485BPOS
PGIM Active High Yield Bond ETF
PROSPECTUS — October 28, 2022
INVESTMENT OBJECTIVE
Total return through a combination of current income and capital appreciation
PGIM ACTIVE HIGH YIELD BOND ETF
Ticker Symbol: PHYL
Listing Exchange: NYSE Arca, Inc.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
         
The Securities and Exchange Commission
(“SEC”) has not approved or disapproved the
Fund's shares, nor has the SEC determined
that this prospectus is complete or accurate.
It is a criminal offense to state otherwise.
Exchange-traded funds are distributed by
Prudential Investment Management Services
LLC (“PIMS”), member SIPC. PGIM Fixed
Income is a unit of PGIM, Inc. (“PGIM”), a
registered investment adviser. PIMS and
PGIM are Prudential Financial companies.
© 2022 Prudential Financial, Inc. and its
related entities. The Prudential logo and the
Rock symbol are service marks of Prudential
Financial, Inc. and its related entities,
registered in many jurisdictions worldwide.
To enroll in e-delivery, go to pgim.com/investments/resource/edelivery


FUND SUMMARY
INVESTMENT OBJECTIVE
The investment objective of the Fund is to seek total return, through a combination of current income and capital appreciation.
FUND FEES AND EXPENSES
The table below describes the fees and expenses that you may pay if you buy, hold and sell shares of the Fund. You may pay other fees, such as brokerage commissions and other fees to financial intermediaries, which are not reflected in the table and example below. The management agreement between PGIM ETF Trust (the “Trust”) and PGIM Investments LLC (“PGIM Investments”) (the “Management Agreement”) provides that PGIM Investments will pay all operating expenses of the Fund, except for certain expenses, including but not limited to, interest expenses, taxes, brokerage expenses, future Rule 12b-1 fees (if any), and acquired fund fees and expenses. For more information on the fee structure pertaining to the Management Agreement please refer to the Fund’s Statement of Additional Information.
Annual Fund Operating Expenses (expenses that you pay each year as a percentage of the value of your investment)
 
Management fee
0.53%
Distribution and service (12b-1) fees
None
Other expenses
None
Total annual Fund operating expenses
0.53%
Example.  The following hypothetical example is intended to help you compare the cost of investing in the Fund with the cost of investing in other exchange-traded funds. It assumes that you invest $10,000 in the Fund for the time periods indicated. It assumes a 5% return on your investment each year and that the Fund's operating expenses remain the same. Your actual costs may be higher or lower.
Number of Years You Own Shares
1 Year
3 Years
5 Years
10 Years
 
$54
$170
$296
$665
Portfolio Turnover.  The Fund pays transaction costs, such as commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or “turns over” its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover rate may indicate higher transaction costs and may result in higher taxes when Fund shares are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are not reflected in annual fund operating expenses or in the example, affect the Fund's performance. During the Fund's most recent fiscal year, the Fund's portfolio turnover rate was 31% of the average value of its portfolio.
INVESTMENTS, RISKS AND PERFORMANCE
Principal Investment Strategies.  The Fund seeks to achieve its investment objective by investing primarily in a portfolio of high yield bonds (commonly referred to as junk bonds) of companies or governments. Under normal market conditions, the Fund invests at least 80% of its investable assets in a diversified portfolio of high yield bonds that are below investment grade and other investments (including derivatives) with similar economic characteristics. The term “below investment grade” refers to instruments either rated Ba1 or lower by Moody’s Investors Service, Inc. (“Moody’s”), BB+ or lower by S&P Global Ratings (“S&P”) or Fitch, Inc. (“Fitch”), or comparably rated by another nationally recognized statistical rating organization (“NRSRO”), or, if unrated, considered by the subadviser to be of comparable quality. The term “investable assets” refers to the Fund's net assets plus any borrowings for investment purposes. The Fund's investable assets will be less than its total assets to the extent that it has borrowed money for non-investment purposes, such as to meet anticipated redemptions. The Fund is an actively managed exchange-traded fund (“ETF”) and, thus, does not seek to replicate the performance of a specified index.
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The term “bonds” includes fixed income instruments issued by the U.S. Government, its agencies and instrumentalities, commercial paper, asset-backed securities, mortgage-backed securities, variable and floating rate instruments, bills, notes and other obligations issued by banks, corporations and other companies (including trust structures), convertible and non-convertible securities (including preferred stocks), loan participations and assignments, obligations issued by non-U.S. banks, companies or non-U.S. Governments, and municipal bonds and notes.
The Fund may invest in securities which are the subject of bankruptcy proceedings or otherwise in default as to the repayment of principal and/or interest at the time of acquisition by the Fund or are rated in the lower rating categories or, if unrated, are in the judgment of the subadviser of equivalent quality (“distressed securities”).
The Fund's investments in derivatives will be included under the 80% investment policy noted above so long as the underlying assets of such derivatives are based on one or more high yield fixed income instruments that are rated below investment grade. Such derivative investments are subject to the Fund's limit of investing up to 25% of its net assets in derivatives and are valued at notional value for purposes of the 80% investment policy noted above.
The Fund may invest up to 20% of its investable assets in foreign currency-denominated fixed income securities issued by foreign or domestic issuers, including emerging markets. Foreign government fixed income securities include securities issued by quasi-governmental entities, governmental agencies, supranational entities and other governmental entities. The Fund intends to hedge the currency risk of its foreign currency denominated fixed income securities into U.S. dollars through the use of derivatives.
In managing the Fund’s assets, the subadviser uses a combination of top-down economic analysis and bottom-up research in conjunction with proprietary quantitative models and risk management systems. In the top-down economic analysis, the subadviser develops views on economic, policy and market trends. In its bottom-up research, the subadviser develops an internal rating and outlook on issuers. The rating and outlook are determined based on a thorough review of the financial health and trends of the issuer. The subadviser may also consider investment factors such as expected total return, yield, spread and potential for price appreciation as well as credit quality, maturity and risk. The Fund may invest in a security based upon the expected total return rather than the yield of such security.
Principal Risks.  All investments have risks to some degree. The value of your investment in the Fund, as well as the amount of return you receive on your investment, may fluctuate significantly from day-to-day and over time.
You may lose part or all of your investment in the Fund or your investment may not perform as well as other similar investments.
An investment in the Fund is not guaranteed to achieve its investment objective; is not a deposit with a bank; and is not insured, endorsed or guaranteed by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation or any other government agency. The following is a summary description of principal risks of investing in the Fund.
The order of the below risk factors does not indicate the significance of any particular risk factor.
Authorized Participant Concentration Risk. Only an Authorized Participant (as defined in “How to Buy and Sell Shares of the Fund” in the Fund’s Prospectus) may engage in creation or redemption transactions directly with the Fund. The Fund has a limited number of intermediaries that act as Authorized Participants and none of these Authorized Participants is or will be obligated to engage in creation or redemption transactions. To the extent that these Authorized Participants exit the business or are unable to or choose not to proceed with creation and/or redemption orders with respect to the Fund and no other Authorized Participant creates or redeems, shares of the Fund may trade at a substantial discount or premium to net asset value (“NAV”), may trade at larger spreads, and possibly face trading halts and/or delisting.
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PGIM Active High Yield Bond ETF

Cash Transactions Risk. Unlike certain ETFs, the Fund may effect creations and redemptions in cash or partially in cash. Therefore, it may be required to sell portfolio securities and subsequently recognize gains on such sales that the Fund might not have recognized if it were to distribute portfolio securities in-kind. As such, investments in shares of the Fund may be less tax-efficient than an investment in an ETF that distributes portfolio securities entirely in-kind.
“Covenant-Lite” Risk. Some of the loans or debt obligations in which the Fund may invest or get exposure to may be “covenant-lite”, which means the loans or obligations contain fewer financial maintenance covenants than other loans or obligations (in some cases, none) and do not include terms which allow the lender to monitor the borrower’s performance and declare a default if certain criteria are breached. An investment by the Fund in a covenant-lite loan may potentially hinder the ability to reprice credit risk associated with the issuer and reduce the ability to restructure a problematic loan and mitigate potential loss. The Fund may also experience difficulty, expenses or delays in enforcing its rights on its holdings of covenant-lite loans or obligations. As a result of these risks, the Fund’s exposure to losses may be increased, which could result in an adverse impact on the Fund’s net income and NAV.
Credit Risk. This is the risk that the issuer, the guarantor or the insurer of a fixed income security, or the counterparty to a contract, may be unable or unwilling to make timely principal and interest payments, or to otherwise honor its obligations. Additionally, fixed income securities could lose value due to a loss of confidence in the ability of the issuer, guarantor, insurer or counterparty to pay back debt. The lower the credit quality of a bond, the more sensitive it is to credit risk.
Debt Obligations Risk. Debt obligations are subject to credit risk, market risk and interest rate risk. The Fund's holdings, share price, yield and total return may also fluctuate in response to bond market movements. The value of bonds may decline for issuer-related reasons, including management performance, financial leverage and reduced demand for the issuer’s goods and services. Certain types of fixed income obligations also may be subject to “call and redemption risk,” which is the risk that the issuer may call a bond held by the Fund for redemption before it matures and the Fund may not be able to reinvest at the same rate of interest and therefore would earn less income.
Derivatives Risk. Derivatives involve special risks and costs and may result in losses to the Fund. The successful use of derivatives requires sophisticated management, and, to the extent that derivatives are used, the Fund will depend on the subadviser’s ability to analyze and manage derivatives transactions. The prices of derivatives may move in unexpected ways, especially in abnormal market conditions. Some derivatives are “leveraged” or may create economic leverage for the Fund. and therefore may magnify or otherwise increase investment losses to the Fund. The Fund's use of derivatives may also increase the amount of taxes payable by shareholders.
Other risks arise from the potential inability to terminate or sell derivatives positions. A liquid secondary market may not always exist for the Fund's derivatives positions. In fact, many over-the-counter derivative instruments will not have liquidity beyond the counterparty to the instrument. Over-the-counter derivative instruments also involve the risk that the other party will not meet its obligations to the Fund. The use of derivatives also exposes the Fund to operational issues, such as documentation and settlement issues, systems failures, inadequate control and human error.
Derivatives may also involve legal risks, such as insufficient documentation, the lack of capacity or authority of a counterparty to execute or settle a transaction, and the legality and enforceability of derivatives contracts. The U.S. Government and foreign governments have adopted (and may adopt further) regulations governing derivatives markets, including mandatory clearing of certain derivatives, margin and reporting requirements and risk exposure limitations. Regulation of derivatives may make derivatives more costly, limit their availability or utility to the Fund, or otherwise adversely affect their performance or disrupt markets.
Distressed and Defaulted Securities Risk. Distressed and defaulted securities are subject to particularly high credit risk, market risk and illiquidity risk. These securities are at a high risk for default, especially during economic downturns, and they are subject to greater volatility than securities of more stable issuers. To the extent that the Fund invests in bankrupt issuers, the Fund may be subject to litigation risks and costs.
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Economic and Market Events Risk. Events in the U.S. and global financial markets, including actions taken by the U.S. Federal Reserve or foreign central banks to stimulate or stabilize economic growth or the functioning of the securities markets, may at times result in unusually high market volatility, which could negatively impact performance. Relatively reduced liquidity in credit and fixed income markets could adversely affect issuers worldwide.
Emerging Markets Risk. The risks of foreign investments are greater for investments in or exposed to emerging markets. Emerging market countries typically have economic and political systems that are less fully developed, and can be expected to be less stable, than those of more developed countries. For example, the economies of such countries can be subject to rapid and unpredictable rates of inflation or deflation. Low trading volumes may result in a lack of liquidity and price volatility. Emerging market countries may have policies that restrict investment by non-U.S. investors, or that prevent non-U.S. investors from withdrawing their money at will.
The Fund may invest in some emerging markets that subject it to risks such as those associated with illiquidity, custody of assets, different settlement and clearance procedures and asserting legal title under a developing legal and regulatory regime to a greater degree than in developed markets or even in other emerging markets.
ETF Shares Trading Risk. Fund shares are listed for trading on NYSE Arca, Inc. (the “Exchange”) and the shares are bought and sold in the secondary market at market prices. The market prices of the shares of the Fund are expected to fluctuate in response to changes in the Fund's NAV, the intraday value of the Fund's holdings and supply and demand for shares of the Fund. We cannot predict whether shares of the Fund will trade above, below or at their NAV. Trading on the Exchange, including trading of Fund shares, may be halted in certain circumstances and shareholders may not be able to sell Fund shares at the time or price desired. During periods of stressed market conditions, the market for the shares of the Fund may become less liquid in response to deteriorating liquidity in the markets for the Fund's portfolio investments. This adverse effect on the liquidity of the Fund's shares could lead to differences between the market price of the Fund's shares and the NAV of those shares. There can be no assurance that the requirements of the Exchange to maintain the listing of shares of the Fund will continue to be met. At times, trading in the securities of ETFs has become volatile and unpredictable and the price of ETF shares has diverged from market driven fundamentals.
Disruptions to creations and redemptions, the existence of significant market volatility or potential lack of an active trading market for the shares of the Fund (including through a trading halt), as well as other factors, may result in the Fund's shares trading on the Exchange significantly above (at a premium) or below (at a discount) to NAV or to the intraday value of the Fund's holdings. Premiums and discounts relate to differences between the market price and NAV of the Fund's shares. During such periods, you may incur significant losses if you sell your shares of the Fund. The securities held by the Fund may be traded in markets that close at a different time than the Exchange and may trade outside of a collateralized settlement system. Liquidity in those securities may be reduced after the applicable closing times. Accordingly, during the time when the Exchange is open but after the applicable market closing, fixing or settlement times, bid-ask spreads for the Fund's shares on the Exchange and the corresponding premium or discount between the market price for Fund shares and their NAV may widen. Additionally, during times when the Exchange is open but after the applicable market is closed, there may be changes between the last quote from the closed foreign market and the value of such security during the Fund's trading day on the Exchange and this may lead to differences between the market price of the Fund's shares and the underlying value of those shares.
Cost of Buying or Selling Shares. When you buy or sell shares of the Fund through a broker, you will likely incur a brokerage commission or other charges imposed by brokers. In addition, the market price of shares of the Fund, like the price of any exchange-traded security, includes a “bid-ask spread” charged by the market makers or other participants that trade the particular security. The spread of the Fund's shares varies over time based on the Fund's trading volume, the spread of the Fund's underlying securities, and market liquidity and may increase if the Fund's trading volume, the spread of the Fund's underlying securities, or market liquidity decreases. In times of severe market disruption, including when trading of the Fund's holdings may be halted, the bid-ask spread may increase significantly. This means that the shares may trade at a discount to the Fund's NAV, and the discount is likely to be greatest during significant market volatility.
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PGIM Active High Yield Bond ETF

No Guarantee of Active Trading Market Risk. While shares of the Fund are listed on the Exchange, there can be no assurance that active trading markets for the shares will develop or be maintained by market makers or by Authorized Participants. The distributor of the Fund's shares does not maintain a secondary market in the shares.
Floating Rate and Other Loans Risk. The Fund's ability to receive payments of principal and interest and other amounts in connection with loans (whether through participations, assignments or otherwise) will depend primarily on the financial condition of the borrower. The failure by the Fund to receive scheduled interest or principal payments on a loan because of a default, bankruptcy or any other reason would adversely affect the income of the Fund and would likely reduce the value of its assets. Even with loans secured by collateral, there is the risk that the value of the collateral may decline, may be insufficient to meet the obligations of the borrower, or be difficult to liquidate. In the event of a default, the Fund may have difficulty collecting on any collateral and would not have the ability to collect on any collateral for an uncollateralized loan. Further, the Fund's access to collateral, if any, may be limited by bankruptcy laws. Due to the nature of the private syndication of senior loans, including, for example, lack of publicly-available information, some senior loans are not as easily purchased or sold as publicly-traded securities. In addition, loan participations generally are subject to restrictions on transfer, and only limited opportunities may exist to sell loan participations in secondary markets. As a result, it may be difficult for the Fund to value loans or sell loans at an acceptable price when it wants to sell them. Loans trade in an over-the-counter market, and confirmation and settlement, which are effected through standardized procedures and documentation, may take significantly longer than seven days to complete. Extended trade settlement periods may, in unusual market conditions with a high volume of shareholder redemptions, present a risk to shareholders regarding the Fund's ability to pay redemption proceeds in a timely manner. In some instances, loans and loan participations are not rated by independent credit rating agencies; in such instances, a decision by the Fund to invest in a particular loan or loan participation could depend exclusively on the subadviser's credit analysis of the borrower, or in the case of a loan participation, of the intermediary holding the portion of the loan that the Fund has purchased. To the extent the Fund invests in loans of non-U.S. issuers, the risks of investing in non-U.S. issuers are applicable. Loans may not be considered to be “securities” and as a result may not benefit from the protections of the federal securities laws, including anti-fraud protections and those with respect to the use of material non-public information, so that purchasers, such as the Fund, may not have the benefit of these protections. If the Fund is in possession of material non-public information about a borrower as a result of its investment in such borrower’s loan, the Fund may not be able to enter into a transaction with respect to a publicly-traded security of the borrower when it would otherwise be advantageous to do so.
Foreign Securities Risk. Investments in securities of non-U.S. issuers (including those denominated in U.S. dollars) may involve more risk than investing in securities of U.S. issuers. Foreign political, economic and legal systems, especially those in developing and emerging market countries, may be less stable and more volatile than in the United States. Foreign legal systems generally have fewer regulatory requirements than the U.S. legal system, particularly those of emerging markets. In general, less information is publicly available with respect to non-U.S. companies than U.S. companies. Non-U.S. companies generally are not subject to the same accounting, auditing, and financial reporting standards as are U.S. companies. Additionally, the changing value of foreign currencies and changes in exchange rates could also affect the value of the assets the Fund holds and the Fund's performance. Certain foreign countries may impose restrictions on the ability of issuers of foreign securities to make payment of principal and interest or dividends to investors located outside the country, due to blockage of foreign currency exchanges or otherwise. Investments in emerging markets are subject to greater volatility and price declines.
In addition, the Fund's investments in non-U.S. securities may be subject to the risks of nationalization or expropriation of assets, imposition of currency exchange controls or restrictions on the repatriation of non-U.S. currency, confiscatory taxation and adverse diplomatic developments. Special U.S. tax considerations may apply.
Interest Rate Risk. The value of your investment may go down when interest rates rise. A rise in rates tends to have a greater impact on the prices of longer term or duration debt securities. For example, a fixed income security with a duration of three years is expected to decrease in value by approximately 3% if interest rates increase by 1%. This is referred to as “duration risk.” When interest rates fall, the issuers of debt obligations may prepay principal more quickly than expected, and the Fund may be required to reinvest the proceeds at a lower interest rate. This is referred to as
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7

prepayment risk.” For premium bonds (bonds acquired at prices that exceed their par or principal value) purchased by the Fund, prepayment risk may be enhanced. When interest rates rise, debt obligations may be repaid more slowly than expected, and the value of the Fund's holdings may fall sharply. This is referred to as “extension risk.” The Fund may lose money if short-term or long-term interest rates rise sharply or in a manner not anticipated by the subadviser.
Junk Bonds Risk. High-yield, high-risk bonds have predominantly speculative characteristics, including particularly high credit risk. Junk bonds tend to have lower market liquidity than higher-rated securities. The liquidity of particular issuers or industries within a particular investment category may shrink or disappear suddenly and without warning. The non-investment grade bond market can experience sudden and sharp price swings and become illiquid due to a variety of factors, including changes in economic forecasts, stock market activity, large sustained sales by major investors, a high profile default or a change in the market's psychology.
Large Shareholder and Large Scale Redemption Risk. Certain individuals, accounts, funds (including funds affiliated with the Manager) or institutions, including the Manager and its affiliates, may from time to time own or control a substantial amount of the Fund’s shares. There is no requirement that these entities maintain their investment in the Fund. There is a risk that such large shareholders or that the Fund’s shareholders generally may redeem all or a substantial portion of their investments in the Fund in a short period of time, which could have a significant negative impact on the Fund’s NAV, liquidity, and brokerage costs. Large redemptions could also result in tax consequences to shareholders and impact the Fund’s ability to implement its investment strategy. The Fund’s ability to pursue its investment objective after one or more large scale redemptions may be impaired and, as a result, the Fund may invest a larger portion of its assets in cash or cash equivalents.
Liquidity Risk. The Fund may invest in instruments that trade in lower volumes and are more illiquid than other investments. If the Fund is forced to sell these investments to pay redemption proceeds or for other reasons, the Fund may lose money. In addition, when there is no willing buyer and investments cannot be readily sold at the desired time or price, the Fund may have to accept a lower price or may not be able to sell the instrument at all. An inability to sell a portfolio position can adversely affect the Fund's value or prevent the Fund from being able to take advantage of other investment opportunities.
Management Risk. The value of your investment may decrease if judgments by the subadviser about the attractiveness, value or market trends affecting a particular security, industry or sector or about market movements are incorrect.
Market Disruption and Geopolitical Risks. Market disruption can be caused by economic, financial or political events and factors, including but not limited to, international wars or conflicts (including Russia’s military invasion of Ukraine), geopolitical developments (including trading and tariff arrangements, sanctions and cybersecurity attacks), instability in regions such as Asia, Eastern Europe and the Middle East, terrorism, natural disasters and public health epidemics (including the outbreak of COVID-19 globally).
The extent and duration of such events and resulting market disruptions cannot be predicted, but could be substantial and could magnify the impact of other risks to the Fund. These and other similar events could adversely affect the U.S. and foreign financial markets and lead to increased market volatility, reduced liquidity in the securities markets, significant negative impacts on issuers and the markets for certain securities and commodities and/or government intervention. They may also cause short- or long-term economic uncertainties in the United States and worldwide. As a result, whether or not the Fund invests in securities of issuers located in or with significant exposure to the countries directly affected, the value and liquidity of the Fund’s investments may be negatively impacted. Further, due to closures of certain markets and restrictions on trading certain securities, the value of certain securities held by the Fund could be significantly impacted, which could lead to such securities being valued at zero.
COVID-19 and the related governmental and public responses have had and may continue to have an impact on the Fund’s investments and net asset value and have led and may continue to lead to increased market volatility and the potential for illiquidity in certain classes of securities and sectors of the market. They have also had and may continue to result in periods of business disruption, business closures, inability to obtain raw materials, supplies and component
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PGIM Active High Yield Bond ETF

parts, and reduced or disrupted operations for the issuers in which the Fund invests. The occurrence, reoccurrence and pendency of public health epidemics could adversely affect the economies and financial markets either in specific countries or worldwide.
Market Risk. Securities markets may be volatile and the market prices of the Fund’s securities may decline. Securities fluctuate in price based on changes in an issuer’s financial condition and overall market and economic conditions. If the market prices of the securities owned by the Fund fall, the value of your investment in the Fund will decline.
Mortgage-Backed and Asset-Backed Securities Risk. Mortgage-backed and asset-backed securities tend to increase in value less than other debt securities when interest rates decline, but are subject to similar risk of decline in market value during periods of rising interest rates. The values of mortgage-backed and asset-backed securities become more volatile as interest rates rise. In a period of declining interest rates, the Fund may be required to reinvest more frequent prepayments on mortgage-backed and asset-backed securities in lower-yielding investments.
Small Fund Risk. When the Fund’s size is small, the Fund may experience low trading volume and wide bid/ask spreads. The Fund may face the risk of being delisted if it does not meet certain conditions of the listing exchange due to small size. Any resulting liquidation of the Fund could cause the Fund to incur elevated transaction costs for the Fund and negative tax consequences for its shareholders.
Performance
The following bar chart shows the performance of the Fund’s shares for each full calendar year of operations or for the last 10 calendar years, whichever is shorter. The following table shows the Fund’s average annual returns and also compares the Fund’s performance with the average annual total returns of an index or other benchmark. The bar chart and table demonstrate the risk of investing in the Fund by showing how returns can change from year to year.
Past performance (before and after taxes) does not mean that the Fund will achieve similar results in the future. Updated Fund performance information, including current net asset value, is available online at www.pgim.com/investments.
Best Quarter:
Worst Quarter:
11.57%
2nd
Quarter
2020
-14.38%
1st
Quarter
2020
1 The total return from January 1, 2022 to
September 30, 2022
was
-15.51%.
Average Annual Total Returns % (as of 12-31-21)
 
1 Year
Since
Inception
Inception
Date
Return Before Taxes
6.28%
7.67%
9-24-2018
Return After Taxes on Distributions
3.73%
4.66%
9-24-2018
Return After Taxes on Distributions and Sale of Fund Shares
3.74%
4.58%
9-24-2018
Index % (reflects no deduction for fees, expenses or taxes) (as of 12-31-21)
Bloomberg US High Yield Very Liquid Index
4.51%
6.18%*
 
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° After-tax returns are calculated using the historical highest individual federal marginal income tax rates and do not reflect the impact of state and local taxes. Actual after-tax returns depend on an investor's tax situation and may differ from those shown. After-tax returns shown are not relevant to investors who hold their Fund shares through tax-deferred arrangements, such as 401(k) plans or individual retirement accounts.
*Since Inception returns for the Index are measured from the closest month-end to the Fund’s inception date.
MANAGEMENT OF THE FUND
The following individuals are jointly and primarily responsible for the day-to-day management of the Fund.
Investment Manager
Subadviser
Portfolio Managers
Title
Service Date
PGIM Investments LLC
PGIM Fixed Income
Robert Cignarella, CFA
Managing Director &
Head of U.S. High
Yield
September 2018
 
 
Robert Spano, CFA,
CPA
Principal
September 2018
 
 
Ryan Kelly, CFA
Principal
September 2018
 
 
Brian Clapp, CFA
Principal
September 2018
 
 
Michael Gormally
Vice President and
Portfolio Manager
April 2022
BUYING AND SELLING FUND SHARES
Individual shares of the Fund may only be purchased and sold in secondary market transactions through brokers or other financial intermediaries at market prices and are not individually redeemable by the ETF. Shares of the Fund are listed for trading on the Exchange, and because the shares of the Fund trade at market prices rather than NAV, shares of the Fund may trade at a price greater than NAV (a “premium”) or less than NAV (a “discount”). You may incur costs attributable to the difference between the highest price a buyer is willing to pay to purchase shares of the Fund (“bid”) and the lowest price a seller is willing to accept for shares of the Fund (“ask”) when buying or selling shares in the secondary market (the “bid-ask spread”).
TAX INFORMATION
Dividends, Capital Gains and Taxes. The Fund's dividends and distributions are taxable and will be taxed as ordinary income or capital gains, unless you are investing through a tax-deferred arrangement, such as a 401(k) plan or an individual retirement account. Such tax-deferred arrangements may be taxed later upon withdrawal of monies from those arrangements.
PAYMENTS TO BROKER-DEALERS AND OTHER FINANCIAL INTERMEDIaries
If you purchase shares of the Fund through a broker-dealer or other financial intermediary (such as a bank), PGIM or other related companies may pay the intermediary for marketing activities and presentations, educational training programs, conferences, the development of technology platforms and reporting systems or other services related to the sale or promotion of the Fund. These payments may create a conflict of interest by influencing the broker-dealer or other intermediary and your salesperson to recommend the Fund over another investment. Ask your salesperson or visit your financial intermediary’s website for more information.
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PGIM Active High Yield Bond ETF

MORE ABOUT THE FUND'S PRINCIPAL AND NON-PRINCIPAL INVESTMENT STRATEGIES, INVESTMENTS AND RISKS
INVESTMENT STRATEGIES AND INVESTMENTS
The Fund's investment objective is to seek total return, through a combination of current income and capital appreciation.
In managing the Fund’s assets, the subadviser uses a combination of top-down economic analysis and bottom-up research in conjunction with proprietary quantitative models and risk management systems. In the top-down economic analysis, the subadviser develops views on economic, policy and market trends by continually evaluating economic data that affect the movement of markets and securities prices. This top-down macroeconomic analysis is integrated into the subadviser’s bottom-up research which informs security selection. In its bottom-up research, the subadviser develops an internal rating and outlook on issuers. The rating and outlook are determined based on a thorough review of the financial health and trends of the issuer, which includes a review of the composition of revenue, profitability, cash flow margin, and leverage.
The subadviser may also consider investment factors such as expected total return, yield, spread and potential for price appreciation as well as credit quality, maturity and risk. The Fund may invest in a security based upon the expected total return rather than the yield of such security.
The subadviser may also utilize proprietary quantitative tools to support relative value trading and asset allocation for portfolio management as well as various risk models to support risk management.
The Fund may invest up to 100% of its assets in below investment grade investments. Fixed income instruments rated below investment grade are regarded as having predominantly speculative characteristics with respect to the issuer's capacity to pay interest and repay principal and are considered to have a greater vulnerability to default than higher rated securities. In the event that a security receives different ratings from different NRSROs, the Fund will treat the security as being rated in the highest rating category received from an NRSRO. Investing in Distressed Securities is speculative and involves significant risks. Such instruments are subject to very high credit risk. A rating is an assessment of the likelihood of the timely payment of interest and repayment of principal and can be useful when comparing different debt obligations. An investor can evaluate the expected likelihood of default by an issuer by looking at its ratings as compared to another similar issuer.
Lower-rated securities tend to offer higher yields, but also offer greater risks, including higher risk of default, than higher-rated securities. Under certain economic conditions, however, lower-rated securities might not yield significantly more than higher-rated securities, or comparable unrated securities. If that happens, the Fund may invest in higher-rated fixed income securities that offer similar yields but have less risk. Furthermore, if issuers redeem their high yield securities at a higher than expected rate, which might happen during periods of declining interest rates, the Fund could be forced to buy higher-rated, lower-yielding securities, which would decrease the Fund’s return. Medium-rated fixed income bonds are regarded as investment grade bonds, but have speculative characteristics and are riskier than higher-rated securities. A rating is an assessment of the likelihood of the timely payment of interest and repayment of principal and can be useful when comparing different debt obligations. An investor can evaluate the expected likelihood of default by an issuer by looking at its ratings as compared to those of another similar issuer.
The Fund’s investment objective is not a fundamental policy of the Fund, and therefore may be changed by the Board without shareholder approval. The Fund will provide 60 days’ prior written notice to shareholders of a change in its non-fundamental policy of investing at least 80% of its investable assets in high yield bonds.
Floating Rate and Other Loans
The Fund may invest in fixed and floating rate loans (secured or unsecured) arranged through private negotiations between a company as the borrower and one or more financial institutions as lenders. These types of investments can be in the form of loan participations or assignments.
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Loan participations and assignments are nonconvertible corporate debt instruments of varying maturities. With participations, the Fund has the right to receive payments of principal, interest and fees from the lender conditioned upon the lender's receipt of payment from the borrower. In participations, the Fund generally does not have direct rights against the borrower on the loan, which means that if the borrower does not pay back the loan or otherwise comply with the loan agreement, the Fund will not have the right to make it do so. With assignments, the Fund has direct rights against the borrower on the loan, but its rights may be more limited than the original lender's.
Derivative Strategies
Derivatives are financial instruments whose value depends upon, or is derived from, the value of something else, such as one or more underlying investments, indices or currencies. The Fund may use various derivative strategies to try to improve the Fund's returns. The subadviser may also use hedging techniques to try to protect the Fund's assets. A derivative contract will obligate or entitle the Fund to deliver or receive an asset or cash payment based on the change in value of one or more investments, indices or currencies. Derivatives may be traded on organized exchanges, or in individually negotiated transactions with other parties (these are known as “over-the-counter” derivatives). The Fund may be limited in its use of derivatives by rules adopted by the SEC governing derivatives transactions. Although the Fund has the flexibility to make use of derivatives, it may choose not to for a variety of reasons, even under very volatile market conditions.
Foreign Currency Forward Contracts. The Fund may enter into foreign currency forward contracts to protect the value of its assets against future changes in the level of foreign exchange rates or to enhance returns. A foreign currency forward contract is an obligation to buy or sell a given currency on a future date and at a set price or to make or receive a cash payment based on the value of a given currency at a future date. Delivery of the underlying currency is expected, the terms are individually negotiated, the counterparty is not a clearing corporation or an exchange, and payment on the contract is made upon delivery, rather than daily.
Futures Contracts and Related Options. The Fund may purchase and sell financial futures contracts and related options on financial futures. A futures contract is an agreement to buy or sell a set quantity of an underlying asset at a future date, or to make or receive a cash payment based on the value of a securities index, or some other asset, at a stipulated future date. The terms of futures contracts are standardized. In the case of a financial futures contract based upon a broad index, there is no delivery of the securities comprising the underlying index, margin is uniform, a clearing corporation or an exchange is the counterparty and the Fund makes daily margin payments based on price movements in the index. An option gives the purchaser the right to buy or sell securities or currencies, or in the case of an option on a futures contract, the right to buy or sell a futures contract in exchange for a premium.
Swap Transactions. The Fund may enter into swap transactions. Swap agreements are two-party contracts entered into primarily by institutional investors for periods typically ranging from a few weeks to more than one year. In a standard “swap” transaction, two parties agree to exchange the returns (or differentials in rates of return) earned or realized on particular predetermined investments or instruments, which may be adjusted for an interest factor. There are various types of swaps, including but not limited to credit default swaps, interest rate swaps, total return swaps and index swaps.
Swap Options. The Fund may enter into swap options. A swap option is a contract that gives a counterparty the right (but not the obligation) to enter into a new swap agreement or to shorten, extend, cancel or otherwise modify an existing swap agreement, at some designated future time on specified terms.
Options. The Fund may purchase and sell put and call options on debt securities, aggregates of debt securities, financial indices, and currencies traded on U.S. or foreign securities exchanges or in the over-the-counter market. An option gives the purchaser the right to buy or sell securities or such currencies in exchange for a premium.
Short Sales
The Fund may make short sales of a security. This means that the Fund may sell a security that it does not own, which it may do, for example, when the subadviser thinks the value of the security will decline. The Fund generally borrows the security to deliver to the buyers in a short sale. The Fund must then replace the borrowed security by purchasing it
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PGIM Active High Yield Bond ETF

at the market price at the time of replacement. The Fund may make short sales “against the box.” In a short sale against the box, at the time of sale, the Fund owns or has the right to acquire the identical security at no additional cost through conversion or exchange of other securities it owns.
Equity and Equity-Related Securities
The Fund may also invest in equity and equity-related securities incidental to the purchase or ownership of fixed income instruments or in connection with a reorganization of a borrower. These may include common stock, preferred stock or securities that may be converted into or exchanged for common stock—known as convertible securities—like rights and warrants. The Fund may also invest in American Depositary Receipts (“ADRs”), which are certificates—usually issued by a U.S. bank or trust company—that represent an equity investment in a foreign company or some other foreign issuer. ADRs are valued in U.S. dollars. The subadviser  considers ADRs to be equity-related securities. Certain ADR programs are established without the participation of the foreign issuer and as a result, there may be less information available about the foreign issuer. Other equity-related securities in which the Fund may invest include investments in various types of business ventures, including partnerships and joint ventures and securities of real estate investment trusts (“REITs”). Investments in REITs may result in payment of duplicative management or other fees.
Step-Ups and Payment-In-Kind Securities
“Step-up” bonds pay no interest initially but eventually begin to pay a coupon rate prior to maturity, which rate may increase at stated intervals during the life of the security. Payment-in-kind securities (“PIKs”) are debt obligations that pay “interest” in the form of other debt obligations, instead of in cash. Each of these instruments may be issued and traded at a deep discount from face value. Step-ups and PIKs allow an issuer to avoid or delay the need to generate cash to meet current interest payments. The Fund would be required to distribute the income on these instruments as it accrues, even though the Fund will not receive the income on a current basis or in cash. Thus, the Fund may have to sell other investments, including when it may not be advisable to do so, to make income distributions to its stockholders.
Credit-Linked Securities
The Fund may invest in credit-linked securities. Credit-linked securities are securities whose payments are derived from the performance of designated reference obligations, which may be corporate debt securities or a pool of assets such as mortgage loans. The Fund has the right to receive periodic interest payments from the issuer of the credit-linked security at an agreed-upon interest rate, and a return of principal as contractually agreed at the maturity date. The source of payment for credit-linked securities may be dependent on both the performance of the reference obligations and the viability of the issuer.
Repurchase Agreements
The Fund may enter into repurchase agreements, where a party agrees to sell a security to the Fund and then repurchases it at an agreed-upon price at a stated time. This creates a fixed return for the Fund, and is, in effect, a loan by the Fund. Repurchase agreements are used for cash management purposes only.
Reverse Repurchase Agreements
The Fund may enter into reverse repurchase agreements, where the Fund sells a security with an obligation to repurchase it at an agreed-upon price and time. Reverse repurchase agreements that involve borrowing to take advantage of investment opportunities, a practice known as leverage, could magnify losses. If the Fund borrows money to purchase securities and those securities decline in value, then the value of the Fund's shares will decline faster than if the Fund were not leveraged. In addition, interest costs and investment fees relating to leverage may exceed potential investment gains.
Dollar Rolls
The Fund may enter into dollar rolls in which the Fund sells securities to be delivered in the current month and repurchases substantially similar (same type and coupon) securities to be delivered on a specified future date by the same party. The Fund is paid the difference between the current sales price and the forward price for the future purchase as well as the interest earned on the cash proceeds of the initial sale.
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When-Issued and Delayed-Delivery Securities
The Fund may purchase securities, including money market obligations, bonds or other obligations, on a when-issued, delayed-delivery or forward commitment basis. When the Fund purchases delayed-delivery securities, the price and interest rate are fixed at the time of purchase. For both when-issued and delayed-delivery securities, delivery and payment for the obligations take place at a later time. The Fund does not earn interest income until the date the obligations are expected to be delivered.
Investments in Affiliated Funds
The Fund may invest its assets in affiliated funds, including exchange-traded funds, that are registered investment companies under the Investment Company Act of 1940 (the “1940 Act”). The Fund can invest its free cash balances in affiliated short-term bond funds and/or money market funds to obtain income on short-term cash balances while awaiting attractive investment opportunities, to provide liquidity in preparation for anticipated redemptions or for defensive purposes. Such an investment could also allow the Fund to obtain the benefits of a more diversified portfolio available in the affiliated funds than might otherwise be available through direct investments in those asset classes, and will subject the Fund to the risks associated with the particular asset class. To the extent the Fund serves as an underlying investment for other registered funds, the Fund may be prohibited from investing in certain registered funds and private funds.
As a shareholder in the affiliated funds, the Fund will pay its proportional share of the expenses of the affiliated funds. The affiliated short-term bond funds and certain money market funds do not pay a management fee to the investment manager, since the investment manager only receives reimbursement for its expenses. Thus, shareholders of the Fund are not paying management fees for both the Fund and the affiliated short-term bond funds and money market funds. The investment results of the portions of the Fund’s assets invested in the affiliated funds will be based on the investment results of the affiliated funds.
Securities Lending
Consistent with applicable regulatory requirements, the Fund may lend portfolio securities with a value up to 33 13% of its total assets to brokers, dealers and other financial organizations to earn additional income. Loans of portfolio securities will be collateralized by cash. Cash collateral will be invested in an affiliated prime money market fund.
Temporary Defensive Investments
In response to adverse market, economic or political conditions, the Fund may take a temporary defensive position and invest up to 100% of its investable assets in money market instruments, including short-term obligations of, or securities guaranteed by, the U.S. Government, its agencies or instrumentalities, or in high-quality obligations of U.S. or non-U.S. banks and corporations, and may hold up to 100% of its investable assets in cash or cash equivalents. Although the subadviser has the ability to take defensive positions, it may choose not to do so for a variety of reasons, even during volatile market conditions. Investing heavily in these securities is inconsistent with and limits the Fund's ability to achieve its investment objective, but may help to preserve the Fund's assets.
Other Investments
In addition to the strategies and securities discussed above, the Fund may use other strategies or invest in other types of securities as described in the Statement of Additional Information (“SAI”). The Fund might not use all of the strategies or invest in all of the types of securities as described in the Prospectus or in the SAI.
The table below summarizes the investment limits applicable to the Fund’s principal investment strategies and certain non-principal investment strategies.
Principal Strategies: Investment Limits
High Yield Bonds (Junk Bonds): At least 80% of investable assets
Non-U.S. currency denominated securities of foreign or domestic issuers: Up to 20% of investable assets
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PGIM Active High Yield Bond ETF

Certain Non-Principal Strategies: Investment Limits
Derivatives: Up to 25% of net assets (subject to the Fund’s operation under the requirements of Rule 18f-4 under the
Investment Company Act of 1940)
Non-agency and non-Government sponsored entity and privately issued mortgage-related securities and asset-backed
securities: Up to 20% of total assets
Illiquid Investments: Up to 15% of net assets
Equity and Equity-related securities: Up to 20% of investable assets
Borrowing: Up to 33 13% of total assets
RISKS OF INVESTING IN THE FUND
The order of the below risk factors does not indicate the significance of any particular risk factor.
Authorized Participant Concentration Risk. Only an Authorized Participant (as defined in “How to Buy and Sell Shares of the Fund” in the Fund’s Prospectus) may engage in creation or redemption transactions directly with the Fund. The Fund has a limited number of intermediaries that act as Authorized Participants and none of these Authorized Participants is or will be obligated to engage in creation or redemption transactions. To the extent that these Authorized Participants exit the business or are unable to or choose not to proceed with creation and/or redemption orders with respect to the Fund and no other Authorized Participant creates or redeems, shares of the Fund may trade at a substantial discount or premium to net asset value (“NAV”), may trade at larger spreads, and possibly face trading halts and/or delisting.
Cash Transactions Risk. Unlike certain ETFs, the Fund may effect its creations and redemptions in cash or partially in cash. As a result, an investment in the Fund may be less tax-efficient than an investment in other ETFs. Other ETFs generally make in-kind redemptions and avoid realizing gains in connection with transactions designed to raise cash to meet redemption requests. If the Fund effects a portion of redemptions for cash, it may be required to sell portfolio securities in order to obtain the cash needed to distribute redemption proceeds, which involves transaction costs. If the Fund recognizes gain on these sales, this generally will cause the Fund to recognize gain it might not otherwise have recognized if it were to distribute portfolio securities in-kind, or to recognize such gain sooner than would otherwise be required. The Fund generally intends to distribute these gains to shareholders to avoid being taxed on this gain at the Fund level and otherwise comply with the special tax rules that apply to it. This strategy may cause shareholders to be subject to tax on gains they would not otherwise be subject to, or at an earlier date than, if they had made an investment in a different ETF.
“Covenant-Lite” Risk. Some of the loans or debt obligations in which the Fund may invest or get exposure to may be “covenant-lite”, which means the loans or obligations contain fewer financial maintenance covenants than other loans or obligations (in some cases, none) and do not include terms which allow the lender to monitor the borrower’s performance and declare a default if certain criteria are breached. An investment by the Fund in a covenant-lite loan may potentially hinder the ability to reprice credit risk associated with the issuer and reduce the ability to restructure a problematic loan and mitigate potential loss. The Fund may also experience difficulty, expenses or delays in enforcing its rights on its holdings of covenant-lite loans or obligations. As a result of these risks, the Fund’s exposure to losses may be increased, which could result in an adverse impact on the Fund’s net income and NAV.
Credit Risk. This is the risk that the issuer, the guarantor or the insurer of a fixed income security, or the counterparty to a contract, may be unable or unwilling to make timely principal and interest payments, or to otherwise honor its obligations. Additionally, fixed income securities could lose value due to a loss of confidence in the ability of the issuer, guarantor, insurer or counterparty to pay back debt. The lower the credit quality of a bond, the more sensitive it is to credit risk.
Currency Risk. The Fund's net asset value could decline as a result of changes in exchange rates, which could adversely affect the Fund’s investments in currencies, or in securities that trade in, and receive revenues related to, currencies, or in derivatives that provide exposure to currencies. Certain foreign countries may impose restrictions on the ability of issuers of foreign securities to make payment of principal and interest or dividends to investors located outside the country, due to blockage of foreign currency exchanges or otherwise.
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Cyber Security Risk. Failures or breaches of the electronic systems of the Fund, the Fund's manager, subadviser, distributor, and other service providers, or the issuers of securities in which the Fund invests have the ability to cause disruptions and negatively impact the Fund's business operations, potentially resulting in financial losses to the Fund and its shareholders. While the Fund has established business continuity plans and risk management systems seeking to address system breaches or failures, there are inherent limitations in such plans and systems. Furthermore, the Fund cannot control the cyber security plans and systems of the Fund's service providers or issuers of securities in which the Fund invests.
Debt Obligations Risk. Debt obligations are subject to credit risk, market risk and interest rate risk. The Fund's holdings, share price, yield and total return may also fluctuate in response to bond market movements. The value of bonds may decline for issuer-related reasons, including management performance, financial leverage and reduced demand for the issuer’s goods and services. Certain types of fixed income obligations also may be subject to “call and redemption risk,” which is the risk that the issuer may call a bond held by the Fund for redemption before it matures and the Fund may not be able to reinvest at the same rate of interest and therefore would earn less income.
Derivatives Risk. Derivatives involve special risks and costs and may result in losses to the Fund. The successful use of derivatives requires sophisticated management, and, to the extent that derivatives are used, the Fund will depend on the subadviser’s ability to analyze and manage derivatives transactions. The prices of derivatives may move in unexpected ways, especially in abnormal market conditions. Some derivatives are “leveraged” or may create economic leverage for the Fund. and therefore may magnify or otherwise increase investment losses to the Fund. The Fund's use of derivatives may also increase the amount of taxes payable by shareholders.
Other risks arise from the potential inability to terminate or sell derivatives positions. A liquid secondary market may not always exist for the Fund's derivatives positions. In fact, many over-the-counter derivative instruments will not have liquidity beyond the counterparty to the instrument. Over-the-counter derivative instruments also involve the risk that the other party will not meet its obligations to the Fund. The use of derivatives also exposes the Fund to operational issues, such as documentation and settlement issues, systems failures, inadequate control and human error.
Derivatives may also involve legal risks, such as insufficient documentation, the lack of capacity or authority of a counterparty to execute or settle a transaction, and the legality and enforceability of derivatives contracts. The U.S. Government and foreign governments have adopted (and may adopt further) regulations governing derivatives markets, including mandatory clearing of certain derivatives, margin and reporting requirements and risk exposure limitations. Regulation of derivatives may make derivatives more costly, limit their availability or utility to the Fund, or otherwise adversely affect their performance or disrupt markets.
Distressed and Defaulted Securities Risk. Distressed and defaulted securities are subject to particularly high credit risk, market risk and illiquidity risk. These securities are at a high risk for default, especially during economic downturns, and they are subject to greater volatility than securities of more stable issuers. To the extent that the Fund invests in bankrupt issuers, the Fund may be subject to litigation risks and costs.
Economic and Market Events Risk. Events in the U.S. and global financial markets, including actions taken by the U.S. Federal Reserve or foreign central banks to stimulate or stabilize economic growth or the functioning of the securities markets, may at times result in unusually high market volatility, which could negatively impact performance. Relatively reduced liquidity in credit and fixed income markets could adversely affect issuers worldwide.
Emerging Markets Risk. The risks of foreign investments are greater for investments in or exposed to emerging markets. Emerging market countries typically have economic and political systems that are less fully developed, and can be expected to be less stable, than those of more developed countries. For example, the economies of such countries can be subject to rapid and unpredictable rates of inflation or deflation. Low trading volumes may result in a lack of liquidity and price volatility. Emerging market countries may have policies that restrict investment by non-U.S. investors, or that prevent non-U.S. investors from withdrawing their money at will.
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PGIM Active High Yield Bond ETF

The Fund may invest in some emerging markets that subject it to risks such as those associated with illiquidity, custody of assets, different settlement and clearance procedures and asserting legal title under a developing legal and regulatory regime to a greater degree than in developed markets or even in other emerging markets.
ETF Shares Trading Risk. Fund shares are listed for trading on NYSE Arca, Inc. (the “Exchange”) and the shares are bought and sold in the secondary market at market prices. The market prices of the shares of the Fund are expected to fluctuate in response to changes in the Fund's NAV, the intraday value of the Fund's holdings and supply and demand for shares of the Fund. We cannot predict whether shares of the Fund will trade above, below or at their NAV. Trading on the Exchange, including trading of Fund shares, may be halted in certain circumstances and shareholders may not be able to sell Fund shares at the time or price desired. During periods of stressed market conditions, the market for the shares of the Fund may become less liquid in response to deteriorating liquidity in the markets for the Fund's portfolio investments. This adverse effect on the liquidity of the Fund's shares could lead to differences between the market price of the Fund's shares and the NAV of those shares. There can be no assurance that the requirements of the Exchange to maintain the listing of shares of the Fund will continue to be met. At times, trading in the securities of ETFs has become volatile and unpredictable and the price of ETF shares has diverged from market driven fundamentals.
Disruptions to creations and redemptions, the existence of significant market volatility or potential lack of an active trading market for the shares of the Fund (including through a trading halt), as well as other factors, may result in the Fund's shares trading on the Exchange significantly above (at a premium) or below (at a discount) to NAV or to the intraday value of the Fund's holdings. Premiums and discounts relate to differences between the market price and NAV of the Fund's shares. During such periods, you may incur significant losses if you sell your shares of the Fund. The securities held by the Fund may be traded in markets that close at a different time than the Exchange and may trade outside of a collateralized settlement system. Liquidity in those securities may be reduced after the applicable closing times. Accordingly, during the time when the Exchange is open but after the applicable market closing, fixing or settlement times, bid-ask spreads for the Fund's shares on the Exchange and the corresponding premium or discount between the market price for Fund shares and their NAV may widen. Additionally, during times when the Exchange is open but after the applicable market is closed, there may be changes between the last quote from the closed foreign market and the value of such security during the Fund's trading day on the Exchange and this may lead to differences between the market price of the Fund's shares and the underlying value of those shares.
Cost of Buying or Selling Shares. When you buy or sell shares of the Fund through a broker, you will likely incur a brokerage commission or other charges imposed by brokers. In addition, the market price of shares of the Fund, like the price of any exchange-traded security, includes a “bid-ask spread” charged by the market makers or other participants that trade the particular security. The spread of the Fund's shares varies over time based on the Fund's trading volume, the spread of the Fund's underlying securities, and market liquidity and may increase if the Fund's trading volume, the spread of the Fund's underlying securities, or market liquidity decreases. In times of severe market disruption, including when trading of the Fund's holdings may be halted, the bid-ask spread may increase significantly. This means that the shares may trade at a discount to the Fund's NAV, and the discount is likely to be greatest during significant market volatility.
No Guarantee of Active Trading Market Risk. While shares of the Fund are listed on the Exchange, there can be no assurance that active trading markets for the shares will develop or be maintained by market makers or by Authorized Participants. The distributor of the Fund's shares does not maintain a secondary market in the shares.
Floating Rate and Other Loans Risk. The Fund's ability to receive payments of principal and interest and other amounts in connection with loans (whether through participations, assignments or otherwise) will depend primarily on the financial condition of the borrower. The failure by the Fund to receive scheduled interest or principal payments on a loan because of a default, bankruptcy or any other reason would adversely affect the income of the Fund and would likely reduce the value of its assets. Even with loans secured by collateral, there is the risk that the value of the collateral may decline, may be insufficient to meet the obligations of the borrower, or be difficult to liquidate. In the event of a default, the Fund may have difficulty collecting on any collateral and would not have the ability to collect on any collateral for an uncollateralized loan. Further, the Fund's access to collateral, if any, may be limited by bankruptcy
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laws. Due to the nature of the private syndication of senior loans, including, for example, lack of publicly-available information, some senior loans are not as easily purchased or sold as publicly-traded securities. In addition, loan participations generally are subject to restrictions on transfer, and only limited opportunities may exist to sell loan participations in secondary markets. As a result, it may be difficult for the Fund to value loans or sell loans at an acceptable price when it wants to sell them. Loans trade in an over-the-counter market, and confirmation and settlement, which are effected through standardized procedures and documentation, may take significantly longer than seven days to complete. Extended trade settlement periods may, in unusual market conditions with a high volume of shareholder redemptions, present a risk to shareholders regarding the Fund's ability to pay redemption proceeds in a timely manner. In some instances, loans and loan participations are not rated by independent credit rating agencies; in such instances, a decision by the Fund to invest in a particular loan or loan participation could depend exclusively on the subadviser's credit analysis of the borrower, or in the case of a loan participation, of the intermediary holding the portion of the loan that the Fund has purchased. To the extent the Fund invests in loans of non-U.S. issuers, the risks of investing in non-U.S. issuers are applicable. Loans may not be considered to be “securities” and as a result may not benefit from the protections of the federal securities laws, including anti-fraud protections and those with respect to the use of material non-public information, so that purchasers, such as the Fund, may not have the benefit of these protections. If the Fund is in possession of material non-public information about a borrower as a result of its investment in such borrower’s loan, the Fund may not be able to enter into a transaction with respect to a publicly-traded security of the borrower when it would otherwise be advantageous to do so.
Foreign Securities Risk. Investments in securities of non-U.S. issuers (including those denominated in U.S. dollars) may involve more risk than investing in securities of U.S. issuers. Foreign political, economic and legal systems, especially those in developing and emerging market countries, may be less stable and more volatile than in the United States. Foreign legal systems generally have fewer regulatory requirements than the U.S. legal system, particularly those of emerging markets. In general, less information is publicly available with respect to non-U.S. companies than U.S. companies. Non-U.S. companies generally are not subject to the same accounting, auditing, and financial reporting standards as are U.S. companies. Additionally, the changing value of foreign currencies and changes in exchange rates could also affect the value of the assets the Fund holds and the Fund's performance. Certain foreign countries may impose restrictions on the ability of issuers of foreign securities to make payment of principal and interest or dividends to investors located outside the country, due to blockage of foreign currency exchanges or otherwise. Investments in emerging markets are subject to greater volatility and price declines.
In addition, the Fund's investments in non-U.S. securities may be subject to the risks of nationalization or expropriation of assets, imposition of currency exchange controls or restrictions on the repatriation of non-U.S. currency, confiscatory taxation and adverse diplomatic developments. Special U.S. tax considerations may apply.
Interest Rate Risk. The value of your investment may go down when interest rates rise. A rise in rates tends to have a greater impact on the prices of longer term or duration debt securities. For example, a fixed income security with a duration of three years is expected to decrease in value by approximately 3% if interest rates increase by 1%. This is referred to as “duration risk.” When interest rates fall, the issuers of debt obligations may prepay principal more quickly than expected, and the Fund may be required to reinvest the proceeds at a lower interest rate. This is referred to as “prepayment risk.” For premium bonds (bonds acquired at prices that exceed their par or principal value) purchased by the Fund, prepayment risk may be enhanced. When interest rates rise, debt obligations may be repaid more slowly than expected, and the value of the Fund's holdings may fall sharply. This is referred to as “extension risk.” The Fund may lose money if short-term or long-term interest rates rise sharply or in a manner not anticipated by the subadviser.
Junk Bonds Risk. High-yield, high-risk bonds have predominantly speculative characteristics, including particularly high credit risk. Junk bonds tend to have lower market liquidity than higher-rated securities. The liquidity of particular issuers or industries within a particular investment category may shrink or disappear suddenly and without warning. The non-investment grade bond market can experience sudden and sharp price swings and become illiquid due to a variety of factors, including changes in economic forecasts, stock market activity, large sustained sales by major investors, a high profile default or a change in the market's psychology.
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PGIM Active High Yield Bond ETF

Large Shareholder and Large Scale Redemption Risk. Certain individuals, accounts, funds (including funds affiliated with the Manager) or institutions, including the Manager and its affiliates, may from time to time own or control a substantial amount of the Fund’s shares. There is no requirement that these entities maintain their investment in the Fund. Certain of these entities may use predetermined, nondiscretionary mathematical formulas in their investment process that may result in large-scale asset flows into and out of the Fund. These shareholders may also pledge or loan Fund shares (to secure financing or otherwise), which may result in the shares becoming concentrated in another party. There is a risk that such large shareholders or that the Fund’s shareholders generally may redeem all or a substantial portion of their investments in the Fund in a short period of time, which could have a significant negative impact on the Fund’s NAV, liquidity, and brokerage costs. Such redemptions may cause the Fund to have to sell securities at inopportune times or prices. These transactions may adversely affect the Fund’s performance and increase transaction costs. In addition, large redemption requests may exceed the cash balance of the Fund and result in credit line borrowing fees and/or overdraft charges to the Fund until the sales of portfolio securities necessary to cover the redemption request settle. To the extent a large shareholder in the Fund is an entity subject to domestic and/or international regulations governing banking, insurance, or other financial institutions, changes in those regulations (e.g., capital requirements) or in the shareholder’s financial status may cause or require the shareholder to redeem its investment in the Fund when it otherwise would not choose to redeem that investment. It is also possible that a significant redemption could result in an increase in Fund expenses on account of being spread over a smaller asset base, and therefore make it more difficult for the Fund to implement its investment strategy. Large redemptions could also result in tax consequences to shareholders. The Fund’s ability to pursue its investment objective after one or more large scale redemptions may be impaired and, as a result, the Fund may invest a larger portion of its assets in cash or cash equivalents.
Liquidity Risk. The Fund may invest in instruments that trade in lower volumes and are more illiquid than other investments. If the Fund is forced to sell these investments to pay redemption proceeds or for other reasons, the Fund may lose money. In addition, when there is no willing buyer and investments cannot be readily sold at the desired time or price, the Fund may have to accept a lower price or may not be able to sell the instrument at all. An inability to sell a portfolio position can adversely affect the Fund's value or prevent the Fund from being able to take advantage of other investment opportunities.
Management Risk. The value of your investment may decrease if judgments by the subadviser about the attractiveness, value or market trends affecting a particular security, industry or sector or about market movements are incorrect.
Market Disruption and Geopolitical Risks. Market disruption can be caused by economic, financial or political events and factors, including but not limited to, international wars or conflicts (including Russia’s military invasion of Ukraine), geopolitical developments (including trading and tariff arrangements, sanctions and cybersecurity attacks), instability in regions such as Asia, Eastern Europe and the Middle East, terrorism, natural disasters and public health epidemics (including the outbreak of COVID-19 globally).
The extent and duration of such events and resulting market disruptions cannot be predicted, but could be substantial and could magnify the impact of other risks to the Fund. These and other similar events could adversely affect the U.S. and foreign financial markets and lead to increased market volatility, reduced liquidity in the securities markets, significant negative impacts on issuers and the markets for certain securities and commodities and/or government intervention. They may also cause short- or long-term economic uncertainties in the United States and worldwide. As a result, whether or not the Fund invests in securities of issuers located in or with significant exposure to the countries directly affected, the value and liquidity of the Fund’s investments may be negatively impacted. Further, due to closures of certain markets and restrictions on trading certain securities, the value of certain securities held by the Fund could be significantly impacted, which could lead to such securities being valued at zero.
COVID-19 and the related governmental and public responses have had and may continue to have an impact on the Fund’s investments and net asset value and have led and may continue to lead to increased market volatility and the potential for illiquidity in certain classes of securities and sectors of the market. They have also had and may continue to result in periods of business disruption, business closures, inability to obtain raw materials, supplies and component
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parts, and reduced or disrupted operations for the issuers in which the Fund invests. The occurrence, reoccurrence and pendency of public health epidemics could adversely affect the economies and financial markets either in specific countries or worldwide.
Market Risk. Securities markets may be volatile and the market prices of the Fund’s securities may decline. Securities fluctuate in price based on changes in an issuer’s financial condition and overall market and economic conditions. If the market prices of the securities owned by the Fund fall, the value of your investment in the Fund will decline.
Mortgage-Backed and Asset-Backed Securities Risk. Mortgage-backed securities are particularly susceptible to prepayment and extension risks, because prepayments on the underlying mortgages tend to increase when interest rates fall and decrease when interest rates rise. Prepayments may also occur on a scheduled basis or due to foreclosure. When market interest rates increase, mortgage refinancings and prepayments slow, which lengthens the effective duration of these securities. As a result, the negative effect of the interest rate increase on the market value of mortgage-backed securities is usually more pronounced than it is for other types of fixed income securities, potentially increasing the volatility of the Fund.
Conversely, when market interest rates decline, while the value of mortgage-backed securities may increase, the rates of prepayment of the underlying mortgages tend to increase, which shortens the effective duration of these securities. Mortgage-backed securities are also subject to the risk that underlying borrowers will be unable to meet their obligations.
At times, some of the mortgage-backed securities in which the Fund may invest will have higher than market interest rates and therefore will be purchased at a premium above their par value. Prepayments may cause losses on securities purchased at a premium.
The value of mortgage-backed securities may be affected by changes in credit quality or value of the mortgage loans or other assets that support the securities. In addition, for mortgage-backed securities, when market conditions result in an increase in the default rates on the underlying mortgages and the foreclosure values of the underlying real estate are below the outstanding amount of the underlying mortgages, collection of the full amount of accrued interest and principal on these investments may be doubtful. For mortgage derivatives and structured securities that have embedded leverage features, small changes in interest or prepayment rates may cause large and sudden price movements. Mortgage derivatives can also become illiquid and hard to value in declining markets.
Asset-backed securities are structured like mortgage-backed securities and are subject to many of the same risks, including prepayment risk, extension risk, credit risk and interest rate risk. The ability of an issuer of asset-backed securities to enforce its security interest in the underlying assets or to otherwise recover from the underlying obligor may be limited. Certain asset-backed securities present a heightened level of risk because, in the event of default, the liquidation value of the underlying assets may be inadequate to pay any unpaid principal or interest.
Reference Rate Risk. The Fund may be exposed to financial instruments that are tied to the London Interbank Offered Rate (“LIBOR”) to determine payment obligations, financing terms, hedging strategies or investment value.
The United Kingdom's Financial Conduct Authority announced a phase out of LIBOR such that after June 30, 2023, the overnight, 1-month, 3-month, 6-month and 12-month U.S. dollar LIBOR settings will cease to be published or will no longer be representative. All other LIBOR settings and certain other interbank offered rates, such as the Euro Overnight Index Average (“EONIA”), ceased to be published or representative after December 31, 2021. The Fund may have investments linked to other interbank offered rates that may also cease to be published in the future. Various financial industry groups have been planning for the transition away from LIBOR, but there remain challenges to converting certain securities and transactions to a new reference rate (e.g., the Secured Overnight Financing Rate (“SOFR”), which is intended to replace the U.S. dollar LIBOR).
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PGIM Active High Yield Bond ETF

Neither the effect of the LIBOR transition process nor its ultimate success can yet be known. The transition process might lead to increased volatility and illiquidity in markets for instruments whose terms currently include LIBOR as well as loan facilities used by the Fund. While some existing LIBOR-based instruments may contemplate a scenario where LIBOR is no longer available by providing for an alternative rate-setting methodology, there may be significant uncertainty regarding the effectiveness of any such alternative methodologies to replicate LIBOR. Not all existing LIBOR-based instruments may have alternative rate-setting provisions and there remains uncertainty regarding the willingness and ability of issuers to add alternative rate-setting provisions in certain existing instruments. Global regulators have advised market participants to cease entering into new contracts using LIBOR as a reference rate, and it is possible that investments in LIBOR-based instruments could invite regulatory scrutiny. In addition, a liquid market for newly-issued instruments that use a reference rate other than LIBOR still may be developing. There may also be challenges for the Fund to enter into hedging transactions against such newly-issued instruments until a market for such hedging transactions develops. All of the aforementioned may adversely affect the Fund's performance or net asset value.
Small Fund Risk. When the Fund’s size is small, the Fund may experience low trading volume and wide bid/ask spreads. The Fund may face the risk of being delisted if it does not meet certain conditions of the listing exchange due to small size. Any resulting liquidation of the Fund could cause the Fund to incur elevated transaction costs for the Fund and negative tax consequences for its shareholders.
The following risks are associated with the Fund’s non-principal investment strategies.
Credit-Linked Securities Risk. Credit-linked securities are subject to the risk that the issuer of the credit-linked security may default or go bankrupt, as well as the credit risk of the corporate issuer underlying the credit default swaps. In addition, credit-linked securities are usually issued in privately negotiated transactions, resulting in limited or no liquidity. Credit-linked securities are also subject to market risk, interest rate risk, prepayment risk and extension risk.
Dollar Rolls Risk. Dollar rolls involve the risk that the market value of the securities that the Fund is committed to buy may decline below the price of the securities the Fund has sold. If the buyer of securities under a dollar roll files for bankruptcy or becomes insolvent, the Fund's right to purchase or repurchase securities under a dollar roll may be restricted. Successful use of dollar rolls depends on the ability to correctly predict interest rates and prepayments, depending on the underlying security. These transactions may involve leverage.
Equity and Equity-Related Securities Risk. Equity and equity-related securities may be subject to changes in value, and their values may be more volatile than those of other asset classes. In addition to an individual security losing value, the value of the equity markets or a sector in which the Fund invests could go down. Different parts of a market can react differently to adverse issuer, market, regulatory, political and economic developments.
Forward Commitments Risk. Forward commitments are subject to the risk that the counterparty to the forward commitment may fail to make payment or delivery in a timely manner or at all. Forward commitments are also subject to the risk that the value of the security to be purchased may decline prior to the settlement date.
Repurchase Agreements Risk. Repurchase agreements could involve certain risks in the event of default or insolvency of the seller, including losses and possible delays or restrictions upon the Fund’s ability to dispose of the underlying securities. To the extent that, in the meantime, the value of the securities that the Fund has purchased has decreased, the Fund could experience a loss.
Reverse Repurchase Agreements Risk. Reverse repurchase agreements involve the risk that the other party may fail to return the securities in a timely manner or at all. The Fund could lose money if it is unable to recover the securities and the value of the collateral held by the Fund, including the value of investments made with cash collateral, is less than the value of the securities. These events could also trigger adverse tax consequences to the Fund. Reverse repurchase agreements also involve leverage, which may exaggerate the increase or decrease of the value of the Fund’s assets during the term of the agreement.
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Securities Lending Risk. Securities lending involves the risk that the borrower may fail to return the securities in a timely manner or at all. As a result, the Fund may lose money and there may be a delay in recovering the loaned securities. Additionally, losses could result from the reinvestment of collateral received on loaned securities in investments that decline in value, default, or do not perform as well as expected. The affiliated prime money market fund in which cash collateral generally is invested may impose liquidity fees or temporary gates on redemptions if its weekly liquid assets fall below a designated threshold. If this were to occur, the Fund may lose money on its investment of cash collateral in the affiliated prime money market fund, or the Fund may not be able to redeem its investment of cash collateral in the affiliated prime money market fund, which might cause the Fund to liquidate other holdings in order to return the cash collateral to the borrower upon termination of a securities loan. These events could trigger adverse tax consequences for the Fund.
Short Sales Risk. Short sales involve costs and risks. The Fund must pay the lender interest on the security it borrows, and the Fund will lose money to the extent that the price of the security increases between the time of the short sale and the date when the Fund replaces the borrowed security. Although the Fund’s gain is limited to the price at which it sold the securities short, its potential loss is limited only by the maximum attainable price of the securities, less the price at which the security was sold and may, theoretically, be unlimited. The Fund may also make short sales “against the box.” When selling short against the box, the Fund gives up the opportunity for capital appreciation in the security.
Step-ups and PIK Securities Risks. Step-ups and PIK securities are typically affected to a greater extent by interest rate changes, and therefore subject to greater volatility than the prices of securities that pay interest currently and in cash and less liquidity in adverse markets than other debt securities. Step-ups and PIK securities allow an issuer to avoid or delay the need to generate cash to meet current interest payments, such securities are also subject to credit risk and market risk.
Stripped Securities Risk. Stripped securities are more volatile than securities where the principal and interest have not been separated. Principal-only stripped securities do not make periodic interest payments, and generally lose value when interest rates rise. The value of stripped securities generally fluctuates more in response to interest rate movements than the value of traditional bonds. Interest-only stripped securities generally have greater risk of loss compared to principal-only stripped securities.
When-Issued and Delayed-Delivery Transactions Risk. When-issued and delayed-delivery securities involve the risk that the security the Fund buys will lose value prior to its delivery. There also is the risk that the security will not be issued or that the other party to the transaction will not meet its obligation. If this occurs, the Fund may lose both the investment opportunity for the assets it set aside to pay for the security and any gain in the security’s price.
Please note that, in addition to the risks discussed above, there are many other factors that may impact the Fund’s ability to achieve its investment objective and which could result in a loss of all or a part of your investment.
More information about the Fund’s investment strategies and risks appears in the SAI.
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PGIM Active High Yield Bond ETF

HOW THE FUND IS MANAGED
BOARD OF TRUSTEES
The Fund is overseen by a Board of Trustees (hereafter referred to as “Trustees”, or the “Board”). The Board oversees the actions of the Manager, subadviser and distributor and decides on general policies. The Board also oversees the Fund's officers, who conduct and supervise the daily business operations of the Fund.
MANAGER
PGIM Investments LLC (“PGIM Investments”)
655 Broad Street
Newark, NJ 07102-4410
As manager, PGIM Investments manages the Fund's investment operations and administers its business affairs and is responsible for supervising the Fund's subadviser. Pursuant to the management agreement relating to the Fund, PGIM Investments is responsible for substantially all expenses of the Fund, except taxes, brokerage expenses, interest expenses, distribution fees or expenses, expenses incident to shareholder meetings and extraordinary expenses. The Fund may also pay for any costs or expenses of investing in other funds. The Fund pays PGIM Investments management fees at the rate of 0.53% of the Fund's average daily net assets.
PGIM Investments and its predecessors have served as a manager or administrator to investment companies since 1987. As of September 30, 2022, PGIM Investments, a wholly-owned subsidiary of Prudential, served as the investment manager to all of the Prudential U.S. and offshore open-end investment companies, and as the manager or administrator to closed-end investment companies, with aggregate assets of approximately $276.9 billion.
Subject to the supervision of the Board, PGIM Investments is responsible for conducting the initial review of prospective subadvisers for the Fund. In evaluating a prospective subadviser, PGIM Investments considers many factors, including the firm's experience, investment philosophy and historical performance. Subject to the Board’s oversight, PGIM Investments is also responsible for monitoring the performance of the Fund's subadviser and recommending termination and replacement when deemed appropriate. PGIM Investments may provide a subadviser with additional investment guidelines consistent with the Fund's investment objective and restrictions.
PGIM Investments and the Fund operate under an exemptive order (the “Order”) from the SEC that generally permits PGIM Investments to enter into or amend agreements with unaffiliated subadvisers and certain subadvisers that are affiliates of PGIM Investments without obtaining shareholder approval. This authority is subject to certain conditions, including the requirement that the Board must approve any new or amended agreements with a subadviser. Shareholders of the Fund still have the right to terminate these agreements at any time by a vote of the majority of the outstanding shares of the Fund. The Fund will notify shareholders of any new subadvisers engaged or material amendments to subadvisory agreements made pursuant to the Order. Any new subadvisory agreement or amendment to the Fund’s management agreement or current subadvisory agreement that directly or indirectly results in an increase in the aggregate management fee rate payable by the Fund will be submitted to the Fund’s shareholders for their approval. PGIM Investments does not currently intend to retain unaffiliated subadvisers.
A discussion of the basis for the Board's approvals of the management and subadvisory agreements is available in the Fund's Annual Report to shareholders dated August 31.
SUBADVISER
PGIM, Inc. (“PGIM”) is an indirect, wholly-owned subsidiary of Prudential Financial, Inc. (“Prudential”) that was organized in 1984. Its address is 655 Broad Street, Newark, New Jersey 07102. As of September 30, 2022, PGIM managed approximately $1.2 trillion in assets.
PGIM Fixed Income is the primary public fixed income asset management unit of PGIM, with $759.3 billion in assets under management as of September 30, 2022 and is the unit of PGIM that provides investment advisory services to the Fund.*
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PGIM Fixed Income is organized into groups specializing in different sectors of the fixed income market: U.S. and non-U.S. government bonds, mortgage-backed and asset-backed securities, U.S. and non-U.S. investment grade corporate bonds, high-yield bonds, emerging markets bonds, municipal bonds, and money market securities.
*PGIM Fixed Income’s assets under management includes PGIM Limited’s assets under management, an operating division of PGIM Fixed Income.
PORTFOLIO MANAGERS
Robert Cignarella, CFA, Robert Spano CFA, CPA, Ryan Kelly, CFA, Brian Clapp, CFA, and Michael Gormally, are jointly and primarily responsible for the day-to-day management of the Fund.
Robert Cignarella, CFA, is a Managing Director and Head of U.S. High Yield for PGIM Fixed Income. Mr. Cignarella is also the co-Head of the Global High Yield Strategy. Prior to joining the firm in 2014, Mr. Cignarella was a managing director and co-head of high yield and bank loans at Goldman Sachs Asset Management. He also held positions as a high yield portfolio manager and a high yield and investment grade credit analyst. Earlier, he was a financial analyst in the investment banking division of Salomon Brothers. Mr. Cignarella received an MBA from the University of Chicago, and a bachelor’s degree in operations research and industrial engineering from Cornell University. He holds the Chartered Financial Analyst (CFA) designation.
Robert Spano, CFA, CPA, is a Principal and a high yield portfolio manager for PGIM Fixed Income's High Yield Bond Team. Prior to assuming his current position in 2007, Mr. Spano was a high yield credit analyst for 10 years in PGIM Fixed Income's Credit Research Group, covering the health, lodging, consumer, gaming, restaurants, and chemical industries. Earlier, he worked as an investment analyst in the Project Finance Unit of the firm’s private placement group. Mr. Spano also held positions in the internal audit and risk management units of Prudential Securities. He received a BS in Accounting from the University of Delaware and an MBA from New York University. Mr. Spano holds the Chartered Financial Analyst (CFA) and Certified Public Accountant (CPA) designations.
Ryan Kelly, CFA, is a Principal and lead portfolio manager for PGIM Fixed Income’s Credit Opportunities strategy. Mr. Kelly is also a senior portfolio manager for PGIM Fixed Income’s U.S. High Yield Team. Prior to his current roles, Mr. Kelly was a senior credit analyst in PGIM Fixed Income's Credit Research Group covering various high yield sectors including automotive, finance, energy, technology, telecom and power. During his tenure at PGIM Fixed Income he participated in numerous restructurings and workouts. Prior to joining the Firm in 2002, Mr. Kelly was a senior credit analyst at Muzinich & Company and an investment banker at PNC Capital Markets where he worked on high yield, mergers and acquisition and private placement transactions. Mr. Kelly began his career in investment banking at Chase Securities, where he specialized in project finance and mergers & acquisitions for the global power sector. He received a BA in Economics from Michigan State University and holds the Chartered Financial Analyst (CFA) designation.
Brian Clapp, CFA, is a Principal and a high yield portfolio manager for PGIM Fixed Income's High Yield Team. Mr. Clapp was previously a senior high yield credit analyst on PGIM Fixed Income’s Credit Research team. He joined the firm in 2006 from Muzinich & Co. While there, Mr. Clapp held several positions, including portfolio manager for a high yield bond based hedge fund, hedge fund credit analyst, and credit analyst covering the chemical, industrial, and transportation sectors. Earlier at Triton Partners, an institutional high yield fund manager, Mr. Clapp was a credit analyst covering the metals and mining, healthcare, homebuilding, building products and transportation sectors. He received a BS in Finance from Bryant College, and an MS in Computational Finance, and an MBA from Carnegie Mellon. Mr. Clapp holds the Chartered Financial Analyst (CFA) designation.
Michael Gormally is a Vice President, and portfolio manager and trader for PGIM Fixed Income's U.S. High Yield Bond Team. Previously, he was an Analyst in the Portfolio Analysis Group, where he managed a team of portfolio analysts dedicated to High Yield. He was responsible for the monitoring of daily risk and positioning, along with the implementation of portfolio management trading tools and performance attribution models. Before joining the Firm in 2014, Mr. Gormally was a credit analyst at BNY Mellon. Mr. Gormally received a BA in Economics from Johns Hopkins University and an MBA from the University of Notre Dame.
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PGIM Active High Yield Bond ETF

Additional information about portfolio manager compensation, other accounts managed, and portfolio manager ownership of Fund securities may be found in the SAI.
DISTRIBUTOR
The Fund's Distributor is Prudential Investment Management Services LLC (“PIMS” or the “Distributor”). The Distributor is a broker-dealer registered with the SEC. The Distributor distributes Creation Units (as defined below in the section “How to Buy and Sell Shares”) for the Fund and does not maintain a secondary market in shares of the Fund.
Distribution and Service Plan
The Fund has adopted a Distribution and Service Plan (the “12b-1 Plan”) pursuant to Rule 12b-1 under the Investment Company Act of 1940, as amended (the “1940 Act”). The 12b-1 Plan permits compensation in connection with the distribution and marketing of Fund shares and/or the provision of certain shareholder services. The 12b-1 Plan permits the Fund to pay compensation at an annual rate of up to 0.25% of the Fund's average daily net assets. However, the Board has determined not to authorize payment of a 12b-1 Plan fee at this time.
The 12b-1 fee may only be imposed or increased when the Board determines that it is in the best interests of shareholders to do so. Because these fees, when and if authorized, will be paid out of the Fund's assets on an ongoing basis, over time they will increase the cost of an investment in the Fund.
PGIM or its affiliates make payments to broker-dealers, registered investment advisers, banks or other intermediaries (together, “intermediaries”) related to marketing activities and presentations, educational training programs, conferences, the development of technology platforms and reporting systems, or their making Fund shares available to their customers generally and in certain investment programs. Such payments, which may be significant to the intermediary, are not made by the Fund. Rather, such payments are made by PGIM or its affiliates from their own resources, which come directly or indirectly in part from fees paid by the Fund. A financial intermediary may make decisions about which investment options it recommends or makes available, or the level of services provided, to its customers based on the payments it is eligible to receive. Therefore, such payments to an intermediary create conflicts of interest between the intermediary and its customers and may cause the intermediary to recommend the funds over another investment. More information regarding these payments is contained in the Fund’s SAI.
Please contact your salesperson or other investment professional for more information regarding any such payments his or her firm may receive from PGIM or its affiliates.
DISCLOSURE OF PORTFOLIO HOLDINGS
Fund policies and procedures with respect to the disclosure of the Fund's portfolio securities are described in the Fund's SAI. On each business day, before commencement of trading on the Exchange, the Fund will disclose on pgim.com/investments the Fund's portfolio holdings that will form the basis for the Fund's calculation of NAV at the end of the business day.
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FUND DISTRIBUTIONS AND TAX ISSUES
DISTRIBUTIONS
The Fund distributes dividends out of any net investment income to shareholders. For example, if the Fund owns an ACME Corp. bond and the bond pays interest, the Fund will pay out a portion of this interest as a dividend to its shareholders, assuming the Fund’s income is more than its costs and expenses.
The Fund also distributes any realized net capital gains to shareholders. Capital gains are generated when the Fund sells its assets for a profit. For example, if the Fund bought 100 bonds of ACME Corp. for a total of $1,000 and more than one year later sold the bonds for a total of $1,500, the Fund has net long-term capital gains of $500, which it will pass on to shareholders (assuming the Fund’s remaining total gains are greater than any losses it may have).
Dividends and other distributions on shares of the Fund are distributed on a pro rata basis to beneficial owners of such shares.
Dividend payments are made through DTC participants and indirect participants to beneficial owners then of record with proceeds received from the Fund.
Dividend Reinvestment Service. No dividend reinvestment service is provided by the Fund. Broker-dealers may make available the DTC book-entry Dividend Reinvestment Service for use by beneficial owners of the Fund for reinvestment of their dividend distributions. Beneficial owners should contact their broker to determine the availability and costs of the service and the details of participation therein. Brokers may require beneficial owners to adhere to specific procedures and timetables. If this service is available and used, dividend distributions of both income and realized gains will be automatically reinvested in additional whole shares of the Fund purchased in the secondary market. Dividend distributions of both income and realized gains will be subject to taxation whether or not they are reinvested in the Fund.
The chart below sets forth the expected frequency of dividend and capital gains distributions to shareholders. Various factors may impact the frequency of dividend distributions to shareholders, including but not limited to adverse market conditions or portfolio holding-specific events.
Expected Distribution Schedule*
 
Net Investment Income
Monthly
Short-Term Capital Gains
Annually
Long-Term Capital Gains
Annually
*Under certain circumstances, the Fund may make more than one distribution of short-term and/or long-term capital gains during a fiscal year.
TAX ISSUES
Investors who buy shares of the Fund should be aware of some important tax issues. For example, the Fund distributes dividends of net investment income and realized net capital gains, if any, to shareholders. These distributions are subject to federal income taxes, unless you hold your shares in a 401(k) plan, an Individual Retirement Account (“IRA”) or some other qualified or tax-deferred plan or account. Dividends and distributions from the Fund also may be subject to state and local income tax in the state where you live. Also, if you sell shares of the Fund for a profit, you may have to pay capital gains taxes on the amount of your profit, unless you hold your shares in a qualified or tax-deferred plan or account.
The following briefly discusses some of the important income tax issues you should be aware of, but is not meant to be tax advice. For tax advice, please speak with your tax adviser.
Fund Distributions
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PGIM Active High Yield Bond ETF

Dividends of net investment income will generally be taxable to shareholders at ordinary income rates. Dividends from net investment income paid to a non-corporate U.S. shareholder that are reported as qualified dividend income will generally be taxable to such shareholder at the long-term capital gain tax rate. Also, a portion of the dividends paid to corporate shareholders of the Fund will be eligible for the dividends received deduction to the extent the Fund’s income is derived from certain dividends received from U.S. corporations. Because of the nature of the Fund’s investments, the Fund does not expect to pay dividends that for noncorporate shareholders are treated as qualified dividend income or that for corporate shareholders are eligible for the dividends received deduction.
Fund distributions of net capital gains are taxed differently depending on how long the Fund holds the security. If the Fund holds a security for more than one year before selling it, any gain is treated as long-term capital gain which is generally taxed at rates of up to 15% or 20% for noncorporate U.S. shareholders, depending on whether their income exceeds certain threshold amounts which are adjusted annually for inflation. If the Fund holds the security for one year or less, any gain is treated as short-term capital gain, which is taxed at rates applicable to ordinary income. Different rates apply to corporate shareholders.
A U.S. shareholder that is an individual, estate, or certain type of trust is subject to a 3.8% Medicare contribution tax on the lesser of (1) the U.S. shareholder’s “net investment income,” including Fund distributions and net gains from the disposition of Fund shares, and (2) the excess of the U.S. shareholder’s modified adjusted gross income for the taxable year over $200,000 (or $250,000 for married couples filing jointly). For this purpose, net investment income includes interest, dividends, annuities, royalties, capital gain and income from a passive activity business or a business of trading in financial instruments or commodities.
Form 1099
For every year the Fund declares a dividend, you will receive a Form 1099, which reports the amount of ordinary income distributions and long-term capital gains we distributed to you during the prior year unless you own shares of the Fund as part of a qualified or tax-deferred plan or account. If you do own shares of the Fund as part of a qualified or tax-deferred plan or account, your taxes are deferred, so you will not receive a Form 1099 annually, but instead you will receive a Form 1099 when you take any distribution from your qualified or tax-deferred plan or account.
Fund distributions are generally taxable to you in the calendar year in which they are received, except when we declare certain dividends and distributions in the fourth quarter, with a record date in such quarter, and actually pay them in January of the following year. In such cases, the dividends and distributions are treated as if they were paid on December 31st of the prior year.
Withholding Taxes
If federal tax law requires you to provide the Fund with your taxpayer identification number and certifications as to your tax status and you fail to do this, or if you are otherwise subject to backup withholding, we will withhold and pay to the U.S. Treasury a portion of your distributions and sale proceeds based on the applicable backup withholding rate.
Taxation of Non-U.S. Shareholders
For a discussion regarding the taxation of non-U.S. shareholders, please see the SAI and contact your tax adviser.
If You Purchase on or Before a Record Date
If you buy shares of the Fund on or before the record date for a distribution (the date that determines who receives the distribution), we will pay that distribution to you. As explained above, the distribution may be subject to taxes. You may think you’ve done well since you bought shares one day and soon thereafter received a distribution. That is not so, because when dividends are paid out, the value of each share of the Fund decreases by the amount of the dividend to
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reflect the payout, although this may not be apparent because the value of each share of the Fund also will be affected by market changes, if any. However, the timing of your purchase does mean that part of your investment may have come back to you as taxable income.
TAXES WHEN SHARES ARE SOLD
Any capital gain or loss realized upon a sale of shares is generally treated as long-term capital gain or loss if the shares have been held for more than one year and as short-term capital gain or loss if the shares have been held for one year or less. Capital loss realized on the sale or exchange of shares held for six months or less will be treated as long-term capital loss to the extent of any capital gain dividends received by the shareholder. The ability to deduct capital losses may be limited. Net gains from the sale of shares are included in “net investment income” for purposes of the 3.8% Medicare contribution tax mentioned above.
For shares purchased and sold from a taxable account, your intermediary will report cost basis information to you and to the IRS. Your intermediary will permit shareholders to elect their preferred cost basis method. In the absence of an election, your cost basis method will be your intermediary’s default method, which is often the average cost method. Please consult your tax adviser to determine the appropriate cost basis method for your particular tax situation and to learn more about how the cost basis reporting laws apply to you and your investments.
The above is a general summary of tax implications of investing in the Fund. Because each investor’s tax consequences are unique, please consult your tax advisor to see how investing in the Fund and, for individuals and S corporations, selection of a particular cost method of accounting will affect your own tax situation.
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PGIM Active High Yield Bond ETF

HOW TO BUY AND SELL SHARES
Secondary Market
Most investors will buy and sell Fund shares in secondary market transactions through brokers. Shares of the Fund are listed and traded on the secondary market on the Exchange. Shares can be bought and sold throughout the trading day like other publicly traded securities. There is no minimum investment. When buying or selling shares through a broker, you will incur customary brokerage commissions and charges, and you may pay some or all of the spread between the bid and the offered price in the secondary market on each leg of a round trip (purchase and sale) transaction. The spread varies over time for Fund shares based on the Fund’s trading volume and market liquidity, and is generally lower if the Fund has a lot of trading volume and market liquidity.
Shares of the Fund trade on the Exchange at prices that may differ to varying degrees from the daily NAV of the shares.
Directly with the Fund
Fund shares are issued or redeemed by the Fund at NAV per share only in aggregations of a specified number of shares (“Creation Units”). An Authorized Participant is a member or participant of a clearing agency registered with the SEC, which has a written agreement with the Fund or one of its service providers that allows the Authorized Participant to place orders for the purchase and redemption of Creation Units.
A creation transaction, which is subject to acceptance by the Distributor and the Fund, generally takes place when an Authorized Participant deposits into the Fund a designated portfolio of securities, assets or other positions (a “creation basket”, and an amount of cash (including any cash representing the value of substituted securities, assets or other positions), if any, which together approximate the holdings of the Fund in exchange for a specified number of Creation Units. Similarly, shares can be redeemed only in Creation Units, generally for a designated portfolio of securities, assets or other propositions (the “redemption basket”) held by the Fund and an amount of cash (including any portion of such securities for which cash may be substituted). The Fund may, in certain circumstances, offer Creation Units partially or solely for cash. Except when aggregated in Creation Units, shares are not redeemable by the Fund. Creation and redemption baskets may differ and the Fund may accept “custom baskets.”
For more detailed information, see “Creations and Redemptions of Fund Shares” in the Fund’s SAI.
Beneficial Ownership
The Depository Trust Company (“DTC”) serves as securities depository for Fund shares. Shares of the Fund may be held only in book-entry form; stock certificates will not be issued. DTC, or its nominee, is the record or registered owner of all outstanding shares of the Fund. Beneficial ownership of shares will be shown on the records of DTC or its participants. Beneficial owners of shares are not entitled to have shares registered in their names, will not receive or be entitled to receive physical delivery of certificates in definitive form and are not considered the registered holder thereof. Accordingly, to exercise any rights of a holder of shares of the Fund, each beneficial owner must rely on the procedures of: (i) DTC; (ii) “DTC Participants,” i.e., securities brokers and dealers, banks, trust companies, clearing corporations and certain other organizations, some of whom (and/or their representatives) own DTC; and (iii) “Indirect Participants,” i.e., brokers, dealers, banks and trust companies that clear through or maintain a custodial relationship with a DTC Participant, either directly or indirectly, through which such beneficial owner holds its interests.
The Fund understands that under existing industry practice, in the event the Fund requests any action of holders of shares, or a beneficial owner desires to take any action that DTC, as the record owner of all outstanding shares, is entitled to take, DTC would authorize the DTC Participants to take such action and that the DTC Participants would authorize the Indirect Participants and beneficial owners acting through such DTC Participants to take such action and would otherwise act upon the instructions of beneficial owners owning through them. As described above, the Fund recognizes DTC or its nominee as the owner of all shares of the Fund for all purposes. For more detailed information, see “Book Entry Only System” in the Fund’s SAI.
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29

Shares of the Fund have not been registered for sale outside of the United States.
Understanding the Price You'll Pay for the Shares
Market Trading Price. The trading price of the Fund’s shares on the Exchange may differ from the Fund’s daily NAV and can be affected by market forces of supply and demand, economic conditions and other factors.
Premiums and Discounts. Information regarding how often the shares of the Fund traded on the Exchange at a price above (i.e., at a premium) or below (i.e., at a discount) the NAV since the inception of the Fund, as applicable, can be found at pgim.com/investments.
Net Asset Value. The share value of a fund—known as the net asset value or NAV—is determined by a simple calculation: it's the total value of the Fund (assets minus liabilities) divided by the total number of shares outstanding. For example, if the value of the investments held by Fund XYZ (minus its liabilities) is $1,000 and there are 100 shares of Fund XYZ owned by shareholders, the value of one share of Fund XYZ—or the NAV—is $10 ($1,000 divided by 100).
The Fund's NAV will be determined every day on which the Fund is open as of the close of regular trading on the New York Stock Exchange (“NYSE”) (generally, 4:00 p.m. Eastern Time). The price at which a purchase of a Creation Unit is effected is based on the next calculation of NAV after the order is received in proper form in accordance with this prospectus and the requirements of the Authorized Participant agreement.
The Fund's portfolio securities are valued based upon market quotations or, if market quotations are not readily available, at fair value as determined in good faith under procedures established by the Board. These procedures include pricing methodologies for determining the fair value of certain types of securities and other assets held by the Fund that do not have quoted market prices, and authorize the use of other pricing sources, such as bid prices supplied by a principal market maker and evaluated prices supplied by pricing vendors that employ analytic methodologies that take into account the prices of similar securities and other market factors.
If the Fund determines that a market quotation for a security is not reliable based on, among other things, events or market conditions that occur with respect to one or more securities held by the Fund or the market as a whole, after the quotation is derived or after the closing of the primary market on which the security is traded, but before the time that the Fund's NAV is determined, the Fund may use “fair value pricing,” which is implemented by a valuation committee (“Valuation Committee”) consisting of representatives of the Manager or by the Board. The subadviser often provides relevant information for the Valuation Committee meeting. In addition, the Fund may use fair value pricing determined by the Valuation Committee or Board if the pricing source does not provide an evaluated price for a security or provides an evaluated price that, in the judgment of the Manager (which may be based upon a recommendation from the subadviser), does not represent fair value. Equity securities that are traded on foreign exchanges are valued using pricing vendor services that provide fair value model prices. The models generate an evaluated adjustment factor for each security, which is applied to the local closing price to adjust it for post-closing market movements. Utilizing that evaluated adjustment factor, the vendor provides an evaluated price for each security. Non-U.S. securities markets are open for trading on weekends and other days when the Fund does not price shares. Therefore, the value of the Fund’s shares may change on days when you will not be able to purchase or redeem the Fund’s shares.
Investments in open-end non-exchange-traded mutual funds will be valued at their NAV as determined as of the close of the NYSE on the date of valuation, which will reflect the mutual fund’s fair valuation procedures.
Different valuation methods may result in differing values for the same security. The fair value of a portfolio security that the Fund uses to determine its NAV may differ from the security's quoted or published price. If the Fund needs to implement fair value pricing after the NAV publishing deadline but before shares of the Fund are processed, the NAV you receive or pay may differ from the published NAV price. The prospectuses of any other mutual funds or ETFs in which the Fund invests will explain each fund’s procedures and policies with respect to the use of fair value pricing.
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PGIM Active High Yield Bond ETF

Fair value pricing procedures are designed to result in prices for the Fund's securities and its NAV that are reasonable in light of the circumstances which make or have made market quotations unavailable or unreliable, and may have the effect of reducing arbitrage opportunities available to short-term traders. There is no assurance, however, that fair value pricing will more accurately reflect the market value of a security than the market price of such security on that day or that it will prevent dilution of the Fund's NAV by short-term traders.
Frequent Purchases and Redemptions
The Fund does not impose restrictions on the frequency of purchases and redemptions. The Board evaluated the risks of market timing activities by Fund shareholders when they considered whether a restriction or policy was necessary. The Board considered that, unlike mutual funds, the Fund issues and redeems its shares at NAV only in Creation Units, and the Fund’s shares may be purchased and sold on the Exchange at prevailing market prices.
“Revenue Sharing” Payments
The Manager or certain of its affiliates (but not the Distributor) may make payments (which are often referred to as “revenue sharing” payments) to financial intermediaries from the Manager's or certain affiliates' own resources, including from the profits derived from management fees or other fees received from the Fund, without additional direct or indirect cost to the Fund or its shareholders. Revenue sharing payments are usually calculated based on Fund assets attributable to a particular financial services firm, and the amount of the payments varies among financial intermediaries. The Manager or certain of its affiliates may revise the terms of any existing revenue sharing arrangement, and may enter into additional revenue sharing arrangements with other financial intermediaries in the future. Revenue sharing arrangements are intended to foster the sale of Fund shares and/or to compensate financial intermediaries for assisting in marketing or promotional activities in connection with the sale of Fund shares. In exchange for revenue sharing payments, it is expected that the Fund will receive the opportunity to be sold through the financial intermediaries' sales force or gain access to third-party platforms or other marketing programs, including but not limited to “supermarket” platforms or other sales programs. Both the Manager and Fund shareholders may receive services from the financial intermediary in exchange for the revenue sharing payments. Because the Manager's management fee is based on Fund assets, to the extent that financial intermediaries receiving revenue sharing payments results in an increase in the sale of Fund shares, the Manager and/or its affiliates will benefit from the increase in Fund assets. From time to time the Manager and/or an affiliate of the Fund (and not the Fund itself) may pay certain administrative fees in order to make the Fund available to shareholders. Such fees are not included in, and are paid separate and apart from, any revenue sharing payments. Revenue sharing payments, or other similar payments, may provide an incentive for financial intermediaries and their registered representatives to recommend or sell shares of the Fund to you and in doing so may create conflicts of interest between such intermediaries' financial interests and their duties to customers. Please contact the registered representative (or the financial intermediary) who sold shares of the Fund to you for details about any payments the financial intermediary may receive from the Manager and/or certain of its affiliates.
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31

FINANCIAL HIGHLIGHTS
Introduction
The financial highlights will help you evaluate the Fund's financial performance for the fiscal years or periods indicated below. Certain information reflects financial results for a single fund share. The total return represents the rate that a shareholder would have earned (or lost) on an investment in the Fund, assuming investment at the start of the period and reinvestment of all dividends and other distributions. The information is for the periods indicated.
These financial highlights for the fiscal years ended August 31, 2021 and after were derived from the financial statements audited by PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP, an independent registered public accounting firm, whose report on those financial statements was unqualified. The information for the fiscal years or periods (as applicable) prior to the fiscal year ended August 31, 2021 was audited by another independent registered public accounting firm.
A copy of the Fund's annual report, including the Fund's audited financial statements and report of independent registered public accounting firm, is available upon request, at no charge, as described on the back cover of this Prospectus.
 
 
Year Ended August 31,
September 24,
2018(a)
through August
31,

2019
 

2022

2021

2020
Per Share Operating Performance(b):
Net Asset Value, Beginning of Period
$41.42
$39.99
$40.96
$40.00
Income (loss) from investment operations:
Net investment income (loss)
1.85
1.95
2.49
2.30
Net realized and unrealized gain (loss) on investment and foreign currency transactions
(6.23)
2.30
(0.49)
0.85
Total from investment operations
(4.38)
4.25
2.00
3.15
Less Dividends and Distributions:
Dividends from net investment income
(1.92)
(2.24)
(2.55)
(2.19)
Distributions from net realized gains
(0.48)
(0.58)
(0.42)
-
Total dividends and distributions
(2.40)
(2.82)
(2.97)
(2.19)
Net asset value, end of Period
$34.64
$41.42
$39.99
$40.96
Total Return(c):
(11.01)%
11.00%
5.24%
8.20%
 
Ratios/Supplemental Data:
Net assets, end of Period (000)
$94,396
$86,976
$34,994
$27,649
Average net assets (000)
$85,683
$58,270
$29,367
$26,467
Ratios to average net assets(d):
 
 
 
 
Expenses after waivers and/or expense reimbursement
0.53%
0.53%
0.53%
0.52%(e)
Expenses before waivers and/or expense reimbursement
0.53%
0.53%
0.53%
0.53%(e)
Net investment income (loss)
4.87%
4.76%
6.37%
6.15%(e)
Portfolio turnover rate(f)
31%
85%
57%
55%
(a)
Commencement of operations.
(b)
Calculated based on average shares outstanding during the period.
(c)
Total return is calculated assuming a purchase of a share on the first day and a sale on the last day of each period reported and includes reinvestment of dividends and
distributions, if any. Total returns may reflect adjustments to conform to GAAP. Total returns for periods less than one full year are not annualized.
(d)
Does not include expenses of the underlying funds in which the Fund invests.
(e)
Annualized.
(f)
The Fund's portfolio turnover rate is calculated in accordance with regulatory requirements, without regard to transactions involving short-term investments, certain derivatives
and in-kind transactions (if any). If such transactions were included, the Fund's portfolio turnover rate may be higher.
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PGIM Active High Yield Bond ETF

GLOSSARY
FUND Index
Bloomberg US High Yield Very Liquid Index (VLI). The Bloomberg US High Yield Very Liquid Index is a component of the US Corporate High Yield Index that is designed to track a more liquid component of the USD-denominated, high yield, fixed rate corporate bond market. The Index uses the same eligibility criteria as the US Corporate High Yield Index, but includes only the three largest bonds from each issuer that have a minimum amount outstanding of USD500mn and less than five years from issue date. The Index also limits the exposure of each issuer to 2% of the total market value and redistributes any excess market value index-wide on a pro rata basis.
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FOR MORE INFORMATION
Please read this Prospectus before you invest in the Fund and keep it for future reference. Information on the Fund's
net asset value, market price, premiums and discounts, and bid-ask spreads can be found at pgim.com/investments.
For information or shareholder questions contact:
MAIL
PGIM Investments LLC
655 Broad Street, 17th Floor
Newark NJ 07102
WEBSITE
pgim.com/investments
TELEPHONE
(888) 247-8090
(973) 802-2093
(from outside the U.S.)
E-DELIVERY
You may request e-delivery of Fund documents by contacting your financial intermediary directly or by going to
www.icsdelivery.com. Instead of receiving printed documents by mail, you will receive notification via email when
new materials are available. You can cancel your enrollment or change your email address at any time by visiting
the website address above.
The Annual and Semi-Annual Reports and the SAI contain additional information about the Fund. Shareholders may
obtain free copies of the SAI, Annual Report and Semi-Annual Report as well as other information about the Fund
and may make other shareholder inquiries through the telephone number, address and website listed above.
STATEMENT OF ADDITIONAL INFORMATION (SAI)
(incorporated by reference into this Prospectus)
SEMI-ANNUAL REPORT
ANNUAL REPORT
(contains a discussion of the market conditions and
investment strategies that significantly affected the
Fund's performance during the last fiscal year)
You can also obtain copies of Fund documents, including the SAI, from the Securities and Exchange Commission as
follows (the SEC charges a fee to copy documents):
ELECTRONIC REQUEST
publicinfo@sec.gov
VIA THE INTERNET
on the EDGAR Database at www.sec.gov
PGIM Active High Yield Bond ETF
Ticker Symbol
PHYL
Listing Exchange
NYSE Arca, Inc.
ETF1001STAT The Fund's Investment Company Act File No. 811-23324