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Prospectus | April 28, 2022
Schwab® ETFs
Schwab® Fixed-Income ETFs
Schwab® 1-5 Year Corporate Bond ETF
SCHJ
Schwab® 5-10 Year Corporate Bond ETF
SCHI
Schwab® U.S. Aggregate Bond ETF
SCHZ
Schwab® U.S. TIPS ETF
SCHP
Schwab® Short-Term U.S. Treasury ETF
SCHO
Schwab® Intermediate-Term U.S. Treasury ETF
SCHR
Schwab® Long-Term U.S. Treasury ETF
SCHQ
Principal U.S. Listing Exchange: NYSE Arca, Inc.
As with all exchange-traded funds, the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) has not approved these securities or passed on whether the information in this prospectus is adequate and accurate. Anyone who indicates otherwise is committing a federal crime.

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Schwab Fixed-Income ETFs
Fund Summaries
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Schwab® 1-5 Year Corporate Bond ETF
Ticker Symbol:
SCHJ
Investment Objective
The fund’s goal is to track as closely as possible, before fees and expenses, the total return of an index that measures the performance of the short-term U.S. corporate bond market.
Fund Fees and Expenses
This table describes the fees and expenses you may pay if you buy, hold and sell shares of the fund. You may pay other fees, such as brokerage commissions and other fees to financial intermediaries, which are not reflected in the table and Example below.
Shareholder Fees (fees paid directly from your investment)
None
Annual Fund Operating Expenses (expenses that you pay each year as a %
of the value
of your investment)
Management fees
0.04
Other expenses
None
Total annual fund operating expenses(1)
0.04
(1)
The information in the table has been restated to reflect current fees and expenses.
Example
This example is intended to help you compare the cost of investing in the fund with the cost of investing in other funds. The example assumes that you invest $10,000 in the fund for the time periods indicated and then sell all of your shares at the end of those time periods. The example also assumes that your investment has a 5% return each year and that the fund’s operating expenses remain the same. Your actual costs may be higher or lower.
Expenses on a $10,000 Investment
1 Year
3 Years
5 Years
10 Years
$ 4 $ 13 $ 23 $ 51
Portfolio Turnover
The fund pays transaction costs, such as commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or “turns over” its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover may indicate higher transaction costs and may result in higher taxes when fund shares are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are not reflected in the annual fund operating expenses or in the example, affect the fund’s performance. During the most recent fiscal year, the fund’s portfolio turnover rate was 13% of the average value of its portfolio.
Principal Investment Strategies
To pursue its goal, the fund generally invests in securities that are included in the Bloomberg US 1-5 Year Corporate Bond Index. The index measures the performance of U.S. investment grade, taxable corporate bonds with maturities greater than or equal to one year and less than five years that have $300 million or more of outstanding face value. The securities in the index must be denominated in U.S. dollars and must be fixed-rate. The index includes securities publicly issued by U.S. and non-U.S. industrial, utility and financial issuers. The index excludes certain types of securities, including contingent capital securities, inflation-linked bonds, floating-rate issues, taxable and tax-exempt municipal securities, and structured notes. The index is market capitalization weighted and the securities in the index are updated on the last business day of each month. As of December 31, 2021, there were approximately 2,316 securities in the index.
It is the fund’s policy that under normal circumstances it will invest at least 90% of its net assets (including, for this purpose, any borrowings for investment purposes) in securities included in the index. The fund will notify its shareholders at least 60 days before changing this policy.
Under normal circumstances, the fund may invest up to 10% of its net assets in securities not included in its index. The principal types of these investments include those that the investment adviser believes will help the fund track the index, such as investments in (a) securities that are not represented in the index but the investment adviser anticipates will be added to the index; (b) high-quality liquid investments, such as securities issued by the U.S. government, its agencies or instrumentalities, including obligations that are not guaranteed by the U.S. Treasury, and obligations that are issued by private issuers; (c) other investment companies; and (d) derivatives, principally futures contracts. The fund may use futures contracts and other derivatives primarily to help manage interest rate exposure. The fund may also invest in cash and cash equivalents, including money market funds, and lend its securities to minimize the difference in performance that naturally exists between an index fund and its corresponding index.
Because it may not be possible or practical to purchase all of the securities in the index, the fund’s investment adviser will seek to track the total return of the index by using sampling techniques. Sampling techniques involve investing in a limited number of index securities that, when taken together, are expected to perform similarly to the index as a whole. These techniques are based on a variety of factors, including interest rate and yield curve risk, maturity

Index ownership – Bloomberg® and Bloomberg US 1-5 Year Corporate Bond Index are service marks of Bloomberg Finance L.P. and its affiliates, including Bloomberg Index Services Limited (BISL), the administrator of the indices (collectively, Bloomberg). Bloomberg is not affiliated with Charles Schwab Investment Management, Inc., and Bloomberg does not approve, endorse, review, or recommend Schwab 1-5 Year Corporate Bond ETF. Bloomberg does not guarantee the timeliness, accurateness, or completeness of any data or information relating to Schwab 1-5 Year Corporate Bond ETF.
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exposures, industry, sector and issuer weights, credit quality, and other risk factors and characteristics. The fund expects that its portfolio will hold less than the total number of securities in the index, but reserves the right to hold as many securities as it believes necessary to achieve the fund’s investment objective. The fund may sell securities that are represented in the index in anticipation of their removal from the index. The fund generally expects that its maturity will be similar to that of the index. In addition, the fund generally expects that its weighted average duration will closely correspond to the weighted average duration of the index, which as of December 31, 2021, was 2.68 years.
The fund will concentrate its investments (i.e., hold 25% or more of its total assets) in a particular industry, group of industries or sector to approximately the same extent that its index is so concentrated. For purposes of this limitation, securities of the U.S. government (including its agencies and instrumentalities), and repurchase agreements collateralized by U.S. government securities are not considered to be issued by members of any industry.
The investment adviser seeks to achieve, over time, a correlation between the fund’s performance and that of its index, before fees and expenses, of 95% or better. However, there can be no guarantee that the fund will achieve a high degree of correlation with the index. A number of factors may affect the fund’s ability to achieve a high correlation with its index, including the degree to which the fund uses a sampling technique (or otherwise gives a different weighting to a security than the index does). The correlation between the performance of the fund and its index may also diverge due to transaction costs, asset valuations, timing variances, and differences between the fund’s portfolio and the index resulting from legal restrictions (such as diversification requirements) that apply to the fund but not to the index.
Principal Risks
The fund is subject to risks, any of which could cause an investor to lose money. The fund’s principal risks include:
Market Risk. Financial markets rise and fall in response to a variety of factors, sometimes rapidly and unpredictably. Markets may be impacted by economic, political, regulatory and other conditions, including economic sanctions and other government actions. In addition, the occurrence of global events, such as war, terrorism, environmental disasters, natural disasters and epidemics, may also negatively affect the financial markets. As with any investment whose performance is tied to these markets, the value of an investment in the fund will fluctuate, which means that an investor could lose money over short or long periods.
Investment Style Risk. The fund is an index fund. Therefore, the fund follows the securities included in the index during upturns as well as downturns. Because of its indexing strategy, the fund does not take steps to reduce market exposure or to lessen the effects of a declining market. In addition, because of the fund’s expenses, the fund’s performance may be below that of the index. Errors relating to the index may occur from time to time and may not be identified by the index provider for a period of time. In addition, market disruptions could cause delays in the index’s rebalancing schedule. Such errors and/or market disruptions may result in losses for the fund.
Interest Rate Risk. Interest rates rise and fall over time. As with any investment whose yield reflects current interest rates, the fund’s yield will change over time. During periods when interest rates are low, the fund’s yield (and total return) also may be low. Changes in interest rates also may affect the fund’s share price: a rise in interest rates generally causes the fund’s share price to fall. The longer the fund’s portfolio duration, the more sensitive to interest rate movements its share price is likely to be. Also, a change in a central bank’s monetary policy or economic conditions, among other things, may result in a change in interest rates, which could have sudden and unpredictable effects on the markets and significantly impact the value of fixed-income securities in which the fund invests. A sudden or unpredictable rise in interest rates may cause volatility and the value of fixed-income securities to decline.
Credit Risk. A decline in the credit quality of an issuer, guarantor or liquidity provider of a portfolio investment or a counterparty could cause the fund to lose money or underperform. The fund could lose money if, due to a decline in credit quality, the issuer, guarantor or liquidity provider of a portfolio investment or a counterparty fails to make, or is perceived as being unable or unwilling to make, timely principal or interest payments or otherwise honor its obligations.
Sampling Index Tracking Risk. The fund may not fully replicate the index and may hold securities not included in the index. As a result, the fund is subject to the risk that the investment adviser’s investment management strategy, the implementation of which is subject to a number of constraints, may not produce the intended results. Because the fund utilizes a sampling approach it may not track the return of the index as well as it would if the fund purchased all of the securities in the index.
Tracking Error Risk. As an index fund, the fund seeks to track the performance of the index, although it may not be successful in doing so. The divergence between the performance of the fund and the index, positive or negative, is called “tracking error.” Tracking error can be caused by many factors and it may be significant.
Non-U.S. Issuer Risk. The fund may invest in U.S.-registered, dollar-denominated bonds of non-U.S. corporations. The fund’s investments in bonds of non-U.S. issuers may involve certain risks that are greater than those associated with investments in securities of U.S. issuers. These include risks of adverse changes in foreign economic, political, regulatory and other conditions; the imposition of economic sanctions or other government restrictions; differing accounting, auditing, financial reporting and legal standards and practices; differing securities market structures; and higher transaction costs. These risks may be heightened in connection with bonds issued by non-U.S. corporations and entities in emerging markets.
Derivatives Risk. The fund’s use of derivative instruments involves risks different from, or possibly greater than, the risks associated with investing directly in securities and other traditional investments. The fund’s use of derivatives could reduce the fund’s performance, increase the fund’s volatility and cause the fund to lose more than the
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initial amount invested. In addition, investments in derivatives may involve leverage, which means a small percentage of assets invested in derivatives can have a disproportionately large impact on the fund.
Liquidity Risk. The fund may be unable to sell certain securities, such as illiquid securities, readily at a favorable time or price, or the fund may have to sell them at a loss.
Securities Lending Risk. Securities lending involves the risk of loss of rights in, or delay in recovery of, the loaned securities if the borrower fails to return the security loaned or becomes insolvent.
Concentration Risk. To the extent that the fund’s or the index’s portfolio is concentrated in the securities of issuers in a particular market, industry, group of industries, sector or asset class, the fund may be adversely affected by the performance of those securities, may be subject to increased price volatility and may be more vulnerable to adverse economic, market, political or regulatory occurrences affecting that market, industry, group of industries, sector or asset class.
Market Trading Risk. Although fund shares are listed on national securities exchanges, there can be no assurance that an active trading market for fund shares will develop or be maintained. If an active market is not maintained, investors may find it difficult to buy or sell fund shares.
Shares of the Fund May Trade at Prices Other Than NAV. Fund shares may be bought and sold in the secondary market at market prices. Although it is expected that the market price of the shares of the fund will approximate the fund’s net asset value (NAV), there may be times when the market price and the NAV vary significantly. An investor may pay more than NAV when buying shares of the fund in the secondary market, and an investor may receive less than NAV when selling those shares in the secondary market. The market price of fund shares may deviate, sometimes significantly, from NAV during periods of market volatility or market disruption.
For more information on the risks of investing in the fund, please see the “Fund Details” section in the prospectus.
Performance
The bar chart below shows how the fund’s investment results have varied from year to year, and the following table shows how the fund’s average annual total returns for various periods compared to that of an index. This information provides some indication of the risks of investing in the fund. All figures assume distributions were reinvested. Keep in mind that future performance (both before and after taxes) may differ from past performance. For current performance information, please see
www.schwabassetmanagement.com/schwabetfs_prospectus.
Annual Total Returns (%) as of 12/31
[MISSING IMAGE: oeeacpj3l3mfmb7upq019ieen8ei.jpg] 
Best Quarter: 5.31% Q2 2020
Worst Quarter: (1.90%) Q1 2020
Average Annual Total Returns as of 12/31/21
1 Year
Since
Inception
(10/10/19)
Before taxes (0.64%) 2.29%
After taxes on distributions (1.01%) 1.56%
After taxes on distributions and sale of shares (0.38%) 1.44%
Comparative Index (reflects no deduction for expenses or taxes)
Bloomberg US 1-5 Year Corporate Bond Index (0.47%) 2.43%
The after-tax figures reflect the highest individual federal income tax rates in effect during the period and do not reflect the impact of state and local taxes. Your actual after-tax returns depend on your individual tax situation. In addition, after-tax returns are not relevant if you hold your fund shares through a tax-deferred arrangement, such as a 401(k) plan, an individual retirement account (IRA) or other tax-advantaged account. In some cases, the return after taxes on distributions and sale of shares may exceed the fund’s other returns due to an assumed benefit from any losses on a sale of shares at the end of the measurement period.
Investment Adviser
Charles Schwab Investment Management, Inc., dba Schwab Asset Management™
Portfolio Managers
Matthew Hastings, CFA, Managing Director and Head of Taxable Bond Strategies, is responsible for the day-to-day co-management of the fund. He has managed the fund since 2019.
Steven Hung, Senior Portfolio Manager, is responsible for the day-to-day co-management of the fund. He has managed the fund since 2019.
Purchase and Sale of Fund Shares
The fund issues and redeems shares at its NAV only in large blocks of shares (Creation Units). These transactions are usually in exchange for a basket of securities included in the index and/or an amount of cash. As a practical matter, only Authorized Participants purchase or redeem Creation Units.
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Individual shares may only be purchased and sold in the secondary market (i.e., on a national securities exchange) through a broker or dealer at market prices. Because fund shares trade at market prices rather than at NAV, fund shares may trade at a price greater than NAV (premium) or less than NAV (discount). When buying or selling shares in the secondary market, you may incur costs attributable to the difference between the highest price a buyer is willing to pay to purchase shares of the fund (bid) and the lowest price a seller is willing to accept for shares of the fund (ask) (the “bid-ask spread”). Recent information regarding the fund’s NAV, market price, premiums and discounts, and bid-ask spreads is available at www.schwabassetmanagement.com.
Tax Information
Dividends and capital gains distributions received from the fund will generally be taxable as ordinary income or capital gains, unless you are investing through an IRA, 401(k) or other tax-advantaged account (in which case you may be taxed later, upon withdrawal of your investment from such account).
Payments to Financial Intermediaries
If you purchase shares of the fund through a broker-dealer or other financial intermediary (such as a bank), the adviser and its related companies may pay the intermediary for the sale of fund shares and related services. These payments may create a conflict of interest by influencing the broker-dealer or other financial intermediary and your salesperson to recommend the fund over another investment. Ask your salesperson or visit your financial intermediary’s website for more information.
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Schwab® 5-10 Year Corporate Bond ETF
Ticker Symbol:
SCHI
Investment Objective
The fund’s goal is to track as closely as possible, before fees and expenses, the total return of an index that measures the performance of the intermediate-term U.S. corporate bond market.
Fund Fees and Expenses
This table describes the fees and expenses you may pay if you buy, hold and sell shares of the fund. You may pay other fees, such as brokerage commissions and other fees to financial intermediaries, which are not reflected in the table and Example below.
Shareholder Fees (fees paid directly from your investment)
None
Annual Fund Operating Expenses (expenses that you pay each year as a %
of the value
of your investment)
Management fees
0.04
Other expenses
None
Total annual fund operating expenses(1)
0.04
(1)
The information in the table has been restated to reflect current fees and expenses.
Example
This example is intended to help you compare the cost of investing in the fund with the cost of investing in other funds. The example assumes that you invest $10,000 in the fund for the time periods indicated and then sell all of your shares at the end of those time periods. The example also assumes that your investment has a 5% return each year and that the fund’s operating expenses remain the same. Your actual costs may be higher or lower.
Expenses on a $10,000 Investment
1 Year
3 Years
5 Years
10 Years
$ 4 $ 13 $ 23 $ 51
Portfolio Turnover
The fund pays transaction costs, such as commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or “turns over” its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover may indicate higher transaction costs and may result in higher taxes when fund shares are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are not reflected in the annual fund operating expenses or in the example, affect the fund’s performance. During the most recent fiscal year, the fund’s portfolio turnover rate was 11% of the average value of its portfolio.
Principal Investment Strategies
To pursue its goal, the fund generally invests in securities that are included in the Bloomberg US 5-10 Year Corporate Bond Index. The index measures the performance of U.S. investment grade, taxable corporate bonds with maturities greater than or equal to five years and less than ten years that have $300 million or more of outstanding face value. The securities in the index must be denominated in U.S. dollars and must be fixed-rate. The index includes securities publicly issued by U.S. and non-U.S. industrial, utility and financial issuers. The index excludes certain types of securities, including contingent capital securities, inflation-linked bonds, floating-rate bonds, taxable and tax-exempt municipal securities, and structured notes. The index is market capitalization weighted and the securities in the index are updated on the last business day of each month. As of December 31, 2021, there were approximately 2,028 securities in the index.
It is the fund’s policy that under normal circumstances it will invest at least 90% of its net assets (including, for this purpose, any borrowings for investment purposes) in securities included in the index. The fund will notify its shareholders at least 60 days before changing this policy.
Under normal circumstances, the fund may invest up to 10% of its net assets in securities not included in its index. The principal types of these investments include those that the investment adviser believes will help the fund track the index, such as investments in (a) securities that are not represented in the index but the investment adviser anticipates will be added to the index; (b) high-quality liquid investments, such as securities issued by the U.S. government, its agencies or instrumentalities, including obligations that are not guaranteed by the U.S. Treasury, and obligations that are issued by private issuers; (c) other investment companies; and (d) derivatives, principally futures contracts. The fund may use futures contracts and other derivatives primarily to help manage interest rate exposure. The fund may also invest in cash and cash equivalents, including money market funds, and lend its securities to minimize the difference in performance that naturally exists between an index fund and its corresponding index.
Because it may not be possible or practical to purchase all of the securities in the index, the fund’s investment adviser will seek to track the total return of the index by using sampling techniques. Sampling techniques involve investing in a limited number of index securities that, when taken together, are expected to perform similarly to the index as a whole. These techniques are based on a variety of factors, including interest rate and yield curve risk, maturity

Index ownership – Bloomberg® and Bloomberg US 5-10 Year Corporate Bond Index are service marks of Bloomberg Finance L.P. and its affiliates, including Bloomberg Index Services Limited (BISL), the administrator of the indices (collectively, Bloomberg). Bloomberg is not affiliated with Charles Schwab Investment Management, Inc., and Bloomberg does not approve, endorse, review, or recommend Schwab 5-10 Year Corporate Bond ETF. Bloomberg does not guarantee the timeliness, accurateness, or completeness of any data or information relating to Schwab 5-10 Year Corporate Bond ETF.
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exposures, industry, sector and issuer weights, credit quality, and other risk factors and characteristics. The fund expects that its portfolio will hold less than the total number of securities in the index, but reserves the right to hold as many securities as it believes necessary to achieve the fund’s investment objective. The fund may sell securities that are represented in the index in anticipation of their removal from the index. The fund generally expects that its maturity will be similar to that of the index. In addition, the fund generally expects that its weighted average duration will closely correspond to the weighted average duration of the index, which as of December 31, 2021, was 6.40 years.
The fund will concentrate its investments (i.e., hold 25% or more of its total assets) in a particular industry, group of industries or sector to approximately the same extent that its index is so concentrated. For purposes of this limitation, securities of the U.S. government (including its agencies and instrumentalities), and repurchase agreements collateralized by U.S. government securities are not considered to be issued by members of any industry.
The investment adviser seeks to achieve, over time, a correlation between the fund’s performance and that of its index, before fees and expenses, of 95% or better. However, there can be no guarantee that the fund will achieve a high degree of correlation with the index. A number of factors may affect the fund’s ability to achieve a high correlation with its index, including the degree to which the fund uses a sampling technique (or otherwise gives a different weighting to a security than the index does). The correlation between the performance of the fund and its index may also diverge due to transaction costs, asset valuations, timing variances, and differences between the fund’s portfolio and the index resulting from legal restrictions (such as diversification requirements) that apply to the fund but not to the index.
Principal Risks
The fund is subject to risks, any of which could cause an investor to lose money. The fund’s principal risks include:
Market Risk. Financial markets rise and fall in response to a variety of factors, sometimes rapidly and unpredictably. Markets may be impacted by economic, political, regulatory and other conditions, including economic sanctions and other government actions. In addition, the occurrence of global events, such as war, terrorism, environmental disasters, natural disasters and epidemics, may also negatively affect the financial markets. As with any investment whose performance is tied to these markets, the value of an investment in the fund will fluctuate, which means that an investor could lose money over short or long periods.
Investment Style Risk. The fund is an index fund. Therefore, the fund follows the securities included in the index during upturns as well as downturns. Because of its indexing strategy, the fund does not take steps to reduce market exposure or to lessen the effects of a declining market. In addition, because of the fund’s expenses, the fund’s performance may be below that of the index. Errors relating to the index may occur from time to time and may not be identified by the index provider for a period of time. In addition, market disruptions could cause delays in the index’s rebalancing schedule. Such errors and/or market disruptions may result in losses for the fund.
Interest Rate Risk. Interest rates rise and fall over time. As with any investment whose yield reflects current interest rates, the fund’s yield will change over time. During periods when interest rates are low, the fund’s yield (and total return) also may be low. Changes in interest rates also may affect the fund’s share price: a rise in interest rates generally causes the fund’s share price to fall. The longer the fund’s portfolio duration, the more sensitive to interest rate movements its share price is likely to be. Also, a change in a central bank’s monetary policy or economic conditions, among other things, may result in a change in interest rates, which could have sudden and unpredictable effects on the markets and significantly impact the value of fixed-income securities in which the fund invests. A sudden or unpredictable rise in interest rates may cause volatility and the value of fixed-income securities to decline.
Credit Risk. A decline in the credit quality of an issuer, guarantor or liquidity provider of a portfolio investment or a counterparty could cause the fund to lose money or underperform. The fund could lose money if, due to a decline in credit quality, the issuer, guarantor or liquidity provider of a portfolio investment or a counterparty fails to make, or is perceived as being unable or unwilling to make, timely principal or interest payments or otherwise honor its obligations.
Sampling Index Tracking Risk. The fund may not fully replicate the index and may hold securities not included in the index. As a result, the fund is subject to the risk that the investment adviser’s investment management strategy, the implementation of which is subject to a number of constraints, may not produce the intended results. Because the fund utilizes a sampling approach it may not track the return of the index as well as it would if the fund purchased all of the securities in the index.
Tracking Error Risk. As an index fund, the fund seeks to track the performance of the index, although it may not be successful in doing so. The divergence between the performance of the fund and the index, positive or negative, is called “tracking error.” Tracking error can be caused by many factors and it may be significant.
Non-U.S. Issuer Risk. The fund may invest in U.S.-registered, dollar-denominated bonds of non-U.S. corporations. The fund’s investments in bonds of non-U.S. issuers may involve certain risks that are greater than those associated with investments in securities of U.S. issuers. These include risks of adverse changes in foreign economic, political, regulatory and other conditions; the imposition of economic sanctions or other government restrictions; differing accounting, auditing, financial reporting and legal standards and practices; differing securities market structures; and higher transaction costs. These risks may be heightened in connection with bonds issued by non-U.S. corporations and entities in emerging markets.
Derivatives Risk. The fund’s use of derivative instruments involves risks different from, or possibly greater than, the risks associated with investing directly in securities and other traditional investments. The fund’s use of derivatives could reduce the fund’s performance, increase the fund’s volatility and cause the fund to lose more than the
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initial amount invested. In addition, investments in derivatives may involve leverage, which means a small percentage of assets invested in derivatives can have a disproportionately large impact on the fund.
Liquidity Risk. The fund may be unable to sell certain securities, such as illiquid securities, readily at a favorable time or price, or the fund may have to sell them at a loss.
Securities Lending Risk. Securities lending involves the risk of loss of rights in, or delay in recovery of, the loaned securities if the borrower fails to return the security loaned or becomes insolvent.
Concentration Risk. To the extent that the fund’s or the index’s portfolio is concentrated in the securities of issuers in a particular market, industry, group of industries, sector or asset class, the fund may be adversely affected by the performance of those securities, may be subject to increased price volatility and may be more vulnerable to adverse economic, market, political or regulatory occurrences affecting that market, industry, group of industries, sector or asset class.
Market Trading Risk. Although fund shares are listed on national securities exchanges, there can be no assurance that an active trading market for fund shares will develop or be maintained. If an active market is not maintained, investors may find it difficult to buy or sell fund shares.
Shares of the Fund May Trade at Prices Other Than NAV. Fund shares may be bought and sold in the secondary market at market prices. Although it is expected that the market price of the shares of the fund will approximate the fund’s net asset value (NAV), there may be times when the market price and the NAV vary significantly. An investor may pay more than NAV when buying shares of the fund in the secondary market, and an investor may receive less than NAV when selling those shares in the secondary market. The market price of fund shares may deviate, sometimes significantly, from NAV during periods of market volatility or market disruption.
For more information on the risks of investing in the fund, please see the “Fund Details” section in the prospectus.
Performance
The bar chart below shows how the fund’s investment results have varied from year to year, and the following table shows how the fund’s average annual total returns for various periods compared to that of an index. This information provides some indication of the risks of investing in the fund. All figures assume distributions were reinvested. Keep in mind that future performance (both before and after taxes) may differ from past performance. For current performance information, please see
www.schwabassetmanagement.com/schwabetfs_prospectus.
Annual Total Returns (%) as of 12/31
[MISSING IMAGE: aku6ghrrbhs7hk0nc03l5bvomugv.jpg] 
Best Quarter: 9.74% Q2 2020
Worst Quarter: (4.02%) Q1 2021
Average Annual Total Returns as of 12/31/21
1 Year
Since
Inception
(10/10/19)
Before taxes (1.80%) 3.76%
After taxes on distributions (2.56%) 2.85%
After taxes on distributions and sale of shares (1.06%) 2.49%
Comparative Index (reflects no deduction for expenses or taxes)
Bloomberg US 5-10 Year Corporate Bond Index (1.52%) 3.90%
The after-tax figures reflect the highest individual federal income tax rates in effect during the period and do not reflect the impact of state and local taxes. Your actual after-tax returns depend on your individual tax situation. In addition, after-tax returns are not relevant if you hold your fund shares through a tax-deferred arrangement, such as a 401(k) plan, an individual retirement account (IRA) or other tax-advantaged account. In some cases, the return after taxes on distributions and sale of shares may exceed the fund’s other returns due to an assumed benefit from any losses on a sale of shares at the end of the measurement period.
Investment Adviser
Charles Schwab Investment Management, Inc., dba Schwab Asset Management™
Portfolio Managers
Matthew Hastings, CFA, Managing Director and Head of Taxable Bond Strategies, is responsible for the day-to-day co-management of the fund. He has managed the fund since 2019.
Steven Hung, Senior Portfolio Manager, is responsible for the day-to-day co-management of the fund. He has managed the fund since 2019.
Purchase and Sale of Fund Shares
The fund issues and redeems shares at its NAV only in large blocks of shares (Creation Units). These transactions are usually in exchange for a basket of securities included in the index and/or an amount of cash. As a practical matter, only Authorized Participants purchase or redeem Creation Units.
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Individual shares may only be purchased and sold in the secondary market (i.e., on a national securities exchange) through a broker or dealer at market prices. Because fund shares trade at market prices rather than at NAV, fund shares may trade at a price greater than NAV (premium) or less than NAV (discount). When buying or selling shares in the secondary market, you may incur costs attributable to the difference between the highest price a buyer is willing to pay to purchase shares of the fund (bid) and the lowest price a seller is willing to accept for shares of the fund (ask) (the “bid-ask spread”). Recent information regarding the fund’s NAV, market price, premiums and discounts, and bid-ask spreads is available at www.schwabassetmanagement.com.
Tax Information
Dividends and capital gains distributions received from the fund will generally be taxable as ordinary income or capital gains, unless you are investing through an IRA, 401(k) or other tax-advantaged account (in which case you may be taxed later, upon withdrawal of your investment from such account).
Payments to Financial Intermediaries
If you purchase shares of the fund through a broker-dealer or other financial intermediary (such as a bank), the adviser and its related companies may pay the intermediary for the sale of fund shares and related services. These payments may create a conflict of interest by influencing the broker-dealer or other financial intermediary and your salesperson to recommend the fund over another investment. Ask your salesperson or visit your financial intermediary’s website for more information.
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Schwab® U.S. Aggregate Bond ETF
Ticker Symbol:
SCHZ
Investment Objective
The fund’s goal is to track as closely as possible, before fees and expenses, the total return of an index that measures the performance of the broad U.S. investment-grade bond market.
Fund Fees and Expenses
This table describes the fees and expenses you may pay if you buy, hold and sell shares of the fund. You may pay other fees, such as brokerage commissions and other fees to financial intermediaries, which are not reflected in the table and Example below.
Shareholder Fees (fees paid directly from your investment)
None
Annual Fund Operating Expenses (expenses that you pay each year as a %
of the value of your investment)
Management fees
0.04
Other expenses
None
Total annual fund operating expenses
0.04
Example
This example is intended to help you compare the cost of investing in the fund with the cost of investing in other funds. The example assumes that you invest $10,000 in the fund for the time periods indicated and then redeem all of your shares at the end of those time periods. The example also assumes that your investment has a 5% return each year and that the fund’s operating expenses remain the same. Your actual costs may be higher or lower.
Expenses on a $10,000 Investment
1 Year
3 Years
5 Years
10 Years
$ 4 $ 13 $ 23 $ 51
Portfolio Turnover
The fund pays transaction costs, such as commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or “turns over” its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover may indicate higher transaction costs and may result in higher taxes when fund shares are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are not reflected in the annual fund operating expenses or in the example, affect the fund’s performance. During the most recent fiscal year, the fund’s portfolio turnover rate was 48% of the average value of its portfolio.
Principal Investment Strategies
To pursue its goal, the fund generally invests in securities that are included in the Bloomberg US Aggregate Bond Index. The index
is a broad-based benchmark measuring the performance of the U.S. investment grade, taxable bond market, including U.S. Treasuries, government-related and corporate bonds, mortgage pass-through securities, commercial mortgage-backed securities, and asset-backed securities that are publicly available for sale in the United States. To be eligible for inclusion in the index, securities must be fixed-rate, non-convertible, U.S. dollar denominated with at least $300 million or more of outstanding face value and have one or more years remaining to maturity. The index excludes certain types of securities, including tax-exempt state and local government series bonds, structured notes embedded with swaps or other special features, private placements, floating-rate securities, inflation-linked bonds and Eurobonds. The index is market capitalization weighted and the securities in the index are updated on the last business day of each month. As of December 31, 2021, there were approximately 12,372 securities in the index.
It is the fund’s policy that under normal circumstances it will invest at least 90% of its net assets (including, for this purpose, any borrowings for investment purposes) in securities included in the index, including TBA transactions, as defined below. The fund will notify its shareholders at least 60 days before changing this policy.
Under normal circumstances, the fund may invest up to 10% of its net assets in securities not included in its index. The principal types of these investments include those that the investment adviser believes will help the fund track the index, such as investments in (a) securities that are not represented in the index but the investment adviser anticipates will be added to the index; (b) high-quality liquid investments, such as securities issued by the U.S. government, its agencies or instrumentalities, including obligations that are not guaranteed by the U.S. Treasury, and obligations that are issued by private issuers; (c) other investment companies; and (d) derivatives, principally futures contracts. The fund may use futures contracts and other derivatives primarily to help manage interest rate exposure. The fund may also invest in cash and cash equivalents, including money market funds, and lend its securities to minimize the difference in performance that naturally exists between an index fund and its corresponding index.
Because it is not possible or practical to purchase all of the securities in the index, the fund’s investment adviser will seek to track the total return of the index by using sampling techniques. Sampling techniques involve investing in a limited number of index securities that, when taken together, are expected to perform similarly to the index as a whole. These techniques are based on a

Index ownership – Bloomberg® and Bloomberg US Aggregate Bond Index are service marks of Bloomberg Finance L.P. and its affiliates, including Bloomberg Index Services Limited (BISL), the administrator of the indices (collectively, Bloomberg). Bloomberg is not affiliated with Charles Schwab Investment Management, Inc., and Bloomberg does not approve, endorse, review, or recommend Schwab U.S. Aggregate Bond ETF. Bloomberg does not guarantee the timeliness, accurateness, or completeness of any data or information relating to Schwab U.S. Aggregate Bond ETF.
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variety of factors, including interest rate and yield curve risk, maturity exposures, industry, sector and issuer weights, credit quality, and other risk factors and characteristics. The fund expects that its portfolio will hold less than the total number of securities in the index, but reserves the right to hold as many securities as it believes necessary to achieve the fund’s investment objective. The fund may sell securities that are represented in the index in anticipation of their removal from the index. The fund generally expects that its weighted average duration will closely correspond to the weighted average duration of the index, which as of December 31, 2021, was 6.69 years.
As of December 31, 2021, approximately 27.42% of the bonds represented in the index were U.S. fixed-rate agency mortgage pass-through securities. U.S. fixed-rate agency mortgage pass-through securities are securities issued by entities such as the Government National Mortgage Association (Ginnie Mae), the Federal National Mortgage Association (Fannie Mae), and the Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation (Freddie Mac) that are backed by pools of mortgages. Most transactions in fixed-rate mortgage pass-through securities occur through standardized contracts for future delivery in which the exact mortgage pools to be delivered are not specified until a few days prior to settlement, and are often referred to as “to-be-announced transactions” or “TBA transactions.” In a TBA transaction, the buyer and seller agree upon general trade parameters such as agency, settlement date, par amount and price. The actual pools delivered generally are determined two days prior to settlement date; however, it is not anticipated that the fund will receive the pools, but will instead participate in rolling TBA transactions. The fund anticipates that it may enter into such contracts on a regular basis. This may result in a significantly higher portfolio turnover for the fund than a typical index fund. The fund, pending settlement of such contracts, will invest its assets in high-quality liquid short-term instruments, including Treasury securities and shares of money market mutual funds. The fund will assume its pro rata share of the fees and expenses of any money market fund that it may invest in, in addition to the fund’s own fees and expenses.
The fund will concentrate its investments (i.e., hold 25% or more of its total assets) in a particular industry, group of industries or sector to approximately the same extent that its index is so concentrated. For purposes of this limitation, securities of the U.S. government (including its agencies and instrumentalities), and repurchase agreements collateralized by U.S. government securities are not considered to be issued by members of any industry.
The investment adviser seeks to achieve, over time, a correlation between the fund’s performance and that of its index, before fees and expenses, of 95% or better. However, there can be no guarantee that the fund will achieve a high degree of correlation with the index. A number of factors may affect the fund’s ability to achieve a high correlation with its index, including the degree to which the fund uses a sampling technique (or otherwise gives a different weighting to a security than the index does). The correlation between the performance of the fund and its index may also diverge due to transaction costs, asset valuations, timing variances, and differences between the fund’s portfolio and the index resulting from legal restrictions (such as diversification requirements) that apply to the fund but not to the index.
Principal Risks
The fund is subject to risks, any of which could cause an investor to lose money. The fund’s principal risks include:
Market Risk. Financial markets rise and fall in response to a variety of factors, sometimes rapidly and unpredictably. Markets may be impacted by economic, political, regulatory and other conditions, including economic sanctions and other government actions. In addition, the occurrence of global events, such as war, terrorism, environmental disasters, natural disasters and epidemics, may also negatively affect the financial markets. As with any investment whose performance is tied to these markets, the value of an investment in the fund will fluctuate, which means that an investor could lose money over short or long periods.
Investment Style Risk. The fund is an index fund. Therefore, the fund follows the securities included in the index during upturns as well as downturns. Because of its indexing strategy, the fund does not take steps to reduce market exposure or to lessen the effects of a declining market. In addition, because of the fund’s expenses, the fund’s performance may be below that of the index. Errors relating to the index may occur from time to time and may not be identified by the index provider for a period of time. In addition, market disruptions could cause delays in the index’s rebalancing schedule. Such errors and/or market disruptions may result in losses for the fund.
Interest Rate Risk. Interest rates rise and fall over time. As with any investment whose yield reflects current interest rates, the fund’s yield will change over time. During periods when interest rates are low, the fund’s yield (and total return) also may be low. Changes in interest rates also may affect the fund’s share price: a rise in interest rates generally causes the fund’s share price to fall. The longer the fund’s portfolio duration, the more sensitive to interest rate movements its share price is likely to be. Also, a change in a central bank’s monetary policy or economic conditions, among other things, may result in a change in interest rates, which could have sudden and unpredictable effects on the markets and significantly impact the value of fixed-income securities in which the fund invests. A sudden or unpredictable rise in interest rates may cause volatility and the value of fixed-income securities to decline.
Credit Risk. A decline in the credit quality of an issuer, guarantor or liquidity provider of a portfolio investment or a counterparty could cause the fund to lose money or underperform. The fund could lose money if, due to a decline in credit quality, the issuer, guarantor or liquidity provider of a portfolio investment or a counterparty fails to make, or is perceived as being unable or unwilling to make, timely principal or interest payments or otherwise honor its obligations.
Sampling Index Tracking Risk. The fund may not fully replicate the index and may hold securities not included in the index. As a result, the fund is subject to the risk that the investment adviser’s investment management strategy, the implementation of which is subject to a number of constraints, may not produce the intended
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results. Because the fund utilizes a sampling approach it may not track the return of the index as well as it would if the fund purchased all of the securities in the index.
Tracking Error Risk. As an index fund, the fund seeks to track the performance of the index, although it may not be successful in doing so. The divergence between the performance of the fund and the index, positive or negative, is called “tracking error.” Tracking error can be caused by many factors and it may be significant.
Portfolio Turnover Risk. The fund may engage in frequent trading of its portfolio securities in connection with its tracking of the index, primarily due to the fund rolling over its positions in TBAs as it tracks the portion of the index represented by mortgage-backed securities. A higher portfolio turnover rate may result in increased transaction costs, which may lower the fund’s performance. A higher portfolio turnover rate can also result in an increase in taxable capital gains distributions to the fund’s shareholders.
Prepayment and Extension Risk. Certain fixed-income securities are subject to the risk that the securities may be paid off earlier or later than expected, especially during periods of falling or rising interest rates, respectively. Prepayments of obligations could cause the fund to forgo future interest income on the portion of the security’s principal repaid early and force the fund to reinvest that money at the lower prevailing interest rates. Extensions of obligations could cause the fund to exhibit additional volatility and hold securities paying lower-than-market rates of interest. Either case could hurt the fund’s performance.
Non-U.S. Issuer Risk. The fund may invest in U.S.-registered, dollar-denominated bonds of non-U.S. corporations, governments, agencies and supra-national entities. The fund’s investments in bonds of non-U.S. issuers may involve certain risks that are greater than those associated with investments in securities of U.S. issuers. These include risks of adverse changes in foreign economic, political, regulatory and other conditions; the imposition of economic sanctions or other government restrictions; differing accounting, auditing, financial reporting and legal standards and practices; differing securities market structures; and higher transaction costs. These risks may be heightened in connection with bonds issued by non-U.S. corporations and entities in emerging markets.
Derivatives Risk. The fund’s use of derivative instruments involves risks different from, or possibly greater than, the risks associated with investing directly in securities and other traditional investments. The fund’s use of derivatives could reduce the fund’s performance, increase the fund’s volatility and cause the fund to lose more than the initial amount invested. In addition, investments in derivatives may involve leverage, which means a small percentage of assets invested in derivatives can have a disproportionately large impact on the fund.
Mortgage-Backed and Mortgage Pass-Through Securities Risk. Mortgage-backed securities tend to increase in value less than other debt securities when interest rates decline, but are subject to similar or greater risk of decline in market value during periods of
rising interest rates. Certain of the mortgage-backed securities in which the fund may invest are issued or guaranteed by agencies or instrumentalities of the U.S. government but are not backed by the full faith and credit of the U.S. government. There can be no assurance that the U.S. government would provide financial support to its agencies or instrumentalities where it was not obligated to do so which can cause the fund to lose money or underperform. The risks of investing in mortgage-backed securities include, among others, interest rate risk, credit risk, prepayment risk and extension risk. Transactions in mortgage pass-through securities often occur through TBA transactions. The fund could lose money or underperform if a TBA counterparty defaults or goes bankrupt.
Liquidity Risk. The fund may be unable to sell certain securities, such as illiquid securities, readily at a favorable time or price, or the fund may have to sell them at a loss.
Securities Lending Risk. Securities lending involves the risk of loss of rights in, or delay in recovery of, the loaned securities if the borrower fails to return the security loaned or becomes insolvent.
Concentration Risk. To the extent that the fund’s or the index’s portfolio is concentrated in the securities of issuers in a particular market, industry, group of industries, sector or asset class, the fund may be adversely affected by the performance of those securities, may be subject to increased price volatility and may be more vulnerable to adverse economic, market, political or regulatory occurrences affecting that market, industry, group of industries, sector or asset class.
Market Trading Risk. Although fund shares are listed on national securities exchanges, there can be no assurance that an active trading market for fund shares will develop or be maintained. If an active market is not maintained, investors may find it difficult to buy or sell fund shares.
Shares of the Fund May Trade at Prices Other Than NAV. Fund shares may be bought and sold in the secondary market at market prices. Although it is expected that the market price of the shares of the fund will approximate the fund’s net asset value (NAV), there may be times when the market price and the NAV vary significantly. An investor may pay more than NAV when buying shares of the fund in the secondary market, and an investor may receive less than NAV when selling those shares in the secondary market. The market price of fund shares may deviate, sometimes significantly, from NAV during periods of market volatility or market disruption.
For more information on the risks of investing in the fund, please see the “Fund Details” section in the prospectus.
Performance
The bar chart below shows how the fund’s investment results have varied from year to year, and the following table shows how the fund’s average annual total returns for various periods compared to that of an index. This information provides some indication of the risks of investing in the fund. All figures assume distributions were reinvested. Keep in mind that future performance (both before and
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after taxes) may differ from past performance. For current performance information, please see
www.schwabassetmanagement.com/schwabetfs_prospectus.
Annual Total Returns (%) as of 12/31
[MISSING IMAGE: i7v7nk7nq0o9k1l4h3abpg0895gl.jpg] 
Best Quarter: 3.29% Q1 2020
Worst Quarter: (3.44%) Q1 2021
Average Annual Total Returns as of 12/31/21
1 Year
5 Years
10 Years
Before taxes
(1.74%)
3.47%
2.79%
After taxes on distributions
(2.59%)
2.40%
1.82%
After taxes on distributions and sale
of shares
(1.03%) 2.20% 1.71%
Comparative Index (reflects no deduction for expenses or taxes)
Bloomberg US Aggregate Bond Index
(1.54%) 3.57% 2.90%
The after-tax figures reflect the highest individual federal income tax rates in effect during the period and do not reflect the impact of state and local taxes. Your actual after-tax returns depend on your individual tax situation. In addition, after-tax returns are not relevant if you hold your fund shares through a tax-deferred arrangement, such as a 401(k) plan, an individual retirement account (IRA) or other tax-advantaged account. In some cases, the return after taxes on distributions and sale of shares may exceed the fund’s other returns due to an assumed benefit from any losses on a sale of shares at the end of the measurement period.
Investment Adviser
Charles Schwab Investment Management, Inc., dba Schwab Asset Management™
Portfolio Managers
Matthew Hastings, CFA, Managing Director and Head of Taxable Bond Strategies, is responsible for the day-to-day co-management of the fund. He has managed the fund since 2011.
Steven Hung, Senior Portfolio Manager, is responsible for the day-to-day co-management of the fund. He has managed the fund since 2011.
Mark McKissick, CFA, Senior Portfolio Manager, is responsible for the day-to-day co-management of the fund. He has managed the fund since 2017.
Alfonso Portillo, Jr., Senior Portfolio Manager, is responsible for the day-to-day co-management of the fund. He has managed the fund since 2011.
Purchase and Sale of Fund Shares
The fund issues and redeems shares at its NAV only in large blocks of shares (Creation Units). These transactions are usually in exchange for a basket of securities included in the index and/or an amount of cash. As a practical matter, only Authorized Participants purchase or redeem Creation Units.
Individual shares may only be purchased and sold in the secondary market (i.e., on a national securities exchange) through a broker or dealer at market prices. Because fund shares trade at market prices rather than at NAV, fund shares may trade at a price greater than NAV (premium) or less than NAV (discount). When buying or selling shares in the secondary market, you may incur costs attributable to the difference between the highest price a buyer is willing to pay to purchase shares of the fund (bid) and the lowest price a seller is willing to accept for shares of the fund (ask) (the “bid-ask spread”). Recent information regarding the fund’s NAV, market price, premiums and discounts, and bid-ask spreads is available at www.schwabassetmanagement.com.
Tax Information
Dividends and capital gains distributions received from the fund will generally be taxable as ordinary income or capital gains, unless you are investing through an IRA, 401(k) or other tax-advantaged account (in which case you may be taxed later, upon withdrawal of your investment from such account).
Payments to Financial Intermediaries
If you purchase shares of the fund through a broker-dealer or other financial intermediary (such as a bank), the adviser and its related companies may pay the intermediary for the sale of fund shares and related services. These payments may create a conflict of interest by influencing the broker-dealer or other financial intermediary and your salesperson to recommend the fund over another investment. Ask your salesperson or visit your financial intermediary’s website for more information.
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Schwab® U.S. TIPS ETF
Ticker Symbol:
SCHP
Investment Objective
The fund’s goal is to track as closely as possible, before fees and expenses, the total return of an index composed of inflation-protected U.S. Treasury securities.
Fund Fees and Expenses
This table describes the fees and expenses you may pay if you buy, hold and sell shares of the fund. You may pay other fees, such as brokerage commissions and other fees to financial intermediaries, which are not reflected in the table and Example below.
Shareholder Fees (fees paid directly from your investment)
None
Annual Fund Operating Expenses (expenses that you pay each year as a %
of the value
of your investment)
Management fees
0.05
Other expenses
None
Total annual fund operating expenses
0.05
Example
This example is intended to help you compare the cost of investing in the fund with the cost of investing in other funds. The example assumes that you invest $10,000 in the fund for the time periods indicated and then sell all of your shares at the end of those time periods. The example also assumes that your investment has a 5% return each year and that the fund’s operating expenses remain the same. Your actual costs may be higher or lower.
Expenses on a $10,000 Investment
1 Year
3 Years
5 Years
10 Years
$ 5 $ 16 $ 28 $ 64
Portfolio Turnover
The fund pays transaction costs, such as commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or “turns over” its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover may indicate higher transaction costs and may result in higher taxes when fund shares are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are not reflected in the annual fund operating expenses or in the example, affect the fund’s performance. During the most recent fiscal year, the fund’s portfolio turnover rate was 19% of the average value of its portfolio.
Principal Investment Strategies
To pursue its goal, the fund generally invests in securities that are included in the Bloomberg US Treasury Inflation-Linked Bond Index (Series-L)SM. The index includes all publicly-issued U.S. Treasury Inflation-Protected Securities (TIPS) that have at least one year remaining to maturity, are rated investment grade and have $500 million or more of outstanding face value. The TIPS in the index must be denominated in U.S. dollars and must be fixed-rate and non-convertible. The index is market capitalization weighted and the TIPS in the index are updated on the last business day of each month. As of December 31, 2021, there were 45 TIPS in the index. TIPS are publicly issued, dollar denominated U.S. Government securities issued by the U.S. Treasury that have principal and interest payments linked to an official inflation measure (as measured by the Consumer Price Index, or CPI) and their payments are supported by the full faith and credit of the United States.
It is the fund’s policy that under normal circumstances it will invest at least 90% of its net assets (including, for this purpose, any borrowings for investment purposes) in securities included in the index. The fund will notify its shareholders at least 60 days before changing this policy. The fund will generally seek to replicate the performance of the index by giving the same weight to a given security as the index does. However, when the investment adviser believes it is in the best interest of the fund, such as to avoid purchasing odd-lots (i.e., purchasing less than the usual number of shares traded for a security), for tax considerations, or to address liquidity considerations with respect to a security, the investment adviser may cause the fund’s weighting of a security to be more or less than the index’s weighting of the security.
Under normal circumstances, the fund may invest up to 10% of its net assets in securities not included in its index. The principal types of these investments include those that the investment adviser believes will help the fund track the index, such as investments in (a) securities that are not represented in the index but the investment adviser anticipates will be added to the index; (b) high-quality liquid investments, such as securities issued by the U.S. government, its agencies or instrumentalities, including obligations that are not guaranteed by the U.S. Treasury, and obligations that are issued by private issuers that are guaranteed as to principal or interest by the U.S. government, its agencies or instrumentalities; and (c) other investment companies. The fund may also invest in cash and cash equivalents, including money market funds, enter into repurchase agreements, and may lend its securities to minimize the

Index ownership – Bloomberg® and Bloomberg US Treasury Inflation-Linked Bond Index (Series-L) are service marks of Bloomberg Finance L.P. and its affiliates, including Bloomberg Index Services Limited (BISL), the administrator of the indices (collectively, Bloomberg). Bloomberg is not affiliated with Charles Schwab Investment Management, Inc., and Bloomberg does not approve, endorse, review, or recommend Schwab U.S. TIPS ETF. Bloomberg does not guarantee the timeliness, accurateness, or completeness of any data or information relating to Schwab U.S. TIPS ETF.
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difference in performance that naturally exists between an index fund and its corresponding index. The fund may sell securities that are represented in the index in anticipation of their removal from the index.
The investment adviser typically seeks to track the total return of the index by replicating the index. This means that the fund generally expects that it will hold the same securities as those included in the index. However, the investment adviser may use sampling techniques if the investment adviser believes such use will best help the fund to track its index or is otherwise in the best interest of the fund. Sampling techniques involve investing in a limited number of index securities that, when taken together, are expected to perform similarly to the index as a whole. These techniques are based on a variety of factors, including interest rate and yield curve risk, maturity exposures, and other risk factors and characteristics. When the fund uses sampling techniques, the fund generally expects that its yield, maturity and weighted average duration will be similar to those of the index.
The investment adviser seeks to achieve, over time, a correlation between the fund’s performance and that of its index, before fees and expenses, of 95% or better. However, there can be no guarantee that the fund will achieve a high degree of correlation with the index. A number of factors may affect the fund’s ability to achieve a high correlation with its index, including the degree to which the fund utilizes a sampling technique (or otherwise gives a different weighting to a security than the index does). The correlation between the performance of the fund and its index may also diverge due to transaction costs, asset valuations, timing variances, and differences between the fund’s portfolio and the index resulting from legal restrictions (such as diversification requirements) that apply to the fund but not to the index.
Principal Risks
The fund is subject to risks, any of which could cause an investor to lose money. The fund’s principal risks include:
Market Risk. Financial markets rise and fall in response to a variety of factors, sometimes rapidly and unpredictably. Markets may be impacted by economic, political, regulatory and other conditions, including economic sanctions and other government actions. In addition, the occurrence of global events, such as war, terrorism, environmental disasters, natural disasters and epidemics, may also negatively affect the financial markets. As with any investment whose performance is tied to these markets, the value of an investment in the fund will fluctuate, which means that an investor could lose money over short or long periods.
Investment Style Risk. The fund is an index fund. Therefore, the fund follows the securities included in the index during upturns as well as downturns. Because of its indexing strategy, the fund does not take steps to reduce market exposure or to lessen the effects of a declining market. In addition, because of the fund’s expenses, the fund’s performance may be below that of the index. Errors relating to the index may occur from time to time and may not be identified by the index provider for a period of time. In addition, market disruptions could cause delays in the index’s rebalancing schedule. Such errors and/or market disruptions may result in losses for the fund.
Interest Rate Risk. Interest rates rise and fall over time. As with any investment whose yield reflects current interest rates, the fund’s yield will change over time. During periods when interest rates are low, the fund’s yield (and total return) also may be low. Changes in interest rates also may affect the fund’s share price: a rise in interest rates generally causes the fund’s share price to fall. The longer the fund’s portfolio duration, the more sensitive to interest rate movements its share price is likely to be. Also, a change in a central bank’s monetary policy or economic conditions, among other things, may result in a change in interest rates, which could have sudden and unpredictable effects on the markets and significantly impact the value of fixed-income securities in which the fund invests. A sudden or unpredictable rise in interest rates may cause volatility and the value of fixed-income securities to decline.
Credit Risk. A decline in the credit quality of an issuer, guarantor or liquidity provider of a portfolio investment or a counterparty could cause the fund to lose money or underperform. The fund could lose money if, due to a decline in credit quality, the issuer, guarantor or liquidity provider of a portfolio investment or a counterparty fails to make, or is perceived as being unable or unwilling to make, timely principal or interest payments or otherwise honor its obligations.
Inflation-Protected Security Risk. The value of inflation-protected securities, including TIPS, generally will fluctuate in response to changes in “real” interest rates, generally decreasing when real interest rates rise and increasing when real interest rates fall. Real interest rates represent nominal (or stated) interest rates reduced by the expected impact of inflation. In addition, interest payments on inflation-indexed securities will generally vary up or down along with the rate of inflation.
Sampling Index Tracking Risk. To the extent the fund uses sampling techniques, the fund will not fully replicate the index and may hold securities not included in the index. As a result, the fund will be subject to the risk that the investment adviser’s investment management strategy, the implementation of which is subject to a number of constraints, may not produce the intended results. If the fund uses a sampling approach it may not track the return of the index as well as it would if the fund purchased all of the securities in the index.
Tracking Error Risk. As an index fund, the fund seeks to track the performance of the index, although it may not be successful in doing so. The divergence between the performance of the fund and the index, positive or negative, is called “tracking error.” Tracking error can be caused by many factors and it may be significant.
Liquidity Risk. The fund may be unable to sell certain securities, such as illiquid securities, readily at a favorable time or price, or the fund may have to sell them at a loss.
Securities Lending Risk. Securities lending involves the risk of loss of rights in, or delay in recovery of, the loaned securities if the borrower fails to return the security loaned or becomes insolvent.
Market Trading Risk. Although fund shares are listed on national securities exchanges, there can be no assurance that an active
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trading market for fund shares will develop or be maintained. If an active market is not maintained, investors may find it difficult to buy or sell fund shares.
Shares of the Fund May Trade at Prices Other Than NAV. Fund shares may be bought and sold in the secondary market at market prices. Although it is expected that the market price of the shares of the fund will approximate the fund’s net asset value (NAV), there may be times when the market price and the NAV vary significantly. An investor may pay more than NAV when buying shares of the fund in the secondary market, and an investor may receive less than NAV when selling those shares in the secondary market. The market price of fund shares may deviate, sometimes significantly, from NAV during periods of market volatility or market disruption.
For more information on the risks of investing in the fund, please see the “Fund Details” section in the prospectus.
Performance
The bar chart below shows how the fund’s investment results have varied from year to year, and the following table shows how the fund’s average annual total returns for various periods compared to that of an index. This information provides some indication of the risks of investing in the fund. All figures assume distributions were reinvested. Keep in mind that future performance (both before and after taxes) may differ from past performance. For current performance information, please see
www.schwabassetmanagement.com/schwabetfs_prospectus.
Annual Total Returns (%) as of 12/31
[MISSING IMAGE: vqd46s6li1ej8oue66hcl1o5fovt.jpg] 
Best Quarter: 4.42% Q1 2016
Worst Quarter: (7.02%) Q2 2013
Average Annual Total Returns as of 12/31/21
1 Year
5 Years
10 Years
Before taxes
5.80%
5.26%
3.01%
After taxes on distributions
3.92%
4.22%
2.29%
After taxes on distributions and sale
of shares
3.41% 3.60% 2.01%
Comparative Index (reflects no deduction for expenses or taxes)
Bloomberg US Treasury Inflation-Linked Bond Index (Series-L)
5.96% 5.34% 3.09%
The after-tax figures reflect the highest individual federal income tax rates in effect during the period and do not reflect the impact of state and local taxes. Your actual after-tax returns depend on
your individual tax situation. In addition, after-tax returns are not relevant if you hold your fund shares through a tax-deferred arrangement, such as a 401(k) plan, an individual retirement account (IRA) or other tax-advantaged account.
Investment Adviser
Charles Schwab Investment Management, Inc., dba Schwab Asset Management™
Portfolio Managers
Matthew Hastings, CFA, Managing Director and Head of Taxable Bond Strategies, is responsible for the day-to-day co-management of the fund. He has managed the fund since 2010.
Mark McKissick, CFA, Senior Portfolio Manager, is responsible for the day-to-day co-management of the fund. He has managed the fund since 2017.
Purchase and Sale of Fund Shares
The fund issues and redeems shares at its NAV only in large blocks of shares (Creation Units). These transactions are usually in exchange for a basket of securities included in the index and/or an amount of cash. As a practical matter, only Authorized Participants purchase or redeem Creation Units.
Individual shares may only be purchased and sold in the secondary market (i.e., on a national securities exchange) through a broker or dealer at market prices. Because fund shares trade at market prices rather than at NAV, fund shares may trade at a price greater than NAV (premium) or less than NAV (discount). When buying or selling shares in the secondary market, you may incur costs attributable to the difference between the highest price a buyer is willing to pay to purchase shares of the fund (bid) and the lowest price a seller is willing to accept for shares of the fund (ask) (the “bid-ask spread”). Recent information regarding the fund’s NAV, market price, premiums and discounts, and bid-ask spreads is available at www.schwabassetmanagement.com.
Tax Information
Dividends and capital gains distributions received from the fund will generally be taxable as ordinary income or capital gains, unless you are investing through an IRA, 401(k) or other tax-advantaged account (in which case you may be taxed later, upon withdrawal of your investment from such account).
Payments to Financial Intermediaries
If you purchase shares of the fund through a broker-dealer or other financial intermediary (such as a bank), the adviser and its related companies may pay the intermediary for the sale of fund shares and related services. These payments may create a conflict of interest by influencing the broker-dealer or other financial intermediary and your salesperson to recommend the fund over another investment. Ask your salesperson or visit your financial intermediary’s website for more information.
Schwab U.S. TIPS ETF | Fund Summary15

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Schwab® Short-Term U.S. Treasury ETF
Ticker Symbol:
SCHO
Investment Objective
The fund’s goal is to track as closely as possible, before fees and expenses, the total return of an index that measures the performance of the short-term U.S. Treasury bond market.
Fund Fees and Expenses
This table describes the fees and expenses you may pay if you buy, hold and sell shares of the fund. You may pay other fees, such as brokerage commissions and other fees to financial intermediaries, which are not reflected in the table and Example below.
Shareholder Fees (fees paid directly from your investment)
None
Annual Fund Operating Expenses (expenses that you pay each year as a %
of the value
of your investment)
Management fees
0.04
Other expenses
None
Total annual fund operating expenses(1)
0.04
(1)
The information in the table has been restated to reflect current fees and expenses.
Example
This example is intended to help you compare the cost of investing in the fund with the cost of investing in other funds. The example assumes that you invest $10,000 in the fund for the time periods indicated and then sell all of your shares at the end of those time periods. The example also assumes that your investment has a 5% return each year and that the fund’s operating expenses remain the same. Your actual costs may be higher or lower.
Expenses on a $10,000 Investment
1 Year
3 Years
5 Years
10 Years
$ 4 $ 13 $ 23 $ 51
Portfolio Turnover
The fund pays transaction costs, such as commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or “turns over” its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover may indicate higher transaction costs and may result in higher taxes when fund shares are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are not reflected in the annual fund operating expenses or in the example, affect the fund’s performance. During the most recent fiscal year, the fund’s portfolio turnover rate was 73% of the average value of its portfolio.
Principal Investment Strategies
To pursue its goal, the fund generally invests in securities that are included in the Bloomberg US Treasury 1-3 Year Index. The index includes all publicly-issued U.S. Treasury securities that have a remaining maturity of greater than or equal to one year and less than three years, are rated investment grade, and have $300 million or more of outstanding face value. The securities in the index must be denominated in U.S. dollars and must be fixed-rate and non-convertible. The index excludes U.S. Treasury stripped securities. The index is market capitalization weighted and the securities in the index are updated on the last business day of each month. As of December 31, 2021, there were 92 securities in the index.
It is the fund’s policy that under normal circumstances it will invest at least 90% of its net assets (including, for this purpose, any borrowings for investment purposes) in securities included in the index. The fund will notify its shareholders at least 60 days before changing this policy.
Under normal circumstances, the fund may invest up to 10% of its net assets in securities not included in its index. The principal types of these investments include those that the investment adviser believes will help the fund track the index, such as investments in (a) securities that are not represented in the index but the investment adviser anticipates will be added to the index; (b) high-quality liquid investments, such as securities issued by the U.S. government, its agencies or instrumentalities, including obligations that are not guaranteed by the U.S. Treasury, and obligations that are issued by private issuers that are guaranteed as to principal or interest by the U.S. government, its agencies or instrumentalities; and (c) other investment companies. The fund may also invest in cash and cash equivalents, including money market funds, enter into repurchase agreements, and may lend its securities to minimize the difference in performance that naturally exists between an index fund and its corresponding index.
Because it may not be possible or practical to purchase all of the securities in the index, the investment adviser will seek to track the total return of the index by using sampling techniques. Sampling techniques involve investing in a limited number of index securities that, when taken together, are expected to perform similarly to the index as a whole. These techniques are based on a variety of factors, including interest rate and yield curve risk, maturity exposures, and other risk factors and characteristics. The fund generally expects that its portfolio will hold less than the total number of securities in the index, but reserves the right to hold as

Index ownership – Bloomberg® and Bloomberg US Treasury 1-3 Year Index are service marks of Bloomberg Finance L.P. and its affiliates, including Bloomberg Index Services Limited (BISL), the administrator of the indices (collectively, Bloomberg). Bloomberg is not affiliated with Charles Schwab Investment Management, Inc., and Bloomberg does not approve, endorse, review, or recommend Schwab Short-Term U.S. Treasury ETF. Bloomberg does not guarantee the timeliness, accurateness, or completeness of any data or information relating to Schwab Short-Term U.S. Treasury ETF.
16Schwab Short-Term U.S. Treasury ETF | Fund Summary

TABLE OF CONTENTS
many securities as it believes necessary to achieve the fund’s investment objective. The fund may sell securities that are represented in the index in anticipation of their removal from the index. The fund generally expects that its yield and maturity will be similar to those of the index. In addition, the fund generally expects that its weighted average duration will closely correspond to the weighted average duration of the index, which as of December 31, 2021, was 1.89 years.
The investment adviser seeks to achieve, over time, a correlation between the fund’s performance and that of its index, before fees and expenses, of 95% or better. However, there can be no guarantee that the fund will achieve a high degree of correlation with the index. A number of factors may affect the fund’s ability to achieve a high correlation with its index, including the degree to which the fund utilizes a sampling technique (or otherwise gives a different weighting to a security than the index does). The correlation between the performance of the fund and its index may also diverge due to transaction costs, asset valuations, timing variances, and differences between the fund’s portfolio and the index resulting from legal restrictions (such as diversification requirements) that apply to the fund but not to the index.
Principal Risks
The fund is subject to risks, any of which could cause an investor to lose money. The fund’s principal risks include:
Market Risk. Financial markets rise and fall in response to a variety of factors, sometimes rapidly and unpredictably. Markets may be impacted by economic, political, regulatory and other conditions, including economic sanctions and other government actions. In addition, the occurrence of global events, such as war, terrorism, environmental disasters, natural disasters and epidemics, may also negatively affect the financial markets. As with any investment whose performance is tied to these markets, the value of an investment in the fund will fluctuate, which means that an investor could lose money over short or long periods.
Investment Style Risk. The fund is an index fund. Therefore, the fund follows the securities included in the index during upturns as well as downturns. Because of its indexing strategy, the fund does not take steps to reduce market exposure or to lessen the effects of a declining market. In addition, because of the fund’s expenses, the fund’s performance may be below that of the index. Errors relating to the index may occur from time to time and may not be identified by the index provider for a period of time. In addition, market disruptions could cause delays in the index’s rebalancing schedule. Such errors and/or market disruptions may result in losses for the fund.
Interest Rate Risk. Interest rates rise and fall over time. As with any investment whose yield reflects current interest rates, the fund’s yield will change over time. During periods when interest rates are low, the fund’s yield (and total return) also may be low. Changes in interest rates also may affect the fund’s share price: a rise in interest rates generally causes the fund’s share price to fall. The longer the fund’s portfolio duration, the more sensitive to interest rate movements its share price is likely to be. Also, a change in a
central bank’s monetary policy or economic conditions, among other things, may result in a change in interest rates, which could have sudden and unpredictable effects on the markets and significantly impact the value of fixed-income securities in which the fund invests. A sudden or unpredictable rise in interest rates may cause volatility and the value of fixed-income securities to decline.
Credit Risk. A decline in the credit quality of an issuer, guarantor or liquidity provider of a portfolio investment or a counterparty could cause the fund to lose money or underperform. The fund could lose money if, due to a decline in credit quality, the issuer, guarantor or liquidity provider of a portfolio investment or a counterparty fails to make, or is perceived as being unable or unwilling to make, timely principal or interest payments or otherwise honor its obligations.
Sampling Index Tracking Risk. The fund may not fully replicate the index and may hold securities not included in the index. As a result, the fund is subject to the risk that the investment adviser’s investment management strategy, the implementation of which is subject to a number of constraints, may not produce the intended results. Because the fund utilizes a sampling approach it may not track the return of the index as well as it would if the fund purchased all of the securities in the index.
Tracking Error Risk. As an index fund, the fund seeks to track the performance of the index, although it may not be successful in doing so. The divergence between the performance of the fund and the index, positive or negative, is called “tracking error.” Tracking error can be caused by many factors and it may be significant.
Liquidity Risk. The fund may be unable to sell certain securities, such as illiquid securities, readily at a favorable time or price, or the fund may have to sell them at a loss.
Securities Lending Risk. Securities lending involves the risk of loss of rights in, or delay in recovery of, the loaned securities if the borrower fails to return the security loaned or becomes insolvent.
Market Trading Risk. Although fund shares are listed on national securities exchanges, there can be no assurance that an active trading market for fund shares will develop or be maintained. If an active market is not maintained, investors may find it difficult to buy or sell fund shares.
Shares of the Fund May Trade at Prices Other Than NAV. Fund shares may be bought and sold in the secondary market at market prices. Although it is expected that the market price of the shares of the fund will approximate the fund’s net asset value (NAV), there may be times when the market price and the NAV vary significantly. An investor may pay more than NAV when buying shares of the fund in the secondary market, and an investor may receive less than NAV when selling those shares in the secondary market. The market price of fund shares may deviate, sometimes significantly, from NAV during periods of market volatility or market disruption.
For more information on the risks of investing in the fund, please see the “Fund Details” section in the prospectus.
Schwab Short-Term U.S. Treasury ETF | Fund Summary17

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Performance
The bar chart below shows how the fund’s investment results have varied from year to year, and the following table shows how the fund’s average annual total returns for various periods compared to that of an index. This information provides some indication of the risks of investing in the fund. All figures assume distributions were reinvested. Keep in mind that future performance (both before and after taxes) may differ from past performance. For current performance information, please see
www.schwabassetmanagement.com/schwabetfs_prospectus.
Annual Total Returns (%) as of 12/31
[MISSING IMAGE: lai1d75efuc7vqg2504b2jbt7klv.jpg] 
Best Quarter: 2.83% Q1 2020
Worst Quarter: (0.60%) Q4 2021
Average Annual Total Returns as of 12/31/21
1 Year
5 Years
10 Years
Before taxes
(0.66%)
1.55%
1.01%
After taxes on distributions
(0.83%)
0.98%
0.62%
After taxes on distributions and sale
of shares
(0.39%) 0.94% 0.60%
Comparative Index (reflects no deduction for expenses or taxes)
Bloomberg US Treasury 1-3 Year Index
(0.60%) 1.61% 1.09%
The after-tax figures reflect the highest individual federal income tax rates in effect during the period and do not reflect the impact of state and local taxes. Your actual after-tax returns depend on your individual tax situation. In addition, after-tax returns are not relevant if you hold your fund shares through a tax-deferred arrangement, such as a 401(k) plan, an individual retirement account (IRA) or other tax-advantaged account. In some cases, the return after taxes on distributions and sale of shares may exceed the fund’s other returns due to an assumed benefit from any losses on a sale of shares at the end of the measurement period.
Investment Adviser
Charles Schwab Investment Management, Inc., dba Schwab Asset Management™
Portfolio Managers
Matthew Hastings, CFA, Managing Director and Head of Taxable Bond Strategies, is responsible for the day-to-day co-management of the fund. He has managed the fund since 2010.
Mark McKissick, CFA, Senior Portfolio Manager, is responsible for the day-to-day co-management of the fund. He has managed the fund since 2017.
Purchase and Sale of Fund Shares
The fund issues and redeems shares at its NAV only in large blocks of shares (Creation Units). These transactions are usually in exchange for a basket of securities included in the index and/or an amount of cash. As a practical matter, only Authorized Participants purchase or redeem Creation Units.
Individual shares may only be purchased and sold in the secondary market (i.e., on a national securities exchange) through a broker or dealer at market prices. Because fund shares trade at market prices rather than at NAV, fund shares may trade at a price greater than NAV (premium) or less than NAV (discount). When buying or selling shares in the secondary market, you may incur costs attributable to the difference between the highest price a buyer is willing to pay to purchase shares of the fund (bid) and the lowest price a seller is willing to accept for shares of the fund (ask) (the “bid-ask spread”). Recent information regarding the fund’s NAV, market price, premiums and discounts, and bid-ask spreads is available at www.schwabassetmanagement.com.
Tax Information
Dividends and capital gains distributions received from the fund will generally be taxable as ordinary income or capital gains, unless you are investing through an IRA, 401(k) or other tax-advantaged account (in which case you may be taxed later, upon withdrawal of your investment from such account).
Payments to Financial Intermediaries
If you purchase shares of the fund through a broker-dealer or other financial intermediary (such as a bank), the adviser and its related companies may pay the intermediary for the sale of fund shares and related services. These payments may create a conflict of interest by influencing the broker-dealer or other financial intermediary and your salesperson to recommend the fund over another investment. Ask your salesperson or visit your financial intermediary’s website for more information.
18Schwab Short-Term U.S. Treasury ETF | Fund Summary

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Schwab® Intermediate-Term U.S. Treasury ETF
Ticker Symbol:
SCHR
Investment Objective
The fund’s goal is to track as closely as possible, before fees and expenses, the total return of an index that measures the performance of the intermediate-term U.S. Treasury bond market.
Fund Fees and Expenses
This table describes the fees and expenses you may pay if you buy, hold and sell shares of the fund. You may pay other fees, such as brokerage commissions and other fees to financial intermediaries, which are not reflected in the table and Example below.
Shareholder Fees (fees paid directly from your investment)
None
Annual Fund Operating Expenses (expenses that you pay each year as a %
of the value
of your investment)
Management fees
0.04
Other expenses
None
Total annual fund operating expenses(1)
0.04
(1)
The information in the table has been restated to reflect current fees and expenses.
Example
This example is intended to help you compare the cost of investing in the fund with the cost of investing in other funds. The example assumes that you invest $10,000 in the fund for the time periods indicated and then sell all of your shares at the end of those time periods. The example also assumes that your investment has a 5% return each year and that the fund’s operating expenses remain the same. Your actual costs may be higher or lower.
Expenses on a $10,000 Investment
1 Year
3 Years
5 Years
10 Years
$ 4 $ 13 $ 23 $ 51
Portfolio Turnover
The fund pays transaction costs, such as commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or “turns over” its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover may indicate higher transaction costs and may result in higher taxes when fund shares are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are not reflected in the annual fund operating expenses or in the example, affect the fund’s performance. During the most recent fiscal year, the fund’s portfolio turnover rate was 56% of the average value of its portfolio.
Principal Investment Strategies
To pursue its goal, the fund generally invests in securities that are included in the Bloomberg US Treasury 3-10 Year Index. The index includes all publicly-issued U.S. Treasury securities that have a remaining maturity of greater than or equal to three years and less than ten years, are rated investment grade, and have $300 million or more of outstanding face value. The securities in the index must be denominated in U.S. dollars and must be fixed-rate and non-convertible. The index excludes U.S. Treasury stripped securities. The index is market capitalization weighted and the securities in the index are updated on the last business day of each month. As of December 31, 2021, there were 114 securities in the index.
It is the fund’s policy that under normal circumstances it will invest at least 90% of its net assets (including, for this purpose, any borrowings for investment purposes) in securities included in the index. The fund will notify its shareholders at least 60 days before changing this policy.
Under normal circumstances, the fund may invest up to 10% of its net assets in securities not included in its index. The principal types of these investments include those that the investment adviser believes will help the fund track the index, such as investments in (a) securities that are not represented in the index but the investment adviser anticipates will be added to the index; (b) high-quality liquid investments, such as securities issued by the U.S. government, its agencies or instrumentalities, including obligations that are not guaranteed by the U.S. Treasury, and obligations that are issued by private issuers that are guaranteed as to principal or interest by the U.S. government, its agencies or instrumentalities; and (c) other investment companies. The fund may also invest in cash and cash equivalents, including money market funds, enter into repurchase agreements, and may lend its securities to minimize the difference in performance that naturally exists between an index fund and its corresponding index.
Because it may not be possible or practical to purchase all of the securities in the index, the investment adviser will seek to track the total return of the index by using sampling techniques. Sampling techniques involve investing in a limited number of index securities that, when taken together, are expected to perform similarly to the index as a whole. These techniques are based on a variety of factors, including interest rate and yield curve risk, maturity exposures, and other risk factors and characteristics. The fund generally expects that its portfolio will hold less than the total number of securities in the index, but reserves the right to hold as

Index ownership – Bloomberg® and Bloomberg US Treasury 3-10 Year Index are service marks of Bloomberg Finance L.P. and its affiliates, including Bloomberg Index Services Limited (BISL), the administrator of the indices (collectively, Bloomberg). Bloomberg is not affiliated with Charles Schwab Investment Management, Inc., and Bloomberg does not approve, endorse, review, or recommend Schwab Intermediate-Term U.S. Treasury ETF. Bloomberg does not guarantee the timeliness, accurateness, or completeness of any data or information relating to Schwab Intermediate-Term U.S. Treasury ETF.
Schwab Intermediate-Term U.S. Treasury ETF | Fund Summary19

TABLE OF CONTENTS
many securities as it believes necessary to achieve the fund’s investment objective. The fund may sell securities that are represented in the index in anticipation of their removal from the index. The fund generally expects that its yield and maturity will be similar to those of the index. In addition, the fund generally expects that its weighted average duration will closely correspond to the weighted average duration of the index, which as of December 31, 2021, was 5.39 years.
The investment adviser seeks to achieve, over time, a correlation between the fund’s performance and that of its index, before fees and expenses, of 95% or better. However, there can be no guarantee that the fund will achieve a high degree of correlation with the index. A number of factors may affect the fund’s ability to achieve a high correlation with its index, including the degree to which the fund utilizes a sampling technique (or otherwise gives a different weighting to a security than the index does). The correlation between the performance of the fund and its index may also diverge due to transaction costs, asset valuations, timing variances, and differences between the fund’s portfolio and the index resulting from legal restrictions (such as diversification requirements) that apply to the fund but not to the index.
Principal Risks
The fund is subject to risks, any of which could cause an investor to lose money. The fund’s principal risks include:
Market Risk. Financial markets rise and fall in response to a variety of factors, sometimes rapidly and unpredictably. Markets may be impacted by economic, political, regulatory and other conditions, including economic sanctions and other government actions. In addition, the occurrence of global events, such as war, terrorism, environmental disasters, natural disasters and epidemics, may also negatively affect the financial markets. As with any investment whose performance is tied to these markets, the value of an investment in the fund will fluctuate, which means that an investor could lose money over short or long periods.
Investment Style Risk. The fund is an index fund. Therefore, the fund follows the securities included in the index during upturns as well as downturns. Because of its indexing strategy, the fund does not take steps to reduce market exposure or to lessen the effects of a declining market. In addition, because of the fund’s expenses, the fund’s performance may be below that of the index. Errors relating to the index may occur from time to time and may not be identified by the index provider for a period of time. In addition, market disruptions could cause delays in the index’s rebalancing schedule. Such errors and/or market disruptions may result in losses for the fund.
Interest Rate Risk. Interest rates rise and fall over time. As with any investment whose yield reflects current interest rates, the fund’s yield will change over time. During periods when interest rates are low, the fund’s yield (and total return) also may be low. Changes in interest rates also may affect the fund’s share price: a rise in interest rates generally causes the fund’s share price to fall. The longer the fund’s portfolio duration, the more sensitive to interest rate movements its share price is likely to be. Also, a change in a
central bank’s monetary policy or economic conditions, among other things, may result in a change in interest rates, which could have sudden and unpredictable effects on the markets and significantly impact the value of fixed-income securities in which the fund invests. A sudden or unpredictable rise in interest rates may cause volatility and the value of fixed-income securities to decline.
Credit Risk. A decline in the credit quality of an issuer, guarantor or liquidity provider of a portfolio investment or a counterparty could cause the fund to lose money or underperform. The fund could lose money if, due to a decline in credit quality, the issuer, guarantor or liquidity provider of a portfolio investment or a counterparty fails to make, or is perceived as being unable or unwilling to make, timely principal or interest payments or otherwise honor its obligations.
Sampling Index Tracking Risk. The fund may not fully replicate the index and may hold securities not included in the index. As a result, the fund is subject to the risk that the investment adviser’s investment management strategy, the implementation of which is subject to a number of constraints, may not produce the intended results. Because the fund utilizes a sampling approach it may not track the return of the index as well as it would if the fund purchased all of the securities in the index.
Tracking Error Risk. As an index fund, the fund seeks to track the performance of the index, although it may not be successful in doing so. The divergence between the performance of the fund and the index, positive or negative, is called “tracking error.” Tracking error can be caused by many factors and it may be significant.
Liquidity Risk. The fund may be unable to sell certain securities, such as illiquid securities, readily at a favorable time or price, or the fund may have to sell them at a loss.
Securities Lending Risk. Securities lending involves the risk of loss of rights in, or delay in recovery of, the loaned securities if the borrower fails to return the security loaned or becomes insolvent.
Market Trading Risk. Although fund shares are listed on national securities exchanges, there can be no assurance that an active trading market for fund shares will develop or be maintained. If an active market is not maintained, investors may find it difficult to buy or sell fund shares.
Shares of the Fund May Trade at Prices Other Than NAV. Fund shares may be bought and sold in the secondary market at market prices. Although it is expected that the market price of the shares of the fund will approximate the fund’s net asset value (NAV), there may be times when the market price and the NAV vary significantly. An investor may pay more than NAV when buying shares of the fund in the secondary market, and an investor may receive less than NAV when selling those shares in the secondary market. The market price of fund shares may deviate, sometimes significantly, from NAV during periods of market volatility or market disruption.
For more information on the risks of investing in the fund, please see the “Fund Details” section in the prospectus.
20Schwab Intermediate-Term U.S. Treasury ETF | Fund Summary

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Performance
The bar chart below shows how the fund’s investment results have varied from year to year, and the following table shows how the fund’s average annual total returns for various periods compared to that of an index. This information provides some indication of the risks of investing in the fund. All figures assume distributions were reinvested. Keep in mind that future performance (both before and after taxes) may differ from past performance. For current performance information, please see
www.schwabassetmanagement.com/schwabetfs_prospectus.
Annual Total Returns (%) as of 12/31
[MISSING IMAGE: fio37p87ajekm6bja7m3rcpm8v72.jpg] 
Best Quarter: 7.15% Q1 2020
Worst Quarter: (3.36%) Q4 2016
Average Annual Total Returns as of 12/31/21
1 Year
5 Years
10 Years
Before taxes
(2.57%)
2.78%
2.05%
After taxes on distributions
(2.96%)
2.05%
1.41%
After taxes on distributions and sale
of shares
(1.52%) 1.81% 1.29%
Comparative Index (reflects no deduction for expenses or taxes)
Bloomberg US Treasury 3-10 Year Index
(2.49%) 2.84% 2.13%
The after-tax figures reflect the highest individual federal income tax rates in effect during the period and do not reflect the impact of state and local taxes. Your actual after-tax returns depend on your individual tax situation. In addition, after-tax returns are not relevant if you hold your fund shares through a tax-deferred arrangement, such as a 401(k) plan, an individual retirement account (IRA) or other tax-advantaged account. In some cases, the return after taxes on distributions and sale of shares may exceed the fund’s other returns due to an assumed benefit from any losses on a sale of shares at the end of the measurement period.
Investment Adviser
Charles Schwab Investment Management, Inc., dba Schwab Asset Management™
Portfolio Managers
Matthew Hastings, CFA, Managing Director and Head of Taxable Bond Strategies, is responsible for the day-to-day co-management of the fund. He has managed the fund since 2010.
Mark McKissick, CFA, Senior Portfolio Manager, is responsible for the day-to-day co-management of the fund. He has managed the fund since 2017.
Purchase and Sale of Fund Shares
The fund issues and redeems shares at its NAV only in large blocks of shares (Creation Units). These transactions are usually in exchange for a basket of securities included in the index and/or an amount of cash. As a practical matter, only Authorized Participants purchase or redeem Creation Units.
Individual shares may only be purchased and sold in the secondary market (i.e., on a national securities exchange) through a broker or dealer at market prices. Because fund shares trade at market prices rather than at NAV, fund shares may trade at a price greater than NAV (premium) or less than NAV (discount). When buying or selling shares in the secondary market, you may incur costs attributable to the difference between the highest price a buyer is willing to pay to purchase shares of the fund (bid) and the lowest price a seller is willing to accept for shares of the fund (ask) (the “bid-ask spread”). Recent information regarding the fund’s NAV, market price, premiums and discounts, and bid-ask spreads is available at www.schwabassetmanagement.com.
Tax Information
Dividends and capital gains distributions received from the fund will generally be taxable as ordinary income or capital gains, unless you are investing through an IRA, 401(k) or other tax-advantaged account (in which case you may be taxed later, upon withdrawal of your investment from such account).
Payments to Financial Intermediaries
If you purchase shares of the fund through a broker-dealer or other financial intermediary (such as a bank), the adviser and its related companies may pay the intermediary for the sale of fund shares and related services. These payments may create a conflict of interest by influencing the broker-dealer or other financial intermediary and your salesperson to recommend the fund over another investment. Ask your salesperson or visit your financial intermediary’s website for more information.
Schwab Intermediate-Term U.S. Treasury ETF | Fund Summary21

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Schwab® Long-Term U.S. Treasury ETF
Ticker Symbol:
SCHQ
Investment Objective
The fund’s goal is to track as closely as possible, before fees and expenses, the total return of an index that measures the performance of the long-term U.S. Treasury bond market.
Fund Fees and Expenses
This table describes the fees and expenses you may pay if you buy, hold and sell shares of the fund. You may pay other fees, such as brokerage commissions and other fees to financial intermediaries, which are not reflected in the table and Example below.
Shareholder Fees (fees paid directly from your investment)
None
Annual Fund Operating Expenses (expenses that you pay each year as a %
of the value
of your investment)
Management fees
0.04
Other expenses
None
Total annual fund operating expenses(1)
0.04
(1)
The information in the table has been restated to reflect current fees and expenses.
Example
This example is intended to help you compare the cost of investing in the fund with the cost of investing in other funds. The example assumes that you invest $10,000 in the fund for the time periods indicated and then sell all of your shares at the end of those time periods. The example also assumes that your investment has a 5% return each year and that the fund’s operating expenses remain the same. Your actual costs may be higher or lower.
Expenses on a $10,000 Investment
1 Year
3 Years
5 years
10 Years
$ 4 $ 13 $ 23 $ 51
Portfolio Turnover
The fund pays transaction costs, such as commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or “turns over” its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover may indicate higher transaction costs and may result in higher taxes when fund shares are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are not reflected in the annual fund operating expenses or in the example, affect the fund’s performance. During the most recent fiscal year, the fund’s portfolio turnover rate was 68% of the average value of its portfolio.
Principal Investment Strategies
To pursue its goal, the fund generally invests in securities that are included in the Bloomberg US Long Treasury Index. The index includes all publicly issued, U.S. Treasury securities that have a remaining maturity of ten or more years, are rated investment grade, and have $300 million or more of outstanding face value. The securities in the index must be denominated in U.S. dollars and must be fixed-rate and non-convertible. The index excludes U.S. Treasury stripped securities. The index is market capitalization weighted and the securities in the index are updated on the last business day of each month. As of December 31, 2021, there were 64 securities in the index.
It is the fund’s policy that under normal circumstances it will invest at least 90% of its net assets (including, for this purpose, any borrowings for investment purposes) in securities included in the index. The fund will notify its shareholders at least 60 days before changing this policy.
Under normal circumstances, the fund may invest up to 10% of its net assets in securities not included in its index. The principal types of these investments include those that the investment adviser believes will help the fund track the index, such as investments in (a) securities that are not represented in the index but the investment adviser anticipates will be added to the index; (b) high-quality liquid investments, such as securities issued by the U.S. government, its agencies or instrumentalities, including obligations that are not guaranteed by the U.S. Treasury, and obligations that are issued by private issuers that are guaranteed as to principal or interest by the U.S. government, its agencies or instrumentalities; and (c) other investment companies. The fund may also invest in cash and cash equivalents, including money market funds, enter into repurchase agreements, and may lend its securities to minimize the difference in performance that naturally exists between an index fund and its corresponding index.
Because it may not be possible or practical to purchase all of the securities in the index, the investment adviser will seek to track the total return of the index by using sampling techniques. Sampling techniques involve investing in a limited number of index securities that, when taken together, are expected to perform similarly to the index as a whole. These techniques are based on a variety of factors, including interest rate and yield curve risk, maturity exposures, and other risk factors and characteristics. The fund generally expects that its portfolio will hold less than the total number of securities in the index, but reserves the right to hold as many securities as it believes necessary to achieve the fund’s

Index ownership – Bloomberg® and Bloomberg US Long Treasury Index are service marks of Bloomberg Finance L.P. and its affiliates, including Bloomberg Index Services Limited (BISL), the administrator of the indices (collectively, Bloomberg). Bloomberg is not affiliated with Charles Schwab Investment Management, Inc., and Bloomberg does not approve, endorse, review, or recommend Schwab Long-Term U.S. Treasury ETF. Bloomberg does not guarantee the timeliness, accurateness, or completeness of any data or information relating to Schwab Long-Term U.S. Treasury ETF.
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investment objective. The fund may sell securities that are represented in the index in anticipation of their removal from the index. The fund generally expects that its yield and maturity will be similar to those of the index. In addition, the fund generally expects that its weighted average duration will closely correspond to the weighted average duration of the index, which as of December 31, 2021, was 18.58 years.
The investment adviser seeks to achieve, over time, a correlation between the fund’s performance and that of its index, before fees and expenses, of 95% or better. However, there can be no guarantee that the fund will achieve a high degree of correlation with the index. A number of factors may affect the fund’s ability to achieve a high correlation with its index, including the degree to which the fund utilizes a sampling technique (or otherwise gives a different weighting to a security than the index does). The correlation between the performance of the fund and its index may also diverge due to transaction costs, asset valuations, timing variances, and differences between the fund’s portfolio and the index resulting from legal restrictions (such as diversification requirements) that apply to the fund but not to the index.
Principal Risks
The fund is subject to risks, any of which could cause an investor to lose money. The fund’s principal risks include:
Market Risk. Financial markets rise and fall in response to a variety of factors, sometimes rapidly and unpredictably. Markets may be impacted by economic, political, regulatory and other conditions, including economic sanctions and other government actions. In addition, the occurrence of global events, such as war, terrorism, environmental disasters, natural disasters and epidemics, may also negatively affect the financial markets. As with any investment whose performance is tied to these markets, the value of an investment in the fund will fluctuate, which means that an investor could lose money over short or long periods.
Investment Style Risk. The fund is an index fund. Therefore, the fund follows the securities included in the index during upturns as well as downturns. Because of its indexing strategy, the fund does not take steps to reduce market exposure or to lessen the effects of a declining market. In addition, because of the fund’s expenses, the fund’s performance may be below that of the index. Errors relating to the index may occur from time to time and may not be identified by the index provider for a period of time. In addition, market disruptions could cause delays in the index’s rebalancing schedule. Such errors and/or market disruptions may result in losses for the fund.
Interest Rate Risk. Interest rates rise and fall over time. As with any investment whose yield reflects current interest rates, the fund’s yield will change over time. During periods when interest rates are low, the fund’s yield (and total return) also may be low. Changes in interest rates also may affect the fund’s share price: a rise in interest rates generally causes the fund’s share price to fall. The longer the fund’s portfolio duration, the more sensitive to interest rate movements its share price is likely to be. Also, a change in a central bank’s monetary policy or economic conditions, among
other things, may result in a change in interest rates, which could have sudden and unpredictable effects on the markets and significantly impact the value of fixed-income securities in which the fund invests. A sudden or unpredictable rise in interest rates may cause volatility and the value of fixed-income securities to decline.
Credit Risk. A decline in the credit quality of an issuer, guarantor or liquidity provider of a portfolio investment or a counterparty could cause the fund to lose money or underperform. The fund could lose money if, due to a decline in credit quality, the issuer, guarantor or liquidity provider of a portfolio investment or a counterparty fails to make, or is perceived as being unable or unwilling to make, timely principal or interest payments or otherwise honor its obligations.
Sampling Index Tracking Risk. To the extent the fund uses sampling techniques, the fund will not fully replicate the index and may hold securities not included in the index. As a result, the fund will be subject to the risk that the investment adviser’s investment management strategy, the implementation of which is subject to a number of constraints, may not produce the intended results. If the fund uses a sampling approach it may not track the return of the index as well as it would if the fund purchased all of the securities in the index.
Tracking Error Risk. As an index fund, the fund seeks to track the performance of the index, although it may not be successful in doing so. The divergence between the performance of the fund and the index, positive or negative, is called “tracking error.” Tracking error can be caused by many factors and it may be significant.
Liquidity Risk. The fund may be unable to sell certain securities, such as illiquid securities, readily at a favorable time or price, or the fund may have to sell them at a loss.
Securities Lending Risk. Securities lending involves the risk of loss of rights in, or delay in recovery of, the loaned securities if the borrower fails to return the security loaned or becomes insolvent.
Market Trading Risk. Although fund shares are listed on national securities exchanges, there can be no assurance that an active trading market for fund shares will develop or be maintained. If an active market is not maintained, investors may find it difficult to buy or sell fund shares.
Shares of the Fund May Trade at Prices Other Than NAV. Fund shares may be bought and sold in the secondary market at market prices. Although it is expected that the market price of the shares of the fund will approximate the fund’s net asset value (NAV), there may be times when the market price and the NAV vary significantly. An investor may pay more than NAV when buying shares of the fund in the secondary market, and an investor may receive less than NAV when selling those shares in the secondary market. The market price of fund shares may deviate, sometimes significantly, from NAV during periods of market volatility or market disruption.
For more information on the risks of investing in the fund, please see the “Fund Details” section in the prospectus.
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Performance
The bar chart below shows how the fund’s investment results have varied from year to year, and the following table shows how the fund’s average annual total returns for various periods compared to that of an index. This information provides some indication of the risks of investing in the fund. All figures assume distributions were reinvested. Keep in mind that future performance (both before and after taxes) may differ from past performance. For current performance information, please see
www.schwabassetmanagement.com/schwabetfs_prospectus.
Annual Total Returns (%) as of 12/31
[MISSING IMAGE: m1jrsfunjvbbflpp08usi8nh5su3.jpg] 
Best Quarter: 21.46% Q1 2020
Worst Quarter: (13.51%) Q1 2021
Average Annual Total Returns as of 12/31/21
1 Year
Since
Inception
(10/10/19)
Before taxes (4.96%) 2.78%
After taxes on distributions (5.63%) 2.10%
After taxes on distributions and sale of shares (2.95%) 1.84%
Comparative Index (reflects no deduction for expenses or taxes)
Bloomberg US Long Treasury Index (4.65%) 2.96%
The after-tax figures reflect the highest individual federal income tax rates in effect during the period and do not reflect the impact of state and local taxes. Your actual after-tax returns depend on your individual tax situation. In addition, after-tax returns are not relevant if you hold your fund shares through a tax-deferred arrangement, such as a 401(k) plan, an individual retirement account (IRA) or other tax-advantaged account. In some cases, the return after taxes on distributions and sale of shares may exceed the fund’s other returns due to an assumed benefit from any losses on a sale of shares at the end of the measurement period.
Investment Adviser
Charles Schwab Investment Management, Inc., dba Schwab Asset Management™
Portfolio Managers
Matthew Hastings, CFA, Managing Director and Head of Taxable Bond Strategies, is responsible for the day-to-day co-management of the fund. He has managed the fund since 2019.
Mark McKissick, CFA, Senior Portfolio Manager, is responsible for the day-to-day co-management of the fund. He has managed the fund since 2019.
Purchase and Sale of Fund Shares
The fund issues and redeems shares at its NAV only in large blocks of shares (Creation Units). These transactions are usually in exchange for a basket of securities included in the index and/or an amount of cash. As a practical matter, only Authorized Participants purchase or redeem Creation Units.
Individual shares may only be purchased and sold in the secondary market (i.e., on a national securities exchange) through a broker or dealer at market prices. Because fund shares trade at market prices rather than at NAV, fund shares may trade at a price greater than NAV (premium) or less than NAV (discount). When buying or selling shares in the secondary market, you may incur costs attributable to the difference between the highest price a buyer is willing to pay to purchase shares of the fund (bid) and the lowest price a seller is willing to accept for shares of the fund (ask) (the “bid-ask spread”). Recent information regarding the fund’s NAV, market price, premiums and discounts, and bid-ask spreads is available at www.schwabassetmanagement.com.
Tax Information
Dividends and capital gains distributions received from the fund will generally be taxable as ordinary income or capital gains, unless you are investing through an IRA, 401(k) or other tax-advantaged account (in which case you may be taxed later, upon withdrawal of your investment from such account).
Payments to Financial Intermediaries
If you purchase shares of the fund through a broker-dealer or other financial intermediary (such as a bank), the adviser and its related companies may pay the intermediary for the sale of fund shares and related services. These payments may create a conflict of interest by influencing the broker-dealer or other financial intermediary and your salesperson to recommend the fund over another investment. Ask your salesperson or visit your financial intermediary’s website for more information.
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About the Funds
The funds described in this prospectus are advised by Charles Schwab Investment Management, Inc., dba Schwab Asset Management (the investment adviser). Each fund is an “exchange-traded fund” ​(ETF). ETFs are funds that trade like other publicly-traded securities. The funds in this prospectus are index funds and are designed to track the total return of an index. Because the composition of an index tends to be comparatively stable, most index funds historically have shown low portfolio turnover compared to actively managed funds.
This strategy distinguishes an index fund from an “actively managed” fund. Instead of choosing investments for the fund based on portfolio management’s judgment, an index is used to determine which securities the fund should own.
Unlike shares of a mutual fund, shares of the funds are listed on a national securities exchange and trade at market prices that change throughout the day. The market price for each of the fund’s shares may be different from its net asset value per share (NAV). The funds have their own CUSIP numbers and trade on the NYSE Arca, Inc. under the following tickers:
Schwab 1-5 Year Corporate Bond ETF SCHJ
Schwab 5-10 Year Corporate Bond ETF SCHI
Schwab U.S. Aggregate Bond ETF SCHZ
Schwab U.S. TIPS ETF SCHP
Schwab Short-Term U.S. Treasury ETF SCHO
Schwab Intermediate-Term U.S. Treasury ETF
SCHR
Schwab Long-Term U.S. Treasury ETF SCHQ
The funds issue and redeem shares at their NAV only in large blocks of shares (Creation Units). These transactions are usually in exchange for a basket of securities and/or an amount of cash. As a practical matter, only institutional investors who have entered into an authorized participant agreement (Authorized Participants) purchase or redeem Creation Units.
A Note to Retail Investors
Shares can be purchased directly from the funds only in exchange for a basket of securities and/or an amount of cash that is expected to be worth a minimum of two million dollars or more. Most individual investors, therefore, will not be able to purchase shares directly from the funds. Instead, these investors will purchase shares in the secondary market through a brokerage account or with the assistance of a broker. Thus, some of the information contained in this prospectus – such as information about purchasing and redeeming shares from the funds and references to transaction fees imposed on purchases and redemptions – is not relevant to most individual investors. Shares purchased or sold through a brokerage account or with the assistance of a broker may be subject to brokerage commissions and charges.
The funds’ performance will fluctuate over time and, as with all investments, future performance may differ from past performance.
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Fund Details
There can be no assurance that the funds will achieve their objectives. Except as explicitly described otherwise, the investment objectives, strategies and policies of each fund may be changed without shareholder approval.
The principal investment strategies and the main risks associated with investing in each fund are summarized in the fund summaries at the front of this prospectus. This section takes a more detailed look at some of the types of securities, the associated risks, and the various investment strategies that may be used in the day-to-day portfolio management of the funds, as described below. In addition to the particular types of securities and strategies that are described in this prospectus, each fund may use strategies that are not described herein in support of its overall investment goal. These additional strategies and the risks associated with them are described in the “Investment Objectives, Strategies, Risks and Limitations” section in the Statement of Additional Information (SAI).
Each fund reserves the right to substitute a different index for the index it currently tracks if the current index is discontinued, if the agreement with the sponsor of its current index is terminated or for any other reason determined in good faith by the fund’s Board of Trustees. In any such instance, the substitute index would represent the same market segment as the current index.
Investment Objectives and More About Principal Risks
Schwab 1-5 Year Corporate Bond ETF
Investment Objective
The fund’s goal is to track as closely as possible, before fees and expenses, the total return of an index that measures the performance of the short-term U.S. corporate bond market. The fund’s investment objective is not fundamental and therefore may be changed by the fund’s Board of Trustees without shareholder approval.
Non-Principal Investment Strategies
Temporary Investment Measures. During unusual economic or market conditions or for liquidity purposes, the fund may temporarily depart from its normal investment policies and strategies when the investment adviser believes doing so is in the fund’s best interest, provided the strategy or policy employed is consistent with the fund’s investment objective. For example, the fund may invest beyond its normal limits in derivatives or certain debt securities if it is unable to invest directly in a component security of its index.
More Information About Principal Investment Risks
The fund is subject to risks, any of which could cause an investor to lose money.
Market Risk. Financial markets rise and fall in response to a variety of factors, sometimes rapidly and unpredictably. Markets may be impacted by economic, political, regulatory and other conditions, including economic sanctions and other government actions. In addition, the occurrence of global events, such as war, terrorism, environmental disasters, natural disasters and epidemics, may also negatively affect the financial markets. These events could reduce consumer demand or economic output; result in market closures, low or negative interest rates, travel restrictions or quarantines; and significantly adversely impact the economy. Governmental and quasi-governmental authorities and regulators throughout the world have in the past often responded to serious economic disruptions with a variety of significant fiscal and monetary policy changes which could have an unexpected impact on financial markets and the fund’s investments. As with any investment whose performance is tied to these markets, the value of an investment in the fund will fluctuate, which means that an investor could lose money over short or long periods.
Interest Rate Risk. Interest rates rise and fall over time. As with any investment whose yield reflects current interest rates, the fund’s yield will change over time. During periods when interest rates are low or there are negative interest rates, the fund’s yield (and total return) also may be low or the fund may be unable to maintain positive returns. Changes in interest rates also may affect the fund’s share price: a rise in interest rates generally causes the fund’s share price to fall. This risk is greater when the fund holds fixed-income securities with longer maturities. The longer the fund’s portfolio duration, the more sensitive to interest rate movements its share price is likely to be. For example, a fund with a longer portfolio duration is more likely to experience a decrease in its share price as interest rates rise. Duration is an estimate of a security’s (or portfolio of securities) sensitivity to changes in prevailing interest rates that is based on certain factors that may prove to be incorrect. It is therefore not an exact measurement and may not be able to reliably predict a particular security’s price sensitivity to changes in interest rates.
Economic conditions and other factors, including a central bank’s monetary policy, may result in changes in interest rates, which could have sudden and unpredictable effects on the markets and significantly impact the value of fixed-income securities in which the fund invests. Rising interest rates may decrease liquidity in the fixed-income securities markets, making it more difficult for the fund to sell its fixed-income
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securities holdings at a time when the investment adviser might wish to sell such securities. In addition, decreased market liquidity also may make it more difficult to value some or all of the fund’s fixed-income securities holdings. Certain countries have experienced negative interest rates on certain fixed-income securities. Negative or very low interest rates could magnify the risks associated with changes in interest rates. In general, changing interest rates, including rates that fall below zero, could have unpredictable effects on markets and may expose fixed-income and related markets to heightened volatility. To the extent that the investment adviser of the fund anticipates interest rate trends imprecisely, the fund could miss yield opportunities or its share price could fall. Inflation-protected securities may react differently to interest rate changes than other types of fixed-income securities and tend to react to changes in “real” interest rates.
Credit Risk. A decline in the credit quality of an issuer, guarantor or liquidity provider of a portfolio investment or a counterparty could cause the fund to lose money or underperform. The fund could lose money if, due to a decline in credit quality, the issuer, guarantor or liquidity provider of a portfolio investment or a counterparty fails to make, or is perceived as being unable or unwilling to make, timely principal or interest payments or otherwise honor its obligations. The credit quality of the fund’s portfolio holdings can change rapidly in certain market environments and any default on the part of a single portfolio investment could cause the fund’s share price or yield to fall. Certain U.S. government securities that the fund invests in are not backed by the full faith and credit of the U.S. government, which means they are neither issued nor guaranteed by the U.S. Treasury. There can be no assurance that the U.S. government will provide financial support to securities of its agencies and instrumentalities if it is not obligated to do so under law. Also, any government guarantees on securities the fund owns do not extend to the shares of the fund itself.
Tracking Error Risk. As an index fund, the fund seeks to track the performance of the index, although it may not be successful in doing so. The divergence between the performance of the fund and the index, positive or negative, is called “tracking error.” Tracking error can be caused by many factors and it may be significant. For example, the fund may not invest in certain securities in the index, match the securities’ weighting to the index, or the fund may invest in securities not in the index, due to regulatory, operational, custodial or liquidity constraints; corporate transactions; asset valuations; transaction costs and timing; tax considerations; and index rebalancing, which may result in tracking error. The fund may attempt to offset the effects of not being invested in certain index securities by making substitute investments, but these efforts may not be successful. In addition, cash flows into and out of the fund, operating expenses and trading costs all affect the ability of the fund to match the performance of the index, because the index does not have to manage cash flows and does not incur any costs.
Non-U.S. Issuer Risk. The fund may invest in U.S.-registered, dollar-denominated bonds of non-U.S. corporations. Investments in bonds of non-U.S. issuers involve certain risks that are more significant than those associated with investments in securities of U.S. issuers. These include risks of adverse changes in foreign economic, political, regulatory and other conditions; the imposition of economic sanctions or other government restrictions; differing accounting, auditing, financial reporting and legal standards and practices; differing securities market structures; and higher transaction costs. In certain countries, non-U.S. issuers may be subject to less governmental regulation than U.S. issuers and legal remedies available to investors may be more limited than those available with respect to investments in the United States. The securities of some foreign companies may be less liquid and at times more volatile than securities of comparable U.S. companies. Moreover, individual foreign economies may differ favorably or unfavorably from the U.S. economy in such respects as growth of gross national product, rate of inflation, capital reinvestment, resource self-sufficiency and balance of payments position, and the prices of foreign bonds and the U.S. bonds have, at times, moved in opposite directions. Changes to the financial condition or credit rating of a non-U.S. issuer may also adversely affect the value of the non-U.S. issuer’s securities held by the fund. These risks may be heightened in connection with bonds issued by non-U.S. corporations and entities in emerging markets.
Derivatives Risk. The fund may invest in derivative instruments. The principal types of derivatives used by the fund are futures contracts. A futures contract is an agreement to buy or sell a financial instrument at a specific price on a specific day. The fund’s use of derivative instruments involves risks different from, or possibly greater than, the risks associated with investing directly in securities and other traditional investments. Certain of these risks, such as market risk, credit risk, liquidity risk and leverage risk, are discussed elsewhere in this prospectus. The fund’s use of derivatives is also subject to lack of availability risk, valuation risk, correlation risk and tax risk. Lack of availability risk is the risk that suitable derivative transactions may not be available in all circumstances for risk management or other purposes. Valuation risk is the risk that a particular derivative may be valued incorrectly. Correlation risk is the risk that changes in the value of the derivative may not correlate perfectly with the underlying asset, rate or index. Tax risk is the risk that the use of derivatives may cause the fund to realize higher amounts of short-term capital gains. The fund’s use of derivatives could reduce the fund’s performance, increase the fund’s volatility, and cause the fund to lose more than the initial amount invested. Furthermore, the use of derivatives subject to regulation by the Commodity Futures Trading Commission (CFTC) could cause the fund to become a commodity pool, which would require the fund to comply with certain CFTC rules.
Liquidity Risk. Liquidity risk exists when particular investments may be difficult to purchase, sell or value, especially during stressed market conditions. The market for certain investments may become illiquid due to specific adverse changes in the conditions of a particular issuer or under adverse market or economic conditions independent of the issuer. In addition, limited dealer inventories of certain securities could potentially lead to decreased liquidity. In such cases, the fund, due to limitations on investments in illiquid securities and the difficulty in readily purchasing and selling such securities at favorable times or prices, may decline in value, experience lower returns and/or be unable to achieve its desired level of exposure to a certain issuer or sector. Further, transactions in illiquid securities may entail transaction costs that are higher than those for transactions in liquid securities.
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Leverage Risk. Certain fund transactions, such as derivatives transactions, may give rise to a form of leverage and may expose the fund to greater risk. Leverage tends to magnify the effect of any decrease or increase in the value of the fund’s portfolio securities which means even a small amount of leverage can have a disproportionately large impact on the fund. The use of leverage may cause the fund to liquidate portfolio positions when it would not be advantageous to do so in order to satisfy its obligations.
Securities Lending Risk. The fund may lend its portfolio securities to brokers, dealers, and other financial institutions provided a number of conditions are satisfied, including that the loan is fully collateralized. When the fund lends portfolio securities, its investment performance will continue to reflect changes in the value of the securities loaned, and the fund will also receive a fee or interest on the collateral. Securities lending involves the risk of loss of rights in, or delay in recovery of, the loaned securities if the borrower fails to return the security loaned or becomes insolvent. The fund will also bear the risk of any decline in value of securities acquired with cash collateral. The fund may pay lending fees to a party arranging the loan.
Operational Risk. The fund is exposed to operational risk arising from a number of factors, including, but not limited to, human error, processing and communication errors, errors of the fund’s service providers, counterparties or other third parties, failed or inadequate processes and technology or system failures. The fund seeks to reduce these operational risks through controls and procedures believed to be reasonably designed to address these risks. However, these controls and procedures cannot address every possible risk and may not fully mitigate the risks that they are intended to address.
Market Trading Risk. Although fund shares are listed on national securities exchanges, there can be no assurance that an active trading market for fund shares will develop or be maintained. If an active market is not maintained, investors may find it difficult to buy or sell fund shares. Trading of shares of the fund on a national securities exchange may be halted if exchange officials deem such action appropriate, if the fund is delisted, or if the activation of marketwide “circuit breakers” halts stock trading generally. If the fund’s shares are delisted, the fund may seek to list its shares on another market, merge with another ETF, or redeem its shares at NAV.
Shares of the Fund May Trade at Prices Other Than NAV. As with all ETFs, fund shares may be bought and sold in the secondary market at market prices. Although it is expected that the market price of the shares of the fund will approximate the fund’s NAV, there may be times when the market price and the NAV vary significantly. Thus, an investor may pay more than NAV when buying shares of the fund in the secondary market, and an investor may receive less than NAV when selling those shares in the secondary market. The investment adviser cannot predict whether shares will trade above (premium), below (discount) or at NAV. The fund may have a limited number of financial institutions that may act as “Authorized Participants” or market makers. Only Authorized Participants who have entered into agreements with the fund’s distributor may engage in creation or redemption transactions directly with the fund (as discussed in the “Creation and Redemption” section below). If those Authorized Participants exit the business or are unable to process creation and/or redemption orders (including in situations where Authorized Participants have limited or diminished access to capital required to post collateral), and no other Authorized Participant is able to step forward to create and/or redeem, fund shares may trade at a premium or discount to NAV like closed-end fund shares (and may even face delisting). Similar effects may result if market makers exit the business or are unable to continue making markets in the fund’s shares. More generally, market makers are not obligated to make a market in the fund’s shares, and Authorized Participants are not obligated to submit purchase or redemption orders for Creation Units. Further, while the creation/ redemption feature is designed to make it likely that shares normally will trade close to the value of the fund’s holdings, disruptions to creations and/or redemptions, including disruptions at market makers, Authorized Participants or market participants, or during periods of significant market volatility, may result in market prices that differ significantly from the value of the fund’s holdings. In addition, transactions by large shareholders may account for a large percentage of trading volume on the fund’s primary listing exchange and may, therefore, have a material effect on the market price of the fund’s shares.
The market price of fund shares during the trading day, like the price of any exchange-traded security, may be impacted by a “bid/ask” spread. The bid/ask spread is the difference between what investors are willing to pay for fund shares (the “bid” price) and the price at which investors are willing to sell fund shares (the “ask” price). The spread may vary over time and is based on many factors including supply and demand for the underlying securities held by the fund, supply and demand for shares of the fund itself, and the historical and current magnitude of price fluctuation of the fund’s asset class. The spread is generally narrower if the fund has higher trading volume and wider if the fund has lower trading volume (which may be the case for funds that are newly launched or small in size). Bid/ask spreads may also be wider during times of higher market volatility. At those times, fund shares are most likely to be traded at a discount to NAV, and the discount is likely to be greatest when the price of shares is falling fastest, which may be the time that investors most want to sell shares.
There are various methods by which investors can purchase and sell shares of the fund and various types of orders that may be placed. Investors should consult their financial intermediary before purchasing or selling shares of the fund.
Money Market Fund Risk. An investment by the fund in an underlying money market fund has risks. The fund may invest in underlying money market funds that either seek to maintain a stable $1.00 net asset value (“stable share price money market funds”) or that have a share price that fluctuates (“variable share price money market funds”). Although an underlying stable share price money market fund seeks to maintain a stable $1.00 net asset value, it is possible to lose money by investing in such a money market fund. Because the share price of an underlying variable share price money market fund will fluctuate, when the fund sells the shares it owns they may be worth more or less
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than what the fund originally paid for them. In addition, neither type of money market fund is designed to offer capital appreciation. In exchange for their emphasis on stability and liquidity, money market investments may offer lower long-term performance than stock or bond investments. Certain underlying money market funds may impose a fee upon the sale of shares or may temporarily suspend the ability to sell shares if such fund’s liquidity falls below required minimums.
Schwab 5-10 Year Corporate Bond ETF
Investment Objective
The fund’s goal is to track as closely as possible, before fees and expenses, the total return of an index that measures the performance of the intermediate-term U.S. corporate bond market. The fund’s investment objective is not fundamental and therefore may be changed by the fund’s Board of Trustees without shareholder approval.
Non-Principal Investment Strategies
Temporary Investment Measures. During unusual economic or market conditions or for liquidity purposes, the fund may temporarily depart from its normal investment policies and strategies when the investment adviser believes doing so is in the fund’s best interest, provided the strategy or policy employed is consistent with the fund’s investment objective. For example, the fund may invest beyond its normal limits in derivatives or certain debt securities if it is unable to invest directly in a component security of its index.
More Information About Principal Investment Risks
The fund is subject to risks, any of which could cause an investor to lose money.
Market Risk. Financial markets rise and fall in response to a variety of factors, sometimes rapidly and unpredictably. Markets may be impacted by economic, political, regulatory and other conditions, including economic sanctions and other government actions. In addition, the occurrence of global events, such as war, terrorism, environmental disasters, natural disasters and epidemics, may also negatively affect the financial markets. These events could reduce consumer demand or economic output; result in market closures, low or negative interest rates, travel restrictions or quarantines; and significantly adversely impact the economy. Governmental and quasi-governmental authorities and regulators throughout the world have in the past often responded to serious economic disruptions with a variety of significant fiscal and monetary policy changes which could have an unexpected impact on financial markets and the fund’s investments. As with any investment whose performance is tied to these markets, the value of an investment in the fund will fluctuate, which means that an investor could lose money over short or long periods.
Interest Rate Risk. Interest rates rise and fall over time. As with any investment whose yield reflects current interest rates, the fund’s yield will change over time. During periods when interest rates are low or there are negative interest rates, the fund’s yield (and total return) also may be low or the fund may be unable to maintain positive returns. Changes in interest rates also may affect the fund’s share price: a rise in interest rates generally causes the fund’s share price to fall. This risk is greater when the fund holds fixed-income securities with longer maturities. The longer the fund’s portfolio duration, the more sensitive to interest rate movements its share price is likely to be. For example, a fund with a longer portfolio duration is more likely to experience a decrease in its share price as interest rates rise. Duration is an estimate of a security’s (or portfolio of securities) sensitivity to changes in prevailing interest rates that is based on certain factors that may prove to be incorrect. It is therefore not an exact measurement and may not be able to reliably predict a particular security’s price sensitivity to changes in interest rates.
Economic conditions and other factors, including a central bank’s monetary policy, may result in changes in interest rates, which could have sudden and unpredictable effects on the markets and significantly impact the value of fixed-income securities in which the fund invests. Rising interest rates may decrease liquidity in the fixed-income securities markets, making it more difficult for the fund to sell its fixed-income securities holdings at a time when the investment adviser might wish to sell such securities. In addition, decreased market liquidity also may make it more difficult to value some or all of the fund’s fixed-income securities holdings. Certain countries have experienced negative interest rates on certain fixed-income securities. Negative or very low interest rates could magnify the risks associated with changes in interest rates. In general, changing interest rates, including rates that fall below zero, could have unpredictable effects on markets and may expose fixed-income and related markets to heightened volatility. To the extent that the investment adviser of the fund anticipates interest rate trends imprecisely, the fund could miss yield opportunities or its share price could fall. Inflation-protected securities may react differently to interest rate changes than other types of fixed-income securities and tend to react to changes in “real” interest rates.
Credit Risk. A decline in the credit quality of an issuer, guarantor or liquidity provider of a portfolio investment or a counterparty could cause the fund to lose money or underperform. The fund could lose money if, due to a decline in credit quality, the issuer, guarantor or liquidity provider of a portfolio investment or a counterparty fails to make, or is perceived as being unable or unwilling to make, timely principal or interest payments or otherwise honor its obligations. The credit quality of the fund’s portfolio holdings can change rapidly in certain market environments and any default on the part of a single portfolio investment could cause the fund’s share price or yield to fall. Certain U.S. government securities that the fund invests in are not backed by the full faith and credit of the U.S. government, which means they are neither
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issued nor guaranteed by the U.S. Treasury. There can be no assurance that the U.S. government will provide financial support to securities of its agencies and instrumentalities if it is not obligated to do so under law. Also, any government guarantees on securities the fund owns do not extend to the shares of the fund itself.
Tracking Error Risk. As an index fund, the fund seeks to track the performance of the index, although it may not be successful in doing so. The divergence between the performance of the fund and the index, positive or negative, is called “tracking error.” Tracking error can be caused by many factors and it may be significant. For example, the fund may not invest in certain securities in the index, match the securities’ weighting to the index, or the fund may invest in securities not in the index, due to regulatory, operational, custodial or liquidity constraints; corporate transactions; asset valuations; transaction costs and timing; tax considerations; and index rebalancing, which may result in tracking error. The fund may attempt to offset the effects of not being invested in certain index securities by making substitute investments, but these efforts may not be successful. In addition, cash flows into and out of the fund, operating expenses and trading costs all affect the ability of the fund to match the performance of the index, because the index does not have to manage cash flows and does not incur any costs.
Non-U.S. Issuer Risk. The fund may invest in U.S.-registered, dollar-denominated bonds of non-U.S. corporations. Investments in bonds of non-U.S. issuers involve certain risks that are more significant than those associated with investments in securities of U.S. issuers. These include risks of adverse changes in foreign economic, political, regulatory and other conditions; the imposition of economic sanctions or other government restrictions; differing accounting, auditing, financial reporting and legal standards and practices; differing securities market structures; and higher transaction costs. In certain countries, non-U.S. issuers may be subject to less governmental regulation than U.S. issuers and legal remedies available to investors may be more limited than those available with respect to investments in the United States. The securities of some foreign companies may be less liquid and at times more volatile than securities of comparable U.S. companies. Moreover, individual foreign economies may differ favorably or unfavorably from the U.S. economy in such respects as growth of gross national product, rate of inflation, capital reinvestment, resource self-sufficiency and balance of payments position, and the prices of foreign bonds and the U.S. bonds have, at times, moved in opposite directions. Changes to the financial condition or credit rating of a non-U.S. issuer may also adversely affect the value of the non-U.S. issuer’s securities held by the fund. These risks may be heightened in connection with bonds issued by non-U.S. corporations and entities in emerging markets.
Derivatives Risk. The fund may invest in derivative instruments. The principal types of derivatives used by the fund are futures contracts. A futures contract is an agreement to buy or sell a financial instrument at a specific price on a specific day. The fund’s use of derivative instruments involves risks different from, or possibly greater than, the risks associated with investing directly in securities and other traditional investments. Certain of these risks, such as market risk, credit risk, liquidity risk and leverage risk, are discussed elsewhere in this prospectus. The fund’s use of derivatives is also subject to lack of availability risk, valuation risk, correlation risk and tax risk. Lack of availability risk is the risk that suitable derivative transactions may not be available in all circumstances for risk management or other purposes. Valuation risk is the risk that a particular derivative may be valued incorrectly. Correlation risk is the risk that changes in the value of the derivative may not correlate perfectly with the underlying asset, rate or index. Tax risk is the risk that the use of derivatives may cause the fund to realize higher amounts of short-term capital gains. The fund’s use of derivatives could reduce the fund’s performance, increase the fund’s volatility, and cause the fund to lose more than the initial amount invested. Furthermore, the use of derivatives subject to regulation by the Commodity Futures Trading Commission (CFTC) could cause the fund to become a commodity pool, which would require the fund to comply with certain CFTC rules.
Liquidity Risk. Liquidity risk exists when particular investments may be difficult to purchase, sell or value, especially during stressed market conditions. The market for certain investments may become illiquid due to specific adverse changes in the conditions of a particular issuer or under adverse market or economic conditions independent of the issuer. In addition, limited dealer inventories of certain securities could potentially lead to decreased liquidity. In such cases, the fund, due to limitations on investments in illiquid securities and the difficulty in readily purchasing and selling such securities at favorable times or prices, may decline in value, experience lower returns and/or be unable to achieve its desired level of exposure to a certain issuer or sector. Further, transactions in illiquid securities may entail transaction costs that are higher than those for transactions in liquid securities.
Leverage Risk. Certain fund transactions, such as derivatives transactions, may give rise to a form of leverage and may expose the fund to greater risk. Leverage tends to magnify the effect of any decrease or increase in the value of the fund’s portfolio securities which means even a small amount of leverage can have a disproportionately large impact on the fund. The use of leverage may cause the fund to liquidate portfolio positions when it would not be advantageous to do so in order to satisfy its obligations.
Securities Lending Risk. The fund may lend its portfolio securities to brokers, dealers, and other financial institutions provided a number of conditions are satisfied, including that the loan is fully collateralized. When the fund lends portfolio securities, its investment performance will continue to reflect changes in the value of the securities loaned, and the fund will also receive a fee or interest on the collateral. Securities lending involves the risk of loss of rights in, or delay in recovery of, the loaned securities if the borrower fails to return the security loaned or becomes insolvent. The fund will also bear the risk of any decline in value of securities acquired with cash collateral. The fund may pay lending fees to a party arranging the loan.
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Operational Risk. The fund is exposed to operational risk arising from a number of factors, including, but not limited to, human error, processing and communication errors, errors of the fund’s service providers, counterparties or other third parties, failed or inadequate processes and technology or system failures. The fund seeks to reduce these operational risks through controls and procedures believed to be reasonably designed to address these risks. However, these controls and procedures cannot address every possible risk and may not fully mitigate the risks that they are intended to address.
Market Trading Risk. Although fund shares are listed on national securities exchanges, there can be no assurance that an active trading market for fund shares will develop or be maintained. If an active market is not maintained, investors may find it difficult to buy or sell fund shares. Trading of shares of the fund on a national securities exchange may be halted if exchange officials deem such action appropriate, if the fund is delisted, or if the activation of marketwide “circuit breakers” halts stock trading generally. If the fund’s shares are delisted, the fund may seek to list its shares on another market, merge with another ETF, or redeem its shares at NAV.
Shares of the Fund May Trade at Prices Other Than NAV. As with all ETFs, fund shares may be bought and sold in the secondary market at market prices. Although it is expected that the market price of the shares of the fund will approximate the fund’s NAV, there may be times when the market price and the NAV vary significantly. Thus, an investor may pay more than NAV when buying shares of the fund in the secondary market, and an investor may receive less than NAV when selling those shares in the secondary market. The investment adviser cannot predict whether shares will trade above (premium), below (discount) or at NAV. The fund may have a limited number of financial institutions that may act as “Authorized Participants” or market makers. Only Authorized Participants who have entered into agreements with the fund’s distributor may engage in creation or redemption transactions directly with the fund (as discussed in the “Creation and Redemption” section below). If those Authorized Participants exit the business or are unable to process creation and/or redemption orders (including in situations where Authorized Participants have limited or diminished access to capital required to post collateral), and no other Authorized Participant is able to step forward to create and/or redeem, fund shares may trade at a premium or discount to NAV like closed-end fund shares (and may even face delisting). Similar effects may result if market makers exit the business or are unable to continue making markets in the fund’s shares. More generally, market makers are not obligated to make a market in the fund’s shares, and Authorized Participants are not obligated to submit purchase or redemption orders for Creation Units. Further, while the creation/ redemption feature is designed to make it likely that shares normally will trade close to the value of the fund’s holdings, disruptions to creations and/or redemptions, including disruptions at market makers, Authorized Participants or market participants, or during periods of significant market volatility, may result in market prices that differ significantly from the value of the fund’s holdings. In addition, transactions by large shareholders may account for a large percentage of trading volume on the fund’s primary listing exchange and may, therefore, have a material effect on the market price of the fund’s shares.
The market price of fund shares during the trading day, like the price of any exchange-traded security, may be impacted by a “bid/ask” spread. The bid/ask spread is the difference between what investors are willing to pay for fund shares (the “bid” price) and the price at which investors are willing to sell fund shares (the “ask” price). The spread may vary over time and is based on many factors including supply and demand for the underlying securities held by the fund, supply and demand for shares of the fund itself, and the historical and current magnitude of price fluctuation of the fund’s asset class. The spread is generally narrower if the fund has higher trading volume and wider if the fund has lower trading volume (which may be the case for funds that are newly launched or small in size). Bid/ask spreads may also be wider during times of higher market volatility. At those times, fund shares are most likely to be traded at a discount to NAV, and the discount is likely to be greatest when the price of shares is falling fastest, which may be the time that investors most want to sell shares.
There are various methods by which investors can purchase and sell shares of the fund and various types of orders that may be placed. Investors should consult their financial intermediary before purchasing or selling shares of the fund.
Money Market Fund Risk. An investment by the fund in an underlying money market fund has risks. The fund may invest in underlying money market funds that either seek to maintain a stable $1.00 net asset value (“stable share price money market funds”) or that have a share price that fluctuates (“variable share price money market funds”). Although an underlying stable share price money market fund seeks to maintain a stable $1.00 net asset value, it is possible to lose money by investing in such a money market fund. Because the share price of an underlying variable share price money market fund will fluctuate, when the fund sells the shares it owns they may be worth more or less than what the fund originally paid for them. In addition, neither type of money market fund is designed to offer capital appreciation. In exchange for their emphasis on stability and liquidity, money market investments may offer lower long-term performance than stock or bond investments. Certain underlying money market funds may impose a fee upon the sale of shares or may temporarily suspend the ability to sell shares if such fund’s liquidity falls below required minimums.
Schwab U.S. Aggregate Bond ETF
Investment Objective
The fund’s goal is to track as closely as possible, before fees and expenses, the total return of an index that measures the performance of the broad U.S. investment-grade bond market. The fund’s investment objective is not fundamental and therefore may be changed by the fund’s Board of Trustees without shareholder approval.
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More About the Index
The fund’s index is comprised of U.S. investment grade, taxable fixed-income securities, including U.S. Treasuries, government-related and corporate bonds, mortgage pass-through securities, commercial mortgage-backed securities, and asset-backed securities that are publicly available for sale in the United States.To be eligible for inclusion in the index, securities must be fixed-rate, non-convertible, U.S. dollar denominated with at least $300 million or more of outstanding face value and have one or more years remaining to maturity. Asset-backed securities must have a minimum deal size of $500 million and a minimum tranche size of $25 million. For commercial mortgage-backed securities, the original aggregate transaction must have a minimum deal size of $500 million and a minimum tranche size of $25 million; the aggregate outstanding transaction sizes must be at least $300 million to remain in the index. For mortgage-backed security pass-throughs, pool aggregates must have a minimum of $1 billion par amount outstanding. The index excludes certain types of securities, including tax-exempt state and local government series bonds, structured notes embedded with swaps or other special features, private placements, floating-rate securities, inflation-linked bonds, and Eurobonds. The index is market capitalization weighted and the securities in the index are updated on the last business day of each month.
Non-Principal Investment Strategies
Temporary Investment Measures. During unusual economic or market conditions or for liquidity purposes, the fund may temporarily depart from its normal investment policies and strategies when the investment adviser believes doing so is in the fund’s best interest, provided the strategy or policy employed is consistent with the fund’s investment objective. For example, the fund may invest beyond its normal limits in derivatives or certain debt securities if it is unable to invest directly in a component security of its index.
More Information About Principal Investment Risks
The fund is subject to risks, any of which could cause an investor to lose money.
Market Risk. Financial markets rise and fall in response to a variety of factors, sometimes rapidly and unpredictably. Markets may be impacted by economic, political, regulatory and other conditions, including economic sanctions and other government actions. In addition, the occurrence of global events, such as war, terrorism, environmental disasters, natural disasters and epidemics, may also negatively affect the financial markets. These events could reduce consumer demand or economic output; result in market closures, low or negative interest rates, travel restrictions or quarantines; and significantly adversely impact the economy. Governmental and quasi-governmental authorities and regulators throughout the world have in the past often responded to serious economic disruptions with a variety of significant fiscal and monetary policy changes which could have an unexpected impact on financial markets and the fund’s investments. As with any investment whose performance is tied to these markets, the value of an investment in the fund will fluctuate, which means that an investor could lose money over short or long periods.
Interest Rate Risk. Interest rates rise and fall over time. As with any investment whose yield reflects current interest rates, the fund’s yield will change over time. During periods when interest rates are low or there are negative interest rates, the fund’s yield (and total return) also may be low or the fund may be unable to maintain positive returns. Changes in interest rates also may affect the fund’s share price: a rise in interest rates generally causes the fund’s share price to fall. This risk is greater when the fund holds fixed-income securities with longer maturities. The longer the fund’s portfolio duration, the more sensitive to interest rate movements its share price is likely to be. For example, a fund with a longer portfolio duration is more likely to experience a decrease in its share price as interest rates rise. Duration is an estimate of a security’s (or portfolio of securities) sensitivity to changes in prevailing interest rates that is based on certain factors that may prove to be incorrect. It is therefore not an exact measurement and may not be able to reliably predict a particular security’s price sensitivity to changes in interest rates.
Economic conditions and other factors, including a central bank’s monetary policy, may result in changes in interest rates, which could have sudden and unpredictable effects on the markets and significantly impact the value of fixed-income securities in which the fund invests. Rising interest rates may decrease liquidity in the fixed-income securities markets, making it more difficult for the fund to sell its fixed-income securities holdings at a time when the investment adviser might wish to sell such securities. In addition, decreased market liquidity also may make it more difficult to value some or all of the fund’s fixed-income securities holdings. Certain countries have experienced negative interest rates on certain fixed-income securities. Negative or very low interest rates could magnify the risks associated with changes in interest rates. In general, changing interest rates, including rates that fall below zero, could have unpredictable effects on markets and may expose fixed-income and related markets to heightened volatility. To the extent that the investment adviser of the fund anticipates interest rate trends imprecisely, the fund could miss yield opportunities or its share price could fall. Inflation-protected securities may react differently to interest rate changes than other types of fixed-income securities and tend to react to changes in “real” interest rates.
Credit Risk. A decline in the credit quality of an issuer, guarantor or liquidity provider of a portfolio investment or a counterparty could cause the fund to lose money or underperform. The fund could lose money if, due to a decline in credit quality, the issuer, guarantor or liquidity provider of a portfolio investment or a counterparty fails to make, or is perceived as being unable or unwilling to make, timely principal or interest payments or otherwise honor its obligations. The credit quality of the fund’s portfolio holdings can change rapidly in certain market environments and any default on the part of a single portfolio investment could cause the fund’s share price or yield to fall. Certain U.S.
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government securities that the fund invests in are not backed by the full faith and credit of the U.S. government, which means they are neither issued nor guaranteed by the U.S. Treasury. There can be no assurance that the U.S. government will provide financial support to securities of its agencies and instrumentalities if it is not obligated to do so under law. Also, any government guarantees on securities the fund owns do not extend to the shares of the fund itself.
Tracking Error Risk. As an index fund, the fund seeks to track the performance of the index, although it may not be successful in doing so. The divergence between the performance of the fund and the index, positive or negative, is called “tracking error.” Tracking error can be caused by many factors and it may be significant. For example, the fund may not invest in certain securities in the index, match the securities’ weighting to the index, or the fund may invest in securities not in the index, due to regulatory, operational, custodial or liquidity constraints; corporate transactions; asset valuations; transaction costs and timing; tax considerations; and index rebalancing, which may result in tracking error. The fund may attempt to offset the effects of not being invested in certain index securities by making substitute investments, but these efforts may not be successful. In addition, cash flows into and out of the fund, operating expenses and trading costs all affect the ability of the fund to match the performance of the index, because the index does not have to manage cash flows and does not incur any costs.
Portfolio Turnover Risk. The fund may engage in frequent trading of its portfolio securities in connection with its tracking of the index, primarily due to the fund rolling over its positions in TBAs as it tracks the portion of the index represented by mortgage-backed securities. A portfolio turnover rate of 200%, for example, is equivalent to the fund buying and selling all of its securities two times during the course of the year. A high portfolio turnover rate (such as 100% or more) could result in high brokerage costs, though the brokerage costs incurred in connection with rolling over TBA positions are expected to be minimal. A high portfolio turnover rate also can result in an increase in taxable capital gains distributions to the fund’s shareholders.
Prepayment and Extension Risk. Certain fixed-income securities are subject to the risk that the securities may be paid off earlier or later than expected, especially during periods of falling or rising interest rates, respectively. Rising interest rates tend to extend the duration of certain fixed-income securities, making them more sensitive to changes in interest rates. As a result, in a period of rising interest rates, the fund could exhibit additional volatility and hold securities paying lower-than-market rates of interest. This is known as extension risk. When interest rates decline, borrowers may pay off their fixed-income securities sooner than expected. This can reduce the fund’s returns because the fund will have to reinvest that money at the lower prevailing interest rates. In addition, prepayments and subsequent reinvestments increase the fund’s portfolio turnover rate. This is known as prepayment risk. Either situation could hurt the fund’s performance.
Non-U.S. Issuer Risk. The fund may invest in U.S.-registered, dollar-denominated bonds of non-U.S. corporations, governments, agencies and supra-national entities. Investments in bonds of non-U.S. issuers involve certain risks that are more significant than those associated with investments in securities of U.S. issuers. These include risks of adverse changes in foreign economic, political, regulatory and other conditions; the imposition of economic sanctions or other government restrictions; differing accounting, auditing, financial reporting and legal standards and practices; differing securities market structures; and higher transaction costs. In certain countries, non-U.S. issuers may be subject to less governmental regulation than U.S. issuers and legal remedies available to investors may be more limited than those available with respect to investments in the United States. The securities of some foreign companies may be less liquid and at times more volatile than securities of comparable U.S. companies. Moreover, individual foreign economies may differ favorably or unfavorably from the U.S. economy in such respects as growth of gross national product, rate of inflation, capital reinvestment, resource self-sufficiency and balance of payments position, and the prices of foreign bonds and the U.S. bonds have, at times, moved in opposite directions. Changes to the financial condition or credit rating of a non-U.S. issuer may also adversely affect the value of the non-U.S. issuer’s securities held by the fund. These risks may be heightened in connection with bonds issued by non-U.S. corporations and entities in emerging markets.
Derivatives Risk. The fund may invest in derivative instruments. The principal types of derivatives used by the fund are futures contracts. A futures contract is an agreement to buy or sell a financial instrument at a specific price on a specific day. The fund’s use of derivative instruments involves risks different from, or possibly greater than, the risks associated with investing directly in securities and other traditional investments. Certain of these risks, such as market risk, credit risk, liquidity risk and leverage risk, are discussed elsewhere in this prospectus. The fund’s use of derivatives is also subject to lack of availability risk, valuation risk, correlation risk and tax risk. Lack of availability risk is the risk that suitable derivative transactions may not be available in all circumstances for risk management or other purposes. Valuation risk is the risk that a particular derivative may be valued incorrectly. Correlation risk is the risk that changes in the value of the derivative may not correlate perfectly with the underlying asset, rate or index. Tax risk is the risk that the use of derivatives may cause the fund to realize higher amounts of short-term capital gains. The fund’s use of derivatives could reduce the fund’s performance, increase the fund’s volatility, and cause the fund to lose more than the initial amount invested. Furthermore, the use of derivatives subject to regulation by the Commodity Futures Trading Commission (CFTC) could cause the fund to become a commodity pool, which would require the fund to comply with certain CFTC rules.
Mortgage-Backed and Mortgage Pass-Through Securities Risk. Mortgage-backed securities tend to increase in value less than other debt securities when interest rates decline, but are subject to similar or greater risk of decline in market value during periods of rising interest rates. Because of prepayment and extension risk, mortgage-backed securities react differently to changes in interest rates than other debt securities. Small movements in interest rates – both increases and decreases – may quickly and significantly affect the value of certain
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mortgage-backed securities. In addition, certain of the mortgage-backed securities in which the fund may invest are issued or guaranteed by agencies or instrumentalities of the U.S. government but are not backed by the full faith and credit of the U.S. government and there can be no assurance that the U.S. government would provide financial support to its agencies or instrumentalities where it was not obligated to do so which can cause the fund to lose money or underperform. The risks of investing in mortgage-backed securities include, among others, interest rate risk, credit risk, prepayment risk and extension risk, as well as risks associated with the nature of the underlying mortgage assets and the servicing of those assets. These securities are subject to the risk of default on the underlying mortgages, and such risk is heightened during periods of economic downturn. Transactions in mortgage pass-through securities often occur through TBA transactions. If a TBA counterparty defaults or goes bankrupt the fund may experience adverse market action, expenses, or delays in connection with the purchase or sale of the pools of mortgage pass-through securities specified in a TBA transaction which can cause the fund to lose money or underperform.
Liquidity Risk. Liquidity risk exists when particular investments may be difficult to purchase, sell or value, especially during stressed market conditions. The market for certain investments may become illiquid due to specific adverse changes in the conditions of a particular issuer or under adverse market or economic conditions independent of the issuer. In addition, limited dealer inventories of certain securities could potentially lead to decreased liquidity. In such cases, the fund, due to limitations on investments in illiquid securities and the difficulty in readily purchasing and selling such securities at favorable times or prices, may decline in value, experience lower returns and/or be unable to achieve its desired level of exposure to a certain issuer or sector. Further, transactions in illiquid securities may entail transaction costs that are higher than those for transactions in liquid securities.
Leverage Risk. Certain fund transactions, such as TBA transactions or derivatives transactions, may give rise to a form of leverage and may expose the fund to greater risk. Leverage tends to magnify the effect of any decrease or increase in the value of the fund’s portfolio securities which means even a small amount of leverage can have a disproportionately large impact on the fund. The use of leverage may cause the fund to liquidate portfolio positions when it would not be advantageous to do so in order to satisfy its obligations.
Securities Lending Risk. The fund may lend its portfolio securities to brokers, dealers, and other financial institutions provided a number of conditions are satisfied, including that the loan is fully collateralized. When the fund lends portfolio securities, its investment performance will continue to reflect changes in the value of the securities loaned, and the fund will also receive a fee or interest on the collateral. Securities lending involves the risk of loss of rights in, or delay in recovery of, the loaned securities if the borrower fails to return the security loaned or becomes insolvent. The fund will also bear the risk of any decline in value of securities acquired with cash collateral. The fund may pay lending fees to a party arranging the loan.
Operational Risk. The fund is exposed to operational risk arising from a number of factors, including, but not limited to, human error, processing and communication errors, errors of the fund’s service providers, counterparties or other third parties, failed or inadequate processes and technology or system failures. The fund seeks to reduce these operational risks through controls and procedures believed to be reasonably designed to address these risks. However, these controls and procedures cannot address every possible risk and may not fully mitigate the risks that they are intended to address.
Market Trading Risk. Although fund shares are listed on national securities exchanges, there can be no assurance that an active trading market for fund shares will develop or be maintained. If an active market is not maintained, investors may find it difficult to buy or sell fund shares. Trading of shares of the fund on a national securities exchange may be halted if exchange officials deem such action appropriate, if the fund is delisted, or if the activation of marketwide “circuit breakers” halts stock trading generally. If the fund’s shares are delisted, the fund may seek to list its shares on another market, merge with another ETF, or redeem its shares at NAV.
Shares of the Fund May Trade at Prices Other Than NAV. As with all ETFs, fund shares may be bought and sold in the secondary market at market prices. Although it is expected that the market price of the shares of the fund will approximate the fund’s NAV, there may be times when the market price and the NAV vary significantly. Thus, an investor may pay more than NAV when buying shares of the fund in the secondary market, and an investor may receive less than NAV when selling those shares in the secondary market. The investment adviser cannot predict whether shares will trade above (premium), below (discount) or at NAV. The fund may have a limited number of financial institutions that may act as “Authorized Participants” or market makers. Only Authorized Participants who have entered into agreements with the fund’s distributor may engage in creation or redemption transactions directly with the fund (as discussed in the “Creation and Redemption” section below). If those Authorized Participants exit the business or are unable to process creation and/or redemption orders (including in situations where Authorized Participants have limited or diminished access to capital required to post collateral), and no other Authorized Participant is able to step forward to create and redeem in either of these cases, fund shares may trade at a discount to NAV like closed-end fund shares (and may even face delisting). Similar effects may result if market makers exit the business or are unable to continue making markets in the fund’s shares. More generally, market makers are not obligated to make a market in the fund’s shares, and Authorized Participants are not obligated to submit purchase or redemption orders for Creation Units. Further, while the creation/ redemption feature is designed to make it likely that shares normally will trade close to the value of the fund’s holdings, disruptions to creations and redemptions, including disruptions at market makers, Authorized Participants or market participants, or during periods of significant market volatility, may result in market prices that differ significantly from the value of the fund’s holdings. In addition, transactions by large shareholders may account for a large percentage of trading volume on the fund’s primary listing exchange and may, therefore, have a material effect on the market price of the fund’s shares.
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The market price of fund shares during the trading day, like the price of any exchange-traded security, includes a “bid/ask” spread charged by the exchange specialist, market makers or other participants that trade the fund shares. The bid/ask spread on ETF shares varies over time based on the fund’s trading volume and market liquidity. As a result, the bid/ask spread on ETF shares is generally larger when the shares have little trading volume or market liquidity and generally lower when the shares have high trading volume or market liquidity. In addition, in times of severe market disruption, the bid/ask spread can increase significantly. At those times, fund shares are most likely to be traded at a discount to NAV, and the discount is likely to be greatest when the price of shares is falling fastest, which may be the time that investors most want to sell shares. The investment adviser believes that, under normal market conditions, large market price discounts or premiums to NAV will not be sustained because of arbitrage opportunities. There are various methods by which investors can purchase and sell shares of the fund and various types of orders that may be placed. Investors should consult their financial intermediary before purchasing or selling shares of the fund.
Money Market Fund Risk. An investment by the fund in an underlying money market fund has risks. The fund may invest in underlying money market funds that either seek to maintain a stable $1.00 net asset value (“stable share price money market funds”) or that have a share price that fluctuates (“variable share price money market funds”). Although an underlying stable share price money market fund seeks to maintain a stable $1.00 net asset value, it is possible to lose money by investing in such a money market fund. Because the share price of an underlying variable share price money market fund will fluctuate, when the fund sells the shares it owns they may be worth more or less than what the fund originally paid for them. In addition, neither type of money market fund is designed to offer capital appreciation. In exchange for their emphasis on stability and liquidity, money market investments may offer lower long-term performance than stock or bond investments. Certain underlying money market funds may impose a fee upon the sale of shares or may temporarily suspend the ability to sell shares if such fund’s liquidity falls below required minimums.
Schwab U.S. TIPS ETF
Investment Objective
The fund’s goal is to track as closely as possible, before fees and expenses, the total return of an index composed of inflation-protected U.S. Treasury securities. The fund’s investment objective is not fundamental and therefore may be changed by the fund’s Board of Trustees without shareholder approval.
More Information About Principal Investment Risks
The fund is subject to risks, any of which could cause an investor to lose money.
Market Risk. Financial markets rise and fall in response to a variety of factors, sometimes rapidly and unpredictably. Markets may be impacted by economic, political, regulatory and other conditions, including economic sanctions and other government actions. In addition, the occurrence of global events, such as war, terrorism, environmental disasters, natural disasters and epidemics, may also negatively affect the financial markets. These events could reduce consumer demand or economic output; result in market closures, low or negative interest rates, travel restrictions or quarantines; and significantly adversely impact the economy. Governmental and quasi-governmental authorities and regulators throughout the world have in the past often responded to serious economic disruptions with a variety of significant fiscal and monetary policy changes which could have an unexpected impact on financial markets and the fund’s investments. As with any investment whose performance is tied to these markets, the value of an investment in the fund will fluctuate, which means that an investor could lose money over short or long periods.
Interest Rate Risk. Interest rates rise and fall over time. As with any investment whose yield reflects current interest rates, the fund’s yield will change over time. During periods when interest rates are low or there are negative interest rates, the fund’s yield (and total return) also may be low or the fund may be unable to maintain positive returns. Changes in interest rates also may affect the fund’s share price: a rise in interest rates generally causes the fund’s share price to fall. This risk is greater when the fund holds fixed-income securities with longer maturities. The longer the fund’s portfolio duration, the more sensitive to interest rate movements its share price is likely to be. For example, a fund with a longer portfolio duration is more likely to experience a decrease in its share price as interest rates rise. Duration is an estimate of a security’s (or portfolio of securities) sensitivity to changes in prevailing interest rates that is based on certain factors that may prove to be incorrect. It is therefore not an exact measurement and may not be able to reliably predict a particular security’s price sensitivity to changes in interest rates.
Economic conditions and other factors, including a central bank’s monetary policy, may result in changes in interest rates, which could have sudden and unpredictable effects on the markets and significantly impact the value of fixed-income securities in which the fund invests. Rising interest rates may decrease liquidity in the fixed-income securities markets, making it more difficult for the fund to sell its fixed-income securities holdings at a time when the investment adviser might wish to sell such securities. In addition, decreased market liquidity also may make it more difficult to value some or all of the fund’s fixed-income securities holdings. Certain countries have experienced negative interest rates on certain fixed-income securities. Negative or very low interest rates could magnify the risks associated with changes in interest rates. In general, changing interest rates, including rates that fall below zero, could have unpredictable effects on markets and may expose
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fixed-income and related markets to heightened volatility. To the extent that the investment adviser of the fund anticipates interest rate trends imprecisely, the fund could miss yield opportunities or its share price could fall. Inflation-protected securities may react differently to interest rate changes than other types of fixed-income securities and tend to react to changes in “real” interest rates.
Credit Risk. A decline in the credit quality of an issuer, guarantor or liquidity provider of a portfolio investment or a counterparty could cause the fund to lose money or underperform. The fund could lose money if, due to a decline in credit quality, the issuer, guarantor or liquidity provider of a portfolio investment or a counterparty fails to make, or is perceived as being unable or unwilling to make, timely principal or interest payments or otherwise honor its obligations. The credit quality of the fund’s portfolio holdings can change rapidly in certain market environments and any default on the part of a single portfolio investment could cause the fund’s share price or yield to fall. Certain U.S. government securities that the fund invests in are not backed by the full faith and credit of the U.S. government, which means they are neither issued nor guaranteed by the U.S. Treasury. There can be no assurance that the U.S. government will provide financial support to securities of its agencies and instrumentalities if it is not obligated to do so under law. Also, any government guarantees on securities the fund owns do not extend to the shares of the fund itself.
Inflation-Protected Security Risk. The value of inflation-protected securities, including TIPS, generally will fluctuate in response to changes in “real” interest rates. Real interest rates represent nominal (or stated) interest rates reduced by the expected impact of inflation. The value of an inflation-protected security generally decreases when real interest rates rise and generally increase when real interest rates fall. In addition, the principal value of an inflation-protected security is periodically adjusted up or down along with the rate of inflation. If the measure of inflation falls, the principal value of the inflation-protected security will be adjusted downwards, and consequently, the interest payable on the security will be reduced. In certain interest rate environments, such as when real interest rates are rising faster than nominal interest rates, inflation-protected securities may experience greater losses than other fixed-income securities with similar durations. Repayment of the original bond principal upon maturity (as adjusted for inflation) is guaranteed by the United States Treasury in the case of TIPS. For securities that do not provide a similar guarantee, the adjusted principal value of the security to be repaid at maturity is subject to credit risk.
Tracking Error Risk. As an index fund, the fund seeks to track the performance of the index, although it may not be successful in doing so. The divergence between the performance of the fund and the index, positive or negative, is called “tracking error.” Tracking error can be caused by many factors and it may be significant. For example, the fund may not invest in certain securities in the index, match the securities’ weighting to the index, or the fund may invest in securities not in the index, due to regulatory, operational, custodial or liquidity constraints; corporate transactions; asset valuations; transaction costs and timing; tax considerations; and index rebalancing, which may result in tracking error. The fund may attempt to offset the effects of not being invested in certain index securities by making substitute investments, but these efforts may not be successful. In addition, cash flows into and out of the fund, operating expenses and trading costs all affect the ability of the fund to match the performance of the index, because the index does not have to manage cash flows and does not incur any costs.
Liquidity Risk. Liquidity risk exists when particular investments may be difficult to purchase, sell or value, especially during stressed market conditions. The market for certain investments may become illiquid due to specific adverse changes in the conditions of a particular issuer or under adverse market or economic conditions independent of the issuer. In addition, limited dealer inventories of certain securities could potentially lead to decreased liquidity. In such cases, the fund, due to limitations on investments in illiquid securities and the difficulty in readily purchasing and selling such securities at favorable times or prices, may decline in value, experience lower returns and/or be unable to achieve its desired level of exposure to a certain issuer or sector. Further, transactions in illiquid securities may entail transaction costs that are higher than those for transactions in liquid securities.
Securities Lending Risk. The fund may lend its portfolio securities to brokers, dealers, and other financial institutions provided a number of conditions are satisfied, including that the loan is fully collateralized. When the fund lends portfolio securities, its investment performance will continue to reflect changes in the value of the securities loaned, and the fund will also receive a fee or interest on the collateral. Securities lending involves the risk of loss of rights in, or delay in recovery of, the loaned securities if the borrower fails to return the security loaned or becomes insolvent. The fund will also bear the risk of any decline in value of securities acquired with cash collateral. The fund may pay lending fees to a party arranging the loan.
Operational Risk. The fund is exposed to operational risk arising from a number of factors, including, but not limited to, human error, processing and communication errors, errors of the fund’s service providers, counterparties or other third parties, failed or inadequate processes and technology or system failures. The fund seeks to reduce these operational risks through controls and procedures believed to be reasonably designed to address these risks. However, these controls and procedures cannot address every possible risk and may not fully mitigate the risks that they are intended to address.
Market Trading Risk. Although fund shares are listed on national securities exchanges, there can be no assurance that an active trading market for fund shares will develop or be maintained. If an active market is not maintained, investors may find it difficult to buy or sell fund shares. Trading of shares of the fund on a national securities exchange may be halted if exchange officials deem such action appropriate, if the fund is delisted, or if the activation of marketwide “circuit breakers” halts stock trading generally. If the fund’s shares are delisted, the fund may seek to list its shares on another market, merge with another ETF, or redeem its shares at NAV.
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Shares of the Fund May Trade at Prices Other Than NAV. As with all ETFs, fund shares may be bought and sold in the secondary market at market prices. Although it is expected that the market price of the shares of the fund will approximate the fund’s NAV, there may be times when the market price and the NAV vary significantly. Thus, an investor may pay more than NAV when buying shares of the fund in the secondary market, and an investor may receive less than NAV when selling those shares in the secondary market. The investment adviser cannot predict whether shares will trade above (premium), below (discount) or at NAV. The fund may have a limited number of financial institutions that may act as “Authorized Participants” or market makers. Only Authorized Participants who have entered into agreements with the fund’s distributor may engage in creation or redemption transactions directly with the fund (as discussed in the “Creation and Redemption” section below). If those Authorized Participants exit the business or are unable to process creation and/or redemption orders (including in situations where Authorized Participants have limited or diminished access to capital required to post collateral), and no other Authorized Participant is able to step forward to create and redeem in either of these cases, fund shares may trade at a discount to NAV like closed-end fund shares (and may even face delisting). Similar effects may result if market makers exit the business or are unable to continue making markets in the fund’s shares. More generally, market makers are not obligated to make a market in the fund’s shares, and Authorized Participants are not obligated to submit purchase or redemption orders for Creation Units. Further, while the creation/ redemption feature is designed to make it likely that shares normally will trade close to the value of the fund’s holdings, disruptions to creations and redemptions, including disruptions at market makers, Authorized Participants or market participants, or during periods of significant market volatility, may result in market prices that differ significantly from the value of the fund’s holdings. In addition, transactions by large shareholders may account for a large percentage of trading volume on the fund’s primary listing exchange and may, therefore, have a material effect on the market price of the fund’s shares.
The market price of fund shares during the trading day, like the price of any exchange-traded security, includes a “bid/ask” spread charged by the exchange specialist, market makers or other participants that trade the fund shares. The bid/ask spread on ETF shares varies over time based on the fund’s trading volume and market liquidity. As a result, the bid/ask spread on ETF shares is generally larger when the shares have little trading volume or market liquidity and generally lower when the shares have high trading volume or market liquidity. In addition, in times of severe market disruption, the bid/ask spread can increase significantly. At those times, fund shares are most likely to be traded at a discount to NAV, and the discount is likely to be greatest when the price of shares is falling fastest, which may be the time that investors most want to sell shares. The investment adviser believes that, under normal market conditions, large market price discounts or premiums to NAV will not be sustained because of arbitrage opportunities. There are various methods by which investors can purchase and sell shares of the fund and various types of orders that may be placed. Investors should consult their financial intermediary before purchasing or selling shares of the fund.
Money Market Fund Risk. An investment by the fund in an underlying money market fund has risks. The fund may invest in underlying money market funds that either seek to maintain a stable $1.00 net asset value (“stable share price money market funds”) or that have a share price that fluctuates (“variable share price money market funds”). Although an underlying stable share price money market fund seeks to maintain a stable $1.00 net asset value, it is possible to lose money by investing in such a money market fund. Because the share price of an underlying variable share price money market fund will fluctuate, when the fund sells the shares it owns they may be worth more or less than what the fund originally paid for them. In addition, neither type of money market fund is designed to offer capital appreciation. In exchange for their emphasis on stability and liquidity, money market investments may offer lower long-term performance than stock or bond investments. Certain underlying money market funds may impose a fee upon the sale of shares or may temporarily suspend the ability to sell shares if such fund’s liquidity falls below required minimums.
Schwab Short-Term U.S. Treasury ETF
Investment Objective
The fund’s goal is to track as closely as possible, before fees and expenses, the total return of an index that measures the performance of the short-term U.S. Treasury bond market. The fund’s investment objective is not fundamental and therefore may be changed by the fund’s Board of Trustees without shareholder approval.
More Information About Principal Investment Risks
The fund is subject to risks, any of which could cause an investor to lose money.
Market Risk. Financial markets rise and fall in response to a variety of factors, sometimes rapidly and unpredictably. Markets may be impacted by economic, political, regulatory and other conditions, including economic sanctions and other government actions. In addition, the occurrence of global events, such as war, terrorism, environmental disasters, natural disasters and epidemics, may also negatively affect the financial markets. These events could reduce consumer demand or economic output; result in market closures, low or negative interest rates, travel restrictions or quarantines; and significantly adversely impact the economy. Governmental and quasi-governmental authorities and regulators throughout the world have in the past often responded to serious economic disruptions with a variety of significant fiscal and monetary policy changes which could have an unexpected impact on financial markets and the fund’s investments. As with any investment whose performance is tied to these markets, the value of an investment in the fund will fluctuate, which means that an investor could lose money over short or long periods.
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Interest Rate Risk. Interest rates rise and fall over time. As with any investment whose yield reflects current interest rates, the fund’s yield will change over time. During periods when interest rates are low or there are negative interest rates, the fund’s yield (and total return) also may be low or the fund may be unable to maintain positive returns. Changes in interest rates also may affect the fund’s share price: a rise in interest rates generally causes the fund’s share price to fall. This risk is greater when the fund holds fixed-income securities with longer maturities. The longer the fund’s portfolio duration, the more sensitive to interest rate movements its share price is likely to be. For example, a fund with a longer portfolio duration is more likely to experience a decrease in its share price as interest rates rise. Duration is an estimate of a security’s (or portfolio of securities) sensitivity to changes in prevailing interest rates that is based on certain factors that may prove to be incorrect. It is therefore not an exact measurement and may not be able to reliably predict a particular security’s price sensitivity to changes in interest rates.
Economic conditions and other factors, including a central bank’s monetary policy, may result in changes in interest rates, which could have sudden and unpredictable effects on the markets and significantly impact the value of fixed-income securities in which the fund invests. Rising interest rates may decrease liquidity in the fixed-income securities markets, making it more difficult for the fund to sell its fixed-income securities holdings at a time when the investment adviser might wish to sell such securities. In addition, decreased market liquidity also may make it more difficult to value some or all of the fund’s fixed-income securities holdings. Certain countries have experienced negative interest rates on certain fixed-income securities. Negative or very low interest rates could magnify the risks associated with changes in interest rates. In general, changing interest rates, including rates that fall below zero, could have unpredictable effects on markets and may expose fixed-income and related markets to heightened volatility. To the extent that the investment adviser of the fund anticipates interest rate trends imprecisely, the fund could miss yield opportunities or its share price could fall. Inflation-protected securities may react differently to interest rate changes than other types of fixed-income securities and tend to react to changes in “real” interest rates.
Credit Risk. A decline in the credit quality of an issuer, guarantor or liquidity provider of a portfolio investment or a counterparty could cause the fund to lose money or underperform. The fund could lose money if, due to a decline in credit quality, the issuer, guarantor or liquidity provider of a portfolio investment or a counterparty fails to make, or is perceived as being unable or unwilling to make, timely principal or interest payments or otherwise honor its obligations. The credit quality of the fund’s portfolio holdings can change rapidly in certain market environments and any default on the part of a single portfolio investment could cause the fund’s share price or yield to fall. Certain U.S. government securities that the fund invests in are not backed by the full faith and credit of the U.S. government, which means they are neither issued nor guaranteed by the U.S. Treasury. There can be no assurance that the U.S. government will provide financial support to securities of its agencies and instrumentalities if it is not obligated to do so under law. Also, any government guarantees on securities the fund owns do not extend to the shares of the fund itself.
Tracking Error Risk. As an index fund, the fund seeks to track the performance of the index, although it may not be successful in doing so. The divergence between the performance of the fund and the index, positive or negative, is called “tracking error.” Tracking error can be caused by many factors and it may be significant. For example, the fund may not invest in certain securities in the index, match the securities’ weighting to the index, or the fund may invest in securities not in the index, due to regulatory, operational, custodial or liquidity constraints; corporate transactions; asset valuations; transaction costs and timing; tax considerations; and index rebalancing, which may result in tracking error. The fund may attempt to offset the effects of not being invested in certain index securities by making substitute investments, but these efforts may not be successful. In addition, cash flows into and out of the fund, operating expenses and trading costs all affect the ability of the fund to match the performance of the index, because the index does not have to manage cash flows and does not incur any costs.
Liquidity Risk. Liquidity risk exists when particular investments may be difficult to purchase, sell or value, especially during stressed market conditions. The market for certain investments may become illiquid due to specific adverse changes in the conditions of a particular issuer or under adverse market or economic conditions independent of the issuer. In addition, limited dealer inventories of certain securities could potentially lead to decreased liquidity. In such cases, the fund, due to limitations on investments in illiquid securities and the difficulty in readily purchasing and selling such securities at favorable times or prices, may decline in value, experience lower returns and/or be unable to achieve its desired level of exposure to a certain issuer or sector. Further, transactions in illiquid securities may entail transaction costs that are higher than those for transactions in liquid securities.
Securities Lending Risk. The fund may lend its portfolio securities to brokers, dealers, and other financial institutions provided a number of conditions are satisfied, including that the loan is fully collateralized. When the fund lends portfolio securities, its investment performance will continue to reflect changes in the value of the securities loaned, and the fund will also receive a fee or interest on the collateral. Securities lending involves the risk of loss of rights in, or delay in recovery of, the loaned securities if the borrower fails to return the security loaned or becomes insolvent. The fund will also bear the risk of any decline in value of securities acquired with cash collateral. The fund may pay lending fees to a party arranging the loan.
Operational Risk. The fund is exposed to operational risk arising from a number of factors, including, but not limited to, human error, processing and communication errors, errors of the fund’s service providers, counterparties or other third parties, failed or inadequate processes and technology or system failures. The fund seeks to reduce these operational risks through controls and procedures believed to be reasonably designed to address these risks. However, these controls and procedures cannot address every possible risk and may not fully mitigate the risks that they are intended to address.
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Market Trading Risk. Although fund shares are listed on national securities exchanges, there can be no assurance that an active trading market for fund shares will develop or be maintained. If an active market is not maintained, investors may find it difficult to buy or sell fund shares. Trading of shares of the fund on a national securities exchange may be halted if exchange officials deem such action appropriate, if the fund is delisted, or if the activation of marketwide “circuit breakers” halts stock trading generally. If the fund’s shares are delisted, the fund may seek to list its shares on another market, merge with another ETF, or redeem its shares at NAV.
Shares of the Fund May Trade at Prices Other Than NAV. As with all ETFs, fund shares may be bought and sold in the secondary market at market prices. Although it is expected that the market price of the shares of the fund will approximate the fund’s NAV, there may be times when the market price and the NAV vary significantly. Thus, an investor may pay more than NAV when buying shares of the fund in the secondary market, and an investor may receive less than NAV when selling those shares in the secondary market. The investment adviser cannot predict whether shares will trade above (premium), below (discount) or at NAV. The fund may have a limited number of financial institutions that may act as “Authorized Participants” or market makers. Only Authorized Participants who have entered into agreements with the fund’s distributor may engage in creation or redemption transactions directly with the fund (as discussed in the “Creation and Redemption” section below). If those Authorized Participants exit the business or are unable to process creation and/or redemption orders (including in situations where Authorized Participants have limited or diminished access to capital required to post collateral), and no other Authorized Participant is able to step forward to create and redeem in either of these cases, fund shares may trade at a discount to NAV like closed-end fund shares (and may even face delisting). Similar effects may result if market makers exit the business or are unable to continue making markets in the fund’s shares. More generally, market makers are not obligated to make a market in the fund’s shares, and Authorized Participants are not obligated to submit purchase or redemption orders for Creation Units. Further, while the creation/ redemption feature is designed to make it likely that shares normally will trade close to the value of the fund’s holdings, disruptions to creations and redemptions, including disruptions at market makers, Authorized Participants or market participants, or during periods of significant market volatility, may result in market prices that differ significantly from the value of the fund’s holdings. In addition, transactions by large shareholders may account for a large percentage of trading volume on the fund’s primary listing exchange and may, therefore, have a material effect on the market price of the fund’s shares.
The market price of fund shares during the trading day, like the price of any exchange-traded security, includes a “bid/ask” spread charged by the exchange specialist, market makers or other participants that trade the fund shares. The bid/ask spread on ETF shares varies over time based on the fund’s trading volume and market liquidity. As a result, the bid/ask spread on ETF shares is generally larger when the shares have little trading volume or market liquidity and generally lower when the shares have high trading volume or market liquidity. In addition, in times of severe market disruption, the bid/ask spread can increase significantly. At those times, fund shares are most likely to be traded at a discount to NAV, and the discount is likely to be greatest when the price of shares is falling fastest, which may be the time that investors most want to sell shares. The investment adviser believes that, under normal market conditions, large market price discounts or premiums to NAV will not be sustained because of arbitrage opportunities. There are various methods by which investors can purchase and sell shares of the fund and various types of orders that may be placed. Investors should consult their financial intermediary before purchasing or selling shares of the fund.
Money Market Fund Risk. An investment by the fund in an underlying money market fund has risks. The fund may invest in underlying money market funds that either seek to maintain a stable $1.00 net asset value (“stable share price money market funds”) or that have a share price that fluctuates (“variable share price money market funds”). Although an underlying stable share price money market fund seeks to maintain a stable $1.00 net asset value, it is possible to lose money by investing in such a money market fund. Because the share price of an underlying variable share price money market fund will fluctuate, when the fund sells the shares it owns they may be worth more or less than what the fund originally paid for them. In addition, neither type of money market fund is designed to offer capital appreciation. In exchange for their emphasis on stability and liquidity, money market investments may offer lower long-term performance than stock or bond investments. Certain underlying money market funds may impose a fee upon the sale of shares or may temporarily suspend the ability to sell shares if such fund’s liquidity falls below required minimums.
Schwab Intermediate-Term U.S. Treasury ETF
Investment Objective
The fund’s goal is to track as closely as possible, before fees and expenses, the total return of an index that measures the performance of the intermediate-term U.S. Treasury bond market. The fund’s investment objective is not fundamental and therefore may be changed by the fund’s Board of Trustees without shareholder approval.
More Information About Principal Investment Risks
The fund is subject to risks, any of which could cause an investor to lose money.
Market Risk. Financial markets rise and fall in response to a variety of factors, sometimes rapidly and unpredictably. Markets may be impacted by economic, political, regulatory and other conditions, including economic sanctions and other government actions. In addition, the occurrence of global events, such as war, terrorism, environmental disasters, natural disasters and epidemics, may also negatively affect
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the financial markets. These events could reduce consumer demand or economic output; result in market closures, low or negative interest rates, travel restrictions or quarantines; and significantly adversely impact the economy. Governmental and quasi-governmental authorities and regulators throughout the world have in the past often responded to serious economic disruptions with a variety of significant fiscal and monetary policy changes which could have an unexpected impact on financial markets and the fund’s investments. As with any investment whose performance is tied to these markets, the value of an investment in the fund will fluctuate, which means that an investor could lose money over short or long periods.
Interest Rate Risk. Interest rates rise and fall over time. As with any investment whose yield reflects current interest rates, the fund’s yield will change over time. During periods when interest rates are low or there are negative interest rates, the fund’s yield (and total return) also may be low or the fund may be unable to maintain positive returns. Changes in interest rates also may affect the fund’s share price: a rise in interest rates generally causes the fund’s share price to fall. This risk is greater when the fund holds fixed-income securities with longer maturities. The longer the fund’s portfolio duration, the more sensitive to interest rate movements its share price is likely to be. For example, a fund with a longer portfolio duration is more likely to experience a decrease in its share price as interest rates rise. Duration is an estimate of a security’s (or portfolio of securities) sensitivity to changes in prevailing interest rates that is based on certain factors that may prove to be incorrect. It is therefore not an exact measurement and may not be able to reliably predict a particular security’s price sensitivity to changes in interest rates.
Economic conditions and other factors, including a central bank’s monetary policy, may result in changes in interest rates, which could have sudden and unpredictable effects on the markets and significantly impact the value of fixed-income securities in which the fund invests. Rising interest rates may decrease liquidity in the fixed-income securities markets, making it more difficult for the fund to sell its fixed-income securities holdings at a time when the investment adviser might wish to sell such securities. In addition, decreased market liquidity also may make it more difficult to value some or all of the fund’s fixed-income securities holdings. Certain countries have experienced negative interest rates on certain fixed-income securities. Negative or very low interest rates could magnify the risks associated with changes in interest rates. In general, changing interest rates, including rates that fall below zero, could have unpredictable effects on markets and may expose fixed-income and related markets to heightened volatility. To the extent that the investment adviser of the fund anticipates interest rate trends imprecisely, the fund could miss yield opportunities or its share price could fall. Inflation-protected securities may react differently to interest rate changes than other types of fixed-income securities and tend to react to changes in “real” interest rates.
Credit Risk. A decline in the credit quality of an issuer, guarantor or liquidity provider of a portfolio investment or a counterparty could cause the fund to lose money or underperform. The fund could lose money if, due to a decline in credit quality, the issuer, guarantor or liquidity provider of a portfolio investment or a counterparty fails to make, or is perceived as being unable or unwilling to make, timely principal or interest payments or otherwise honor its obligations. The credit quality of the fund’s portfolio holdings can change rapidly in certain market environments and any default on the part of a single portfolio investment could cause the fund’s share price or yield to fall. Certain U.S. government securities that the fund invests in are not backed by the full faith and credit of the U.S. government, which means they are neither issued nor guaranteed by the U.S. Treasury. There can be no assurance that the U.S. government will provide financial support to securities of its agencies and instrumentalities if it is not obligated to do so under law. Also, any government guarantees on securities the fund owns do not extend to the shares of the fund itself.
Tracking Error Risk. As an index fund, the fund seeks to track the performance of the index, although it may not be successful in doing so. The divergence between the performance of the fund and the index, positive or negative, is called “tracking error.” Tracking error can be caused by many factors and it may be significant. For example, the fund may not invest in certain securities in the index, match the securities’ weighting to the index, or the fund may invest in securities not in the index, due to regulatory, operational, custodial or liquidity constraints; corporate transactions; asset valuations; transaction costs and timing; tax considerations; and index rebalancing, which may result in tracking error. The fund may attempt to offset the effects of not being invested in certain index securities by making substitute investments, but these efforts may not be successful. In addition, cash flows into and out of the fund, operating expenses and trading costs all affect the ability of the fund to match the performance of the index, because the index does not have to manage cash flows and does not incur any costs.
Liquidity Risk. Liquidity risk exists when particular investments may be difficult to purchase, sell or value, especially during stressed market conditions. The market for certain investments may become illiquid due to specific adverse changes in the conditions of a particular issuer or under adverse market or economic conditions independent of the issuer. In addition, limited dealer inventories of certain securities could potentially lead to decreased liquidity. In such cases, the fund, due to limitations on investments in illiquid securities and the difficulty in readily purchasing and selling such securities at favorable times or prices, may decline in value, experience lower returns and/or be unable to achieve its desired level of exposure to a certain issuer or sector. Further, transactions in illiquid securities may entail transaction costs that are higher than those for transactions in liquid securities.
Securities Lending Risk. The fund may lend its portfolio securities to brokers, dealers, and other financial institutions provided a number of conditions are satisfied, including that the loan is fully collateralized. When the fund lends portfolio securities, its investment performance will continue to reflect changes in the value of the securities loaned, and the fund will also receive a fee or interest on the collateral. Securities
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lending involves the risk of loss of rights in, or delay in recovery of, the loaned securities if the borrower fails to return the security loaned or becomes insolvent. The fund will also bear the risk of any decline in value of securities acquired with cash collateral. The fund may pay lending fees to a party arranging the loan.
Operational Risk. The fund is exposed to operational risk arising from a number of factors, including, but not limited to, human error, processing and communication errors, errors of the fund’s service providers, counterparties or other third parties, failed or inadequate processes and technology or system failures. The fund seeks to reduce these operational risks through controls and procedures believed to be reasonably designed to address these risks. However, these controls and procedures cannot address every possible risk and may not fully mitigate the risks that they are intended to address.
Market Trading Risk. Although fund shares are listed on national securities exchanges, there can be no assurance that an active trading market for fund shares will develop or be maintained. If an active market is not maintained, investors may find it difficult to buy or sell fund shares. Trading of shares of the fund on a national securities exchange may be halted if exchange officials deem such action appropriate, if the fund is delisted, or if the activation of marketwide “circuit breakers” halts stock trading generally. If the fund’s shares are delisted, the fund may seek to list its shares on another market, merge with another ETF, or redeem its shares at NAV.
Shares of the Fund May Trade at Prices Other Than NAV. As with all ETFs, fund shares may be bought and sold in the secondary market at market prices. Although it is expected that the market price of the shares of the fund will approximate the fund’s NAV, there may be times when the market price and the NAV vary significantly. Thus, an investor may pay more than NAV when buying shares of the fund in the secondary market, and an investor may receive less than NAV when selling those shares in the secondary market. The investment adviser cannot predict whether shares will trade above (premium), below (discount) or at NAV. The fund may have a limited number of financial institutions that may act as “Authorized Participants” or market makers. Only Authorized Participants who have entered into agreements with the fund’s distributor may engage in creation or redemption transactions directly with the fund (as discussed in the “Creation and Redemption” section below). If those Authorized Participants exit the business or are unable to process creation and/or redemption orders (including in situations where Authorized Participants have limited or diminished access to capital required to post collateral), and no other Authorized Participant is able to step forward to create and redeem in either of these cases, fund shares may trade at a discount to NAV like closed-end fund shares (and may even face delisting). Similar effects may result if market makers exit the business or are unable to continue making markets in the fund’s shares. More generally, market makers are not obligated to make a market in the fund’s shares, and Authorized Participants are not obligated to submit purchase or redemption orders for Creation Units. Further, while the creation/ redemption feature is designed to make it likely that shares normally will trade close to the value of the fund’s holdings, disruptions to creations and redemptions, including disruptions at market makers, Authorized Participants or market participants, or during periods of significant market volatility, may result in market prices that differ significantly from the value of the fund’s holdings. In addition, transactions by large shareholders may account for a large percentage of trading volume on the fund’s primary listing exchange and may, therefore, have a material effect on the market price of the fund’s shares.
The market price of fund shares during the trading day, like the price of any exchange-traded security, includes a “bid/ask” spread charged by the exchange specialist, market makers or other participants that trade the fund shares. The bid/ask spread on ETF shares varies over time based on the fund’s trading volume and market liquidity. As a result, the bid/ask spread on ETF shares is generally larger when the shares have little trading volume or market liquidity and generally lower when the shares have high trading volume or market liquidity. In addition, in times of severe market disruption, the bid/ask spread can increase significantly. At those times, fund shares are most likely to be traded at a discount to NAV, and the discount is likely to be greatest when the price of shares is falling fastest, which may be the time that investors most want to sell shares. The investment adviser believes that, under normal market conditions, large market price discounts or premiums to NAV will not be sustained because of arbitrage opportunities. There are various methods by which investors can purchase and sell shares of the fund and various types of orders that may be placed. Investors should consult their financial intermediary before purchasing or selling shares of the fund.
Money Market Fund Risk. An investment by the fund in an underlying money market fund has risks. The fund may invest in underlying money market funds that either seek to maintain a stable $1.00 net asset value (“stable share price money market funds”) or that have a share price that fluctuates (“variable share price money market funds”). Although an underlying stable share price money market fund seeks to maintain a stable $1.00 net asset value, it is possible to lose money by investing in such a money market fund. Because the share price of an underlying variable share price money market fund will fluctuate, when the fund sells the shares it owns they may be worth more or less than what the fund originally paid for them. In addition, neither type of money market fund is designed to offer capital appreciation. In exchange for their emphasis on stability and liquidity, money market investments may offer lower long-term performance than stock or bond investments. Certain underlying money market funds may impose a fee upon the sale of shares or may temporarily suspend the ability to sell shares if such fund’s liquidity falls below required minimums.
Schwab Long-Term U.S. Treasury ETF
Investment Objective
The fund’s goal is to track as closely as possible, before fees and expenses, the total return of an index that measures the performance of the long-term U.S. Treasury bond market. The fund’s investment objective is not fundamental and therefore may be changed by the fund’s Board of Trustees without shareholder approval.
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More Information About Principal Investment Risks
The fund is subject to risks, any of which could cause an investor to lose money.
Market Risk. Financial markets rise and fall in response to a variety of factors, sometimes rapidly and unpredictably. Markets may be impacted by economic, political, regulatory and other conditions, including economic sanctions and other government actions. In addition, the occurrence of global events, such as war, terrorism, environmental disasters, natural disasters and epidemics, may also negatively affect the financial markets. These events could reduce consumer demand or economic output; result in market closures, low or negative interest rates, travel restrictions or quarantines; and significantly adversely impact the economy. Governmental and quasi-governmental authorities and regulators throughout the world have in the past often responded to serious economic disruptions with a variety of significant fiscal and monetary policy changes which could have an unexpected impact on financial markets and the fund’s investments. As with any investment whose performance is tied to these markets, the value of an investment in the fund will fluctuate, which means that an investor could lose money over short or long periods.
Interest Rate Risk. Interest rates rise and fall over time. As with any investment whose yield reflects current interest rates, the fund’s yield will change over time. During periods when interest rates are low or there are negative interest rates, the fund’s yield (and total return) also may be low or the fund may be unable to maintain positive returns. Changes in interest rates also may affect the fund’s share price: a rise in interest rates generally causes the fund’s share price to fall. This risk is greater when the fund holds fixed-income securities with longer maturities. The longer the fund’s portfolio duration, the more sensitive to interest rate movements its share price is likely to be. For example, a fund with a longer portfolio duration is more likely to experience a decrease in its share price as interest rates rise. Duration is an estimate of a security’s (or portfolio of securities) sensitivity to changes in prevailing interest rates that is based on certain factors that may prove to be incorrect. It is therefore not an exact measurement and may not be able to reliably predict a particular security’s price sensitivity to changes in interest rates.
Economic conditions and other factors, including a central bank’s monetary policy, may result in changes in interest rates, which could have sudden and unpredictable effects on the markets and significantly impact the value of fixed-income securities in which the fund invests. Rising interest rates may decrease liquidity in the fixed-income securities markets, making it more difficult for the fund to sell its fixed-income securities holdings at a time when the investment adviser might wish to sell such securities. In addition, decreased market liquidity also may make it more difficult to value some or all of the fund’s fixed-income securities holdings. Certain countries have experienced negative interest rates on certain fixed-income securities. Negative or very low interest rates could magnify the risks associated with changes in interest rates. In general, changing interest rates, including rates that fall below zero, could have unpredictable effects on markets and may expose fixed-income and related markets to heightened volatility. To the extent that the investment adviser of the fund anticipates interest rate trends imprecisely, the fund could miss yield opportunities or its share price could fall. Inflation-protected securities may react differently to interest rate changes than other types of fixed-income securities and tend to react to changes in “real” interest rates.
Credit Risk. A decline in the credit quality of an issuer, guarantor or liquidity provider of a portfolio investment or a counterparty could cause the fund to lose money or underperform. The fund could lose money if, due to a decline in credit quality, the issuer, guarantor or liquidity provider of a portfolio investment or a counterparty fails to make, or is perceived as being unable or unwilling to make, timely principal or interest payments or otherwise honor its obligations. The credit quality of the fund’s portfolio holdings can change rapidly in certain market environments and any default on the part of a single portfolio investment could cause the fund’s share price or yield to fall. Certain U.S. government securities that the fund invests in are not backed by the full faith and credit of the U.S. government, which means they are neither issued nor guaranteed by the U.S. Treasury. There can be no assurance that the U.S. government will provide financial support to securities of its agencies and instrumentalities if it is not obligated to do so under law. Also, any government guarantees on securities the fund owns do not extend to the shares of the fund itself.
Tracking Error Risk. As an index fund, the fund seeks to track the performance of the index, although it may not be successful in doing so. The divergence between the performance of the fund and the index, positive or negative, is called “tracking error.” Tracking error can be caused by many factors and it may be significant. For example, the fund may not invest in certain securities in the index, match the securities’ weighting to the index, or the fund may invest in securities not in the index, due to regulatory, operational, custodial or liquidity constraints; corporate transactions; asset valuations; transaction costs and timing; tax considerations; and index rebalancing, which may result in tracking error. The fund may attempt to offset the effects of not being invested in certain index securities by making substitute investments, but these efforts may not be successful. In addition, cash flows into and out of the fund, operating expenses and trading costs all affect the ability of the fund to match the performance of the index, because the index does not have to manage cash flows and does not incur any costs.
Liquidity Risk. Liquidity risk exists when particular investments may be difficult to purchase, sell or value, especially during stressed market conditions. The market for certain investments may become illiquid due to specific adverse changes in the conditions of a particular issuer or under adverse market or economic conditions independent of the issuer. In addition, limited dealer inventories of certain securities could potentially lead to decreased liquidity. In such cases, the fund, due to limitations on investments in illiquid securities and the
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difficulty in readily purchasing and selling such securities at favorable times or prices, may decline in value, experience lower returns and/or be unable to achieve its desired level of exposure to a certain issuer or sector. Further, transactions in illiquid securities may entail transaction costs that are higher than those for transactions in liquid securities.
Securities Lending Risk. The fund may lend its portfolio securities to brokers, dealers, and other financial institutions provided a number of conditions are satisfied, including that the loan is fully collateralized. When the fund lends portfolio securities, its investment performance will continue to reflect changes in the value of the securities loaned, and the fund will also receive a fee or interest on the collateral. Securities lending involves the risk of loss of rights in, or delay in recovery of, the loaned securities if the borrower fails to return the security loaned or becomes insolvent. The fund will also bear the risk of any decline in value of securities acquired with cash collateral. The fund may pay lending fees to a party arranging the loan.
Operational Risk. The fund is exposed to operational risk arising from a number of factors, including, but not limited to, human error, processing and communication errors, errors of the fund’s service providers, counterparties or other third parties, failed or inadequate processes and technology or system failures. The fund seeks to reduce these operational risks through controls and procedures believed to be reasonably designed to address these risks. However, these controls and procedures cannot address every possible risk and may not fully mitigate the risks that they are intended to address.
Market Trading Risk. Although fund shares are listed on national securities exchanges, there can be no assurance that an active trading market for fund shares will develop or be maintained. If an active market is not maintained, investors may find it difficult to buy or sell fund shares. Trading of shares of the fund on a national securities exchange may be halted if exchange officials deem such action appropriate, if the fund is delisted, or if the activation of marketwide “circuit breakers” halts stock trading generally. If the fund’s shares are delisted, the fund may seek to list its shares on another market, merge with another ETF, or redeem its shares at NAV.
Shares of the Fund May Trade at Prices Other Than NAV. As with all ETFs, fund shares may be bought and sold in the secondary market at market prices. Although it is expected that the market price of the shares of the fund will approximate the fund’s NAV, there may be times when the market price and the NAV vary significantly. Thus, an investor may pay more than NAV when buying shares of the fund in the secondary market, and an investor may receive less than NAV when selling those shares in the secondary market. The investment adviser cannot predict whether shares will trade above (premium), below (discount) or at NAV. The fund may have a limited number of financial institutions that may act as “Authorized Participants” or market makers. Only Authorized Participants who have entered into agreements with the fund’s distributor may engage in creation or redemption transactions directly with the fund (as discussed in the “Creation and Redemption” section below). If those Authorized Participants exit the business or are unable to process creation and/or redemption orders (including in situations where Authorized Participants have limited or diminished access to capital required to post collateral), and no other Authorized Participant is able to step forward to create and/or redeem, fund shares may trade at a premium or discount to NAV like closed-end fund shares (and may even face delisting). Similar effects may result if market makers exit the business or are unable to continue making markets in the fund’s shares. More generally, market makers are not obligated to make a market in the fund’s shares, and Authorized Participants are not obligated to submit purchase or redemption orders for Creation Units. Further, while the creation/ redemption feature is designed to make it likely that shares normally will trade close to the value of the fund’s holdings, disruptions to creations and/or redemptions, including disruptions at market makers, Authorized Participants or market participants, or during periods of significant market volatility, may result in market prices that differ significantly from the value of the fund’s holdings. In addition, transactions by large shareholders may account for a large percentage of trading volume on the fund’s primary listing exchange and may, therefore, have a material effect on the market price of the fund’s shares.
The market price of fund shares during the trading day, like the price of any exchange-traded security, may be impacted by a “bid/ask” spread. The bid/ask spread is the difference between what investors are willing to pay for fund shares (the “bid” price) and the price at which investors are willing to sell fund shares (the “ask” price). The spread may vary over time and is based on many factors including supply and demand for the underlying securities held by the fund, supply and demand for shares of the fund itself, and the historical and current magnitude of price fluctuation of the fund’s asset class. The spread is generally narrower if the fund has higher trading volume and wider if the fund has lower trading volume (which may be the case for funds that are newly launched or small in size). Bid/ask spreads may also be wider during times of higher market volatility. At those times, fund shares are most likely to be traded at a discount to NAV, and the discount is likely to be greatest when the price of shares is falling fastest, which may be the time that investors most want to sell shares.
There are various methods by which investors can purchase and sell shares of the fund and various types of orders that may be placed. Investors should consult their financial intermediary before purchasing or selling shares of the fund.
Money Market Fund Risk. An investment by the fund in an underlying money market fund has risks. The fund may invest in underlying money market funds that either seek to maintain a stable $1.00 net asset value (“stable share price money market funds”) or that have a share price that fluctuates (“variable share price money market funds”). Although an underlying stable share price money market fund seeks to maintain a stable $1.00 net asset value, it is possible to lose money by investing in such a money market fund. Because the share price of an underlying variable share price money market fund will fluctuate, when the fund sells the shares it owns they may be worth more or less than what the fund originally paid for them. In addition, neither type of money market fund is designed to offer capital appreciation. In
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exchange for their emphasis on stability and liquidity, money market investments may offer lower long-term performance than stock or bond investments. Certain underlying money market funds may impose a fee upon the sale of shares or may temporarily suspend the ability to sell shares if such fund’s liquidity falls below required minimums.
Maturity and Duration: A Brief Explanation
“Maturity” and “duration” are concepts generally associated with fixed-income investments, such as bonds, and, as an investor or potential investor in a fixed-income fund, it is important that you have a basic understanding of each concept and how each relates to your investment. The following discussion about maturity and duration will also help you understand how bond prices – and, by extension, the share price of a fund that invests in bonds – can be expected to change given a change in interest rates.
Maturity and Duration – The Basics
A BOND is a loan between an issuer and a bondholder that obligates the issuer to pay the bondholder a specified sum of money, usually at specific intervals, over a specified period of time. More specifically, in exchange for the loan amount, or PRINCIPAL, a bondholder receives INTEREST – or COUPON – payments from the issuer as compensation for the use – or borrowing – of the bondholder’s principal for a specific period of time. “ISSUERS” may include entities such as corporations, governments, government agencies and municipalities, while “BONDHOLDERS” may include, but are not limited to, mutual funds or ETFs, banks, insurance companies and individuals.
In addition to the coupon payments that an issuer is obligated to pay a bondholder, the issuer is also obligated to repay the principal amount at “maturity.” A bond’s MATURITY represents when the final principal payment of a bond is scheduled to be repaid. Simply, it is the period of time until a bondholder can expect to receive all of its money, or principal, back from the issuer. A bond’s MATURITY DATE is the specific date by which the entire principal amount is to be repaid.
DURATION is a measure that estimates the sensitivity of a bond’s price relative to interest rate changes. Duration is often expressed as a period of time (i.e., 6 months, 1 year, 2.5 years, etc.). Generally, a lower duration indicates a lower sensitivity to changes in interest rates, and a higher duration indicates a higher sensitivity to changes in interest rates. Unlike maturity, which only measures the time until final payment of principal, duration considers the timing and pattern of interest and principal payments. Because different factors are considered when calculating maturity and duration, a bond’s duration is often shorter than its maturity and can at times be significantly shorter than the maturity. Another characteristic of duration is that as interest rates decline, duration tends to increase.
When thinking about the concepts of maturity and duration, there are two common risks1 generally associated with fixed-income investments that are important to consider. The first relates to maturity: there is risk that an issuer may be unable to repay the principal due. Usually, this risk increases with time. Bondholders typically have greater transparency with respect to an issuer’s ability to repay a loan over shorter time horizons, while assessing the future becomes more difficult as the periods get longer. As a result, bonds with longer maturities tend to carry higher repayment risk than bonds with shorter maturities. This is one reason why longer-maturity bonds typically pay higher interest rates than shorter-maturity bonds. Similarly, funds that invest in bonds with longer maturities are subject to higher repayment risk, but will typically pay higher dividends than funds that invest in bonds with shorter maturities.
The second risk relates to the impact of interest rates on a bond’s price. Interest rates generally fluctuate; meaning, they can increase or decrease prior to a bond’s maturity date. This means that during an investor’s holding period, a bond’s coupon may be less than or greater than current market interest rates. To the extent a bond’s coupon is different from current market interest rates, a bond’s price will fall or rise to align with current market interest rates. Bond prices exhibit an inverse relationship relative to interest rates: when interest rates decline, bond prices increase and vice versa. For example, assume you purchased a new issue bond when interest rates were 4%. Now assume that since you purchased that bond interest rates increased by 1% to 5%. Keeping in mind that bond prices and interest rates have an inverse relationship – when interest rates increase, a bond’s price declines – the price of the purchased 4% coupon bond in this example would decline because bonds can now be purchased with 5% coupons making the 4% coupon bond less valuable.
More on Duration
While having a basic understanding of both maturity and duration is important for any fixed-income investor, maturity tends to be more straightforward than the concept of duration, which requires a bit more discussion. In its simplest terms, duration attempts to quantify and estimate how much a bond’s price can be expected to change in response to changing interest rates. Typically, duration increases as a bond’s maturity increases and decreases as a bond’s maturity decreases; meaning, longer-maturity bonds have higher durations than shorter-maturity bonds. With this in mind, remember that as duration increases, a bond’s sensitivity to changes in interest rates increases. That means that when interest rates increase:
1
All investments are subject to risks, including risks not discussed in this section of the prospectus. Please refer to the risks disclosed elsewhere in this prospectus and the SAI to understand the risks of investing in the funds.
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Relative to longer duration bonds, shorter duration bonds would fall less in price because an investor’s principal would be repaid at the lower interest rate sooner.

Longer-duration bonds, on the other hand, would fall in price more than shorter-duration bonds, due to the longer horizon of holding bonds paying less interest than current interest rates.
So, when looking at the example above, where interest rates rose from 4% to 5%, the extent to which the 4% coupon bond would decline in price is dependent upon the bond’s duration – the longer the duration, the more it would decline in price. For example, a 4% coupon bond with a duration of 2 years would decline less in price than a 4% coupon bond with a duration of 4 years. This is true when assessing the extent to which any bond’s price may change when interest rates change.
Beyond providing a way to compare the relative interest rate sensitivity of bonds, duration attempts to estimate the expected change in a bond’s value should interest rates change by 1%. Again, recall the example above, where interest rates rose from 4% to 5%. Under this scenario, a bond with a 6 year duration would generally be expected to decline in price by approximately 6% (1% price move for each year of duration), while a bond with a 7 year duration would generally be expected to decline in price by approximately 7%. If the example above were reversed and interest rates instead declined by 1%, from 4% to 3%, the opposite would occur:

Relative to longer-duration bonds, shorter duration bonds would appreciate less in price; longer-duration bonds would appreciate more in price than shorter-duration bonds.

A bond with a 6 year duration would generally be expected to increase in value by approximately 6% (1% price move for each year of duration), while a bond, or bond fund, with a 7 year duration would generally be expected to increase in value by approximately 7%.
It is important to understand that a bond’s duration is not constant. As stated earlier, duration considers the timing and pattern of interest and principal payments. As time progresses, the period of time remaining until interest and principal payments are made changes, impacting the duration of a bond – as the time until those payments are made shortens, the duration also shortens. In addition, and as discussed previously, duration is also impacted by interest rate changes. As such, duration is a gauge of a bond’s sensitivity to interest rate changes, but it should not be relied on as an exact measure of the price change if interest rates change.
Maturity and Duration – At the Fund Level
A fund that invests in bonds is impacted in the same way as the individual bond described in the examples above – as interest rates increase the value of fund shares will decline, and as interest rates decline the value of fund shares will increase. To provide investors with information about a fund’s interest rate risk exposure, the fund typically provides the average maturity and duration of the portfolio, which take into consideration the maturity and duration of all the fund’s fixed-income investments. A fund with a shorter portfolio average maturity and duration is expected to be less impacted by changing interest rates than a fund with a longer portfolio average maturity and duration. Simply stated, a fund with a shorter portfolio average maturity and duration is generally less volatile as a result of interest rate changes than a fund with a longer portfolio average maturity and duration.
In the same way that a bond’s duration is not constant, a fund’s portfolio average maturity and duration are not constant. A fund’s portfolio average duration will change as a result of duration changes to the bonds the fund owns, as described above. Further, both the average maturity and duration may change as the fund’s portfolio manager buys and/or sells bonds owned by the fund. To remain aware of the interest rate sensitivity of funds you own, it is helpful to periodically review the fund’s reported average portfolio maturity and duration.
Maturity and Duration – Other Fixed-Income Securities
The above discussion provides a general overview of the concepts of maturity and duration. Application and calculation of these concepts may be slightly different or become more complex when applied to other types of fixed-income securities, which may require different assessments to determine and/or calculate maturity and duration. For example, to calculate the duration for securitized investments, such as mortgage-backed securities and certain asset-backed securities, an investor must look-through to the instruments underlying the securities and must account for the pace of repayment of the underlying instruments. To learn more about maturity and duration for the specific types of fixed-income investments that the funds may invest in, please refer to the SAI.
Portfolio Holdings
A description of the funds’ policies and procedures with respect to the disclosure of a fund’s portfolio securities is available in the SAI.
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Financial Highlights
This section provides further details about each fund’s financial history for the past five years or, if shorter, for its period of operations. Certain information reflects financial results for a single fund share. “Total return” shows the percentage that an investor in a fund would have earned or lost during a given period, assuming all distributions were reinvested. The information for fiscal years/periods ended December 31, 2017 through December 31, 2019 has been audited by the funds’ prior independent registered public accounting firm. The information for the fiscal years ended December 31, 2020 and December 31, 2021 has been audited by Deloitte & Touche LLP (Deloitte). Deloitte’s full report is included in each fund’s annual report (see back cover).
Schwab 1-5 Year Corporate Bond ETF
1/1/21–
12/31/21
1/1/20–
12/31/20
10/10/19(1)
12/31/19
Per-Share Data
Net asset value at beginning of period $ 51.37 $ 50.04 $ 50.00
Income (loss) from investment operations:
Net investment income (loss)(2)
0.50 0.89 0.23
Net realized and unrealized gains (losses)
(0.82) 1.74 0.02
Total from investment operations
(0.32) 2.63 0.25
Less distributions:
Distributions from net investment income
(0.48) (0.89) (0.21)
Distributions from net realized gains
(0.41)
Total distributions
(0.48) (1.30) (0.21)
Net asset value at end of period $ 50.57 $ 51.37 $ 50.04
Total return (0.64%) 5.31% 0.50%(3)
Ratios/Supplemental Data
Ratios to average net assets:
Total expenses
0.05%(4) 0.05% 0.06%(5)(6)
Net investment income (loss)
0.99% 1.74% 2.01%(5)
Portfolio turnover rate(7) 13% 80% 12%(3)
Net assets, end of period (x 1,000) $ 609,404 $ 118,146 $ 35,029
(1)
Commencement of operations.
(2)
Calculated based on the average shares outstanding during the period.
(3)
Not annualized.
(4)
Effective December 20, 2021, the annual operating expense ratio was reduced to 0.04%. The ratio presented for period ended 12/31/21 is a blended ratio.
(5)
Annualized.
(6)
Effective December 13, 2019, the annual operating expense ratio was reduced to 0.05%. The ratio presented for the period ended 12/31/19 is a blended ratio.
(7)
Portfolio turnover rate excludes securities received or delivered from processing of in-kind creations or redemptions.
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Schwab 5-10 Year Corporate Bond ETF
1/1/21–
12/31/21
1/1/20–
12/31/20
10/10/19(1)
12/31/19
Per-Share Data
Net asset value at beginning of period $ 53.69 $ 50.07 $ 50.00
Income (loss) from investment operations:
Net investment income (loss)(2)
1.02 1.26 0.29
Net realized and unrealized gains (losses)
(1.98) 3.60 0.04
Total from investment operations
(0.96) 4.86 0.33
Less distributions:
Distributions from net investment income
(1.00) (1.24) (0.26)
Net asset value at end of period $ 51.73 $ 53.69 $ 50.07
Total return (1.80%) 9.83% 0.67%(3)
Ratios/Supplemental Data
Ratios to average net assets:
Total expenses
0.05%(4) 0.05% 0.06%(5)(6)
Net investment income (loss)
1.96% 2.43% 2.61%(5)
Portfolio turnover rate(7) 11% 36% 8%(3)
Net assets, end of period (x 1,000) $ 375,055 $ 190,584 $ 110,151
(1)
Commencement of operations.
(2)
Calculated based on the average shares outstanding during the period.
(3)
Not annualized.
(4)
Effective December 20, 2021, the annual operating expense ratio was reduced to 0.04%. The ratio presented for period ended 12/31/21 is a blended ratio.
(5)
Annualized.
(6)
Effective December 13, 2019, the annual operating expense ratio was reduced to 0.05%. The ratio presented for the period ended 12/31/19 is a blended ratio.
(7)
Portfolio turnover rate excludes securities received or delivered from processing of in-kind creations or redemptions.
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Schwab U.S. Aggregate Bond ETF
1/1/21–
12/31/21
1/1/20–
12/31/20
1/1/19–
12/31/19
1/1/18–
12/31/18
1/1/17–
12/31/17
Per-Share Data
Net asset value at beginning of period $ 56.05 $ 53.43 $ 50.59 $ 52.07 $ 51.55
Income (loss) from investment operations:
Net investment income (loss)(1)
0.96 1.19 1.43 1.35 1.18
Net realized and unrealized gains (losses)
(1.93) 2.79 2.90 (1.42) 0.59
Total from investment operations
(0.97) 3.98 4.33 (0.07) 1.77
Less distributions:
Distributions from net investment income