ck0001540305-20210430

Aptus Drawdown Managed Equity ETF (ADME)

Aptus Collared Income Opportunity ETF (ACIO)

Aptus Defined Risk ETF (DRSK)

Opus Small Cap Value ETF (OSCV)

Listed on Cboe BZX Exchange, Inc.

PROSPECTUS
August 31, 2021















The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”) has not approved or disapproved of these securities or passed upon the accuracy or adequacy of this Prospectus. Any representation to the contrary is a criminal offense.




TABLE OF CONTENTS



APTUS DRAWDOWN MANAGED EQUITY ETF FUND SUMMARY
Investment Objective
The Aptus Drawdown Managed Equity ETF (the “Fund”) seeks capital appreciation with downside protection.
Fees and Expenses of the Fund
The following table describes the fees and expenses you may pay if you buy, hold, and sell shares of the Fund (“Shares”). You may pay other fees, such as brokerage commissions and other fees to financial intermediaries, which are not reflected in the table and Example below.
Annual Fund Operating Expenses
(expenses that you pay each year as a percentage of the value of your investment)
Management Fees 0.79%
Distribution and/or Service (12b-1) Fees 0.00%
Other Expenses 0.00%
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses 0.79%
Expense Example
This Example is intended to help you compare the cost of investing in the Fund with the cost of investing in other funds. The Example assumes that you invest $10,000 in the Fund for the time periods indicated and then redeem all of your Shares at the end of those periods. The Example also assumes that your investment has a 5% return each year and that the Fund’s operating expenses remain the same. Although your actual costs may be higher or lower, based on these assumptions your costs would be:
1 Year 3 Years 5 Years 10 Years
$81 $252 $439 $978
Portfolio Turnover
The Fund pays transaction costs, such as commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or “turns over” its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover rate may indicate higher transaction costs and may result in higher taxes when Shares are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are not reflected in annual fund operating expenses or in the Example, affect the Fund’s performance. For the fiscal year ended April 30, 2021, the Fund’s portfolio turnover rate was 48% of the average value of its portfolio.
Principal Investment Strategy
The Fund is an actively managed exchange-traded fund (“ETF”) that seeks to achieve its objective principally by investing in a portfolio of U.S.-listed equity securities, while limiting downside risk by purchasing exchange-listed put options on one or more of such equity securities or on broad-based indexes or ETFs that track the performance of the U.S. equity market. Under normal circumstances, at least 80% of the Fund’s net assets (plus borrowings for investment purposes) will be invested in equity securities.
The equity component of the Fund’s portfolio is comprised of large, mid, or small-capitalization U.S.-listed common stocks, real estate investment trusts (“REITs”), and American Depository Receipts (“ADRs”). Aptus Capital Advisors, LLC, the Fund’s investment adviser (“Aptus” or the “Adviser”), generally selects the equity securities for the Fund based on an analysis of each company’s fundamental and momentum characteristics to try to identify attractive opportunities for growth. The Adviser’s proprietary analysis is built from a “yield plus growth” framework, which takes into account fundamental characteristics such as yield, growth, and valuation, along with momentum, to identify attractive securities. Typically, such securities will have either an attractive combination of yield plus growth relative to the overall market and/or strong momentum relative to the overall market.
The Adviser seeks to limit the Fund’s exposure to equity market declines primarily by purchasing exchange-listed put options on individual equity securities or on one or more equity indexes or ETFs (each, a “reference asset”) that track a portfolio of U.S. equity securities (“Equity Puts”). A put option gives the purchaser the right to sell shares of the reference asset at a specified price (“strike price”) prior to a specified date (“expiration date”). The purchaser pays a cost (premium) to purchase the put option. In the event the reference asset declines in value below the strike price and the holder exercises its put option, the holder will be entitled to receive the difference between the value of the reference asset and the strike price (which gain is offset by the premium originally paid by the holder), and in the event the reference asset closes above the strike price as of the expiration date, the put option may end up worthless and the holder’s loss is limited to the amount of premium it paid. The Adviser may purchase Equity Puts that are at-the-money, near-the-money, or out-of-the-money (also known as a “tail hedge”), and the Adviser will actively manage the Fund’s Equity Puts as markets move or events occur (e.g., earnings announcements) to roll forward expiration dates or to increase or decrease market exposure. The Adviser generally expects to invest less than 5% of the Fund’s net assets in Equity Puts at the time of investment.
2



In addition to purchasing Equity Puts, the Adviser may write (sell) Equity Puts. A written (sold) put option gives the seller the obligation to buy shares of the reference asset at a strike price until the expiration date. The writer (seller) of the put option receives an amount (premium) for writing (selling) the option. In the event the reference asset declines in value below the strike price and the holder exercises the put option, the writer (seller) of the put option will have to pay the difference between the value of the reference asset and the strike price or deliver the reference asset (which loss is offset by the premium initially received), and in the event the reference asset appreciates in value, the put option may end up worthless and the writer (seller) of the put option retains the premium.
In addition to or in lieu of such Equity Puts, the Adviser may purchase call options on the Cboe Volatility Index® (the “VIX® Index”). The VIX Index reflects a calculation designed to produce a measure of constant, 30-day expected volatility of the U.S. stock market, derived from real-time, mid-quote prices of S&P 500® Index call and put options. A call option gives the purchaser the right to purchase shares of the reference asset at a specified strike price prior to a specified expiration date. The purchaser pays a cost (premium) to purchase the call option. In the event the reference asset appreciates in value, the value of the call option will generally increase, and in the event the reference asset declines in value, the call option may end up worthless and the premium may be lost. The Adviser generally expects to invest less than 1% of the Fund’s net assets in VIX Index call options at the time of investment.
The Fund may purchase call options or a combination of purchased and written (sold) call options (known as a “spread”) on individual equity securities or on one or more equity indexes or ETFs. A call option gives the purchaser the right to purchase shares of the reference asset at a specified strike price prior to a specified expiration date. The purchaser pays a cost (premium) to purchase the call option. In the event the reference asset appreciates in value, the value of the call option will generally increase, and in the event the reference asset declines in value, the call option may end up worthless and the premium may be lost.
A written (sold) call option gives the seller the obligation to sell shares of the reference asset at a strike price until the expiration date. The writer (seller) of the call option receives an amount (premium) for writing (selling) the option. In the event the reference asset appreciates above the strike price and the holder exercises the call option, the writer (seller) of the call option will have to pay the difference between the value of the reference asset and the strike price or deliver the reference asset (which loss is offset by the premium initially received), and in the event the reference asset declines in value, the call option may end up worthless and the writer (seller) of the call option retains the premium.
As of July 30, 2021, the Fund invested a significant portion of its assets in the information technology sector.
Principal Investment Risks
The principal risks of investing in the Fund are summarized below. The principal risks are presented in alphabetical order to facilitate finding particular risks and comparing them with other funds. Each risk summarized below is considered a “principal risk” of investing in the Fund, regardless of the order in which it appears. As with any investment, there is a risk that you could lose all or a portion of your investment in the Fund. Some or all of these risks may adversely affect the Fund’s net asset value per share (“NAV”), trading price, yield, total return and/or ability to meet its objectives. For more information about the risks of investing in the Fund, see the section in the Fund’s Prospectus titled “Additional Information About the Funds.”
Depositary Receipt Risk. Depositary Receipts involve risks similar to those associated with investments in foreign securities, such as changes in political or economic conditions of other countries and changes in the exchange rates of foreign currencies. Depositary Receipts listed on U.S. exchanges are issued by banks or trust companies and entitle the holder to all dividends and capital gains that are paid out on the underlying foreign shares (“Underlying Shares”). When the Fund invests in Depositary Receipts as a substitute for an investment directly in the Underlying Shares, the Fund is exposed to the risk that the Depositary Receipts may not provide a return that corresponds precisely with that of the Underlying Shares.
Derivative Securities Risk. The Fund invests in options that derive their performance from the performance of an underlying reference asset. Derivatives, such as the options in which the Fund invests, can be volatile and involve various types and degrees of risks, depending upon the characteristics of a particular derivative. Derivatives may entail investment exposures that are greater than their cost would suggest, meaning that a small investment in a derivative could have a substantial impact on the performance of the Fund. The Fund could experience a loss if its derivatives do not perform as anticipated, the derivatives are not correlated with the performance of their reference asset, or if the Fund is unable to purchase or liquidate a position because of an illiquid secondary market. The market for many derivatives is, or suddenly can become, illiquid. Changes in liquidity may result in significant, rapid, and unpredictable changes in the prices for derivatives.
Equity Market Risk. The equity securities held in the Fund’s portfolio may experience sudden, unpredictable drops in value or long periods of decline in value. This may occur because of factors that affect securities markets generally or factors affecting specific issuers, industries, or sectors in which the Fund invests. Common stocks are generally exposed to greater risk than other types of securities, such as preferred stock and debt obligations, because common stockholders generally have inferior rights to receive payment from issuers. In addition, local, regional or global events such as war, acts of terrorism, spread of infectious diseases or other public health issues, recessions, or other events could have a significant negative impact on the Fund and its investments. For example, the global pandemic caused by COVID-19, a novel coronavirus, and the aggressive responses taken by many governments, including closing borders, restricting international and domestic travel, and the imposition of prolonged quarantines or similar restrictions, has had negative impacts, and in many cases severe
3



impacts, on markets worldwide. The COVID-19 pandemic has caused prolonged disruptions to the normal business operations of companies around the world and the impact of such disruptions is hard to predict. Such events may affect certain geographic regions, countries, sectors and industries more significantly than others. Such events could adversely affect the prices and liquidity of the Fund’s portfolio securities or other instruments and could result in disruptions in the trading markets.
ETF Risks. The Fund is an ETF, and, as a result of an ETF’s structure, it is exposed to the following risks:
Authorized Participants, Market Makers, and Liquidity Providers Concentration Risk. The Fund has a limited number of financial institutions that may act as Authorized Participants (“APs”). In addition, there may be a limited number of market makers and/or liquidity providers in the marketplace. To the extent either of the following events occur, Shares may trade at a material discount to NAV and possibly face delisting: (i) APs exit the business or otherwise become unable to process creation and/or redemption orders and no other APs step forward to perform these services, or (ii) market makers and/or liquidity providers exit the business or significantly reduce their business activities and no other entities step forward to perform their functions.
Costs of Buying or Selling Shares. Due to the costs of buying or selling Shares, including brokerage commissions imposed by brokers and bid-ask spreads, frequent trading of Shares may significantly reduce investment results and an investment in Shares may not be advisable for investors who anticipate regularly making small investments.
Shares May Trade at Prices Other Than NAV. As with all ETFs, Shares may be bought and sold in the secondary market at market prices. Although it is expected that the market price of Shares will approximate the Fund’s NAV, there may be times when the market price of Shares is more than the NAV intra-day (premium) or less than the NAV intra-day (discount) due to supply and demand of Shares or during periods of market volatility. This risk is heightened in times of market volatility, periods of steep market declines, and periods when there is limited trading activity for Shares in the secondary market, in which case such premiums or discounts may be significant.
Trading. Although Shares are listed for trading on Cboe BZX Exchange, Inc. (the “Exchange”) and may be traded on U.S. exchanges other than the Exchange, there can be no assurance that Shares will trade with any volume, or at all, on any stock exchange. In stressed market conditions, the liquidity of Shares may begin to mirror the liquidity of the Fund’s underlying portfolio holdings, which can be significantly less liquid than Shares, and this could lead to differences between the market price of the Shares and the underlying value of those Shares.
Foreign Investment Risk. Because of the Fund’s investment in ADRs, changes in foreign economies and political climates are more likely to affect the Fund than a fund that invests exclusively in U.S. companies. There may be less government supervision of foreign markets, resulting in non-uniform accounting practices and less publicly available information. The value of foreign investments may be affected by changes in exchange control regulations, application of foreign tax laws (including withholding tax), changes in governmental administration or economic or monetary policy (in this country or abroad) or changed circumstances in dealings between nations.
High Portfolio Turnover Risk. The Fund may frequently buy and sell portfolio securities and other assets to rebalance the Fund’s exposure to specific securities. Higher portfolio turnover may result in the Fund paying higher levels of transaction costs and generating greater tax liabilities for shareholders. Portfolio turnover risk may cause the Fund’s performance to be less than you expect.
Management Risk. The Fund is actively managed and may not meet its investment objective based on the Adviser’s success or failure to implement investment strategies for the Fund.
Market Capitalization Risk.
Large-Capitalization Investing. The securities of large-capitalization companies may be relatively mature compared to smaller companies and therefore subject to slower growth during times of economic expansion. Large-capitalization companies may also be unable to respond quickly to new competitive challenges, such as changes in technology and consumer tastes.
Mid-Capitalization Investing. The securities of mid-capitalization companies may be more vulnerable to adverse issuer, market, political, or economic developments than securities of large-capitalization companies, but they may also be subject to slower growth than small-capitalization companies during times of economic expansion. The securities of mid-capitalization companies generally trade in lower volumes and are subject to greater and more unpredictable price changes than large capitalization stocks or the stock market as a whole, but they may also be nimbler and more responsive to new challenges than large-capitalization companies. Some mid-capitalization companies have limited product lines, markets, financial resources, and management personnel and tend to concentrate on fewer geographical markets relative to large-capitalization companies.
Small-Capitalization Investing. The securities of small-capitalization companies may be more vulnerable to adverse issuer, market, political, or economic developments than securities of larger-capitalization companies. The securities of
4



small-capitalization companies generally trade in lower volumes and are subject to greater and more unpredictable price changes than larger capitalization stocks or the stock market as a whole. Some small capitalization companies have limited product lines, markets, and financial and managerial resources and tend to concentrate on fewer geographical markets relative to larger capitalization companies. There is typically less publicly available information concerning smaller-capitalization companies than for larger, more established companies. Small-capitalization companies also may be particularly sensitive to changes in interest rates, government regulation, borrowing costs and earnings.
Options Risk. Selling (writing) and buying options are speculative activities and entail greater than ordinary investment risks. The Fund’s use of call and put options can lead to losses because of adverse movements in the price or value of the reference asset, which may be magnified by certain features of the options. When selling a put option, the Fund will receive a premium; however, this premium may not be enough to offset a loss incurred by the Fund if the price of the underlying asset is below the strike price by an amount equal to or greater than the premium. Purchasing of put or call options involves the payment of premiums, which may adversely affect the Fund’s performance. Purchased put or call options may expire worthless resulting in the Fund’s loss of the premium it paid for the option.
REIT Investment Risk. Investments in REITs involve unique risks. REITs may have limited financial resources, may trade less frequently and in limited volume, and may be more volatile than other securities. REITs may be affected by changes in the value of their underlying properties or mortgages or by defaults by their borrowers or tenants. Furthermore, these entities depend upon specialized management skills, have limited diversification and are, therefore, subject to risks inherent in financing a limited number of projects. In addition, the performance of a REIT may be affected by changes in the tax laws or by its failure to qualify for tax-free pass-through of income.
Sector Risk. To the extent the Fund invests more heavily in particular sectors of the economy, its performance will be especially sensitive to developments that significantly affect those sectors.
Information Technology Sector Risk. Market or economic factors impacting information technology companies and companies that rely heavily on technological advances could have a significant effect on the value of the Fund’s investments. The value of stocks of information technology companies and companies that rely heavily on technology is particularly vulnerable to rapid changes in technology product cycles, rapid product obsolescence, government regulation and competition, both domestically and internationally, including competition from foreign competitors with lower production costs. Stocks of information technology companies and companies that rely heavily on technology, especially those of smaller, less-seasoned companies, tend to be more volatile than the overall market. Information technology companies are heavily dependent on patent and intellectual property rights, the loss or impairment of which may adversely affect profitability.
Tail Hedge Risk. The Fund may purchase put options designed to mitigate the Fund’s exposure to significant declines in the broader U.S. equity market. However, there is a risk that the Fund will experience a loss as a result of engaging in such options transactions. Moreover, there can be no assurance that the tail hedge will be successful in protecting against all or any declines in the value of the Fund’s portfolio because the amount of protection provided by the put options purchased by the Fund and the price of such protection will be dictated by prevailing market sentiment at the time the tail hedge is triggered. Additionally, the tail hedge will not protect against declines in the value of the Fund’s portfolio where such declines are based on factors other than general stock market fluctuations.
Tax Risk. The Fund expects to generate premiums from its sale of options. These premiums typically will result in short-term capital gains for federal income tax purposes. In addition, equity securities that are hedged with put options may not be eligible for long-term capital gains tax treatment. The Fund is not designed for investors seeking a tax efficient investment.
Performance
The following performance information indicates some of the risks of investing in the Fund. The bar chart shows the Fund’s performance for calendar years ended December 31. The table illustrates how the Fund’s average annual returns for the 1-year and since inception periods compare with those of a broad measure of market performance. The Fund’s past performance, before and after taxes, does not necessarily indicate how it will perform in the future. Updated performance information is available on the Fund’s website at www.aptusetfs.com/funds/adme.
Prior to November 8, 2019, the Fund operated as an index-based ETF that sought to track the performance of the Aptus Behavioral Momentum Index. Consequently, performance for periods prior to November 8, 2019 does not reflect the Fund’s current investment strategy as an actively-managed ETF. The Fund’s performance may have differed if the Fund’s current strategy had been in place.

5



Calendar Year Total Return
ck0001540305-20210430_g1.jpg
For the year-to-date period ended June 30, 2021, the Fund’s total return was 10.40%. During the period of time shown in the bar chart, the Fund’s highest quarterly return was 13.97% for the quarter ended June 30, 2020, and the lowest quarterly return was -22.83% for the quarter ended December 31, 2018.
Average Annual Total Returns for the Period Ended December 31, 2020
Aptus Drawdown Managed Equity ETF 1 Year
Since Inception
(6/8/2016)
Return Before Taxes
18.19% 9.05%
Return After Taxes on Distributions
18.06% 8.88%
Return After Taxes on Distributions and Sale of Shares
10.84% 7.10%
S&P 500® Index
(reflects no deduction for fees, expenses, or taxes)
18.40% 15.61%
After-tax returns are calculated using the historical highest individual federal marginal income tax rates during the period covered by the table above and do not reflect the impact of state and local taxes. Actual after-tax returns depend on an investor’s tax situation and may differ from those shown. After-tax returns shown are not relevant to investors who hold their Shares through tax-deferred arrangements such as an individual retirement account (“IRA”) or other tax-advantaged accounts.
Management
Investment Adviser
Aptus Capital Advisors, LLC serves as investment adviser to the Fund.
Portfolio Managers
John D. (“JD”) Gardner, CFA, Chief Investment Officer and Managing Member at the Adviser, has been a portfolio manager of the Fund since August 2017.
John Luke Tyner, CFA, Portfolio Manager and Analyst at the Adviser, has been a portfolio manager of the Fund since August 2020.
David Wagner III, CFA, Portfolio Manager and Analyst at the Adviser, has been a portfolio manager of the Fund since August 2020.
Beckham D. Wyrick, CFA, Portfolio Manager at the Adviser, has been a portfolio manager of the Fund since August 2017.
Purchase and Sale of Shares
Shares are listed on the Exchange, and individual Shares may only be bought and sold in the secondary market through brokers at market prices, rather than NAV. Because Shares trade at market prices rather than NAV, Shares may trade at a price greater than NAV (premium) or less than NAV (discount).
The Fund issues and redeems Shares at NAV only in large blocks known as “Creation Units,” which only APs (typically, broker-dealers) may purchase or redeem. The Fund generally issues and redeems Creation Units in exchange for a portfolio of securities and/or a designated amount of U.S. cash.
6



Investors may incur costs attributable to the difference between the highest price a buyer is willing to pay to purchase Shares (bid) and the lowest price a seller is willing to accept for Shares (ask) when buying or selling Shares in the secondary market (the “bid-ask spread”). Recent information about the Fund, including its NAV, market price, premiums and discounts, and bid-ask spreads is available on the Fund’s website at www.aptusetfs.com/funds/adme.
Tax Information
Fund distributions are generally taxable as ordinary income, qualified dividend income, or capital gains (or a combination), unless your investment is in an IRA or other tax-advantaged account. Distributions on investments made through tax-deferred arrangements may be taxed later upon withdrawal of assets from those accounts.
Financial Intermediary Compensation
If you purchase Shares through a broker-dealer or other financial intermediary (such as a bank) (an “Intermediary”), the Adviser or its affiliates may pay Intermediaries for certain activities related to the Fund, including participation in activities that are designed to make Intermediaries more knowledgeable about exchange traded products, including the Fund, or for other activities, such as marketing, educational training or other initiatives related to the sale or promotion of Shares. These payments may create a conflict of interest by influencing the Intermediary and your salesperson to recommend the Fund over another investment. Any such arrangements do not result in increased Fund expenses. Ask your salesperson or visit the Intermediary’s website for more information.
7



APTUS COLLARED INCOME OPPORTUNITY ETF FUND SUMMARY
Investment Objective
The Aptus Collared Income Opportunity ETF (the “Fund”) seeks current income and capital appreciation.
Fees and Expenses of the Fund
The following table describes the fees and expenses you may pay if you buy, hold, and sell shares of the Fund (“Shares”). You may pay other fees, such as brokerage commissions and other fees to financial intermediaries, which are not reflected in the table and Example below.
Annual Fund Operating Expenses
(expenses that you pay each year as a percentage of the value of your investment)
Management Fees 0.79%
Distribution and/or Service (12b-1) Fees 0.00%
Other Expenses 0.00%
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses 0.79%
Expense Example
This Example is intended to help you compare the cost of investing in the Fund with the cost of investing in other funds. The Example assumes that you invest $10,000 in the Fund for the time periods indicated and then redeem all of your Shares at the end of those periods. The Example also assumes that your investment has a 5% return each year and that the Fund’s operating expenses remain the same. Although your actual costs may be higher or lower, based on these assumptions your costs would be:
1 Year 3 Years 5 Years 10 Years
$81 $252 $439 $978
Portfolio Turnover
The Fund pays transaction costs, such as commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or “turns over” its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover rate may indicate higher transaction costs and may result in higher taxes when Shares are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are not reflected in annual fund operating expenses or in the Example, affect the Fund’s performance. For the fiscal year ended April 30, 2021, the Fund’s portfolio turnover rate was 46% of the average value of its portfolio.
Principal Investment Strategy
The Fund is an actively managed exchange-traded fund (“ETF”) that seeks to achieve its investment objective principally by investing in a portfolio of U.S.-listed equity securities of any market capitalization and buying put options or an options collar (i.e., a mix of written (sold) call options and long (bought) put options) on the same underlying equity securities or on an index tracking a portfolio of U.S. equity securities (a “U.S. Equity Index”). The U.S. Equity Index and the underlying equity securities may be of any market capitalization. The equity securities and options held by the Fund must be listed on a U.S.-exchange, and the equity securities may include common stocks of U.S. companies, American Depositary Receipts (“ADRs”) (i.e., receipts evidencing ownership of foreign equity securities), and real estate investment trusts (“REITs”). The Fund will typically limit investments in ADRs to approximately 20% of the Fund’s net assets.
Aptus Capital Advisors, LLC, the Fund’s investment adviser (“Aptus” or the “Adviser”), selects the Fund’s equity securities based on the Adviser’s assessment of the likelihood that the dividends paid by the issuer will increase or remain stable and based on the liquidity of the options available for such security. The Adviser considers factors primarily related to yield, earnings growth, revenue growth, and distribution history in assessing the likelihood that the dividends paid by an issuer will increase or remain stable. No more than 30% of the Fund’s net assets will typically be invested in companies in a single sector. The Adviser may replace a security if it believes another security offers a better value proposition, with a bias for low portfolio turnover.
The Fund’s options collar strategy typically consists of two components: (i) selling covered call options on up to 100% of the equity securities held by the Fund to generate premium from such options, while (ii) simultaneously reinvesting a portion of such premium to buy put options on the same underlying equity securities or a U.S. Equity Index to “hedge” or mitigate the downside risk associated with owning equity securities. The Fund seeks to generate income from the combination of dividends received from the equity securities held by the Fund and premiums received from the sale of options. Additionally, the Fund may purchase put options or utilize a combination of purchased and written (sold) put options (known as a “spread”) on one or more equity securities or a U.S. Equity Index to “hedge” or mitigate the downside risk associated with owning equity securities.
8



Call Options. A written (sold) call option gives the seller the obligation to sell shares of the reference asset at a specified price (“strike price”) until a specified date (“expiration date”). The writer (seller) of the call option receives an amount (premium) for writing (selling) the option. In the event the reference asset appreciates above the strike price and the holder exercises the call option, the writer (seller) of the call option will have to pay the difference between the value of the reference asset and the strike price or deliver the reference asset (which loss is offset by the premium initially received), and in the event the reference asset declines in value, the call option may end up worthless and the writer (seller) of the call option retains the premium. The call options written by the Fund are “covered” because the Fund owns the reference asset at the time it sells the option.
Put Options. A put option gives the purchaser the right to sell shares of the reference asset at a strike price prior to its expiration date. The purchaser pays a cost (premium) to purchase the put option. In the event the reference asset declines in value below the strike price and the holder exercises its put option, the holder will be entitled to receive the difference between the value of the reference asset and the strike price (which gain is offset by the premium originally paid by the holder), and in the event the reference asset closes above the strike price as of the expiration date, the put option may end up worthless and the holder’s loss is limited to the amount of premium it paid.
A written (sold) put option gives the seller the obligation to buy shares of the reference asset at a strike price until its expiration date. The writer (seller) of the put option receives an amount (premium) for writing (selling) the option. In the event the reference asset declines in value below the strike price and the holder exercises the put option, the writer (seller) of the put option will have to pay the difference between the value of the reference asset and the strike price or deliver the reference asset (which loss is offset by the premium initially received), and in the event the reference asset appreciates in value, the put option may end up worthless and the writer (seller) of the put option retains the premium. The put options written by the Fund are considered “covered” when the Fund owns at least an equivalent number of put options on the same reference asset with the same expiration date and a higher strike price at the time it sells the options.
The Fund may write call options on up to 100% of each equity position held in the portfolio and will use a portion of the premium received from writing such call options to purchase put options. Call options written by the Fund will typically have a strike price that is higher than the current price of the reference asset, and put options purchased by the Fund will typically have a strike price that is lower (in some cases, significantly lower) than the current price of the reference asset. Options selected for the Fund will typically expire one week to nine months from their purchase date and will be rolled periodically (e.g., monthly) to continue generating income or to reflect the Adviser’s revised outlook on the underlying portfolio security. When an option is rolled, the Adviser simultaneously closes one option contract and opens another. The new contract opened can have a further-dated expiration (i.e., the option would be rolled “out”), higher strike price (i.e., rolled “up”), lower strike price (i.e., rolled “down”), or a combination of both a different expiration and strike.
In addition to the options strategies discussed above, the Fund may utilize a “bull call spread” options strategy. The Fund’s bull call spread strategy entails (i) the purchase of at-the-money call options (i.e., call options with a strike price roughly equal to the current price of the underlying asset) on an index or ETF tracking an index representing the U.S. equity market and (ii) writing (selling) out-of-the-money call options (i.e., call options with a strike price higher than the current price of the underlying asset) on the same index or ETF. The bull call spread strategy is intended to profit from moderate increases in the value of the reference asset (up to the strike price of the written call options). The Fund may also purchase call options on the securities held by the Fund to enable the Fund to further benefit from an increase in the value of such securities.
The Fund is considered to be non-diversified, which means that it may invest more of its assets in the securities of a single issuer or a smaller number of issuers than if it were a diversified fund.
As of July 30, 2021, the Fund invested a significant portion of its assets in the information technology sector.
Principal Investment Risks
The principal risks of investing in the Fund are summarized below. The principal risks are presented in alphabetical order to facilitate finding particular risks and comparing them with other funds. Each risk summarized below is considered a “principal risk” of investing in the Fund, regardless of the order in which it appears. As with any investment, there is a risk that you could lose all or a portion of your investment in the Fund. Some or all of these risks may adversely affect the Fund’s net asset value per share (“NAV”), trading price, yield, total return and/or ability to meet its objectives. For more information about the risks of investing in the Fund, see the section in the Fund’s Prospectus titled “Additional Information About the Funds.”
Collared Options Strategy Risk. Writing and buying options are speculative activities and entail greater than ordinary investment risks. The Fund’s use of call and put options can lead to losses because of adverse movements in the price or value of the underlying security, which may be magnified by certain features of the options. When selling a call option, the Fund will receive a premium; however, this premium may not be enough to offset a loss incurred by the Fund if the price of the underlying security is above the strike price by an amount equal to or greater than the premium. The value of an option may be adversely affected if the market for the option becomes less liquid or smaller, and will be affected by changes in the value or yield of the option’s underlying security, an increase in interest rates, a change in the actual or perceived volatility of the stock market or the
9



underlying security and the remaining time to expiration. Additionally, the value of an option does not increase or decrease at the same rate as the underlying security.
The Fund’s use of options may reduce the Fund’s ability to profit from increases in the value of the underlying securities. If the price of the underlying security of a written call option rises above its strike price, the value of the option and, consequently, the Fund may decline significantly more than if the Fund invested solely in the underlying security instead of using options. Similarly, if the price of the underlying security of a purchased put option remains above its strike price, the option may become worthless, and, consequently the value of the Fund may decline significantly more than if the Fund invested solely in the underlying security instead of using options.
Depositary Receipt Risk. Depositary Receipts involve risks similar to those associated with investments in foreign securities, such as changes in political or economic conditions of other countries and changes in the exchange rates of foreign currencies. Depositary Receipts listed on U.S. exchanges are issued by banks or trust companies and entitle the holder to all dividends and capital gains that are paid out on the underlying foreign shares (“Underlying Shares”). When the Fund invests in Depositary Receipts as a substitute for an investment directly in the Underlying Shares, the Fund is exposed to the risk that the Depositary Receipts may not provide a return that corresponds precisely with that of the Underlying Shares.
Derivative Securities Risk. The Fund invests in options that derive their performance from the performance of an underlying reference asset. Derivatives, such as the options in which the Fund invests, can be volatile and involve various types and degrees of risks, depending upon the characteristics of a particular derivative. Derivatives may entail investment exposures that are greater than their cost would suggest, meaning that a small investment in a derivative could have a substantial impact on the performance of the Fund. The Fund could experience a loss if its derivatives do not perform as anticipated, the derivatives are not correlated with the performance of their reference asset, or if the Fund is unable to purchase or liquidate a position because of an illiquid secondary market. The market for many derivatives is, or suddenly can become, illiquid. Changes in liquidity may result in significant, rapid, and unpredictable changes in the prices for derivatives.
Equity Market Risk. The equity securities held in the Fund’s portfolio may experience sudden, unpredictable drops in value or long periods of decline in value. This may occur because of factors that affect securities markets generally or factors affecting specific issuers, industries, or sectors in which the Fund invests. Common stocks are generally exposed to greater risk than other types of securities, such as preferred stock and debt obligations, because common stockholders generally have inferior rights to receive payment from issuers. In addition, local, regional or global events such as war, acts of terrorism, spread of infectious diseases or other public health issues, recessions, or other events could have a significant negative impact on the Fund and its investments. For example, the global pandemic caused by COVID-19, a novel coronavirus, and the aggressive responses taken by many governments, including closing borders, restricting international and domestic travel, and the imposition of prolonged quarantines or similar restrictions, has had negative impacts, and in many cases severe impacts, on markets worldwide. The COVID-19 pandemic has caused prolonged disruptions to the normal business operations of companies around the world and the impact of such disruptions is hard to predict. Such events may affect certain geographic regions, countries, sectors and industries more significantly than others. Such events could adversely affect the prices and liquidity of the Fund’s portfolio securities or other instruments and could result in disruptions in the trading markets.
ETF Risks. The Fund is an ETF, and, as a result of an ETF’s structure, it is exposed to the following risks:
Authorized Participants, Market Makers, and Liquidity Providers Concentration Risk. The Fund has a limited number of financial institutions that may act as Authorized Participants (“APs”). In addition, there may be a limited number of market makers and/or liquidity providers in the marketplace. To the extent either of the following events occur, Shares may trade at a material discount to NAV and possibly face delisting: (i) APs exit the business or otherwise become unable to process creation and/or redemption orders and no other APs step forward to perform these services, or (ii) market makers and/or liquidity providers exit the business or significantly reduce their business activities and no other entities step forward to perform their functions.
Costs of Buying or Selling Shares. Due to the costs of buying or selling Shares, including brokerage commissions imposed by brokers and bid-ask spreads, frequent trading of Shares may significantly reduce investment results and an investment in Shares may not be advisable for investors who anticipate regularly making small investments.
Shares May Trade at Prices Other Than NAV. As with all ETFs, Shares may be bought and sold in the secondary market at market prices. Although it is expected that the market price of Shares will approximate the Fund’s NAV, there may be times when the market price of Shares is more than the NAV intra-day (premium) or less than the NAV intra-day (discount) due to supply and demand of Shares or during periods of market volatility. This risk is heightened in times of market volatility, periods of steep market declines, and periods when there is limited trading activity for Shares in the secondary market, in which case such premiums or discounts may be significant.
Trading. Although Shares are listed for trading on Cboe BZX Exchange, Inc. (the “Exchange”) and may be traded on U.S. exchanges other than the Exchange, there can be no assurance that Shares will trade with any volume, or at all, on any stock exchange. In stressed market conditions, the liquidity of Shares may begin to mirror the liquidity of the Fund’s underlying
10



portfolio holdings, which can be significantly less liquid than Shares, and this could lead to differences between the market price of the Shares and the underlying value of those Shares.
Foreign Investment Risk. Because of the Fund’s investment in ADRs, changes in foreign economies and political climates are more likely to affect the Fund than a fund that invests exclusively in U.S. companies. There may be less government supervision of foreign markets, resulting in non-uniform accounting practices and less publicly available information. The value of foreign investments may be affected by changes in exchange control regulations, application of foreign tax laws (including withholding tax), changes in governmental administration or economic or monetary policy (in this country or abroad) or changed circumstances in dealings between nations.
High Portfolio Turnover Risk. The Fund may frequently buy and sell portfolio securities and other assets to rebalance the Fund’s exposure to specific securities. Higher portfolio turnover may result in the Fund paying higher levels of transaction costs and generating greater tax liabilities for shareholders. Portfolio turnover risk may cause the Fund’s performance to be less than you expect.
Limited Operating History. The Fund is a recently organized investment company with a limited operating history. As a result, prospective investors have a limited track record or history on which to base their investment decision.
Management Risk. The Fund is actively managed and may not meet its investment objective based on the Adviser’s success or failure to implement investment strategies for the Fund.
Market Capitalization Risk.
Large-Capitalization Investing. The securities of large-capitalization companies may be relatively mature compared to smaller companies and therefore subject to slower growth during times of economic expansion. Large-capitalization companies may also be unable to respond quickly to new competitive challenges, such as changes in technology and consumer tastes.
Mid-Capitalization Investing. The securities of mid-capitalization companies may be more vulnerable to adverse issuer, market, political, or economic developments than securities of large-capitalization companies, but they may also be subject to slower growth than small-capitalization companies during times of economic expansion. The securities of mid-capitalization companies generally trade in lower volumes and are subject to greater and more unpredictable price changes than large capitalization stocks or the stock market as a whole, but they may also be nimbler and more responsive to new challenges than large-capitalization companies. Some mid-capitalization companies have limited product lines, markets, financial resources, and management personnel and tend to concentrate on fewer geographical markets relative to large-capitalization companies.
Small-Capitalization Investing. The securities of small-capitalization companies may be more vulnerable to adverse issuer, market, political, or economic developments than securities of larger-capitalization companies. The securities of small-capitalization companies generally trade in lower volumes and are subject to greater and more unpredictable price changes than larger capitalization stocks or the stock market as a whole. Some small capitalization companies have limited product lines, markets, and financial and managerial resources and tend to concentrate on fewer geographical markets relative to larger capitalization companies. There is typically less publicly available information concerning smaller-capitalization companies than for larger, more established companies. Small-capitalization companies also may be particularly sensitive to changes in interest rates, government regulation, borrowing costs and earnings.
Non-Diversification Risk. The Fund is considered to be non-diversified, which means that it may invest more of its assets in the securities of a single issuer or a smaller number of issuers than if it were a diversified fund. As a result, the Fund may be more exposed to the risks associated with and developments affecting an individual issuer or a smaller number of issuers than a fund that invests more widely. This may increase the Fund’s volatility and cause the performance of a relatively smaller number of issuers to have a greater impact on the Fund’s performance.
REIT Investment Risk. Investments in REITs involve unique risks. REITs may have limited financial resources, may trade less frequently and in limited volume, and may be more volatile than other securities. REITs may be affected by changes in the value of their underlying properties or mortgages or by defaults by their borrowers or tenants. Furthermore, these entities depend upon specialized management skills, have limited diversification and are, therefore, subject to risks inherent in financing a limited number of projects. In addition, the performance of a REIT may be affected by changes in the tax laws or by its failure to qualify for tax-free pass-through of income.
Sector Risk. To the extent the Fund invests more heavily in particular sectors of the economy, its performance will be especially sensitive to developments that significantly affect those sectors.
Information Technology Sector Risk. Market or economic factors impacting information technology companies and companies that rely heavily on technological advances could have a significant effect on the value of the Fund’s investments. The value of stocks of information technology companies and companies that rely heavily on technology is particularly vulnerable to rapid changes in technology product cycles, rapid product obsolescence, government regulation
11



and competition, both domestically and internationally, including competition from foreign competitors with lower production costs. Stocks of information technology companies and companies that rely heavily on technology, especially those of smaller, less-seasoned companies, tend to be more volatile than the overall market. Information technology companies are heavily dependent on patent and intellectual property rights, the loss or impairment of which may adversely affect profitability.
Tax Risk. The Fund expects to generate premiums from its sale of call options. These premiums typically will result in short-term capital gains for federal income tax purposes. In addition, stocks that are hedged with put options may not be eligible for long-term capital gains tax treatment. The Fund is not designed for investors seeking a tax efficient investment.
Performance
The following performance information indicates some of the risks of investing in the Fund. The bar chart shows the Fund’s performance for the calendar year ended December 31. The table illustrates how the Fund’s average annual returns for the 1-year and since inception periods compared with those of a broad measure of market performance. The Fund’s past performance, before and after taxes, does not necessarily indicate how it will perform in the future. Updated performance information is also available on the Fund’s website at www.aptusetfs.com/funds/acio.
Calendar Year Total Return
ck0001540305-20210430_g2.jpg
For the year-to-date period ended June 30, 2021, the Fund’s total return was 8.87%. During the period of time shown in the bar chart, the Fund’s highest quarterly return was 11.91% for the quarter ended June 30, 2020, and the lowest quarterly return was -11.47% for the quarter ended March 31, 2020.
Average Annual Total Returns for the Period Ended December 31, 2020
Aptus Collared Income Opportunity ETF 1 Year
Since Inception
(7/9/2019)
Return Before Taxes
9.66% 9.18%
Return After Taxes on Distributions
9.36% 8.75%
Return After Taxes on Distributions and Sale of Shares
5.89% 6.98%
S&P 500® Index
(reflects no deduction for fees, expenses, or taxes)
18.40% 19.14%
After-tax returns are calculated using the historical highest individual federal marginal income tax rates during the period covered by the table above and do not reflect the impact of state and local taxes. Actual after-tax returns depend on an investor’s tax situation and may differ from those shown. After-tax returns shown are not relevant to investors who hold their Shares through tax-deferred arrangements such as an individual retirement account (“IRA”) or other tax-advantaged accounts.
Management
Investment Adviser
Aptus Capital Advisors, LLC serves as investment adviser to the Fund.
Portfolio Managers
John D. (“JD”) Gardner, CFA, Chief Investment Officer and Managing Member at the Adviser, has been a portfolio manager of the Fund since its inception in July 2019.
12



Beckham D. Wyrick, CFA, Portfolio Manager at the Adviser, has been a portfolio manager of the Fund since its inception in July 2019.
John Luke Tyner, CFA, Portfolio Manager and Analyst at the Adviser, has been a portfolio manager of the Fund since August 2020.
David Wagner III, CFA, Portfolio Manager and Analyst at the Adviser, has been a portfolio manager of the Fund since August 2020.
Purchase and Sale of Shares
Shares are listed on the Exchange, and individual Shares may only be bought and sold in the secondary market through brokers at market prices, rather than NAV. Because Shares trade at market prices rather than NAV, Shares may trade at a price greater than NAV (premium) or less than NAV (discount).
The Fund issues and redeems Shares at NAV only in large blocks known as “Creation Units,” which only APs (typically, broker-dealers) may purchase or redeem. The Fund generally issues and redeems Creation Units in exchange for a portfolio of securities and/or a designated amount of U.S. cash.
Investors may incur costs attributable to the difference between the highest price a buyer is willing to pay to purchase Shares (bid) and the lowest price a seller is willing to accept for Shares (ask) when buying or selling Shares in the secondary market (the “bid-ask spread”). Recent information about the Fund, including its NAV, market price, premiums and discounts, and bid-ask spreads is available on the Fund’s website at www.aptusetfs.com/funds/acio.
Tax Information
Fund distributions are generally taxable as ordinary income, qualified dividend income, or capital gains (or a combination), unless your investment is in an IRA or other tax-advantaged account. Distributions on investments made through tax-deferred arrangements may be taxed later upon withdrawal of assets from those accounts.
Financial Intermediary Compensation
If you purchase Shares through a broker-dealer or other financial intermediary (such as a bank) (an “Intermediary”), the Adviser or its affiliates may pay Intermediaries for certain activities related to the Fund, including participation in activities that are designed to make Intermediaries more knowledgeable about exchange traded products, including the Fund, or for other activities, such as marketing, educational training or other initiatives related to the sale or promotion of Shares. These payments may create a conflict of interest by influencing the Intermediary and your salesperson to recommend the Fund over another investment. Any such arrangements do not result in increased Fund expenses. Ask your salesperson or visit the Intermediary’s website for more information.
13



APTUS DEFINED RISK ETF FUND SUMMARY
Investment Objective
The Aptus Defined Risk ETF (the “Fund”) seeks current income and capital appreciation.
Fees and Expenses of the Fund
The following table describes the fees and expenses you may pay if you buy, hold, and sell shares of the Fund (“Shares”). You may pay other fees, such as brokerage commissions and other fees to financial intermediaries, which are not reflected in the table and Example below.
Annual Fund Operating Expenses
(expenses that you pay each year as a percentage of the value of your investment)
Management Fees 0.69%
Distribution and/or Service (12b-1) Fees 0.00%
Other Expenses
0.01%
Acquired Fund Fees and Expenses1
0.09%
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses 0.79%
1     Acquired Fund Fees and Expenses are the indirect costs of investing in other investment companies. Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses do not correlate to the expense ratios in the Fund’s Financial Highlights because the Financial Highlights include only the direct operating expenses incurred by the Fund and exclude Acquired Fund Fees and Expenses.
Expense Example
This Example is intended to help you compare the cost of investing in the Fund with the cost of investing in other funds. The Example assumes that you invest $10,000 in the Fund for the time periods indicated and then redeem all of your Shares at the end of those periods. The Example also assumes that your investment has a 5% return each year and that the Fund’s operating expenses remain the same. Although your actual costs may be higher or lower, based on these assumptions your costs would be:
1 Year 3 Years 5 Years 10 Years
$81 $252 $439 $978
Portfolio Turnover
The Fund pays transaction costs, such as commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or “turns over” its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover rate may indicate higher transaction costs and may result in higher taxes when Shares are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are not reflected in annual fund operating expenses or in the Example, affect the Fund’s performance. For the fiscal year ended April 30, 2021, the Fund’s portfolio turnover rate was 28% of the average value of its portfolio.
Principal Investment Strategies
The Fund is an actively managed exchange-traded fund (“ETF”) that seeks to achieve its objective through a hybrid fixed income and equity strategy. The Fund typically invests approximately 75% to 95% of its assets to obtain exposure to investment-grade corporate bonds (the “Fixed Income Strategy”) and invests the remainder of its assets to obtain exposure to U.S. stocks, while limiting downside risk (the “Equity Strategy”).
Fixed Income Strategy
The Fund’s Fixed Income Strategy seeks exposure to U.S. dollar-denominated, investment-grade corporate bonds of U.S. and non-U.S. issuers with maturities between one and eight years (also known as a “bond ladder”). The Fund will primarily obtain this exposure through investments in ETFs (“Underlying Bond ETFs”) that each track the investment results of an index composed of such bonds maturing in a specified year during that period (e.g., bonds maturing in 2023). The Underlying Bond ETFs are generally expected to make monthly distributions of principal and interest received from their underlying holdings, and each Underlying Bond ETF is expected to make a liquidating distribution at the end of the calendar year in which its holdings mature. The Fund generally reinvests the proceeds of such liquidating distributions into the Underlying Bond ETF with the furthest away maturity date in the bond ladder.
14



While the Fund’s Fixed Income Strategy is expected to obtain exposure to a diversified array of corporate bonds regardless of the size of the Fund, a significant portion of the Underlying Bond ETFs is generally expected to be represented by securities of companies in the financial sector. The Fund will typically rebalance its investments in Underlying Bond ETFs on a quarterly basis. The Adviser may also decide to reallocate assets among the Equity Strategy and Fixed Income Strategy outside of the normal rebalance activity if the Fund’s balance of equity and fixed income exposure has shifted significantly during the quarter.
Equity Strategy
The Fund’s Equity Strategy seeks exposure to small-, mid-, and large-capitalization U.S. stocks by purchasing exchange-listed call options on approximately ten to twenty individual stocks or depositary receipts (the “Underlying Individual Equities”) or on one or more other ETFs that principally invest in U.S. equity securities (the “Underlying Equity ETFs”). A call option gives the purchaser the right to purchase shares of the underlying security at a specified price (“strike price”) prior to a specified date (“expiration date”). The purchaser pays a cost (premium) to purchase the call option. In the event the underlying security appreciates in value, the value of the call option will generally increase, and in the event the underlying security declines in value, the call option may end up worthless and the premium may be lost.
Aptus Capital Advisors, LLC, the Fund’s investment adviser (“Aptus” or the “Adviser”), selects the Underlying Individual Equities based primarily on their momentum (i.e., how close a stock is to its 52-week high), potential for growth, and correlation to the broader U.S. equity market. Stocks selected as Underlying Individual Equities by the Adviser must also have call options available for purchase that meet the Fund’s minimum liquidity threshold for investibility. The Adviser seeks to select Underlying Individual Equities to diversify exposure across a variety of industries and to maximize the Fund’s equity exposure given the amount allocated to the applicable options, as described below. Underlying Equity ETFs may be selected in lieu of or in addition to Underlying Individual Equities to adjust the balance of the Fund’s exposure across industries or to maintain the Fund’s equity exposure when the Adviser believes they present a better risk profile than Underlying Individual Equities.
The Fund may utilize a combination of purchased and written (sold) call options (known as a “spread”). A written (sold) call option gives the seller the obligation to sell shares of the reference asset at the strike price until the expiration date. The writer (seller) of the call option receives an amount (premium) for writing (selling) the option. In the event the reference asset appreciates above the strike price and the holder exercises the call option, the writer (seller) of the call option will have to pay the difference between the value of the reference asset and the strike price or deliver the reference asset (which loss is offset by the premium initially received), and in the event the reference asset declines in value, the call option may end up worthless and the writer (seller) of the call option retains the premium.
Call options purchased by the Fund typically have a time-to-expiration of one to six months at the time of purchase and a strike price at or near the current market price of the applicable Underlying Individual Equity or Underlying Equity ETF. The Fund will generally turn over its options holdings to rebalance its Equity Strategy investments on a monthly basis, at which time the Fund allocates approximately 0.25% to 1.00% of its net assets to options on each of the Underlying Individual Equities and may allocate up to approximately 5.00% to options on each of the Underlying Equity ETFs selected. Each time the Fund rebalances its Equity Strategy, the Fund will typically sell the options it holds and purchase new ones as described above. To the extent the Fund sells options tied to one individual stock or ETF and purchases new options tied to the same individual stock or ETF, the rebalance will generally result in the Fund owning options with a later expiration date than the previous set of options. The Adviser will actively manage the Fund’s options as markets move or events occur (e.g., earnings announcements) to roll forward expiration dates or to increase or decrease market exposure to attempt to reduce the potential volatility inherent in options where the price of the reference asset is significantly higher or lower than the strike price.
Additionally, the Adviser seeks to limit the Fund’s exposure to equity market declines by purchasing exchange-listed put options on one or more broad-based indexes or ETFs that track a portfolio of U.S. equity securities (“Broad Market Puts”). A put option gives the purchaser the right to sell shares of the underlying security at a strike price prior to its expiration date. The purchaser pays a cost (premium) to purchase the put option. In the event the underlying security depreciates in value, the value of the put option will generally increase, and in the event the underlying security appreciates in value, the put option may end up worthless and the premium may be lost.
Broad Market Puts purchased by the Fund typically have a time-to-expiration of one to six months at the time of purchase and a strike price at or near the current market price of the applicable reference asset. Generally, each time the Fund rebalances its Equity Strategy, the Fund allocates approximately 0.25% to 1.50% of its net assets to Broad Market Puts and will sell the options it holds and purchase new ones as described above.
Because the premiums for call and put options purchased by the Fund will typically be a fraction of the value of the underlying reference assets, the options enable the Fund to gain greater exposure to the underlying reference assets than the amount invested in such options. Consequently, the Fund seeks to have greater participation in the appreciation (for call options) or depreciation (for put options) of the applicable underlying reference assets than it would have by investing the same amounts directly in such underlying reference assets, while limiting the maximum loss from such options to the premiums paid.
15



Principal Investment Risks
The principal risks of investing in the Fund are summarized below. The principal risks are presented in alphabetical order to facilitate finding particular risks and comparing them with other funds. Each risk summarized below is considered a “principal risk” of investing in the Fund, regardless of the order in which it appears. As with any investment, there is a risk that you could lose all or a portion of your investment in the Fund. Some or all of these risks may adversely affect the Fund’s net asset value per share (“NAV”), trading price, yield, total return and/or ability to meet its objectives. For more information about the risks of investing in the Fund, see the section in the Fund’s Prospectus titled “Additional Information About the Funds.”
Depositary Receipt Risk. Depositary Receipts involve risks similar to those associated with investments in foreign securities, such as changes in political or economic conditions of other countries and changes in the exchange rates of foreign currencies. Depositary Receipts listed on U.S. exchanges are issued by banks or trust companies and entitle the holder to all dividends and capital gains that are paid out on the underlying foreign shares (“Underlying Shares”). When the Fund invests in Depositary Receipts as a substitute for an investment directly in the Underlying Shares, the Fund is exposed to the risk that the Depositary Receipts may not provide a return that corresponds precisely with that of the Underlying Shares.
Derivative Securities Risk. The Fund invests in options that derive their performance from the performance of an underlying reference asset. Derivatives, such as the options in which the Fund invests, can be volatile and involve various types and degrees of risks, depending upon the characteristics of a particular derivative. Derivatives may entail investment exposures that are greater than their cost would suggest, meaning that a small investment in a derivative could have a substantial impact on the performance of the Fund. The Fund could experience a loss if its derivatives do not perform as anticipated, the derivatives are not correlated with the performance of their reference asset, or if the Fund is unable to purchase or liquidate a position because of an illiquid secondary market. The market for many derivatives is, or suddenly can become, illiquid. Changes in liquidity may result in significant, rapid, and unpredictable changes in the prices for derivatives.
Equity Market Risk. The equity securities held in the Fund’s portfolio may experience sudden, unpredictable drops in value or long periods of decline in value. This may occur because of factors that affect securities markets generally or factors affecting specific issuers, industries, or sectors in which the Fund invests. Common stocks are generally exposed to greater risk than other types of securities, such as preferred stock and debt obligations, because common stockholders generally have inferior rights to receive payment from issuers. In addition, local, regional or global events such as war, acts of terrorism, spread of infectious diseases or other public health issues, recessions, or other events could have a significant negative impact on the Fund and its investments. For example, the global pandemic caused by COVID-19, a novel coronavirus, and the aggressive responses taken by many governments, including closing borders, restricting international and domestic travel, and the imposition of prolonged quarantines or similar restrictions, has had negative impacts, and in many cases severe impacts, on markets worldwide. The COVID-19 pandemic has caused prolonged disruptions to the normal business operations of companies around the world and the impact of such disruptions is hard to predict. Such events may affect certain geographic regions, countries, sectors and industries more significantly than others. Such events could adversely affect the prices and liquidity of the Fund’s portfolio securities or other instruments and could result in disruptions in the trading markets.
ETF Risks. The Fund is an ETF, and, as a result of an ETF’s structure, it is exposed to the following risks:
Authorized Participants, Market Makers, and Liquidity Providers Concentration Risk. The Fund has a limited number of financial institutions that may act as Authorized Participants (“APs”). In addition, there may be a limited number of market makers and/or liquidity providers in the marketplace. To the extent either of the following events occur, Shares may trade at a material discount to NAV and possibly face delisting: (i) APs exit the business or otherwise become unable to process creation and/or redemption orders and no other APs step forward to perform these services, or (ii) market makers and/or liquidity providers exit the business or significantly reduce their business activities and no other entities step forward to perform their functions.
Costs of Buying or Selling Shares. Due to the costs of buying or selling Shares, including brokerage commissions imposed by brokers and bid-ask spreads, frequent trading of Shares may significantly reduce investment results and an investment in Shares may not be advisable for investors who anticipate regularly making small investments.
Shares May Trade at Prices Other Than NAV. As with all ETFs, Shares may be bought and sold in the secondary market at market prices. Although it is expected that the market price of Shares will approximate the Fund’s NAV, there may be times when the market price of Shares is more than the NAV intra-day (premium) or less than the NAV intra-day (discount) due to supply and demand of Shares or during periods of market volatility. This risk is heightened in times of market volatility, periods of steep market declines, and periods when there is limited trading activity for Shares in the secondary market, in which case such premiums or discounts may be significant.
Trading. Although Shares are listed for trading on Cboe BZX Exchange, Inc. (the “Exchange”) and may be traded on U.S. exchanges other than the Exchange, there can be no assurance that Shares will trade with any volume, or at all, on any stock exchange. In stressed market conditions, the liquidity of Shares may begin to mirror the liquidity of the Fund’s
16



underlying portfolio holdings, which can be significantly less liquid than Shares, and this could lead to differences between the market price of the Shares and the underlying value of those Shares.
Fixed Income Securities Risk.  The Fund invests indirectly in fixed income securities through investments in Underlying Bond ETFs, which involve certain risks, including:
Credit Risk. Credit risk refers to the possibility that the issuer of a security will not be able to make payments of interest and principal when due. Changes in an issuer’s credit rating or the market’s perception of an issuer’s creditworthiness may also affect the value of an investment in that issuer.
Event Risk. Event risk is the risk that corporate issuers may undergo restructurings, such as mergers, leveraged buyouts, takeovers, or similar events financed by increased debt. As a result of the added debt, the credit quality and market value of a company’s bonds and/or other debt securities may decline significantly.
Extension Risk. When interest rates rise, certain obligations will be paid off by the obligor more slowly than anticipated, causing the value of these securities to fall.
Interest Rate Risk. Generally, the value of fixed income securities will change inversely with changes in interest rates. As interest rates rise, the market value of fixed income securities tends to decrease. Conversely, as interest rates fall, the market value of fixed income securities tends to increase. This risk will be greater for long-term securities than for short-term securities. Changes in government intervention may have adverse effects on investments, volatility, and illiquidity in debt markets.
Prepayment Risk. When interest rates fall, certain obligations will be paid off by the obligor more quickly than originally anticipated, and the proceeds may have to be invested in securities with lower yields.
Foreign Securities Risk. The Fund invests in Underlying Bond ETFs that may invest in U.S. dollar-denominated, investment-grade corporate bonds of non-U.S. issuers. Investments in foreign securities involve certain risks that may not be present with investments in U.S. securities. For example, investments in foreign securities may be subject to risk of loss due to differences in accounting, auditing, and financial reporting standards, the possibility of expropriation or confiscatory taxation, adverse changes in investment or exchange control regulations, political instability, regulatory and economic differences, and potential restrictions on the flow of international capital. Investments in foreign securities also may be subject to withholding or other taxes and may be subject to additional trading, settlement, custodial, and operational risks. These and other factors can make investments in the Fund more volatile and potentially less liquid than other types of investments.
Management Risk. The Fund is actively managed and may not meet its investment objective based on the Adviser’s success or failure to implement investment strategies for the Fund.
Market Risk. The trading prices of equity and debt securities and other instruments fluctuate in response to a variety of factors. The Fund’s NAV and market price may fluctuate significantly in response to these and other factors. As a result, an investor could lose money over short or long periods of time.
Options Risk. Options enable the Fund to purchase exposure that is significantly greater than the premium paid. Consequently, the value of such options can be volatile, and a small investment in options can have a large impact on the performance of the Fund. The Fund risks losing all or part of the cash paid (premium) for purchasing options. Because the Fund only purchases options (as opposed to writing/selling options), the Fund’s losses from its exposure to options are limited to the amount of premiums paid. However, even a small decline in the value of a reference asset underlying call options or a small increase in the value of a reference asset underlying put options can result in the entire investment in such options being lost.
Other Investment Companies Risk. The risks of investing in investment companies, such as the Underlying Bond ETFs, typically reflect the risks of the types of instruments in which the investment companies invest. By investing in another investment company, the Fund becomes a shareholder of that investment company and bears its proportionate share of the fees and expenses of the other investment company. The Fund may be subject to statutory limits with respect to the amount it can invest in other ETFs, which may adversely affect the Fund’s ability to achieve its investment objective. Investments in ETFs are also subject to the “ETF Risks” described above.
Sector Risk. To the extent the Fund invests more heavily in particular sectors of the economy, its performance will be especially sensitive to developments that significantly affect those sectors.
17



Performance
The following performance information indicates some of the risks of investing in the Fund. The bar chart shows the Fund’s performance for the calendar year ended December 31. The table illustrates how the Fund’s average annual returns for the 1-year and since inception periods compared with those of a broad measure of market performance. The Fund’s past performance, before and after taxes, does not necessarily indicate how it will perform in the future. Updated performance information is also available on the Fund’s website at www.aptusetfs.com/funds/drsk.
Calendar Year Total Return
ck0001540305-20210430_g3.jpg
For the year-to-date period ended June 30, 2021, the Fund’s total return was 1.14%. During the period of time shown in the bar chart, the Fund’s highest quarterly return was 7.86% for the quarter ended June 30, 2020, and the lowest quarterly return was 0.18% for the quarter ended December 31, 2020.
Average Annual Total Returns for the Period Ended December 31, 2020
Aptus Defined Risk ETF
1 Year
Since Inception
(8/7/2018)
Return Before Taxes
13.98% 12.06%
Return After Taxes on Distributions
11.54% 10.00%
Return After Taxes on Distributions and Sale of Shares
8.37% 8.43%
Bloomberg US Aggregate Bond Index1
(reflects no deduction for fees, expenses, or taxes)
7.51% 7.43%
1 Formerly known as the Bloomberg Barclays US Aggregate Bond Index.
After-tax returns are calculated using the historical highest individual federal marginal income tax rates during the period covered by the table above and do not reflect the impact of state and local taxes. Actual after-tax returns depend on an investor’s tax situation and may differ from those shown. After-tax returns shown are not relevant to investors who hold their Shares through tax-deferred arrangements such as an individual retirement account (“IRA”) or other tax-advantaged accounts.
Management
Investment Adviser
Aptus Capital Advisors, LLC serves as investment adviser to the Fund.
Portfolio Managers
John D. (“JD”) Gardner, CFA, Chief Investment Officer and Managing Member at the Adviser, has been a portfolio manager of the Fund since its inception in August 2018.
Beckham D. Wyrick, CFA, Portfolio Manager at the Adviser, has been a portfolio manager of the Fund since its inception in August 2018.
John Luke Tyner, CFA, Portfolio Manager and Analyst at the Adviser, has been a portfolio manager of the Fund since August 2020.
Mark Callahan, Portfolio Manager and Head of Trading at the Adviser, has been a portfolio manager of the Fund since August 2020.
18



Purchase and Sale of Shares
Shares are listed on the Exchange, and individual Shares may only be bought and sold in the secondary market through brokers at market prices, rather than NAV. Because Shares trade at market prices rather than NAV, Shares may trade at a price greater than NAV (premium) or less than NAV (discount).
The Fund issues and redeems Shares at NAV only in large blocks known as “Creation Units,” which only APs (typically, broker-dealers) may purchase or redeem. The Fund generally issues and redeems Creation Units in exchange for a portfolio of securities and/or a designated amount of U.S. cash.
Investors may incur costs attributable to the difference between the highest price a buyer is willing to pay to purchase Shares (bid) and the lowest price a seller is willing to accept for Shares (ask) when buying or selling Shares in the secondary market (the “bid-ask spread”). Recent information about the Fund, including its NAV, market price, premiums and discounts, and bid-ask spreads is available on the Fund’s website at www.aptusetfs.com/funds/drsk.
Tax Information
Fund distributions are generally taxable as ordinary income, qualified dividend income, or capital gains (or a combination), unless your investment is in an IRA or other tax-advantaged account. Distributions on investments made through tax-deferred arrangements may be taxed later upon withdrawal of assets from those accounts.
Financial Intermediary Compensation
If you purchase Shares through a broker-dealer or other financial intermediary (such as a bank) (an “Intermediary”), the Adviser or its affiliates may pay Intermediaries for certain activities related to the Fund, including participation in activities that are designed to make Intermediaries more knowledgeable about exchange traded products, including the Fund, or for other activities, such as marketing, educational training or other initiatives related to the sale or promotion of Shares. These payments may create a conflict of interest by influencing the Intermediary and your salesperson to recommend the Fund over another investment. Any such arrangements do not result in increased Fund expenses. Ask your salesperson or visit the Intermediary’s website for more information.
19



OPUS SMALL CAP VALUE ETF FUND SUMMARY
Investment Objective
The Opus Small Cap Value ETF (the “Fund”) seeks capital appreciation.
Fees and Expenses of the Fund
The following table describes the fees and expenses you may pay if you buy, hold, and sell shares of the Fund (“Shares”). You may pay other fees, such as brokerage commissions and other fees to financial intermediaries, which are not reflected in the table and Example below.
Annual Fund Operating Expenses
(expenses that you pay each year as a percentage of the value of your investment)
Management Fees
0.79%
Distribution and/or Service (12b-1) Fees
0.00%
Other Expenses
0.00%
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses
0.79%
Expense Example
This Example is intended to help you compare the cost of investing in the Fund with the cost of investing in other funds. The Example assumes that you invest $10,000 in the Fund for the time periods indicated and then redeem all of your Shares at the end of those periods. The Example also assumes that your investment has a 5% return each year and that the Fund’s operating expenses remain the same. Although your actual costs may be higher or lower, based on these assumptions your costs would be:
1 Year 3 Years 5 Years 10 Years
$81 $252 $439 $978
Portfolio Turnover
The Fund pays transaction costs, such as commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or “turns over” its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover rate may indicate higher transaction costs and may result in higher taxes when Shares are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are not reflected in annual fund operating expenses or in the Example, affect the Fund’s performance. For the fiscal year ended April 30, 2021, the Fund’s portfolio turnover rate was 65% of the average value of its portfolio.
Principal Investment Strategies
The Fund is an actively managed exchange-traded fund (“ETF”) that invests under normal circumstances at least 80% of its net assets (plus any borrowings for investment purposes) in equity securities of small-capitalization U.S. companies. The Fund defines a small-capitalization company as an issuer whose market capitalization at the time of purchase is in the range of those found in the Russell 2000® Index. The Fund’s equity securities primarily include common stocks, real estate investment trusts (“REITs”), and American Depositary Receipts (“ADRs”) representing the stock of a foreign company. The Fund will generally limit its investments in ADRs to 20% of its total assets. The Fund may invest in securities offered in an initial public offering (“IPO”) or in companies that have recently completed an IPO.
Aptus Capital Advisors, LLC, the Fund’s investment adviser (“Aptus” or the “Adviser”), selects stocks across a variety of sectors and industries for the Fund by combining factor-based analysis with rigorous fundamental research to identify high-quality, growing companies that the Adviser believes are undervalued. The Adviser focuses on three core themes to identify companies for the Fund:
Higher Quality
Companies with sound business models, higher returns on equity, strong balance sheets, and shareholder-friendly management.
Higher Growth
Companies that are well-positioned to grow sales, earnings, cash flows, and dividends.
Lower Valuation
Companies whose valuations reflect lower price-to-earnings and higher yields than their peers.
The Adviser generally sells a stock for the Fund when the company is no longer believed to be high quality, when its anticipated growth rate has significantly declined, when it is no longer considered undervalued, or when it is no longer considered a small-capitalization company after a significant period of time (e.g., more than one year).
As of July 30, 2021, the Fund invested a significant portion of its assets in the financial and information technology sectors.
20



Principal Investment Risks
The principal risks of investing in the Fund are summarized below. The principal risks are presented in alphabetical order to facilitate finding particular risks and comparing them with other funds. Each risk summarized below is considered a “principal risk” of investing in the Fund, regardless of the order in which it appears. As with any investment, there is a risk that you could lose all or a portion of your investment in the Fund. Some or all of these risks may adversely affect the Fund’s net asset value per share (“NAV”), trading price, yield, total return and/or ability to meet its objectives. For more information about the risks of investing in the Fund, see the section in the Fund’s Prospectus titled “Additional Information About the Funds.”
Depositary Receipt Risk. Depositary Receipts involve risks similar to those associated with investments in foreign securities, such as changes in political or economic conditions of other countries and changes in the exchange rates of foreign currencies. Depositary Receipts listed on U.S. exchanges are issued by banks or trust companies and entitle the holder to all dividends and capital gains that are paid out on the underlying foreign shares (“Underlying Shares”). When the Fund invests in Depositary Receipts as a substitute for an investment directly in the Underlying Shares, the Fund is exposed to the risk that the Depositary Receipts may not provide a return that corresponds precisely with that of the Underlying Shares.
Equity Market Risk. The equity securities held in the Fund’s portfolio may experience sudden, unpredictable drops in value or long periods of decline in value. This may occur because of factors that affect securities markets generally or factors affecting specific issuers, industries, or sectors in which the Fund invests. Common stocks are generally exposed to greater risk than other types of securities, such as preferred stock and debt obligations, because common stockholders generally have inferior rights to receive payment from issuers. In addition, local, regional or global events such as war, acts of terrorism, spread of infectious diseases or other public health issues, recessions, or other events could have a significant negative impact on the Fund and its investments. For example, the global pandemic caused by COVID-19, a novel coronavirus, and the aggressive responses taken by many governments, including closing borders, restricting international and domestic travel, and the imposition of prolonged quarantines or similar restrictions, has had negative impacts, and in many cases severe impacts, on markets worldwide. The COVID-19 pandemic has caused prolonged disruptions to the normal business operations of companies around the world and the impact of such disruptions is hard to predict. Such events may affect certain geographic regions, countries, sectors and industries more significantly than others. Such events could adversely affect the prices and liquidity of the Fund’s portfolio securities or other instruments and could result in disruptions in the trading markets.
ETF Risks. The Fund is an ETF, and, as a result of an ETF’s structure, it is exposed to the following risks:
Authorized Participants, Market Makers, and Liquidity Providers Concentration Risk. The Fund has a limited number of financial institutions that may act as Authorized Participants (“APs”). In addition, there may be a limited number of market makers and/or liquidity providers in the marketplace. To the extent either of the following events occur, Shares may trade at a material discount to NAV and possibly face delisting: (i) APs exit the business or otherwise become unable to process creation and/or redemption orders and no other APs step forward to perform these services, or (ii) market makers and/or liquidity providers exit the business or significantly reduce their business activities and no other entities step forward to perform their functions.
Costs of Buying or Selling Shares. Due to the costs of buying or selling Shares, including brokerage commissions imposed by brokers and bid-ask spreads, frequent trading of Shares may significantly reduce investment results and an investment in Shares may not be advisable for investors who anticipate regularly making small investments.
Shares May Trade at Prices Other Than NAV. As with all ETFs, Shares may be bought and sold in the secondary market at market prices. Although it is expected that the market price of Shares will approximate the Fund’s NAV, there may be times when the market price of Shares is more than the NAV intra-day (premium) or less than the NAV intra-day (discount) due to supply and demand of Shares or during periods of market volatility. This risk is heightened in times of market volatility, periods of steep market declines, and periods when there is limited trading activity for Shares in the secondary market, in which case such premiums or discounts may be significant.
Trading. Although Shares are listed for trading on Cboe BZX Exchange, Inc. (the “Exchange”) and may be traded on U.S. exchanges other than the Exchange, there can be no assurance that Shares will trade with any volume, or at all, on any stock exchange. In stressed market conditions, the liquidity of Shares may begin to mirror the liquidity of the Fund’s underlying portfolio holdings, which can be significantly less liquid than Shares, and this could lead to differences between the market price of the Shares and the underlying value of those Shares.
Foreign Investment Risk. Because of the Fund’s investment in ADRs, changes in foreign economies and political climates are more likely to affect the Fund than a fund that invests exclusively in U.S. companies. There may be less government supervision of foreign markets, resulting in non-uniform accounting practices and less publicly available information. The value of foreign investments may be affected by changes in exchange control regulations, application of foreign tax laws (including withholding tax), changes in governmental administration or economic or monetary policy (in this country or abroad) or changed circumstances in dealings between nations.
21



IPO Risk. The Fund may invest in securities offered in an IPO or in companies that have recently completed an IPO. The market value of IPO shares can have significant volatility due to factors such as the absence of a prior public market, unseasoned trading, a small number of shares available for trading and limited information about the issuer. The purchase of IPO shares may involve high transaction costs, and the Fund may lose money on an investment in such securities.
Management Risk. The Fund is actively managed and may not meet its investment objective based on the Adviser’s success or failure to implement investment strategies for the Fund.
REIT Investment Risk. Investments in REITs involve unique risks. REITs may have limited financial resources, may trade less frequently and in limited volume, and may be more volatile than other securities. REITs may be affected by changes in the value of their underlying properties or mortgages or by defaults by their borrowers or tenants. Furthermore, these entities depend upon specialized management skills, have limited diversification and are, therefore, subject to risks inherent in financing a limited number of projects. In addition, the performance of a REIT may be affected by changes in the tax laws or by its failure to qualify for tax-free pass-through of income.
Sector Risk. To the extent the Fund invests more heavily in particular sectors of the economy, its performance will be especially sensitive to developments that significantly affect those sectors.
Financial Sector Risk. This sector can be significantly affected by changes in interest rates, government regulation, the rate of defaults on corporate, consumer and government debt, the availability and cost of capital, and fallout from the housing and sub-prime mortgage crisis. Insurance companies, in particular, may be significantly affected by changes in interest rates, catastrophic events, price and market competition, the imposition of premium rate caps, or other changes in government regulation or tax law and/or rate regulation, which may have an adverse impact on their profitability. This sector has experienced significant losses in the recent past, and the impact of more stringent capital requirements and of recent or future regulation on any individual financial company or on the sector as a whole cannot be predicted. In recent years, cyber attacks and technology malfunctions and failures have become increasingly frequent in this sector and have caused significant losses.
Information Technology Sector Risk. Market or economic factors impacting information technology companies and companies that rely heavily on technological advances could have a significant effect on the value of the Fund’s investments. The value of stocks of information technology companies and companies that rely heavily on technology is particularly vulnerable to rapid changes in technology product cycles, rapid product obsolescence, government regulation and competition, both domestically and internationally, including competition from foreign competitors with lower production costs. Stocks of information technology companies and companies that rely heavily on technology, especially those of smaller, less-seasoned companies, tend to be more volatile than the overall market. Information technology companies are heavily dependent on patent and intellectual property rights, the loss or impairment of which may adversely affect profitability.
Small-Capitalization Investing. The Fund may invest in the securities of small-capitalization companies. As a result, the Fund may be more volatile than funds that invest in larger, more established companies. The securities of small-capitalization companies generally trade in lower volumes and are subject to greater and more unpredictable price changes than larger capitalization stocks or the stock market as a whole. Small-capitalization companies may be particularly sensitive to changes in interest rates, government regulation, borrowing costs and earnings.
Value-Style Investing Risk. The value investing style may over time go in and out of favor. At times when the value investing style is out of favor, the Fund may underperform other funds that use different investing styles.
22



Performance
The following performance information indicates some of the risks of investing in the Fund. The bar chart shows the Fund’s performance for the calendar year ended December 31. The table illustrates how the Fund’s average annual returns for the 1-year and since inception periods compared with those of a broad measure of market performance. The Fund’s past performance, before and after taxes, does not necessarily indicate how it will perform in the future. Updated performance information is also available on the Fund’s website at www.opusetfs.com.
Calendar Year Total Return
ck0001540305-20210430_g4.jpg
For the year-to-date period ended June 30, 2021, the Fund’s total return was 16.99%. During the period of time shown in the bar chart, the Fund’s highest quarterly return was 21.02% for the quarter ended December 31, 2020, and the lowest quarterly return was -30.20% for the quarter ended March 31, 2020.
Average Annual Total Returns for the Period Ended December 31, 2020
Opus Small Cap Value ETF 1 Year
Since Inception
(7/17/2018)
Return Before Taxes
4.88% 6.50%
Return After Taxes on Distributions
4.58% 6.07%
Return After Taxes on Distributions and Sale of Shares
3.02% 4.92%
Russell 2000 Value Total Return
(reflects no deduction for fees, expenses, or taxes)
4.63% 1.67%
After-tax returns are calculated using the historical highest individual federal marginal income tax rates during the period covered by the table above and do not reflect the impact of state and local taxes. Actual after-tax returns depend on an investor’s tax situation and may differ from those shown. After-tax returns shown are not relevant to investors who hold their Shares through tax-deferred arrangements such as an individual retirement account (“IRA”) or other tax-advantaged accounts.
Management
Investment Adviser
Aptus Capital Advisors, LLC (the “Adviser”)
Portfolio Managers
John D. (“JD”) Gardner, CFA, Chief Investment Officer and Managing Member at the Adviser, has been a portfolio manager of the Fund since November 2019.
Beckham D. Wyrick, CFA, Portfolio Manager at the Adviser, has been a portfolio manager of the Fund since November 2019.
Brad Rapking, CFA, Portfolio Manager and Analyst at the Adviser, has been portfolio manager of the Fund since August 2020.
David Wagner III, CFA, Portfolio Manager and Analyst at the Adviser, has been a portfolio manager of the Fund since August 2020.
23



Purchase and Sale of Shares
Shares are listed on the Exchange, and individual Shares may only be bought and sold in the secondary market through brokers at market prices, rather than NAV. Because Shares trade at market prices rather than NAV, Shares may trade at a price greater than NAV (premium) or less than NAV (discount).
The Fund issues and redeems Shares at NAV only in large blocks known as “Creation Units,” which only APs (typically, broker-dealers) may purchase or redeem. The Fund generally issues and redeems Creation Units in exchange for a portfolio of securities and/or a designated amount of U.S. cash.
Investors may incur costs attributable to the difference between the highest price a buyer is willing to pay to purchase Shares (bid) and the lowest price a seller is willing to accept for Shares (ask) when buying or selling Shares in the secondary market (the “bid-ask spread”). Recent information about the Fund, including its NAV, market price, premiums and discounts, and bid-ask spreads is available on the Fund’s website at www.aptusetfs.com/funds/oscv.
Tax Information
Fund distributions are generally taxable as ordinary income, qualified dividend income, or capital gains (or a combination), unless your investment is in an IRA or other tax-advantaged account. Distributions on investments made through tax-deferred arrangements may be taxed later upon withdrawal of assets from those accounts.
Financial Intermediary Compensation
If you purchase Shares through a broker-dealer or other financial intermediary (such as a bank) (an “Intermediary”), the Adviser or its affiliates may pay Intermediaries for certain activities related to the Fund, including participation in activities that are designed to make Intermediaries more knowledgeable about exchange traded products, including the Fund, or for other activities, such as marketing, educational training or other initiatives related to the sale or promotion of Shares. These payments may create a conflict of interest by influencing the Intermediary and your salesperson to recommend the Fund over another investment. Any such arrangements do not result in increased Fund expenses. Ask your salesperson or visit the Intermediary’s website for more information.
24



ADDITIONAL INFORMATION ABOUT THE FUNDS
Each Fund’s ticker symbol appears on the cover of this Prospectus, and references to specific Funds in the sections below will refer to such Funds by their ticker symbol.
Investment Objective. Each Fund’s investment objective has been adopted as a non-fundamental investment policy and may be changed without shareholder approval upon written notice to shareholders.
Principal Investment Strategies. ADME and OSCV will provide at least 60 days’ prior written notice to shareholders of a change in the applicable Fund’s policy of investing at least 80% of its net assets (plus any borrowings for investment purposes) in the type of investments suggested by the Fund’s name.
Temporary Defensive Positions. To respond to adverse market, economic, political, or other conditions, each Fund may invest up to 100% of its assets in a temporary defensive manner by holding all or a substantial portion of its assets in cash, cash equivalents, or other high quality short-term investments or in other ETFs that invest in such instruments. The Adviser also may invest in these types of securities or hold cash while looking for suitable investment opportunities or to maintain liquidity. In these circumstances, a Fund may be unable to achieve its investment objective.
Additional Information about ADME
The Fund will write call options only if they are “covered.” In the case of a call option written on a security, the option is “covered” if the Fund owns the security underlying the call or has an absolute and immediate right to acquire that security without additional cash consideration (or, if additional cash consideration is required, liquid assets in such amount are segregated) upon conversion or exchange of other securities held by it. For a call option written on an index, the option is covered if the Fund maintains with its custodian a portfolio of securities substantially replicating the index or liquid assets equal to the contract value. A call option also is covered if the Fund holds a call on the same reference asset as the call written where the exercise price of the call held is (i) equal to or less than the exercise price of the call written, or (ii) greater than the exercise price of the call written, provided the Fund segregates liquid assets in the amount of the difference.
All put options written by the Fund will be covered, which means that the Fund will segregate cash or liquid assets with a value at least equal to the exercise price of the put option or will hold a put option on the same reference asset as the option written where the exercise price of the option held is (i) equal to or higher than the exercise price of the option written, or (ii) less than the exercise price of the option written, provided the Fund segregates liquid assets in the amount of the difference.
Additional Information about OSCV
Investment Process for the Fund
The Fund’s portfolio managers lead a team constantly engaged in investment idea generation. The team identifies companies with the characteristics they seek using a variety of sources, including factor-based analysis, research on competitors/suppliers, industry conferences, and conversations with company management. While the portfolio managers’ investment approach is rooted in fundamental research, and accordingly is bottom-up, the team maintains an awareness of the impact of top-down factors (e.g., interest rates) and their effect on a given company, including any effect on the valuation of a company.
The portfolio managers’ approach seeks to assess each company’s ability to generate growth in sales, earnings, cash flows, and dividends, as well as the sustainability of its business model and potential risks. After the research process concludes, portfolio managers engage in detailed and collegial discussions, ranking each name being considered for purchase, then stating if they are a buy or no buy, which helps form final consensus-based decisions. Concurrent with buy decisions, sales are evaluated and ranked in a similar fashion. The portfolio managers continuously monitor portfolio holdings for relevant data that affects their evaluation of a given holding, and will sell those holdings when the risk/return profile is no longer favorable.
Portfolio Construction
Portfolio manager collaboration leads to the construction of a diversified long-only portfolio of 50–100 positions that manages risk at multiple levels for the Fund. The Adviser anticipates turnover of approximately 50% under normal market conditions. The Fund may have weightings that are significantly different from those of the Fund’s primary benchmark, the Russell 2000 Value Index, as the Fund’s sector allocations at the time of investment may fluctuate from 0% to the greater of (i) 35% or (ii) the weight of such sector in the Fund’s benchmark index. Individual securities are limited at the time of investment to no more than a 3% weighting. Investments in other ETFs that have a policy of investing, under normal circumstances, at least 80% of their net assets, plus borrowings for investment purposes, in small-capitalization securities will count towards the Fund’s 80% policy.

25



Additional Information About Each Fund’s Principal Risks. This section provides additional information regarding the principal risks described in each Fund Summary. As in each Fund Summary, the principal risks below are presented in alphabetical order to facilitate finding particular risks and comparing them with other funds. Each risk described below is considered a “principal risk” of investing in the applicable Fund, regardless of the order in which it appears. Each of the factors below could have a negative impact on the applicable Fund’s performance and trading prices. Each risk applies to one or more Funds as indicated in the following table:
ADME ACIO DRSK OSCV
Collared Options Strategy Risk X
Depositary Receipt Risk X X X X
Derivative Securities Risk X X X
Equity Market Risk
X X X X
ETF Risks
X X X X
Fixed Income Securities Risk
X
Foreign Investment Risk X X X
Foreign Securities Risk
X
High Portfolio Turnover Risk
X X
IPO Risk X
Limited Operating History
X
Management Risk
X X X X
Market Capitalization Risk
X X X
Large-Capitalization Investing
X X
Mid-Capitalization Investing
X X
Small-Capitalization Investing
X X X
Market Risk
X
Non-Diversification Risk
X
Options Risk
X X
Other Investment Companies Risk
X
REIT Investment Risk
X X X
Sector Risk
X X X X
Financial Sector Risk
X
Information Technology Sector Risk
X X X
Tail Hedge Risk
X
Tax Risk X X
Value Style Investing Risk
X
Collared Options Strategy Risk. Writing and buying options are speculative activities and entail greater than ordinary investment risks. The Fund’s use of call and put options can lead to losses because of adverse movements in the price or value of the underlying security, which may be magnified by certain features of the options. When selling a call option, the Fund will receive a premium; however, this premium may not be enough to offset a loss incurred by the Fund if the price of the underlying security is above the strike price by an amount equal to or greater than the premium. The value of an option may be adversely affected if the market for the option becomes less liquid or smaller, and will be affected by changes in the value or yield of the option’s underlying security, an increase in interest rates, a change in the actual or perceived volatility of the stock market or the underlying security and the remaining time to expiration. Additionally, the value of an option does not increase or decrease at the same rate as the underlying security.
The Fund’s use of options may reduce the Fund’s ability to profit from increases in the value of the underlying securities. If the price of the underlying security of a written call option rises above its strike price, the value of the option and, consequently, the Fund may decline significantly more than if the Fund invested solely in the underlying security instead of using options. Similarly, if the price of the underlying security of a purchased put option remains above its strike price, the option may become worthless, and, consequently the value of the Fund may decline significantly more than if the Fund invested solely in the underlying security instead of using options.
Depositary Receipt Risk. The Fund may hold the securities of non-U.S. companies in the form of ADRs. ADRs are negotiable certificates issued by a U.S. financial institution that represent a specified number of shares in a foreign stock and trade on a U.S.
26



national securities exchange, such as the Exchange. Sponsored ADRs are issued with the support of the issuer of the foreign stock underlying the ADRs and carry all of the rights of common shares, including voting rights. The underlying issuers of certain ADRs are under no obligation to distribute shareholder communications to the holders of such receipts, or to pass through to them any voting rights with respect to the deposited securities. The underlying securities of the ADRs in the Fund’s portfolio are usually denominated or quoted in currencies other than the U.S. dollar. As a result, changes in foreign currency exchange rates may affect the value of the Fund’s portfolio. In addition, because the underlying securities of ADRs trade on foreign exchanges at times when the U.S. markets are not open for trading, the value of the securities underlying the ADRs may change materially at times when the U.S. markets are not open for trading, regardless of whether there is an active U.S. market for Shares.
Derivative Securities Risk. The Fund invests in options that derive their performance from the performance of an underlying reference asset. Derivatives, such as the options in which the Fund invests, can be volatile and involve various types and degrees of risks, depending upon the characteristics of a particular derivative. Derivatives may entail investment exposures that are greater than their cost would suggest, meaning that a small investment in a derivative could have a substantial impact on the performance of the Fund. The Fund could experience a loss if its derivatives do not perform as anticipated, the derivatives are not correlated with the performance of their reference asset, or if the Fund is unable to purchase or liquidate a position because of an illiquid secondary market. The market for many derivatives is, or suddenly can become, illiquid. Changes in liquidity may result in significant, rapid, and unpredictable changes in the prices for derivatives.
Equity Market Risk. Common stocks are susceptible to general stock market fluctuations and to volatile increases and decreases in value as market confidence in and perceptions of their issuers change. These investor perceptions are based on various and unpredictable factors including: expectations regarding government, economic, monetary and fiscal policies; inflation and interest rates; economic expansion or contraction; and global or regional political, economic, public health, and banking crises. If you held common stock, or common stock equivalents, of any given issuer, you would generally be exposed to greater risk than if you held preferred stocks and debt obligations of the issuer because common stockholders, or holders of equivalent interests, generally have inferior rights to receive payments from issuers in comparison with the rights of preferred stockholders, bondholders, and other creditors of such issuers.
Beginning in the first quarter of 2020, financial markets in the United States and around the world experienced extreme and in many cases unprecedented volatility and severe losses due to the global pandemic caused by COVID-19, a novel coronavirus. The pandemic has resulted in a wide range of social and economic disruptions, including closed borders, voluntary or compelled quarantines of large populations, stressed healthcare systems, reduced or prohibited domestic or international travel, supply chain disruptions, and so-called “stay-at-home” orders throughout much of the United States and many other countries. The fall-out from these disruptions has included the rapid closure of businesses deemed “non-essential” by federal, state, or local governments and rapidly increasing unemployment, as well as greatly reduced liquidity for certain instruments at times. Some sectors of the economy and individual issuers have experienced particularly large losses. Such disruptions may continue for an extended period of time or reoccur in the future to a similar or greater extent. In response, the U.S. government and the Federal Reserve have taken extraordinary actions to support the domestic economy and financial markets, resulting in very low interest rates and in some cases negative yields. It is unknown how long circumstances related to the pandemic will persist, whether they will reoccur in the future, whether efforts to support the economy and financial markets will be successful, and what additional implications may follow from the pandemic. The impact of these events and other epidemics or pandemics in the future could adversely affect Fund performance.
ETF Risks. The Fund is an ETF, and, as a result of an ETF’s structure, it is exposed to the following risks:
APs, Market Makers, and Liquidity Providers Concentration Risk. The Fund has a limited number of financial institutions that may act as APs. In addition, there may be a limited number of market makers and/or liquidity providers in the marketplace. To the extent either of the following events occur, Shares may trade at a material discount to NAV and possibly face delisting: (i) APs exit the business or otherwise become unable to process creation and/or redemption orders and no other APs step forward to perform these services, or (ii) market makers and/or liquidity providers exit the business or significantly reduce their business activities and no other entities step forward to perform their functions.
Costs of Buying or Selling Shares. Investors buying or selling Shares in the secondary market will pay brokerage commissions or other charges imposed by brokers, as determined by that broker. Brokerage commissions are often a fixed amount and may be a significant proportional cost for investors seeking to buy or sell relatively small amounts of Shares. In addition, secondary market investors will also incur the cost of the difference between the price at which an investor is willing to buy Shares (the “bid” price) and the price at which an investor is willing to sell Shares (the “ask” price). This difference in bid and ask prices is often referred to as the “spread” or “bid-ask spread.” The bid-ask spread varies over time for Shares based on trading volume and market liquidity, and the spread is generally lower if Shares have more trading volume and market liquidity and higher if Shares have little trading volume and market liquidity. Further, a relatively small investor base in the Fund, asset swings in the Fund, and/or increased market volatility may cause increased bid-ask spreads. Due to the costs of buying or selling Shares, including bid-ask spreads, frequent trading of Shares may significantly reduce investment results and an investment in Shares may not be advisable for investors who anticipate regularly making small investments.
27



Shares May Trade at Prices Other Than NAV. As with all ETFs, Shares may be bought and sold in the secondary market at market prices. Although it is expected that the market price of Shares will approximate the Fund’s NAV, there may be times when the market price of Shares is more than the NAV intra-day (premium) or less than the NAV intra-day (discount) due to supply and demand of Shares or during periods of market volatility. This risk is heightened in times of market volatility, periods of steep market declines, and periods when there is limited trading activity for Shares in the secondary market, in which case such premiums or discounts may be significant.
Trading. Although Shares are listed for trading on the Exchange and may be listed or traded on U.S. and non-U.S. stock exchanges other than the Exchange, there can be no assurance that an active trading market for such Shares will develop or be maintained. Trading in Shares may be halted due to market conditions or for reasons that, in the view of the Exchange, make trading in Shares inadvisable. In addition, trading in Shares on the Exchange is subject to trading halts caused by extraordinary market volatility pursuant to Exchange “circuit breaker” rules, which temporarily halt trading on the Exchange when a decline in the S&P 500® Index during a single day reaches certain thresholds (e.g., 7%, 13%, and 20%). Additional rules applicable to the Exchange may halt trading in Shares when extraordinary volatility causes sudden, significant swings in the market price of Shares. There can be no assurance that Shares will trade with any volume, or at all, on any stock exchange. In stressed market conditions, the liquidity of Shares may begin to mirror the liquidity of the Fund’s underlying portfolio holdings, which can be significantly less liquid than Shares, and this could lead to differences between the market price of the Shares and the underlying value of those Shares. Additionally, this adverse change in liquidity could in turn lead to differences between the market price of Shares and the underlying value of those Shares.
Fixed Income Securities Risk. The Fund invests indirectly in fixed income securities through investments in Underlying Bond ETFs, which involve certain risks, including:
Credit Risk. Credit risk refers to the possibility that the issuer of a security will not be able to make principal and interest payments when due. Changes in an issuer’s credit rating or the market’s perception of an issuer’s creditworthiness may also affect the value of an Underlying Bond ETF’s investment in that issuer. The degree of credit risk depends on both the financial condition of the issuer and the terms of the obligation.
Event Risk. Event risk is the risk that corporate issuers may undergo restructurings, such as mergers, leveraged buyouts, takeovers, or similar events financed by increased debt. As a result of the added debt, the credit quality and market value of a company’s bonds and/or other debt securities may decline significantly.
Extension Risk. When interest rates rise, certain obligations will be paid off by the obligor more slowly than anticipated, causing the value of these securities to fall. Rising interest rates tend to extend the duration of securities, making them more sensitive to future changes in interest rates. The value of longer-term securities generally changes more in response to changes in interest rates than the value of shorter-term securities. As a result, in a period of rising interest rates, securities may exhibit additional volatility and may lose value.
Interest Rate Risk. Generally, the value of fixed income securities will change inversely with changes in interest rates. As interest rates rise, the market value of fixed income securities tends to decrease. Conversely, as interest rates fall, the market value of fixed income securities tends to increase. This risk will be greater for long-term securities than for short-term securities. An Underlying Bond ETF may take steps to attempt to reduce the exposure of its portfolio to interest rate changes; however, there can be no guarantee that the Fund will take such actions or that the Fund will be successful in reducing the impact of interest rate changes on the portfolio. Changes in government intervention may have adverse effects on investments, volatility, and illiquidity in debt markets.
Prepayment Risk. When interest rates fall, certain obligations will be paid off by the obligor more quickly than originally anticipated, and the Fund may have to invest the proceeds in securities with lower yields. In periods of falling interest rates, the rate of prepayments tends to increase (as does price fluctuation) as borrowers are motivated to pay off debt and refinance at new lower rates. During such periods, reinvestment of the prepayment proceeds by the management team will generally be at lower rates of return than the return on the assets that were prepaid. Prepayment reduces the yield to maturity and the average life of the security.
Foreign Investment Risk. Because of the Fund’s investment in ADRs, changes in foreign economies and political climates are more likely to affect the Fund than a fund that invests exclusively in U.S. companies. There may also be less government supervision of foreign markets, resulting in non-uniform accounting practices and less publicly available information. The value of foreign investments may be affected by changes in exchange control regulations, application of foreign tax laws (including withholding tax), changes in governmental administration or economic or monetary policy (in this country or abroad) or changed circumstances in dealings between nations. Investments in foreign issues could be affected by other factors not present in the United States, including expropriation, armed conflict, confiscatory taxation, and potential difficulties in enforcing contractual obligations.
Foreign Securities Risk. The Fund invests in Underlying Bond ETFs that may invest in foreign securities. Investments in foreign securities involve certain risks that may not be present with investments in U.S. securities. There may be less information publicly
28



available about a foreign issuer than a U.S. issuer. Foreign issuers may be subject to different accounting, auditing, financial reporting and investor protection standards than U.S. issuers. Investments in foreign securities may be subject to withholding or other taxes and may be subject to additional trading, settlement, custodial, and operational risks. With respect to certain countries, there is the possibility of government intervention and expropriation or nationalization of assets. Because legal systems differ, there is also the possibility that it will be difficult to obtain or enforce legal judgments in certain countries. Since foreign exchanges may be open on days when an Underlying Bond ETF does not price its shares, the value of the securities in an Underlying Bond ETF’s portfolio may change on days when shareholders will not be able to purchase or sell the Underlying Bond ETF’s or the Fund’s shares. Conversely, the Underlying Bond ETF’s and the Fund’s shares may trade on days when foreign exchanges are closed. Each of these factors can make investments in the Fund more volatile and potentially less liquid than other types of investments.
High Portfolio Turnover Risk. Because the Fund may “turn over” some or all of its put options and equity securities as frequently as monthly, the Fund may incur high levels of transaction costs from commissions or mark-ups in the bid/offer spread. Higher portfolio turnover may result in the Fund paying higher levels of transaction costs and generating greater tax liabilities for shareholders. Portfolio turnover risk may cause the Fund’s performance to be less than you expect. While the turnover of the put options is not deemed “portfolio turnover” for accounting purposes, the economic impact to the Fund is similar to what could occur if the Fund experienced high portfolio turnover (e.g., in excess of 100% per year).
IPO Risk. The Fund may invest in securities offered in an IPO or in companies that have recently completed an IPO. The stocks of such companies are unseasoned equities lacking a trading history, a track record of reporting to investors, and widely available research coverage. IPOs are thus often subject to extreme price volatility and speculative trading. These stocks may have above-average price appreciation in connection with the IPO. In addition, IPOs share similar illiquidity risks of private equity and venture capital. The free float shares held by the public in an IPO are typically a small percentage of the market capitalization. The ownership of many IPOs often include large holdings by venture capital and private equity investors who seek to sell their shares in the public market in the months following an IPO when shares restricted by lock-up are released, causing greater volatility and possible downward pressure during the time that locked-up shares are released.
Limited Operating History. The Fund is a recently organized management investment company with a limited operating history. As a result, prospective investors have a limited track record or history on which to base their investment decision.
Management Risk. The Fund is actively managed and may not meet its investment objective based on the Adviser’s success or failure to implement investment strategies for the Fund.
Market Capitalization Risk.
Large-Capitalization Investing. The securities of large-capitalization companies may be relatively mature compared to smaller companies and therefore subject to slower growth during times of economic expansion. Large-capitalization companies may also be unable to respond quickly to new competitive challenges, such as changes in technology and consumer tastes.
Mid-Capitalization Investing. The securities of mid-capitalization companies may be more vulnerable to adverse issuer, market, political, or economic developments than securities of large-capitalization companies, but they may also be subject to slower growth than small-capitalization companies during times of economic expansion. The securities of mid-capitalization companies generally trade in lower volumes and are subject to greater and more unpredictable price changes than large capitalization stocks or the stock market as a whole, but they may also be nimbler and more responsive to new challenges than large-capitalization companies. Some mid-capitalization companies have limited product lines, markets, financial resources, and management personnel and tend to concentrate on fewer geographical markets relative to large-capitalization companies.
Small-Capitalization Investing. The securities of small-capitalization companies may be more vulnerable to adverse issuer, market, political, or economic developments than securities of larger-capitalization companies. The securities of small-capitalization companies generally trade in lower volumes and are subject to greater and more unpredictable price changes than larger capitalization stocks or the stock market as a whole. Some small capitalization companies have limited product lines, markets, and financial and managerial resources and tend to concentrate on fewer geographical markets relative to larger capitalization companies. There is typically less publicly available information concerning smaller-capitalization companies than for larger, more established companies. Small-capitalization companies also may be particularly sensitive to changes in interest rates, government regulation, borrowing costs and earnings.
Market Risk. The trading prices of securities and other instruments fluctuate in response to a variety of factors. These factors include events impacting the entire market or specific market segments, such as political, market and economic developments, as well as events that impact specific issuers. The Fund’s NAV and market price, like security and commodity prices generally, may fluctuate significantly in response to these and other factors. As a result, an investor could lose money over short or long periods of time.
29



Non-Diversification Risk. The Fund is considered to be non-diversified, which means that it may invest more of its assets in the securities of a single issuer or a smaller number of issuers than if it were a diversified fund. As a result, the Fund may be more exposed to the risks associated with and developments affecting an individual issuer or a smaller number of issuers than a fund that invests more widely. This may increase the Fund’s volatility and cause the performance of a relatively smaller number of issuers to have a greater impact on the Fund’s performance.
Options Risk. Selling (writing) and buying options are speculative activities and entail greater than ordinary investment risks. The Fund’s use of options can lead to losses because of adverse movements in the price or value of the reference asset, which may be magnified by certain features of the options. When selling a put option, the Fund will receive a premium; however, this premium may not be enough to offset a loss incurred by the Fund if the price of the underlying asset is below the strike price by an amount equal to or greater than the premium. Purchasing of put or call options involves the payment of premiums, which may adversely affect the Fund’s performance. Purchased put or call options may expire worthless resulting in the Fund’s loss of the premium it paid for the option.
The value of an option may be adversely affected if the market for the option becomes less liquid or smaller, and will be affected by changes in the value or yield of the option’s reference asset, an increase in interest rates, a change in the actual or perceived volatility of the stock market or the reference asset and the remaining time to expiration. Additionally, the value of an option does not increase or decrease at the same rate as the reference asset. The Fund’s use of options may reduce the Fund’s profit from its other holdings and may result in a significantly greater decline in the value of the Fund than if it had invested directly in the reference asset instead of using options. If the price of the reference asset of a purchased put option remains above its strike price or the price of the reference asset of a purchased call option remains below its strike price, the option may become worthless, and, consequently the value of the Fund may decline significantly more than if the Fund invested solely in the reference asset instead of using options or did not invest in the options at all.
Other Investment Companies Risk. The Fund may invest in shares of other investment companies, such as ETFs. The risks of investment in these securities typically reflect the risks of the types of instruments in which the investment company invests. When the Fund invests in investment company securities, shareholders of the Fund bear indirectly their proportionate share of their fees and expenses, as well as their share of the Fund’s fees and expenses. As a result, an investment by the Fund in an investment company could cause the Fund’s operating expenses (taking into account indirect expenses such as the fees and expenses of the investment company) to be higher and, in turn, performance to be lower than if it were to invest directly in the instruments underlying the investment company. Additionally, there may not be an active trading market available for shares of some ETFs. Shares of an ETF may also trade in the market at a premium or discount to its NAV.
REIT Investment Risk. Investments in REITs involve unique risks. REITs may have limited financial resources, may trade less frequently and in limited volume, and may be more volatile than other securities. In addition, to the extent a Fund holds interests in REITs, it is expected that investors in a Fund will bear two layers of asset-based management fees and expenses (directly at a Fund level and indirectly at the REIT level). The risks of investing in REITs include certain risks associated with the direct ownership of real estate and the real estate industry in general. These include risks related to general, regional and local economic conditions; fluctuations in interest rates and property tax rates; shifts in zoning laws, environmental regulations and other governmental action such as the exercise of eminent domain; cash flow dependency; increased operating expenses; lack of availability of mortgage funds; losses due to natural disasters; overbuilding; losses due to casualty or condemnation; changes in property values and rental rates; and other factors.
In addition to these risks, residential/diversified REITs and commercial equity REITs may be affected by changes in the value of the underlying property owned by the trusts, while mortgage REITs may be affected by the quality of any credit extended. Further, REITs are dependent upon management skills and generally may not be diversified. REITs are also subject to heavy cash flow dependency, defaults by borrowers and self-liquidation. In addition, REITs could possibly fail to qualify for the beneficial tax treatment available to REITs under the Code, or to maintain their exemptions from registration under the Investment Company Act of 1940, as amended (the “1940 Act”). A REIT that fails to comply with such tax requirements may be subject to U.S. federal income taxation, which may affect the value of the REIT and the characterization of the REIT’s distributions. A REIT that successfully maintains its qualification may still become subject to U.S. federal, state and local taxes, including excise, penalty, franchise, payroll, mortgage recording, and transfer taxes, both directly and indirectly through its subsidiaries.
Sector Risk. Each Fund’s investing approach may result in an emphasis on certain sectors or sub-sectors of the market at any given time. To the extent a Fund invests more heavily in one sector or sub-sector of the market, it thereby presents a more concentrated risk and its performance will be especially sensitive to developments that significantly affect those sectors or sub-sectors. In addition, the value of a Fund’s shares may change at different rates compared to the value of shares of a fund with investments in a more diversified mix of sectors and industries. An individual sector or sub-sector of the market may have above-average performance during particular periods but may also move up and down more than the broader market. The several industries that constitute a sector may all react in the same way to economic, political or regulatory events. A Fund’s performance could also be affected if the sectors or sub-sectors do not perform as expected. Alternatively, the lack of exposure to one or more sectors or sub-sectors may adversely affect performance.
30



Financial Sector Risk. Companies in the financial sector of an economy are often subject to extensive governmental regulation and intervention, which may adversely affect the scope of their activities, the prices they can charge and the amount of capital they must maintain. Governmental regulation may change frequently and may have significant adverse consequences for companies in the financial sector, including effects not intended by such regulation. The impact of recent or future regulation in various countries on any individual financial company or on the sector as a whole cannot be predicted.
Certain risks may impact the value of investments in the financial sector more severely than those of investments outside this sector, including the risks associated with companies that operate with substantial financial leverage. Companies in the financial sector may also be adversely affected by increases in interest rates and loan losses, decreases in the availability of money or asset valuations, credit rating downgrades and adverse conditions in other related markets.
Insurance companies, in particular, may be subject to severe price competition and/or rate regulation, which may have an adverse impact on their profitability. Insurance companies are subject to extensive government regulation in some countries and can be significantly affected by changes in interest rates, general economic conditions, price and marketing competition, the imposition of premium rate caps, or other changes in government regulation or tax law. Different segments of the insurance industry can be significantly affected by mortality and morbidity rates, environmental clean-up costs and catastrophic events such as earthquakes, hurricanes and terrorist acts.
The financial sector is also a target for cyber attacks and may experience technology malfunctions and disruptions. In recent years, cyber attacks and technology failures have become increasingly frequent and have caused significant losses.
Information Technology Sector Risk. Market or economic factors impacting information technology companies and companies that rely heavily on technological advances could have a significant effect on the value of the Fund’s investments. The value of stocks of information technology companies and companies that rely heavily on technology is particularly vulnerable to rapid changes in technology product cycles, rapid product obsolescence, government regulation and competition, both domestically and internationally, including competition from foreign competitors with lower production costs. Stocks of information technology companies and companies that rely heavily on technology, especially those of smaller, less-seasoned companies, tend to be more volatile than the overall market. Information technology companies are heavily dependent on patent and intellectual property rights, the loss or impairment of which may adversely affect profitability. Additionally, companies in the technology sector may face dramatic and often unpredictable changes in growth rates and competition for the services of qualified personnel.
Tail Hedge Risk. When the Fund’s tail hedge is in effect, the Fund may purchase put options designed to mitigate the Fund’s exposure to significant declines in the broader U.S. equity market. However, there is a risk that the Fund will experience a loss as a result of engaging in such options transactions. Moreover, there can be no assurance that the tail hedge will be successful in protecting against all or any declines in the value of the Fund’s portfolio because the amount of protection provided by the put options purchased by the Fund and the price of such protection will be dictated by prevailing market sentiment at the time the tail hedge is triggered. Additionally, the tail hedge will not protect against declines in the value of the Fund’s portfolio where such declines are based on factors other than general stock market fluctuations.
Tax Risk. The Fund expects to generate premiums from its sale of options. These premiums typically will result in short-term capital gains for federal income tax purposes. In addition, equity securities that are hedged with put options may not be eligible for long-term capital gains tax treatment. The Fund is not designed for investors seeking a tax efficient investment.
Value Style Investing Risk. Certain equity securities (generally referred to as value securities) are purchased primarily because they are selling at prices below what the Adviser believes to be their fundamental value and not necessarily because the issuing companies are expected to experience significant earnings growth. The Fund bears the risk that the companies that issued these securities may not overcome the adverse business developments or other factors causing their securities to be perceived by the Adviser to be underpriced or that the market may never come to recognize their fundamental value. A value stock may not increase in price, as anticipated by the Adviser investing in such securities, if other investors fail to recognize the company’s value and bid up the price or invest in markets favoring faster growing companies. The Fund’s strategy of investing in value stocks also carries the risk that in certain markets value stocks will under-perform growth stocks.
PORTFOLIO HOLDINGS INFORMATION
Information about the Funds’ daily portfolio holdings is available at www.aptusetfs.com and opusetfs.com. A description of the Funds’ policies and procedures with respect to the disclosure of the Funds’ portfolio holdings is available in the Funds’ Statement of Additional Information (“SAI”).
MANAGEMENT
Investment Adviser
Aptus serves as the Funds’ investment adviser and has overall responsibility for the general management and administration of the Funds. Aptus is a registered investment adviser with offices located at 265 Young Street Fairhope, Alabama 36532. Aptus provides
31



investment advisory services to separately managed accounts, as well as the Funds. Aptus also arranges for transfer agency, custody, fund administration, and all other related services necessary for the Funds to operate.
For the services it provides to the Funds, each Fund pays the Adviser a unified management fee, which is calculated daily and paid monthly, at an annual rate based on the applicable Fund’s average daily net assets as set forth in the table below.
Name of Fund Management Fee
Aptus Drawdown Managed Equity ETF (ADME) 0.79%
Aptus Collared Income Opportunity ETF (ACIO) 0.79%
Aptus Defined Risk ETF (DRSK) 0.69%
Opus Small Cap Value ETF (OSCV) 0.79%
Under the investment advisory agreement, the Adviser has agreed to pay all expenses incurred by the Funds except for interest charges on any borrowings, taxes, brokerage commissions and other expenses incurred in placing orders for the purchase and sale of securities and other investment instruments, acquired fund fees and expenses, accrued deferred tax liability, extraordinary expenses, distribution fees and expenses paid by the Funds under any distribution plan adopted pursuant to Rule 12b-1 under the 1940 Act, and the unified management fee payable to the Adviser.
The basis for the Board of Trustees’ (the “Board”) approval of the Investment Advisory Agreement with respect to ADME, DRSK, ACIO, and OSCV is available in the Funds’ Annual Report to Shareholders dated April 30, 2021.
Portfolio Managers
Each of ADME and ACIO is jointly and primarily managed by Messrs. Gardner, Tyner, Wagner, and Wyrick. DRSK is jointly and primarily managed by Messrs. Callahan, Gardner, Tyner, and Wyrick. OSCV is jointly and primarily managed by Messrs. Gardner, Wyrick, Rapking, and Wagner.
Mark Callahan is a Portfolio Manager and the Head of Trading at Aptus and has been with Aptus since 2019. In his role as Portfolio Manager, Mr. Callahan has been focused on derivative management, timing, hedging, and trading. Prior to joining Aptus, Mr. Callahan enjoyed a nearly 12-year career on the Sell-Side as an Institutional Equity and Derivatives Trader, as well as a Transition Manager. Mr. Callahan holds a BBA in Finance from the University of Oklahoma, and a MSc. of Real Estate from the University of Texas at Arlington.
JD Gardner, CFA, CMT, is the Managing Member and Chief Investment Officer at Aptus and has been with Aptus since founding the firm in 2013. Prior to Aptus, Mr. Gardner was a research analyst at Cornerstone Investment Management and an Associated Person for a commodity trading advisor. Mr. Gardner previously held roles in wealth and asset management for UBS and Morgan Stanley.
Brad Rapking, CFA, is a Portfolio Manager and Analyst at Aptus and joined the firm in 2020. In his role as Portfolio Manager, Mr. Rapking is focused on portfolio construction, fundamental research, idea generation and buy/sell decisions. Mr. Rapking graduated from Xavier University in 2015 with a BSBA in Finance. Mr. Rapking is a CFA Charterholder and a member of the CFA Institute and CFA Society of Alabama. Prior to joining Aptus, Mr. Rapking was an Equity Analyst for the Driehaus Capital Value Equities team responsible for fundamental research and idea generation in the Small Cap Value, Micro Cap Value, and International Small Cap Value strategies. Mr. Rapking has more than five years of experience in institutional equity research, trading and operations.
John Luke Tyner, CFA, is a Portfolio Manager and Analyst at Aptus and he has been with Aptus since 2019. In his role as Portfolio Manager, Mr. Tyner has been focused on custom research, and he was heavily involved in the Fund’s strategy. In addition, he also builds and maintains asset allocation models for individual investors in separately managed accounts. Mr. Tyner is CFA Charterholder. Prior to joining Aptus, Mr. Tyner worked in Industrial Sales at Duncan-Williams, Inc. since 2015. He earned a B.A. in Accounting from the University of Memphis and was a member of the golf team.
David Wagner III, CFA, is a Portfolio Manager and Analyst at Aptus and joined the firm in 2020. In his role as Portfolio Manager, he is responsible for portfolio construction, risk management, and buy/sell decisions. Additionally, he is responsible for implementation of the investment philosophy and idea generation, as well as the evaluation of macro-level trends and the market environment. Mr. Wagner began his career at Opus Capital Management in 2013 as an equity research analyst. He was most recently employed by Driehaus Capital Management as an Assistant Portfolio Manager where he was responsible for conducting research and analysis for various small and microcap strategies. Mr. Wagner is a CFA Charterholder and a member of the CFA Society of Cincinnati. He earned his BS in Accounting and BBA in Finance from the University of Kentucky. He also earned his MBA specialized in Finance from Xavier University in Cincinnati, Ohio.
Beckham Wyrick, CFA, is a Portfolio Manager and Analyst at Aptus and has been with Aptus since 2016. In his role as Portfolio Manager, Mr. Wyrick has been focused on custom research, and is heavily involved in the management and daily operations of the Aptus Funds. In addition, he also builds and maintains asset allocation models for individual investors in separately managed
32



accounts. Mr. Wyrick is CFA Charterholder and is a member of the CFA Institute and CFA Society of Alabama. He earned a B.A. in Finance from the University of North Carolina at Wilmington.
The Funds’ SAI provides additional information about the Portfolio Managers’ compensation structure, other accounts managed by the Portfolio Managers, and the Portfolio Managers’ ownership of Shares.
HOW TO BUY AND SELL SHARES
Each Fund issues and redeems Shares at NAV only in Creation Units. Only APs may acquire Shares directly from a Fund, and only APs may tender their Shares for redemption directly to a Fund, at NAV. APs must be a member or participant of a clearing agency registered with the SEC and must execute a Participant Agreement that has been agreed to by the Distributor (defined below), and that has been accepted by a Fund’s transfer agent, with respect to purchases and redemptions of Creation Units. Once created, Shares trade in the secondary market in quantities less than a Creation Unit.
Most investors buy and sell Shares in secondary market transactions through brokers. Shares are listed for trading on the secondary market on the Exchange and can be bought and sold throughout the trading day like other publicly traded securities.
When buying or selling Shares through a broker, you will incur customary brokerage commissions and charges, and you may pay some or all of the spread between the bid and the offer price in the secondary market on each leg of a round trip (purchase and sale) transaction. In addition, because secondary market transactions occur at market prices, you may pay more than NAV when you buy Shares and receive less than NAV when you sell those Shares.
Book Entry
Shares are held in book-entry form, which means that no stock certificates are issued. The Depository Trust Company (“DTC”) or its nominee is the record owner of all outstanding Shares.
Investors owning Shares are beneficial owners as shown on the records of DTC or its participants. DTC serves as the securities depository for all Shares. DTC’s participants include securities brokers and dealers, banks, trust companies, clearing corporations and other institutions that directly or indirectly maintain a custodial relationship with DTC. As a beneficial owner of Shares, you are not entitled to receive physical delivery of stock certificates or to have Shares registered in your name, and you are not considered a registered owner of Shares. Therefore, to exercise any right as an owner of Shares, you must rely upon the procedures of DTC and its participants. These procedures are the same as those that apply to any other securities that you hold in book entry or “street name” through your brokerage account.
Frequent Purchases and Redemptions of Shares
The Funds impose no restrictions on the frequency of purchases and redemptions of Shares. In determining not to approve a written, established policy, the Board evaluated the risks of market timing activities by Fund shareholders. Purchases and redemptions by APs, who are the only parties that may purchase or redeem Shares directly with a Fund, are an essential part of the ETF process and help keep Share trading prices in line with NAV. As such, the Funds accommodate frequent purchases and redemptions by APs. However, the Board has also determined that frequent purchases and redemptions for cash may increase tracking error and portfolio transaction costs and may lead to the realization of capital gains. To minimize these potential consequences of frequent purchases and redemptions, the Funds employ fair value pricing and may impose transaction fees on purchases and redemptions of Creation Units to cover the custodial and other costs incurred by a Fund in effecting trades. In addition, the Funds and the Adviser reserve the right to reject any purchase order at any time.
Determination of Net Asset Value (NAV)
Each Fund’s NAV is calculated as of the scheduled close of regular trading on the New York Stock Exchange (“NYSE”), generally 4:00 p.m. Eastern time, each day the NYSE is open for business. Each NAV for a Fund is calculated by dividing the applicable Fund’s net assets by its Shares outstanding.
In calculating its NAV, each Fund generally values its assets on the basis of market quotations, last sale prices, or estimates of value furnished by a pricing service or brokers who make markets in such instruments. In particular, each Fund generally values equity securities traded on any recognized U.S. or non-U.S. exchange at the last sale price or official closing price on the exchange or system on which they are principally traded. If such information is not available for a security held by a Fund or is determined to be unreliable, the security will be valued at fair value estimates under guidelines established by the Board (as described below).
Fair Value Pricing
The Board has adopted procedures and methodologies to fair value Fund securities whose market prices are not “readily available” or are deemed to be unreliable. For example, such circumstances may arise when: (i) a security has been de-listed or has had its trading halted or suspended; (ii) a security’s primary pricing source is unable or unwilling to provide a price; (iii) a security’s primary trading market is closed during regular market hours; or (iv) a security’s value is materially affected by events occurring after the close of the
33



security’s primary trading market. Generally, when fair valuing a security, the Funds will take into account all reasonably available information that may be relevant to a particular valuation including, but not limited to, fundamental analytical data regarding the issuer, information relating to the issuer’s business, recent trades or offers of the security, general and/or specific market conditions and the specific facts giving rise to the need to fair value the security. Fair value determinations are made in good faith and in accordance with the fair value methodologies included in the Board-adopted valuation procedures. Due to the subjective and variable nature of fair value pricing, there can be no assurance that the Adviser will be able to obtain the fair value assigned to the security upon the sale of such security.
Investments by Registered Investment Companies
Section 12(d)(1) of the 1940 Act restricts investments by registered investment companies in the securities of other investment companies, including Shares. Registered investment companies are permitted to invest in the Fund beyond the limits set forth in section 12(d)(1), subject to certain terms and conditions set forth in an SEC exemptive order issued to the Adviser or rule under the 1940 Act, including that such investment companies enter into an agreement with the Fund. The relief from Section 12(d)(1), however, may not be available for investments in a Fund if the Fund invests significantly in other ETFs. The relief from Section 12(d)(1) is not expected to be available for DRSK.
Delivery of Shareholder Documents – Householding
Householding is an option available to certain investors of the Funds. Householding is a method of delivery, based on the preference of the individual investor, in which a single copy of certain shareholder documents can be delivered to investors who share the same address, even if their accounts are registered under different names. Householding for the Funds is available through certain broker-dealers. If you are interested in enrolling in householding and receiving a single copy of prospectuses and other shareholder documents, please contact your broker-dealer. If you are currently enrolled in householding and wish to change your householding status, please contact your broker-dealer.
DIVIDENDS, DISTRIBUTIONS, AND TAXES
Dividends and Distributions
Each Fund intends to pay out dividends, if any, and distribute any net realized capital gains to its shareholders at least annually. Each Fund will declare and pay capital gain distributions in cash. Distributions in cash may be reinvested automatically in additional whole Shares only if the broker through whom you purchased Shares makes such option available. Your broker is responsible for distributing the income and capital gain distributions to you.
Taxes
The following discussion is a summary of some important U.S. federal income tax considerations generally applicable to investments in a Fund. Your investment in a Fund may have other tax implications. Please consult your tax advisor about the tax consequences of an investment in Shares, including the possible application of foreign, state, and local tax laws.
Each Fund intends to elect and to qualify each year for treatment as a RIC. If a Fund meets certain minimum distribution requirements, a RIC is not subject to tax at the fund level on income and gains from investments that are timely distributed to shareholders. However, a Fund’s failure to qualify as a RIC or to meet minimum distribution requirements would result (if certain relief provisions were not available) in fund-level taxation and, consequently, a reduction in income available for distribution to shareholders.
Unless your investment in Shares is made through a tax-exempt entity or tax-advantaged account, such as an IRA plan, you need to be aware of the possible tax consequences when a Fund makes distributions, when you sell your Shares listed on the Exchange; and when you purchase or redeem Creation Units (APs only).
Taxes on Distributions
Each Fund intends to distribute, at least annually, substantially all of its net investment income and net capital gains. For federal income tax purposes, distributions of investment income are generally taxable as ordinary income or qualified dividend income. Taxes on distributions of capital gains (if any) are determined by how long a Fund owned the investments that generated them, rather than how long a shareholder has owned his or her Shares. Sales of assets held by a Fund for more than one year generally result in long-term capital gains and losses, and sales of assets held by a Fund for one year or less generally result in short-term capital gains and losses. Distributions of a Fund’s net capital gain (the excess of net long-term capital gains over net short-term capital losses) that are reported by such Fund as capital gain dividends (“Capital Gain Dividends”) will be taxable as long-term capital gains, which for non-corporate shareholders are subject to tax at reduced rates of up to 20% (lower rates apply to individuals in lower tax brackets), provided that certain capital gain dividends attributable to dividends the Fund receives from REITs (i.e., “unrecaptured section 1250 gain”) may be taxable to non-corporate shareholders at a rate of 25%. Distributions of short-term capital gain will generally be taxable as ordinary income. Dividends and distributions are generally taxable to you whether you receive them in cash or reinvest them in additional Shares.
34



Distributions reported by a Fund as “qualified dividend income” are generally taxed to non-corporate shareholders at rates applicable to long-term capital gains, provided holding period and other requirements are met. “Qualified dividend income” generally is income derived from dividends paid by U.S. corporations or certain foreign corporations that are either incorporated in a U.S. possession or eligible for tax benefits under certain U.S. income tax treaties. In addition, dividends that a Fund received in respect of stock of certain foreign corporations may be qualified dividend income if that stock is readily tradable on an established U.S. securities market. Dividends received by a Fund from an ETF, an underlying fund taxable as a RIC, or from a REIT may be treated as qualified dividend income generally only to the extent so reported by such ETF, underlying fund, or REIT. Certain of the Funds’ investment strategies (including the options collar strategy) may significantly reduce or eliminate a Fund’s ability to make distributions eligible to be treated as qualified dividend income or for the dividends-received deduction.
Shortly after the close of each calendar year, you will be informed of the amount and character of any distributions received from a Fund.
U.S. individuals with income exceeding specified thresholds are subject to a 3.8% tax on all or a portion of their “net investment income,” which includes interest, dividends, and certain capital gains (generally including capital gains distributions and capital gains realized on the sale of Shares). This 3.8% tax also applies to all or a portion of the undistributed net investment income of certain shareholders that are estates and trusts.
In general, your distributions are subject to federal income tax for the year in which they are paid. Certain distributions paid in January, however, may be treated as paid on December 31 of the prior year. Distributions are generally taxable even if they are paid from income or gains earned by a Fund before your investment (and thus were included in the Shares’ NAV when you purchased your Shares).
You may wish to avoid investing in a Fund shortly before a dividend or other distribution, because such a distribution will generally be taxable even though it may economically represent a return of a portion of your investment.
If a Fund’s distributions exceed its earnings and profits, all or a portion of the distributions made for a taxable year may be recharacterized as a return of capital to shareholders. A return of capital distribution will generally not be taxable, but will reduce each shareholder’s cost basis in Shares and result in a higher capital gain or lower capital loss when the Shares are sold. After a shareholder’s basis in Shares has been reduced to zero, distributions in excess of earnings and profits in respect of those Shares will be treated as gain from the sale of the Shares.
If you are neither a resident nor a citizen of the United States or if you are a foreign entity, distributions (other than Capital Gain Dividends) paid to you by a Fund will generally be subject to a U.S. withholding tax at the rate of 30%, unless a lower treaty rate applies. Gains from the sale or other disposition of your Shares generally are not subject to U.S. taxation, unless you are a nonresident alien individual who is physically present in the U.S. for 183 days or more per year. A Fund may, under certain circumstances, report all or a portion of a dividend as an “interest-related dividend” or a “short-term capital gain dividend,” which would generally be exempt from this 30% U.S. withholding tax, provided certain other requirements are met. Different tax consequences may result if you are a foreign shareholder engaged in a trade or business within the United States or if a tax treaty applies.
Under legislation generally known as “FATCA” (the Foreign Account Tax Compliance Act), a Fund is required to withhold 30% of certain ordinary dividends it pays to shareholders that are foreign entities and that fail to meet prescribed information reporting or certification requirements.
Each Fund (or a financial intermediary, such as a broker, through which a shareholder owns Shares) generally is required to withhold and remit to the U.S. Treasury a percentage of the taxable distributions and sale or redemption proceeds paid to any shareholder who fails to properly furnish a correct taxpayer identification number, who has underreported dividend or interest income, or who fails to certify that he, she or it is not subject to such withholding.
Taxes When Shares are Sold on the Exchange
Any capital gain or loss realized upon a sale of Shares generally is treated as a long-term capital gain or loss if Shares have been held for more than one year and as a short-term capital gain or loss if Shares have been held for one year or less. However, any capital loss on a sale of Shares held for six months or less is treated as long-term capital loss to the extent of Capital Gain Dividends paid with respect to such Shares. Any loss realized on a sale will be disallowed to the extent Shares of a Fund are acquired, including through reinvestment of dividends, within a 61-day period beginning 30 days before and ending 30 days after the disposition of Shares. The ability to deduct capital losses may be limited.
The cost basis of Shares of a Fund acquired by purchase will generally be based on the amount paid for the Shares and then may be subsequently adjusted for other applicable transactions as required by the Code. The difference between the selling price and the cost basis of Shares generally determines the amount of the capital gain or loss realized on the sale or exchange of Shares. Contact the broker through whom you purchased your Shares to obtain information with respect to the available cost basis reporting methods and elections for your account.
35



Taxes on Purchases and Redemptions of Creation Units
An AP having the U.S. dollar as its functional currency for U.S. federal income tax purposes who exchanges securities for Creation Units generally recognizes a gain or a loss. The gain or loss will be equal to the difference between the value of the Creation Units at the time of the exchange and the exchanging AP’s aggregate basis in the securities delivered, plus the amount of any cash paid for the Creation Units. An AP who exchanges Creation Units for securities will generally recognize a gain or loss equal to the difference between the exchanging AP’s basis in the Creation Units and the aggregate U.S. dollar market value of the securities received, plus any cash received for such Creation Units. The Internal Revenue Service may assert, however, that a loss that is realized upon an exchange of securities for Creation Units may not be currently deducted under the rules governing “wash sales” (for an AP who does not mark-to-market their holdings), or on the basis that there has been no significant change in economic position. APs exchanging securities should consult their own tax advisor with respect to whether wash sale rules apply and when a loss might be deductible.
Any capital gain or loss realized upon redemption of Creation Units is generally treated as long-term capital gain or loss if Shares have been held for more than one year and as a short-term capital gain or loss if Shares have been held for one year or less.
Each Fund may include a payment of cash in addition to, or in place of, the delivery of a basket of securities upon the redemption of Creation Units. Such Fund may sell portfolio securities to obtain the cash needed to distribute redemption proceeds. This may cause such Fund to recognize investment income and/or capital gains or losses that it might not have recognized if it had completely satisfied the redemption in-kind. As a result, such Fund may be less tax efficient if it includes such a cash payment in the proceeds paid upon the redemption of Creation Units.
Taxation of REIT Investments
A Fund may invest in REITs. “Qualified REIT dividends” (i.e., ordinary REIT dividends other than capital gain dividends and portions of REIT dividends designated as qualified dividend income eligible for capital gain tax rates) are eligible for a 20% deduction by non-corporate taxpayers. This deduction, if allowed in full, equates to a maximum effective tax rate of 29.6% (37% top rate applied to income after 20% deduction). Distributions by a Fund to its shareholders that are attributable to qualified REIT dividends received by the Fund and which the Fund properly reports as “section 199A dividends,” are treated as “qualified REIT dividends” in the hands of non-corporate shareholders. A section 199A dividend is treated as a qualified REIT dividend only if the shareholder receiving such dividend holds the dividend-paying RIC shares for at least 46 days of the 91-day period beginning 45 days before the shares become ex-dividend, and is not under an obligation to make related payments with respect to a position in substantially similar or related property. A Fund is permitted to report such part of its dividends as section 199A dividends as are eligible, but is not required to do so.
REITs in which a Fund invests often do not provide complete and final tax information to the Fund until after the time that the Fund issues a tax reporting statement. As a result, a Fund may at times find it necessary to reclassify the amount and character of its distributions to you after it issues your tax reporting statement. When such reclassification is necessary, a Fund (or a financial intermediary, such as a broker, through which a shareholder owns Shares) will send you a corrected, final Form 1099-DIV to reflect the reclassified information. If you receive a corrected Form 1099-DIV, use the information on this corrected form, and not the information on the previously issued tax reporting statement, in completing your tax returns.
Taxation of Options Collar Strategy
If positions held by a Fund were treated as “straddles” for federal income tax purposes, or the Fund’s risk of loss with respect to a position was otherwise diminished as set forth in Treasury Regulations, dividends on stocks that are a part of such positions would not constitute qualified dividend income subject to such favorable income tax treatment. In addition, generally, straddles are subject to certain rules that may affect the amount, character and timing of a Fund’s gains and losses with respect to straddle positions by requiring, among other things, that: (1) any loss realized on disposition of one position of a straddle may not be recognized to the extent that the Fund has unrealized gains with respect to the other position in such straddle; (2) the Fund’s holding period in straddle positions be suspended while the straddle exists (possibly resulting in a gain being treated as short-term capital gain rather than long-term capital gain); (3) the losses recognized with respect to certain straddle positions that are part of a mixed straddle and that are not subject to Section 1256 of the Code be treated as 60% long-term and 40% short-term capital loss; (4) losses recognized with respect to certain straddle positions that would otherwise constitute short-term capital losses be treated as long-term capital losses; and (5) the deduction of interest and carrying charges attributable to certain straddle positions may be deferred.
Foreign Taxes
Dividends and interest received by a Fund from sources within foreign countries may be subject to withholding and other taxes imposed by such countries. Tax treaties between certain countries and the U.S. may reduce or eliminate such taxes. Foreign tax credits, if any, received by a Fund as a result of an investment in another RIC (including an ETF which is taxable as a RIC) will not be passed through to you unless the Fund qualifies as a “qualified fund-of-funds” under the Code. If a Fund is a “qualified fund-of-funds” it will be eligible to file an election with the Internal Revenue Service that will enable the Fund to pass along these foreign tax credits to its shareholders. A Fund will be treated as a “qualified fund-of-funds” under the Code if at least 50% of the value of the Fund’s total assets (at the close of each quarter of the Fund’s taxable year) is represented by interests in other RICs. Each Fund does not expect to satisfy the requirements for passing through to its shareholders any share of foreign taxes paid by the Fund, with the result that
36



shareholders will not include such taxes in their gross incomes and will not be entitled to a tax deduction or credit for such taxes on their own tax returns.
The foregoing discussion summarizes some of the possible consequences under current federal tax law of an investment in each Fund. It is not a substitute for personal tax advice. You also may be subject to state and local tax on Fund distributions and sales of Shares. Consult your personal tax advisor about the potential tax consequences of an investment in Shares under all applicable tax laws. For more information, please see the section entitled “Federal Income Taxes” in the SAI.
DISTRIBUTION
The Distributor, Quasar Distributors, LLC, is a broker-dealer registered with the SEC. The Distributor distributes Creation Units for the Funds on an agency basis and does not maintain a secondary market in Shares. The Distributor has no role in determining the policies of the Funds or the securities that are purchased or sold by the Funds. The Distributor’s principal address is 111 East Kilbourn Avenue, Suite 2200, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53202.
The Board has adopted a Distribution and Service Plan (the “Plan”) pursuant to Rule 12b-1 under the 1940 Act. In accordance with the Plan, each Fund is authorized to pay an amount up to 0.25% of its average daily net assets each year for certain distribution-related activities and shareholder services.
No Rule 12b-1 fees are currently paid by the Funds, and there are no plans to impose these fees. However, in the event Rule 12b-1 fees are charged in the future, because the fees are paid out of Fund assets, over time these fees will increase the cost of your investment and may cost you more than certain other types of sales charges.
PREMIUM/DISCOUNT INFORMATION
Information regarding how often Shares traded on the Exchange at a price above (i.e., at a premium) or below (i.e., at a discount) the NAV per Share is available, free of charge, on the Funds’ websites at www.aptusetfs.com or www.opusetfs.com, as applicable.
ADDITIONAL NOTICES
Shares are not sponsored, endorsed, or promoted by the Exchange. The Exchange is not responsible for, nor has it participated in the determination of, the timing, prices, or quantities of Shares to be issued, nor in the determination or calculation of the equation by which Shares are redeemable. The Exchange has no obligation or liability to owners of Shares in connection with the administration, marketing, or trading of Shares.
Without limiting any of the foregoing, in no event shall the Exchange have any liability for any lost profits or indirect, punitive, special, or consequential damages even if notified of the possibility thereof.
The Adviser and the Funds make no representation or warranty, express or implied, to the owners of Shares or any member of the public regarding the advisability of investing in securities generally or in the Funds particularly.
37



FINANCIAL HIGHLIGHTS
The financial highlights tables are intended to help you understand each Fund’s financial performance for each Fund’s five most recent fiscal years (or the life of the Fund, if shorter). Certain information reflects financial results for a single Share. The total returns in the tables represent the rate that an investor would have earned or lost on an investment in a Fund (assuming reinvestment of all dividends and distributions). This information has been audited by Cohen & Company, Ltd., the Funds’ independent registered public accounting firm, whose report, along with the Funds’ financial statements, is included in the Funds’ annual report, which is available upon request.

Aptus Drawdown Managed Equity ETF

FINANCIAL HIGHLIGHTS
For a capital share outstanding throughout each year/period
Year Ended
April 30,
2021
Year Ended
April 30,
2020
Year Ended
April 30,
2019
Year Ended
April 30,
2018
Period Ended
April 30, 2017(1)
Net asset value, beginning of year/period
$ 30.23  $ 29.82  $ 32.49  $ 26.57  $ 25.00 
INCOME (LOSS) FROM INVESTMENT OPERATIONS:
Net investment income (loss) (2)
0.10  0.28  0.29  0.05  0.28 
Net realized and unrealized gain (loss) on investments 8.52  0.39 

(2.72) 5.97  1.47 
Total from investment operations
8.62  0.67  (2.43) 6.02  1.75 
DISTRIBUTIONS TO SHAREHOLDERS:
Distributions from:
Net investment income
(0.12) (0.26) (0.24) (0.10) (0.18)
Return of capital (0.01) —  —  —  — 
Total distributions
(0.13) (0.26) (0.24) (0.10) (0.18)
Net asset value, end of year/period
$ 38.72  $ 30.23  $ 29.82  $ 32.49  $ 26.57 
Total return 28.59  % 2.27  % -7.46  % 22.68  % 7.01  %
(3)
SUPPLEMENTAL DATA:
Net assets at end of year/period (000’s) $ 222,333  $ 131,249  $ 70,065  $ 56,866  $ 33,214 
RATIOS TO AVERAGE NET ASSETS:
Expenses to average net assets 0.79  % 0.79  % 0.79  % 0.79  % 0.79  %
(4)
Net investment income (loss) to average net assets 0.29  % 0.94  % 0.91  % 0.17  % 1.21  %
(4)
Portfolio turnover rate (5)
48  % 230  % 321  % 124  % 144  %
(3)
(1)Commencement of operations on June 8, 2016.
(2)Calculated based on average shares outstanding during the year/period.
(3)Not annualized.
(4)Annualized.
(5)Excludes the impact of in-kind transactions.


38



Aptus Collared Income Opportunity ETF

FINANCIAL HIGHLIGHTS
For a capital share outstanding throughout the year/period
Year Ended
April 30,
2021
Period Ended
April 30,
2020(1)
Net asset value, beginning of year/period $ 24.04  $ 25.00 
INCOME (LOSS) FROM INVESTMENT OPERATIONS:
Net investment income (loss) (2)
0.27  0.49 
Net realized and unrealized gain (loss) on investments
5.61  (1.01)
Total from investment operations 5.88  (0.52)
DISTRIBUTIONS TO SHAREHOLDERS:
Distributions from:
Net investment income (0.25) (0.44)
Total distributions (0.25) (0.44)
Net asset value, end of year/period $ 29.67  $ 24.04 
Total return 24.57  % -2.14  %
(3)
SUPPLEMENTAL DATA:
Net assets at end of year/period (000’s) $ 201,742  $ 112,970 
RATIOS TO AVERAGE NET ASSETS:
Expenses to average net assets 0.79  % 0.79  %
(4)
Net investment income (loss) to average net assets 0.99  % 2.46  %
(4)
Portfolio turnover rate (5)
46  % 170  %
(3)
(1)Commencement of operations on July 9, 2019.
(2)Calculated based on average shares outstanding during the year/period.
(3)Not annualized.
(4)Annualized.
(5)Excludes the impact of in-kind transactions.


39



Aptus Defined Risk ETF

FINANCIAL HIGHLIGHTS
For a capital share outstanding throughout the year/period
Year Ended April 30,
2021
Year Ended April 30,
2020
Period Ended
April 30, 2019(1)
Net asset value, beginning of year/period
$ 29.38  $ 26.51  $ 25.00 
INCOME (LOSS) FROM INVESTMENT OPERATIONS:
Net investment income (loss) (2)(3)
0.32  0.55  0.35 
Net realized and unrealized gain (loss) on investments
1.31  3.14  1.90 
Total from investment operations
1.63  3.69  2.25 
DISTRIBUTIONS TO SHAREHOLDERS:
Distributions from:
Net investment income
(0.33) (0.50) (0.27)
Net realized gain
(1.31) (0.32) (0.47)
Total distributions
(1.64) (0.82) (0.74)
Net asset value, end of year/period
$ 29.37  $ 29.38  $ 26.51 
Total return 5.62  % 14.12  % 9.23  %
(4)
SUPPLEMENTAL DATA:
Net assets at end of year/period (000’s) $ 656,363  $ 260,029  $ 104,695 
RATIOS TO AVERAGE NET ASSETS:
Expenses to average net assets (5)
0.70  %
(6)
0.69  % 0.69  %
(7)
Net investment income (loss) to average net assets (3)
1.07  % 1.97  % 1.86  %
(7)
Portfolio turnover rate (8)
28  % 78  % 21  %
(4)
(1)Commencement of operations on August 7, 2018.
(2)Calculated based on average shares outstanding during the year/period.
(3)Recognition of net investment income by the Fund is affected by the timing of the declaration of dividends by the underlying investment companies in which the Fund invests. The ratio does not include net investment income of the underlying investment companies in which the Fund invests.
(4)Not annualized.
(5)Does not include expenses of the investment companies in which the Fund invests.
(6)Includes broker interest expense of 0.01%
(7)Annualized.
(8)Excludes the impact of in-kind transactions.


40




Opus Small Cap Value ETF

FINANCIAL HIGHLIGHTS
For a capital share outstanding throughout each year/period
Year Ended
April 30,
2021
Year Ended
April 30,
2020
Period Ended
April 30,
2019(1)
Net asset value, beginning of year/period $ 20.41  $ 25.00  $ 25.00 
INCOME (LOSS) FROM INVESTMENT OPERATIONS:
Net investment income (loss) (2)
0.21  0.48  0.38 
Net realized and unrealized gain (loss) on investments
12.69  (4.53) (0.08)

Total from investment operations 12.90  (4.05) 0.30 
DISTRIBUTIONS TO SHAREHOLDERS:
Distributions from:
Net investment income (0.20) (0.49) (0.30)
Return of capital (0.04) (0.05) — 
Total distributions (0.24) (0.54) (0.30)
CAPITAL SHARE TRANSACTIONS:
Transaction fees —  0.00 
(3)
0.00 
(3)
Net asset value, end of year/period $ 33.07  $ 20.41  $ 25.00 
Total return 63.49  % -16.46  % 1.34  %
(4)
SUPPLEMENTAL DATA:
Net assets at end of year/period (000’s) $ 106,660  $ 44,393  $ 46,877 
RATIOS TO AVERAGE NET ASSETS:
Expenses to average net assets 0.79  % 0.79  % 0.79  %
(5)
Net investment income (loss) to average net assets 0.77  % 1.94  % 2.01  %
(5)
Portfolio turnover rate (6)
65  % 56  % 31  %
(4)
(1)Commencement of operations on July 17, 2018.
(2)Calculated based on average shares outstanding during the year/period.
(3)Represents less than $0.005.
(4)Not annualized.
(5)Annualized.
(6)Excludes the impact of in-kind transactions.

41



Aptus Drawdown Managed Equity ETF
Aptus Collared Income Opportunity ETF
Aptus Defined Risk ETF
Opus Small Cap Value ETF
Adviser
Aptus Capital Advisors, LLC
265 Young Street
Fairhope, Alabama 36532
Custodian
U.S. Bank National Association
1555 North Rivercenter Drive, Suite 302
Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53212
Administrator, Fund Accountant, and Transfer Agent
U.S. Bancorp Fund Services, LLC
615 East Michigan Street
Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53202
Distributor
Quasar Distributors, LLC
111 East Kilbourn Avenue, Suite 2200
Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53202
Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm
Cohen & Company, Ltd.
342 North Water Street, Suite 830
Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53202

Legal Counsel
Morgan, Lewis & Bockius LLP
1111 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW
Washington, DC 20004-2541
Investors may find more information about the Funds in the following documents:
Statement of Additional Information: The Funds’ SAI provides additional details about the investments and techniques of the Funds and certain other additional information. A current SAI dated August 31, 2021 is on file with the SEC and is herein incorporated by reference into this Prospectus. It is legally considered a part of this Prospectus.
Annual/Semi-Annual Reports: Additional information about each Fund’s investments is available in the respective Fund’s annual and semi-annual reports to shareholders. In the annual report you will find a discussion of the market conditions and investment strategies that significantly affected each Fund’s performance.
You can obtain free copies of these documents, request other information or make general inquiries about the Fund by contacting the Funds at c/o U.S. Bank Global Fund Services, P.O. Box 701, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53201-0701 or by calling 1-800-617-0004.
Shareholder reports and other information about the Funds are available:
Free of charge from the SEC’s EDGAR database on the SEC’s website at http://www.sec.gov; or
Free of charge from the Funds’ Internet website at www.aptusetfs.com or www.opusetfs.com; or
For a fee, by e-mail request to publicinfo@sec.gov.

(SEC Investment Company Act File No. 811-22668)








42