ck0001506768-20221231
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LoCorr Macro Strategies Fund LoCorr Long/Short Commodities Strategy Fund
Class A LFMAX Class A LCSAX
Class C LFMCX Class C LCSCX
Class I LFMIX Class I LCSIX
LoCorr Dynamic Opportunity Fund LoCorr Spectrum Income Fund
Class A LEQAX Class A LSPAX
Class C LEQCX Class C LSPCX
Class I LEQIX Class I LSPIX
LoCorr Market Trend Fund
Class A LOTAX
Class C LOTCX
Class I LOTIX
PROSPECTUS
May 1, 2023
Advised by:
LoCorr Fund Management, LLC
687 Excelsior Boulevard
Excelsior, MN 55331

www.LoCorrFunds.com    1-855-LCFUNDS
    1-855-523-8637

This Prospectus provides important information about the Class A, Class C and Class I shares of the Funds that you should know before investing. Please read it carefully and keep it for future reference.

As permitted by regulations adopted by the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission ("SEC"), paper copies of the Funds’ annual and semi-annual shareholder reports are no longer sent by mail, unless you specifically request paper copies of the reports from the Funds or your financial intermediary, such as a broker-dealer or bank. Instead, the reports will be made available on the Funds’ website (www.LoCorrFunds.com), and you will be notified by mail each time a report is posted and provided with a website link to access the report.

You may elect to receive all future reports in paper free of charge by contacting your financial intermediary, or if you invest directly with the Funds, you can call 1-855-523-8637 or send an email request to [email protected] to let the Funds know of your request. Your election to receive shareholder reports in paper will apply to all Funds held in your account.

These securities have not been approved or disapproved by the SEC or the Commodity Futures Trading Commission ("CFTC") nor has the SEC or the CFTC passed upon the accuracy or adequacy of this Prospectus. Any representation to the contrary is a criminal offense.



TABLE OF CONTENTS
LOCORR MARKET TREND FUND SUMMARY
Back Cover





LOCORR MACRO STRATEGIES FUND SUMMARY

Investment Objectives: The Fund's primary investment objective is capital appreciation in rising and falling equity markets with managing volatility as a secondary objective.

Fees and Expenses of the Fund: This table describes the fees and expenses that you may pay if you buy, hold, and sell shares of the Fund. You may pay other fees, such as brokerage commissions and other fees to financial intermediaries, which are not reflected in the table and example below. You may qualify for sales charge discounts on purchases of Class A shares if you and your family invest, or agree to invest in the future, at least $25,000 in the Fund. More information about these and other discounts is available from your financial intermediary, in How to Purchase Shares on page 84 of this Prospectus, and in Appendix A to this Prospectus.
Shareholder Fees
(fees paid directly from your investment)
Class
A
Class
C
Class
I
Maximum Sales Charge (Load)
Imposed on Purchases (as a % of offering price)
5.75% None None
Maximum Deferred Sales Charge (Load)
(as a % of original purchase price)
1.00%⁽¹⁾ 1.00%⁽²⁾ None
Maximum Sales Charge (Load) Imposed on
Reinvested Dividends and other Distributions
None None None
Annual Fund Operating Expenses
(expenses that you pay each year as a
percentage of the value of your investment)
Management Fees 1.65% 1.65% 1.65%
Distribution and/or Service (12b-1) Fees 0.25% 1.00% 0.00%
Other Expenses 0.23% 0.23% 0.23%
Acquired Fund Fees and Expenses(3)
0.03% 0.03% 0.03%
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses 2.16% 2.91% 1.91%

(1)    Applied to purchases of $1 million or more that are redeemed within 12 months of their purchase.

(2)    Applied to shares redeemed within 12 months of their purchase.

(3)    Acquired Fund Fees and Expenses are the indirect costs of investing in other investment companies. The operating expenses in this fee table will not correlate to the expense ratio in the Fund's financial highlights because the financial statements include only the direct operating expenses incurred by the Fund.


Example: This Example is intended to help you compare the cost of investing in the Fund with the cost of investing in other mutual funds.

The Example assumes that you invest $10,000 in the Fund for the time periods indicated and then redeem all of your shares at the end of those periods. The Example also assumes that your investment has a 5% return each year and that the Fund’s operating expenses remain the same. Although your actual costs may be higher or lower, based upon these assumptions your costs would be:

Class 1 Year 3 Years 5 Years 10 Years
A $881 $1,212 $1,668 $2,925
C $394 $901 $1,533 $3,233
I $194 $600 $1,032 $2,233

Portfolio Turnover: The Fund pays transaction costs, such as commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or “turns over” its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover may indicate higher transaction costs and may result in higher taxes when Fund shares are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are
1



not reflected in annual fund operating expenses or in the Example, affect the Fund’s performance. During the most recent fiscal year ended December 31, 2022, the Fund’s portfolio turnover rate was 76% of the average value of its portfolio.

Principal Investment Strategies: The Fund seeks to achieve its investment objectives by allocating its assets using two principal strategies:

“Managed Futures” Strategy
“Fixed Income” Strategy

The Managed Futures strategy is designed to produce capital appreciation by capturing returns related to the commodity and financial markets by investing long or short in: (i) futures, (ii) forwards, (iii) options, (iv) spot contracts, or (v) swaps, each of which may be tied to (a) currencies, (b) interest rates, (c) stock market indices, (d) energy resources, (e) metals or (f) agricultural products. These derivative instruments are used as substitutes for securities, interest rates, currencies and commodities and for hedging. The Fund may also invest in cash-settled Bitcoin futures contracts traded on the Chicago Mercantile Exchange ("CME"). The Fund will allocate less than 5% of Fund assets in Bitcoin futures. To the extent the Fund uses swaps or structured notes under the Managed Futures strategy, the investments will generally have payments linked to commodity or financial derivatives. The Fund does not invest more than 25% of its assets in contracts with any one counterparty. Managed futures sub-strategies may include investment styles that rely upon buy and sell signals generated from technical analysis systems such as trend-pattern recognition, as well as from fundamental economic analysis and relative value comparisons. Managed Futures strategy investments will be made without restriction as to country.

The Fund will execute its Managed Futures strategy primarily by directly investing by the Fund or by investing up to 25% of its total assets (measured at the time of purchase) in a wholly-owned and controlled subsidiary (the “Subsidiary”). The Fund and the Subsidiary will invest primarily in futures, forwards, options, spot contracts, swaps, and other assets intended to serve as margin or collateral for derivative positions. The Subsidiary is subject to the same investment restrictions as the Fund.

The Fund’s Adviser may delegate management of the Fund’s Managed Futures Strategy to one or more sub-advisers.

The Adviser anticipates that, based upon its analysis of long-term historical returns and volatility of various asset classes, the Fund will allocate approximately 25% of its assets to the Managed Futures strategy and approximately 75% of its assets to the Fixed Income strategy. However, as market conditions change the portion allocated may be higher or lower.

The Fixed Income strategy is designed to generate interest income and preserve principal by investing primarily in investment grade securities including: (1) obligations issued or guaranteed by the U.S. Government, its agencies or instrumentalities, (2) securities issued or guaranteed by foreign governments, their political subdivisions or agencies or instrumentalities, (3) bonds, notes, or similar debt obligations issued by U.S. or foreign corporations or special-purpose entities backed by corporate debt obligations, (4) U.S. asset-backed securities (“ABS”), (5) U.S. residential mortgage-backed securities (“MBS”), (6) U.S. commercial mortgage-backed securities (“CMBS”), (7) interest rate-related futures contracts, (8) interest rate-related or credit default-related swap contracts and (9) money market funds. The Fund defines investment grade fixed income securities as those that are rated, at the time purchased, in the top four categories by a rating agency such as Moody’s Investors Service, Inc. (“Moody’s”) or Standard & Poor’s Ratings Services (“S&P”), or, if unrated, determined to be of comparable quality. However, the fixed income portion of the Fund’s portfolio will be invested without restriction as to individual issuer country, type of entity, or capitalization Futures and swap contracts are used for hedging purposes and as substitutes for fixed income securities. The Fund’s Adviser delegates management of the Fund’s Fixed Income strategy portfolio to a sub-adviser.

The Fund seeks to achieve its secondary investment objective primarily by (1) diversifying the Managed Futures strategy investments among asset classes and sub-strategies that are not expected to have returns that are highly correlated to each other or the equity markets and (2) by selecting Fixed Income
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strategy investments that are short-term to medium-term interest income-generating securities (those with maturities or average lives of less than 10 years) that are expected to be less volatile than the equity markets in general and that are not expected to have returns that are highly correlated to the equity markets or the Managed Futures strategy.

The Adviser, on behalf of itself and on behalf of the Fund and other Funds it advises or may advise in the future that are each a series of LoCorr Investment Trust, was granted an exemptive order from the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission ("SEC") that permits the adviser, with Board of Trustees approval, to enter into or amend sub-advisory agreements with sub-advisers without obtaining shareholder approval. Shareholders will be notified within 90 days of the engagement of an additional sub-adviser or sub-advisers to manage a portion of the Fund's portfolio.

ADVISER’S INVESTMENT PROCESS

The Adviser will pursue the Fund’s investment objectives, in part, by utilizing its investment and risk management process.

Sub-Adviser Selection represents the result of quantitative and qualitative reviews that will identify a sub-adviser chosen for its managed futures expertise, historical performance, management accessibility, commitment, investment strategy, as well as process and methodology. Using this selection process, the Adviser believes it can identify a sub-adviser that can produce positive, risk-adjusted returns. The Adviser replaces a sub-adviser when its returns are below expectations or it deviates from its traditional investment process.

Risk Management represents the ongoing attention to the historical return performance of each Underlying Fund as well as the interaction or correlation of returns between Underlying Funds. Using this risk management process, the Adviser believes the Fund, over time, will not be highly correlated to the equity markets and will provide the potential for reducing volatility in investors’ portfolios.

SUB-ADVISER’S INVESTMENT PROCESS

Graham Capital Management, L.P.
Graham Capital Management, L.P. (“GCM”) serves as a sub-adviser to the Fund. GCM executes the strategy within the Macro Strategies Fund by employing macro-oriented quantitative investment techniques to select long and short positions in the global futures and foreign exchange markets. These techniques are designed to produce attractive absolute and risk-adjusted returns while maintaining low correlation to traditional asset classes. The strategy within the Macro Strategies Fund is a quantitative trading system driven by trend-following models. This program signals buy and sell orders based on a number of factors, including price, volatility, and length of time a position has been held in the portfolio. The strategy employs sophisticated techniques to gradually enter and exit positions over the course of a trend in order to maximize profit opportunities. It is expected that the average holding period of instruments traded pursuant to the strategy within the Macro Strategies Fund will be approximately six to eight weeks; however, that average may differ depending on various factors and the system will make daily adjustments to positions based on both price activity and market volatility. The program trades a broad range of markets, including global interest rates, foreign exchange, global stock indices and commodities.

Millburn Ridgefield Corporation
Millburn Ridgefield Corporation (“Millburn”) serves as a sub-adviser to the Fund. Millburn’s Diversified Program invests in a diversified portfolio of futures, forward and spot contracts (and may also invest in option and swap contracts) on currencies, interest rate instruments, stock indices, metals, energy and agricultural commodities. Millburn invests globally pursuant to its proprietary quantitative and systematic trading methodology, based upon signals generated from an analysis of price, price-derivatives, fundamental and other quantitative data. Millburn’s Diversified Program generally seeks maximum diversification subject to liquidity and sector concentration constraints. Each market is traded using a diversified set of trading systems, which may be optimized for groups of markets, sectors or specific
3



markets. The following factors, among others, are considered in constructing a universe of markets to trade: profitability, liquidity of markets, professional judgment, desired diversification, transaction costs, exchange regulations and depth of market.

Revolution Capital Management, LLC
Revolution Capital Management, LLC (“Revolution”) serves as a sub-adviser to the Fund. Revolution focuses on short-term, systematic and quantitative trading, applying statistical analysis to all aspects of research, development, and operations. The strategy seeks to provide superior risk-adjusted returns while maintaining low correlations both to traditional equity and bond investments as well as the trend-following strategies often employed by commodity trading advisors.

R.G. Niederhoffer Capital Management, Inc.
R.G. Niederhoffer Capital Management, Inc. (“Niederhoffer”) serves as a sub-adviser to the Fund. Niederhoffer provides asset management services for the Fund using its Smart Alpha Program. The R.G. Niederhoffer Smart Alpha Program seeks to achieve three key objectives: (1) Stable absolute returns regardless of market environment, with zero correlation to Fixed Income, Equities and Hedge Funds; (2) Strong, consistent downside and upside protection for portfolios containing Global Bonds, Global Equities, Hedge Funds, and CTAs, and (3) Daily/monthly liquidity and high transparency.

Nuveen Asset Management, LLC
Nuveen Asset Management, LLC (“Nuveen”), serves as a sub-adviser to the Fund, selects securities using a “top-down” approach that begins with the formulation of Nuveen’s general economic outlook. Following this, various sectors and industries are analyzed and selected for investment. Finally, Nuveen selects individual securities within these sectors or industries that it believes have above peer-group expected yield, potential for capital preservation or appreciation. Nuveen selects futures and swaps to hedge interest rate and credit risks and as substitutes for securities when it believes derivatives provide a better return profile or when specific securities are temporarily unavailable. Nuveen sells securities and derivatives to adjust interest rate risk, adjust credit risk, when a price target is reached, or when a security’s or derivative’s price outlook is deteriorating.

Principal Investment Risks: As with all mutual funds, there is the risk that you could lose money through your investment in the Fund. Many factors affect the Fund’s net asset value and performance.

The following risks apply to the Fund’s direct investments in securities and derivatives as well as the Fund’s indirect risks through investing in Underlying Funds and the Subsidiary. The principal risks are presented in alphabetical order to facilitate finding particular risks and comparing them with other funds. Each risk summarized below is considered a principal risk of investing in the Fund, regardless of the order in which it appears. It is important to read the provided risk disclosures in their entirety.

ABS, MBS and CMBS Risk: ABS, MBS and CMBS are subject to credit risk because underlying loan borrowers may default. Additionally, these securities are subject to prepayment risk because the underlying loans held by the issuers may be paid off prior to maturity. The value of these securities may go down as a result of changes in prepayment rates on the underlying mortgages or loans. During periods of declining interest rates, prepayment rates usually increase and the Fund may have to reinvest prepayment proceeds at a lower interest rate. CMBS are less susceptible to this risk because underlying loans may have prepayment penalties or prepayment lock out periods.
Bitcoin Futures Risk: The market for Bitcoin futures may be less developed, and potentially less liquid and more volatile, than more established futures markets. While the Bitcoin futures market has grown substantially since Bitcoin futures commenced trading, there can be no assurance that this growth will continue. The price for Bitcoin futures contracts is based on a number of factors, including the supply of and the demand for Bitcoin futures contracts. Market conditions and expectations, position limits, collateral requirements, and other factors each can impact the supply of and demand for Bitcoin futures contracts. Recently increased demand paired with supply constraints and other factors have caused bitcoin futures to trade at a significant premium
4



to the “spot” price of Bitcoin. Additional demand, including demand resulting from the purchase, or anticipated purchase, of Bitcoin futures contracts by the Fund or other entities may increase that premium, perhaps significantly. It is not possible to predict whether or for how long such conditions will continue. To the extent the Fund purchases futures contracts at a premium and the premium declines, the value of an investment in the Fund also should be expected to decline. The performance of Bitcoin futures contracts and Bitcoin may differ and may not be correlated with each other, over short or long periods of time.
Bitcoin may experience very high volatility and related investments, such as Bitcoin futures, may be affected by such volatility. As a cryptocurrency, Bitcoin operates without central authority and is not backed by any government. Large sales by a few holders of significant amounts of Bitcoin (commonly referred to as “whales”) could depress the price of Bitcoin. Federal, state or foreign governments may restrict the use and exchange of Bitcoin, and regulation in the U.S. is still developing. Increased regulation might tend to depress the price of Bitcoin. Legal or regulatory changes may negatively impact the operation of the Bitcoin Network or restrict the use of Bitcoin. The realization of any of these risks could result in a decline in the acceptance of bitcoin and consequently a reduction in the value of Bitcoin, Bitcoin futures, and the Fund.
Commodity Risk: Investing in the commodities markets may subject the Fund to greater volatility than investments in traditional securities. Commodity prices may be influenced by unfavorable weather, animal and plant disease, geologic and environmental factors as well as changes in government regulation such as tariffs, embargoes or burdensome production rules and restrictions.
Credit Risk: There is a risk that issuers and counterparties will not make payments on securities and other investments held by the Fund, resulting in losses to the Fund. In addition, the credit quality of securities held by the Fund may be lowered if an issuer’s financial condition changes.
Derivatives Risk: Derivatives are subject to tracking risk because they may not be perfect substitutes for the instruments they are intended to hedge or replace. Short positions are subject to potentially unlimited liability. Futures positions held by the Fund may incur significant losses caused by unanticipated market movements and such losses may be unlimited. Purchased options may expire worthless. Over the counter derivatives, such as swaps, are subject to counterparty default. Leverage inherent in derivatives will tend to magnify the Fund’s losses.
Fixed Income Risk: Typically, a rise in interest rates causes a decline in the value of fixed income securities owned by the Fund. The value of fixed income securities typically falls when an issuer’s credit quality declines and may even become worthless if an issuer defaults.
Foreign Currency Risk: Currency trading risks include market risk, credit risk and country risk. Market risk results from adverse changes in exchange rates in the currencies the Fund is long or short. Credit risk results because a currency-trade counterparty may default. Country risk arises because a government may interfere with transactions in its currency.
Foreign Investment Risk: Foreign investing involves risks not typically associated with U.S. investments, including adverse fluctuations in foreign currency values, adverse political, social and economic developments, less liquidity, greater volatility, less developed or less efficient trading markets, political instability and differing auditing and legal standards. Investing in emerging markets imposes risks different from, or greater than, risks of investing in foreign developed countries.
Interest Rates and Bond Maturities Risk: Interest rate changes may adversely affect the market value of an investment. Fixed-income securities typically decline in value when interest rates rise. Fixed-income securities typically increase in value when interest rates decline. The Fund may experience adverse exposure from either increasing or declining rates. Bonds with longer maturities will be more affected by interest rate changes than intermediate-term bonds.
Issuer-Specific Risk: The value of a specific security can be more volatile than the market as a whole and can perform differently from the value of the market as a whole. The value of securities of smaller issuers can be more volatile than those of larger issuers. The value of certain types of
5



securities can be more volatile due to increased sensitivity to adverse issuer, political, regulatory, market, or economic developments.
Leverage Risk: Using derivatives to increase the Fund’s combined long and short exposure creates leverage, which can magnify the Fund’s potential for gain or loss and, therefore, amplify the effects of market volatility on the Fund’s share price.
Liquidity Risk: Liquidity risk exists when particular investments of the Fund would be difficult to purchase or sell, possibly preventing the Fund from selling such illiquid securities at an advantageous time or price, or possibly requiring the Fund to dispose of other investments at unfavorable times or prices in order to satisfy its obligations.
Management Risk: The Adviser’s and sub-advisers’ judgments about the attractiveness, value and potential appreciation of particular asset classes, securities and derivatives in which the Fund invests may prove to be incorrect and may not produce the desired results. Additionally, the Adviser’s judgments about the potential performance of the sub-adviser may also prove incorrect and may not produce the desired results.
Market Risk: Overall securities and derivatives market risks may affect the value of individual instruments in which the Fund invests. Factors such as domestic and foreign economic growth and market conditions, interest rate levels, and political and social events affect the securities and derivatives markets. Global economies and financial markets are increasingly interconnected, and conditions and events in one country, region or financial market may adversely impact issuers in a different country, region or financial market. These risks may be magnified if certain events or developments adversely interrupt the global supply chain; in these and other circumstances, such risks might affect companies worldwide. Recent examples include pandemic risks related to COVID-19 and aggressive measures taken worldwide in response by governments. The effects of COVID-19 have contributed to increased volatility in global markets and will likely affect certain countries, companies, industries and market sectors more dramatically than others. The COVID-19 pandemic has had, and any other outbreak of an infectious disease or other serious public health concern could have, a significant negative impact on economic and market conditions and could trigger a prolonged period of global economic slowdown. When the value of the Fund’s investments goes down, your investment in the Fund decreases in value and you could lose money.
Portfolio Turnover Risk: Active and frequent trading may lead to the realization and distribution to shareholders of higher short-term capital gains, which would increase their tax liability. Frequent trading also increases transaction costs, which could detract from the Fund’s performance.
Restricted Securities Risk: Rule 144A securities, which are restricted securities, may not be readily marketable in broad public markets. A Rule 144A restricted security carries the risk that the Fund may not be able to sell a security when the portfolio managers consider it desirable to do so and/or may have to sell the security at a lower price. In addition, transaction costs may be higher for Rule 144A securities than for more liquid securities. Although there is a substantial institutional market for Rule 144A securities, it is not possible to predict exactly how the market for Rule 144A securities will develop. A restricted security that when purchased was liquid in the institutional markets may subsequently become illiquid.
Short Position Risk: The Fund will incur a loss as a result of a short position if the price of the short position instrument increases in value between the date of the short position sale and the date on which an offsetting position is purchased. The Fund is required to make a margin deposit in connection with such short sales. The Fund may have to pay a fee to borrow particular securities and will often be obligated to pay over any dividends and accrued interest on borrowed securities. Short positions may be considered speculative transactions and involve special risks, including greater reliance on the Adviser’s ability to accurately anticipate the future value of a security or instrument. The Fund’s losses are potentially unlimited in a short position transaction.
Underlying Funds Risk: Underlying Funds are subject to management fees and other expenses, which will be indirectly paid by the Fund. As a result, the cost of investing in the Fund will be higher than the cost of investing directly in an Underlying Fund and may be higher than other
6



mutual funds that invest directly in stocks and bonds. Underlying Funds are subject to specific risks, depending on the nature of the fund.
Wholly-Owned Subsidiary Risk: The Subsidiary is not registered under the Investment Company Act of 1940, as amended (the “1940 Act”) and, unless otherwise noted in this Prospectus, is not subject to all of the investor protections of the 1940 Act. Changes in the laws of the United States and/or the Cayman Islands, under which the Fund and the Subsidiary, respectively, are organized, could result in the inability of the Fund and/or Subsidiary to operate as described in this Prospectus and could negatively affect the Fund and its shareholders. Your cost of investing in the Fund will be higher because you indirectly bear the expenses of the Subsidiary.

Who Should Invest in the Fund?

The Adviser believes the Fund is appropriate for investors seeking the low-correlation benefits of managed futures investing, relative to traditional stock portfolios.

Performance:

The following bar chart and table provide some indication of the risks of investing in the Fund by showing changes in the performance of the Fund’s Class I shares from year to year and by showing how the one-year, five-year, ten-year and since inception average annual total returns for the Fund’s Class I shares compare with that of a broad-based securities index and a secondary index The returns in the bar chart and best/worst quarter are for Class I shares which do not have sales charges. The performance of Class A and Class C Shares would be lower due to differing expense structures and sales charges. The returns in the table reflect the maximum applicable sales load of 5.75% on Class A shares, and the maximum deferred sales load of 1.00% on Class C shares for the one-year period. The Fund’s past performance, before and after taxes, is not necessarily an indication of how the Fund will perform in the future and does not guarantee future results. Net asset value (“NAV”) per share information and updated performance information is available on the Fund’s website at www.LoCorrFunds.com.

Calendar Year Total Return

LoCorr Macro Strategies Fund – Class I
25244
Highest Quarterly Return:
Q2 2014 8.13%
Lowest Quarterly Return:
Q2 2013 -9.97%
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Average Annual Total Return as of December 31, 2022
1 Year 5 Years 10 Years
Since Inception (3/24/2011)(1)
 Class I Shares
   Return Before Taxes
15.40% 5.49% 5.00% 3.12%
   Return After Taxes on Distributions
10.42% 3.10% 2.88% 1.35%
   Return After Taxes on Distributions and
      Sale of Fund Shares
10.08% 3.30% 2.99% 1.64%
Class A Shares
   Return Before Taxes
8.34% 3.96% 4.10% 2.33%
Class C Shares
   Return Before Taxes
13.17% 4.43% 3.96% 2.09%
ICE BofA 3-Month Treasury Bill Index (reflects no deduction for fees, expenses or taxes)
1.47% 1.27% 0.77% 0.66%
Barclay CTA Index
(reflects no deduction for fees, expenses or taxes)
7.41% 3.94% 2.36% 1.54%
(1)     The Fund offers three classes of shares. The Class I shares and Class C shares commenced operations on March 24, 2011 and Class A shares commenced operations on March 22, 2011. “Since Inception” performance for Class A shares is shown as of March 22, 2011.


After-tax returns are calculated using the historical highest individual federal marginal income tax rates and does not reflect the impact of state and local taxes. Actual after-tax returns depend on the individual investor’s situation and may differ from those shown. Furthermore, the after-tax returns shown are not relevant to investors who hold their shares through tax-deferred arrangements such as 401(k) plans or Individual Retirement Accounts (“IRAs”). After-tax returns are shown for Class I shares only and will vary for Class A and Class C shares. The Fund’s return after taxes on distributions and sale of Fund shares is greater than its return after taxes on distributions because it includes a tax benefit resulting from the capital losses that would have been incurred, and could be utilized against other capital gains an investor may have.

Adviser: LoCorr Fund Management, LLC
Portfolio Managers: Jon C. Essen, Chief Financial Officer of the Adviser, has served the Fund as a portfolio manager since it commenced operations in 2011; Sean Katof, Chief Investment Officer of the Adviser, has served the Fund as a portfolio manager since 2016.

Sub-Adviser: Graham Capital Management, L.P.
Portfolio Managers: Kenneth G. Tropin, Chairman of GCM, and Pablo Calderini, President and Chief Investment Officer of GCM, have each served the Fund as portfolio managers since 2016.

Sub-Adviser: Millburn Ridgefield Corporation
Portfolio Managers: Harvey Beker, Co-Chairman; Barry Goodman, Co-Chief Executive officer and Executive Director of Trading; and Grant Smith, Co-Chief Executive Officer and Chief Investment Officer, have each served the Fund as portfolio managers since 2016.

Sub-Adviser: Revolution Capital Management, LLC
Portfolio Managers: Michael Mundt, Principal and Chief Compliance Officer, and Theodore Robert Olson, Principal, have served the Fund as portfolio managers since 2016.

Sub-Adviser: R.G. Niederhoffer Capital Management, Inc.
Portfolio Manager: Roy Niederhoffer founded R.G. Niederhoffer Capital Management, Inc. in 1993. Niederhoffer employs a quantitative, behavioral finance-based strategy to trade equities, fixed income, foreign exchange and commodities to provide returns that are both valuable on a stand-alone basis and
8



also provide significant downside protection to clients’ portfolios. Mr. Niederhoffer leads the Management Committee and brings nearly 30 years of experience in the hedge fund industry.

Sub-Adviser: Nuveen Asset Management, LLC
Portfolio Managers: Tony Rodriguez, Portfolio Manager of the sub-adviser, has served the Fund as a portfolio manager since 2017. Peter Agrimson, Portfolio Manager of the sub-adviser, has served as a portfolio manager since 2018.

Purchase and Sale of Fund Shares: You may purchase and redeem shares of the Fund on any day that the New York Stock Exchange is open for trading by written request, telephone, wire transfer, website, or through your broker. You may also exchange shares of the Fund for shares of another Fund in the LoCorr Investment Trust. Redemptions will be paid by ACH, check or wire transfer. The minimum initial investment amount for Class A and Class C shares is $2,500. The minimum initial investment in Class I shares is $100,000. The minimum subsequent investment amount for all classes is $500. The Fund or its Adviser may waive any investment minimum.

Tax Information: Dividends and capital gain distributions you receive from the Fund, whether you reinvest your distributions in additional Fund shares or receive them in cash, are taxable to you at either ordinary income or capital gains tax rates unless you are investing through a tax-deferred plan such as an IRA or 401(k) plan.
Payments to Broker-Dealers and Other Financial Intermediaries: If you purchase the Fund through a broker-dealer or other financial intermediary (such as a bank), the Fund and its related companies may pay the intermediary for the sale of Fund shares and related services. These payments may create a conflict of interest by influencing the broker-dealer or other intermediary and your salesperson to recommend the Fund over another investment. Ask your salesperson or visit your financial intermediary’s website for more information.

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LOCORR LONG/SHORT COMMODITIES STRATEGY FUND SUMMARY

Investment Objectives: The Fund's primary investment objective is capital appreciation in rising and falling commodities markets with managing volatility as a secondary objective.

Fees and Expenses of the Fund: This table describes the fees and expenses that you may pay if you buy, hold, and sell shares of the Fund. You may pay other fees, such as brokerage commissions and other fees to financial intermediaries, which are not reflected in the table and example below. You may qualify for sales charge discounts on purchases of Class A shares if you and your family invest, or agree to invest in the future, at least $25,000 in the Fund. More information about these and other discounts is available from your financial intermediary, in How to Purchase Shares on page 84 of this Prospectus, and in Appendix A to this Prospectus.
Shareholder Fees
(fees paid directly from your investment)
Class
A
Class
C
Class
I
Maximum Sales Charge (Load)
Imposed on Purchases (as a % of offering price)
5.75% None None
Maximum Deferred Sales Charge (Load)
(as a % of original purchase price)
1.00%⁽¹⁾ 1.00%⁽²⁾ None
Maximum Sales Charge (Load) Imposed on
Reinvested Dividends and other Distributions
None None None
Annual Fund Operating Expenses
(expenses that you pay each year as a
percentage of the value of your investment)
Management Fees 1.50% 1.50% 1.50%
Distribution and/or Service (12b-1) Fees 0.25% 1.00% 0.00%
Other Expenses(3)
0.66% 0.66% 0.66%
   Swap and Commodity Pool Fees and Expenses(4)
0.33%
   Remaining Other Expenses 0.33%
Acquired Fund Fees and Expenses(5)
0.02% 0.02% 0.02%
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses 2.43% 3.18% 2.18%

(1)     Applied to purchases of $1 million or more that are redeemed within 12 months of their purchase.

(2)    Applied to shares redeemed within 12 months of their purchase.

(3)    "Other Expenses" include both the expenses of the Fund's consolidated wholly-owned subsidiary ("Subsidiary") and the fee paid to the counterparty of the Fund's total return swap ("Swap") and the Fund's commodity pool ("Commodity Pool"), which are the primary ways the Fund seeks exposure to managers' (which are generally commodity trading advisors ("CTAs")) trading vehicles (each, an "Underlying Fund"). The Swap is designed to replicate the aggregate returns of the trading strategies of the CTAs through a customized index. More information regarding the Subsidiary and the investments made to pursue the Fund's Commodities strategy can be found in the "Principal Investment Strategies" section of this Prospectus.

(4)     The cost of the Swap and the Commodity Pool does not include the fees and expenses of the CTAs included in the Swap and Commodity Pool. The returns of the Swap and the Commodity Pool will be reduced and its losses increased by the costs associated with the Swap and Commodity Pool, which are the fees and expenses deducted by the counterparty in the calculation of the returns on the Swap and Commodity Pool, including the management and performance fees of the CTAs. A performance fee for one or more managers represented in the Swap and Commodity Pool may be deducted from the return of the Swap and Commodity Pool even if the aggregate respective returns of the Swap and Commodity Pool are negative. These fees, which are not reflected in the Annual Fund Operating Expenses table, are embedded in the returns of the Swap and Commodity Pool and represent an indirect cost of investing in the Fund.  Generally, the management fees and performance fees of the CTAs included in the Swap and Commodity Pool range up to 1.50% of assets and up to 20% of the returns, respectively. Such fees are accrued daily within the index and deducted from the Swap and Commodity Pool value quarterly. Fees have been restated to reflect current expenses.

(5)    Acquired Fund Fees and Expenses are the indirect costs of investing in other investment companies. The operating expenses in this fee table will not correlate to the expense ratio in the Fund's financial highlights because the financial statements include only the direct operating expenses incurred by the Fund.

10



Example: This Example is intended to help you compare the cost of investing in the Fund with the cost of investing in other mutual funds.
The Example assumes that you invest $10,000 in the Fund for the time periods indicated and then redeem all of your shares at the end of those periods. The Example also assumes that your investment has a 5% return each year and that the Fund’s operating expenses remain the same. Although your actual costs may be higher or lower, based upon these assumptions your costs would be:

Class 1 Year 3 Years 5 Years 10 Years
A $907 $1,289 $1,796 $3,182
C $421 $980 $1,664 $3,485
I $221 $682 $1,169 $2,513

Portfolio Turnover: The Fund pays transaction costs, such as commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or “turns over” its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover may indicate higher transaction costs and may result in higher taxes when Fund shares are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are not reflected in annual fund operating expenses or in the Example, affect the Fund’s performance. During the most recent fiscal period ended December 31, 2022, the Fund’s portfolio turnover rate was 90% of the average value of its portfolio.

Principal Investment Strategies: The Fund seeks to achieve its investment objectives by allocating its assets using two principal strategies:

“Commodities” Strategy
“Fixed Income” Strategy

The Commodities strategy is designed to produce capital appreciation by capturing returns related to the commodities markets by investing primarily in securities of one or more (1) limited partnerships, (2) corporations, (3) limited liability companies and (4) other types of pooled investment vehicles, including commodity pools (collectively, “Underlying Funds”) and derivative instruments, such as swap contracts, structured notes or other securities or derivatives, that provide exposure to the managers of Underlying Funds. Each Underlying Fund invests according to its manager’s sub-strategy, long or short in one or a combination of: (i) futures, (ii) forwards, (iii) options, (iv) spot contracts, or (v) swaps, each of which may be tied to (a) energy resources, (b) metals or (c) agricultural products. These derivative instruments are used as substitutes for commodities and for hedging. To the extent the Fund uses swaps or structured notes under the Commodities strategy, the investments will generally have payments linked to commodity or financial derivatives that are designed to produce returns similar to those of the Underlying Funds and their respective sub-strategies. The Fund does not invest more than 25% of its assets in contracts with any one counterparty. Commodities sub-strategies may include investment styles that rely upon buy and sell signals generated from technical analysis systems such as trend-pattern recognition, as well as from fundamental economic analysis and relative value comparisons. Commodities strategy investments are made without restriction as to the Underlying Fund’s country.

The Fund executes its Commodities strategy primarily by investing up to 25% of its total assets (measured at the time of purchase) in a wholly-owned and controlled subsidiary (the “Subsidiary”). The Subsidiary invests the majority of its assets in one or more Underlying Funds, swap contracts, structured notes and other investments intended to serve as margin or collateral for derivative positions. The Subsidiary is subject to the same investment restrictions as the Fund.

To the extent the Adviser is utilizing derivatives to gain exposure to managers, it is anticipated that the Fund uses a total return swap (the "Swap"), a type of derivative instrument based on a customized index (the "Index") designed to replicate the aggregate returns of the managers selected by the Adviser. The Swap is based on a notional amount agreed upon by the Adviser and the counterparty. The Adviser may add or remove managers from the Swap or adjust the notional exposure between the managers within the Swap. Generally, the fees and expenses of the Swap are based on the notional value. The Index is calculated by the counterparty to the Swap and includes a deduction for fees of the counterparty as well as management and performance fees of the managers. Because the Index is designed to replicate the
11



returns of managers selected by the Adviser, the performance of the Fund will depend on the ability of the managers to generate returns in excess of the costs of the Index.

The Adviser anticipates that, based upon its analysis of long-term historical returns and volatility of various asset classes, the Fund will allocate approximately 25% of its assets to the Commodities strategy and approximately 75% of its assets to the Fixed Income strategy. However, as market conditions change the portion allocated may be higher or lower.

The Fixed Income strategy is designed to generate interest income and preserve principal by investing primarily in investment grade securities including: (1) obligations issued or guaranteed by the United States Government, its agencies or instrumentalities, (2) securities issued or guaranteed by foreign governments, their political subdivisions or agencies or instrumentalities, (3) bonds, notes, or similar debt obligations issued by U.S. or foreign corporations or special-purpose entities backed by corporate debt obligations, (4) U.S. asset-backed securities (“ABS”), (5) U.S. residential mortgage-backed securities (“MBS”), (6) U.S. commercial mortgage-backed securities (“CMBS”), (7) interest rate-related futures contracts, (8) interest rate-related or credit default-related swap contracts and (9) money market funds. The Fund defines investment grade fixed income securities as those that are rated, at the time purchased, in the top four categories by a rating agency such as Moody’s Investors Service, Inc. (“Moody’s”) or Standard & Poor’s Ratings Services (“S&P”), or, if unrated, determined to be of comparable quality. However, the fixed income portion of the Fund’s portfolio will be invested without restriction as to individual issuer country, type of entity, or capitalization. Futures and swap contracts are used for hedging purposes and as substitutes for fixed income securities. The Fund’s Adviser delegates management of the Fund’s Fixed Income strategy portfolio to a sub-adviser.

The Fund seeks to achieve its secondary investment objective primarily by (1) diversifying the Commodities strategy investments among sub-strategies that are not expected to have returns that are highly correlated to each other or the commodities markets and (2) by selecting Fixed Income strategy investments that are short-term to medium-term interest income-generating securities (those with maturities or average lives of less than 10 years) that are expected to be less volatile than the commodities markets in general and that are not expected to have returns that are highly correlated to the commodities markets or the Commodities strategy.

The Adviser, on behalf of itself and on behalf of the Fund and other Funds it advises or may advise in the future that are each a series of LoCorr Investment Trust, was granted an exemptive order from the U.S. Securities Exchange Commission (the "SEC") that permits the Adviser, with Board of Trustees approval, to enter into or amend sub-advisory agreements with sub-advisers without obtaining shareholder approval. Shareholders will be notified within 90 days of the engagement of an additional sub-adviser or sub-advisers to manage a portion of the Fund's portfolio.

ADVISER’S INVESTMENT PROCESS

The Adviser will pursue the Fund’s investment objectives, in part, by utilizing its investment and risk management process.

Underlying Fund selection by the Adviser, or including an Underlying Fund in a derivative investment designed to replicate the returns of an Underlying Fund, represents the result of quantitative and qualitative reviews that identify Underlying Funds and their managers chosen for their alternative investment market niche (investments other than stocks and bonds), historical performance, management accessibility, commitment, investment strategy, as well as process and methodology. Using this selection process, the Adviser believes it can identify Underlying Funds with above-average expected returns and lower-than-average volatility.

Risk Management represents the ongoing attention to the historical return performance of each Underlying Fund as well as the interaction or correlation of returns between Underlying Funds. Using this risk management process, the adviser believes the Fund, over time, will not be highly correlated to the commodities markets and will provide the potential for reducing volatility in investors’ portfolios.

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The Adviser buys securities that it believes offer above-average expected returns and lower-than-average volatility and sells them when it believes they have reached their target price, to adjust asset allocation or when more attractive investments are available.

SUB-ADVISER’S INVESTMENT PROCESS

Nuveen Asset Management, LLC (“Nuveen”) serves as the Fund’s sub-adviser for its Fixed Income Strategy. The sub-adviser selects securities using a “bottom-up” approach that begins with fundamental analysis. The portfolio construction process emphasizes income generation with risk control by focusing on broad diversification across issuer and sector. The sub-adviser is typically strategically over-weighted in non-Treasury sectors. Portfolios are diversified among agency, corporate bonds, mortgage-backed, commercial mortgage-backed, asset-backed, supranational, sovereign, and municipal securities. The sub-adviser may select futures and swaps to hedge interest rate and credit risks and as substitutes for securities when it believes derivatives provide a better return profile or when specific securities are temporarily unavailable. The sub-adviser may sell securities and derivatives to adjust interest rate risk, adjust credit risk, when a price target is reached, or when a security’s or derivative’s price outlook is deteriorating.
Principal Investment Risks: As with all mutual funds, there is the risk that you could lose money through your investment in the Fund. Many factors affect the Fund’s net asset value and performance.

The following risks apply to the Fund’s direct investments in securities and derivatives as well as the Fund’s indirect risks through investing in Underlying Funds and the Subsidiary. The principal risks are presented in alphabetical order to facilitate finding particular risks and comparing them with other funds. Each risk summarized below is considered a principal risk of investing in the Fund, regardless of the order in which it appears. It is important to read the provided risk disclosures in their entirety.

ABS, MBS and CMBS Risk: ABS, MBS and CMBS are subject to credit risk because underlying loan borrowers may default. Additionally, these securities are subject to prepayment risk because the underlying loans held by the issuers may be paid off prior to maturity. The value of these securities may go down as a result of changes in prepayment rates on the underlying mortgages or loans. During periods of declining interest rates, prepayment rates usually increase and the Fund may have to reinvest prepayment proceeds at a lower interest rate. CMBS are less susceptible to this risk because underlying loans may have prepayment penalties or prepayment lock out periods.
Commodity Risk: Investing in the commodities markets may subject the Fund to greater volatility than investments in traditional securities. Commodity prices may be influenced by unfavorable weather, animal and plant disease, geologic and environmental factors as well as changes in government regulation such as tariffs, embargoes or burdensome production rules and restrictions.
Commodity Pool Risk: Commodity Pools are privately offered investment vehicles that are not registered under The Investment Company Act of 1940 (“1940 Act”) and will not be subject to all of the investor protections of the 1940 Act. Commodity pools may incur a significant degree of leverage which can magnify the Fund’s potential loss or gain. Commodity pools are also subject to investment advisory fees and other expenses, including performance fees, which will be indirectly paid by the Fund.
Credit Risk: There is a risk that issuers and counterparties will not make payments on securities and other investments held by the Fund, resulting in losses to the Fund. In addition, the credit quality of securities held by the Fund may be lowered if an issuer’s financial condition changes.
Derivatives Risk: Derivatives are subject to tracking risk because they may not be perfect substitutes for the instruments they are intended to hedge or replace. Short positions are subject to potentially unlimited liability. Futures positions held by the Fund may incur significant losses caused by unanticipated market movements and such losses may be unlimited. Purchased options may expire worthless. Over the counter derivatives, such as swaps, are subject to counterparty default. Leverage inherent in derivatives will tend to magnify the Fund’s losses. The
13



Fund may engage in transactions involving dealer options as well as exchange-traded options. Certain additional risks are specific to dealer options. While the Fund might look to a clearing corporation to exercise exchange-traded options, if the Fund were to purchase a dealer option it would need to rely on the dealer from which it purchased the option to perform if the option were exercised. Failure by the dealer to do so would result in the loss of the premium paid by the Fund as well as loss of the expected benefit of the transaction.
Fixed Income Risk: Typically, a rise in interest rates causes a decline in the value of fixed income securities owned by the Fund. The value of fixed income securities typically falls when an issuer’s credit quality declines and may even become worthless if an issuer defaults.
Foreign Currency Risk: Currency trading risks include market risk, credit risk and country risk. Market risk results from adverse changes in exchange rates in the currencies the Fund is long or short. Credit risk results because a currency-trade counterparty may default. Country risk arises because a government may interfere with transactions in its currency.
Foreign Investment Risk: Foreign investing involves risks not typically associated with U.S. investments, including adverse fluctuations in foreign currency values, adverse political, social and economic developments, less liquidity, greater volatility, less developed or less efficient trading markets, political instability and differing auditing and legal standards. Investing in emerging markets imposes risks different from, or greater than, risks of investing in foreign developed countries.
Interest Rates and Bond Maturities Risk: Interest rate changes may adversely affect the market value of an investment. Fixed-income securities typically decline in value when interest rates rise. Fixed-income securities typically increase in value when interest rates decline. The Fund may experience adverse exposure from either increasing or declining rates. Bonds with longer maturities will be more affected by interest rate changes than intermediate-term bonds.
Issuer-Specific Risk: The value of a specific security can be more volatile than the market as a whole and can perform differently from the value of the market as a whole. The value of securities of smaller issuers can be more volatile than those of larger issuers. The value of certain types of securities can be more volatile due to increased sensitivity to adverse issuer, political, regulatory, market, or economic developments.
Leverage Risk: Using derivatives to increase the Fund’s combined long and short exposure creates leverage, which can magnify the Fund’s potential for gain or loss and, therefore, amplify the effects of market volatility on the Fund’s share price.
Liquidity Risk: Liquidity risk exists when particular investments of the Fund would be difficult to purchase or sell, possibly preventing the Fund from selling such illiquid securities at an advantageous time or price, or possibly requiring the Fund to dispose of other investments at unfavorable times or prices in order to satisfy its obligations.
Management Risk: The Adviser’s and sub-adviser’s judgments about the attractiveness, value and potential appreciation of particular asset classes, securities and derivatives in which the Fund invests may prove to be incorrect and may not produce the desired results. Additionally, the Adviser’s judgments about the potential performance of the sub-adviser may also prove incorrect and may not produce the desired results.
Market Risk: Overall securities and derivatives market risks may affect the value of individual instruments in which the Fund invests. Factors such as domestic and foreign economic growth and market conditions, interest rate levels, and political and social events affect the securities and derivatives markets. Global economies and financial markets are increasingly interconnected, and conditions and events in one country, region or financial market may adversely impact issuers in a different country, region or financial market. These risks may be magnified if certain events or developments adversely interrupt the global supply chain; in these and other circumstances, such risks might affect companies worldwide. Recent examples include pandemic risks related to COVID-19 and aggressive measures taken worldwide in response by governments. The effects of COVID-19 have contributed to increased volatility in global markets and will likely affect certain countries, companies, industries and market sectors more dramatically than others. The COVID-19 pandemic has had, and any other outbreak of an
14



infectious disease or other serious public health concern could have, a significant negative impact on economic and market conditions and could trigger a prolonged period of global economic slowdown. When the value of the Fund’s investments goes down, your investment in the Fund decreases in value and you could lose money.
Portfolio Turnover Risk: Active and frequent trading may lead to the realization and distribution to shareholders of higher short-term capital gains, which would increase their tax liability. Frequent trading also increases transaction costs, which could detract from the Fund’s performance.
Restricted Securities Risk: Rule 144A securities, which are restricted securities, may not be readily marketable in broad public markets. A Rule 144A restricted security carries the risk that the Funds may not be able to sell a security when the portfolio managers consider it desirable to do so and/or may have to sell the security at a lower price. In addition, transaction costs may be higher for Rule 144A securities than for more liquid securities. Although there is a substantial institutional market for Rule 144A securities, it is not possible to predict exactly how the market for Rule 144A securities will develop. A restricted security that when purchased was liquid in the institutional markets may subsequently become illiquid.
Short Position Risk: The Fund will incur a loss as a result of a short position if the price of the short position instrument increases in value between the date of the short position sale and the date on which an offsetting position is purchased. The Fund is required to make a margin deposit in connection with such short sales; The Fund may have to pay a fee to borrow particular securities and will often be obligated to pay over any dividends and accrued interest on borrowed securities. Short positions may be considered speculative transactions and involve special risks, including greater reliance on the Adviser’s ability to accurately anticipate the future value of a security or instrument. The Fund’s losses are potentially unlimited in a short position transaction.
Swap Risk: Swap agreements are subject to the risk that the counterparty to the swap will default on its obligation to pay the Fund and the risk that the Fund will not be able to meet its obligations to pay the counterparty to the swap. Swap agreements may also involve fees, commissions or other costs that may reduce the Fund's gains from a swap agreement or may cause the Fund to lose money.
Underlying Funds Risk: Underlying Funds are subject to management fees and other expenses, which will be indirectly paid by the Fund. In addition to management fees and other expenses, certain Underlying Fund assets may be subject to additional performance-based fees based on a percentage of Underlying Fund profits. As a result, the cost of investing in the Fund will be higher than the cost of investing directly in an Underlying Fund and may be higher than other mutual funds that invest directly in stocks and bonds. Each Underlying Fund may pay performance-based fees to each manager without regard to the performance of other managers and the Underlying Fund’s overall profitability. Underlying Funds are subject to specific risks, depending on the nature of the fund.
Wholly-Owned Subsidiary Risk: The Subsidiary is not registered under the 1940 Act and, unless otherwise noted in this Prospectus, is not subject to all of the investor protections of the 1940 Act. Changes in the laws of the United States and/or the Cayman Islands, under which the Fund and the Subsidiary, respectively, are organized, could result in the inability of the Fund and/or Subsidiary to operate as described in this Prospectus and could negatively affect the Fund and its shareholders. Your cost of investing in the Fund will be higher because you indirectly bear the expenses of the Subsidiary.

Who Should Invest in the Fund?

The Adviser believes the Fund is appropriate for investors seeking the low-correlation benefits of commodities strategy investing, relative to traditional stock portfolios.

Performance:

The following bar chart and table provide some indication of the risks of investing in the Fund by showing changes in the performance of the Fund’s Class I shares from year to year and by showing how the one-
15



year, five-year, ten-year and since inception average annual total returns of the Fund’s Class I shares compare with that of a broad-based securities index and a secondary index. The returns in the bar chart and best/worst quarter are for Class I shares which do not have sales charges. The performance of Class A and Class C Shares would be lower due to differing expense structures and sales charges. The returns in the table reflect the maximum applicable sales load of 5.75% on Class A shares, and the maximum deferred sales load of 1.00% on Class C shares for the one-year period. The Fund’s past performance, before and after taxes, is not necessarily an indication of how the Fund will perform in the future and does not guarantee future results. Net asset value (“NAV”) per share information and updated performance information is available on the Fund’s website at www.LoCorrFunds.com.

Calendar Year Total Return

LoCorr Long/Short Commodities Strategy Fund – Class I

26430
Highest Quarterly Return:
Q1 2020 15.67%
Lowest Quarterly Return:
Q4 2016 -5.19%
Average Annual Total Return as of December 31, 2022
1 Year 5 Years 10 Years
Since Inception
(12/31/2011)(1)
 Class I Shares
   Return Before Taxes
6.06% 7.75% 7.54% 5.13%
   Return After Taxes on Distributions
1.84% 4.98% 5.27% 3.11%
   Return After Taxes on Distributions and
      Sale of Fund Shares
3.57% 4.78% 4.89% 3.04%
Class A Shares
   Return Before Taxes
-0.29% 6.22% 6.63% 4.31%
Class C Shares
   Return Before Taxes
4.08% 6.67% 6.45% 4.06%
ICE BofA 3-Month Treasury Bill Index (reflects no deduction for fees, expenses or taxes)
1.47% 1.27% 0.77% 0.71%
HFRI Macro Commodity Index (reflects no deduction for fees, expenses or taxes)
14.95% 9.05% 4.48% 3.82%
(1)    The Fund's inception date is December 31, 2011, the date to which performance is measured. The Fund commenced operations on January 1, 2012. 

After-tax returns are calculated using the historical highest individual federal marginal income tax rates and does not reflect the impact of state and local taxes. Actual after-tax returns depend on the individual investor’s situation and may differ from those shown. Furthermore, the after-tax returns shown are not relevant to investors who hold their shares through tax-deferred arrangements such as 401(k) plans or
16



Individual Retirement Accounts (“IRAs”). After-tax returns are shown for Class I shares only and will vary for Class A and Class C shares.

Adviser: LoCorr Fund Management, LLC
Portfolio Managers: Jon C. Essen, Chief Financial Officer of the Adviser, has served the Fund as a portfolio manager since it commenced operations in 2012; Sean Katof, Chief Investment Officer of the Adviser, has served the Fund as a portfolio manager since 2016.

Sub-Adviser: Nuveen Asset Management, LLC
Portfolio Managers: Tony Rodriguez, Portfolio Manager of the sub-adviser, has served the Fund as a portfolio manager since 2017. Peter Agrimson, Portfolio Manager of the sub-adviser, has served as a portfolio manager since 2018.

Purchase and Sale of Fund Shares: You may purchase and redeem shares of the Fund on any day that the New York Stock Exchange is open for trading by written request, telephone, wire transfer, website, or through your broker. You may also exchange shares of the Fund for shares of another Fund in the LoCorr Investment Trust. Redemptions will be paid by ACH, check or wire transfer. The minimum initial investment amount for Class A and Class C shares is $2,500. The minimum initial investment in Class I shares is $100,000. The minimum subsequent investment amount for all classes is $500. The Fund or its Adviser may waive any investment minimum.

Tax Information: Dividends and capital gain distributions you receive from the Fund, whether you reinvest your distributions in additional Fund shares or receive them in cash, are taxable to you at either ordinary income or capital gains tax rates unless you are investing through a tax-deferred plan such as an IRA or 401(k) plan.

Payments to Broker-Dealers and Other Financial Intermediaries: If you purchase the Fund through a broker-dealer or other financial intermediary (such as a bank), the Fund and its related companies may pay the intermediary for the sale of Fund shares and related services. These payments may create a conflict of interest by influencing the broker-dealer or other intermediary and your salesperson to recommend the Fund over another investment. Ask your salesperson or visit your financial intermediary’s website for more information.
17



LOCORR MARKET TREND FUND SUMMARY

Investment Objectives: The Fund's primary investment objective is capital appreciation in rising and falling equity markets with managing volatility as a secondary objective.

Fees and Expenses of the Fund: This table describes the fees and expenses that you may pay if you buy, hold, and sell shares of the Fund. You may pay other fees, such as brokerage commissions and other fees to financial intermediaries, which are not reflected in the table and example below. You may qualify for sales charge discounts on purchases of Class A shares if you and your family invest, or agree to invest in the future, at least $25,000 in the Fund. More information about these and other discounts is available from your financial intermediary, in How to Purchase Shares on page 84 of this Prospectus, and in Appendix A to this Prospectus.
Shareholder Fees
(fees paid directly from your investment)
Class
A
Class
C
Class
I
Maximum Sales Charge (Load)
Imposed on Purchases (as a % of offering price)
5.75% None None
Maximum Deferred Sales Charge (Load)
(as a % of original purchase price)
1.00%⁽¹⁾ 1.00%⁽²⁾ None
Maximum Sales Charge (Load) Imposed on
Reinvested Dividends and other Distributions
None None None
Annual Fund Operating Expenses
(expenses that you pay each year as a
percentage of the value of your investment)
Management Fees 1.50% 1.50% 1.50%
Distribution and Service (12b-1) Fees 0.25% 1.00% 0.00%
Other Expenses 0.25% 0.25% 0.25%
Acquired Fund Fees and Expenses(3)
0.03% 0.03% 0.03%
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses 2.03% 2.78% 1.78%

(1)    Applied to purchases of $1 million or more that are redeemed within 12 months of their purchase.
    
(2)    Applied to shares that are redeemed within 12 months of their purchase.

(3)    Acquired Fund Fees and Expenses are the indirect costs of investing in other investment companies. The operating expenses in this fee table will not correlate to the expense ratio in the Fund's financial highlights because the financial statements include only the direct operating expenses incurred by the Fund.

Example: This Example is intended to help you compare the cost of investing in the Fund with the cost of investing in other mutual funds.

The Example assumes that you invest $10,000 in the Fund for the time periods indicated and then redeem all of your shares at the end of those periods. The Example also assumes that your investment has a 5% return each year and that the Fund's operating expenses remain the same. Although your actual costs may be higher or lower, based upon these assumptions your costs would be:

Class 1 Year 3 Years 5 Years 10 Years
A $869 $1,175 $1,605 $2,798
C $381 $862 $1,469 $3,109
I $181 $560 $964 $2,095

Portfolio Turnover: The Fund pays transaction costs, such as commissions, when it buys and sells financial instruments (or "turns over" its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover may indicate higher transaction costs and may result in higher taxes when Fund shares are held in a taxable account. These
18



costs, which are not reflected in annual fund operating expenses or in the Example, affect the Fund's performance. During the most recent fiscal year ended December 31, 2022, the Fund’s portfolio turnover rate was 100% of the average value of its portfolio.

Principal Investment Strategies: The Fund seeks to achieve its investment objectives by allocating its assets using two principal strategies:
"Market Trend" Strategy
"Fixed Income" Strategy

The Market Trend strategy is a macro-oriented quantitative strategy that employs various investment techniques to select long and short positions in the global futures and foreign exchange markets. These techniques are designed to produce attractive absolute and risk-adjusted returns while maintaining low correlation to traditional asset classes. The Market Trend strategy is a quantitative trading system driven by trend-following models. The program signals buy and sell orders based on a number of factors, including price, volatility, and length of time a position has been held in the portfolio, and employs sophisticated techniques to gradually enter and exit positions over the course of a trend in order to maximize profit opportunities. It is expected that the average holding period of instruments traded pursuant to the Market Trend strategy will be approximately 50 days; however, that average may differ depending on various factors and the program will make daily adjustments to positions based on both price activity and market volatility. The program trades a broad range of markets, including global interest rates, foreign exchange, global stock indices and commodities. LoCorr Fund Management, LLC, the Fund’s adviser (the “Adviser”), delegates management of the Fund's Market Trend strategy portfolio to a sub-adviser, Graham Capital Management, L.P. ("GCM").

The Fund will execute a portion of its Market Trend strategy by directly investing in the Fund or by investing up to 25% of its total assets (measured at the time of purchase) in a wholly-owned and controlled subsidiary (the "Subsidiary"). The Fund and the Subsidiary will invest the majority of its assets in futures contracts and other investments (short to medium term investment grade securities) intended to serve as margin or collateral for futures positions. The Subsidiary is managed by the Adviser and sub-advised by GCM and is subject to the same investment restrictions as the Fund, when viewed on a consolidated basis.

The Fixed Income strategy is designed to generate interest income and preserve principal by investing primarily in investment grade securities including: (1) obligations issued or guaranteed by the United States Government, its agencies or instrumentalities, (2) securities issued or guaranteed by foreign governments, their political subdivisions or agencies or instrumentalities, (3) bonds, notes, or similar debt obligations issued by U.S. or foreign corporations or special-purpose entities backed by corporate debt obligations, (4) U.S. asset-backed securities ("ABS"), (5) U.S. residential mortgage-backed securities ("MBS"), (6) U.S. commercial mortgage-backed securities ("CMBS"), (7) interest rate-related futures contracts, (8) interest rate-related or credit default swap contracts and (9) money market funds. The Fund defines investment grade fixed income securities as those that are rated, at the time purchased, in the top four categories by a rating agency such as Moody's Investors Service, Inc. ("Moody's") or Standard & Poor's Ratings Services ("S&P"), or, if unrated, determined to be of comparable quality. However, the fixed income portion of the Fund's portfolio will be invested without restriction as to individual issuer country, type of entity, or capitalization. Futures and swap contracts are used for hedging purposes and as substitutes for fixed income securities. The Fund's Adviser delegates management of the Fund's Fixed Income strategy portfolio to a sub-adviser, Nuveen Asset Management, LLC ("Nuveen").

The Adviser anticipates that, based upon its analysis of long-term historical returns and volatility of various asset classes, the Fund will allocate approximately 25% of its assets to the Market Trend strategy and approximately 75% of its assets to the Fixed Income strategy. However, as market conditions change the portion allocated may be higher or lower.

The Fund seeks to achieve its secondary investment objective primarily by (1) diversifying the Market Trend strategy investments among financial instruments that are not expected to have returns that are
19



highly correlated to each other or the equity markets and (2) by selecting Fixed Income strategy investments that are short-term to medium-term interest income-generating securities (those with maturities or average lives of less than 10 years) that are expected to be less volatile than the equity markets in general and that are not expected to have returns that are highly correlated to the equity markets or the Market Trend strategy.

The Adviser, on behalf of itself and on behalf of the Fund and other Funds it advises or may advise in the future that are each a series of LoCorr Investment Trust, was granted an exemptive order from the U.S. Securities Exchange Commission (the "SEC") that permits the Adviser, with Board of Trustees approval, to enter into or amend sub-advisory agreements with sub-advisers without obtaining shareholder approval. Shareholders will be notified within 90 days of the engagement of an additional sub-adviser or sub-advisers to manage a portion of the Fund's portfolio.

The Fund and the Subsidiary are each a "commodity pool" under the U.S. Commodity Exchange Act and the Adviser is a "commodity pool operator" registered with and regulated by the Commodity Futures Trading Commission ("CFTC"). As a result, additional CFTC-mandated disclosure, reporting and recordkeeping obligations apply with respect to the Fund and the Subsidiary under CFTC and SEC harmonized regulations.

ADVISER'S INVESTMENT PROCESS

The Adviser will pursue the Fund's investment objectives, in part, by utilizing its sub-adviser selection and risk management process.

Sub-adviser Selection. The Adviser selects sub-advisers it believes can successfully execute the Fund's overall investment strategies. The Adviser also monitors and evaluates the performance of the sub-advisers and implements procedures to ensure each sub-adviser complies with the Fund's investment policies and restrictions.

Risk Management. The Adviser manages the expected volatility of the Fund's returns by monitoring the interaction and correlation of the returns between the Market Trend and Fixed Income strategies. Using this risk management process, the Adviser believes the Fund's returns, over time, will not be highly correlated to the equity markets and will provide the potential for reducing volatility in investors' portfolios.

SUB-ADVISERS' INVESTMENT PROCESS

Graham Capital Management, L.P.
GCM executes the Market Trend strategy by employing macro-oriented quantitative investment techniques to select long and short positions in the global futures and foreign exchange markets These techniques are designed to produce attractive absolute and risk-adjusted returns while maintaining low correlation to traditional asset classes. Futures contracts and foreign exchange forward contracts have leverage inherent in their terms as the Fund need only post a margin deposit and does not have to pay the full price of the contract.

The Market Trend strategy is based on a quantitative investment program that has its origins in GCM’s trend-following trading systems, dating as far back as 1995. Such systems generally are based on computerized mathematical models and can rely both on technical (i.e., historic price and volume data) and fundamental (i.e., general economic, interest rate and industrial production data) information as the basis for their trading decisions. GCM’s trend systems are designed to participate selectively in potential profit opportunities that can occur during periods of price trends in a diverse number of U.S. and international markets. The trend systems establish positions in markets where the price action of a particular market signals the computerized systems used by GCM that a potential trend in prices is occurring. The trend systems are designed to analyze, mathematically, the recent trading characteristics of each market and statistically compare such characteristics to the historical trading patterns of the particular market. The trend systems also employ proprietary risk management and trade filter strategies
20



that seek to benefit from sustained price trends while reducing risk and volatility exposure. Positions are adjusted to reflect changes in prices and trends and to manage risk.

Nuveen Asset Management, LLC
Nuveen executes the Fixed Income strategy by selecting securities using a "top-down" approach that begins with the formulation of its general economic outlook. Following this, various sectors and industries are analyzed and selected for investment. Finally, Nuveen selects individual securities within these sectors or industries that it believes have above peer-group expected yield, potential for capital preservation or appreciation. Nuveen also selects futures and swaps to hedge interest rate and credit risks and as substitutes for securities when it believes derivatives provide a better return profile or when specific securities are temporarily unavailable. Nuveen sells securities and derivatives to adjust interest rate risk, adjust credit risk, when a price target is reached, or when a security's or derivative's price outlook is deteriorating.

Principal Investment Risks: As with all mutual funds, there is the risk that you could lose money through your investment in the Fund. Many factors affect the Fund's net asset value and performance.

The following risks apply to the Fund's direct investments in securities and derivatives as well as the Fund's indirect risks through investing in the Subsidiary. The principal risks are presented in alphabetical order to facilitate finding particular risks and comparing them with other funds. Each risk summarized below is considered a principal risk of investing in the Fund, regardless of the order in which it appears. It is important to read the provided risk disclosures in their entirety.

ABS, MBS and CMBS Risk: ABS, MBS and CMBS are subject to credit risk because underlying loan borrowers may default. Additionally, these securities are subject to prepayment risk because the underlying loans held by the issuers may be paid off prior to maturity. The value of these securities may go down as a result of changes in prepayment rates on the underlying mortgages or loans. During periods of declining interest rates, prepayment rates usually increase and the Fund may have to reinvest prepayment proceeds at a lower interest rate. CMBS are less susceptible to this risk because underlying loans may have prepayment penalties or prepayment lock out periods.
Commodity Risk: Investing in the commodities markets may subject the Fund to greater volatility than investments in traditional securities. Commodity prices may be influenced by unfavorable weather, animal and plant disease, geologic and environmental factors as well as changes in government regulation such as tariffs, embargoes or burdensome production rules and restrictions.
Convertible Bond Risk: Convertible bonds are particularly sensitive to changes in interest rates when their conversion to equity feature is small relative to the interest and principal value of the bond. Convertible issuers may not be able to make principal and interest payments on the bond as they become due. Convertible bonds may also be subject to prepayment or redemption risk. If a convertible bond held by the Fund is called for redemption, the Fund will be required to surrender the security for redemption, convert it into the issuing company's common stock or cash at a time that may be unfavorable to the Fund. When a convertible bond's value is more closely tied to its conversion to stock feature, it is sensitive to the underlying stock's price.
Credit Risk: There is a risk that issuers and counterparties will not make payments on securities and other investments held by the Fund, resulting in losses to the Fund. In addition, the credit quality of securities held by the Fund may be lowered if an issuer's financial condition changes.
Derivatives Risk: Derivatives are subject to tracking risk because they may not be perfect substitutes for the instruments they are intended to hedge or replace. Short positions are subject to potentially unlimited liability. Futures positions held by the Fund may incur significant losses caused by unanticipated market movements and such losses may be unlimited. Purchased options may expire worthless. Over the counter derivatives, such as swaps, are subject to
21



counterparty default. Leverage inherent in derivatives such as futures will tend to magnify the Fund’s losses.
Fixed Income Risk: Typically, a rise in interest rates causes a decline in the value of fixed income securities owned by the Fund. The value of fixed income securities typically falls when an issuer's credit quality declines and may even become worthless if an issuer defaults.
Foreign Currency Risk: Currency trading risks include market risk, credit risk and country risk. Market risk results from adverse changes in exchange rates in the currencies the Fund is long or short. Credit risk results because a currency-trade counterparty may default. Country risk arises because a government may interfere with transactions in its currency.
Foreign Investment Risk: Foreign investing involves risks not typically associated with U.S. investments, including adverse fluctuations in foreign currency values, adverse political, social and economic developments, less liquidity, greater volatility, less developed or less efficient trading markets, political instability and differing auditing and legal standards. Investing in emerging markets imposes risks different from, or greater than, risks of investing in foreign developed countries.
Interest Rates and Bond Maturities Risk: Interest rate changes may adversely affect the market value of an investment. Fixed-income securities typically decline in value when interest rates rise. Fixed-income securities typically increase in value when interest rates decline. The Fund may experience adverse exposure from either increasing or declining rates. Bonds with longer maturities will be more affected by interest rate changes than intermediate-term bonds.
Issuer-Specific Risk: The value of a specific security can be more volatile than the market as a whole and can perform differently from the value of the market as a whole. The value of securities of smaller issuers can be more volatile than those of larger issuers. The value of certain types of securities can be more volatile due to increased sensitivity to adverse issuer, political, regulatory, market, or economic developments.
Leverage Risk: Using derivatives to increase the Fund's combined long and short exposure creates leverage, which can magnify the Fund's potential for gain or loss and, therefore, amplify the effects of market volatility on the Fund's share price.
Liquidity Risk: Liquidity risk exists when particular investments of the Fund would be difficult to purchase or sell, possibly preventing the Fund from selling such illiquid securities at an advantageous time or price, or possibly requiring the Fund to dispose of other investments at unfavorable times or prices in order to satisfy its obligations.
Management Risk: The Adviser's and each sub-adviser's judgments about the attractiveness, value and potential appreciation of particular asset classes, securities and derivatives in which the Fund invests may prove to be incorrect and may not produce the desired results. Additionally, the Adviser's judgments about the potential performance of the sub-advisers may also prove incorrect and may not produce the desired results.
Market Risk: Overall securities and derivatives market risks may affect the value of individual instruments in which the Fund invests. Factors such as domestic and foreign economic growth and market conditions, interest rate levels, and political and social events affect the securities and derivatives markets. Global economies and financial markets are increasingly interconnected, and conditions and events in one country, region or financial market may adversely impact issuers in a different country, region or financial market. These risks may be magnified if certain events or developments adversely interrupt the global supply chain; in these and other circumstances, such risks might affect companies worldwide. Recent examples include pandemic risks related to COVID-19 and aggressive measures taken worldwide in response by governments. The effects of COVID-19 have contributed to increased volatility in global markets and will likely affect certain countries, companies, industries and market sectors more dramatically than others. The COVID-19 pandemic has had, and any other outbreak of an infectious disease or other serious public health concern could have, a significant negative impact on economic and market conditions and could trigger a prolonged period of global economic
22



slowdown. When the value of the Fund's investments goes down, your investment in the Fund decreases in value and you could lose money.
Portfolio Turnover Risk: Active and frequent trading may lead to the realization and distribution to shareholders of higher short-term capital gains, which would increase their tax liability. Frequent trading also increases transaction costs, which could detract from the Fund’s performance.
Restricted Securities Risk: Rule 144A securities, which are restricted securities, may not be readily marketable in broad public markets. A Rule 144A restricted security carries the risk that the Funds may not be able to sell a security when the portfolio managers consider it desirable to do so and/or may have to sell the security at a lower price. In addition, transaction costs may be higher for Rule 144A securities than for more liquid securities. Although there is a substantial institutional market for Rule 144A securities, it is not possible to predict exactly how the market for Rule 144A securities will develop. A restricted security that when purchased was liquid in the institutional markets may subsequently become illiquid.
Short Position Risk: The Fund will incur a loss as a result of a short position if the price of the short position instrument increases in value between the date of the short position sale and the date on which an offsetting position is purchased. The Fund is required to make a margin deposit in connection with such short sales; The Fund may have to pay a fee to borrow particular securities and will often be obligated to pay over any dividends and accrued interest on borrowed securities. Short positions may be considered speculative transactions and involve special risks, including greater reliance on the Adviser's ability to accurately anticipate the future value of a security or instrument. The Fund's losses are potentially unlimited in a short position transaction.
Wholly-Owned Subsidiary Risk: The Subsidiary will not be registered under the 1940 Act and, unless otherwise noted in this Prospectus, will not be subject to all of the investor protections of the 1940 Act. Changes in the laws of the United States and/or the Cayman Islands, under which the Fund and the Subsidiary, respectively, are organized, could result in the inability of the Fund and/or Subsidiary to operate as described in this Prospectus and could negatively affect the Fund and its shareholders. By investing in commodities indirectly through the Subsidiary, the Fund will obtain exposure to the commodities markets within the federal tax requirements that apply to the Fund. However, because the Subsidiary is a controlled foreign corporation, any income received from its investments will be passed through to the Fund as ordinary income, which may be taxed at less favorable rates than capital gains. Additionally, losses at the subsidiary are not available to be carried forward nor offset by gains at the Fund level. Your cost of investing in the Fund will be higher because you indirectly bear the expenses of the Subsidiary.

Who Should Invest in the Fund?

The Adviser believes the Fund is appropriate for investors seeking the low-correlation benefits of Market Trend investing, relative to traditional stock portfolios.
Performance:

The following bar chart and table provide some indication of the risks of investing in the Fund by showing changes in the Fund’s performance from year to year and by showing how the Fund’s average annual total returns for one-year, 5-years and since inception compare with that of a broad-based securities index and a secondary index. The returns in the bar chart and best/worst quarter are for Class I shares which do not have sales charges. The performance of Class A and Class C Shares would be lower due to differing expense structures and sales charges. The returns in the table reflect the maximum applicable sales load of 5.75% on Class A shares, and the maximum deferred sales load of 1.00% on Class C shares for the one-year period. The Fund’s past performance, before and after taxes, is not necessarily an indication of how the Fund will perform in the future and does not guarantee future results. Updated performance information is available at no cost to shareholders by visiting www.LoCorrFunds.com or by calling 1-855-523-8637. Net asset value (“NAV”) per share information may be obtained by visiting www.LoCorrFunds.com/performance.html.

23



Calendar Year Total Return

LoCorr Market Trend Fund – Class I

24126
Highest Quarterly Return:
Q1 2022 21.48%
Lowest Quarterly Return:
Q4 2018 -10.78%

Average Annual Total Return as of December 31, 2022

1 Year
5 Years
Since Inception
(6/30/2014)(1)
Class I Shares
   Return Before Taxes
29.94% 7.14% 6.23%
   Return After Taxes on Distributions
22.97% 5.53% 4.96%
   Return After Taxes on Distributions and Sale of Fund Shares
18.71% 4.96% 4.41%
Class A Shares
Return Before Taxes
22.10% 5.63% 5.23%
Class C Shares
Return Before Taxes
27.67% 6.08% 5.17%
ICE BofA 3-Month Treasury Bill Index (reflects no deduction for fees, expenses or taxes)
1.47% 1.27% 0.89%
Barclay CTA Index
(reflects no deduction for fees, expenses or taxes)
7.41% 3.94% 2.88%

(1)The Fund's inception date is June 30, 2014, the date to which performance is measured. The Fund commenced operations on July 1, 2014.

After-tax returns are calculated using the historical highest individual federal marginal income tax rates and does not reflect the impact of state and local taxes. Actual after-tax returns depend on the individual investor’s situation and may differ from those shown. Furthermore, the after-tax returns shown are not relevant to investors who hold their shares through tax-deferred arrangements such as 401(k) plans or Individual Retirement Accounts (“IRAs”). After-tax returns are shown for Class I shares only and will vary for Class A and Class C shares.

24



Investment Adviser: LoCorr Fund Management, LLC
Portfolio Managers: Jon C. Essen, Chief Financial Officer of the Adviser, has served the Fund as a portfolio manager since it commenced operations in 2014; Sean Katof, Chief Investment Officer of the Adviser, has served the Fund as a portfolio manager since 2016.

Sub-Adviser (Market Trend Strategy): Graham Capital Management, L.P.
Portfolio Managers: Kenneth G. Tropin, Chairman of GCM, and Pablo Calderini, President and Chief Investment Officer of GCM, have each served the Fund as a portfolio manager since it commenced operations in 2014.

Sub-Adviser (Fixed Income Strategy): Nuveen Asset Management, LLC
Portfolio Managers: Tony Rodriguez, Portfolio Manager of the sub-adviser, has served the Fund as a portfolio manager since 2017. Peter Agrimson, Portfolio Manager of the sub-adviser, has served as a portfolio manager since 2018.

Purchase and Sale of Fund Shares: You may purchase and redeem shares of the Fund on any day that the New York Stock Exchange is open for trading by written request, telephone, website, wire transfer or through your broker. You may also exchange shares of the Fund for shares of another Fund in the LoCorr Investment Trust. Redemptions will be paid by ACH, check or wire transfer. The minimum initial investment amount for Class A and Class C shares is $2,500. The minimum initial investment in Class I shares is $100,000. The minimum subsequent investment amount for all classes is $500. The Fund or its Adviser may waive any investment minimum.

Tax Information: Dividends and capital gain distributions you receive from the Fund, whether you reinvest your distributions in additional Fund shares or receive them in cash, are taxable to you at either ordinary income or capital gains tax rates unless you are investing through a tax-deferred plan such as an IRA or 401(k) plan.

Payments to Broker-Dealers and Other Financial Intermediaries: If you purchase the Fund through a broker-dealer or other financial intermediary (such as a bank), the Fund and its related companies may pay the intermediary for the sale of Fund shares and related services. These payments may create a conflict of interest by influencing the broker-dealer or other intermediary and your salesperson to recommend the Fund over another investment. Ask your salesperson or visit your financial intermediary's website for more information.

25



LOCORR DYNAMIC OPPORTUNITY FUND SUMMARY

Investment Objectives: The Fund's investment objective is long-term capital appreciation with reduced volatility compared to traditional broad-based equity market indices as a secondary objective.

Fees and Expenses of the Fund: This table describes the fees and expenses that you may pay if you buy, hold, and sell shares of the Fund. You may pay other fees, such as brokerage commissions and other fees to financial intermediaries, which are not reflected in the table and example below. You may qualify for sales charge discounts on purchases of Class A shares if you and your family invest, or agree to invest in the future, at least $25,000 in the Fund. More information about these and other discounts is available from your financial intermediary, in How to Purchase Shares on page 84 of this Prospectus, and in Appendix A to this Prospectus.
Shareholder Fees
(fees paid directly from your investment)
Class
A
Class
C
Class
I
Maximum Sales Charge (Load)
Imposed on Purchases (as a % of offering price)
5.75% None None
Maximum Deferred Sales Charge (Load)
(as a % of original purchase price)
1.00%⁽¹⁾ 1.00%⁽²⁾ None
Maximum Sales Charge (Load) Imposed on
Reinvested Dividends and other Distributions
None None None
Annual Fund Operating Expenses
(expenses that you pay each year as a
percentage of the value of your investment)
Management Fees 1.50% 1.50% 1.50%
Distribution and/or Service (12b-1) Fees 0.25% 1.00% 0.00%
Other Expenses 0.93% 0.93% 0.93%
   Dividend Expense 0.26%
   Remaining Other Expenses(3)
0.67%
Acquired Fund Fees and Expenses(4)
0.02% 0.02% 0.02%
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses 2.70% 3.45% 2.45%
Fee Waiver and/or Reimbursement(5)
-0.19% -0.19% -0.19%
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses After
Fee Waiver and/or Reimbursement(5)
2.51% 3.26% 2.26%

(1)    Applied to purchases of $1 million or more that are redeemed within 12 months of their purchase.

(2)    Applied to shares redeemed within 12 months of their purchase.

(3)    "Other Expenses includes expenses incurred by the Fund in the normal course of operations together with recoupment of management fees previously reimbursed to the Fund. Such expenses are borne by the Fund separately from the management fees paid to the Advisor.

(4)    Acquired Fund Fees and Expenses are the indirect costs of investing in other investment companies. The operating expenses in this fee table will not correlate to the expense ratio in the Fund's financial highlights because the financial statements include only the direct operating expenses incurred by the Fund.

(5)    The Fund's Adviser has contractually agreed to reduce its fees and/or absorb expenses of the Fund, until at least April 30, 2024, to ensure that Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses After Fee Waiver and/or Reimbursement (exclusive of any Rule 12b-1 distribution and/or servicing fees, taxes, interest, brokerage commissions, expenses incurred in connection with any merger or reorganization, dividend expenses on short sales, swap fees, indirect expenses, expenses of other investment companies in which the Fund may invest, or extraordinary expenses such as litigation expenses and inclusive of offering and organizational costs incurred prior to the commencement of operations) will not exceed 1.99% of the Fund’s daily average net assets attributable to each class of the Fund. These fee waivers and expense reimbursements are subject to possible recoupment from the Fund within three years following the date on which the fee waiver or expense reimbursement occurred, if the Fund is able to make the repayment without exceeding its current expense limitations and the repayment is approved by the Board of Trustees. This agreement may be terminated only by the Fund’s Board of Trustees, on 60 days’ written notice to the Adviser.


26



Example: This Example is intended to help you compare the cost of investing in the Fund with the cost of investing in other mutual funds.
The Example assumes that you invest $10,000 in the Fund for the time periods indicated and then redeem all of your shares at the end of those periods. The Example also assumes that your investment has a 5% return each year, that the Fund’s operating expenses remain the same, and reflects the expense limitation in the first year only. Although your actual costs may be higher or lower, based upon these assumptions your costs would be:

Class 1 Year 3 Years 5 Years 10 Years
A $915 $1,348 $1,907 $3,419
C $429 $1,042 $1,777 $3,717
I $229 $745 $1,288 $2,772

Portfolio Turnover: The Fund pays transaction costs, such as commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or "turns over" its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover may indicate higher transaction costs and may result in higher taxes when Fund shares are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are not reflected in annual fund operating expenses or in the Example, affect the Fund’s performance. During the most recent fiscal year ended December 31, 2022, the Fund’s portfolio turnover rate was 686% of the average value of its portfolio.

Principal Investment Strategies: Under normal market conditions, the Fund invests in long or short positions in equity securities of domestic and foreign companies. The Fund defines equity securities as (1) common stocks, (2) preferred stocks and (3) debt securities that are convertible into stock. The Fund invests in securities of issuers without restriction as to capitalization or country, including emerging markets. The Fund invests in convertible debt securities of any maturity or credit quality, including those known as "junk bonds." Junk bonds are rated below Baa3 by Moody's Investors Service, Inc. (“Moody’s”) or equivalently by another nationally recognized statistical rating organization (“NRSRO”). The Fund may invest a portion of its assets in private placement offerings which may be illiquid.

The Fund's Adviser seeks to achieve the Fund's primary investment objective of long-term capital appreciation by using a "long/short equity" strategy that is executed by allocating assets to a sub-adviser that has a long/short equity investment strategy. The Adviser may also engage an additional sub-adviser or additional sub-advisers if it believes they will enhance the Fund’s performance or reduce volatility. The Adviser may also use one or more exchange-traded funds ("ETFs") to execute a portion of the long/short equity strategy rather than allocate assets to a sub-adviser, when it believes that doing so will help the Fund achieve its investment objective. The Fund anticipates reduced return volatility when compared to traditional broad-based equity market indices because the short element of its strategies is expected to produce a hedging effect.

The Adviser, on behalf of itself and on behalf of the Fund and other Funds it advises or may advise in the future that are each a series of LoCorr Investment Trust, was granted an exemptive order from the U.S. Securities Exchange Commission (the "SEC") that permits the adviser, with Board of Trustees approval, to enter into or amend sub-advisory agreements with sub-advisers without obtaining shareholder approval. Shareholders will be notified within 90 days of the engagement of an additional sub-adviser or sub-advisers to manage a portion of the Fund's portfolio.

ADVISER’S INVESTMENT PROCESS

The Adviser will pursue the Fund’s investment objectives, in part, by utilizing its sub-adviser selection and its risk management process to select the appropriate sub-adviser(s) to help the Fund achieve its objectives.

Sub-Adviser Selection represents the result of quantitative and qualitative reviews that will identify a sub-adviser chosen for its long/short equity market niche, historical performance, management accessibility, commitment, investment strategy, as well as process and methodology. Using this selection process, the Adviser believes it can identify a sub-adviser
27



that can produce positive, risk-adjusted returns. The Adviser replaces a sub-adviser when its returns are below expectations or it deviates from its traditional investment process.

SUB-ADVISERS’ INVESTMENT PROCESS

Kettle Hill Capital Management, LLC (“KHCM”) serves as a sub-adviser to the Fund. KHCM’s investment strategy is a value-oriented, fundamentals- and research-driven, bottom-up equity long/short approach. The strategy focuses on unique risk-reward strategies within the small-cap universe, seeking to generate superior absolute returns over the investment cycle and balancing return potential of the portfolio against risks inherent in individual stocks, industry selection, small-cap investing, and broader markets and economies. For both long and short investments, KHCM selects companies ranked by relative value.

Millrace Asset Group, Inc. (“Millrace”) serves as a sub-adviser to the Fund. Millrace manages a long/short US equity strategy based on their fundamental, bottom-up research of, predominantly, smaller companies. Their objective is to deliver returns over the course of a full market cycle that exceed the US equity market with less downside exposure during market downturns. The portfolio is diversified by the number of holdings as well as the sector exposure.

Principal Investment Risks: As with all mutual funds, there is the risk that you could lose money through your investment in the Fund. Many factors affect the Fund’s net asset value and performance.

The following risks apply to the Fund’s direct investments in securities and derivatives as well as the Fund’s indirect risks through investing in Underlying Funds and the Subsidiary. The principal risks are presented in alphabetical order to facilitate finding particular risks and comparing them with other funds. Each risk summarized below is considered a principal risk of investing in the Fund, regardless of the order in which it appears. It is important to read the provided risk disclosures in their entirety.

Convertible Securities Risk: A convertible security is a fixed-income security (a debt instrument or a preferred stock) which may be converted at a stated price within a specified period of time into a certain quantity of the common stock of the same or a different issuer. The market value of a convertible security performs like that of a regular debt security, that is, if market interest rates rise, the value of the convertible security falls.
Credit Risk: There is a risk that convertible debt issuers will not make payments on securities held by the Fund, resulting in losses to the Fund. In addition, the credit quality of convertible debt securities held by the Fund may be lowered if an issuer's financial condition changes.
Derivatives Risk: Derivatives are subject to tracking risk because they may not be perfect substitutes for the instruments they are intended to hedge or replace. Short positions are subject to potentially unlimited liability. Futures positions held by the Fund may incur significant losses caused by unanticipated market movements and such losses may be unlimited. Purchased options may expire worthless. Over the counter derivatives, such as swaps, are subject to counterparty default. Leverage inherent in derivatives will tend to magnify the Fund’s losses.
Emerging Market Risk: Investments in securities of issuers in emerging markets will be subject to risks of foreign securities in general and with those of emerging markets as well. Emerging market countries may have relatively unstable governments, weaker economies, and less-developed legal systems with fewer security holder rights. Emerging market economies may be based on only a few industries and security issuers may be more susceptible to economic weakness and more likely to default. Securities of issuers in emerging markets securities also tend to be less liquid.
Equity Market Risk: Common and preferred stocks are susceptible to general stock market fluctuations and to volatile increases and decreases in value as market confidence in and perceptions of their issuers change. Convertible bonds may decline in value if the price of a common stock falls below the conversion price. Investor perceptions are based on various and unpredictable factors including expectations regarding government, economic, monetary and
28



fiscal policies; inflation and interest rates; economic expansion or contraction and global or regional political, economic and banking crises.
ETF Risk: ETFs are subject to investment advisory fees and other expenses, which will be indirectly paid by the Fund. As a result, the cost of investing in the Fund will be higher than the cost of investing directly in ETFs and may be higher than other mutual funds that invest directly in stocks and bonds. Each ETF is subject to specific risks, depending on the nature of the ETF.
Foreign Investment Risk: Foreign investing involves risks not typically associated with U.S. investments, including adverse fluctuations in foreign currency values, adverse political, social and economic developments, less liquidity, greater volatility, less developed or less efficient trading markets, political instability and differing auditing and legal standards. Investing in emerging markets imposes risks different from, or greater than, risks of investing in foreign developed countries.
High Yield or Junk Bond Risk: Lower-quality convertible debt securities, known as "high yield" or "junk" bonds, present greater risk than bonds of higher quality, including an increased risk of default. An economic downturn or period of rising interest rates could adversely affect the market for these bonds and reduce the Fund's ability to sell its bonds. The lack of a liquid market for these bonds could decrease the Fund's share price.
Interest Rates and Bond Maturities Risk: Interest rate changes may adversely affect the market value of an investment. Fixed-income securities typically decline in value when interest rates rise. Fixed-income securities typically increase in value when interest rates decline. The Fund may experience adverse exposure from either increasing or declining rates. Bonds with longer maturities will be more affected by interest rate changes than intermediate-term bonds.
Issuer-Specific Risk: The value of a specific security can be more volatile than the market as a whole and can perform differently from the value of the market as a whole. The value of securities of smaller issuers can be more volatile than those of larger issuers. The value of certain types of securities can be more volatile due to increased sensitivity to adverse issuer, political, regulatory, market, or economic developments.
Liquidity Risk: Liquidity risk exists when particular investments of the Fund would be difficult to purchase or sell, possibly preventing the Fund from selling such illiquid securities at an advantageous time or price, or possibly requiring the Fund to dispose of other investments at unfavorable times or prices in order to satisfy its obligations.
Management Risk: The Adviser's judgments about an investment or the investment expertise of a sub-adviser may prove to be inaccurate and may not produce the desired results. A sub-adviser's judgments about the attractiveness, value and potential appreciation or depreciation of a particular security in which the Fund invests or sells short may prove to be inaccurate and may not produce the desired results.
Market Risk: Overall securities market risks may affect the value of individual instruments in which the Fund invests. Factors such as domestic and foreign economic growth and market conditions, interest rate levels, and political and social events affect the securities markets. Global economies and financial markets are increasingly interconnected, and conditions and events in one country, region or financial market may adversely impact issuers in a different country, region or financial market. These risks may be magnified if certain events or developments adversely interrupt the global supply chain; in these and other circumstances, such risks might affect companies worldwide. Recent examples include pandemic risks related to COVID-19 and aggressive measures taken worldwide in response by governments. The effects of COVID-19 have contributed to increased volatility in global markets and will likely affect certain countries, companies, industries and market sectors more dramatically than others. The COVID-19 pandemic has had, and any other outbreak of an infectious disease or other serious public health concern could have, a significant negative impact on economic and market conditions and could trigger a prolonged period of global economic slowdown. When the value of the Fund's
29



investments goes down, your investment in the Fund decreases in value and you could lose money.
Portfolio Turnover Risk: Active and frequent trading may lead to the realization and distribution to shareholders of higher short-term capital gains, which would increase their tax liability. Frequent trading also increases transaction costs, which could detract from the Fund’s performance.
Preferred Stock Risk: Typically, a rise in interest rates causes a decline in the value of preferred stock. Preferred stocks are also subject to credit and default risk, which is the possibility that an issuer of preferred stock will fail to make its dividend payments.
REIT Risk: Real estate values rise and fall in response to a variety of factors, including local, regional and national economic conditions, interest rates and tax considerations. An individual REIT's performance depends on the types and locations of the rental properties it owns and on how well it manages those properties.

Short Position Risk: The Fund will engage in short selling, which is significantly different from the investment activities commonly associated with long-only stock funds. Positions in shorted securities are speculative and more risky than "long" positions (purchases) because the cost of the replacement security is unknown. Therefore, the potential loss on an uncovered short is unlimited, whereas the potential loss on long positions is limited to the original purchase price. You should be aware that any strategy that includes selling securities short could suffer significant losses. Shorting will also result in higher transaction costs (such as interest and dividends), which reduce the Fund's return, and may result in higher taxes.
Small and Medium Capitalization Company Risk: Small and mid-sized companies may have limited product lines, markets or financial resources, and they may be dependent on a limited management group. Equities of smaller companies may be subject to more abrupt or erratic market movements than those of larger, more established companies or the market averages in general.
Underlying Funds Risk: Underlying Funds are subject to management fees and other expenses, which will be indirectly paid by the Fund. As a result, the cost of investing in the Fund will be higher than the cost of investing directly in an Underlying Fund and may be higher than other mutual funds that invest directly in stocks and bonds. Underlying Funds are subject to specific risks, depending on the nature of the fund.
Who Should Invest in the Fund?

The Adviser believes the Fund is appropriate for investors seeking long-term capital appreciation with reduced volatility.

Performance:

The following bar chart and table provide some indication of the risks of investing in the Fund by showing changes in the performance of the Fund’s Class I shares from year to year and by showing how the one-year, five-year and since inception average annual total returns for the Fund’s Class I shares compare with that of a broad-based securities index and a secondary index. The returns in the bar chart and best/worst quarter are for Class I shares which do not have sales charges. The performance of Class A and Class C Shares would be lower due to differing expense structures and sales charges. The returns in the table reflect the maximum applicable sales load of 5.75% on Class A shares, and the maximum deferred sales load of 1.00% on Class C shares for the one-year period. The Fund’s past performance, before and after taxes, is not necessarily an indication of how the Fund will perform in the future and does not guarantee future results. Net asset value (“NAV”) per share information and updated performance information is available on the Fund’s website at www.LoCorrFunds.com.

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Calendar Year Total Return

LoCorr Dynamic Opportunity Fund – Class I
20626
Highest Quarterly Return:
Q4 2020 16.49%
Lowest Quarterly Return:
Q1 2020 -24.01%

Average Annual Total Return as of December 31, 2022
1 Year 5 Years
Since Inception
(5/10/2013)
Class I Shares
   Return Before Taxes
-8.80% 1.56% 3.20%
   Return After Taxes on Distributions
-9.19% 0.94% 2.75%
   Return After Taxes on Distributions and Sale of Fund Shares
-5.12% 1.12% 2.45%
Class A Shares
   Return Before Taxes
-14.38% 0.07% 2.29%
Class C Shares
   Return Before Taxes
-10.69% 0.51% 2.15%
S&P 500 Total Return Index
(reflects no deduction for fees, expenses or taxes)
-18.11% 9.42% 11.39%
Morningstar Long/Short Equity Fund Index
(reflects no deduction for fees, expenses or taxes)
-8.35% 2.60% 3.44%

After-tax returns are calculated using the historical highest individual federal marginal income tax rates and does not reflect the impact of state and local taxes. Actual after-tax returns depend on the individual investor’s situation and may differ from those shown. Furthermore, the after-tax returns shown are not relevant to investors who hold their shares through tax-deferred arrangements such as 401(k) plans or Individual Retirement Accounts (“IRAs”). After-tax returns are shown for Class I shares only and will vary for Class A and Class C shares.

Adviser: LoCorr Fund Management, LLC
Portfolio Managers: Jon C. Essen, Chief Financial Officer of the Adviser, has served the Fund as a portfolio manager since it commenced operations in 2013; Sean Katof, Chief Investment Officer of the Adviser, has served the Fund as a portfolio manager since 2016.

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Sub-Adviser: Kettle Hill Capital Management, LLC
Portfolio Manager: Andrew Y. Kurita, Managing Partner of KHCM, has served the Fund as a sub-adviser portfolio manager since 2015.
Sub-Adviser: Millrace Asset Group, Inc.
Portfolio Managers: William L. Kitchel III and Whitney M. Maroney have each served the Fund as a sub-adviser portfolio manager since 2022.
Purchase and Sale of Fund Shares: You may purchase and redeem shares of the Fund on any day that the New York Stock Exchange is open for trading by written request, telephone, wire transfer, website, or through your broker. You may also exchange shares of the Fund for shares of another Fund in the LoCorr Investment Trust. Redemptions will be paid by ACH, check or wire transfer. The minimum initial investment amount for Class A and Class C shares is $2,500. The minimum initial investment in Class I shares is $100,000. The minimum subsequent investment amount for all classes is $500. The Fund or its Adviser may waive any investment minimum.

Tax Information: Dividends and capital gain distributions you receive from the Fund, whether you reinvest your distributions in additional Fund shares or receive them in cash, are taxable to you at either ordinary income or capital gains tax rates unless you are investing through a tax-deferred plan such as an IRA or 401(k) plan.
Payments to Broker-Dealers and Other Financial Intermediaries: If you purchase the Fund through a broker-dealer or other financial intermediary (such as a bank), the Fund and its related companies may pay the intermediary for the sale of Fund shares and related services. These payments may create a conflict of interest by influencing the broker-dealer or other intermediary and your salesperson to recommend the Fund over another investment. Ask your salesperson or visit your financial intermediary’s website for more information.
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LOCORR SPECTRUM INCOME FUND SUMMARY
 
Investment Objectives: The Fund's primary investment objective is current income with capital appreciation as a secondary objective.

Fees and Expenses of the Fund: This table describes the fees and expenses that you may pay if you buy, hold, and sell shares of the Fund. You may pay other fees, such as brokerage commissions and other fees to financial intermediaries, which are not reflected in the table and example below. You may qualify for sales charge discounts on purchases of Class A shares if you and your family invest, or agree to invest in the future, at least $25,000 in the Fund. More information about these and other discounts is available from your financial intermediary, in How to Purchase Shares on page 84 of this Prospectus, and in Appendix A to this Prospectus.
Shareholder Fees
(fees paid directly from your investment)
Class
A
Class
C
Class
I
Maximum Sales Charge (Load)
Imposed on Purchases (as a % of offering price)
5.75% None None
Maximum Deferred Sales Charge (Load)
(as a % of original purchase price)
1.00%⁽¹⁾ 1.00%⁽²⁾ None
Maximum Sales Charge (Load) Imposed on
Reinvested Dividends and other Distributions
None None None
Redemption Fee (as a % of amount redeemed
if sold within 60 days)
2.00% 2.00% 2.00%
Annual Fund Operating Expenses
(expenses that you pay each year as a
percentage of the value of your investment)
Management Fees 1.30% 1.30% 1.30%
Distribution and/or Service (12b-1) Fees 0.25% 1.00% 0.00%
Other Expenses(3)
0.53% 0.53% 0.53%
Acquired Fund Fees and Expenses(4)
0.80% 0.80% 0.80%
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses 2.88% 3.63% 2.63%
Fee Waiver(5)
-0.01% -0.01% -0.01%
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses After
Fee Waiver and/or Reimbursement(5)
2.87% 3.62% 2.62%

(1)Applied to purchases of $1 million or more that are redeemed within 12 months of their purchase.

(2)Applied to shares redeemed within 12 months of their purchase.

(3)"Other Expenses" includes expenses incurred by the Fund in the normal course of operations together with recoupment of management fees previously reimbursed to the Fund. Such expenses are borne by the Fund separately from the management fees paid to the Advisor.

(4)Acquired Fund Fees and Expenses are the indirect costs of investing in other investment companies. The operating expenses in this fee table will not correlate to the expense ratio in the Fund's financial highlights because the financial statements include only the direct operating expenses incurred by the Fund.

(5)The Fund's Adviser has contractually agreed to reduce its fees and/or absorb expenses of the Fund, until at least April 30, 2024, to ensure that Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses After Fee Waiver and/or Reimbursement (exclusive of any Rule 12b-1 distribution and/or servicing fees, taxes, interest, brokerage commissions, expenses incurred in connection with any merger or reorganization, dividend expenses on short sales, swap fees, indirect expenses, expenses of other investment companies in which the Fund may invest, or extraordinary expenses such as litigation expenses and inclusive of offering and organizational costs incurred prior to the commencement of operations) will not exceed 1.80% of the Fund’s daily average net assets attributable to each class of the Fund. These fee waivers and expense reimbursements are subject to possible recoupment from the Fund within three years following the date on which the fee waiver or expense reimbursement occurred, if the Fund is able to make the repayment without exceeding its current expense limitations and the repayment is approved by the Board of Trustees. This agreement may be terminated only by the Fund’s Board of Trustees, on 60 days’ written notice to the Adviser.


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Example: This Example is intended to help you compare the cost of investing in the Fund with the cost of investing in other mutual funds.
 
The Example assumes that you invest $10,000 in the Fund for the time periods indicated and then redeem all of your shares at the end of those periods. The Example also assumes that your investment has a 5% return each year, that the Fund's operating expenses remain the same, and reflects the expense limitation in the first year only. Although your actual costs may be higher or lower, based upon these assumptions your costs would be:

Class 1 Year 3 Years 5 Years 10 Years
A $948 $1,415 $2,005 $3,595
C $464 $1,111 $1,877 $3,888
I $265 $816 $1,394 $2,963

Portfolio Turnover: The Fund pays transaction costs, such as commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or "turns over" its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover may indicate higher transaction costs and may result in higher taxes when Fund shares are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are not reflected in annual fund operating expenses or in the Example, affect the Fund's performance. During the most recent fiscal year ended December 31, 2022, the Fund’s portfolio turnover rate was 50% of the average value of its portfolio.

Principal Investment Strategies: The Fund seeks to achieve its investment objectives by allocating its assets primarily among income-producing securities using an "Income" Strategy.
 
The Income strategy employed by the Fund's sub-adviser attempts to produce current income and capital appreciation. The primary focus of this portfolio is exchange traded “pass-through” securities that distribute substantially all of their profits directly to their shareholders. The main categories of such securities include Real Estate Investment Trusts (“REITs”), Master Limited Partnerships (”MLPs”), Closed End Funds (“CEFs”), Royalty Trusts, and Business Development Companies (”BDCs”). In addition to such securities, the sub-adviser may include in the portfolio exchange traded common stocks and bonds, including those issued by foreign entities. These securities may be of any market capitalization or, in the case of bonds, any maturity or credit quality. These may include bonds of higher yield and higher risk, commonly called "junk bonds" that may be rated BB+ and below by Standard & Poor’s Ratings Services (“S&P”) or similarly rated by another nationally recognized statistical rating organization (“NRSRO”).

To reduce overall portfolio market risk or security specific risk, the Adviser may employ hedging strategies. These strategies attempt to mitigate potential losses in value in certain Fund holdings. The Adviser attempts to hedge risks by investing long and/or short in exchange-traded futures, ETFs and exchange-traded and over-the-counter options, selling securities short and entering into swap contracts. The Adviser takes short positions in equity or interest rate futures contracts to protect against declines in the equity market and debt market, respectively. The Adviser may also invest in inverse ETFs (those that are designed to have price changes that move in the opposite direction of a market index) to protect against declines in the equity market and debt market. The Adviser may invest in protective put options that give the Fund the right to sell a security at a specific price regardless of the decline in the market price. The Adviser may also combine long and short (written) put and call options in "spread" transactions that are designed to protect the Fund over a range of price changes. Short selling is also used to hedge against overall market or sector price declines. Similarly, swaps contracts (agreements to exchange payments based on price changes in an index or specific security) are used to hedge against overall market, sector or security-specific price declines.

The composition of the portfolio will vary over time according to the sub-adviser’s evaluation of economic and market conditions, including prospects for growth and inflation, as they affect the potential returns from different classes of securities. This strategic evaluation is combined with fundamental research on the individual securities considered for inclusion in the portfolio in order to determine the composition of the portfolio at any point in time. Depending on market conditions, the Fund’s assets may be solely allocated to its Income Strategy for significant periods of time.

34



The Adviser, on behalf of itself and on behalf of the Fund and other funds it advises or may advise in the future that are each a series of LoCorr Investment Trust, was granted an exemptive order from the Securities Exchange Commission (the “SEC”) that permits the Adviser, with Board of Trustees approval, to enter into or amend sub-advisory agreements with sub-advisers without obtaining shareholder approval. Shareholders will be notified within 90 days of the engagement of an additional sub-adviser or sub-advisers to manage a portion of the Fund's portfolio.

ADVISER'S INVESTMENT PROCESS

The Adviser will pursue the Fund's investment objectives, in part, by utilizing its investment and risk management process.

The Adviser buys securities that it believes offer above-average expected returns and lower-than-average volatility and sells them when it believes they have reached their target price, to adjust asset allocation or when more attractive investments are available.

SUB-ADVISER'S INVESTMENT PROCESS
 
Bramshill Investments (“Bramshill”) serves as sub-adviser for the Spectrum Income Fund with respect to the Fund’s Income strategy. The sub-adviser's approach towards management of the Income Strategy involves both "top down" and "bottom up" elements:

Security Selection: The sub-adviser screens for securities with attractive yields, liquidity and industry classification. The sub-adviser considers criteria including but not limited to discount to book value, discounted cash flows, discount to the net asset value, sustainability and/or growth of distributions; quality of management; and the security’s consistency with the portfolio manager’s macroeconomic views. High-yielding securities may include non-investment grade securities.

Sector Selection: The relative concentration of each category of assets is based on the sub-adviser’s outlook on the economic and inflationary conditions. This evaluation is based on macroeconomic data and forecasts, as well as technical analysis of market performance of asset classes.

The totality of this process is intended to produce a portfolio that offers current and projected yields meaningfully greater than those provided by broad common stock or investment grade bond indexes. The sub-adviser believes that its research processes make it likely that those yields will be sustained or increased, and that there is a reasonable expectation that modest capital gains can be achieved over a market cycle.

Principal Investment Risks: As with all mutual funds, there is the risk that you could lose money through your investment in the Fund. Many factors affect the Fund's net asset value and performance.

The following risks apply to the Fund's direct investments in securities as well as the Fund's indirect risks through investing in Underlying Funds. The principal risks are presented in alphabetical order to facilitate finding particular risks and comparing them with other funds. Each risk summarized below is considered a principal risk of investing in the Fund, regardless of the order in which it appears. It is important to read the provided risk disclosures in their entirety.

BDC Risk: BDCs may carry risks similar to those of a private equity or venture capital fund. BDC company securities are not redeemable at the option of the shareholder and they may trade in the market at a discount to their net asset value. BDCs usually trade at a discount to their net asset value because they invest in unlisted securities and have limited access to capital markets. BDCs are subject to management and other expenses, which will be indirectly paid by the Fund.
35



Credit Risk: There is a risk that issuers and counterparties will not make payments on securities and other investments held by the Fund, resulting in losses to the Fund. In addition, the credit quality of securities held by the Fund may be lowered if an issuer's financial condition changes.
Derivatives Risk: Derivatives are subject to tracking risk because they may not be perfect substitutes for the instruments they are intended to hedge or replace. Short positions are subject to potentially unlimited liability. Futures positions held by the Fund may incur significant losses caused by unanticipated market movements and such losses may be unlimited. Purchased options may expire worthless. Over the counter derivatives, such as swaps, are subject to counterparty default. Leverage inherent in derivatives will tend to magnify the Fund’s losses.
Fixed Income Risk: Typically, a rise in interest rates causes a decline in the value of fixed income securities owned by the Fund. The value of fixed income securities typically falls when an issuer's credit quality declines and may even become worthless if an issuer defaults.
Foreign Investment Risk: Foreign investing involves risks not typically associated with U.S. investments, including adverse fluctuations in foreign currency values, adverse political, social and economic developments, less liquidity, greater volatility, less developed or less efficient trading markets, political instability and differing auditing and legal standards. Investing in emerging markets imposes risks different from, or greater than, risks of investing in foreign developed countries.
Hedging Strategies Risk: There is no assurance that the Fund will succeed in hedging the underlying portfolio holdings because the value of the hedging vehicle may not correlate perfectly with the underlying portfolio asset. The Adviser is not aware of any security or combination of securities that would provide a perfect hedge to the Fund's holdings. Each of the hedging strategies has inherent leverage risk that may tend to magnify the Fund's losses. Derivative contracts, such as futures, have leverage inherent in their terms because of low margin deposits normally required. Consequently, a relatively small price movement in the futures contract reference index may result in an immediate and substantial loss to the Fund. Over-the-counter instruments, such as swaps and certain purchased options, are subject to counterparty default risk and liquidity risk. Swap agreements also involve fees, commissions or other costs that may reduce the Fund's gains from a swap agreement or may cause the Fund to lose money. The Fund will incur a loss as a result of a short position if the price of the short position instrument increases in value between the date of the short position sale and the date on which an offsetting position is purchased. Short positions may be considered speculative transactions and involve special risks, including greater reliance on the Adviser's ability to accurately anticipate the future value of a security or instrument. The Fund's losses are potentially unlimited in a short position transaction. The Adviser covers hedging positions (buys back, sells or closes out positions) when it believes market price trends are no longer unfavorable or security-specific risks are acceptable or when a different hedging vehicle is more attractive.
High-Yield or Junk Bond Risk: Lower-quality convertible debt securities, known as "high yield" or "junk" bonds, present greater risk than bonds of higher quality, including an increased risk of default. These investments are considered speculative. An economic downturn or period of rising interest rates could adversely affect the market for these bonds and reduce the Fund's ability to sell its bonds. The lack of a liquid market for these bonds could decrease the Fund's share price.
Interest Rates and Bond Maturities Risk: Interest rate changes may adversely affect the market value of an investment. Fixed-income securities typically decline in value when interest rates rise. Fixed-income securities typically increase in value when interest rates decline. The Fund may experience adverse exposure from either increasing or declining rates. Bonds with longer maturities will be more affected by interest rate changes than intermediate-term bonds.
Issuer-Specific Risk: The value of a specific security can be more volatile than the market as a whole and can perform differently from the value of the market as a whole. The value of securities of smaller issuers can be more volatile than those of larger issuers. The value of certain types of securities can be more volatile due to increased sensitivity to adverse issuer, political, regulatory, market, or economic developments.
Liquidity Risk: Liquidity risk exists when particular investments of the Fund would be difficult to purchase or sell, possibly preventing the Fund from selling such illiquid securities at an
36



advantageous time or price, or possibly requiring the Fund to dispose of other investments at unfavorable times or prices in order to satisfy its obligations.
Management Risk: The Adviser's and sub-adviser's judgments about the attractiveness, value and potential appreciation of particular asset classes and securities in which the Fund invests may prove to be incorrect and may not produce the desired results. Additionally, the Adviser's judgments about the potential performance of the sub-adviser may also prove incorrect and may not produce the desired results.
Market Risk: Overall securities market risks may affect the value of individual instruments in which the Fund invests. Factors such as domestic and foreign economic growth and market conditions, interest rate levels, and political and social events affect the securities markets. Global economies and financial markets are increasingly interconnected, and conditions and events in one country, region or financial market may adversely impact issuers in a different country, region or financial market. These risks may be magnified if certain events or developments adversely interrupt the global supply chain; in these and other circumstances, such risks might affect companies worldwide. Recent examples include pandemic risks related to COVID-19 and aggressive measures taken worldwide in response by governments. The effects of COVID-19 have contributed to increased volatility in global markets and will likely affect certain countries, companies, industries and market sectors more dramatically than others. The COVID-19 pandemic has had, and any other outbreak of an infectious disease or other serious public health concern could have, a significant negative impact on economic and market conditions and could trigger a prolonged period of global economic slowdown. When the value of the Fund's investments goes down, your investment in the Fund decreases in value and you could lose money.
Mutual Fund Risk: Mutual funds are subject to investment advisory fees and other expenses, which will be indirectly paid by the Fund. Mutual funds are subject to specific risks, depending on the nature of the mutual fund's strategy.
Portfolio Turnover Risk: Active and frequent trading may lead to the realization and distribution to shareholders of higher short-term capital gains, which would increase their tax liability. Frequent trading also increases transaction costs, which could detract from the Fund’s performance.
Real Estate Industry Risk: The Fund's portfolio will be significantly impacted by the performance of the real estate market generally, and the Fund may be exposed to greater risk and experience higher volatility than would a more economically diversified portfolio. Property values may fall due to increasing vacancies or declining rents resulting from economic, legal, cultural, or technological developments. Real estate company prices also may drop because of the failure of borrowers to pay their loans and poor management, and residential developers, in particular, could be negatively impacted by falling home prices, slower mortgage origination, and rising construction costs. Real estate loans are subject to prepayment risk because the debtor may pay its obligation early, reducing the amount of interest payments.

Mezzanine Loan Risk: The terms of mezzanine loans may restrict transfer of the interests securing such loans, including an involuntary transfer upon foreclosure, or may require the consent of the senior lender or other members or partners of or equity holders in the related real estate company, or may otherwise prohibit a change of control of the related real estate company. These and other limitations on realization on the collateral securing a mezzanine loan or the practical limitations on the availability and effectiveness of such a remedy may affect the likelihood of repayment in the event of a default.

REIT Risk: Real estate values rise and fall in response to a variety of factors, including local, regional and national economic conditions, interest rates and tax considerations. An individual REIT's performance depends on the types and locations of the rental properties it owns and on how well it manages those properties.

Royalty Trust Risk: Royalty trusts are subject to cash-flow fluctuations and revenue decreases due to a sustained decline in demand for crude oil, natural gas and refined petroleum products, risks related to economic conditions, higher taxes or other regulatory actions that increase costs
37



for royalty trusts. Also, royalty trusts do not guarantee minimum distributions or even return of capital.

Small and Medium Capitalization Stock Risk: The value of small or medium capitalization company common stocks may be subject to more abrupt or erratic market movements than those of larger, more established companies or the market averages in general.

Written Call Option Risk: Selling covered call options will limit the Fund's gain, if any, on its underlying securities. The Fund continues to bear the risk of a decline in the value of its underlying stocks. Option premiums are treated as short-term capital gains and when distributed to shareholders, are usually taxable as ordinary income, which may have a higher tax rate than long-term capital gains for shareholders holding Fund shares in a taxable account. Call options involve risks different from, or possibly greater than, the risks associated with investing directly in securities and other traditional investments. These risks include risk of mispricing or improper valuation and the risk that changes in the value of the call option may not correlate perfectly with the underlying asset, rate or index. Derivative prices are highly volatile and may fluctuate substantially during a short period of time. Such prices are influenced by numerous factors that affect the markets, including, but not limited to, changing supply and demand relationships; government programs and policies; national and international political and economic events, changes in interest rates, inflation and deflation and changes in supply and demand relationships.

Who Should Invest in the Fund?

The Adviser believes the Fund is appropriate for investors seeking current income and capital appreciation.

Performance:

The following bar chart and table provide some indication of the risks of investing in the Fund by showing changes in the performance of the Fund’s Class I shares from year to year and by showing how the one-year, five-year and since inception average annual total returns for the Fund’s Class I shares compare with that of a broad-based securities index and a secondary index. The returns in the bar chart and best/worst quarter are for Class I shares which do not have sales charges. The performance of Class A and Class C Shares would be lower due to differing expense structures and sales charges. The returns in the table reflect the maximum applicable sales load of 5.75% on Class A shares, and the maximum deferred sales load of 1.00% on Class C shares for the one-year period. The Fund’s past performance, before and after taxes, is not necessarily an indication of how the Fund will perform in the future and does not guarantee future results. Net asset value (“NAV”) per share information and updated performance information is available on the Fund’s website at www.LoCorrFunds.com.

38



Calendar Year Total Return

LoCorr Spectrum Income Fund – Class I
20453
Highest Quarterly Return:
Q4 2020 21.56%
Lowest Quarterly Return:
Q1 2020 -35.56%
Average Annual Total Return as of December 31, 2022

1 Year
5 Years
Since Inception
(12/31/2013)(1)
 Class I Shares
   Return Before Taxes
-10.99% 2.87% 1.32%
   Return After Taxes on Distributions
-11.69% 1.84% 0.07%
   Return After Taxes on Distributions and Sale of Fund Shares
-6.18% 1.96% 0.58%
Class A Shares
     Return Before Taxes
-16.46% 1.39% 0.39%
Class C Shares
     Return Before Taxes
-12.66% 1.86% 0.30%
Bloomberg Barclays U.S. Aggregate Bond Index (reflects no deduction for fees, expenses or taxes)
-13.01% 0.02% 1.40%
Morningstar Allocation – 86% + Equity
(reflects no deduction for fees, expenses or taxes)
-19.02% 4.11% 5.76%

(1) The Fund's inception date is December 31, 2013, the date to which performance is measured. The Fund commenced operations on January 1, 2014.

After-tax returns are calculated using the historical highest individual federal marginal income tax rates and does not reflect the impact of state and local taxes. Actual after-tax returns depend on the individual investor’s situation and may differ from those shown. Furthermore, the after-tax returns shown are not relevant to investors who hold their shares through tax-deferred arrangements such as 401(k) plans or Individual Retirement Accounts (“IRAs”). After-tax returns are shown for Class I shares only and will vary for Class A and Class C shares. The Fund’s return after taxes on distributions and sale of Fund shares is greater than its return after taxes on distributions because it includes a tax benefit resulting from the capital losses that would have been incurred, and could be utilized against other capital gains an investor may have.

39



Adviser: LoCorr Fund Management, LLC
Portfolio Managers: Jon C. Essen, Chief Financial Officer of the Adviser, has served the Fund as a portfolio manager since it commenced operations in 2014; Sean Katof, Chief Investment Officer of the Adviser, has served the Fund as a portfolio manager since 2016.

Sub-Adviser: Bramshill Investments, LLC
Portfolio Managers: Steven C. Carhart, Co-Portfolio Manager, Bramshill Investments, LLC, has served the Fund as a portfolio manager since it commenced operations in 2014. Art DeGaetano, Co-Portfolio Manager, Bramshill Investments, LLC, has served the Fund as a portfolio manager since 2016. Justin Byrnes, Co-Portfolio Manager, Bramshill Investments, LLC, has served the Fund as a portfolio manager since 2023.

Purchase and Sale of Fund Shares: You may purchase and redeem shares of the Fund on any day that the New York Stock Exchange is open for trading by written request, telephone, wire transfer, website, or through your broker. You may also exchange shares of your Fund for shares of another Fund in the LoCorr Investment Trust. Redemptions will be paid by ACH, check or wire transfer. The minimum initial investment amount for Class A and Class C shares is $2,500. The minimum initial investment in Class I shares is $100,000. The minimum subsequent investment amount for all classes is $500. The Fund or its Adviser may waive any investment minimum.

Tax Information: Dividends and capital gain distributions you receive from the Fund, whether you reinvest your distributions in additional Fund shares or receive them in cash, are taxable to you at either ordinary income or capital gains tax rates unless you are investing through a tax-deferred plan such as an IRA or 401(k) plan.

Payments to Broker-Dealers and Other Financial Intermediaries: If you purchase the Fund through a broker-dealer or other financial intermediary (such as a bank), the Fund and its related companies may pay the intermediary for the sale of Fund shares and related services. These payments may create a conflict of interest by influencing the broker-dealer or other intermediary and your salesperson to recommend the Fund over another investment. Ask your salesperson or visit your financial intermediary's website for more information.
40



ADDITIONAL INFORMATION ABOUT PRINCIPAL INVESTMENT OBJECTIVES, STRATEGIES AND RELATED RISKS

Investment Objectives:

LoCorr Macro Strategies Fund
(“Macro Strategies Fund”)
The Fund's primary investment objective is capital appreciation in rising and falling equity markets with managing volatility as a secondary objective.

LoCorr Long/Short Commodities Strategy Fund (“Commodities Fund”)
The Fund's primary investment objective is capital appreciation in rising and falling commodities markets with managing volatility as a secondary objective.

LoCorr Market Trend Fund
("Market Trend Fund")
The Fund's primary investment objective is capital appreciation in rising and falling equity markets with managing volatility as a secondary objective.

LoCorr Dynamic Opportunity Fund
(“Dynamic Opportunity Fund")
The Fund's primary investment objective is long-term capital appreciation with reduced volatility compared to traditional broad-based equity market indices as a secondary objective.

LoCorr Spectrum Income Fund
(“Spectrum Income Fund”)

The Fund's primary investment objective is current income with capital appreciation as a secondary objective.


Each Fund’s investment objective, may be changed without shareholder approval by the Funds’ Board of Trustees (the “Board of Trustees” or the “Board”) upon 60 days’ written notice to shareholders.

Principal Investment Strategies:

Macro Strategies Fund

The Macro Strategies Fund seeks to achieve its investment objectives by allocating assets using two principal strategies:

Managed Futures
Fixed Income

The Managed Futures strategy is designed to produce capital appreciation by capturing returns related to the commodity markets. The Managed Futures strategy directly invests primarily in (i) futures, (ii) forwards, (iii) options, (iv) spot contracts, and (v) swaps, each of which may be tied to currencies, interest rates, stock market indices, energy resources, metals, or agricultural products.

The Fund may also invest in exchange-traded Bitcoin Futures. Bitcoin is a digital asset, also as known as a cryptocurrency, that can be transferred on a peer-to-peer basis. Unlike traditional currencies, bitcoin is decentralized, meaning that the supply of bitcoin is not determined by a central government, but rather by software protocols that limit both the total amount of bitcoin that will be produced and the rate at which such bitcoin are released into the Bitcoin network. The Bitcoin network is a decentralized record of bitcoin transactions that is kept in multiple locations and updated by multiple contributors to the network. In addition, the official ledger or record of who owns what bitcoin is not maintained by any central entity, but rather, is maintained by multiple different independent computers and entities simultaneously. Ownership and transaction records for bitcoin are protected through public-key cryptography on a “blockchain.”
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Public-key cryptography uses a pair of keys to encrypt and decrypt data — a public key and a private key. The public key can be disclosed to others so that anyone can send encrypted data to the holder, but that data can only be decrypted with the holder’s private key.

The transactions on the bitcoin blockchain are verified by “miners.” Bitcoin “miners” are people or companies who create new bitcoin by solving complex math problems that verify transactions in the currency. Miners support the Bitcoin network by adding new blocks of data on bitcoin transactions to the blockchain. To add bitcoin transactions to the blockchain, miners’ computers must solve complex equations generated by the blockchain system. Miners are rewarded with a certain amount of bitcoin algorithmically determined by the blockchain system for supporting the Bitcoin network. In addition to miners, the Bitcoin network is collectively maintained by developers (who propose improvements to the protocols) and users. Bitcoin and Bitcoin Futures are a relatively new asset class and are subject to unique and substantial risks, including the risk that the value of the Fund’s investments could decline rapidly, including to zero. Bitcoin and Bitcoin Futures have historically been more volatile than traditional asset classes.

The Fund will only invest in cash-settled Bitcoin Futures. “Cash-settled” means that when the relevant futures contract expires, if the value of the underlying asset exceeds the futures contract price, the seller pays to the purchaser cash in the amount of that excess, and if the futures contract price exceeds the value of the underlying asset, the purchaser pays to the seller cash in the amount of that excess. In a cash-settled futures contract on bitcoin, the amount of cash to be paid is equal to the difference between the value of the bitcoin underlying the futures contract at the close of the last trading day of the contract and the futures contract price specified in the agreement. Currently, the only such contracts are traded on, or subject to the rules of, the CME, a commodity exchange registered with the CFTC. The value of Bitcoin Futures is determined by reference to the CME CF Bitcoin Reference Rate, which provides an indication of the price of bitcoin across certain cash bitcoin exchanges.

The Fund's investments in derivative instruments may be used as substitutes for securities, interest rates, currencies and commodities and for hedging. To the extent the Fund uses swaps or structured notes under the Managed Futures strategy, the investments will generally have payments linked to commodity or financial derivatives that are designed to produce returns similar to those of the Underlying Funds and their respective sub-strategies. The Fund does not invest more than 25% of its assets in contracts with any one counterparty. Sub-strategies may include investment styles that rely upon buy and sell signals generated from technical analysis systems such as trend-pattern recognition, as well as from fundamental economic analysis and relative value comparisons. Investments made according to the Fund’s strategy will be made without restriction as to the country.

The Macro Strategies Fund will execute a portion of its Managed Futures strategy by directly investing in the Fund or by investing up to 25% of its total assets (measured at the time of purchase) in the Subsidiary. The Fund or the Subsidiary will invest the majority of its assets in futures contracts, forward contracts and other investments (short to medium term investment grade securities) intended to serve as margin or collateral for such contracts. The Subsidiary is managed by the Adviser, which selects sub-advisers to assist in the Subsidiary’s management. The Subsidiary is subject to the same investment restrictions as the Fund, when viewed on a consolidated basis.

The Adviser anticipates that, based upon its analysis of long-term historical returns and volatility of various asset classes, the Fund will allocate approximately 25% of its assets to its Managed Futures strategy, as applicable, and approximately 75% of its assets to the Fixed Income strategy. However, as market conditions change, the portion allocated to each strategy may change.

The Fixed Income strategy is designed to generate interest income and preserve principal by investing primarily in investment grade securities including: (1) obligations issued or guaranteed by the United States Government, its agencies or instrumentalities, (2) securities issued or guaranteed by foreign governments, their political subdivisions or agencies or instrumentalities, (3) bonds, notes, or similar debt obligations issued by U.S. or foreign corporations or special-purpose entities backed by corporate debt obligations, (4) ABS, (5) MBS, (6) CMBS, (7) interest rate-related futures contracts, (8) interest rate-related or credit default-related swap contracts and (9) money market funds. Each Fund defines investment grade fixed income securities as those that are rated, at the time purchased, in the top four
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categories by a rating agency, such as Moody’s or S&P, or, if unrated, determined to be of comparable quality. However, the fixed income portion of each Fund’s portfolio will be invested without restriction as to individual issuer country, type of entity, or capitalization. Futures and swap contracts are used for hedging purposes and as substitutes for fixed income securities. The Adviser delegates management of the Fund’s Fixed Income strategy portfolio to a sub-adviser.

The Fund seeks to achieve its secondary investment objective primarily by (1) diversifying the Managed Futures strategy investments, as applicable, among asset classes and sub-strategies that are not expected to have returns that are highly correlated to each other or the equity or commodities markets, as applicable, and (2) by selecting Fixed Income strategy investments that are short-term to medium-term interest income-generating securities (those with maturities or average lives of less than 10 years) that are expected to be less volatile than and not highly correlated to the equity or commodities markets or the Managed Futures strategy, as applicable.

Commodities Fund

The Commodities Fund seeks to achieve its investment objective by allocating assets using two principal strategies:

Commodities
Fixed Income

The Commodities strategy is designed to produce capital appreciation by capturing returns related to the commodity markets. The Commodities strategy invests primarily in securities of one or more (1) limited partnerships, (2) corporations, (3) limited liability companies and (4) other types of pooled investment vehicles, including commodity pools (collectively, “Underlying Funds”) and derivative instruments, such as swap contracts, structured notes or other securities or derivatives, that provide exposure to the managers of Underlying Funds. Each Underlying Fund invests according to its manager’s sub-strategy, long or short in one or a combination of: (i) futures, (ii) forwards, (iii) options, (iv) spot contracts, or (v) swaps, each of which may be tied to energy resources, metals, and agricultural products. To the extent the Fund uses swaps or structured notes under the Commodities strategy, the investments will generally have payments linked to commodity or financial derivatives that are designed to produce returns similar to those of the Underlying Funds and their respective sub-strategies. The Fund does not invest more than 25% of its assets in contracts with any one counterparty. Sub-strategies may include investment styles that rely upon buy and sell signals generated from technical analysis systems such as trend-pattern recognition, as well as from fundamental economic analysis and relative value comparisons. Investments made according to the Fund’s strategy will be made without restriction as to the country.

The Commodities Fund will execute its Commodities strategy primarily by investing up to 25% of the Fund’s total assets (measured at the time of purchase) in the Subsidiary. The Subsidiary will invest the majority of its assets in one or more Underlying Funds, swap contracts, structured notes and other investments intended to serve as margin or collateral for derivative positions. The Subsidiary is subject to the same investment restrictions as the Fund.

To the extent that the Adviser is utilizing derivatives to gain exposure to managers, it is anticipated that the Commodities Fund will use a swap designed to replicate the aggregate returns of the managers selected by the Adviser. The swap is based on a notional amount agreed upon by the Adviser and the counterparty. The Adviser may add or remove managers from the swap or adjust the notional exposure between the managers within the swap. Generally, the fees and expenses of the swap are based on the notional value. The Index is calculated by the counterparty to the Swap and includes a deduction for fees of the counterparty as well as management and performance fees of the managers. Because the Index is designed to replicate the returns of managers selected by the Adviser, the performance of the Fund will depend on the ability of the managers to generate returns in excess of the costs of the Index.

The Adviser anticipates that, based upon its analysis of long-term historical returns and volatility of various asset classes, the Fund will allocate approximately 25% of its assets to its Commodities strategy and approximately 75% of its assets to the Fixed Income strategy. However, as market conditions change, the portion allocated to each strategy may change.
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The Fixed Income strategy is designed to generate interest income and preserve principal by investing primarily in investment grade securities including: (1) obligations issued or guaranteed by the United States Government, its agencies or instrumentalities, (2) securities issued or guaranteed by foreign governments, their political subdivisions or agencies or instrumentalities, (3) bonds, notes, or similar debt obligations issued by U.S. or foreign corporations or special-purpose entities backed by corporate debt obligations, (4) ABS, (5) MBS, (6) CMBS, (7) interest rate-related futures contracts, (8) interest rate-related or credit default-related swap contracts and (9) money market funds. Each Fund defines investment grade fixed income securities as those that are rated, at the time purchased, in the top four categories by a rating agency, such as Moody’s or S&P, or, if unrated, determined to be of comparable quality. However, the fixed income portion of each Fund’s portfolio will be invested without restriction as to individual issuer country, type of entity, or capitalization. Futures and swap contracts are used for hedging purposes and as substitutes for fixed income securities. The Adviser delegates management of the Fund’s Fixed Income strategy portfolio to a sub-adviser.

The Fund seeks to achieve its secondary investment objective primarily by (1) diversifying the Commodities strategy investments among asset classes and sub-strategies that are not expected to have returns that are highly correlated to each other or the equity or commodities markets, as applicable, and (2) by selecting Fixed Income strategy investments that are short-term to medium-term interest income-generating securities (those with maturities or average lives of less than 10 years) that are expected to be less volatile than and not highly correlated to the equity or commodities markets or the Commodities strategy.

Market Trend Fund

The Market Trend Fund seeks to achieve its investment objectives by allocating its assets using two principal strategies:

"Market Trend" Strategy
"Fixed Income" Strategy

The Market Trend strategy is a macro-oriented quantitative strategy that employs various investment techniques to select long and short positions in the global futures and foreign exchange markets. These techniques are designed to produce attractive absolute and risk-adjusted returns while maintaining low correlation to traditional asset classes. The Market Trend strategy is a quantitative trading system driven by trend-following models. The program signals buy and sell orders based on a number of factors, including price, volatility, and length of time a position has been held in the portfolio, and employs sophisticated techniques to gradually enter and exit positions over the course of a trend in order to maximize profit opportunities. It is expected that the average holding period of instruments traded pursuant to the Market Trend strategy will be approximately 50 days; however, that average may differ depending on various factors and the program will make daily adjustments to positions based on both price activity and market volatility. The Fund's Adviser delegates management of the Fund's Market Trend strategy portfolio to a sub-adviser, GCM.

The program trades in a broad range of markets, including global interest rates, foreign exchange, global stock indices and commodities. When trading derivative instruments, such as futures or forward contracts, the Fund is only required to post initial or variation margin with the exchange or clearing broker. The use of margin in trading these instruments has the effect of creating leverage, which can expose the Fund to substantial gains or losses occurring from relatively small price changes in the value of the underlying instrument and can increase the volatility of the Fund’s returns. Volatility is a statistical measure of the dispersion of returns of an investment, where higher volatility generally indicates greater risk. GCM employs macro-oriented quantitative investment techniques to select long and short positions in the global futures and foreign exchange markets. These techniques are designed to produce attractive absolute and risk-adjusted returns while maintaining low correlation to traditional asset classes. GCM expects the average holding period of instruments traded pursuant to the Market Trend strategy, will be approximately 50 days, although the daily adjustments will be made to positions based on both price activity and market volatility.

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The Fund will execute a portion of its Market Trend strategy by directly investing in the Fund or by investing up to 25% of its total assets (measured at the time of purchase) in the Subsidiary. The Fund or the Subsidiary will invest the majority of its assets in futures contracts and forward contracts and other investments (short to medium term investment grade securities) intended to serve as margin or collateral for such contracts. The Subsidiary is managed by the Adviser and sub-advised by GCM and is subject to the same investment restrictions as the Fund, when viewed on a consolidated basis.

The Fixed Income strategy is designed to generate interest income and preserve principal by investing primarily in investment grade securities including: (1) obligations issued or guaranteed by the United States Government, its agencies or instrumentalities, (2) securities issued or guaranteed by foreign governments, their political subdivisions or agencies or instrumentalities, (3) bonds, notes, or similar debt obligations issued by U.S. or foreign corporations or special-purpose entities backed by corporate debt obligations, (4) U.S. ABS, (5) U.S. residential MBS, (6) U.S. CMBS, (7) interest rate-related futures contracts, (8) interest rate-related or credit default swap contracts and (9) money market funds. The Fund defines investment grade fixed income securities as those that are rated, at the time purchased, in the top four categories by a rating agency such as Moody's or S&P, or, if unrated, determined to be of comparable quality. However, the fixed income portion of the Fund's portfolio will be invested without restriction as to individual issuer country, type of entity, or capitalization. Futures and swap contracts are used for hedging purposes and as substitutes for fixed income securities. The Fund's Adviser delegates management of the Fund's Fixed Income strategy portfolio to a sub-adviser, Nuveen.

The Fund seeks to achieve its secondary investment objective primarily by (1) diversifying the Market Trend strategy investments, as applicable, among asset classes and sub-strategies that are not expected to have returns that are highly correlated to each other or the equity or commodities markets, as applicable, and (2) by selecting Fixed Income strategy investments that are short-term to medium-term interest income-generating securities (those with maturities or average lives of less than 10 years) that are expected to be less volatile than and not highly correlated to the equity or commodities markets or the Market Trend strategy, as applicable.

The Adviser anticipates that, based upon its analysis of long-term historical returns and volatility of various asset classes, the Fund will allocate approximately 25% of its assets to its Market Trend strategy, as applicable, and approximately 75% of its assets to the Fixed Income strategy. However, as market conditions change the portion allocated to each strategy may change. Notwithstanding such allocation of assets, Fund returns are expected to primarily reflect the returns of the Market Trend strategy given its higher expected volatility.

The Fund may invest in short-term investment grade fixed income securities and money market funds for cash management purposes. The Fund defines investment grade fixed income securities as those that are rated, at the time purchased, in the top four categories by a rating agency such as Moody’s or S&P, or, if unrated, determined to be of comparable quality.

The Adviser and the LoCorr Funds were granted an exemptive order from the SEC that permits the Adviser, with the Board of Trustees approval, to enter into or amend sub-advisory agreements without obtaining shareholder approval. The order eliminates the need for a shareholder meeting to approve sub-advisors. Shareholders will be notified if a new sub-adviser is employed by the Adviser.

It is the responsibility of the sub-advisers, under the direction of the Adviser, to make day-to-day investment decisions for the Fund. The sub-advisers also place purchase and sell orders for portfolio transactions of the Fund in accordance with the Fund's investment objective and policies.

Dynamic Opportunity Fund

Under normal market conditions, the Dynamic Opportunity Fund invests in long or short positions in equity securities of domestic and foreign companies. The Fund defines equity securities as (1) common stocks, (2) preferred stocks and (3) debt securities that are convertible into stock. The Fund invests in securities of issuers without restriction as to capitalization or country, including emerging markets. The Fund invests in convertible debt securities of any maturity or credit quality, including those known as "junk bonds." Junk
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bonds are rated below Baa3 by Moody's or equivalently by another NRSRO. The Fund may invest a portion of its assets in private placement offerings which may be illiquid.

The Adviser seeks to achieve the Fund's primary investment objective of long-term capital appreciation by using a "long/short equity" strategy that is executed by allocating assets to a sub-adviser that has a long/short equity investment strategy. The Adviser may also engage an additional sub-adviser or sub-advisers if it believes they will enhance the Fund’s performance or reduce volatility. The Adviser will also use one or more ETFs to execute a portion of the long/short equity strategy rather than allocate assets to a sub-adviser, when it believes that doing so will help the Fund achieve its investment objective. The Fund anticipates reduced return volatility when compared to traditional broad-based equity market indices because the short element of its strategies is expected to produce a hedging effect.

Spectrum Income Fund

The Fund seeks to achieve its investment objectives by allocating assets primarily among income-producing securities using an "income" strategy.

The Income strategy employed by the Fund's sub-adviser attempts to produce current income and capital appreciation. The primary focus of this portfolio is exchange traded "pass-through" securities that distribute substantially all of their profits directly to their shareholders. The main categories of such securities include REITs, MLPs, CEFs, Royalty Trusts, and BDCs. In addition to such securities, the sub-adviser may include in the portfolio exchange traded common stocks and bonds, including those issued by foreign entities. These securities may be of any market capitalization or, in the case of bonds, any maturity or credit quality. These may include bonds of higher yield and higher risk, commonly called "junk bonds" that may be rated BB+ and below by S&P or similarly rated by another NRSRO.

To reduce overall portfolio market risk or security specific risk, the Adviser may employ hedging strategies. These strategies attempt to mitigate potential losses in value in certain Fund holdings. The Adviser attempts to hedge risks by investing long and/or short in exchange-traded futures, ETFs and exchange-traded and over-the-counter options, selling securities short and entering into swap contracts. The Adviser takes short positions in equity or interest rate futures contracts to protect against declines in the equity market and debt market, respectively. The Adviser may also invest in inverse ETFs (those that are designed to have price changes that move in the opposite direction of a market index) to protect against declines in the equity market and debt market. The Adviser may invest in protective put options that give the Fund the right to sell a security at a specific price regardless of the decline in the market price. The Adviser may also combine long and short (written) put and call options in "spread" transactions that are designed to protect the Fund over a range of price changes. Short selling is also used to hedge against overall market or sector price declines. Similarly, swaps contracts (agreements to exchange payments based on price changes in an index or specific security) are used to hedge against overall market, sector or security-specific price declines.

The composition of the portfolio will vary over time according to the sub-adviser’s evaluation of economic and market conditions, including prospects for growth and inflation, as they affect the potential returns from different classes of securities. This strategic evaluation is combined with fundamental research on the individual securities considered for inclusion in the portfolio in order to determine the composition of the portfolio at any point in time. Depending on market conditions, the Fund’s assets may be solely allocated to its Income Strategy for significant periods of time.

Non-Principal Investment Strategy. As a non-principal investment strategy, the Adviser may employ a loan investment strategy (the “Loan Investment Strategy”). The Loan Investment Strategy is designed to produce current income and capital appreciation through investment in Underlying Funds including (1) limited partnersh