ck0001742912-20210228


SFY SoFi Select 500 ETF
SFYX SoFi Next 500 ETF
SFYF SoFi Social 50 ETF
TGIF SoFi Weekly Income ETF
each listed on NYSE Arca, Inc.
GIGE SoFi Gig Economy ETF
listed on The Nasdaq Stock Market, LLC
PROSPECTUS
June 28, 2021





The SEC has not approved or disapproved of these securities or passed upon the accuracy or adequacy of this Prospectus. Any representation to the contrary is a criminal offense.



TABLE OF CONTENTS



SoFi Select 500 ETF – FUND SUMMARY
Investment Objective
The SoFi Select 500 ETF (the “Fund”) seeks to track the performance, before fees and expenses, of the Solactive SoFi US 500 Growth Index (the “Index”).
Fees and Expenses of the Fund
This table describes the fees and expenses that you may pay if you buy, hold, and sell shares of the Fund (“Shares”). You may pay other fees, such as brokerage commissions and other fees to financial intermediaries, which are not reflected in the table and Example below.
Annual Fund Operating Expenses (expenses that you pay each year as a percentage of the value of your investment)
Management Fees
0.19%
Distribution and/or Service (12b-1) Fees
0.00%
Other Expenses
0.00%
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses 0.19%
Less Fee Waiver (0.19)%
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses After Fee Waiver1
0.00%
1The Fund’s investment adviser has agreed to waive its Management Fees for the Fund until at least June 30, 2022. This agreement may be terminated only by, or with the consent of, the Fund’s Board of Trustees, on behalf of the Fund, upon sixty (60) days’ written notice to the Adviser. This Agreement may not be terminated by the Adviser without the consent of the Board of Trustees.
Expense Example
This Example is intended to help you compare the cost of investing in the Fund with the cost of investing in other funds. The Example assumes that you invest $10,000 in the Fund for the time periods indicated and then redeem all of your Shares at the end of those periods. The Example also assumes that your investment has a 5% return each year and that the Fund’s operating expenses remain the same. The Example does not take into account brokerage commissions that you may pay on your purchases and sales of Shares. The management fee waiver discussed above is reflected only through June 30, 2022. Although your actual costs may be higher or lower, based on these assumptions your costs would be:
1 Year 3 Years 5 Years 10 Years
$0 $42 $88 $224
Portfolio Turnover
The Fund pays transaction costs, such as commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or “turns over” its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover rate may indicate higher transaction costs and may result in higher taxes when Shares are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are not reflected in total annual fund operating expenses or in the expense example above, affect the Fund’s performance. For the fiscal year ended February 28, 2021, the Fund’s portfolio turnover rate was 26% of the average value of its portfolio.
Principal Investment Strategies
The Fund uses a “passive management” (or indexing) approach to track the performance, before fees and expenses, of the Index. The Index follows a rules-based methodology (described generally below) that tracks the performance of 500 of the largest U.S.-listed companies weighted based on a proprietary mix of their market capitalization and fundamental factors. The Index is owned and administered by Solactive AG (the “Index Provider”), and the Index Provider partnered with Social Finance, Inc. (“SoFi”) to co-develop the methodology used by the Index to determine the securities included in the Index. SoFi is not involved in the ongoing maintenance of the Index or any discretionary decisions relating to its application, and does not act in the capacity of an index provider. SoFi has licensed certain of its trademarks to the Index Provider for use in connection with the Index.
Solactive SoFi US 500 Growth Index
Construction of the Index begins with the selection of the 500 largest constituents by market capitalization of the Solactive US Broad Market Index, a market capitalization-weighted index that includes equity securities of approximately 3,000 of the largest U.S. companies. This selection is subject to a 20% buffer rule to limit index turnover. The Index may include common stocks and equity interests in real estate investment trusts (“REITs”).
1


The weight of each Index constituent is initially based on each constituent’s free-float market capitalization and then adjusted upward or downward based on a proprietary composite score calculated based on three growth-oriented fundamental factors of each company: trailing 12-month sales growth, trailing 12-month earnings per share (“EPS”) growth, and 12-month forward-looking EPS growth consensus estimates. For each factor, the scores for all Index constituents are adjusted to account for outliers, and each company’s score is calculated relative to the average score for that factor. The composite score for a company reflects an average of that company’s score for each factor.
The Index is rebalanced and reconstituted annually, effective on the first Wednesday of each May based on data as of the tenth business day prior to the reconstitution date. As of May 28, 2021, the three largest Index constituents and the weights were as follows: Amazon.com Inc. 5.86%; Apple Inc. 5.14%; and Microsoft Corp. 4.98%.
The Fund’s Investment Strategy
The Fund attempts to invest all, or substantially all, of its assets in the component securities that make up the Index. Under normal circumstances, at least 80% of the Fund’s total assets (exclusive of any collateral held from securities lending) will be invested in the component securities of the Index. The Fund’s investment adviser expects that, over time, the correlation between the Fund’s performance and that of the Index, before fees and expenses, will be 95% or better.
The Fund will generally use a “replication” strategy to achieve its investment objective, meaning it generally will invest in all of the component securities of the Index. However, the Fund may use a “representative sampling” strategy, meaning it may invest in a sample of the securities in the Index whose risk, return and other characteristics closely resemble the risk, return and other characteristics of the Index as a whole, when the Fund’s investment adviser believes it is in the best interests of the Fund (e.g., when replicating the Index involves practical difficulties or substantial costs, an Index constituent becomes temporarily illiquid, unavailable, or less liquid, or as a result of legal restrictions or limitations that apply to the Fund but not to the Index).
The Fund generally may invest up to 20% of its total assets (exclusive of any collateral held from securities lending) in securities or other investments not included in the Index, but which the Fund’s investment adviser believes will help the Fund track the Index. For example, the Fund may invest in securities that are not components of the Index to reflect various corporate actions and other changes to the Index (such as reconstitutions, additions, and deletions).
To the extent the Index concentrates (i.e., holds more than 25% of its total assets in the securities of a particular industry or group of related industries), the Fund will concentrate its investments to approximately the same extent as the Index.
The Fund may actively and frequently trade all or a significant portion of the securities in its portfolio.
Principal Investment Risks
The principal risks of investing in the Fund are summarized below. As with any investment, there is a risk that you could lose all or a portion of your investment in the Fund. Some or all of these risks may adversely affect the Fund’s net asset value per share (“NAV”), trading price, yield, total return, and/or ability to meet its objective. For more information about the risks of investing in the Fund, see the section in the Fund’s Prospectus titled “Additional Information About the Funds—Principal Risks of Investing in Each Fund.”
The principal risks are presented in alphabetical order to facilitate finding particular risks and comparing them with those of other funds. Each risk summarized below is considered a “principal risk” of investing in the Fund, regardless of the order in which it appears.
Cybersecurity Risk. With the increased use of technologies such as the Internet to conduct business, the Fund is susceptible to operational, information security, and related risks. Cyber incidents affecting the Fund or its service providers may cause disruptions and impact business operations, potentially resulting in financial losses, interference with the Fund’s ability to calculate its NAV, impediments to trading, the inability of shareholders to transact business, violations of applicable privacy and other laws, regulatory fines, penalties, reputational damage, reimbursement or other compensation costs, or additional compliance costs.
Equity Market Risk. The equity securities held in the Fund’s portfolio may experience sudden, unpredictable drops in value or long periods of decline in value. This may occur because of factors that affect securities markets generally or factors affecting specific issuers, industries, or sectors in which the Fund invests. Common stocks, such as those held by the Fund, are generally exposed to greater risk than other types of securities, such as preferred stock and debt obligations, because common stockholders generally have inferior rights to receive payment from issuers.
ETF Risk.
Authorized Participants, Market Makers, and Liquidity Providers Concentration Risk. The Fund has a limited number of financial institutions that are authorized to purchase and redeem Shares directly from the Fund (known as “Authorized Participants” or “APs”). In addition, there may be a limited number of market makers and/or liquidity providers in the marketplace. To the extent either of the following events occur, Shares may trade at a material discount to NAV and possibly face delisting: (i) APs exit the business or otherwise become unable to process creation and/or redemption
2


orders and no other APs step forward to perform these services; or (ii) market makers and/or liquidity providers exit the business or significantly reduce their business activities and no other entities step forward to perform their functions.
Costs of Buying or Selling Shares. Due to the costs of buying or selling Shares, including brokerage commissions imposed by brokers and bid-ask spreads, frequent trading of Shares may significantly reduce investment results and an investment in Shares may not be advisable for investors who anticipate regularly making small investments.
Shares May Trade at Prices Other Than NAV. As with all ETFs, Shares may be bought and sold in the secondary market at market prices. Although it is expected that the market price of Shares will approximate the Fund’s NAV, there may be times when the market price of Shares is more than the NAV intra-day (premium) or less than the NAV intra-day (discount) due to supply and demand of Shares or during periods of market volatility. This risk is heightened in times of market volatility, periods of steep market declines, and periods when there is limited trading activity for Shares in the secondary market, in which case such premiums or discounts may be significant.
Trading. Although Shares are listed on a national securities exchange, such as NYSE Arca, Inc. (the “Exchange”), and may be traded on U.S. exchanges other than the Exchange, there can be no assurance that Shares will trade with any volume, or at all, on any stock exchange. In stressed market conditions, the liquidity of Shares may begin to mirror the liquidity of the Fund’s underlying portfolio holdings, which can be significantly less liquid than Shares.
General Market Risk. Economies and financial markets throughout the world are becoming increasingly interconnected, which increases the likelihood that events or conditions in one country or region will adversely impact markets or issuers in other countries or regions. Securities in the Fund’s portfolio may underperform in comparison to securities in the general financial markets, a particular financial market, or other asset classes, due to a number of factors, including inflation (or expectations for inflation), interest rates, global demand for particular products or resources, natural disasters or events, pandemic diseases, terrorism, regulatory events, and government controls.
High Portfolio Turnover Risk. A high portfolio turnover rate increases transaction costs, which may increase the Fund’s expenses. Frequent trading may also cause adverse tax consequences for investors in the Fund due to an increase in short-term capital gains.
Limited Operating History Risk. The Fund has a limited operating history. As a result, prospective investors have a limited track record or history on which to base their investment decision.
Market Capitalization Risk.
Large-Capitalization Investing. The securities of large-capitalization companies may be relatively mature compared to smaller companies and therefore subject to slower growth during times of economic expansion. Large-capitalization companies may also be unable to respond quickly to new competitive challenges, such as changes in technology and consumer tastes.
Mid-Capitalization Investing. The securities of mid-capitalization companies may be more vulnerable to adverse issuer, market, political, or economic developments than securities of large-capitalization companies. The securities of mid-capitalization companies generally trade in lower volumes and are subject to greater and more unpredictable price changes than large-capitalization stocks or the stock market as a whole.
Models and Data Risk. The composition of the Index is heavily dependent on proprietary quantitative models as well as information and data supplied by third parties (“Models and Data”). When Models and Data prove to be incorrect or incomplete, any decisions made in reliance thereon may lead to the inclusion or exclusion of securities from the Index universe that would have been excluded or included had the Models and Data been correct and complete. If the composition of the Index reflects such errors, the Fund’s portfolio can be expected to also reflect the errors.
Passive Investment Risk. The Fund invests in the securities included in, or representative of, its Index regardless of their investment merit. The Fund does not attempt to outperform its Index or take defensive positions in declining markets. As a result, the Fund’s performance may be adversely affected by a general decline in the market segments relating to its Index.
Recent Market Events Risk. U.S. and international markets have experienced significant periods of volatility in recent years and months due to a number of economic, political and global macro factors including the impact of the novel coronavirus (COVID-19) as a global pandemic, which has resulted in public health issues, growth concerns in the U.S. and overseas, layoffs, rising unemployment claims, changed travel and social behaviors, and reduced consumer spending. The effects of COVID-19 may lead to a substantial economic downturn or recession in the U.S. and global economies, the recovery from which is uncertain and may last for an extended period of time. These developments as well as other events could result in further market volatility and negatively affect financial asset prices, the liquidity of certain securities and the normal operations of securities exchanges and other markets.
3


REIT Risk. Through its investments in REITs, the Fund is subject to the risks of investing in the real estate market, including decreases in property revenues, increases in interest rates, increases in property taxes and operating expenses, legal and regulatory changes, a lack of credit or capital, defaults by borrowers or tenants, environmental problems and natural disasters.
REITs are subject to additional risks, including those related to adverse governmental actions; declines in property value and the real estate market; the potential failure to qualify for tax-free pass through of income; and exemption from registration as an investment company. REITs are dependent upon specialized management skills and may invest in relatively few properties, a small geographic area, or a small number of property types. As a result, investments in REITs may be volatile. To the extent the Fund invests in REITs concentrated in specific geographic areas or property types, the Fund may be subject to a greater loss as a result of adverse developments affecting such area or property types. REITs are pooled investment vehicles with their own fees and expenses and the Fund will indirectly bear a proportionate share of those fees and expenses.
Sector Risk. At times the Fund may increase the relative emphasis of its investments in a particular sector or group of industries. The prices of securities of issuers in a particular sector may be more susceptible to fluctuations due to changes in economic or business conditions, government regulations, availability of basic resources or supplies, or other events that affect that industry or sector more than securities of issuers in other industries and sectors. To the extent that the Fund increases the relative emphasis of its investments in a particular industry or sector, the value of Shares may fluctuate in response to events affecting that industry or sector.
Tracking Error Risk. As with all index funds, the performance of the Fund and its Index may differ from each other for a variety of reasons. For example, the Fund incurs operating expenses and portfolio transaction costs not incurred by the Index. In addition, the Fund may not be fully invested in the securities of the Index at all times or may hold securities not included in the Index.
Performance
The following performance information provides some indication of the risks of investing in the Fund by showing changes in the Fund’s performance. The bar chart shows the Fund’s performance for the calendar year ended December 30, 2020. The table illustrates how the Fund’s average annual returns for the 1-year and since inception periods compare with those of the Index and a broad measure of market performance. The Fund’s past performance, before and after taxes, does not necessarily indicate how it will perform in the future. Updated performance information is available on the Fund’s website at www.sofi.com/invest/etfs/.
Calendar Year Ended December 31,
ck0001742912-20210228_g1.jpg
The Fund’s calendar year-to-date return as of March 31, 2021 was 4.78%.
During the period of time shown in the bar chart, the Fund’s highest quarterly return was 22.90% for the quarter ended June 30, 2020 and the lowest quarterly return was -18.41% for the quarter ended March 31, 2020.

4


Average Annual Total Returns
For the Periods Ended December 31, 2020


1 Year
Since Inception
(April 10, 2019)
Return Before Taxes 25.07% 22.21%
Return After Taxes on Distributions 24.66% 21.80%
Return After Taxes on Distributions and Sale of Fund Shares 15.05% 17.13%
Solactive SoFi US 500 Growth Index
(reflects no deduction for fees, expenses, or taxes)
25.04% 22.20%
S&P 500 Total Return Index
(reflects no deduction for fees, expenses, or taxes)
18.40% 18.65%
After-tax returns are calculated using the historical highest individual federal marginal income tax rates during the period covered by the table above and do not reflect the impact of state and local taxes. Actual after-tax returns depend on an investor’s tax situation and may differ from those shown. After-tax returns shown are not relevant to investors who hold their Shares through tax-deferred arrangements such as an individual retirement account (“IRA”) or other tax-advantaged accounts.
Management
Investment Adviser: Toroso Investments, LLC (“Toroso” or the “Adviser”) serves as investment adviser to the Fund.
Portfolio Manager: Charles A. Ragauss, CFA, Portfolio Manager for the Adviser, is responsible for the day-to-day management of the Fund and has been the Fund’s portfolio manager since its inception in 2019.
Purchase and Sale of Shares
The Fund issues and redeems Shares at NAV only in large blocks known as “Creation Units,” which only APs (typically, broker-dealers) may purchase or redeem. The Fund generally issues and redeems Creation Units in exchange for a portfolio of securities (the “Deposit Securities”) and/or a designated amount of U.S. cash.
Shares are listed on a national securities exchange, such as the Exchange, and individual Shares may only be bought and sold in the secondary market through brokers at market prices, rather than NAV. Because Shares trade at market prices rather than NAV, Shares may trade at a price greater than NAV (premium) or less than NAV (discount).
An investor may incur costs attributable to the difference between the highest price a buyer is willing to pay to purchase Shares (the “bid” price) and the lowest price a seller is willing to accept for Shares (the “ask” price) when buying or selling Shares in the secondary market. This difference in bid and ask prices is often referred to as the “bid-ask spread.”
Recent information regarding the Fund’s NAV, market price, how often Shares traded on the Exchange at a premium or discount, and bid-ask spreads can be found on the Fund’s website at www.sofi.com/invest/etfs/.
Tax Information
Fund distributions are generally taxable as ordinary income, qualified dividend income, or capital gains (or a combination), unless an investment is in an IRA or other tax-advantaged account. Distributions on investments made through tax-deferred arrangements may be taxed later upon withdrawal of assets from those accounts.
Financial Intermediary Compensation
If you purchase Shares through a broker-dealer or other financial intermediary (such as a bank) (an “Intermediary”), the Adviser or its affiliates may pay Intermediaries for certain activities related to the Fund, including participation in activities that are designed to make Intermediaries more knowledgeable about exchange-traded products, including the Fund, or for other activities, such as marketing, educational training, or other initiatives related to the sale or promotion of Shares. These payments may create a conflict of interest by influencing the Intermediary and your salesperson to recommend the Fund over another investment. Any such arrangements do not result in increased Fund expenses. Ask your salesperson or visit the Intermediary’s website for more information.
5


SoFi Next 500 ETF – FUND SUMMARY
Investment Objective
The SoFi Next 500 ETF (the “Fund”) seeks to track the performance, before fees and expenses, of the Solactive SoFi US Next 500 Growth Index (the “Index”).
Fees and Expenses of the Fund
This table describes the fees and expenses that you may pay if you buy, hold, and sell shares of the Fund (“Shares”). You may pay other fees, such as brokerage commissions and other fees to financial intermediaries, which are not reflected in the table and Example below.
Annual Fund Operating Expenses (expenses that you pay each year as a percentage of the value of your investment)
Management Fees 0.19  %
Distribution and/or Service (12b-1) Fees 0.00  %
Other Expenses 0.00  %
Acquired Fund Fees and Expenses 0.02  %
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses 0.21  %
Less Fee Waiver (0.19) %
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses After Fee Waiver1
0.02  %
1The Fund’s investment adviser has agreed to waive its Management Fees for the Fund until at least June 30, 2022. This agreement may be terminated only by, or with the consent of, the Fund’s Board of Trustees, on behalf of the Fund, upon sixty (60) days’ written notice to the Adviser. This Agreement may not be terminated by the Adviser without the consent of the Board of Trustees.
Expense Example
This Example is intended to help you compare the cost of investing in the Fund with the cost of investing in other funds. The Example assumes that you invest $10,000 in the Fund for the time periods indicated and then redeem all of your Shares at the end of those periods. The Example also assumes that your investment has a 5% return each year and that the Fund’s operating expenses remain the same. The Example does not take into account brokerage commissions that you may pay on your purchases and sales of Shares. The management fee waiver discussed above is reflected only through June 30, 2022. Although your actual costs may be higher or lower, based on these assumptions your costs would be:
1 Year 3 Years 5 Years 10 Years
$0 $42 $88 $224
Portfolio Turnover
The Fund pays transaction costs, such as commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or “turns over” its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover rate may indicate higher transaction costs and may result in higher taxes when Shares are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are not reflected in total annual fund operating expenses or in the expense example above, affect the Fund’s performance. For the fiscal year ended February 28, 2021, the Fund’s portfolio turnover rate was 53% of the average value of its portfolio.
Principal Investment Strategies
The Fund uses a “passive management” (or indexing) approach to track the performance, before fees and expenses, of the Index. The Index follows a rules-based methodology (described generally below) that tracks the performance of the 500 smallest of the 1,000 largest U.S.-listed companies weighted based on a proprietary mix of their market capitalization and fundamental factors. The Index is owned and administered by Solactive AG (the “Index Provider”), and the Index Provider partnered with Social Finance, Inc. (“SoFi”) to co-develop the methodology used by the Index to determine the securities included in the Index. SoFi is not involved in the ongoing maintenance of the Index or any discretionary decisions relating to its application, and does not act in the capacity of an index provider. SoFi has licensed certain of its trademarks to the Index Provider for use in connection with the Index.
Solactive SoFi US Next 500 Growth Index
Construction of the Index begins with the selection of the next 500 largest constituents after excluding the largest 500 constituents by market capitalization of the Solactive US Broad Market Index, a market capitalization-weighted index that includes equity securities of approximately 3,000 of the largest U.S. companies. This selection is subject to a 20% buffer rule to limit index turnover. The Index may include common stocks and equity interests in real estate investment trusts (“REITs”).
6


The weight of each Index constituent is initially based on each constituent’s free-float market capitalization and then adjusted upward or downward based on a proprietary composite score calculated based on three growth-oriented fundamental factors of each company: trailing 12-month sales growth, trailing 12-month earnings per share (“EPS”) growth, and 12-month forward-looking EPS growth consensus estimates. For each factor, the scores for all Index constituents are adjusted to account for outliers, and each company’s score is calculated relative to the average score for that factor. The composite score for a company reflects an average of that company’s score for each factor.
The Index is rebalanced and reconstituted annually, effective on the first Wednesday of each May based on data as of the tenth business day prior to such reconstitution date. As of June 5, 2021, the three largest Index constituents and the weights were as follows: Medical Properties Trust, Inc. 3.21%; Cleveland-Cliffs Inc. 2.76%; and Nisource Inc. 1.98%.
The Fund’s Investment Strategy
The Fund attempts to invest all, or substantially all, of its assets in the component securities that make up the Index. Under normal circumstances, at least 80% of the Fund’s total assets (exclusive of any collateral held from securities lending) will be invested in the component securities of the Index. The Fund’s investment adviser expects that, over time, the correlation between the Fund’s performance and that of the Index, before fees and expenses, will be 95% or better.
The Fund will generally use a “replication” strategy to achieve its investment objective, meaning it generally will invest in all of the component securities of the Index. However, the Fund may use a “representative sampling” strategy, meaning it may invest in a sample of the securities in the Index whose risk, return and other characteristics closely resemble the risk, return and other characteristics of the Index as a whole, when the Fund’s investment adviser believes it is in the best interests of the Fund (e.g., when replicating the Index involves practical difficulties or substantial costs, an Index constituent becomes temporarily illiquid, unavailable, or less liquid, or as a result of legal restrictions or limitations that apply to the Fund but not to the Index).
The Fund generally may invest up to 20% of its total assets (exclusive of any collateral held from securities lending) in securities or other investments not included in the Index, but which the Fund’s investment adviser believes will help the Fund track the Index. For example, the Fund may invest in securities that are not components of the Index to reflect various corporate actions and other changes to the Index (such as reconstitutions, additions, and deletions).
To the extent the Index concentrates (i.e., holds more than 25% of its total assets in the securities of a particular industry or group of related industries), the Fund will concentrate its investments to approximately the same extent as the Index.
The Fund may actively and frequently trade all or a significant portion of the securities in its portfolio.
Principal Investment Risks
The principal risks of investing in the Fund are summarized below. As with any investment, there is a risk that you could lose all or a portion of your investment in the Fund. Some or all of these risks may adversely affect the Fund’s net asset value per share (“NAV”), trading price, yield, total return, and/or ability to meet its objective. For more information about the risks of investing in the Fund, see the section in the Fund’s Prospectus titled “Additional Information About the Funds—Principal Risks of Investing in Each Fund.”
The principal risks are presented in alphabetical order to facilitate finding particular risks and comparing them with those of other funds. Each risk summarized below is considered a “principal risk” of investing in the Fund, regardless of the order in which it appears.
Cybersecurity Risk. With the increased use of technologies such as the Internet to conduct business, the Fund is susceptible to operational, information security, and related risks. Cyber incidents affecting the Fund or its service providers may cause disruptions and impact business operations, potentially resulting in financial losses, interference with the Fund’s ability to calculate its NAV, impediments to trading, the inability of shareholders to transact business, violations of applicable privacy and other laws, regulatory fines, penalties, reputational damage, reimbursement or other compensation costs, or additional compliance costs.
Equity Market Risk. The equity securities held in the Fund’s portfolio may experience sudden, unpredictable drops in value or long periods of decline in value. This may occur because of factors that affect securities markets generally or factors affecting specific issuers, industries, or sectors in which the Fund invests. Common stocks, such as those held by the Fund, are generally exposed to greater risk than other types of securities, such as preferred stock and debt obligations, because common stockholders generally have inferior rights to receive payment from issuers.
ETF Risk.
Authorized Participants, Market Makers, and Liquidity Providers Concentration Risk. The Fund has a limited number of financial institutions that are authorized to purchase and redeem Shares directly from the Fund (known as “Authorized Participants” or “APs”). In addition, there may be a limited number of market makers and/or liquidity providers in the marketplace. To the extent either of the following events occur, Shares may trade at a material discount to NAV and possibly face delisting: (i) APs exit the business or otherwise become unable to process creation and/or redemption
7


orders and no other APs step forward to perform these services; or (ii) market makers and/or liquidity providers exit the business or significantly reduce their business activities and no other entities step forward to perform their functions.
Costs of Buying or Selling Shares. Due to the costs of buying or selling Shares, including brokerage commissions imposed by brokers and bid-ask spreads, frequent trading of Shares may significantly reduce investment results and an investment in Shares may not be advisable for investors who anticipate regularly making small investments.
Shares May Trade at Prices Other Than NAV. As with all ETFs, Shares may be bought and sold in the secondary market at market prices. Although it is expected that the market price of Shares will approximate the Fund’s NAV, there may be times when the market price of Shares is more than the NAV intra-day (premium) or less than the NAV intra-day (discount) due to supply and demand of Shares or during periods of market volatility. This risk is heightened in times of market volatility, periods of steep market declines, and periods when there is limited trading activity for Shares in the secondary market, in which case such premiums or discounts may be significant.
Trading. Although Shares are listed on a national securities exchange, such as NYSE Arca, Inc. (the “Exchange”), and may be traded on U.S. exchanges other than the Exchange, there can be no assurance that Shares will trade with any volume, or at all, on any stock exchange. In stressed market conditions, the liquidity of Shares may begin to mirror the liquidity of the Fund’s underlying portfolio holdings, which can be significantly less liquid than Shares.
General Market Risk. Economies and financial markets throughout the world are becoming increasingly interconnected, which increases the likelihood that events or conditions in one country or region will adversely impact markets or issuers in other countries or regions. Securities in the Fund’s portfolio may underperform in comparison to securities in the general financial markets, a particular financial market, or other asset classes, due to a number of factors, including inflation (or expectations for inflation), interest rates, global demand for particular products or resources, natural disasters or events, pandemic diseases, terrorism, regulatory events, and government controls.
High Portfolio Turnover Risk. A high portfolio turnover rate increases transaction costs, which may increase the Fund’s expenses. Frequent trading may also cause adverse tax consequences for investors in the Fund due to an increase in short-term capital gains.
Limited Operating History Risk. The Fund has a limited operating history. As a result, prospective investors have a limited track record or history on which to base their investment decision.
Market Capitalization Risk.
Large-Capitalization Investing. The securities of large-capitalization companies may be relatively mature compared to smaller companies and therefore subject to slower growth during times of economic expansion. Large-capitalization companies may also be unable to respond quickly to new competitive challenges, such as changes in technology and consumer tastes.
Mid-Capitalization Investing. The securities of mid-capitalization companies may be more vulnerable to adverse issuer, market, political, or economic developments than securities of large-capitalization companies. The securities of mid-capitalization companies generally trade in lower volumes and are subject to greater and more unpredictable price changes than large-capitalization stocks or the stock market as a whole.
Models and Data Risk. The composition of the Index is heavily dependent on proprietary quantitative models as well as information and data supplied by third parties (“Models and Data”). When Models and Data prove to be incorrect or incomplete, any decisions made in reliance thereon may lead to the inclusion or exclusion of securities from the Index universe that would have been excluded or included had the Models and Data been correct and complete. If the composition of the Index reflects such errors, the Fund’s portfolio can be expected to also reflect the errors.
Passive Investment Risk. The Fund invests in the securities included in, or representative of, its Index regardless of their investment merit. The Fund does not attempt to outperform its Index or take defensive positions in declining markets. As a result, the Fund’s performance may be adversely affected by a general decline in the market segments relating to its Index.
Recent Market Events Risk. U.S. and international markets have experienced significant periods of volatility in recent years and months due to a number of economic, political and global macro factors including the impact of the novel coronavirus (COVID-19) as a global pandemic, which has resulted in public health issues, growth concerns in the U.S. and overseas, layoffs, rising unemployment claims, changed travel and social behaviors, and reduced consumer spending. The effects of COVID-19 may lead to a substantial economic downturn or recession in the U.S. and global economies, the recovery from which is uncertain and may last for an extended period of time. These developments as well as other events could result in further market volatility and negatively affect financial asset prices, the liquidity of certain securities and the normal operations of securities exchanges and other markets.
8


REIT Risk. Through its investments in REITs, the Fund is subject to the risks of investing in the real estate market, including decreases in property revenues, increases in interest rates, increases in property taxes and operating expenses, legal and regulatory changes, a lack of credit or capital, defaults by borrowers or tenants, environmental problems and natural disasters.
REITs are subject to additional risks, including those related to adverse governmental actions; declines in property value and the real estate market; the potential failure to qualify for tax-free pass through of income; and exemption from registration as an investment company. REITs are dependent upon specialized management skills and may invest in relatively few properties, a small geographic area, or a small number of property types. As a result, investments in REITs may be volatile. To the extent the Fund invests in REITs concentrated in specific geographic areas or property types, the Fund may be subject to a greater loss as a result of adverse developments affecting such area or property types. REITs are pooled investment vehicles with their own fees and expenses and the Fund will indirectly bear a proportionate share of those fees and expenses.
Sector Risk. At times the Fund may increase the relative emphasis of its investments in a particular sector or group of industries. The prices of securities of issuers in a particular sector may be more susceptible to fluctuations due to changes in economic or business conditions, government regulations, availability of basic resources or supplies, or other events that affect that industry or sector more than securities of issuers in other industries and sectors. To the extent that the Fund increases the relative emphasis of its investments in a particular industry or sector, the value of Shares may fluctuate in response to events affecting that industry or sector.
Tracking Error Risk. As with all index funds, the performance of the Fund and its Index may differ from each other for a variety of reasons. For example, the Fund incurs operating expenses and portfolio transaction costs not incurred by the Index. In addition, the Fund may not be fully invested in the securities of the Index at all times or may hold securities not included in the Index.
Performance
The following performance information provides some indication of the risks of investing in the Fund by showing changes in the Fund’s performance. The bar chart shows the Fund’s performance for the calendar year ended December 30, 2020. The table illustrates how the Fund’s average annual returns for the 1-year and since inception periods compare with those of the Index and a broad measure of market performance. The Fund’s past performance, before and after taxes, does not necessarily indicate how it will perform in the future. Updated performance information is available on the Fund’s website at www.sofi.com/invest/etfs/.
Calendar Year Ended December 31,
ck0001742912-20210228_g2.jpg
The Fund’s calendar year-to-date return as of March 31, 2021 was 9.65%.
During the period of time shown in the bar chart, the Fund’s highest quarterly return was 27.47% for the quarter ended June 30, 2020 and the lowest quarterly return was -28.94% for the quarter ended March 31, 2020.
9


Average Annual Total Returns
For the Periods Ended December 31, 2020


1 Year
Since Inception
(April 10, 2019)
Return Before Taxes 17.67% 14.28%
Return After Taxes on Distributions 17.23% 13.86%
Return After Taxes on Distributions and Sale of Fund Shares 10.59% 10.90%
Solactive SoFi US Next 500 Growth Index
(reflects no deduction for fees, expenses, or taxes)
17.72% 14.37%
S&P MidCap 400 Total Return Index
(reflects no deduction for fees, expenses, or taxes)
13.66% 12.26%
After-tax returns are calculated using the historical highest individual federal marginal income tax rates during the period covered by the table above and do not reflect the impact of state and local taxes. Actual after-tax returns depend on an investor’s tax situation and may differ from those shown. After-tax returns shown are not relevant to investors who hold their Shares through tax-deferred arrangements such as an individual retirement account (“IRA”) or other tax-advantaged accounts.
Management
Investment Adviser: Toroso Investments, LLC (“Toroso” or the “Adviser”) serves as investment adviser to the Fund.
Portfolio Manager: Charles A. Ragauss, CFA, Portfolio Manager for the Adviser, is responsible for the day-today management of the Fund and has been the Fund’s portfolio manager since its inception in 2019.
Purchase and Sale of Shares
The Fund issues and redeems Shares at NAV only in large blocks known as “Creation Units,” which only APs (typically, broker-dealers) may purchase or redeem. The Fund generally issues and redeems Creation Units in exchange for a portfolio of securities (the “Deposit Securities”) and/or a designated amount of U.S. cash.
Shares are listed on a national securities exchange, such as the Exchange, and individual Shares may only be bought and sold in the secondary market through brokers at market prices, rather than NAV. Because Shares trade at market prices rather than NAV, Shares may trade at a price greater than NAV (premium) or less than NAV (discount).
An investor may incur costs attributable to the difference between the highest price a buyer is willing to pay to purchase Shares (the “bid” price) and the lowest price a seller is willing to accept for Shares (the “ask” price) when buying or selling Shares in the secondary market. This difference in bid and ask prices is often referred to as the “bid-ask spread.”
Recent information regarding the Fund’s NAV, market price, how often Shares traded on the Exchange at a premium or discount, and bid-ask spreads can be found on the Fund’s website at www.sofi.com/invest/etfs/.
Tax Information
Fund distributions are generally taxable as ordinary income, qualified dividend income, or capital gains (or a combination), unless an investment is in an IRA or other tax-advantaged account. Distributions on investments made through tax-deferred arrangements may be taxed later upon withdrawal of assets from those accounts.
Financial Intermediary Compensation
If you purchase Shares through a broker-dealer or other financial intermediary (such as a bank) (an “Intermediary”), the Adviser or its affiliates may pay Intermediaries for certain activities related to the Fund, including participation in activities that are designed to make Intermediaries more knowledgeable about exchange-traded products, including the Fund, or for other activities, such as marketing, educational training, or other initiatives related to the sale or promotion of Shares. These payments may create a conflict of interest by influencing the Intermediary and your salesperson to recommend the Fund over another investment. Any such arrangements do not result in increased Fund expenses. Ask your salesperson or visit the Intermediary’s website for more information.
10


SoFi Social 50 ETF – FUND SUMMARY
Investment Objective
The SoFi Social 50 ETF (the “Fund”) seeks to track the performance, before fees and expenses, of the SoFi Social 50 Index (the “Index”).
Fees and Expenses of the Fund
This table describes the fees and expenses that you may pay if you buy, hold, and sell shares of the Fund (“Shares”). You may pay other fees, such as brokerage commissions and other fees to financial intermediaries, which are not reflected in the table and Example below.
Annual Fund Operating Expenses (expenses that you pay each year as a percentage of the value of your investment)
Management Fees 0.29  %
Distribution and/or Service (12b-1) Fees 0.00  %
Other Expenses 0.00  %
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses 0.29  %
Expense Example
This Example is intended to help you compare the cost of investing in the Fund with the cost of investing in other funds. The Example assumes that you invest $10,000 in the Fund for the time periods indicated and then redeem all of your Shares at the end of those periods. The Example also assumes that your investment has a 5% return each year and that the Fund’s operating expenses remain the same. The Example does not take into account brokerage commissions that you may pay on your purchases and sales of Shares. Although your actual costs may be higher or lower, based on these assumptions your costs would be:
1 Year 3 Years 5 Years 10 Years
$30 $93 $163 $368
Portfolio Turnover
The Fund pays transaction costs, such as commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or “turns over” its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover rate may indicate higher transaction costs and may result in higher taxes when Shares are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are not reflected in total annual fund operating expenses or in the expense example above, affect the Fund’s performance. For the fiscal year ended February 28, 2021, the Fund’s portfolio turnover rate was 414% of the average value of its portfolio.
Principal Investment Strategies
The Fund uses a “passive management” (or indexing) approach to track the performance, before fees and expenses, of the Index. The Index follows a rules-based methodology (described generally below) that tracks the performance of a portfolio of the 50 most widely held U.S.-listed equity securities in self-directed brokerage accounts (the “SoFi Accounts”) of SoFi Securities, LLC, an affiliate of Social Finance, Inc. (“SoFi”), as determined using the rules-based methodology. The Index is owned and administered by Solactive AG (the “Index Provider”), which engaged SoFi to develop the rules set and related methodology used to determine the securities to be included in the Index. SoFi is not involved in the ongoing maintenance of the Index or any discretionary decisions relating to its application, and does not act in the capacity of an index provider. SoFi has licensed certain of its trademarks to the Index Provider for use in connection with the Index.
SoFi Social 50 Index
The Index is designed to reflect the 50 most widely held U.S.-listed equity securities in the SoFi Accounts as weighted by aggregate holdings within the SoFi Accounts. Securities eligible for inclusion in the Index must: (a) be U.S.-listed equity securities held in SoFi Accounts, and (b) have an average daily trading volume of at least $10,000,000 during the preceding one-month and six-month periods (the “Eligible Universe”). The Index may include common stocks and equity interests in real estate investment trusts (“REITs”). ETFs and other investment companies are not eligible for the Index. Securities in the Eligible Universe are sorted based on (1) the number of SoFi Accounts that hold a particular security and (2) the total market value of the security held in the SoFi Accounts (the “Weighted Average Value”). Each security in the Eligible Universe is then ranked from highest to lowest based on its Weighted Average Value (e.g., the security with the highest Weighted Average Value is assigned rank 1). Subject to a “buffer rule” aimed at limiting Index turnover, securities ranked within the top 50 are included in the Index.
11


Each security in the Index is then weighted based on its Weighted Average Value in relation to that of the other Index components and is subject to certain individual security weight and sector concentration caps. For example, the weight of each individual Index component is capped at 10%, and securities representing investments in any particular industry sector are capped at 50%. The Index is rebalanced and reconstituted monthly.
As of May 31, 2021, the SoFi Accounts consisted of over 300,000 separate self-directed brokerage accounts.
The Fund’s Investment Strategy
The Fund attempts to invest all, or substantially all, of its assets in the component securities that make up the Index. Under normal circumstances, at least 80% of the Fund’s total assets (exclusive of any collateral held from securities lending) will be invested in the component securities of the Index. The Fund’s investment adviser expects that, over time, the correlation between the Fund’s performance and that of the Index, before fees and expenses, will be 95% or better.
The Fund will generally use a “replication” strategy to achieve its investment objective, meaning it generally will invest in all of the component securities of the Index. However, the Fund may use a “representative sampling” strategy, meaning it may invest in a sample of the securities in the Index whose risk, return and other characteristics closely resemble the risk, return and other characteristics of the Index as a whole, when the Fund’s investment adviser believes it is in the best interests of the Fund (e.g., when replicating the Index involves practical difficulties or substantial costs, an Index constituent becomes temporarily illiquid, unavailable, or less liquid, or as a result of legal restrictions or limitations that apply to the Fund but not to the Index).
The Fund generally may invest up to 20% of its total assets (exclusive of any collateral held from securities lending) in securities or other investments not included in the Index, but which the Fund’s investment adviser believes will help the Fund track the Index. For example, the Fund may invest in securities that are not components of the Index to reflect various corporate actions and other changes to the Index (such as reconstitutions, additions, and deletions).
To the extent the Index concentrates (i.e., holds more than 25% of its total assets in the securities of a particular industry or group of related industries), the Fund will concentrate its investments to approximately the same extent as the Index.
The Fund may actively and frequently trade all or a significant portion of the securities in its portfolio.
Principal Investment Risks
The principal risks of investing in the Fund are summarized below. As with any investment, there is a risk that you could lose all or a portion of your investment in the Fund. Some or all of these risks may adversely affect the Fund’s net asset value per share (“NAV”), trading price, yield, total return, and/or ability to meet its objective. For more information about the risks of investing in the Fund, see the section in the Fund’s Prospectus titled “Additional Information About the Funds—Principal Risks of Investing in Each Fund.”
The principal risks are presented in alphabetical order to facilitate finding particular risks and comparing them with those of other funds. Each risk summarized below is considered a “principal risk” of investing in the Fund, regardless of the order in which it appears.
Cybersecurity Risk. With the increased use of technologies such as the Internet to conduct business, the Fund is susceptible to operational, information security, and related risks. Cyber incidents affecting the Fund or its service providers may cause disruptions and impact business operations, potentially resulting in financial losses, interference with the Fund’s ability to calculate its NAV, impediments to trading, the inability of shareholders to transact business, violations of applicable privacy and other laws, regulatory fines, penalties, reputational damage, reimbursement or other compensation costs, or additional compliance costs.
Data Risk.  The composition of the Index is heavily dependent on information and data supplied by third parties. When such data prove to be incorrect or incomplete, any decisions made in reliance thereon may lead to the inclusion or exclusion of securities from the Index universe that would have been excluded or included had the data been correct and complete. If the composition of the Index reflects such errors, the Fund’s portfolio can be expected to also reflect the errors.
Equity Market Risk. The equity securities held in the Fund’s portfolio may experience sudden, unpredictable drops in value or long periods of decline in value. This may occur because of factors that affect securities markets generally or factors affecting specific issuers, industries, or sectors in which the Fund invests. Common stocks, such as those held by the Fund, are generally exposed to greater risk than other types of securities, such as preferred stock and debt obligations, because common stockholders generally have inferior rights to receive payment from issuers.
ETF Risk.
Authorized Participants, Market Makers, and Liquidity Providers Concentration Risk. The Fund has a limited number of financial institutions that are authorized to purchase and redeem Shares directly from the Fund (known as “Authorized Participants” or “APs”). In addition, there may be a limited number of market makers and/or liquidity providers in the marketplace. To the extent either of the following events occur, Shares may trade at a material discount to NAV and
12


possibly face delisting: (i) APs exit the business or otherwise become unable to process creation and/or redemption orders and no other APs step forward to perform these services; or (ii) market makers and/or liquidity providers exit the business or significantly reduce their business activities and no other entities step forward to perform their functions.
Costs of Buying or Selling Shares. Due to the costs of buying or selling Shares, including brokerage commissions imposed by brokers and bid-ask spreads, frequent trading of Shares may significantly reduce investment results and an investment in Shares may not be advisable for investors who anticipate regularly making small investments.
Shares May Trade at Prices Other Than NAV. As with all ETFs, Shares may be bought and sold in the secondary market at market prices. Although it is expected that the market price of Shares will approximate the Fund’s NAV, there may be times when the market price of Shares is more than the NAV intra-day (premium) or less than the NAV intra-day (discount) due to supply and demand of Shares or during periods of market volatility. This risk is heightened in times of market volatility, periods of steep market declines, and periods when there is limited trading activity for Shares in the secondary market, in which case such premiums or discounts may be significant.
Trading. Although Shares are listed on a national securities exchange, such as NYSE Arca, Inc. (the “Exchange”), and may be traded on U.S. exchanges other than the Exchange, there can be no assurance that Shares will trade with any volume, or at all, on any stock exchange. In stressed market conditions, the liquidity of Shares may begin to mirror the liquidity of the Fund’s underlying portfolio holdings, which can be significantly less liquid than Shares.
General Market Risk. Economies and financial markets throughout the world are becoming increasingly interconnected, which increases the likelihood that events or conditions in one country or region will adversely impact markets or issuers in other countries or regions. Securities in the Fund’s portfolio may underperform in comparison to securities in the general financial markets, a particular financial market, or other asset classes, due to a number of factors, including inflation (or expectations for inflation), interest rates, global demand for particular products or resources, natural disasters or events, pandemic diseases, terrorism, regulatory events, and government controls.
High Portfolio Turnover Risk. A high portfolio turnover rate increases transaction costs, which may increase the Fund’s expenses. Frequent trading may also cause adverse tax consequences for investors in the Fund due to an increase in short-term capital gains.
Limited Operating History Risk. The Fund has a limited operating history. As a result, prospective investors have a limited track record or history on which to base their investment decision.
Market Capitalization Risk.
Large-Capitalization Investing. The securities of large-capitalization companies may be relatively mature compared to smaller companies and therefore subject to slower growth during times of economic expansion. Large-capitalization companies may also be unable to respond quickly to new competitive challenges, such as changes in technology and consumer tastes.
Mid-Capitalization Investing. The securities of mid-capitalization companies may be more vulnerable to adverse issuer, market, political, or economic developments than securities of large-capitalization companies. The securities of mid-capitalization companies generally trade in lower volumes and are subject to greater and more unpredictable price changes than large-capitalization stocks or the stock market as a whole.
Passive Investment Risk. The Fund invests in the securities included in, or representative of, its Index regardless of their investment merit. The Fund does not attempt to outperform its Index or take defensive positions in declining markets. As a result, the Fund’s performance may be adversely affected by a general decline in the market segments relating to its Index.
Recent Market Events Risk. U.S. and international markets have experienced significant periods of volatility in recent years and months due to a number of economic, political and global macro factors including the impact of the novel coronavirus (COVID-19) as a global pandemic, which has resulted in public health issues, growth concerns in the U.S. and overseas, layoffs, rising unemployment claims, changed travel and social behaviors, and reduced consumer spending. The effects of COVID-19 may lead to a substantial economic downturn or recession in the U.S. and global economies, the recovery from which is uncertain and may last for an extended period of time. These developments as well as other events could result in further market volatility and negatively affect financial asset prices, the liquidity of certain securities and the normal operations of securities exchanges and other markets.
REIT Risk. Through its investments in REITs, the Fund is subject to the risks of investing in the real estate market, including decreases in property revenues, increases in interest rates, increases in property taxes and operating expenses, legal and regulatory changes, a lack of credit or capital, defaults by borrowers or tenants, environmental problems and natural disasters.
REITs are subject to additional risks, including those related to adverse governmental actions; declines in property value and the real estate market; the potential failure to qualify for tax-free pass through of income; and exemption from registration as an investment company. REITs are dependent upon specialized management skills and may invest in relatively few
13


properties, a small geographic area, or a small number of property types. As a result, investments in REITs may be volatile. To the extent the Fund invests in REITs concentrated in specific geographic areas or property types, the Fund may be subject to a greater loss as a result of adverse developments affecting such area or property types. REITs are pooled investment vehicles with their own fees and expenses and the Fund will indirectly bear a proportionate share of those fees and expenses.
Sector Risk. At times the Fund may increase the relative emphasis of its investments in a particular sector or group of industries. The prices of securities of issuers in a particular sector may be more susceptible to fluctuations due to changes in economic or business conditions, government regulations, availability of basic resources or supplies, or other events that affect that industry or sector more than securities of issuers in other industries and sectors. To the extent that the Fund increases the relative emphasis of its investments in a particular industry or sector, the value of Shares may fluctuate in response to events affecting that industry or sector.
Communication Services Sector Risk. The Fund may invest in companies in the communication services sector, and therefore the performance of the Fund could be negatively impacted by events affecting this sector. Communication services companies are susceptible to the risk of potential obsolescence of products and services due to technological advancements and innovation competition among companies. Demand for product, shifting consumer demographics and shifting consumer preferences can drastically affect a communication services company's profitability. Companies in the communication services sector may be particular targets of cyber-security losses and potential theft of proprietary or consumer information or disruptions in service, which could have a material adverse effect on their businesses. Companies in the communication services sector may also be affected by other competitive pressures, such as pricing competition, as well as research and development costs, substantial capital requirements and government regulation.
Consumer Staples Sector Risk. The Fund may invest in companies in the consumer staples sector, and therefore the performance of the Fund could be negatively impacted by events affecting this sector. Companies in the consumer staples sector, including those in the food and beverage industries, may be affected by general economic conditions, commodity production and pricing, consumer confidence and spending, consumer preferences, interest rates, product cycles, marketing campaigns, competition, and government regulations.
Tracking Error Risk. As with all index funds, the performance of the Fund and its Index may differ from each other for a variety of reasons. For example, the Fund incurs operating expenses and portfolio transaction costs not incurred by the Index. In addition, the Fund may not be fully invested in the securities of the Index at all times or may hold securities not included in the Index.
User Bias Risk. The securities that comprise the Index are selected by retail investors holding SoFi Accounts, who may not be professional investors, may have no financial expertise, and may not do any research on the companies in which they invest prior to investing. In some cases, investment decisions made may be influenced by non-quantitative factors, including, without limitation, cognitive and emotional biases, resulting in the inclusion of certain securities in the Index which may underperform the market generally and result in lower returns for the Fund.
Performance
The following performance information provides some indication of the risks of investing in the Fund by showing changes in the Fund’s performance. The bar chart shows the Fund’s performance for the calendar year ended December 30, 2020. The table illustrates how the Fund’s average annual returns for the 1-year and since inception periods compare with those of the Index and a broad measure of market performance. The Fund’s past performance, before and after taxes, does not necessarily indicate how it will perform in the future. On June 30, 2020, the Fund’s investment objective and principal investment strategies were substantially revised; therefore, the performance and average annual total returns for periods prior to that date were achieved under the Fund’s prior investment objective and principal investment strategies and would have differed if the Fund’s current investment objective and principal investment strategies had been in effect during those periods. Updated performance information is available on the Fund’s website at www.sofi.com/invest/etfs/.

14


Calendar Year Ended December 31,
ck0001742912-20210228_g3.jpg
The Fund’s calendar year-to-date return as of March 31, 2021 was 7.86%.
During the period of time shown in the bar chart, the Fund’s highest quarterly return was 26.70% for the quarter ended June 30 ,2020 and the lowest quarterly return was -28.13% for the quarter ended March 31, 2020.
Average Annual Total Returns
For the Periods Ended December 31, 2020


1 Year
Since Inception
(May 7, 2019)
Return Before Taxes 33.51% 22.88%
Return After Taxes on Distributions 33.35% 22.66%
Return After Taxes on Distributions and Sale of Fund Shares 19.90% 17.65%
SoFi Social 50 Index
(reflects no deduction for fees, expenses, or taxes)
33.52% 23.06%
S&P 500 Total Return Index
(reflects no deduction for fees, expenses, or taxes)
18.40% 19.62%
After-tax returns are calculated using the historical highest individual federal marginal income tax rates during the period covered by the table above and do not reflect the impact of state and local taxes. Actual after-tax returns depend on an investor’s tax situation and may differ from those shown. After-tax returns shown are not relevant to investors who hold their Shares through tax-deferred arrangements such as an individual retirement account (“IRA”) or other tax-advantaged accounts.
Management
Investment Adviser: Toroso Investments, LLC (“Toroso” or the “Adviser”) serves as investment adviser to the Fund.
Portfolio Manager: Charles A. Ragauss, CFA, Portfolio Manager for the Adviser, is responsible for the day-to-day management of the Fund and has been the Fund’s portfolio manager since its inception in 2019.
Purchase and Sale of Shares
The Fund issues and redeems Shares at NAV only in large blocks known as “Creation Units,” which only APs (typically, broker-dealers) may purchase or redeem. The Fund generally issues and redeems Creation Units in exchange for a portfolio of securities (the “Deposit Securities”) and/or a designated amount of U.S. cash.
Shares are listed on a national securities exchange, such as the Exchange, and individual Shares may only be bought and sold in the secondary market through brokers at market prices, rather than NAV. Because Shares trade at market prices rather than NAV, Shares may trade at a price greater than NAV (premium) or less than NAV (discount).
An investor may incur costs attributable to the difference between the highest price a buyer is willing to pay to purchase Shares (the “bid” price) and the lowest price a seller is willing to accept for Shares (the “ask” price) when buying or selling Shares in the secondary market. This difference in bid and ask prices is often referred to as the “bid-ask spread.”
Recent information regarding the Fund’s NAV, market price, how often Shares traded on the Exchange at a premium or discount, and bid-ask spreads can be found on the Fund’s website at www.sofi.com/invest/etfs/.
15


Tax Information
Fund distributions are generally taxable as ordinary income, qualified dividend income, or capital gains (or a combination), unless an investment is in an IRA or other tax-advantaged account. Distributions on investments made through tax-deferred arrangements may be taxed later upon withdrawal of assets from those accounts.
Financial Intermediary Compensation
If you purchase Shares through a broker-dealer or other financial intermediary (such as a bank) (an “Intermediary”), the Adviser or its affiliates may pay Intermediaries for certain activities related to the Fund, including participation in activities that are designed to make Intermediaries more knowledgeable about exchange-traded products, including the Fund, or for other activities, such as marketing, educational training, or other initiatives related to the sale or promotion of Shares. These payments may create a conflict of interest by influencing the Intermediary and your salesperson to recommend the Fund over another investment. Any such arrangements do not result in increased Fund expenses. Ask your salesperson or visit the Intermediary’s website for more information.
16


SoFi Gig Economy ETF – FUND SUMMARY
Investment Objective
The SoFi Gig Economy ETF (the “Fund”) seeks long-term capital appreciation.
Fees and Expenses of the Fund
This table describes the fees and expenses that you may pay if you buy, hold, and sell shares of the Fund (“Shares”). You may pay other fees, such as brokerage commissions and other fees to financial intermediaries, which are not reflected in the table and Example below.
Annual Fund Operating Expenses (expenses that you pay each year as a percentage of the value of your investment)
Management Fees 0.59  %
Distribution and/or Service (12b-1) Fees 0.00  %
Other Expenses 0.00  %
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses 0.59  %
Expense Example
This Example is intended to help you compare the cost of investing in the Fund with the cost of investing in other funds. The Example assumes that you invest $10,000 in the Fund for the time periods indicated and then redeem all of your Shares at the end of those periods. The Example also assumes that your investment has a 5% return each year and that the Fund’s operating expenses remain the same. The Example does not take into account brokerage commissions that you may pay on your purchases and sales of Shares. Although your actual costs may be higher or lower, based on these assumptions your costs would be:
1 Year 3 Years 5 Years 10 Years
$60 $189 $329 $738
Portfolio Turnover
The Fund pays transaction costs, such as commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or “turns over” its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover rate may indicate higher transaction costs and may result in higher taxes when Shares are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are not reflected in total annual fund operating expenses or in the expense example above, affect the Fund’s performance. For the fiscal year ended February 28, 2021, the Fund’s portfolio turnover rate was 68% of the average value of its portfolio.
Principal Investment Strategies
The Fund is an actively-managed exchange-traded fund (“ETF”) that seeks to achieve its investment objective primarily by investing in a portfolio of companies listed globally that Toroso Investments, LLC, the Fund’s investment adviser (the “Adviser”), considers part of the “gig economy”. The “gig economy” refers to the group of companies that have embraced, that support, or that otherwise benefit from a workforce where individual employees or independent contractors are empowered to create their own freelance business by leveraging recent developments in technology platforms that enable individuals to offer their services directly to retail and commercial customers. Examples of gig economy businesses include selling or reselling products through auction platforms or web-based stores and offering delivery services through an app-based platform.
The Adviser considers the gig economy to include five categories of companies, and constructs the Fund’s portfolio based on the following weights:
30% to 60% Companies that directly facilitate and participate in revenue generation from gig economy businesses (e.g., app-based platforms, auction sites, web-based stores, and other commission-based platforms)
20% to 40% Companies that enable or support gig economy businesses in marketing and sales functions (e.g., social media platforms, messaging platforms)
5% to 20% Companies that facilitate financial transactions for gig economy businesses through apps or web-based platforms
5% to 15% Companies that support the ability of individuals to operate a gig economy business without participating in a commission or revenue-based model (e.g., companies providing health care, technology, or other back office services)
0% to 10% Other companies that are expected to benefit from the growth of gig economy businesses and associated lifestyle changes for individuals engaged in gig economy businesses
17


The Adviser purchases and sells securities based on changes in the Adviser’s assessment of which companies are likely to benefit the most from their role in the gig economy. The Fund may invest in equity securities of large-, mid-, and small-capitalization companies listed on a U.S., non-U.S. developed, or emerging markets exchange. The Fund is considered to be non-diversified, which means that it may invest more of its assets in the securities of a single issuer or a smaller number of issuers than if it were a diversified fund. The Fund may actively and frequently trade all or a significant portion of the securities in its portfolio.
The Fund may invest significantly in companies in the communication services sector.
Principal Investment Risks
The principal risks of investing in the Fund are summarized below. As with any investment, there is a risk that you could lose all or a portion of your investment in the Fund. Some or all of these risks may adversely affect the Fund’s net asset value per share (“NAV”), trading price, yield, total return, and/or ability to meet its objective. For more information about the risks of investing in the Fund, see the section in the Fund’s Prospectus titled “Additional Information About the Funds—Principal Risks of Investing in Each Fund.”
The principal risks are presented in alphabetical order to facilitate finding particular risks and comparing them with those of other funds. Each risk summarized below is considered a “principal risk” of investing in the Fund, regardless of the order in which it appears.
Currency Exchange Rate Risk. The Fund’s assets may include exposure to investments denominated in non-U.S. currencies or in securities or other assets that provide exposure to such currencies. Changes in currency exchange rates and the relative value of non-U.S. currencies will affect the value of the Fund’s investments and the value of your Fund shares. Currency exchange rates can be very volatile and can change quickly and unpredictably. As a result, the value of an investment in the Fund may change quickly and without warning and you may lose money.
Cybersecurity Risk. With the increased use of technologies such as the Internet to conduct business, the Fund is susceptible to operational, information security, and related risks. Cyber incidents affecting the Fund or its service providers may cause disruptions and impact business operations, potentially resulting in financial losses, interference with the Fund’s ability to calculate its NAV, impediments to trading, the inability of shareholders to transact business, violations of applicable privacy and other laws, regulatory fines, penalties, reputational damage, reimbursement or other compensation costs, or additional compliance costs.
Emerging Markets Risk. The Fund may invest in securities issued by companies domiciled or headquartered in emerging market nations. Investments in securities traded in developing or emerging markets, or that provide exposure to such securities or markets, can involve additional risks relating to political, economic, currency, or regulatory conditions not associated with investments in U.S. securities and investments in more developed international markets. Such conditions may impact the ability of the Fund to buy, sell, or otherwise transfer securities, adversely affect the trading market and price for Shares and cause the Fund to decline in value.
Equity Market Risk. The equity securities held in the Fund’s portfolio may experience sudden, unpredictable drops in value or long periods of decline in value. This may occur because of factors that affect securities markets generally or factors affecting specific issuers, industries, or sectors in which the Fund invests. Common stocks, such as those held by the Fund, are generally exposed to greater risk than other types of securities, such as preferred stock and debt obligations, because common stockholders generally have inferior rights to receive payment from issuers.
ETF Risk.
Authorized Participants, Market Makers, and Liquidity Providers Concentration Risk. The Fund has a limited number of financial institutions that are authorized to purchase and redeem Shares directly from the Fund (known as “Authorized Participants” or “APs”). In addition, there may be a limited number of market makers and/or liquidity providers in the marketplace. To the extent either of the following events occur, Shares may trade at a material discount to NAV and possibly face delisting: (i) APs exit the business or otherwise become unable to process creation and/or redemption orders and no other APs step forward to perform these services; or (ii) market makers and/or liquidity providers exit the business or significantly reduce their business activities and no other entities step forward to perform their functions.
Costs of Buying or Selling Shares. Due to the costs of buying or selling Shares, including brokerage commissions imposed by brokers and bid-ask spreads, frequent trading of Shares may significantly reduce investment results and an investment in Shares may not be advisable for investors who anticipate regularly making small investments.
Shares May Trade at Prices Other Than NAV. As with all ETFs, Shares may be bought and sold in the secondary market at market prices. Although it is expected that the market price of Shares will approximate the Fund’s NAV, there may be times when the market price of Shares is more than the NAV intra-day (premium) or less than the NAV intra-day (discount) due to supply and demand of Shares or during periods of market volatility. This risk is heightened in times of market volatility, periods of steep market declines, and periods when there is limited trading activity for Shares in the secondary market, in which case such premiums or discounts may be significant.
18


Trading. Although Shares are listed on a national securities exchange, such as The Nasdaq Stock Market, LLC (the “Exchange”), and may be traded on U.S. exchanges other than the Exchange, there can be no assurance that Shares will trade with any volume, or at all, on any stock exchange. In stressed market conditions, the liquidity of Shares may begin to mirror the liquidity of the Fund’s underlying portfolio holdings, which can be significantly less liquid than Shares.
Foreign Securities Risk. Investments in securities or other instruments of non-U.S. issuers involve certain risks not involved in domestic investments and may experience more rapid and extreme changes in value than investments in securities of U.S. companies. Financial markets in foreign countries often are not as developed, efficient, or liquid as financial markets in the United States, and therefore, the prices of non-U.S. securities and instruments can be more volatile. In addition, the Fund will be subject to risks associated with adverse political and economic developments in foreign countries, which may include the imposition of economic sanctions. Generally, there is less readily available and reliable information about non-U.S. issuers due to less rigorous disclosure or accounting standards and regulatory practices.
General Market Risk. Economies and financial markets throughout the world are becoming increasingly interconnected, which increases the likelihood that events or conditions in one country or region will adversely impact markets or issuers in other countries or regions. Securities in the Fund’s portfolio may underperform in comparison to securities in the general financial markets, a particular financial market, or other asset classes, due to a number of factors, including inflation (or expectations for inflation), interest rates, global demand for particular products or resources, natural disasters or events, pandemic diseases, terrorism, regulatory events, and government controls.
High Portfolio Turnover Risk. A high portfolio turnover rate increases transaction costs, which may increase the Fund’s expenses. Frequent trading may also cause adverse tax consequences for investors in the Fund due to an increase in short-term capital gains.
Limited Operating History Risk. The Fund has a limited operating history. As a result, prospective investors have a limited track record or history on which to base their investment decision.
Management Risk. The Fund is actively-managed and may not meet its investment objective based on the Adviser’s success or failure to implement investment strategies for the Fund.
Market Capitalization Risk.
Large-Capitalization Investing. The securities of large-capitalization companies may be relatively mature compared to smaller companies and therefore subject to slower growth during times of economic expansion. Large-capitalization companies may also be unable to respond quickly to new competitive challenges, such as changes in technology and consumer tastes.
Mid-Capitalization Investing. The securities of mid-capitalization companies may be more vulnerable to adverse issuer, market, political, or economic developments than securities of large-capitalization companies. The securities of mid-capitalization companies generally trade in lower volumes and are subject to greater and more unpredictable price changes than large-capitalization stocks or the stock market as a whole.
Small-Capitalization Investing. The securities of small-capitalization companies may be more vulnerable to adverse issuer, market, political, or economic developments than securities of large- or mid-capitalization companies. The securities of small-capitalization companies generally trade in lower volumes and are subject to greater and more unpredictable price changes than large- or mid-capitalization stocks or the stock market as a whole. There is typically less publicly available information concerning smaller-capitalization companies than for larger, more established companies.
Non-Diversification Risk. The Fund is considered to be non-diversified, which means that it may invest more of its assets in the securities of a single issuer or a smaller number of issuers than if it were a diversified fund. As a result, the Fund may be more exposed to the risks associated with and developments affecting an individual issuer or a smaller number of issuers than a fund that invests more widely. This may increase the Fund’s volatility and cause the performance of a relatively smaller number of issuers to have a greater impact on the Fund’s performance.
Recent Market Events Risk. U.S. and international markets have experienced significant periods of volatility in recent years and months due to a number of economic, political and global macro factors including the impact of the novel coronavirus (COVID-19) as a global pandemic, which has resulted in public health issues, growth concerns in the U.S. and overseas, layoffs, rising unemployment claims, changed travel and social behaviors, and reduced consumer spending. The effects of COVID-19 may lead to a substantial economic downturn or recession in the U.S. and global economies, the recovery from which is uncertain and may last for an extended period of time. These developments as well as other events could result in further market volatility and negatively affect financial asset prices, the liquidity of certain securities and the normal operations of securities exchanges and other markets.
19


Sector Risk. At times the Fund may increase the relative emphasis of its investments in a particular sector or group of industries. The prices of securities of issuers in a particular sector may be more susceptible to fluctuations due to changes in economic or business conditions, government regulations, availability of basic resources or supplies, or other events that affect that industry or sector more than securities of issuers in other industries and sectors. To the extent that the Fund increases the relative emphasis of its investments in a particular industry or sector, the value of Shares may fluctuate in response to events affecting that industry or sector.
Communication Services Sector Risk. The Fund may invest in companies in the communication services sector, and therefore the performance of the Fund could be negatively impacted by events affecting this sector. Communication services companies are susceptible to the risk of potential obsolescence of products and services due to technological advancements and innovation competition among companies. Demand for product, shifting consumer demographics and shifting consumer preferences can drastically affect a communication services company's profitability. Companies in the communication services sector may be particular targets of cyber-security losses and potential theft of proprietary or consumer information or disruptions in service, which could have a material adverse effect on their businesses. Companies in the communication services sector may also be affected by other competitive pressures, such as pricing competition, as well as research and development costs, substantial capital requirements and government regulation.
Performance
The following performance information provides some indication of the risks of investing in the Fund by showing changes in the Fund’s performance. The bar chart shows the Fund’s performance for the calendar year ended December 30, 2020. The table illustrates how the Fund’s average annual returns for the 1-year and since inception periods compare with those of a broad measure of market performance. The Fund’s past performance, before and after taxes, does not necessarily indicate how it will perform in the future. Updated performance information is available on the Fund’s website at www.sofi.com/invest/etfs/.
Calendar Year Ended December 31,
ck0001742912-20210228_g4.jpg
The Fund’s calendar year-to-date return as of March 31, 2021 was 1.80%.
During the period of time shown in the bar chart, the Fund’s highest quarterly return was 49.85% for the quarter ended June 30, 2020 and the lowest quarterly return was -14.42% for the quarter ended March 31, 2020.
Average Annual Total Returns
For the Periods Ended December 31, 2020


1 Year
Since Inception
(May 7, 2019)
Return Before Taxes 97.81% 44.55%
Return After Taxes on Distributions 97.58% 44.45%
Return After Taxes on Distributions and Sale of Fund Shares 57.94% 34.81%
S&P 500 Total Return Index
(reflects no deduction for fees, expenses, or taxes)
18.40% 19.62%
Nasdaq 100 Total Return Index
(reflects no deduction for fees, expenses, or taxes)
48.88% 38.58%
20


After-tax returns are calculated using the historical highest individual federal marginal income tax rates during the period covered by the table above and do not reflect the impact of state and local taxes. Actual after-tax returns depend on an investor’s tax situation and may differ from those shown. After-tax returns shown are not relevant to investors who hold their Shares through tax-deferred arrangements such as an individual retirement account (“IRA”) or other tax-advantaged accounts.
Management
Investment Adviser: Toroso Investments, LLC serves as investment adviser to the Fund.
Portfolio Managers: Michael Venuto, Chief Investment Officer for the Adviser, is responsible for the day-to-day management of the Fund and has been a portfolio manager of the Fund since its inception in 2019.
Charles A. Ragauss, CFA, Portfolio Manager for the Adviser, is responsible for the day-to-day management of the Fund and has been the Fund’s portfolio manager since its inception in 2019.
David Dziekanski, Portfolio Manager for the Adviser, is responsible for the day-to-day management of the Fund and has been the Fund’s portfolio manager since September 2020.
Purchase and Sale of Shares
The Fund issues and redeems Shares at NAV only in large blocks known as “Creation Units,” which only APs (typically, broker-dealers) may purchase or redeem. The Fund generally issues and redeems Creation Units in exchange for a portfolio of securities (the “Deposit Securities”) and/or a designated amount of U.S. cash.
Shares are listed on a national securities exchange, such as the Exchange, and individual Shares may only be bought and sold in the secondary market through brokers at market prices, rather than NAV. Because Shares trade at market prices rather than NAV, Shares may trade at a price greater than NAV (premium) or less than NAV (discount).
An investor may incur costs attributable to the difference between the highest price a buyer is willing to pay to purchase Shares (the “bid” price) and the lowest price a seller is willing to accept for Shares (the “ask” price) when buying or selling Shares in the secondary market. This difference in bid and ask prices is often referred to as the “bid-ask spread.”
Recent information regarding the Fund’s NAV, market price, how often Shares traded on the Exchange at a premium or discount, and bid-ask spreads can be found on the Fund’s website at www.sofi.com/invest/etfs/.
Tax Information
Fund distributions are generally taxable as ordinary income, qualified dividend income, or capital gains (or a combination), unless an investment is in an IRA or other tax-advantaged account. Distributions on investments made through tax-deferred arrangements may be taxed later upon withdrawal of assets from those accounts.
Financial Intermediary Compensation
If you purchase Shares through a broker-dealer or other financial intermediary (such as a bank) (an “Intermediary”), the Adviser or its affiliates may pay Intermediaries for certain activities related to the Fund, including participation in activities that are designed to make Intermediaries more knowledgeable about exchange-traded products, including the Fund, or for other activities, such as marketing, educational training, or other initiatives related to the sale or promotion of Shares. These payments may create a conflict of interest by influencing the Intermediary and your salesperson to recommend the Fund over another investment. Any such arrangements do not result in increased Fund expenses. Ask your salesperson or visit the Intermediary’s website for more information.
21


SoFi Weekly Income ETF – FUND SUMMARY
Investment Objective
The SoFi Weekly Income ETF (the “Fund”) seeks to provide current income.
Fees and Expenses of the Fund
This table describes the fees and expenses that you may pay if you buy, hold, and sell shares of the Fund (“Shares”). You may pay other fees, such as brokerage commissions and other fees to financial intermediaries, which are not reflected in the table and Example below.
Annual Fund Operating Expenses (expenses that you pay each year as a percentage of the value of your investment)
Management Fees 0.59  %
Distribution and/or Service (12b-1) Fees 0.00  %
Other Expenses (1) 0.00  %
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses 0.59  %
(1) Estimated for the current fiscal year.
Expense Example
This Example is intended to help you compare the cost of investing in the Fund with the cost of investing in other funds. The Example assumes that you invest $10,000 in the Fund for the time periods indicated and then redeem all of your Shares at the end of those periods. The Example also assumes that your investment has a 5% return each year and that the Fund’s operating expenses remain the same. The Example does not take into account brokerage commissions that you may pay on your purchases and sales of Shares. Although your actual costs may be higher or lower, based on these assumptions your costs would be:
1 Year 3 Years 5 Years 10 Years
$60 $189 $329 $738
Portfolio Turnover
The Fund pays transaction costs, such as commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or “turns over” its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover rate may indicate higher transaction costs and may result in higher taxes when Shares are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are not reflected in total annual fund operating expenses or in the expense example above, affect the Fund’s performance. For the fiscal period from commencement of operations (October 1, 2020) to February 28, 2021, the Fund’s portfolio turnover rate was 8% of the average value of its portfolio.
Principal Investment Strategies
The Fund is an actively-managed exchange-traded fund (“ETF”) that seeks to achieve its investment objective, under normal circumstances, by investing in U.S.-dollar denominated investment grade and non-investment grade (also known as “high-yield” or “junk”) fixed income securities and instruments and expects to distribute income from its investments to shareholders weekly. The Fund anticipates making its weekly income distributions each Friday (or, in the event the NYSE is closed for trading on Friday, on a day earlier in the week). While obligations of any maturity may be purchased, under normal circumstances, the Fund will generally have a short to intermediate overall effective duration (i.e., typically less than three years). Effective duration is a measure of the Fund’s price sensitivity to changes in yields or interest rates and a fund with a higher effective duration will, under normal circumstances, have a greater sensitivity to interest rates. For example, if a portfolio has a duration of one year, and interest rates increase (fall) by 2%, the portfolio would decline (increase) in value by approximately 2%. However, duration may not accurately reflect the true interest rate sensitivity of instruments held by the Fund and, therefore, the Fund’s exposure to changes in interest rates.
Investment decisions for the Fund are made by Income Research + Management (“IR+M” or the “Sub-Adviser”), the Fund’s sub-adviser, primarily through a fundamental analysis of available debt instruments and their issuers. IR+M applies a bottom-up investing approach focusing on the analysis of individual companies rather than on the industry or sector in which a company operates or on the economy as a whole.
22


IR+M’s bottom-up process focuses on the following attributes of investment opportunities:
Credit IR+M evaluates the strength of a company’s management, its financial statements, and its competitive position in its industry or peer group.
Structure IR+M focuses on the shape of the curve reflecting the relationship of a bond’s price to interest rates (also known as “convexity”) with a particular interest in the extent to which an instrument may be callable (i.e., the issuer can redeem the bond prior to its maturity date) or have other such options attached to it that may affect the bond’s convexity. This analysis favors bonds with positive convexity (i.e., where the price would be expected to increase as interest rates rise) and those with structures that may add to the bond’s effective yield without increasing credit risk.
Price IR+M seeks bonds that it believes are under- or mis-priced and will seek to avoid bonds it determines are overpriced.
The Fund may invest in a variety of fixed income instruments with a fixed or floating (variable) interest rate. The Fund may hold U.S government securities, including Treasury securities, Treasury Inflation Protected Securities (“TIPS”), and agency bonds. The Fund may also invest in corporate debt, commercial and residential mortgage-backed securities (“CMBS” and “RMBS”, respectively) (including collateralized mortgage obligations (“CMOs”), including interest only and principal only instruments), asset-backed securities (“ABS”), municipal securities, convertible securities, pass-through securities, and U.S. dollar denominated securities issued or guaranteed by foreign governments, their agencies, or instrumentalities, and floating rate securities (such as bank loans). The Fund may also invest in non-investment grade bonds (including distressed securities), non-investment grade bank loans, and bonds of emerging market issuers. The Fund’s investment in mortgage-backed securities (“MBS”) may include both agency and non-agency MBS. The portion of the Fund invested in non-investment grade instruments may be up to 100% of the Fund’s total assets.
The Fund may purchase or sell securities on a when-issued, delayed delivery, or forward commitment basis, including the use of the “To Be Announced” (“TBA”) market for MBS investments. The Fund may invest up to 15% of its net assets in securities that are deemed to be illiquid, which may include private placements, certain Rule 144A securities (which are subject to resale restrictions), and securities of issuers that are bankrupt or in default.
The Fund may actively and frequently trade the Fund’s all or a significant portion of the securities in its portfolio.
The Fund is expected to generally have significant exposure to companies in the financial services and industrials sectors, although the Fund will not concentrate (i.e., investment more than 25% of its total assets) in any particular industry. The Fund is considered to be non-diversified, which means that it may invest more of its assets in the securities of a single issuer or a smaller number of issuers than if it were a diversified fund. 
Principal Investment Risks
The principal risks of investing in the Fund are summarized below. As with any investment, there is a risk that you could lose all or a portion of your investment in the Fund. Some or all of these risks may adversely affect the Fund’s net asset value per share (“NAV”), trading price, yield, total return, and/or ability to meet its objective. For more information about the risks of investing in the Fund, see the section in the Fund’s Prospectus titled “Additional Information About the Funds—Principal Risks of Investing in Each Fund.”
The principal risks are presented in alphabetical order to facilitate finding particular risks and comparing them with those of other funds. Each risk summarized below is considered a “principal risk” of investing in the Fund, regardless of the order in which it appears.
ABS Risk. The value of ABS may be significantly affected by changes in interest rates, the market’s perception of issuers, and the creditworthiness of the parties involved. These securities may have a structure that makes their reaction to interest rate changes and other factors difficult to predict, making their value highly volatile.
Agency Debt Risk. Bonds or debentures issued by U.S. government agencies, government-sponsored entities, or government corporations, including, among others, Federal National Mortgage Association (“Fannie Mae”) and Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation (“Freddie Mac”), are generally backed only by the general creditworthiness and reputation of the U.S. government agency, government-sponsored entity, or government corporation issuing the bond or debenture and are not guaranteed by the U.S. Department of the Treasury (“U.S. Treasury”) or backed by the full faith and credit of the U.S. government. As a result, there is uncertainty as to the current status of many obligations of Fannie Mae, Freddie Mac and other agencies that are placed under conservatorship of the federal government. By contrast, Government National Mortgage Association securities are generally backed by the full faith and credit of the U.S. government.
Bank Loans Risk. Bank loans often involve borrowers whose financial conditions are troubled or uncertain and companies that are highly leveraged. The market for bank loans may not be highly liquid and the Fund may have difficulty selling bank loans. These investments expose the Fund to the credit risk of both the financial institution and the underlying borrower. Bank loans generally are subject to legal or contractual restrictions on resale. In addition, bank loans may have trade settlement periods extending beyond seven days, which means that, in certain cases, it could take the Fund a significant amount of time to get its money after selling an investment. Bank loans may be structured such that they are not “securities” under federal securities laws and therefore not subject to federal securities laws protections against fraud and misrepresentation. As such, there can be no assurances that fraud or misrepresentation will not occur with respect to bank loans in which the Fund invests.
23


Call Risk. During periods of falling interest rates, an issuer of a callable bond held by the Fund may “call” or repay the security prior to its stated maturity, and the Fund may have to reinvest the proceeds at lower interest rates, resulting in a decline in the Fund’s income.
Convertible Securities Risk. Convertible securities rank senior to the issuer's common stock, but may be subordinate to senior debt obligations. In part, the total return for a convertible security may depend upon the performance of the underlying stock into which it can be converted. Synthetic convertibles may respond differently to market fluctuations than traditional convertible securities. They are also subject to counterparty risk.
CMBS Risk. The Fund’s investments in CMBS are subject to the risk that if there is a shortfall in loan payments from borrowers or if an underlying property is sold via foreclosure and does not generate sufficient proceeds to meet scheduled payments on all bond classes, investments in the most subordinate outstanding bond class will incur a principal loss first, with any further losses impacting more senior classes in reverse order of payment priority. CMBS are historically more volatile than RMBS. Such securities are subject to credit, interest rate, prepayment, and extension risks.
CMOs Risk. CMOs represent interests in a short-term, intermediate-term or long-term portion of a mortgage pool. Each portion of the pool receives monthly interest payments, but the principal repayments pass through to the short-term CMO first and to the long-term CMO last. Investments in CMOs are subject to the same risks as direct investments in the underlying mortgage-backed securities including credit, interest rate, prepayment, and extension risks. In the event of a bankruptcy or other default of a broker who issued the CMO held by the Fund, the Fund could experience both delays in liquidating its position and losses. In addition, classes of CMOs may also include interest only (“IOs”) and principal only (“POs”). IOs and POs are stripped mortgage-backed securities representing interests in a pool of mortgages the cash flow from which has been separated into interest and principal components. IOs (interest only securities) receive the interest portion of the cash flow while POs (principal only securities) receive the principal portion. IOs and POs can be extremely volatile in response to changes in interest rates. As interest rates rise and fall, the value of IOs tends to move in the same direction as interest rates. When payments on mortgages underlying a PO are slow, the life of the PO is lengthened and the yield to maturity is reduced.
Credit Risk. Issuers and/or counterparties may fail to make payments when due or default completely. If an issuer’s or counterparty’s financial condition worsens, the credit quality of the issuer or counterparty may deteriorate, making it difficult for the Fund to sell such investments. Changes in an issuer’s credit rating or the market’s perception of an issuer’s creditworthiness may also affect the value of an investment in that issuer.
Cybersecurity Risk. With the increased use of technologies such as the Internet to conduct business, the Fund is susceptible to operational, information security, and related risks. Cyber incidents affecting the Fund or its service providers may cause disruptions and impact business operations, potentially resulting in financial losses, interference with the Fund’s ability to calculate its NAV, impediments to trading, the inability of shareholders to transact business, violations of applicable privacy and other laws, regulatory fines, penalties, reputational damage, reimbursement or other compensation costs, or additional compliance costs.
Emerging Markets Risk. Investments in securities traded in developing or emerging markets, or that provide exposure to such securities or markets, can involve additional risks relating to political, economic, currency, or regulatory conditions not associated with investments in U.S. securities and investments in more developed international markets. Such conditions may impact the ability of the Fund to buy, sell, or otherwise transfer securities, adversely affect the trading market and price for Shares and cause the Fund to decline in value.
ETF Risk.
Authorized Participants, Market Makers, and Liquidity Providers Concentration Risk. The Fund has a limited number of financial institutions that are authorized to purchase and redeem Shares directly from the Fund (known as “Authorized Participants” or “APs”). In addition, there may be a limited number of market makers and/or liquidity providers in the marketplace. To the extent either of the following events occur, Shares may trade at a material discount to NAV and possibly face delisting: (i) APs exit the business or otherwise become unable to process creation and/or redemption orders and no other APs step forward to perform these services; or (ii) market makers and/or liquidity providers exit the business or significantly reduce their business activities and no other entities step forward to perform their functions.
Cash Redemption Risk. The Fund’s investment strategy may require it to redeem Shares for cash or to otherwise include cash as part of its redemption proceeds. For example, the Fund may not be able to redeem in-kind certain securities held by the Fund (e.g., derivative instruments and bonds that cannot be broken up beyond certain minimum sizes needed for transfer and settlement). In such a case, the Fund may be required to sell or unwind portfolio investments to obtain the cash needed to distribute redemption proceeds. This may cause the Fund to recognize a capital gain that it might not have recognized if it had made a redemption in-kind. As a result, the Fund may pay out higher annual capital gain distributions than if the in-kind redemption process was used.
24


Costs of Buying or Selling Shares. Due to the costs of buying or selling Shares, including brokerage commissions imposed by brokers and bid-ask spreads, frequent trading of Shares may significantly reduce investment results and an investment in Shares may not be advisable for investors who anticipate regularly making small investments.
Shares May Trade at Prices Other Than NAV. As with all ETFs, Shares may be bought and sold in the secondary market at market prices. Although it is expected that the market price of Shares will approximate the Fund’s NAV, there may be times when the market price of Shares is more than the NAV intra-day (premium) or less than the NAV intra-day (discount) due to supply and demand of Shares or during periods of market volatility. This risk is heightened in times of market volatility, periods of steep market declines, and periods when there is limited trading activity for Shares in the secondary market, in which case such premiums or discounts may be significant. Because securities held by the Fund may trade on foreign exchanges that are closed when the Fund’s primary listing exchange is open, the Fund is likely to experience premiums and discounts greater than those of ETFs holding only domestic securities.
Trading. Although Shares are listed on a national securities exchange, such as NYSE Arca, Inc. (the “Exchange”), and may be traded on U.S. exchanges other than the Exchange, there can be no assurance that Shares will trade with any volume, or at all, on any stock exchange. In stressed market conditions, the liquidity of Shares may begin to mirror the liquidity of the Fund’s underlying portfolio holdings, which can be significantly less liquid than Shares.
Event Risk. Corporate issuers may undergo restructurings, such as mergers, leveraged buyouts, takeovers, or similar events financed by increased debt. As a result of the added debt, the credit quality and market value of a company’s bonds and/or other debt securities may decline significantly.
Extension Risk. When interest rates rise, certain obligations will be repaid by the obligor more slowly than anticipated, causing the value of these securities to fall.
Fixed Income Risk. The value of the Fund’s investments in fixed income securities will fluctuate with changes in interest rates. Typically, a rise in interest rates causes a decline in the value of fixed income securities owned indirectly by the Fund. On the other hand, if rates fall, the value of the fixed income securities generally increases. The Fund may be subject to a greater risk of rising interest rates due to the current period of historically low rates and the effect of potential government fiscal policy initiatives and resulting market reaction to those initiatives. In general, the market price of fixed income securities with longer maturities will increase or decrease more in response to changes in interest rates than shorter-term securities.
Floating or Variable Rate Securities Risk. Securities with floating or variable interest rates are generally less sensitive to interest rate changes than securities with fixed interest rates, but may decline in value if their interest rates do not rise as much, or as quickly, as comparable market interest rates. Although floating or variable rate securities are generally less sensitive to interest rate risk than fixed rate securities, they are subject to credit, liquidity and default risk and may be subject to legal or contractual restrictions on resale, which could impair their value.
Foreign Securities Risk. Investments in securities or other instruments of non-U.S. issuers involve certain risks not involved in domestic investments and may experience more rapid and extreme changes in value than investments in securities of U.S. companies. Financial markets in foreign countries often are not as developed, efficient, or liquid as financial markets in the United States, and therefore, the prices of non-U.S. securities and instruments can be more volatile. In addition, the Fund will be subject to risks associated with adverse political and economic developments in foreign countries, which may include the imposition of economic sanctions. Generally, there is less readily available and reliable information about non-U.S. issuers due to less rigorous disclosure or accounting standards and regulatory practices.
General Market Risk. Economies and financial markets throughout the world are becoming increasingly interconnected, which increases the likelihood that events or conditions in one country or region will adversely impact markets or issuers in other countries or regions. Securities in the Fund’s portfolio may underperform in comparison to securities in the general financial markets, a particular financial market, or other asset classes, due to a number of factors, including inflation (or expectations for inflation), interest rates, global demand for particular products or resources, natural disasters or events, pandemic diseases, terrorism, regulatory events, and government controls.
High Portfolio Turnover Risk. A high portfolio turnover rate increases transaction costs, which may increase the Fund’s expenses. Frequent trading may also cause adverse tax consequences for investors in the Fund due to an increase in short-term capital gains.
High-Yield Securities Risk. High-yield securities (also known as “junk” bonds) carry a greater degree of risk and are more volatile than investment grade securities and are considered speculative. High-yield securities may be issued by companies that are restructuring, are smaller and less creditworthy, or are more highly indebted than other companies. This means that they may have more difficulty making scheduled payments of principal and interest. Changes in the value of high-yield securities are influenced more by changes in the financial and business position of the issuing company than by changes in interest rates when compared to investment grade securities. The Fund’s investments in high-yield securities expose it to a substantial degree of credit risk.
25


Illiquid Securities Risk. The Fund may, at times, hold illiquid securities, by virtue of the absence of a readily available market for certain of its investments, or because of legal or contractual restrictions on sales. The Fund could lose money if it is unable to dispose of an investment at a time or price that is most beneficial to the Fund.
Interest Rate Risk. The Fund’s investments in bonds and other debt securities will change in value based on changes in interest rates. If rates rise, the value of these investments generally declines. Securities with greater interest rate sensitivity and longer maturities generally are subject to greater fluctuations in value.
LIBOR Risk. Instruments in which the Fund invests may pay interest at floating rates based on the London Interbank Offered Rate (“LIBOR”) or may be subject to interest caps or floors based on LIBOR. The Fund and issuers of instruments in which the Fund invests may also obtain financing at floating rates based on LIBOR. Derivative instruments utilized by the Fund and/or issuers of instruments in which the Fund may invest may also reference LIBOR. In July 2017, the head of the United Kingdom Financial Conduct Authority announced the desire to phase out the use of LIBOR by December 31, 2021. There is currently no definitive information regarding the future utilization of LIBOR or of any particular replacement rate. Abandonment of or modifications to LIBOR may affect the value, liquidity or return on certain Fund investments that reference LIBOR without including fallback provisions and may result in costs incurred in connection with closing out positions and entering into new trades. Any pricing adjustments to the Fund’s investments resulting from a substitute reference rate may also adversely affect the Fund’s performance and/or NAV. The effect of a phase out of LIBOR on instruments in which the Fund may invest is currently unclear.
Limited Operating History Risk. The Fund has a limited operating history. As a result, prospective investors have a limited track record or history on which to base their investment decision.
Management Risk. The Fund is actively-managed and may not meet its investment objective based on IR+M’s success or failure to implement investment strategies for the Fund.
MBS Risk. MBS securities are subject to credit, interest rate, prepayment, and extension risks. These securities also are subject to risk of default on the underlying mortgage or asset, particularly during periods of economic downturn. Small movements in interest rates may quickly and significantly reduce the value of certain mortgage back securities.
Municipal Securities Risk. Municipal securities can be significantly affected by political or economic changes, including changes made in the law after issuance of the securities, as well as uncertainties in the municipal market related to taxation, legislative changes or the rights of municipal security holders, including in connection with an issuer insolvency. Municipal securities backed by current or anticipated revenues from a specific project or specific assets can be negatively affected by the inability to collect revenues from the project or the assets.
Non-Diversification Risk. The Fund is considered to be non-diversified, which means that it may invest more of its assets in the securities of a single issuer or a smaller number of issuers than if it were a diversified fund. As a result, the Fund may be more exposed to the risks associated with and developments affecting an individual issuer or a smaller number of issuers than a fund that invests more widely. This may increase the Fund’s volatility and cause the performance of a relatively smaller number of issuers to have a greater impact on the Fund’s performance.
Prepayment Risk. The issuer of certain securities may repay principal in advance, especially when yields fall. Changes in the rate at which prepayments occur can affect the return on investment of these securities. When debt obligations are prepaid or when securities are called, the Fund may have to reinvest in securities with a lower yield. The Fund also may fail to recover additional amounts (i.e., premiums) paid for securities with higher coupons, resulting in an unexpected capital loss.
Privately Placed Securities Risk. Privately placed securities generally are less liquid than publicly traded securities and the Fund may not always be able to sell such securities without experiencing delays in finding buyers or reducing the sale price for such securities. The disposition of some of the securities held by the Fund may be restricted under federal securities laws. As a result, the Fund may not be able to dispose of such investments at a time when, or at a price at which, it desires to do so and may have to bear expenses of registering these securities, if necessary. These securities may also be difficult to value.
Rating Agencies Risks. Ratings are not an absolute standard of quality. Ratings are general indicators that reflect only the view of the originating rating agencies from which an explanation of the significance of such ratings may be obtained. There is no assurance that a particular rating will continue for any given period of time or that any such rating will not be revised downward or withdrawn entirely. Such changes may negatively affect the liquidity or market price of the securities in which the Fund invests. The ratings of securitized assets may not adequately reflect the credit risk of those assets due to their structure.
Recent Market Events Risk. U.S. and international markets have experienced significant periods of volatility in recent years and months due to a number of economic, political and global macro factors including the impact of the novel coronavirus (COVID-19) as a global pandemic, which has resulted in public health issues, growth concerns in the U.S. and overseas, layoffs, rising unemployment claims, changed travel and social behaviors, and reduced consumer spending. The effects of COVID-19 may lead to a substantial economic downturn or recession in the U.S. and global economies, the recovery from which is uncertain and may last for an extended period of time. These developments as well as other events could result in further market volatility
26


and negatively affect financial asset prices, the liquidity of certain securities and the normal operations of securities exchanges and other markets.
RMBS Risk. RMBS are particularly susceptible to prepayment risks, as they generally do not contain prepayment penalties and a reduction in interest rates will increase the prepayments on the RMBS. Such securities are also subject to credit, interest rate, and extension risks.
Sector Risk. At times the Fund may increase the relative emphasis of its investments in a particular sector or group of industries. The prices of securities of issuers in a particular sector may be more susceptible to fluctuations due to changes in economic or business conditions, government regulations, availability of basic resources or supplies, or other events that affect that industry or sector more than securities of issuers in other industries and sectors. To the extent that the Fund increases the relative emphasis of its investments in a particular industry or sector, the value of Shares may fluctuate in response to events affecting that industry or sector.
Financial Services Sector Risk. The Fund may invest in companies in the financial services sector, and therefore the performance of the Fund could be negatively impacted by events affecting this sector. This sector can be significantly affected by changes in interest rates, government regulation, the rate of defaults on corporate, consumer and government debt and the availability and cost of capital, among other factors. Insurance companies, in particular, may be significantly affected by changes in interest rates, catastrophic events, price and market competition, the imposition of premium rate caps, or other changes in government regulation or tax law and/or rate regulation, which may have an adverse impact on their profitability. This sector has experienced significant losses in the recent past, and the impact of more stringent capital requirements and of recent or future regulation on any individual financial company or on the sector as a whole cannot be predicted. In recent years, cyber attacks and technology malfunctions and failures have become increasingly frequent in this sector and have caused significant losses.
Industrials Sector Risk. The Fund may invest in companies in the industrials sector, and therefore the performance of the Fund could be negatively impacted by events affecting this sector. The industrials sector may be affected by changes in the supply of and demand for products and services, product obsolescence, claims for environmental damage or product liability and general economic conditions, among other factors.
TBA Securities and Rolls Risk. TBA transactions are subject to increased credit risk and increased overall investment exposure. TBA rolls involve the risk that the Fund’s counterparty will be unable to deliver the MBS underlying the TBA roll at the fixed time. If the buyer files for bankruptcy or becomes insolvent, the buyer or its representative may ask for and receive an extension of time to decide whether to enforce the Fund’s repurchase obligation. In addition, the Fund earns interest by investing the transaction proceeds during the roll period. TBA roll transactions may have the effect of creating leverage in the Fund’s portfolio.
TIPS Risk. Interest payments on TIPS are unpredictable and will fluctuate as the principal and corresponding interest payments are adjusted for inflation. There can be no assurance that the Consumer Price Index (“CPI”) will accurately measure the real rate of inflation in the prices of goods and services. Any increases in the principal amount of TIPS will be considered taxable ordinary income, even though the Fund will not receive the principal until maturity. As a result, the Fund may make income distributions to shareholders that exceed the cash it receives. In addition, TIPS are subject to credit risk and interest rate risk.
Uncertain Tax Treatment. Below investment grade instruments may present special tax issues for the Fund. U.S. federal income tax rules are not entirely clear about issues such as when the Fund may cease to accrue interest, original issue discount (“OID”) or market discount, when and to what extent deductions may be taken for bad debts or worthless instruments, how payments received on obligations in default should be allocated between principal and income and whether exchanges of debt obligations in a bankruptcy or workout context are taxable, which may make it difficult for the Fund to satisfy the annual distribution requirements applicable to RICs.
U.S. Government Obligations Risk. Obligations of U.S. government agencies and authorities receive varying levels of support and may not be backed by the full faith and credit of the U.S. government, which could affect the Fund’s ability to recover should they default. No assurance can be given that the U.S. government will provide financial support to its agencies and authorities if it is not obligated by law to do so. Additionally, market prices and yields of securities supported by the full faith and credit of the U.S. government or other countries may decline or be negative for short or long periods of time.
Valuation Risk. The prices provided by the Fund’s pricing services or independent dealers or the fair value determinations made by the Fund’s valuation committee may be different from the prices used by other investment companies or from the prices at which debt obligations are actually bought and sold. The prices of certain debt obligations provided by pricing services may be subject to frequent and significant change, and will vary depending on the information that is available.
When-Issued, Delayed Delivery, and Forward Commitment Risks. The purchase of securities on a when-issued, delayed delivery, or forward commitment basis involves a risk of loss if the value of the security to be purchased declines prior to the settlement date.
27


Performance
Performance information for the Fund is not included because the Fund has not completed a full calendar year of operations as of the date of this Prospectus. When such information is included, this section will provide some indication of the risks of investing in the Fund by showing changes in the Fund’s performance history from year to year and showing how the Fund’s average annual total returns compare with those of a broad measure of market performance. Although past performance of the Fund is no guarantee of how it will perform in the future, historical performance may give you some indication of the risks of investing in the Fund. Updated performance information is available on the Fund’s website at www.sofi.com/invest/etfs/.
Management
Investment Adviser     
Toroso Investments, LLC (“Toroso” or the “Adviser”) serves as investment adviser to the Fund.
Sub-Adviser    
Income Research + Management serves as investment sub-adviser to the Fund.
Portfolio Managers     
William A. O’Malley, CFA, Chief Executive Officer and Co-Chief Investment Officer for IR+M, is responsible for the day-to-day management of the Fund and has been a portfolio manager of the Fund since its inception in 2020.
James E. Gubitosi, CFA, Senior Portfolio Manager and Co-Chief Investment Officer for IR+M, is responsible for the day-to-day management of the Fund and has been a portfolio manager of the Fund since its inception in 2020.
William O’Neill, CFA, Senior Portfolio Manager for IR+M, is responsible for the day-to-day management of the Fund and has been a portfolio manager of the Fund since its inception in 2020.
Charles A. Ragauss, CFA, Portfolio Manager for Toroso, has been a portfolio manager of the Fund since its inception in 2020.
Purchase and Sale of Shares
The Fund issues and redeems Shares at NAV only in large blocks known as “Creation Units,” which only APs (typically, broker-dealers) may purchase or redeem. The Fund generally issues and redeems Creation Units in exchange for a portfolio of securities (the “Deposit Securities”) and/or a designated amount of U.S. cash.
Shares are listed on a national securities exchange, such as the Exchange, and individual Shares may only be bought and sold in the secondary market through brokers at market prices, rather than NAV. Because Shares trade at market prices rather than NAV, Shares may trade at a price greater than NAV (premium) or less than NAV (discount).
An investor may incur costs attributable to the difference between the highest price a buyer is willing to pay to purchase Shares (the “bid” price) and the lowest price a seller is willing to accept for Shares (the “ask” price) when buying or selling Shares in the secondary market. This difference in bid and ask prices is often referred to as the “bid-ask spread.”
Recent information regarding the Fund’s NAV, market price, how often Shares traded on the Exchange at a premium or discount, and bid-ask spreads can be found on the Fund’s website at www.sofi.com/invest/etfs/.
Tax Information
Fund distributions are generally taxable as ordinary income, qualified dividend income, or capital gains (or a combination), unless an investment is in an IRA or other tax-advantaged account. Distributions on investments made through tax-deferred arrangements may be taxed later upon withdrawal of assets from those accounts.
Financial Intermediary Compensation
If you purchase Shares through a broker-dealer or other financial intermediary (such as a bank) (an “Intermediary”), the Adviser, Sub-Adviser or their affiliates may pay Intermediaries for certain activities related to the Fund, including participation in activities that are designed to make Intermediaries more knowledgeable about exchange-traded products, including the Fund, or for other activities, such as marketing, educational training, or other initiatives related to the sale or promotion of Shares. These payments may create a conflict of interest by influencing the Intermediary and your salesperson to recommend the Fund over another investment. Any such arrangements do not result in increased Fund expenses. Ask your salesperson or visit the Intermediary’s website for more information.
28


ADDITIONAL INFORMATION ABOUT THE FUNDS
Investment Objective
Each of the SoFi Select 500 ETF, SoFi Next 500 ETF, and SoFi Social 50 ETF (collectively, the “Index ETFs”) seeks to track the performance, before fees and expenses, of the applicable Index. The SoFi Gig Economy ETF seeks long-term capital appreciation. The SoFi Weekly Income ETF seeks to provide current income.
An investment objective is fundamental if it cannot be changed without the consent of the holders of a majority of the outstanding Shares. The Funds’ investment objectives have not been adopted as fundamental investment policies and therefore may be changed without the consent of the Funds’ shareholders upon approval by the Board of Trustees (the “Board’) of Tidal ETF Trust (the “Trust”) and written notice to shareholders.
Principal Investment Strategies
For the Index ETFs, to the extent the applicable Index concentrates (i.e., holds more than 25% of its total assets in the securities of a particular industry or group of related industries), a Fund will concentrate its investments to approximately the same extent as the Index.
The Funds may engage in active and frequent trading of portfolio securities to achieve their principal investment strategies. A high portfolio turnover rate increases transaction costs, which may increase a Fund’s expenses. Frequent trading may also cause adverse tax consequences for investors in a Fund due to an increase in short-term capital gains.
Each of the Index ETFs tracks an Index that is calculated by Solactive AG, an independent third party calculation agent that is not affiliated with the applicable Fund, the Adviser, the Sub-Adviser (with regard to the SoFi Weekly Income ETF), the Funds’ distributor, or any of their affiliates. None of the Index ETFs is sponsored, promoted, sold or supported in any other manner by Solactive AG, nor does Solactive AG offer any express or implicit guarantee or assurance either with regard to the results of using each Index and/or Index trade mark, or the price of each Index at any time or in any other respect. Each Index is calculated and published by Solactive AG. Solactive AG uses its best efforts to ensure that the Index is calculated correctly. Notwithstanding its obligations under an index license agreement with the Adviser, Solactive AG has no obligation to point out errors in an Index to third parties, including, but not limited to, investors and/or financial intermediaries of each Index ETF. Neither publication of the Indices nor the licensing of the Indices or their trade marks by Solactive AG for the purpose of use in connection with the Index ETFs constitutes a recommendation by Solactive AG to invest capital in any of the Index ETFs, nor does it in any way represent an assurance or opinion of Solactive AG with regard to an investment in any of the Index ETFs.
Additional Information - SoFi Weekly Income ETF
144A Securities. The SoFi Weekly Income ETF may invest in Rule 144A securities (known as “restricted securities”), which are not registered under the federal securities laws and cannot be sold to the U.S. public because of SEC regulations. The SoFi Weekly Income ETF generally considers Rule 144A securities to be liquid unless determined otherwise pursuant to guidelines contained in the liquidity risk management program of the Trust applicable to the SoFi Weekly Income ETF.
MBS. The SoFi Weekly Income ETF’s investments may include instruments issued by both U.S. and non-U.S. government and private sector issuers, including asset-backed securities. Instruments issued by the U.S. government include U.S. Treasuries and U.S. agency securities, which may include MBS issued or guaranteed by the U.S. government, federal agencies, or U.S. government sponsored instrumentalities, such as Ginnie Mae and the Federal Housing Administration (“FHA”).
TBA Securities. The TBA market allows investors to gain exposure to MBS with certain broad characteristics (e.g., maturity, coupon, age) without taking delivery of the actual securities until the settlement day, which is once every month. In addition, the SoFi Weekly Income ETF may utilize the TBA roll market, in which one sells, in the TBA market, the security for current month settlement, while simultaneously committing to buy the same TBA security for next month settlement. The SoFi Weekly Income ETF may utilize the TBA roll market for extended periods of time without taking delivery of the physical securities. The SoFi Weekly Income ETF may, without limitation, seek to obtain market exposure to the securities in which it primarily invests by entering into a series of purchase and sale contracts or by using other investment techniques (such as buy backs or dollar rolls).
Temporary Strategies
For temporary defensive purposes, the SoFi Gig Economy ETF may invest in short-term instruments such as commercial paper and/or repurchase agreements collateralized by U.S. government securities, corporation obligations, municipal debt securities, MBS, or convertible securities.
For temporary defensive purposes during adverse market, economic, political, or other conditions, the SoFi Weekly Income ETF may invest in short-term instruments such as commercial paper and/or repurchase agreements collateralized by U.S. government securities, corporation obligations, municipal debt securities, or MBS.
Taking a temporary defensive position may result in the SoFi Gig Economy ETF and SoFi Weekly Income ETF not achieving their investment objectives.
29


Manager of Managers Structure
The Funds and the Adviser have received exemptive relief from the SEC permitting the Adviser (subject to certain conditions and the approval of the Board) to change or select new unaffiliated sub-advisers without obtaining shareholder approval. The relief also permits the Adviser to materially amend the terms of agreements with an unaffiliated sub-adviser (including an increase in the fee paid by the Adviser to the unaffiliated sub-adviser (and not paid by a Fund)) or to continue the employment of an unaffiliated sub-adviser after an event that would otherwise cause the automatic termination of services with Board approval, but without shareholder approval. Shareholders will be notified of any unaffiliated sub-adviser changes. The Adviser has the ultimate responsibility, subject to oversight by the Board, to oversee a sub-adviser(s) and recommend their hiring, termination and replacement.
Principal Risks of Investing in each Fund
There can be no assurance that a Fund will achieve its investment objective. The following information is in addition to, and should be read along with, the description of each Fund’s principal investment risks in the section titled “Fund Summary— Principal Investment Risks” above.
The principal risks are presented in alphabetical order to facilitate finding particular risks and comparing them with those of other funds. Each risk summarized below is considered a “principal risk” of investing in the Funds, regardless of the order in which it appears. As with any investment, there is a risk that you could lose all or a portion of your investment in a Fund. Some or all of these risks may adversely affect a Fund’s NAV per share, trading price, yield, total return and/or ability to meet its investment objective. The following risks could affect the value of your performance in the Funds:
SoFi Select 500 ETF SoFi Next 500 ETF SoFi Social 50 ETF SoFi Gig Economy ETF SoFi Weekly Income ETF
ABS Risk X
Agency Debt Risk X
Bank Loans Risk X
Call Risk X
Convertible Securities Risk X
CMBS Risk X
CMOs Risk X
Credit Risk X
Currency Exchange Rate Risk
X
Cybersecurity Risk
X
X
X
X
X
Data Risk
X
Emerging Markets Risk
X
X
Equity Market Risk
X
X
X
X
ETF Risk
X
X
X
X
X
— Authorized Participants, Market Makers, and Liquidity Providers Concentration Risk
X X X X X
Cash Redemption Risk
X
Costs of Buying or Selling Shares
X X X X X
Shares May Trade at Prices Other Than NAV
X X X X X
Trading
X X X X X
Event Risk X
Extension Risk X
Fixed Income Risk X
Floating or Variable Rate Securities Risk X
Foreign Securities Risk
X
X
General Market Risk
X X X
X
X
High Portfolio Turnover Risk
X
X
X
X
X
High-Yield Securities Risk
X
Illiquid Securities Risk
X
Interest Rate Risk X
LIBOR Risk X
30


SoFi Select 500 ETF SoFi Next 500 ETF SoFi Social 50 ETF SoFi Gig Economy ETF SoFi Weekly Income ETF
Limited Operating History Risk
X
X
X
X
X
Management Risk
X
X
Market Capitalization Risk
X
X
X
X
— Large-Capitalization Investing
X
X
X
X
— Mid-Capitalization Investing
X
X
X
X
—Small-Capitalization Investing
X
MBS Risk
X
Municipal Securities Risk
X
Models and Data Risk
X
X
Non-Diversification Risk
X
X
Passive Investment Risk
X
X
X
Prepayment Risk
X
Privately Placed Securities Risk
X
Rating Agencies Risk X
Recent Market Events Risk
X
X
X
X
X
REIT Investment Risk
X
X
X
RMBS Risk
X
Sector Risk
X
X
X
X
X
— Communication Services Sector Risk
X
X
— Consumer Staples Sector Risk
X

— Financial Services Sector Risk
X
— Industrials Sector Risk
X
TBA Securities and Rolls Risk
X
TIPS Risk
X
Tracking Error Risk
X
X
X
Uncertain Tax Treatment X
U.S. Government Obligations Risk X
User Bias Risk
X
Valuation Risk X
When-Issued, Delayed Delivery, and Forward Commitment Risk X
ABS Risk. The value of ABS may be significantly affected by changes in interest rates, the market’s perception of issuers, and the creditworthiness of the parties involved. These securities may have a structure that makes their reaction to interest rate changes and other factors difficult to predict, making their value highly volatile.
Agency Debt Risk. Bonds or debentures issued by U.S. government agencies, government-sponsored entities, or government corporations, including, among others, Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, are generally backed only by the general creditworthiness and reputation of the U.S. government agency, government-sponsored entity, or government corporation issuing the bond or debenture and are not guaranteed by the U.S. Treasury or backed by the full faith and credit of the U.S. government. Ginnie Mae securities are generally backed by the full faith and credit of the U.S. government.
Some U.S. government agencies, including Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, purchase and guarantee residential mortgages and form MBS that they issue to the market. These agencies also hold their own MBS as well as those of other institutions with funding from the agency debentures they issue. The market for MBS has been adversely affected by the value of those MBS held and/or issued by these agencies. These securities are subject to more credit risk than U.S. government securities that are supported by the full faith and credit of the U.S. (e.g., U.S. Treasury bonds). If a U.S. government agency that is the issuer of securities in which the Fund invests is unable to meet its obligations or ceases to exist and no plan is made for repayment of securities, the performance of the Fund will be adversely impacted.
Bank Loans Risk. Bank loans often involve borrowers whose financial conditions are troubled or uncertain and companies that are highly leveraged. The market for bank loans may not be highly liquid and the Fund may have difficulty selling bank loans. These investments expose the Fund to the credit risk of both the financial institution and the underlying borrower. Bank loans generally are subject to legal or contractual restrictions on resale. In addition, bank loans may have trade settlement periods extending beyond seven
31


days, which means that, in certain cases, it could take the Fund a significant amount of time to get its money after selling an investment. Bank loans may be structured such that they are not “securities” under federal securities laws and therefore not subject to federal securities laws protections against fraud and misrepresentation. As such, there can be no assurances that fraud or misrepresentation will not occur with respect to bank loans in which the Fund invests.
Call Risk. During periods of falling interest rates, an issuer of a callable bond held by the Fund may “call” or repay the security before its stated maturity, and the Fund may have to reinvest the proceeds in securities with lower yields, which would result in a decline in the Fund’s income, or in securities with greater risks or with other less favorable features.
Convertible Securities Risk. Convertible securities rank senior to the issuer's common stock, but may be subordinate to senior debt obligations. In part, the total return for a convertible security may depend upon the performance of the underlying stock into which it can be converted. Synthetic convertibles may respond differently to market fluctuations than traditional convertible securities. They are also subject to counterparty risk.
CMBS Risk. The Fund’s investments in CMBS are subject to the risk that if there is a shortfall in loan payments from borrowers or if an underlying property is sold via foreclosure and does not generate sufficient proceeds to meet scheduled payments on all bond classes, investments in the most subordinate outstanding bond class will incur a principal loss first, with any further losses impacting more senior classes in reverse order of payment priority. CMBS are historically more volatile than RMBS. CMBS, like traditional fixed-income securities, are subject to credit, interest rate, prepayment, and extension risks (see “Credit Risk,” “Interest Rate Risk,” “Prepayment Risk,” and “Extension Risk” for more information on these risks).
CMOs Risk. CMOs represent interests in a short-term, intermediate-term or long-term portion of a mortgage pool. Each portion of the pool receives monthly interest payments, but the principal repayments pass through to the short-term CMO first and to the long-term CMO last. Investments in CMOs are subject to the same risks as direct investments in the underlying mortgage-backed securities including credit, interest rate, prepayment, and extension risks. In the event of a bankruptcy or other default of a broker who issued the CMO held by the Fund, the Fund could experience both delays in liquidating its position and losses. In addition, classes of CMOs may also include interest only (“IOs”) and principal only (“POs”). IOs and POs are stripped mortgage-backed securities representing interests in a pool of mortgages the cash flow from which has been separated into interest and principal components. IOs (interest only securities) receive the interest portion of the cash flow while POs (principal only securities) receive the principal portion. IOs and POs can be extremely volatile in response to changes in interest rates. As interest rates rise and fall, the value of IOs tends to move in the same direction as interest rates. When payments on mortgages underlying a PO are slow, the life of the PO is lengthened and the yield to maturity is reduced.
Credit Risk. Issuers and/or counterparties may fail to make payments when due or default completely. If an issuer’s or counterparty’s financial condition worsens, the credit quality of the issuer or counterparty may deteriorate, making it difficult for the Fund to sell such investments. Changes in an issuer’s credit rating or the market’s perception of an issuer’s creditworthiness may also affect the value of an investment in that issuer.
Currency Exchange Rate Risk. Changes in currency exchange rates and the relative value of non-U.S. currencies will affect the value of the Fund’s investments and the value of your Fund shares. Because the Fund’s NAV is determined on the basis of U.S. dollars, the U.S. dollar value of your investment in the Fund may go down if the value of the local currency of the non-U.S. markets in which the Fund invests depreciates against the U.S. dollar. This is true even if the local currency value of securities in the Fund’s holdings goes up. Conversely, the dollar value of your investment in the Fund may go up if the value of the local currency appreciates against the U.S. dollar. The value of the U.S. dollar measured against other currencies is influenced by a variety of factors. These factors include: national debt levels and trade deficits, changes in balances of payments and trade, domestic and foreign interest and inflation rates, global or regional political, economic or financial events, monetary policies of governments, actual or potential government intervention, and global energy prices. Political instability, the possibility of government intervention and restrictive or opaque business and investment policies may also reduce the value of a country’s currency. Government monetary policies and the buying or selling of currency by a country’s government may also influence exchange rates. Currency exchange rates can be very volatile and can change quickly and unpredictably. As a result, the value of an investment in the Fund may change quickly and without warning, and you may lose money.
Cybersecurity Risk. With the increased use of technologies such as the Internet to conduct business, the Fund is susceptible to operational, information security, and related risks. In general, cyber incidents can result from deliberate attacks or unintentional events. Cyber attacks include, but are not limited to, gaining unauthorized access to digital systems (e.g., through “hacking” or malicious software coding) for purposes of misappropriating assets or sensitive information, corrupting data, or causing operational disruption. Cyber attacks may also be carried out in a manner that does not require gaining unauthorized access, such as causing denial-of-service attacks on websites (i.e., efforts to make network services unavailable to intended users). Cyber incidents affecting the Fund or its service providers have the ability to cause disruptions and impact business operations, potentially resulting in financial losses, interference with the Fund’s ability to calculate its NAV, impediments to trading, the inability of shareholders to transact business, violations of applicable privacy and other laws, regulatory fines, penalties, reputational damage, reimbursement or other compensation costs, or additional compliance costs. Similar adverse consequences could result from cyber incidents affecting issuers of securities in which the Fund invests, counterparties with which the Fund engages in transactions, governmental and other regulatory
32


authorities, exchange and other financial market operators, banks, brokers, dealers, insurance companies and other financial institutions (including financial intermediaries and service providers for shareholders) and other parties. In addition, substantial costs may be incurred in order to prevent any cyber incidents in the future. While the Fund’s service providers have established business continuity plans in the event of, and risk management systems to prevent, such cyber incidents, there are inherent limitations in such plans and systems including the possibility that certain risks have not been identified. Furthermore, the Fund cannot control the cyber security plans and systems put in place by their service providers or any other third parties whose operations may affect the Fund or its shareholders. As a result, the Fund and its shareholders could be negatively impacted.
Data Risk.  The composition of the Index is heavily dependent on information and data supplied by third parties. When such data prove to be incorrect or incomplete, any decisions made in reliance thereon may lead to the inclusion or exclusion of securities from the Index universe that would have been excluded or included had the data been correct and complete. If the composition of the Index reflects such errors, the Fund’s portfolio can be expected to reflect the errors, too.
Emerging Markets Risk. Investments in securities and instruments traded in developing or emerging markets, or that provide exposure to such securities or markets, can involve additional risks relating to political, economic, or regulatory conditions not associated with investments in U.S. securities and instruments. For example, developing and emerging markets may be subject to (i) greater market volatility, (ii) lower trading volume and liquidity, (iii) greater social, political, and economic uncertainty, (iv) governmental controls on foreign investments and limitations on repatriation of invested capital, (v) lower disclosure, corporate governance, auditing and financial reporting standards, (vi) fewer protections of property rights, (vii) restrictions on the transfer of securities or currency, and (viii) settlement and trading practices that differ from those in U.S. markets. Each of these factors may impact the ability of the Fund to buy, sell, or otherwise transfer securities, adversely affect the trading market and price for Fund Shares and cause the Fund to decline in value.
Equity Market Risk. Common stocks are susceptible to general stock market fluctuations and to volatile increases and decreases in value as market confidence in and perceptions of their issuers change. These investor perceptions are based on various and unpredictable factors including: expectations regarding government, economic, monetary and fiscal policies; inflation and interest rates; economic expansion or contraction; and global or regional political, economic and banking crises. If you held common stock, or common stock equivalents, of any given issuer, you would generally be exposed to greater risk than if you held preferred stocks and debt obligations of the issuer because common stockholders, or holders of equivalent interests, generally have inferior rights to receive payments from issuers in comparison with the rights of preferred stockholders, bondholders, and other creditors of such issuers.
ETF Risk.
APs, Market Makers, and Liquidity Providers Concentration Risk. The Fund has a limited number of financial institutions that may act as APs. In addition, there may be a limited number of market makers and/or liquidity providers in the marketplace. To the extent either of the following events occur, Shares may trade at a material discount to NAV and possibly face delisting: (i) APs exit the business or otherwise become unable to process creation and/or redemption orders and no other APs step forward to perform these services; or (ii) market makers and/or liquidity providers exit the business or significantly reduce their business activities and no other entities step forward to perform their functions.
Cash Redemption Risk. The Fund’s investment strategy may require it to redeem Shares for cash or to otherwise include cash as part of its redemption proceeds. For example, the Fund may not be able to redeem in-kind certain securities held by the Fund (e.g., derivative instruments and bonds that cannot be broken up beyond certain minimum sizes needed for transfer and settlement). In such a case, the Fund may be required to sell or unwind portfolio investments to obtain the cash needed to distribute redemption proceeds. This may cause the Fund to recognize a capital gain that it might not have recognized if it had made a redemption in-kind. As a result, the Fund may pay out higher annual capital gain distributions than if the in-kind redemption process was used.
Costs of Buying or Selling Shares. Investors buying or selling Shares in the secondary market will pay brokerage commissions or other charges imposed by brokers, as determined by that broker. Brokerage commissions are often a fixed amount and may be a significant proportional cost for investors seeking to buy or sell relatively small amounts of Shares. In addition, secondary market investors will also incur the cost of the bid-ask spread. The bid-ask spread varies over time for Shares based on trading volume and market liquidity, and is generally lower if Shares have more trading volume and market liquidity and higher if Shares have little trading volume and market liquidity. Further, a relatively small investor base in the Fund, asset swings in the Fund and/or increased market volatility may cause increased bid-ask spreads. Due to the costs of buying or selling Shares, including bid-ask spreads, frequent trading of Shares may significantly reduce investment results and an investment in Shares may not be advisable for investors who anticipate regularly making small investments.
33


Shares May Trade at Prices Other Than NAV. As with all ETFs, Shares may be bought and sold in the secondary market at market prices. Although it is expected that the market price of the Shares will approximate the Fund’s NAV, there may be times when the market price of Shares is more than the NAV intra-day (premium) or less than the NAV intra-day (discount) due to supply and demand of the Shares or during periods of market volatility. This risk is heightened in times of market volatility or periods of steep market declines. The market price of Shares during the trading day, like the price of any exchange-traded security, includes a “bid-ask” spread charged by the exchange specialist, market makers, or other participants that trade the Shares. In times of severe market disruption, the bid-ask spread can increase significantly. At those times, Shares are most likely to be traded at a discount to NAV, and the discount is likely to be greatest when the price of Shares is falling fastest, which may be the time that you most want to sell your Shares. The Adviser believes that, under normal market conditions, large market price discounts or premiums to NAV will not be sustained because of arbitrage opportunities. Because securities held by the Fund may trade on foreign exchanges that are closed when the Fund’s primary listing exchange is open, the Fund is likely to experience premiums and discounts greater than those of ETFs holding only domestic securities.
Trading. Although Shares are listed for trading on the Exchange and may be listed or traded on U.S. and non-U.S. stock exchanges other than the Exchange, there can be no assurance that an active trading market for such Shares will develop or be maintained. Trading in Shares may be halted due to market conditions or for reasons that, in the view of the Exchange, make trading in Shares inadvisable. In addition, trading in Shares on the Exchange is subject to trading halts caused by extraordinary market volatility pursuant to Exchange “circuit breaker” rules, which temporarily halt trading on the Exchange when a decline in the S&P 500 during a single day reaches certain thresholds (e.g., 7%, 13%, and 20%). Additional rules applicable to the Exchange may halt trading in Shares when extraordinary volatility causes sudden, significant swings in the market price of Shares. There can be no assurance that Shares will trade with any volume, or at all, on any stock exchange. In stressed market conditions, the liquidity of Shares may begin to mirror the liquidity of the Fund’s underlying portfolio holdings, which can be significantly less liquid than Shares.
Event Risk. Corporate issuers may undergo restructurings, such as mergers, leveraged buyouts, takeovers, or similar events financed by increased debt. As a result of the added debt, the credit quality and market value of a company’s bonds and/or other debt securities may decline significantly.
Extension Risk. When interest rates rise, certain obligations will be repaid by the obligor more slowly than anticipated, causing the value of these securities to fall. Rising interest rates tend to extend the duration of securities, making them more sensitive to future changes in interest rates. The value of longer-term securities generally changes more in response to changes in interest rates than the value of shorter-term securities. As a result, in a period of rising interest rates, securities may exhibit additional volatility and may lose value.
Fixed Income Risk. The value of the Fund’s investments in fixed income securities will fluctuate with changes in interest rates. Typically, a rise in interest rates causes a decline in the value of fixed income securities owned indirectly by the Fund. On the other hand, if rates fall, the value of the fixed income securities generally increases. The Fund may be subject to a greater risk of rising interest rates due to the current period of historically low rates and the effect of potential government fiscal policy initiatives and resulting market reaction to those initiatives. In general, the market price of fixed income securities with longer maturities will increase or decrease more in response to changes in interest rates than shorter-term securities.
Floating or Variable Rate Securities Risk. Securities with floating or variable interest rates are generally less sensitive to interest rate changes than securities with fixed interest rates, but may decline in value if their interest rates do not rise as much, or as quickly, as comparable market interest rates. Conversely, floating or variable rate securities will not generally increase in value if interest rates decline. The impact of interest rate changes on floating or variable rate securities is typically mitigated by the periodic interest rate reset of the investments. Floating or variable rate securities can be rated below investment grade or unrated; therefore, the Fund relies heavily on the analytical ability of IR+M. Floating or variable rate securities are often subject to restrictions on resale, which can result in reduced liquidity.
Foreign Securities Risk. Certain foreign countries may impose exchange control regulations, restrictions on repatriation of profit on investments or of capital invested, local taxes on investments, and restrictions on the ability of issuers of non-U.S. securities to make payments of principal and interest to investors located outside the country, whether from currency blockage or otherwise. In addition, the Fund will be subject to risks associated with adverse political and economic developments in foreign countries, including seizure or nationalization of foreign deposits, the imposition of economic sanctions, different legal systems and laws relating to bankruptcy and creditors’ rights, and the potential inability to enforce legal judgments, all of which could cause the Fund to lose money on its investments in non-U.S. securities. The cost of servicing external debt will also generally be adversely affected by rising international interest rates, as many external debt obligations bear interest at rates which are adjusted based upon international interest rates. Because non-U.S. securities may trade on days when Shares are not priced, NAV may change at times when Shares cannot be sold.
Foreign banks and securities depositories at which the Fund holds its foreign securities and cash may be recently organized or new to the foreign custody business and may be subject to only limited or no regulatory oversight. Additionally, many foreign governments do not supervise and regulate stock exchanges, brokers and the sale of securities to the same extent as does the United States and may
34


not have laws to protect investors that are comparable to U.S. securities laws. Settlement and clearance procedures in certain foreign markets may result in delays in payment for or delivery of securities not typically associated with settlement and clearance of U.S. investments.
In recent years, the European financial markets have experienced volatility and adverse trends due to concerns about economic downturns in, or rising government debt levels of, several European countries. These events may spread to other countries in Europe, including countries that do not use the Euro. These events may affect the value and liquidity of certain of the Fund’s investments.
General Market Risk. Economies and financial markets throughout the world are becoming increasingly interconnected, which increases the likelihood that events or conditions in one country or region will adversely impact markets or issuers in other countries or regions. Securities in the Fund’s portfolio may underperform in comparison to securities in the general financial markets, a particular financial market or other asset classes, due to a number of factors, including inflation (or expectations for inflation), interest rates, global demand for particular products or resources, natural disasters or events, pandemic diseases, terrorism, regulatory events, and government controls.
High Portfolio Turnover Risk. A high portfolio turnover rate increases transaction costs, which may increase the Fund’s expenses. Frequent trading may also cause adverse tax consequences for investors in the Fund due to an increase in short-term capital gains.
High-Yield Securities Risk. Below investment grade instruments are commonly referred to as “junk” or high-yield instruments and are regarded as predominantly speculative with respect to the issuer’s capacity to pay interest and repay principal. Lower grade instruments may be particularly susceptible to economic downturns. It is likely that a prolonged or deepening economic recession could adversely affect the ability of the issuers of such instruments to repay principal and pay interest thereon, increase the incidence of default for such instruments and severely disrupt the market value of such instruments.
Lower grade instruments, though higher yielding, are characterized by higher risk. The retail secondary market for lower grade instruments, which are often thinly traded or subject to irregular trading, may be less liquid than that for higher rated instruments. Such instruments can be more difficult to sell and to value than higher rated instruments because there is generally less public information available about such securities. As a result, subjective judgment may play a greater role in valuing such instruments. Adverse conditions could make it difficult at times for the Fund to sell certain instruments or could result in lower prices than those used in calculating the Fund’s NAV. Because of the substantial risks associated with investments in lower grade instruments, investors could lose money on their investment in the Fund, both in the short-term and the long-term.
Illiquid Securities Risks. The Fund may invest up to 15% of its net assets in illiquid or restricted securities deemed illiquid. Investments in restricted securities could have the effect of increasing the amount of the Fund’s assets invested in illiquid securities if qualified institutional buyers are unwilling to purchase these securities.
Illiquid and restricted securities may be difficult to dispose of at a fair price at the times when the Fund believes it is desirable to do so. The market price of illiquid and restricted securities generally is more volatile than that of more liquid securities, which may adversely affect the price that the Fund pays for or recovers upon the sale of such securities. Illiquid and restricted securities are also more difficult to value, especially in challenging markets. The Adviser’s or Sub-Adviser’s judgment may play a greater role in the valuation process. Investment of the Fund’s assets in illiquid and restricted securities may restrict the Fund’s ability to take advantage of market opportunities. To dispose of an unregistered security, the Fund, where it has contractual rights to do so, may have to cause such security to be registered. A considerable period may elapse between the time the decision is made to sell the security and the time the security is registered, thereby enabling the Fund to sell it. Contractual restrictions on the resale of securities vary in length and scope and are generally the result of a negotiation between the issuer and acquiror of the securities. In either case, the Fund would bear market risks during that period. Liquidity risk may impact the Fund’s ability to meet shareholder redemptions and as a result, the Fund may be forced to sell securities at inopportune prices.
Certain fixed income instruments are not readily marketable and may be subject to restrictions on resale. Fixed income instruments may not be listed on any national securities exchange and no active trading market may exist for certain of the fixed income instruments in which the Fund will invest. Where a secondary market exists, the market for some fixed income instruments may be subject to irregular trading activity, wide bid-ask spreads and extended trade settlement periods. In addition, dealer inventories of certain securities are at historic lows in relation to market size, which indicates a potential for reduced liquidity as dealers may be less able to “make markets” for certain fixed income securities.
Interest Rate Risk. The Fund’s investments in bonds and other debt securities will change in value based on changes in interest rates. If rates rise, the value of these investments generally declines. Securities with greater interest rate sensitivity and longer maturities generally are subject to greater fluctuations in value.
LIBOR Risk. Instruments in which the Fund invests may pay interest at floating rates based on LIBOR or may be subject to interest caps or floors based on LIBOR. The Fund and issuers of instruments in which the Fund invests may also obtain financing at floating rates based on LIBOR. Derivative instruments utilized by the Fund and/or issuers of instruments in which the Fund may invest may also reference LIBOR. In July 2017, the head of the United Kingdom Financial Conduct Authority announced the desire to phase out the use of LIBOR by December 31, 2021. There is currently no definitive information regarding the future utilization of LIBOR or of any particular replacement rate. Abandonment of or modifications to LIBOR may affect the value, liquidity or return on certain Fund
35


investments that reference LIBOR without including fallback provisions and may result in costs incurred in connection with closing out positions and entering into new trades. Any pricing adjustments to the Fund’s investments resulting from a substitute reference rate may also adversely affect the Fund’s performance and/or NAV. The effect of a phase out of LIBOR on instruments in which the Fund may invest is currently unclear.
Limited Operating History Risk. The Fund has a limited operating history. As a result, prospective investors have a limited track record or history on which to base their investment decision. There can be no assurance that the Fund will grow to or maintain an economically viable size.
Management Risk. The Fund is actively-managed and may not meet its investment objective based on the Adviser’s or Sub-Adviser’s, as applicable, success or failure to implement investment strategies for the Fund.
Market Capitalization Risk.
Large-Capitalization Investing. The securities of large-capitalization companies may be relatively mature compared to smaller companies and therefore subject to slower growth during times of economic expansion. Large-capitalization companies may also be unable to respond quickly to new competitive challenges, such as changes in technology and consumer tastes.
Mid-Capitalization Investing. The securities of mid-capitalization companies may be more vulnerable to adverse issuer, market, political, or economic developments than securities of large-capitalization companies. The securities of mid-capitalization companies generally trade in lower volumes and are subject to greater and more unpredictable price changes than large capitalization stocks or the stock market as a whole. Some medium capitalization companies have limited product lines, markets, financial resources, and management personnel and tend to concentrate on fewer geographical markets relative to large-capitalization companies.
Small-Capitalization Investing. The securities of small-capitalization companies may be more vulnerable to adverse issuer, market, political, or economic developments than securities of large- or mid-capitalization companies. The securities of small-capitalization companies generally trade in lower volumes and are subject to greater and more unpredictable price changes than large- or mid-capitalization stocks or the stock market as a whole. Some small capitalization companies have limited product lines, markets, and financial and managerial resources and tend to concentrate on fewer geographical markets relative to larger capitalization companies. There is typically less publicly available information concerning smaller-capitalization companies than for larger, more established companies. Small-capitalization companies also may be particularly sensitive to changes in interest rates, government regulation, borrowing costs and earnings.
MBS Risk. Mortgage-related securities represent ownership in pools of mortgage loans assembled for sale to investors by various government agencies such as Ginnie Mae and government-related organizations such as Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac. Although these mortgage-related securities are guaranteed by a third party or otherwise similarly secured, the market value of the security, which may fluctuate, is not so secured. MBS, like traditional fixed-income securities, are subject to credit, interest rate, prepayment, and extension risks (see “Credit Risk,” “Interest Rate Risk,” “Prepayment Risk,” and “Extension Risk” for more information on these risks).
These securities differ from conventional bonds in that the principal is paid back to the investor as payments are made on the underlying mortgages in the pool. Accordingly, the Fund will receive scheduled payments of principal and interest along with any unscheduled principal prepayments on the underlying mortgages. Because these scheduled and unscheduled principal payments must be reinvested at prevailing interest rates, MBS do not provide an effective means of locking in long-term interest rates for the investor. Small movements in interest rates (both increases and decreases) may quickly and significantly reduce the value of certain MBS.
The mortgage market in the United States has experienced and may in the future experience difficulties that may adversely affect the performance and market value of certain of the Fund’s mortgage-related investments. Delinquencies and losses on mortgage loans (including subprime and second-lien mortgage loans) may increase and real-estate values may decline due to such difficulties, which may exacerbate such delinquencies and losses. Reduced investor demand for mortgage loans and mortgage-related securities and increased investor yield requirements may cause limited liquidity in the secondary market for mortgage-related securities, which can adversely affect the market value of mortgage-related securities and the Fund.
Municipal Securities Risk. Municipal securities can be significantly affected by political or economic changes, including changes made in the law after issuance of the securities, as well as uncertainties in the municipal market related to taxation, legislative changes or the rights of municipal security holders, including in connection with an issuer insolvency. Municipal securities backed by current or anticipated revenues from a specific project or specific assets can be negatively affected by the inability to collect revenues from the project or the assets.
Models and Data Risk. The composition of the Index is heavily dependent on proprietary quantitative models as well as information and data supplied by third parties (“Models and Data”). When Models and Data prove to be incorrect or incomplete, any decisions made in reliance thereon may lead to the inclusion or exclusion of securities from the Index universe that would have been excluded or included had the Models and Data been correct and complete. If the composition of the Index reflects such errors, the Fund’s portfolio can be expected to also reflect the errors.
36


Non-Diversification Risk. A non-diversified Fund may be more exposed to the risks associated with and developments affecting an individual issuer or a smaller number of issuers than a fund that invests more widely. This may increase the Fund’s volatility and cause the performance of a relatively smaller number of issuers to have a greater impact on the Fund’s performance.
Passive Investment Risk. The Fund invests in the securities included in, or representative of, its Index regardless of their investment merit. The Fund does not attempt to outperform its Index or take defensive positions in declining markets. As a result, the Fund’s performance may be adversely affected by a general decline in the market segments relating to its Index. The returns from the types of securities in which the Fund invests may underperform returns from the various general securities markets or different asset classes. This may cause the Fund to underperform other investment vehicles that invest in different asset classes. Different types of securities (for example, large-, mid- and small-capitalization stocks) tend to go through cycles of doing better – or worse – than the general securities markets. In the past, these periods have lasted for as long as several years.
Prepayment Risk. The issuer of certain securities may repay principal in advance, especially when yields fall. Changes in the rate at which prepayments occur can affect the return on investment of these securities. When debt obligations are prepaid or when securities are called, the Fund may have to reinvest in securities with a lower yield. The Fund also may fail to recover additional amounts (i.e., premiums) paid for securities with higher coupons, resulting in an unexpected capital loss. In periods of falling interest rates, the rate of prepayments tends to increase (as does price fluctuation) as borrowers are motivated to repay debt and refinance at new lower rates. During such periods, reinvestment of the prepayment proceeds by the management team will generally be at lower rates of return than the return on the assets that were prepaid. Prepayment reduces the yield to maturity and the average life of the security.
Privately Placed Securities Risk. Privately placed securities generally are less liquid than publicly traded securities and the Fund may not always be able to sell such securities without experiencing delays in finding buyers or reducing the sale price for such securities. The disposition of some of the securities held by the Fund may be restricted under federal securities laws. As a result, the Fund may not be able to dispose of such investments at a time when, or at a price at which, it desires to do so and may have to bear expenses of registering these securities, if necessary. These securities may also be difficult to value.
Rating Agencies Risk. Rating agencies may fail to make timely changes in credit ratings and an issuer’s current financial condition may be better or worse than a rating indicates. In addition, rating agencies are subject to an inherent conflict of interest because they are often compensated by the same issuers whose securities they grade.
Recent Market Events Risk. U.S. and international markets have experienced significant periods of volatility in recent years and months due to a number of economic, political and global macro factors including the impact of the novel coronavirus (COVID-19) as a global pandemic and related public health issues, growth concerns in the U.S. and overseas, uncertainties regarding interest rates, trade tensions, and the threat of tariffs imposed by the U.S. and other countries. In particular, the spread of COVID-19 worldwide has resulted in disruptions to supply chains and customer activity, stress on the global healthcare system, temporary and permanent layoffs in the private sector, and rising unemployment claims, reduced consumer spending, quarantines, cancellations, market declines, the closing of borders, restrictions on travel, changed travel and social behaviors, and widespread concern and uncertainty, all of which may lead to a substantial economic downturn or recession in the U.S. and global economies. The recovery from the effects of COVID-19 is uncertain and may last for an extended period of time. Health crises and related political, social and economic disruptions caused by the spread of COVID-19 may also exacerbate other pre-existing political, social and economic risks in certain countries. These developments as well as other events could result in further market volatility and negatively affect financial asset prices, the liquidity of certain securities and the normal operations of securities exchanges and other markets, despite government efforts to address market disruptions. In addition, the Fund may face challenges with respect to its day-to-day operations if key personnel of the Fund’s Adviser or Sub-Adviser or other service providers are unavailable due to quarantines and restrictions on travel related to COVID-19. As a result, the risk environment remains elevated. The Adviser and the Sub-Adviser will monitor developments and seek to manage the Fund in a manner consistent with achieving the Fund’s investment objective, but there can be no assurance that they will be successful in doing so.
REIT Investment Risk. Investments in REITs involve unique risks. REITs may have limited financial resources, may trade less frequently and in limited volume, and may be more volatile than other securities. In addition, to the extent the Fund holds interests in REITs, it is expected that investors in the Fund will bear two layers of asset-based management fees and expenses (directly at the Fund level and indirectly at the REIT level). The risks of investing in REITs include certain risks associated with the direct ownership of real estate and the real estate industry in general. These include risks related to general, regional and local economic conditions; fluctuations in interest rates and property tax rates; shifts in zoning laws, environmental regulations and other governmental action such as the exercise of eminent domain; cash flow dependency; increased operating expenses; lack of availability of mortgage funds; losses due to natural disasters; overbuilding; losses due to casualty or condemnation; changes in property values and rental rates; and other factors.
In addition to these risks, REITs are dependent upon management skills and generally may not be diversified. REITs are also subject to heavy cash flow dependency, defaults by borrowers and self-liquidation. In addition, REITs could possibly fail to qualify for the beneficial tax treatment available to REITs under the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended (the “Code”), or to maintain their exemptions from registration under the Investment Company Act of 1940, as amended (the “1940 Act”). The Fund expects that dividends received from a REIT and distributed to Fund shareholders generally will be taxable to the shareholder as ordinary income,
37


but may be taxable as return of capital. In the event of a default by a borrower or lessee, the REIT may experience delays in enforcing its rights as a mortgagee or lessor and may incur substantial costs associated with protecting investments. For more information regarding the regulation and taxation of REIT investments, please see the section in this Prospectus entitled “Taxation of REIT Investments” under “Dividends, Distributions, and Taxes.”
RMBS Risk. RMBS are particularly susceptible to prepayment risks, as they generally do not contain prepayment penalties and a reduction in interest rates will increase the prepayments on the RMBS. Such securities are also subject to credit, interest rate, and extension risks. (see “Credit Risk,” “Interest Rate Risk,” and “Extension Risk” for more information on these risks). The rate of defaults and losses on residential mortgage loans will be affected by a number of factors, including general economic conditions and those in the geographic area where the mortgaged property is located, the terms of the mortgage loan, the borrower’s equity in the mortgaged property, and the financial circumstances of the borrower. Certain mortgage loans may be of sub-prime credit quality (i.e., do not meet the customary credit standards of Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac). Delinquencies and liquidation proceedings are more likely with sub-prime mortgage loans than with mortgage loans that satisfy customary credit standards. If a portfolio of RMBS is backed by loans with disproportionately large aggregate principal amounts secured by properties in only a few states or regions in the United States, residential mortgage loans may be more susceptible to geographic risks relating to such areas. Violation of laws, public policies, and principles designed to protect consumers may limit the servicer’s ability to collect all or part of the principal or interest on a residential mortgage loan, entitle the borrower to a refund of amounts previously paid by it, or subject the servicer to damages and administrative enforcement. Any such violation could also result in cash flow delays and losses on the related issue of RMBS. It is not expected that RMBS will be guaranteed or insured by any U.S. governmental agency or instrumentality or by any other person. Distributions on RMBS will depend solely upon the amount and timing of payments and other collections on the related underlying mortgage loans.
Sector Risk. The Fund’s investing approach may dictate an emphasis on certain sectors, industries, or sub-sectors of the market at any given time. To the extent the Fund invests more heavily in one sector, industry, or sub-sector of the market, it thereby presents a more concentrated risk and its performance will be especially sensitive to developments that significantly affect those sectors, industries, or sub-sectors. In addition, the value of Shares may change at different rates compared to the value of shares of a fund with investments in a more diversified mix of sectors and industries. An individual sector, industry, or sub-sector of the market may have above-average performance during particular periods, but may also move up and down more than the broader market. The several industries that constitute a sector may all react in the same way to economic, political or regulatory events. The Fund’s performance could also be affected if the sectors, industries, or sub-sectors do not perform as expected. Alternatively, the lack of exposure to one or more sectors or industries may adversely affect performance.
Communication Services Sector Risk. The Fund may invest in companies in the communication services sector, and therefore the performance of the Fund could be negatively impacted by events affecting this sector. Communication services companies are susceptible to the risk of potential obsolescence of products and services due to technological advancements and innovation competition among companies. Demand for product, shifting consumer demographics and shifting consumer preferences can drastically affect a communication services company's profitability. Companies in the communication services sector may be particular targets of cyber-security losses and potential theft of proprietary or consumer information or disruptions in service, which could have a material adverse effect on their businesses. Companies in the communication services sector may also be affected by other competitive pressures, such as pricing competition, as well as research and development costs, substantial capital requirements and government regulation.
Consumer Staples Sector Risk. The Fund may invest in companies in the consumer staples sector, and therefore the performance of the Fund could be negatively impacted by events affecting this sector. Companies in the consumer staples sector, including those in the food and beverage industries, may be affected by general economic conditions, commodity production and pricing, consumer confidence and spending, consumer preferences, interest rates, product cycles, marketing campaigns, competition, and government regulations.
Financial Services Sector Risk. The Fund may invest in companies in the financial services sector, and therefore the performance of the Fund could be negatively impacted by events affecting this sector. This sector can be significantly affected by changes in interest rates, government regulation, the rate of defaults on corporate, consumer and government debt and the availability and cost of capital, among other factors. Insurance companies, in particular, may be significantly affected by changes in interest rates, catastrophic events, price and market competition, the imposition of premium rate caps, or other changes in government regulation or tax law and/or rate regulation, which may have an adverse impact on their profitability. This sector has experienced significant losses in the recent past, and the impact of more stringent capital requirements and of recent or future regulation on any individual financial company or on the sector as a whole cannot be predicted. In recent years, cyber attacks and technology malfunctions and failures have become increasingly frequent in this sector and have caused significant losses.
Industrials Sector Risk. The Fund may invest in companies in the industrials sector, and therefore the performance of the Fund could be negatively impacted by events affecting this sector. The industrials sector may be affected by changes in the supply of and demand for products and services, product obsolescence, claims for environmental damage or product liability and general economic conditions, among other factors.
38


TBA Securities and Rolls Risk. The principal risks of TBA transactions are increased credit risk and increased overall investment exposure. The Fund may enter into TBA roll transactions, in which the Fund sells MBS for delivery in the current month and simultaneously contracts to purchase substantially similar securities on a specified future date from the same party. The investor may assume some risk because the characteristics of the MBS delivered to the investor may be less favorable than the MBS the investor delivered to the dealer. Because the dealer is not obligated to return the identical MBS collateral that the investor has delivered, both parties usually transact the dollar roll with generic MBS pools that have the same or less value than the average TBA-eligible security.
TIPS Risk. Interest payments on TIPS are unpredictable and will fluctuate as the principal and corresponding interest payments are adjusted for inflation. There can be no assurance that the CPI will accurately measure the real rate of inflation in the prices of goods and services. Any increases in the principal amount of TIPS will be considered taxable ordinary income, even though the Fund will not receive the principal until maturity. As a result, the Fund may make income distributions to shareholders that exceed the cash it receives. In addition, TIPS are subject to credit risk and interest rate risk (see “Credit Risk,” and “Interest Rate Risk,” for more information on these risks).
Tracking Error Risk. As with all index funds, the performance of the Fund and its Index may differ from each other for a variety of reasons. For example, the Fund incurs operating expenses and portfolio transaction costs not incurred by its Index. In addition, the Fund may not be fully invested in the securities of its Index at all times or may hold securities not included in its Index. The use of sampling techniques may affect the Fund’s ability to achieve close correlation with its Index. The Fund may use a representative sampling strategy to achieve its investment objective, if the Adviser believes it is in the best interest of the Fund, which generally can be expected to produce a greater non-correlation risk.
Uncertain Tax Treatment. The Fund may invest a portion of its net assets in below investment grade instruments. Investments in these types of instruments may present special tax issues for the Fund. U.S. federal income tax rules are not entirely clear about issues such as when the Fund may cease accruing interest, OID or market discount, when and to what extent deductions may be taken for bad debts or worthless instruments, how payments received on obligations in default should be allocated between principal and income and whether exchanges of debt obligations in a bankruptcy or workout context are taxable. These and other issues will be addressed by the Fund to the extent necessary to seek to ensure that it distributes sufficient income that it does not become subject to U.S. federal income or excise tax.
U.S. Government Obligations Risk. The total public debt of the United States as a percentage of gross domestic product has grown rapidly since the beginning of the 2008–2009 financial downturn. Although high debt levels do not necessarily indicate or cause economic problems, they may create certain systemic risks if sound debt management practices are not implemented. A high national debt can raise concerns that the U.S. government will not be able to make principal or interest payments when they are due. This increase has also necessitated the need for the U.S. Congress to negotiate adjustments to the statutory debt limit to increase the cap on the amount the U.S. government is permitted to borrow to meet its existing obligations and finance current budget deficits. In August 2011, S&P lowered its long term sovereign credit rating on the U.S. In explaining the downgrade at that time, S&P cited, among other reasons, controversy over raising the statutory debt limit and growth in public spending. On August 2, 2019, following passage by Congress, the President of the United States signed the Bipartisan Budget Act of 2019, which suspends the statutory debt limit through July 31, 2021. Any controversy or ongoing uncertainty regarding the statutory debt ceiling negotiations may impact the U.S. long-term sovereign credit rating and may cause market uncertainty. As a result, market prices and yields of securities supported by the full faith and credit of the U.S. government may be adversely affected.
Valuation Risk. It may be difficult for the Fund to purchase and sell particular investments within a reasonable time at a fair price, or the price at which it has been valued for purposes of the Fund’s net asset value, causing the Fund to be less liquid and unable to sell securities for what the Adviser believes is the appropriate price of the investment. Valuation of portfolio investments may be difficult, such as during periods of market turmoil or reduced liquidity and for investments that trade infrequently or irregularly. In these and other circumstances, an investment may be valued using fair value methodologies, which are inherently subjective, reflect good faith judgments based on available information and may not accurately estimate the price at which the Fund could sell the investment at that time. Based on its investment strategies, a significant portion of the Fund’s investments can be difficult to value and potentially less liquid and therefore particularly prone to these risks.
When-Issued, Delayed Delivery, and Forward Commitment Risks. The purchase of securities on a when-issued, delayed delivery, or forward commitment basis involves a risk of loss if the value of the security to be purchased declines prior to the settlement date. Although the Fund would generally purchase securities on a when-issued, delayed delivery, or forward commitment basis with the intention of actually acquiring securities for its portfolio, it may dispose of a when- issued or delayed delivery security or forward commitment prior to settlement if the SoFi Weekly Income ETF’s Sub-Adviser deems it appropriate to do so.
User Bias Risk. The securities that comprise the Index are selected by retail investors holding SoFi Accounts, who may not be professional investors, may have no financial expertise, and may not do any research on the companies in which they invest prior to investing. In some cases, investment decisions made may be influenced by non-quantitative factors, including, without limitation, cognitive and emotional biases, resulting in the inclusion of certain securities in the Index which may underperform the market generally and result in lower returns for the Fund.
39


PORTFOLIO HOLDINGS INFORMATION
Information about each Fund’s daily portfolio holdings is available on the Funds’ website at www.sofi.com/invest/etfs/. A complete description of the Funds’ policies and procedures with respect to the disclosure of the Funds’ portfolio holdings is available in the Funds’ Statement of Additional Information (“SAI”).
MANAGEMENT
Investment Adviser
Toroso Investments, LLC, 898 N. Broadway, Suite 2, Massapequa, New York 11758, serves as investment adviser to the Funds and has overall responsibility for the general management and administration of the Funds pursuant to an investment advisory agreement with the Trust, on behalf of the Funds (the “Advisory Agreement”). The Adviser also arranges for sub-advisory, transfer agency, custody, fund administration, and all other related services necessary for the Funds to operate. Toroso is a Delaware limited liability company founded in March 2012 that is dedicated to understanding, researching and managing assets within the expanding ETF universe. As of May 31, 2021, Toroso had assets under management of approximately $7.5 billion.
With respect to the SoFi Weekly Income ETF, the Adviser provides oversight of the Sub-Adviser, monitoring of the Sub-Adviser’s buying and selling of securities for the SoFi Weekly Income ETF, and review of the Sub-Adviser’s performance. With respect to the SoFi Gig Economy ETF, the Adviser is responsible for determining the securities purchased and sold by the Fund. For the services it provides to the Funds, each Fund pays the Adviser a unified management fee, which is calculated daily and paid monthly, at an annual rate based on the applicable Fund’s average daily net assets as set forth in the table below.
Name of Fund Management Fee Management Fee
After Waiver
SoFi Select 500 ETF 0.19% 0.00%
SoFi Next 500 ETF 0.19% 0.00%
SoFi Social 50 ETF 0.29% 0.29%
SoFi Gig Economy ETF 0.59% 0.59%
SoFi Weekly Income ETF 0.59% 0.59%
The Adviser has contractually agreed to waive its unified management fee for the SoFi Select 500 ETF and SoFi Next 500 ETF until at least June 30, 2022. The fee waiver agreement may be terminated only by, or with the consent of, the Board.
Under the Advisory Agreement, the Adviser has agreed to pay all expenses incurred by each Fund except for interest charges on any borrowings, dividends and other expenses on securities sold short, taxes, brokerage commissions and other expenses incurred in placing orders for the purchase and sale of securities and other investment instruments, acquired fund fees and expenses, accrued deferred tax liability, extraordinary expenses, distribution fees and expenses paid by the Fund under any distribution plan adopted pursuant to Rule 12b-1 under the 1940 Act, and the unified management fee payable to the Adviser (collectively, the “Excluded Expenses”).
Sub-Adviser - SoFi Weekly Income ETF
Income Research + Management, a Massachusetts business trust, located at 100 Federal Street, 30th Floor, Boston, Massachusetts 02110, serves as investment sub-adviser to the SoFi Weekly Income ETF pursuant to a sub-advisory agreement between the Adviser and the Sub-Adviser (the “Sub-Advisory Agreement”). IR+M is responsible for the day-to-day management of the SoFi Weekly Income ETF’s portfolio, including determining the securities purchased and sold by the SoFi Weekly Income ETF and trading portfolio securities for the SoFi Weekly Income ETF, subject to the supervision of the Adviser and the Board. IR+M specializes in managing U.S. fixed income portfolios for institutional and private clients, as well as managing several U.S. fixed income private investment funds and collective investment trusts for qualified investors. For its services, IR+M is paid a fee by the Adviser, which fee is calculated daily and paid monthly, at an annual rate of the SoFi Weekly Income ETF’s average daily net assets as follows: 0.35% on the first $20 million; 0.30% on the next $80 million; 0.20% on the next $200 million; 0.15% on the next $300 million; 0.10% on the next $400 million; and 0.075% on amounts over $1 billion.
A discussion regarding the basis for the Board’s approval of the Index ETFs’ and the SoFi Gig Economy ETF’s Advisory Agreement is available in the Index ETFs’ and the SoFi Gig Economy ETF’s semi-annual report to shareholders for the period ended August 31, 2019.
A discussion regarding the basis for the Board’s approval of the SoFi Weekly Income ETF’s Advisory Agreement and Sub-Advisory Agreement is available in the Fund’s annual report to shareholders for the period ended February 28, 2021.
Portfolio Managers
The Index ETFs are managed by Charles A. Ragauss, CFA, Portfolio Manager for the Adviser. Mr. Ragauss has been the portfolio manager for each Index ETF since the inception of each Index ETF in 2019.
40


The SoFi Gig Economy ETF is jointly managed by Michael Venuto, Chief Investment Officer for the Adviser, Charles A. Ragauss, CFA, Portfolio Manager for the Adviser, and David Dziekanski, Portfolio Manager for the Adviser. Mr. Venuto and Mr. Ragauss have each been a portfolio manager for the SoFi Gig Economy ETF since its inception in 2019. Mr. Dziekanski has been a portfolio manager for the SoFi Gig Economy ETF since September 2020.
The SoFi Weekly Income ETF is jointly managed by William A. O’Malley, CFA, Chief Executive Officer and Co-Chief Investment Officer for IR+M, James E. Gubitosi, CFA, Senior Portfolio Manager and Co-Chief Investment Officer for IR+M, and William O’Neill, CFA, Senior Portfolio Manager for IR+M and each has served as a portfolio manager since its inception in 2020. Charles A. Ragauss, CFA, Portfolio Manager for the Adviser, oversees trading and execution for the SoFi Weekly Income ETF and has served as a portfolio manager since its inception in 2020.
Portfolio Managers of the Adviser (All Funds)
Michael Venuto, Chief Investment Officer for the Adviser
Mr. Venuto is a co-founder and has been the Chief Investment Officer of the Adviser since 2012. Mr. Venuto is an ETF industry veteran with over a decade of experience in the design and implementation of ETF-based investment strategies. Previously, he was Head of Investments at Global X Funds where he provided portfolio optimization services to institutional clients. Before that, he was Senior Vice President at Horizon Kinetics where his responsibilities included new business development, investment strategy and client and strategic initiatives.
Charles A. Ragauss, CFA, Portfolio Manager for the Adviser
Mr. Ragauss serves as Portfolio Manager at the Adviser, having joined the Adviser in September 2020. Mr. Ragauss previously served as Chief Operating Officer and in other roles at CSat Investment Advisory, L.P., doing business as Exponential ETFs from April 2016 to September 2020. Previously, Mr. Ragauss was Assistant Vice President at Huntington National Bank (“Huntington”), where he was Product Manager for the Huntington Funds and Huntington Strategy Shares ETFs, a combined fund complex of almost $4 billion in assets under management. At Huntington, he led ETF development bringing to market some of the first actively managed ETFs. Mr. Ragauss joined Huntington in 2010. Mr. Ragauss attended Grand Valley State University where he received his Bachelor of Business Administration in Finance and International Business, as well as a minor in French. He is a member of both the National and West Michigan CFA societies and holds the CFA designation.
David Dziekanski, Portfolio Manager for the Adviser
Mr. Dziekanski has 18 years of experience in the asset management industry, 14 years as a portfolio manager in the ETF space. He has been a Portfolio Manager and Partner at the Adviser since 2013. Previously, he was a portfolio manager and head of research and trading for Ladenburg Thalmann Asset Management, working on internal ETF-based models. Mr. Dziekanski co-founded Foursight Capital Partners in 2020 in the seed round venture space. Mr. Dziekanski earned a Triple Major degree in Applied Mathematics, Finance, and Economics from Washington University in St. Louis, and a Master of Science in Finance from Washington University in St. Louis.
Portfolio Managers of the Sub-Adviser (SoFi Weekly Income ETF)
William A. O’Malley, CFA, Chief Executive Officer and Co-Chief Investment Officer for IR+M
Mr. O’Malley joined IR+M in September 1994 and was named Chief Executive Officer in January 2020. In his role as Chief Executive Officer, Mr. O’Malley is responsible for leading the operations and day-to-day business functions of IR+M. As Co-Chief Investment Officer, Mr. O’Malley partners with Mr. James E. Gubitosi to lead IR+M’s Investment Professionals and they share responsibility for all investment activity and investment results. Mr. O’Malley is also the Chairperson of IR+M’s Management Committee and serves on IR+M’s Board of Trustees. Prior to joining IR+M, Mr. O’Malley was a Vice President at Wellington Management Company, LLP, and also worked at the Vanguard Group, and in Morgan Stanley’s Fixed Income Division. Mr. O’Malley has a BA in Political Science from Amherst College (1984) and an MBA from The Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania (1989).
James E. Gubitosi, CFA, Senior Portfolio Manager and Co-Chief Investment Officer for IR+M
Mr. Gubitosi joined IR+M in March of 2007 as an Analyst and was named Co-Chief Investment Officer in January 2020. As Co-Chief Investment Officer, Mr. Gubitosi partners with Mr. William A. O’Malley to lead IR+M’s Investment Professionals and they share responsibility for all investment activity and results. Mr. Gubitosi is also a member of IR+M’s Management Committee. Prior to joining IR+M, Mr. Gubitosi was a Senior Analyst at Financial Architects Partners. Mr. Gubitosi has a BSBA from Boston University School of Management.
William O’Neill, CFA, Senior Portfolio Manager for IR+M
Mr. O’Neill joined IR+M in July 2004 as an Analyst, assisting IR+M with its broad fixed income research and analysis efforts. He was promoted to Portfolio Manager in 2008 and subsequently to Senior Portfolio Manager in 2013, focusing on credit investing and broad asset allocation. Mr. O’Neill serves on IR+M’s Product Committee. Prior to joining IR+M, Mr. O’Neill was a Trader at
41


Investors Bank and Trust. In this role, he focused on the securitized and rates markets with responsibilities in trading, analysis, and idea generation. Mr. O’Neill has a BSBA in Finance from the University of Rhode Island and an MBA from F.W. Olin Graduate School of Business, Babson College.
The Funds’ SAI provides additional information about the Portfolio Managers’ compensation structure, other accounts that the Portfolio Managers manage, and the Portfolio Managers’ ownership of Shares.
CFA® is a registered trademark owned by the CFA Institute.
FUND SPONSOR
The Adviser has entered into an Agreement with SoFi, under which SoFi assumes the obligation of the Adviser to pay all expenses of the Funds, except Excluded Expenses (such expenses of the Funds, except Excluded Expenses, the “Unitary Expenses”). Although SoFi has agreed to be responsible for the Unitary Expenses, the Adviser retains the ultimate obligation to the Funds to pay such expenses. SoFi will also provide marketing support for the Funds, including hosting the Funds’ website and preparing marketing materials related to the Funds. For these services and payments, SoFi is entitled to a fee, paid by the Adviser, based on the total management fee earned by the Adviser under the Advisory Agreement less the Unitary Expenses and certain start-up costs. SoFi does not make investment decisions, provide investment advice, or otherwise act in the capacity of an investment adviser to the Funds.
SoFi also provided support to the Index Provider in developing the methodology used by each Index ETF’s underlying Index to determine the securities included in such Index. However, SoFi is not involved in the maintenance of each such Index and does not act in the capacity of an index provider.
HOW TO BUY AND SELL SHARES
Each Fund issues and redeems Shares only in Creation Units at the NAV per share next determined after receipt of an order from an AP. Only APs may acquire Shares directly from a Fund, and only APs may tender their Shares for redemption directly to a Fund, at NAV. APs must be a member or participant of a clearing agency registered with the SEC and must execute a Participant Agreement that has been agreed to by the Distributor (defined below), and that has been accepted by the Funds’ transfer agent, with respect to purchases and redemptions of Creation Units. Once created, Shares trade in the secondary market in quantities less than a Creation Unit.
Most investors buy and sell Shares in secondary market transactions through brokers. Individual Shares are listed for trading on the secondary market on the Exchange and can be bought and sold throughout the trading day like other publicly traded securities.
When buying or selling Shares through a broker, you will incur customary brokerage commissions and charges, and you may pay some or all of the spread between the bid and the offer price in the secondary market on each leg of a round trip (purchase and sale) transaction. In addition, because secondary market transactions occur at market prices, you may pay more than NAV when you buy Shares, and receive less than NAV when you sell those Shares.
Book Entry
Shares are held in book-entry form, which means that no stock certificates are issued. Depository Trust Company (“DTC”) or its nominee is the record owner of all outstanding Shares.
Investors owning Shares are beneficial owners as shown on the records of DTC or its participants. DTC serves as the securities depository for all Shares. DTC’s participants include securities brokers and dealers, banks, trust companies, clearing corporations and other institutions that directly or indirectly maintain a custodial relationship with DTC. As a beneficial owner of Shares, you are not entitled to receive physical delivery of stock certificates or to have Shares registered in your name, and you are not considered a registered owner of Shares. Therefore, to exercise any right as an owner of Shares, you must rely upon the procedures of DTC and its participants. These procedures are the same as those that apply to any other securities that you hold in book-entry or “street name” through your brokerage account.
Frequent Purchases and Redemptions of Shares
The Funds impose no restrictions on the frequency of purchases and redemptions of Shares. In determining not to approve a written, established policy, the Board evaluated the risks of market timing activities by Fund shareholders. Purchases and redemptions by APs, who are the only parties that may purchase or redeem Shares directly with the Funds, are an essential part of the ETF process and help keep Share trading prices in line with the NAV. As such, the Funds accommodate frequent purchases and redemptions by APs. However, the Board has also determined that frequent purchases and redemptions for cash may increase tracking error and portfolio transaction costs and may lead to the realization of capital gains. To minimize these potential consequences of frequent purchases and redemptions, the Funds employ fair value pricing and may impose transaction fees on purchases and redemptions of Creation Units to cover the custodial and other costs incurred by the Funds in effecting trades. In addition, the Funds and the Adviser reserve the right to reject any purchase order at any time.
Determination of Net Asset Value
42


Each Fund’s NAV is calculated as of the scheduled close of regular trading on the New York Stock Exchange (“NYSE”), generally 4:00 p.m. Eastern Time, each day the NYSE is open for business. The NAV for each Fund is calculated by dividing the Fund’s net assets by its Shares outstanding.
In calculating its NAV, each Fund generally values its assets on the basis of market quotations, last sale prices, or estimates of value furnished by a pricing service or brokers who make markets in such instruments. The values of non-U.S. dollar denominated securities are converted to U.S. dollars using foreign currency exchange rates generally determined as of 4:00 p.m., London time. If such information is not available for a security held by a Fund or is determined to be unreliable, the security will be valued at fair value estimates under guidelines established by the Board (as described below).
Fair Value Pricing
The Board has adopted procedures and methodologies to fair value Fund securities whose market prices are not “readily available” or are deemed to be unreliable. For example, such circumstances may arise when: (i) a security has been delisted or has had its trading halted or suspended; (ii) a security’s primary pricing source is unable or unwilling to provide a price; (iii) a security’s primary trading market is closed during regular market hours; or (iv) a security’s value is materially affected by events occurring after the close of the security’s primary trading market. Generally, when fair valuing a security, the Funds will take into account all reasonably available information that may be relevant to a particular valuation including, but not limited to, fundamental analytical data regarding the issuer, information relating to the issuer’s business, recent trades or offers of the security, general and/or specific market conditions, and the specific facts giving rise to the need to fair value the security. Fair value determinations are made in good faith and in accordance with the fair value methodologies included in the Board-adopted valuation procedures. Due to the subjective and variable nature of fair value pricing, there can be no assurance that a Fund will be able to obtain the fair value assigned to the security upon the sale of such security.
Investments by Other Registered Investment Companies in the Funds
Section 12(d)(1) of the 1940 Act restricts investments by registered investment companies in the securities of other investment companies, including Shares. Registered investment companies are permitted to invest in the Funds beyond the limits set forth in Section 12(d)(1), subject to certain terms and conditions set forth in an SEC exemptive order issued to the Trust or rule under the 1940 Act, including that such investment companies enter into an agreement with the Funds.
Delivery of Shareholder Documents – Householding
Householding is an option available to certain investors of the Funds. Householding is a method of delivery, based on the preference of the individual investor, in which a single copy of certain shareholder documents can be delivered to investors who share the same address, even if their accounts are registered under different names. Householding for the Funds is available through certain broker-dealers. If you are interested in enrolling in householding and receiving a single copy of prospectuses and other shareholder documents, please contact your broker-dealer. If you are currently enrolled in householding and wish to change your householding status, please contact your broker-dealer.
DIVIDENDS, DISTRIBUTIONS, AND TAXES
Dividends and Distributions
Each of the SoFi Select 500 ETF, the SoFi Next 500 ETF, the SoFi Social 50 ETF, and the SoFi Gig Economy ETF intends to pay out dividends and interest income, if any, at least semi-annually, and distribute any net realized capital gains to its shareholders at least annually. The SoFi Weekly Income ETF intends to pay out dividends and interest income, if any, weekly, and distribute any net realized capital gains to its shareholders at least annually. Each Fund will declare and pay income and capital gain distributions, if any, in cash. Distributions in cash may be reinvested automatically in additional whole Shares only if the broker through whom you purchased Shares makes such option available. Your broker is responsible for distributing the income and capital gain distributions to you.
Taxes
The following discussion is a summary of some important U.S. federal income tax considerations generally applicable to investments in the Funds. Your investment in a Fund may have other tax implications. Please consult your tax advisor about the tax consequences of an investment in Shares, including the possible application of foreign, state, and local tax laws.
Each Fund intends to qualify each year for treatment as a regulated investment company (a “RIC”) under the Code. If it meets certain minimum distribution requirements, a RIC is not subject to tax at the fund level on income and gains from investments that are timely distributed to shareholders. However, a Fund’s failure to qualify as a RIC or to meet minimum distribution requirements would result (if certain relief provisions were not available) in fund-level taxation and, consequently, a reduction in income available for distribution to shareholders.
Unless your investment in Shares is made through a tax-exempt entity or tax-advantaged account, such as an IRA plan, you need to be aware of the possible tax consequences when a Fund makes distributions, when you sell your Shares listed on the Exchange, and when you purchase or redeem Creation Units (institutional investors only).
43


The tax legislation commonly referred to as the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (the “Tax Act”) made significant changes to the U.S. federal income tax rules for taxation of individuals and corporations, generally effective for taxable years beginning after December 31, 2017. Many of the changes applicable to individuals are temporary and would apply only to taxable years before January 1, 2026. There were only minor changes with respect to the specific rules only applicable to RICs, such as the Funds. The Tax Act, however, also made numerous other changes to the tax rules that may affect shareholders and the Funds. Subsequent legislation has modified certain changes to the U.S. federal income tax rules made by the Tax Act which may, in addition, affect shareholders and the Funds. You are urged to consult with your own tax advisor regarding how this legislation affects your investment in a Fund.
Taxes on Distributions
For federal income tax purposes, distributions of net investment income are generally taxable as ordinary income or qualified dividend income. Taxes on distributions of net capital gains (if any) are determined by how long a Fund owned the investments that generated them, rather than how long a shareholder has owned their Shares. Sales of assets held by a Fund for more than one year generally result in long-term capital gains and losses, and sales of assets held by such Fund for one year or less generally result in short-term capital gains and losses. Distributions of a Fund’s net capital gain (the excess of net long-term capital gains over net short-term capital losses) that are reported by such Fund as capital gain dividends (“Capital Gain Dividends”) will be taxable as long-term capital gains. Distributions of short-term capital gain will generally be taxable as ordinary income. Dividends and distributions are generally taxable to you whether you receive them in cash or reinvest them in additional Shares.
Distributions reported by a Fund as “qualified dividend income” are generally taxed to non-corporate shareholders at rates applicable to long-term capital gains, provided certain holding period and other requirements are met. “Qualified dividend income” generally is income derived from dividends paid by U.S. corporations or certain foreign corporations that are either incorporated in a U.S. possession or eligible for tax benefits under certain U.S. income tax treaties. In addition, dividends that a Fund receives in respect of stock of certain foreign corporations may be qualified dividend income if that stock is readily tradable on an established U.S. securities market. Corporate shareholders may be entitled to a dividends-received deduction for the portion of dividends they receive from a Fund that are attributable to dividends received by the Fund from U.S. corporations, subject to certain limitations.
Shortly after the close of each calendar year, you will be informed of the character of any distributions received from a Fund.
In addition to the federal income tax, certain individuals, trusts, and estates may be subject to a Net Investment Income (“NII”) tax of 3.8%. The NII tax is imposed on the lesser of: (i) a taxpayer’s investment income, net of deductions properly allocable to such income; or (ii) the amount by which such taxpayer’s modified adjusted gross income exceeds certain thresholds ($250,000 for married individuals filing jointly, $200,000 for unmarried individuals and $125,000 for married individuals filing separately). A Fund’s distributions are includable in a shareholder’s investment income for purposes of this NII tax. In addition, any capital gain realized by a shareholder upon a sale or redemption of Fund shares is includable in such shareholder’s investment income for purposes of this NII tax.
In general, your distributions are subject to federal income tax for the year in which they are paid. Certain distributions paid in January, however, may be treated as paid on December 31 of the prior year. Distributions are generally taxable even if they are paid from income or gains earned by a Fund before your investment (and thus were included in the Shares’ NAV when you purchased your Shares).
You may wish to avoid investing in a Fund shortly before a dividend or other distribution, because such a distribution will generally be taxable even though it may economically represent a return of a portion of your investment.
If you are neither a resident nor a citizen of the United States or if you are a foreign entity, distributions (other than Capital Gain Dividends) paid to you by a Fund will generally be subject to a U.S. withholding tax at the rate of 30%, unless a lower treaty rate applies. A Fund may, under certain circumstances, report all or a portion of a dividend as an “interest-related dividend” or a “short-term capital gain dividend,” which would generally be exempt from this 30% U.S. withholding tax, provided certain other requirements are met.
Under the Foreign Account Tax Compliance Act (“FATCA”), a Fund may be required to withhold a generally nonrefundable 30% tax on (i) distributions of investment company taxable income and (ii) distributions of net capital gain and the gross proceeds of a sale or redemption of Fund shares paid to (A) certain “foreign financial institutions” unless such foreign financial institution agrees to verify, monitor, and report to the Internal Revenue Service (“IRS”) the identity of certain of its account-holders, among other items (or unless such entity is otherwise deemed compliant under the terms of an intergovernmental agreement between the United States and the foreign financial institution’s country of residence), and (B) certain “non-financial foreign entities” unless such entity certifies to the Fund that it does not have any substantial U.S. owners or provides the name, address, and taxpayer identification number of each substantial U.S. owner, among other items. In December 2018, the IRS and Treasury Department released proposed Treasury Regulations that would eliminate FATCA withholding on Fund distributions of net capital gain and the gross proceeds from a sale or redemption of Fund shares. Although taxpayers are entitled to rely on these proposed Treasury Regulations until final Treasury Regulations are issued, these proposed Treasury Regulations have not been finalized, may not be finalized in their proposed form, and are potentially subject to change. This FATCA withholding tax could also affect a Fund’s return on its investments in foreign securities or affect a shareholder’s return if the shareholder holds its Fund shares through a foreign intermediary. You are urged to
44


consult your tax adviser regarding the application of this FATCA withholding tax to your investment in a Fund and the potential certification, compliance, due diligence, reporting, and withholding obligations to which you may become subject in order to avoid this withholding tax.
Each Fund (or a financial intermediary, such as a broker, through which a shareholder owns Shares) generally is required to withhold and remit to the U.S. Treasury a percentage of the taxable distributions and sale or redemption proceeds paid to any shareholder who fails to properly furnish a correct taxpayer identification number, who has underreported dividend or interest income, or who fails to certify that they are not subject to such withholding.
Taxes When Shares are Sold on the Exchange
Any capital gain or loss realized upon a sale of Shares generally is treated as a long-term capital gain or loss if Shares have been held for more than one year and as a short-term capital gain or loss if Shares have been held for one year or less. However, any capital loss on a sale of Shares held for six months or less is treated as long-term capital loss to the extent of Capital Gain Dividends paid with respect to such Shares. Any loss realized on a sale will be disallowed to the extent Shares of a Fund are acquired, including through reinvestment of dividends, within a 61-day period beginning 30 days before and ending 30 days after the sale of substantially identical Shares.
Taxes on Purchases and Redemptions of Creation Units
An AP having the U.S. dollar as its functional currency for U.S. federal income tax purposes who exchanges securities for Creation Units generally recognizes a gain or a loss. The gain or loss will be equal to the difference between the value of the Creation Units at the time of the exchange and the exchanging AP’s aggregate basis in the securities delivered plus the amount of any cash paid for the Creation Units. An AP who exchanges Creation Units for securities will generally recognize a gain or loss equal to the difference between the exchanging AP’s basis in the Creation Units and the aggregate U.S. dollar market value of the securities received, plus any cash received for such Creation Units. The IRS may assert, however, that a loss that is realized upon an exchange of securities for Creation Units may not be currently deducted under the rules governing “wash sales” (for an AP who does not mark-to-market their holdings) or on the basis that there has been no significant change in economic position. Persons exchanging securities should consult their own tax advisor with respect to whether wash sale rules apply and when a loss might be deductible.
Any capital gain or loss realized upon redemption of Creation Units is generally treated as long-term capital gain or loss if Shares comprising the Creation Units have been held for more than one year and as a short-term capital gain or loss if such Shares have been held for one year or less.
A Fund may include a payment of cash in addition to, or in place of, the delivery of a basket of securities upon the redemption of Creation Units. A Fund may sell portfolio securities to obtain the cash needed to distribute redemption proceeds. This may cause a Fund to recognize investment income and/or capital gains or losses that it might not have recognized if it had completely satisfied the redemption in-kind. As a result, a Fund may be less tax efficient if it includes such a cash payment in the proceeds paid upon the redemption of Creation Units.
Taxation of REIT Investments
In general, qualified REIT dividends that an investor receives directly from a REIT are automatically eligible for the 20% qualified business income deduction. The IRS has issued final Treasury Regulations that permit a dividend or part of a dividend paid by a RIC and reported as a “section 199A dividend” to be treated by the recipient as a qualified REIT dividend for purposes of the 20% qualified business income deduction, if certain holding period and other requirements have been satisfied by the recipient with respect to its Fund shares.
Foreign Investments by a Fund
Interest and other income received by a Fund with respect to foreign securities may give rise to withholding and other taxes imposed by foreign countries. Tax treaties or conventions between certain countries and the United States may reduce or eliminate such taxes. If as of the close of a taxable year more than 50% of the value of a Fund’s assets consists of certain foreign stock or securities, such Fund will be eligible to elect to “pass through” to investors the amount of foreign income and similar taxes paid by such Fund during that taxable year. This means that investors would be considered to have received as additional income their respective shares of such foreign taxes, but may be entitled to either a corresponding tax deduction in calculating taxable income, or, subject to certain limitations, a credit in calculating federal income tax. If a Fund does not so elect, such Fund will be entitled to claim a deduction for certain foreign taxes incurred by such Fund. A Fund (or its administrative agent) will notify you if it makes such an election and provide you with the information necessary to reflect foreign taxes paid on your income tax return.
The foregoing discussion summarizes some of the possible consequences under current federal tax law of an investment in each Fund. It is not a substitute for personal tax advice. You also may be subject to foreign, state and local tax on Fund distributions and sales of Shares. Consult your personal tax advisor about the potential tax consequences of an investment in Shares under all applicable tax laws. For more information, please see the section entitled “Federal Income Taxes” in the SAI.
DISTRIBUTION
45


Foreside Fund Services, LLC (the “Distributor”), the Funds’ distributor, is a broker-dealer registered with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission. The Distributor distributes Creation Units for the Funds on an agency basis and does not maintain a secondary market in Shares. The Distributor has no role in determining the policies of the Funds or the securities that are purchased or sold by the Funds. The Distributor’s principal address is Three Canal Plaza, Suite 100, Portland, Maine 04101.
The Board has adopted a Distribution (Rule 12b-1) Plan (the “Plan”) pursuant to Rule 12b-1 under the 1940 Act. In accordance with the Plan, each Fund is authorized to pay an amount up to 0.25% of its average daily net assets each year for certain distribution-related activities and shareholder services.
No Rule 12b-1 fees are currently paid by the Funds, and there are no plans to impose these fees. However, in the event Rule 12b-1 fees are charged in the future, because the fees are paid out of Fund assets on an ongoing basis, over time these fees will increase the cost of your investment and may cost you more than certain other types of sales charges.
PREMIUM/DISCOUNT INFORMATION
Information regarding how often Shares of a Fund traded on the Exchange at a price above (i.e., at a premium) or below (i.e., at a discount) the NAV of the applicable Fund can be found on the Funds’ website at www.sofi.com/invest/etfs/.
ADDITIONAL NOTICES
Shares are not sponsored, endorsed, or promoted by the Exchange. The Exchange is not responsible for, nor has it participated in the determination of, the timing, prices, or quantities of Shares to be issued, nor in the determination or calculation of the equation by which Shares are redeemable. The Exchange has no obligation or liability to owners of Shares in connection with the administration, marketing, or trading of Shares.
Without limiting any of the foregoing, in no event shall the Exchange have any liability for any lost profits or indirect, punitive, special, or consequential damages even if notified of the possibility thereof.
The Adviser, the Sub-Adviser, and each Fund make no representation or warranty, express or implied, to the owners of Shares or any member of the public regarding the advisability of investing in securities generally or in the Funds particularly.
46


FINANCIAL HIGHLIGHTS
The Financial Highlights table is intended to help you understand each Fund’s financial performance from commencement of operations to the fiscal year/period ended February 28, 2021. Certain information reflects financial results for a single Fund share. The total return in the table represents the rate that an investor would have earned or lost on an investment in the Fund (assuming reinvestment of all dividends and distributions). This information has been audited by Tait, Weller & Baker LLP, the Funds’ independent registered public accounting firm, whose report, along with each Fund’s financial statements, is included in the Funds’ annual report, which is available upon request.
SoFi Select 500 ETF
FINANCIAL HIGHLIGHTS For a capital share outstanding throughout the year/period
Year Ended
February 28, 2021
Period Ended
February 29, 2020 (1)
Net asset value, beginning of year/period $ 10.38  $ 10.00 
Income (Loss) from Investment Operations:
Net investment income (loss) (2)
0.18  0.17 
Net realized and unrealized gain (loss) on investments 3.54  0.33 
Total from investment operations 3.72  0.50 
Less Distributions:
From net investment income (0.16) (0.12)
From net realized gain (0.00)
(6)
— 
Total distributions (0.16) (0.12)
Net asset value, end of year/period $ 13.94  $ 10.38 
Total return (3) (4)
36.04  % 4.95  %
Ratios / Supplemental Data:
Net assets, end of year/period (millions) $ 177.1  $ 73.7 
Portfolio turnover rate 26  % 22  %
(3)
Ratio of expenses to average net assets
Before management fees waived 0.19  % 0.19  %
(5)
After management fees waived 0.00  % 0.00  %
(5)
Ratio of net investment income (loss) to average net assets
Before management fees waived 1.25  % 1.60  %
(5)
After management fees waived 1.44  % 1.79  %
(5)
(1) The Fund commenced operations on April 10, 2019. The information presented is from April 10, 2019 to February 29, 2020.
(2) Calculated using average shares outstanding method.
(3) Not annualized.
(4) The total return is based on the Fund’s net asset value. Additional performance information is presented in the Performance Summary.
(5) Annualized.
(6) Does not round to $0.01 or $(0.01), as applicable.
47


SoFi Next 500 ETF
FINANCIAL HIGHLIGHTS For a capital share outstanding throughout the year/period
Year Ended
February 28, 2021
Period Ended
February 29, 2020 (1)
Net asset value, beginning of year/period $ 9.62  $ 10.00 
Income (Loss) from Investment Operations:
Net investment income (loss) (2)
0.16  0.13 
Net realized and unrealized gain (loss) on investments 3.67  (0.40)
Total from investment operations 3.83  (0.27)
Less Distributions:
From net investment income (0.14) (0.11)
From net realized gain (0.00)
(6)
— 
Total distributions (0.14) (0.11)
Net asset value, end of year/period $ 13.31  $ 9.62 
Total return (3) (4)
40.17  % (2.84) %
Ratios / Supplemental Data:
Net assets, end of year/period (millions) $ 24.6  $ 9.1 
Portfolio turnover rate 53  % 55  %
(3)
Ratio of expenses to average net assets
Before management fees waived 0.19  % 0.19  %
(5)
After management fees waived 0.00  % 0.00  %
(5)
Ratio of net investment income (loss) to average net assets
Before management fees waived 1.29  % 1.29  %
(5)
After management fees waived 1.48  % 1.48  %
(5)
(1) The Fund commenced operations on April 10, 2019. The information presented is from April 10, 2019 to February 29, 2020.
(2) Calculated using average shares outstanding method.
(3) Not annualized.
(4) The total return is based on the Fund’s net asset value. Additional performance information is presented in the Performance Summary.
(5) Annualized.
(6) Does not round to $0.01 or $(0.01), as applicable.

48


SoFi Social 50 ETF
FINANCIAL HIGHLIGHTS For a capital share outstanding throughout the year/period
Year Ended
February 28, 2021
Period Ended
February 29, 2020 (1)
Net asset value, beginning of year/period $ 18.73  $ 20.00 
Income (Loss) from Investment Operations:
Net investment income (loss) (2)
0.12  0.15 
Net realized and unrealized gain (loss) on investments 10.64  (1.27)
Total from investment operations 10.76  (1.12)
Less Distributions:
From net investment income (0.11) (0.15)
Total distributions (0.11) (0.15)
Net asset value, end of year/period $ 29.38  $ 18.73 
Total return (3) (4)
57.67  % (5.67) %
Ratios / Supplemental Data:
Net assets, end of year/period (millions) $ 11.8  $ 2.8 
Portfolio turnover rate 414  % 168  %
(3)
Ratio of expenses to average net assets 0.29  % 0.29  %
(5)
Ratio of net investment income (loss) to average net assets 0.52  % 0.92  %
(5)
(1) The Fund commenced operations on May 7, 2019. The information presented is from May 7, 2019 to February 29, 2020.
(2) Calculated using average shares outstanding method.
(3) Not annualized.
(4) The total return is based on the Fund’s net asset value. Additional performance information is presented in the Performance Summary.
(5) Annualized.












49


SoFi Gig Economy ETF
FINANCIAL HIGHLIGHTS For a capital share outstanding throughout the year/period
Year Ended
February 28, 2021
Period Ended
February 29, 2020 (1)
Net asset value, beginning of year/period $ 18.56  $ 20.00 
Income (Loss) from Investment Operations:
Net investment income (loss) (2)
(0.11) (0.05)
Net realized and unrealized gain (loss) on investments 23.14  (1.39)
Total from investment operations 23.03  (1.44)
Less Distributions:
From net investment income (0.12) — 
Total distributions (0.12) — 
Net asset value, end of year/period $ 41.47  $ 18.56