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Mutual Funds
 
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Fixed-Income
 
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1.31.2019
Guggenheim Funds Prospectus
January 31, 2019, as supplemented May 1, 2019
Class A, Class C, Institutional and Class P

Ticker Symbol
 
 
Fund Name
Class A
Class C
Institutional
Class P
 
GIFAX
GIFCX
GIFIX
GIFPX
Guggenheim Floating Rate Strategies Fund
SIHAX
SIHSX
SHYIX
SIHPX
Guggenheim High Yield Fund
SIUSX
SDICX
GIUSX
SIUPX
Guggenheim Investment Grade Bond Fund
GILDX
GILFX
GILHX
GILPX
Guggenheim Limited Duration Fund
GIOAX
GIOCX
GIOIX
GIOPX
Guggenheim Macro Opportunities Fund
GIJAX
GIJCX
GIJIX
GIJPX
Guggenheim Municipal Income Fund
GIBAX
GIBCX
GIBIX
GIBLX
Guggenheim Total Return Bond Fund
GIYAX
    —
GIYIX
GIYPX*
Guggenheim Ultra Short Duration Fund










* Class P shares of the Fund are not currently offered for sale.

The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission and the Commodity Futures Trading Commission have not approved or disapproved these securities, or passed upon the accuracy or adequacy of this Prospectus. Any representation to the contrary is a criminal offense.

Beginning on January 1, 2021, paper copies of the Funds’ annual and semi-annual shareholder reports will no longer be sent by mail, unless you specifically request paper copies of the reports from a Fund or from your financial intermediary. Instead, the reports will be made available on a website, and you will be notified by mail each time a report is posted and provided with a website link to access the report.

If you already elected to receive shareholder reports electronically, you will not be affected by this change, and you need not take any action. At any time, you may elect to receive reports and other communications from a Fund electronically by calling 800.820.0888 or going to guggenheiminvestments.com/myaccount or contacting your financial intermediary.

You may elect to receive all future shareholder reports in paper free of charge. If you hold shares of a Fund directly, you can inform a Fund that you wish to receive paper copies of reports by calling 800.820.0888. If you hold shares of a Fund through a financial intermediary, please contact the financial intermediary to make this election. Your election to receive reports in paper will apply to all Guggenheim Funds in which you are invested and may apply to all funds held with your financial intermediary.
GISIF-1-0519x0120

guggenheiminvestments.com




Table of Contents
 
FUND SUMMARIES
 
Guggenheim Floating Rate Strategies Fund

Guggenheim High Yield Fund

Guggenheim Investment Grade Bond Fund

Guggenheim Limited Duration Fund

Guggenheim Macro Opportunities Fund

Guggenheim Municipal Income Fund

Guggenheim Total Return Bond Fund

Guggenheim Ultra Short Duration Fund

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION REGARDING INVESTMENT OBJECTIVES AND STRATEGIES

DESCRIPTIONS OF PRINCIPAL RISKS

PORTFOLIO HOLDINGS

INVESTMENT MANAGER

MANAGEMENT FEES

PORTFOLIO MANAGERS

CONFLICTS OF INTEREST

SUB-ADVISERS

BUYING, SELLING AND EXCHANGING FUND SHARES

OPENING YOUR ACCOUNT

TIPS TO SUCCESSFULLY COMPLETE YOUR ACCOUNT APPLICATION

TRANSACTION INFORMATION

TRANSACTION CUT-OFF TIMES

TRANSACTIONS THROUGH YOUR FINANCIAL INTERMEDIARY

SALES CHARGES

CLASS A SHARES

HOW TO REDUCE YOUR SALES CHARGE

SALES CHARGE WAIVERS

SALES CHARGE EXCEPTIONS

CLASS C SHARES

WAIVER OF CDSC

BUYING FUND SHARES

PURCHASE PROCEDURES

CANCELED PURCHASE ORDERS

SELLING FUND SHARES

REDEMPTION PROCEDURES

DISTRIBUTIONS FROM QUALIFIED RETIREMENT ACCOUNTS

RECEIVING YOUR REDEMPTION PROCEEDS

MEDALLION SIGNATURE GUARANTEES

REDEMPTION CHARGE (GUGGENHEIM HIGH YIELD FUND)

UNCASHED CHECK POLICY

EXCHANGING FUND SHARES

EXCHANGE PROCEDURES

DOLLAR-COST AVERAGING

ACCOUNT POLICIES


i | PROSPECTUS




SHAREHOLDER IDENTIFICATION AND VERIFICATION

CHANGES TO YOUR ACCOUNT

TRANSACTIONS OVER TELEPHONE OR INTERNET

STATEMENTS & CONFIRMATIONS

eDELIVERY SERVICES

HOUSEHOLDING

GUGGENHEIM INVESTMENTS EXPRESS LINE—800.717.7776

SERVICE AND OTHER FEES

RETIREMENT ACCOUNT FEES

MARKET TIMING/SHORT-TERM TRADING

RIGHTS RESERVED BY THE FUNDS

UNCLAIMED PROPERTY LAWS

DISTRIBUTION AND SHAREHOLDER SERVICES

CLASS A AND CLASS P SHARES

CLASS C SHARES

COMPENSATION TO DEALERS

SHAREHOLDER SERVICES

SUB-TRANSFER AGENCY SERVICES

SYSTEMATIC WITHDRAWAL PLAN

EXCHANGE PRIVILEGE

DIVIDENDS AND TAXES

DIVIDEND PAYMENT OPTIONS

TAX ON DISTRIBUTIONS

TAXES ON SALES, REDEMPTIONS OR EXCHANGES
91

MEDICARE TAX

BACK-UP WITHHOLDING

FOREIGN TAXES

FOREIGN SHAREHOLDERS

COST BASIS

DETERMINATION OF NET ASSET VALUE

GENERAL INFORMATION

SHAREHOLDER INQUIRIES

OTHER INFORMATION

FINANCIAL HIGHLIGHTS

FOR MORE INFORMATION

ANNUAL/SEMI-ANNUAL REPORT

STATEMENT OF ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

APPENDIX A
1

INTERMEDIARY-SPECIFIC SALES CHARGE WAIVERS AND DISCOUNTS
1

 


PROSPECTUS | ii



Guggenheim Floating Rate Strategies Fund

 
INVESTMENT OBJECTIVE
The Guggenheim Floating Rate Strategies Fund (the “Fund”) seeks to provide a high level of current income while maximizing total return.
FEES AND EXPENSES OF THE FUND
This table describes the fees and expenses that you may pay if you buy and hold shares of the Fund. You may be required to pay a commission to your financial intermediary for effecting transactions in a class of shares of the Fund without any initial sales charge, contingent deferred sales charge, or other asset-based fee for sales or distribution. These commissions are not reflected in the fee and expense table or expense example below. You may qualify for sales charge discounts if you and your family invest, or agree to invest in the future, at least $50,000 in the Family of Funds, as defined on page 150 of the Fund’s prospectus. This amount may vary depending on the Guggenheim Fund in which you invest. More information about these and other discounts is available from your financial professional and in the “Sales Charges-Class A Shares” section on page 101 of the Fund’s prospectus and the “How to Purchase Shares” section on page 80 of the Fund’s Statement of Additional Information. Different intermediaries and financial professionals may impose different sales charges or offer different sales charge waivers or discounts.  These variations are described in Appendix A to the Fund’s prospectus (Intermediary-Specific Sales Charge Waivers and Discounts).
 
Class A
Class C
Institutional Class
Class P
SHAREHOLDER FEES (fees paid directly from your investment)
 
 
 
 
Maximum Sales Charge (Load) Imposed on Purchases (as a percentage of offering price)
3.00%
None
None
None
Maximum Deferred Sales Charge (Load) (as a percentage of original purchase price or redemption proceeds, whichever is lower)
None*
1.00%**
None
None
*
A 1.00% deferred sales charge will normally be imposed on purchases of $1,000,000 or more on Fund shares purchased without an initial sales charge that are redeemed within 12 months of purchase.
**
A 1.00% deferred sales charge will be imposed if Fund shares are redeemed within 12 months of purchase.

ANNUAL FUND OPERATING EXPENSES (expenses that you pay each year as a percentage of the value of your investment)
Management Fees
0.65%
0.65%
0.65%
0.65%
Distribution and Service (12b-1) Fees
0.25%
1.00%
None
0.25%
Other Expenses
0.25%
0.22%
0.19%
0.25%
Interest and Other Related Expenses
0.01%
0.01%
0.01%
0.01%
Remaining Other Expenses
0.24%
0.21%
0.18%
0.24%
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses
1.15%
1.87%
0.84%
1.15%
Fee Waiver (and/or expense reimbursement)1
-0.12%
-0.09%
-0.05%
-0.12%
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses After Fee Waiver (and/or expense reimbursement)
1.03%
1.78%
0.79%
1.03%
1 
Guggenheim Partners Investment Management, LLC, also known as Guggenheim Investments (the "Investment Manager") has contractually agreed through February 1, 2020 to waive fees and/or reimburse expenses to the extent necessary to limit the ordinary operating expenses (including distribution (12b-1) fees (if any), but exclusive of brokerage costs, dividends on securities sold short, acquired fund fees and expenses, interest, taxes, litigation, indemnification, and extraordinary expenses) (“Operating Expenses”) of the Fund to the annual percentage of average daily net assets for each class of shares as follows: Class A-1.02%, Class C-1.77%, Institutional Class-0.78%, and Class P-1.02%. The Investment Manager is entitled to reimbursement by the Fund of fees waived or expenses reimbursed during any of the previous 36 months beginning on the date of the expense limitation agreement, provided that the Operating Expenses do not exceed the then-applicable expense cap. The agreement will expire when it reaches its termination or when the Investment Manager ceases to serve as such and it can be terminated by the Fund’s Board of Trustees, with certain waived fees and reimbursed expenses subject to the recoupment rights of the Investment Manager.
EXAMPLE
This Example is intended to help you compare the cost of investing in the Fund with the cost of investing in other mutual funds.
The Example assumes that you invest $10,000 in the Fund for the time periods indicated and then redeem all of your shares at the end of those periods. The Example also assumes that your investment has a 5% return each year and that the Fund’s operating expenses remain the same. Although the actual costs may be higher or lower, based on these assumptions your costs would be:

1 | PROSPECTUS




 
Class A
Class C
Institutional
Class P
Redeemed
Not Redeemed
1 Year
$402
$281
$181
$81
$105
3 Years
$643
$579
$579
$263
$353
5 Years
$903
$1,003
$1,003
$461
$621
10 Years
$1,645
$2,183
$2,183
$1,033
$1,387
The above Example reflects applicable contractual fee waiver/expense reimbursement arrangements for the current duration of the arrangements only.
PORTFOLIO TURNOVER
The Fund pays transaction costs, such as commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or “turns over” its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover rate may indicate higher transaction costs and may result in higher taxes when Fund shares are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are not reflected in annual fund operating expenses or in the example, affect the Fund’s performance. During the most recent fiscal year, the Fund’s portfolio turnover rate was 33% of the average value of its portfolio.
PRINCIPAL INVESTMENT STRATEGIES
The Fund will, under normal circumstances, invest at least 80% of its assets (net assets, plus the amount of any borrowings for investment purposes) in floating rate senior secured syndicated bank loans, floating rate revolving credit facilities (“revolvers”), floating rate unsecured loans, floating rate asset backed securities (including floating rate collateralized loan obligations (“CLOs”)), other floating rate bonds, loans, notes and other securities (which may include, principally, senior secured, senior unsecured and subordinated bonds), fixed income instruments with respect to which the Fund has entered into derivative instruments to effectively convert the fixed rate interest payments into floating rate income payments, and derivative instruments (based on their notional value for purposes of this 80% strategy) that provide exposure (i.e., economic characteristics similar) to floating rate or variable rate loans, obligations or other securities. The loans in which the Fund will invest, generally made by banks and other lending institutions, are made to (or issued by) corporations, partnerships and other business entities. Floating rate loans feature rates that reset regularly, maintaining a fixed spread over the London InterBank Offered Rate (“LIBOR”) or the prime rates of large money-center banks. The interest rates for floating rate loans typically reset quarterly, although rates on some loans may adjust at other intervals.
The Fund invests in other fixed-income instruments of various maturities which may be represented by bonds, debt securities, commercial paper, forwards, derivatives or other similar instruments that Guggenheim Partners Investment Management, LLC, also known as Guggenheim Investments (the "Investment Manager"), believes provide the potential to deliver a high level of current income. Securities in which the Fund invests also may include corporate bonds, convertible securities (including those that are deemed to be “busted” because they are trading well below their equity conversion value), agency and non-agency mortgage-backed securities, asset-backed securities (including collateralized mortgage-backed securities) and CLOs. The Fund may invest in a variety of investment vehicles, such as closed-end funds, exchange-traded funds (“ETFs”) and other mutual funds.
The Fund may hold securities of any quality, rated or unrated, including, those that are rated below investment grade, or, if unrated, determined to be of comparable quality (also known as “high yield securities” or “junk bonds”). The Fund may hold below investment grade securities with no limit. The Fund may hold non-registered or restricted securities (consisting of securities originally issued in reliance on Rule 144A and Regulation S securities). The Fund may also invest in securities of real estate investment trusts (“REITs”) and other real estate companies.
The Fund will principally invest in U.S. dollar denominated loans and other securities of U.S. companies, but may also invest in securities of non-U.S. companies, non-U.S. dollar denominated loans and securities (e.g., denominated in Euros, British pounds, Swiss francs or Canadian dollars), including loans and securities of emerging market countries, sovereign debt securities and Eurodollar bonds and obligations. The Investment Manager may attempt to reduce foreign currency exchange rate risk by entering into contracts with banks, brokers or dealers to purchase or sell securities or foreign currencies at a future date (“forward contracts”).
The Fund also may seek certain exposures through derivative transactions, including: foreign exchange forward contracts; futures on securities, indices, currencies and other investments; Eurodollar futures; options; interest rate swaps; cross-currency swaps; total return swaps; and credit default swaps, which may also create economic leverage in the Fund. The Fund may engage in derivative transactions for speculative purposes to enhance total return, to seek to hedge against fluctuations in securities prices, interest rates or currency rates, to change the effective duration of its portfolio, to manage certain investment risks and/or as a substitute for the purchase or sale of securities or

PROSPECTUS | 2



currencies. The Fund may use leverage to the extent permitted by applicable law by entering into reverse repurchase agreements and transactions equivalent to a borrowing for investment purposes.
The Fund also may engage, without limit, in repurchase agreements, forward commitments, short sales and securities lending. The Fund may, without limitation, seek to obtain exposure to the securities in which it primarily invests by entering into a series of purchase and sale contracts or by using other investment techniques (such as dollar rolls).
The Investment Manager’s investment philosophy is predicated upon the belief that thorough research and independent thought are rewarded with performance that has the potential to outperform benchmark indexes with both lower volatility and lower correlation of returns as compared to such benchmark indexes.
The Investment Manager may determine to sell a security for several reasons, including but not limited to the following: (1) to adjust the portfolio’s average maturity or duration, or to shift assets into or out of higher-yielding securities; (2) if a security’s credit rating has been changed, our credit outlook has changed, or for other similar reasons; (3) to meet redemption requests; (4) to take gains; or (5) due to relative value. The Fund generally will not invest in securities that are in default at the time of purchase. If a security defaults subsequent to purchase by the Fund, the Investment Manager will determine in its discretion whether to hold or dispose of such security. Under adverse or unstable market conditions or abnormal circumstances (for example, in the event of credit events, where it is deemed opportune to preserve gains, or to preserve the relative value of investments or in the case of large cash inflows or anticipated large redemptions), the Fund can make temporary investments and may not be able to pursue or achieve its investment objective.
PRINCIPAL RISKS
The value of an investment in the Fund will fluctuate and is subject to investment risks, which means investors could lose money. An investment in the Fund is not a bank deposit and is not insured or guaranteed by the FDIC or any governmental agency. There is no assurance that the Fund will achieve its investment objective. The principal risks of investing in the Fund are summarized below.
Asset-Backed Securities RiskInvestors in asset-backed securities, including residential mortgage-backed securities, commercial mortgage-backed securities and other structured finance investments, generally receive payments that are part interest and part return of principal. These payments may vary based on the rate at which the underlying borrowers pay off their loans. Some asset-backed securities, including mortgage-backed securities, may have structures that make their reaction to interest rates and other factors difficult to predict, causing their prices to be volatile. These instruments are particularly subject to interest rate, credit and liquidity and valuation risks.
Residential Mortgage-Backed Securities—Residential mortgage-backed securities may be particularly sensitive to changes in interest rates given that rising interest rates tend to extend the duration of fixed-rate mortgage-backed securities. As a result, a rising interest rate environment can cause the prices of mortgage-backed securities to be increasingly volatile, which may adversely affect the Fund’s holdings of mortgage-backed securities.  In light of the current interest rate environment, the Fund’s investments in these securities may be subject to heightened interest rate risk. Investments in non-agency residential mortgage-backed securities are subject to increased interest rate risk and other risks, such as credit and liquidity and valuation risks.
Commercial Mortgage-Backed Securities—Investments in commercial mortgage-backed securities (“CMBS”) are backed by commercial mortgage loans that may be secured by office properties, retail properties, hotels, mixed use properties or multi-family apartment buildings and are particularly subject to the credit risk of the borrower and the tenants of the properties securing the commercial mortgage loans.  CMBS are subject to the risks of asset-backed securities generally and particularly subject to credit risk, interest rate risk, and liquidity and valuation risk.
Collateralized Loan Obligations and Collateralized Debt Obligations RiskCollateralized loan obligations (“CLOs”) bear many of the same risks as other forms of asset-backed securities, including interest rate risk, credit risk and default risk. As they are backed by pools of loans, CLOs also bear similar risks to investing in loans directly. CLOs issue classes or “tranches” that vary in risk and yield. CLOs may experience substantial losses attributable to loan defaults. Losses caused by defaults on underlying assets are borne first by the holders of subordinate tranches. The Fund’s investment in CLOs may decrease in market value when the CLO experiences loan defaults or credit impairment, the disappearance of a subordinate tranche, or market anticipation of defaults and investor aversion to CLO securities as a class.
Collateralized debt obligations (“CDOs”) are structured similarly to CLOs and bear the same risks as CLOs including interest rate risk, credit risk and default risk. CDOs are subject to additional risks because they are backed by pools of assets other than loans including securities (such as other asset-backed securities), synthetic instruments or bonds and may be highly leveraged. Like CLOs, losses incurred by a CDO are borne first by holders of subordinate tranches.

3 | PROSPECTUS




Accordingly, the risks of CDOs depend largely on the type of underlying collateral and the tranche of CDOs in which the Fund invests. For example, CDOs that obtain their exposure through synthetic investments entail the risks associated with derivative instruments.
Commercial Paper Risk—The value of the Fund’s investment in commercial paper, which is an unsecured promissory note that generally has a maturity date between one and 270 days and is issued by a U.S. or foreign entity, is susceptible to changes in the issuer’s financial condition or credit quality. Investments in commercial paper are usually discounted from their value at maturity. Commercial paper can be fixed-rate or variable rate and can be adversely affected by changes in interest rates.
Convertible Securities Risk—Convertible securities may be subordinate to other securities. The total return for a convertible security depends, in part, upon the performance of the underlying security into which it can be converted. The value of convertible securities tends to decline as interest rates increase. Convertible securities generally offer lower interest or dividend yields than non-convertible securities of similar quality.
Counterparty Credit RiskThe Fund makes investments in financial instruments and over-the-counter ("OTC")-traded derivatives involving counterparties to gain exposure to a particular group of securities, index, asset class or other reference asset without actually purchasing those securities or investments, to hedge a position, or for other investment purposes. Through these investments and related arrangements (e.g., prime brokerage or securities lending arrangements or derivatives transactions), the Fund is exposed to credit risks that the counterparty may be unwilling or unable to make timely payments or otherwise to meet its contractual obligations. If the counterparty becomes bankrupt or defaults on (or otherwise becomes unable or unwilling to perform) its payment or other obligations to the Fund, the Fund may not receive the full amount that it is entitled to receive or may experience delays in recovering the collateral or other assets held by, or on behalf of, the counterparty. If this occurs, the value of your shares in the Fund will decrease.
Credit Risk—The Fund could lose money if the issuer or guarantor of a fixed-income instrument or a counterparty to a derivatives transaction or other transaction is unable or unwilling, or perceived to be unable or unwilling, to pay interest or repay principal on time or defaults. The issuer, guarantor or counterparty could also suffer a rapid decrease in credit quality rating, which would adversely affect the volatility of the value and liquidity of the instrument. Credit ratings may not be an accurate assessment of liquidity or credit risk.
Currency Risk—Indirect and direct exposure to foreign currencies subjects the Fund to the risk that those currencies will decline in value relative to the U.S. Dollar, which would cause a decline in the U.S. value of the holdings of the Fund. Currency rates in foreign countries may fluctuate significantly over short periods of time for a number of reasons, including changes in interest rates and the imposition of currency controls or other political, economic and tax developments in the U.S. or abroad.
Derivatives Risk—Derivatives may pose risks in addition to and greater than those associated with investing directly in securities, currencies or other investments, including risks relating to leverage, imperfect correlations with underlying investments or the Fund’s other portfolio holdings, high price volatility, lack of availability, counterparty credit, liquidity, valuation and legal restrictions. Their use is a highly specialized activity that involves investment techniques and risks different from those associated with ordinary portfolio securities transactions. If the Investment Manager is incorrect about its expectations of market conditions, the use of derivatives could also result in a loss, which in some cases may be unlimited. In addition, the Fund’s use of derivatives may cause the Fund to realize higher amounts of short term capital gains (generally taxed at ordinary income tax rates) than if the Fund had not used such instruments. Some of the derivatives in which the Fund invests may be traded (and privately negotiated) in the OTC market. OTC derivatives are subject to heightened credit, liquidity and valuation risks.
Dollar Roll Transaction Risk—The Fund may enter into dollar roll transactions, in which the Fund sells a mortgage-backed or other security for settlement on one date and buys back a substantially similar security for settlement at a later date. Dollar rolls involve a risk of loss if the market value of the securities that the Fund is committed to buy declines below the price of the securities the Fund has sold.
Emerging Markets RiskInvestments in or exposure to emerging markets are generally subject to a greater level of those risks associated with investing in or being exposed to developed foreign markets, as emerging markets are considered to be less developed than developing countries. Furthermore, investments in or exposure to emerging markets are generally subject to additional risks, including the risks associated with trading in smaller markets, lower volumes of trading, and being subject to lower levels of government regulation and less extensive accounting, financial and other reporting requirements.
Extension RiskCertain debt instruments, including mortgage- and other asset-backed securities, are subject to the risk that payments on principal may occur at a slower rate or later than expected.  In this event, the expected maturity could lengthen and the Fund’s investment may sharply decrease in value and the Fund’s income from the investment

PROSPECTUS | 4



may quickly decline.  These types of instruments are particularly subject to extension risk, and offer less potential for gains, during periods of rising interest rates. In addition, the Fund may be delayed in its ability to reinvest income or proceeds from these instruments in potentially higher yielding investments, which would adversely affect the Fund.
Foreign Securities and Currency Risk—Foreign securities carry unique or additional risks when compared to U.S. securities, including currency fluctuations, adverse political and economic developments, unreliable or untimely information, less liquidity and more volatility, limited legal recourse and higher transactional costs.
High Yield and Unrated Securities Risk—High yield, below investment grade and unrated high risk debt securities (which also may be known as “junk bonds”) may present additional risks because these securities may be less liquid, and therefore more difficult to value accurately and sell at an advantageous price or time, and present more credit risk than investment grade bonds. The price of high yield securities tends to be subject to greater volatility due to issuer-specific operating results and outlook and to real or perceived adverse economic and competitive industry conditions. This exposure may be obtained through investments in other investment companies.
Interest Rate RiskInvestments in fixed-income instruments and other debt instruments are subject to the possibility that interest rates could rise sharply, which may cause the value of the Fund’s holdings and share price to decline. Changes in interest rates may also affect the liquidity of the Fund's investments in fixed-income instruments. The risks associated with rising interest rates are heightened given the recent near historically low interest rate environment and, as of the date of this prospectus, increasing interest rate environment. Interest rates may continue to rise in the future, possibly suddenly and significantly, with unpredictable effects on the financial markets and the Fund’s investments. Fixed-income instruments with longer durations are subject to more volatility than those with shorter durations. During periods of rising interest rates, because changes in interest rates on adjustable rate securities may lag behind changes in market rates, the value of such securities may decline until their interest rates reset to market rates. During periods of declining interest rates, because the interest rates on adjustable rate securities generally reset downward, their market value is unlikely to rise to the same extent as the value of comparable fixed rate securities.
Investment in Investment Vehicles Risk—Investing in other investment vehicles, including ETFs, closed-end funds and other mutual funds, subjects the Fund to those risks affecting the investment vehicle, including the possibility that the value of the underlying securities held by the investment vehicle could decrease or the portfolio becomes illiquid. Moreover, the Fund and its shareholders will incur its pro rata share of the underlying vehicles’ expenses, which will reduce the Fund’s performance. In addition, investments in an ETF are subject to, among other risks, the risk that the ETF's shares may trade at a discount or premium relative to the net asset value of the shares and the listing exchange may halt trading of the ETF's shares.
Investment in Loans Risk—The Fund may invest in loans through assignments, participations or directly. Investments in loans, including loan syndicates and other direct lending opportunities, involve special types of risks, including credit risk, interest rate risk, counterparty risk and prepayment risk. Loans may offer a fixed or floating interest rate. Loans are often generally below investment grade and may be unrated. The Fund’s investments in loans can also be difficult to value accurately and may be more susceptible to liquidity risk than fixed-income instruments of similar credit quality and/or maturity. The Fund is also subject to the risk that the value of any collateral for the loan may be insufficient or unavailable to cover the borrower’s obligations should the borrower fail to make payments, become insolvent, or otherwise default. Participations in loans may subject the Fund to the credit risk of both the borrower and the issuer of the participation and may make enforcement of loan covenants, if any, more difficult for the Fund as legal action may have to go through the issuer of the participation (or an agent acting on its behalf). Transactions in loans are often subject to long settlement periods, thus potentially limiting the ability of the Fund to invest sale proceeds in other investments and to use proceeds to meet its current redemption obligations.
Leverage Risk—The Fund’s use of leverage, through borrowings or instruments such as derivatives, may cause the Fund to be more volatile and riskier than if it had not been leveraged.
Liquidity and Valuation RiskIt may be difficult for the Fund to purchase and sell particular investments within a reasonable time at a fair price, or the price at which it has been valued by the Investment Manager for purposes of the Fund’s net asset value, causing the Fund to be less liquid and unable to realize what the Investment Manager believes should be the price of the investment. Valuation of portfolio investments may be difficult, such as during periods of market turmoil or reduced liquidity, and for investments that may, for example, trade infrequently or irregularly. In these and other circumstances, an investment may be valued using fair value methodologies, which are inherently subjective, reflect good faith judgments based on available information and may not accurately estimate the price at which the Fund could sell the investment at that time. These risks may be heightened for fixed-income instruments because of the near historically low interest rate environment as of the date of this prospectus. Based

5 | PROSPECTUS




on its investment strategies, a significant portion of the Fund's investments can be difficult to value and potentially less liquid and thus particularly prone to the foregoing risks.
Management Risk—The Fund is actively managed, which means that investment decisions are made based on investment views. There is no guarantee that the investment views will produce the desired results or expected returns, causing the Fund to fail to meet its investment objective or underperform its benchmark index or funds with similar investment objectives and strategies. Furthermore, active and frequent trading that can accompany active management, also called “high turnover,” may have a negative impact on performance. Active and frequent trading may result in higher brokerage costs or mark-up charges, which are ultimately passed on to shareholders of the Fund. Active and frequent trading may also result in adverse tax consequences.
Market Risk—The value of, or income generated by, the securities held by the Fund may fluctuate rapidly and unpredictably as a result of factors affecting individual companies or changing economic, political, social or financial market conditions throughout the world. The performance of these investments may underperform the general securities markets or other types of securities.
Prepayment RiskCertain debt instruments, including loans and mortgage- and other asset-backed securities, are subject to the risk that payments on principal may occur more quickly or earlier than expected.  In this event, the Fund might be forced to forego future interest income on the principal repaid early and to reinvest income or proceeds at generally lower interest rates, thus reducing the Fund’s yield.  These types of instruments are particularly subject to prepayment risk, and offer less potential for gains, during periods of declining interest rates.
Real Estate Securities Risk—The Fund may invest in securities of real estate companies and companies related to the real estate industry, including real estate investment trusts (“REITs”), which are subject to the same risks as direct investments in real estate. The real estate industry is particularly sensitive to economic downturns.
Regulatory and Legal RiskU.S. and non-U.S. governmental agencies and other regulators regularly implement additional regulations and legislators pass new laws that affect the investments held by the Fund, the strategies used by the Fund or the level of regulation or taxation applying to the Fund (such as regulations related to investments in derivatives and other transactions). These regulations and laws impact the investment strategies, performance, costs and operations of the Fund or taxation of shareholders.
Repurchase Agreements and Reverse Repurchase Agreements Risk—In the event of the insolvency of the counterparty to a repurchase agreement or reverse repurchase agreement, recovery of the repurchase price owed to the Fund or, in the case of a reverse repurchase agreement, the securities sold by the Fund, may be delayed. Because reverse repurchase agreements may be considered to be the practical equivalent of borrowing funds, they constitute a form of leverage. If the Fund reinvests the proceeds of a reverse repurchase agreement at a rate lower than the cost of the agreement, entering into the agreement will lower the Fund’s yield.
Restricted Securities Risk—Restricted securities generally cannot be sold to the public and may involve a high degree of business, financial and liquidity risk, which may result in substantial losses to the Fund.
Securities Lending Risk—Securities lending involves a risk that the borrower may fail to return the securities or deliver the proper amount of collateral, which may result in a loss to the Fund. In the event of bankruptcy of the borrower, the Fund could experience losses or delays in recovering the loaned securities.
Short Sale Risk—Short selling a security involves selling a borrowed security with the expectation that the value of that security will decline so that the security may be purchased at a lower price when returning the borrowed security. The risk for loss on short selling is greater than the original value of the securities sold short because the price of the borrowed security may rise, thereby increasing the price at which the security must be purchased. Government actions also may affect the Fund’s ability to engage in short selling.
Sovereign Debt RiskThe debt securities issued by sovereign entities may decline as a result of default or other adverse credit event resulting from a sovereign debtor's unwillingness or inability to repay principal and pay interest in a timely manner, which may be affected by a variety of factors, including its cash flow situation, the extent of its reserves, the availability of sufficient foreign exchange on the date a payment is due, the relative size of the debt service burden to the economy as a whole, the sovereign debtor's policy toward international lenders, and the political constraints to which a sovereign debtor may be subject. Sovereign debt risk is increased for emerging market issuers.
Special Situations/Securities in Default RiskInvestments in the securities and debt of distressed issuers or issuers in default involve far greater risk than investing in issuers whose debt obligations are being met and whose debt trade at or close to its “par” or full value because the investments are highly speculative with respect to the issuer’s ability to make interest payments and/or to pay its principal obligations in full and/or on time.

PROSPECTUS | 6



PERFORMANCE INFORMATION
The following chart and table provide some indication of the risks of investing in the Fund by showing the Fund’s Class A share calendar year performance from year to year and average annual returns for the one, five and ten year or since inception periods (if shorter), as applicable, for the Fund’s Class A, Class C, Institutional Class, and Class P shares compared to those of a broad measure of market performance. As with all mutual funds, past performance (before and after taxes) is not necessarily an indication of how the Fund will perform in the future. Updated performance information is available on the Fund’s website at www.guggenheiminvestments.com or by calling 800.820.0888.
The bar chart does not reflect the impact of the sales charge applicable to Class A shares which, if reflected, would lower the returns shown.
chart-1c64f864ef4a5936922.jpg
Highest Quarter Return
Q1 2012 4.58%
  
Lowest Quarter Return
Q4 2018 -3.13%
AVERAGE ANNUAL TOTAL RETURNS (for the periods ended December 31, 2018)
After-tax returns shown in the table are calculated using the historical highest individual federal marginal income tax rates and do not reflect the impact of any state or local taxes. Actual after-tax returns depend on an investor’s tax situation and may differ from those shown. After-tax returns shown are not relevant to investors who hold their Fund shares through tax-deferred arrangements, such as 401(k) plans or individual retirement accounts (“IRAs”). After-tax returns are shown for Class A only. After-tax returns for Class C, Institutional Class, and Class P will vary. The returns shown below reflect applicable sales charges, if any.
 
Inception
1 Year
5 Years or Since Inception
10 Years or Since Inception
Class A
11/30/2011
 
 
 
Return Before Taxes
 
-3.29%
1.78%
3.74%
Return After Taxes on Distributions
 
-5.00%
-0.06%
1.83%
Return After Taxes on Distributions and Sale of Fund Shares
 
-1.93%
0.53%
2.03%
Class C
11/30/2011
-2.01%
2.00%
3.68%
Institutional Class
11/30/2011
-0.08%
3.01%
4.71%
Class P
5/1/2015
-0.32%
2.38%
N/A
Index
 
 
 
 
Credit Suisse Leveraged Loan Index (reflects no deductions for fees, expenses or taxes)
 
1.15%
3.32%
4.60%

7 | PROSPECTUS




MANAGEMENT OF THE FUND
Guggenheim Partners Investment Management, LLC, also known as Guggenheim Investments, serves as the investment manager of the Fund. B. Scott Minerd, Anne B. Walsh, Kevin H. Gundersen and Thomas J. Hauser are primarily responsible for the day-to-day management of the Fund. They hold the titles of Chairman, Global Chief Investment Officer, Managing Partner and Portfolio Manager; Chief Investment Officer, Fixed Income, Senior Managing Director and Portfolio Manager; Senior Managing Director and Portfolio Manager; and Senior Managing Director and Portfolio Manager, respectively, with the Investment Manager. B. Scott Minerd, Anne B. Walsh and Kevin H. Gundersen have managed the Fund since 2011, and Thomas J. Hauser has managed the Fund since 2014.
PURCHASE AND SALE OF FUND SHARES
You may purchase or redeem Fund shares through your broker/dealer, other financial intermediary that has an agreement with Guggenheim Funds Distributors, LLC, the Fund’s distributor, or, for shares of each class other than Class P shares, through the Fund’s transfer agent. You may purchase, redeem or exchange shares of any class of the Fund on any day the New York Stock Exchange is open for business. The minimum initial investment for Class A and Class C shares is $2,500. The minimum subsequent investment is $100. Class A and Class C do not have a minimum account balance.
The Institutional Class minimum initial investment is $2 million, although the Investment Manager may waive this requirement at its discretion. The Institutional Class has a minimum account balance of $1 million. Due to the relatively high cost of maintaining accounts below the minimum account balance, the Fund reserves the right to redeem shares if an account balance falls below the minimum account balance for any reason. Investors will be given 60 days notice to reestablish the minimum account balance. If the account balance is not increased, the account may be closed and the proceeds sent to the investor. Institutional Class shares of the Fund will be redeemed at net asset value on the day the account is closed.
Class P shares of the Fund are offered through broker/dealers and other financial intermediaries with which Guggenheim Funds Distributors, LLC has an agreement for the use of Class P shares of the Fund in investment products, programs or accounts. Class P shares do not have a minimum initial investment amount, subsequent investment amount or a minimum account balance. The Fund reserves the right to modify its minimum investment amount and account balance requirements at any time, with or without prior notice to you.
TAX INFORMATION
Fund distributions are taxable as ordinary income or capital gains (or a combination of both), unless your investment is through an IRA or other tax-advantaged retirement account. Investments through tax-advantaged accounts may sometimes become taxable upon withdrawal.
PAYMENTS TO BROKER/DEALERS AND OTHER FINANCIAL INTERMEDIARIES
If you purchase Fund shares through a broker/dealer or other financial intermediary, the Fund and its related companies may pay the intermediary for the sale of Fund shares and related services. These payments may create a conflict of interest by influencing the broker/dealer or other intermediary and your sales person to recommend the Fund over another investment. Ask your sales person or visit your financial intermediary’s website for more information.


PROSPECTUS | 8



Guggenheim High Yield Fund

INVESTMENT OBJECTIVE
The Guggenheim High Yield Fund (the “Fund”) seeks high current income. Capital appreciation is a secondary objective.
FEES AND EXPENSES OF THE FUND
This table describes the fees and expenses that you may pay if you buy and hold shares of the Fund. You may be required to pay a commission to your financial intermediary for effecting transactions in a class of shares of the Fund without any initial sales charge, contingent deferred sales charge, or other asset-based fee for sales or distribution. These commissions are not reflected in the fee and expense table or expense example below. You may qualify for sales charge discounts if you and your family invest, or agree to invest in the future, at least $50,000 in the Family of Funds, as defined on page 150 of the Fund’s prospectus. This amount may vary depending on the Guggenheim Fund in which you invest. More information about these and other discounts is available from your financial professional and in the “Sales Charges-Class A Shares” section on page 101 of the Fund’s prospectus and the “How to Purchase Shares” section on page 80 of the Fund’s Statement of Additional Information. Different intermediaries and financial professionals may impose different sales charges or offer different sales charge waivers or discounts.  These variations are described in Appendix A to the Fund’s prospectus (Intermediary-Specific Sales Charge Waivers and Discounts).
 
Class A
Class C
Institutional Class
Class P
SHAREHOLDER FEES (fees paid directly from your investment)
 
 
 
 
Maximum Sales Charge (Load) Imposed on Purchases (as a percentage of offering price)
4.00%
None
None
None
Maximum Deferred Sales Charge (Load) (as a percentage of original purchase price or redemption proceeds, whichever is lower)
None*
1.00%**
None
None
Redemption Charge (as a percentage of amount redeemed or exchanged)
2.00%
2.00%
2.00%
2.00%
*
A 1.00% deferred sales charge will normally be imposed on purchases of $1,000,000 or more on Fund shares purchased without an initial sales charge that are redeemed within 12 months of purchase.
**
A 1.00% deferred sales charge will be imposed if Fund shares are redeemed within 12 months of purchase.

ANNUAL FUND OPERATING EXPENSES (expenses that you pay each year as a percentage of the value of your investment)
Management Fees
0.60%
0.60%
0.60%
0.60%
Distribution and Service (12b-1) Fees
0.25%
1.00%
None
0.25%
Acquired Fund Fees and Expenses
0.01%
0.01%
0.01%
0.01%
Other Expenses
0.50%
0.51%
0.50%
0.57%
Interest and Other Related Expenses
0.23%
0.23%
0.23%
0.23%
Remaining Other Expenses
0.27%
0.28%
0.27%
0.34%
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses
1.36%
2.12%
1.11%
1.43%
Fee Waiver (and/or expense reimbursement)1
0.00%
0.00%
0.00%
-0.03%
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses After Fee Waiver (and/or expense reimbursement)
1.36%
2.12%
1.11%
1.40%
1 
Security Investors, LLC, also known as Guggenheim Investments (the “Investment Manager”) has contractually agreed through February 1, 2020 to waive fees and/or reimburse expenses to the extent necessary to limit the ordinary operating expenses (including distribution (12b-1) fees (if any), but exclusive of brokerage costs, dividends on securities sold short, acquired fund fees and expenses, interest, taxes, litigation, indemnification, and extraordinary expenses) (“Operating Expenses”) of the Fund to the annual percentage of average daily net assets for each class of shares as follows: Class A-1.16%, Class C-1.91%, Institutional Class-0.91%, and Class P-1.16%. The Investment Manager is entitled to reimbursement by the Fund of fees waived or expenses reimbursed during any of the previous 36 months beginning on the date of the expense limitation agreement, provided that the Operating Expenses do not exceed the then-applicable expense cap. The agreement will expire when it reaches its termination or when the Investment Manager ceases to serve as such and it can be terminated by the Fund’s Board of Trustees, with certain waived fees and reimbursed expenses subject to the recoupment rights of the Investment Manager.






9 | PROSPECTUS




EXAMPLE
This Example is intended to help you compare the cost of investing in the Fund with the cost of investing in other mutual funds.
The Example assumes that you invest $10,000 in the Fund for the time periods indicated and then redeem all of your shares at the end of those periods. The Example also assumes that your investment has a 5% return each year and that the Fund’s operating expenses remain the same. Although the actual costs may be higher or lower, based on these assumptions your costs would be:
 
Class A
Class C
Institutional
Class P
Redeemed
Not Redeemed
1 Year
$533
$315
$215
$113
$143
3 Years
$814
$664
$664
$353
$449
5 Years
$1,115
$1,139
$1,139
$612
$779
10 Years
$1,970
$2,452
$2,452
$1,352
$1,710
The above Example reflects applicable contractual fee waiver/expense reimbursement arrangements for the current duration of the arrangements only.
PORTFOLIO TURNOVER
The Fund pays transaction costs, such as commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or “turns over” its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover rate may indicate higher transaction costs and may result in higher taxes when Fund shares are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are not reflected in annual fund operating expenses or in the example, affect the Fund’s performance. During the most recent fiscal year, the Fund’s portfolio turnover rate was 61% of the average value of its portfolio.
PRINCIPAL INVESTMENT STRATEGIES
The Fund pursues its objective by investing at least 80% of its assets (net assets, plus the amount of any borrowings for investment purposes), under normal circumstances, in a broad range of high yield, high risk debt securities rated below the top four long-term rating categories by a nationally recognized statistical rating organization or, if unrated, determined by Security Investors, LLC, also known as Guggenheim Investments (the “Investment Manager”), to be of comparable quality (also known as “junk bonds”). If nationally recognized statistical rating organizations assign different ratings to the same security, the Fund will use the higher rating for purposes of determining the security’s credit quality. These debt securities may include, without limitation: corporate bonds and notes, commercial paper, discount notes, securities issued by the U.S. government or its agencies and instrumentalities (including those not backed by the full faith and credit of the U.S. government), convertible securities, agency and non-agency mortgage-backed securities and other asset-backed securities (including collateralized debt obligations), participations in and assignments of loans (such as senior floating rate loans, syndicated bank loans, secured or unsecured loans, bridge loans and other loans), floating rate revolving credit facilities (“revolvers”), debtor-in-possession loans (“DIPs”) and other loans, and sovereign debt securities and Eurodollar bonds and obligations. These securities may pay fixed or variable rates of interest. These securities also may be restricted securities, including Rule 144A securities that are eligible for resale to qualified institutional buyers. The Fund also may invest in a variety of investment vehicles, principally, closed-end funds, exchange-traded funds (“ETFs”) and other mutual funds. The Fund may invest up to 10% of its net assets in securities that are in default at the time of purchase. The debt securities in which the Fund invests will primarily be domestic securities, but may also include foreign securities. Such securities may be denominated in foreign currencies. The Fund may also invest in preferred securities.
The Fund also may seek certain exposures through derivative transactions, including: foreign exchange forward contracts; futures on securities, indices, currencies and other investments; Eurodollar futures; options; interest rate swaps; cross-currency swaps; total return swaps; and credit default swaps, which may also create economic leverage in the Fund. The Fund may engage in derivative transactions for speculative purposes to enhance total return, to seek to hedge against fluctuations in securities prices, interest rates or currency rates, to change the effective duration of its portfolio, to manage certain investment risks and/or as a substitute for the purchase or sale of securities or currencies.
The Fund also may engage, without limit, in repurchase agreements, forward commitments, short sales and securities lending. The Fund may, without limitation, seek to obtain exposure to the securities in which it primarily invests by entering into a series of purchase and sale contracts or by using other investment techniques (such as dollar rolls).

PROSPECTUS | 10



The Investment Manager selects securities and other investments for purchase and sale based on intensive credit research involving extensive due diligence on each issuer, region and sector. The Investment Manager also considers macroeconomic outlook and geopolitical issues.
The Investment Manager may determine to sell a security for several reasons, including but not limited to the following: (1) to adjust the portfolio’s average maturity or duration, or to shift assets into or out of higher-yielding securities; (2) if a security’s credit rating has been changed, our credit outlook has changed, or for other similar reasons; (3) to meet redemption requests; (4) to take gains; or (5) due to relative value. Under adverse or unstable market conditions or abnormal circumstances (for example, in the event of credit events, where it is deemed opportune to preserve gains, or to preserve the relative value of investments or in the case of large cash inflows or anticipated large redemptions), the Fund can make temporary investments and may not be able to pursue or achieve its investment objective.
PRINCIPAL RISKS
The value of an investment in the Fund will fluctuate and is subject to investment risks, which means investors could lose money. An investment in the Fund is not a bank deposit and is not insured or guaranteed by the FDIC or any governmental agency. There is no assurance that the Fund will achieve its investment objective. The principal risks of investing in the Fund are summarized below.
Asset-Backed Securities RiskInvestors in asset-backed securities, including residential mortgage-backed securities, commercial mortgage-backed securities and other structured finance investments, generally receive payments that are part interest and part return of principal. These payments may vary based on the rate at which the underlying borrowers pay off their loans. Some asset-backed securities, including mortgage-backed securities, may have structures that make their reaction to interest rates and other factors difficult to predict, causing their prices to be volatile. These instruments are particularly subject to interest rate, credit and liquidity and valuation risks.
Collateralized Loan Obligations and Collateralized Debt Obligations RiskCollateralized loan obligations (“CLOs”) bear many of the same risks as other forms of asset-backed securities, including interest rate risk, credit risk and default risk. As they are backed by pools of loans, CLOs also bear similar risks to investing in loans directly. CLOs issue classes or “tranches” that vary in risk and yield. CLOs may experience substantial losses attributable to loan defaults. Losses caused by defaults on underlying assets are borne first by the holders of subordinate tranches. The Fund’s investment in CLOs may decrease in market value when the CLO experiences loan defaults or credit impairment, the disappearance of a subordinate tranche, or market anticipation of defaults and investor aversion to CLO securities as a class.
Collateralized debt obligations (“CDOs”) are structured similarly to CLOs and bear the same risks as CLOs including interest rate risk, credit risk and default risk. CDOs are subject to additional risks because they are backed by pools of assets other than loans including securities (such as other asset-backed securities), synthetic instruments or bonds and may be highly leveraged. Like CLOs, losses incurred by a CDO are borne first by holders of subordinate tranches. Accordingly, the risks of CDOs depend largely on the type of underlying collateral and the tranche of CDOs in which the Fund invests. For example, CDOs that obtain their exposure through synthetic investments entail the risks associated with derivative instruments.
Commercial Paper RiskThe value of the Fund’s investment in commercial paper, which is an unsecured promissory note that generally has a maturity date between one and 270 days and is issued by a U.S. or foreign entity, is susceptible to changes in the issuer’s financial condition or credit quality. Investments in commercial paper are usually discounted from their value at maturity. Commercial paper can be fixed-rate or variable rate and can be adversely affected by changes in interest rates.
Convertible Securities Risk—Convertible securities may be subordinate to other securities. The total return for a convertible security depends, in part, upon the performance of the underlying security into which it can be converted. The value of convertible securities tends to decline as interest rates increase. Convertible securities generally offer lower interest or dividend yields than non-convertible securities of similar quality.
Counterparty Credit RiskThe Fund makes investments in financial instruments and over-the-counter ("OTC")-traded derivatives involving counterparties to gain exposure to a particular group of securities, index, asset class or other reference asset without actually purchasing those securities or investments, to hedge a position, or for other investment purposes. Through these investments and related arrangements (e.g., prime brokerage or securities lending arrangements or derivatives transactions), the Fund is exposed to credit risks that the counterparty may be unwilling or unable to make timely payments or otherwise to meet its contractual obligations. If the counterparty becomes bankrupt or defaults on (or otherwise becomes unable or unwilling to perform) its payment or other obligations to the Fund, the Fund may not receive the full amount that it is entitled to receive or may experience

11 | PROSPECTUS




delays in recovering the collateral or other assets held by, or on behalf of, the counterparty. If this occurs, the value of your shares in the Fund will decrease.
Credit Risk—The Fund could lose money if the issuer or guarantor of a fixed-income instrument or a counterparty to a derivatives transaction or other transaction is unable or unwilling, or perceived to be unable or unwilling, to pay interest or repay principal on time or defaults. The issuer, guarantor or counterparty could also suffer a rapid decrease in credit quality rating, which would adversely affect the volatility of the value and liquidity of the instrument. Credit ratings may not be an accurate assessment of liquidity or credit risk.
Currency Risk—Indirect and direct exposure to foreign currencies subjects the Fund to the risk that those currencies will decline in value relative to the U.S. Dollar, which would cause a decline in the U.S. value of the holdings of the Fund. Currency rates in foreign countries may fluctuate significantly over short periods of time for a number of reasons, including changes in interest rates and the imposition of currency controls or other political, economic and tax developments in the U.S. or abroad.
Derivatives Risk—Derivatives may pose risks in addition to and greater than those associated with investing directly in securities, currencies or other investments, including risks relating to leverage, imperfect correlations with underlying investments or the Fund’s other portfolio holdings, high price volatility, lack of availability, counterparty credit, liquidity, valuation and legal restrictions. Their use is a highly specialized activity that involves investment techniques and risks different from those associated with ordinary portfolio securities transactions. If the Investment Manager is incorrect about its expectations of market conditions, the use of derivatives could also result in a loss, which in some cases may be unlimited. In addition, the Fund’s use of derivatives may cause the Fund to realize higher amounts of short term capital gains (generally taxed at ordinary income tax rates) than if the Fund had not used such instruments. Some of the derivatives in which the Fund invests may be traded (and privately negotiated) in the OTC market. OTC derivatives are subject to heightened credit, liquidity and valuation risks.
Dollar Roll Transaction Risk—The Fund may enter into dollar roll transactions, in which the Fund sells a mortgage-backed or other security for settlement on one date and buys back a substantially similar security for settlement at a later date. Dollar rolls involve a risk of loss if the market value of the securities that the Fund is committed to buy declines below the price of the securities the Fund has sold.
Equity Securities RiskEquity securities include common stocks and other equity and equity-related securities (and securities convertible into stocks). The prices of equity securities generally fluctuate in value more than fixed-income investments, may rise or fall rapidly or unpredictably and may reflect real or perceived changes in the issuing company’s financial condition and changes in the overall market or economy. A decline in the value of equity securities held by the Fund will adversely affect the value of your investment in the Fund. Common stocks generally represent the riskiest investment in a company and dividend payments (if declared) to preferred stockholders generally rank junior to payments due to a company’s debtholders. The Fund may lose a substantial part, or even all, of its investment in a company’s stock.
Extension RiskCertain debt instruments, including mortgage- and other asset-backed securities, are subject to the risk that payments on principal may occur at a slower rate or later than expected.  In this event, the expected maturity could lengthen and the Fund’s investment may sharply decrease in value and the Fund’s income from the investment may quickly decline.  These types of instruments are particularly subject to extension risk, and offer less potential for gains, during periods of rising interest rates. In addition, the Fund may be delayed in its ability to reinvest income or proceeds from these instruments in potentially higher yielding investments, which would adversely affect the Fund.
Foreign Securities and Currency Risk—Foreign securities carry unique or additional risks when compared to U.S. securities, including currency fluctuations, adverse political and economic developments, unreliable or untimely information, less liquidity and more volatility, limited legal recourse and higher transactional costs.
High Yield and Unrated Securities Risk—High yield, below investment grade and unrated high risk debt securities (which also may be known as “junk bonds”) may present additional risks because these securities may be less liquid, and therefore more difficult to value accurately and sell at an advantageous price or time, and present more credit risk than investment grade bonds. The price of high yield securities tends to be subject to greater volatility due to issuer-specific operating results and outlook and to real or perceived adverse economic and competitive industry conditions. This exposure may be obtained through investments in other investment companies.
Interest Rate RiskInvestments in fixed-income instruments and other debt instruments are subject to the possibility that interest rates could rise sharply, which may cause the value of the Fund’s holdings and share price to decline. Changes in interest rates may also affect the liquidity of the Fund's investments in fixed-income instruments. The risks associated with rising interest rates are heightened given the recent near historically low interest rate environment and, as of the date of this prospectus, increasing interest rate environment. Interest rates may continue

PROSPECTUS | 12



to rise in the future, possibly suddenly and significantly, with unpredictable effects on the financial markets and the Fund’s investments. Fixed-income instruments with longer durations are subject to more volatility than those with shorter durations. During periods of rising interest rates, because changes in interest rates on adjustable rate securities may lag behind changes in market rates, the value of such securities may decline until their interest rates reset to market rates. During periods of declining interest rates, because the interest rates on adjustable rate securities generally reset downward, their market value is unlikely to rise to the same extent as the value of comparable fixed rate securities.
Investment in Investment Vehicles Risk—Investing in other investment vehicles, including ETFs, closed-end funds and other mutual funds, subjects the Fund to those risks affecting the investment vehicle, including the possibility that the value of the underlying securities held by the investment vehicle could decrease or the portfolio becomes illiquid. Moreover, the Fund and its shareholders will incur its pro rata share of the underlying vehicles’ expenses, which will reduce the Fund’s performance. In addition, investments in an ETF are subject to, among other risks, the risk that the ETF's shares may trade at a discount or premium relative to the net asset value of the shares and the listing exchange may halt trading of the ETF's shares.
Investment in Loans Risk—The Fund may invest in loans through assignments, participations or directly. Investments in loans, including loan syndicates and other direct lending opportunities, involve special types of risks, including credit risk, interest rate risk, counterparty risk and prepayment risk. Loans may offer a fixed or floating interest rate. Loans are often generally below investment grade and may be unrated. The Fund’s investments in loans can also be difficult to value accurately and may be more susceptible to liquidity risk than fixed-income instruments of similar credit quality and/or maturity. The Fund is also subject to the risk that the value of any collateral for the loan may be insufficient or unavailable to cover the borrower’s obligations should the borrower fail to make payments, become insolvent, or otherwise default. Participations in loans may subject the Fund to the credit risk of both the borrower and the issuer of the participation and may make enforcement of loan covenants, if any, more difficult for the Fund as legal action may have to go through the issuer of the participation (or an agent acting on its behalf). Transactions in loans are often subject to long settlement periods, thus potentially limiting the ability of the Fund to invest sale proceeds in other investments and to use proceeds to meet its current redemption obligations.
Leverage Risk—The Fund’s use of leverage, through borrowings or instruments such as derivatives, may cause the Fund to be more volatile and riskier than if it had not been leveraged.
Liquidity and Valuation RiskIt may be difficult for the Fund to purchase and sell particular investments within a reasonable time at a fair price, or the price at which it has been valued by the Investment Manager for purposes of the Fund’s net asset value, causing the Fund to be less liquid and unable to realize what the Investment Manager believes should be the price of the investment. Valuation of portfolio investments may be difficult, such as during periods of market turmoil or reduced liquidity, and for investments that may, for example, trade infrequently or irregularly. In these and other circumstances, an investment may be valued using fair value methodologies, which are inherently subjective, reflect good faith judgments based on available information and may not accurately estimate the price at which the Fund could sell the investment at that time. These risks may be heightened for fixed-income instruments because of the near historically low interest rate environment as of the date of this prospectus. Based on its investment strategies, a significant portion of the Fund's investments can be difficult to value and potentially less liquid and thus particularly prone to the foregoing risks.
Management Risk—The Fund is actively managed, which means that investment decisions are made based on investment views. There is no guarantee that the investment views will produce the desired results or expected returns, causing the Fund to fail to meet its investment objective or underperform its benchmark index or funds with similar investment objectives and strategies. Furthermore, active and frequent trading that can accompany active management, also called “high turnover,” may have a negative impact on performance. Active and frequent trading may result in higher brokerage costs or mark-up charges, which are ultimately passed on to shareholders of the Fund. Active and frequent trading may also result in adverse tax consequences.
Market Risk—The value of, or income generated by, the securities held by the Fund may fluctuate rapidly and unpredictably as a result of factors affecting individual companies or changing economic, political, social or financial market conditions throughout the world. The performance of these investments may underperform the general securities markets or other types of securities.
Preferred Securities Risk—A company’s preferred stock generally pays dividends only after the company makes required payments to holders of its bonds and other debt. For this reason, the value of preferred stock will usually react more strongly than bonds and other debt to actual or perceived changes in the company’s financial condition or prospects.

13 | PROSPECTUS




Prepayment RiskCertain debt instruments, including loans and mortgage- and other asset-backed securities, are subject to the risk that payments on principal may occur more quickly or earlier than expected.  In this event, the Fund might be forced to forego future interest income on the principal repaid early and to reinvest income or proceeds at generally lower interest rates, thus reducing the Fund’s yield.  These types of instruments are particularly subject to prepayment risk, and offer less potential for gains, during periods of declining interest rates.
Regulatory and Legal RiskU.S. and non-U.S. governmental agencies and other regulators regularly implement additional regulations and legislators pass new laws that affect the investments held by the Fund, the strategies used by the Fund or the level of regulation or taxation applying to the Fund (such as regulations related to investments in derivatives and other transactions). These regulations and laws impact the investment strategies, performance, costs and operations of the Fund or taxation of shareholders.
Repurchase Agreements and Reverse Repurchase Agreements Risk—In the event of the insolvency of the counterparty to a repurchase agreement or reverse repurchase agreement, recovery of the repurchase price owed to the Fund or, in the case of a reverse repurchase agreement, the securities sold by the Fund, may be delayed. Because reverse repurchase agreements may be considered to be the practical equivalent of borrowing funds, they constitute a form of leverage. If the Fund reinvests the proceeds of a reverse repurchase agreement at a rate lower than the cost of the agreement, entering into the agreement will lower the Fund’s yield.
Restricted Securities Risk—Restricted securities generally cannot be sold to the public and may involve a high degree of business, financial and liquidity risk, which may result in substantial losses to the Fund.
Securities Lending Risk—Securities lending involves a risk that the borrower may fail to return the securities or deliver the proper amount of collateral, which may result in a loss to the Fund. In the event of bankruptcy of the borrower, the Fund could experience losses or delays in recovering the loaned securities.
Short Sale Risk—Short selling a security involves selling a borrowed security with the expectation that the value of that security will decline so that the security may be purchased at a lower price when returning the borrowed security. The risk for loss on short selling is greater than the original value of the securities sold short because the price of the borrowed security may rise, thereby increasing the price at which the security must be purchased. Government actions also may affect the Fund’s ability to engage in short selling.
Sovereign Debt RiskThe debt securities issued by sovereign entities may decline as a result of default or other adverse credit event resulting from a sovereign debtor's unwillingness or inability to repay principal and pay interest in a timely manner, which may be affected by a variety of factors, including its cash flow situation, the extent of its reserves, the availability of sufficient foreign exchange on the date a payment is due, the relative size of the debt service burden to the economy as a whole, the sovereign debtor's policy toward international lenders, and the political constraints to which a sovereign debtor may be subject. Sovereign debt risk is increased for emerging market issuers.
Special Situations/Securities in Default RiskInvestments in the securities and debt of distressed issuers or issuers in default involve far greater risk than investing in issuers whose debt obligations are being met and whose debt trade at or close to its “par” or full value because the investments are highly speculative with respect to the issuer’s ability to make interest payments and/or to pay its principal obligations in full and/or on time.
U.S. Government Securities RiskU.S. government securities may or may not be backed by the full faith and credit of the U.S. government. U.S. government securities are subject to the risks associated with fixed-income and debt securities, particularly interest rate risk and credit risk.
When Issued, Forward Commitment and Delayed-Delivery Transactions Risk—When-issued, forward-commitment and delayed-delivery transactions involve a commitment to purchase or sell specific securities at a predetermined price or yield in which payment and delivery take place after the customary settlement period for that type of security. When purchasing securities pursuant to one of these transactions, payment for the securities is not required until the delivery date. However, the purchaser assumes the rights and risks of ownership, including the risks of price and yield fluctuations and the risk that the security will not be issued as anticipated.

PROSPECTUS | 14



PERFORMANCE INFORMATION
The following chart and table provide some indication of the risks of investing in the Fund by showing the Fund’s Class A share calendar year performance from year to year and average annual returns for the one, five and ten year or since inception periods (if shorter), as applicable, for the Fund’s Class A, Class C, Institutional Class, and Class P shares compared to those of a broad measure of market performance. As with all mutual funds, past performance (before and after taxes) is not necessarily an indication of how the Fund will perform in the future. Updated performance information is available on the Fund’s website at www.guggenheiminvestments.com or by calling 800.820.0888.
The bar chart does not reflect the impact of the sales charge applicable to Class A shares which, if reflected, would lower the returns shown.

chart-52a51830f5cb58329af.jpg
Highest Quarter Return
Q2 2009 32.56%
  
Lowest Quarter Return
Q3 2011 -11.82%
AVERAGE ANNUAL TOTAL RETURNS (for the periods ended December 31, 2018)
After-tax returns shown in the table are calculated using the historical highest individual federal marginal income tax rates and do not reflect the impact of any state or local taxes. Actual after-tax returns depend on an investor’s tax situation and may differ from those shown. After-tax returns shown are not relevant to investors who hold their Fund shares through tax-deferred arrangements, such as 401(k) plans or individual retirement accounts (“IRAs”). After-tax returns are shown for Class A only. After-tax returns for Class C, Institutional Class, and Class P will vary. The returns shown below reflect applicable sales charges, if any.

 
Inception
1 Year
5 Years or Since Inception
10 Years or Since Inception
Class A
8/5/1996
 
 
 
Return Before Taxes
 
-7.11%
2.56%
10.80%
Return After Taxes on Distributions
 
-9.52%
-0.28%
7.60%
Return After Taxes on Distributions and Sale of Fund Shares
 
-4.17%
0.69%
7.35%
Class C
5/1/2000
-4.85%
2.80%
10.51%
Institutional Class
7/11/2008
-3.02%
3.84%
11.65%
Class P
5/1/2015
-3.26%
3.47%
N/A
Index
 
 
 
 
Bloomberg Barclays U.S. Corporate High Yield Index (reflects no deductions for fees, expenses or taxes)
 
-2.08%
3.83%
11.12%

15 | PROSPECTUS




MANAGEMENT OF THE FUND
Security Investors, LLC, also known as Guggenheim Investments, serves as the investment manager of the Fund. B. Scott Minerd, Kevin H. Gundersen, Thomas J. Hauser and Richard de Wet are primarily responsible for the day-to-day management of the Fund. They hold the titles of Chairman, Global Chief Investment Officer, Managing Partner and Portfolio Manager; Senior Managing Director and Portfolio Manager; Senior Managing Director and Portfolio Manager; and Director and Portfolio Manager, respectively, with the Investment Manager. B. Scott Minerd and Kevin H. Gundersen have managed the Fund since 2012. Thomas J. Hauser and Richard de Wet have managed the Fund since 2017.
 
PURCHASE AND SALE OF FUND SHARES
You may purchase or redeem Fund shares through your broker/dealer, other financial intermediary that has an agreement with Guggenheim Funds Distributors, LLC, the Fund’s distributor, or, for shares of each class other than Class P shares, through the Fund’s transfer agent. You may purchase, redeem or exchange shares of any class of the Fund on any day the New York Stock Exchange is open for business. The minimum initial investment for Class A and Class C shares is $2,500. The minimum subsequent investment is $100. Class A and Class C do not have a minimum account balance.
The Institutional Class minimum initial investment is $2 million, although the Investment Manager may waive this requirement at its discretion. The Institutional Class has a minimum account balance of $1 million. Due to the relatively high cost of maintaining accounts below the minimum account balance, the Fund reserves the right to redeem shares if an account balance falls below the minimum account balance for any reason. Investors will be given 60 days notice to reestablish the minimum account balance. If the account balance is not increased, the account may be closed and the proceeds sent to the investor. Institutional Class shares of the Fund will be redeemed at net asset value on the day the account is closed.
Class P shares of the Fund are offered through broker/dealers and other financial intermediaries with which Guggenheim Funds Distributors, LLC has an agreement for the use of Class P shares of the Fund in investment products, programs or accounts. Class P shares do not have a minimum initial investment amount, subsequent investment amount or a minimum account balance. The Fund reserves the right to modify its minimum investment amount and account balance requirements at any time, with or without prior notice to you.
TAX INFORMATION
Fund distributions are taxable as ordinary income or capital gains (or a combination of both), unless your investment is through an IRA or other tax-advantaged retirement account. Investments through tax-advantaged accounts may sometimes become taxable upon withdrawal.
PAYMENTS TO BROKER/DEALERS AND OTHER FINANCIAL INTERMEDIARIES
If you purchase Fund shares through a broker/dealer or other financial intermediary, the Fund and its related companies may pay the intermediary for the sale of Fund shares and related services. These payments may create a conflict of interest by influencing the broker/dealer or other intermediary and your sales person to recommend the Fund over another investment. Ask your sales person or visit your financial intermediary’s website for more information.



PROSPECTUS | 16



Guggenheim Investment Grade Bond Fund

 
INVESTMENT OBJECTIVE
The Guggenheim Investment Grade Bond Fund (the “Fund”) seeks to provide current income.
FEES AND EXPENSES OF THE FUND
This table describes the fees and expenses that you may pay if you buy and hold shares of the Fund. You may be required to pay a commission to your financial intermediary for effecting transactions in a class of shares of the Fund without any initial sales charge, contingent deferred sales charge, or other asset-based fee for sales or distribution. These commissions are not reflected in the fee and expense table or expense example below. You may qualify for sales charge discounts if you and your family invest, or agree to invest in the future, at least $50,000 in the Family of Funds, as defined on page 150 of the Fund’s prospectus. This amount may vary depending on the Guggenheim Fund in which you invest. More information about these and other discounts is available from your financial professional and in the “Sales Charges-Class A Shares” section on page 101 of the Fund’s prospectus and the “How to Purchase Shares” section on page 80 of the Fund’s Statement of Additional Information. Different intermediaries and financial professionals may impose different sales charges or offer different sales charge waivers or discounts.  These variations are described in Appendix A to the Fund’s prospectus (Intermediary-Specific Sales Charge Waivers and Discounts).
 
Class A
Class C
Institutional Class
Class P
SHAREHOLDER FEES (fees paid directly from your investment)
 
 
 
 
Maximum Sales Charge (Load) Imposed on Purchases (as a percentage of offering price)
4.00%
None
None
None
Maximum Deferred Sales Charge (Load) (as a percentage of original purchase price or redemption proceeds, whichever is lower)
None*
1.00%**
None
None
*
A 1.00% deferred sales charge will normally be imposed on purchases of $1,000,000 or more on Fund shares purchased without an initial sales charge that are redeemed within 12 months of purchase.
**
A 1.00% deferred sales charge will be imposed if Fund shares are redeemed within 12 months of purchase.

ANNUAL FUND OPERATING EXPENSES (expenses that you pay each year as a percentage of the value of your investment)
Management Fees1
0.39%
0.39%
0.39%
0.39%
Distribution and Service (12b-1) Fees
0.25%
1.00%
None
0.25%
Other Expenses
0.28%
0.34%
0.20%
0.29%
Interest and Other Related Expenses
0.01%
0.00%
0.00%
0.00%
Remaining Other Expenses
0.27%
0.34%
0.20%
0.29%
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses
0.92%
1.73%
0.59%
0.93%
Fee Waiver (and/or expense reimbursement)2
-0.12%
-0.19%
-0.09%
-0.14%
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses After Fee Waiver (and/or expense reimbursement)
0.80%
1.54%
0.50%
0.79%
1 
Restated to reflect current management fees.
2 
Security Investors, LLC, also known as Guggenheim Investments (the “Investment Manager”) has contractually agreed through February 1, 2020 to waive fees and/or reimburse expenses to the extent necessary to limit the ordinary operating expenses (including distribution (12b-1) fees (if any), but exclusive of brokerage costs, dividends on securities sold short, acquired fund fees and expenses, interest, taxes, litigation, indemnification, and extraordinary expenses) (“Operating Expenses”) of the Fund to the annual percentage of average daily net assets for each class of shares as follows: Class A-0.79%, Class C-1.54%, Institutional Class-0.50%, and Class P-0.79%. The Investment Manager is entitled to reimbursement by the Fund of fees waived or expenses reimbursed during any of the previous 36 months beginning on the date of the expense limitation agreement, provided that the Operating Expenses do not exceed the then-applicable expense cap. The agreement will expire when it reaches its termination or when the Investment Manager ceases to serve as such and it can be terminated by the Fund’s Board of Trustees, with certain waived fees and reimbursed expenses subject to the recoupment rights of the Investment Manager.
EXAMPLE
This Example is intended to help you compare the cost of investing in the Fund with the cost of investing in other mutual funds.
The Example assumes that you invest $10,000 in the Fund for the time periods indicated and then redeem all of your shares at the end of those periods. The Example also assumes that your investment has a 5% return each year and that the Fund’s operating expenses remain the same. Although the actual costs may be higher or lower, based on these assumptions your costs would be:

17 | PROSPECTUS




 
Class A
Class C
Institutional
Class P
Redeemed
Not Redeemed
1 Year
$478
$257
$157
$51
$81
3 Years
$670
$526
$526
$180
$282
5 Years
$878
$921
$921
$320
$501
10 Years
$1,475
$2,025
$2,025
$729
$1,130
The above Example reflects applicable contractual fee waiver/expense reimbursement arrangements for the current duration of the arrangements only.
PORTFOLIO TURNOVER
The Fund pays transaction costs, such as commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or “turns over” its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover rate may indicate higher transaction costs and may result in higher taxes when Fund shares are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are not reflected in annual fund operating expenses or in the example, affect the Fund’s performance. During the most recent fiscal year, the Fund’s portfolio turnover rate was 53% of the average value of its portfolio.
PRINCIPAL INVESTMENT STRATEGIES
In pursuit of its objective, the Fund will invest, under normal circumstances, at least 80% of its assets (net assets, plus the amount of any borrowings for investment purposes) in investment grade fixed-income securities (i.e., rated in the top four long-term rating categories by a nationally recognized statistical rating organization or, if unrated, determined by Security Investors, LLC, also known as Guggenheim Investments (the “Investment Manager”), to be of comparable quality). If nationally recognized statistical rating organizations assign different ratings to the same security, the Fund will use the higher rating for purposes of determining the security’s credit quality. Such fixed-income securities may include corporate bonds and other corporate debt securities, commercial paper, securities issued by the U.S. government or its agencies and instrumentalities (including those not backed by the full faith and credit of the U.S. government), sovereign debt securities, Eurodollar bonds and obligations, agency and non-agency mortgage-backed securities and other asset-backed securities (such as corporate, consumer and commercial asset-backed securities) including collateralized debt, loan and mortgage obligations, participations in and assignments of loans (such as senior floating rate loans, syndicated bank loans, secured or unsecured loans, bridge loans and other loans), zero-coupon bonds, municipal bonds, payment-in-kind debt securities (such as payment-in-kind bonds), convertible fixed-income securities, non-registered or restricted securities (including securities originally issued in reliance on Rule 144A and Regulation S securities), certain preferred securities and step-up securities (such as step-up bonds). These securities may pay fixed or variable rates of interest. Although the Fund will invest at least 80% of its assets in investment grade fixed-income securities, such securities (especially those in the lowest of the top four long-term rating categories) may have speculative characteristics. The Fund may, without limitation, seek to obtain exposure to the securities in which it primarily invests through a variety of investment vehicles, principally closed-end funds, exchange-traded funds (“ETFs”) and other mutual funds. The Fund may invest up to 20% of its assets in preferred stock. While the Fund will principally invest in securities listed, traded or dealt in developed markets countries globally, it may also invest without limitation in securities listed, traded or dealt in other countries, including emerging markets countries. Such securities may be denominated in foreign currencies.
Consistent with its investment objective and principal investment strategies, the Fund also may invest in debt securities or loans that are not investment grade (also known as “high yield/high risk securities” or “junk bonds”). The Fund also may seek certain exposures through derivative transactions, principally, foreign exchange forward contracts, futures on securities, indices, currencies and other investments, Eurodollar futures, options, interest rate swaps, cross-currency swaps, total return swaps, and credit default swaps, which may also create economic leverage in the Fund. The Fund may engage in derivative transactions for speculative purposes to enhance total return, to seek to hedge against fluctuations in securities prices, interest rates or currency rates, to change the effective duration of its portfolio, to manage certain investment risks, as a substitute for the purchase or sale of securities or currencies and/or to obtain or replicate market exposure. The Fund may use leverage to the extent permitted by applicable law by entering into reverse repurchase agreements and transactions equivalent to a borrowing for investment purposes. The Fund may also seek to obtain market exposure to the securities in which it primarily invests by entering into a series of purchase and sale contracts or by using other investment techniques (such as “To Be Announced” (“TBA”) transactions and/or dollar rolls). In a TBA transaction, a seller agrees to deliver a mortgage-backed security to the Fund at a future date, but the seller does not specify the particular security to be delivered. Instead, the Fund agrees to accept or sell any security that meets specified terms.

PROSPECTUS | 18



The Investment Manager selects securities and other investments for purchase and sale based on intensive credit research involving extensive due diligence on each issuer, region and sector. The Investment Manager also considers macroeconomic outlook and geopolitical issues. The Investment Manager may employ a tactical sector allocation strategy to seek to capitalize on total return potential created by changing market and economic conditions.
The Investment Manager may determine to sell a security for several reasons, including but not limited to the following: (1) to adjust the portfolio’s average maturity or duration, or to shift assets into or out of higher-yielding securities; (2) if a security’s credit rating has been changed, our credit outlook has changed, or for other similar reasons; (3) to meet redemption requests; (4) to take gains; or (5) due to relative value. Under adverse or unstable market conditions or abnormal circumstances (for example, in the event of credit events, where it is deemed opportune to preserve gains, or to preserve the relative value of investments or in the case of large cash inflows or anticipated large redemptions), the Fund can make temporary investments and may not be able to pursue or achieve its investment objective.
PRINCIPAL RISKS
The value of an investment in the Fund will fluctuate and is subject to investment risks, which means investors could lose money. An investment in the Fund is not a bank deposit and is not insured or guaranteed by the FDIC or any governmental agency. There is no assurance that the Fund will achieve its investment objective. The principal risks of investing in the Fund are summarized below.
Asset-Backed Securities RiskInvestors in asset-backed securities, including residential mortgage-backed securities, commercial mortgage-backed securities and other structured finance investments, generally receive payments that are part interest and part return of principal. These payments may vary based on the rate at which the underlying borrowers pay off their loans. Some asset-backed securities, including mortgage-backed securities, may have structures that make their reaction to interest rates and other factors difficult to predict, causing their prices to be volatile. These instruments are particularly subject to interest rate, credit and liquidity and valuation risks.
Residential Mortgage-Backed Securities—Residential mortgage-backed securities may be particularly sensitive to changes in interest rates given that rising interest rates tend to extend the duration of fixed-rate mortgage-backed securities. As a result, a rising interest rate environment can cause the prices of mortgage-backed securities to be increasingly volatile, which may adversely affect the Fund’s holdings of mortgage-backed securities.  In light of the current interest rate environment, the Fund’s investments in these securities may be subject to heightened interest rate risk. Investments in non-agency residential mortgage-backed securities are subject to increased interest rate risk and other risks, such as credit and liquidity and valuation risks.
Commercial Mortgage-Backed Securities—Investments in commercial mortgage-backed securities (“CMBS”) are backed by commercial mortgage loans that may be secured by office properties, retail properties, hotels, mixed use properties or multi-family apartment buildings and are particularly subject to the credit risk of the borrower and the tenants of the properties securing the commercial mortgage loans.  CMBS are subject to the risks of asset-backed securities generally and particularly subject to credit risk, interest rate risk, and liquidity and valuation risk.
Collateralized Loan Obligations and Collateralized Debt Obligations RiskCollateralized loan obligations (“CLOs”) bear many of the same risks as other forms of asset-backed securities, including interest rate risk, credit risk and default risk. As they are backed by pools of loans, CLOs also bear similar risks to investing in loans directly. CLOs issue classes or “tranches” that vary in risk and yield. CLOs may experience substantial losses attributable to loan defaults. Losses caused by defaults on underlying assets are borne first by the holders of subordinate tranches. The Fund’s investment in CLOs may decrease in market value when the CLO experiences loan defaults or credit impairment, the disappearance of a subordinate tranche, or market anticipation of defaults and investor aversion to CLO securities as a class.
Collateralized debt obligations (“CDOs”) are structured similarly to CLOs and bear the same risks as CLOs including interest rate risk, credit risk and default risk. CDOs are subject to additional risks because they are backed by pools of assets other than loans including securities (such as other asset-backed securities), synthetic instruments or bonds and may be highly leveraged. Like CLOs, losses incurred by a CDO are borne first by holders of subordinate tranches. Accordingly, the risks of CDOs depend largely on the type of underlying collateral and the tranche of CDOs in which the Fund invests. For example, CDOs that obtain their exposure through synthetic investments entail the risks associated with derivative instruments.
Commercial Paper Risk—The value of the Fund’s investment in commercial paper, which is an unsecured promissory note that generally has a maturity date between one and 270 days and is issued by a U.S. or foreign entity, is susceptible to changes in the issuer’s financial condition or credit quality. Investments in commercial paper are usually discounted

19 | PROSPECTUS




from their value at maturity. Commercial paper can be fixed-rate or variable rate and can be adversely affected by changes in interest rates.
Convertible Securities Risk—Convertible securities may be subordinate to other securities. The total return for a convertible security depends, in part, upon the performance of the underlying security into which it can be converted. The value of convertible securities tends to decline as interest rates increase. Convertible securities generally offer lower interest or dividend yields than non-convertible securities of similar quality.
Counterparty Credit RiskThe Fund makes investments in financial instruments and over-the-counter ("OTC")-traded derivatives involving counterparties to gain exposure to a particular group of securities, index, asset class or other reference asset without actually purchasing those securities or investments, to hedge a position, or for other investment purposes. Through these investments and related arrangements (e.g., prime brokerage or securities lending arrangements or derivatives transactions), the Fund is exposed to credit risks that the counterparty may be unwilling or unable to make timely payments or otherwise to meet its contractual obligations. If the counterparty becomes bankrupt or defaults on (or otherwise becomes unable or unwilling to perform) its payment or other obligations to the Fund, the Fund may not receive the full amount that it is entitled to receive or may experience delays in recovering the collateral or other assets held by, or on behalf of, the counterparty. If this occurs, the value of your shares in the Fund will decrease.
Credit Risk—The Fund could lose money if the issuer or guarantor of a fixed-income instrument or a counterparty to a derivatives transaction or other transaction is unable or unwilling, or perceived to be unable or unwilling, to pay interest or repay principal on time or defaults. The issuer, guarantor or counterparty could also suffer a rapid decrease in credit quality rating, which would adversely affect the volatility of the value and liquidity of the instrument. Credit ratings may not be an accurate assessment of liquidity or credit risk.
Currency Risk—Indirect and direct exposure to foreign currencies subjects the Fund to the risk that those currencies will decline in value relative to the U.S. Dollar, which would cause a decline in the U.S. value of the holdings of the Fund. Currency rates in foreign countries may fluctuate significantly over short periods of time for a number of reasons, including changes in interest rates and the imposition of currency controls or other political, economic and tax developments in the U.S. or abroad.
Derivatives Risk—Derivatives may pose risks in addition to and greater than those associated with investing directly in securities, currencies or other investments, including risks relating to leverage, imperfect correlations with underlying investments or the Fund’s other portfolio holdings, high price volatility, lack of availability, counterparty credit, liquidity, valuation and legal restrictions. Their use is a highly specialized activity that involves investment techniques and risks different from those associated with ordinary portfolio securities transactions. If the Investment Manager is incorrect about its expectations of market conditions, the use of derivatives could also result in a loss, which in some cases may be unlimited. In addition, the Fund’s use of derivatives may cause the Fund to realize higher amounts of short term capital gains (generally taxed at ordinary income tax rates) than if the Fund had not used such instruments. Some of the derivatives in which the Fund invests may be traded (and privately negotiated) in the OTC market. OTC derivatives are subject to heightened credit, liquidity and valuation risks. Certain risks also are specific to the derivatives in which the Fund invests.
Swap Agreements Risk—Swap agreements are contracts among the Fund and a counterparty to exchange the return of the pre-determined underlying investment (such as the rate of return of the underlying index). Swap agreements may be negotiated bilaterally and traded OTC between two parties or, in some instances, must be exchange-traded through a futures commission merchant and/or cleared through a clearinghouse that serves as a central counterparty. Risks associated with the use of swap agreements are different from those associated with ordinary portfolio securities transactions, due in part to the fact they could be considered illiquid and many swaps trade on the OTC market. Swaps are particularly subject to counterparty credit, correlation, valuation, liquidity and leveraging risks. Certain standardized swaps are subject to mandatory exchange trading and central clearing. Exchange trading and central clearing are intended to reduce counterparty credit risk and increase liquidity but exchange trading and central clearing do not make swap transactions risk-free. Additionally, applicable regulators have adopted rules imposing certain margin requirements, including minimums, on OTC swaps, which may result in the Fund and its counterparties posting higher margin amounts for OTC swaps.
Futures Contracts Risk—Futures contracts are exchange-traded contracts that call for the future delivery of an asset at a certain price and date, or cash settlement of the terms of the contract. Risks of futures contracts may be caused by an imperfect correlation between movements in the price of the instruments and the price of the underlying assets. In addition, there is the risk that the Fund may not be able to enter into a closing transaction because of an illiquid market. Exchanges can limit the number of positions that can be held or controlled by the Fund or its Investment Manager, thus limiting the ability to implement the Fund’s strategies.

PROSPECTUS | 20



Futures markets are highly volatile and the use of futures may increase the volatility of the Fund’s NAV. Futures are also subject to leverage risks and to liquidity risk.
Options Risk—Options or options on futures contracts give the holder of the option the right, but not the obligation, to buy (or to sell) a position in a security or in a contract to the writer of the option, at a certain price. They are subject to correlation risk because there may be an imperfect correlation between the options and the securities markets that cause a given transaction to fail to achieve its objectives. The successful use of options depends on the Investment Manager’s ability to predict correctly future price fluctuations and the degree of correlation between the markets for options and the underlying instruments. Exchanges can limit the number of positions that can be held or controlled by the Fund or its Investment Manager, thus limiting the ability to implement the Fund’s strategies. Options are also particularly subject to leverage risk and can be subject to liquidity risk.
Dollar Roll Transaction Risk—The Fund may enter into dollar roll transactions, in which the Fund sells a mortgage-backed or other security for settlement on one date and buys back a substantially similar security for settlement at a later date. Dollar rolls involve a risk of loss if the market value of the securities that the Fund is committed to buy declines below the price of the securities the Fund has sold.
Emerging Markets RiskInvestments in or exposure to emerging markets are generally subject to a greater level of those risks associated with investing in or being exposed to developed foreign markets, as emerging markets are considered to be less developed than developing countries. Furthermore, investments in or exposure to emerging markets are generally subject to additional risks, including the risks associated with trading in smaller markets, lower volumes of trading, and being subject to lower levels of government regulation and less extensive accounting, financial and other reporting requirements.
Extension RiskCertain debt instruments, including mortgage- and other asset-backed securities, are subject to the risk that payments on principal may occur at a slower rate or later than expected.  In this event, the expected maturity could lengthen and the Fund’s investment may sharply decrease in value and the Fund’s income from the investment may quickly decline.  These types of instruments are particularly subject to extension risk, and offer less potential for gains, during periods of rising interest rates. In addition, the Fund may be delayed in its ability to reinvest income or proceeds from these instruments in potentially higher yielding investments, which would adversely affect the Fund.
Foreign Securities and Currency Risk—Foreign securities carry unique or additional risks when compared to U.S. securities, including currency fluctuations, adverse political and economic developments, unreliable or untimely information, less liquidity and more volatility, limited legal recourse and higher transactional costs.
High Yield and Unrated Securities Risk—High yield, below investment grade and unrated high risk debt securities (which also may be known as “junk bonds”) may present additional risks because these securities may be less liquid, and therefore more difficult to value accurately and sell at an advantageous price or time, and present more credit risk than investment grade bonds. The price of high yield securities tends to be subject to greater volatility due to issuer-specific operating results and outlook and to real or perceived adverse economic and competitive industry conditions. This exposure may be obtained through investments in other investment companies.
Interest Rate RiskInvestments in fixed-income instruments and other debt instruments are subject to the possibility that interest rates could rise sharply, which may cause the value of the Fund’s holdings and share price to decline. Changes in interest rates may also affect the liquidity of the Fund's investments in fixed-income instruments. The risks associated with rising interest rates are heightened given the recent near historically low interest rate environment and, as of the date of this prospectus, increasing interest rate environment. Interest rates may continue to rise in the future, possibly suddenly and significantly, with unpredictable effects on the financial markets and the Fund’s investments. Fixed-income instruments with longer durations are subject to more volatility than those with shorter durations. During periods of rising interest rates, because changes in interest rates on adjustable rate securities may lag behind changes in market rates, the value of such securities may decline until their interest rates reset to market rates. During periods of declining interest rates, because the interest rates on adjustable rate securities generally reset downward, their market value is unlikely to rise to the same extent as the value of comparable fixed rate securities.
Investment in Investment Vehicles Risk—Investing in other investment vehicles, including ETFs, closed-end funds and other mutual funds, subjects the Fund to those risks affecting the investment vehicle, including the possibility that the value of the underlying securities held by the investment vehicle could decrease or the portfolio becomes illiquid. Moreover, the Fund and its shareholders will incur its pro rata share of the underlying vehicles’ expenses, which will reduce the Fund’s performance. In addition, investments in an ETF are subject to, among other risks, the

21 | PROSPECTUS




risk that the ETF's shares may trade at a discount or premium relative to the net asset value of the shares and the listing exchange may halt trading of the ETF's shares.
Investment in Loans Risk—The Fund may invest in loans through assignments, participations or directly. Investments in loans, including loan syndicates and other direct lending opportunities, involve special types of risks, including credit risk, interest rate risk, counterparty risk and prepayment risk. Loans may offer a fixed or floating interest rate. Loans are often generally below investment grade and may be unrated. The Fund’s investments in loans can also be difficult to value accurately and may be more susceptible to liquidity risk than fixed-income instruments of similar credit quality and/or maturity. The Fund is also subject to the risk that the value of any collateral for the loan may be insufficient or unavailable to cover the borrower’s obligations should the borrower fail to make payments, become insolvent, or otherwise default. Participations in loans may subject the Fund to the credit risk of both the borrower and the issuer of the participation and may make enforcement of loan covenants, if any, more difficult for the Fund as legal action may have to go through the issuer of the participation (or an agent acting on its behalf). Transactions in loans are often subject to long settlement periods, thus potentially limiting the ability of the Fund to invest sale proceeds in other investments and to use proceeds to meet its current redemption obligations.
Leverage Risk—The Fund’s use of leverage, through borrowings or instruments such as derivatives, may cause the Fund to be more volatile and riskier than if it had not been leveraged.
Liquidity and Valuation RiskIt may be difficult for the Fund to purchase and sell particular investments within a reasonable time at a fair price, or the price at which it has been valued by the Investment Manager for purposes of the Fund’s net asset value, causing the Fund to be less liquid and unable to realize what the Investment Manager believes should be the price of the investment. Valuation of portfolio investments may be difficult, such as during periods of market turmoil or reduced liquidity, and for investments that may, for example, trade infrequently or irregularly. In these and other circumstances, an investment may be valued using fair value methodologies, which are inherently subjective, reflect good faith judgments based on available information and may not accurately estimate the price at which the Fund could sell the investment at that time. These risks may be heightened for fixed-income instruments because of the near historically low interest rate environment as of the date of this prospectus. Based on its investment strategies, a significant portion of the Fund's investments can be difficult to value and potentially less liquid and thus particularly prone to the foregoing risks.
Management Risk—The Fund is actively managed, which means that investment decisions are made based on investment views. There is no guarantee that the investment views will produce the desired results or expected returns, causing the Fund to fail to meet its investment objective or underperform its benchmark index or funds with similar investment objectives and strategies. Furthermore, active and frequent trading that can accompany active management, also called “high turnover,” may have a negative impact on performance. Active and frequent trading may result in higher brokerage costs or mark-up charges, which are ultimately passed on to shareholders of the Fund. Active and frequent trading may also result in adverse tax consequences.
Market Risk—The value of, or income generated by, the securities held by the Fund may fluctuate rapidly and unpredictably as a result of factors affecting individual companies or changing economic, political, social or financial market conditions throughout the world. The performance of these investments may underperform the general securities markets or other types of securities.
Municipal Securities RiskMunicipal securities are subject to a variety of risks, including credit, interest, prepayment, liquidity, and valuation risks. In addition, municipal securities can be adversely affected by (i) unfavorable legislative, political or other developments or events, including natural disasters, and (ii) changes in the economic and fiscal conditions of state and municipal issuers or the federal government in case it provides financial support to such issuers. To the extent a Fund invests a substantial portion of its assets in securities issued by a particular state or municipality, the Fund will be particularly sensitive to developments and events adversely affecting such issuer. Certain sectors of the municipal bond market have special risks that can affect them more significantly than the market as a whole. Because many municipal instruments are issued to finance similar projects, conditions in these industries can significantly affect the overall municipal market. Municipal securities that are insured by an insurer may be adversely affected by developments relevant to that particular insurer, or more general developments relevant to the market as a whole. Municipal securities can be difficult to value and be less liquid than other investments, which may affect performance or the ability to meet fund redemption requests.
Preferred Securities Risk—A company’s preferred stock generally pays dividends only after the company makes required payments to holders of its bonds and other debt. For this reason, the value of preferred stock will usually react more strongly than bonds and other debt to actual or perceived changes in the company’s financial condition or prospects.

PROSPECTUS | 22



Prepayment RiskCertain debt instruments, including loans and mortgage- and other asset-backed securities, are subject to the risk that payments on principal may occur more quickly or earlier than expected.  In this event, the Fund might be forced to forego future interest income on the principal repaid early and to reinvest income or proceeds at generally lower interest rates, thus reducing the Fund’s yield.  These types of instruments are particularly subject to prepayment risk, and offer less potential for gains, during periods of declining interest rates.
Regulatory and Legal RiskU.S. and non-U.S. governmental agencies and other regulators regularly implement additional regulations and legislators pass new laws that affect the investments held by the Fund, the strategies used by the Fund or the level of regulation or taxation applying to the Fund (such as regulations related to investments in derivatives and other transactions). These regulations and laws impact the investment strategies, performance, costs and operations of the Fund or taxation of shareholders.
Repurchase Agreements and Reverse Repurchase Agreements Risk—In the event of the insolvency of the counterparty to a repurchase agreement or reverse repurchase agreement, recovery of the repurchase price owed to the Fund or, in the case of a reverse repurchase agreement, the securities sold by the Fund, may be delayed. Because reverse repurchase agreements may be considered to be the practical equivalent of borrowing funds, they constitute a form of leverage. If the Fund reinvests the proceeds of a reverse repurchase agreement at a rate lower than the cost of the agreement, entering into the agreement will lower the Fund’s yield.
Restricted Securities Risk—Restricted securities generally cannot be sold to the public and may involve a high degree of business, financial and liquidity risk, which may result in substantial losses to the Fund.
Sovereign Debt RiskThe debt securities issued by sovereign entities may decline as a result of default or other adverse credit event resulting from a sovereign debtor's unwillingness or inability to repay principal and pay interest in a timely manner, which may be affected by a variety of factors, including its cash flow situation, the extent of its reserves, the availability of sufficient foreign exchange on the date a payment is due, the relative size of the debt service burden to the economy as a whole, the sovereign debtor's policy toward international lenders, and the political constraints to which a sovereign debtor may be subject. Sovereign debt risk is increased for emerging market issuers.
To-Be-Announced (“TBA”) Transactions Risk—The Fund may enter into “To Be Announced” (“TBA”) transactions to purchase or sell mortgage-backed securities for a fixed price at a future date. TBA purchase commitments involve a risk of loss if the value of the securities to be purchased declines prior to settlement date or if the counterparty may not deliver the securities as promised. Selling a TBA involves a risk of loss if the value of the securities to be sold goes up prior to settlement date. Recently finalized FINRA rules include mandatory margin requirements that will require the Fund to post collateral in connection with its TBA transactions, which could increase the cost of TBA transactions to the Fund and impose added operational complexity.
U.S. Government Securities Risk—U.S. government securities may or may not be backed by the full faith and credit of the U.S. government. U.S. government securities are subject to the risks associated with fixed-income and debt securities, particularly interest rate risk and credit risk.
Zero Coupon and Payment-In-Kind Securities Risk—Zero coupon and payment-in-kind securities pay no cash interest income and usually are sold at substantial discounts from their value at maturity. Zero coupon and payment-in-kind securities are subject to greater market value fluctuations from changing interest rates than debt obligations of comparable maturities, which make current cash-pay interest payments.
PERFORMANCE INFORMATION
The following chart and table provide some indication of the risks of investing in the Fund by showing the Fund’s Class A share calendar year performance from year to year and average annual returns for the one, five and ten year or since inception periods (if shorter), as applicable, for the Fund’s Class A, Class C, Institutional Class, and Class P shares compared to those of a broad measure of market performance. As with all mutual funds, past performance (before and after taxes) is not necessarily an indication of how the Fund will perform in the future. Updated performance information is available on the Fund’s website at www.guggenheiminvestments.com or by calling 800.820.0888.
Effective January 28, 2013, the Fund changed its name and principal investment strategies. Performance information prior to that date reflects the Fund’s prior principal investment strategies.
The bar chart does not reflect the impact of the sales charge applicable to Class A shares which, if reflected, would lower the returns shown.



23 | PROSPECTUS




chart-37633c1430c25f9794a.jpg
Highest Quarter Return
  
Lowest Quarter Return
Q3 2009 4.63%
  
Q4 2016 -1.53%
AVERAGE ANNUAL TOTAL RETURNS (for the periods ended December 31, 2018)
After-tax returns shown in the table are calculated using the historical highest individual federal marginal income tax rates and do not reflect the impact of any state or local taxes. Actual after-tax returns depend on an investor’s tax situation and may differ from those shown. After-tax returns shown are not relevant to investors who hold their Fund shares through tax-deferred arrangements, such as 401(k) plans or individual retirement accounts (“IRAs”). After-tax returns are shown for Class A only. After-tax returns for Class C, Institutional Class, and Class P will vary. The returns shown below reflect applicable sales charges, if any.
 
Inception
1 Year
5 Years or Since Inception
10 Years or Since Inception
Class A
8/15/1985
 
 
 
Return Before Taxes
 
-3.22%
3.12%
4.85%
Return After Taxes on Distributions
 
-4.18%
1.58%
3.47%
Return After Taxes on Distributions and Sale of Fund Shares
 
-1.91%
1.67%
3.18%
Class C
5/1/2000
-0.85%
3.38%
4.59%
Institutional Class
1/29/2013
1.18%
4.40%
4.26%
Class P
5/1/2015
0.83%
3.22%
N/A
Index
 

 
 
Bloomberg Barclays U.S. Aggregate Bond Index (reflects no deductions for fees, expenses or taxes)
 
0.01%
2.52%
3.48%
MANAGEMENT OF THE FUND
Security Investors, LLC, also known as Guggenheim Investments, serves as the investment manager of the Fund. B. Scott Minerd, Anne B. Walsh, Steven H. Brown and Adam Bloch are primarily responsible for the day-to-day management of the Fund. They hold the titles of Chairman, Global Chief Investment Officer, Managing Partner and Portfolio Manager; Chief Investment Officer, Fixed Income, Senior Managing Director and Portfolio Manager; Managing Director and Portfolio Manager; and Director and Portfolio Manager, respectively, with the Investment Manager. B. Scott Minerd and Anne B. Walsh have managed the Fund since 2012. Steven H. Brown and Adam Bloch have managed the Fund since 2017.
PURCHASE AND SALE OF FUND SHARES
You may purchase or redeem Fund shares through your broker/dealer, other financial intermediary that has an agreement with Guggenheim Funds Distributors, LLC, the Fund’s distributor, or, for shares of each class other than Class P shares, through the Fund’s transfer agent. You may purchase, redeem or exchange shares of any class of the Fund on any day the New York Stock Exchange is open for business. The minimum initial investment for Class A and Class C shares is $2,500. The minimum subsequent investment is $100. Class A and Class C do not have a minimum account balance.

PROSPECTUS | 24



The Institutional Class minimum initial investment is $2 million, although the Investment Manager may waive this requirement at its discretion. The Institutional Class has a minimum account balance of $1 million. Due to the relatively high cost of maintaining accounts below the minimum account balance, the Fund reserves the right to redeem shares if an account balance falls below the minimum account balance for any reason. Investors will be given 60 days notice to reestablish the minimum account balance. If the account balance is not increased, the account may be closed and the proceeds sent to the investor. Institutional Class shares of the Fund will be redeemed at net asset value on the day the account is closed.
Class P shares of the Fund are offered through broker/dealers and other financial intermediaries with which Guggenheim Funds Distributors, LLC has an agreement for the use of Class P shares of the Fund in investment products, programs or accounts. Class P shares do not have a minimum initial investment amount, subsequent investment amount or a minimum account balance. The Fund reserves the right to modify its minimum investment amount and account balance requirements at any time, with or without prior notice to you.
TAX INFORMATION
Fund distributions are taxable as ordinary income or capital gains (or a combination of both), unless your investment is through an IRA or other tax-advantaged retirement account. Investments through tax-advantaged accounts may sometimes become taxable upon withdrawal.
PAYMENTS TO BROKER/DEALERS AND OTHER FINANCIAL INTERMEDIARIES
If you purchase Fund shares through a broker/dealer or other financial intermediary, the Fund and its related companies may pay the intermediary for the sale of Fund shares and related services. These payments may create a conflict of interest by influencing the broker/dealer or other intermediary and your sales person to recommend the Fund over another investment. Ask your sales person or visit your financial intermediary’s website for more information.



25 | PROSPECTUS




Guggenheim Limited Duration Fund 

INVESTMENT OBJECTIVE
The Guggenheim Limited Duration Fund (the “Fund”) seeks to provide a high level of income consistent with preservation of capital.
FEES AND EXPENSES OF THE FUND
This table describes the fees and expenses that you may pay if you buy and hold shares of the Fund. You may be required to pay a commission to your financial intermediary for effecting transactions in a class of shares of the Fund without any initial sales charge, contingent deferred sales charge, or other asset-based fee for sales or distribution. These commissions are not reflected in the fee and expense table or expense example below. You may qualify for sales charge discounts if you and your family invest, or agree to invest in the future, at least $100,000 in the Family of Funds, as defined on page 150 of the Fund’s prospectus. This amount may vary depending on the Guggenheim Fund in which you invest. More information about these and other discounts is available from your financial professional and in the “Sales Charges-Class A Shares” section on page 101 of the Fund’s prospectus and the “How to Purchase Shares” section on page 80 of the Fund’s Statement of Additional Information. Different intermediaries and financial professionals may impose different sales charges or offer different sales charge waivers or discounts.  These variations are described in Appendix A to the Fund’s prospectus (Intermediary-Specific Sales Charge Waivers and Discounts).
 
Class A
Class C
Institutional Class
Class P
SHAREHOLDER FEES (fees paid directly from your investment)
 
 
 
 
Maximum Sales Charge (Load) Imposed on Purchases (as a percentage of offering price)
2.25%
None
None
None
Maximum Deferred Sales Charge (Load) (as a percentage of original purchase price or redemption proceeds, whichever is lower)
None*
1.00%**
None
None

*
A 1.00% deferred sales charge will normally be imposed on purchases of $250,000 or more on Fund shares purchased without an initial sales charge that are redeemed within 12 months of purchase.
**
A 1.00% deferred sales charge will be imposed if Fund shares are redeemed within 12 months of purchase.

ANNUAL FUND OPERATING EXPENSES (expenses that you pay each year as a percentage of the value of your investment)
Management Fees1
0.39%
0.39%
0.39%
0.39%
Distribution and Service (12b-1) Fees
0.25%
1.00%
None
0.25%
Other Expenses
0.16%
0.18%
0.16%
0.23%
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses
0.80%
1.57%
0.55%
0.87%
Fee Waiver (and/or expense reimbursement)2
-0.05%
-0.07%
-0.05%
-0.12%
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses After Fee Waiver (and/or expense reimbursement)
0.75%
1.50%
0.50%
0.75%
1 
Restated to reflect current management fees.
2 
Guggenheim Partners Investment Management, LLC, also known as Guggenheim Investments (the "Investment Manager"), has contractually agreed through February 1, 2020 to waive fees and/or reimburse expenses to the extent necessary to limit the ordinary operating expenses (including distribution (12b-1) fees (if any), but exclusive of brokerage costs, dividends on securities sold short, acquired fund fees and expenses, interest, taxes, litigation, indemnification, and extraordinary expenses) (“Operating Expenses”) of the Fund to the annual percentage of average daily net assets for each class of shares as follows: Class A-0.75%, Class C-1.50%, Institutional Class-0.50%, and Class P-0.75%. The Investment Manager is entitled to reimbursement by the Fund of fees waived or expenses reimbursed during any of the previous 36 months beginning on the date of the expense limitation agreement, provided that the Operating Expenses do not exceed the then-applicable expense cap. The agreement will expire when it reaches its termination or when the Investment Manager ceases to serve as such and it can be terminated by the Fund’s Board of Trustees, with certain waived fees and reimbursed expenses subject to the recoupment rights of the Investment Manager.
EXAMPLE
This Example is intended to help you compare the cost of investing in the Fund with the cost of investing in other mutual funds.
The Example assumes that you invest $10,000 in the Fund for the time periods indicated and then redeem all of your shares at the end of those periods. The Example also assumes that your investment has a 5% return each year and that the Fund’s operating expenses remain the same. Although the actual costs may be higher or lower, based on these assumptions your costs would be:

PROSPECTUS | 26



 
Class A
Class C
Institutional
Class P
Redeemed
Not Redeemed
1 Year
$300
$253
$153
$51
$77
3 Years
$470
$489
$489
$171
$266
5 Years
$654
$849
$849
$302
$470
10 Years
$1,188
$1,861
$1,861
$684
$1,061
 
The above Example reflects applicable contractual fee waiver/expense reimbursement arrangements for the current duration of the arrangements only.
PORTFOLIO TURNOVER
The Fund pays transaction costs, such as commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or “turns over” its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover rate may indicate higher transaction costs and may result in higher taxes when Fund shares are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are not reflected in annual fund operating expenses or in the example, affect the Fund’s performance. During the most recent fiscal year, the Fund’s portfolio turnover rate was 45% of the average value of its portfolio.
PRINCIPAL INVESTMENT STRATEGIES
The Fund intends to pursue its investment objective by investing, under normal circumstances, at least 80% of its assets (net assets, plus the amount of any borrowings for investment purposes) in a diversified portfolio of debt securities, financial instruments that should perform similarly to debt securities and investment vehicles that provide exposure to debt securities, and debt-like securities, including individual securities, investment vehicles and derivatives giving exposure (i.e., similar economic characteristics) to fixed-income markets. Such debt securities may include, corporate bonds and other corporate debt securities, securities issued by the U.S. government or its agencies and instrumentalities (including those not backed by the full faith and credit of the U.S. government), sovereign debt securities, Eurodollar bonds and obligations, agency and non-agency mortgage-backed securities and other asset-backed securities, repurchase agreements, participations in and assignments of bank and bridge loans, commercial paper (including asset-backed commercial paper), zero-coupon bonds, municipal bonds, payment-in-kind securities (such as payment-in-kind bonds), convertible fixed-income securities, non-registered or restricted securities (including those issued in reliance on Rule 144A and Regulation S securities), certain preferred securities and step-up securities (such as step-up bonds). These securities may pay fixed or variable rates of interest and may include adjustable rate securities. While the Fund will principally invest in debt securities listed, traded or dealt in developed markets countries globally, it may also invest without limitation in securities listed, traded or dealt in other countries, including emerging markets countries. Such securities may be denominated in foreign currencies. However, the Fund may not invest more than 35% of its total assets in debt securities listed, traded or dealt in emerging market countries as determined by Guggenheim Partners Investment Management, LLC, also known as Guggenheim Investments (the "Investment Manager"), and non-U.S. dollar denominated securities. Emerging market countries are generally considered to be countries with developing economies or markets and may include any country recognized to be an emerging market country by the International Monetary Fund, MSCI, Inc. or Standard & Poor’s Corporation or recognized to be a developing country by the United Nations. The Fund may also invest in preferred stock and convertible securities. The Fund may seek to obtain exposure to the securities in which it primarily invests through a variety of investment vehicles, including closed-end funds, exchange-traded funds (“ETFs”) and other mutual funds.
The Fund may hold fixed-income securities of any quality, rated or unrated, including, those that are rated below investment grade (also known as “high yield securities” or “junk bonds”), or if unrated, determined by the Investment Manager to be of comparable quality. If nationally recognized statistical rating organizations assign different ratings to the same security, the Fund will use the higher rating for purposes of determining the security’s credit quality. However, the Fund may not invest more than 35% of its total assets in fixed-income securities that are below investment grade. These may include securities that are in default at the time of purchase.
The Fund may hold securities of any duration or maturity but expects, under normal circumstances, to maintain a dollar-weighted average duration of generally less than 3.5 years. Duration is a measure of the price volatility of a debt instrument as a result of changes in market rates of interest, based on the weighted average timing of the instrument’s expected principal and interest payments. Duration differs from maturity in that it considers a security’s yield, coupon payments, principal payments and call features in addition to the amount of time until the security matures. As the value of a security changes over time, so will its duration.
The Fund may invest in repurchase agreements, which are fixed-income securities in the form of agreements backed by collateral. These agreements, which may be viewed as a type of secured lending by the Fund, typically involve

27 | PROSPECTUS




the acquisition by the Fund of securities from the selling institution (such as a bank or a broker-dealer), coupled with the agreement that the selling institution will repurchase the underlying securities at a specified price and at a fixed time in the future (or on demand). The Fund may accept a wide variety of underlying securities as collateral for the repurchase agreements entered into by the Fund. Such collateral may include U.S. government securities, corporate obligations, equity securities, municipal debt securities, asset- and mortgage-backed securities, convertible securities and other fixed-income securities. Any such securities serving as collateral are marked-to-market daily in order to maintain full collateralization (typically purchase price plus accrued interest).
With respect to mortgage-backed securities (“MBS”) and other asset-backed securities, the Fund may invest in MBS issued or guaranteed by federal agencies and/or U.S. government sponsored instrumentalities, such as the Government National Mortgage Administration (“GNMA”), the Federal Housing Administration (“FHA”), the Federal National Mortgage Association (“FNMA”) and the Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation (“FHLMC”). In addition to securities issued or guaranteed by such agencies or instrumentalities, the Fund may invest in MBS or other asset-backed securities issued or guaranteed by private issuers. The MBS in which the Fund may invest may also include residential mortgage-backed securities (“RMBS”), collateralized mortgage obligations (“CMOs”) and commercial mortgage-backed securities (“CMBS”). The asset-backed securities in which the Fund may invest include collateralized debt obligations (“CDOs”). CDOs include collateralized bond obligations (“CBOs”), collateralized loan obligations (“CLOs”), commercial real estate CDOs (“CRE CDOs”) and other similarly structured securities. A CBO is a trust which is backed by a diversified pool of below investment grade fixed-income securities. A CLO is a trust typically collateralized by a pool of loans, which may include domestic and foreign senior secured loans, senior unsecured loans, and subordinate corporate loans, including loans that may be rated below investment grade or equivalent unrated loans.
With respect to bank loans, the Fund may purchase participations in, or assignments of, floating rate bank loans that may be secured by real estate or other assets. These participations may be interests in, or assignments of, the loan and may be acquired from banks or brokers that have made the loan or members of the lending syndicate.
To enhance the Fund’s debt exposure, to hedge against investment risk, or to increase the Fund’s yield, at the discretion of the Investment Manager, the direct debt strategy may be combined with a derivative strategy. This strategy could include: foreign exchange forward contracts; futures on securities, indices, currencies and other investments; Eurodollar futures; options; interest rate swaps; cross-currency swaps; total return swaps; and credit default swaps. The Fund may engage in derivative transactions for speculative purposes to enhance total return, to seek to hedge against fluctuations in securities prices, interest rates or currency rates, to change the effective duration of its portfolio, to manage certain investment risks, as a substitute for the purchase or sale of securities or currencies and/or to obtain or replicate market exposure. These transactions may also create economic leverage in the Fund. The Fund may seek to obtain market exposure to the securities in which it primarily invests by entering into a series of purchase and sale contracts or by using other investment techniques (such as “To Be Announced” (“TBA”) transactions and/or dollar rolls). In a TBA transaction, a seller agrees to deliver a mortgage-backed security to the Fund at a future date, but the seller does not specify the particular security to be delivered. Instead, the Fund agrees to accept any security that meets specified terms. The Fund may also engage in securities lending.
The Fund may use leverage to the extent permitted by applicable law by entering into reverse repurchase agreements and transactions equivalent to a borrowing for investment purposes.
The Investment Manager selects securities and other investments for purchase and sale based on intensive credit research involving extensive due diligence on each investment (including the investment’s structure), issuer, region and sector. The Investment Manager also considers macroeconomic outlook and geopolitical issues.
The Investment Manager may determine to sell a security for several reasons, including but not limited to the following: (1) to adjust the portfolio’s average maturity or duration, or to shift assets into or out of higher-yielding securities; (2) if a security’s credit rating has been changed, our credit outlook has changed, or for other similar reasons; (3) to meet redemption requests; (4) to take gains; or (5) due to relative value. Under adverse or unstable market conditions or abnormal circumstances (for example, in the event of credit events, where it is deemed opportune to preserve gains, or to preserve the relative value of investments or in the case of large cash inflows or anticipated large redemptions), the Fund can make temporary investments and may not be able to pursue or achieve its investment objective.
PRINCIPAL RISKS
The value of an investment in the Fund will fluctuate and is subject to investment risks, which means investors could lose money. An investment in the Fund is not a bank deposit and is not insured or guaranteed by the FDIC or any governmental agency. There is no assurance that the Fund will achieve its investment objective. The principal risks of investing in the Fund are summarized below.

PROSPECTUS | 28



Asset-Backed Securities RiskInvestors in asset-backed securities, including residential mortgage-backed securities, commercial mortgage-backed securities and other structured finance investments, generally receive payments that are part interest and part return of principal. These payments may vary based on the rate at which the underlying borrowers pay off their loans. Some asset-backed securities, including mortgage-backed securities, may have structures that make their reaction to interest rates and other factors difficult to predict, causing their prices to be volatile. These instruments are particularly subject to interest rate, credit and liquidity and valuation risks.
Residential Mortgage-Backed Securities—Residential mortgage-backed securities may be particularly sensitive to changes in interest rates given that rising interest rates tend to extend the duration of fixed-rate mortgage-backed securities. As a result, a rising interest rate environment can cause the prices of mortgage-backed securities to be increasingly volatile, which may adversely affect the Fund’s holdings of mortgage-backed securities.  In light of the current interest rate environment, the Fund’s investments in these securities may be subject to heightened interest rate risk. Investments in non-agency residential mortgage-backed securities are subject to increased interest rate risk and other risks, such as credit and liquidity and valuation risks.
Commercial Mortgage-Backed Securities—Investments in commercial mortgage-backed securities (“CMBS”) are backed by commercial mortgage loans that may be secured by office properties, retail properties, hotels, mixed use properties or multi-family apartment buildings and are particularly subject to the credit risk of the borrower and the tenants of the properties securing the commercial mortgage loans.  CMBS are subject to the risks of asset-backed securities generally and particularly subject to credit risk, interest rate risk, and liquidity and valuation risk.
Collateralized Loan Obligations and Collateralized Debt Obligations RiskCollateralized loan obligations (“CLOs”) bear many of the same risks as other forms of asset-backed securities, including interest rate risk, credit risk and default risk. As they are backed by pools of loans, CLOs also bear similar risks to investing in loans directly. CLOs issue classes or “tranches” that vary in risk and yield. CLOs may experience substantial losses attributable to loan defaults. Losses caused by defaults on underlying assets are borne first by the holders of subordinate tranches. The Fund’s investment in CLOs may decrease in market value when the CLO experiences loan defaults or credit impairment, the disappearance of a subordinate tranche, or market anticipation of defaults and investor aversion to CLO securities as a class.
Collateralized debt obligations (“CDOs”) are structured similarly to CLOs and bear the same risks as CLOs including interest rate risk, credit risk and default risk. CDOs are subject to additional risks because they are backed by pools of assets other than loans including securities (such as other asset-backed securities), synthetic instruments or bonds and may be highly leveraged. Like CLOs, losses incurred by a CDO are borne first by holders of subordinate tranches. Accordingly, the risks of CDOs depend largely on the type of underlying collateral and the tranche of CDOs in which the Fund invests. For example, CDOs that obtain their exposure through synthetic investments entail the risks associated with derivative instruments.
Commercial Paper Risk—The value of the Fund’s investment in commercial paper, which is an unsecured promissory note that generally has a maturity date between one and 270 days and is issued by a U.S. or foreign entity, is susceptible to changes in the issuer’s financial condition or credit quality. Investments in commercial paper are usually discounted from their value at maturity. Commercial paper can be fixed-rate or variable rate and can be adversely affected by changes in interest rates.
Convertible Securities Risk—Convertible securities may be subordinate to other securities. The total return for a convertible security depends, in part, upon the performance of the underlying security into which it can be converted. The value of convertible securities tends to decline as interest rates increase. Convertible securities generally offer lower interest or dividend yields than non-convertible securities of similar quality.
Counterparty Credit RiskThe Fund makes investments in financial instruments and over-the-counter ("OTC")-traded derivatives involving counterparties to gain exposure to a particular group of securities, index, asset class or other reference asset without actually purchasing those securities or investments, to hedge a position, or for other investment purposes. Through these investments and related arrangements (e.g., prime brokerage or securities lending arrangements or derivatives transactions), the Fund is exposed to credit risks that the counterparty may be unwilling or unable to make timely payments or otherwise to meet its contractual obligations. If the counterparty becomes bankrupt or defaults on (or otherwise becomes unable or unwilling to perform) its payment or other obligations to the Fund, the Fund may not receive the full amount that it is entitled to receive or may experience delays in recovering the collateral or other assets held by, or on behalf of, the counterparty. If this occurs, the value of your shares in the Fund will decrease.
Credit Risk—The Fund could lose money if the issuer or guarantor of a fixed-income instrument or a counterparty to a derivatives transaction or other transaction is unable or unwilling, or perceived to be unable or unwilling, to pay

29 | PROSPECTUS




interest or repay principal on time or defaults. The issuer, guarantor or counterparty could also suffer a rapid decrease in credit quality rating, which would adversely affect the volatility of the value and liquidity of the instrument. Credit ratings may not be an accurate assessment of liquidity or credit risk.
Currency Risk—Indirect and direct exposure to foreign currencies subjects the Fund to the risk that those currencies will decline in value relative to the U.S. Dollar, which would cause a decline in the U.S. value of the holdings of the Fund. Currency rates in foreign countries may fluctuate significantly over short periods of time for a number of reasons, including changes in interest rates and the imposition of currency controls or other political, economic and tax developments in the U.S. or abroad.
Derivatives Risk—Derivatives may pose risks in addition to and greater than those associated with investing directly in securities, currencies or other investments, including risks relating to leverage, imperfect correlations with underlying investments or the Fund’s other portfolio holdings, high price volatility, lack of availability, counterparty credit, liquidity, valuation and legal restrictions. Their use is a highly specialized activity that involves investment techniques and risks different from those associated with ordinary portfolio securities transactions. If the Investment Manager is incorrect about its expectations of market conditions, the use of derivatives could also result in a loss, which in some cases may be unlimited. In addition, the Fund’s use of derivatives may cause the Fund to realize higher amounts of short term capital gains (generally taxed at ordinary income tax rates) than if the Fund had not used such instruments. Some of the derivatives in which the Fund invests may be traded (and privately negotiated) in the OTC market. OTC derivatives are subject to heightened credit, liquidity and valuation risks. Certain risks also are specific to the derivatives in which the Fund invests.
Swap Agreements Risk—Swap agreements are contracts among the Fund and a counterparty to exchange the return of the pre-determined underlying investment (such as the rate of return of the underlying index). Swap agreements may be negotiated bilaterally and traded OTC between two parties or, in some instances, must be exchange-traded through a futures commission merchant and/or cleared through a clearinghouse that serves as a central counterparty. Risks associated with the use of swap agreements are different from those associated with ordinary portfolio securities transactions, due in part to the fact they could be considered illiquid and many swaps trade on the OTC market. Swaps are particularly subject to counterparty credit, correlation, valuation, liquidity and leveraging risks. Certain standardized swaps are subject to mandatory exchange trading and central clearing. Exchange trading and central clearing are intended to reduce counterparty credit risk and increase liquidity but exchange trading and central clearing do not make swap transactions risk-free. Additionally, applicable regulators have adopted rules imposing certain margin requirements, including minimums, on OTC swaps, which may result in the Fund and its counterparties posting higher margin amounts for OTC swaps.
Futures Contracts Risk—Futures contracts are exchange-traded contracts that call for the future delivery of an asset at a certain price and date, or cash settlement of the terms of the contract. Risks of futures contracts may be caused by an imperfect correlation between movements in the price of the instruments and the price of the underlying assets. In addition, there is the risk that the Fund may not be able to enter into a closing transaction because of an illiquid market. Exchanges can limit the number of positions that can be held or controlled by the Fund or its Investment Manager, thus limiting the ability to implement the Fund’s strategies. Futures markets are highly volatile and the use of futures may increase the volatility of the Fund’s NAV. Futures are also subject to leverage risks and to liquidity risk.
Options Risk—Options or options on futures contracts give the holder of the option the right, but not the obligation, to buy (or to sell) a position in a security or in a contract to the writer of the option, at a certain price. They are subject to correlation risk because there may be an imperfect correlation between the options and the securities markets that cause a given transaction to fail to achieve its objectives. The successful use of options depends on the Investment Manager’s ability to predict correctly future price fluctuations and the degree of correlation between the markets for options and the underlying instruments. Exchanges can limit the number of positions that can be held or controlled by the Fund or its Investment Manager, thus limiting the ability to implement the Fund’s strategies. Options are also particularly subject to leverage risk and can be subject to liquidity risk.
Dollar Roll Transaction Risk—The Fund may enter into dollar roll transactions, in which the Fund sells a mortgage-backed or other security for settlement on one date and buys back a substantially similar security for settlement at a later date. Dollar rolls involve a risk of loss if the market value of the securities that the Fund is committed to buy declines below the price of the securities the Fund has sold.
Emerging Markets RiskInvestments in or exposure to emerging markets are generally subject to a greater level of those risks associated with investing in or being exposed to developed foreign markets, as emerging markets are considered to be less developed than developing countries. Furthermore, investments in or exposure to emerging

PROSPECTUS | 30



markets are generally subject to additional risks, including the risks associated with trading in smaller markets, lower volumes of trading, and being subject to lower levels of government regulation and less extensive accounting, financial and other reporting requirements.
Extension RiskCertain debt instruments, including mortgage- and other asset-backed securities, are subject to the risk that payments on principal may occur at a slower rate or later than expected.  In this event, the expected maturity could lengthen and the Fund’s investment may sharply decrease in value and the Fund’s income from the investment may quickly decline.  These types of instruments are particularly subject to extension risk, and offer less potential for gains, during periods of rising interest rates. In addition, the Fund may be delayed in its ability to reinvest income or proceeds from these instruments in potentially higher yielding investments, which would adversely affect the Fund.
Foreign Securities and Currency Risk—Foreign securities carry unique or additional risks when compared to U.S. securities, including currency fluctuations, adverse political and economic developments, unreliable or untimely information, less liquidity and more volatility, limited legal recourse and higher transactional costs.
High Yield and Unrated Securities Risk—High yield, below investment grade and unrated high risk debt securities (which also may be known as “junk bonds”) may present additional risks because these securities may be less liquid, and therefore more difficult to value accurately and sell at an advantageous price or time, and present more credit risk than investment grade bonds. The price of high yield securities tends to be subject to greater volatility due to issuer-specific operating results and outlook and to real or perceived adverse economic and competitive industry conditions. This exposure may be obtained through investments in other investment companies.
Interest Rate RiskInvestments in fixed-income instruments and other debt instruments are subject to the possibility that interest rates could rise sharply, which may cause the value of the Fund’s holdings and share price to decline. Changes in interest rates may also affect the liquidity of the Fund's investments in fixed-income instruments. The risks associated with rising interest rates are heightened given the recent near historically low interest rate environment and, as of the date of this prospectus, increasing interest rate environment. Interest rates may continue to rise in the future, possibly suddenly and significantly, with unpredictable effects on the financial markets and the Fund’s investments. Fixed-income instruments with longer durations are subject to more volatility than those with shorter durations. During periods of rising interest rates, because changes in interest rates on adjustable rate securities may lag behind changes in market rates, the value of such securities may decline until their interest rates reset to market rates. During periods of declining interest rates, because the interest rates on adjustable rate securities generally reset downward, their market value is unlikely to rise to the same extent as the value of comparable fixed rate securities.
Investment in Investment Vehicles Risk—Investing in other investment vehicles, including ETFs, closed-end funds and other mutual funds, subjects the Fund to those risks affecting the investment vehicle, including the possibility that the value of the underlying securities held by the investment vehicle could decrease or the portfolio becomes illiquid. Moreover, the Fund and its shareholders will incur its pro rata share of the underlying vehicles’ expenses, which will reduce the Fund’s performance. In addition, investments in an ETF are subject to, among other risks, the risk that the ETF's shares may trade at a discount or premium relative to the net asset value of the shares and the listing exchange may halt trading of the ETF's shares.
Investment in Loans Risk—The Fund may invest in loans through assignments, participations or directly. Investments in loans, including loan syndicates and other direct lending opportunities, involve special types of risks, including credit risk, interest rate risk, counterparty risk and prepayment risk. Loans may offer a fixed or floating interest rate. Loans are often generally below investment grade and may be unrated. The Fund’s investments in loans can also be difficult to value accurately and may be more susceptible to liquidity risk than fixed-income instruments of similar credit quality and/or maturity. The Fund is also subject to the risk that the value of any collateral for the loan may be insufficient or unavailable to cover the borrower’s obligations should the borrower fail to make payments, become insolvent, or otherwise default. Participations in loans may subject the Fund to the credit risk of both the borrower and the issuer of the participation and may make enforcement of loan covenants, if any, more difficult for the Fund as legal action may have to go through the issuer of the participation (or an agent acting on its behalf). Transactions in loans are often subject to long settlement periods, thus potentially limiting the ability of the Fund to invest sale proceeds in other investments and to use proceeds to meet its current redemption obligations.
Leverage Risk—The Fund’s use of leverage, through borrowings or instruments such as derivatives, may cause the Fund to be more volatile and riskier than if it had not been leveraged.
Liquidity and Valuation RiskIt may be difficult for the Fund to purchase and sell particular investments within a reasonable time at a fair price, or the price at which it has been valued by the Investment Manager for purposes of the Fund’s net asset value, causing the Fund to be less liquid and unable to realize what the Investment Manager

31 | PROSPECTUS




believes should be the price of the investment. Valuation of portfolio investments may be difficult, such as during periods of market turmoil or reduced liquidity, and for investments that may, for example, trade infrequently or irregularly. In these and other circumstances, an investment may be valued using fair value methodologies, which are inherently subjective, reflect good faith judgments based on available information and may not accurately estimate the price at which the Fund could sell the investment at that time. These risks may be heightened for fixed-income instruments because of the near historically low interest rate environment as of the date of this prospectus. Based on its investment strategies, a significant portion of the Fund's investments can be difficult to value and potentially less liquid and thus particularly prone to the foregoing risks.
Management Risk—The Fund is actively managed, which means that investment decisions are made based on investment views. There is no guarantee that the investment views will produce the desired results or expected returns, causing the Fund to fail to meet its investment objective or underperform its benchmark index or funds with similar investment objectives and strategies. Furthermore, active and frequent trading that can accompany active management, also called “high turnover,” may have a negative impact on performance. Active and frequent trading may result in higher brokerage costs or mark-up charges, which are ultimately passed on to shareholders of the Fund. Active and frequent trading may also result in adverse tax consequences.
Market Risk—The value of, or income generated by, the securities held by the Fund may fluctuate rapidly and unpredictably as a result of factors affecting individual companies or changing economic, political, social or financial market conditions throughout the world. The performance of these investments may underperform the general securities markets or other types of securities.
Municipal Securities RiskMunicipal securities are subject to a variety of risks, including credit, interest, prepayment, liquidity, and valuation risks. In addition, municipal securities can be adversely affected by (i) unfavorable legislative, political or other developments or events, including natural disasters, and (ii) changes in the economic and fiscal conditions of state and municipal issuers or the federal government in case it provides financial support to such issuers. To the extent a Fund invests a substantial portion of its assets in securities issued by a particular state or municipality, the Fund will be particularly sensitive to developments and events adversely affecting such issuer. Certain sectors of the municipal bond market have special risks that can affect them more significantly than the market as a whole. Because many municipal instruments are issued to finance similar projects, conditions in these industries can significantly affect the overall municipal market. Municipal securities that are insured by an insurer may be adversely affected by developments relevant to that particular insurer, or more general developments relevant to the market as a whole. Municipal securities can be difficult to value and be less liquid than other investments, which may affect performance or the ability to meet fund redemption requests.
Preferred Securities Risk—A company’s preferred stock generally pays dividends only after the company makes required payments to holders of its bonds and other debt. For this reason, the value of preferred stock will usually react more strongly than bonds and other debt to actual or perceived changes in the company’s financial condition or prospects.
Prepayment RiskCertain debt instruments, including loans and mortgage- and other asset-backed securities, are subject to the risk that payments on principal may occur more quickly or earlier than expected.  In this event, the Fund might be forced to forego future interest income on the principal repaid early and to reinvest income or proceeds at generally lower interest rates, thus reducing the Fund’s yield.  These types of instruments are particularly subject to prepayment risk, and offer less potential for gains, during periods of declining interest rates.
Real Estate Securities Risk—The Fund may invest in securities of real estate companies and companies related to the real estate industry, including real estate investment trusts (“REITs”), which are subject to the same risks as direct investments in real estate. The real estate industry is particularly sensitive to economic downturns.
Regulatory and Legal RiskU.S. and non-U.S. governmental agencies and other regulators regularly implement additional regulations and legislators pass new laws that affect the investments held by the Fund, the strategies used by the Fund or the level of regulation or taxation applying to the Fund (such as regulations related to investments in derivatives and other transactions). These regulations and laws impact the investment strategies, performance, costs and operations of the Fund or taxation of shareholders.
Repurchase Agreements and Reverse Repurchase Agreements Risk—In the event of the insolvency of the counterparty to a repurchase agreement or reverse repurchase agreement, recovery of the repurchase price owed to the Fund or, in the case of a reverse repurchase agreement, the securities sold by the Fund, may be delayed. Because reverse repurchase agreements may be considered to be the practical equivalent of borrowing funds, they constitute a form of leverage. If the Fund reinvests the proceeds of a reverse repurchase agreement at a rate lower than the cost of the agreement, entering into the agreement will lower the Fund’s yield.

PROSPECTUS | 32



Restricted Securities Risk—Restricted securities generally cannot be sold to the public and may involve a high degree of business, financial and liquidity risk, which may result in substantial losses to the Fund.
Securities Lending Risk—Securities lending involves a risk that the borrower may fail to return the securities or deliver the proper amount of collateral, which may result in a loss to the Fund. In the event of bankruptcy of the borrower, the Fund could experience losses or delays in recovering the loaned securities.
Sovereign Debt RiskThe debt securities issued by sovereign entities may decline as a result of default or other adverse credit event resulting from a sovereign debtor's unwillingness or inability to repay principal and pay interest in a timely manner, which may be affected by a variety of factors, including its cash flow situation, the extent of its reserves, the availability of sufficient foreign exchange on the date a payment is due, the relative size of the debt service burden to the economy as a whole, the sovereign debtor's policy toward international lenders, and the political constraints to which a sovereign debtor may be subject. Sovereign debt risk is increased for emerging market issuers.
Special Situations/Securities in Default RiskInvestments in the securities and debt of distressed issuers or issuers in default involve far greater risk than investing in issuers whose debt obligations are being met and whose debt trade at or close to its “par” or full value because the investments are highly speculative with respect to the issuer’s ability to make interest payments and/or to pay its principal obligations in full and/or on time.
To-Be-Announced (“TBA”) Transactions Risk—The Fund may enter into “To Be Announced” (“TBA”) transactions to purchase or sell mortgage-backed securities for a fixed price at a future date. TBA purchase commitments involve a risk of loss if the value of the securities to be purchased declines prior to settlement date or if the counterparty may not deliver the securities as promised. Selling a TBA involves a risk of loss if the value of the securities to be sold goes up prior to settlement date. Recently finalized FINRA rules include mandatory margin requirements that will require the Fund to post collateral in connection with its TBA transactions, which could increase the cost of TBA transactions to the Fund and impose added operational complexity.
U.S. Government Securities Risk—U.S. government securities may or may not be backed by the full faith and credit of the U.S. government. U.S. government securities are subject to the risks associated with fixed-income and debt securities, particularly interest rate risk and credit risk.
Zero Coupon and Payment-In-Kind Securities Risk—Zero coupon and payment-in-kind securities pay no cash interest income and usually are sold at substantial discounts from their value at maturity. Zero coupon and payment-in-kind securities are subject to greater market value fluctuations from changing interest rates than debt obligations of comparable maturities, which make current cash-pay interest payments.
PERFORMANCE INFORMATION
The following chart and table provide some indication of the risks of investing in the Fund by showing the Fund’s Class A share calendar year performance from year to year and average annual returns for the one, five and ten year or since inception periods (if shorter), as applicable, for the Fund’s Class A, Class C, Institutional Class, and Class P shares compared to those of a broad measure of market performance. As with all mutual funds, past performance (before and after taxes) is not necessarily an indication of how the Fund will perform in the future. Updated performance information is available on the Fund’s website at www.guggenheiminvestments.com or by calling 800.820.0888.
The bar chart does not reflect the impact of the sales charge applicable to Class A shares which, if reflected, would lower the returns shown.


33 | PROSPECTUS




chart-e0e7efde59d551bf9e1.jpg
Highest Quarter Return
Q3 2016 1.76%
  
Lowest Quarter Return
Q4 2015 -0.15%

AVERAGE ANNUAL TOTAL RETURNS (for the periods ended December 31, 2018)
After-tax returns shown in the table are calculated using the historical highest individual federal marginal income tax rates and do not reflect the impact of any state or local taxes. Actual after-tax returns depend on an investor’s tax situation and may differ from those shown. After-tax returns shown are not relevant to investors who hold their Fund shares through tax-deferred arrangements, such as 401(k) plans or individual retirement accounts ("IRAs"). After-tax returns are shown for Class A only. After-tax returns for Class C, Institutional Class, and Class P will vary. The returns shown below reflect applicable sales charges, if any.
 
Inception
1 Year
5 Years or Since Inception
10 Years or Since Inception
Class A
12/16/2013
 
 
 
Return Before Taxes
 
-0.77%
1.92%
1.90%
Return After Taxes on Distributions
 
-1.63%
0.76%
0.75%
Return After Taxes on Distributions and Sale of Fund Shares
 
-0.46%
0.94%
0.93%
Class C
12/16/2013
-0.24%
1.61%
1.60%
Institutional Class
12/16/2013
1.73%
2.65%
2.63%
Class P
5/1/2015
1.51%
2.27%
N/A
Index
 
 
 
 
Bloomberg Barclays U.S. Aggregate Bond 1-3 Total Return Index (reflects no deductions for fees, expenses or taxes)
 
1.61%
1.05%
1.04%
MANAGEMENT OF THE FUND
Guggenheim Partners Investment Management, LLC, also known as Guggenheim Investments, serves as the investment manager of the Fund. Anne B. Walsh, Steven H. Brown and Adam Bloch are primarily responsible for the day-to-day management of the Fund. They hold the titles of Chief Investment Officer, Fixed Income, Senior Managing Director and Portfolio Manager; Managing Director and Portfolio Manager; and Director and Portfolio Manager, respectively, with the Investment Manager. Anne B. Walsh and Steven H. Brown have managed the Fund since its inception (December 2013). Adam Bloch has managed the Fund since 2017.
PURCHASE AND SALE OF FUND SHARES
You may purchase or redeem Fund shares through your broker/dealer, other financial intermediary that has an agreement with Guggenheim Funds Distributors, LLC, the Fund’s distributor, or, for shares of each class other than Class P shares, through the Fund’s transfer agent. You may purchase, redeem or exchange shares of any class of the Fund on any day the New York Stock Exchange is open for business. The minimum initial investment for Class A and

PROSPECTUS | 34



Class C shares is $2,500. The minimum subsequent investment is $100. Class A and Class C do not have a minimum account balance.
The Institutional Class minimum initial investment is $2 million, although the Investment Manager may waive this requirement at its discretion. The Institutional Class has a minimum account balance of $1 million. Due to the relatively high cost of maintaining accounts below the minimum account balance, the Fund reserves the right to redeem shares if an account balance falls below the minimum account balance for any reason. Investors will be given 60 days notice to reestablish the minimum account balance. If the account balance is not increased, the account may be closed and the proceeds sent to the investor. Institutional Class shares of the Fund will be redeemed at net asset value on the day the account is closed.
Class P shares of the Fund are offered through broker/dealers and other financial intermediaries with which Guggenheim Funds Distributors, LLC has an agreement for the use of Class P shares of the Fund in investment products, programs or accounts. Class P shares do not have a minimum initial investment amount, subsequent investment amount or a minimum account balance. The Fund reserves the right to modify its minimum investment amount and account balance requirements at any time, with or without prior notice to you.
TAX INFORMATION
Fund distributions are taxable as ordinary income or capital gains (or a combination of both), unless your investment is through an IRA or other tax-advantaged retirement account. Investments through tax-advantaged accounts may sometimes become taxable upon withdrawal.
PAYMENTS TO BROKER/DEALERS AND OTHER FINANCIAL INTERMEDIARIES
If you purchase Fund shares through a broker/dealer or other financial intermediary, the Fund and its related companies may pay the intermediary for the sale of Fund shares and related services. These payments may create a conflict of interest by influencing the broker/dealer or other intermediary and your sales person to recommend the Fund over another investment. Ask your sales person or visit your financial intermediary’s website for more information.



35 | PROSPECTUS




Guggenheim Macro Opportunities Fund

 
INVESTMENT OBJECTIVE
The Guggenheim Macro Opportunities Fund (the “Fund”) seeks to provide total return, comprised of current income and capital appreciation.
FEES AND EXPENSES OF THE FUND
This table describes the fees and expenses that you may pay if you buy and hold shares of the Fund. You may be required to pay a commission to your financial intermediary for effecting transactions in a class of shares of the Fund without any initial sales charge, contingent deferred sales charge, or other asset-based fee for sales or distribution. These commissions are not reflected in the fee and expense table or expense example below. You may qualify for sales charge discounts if you and your family invest, or agree to invest in the future, at least $50,000 in the Family of Funds, as defined on page 150 of the Fund’s prospectus. This amount may vary depending on the Guggenheim Fund in which you invest. More information about these and other discounts is available from your financial professional and in the “Sales Charges-Class A Shares” section on page 101 of the Fund’s prospectus and the “How to Purchase Shares” section on page 80 of the Fund’s Statement of Additional Information. Different intermediaries and financial professionals may impose different sales charges or offer different sales charge waivers or discounts.  These variations are described in Appendix A to the Fund’s prospectus (Intermediary-Specific Sales Charge Waivers and Discounts).
 
Class A
Class C
Institutional Class
Class P
SHAREHOLDER FEES (fees paid directly from your investment)
 
 
 
 
Maximum Sales Charge (Load) Imposed on Purchases (as a percentage of offering price)
4.00%
None
None
None
Maximum Deferred Sales Charge (Load) (as a percentage of original purchase price or redemption proceeds, whichever is lower)
None*
1.00%**
None
None
*
A 1.00% deferred sales charge will normally be imposed on purchases of $1,000,000 or more on Fund shares purchased without an initial sales charge that are redeemed within 12 months of purchase.
**
A 1.00% deferred sales charge will be imposed if Fund shares are redeemed within 12 months of purchase.

ANNUAL FUND OPERATING EXPENSES (expenses that you pay each year as a percentage of the value of your investment)
Management Fees of the Fund and the Subsidiary
0.88%
0.88%
0.88%
0.88%
Distribution and Service (12b-1) Fees
0.25%
1.00%
None
0.25%
Acquired Fund Fees and Expenses
0.05%
0.05%
0.05%
0.05%
Other Expenses
0.30%
0.30%
0.20%
0.33%
Other Expenses of the Subsidiary1
0.00%
0.00%
0.00%
0.00%
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses
1.48%
2.23%
1.13%
1.51%
Fee Waiver (and/or expense reimbursement)2, 3
-0.12%
-0.12%
-0.18%
-0.15%
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses After Fee Waiver (and/or expense reimbursement)
1.36%
2.11%
0.95%
1.36%
1 
Other Expenses of the Subsidiary were less than 0.01% for the most recently completed fiscal year.
2 
Guggenheim Partners Investment Management, LLC, also known as Guggenheim Investments (the "Investment Manager") has contractually agreed through February 1, 2020 to waive fees and/or reimburse expenses to the extent necessary to limit the ordinary operating expenses (including distribution (12b-1) fees (if any), but exclusive of brokerage costs, dividends on securities sold short, acquired fund fees and expenses, interest, taxes, litigation, indemnification, and extraordinary expenses) (“Operating Expenses”) of the Fund to the annual percentage of average daily net assets for each class of shares as follows: Class A-1.36%, Class C-2.11%, Institutional Class-0.95%, and Class P-1.36%. The Investment Manager has also contractually agreed to waive the management fee it receives from the Fund in any amount equal to the management fee paid to the Investment Manager by the Subsidiary. This undertaking will continue for so long as the Fund invests in the Subsidiary, and may be terminated only with the approval of the Fund’s Board of Trustees. The Investment Manager is entitled to reimbursement by the Fund of fees waived or expenses reimbursed during any of the previous 36 months beginning on the date of the expense limitation agreement, provided that the Operating Expenses do not exceed the then-applicable expense cap. The agreement will expire when it reaches its termination or when the Investment Manager ceases to serve as such and it can be terminated by the Fund’s Board of Trustees, with certain waived fees and reimbursed expenses subject to the recoupment rights of the Investment Manager.  
3 
The Investment Manager has contractually agreed through February 1, 2020, to waive the amount of the Fund’s management fee to the extent necessary to offset the proportionate share of any management fee paid by the Fund with respect to any Fund investment in an underlying fund for which the Investment Manager or any of its affiliates also serves as investment manager. The agreement will expire when it reaches its termination or when the Investment Manager ceases to serve as such and it can be terminated by the Fund’s Board of Trustees.


PROSPECTUS | 36




EXAMPLE
This Example is intended to help you compare the cost of investing in the Fund with the cost of investing in other mutual funds.
The Example assumes that you invest $10,000 in the Fund for the time periods indicated and then redeem all of your shares at the end of those periods. The Example also assumes that your investment has a 5% return each year and that the Fund’s operating expenses remain the same. Although the actual costs may be higher or lower, based on these assumptions your costs would be:
 
Class A
Class C
Institutional
Class P
Redeemed
Not Redeemed
1 Year
$533
$314
$214
$97
$138
3 Years
$838
$686
$686
$341
$462
5 Years
$1,165
$1,184
$1,184
$605
$810
10 Years
$2,088
$2,555
$2,555
$1,359
$1,789
The above Example reflects applicable contractual fee waiver/expense reimbursement arrangements for the current duration of the arrangements only.
PORTFOLIO TURNOVER
The Fund pays transaction costs, such as commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or “turns over” its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover rate may indicate higher transaction costs and may result in higher taxes when Fund shares are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are not reflected in annual fund operating expenses or in the example, affect the Fund’s performance. During the most recent fiscal year, the Fund’s portfolio turnover rate was 66% of the average value of its portfolio.
PRINCIPAL INVESTMENT STRATEGIES
The Fund will seek to achieve its investment objective by investing in a wide range of fixed-income and other debt and equity securities selected from a variety of sectors and credit qualities, principally, corporate bonds, syndicated bank loans and other direct lending opportunities, participations in and assignments of syndicated bank loans (including senior floating rate loans), asset-backed securities (including agency and non-agency mortgage-backed securities, collateralized mortgage obligations and other structured finance investments), U.S. government and agency securities (including those not backed by the full faith and credit of the U.S. government), sovereign debt securities, Eurodollar bonds and obligations, mezzanine and preferred securities, commercial paper, zero-coupon bonds, municipal securities, non-registered or restricted securities (consisting of securities originally issued in reliance on Rule 144A and Regulation S), step-up securities (such as step-up bonds) and convertible securities, and in common stocks and other equity investments that Guggenheim Partners Investment Management, LLC, also known as Guggenheim Investments (the “Investment Manager”), believes offer attractive yield and/or capital appreciation potential. The Investment Manager may employ a strategy of writing (selling) covered call and put options on such equity securities.
While the Fund will principally invest in securities listed, traded or dealt in developed markets countries globally, it may also invest without limitation in securities listed, traded or dealt in other countries, including emerging markets countries. Such securities may be denominated in foreign currencies. The Fund may hold securities of any duration or maturity. Securities in which the Fund may invest may pay fixed or variable rates of interest. The Fund may invest in a variety of investment vehicles, principally closed-end funds, exchange-traded funds (“ETFs”) and other mutual funds.
The Fund may also invest in commodities (such as precious metals), commodity-linked notes and other commodity-linked derivative instruments, such as swaps, options, or forward contracts based on the value of commodities or commodities indices and commodity futures. The Fund may gain exposure to such commodity instruments by investing a portion of the Fund’s total assets in a wholly-owned subsidiary, which is organized as a limited company under the laws of the Cayman Islands (the “Subsidiary”). The Subsidiary primarily obtains its commodities exposure by investing in commodities, commodity-linked notes, and commodity-linked derivative instruments. The Subsidiary’s investments in such instruments are subject to limits on leverage imposed by the Investment Company Act of 1940 (“1940 Act”). The Fund must maintain no more than 25% of its total assets in the Subsidiary at the end of every quarter of its taxable year.

37 | PROSPECTUS




The Fund may use leverage to the extent permitted by applicable law by entering into reverse repurchase agreements and transactions equivalent to a borrowing for investment purposes. The Fund also may engage in collateralized debt obligations ("CDOs") (which include collateralized bond obligations, collateralized loan obligations and other similarly structured instruments), repurchase agreements, forward commitments, short sales and securities lending and it may seek certain exposures through derivative transactions, including: foreign exchange forward contracts; futures on securities, indices, currencies and other investments; Eurodollar futures; options; interest rate swaps; cross-currency swaps; total return swaps; credit default swaps; and other foreign currency contracts and foreign currency-related transactions, which may also create economic leverage in the Fund (some of these instruments may be traded in the over-the-counter market). The Fund may engage, without limit, in derivative and foreign currency-related transactions for speculative purposes to enhance total return, to seek to hedge against fluctuations in securities prices, interest rates or currency rates, to change the effective duration of its portfolio, to manage certain investment risks and/or as a substitute for the purchase or sale of securities or currencies. The Fund may also, without limitation, seek to obtain exposure to the securities in which it primarily invests by entering into a series of purchase and sale contracts or by using other investment techniques (such as dollar rolls).
The Investment Manager will use a relative value-based investment philosophy, which utilizes quantitative and qualitative analysis to seek to identify securities or spreads between securities that deviate from their perceived fair value and/or historical norms. The Investment Manager seeks to combine a credit managed fixed-income portfolio with access to a diversified pool of alternative investments and equity strategies. The Investment Manager’s investment philosophy is predicated upon the belief that thorough research and independent thought are rewarded with performance that has the potential to outperform benchmark indexes with both lower volatility and lower correlation of returns as compared to such benchmark indexes.
The Investment Manager may determine to sell a security for several reasons, including but not limited to the following: (1) to adjust the portfolio’s average maturity or duration, or to shift assets into or out of higher-yielding securities; (2) if a security’s credit rating has been changed, our credit outlook has changed, or for other similar reasons; (3) to meet redemption requests; (4) to take gains; or (5) due to relative value. The Fund may hold, without limit, fixed-income securities of any quality, rated or unrated, including, those that are rated below investment grade, or, if unrated, determined to be of comparable quality (also known as “high yield securities” or “junk bonds”) and defaulted securities. If nationally recognized statistical rating organizations assign different ratings to the same security, the Fund will use the higher rating for purposes of determining the security’s credit quality. Under adverse or unstable market conditions or abnormal circumstances (for example, in the event of credit events, where it is deemed opportune to preserve gains, or to preserve the relative value of investments or in the case of large cash inflows or anticipated large redemptions), the Fund can make temporary investments and may not be able to pursue or achieve its investment objective.
PRINCIPAL RISKS
The value of an investment in the Fund will fluctuate and is subject to investment risks, which means investors could lose money. An investment in the Fund is not a bank deposit and is not insured or guaranteed by the FDIC or any governmental agency. There is no assurance that the Fund will achieve its investment objective. The principal risks of investing in the Fund are summarized below.
Asset-Backed Securities RiskInvestors in asset-backed securities, including residential mortgage-backed securities, commercial mortgage-backed securities and other structured finance investments, generally receive payments that are part interest and part return of principal. These payments may vary based on the rate at which the underlying borrowers pay off their loans. Some asset-backed securities, including mortgage-backed securities, may have structures that make their reaction to interest rates and other factors difficult to predict, causing their prices to be volatile. These instruments are particularly subject to interest rate, credit and liquidity and valuation risks.
Residential Mortgage-Backed Securities—Residential mortgage-backed securities may be particularly sensitive to changes in interest rates given that rising interest rates tend to extend the duration of fixed-rate mortgage-backed securities. As a result, a rising interest rate environment can cause the prices of mortgage-backed securities to be increasingly volatile, which may adversely affect the Fund’s holdings of mortgage-backed securities.  In light of the current interest rate environment, the Fund’s investments in these securities may be subject to heightened interest rate risk. Investments in non-agency residential mortgage-backed securities are subject to increased interest rate risk and other risks, such as credit and liquidity and valuation risks.
Commercial Mortgage-Backed Securities—Investments in commercial mortgage-backed securities (“CMBS”) are backed by commercial mortgage loans that may be secured by office properties, retail properties, hotels, mixed use properties or multi-family apartment buildings and are particularly subject to the credit risk of the borrower and the tenants of the properties securing the commercial mortgage loans.  CMBS are subject to the

PROSPECTUS | 38



risks of asset-backed securities generally and particularly subject to credit risk, interest rate risk, and liquidity and valuation risk.
Collateralized Loan Obligations and Collateralized Debt Obligations RiskCollateralized loan obligations (“CLOs”) bear many of the same risks as other forms of asset-backed securities, including interest rate risk, credit risk and default risk. As they are backed by pools of loans, CLOs also bear similar risks to investing in loans directly. CLOs issue classes or “tranches” that vary in risk and yield. CLOs may experience substantial losses attributable to loan defaults. Losses caused by defaults on underlying assets are borne first by the holders of subordinate tranches. The Fund’s investment in CLOs may decrease in market value when the CLO experiences loan defaults or credit impairment, the disappearance of a subordinate tranche, or market anticipation of defaults and investor aversion to CLO securities as a class.
Collateralized debt obligations (“CDOs”) are structured similarly to CLOs and bear the same risks as CLOs including interest rate risk, credit risk and default risk. CDOs are subject to additional risks because they are backed by pools of assets other than loans including securities (such as other asset-backed securities), synthetic instruments or bonds and may be highly leveraged. Like CLOs, losses incurred by a CDO are borne first by holders of subordinate tranches. Accordingly, the risks of CDOs depend largely on the type of underlying collateral and the tranche of CDOs in which the Fund invests. For example, CDOs that obtain their exposure through synthetic investments entail the risks associated with derivative instruments.
Commercial Paper Risk—The value of the Fund’s investment in commercial paper, which is an unsecured promissory note that generally has a maturity date between one and 270 days and is issued by a U.S. or foreign entity, is susceptible to changes in the issuer’s financial condition or credit quality. Investments in commercial paper are usually discounted from their value at maturity. Commercial paper can be fixed-rate or variable rate and can be adversely affected by changes in interest rates.
Commodities Risk—The commodities industries can be significantly affected by the level and volatility of commodity prices; world events including international monetary and political developments; import controls and worldwide competition; exploration and production spending; and tax and other government regulations and economic conditions.
Commodity-Linked Investments Risk—Commodity-linked investments may be more volatile and less liquid than the underlying commodity, instruments, or measures and their value may be affected by the performance of the overall commodities markets as well as weather, tax, and other regulatory developments.
Convertible Securities Risk—Convertible securities may be subordinate to other securities. The total return for a convertible security depends, in part, upon the performance of the underlying security into which it can be converted. The value of convertible securities tends to decline as interest rates increase. Convertible securities generally offer lower interest or dividend yields than non-convertible securities of similar quality.
Counterparty Credit RiskThe Fund makes investments in financial instruments and over-the-counter ("OTC")-traded derivatives involving counterparties to gain exposure to a particular group of securities, index, asset class or other reference asset without actually purchasing those securities or investments, to hedge a position, or for other investment purposes. Through these investments and related arrangements (e.g., prime brokerage or securities lending arrangements or derivatives transactions), the Fund is exposed to credit risks that the counterparty may be unwilling or unable to make timely payments or otherwise to meet its contractual obligations. If the counterparty becomes bankrupt or defaults on (or otherwise becomes unable or unwilling to perform) its payment or other obligations to the Fund, the Fund may not receive the full amount that it is entitled to receive or may experience delays in recovering the collateral or other assets held by, or on behalf of, the counterparty. If this occurs, the value of your shares in the Fund will decrease.
Credit Risk—The Fund could lose money if the issuer or guarantor of a fixed-income instrument or a counterparty to a derivatives transaction or other transaction is unable or unwilling, or perceived to be unable or unwilling, to pay interest or repay principal on time or defaults. The issuer, guarantor or counterparty could also suffer a rapid decrease in credit quality rating, which would adversely affect the volatility of the value and liquidity of the instrument. Credit ratings may not be an accurate assessment of liquidity or credit risk.
Currency Risk—Indirect and direct exposure to foreign currencies subjects the Fund to the risk that those currencies will decline in value relative to the U.S. Dollar, which would cause a decline in the U.S. value of the holdings of the Fund. Currency rates in foreign countries may fluctuate significantly over short periods of time for a number of reasons, including changes in interest rates and the imposition of currency controls or other political, economic and tax developments in the U.S. or abroad. When the Fund seeks exposure to foreign currencies through foreign currency contracts and related transactions, the Fund becomes particularly susceptible to foreign currency value fluctuations, which may be sudden and significant, and investment decisions tied to currency markets. In addition, these

39 | PROSPECTUS




investments are subject to the risks associated with derivatives and hedging and the impact on the Fund of fluctuations in the value of currencies may be magnified.
Derivatives Risk—Derivatives may pose risks in addition to and greater than those associated with investing directly in securities, currencies or other investments, including risks relating to leverage, imperfect correlations with underlying investments or the Fund’s other portfolio holdings, high price volatility, lack of availability, counterparty credit, liquidity, valuation and legal restrictions. Their use is a highly specialized activity that involves investment techniques and risks different from those associated with ordinary portfolio securities transactions. If the Investment Manager is incorrect about its expectations of market conditions, the use of derivatives could also result in a loss, which in some cases may be unlimited. In addition, the Fund’s use of derivatives (including covered call options) may cause the Fund to realize higher amounts of short term capital gains (generally taxed at ordinary income tax rates) than if the Fund had not used such instruments. Some of the derivatives in which the Fund invests may be traded (and privately negotiated) in the OTC market. OTC derivatives are subject to heightened credit, liquidity and valuation risks. Certain risks also are specific to the derivatives in which the Fund invests.
Swap Agreements Risk—Swap agreements are contracts among the Fund and a counterparty to exchange the return of the pre-determined underlying investment (such as the rate of return of the underlying index). Swap agreements may be negotiated bilaterally and traded OTC between two parties or, in some instances, must be exchange-traded through a futures commission merchant and/or cleared through a clearinghouse that serves as a central counterparty. Risks associated with the use of swap agreements are different from those associated with ordinary portfolio securities transactions, due in part to the fact they could be considered illiquid and many swaps trade on the OTC market. Swaps are particularly subject to counterparty credit, correlation, valuation, liquidity and leveraging risks. Certain standardized swaps are subject to mandatory exchange trading and central clearing. Exchange trading and central clearing are intended to reduce counterparty credit risk and increase liquidity but exchange trading and central clearing do not make swap transactions risk-free. Additionally, applicable regulators have adopted rules imposing certain margin requirements, including minimums, on OTC swaps, which may result in the Fund and its counterparties posting higher margin amounts for OTC swaps.
Futures Contracts Risk—Futures contracts are exchange-traded contracts that call for the future delivery of an asset at a certain price and date, or cash settlement of the terms of the contract. Risks of futures contracts may be caused by an imperfect correlation between movements in the price of the instruments and the price of the underlying assets. In addition, there is the risk that the Fund may not be able to enter into a closing transaction because of an illiquid market. Exchanges can limit the number of positions that can be held or controlled by the Fund or its Investment Manager, thus limiting the ability to implement the Fund’s strategies. Futures markets are highly volatile and the use of futures may increase the volatility of the Fund’s NAV. Futures are also subject to leverage risks and to liquidity risk.
Options Risk—Options or options on futures contracts give the holder of the option the right, but not the obligation, to buy (or to sell) a position in a security or in a contract to the writer of the option, at a certain price. They are subject to correlation risk because there may be an imperfect correlation between the options and the securities markets that cause a given transaction to fail to achieve its objectives. The successful use of options depends on the Investment Manager’s ability to predict correctly future price fluctuations and the degree of correlation between the markets for options and the underlying instruments. Exchanges can limit the number of positions that can be held or controlled by the Fund or its Investment Manager, thus limiting the ability to implement the Fund’s strategies. Options are also particularly subject to leverage risk and can be subject to liquidity risk.
Dollar Roll Transaction Risk—The Fund may enter into dollar roll transactions, in which the Fund sells a mortgage-backed or other security for settlement on one date and buys back a substantially similar security for settlement at a later date. Dollar rolls involve a risk of loss if the market value of the securities that the Fund is committed to buy declines below the price of the securities the Fund has sold.
Emerging Markets RiskInvestments in or exposure to emerging markets are generally subject to a greater level of those risks associated with investing in or being exposed to developed foreign markets, as emerging markets are considered to be less developed than developing countries. Furthermore, investments in or exposure to emerging markets are generally subject to additional risks, including the risks associated with trading in smaller markets, lower volumes of trading, and being subject to lower levels of government regulation and less extensive accounting, financial and other reporting requirements.
Equity Securities RiskEquity securities include common stocks and other equity and equity-related securities (and securities convertible into stocks). The prices of equity securities generally fluctuate in value more than fixed-income investments, may rise or fall rapidly or unpredictably and may reflect real or perceived changes in the issuing

PROSPECTUS | 40



company’s financial condition and changes in the overall market or economy. A decline in the value of equity securities held by the Fund will adversely affect the value of your investment in the Fund. Common stocks generally represent the riskiest investment in a company and dividend payments (if declared) to preferred stockholders generally rank junior to payments due to a company’s debtholders. The Fund may lose a substantial part, or even all, of its investment in a company’s stock.
Extension RiskCertain debt instruments, including mortgage- and other asset-backed securities, are subject to the risk that payments on principal may occur at a slower rate or later than expected.  In this event, the expected maturity could lengthen and the Fund’s investment may sharply decrease in value and the Fund’s income from the investment may quickly decline.  These types of instruments are particularly subject to extension risk, and offer less potential for gains, during periods of rising interest rates. In addition, the Fund may be delayed in its ability to reinvest income or proceeds from these instruments in potentially higher yielding investments, which would adversely affect the Fund.
Foreign Securities and Currency Risk—Foreign securities carry unique or additional risks when compared to U.S. securities, including currency fluctuations, adverse political and economic developments, unreliable or untimely information, less liquidity and more volatility, limited legal recourse and higher transactional costs.
Geographic Emphasis Risk—To the extent the Fund invests a significant portion of its assets in one country or geographic region, the Fund will be more vulnerable to the economic, financial, social, political or other developments affecting that country or region than a fund that invests its assets more broadly. Such developments may have a significant impact on the Fund’s investment performance causing such performance to be more volatile than the investment performance of a more geographically diversified fund.
Hedging Risk—The Fund may, but is not required to, engage in various investments or transactions that are designed to hedge a position that the Fund holds.  There can be no assurance that the Fund’s hedging investments or transactions will be effective.  Hedging investments or transactions involve costs and may reduce gains or result in losses, which may adversely affect the Fund.
High Yield and Unrated Securities Risk—High yield, below investment grade and unrated high risk debt securities (which also may be known as “junk bonds”) may present additional risks because these securities may be less liquid, and therefore more difficult to value accurately and sell at an advantageous price or time, and present more credit risk than investment grade bonds. The price of high yield securities tends to be subject to greater volatility due to issuer-specific operating results and outlook and to real or perceived adverse economic and competitive industry conditions. This exposure may be obtained through investments in other investment companies.
Interest Rate RiskInvestments in fixed-income instruments and other debt instruments are subject to the possibility that interest rates could rise sharply, which may cause the value of the Fund’s holdings and share price to decline. Changes in interest rates may also affect the liquidity of the Fund's investments in fixed-income instruments. The risks associated with rising interest rates are heightened given the recent near historically low interest rate environment and, as of the date of this prospectus, increasing interest rate environment. Interest rates may continue to rise in the future, possibly suddenly and significantly, with unpredictable effects on the financial markets and the Fund’s investments. Fixed-income instruments with longer durations are subject to more volatility than those with shorter durations. During periods of rising interest rates, because changes in interest rates on adjustable rate securities may lag behind changes in market rates, the value of such securities may decline until their interest rates reset to market rates. During periods of declining interest rates, because the interest rates on adjustable rate securities generally reset downward, their market value is unlikely to rise to the same extent as the value of comparable fixed rate securities.
Investment in Investment Vehicles Risk—Investing in other investment vehicles, including ETFs, closed-end funds and other mutual funds, subjects the Fund to those risks affecting the investment vehicle, including the possibility that the value of the underlying securities held by the investment vehicle could decrease or the portfolio becomes illiquid. Moreover, the Fund and its shareholders will incur its pro rata share of the underlying vehicles’ expenses, which will reduce the Fund’s performance. In addition, investments in an ETF are subject to, among other risks, the risk that the ETF's shares may trade at a discount or premium relative to the net asset value of the shares and the listing exchange may halt trading of the ETF's shares.
Investment in Loans Risk—The Fund may invest in loans through assignments, participations or directly. Investments in loans, including loan syndicates and other direct lending opportunities, involve special types of risks, including credit risk, interest rate risk, counterparty risk and prepayment risk. Loans may offer a fixed or floating interest rate. Loans are often generally below investment grade and may be unrated. The Fund’s investments in loans can also be difficult to value accurately and may be more susceptible to liquidity risk than fixed-income instruments of similar credit quality and/or maturity. The Fund is also subject to the risk that the value of any collateral for the loan may

41 | PROSPECTUS




be insufficient or unavailable to cover the borrower’s obligations should the borrower fail to make payments, become insolvent, or otherwise default. Participations in loans may subject the Fund to the credit risk of both the borrower and the issuer of the participation and may make enforcement of loan covenants, if any, more difficult for the Fund as legal action may have to go through the issuer of the participation (or an agent acting on its behalf). Transactions in loans are often subject to long settlement periods, thus potentially limiting the ability of the Fund to invest sale proceeds in other investments and to use proceeds to meet its current redemption obligations.
Investment in the Subsidiary Risk—The Subsidiary, unless otherwise noted in this Prospectus, is not subject to all of the investor protections of the Fund because the Subsidiary is not registered under the 1940 Act. The Fund is exposed to the risks of the Subsidiary’s investments, which are exposed to the risks of investing in the commodities markets. The Fund also will incur its pro rata share of the expenses of the Subsidiary. In addition, changes in the laws of the United States or the Cayman Islands, under which the Fund and the Subsidiary, respectively, are organized, could result in the inability of the Fund and/or the Subsidiary to operate as intended and could negatively affect the Fund and its shareholders. The character, timing, or amount that the Fund will pay in taxes may be affected by the Fund’s investment in the Subsidiary. Future or new legislation, Treasury regulations and/or guidance issued by the Internal Revenue Service may also affect whether income derived from the Fund’s investments in the Subsidiary is considered qualifying income.
Leverage Risk—The Fund’s use of leverage, through borrowings or instruments such as derivatives, may cause the Fund to be more volatile and riskier than if it had not been leveraged.
Liquidity and Valuation RiskIt may be difficult for the Fund to purchase and sell particular investments within a reasonable time at a fair price, or the price at which it has been valued by the Investment Manager for purposes of the Fund’s net asset value, causing the Fund to be less liquid and unable to realize what the Investment Manager believes should be the price of the investment. Valuation of portfolio investments may be difficult, such as during periods of market turmoil or reduced liquidity, and for investments that may, for example, trade infrequently or irregularly. In these and other circumstances, an investment may be valued using fair value methodologies, which are inherently subjective, reflect good faith judgments based on available information and may not accurately estimate the price at which the Fund could sell the investment at that time. These risks may be heightened for fixed-income instruments because of the near historically low interest rate environment as of the date of this prospectus. Based on its investment strategies, a significant portion of the Fund's investments can be difficult to value and potentially less liquid and thus particularly prone to the foregoing risks.
Management Risk—The Fund is actively managed, which means that investment decisions are made based on investment views. There is no guarantee that the investment views will produce the desired results or expected returns, causing the Fund to fail to meet its investment objective or underperform its benchmark index or funds with similar investment objectives and strategies. Furthermore, active and frequent trading that can accompany active management, also called “high turnover,” may have a negative impact on performance. Active and frequent trading may result in higher brokerage costs or mark-up charges, which are ultimately passed on to shareholders of the Fund. Active and frequent trading may also result in adverse tax consequences.
Market Risk—The value of, or income generated by, the securities held by the Fund may fluctuate rapidly and unpredictably as a result of factors affecting individual companies or changing economic, political, social or financial market conditions throughout the world. The performance of these investments may underperform the general securities markets or other types of securities.
Municipal Securities RiskMunicipal securities are subject to a variety of risks, including credit, interest, prepayment, liquidity, and valuation risks. In addition, municipal securities can be adversely affected by (i) unfavorable legislative, political or other developments or events, including natural disasters, and (ii) changes in the economic and fiscal conditions of state and municipal issuers or the federal government in case it provides financial support to such issuers. To the extent a Fund invests a substantial portion of its assets in securities issued by a particular state or municipality, the Fund will be particularly sensitive to developments and events adversely affecting such issuer. Certain sectors of the municipal bond market have special risks that can affect them more significantly than the market as a whole. Because many municipal instruments are issued to finance similar projects, conditions in these industries can significantly affect the overall municipal market. Municipal securities that are insured by an insurer may be adversely affected by developments relevant to that particular insurer, or more general developments relevant to the market as a whole. Municipal securities can be difficult to value and be less liquid than other investments, which may affect performance or the ability to meet fund redemption requests.
Preferred Securities Risk—A company’s preferred stock generally pays dividends only after the company makes required payments to holders of its bonds and other debt. For this reason, the value of preferred stock will usually react more strongly than bonds and other debt to actual or perceived changes in the company’s financial condition or prospects.

PROSPECTUS | 42



Prepayment RiskCertain debt instruments, including loans and mortgage- and other asset-backed securities, are subject to the risk that payments on principal may occur more quickly or earlier than expected.  In this event, the Fund might be forced to forego future interest income on the principal repaid early and to reinvest income or proceeds at generally lower interest rates, thus reducing the Fund’s yield.  These types of instruments are particularly subject to prepayment risk, and offer less potential for gains, during periods of declining interest rates.
Real Estate Securities Risk—The Fund may invest in securities of real estate companies and companies related to the real estate industry, including real estate investment trusts (“REITs”), which are subject to the same risks as direct investments in real estate. The real estate industry is particularly sensitive to economic downturns.
Regulatory and Legal RiskU.S. and non-U.S. governmental agencies and other regulators regularly implement additional regulations and legislators pass new laws that affect the investments held by the Fund, the strategies used by the Fund or the level of regulation or taxation applying to the Fund (such as regulations related to investments in derivatives and other transactions). These regulations and laws impact the investment strategies, performance, costs and operations of the Fund or taxation of shareholders.
Repurchase Agreements and Reverse Repurchase Agreements Risk—In the event of the insolvency of the counterparty to a repurchase agreement or reverse repurchase agreement, recovery of the repurchase price owed to the Fund or, in the case of a reverse repurchase agreement, the securities sold by the Fund, may be delayed. Because reverse repurchase agreements may be considered to be the practical equivalent of borrowing funds, they constitute a form of leverage. If the Fund reinvests the proceeds of a reverse repurchase agreement at a rate lower than the cost of the agreement, entering into the agreement will lower the Fund’s yield.
Restricted Securities Risk—Restricted securities generally cannot be sold to the public and may involve a high degree of business, financial and liquidity risk, which may result in substantial losses to the Fund.
Securities Lending Risk—Securities lending involves a risk that the borrower may fail to return the securities or deliver the proper amount of collateral, which may result in a loss to the Fund. In the event of bankruptcy of the borrower, the Fund could experience losses or delays in recovering the loaned securities.
Short Sale and Short Exposure Risk—Short selling a security involves selling a borrowed security with the expectation that the value of that security will decline, so that the security may be purchased at a lower price when returning the borrowed security. A short exposure through a derivative exposes the Fund to counterparty credit risk and leverage risk. The risk for loss on a short sale or other short exposure is greater than a direct investment in the security itself because the price of the borrowed security may rise, thereby increasing the price at which the security must be purchased. The risk of loss through a short sale or other short exposure may in some cases be theoretically unlimited. Government actions also may affect the Fund’s ability to engage in short selling.
Sovereign Debt RiskThe debt securities issued by sovereign entities may decline as a result of default or other adverse credit event resulting from a sovereign debtor's unwillingness or inability to repay principal and pay interest in a timely manner, which may be affected by a variety of factors, including its cash flow situation, the extent of its reserves, the availability of sufficient foreign exchange on the date a payment is due, the relative size of the debt service burden to the economy as a whole, the sovereign debtor's policy toward international lenders, and the political constraints to which a sovereign debtor may be subject. Sovereign debt risk is increased for emerging market issuers.
Special Situations/Securities in Default RiskInvestments in the securities and debt of distressed issuers or issuers in default involve far greater risk than investing in issuers whose debt obligations are being met and whose debt trade at or close to its “par” or full value because the investments are highly speculative with respect to the issuer’s ability to make interest payments and/or to pay its principal obligations in full and/or on time.
U.S. Government Securities Risk—U.S. government securities may or may not be backed by the full faith and credit of the U.S. government. U.S. government securities are subject to the risks associated with fixed-income and debt securities, particularly interest rate risk and credit risk.








43 | PROSPECTUS




PERFORMANCE INFORMATION
The following chart and table provide some indication of the risks of investing in the Fund by showing the Fund’s Class A share calendar year performance from year to year and average annual returns for the one, five and ten year or since inception periods (if shorter), as applicable, for the Fund’s Class A, Class C, Institutional Class, and Class P shares compared to those of a broad measure of market performance. As with all mutual funds, past performance (before and after taxes) is not necessarily an indication of how the Fund will perform in the future. Updated performance information is available on the Fund’s website at www.guggenheiminvestments.com or by calling 800.820.0888.
The bar chart does not reflect the impact of the sales charge applicable to Class A shares which, if reflected, would lower the returns shown.
 
chart-482c88163d755c34a98.jpg
Highest Quarter Return
  
Lowest Quarter Return
Q1 2012 5.20%
  
Q2 2013 -2.24%
AVERAGE ANNUAL TOTAL RETURNS (for the periods ended December 31, 2018)
After-tax returns shown in the table are calculated using the historical highest individual federal marginal income tax rates and do not reflect the impact of any state or local taxes. Actual after-tax returns depend on an investor’s tax situation and may differ from those shown. After-tax returns shown are not relevant to investors who hold their Fund shares through tax-deferred arrangements, such as 401(k) plans or individual retirement accounts (“IRAs”). After-tax returns are shown for Class A only. After-tax returns for Class C, Institutional Class, and Class P will vary. The returns shown below reflect applicable sales charges, if any.
 
Inception
1 Year
5 Years or Since Inception
10 Years or Since Inception
Class A
11/30/2011
 
 
 
Return Before Taxes
 
-3.86%
2.71%
4.43%
Return After Taxes on Distributions
 
-5.09%
0.87%
2.50%
Return After Taxes on Distributions and Sale of Fund Shares
 
-2.28%
1.22%
2.54%
Class C
11/30/2011
-1.59%
2.95%
4.38%
Institutional Class
11/30/2011
0.53%
4.08%
5.53%
Class P
5/1/2015
0.16%
3.32%
N/A
Index
 
 
 
 
ICE BofAML 3-Month U.S. Treasury Bill Index (reflects no deductions for fees, expenses or taxes)
 
1.87%
0.63%
0.47%

PROSPECTUS | 44



MANAGEMENT OF THE FUND
Guggenheim Partners Investment Management, LLC, also known as Guggenheim Investments, serves as the investment manager of the Fund. B. Scott Minerd, Anne B. Walsh, Kevin H. Gundersen, Steven H. Brown and Adam Bloch are primarily responsible for the day-to-­day management of the Fund. They hold the titles of Chairman, Global Chief Investment Officer, Managing Partner and Portfolio Manager; Chief Investment Officer, Fixed Income, Senior Managing Director and Portfolio Manager; Senior Managing Director and Portfolio Manager; Managing Director and Portfolio Manager; and Director and Portfolio Manager, respectively, with the Investment Manager. B. Scott Minerd, Anne B. Walsh and Kevin H. Gundersen have managed the Fund since its inception (November 2011). Steven H. Brown and Adam Bloch have managed the Fund since 2016.
PURCHASE AND SALE OF FUND SHARES
You may purchase or redeem Fund shares through your broker/dealer, other financial intermediary that has an agreement with Guggenheim Funds Distributors, LLC, the Fund’s distributor, or, for shares of each class other than Class P shares, through the Fund’s transfer agent. You may purchase, redeem or exchange shares of any class of the Fund on any day the New York Stock Exchange is open for business. The minimum initial investment for Class A and Class C shares is $2,500. The minimum subsequent investment is $100. Class A and Class C do not have a minimum account balance.
The Institutional Class minimum initial investment is $2 million, although the Investment Manager may waive this requirement at its discretion. The Institutional Class has a minimum account balance of $1 million. Due to the relatively high cost of maintaining accounts below the minimum account balance, the Fund reserves the right to redeem shares if an account balance falls below the minimum account balance for any reason. Investors will be given 60 days notice to reestablish the minimum account balance. If the account balance is not increased, the account may be closed and the proceeds sent to the investor. Institutional Class shares of the Fund will be redeemed at net asset value on the day the account is closed.
Class P shares of the Fund are offered through broker/dealers and other financial intermediaries with which Guggenheim Funds Distributors, LLC has an agreement for the use of Class P shares of the Fund in investment products, programs or accounts. Class P shares do not have a minimum initial investment amount, subsequent investment amount or a minimum account balance. The Fund reserves the right to modify its minimum investment amount and account balance requirements at any time, with or without prior notice to you.
TAX INFORMATION
Fund distributions are taxable as ordinary income or capital gains (or a combination of both), unless your investment is through an IRA or other tax-advantaged retirement account. Investments through tax-advantaged accounts may sometimes become taxable upon withdrawal.
PAYMENTS TO BROKER/DEALERS AND OTHER FINANCIAL INTERMEDIARIES
If you purchase Fund shares through a broker/dealer or other financial intermediary, the Fund and its related companies may pay the intermediary for the sale of Fund shares and related services. These payments may create a conflict of interest by influencing the broker/dealer or other intermediary and your sales person to recommend the Fund over another investment. Ask your sales person or visit your financial intermediary’s website for more information.

45 | PROSPECTUS




Guggenheim Municipal Income Fund

INVESTMENT OBJECTIVE
The Guggenheim Municipal Income Fund (the “Fund”) seeks to provide current income with an emphasis on income exempt from federal income tax, while also considering capital appreciation.
FEES AND EXPENSES OF THE FUND
This table describes the fees and expenses that you may pay if you buy and hold shares of the Fund. You may be required to pay a commission to your financial intermediary for effecting transactions in a class of shares of the Fund without any initial sales charge, contingent deferred sales charge, or other asset-based fee for sales or distribution. These commissions are not reflected in the fee and expense table or expense example below. You may qualify for sales charge discounts if you and your family invest, or agree to invest in the future, at least $50,000 in the Family of Funds, as defined on page 150 of the Fund’s prospectus. This amount may vary depending on the Guggenheim Fund in which you invest. More information about these and other discounts is available from your financial professional and in the “Sales Charges-Class A Shares” section on page 101 of the Fund’s prospectus and the “How to Purchase Shares” section on page 80 of the Fund’s Statement of Additional Information. Different intermediaries and financial professionals may impose different sales charges or offer different sales charge waivers or discounts.  These variations are described in Appendix A to the Fund’s prospectus (Intermediary-Specific Sales Charge Waivers and Discounts).
 
Class A
Class C
Institutional Class
Class P
SHAREHOLDER FEES (fees paid directly from your investment)
 
 
 
 
Maximum Sales Charge (Load) Imposed on Purchases (as a percentage of offering price)
4.00%
None
None
None
Maximum Deferred Sales Charge (Load) (as a percentage of original purchase price or redemption proceeds, whichever is lower)
None*
1.00%**
None
None
*
A 1.00% deferred sales charge will normally be imposed on purchases of $1,000,000 or more on Fund shares purchased without an initial sales charge that are redeemed within 12 months of purchase.
**
A 1.00% deferred sales charge will be imposed if Fund shares are redeemed within 12 months of purchase.

ANNUAL FUND OPERATING EXPENSES (expenses that you pay each year as a percentage of the value of your investment)
Management Fees
0.50%
0.50%
0.50%
0.50%
Distribution and Service (12b-1) Fees
0.25%
1.00%
None
0.25%
Other Expenses
0.55%
0.61%
0.59%
0.97%
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses
1.30%
2.11%
1.09%
1.72%
Fee Waiver (and/or expense reimbursement)1
-0.50%
-0.56%
-0.54%
-0.92%
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses After Fee Waiver (and/or expense reimbursement)
0.80%
1.55%
0.55%
0.80%
1 
Security Investors, LLC, also known as Guggenheim Investments (the “Investment Manager”) has contractually agreed through February 1, 2020 to waive fees and/or reimburse expenses to the extent necessary to limit the ordinary operating expenses (including distribution (12b-1) fees (if any), but exclusive of brokerage costs, dividends on securities sold short, acquired fund fees and expenses, interest, taxes, litigation, indemnification, and extraordinary expenses) (“Operating Expenses”) of the Fund to the annual percentage of average daily net assets for each class of shares as follows: Class A-0.80%, Class C-1.55%, Institutional Class-0.55%, and Class P-0.80%. The Investment Manager is entitled to reimbursement by the Fund of fees waived or expenses reimbursed during any of the previous 36 months beginning on the date of the expense limitation agreement, provided that the Operating Expenses do not exceed the then-applicable expense cap. The agreement will expire when it reaches its termination or when the Investment Manager ceases to serve as such and it can be terminated by the Fund’s Board of Trustees, with certain waived fees and reimbursed expenses subject to the recoupment rights of the Investment Manager.
EXAMPLE
This Example is intended to help you compare the cost of investing in the Fund with the cost of investing in other mutual funds.
The Example assumes that you invest $10,000 in the Fund for the time periods indicated and then redeem all of your shares at the end of those periods. The Example also assumes that your investment has a 5% return each year and that the Fund’s operating expenses remain the same. Although the actual costs may be higher or lower, based on these assumptions your costs would be:

PROSPECTUS | 46



 
Class A
Class C
Institutional
Class P
Redeemed
Not Redeemed
1 Year
$478
$258
$158
$56
$82
3 Years
$748
$607
$607
$293
$452
5 Years
$1,038
$1,083
$1,083
$548
$847
10 Years
$1,863
$2,397
$2,397
$1,280
$1,954
The above Example reflects applicable contractual fee waiver/expense reimbursement arrangements for the current duration of the arrangements only.
PORTFOLIO TURNOVER
The Fund pays transaction costs, such as commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or “turns over” its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover rate may indicate higher transaction costs and may result in higher taxes when Fund shares are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are not reflected in annual fund operating expenses or in the example, affect the Fund’s performance. During the most recent fiscal year, the Fund’s portfolio turnover rate was 13% of the average value of its portfolio.
PRINCIPAL INVESTMENT STRATEGIES
In pursuit of its objective, the Fund will invest, under normal circumstances, at least 80% of its assets (net assets, plus the amount of any borrowings for investment purposes) in a diversified portfolio of municipal securities whose interest is free from federal income tax. This investment policy may not be changed without shareholder approval. Interest from the Fund’s investments may be subject to the federal alternative minimum tax. The Fund may invest up to 20% of its assets in securities the interest on which is subject to federal income taxation, including, among others, corporate bonds and other corporate debt securities, taxable municipal securities (which include Build America Bonds and Qualified School Construction Bonds), mortgage-backed and asset backed securities (including collateralized debt obligations), repurchase and reverse repurchase agreements, syndicated bank loans and securities issued by the U.S. government or its agencies and instrumentalities (including those not backed by the full faith and credit of the U.S. government). The Fund also may invest up to 20% of its assets in a variety of investment vehicles, principally closed-end funds, exchange-traded funds (“ETFs”) and other mutual funds. The Fund may use derivatives for investment purposes (i.e., speculative purposes). Derivatives include futures, forward contracts, Eurodollar futures, options, structured securities, inverse floating rate instruments, swaps, caps, floors, and collars (some of these instruments may be traded in the over-the-counter market). When market conditions are deemed appropriate, the Fund will use leverage to the full extent permitted by its investment policies and restrictions and applicable law. The Fund may use leverage by using derivatives and municipal tender option bonds (“TOBs”), or by entering into reverse repurchase agreements and borrowing transactions (principally lines of credit) for investment purposes. The fixed-income securities in which the Fund invests will primarily be domestic securities, but may also include, up to 20% of its assets, in foreign and emerging markets securities (such as sovereign debt securities and Eurodollar bonds and obligations).
The Fund will allocate assets across different market sectors and maturities and may invest in municipal bonds rated in any rating category or in unrated municipal bonds. The Fund, however, will invest under normal market conditions, at least 80% of its net assets in investment grade securities (i.e., rated in the top four long-term rating categories by a nationally recognized statistical ratings organization or, if unrated, determined by Guggenheim Partners Investment Management, LLC, also known as Guggenheim Investments (“Guggenheim Partners” or the “Sub-Adviser”) to be of comparable quality). If nationally recognized statistical rating organizations assign different ratings to the same security, the Fund will use the higher rating for purposes of determining the security’s credit quality. The Fund may invest 25% or more of the Fund’s assets in municipal instruments that finance similar projects, such as those relating to education, healthcare, housing, utilities, or water and sewers.
Guggenheim Partners, the Fund’s sub-adviser, selects securities and other investments for purchase and sale based on intensive credit research involving extensive due diligence on each issuer, region and sector. Guggenheim Partners also considers macroeconomic outlook and geopolitical issues.
Guggenheim Partners may determine to sell an instrument for several reasons, including but not limited to the following: (1) to adjust the portfolio’s average maturity or duration, or to shift assets into or out of higher-yielding securities; (2) if a security’s credit rating has been changed, our credit outlook has changed, or for other similar reasons; (3) to meet redemption requests; (4) to take gains; or (5) due to relative value. Under adverse or unstable market conditions or abnormal circumstances (for example, in the event of credit events, where it is deemed opportune to preserve gains, or to preserve the relative value of investments or in the case of large cash inflows or anticipated

47 | PROSPECTUS




large redemptions), the Fund can make temporary investments and may not be able to pursue or achieve its investment objective.
PRINCIPAL RISKS
The value of an investment in the Fund will fluctuate and is subject to investment risks, which means investors could lose money. An investment in the Fund is not a bank deposit and is not insured or guaranteed by the FDIC or any governmental agency. There is no assurance that the Fund will achieve its investment objective. The principal risks of investing in the Fund are summarized below.
Asset-Backed Securities RiskInvestors in asset-backed securities, including residential mortgage-backed securities, commercial mortgage-backed securities and other structured finance investments, generally receive payments that are part interest and part return of principal. These payments may vary based on the rate at which the underlying borrowers pay off their loans. Some asset-backed securities, including mortgage-backed securities, may have structures that make their reaction to interest rates and other factors difficult to predict, causing their prices to be volatile. These instruments are particularly subject to interest rate, credit and liquidity and valuation risks.
Collateralized Loan Obligations and Collateralized Debt Obligations RiskCollateralized loan obligations (“CLOs”) bear many of the same risks as other forms of asset-backed securities, including interest rate risk, credit risk and default risk. As they are backed by pools of loans, CLOs also bear similar risks to investing in loans directly. CLOs issue classes or “tranches” that vary in risk and yield. CLOs may experience substantial losses attributable to loan defaults. Losses caused by defaults on underlying assets are borne first by the holders of subordinate tranches. The Fund’s investment in CLOs may decrease in market value when the CLO experiences loan defaults or credit impairment, the disappearance of a subordinate tranche, or market anticipation of defaults and investor aversion to CLO securities as a class.
Collateralized debt obligations (“CDOs”) are structured similarly to CLOs and bear the same risks as CLOs including interest rate risk, credit risk and default risk. CDOs are subject to additional risks because they are backed by pools of assets other than loans including securities (such as other asset-backed securities), synthetic instruments or bonds and may be highly leveraged. Like CLOs, losses incurred by a CDO are borne first by holders of subordinate tranches. Accordingly, the risks of CDOs depend largely on the type of underlying collateral and the tranche of CDOs in which the Fund invests. For example, CDOs that obtain their exposure through synthetic investments entail the risks associated with derivative instruments.
Counterparty Credit RiskThe Fund makes investments in financial instruments and over-the-counter ("OTC")-traded derivatives involving counterparties to gain exposure to a particular group of securities, index, asset class or other reference asset without actually purchasing those securities or investments, to hedge a position, or for other investment purposes. Through these investments and related arrangements (e.g., prime brokerage or securities lending arrangements or derivatives transactions), the Fund is exposed to credit risks that the counterparty may be unwilling or unable to make timely payments or otherwise to meet its contractual obligations. If the counterparty becomes bankrupt or defaults on (or otherwise becomes unable or unwilling to perform) its payment or other obligations to the Fund, the Fund may not receive the full amount that it is entitled to receive or may experience delays in recovering the collateral or other assets held by, or on behalf of, the counterparty. If this occurs, the value of your shares in the Fund will decrease.
Credit Risk—The Fund could lose money if the issuer or guarantor of a fixed-income instrument or a counterparty to a derivatives transaction or other transaction is unable or unwilling, or perceived to be unable or unwilling, to pay interest or repay principal on time or defaults. The issuer, guarantor or counterparty could also suffer a rapid decrease in credit quality rating, which would adversely affect the volatility of the value and liquidity of the instrument. Credit ratings may not be an accurate assessment of liquidity or credit risk.
Derivatives Risk—Derivatives may pose risks in addition to and greater than those associated with investing directly in securities, currencies or other investments, including risks relating to leverage, imperfect correlations with underlying investments or the Fund’s other portfolio holdings, high price volatility, lack of availability, counterparty credit, liquidity, valuation and legal restrictions. Their use is a highly specialized activity that involves investment techniques and risks different from those associated with ordinary portfolio securities transactions. If the Investment Manager is incorrect about its expectations of market conditions, the use of derivatives could also result in a loss, which in some cases may be unlimited. In addition, the Fund’s use of derivatives may cause the Fund to realize higher amounts of short term capital gains (generally taxed at ordinary income tax rates) than if the Fund had not used such instruments. Some of the derivatives in which the Fund invests may be traded (and privately negotiated) in the OTC market. OTC derivatives are subject to heightened credit, liquidity and valuation risks.
Emerging Markets RiskInvestments in or exposure to emerging markets are generally subject to a greater level of those risks associated with investing in or being exposed to developed foreign markets, as emerging markets are

PROSPECTUS | 48



considered to be less developed than developing countries. Furthermore, investments in or exposure to emerging markets are generally subject to additional risks, including the risks associated with trading in smaller markets, lower volumes of trading, and being subject to lower levels of government regulation and less extensive accounting, financial and other reporting requirements.
Extension RiskCertain debt instruments, including mortgage- and other asset-backed securities, are subject to the risk that payments on principal may occur at a slower rate or later than expected.  In this event, the expected maturity could lengthen and the Fund’s investment may sharply decrease in value and the Fund’s income from the investment may quickly decline.  These types of instruments are particularly subject to extension risk, and offer less potential for gains, during periods of rising interest rates. In addition, the Fund may be delayed in its ability to reinvest income or proceeds from these instruments in potentially higher yielding investments, which would adversely affect the Fund.
Foreign Securities and Currency Risk—Foreign securities carry unique or additional risks when compared to U.S. securities, including currency fluctuations, adverse political and economic developments, unreliable or untimely information, less liquidity and more volatility, limited legal recourse and higher transactional costs.
High Yield and Unrated Securities Risk—High yield, below investment grade and unrated high risk debt securities (which also may be known as “junk bonds”) may present additional risks because these securities may be less liquid, and therefore more difficult to value accurately and sell at an advantageous price or time, and present more credit risk than investment grade bonds. The price of high yield securities tends to be subject to greater volatility due to issuer-specific operating results and outlook and to real or perceived adverse economic and competitive industry conditions. This exposure may be obtained through investments in other investment companies.
Interest Rate RiskInvestments in fixed-income instruments and other debt instruments are subject to the possibility that interest rates could rise sharply, which may cause the value of the Fund’s holdings and share price to decline. Changes in interest rates may also affect the liquidity of the Fund's investments in fixed-income instruments. The risks associated with rising interest rates are heightened given the recent near historically low interest rate environment and, as of the date of this prospectus, increasing interest rate environment. Interest rates may continue to rise in the future, possibly suddenly and significantly, with unpredictable effects on the financial markets and the Fund’s investments. Fixed-income instruments with longer durations are subject to more volatility than those with shorter durations. During periods of rising interest rates, because changes in interest rates on adjustable rate securities may lag behind changes in market rates, the value of such securities may decline until their interest rates reset to market rates. During periods of declining interest rates, because the interest rates on adjustable rate securities generally reset downward, their market value is unlikely to rise to the same extent as the value of comparable fixed rate securities.
Investment in Investment Vehicles Risk—Investing in other investment vehicles, including ETFs, closed-end funds and other mutual funds, subjects the Fund to those risks affecting the investment vehicle, including the possibility that the value of the underlying securities held by the investment vehicle could decrease or the portfolio becomes illiquid. Moreover, the Fund and its shareholders will incur its pro rata share of the underlying vehicles’ expenses, which will reduce the Fund’s performance. In addition, investments in an ETF are subject to, among other risks, the risk that the ETF's shares may trade at a discount or premium relative to the net asset value of the shares and the listing exchange may halt trading of the ETF's shares.
Investment in Loans Risk—The Fund may invest in loans through assignments, participations or directly. Investments in loans, including loan syndicates and other direct lending opportunities, involve special types of risks, including credit risk, interest rate risk, counterparty risk and prepayment risk. Loans may offer a fixed or floating interest rate. Loans are often generally below investment grade and may be unrated. The Fund’s investments in loans can also be difficult to value accurately and may be more susceptible to liquidity risk than fixed-income instruments of similar credit quality and/or maturity. The Fund is also subject to the risk that the value of any collateral for the loan may be insufficient or unavailable to cover the borrower’s obligations should the borrower fail to make payments, become insolvent, or otherwise default. Participations in loans may subject the Fund to the credit risk of both the borrower and the issuer of the participation and may make enforcement of loan covenants, if any, more difficult for the Fund as legal action may have to go through the issuer of the participation (or an agent acting on its behalf). Transactions in loans are often subject to long settlement periods, thus potentially limiting the ability of the Fund to invest sale proceeds in other investments and to use proceeds to meet its current redemption obligations.
Leverage Risk—The Fund’s use of leverage, through borrowings or instruments such as derivatives, may cause the Fund to be more volatile and riskier than if it had not been leveraged.
Liquidity and Valuation RiskIt may be difficult for the Fund to purchase and sell particular investments within a reasonable time at a fair price, or the price at which it has been valued by the Investment Manager for purposes of

49 | PROSPECTUS




the Fund’s net asset value, causing the Fund to be less liquid and unable to realize what the Investment Manager believes should be the price of the investment. Valuation of portfolio investments may be difficult, such as during periods of market turmoil or reduced liquidity, and for investments that may, for example, trade infrequently or irregularly. In these and other circumstances, an investment may be valued using fair value methodologies, which are inherently subjective, reflect good faith judgments based on available information and may not accurately estimate the price at which the Fund could sell the investment at that time. These risks may be heightened for fixed-income instruments because of the near historically low interest rate environment as of the date of this prospectus. Based on its investment strategies, a significant portion of the Fund's investments can be difficult to value and potentially less liquid and thus particularly prone to the foregoing risks.
Management Risk—The Fund is actively managed, which means that investment decisions are made based on investment views. There is no guarantee that the investment views will produce the desired results or expected returns, causing the Fund to fail to meet its investment objective or underperform its benchmark index or funds with similar investment objectives and strategies. Furthermore, active and frequent trading that can accompany active management, also called “high turnover,” may have a negative impact on performance. Active and frequent trading may result in higher brokerage costs or mark-up charges, which are ultimately passed on to shareholders of the Fund. Active and frequent trading may also result in adverse tax consequences.
Market Risk—The value of, or income generated by, the securities held by the Fund may fluctuate rapidly and unpredictably as a result of factors affecting individual companies or changing economic, political, social or financial market conditions throughout the world. The performance of these investments may underperform the general securities markets or other types of securities.
Municipal Securities RiskMunicipal securities are subject to a variety of risks, including credit, interest, prepayment, liquidity, and valuation risks. In addition, municipal securities can be adversely affected by (i) unfavorable legislative, political or other developments or events, including natural disasters, and (ii) changes in the economic and fiscal conditions of state and municipal issuers or the federal government in case it provides financial support to such issuers. To the extent a Fund invests a substantial portion of its assets in securities issued by a particular state or municipality, the Fund will be particularly sensitive to developments and events adversely affecting such issuer. Certain sectors of the municipal bond market have special risks that can affect them more significantly than the market as a whole. Because many municipal instruments are issued to finance similar projects, conditions in these industries can significantly affect the overall municipal market. Municipal securities that are insured by an insurer may be adversely affected by developments relevant to that particular insurer, or more general developments relevant to the market as a whole. Municipal securities can be difficult to value and be less liquid than other investments, which may affect performance or the ability to meet fund redemption requests.
Prepayment RiskCertain debt instruments, including loans and mortgage- and other asset-backed securities, are subject to the risk that payments on principal may occur more quickly or earlier than expected.  In this event, the Fund might be forced to forego future interest income on the principal repaid early and to reinvest income or proceeds at generally lower interest rates, thus reducing the Fund’s yield.  These types of instruments are particularly subject to prepayment risk, and offer less potential for gains, during periods of declining interest rates.
Regulatory and Legal RiskU.S. and non-U.S. governmental agencies and other regulators regularly implement additional regulations and legislators pass new laws that affect the investments held by the Fund, the strategies used by the Fund or the level of regulation or taxation applying to the Fund (such as regulations related to investments in derivatives and other transactions). These regulations and laws impact the investment strategies, performance, costs and operations of the Fund or taxation of shareholders.
Repurchase Agreements and Reverse Repurchase Agreements Risk—In the event of the insolvency of the counterparty to a repurchase agreement or reverse repurchase agreement, recovery of the repurchase price owed to the Fund or, in the case of a reverse repurchase agreement, the securities sold by the Fund, may be delayed. Because reverse repurchase agreements may be considered to be the practical equivalent of borrowing funds, they constitute a form of leverage. If the Fund reinvests the proceeds of a reverse repurchase agreement at a rate lower than the cost of the agreement, entering into the agreement will lower the Fund’s yield.
Restricted Securities Risk—Restricted securities generally cannot be sold to the public and may involve a high degree of business, financial and liquidity risk, which may result in substantial losses to the Fund.
Sovereign Debt RiskThe debt securities issued by sovereign entities may decline as a result of default or other adverse credit event resulting from a sovereign debtor's unwillingness or inability to repay principal and pay interest in a timely manner, which may be affected by a variety of factors, including its cash flow situation, the extent of its reserves, the availability of sufficient foreign exchange on the date a payment is due, the relative size of the debt

PROSPECTUS | 50



service burden to the economy as a whole, the sovereign debtor's policy toward international lenders, and the political constraints to which a sovereign debtor may be subject. Sovereign debt risk is increased for emerging market issuers.
Tender Option Bonds Risk—Tender option bonds, residual interest tender option bonds and inverse floaters expose the Fund to the same risks as investments in derivatives, as well as risks associated with leverage, especially the risk of increased volatility. An investment in these securities typically will involve greater risk than an investment in a municipal fixed rate security, including the risk of loss of principal. Because distributions on these securities will bear an inverse relationship to short-term municipal security interest rates, distributions will be reduced or, in the extreme, eliminated as rates rise and will increase when rates fall.
U.S. Government Securities Risk—U.S. government securities may or may not be backed by the full faith and credit of the U.S. government. U.S. government securities are subject to the risks associated with fixed-income and debt securities, particularly interest rate risk and credit risk.
PERFORMANCE INFORMATION
The following chart and table provide some indication of the risks of investing in the Fund by showing the Fund’s Class A share calendar year performance from year to year and average annual returns for the one, five and ten year or since inception periods (if shorter), as applicable, for the Fund’s Class A, Class C, Institutional Class, and Class P shares compared to those of a broad measure of market performance. As with all mutual funds, past performance (before and after taxes) is not necessarily an indication of how the Fund will perform in the future. Updated performance information is available on the Fund’s website at www.guggenheiminvestments.com or by calling 800.820.0888.
On January 13, 2012, the Fund acquired the assets and assumed the liabilities of TS&W/Claymore Tax-Advantaged Balanced Fund (the “Predecessor Fund”), a closed-end fund which used different investment strategies and had different investment advisers (the “Reorganization”). Class A shares of the Fund have assumed the performance, financial and other historical information of the Predecessor Fund’s Common Shares. Returns are based on the net asset value of fund shares. The performance of Class A shares of the Fund reflects the performance of the Predecessor Fund. Performance has not been restated to reflect the estimated annual operating expenses of Class A shares.
The bar chart does not reflect the impact of the sales charge applicable to Class A shares which, if reflected, would lower the returns shown.
chart-c6b487c70d5255af953.jpg
Highest Quarter Return
Q3 2009 22.36%
  
Lowest Quarter Return
Q2 2010 -5.54%
 
AVERAGE ANNUAL TOTAL RETURNS (for the periods ended December 31, 2018)
After-tax returns shown in the table are calculated using the historical highest individual federal marginal income tax rates and do not reflect the impact of any state or local taxes. Actual after-tax returns depend on an investor’s tax situation and may differ from those shown. After-tax returns shown are not relevant to investors who hold their Fund shares through tax-deferred arrangements, such as 401(k) plans or individual retirement accounts (“IRAs”). After-tax returns are shown for Class A only. After-tax returns for Class C, Institutional Class, and Class P will vary. The returns shown below reflect applicable sales charges, if any.

51 | PROSPECTUS




 
Inception
1 Year
5 Years or Since Inception
10 Years or Since Inception
Class A
4/28/2004
 
 
 
Return Before Taxes
 
-3.19%
3.07%
7.71%
Return After Taxes on Distributions
 
-4.21%
2.03%
6.21%
Return After Taxes on Distributions and Sale of Fund Shares
 
-1.85%
1.89%
5.58%
Class C
1/13/2012
-0.90%
3.32%
2.55%
Institutional Class
1/13/2012
1.08%
4.35%
3.57%
Class P
5/1/2015
0.82%
2.11%
N/A
Index
 
 
 
 
Bloomberg Barclays Municipal Bond Index (reflects no deductions for fees, expenses or taxes)
 
1.28%
3.82%
4.85%
MANAGEMENT OF THE FUND
Security Investors, LLC, also known as Guggenheim Investments, serves as the investment manager of the Fund. Guggenheim Partners Investment Management, LLC, also known as Guggenheim Investments (“Guggenheim Partners” or the “Sub-Adviser”) serves as the sub-adviser of the Fund. B. Scott Minerd, Anne B. Walsh, Jeffrey S. Carefoot and Allen Li are primarily responsible for the day-to-day management of the Fund. They hold the titles of Chairman, Global Chief Investment Officer, Managing Partner and Portfolio Manager; Chief Investment Officer, Fixed Income, Senior Managing Director and Portfolio Manager; Senior Managing Director and Portfolio Manager; and Managing Director and Portfolio Manager, respectively, with the Sub-Adviser. B. Scott Minerd and Anne B. Walsh have managed the Fund since 2012. Jeffrey S. Carefoot and Allen Li have managed the Fund since 2017.
PURCHASE AND SALE OF FUND SHARES
You may purchase or redeem Fund shares through your broker/dealer, other financial intermediary that has an agreement with Guggenheim Funds Distributors, LLC, the Fund’s distributor, or, for shares of each class other than Class P shares, through the Fund’s transfer agent. You may purchase, redeem or exchange shares of any class of the Fund on any day the New York Stock Exchange is open for business. The minimum initial investment for Class A and Class C shares is $2,500. The minimum subsequent investment is $100. Class A and Class C do not have a minimum account balance.
The Institutional Class minimum initial investment is $2 million, although the Investment Manager may waive this requirement at its discretion. The Institutional Class has a minimum account balance of $1 million. Due to the relatively high cost of maintaining accounts below the minimum account balance, the Fund reserves the right to redeem shares if an account balance falls below the minimum account balance for any reason. Investors will be given 60 days notice to reestablish the minimum account balance. If the account balance is not increased, the account may be closed and the proceeds sent to the investor. Institutional Class shares of the Fund will be redeemed at net asset value on the day the account is closed.
Class P shares of the Fund are offered through broker/dealers and other financial intermediaries with which Guggenheim Funds Distributors, LLC has an agreement for the use of Class P shares of the Fund in investment products, programs or accounts. Class P shares do not have a minimum initial investment amount, subsequent investment amount or a minimum account balance. The Fund reserves the right to modify its minimum investment amount and account balance requirements at any time, with or without prior notice to you.
TAX INFORMATION
The Fund intends to distribute income exempt from federal income tax. Such income may, however, be subject to state or local tax as well as the federal alternative minimum tax, and a portion of the Fund’s distributions may be subject to federal income tax. Sales of municipal securities are also expected to generate taxable distributions. As such, investments through tax-advantaged accounts may sometimes become taxable upon withdrawal.
PAYMENTS TO BROKER/DEALERS AND OTHER FINANCIAL INTERMEDIARIES
If you purchase Fund shares through a broker/dealer or other financial intermediary, the Fund and its related companies may pay the intermediary for the sale of Fund shares and related services. These payments may create a conflict of interest by influencing the broker/dealer or other intermediary and your sales person to recommend the Fund over another investment. Ask your sales person or visit your financial intermediary’s website for more information.

PROSPECTUS | 52



Guggenheim Total Return Bond Fund

INVESTMENT OBJECTIVE
The Guggenheim Total Return Bond Fund (the “Fund”) seeks to provide total return, comprised of current income and capital appreciation.
FEES AND EXPENSES OF THE FUND
This table describes the fees and expenses that you may pay if you buy and hold shares of the Fund. You may be required to pay a commission to your financial intermediary for effecting transactions in a class of shares of the Fund without any initial sales charge, contingent deferred sales charge, or other asset-based fee for sales or distribution. These commissions are not reflected in the fee and expense table or expense example below. You may qualify for sales charge discounts if you and your family invest, or agree to invest in the future, at least $50,000 in the Family of Funds, as defined on page 150 of the Fund’s prospectus. This amount may vary depending on the Guggenheim Fund in which you invest. More information about these and other discounts is available from your financial professional and in the “Sales Charges-Class A Shares” section on page 101 of the Fund’s prospectus and the “How to Purchase Shares” section on page 80 of the Fund’s Statement of Additional Information. Different intermediaries and financial professionals may impose different sales charges or offer different sales charge waivers or discounts.  These variations are described in Appendix A to the Fund’s prospectus (Intermediary-Specific Sales Charge Waivers and Discounts).
 
Class A
Class C
Institutional Class
Class P
SHAREHOLDER FEES (fees paid directly from your investment)
 
 
 
 
Maximum Sales Charge (Load) Imposed on Purchases (as a percentage of offering price)
4.00%
None
None
None
Maximum Deferred Sales Charge (Load) (as a percentage of original purchase price or redemption proceeds, whichever is lower)
None*
1.00%**
None
None
*
A 1.00% deferred sales charge will normally be imposed on purchases of $1,000,000 or more on Fund shares purchased without an initial sales charge that are redeemed within 12 months of purchase.
**
A 1.00% deferred sales charge will be imposed if Fund shares are redeemed within 12 months of purchase.

ANNUAL FUND OPERATING EXPENSES (expenses that you pay each year as a percentage of the value of your investment)
Management Fees1
0.39%
0.39%
0.39%
0.39%
Distribution and Service (12b-1) Fees
0.25%
1.00%
None
0.25%
Other Expenses
0.27%
0.22%
0.18%
0.26%
Interest and Other Related Expenses
0.01%
0.01%
0.01%
0.01%
Remaining Other Expenses
0.26%
0.21%
0.17%
0.25%
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses
0.91%
1.61%
0.57%
0.90%
Fee Waiver (and/or expense reimbursement)2
-0.11%
-0.06%
-0.06%
-0.10%
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses After Fee Waiver (and/or expense reimbursement)
0.80%
1.55%
0.51%
0.80%
1 
Restated to reflect current management fees.
2 
Guggenheim Partners Investment Management, LLC, also known as Guggenheim Investments (the "Investment Manager") has contractually agreed through February 1, 2020 to waive fees and/or reimburse expenses to the extent necessary to limit the ordinary operating expenses (including distribution (12b-1) fees (if any), but exclusive of brokerage costs, dividends on securities sold short, acquired fund fees and expenses, interest, taxes, litigation, indemnification, and extraordinary expenses) (“Operating Expenses”) of the Fund to the annual percentage of average daily net assets for each class of shares as follows: Class A-0.79%, Class C-1.54%, Institutional Class-0.50%, and Class P-0.79%. The Investment Manager is entitled to reimbursement by the Fund of fees waived or expenses reimbursed during any of the previous 36 months beginning on the date of the expense limitation agreement, provided that the Operating Expenses do not exceed the then-applicable expense cap. The agreement will expire when it reaches its termination or when the Investment Manager ceases to serve as such and it can be terminated by the Fund’s Board of Trustees, with certain waived fees and reimbursed expenses subject to the recoupment rights of the Investment Manager.
EXAMPLE
This Example is intended to help you compare the cost of investing in the Fund with the cost of investing in other mutual funds.
The Example assumes that you invest $10,000 in the Fund for the time periods indicated and then redeem all of your shares at the end of those periods. The Example also assumes that your investment has a 5% return each year and

53 | PROSPECTUS




that the Fund’s operating expenses remain the same. Although the actual costs may be higher or lower, based on these assumptions your costs would be:
 
Class A
Class C
Institutional
Class P
Redeemed
Not Redeemed
1 Year
$478
$258
$158
$52
$82
3 Years
$668
$502
$502
$177
$277
5 Years
$873
$870
$870
$312
$489
10 Years
$1,465
$1,906
$1,906
$708
$1,099
The above Example reflects applicable contractual fee waiver/expense reimbursement arrangements for the current duration of the arrangements only.
PORTFOLIO TURNOVER
The Fund pays transaction costs, such as commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or “turns over” its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover rate may indicate higher transaction costs and may result in higher taxes when Fund shares are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are not reflected in annual fund operating expenses or in the example, affect the Fund’s performance. During the most recent fiscal year, the Fund’s portfolio turnover rate was 48% of the average value of its portfolio.
PRINCIPAL INVESTMENT STRATEGIES
The Fund intends to pursue its investment objective by investing, under normal circumstances, at least 80% of its assets (net assets, plus the amount of any borrowings for investment purposes) in debt securities. Such debt securities may include, corporate bonds and other corporate debt securities, securities issued by the U.S. government or its agencies and instrumentalities (including those not backed by the full faith and credit of the U.S. government), sovereign debt securities, Eurodollar bonds and obligations, agency and non-agency mortgage-backed securities and other asset-backed securities (including collateralized mortgage obligations), loans, participations in and assignments of bank and bridge loans, zero-coupon bonds, municipal bonds, payment-in-kind securities (such as payment-in-kind bonds), convertible fixed-income securities, non-registered or restricted securities (including those issued in reliance on Rule 144A and Regulation S securities), certain preferred securities and step-up securities (such as step-up bonds). These securities may pay fixed or variable rates of interest and may include adjustable rate securities. While the Fund will principally invest in debt securities listed, traded or dealt in developed markets countries globally, it may also invest without limitation in securities listed, traded or dealt in other countries, including emerging markets countries. Such securities may be denominated in foreign currencies. The Fund may also invest in collateralized debt obligations ("CDOs") (which include collateralized bond obligations, collateralized loan obligations and other similarly structured instruments), preferred stock and convertible securities. The Fund may seek to obtain exposure to the securities in which it primarily invests through a variety of investment vehicles, principally closed-end funds, exchange-traded funds (“ETFs”) and other mutual funds.
The Fund may hold fixed-income instruments of any quality, rated or unrated, including, those that are rated below investment grade, or if unrated, determined to be of comparable quality (also known as “high yield securities” or “junk bonds”). If nationally recognized statistical rating organizations assign different ratings to the same security, the Fund will use the higher rating for purposes of determining the security’s credit quality. However, the Fund may not invest more than 33 1/3% of its total assets in fixed-income securities that are below investment grade. The Fund may hold securities of any duration or maturity.
With respect to bank loans, the Fund may purchase participations in, or assignments of, floating rate bank loans that meet certain liquidity standards and will provide for interest rate adjustments at least every 397 days and which may be secured by real estate or other assets. Participations may be interests in, or assignments of, the loan and may be acquired from banks or brokers that have made the loan or members of the lending syndicate. The Fund may also participate in lending syndicates and other direct lending opportunities.
The Fund also may seek certain exposures through derivative transactions, principally: foreign exchange forward contracts; futures on securities; indices; currencies and other investments; Eurodollar futures; options; interest rate swaps; cross-currency swaps; total return swaps; credit default swaps; and other foreign currency contracts and foreign currency-related transactions, which may also create economic leverage in the Fund. The Fund may engage in derivative and foreign currency-related transactions for speculative purposes to enhance total return, to seek to hedge against fluctuations in securities prices, interest rates or currency rates, to change the effective duration of its portfolio, to manage certain investment risks, as a substitute for the purchase or sale of securities or currencies and/or to obtain or replicate market exposure. The Fund may seek to obtain market exposure to the securities in

PROSPECTUS | 54



which it primarily invests by entering into a series of purchase and sale contracts or by using other investment techniques (such as “To Be Announced” (“TBA”) transactions and/or dollar rolls). In a TBA transaction, a seller agrees to deliver a mortgage-backed security to the Fund at a future date, but the seller does not specify the particular security to be delivered. Instead, the Fund agrees to accept any security that meets specified terms. The Fund may use leverage to the extent permitted by applicable law by entering into reverse repurchase agreements and transactions equivalent to a borrowing for investment purposes.
Guggenheim Partners Investment Management, LLC, also known as Guggenheim Investments (the "Investment Manager"), selects securities and other investments for purchase and sale based on intensive credit research involving extensive due diligence on each issuer, region and sector. The Investment Manager also considers macroeconomic outlook and geopolitical issues. The Investment Manager may employ a tactical sector allocation strategy to seek to capitalize on total return potential created by changing market and economic conditions.
The Investment Manager may determine to sell a security for several reasons, including but not limited to the following: (1) to adjust the portfolio’s average maturity or duration, or to shift assets into or out of higher-yielding securities; (2) if a security’s credit rating has been changed, our credit outlook has changed, or for other similar reasons; (3) to meet redemption requests; (4) to take gains; or (5) due to relative value. The Fund does not intend to principally invest in defaulted securities, but if a security defaults subsequent to purchase by the Fund, the Investment Manager will determine in its discretion whether to hold or dispose of such security. Under adverse or unstable market conditions or abnormal circumstances (for example, in the event of credit events, where it is deemed opportune to preserve gains, or to preserve the relative value of investments or in the case of large cash inflows or anticipated large redemptions), the Fund can make temporary investments and may not be able to pursue or achieve its investment objective.
PRINCIPAL RISKS
The value of an investment in the Fund will fluctuate and is subject to investment risks, which means investors could lose money. An investment in the Fund is not a bank deposit and is not insured or guaranteed by the FDIC or any governmental agency. There is no assurance that the Fund will achieve its investment objective. The principal risks of investing in the Fund are summarized below.
Asset-Backed Securities RiskInvestors in asset-backed securities, including residential mortgage-backed securities, commercial mortgage-backed securities and other structured finance investments, generally receive payments that are part interest and part return of principal. These payments may vary based on the rate at which the underlying borrowers pay off their loans. Some asset-backed securities, including mortgage-backed securities, may have structures that make their reaction to interest rates and other factors difficult to predict, causing their prices to be volatile. These instruments are particularly subject to interest rate, credit and liquidity and valuation risks.
Residential Mortgage-Backed Securities—Residential mortgage-backed securities may be particularly sensitive to changes in interest rates given that rising interest rates tend to extend the duration of fixed-rate mortgage-backed securities. As a result, a rising interest rate environment can cause the prices of mortgage-backed securities to be increasingly volatile, which may adversely affect the Fund’s holdings of mortgage-backed securities.  In light of the current interest rate environment, the Fund’s investments in these securities may be subject to heightened interest rate risk. Investments in non-agency residential mortgage-backed securities are subject to increased interest rate risk and other risks, such as credit and liquidity and valuation risks.
Commercial Mortgage-Backed Securities—Investments in commercial mortgage-backed securities (“CMBS”) are backed by commercial mortgage loans that may be secured by office properties, retail properties, hotels, mixed use properties or multi-family apartment buildings and are particularly subject to the credit risk of the borrower and the tenants of the properties securing the commercial mortgage loans.  CMBS are subject to the risks of asset-backed securities generally and particularly subject to credit risk, interest rate risk, and liquidity and valuation risk.
Collateralized Loan Obligations and Collateralized Debt Obligations RiskCollateralized loan obligations (“CLOs”) bear many of the same risks as other forms of asset-backed securities, including interest rate risk, credit risk and default risk. As they are backed by pools of loans, CLOs also bear similar risks to investing in loans directly. CLOs issue classes or “tranches” that vary in risk and yield. CLOs may experience substantial losses attributable to loan defaults. Losses caused by defaults on underlying assets are borne first by the holders of subordinate tranches. The Fund’s investment in CLOs may decrease in market value when the CLO experiences loan defaults or credit impairment, the disappearance of a subordinate tranche, or market anticipation of defaults and investor aversion to CLO securities as a class.
Collateralized debt obligations (“CDOs”) are structured similarly to CLOs and bear the same risks as CLOs including interest rate risk, credit risk and default risk. CDOs are subject to additional risks because they are backed by pools

55 | PROSPECTUS




of assets other than loans including securities (such as other asset-backed securities), synthetic instruments or bonds and may be highly leveraged. Like CLOs, losses incurred by a CDO are borne first by holders of subordinate tranches. Accordingly, the risks of CDOs depend largely on the type of underlying collateral and the tranche of CDOs in which the Fund invests. For example, CDOs that obtain their exposure through synthetic investments entail the risks associated with derivative instruments.
Convertible Securities Risk—Convertible securities may be subordinate to other securities. The total return for a convertible security depends, in part, upon the performance of the underlying security into which it can be converted. The value of convertible securities tends to decline as interest rates increase. Convertible securities generally offer lower interest or dividend yields than non-convertible securities of similar quality.
Counterparty Credit RiskThe Fund makes investments in financial instruments and over-the-counter ("OTC")-traded derivatives involving counterparties to gain exposure to a particular group of securities, index, asset class or other reference asset without actually purchasing those securities or investments, to hedge a position, or for other investment purposes. Through these investments and related arrangements (e.g., prime brokerage or securities lending arrangements or derivatives transactions), the Fund is exposed to credit risks that the counterparty may be unwilling or unable to make timely payments or otherwise to meet its contractual obligations. If the counterparty becomes bankrupt or defaults on (or otherwise becomes unable or unwilling to perform) its payment or other obligations to the Fund, the Fund may not receive the full amount that it is entitled to receive or may experience delays in recovering the collateral or other assets held by, or on behalf of, the counterparty. If this occurs, the value of your shares in the Fund will decrease.
Credit Risk—The Fund could lose money if the issuer or guarantor of a fixed-income instrument or a counterparty to a derivatives transaction or other transaction is unable or unwilling, or perceived to be unable or unwilling, to pay interest or repay principal on time or defaults. The issuer, guarantor or counterparty could also suffer a rapid decrease in credit quality rating, which would adversely affect the volatility of the value and liquidity of the instrument. Credit ratings may not be an accurate assessment of liquidity or credit risk.
Currency Risk—Indirect and direct exposure to foreign currencies subjects the Fund to the risk that those currencies will decline in value relative to the U.S. Dollar, which would cause a decline in the U.S. value of the holdings of the Fund. Currency rates in foreign countries may fluctuate significantly over short periods of time for a number of reasons, including changes in interest rates and the imposition of currency controls or other political, economic and tax developments in the U.S. or abroad. When the Fund seeks exposure to foreign currencies through foreign currency contracts and related transactions, the Fund becomes particularly susceptible to foreign currency value fluctuations, which may be sudden and significant, and investment decisions tied to currency markets. In addition, these investments are subject to the risks associated with derivatives and hedging and the impact on the Fund of fluctuations in the value of currencies may be magnified.
Derivatives Risk—Derivatives may pose risks in addition to and greater than those associated with investing directly in securities, currencies or other investments, including risks relating to leverage, imperfect correlations with underlying investments or the Fund’s other portfolio holdings, high price volatility, lack of availability, counterparty credit, liquidity, valuation and legal restrictions. Their use is a highly specialized activity that involves investment techniques and risks different from those associated with ordinary portfolio securities transactions. If the Investment Manager is incorrect about its expectations of market conditions, the use of derivatives could also result in a loss, which in some cases may be unlimited. In addition, the Fund’s use of derivatives may cause the Fund to realize higher amounts of short term capital gains (generally taxed at ordinary income tax rates) than if the Fund had not used such instruments. Some of the derivatives in which the Fund invests may be traded (and privately negotiated) in the OTC market. OTC derivatives are subject to heightened credit, liquidity and valuation risks. Certain risks also are specific to the derivatives in which the Fund invests.
Swap Agreements Risk—Swap agreements are contracts among the Fund and a counterparty to exchange the return of the pre-determined underlying investment (such as the rate of return of the underlying index). Swap agreements may be negotiated bilaterally and traded OTC between two parties or, in some instances, must be exchange-traded through a futures commission merchant and/or cleared through a clearinghouse that serves as a central counterparty. Risks associated with the use of swap agreements are different from those associated with ordinary portfolio securities transactions, due in part to the fact they could be considered illiquid and many swaps trade on the OTC market. Swaps are particularly subject to counterparty credit, correlation, valuation, liquidity and leveraging risks. Certain standardized swaps are subject to mandatory exchange trading and central clearing. Exchange trading and central clearing are intended to reduce counterparty credit risk and increase liquidity but exchange trading and central clearing do not make swap transactions risk-free. Additionally, applicable regulators have adopted rules imposing certain margin requirements, including

PROSPECTUS | 56



minimums, on OTC swaps, which may result in the Fund and its counterparties posting higher margin amounts for OTC swaps.
Futures Contracts Risk—Futures contracts are exchange-traded contracts that call for the future delivery of an asset at a certain price and date, or cash settlement of the terms of the contract. Risks of futures contracts may be caused by an imperfect correlation between movements in the price of the instruments and the price of the underlying assets. In addition, there is the risk that the Fund may not be able to enter into a closing transaction because of an illiquid market. Exchanges can limit the number of positions that can be held or controlled by the Fund or its Investment Manager, thus limiting the ability to implement the Fund’s strategies. Futures markets are highly volatile and the use of futures may increase the volatility of the Fund’s NAV. Futures are also subject to leverage risks and to liquidity risk.
Options Risk—Options or options on futures contracts give the holder of the option the right, but not the obligation, to buy (or to sell) a position in a security or in a contract to the writer of the option, at a certain price. They are subject to correlation risk because there may be an imperfect correlation between the options and the securities markets that cause a given transaction to fail to achieve its objectives. The successful use of options depends on the Investment Manager’s ability to predict correctly future price fluctuations and the degree of correlation between the markets for options and the underlying instruments. Exchanges can limit the number of positions that can be held or controlled by the Fund or its Investment Manager, thus limiting the ability to implement the Fund’s strategies. Options are also particularly subject to leverage risk and can be subject to liquidity risk.
Dollar Roll Transaction Risk—The Fund may enter into dollar roll transactions, in which the Fund sells a mortgage-backed or other security for settlement on one date and buys back a substantially similar security for settlement at a later date. Dollar rolls involve a risk of loss if the market value of the securities that the Fund is committed to buy declines below the price of the securities the Fund has sold.
Emerging Markets RiskInvestments in or exposure to emerging markets are generally subject to a greater level of those risks associated with investing in or being exposed to developed foreign markets, as emerging markets are considered to be less developed than developing countries. Furthermore, investments in or exposure to emerging markets are generally subject to additional risks, including the risks associated with trading in smaller markets, lower volumes of trading, and being subject to lower levels of government regulation and less extensive accounting, financial and other reporting requirements.
Extension RiskCertain debt instruments, including mortgage- and other asset-backed securities, are subject to the risk that payments on principal may occur at a slower rate or later than expected.  In this event, the expected maturity could lengthen and the Fund’s investment may sharply decrease in value and the Fund’s income from the investment may quickly decline.  These types of instruments are particularly subject to extension risk, and offer less potential for gains, during periods of rising interest rates. In addition, the Fund may be delayed in its ability to reinvest income or proceeds from these instruments in potentially higher yielding investments, which would adversely affect the Fund.
Foreign Securities and Currency Risk—Foreign securities carry unique or additional risks when compared to U.S. securities, including currency fluctuations, adverse political and economic developments, unreliable or untimely information, less liquidity and more volatility, limited legal recourse and higher transactional costs.
Hedging Risk—The Fund may, but is not required to, engage in various investments or transactions that are designed to hedge a position that the Fund holds.  There can be no assurance that the Fund’s hedging investments or transactions will be effective.  Hedging investments or transactions involve costs and may reduce gains or result in losses, which may adversely affect the Fund.
High Yield and Unrated Securities Risk—High yield, below investment grade and unrated high risk debt securities (which also may be known as “junk bonds”) may present additional risks because these securities may be less liquid, and therefore more difficult to value accurately and sell at an advantageous price or time, and present more credit risk than investment grade bonds. The price of high yield securities tends to be subject to greater volatility due to issuer-specific operating results and outlook and to real or perceived adverse economic and competitive industry conditions. This exposure may be obtained through investments in other investment companies.
Interest Rate RiskInvestments in fixed-income instruments and other debt instruments are subject to the possibility that interest rates could rise sharply, which may cause the value of the Fund’s holdings and share price to decline. Changes in interest rates may also affect the liquidity of the Fund's investments in fixed-income instruments. The risks associated with rising interest rates are heightened given the recent near historically low interest rate environment and, as of the date of this prospectus, increasing interest rate environment. Interest rates may continue to rise in the future, possibly suddenly and significantly, with unpredictable effects on the financial markets and the

57 | PROSPECTUS




Fund’s investments. Fixed-income instruments with longer durations are subject to more volatility than those with shorter durations. During periods of rising interest rates, because changes in interest rates on adjustable rate securities may lag behind changes in market rates, the value of such securities may decline until their interest rates reset to market rates. During periods of declining interest rates, because the interest rates on adjustable rate securities generally reset downward, their market value is unlikely to rise to the same extent as the value of comparable fixed rate securities.
Investment in Investment Vehicles Risk—Investing in other investment vehicles, including ETFs, closed-end funds and other mutual funds, subjects the Fund to those risks affecting the investment vehicle, including the possibility that the value of the underlying securities held by the investment vehicle could decrease or the portfolio becomes illiquid. Moreover, the Fund and its shareholders will incur its pro rata share of the underlying vehicles’ expenses, which will reduce the Fund’s performance. In addition, investments in an ETF are subject to, among other risks, the risk that the ETF's shares may trade at a discount or premium relative to the net asset value of the shares and the listing exchange may halt trading of the ETF's shares.
Investment in Loans Risk—The Fund may invest in loans through assignments, participations or directly. Investments in loans, including loan syndicates and other direct lending opportunities, involve special types of risks, including credit risk, interest rate risk, counterparty risk and prepayment risk. Loans may offer a fixed or floating interest rate. Loans are often generally below investment grade and may be unrated. The Fund’s investments in loans can also be difficult to value accurately and may be more susceptible to liquidity risk than fixed-income instruments of similar credit quality and/or maturity. The Fund is also subject to the risk that the value of any collateral for the loan may be insufficient or unavailable to cover the borrower’s obligations should the borrower fail to make payments, become insolvent, or otherwise default. Participations in loans may subject the Fund to the credit risk of both the borrower and the issuer of the participation and may make enforcement of loan covenants, if any, more difficult for the Fund as legal action may have to go through the issuer of the participation (or an agent acting on its behalf). Transactions in loans are often subject to long settlement periods, thus potentially limiting the ability of the Fund to invest sale proceeds in other investments and to use proceeds to meet its current redemption obligations.
Leverage Risk—The Fund’s use of leverage, through borrowings or instruments such as derivatives, may cause the Fund to be more volatile and riskier than if it had not been leveraged.
Liquidity and Valuation RiskIt may be difficult for the Fund to purchase and sell particular investments within a reasonable time at a fair price, or the price at which it has been valued by the Investment Manager for purposes of the Fund’s net asset value, causing the Fund to be less liquid and unable to realize what the Investment Manager believes should be the price of the investment. Valuation of portfolio investments may be difficult, such as during periods of market turmoil or reduced liquidity, and for investments that may, for example, trade infrequently or irregularly. In these and other circumstances, an investment may be valued using fair value methodologies, which are inherently subjective, reflect good faith judgments based on available information and may not accurately estimate the price at which the Fund could sell the investment at that time. These risks may be heightened for fixed-income instruments because of the near historically low interest rate environment as of the date of this prospectus. Based on its investment strategies, a significant portion of the Fund's investments can be difficult to value and potentially less liquid and thus particularly prone to the foregoing risks.
Management Risk—The Fund is actively managed, which means that investment decisions are made based on investment views. There is no guarantee that the investment views will produce the desired results or expected returns, causing the Fund to fail to meet its investment objective or underperform its benchmark index or funds with similar investment objectives and strategies. Furthermore, active and frequent trading that can accompany active management, also called “high turnover,” may have a negative impact on performance. Active and frequent trading may result in higher brokerage costs or mark-up charges, which are ultimately passed on to shareholders of the Fund. Active and frequent trading may also result in adverse tax consequences.
Market Risk—The value of, or income generated by, the securities held by the Fund may fluctuate rapidly and unpredictably as a result of factors affecting individual companies or changing economic, political, social or financial market conditions throughout the world. The performance of these investments may underperform the general securities markets or other types of securities.
Municipal Securities RiskMunicipal securities are subject to a variety of risks, including credit, interest, prepayment, liquidity, and valuation risks. In addition, municipal securities can be adversely affected by (i) unfavorable legislative, political, or other developments or events, including natural disasters, and (ii) changes in the economic and fiscal conditions of state and municipal issuers or the federal government in case it provides financial support to such issuers. To the extent the Fund invests a substantial portion of its assets in securities issued by a particular state or municipality, the Fund will be particularly sensitive to developments and events adversely affecting such issuer. Certain sectors of the municipal bond market have special risks that can affect them more significantly than the

PROSPECTUS | 58



market as a whole. Because many municipal instruments are issued to finance similar projects, conditions in these industries can significantly affect the overall municipal market. Municipal securities that are insured by an insurer may be adversely affected by developments relevant to that particular insurer, or more general developments relevant to the market as a whole. Municipal securities can be difficult to value and be less liquid than other investments, which may affect performance or the ability to meet fund redemption requests.
Preferred Securities Risk—A company’s preferred stock generally pays dividends only after the company makes required payments to holders of its bonds and other debt. For this reason, the value of preferred stock will usually react more strongly than bonds and other debt to actual or perceived changes in the company’s financial condition or prospects.
Prepayment RiskCertain debt instruments, including loans and mortgage- and other asset-backed securities, are subject to the risk that payments on principal may occur more quickly or earlier than expected.  In this event, the Fund might be forced to forego future interest income on the principal repaid early and to reinvest income or proceeds at generally lower interest rates, thus reducing the Fund’s yield.  These types of instruments are particularly subject to prepayment risk, and offer less potential for gains, during periods of declining interest rates.
Real Estate Securities Risk—The Fund may invest in securities of real estate companies and companies related to the real estate industry, including real estate investment trusts (“REITs”), which are subject to the same risks as direct investments in real estate. The real estate industry is particularly sensitive to economic downturns.
Regulatory and Legal RiskU.S. and non-U.S. governmental agencies and other regulators regularly implement additional regulations and legislators pass new laws that affect the investments held by the Fund, the strategies used by the Fund or the level of regulation or taxation applying to the Fund (such as regulations related to investments in derivatives and other transactions). These regulations and laws impact the investment strategies, performance, costs and operations of the Fund or taxation of shareholders.
Repurchase Agreements and Reverse Repurchase Agreements Risk—In the event of the insolvency of the counterparty to a repurchase agreement or reverse repurchase agreement, recovery of the repurchase price owed to the Fund or, in the case of a reverse repurchase agreement, the securities sold by the Fund, may be delayed. Because reverse repurchase agreements may be considered to be the practical equivalent of borrowing funds, they constitute a form of leverage. If the Fund reinvests the proceeds of a reverse repurchase agreement at a rate lower than the cost of the agreement, entering into the agreement will lower the Fund’s yield.
Restricted Securities Risk—Restricted securities generally cannot be sold to the public and may involve a high degree of business, financial and liquidity risk, which may result in substantial losses to the Fund.
Sovereign Debt RiskThe debt securities issued by sovereign entities may decline as a result of default or other adverse credit event resulting from a sovereign debtor's unwillingness or inability to repay principal and pay interest in a timely manner, which may be affected by a variety of factors, including its cash flow situation, the extent of its reserves, the availability of sufficient foreign exchange on the date a payment is due, the relative size of the debt service burden to the economy as a whole, the sovereign debtor's policy toward international lenders, and the political constraints to which a sovereign debtor may be subject. Sovereign debt risk is increased for emerging market issuers.
To-Be-Announced (“TBA”) Transactions Risk—The Fund may enter into “To Be Announced” (“TBA”) transactions to purchase or sell mortgage-backed securities for a fixed price at a future date. TBA purchase commitments involve a risk of loss if the value of the securities to be purchased declines prior to settlement date or if the counterparty may not deliver the securities as promised. Selling a TBA involves a risk of loss if the value of the securities to be sold goes up prior to settlement date. Recently finalized FINRA rules include mandatory margin requirements that will require the Fund to post collateral in connection with its TBA transactions, which could increase the cost of TBA transactions to the Fund and impose added operational complexity.
U.S. Government Securities Risk—U.S. government securities may or may not be backed by the full faith and credit of the U.S. government. U.S. government securities are subject to the risks associated with fixed-income and debt securities, particularly interest rate risk and credit risk.
Zero Coupon and Payment-In-Kind Securities Risk—Zero coupon and payment-in-kind securities pay no cash interest income and usually are sold at substantial discounts from their value at maturity. Zero coupon and payment-in-kind securities are subject to greater market value fluctuations from changing interest rates than debt obligations of comparable maturities, which make current cash-pay interest payments.
PERFORMANCE INFORMATION
The following chart and table provide some indication of the risks of investing in the Fund by showing the Fund’s Class A share calendar year performance from year to year and average annual returns for the one, five and ten year

59 | PROSPECTUS




or since inception periods (if shorter), as applicable, for the Fund’s Class A, Class C, Institutional Class, and Class P shares compared to those of a broad measure of market performance. As with all mutual funds, past performance (before and after taxes) is not necessarily an indication of how the Fund will perform in the future. Updated performance information is available on the Fund’s website at www.guggenheiminvestments.com or by calling 800.820.0888.
The bar chart does not reflect the impact of the sales charge applicable to Class A shares which, if reflected, would lower the returns shown.

chart-46bc851b030e59e3a74.jpg
Highest Quarter Return
Q3 2012 3.94%
  
Lowest Quarter Return
Q2 2013 -2.09%
AVERAGE ANNUAL TOTAL RETURNS (for the periods ended December 31, 2018)
After-tax returns shown in the table are calculated using the historical highest individual federal marginal income tax rates and do not reflect the impact of any state or local taxes. Actual after-tax returns depend on an investor’s tax situation and may differ from those shown. After-tax returns shown are not relevant to investors who hold their Fund shares through tax-deferred arrangements, such as 401(k) plans or individual retirement accounts (“IRAs”). After-tax returns are shown for Class A only. After-tax returns for Class C, Institutional Class, and Class P will vary. The returns shown below reflect applicable sales charges, if any.
 
Inception
1 Year
5 Years or Since Inception
10 Years or Since Inception
Class A
11/30/2011
 
 
 
Return Before Taxes
 
-3.37%
3.21%
4.36%
Return After Taxes on Distributions
 
-4.54%
1.54%
2.60%
Return After Taxes on Distributions and Sale of Fund Shares
 
-2.00%
1.69%
2.56%
Class C
11/30/2011
-1.09%
3.46%
4.31%
Institutional Class
11/30/2011
0.93%
4.58%
5.44%
Class P
5/1/2015
0.64%
3.23%
N/A
Index
 
 
 
 
Bloomberg Barclays U.S. Aggregate Bond Index (reflects no deductions for fees, expenses or taxes)
 
0.01%
2.52%
2.23%
MANAGEMENT OF THE FUND
Guggenheim Partners Investment Management, LLC, also known as Guggenheim Investments, serves as the investment manager of the Fund. B. Scott Minerd, Anne B. Walsh, Steven H. Brown and Adam Bloch are primarily responsible for the day-to­-day management of the Fund. They hold the titles of Chairman, Global Chief Investment Officer, Managing Partner and Portfolio Manager; Chief Investment Officer, Fixed Income, Senior Managing Director

PROSPECTUS | 60



and Portfolio Manager; Managing Director and Portfolio Manager; and Director and Portfolio Manager, respectively, with the Investment Manager. B. Scott Minerd and Anne B. Walsh have managed the Fund since 2011. Steven H. Brown and Adam Bloch have managed the Fund since 2016.
PURCHASE AND SALE OF FUND SHARES
You may purchase or redeem Fund shares through your broker/dealer, other financial intermediary that has an agreement with Guggenheim Funds Distributors, LLC, the Fund’s distributor, or, for shares of each class other than Class P shares, through the Fund’s transfer agent. You may purchase, redeem or exchange shares of any class of the Fund on any day the New York Stock Exchange is open for business. The minimum initial investment for Class A and Class C shares is $2,500. The minimum subsequent investment is $100. Class A and Class C do not have a minimum account balance.
The Institutional Class minimum initial investment is $2 million, although the Investment Manager may waive this requirement at its discretion. The Institutional Class has a minimum account balance of $1 million. Due to the relatively high cost of maintaining accounts below the minimum account balance, the Fund reserves the right to redeem shares if an account balance falls below the minimum account balance for any reason. Investors will be given 60 days notice to reestablish the minimum account balance. If the account balance is not increased, the account may be closed and the proceeds sent to the investor. Institutional Class shares of the Fund will be redeemed at net asset value on the day the account is closed.
Class P shares of the Fund are offered through broker/dealers and other financial intermediaries with which Guggenheim Funds Distributors, LLC has an agreement for the use of Class P shares of the Fund in investment products, programs or accounts. Class P shares do not have a minimum initial investment amount, subsequent investment amount or a minimum account balance. The Fund reserves the right to modify its minimum investment amount and account balance requirements at any time, with or without prior notice to you.
TAX INFORMATION
Fund distributions are taxable as ordinary income or capital gains (or a combination of both), unless your investment is through an IRA or other tax-advantaged retirement account. Investments through tax-advantaged accounts may sometimes become taxable upon withdrawal.
PAYMENTS TO BROKER/DEALERS AND OTHER FINANCIAL INTERMEDIARIES
If you purchase Fund shares through a broker/dealer or other financial intermediary, the Fund and its related companies may pay the intermediary for the sale of Fund shares and related services. These payments may create a conflict of interest by influencing the broker/dealer or other intermediary and your sales person to recommend the Fund over another investment. Ask your sales person or visit your financial intermediary’s website for more information.


61 | PROSPECTUS





Guggenheim Ultra Short Duration Fund

INVESTMENT OBJECTIVE
The Guggenheim Ultra Short Duration Fund (the “Fund”) seeks a high level of income consistent with the preservation of capital.
FEES AND EXPENSES OF THE FUND
This table describes the fees and expenses that you may pay if you buy and hold shares of the Fund. You may be required to pay a commission to your financial intermediary for effecting transactions in a class of shares of the Fund without any initial sales charge, contingent deferred sales charge, or other asset-based fee for sales or distribution.  These commissions are not reflected in the fee and expense table or expense example below.
 
Class A
Institutional Class
Class P
SHAREHOLDER FEES (fees paid directly from your investment)
 
 
 
Maximum Sales Charge (Load) Imposed on Purchases (as a percentage of offering price)
None
None
None
Maximum Deferred Sales Charge (Load) (as a percentage of original purchase price or redemption proceeds, whichever is lower)
None*
None
None
*
No contingent deferred sales charge is imposed on redemptions of Class A shares of the Fund unless you acquire Class A shares of the Fund by exchanging Class A shares of another fund in the Guggenheim family of funds that was subject to a contingent deferred sales charge.

ANNUAL FUND OPERATING EXPENSES (expenses that you pay each year as a percentage of the value of your investment)
Management Fees
0.25%
0.25%
0.25%
Distribution and Service (12b-1) Fees
0.25%
None
0.25%
Other Expenses1
0.23%
0.20%
0.25%
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses
0.73%
0.45%
0.75%
Fee Waiver (and/or expense reimbursement)2
-0.15%
-0.12%
-0.17%
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses After Fee Waiver (and/or expense reimbursement)
0.58%
0.33%
0.58%
1 
Other expenses are based on estimated amounts for the current fiscal year.
2 
Guggenheim Partners Investment Management, LLC, also known as Guggenheim Investments (the "Investment Manager") has contractually agreed through February 1, 2020 to waive fees and/or reimburse expenses to the extent necessary to limit the ordinary operating expenses (including distribution (12b-1) fees (if any), but exclusive of brokerage costs, dividends on securities sold short, acquired fund fees and expenses, interest, taxes, litigation, indemnification, and extraordinary expenses) (“Operating Expenses”) of the Fund to the annual percentage of average daily net assets for each class of shares as follows: Class A-0.58%, Institutional Class-0.33%, and Class P-0.58%. The Investment Manager is entitled to reimbursement by the Fund of fees waived or expenses reimbursed during any of the previous 36 months beginning on the date of the expense limitation agreement, provided that the Operating Expenses do not exceed the then-applicable expense cap. The agreement will expire when it reaches its termination or when the Investment Manager ceases to serve as such and it can be terminated by the Fund’s Board of Trustees, with certain waived fees and reimbursed expenses subject to the recoupment rights of the Investment Manager.
EXAMPLE
This Example is intended to help you compare the cost of investing in the Fund with the cost of investing in other mutual funds.
The Example assumes that you invest $10,000 in the Fund for the time periods indicated. The Example also assumes that your investment has a 5% return each year and that the Fund’s operating expenses remain the same. Although the actual costs may be higher or lower, based on these assumptions your costs (whether or not you redeem your shares at the end of the given period) would be: