Hartford Funds Exchange-Traded Trust
Hartford Exchange-Traded Funds
Prospectus
November 24, 2021
Ticker
Exchange
Hartford Core Bond ETF
HCRB
Cboe BZX
Hartford Municipal Opportunities ETF
HMOP
NYSE Arca
Hartford Short Duration ETF
HSRT
Cboe BZX
Hartford Schroders Tax-Aware Bond ETF
HTAB
NYSE Arca
Hartford Total Return Bond ETF
HTRB
NYSE Arca
Neither the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission nor the U.S. Commodity Futures Trading Commission has approved or disapproved these securities, or determined if this prospectus is truthful or complete. Any representation to the contrary is a criminal offense. Because you could lose money by investing in the Funds, be sure to read all risk disclosures carefully before investing.


Hartford Core Bond ETF Summary Section
INVESTMENT OBJECTIVE. The Fund seeks to provide long-term total return.
YOUR EXPENSES. The table below describes the fees and expenses that you may pay if you buy, hold and sell shares of the Fund. You may pay other fees, such as brokerage commissions and other fees to financial intermediaries, which are not reflected in the table or the example below.
Annual Fund Operating Expenses (expenses that you pay each year as a percentage of the value of your investment):
Management fees
0.29%
Distribution and service (12b-1) fees
None
Other expenses
0.00%
Total annual fund operating expenses
0.29%
Example. The examples below are intended to help you compare the cost of investing in the Fund with the cost of investing in other exchange-traded funds. The examples assume that:
Your investment has a 5% return each year
The Fund’s operating expenses remain the same
Your actual costs may be higher or lower. Based on these assumptions, for every $10,000 invested, you would pay the following expenses if you sell all of your shares at the end of each time period indicated:
Year 1
Year 3
Year 5
Year 10
$ 30
$ 93
$ 163
$368
Portfolio Turnover. The Fund pays transaction costs, such as commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or “turns over” its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover rate may indicate higher transaction costs and may result in higher taxes when Fund shares are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are not reflected in annual fund operating expenses or in the examples, affect the Fund’s performance. During the fiscal year ended July 31, 2021, the Fund’s portfolio turnover rate was 30% (excluding to be announced (TBA) roll transactions) of the average value of its portfolio. If TBA roll transactions were included, the Fund’s portfolio turnover rate would have been 362% of the average value of its portfolio.
PRINCIPAL INVESTMENT STRATEGY. The Fund seeks to achieve its investment objective by investing in fixed income securities that Wellington Management Company LLP (“Wellington Management”) considers to be attractive from a total return perspective. The Fund invests, under normal circumstances, at least 80% of its net assets (including any borrowings for investment purposes) in fixed-income securities. The Fund will invest primarily in investment grade fixed income securities. The Fund may invest in securities and other instruments issued by both U.S. and foreign issuers.
The fixed income securities in which the Fund may invest include, but are not limited to, (1) securities issued or guaranteed as to principal or interest by the U.S. Government, its agencies or instrumentalities; (2) non-convertible and convertible debt securities issued or guaranteed by U.S. corporations or other issuers (including foreign issuers); (3) asset-backed and mortgage-related securities, including collateralized mortgage and loan obligations; and (4) securities and loans issued or guaranteed as to principal or interest by a sovereign government or one of its agencies or political subdivisions (including quasi-sovereigns), supranational entities such as development banks, non-U.S. corporations, banks or bank holding companies, or other foreign issuers.
The Fund may use derivatives to manage portfolio risk or for other investment purposes. The derivatives in which the Fund may invest include, but are not limited to, futures and options contracts and various types of swap agreements. Additionally, the Fund may invest up to 25% of its net assets in debt securities, primarily U.S. dollar denominated debt securities, of foreign issuers. The Fund may purchase or sell securities on a when-issued, delayed delivery or forward commitment basis, including securities acquired or sold in the “to be announced” (TBA) market. The Fund may invest in “Rule 144A” securities, which are privately placed, restricted securities that may only be resold under certain circumstances to other qualified institutional buyers. The Fund may trade securities actively. Although the Fund may invest in securities and other instruments of any maturity or duration, the Fund normally invests in debt securities with
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a maturity of at least one year and maintains an average duration within 1.5 years of the Bloomberg U.S. Aggregate Bond Index, the Fund’s performance benchmark. As of September 30, 2021, the average duration of the Bloomberg U.S. Aggregate Bond Index was 6.69 years. There is no limit on the average maturity of the Fund’s portfolio.
The investment team is organized with generalist portfolio managers leading sector, rates and risk positioning decisions. The portfolio managers may allocate a portion of the Fund’s assets to specialists within Wellington Management who drive individual sector and security selection strategies.
PRINCIPAL RISKS. The principal risks of investing in the Fund are described below. When you sell your shares they may be worth more or less than what you paid for them, which means that you could lose money as a result of your investment. An investment in the Fund is not a bank deposit and is not insured or guaranteed by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation or any other government agency. As with any fund, there is no guarantee that the Fund will achieve its investment objective.
Market Risk –  Market risk is the risk that one or more markets in which the Fund invests will go down in value, including the possibility that the markets will go down sharply and unpredictably. Securities of a company may decline in value due to its financial prospects and activities, including certain operational impacts, such as data breaches and cybersecurity attacks. Securities may also decline in value due to general market and economic movements and trends, including adverse changes to credit markets, or as a result of other events such as geopolitical events, natural disasters, or widespread pandemics (such as COVID-19) or other adverse public health developments.
Interest Rate Risk –  The risk that your investment may go down in value when interest rates rise, because when interest rates rise, the prices of bonds and fixed rate loans fall. A wide variety of factors can cause interest rates to rise, including central bank monetary policies and inflation rates. Generally, the longer the maturity of a bond or fixed rate loan, the more sensitive it is to this risk. Falling interest rates also create the potential for a decline in the Fund’s income. These risks are greater during periods of rising inflation. Volatility in interest rates and in fixed income markets may increase the risk that the Fund’s investment in fixed income securities will go down in value. Risks associated with rising interest rates are currently heightened because interest rates in the U.S. remain near historic lows and inflation has begun to increase. Actions taken by the Federal Reserve Board or foreign central banks to stimulate or stabilize economic growth, such as decreases or increases in short-term interest rates, may adversely affect markets, which could, in turn, negatively impact Fund performance.
Credit Risk –  Credit risk is the risk that the issuer of a security or other instrument will not be able to make principal and interest payments when due. Changes in an issuer’s financial strength, credit rating or the market’s perception of an issuer’s creditworthiness may also affect the value of the Fund’s investment in that issuer. The degree of credit risk depends on both the financial condition of the issuer and the terms of the obligation. Periods of market volatility may increase credit risk.
Derivatives Risk –  Derivatives are instruments whose value depends on, or is derived from, the value of an underlying asset, reference rate or index. Derivatives may be riskier than other types of investments because they may be more sensitive to changes in economic or market conditions than other types of investments and could result in losses that significantly exceed the Fund’s original investment. Successful use of derivative instruments by the Fund depends on the sub-adviser’s judgment with respect to a number of factors and the Fund’s performance could be worse and/or more volatile than if it had not used these instruments. In addition, the fluctuations in the value of derivatives may not correlate perfectly with the value of any portfolio assets being hedged, the performance of the asset class to which the sub-adviser seeks exposure, or the overall securities markets.
Leverage Risk –  Certain transactions, such as the use of derivatives, may give rise to leverage. Leverage can increase market exposure, increase volatility in the Fund, magnify investment risks, and cause losses to be realized more quickly. The use of leverage may cause the Fund to liquidate portfolio positions to satisfy its obligations or to meet asset segregation requirements when it may not be advantageous to do so.
Futures and Options Risk –  Futures and options may be more volatile than direct investments in the securities underlying the futures and options, may not correlate perfectly to the underlying securities, may involve additional costs, and may be illiquid. Futures and options also may involve the use of leverage as the Fund may make a small initial investment relative to the risk assumed, which could result in losses greater than if futures or options had not been used. Futures and options are also subject to the risk that the other party to the transaction may default on its obligation.
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Swaps Risk –  A swap is a contract that generally obligates the parties to exchange payments based on a specified reference security, basket of securities, security index or index component. Swaps can involve greater risks than direct investment in securities because swaps may be leveraged and are subject to counterparty risk (e.g., the risk of a counterparty defaulting on the obligation or bankruptcy), credit risk and pricing risk (i.e., swaps may be difficult to value). Certain swaps may also be considered illiquid. It may not be possible for the Fund to liquidate a swap position at an advantageous time or price, which may result in significant losses.
Call Risk –  Call risk is the risk that an issuer, especially during a period of falling interest rates, may redeem a security by repaying it early, which may reduce the Fund’s income if the proceeds are reinvested at lower interest rates.
Active Investment Management Risk –  The risk that, if the sub-adviser’s investment strategy, including allocating assets to specialist portfolio managers, does not perform as expected, the Fund could underperform its peers or lose money. The investment styles employed by the specialist portfolio managers may not be complementary, which could adversely affect the performance of the Fund.
Liquidity Risk –  The risk that the market for a particular investment or type of investment is or becomes relatively illiquid, making it difficult for the Fund to sell that investment at an advantageous time or price. Illiquidity may be due to events relating to the issuer of the securities, market events, rising interest rates, economic conditions or investor perceptions. Illiquid securities may be difficult to value and their value may be lower than the market price of comparable liquid securities, which would negatively affect the Fund’s performance.
Foreign Investments Risk –  Investments in foreign securities may be riskier, more volatile, and less liquid than investments in U.S. securities. Differences between the U.S. and foreign regulatory regimes and securities markets, including the less stringent investor protection, less stringent accounting, corporate governance, financial reporting and disclosure standards of some foreign markets, as well as political and economic developments in foreign countries and regions and the U.S. (including the imposition of sanctions, tariffs, or other governmental restrictions), may affect the value of the Fund’s investments in foreign securities. Changes in currency exchange rates may also adversely affect the Fund’s foreign investments. The impact of the United Kingdom’s departure from the European Union, commonly known as “Brexit,” and the potential departure of one or more other countries from the European Union may have significant political and financial consequences for global markets. This may adversely impact Fund performance.
Mortgage-Related and Asset-Backed Securities Risk –  Mortgage-related and asset-backed securities represent interests in “pools” of mortgages or other assets, including consumer loans or receivables held in trust. These mortgage-related or asset-backed securities are subject to credit risk, interest rate risk, “prepayment risk” (the risk that borrowers will repay a loan more quickly in periods of falling interest rates) and “extension risk” (the risk that borrowers will repay a loan more slowly in periods of rising interest rates). If the Fund invests in mortgage-related or asset-backed securities that are subordinated to other interests in the same mortgage or asset pool, the Fund may only receive payments after the pool’s obligations to other investors have been satisfied. An unexpectedly high rate of defaults on the mortgages held by a mortgage pool may limit substantially the pool’s ability to make payments of principal or interest to the Fund, reducing the values of those securities or in some cases rendering them worthless. The risk of such defaults is generally higher in the case of mortgage pools that include so-called “subprime” mortgages. The Fund may purchase or sell mortgage-backed securities on a delayed delivery or forward commitment basis through the TBA market.
Uniform Mortgage-Backed Securities, which generally align the characteristics of Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac certificates, are a recent innovation and the effect they may have on the market for mortgage-related securities is uncertain.
Collateralized Loan Obligations Risk –  Collateralized loan obligations (“CLOs”) bear many of the same risks as other forms of asset-backed securities. As they are backed by pools of loans, CLOs also bear similar risks to investing in loans directly. CLOs may experience substantial losses attributable to loan defaults. Losses caused by defaults on underlying assets are borne first by the holders of subordinate tranches. The Fund’s investment in CLOs may decrease in market value when the CLO experiences loan defaults or credit impairment, the disappearance of a subordinate tranche, or market anticipation of defaults and investor aversion to CLO securities as a class.
To Be Announced (TBA) Transactions Risk –  TBA investments include when-issued and delayed delivery securities and forward commitments. TBA transactions involve the risk that the security the Fund buys will lose value prior to its delivery. The Fund is subject to this risk whether or not the Fund takes delivery of the securities on the settlement date for a transaction. There also is the risk that the security will not be issued or that the other party to the transaction will
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not meet its obligation. If this occurs, the Fund loses both the investment opportunity for the assets it set aside to pay for the security and any gain in the security’s price. The Fund may also take a short position in a TBA investment when it owns or has the right to obtain, at no added cost, identical securities. If the Fund takes such a short position, it may reduce the risk of a loss if the price of the securities declines in the future, but will lose the opportunity to profit if the price rises. TBA transactions may also result in a higher portfolio turnover rate and/or increased capital gains for the Fund.
Restricted Securities Risk –  Restricted securities are subject to the risk that they may be difficult to sell at the time and price the Fund prefers.
Event Risk –  Event risk is the risk that corporate issuers may undergo restructurings, such as mergers, leveraged buyouts, takeovers, or similar events financed by increased debt. As a result of the added debt, the credit quality and market value of a company’s bonds and/or other debt securities may decline significantly.
U.S. Government Securities Risk –  Treasury obligations may differ in their interest rates, maturities, times of issuance and other characteristics. Securities backed by the U.S. Treasury or the full faith and credit of the United States are guaranteed only as to the timely payment of interest and principal when held to maturity. Accordingly, the current market values for these securities will fluctuate with changes in interest rates. Obligations of U.S. Government agencies and authorities are supported by varying degrees of credit but generally are not backed by the full faith and credit of the U.S. Government. No assurance can be given that the U.S. Government will provide financial support to its agencies and authorities if it is not obligated by law to do so. In addition, the value of U.S. Government securities may be affected by changes in the credit rating of the U.S. Government. U.S. Government securities are also subject to the risk that the U.S. Treasury will be unable to meet its payment obligations.
Market Price Risk –  The net asset value (“NAV”) of the Fund’s shares and the value of your investment may fluctuate. The market prices of the Fund’s shares will generally fluctuate in accordance with changes in NAV and changes in the intraday value of the Fund’s holdings, as well as the relative supply of and demand for the shares on the Fund’s listing exchange. Although it is expected that the Fund’s shares will remain listed on the exchange, disruptions to creations and redemptions, the existence of market volatility or lack of an active trading market for the shares (including through a trading halt), as well as other factors, may result in the shares trading significantly above (at a premium to) or below (at a discount to) the Fund’s NAV or the intraday value of the Fund’s holdings. During such periods, you may be unable to sell your shares or may incur significant losses if you sell your shares. There are various methods by which investors can purchase and sell shares and various types of orders that may be placed. Investors should consult their financial intermediary before purchasing or selling shares of the Fund. Neither the investment manager nor the Fund’s Sub-Adviser can predict whether the Fund’s shares will trade below, at or above their NAV. Price differences may be due, in large part, to the fact that supply and demand forces at work in the secondary trading market for the Fund’s shares will be closely related to, but not identical to, the same forces influencing the prices of the Fund’s holdings trading individually or in the aggregate at any point in time. In addition, unlike many ETFs, the Fund is not an index fund. The Fund is actively managed and does not seek to replicate the performance of a specified index. There can be no assurance as to whether and/or to what extent the Fund’s shares will trade at premiums or discounts to NAV or to the intraday value of the Fund’s holdings.
Cash Transactions Risk –  The Fund, unlike certain other ETFs, may effect creations and redemptions partly or wholly for cash, rather than through in-kind distributions of securities. Because the Fund may effect redemptions for cash rather than in-kind, the Fund may be required to sell portfolio securities in order to obtain the cash needed to distribute redemption proceeds and it may subsequently recognize gains on such sales that the Fund might not have recognized if it were to distribute portfolio securities in-kind. As a result, an investment in the Fund may be less tax-efficient than an investment in an ETF that primarily or wholly effects creations and redemptions in-kind. Moreover, cash transactions may have to be carried out over several days if the securities markets are relatively illiquid at the time the Fund must sell securities and may involve considerable brokerage fees and taxes. These brokerage fees and taxes, which will be higher than if the Fund sold and redeemed its shares principally in-kind, will be passed on to purchasers and redeemers of Creation Units in the form of creation and redemption transaction fees. As a result of these factors, the spreads between the bid and the offered prices of the Fund’s shares may be wider than those of shares of ETFs that primarily or wholly transact in-kind.
Authorized Participant Concentration Risk –  Only an authorized participant may engage in creation or redemption transactions directly with the Fund. The Fund has a limited number of intermediaries that act as authorized participants, and none of these authorized participants are or will be obligated to engage in creation or redemption
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transactions. To the extent that these intermediaries exit the business or are unable to or choose not to proceed with creation and/or redemption orders with respect to the Fund and no other authorized participant is able to step forward to create or redeem, Fund shares may trade at a discount to NAV and possibly face trading halts and/or delisting.
Active Trading Risk –  Active trading could increase the Fund’s transaction costs and may increase your tax liability as compared to a fund with less active trading policies. These effects may adversely affect Fund performance.
The Fund is subject to certain other risks, which are discussed in “Additional Information Regarding Investment Strategies and Risks” in the Fund’s statutory prospectus.
PAST PERFORMANCE. Because the Fund had been in operation for less than one full calendar year as of December 31, 2020, no performance history has been provided. Updated performance information is available at hartfordfunds.com. Keep in mind that past performance does not indicate future results.
MANAGEMENT. The Fund’s investment manager is Hartford Funds Management Company, LLC. The Fund’s sub-adviser is Wellington Management.
Portfolio Manager
Title
Involved with Fund Since
Joseph F. Marvan, CFA
Senior Managing Director and Fixed Income Portfolio Manager
2020
Campe Goodman, CFA
Senior Managing Director and Fixed Income Portfolio Manager
2020
Robert D. Burn, CFA
Managing Director and Fixed Income Portfolio Manager
2020
PURCHASE AND SALE OF FUND SHARES. The Fund is an exchange-traded fund (“ETF”). Individual Fund shares may only be purchased and sold on a national securities exchange through a broker-dealer and may not be purchased or redeemed directly with the Fund. The price of Fund shares is based on market price, and because ETF shares trade at market prices rather than at NAV, shares may trade at a price greater than NAV (a premium) or less than NAV (a discount). When buying and selling Fund shares on an exchange, therefore, investors may incur costs related to the difference between the highest price a buyer is willing to pay to purchase Fund shares (bid) and the lowest price a seller is willing to accept for Fund shares (ask) (the “bid-ask spread”). The Fund will only issue or redeem shares at NAV that have been aggregated into blocks of shares (“Creation Units”) to authorized participants (“Authorized Participants”) who have entered into participation agreements with the Fund‘s distributor, ALPS Distributors, Inc. (the “Distributor”). The Fund will issue or redeem Creation Units in return for a basket of securities and/or cash that the Fund specifies each business day. Additional information about the Fund, including the Fund’s net asset value, market price, premiums and discounts and bid-ask spreads can be found at hartfordfunds.com.
TAX INFORMATION. The Fund’s distributions are generally taxable, and may be taxed as ordinary income or capital gains, unless you are investing through a tax-deferred arrangement, such as a 401(k) plan or an individual retirement account. Such tax-deferred arrangements may be taxed later upon withdrawal of monies from those arrangements.
PAYMENTS TO BROKER-DEALERS AND OTHER FINANCIAL INTERMEDIARIES. If you purchase shares of the Fund through a broker-dealer or other financial intermediary (such as a bank or financial advisor), the Fund’s related companies may pay the intermediary for services and/or data related to the sale of Fund shares. These payments may create a conflict of interest by influencing the broker-dealer or other intermediary and your financial advisor to recommend the Fund over another investment. Ask your financial advisor or visit your financial intermediary’s website for more information.
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Hartford Municipal Opportunities ETF Summary Section
INVESTMENT OBJECTIVE. The Fund seeks to provide current income that is generally exempt from federal income taxes and long-term total return.
YOUR EXPENSES. The table below describes the fees and expenses that you may pay if you buy, hold and sell shares of the Fund. You may pay other fees, such as brokerage commissions and other fees to financial intermediaries, which are not reflected in the table or the example below.
Annual Fund Operating Expenses (expenses that you pay each year as a percentage of the value of your investment):
Management fees
0.29%
Distribution and service (12b-1) fees
None
Other expenses
0.00%
Total annual fund operating expenses
0.29%
Example. The examples below are intended to help you compare the cost of investing in the Fund with the cost of investing in other exchange-traded funds. The examples assume that:
Your investment has a 5% return each year
The Fund’s operating expenses remain the same
Your actual costs may be higher or lower. Based on these assumptions, for every $10,000 invested, you would pay the following expenses if you sell all of your shares at the end of each time period indicated:
Year 1
Year 3
Year 5
Year 10
$ 30
$ 93
$ 163
$368
Portfolio Turnover. The Fund pays transaction costs, such as commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or “turns over” its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover rate may indicate higher transaction costs and may result in higher taxes when Fund shares are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are not reflected in annual fund operating expenses or in the examples, affect the Fund’s performance. During the fiscal year ended July 31, 2021, the Fund’s portfolio turnover rate was 17% of the average value of its portfolio.
PRINCIPAL INVESTMENT STRATEGY. The Fund seeks to achieve its investment objective by investing in investment grade and non-investment grade municipal securities (known as “junk bonds”) that the sub-adviser, Wellington Management Company LLP (“Wellington Management”), considers to be attractive from a yield perspective while considering total return. At least 80% of the Fund’s net assets must be invested in municipal securities, and up to 35% of the Fund’s net assets may be invested in non-investment grade municipal securities. The Fund may invest in securities that produce income subject to income tax, including the Alternative Minimum Tax. The Fund will generally hold a diversified portfolio of investments across states and sectors, although the Fund is not required to invest in all states and sectors at all times. The Fund may invest in securities of any maturity or duration.
Wellington Management’s portfolio construction process combines a top-down strategy, bottom-up fundamental research and comprehensive risk management. Bottom-up, internally generated, fundamental research attempts to identify relative value among sectors, within sectors, and between individual securities. Wellington Management considers financially material environmental, social and/or governance (“ESG”) factors during its research process. The factors that Wellington Management considers as part of its fundamental analysis, including the assessment of financially materially ESG factors, contribute to its overall evaluation of an issuer’s risk and return potential.
PRINCIPAL RISKS. The principal risks of investing in the Fund are described below. When you sell your shares they may be worth more or less than what you paid for them, which means that you could lose money as a result of your investment. An investment in the Fund is not a bank deposit and is not insured or guaranteed by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation or any other government agency. As with any fund, there is no guarantee that the Fund will achieve its investment objective. For more information regarding risks and investment matters please see “Additional Information Regarding Investment Strategies and Risks” in the Fund’s statutory prospectus.
Market Risk –  Market risk is the risk that one or more markets in which the Fund invests will go down in value, including the possibility that the markets will go down sharply and unpredictably. Securities of a company may decline in value due to its financial prospects and activities, including certain operational impacts, such as data breaches and
8

cybersecurity attacks. Securities may also decline in value due to general market and economic movements and trends, including adverse changes to credit markets, or as a result of other events such as geopolitical events, natural disasters, or widespread pandemics (such as COVID-19) or other adverse public health developments.
Municipal Securities Risk –  Municipal securities risks include the possibility that the issuer may be unable to pay interest or repay principal on a timely basis or at all, the relative lack of information about certain issuers of municipal securities, and the possibility of future legislative changes which could affect the market for and value of municipal securities. In addition, state or local political or economic conditions and developments can adversely affect the securities issued by state and local governments. The value of the municipal securities owned by the Fund also may be adversely affected by future changes in federal or state income tax laws, including tax rate reductions or the determination that municipal securities are subject to taxation.
Interest Rate Risk –  The risk that your investment may go down in value when interest rates rise, because when interest rates rise, the prices of bonds and fixed rate loans fall. A wide variety of factors can cause interest rates to rise, including central bank monetary policies and inflation rates. Generally, the longer the maturity of a bond or fixed rate loan, the more sensitive it is to this risk. Falling interest rates also create the potential for a decline in the Fund’s income. These risks are greater during periods of rising inflation. Volatility in interest rates and in fixed income markets may increase the risk that the Fund’s investment in fixed income securities will go down in value. Risks associated with rising interest rates are currently heightened because interest rates in the U.S. remain near historic lows and inflation has begun to increase. Actions taken by the Federal Reserve Board or foreign central banks to stimulate or stabilize economic growth, such as decreases or increases in short-term interest rates, may adversely affect markets, which could, in turn, negatively impact Fund performance.
Credit Risk –  Credit risk is the risk that the issuer of a security or other instrument will not be able to make principal and interest payments when due. Changes in an issuer’s financial strength, credit rating or the market’s perception of an issuer’s creditworthiness may also affect the value of the Fund’s investment in that issuer. The degree of credit risk depends on both the financial condition of the issuer and the terms of the obligation. Periods of market volatility may increase credit risk.
Call Risk –  Call risk is the risk that an issuer, especially during a period of falling interest rates, may redeem a security by repaying it early, which may reduce the Fund’s income if the proceeds are reinvested at lower interest rates.
High Yield Investments Risk –  High yield investments rated below investment grade (also referred to as “junk bonds”) are considered to be speculative and are subject to heightened credit risk, which may make the Fund more sensitive to adverse developments in the U.S. and abroad. Lower rated debt securities generally involve greater risk of default or price changes due to changes in the issuer’s creditworthiness than higher rated debt securities. The market prices of these securities may fluctuate more than those of higher rated securities and may decline significantly in periods of general economic difficulty. There may be little trading in the secondary market for particular debt securities, which may make them more difficult to value or sell.
Active Investment Management Risk –  The risk that, if the sub-adviser’s investment strategy does not perform as expected, the Fund could underperform its peers or lose money. As part of the Fund’s investment strategy, the sub-adviser evaluates certain factors as part of the investment process, including ESG characteristics. The analysis of these factors may not work as intended. ESG characteristics are not the only factors considered and as a result, the issuers in which the Fund invests may not be issuers with favorable ESG characteristics or high ESG ratings.
Liquidity Risk –  The risk that the market for a particular investment or type of investment is or becomes relatively illiquid, making it difficult for the Fund to sell that investment at an advantageous time or price. Illiquidity may be due to events relating to the issuer of the securities, market events, rising interest rates, economic conditions or investor perceptions. Illiquid securities may be difficult to value and their value may be lower than the market price of comparable liquid securities, which would negatively affect the Fund’s performance.
Market Price Risk –  The net asset value (“NAV”) of the Fund’s shares and the value of your investment may fluctuate. The market prices of the Fund’s shares will generally fluctuate in accordance with changes in NAV and changes in the intraday value of the Fund’s holdings, as well as the relative supply of and demand for the shares on the Fund’s listing exchange. Although it is expected that the Fund’s shares will remain listed on the exchange, disruptions to creations and redemptions, the existence of market volatility or lack of an active trading market for the shares (including through a trading halt), as well as other factors, may result in the shares trading significantly above (at a premium to) or below (at a discount to) the Fund’s NAV or the intraday value of the Fund’s holdings. During such periods, you may be unable
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to sell your shares or may incur significant losses if you sell your shares. There are various methods by which investors can purchase and sell shares and various types of orders that may be placed. Investors should consult their financial intermediary before purchasing or selling shares of the Fund. Neither the investment manager nor the Fund’s Sub-Adviser can predict whether the Fund’s shares will trade below, at or above their NAV. Price differences may be due, in large part, to the fact that supply and demand forces at work in the secondary trading market for the Fund’s shares will be closely related to, but not identical to, the same forces influencing the prices of the Fund’s holdings trading individually or in the aggregate at any point in time. In addition, unlike many ETFs, the Fund is not an index fund. The Fund is actively managed and does not seek to replicate the performance of a specified index. There can be no assurance as to whether and/or to what extent the Fund’s shares will trade at premiums or discounts to NAV or to the intraday value of the Fund’s holdings.
Cash Transactions Risk –  The Fund, unlike certain other ETFs, may effect creations and redemptions partly or wholly for cash, rather than through in-kind distributions of securities. Because the Fund may effect redemptions for cash rather than in-kind, the Fund may be required to sell portfolio securities in order to obtain the cash needed to distribute redemption proceeds and it may subsequently recognize gains on such sales that the Fund might not have recognized if it were to distribute portfolio securities in-kind. As a result, an investment in the Fund may be less tax-efficient than an investment in an ETF that primarily or wholly effects creations and redemptions in-kind. Moreover, cash transactions may have to be carried out over several days if the securities markets are relatively illiquid at the time the Fund must sell securities and may involve considerable brokerage fees and taxes. These brokerage fees and taxes, which will be higher than if the Fund sold and redeemed its shares principally in-kind, will be passed on to purchasers and redeemers of Creation Units in the form of creation and redemption transaction fees. As a result of these factors, the spreads between the bid and the offered prices of the Fund’s shares may be wider than those of shares of ETFs that primarily or wholly transact in-kind.
Authorized Participant Concentration Risk –  Only an authorized participant may engage in creation or redemption transactions directly with the Fund. The Fund has a limited number of intermediaries that act as authorized participants, and none of these authorized participants are or will be obligated to engage in creation or redemption transactions. To the extent that these intermediaries exit the business or are unable to or choose not to proceed with creation and/or redemption orders with respect to the Fund and no other authorized participant is able to step forward to create or redeem, Fund shares may trade at a discount to NAV and possibly face trading halts and/or delisting.
The Fund is subject to certain other risks, which are discussed in “Additional Information Regarding Investment Strategies and Risks” in the Fund’s statutory prospectus.
PAST PERFORMANCE. The performance information below provides some indication of the risks of investing in the Fund by comparing the Fund’s performance to a broad measure of market performance. Keep in mind that past performance does not indicate future results. Updated performance information is available at hartfordfunds.com.
The bar chart shows the Fund’s performance for each calendar year since the Fund’s inception.
Total returns by calendar year
During the periods shown in the chart above:
Returns
Quarter Ended
Best Quarter Return
3.12%
March 31, 2019
Worst Quarter Return
-1.50%
March 31, 2020
The
year-to-date
return of the Fund as of
September 30, 2021
was
1.31%
.
10

Average Annual Total Returns. The table below shows returns for the Fund over time compared to those of a broad-based market index. After-tax returns are calculated using the historical highest individual U.S. federal marginal income tax rates and do not reflect the impact of state and local taxes. In some instances, the “Return After Taxes on Distributions and Sale of Fund Shares” may be greater than “Return Before Taxes” because the investor is assumed to be able to use the capital loss from the sale of Fund shares to offset other taxable gains. Actual after-tax returns, which depend on an investor’s particular tax situation, may differ from those shown and are not relevant to investors who hold their Fund shares through tax-deferred arrangements, such as 401(k) plans or individual retirement accounts. Updated performance information is available by visiting our website at hartfordfunds.com.
Average annual total returns for periods ending December 31, 2020
 
Since Inception
Hartford Municipal Opportunities ETF
1 Year
(12/13/2017)
Return Before Taxes
5.39%
4.94%
Return After Taxes on Distributions
4.67%
4.63%
Return After Taxes on Distributions and Sale of Fund Shares
4.67%
4.30%
Bloomberg Municipal Bond 1-15 Year Blend (1-17) Index (reflects no deduction for fees, expenses
or taxes)
4.73%
4.18%
MANAGEMENT. The Fund’s investment manager is Hartford Funds Management Company, LLC. The Fund’s sub-adviser is Wellington Management.
Portfolio Manager
Title
Involved with
Fund Since
Timothy D. Haney, CFA
Senior Managing Director and Fixed Income Portfolio Manager
2017
Brad W. Libby
Managing Director and Fixed Income Portfolio Manager/Credit Analyst
2017
PURCHASE AND SALE OF FUND SHARES. The Fund is an exchange-traded fund (“ETF”). Individual Fund shares may only be purchased and sold on a national securities exchange through a broker-dealer and may not be purchased or redeemed directly with the Fund. The price of Fund shares is based on market price, and because ETF shares trade at market prices rather than at NAV, shares may trade at a price greater than NAV (a premium) or less than NAV (a discount). When buying and selling Fund shares on an exchange, therefore, investors may incur costs related to the difference between the highest price a buyer is willing to pay to purchase Fund shares (bid) and the lowest price a seller is willing to accept for Fund shares (ask) (the “bid-ask spread”). The Fund will only issue or redeem shares at NAV that have been aggregated into blocks of shares (“Creation Units”) to authorized participants (“Authorized Participants”) who have entered into participation agreements with the Fund‘s distributor, ALPS Distributors, Inc. (the “Distributor”). The Fund will issue or redeem Creation Units in return for a basket of securities and/or cash that the Fund specifies each business day. Additional information about the Fund, including the Fund’s net asset value, market price, premiums and discounts and bid-ask spreads can be found at hartfordfunds.com.
TAX INFORMATION. The Fund’s distributions of interest on municipal bonds generally are not subject to federal income tax; however the Fund may distribute taxable dividends, including distributions of short-term capital gains, and long-term capital gains. In addition, interest on certain bonds may be subject to the federal alternative minimum tax. To the extent that the Fund’s distributions are derived from interest on bonds that are not exempt from applicable state and local taxes, such distributions will be subject to such state and local taxes.
PAYMENTS TO BROKER-DEALERS AND OTHER FINANCIAL INTERMEDIARIES. If you purchase shares of the Fund through a broker-dealer or other financial intermediary (such as a bank or financial advisor), the Fund’s related companies may pay the intermediary for services and/or data related to the sale of Fund shares. These payments may create a conflict of interest by influencing the broker-dealer or other intermediary and your financial advisor to recommend the Fund over another investment. Ask your financial advisor or visit your financial intermediary’s website for more information.
11

Hartford Short Duration ETF Summary Section
INVESTMENT OBJECTIVE. The Fund seeks to provide current income and long-term total return.
YOUR EXPENSES. The table below describes the fees and expenses that you may pay if you buy, hold and sell shares of the Fund. You may pay other fees, such as brokerage commissions and other fees to financial intermediaries, which are not reflected in the table or the example below.
Annual Fund Operating Expenses (expenses that you pay each year as a percentage of the value of your investment):
Management fees
0.29%
Distribution and service (12b-1) fees
None
Other expenses
0.00%
Total annual fund operating expenses
0.29%
Example. The examples below are intended to help you compare the cost of investing in the Fund with the cost of investing in other exchange-traded funds. The examples assume that:
Your investment has a 5% return each year
The Fund’s operating expenses remain the same
Your actual costs may be higher or lower. Based on these assumptions, for every $10,000 invested, you would pay the following expenses if you sell all of your shares at the end of each time period indicated:
Year 1
Year 3
Year 5
Year 10
$ 30
$ 93
$ 163
$368
Portfolio Turnover. The Fund pays transaction costs, such as commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or “turns over” its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover rate may indicate higher transaction costs and may result in higher taxes when Fund shares are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are not reflected in annual fund operating expenses or in the examples, affect the Fund’s performance. During the fiscal year ended July 31, 2021, the Fund’s portfolio turnover rate was 41% (excluding to be announced (TBA) roll transactions) of the average value of its portfolio. If TBA roll transactions were included, the Fund’s portfolio turnover rate would have been 53% of the average value of its portfolio.
PRINCIPAL INVESTMENT STRATEGY. The Fund seeks to achieve its investment objective by investing in securities that Wellington Management Company LLP (“Wellington Management”), the Fund’s sub-adviser, considers to be attractive giving consideration to both yield and total return. The Fund normally invests in investment grade securities. The Fund may invest up to 35% of its net assets in non-investment grade fixed income securities (also referred to as “junk bonds”). The Fund may also invest up to 35% of its net assets in bank loans or loan participation interests in secured or unsecured variable, fixed or floating rate loans to U.S. and foreign corporations, partnerships and other entities (“Bank Loans”). The Fund’s investments in non-investment grade Bank Loans and other non-investment grade fixed income securities in the aggregate may not exceed 35% of its net assets. Under normal circumstances, the Fund will invest at least 80% of its net assets in fixed income securities, including Bank Loans.
The fixed income securities in which the Fund may invest include, but are not limited to, (1) securities issued or guaranteed as to principal or interest by the U.S. Government, its agencies or instrumentalities; (2) non-convertible and convertible debt securities issued or guaranteed by U.S. corporations or other issuers (including foreign issuers); (3) asset-backed and mortgage-related securities, including collateralized mortgage obligations; (4) securities and loans issued or guaranteed as to principal or interest by a foreign issuer, including supranational entities such as development banks, non-U.S. corporations, banks or bank holding companies, or other foreign issuers; (5) commercial mortgage-backed securities; (6) zero coupon securities; (7) fixed income related derivatives; and (8) Bank Loans.
In order to manage the Fund’s interest rate risk, including managing the Fund’s average duration, the Fund generally uses derivatives such as Treasury futures, options and interest rate swaps. The Fund normally will maintain a dollar weighted average duration of less than 3 years. The Fund’s average duration measure will incorporate a bond’s yield, coupon, final maturity, and the effect of derivatives that may be used to manage the Fund’s interest rate risk. The Fund may invest up to 25% of its net assets in securities of foreign issuers. The Fund may also invest in “Rule 144A” securities, which are privately placed, restricted securities that may only be resold under certain circumstances to other qualified institutional buyers.
12

The portfolio manager may allocate a portion of the Fund’s assets to specialists within Wellington Management who implement the individual sector and security selection strategies.
PRINCIPAL RISKS. The principal risks of investing in the Fund are described below. When you sell your shares they may be worth more or less than what you paid for them, which means that you could lose money as a result of your investment. An investment in the Fund is not a bank deposit and is not insured or guaranteed by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation or any other government agency. As with any fund, there is no guarantee that the Fund will achieve its investment objective. For more information regarding risks and investment matters please see “Additional Information Regarding Investment Strategies and Risks” in the Fund’s statutory prospectus.
Market Risk –  Market risk is the risk that one or more markets in which the Fund invests will go down in value, including the possibility that the markets will go down sharply and unpredictably. Securities of a company may decline in value due to its financial prospects and activities, including certain operational impacts, such as data breaches and cybersecurity attacks. Securities may also decline in value due to general market and economic movements and trends, including adverse changes to credit markets, or as a result of other events such as geopolitical events, natural disasters, or widespread pandemics (such as COVID-19) or other adverse public health developments.
Interest Rate Risk –  The risk that your investment may go down in value when interest rates rise, because when interest rates rise, the prices of bonds and fixed rate loans fall. A wide variety of factors can cause interest rates to rise, including central bank monetary policies and inflation rates. Generally, the longer the maturity of a bond or fixed rate loan, the more sensitive it is to this risk. Falling interest rates also create the potential for a decline in the Fund’s income. These risks are greater during periods of rising inflation. Volatility in interest rates and in fixed income markets may increase the risk that the Fund’s investment in fixed income securities will go down in value. Risks associated with rising interest rates are currently heightened because interest rates in the U.S. remain near historic lows and inflation has begun to increase. Actions taken by the Federal Reserve Board or foreign central banks to stimulate or stabilize economic growth, such as decreases or increases in short-term interest rates, may adversely affect markets, which could, in turn, negatively impact Fund performance.
Credit Risk –  Credit risk is the risk that the issuer of a security or other instrument will not be able to make principal and interest payments when due. Changes in an issuer’s financial strength, credit rating or the market’s perception of an issuer’s creditworthiness may also affect the value of the Fund’s investment in that issuer. The degree of credit risk depends on both the financial condition of the issuer and the terms of the obligation. Periods of market volatility may increase credit risk.
Loans and Loan Participations Risk –  Loans and loan participations, including floating rate loans, are subject to credit risk, including the risk of nonpayment of principal or interest. Also, substantial increases in interest rates may cause an increase in loan defaults. Although the loans the Fund holds may be fully collateralized at the time of acquisition, the collateral may decline in value, be relatively illiquid, or lose all or substantially all of its value subsequent to investment. The risks associated with unsecured loans, which are not backed by a security interest in any specific collateral, are higher than those for comparable loans that are secured by specific collateral. In addition, in the event an issuer becomes insolvent, a loan could be subject to settlement risks or administrative disruptions that could adversely affect the Fund’s investment. It may also be difficult to obtain reliable information about a loan or loan participation.
Many loans are subject to restrictions on resale (thus affecting their liquidity) and may be difficult to value. As a result, the Fund may be unable to sell its loan interests at an advantageous time or price. Loans and loan participations typically have extended settlement periods (generally greater than 7 days). As a result of these extended settlement periods, the Fund may incur losses if it is required to sell other investments or temporarily borrow to meet its cash needs. Loans may also be subject to extension risk (the risk that borrowers will repay a loan more slowly in periods of rising interest rates) and prepayment risk (the risk that borrowers will repay a loan more quickly in periods of falling interest rates).
The Fund may acquire a participation interest in a loan that is held by another party. When the Fund’s loan interest is a participation, the Fund may have less control over the exercise of remedies than the party selling the participation interest, and it normally would not have any direct rights against the borrower.
Loan interests may not be considered “securities,” and purchasers, such as the Fund, may not, therefore, be entitled to rely on the anti-fraud protections of the federal securities laws. The Fund may be in possession of material non-public information about a borrower or issuer as a result of its ownership of a loan or security of such borrower or
13

issuer. Because of prohibitions on trading in securities of issuers while in possession of such information, the Fund may be unable to enter into a transaction in a loan or security of such a borrower or issuer when it would otherwise be advantageous to do so.
Mortgage-Related and Asset-Backed Securities Risk –  Mortgage-related and asset-backed securities represent interests in “pools” of mortgages or other assets, including consumer loans or receivables held in trust. These mortgage-related or asset-backed securities are subject to credit risk, interest rate risk, “prepayment risk” (the risk that borrowers will repay a loan more quickly in periods of falling interest rates) and “extension risk” (the risk that borrowers will repay a loan more slowly in periods of rising interest rates). If the Fund invests in mortgage-related or asset-backed securities that are subordinated to other interests in the same mortgage or asset pool, the Fund may only receive payments after the pool’s obligations to other investors have been satisfied. An unexpectedly high rate of defaults on the mortgages held by a mortgage pool may limit substantially the pool’s ability to make payments of principal or interest to the Fund, reducing the values of those securities or in some cases rendering them worthless. The risk of such defaults is generally higher in the case of mortgage pools that include so-called “subprime” mortgages. The Fund may purchase or sell mortgage-backed securities on a delayed delivery or forward commitment basis through the TBA market.
Uniform Mortgage-Backed Securities, which generally align the characteristics of Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac certificates, are a recent innovation and the effect they may have on the market for mortgage-related securities is uncertain.
High Yield Investments Risk –  High yield investments rated below investment grade (also referred to as “junk bonds”) are considered to be speculative and are subject to heightened credit risk, which may make the Fund more sensitive to adverse developments in the U.S. and abroad. Lower rated debt securities generally involve greater risk of default or price changes due to changes in the issuer’s creditworthiness than higher rated debt securities. The market prices of these securities may fluctuate more than those of higher rated securities and may decline significantly in periods of general economic difficulty. There may be little trading in the secondary market for particular debt securities, which may make them more difficult to value or sell.
Derivatives Risk –  Derivatives are instruments whose value depends on, or is derived from, the value of an underlying asset, reference rate or index. Derivatives may be riskier than other types of investments because they may be more sensitive to changes in economic or market conditions than other types of investments and could result in losses that significantly exceed the Fund’s original investment. Successful use of derivative instruments by the Fund depends on the sub-adviser’s judgment with respect to a number of factors and the Fund’s performance could be worse and/or more volatile than if it had not used these instruments. In addition, the fluctuations in the value of derivatives may not correlate perfectly with the value of any portfolio assets being hedged, the performance of the asset class to which the sub-adviser seeks exposure, or the overall securities markets.
Leverage Risk –  Certain transactions, such as the use of derivatives, may give rise to leverage. Leverage can increase market exposure, increase volatility in the Fund, magnify investment risks, and cause losses to be realized more quickly. The use of leverage may cause the Fund to liquidate portfolio positions to satisfy its obligations or to meet asset segregation requirements when it may not be advantageous to do so.
Futures and Options Risk –  Futures and options may be more volatile than direct investments in the securities underlying the futures and options, may not correlate perfectly to the underlying securities, may involve additional costs, and may be illiquid. Futures and options also may involve the use of leverage as the Fund may make a small initial investment relative to the risk assumed, which could result in losses greater than if futures or options had not been used. Futures and options are also subject to the risk that the other party to the transaction may default on its obligation.
Swaps Risk –  A swap is a contract that generally obligates the parties to exchange payments based on a specified reference security, basket of securities, security index or index component. Swaps can involve greater risks than direct investment in securities because swaps may be leveraged and are subject to counterparty risk (e.g., the risk of a counterparty defaulting on the obligation or bankruptcy), credit risk and pricing risk (i.e., swaps may be difficult to value). Certain swaps may also be considered illiquid. It may not be possible for the Fund to liquidate a swap position at an advantageous time or price, which may result in significant losses.
Call Risk –  Call risk is the risk that an issuer, especially during a period of falling interest rates, may redeem a security by repaying it early, which may reduce the Fund’s income if the proceeds are reinvested at lower interest rates.
14

Liquidity Risk –  The risk that the market for a particular investment or type of investment is or becomes relatively illiquid, making it difficult for the Fund to sell that investment at an advantageous time or price. Illiquidity may be due to events relating to the issuer of the securities, market events, rising interest rates, economic conditions or investor perceptions. Illiquid securities may be difficult to value and their value may be lower than the market price of comparable liquid securities, which would negatively affect the Fund’s performance.
Foreign Investments Risk –  Investments in foreign securities may be riskier, more volatile, and less liquid than investments in U.S. securities. Differences between the U.S. and foreign regulatory regimes and securities markets, including the less stringent investor protection, less stringent accounting, corporate governance, financial reporting and disclosure standards of some foreign markets, as well as political and economic developments in foreign countries and regions and the U.S. (including the imposition of sanctions, tariffs, or other governmental restrictions), may affect the value of the Fund’s investments in foreign securities. Changes in currency exchange rates may also adversely affect the Fund’s foreign investments. The impact of the United Kingdom’s departure from the European Union, commonly known as “Brexit,” and the potential departure of one or more other countries from the European Union may have significant political and financial consequences for global markets. This may adversely impact Fund performance.
Restricted Securities Risk –  Restricted securities are subject to the risk that they may be difficult to sell at the time and price the Fund prefers.
Event Risk –  Event risk is the risk that corporate issuers may undergo restructurings, such as mergers, leveraged buyouts, takeovers, or similar events financed by increased debt. As a result of the added debt, the credit quality and market value of a company’s bonds and/or other debt securities may decline significantly.
U.S. Government Securities Risk –  Treasury obligations may differ in their interest rates, maturities, times of issuance and other characteristics. Securities backed by the U.S. Treasury or the full faith and credit of the United States are guaranteed only as to the timely payment of interest and principal when held to maturity. Accordingly, the current market values for these securities will fluctuate with changes in interest rates. Obligations of U.S. Government agencies and authorities are supported by varying degrees of credit but generally are not backed by the full faith and credit of the U.S. Government. No assurance can be given that the U.S. Government will provide financial support to its agencies and authorities if it is not obligated by law to do so. In addition, the value of U.S. Government securities may be affected by changes in the credit rating of the U.S. Government. U.S. Government securities are also subject to the risk that the U.S. Treasury will be unable to meet its payment obligations.
Active Investment Management Risk –  The risk that, if the sub-adviser’s investment strategy does not perform as expected, the Fund could underperform its peers or lose money. In addition, to the extent the Fund allocates a portion of its assets to specialist portfolio managers, those styles employed may not be complementary, which could adversely affect the Fund’s performance.
Market Price Risk –  The net asset value (“NAV”) of the Fund’s shares and the value of your investment may fluctuate. The market prices of the Fund’s shares will generally fluctuate in accordance with changes in NAV and changes in the intraday value of the Fund’s holdings, as well as the relative supply of and demand for the shares on the Fund’s listing exchange. Although it is expected that the Fund’s shares will remain listed on the exchange, disruptions to creations and redemptions, the existence of market volatility or lack of an active trading market for the shares (including through a trading halt), as well as other factors, may result in the shares trading significantly above (at a premium to) or below (at a discount to) the Fund’s NAV or the intraday value of the Fund’s holdings. During such periods, you may be unable to sell your shares or may incur significant losses if you sell your shares. There are various methods by which investors can purchase and sell shares and various types of orders that may be placed. Investors should consult their financial intermediary before purchasing or selling shares of the Fund. Neither the investment manager nor the Fund’s Sub-Adviser can predict whether the Fund’s shares will trade below, at or above their NAV. Price differences may be due, in large part, to the fact that supply and demand forces at work in the secondary trading market for the Fund’s shares will be closely related to, but not identical to, the same forces influencing the prices of the Fund’s holdings trading individually or in the aggregate at any point in time. In addition, unlike many ETFs, the Fund is not an index fund. The Fund is actively managed and does not seek to replicate the performance of a specified index. There can be no assurance as to whether and/or to what extent the Fund’s shares will trade at premiums or discounts to NAV or to the intraday value of the Fund’s holdings.
Cash Transactions Risk –  The Fund, unlike certain other ETFs, may effect creations and redemptions partly or wholly for cash, rather than through in-kind distributions of securities. Because the Fund may effect redemptions for cash rather than in-kind, the Fund may be required to sell portfolio securities in order to obtain the cash needed to
15

distribute redemption proceeds and it may subsequently recognize gains on such sales that the Fund might not have recognized if it were to distribute portfolio securities in-kind. As a result, an investment in the Fund may be less tax-efficient than an investment in an ETF that primarily or wholly effects creations and redemptions in-kind. Moreover, cash transactions may have to be carried out over several days if the securities markets are relatively illiquid at the time the Fund must sell securities and may involve considerable brokerage fees and taxes. These brokerage fees and taxes, which will be higher than if the Fund sold and redeemed its shares principally in-kind, will be passed on to purchasers and redeemers of Creation Units in the form of creation and redemption transaction fees. As a result of these factors, the spreads between the bid and the offered prices of the Fund’s shares may be wider than those of shares of ETFs that primarily or wholly transact in-kind.
Authorized Participant Concentration Risk –  Only an authorized participant may engage in creation or redemption transactions directly with the Fund. The Fund has a limited number of intermediaries that act as authorized participants, and none of these authorized participants are or will be obligated to engage in creation or redemption transactions. To the extent that these intermediaries exit the business or are unable to or choose not to proceed with creation and/or redemption orders with respect to the Fund and no other authorized participant is able to step forward to create or redeem, Fund shares may trade at a discount to NAV and possibly face trading halts and/or delisting.
The Fund is subject to certain other risks, which are discussed in “Additional Information Regarding Investment Strategies and Risks” in the Fund’s statutory prospectus.
PAST PERFORMANCE. The performance information below provides some indication of the risks of investing in the Fund by comparing the Fund’s performance to a broad measure of market performance. Keep in mind that past performance does not indicate future results. Updated performance information is available at hartfordfunds.com.
The bar chart shows the Fund’s performance for each calendar year since the Fund’s inception.
Total returns by calendar year
During the periods shown in the chart above:
Returns
Quarter Ended
Best Quarter Return
5.98%
June 30, 2020
Worst Quarter Return
-4.84%
March 31, 2020
The
year-to-date
return of the Fund as of
September 30, 2021
was
0.86%
.
Average Annual Total Returns. The table below shows returns for the Fund over time compared to those of a broad-based market index. After-tax returns are calculated using the historical highest individual U.S. federal marginal income tax rates and do not reflect the impact of state and local taxes. In some instances, the “Return After Taxes on Distributions and Sale of Fund Shares” may be greater than “Return Before Taxes” because the investor is assumed to be able to use the capital loss from the sale of Fund shares to offset other taxable gains. Actual after-tax returns, which depend on an investor’s particular tax situation, may differ from those shown and are not relevant to investors who hold their Fund shares through tax-deferred arrangements, such as 401(k) plans or individual retirement accounts. Updated performance information is available by visiting our website at hartfordfunds.com.
16

Average annual total returns for periods ending December 31, 2020
 
Since Inception
Hartford Short Duration ETF
1 Year
(5/30/2018)
Return Before Taxes
3.83%
4.34%
Return After Taxes on Distributions
2.60%
3.02%
Return After Taxes on Distributions and Sale of Fund Shares
2.25%
2.75%
Bloomberg 1-3 Year U.S. Government/Credit Index (reflects no deduction for fees, expenses or
taxes)
3.33%
3.44%
MANAGEMENT. The Fund’s investment manager is Hartford Funds Management Company, LLC. The Fund’s sub-adviser is Wellington Management.
Portfolio Manager
Title
Involved with
Fund Since
Timothy E. Smith
Senior Managing Director and Fixed Income Portfolio Manager
2018
PURCHASE AND SALE OF FUND SHARES. The Fund is an exchange-traded fund (“ETF”). Individual Fund shares may only be purchased and sold on a national securities exchange through a broker-dealer and may not be purchased or redeemed directly with the Fund. The price of Fund shares is based on market price, and because ETF shares trade at market prices rather than at NAV, shares may trade at a price greater than NAV (a premium) or less than NAV (a discount). When buying and selling Fund shares on an exchange, therefore, investors may incur costs related to the difference between the highest price a buyer is willing to pay to purchase Fund shares (bid) and the lowest price a seller is willing to accept for Fund shares (ask) (the “bid-ask spread”). The Fund will only issue or redeem shares at NAV that have been aggregated into blocks of shares (“Creation Units”) to authorized participants (“Authorized Participants”) who have entered into participation agreements with the Fund‘s distributor, ALPS Distributors, Inc. (the “Distributor”). The Fund will issue or redeem Creation Units in return for a basket of securities and/or cash that the Fund specifies each business day. Additional information about the Fund, including the Fund’s net asset value, market price, premiums and discounts and bid-ask spreads can be found at hartfordfunds.com.
TAX INFORMATION. The Fund’s distributions are generally taxable, and may be taxed as ordinary income or capital gains, unless you are investing through a tax-deferred arrangement, such as a 401(k) plan or an individual retirement account. Such tax-deferred arrangements may be taxed later upon withdrawal of monies from those arrangements.
PAYMENTS TO BROKER-DEALERS AND OTHER FINANCIAL INTERMEDIARIES. If you purchase shares of the Fund through a broker-dealer or other financial intermediary (such as a bank or financial advisor), the Fund’s related companies may pay the intermediary for services and/or data related to the sale of Fund shares. These payments may create a conflict of interest by influencing the broker-dealer or other intermediary and your financial advisor to recommend the Fund over another investment. Ask your financial advisor or visit your financial intermediary’s website for more information.
17

Hartford Schroders Tax-Aware Bond ETF Summary Section
INVESTMENT OBJECTIVE. The Fund seeks total return on an after-tax basis.
YOUR EXPENSES. The table below describes the fees and expenses that you may pay if you buy, hold and sell shares of the Fund. You may pay other fees, such as brokerage commissions and other fees to financial intermediaries, which are not reflected in the table or the example below.
Annual Fund Operating Expenses (expenses that you pay each year as a percentage of the value of your investment):
Management fees
0.39%
Distribution and service (12b-1) fees
None
Other expenses
0.00%
Total annual fund operating expenses
0.39%
Example. The examples below are intended to help you compare the cost of investing in the Fund with the cost of investing in other exchange-traded funds. The examples assume that:
Your investment has a 5% return each year
The Fund’s operating expenses remain the same
Your actual costs may be higher or lower. Based on these assumptions, for every $10,000 invested, you would pay the following expenses if you sell all of your shares at the end of each time period indicated:
Year 1
Year 3
Year 5
Year 10
$ 40
$ 125
$ 219
$493
Portfolio Turnover. The Fund pays transaction costs, such as commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or “turns over” its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover rate may indicate higher transaction costs and may result in higher taxes when Fund shares are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are not reflected in annual fund operating expenses or in the examples, affect the Fund’s performance. During the fiscal year ended July 31, 2021, the Fund’s portfolio turnover rate was 199% of the average value of its portfolio.
PRINCIPAL INVESTMENT STRATEGY. The Fund seeks to achieve its investment objective by investing in a diversified portfolio of fixed income debt instruments of varying maturities. Under normal circumstances, the Fund invests at least 80% of its assets in U.S. dollar-denominated, investment-grade fixed income debt instruments. Fixed income debt instruments include bonds, debt securities and other similar instruments issued by various U.S. and non-U.S. public or private-sector entities.
The fixed income debt instruments in which the Fund may invest include securities issued or guaranteed by the U.S. government and its agencies, government-sponsored enterprise securities, corporate bonds, mortgage-backed securities (including “to be announced” or “TBA” transactions), asset-backed securities, municipal securities, sovereign debt and debt securities issued by supranational organizations. They may pay fixed, variable, or floating interest rates. “Investment-grade” securities are securities that are rated by at least one major rating agency in one of its top four rating categories, or, if unrated, are determined by the Fund’s sub-advisers to be of similar quality, at the time of purchase. In the case of a split rated security (that is, two or more rating agencies give a security different ratings), the average rating shall apply. The Fund may invest without limit in U.S. dollar denominated foreign securities. The Fund may also invest a portion of its assets in cash and cash equivalents. Schroder Investment Management North America Inc. (“SIMNA”) serves as the Fund’s sub-adviser. SIMNA may use a sub-sub-adviser, Schroder Investment Management North America Limited (“SIMNA Ltd.”), which is an affiliate. References to “Sub-Advisers” include SIMNA Ltd., as applicable, with respect to its role as the Fund’s sub-sub-adviser.
The Fund may invest in fixed income securities of any maturity or duration. The Fund’s effective duration may vary over time depending on the Sub-Advisers’ assessment of market and economic conditions and other factors.
“Total return” consists of income earned on the Fund’s investments, plus capital appreciation, if any. In seeking to achieve the Fund’s investment objective, the Sub-Advisers’ employ a tax-aware investing strategy that attempts to realize total return for shareholders, primarily in the form of current income and price appreciation, by balancing investment considerations and tax considerations. The Sub-Advisers allocate the Fund’s assets among taxable and tax-exempt investments with no limitation on the amount of assets that may be invested in either category. The Fund is
18

eligible to pay “exempt-interest dividends” only if 50% of the value of its total assets is invested in tax-exempt securities at the end of each quarter of its taxable year. At times, the Fund’s investments in municipal securities may be substantial depending on the Sub-Advisers’ outlook on the market. In particular, the Fund may invest more than 25% (but not more than 40%) of its total assets in municipal securities of issuers in each of California, New York and Texas.
It is important to understand that the Fund is not limited to investing solely in assets that generate tax-exempt income and may make both taxable and tax-exempt distributions to shareholders. Among the techniques and strategies used by the Fund in seeking tax-efficient management are the following: investing in municipal securities, the interest from which is exempt from federal income tax (but not necessarily the federal alternative minimum tax (“AMT”) or state income tax); investing in taxable securities where after-tax valuation is favorable; attempting to minimize net realized short-term capital gain; and employing a long-term approach to investing. When making investment decisions for the Fund, the Sub-Advisers take into consideration the maximum federal tax rates.
The Fund’s decision to purchase or sell a security or make investments in a particular sector is based on relative value considerations. In analyzing the relative attractiveness of a particular security or sector, the Sub-Advisers assess an issue’s historical relationships to other bonds, technical factors including supply and demand and fundamental risk and reward relationships. As part of this analysis, the Sub-Advisers also consider sector exposures, interest rate duration, yield and the relationship between yields and maturity dates. In addition to these factors, the Sub-Advisers integrate environmental, social and governance (ESG) factors into their investment process. The Sub-Advisers evaluate the impact and risk around issues such as climate change, environmental performance, labor standards or corporate governance, which they view as important in their assessment of a company’s risk and potential for profitability. The Sub-Advisers view their ESG assessment as an important consideration in determining the weights of securities within the portfolio.
As part of its tax-aware strategy, the Fund typically sells securities when the anticipated performance benefit justifies the resulting gain. This strategy often includes minimizing the sale of securities with large unrealized gains, holding securities long enough to avoid short-term capital gains taxes, selling securities with a higher cost basis first and offsetting capital gains realized in one security by selling another security at a capital loss.
In addition, the Fund may engage actively in transactions involving derivatives. Derivative transactions may include exchange-traded or over-the-counter derivatives, such as swap contracts (including interest rate swaps, total return swaps, and credit default swaps), futures contracts, and options on futures. The Fund will normally use derivatives to supplement the effective management of its duration profile, to gain exposure to particular securities or markets, in connection with hedging transactions, or for purposes of efficient portfolio management, including managing cash flows or as part of the Fund’s risk management process.
PRINCIPAL RISKS. The principal risks of investing in the Fund are described below. When you sell your shares they may be worth more or less than what you paid for them, which means that you could lose money as a result of your investment. An investment in the Fund is not a bank deposit and is not insured or guaranteed by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation or any other government agency. As with any fund, there is no guarantee that the Fund will achieve its investment objective. For more information regarding risks and investment matters please see “Additional Information Regarding Investment Strategies and Risks” in the Fund’s statutory prospectus.
Market Risk –  Market risk is the risk that one or more markets in which the Fund invests will go down in value, including the possibility that the markets will go down sharply and unpredictably. Securities of a company may decline in value due to its financial prospects and activities, including certain operational impacts, such as data breaches and cybersecurity attacks. Securities may also decline in value due to general market and economic movements and trends, including adverse changes to credit markets, or as a result of other events such as geopolitical events, natural disasters, or widespread pandemics (such as COVID-19) or other adverse public health developments.
Interest Rate Risk –  The risk that your investment may go down in value when interest rates rise, because when interest rates rise, the prices of bonds and fixed rate loans fall. A wide variety of factors can cause interest rates to rise, including central bank monetary policies and inflation rates. Generally, the longer the maturity of a bond or fixed rate loan, the more sensitive it is to this risk. Falling interest rates also create the potential for a decline in the Fund’s income. These risks are greater during periods of rising inflation. Volatility in interest rates and in fixed income markets may increase the risk that the Fund’s investment in fixed income securities will go down in value. Risks associated with rising interest rates are currently heightened because interest rates in the U.S. remain near historic lows and inflation has begun to increase. Actions taken by the Federal Reserve Board or foreign central banks to stimulate or stabilize economic growth, such as decreases or increases in short-term interest rates, may adversely affect markets, which could, in turn, negatively impact Fund performance.
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Credit Risk –  Credit risk is the risk that the issuer of a security or other instrument will not be able to make principal and interest payments when due. Changes in an issuer’s financial strength, credit rating or the market’s perception of an issuer’s creditworthiness may also affect the value of the Fund’s investment in that issuer. The degree of credit risk depends on both the financial condition of the issuer and the terms of the obligation. Periods of market volatility may increase credit risk.
Mortgage-Related and Asset-Backed Securities Risk –  Mortgage-related and asset-backed securities represent interests in “pools” of mortgages or other assets, including consumer loans or receivables held in trust. These mortgage-related or asset-backed securities are subject to credit risk, interest rate risk, “prepayment risk” (the risk that borrowers will repay a loan more quickly in periods of falling interest rates) and “extension risk” (the risk that borrowers will repay a loan more slowly in periods of rising interest rates). If the Fund invests in mortgage-related or asset-backed securities that are subordinated to other interests in the same mortgage or asset pool, the Fund may only receive payments after the pool’s obligations to other investors have been satisfied. An unexpectedly high rate of defaults on the mortgages held by a mortgage pool may limit substantially the pool’s ability to make payments of principal or interest to the Fund, reducing the values of those securities or in some cases rendering them worthless. The risk of such defaults is generally higher in the case of mortgage pools that include so-called “subprime” mortgages. The Fund may purchase or sell mortgage-backed securities on a delayed delivery or forward commitment basis through the TBA market.
Uniform Mortgage-Backed Securities, which generally align the characteristics of Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac certificates, are a recent innovation and the effect they may have on the market for mortgage-related securities is uncertain.
To Be Announced (TBA) Transactions Risk –  TBA investments include when-issued and delayed delivery securities and forward commitments. TBA transactions involve the risk that the security the Fund buys will lose value prior to its delivery. The Fund is subject to this risk whether or not the Fund takes delivery of the securities on the settlement date for a transaction. There also is the risk that the security will not be issued or that the other party to the transaction will not meet its obligation. If this occurs, the Fund loses both the investment opportunity for the assets it set aside to pay for the security and any gain in the security’s price. The Fund may also take a short position in a TBA investment when it owns or has the right to obtain, at no added cost, identical securities. If the Fund takes such a short position, it may reduce the risk of a loss if the price of the securities declines in the future, but will lose the opportunity to profit if the price rises. TBA transactions may also result in a higher portfolio turnover rate and/or increased capital gains for the Fund.
U.S. Government Securities Risk –  Treasury obligations may differ in their interest rates, maturities, times of issuance and other characteristics. Securities backed by the U.S. Treasury or the full faith and credit of the United States are guaranteed only as to the timely payment of interest and principal when held to maturity. Accordingly, the current market values for these securities will fluctuate with changes in interest rates. Obligations of U.S. Government agencies and authorities are supported by varying degrees of credit but generally are not backed by the full faith and credit of the U.S. Government. No assurance can be given that the U.S. Government will provide financial support to its agencies and authorities if it is not obligated by law to do so. In addition, the value of U.S. Government securities may be affected by changes in the credit rating of the U.S. Government. U.S. Government securities are also subject to the risk that the U.S. Treasury will be unable to meet its payment obligations.
Liquidity Risk –  The risk that the market for a particular investment or type of investment is or becomes relatively illiquid, making it difficult for the Fund to sell that investment at an advantageous time or price. Illiquidity may be due to events relating to the issuer of the securities, market events, rising interest rates, economic conditions or investor perceptions. Illiquid securities may be difficult to value and their value may be lower than the market price of comparable liquid securities, which would negatively affect the Fund’s performance.
Market Price Risk –  The net asset value (“NAV”) of the Fund’s shares and the value of your investment may fluctuate. The market prices of the Fund’s shares will generally fluctuate in accordance with changes in NAV and changes in the intraday value of the Fund’s holdings, as well as the relative supply of and demand for the shares on the Fund’s listing exchange. Although it is expected that the Fund’s shares will remain listed on the exchange, disruptions to creations and redemptions, the existence of market volatility or lack of an active trading market for the shares (including through a trading halt), as well as other factors, may result in the shares trading significantly above (at a premium to) or below (at a discount to) the Fund’s NAV or the intraday value of the Fund’s holdings. During such periods, you may be unable to sell your shares or may incur significant losses if you sell your shares. There are various methods by which investors can purchase and sell shares and various types of orders that may be placed. Investors should consult their financial
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intermediary before purchasing or selling shares of the Fund. Neither the investment manager nor the Fund’s Sub-Advisers can predict whether the Fund’s shares will trade below, at or above their NAV. Price differences may be due, in large part, to the fact that supply and demand forces at work in the secondary trading market for the Fund’s shares will be closely related to, but not identical to, the same forces influencing the prices of the Fund’s holdings trading individually or in the aggregate at any point in time. In addition, unlike many ETFs, the Fund is not an index fund. The Fund is actively managed and does not seek to replicate the performance of a specified index. There can be no assurance as to whether and/or to what extent the Fund’s shares will trade at premiums or discounts to NAV or to the intraday value of the Fund’s holdings.
Municipal Securities Risk –  Municipal securities risks include the possibility that the issuer may be unable to pay interest or repay principal on a timely basis or at all, the relative lack of information about certain issuers of municipal securities, and the possibility of future legislative changes which could affect the market for and value of municipal securities. In addition, state or local political or economic conditions and developments can adversely affect the securities issued by state and local governments. The value of the municipal securities owned by the Fund also may be adversely affected by future changes in federal or state income tax laws, including tax rate reductions or the determination that municipal securities are subject to taxation.
Derivatives Risk –  Derivatives are instruments whose value depends on, or is derived from, the value of an underlying asset, reference rate or index. Derivatives may be riskier than other types of investments because they may be more sensitive to changes in economic or market conditions than other types of investments and could result in losses that significantly exceed the Fund’s original investment. Successful use of derivative instruments by the Fund depends on the Sub-Advisers’ judgment with respect to a number of factors and the Fund’s performance could be worse and/or more volatile than if it had not used these instruments. In addition, the fluctuations in the value of derivatives may not correlate perfectly with the value of any portfolio assets being hedged, the performance of the asset class to which the Sub-Advisers seek exposure, or the overall securities markets.
Swaps Risk –  A swap is a contract that generally obligates the parties to exchange payments based on a specified reference security, basket of securities, security index or index component. Swaps can involve greater risks than direct investment in securities because swaps may be leveraged and are subject to counterparty risk (e.g., the risk of a counterparty defaulting on the obligation or bankruptcy), credit risk and pricing risk (i.e., swaps may be difficult to value). Certain swaps may also be considered illiquid. It may not be possible for the Fund to liquidate a swap position at an advantageous time or price, which may result in significant losses.
Futures and Options Risk –  Futures and options may be more volatile than direct investments in the securities underlying the futures and options, may not correlate perfectly to the underlying securities, may involve additional costs, and may be illiquid. Futures and options also may involve the use of leverage as the Fund may make a small initial investment relative to the risk assumed, which could result in losses greater than if futures or options had not been used. Futures and options are also subject to the risk that the other party to the transaction may default on its obligation.
Leverage Risk –  Certain transactions, such as the use of derivatives, may give rise to leverage. Leverage can increase market exposure, increase volatility in the Fund, magnify investment risks, and cause losses to be realized more quickly. The use of leverage may cause the Fund to liquidate portfolio positions to satisfy its obligations or to meet asset segregation requirements when it may not be advantageous to do so.
Counterparty Risk –  The risk that the counterparty in a transaction by the Fund may be unable or unwilling to make timely principal, interest or settlement payments, or otherwise to honor its obligations.
Foreign Investments Risk –  Investments in foreign securities may be riskier, more volatile, and less liquid than investments in U.S. securities. Differences between the U.S. and foreign regulatory regimes and securities markets, including the less stringent investor protection, less stringent accounting, corporate governance, financial reporting and disclosure standards of some foreign markets, as well as political and economic developments in foreign countries and regions and the U.S. (including the imposition of sanctions, tariffs, or other governmental restrictions), may affect the value of the Fund’s investments in foreign securities. Changes in currency exchange rates may also adversely affect the Fund’s foreign investments. The impact of the United Kingdom’s departure from the European Union, commonly known as “Brexit,” and the potential departure of one or more other countries from the European Union may have significant political and financial consequences for global markets. This may adversely impact Fund performance.
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Cash Transactions Risk –  The Fund, unlike certain other ETFs, may effect creations and redemptions partly or wholly for cash, rather than through in-kind distributions of securities. Because the Fund may effect redemptions for cash rather than in-kind, the Fund may be required to sell portfolio securities in order to obtain the cash needed to distribute redemption proceeds and it may subsequently recognize gains on such sales that the Fund might not have recognized if it were to distribute portfolio securities in-kind. As a result, an investment in the Fund may be less tax-efficient than an investment in an ETF that primarily or wholly effects creations and redemptions in-kind. Moreover, cash transactions may have to be carried out over several days if the securities markets are relatively illiquid at the time the Fund must sell securities and may involve considerable brokerage fees and taxes. These brokerage fees and taxes, which will be higher than if the Fund sold and redeemed its shares principally in-kind, will be passed on to purchasers and redeemers of Creation Units in the form of creation and redemption transaction fees. As a result of these factors, the spreads between the bid and the offered prices of the Fund’s shares may be wider than those of shares of ETFs that primarily or wholly transact in-kind.
State-Specific Risk –  A fund that may invest more than 25% of its total assets in municipal securities of issuers in one or more states is subject to the risk that the economies of the states in which it invests, and the revenues supporting the municipal securities, may decline. Investing significantly in one or more states means that the Fund may be more exposed to negative political or economic factors in those states than a fund that invests more widely.
Active Investment Management Risk –  The risk that, if the Sub-Advisers’ investment strategy does not perform as expected, the Fund could underperform its peers or lose money. As part of the Fund’s investment strategy, the Sub-Advisers evaluate certain factors as part of the investment process, including ESG characteristics. The analysis of these factors may not work as intended. ESG characteristics are not the only factors considered and as a result, the companies (or issuers) in which the Fund invests may not be companies (or issuers) with favorable ESG characteristics or high ESG ratings.
Authorized Participant Concentration Risk –  Only an authorized participant may engage in creation or redemption transactions directly with the Fund. The Fund has a limited number of intermediaries that act as authorized participants, and none of these authorized participants are or will be obligated to engage in creation or redemption transactions. To the extent that these intermediaries exit the business or are unable to or choose not to proceed with creation and/or redemption orders with respect to the Fund and no other authorized participant is able to step forward to create or redeem, Fund shares may trade at a discount to NAV and possibly face trading halts and/or delisting.
Call Risk –  Call risk is the risk that an issuer, especially during a period of falling interest rates, may redeem a security by repaying it early, which may reduce the Fund’s income if the proceeds are reinvested at lower interest rates.
Active Trading Risk –  Active trading could increase the Fund’s transaction costs and may increase your tax liability as compared to a fund with less active trading policies. These effects may adversely affect Fund performance.
The Fund is subject to certain other risks, which are discussed in “Additional Information Regarding Investment Strategies and Risks” in the Fund’s statutory prospectus.
PAST PERFORMANCE. The performance information below provides some indication of the risks of investing in the Fund by comparing the Fund’s performance to a broad measure of market performance. Keep in mind that past performance does not indicate future results. Updated performance information is available at hartfordfunds.com.
The bar chart shows the Fund’s performance for each calendar year since the Fund’s inception.
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Total returns by calendar year
During the periods shown in the chart above:
Returns
Quarter Ended
Best Quarter Return
4.30%
June 30, 2020
Worst Quarter Return
-0.86%
March 31, 2020
The
year-to-date
return of the Fund as of
September 30, 2021
was
0.10%
.
Average Annual Total Returns. The table below shows returns for the Fund over time compared to those of a broad-based market index. After-tax returns are calculated using the historical highest individual U.S. federal marginal income tax rates and do not reflect the impact of state and local taxes. In some instances, the “Return After Taxes on Distributions and Sale of Fund Shares” may be greater than “Return Before Taxes” because the investor is assumed to be able to use the capital loss from the sale of Fund shares to offset other taxable gains. Actual after-tax returns, which depend on an investor’s particular tax situation, may differ from those shown and are not relevant to investors who hold their Fund shares through tax-deferred arrangements, such as 401(k) plans or individual retirement accounts. Updated performance information is available by visiting our website at hartfordfunds.com.
Average annual total returns for periods ending December 31, 2020
 
Since Inception
Hartford Schroders Tax-Aware Bond ETF
1 Year
(4/18/2018)
Return Before Taxes
5.56%
5.51%
Return After Taxes on Distributions
5.24%
5.09%
Return After Taxes on Distributions and Sale of Fund Shares
3.68%
4.35%
Bloomberg Municipal Bond Index (reflects no deduction for fees, expenses or taxes)
5.21%
5.55%
MANAGEMENT. The Fund’s investment manager is Hartford Funds Management Company, LLC. The Fund’s sub-adviser is Schroder Investment Management North America Inc. and its sub-sub-adviser is Schroder Investment Management North America Limited.
Portfolio Manager
Title
Involved with
Fund Since
Lisa Hornby, CFA
Portfolio Manager
2018
Neil G. Sutherland, CFA
Portfolio Manager
2017
Julio C. Bonilla, CFA
Portfolio Manager
2017
David May
Portfolio Manager
2020
PURCHASE AND SALE OF FUND SHARES. The Fund is an exchange-traded fund (“ETF”). Individual Fund shares may only be purchased and sold on a national securities exchange through a broker-dealer and may not be purchased or redeemed directly with the Fund. The price of Fund shares is based on market price, and because ETF shares trade at market prices rather than at NAV, shares may trade at a price greater than NAV (a premium) or less than NAV (a discount). When buying and selling Fund shares on an exchange, therefore, investors may incur costs related to the difference between the highest price a buyer is willing to pay to purchase Fund shares (bid) and the lowest price a seller is willing to accept for Fund shares (ask) (the “bid-ask spread”). The Fund will only issue or redeem shares at NAV that have been aggregated into blocks of shares (“Creation Units”) to authorized participants (“Authorized Participants”) who have entered into participation agreements with the Fund‘s distributor, ALPS Distributors, Inc. (the “Distributor”). The
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Fund will issue or redeem Creation Units in return for a basket of securities and/or cash that the Fund specifies each business day. Additional information about the Fund, including the Fund’s net asset value, market price, premiums and discounts and bid-ask spreads can be found at hartfordfunds.com.
TAX INFORMATION. The Fund’s distributions are generally taxable, and may be taxed as ordinary income or capital gains, unless you are investing through a tax-deferred arrangement, such as a 401(k) plan or an individual retirement account. Such tax-deferred arrangements may be taxed later upon withdrawal of monies from those arrangements. If at least 50% of the value of its total assets is invested in tax-exempt securities at the end of each quarter of its taxable year, the Fund is eligible to pay “exempt-interest dividends” for such taxable year. There can be no assurance that the Fund will qualify to pay exempt-interest dividends with respect to any taxable year.
PAYMENTS TO BROKER-DEALERS AND OTHER FINANCIAL INTERMEDIARIES. If you purchase shares of the Fund through a broker-dealer or other financial intermediary (such as a bank or financial advisor), the Fund’s related companies may pay the intermediary for services and/or data related to the sale of Fund shares. These payments may create a conflict of interest by influencing the broker-dealer or other intermediary and your financial advisor to recommend the Fund over another investment. Ask your financial advisor or visit your financial intermediary’s website for more information.
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Hartford Total Return Bond ETF Summary Section
INVESTMENT OBJECTIVE. The Fund seeks a competitive total return, with income as a secondary objective.
YOUR EXPENSES. The table below describes the fees and expenses that you may pay if you buy, hold and sell shares of the Fund. You may pay other fees, such as brokerage commissions and other fees to financial intermediaries, which are not reflected in the table or the example below.
Annual Fund Operating Expenses (expenses that you pay each year as a percentage of the value of your investment):
Management fees
0.29%
Distribution and service (12b-1) fees
None
Other expenses
0.00%
Total annual fund operating expenses
0.29%
Example. The examples below are intended to help you compare the cost of investing in the Fund with the cost of investing in other exchange-traded funds. The examples assume that:
Your investment has a 5% return each year
The Fund’s operating expenses remain the same
Your actual costs may be higher or lower. Based on these assumptions, for every $10,000 invested, you would pay the following expenses if you sell all of your shares at the end of each time period indicated:
Year 1
Year 3
Year 5
Year 10
$ 30
$ 93
$ 163
$368
Portfolio Turnover. The Fund pays transaction costs, such as commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or “turns over” its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover rate may indicate higher transaction costs and may result in higher taxes when Fund shares are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are not reflected in annual fund operating expenses or in the examples, affect the Fund’s performance. During the fiscal year ended July 31, 2021, the Fund’s portfolio turnover rate was 49% (excluding to be announced (TBA) roll transactions) of the average value of its portfolio. If TBA roll transactions were included, the Fund’s portfolio turnover rate would have been 499% of the average value of its portfolio.
PRINCIPAL INVESTMENT STRATEGY. Under normal circumstances, the Fund invests at least 80% of its net assets in bonds that the sub-adviser, Wellington Management Company LLP (“Wellington Management” or the “Sub-Adviser”), considers to be attractive from a total return perspective along with current income. The Fund may invest up to 20% of its net assets in securities rated below investment grade (also known as “junk bonds”).
Bonds in which the Fund invests include (1) securities issued or guaranteed as to principal or interest by the U.S. Government, its agencies or instrumentalities; (2) non-convertible debt securities issued or guaranteed by U.S. corporations or other issuers (including foreign governments or corporations); (3) asset-backed and mortgage-related securities; and (4) securities issued or guaranteed as to principal or interest by a sovereign government or one of its agencies or political subdivisions, supranational entities such as development banks, non-U.S. corporations, banks or bank holding companies, or other foreign issuers.
The Fund may use derivatives to manage portfolio risk or for other investment purposes. The derivatives in which the Fund may invest include, but are not limited to, futures and options contracts, swap agreements and forward foreign currency contracts. Additionally, the Fund may invest up to 40% of its net assets in debt securities of foreign issuers, including from emerging markets, and up to 20% of its net assets in non-dollar securities. The Fund may purchase or sell securities on a when-issued, delayed delivery or forward commitment basis, including securities acquired or sold in the “to be announced” (TBA) market. The Fund may invest in “Rule 144A” securities, which are privately placed, restricted securities that may only be resold under certain circumstances to other qualified institutional buyers. The Fund may trade securities actively. Although the Fund may invest in securities and other instruments of any maturity or duration, the Fund normally invests in debt securities with a maturity of at least one year. There is no limit on the average maturity of the Fund’s portfolio.
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The investment team is organized with generalist portfolio managers leading sector, rates and risk positioning decisions. The portfolio managers may allocate a portion of the Fund’s assets to specialists within Wellington Management who drive individual sector and security selection strategies.
PRINCIPAL RISKS. The principal risks of investing in the Fund are described below. When you sell your shares they may be worth more or less than what you paid for them, which means that you could lose money as a result of your investment. An investment in the Fund is not a bank deposit and is not insured or guaranteed by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation or any other government agency. As with any fund, there is no guarantee that the Fund will achieve its investment objective. For more information regarding risks and investment matters please see “Additional Information Regarding Investment Strategies and Risks” in the Fund’s statutory prospectus.
Market Risk –  Market risk is the risk that one or more markets in which the Fund invests will go down in value, including the possibility that the markets will go down sharply and unpredictably. Securities of a company may decline in value due to its financial prospects and activities, including certain operational impacts, such as data breaches and cybersecurity attacks. Securities may also decline in value due to general market and economic movements and trends, including adverse changes to credit markets, or as a result of other events such as geopolitical events, natural disasters, or widespread pandemics (such as COVID-19) or other adverse public health developments.
Interest Rate Risk –  The risk that your investment may go down in value when interest rates rise, because when interest rates rise, the prices of bonds and fixed rate loans fall. A wide variety of factors can cause interest rates to rise, including central bank monetary policies and inflation rates. Generally, the longer the maturity of a bond or fixed rate loan, the more sensitive it is to this risk. Falling interest rates also create the potential for a decline in the Fund’s income. These risks are greater during periods of rising inflation. Volatility in interest rates and in fixed income markets may increase the risk that the Fund’s investment in fixed income securities will go down in value. Risks associated with rising interest rates are currently heightened because interest rates in the U.S. remain near historic lows and inflation has begun to increase. Actions taken by the Federal Reserve Board or foreign central banks to stimulate or stabilize economic growth, such as decreases or increases in short-term interest rates, may adversely affect markets, which could, in turn, negatively impact Fund performance.
Credit Risk –  Credit risk is the risk that the issuer of a security or other instrument will not be able to make principal and interest payments when due. Changes in an issuer’s financial strength, credit rating or the market’s perception of an issuer’s creditworthiness may also affect the value of the Fund’s investment in that issuer. The degree of credit risk depends on both the financial condition of the issuer and the terms of the obligation. Periods of market volatility may increase credit risk.
Mortgage-Related and Asset-Backed Securities Risk –  Mortgage-related and asset-backed securities represent interests in “pools” of mortgages or other assets, including consumer loans or receivables held in trust. These mortgage-related or asset-backed securities are subject to credit risk, interest rate risk, “prepayment risk” (the risk that borrowers will repay a loan more quickly in periods of falling interest rates) and “extension risk” (the risk that borrowers will repay a loan more slowly in periods of rising interest rates). If the Fund invests in mortgage-related or asset-backed securities that are subordinated to other interests in the same mortgage or asset pool, the Fund may only receive payments after the pool’s obligations to other investors have been satisfied. An unexpectedly high rate of defaults on the mortgages held by a mortgage pool may limit substantially the pool’s ability to make payments of principal or interest to the Fund, reducing the values of those securities or in some cases rendering them worthless. The risk of such defaults is generally higher in the case of mortgage pools that include so-called “subprime” mortgages. The Fund may purchase or sell mortgage-backed securities on a delayed delivery or forward commitment basis through the TBA market.
Uniform Mortgage-Backed Securities, which generally align the characteristics of Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac certificates, are a recent innovation and the effect they may have on the market for mortgage-related securities is uncertain.
To Be Announced (TBA) Transactions Risk –  TBA investments include when-issued and delayed delivery securities and forward commitments. TBA transactions involve the risk that the security the Fund buys will lose value prior to its delivery. The Fund is subject to this risk whether or not the Fund takes delivery of the securities on the settlement date for a transaction. There also is the risk that the security will not be issued or that the other party to the transaction will not meet its obligation. If this occurs, the Fund loses both the investment opportunity for the assets it set aside to pay for the security and any gain in the security’s price. The Fund may also take a short position in a TBA investment when
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it owns or has the right to obtain, at no added cost, identical securities. If the Fund takes such a short position, it may reduce the risk of a loss if the price of the securities declines in the future, but will lose the opportunity to profit if the price rises. TBA transactions may also result in a higher portfolio turnover rate and/or increased capital gains for the Fund.
Derivatives Risk –  Derivatives are instruments whose value depends on, or is derived from, the value of an underlying asset, reference rate or index. Derivatives may be riskier than other types of investments because they may be more sensitive to changes in economic or market conditions than other types of investments and could result in losses that significantly exceed the Fund’s original investment. Successful use of derivative instruments by the Fund depends on the sub-adviser’s judgment with respect to a number of factors and the Fund’s performance could be worse and/or more volatile than if it had not used these instruments. In addition, the fluctuations in the value of derivatives may not correlate perfectly with the value of any portfolio assets being hedged, the performance of the asset class to which the sub-adviser seeks exposure, or the overall securities markets.
Foreign Investments Risk –  Investments in foreign securities may be riskier, more volatile, and less liquid than investments in U.S. securities. Differences between the U.S. and foreign regulatory regimes and securities markets, including the less stringent investor protection, less stringent accounting, corporate governance, financial reporting and disclosure standards of some foreign markets, as well as political and economic developments in foreign countries and regions and the U.S. (including the imposition of sanctions, tariffs, or other governmental restrictions), may affect the value of the Fund’s investments in foreign securities. Changes in currency exchange rates may also adversely affect the Fund’s foreign investments. The impact of the United Kingdom’s departure from the European Union, commonly known as “Brexit,” and the potential departure of one or more other countries from the European Union may have significant political and financial consequences for global markets. This may adversely impact Fund performance.
High Yield Investments Risk –  High yield investments rated below investment grade (also referred to as “junk bonds”) are considered to be speculative and are subject to heightened credit risk, which may make the Fund more sensitive to adverse developments in the U.S. and abroad. Lower rated debt securities generally involve greater risk of default or price changes due to changes in the issuer’s creditworthiness than higher rated debt securities. The market prices of these securities may fluctuate more than those of higher rated securities and may decline significantly in periods of general economic difficulty. There may be little trading in the secondary market for particular debt securities, which may make them more difficult to value or sell.
Emerging Markets Risk –  The risks related to investing in foreign securities are generally greater with respect to investments in companies that conduct their principal business activities in emerging markets or whose securities are traded principally on exchanges in emerging markets. The risks of investing in emerging markets include risks of illiquidity, increased price volatility, smaller market capitalizations, less government regulation and oversight, less extensive and less frequent accounting, financial, auditing and other reporting requirements, significant delays in settlement of trades, risk of loss resulting from problems in share registration and custody and substantial economic and political disruptions. In addition, the imposition of exchange controls (including repatriation restrictions), sanctions, confiscations, trade restrictions (including tariffs) and other government restrictions by the United States and other governments may also result in losses. Frontier markets are those emerging markets that are considered to be among the smallest, least mature and least liquid, and as a result, the risks of investing in emerging markets are magnified in frontier markets.
Currency Risk –  The risk that the value of the Fund’s investments in foreign securities or currencies will be affected by the value of the applicable currency relative to the U.S. dollar. When the Fund sells a foreign currency or foreign currency denominated security, its value may be worth less in U.S. dollars even if the investment increases in value in its local market. U.S. dollar-denominated securities of foreign issuers may also be affected by currency risk, as the revenue earned by issuers of these securities may also be affected by changes in the issuer’s local currency.
Leverage Risk –  Certain transactions, such as the use of derivatives, may give rise to leverage. Leverage can increase market exposure, increase volatility in the Fund, magnify investment risks, and cause losses to be realized more quickly. The use of leverage may cause the Fund to liquidate portfolio positions to satisfy its obligations or to meet asset segregation requirements when it may not be advantageous to do so.
Swaps Risk –  A swap is a contract that generally obligates the parties to exchange payments based on a specified reference security, basket of securities, security index or index component. Swaps can involve greater risks than direct investment in securities because swaps may be leveraged and are subject to counterparty risk (e.g., the risk of a
27

counterparty defaulting on the obligation or bankruptcy), credit risk and pricing risk (i.e., swaps may be difficult to value). Certain swaps may also be considered illiquid. It may not be possible for the Fund to liquidate a swap position at an advantageous time or price, which may result in significant losses.
Futures and Options Risk –  Futures and options may be more volatile than direct investments in the securities underlying the futures and options, may not correlate perfectly to the underlying securities, may involve additional costs, and may be illiquid. Futures and options also may involve the use of leverage as the Fund may make a small initial investment relative to the risk assumed, which could result in losses greater than if futures or options had not been used. Futures and options are also subject to the risk that the other party to the transaction may default on its obligation.
Forward Currency Contracts Risk –  A forward currency contract is an agreement between two parties to buy and sell a currency at a set price on a future date. The market value of a forward currency contract fluctuates with changes in foreign currency exchange rates. While forward foreign currency exchange contracts do not eliminate fluctuations in the value of foreign securities, they do allow the Fund to establish a fixed rate of exchange for a future point in time. Use of such contracts, therefore, can have the effect of reducing returns and minimizing opportunities for gain. The Fund could also lose money when the contract is settled. The Fund’s gains from its positions in forward foreign currency contracts may accelerate and/or recharacterize the Fund’s income or gains and its distributions to shareholders as ordinary income. The Fund’s losses from such positions may also recharacterize the Fund’s income and its distributions to shareholders and may cause a return of capital to Fund shareholders. Such acceleration or recharacterization could affect an investor’s tax liability.
U.S. Government Securities Risk –  Treasury obligations may differ in their interest rates, maturities, times of issuance and other characteristics. Securities backed by the U.S. Treasury or the full faith and credit of the United States are guaranteed only as to the timely payment of interest and principal when held to maturity. Accordingly, the current market values for these securities will fluctuate with changes in interest rates. Obligations of U.S. Government agencies and authorities are supported by varying degrees of credit but generally are not backed by the full faith and credit of the U.S. Government. No assurance can be given that the U.S. Government will provide financial support to its agencies and authorities if it is not obligated by law to do so. In addition, the value of U.S. Government securities may be affected by changes in the credit rating of the U.S. Government. U.S. Government securities are also subject to the risk that the U.S. Treasury will be unable to meet its payment obligations.
Restricted Securities Risk –  Restricted securities are subject to the risk that they may be difficult to sell at the time and price the Fund prefers.
Call Risk –  Call risk is the risk that an issuer, especially during a period of falling interest rates, may redeem a security by repaying it early, which may reduce the Fund’s income if the proceeds are reinvested at lower interest rates.
Liquidity Risk –  The risk that the market for a particular investment or type of investment is or becomes relatively illiquid, making it difficult for the Fund to sell that investment at an advantageous time or price. Illiquidity may be due to events relating to the issuer of the securities, market events, rising interest rates, economic conditions or investor perceptions. Illiquid securities may be difficult to value and their value may be lower than the market price of comparable liquid securities, which would negatively affect the Fund’s performance.
Event Risk –  Event risk is the risk that corporate issuers may undergo restructurings, such as mergers, leveraged buyouts, takeovers, or similar events financed by increased debt. As a result of the added debt, the credit quality and market value of a company’s bonds and/or other debt securities may decline significantly.
Active Investment Management Risk –  The risk that, if the sub-adviser’s investment strategy does not perform as expected, the Fund could underperform its peers or lose money. In addition, to the extent the Fund allocates a portion of its assets to specialist portfolio managers, those styles employed may not be complementary, which could adversely affect the Fund’s performance.
Active Trading Risk –  Active trading could increase the Fund’s transaction costs and may increase your tax liability as compared to a fund with less active trading policies. These effects may adversely affect Fund performance.
Market Price Risk –  The net asset value (“NAV”) of the Fund’s shares and the value of your investment may fluctuate. The market prices of the Fund’s shares will generally fluctuate in accordance with changes in NAV and changes in the intraday value of the Fund’s holdings, as well as the relative supply of and demand for the shares on the Fund’s listing exchange. Although it is expected that the Fund’s shares will remain listed on the exchange, disruptions to creations and redemptions, the existence of market volatility or lack of an active trading market for the shares (including through
28

a trading halt), as well as other factors, may result in the shares trading significantly above (at a premium to) or below (at a discount to) the Fund’s NAV or the intraday value of the Fund’s holdings. During such periods, you may be unable to sell your shares or may incur significant losses if you sell your shares. There are various methods by which investors can purchase and sell shares and various types of orders that may be placed. Investors should consult their financial intermediary before purchasing or selling shares of the Fund. Neither the investment manager nor the Fund’s Sub-Adviser can predict whether the Fund’s shares will trade below, at or above their NAV. Price differences may be due, in large part, to the fact that supply and demand forces at work in the secondary trading market for the Fund’s shares will be closely related to, but not identical to, the same forces influencing the prices of the Fund’s holdings trading individually or in the aggregate at any point in time. In addition, unlike many ETFs, the Fund is not an index fund. The Fund is actively managed and does not seek to replicate the performance of a specified index. There can be no assurance as to whether and/or to what extent the Fund’s shares will trade at premiums or discounts to NAV or to the intraday value of the Fund’s holdings.
Cash Transactions Risk –  The Fund, unlike certain other ETFs, may effect creations and redemptions partly or wholly for cash, rather than through in-kind distributions of securities. Because the Fund may effect redemptions for cash rather than in-kind, the Fund may be required to sell portfolio securities in order to obtain the cash needed to distribute redemption proceeds and it may subsequently recognize gains on such sales that the Fund might not have recognized if it were to distribute portfolio securities in-kind. As a result, an investment in the Fund may be less tax-efficient than an investment in an ETF that primarily or wholly effects creations and redemptions in-kind. Moreover, cash transactions may have to be carried out over several days if the securities markets are relatively illiquid at the time the Fund must sell securities and may involve considerable brokerage fees and taxes. These brokerage fees and taxes, which will be higher than if the Fund sold and redeemed its shares principally in-kind, will be passed on to purchasers and redeemers of Creation Units in the form of creation and redemption transaction fees. As a result of these factors, the spreads between the bid and the offered prices of the Fund’s shares may be wider than those of shares of ETFs that primarily or wholly transact in-kind.
Authorized Participant Concentration Risk –  Only an authorized participant may engage in creation or redemption transactions directly with the Fund. The Fund has a limited number of intermediaries that act as authorized participants, and none of these authorized participants are or will be obligated to engage in creation or redemption transactions. To the extent that these intermediaries exit the business or are unable to or choose not to proceed with creation and/or redemption orders with respect to the Fund and no other authorized participant is able to step forward to create or redeem, Fund shares may trade at a discount to NAV and possibly face trading halts and/or delisting.
The Fund is subject to certain other risks, which are discussed in “Additional Information Regarding Investment Strategies and Risks” in the Fund’s statutory prospectus.
PAST PERFORMANCE. The performance information below provides some indication of the risks of investing in the Fund by comparing the Fund’s performance to a broad measure of market performance. Keep in mind that past performance does not indicate future results. Updated performance information is available at hartfordfunds.com.
The bar chart shows the Fund’s performance for each calendar year since the Fund’s inception.
Total returns by calendar year
During the periods shown in the chart above:
Returns
Quarter Ended
Best Quarter Return
6.02%
June 30, 2020
Worst Quarter Return
-1.58%
March 31, 2018
The
year-to-date
return of the Fund as of
September 30, 2021
was
-0.90%
.
29

Average Annual Total Returns. The table below shows returns for the Fund over time compared to those of a broad-based market index. After-tax returns are calculated using the historical highest individual U.S. federal marginal income tax rates and do not reflect the impact of state and local taxes. In some instances, the “Return After Taxes on Distributions and Sale of Fund Shares” may be greater than “Return Before Taxes” because the investor is assumed to be able to use the capital loss from the sale of Fund shares to offset other taxable gains. Actual after-tax returns, which depend on an investor’s particular tax situation, may differ from those shown and are not relevant to investors who hold their Fund shares through tax-deferred arrangements, such as 401(k) plans or individual retirement accounts. Updated performance information is available by visiting our website at hartfordfunds.com.
Average annual total returns for periods ending December 31, 2020
 
Since Inception
Hartford Total Return Bond ETF
1 Year
(9/27/2017)
Return Before Taxes
8.94%
5.79%
Return After Taxes on Distributions
6.86%
3.96%
Return After Taxes on Distributions and Sale of Fund Shares
5.29%
3.65%
Bloomberg U.S. Aggregate Bond Index (reflects no deduction for fees, expenses or taxes)
7.51%
5.05%
MANAGEMENT. The Fund’s investment manager is Hartford Funds Management Company, LLC. The Fund’s sub-adviser is Wellington Management.
Portfolio Manager
Title
Involved with
Fund Since
Joseph F. Marvan, CFA
Senior Managing Director and Fixed Income Portfolio Manager
2017
Campe Goodman, CFA
Senior Managing Director and Fixed Income Portfolio Manager
2017
Robert D. Burn, CFA
Managing Director and Fixed Income Portfolio Manager
2017
PURCHASE AND SALE OF FUND SHARES. The Fund is an exchange-traded fund (“ETF”). Individual Fund shares may only be purchased and sold on a national securities exchange through a broker-dealer and may not be purchased or redeemed directly with the Fund. The price of Fund shares is based on market price, and because ETF shares trade at market prices rather than at NAV, shares may trade at a price greater than NAV (a premium) or less than NAV (a discount). When buying and selling Fund shares on an exchange, therefore, investors may incur costs related to the difference between the highest price a buyer is willing to pay to purchase Fund shares (bid) and the lowest price a seller is willing to accept for Fund shares (ask) (the “bid-ask spread”). The Fund will only issue or redeem shares at NAV that have been aggregated into blocks of shares (“Creation Units”) to authorized participants (“Authorized Participants”) who have entered into participation agreements with the Fund‘s distributor, ALPS Distributors, Inc. (the “Distributor”). The Fund will issue or redeem Creation Units in return for a basket of securities and/or cash that the Fund specifies each business day. Additional information about the Fund, including the Fund’s net asset value, market price, premiums and discounts and bid-ask spreads can be found at hartfordfunds.com.
TAX INFORMATION. The Fund’s distributions are generally taxable, and may be taxed as ordinary income or capital gains, unless you are investing through a tax-deferred arrangement, such as a 401(k) plan or an individual retirement account. Such tax-deferred arrangements may be taxed later upon withdrawal of monies from those arrangements.
PAYMENTS TO BROKER-DEALERS AND OTHER FINANCIAL INTERMEDIARIES. If you purchase shares of the Fund through a broker-dealer or other financial intermediary (such as a bank or financial advisor), the Fund’s related companies may pay the intermediary for services and/or data related to the sale of Fund shares. These payments may create a conflict of interest by influencing the broker-dealer or other intermediary and your financial advisor to recommend the Fund over another investment. Ask your financial advisor or visit your financial intermediary’s website for more information.
30

Summary Information About the Exchange-Traded Funds
This prospectus describes five ETFs: Hartford Core Bond ETF (the “Core Bond ETF”), Hartford Municipal Opportunities ETF (the “Municipal Opportunities ETF”), Hartford Short Duration ETF (the “Short Duration ETF”), Hartford Schroders Tax-Aware Bond ETF (the “Tax-Aware Bond ETF”), and Hartford Total Return Bond ETF (the “Total Return Bond ETF“) (each a “Fund” and collectively, the “Funds”), each a series of Hartford Funds Exchange-Traded Trust (the “Trust”).
The Funds provide access to the professional investment advisory services offered by Hartford Funds Management Company, LLC (“HFMC”); Wellington Management Company LLP (“Wellington Management”) for Core Bond ETF, Municipal Opportunities ETF, Short Duration ETF and Total Return Bond ETF; and Schroder Investment Management North America Inc. (“SIMNA”) and Schroder Investment Management North America Limited (“SIMNA Ltd.” or together with SIMNA, the “Schroders”) for Tax-Aware Bond ETF. ETFs are funds that trade on an exchange like other publicly-traded securities and may be designed to track an index or to be actively managed. The Funds are actively managed and do not seek to replicate the performance of a specified index. Unlike shares of a mutual fund, which all shareholders can buy or redeem directly from the issuing fund at a price based on Net Asset Value (“NAV”), only Authorized Participants may buy and redeem shares of the Funds directly from the Funds at NAV. Also, unlike shares of a mutual fund, shares of the Funds are listed on a national securities exchange and trade in the secondary market at market prices that change throughout the day.
Shares of Municipal Opportunities ETF, Tax-Aware Bond ETF and Total Return Bond ETF are listed and traded at market prices on the NYSE Arca, Inc. (“NYSE Arca”) and shares of Core Bond ETF and Short Duration ETF are listed and traded on Cboe BZX Exchange, Inc. (“Cboe BZX”). Shares of the Funds may be listed and trade on other secondary markets. The market price for each Fund’s shares may be different from that Fund’s NAV. Each Fund issues and redeems shares at NAV only in Creation Units, which only Authorized Participants may purchase or redeem directly with a Fund at NAV. These transactions are in exchange for securities and/or cash. Except when aggregated in Creation Units, shares of a Fund are not redeemable securities. Shareholders who are not Authorized Participants may not purchase or redeem shares directly from a Fund.
An investment in a Fund should not by itself constitute an entire investment program. This prospectus explains what you should know about the Funds before you invest. Please read it carefully. Investors should be aware that the investments made by the Funds and the results achieved by the Funds at any given time are not expected to be the same as those made by other funds for which HFMC acts as investment manager/adviser, or for which Wellington Management or Schroders act as sub-adviser, including funds with names, investment objectives and policies similar to the Funds. Certain affiliates of the Funds and HFMC may purchase and resell Fund shares pursuant to this Prospectus.
Additional information about the Funds, including Fund fact sheets, and information regarding each Fund’s net asset value, market price, bid-ask spreads and the number of days that the Fund’s shares traded on NYSE Arca or Cboe BZX at a price above (i.e., at a premium) or below (i.e., at a discount) the NAV of the Fund during the prior calendar year and subsequent quarters, when available, can be found at hartfordfunds.com.
31

Additional Information Regarding Investment Strategies and Risks
Information about each Fund’s investment objective and principal strategy is provided in the summary section of this prospectus. Additional information regarding the investment strategy and other investment policies for each of the Funds is provided below.
Core Bond ETF
In addition to the principal strategies set forth in the summary section of this Prospectus, the Fund may invest in emerging markets issuers, enter into bond forwards and forward currency contracts and engage in short selling with respect to its TBA investments. The Fund may also invest in dollar rolls and in other investment companies and exchange traded notes. The Fund may invest in loans and loan participations, credit risk transfer securities, inflation protected securities, repurchase agreements, warrants and zero coupon securities. While the Fund will not make direct purchases of common stock, from time to time the Fund will hold positions in common stock as a result of certain events, such as among other things the exercise of conversion rights or warrants, as well as restructurings or bankruptcy plans of reorganization with respect to an issuer’s securities held by the Fund. The Fund normally will maintain a dollar weighted average duration within 1.5 years relative to the Fund’s performance benchmark. Duration is a measure of the sensitivity of a fixed income security’s price to changes in interest rates. For example, the price of a bond fund with an average duration of two years would be expected to fall approximately 2% if interest rates rose by one percentage point.
In managing the Fund’s portfolio, Wellington Management emphasizes identification of structural and cyclical themes that may unfold over the intermediate to long term complemented by shorter-term opportunistic themes created by market dislocations. Wellington Management may also consider certain environmental, social and/or governance (ESG) factors during its assessment. These ESG factors are not the only factors considered and as result, certain companies in which the Fund invests may not be considered ESG companies or have high ESG ratings.
“Investment grade” quality means securities that are rated at the time of purchase within the four highest categories assigned by Moody’s Investor Services, Inc. (“Aaa”, “Aa”, “A” or “Baa”) or Standard & Poor’s (“AAA”, “AA”, “A” or “BBB”) or Fitch, Inc. (“AAA”, “AA”, “A” or “BBB”) or are unrated securities that are judged by Wellington Management to be of comparable quality to securities rated within these four highest categories.
Municipal Opportunities ETF
In addition to the principal strategies described in the summary section of this Prospectus, the Fund may invest in non-investment grade municipal securities, which are securities issued by state and local governments and their agencies or instrumentalities that are rated “Ba” or lower by Moody’s Investor Services, Inc. (“Moody’s”), “BB” or lower by Standard & Poor’s (“S&P”) or “BB” or lower by Fitch, Inc. (“Fitch”), or securities which, if unrated, are determined by Wellington Management to be of comparable quality. Non-investment grade securities are commonly referred to as “high yield-high risk” or “junk bonds.” Although the Fund does not have restrictions regarding maturity or duration, the Fund tends to have an average maturity of 5 –  25 years. As a secondary investment strategy, the Fund may use derivatives and may invest in variable rate bonds known as “inverse floaters” which pay interest at rates that bear an inverse relationship to changes in short-term market interest rates. The Fund may use derivatives to manage portfolio risk, to replicate securities the Fund could buy that are not currently available in the market or for other investment purposes.
The sub-adviser, Wellington Management, combines top-down strategy with bottom-up fundamental research and comprehensive risk management within the portfolio construction process. Bottom-up, internally generated, fundamental research attempts to identify relative value among sectors, within sectors, and between individual securities. Wellington Management considers financially material ESG factors during its research process. Wellington Management believes factors, such as climate risk, governance practices, as well as other factors, can have an impact on the performance of the securities in which it invests and present potential risk. Examples of such factors include: extreme weather, wildfires, demographic trends, data quality and protection, and the independence, effectiveness, and composition of an issuer’s board of directors. As a part of its analysis on each issuer, Wellington Management assesses how ESG risks impact municipal fundamentals and whether valuations compensate for that risk. Wellington Management leverages the analysis of its dedicated ESG and Climate Research teams in its ESG research. Wellington Management also engages with certain issuers regarding governance practices as well as what it deems to be materially important environmental and/or social issues facing an issuer.
The Fund may also (1) enter into repurchase and reverse repurchase agreements; (2) invest in other ETFs and exchange-traded notes; and (3) invest in privately placed, restricted securities that may only be resold under certain circumstances to other qualified institutional buyers.
32

Short Duration ETF
In addition to the principal strategies set forth in the summary section of this Prospectus, the Fund may enter into bond forwards and may invest in when-issued and delayed delivery securities and forward commitment transactions. Such investments may include mortgage-backed securities acquired or sold in the “to be announced” (TBA) market. The Fund may also invest in other investment companies, exchange traded notes, emerging market securities and non-dollar securities. The Fund normally will maintain a dollar weighted average duration of less than 3 years. Duration is a measure of the sensitivity of a fixed income security’s price to changes in interest rates. For example, the price of a bond fund with an average duration of two years would be expected to fall approximately 2% if interest rates rose by one percentage point.
The sub-adviser, Wellington Management, uses proprietary research to conduct value-driven sector rotation and intensive credit and structure analyses, while using interest rate management, within the portfolio construction process. Wellington Management seeks to add value from top-down sector rotation decisions, bottom-up security selection within sectors, and interest rate management. When evaluating investments for the Fund, Wellington Management has access to proprietary environmental, social and/or governance (“ESG”) research to help evaluate a company’s (or issuer’s) risk and return potential. Wellington Management believes financially material ESG factors can impact the performance of the companies (or issuers) in which it invests. Wellington Management has discretion to determine the level at which financially material ESG factors are imbedded into its overall fundamental analysis. Wellington Management also engages with management of certain companies (or issuers) regarding corporate governance practices as well as what it deems to be materially important environmental and/or social issues facing a company (or issuer).
“Investment grade” quality means securities that are rated at the time of purchase within the four highest categories assigned by Moody’s (“Aaa”, “Aa”, “A” or “Baa”) or S&P (“AAA”, “AA”, “A” or “BBB”) or Fitch (“AAA”, “AA”, “A” or “BBB”) or are unrated securities that are judged by Wellington Management to be of comparable quality to securities rated within these four highest categories. The Fund normally will maintain an average credit quality that is equivalent to at least Moody’s “Baa3” rating.
Tax-Aware Bond ETF
In addition to the principal strategies described in the summary section, the Fund may also invest in structured securities, inverse floaters, loans, inflation-protected securities, collateralized loan obligations, zero coupon securities, and restricted securities that may only be resold under certain circumstances to other qualified institutional buyers. The Fund may also invest in other investment companies, including exchange-traded funds.
The Fund may invest in fixed income securities of any maturity or duration. The Fund’s effective duration may vary over time depending on the Sub-Advisers’ assessment of market and economic conditions and other factors. Duration is a measure of a bond price’s sensitivity to a given change in interest rates; effective duration is a measure of the Fund’s portfolio duration adjusted for the anticipated effect of interest rate changes on pre-payment rates. Generally, the higher a bond’s duration, the greater its price sensitivity to a change in interest rates. In contrast to duration, maturity measures only the time until final payment is due. With respect to its ESG analysis discussed in the summary section, the Sub-Advisers integrate financially material ESG criteria into all phases of the investment process, from stock selection to portfolio construction and engagement. The Sub-Advisers believe that this ESG assessment, which is integrated with more traditional methods, is an important consideration to understand the potential of a company. The Sub-Advisers engage with management of certain issuers regarding corporate governance practices as well as what the Sub-Advisers deem to be materially important environmental and/or social issues facing a company. The emphasis that the Sub-Advisers place on various factors when purchasing and selling securities for the Fund may change with changes in the markets. The emphasis that the Sub-Advisers place on various factors when purchasing and selling securities for the Fund may change with changes in the markets. Sector allocation and individual security decisions are made independent of sector and security weightings in the benchmark.
Total Return Bond ETF
In addition to the principal strategies described in the summary section, the Fund may invest up to 15% of its net assets in bank loans or loan participation interests in secured or unsecured variable, fixed or floating rate loans to U.S. and foreign corporations, partnerships and other entities. The Fund may invest up to 15% of its net assets in preferred stocks, convertible securities, and securities accompanied by warrants to purchase equity securities. While the Fund will not make direct purchases of common stock, from time to time the Fund will hold positions in common stock as a result of certain events, such as among other things the exercise of conversion rights or warrants, as well as restructurings or bankruptcy plans of reorganization with respect to an issuer’s securities held by the Fund. As part of
33

the Fund’s secondary investment strategy, the Fund may (1) engage in short-selling of “to-be-announced” investments; (2) use dollar rolls; (3) enter into bond forwards; (4) invest in other investment companies, including exchange-traded funds; (5) invest in exchange traded notes; (6) invest in collateralized loan obligations (CLOs); and (7) invest in credit risk transfer securities.
Any security rated “Ba” or lower by Moody’s, “BB” or lower by S&P or “BB” or lower by Fitch, or securities which, if unrated, are determined by Wellington Management to be of comparable quality, are below-investment-grade. Securities rated below-investment-grade are commonly referred to as “high yield-high risk” or “junk bonds.”
The sub-adviser, Wellington Management, emphasizes identification of structural and cyclical themes that may unfold over the intermediate to long term complemented by shorter-term opportunistic themes created by market dislocations. When evaluating investments for the Fund, Wellington Management has access to proprietary environmental, social and/or governance (“ESG”) research to help evaluate a company’s (or issuer’s) risk and return potential. Wellington Management believes financially material ESG factors can impact the performance of the companies (or issuers) in which it invests. Wellington Management has discretion to determine the level at which financially material ESG factors are imbedded into its overall fundamental analysis. Wellington Management also engages with management of certain companies (or issuers) regarding corporate governance practices as well as what it deems to be materially important environmental and/or social issues facing a company (or issuer).
34

More Information About Risks
The principal and certain additional risks of investing in each Fund are described below. When you sell your shares they may be worth more or less than what you paid for them, which means that you could lose money as a result of your investment. Many factors affect each Fund’s performance. An investment in a Fund is not a bank deposit and is not insured or guaranteed by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation or any other government agency. There is no assurance that a Fund will achieve its investment objective, and you should not consider any one fund alone to be a complete investment program. The different types of securities, investments, and investment techniques used by each Fund have varying degrees of risk. The Funds’ combined statement of additional information (“SAI”) contains more detailed information about the Funds’ investment policies and risks.
√ Principal Risk
X Additional Risk
Core Bond
ETF
Municipal
Opportunities
ETF
Short
Duration ETF
Tax-Aware
Bond ETF
Total Return
Bond ETF
Active Investment Management Risk
Active Trading Risk
 
 
Authorized Participant Concentration Risk
Bond Forwards Risk
X
 
X
 
X
Call Risk
Cash Transactions Risk
Convertible Securities Risk
X
 
X
 
X
Counterparty Risk
X
X
X
X
Credit Risk
Credit Risk Transfer Securities Risk
X
 
X
 
X
Currency Risk
X
 
X
 
Derivatives Risk
X
Forward Currency Contracts Risk
X
 
X
 
Forward Rate Agreements Risk
 
X
 
 
 
Futures and Options Risk
X
Hedging Risk
X
X
X
X
X
Swaps Risk
 
Dollar Rolls Risk
X
 
X
 
X
Exchange Traded Funds Risk
X
X
X
X
X
Exchange Traded Notes Risk
X
X
X
X
X
Event Risk
X
 
Foreign Investments Risk
 
Sovereign Debt Risk
X
 
X
 
X
Emerging Markets Risk
X
 
X
X
High Yield Investments Risk
 
 
Illiquid Investments Risk
X
X
X
X
X
Inflation Risk
X
X
X
X
X
Inflation-Protected Securities Risk
X
 
X
X
X
Interest Rate Risk
Inverse Floater Risk
 
X
 
 
 
Issuer Risk
X
X
X
X
X
Large Shareholder Transaction Risk
X
X
X
X
X
Leverage Risk
X
LIBOR Risk
X
X
X
X
X
Liquidity Risk
Loans and Loan Participations Risk
X
 
 
X
Market Price Risk
Market Risk
Mortgage-Related and Other Asset-Backed Securities Risk
 
35

√ Principal Risk
X Additional Risk
Core Bond
ETF
Municipal
Opportunities
ETF
Short
Duration ETF
Tax-Aware
Bond ETF
Total Return
Bond ETF
Collateralized Loan Obligations Risk
 
X
X
X
Municipal Securities Risk
 
X
 
New Fund Risk
X
 
 
 
 
No Guarantee of Active Trading Market Risk
X
X
X
X
X
Other Investment Companies Risk
X
X
X
X
X
Repurchase Agreements Risk
X
X
X
 
 
Restricted Securities Risk
X
X
Reverse Repurchase Agreements Risk
 
X
 
 
 
Secondary Trading Market Issues
X
X
X
X
X
Securities Lending Risk
X
X
X
X
X
State-Specific Risk
 
X
 
 
Taxable Income Risk
 
X
 
 
 
To Be Announced (TBA) Transactions Risk
 
X
Short Sales of To Be Announced (TBA) Securities Risk
X
 
 
 
X
Unsecured Loans Risk
 
 
 
 
X
Use as an Underlying Fund Risk
X
 
X
X
X
U.S. Government Securities Risk
 
Valuation Risk
X
X
X
X
X
Volatility Risk
X
 
X
 
X
Warrants Risk
X
 
 
 
X
Zero Coupon Securities Risk
X
 
X
 
 
ACTIVE INVESTMENT MANAGEMENT RISK –  The risk that, if the investment decisions and strategy of the portfolio manager(s) do not perform as expected, a Fund could underperform its peers or lose money. A Fund’s performance depends on the judgment of the portfolio manager(s) about a variety of factors, such as markets, interest rates and/or the attractiveness, relative value, liquidity, or potential appreciation of particular investments made for the Fund’s portfolio. The portfolio manager(s)’ investment models may not adequately take into account certain factors, may perform differently than anticipated and may result in a Fund having a lower return than if the portfolio managers used another model or investment strategy. In addition, to the extent a Fund allocates a portion of its assets to specialist portfolio managers, the styles employed by the different portfolio managers may not be complementary, which could adversely affect the Fund’s performance.
The ESG characteristics that may be evaluated as part of a Fund’s investment process are anticipated to evolve over time and one or more characteristics may not be relevant with respect to all issuers that are eligible for investment. The relevance and weightings of specific ESG characteristics to the investment process varies across asset classes, sectors and strategies. With respect to a Fund that integrates or may consider ESG characteristics as part of the investment process, ESG characteristics are not the only factors that may be considered by the portfolio manager(s) and as a result, the companies (or issuers) in which a Fund invests may not be companies (or issuers) with favorable ESG characteristics or high ESG ratings. Further, the regulatory landscape with respect to ESG investing in the United States is still developing and future rules and regulations may require a Fund to modify or alter its investment process with respect to ESG integration or consideration.
ACTIVE TRADING RISK –  Active trading could increase a Fund’s transaction costs and may increase your tax liability as compared to a fund with less active trading policies. These effects may also adversely affect Fund performance.
AUTHORIZED PARTICIPANT CONCENTRATION RISK –  Only an authorized participant may engage in creation or redemption transactions directly with a Fund. A Fund has a limited number of intermediaries that act as authorized participants, and none of these authorized participants are or will be obligated to engage in creation or redemption transactions. To the extent that these intermediaries exit the business or are unable to or choose not to proceed with creation and/or redemption orders with respect to a Fund and no other authorized participant is able to step forward to create or redeem, Fund shares may trade at a discount to NAV and possibly face trading halts and/or delisting.
BOND FORWARDS RISK –  A bond forward is a contractual agreement between a Fund and another party to buy or sell an underlying asset at an agreed-upon future price and date. When a Fund enters into a bond forward, it will also simultaneously enter into a reverse repurchase agreement. In a bond forward transaction, no cash premium is paid
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when the parties enter into the bond forward. If the transaction is collateralized, an exchange of margin collateral will take place according to an agreed-upon schedule. Otherwise, no asset of any kind changes hands until the bond forward matures (typically in 30 days) or is rolled over for another agreed-upon period. Generally, the value of the bond forward will change based on changes in the value of the underlying asset. Bond forwards are subject to market risk (the risk that the market value of the underlying bond may change), non-correlation risk (the risk that the market value of the bond forward might move independently of the market value of the underlying bond) and counterparty credit risk (the risk that a counterparty will be unable to meet its obligation under the contract). If there is no cash exchanged at the time a Fund enters into the bond forward, counterparty risk may be limited to the loss of any marked-to-market profit on the contract and any delays or limitations on the Fund’s ability to sell or otherwise use the investments used as collateral for the bond forward. Reverse repurchase agreements involve the sale of securities held by a Fund with an agreement to repurchase the securities at an agreed-upon price, date and interest payment. Reverse repurchase agreements carry the risk that the market value of the securities that a Fund is obligated to repurchase may decline below the repurchase price. A Fund could also lose money if it is unable to recover the securities and/or the value of any collateral held or assets segregated by the Fund to cover the transaction declines below the value of securities. The use of reverse repurchase agreements may increase the possibility of fluctuation in a Fund’s NAV.
CALL RISK –  Call risk is the risk that an issuer, especially during periods of falling interest rates, may redeem a security by repaying it early. If an issuer calls a security in which a Fund has invested, the Fund may not recoup the full amount of its initial investment and may be forced to reinvest in lower-yielding securities, securities with greater credit risks or securities with other, less favorable features. This could potentially lower a Fund’s income, yield and distributions to shareholders.
CASH TRANSACTIONS RISK –  A Fund may effect creations and redemptions partly or wholly for cash, rather than through in-kind distributions of securities. As a result, an investment in a Fund may be less tax-efficient than an investment in an ETF that effects creations and redemptions primarily or wholly in-kind. ETFs generally are able to make in-kind redemptions and thereby avoid being taxed on gains on the distributed portfolio securities at the Fund level. When a Fund effects redemptions partly or wholly for cash, rather than in-kind, it may be required to sell portfolio securities in order to obtain the cash needed to distribute redemption proceeds, which involves transaction costs. If a Fund realizes a gain on these sales, the Fund generally will be required to recognize a gain it might not otherwise have recognized, or to recognize such gain sooner than would otherwise be required if it were to distribute portfolio securities in-kind. A Fund generally distributes these gains to shareholders to avoid capital gains taxes at the Fund level and the need to otherwise comply with the special tax rules that apply to such gains. This strategy may cause shareholders to be subject to tax on gains to which they would not otherwise be subject, or at an earlier date than if they had made an investment in a different ETF. Moreover, cash transactions may have to be carried out over several days if the securities markets are relatively illiquid at the time the Fund must sell securities and may involve considerable brokerage fees and taxes. These brokerage fees and taxes, which will be higher than if a Fund sold and redeemed its shares principally in-kind, will be passed on to purchasers and redeemers of Creation Units in the form of creation and redemption transaction fees. As a result of these factors, the spreads between the bid and the offered prices of a Fund’s shares may be wider than those of shares of ETFs that primarily or wholly transact in-kind.
CONVERTIBLE SECURITIES RISK –  The market value of a convertible security typically performs like that of a regular debt security; that is, if market interest rates rise, the value of a convertible security usually falls. In addition, convertible securities are subject to the risk that the issuer will not be able to pay interest or dividends when due, and their market value may change based on changes in the issuer’s credit rating or the market’s perception of the issuer’s creditworthiness. Since it derives a portion of its value from the common stock into which it may be converted, a convertible security is also subject to the same types of market and issuer risk that apply to the underlying common stock. A convertible security tends to perform more like a stock when the underlying stock price is high relative to the conversion price (because more of the security’s value resides in the option to convert) and more like a debt security when the underlying stock price is low relative to the conversion price (because the option to convert is less valuable).
A Fund may invest in contingent capital securities (also known as contingent convertible securities or CoCos). CoCos are a form of hybrid debt security that are intended to either convert into equity or have their principal written down upon the occurrence of certain “triggers.” The value of CoCos is unpredictable and will be influenced by many factors including, without limitation: (i) the creditworthiness of the issuer and/or fluctuations in such issuer’s applicable capital ratios; (ii) supply and demand for the CoCos; (iii) general market conditions and available liquidity; and (iv) economic, financial and political events that affect the issuer, its particular market or the financial markets in general. Investments in CoCos may be considered speculative.
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COUNTERPARTY RISK –  With respect to certain transactions, such as over-the-counter derivatives contracts or repurchase agreements, a Fund will be exposed to the risk that the counterparty to the transaction may be unable or unwilling to make timely principal, interest or settlement payments, or otherwise to honor its obligations. In the event of a bankruptcy or insolvency of a counterparty, a Fund could experience delays in liquidating its positions and significant losses, including declines in the value of its investment during the period in which the Fund seeks to enforce its rights, the inability to realize any gains on its investment during such period and any fees and expenses incurred in enforcing its rights. A Fund also bears the risk of loss of the amount expected to be received under a derivative transaction in the event of the default or bankruptcy of a counterparty. Over-the-counter derivatives may not offer a Fund the same level of protection as exchange traded derivatives.
CREDIT RISK –  Credit risk is the risk that the issuer of a security or other instrument will not be able to make principal and interest payments when due. Changes in an issuer’s financial strength, credit rating or the market’s perception of an issuer’s creditworthiness may also affect the value of the Fund’s investment in that issuer. The degree of credit risk depends on both the financial condition of the issuer and the terms of the obligation. Periods of market volatility may increase credit risk.
CREDIT RISK TRANSFER SECURITIES RISK –  Credit risk transfer (“CRT”) securities are fixed income securities that transfer the credit risk related to certain types of mortgage-backed securities (“MBS”) to the owner of the CRT securities. If the underlying mortgages default, the principal of the owners of CRT securities is used to pay back holders of the MBS. As a result, all or part of the mortgage default or credit risk associated with the underlying mortgage pools is transferred to a Fund. Therefore, a Fund could lose all or part of its investments in CRT securities in the event of default by the underlying mortgages.
CURRENCY RISK –  The risk that the value of a Fund’s investments in foreign securities or currencies will be affected by the value of the applicable currency relative to the U.S. dollar. When a Fund sells a foreign currency or foreign currency denominated security, its value may be worth less in U.S. dollars even if the investment increases in value in its local market. U.S. dollar-denominated securities of foreign issuers may also be affected by currency risk, as the revenue earned by issuers of these securities may also be affected by changes in the issuer’s local currency. Currency markets generally are not as regulated as securities markets. The dollar value of foreign investments may be affected by exchange controls. A Fund may be positively or negatively affected by governmental strategies intended to make the U.S. dollar, or other currencies in which a Fund invests, stronger or weaker. Currency risk may be particularly high to the extent that a Fund invests in foreign securities or currencies that are economically tied to emerging market countries.
DERIVATIVES RISK –  A Fund may use derivatives for investment purposes and/or for hedging purposes, including anticipatory hedges. Derivatives are instruments whose value depends on, or is derived from, the value of an underlying asset, reference rate or index. Successful use of derivative instruments by a Fund depends on the sub-adviser’s judgment with respect to a number of factors and a Fund’s performance may be worse and/or more volatile than if it had not used these instruments. Derivatives may involve significant risks, including:
Counterparty/Credit Risk - the risk that the party on the other side of the transaction will be unable to honor its financial obligation to a Fund.
Currency Risk - the risk that changes in the exchange rate between currencies will adversely affect the value (in U.S. dollar terms) of an investment.
Leverage Risk - the risk associated with certain types of investments or trading strategies that relatively small market movements may result in large changes in the value of an investment. Certain investments or trading strategies that involve leverage can result in losses that greatly exceed the amount originally invested.
Liquidity Risk - the risk that certain investments may be difficult or impossible to sell at the time that the seller would like or at the price that the seller believes the security is currently worth, which could expose a Fund to losses and could make derivatives more difficult for a Fund to value accurately.
Index Risk - if the derivative is linked to the performance of an index, it will be subject to the risks associated with changes in that index. If the index changes, a Fund could receive lower interest payments or experience a reduction in the value of the derivative to below what a Fund paid. Certain indexed securities, including inverse securities (which move in an opposite direction to the index), may create leverage, to the extent that they increase or decrease in value at a rate that is a multiple of the changes in the applicable index. For this reason, a Fund’s investment in these instruments may decline significantly in value if index levels move in a way that is not anticipated.
Regulatory Risk - Government legislation or regulation may make derivatives more costly, may limit the availability of derivatives, or may otherwise adversely affect the use, value or performance of derivatives. In October 2020, the SEC adopted new regulations applicable to a Fund’s use of derivatives, short sales, reverse repurchase agreements, and certain other instruments that will, among other things, require a Fund to adopt a derivatives risk management
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program and appoint a derivatives risk manager that will manage the program and communicate to the board of trustees of a Fund. However, subject to certain conditions, funds that do not invest heavily in derivatives may be deemed limited derivatives users and would not be subject to the full requirements of the new rule. The SEC also eliminated the asset segregation and cover framework arising from prior SEC guidance for covering derivatives and certain financial instruments, as discussed herein, effective at the time that the Fund complies with the new rule. The new rule could impact the effectiveness or raise the costs of a Fund’s derivatives transactions, impede the employment of the Fund’s derivatives strategies, or adversely affect Fund performance and cause the Fund to lose value. Compliance with the new rule will be required in August 2022.
Tax Risk - The tax treatment of a derivative may not be as favorable as a direct investment in the underlying asset. The use of derivatives may adversely affect the timing, character and amount of income a Fund realizes from its investments, and could impair the ability of the sub-adviser to use derivatives when it wishes to do so.
Short Position Risk - A Fund may also take a short position in a derivative instrument, such as a future, forward or swap. A short position in a derivative instrument involves the risk of a theoretically unlimited increase in the value of the underlying instrument which could cause a Fund to suffer a (potentially unlimited) loss.
If a Fund’s derivative investments represent a significant portion of its portfolio, a Fund’s exposure could far exceed the value of its portfolio securities and its investment performance could be primarily dependent upon securities it does not own.
FORWARD CURRENCY CONTRACTS RISK –  A forward currency contract is an agreement between two parties to buy and sell a currency at a set price on a future date. A Fund may enter into forward currency contracts in connection with settling purchases or sales of securities, to hedge the currency exposure associated with some or all of the Fund’s investments or as part of its investment strategy. The market value of a forward currency contract fluctuates with changes in foreign currency exchange rates. Forward foreign currency exchange contracts do not eliminate fluctuations in the value of foreign securities but allow a Fund to establish a fixed rate of exchange for a future point in time. Forward currency contracts involve the risk that anticipated currency movements will not be accurately predicted, which could result in losses on those contracts and additional transaction costs. Use of such contracts, therefore, can have the effect of reducing returns and minimizing opportunities for gain. A Fund could also lose money when the contract is settled. A Fund’s gains from its positions in forward foreign currency contracts may accelerate and/or recharacterize the Fund’s income or gains and its distributions to shareholders as ordinary income. A Fund’s losses from such positions may also recharacterize the Fund’s income and its distributions to shareholders and may cause a return of capital to Fund shareholders. Such acceleration or recharacterization could affect an investor’s tax liability.
FORWARD RATE AGREEMENTS RISK –  A forward rate agreement is an agreement where the buyer locks in an interest rate at a future settlement date (“lock rate”). If the interest rate on the settlement date exceeds the lock rate, the buyer pays the seller the difference between the two rates. If the lock rate exceeds the interest rate on the settlement date, the seller pays the buyer the difference between the two rates. These transactions are subject to counterparty risk and the risk that a Fund will lose money if the Sub-Adviser predicts interest rate changes incorrectly.
FUTURES AND OPTIONS RISK –  An option is an agreement that, for a premium payment or fee, gives the purchaser the right but not the obligation to buy or sell the underlying asset at a specified price during a period of time or on a specified date, or receive a cash settlement payment. A future is a contract that obligates the purchaser to take delivery, and the seller to make delivery, of a specific amount of an asset at a specified future date at a specified price, or make a cash settlement payment. Futures and options are subject to the risk that the sub-adviser may incorrectly predict the direction of securities prices, interest rates, currency exchange rates and other economic factors that may affect the value of the underlying asset. Futures and options may be more volatile than direct investments in the securities underlying the futures and options and may not correlate perfectly to the underlying securities. Futures and options also involve additional expenses as compared to investing directly in the underlying securities, which could reduce any benefit or increase any loss to a Fund from using the strategy. Futures and options may also involve the use of leverage as a Fund may make a small initial investment relative to the risk assumed, which could result in losses greater than if futures or options had not been used. Futures and options transactions may be effected on securities exchanges or, in the case of certain options, in the over-the-counter market. When options are purchased over-the-counter, a Fund bears the risk that the counterparty that wrote the option will be unable or unwilling to perform its obligations under the contract. Futures and options may also be illiquid, and in such cases, a Fund may have difficulty closing out its position or valuing the contract. Options on foreign currencies are affected by the factors that influence foreign exchange rates and investments generally. A Fund’s ability to establish and close out positions on foreign currency options is subject to the maintenance of a liquid secondary market, and there can be no assurance that a liquid secondary market will exist for a particular option at any specific time.
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HEDGING RISK –  Hedging is a strategy in which a Fund uses a derivative to offset the risks associated with other Fund holdings. While hedging can reduce losses, it can also reduce or eliminate gains or cause losses if the market moves in a manner different from that anticipated by a Fund or if the cost of the derivative outweighs the benefit of the hedge. Hedging also involves the risk that changes in the value of the derivative will not match those of the holdings being hedged as expected by a Fund, in which case any losses on the holdings being hedged may not be reduced and may be increased. There can be no assurance that a Fund’s hedging strategy will reduce risk or that hedging transactions will be either available or cost effective. A Fund is not required to use hedging and may choose not to do so.
SWAPS RISK –  Swap agreements are contracts entered into for a set period of time in which the parties agree to exchange payments based on some underlying reference asset (such as interest rates). The use of swaps is a highly specialized activity that involves investment techniques, risk analyses and tax planning different from those associated with ordinary portfolio securities transactions. These transactions can result in sizeable realized and unrealized capital gains and losses relative to the gains and losses from a Fund’s direct investments in the reference assets.
Transactions in swaps can involve greater risks than if a Fund had invested directly in the reference asset since, in addition to general market risks, swaps may be leveraged and are also subject to illiquidity risk, counterparty risk, credit risk and valuation risk. Because certain swaps are two-party contracts and because they may have terms of greater than seven days, certain swap transactions may be considered to be illiquid. Moreover, a Fund bears the risk of loss of the amount expected to be received under a swap in the event of the default or bankruptcy of a swap counterparty. Some swaps may be complex and difficult to value. Swaps may also be subject to pricing or “basis” risk, which exists when a particular swap becomes extraordinarily expensive relative to historical prices or the price of corresponding cash market instruments. Under certain market conditions it may not be economically feasible to initiate a transaction or liquidate a position in time to avoid a loss or take advantage of an opportunity. If a swap transaction is particularly large or if the relevant market is illiquid, it may not be possible to initiate a transaction or liquidate a position at an advantageous time or price, which may result in significant losses.
The prices of swaps can be very volatile, and a variance in the degree of volatility or in the direction of the price of the reference asset from the sub-adviser’s expectations may produce significant losses in a Fund’s investments in swaps. In addition, a perfect correlation between a swap and an investment position may be impossible to achieve. As a result, a Fund’s use of swaps may not be effective in fulfilling a Fund’s investment strategies and may contribute to losses that would not have been incurred otherwise.
Certain swaps are centrally-cleared and are exchange-traded. Central clearing tends to decrease credit risk, and exchange trading is expected to improve liquidity. However, central clearing does not make the contracts risk-free and there is no guarantee that a Fund would consider all exchange-traded swaps to be liquid.
In order to reduce the risk associated with leveraging, a Fund may “set aside” liquid assets (often referred to as “asset segregation”), or otherwise “cover” its position in a manner consistent with the Investment Company Act of 1940, as amended (the “1940 Act”) or the current rules and SEC interpretations thereunder. Each Fund reserves the right to modify its asset segregation policies in the future to comply with any changes in the SEC’s positions regarding asset segregation.
Credit Default Swaps Risk - A credit default swap enables an investor to buy or sell protection against a credit event with respect to an issuer. Credit default swaps may have as reference obligations one or more securities that are not currently held by a Fund. The protection “buyer” may be obligated to pay the protection “seller” an up-front payment or a periodic stream of payments over the term of the contract, provided generally that no credit event on a reference obligation has occurred. Credit default swaps involve special risks in addition to those mentioned above because they are difficult to value, are highly susceptible to liquidity and credit risk, and generally pay a return to the party that has paid the premium only in the event of an actual default by the issuer of the underlying obligation (as opposed to a credit downgrade or other indication of financial difficulty).
Interest Rate Swaps Risk - In an interest rate swap, a Fund and another party exchange their rights to receive interest payments based on a reference interest rate. Interest rate swaps are subject to interest rate risk and credit risk. An interest rate swap transaction could result in losses if the underlying asset or reference does not perform as anticipated. Interest rate swaps are also subject to counterparty risk. If the counterparty fails to meet its obligations, a Fund may lose money.
Total Return Swaps Risk - In a total return swap transaction, one party agrees to pay the other party an amount equal to the total return on a defined underlying asset or a non-asset reference during a specified period of time. In return, the other party would make periodic payments based on a fixed or variable interest rate or on the total
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return from a different underlying asset or non-asset reference. Total return swaps could result in losses if the underlying asset or reference does not perform as anticipated. Total return swaps can have the potential for unlimited losses. They are also subject to counterparty risk. If the counterparty fails to meet its obligations, a Fund may lose money.
Volatility Swaps Risk - A Fund may enter into types of volatility swaps to hedge the volatility of a particular security, currency, index or other financial instrument, or to seek to increase its investment return. In volatility swaps, counterparties agree to buy or sell volatility at a specific level over a fixed period. Volatility swaps are subject to credit risks (if the counterparty fails to meet its obligations), and the risk that the Sub-Adviser is incorrect in its forecast of volatility for the underlying security, currency, index or other financial instrument that is the subject of the swap. If the Sub-Adviser is incorrect in its forecast, a Fund would likely be required to make a payment to the counterparty under the swap. Volatility swaps can have the potential for unlimited losses.
DOLLAR ROLLS RISK –  A Fund may enter into dollar rolls in which the Fund will sell securities for delivery in the current month and simultaneously contract to repurchase substantially similar (the same type and coupon) securities on a specified future date from the same party. Dollar rolls involve the risk that the market value of the securities that a Fund is committed to buy may decline below the price of the securities the Fund has sold or that the counterparty may be unable to fulfill its obligations. These transactions may involve leverage.
EXCHANGE TRADED FUNDS RISK –  An investment in an ETF generally presents the same primary risks as an investment in a fund that is not exchange-traded that has the same investment objectives, strategies and policies as the ETF. ETF investments are also subject to the risk that the ETF may fail to accurately track the market segment or index that underlies its investment objective; the risk that, to the extent the ETF does not fully replicate the underlying index, the ETF’s investment strategy may not produce the intended results; the risk of more frequent price fluctuations due to secondary market trading, which may result in a loss to a Fund; the risk that the ETF may trade at a price that is lower than its NAV; and the risk that an active market for the ETF’s shares may not develop or be maintained. ETFs are also subject to specific risks depending on the nature of the ETF, such as liquidity risk, sector risk, and foreign and emerging markets risk, as well as risks associated with fixed income securities, real estate investments and commodities. An investment in an ETF presents the risk that the ETF may no longer meet the listing requirements of any applicable exchanges on which the ETF is listed. A Fund will indirectly pay a proportional share of the asset-based fees of the ETFs in which a Fund invests. In addition, a Fund pays brokerage commissions in connection with the purchase and sale of shares of ETFs.
EXCHANGE TRADED NOTES RISK –  Exchange traded notes (“ETNs”) are a type of unsecured, unsubordinated debt security that have characteristics and risks, including credit risk, similar to those of fixed-income securities, and trade on a major exchange similar to shares of exchange-traded funds (“ETFs”). Unlike other types of fixed income securities, however, the performance of ETNs is based upon that of a market index or other reference asset minus fees and expenses, no coupon payments are made and no principal protection exists. The value of an ETN may be affected by time to maturity, level of supply and demand for the ETN, volatility and lack of liquidity in underlying commodities or securities markets, changes in the applicable interest rates, changes in the issuer’s credit rating and economic, legal, political or geographic events that affect the referenced commodity or security. A Fund’s ability to sell its ETN holdings also may be limited by the availability of a secondary market and the Fund may have to sell such holdings at a discount. ETNs also are subject to counterparty credit risk, fixed-income risk and tracking error risk (where the ETN’s performance may not match or correlate to that of its market index). ETNs also incur certain expenses not incurred by their applicable index.
EVENT RISK –  Event risk is the risk that corporate issuers may undergo restructurings, such as mergers, leveraged buyouts, takeovers, or similar events financed by increased debt. As a result of the added debt, the credit quality and market value of a company’s bonds and/or other debt securities may decline significantly.
FOREIGN INVESTMENTS RISK –  Investments in foreign securities may be riskier than investments in U.S. securities and may also be less liquid, more volatile and more difficult to value than securities of U.S. issuers. Foreign investments may be affected by the following:
changes in currency exchange rates
changes in foreign or U.S. law or restrictions applicable to such investments and in exchange control regulations
increased volatility
substantially less volume on foreign stock markets and other securities markets
higher commissions and dealer mark-ups
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inefficiencies in certain foreign clearance and settlement procedures that could result in an inability to execute transactions or delays in settlement
less uniform accounting, auditing and financial reporting standards
less publicly available information about a foreign issuer or borrower
less government regulation and oversight
unfavorable foreign tax laws
political, social, economic or diplomatic developments in a foreign country or region or the U.S. (including the imposition of sanctions, tariffs, or other governmental restrictions)
differences in individual foreign economies
geopolitical events (including pandemics and epidemics) that may disrupt securities markets and adversely affect global economies and markets
Governments in many emerging market countries participate to a significant degree in their economies and securities markets, which may impair investment and economic growth. In addition, global economies and financial markets are becoming increasingly interconnected, which increases the possibility that conditions in one country or region might adversely impact issuers in a different country or region.
The impact of the United Kingdom’s departure from the European Union (“EU”), commonly known as “Brexit,” and the potential departure of one or more other countries from the EU has and may have significant political and financial consequences for global markets. These consequences include greater market volatility and illiquidity, currency fluctuations, deterioration in economic activity, a decrease in business confidence and an increased likelihood of a recession in such markets. Uncertainty relating to the United Kingdom’s post-departure framework and relationships may have adverse effects on asset valuations and the renegotiation of trade agreements, as well as an increase in financial regulation in such markets. This may adversely impact Fund performance.
SOVEREIGN DEBT RISK –  In addition to the risks associated with investment in debt securities and foreign securities generally, sovereign debt instruments are subject to the risk that a governmental entity may delay or refuse to pay interest or repay principal on its sovereign debt or otherwise meet its obligations. This may be due to cash flow problems, insufficient foreign currency reserves, political considerations, the relative size of the governmental entity’s debt position in relation to the economy or the failure to put in place economic reforms required by the International Monetary Fund or other multilateral agencies. Furthermore, there is the possibility of contagion that could occur if one country defaults on its debt, and that a default in one country could trigger declines and possible additional defaults in other countries in the region. If a governmental entity defaults, it may ask for more time in which to pay or for further loans. There is no legal process for collecting sovereign debt that a government does not pay nor are there bankruptcy proceedings through which all or part of the sovereign debt that a governmental entity has not repaid may be collected. In addition, if a sovereign debtor defaults (or threatens to default) on its sovereign debt obligations, the indebtedness may be restructured. Unlike most corporate debt restructurings, the fees and expenses of financial and legal advisers to the creditors in connection with a restructuring may be borne by the holders of the sovereign debt securities instead of the sovereign entity itself. Some sovereign debtors have in the past been able to restructure their debt payments without the approval of some or all debt holders or to declare moratoria on payments, and similar occurrences may happen in the future.
Sub-sovereign bonds represent the debt of state, provincial, territorial, municipal, local or other political sub-divisions, including other governmental entities or agencies. Quasi-sovereign bonds represent the debt of corporations that have significant government ownership. Sub-sovereign and quasi-sovereign bonds are subject to the risks of investing in sovereign debt generally. In addition, sub-sovereign and quasi-sovereign debt may or may not be issued by or guaranteed as to principal and interest by a governmental authority. Certain foreign government securities may be backed by the issuer’s right to borrow from a central bank or other regional banking entity while others may be backed only by the assets and credit of the issuing foreign entity. If an issuer of sub-sovereign or quasi-sovereign bonds defaults on payments of principal and/or interest, a Fund may have limited recourse against the issuer.
A Fund may invest in obligations issued or guaranteed by supranational entities, which may include, for example, entities such as the International Bank for Reconstruction and Development (the World Bank). If one or more shareholders of a supranational entity fails to make necessary additional capital contributions, the entity may be unable to pay interest or repay principal on its debt securities, and the Fund may lose money on such investments.
EMERGING MARKETS RISK –  The risks of foreign investments are usually greater for emerging markets. Investments in emerging markets may be considered speculative. Emerging markets are riskier than more developed markets because they tend to develop unevenly and may never fully develop. They are more likely to experience hyperinflation and
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currency devaluations, which adversely affect returns to U.S. investors. In addition, many emerging markets have far lower trading volumes and less liquidity than developed markets. Since these markets are often small, they may be more likely to suffer sharp and frequent price changes or long-term price depression because of adverse publicity, investor perceptions or the actions of a few large investors. In addition, traditional measures of investment value used in the United States, such as price to earnings ratios, may not apply to certain small markets. Also, there may be less publicly available information about issuers in emerging markets than would be available about issuers in more developed capital markets, and such issuers may not be subject to accounting, auditing and financial reporting standards and requirements comparable to those to which U.S. companies are subject. Many emerging markets have histories of political instability and abrupt changes in policies. As a result, their governments are more likely to take actions that are hostile or detrimental to private enterprise or foreign investment than those of more developed countries, including expropriation of assets, confiscatory taxation, high rates of inflation or unfavorable diplomatic developments. In such an event, it is possible that a Fund could lose the entire value of its investments in the affected market. Some countries have pervasive corruption and crime that may hinder investments. Certain emerging markets may also face other significant internal or external risks, including the risk of war, and ethnic, religious and racial conflicts. In addition, governments in many emerging market countries participate to a significant degree in their economies and securities markets, which may impair investment and economic growth. Emerging markets may also have differing legal systems and the existence or possible imposition of exchange controls, custodial restrictions or other foreign or U.S. governmental laws or restrictions applicable to such investments. Settlements of trades in emerging markets may be subject to significant delays. The inability to make intended purchases of securities due to settlement problems could cause missed investment opportunities. Losses could also be caused by an inability to dispose of portfolio securities due to settlement problems. Sometimes, emerging markets may lack or be in the relatively early development of legal structures governing private and foreign investments and private property, and the ability of U.S. authorities (e.g., SEC and the U.S. Department of Justice) and investors (e.g., the Funds) to bring actions against bad actors may be limited. As a result of these legal structures and limitations, a Fund faces the risk of being unable to enforce its rights with respect to its investments in emerging markets, which may cause losses to the Fund. In addition to withholding taxes on investment income, some countries with emerging markets may impose differential capital gains taxes on foreign investors.
In addition, as much of China’s growth over recent decades has been a result of significant investment in substantial export trade, international trade tensions may arise from time to time, which could result in trade tariffs, embargoes, trade limitations, trade wars and other negative consequences. These consequences may trigger a significant reduction in international trade, the oversupply of certain manufactured goods, substantial price reductions of goods and possible failure of individual companies and/or large segments of China’s export industry with a potentially severe negative impact to a Fund. In addition, it is possible that the continuation or worsening of the current political climate could result in regulatory restrictions being contemplated or imposed in the U.S. or in China that could have a material adverse effect on a Fund’s ability to invest in accordance with its investment policies and/or achieve its investment objective.
The risks outlined above are often more pronounced in “frontier markets” in which a Fund may invest. Frontier markets are those emerging markets that are considered to be among the smallest, least mature and least liquid. These factors make investing in frontier market countries significantly riskier than investing in other countries.
HIGH YIELD INVESTMENTS RISK –  Although high yield investments (also known as “junk bonds”) generally pay higher rates of interest than investment grade bonds, junk bonds are high risk, speculative investments that may cause income and principal losses for a Fund. The major risks of junk bond investments include:
Junk bonds may be issued by less creditworthy issuers. Issuers of junk bonds may have a larger amount of outstanding debt relative to their assets than issuers of investment grade bonds. In the event of an issuer’s bankruptcy, claims of other creditors may have priority over the claims of junk bond holders, leaving few or no assets available to repay junk bond holders.​
Prices of junk bonds are subject to extreme price fluctuations. Adverse changes in an issuer’s industry and general economic conditions may have a greater impact on the prices of junk bonds than on other higher rated fixed-income securities.
Issuers of junk bonds may be unable to meet their interest or principal payment obligations because of an economic downturn, specific issuer developments, or the unavailability of additional financing.
Junk bonds frequently have redemption features that permit an issuer to repurchase the security from a Fund before it matures. If the issuer redeems junk bonds, a Fund may have to invest the proceeds in bonds with lower yields and may lose income.
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Junk bonds may be less liquid than higher rated fixed-income securities, even under normal economic conditions. There are fewer dealers in the junk bond market, and there may be significant differences in the prices quoted for junk bonds by the dealers. Because they are less liquid, judgment may play a greater role in valuing certain of a Fund’s securities than is the case with securities trading in a more liquid market.
A Fund may incur expenses to the extent necessary to seek recovery upon default or to negotiate new terms with a defaulting issuer.
The credit rating of a high yield security does not necessarily address its market value risk. Ratings and market value may change from time to time, positively or negatively, to reflect new developments regarding the issuer.
ILLIQUID INVESTMENTS RISK –  An illiquid investment means an investment that a Fund reasonably expects cannot be sold or disposed of in current market conditions within seven calendar days without the sale or disposition significantly changing the market value of the investment, as determined under the Fund’s liquidity risk management program. In addition, securities and other investments purchased by a Fund that are liquid at the time of purchase may subsequently become illiquid due to events relating to the issuer of the securities, market events, rising interest rates, economic conditions or investor perceptions. If a Fund holds illiquid investments, it may be unable to quickly sell them or may be able to sell them only at a price below current value. If one or more of a Fund’s investments becomes illiquid, the Fund may exceed its limit on such investments. In this case, the Fund will consider appropriate steps to bring the Fund’s holdings back under the limit.
INFLATION RISK –  A Fund’s investments may be subject to inflation risk, which is the risk that the real value (i.e., nominal price of the asset adjusted for inflation) of assets or income from investments will be less in the future as inflation decreases the purchasing power and value of money (i.e., as inflation increases, the real value of a Fund’s assets can decline). Inflation rates may change frequently and significantly as a result of various factors, including unexpected shifts in the domestic or global economy and changes in monetary or economic policies (or expectations that these policies may change), and a Fund’s investments may not keep pace with inflation, which would generally adversely affect the real value of Fund shareholders’ investment in the Fund. This risk is greater for fixed-income instruments with longer maturities. In addition, this risk may be significantly elevated compared to normal conditions because of recent monetary policy measures and the current interest rate environment.
INFLATION-PROTECTED SECURITIES RISK –  The value of inflation-protected securities generally fluctuates in response to changes in real interest rates (stated interest rates adjusted to factor in inflation). In general, the price of an inflation-indexed security decreases when real interest rates increase, and increases when real interest rates decrease. Interest payments on inflation-protected debt securities will fluctuate as the principal and/or interest is adjusted for inflation and can be unpredictable. The market for Treasury inflation-protected securities (“TIPS”) and corporate inflation-protected securities (“CIPS”) may be less developed or liquid, and more volatile, than certain other securities markets. There can be no assurance that the inflation index used in these securities (i.e., the CPI) will accurately measure the real rate of inflation. Any increase in the principal amount of an inflation-indexed bond will be considered taxable ordinary income for the amount of the increase in the calendar year, even though a Fund will not receive its principal until maturity.
INTEREST RATE RISK –  The risk that your investment may go down in value when interest rates rise, because when interest rates rise, the prices of bonds and fixed rate loans fall. A wide variety of factors can cause interest rates to rise, including central bank monetary policies and inflation rates. Generally, the longer the maturity of a bond or fixed rate loan, the more sensitive it is to this risk. For this reason, the longer the Fund’s average weighted portfolio maturity, the greater the impact a change in interest rates will have on its share price. Falling interest rates may also lead to a decline in the Fund’s income. These risks are greater during periods of rising inflation. Volatility in interest rates and in fixed income markets may increase the risk that the Fund’s investment in fixed income securities will go down in value. A rise in interest rates could also cause investors to rapidly move out of fixed-income securities, which may increase redemptions in the Fund and subject the Fund to increased liquidity risk. A substantial increase in interest rates may also have an adverse impact on the liquidity of one or more portfolio securities, especially those with longer maturities.
Risks associated with rising interest rates are currently heightened because interest rates remain near historic lows and inflation has begun to increase. The U.S. Federal Reserve Board and other central banks may raise the federal funds rate and equivalent rates. Any such increases will likely cause market interest rates to rise, which will cause the value of the Fund’s fixed income holdings, particularly those with longer maturities, to fall. Any such rate increases may also increase volatility and reduce liquidity in the fixed income markets, which would make it more difficult to sell a Fund’s fixed income investments. Changes in central bank interest rate policies could also result in higher than normal selling of Fund shares, which could potentially increase portfolio turnover and a Fund’s transaction costs.
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INVERSE FLOATER RISK –  Inverse floaters earn interest at rates that vary inversely to changes in short-term interest rates. As short-term interest rates rise, inverse floaters produce less income (and, in extreme cases, may pay no income) and as short-term interest rates fall, inverse floaters produce more income. Inverse floaters may be subject to leverage risk and counterparty risk. These risks are greater for inverse floaters that are structured as tender option bonds (“TOBs”). The prices and income of inverse floaters are generally more volatile than the prices and income of bonds with similar maturities and may decline rapidly during periods of rising interest rates. An investment in inverse floaters involves the risk of loss of principal and typically will involve greater risk than an investment in a municipal fixed rate security. Inverse floaters generally will underperform the market for fixed rate municipal securities in a rising interest rate environment. Investments in inverse floaters in the form of TOBs are also subject to risks related to the termination of the trust that issues the TOB, which could expose a Fund to losses associated with such termination.
ISSUER RISK –  The performance of each Fund depends on the performance of individual securities to which a Fund has exposure. Any issuer of these securities may perform poorly, causing the value of its securities to decline. Poor performance may be caused by poor management decisions, competitive pressures, changes in technology, expiration of patent protection, disruptions in supply, labor problems or shortages, corporate restructurings, fraudulent disclosures or other factors. Issuers may, in times of distress or at their own discretion, decide to reduce or eliminate dividends, which may also cause their stock prices to decline.
LARGE SHAREHOLDER TRANSACTION RISK –  Certain shareholders, including funds advised by Hartford Funds Management Company, LLC (“HFMC” or the “Investment Manager”) or an affiliate, may from time to time own a substantial amount of a Fund’s shares. A third-party investor, HFMC or an affiliate of HFMC, an authorized participant, a lead market maker, or another entity may invest in a Fund and hold its investment for a limited period of time solely to facilitate commencement of the Fund or to facilitate the Fund’s achieving a specified size or scale. There can be no assurance that any large shareholder would not redeem its investment, that the size of the Fund would be maintained at such levels or that the Fund would continue to meet applicable listing requirements. In addition, transactions by large shareholders may account for a large percentage of the trading volume on a Fund’s listing exchange and may, therefore, have a material upward or downward effect on the market price of the Fund’s shares.
LEVERAGE RISK –  Certain transactions, including derivatives, to-be-announced investments and other when-issued, delayed delivery or forward commitment transactions, involve a form of leverage. Transactions involving leverage provide investment exposure in an amount exceeding the initial investment. Leverage can increase market exposure, magnify investment risks, and cause losses to be realized more quickly. Certain derivatives have the potential to cause unlimited losses for a Fund, regardless of the size of the initial investment. Leverage may also cause a Fund’s NAV to be more volatile than if the Fund had not been leveraged, as relatively small market movements may result in large changes in the value of a leveraged investment. To reduce the risk associated with leveraging, a Fund may “set aside” liquid assets (often referred to as “asset segregation”), or otherwise “cover” its position in a manner consistent with the 1940 Act or the current rules and SEC interpretations thereunder. Each Fund reserves the right to modify its asset segregation policies in the future to comply with any changes in the SEC’s positions regarding asset segregation. The use of leverage may cause a Fund to liquidate portfolio positions to satisfy its obligations or to meet asset segregation requirements when it may not be advantageous to do so.
LIBOR RISK –  The use of certain London Interbank Offered Rates (collectively, “LIBOR”) is expected to be phased out by the end of 2021. However, it is possible that certain LIBORs may continue beyond 2021 and the most widely used LIBORs may continue until mid-2023. There remains uncertainty regarding the future use of LIBOR and the nature of any replacement rate. As such, the potential effect of a transition away from LIBOR on a Fund or the LIBOR-based instruments in which the Fund invests cannot yet be determined. The transition process away from LIBOR may involve, among other things, increased volatility or illiquidity in markets for instruments that currently rely on LIBOR. The transition process may also result in a reduction in the value of certain instruments held by a Fund or reduce the effectiveness of related Fund transactions, such as hedges. Volatility, the potential reduction in value, and/or the hedge effectiveness of financial instruments may be heightened for financial instruments that do not include fallback provisions that address the cessation of LIBOR. Any potential effects of the transition away from LIBOR on a Fund or on financial instruments in which the Fund invests, as well as other unforeseen effects, could result in losses to the Fund. Since the usefulness of LIBOR as a benchmark or reference rate could deteriorate during the transition period, these effects could occur prior to and/or subsequent to the end of 2021 with respect to certain LIBORs or mid-2023 for the remaining LIBORs.
LIQUIDITY RISK –  Liquidity risk exists when the markets for particular investments or types of investments are or become relatively illiquid so that it is difficult or impossible for a Fund to sell the investment at the price at which the Fund has valued it. Illiquidity may result from political, economic or issuer specific events; changes in a specific market’s size or structure, including the number of participants; or overall market disruptions. Securities with reduced liquidity
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or that become illiquid involve greater risk than securities with more liquid markets. If a Fund and its affiliates hold a significant portion of a single issuer’s outstanding securities, the Fund may be subject to greater liquidity risk than if the issuer’s securities were more widely held.
Market quotations for illiquid or less liquid securities may be volatile and/or subject to large spreads between bid and ask prices. Reduced liquidity may have a negative impact on market price and a Fund’s ability to sell particular securities when necessary to meet the Fund’s liquidity needs or in response to a specific economic event. In addition, during periods of reduced market liquidity or in the absence of readily available market quotations for particular investments in a Fund’s portfolio, it may be difficult for the Fund to value these investments and it may be necessary to fair value the investments. There can be no assurance that a security’s fair value accurately reflects the price at which a Fund could sell that security at that time, which could affect the proceeds of any sale or the number of Fund shares you receive upon purchase.
Bond markets have consistently grown over the past three decades while the capacity for traditional dealer counterparties to engage in fixed income trading has not kept pace and in some cases has decreased. As a result, dealer inventories of corporate bonds are at or near historic lows in relation to market size. The significant reduction in dealer inventories could potentially lead to decreased liquidity and increased volatility in the fixed income markets. Such issues may be worse during periods of economic uncertainty.
LOANS AND LOAN PARTICIPATIONS RISK –  A Fund may invest in loans and loan participations originated or issued by both banks and corporations. Loans and loan participations, including floating rate loans, are subject to credit risk, including the risk of nonpayment of principal or interest. Also, substantial increases in interest rates may cause an increase in loan defaults. Although the loans a Fund holds may be fully collateralized at the time of acquisition, the collateral may decline in value, be relatively illiquid, or lose all or substantially all of its value subsequent to investment. The claims of holders of unsecured loans are subordinated to, and thus lower in priority of payment to, claims of creditors holding secured indebtedness and possibly other classes of creditors holding unsecured debt. Unsecured loans have a greater risk of default than secured loans, particularly during periods of deteriorating economic conditions. Since they do not afford the lender recourse to collateral, unsecured loans are also subject to greater risk of nonpayment in the event of default than secured loans. Such loans generally have greater price volatility than more senior loans and may be less liquid. In addition, in the event an issuer becomes insolvent, a loan could be subject to settlement risks or administrative disruptions that could adversely affect a Fund’s investment. It may also be difficult to obtain reliable information about a loan or loan participation.
Many loans are subject to extended settlement periods and it may take greater than seven days for a loan purchase or sale transaction to settle. Loans may also be subject to restrictions on resale and may be difficult to value. Long settlement periods, any restrictions on a Fund’s ability to resell a loan investment and any difficulties in valuing a loan investment will have an adverse impact on the Fund’s ability to sell particular loans or loan participations when necessary to meet redemption requests or liquidity needs to the extent that such redemptions are effected on a cash basis, or to respond to a specific economic event, such as deterioration in the creditworthiness of the borrower. These effects may make it more difficult for a Fund to pay Authorized Participants when they redeem their Fund shares to the extent that such redemptions are effected on a cash basis. Loans may also be subject to extension risk (the risk that borrowers will repay a loan more slowly in periods of rising interest rates) and prepayment risk (the risk that borrowers will repay a loan more quickly in periods of falling interest rates).
Commercial banks and other financial institutions or institutional investors make floating rate loans to companies that need capital to grow or restructure. Borrowers generally pay interest on these loans at rates that change in response to changes in market interest rates such as the London Interbank Offered Rate (“LIBOR”) or the prime rates of U.S. banks. As a result, the value of loan investments is generally less exposed to the adverse effects of shifts in market interest rates than investments that pay a fixed rate of interest. However, because the trading market for certain loans may be less developed than the secondary market for bonds and notes, a Fund may experience difficulties in selling its loans. Leading financial institutions often act as agent for a broader group of lenders, generally referred to as a syndicate. The syndicate’s agent arranges the loans, holds collateral and accepts payments of principal and interest. If the agent develops financial problems, the Fund may not recover its investment or recovery may be delayed. By investing in such a loan, a Fund may become a member of the syndicate.
The loans in which a Fund invests are subject to the risk of loss of principal and income. Although borrowers frequently provide collateral to secure repayment of these obligations, they do not always do so. If they do provide collateral, the value of the collateral may not completely cover the borrower’s obligations at the time of a default. If a borrower files for protection from its creditors under the U.S. bankruptcy laws, these laws may limit a Fund’s rights to its collateral. In addition, the value of collateral may erode during a bankruptcy case. In the event of a bankruptcy, the holder of a loan
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may not recover its principal, may experience a long delay in recovering its investment and may not receive interest during the delay. Additionally, with respect to loan participations, a Fund, as a participant in a loan, will not have any direct claim on the loan or against the borrower, and the Fund may be subject to greater delays, expenses and risks than would have been involved if the Fund had purchased a direct obligation of the borrower. In the event of the insolvency of an agent bank (in a syndicated loan, the agent bank is the bank in the syndicate whom undertakes the bulk of the administrative duties involved in the day-to-day administration of the loan), a loan could be subject to settlement risk, as well as the risk of interruptions in the administrative duties performed in the day-to-day administration of the loan (such as processing LIBOR calculations, processing draws, etc.). Because the Sub-Adviser relies primarily on its own evaluation of a borrower’s credit quality, a Fund is dependent on the analytical abilities of the Sub-Adviser with respect to its investments in loans.
Compared to securities and to certain other types of financial assets, purchases and sales of Senior Loans take relatively longer to settle, partly due to the fact that Senior Loans require a written assignment agreement and various ancillary documents for each transfer, and frequently require discretionary consents from both the borrower and the administrative agent. In addition, recent regulatory changes have increasingly caused dealers to insist on matching their purchases and sales, which can lead to delays in a Fund’s settlement of a purchase or sale of a Senior Loan in circumstances where the dealer’s corresponding transaction with another party is delayed. Dealers will also sometimes sell Senior Loans short, and hold their trades open for an indefinite period while waiting for a price movement or looking for inventory to purchase.
This extended settlement process can (i) increase the counterparty credit risk borne by a Fund; (ii) leave a Fund unable to timely vote, or otherwise act with respect to, Senior Loans it has agreed to purchase; (iii) delay a Fund from realizing the proceeds of a sale of a Senior Loan; (iv) inhibit a Fund’s ability to re-sell a Senior Loan that it has agreed to purchase if conditions change (leaving the Fund more exposed to price fluctuations); (v) prevent a Fund from timely collecting principal and interest payments; and (vi) expose a Fund to adverse tax or regulatory consequences.
Loan interests may not be considered “securities,” and, therefore, purchasers such as a Fund may not be entitled to rely on the anti-fraud protections of the federal securities laws. A Fund may be in possession of material non-public information about a borrower or issuer as a result of its ownership of a loan or security of such borrower or issuer. Because of prohibitions on trading in securities of issuers while in possession of such information, a Fund may be unable to enter into a transaction in a loan or security of such a borrower or issuer when it would otherwise be advantageous to do so.
MARKET PRICE RISK –  The NAV of a Fund’s shares and the value of your investment may fluctuate. The market prices of a Fund’s shares will generally fluctuate in accordance with changes in NAV, and changes in the intraday value of the Fund’s holdings, as well as the relative supply of and demand for the shares on the listing exchange. Although it is expected that a Fund’s shares will remain listed on an exchange, disruptions to creations and redemptions, the existence of market volatility or lack of an active trading market for the shares (including through a trading halt), as well as other factors, may result in the shares trading significantly above (at a premium to) or below (at a discount to) a Fund’s NAV or the intraday value of a Fund’s holdings. During such periods, you may be unable to sell your shares or may incur significant losses if you sell your shares. There are various methods by which investors can purchase and sell shares and various types of orders that may be placed. Investors should consult their financial intermediary before purchasing or selling shares of a Fund. Neither the investment manager nor a Fund’s Sub-Adviser can predict whether a Fund’s shares will trade below, at or above their NAV. Price differences may be due, in large part, to the fact that supply and demand forces at work in the secondary trading market for a Fund’s shares will be closely related to, but not identical to, the same forces influencing the prices of a Fund’s portfolio holdings trading individually or in the aggregate at any point in time. Authorized Participants may be less willing to create or redeem Fund shares if there is a lack of an active market for such shares or a Fund’s underlying investments, which may contribute to the Fund’s shares trading at a premium or discount to NAV. There can be no assurance as to whether and/or to what extent a Fund’s shares will trade at premiums or discounts to NAV or to the intraday value of a Fund’s holdings.
MARKET RISK –  Market risk is the risk that one or more markets in which a Fund invests will go down in value, including the possibility that the markets will go down sharply and unpredictably. Securities or other investments may decline in value due to factors affecting securities markets generally or individual issuers. The value of a security or other investment may change in value due to general market conditions that are not related to a particular issuer, such as real or perceived adverse economic conditions, changes in the general outlook for revenues or corporate earnings, changes in interest, or currency rates or adverse investor sentiment generally as well as global trade policies and political unrest or uncertainties. The value of a security or other investment may also change in value due to factors that affect an individual issuer, including data breaches and cybersecurity attacks, or a particular sector or industry. During a general downturn in the securities or other markets, multiple asset classes may decline in value
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simultaneously. When markets perform well, there can be no assurance that securities or other investments held by a Fund will participate in or otherwise benefit from the advance. Any market disruptions, including those arising out of geopolitical events (including pandemics and epidemics) or natural/environmental disasters, could also prevent a Fund from executing advantageous investment decisions in a timely manner. The adverse impact of any one or more of these events on the market value of Fund investments could be significant and cause losses. A widespread health crisis, such as a global pandemic, could cause substantial market volatility, exchange trading suspensions or restrictions and closures of securities exchanges and businesses, impact the ability to complete redemptions, and adversely impact Fund performance. A recent outbreak of COVID-19, a respiratory disease caused by a novel coronavirus, has negatively affected the worldwide economy, created supply chain disruptions and labor shortages, and impacted the financial health of individual companies and the market in significant and unforeseen ways. The future impact of COVID-19 is currently unknown. The effects to public health, business and market conditions resulting from COVID-19 pandemic may have a significant negative impact on the performance of a Fund’s investments, including exacerbating other pre-existing political, social and economic risks.
MORTGAGE-RELATED AND OTHER ASSET-BACKED SECURITIES RISK –  Mortgage-related and other asset-backed securities are subject to certain risks, including credit risk and interest rate risk. These investments expose a Fund to “extension risk,” which is the risk that borrowers will repay a loan more slowly in periods of rising interest rates which could increase the interest rate sensitivity of certain investments — such as mortgage- and asset-backed securities — and cause the value of these investments to fall. As a result, in a period of rising interest rates, if a Fund holds mortgage-related securities and other asset-backed securities, it may exhibit additional volatility. In addition, adjustable and fixed rate mortgage-backed securities are subject to “prepayment risk.” When interest rates decline, borrowers may pay off their mortgages sooner than expected. This can reduce a Fund’s returns because the Fund may have to reinvest that money at lower prevailing interest rates. A Fund’s investments in other asset-backed securities are subject to risks similar to those associated with mortgage-backed securities, as well as additional risks associated with the nature of the assets and the servicing of those assets. These securities are also subject to risk of default on the underlying mortgage or asset, particularly during periods of economic downturn. Issuers of asset-backed securities may have limited ability to enforce the security interest in the underlying assets, and credit enhancements provided to support the securities, if any, may be inadequate to protect investors in the event of default. In addition, as a result of its investment in asset-backed securities, a Fund would be subject to the risk that in certain states it may be difficult to perfect the liens securing the collateral backing certain asset-backed securities. Certain asset-backed securities are based on loans that are unsecured, which means that there is no collateral to seize if the underlying borrower defaults.
Collateralized debt obligations (“CDOs”), which are a type of asset-backed security, are subject to heightened risks, including the possibility that distributions from collateral securities will not be adequate to make interest or other payments; the quality of the collateral may decline in value or default; a Fund may invest in collateralized debt obligations that are subordinate to other classes and, therefore, will not have primary rights to any payments in bankruptcy; values may be volatile; and disputes with the issuer may produce unexpected investment results. A Fund’s investments in CDOs will not receive the same investor protection as an investment in registered securities. In addition, prices of CDO investments can decline considerably. These types of instruments are frequently referred to as “mortgage derivatives” and are sensitive to changing interest rates and deteriorating credit environments. CDOs may lack of a readily available secondary market and be difficult to sell at the price at which a Fund values them.
A Fund may invest in uniform mortgage-backed securities, which are securities that generally align the characteristics of Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac certificates. Uniform mortgage-backed securities are a recent innovation and the effect they may have on the market for mortgage-related securities is uncertain.
A Fund may invest in mortgage-backed securities issued by the U.S. Government or by non-governmental issuers. To the extent that a Fund invests in mortgage-backed securities offered by non-governmental issuers, such as commercial banks, savings and loan institutions, private mortgage insurance companies, mortgage bankers and other secondary market issuers, the Fund may be subject to additional risks. Mortgage-related securities issued by private issuers are subject to the credit risks of the issuers, as well as to interest rate risks. Timely payment of interest and principal of non-governmental issuers is supported by various forms of private insurance or guarantees, including individual loan, title, pool and hazard insurance purchased by the issuer. There can be no assurance that the private insurers can meet their obligations under the policies. An unexpectedly high rate of defaults on the mortgages held by a mortgage pool may adversely affect the value of a mortgage-backed security and could result in losses to a Fund. The risk of such defaults is generally higher in the case of mortgage pools that include subprime mortgages. Subprime mortgages refer to loans made to borrowers with weakened credit histories or with a lower capacity to make timely payments on their mortgages. These risks typically become elevated during periods of distressed economic, market, health and labor
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conditions. In particular, increased levels of unemployment, delays and delinquencies in payments of mortgage and rent obligations, and uncertainty regarding the effects and extent of government intervention with respect to mortgage payments and other economic matters may adversely affect a Fund’s investments in mortgage-backed securities.
COLLATERALIZED LOAN OBLIGATIONS RISK –  Collateralized loan obligations (“CLOs”) bear many of the same risks as other forms of asset-backed securities, including interest rate risk, credit risk and default risk. As they are backed by pools of loans, CLOs also bear similar risks to investing in loans directly. CLOs issue classes or “tranches” that vary in risk and yield. CLOs may experience substantial losses attributable to loan defaults. Losses caused by defaults on underlying assets are borne first by the holders of subordinate tranches. A Fund’s investment in CLOs may decrease in market value when the CLO experiences loan defaults or credit impairment, the disappearance of a subordinate tranche, or market anticipation of defaults and investor aversion to CLO securities as a class.
MUNICIPAL SECURITIES RISK –  Municipal securities risks include the possibility that the issuer may not be able to pay interest or repay principal when due; the relative lack of information about certain issuers of municipal securities; and the possibility that future legislative changes could affect the market for and value of municipal securities. Municipal securities are subject to interest rate risk, credit risk and market risk. Negative events, such as severe fiscal difficulties, bankruptcy of one or more issuers, an economic downturn, unfavorable legislation, court rulings or political developments, or reduced monetary support from the federal government could hurt Fund performance. Because municipal securities are issued to finance similar projects, conditions in those sectors may affect the overall municipal securities market. Municipal securities may be susceptible to periods of economic stress, which could affect the market values and marketability of many or all municipal obligations of issuers in a state, locality or US territory or possession. For example, the COVID-19 pandemic has significantly stressed the financial resources of many municipal issuers, which may impair a municipal issuer’s ability to meet its financial obligations when due and could adversely impact the value of its bonds, which could negatively impact the performance of a Fund. In addition, changes in the financial condition of an individual municipal issuer can affect the overall municipal market. Investment in municipal securities is also subject to:
General Obligation Bonds Risks - The full faith, credit and taxing power of the municipality that issues a general obligation bond secures payment of interest and repayment of principal. Timely payments depend on the issuer’s credit quality, ability to raise tax revenues and ability to maintain an adequate tax base.
Revenue Bonds Risks - Payments of interest and principal on revenue bonds are made only from the revenues generated by a particular facility, class of facilities or the proceeds of a special tax or other revenue source. These payments depend on the money earned by the particular facility or class of facilities, or the amount of revenues derived from another source.
Private Activity Bonds Risks - Municipalities and other public authorities issue private activity bonds to finance development of industrial facilities for use by a private enterprise. The private enterprise pays the principal and interest on the bond, and the issuer does not pledge its full faith, credit and taxing power for repayment. If the private enterprise defaults on its payments, a Fund may not receive any income or get its money back from the investment.
Moral Obligation Bonds Risks - Moral obligation bonds are generally issued by special purpose public authorities of a state or municipality. If the issuer is unable to meet its obligations, repayment of these bonds becomes a moral commitment, but not a legal obligation, of the state or municipality.
Municipal Notes Risks - Municipal notes are shorter term municipal debt obligations. They may provide interim financing in anticipation of, and are secured by, tax collection, bond sales or revenue receipts. If there is a shortfall in the anticipated proceeds, the notes may not be fully repaid and a Fund may lose money.
Municipal Lease Obligations Risks - In a municipal lease obligation, the issuer agrees to make payments when due on the lease obligation. The issuer will generally appropriate municipal funds for that purpose, but is not obligated to do so. Although the issuer does not pledge its unlimited taxing power for payment of the lease obligation, the lease obligation is secured by the leased property. However, if the issuer does not fulfill its payment obligation (i.e., annually appropriate money to make the lease payments), it may be difficult to sell the property and the proceeds of a sale may not cover a Fund’s loss.
Tax-Exempt Status Risk - Municipal securities are subject to the risk that the Internal Revenue Service may determine that an issuer has not complied with applicable tax requirements and that interest from the municipal security is taxable, which may result in a significant decline in the value of the security.
NEW FUND RISK –  A Fund with a limited operating history may be subject to additional risks. There can be no assurance that a Fund will grow to an economically viable size, in which case a Fund may cease operations. In such an event, investors may be required to liquidate or transfer their investments at an inopportune time.
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NO GUARANTEE OF ACTIVE TRADING MARKET RISK –  While Fund shares are listed on an exchange, there can be no assurance that active trading markets for shares will be maintained by market makers or authorized participants. Decisions by market makers or authorized participants to reduce their role or “step away” from these activities in times of market stress may inhibit the effectiveness of the arbitrage process in maintaining the relationship between the underlying value of a Fund’s holdings and a Fund’s NAV. Such reduced effectiveness could result in a Fund’s shares trading at a discount to its NAV and also in greater than normal intraday bid/ask spreads for a Fund’s shares.
OTHER INVESTMENT COMPANIES RISK –  Investments in securities of other investment companies, including ETFs, are generally subject to limitations prescribed by the 1940 Act and its rules, and applicable SEC staff interpretations or applicable exemptive relief granted by the SEC. Such investments subject a Fund to the risks that apply to the other investment company, including market and selection risk, and may increase a Fund’s expenses to the extent a Fund pays fees, including investment advisory and administrative fees, charged by the other investment company. The success of a Fund’s investment in these securities is directly related, in part, to the ability of the other investment companies, including ETFs, to meet their investment objective.
A business development company (“BDC”), which is a type of closed-end fund, typically invests in small and medium-sized companies. A BDC’s portfolio is subject to the risks inherent in investing in smaller companies, including that portfolio companies may be dependent on a small number of products or services and may be more adversely affected by poor economic or market conditions. Some BDCs invest substantially, or even exclusively, in one sector or industry group and therefore the BDC may be susceptible to adverse conditions and economic or regulatory occurrences affecting the sector or industry group, which tends to increase volatility and result in higher risk. The Small Business Credit Availability Act permits BDCs to adopt a lower asset coverage ratio, thereby enhancing their ability to use leverage. Investments in BDCs that use greater leverage may be subject to heightened risks.
REPURCHASE AGREEMENTS RISK –  A Fund may enter into certain types of repurchase agreements or purchase and sale contracts. Under a repurchase agreement, the seller agrees to repurchase a security (typically a security issued or guaranteed by the U.S. Government) at a mutually agreed upon time and price. This insulates a Fund from changes in the market value of the security during the period. A purchase and sale contract is similar to a repurchase agreement, but purchase and sale contracts provide that the purchaser receives any interest on the security paid during the period. If the seller fails to repurchase the security in either situation and the market value declines, a Fund may lose money.
RESTRICTED SECURITIES RISK –  Restricted securities are securities that cannot be offered for public resale unless registered under the applicable securities laws or that have a contractual restriction that prohibits or limits their resale. Restricted securities include private placement securities that have not been registered under the applicable securities laws, such as Rule 144A securities, and securities of U.S. and non-U.S. issuers that are issued pursuant to Regulation S. Restricted securities may not be listed on an exchange and may have no active trading market. Restricted securities may be illiquid. A Fund may be unable to sell them on short notice or may be able to sell them only at a price below current value. Also, a Fund may get only limited information about the issuer of a restricted security, so it may be less able to predict a loss. In addition, if Fund management receives material non-public information about the issuer, a Fund may as a result be unable to sell the securities. Certain restricted securities may involve a high degree of business and financial risk and may result in substantial losses. Please see “Rule 144A Securities and Regulation S Securities Risk” below.
Rule 144A Securities and Regulation S Securities Risk - “Rule 144A” securities are privately placed, restricted securities that may only be resold under certain circumstances to other qualified institutional buyers. Rule 144A investments are subject to certain additional risks compared to publicly traded securities. If there are not enough qualified buyers interested in purchasing Rule 144A securities when a Fund wishes to sell such securities, the Fund may be unable to dispose of such securities promptly or at reasonable prices. For this reason, although Rule 144A securities are generally considered to be liquid, a Fund’s holdings in Rule 144A securities may adversely affect the Fund’s overall liquidity if qualified buyers become uninterested in buying them at a particular time. Issuers of Rule 144A securities are required to furnish information to potential investors upon request. However, the required disclosure is much less extensive than that required of public companies and is not publicly available. Further, issuers of Rule 144A securities can require recipients of the information (such as the Fund) to agree contractually to keep the information confidential, which could also adversely affect a Fund’s ability to dispose of a security. Offerings of Regulation S securities may be conducted outside of the United States. Regulation S securities are generally less liquid than registered securities, as a result, a Fund may take longer to liquidate these positions than would be the case for publicly traded securities. Although Regulation S securities may be resold in privately negotiated transactions, the price realized from these sales could be less than those originally paid by a Fund.
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Further, companies whose securities are not publicly traded may not be subject to the disclosure and other investor protection requirements that would be applicable if their securities were publicly traded. Accordingly, Regulation S securities may involve a high degree of business and financial risk and may result in substantial losses.
REVERSE REPURCHASE AGREEMENTS RISK –  Reverse repurchase agreements involve the sale of securities held by a Fund with an agreement to repurchase the securities at an agreed-upon price, date and interest payment. Reverse repurchase agreements carry the risk that the market value of the securities that a Fund is obligated to repurchase may decline below the repurchase price. A Fund could also lose money if it is unable to recover the securities and the value of any collateral held or if assets segregated by the Fund to cover the transaction under current regulatory requirements is less than the value of securities. The use of reverse repurchase agreements may increase the possibility of fluctuation in a Fund’s net asset value.
SECONDARY TRADING MARKET ISSUES –  Trading in shares on a listing exchange may be halted due to market conditions or for reasons that, in the view of the exchange, make trading in shares inadvisable. In addition, trading in shares on an exchange is subject to the risk of trading halts caused by extraordinary market volatility pursuant to the specific exchange’s “circuit breaker” rules. If a trading halt or unanticipated early closing of the listing exchange occurs, a shareholder may be unable to purchase or sell shares of a Fund. There also can be no assurance that the requirements of the exchange necessary to maintain the listing of a Fund will continue to be met or will remain unchanged.
While the creation/redemption feature is designed to make it likely that shares normally will trade close to a Fund’s NAV, market prices are not expected to correlate exactly to a Fund’s NAV due to timing reasons, supply and demand imbalances and other factors. In addition, disruptions to creations and redemptions, adverse developments impacting market makers, authorized participants or other market participants, high market volatility or lack of an active trading market for the shares (including through a trading halt) may result in market prices for shares of a Fund that differ significantly from its NAV or to the intra-day value of a Fund’s holdings. If an investor purchases shares at a time when the market price is at a premium to the NAV of the shares or sells at a time when the market price is at a discount to the NAV of the shares, then the investor may sustain losses.
Given the nature of the relevant markets for certain of the securities held by a Fund, shares may trade at a larger premium or discount to NAV than shares of other kinds of ETFs. In addition, the securities held by a Fund may be traded in markets that close at a different time from a Fund’s listing exchange. Liquidity in those securities may be reduced after the applicable closing times. Accordingly, during the time when the listing exchange is open but after the applicable market closing, fixing or settlement times, bid/ask spreads and the resulting premium or discount to the shares’ NAV may widen.
When you buy or sell shares of a Fund through a broker, you will likely incur a brokerage commission or other charges imposed by that broker. In addition, the market price of Fund shares, like the price of any exchange-traded security, includes a “bid-ask spread” charged by the market makers or other participants that trade the particular security. The spread of a Fund’s shares varies over time based on a Fund’s trading volume and market liquidity and may increase if a Fund’s trading volume, the spread of a Fund’s underlying securities, or market liquidity decrease. In times of severe market disruption, including when trading of a Fund’s holdings may be halted, the bid-ask spread on a Fund’s shares may increase significantly. This means that Fund shares may trade at a discount to a Fund’s NAV, and the discount is likely to be greatest during periods of significant market volatility.
Shares of a Fund, similar to shares of other issuers listed on a stock exchange, may be sold short and are, therefore, subject to the risk of increased volatility and price decreases associated with being sold short.
SECURITIES LENDING RISK –  Securities lending involves the risk that a Fund may lose money because the borrower of the securities the Fund has loaned out fails to return the securities in a timely manner or at all. A Fund could also lose money in the event of a decline in the value of the collateral provided for loaned securities or a decline in the value of any investments made with cash collateral. These events could also trigger adverse tax consequences for a Fund. Securities lending also involves exposure to certain additional risks, including operational risk (i.e., the risk of losses resulting from problems in the settlement and accounting process –  especially so in certain international markets), “gap” risk (i.e., the risk of a mismatch between the return on cash collateral reinvestments and the fees a Fund has agreed to pay a borrower), risk of loss of collateral, credit, legal, counterparty and market risk. Although a Fund’s securities lending agent has agreed to provide a Fund with indemnification in the event of a borrower default, a Fund is still exposed to the risk of losses in the event a borrower does not return a Fund’s securities as agreed and the agent fails to indemnify a Fund.
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STATE-SPECIFIC RISK –  A Fund may from time to time invest more than 25% of its total assets in municipal securities of issuers in one or more states. A Fund is subject to the risk that the economies of the states in which it invests, and the revenues supporting the municipal securities, may decline. Investing significantly in one or more states means that a Fund is more susceptible to any single economic, market, political, regulatory or other occurrence that affects issuers in those states. This is because, for example, issuers in a particular state may react similarly to specific economic, market, regulatory, political or other developments. The particular states in which a Fund may focus its investments may change over time and the Fund may alter its focus at inopportune times. Tax-Aware Bond ETF currently may invest more than 25% of its total assets in municipal securities of issuers in each of California, New York and Texas. The possibility exists that natural and man-made disasters, including hurricanes, earthquakes, and major terrorist events, could cause a major dislocation of the California, New York or Texas economies and significantly affect the ability of state or local governments to raise money to pay principal and interest on their municipal securities. Additional risks applicable to issuers in these states include the following:
California Risk - While California’s economy is large, it is relatively concentrated in certain industries, including technology, aerospace and defense-related manufacturing, trade, entertainment, real estate and financial services, and thus may be sensitive to economic, business, political, environmental, regulatory or other developments affecting those industries.
New York Risk - New York’s economy and finances may be especially vulnerable to changes in the performance of the financial services industry, which has historically experienced significant volatility. Future economic, regulatory, political or behavioral changes concerning the financial services industry could have a significant impact on its profitability. A decline in the value of New York’s real estate market could also have a significant negative impact on state and local economies.
Texas Risk - Texas’ economy relies to a significant extent on certain key industries, such as the oil and gas industry (including drilling, production and refining), chemicals production, technology and telecommunications equipment manufacturing and international trade. Each of these industries has from time to time suffered from economic downturns, and adverse conditions in one or more of these industries could impair the ability of issuers of Texas municipal securities to pay principal or interest on their obligations.
TAXABLE INCOME RISK –  The risk that a Fund may invest in securities or other instruments that produce income subject to income tax, including the Alternative Minimum Tax. A Fund’s investments in municipal securities rely on the opinion of the issuer’s bond counsel that the interest paid on those securities will not be subject to federal income tax. Tax opinions are generally provided at the time the municipal security is initially issued. However, after a Fund buys a security, the Internal Revenue Service may determine that a bond issued as tax-exempt should in fact be taxable and the Fund’s dividends with respect to that bond might be subject to federal income tax. In addition, income from tax-exempt municipal securities could be declared taxable because of unfavorable changes in tax laws, adverse interpretations by the Internal Revenue Service, state tax authorities, or a court, or the non-compliant conduct of a bond issuer.
TO BE ANNOUNCED (TBA) TRANSACTIONS RISK –  TBA investments include when-issued and delayed delivery securities and forward commitments. TBA transactions involve the risk that the security a Fund buys will lose value prior to its delivery. A Fund is subject to this risk whether or not the Fund takes delivery of the securities on the settlement date for a transaction. There also is the risk that the security will not be issued or that the other party to the transaction will not meet its obligation. If this occurs, a Fund would lose both the investment opportunity for the assets it set aside to pay for the security and any gain in the security’s price. A Fund may also take a short position in a TBA investment when it owns or has the right to obtain, at no added cost, identical securities. If a Fund takes such a short position, it may reduce the risk of a loss if the price of the securities declines in the future, but will lose the opportunity to profit if the price rises. TBA transactions may also result in a higher portfolio turnover rate and/or increased capital gains for a Fund.
Short sales of to be announced (TBA) securities risk  –  When a Fund enters into a short sale of a TBA security it effectively agrees to sell at a future date and price a security it does not own. Although most TBA short sale transactions are closed before a Fund would be required to deliver the security, if the Fund does not close the position, the Fund may have to purchase the securities needed to settle the short sale at a higher price than anticipated. This would cause a Fund to lose money. A Fund may not always be able to purchase the securities required to settle a short at a particular time or at an attractive price. A Fund may incur increased transaction costs associated with selling TBA securities short. In addition, taking short positions in TBA securities results in a form of leverage, which could increase the volatility of the Fund’s returns.
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UNSECURED LOANS RISK –  The claims of holders of unsecured loans are subordinated to, and thus lower in priority of payment to, claims of creditors holding secured indebtedness and possibly other classes of creditors holding unsecured debt. Unsecured loans have a greater risk of default than secured loans, particularly during periods of deteriorating economic conditions. Since they do not afford the lender recourse to collateral, unsecured loans are also subject to greater risk of nonpayment in the event of default than secured loans. Such loans generally have greater price volatility than more senior loans and may be less liquid.
USE AS AN UNDERLYING FUND RISK –  A Fund may be an investment (an “Underlying Fund”) of one or more fund of funds. The term “fund of funds” refers to a fund that pursues its investment objective by investing primarily in other funds. As a result, a Fund may be subject to the following risks:
A Fund, as an Underlying Fund, may experience relatively large redemptions or investments as a fund of funds periodically reallocates or rebalances its assets. These transactions, to the extent they are effected on a cash basis, may cause a Fund to sell securities to meet such redemptions, or to invest in cash, at times it would not otherwise do so, and may as a result increase transaction costs and adversely affect Fund performance.
Such transactions could increase or decrease the frequency of capital gain recognition by a Fund and could affect the timing, amount and character of distributions you receive from a Fund.
U.S. GOVERNMENT SECURITIES RISK –  Treasury obligations may differ in their interest rates, maturities, times of issuance and other characteristics. Securities backed by the U.S. Treasury or the full faith and credit of the United States are guaranteed only as to the timely payment of interest and principal when held to maturity. Accordingly, the current market values for these securities will fluctuate with changes in interest rates. Obligations of U.S. Government agencies and authorities are supported by varying degrees of credit but generally are not backed by the full faith and credit of the U.S. Government. No assurance can be given that the U.S. Government will provide financial support to its agencies and authorities if it is not obligated by law to do so. In addition, the value of U.S. Government securities may be affected by changes in the credit rating of the U.S. Government. U.S. Government securities are also subject to default risk, which is the risk that the U.S. Treasury will be unable to meet its payment obligations. The maximum potential liability of the issuers of some U.S. Government securities held by a Fund may greatly exceed their current resources, including their legal right to support from the U.S. Treasury. It is possible that these issuers will not have the funds to meet their payment obligations in the future.
VALUATION RISK –  The risk that the sale price a Fund could receive for a security may differ from the Fund’s valuation of the security, particularly for securities that trade in low volume or volatile markets or that are valued using a fair value methodology. In addition, the value of the securities in a Fund’s portfolio may change on days when shareholders will not be able to purchase or sell the Fund’s shares. In addition, a Fund may rely on various third-party sources to calculate its net asset value. As a result, a Fund is subject to certain operational risks associated with reliance on service providers and service providers’ data sources. In particular, errors or system failures and other technological issues may adversely impact a Fund’s calculation of its net asset value, and such net asset value calculation issues may result in inaccurately calculated net asset values, delays in net asset value calculation, and/or the inability to calculate net asset value over extended periods. A Fund may be unable to recover any losses associated with such failures.
VOLATILITY RISK –  The value of a Fund’s investments may fluctuate over a relatively short period of time. These fluctuations may cause a Fund’s net asset value per share to experience significant changes over similarly short periods of time.
WARRANTS RISK –  Warrants give a Fund the right to purchase equity securities (“underlying stock”) at specific prices valid for a specific period of time. If the price of the underlying stock does not rise above the exercise price before the warrant expires, the warrant generally expires without any value and a Fund loses any amount it paid for the warrant. Thus, investments in warrants may involve substantially more risk than investments in common stock. Warrants may trade in the same markets as their underlying stock; however, the price of the warrant does not necessarily move with the price of the underlying stock and can be more volatile than the prices of the underlying stocks. The market for warrants may be limited and it may be difficult for a Fund to sell a warrant promptly at an advantageous price.
ZERO COUPON SECURITIES RISK –  Zero-coupon securities pay no interest prior to their maturity date or another specified date in the future but are issued and traded at a discount to their face value. The discount varies as the securities approach their maturity date (or the date on which interest payments are scheduled to begin). While interest payments are not made on such securities, holders of such securities are deemed to have received income (“phantom income”) annually, notwithstanding that cash may not be received currently. As with other fixed income securities, zero coupon bonds are subject to interest rate and credit risk. Some of these securities may be subject to substantially greater price fluctuations during periods of changing market interest rates than comparable securities that pay interest currently. Longer term zero coupon bonds have greater interest rate risk than shorter term zero coupon bonds.
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TRANSACTIONS IN FUND SHARES BY THE INVESTMENT MANAGER AND ITS AFFILIATES
HFMC and its affiliates may purchase and sell Fund shares in secondary market transactions on behalf of their own accounts or the accounts of their advisory clients. Such investments and transactions in Fund shares may be substantial in comparison to the investments and transactions in Fund shares by non-affiliated investors. In particular, HFMC is the investment manager to a group of asset allocation funds (each an “Asset Allocation Fund” and, collectively, the “Asset Allocation Funds”), each of which operates as a fund-of-funds and invests substantially all of its assets in underlying funds for which HFMC serves as the investment manager, including the Funds. The Asset Allocation Funds may currently and from time to time hold (or beneficially own) a substantial percentage of a Fund’s outstanding shares. To the extent that an Asset Allocation Fund owns more than 25% of a Fund’s shares, the Asset Allocation Fund will be deemed to hold a controlling interest in the Fund. Such controlling interest may create a conflict of interest for HFMC in managing both the Fund and the Asset Allocation Funds. To address the potential conflicts of interest that may arise from managing a Fund and other accounts, including the Asset Allocation Funds, HFMC has adopted policies and procedures that are designed to identify and mitigate the risks associated with these potential conflicts of interests. For example, HFMC or an Asset Allocation Fund generally will vote Fund shares that it beneficially owns in the same proportion as the votes of other non-affiliated beneficial owners of the same Fund. In addition, HFMC and its affiliates, including the Asset Allocation Funds, may from time to time be substantially, if not entirely, responsible for the trading activity in a Fund’s shares, which may be comprised of purchase or sale transactions initiated by HFMC and its affiliates. Such trading activity by a Fund’s affiliates may impact other investors seeking to purchase or sell Fund shares at the same time, which may diminish over time to the extent that the Fund increases in size and becomes more broadly owned.
Use of Cash or Money Market Investments
Each Fund may participate in a cash sweep program whereby a Fund’s uninvested cash balance is used to purchase shares of affiliated or unaffiliated money market funds or cash management pooled investment vehicles at the end of each day. To the extent a Fund invests its uninvested cash through a sweep program, it is subject to the risks of the account or fund into which it is investing, including liquidity issues that may delay the Fund from accessing its cash.
A Fund may invest some or all of its assets in cash, high quality money market instruments (including, but not limited to U.S. government securities, bank obligations, commercial paper and repurchase agreements involving the foregoing securities) and shares of money market funds for temporary defensive purposes in response to adverse market, economic or political conditions. In addition, a Fund may invest some of its assets in these instruments to maintain liquidity, for cash management purposes, or in response to atypical circumstances such as unusually large cash inflows or redemptions. Under such conditions, a Fund may not invest in accordance with its investment objective or principal investment strategy and, as a result, there is no assurance that the Fund will achieve its investment objective, and may lose the benefit of market upswings.
Participation In Securities Lending Activities
Each Fund may lend portfolio securities to certain borrowers in U.S. and non-U.S. markets in an amount not to exceed one third (33 1/3%) of the value of its total assets.
Operational Risks Associated With Cybersecurity
Each Fund and its service providers use internet, technology and information systems, which may expose the Fund to potential risks linked to cybersecurity breaches of those technological or information systems. Cybersecurity breaches, amongst other things, could allow an unauthorized party to gain access to proprietary information, customer data, or Fund assets, or cause a Fund and/or its service providers to suffer data corruption or lose operational functionality. For instance, cybersecurity breaches may interfere with the processing of shareholder transactions, impact a Fund’s ability to calculate its NAV, cause the release of private shareholder information or confidential business information, impede trading, subject the Fund to regulator fines or financial losses and/or cause reputational damage.
About Each Fund’s Investment Objective
Each Fund’s investment objective may be changed by the Funds’ Board without approval of the shareholders of the Fund. A Fund’s prospectus will be updated prior to any change in the Fund’s investment objective. In addition, the Trust may determine to cease operating a Fund as an “exchange-traded” fund and cause the Fund’s shares to stop trading on a securities exchange.
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The Board reserves the right to convert a Fund to a master-feeder structure without shareholder approval and with advance notice to the Fund’s shareholders. Under a master-feeder structure, a Fund (i.e., feeder fund) would seek to achieve its investment objective by investing all or a portion of its investable assets in another open-end investment management company (i.e., master fund) with substantially the same investment objective, restrictions and policies, instead of investing in portfolio securities directly.
Consequences of Portfolio Trading Practices
Each Fund may have a relatively high portfolio turnover and may, at times, engage in short-term trading. To the extent that Creation Unit purchases from and redemptions by a Fund are effected in cash, frequent purchases and redemptions may increase the rate of portfolio turnover. Such activity could produce higher brokerage expenses for a Fund and higher taxable distributions to the Fund’s shareholders and therefore could adversely affect the Fund’s performance. In addition, large movements of cash into or out of a Fund may negatively impact the Fund’s ability to achieve its investment objective or maintain a consistent level of operating expenses. Each Fund is not managed to achieve a particular tax result for shareholders. Shareholders should consult their own tax advisor for individual tax advice.
Investment Policies
Each of Core Bond ETF, Municipal Opportunities ETF, Tax-Aware Bond ETF and Total Return Bond ETF has a name that suggests a focus on a particular type of investment. In accordance with Rule 35d-1 under the 1940 Act, each Fund (except Short Duration ETF) has adopted a policy that it will, under normal circumstances, invest at least 80% of the value of its assets (net assets plus the amount of any borrowings for investment purposes) in investments of the type suggested by its name, as set forth in the Fund’s Principal Investment Strategy section. This requirement is applied at the time a Fund invests its assets. If, subsequent to an investment by a Fund, this requirement is no longer met, the Fund’s future investments will be made in a manner that will bring the Fund into compliance with this requirement. In addition, in appropriate circumstances, synthetic investments may count toward the 80% minimum if they have economic characteristics similar to the other included investments.
Core Bond ETF’s, Tax-Aware Bond ETF’s and Total Return Bond ETF’s policy to invest at least 80% of its assets in such a manner is not a “fundamental” policy, which means that it may be changed without the vote of a majority of the Fund’s outstanding shares as defined in the 1940 Act. Shareholders will be given written notice at least 60 days prior to any change by a Fund of its 80% investment policy covered by Rule 35d-1.
Municipal Opportunities ETF’s policy to invest at least 80% of its assets in such a manner is a “fundamental” policy, which means that it may not be changed without the vote of a majority of the Fund’s outstanding shares as defined in the 1940 Act. The name of each Fund may be changed at any time by a vote of the Funds’ Board of Trustees.
ADDITIONAL INFORMATION ABOUT SCHRODERS
To the extent applicable to the Tax-Aware Bond Fund’s investment strategy, Schroders does not generally invest in companies whose core business is focused on producing cluster munitions, anti-personnel mines, chemical weapons and biological weapons; Schroders believes these types of companies present sustainability risks that are detrimental to returns.
Additional Investment Strategies and Risks
Each Fund may invest in various securities and engage in various investment techniques that are not the principal focus of the Fund and, therefore, are not described in this prospectus. These securities and techniques, together with their risks, are discussed in the Funds’ SAI, which may be obtained free of charge by contacting the Funds (see back cover for address, phone number and website address).
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Disclosure of Portfolio Holdings
On each business day, before commencement of trading on NYSE Arca or Cboe BZX, as applicable, each Fund will disclose on hartfordfunds.com the identities and quantities of the Fund’s portfolio holdings that will form the basis for the Fund’s calculation of NAV at the end of the business day.
A description of each Fund’s policies and procedures with respect to the disclosure of the Fund’s portfolio securities is available in the SAI.
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The Investment Manager and Sub-Advisers
THE INVESTMENT MANAGER
Hartford Funds Management Company, LLC (“HFMC” or the “Investment Manager”) is the investment manager to each Fund. The Investment Manager is an indirect subsidiary of The Hartford Financial Services Group, Inc. (“The Hartford”), a Connecticut-based financial services company. As of September 30, 2021, the Investment Manager and its wholly owned subsidiary, Lattice Strategies LLC, had approximately $150.5 billion in discretionary assets under management. The Investment Manager is responsible for the management of the Funds and supervises the activities of the investment sub-advisers described below. The Investment Manager is principally located at 690 Lee Road, Wayne, Pennsylvania 19087.
“MANAGERS OF MANAGERS” STRUCTURE
The Investment Manager relies on an exemptive order from the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”) for the Funds under which it uses a “Manager of Managers” structure (the “Order”). The Investment Manager has responsibility, subject to oversight by the Board of Trustees, to oversee each sub-adviser and recommend its hiring, termination and replacement. The Order permits the Investment Manager, on behalf of the Funds and subject to the approval of the Board of Trustees, to hire, and to materially amend any existing or future sub-advisory agreements with sub-advisers that are not affiliated with the Investment Manager as well as sub-advisers that are indirect or direct, wholly owned subsidiaries of the Investment Manager or of another company that, indirectly or directly wholly owns the Investment Manager, in each case without obtaining approval from the Fund’s shareholders. Within 90 days after hiring any new sub-adviser, a Fund’s shareholders will receive information about any new sub-advisory relationship.
Each Fund’s sole initial shareholder approved the operation of the Fund under any “Manager of Managers” structure, including under (i) the Order, and/or (ii) any future law, regulation, guidance or exemptive relief provided by the SEC.
THE INVESTMENT SUB-ADVISERS
Wellington Management Company LLP (“Wellington Management”) serves as the sub-adviser to Core Bond ETF, Municipal Opportunities ETF, Short Duration ETF, and Total Return Bond ETF. Wellington Management performs the daily investment of the assets for the applicable Funds. Wellington Management is a Delaware limited liability partnership with principal offices at 280 Congress Street, Boston, Massachusetts 02210. Wellington Management is a professional investment counseling firm which provides investment services to investment companies, employee benefit plans, endowments, foundations, and other institutions. Wellington Management and its predecessor organizations have provided investment advisory services for over 80 years. Wellington Management is owned by the partners of Wellington Management Group LLP, a Massachusetts limited liability partnership. As of September 30, 2021, Wellington Management and its investment advisory affiliates had investment management authority with respect to approximately $1.385 trillion in assets.
SIMNA serves as the sub-adviser and SIMNA Ltd. serves as sub-sub-adviser to Tax-Aware Bond ETF. SIMNA performs the daily investment of the assets for Tax-Aware Bond ETF and SIMNA may allocate assets to or from SIMNA Ltd., an affiliate of SIMNA, in connection with the daily investment of the assets of that Fund. SIMNA (itself and its predecessors) has been an investment manager since 1962, and also serves as investment adviser to other mutual funds and a broad range of institutional investors. SIMNA and SIMNA Ltd. are both indirect, wholly owned subsidiaries of Schroders plc. Schroders plc is a global asset management company with approximately $816.5 billion under management as of September 30, 2021. Schroders plc and its affiliates (“Schroders”) have clients that are major financial institutions including banks and insurance companies, public and private pension funds, endowments and foundations, high net worth individuals, financial intermediaries and retail investors. Schroders has one of the largest networks of offices of any dedicated asset management company with numerous portfolio managers and analysts covering the world’s investment markets. SIMNA’s principal address is 7 Bryant Park, New York, New York 10018. SIMNA Ltd.’s address is 1 London Wall Place, London EC2Y 5AU.
Portfolio MANAGERS
The Funds’ SAI provides additional information about the portfolio managers’ compensation, other accounts managed by the portfolio managers and the portfolio managers’ ownership of securities in each applicable Fund. In order to implement the investment strategy for Core Bond ETF, Municipal Opportunities ETF, Short Duration ETF, and Total Return Bond ETF, the portfolio managers may allocate a portion of its Fund’s assets to another portfolio management team within Wellington Management. The persons with the most significant responsibility for the daily investment of each Fund’s assets are listed below.
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Core Bond ETF
Joseph F. Marvan, CFA, Senior Managing Director and Fixed Income Portfolio Manager of Wellington Management, has served as portfolio manager of the Fund since 2020. Mr. Marvan joined Wellington Management as an investment professional in 2003.
Campe Goodman, CFA, Senior Managing Director and Fixed Income Portfolio Manager of Wellington Management, has been involved in portfolio management for the Fund since 2020. Mr. Goodman joined Wellington Management as an investment professional in 2000.
Robert D. Burn, CFA, Managing Director and Fixed Income Portfolio Manager of Wellington Management, has been involved in portfolio management for the Fund since 2020. Mr. Burn joined Wellington Management as an investment professional in 2007.
Municipal Opportunities ETF
Timothy D. Haney, CFA, Senior Managing Director and Fixed Income Portfolio Manager of Wellington Management, has served as portfolio manager of the Fund since 2017. Mr. Haney joined Wellington Management as an investment professional in 2005.
Brad W. Libby, Managing Director and Fixed Income Portfolio Manager/Credit Analyst of Wellington Management, has served as portfolio manager of the Fund since 2017. Mr. Libby joined Wellington Management as an investment professional in 2010. Prior to joining Wellington Management, Mr. Libby was an investment professional with Putnam Investments (1996 to 2009).
Short Duration ETF
Timothy E. Smith, Senior Managing Director and Fixed Income Portfolio Manager of Wellington Management, has served as portfolio manager of the Fund since 2018. Mr. Smith joined Wellington Management as an investment professional in 1992.
Tax-Aware Bond ETF
Lisa Hornby, CFA, Portfolio Manager and Head of the US Multi-Sector Fixed Income team at Schroders, has served as portfolio manager of the Fund since 2019 and has been involved with research and portfolio construction on the Fund since 2018. She has been an employee of Schroders since 2010. Prior to joining Schroders, she was an analyst at Barclays Capital.
Neil G. Sutherland, CFA, Portfolio Manager, has served as portfolio manager of the Fund since 2017. He has been associated with Schroders since 2013. Mr. Sutherland joined Fixed Income Management LLC (“STW”) in 2008 and has over 15 years of investment experience. Previously, he spent seven years at AXA Investment Managers, where he held the position of Senior Fixed Income Manager. Before that, Mr. Sutherland was part of Newton Investment Group’s Global Fixed Income Team.
Julio C. Bonilla, CFA, Portfolio Manager, has served as portfolio manager of the Fund since 2017. He has been associated with Schroders since 2013. Mr. Bonilla joined STW in 2010 and has over 15 years of investment experience. Prior to joining STW, Mr. Bonilla spent ten years with Wells Capital Management, where he held the title of Senior Portfolio Manager.
David May, Portfolio Manager and a municipal specialist on the US Multi-Sector Fixed Income team at Schroders, has served as portfolio manager of the Fund since 2020. He has been associated with Schroders since 2019. Mr. May joined the fixed income investment team as a Portfolio Manager, specializing in municipal bonds. Prior to joining Schroders, Mr. May previously served as a portfolio manager at Wasemer Schroeder from 2018 through 2019 and Strategic Partners Investment Advisors from 2010 through 2018.
Total Return Bond ETF
Joseph F. Marvan, CFA, Senior Managing Director and Fixed Income Portfolio Manager of Wellington Management, has served as portfolio manager of the Fund since 2017. Mr. Marvan joined Wellington Management as an investment professional in 2003.
Campe Goodman, CFA, Senior Managing Director and Fixed Income Portfolio Manager of Wellington Management, has been involved in portfolio management for the Fund since 2017. Mr. Goodman joined Wellington Management as an investment professional in 2000.
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Robert D. Burn, CFA, Managing Director and Fixed Income Portfolio Manager of Wellington Management, has been involved in portfolio management for the Fund since 2017. Mr. Burn joined Wellington Management as an investment professional in 2007.
MANAGEMENT FEE
Each Fund pays a monthly management fee to the Investment Manager in return for providing investment advisory and administrative services under an unitary fee structure. The Investment Manager, not the Fund, pays the sub-advisory fees to Wellington Management and SIMNA, as applicable, out of its management fee. Pursuant to a sub-sub-advisory agreement between SIMNA and SIMNA Ltd., on behalf of Tax-Aware Bond ETF, SIMNA pays a fee to SIMNA Ltd. out of the sub-advisory fees received from the Investment Manager. The management fee rate set forth in each Fund’s investment management agreement, which is based on the annual rate set forth below calculated on the average daily net assets of each Fund, is shown below.
Fund
Annual Rate
Core Bond ETF
0.29%
Municipal Opportunities ETF
0.29%
Short Duration ETF
0.29%
Tax-Aware Bond ETF
0.39%
Total Return Bond ETF
0.29%
In addition to providing investment management services, the Investment Manager provides or procures administrative services for shareholders and also bears the costs of various third-party services required by a Fund, including audit, custodial, portfolio accounting, legal, transfer agency and printing costs. Each Fund bears other expenses that are not covered under the management fee. These expenses, which may vary and may affect the total level of expenses paid by shareholders, include, but are not limited to, interest and taxes; brokerage commissions and other expenses connected with the execution of portfolio transactions; extraordinary non-recurring expenses, such as arbitration, litigation and indemnification expenses; and acquired fund fees and expenses. The Investment Manager generally earns or is expected to earn in the future a profit on the management fee paid by each Fund. Also, under the terms of the investment management agreement, the Investment Manager, and not Fund shareholders, would benefit from any price decreases in third-party services, including decreases resulting from an increase in net assets.
A discussion regarding the basis for the Board of Trustees’ August 2020 approval of the investment management agreement for each Fund, except for Core Bond ETF, is available in the Funds’ semi-annual report for the period ended January 31, 2021. A discussion regarding the basis for the Board of Trustees’ August 2021 approval of the investment management agreement for each Fund with the Investment Manager, as well as the investment sub-advisory and, where applicable, sub-sub-advisory agreements for such Funds, will be available in the Funds’ semi-annual report to shareholders for the fiscal period ended January 31, 2022. A discussion regarding the basis for the Board of Trustees’ approval of the investment management agreement for Core Bond ETF with the Investment Manager, as well as the investment sub-advisory agreement between the Investment Manager and the Core Bond ETF’s sub-adviser, is available in the Core Bond ETF’s annual report to shareholders for the fiscal year ending July 31, 2020.
ACQUIRED FUND FEES AND EXPENSES. A Fund will indirectly bear a pro rata share of fees and expenses incurred by any investment companies, including business development companies, in which the Fund is invested. A Fund’s pro rata portion of the cumulative expenses charged by the investment companies is calculated as a percentage of the Fund’s average net assets. The pro rata portion of the cumulative expenses may be higher or lower depending on the allocation of a Fund’s assets among the investment companies and the actual expenses of the investment companies. Business development company expenses are similar to the expenses paid by any operating company held by a Fund. They are not direct costs paid by Fund shareholders and are not used to calculate a Fund’s net asset value. They have no impact on the costs associated with Fund operations.
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How To Buy And Sell Shares
BUYING AND SELLING SHARES
Shares of a Fund may be acquired or redeemed directly with the Fund only in Creation Units or multiples thereof, as discussed in the “Creation and Redemption of Shares” section of the Statement of Additional Information. Once created, shares of a Fund generally trade in the secondary market in amounts less than a Creation Unit.
Shares of each Fund are listed for trading on a national securities exchange and can be bought and sold in the secondary market through a broker-dealer at market price throughout the trading day like shares of other publicly traded companies. The price of Fund shares is based on market price, and because ETF shares trade at market prices rather than NAV, shares may trade at a price greater than NAV (a premium) or less than NAV (a discount). However, there can be no guarantee that an active trading market will develop or be maintained, or that a Fund shares listing will continue or remain unchanged. The Trust does not impose any minimum investment amount for shares of a Fund purchased on an exchange. Buying or selling a Fund’s shares involves certain costs that apply to all securities transactions. When buying or selling shares of a Fund through a financial intermediary, you may incur a brokerage commission or other charges determined by your financial intermediary. Due to these brokerage costs, if any, frequent trading may detract significantly from investment returns. In addition, you may also incur the cost of the spread - the difference between the bid price (the highest price at which buyers are willing to buy shares) and the ask price (the lowest price at which sellers are willing to sell shares) (the “bid-ask spread”). The commission is frequently a fixed amount and may be a significant cost for investors seeking to buy or sell small amounts of shares. The spread varies over time for shares of a Fund based on its trading volume and market liquidity, and is generally less if the Fund has more trading volume and market liquidity and more if the Fund has less trading volume and market liquidity.
The Trust’s Board of Trustees has not adopted a policy of monitoring for frequent purchases and redemptions of Fund shares (“frequent trading”) that appear to attempt to take advantage of potential arbitrage opportunities presented by a lag between a change in the value of a Fund’s portfolio securities after the close of the primary markets for the Fund’s portfolio securities and the reflection of that change in the Fund’s NAV (“market timing”). The Trust believes such a policy is not necessary or appropriate because ETFs, such as the Funds, are intended to be attractive to arbitrageurs, as trading activity is critical to ensuring that the market price of Fund shares remains at or close to NAV. Since each Fund issues and redeems Creation Units at NAV plus applicable transaction fees, and the Fund’s shares may be purchased and sold on NYSE Arca or Cboe BZX, as applicable, at prevailing market prices, the risks of frequent trading are limited.
NYSE Arca is the primary listing exchange for Municipal Opportunities ETF, Tax-Aware Bond ETF and Total Return Bond ETF, and Cboe BZX is the primary listing exchange for Core Bond ETF and Short Duration ETF. Each exchange is open for trading Monday through Friday and is closed on the following holidays: New Year’s Day, Martin Luther King, Jr. Day, Presidents’ Day, Good Friday, Memorial Day, Independence Day, Labor Day, Thanksgiving Day and Christmas Day.
A “Business Day” with respect to the Funds is each day the New York Stock Exchange (the “Exchange”) is open. Orders from Authorized Participants to create or redeem Creation Units will only be accepted on a Business Day. On days when the Exchange closes earlier than normal, the Fund may require orders to create or redeem Creation Units to be placed earlier in the day. See the Statement of Additional Information for more information.
Section 12(d)(1) of the 1940 Act limits investments by registered investment companies and companies relying on Sections 3(c)(1) or 3(c)(7) of the 1940 Act in the securities of other investment companies. Registered investment companies are permitted to invest in the Funds beyond the limits set forth in Section 12(d)(1), currently subject to certain terms and conditions set forth in an SEC exemptive order issued to HFMC and the Trust, including that such investment companies enter into an agreement with the Trust. Rule 12d1-4 under the 1940 Act rather than the exemptive order will govern investments in the Funds by other registered investment companies as of the effective date of that rule.
Additional information about each Fund, including the Fund’s net asset value, market price, premiums and discounts and median bid-ask spreads, can be found at hartfordfunds.com.
BOOK ENTRY
Shares of each Fund are held in book-entry form, which means that no stock certificates are issued. The Depository Trust Company (“DTC”) or its nominee is the record owner of all outstanding shares of the Funds and is recognized as the owner of all shares for all purposes. Investors owning shares of a Fund are beneficial owners as shown on the records of DTC or its participants. DTC serves as the securities depository for shares of each Fund. DTC participants include securities brokers and dealers, banks, trust companies, clearing corporations and other institutions that directly or indirectly maintain a custodial relationship with DTC. As a beneficial owner of shares, you are not entitled to receive
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physical delivery of stock certificates or to have shares registered in your name, and you are not considered a registered owner of shares. Therefore, to exercise any right as an owner of shares, you must rely upon the procedures of DTC and its participants. These procedures are the same as those that apply to any other exchange-traded securities that you hold in book-entry or “street name” form.
Share Prices
The trading price of each Fund’s shares in the secondary market will generally differ from the Fund’s daily NAV per share and is affected by market forces such as supply and demand, economic conditions and other factors. The quotations and/or valuations of certain Fund holdings may not be updated during U.S. trading hours if such holdings do not trade in the United States.
PREMIUMS AND DISCOUNTS
The daily market prices on secondary markets for shares of a Fund may differ from the Fund’s NAV. NAV is the price per share at which a Fund issues and redeems shares. See “Valuation of Shares” below. The price used to calculate market returns (“Market Price”) of a Fund generally is determined using the midpoint between the highest bid and the lowest offer on the national securities exchange on which shares of the Fund are primarily listed for trading, as of the time that the Fund’s NAV is calculated. A Fund’s Market Price may be at, above or below its NAV. The NAV of a Fund will fluctuate with changes in the market value of its portfolio holdings. The Market Price of each Fund will fluctuate in accordance with changes in its NAV, as well as market supply and demand. Premiums or discounts are the differences (expressed as a percentage) between the NAV and the Market Price of a Fund on a given day, generally at the time the NAV is calculated. A premium is the amount that a Fund is trading above the reported NAV, expressed as a percentage of the NAV. A discount is the amount that a Fund is trading below the reported NAV, expressed as a percentage of the NAV. A discount or premium could be significant. Information regarding the frequency of daily premiums or discounts, generally at the time the NAV is calculated, during the Fund’s most recently completed calendar year and the most recently completed calendar quarters since that year (or the life of the Fund, if shorter) can be found at hartfordfunds.com.
VALUATION OF SHARES
Each Fund’s NAV per share is determined as of the close of regular trading on the Exchange (normally 4:00 p.m. Eastern Time) (the “NYSE Close”) on each day that the Exchange is open (“Valuation Date”). If the Exchange is closed due to weather or other extraordinary circumstances on a day it would typically be open for business, a Fund may treat such day as a typical business day and accept purchase and redemption orders from Authorized Participants and calculate the Fund’s NAV in accordance with applicable law. The net asset value for the shares is determined by dividing the value of a Fund’s net assets attributable to the shares by the number of shares outstanding. Information that becomes known to a Fund after the NAV has been calculated on a particular day will not generally be used to retroactively adjust the NAV determined earlier that day.
For purposes of calculating the NAV, portfolio securities and other assets held in a Fund’s portfolio for which market prices are readily available are valued at market value. Market value is generally determined on the basis of official close price or last reported trade prices. If no trades were reported, market value is based on prices obtained from a quotation reporting system, established market makers (including evaluated prices), or independent pricing services. Pricing vendors may use matrix pricing or valuation models that utilize certain inputs and assumptions to derive values, including transaction data, credit quality information, general market conditions, news, and other factors and assumptions. Special valuation considerations may apply with respect to a Fund’s “odd-lot” positions.
If market prices are not readily available or are deemed unreliable, the Fund will use the fair value of the security or other instrument as determined in good faith under policies and procedures established by and under the supervision of the Board of Trustees of the Trust (“Valuation Procedures”). Market prices are considered not readily available where there is an absence of current or reliable market-based data (e.g., trade information or broker quotes), including where events occur after the close of the relevant market, but prior to the NYSE Close that materially affect the values of a Fund’s portfolio holdings or assets. In addition, market prices are considered not readily available when, due to extraordinary circumstances, the exchanges or markets on which the securities or other instruments trade, do not open for trading for the entire day and no other market prices are available. Securities or other instruments that are primarily traded on foreign markets may trade on days that are not business days of a Fund. Fair value pricing is subjective in nature and the use of fair value pricing by a Fund may cause the NAV of its shares to differ significantly from the NAV that would have been calculated using market prices at the close of the exchange on which a portfolio holding is primarily traded. There can be no assurance that a Fund could obtain the fair value assigned to an investment if the Fund were to sell the investment at approximately the time at which the Fund determines its NAV.
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The value of the foreign securities or other instruments in which a Fund invests may change on days when a shareholder will not be able to purchase or sell shares of the Fund.
Fixed income investments (other than short-term obligations) and non-exchange traded derivatives held by a Fund are normally valued at prices supplied by independent pricing services in accordance with the Valuation Procedures. Short term investments maturing in 60 days or less are generally valued at amortized cost.
Exchange traded derivatives, such as options, futures and options on futures are valued at the last sale price determined by the exchange where such instruments principally trade as of the close of such exchange. If a last sale price is not available, the value will be the mean of the most recently quoted bid and ask prices as of the close of the relevant exchange. If a mean of the bid and ask prices cannot be calculated for the day, the value will be the most recently quoted bid price as of the close of the relevant exchange. OTC derivatives and other instruments that do not trade on an exchange are normally valued based on prices supplied by independent pricing services in accordance with the Valuation Procedures.
Investments valued in currencies other than U.S. dollars are converted to U.S. dollars using the prevailing spot currency exchange rates obtained from independent pricing services for calculation of the NAV. As a result, the NAV of a Fund’s shares may be affected by changes in the value of currencies in relation to the U.S. dollar. The value of securities or other instruments traded in markets outside the United States or denominated in currencies other than the U.S. dollar may be affected significantly on a day that the Exchange is closed and the market value may change on days when an investor is not able to purchase or sell shares of a Fund.
Foreign currency contracts represent agreements to exchange currencies on specific future dates at predetermined rates. Foreign currency contracts are valued using foreign currency exchange rates and forward rates as provided by an independent pricing service on the Valuation Date.
Investments in open-end mutual funds, if any, are valued at the respective NAV of each open-end mutual fund on the Valuation Date. Shares of investment companies listed and traded on an exchange are valued in the same manner as any exchange-listed equity security. Such open-end mutual funds and listed investment companies may use fair value pricing as disclosed in their prospectuses.
Financial instruments for which prices are not available from an independent pricing service may be valued using market quotations obtained from one or more dealers that make markets in the respective financial instrument in accordance with the Valuation Procedures established by the Trust’s Board of Trustees.
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Distribution Arrangements
ALPS Distributors, Inc., a registered broker-dealer and member of the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, Inc. (“FINRA”), serves as the principal underwriter and distributor for the Funds pursuant to a Distribution Agreement approved by the Board of Trustees of the Trust. The Distributor will not distribute shares in an amount that is less than a Creation Unit, and it does not maintain a secondary market in the shares. The Distributor may enter into participant agreements with other qualified financial institutions (i.e., Authorized Participants) with respect to creations and redemptions of Creation Units.
DISTRIBUTION PLAN
The Trust has adopted a Distribution and Servicing Plan for shares of each Fund pursuant to Rule 12b-1 under the 1940 Act (the “12b-1 Plan”). The 12b-1 Plan permits compensation in connection with the distribution and marketing of Fund shares and/or the provision of certain shareholder services. The 12b-1 Plan permits each Fund to pay compensation at an annual rate of up to 0.25% of the Fund’s average daily net assets. However, the Board of Trustees has determined not to authorize payment of a 12b-1 Plan fee with respect to any Fund at this time.
The 12b-1 Plan fee may only be imposed or increased when the Board of Trustees determines that it is in the best interests of shareholders to do so. Because these fees are paid out of a Fund’s assets on an ongoing basis, to the extent that a fee is authorized, over time it will increase the cost of an investment in the Fund. The 12b-1 Plan fee may cost an investor more than other types of sales charges.
PAYMENTS TO FINANCIAL INTERMEDIARIES AND OTHER ENTITIES
The Investment Manager and/or its affiliates may make a variety of payments to broker-dealers and financial institutions (“Financial Intermediaries”) for support and/or services related to activities that are designed to make registered representatives, other professionals and individual investors more knowledgeable about the Funds or for other activities, such as participation in marketing activities and presentations, educational training programs, the support of technology platforms and/or reporting systems. The Investment Manager and/or its affiliates may also make payments to Financial Intermediaries for the provision of analytical or other data to the Investment Manager or its affiliates relating to sales of Fund shares. For these reasons, (1) if your Financial Intermediary receives greater payments with respect to a Fund than it receives with respect to other products, it may be more inclined to sell you shares of the Fund rather than another product and/or (2) if your Financial Intermediary receives greater payments with respect to a Fund, such payments may create an incentive for the Financial Intermediary to favor the Fund rather than other fund companies or investment products for which it may receive a lower payment. You may contact your Financial Intermediary if you want additional information regarding any additional payments it receives.
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Fund Distributions and Tax Matters
DIVIDENDS AND DISTRIBUTIONS
Each Fund intends to distribute substantially all of its net investment income and capital gains to shareholders at least once a year. Capital gains of each Fund are normally declared and paid annually. Dividends from net investment income of each Fund are normally declared and paid monthly.
Notwithstanding the foregoing, the Trust’s Board of Trustees has delegated authority to the Funds’ Treasurer to reduce the frequency with which dividends are declared and paid and to declare and make payments of long-term capital gains as permitted or required by law or in order to avoid tax penalties. Further, each Fund reserves the right to change its dividend distribution policy at the discretion of the Board of Trustees. Dividend payments are made through DTC participants and indirect participants to beneficial owners then of record with proceeds received from a Fund.
Unless your investment is in a tax-deferred account, you may want to avoid buying shares shortly before a Fund pays a dividend. The reason? If you buy shares when a Fund has realized but not yet distributed taxable income or capital gains, you will pay the full price for the shares and then receive a portion of the price back in the form of a taxable dividend. Before investing you may want to consult your tax advisor.
No dividend reinvestment service is provided by the Trust. Financial intermediaries may make the DTC book-entry Dividend Reinvestment Service available for use by beneficial owners of Fund shares for reinvestment of their dividend distributions. Beneficial owners should contact their financial intermediary to determine the availability and costs of the service and the details of participation therein. Financial intermediaries may require beneficial owners to adhere to specific procedures and timetables. If this service is available and used, dividend distributions of both income and net capital gains will be automatically reinvested in additional whole shares of a Fund purchased in the secondary market.
TAXABILITY OF DIVIDENDS
Municipal Opportunities ETF
Municipal Opportunities ETF intends to meet certain federal tax requirements so that distributions of tax-exempt income may be treated as exempt-interest dividends. These dividends are not subject to regular federal income tax. However, the Fund may invest a portion of its assets in tax-exempt obligations subject to the Alternative Minimum Tax. Any portion of exempt-interest dividends attributable to interest on these obligations may increase some shareholders’ Alternative Minimum Tax. The Fund expects that its distributions will consist primarily of exempt-interest dividends. The Fund’s exempt-interest dividends may be subject to state or local taxes. Distributions paid from any interest income that is not tax-exempt and from any short-term or long-term capital gains will be taxable whether you reinvest those distributions or receive them in cash. Distributions from the Fund’s long-term capital gains (if any) are taxable as long-term capital gains, regardless of how long you held your shares. Distributions from short-term capital gains and from ordinary income (other than certain qualified dividend income) are generally taxable as ordinary income.
Tax exempt income received by a tax-deferred retirement account will generally be taxable when distributed from the tax-deferred retirement account. As a result, any retirement plan investor should consider whether a Fund is an appropriate investment. Tax-exempt income is included when determining whether Social Security and railroad retirement benefits are taxable.
Core Bond ETF, Short Duration ETF, Tax-Aware Bond ETF and Total Return Bond ETF
Unless your shares are held in a tax-advantaged account, dividends and distributions you receive from a Fund, whether reinvested or taken as cash, are generally considered taxable. Distributions from a Fund’s long-term capital gains are taxable as long-term capital gains, regardless of how long you held your shares. Distributions from short-term capital gains and from ordinary income (other than certain qualified dividend income) are generally taxable as ordinary income. A portion of dividends from ordinary income may qualify for the dividends-received deduction for corporations. Distributions from certain qualified dividend income generally are taxable to individuals at the same rates that apply to long-term capital gains, if certain holding period and other requirements are met. The maximum individual rate applicable to “qualified dividend income” and long-term capital gains is currently generally either 15% or 20%, depending on whether the individual’s income exceeds certain threshold amounts. Given the investment strategies of each Fund, it is not expected that a significant portion of a Fund’s dividends would be eligible to be designated as qualified dividend income or for the dividends-received deduction for corporations.
For the Tax-Aware Bond ETF, if at least 50% of the value of the Fund’s total assets is invested in tax-exempt securities at the end of each quarter of its taxable year, distributions of tax-exempt income may be treated as exempt-interest dividends. These dividends are not subject to regular federal income tax. However, the Fund may invest a portion of its
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assets in tax-exempt obligations subject to the Alternative Minimum Tax. Any portion of exempt-interest dividends attributable to interest on these obligations may increase some shareholders’ Alternative Minimum Tax. The Fund’s exempt-interest dividends may be subject to state or local taxes.
Tax exempt income received by a tax-deferred retirement account will generally be taxable when distributed from the tax-deferred retirement account. As a result, any retirement plan investor should consider whether a Fund is an appropriate investment. Tax-exempt income is included when determining whether Social Security and railroad retirement benefits are taxable.
All Funds
An additional 3.8% Medicare tax is imposed on certain net investment income (including taxable distributions received from a Fund and net gains from redemptions of Fund shares) of individuals, estates and trusts to the extent that such person’s gross income, with certain adjustments, exceeds certain threshold amounts.
Some dividends paid in January may be taxable as if they had been paid the previous December.
Unless your shares are held in a tax-advantaged account, dividends and distributions you receive from a Fund that are not considered exempt-interest dividends, whether reinvested or taken as cash, are generally considered taxable.
Dividends and capital gains distributed by the Fund to tax-deferred retirement plan accounts are not taxable currently.
TAXES ON EXCHANGE-LISTED SHARES SALES
Currently, any capital gain or loss realized upon a sale of shares is generally treated as long-term capital gain or loss if the shares have been held for more than one year and as short-term capital gain or loss if the shares have been held for one year or less. The ability to deduct capital losses may be limited. Any loss realized upon the sale or exchange of Fund shares that you held for less than six months may be disallowed to the extent of any distributions treated as exempt-interest dividends with respect to such shares. Consult your tax advisor if you sell shares held for less than six months at a loss after receiving a long-term capital gain distribution from a Fund.
TAXES ON PURCHASE AND REDEMPTION OF CREATION UNITS
An Authorized Participant who exchanges equity securities for Creation Units generally will recognize a gain or a loss. The gain or loss will be equal to the difference between the market value of the Creation Units at the time of the exchange and the exchanger’s aggregate basis in the securities surrendered and the cash component paid. A person who exchanges Creation Units for equity securities will generally recognize a gain or loss equal to the difference between the exchanger’s basis in the Creation Units and the aggregate market value of the securities received and the cash redemption amount. The Internal Revenue Service (the “IRS”), however, may assert that a loss realized upon an exchange of securities for Creation Units cannot be deducted currently under the rules governing “wash sales,” or on the basis that there has been no significant change in economic position. Persons exchanging securities should consult their own tax advisor with respect to whether the wash sale rules apply and when a loss might be deductible.
Under current federal tax laws, any capital gain or loss realized upon redemption of Creation Units is generally treated as long-term capital gain or loss if the shares have been held for more than one year and as a short-term capital gain or loss if the shares have been held for one year or less.
If you purchase or redeem Creation Units, you will be sent a confirmation statement showing how many and at what price you purchased or sold shares.
ADDITIONAL INFORMATION
Shareholders may be subject to U.S. federal income tax withholding (currently, at the rate of 24%) of all taxable distributions if they fail to provide their correct taxpayer identification number or to make required certifications, or if they have been notified by the IRS that they are subject to backup withholding. Backup withholding is not an additional tax. Any amounts withheld may be credited against U.S. federal income tax liability.
IRS Regulations require reporting to the IRS and furnishing to shareholders the cost basis information and holding period for Fund shares purchased on or after January 1, 2012, and sold on or after that date. Shareholders may elect from among several cost basis methods accepted by the IRS, including average cost. Fund shareholders should consult with their tax advisors to determine the best cost basis method for their tax situation and to obtain more information about how the cost basis reporting rules apply to them. Shareholders should contact their financial intermediaries with respect to reporting of cost basis and available elections for their accounts.
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Shareholders that are non-resident aliens or foreign entities will generally be subject to withholding of U.S. federal income tax at the rate of 30% of all ordinary dividends if there is no applicable tax treaty or if they are claiming reduced withholding under a tax treaty and have not properly completed and signed the appropriate IRS Form W-8. Provided that the appropriate IRS Form W-8 is properly completed and provided to the applicable withholding agent, long-term capital gains distributions and proceeds of sales are not subject to withholding for foreign shareholders.
If more than 50% of the value of a Fund’s total assets at the close of any taxable year consists of securities of foreign corporations, or if at least 50% of the value of the Fund’s total assets at the close of each quarter of its taxable year is represented by interests in other regulated investment companies, the Fund will be eligible to file an election with the IRS that would generally enable its shareholders to benefit from any foreign tax credit or deduction available for any foreign taxes the Fund pays. Pursuant to this election (if made), a shareholder will be required to include in gross income (in addition to dividends actually received) its pro rata share of the foreign taxes paid by the Fund, and may be entitled either to deduct its pro rata share of the foreign taxes in computing its taxable income or to use the amount as a foreign tax credit against its U.S. federal income tax liability (subject to certain holding period and other requirements). The consequences of such an election are discussed in more detail in the SAI.
Withholding of U.S. tax (at a 30% rate) is required on payments of taxable dividends made to certain non-U.S. entities that fail to comply (or be deemed compliant) with extensive new reporting and withholding requirements designed to inform the U.S. Department of the Treasury of U.S.-owned foreign investment accounts. Shareholders may be requested to provide additional information to enable the applicable withholding agent to determine whether withholding is required.
Distributions from a Fund may also be subject to state, local and foreign taxes. You should consult your own tax advisor regarding the particular tax consequences of an investment in a Fund.
This section summarizes some of the consequences under current Federal tax law of an investment in a Fund. It is not a substitute for personal tax advice. Consult your personal tax advisor about the potential tax consequences of an investment in a Fund under all applicable tax laws.
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Performance Notes
The following notes provide additional information for understanding how each Fund measures its performance.
Core Bond ETF and Total Return Bond ETF will measure their performance against the Bloomberg U.S. Aggregate Bond Index. The Bloomberg U.S. Aggregate Bond Index is an unmanaged index and is composed of securities that are SEC-registered, taxable, and dollar denominated. The index covers the U.S. investment grade fixed rate bond market, with index components for government and corporate securities, mortgage pass-through securities, and asset-backed securities. These major sectors are subdivided into more specific indices that are calculated and reported on a regular basis.
Municipal Opportunities ETF will measure its performance against the Bloomberg Municipal Bond 1-15 Year Blend (1-17) Index. The Bloomberg Municipal Bond 1-15 Year Blend (1-17) Index is a sub-index of the Bloomberg Municipal Bond Index. It is a rules-based market value-weighted index of bonds with maturities of one year to 17 years engineered for the tax-exempt bond market.
Short Duration ETF will measure its performance against the Bloomberg 1-3 Year U.S. Government/Credit Index. The Bloomberg 1-3 Year U.S. Government/Credit Index is an unmanaged index comprised of the U.S. Government/Credit component of the U.S. Aggregate Index. The 1-3 Year Government/Credit Index includes securities in the 1-3 year maturity range in the Government/Credit Index.
Tax-Aware Bond ETF will measure its performance against the Bloomberg Municipal Bond Index. The Bloomberg Municipal Bond Index is an unmanaged index of municipal bonds with maturities greater than two years.
Additional Information Regarding Bloomberg Index(es) “Bloomberg®” and the above referenced Bloomberg index(es) are service marks of Bloomberg Finance L.P. and its affiliates, including Bloomberg Index Services Limited (“BISL”), the administrator of the index (collectively, “Bloomberg”), and have been licensed for use for certain purposes by HFMC.
The Fund is not sponsored, endorsed, sold or promoted by Bloomberg. Bloomberg does not make any representation or warranty, express or implied, to the owners of or counterparties to the Fund or any member of the public regarding the advisability of investing in securities generally or in the Fund particularly. The only relationship of Bloomberg to HFMC is the licensing of certain trademarks, trade names and service marks and of the above referenced Bloomberg index(es), which is determined, composed and calculated by BISL without regard to HFMC or the Fund. Bloomberg has no obligation to take the needs of HFMC or the owners of the Fund into consideration in determining, composing or calculating the above referenced Bloomberg index(es). Bloomberg is not responsible for and has not participated in the determination of the timing of, prices at, or quantities of the Fund to be issued. Bloomberg shall not have any obligation or liability, including, without limitation, to the Fund’s customers, in connection with the administration, marketing or trading of the Fund.
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Prior Performance of Related Accounts
CORE BOND ETF
The following tables present the past performance of a composite of certain accounts managed by Wellington Management (the “Core Bond Broad Composite”), which serves as sub-adviser to the Core Bond ETF. The Core Bond Broad Composite consists of all accounts under discretionary management by Wellington Management in Wellington Management’s core bond investment strategy that have investment objectives, policies and strategies substantially similar to those of Core Bond ETF. The performance of the Core Bond Broad Composite reflects the performance of Wellington Management. The performance of the Core Bond Broad Composite has been adjusted to reflect the operating costs of the account with the highest operating expenses in the Core Bond Broad Composite. Historical performance has been prepared in compliance with the Global Investment Performance Standards (GIPS®). The GIPS method for computing historical performance differs from the SEC’s method. Returns reflect all income, gains and losses and reinvestment of any dividends or capital gains without provision for federal or state income tax. Because the gross performance data of the Core Bond Broad Composite shown in the tables does not reflect the deduction of investment advisory fees paid by certain accounts that make up the composite and certain other expenses that would be applicable to exchange-traded funds, the net performance data may be more relevant to potential investors in Core Bond ETF in their analysis of the historical experience of Wellington Management in managing all core bond portfolios, with investment objectives, policies and strategies substantially similar to those of Core Bond ETF. To calculate the net performance of the composite, the total annual fund operating expenses of Core Bond ETF, as set forth in Core Bond ETF’s fee table in the Summary Section of the Prospectus dated November 24, 2021, were used.
Certain accounts that are included in the Core Bond Broad Composite are not subject to the diversification requirements, specific tax restrictions and investment limitations imposed on Core Bond ETF by the 1940 Act or Subchapter M of the Internal Revenue Code. Consequently, the performance results for the composite may have been less favorable had it been regulated as an investment company under the federal securities laws.
THE HISTORICAL PERFORMANCE OF THE CORE BOND BROAD COMPOSITE IS NOT THAT OF CORE BOND ETF, IS NOT A SUBSTITUTE FOR CORE BOND ETF’S PERFORMANCE AND IS NOT NECESSARILY INDICATIVE OF ANY FUND’S FUTURE RESULTS. Core Bond ETF’s actual performance may differ significantly from the past performance of the Core Bond Broad Composite. The personnel who managed the accounts that make up the Core Bond Broad Composite, and who, therefore, generated, or contributed to, the historical performance shown may differ from the personnel managing the Core Bond ETF.
While the accounts in the composite experience inflows and outflows of cash from clients, there can be no assurance that the continuous offering of Core Bond ETF’s shares and Core Bond ETF’s obligation to redeem its shares will not adversely affect Core Bond ETF’s performance.
CORE Bond Broad Composite performance1
Average annual total returns for the periods ended December 31, 2020
1 Year
5 Years
10 Years
Core Bond Broad Composite (Net)
9.03%
5.11%
4.31%
Core Bond Broad Composite (Gross)
9.35%
5.41%
4.61%
Bloomberg U.S. Aggregate Bond Index (reflects no deduction for fees, expenses or taxes)
7.51%
4.44%
3.84%
Total returns for the periods ended December 31
2011
2012
2013
2014
2015
2016
2017
2018
2019
2020
Core Bond Broad Composite
(Net)
7.41%
5.88%
-1.71%
6.04%
0.29%
3.91%
4.05%
-0.56%
9.40%
9.03%
Core Bond Broad Composite
(Gross)
7.72%
6.19%
-1.42%
6.35%
0.58%
4.21%
4.35%
-0.27%
9.72%
9.35%
Bloomberg U.S. Aggregate
Bond Index (reflects no
deduction for fees, expenses
or taxes)