Prospectus
April 28, 2023
GOLDMAN SACHS ALTERNATIVE FUNDS
             
THE SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION AND COMMODITY FUTURES TRADING COMMISSION HAVE NOT APPROVED OR DISAPPROVED THESE SECURITIES OR PASSED UPON THE ADEQUACY OF THIS PROSPECTUS. ANY REPRESENTATION TO THE CONTRARY IS A CRIMINAL OFFENSE.
AN INVESTMENT IN A FUND IS NOT A BANK DEPOSIT AND IS NOT INSURED BY THE FEDERAL DEPOSIT
INSURANCE CORPORATION OR ANY OTHER GOVERNMENT AGENCY. AN INVESTMENT IN A FUND INVOLVES
INVESTMENT RISKS, AND YOU MAY LOSE MONEY IN A FUND.
Goldman Sachs Absolute Return Tracker Fund
Class A Shares: GARTX
Class C Shares: GCRTX
Institutional Shares: GJRTX
Investor Shares: GSRTX
Class R Shares: GRRTX
Class R6 Shares: GARUX
Goldman Sachs Commodity Strategy Fund
Class A Shares: GSCAX
Class C Shares: GSCCX
Institutional Shares: GCCIX
Investor Shares: GCCTX
Class R Shares: GCCRX
Class R6 Shares: GCCUX
Goldman Sachs Managed Futures Strategy Fund
Class A Shares: GMSAX
Class C Shares: GMSCX
Institutional Shares: GMSSX
Investor Shares: GFIRX
Class R Shares: GFFRX
Class R6 Shares: GMSWX

Table of Contents
1
9
16
24
32
43
47
48
48
57
64
67
86
104

Goldman Sachs Absolute Return Tracker Fund—Summary
Investment Objective
The Goldman Sachs Absolute Return Tracker Fund (the "Fund") seeks to deliver long-term total return consistent with investment results that approximate the return and risk patterns of a diversified universe of hedge funds.
Fees and Expenses of the Fund
This table describes the fees and expenses that you may pay if you buy, hold and sell shares of the Fund. You may pay other fees, such as brokerage commissions and other fees to financial intermediaries, which are not reflected in the table and Example below. You may qualify for sales charge discounts on purchases of Class A Shares if you invest at least $50,000 in Goldman Sachs Funds. More information about these and other discounts is available from your financial professional and in “Shareholder Guide—Common Questions Applicable to the Purchase of Class A Shares” beginning on page 53 and in Appendix C—Additional Information About Sales Charge Variations, Waivers and Discounts on page 104 of the Prospectus and “Other Information Regarding Maximum Sales Charge, Purchases, Redemptions, Exchanges and Dividends” beginning on page B-171 of the Fund’s Statement of Additional Information (“SAI”).
Shareholder Fees
(fees paid directly from your investment)
 
Class A
Class C
Institutional
Investor
Class R
Class R6
Maximum Sales Charge (Load) Imposed on Purchases (as a
percentage of offering price)
5.50%
None
None
None
None
None
Maximum Deferred Sales Charge (Load) (as a percentage of the
lower of original purchase price or sale proceeds)1
None
1.00%
None
None
None
None
Annual Fund Operating Expenses
(expenses that you pay each year as a percentage of the value of your investment)
 
Class A
Class C
Institutional
Investor
Class R
Class R6
Management Fees
0.63%
0.63%
0.63%
0.63%
0.63%
0.63%
Distribution and/or Service (12b-1) Fees
0.25%
0.75%
0.00%
0.00%
0.50%
0.00%
Other Expenses
0.20%
0.45%
0.08%
0.20%
0.20%
0.07%
Service Fees
0.00%
0.25%
0.00%
0.00%
0.00%
0.00%
All Other Expenses
0.20%
0.20%
0.08%
0.20%
0.20%
0.07%
Acquired Fund Fees and Expenses
0.11%
0.11%
0.11%
0.11%
0.11%
0.11%
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses2
1.19%
1.94%
0.82%
0.94%
1.44%
0.81%
Fee Waiver and Expense Limitation3
(0.10%)
(0.10%)
(0.10%)
(0.10%)
(0.10%)
(0.10%)
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses After Fee Waiver and
Expense Limitation
1.09%
1.84%
0.72%
0.84%
1.34%
0.71%
1
A contingent deferred sales charge (“CDSC”) of 1% is imposed on Class C Shares redeemed within 12 months of purchase.
2
The “Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses” do not correlate to the ratios of net and total expenses to average net assets provided in the Financial Highlights, which reflect the operating expenses of the Fund and do not include “Acquired Fund Fees and Expenses.”
3
The Investment Adviser has agreed to: (i) waive a portion of its management fee payable by the Fund in an amount equal to any management fees it earns as an investment adviser to the affiliated funds in which the Fund invests, except those management fees it earns from the Fund’s investments of cash collateral received in connection with securities lending transactions in affiliated funds; (ii) waive a portion of its management fee in an amount equal to the management fee paid to the Investment Adviser by the ART Subsidiary (as defined below) at an annual rate of 0.42% of the ART Subsidiary’s average daily net assets; and (iii) reduce or limit “Other Expenses” (excluding acquired fund fees and expenses, transfer agency fees and expenses, service fees, taxes, dividend and interest expenses on short sales, interest, brokerage fees, expenses of shareholder meetings, litigation and indemnification, and extraordinary expenses) to 0.014% of the Fund’s average daily net assets. The management fee waiver arrangement with respect to the ART Subsidiary may not be discontinued by the Investment Adviser as long as its contract with the ART Subsidiary is in place. The other management fee waiver and expense limitation arrangements will remain in effect through at least April 28, 2024, and prior to such date the Investment Adviser may not terminate the arrangements without the approval of the Board of Trustees.
Expense Example
This Example is intended to help you compare the cost of investing in the Fund with the cost of investing in other mutual funds.
1

The Example assumes that you invest $10,000 in Class A, Class C, Institutional, Investor, Class R and/or Class R6 Shares of the Fund for the time periods indicated and then redeem all of your Class A, Class C, Institutional, Investor, Class R and/or Class R6 Shares at the end of those periods. The Example also assumes that your investment has a 5% return each year and that the Fund’s operating expenses remain the same (except that the Example incorporates the fee waiver and expense limitation arrangements for only the first year). Although your actual costs may be higher or lower, based on these assumptions your costs would be:
 
1 Year
3 Years
5 Years
10 Years
Class A Shares
$655
$898
$1,159
$1,905
Class C Shares
$287
$600
$1,038
$2,256
Institutional Shares
$74
$252
$445
$1,004
Investor Shares
$86
$290
$510
$1,146
Class R Shares
$136
$446
$777
$1,716
Class R6 Shares
$73
$249
$440
$992
Class C Shares – Assuming no redemption
$187
$600
$1,038
$2,256

Portfolio Turnover
The Fund pays transaction costs when it buys and sells securities or instruments (i.e., “turns over” its portfolio). A high rate of portfolio turnover may result in increased transaction costs, including brokerage commissions, which must be borne by the Fund and its shareholders, and is also likely to result in higher short-term capital gains for taxable shareholders. These costs are not reflected in the annual fund operating expenses or in the expense example above, but are reflected in the Fund’s performance. The Fund’s portfolio turnover rate for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2022 was 184% of the average value of its portfolio.
Principal Strategy
The Fund’s Investment Adviser believes that hedge funds derive a large portion of their returns from exposure to sources of market risk (“Market Exposures”) and “Trading Strategies” involving long and/or short positions in Market Exposures and/or individual securities or baskets of securities. In seeking to meet its investment objective, the Fund uses a dynamic investment process to seek to identify the appropriate weights to Market Exposures and Trading Strategies that approximate the return and risk patterns of specific hedge fund sub-strategies. The hedge fund sub-strategies whose returns the Fund seeks to approximate include, but are not limited to, Equity Long Short, Event Driven, Relative Value and Macro sub-strategies (each a “Hedge Fund Sub-Strategy”). To establish the Market Exposures and Trading Strategies that drive the returns of the Hedge Fund Sub-Strategies, the Investment Adviser uses industry analysis of hedge funds, including hedge fund return databases, prime brokerage reports, industry participants and regulatory filings and other public sources. The Investment Adviser then applies a quantitative methodology, in combination with a qualitative overlay, to assess the appropriate weight to each Market Exposure and Trading Strategy. The Fund may seek to establish long and/or short positions in a multitude of Market Exposures, including but not limited to:
U.S. and non-U.S. (including emerging market) equity indices;
U.S. and non-U.S. (including emerging market) fixed income indices;
Credit indices;
Interest rates;
Commodity indices;
Master limited partnership (“MLP”) indices;
Foreign currency exchange rates;
Baskets of top positions held by hedge funds;
Single stocks and single commodities;
Volatility; and
Market momentum/trends.
The Fund invests in instruments that the Investment Adviser believes will assist the Fund in gaining exposure to the Market Exposures. The instruments in which the Fund may invest include, but are not limited to:
Equity securities (including securities that may convert into equity securities);
U.S. corporate bonds and other fixed income securities (including non-investment grade fixed income securities (commonly known as “junk bonds”));
Futures (including equity index futures, interest rate futures, bond futures and volatility futures);
Swaps (including total return swaps and credit default swaps on indices);
Options (including listed equity index put and call options, listed government bond future put and call options, options on volatility, and swaptions);
Structured notes (including commodity-linked notes);
Exchange-traded funds (“ETFs”);
Forward contracts (including currency forward contracts on developed and emerging markets currencies);
2

Wholly-owned subsidiary (to gain exposure to the commodities markets);
Asset and mortgage-backed securities and real estate investment trusts (“REITs”);
U.S. government securities, including agency debentures, and other high quality debt securities; and
Cash equivalents.
Investment in the Subsidiary. The Fund seeks to gain exposure to the commodities markets by investing in a wholly-owned subsidiary of the Fund organized as a limited liability company under the laws of the Cayman Islands, Cayman Commodity – ART, LLC (the “ART Subsidiary”). The ART Subsidiary is advised by the Investment Adviser and seeks to gain commodities exposure. The Fund may invest up to 25% of its total assets in the ART Subsidiary. The ART Subsidiary primarily obtains its commodity exposure by investing in commodity-linked derivative instruments (which may include total return swaps on commodity indexes, sub-indexes and single commodities, as well as commodity (U.S. or foreign) futures, commodity options and commodity-linked notes). Commodity-linked swaps are derivative instruments whereby the cash flows agreed upon between counterparties are dependent upon the price of the underlying commodity or commodity index over the life of the swap. Commodity futures contracts are standardized, exchange-traded contracts that provide for the sale or purchase of, or economic exposure to the price of, a commodity or a specified basket of commodities at a future time. An option on commodities gives the purchaser the right (and the writer of the option the obligation) to assume a position in a commodity or a specified basket of commodities at a specified exercise price within a specified period of time. The value of these commodity-linked derivatives will rise and fall in response to changes in the underlying commodity or commodity index. Commodity-linked derivatives expose the ART Subsidiary and the Fund economically to movements in commodity prices. Such instruments may be leveraged so that small changes in the underlying commodity prices would result in disproportionate changes in the value of the instrument. Neither the Fund nor the ART Subsidiary invests directly in physical commodities. The ART Subsidiary may also invest in other instruments, including fixed income securities, either as investments or to serve as margin or collateral for its swap positions, as well as volatility index derivatives and foreign currency transactions (including forward contracts).
The Fund may from time to time hold foreign currencies. Additionally, as a result of the Fund’s use of derivatives, the Fund may also hold as collateral significant amounts of U.S. Treasury or short-term investments, including money market funds, repurchase agreements, cash and time deposits. In managing the collateral portion of the Fund’s investment strategy, the Investment Adviser generally seeks capital preservation.
The weighting of a Market Exposure or Trading Strategy within the Fund may be positive or negative. A negative weighting will result from establishing a short position with respect to a Market Exposure or Trading Strategy. As a result of the Fund’s negative weightings in various Market Exposures or Trading Strategies from time to time, the Fund’s net asset value (“NAV”) per share may decline during certain periods, even if the value of any or all of the Market Exposures or Trading Strategies increases during that time. Additionally, the sum of the Fund’s target weightings to each Market Exposure or Trading Strategy may not equal 100%.
The Fund may make investment decisions that deviate from those generated by the Investment Adviser’s proprietary investment model, at the discretion of the Investment Adviser. In addition, the Investment Adviser may, in its discretion, make changes to the quantitative methodology used by the Fund, and the Fund may use other proprietary methodologies based on the Investment Adviser’s proprietary research.
The Fund does not invest in hedge funds.
The Fund’s benchmark index is the ICE Bank of America Merrill Lynch Three-Month U.S. Treasury Bill Index.
Principal Risks of the Fund
Loss of money is a risk of investing in the Fund. The investment program of the Fund is speculative, entails substantial risks and includes alternative investment techniques not employed by traditional mutual funds. The Fund should not be relied upon as a complete investment program. The Fund’s investment techniques (if they do not perform as designed) may increase the volatility of performance and the risk of investment loss, including the loss of the entire amount that is invested, and there can be no assurance that the investment objective of the Fund will be achieved. Moreover, certain investment techniques which the Fund may employ in its investment program can substantially increase the adverse impact to which the Fund’s investments may be subject. There is no assurance that the investment processes of the Fund will be successful, that the techniques utilized therein will be implemented successfully or that they are adequate for their intended uses, or that the discretionary element of the investment processes of the Fund will be exercised in a manner that is successful or that is not adverse to the Fund. An investment in the Fund is not a bank deposit and is not insured or guaranteed by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (“FDIC”) or any government agency. Investors should carefully consider these risks before investing.
In addition, the Fund’s NAV may fluctuate substantially over time. Because the Fund attempts to approximate the return and risk patterns of a diversified universe of hedge funds, the Fund’s performance may potentially be lower than the returns of the broader stock market. Accordingly, the Fund should be considered a speculative investment entailing a high degree of risk and is not suitable for all investors. The Fund’s principal risks are presented below in alphabetical order, and not in the order of importance or potential exposure.
Absence of Regulation Risk. The Fund engages in over-the-counter (“OTC”) transactions, which trade in a dealer network, rather than on an exchange. In general, there is less governmental regulation and supervision of transactions in the OTC markets than of transactions entered into on organized exchanges.
3

Commodity Sector Risk. Exposure to the commodities markets may subject the Fund to greater volatility than investments in more traditional securities. The value of commodity-linked investments may be affected by changes in overall market movements, commodity index volatility, changes in interest rates, or factors affecting a particular industry or commodity, such as drought, floods, weather, livestock disease, embargoes, tariffs and international economic, business, political and regulatory developments. The prices of energy, industrial metals, precious metals, agriculture and livestock sector commodities may fluctuate widely due to factors such as changes in value, supply and demand and governmental regulatory policies. The commodity-linked investments in which the ART Subsidiary enters into may involve counterparties in the financial services sector, and events affecting the financial services sector may cause the  ART Subsidiary's, and therefore the Fund’s, share value to fluctuate.
Counterparty Risk. Many of the protections afforded to cleared transactions, such as the security afforded by transacting through a clearing house, might not be available in connection with OTC transactions. Therefore, in those instances in which the Fund enters into uncleared OTC transactions, the Fund will be subject to the risk that its direct counterparty will not perform its obligations under the transactions and that the Fund will sustain losses.
Credit/Default Risk. An issuer or guarantor of fixed income securities or instruments held by the Fund (which may have low credit ratings) may default on its obligation to pay interest and repay principal or default on any other obligation. The credit quality of the Fund’s portfolio securities or instruments may meet the Fund’s credit quality requirements at the time of purchase but then deteriorate thereafter, and such a deterioration can occur rapidly. In certain instances, the downgrading or default of a single holding or guarantor of the Fund’s holding may impair the Fund’s liquidity and have the potential to cause significant deterioration in net asset value (“NAV”). These risks are heightened in market environments where interest rates are rising as well as in connection with the Fund’s investments in non-investment grade fixed income securities.
Derivatives Risk. The Fund’s use of options, futures, forwards, swaps, options on swaps, structured securities and other derivative instruments may result in losses. These instruments, which may pose risks in addition to and greater than those associated with investing directly in securities, currencies or other instruments, may be illiquid or less liquid, volatile, difficult to price and leveraged so that small changes in the value of underlying instruments may produce disproportionate losses to the Fund. Certain derivatives are also subject to counterparty risk, which is the risk that the other party in the transaction will not fulfill its contractual obligations. The use of derivatives is a highly specialized activity that involves investment techniques and risks different from those associated with investments in more traditional securities and instruments.
Expenses Risk. By investing in pooled investment vehicles (including investment companies and exchange-traded funds (“ETFs”)), partnerships, and real estate investment trusts (“REITs”) (“Underlying Funds”) indirectly through the Fund, the investor will incur not only a proportionate share of the expenses of those Underlying Funds held by the Fund (including operating costs and investment management fees), but also the expenses of the Fund.
Foreign and Emerging Countries Risk. Foreign securities may be subject to risk of loss because of more or less foreign government regulation; less public information; less stringent investor protections; less stringent accounting, corporate governance, financial reporting and disclosure standards; and less economic, political and social stability in the countries in which the Fund invests. The imposition of sanctions, exchange controls (including repatriation restrictions), confiscations, trade restrictions (including tariffs) and other government restrictions by the United States and other governments, or from problems in share registration, settlement or custody, may also result in losses. The type and severity of sanctions and other similar measures, including counter sanctions and other retaliatory actions, that may be imposed could vary broadly in scope, and their impact is impossible to predict. For example, the imposition of sanctions and other similar measures could, among other things, cause a decline in the value and/or liquidity of securities issued by the sanctioned country or companies located in or economically tied to the sanctioned country and increase market volatility and disruption in the sanctioned country and throughout the world. Sanctions and other similar measures could limit or prevent the Fund from buying and selling securities (in the sanctioned country and other markets), significantly delay or prevent the settlement of securities transactions, and significantly impact the Fund’s liquidity and performance. Foreign risk also involves the risk of negative foreign currency exchange rate fluctuations, which may cause the value of securities denominated in such foreign currency (or other instruments through which the Fund has exposure to foreign currencies) to decline in value. Currency exchange rates may fluctuate significantly over short periods of time. These risks are more pronounced in connection with the Fund’s investments in securities of issuers located in, or otherwise economically tied to, emerging countries.
Interest Rate Risk. When interest rates increase, fixed income securities or instruments held by the Fund will generally decline in value. Long-term fixed income securities or instruments will normally have more price volatility because of this risk than short-term fixed income securities or instruments. Changing interest rates may have unpredictable effects on the markets, may result in heightened market volatility and may detract from Fund performance. In addition, changes in monetary policy may exacerbate the risks associated with changing interest rates. Funds with longer average portfolio durations will generally be more sensitive to changes in interest rates than funds with a shorter average portfolio duration. Fluctuations in interest rates may also affect the liquidity of fixed income securities and instruments held by the Fund.
Investing in the Underlying Funds. The investments of the Fund may be concentrated in one or more Underlying Funds (including ETFs and other registered investment companies) subject to limitations and/or conditions prescribed by the Investment Company Act of 1940, as amended (the “Investment Company Act”), or rules, regulations or exemptive relief thereunder. The Fund’s investment performance is directly related to the investment performance of the Underlying Funds it holds. The Fund is subject to the risk factors associated with the investments of the Underlying Funds in direct proportion to the amount of assets allocated to each. If the Fund has a relative concentration of its portfolio in a single Underlying Fund, it may be more susceptible to adverse developments affecting that Underlying Fund and may be more susceptible to losses because of these developments.
4

Investment Style Risk. Different investment styles (e.g., “growth”, “value” or “quantitative”) tend to shift in and out of favor depending upon market and economic conditions and investor sentiment. The Fund employs a “quantitative” style, and may outperform or underperform other funds that invest in similar asset classes but employ different investment styles.
Large Shareholder Transactions Risk. The Fund may experience adverse effects when certain large shareholders purchase or redeem large amounts of shares of the Fund. Such large shareholder redemptions, which may occur rapidly or unexpectedly, may cause the Fund to sell portfolio securities at times when it would not otherwise do so, which may negatively impact the  Fund's  NAV and liquidity. Similarly, large Fund share purchases may adversely affect the  Fund's  performance to the extent that the Fund is delayed in investing new cash or otherwise maintains a larger cash position than it ordinarily would. These transactions may also accelerate the realization of taxable income to shareholders if such sales of investments resulted in gains, and may also increase transaction costs. In addition, a large redemption could result in the  Fund's  current expenses being allocated over a smaller asset base, leading to an increase in the  Fund's  expense ratio.
Leverage Risk. Borrowing and the use of derivatives may result in leverage and may make the Fund more volatile. The use of leverage may cause the Fund to liquidate portfolio positions to satisfy its obligations when it may not be advantageous to do so. The use of leverage by the Fund can substantially increase the adverse impact to which the Fund’s investment portfolio may be subject.
Liquidity Risk. The Fund may make investments that are illiquid or that may become less liquid in response to market developments or adverse investor perceptions. Illiquid investments may be more difficult to value. Liquidity risk may also refer to the risk that the Fund will not be able to pay redemption proceeds within the allowable time period because of unusual market conditions, declining prices of the securities sold, an unusually high volume of redemption requests or other reasons. To meet redemption requests, the Fund may be forced to sell  investments at an unfavorable time and/or under unfavorable conditions. Liquidity risk may be the result of, among other things, the reduced number and capacity of traditional market participants to make a market in fixed income securities or the lack of an active market. The potential for liquidity risk may be magnified by a rising interest rate environment or other circumstances where investor redemptions from fixed income funds may be higher than normal, potentially causing increased supply in the market due to selling activity. These risks may be more pronounced in connection with the Fund’s investments in securities of issuers located in emerging market countries. Redemptions by large shareholders may have a negative impact on the Fund’s liquidity.
Management Risk. A strategy used by the Investment Adviser may fail to produce the intended results. The Investment Adviser attempts to execute a complex strategy for the Fund using proprietary quantitative models. Investments selected using these models may perform differently than expected as a result of the factors used in the models, the weight placed on each factor, changes from the factors’ historical trends, and technical issues in the construction and implementation of the models (including, for example, data problems and/or software issues). There is no guarantee that the Investment Adviser’s use of these quantitative models will result in effective investment decisions for the Fund. Additionally, commonality of holdings across quantitative money managers may amplify losses.
Market Risk. The value of the securities in which the Fund  invests may go up or down in response to the prospects of individual companies, particular sectors or governments and/or general economic conditions throughout the world due to increasingly interconnected global economies and financial markets. Events such as war, military conflict, acts of terrorism, social unrest, natural disasters, recessions, inflation, rapid interest rate changes, supply chain disruptions, sanctions, the spread of infectious illness or other public health threats could also significantly impact the Fund and its investments.
Master Limited Partnership Risk. Investments in securities of an MLP involve risks that differ from investments in common stock, including risks related to limited control and limited rights to vote on matters affecting the MLP. Certain MLP securities may trade in lower volumes due to their smaller capitalizations, and may be subject to more abrupt or erratic price movements and lower market liquidity. MLPs are generally considered interest-rate sensitive investments. During periods of interest rate volatility, these investments may not provide attractive returns.
Investments in securities of an MLP also include tax-related risks. For example, to the extent a distribution received by the Fund from an MLP is treated as a return of capital, the Fund’s adjusted tax basis in the interests of the MLP may be reduced, which will result in an increase in an amount of income or gain (or decrease in the amount of loss) that will be recognized by the Fund for tax purposes upon the sale of any such interests or upon subsequent distributions in respect of such interests.
Mid-Cap and Small-Cap Risk. Investments in mid-capitalization and small-capitalization companies involve greater risks than those associated with larger, more established companies. These securities may be subject to more abrupt or erratic price movements and may lack sufficient market liquidity, and these issuers often face greater business risks.
Non-Hedging Foreign Currency Trading Risk. The Fund may engage in forward foreign currency transactions for hedging and non-hedging purposes. The Investment Adviser may purchase or sell foreign currencies through the use of forward contracts based on the Investment Adviser's judgment regarding the direction of the market for a particular foreign currency or currencies. In pursuing this strategy, the Investment Adviser seeks to profit from anticipated movements in currency rates by establishing “long” and/or “short” positions in forward contracts on various foreign currencies. Foreign exchange rates can be extremely volatile and a variance in the degree of volatility of the market or in the direction of the market from the Investment Adviser's expectations may produce significant losses to the Fund. Some of these transactions may also be subject to interest rate risk.
5

Other Investment Companies Risk. By investing in other investment companies (including ETFs) indirectly through the Fund, investors will incur a proportionate share of the expenses of the other investment companies held by the Fund (including operating costs and investment management fees) in addition to the fees regularly borne by the Fund. In addition, the Fund will be affected by the investment policies, practices and performance of such investment companies in direct proportion to the amount of assets the Fund invests therein.
Portfolio Turnover Rate Risk. A high rate of portfolio turnover (100% or more) involves correspondingly greater expenses which must be borne by the Fund and its shareholders, and is also likely to result in short-term capital gains taxable to shareholders.
Short Position Risk. The Fund may enter into a short position through a futures contract, an option or swap agreement or through short sales of any instrument that the Fund may purchase for investment. Taking short positions involves leverage of the Fund’s assets and presents various risks. If the value of the underlying instrument or market in which the Fund has taken a short position increases, then the Fund will incur a loss equal to the increase in value from the time that the short position was entered into plus any related interest payments or other fees. Taking short positions involves the risk that losses may be disproportionate, may exceed the amount invested and may be unlimited.
Stock Risk. Stock prices have historically risen and fallen in periodic cycles. U.S. and foreign stock markets have experienced periods of substantial price volatility in the past and may do so again in the future.
Subsidiary Risk. The ART Subsidiary is not registered under the Investment Company Act of 1940, as amended (“Investment Company Act”) and is not subject to all the investor protections of the Investment Company Act. Changes in the laws of the United States and/or the Cayman Islands could result in the inability of the Fund and/or the ART Subsidiary to operate as described in the Prospectus and the SAI and could adversely affect the Fund.
Swaps Risk. In a standard “swap” transaction, two parties agree to exchange the returns, differentials in rates of return or some other amount earned or realized on the “notional amount” of predetermined investments or instruments, which may be adjusted for an interest factor. Swaps can involve greater risks than direct investment in securities, because swaps may be leveraged and subject to counterparty risk (e.g., the risk of a counterparty’s defaulting on the obligation or bankruptcy), credit risk and pricing risk (i.e., swaps may be difficult to value). Swaps may also be considered illiquid. It may not be possible for the Fund or the ART Subsidiary to liquidate a swap position at an advantageous time or price, which may result in significant losses.
Tax Risk. Based on a private letter ruling from the Internal Revenue Service (“IRS”), the Fund seeks to gain exposure to the commodity markets through investments in the ART Subsidiary.
The tax treatment of the Fund’s investments in the ART Subsidiary could affect whether income derived from such investments is “qualifying income” under Subchapter M of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended (the “Code”), or otherwise affect the character, timing and/or amount of the Fund’s taxable income or any gains and distributions made by the Fund. If the IRS were to successfully assert that a Fund’s income from such investments was not “qualifying income,” the Fund may fail to qualify as a regulated investment company (“RIC”) under Subchapter M of the Code if over 10% of its gross income was derived from these investments. If the Fund failed to qualify as a RIC, it would be subject to federal and state income tax on all of its taxable income at regular corporate tax rates with no deduction for any distributions paid to shareholders, which would significantly adversely affect the returns to, and could cause substantial losses for, Fund shareholders.
Shareholders should review “Other Information” under “Taxation” on page 73 of the Prospectus for more information.
U.S. Government Securities Risk. The U.S. government may not provide financial support to U.S. government agencies, instrumentalities or sponsored enterprises if it is not obligated to do so by law. U.S. government securities  issued by those agencies, instrumentalities and sponsored enterprises, including those issued by the Federal National Mortgage Association (“Fannie Mae”), Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation (“Freddie Mac”) and the Federal Home Loan Banks, are neither issued nor guaranteed by the U.S. Treasury and, therefore, are not backed by the full faith and credit of the United States. The maximum potential liability of the issuers of some U.S. government securities held by the Fund may greatly exceed their current resources, including any legal right to support from the U.S. Treasury. It is possible that issuers of U.S. government securities will not have the funds to meet their payment obligations in the future.
Performance
The bar chart and table below provide an indication of the risks of investing in the Fund by showing: (a) changes in the performance of the Fund’s Institutional Shares from year to year; and (b) how the average annual total returns of the Fund’s Class A, Class C, Institutional, Investor, Class R and Class R6 Shares compare to those of a broad-based securities market index.The Fund’s past performance, before and after taxes, is not necessarily an indication of how the Fund will perform in the future. Updated performance information is available at no cost at www.gsamfunds.com/performance or by calling the appropriate phone number on the back cover of the Prospectus.
Performance reflects applicable fee waivers and/or expense limitations in effect during the periods shown.
6

CALENDAR YEAR (INSTITUTIONAL)
During the periods shown in the chart above:
Returns
Quarter ended
Best Quarter Return
6.57%
December 31, 2020
Worst Quarter Return
-9.75%
March 31, 2020
AVERAGE ANNUAL TOTAL RETURN
For the period ended December 31, 2022
 
 
 
 
1 Year
5 Years
10 Years
Inception
Date
Class A Shares
 
 
 
5/30/2008
Returns Before Taxes
-11.78%
0.74%
2.27%
 
Returns After Taxes on Distributions
-13.43%
-0.71%
1.03%
 
Returns After Taxes on Distributions and Sale of Fund Shares
-6.89%
0.07%
1.33%
 
Class C Shares
 
 
 
5/30/2008
Returns Before Taxes
-8.21%
1.14%
2.08%*
 
Institutional Shares
 
 
 
5/30/2008
Returns Before Taxes
-6.27%
2.26%
3.25%
 
Investor Shares
 
 
 
5/30/2008
Returns Before Taxes
-6.37%
2.14%
3.11%
 
Class R Shares
 
 
 
5/30/2008
Returns
-6.79%
1.61%
2.58%
 
Class R6 Shares
 
 
 
7/31/2015
Returns Before Taxes
-6.17%
2.28%
3.25%**
 
ICE BofAML Three-Month U.S. Treasury Bill Index
1.47%
1.26%
0.76%
 
*
Class C Shares automatically convert into Class A Shares eight years after the purchase date. The 10-Year performance for Class C Shares does not reflect the conversion to Class A Shares after the first eight years of performance.
**
Class R6 Shares commenced operations on July 31, 2015. Prior to that date, the performance of Class R6 Shares shown in the table above is that of Institutional Shares. Performance has not been adjusted to reflect the lower expenses of Class R6 Shares. Class R6 Shares would have had higher returns because: (i) Institutional Shares and Class R6 Shares represent interests in the same portfolio of securities; and (ii) Class R6 Shares have lower expenses.
The after-tax returns are for Class A Shares only. The after-tax returns for Class C, Institutional, Investor and Class R6 Shares, and returns for Class R Shares (which are offered exclusively to employee benefit plans), will vary. After-tax returns are calculated using the historical highest individual federal marginal income tax rates and do not reflect the impact of state and local taxes. Actual after-tax returns depend on an investor’s tax situation and may differ from those shown. In addition, the after-tax returns shown are not relevant to investors who hold Fund Shares through tax-deferred arrangements such as 401(k) plans or individual retirement accounts.
Portfolio Management
Goldman Sachs Asset Management, L.P. is the investment adviser for the Fund (the “Investment Adviser” or “GSAM”).
Portfolio Manager: Oliver Bunn, Vice President, has managed the Fund since 2017.
Buying and Selling Fund Shares
The minimum initial investment for Class A and Class C Shares is, generally, $1,000. The minimum initial investment for Institutional Shares is, generally, $1,000,000 for individual or certain institutional investors, alone or in combination with other assets under the management of the Investment Adviser and its affiliates. There is no minimum for initial purchases of Investor, Class R and Class R6
7

Shares, except for certain institutional investors who purchase Class R6 Shares directly with the Fund’s transfer agent for which the minimum initial investment is $5,000,000. Those share classes with a minimum initial investment requirement do not impose it on certain employee benefit plans, and Institutional Shares do not impose it on certain investment advisers investing on behalf of other accounts.
The minimum subsequent investment for Class A and Class C shareholders is $50, except for certain employee benefit plans, for which there is no minimum. There is no minimum subsequent investment for Institutional, Investor, Class R or Class R6 shareholders.
You may purchase and redeem (sell) shares of the Fund on any business day through certain intermediaries that have a relationship with Goldman Sachs & Co. LLC (“Goldman Sachs”), including banks, trust companies, brokers, registered investment advisers and other financial institutions (“Intermediaries”).
Tax Information
For important tax information, please see “Tax Information” on page 23 of the Prospectus.
Payments to Broker-Dealers and
Other Financial Intermediaries
For important information about financial intermediary compensation, please see “Payments to Broker-Dealers and Other Financial Intermediaries” on page 23 of the Prospectus.
8

Goldman Sachs Commodity Strategy Fund—Summary
Investment Objective
The Goldman Sachs Commodity Strategy Fund (the "Fund") seeks long-term total return.
Fees and Expenses of the Fund
This table describes the fees and expenses that you may pay if you buy, hold and sell shares of the Fund. You may pay other fees, such as brokerage commissions and other fees to financial intermediaries, which are not reflected in the table and Example below. You may qualify for sales charge discounts on purchases of Class A Shares if you invest at least $100,000 in Goldman Sachs Funds. More information about these and other discounts is available from your financial professional and in “Shareholder Guide—Common Questions Applicable to the Purchase of Class A Shares” beginning on page 53 and in Appendix C—Additional Information About Sales Charge Variations, Waivers and Discounts on page 104 of the Prospectus and “Other Information Regarding Maximum Sales Charge, Purchases, Redemptions, Exchanges and Dividends” beginning on page B-171 of the Fund’s Statement of Additional Information (“SAI”).
Shareholder Fees
(fees paid directly from your investment)
 
Class A
Class C
Institutional
Investor
Class R
Class R6
Maximum Sales Charge (Load) Imposed on Purchases (as a
percentage of offering price)
4.50%
None
None
None
None
None
Maximum Deferred Sales Charge (Load) (as a percentage of the
lower of original purchase price or sale proceeds)1
None
1.00%
None
None
None
None
Annual Fund Operating Expenses
(expenses that you pay each year as a percentage of the value of your investment)
 
Class A
Class C
Institutional
Investor
Class R
Class R6
Management Fees
0.50%
0.50%
0.50%
0.50%
0.50%
0.50%
Distribution and/or Service (12b-1) Fees
0.25%
0.75%
0.00%
0.00%
0.50%
0.00%
Other Expenses
0.18%
0.43%
0.10%
0.18%
0.18%
0.09%
Service Fees
0.00%
0.25%
0.00%
0.00%
0.00%
0.00%
All Other Expenses
0.18%
0.18%
0.10%
0.18%
0.18%
0.09%
Acquired Fund Fees and Expenses
0.13%
0.13%
0.13%
0.13%
0.13%
0.13%
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses2
1.06%
1.81%
0.73%
0.81%
1.31%
0.72%
Fee Waiver3
(0.13%)
(0.13%)
(0.13%)
(0.13%)
(0.13%)
(0.13%)
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses After Fee Waiver
0.93%
1.68%
0.60%
0.68%
1.18%
0.59%
1
A contingent deferred sales charge (“CDSC”) of 1.00% is imposed on Class C Shares redeemed within 12 months of purchase.
2
The “Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses” do not correlate to the ratios of net and total expenses to average net assets provided in the Financial Highlights, which reflect the operating expenses of the Fund and do not include “Acquired Fund Fees and Expenses.”
3
The Investment Adviser has agreed to: (i) waive a portion of its management fee payable by the Fund in an amount equal to any management fees it earns as an investment adviser to the affiliated funds in which the Fund invests; and (ii) waive a portion of its management fee in an amount equal to the management fee paid to the Investment Adviser by the CSF Subsidiary (as defined below) at an annual rate of 0.42% of the CSF Subsidiary’s average daily net assets. The management fee waiver arrangement with respect to the CSF Subsidiary may not be discontinued by the Investment Adviser as long as its contract with the CSF Subsidiary is in place. The other management fee waiver arrangements will remain in effect through at least April 28, 2024, and prior to such date the Investment Adviser may not terminate the arrangements without the approval of the Board of Trustees.
Expense Example
This Example is intended to help you compare the cost of investing in the Fund with the cost of investing in other mutual funds.
9

The Example assumes that you invest $10,000 in Class A, Class C, Institutional, Investor, Class R and/or Class R6 Shares of the Fund for the time periods indicated and then redeem all of your Class A, Class C, Institutional, Investor, Class R and/or Class R6 Shares at the end of those periods. The Example also assumes that your investment has a 5% return each year and that the Fund’s operating expenses remain the same (except that the Example incorporates the fee waiver and expense limitation arrangements for only the first year). Although your actual costs may be higher or lower, based on these assumptions your costs would be:
 
1 Year
3 Years
5 Years
10 Years
Class A Shares
$541
$760
$996
$1,675
Class C Shares
$271
$557
$968
$2,116
Institutional Shares
$61
$220
$393
$894
Investor Shares
$69
$246
$437
$990
Class R Shares
$120
$402
$706
$1,568
Class R6 Shares
$60
$217
$388
$882
Class C Shares – Assuming no redemption
$171
$557
$968
$2,116

Portfolio Turnover
The Fund pays transaction costs when it buys and sells securities or instruments (i.e., “turns over” its portfolio). A high rate of portfolio turnover may result in increased transaction costs, including brokerage commissions, which must be borne by the Fund and its shareholders, and is also likely to result in higher short-term capital gains for taxable shareholders. These costs are not reflected in the annual fund operating expenses or in the expense example above, but are reflected in the Fund’s performance. The Fund’s portfolio turnover rate for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2022 was 0% of the average value of its portfolio. However, the Fund’s portfolio turnover rate is calculated without regard to transactions involving certain short-term instruments or derivatives. If such transactions were included in the calculation, the Fund would have a higher portfolio turnover rate.
Principal Strategy
The Fund seeks to maintain substantial economic exposure to the performance of the commodities markets. The Fund primarily gains exposure to the commodities markets by investing in a wholly-owned subsidiary of the Fund organized as a company under the laws of the Cayman Islands, Cayman Commodity – CSF, Ltd. (the “CSF Subsidiary”). The CSF Subsidiary is advised by the Investment Adviser, and has the same investment objective as the Fund. CoreCommodity Management, LLC (the “Sub-Adviser” or “CoreCommodity”) serves as sub-adviser to both the Fund and the CSF Subsidiary.
The Fund seeks to provide exposure to the commodities markets by investing, through the CSF Subsidiary, in commodity-linked investments including, without limitation, commodity swaps, commodity futures contracts, exchange-listed commodity forward contracts, options on commodity futures, and commodity-linked notes. In pursuing its objective, the Fund attempts to provide long and/or short exposure to the returns of real assets that trade in the commodity markets without direct investment in physical commodities. The Fund uses the Bloomberg Commodity Index Total Return (“BCOM”) as its performance benchmark, but the Fund is actively managed and will not attempt to replicate the index.
Investment in the Subsidiary. The Fund may invest up to 25% of its total assets in the CSF Subsidiary. The CSF Subsidiary primarily obtains its commodity exposure by investing in commodity-linked derivative instruments (which typically includes total return swaps). Commodity-linked swaps are derivative instruments whereby the cash flows agreed upon between counterparties are dependent upon the price of the underlying commodity or commodity index (or a component of the underlying commodity index) over the life of the swap. The value of the swap will rise and fall in response to changes in the underlying commodity or commodity index (or component of the underlying commodity index). Commodity-linked swaps expose the CSF Subsidiary and the Fund economically to movements in commodity prices. Such instruments may be leveraged so that small changes in the underlying commodity prices would result in disproportionate changes in the value of the instrument. Neither the Fund nor the CSF Subsidiary invests directly in physical commodities. The CSF Subsidiary will also invest in other instruments, including fixed income securities, either as investments or to serve as margin or collateral for its swap positions.
The Sub-Adviser will take various factors into account when seeking commodity market exposure, such as, without limitation, the results of proprietary models developed by the Sub-Adviser, relative price differentials for various commodity futures for current delivery as compared to those for future delivery, and market conditions. Among other strategies, the Fund employs commodity roll-timing strategies. “Rolling” futures exposure is the process by which the holder of a particular futures contract or other instrument providing futures exposure (e.g. swaps) will sell such contract or instrument on or before the expiration date and simultaneously purchase a new contract or instrument with identical terms except for a later expiration date. This process allows a holder of the instrument to extend its current position through the original instrument’s expiration without delivering the underlying asset. The Fund’s rolling may differ from that of the BCOM to the extent necessary to enable the Fund to seek excess returns over the BCOM. The Fund’s “roll-timing” strategies may include, for example, rolling the Fund’s commodity exposure earlier or later versus the BCOM, or holding and rolling positions with longer or different expiration dates than the BCOM. The Fund also may underweight or overweight various commodities as compared to the BCOM, and may utilize commodities that are not components of the BCOM.
10

Fixed Income Investments. As a result of the Fund’s use of derivatives, the Fund may hold as collateral significant amounts of U.S. Treasury or short-term investments, including money market funds. In managing the collateral portion of the Fund’s investment strategy, the Sub-Adviser generally seeks capital preservation. The average duration will vary. The Sub-Adviser uses derivatives, including futures and swaps, to manage the duration of the Fund’s investment portfolio.
Other. The Fund may also invest in forwards, futures, and swaps, which are used for both hedging and non-hedging purposes. The Fund may invest up to 35% of its net assets in foreign securities.
The Fund’s benchmark index is the BCOM.
Principal Risks of the Fund
Loss of money is a risk of investing in the Fund. The investment program of the Fund is speculative, entails substantial risks and includes asset classes and investment techniques not employed by more traditional mutual funds. The Fund should not be relied upon as a complete investment program. There can be no assurance that the investment objective of the Fund will be achieved. Moreover, there is no assurance that the investment processes of the Fund will be successful, that the techniques utilized therein will be implemented successfully or that they are adequate for their intended uses, or that the discretionary element of the investment processes of the Fund will be exercised in a manner that is successful or that is not adverse to the Fund. An investment in the Fund is not a bank deposit and is not insured or guaranteed by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (“FDIC”) or any government agency. Investors should carefully consider these risks before investing. The Fund’s principal risks are presented below in alphabetical order, and not in the order of importance or potential exposure.
Absence of Regulation Risk. The Fund engages in over-the-counter (“OTC”) transactions, which trade in a dealer network, rather than on an exchange. In general, there is less governmental regulation and supervision of transactions in the OTC markets than of transactions entered into on organized exchanges.
Commodity Sector Risk. Exposure to the commodities markets may subject the Fund to greater volatility than investments in more traditional securities. The value of commodity-linked investments may be affected by changes in overall market movements, commodity index volatility, changes in interest rates, or factors affecting a particular industry or commodity, such as drought, floods, weather, livestock disease, embargoes, tariffs and international economic, business, political and regulatory developments. The prices of energy, industrial metals, precious metals, agriculture and livestock sector commodities may fluctuate widely due to factors such as changes in value, supply and demand and governmental regulatory policies. The commodity-linked investments in which the CSF Subsidiary enters into may involve counterparties in the financial services sector, and events affecting the financial services sector may cause the CSF Subsidiary's, and therefore the Fund’s, share value to fluctuate.
Counterparty Risk. Many of the protections afforded to cleared transactions, such as the security afforded by transacting through a clearing house, might not be available in connection with OTC transactions. Therefore, in those instances in which the Fund enters into uncleared OTC transactions, the Fund will be subject to the risk that its direct counterparty will not perform its obligations under the transactions and that the Fund will sustain losses.
Credit/Default Risk. An issuer or guarantor of fixed income securities  or instruments held by the Fund (which may have low credit ratings) may default on its obligation to pay interest and repay principal or default on any other obligation. Additionally, the credit quality of securities  or instruments may deteriorate rapidly, which may impair the Fund's liquidity and cause significant deterioration in net asset value (“NAV”). These risks are heightened in market environments where interest rates are rising as well as in connection with the Fund's investments in non-investment grade fixed income securities.
Derivatives Risk. The Fund's use of  options, futures, forwards, swaps and other derivative instruments may result in losses, including due to adverse market movements. These instruments, which may pose risks in addition to and greater than those associated with investing directly in securities, currencies or other assets and instruments, may increase market exposure and be illiquid or less liquid, volatile, difficult to price and leveraged so that small changes in the value of the underlying assets or instruments may produce disproportionate losses to the Fund. Certain derivatives are also subject to counterparty risk, which is the risk that the other party in the transaction will not fulfill its contractual obligations. The use of derivatives is a highly specialized activity that involves investment techniques and risks different from those associated with investments in more traditional securities and instruments.
Foreign Risk. Foreign securities may be subject to risk of loss because of more or less foreign government regulation; less public information; less stringent investor protections; less stringent accounting, corporate governance, financial reporting and disclosure standards; and less economic, political and social stability in the countries in which the Fund invests. The imposition of sanctions, exchange controls (including repatriation restrictions), confiscations, trade restrictions (including tariffs) and other government restrictions by the United States and other governments, or from problems in share registration, settlement or custody, may also result in losses. The type and severity of sanctions and other similar measures, including counter sanctions and other retaliatory actions, that may be imposed could vary broadly in scope, and their impact is impossible to predict. For example, the imposition of sanctions and other similar measures could, among other things, cause a decline in the value and/or liquidity of securities issued by the sanctioned country or companies located in or economically tied to the sanctioned country and increase market volatility and disruption in the sanctioned country and throughout the world. Sanctions and other similar measures could limit or prevent the Fund from buying and selling securities (in the sanctioned country and other markets), significantly delay or prevent the settlement of securities transactions,
11

and significantly impact the Fund’s liquidity and performance. Foreign risk also involves the risk of negative foreign currency rate fluctuations, which may cause the value of securities denominated in such foreign currency (or other instruments through which the Fund has exposure to foreign currencies) to decline in value. Currency exchange rates may fluctuate significantly over short periods of time.
Large Shareholder Transactions Risk. The Fund may experience adverse effects when certain large shareholders purchase or redeem large amounts of shares of the Fund. Such large shareholder redemptions, which may occur rapidly or unexpectedly, may cause the Fund to sell portfolio securities at times when it would not otherwise do so, which may negatively impact the  Fund's  NAV and liquidity. Similarly, large Fund share purchases may adversely affect the  Fund's  performance to the extent that the Fund is delayed in investing new cash or otherwise maintains a larger cash position than it ordinarily would. These transactions may also accelerate the realization of taxable income to shareholders if such sales of investments resulted in gains, and may also increase transaction costs. In addition, a large redemption could result in the  Fund's  current expenses being allocated over a smaller asset base, leading to an increase in the  Fund's  expense ratio.
Leverage Risk. Borrowing and the use of derivatives may result in leverage and may make the Fund more volatile. The use of leverage may cause the Fund to liquidate portfolio positions to satisfy its obligations when it may not be advantageous to do so. The use of leverage by the Fund can substantially increase the adverse impact to which the Fund’s investment portfolio may be subject.
Liquidity Risk. The Fund may make investments that are illiquid or that may become less liquid in response to market developments or adverse investor perceptions. Illiquid investments may be more difficult to value. Liquidity risk may also refer to the risk that the Fund will not be able to pay redemption proceeds within the allowable time period because of unusual market conditions, declining prices of the securities sold, an unusually high volume of redemption requests, or other reasons. To meet redemption requests, the Fund may be forced to sell securities at an unfavorable time and/or under unfavorable conditions. Liquidity risk may be the result of, among other things, the reduced number and capacity of traditional market participants to make a market in fixed income securities or the lack of an active market. The potential for liquidity risk may be magnified by a rising interest rate environment or other circumstances where investor redemptions from fixed income funds may be higher than normal, potentially causing increased supply in the market due to selling activity.  Redemptions by large shareholders may have a negative impact on the Fund’s liquidity.
Market Risk. The value of the securities in which the Fund  invests may go up or down in response to the prospects of individual companies, particular sectors or governments and/or general economic conditions throughout the world due to increasingly interconnected global economies and financial markets. Events such as war, military conflict, acts of terrorism, social unrest, natural disasters, recessions, inflation, rapid interest rate changes, supply chain disruptions, sanctions, the spread of infectious illness or other public health threats could also significantly impact the Fund and its investments.
Short Position Risk. The Fund may enter into a short position through a futures contract, an option or swap agreement or through short sales of any instrument that the Fund may purchase for investment. Taking short positions involves leverage of the Fund’s assets and presents various risks. If the value of the underlying instrument or market in which the Fund has taken a short position increases, then the Fund will incur a loss equal to the increase in value from the time that the short position was entered into plus any related interest payments or other fees. Taking short positions involves the risk that losses may be disproportionate, may exceed the amount invested and may be unlimited.
Subsidiary Risk. The CSF Subsidiary is not registered under the Investment Company Act of 1940, as amended (“Investment Company Act”) and is not subject to all the investor protections of the Investment Company Act. Changes in the laws of the United States and/or the Cayman Islands could result in the inability of the Fund and/or the CSF Subsidiary to operate as described in the Prospectus and the SAI and could adversely affect the Fund.
Swaps Risk. In a standard “swap” transaction, two parties agree to exchange the returns, differentials in rates of return or some other amount earned or realized on the “notional amount” of predetermined investments or instruments, which may be adjusted for an interest factor. Swaps can involve greater risks than direct investment in securities, because swaps may be leveraged and subject to counterparty risk (e.g., the risk of a counterparty’s defaulting on the obligation or bankruptcy), credit risk and pricing risk (i.e., swaps may be difficult to value). Swaps may also be considered illiquid. It may not be possible for the Fund or the CSF Subsidiary to liquidate a swap position at an advantageous time or price, which may result in significant losses.
Tax Risk. Based on a private letter ruling from the Internal Revenue Service (“IRS”), the Fund seeks to gain exposure to the commodity markets through investments in the CSF Subsidiary.
The tax treatment of the Fund’s investments in the CSF Subsidiary could affect whether income derived from such investments is “qualifying income” under Subchapter M of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended (the “Code”), or otherwise affect the character, timing and/or amount of the Fund’s taxable income or any gains and distributions made by the Fund. If the IRS were to successfully assert that a Fund’s income from such investments was not “qualifying income,” the Fund may fail to qualify as a regulated investment company (“RIC”) under Subchapter M of the Code if over 10% of its gross income was derived from these investments. If the Fund failed to qualify as a RIC, it would be subject to federal and state income tax on all of its taxable income at regular corporate tax rates with no deduction for any distributions paid to shareholders, which would significantly adversely affect the returns to, and could cause substantial losses for, Fund shareholders.
Shareholders should review “Other Information” under “Taxation” on page 73 of the Prospectus for more information.
12

U.S. Government Securities Risk. The U.S. government may not provide financial support to U.S. government agencies, instrumentalities or sponsored enterprises if it is not obligated to do so by law. U.S. government securities  issued by those agencies, instrumentalities and sponsored enterprises, including those issued by the Federal National Mortgage Association (“Fannie Mae”), Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation (“Freddie Mac”) and the Federal Home Loan Banks, are neither issued nor guaranteed by the U.S. Treasury and, therefore, are not backed by the full faith and credit of the United States. The maximum potential liability of the issuers of some U.S. government securities held by the Fund may greatly exceed their current resources, including any legal right to support from the U.S. Treasury. It is possible that issuers of U.S. government securities will not have the funds to meet their payment obligations in the future.
Performance
The bar chart and table below provide an indication of the risks of investing in the Fund by showing: (a) changes in the performance of the Fund’s Institutional Shares from year to year; and (b) how the average annual total returns of the Fund’s Class A, Class C, Institutional, Investor, Class R and Class R6 Shares compare to those of a broad-based securities market index. Through January 22, 2021, the Fund had been managed by GSAM. Performance information set forth below prior to the close of business on January 22, 2021, does not reflect the transition of day-to-day portfolio management from GSAM to CoreCommodity. The Fund’s past performance, before and after taxes, is not necessarily an indication of how the Fund will perform in the future. Updated performance information is available at no cost at www.gsamfunds.com/performance or by calling the appropriate phone number on the back cover of the Prospectus.
Performance reflects applicable fee waivers and/or expense limitations in effect during the periods shown.
CALENDAR YEAR (INSTITUTIONAL)
During the periods shown in the chart above:
Returns
Quarter ended
Best Quarter Return
26.99%
March 31, 2022
Worst Quarter Return
-41.54%
March 31, 2020
13

AVERAGE ANNUAL TOTAL RETURN
For the period ended December 31, 2022
 
 
 
 
1 Year
5 Years
10 Years
Inception
Date
Class A Shares
 
 
 
3/30/2007
Returns Before Taxes
10.17%
2.12%
-5.09%
 
Returns After Taxes on Distributions
5.93%
-0.10%
-6.34%
 
Returns After Taxes on Distributions and Sale of Fund Shares
6.02%
0.61%
-4.14%
 
Class C Shares
 
 
 
3/30/2007
Returns Before Taxes
13.40%
2.29%
-5.36%*
 
Institutional Shares
 
 
 
3/30/2007
Returns Before Taxes
15.75%
3.41%
-4.35%
 
Investor Shares
 
 
 
11/30/2007
Returns Before Taxes
15.79%
3.35%
-4.39%
 
Class R Shares
 
 
 
11/30/2007
Returns
15.07%
2.82%
-4.92%
 
Class R6 Shares
 
 
 
7/31/2015
Returns Before Taxes
15.84%
3.42%
-4.34%**
 
BCOM (Gross, USD, Unhedged)
16.09%
6.44%
-1.28%
 
*
Class C Shares automatically convert into Class A Shares eight years after the purchase date. The 10-Year performance for Class C Shares does not reflect the conversion to Class A Shares after the first eight years of performance.
**
Class R6 Shares commenced operations on July 31, 2015. Prior to that date, the performance of Class R6 Shares shown in the table above is that of Institutional Shares. Performance has not been adjusted to reflect the lower expenses of Class R6 Shares. Class R6 Shares would have had higher returns because: (i) Institutional Shares and Class R6 Shares represent interests in the same portfolio of securities; and (ii) Class R6 Shares have lower expenses.
The after-tax returns are for Class A Shares only. The after-tax returns for Class C, Institutional, Investor and Class R6 Shares, and returns for Class R Shares (which are offered exclusively to employee benefit plans), will vary. After-tax returns are calculated using the historical highest individual federal marginal income tax rates and do not reflect the impact of state and local taxes. Actual after-tax returns depend on an investor’s tax situation and may differ from those shown. In addition, the after-tax returns shown are not relevant to investors who hold Fund Shares through tax-deferred arrangements such as 401(k) plans or individual retirement accounts.
Portfolio Management
Goldman Sachs Asset Management, L.P. is the investment adviser for the Fund (the “Investment Adviser” or “GSAM”). CoreCommodity Management, LLC (“CoreCommodity”) serves as the sub-adviser to the Fund (the “Sub-Adviser”).
Portfolio Managers: Robert B. Hyman—Managing Director for sub-adviser CoreCommodity Management, LLC—has served as Portfolio Manager to the Fund and its CSF Subsidiary since January 2021.
Buying and Selling Fund Shares
The minimum initial investment for Class A and Class C Shares is, generally, $1,000. The minimum initial investment for Institutional Shares is, generally, $1,000,000 for individual or certain institutional investors, alone or in combination with other assets under the management of the Investment Adviser and its affiliates. There is no minimum for initial purchases of Investor, Class R and Class R6 Shares, except for certain institutional investors who purchase Class R6 Shares directly with the Fund’s transfer agent for which the minimum initial investment is $5,000,000. Those share classes with a minimum initial investment requirement do not impose it on certain employee benefit plans, and Institutional Shares do not impose it on certain investment advisers investing on behalf of other accounts.
The minimum subsequent investment for Class A and Class C shareholders is $50, except for certain employee benefit plans, for which there is no minimum. There is no minimum subsequent investment for Institutional, Investor, Class R or Class R6 shareholders.
You may purchase and redeem (sell) shares of the Fund on any business day through certain intermediaries that have a relationship with Goldman Sachs & Co. LLC (“Goldman Sachs”), including banks, trust companies, brokers, registered investment advisers and other financial institutions (“Intermediaries”).
Tax Information
For important tax information, please see “Tax Information” on page 23 of the Prospectus.
14

Payments to Broker-Dealers and
Other Financial Intermediaries
For important information about financial intermediary compensation, please see “Payments to Broker-Dealers and Other Financial Intermediaries” on page 23 of the Prospectus.
15

Goldman Sachs Managed Futures Strategy Fund—Summary
Investment Objective
The Goldman Sachs Managed Futures Strategy Fund (the "Fund") seeks to generate long-term absolute return.
Fees and Expenses of the Fund
This table describes the fees and expenses that you may pay if you buy, hold and sell shares of the Fund. You may pay other fees, such as brokerage commissions and other fees to financial intermediaries, which are not reflected in the table and Example below. You may qualify for sales charge discounts on purchases of Class A Shares if you invest at least $50,000 in Goldman Sachs Funds. More information about these and other discounts is available from your financial professional and in “Shareholder Guide—Common Questions Applicable to the Purchase of Class A Shares” beginning on page 53 and in Appendix C—Additional Information About Sales Charge Variations, Waivers and Discounts on page 104 of the Prospectus and “Other Information Regarding Maximum Sales Charge, Purchases, Redemptions, Exchanges and Dividends” beginning on page B-171 of the Fund’s Statement of Additional Information (“SAI”).
Shareholder Fees
(fees paid directly from your investment)
 
Class A
Class C
Institutional
Investor
Class R
Class R6
Maximum Sales Charge (Load) Imposed on Purchases (as a
percentage of offering price)
5.50%
None
None
None
None
None
Maximum Deferred Sales Charge (Load) (as a percentage of the
lower of original purchase price or sale proceeds)1
None
1.00%
None
None
None
None
Annual Fund Operating Expenses
(expenses that you pay each year as a percentage of the value of your investment)
 
Class A
Class C
Institutional
Investor
Class R
Class R6
Management Fees
1.00%
1.00%
1.00%
1.00%
1.00%
1.00%
Distribution and/or Service (12b-1) Fees
0.25%
0.75%
0.00%
0.00%
0.50%
0.00%
Other Expenses
0.28%
0.53%
0.16%
0.28%
0.28%
0.15%
Service Fees
None
0.25%
None
None
None
None
All Other Expenses
0.28%
0.28%
0.16%
0.28%
0.28%
0.15%
Acquired Fund Fees and Expenses
0.20%
0.20%
0.20%
0.20%
0.20%
0.20%
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses2
1.73%
2.48%
1.36%
1.48%
1.98%
1.35%
Fee Waiver and Expense Limitation3
(0.19)%
(0.19)%
(0.19)%
(0.19)%
(0.19)%
(0.19)%
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses After Fee Waiver and
Expense Limitation
1.54%
2.29%
1.17%
1.29%
1.79%
1.16%
1
A contingent deferred sales charge (“CDSC”) of 1% is imposed on Class C Shares redeemed within 12 months of purchase.
2
The “Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses” do not correlate to the ratios of net and total expenses to average net assets provided in the Financial Highlights, which reflect the operating expenses of the Fund and do not include “Acquired Fund Fees and Expenses.”
3
The Investment Adviser has agreed to: (i) waive a portion of its management fee payable by the Fund in an amount equal to any management fees it earns as an investment adviser to the affiliated funds in which the Fund invests; (ii) waive a portion of its management fee in an amount equal to the management fee paid to the Investment Adviser by the MFS Subsidiary (as defined below) at an annual rate of 0.42% of the MFS Subsidiary’s average daily net assets; and (iii) reduce or limit “Other Expenses” (excluding acquired fund fees and expenses, transfer agency fees and expenses, service fees, taxes, interest, brokerage fees, expenses of shareholder meetings, litigation and indemnification, and extraordinary expenses) to 0.254% of the Fund’s average daily net assets. The management fee waiver arrangement with respect to the MFS Subsidiary may not be discontinued by the Investment Adviser as long as its contract with the MFS Subsidiary is in place. The other management fee waiver and expense limitation arrangements will remain in effect through at least April 28, 2024, and prior to such date the Investment Adviser may not terminate the arrangements without the approval of the Board of Trustees.
Expense Example
This Example is intended to help you compare the cost of investing in the Fund with the cost of investing in other mutual funds.
16

The Example assumes that you invest $10,000 in Class A, Class C, Institutional, Investor, Class R and/or Class R6 Shares of the Fund for the time periods indicated and then redeem all of your Class A, Class C, Institutional, Investor, Class R and/or Class R6 Shares at the end of those periods. The Example also assumes that your investment has a 5% return each year and that the Fund’s operating expenses remain the same (except that the Example incorporates the fee waiver and expense limitation arrangements for only the first year). Although your actual costs may be higher or lower, based on these assumptions your costs would be:
 
1 Year
3 Years
5 Years
10 Years
Class A Shares
$698
$1,047
$1,420
$2,464
Class C Shares
$332
$754
$1,303
$2,802
Institutional Shares
$119
$412
$727
$1,619
Investor Shares
$131
$449
$790
$1,752
Class R Shares
$182
$603
$1,050
$2,291
Class R6 Shares
$118
$409
$721
$1,607
Class C Shares – Assuming no redemption
$232
$754
$1,303
$2,802

Portfolio Turnover
The Fund pays transaction costs when it buys and sells securities or instruments (i.e., “turns over” its portfolio). A high rate of portfolio turnover may result in increased transaction costs, including brokerage commissions, which must be borne by the Fund and its shareholders, and is also likely to result in higher short-term capital gains for taxable shareholders. These costs are not reflected in the annual fund operating expenses or in the expense example above, but are reflected in the Fund’s performance. The Fund’s portfolio turnover rate for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2022 was 0% of the average value of its portfolio. However, the Fund’s portfolio turnover rate is calculated without regard to transactions involving certain short-term instruments or derivatives. If such transactions were included in the calculation, the Fund would have a higher portfolio turnover rate.
Principal Strategy
The Fund implements a trend-following strategy that takes long and/or short positions in a wide range of asset classes, including equities, fixed income, commodities and currencies, among others, to seek long-term absolute return. The Fund seeks to achieve its investment objective by investing primarily in a portfolio of equities, equity index futures, bonds, bond futures, equity swaps, interest rate swaps, currency forwards and non-deliverable forwards, options, exchange-traded funds (“ETFs”), and structured securities. As a result of the Fund’s use of derivatives, the Fund may also hold significant amounts of U.S. Treasuries or short-term investments, including money market funds, repurchase agreements, cash and time deposits. The Fund’s investments will be made without restriction as to issuer capitalization, country, currency, maturity, or credit rating.
The Investment Adviser seeks to identify price trends in various asset classes over short-, medium-, and long-term horizons via a proprietary investment model, in combination with a qualitative overlay. The proprietary investment model uses past asset prices and other market information to seek to determine the direction and the magnitude of the price trend. The investment model tends to have positive view on assets with positive trends and negative view on assets with negative trends. For certain assets where market events produce predictable price patterns, the model adjusts such asset views accordingly. Based on the investment model views, the Fund will take a long or short position in the instrument or asset. Long positions benefit from an increase in price of the underlying instrument or asset, while short positions benefit from a decrease in price of the underlying instrument or asset. The size of the Fund’s position in an instrument or asset will primarily be related to the strength of the overall trend identified by the investment model as well as its forecasted risk. The Fund may make investment decisions that deviate from those generated by the Investment Adviser’s proprietary investment model, at the discretion of the Investment Adviser. In addition, the Investment Adviser may, in its discretion, make changes to its investment model, or use other investment models that are based on the Investment Adviser’s proprietary research.
The Fund may implement short positions and may do so by using swaps or futures, or through short sales of any instrument that the Fund may purchase for investment. For example, the Fund may enter into a futures contract pursuant to which it agrees to sell an asset (that it does not currently own) at a specified price at a specified point in the future. This gives the Fund a short position with respect to that asset.
The Fund may use leverage (e.g., by borrowing or through derivatives). As a result, the sum of the Fund’s investment exposures may at times exceed the amount of assets invested in the Fund, although these exposures may vary over time.
The Fund may seek exposure to the commodities markets by investing in commodity index-linked structured notes. The Fund may also take long and/or short positions in commodities by investing in other investment companies, ETFs or other pooled investment vehicles. The Fund may also gain exposure to the commodities markets by investing in a wholly-owned subsidiary of the Fund organized as a limited liability company under the laws of the Cayman Islands (the “MFS Subsidiary”). The MFS Subsidiary is advised by the Investment Adviser and seeks to gain commodities exposure.
Investment in the Subsidiary. The Fund may invest up to 25% of its total assets in the MFS Subsidiary. The MFS Subsidiary primarily obtains its commodity exposure by investing in commodity-linked derivative instruments, which may include but are not limited to total return swaps, commodity (U.S. or foreign) futures and commodity-linked notes. Commodity-linked swaps are derivative
17

instruments whereby the cash flows agreed upon between counterparties are dependent upon the price of the underlying commodity or commodity index over the life of the swap. Commodity futures contracts are standardized, exchange-traded contracts that provide for the sale or purchase of, or economic exposure to the price of, a commodity or a specified basket of commodities at a future time. The value of these commodity-linked derivatives will rise and fall in response to changes in the underlying commodity or commodity index. Commodity-linked derivatives expose the MFS Subsidiary and the Fund economically to movements in commodity prices. Such instruments may be leveraged so that small changes in the underlying commodity prices would result in disproportionate changes in the value of the instrument. Neither the Fund nor the MFS Subsidiary invests directly in physical commodities. The MFS Subsidiary may also invest in other instruments, including fixed income securities, either as investments or to serve as margin or collateral for its swap positions, as well as volatility index derivatives and foreign currency transactions (including forward contracts).
The Fund’s benchmark index is the ICE Bank of America Merrill Lynch Three-Month U.S. Treasury Bill Index.
Principal Risks of the Fund
Loss of money is a risk of investing in the Fund. The investment program of the Fund is speculative, entails substantial risks and includes alternative investment techniques not employed by traditional mutual funds. The Fund should not be relied upon as a complete investment program. The Fund’s investment techniques (if they do not perform as designed) may increase the volatility of performance and the risk of investment loss, including the loss of the entire amount that is invested, and there can be no assurance that the investment objective of the Fund will be achieved. Moreover, certain investment techniques which the Fund may employ in its investment program can substantially increase the adverse impact to which the Fund’s investments may be subject. There is no assurance that the investment processes of the Fund will be successful, that the techniques utilized therein will be implemented successfully or that they are adequate for their intended uses, or that the discretionary element of the investment processes of the Fund will be exercised in a manner that is successful or that is not adverse to the Fund. An investment in the Fund is not a bank deposit and is not insured or guaranteed by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (“FDIC”) or any government agency. Investors should carefully consider these risks before investing. The Fund's principal risks are presented below in alphabetical order, and not in the order of importance or potential exposure.
Absence of Regulation Risk. The Fund engages in over-the-counter (“OTC”) transactions, which trade in a dealer network, rather than on an exchange. In general, there is less governmental regulation and supervision of transactions in the OTC markets than of transactions entered into on organized exchanges.
Call/Prepayment Risk. An issuer could exercise its right to pay principal on an obligation held by the Fund (such as a mortgage-backed security) earlier than expected. This may happen when there is a decline in interest rates, when credit spreads change, or when an issuer’s credit quality improves. Under these circumstances, the Fund may be unable to recoup all of its initial investment and will also suffer from having to reinvest in lower-yielding securities.
Commodity Sector Risk. Exposure to the commodities markets may subject the Fund to greater volatility than investments in more traditional securities. The value of commodity-linked investments may be affected by changes in overall market movements, commodity index volatility, changes in interest rates, or factors affecting a particular industry or commodity, such as drought, floods, weather, livestock disease, embargoes, tariffs and international economic, business, political and regulatory developments. The prices of energy, industrial metals, precious metals, agriculture and livestock sector commodities may fluctuate widely due to factors such as changes in value, supply and demand and governmental regulatory policies. The commodity-linked investments in which the MFS Subsidiary enters into may involve counterparties in the financial services sector, and events affecting the financial services sector may cause the MFS Subsidiary's, and therefore the Fund’s, share value to fluctuate.
Counterparty Risk. Many of the protections afforded to cleared transactions, such as the security afforded by transacting through a clearing house, might not be available in connection with OTC transactions. Therefore, in those instances in which the Fund enters into uncleared OTC transactions, the Fund will be subject to the risk that its direct counterparty will not perform its obligations under the transactions and that the Fund will sustain losses.
Credit/Default Risk. An issuer or guarantor of fixed income securities or instruments held by the Fund (which may have low credit ratings) may default on its obligation to pay interest and repay principal or default on any other obligation. Additionally, the credit quality of securities may deteriorate rapidly, which may impair the Fund’s liquidity and cause significant deterioration in net asset value (“NAV”). These risks are heightened in market environments where interest rates are rising as well as in connection with the Fund’s investments in non-investment grade fixed income securities.
Derivatives Risk. The Fund’s use of options, futures, forwards, swaps, options on swaps, structured securities and other derivative instruments may result in losses. These instruments, which may pose risks in addition to and greater than those associated with investing directly in securities, currencies or other instruments, may be illiquid or less liquid, volatile, difficult to price and leveraged so that small changes in the value of underlying instruments may produce disproportionate losses to the Fund. Certain derivatives are also subject to counterparty risk, which is the risk that the other party in the transaction will not fulfill its contractual obligations. The use of derivatives is a highly specialized activity that involves investment techniques and risks different from those associated with investments in more traditional securities and instruments.
Expenses Risk. By investing in Underlying Funds indirectly through the Fund, the investor will incur a proportionate share of the expenses of those Underlying Funds held by the Fund (including operating costs and investment management fees), in addition to the expenses of the Fund.
18

Foreign and Emerging Countries Risk. Foreign securities may be subject to risk of loss because of more or less foreign government regulation; less public information; less stringent investor protections; less stringent accounting, corporate governance, financial reporting and disclosure standards; and less economic, political and social stability in the countries in which the Fund invests. The imposition of sanctions, exchange controls (including repatriation restrictions), confiscations, trade restrictions (including tariffs) and other government restrictions by the United States and other governments, or from problems in share registration, settlement or custody, may also result in losses. The type and severity of sanctions and other similar measures, including counter sanctions and other retaliatory actions, that may be imposed could vary broadly in scope, and their impact is impossible to predict. For example, the imposition of sanctions and other similar measures could, among other things, cause a decline in the value and/or liquidity of securities issued by the sanctioned country or companies located in or economically tied to the sanctioned country and increase market volatility and disruption in the sanctioned country and throughout the world. Sanctions and other similar measures could limit or prevent the Fund from buying and selling securities (in the sanctioned country and other markets), significantly delay or prevent the settlement of securities transactions, and significantly impact the Fund’s liquidity and performance. Foreign risk also involves the risk of negative foreign currency exchange rate fluctuations, which may cause the value of securities denominated in such foreign currency (or other instruments through which the Fund has exposure to foreign currencies) to decline in value. Currency exchange rates may fluctuate significantly over short periods of time. These risks are more pronounced in connection with the Fund’s investments in securities of issuers located in, or otherwise economically tied to, emerging countries.
Interest Rate Risk. When interest rates increase, fixed income securities or instruments held by the Fund will generally decline in value. Long-term fixed income securities or instruments will normally have more price volatility because of this risk than short-term fixed income securities or instruments. Changing interest rates may have unpredictable effects on the markets, may result in heightened market volatility and may detract from Fund performance. In addition, changes in monetary policy may exacerbate the risks associated with changing interest rates. Funds with longer average portfolio durations will generally be more sensitive to changes in interest rates than funds with a shorter average portfolio duration. Fluctuations in interest rates may also affect the liquidity of fixed income securities and instruments held by the Fund.
Investment Style Risk. Different investment styles (e.g., “growth”, “value” or “quantitative”) tend to shift in and out of favor depending upon market and economic conditions and investor sentiment. The Fund employs a “quantitative” style, and may outperform or underperform other funds that invest in similar asset classes but employ different investment styles.
Large Shareholder Transactions Risk. The Fund may experience adverse effects when certain large shareholders purchase or redeem large amounts of shares of the Fund. Such large shareholder redemptions, which may occur rapidly or unexpectedly, may cause the Fund to sell portfolio securities at times when it would not otherwise do so, which may negatively impact the  Fund's  NAV and liquidity. Similarly, large Fund share purchases may adversely affect the  Fund's  performance to the extent that the Fund is delayed in investing new cash or otherwise maintains a larger cash position than it ordinarily would. These transactions may also accelerate the realization of taxable income to shareholders if such sales of investments resulted in gains, and may also increase transaction costs. In addition, a large redemption could result in the  Fund's  current expenses being allocated over a smaller asset base, leading to an increase in the  Fund's  expense ratio.
Leverage Risk. Borrowing and the use of derivatives may result in leverage and may make the Fund more volatile. The use of leverage may cause the Fund to liquidate portfolio positions to satisfy its obligations when it may not be advantageous to do so. The use of leverage by the Fund can substantially increase the adverse impact to which the Fund’s investment portfolio may be subject.
Liquidity Risk. The Fund may make investments that are illiquid or that may become less liquid in response to market developments or adverse investor perceptions. Illiquid investments may be more difficult to value. Liquidity risk may also refer to the risk that the Fund will not be able to pay redemption proceeds within the allowable time period because of unusual market conditions, declining prices of the securities sold, an unusually high volume of redemption requests or other reasons. To meet redemption requests, the Fund may be forced to sell  investments at an unfavorable time and/or under unfavorable conditions. Liquidity risk may be the result of, among other things, the reduced number and capacity of traditional market participants to make a market in fixed income securities or the lack of an active market. The potential for liquidity risk may be magnified by a rising interest rate environment or other circumstances where investor redemptions from fixed income funds may be higher than normal, potentially causing increased supply in the market due to selling activity. These risks may be more pronounced in connection with the Fund’s investments in securities of issuers located in emerging market countries. Redemptions by large shareholders may have a negative impact on the Fund’s liquidity.
Management Risk. A strategy used by the Investment Adviser may fail to produce the intended results. The Investment Adviser attempts to execute a complex strategy for the Fund using proprietary quantitative models. Investments selected using these models may perform differently than expected as a result of the factors used in the models, the weight placed on each factor, changes from the factors’ historical trends, and technical issues in the construction and implementation of the models (including, for example, data problems and/or software issues). There is no guarantee that the Investment Adviser’s use of these quantitative models will result in effective investment decisions for the Fund. Additionally, commonality of holdings across quantitative money managers may amplify losses.
Market Risk. The value of the securities in which the Fund  invests may go up or down in response to the prospects of individual companies, particular sectors or governments and/or general economic conditions throughout the world due to increasingly interconnected global economies and financial markets. Events such as war, military conflict, acts of terrorism, social unrest, natural disasters, recessions, inflation, rapid interest rate changes, supply chain disruptions, sanctions, the spread of infectious illness or other public health threats could also significantly impact the Fund and its investments.
19

Non-Hedging Foreign Currency Trading Risk. The Fund may engage in forward foreign currency transactions for hedging and non-hedging purposes. The Investment Adviser may purchase or sell foreign currencies through the use of forward contracts based on the Investment Adviser’s judgment regarding the direction of the market for a particular foreign currency or currencies. In pursuing this strategy, the Investment Adviser seeks to profit from anticipated movements in currency rates by establishing “long” and/or “short” positions in forward contracts on various foreign currencies. Foreign exchange rates can be extremely volatile and a variance in the degree of volatility of the market or in the direction of the market from the Investment Adviser’s expectations may produce significant losses to the Fund. Some of these transactions may also be subject to interest rate risk.
Other Investment Companies Risk. By investing in other investment companies (including ETFs) indirectly through the Fund, investors will incur a proportionate share of the expenses of the other investment companies held by the Fund (including operating costs and investment management fees) in addition to the fees regularly borne by the Fund. In addition, the Fund will be affected by the investment policies, practices and performance of such investment companies in direct proportion to the amount of assets the Fund invests therein.
Portfolio Turnover Rate Risk. A high rate of portfolio turnover (100% or more) involves correspondingly greater expenses which must be borne by the Fund and its shareholders, and is also likely to result in short-term capital gains taxable to shareholders.
Short Position Risk. The Fund may enter into a short position through a futures contract, an option or swap agreement or through short sales of any instrument that the Fund may purchase for investment. Taking short positions involves leverage of the Fund’s assets and presents various risks. If the value of the underlying instrument or market in which the Fund has taken a short position increases, then the Fund will incur a loss equal to the increase in value from the time that the short position was entered into plus any related interest payments or other fees. Taking short positions involves the risk that losses may be disproportionate, may exceed the amount invested and may be unlimited.
Stock Risk. Stock prices have historically risen and fallen in periodic cycles. U.S. and foreign stock markets have experienced periods of substantial price volatility in the past and may do so again in the future.
Subsidiary Risk. The MFS Subsidiary is not registered under the Investment Company Act of 1940, as amended (“Investment Company Act”) and is not subject to all the investor protections of the Investment Company Act. Changes in the laws of the United States and/or the Cayman Islands could result in the inability of the Fund and/or the MFS Subsidiary to operate as described in the Prospectus and the SAI and could adversely affect the Fund.
Swaps Risk. In a standard “swap” transaction, two parties agree to exchange the returns, differentials in rates of return or some other amount earned or realized on the “notional amount” of predetermined investments or instruments, which may be adjusted for an interest factor. Swaps can involve greater risks than direct investment in securities, because swaps may be leveraged and subject to counterparty risk (e.g., the risk of a counterparty’s defaulting on the obligation or bankruptcy), credit risk and pricing risk (i.e., swaps may be difficult to value). Swaps may also be considered illiquid. It may not be possible for the Fund or the MFS Subsidiary to liquidate a swap position at an advantageous time or price, which may result in significant losses.
Tax Risk. In reliance on an opinion of counsel, the Fund seeks to gain exposure to the commodity markets primarily through investments in the MFS Subsidiary.The tax treatment of the Fund’s investments in the MFS Subsidiary could affect whether income derived from such investments is “qualifying income” under Subchapter M of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended (the “Code”), or otherwise affect the character, timing and/or amount of the Fund’s taxable income or any gains and distributions made by the Fund. If the IRS were to successfully assert that a Fund’s income from such investments was not “qualifying income,” the Fund may fail to qualify as a regulated investment company (“RIC”) under Subchapter M of the Code if over 10% of its gross income was derived from these investments. If the Fund failed to qualify as a RIC, it would be subject to federal and state income tax on all of its taxable income at regular corporate tax rates with no deduction for any distributions paid to shareholders, which would significantly adversely affect the returns to, and could cause substantial losses for, Fund shareholders.

Shareholders should review “Other Information” under “Taxation” on page 73 of the Prospectus for more information.
U.S. Government Securities Risk. The U.S. government may not provide financial support to U.S. government agencies, instrumentalities or sponsored enterprises if it is not obligated to do so by law. U.S. government securities  issued by those agencies, instrumentalities and sponsored enterprises, including those issued by the Federal National Mortgage Association (“Fannie Mae”), Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation (“Freddie Mac”) and the Federal Home Loan Banks, are neither issued nor guaranteed by the U.S. Treasury and, therefore, are not backed by the full faith and credit of the United States. The maximum potential liability of the issuers of some U.S. government securities held by the Fund may greatly exceed their current resources, including any legal right to support from the U.S. Treasury. It is possible that issuers of U.S. government securities will not have the funds to meet their payment obligations in the future.
20

Performance
The bar chart and table below provide an indication of the risks of investing in the Fund by showing: (a) changes in the performance of the Fund’s Institutional Shares from year to year; and (b) how the average annual total returns of the Fund’s Class A, Class C, Institutional, Investor, Class R and Class R6 Shares compare to those of a broad-based securities market index. The Fund’s past performance, before and after taxes, is not necessarily an indication of how the Fund will perform in the future. Updated performance information is available at no cost at www.gsamfunds.com/performance or by calling the appropriate phone number on the back cover of the Prospectus.
Performance reflects applicable fee waivers and/or expense limitations in effect during the periods shown.
CALENDAR YEAR (INSTITUTIONAL)
During the periods shown in the chart above:
Returns
Quarter ended
Best Quarter Return
14.23%
March 31, 2022
Worst Quarter Return
-8.49%
June 30, 2013
AVERAGE ANNUAL TOTAL RETURN
For the period ended December 31, 2022
 
 
 
 
1 Year
5 Years
10 Years
Inception
Date
Class A Shares
 
 
 
2/29/2012
Returns Before Taxes
13.52%
4.80%
2.67%
 
Returns After Taxes on Distributions
5.43%
2.11%
1.14%
 
Returns After Taxes on Distributions and Sale of Fund Shares
7.95%
2.57%
1.41%
 
Class C Shares
 
 
 
2/29/2012
Returns Before Taxes
18.11%
5.20%
2.47%*
 
Institutional Shares
 
 
 
2/29/2012
Returns Before Taxes
20.59%
6.38%
3.65%
 
Investor Shares
 
 
 
2/29/2012
Returns Before Taxes
20.43%
6.25%
3.50%
 
Class R Shares
 
 
 
2/29/2012
Returns
19.77%
5.71%
2.98%
 
Class R6 Shares
 
 
 
4/30/2018
Returns Before Taxes
20.47%
6.38%**
3.65%**
 
ICE BofAML Three-Month U.S. Treasury Bill Index
1.47%
1.26%
0.76%
 
*
Class C Shares automatically convert into Class A Shares eight years after the purchase date. The 10-Year performance for Class C Shares does not reflect the conversion to Class A Shares after the first eight years of performance.
**
Class R6 Shares commenced operations on April 30, 2018. Prior to that date, the performance of Class R6 Shares shown in the table above is that of Institutional Shares. Performance has not been adjusted to reflect the lower expenses of Class R6 Shares. Class R6 Shares would have had higher returns because: (i) Institutional Shares and Class R6 Shares represent interests in the same portfolio of securities; and (ii) Class R6 Shares have lower expenses.
The after-tax returns are for Class A Shares only. The after-tax returns for Class C, Institutional, Investor and Class R6 Shares, and returns for Class R Shares (which are offered exclusively to employee benefit plans), will vary. After-tax returns are calculated using the historical highest individual federal marginal income tax rates and do not reflect the impact of state and local taxes. Actual after-tax returns depend on an investor’s tax situation and may differ from those shown. In addition, the after-tax returns shown are not relevant to investors who hold Fund Shares through tax-deferred arrangements such as 401(k) plans or individual retirement accounts.
Portfolio Management
Goldman Sachs Asset Management, L.P. is the investment adviser for the Fund (the “Investment Adviser” or “GSAM”).
21

Portfolio Managers: Oliver Bunn, Vice President, has managed the Fund since 2022; Momoko Ono, Vice President, has managed the Fund since 2017; and Jay Seo, Vice President, has managed the Fund since 2022.
Buying and Selling Fund Shares
The minimum initial investment for Class A and Class C Shares is, generally, $1,000. The minimum initial investment for Institutional Shares is, generally, $1,000,000 for individual or certain institutional investors, alone or in combination with other assets under the management of the Investment Adviser and its affiliates. There is no minimum for initial purchases of Investor, Class R and Class R6 Shares, except for certain institutional investors who purchase Class R6 Shares directly with the Fund’s transfer agent for which the minimum initial investment is $5,000,000. Those share classes with a minimum initial investment requirement do not impose it on certain employee benefit plans, and Institutional Shares do not impose it on certain investment advisers investing on behalf of other accounts.
The minimum subsequent investment for Class A and Class C shareholders is $50, except for certain employee benefit plans, for which there is no minimum. There is no minimum subsequent investment for Institutional, Investor, Class R or Class R6 shareholders.
You may purchase and redeem (sell) shares of the Fund on any business day through certain intermediaries that have a relationship with Goldman Sachs & Co. LLC (“Goldman Sachs”), including banks, trust companies, brokers, registered investment advisers and other financial institutions (“Intermediaries”).
Tax Information
For important tax information, please see “Tax Information” on page 23 of the Prospectus.
Payments to Broker-Dealers and
Other Financial Intermediaries
For important information about financial intermediary compensation, please see “Payments to Broker-Dealers and Other Financial Intermediaries” on page 23 of the Prospectus.
22

Alternative Funds –
Additional Summary Information
Tax Information
The Funds' distributions are taxable, and will be taxed as ordinary income or capital gains, unless you are investing through a tax-deferred arrangement, such as a 401(k) plan or an individual retirement account. Investments made through tax-deferred arrangements may become taxable upon withdrawal from such arrangements.
Payments to Broker-Dealers and
Other Financial Intermediaries
If you purchase a Fund through an Intermediary, the Fund and/or its related companies may pay the Intermediary for the sale of Fund shares and related services. These payments may create a conflict of interest by influencing the Intermediary and your salesperson to recommend a Fund over another investment. Ask your salesperson or visit your Intermediary’s website for more information.
23

Investment Management Approach
INVESTMENT OBJECTIVE
The Absolute Return Tracker Fund seeks to deliver long-term total return consistent with investment results that approximate the return and risk patterns of a diversified universe of hedge funds.
The Commodity Strategy Fund seeks long-term total return.
The Managed Futures Strategy Fund seeks to generate long-term absolute return.
Each Fund’s investment objective may be changed without shareholder approval upon sixty days’ notice.
PRINCIPAL INVESTMENT STRATEGIES
Absolute Return Tracker Fund
The Fund’s Investment Adviser believes that hedge funds derive a large portion of their returns from Market Exposures and Trading Strategies involving long and/or short positions in Market Exposures and/or individual securities or baskets of securities. In seeking to meet its investment objective, the Fund uses a dynamic investment process to seek to identify the appropriate weights to Market Exposures and Trading Strategies that approximate the return and risk patterns of specific Hedge Fund Sub-Strategies. The Hedge Fund Sub-Strategies whose returns the Fund seeks to approximate include, but are not limited to, Equity Long Short, Event Driven, Relative Value and Macro sub-strategies. To establish the Market Exposures and Trading Strategies that drive the returns of the Hedge Fund Sub-Strategies the Investment Adviser uses industry analysis of hedge funds, including hedge fund return databases, prime brokerage reports, industry participants and regulatory filings and other public sources. The Investment Adviser then applies a quantitative methodology, in combination with a qualitative overlay, to assess the appropriate weight to each Market Exposure and Trading Strategy. The Fund may seek to establish long and/or short positions in a multitude of Market Exposures, including but not limited to:
U.S. and non-U.S. (including emerging market) equity indices;
U.S. and non-U.S. (including emerging market) fixed income indices;
Credit indices;
Interest rates;
Commodity indices;
MLP indices;
Foreign currency exchange rates;
Baskets of top positions held by hedge funds;
Single stocks and single commodities;
Volatility; and
Market momentum/trends.
The Fund invests in instruments that the Investment Adviser believes will assist the Fund in gaining exposure to the Market Exposures. The instruments in which the Fund may invest include, but are not limited to:
Equity securities (including securities that may convert into equity securities);
U.S. corporate bonds and other fixed income securities (including non-investment grade fixed income securities (commonly known as “junk bonds”));
Futures (including equity index futures, interest rate futures, bond futures and volatility futures);
Swaps (including total return swaps and credit default swaps on indices);
Options (including listed equity index put and call options, listed government bond future put and call options, options on volatility, and swaptions);
Structured notes (including commodity-linked notes);
ETFs;
Forward contracts (including currency forward contracts on developed and emerging markets currencies);
Wholly-owned subsidiary (to gain exposure to the commodities markets);
Asset and mortgage-backed securities and REITs;
U.S. government securities, including agency debentures, and other high quality debt securities; and
Cash equivalents.
24

Investment Management Approach
Investment in the Subsidiary. The Fund seeks to gain exposure to the commodities markets by investing in the ART Subsidiary. The ART Subsidiary is advised by the Investment Adviser and seeks to gain commodities exposure. The Fund may invest up to 25% of its total assets in the ART Subsidiary. The ART Subsidiary primarily obtains its commodity exposure by investing in commodity-linked derivative instruments (which may include total return swaps on commodity indexes, sub-indexes and single commodities, as well as commodity (U.S. or foreign) futures, commodity options and commodity-linked notes). Commodity-linked swaps are derivative instruments whereby the cash flows agreed upon between counterparties are dependent upon the price of the underlying commodity or commodity index over the life of the swap. Commodity futures contracts are standardized, exchange-traded contracts that provide for the sale or purchase of, or economic exposure to the price of, a commodity or a specified basket of commodities at a future time. An option on commodities gives the purchaser the right (and the writer of the option the obligation) to assume a position in a commodity or a specified basket of commodities at a specified exercise price within a specified period of time. The value of these commodity-linked derivatives will rise and fall in response to changes in the underlying commodity or commodity index. Commodity-linked derivatives expose the ART Subsidiary and the Fund economically to movements in commodity prices. Such instruments may be leveraged so that small changes in the underlying commodity prices would result in disproportionate changes in the value of the instrument. Neither the Fund nor the ART Subsidiary invests directly in physical commodities. The ART Subsidiary may also invest in other instruments, including fixed income securities, either as investments or to serve as margin or collateral for its swap positions, as well as volatility index derivatives and foreign currency transactions (including forward contracts).
The Fund may from time to time hold foreign currencies. Additionally, as a result of the Fund’s use of derivatives, the Fund may also hold as collateral significant amounts of U.S. Treasury or short-term investments, including money market funds, repurchase agreements, cash and time deposits. In managing the collateral portion of the Fund’s investment strategy, the Investment Adviser generally seeks capital preservation.
The weighting of a Market Exposure or Trading Strategy within the Fund may be positive or negative. A negative weighting will result from establishing a short position with respect to a Market Exposure or Trading Strategy. As a result of the Fund’s negative weightings in various Market Exposures or Trading Strategies from time to time, the Fund’s NAV per share may decline during certain periods, even if the value of any or all of the Market Exposures or Trading Strategies increases during that time. Additionally, the sum of the Fund’s target weightings to each Market Exposure or Trading Strategy may not equal 100%.
The Fund’s investment selection process generally relies on a proprietary investment model. From time to time the Investment Adviser may, in its discretion, also utilize a qualitative overlay. As a result of the qualitative overlay, the Fund’s investments may not correspond to those generated by the Investment Adviser’s proprietary investment model. The Fund may make investment decisions that deviate from those generated by the Investment Adviser’s proprietary investment model, at the discretion of the Investment Adviser, for a number of reasons including, but not limited to, market and/or trading liquidity events. In addition, the Investment Adviser may, in its discretion, make changes to the quantitative methodology used by the Fund, and the Fund may use other proprietary methodologies based on the Investment Adviser’s proprietary research.
The Fund does not invest in hedge funds.
Selection of Market Exposures and Trading Strategies. The Fund’s quantitative methodology selects Market Exposures and Trading Strategies from a universe of investable exposures identified by the Investment Adviser that may contribute to the performance of the Hedge Fund Sub-Strategies. For each Hedge Fund Sub-Strategy, the Investment Adviser selects various Market Exposures and Trading Strategies that it believes represent, when combined, the return and risk patterns of the Hedge Fund Sub-Strategy. The Market Exposures and Trading Strategies are selected using industry analysis of hedge funds, including hedge fund return databases, prime brokerage reports, industry participants and regulatory filings and other public sources. The Investment Adviser relies on third-party data that it believes to be reliable, but it does not guarantee the accuracy of such third-party data.
Rebalancing. The Fund’s quantitative methodology re-weights each of the Market Exposures and Trading Strategies from time to time as determined by the Investment Adviser.
The Fund’s Quantitative Methodology and Hedge Fund Returns. The Fund’s quantitative methodology seeks investment results that approximate the return and risk patterns of a diversified universe of hedge funds. Individual hedge funds themselves may perform better or worse than such return and risk patterns based on the skill of their particular managers. In addition, hedge funds may adjust their investments rapidly in view of market, political, financial or other factors, whereas the Fund’s quantitative methodology only adjusts its composition from time to time. The quantitative methodology is based on an assessment of historical data related to volatility and returns. To the extent that data turns out not to be predictive of future events, the return of the Fund may deviate from the returns of hedge funds. Moreover, neither the Fund nor hedge funds provide a guarantee of “absolute returns,” that is, returns independent of the overall direction of equity and fixed income markets. Alternative investments such as hedge funds may often be purchased by investors on the basis of their potential to produce such returns. However, there can be no assurance that either hedge funds in general, or the Fund in particular, will be successful at producing positive returns.
25

Description of Hedge Fund Sub-Strategies.
Equity Long Short Strategies typically involve long and short investing, based on fundamental evaluations, research and various analytical measurements, in equity and equity-related investments. Equity Long Short managers may, for example, buy stocks that they expect to outperform or that they believe are undervalued, and may also sell short stocks that they believe will underperform, or that they believe are overvalued.
Event Driven Strategies typically seek to achieve investment returns from market movements in security prices caused by certain corporate events, such as bankruptcies, mergers or takeovers.
Relative Value Strategies typically seek to exploit the mis-pricing of related assets and/or price convergence, often with the additional use of leverage. These strategies include, among others, fixed income arbitrage, convertible arbitrage, volatility arbitrage and statistical arbitrage strategies.
Macro Strategies typically seek to produce total return by long and short investing across global fixed income, currency, equity, and commodity markets using fundamental analysis or quantitative techniques. Macro managers typically have no bias to be long, short, or neutral.
Benchmark. The Fund’s benchmark index is the ICE Bank of America Merrill Lynch Three-Month U.S. Treasury Bill Index. The ICE Bank of America Merrill Lynch Three-Month U.S. Treasury Bill Index is comprised of a single issue purchased at the beginning of the month and held for a full month. At the end of the month that issue is sold and rolled into a newly selected issue. The issue selected at each month-end rebalancing is the outstanding Treasury Bill that matures closest to, but not beyond, three months from the rebalancing date. To qualify for selection, an issue must have settled on or before the month-end rebalancing date.
References in the Prospectus to the Fund’s benchmark are for informational purposes only, and unless otherwise noted are not an indication of how the Fund is managed.
THE FUND DOES NOT REPRESENT A COMPLETE INVESTMENT PROGRAM. THE FUND’S NAV MAY FLUCTUATE SUBSTANTIALLY OVER TIME. BECAUSE THE FUND ATTEMPTS TO APPROXIMATE THE RETURN AND RISK PATTERNS OF A DIVERSIFIED UNIVERSE OF HEDGE FUNDS, THE FUND’S PERFORMANCE MAY POTENTIALLY BE LOWER THAN THE RETURNS OF THE BROADER STOCK MARKET. PAST PERFORMANCE OF THE FUND IS NOT AN INDICATION OF FUTURE RETURNS. YOU MAY LOSE MONEY EVEN IF THE FUND’S PAST RETURNS HAVE BEEN POSITIVE. ACCORDINGLY, THE FUND SHOULD BE CONSIDERED A SPECULATIVE INVESTMENT ENTAILING A HIGH DEGREE OF RISK AND IS NOT SUITABLE FOR ALL INVESTORS.
Commodity Strategy Fund
The Fund seeks to maintain substantial economic exposure to the performance of the commodities markets. The Fund primarily gains exposure to the commodities markets by investing in the CSF Subsidiary. The CSF Subsidiary is advised by the Investment Adviser, and has the same investment objective as the Fund. CoreCommodity serves as sub-adviser to both the Fund and the CSF Subsidiary.
The Fund seeks to provide exposure to the commodities markets by investing, through the CSF Subsidiary, in commodity-linked investments including, without limitation, commodity swaps, commodity futures contracts, exchange-listed commodity forward contracts, options on commodity futures, and commodity-linked notes. In pursuing its objective, the Fund attempts to provide long and/or short exposure to the returns of real assets that trade in the commodity markets without direct investment in physical commodities. Real assets include oil, gas, industrial and precious metals, livestock, and agricultural or meat products, or other items that have tangible properties. Commodity-linked investments may be more volatile and less liquid than the underlying instruments and their value may be affected by the performance of commodities as well as weather, tax, and other regulatory or political developments, overall market movements and other factors affecting the value of particular industries or commodities, such as disease, embargoes, acts of war or terrorism. The Fund seeks to provide exposure to various commodities and commodities sectors.
Investment in the Subsidiary. The Fund may invest up to 25% of its total assets in the CSF Subsidiary. The CSF Subsidiary primarily obtains its commodity exposure by investing in commodity-linked derivative instruments (which typically includes total return swaps). Commodity-linked swaps are derivative instruments whereby the cash flows agreed upon between counterparties are dependent upon the price of the underlying commodity or commodity index (or a component of the underlying commodity index) over the life of the swap. The value of the swap will rise and fall in response to changes in the underlying commodity or commodity index (or component of the underlying commodity index). Commodity-linked swaps expose the CSF Subsidiary and the Fund economically to movements in commodity prices. Such instruments may be leveraged so that small changes in the underlying commodity prices would result in disproportionate changes in the value of the instrument. Neither the Fund nor the CSF Subsidiary invests directly in physical commodities. The CSF Subsidiary will also invest in other instruments, including fixed income securities, either as investments or to serve as margin or collateral for its swap positions.
26

Investment Management Approach
Roll-Timing Strategy. The Sub-Adviser will take various factors into account when seeking commodity market exposure, such as, without limitation, the results of proprietary models developed by the Sub-Adviser, relative price differentials for various commodity futures for current delivery as compared to those for future delivery, and market conditions. Among other strategies, the Fund employs commodity roll-timing strategies. “Rolling” futures exposure is the process by which the holder of a particular futures contract or other instrument providing futures exposure (e.g. swaps) will sell such contract or instrument on or before the expiration date and simultaneously purchase a new contract or instrument with identical terms except for a later expiration date. This process allows a holder of the instrument to extend its current position through the original instrument’s expiration without delivering the underlying asset. The Fund does not intend to take physical delivery of commodities.
“Roll-timing” is a process by which the Fund may seek to add incremental return through methods of rolling its commodities exposure. The Fund’s rolling may differ from that of the BCOM to the extent necessary to enable the Fund to seek excess returns over the BCOM. To the extent the Investment Adviser believes fundamental or technical developments will impact its decisions with respect to rolling its commodities exposure decision, the Investment Adviser will incorporate those views into the Fund by electing to “roll-time” positions earlier or later versus the BCOM, or through the holding and rolling of positions with longer or different dates than the BCOM. The Fund also may underweight or overweight various commodities as compared to the BCOM, and may utilize commodities that are not components of the BCOM.
Fixed Income Investments. As a result of the Fund’s use of derivatives, the Fund may hold as collateral significant amounts of U.S. Treasury or short-term investments, including money market funds. In managing the collateral portion of the Fund’s investment strategy, the Sub-Adviser generally seeks capital preservation.
Other. The Fund may also invest for both hedging and non-hedging purposes in options, futures, forwards, options on futures and swaps, and may invest in commodity index-linked structured notes. The Fund may invest up to 35% of its net assets in foreign securities. The Fund will primarily allocate its assets among the CSF Subsidiary and fixed income and other debt securities. In pursuing its investment objective, the Fund uses the BCOM as its performance benchmark but the Fund is actively managed and will not attempt to replicate the index. The Fund may, therefore, invest in securities that are not included in the BCOM or seek to hedge the exposure of components of the BCOM.
The Fund will not invest 25% or more of its total assets in instruments issued by companies in any one industry.
References in the Prospectus to the Fund’s benchmark are for informational purposes only, and unless otherwise noted are not an indication of how the Fund is managed.
CoreCommodity Team’s Investing Philosophy:
Commodity markets can provide portfolio diversification due to their low historical correlations with traditional asset classes such as large cap equities and investment grade fixed income securities. The Commodity Strategy Fund seeks to provide this diversification primarily through investments (through its CSF Subsidiary) in commodity-linked and commodity index-linked swaps, listed commodity futures, and listed commodity forwards, which together provide general exposure to the performance of this asset class, taking an active investment approach as described herein. The Fund also invests in U.S. Treasury securities.
Managed Futures Strategy Fund
The Fund implements a trend-following strategy that takes long and/or short positions in a wide range of asset classes, including equities, fixed income, commodities and currencies, among others, to seek long-term absolute return. The Fund seeks to achieve its investment objective by investing primarily in a portfolio of equities, equity index futures, bonds, bond futures, equity swaps, interest rate swaps, currency forwards and non-deliverable forwards, options, ETFs, and structured securities. As a result of the Fund’s use of derivatives, the Fund may also hold significant amounts of U.S. Treasuries or short-term investments, including money market funds, repurchase agreements, cash and time deposits. The Fund’s investments will be made without restriction as to issuer capitalization, country, currency, maturity or credit rating.
The Fund may implement short positions and may do so by using swaps or futures, or through short sales of any instrument that the Fund may purchase for investment. For example, the Fund may enter into a futures contract pursuant to which it agrees to sell an asset (that it does not currently own) at a specified price at a specified point in the future. This gives the Fund a short position with respect to that asset.
The Investment Adviser seeks to identify price trends in various asset classes over short-, medium-, and long-term horizons via a proprietary investment model, in combination with a qualitative overlay. The proprietary investment model uses past asset prices and other market information to seek to determine the direction and the magnitude of the price trend. The investment model tends to have positive view on assets with positive trends and negative view on assets with negative trends. For certain assets where market events produce predictable price patterns, the model adjusts such asset views accordingly. Based on the investment model views, the Fund
27

will take a long or short position in the instrument or asset. Long positions benefit from an increase in price of the underlying instrument or asset, while short positions benefit from a decrease in price of the underlying instrument or asset. The size of the Fund’s position in an instrument or asset will primarily be related to the strength of the overall trend identified by the investment model as well as its forecasted risk.
The Fund’s investment selection process generally relies on a proprietary investment model. From time to time the Investment Adviser may, in its discretion, also utilize a qualitative overlay. As a result of the qualitative overlay, the Fund’s investments may not correspond to those generated by the Investment Adviser’s proprietary investment model. The Fund may make investment decisions that deviate from those generated by the Investment Adviser’s proprietary investment model, at the discretion of the Investment Adviser, for a number of reasons including, but not limited to, market and/or trading liquidity events. In addition, the Investment Adviser may, in its discretion, make changes to its investment model, or use other investment models based on the Investment Adviser’s proprietary research. For additional information, please consult the Fund’s SAI.
The Fund may use leverage (e.g., by borrowing or through derivatives). As a result, the sum of the Fund’s investment exposures may exceed the amount of assets invested in the Fund, although these exposures may vary over time.
The Fund may seek exposure to the commodities markets by investing in commodity index-linked structured notes. The Fund may also take long and/or short positions in commodities by investing in other investment companies, ETFs or other pooled investment vehicles. The Fund may also gain exposure to the commodities markets by investing in the MFS Subsidiary. The MFS Subsidiary is advised by the Investment Adviser and seeks to gain commodities exposure.
Investment in the Subsidiary. The Fund may invest up to 25% of its total assets in the MFS Subsidiary. The MFS Subsidiary primarily obtains its commodity exposure by investing in commodity-linked derivative instruments (which may include total return swaps). Commodity-linked swaps are derivative instruments whereby the cash flows agreed upon between counterparties are dependent upon the price of the underlying commodity or commodity index over the life of the swap. The value of the swap will rise and fall in response to changes in the underlying commodity or commodity index. Commodity-linked swaps expose the MFS Subsidiary and the Fund economically to movements in commodity prices. Such instruments may be leveraged so that small changes may produce disproportionate losses to the Fund. Neither the Fund nor the MFS Subsidiary purchases or holds physical commodities directly. The MFS Subsidiary will also invest in other instruments, including fixed income securities, either as investments or to serve as margin or collateral for its swap positions, as well as volatility index derivatives.
The Investment Adviser uses derivatives, including futures, swaps, and forwards, among others, to implement long and short positions.
In considering whether to maintain an existing position, the Investment Adviser will take into account a number of factors including, without limitation, the Investment Adviser’s views on future performance of the position and the Fund’s liquidity and/or risk diversification profile.
The Fund’s benchmark index is the ICE Bank of America Merrill Lynch Three-Month U.S. Treasury Bill Index.
References in the Prospectus to the Fund’s benchmark are for informational purposes only, and unless otherwise noted are not an indication of how the Fund is managed. The Fund’s risk profile is different from that of its benchmark and, as a result, the performance of the Fund may not correlate with that of the benchmark.
All Funds
The Funds may, from time to time, take temporary defensive positions that are inconsistent with the Funds’ principal investment strategies in attempting to respond to adverse market, political or other conditions. For temporary defensive purposes (and to the extent that it is permitted to invest in the following), each Fund may invest up to 100% of its total assets in securities issued or guaranteed by the U.S. government, its agencies, instrumentalities or sponsored enterprises (“U.S. Government Securities”), commercial paper rated at least A-2 by S&P Global Ratings, P-2 by Moody’s or having a comparable credit rating by another NRSRO (or if unrated, determined by the Investment Adviser or Sub-Adviser to be of comparable credit quality), certificates of deposit, bankers’ acceptances, repurchase agreements, non-convertible preferred stocks and non-convertible corporate bonds with a remaining maturity of less than one year, certain ETFs and other investment companies and cash items. When a Fund’s assets are invested in such instruments, the Fund may not be achieving its investment objective.
ADDITIONAL FEES AND EXPENSES INFORMATION
“Acquired Fund Fees and Expenses” reflect the expenses, (including the management fees) borne by the Absolute Return Tracker Fund, the Commodity Strategy Fund, and the Managed Futures Strategy Fund as the sole shareholders of the ART Subsidiary, AP Subsidiary, CSF Subsidiary, and MFS Subsidiary, respectively. In addition, “Acquired Fund Fees and Expenses” reflect the expenses (including the management fees) borne by the Funds through their ownership in other investment companies.
28

Investment Management Approach
Differences in the "Expense Limitation" ratios across a Fund’s share classes are the result of, among other things, the effect of mathematical rounding on the daily accrual of expense reimbursement, particularly, in respect to share classes with small amounts of assets.
Differences in the "Other Expenses" ratios across a Fund's share classes are the result of, among other things, contractual differences in transfer agency fees and/or the effect of mathematical rounding on the daily accrual of certain expenses, particularly, in respect to share classes with small amounts of assets.
ADDITIONAL PERFORMANCE INFORMATION
The below is additional information that relates to the “Performance” section of each Fund’s summary section.
Note that the “Best Quarter” and “Worst Quarter” figures shown in the “Performance” section of each Fund’s Summary section are applicable only to the time period covered by the bar chart.
These definitions apply to the after-tax returns shown in the “Performance” section of each Fund’s Summary section.
Average Annual Total Returns Before Taxes. These returns do not reflect taxes on distributions on a Fund’s Shares nor do they show how performance can be impacted by taxes when shares are redeemed (sold) by you.
Average Annual Total Returns After Taxes on Distributions. These returns assume that taxes are paid on distributions on a Fund’s Class A Shares (i.e., dividends and capital gains) but do not reflect taxes that may be incurred upon redemption (sale) of the Class A Shares at the end of the performance period.
Average Annual Total Returns After Taxes on Distributions and Sale of Fund Shares. These returns reflect taxes paid on distributions on a Fund’s Class A Shares and taxes applicable when the shares are redeemed (sold).
Note on Tax Rates. The after-tax performance figures are calculated using the historically highest individual federal marginal income tax rates at the time of the distributions and do not reflect state and local taxes. In calculating the federal income taxes due on redemptions, capital gains taxes resulting from a redemption are subtracted from the redemption proceeds and the tax benefits from capital losses resulting from the redemption are added to the redemption proceeds. Under certain circumstances, the addition of the tax benefits from capital losses resulting from redemptions may cause the Returns After Taxes on Distributions and Sale of Fund Shares to be greater than the Returns After Taxes on Distributions or even the Returns Before Taxes.
OTHER INVESTMENT PRACTICES AND SECURITIES
Although each Fund’s principal investment strategies are described in the Fund’s Summary—Principal Strategy section of the Prospectus, the following tables identify some of the investment techniques that may (but are not required to) be used by the Funds in seeking to achieve their investment objectives. The tables also highlight the differences and similarities among the Funds in their use of these techniques and other investment practices and investment securities. Numbers in these tables show allowable usage only; for actual usage, consult the Funds’ annual/semi-annual report. For more information about these and other investment practices and securities, see Appendix A.
The Funds publish on their website (http://www.gsamfunds.com) complete portfolio holdings as of the end of each calendar quarter (the end of each month, in the case of Managed Futures Strategy Fund) subject to a thirty day lag between the date of the information and the date on which the information is disclosed. In addition, the Funds publish on their website certain month-end holdings information (exposures to five major asset classes, in the case of the Absolute Return Tracker and Commodity Strategy Funds) subject to a fifteen calendar-day lag between the date of the information and the date on which the information is disclosed. In addition, a description of the Funds’ policies and procedures with respect to the disclosure of the Funds’ portfolio holdings is available in the Funds’ SAI.
29

10 Percent of total assets (including securities lending collateral) (italic type)
10 Percent of net assets (excluding borrowings for investment purposes) (roman type)
No specific percentage limitation on usage; limited only by the strategies of the Fund
Not permitted
Absolute
Return
Tracker
Fund
Commodity
Strategy
Fund
Managed
Futures
Strategy
Fund
Investment Practices
 
 
 
Borrowings
33 13
33 13
33 13
Credit, Currency, Equity, Index, Interest Rate, Total Return and Mortgage Swaps and Options on Swaps
Cross Hedging of Currencies
Custodial Receipts and Trust Certificates
Equity Swaps
Foreign Currency Transactions (including forward contracts)*
Futures Contracts and Options and Swaps on Futures Contracts
Illiquid Investments**
15
15
15
Interest Rate Caps, Floors and Collars
Investment Company Securities (including ETFs)***
10
10
10
Mortgage Dollar Rolls
Options on Foreign Currencies1
Options on Futures2
Options on Securities and Securities Indices
Options2
Preferred Stock
Repurchase Agreements
Reverse Repurchase Agreements (for investment purposes)
Securities Lending
33 13
Short Sales
Unseasoned Companies
Warrants and Stock Purchase Rights
When-Issued Securities and Forward Commitments
*
Limited by the amount each Fund may invest in foreign securities.
**
Illiquid investments are any investments that a Fund reasonably expects cannot be sold or disposed of in current market conditions in seven calendar days or less without the sale or disposition significantly changing the market value of the investment.
***
This percentage limitation does not apply to a Fund’s investments in investment companies (including ETFs) where a higher percentage limitation is permitted under the Investment Company Act or rules, regulations or exemptive relief thereunder.
1
The Funds may purchase and sell call and put options on foreign currencies.
2
The Funds may sell call and put options and purchase call and put options on securities and securities indices in which they may invest.
30

Investment Management Approach
10 Percent of total assets (excluding securities lending collateral) (italic type)
10 Percent of Net Assets (including borrowings for investment purposes) (roman type)
No specific percentage limitation on usage; limited only by the strategies of the Fund
Not permitted
Absolute
Return
Tracker
Fund
Commodity
Strategy
Fund
Managed
Futures
Strategy
Fund
Investment Securities
 
 
 
American, European and Global Depositary Receipts
Asset-Backed and Mortgage-Backed Securities1
 
Bank Obligations1,2
Commodity-Linked Derivative Instruments3
Convertible Securities4
Corporate Debt Obligations1
Corporate Debt Obligations and Trust Preferred Securities
Equity Investments
Emerging Country Securities5
25
Fixed Income Securities
Foreign Government Securities1
Foreign Securities5
35
Master Limited Partnerships
 
Municipal Securities
Non-Investment Grade Fixed Income Securities6
 
Real Estate Investment Trusts
 
Stripped Mortgage-Backed Securities1
Structured Securities (which may include equity-linked notes)7
Subsidiary Shares8
25
25
25
Temporary Investments
U.S. Government Securities1
Yield Curve Options and Inverse Floating Rate Securities
1
Limited by the amount the Fund invests in fixed income securities and limited to cash equivalents only.
2
Issued by U.S. or foreign banks.
3
The Funds may invest in commodity-linked derivative instruments only to the extent permissible under applicable law then in effect or in reliance upon a private letter ruling from the IRS or an opinion of counsel, or other applicable guidance or relief provided by the IRS or other agencies.
4
Convertible securities purchased by the Funds use the same rating criteria for convertible and non-convertible debt securities.
5
The Commodity Strategy Fund may invest in the aggregate up to 35% of its net assets in foreign securities.
6
May be BB+ or lower by S&P Global Ratings or Ba1 or lower by Moody’s or have a comparable credit rating by another NRSRO at the time of investment.
7
Structured securities are not subject to the same minimum credit quality requirement as a Fund’s investments in fixed income securities.
8
Each of the Absolute Return Tracker, the Commodity Strategy, and the Managed Futures Strategy Funds may invest up to 25% of its total assets in the shares of the ART Subsidiary, the AP Subsidiary, the CSF Subsidiary, and the MFS Subsidiary (together, the “Subsidiaries”), respectively.
31

Risks of the Funds
Loss of money is a risk of investing in the Fund (which, for the remainder of this Prospectus, refers to one or more of the Funds offered in this prospectus). The principal risks of each Fund are discussed in the Summary sections of the Prospectus. The following section provides additional information on the risks that apply to the Funds, which may result in a loss of your investment. The risks applicable to each Fund are presented below in alphabetical order, and not in the order of importance or potential exposure. An investment in a Fund is not a bank deposit and is not insured or guaranteed by the FDIC or any other governmental agency. Investors should carefully consider these risks before investing. None of the Funds should be relied upon as a complete investment program. There can be no assurance that a Fund will achieve its investment objective.
The investment programs of the Funds are speculative, entail substantial risks and include alternative investment techniques not employed by traditional mutual funds. A Fund’s investment techniques (if they do not perform as designed) may increase the volatility of performance and the risk of investment loss, including the loss of the entire amount that is invested. Moreover, certain investment techniques which a Fund may employ in its investment program can substantially increase the adverse impact to which the Fund’s investments may be subject. There is no assurance that the investment processes of a Fund will be successful, that the techniques utilized therein will be implemented successfully or that they are adequate for their intended uses, or that the discretionary element of the investment processes of a Fund will be exercised in a manner that is successful or that is not adverse to the Fund.
32

Risks of the Funds
Principal Risk
Additional Risk
Absolute
Return
Tracker
Fund
Commodity
Strategy
Fund
Managed
Futures
Strategy
Fund
Absence of Regulation
Call/Prepayment
 
Commodity Sector
Counterparty
Credit/Default
Cybersecurity
Derivatives
Emerging Countries
Expenses
 
Extension
 
Foreign
Geographic
Interest Rate
Investing in the Underlying Funds
 
 
Investment Style
Large Shareholder Transactions
Leverage
Liquidity
Management
Market
Master Limited Partnerships
 
Mid-Cap and Small-Cap
 
Mortgage Backed and Other Asset Backed Securities
 
NAV
Non-Hedging Foreign Currency Trading
 
Non-Investment Grade Fixed Income Securities
 
Other Investment Companies
 
Portfolio Turnover Rate
 
REIT
 
 
Short Selling/Position
Sovereign Default
Stock
 
Strategy
 
 
Subsidiary
Swaps
Tax
U.S. Government Securities
33

Absence of Regulation Risk —The Fund engages in transactions, which trade in a dealer network, rather than on an exchange. In general, there is less governmental regulation and supervision of transactions in the OTC markets (in which option contracts and certain options on swaps are generally traded) than of transactions entered into on organized exchanges.
Call/Prepayment Risk—An issuer could exercise its right to pay principal on an obligation held by the Fund (such as a mortgage-backed security) earlier than expected. This may happen when there is a decline in interest rates, when credit spreads change, or when an issuer’s credit quality improves. Under these circumstances, the Fund may be unable to recoup all of its initial investment and will also suffer from having to reinvest in lower-yielding securities.
Commodity Sector RiskExposure to the commodities markets may subject the Fund to greater volatility than investments in more traditional securities. The value of commodity-linked investments may be affected by changes in overall market movements, commodity index volatility, changes in interest rates, or sectors affecting a particular industry or commodity, such as drought, floods, weather, livestock disease, embargoes, tariffs and international economic, business, political and regulatory developments. The prices of energy, industrial metals, precious metals, agriculture and livestock sector commodities may fluctuate widely due to factors such as changes in value, supply and demand and governmental regulatory policies. The energy sector can be significantly affected by changes in the prices and supplies of oil and other energy fuels, energy conservation, the success of exploration projects, and tax and other government regulations, policies of the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (“OPEC”) and relationships among OPEC members and between OPEC and oil-importing nations. The metals sector can be affected by sharp price volatility over short periods caused by global economic, financial and political factors, resource availability, government regulation, economic cycles, changes in inflation or expectations about inflation in various countries, interest rates, currency fluctuations, metal sales by governments, central banks or international agencies, investment speculation and fluctuations in industrial and commercial supply and demand. Commodity-linked investments are often offered by companies in the financial services sector, including the banking, brokerage and insurance sectors. As a result, events affecting issuers in the financial services sector may cause the Fund’s share value to fluctuate. Although investments in commodities typically move in different directions than traditional equity and debt securities, when the value of those traditional securities is declining due to adverse economic conditions, there is no guarantee that these investments will perform in that manner, and at certain times the price movements of commodity-linked investments have been parallel to those of debt and equity securities.
Counterparty RiskMany of the protections afforded to cleared transactions, such as the security afforded by transacting through a clearing house, might not be available in connection with certain OTC transactions. Therefore, in those instances in which the Fund or its Subsidiary enters into certain OTC transactions, the Fund or its Subsidiary will be subject to the risk that its direct counterparty will not perform its obligations under the transactions and that the Fund or its Subsidiary will sustain losses. However, recent regulatory developments require margin on certain uncleared OTC transactions which may reduce, but not eliminate, this risk.
Credit/Default Risk—An issuer or guarantor of fixed income securities or instruments held by the Fund (which may have low credit ratings) may default on its obligation to pay interest and repay principal or default on any other obligation. The credit quality of the Fund’s portfolio securities or instruments may meet the Fund’s credit quality requirements at the time of purchase but then deteriorate thereafter, and such a deterioration can occur rapidly. In certain instances, the downgrading or default of a single holding or guarantor of the Fund’s holdings may impair the Fund’s liquidity and have the potential to cause significant NAV deterioration. These risks are heightened in market environments where interest rates are rising as well as in connection with a Fund’s investments in non-investment grade fixed income securities.
Cybersecurity Risk—The Fund may be susceptible to operational and information security risks resulting from cyber-attacks. Cyber-attacks include, among others, stealing or corrupting confidential information and other data that is maintained online or digitally for financial gain, denial-of-service attacks on websites causing operational disruption, and the unauthorized release of confidential information and other data. Cyber-attacks have the ability to cause significant disruptions and impact business operations; to result in financial losses; to prevent shareholders from transacting business; to interfere with the Fund’s calculation of NAV; and to lead to violations of applicable privacy and other laws, regulatory fines, penalties, reputational damage, reimbursement or other compensation costs and/or additional compliance costs. Cyber-attacks affecting the Fund or its Investment Adviser, custodian, Transfer Agent, or other third-party service providers may adversely impact the Fund and its shareholders.
Derivatives RiskThe Fund’s use  of options, futures, forwards, swaps, options on swaps, structured securities and other similar instruments (collectively referred to in this paragraph as “derivatives”) may result in losses, including due to adverse market movements. Derivatives, which may pose risks in addition to and greater than those associated with investing directly in securities, currencies or other instruments, may increase market exposure and be illiquid or less liquid, volatile, difficult to price and leveraged so that small changes in the value of the underlying assets or instruments may produce disproportionate losses to the Fund. Certain derivatives are also subject to counterparty risk, which is the risk that the other party in the transaction will not fulfill, or lacks the capacity or authority to fulfill, its contractual obligations, liquidity risk, which includes the risk that the Fund will not be able to
34

Risks of the Funds
close its derivatives position when it is advantageous to do so, and risks arising from margin requirements, which include the risk that the Fund will be required to pay additional margin or set aside additional collateral to maintain open derivative positions. Derivatives may be used for both hedging and non-hedging purposes.
The use of derivatives is a highly specialized activity that involves investment techniques and risks different from those associated with investments in more traditional securities and instruments, and there is no guarantee that the use of derivatives will achieve their intended result. If the Investment Adviser or Sub-Adviser is incorrect in its expectation of the timing or level of fluctuation in securities prices, interest rates, currency prices or other variables, the use of derivatives could result in losses, which in some cases may be significant. A lack of correlation between changes in the value of derivatives and the value of the portfolio assets (if any) being hedged could also result in losses. In addition, there is a risk that the performance of the derivatives or other instruments used by the Investment Adviser or Sub-Adviser to replicate the performance of a particular asset class may not accurately track the performance of that asset class. Futures markets are highly volatile and the use of futures may increase the volatility of a Fund’s NAV.
The use of derivatives is also subject to operational and legal risks. Operational risks generally refer to risks related to potential operational issues, including documentation issues, settlement issues, system failures, inadequate controls, and human error. Legal risks generally refer to risks of loss resulting from insufficient documentation or legality or enforceability of a contract.
Emerging Countries RiskInvestments in securities of issuers located in emerging countries are subject to the risks associated with investments in foreign securities. In addition, the securities markets of most emerging countries are less liquid, developed and efficient, are subject to greater price volatility, and have smaller market capitalizations. In addition, emerging markets and frontier countries may have more or less government regulation and generally do not impose as extensive and frequent accounting, auditing, financial and other reporting requirements as the securities markets of more developed countries. As a result, there could be less information available about issuers in emerging and frontier market countries, which could negatively affect the Investment Adviser’s ability to evaluate local companies or their potential impact on the Fund’s performance. Further, investments in securities of issuers located in certain emerging countries involve the risk of loss resulting from problems in share registration, settlement or custody, substantial economic, political and social disruptions and the imposition of sanctions or exchange controls (including repatriation restrictions). The legal remedies for investors in emerging and frontier markets may be more limited than the remedies available in the U.S., and the ability of U.S. authorities (e.g., SEC and the U.S. Department of Justice) to bring actions against bad actors may be limited. These risks are not normally associated with investments in more developed countries. For more information about these risks, see Appendix A.
Expenses Risk—By investing in Underlying Funds, the investor will incur not only a proportionate share of the expenses of those  Underlying Funds held by the Fund (including operating costs and investment management fees), but also the expenses of the Fund.
Extension Risk—An issuer could exercise its right to pay principal on an obligation held by the Fund (such as a mortgage-backed security) later than expected. This may happen when there is a rise in interest rates. Under these circumstances, the value of the obligation will decrease, and the Fund will also suffer from the inability to reinvest in higher yielding securities.
Foreign Risk—When the Fund invests in foreign securities, it may be subject to risk of loss not typically associated with U.S. issuers. Loss may result because of more or less foreign government regulation; less public information; less stringent investor protections; less stringent accounting, corporate governance, financial reporting and disclosure standards; less liquid, developed or efficient trading markets; greater volatility; and less economic, political and social stability in the countries in which the Fund invests. Loss may also result from, among other things, deteriorating economic and business conditions in other countries, including the United States, regional and global conflicts, the imposition of sanctions, exchange controls (including repatriation restrictions), foreign taxes, confiscation of assets and property, trade restrictions (including tariffs), expropriations and other government restrictions by the United States and other governments, higher transaction costs, difficulty enforcing contractual obligations or from problems in share registration, settlement or custody. The type and severity of sanctions and other similar measures, including counter sanctions and other retaliatory actions, that may be imposed could vary broadly in scope, and their impact is impossible to predict. These types of measures may include, but are not limited to, banning a sanctioned country from global payment systems that facilitate cross-border payments, restricting the settlement of securities transactions by certain investors, and freezing the assets of particular countries, entities, or persons. The imposition of sanctions and other similar measures could, among other things, cause a decline in the value and/or liquidity of securities issued by the sanctioned country or companies located in or economically tied to the sanctioned country, downgrades in the credit ratings of the sanctioned country or companies located in or economically tied to the sanctioned country, devaluation of the sanctioned country’s currency, and increased market volatility and disruption in the sanctioned country and throughout the world. Sanctions and other similar measures could limit or prevent the Fund from buying and selling securities (in the sanctioned country and other markets), significantly delay or prevent the settlement of securities transactions, and significantly impact the Fund’s liquidity and performance. A Fund or the Investment Adviser may determine not to invest in, or may limit its overall investment in, a particular issuer, country or geographic  region due to, among other things, heightened risks regarding repatriation restrictions, confiscation of assets and property,
35

expropriation or nationalization. A Fund will also be subject to the risk of negative foreign currency rate fluctuations, which may cause the value of securities denominated in such foreign currency (or other instruments through which the Fund has exposure to foreign currencies) to decline in value. Currency exchange rates may fluctuate significantly over short periods of time. Foreign risks will normally be greatest when a Fund invests in securities of issuers located in emerging countries. For more information about these risks, see Appendix A.
The Fund's investments in foreign securities may also be subject to foreign currency risk, as described above, the risk of negative foreign currency rate fluctuations, which may cause the value of securities denominated in such foreign currency (or other instruments through which the Fund may have exposure to foreign currencies) to decline in value. Foreign risks will normally be greatest when the Fund invests in securities of issuers located in emerging countries. For more information about these risks, see Appendix A.
Geographic RiskIf  the Fund focuses its investments in securities of issuers located in a particular country or geographic region,  the Fund may be subjected, to a greater extent than if its investments were less focused, to the risks of volatile economic cycles and/or conditions and developments that may be particular to that country or region, such as: adverse securities markets; adverse exchange rates; adverse social, political, regulatory, economic, business, environmental or other developments; or natural disasters.
Interest Rate Risk—When interest rates increase, fixed income securities or instruments held by the Fund (which may include inflation protected securities) will generally decline in value. Long-term fixed income securities or instruments will normally have more price volatility because of this risk than short-term fixed income securities or instruments. A wide variety of market factors can cause interest rates to rise, including central bank monetary policy, rising inflation and changes in general economic conditions. Changing interest rates may have unpredictable effects on the markets, may result in heightened market volatility and may detract from Fund performance to the extent the Fund is exposed to such interest rates and/or volatility. In addition, changes in monetary policy may exacerbate the risks associated with changing interest rates. Funds with longer average portfolio durations will generally be more sensitive to changes in interest rates than funds with a shorter average portfolio duration. Fluctuations in interest rates may also affect the liquidity of fixed income securities and instruments held by the Fund.

It is difficult to predict the magnitude, timing or direction of interest rate changes and the impact these changes will have on the markets in which the Fund invests.
Investing in the Underlying Funds—The Fund’s investments are concentrated in the Underlying Funds (including ETFs and other registered investment companies) subject to limitations and/or conditions prescribed by the Investment Company Act or rules, regulations or exemptive relief thereunder. The Fund’s investment performance is directly related to the investment performance of the Underlying Funds it holds. The Fund is subject to the risk factors associated with investments of the Underlying Funds in direct proportion to the amount of assets allocated to each. The ability of the Fund to meet its investment objective is directly related to the ability of the Underlying Funds to meet their objectives as well as the allocation among those Underlying Funds by the Investment Adviser. The value of the Underlying Funds’ investments, and the net asset values (“NAV”) of the shares of both the Fund and the Underlying Funds, will fluctuate in response to various market and economic factors related to the equity and fixed income markets, as well as the financial condition and prospects of issuers in which the Underlying Funds invest. If the Fund has a relative concentration of its portfolio in a single Underlying Fund, it may be more susceptible to adverse developments affecting that Underlying Fund and may be more susceptible to losses because of these developments. There can be no assurance that the investment objective of the Fund or any Underlying Fund will be achieved.
Investment Style Risk—Different investment styles (e.g., “growth,” “value,” or “quantitative”) tend to shift in and out of favor depending upon market and economic conditions as well as investor sentiment. Certain Funds employ a “quantitative” style, and these Funds as well as the other Funds may outperform or underperform other funds that invest in similar asset classes but employ different investment styles. Additionally, with respect to the Managed Futures Strategy Fund, managed futures strategies have historically offered weaker performance in range-bound or highly volatile markets.
Large Shareholder Transactions Risk—The Fund may experience adverse effects when certain large shareholders, such as other funds, institutional investors (including those trading by use of non-discretionary mathematical formulas), financial intermediaries (who may make investment decisions on behalf of underlying clients and/or include the Fund in their investment model), individuals, accounts and Goldman Sachs affiliates, purchase or redeem large amounts of shares of the Fund. Such large shareholder redemptions, which may occur rapidly or unexpectedly, may cause the Fund to sell portfolio securities at times when it would not otherwise do so, which may negatively impact the Fund’s NAV and liquidity. Similarly, large Fund share purchases may adversely affect the Fund’s performance to the extent that the Fund is delayed in investing new cash or otherwise maintains a larger cash position than it ordinarily would. These transactions may also accelerate the realization of taxable income to shareholders if such sales of investments resulted in gains, and may also increase transaction costs. In addition, a large redemption could result in the Fund’s current expenses being allocated over a smaller asset base, leading to an increase in the Fund’s expense ratio.
36

Risks of the Funds
Leverage RiskLeverage creates exposure to potential gains and losses in excess of the initial amount invested. Borrowing and the use of derivatives may result in leverage and may increase market exposure and make the Fund more volatile. When the Fund uses leverage, the sum of the Fund's investment exposures may significantly exceed the amount of assets invested in the Fund, although these exposures may vary over time. Relatively small market movements may result in large changes in the value of a leveraged investment. The use of leverage may cause the Fund to liquidate portfolio positions to satisfy its obligations or to meet margin/collateral requirements when it may not be advantageous to do so. The use of leverage by the Fund can substantially increase the Fund's investment risks and cause losses to be realized more quickly.
Liquidity RiskThe Fund may invest in securities or instruments that trade in lower volumes, that are less liquid than other investments and/or that may become illiquid or less liquid in response to market developments or adverse investor perceptions. Investments that are illiquid or that trade in lower volumes may be more difficult to value. When there is no willing buyer and investments cannot be readily sold at the desired time or price, the Fund may have to accept a lower price or may not be able to sell the security or instrument at all. An inability to sell one or more portfolio positions can adversely affect the Fund's value or prevent the Fund from being able to take advantage of other investment opportunities.
Illiquidity can be caused by a drop in overall market trading volume, an inability to find a willing buyer, or legal restrictions on the securities’ resale. To the extent that the traditional dealer counterparties that engage in fixed income trading do not maintain inventories of bonds (which provide an important indication of their ability to “make markets”) that keep pace with the growth of the bond markets over time, relatively low levels of dealer inventories could lead to decreased liquidity and increased volatility in the fixed income markets. Additionally, market participants other than a Fund may attempt to sell fixed income holdings at the same time as the Fund, which could cause downward pricing pressure and contribute to decreased liquidity.
Because the Fund may invest in non-investment grade fixed income securities, small- and mid-capitalization stocks, REITs and/or emerging country issuers, the Fund may be especially subject to the risk that during certain periods, the liquidity of particular issuers or industries, or all securities within a particular investment category, may shrink or disappear suddenly and without warning as a result of adverse economic, market or political events (including periods of rapid interest rate changes), or adverse investor perceptions, whether or not accurate.
Liquidity risk may also refer to the risk that the Fund will not be able to pay redemption proceeds within the allowable time period stated in the Prospectus or without significant dilution to remaining investors’ interests because of unusual market conditions, declining prices of the securities sold, an unusually high volume of redemption requests or other reasons. While the Fund reserves the right to meet redemption requests through in-kind distributions, the Fund may instead choose to raise cash to meet redemption requests through sales of portfolio securities or permissible borrowings. If the Fund is forced to sell investments at an unfavorable time and/or under unfavorable conditions, such sales may adversely affect the Fund's NAV and dilute remaining investors’ interests.
Certain shareholders, including clients or affiliates of the Investment Adviser or Sub-Adviser and/or other funds managed by the Investment Adviser or Sub-Adviser, may from time to time own or control a significant percentage of the Fund's shares. Redemptions by these shareholders of their shares of the Fund may further increase the Fund's liquidity risk and may impact the Fund's NAV. These shareholders may include, for example, institutional investors, funds of funds, discretionary advisory clients, certain participating insurance companies, accounts or Goldman Sachs affiliates and other shareholders, whose buy-sell decisions are controlled by a single decision-maker.
Management Risk—A strategy used by the Investment Adviser or Sub-Adviser may fail to produce the intended results. In addition, the Sub-Adviser of the Commodity Strategy Fund may rely on key personnel to carry out its investment strategy and a loss of services of any of these personnel may adversely impact the Sub-Adviser and the Fund. With respect to the Absolute Return Tracker Fund, the Investment Adviser or Sub-Adviser attempts to execute a complex strategy using a proprietary quantitative model. Investments selected using this model may perform differently than expected as a result of the Market Exposures and Trading Strategies used in the models, the weight placed on each Market Exposure or Trading Strategy, changes from a Market Exposure’s or Trading Strategy’s historical trends, the speed that market conditions change and technical issues in the construction and implementation of the models (including, for example, data problems and/or software issues).
There is no guarantee that the Investment Adviser’s or Sub-Adviser’s use of the quantitative model will result in effective investment decisions for the Absolute Return Tracker Fund. With respect to the Managed Futures Strategy Fund, the Investment Adviser or Sub-Adviser attempts to execute a complex strategy using proprietary models. There is no guarantee that the Investment Adviser or Sub-Adviser will correctly forecast the risk of particular instruments or sectors or effectively make changes to the quantitative methodology utilized by the Managed Futures Strategy Fund. The Managed Futures Strategy Fund may allocate assets to an asset class or sector that underperforms other asset classes and sectors. Additionally, commonality of holdings across quantitative money managers may amplify losses.
The use of proprietary quantitative models could be adversely impacted by unforeseeable software or hardware malfunction and other technological failures, power loss, software bugs, malicious code such as “worms,” viruses or system crashes or various other events or circumstances within or beyond the control of the Investment Adviser or Sub-Adviser. Certain of these events or
37

circumstances may be difficult to detect. Models that have been formulated on the basis of past market data may not be predictive of future price movements. Models may not be reliable if unusual or disruptive events cause market movements, the nature or size of which are inconsistent with the historical performance of individual markets and their relationship to one another or to other macroeconomic events. Models also rely heavily on data that may be licensed from a variety of sources, and the functionality of the models depends, in part, on the timeliness and accuracy of voluminous data inputs.
Market Risk—The value of the securities in which the Fund invests may go up or down in response to the prospects of individual companies, particular sectors or governments and/or general economic conditions throughout the world. Price changes may be temporary or last for extended periods. The Fund's investments may be overweighted from time to time in one or more sectors or countries, which will increase the Fund's exposure to risk of loss from adverse developments affecting those sectors or countries.
Global economies and financial markets are becoming increasingly interconnected, and conditions and events in one country, region or financial market may adversely impact issuers in a different country, region or financial market. Furthermore, local, regional and global events such as war, military conflict, acts of terrorism, social unrest, natural disasters, recessions, inflation, rapid interest rate changes, supply chain disruptions, sanctions, the spread of infectious illness or other public health threats could also adversely impact issuers, markets and economies, including in ways that cannot necessarily be foreseen. The Fund could be negatively impacted if the value of a portfolio holding were harmed by such political or economic conditions or events. In addition, governmental and quasi-governmental organizations have taken a number of unprecedented actions designed to support the markets. Such conditions, events and actions may result in greater market risk.
Master Limited Partnership Risk— The Fund’s investments in securities of a Master Limited Partnership (“MLP”) involve risks that differ from investments in common stock, including risks related to limited control and limited rights to vote on matters affecting the MLP, risks related to potential conflicts of interest between the MLP and the MLP’s general partner, cash flow risks, dilution risks and risks related to the general partner’s right to require unit-holders to sell their common units at an undesirable time or price, resulting from regulatory changes or other reasons. Certain MLP securities may trade in lower volumes due to their smaller capitalizations. Accordingly, those MLPs may be subject to more abrupt or erratic price movements and may lack sufficient market liquidity to enable the Fund to effect sales at an advantageous time or without a substantial drop in price. Investment in those MLPs may restrict the Fund’s ability to take advantage of other investment opportunities. MLPs are generally considered interest-rate sensitive investments. During periods of interest rate volatility, these investments may not provide attractive returns.
To the extent a distribution received by the Fund from an MLP is treated as a return of capital, the Fund’s adjusted tax basis in the interests of the MLP may be reduced, which will result in an increase in an amount of income or gain (or decrease in the amount of loss) that will be recognized by the Fund for tax purposes upon the sale of any such interests or upon subsequent distributions in respect of such interests. Furthermore, any return of capital distribution received from the MLP may require the Fund to restate the character of its distributions and amend any shareholder tax reporting previously issued. Moreover, a change in current tax law, or a change in the underlying business mix of a given MLP, could result in an MLP being treated as a corporation for U.S. federal income tax purposes, which could result in a reduction of the value of the Fund's investment in the MLP and lower income to the Fund.
Individuals and certain other noncorporate entities are generally eligible for a 20% deduction with respect to taxable income from MLPs. Currently, there is not a regulatory mechanism for regulated investment companies such as the Fund to pass through the 20% deduction to shareholders. As a result, in comparison, investors investing directly in MLPs would generally be eligible for the 20% deduction for such taxable income from these investments while investors investing in MLPs held indirectly if any through the Fund would not be eligible for the 20% deduction for their share of such taxable income.
Mid-Cap and Small-Cap RiskThe securities of mid-capitalization and small-capitalization companies involve greater risks than those associated with larger, more established companies and may be subject to more abrupt or erratic price movements. Securities of such issuers may lack sufficient market liquidity to enable the Fund to effect sales at an advantageous time or without a substantial drop in price. Both mid-capitalization and small-capitalization companies often have narrower markets and more limited managerial and financial resources than larger, more established companies. As a result, their performance can be more volatile and they face greater risk of business failure, which could increase the volatility of the Fund's portfolio. Generally, the smaller the company size, the greater these risks become.
Mortgage-Backed and Other Asset-Backed Securities Risk—Mortgage-related and other asset-backed securities are subject to credit/default, interest rate and certain additional risks. Generally, rising interest rates tend to extend the duration of fixed rate mortgage-backed securities, making them more sensitive to changes in interest rates. As a result, in a period of rising interest rates, if a Fund holds mortgage-backed securities, it may exhibit additional volatility. This is known as extension risk. In addition, adjustable and fixed rate mortgage-backed securities are subject to prepayment risk. When interest rates decline, borrowers may pay off their mortgages sooner than expected. This can reduce the returns of a Fund because the Fund may have to reinvest that money at the lower prevailing interest rates. Due to these risks, asset-backed securities may become more volatile in certain interest rate environments.
38

Risks of the Funds
A Fund’s investments in other asset-backed securities are subject to risks similar to those associated with mortgage-backed securities, as well as additional risks associated with the nature of the assets and the servicing of those assets. Asset-backed securities may not have the benefit of a security interest in collateral comparable to that of mortgage assets, resulting in additional credit risk.
The Funds may invest in mortgage-backed securities issued by the U.S. Government (see “U.S. Government Securities Risk”). To the extent that a Fund invests in mortgage-backed securities offered by non-governmental issuers, such as commercial banks, savings and loan institutions, private mortgage insurance companies, mortgage bankers and other secondary market issuers, the Fund may be subject to additional risks. Timely payment of interest and principal of non-governmental issuers are supported by various forms of private insurance or guarantees, including individual loan, title, pool and hazard insurance purchased by the issuer. There can be no assurance that the private insurers can meet their obligations under the policies. An unexpectedly high rate of defaults on the mortgages held by a mortgage pool may adversely affect the value of a mortgage-backed security and could result in losses to a Fund. The risk of such defaults is generally higher in the case of mortgage pools that include subprime mortgages or during periods of rising interest rates. Subprime mortgages refer to loans made to borrowers with weakened credit histories or with a lower capacity to make timely payments on their mortgages.
The values of, and income generated by, commercial mortgage-backed securities ("CMBS") may be adversely affected by changing interest rates and other developments impacting the commercial real estate market, such as population shifts and other demographic changes, increasing vacancies (potentially for extended periods) and reduced demand for commercial and office space as well as maintenance or tenant improvement costs and costs to convert properties for other uses. These developments could result from, among other things, changing tastes and preferences (such as for remote work arrangements) as well as cultural, technological, global or local economic and market developments. In addition, changing interest rate environments and associated changes in lending standards and higher refinancing rates may adversely affect the commercial real estate and CMBS markets. The occurrence of any of the foregoing developments would likely increase default risk for the properties and loans underlying these investments as well as impact the value of, and income generated by, these investments. These developments could also result in reduced liquidity for CMBS and other real estate-related investments.
NAV RiskThe net asset value  of the Fund and the value of your investment will fluctuate.
Non-Hedging Foreign Currency Trading Risk—The Fund may engage in forward foreign currency transactions for both hedging and non-hedging purposes. The Fund’s Investment Adviser may purchase or sell foreign currencies through the use of forward contracts based on the Investment Adviser’s judgment regarding the direction of the market for a particular foreign currency or currencies. In pursuing this strategy, the Investment Adviser seeks to profit from anticipated movements in currency rates by establishing “long” and/or “short” positions in forward contracts on various foreign currencies. Foreign exchange rates can be extremely volatile and a variance in the degree of volatility of the market or in the direction of the market from the Investment Adviser’s expectations may produce significant losses to the Fund. Some of the transactions may also be subject to interest rate risk.
Non-Investment Grade Fixed Income Securities RiskNon-investment grade fixed income securities and unrated securities of comparable credit quality (commonly known as “junk bonds”) are considered speculative and are subject to the increased risk of an issuer’s inability to meet principal and interest payment obligations. These securities may be subject to greater price volatility due to such factors as specific issuer developments, interest rate sensitivity, negative perceptions of the junk bond markets generally and less liquidity.
Other Investment Companies Risk—By investing in other investment companies (including ETFs) indirectly through the Fund, investors will incur a proportionate share of the expenses of the other investment companies held by the Fund (including operating costs and investment management fees) in addition to the fees regularly borne by the Fund. In addition, the Fund will be affected by the investment policies, practices and performance of such investment companies in direct proportion to the amount of assets the Fund invests therein.
Portfolio Turnover Rate Risk—The Fund may engage in active and frequent trading of portfolio securities to achieve its principal investment strategies. A high rate of portfolio turnover involves correspondingly greater expenses which must be borne by the Fund and its shareholders.
REIT Risk— Investing in REITs involves certain unique risks in addition to those risks associated with investing in the real estate industry in general. REITs whose underlying properties are concentrated in a particular industry or geographic region are also subject to risks affecting such industries and regions. The securities of REITs involve greater risks than those associated with larger, more established companies and may be subject to more abrupt or erratic price movements because of interest rate changes, economic conditions and other factors. For example, the value of these securities may decline when interest rates rise and will also be affected by the real estate market and by the management or development of the underlying properties. The underlying
39

properties may be subject to mortgage loans, which may also be subject to the risks of default. REITs may also fail to qualify for tax free pass-through of income or may fail to maintain their exemptions from investment company registration. Securities of such issuers may lack sufficient market liquidity to enable  the Fund  to effect sales at an advantageous time or without a substantial drop in price.
Short Selling/Position Risk—Certain Funds may engage in short selling. Short selling involves leverage of the Fund’s assets and presents various risks. In order to establish a short position in a financial instrument, the Fund must first borrow the instrument from a lender, such as a broker or other institution. The Funds may not always be able to borrow an instrument at a particular time or at an acceptable price. Thus, there is risk that the Funds may be unable to implement their investment strategies due to the lack of available financial instruments or for other reasons.
The Absolute Return Tracker, Commodity Strategy and Managed Futures Strategy Funds may also enter into a short derivative position through a futures contract, an option or swap agreement. Taking short positions involves leverage of the Fund’s assets and presents various risks. If the value of the instrument or market in which the Fund has taken a short position on increases, then the Fund will incur a loss equal to the increase in value from the time that the short position was entered into plus any premium and interest paid to a third party. Taking short positions involves the risk that losses may be disproportionate and may exceed the amount invested.
After selling a borrowed financial instrument, the Fund is then obligated to “cover” the short sale by purchasing and returning the instrument to the lender on a later date. The Fund cannot guarantee that the financial instrument necessary to cover a short position will be available for purchase at the time the Fund wishes to close a short position or, if available, that the instrument will be available at an acceptable price. If the borrowed instrument has appreciated in value, the Fund will be required to pay more for the replacement instrument than the amount it received for selling the instrument short. Moreover, purchasing a financial instrument to cover a short position can itself