Subject to Completion—Dated November 9, 2023

 

The information in this Prospectus is not complete and may be changed. The Trust may not sell these securities until the registration statement filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission is effective. This Prospectus is not an offer to sell these securities and is not soliciting an offer to buy these securities in any state where the offer or sale is not permitted.

 

THEMES ETF TRUST

 

PROSPECTUS _________ __, 2023

 

 

AIRL Themes Airlines ETF CZAR Themes Natural Monopoly ETF
DENG Themes China Technology ETF KAMI Themes Renewable Energy ETF
CLOD Themes Cloud Computing ETF BOTT Themes Robotics & Automation ETF
SPAM Themes Cybersecurity ETF NODE Themes Semiconductors ETF
FINE Themes European Luxury ETF AGMI Themes Silver Miners ETF*
CROP Themes Future of Farming ETF SOLP Themes Solar Energy ETF*
WISE Themes Generative Artificial Intelligence ETF USCF Themes US Cash Flow Champions ETF
GSIB Themes Global Systemically Important Banks ETF AWEB Themes US Internet ETF
AUMI Themes Gold Miners ETF USRD Themes US R&D Champions ETF
NEWW Themes Industry 4.0 ETF SMCF Themes US Small Cap Cash Flow Champions ETF
JRMI Themes Junior Gold Miners ETF* KAZE Themes Wind Energy ETF*

 

each of the above is listed on The NASDAQ Stock Market LLC

 

* These Funds are not currently available to the public.

 

These securities have not been approved or disapproved by the Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”) nor has the SEC passed upon the accuracy or adequacy of this Prospectus. Any representation to the contrary is a criminal offense.

 

The Funds offered through this Prospectus are not money market funds and do not seek to maintain a fixed or stable NAV of $1.00 per share.

 

INVESTMENT PRODUCTS: ■ ARE NOT FDIC INSURED ■ MAY LOSE VALUE ■ ARE NOT BANK GUARANTEED

 

 

 

 

Table of Contents

 

SUMMARY SECTIONS   1
Themes Airlines ETF   1
Themes China Technology ETF   9
Themes Cloud Computing ETF   20
Themes Cybersecurity ETF   28
Themes European Luxury ETF   37
Themes Future of Farming ETF   45
Themes Generative Artificial Intelligence ETF   53
Themes Global Systemically Important Banks ETF   62
Themes Gold Miners ETF   71
Themes Industry 4.0 ETF   80
Themes Junior Gold Miners ETF   90
Themes Natural Monopoly ETF   99
Themes Renewable Energy ETF   106
Themes Robotics & Automation ETF   114
Themes Semiconductors ETF   123
Themes Silver Miners ETF   131
Themes Solar Energy ETF   140
Themes US Cash Flow Champions ETF   149
Themes US Internet ETF   155
Themes US R&D Champions ETF   161
Themes US Small Cap Cash Flow Champions ETF   167
Themes Wind Energy ETF   173
ADDITIONAL INFORMATION ABOUT THE FUNDS   182
ADDITIONAL NON-PRINCIPAL INVESTMENT STRATEGY INFORMATION   219
ADDITIONAL NON-PRINCIPAL RISK INFORMATION   219
PORTFOLIO HOLDINGS INFORMATION   219
MANAGEMENT   220
ADDITIONAL INFORMATION ON BUYING AND SELLING FUND SHARES   221
ADDITIONAL TAX INFORMATION   223
DISTRIBUTION   226
PREMIUM/DISCOUNT INFORMATION   226
FINANCIAL HIGHLIGHTS   226

 

i

 

 

SUMMARY SECTIONS

 

Themes Airlines ETF

 

 

Investment Objective

 

The Themes Airlines ETF (the “Fund”) is an exchange traded fund (“ETF”) that seeks to track the performance, before fees and expenses, of an index composed of companies that have business operations in the airlines industry.

 

Fees and Expenses of the Fund

 

The following table describes the fees and expenses you may pay if you buy, hold, and sell shares of the Fund (“Shares”). You may pay other fees, such as brokerage commissions and other fees to financial intermediaries, which are not reflected in the table and Example below.

 

Annual Fund Operating Expenses (expenses that you pay each year as a percentage of the value of your investment)  
Management Fees 0.35%
Distribution and/or Service (12b-1) Fees None
Other Expenses* 0.00%
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses 0.35%

 

* Estimated for the current fiscal year

 

Example

The following example is intended to help retail investors compare the cost of investing in the Fund with the cost of investing in other funds. It illustrates the hypothetical expenses that such investors would incur over various periods if they were to invest $10,000 in the Fund for the time periods indicated and then redeem all of the Shares at the end of those periods. This example assumes that the Fund provides a return of 5% a year and that operating expenses remain the same. Although your actual costs may be higher or lower, based on these assumptions, your costs would be:

 

1 Year

3 Years
$36 $113

 

Portfolio Turnover

The Fund pays transaction costs, such as commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or “turns over” its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover rate may indicate higher transaction costs and may result in higher taxes when Fund Shares are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are not reflected in annual fund operating expenses or in the example, affect the Fund’s performance. Because the Fund is newly organized, portfolio turnover information is not yet available.

 

Principal Investment Strategies of the Fund

 

The Fund employs a “passive management” (or indexing) investment approach designed to track the performance, before fees and expenses, of the Solactive Airlines Index (the “Index”). The Index is based on a proprietary methodology developed and maintained by Solactive AG (the “Index Provider”), which is an organization that is independent of, and unaffiliated with, the Fund and Themes Management Company, LLC, the Fund’s investment adviser (the “Adviser”).

 

The Index

 

The Index is a free float adjusted, market capitalization weighted index that is designed to provide exposure to companies that have business operations in the airlines industry. The Index is denominated in U.S. dollars. As of June 30, 2023, the Index was comprised of 30 companies with a market capitalization range of between approximately $446 million and $46 billion and a weighted average market capitalization of approximately $11.5 billion.

 

1

 

 

In constructing or adjusting the Index, the Index Provider identifies an “Index Universe” of companies that, on Selection Days (as defined below), fulfill the following requirements: 1) are a part/component of the Solactive GBS (Global Benchmark Series) Developed Markets All Cap USD Index (an index developed and maintained by the Index Provider that intends to track the performance of all small-, mid- and large-capitalization companies covering approximately the largest 100% of the free-float market capitalization in Developed Markets (as identified by the Index Provider): Australia, Austria, Belgium, Canada, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Hong Kong, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Japan, the Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Singapore, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, the United Kingdom, and the United States), and 2) are classified in the airlines industry by the Index Provider using the FactSet Revere Business Industry Classification System (“RBICS”), which includes companies that provide air transportation of passengers, both scheduled (regular routes) and non-scheduled (no regular routes) (“Airline Companies”). Only one share class of each company is eligible for inclusion in the Index Universe. The eligible share class is the share class with the higher minimum Average Daily Value Traded over 1 month and over 6 months prior to and including the Selection Day. In order to be classified in the airlines industry, RBICS requires that a company generate at least 50% of its revenue from that industry.

 

Based on the Index Universe, the initial composition of the Index, as well as any selection for an ordinary rebalance, is determined on the Selection Day by ranking all eligible securities based on their free float market capitalization in a descending order and selecting the top 30 securities for inclusion in the Index. The determination of the Index Universe and the selection of securities for inclusion in the Index (“Index Components”) is made by the Index Provider based on its proprietary methodology. “Selection Day” is 20 business days before the Rebalance Day. “Rebalance Day” is the first Wednesday in February, May, August and November.

 

On each Selection Day, each Index Component is assigned a weight according to free float market capitalization. Then, a weight cap is applied for each Index Component by re-distributing any weight which is larger than 4.5% to the other Index Components proportionally in an iterative manner. Adjustments to the Index are made on Rebalance Day. The Index Components may change over time.

 

The Fund’s Investment Strategy

 

The Fund will invest, under normal circumstances, at least 80% of its net assets, plus the amount of any borrowings for investment purposes, in securities that comprise the Index and in American Depositary Receipts (“ADRs”) and Global Depositary Receipts (“GDRs”) based on the securities in the Index. The Fund will also invest, under normal circumstances, at least 80% of its net assets, plus borrowings for investment purposes, in securities of Airline Companies and in ADRs and GDRs based on such securities. The Index may include securities of large-, mid- and small-capitalization companies. The Fund’s 80% Policies are non-fundamental and require 60 days prior written notice to shareholders before they can be changed.

 

The Fund uses a “passive” or indexing approach to try to achieve the Fund’s investment objective. Unlike many investment companies, the Fund does not try to beat the Index and does not seek temporary defensive positions when markets decline or appear overvalued. Indexing may eliminate the chance that the Fund will substantially outperform the Index but also may reduce some of the risks of active management, such as poor security selection. Indexing seeks to achieve lower costs and better after-tax performance by aiming to keep portfolio turnover low in comparison to actively managed investment companies.

 

The Fund will generally use a “replication” strategy to achieve its investment objective, meaning it will invest in all of the component securities of the Index in the same approximate proportion as in the Index. However, the Fund may utilize a representative sampling strategy with respect to the Index when a replication strategy might be detrimental or disadvantageous to shareholders, such as when there are practical difficulties or substantial costs involved in compiling a portfolio of equity securities to replicate the Index, in instances in which a security in the Index becomes temporarily illiquid, unavailable or less liquid, or as a result of legal restrictions or limitations (such as tax diversification requirements or sanctions imposed by the U.S. government) that apply to the Fund but not the Index. The Adviser expects that, over time, the correlation between the Fund’s performance and that of the Index, before fees and expenses, will be 95% or better. If the Fund uses a replication strategy, it can be expected to have greater correlation to the Index than if it uses a representative sampling strategy.

 

The Fund is considered to be non-diversified, which means that it may invest more of its assets in the securities of a single issuer or a smaller number of issuers than if it were a diversified fund. To the extent the Index is concentrated (i.e., holds 25% or more of its total assets) in a particular industry or group of industries, the Fund is expected to be concentrated in that industry or group of industries to approximately the same extent that the Index concentrates in an industry or group of industries. As of June 30, 2023, a significant portion of the Index is represented by securities of companies in the airlines industry and the transportation sector. The degree to which components of the Index represent certain sectors or industries may change over time.

The Fund may lend securities representing up to one-third of the value of the Fund’s total assets (including the value of any collateral received).

 

2

 

 

Principal Risks of Investing in the Fund

 

You can lose money on your investment in the Fund. The Fund is subject to the risks summarized below. Some or all of these risks may adversely affect the Fund’s net asset value per share (“NAV”), trading price, yield, total return and/or ability to meet its objectives. For more information about the risks of investing in the Fund, see the section in the Fund’s prospectus entitled “Additional Information about the Principal Risks of Investing in the Funds.” Each risk summarized below is considered a “principal risk” of investing in the Fund, regardless of the order in which it appears.

 

Concentration Risk. To the extent that the Index concentrates in investments related to a particular industry or group of industries, the Fund also is expected to concentrate its investments to approximately the same extent. In such event, the Fund’s performance will be particularly susceptible to adverse events impacting such industry, which may include, but are not limited to, the following: general economic conditions or cyclical market patterns that could negatively affect supply and demand; competition for resources; adverse labor relations; political or world events; obsolescence of technologies; and increased competition or new product introductions that may affect the profitability or viability of companies in a particular industry. As a result, the value of the Fund’s investments may rise and fall more than the value of shares of a fund that invests in securities of companies in a broader range of industries.

 

  ○ Airline Industry Risk. Airline Companies may be adversely affected by a downturn in economic conditions that can result in decreased demand for air travel. Airline Companies may also be significantly affected by changes in fuel prices, which may be very volatile, the imposition of tariffs, and/or changes in labor relations and insurance costs. Airline Companies may also be highly dependent on aircraft or related equipment from a small number of suppliers, and consequently, issues affecting the availability, reliability, safety, or longevity of such aircraft or equipment (e.g., the inability of a supplier to meet aircraft demand or the grounding of an aircraft due to safety concerns) may have a significant effect on the operations and profitability of Airline Companies.

 

Beginning in the first quarter of 2020, financial markets in the United States and around the world experienced extreme and in many cases unprecedented volatility and severe losses due to the global pandemic caused by COVID-19, a novel coronavirus. The pandemic has resulted in a wide range of social and economic disruptions, including closed borders and reduced or prohibited domestic or international travel. Some sectors of the economy and individual issuers, including Airline Companies, have experienced particularly large losses. Such disruptions may continue for an extended period of time or reoccur in the future to a similar or greater extent.

 

In addition, the Russian invasion of Ukraine and the resulting sanctions by Western countries on Russia, as well as retaliatory measures by Russia, may have a significant impact on Airline Companies. Bans on oil and energy imports from Russia by certain Western countries may increase the costs of jet fuel. In addition, certain Western nations have closed their airspace to all Russian aircraft, issued a recall of leased Russian aircraft and/or seized aircraft on leased aircraft located in Western airports. In response, Russia has closed its airspace to certain Western aircraft and Russia has seized certain leased aircraft located in Russia. These actions may lead to higher ticket prices, flight cancellations, longer routes, fewer diversion airports, a decreased demand for travel, and the permanent loss of property for Western companies. These and any related events could significantly and adversely affect the Fund’s performance and the value of an investment in the Fund.

 

Calculation Methodology Risk. The Index Provider relies directly or indirectly on various sources of information to assess the criteria of issuers included in the Index, including information that may be based on assumptions and estimates. Neither the Fund, the Index Provider, or the Adviser can offer assurances that the Index’s calculation methodology or sources of information will provide an accurate assessment of included issuers or a correct valuation of securities, nor can they guarantee the availability or timeliness of the production of the Index.

 

Currency Risk. The Fund may invest in securities denominated in foreign currencies. Because the Fund’s NAV is determined in U.S. dollars, the Fund’s NAV could decline if currencies of the underlying securities depreciate against the U.S. dollar or if there are delays or limits on repatriation of such currencies. Currency exchange rates can be very volatile and can change quickly and unpredictably. As a result, the Fund’s NAV may change quickly and without warning, which could have a significant negative impact on the Fund.

 

3

 

 

Depositary Receipts Risk. The Fund may invest in depositary receipts (e.g., ADRs and GDRs) which involve similar risks to those associated with investments in foreign securities. Investments in depositary receipts may be less liquid than the underlying shares in their primary trading market and, if not included in the Index, may negatively affect the Fund’s ability to replicate the performance of the Index. The issuers of depositary receipts may discontinue issuing new depositary receipts and withdraw existing depositary receipts at any time, which may result in costs and delays in the distribution of the underlying assets to the Fund and may negatively impact the Fund’s performance and the Fund’s ability to replicate/track the performance of its Index.

 

Equity Market Risk. The equity securities held in the Fund’s portfolio may experience sudden, unpredictable drops in value or long periods of decline in value. This may occur because of factors that affect securities markets generally or factors affecting specific industries, sectors or companies in which the Fund invests. Common stocks are susceptible to general stock market fluctuations and to volatile increases and decreases in value as market confidence in and perceptions of their issuers change. The Fund’s NAV and market price may fluctuate significantly in response to these and other factors. As a result, an investor could lose money over short or long periods of time.

 

ETF Risks. The Fund is an ETF and, as a result of an ETF’s structure, is exposed to the following risks:

 

Authorized Participants (“APs”), Market Makers, and Liquidity Providers Concentration Risk. The Fund has a limited number of financial institutions that may act as APs. In addition, there may be a limited number of market makers and/or liquidity providers in the marketplace. To the extent either of the following events occur, shares of the Fund may trade at a material discount to NAV and possibly face delisting: (i) APs exit the business or otherwise become unable to process creation and/or redemption orders and no other APs step forward to perform these services, or (ii) market makers and/or liquidity providers exit the business or significantly reduce their business activities and no other entities step forward to perform their functions.

 

Costs of Buying or Selling Shares of the Fund. Due to the costs of buying or selling shares of the Fund, including brokerage commissions imposed by brokers and bid/ask spreads, frequent trading of shares of the Fund may significantly reduce investment results and an investment in shares of the Fund may not be advisable for investors who anticipate regularly making small investments.

 

Shares of the Fund May Trade at Prices Other Than NAV. As with all ETFs, shares of the Fund may be bought and sold in the secondary market at market prices. The price of shares of the Fund, like the price of all traded securities, will be subject to factors such as supply and demand, as well as the current value of the Fund’s portfolio holdings. Although it is expected that the market price of the shares of the Fund will approximate the Fund’s NAV, there may be times when the market price of the shares is more than the NAV intra-day (premium) or less than the NAV intra-day (discount). This risk is heightened in times of market volatility, periods of steep market declines, and periods when there is limited trading activity for shares in the secondary market, in which case such premiums or discounts may be significant.

 

  ○ Trading. Although shares of the Fund are listed for trading on a national securities exchange, such as The NASDAQ Stock Market LLC (the “Exchange”), and may be traded on U.S. exchanges other than the Exchange, there can be no assurance that shares of the Fund will trade with any volume, or at all, on any stock exchange. In stressed market conditions, the liquidity of shares of the Fund may begin to mirror the liquidity of the Fund’s underlying portfolio holdings, which can be significantly less liquid than shares of the Fund, and this could lead to differences between the market price of the shares of the Fund and the underlying value of those shares.

 

Foreign Securities Risk. The Fund’s investments in foreign securities can be riskier than U.S. securities investments. Investments in the securities of foreign issuers (including investments in ADRs and GDRs) are subject to the risks associated with investing in those foreign markets, such as heightened risks of inflation or nationalization. The prices of foreign securities and the prices of U.S. securities have, at times, moved in opposite directions. In addition, securities of foreign issuers may lose value due to political, economic and geographic events affecting a foreign issuer or market. During periods of social, political or economic instability in a country or region, the value of a foreign security traded on U.S. exchanges could be affected by, among other things, increasing price volatility, illiquidity, or the closure of the primary market on which the security (or the security underlying the ADR or GDR) is traded. You may lose money due to political, economic and geographic events affecting a foreign issuer or market.

 

4

 

 

Geographic Risk. A natural, biological or other disaster could occur in a geographic region in which the Fund invests, which could affect the economy or particular business operations of companies in the specific geographic region, causing an adverse impact on the Fund’s investments in the affected region or in a region economically tied to the affected region. The securities in which the Fund invests and, consequently, the Fund are also subject to specific risks as a result of their business operations, including, but not limited to:

 

Risk of Investing in Developed Markets. The Fund’s investment in a developed country issuer may subject the Fund to regulatory, political, currency, security, economic and other risks associated with developed countries. Developed countries tend to represent a significant portion of the global economy and have generally experienced slower economic growth than some less developed countries. Certain developed countries have experienced security concerns, such as terrorism and strained international relations. Incidents involving a country’s or region’s security may cause uncertainty in its markets and may adversely affect its economy and the Fund’s investments. In addition, developed countries may be impacted by changes to the economic conditions of certain key trading partners, regulatory burdens, debt burdens and the price or availability of certain commodities.

 

Tracking Risk. The Fund’s return may not track the return of the Index for a number of reasons. For example, the Fund incurs a number of operating expenses not applicable to the Index, and incurs costs in buying and selling securities, especially when rebalancing the Fund’s securities holdings to reflect changes in the composition of the Index. In addition, when the Fund uses a representative sampling approach, the Fund may not be as well correlated with the return of the Index as when the Fund purchases all of the securities in the Index in the proportions in which they are represented in the Index.

 

International Closed Market Trading Risk. To the extent that the underlying investments held by the Fund trade on foreign exchanges that may be closed when the securities exchange on which the Fund’s Shares trade is open, there are likely to be deviations between the current price of such an underlying security and the last quoted price for the underlying security (i.e., the Fund’s quote from the closed foreign market). These deviations could result in premiums or discounts to the Fund’s NAV that may be greater than those experienced by other ETFs.

 

Large-Capitalization Investing Risk. The Fund’s performance may be adversely affected if securities of large-capitalization companies underperform securities of smaller-capitalization companies or the market as a whole. The securities of large-capitalization companies may be relatively mature compared to smaller companies and therefore subject to slower growth during times of economic expansion.

 

Liquidity Risk. The Fund’s investments are subject to liquidity risk, which exists when an investment is or becomes difficult or impossible to purchase or sell at an advantageous time and price. If a transaction is particularly large or if the relevant market is or becomes illiquid, it may not be possible to initiate a transaction or liquidate a position, which may cause the Fund to suffer significant losses and difficulties in meeting redemptions. Liquidity risk may be the result of, among other things, market turmoil, the reduced number and capacity of traditional market participants, or the lack of an active trading market. Markets for securities or financial instruments could be disrupted by a number of events, including, but not limited to, an economic crisis, natural disasters, new legislation or regulatory changes inside or outside the U.S. liquid investments may become less liquid after being purchased by the Fund, particularly during periods of market stress. In addition, if a number of securities held by the Fund stop trading, it may have a cascading effect and cause the Fund to halt trading. Volatility in market prices will increase the risk of the Fund being subject to a trading halt. Certain countries in which the Fund may invest may be subject to extended settlement delays and/or foreign holidays, during which the Fund will unlikely be able to convert holdings to cash.

 

Mid-Capitalization Companies Risk. Mid-capitalization companies may have greater price volatility, lower trading volume and less liquidity than large-capitalization companies. In addition, mid-capitalization companies may have smaller revenues, narrower product lines, less management depth and experience, smaller shares of their product or service markets, fewer financial resources and less competitive strength than large-capitalization companies.

 

New Adviser Risk. Although the Adviser’s principals and the Fund’s portfolio managers have experience managing investments in the past, the Adviser is a newly-formed entity and has no experience managing investments for an ETF, which may limit the Adviser’s effectiveness.

 

5

 

 

New Fund Risk. The Fund is new with no operating history. As a result, there can be no assurance that the Fund will grow to or maintain an economically viable size, in which case it may experience greater tracking error to its Index than it otherwise would at higher asset levels, or it could ultimately liquidate. The Fund’s distributor does not maintain a secondary market in Fund shares.

 

Non-Diversification Risk. Although the Fund intends to invest in a variety of securities and instruments, the Fund is considered to be non-diversified, which means that it may invest more of its assets in the securities of a single issuer or a smaller number of issuers than if it were a diversified fund. As a result, the Fund may be more exposed to the risks associated with and developments affecting an individual issuer or a smaller number of issuers than a fund that invests more widely. This may increase the Fund’s volatility and cause the performance of a relatively smaller number of issuers to have a greater impact on the Fund’s performance.

 

Operational Risk. The Fund is exposed to operational risks arising from a number of factors, including, but not limited to, human error, processing and communication errors, errors of the Fund’s service providers, counterparties or other third parties, failed or inadequate processes and technology or systems failures. The Fund and the Adviser seek to reduce these operational risks through controls and procedures. However, these measures do not address every possible risk and may be inadequate to address significant operational risks.

 

Cybersecurity Risk. Failures or breaches of the electronic systems of the Fund and/or the Fund’s service providers, including the Adviser, Index Provider, market makers, Authorized Participants or the issuers of securities in which the Fund invests, have the ability to cause disruptions, negatively impact the Fund’s business operations and/or potentially result in financial losses to the Fund and its shareholders. While the Fund has established business continuity plans and risk management systems seeking to address system breaches or failures, there are inherent limitations in such plans and systems. Furthermore, the Fund cannot control the cybersecurity plans and systems of the Fund’s Index Provider, Adviser, other service providers, market makers, Authorized Participants or issuers of securities in which the Fund invests.

 

Passive Investment Risk. The Fund is not actively managed and the Adviser would not sell a security due to current or projected underperformance of a security, industry or sector, unless that security is removed from the Index or the selling of shares of that security is otherwise required upon a reconstitution of the Index in accordance with the Index methodology. The Fund invests in securities included in the Index, regardless of their investment merits. The Fund does not take defensive positions under any market conditions, including conditions that are adverse to the performance of the Fund.

 

Sector Risk. To the extent the Fund invests more heavily in particular sectors of the economy, its performance will be especially sensitive to developments that significantly affect those sectors.

 

Transportation Sector Risk. Companies in the transportation sector may be adversely affected by changes in the economy, increases in fuel and operating costs, labor relations, technology developments, exchange rates, insurance costs, industry competition and government regulation. Global or regional events and conditions may materially disrupt or indefinitely impair the operations, financial condition and liquidity of companies in the transportation industry. Securities of companies in the transportation sector are generally cyclical and occasionally subject to sharp price movements.

 

Securities Lending Risk. To the extent the Fund lends its securities, it may be subject to the following risks: (1) the securities in which the collateral is invested may not perform sufficiently to cover the applicable rebate rates paid to borrowers and related administrative costs; (2) delays may occur in the recovery of securities from borrowers, which could interfere with the Fund’s ability to vote proxies or to settle transactions; and (3) although borrowers of the Fund’s securities typically provide collateral in the form of cash that is reinvested in securities, there is the risk of possible loss of rights in the collateral should the borrower fail financially.

 

Small-Capitalization Companies Risk. Compared to mid- and large-capitalization companies, small-capitalization companies may be less stable and more susceptible to adverse developments, and their securities may be more volatile and less liquid.

 

6

 

 

Thematic Investing Risk. The Fund relies on the Index Provider for the identification of securities for inclusion in the Index that reflect themes and sub-themes, and its performance may suffer if such securities are not correctly identified or if a theme or sub-theme develops in an unexpected manner. Performance may also suffer if the stocks included in the Index do not benefit from the development of such themes or sub-themes. Performance may also be impacted by the inclusion of non-theme relevant exposures in the Index. There is no guarantee that the Index will reflect the theme and sub-theme exposures intended.

 

Valuation Risk. Independent market quotations for certain investments held by the Fund may not be readily available, and such investments may be fair valued or valued by a pricing service at an evaluated price. These valuations involve subjectivity and different market participants may assign different prices to the same investment. As a result, there is a risk that the Fund may not be able to sell an investment at the price assigned to the investment by the Fund. In addition, the securities in which the Fund invests may trade on days that the Fund does not price its shares; as a result, the value of Fund shares may change on days when investors cannot purchase or sell their Fund holdings.

 

Fund Performance

 

Performance information for the Fund is not included because the Fund did not commence operations prior to the date of this Prospectus. In the future, performance for the Fund will be presented in this section. Updated performance information will be available on the Fund’s website at www.ThemesETFs.com or by calling the Fund toll-free at _________.

 

Management

 

Investment Adviser

 

Themes Management Company, LLC (the “Adviser”) serves as investment adviser to the Fund.

 

Portfolio Managers

 

Dingxun (Kevin) Shao, Vice President, Product Management & Development of the Adviser, and Calvin Tsang, CFA, Head of Product Management & Development of the Adviser, are jointly and primarily responsible for the day-to-day management of the Fund and have served as portfolio managers since the Fund’s inception.

 

Buying and Selling Fund Shares

 

The Fund is an ETF. This means that individual Shares of the Fund may only be purchased and sold in the secondary market through brokers at market prices, rather than NAV. Because Shares trade at market prices rather than NAV, Shares may trade at a price greater than NAV (premium) or less than NAV (discount).

 

The Fund generally issues and redeems shares at NAV only in large blocks of shares known as “Creation Units,” which only institutions or large investors may purchase or redeem. The Fund generally issues and redeems Creation Units in exchange for a portfolio of securities (the “Deposit Securities”) and/or a designated amount of U.S. cash that the Fund specifies each day.

 

Investors may incur costs attributable to the difference between the highest price a buyer is willing to pay to purchase Shares (bid) and the lowest price a seller is willing to accept for Shares (ask) when buying or selling Shares in the secondary market (the “bid-ask spread”). Recent information about the Fund, including its net asset value, market price, premiums and discounts, and bid-ask spreads is available on the Fund’s website at www.ThemesETFs.com.

 

7

 

 

Tax Information

 

Fund distributions are generally taxable as ordinary income, qualified dividend income, or capital gains (or a combination), unless your investment is in an IRA or other tax-advantaged retirement account. Distributions may be taxable upon withdrawal from tax-deferred accounts.

 

Payments to Broker-Dealers and Other Financial Intermediaries

 

If you purchase the Fund through a broker or other financial intermediary (such as a bank), the Adviser and its related companies may pay the intermediary for activities related to the marketing and promotion of the Fund. These payments may create a conflict of interest by influencing the broker-dealer or other intermediary and your sales person to recommend the Fund over another investment. Ask your sales person or visit your financial intermediary’s website for more information.

 

8

 

 

Themes China Technology ETF

 

 

Investment Objective

 

The Themes China Technology ETF (the “Fund”) is an exchange traded fund (“ETF”) that seeks to track the performance, before fees and expenses, of an index composed of the largest Chinese technology-driven companies.

 

Fees and Expenses of the Fund

 

The following table describes the fees and expenses you may pay if you buy, hold, and sell shares of the Fund (“Shares”). You may pay other fees, such as brokerage commissions and other fees to financial intermediaries, which are not reflected in the table and Example below.

 

Annual Fund Operating Expenses (expenses that you pay each year as a percentage of the value of your investment)  
Management Fees 0.45%
Distribution and/or Service (12b-1) Fees None
Other Expenses* 0.00%
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses 0.45%

 

* Estimated for the current fiscal year

 

Example

The following example is intended to help retail investors compare the cost of investing in the Fund with the cost of investing in other funds. It illustrates the hypothetical expenses that such investors would incur over various periods if they were to invest $10,000 in the Fund for the time periods indicated and then redeem all of the Shares at the end of those periods. This example assumes that the Fund provides a return of 5% a year and that operating expenses remain the same. Although your actual costs may be higher or lower, based on these assumptions, your costs would be:

 

1 Year

3 Years
$46 $144

 

Portfolio Turnover

The Fund pays transaction costs, such as commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or “turns over” its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover rate may indicate higher transaction costs and may result in higher taxes when Fund Shares are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are not reflected in annual fund operating expenses or in the example, affect the Fund’s performance. Because the Fund is newly organized, portfolio turnover information is not yet available.

 

Principal Investment Strategies of the Fund

 

The Fund employs a “passive management” (or indexing) investment approach designed to track the performance, before fees and expenses, of the Solactive China Technology Index, or any successor thereto (the “Index”). The Index is based on a proprietary methodology developed and maintained by Solactive AG (the “Index Provider”), which is an organization that is independent of, and unaffiliated with, the Fund and Themes Management Company, LLC, the Fund’s investment adviser (the “Adviser”).

 

The Index

 

The Index is a free float adjusted, market capitalization weighted index that intends to track the performance of the 100 largest Chinese technology-driven companies which derive the majority of their revenues from innovative business activities, including cloud computing, medical technologies, future mobility, and digital entertainment. The Index is denominated in U.S. dollars. As of June 30, 2023, the Index was comprised of 100 companies with a market capitalization range of between approximately $673 million and $405 billion and a weighted average market capitalization of approximately $86.6 billion.

 

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In constructing or adjusting the Index, the Index Provider identifies an “Index Universe” of companies that, on Selection Days (as defined below), fulfill the following requirements: 1) are a part/component of the Solactive GBS (Global Benchmark Series) China All Cap USD Index (an index developed and maintained by the Index Provider that intends to track the performance of all small-, mid- and large-capitalization companies covering approximately the largest 100% of the free-float market capitalization in the Chinese market), and 2) are headquartered or incorporated in China. Based on the Index Universe, the initial composition of the Index as well as any selection for an ordinary rebalance is determined on the Selection Day in accordance with the following rules: Companies must fit in the Technology, Healthcare Innovation, Blockchain, Cloud Computing, Cyber Security, Future Cars, Genomics, Robotics & Automation, Social Media, or Digital Entertainment index categories based on their FactSet or FactSet Revere Business Industry Classification System (“RBICS”) Classification (“Chinese Technology Companies”). All eligible securities are ranked based on their free float market capitalization in a descending order and the top 100 securities by free float market capitalization are selected for inclusion in the Index (an “Index Component”). Securities subject to sanctions or ownership restrictions by the U.S. or Chinese governments are excluded from the Index Universe by the Index Provider and Index Components that become subject to any such restrictions are removed by the Index Provider from the Index. The determination of the Index Universe and the selection of Index Components is made by the Index Provider based on its proprietary methodology. “Selection Day” is 20 business days before the Rebalance Day. “Rebalance Day” is the first Wednesday in February, May, August and November.

 

On each Selection Day, each Index Component is assigned a weight according to free float market capitalization. The weight of individual securities is capped at 10%. Any excess weight is redistributed to the other Index Components that have a weight of less than 10%. This allocation is performed pro-rata based on the free float market capitalization. This is an iterative process until the maximum individual weight of all Index Components is 10%. The cap represents a general guideline set by the Index Provider and, at times, the Fund may hold positions that exceed the cap based on market activity and/or timing of Index selection/rebalancing. Adjustments to the Index are made on Rebalance Day.

 

The Fund’s Investment Strategy

 

The Fund will invest, under normal circumstances, at least 80% of its net assets, plus the amount of any borrowings for investment purposes, in securities that comprise the Index and in American Depositary Receipts(“ADRs”) and Global Depositary Receipts (“GDRs”) based on the securities in the Index. The Fund will also invest, under normal circumstances, at least 80% of its net assets, plus borrowings for investment purposes, in securities of Chinese Technology Companies and in ADRs and GDRs based on such securities. Such securities may include those of large-, mid- and small-capitalization companies. The Fund’s 80% Policies are non-fundamental and require 60 days prior written notice to shareholders before each can be changed.

 

The following China-related securities may be included in the Index and/or represent investments of the Fund:

 

China A-Shares, which are shares of companies incorporated in mainland China that are traded on the Chinese exchanges and denominated in domestic renminbi. China A-Shares are primarily purchased and sold in the domestic Chinese market. To the extent the Fund invests in China A-Shares, it expects to do so through the trading and clearing facilities of a participating exchange located outside of mainland China (“Stock Connect Programs”). A Renminbi Qualified Foreign Institutional Investor (“RQFII”) or Qualified Foreign Institutional Investor (“QFII”) license may also be acquired to invest directly in China A-Shares.

 

China B-Shares, which are shares of companies listed on the Shanghai or Shenzhen Stock Exchange but quoted and traded in foreign currencies (such as Hong Kong Dollars or U.S. Dollars), which were primarily created for trading by foreign investors.

 

China H-Shares, which are shares of companies incorporated in mainland China and listed on the Hong Kong Stock Exchange (“H-Shares”), where they are traded in Hong Kong dollars and may be traded by foreign investors.

 

China N-Shares, which are shares of companies with business operations in mainland China and listed on an American stock exchange, such as NYSE or NASDAQ (“N-Shares”).

 

P-Chips, which are shares of private sector companies with a majority of their business operations in mainland China and controlling private Chinese shareholders, which are incorporated outside of mainland China and traded on the Hong Kong Stock Exchange in Hong Kong dollars.

 

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Red Chips, which are shares of companies with a majority of their business operations in mainland China and controlled by the central, provincial or municipal governments of China, whose shares are traded on the Hong Kong Stock Exchange in Hong Kong dollars.

 

S-Chips, which are shares of companies with business operations in mainland China and listed on the Singapore Exchange. S-Chip shares are issued by companies incorporated anywhere, but many are registered in Singapore, the British Virgin Islands, the Cayman Islands, or Bermuda.

 

The Fund will generally use a “replication” strategy to achieve its investment objective, meaning it will invest in all of the component securities of the Index in the same approximate proportion as in the Index. However, the Fund may utilize a representative sampling strategy with respect to the Index when a replication strategy might be detrimental or disadvantageous to shareholders, such as when there are practical difficulties or substantial costs involved in compiling a portfolio of equity securities to replicate the Index, in instances in which a security in the Index becomes temporarily illiquid, unavailable or less liquid, or as a result of legal restrictions imposed by the U.S. or Chinese government (such as tax diversification requirements or sanctions) that apply to the Fund but not the Index. Securities subject to ownership restrictions by the U.S. or Chinese governments are excluded from the Index Universe by the Index Provider and Index Components that become subject to any such restrictions are removed by the Index Provider from the Index. The Adviser expects that, over time, the correlation between the Fund’s performance and that of the Index, before fees and expenses, will be 95% or better. If the Fund uses a replication strategy, it can be expected to have greater correlation to the Index than if it uses a representative sampling strategy.

 

The Fund is considered to be non-diversified, which means that it may invest more of its assets in the securities of a single issuer or a smaller number of issuers than if it were a diversified fund. To the extent the Index is concentrated (i.e., holds 25% or more of its total assets) in a particular industry or group of industries, the Fund is expected to be concentrated in that industry or group of industries to approximately the same extent that the Index concentrates in an industry or group of industries. As of June 30, 2023, issuers in the internet industry and communications and information technology sectors represented a significant portion of the Index. The degree to which components of the Index represent certain sectors or industries may change over time.

 

The Fund may lend securities representing up to one-third of the value of the Fund’s total assets (including the value of any collateral received).

 

Principal Risks of Investing in the Fund

 

You can lose money on your investment in the Fund. The Fund is subject to the risks summarized below. Some or all of these risks may adversely affect the Fund’s net asset value per share (“NAV”), trading price, yield, total return and/or ability to meet its objectives. For more information about the risks of investing in the Fund, see the section in the Fund’s prospectus entitled “Additional Information about the Principal Risks of Investing in the Funds.” Each risk summarized below is considered a “principal risk” of investing in the Fund, regardless of the order in which it appears.

 

Risk of Investing in China. The Chinese economy is generally considered an emerging market and can be significantly affected by economic and political conditions in China and surrounding Asian countries and may demonstrate significantly higher volatility from time to time in comparison to developed markets. China may be subject to considerable degrees of economic, political and social instability. Over the last few decades, the Chinese government has undertaken reform of economic and market practices and has expanded the sphere of private ownership of property in China. However, Chinese markets generally continue to experience inefficiency, volatility and pricing anomalies resulting from governmental influence, a lack of publicly available information and/or political and social instability. Chinese companies are also subject to the risk that Chinese authorities can intervene in their operations and structure. In addition, the Chinese economy is export-driven and highly reliant on trading with key partners. A downturn in the economies of China’s primary trading partners could slow or eliminate the growth of the Chinese economy and adversely impact the Fund’s investments. The Chinese government strictly regulates the payment of foreign currency denominated obligations and sets monetary policy. The Chinese government may introduce new laws and regulations that could have an adverse effect on the Fund. Although China has begun the process of privatizing certain sectors of its economy, privatized entities may lose money and/or be re-nationalized.

 

In the Chinese securities markets, a small number of issuers may represent a large portion of the entire market. The Chinese securities markets are subject to more frequent trading halts, low trading volume and price volatility. In recent years, Chinese entities have incurred significant levels of debt and Chinese financial institutions currently hold relatively large amounts of non-performing debt. Thus, there exists a possibility that widespread defaults could occur, which could trigger a financial crisis, freeze Chinese debt and finance markets and make Chinese securities illiquid.

 

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In addition, trade relations between the U.S. and China have recently been strained. Worsening trade relations between the two countries could adversely impact the Fund, particularly to the extent that the Chinese government restricts foreign investments in Chinese companies or the U.S. government restricts investments by U.S. investors in China. There may be companies included in the Index that have at times been, and may in the future be, subject to such restrictions. These recent developments have heightened concerns of increased tariffs and restrictions on trade between the two countries. An increase in tariffs or trade restrictions, or even the threat of such developments, could lead to a significant reduction in international trade, which could have a negative impact on China’s export industry and a commensurately negative impact on the Fund. Market volatility and volatility in the price of Fund shares may also result.

 

Disclosure and regulatory standards in emerging market countries, such as China, are in many respects less stringent than U.S. standards. There is substantially less publicly available information about Chinese issuers than there is about U.S. issuers. Chinese companies, including Chinese companies that are listed on U.S. exchanges, are not subject to the same degree of accounting standards or auditor oversight as companies in more developed countries. As a result, information about the Chinese securities in which the Fund invests may be less reliable or complete. Chinese companies with securities listed on U.S. exchanges may be delisted if they do not meet U.S. accounting standards and auditor oversight requirements, such as those mandated by the Holding Foreign Companies Accountable Act (HFCAA), which would significantly decrease the liquidity and value of the securities. In addition, there may be significant obstacles to obtaining information necessary for investigations into or litigation against Chinese companies, and shareholders may have limited legal remedies. The Fund is not actively managed and does not select investments based on investor protection considerations.

 

Risk of Investments in A-Shares. Investments by foreign investors in A-Shares are subject to various restrictions, regulations and limits. Investments in A-Shares are heavily regulated and the recoupment and repatriation of assets invested in A-Shares is subject to restrictions by the Chinese government.

 

The Chinese government may intervene in the A-Shares market and halt or suspend trading of A-Share securities for short or even extended periods of time. Recently, the A-Shares market has experienced considerable volatility and been subject to frequent and extensive trading halts and suspensions. These trading halts and suspensions have, among other things, contributed to uncertainty in the markets and reduced the liquidity of the securities subject to such trading halts and suspensions. This could cause volatility in the Fund’s share price and subject the Fund to a greater risk of trading halts.

 

A-Shares Tax Risk. The Fund’s investments in A-Shares will be subject to a number of taxes and tax regulations in China. The application of many of these tax regulations is at present uncertain. Moreover, China has implemented a number of tax reforms in recent years, including the value added tax reform, and may continue to amend or revise existing Chinese tax laws in the future. Changes in applicable Chinese tax law, particularly taxation on a retrospective basis, could reduce the after-tax profits of the Fund directly or indirectly by reducing the after-tax profits of the companies in China in which the Fund invests. Uncertainties in the Chinese tax rules governing taxation of income and gains from investments in A-Shares could result in unexpected tax liabilities for the Fund. The Fund’s investments in securities issued by Chinese companies, including A-Shares, may cause the Fund to become subject to withholding income tax and other taxes imposed by China. The Chinese taxation rules are evolving, may change, and new rules may be applied retroactively. Any such changes could have an adverse impact on Fund performance.

 

Stock Connect Programs Risk. The Stock Connect Programs are subject to daily quota limitations, and an investor cannot purchase and sell the same security on the same trading day, which may restrict the Fund’s ability to invest in A-Shares through the Programs and to enter into or exit trades on a timely basis. The Shanghai and Shenzhen markets may be open at a time when the participating exchanges located outside of mainland China are not active, with the result that prices of A-Shares may fluctuate at times when the Fund is unable to add to or exit its positions. Only certain China A-Shares are eligible to be accessed through the Stock Connect Programs. Such securities may lose their eligibility at any time, in which case they could be sold but could no longer be purchased through the Stock Connect Programs. Because the Stock Connect Programs are still evolving, the actual effect on the market for trading A-Shares with the introduction of large numbers of foreign investors is still relatively unknown. Further, regulations or restrictions, such as limitations on redemptions or suspension of trading, may adversely impact the program. There is no guarantee that the participating exchanges will continue to support the Stock Connect Programs in the future.

 

Investments in China A-Shares may not be covered by the securities investor protection programs of either the Shanghai or Shenzhen Stock Exchange and, without the protection of such programs, will be subject to the risk of default by the broker. Because of the way in which China A-Shares are held in the Stock Connect Programs, the Fund may not be able to exercise the rights of a shareholder and may be limited in its ability to pursue claims against the issuer of a security, and may suffer losses in the event the depository of the Chinese exchange becomes insolvent.

 

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B-Shares Risk. The China B-Share market is generally smaller, less liquid and has a smaller issuer base than the China A-Share market. The issuers that compose the B-Share market include a broad range of companies, including companies with large, medium and small capitalizations. Further, the B-Shares market may behave very differently from other portions of the Chinese equity markets, and there may be little to no correlation between the performance of the two.

 

H-Shares Risk. H-Shares are foreign securities which, in addition to the Foreign Securities Risk described below, are subject to the risk that the Hong Kong stock market may behave very differently from the mainland Chinese stock market. There may be little to no correlation between the performance of the Hong Kong stock market and the mainland Chinese stock market.

 

N-Shares Risk. Because companies issuing N-Shares have business operations in China, they are subject to certain political and economic risks in China. The American stock market may behave very differently from the mainland Chinese stock market, and there may be little to no correlation between the performance of the two.

 

P-Chip Companies Risk. Because P-Chip companies are traded on the Hong Kong Stock Exchange, P-Chips are subject to risks similar to those associated with investments in H Shares. They are also subject to risks affecting their jurisdiction of incorporation, including any legal or tax changes.

 

Red Chip Companies Risk. Because Red Chip shares are traded in Hong Kong dollars on the Hong Kong Stock Exchange and are subject to risks similar to those of H-Shares. Red Chip companies are controlled by various Chinese governmental authorities and investing in Red Chips involves risks that political changes, social instability, regulatory uncertainty, adverse diplomatic developments, asset expropriation or nationalization, or confiscatory taxation could adversely affect the performance of Red Chip companies. Red Chip companies may be less efficiently run and less profitable than other companies.

 

S-Chip Companies Risk. S-Chip companies are subject to risks affecting their jurisdiction of incorporation, including any legal or tax changes. S-Chip companies may or may not be owned at least in part by a Chinese central, provincial or municipal government and be subject to the types of risks that come with such ownership described herein. There may be little or no correlation between the performance of the Singapore stock market and the mainland Chinese stock market.

 

Special Risk Considerations of Investing in China. For purposes of raising capital offshore on exchanges outside of China, including on U.S. exchanges, many Chinese-based operating companies are structured as Variable Interest Entities (“VIEs”). In this structure, the Chinese-based operating company is the VIE and establishes an entity, which is typically offshore in a foreign jurisdiction, such as the Cayman Islands. The offshore entity lists on a foreign exchange and enters into contractual arrangements with the VIE. This structure allows Chinese companies in which the government restricts foreign ownership to raise capital from foreign investors. While the offshore entity has no equity ownership of the VIE, these contractual arrangements permit the offshore entity to consolidate the VIE’s financial statements with its own for accounting purposes and provide for economic exposure to the performance of the underlying Chinese operating company. Therefore, an investor in the listed offshore entity, such as the Fund, will have exposure to the Chinese-based operating company only through contractual arrangements and has no ownership in the Chinese-based operating company. Furthermore, because the offshore entity only has specific rights provided for in these service agreements with the VIE, its abilities to control the activities at the Chinese-based operating company are limited and the operating company may engage in activities that negatively impact investment value.

 

While the VIE structure has been widely adopted, it is not formally recognized under Chinese law and therefore there is a risk that the Chinese government could prohibit the existence of such structures or negatively impact the VIE’s contractual arrangements with the listed offshore entity by making them invalid. If these contracts were found to be unenforceable under Chinese law, investors in the listed offshore entity, such as the Fund, may suffer significant losses with little or no recourse available. If the Chinese government determines that the agreements establishing the VIE structures do not comply with Chinese law and regulations, including those related to restrictions on foreign ownership, it could subject a Chinese-based issuer to penalties, revocation of business and operating licenses, or forfeiture of ownership interest.

 

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Hong Kong Risk. The economy of Hong Kong has few natural resources and any fluctuation or shortage in the commodity markets could have a significant adverse effect on the Hong Kong economy. Hong Kong is also heavily dependent on international trade and finance. Additionally, the continuation and success of the current political, economic, legal and social policies of Hong Kong is dependent on and subject to the control of the Chinese government. China may change its policies regarding Hong Kong at any time. Any such change may adversely affect market conditions and the performance of Chinese and Hong Kong issuers and, thus, the value of securities in the Fund’s portfolio.

 

Calculation Methodology Risk. The Index relies directly or indirectly on various sources of information to assess the criteria of issuers included in the Index, including information that may be based on assumptions and estimates. Neither the Fund, the Index Provider, or the Adviser can offer assurances that the Index’s calculation methodology or sources of information will provide an accurate assessment of included issuers or a correct valuation of securities, nor can they guarantee the availability or timeliness of the production of the Index. In the Chinese equity market, free float market capitalization is significantly lower than total market capitalization. This lower float ratio is primarily due to widespread government ownership. As a result, certain well-known Chinese technology companies may be excluded from or have lower weights in the Index as a result of the inclusion of only the top 100 securities by free float market capitalization in the Index.

 

Geographic Risk. The Fund’s investments are expected to be focused in a particular country, countries, or region to the same extent as the Index and therefore the Fund may be susceptible to adverse market, political, regulatory, and geographic events affecting that country, countries or region. Such geographic focus also may subject the Fund to a higher degree of volatility than a more geographically diversified fund.

 

Concentration Risk. To the extent that the Index concentrates in investments related to a particular industry or group of industries, the Fund also is expected to concentrate its investments to approximately the same extent. In such event, the Fund’s performance will be particularly susceptible to adverse events impacting such industry, which may include, but are not limited to, the following: general economic conditions or cyclical market patterns that could negatively affect supply and demand; competition for resources; adverse labor relations; political or world events; obsolescence of technologies; and increased competition or new product introductions that may affect the profitability or viability of companies in a particular industry. As a result, the value of the Fund’s investments may rise and fall more than the value of shares of a fund that invests in securities of companies in a broader range of industries.

 

Internet Industry Risk. Internet companies are subject to rapid changes in technology, worldwide competition, rapid obsolescence of products and services, loss of patent protections, cyclical market patterns, evolving industry standards and frequent new product introductions. Competitive pressures, such as technological developments, fixed-rate pricing and the ability to attract and retain skilled employees, can significantly affect internet companies, and changing domestic and international demand, research and development costs, availability and price components and product obsolescence also can affect their profitability. Certain companies in the internet industry provide retail services primarily on the internet, through mail order and TV home shopping retailers, and rely heavily on consumer spending. Prices of securities of companies in this industry may fluctuate widely due to general economic conditions, consumer spending and the availability of disposable income, changing consumer tastes and preferences and consumer demographics. Legislative or regulatory changes and increased government supervision also may affect companies in this industry.

 

Currency Risk. The Fund’s assets will be invested primarily in the securities of issuers in China, and the gains, losses and income received by the Fund will be denominated primarily in Chinese renminbi (“RMB”) whereas the Fund’s reference currency is the U.S. dollar. As a result, the Fund’s performance may be adversely affected by changes in currency exchange rates, which can be very volatile and change quickly and unpredictably. Such fluctuations may be due to changes in interest rates, investors’ expectations concerning inflation and interest rates, the imposition of currency controls or other national or global political or economic developments. The Fund may lose value if the local currency of a foreign market depreciates against the U.S. dollar, even if the local currency value of the Fund’s holdings goes up. Moreover, the Fund may incur costs in connection with conversions between U.S. dollars and foreign currencies. In addition, the remittance of foreign currency and the exchange of RMB within China are subject to significant governmental restrictions. Because all transactions in A-Shares must be settled in RMB, limitations of the supply of RMB may adversely affect the Fund’s operations. There is no assurance that the Fund will continue to have access to sufficient amounts of RMB to remain fully invested.

 

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Custody Risk. Investments in emerging markets, such as China, may be subject to even greater custody risks than investments in more developed markets. Less developed markets are more likely to experience problems with the clearing and settling of trades and the holding of securities by local banks, agents and depositories. In accordance with Chinese regulations and the terms of a QFII or RQFII license, as applicable, and insofar as the Adviser acquires a QFII or RQFII license, A-Shares will be held in the joint names of the Fund and the Adviser. While the Adviser may not use such an account for any purpose other than for maintaining the Fund’s assets, the Fund’s assets may not be as well protected as they would be if it were possible for them to be registered and held solely in the name of the Fund. There is a risk that creditors of the Adviser may assert that the securities are owned by the Adviser and that regulatory actions taken against Adviser may affect the Fund. The risk is particularly acute in the case of cash deposited with a People’s Republic of China (“PRC”) sub-custodian (“PRC Custodian”) because it may not be segregated, and it may be treated as a debt owing from the PRC Custodian to the Fund as a depositor. Thus, in the event of a PRC Custodian bankruptcy, liquidation, or similar event, the Fund may face difficulties and/or encounter delays in recovering its cash.

 

Depositary Receipts Risk. The Fund may invest in depositary receipts (e.g., ADRs and GDRs) which involve similar risks to those associated with investments in foreign securities. Investments in depositary receipts may be less liquid than the underlying shares in their primary trading market and, if not included in the Index, may negatively affect the Fund’s ability to replicate the performance of the Index. The issuers of depositary receipts may discontinue issuing new depositary receipts and withdraw existing depositary receipts at any time, which may result in costs and delays in the distribution of the underlying assets to the Fund and may negatively impact the Fund’s performance and the Fund’s ability to replicate/track the performance of its Index.

 

Emerging Markets Risk. Investments in securities and instruments traded in developing or emerging markets, or that provide exposure to such securities or markets, can involve additional risks relating to political, economic, or regulatory conditions not associated with investments in U.S. securities and instruments or investments in more developed international markets. Such conditions may impact the ability of the Fund to buy, sell or otherwise transfer securities, adversely affect the trading market and price for Shares and cause the Fund to decline in value.

 

Equity Market Risk. The equity securities held in the Fund’s portfolio may experience sudden, unpredictable drops in value or long periods of decline in value. This may occur because of factors that affect securities markets generally or factors affecting specific industries, sectors or companies in which the Fund invests. Common stocks are susceptible to general stock market fluctuations and to volatile increases and decreases in value as market confidence in and perceptions of their issuers change. The Fund’s NAV and market price may fluctuate significantly in response to these and other factors. As a result, an investor could lose money over short or long periods of time.

 

ETF Risks. The Fund is an ETF and, as a result of an ETF’s structure, is exposed to the following risks:

 

Authorized Participants (“APs”), Market Makers, and Liquidity Providers Concentration Risk. The Fund has a limited number of financial institutions that may act as APs. In addition, there may be a limited number of market makers and/or liquidity providers in the marketplace. To the extent either of the following events occur, shares of the Fund may trade at a material discount to NAV and possibly face delisting: (i) APs exit the business or otherwise become unable to process creation and/or redemption orders and no other APs step forward to perform these services, or (ii) market makers and/or liquidity providers exit the business or significantly reduce their business activities and no other entities step forward to perform their functions.

 

Costs of Buying or Selling Shares of the Fund. Due to the costs of buying or selling shares of the Fund, including brokerage commissions imposed by brokers and bid/ask spreads, frequent trading of shares of the Fund may significantly reduce investment results and an investment in shares of the Fund may not be advisable for investors who anticipate regularly making small investments.

 

Shares of the Fund May Trade at Prices Other Than NAV. As with all ETFs, shares of the Fund may be bought and sold in the secondary market at market prices. The price of shares of the Fund, like the price of all traded securities, will be subject to factors such as supply and demand, as well as the current value of the Fund’s portfolio holdings. Although it is expected that the market price of the shares of the Fund will approximate the Fund’s NAV, there may be times when the market price of the shares is more than the NAV intra-day (premium) or less than the NAV intra-day (discount). This risk is heightened in times of market volatility, periods of steep market declines, and periods when there is limited trading activity for shares in the secondary market, in which case such premiums or discounts may be significant.

 

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  ○ Trading. Although shares of the Fund are listed for trading on a national securities exchange, such as The NASDAQ Stock Market LLC (the “Exchange”), and may be traded on U.S. exchanges other than the Exchange, there can be no assurance that shares of the Fund will trade with any volume, or at all, on any stock exchange. In stressed market conditions, the liquidity of shares of the Fund may begin to mirror the liquidity of the Fund’s underlying portfolio holdings, which can be significantly less liquid than shares of the Fund, and this could lead to differences between the market price of the shares of the Fund and the underlying value of those shares.

 

Foreign Securities Risk. The Fund’s investments in foreign securities can be riskier than U.S. securities investments. Investments in the securities of foreign issuers (including investments in ADRs and GDRs) are subject to the risks associated with investing in those foreign markets, such as heightened risks of inflation or nationalization. The prices of foreign securities and the prices of U.S. securities have, at times, moved in opposite directions. In addition, securities of foreign issuers may lose value due to political, economic and geographic events affecting a foreign issuer or market. During periods of social, political or economic instability in a country or region, the value of a foreign security traded on U.S. exchanges could be affected by, among other things, increasing price volatility, illiquidity, or the closure of the primary market on which the security (or the security underlying the ADR or GDR) is traded. You may lose money due to political, economic and geographic events affecting a foreign issuer or market.

 

Tracking Risk. The performance of the Fund may vary from the performance of the Index as a result of Fund fees and expenses, the use of representative sampling, brokerage and transaction costs, the effect of Chinese taxes, and other factors. In addition, the Fund may not be able to invest in certain securities included in the Index or invest in them in the exact proportions represented in the Index due to market disruptions, legal restrictions or limitations imposed by the Chinese government, certain exchange listing standards, or a lack of liquidity on stock exchanges in which such securities trade. The Fund may not be fully invested at times either as a result of cash flows into the Fund or reserves of cash held by the Fund to meet redemptions or pay expenses. In addition, foreign exchange fluctuations and any issues the Fund encounters with regard to currency convertibility (including the cost of borrowing funds, if any) and repatriation may also increase the index tracking error risk.

 

International Closed Market Trading Risk. To the extent that the underlying investments held by the Fund trade on foreign exchanges that may be closed when the securities exchange on which the Fund’s Shares trade is open, there are likely to be deviations between the current price of such an underlying security and the last quoted price for the underlying security (i.e., the Fund’s quote from the closed foreign market). These deviations could result in premiums or discounts to the Fund’s NAV that may be greater than those experienced by other ETFs.

 

Large-Capitalization Investing Risk. The Fund’s performance may be adversely affected if securities of large-capitalization companies underperform securities of smaller-capitalization companies or the market as a whole. The securities of large-capitalization companies may be relatively mature compared to smaller companies and therefore subject to slower growth during times of economic expansion

 

Liquidity Risk. The Fund’s investments are subject to liquidity risk, which exists when an investment is or becomes difficult or impossible to purchase or sell at an advantageous time and price. If a transaction is particularly large or if the relevant market is or becomes illiquid, it may not be possible to initiate a transaction or liquidate a position, which may cause the Fund to suffer significant losses and difficulties in meeting redemptions. Liquidity risk may be the result of, among other things, market turmoil, the reduced number and capacity of traditional market participants, or the lack of an active trading market. Markets for securities or financial instruments could be disrupted by a number of events, including, but not limited to, an economic crisis, natural disasters, new legislation or regulatory changes inside or outside the U.S. Liquid investments may become less liquid after being purchased by the Fund, particularly during periods of market stress. In addition, if a number of securities held by the Fund stop trading, it may have a cascading effect and cause the Fund to halt trading. Volatility in market prices will increase the risk of the Fund being subject to a trading halt. Certain countries in which the Fund may invest may be subject to extended settlement delays and/or foreign holidays, during which the Fund will unlikely be able to convert holdings to cash.

 

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Mid-Capitalization Companies Risk. Mid-capitalization companies may have greater price volatility, lower trading volume and less liquidity than large-capitalization companies. In addition, mid-capitalization companies may have smaller revenues, narrower product lines, less management depth and experience, smaller shares of their product or service markets, fewer financial resources and less competitive strength than large-capitalization companies.

 

New Adviser Risk. Although the Adviser’s principals and the Fund’s portfolio managers have experience managing investments in the past, the Adviser is a newly-formed entity and has no experience managing investments for an ETF, which may limit the Adviser’s effectiveness.

 

New Fund Risk. The Fund is new with no operating history. As a result, there can be no assurance that the Fund will grow to or maintain an economically viable size, in which case it may experience greater tracking error to its Index than it otherwise would at higher asset levels, or it could ultimately liquidate. The Fund’s distributor does not maintain a secondary market in Fund shares.

 

Non-Diversification Risk. Although the Fund intends to invest in a variety of securities and instruments, the Fund is considered to be non-diversified, which means that it may invest more of its assets in the securities of a single issuer or a smaller number of issuers than if it were a diversified fund. As a result, the Fund may be more exposed to the risks associated with and developments affecting an individual issuer or a smaller number of issuers than a fund that invests more widely. This may increase the Fund’s volatility and cause the performance of a relatively smaller number of issuers to have a greater impact on the Fund’s performance.

 

Operational Risk. The Fund is exposed to operational risks arising from a number of factors, including, but not limited to, human error, processing and communication errors, errors of the Fund’s service providers, counterparties or other third parties, failed or inadequate processes and technology or systems failures. The Fund and the Adviser seek to reduce these operational risks through controls and procedures. However, these measures do not address every possible risk and may be inadequate to address significant operational risks.

 

Cybersecurity Risk. Failures or breaches of the electronic systems of the Fund and/or the Fund’s service providers, including the Adviser, Index Provider, market makers, Authorized Participants or the issuers of securities in which the Fund invests have the ability to cause disruptions, negatively impact the Fund’s business operations and/or potentially result in financial losses to the Fund and its shareholders. While the Fund has established business continuity plans and risk management systems seeking to address system breaches or failures, there are inherent limitations in such plans and systems. Furthermore, the Fund cannot control the cybersecurity plans and systems of the Fund’s Index Provider, Adviser, other service providers, market makers, Authorized Participants or issuers of securities in which the Fund invests.

 

Passive Investment Risk. The Fund is not actively managed and the Adviser would not sell a security due to current or projected underperformance of a security, industry or sector, unless that security is removed from the Index or the selling of shares of that security is otherwise required upon a reconstitution of the Index in accordance with the Index methodology. The Fund invests in securities included in the Index, regardless of their investment merits. The Fund does not take defensive positions under any market conditions, including conditions that are adverse to the performance of the Fund.

 

Sector Risk. To the extent the Fund invests more heavily in particular sectors of the economy, its performance will be especially sensitive to developments that significantly affect those sectors.

 

Communications Sector Risk. Communications companies are subject to extensive government regulation. The costs of complying with governmental regulations, delays or failure to receive required regulatory approvals, or the enactment of new adverse regulatory requirements may adversely affect the business of the such companies. Companies in the communications sector can also be significantly affected by intense competition, including competition with alternative technologies such as wireless communications (including with 5G and other technologies), product compatibility, consumer preferences, rapid product obsolescence, and research and development of new products. Technological innovations may make the products and services of such companies obsolete.

 

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Information Technology Sector Risk. Market or economic factors impacting information technology companies and companies that rely heavily on technological advances could have a significant effect on the value of the Fund’s investments. The value of stocks of information technology companies and companies that rely heavily on technology is particularly vulnerable to rapid changes in technology product cycles, rapid product obsolescence, government regulation and competition, both domestically and internationally, including competition from foreign competitors with lower production costs. Stocks of information technology companies and companies that rely heavily on technology, especially those of smaller, less-seasoned companies, tend to be more volatile than the overall market. Information technology companies are heavily dependent on patent and intellectual property rights, the loss or impairment of which may adversely affect profitability.

 

Securities Lending Risk. To the extent the Fund lends its securities, it may be subject to the following risks: (1) the securities in which the collateral is invested may not perform sufficiently to cover the applicable rebate rates paid to borrowers and related administrative costs; (2) delays may occur in the recovery of securities from borrowers, which could interfere with the Fund’s ability to vote proxies or to settle transactions; and (3) although borrowers of the Fund’s securities typically provide collateral in the form of cash that is reinvested in securities, there is the risk of possible loss of rights in the collateral should the borrower fail financially.

 

Small-Capitalization Companies Risk. Compared to mid- and large-capitalization companies, small-capitalization companies may be less stable and more susceptible to adverse developments, and their securities may be more volatile and less liquid.

 

Thematic Investing Risk. The Fund relies on the Index Provider for the identification of securities for inclusion in the Index that reflect themes and sub-themes, and its performance may suffer if such securities are not correctly identified or if a theme or sub-theme develops in an unexpected manner. Performance may also suffer if the stocks included in the Index do not benefit from the development of such themes or sub-themes. Performance may also be impacted by the inclusion of non-theme relevant exposures in the Index. There is no guarantee that the Index will reflect the theme and sub-theme exposures intended.

 

Valuation Risk. Independent market quotations for certain investments held by the Fund may not be readily available, and such investments may be fair valued or valued by a pricing service at an evaluated price. These valuations involve subjectivity and different market participants may assign different prices to the same investment. As a result, there is a risk that the Fund may not be able to sell an investment at the price assigned to the investment by the Fund. In addition, the securities in which the Fund invests may trade on days that the Fund does not price its shares; as a result, the value of Fund shares may change on days when investors cannot purchase or sell their Fund holdings.

 

Fund Performance

 

Performance information for the Fund is not included because the Fund did not commence operations prior to the date of this Prospectus. In the future, performance for the Fund will be presented in this section. Updated performance information will be available on the Fund’s website at www.ThemesETFs.com or by calling the Fund toll-free at _________.

 

Management

 

Investment Adviser

 

Themes Management Company, LLC (the “Adviser”) serves as investment adviser to the Fund.

 

Portfolio Managers

 

Dingxun (Kevin) Shao, Vice President, Product Management & Development of the Adviser, and Calvin Tsang, CFA, Head of Product Management & Development of the Adviser, are jointly and primarily responsible for the day-to-day management of the Fund and have served as portfolio managers since the Fund’s inception.

 

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Buying and Selling Fund Shares

 

The Fund is an ETF. This means that individual Shares of the Fund may only be purchased and sold in the secondary market through brokers at market prices, rather than NAV. Because Shares trade at market prices rather than NAV, Shares may trade at a price greater than NAV (premium) or less than NAV (discount).

 

The Fund generally issues and redeems shares at NAV only in large blocks of shares known as “Creation Units,” which only institutions or large investors may purchase or redeem. The Fund generally issues and redeems Creation Units in exchange for a portfolio of securities (the “Deposit Securities”) and/or a designated amount of U.S. cash that the Fund specifies each day.

 

Investors may incur costs attributable to the difference between the highest price a buyer is willing to pay to purchase Shares (bid) and the lowest price a seller is willing to accept for Shares (ask) when buying or selling Shares in the secondary market (the “bid-ask spread”). Recent information about the Fund, including its net asset value, market price, premiums and discounts, and bid-ask spreads is available on the Fund’s website at www.ThemesETFs.com.

 

Tax Information

 

Fund distributions are generally taxable as ordinary income, qualified dividend income, or capital gains (or a combination), unless your investment is in an IRA or other tax-advantaged retirement account. Distributions may be taxable upon withdrawal from tax-deferred accounts.

 

Payments to Broker-Dealers and Other Financial Intermediaries

 

If you purchase the Fund through a broker or other financial intermediary (such as a bank), the Adviser and its related companies may pay the intermediary for activities related to the marketing and promotion of the Fund. These payments may create a conflict of interest by influencing the broker-dealer or other intermediary and your sales person to recommend the Fund over another investment. Ask your sales person or visit your financial intermediary’s website for more information.

 

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Themes Cloud Computing ETF

 

 

Investment Objective

 

The Themes Cloud Computing ETF (the “Fund”) is an exchange traded fund (“ETF”) that seeks to track the performance, before fees and expenses, of an index composed of companies that have business operations in the field of cloud computing.

 

Fees and Expenses of the Fund

 

The following table describes the fees and expenses you may pay if you buy, hold, and sell shares of the Fund (“Shares”). You may pay other fees, such as brokerage commissions and other fees to financial intermediaries, which are not reflected in the table and Example below.

 

Annual Fund Operating Expenses (expenses that you pay each year as a percentage of the value of your investment)  
Management Fees 0.35%
Distribution and/or Service (12b-1) Fees None
Other Expenses* 0.00%
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses 0.35%

 

* Estimated for the current fiscal year

 

Example

The following example is intended to help retail investors compare the cost of investing in the Fund with the cost of investing in other funds. It illustrates the hypothetical expenses that such investors would incur over various periods if they were to invest $10,000 in the Fund for the time periods indicated and then redeem all of the Shares at the end of those periods. This example assumes that the Fund provides a return of 5% a year and that operating expenses remain the same. Although your actual costs may be higher or lower, based on these assumptions, your costs would be:

 

1 Year

3 Years
$36 $113

 

Portfolio Turnover

The Fund pays transaction costs, such as commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or “turns over” its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover rate may indicate higher transaction costs and may result in higher taxes when Fund Shares are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are not reflected in annual fund operating expenses or in the example, affect the Fund’s performance. Because the Fund is newly organized, portfolio turnover information is not yet available.

 

Principal Investment Strategies of the Fund

 

The Fund employs a “passive management” (or indexing) investment approach designed to track the performance, before fees and expenses, of the Solactive Cloud Computing Index, or any successor thereto (the “Index”). The Index is based on a proprietary methodology developed and maintained by Solactive AG (the “Index Provider”), which is an organization that is independent of, and unaffiliated with, the Fund and Themes Management Company, LLC, the Fund’s investment adviser (the “Adviser”).

 

The Index

 

The Index is designed to provide exposure to companies that have business operations in the field of cloud computing based in developed market countries. The Index is denominated in U.S. dollars. As of June 30, 2023, the Index was comprised of 50 companies with a market capitalization range of between approximately $4.4 billion and $2.5 trillion and a weighted average market capitalization of approximately $297 billion.

 

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In constructing or adjusting the Index, the Index Provider identifies an “Index Universe” of companies that, on Selection Days (as defined below), fulfill the following requirements: 1) are a part/component of the Solactive GBS (Global Benchmark Series) Global Markets Digital Infrastructure All Cap USD Index, (an index developed and maintained by the Index Provider that intends to track the performance of small-, mid- and large-capitalization securities that have business operations in industries related to digital infrastructure covering approximately the largest 100% of the free-float market capitalization in Developed Markets (as identified by the Index Provider): Australia, Austria, Belgium, Canada, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Hong Kong, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Japan, the Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Singapore, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, the United Kingdom, and the United States), 2) are classified under any of the following industries (the “Index Categories”) based on the FactSet Revere Business Industry Classification System (“RBICS”): digital security software, e-commerce infrastructure software, data infrastructure software, data architecture software, internet infrastructure software and data support software (“Cloud Computing Companies”), and 3) only one share class of each company is eligible for inclusion in the Index Universe. The largest share class of a company that fulfills steps 1 and 2 will be eligible for the Index Universe.

 

Based on the Index Universe, all securities are ranked based on their free float market capitalization in a descending order and the top ranked securities within the Index Categories are included as eligible securities as follows: 10 companies from digital security software, 3 companies from e-commerce infrastructure software, 10 companies from data infrastructure software, 10 companies from data architecture software, 20 companies from internet infrastructure software and 20 companies from data support software. The top 50 securities are selected for the Index. In case there are less than 50 eligible securities, all eligible securities are selected and the Index will consist of less than 50 securities. The components of the Index (each, an “Index Component”) may change over time. The determination of the Index Universe and the selection of Index Components is made by the Index Provider based on its proprietary methodology. Selection Day is 20 business days before the Rebalance Day. The Index is adjusted on the Rebalance Day which is the first Wednesday in February, May, August, and November. If that day is not a trading day the Rebalance Day will be the next trading day.

 

On each Selection Day, each Index Component is assigned an initial weight according to its free float market capitalization. Afterwards, the weights are adjusted by applying a weight cap for each Index Component by re-distributing any weight which is larger than 4.5% to the other Index Components with an initial weight lower than 4.5% proportionally in an iterative manner. The weighting process seeks to weight Index Components primarily based on market capitalization, but subject to caps on the weights of the individual securities. This process is designed to limit the amount of concentration in the largest market capitalization companies and increase company-level diversification.

 

The Fund’s Investment Strategy

 

The Fund will invest, under normal circumstances, at least 80% of its net assets, plus the amount of any borrowings for investment purposes, in securities that comprise the Index and in American Depositary Receipts (“ADRs”) and Global Depositary Receipts (“GDRs”) based on the securities in the Index. The Fund will also invest, under normal circumstances, at least 80% of its net assets, plus borrowings for investment purposes, in securities of Cloud Computing Companies and in ADRs and GDRs based on such securities. Such securities may include those of large-, mid- and small-capitalization companies. The Fund’s 80% Policies are non-fundamental and require 60 days prior written notice to shareholders before each can be changed.

 

The Fund uses a “passive” or indexing approach to try to achieve the Fund’s investment objective. Unlike many investment companies, the Fund does not try to beat the Index and does not seek temporary defensive positions when markets decline or appear overvalued. Indexing may eliminate the chance that the Fund will substantially outperform the Index but also may reduce some of the risks of active management, such as poor security selection. Indexing seeks to achieve lower costs and better after-tax performance by aiming to keep portfolio turnover low in comparison to actively managed investment companies.

 

The Fund will generally use a “replication” strategy to achieve its investment objective, meaning it will invest in all of the component securities of the Index in the same approximate proportion as in the Index. However, the Fund may utilize a representative sampling strategy with respect to the Index when a replication strategy might be detrimental or disadvantageous to shareholders, such as when there are practical difficulties or substantial costs involved in compiling a portfolio of equity securities to replicate the Index, in instances in which a security in the Index becomes temporarily illiquid, unavailable or less liquid, or as a result of legal restrictions or limitations (such as tax diversification requirements or sanctions imposed by the U.S. government) that apply to the Fund but not the Index. The Adviser expects that, over time, the correlation between the Fund’s performance and that of the Index, before fees and expenses, will be 95% or better. If the Fund uses a replication strategy, it can be expected to have greater correlation to the Index than if it uses a representative sampling strategy.

 

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The Fund is considered to be non-diversified, which means that it may invest more of its assets in the securities of a single issuer or a smaller number of issuers than if it were a diversified fund. To the extent the Index is concentrated (i.e., holds 25% or more of its total assets) in a particular industry or group of industries, the Fund is expected to be concentrated in that industry or group of industries to approximately the same extent that the Index concentrates in an industry or group of industries. As of June 30, 2023, a significant portion of the Index is represented by securities of companies in the information technology and communications sectors, the software industry and that have business operations in the field of cloud computing. The degree to which components of the Index represent certain sectors or industries may change over time.

 

The Fund may lend securities representing up to one-third of the value of the Fund’s total assets (including the value of any collateral received).

 

Principal Risks of Investing in the Fund

 

You can lose money on your investment in the Fund. The Fund is subject to the risks summarized below. Some or all of these risks may adversely affect the Fund’s net asset value per share (“NAV”), trading price, yield, total return and/or ability to meet its objectives. For more information about the risks of investing in the Fund, see the section in the Fund’s prospectus entitled “Additional Information about the Principal Risks of Investing in the Funds.” Each risk summarized below is considered a “principal risk” of investing in the Fund, regardless of the order in which it appears.

 

Concentration Risk. To the extent that the Index concentrates in investments related to a particular industry or group of industries, the Fund is expected to also concentrate its investments to approximately the same extent. In such event, the Fund’s performance will be particularly susceptible to adverse events impacting such industry, which may include, but are not limited to, the following: general economic conditions or cyclical market patterns that could negatively affect supply and demand; competition for resources; adverse labor relations; political or world events; obsolescence of technologies; and increased competition or new product introductions that may affect the profitability or viability of companies in a particular industry or sector. As a result, the value of the Fund’s investments may rise and fall more than the value of shares of a fund that invests in securities of companies in a broader range of industries.

 

Cloud Computing Industry Risk. Cloud Computing companies may have limited product lines, markets, financial resources or personnel. These companies typically face intense competition and potentially rapid product obsolescence. In addition, many Cloud Computing companies store sensitive consumer information and could be the target of cybersecurity attacks and other types of theft, which could have a negative impact on these companies. As a result, Cloud Computing companies may be adversely impacted by government regulations, and may be subject to additional regulatory oversight with regard to privacy concerns and cybersecurity risk. These companies are also heavily dependent on intellectual property rights and may be adversely affected by loss or impairment of those rights. Cloud Computing companies could be negatively impacted by disruptions in service caused by hardware or software failure, or by interruptions or delays in service by third-party data center hosting facilities and maintenance providers. Cloud Computing companies, especially smaller companies, tend to be more volatile than companies that do not rely heavily on technology. The customers and/or suppliers of Cloud Computing companies may be concentrated in a particular country, region or industry. Any adverse event affecting one of these countries, regions or industries could have a negative impact on Cloud Computing companies. Cloud Computing companies may participate in monopolistic practices that could make them subject to higher levels of regulatory scrutiny and/or potential break ups in the future, which could severely impact the viability of these companies.

 

Software Industry Risk. The software industry can be significantly affected by intense competition, aggressive pricing, technological innovations, and product obsolescence. Companies in the application software industry, in particular, may also be negatively affected by the decline or fluctuation of subscription renewal rates for their products and services, which may have an adverse effect on profit margins. Companies in the systems software industry may be adversely affected by, among other things, actual or perceived security vulnerabilities in their products and services, which may result in individual or class action lawsuits, state or federal enforcement actions and other remediation costs.

 

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Sector Risk. To the extent the Fund invests more heavily in particular sectors of the economy, its performance will be especially sensitive to developments that significantly affect those sectors.

 

  ○ Communications Sector Risk. Communications companies are subject to extensive government regulation. The costs of complying with governmental regulations, delays or failure to receive required regulatory approvals, or the enactment of new adverse regulatory requirements may adversely affect the business of such companies. Companies in the communications sector can also be significantly affected by intense competition, including competition with alternative technologies such as wireless communications (including with 5G and other technologies), product compatibility, consumer preferences, rapid product obsolescence, and research and development of new products. Technological innovations may make the products and services of such companies obsolete.

 

Information Technology Sector Risk. Market or economic factors impacting information technology companies and companies that rely heavily on technological advances could have a significant effect on the value of the Fund’s investments. The value of stocks of information technology companies and companies that rely heavily on technology is particularly vulnerable to rapid changes in technology product cycles, rapid product obsolescence, government regulation and competition, both domestically and internationally, including competition from foreign competitors with lower production costs. Stocks of information technology companies and companies that rely heavily on technology, especially those of smaller, less-seasoned companies, tend to be more volatile than the overall market. Information technology companies are heavily dependent on patent and intellectual property rights, the loss or impairment of which may adversely affect profitability.

 

Thematic Investing Risk. The Fund relies on the Index Provider for the identification of securities for inclusion in the Index that reflect themes and sub-themes, and its performance may suffer if such securities are not correctly identified or if a theme or sub-theme develops in an unexpected manner. Performance may also suffer if the stocks included in the Index do not benefit from the development of such themes or sub-themes. Performance may also be impacted by the inclusion of non-theme relevant exposures in the Index. There is no guarantee that the Index will reflect the theme and sub-theme exposures intended.

 

Calculation Methodology Risk. The Index Provider relies directly or indirectly on various sources of information to assess the criteria of issuers included in the Index, including information that may be based on assumptions and estimates. Neither the Fund, the Index Provider, or the Adviser can offer assurances that the Index’s calculation methodology or sources of information will provide an accurate assessment of included issuers or a correct valuation of securities, nor can they guarantee the availability or timeliness of the production of the Index.

 

Currency Risk. The Fund may invest in securities denominated in foreign currencies. Because the Fund’s NAV is determined in U.S. dollars, the Fund’s NAV could decline if currencies of the underlying securities depreciate against the U.S. dollar or if there are delays or limits on repatriation of such currencies. Currency exchange rates can be very volatile and can change quickly and unpredictably. As a result, the Fund’s NAV may change quickly and without warning, which could have a significant negative impact on the Fund.

 

Depositary Receipts Risk. Depositary receipts (e.g., ADRs and GDRs) which involve similar risks to those associated with investments in foreign securities. Investments in depositary receipts may be less liquid than the underlying shares in their primary trading market and, if not included in the Index, may negatively affect the Fund’s ability to replicate the performance of the Index. The issuers of depositary receipts may discontinue issuing new depositary receipts and withdraw existing depositary receipts at any time, which may result in costs and delays in the distribution of the underlying assets to the Fund and may negatively impact the Fund’s performance and the Fund’s ability to replicate/track the performance of its Index.

 

Foreign Securities Risk. The Fund’s investments in foreign securities can be riskier than U.S. securities investments. Investments in the securities of foreign issuers (including investments in ADRs and GDRs) are subject to the risks associated with investing in those foreign markets, such as heightened risks of inflation or nationalization. The prices of foreign securities and the prices of U.S. securities have, at times, moved in opposite directions. In addition, securities of foreign issuers may lose value due to political, economic and geographic events affecting a foreign issuer or market. During periods of social, political or economic instability in a country or region, the value of a foreign security traded on U.S. exchanges could be affected by, among other things, increasing price volatility, illiquidity, or the closure of the primary market on which the security (or the security underlying the ADR or GDR) is traded. You may lose money due to political, economic and geographic events affecting a foreign issuer or market.

 

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Geographic Risk. A natural, biological or other disaster could occur in a geographic region in which the Fund invests, which could affect the economy or particular business operations of companies in the specific geographic region, causing an adverse impact on the Fund’s investments in the affected region or in a region economically tied to the affected region. The securities in which the Fund invests and, consequently, the Fund are also subject to specific risks as a result of their business operations, including, but not limited to:

 

Risk of Investing in Developed Markets. The Fund’s investment in a developed country issuer may subject the Fund to regulatory, political, currency, security, economic and other risks associated with developed countries. Developed countries tend to represent a significant portion of the global economy and have generally experienced slower economic growth than some less developed countries. Certain developed countries have experienced security concerns, such as terrorism and strained international relations. Incidents involving a country’s or region’s security may cause uncertainty in its markets and may adversely affect its economy and the Fund’s investments. In addition, developed countries may be impacted by changes to the economic conditions of certain key trading partners, regulatory burdens, debt burdens and the price or availability of certain commodities.

 

Risk of Investing in North America. A decrease in imports or exports, changes in trade regulations or an economic recession in any North American country can have a significant economic effect on the entire North American region and on some or all of the North American countries to which the Fund has economic exposure. The U.S. is Canada’s and Mexico’s largest trading and investment partner. The Canadian and Mexican economies are significantly affected by developments in the U.S. economy. Since the implementation of the North American Free Trade Agreement (“NAFTA”) in 1994 among Canada, the U.S. and Mexico, total merchandise trade among the three countries has increased. However, political developments in the U.S., including the renegotiation of NAFTA and imposition of tariffs by the U.S., may have implications for the trade arrangements among the U.S., Mexico and Canada, which could negatively affect the value of securities held by the Fund. Policy and legislative changes in any of the three countries may have a significant effect on North American economies generally, as well as on the value of certain securities held by the Fund.

 

Risk of Investing in Europe. The economies of Europe are highly dependent on each other, both as key trading partners and, in many cases, as fellow members maintaining the euro. Decreasing European imports, new trade regulations, changes in exchange rates, a recession in Europe, or a slowing of economic growth in this region could have an adverse impact on the securities in which the Fund invests. Reduction in trading activity among European countries may cause an adverse impact on each nation’s individual economies. The Economic and Monetary Union of the European Union (the “EU”) requires compliance with restrictions on inflation rates, deficits, interest rates, debt levels and fiscal and monetary controls, each of which may significantly affect every country in Europe, including those countries that are not members of the EU. Decreasing imports or exports, changes in governmental or EU regulations on trade, changes in the exchange rate of the euro, the default or threat of default by an EU member country on its sovereign debt, and recessions in an EU member country may have a significant adverse effect on the economies of EU member countries and their trading partners. The European financial markets have historically experienced volatility and adverse trends due to concerns about economic downturns or rising government debt levels in several European countries, including, but not limited to, Austria, Belgium, Cyprus, France, Greece, Ireland, Italy, Portugal, Spain and Ukraine. These events have adversely affected the exchange rate of the euro and may continue to significantly affect European countries.

 

International Closed Market Trading Risk. To the extent that the underlying investments held by the Fund trade on foreign exchanges that may be closed when the securities exchange on which the Fund’s Shares trade is open, there are likely to be deviations between the current price of such an underlying security and the last quoted price for the underlying security (i.e., the Fund’s quote from the closed foreign market). These deviations could result in premiums or discounts to the Fund’s NAV that may be greater than those experienced by other ETFs.

 

Equity Market Risk. The equity securities held in the Fund’s portfolio may experience sudden, unpredictable drops in value or long periods of decline in value. This may occur because of factors that affect securities markets generally or factors affecting specific industries, sectors or companies in which the Fund invests. Common stocks are susceptible to general stock market fluctuations and to volatile increases and decreases in value as market confidence in and perceptions of their issuers change. The Fund’s NAV and market price may fluctuate significantly in response to these and other factors. As a result, an investor could lose money over short or long periods of time.

 

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ETF Risks. The Fund is an ETF and, as a result of an ETF’s structure, is exposed to the following risks:

 

Authorized Participants (“APs”), Market Makers, and Liquidity Providers Concentration Risk. The Fund has a limited number of financial institutions that may act as APs. In addition, there may be a limited number of market makers and/or liquidity providers in the marketplace. To the extent either of the following events occur, shares of the Fund may trade at a material discount to NAV and possibly face delisting: (i) APs exit the business or otherwise become unable to process creation and/or redemption orders and no other APs step forward to perform these services, or (ii) market makers and/or liquidity providers exit the business or significantly reduce their business activities and no other entities step forward to perform their functions.

 

Costs of Buying or Selling Shares of the Fund. Due to the costs of buying or selling shares of the Fund, including brokerage commissions imposed by brokers and bid/ask spreads, frequent trading of shares of the Fund may significantly reduce investment results and an investment in shares of the Fund may not be advisable for investors who anticipate regularly making small investments.

 

Shares of the Fund May Trade at Prices Other Than NAV. As with all ETFs, shares of the Fund may be bought and sold in the secondary market at market prices. The price of shares of the Fund, like the price of all traded securities, will be subject to factors such as supply and demand, as well as the current value of the Fund’s portfolio holdings. Although it is expected that the market price of the shares of the Fund will approximate the Fund’s NAV, there may be times when the market price of the shares is more than the NAV intra-day (premium) or less than the NAV intra-day (discount). This risk is heightened in times of market volatility, periods of steep market declines, and periods when there is limited trading activity for shares in the secondary market, in which case such premiums or discounts may be significant.

 

  ○ Trading. Although shares of the Fund are listed for trading on a national securities exchange, such as The NASDAQ Stock Market LLC (the “Exchange”), and may be traded on U.S. exchanges other than the Exchange, there can be no assurance that shares of the Fund will trade with any volume, or at all, on any stock exchange. In stressed market conditions, the liquidity of shares of the Fund may begin to mirror the liquidity of the Fund’s underlying portfolio holdings, which can be significantly less liquid than shares of the Fund, and this could lead to differences between the market price of the shares of the Fund and the underlying value of those shares.

 

Non-Diversification Risk. Although the Fund intends to invest in a variety of securities, the Fund is considered to be non-diversified, which means that it may invest more of its assets in the securities of a single issuer or a smaller number of issuers than if it were a diversified fund. As a result, the Fund may be more exposed to the risks associated with and developments affecting an individual issuer or a smaller number of issuers than a fund that invests more widely. This may increase the Fund’s volatility and cause the performance of a relatively smaller number of issuers to have a greater impact on the Fund’s performance.

 

Large-Capitalization Investing Risk. The Fund’s performance may be adversely affected if securities of large-capitalization companies underperform securities of smaller-capitalization companies or the market as a whole. The securities of large-capitalization companies may be relatively mature compared to smaller companies and therefore subject to slower growth during times of economic expansion.

 

Mid-Capitalization Companies Risk. Mid-capitalization companies may have greater price volatility, lower trading volume and less liquidity than large-capitalization companies. In addition, mid-capitalization companies may have smaller revenues, narrower product lines, less management depth and experience, smaller shares of their product or service markets, fewer financial resources and less competitive strength than large-capitalization companies.

 

Small-Capitalization Companies Risk. Compared to mid- and large-capitalization companies, small-capitalization companies may be less stable and more susceptible to adverse developments, and their securities may be more volatile and less liquid.

 

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Liquidity Risk. The Fund’s investments are subject to liquidity risk, which exists when an investment is or becomes difficult or impossible to purchase or sell at an advantageous time and price. If a transaction is particularly large or if the relevant market is or becomes illiquid, it may not be possible to initiate a transaction or liquidate a position, which may cause the Fund to suffer significant losses and difficulties in meeting redemptions. Liquidity risk may be the result of, among other things, market turmoil, the reduced number and capacity of traditional market participants, or the lack of an active trading market. Markets for securities or financial instruments could be disrupted by a number of events, including, but not limited to, an economic crisis, natural disasters, new legislation or regulatory changes inside or outside the U.S. Liquid investments may become less liquid after being purchased by the Fund, particularly during periods of market stress. In addition, if a number of securities held by the Fund stop trading, it may have a cascading effect and cause the Fund to halt trading. Volatility in market prices will increase the risk of the Fund being subject to a trading halt. Certain countries in which the Fund may invest may be subject to extended settlement delays and/or foreign holidays, during which the Fund will unlikely be able to convert holdings to cash.

 

New Adviser Risk. Although the Adviser’s principals and the Fund’s portfolio managers have experience managing investments in the past, the Adviser is a newly-formed entity and has no experience managing investments for an ETF, which may limit the Adviser’s effectiveness.

 

New Fund Risk. The Fund is new with no operating history. As a result, there can be no assurance that the Fund will grow to or maintain an economically viable size, in which case it may experience greater tracking error to its Index than it otherwise would at higher asset levels, or it could ultimately liquidate. The Fund’s distributor does not maintain a secondary market in Fund shares.

 

Passive Investment Risk. The Fund is not actively managed and the Adviser would not sell a security due to current or projected underperformance of a security, industry or sector, unless that security is removed from the Index or the selling of shares of that security is otherwise required upon a reconstitution of the Index in accordance with the Index methodology. The Fund invests in securities included in the Index, regardless of their investment merits. The Fund does not take defensive positions under any market conditions, including conditions that are adverse to the performance of the Fund.

 

Tracking Risk. The Fund’s return may not track the return of the Index for a number of reasons. For example, the Fund incurs a number of operating expenses not applicable to the Index, and incurs costs in buying and selling securities, especially when rebalancing the Fund’s securities holdings to reflect changes in the composition of the Index. In addition, when the Fund uses a representative sampling approach, the Fund may not be as well correlated with the return of the Index as when the Fund purchases all of the securities in the Index in the proportions in which they are represented in the Index.

 

Securities Lending Risk. To the extent the Fund lends its securities, it may be subject to the following risks: (1) the securities in which the collateral is invested may not perform sufficiently to cover the applicable rebate rates paid to borrowers and related administrative costs; (2) delays may occur in the recovery of securities from borrowers, which could interfere with the Fund’s ability to vote proxies or to settle transactions; and (3) although borrowers of the Fund’s securities typically provide collateral in the form of cash that is reinvested in securities, there is the risk of possible loss of rights in the collateral should the borrower fail financially.

 

Operational Risk. The Fund is exposed to operational risks arising from a number of factors, including, but not limited to, human error, processing and communication errors, errors of the Fund’s service providers, counterparties or other third parties, failed or inadequate processes and technology or systems failures. The Fund and the Adviser seek to reduce these operational risks through controls and procedures. However, these measures do not address every possible risk and may be inadequate to address significant operational risks.

 

Cybersecurity Risk. Failures or breaches of the electronic systems of the Fund and/or the Fund’s service providers, including the Adviser, Index Provider, market makers, Authorized Participants or the issuers of securities in which the Fund invests have the ability to cause disruptions, negatively impact the Fund’s business operations and/or potentially result in financial losses to the Fund and its shareholders. While the Fund has established business continuity plans and risk management systems seeking to address system breaches or failures, there are inherent limitations in such plans and systems. Furthermore, the Fund cannot control the cybersecurity plans and systems of the Fund’s Index Provider, Adviser, other service providers, market makers, Authorized Participants or issuers of securities in which the Fund invests.

 

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Valuation Risk. Independent market quotations for certain investments held by the Fund may not be readily available, and such investments may be fair valued or valued by a pricing service at an evaluated price. These valuations involve subjectivity and different market participants may assign different prices to the same investment. As a result, there is a risk that the Fund may not be able to sell an investment at the price assigned to the investment by the Fund. In addition, the securities in which the Fund invests may trade on days that the Fund does not price its shares; as a result, the value of Fund shares may change on days when investors cannot purchase or sell their Fund holdings.

 

Fund Performance

 

Performance information for the Fund is not included because the Fund did not commence operations prior to the date of this Prospectus. In the future, performance for the Fund will be presented in this section. Updated performance information will be available on the Fund’s website at www.ThemesETFs.com or by calling the Fund toll-free at _________.

 

Management

 

Investment Adviser

 

Themes Management Company, LLC (the “Adviser”) serves as investment adviser to the Fund.

 

Portfolio Managers

 

Dingxun (Kevin) Shao, Vice President, Product Management & Development of the Adviser, and Calvin Tsang, CFA, Head of Product Management & Development of the Adviser, are jointly and primarily responsible for the day-to-day management of the Fund and have served as portfolio managers since the Fund’s inception.

 

Buying and Selling Fund Shares

 

The Fund is an ETF. This means that individual Shares of the Fund may only be purchased and sold in the secondary market through brokers at market prices, rather than NAV. Because Shares trade at market prices rather than NAV, Shares may trade at a price greater than NAV (premium) or less than NAV (discount).

 

The Fund generally issues and redeems shares at NAV only in large blocks of shares known as “Creation Units,” which only institutions or large investors may purchase or redeem. The Fund generally issues and redeems Creation Units in exchange for a portfolio of securities (the “Deposit Securities”) and/or a designated amount of U.S. cash that the Fund specifies each day.

 

Investors may incur costs attributable to the difference between the highest price a buyer is willing to pay to purchase Shares (bid) and the lowest price a seller is willing to accept for Shares (ask) when buying or selling Shares in the secondary market (the “bid-ask spread”). Recent information about the Fund, including its net asset value, market price, premiums and discounts, and bid-ask spreads is available on the Fund’s website at www.ThemesETFs.com.

 

Tax Information

 

Fund distributions are generally taxable as ordinary income, qualified dividend income, or capital gains (or a combination), unless your investment is in an IRA or other tax-advantaged retirement account. Distributions may be taxable upon withdrawal from tax-deferred accounts.

 

Payments to Broker-Dealers and Other Financial Intermediaries

 

If you purchase the Fund through a broker or other financial intermediary (such as a bank), the Adviser and its related companies may pay the intermediary for activities related to the marketing and promotion of the Fund. These payments may create a conflict of interest by influencing the broker-dealer or other intermediary and your sales person to recommend the Fund over another investment. Ask your sales person or visit your financial intermediary’s website for more information.

 

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Themes Cybersecurity ETF

 

 

Investment Objective

 

The Themes Cybersecurity ETF (the “Fund”) is an exchange traded fund (“ETF”) that seeks to track the performance, before fees and expenses, of an index composed of companies that have business operations in the cybersecurity industry.

 

Fees and Expenses of the Fund

 

The following table describes the fees and expenses you may pay if you buy, hold, and sell shares of the Fund (“Shares”). You may pay other fees, such as brokerage commissions and other fees to financial intermediaries, which are not reflected in the table and Example below.

 

Annual Fund Operating Expenses (expenses that you pay each year as a percentage of the value of your investment)  
Management Fees 0.35%
Distribution and/or Service (12b-1) Fees None
Other Expenses* 0.00%
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses 0.35%

 

* Estimated for the current fiscal year

 

Example

The following example is intended to help retail investors compare the cost of investing in the Fund with the cost of investing in other funds. It illustrates the hypothetical expenses that such investors would incur over various periods if they were to invest $10,000 in the Fund for the time periods indicated and then redeem all of the Shares at the end of those periods. This example assumes that the Fund provides a return of 5% a year and that operating expenses remain the same. Although your actual costs may be higher or lower, based on these assumptions, your costs would be:

 

1 Year 3 Years
$36 $113

 

Portfolio Turnover

The Fund pays transaction costs, such as commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or “turns over” its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover rate may indicate higher transaction costs and may result in higher taxes when Fund Shares are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are not reflected in annual fund operating expenses or in the example, affect the Fund’s performance. Because the Fund is newly organized, portfolio turnover information is not yet available.

 

Principal Investment Strategies of the Fund

 

The Fund employs a “passive management” (or indexing) investment approach designed to track the performance, before fees and expenses, of Solactive Cyber Security Index, or any successor thereto (the “Index”). The Index is based on a proprietary methodology developed and maintained by Solactive AG (the “Index Provider”), which is an organization that is independent of, and unaffiliated with, the Fund and Themes Management Company, LLC, the Fund’s investment adviser (the “Adviser”).

 

The Index

 

The Index is designed to provide exposure to companies that have business operations in the cybersecurity industry. The Index is denominated in U.S. dollars. As of June 30, 2023, the Index was comprised of 32 companies with a market capitalization range of between approximately $178 million and $78 billion and a weighted average market capitalization of $14 billion.

 

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In constructing or adjusting the Index, the Index Provider identifies an “Index Universe” of companies that, on Selection Days (as defined below), fulfill the following requirements: 1) are a part/component of the Solactive GBS (Global Benchmark Series) Global Markets Digital Infrastructure All Cap USD Index (an index developed and maintained by the Index Provider that intends to track the performance of small-, mid- and large-capitalization securities that have business operations in industries related to digital security software covering approximately the largest 100% of the free-float market capitalization in Developed Markets (as identified by the Index Provider): Australia, Austria, Belgium, Canada, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Hong Kong, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Japan, the Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Singapore, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, the United Kingdom, and the United States), 2) are classified under the digital security software category as identified by the Index Provider (“Cybersecurity Companies”) using the FactSet Revere Business Industry Classification System (“RBICS”), and 3) only the largest share class of each company is eligible for inclusion in the Index Universe. In order to be classified in the digital security software category, RBICS requires that a company generate at least 50% of its revenue from digital security software.

 

Based on the Index Universe, all eligible securities are ranked based on their free float market capitalization in a descending order and the top 35 ranked securities are included in the Index. If less than 35 securities are eligible, all eligible securities are selected and the Index consists of less than 35 securities (each, an “Index Component”). The Index Components may change over time. The determination of the Index Universe and the selection of Index Components is made by the Index Provider based on its proprietary methodology. Selection Day is 20 business days before the Rebalance Day. The Index is adjusted on the Rebalance Day which is the first Wednesday in February, May, August, and November. If that day is not a trading day the Rebalance Day will be the next trading day.

 

On each Selection Day, each Index Component is assigned an initial weight according to its free float market capitalization. Afterwards, the weights are adjusted by applying a weight cap for each Index Component by re-distributing any weight which is larger than 4.5% to the other Index Components with an initial weight lower than 4.5% proportionally in an iterative manner. The weighting process seeks to weight Index Components primarily based on market capitalization, but subject to caps on the weights of the individual securities. This process is designed to limit the amount of concentration in the largest market capitalization companies and increase company-level diversification.

 

The Fund’s Investment Strategy

 

The Fund will invest, under normal circumstances, at least 80% of its net assets, plus the amount of any borrowings for investment purposes, in securities that comprise the Index and in American Depositary Receipts (“ADRs”) and Global Depositary Receipts (“GDRs”) based on the securities in the Index. The Fund will also invest, under normal circumstances, at least 80% of its net assets, plus borrowings for investment purposes, in securities of Cybersecurity Companies and in ADRs and GDRs based on such securities. The Fund’s 80% Policies are non-fundamental and require 60 days prior written notice to shareholders before each can be changed.

 

The Fund uses a “passive” or indexing approach to try to achieve the Fund’s investment objective. Unlike many investment companies, the Fund does not try to beat the Index and does not seek temporary defensive positions when markets decline or appear overvalued. Indexing may eliminate the chance that the Fund will substantially outperform the Index but also may reduce some of the risks of active management, such as poor security selection. Indexing seeks to achieve lower costs and better after-tax performance by aiming to keep portfolio turnover low in comparison to actively managed investment companies.

 

The Fund will generally use a “replication” strategy to achieve its investment objective, meaning it will invest in all of the component securities of the Index in the same approximate proportion as in the Index. However, the Fund may utilize a representative sampling strategy with respect to the Index when a replication strategy might be detrimental or disadvantageous to shareholders, such as when there are practical difficulties or substantial costs involved in compiling a portfolio of equity securities to replicate the Index, in instances in which a security in the Index becomes temporarily illiquid, unavailable or less liquid, or as a result of legal restrictions or limitations (such as tax diversification requirements or sanctions imposed by the U.S. government) that apply to the Fund but not the Index. The Adviser expects that, over time, the correlation between the Fund’s performance and that of the Index, before fees and expenses, will be 95% or better. If the Fund uses a replication strategy, it can be expected to have greater correlation to the Index than if it uses a representative sampling strategy.

 

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The Fund is considered to be non-diversified, which means that it may invest more of its assets in the securities of a single issuer or a smaller number of issuers than if it were a diversified fund. To the extent the Index is concentrated (i.e., holds 25% or more of its total assets) in a particular industry or group of industries, the Fund is expected to be concentrated in that industry or group of industries to approximately the same extent that the Index concentrates in an industry or group of industries. As of June 30, 2023, a significant portion of the Index is represented by securities in the software industry, and had the information technology and communications sectors. The degree to which components of the Index represent certain sectors or industries may change over time. 

 

The Fund may lend securities representing up to one-third of the value of the Fund’s total assets (including the value of the collateral received).

 

Principal Risks of Investing in the Fund

 

You can lose money on your investment in the Fund. The Fund is subject to the risks summarized below. Some or all of these risks may adversely affect the Fund’s net asset value per share (“NAV”), trading price, yield, total return and/or ability to meet its objectives. For more information about the risks of investing in the Fund, see the section in the Fund’s prospectus entitled “Additional Information about the Principal Risks of Investing in the Funds.” Each risk summarized below is considered a “principal risk” of investing in the Fund, regardless of the order in which it appears.

 

Risks Related to Investing in Cybersecurity Companies: Cybersecurity companies may have limited product lines, markets, financial resources or personnel. These companies typically face intense competition and potentially rapid product obsolescence. Cybersecurity companies may be adversely impacted by government regulations and actions, and may be subject to additional regulatory oversight with regard to privacy concerns and cybersecurity risk. Cybersecurity companies may also be negatively affected by the decline or fluctuation of subscription renewal rates for their products and services, which may have an adverse effect on profit margins. These companies are also heavily dependent on intellectual property rights and may be adversely affected by loss or impairment of those rights. Cybersecurity companies, especially smaller companies, tend to be more volatile than companies that do not rely heavily on technology. The customers and/or suppliers of Cybersecurity companies may be concentrated in a particular country, region or industry. Any adverse event affecting one of these countries, regions or industries could have a negative impact on Cybersecurity companies. Confronting cyberthreats amid increasing remote work environments could result in challenges for Cybersecurity companies.

 

Calculation Methodology Risk. The Index Provider relies directly or indirectly on various sources of information to assess the criteria of issuers included in the Index, including information that may be based on assumptions and estimates. Neither the Fund, the Index Provider, or the Adviser can offer assurances that the Index’s calculation methodology or sources of information will provide an accurate assessment of included issuers or a correct valuation of securities, nor can they guarantee the availability or timeliness of the production of the Index.

 

Concentration Risk. To the extent that the Index concentrates in investments related to a particular industry or group of industries, the Fund will also concentrate its investments to approximately the same extent. In such event, the Fund’s performance will be particularly susceptible to adverse events impacting such industry, which may include, but are not limited to, the following: general economic conditions or cyclical market patterns that could negatively affect supply and demand; competition for resources; adverse labor relations; political or world events; obsolescence of technologies; and increased competition or new product introductions that may affect the profitability or viability of companies in a particular industry. As a result, the value of the Fund’s investments may rise and fall more than the value of shares of a fund that invests in securities of companies in a broader range of industries.

 

Software Industry Risk. The software industry can be significantly affected by intense competition, aggressive pricing, technological innovations, and product obsolescence. Companies in the application software industry, in particular, may also be negatively affected by the decline or fluctuation of subscription renewal rates for their products and services, which may have an adverse effect on profit margins. Companies in the systems software industry may be adversely affected by, among other things, actual or perceived security vulnerabilities in in their products and services, which may result in individual or class action lawsuits, state or federal enforcement actions and other remediation costs.

 

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Currency Risk. The Fund’s NAV is determined on the basis of the U.S. dollar, therefore, the Fund may lose value if the local currency of a foreign market depreciates against the U.S. dollar, even if the local currency value of the Fund’s holdings goes up. Currency exchange rates can be very volatile and can change quickly and unpredictably, which may adversely affect the Fund. The Fund may also be subject to delays in converting or transferring U.S. dollars to foreign currencies for the purpose of purchasing portfolio investments. This may hinder the Fund’s performance, including because any delay could result in the Fund missing an investment opportunity and purchasing securities at a higher price than originally intended, or incurring cash drag.

 

Depositary Receipts Risk. The Fund may invest in depositary receipts (e.g., ADRs and GDRs) which involve similar risks to those associated with investments in foreign securities. Investments in depositary receipts may be less liquid than the underlying shares in their primary trading market and, if not included in the Index, may negatively affect the Fund’s ability to replicate the performance of the Index. The issuers of depositary receipts may discontinue issuing new depositary receipts and withdraw existing depositary receipts at any time, which may result in costs and delays in the distribution of the underlying assets to the Fund and may negatively impact the Fund’s performance and the Fund’s ability to replicate/track the performance of its Index.

 

Equity Market Risk. The equity securities held in the Fund’s portfolio may experience sudden, unpredictable drops in value or long periods of decline in value. This may occur because of factors that affect securities markets generally or factors affecting specific industries, sectors or companies in which the Fund invests. Common stocks are susceptible to general stock market fluctuations and to volatile increases and decreases in value as market confidence in and perceptions of their issuers change. The Fund’s NAV and market price may fluctuate significantly in response to these and other factors. As a result, an investor could lose money over short or long periods of time.

 

ETF Risks. The Fund is an ETF and, as a result of an ETF’s structure, is exposed to the following risks:

 

Authorized Participants (“APs”), Market Makers, and Liquidity Providers Concentration Risk. The Fund has a limited number of financial institutions that may act as APs. In addition, there may be a limited number of market makers and/or liquidity providers in the marketplace. To the extent either of the following events occur, shares of the Fund may trade at a material discount to NAV and possibly face delisting: (i) APs exit the business or otherwise become unable to process creation and/or redemption orders and no other APs step forward to perform these services, or (ii) market makers and/or liquidity providers exit the business or significantly reduce their business activities and no other entities step forward to perform their functions.

 

Costs of Buying or Selling Shares of the Fund. Due to the costs of buying or selling shares of the Fund, including brokerage commissions imposed by brokers and bid/ask spreads, frequent trading of shares of the Fund may significantly reduce investment results and an investment in shares of the Fund may not be advisable for investors who anticipate regularly making small investments.

 

Shares of the Fund May Trade at Prices Other Than NAV. As with all ETFs, shares of the Fund may be bought and sold in the secondary market at market prices. The price of shares of the Fund, like the price of all traded securities, will be subject to factors such as supply and demand, as well as the current value of the Fund’s portfolio holdings. Although it is expected that the market price of the shares of the Fund will approximate the Fund’s NAV, there may be times when the market price of the shares is more than the NAV intra-day (premium) or less than the NAV intra-day (discount). This risk is heightened in times of market volatility, periods of steep market declines, and periods when there is limited trading activity for shares in the secondary market, in which case such premiums or discounts may be significant.

 

Trading. Although shares of the Fund are listed for trading on a national securities exchange, such as The NASDAQ Stock Market LLC (the “Exchange”), and may be traded on U.S. exchanges other than the Exchange, there can be no assurance that shares of the Fund will trade with any volume, or at all, on any stock exchange. In stressed market conditions, the liquidity of shares of the Fund may begin to mirror the liquidity of the Fund’s underlying portfolio holdings, which can be significantly less liquid than shares of the Fund, and this could lead to differences between the market price of the shares of the Fund and the underlying value of those shares.

 

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Foreign Securities Risk. The Fund’s investments in foreign securities can be riskier than U.S. securities investments. Investments in the securities of foreign issuers (including investments in ADRs and GDRs) are subject to the risks associated with investing in those foreign markets, such as heightened risks of inflation or nationalization. The prices of foreign securities and the prices of U.S. securities have, at times, moved in opposite directions. In addition, securities of foreign issuers may lose value due to political, economic and geographic events affecting a foreign issuer or market. During periods of social, political or economic instability in a country or region, the value of a foreign security traded on U.S. exchanges could be affected by, among other things, increasing price volatility, illiquidity, or the closure of the primary market on which the security (or the security underlying the ADR or GDR) is traded. You may lose money due to political, economic and geographic events affecting a foreign issuer or market.

 

Geographic Risk. A natural, biological or other disaster could occur in a geographic region in which the Fund invests, which could affect the economy or particular business operations of companies in the specific geographic region, causing an adverse impact on the Fund’s investments in the affected region or in a region economically tied to the affected region. The securities in which the Fund invests and, consequently, the Fund are also subject to specific risks as a result of their business operations, including, but not limited to:

 

Risk of Investing in Developed Markets. The Fund’s investment in a developed country issuer may subject the Fund to regulatory, political, currency, security, economic and other risks associated with developed countries. Developed countries tend to represent a significant portion of the global economy and have generally experienced slower economic growth than some less developed countries. Certain developed countries have experienced security concerns, such as terrorism and strained international relations. Incidents involving a country’s or region’s security may cause uncertainty in its markets and may adversely affect its economy and the Fund’s investments. In addition, developed countries may be impacted by changes to the economic conditions of certain key trading partners, regulatory burdens, debt burdens and the price or availability of certain commodities.

 

Risk of Investing in North America. A decrease in imports or exports, changes in trade regulations or an economic recession in any North American country can have a significant economic effect on the entire North American region and on some or all of the North American countries to which the Fund has economic exposure. The U.S. is Canada’s and Mexico’s largest trading and investment partner. The Canadian and Mexican economies are significantly affected by developments in the U.S. economy. Since the implementation of the North American Free Trade Agreement (“NAFTA”) in 1994 among Canada, the U.S. and Mexico, total merchandise trade among the three countries has increased. However, political developments in the U.S., including the renegotiation of NAFTA and imposition of tariffs by the U.S., may have implications for the trade arrangements among the U.S., Mexico and Canada, which could negatively affect the value of securities held by the Fund. Policy and legislative changes in any of the three countries may have a significant effect on North American economies generally, as well as on the value of certain securities held by the Fund.

 

Risk of Investing in Asia. Many Asian economies have experienced rapid growth and industrialization in recent years, but there is no assurance that this growth rate will be maintained. Other Asian economies, however, have experienced high inflation, high unemployment, currency devaluations and restrictions, and over-extension of credit. Geopolitical hostility, political instability, as well as economic or environmental events in any one Asian country may have a significant economic effect on the entire Asian region, as well as on major trading partners outside Asia. Any adverse event in the Asian markets may have a significant adverse effect on some or all of the economies of the countries in which the Fund invests. Many Asian countries are subject to political risk, including political instability, corruption and regional conflict with neighboring countries. North Korea and South Korea each have substantial military capabilities, and historical tensions between the two countries present the risk of war. Escalated tensions involving the two countries and any outbreak of hostilities between the two countries, or even the threat of an outbreak of hostilities, could have a severe adverse effect on the entire Asian region. Certain Asian countries have also developed increasingly strained relationships with the U.S., and if these relations were to worsen, they could adversely affect Asian issuers that rely on the U.S. for trade. In addition, many Asian countries are subject to social and labor risks associated with demands for improved political, economic and social conditions.

 

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International Closed Market Trading Risk. To the extent that the underlying investments held by the Fund trade on foreign exchanges that may be closed when the securities exchange on which the Fund’s Shares trade is open, there are likely to be deviations between the current price of such an underlying security and the last quoted price for the underlying security (i.e., the Fund’s quote from the closed foreign market). These deviations could result in premiums or discounts to the Fund’s NAV that may be greater than those experienced by other ETFs.

 

Large-Capitalization Investing Risk. The Fund’s performance may be adversely affected if securities of large-capitalization companies underperform securities of smaller-capitalization companies or the market as a whole. The securities of large-capitalization companies may be relatively mature compared to smaller companies and therefore subject to slower growth during times of economic expansion.

 

Liquidity Risk. The Fund’s investments are subject to liquidity risk, which exists when an investment is or becomes difficult or impossible to purchase or sell at an advantageous time and price. If a transaction is particularly large or if the relevant market is or becomes illiquid, it may not be possible to initiate a transaction or liquidate a position, which may cause the Fund to suffer significant losses and difficulties in meeting redemptions. Liquidity risk may be the result of, among other things, market turmoil, the reduced number and capacity of traditional market participants, or the lack of an active trading market. Markets for securities or financial instruments could be disrupted by a number of events, including, but not limited to, an economic crisis, natural disasters, new legislation or regulatory changes inside or outside the U.S. Liquid investments may become less liquid after being purchased by the Fund, particularly during periods of market stress. In addition, if a number of securities held by the Fund stop trading, it may have a cascading effect and cause the Fund to halt trading. Volatility in market prices will increase the risk of the Fund being subject to a trading halt. Certain countries in which the Fund may invest may be subject to extended settlement delays and/or foreign holidays, during which the Fund will unlikely be able to convert holdings to cash.

 

Mid-Capitalization Companies Risk. Mid-capitalization companies may have greater price volatility, lower trading volume and less liquidity than large-capitalization companies. In addition, mid-capitalization companies may have smaller revenues, narrower product lines, less management depth and experience, smaller shares of their product or service markets, fewer financial resources and less competitive strength than large-capitalization companies.

 

New Adviser Risk. Although the Adviser’s principals and the Fund’s portfolio managers have experience managing investments in the past, the Adviser is a newly-formed entity and has no experience managing investments for an ETF, which may limit the Adviser’s effectiveness.

 

New Fund Risk. The Fund is new with no operating history. As a result, there can be no assurance that the Fund will grow to or maintain an economically viable size, in which case it may experience greater tracking error to its Index than it otherwise would at higher asset levels, or it could ultimately liquidate. The Fund’s distributor does not maintain a secondary market in Fund shares.

 

Non-Diversification Risk. Although the Fund intends to invest in a variety of securities and instruments, the Fund is considered to be non-diversified, which means that it may invest more of its assets in the securities of a single issuer or a smaller number of issuers than if it were a diversified fund. As a result, the Fund may be more exposed to the risks associated with and developments affecting an individual issuer or a smaller number of issuers than a fund that invests more widely. This may increase the Fund’s volatility and cause the performance of a relatively smaller number of issuers to have a greater impact on the Fund’s performance.

 

Operational Risk. The Fund is exposed to operational risks arising from a number of factors, including, but not limited to, human error, processing and communication errors, errors of the Fund’s service providers, counterparties or other third parties, failed or inadequate processes and technology or systems failures. The Fund and the Adviser seek to reduce these operational risks through controls and procedures. However, these measures do not address every possible risk and may be inadequate to address significant operational risks.

 

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Cybersecurity Risk. Failures or breaches of the electronic systems of the Fund and/or the Fund’s service providers, including the Adviser, Index Provider, market makers, Authorized Participants or the issuers of securities in which the Fund invests have the ability to cause disruptions, negatively impact the Fund’s business operations and/or potentially result in financial losses to the Fund and its shareholders. While the Fund has established business continuity plans and risk management systems seeking to address system breaches or failures, there are inherent limitations in such plans and systems. Furthermore, the Fund cannot control the cybersecurity plans and systems of the Fund’s Index Provider, Adviser, other service providers, market makers, Authorized Participants or issuers of securities in which the Fund invests.

 

Passive Investment Risk. The Fund is not actively managed and the Adviser would not sell a security due to current or projected underperformance of a security, industry or sector, unless that security is removed from the Index or the selling of shares of that security is otherwise required upon a reconstitution of the Index in accordance with the Index methodology. The Fund invests in securities included in the Index, regardless of their investment merits. The Fund does not take defensive positions under any market conditions, including conditions that are adverse to the performance of the Fund.

 

Sector Risk. To the extent the Fund invests more heavily in particular sectors of the economy, its performance will be especially sensitive to developments that significantly affect those sectors.

 

Information Technology Sector Risk. Market or economic factors impacting information technology companies and companies that rely heavily on technological advances could have a significant effect on the value of the Fund’s investments. The value of stocks of information technology companies and companies that rely heavily on technology is particularly vulnerable to rapid changes in technology product cycles, rapid product obsolescence, government regulation and competition, both domestically and internationally, including competition from foreign competitors with lower production costs. Stocks of information technology companies and companies that rely heavily on technology, especially those of smaller, less-seasoned companies, tend to be more volatile than the overall market. Information technology companies are heavily dependent on patent and intellectual property rights, the loss or impairment of which may adversely affect profitability.

 

Communications Sector Risk. Communications companies are subject to extensive government regulation. The costs of complying with governmental regulations, delays or failure to receive required regulatory approvals, or the enactment of new adverse regulatory requirements may adversely affect the business of the such companies. Companies in the communications sector can also be significantly affected by intense competition, including competition with alternative technologies such as wireless communications (including with 5G and other technologies), product compatibility, consumer preferences, rapid product obsolescence, and research and development of new products. Technological innovations may make the products and services of such companies obsolete.

 

Securities Lending Risk. To the extent the Fund lends its securities, it may be subject to the following risks: (1) the securities in which the collateral is invested may not perform sufficiently to cover the applicable rebate rates paid to borrowers and related administrative costs; (2) delays may occur in the recovery of securities from borrowers, which could interfere with the Fund’s ability to vote proxies or to settle transactions; and (3) although borrowers of the Fund’s securities typically provide collateral in the form of cash that is reinvested in securities, there is the risk of possible loss of rights in the collateral should the borrower fail financially.

 

Small-Capitalization Companies Risk. Compared to mid- and large-capitalization companies, smaller capitalization companies may be less stable and more susceptible to adverse developments, and their securities may be more volatile and less liquid.

 

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Thematic Investing Risk. The Fund relies on the Index Provider for the identification of securities for inclusion in the Index that reflect themes and sub-themes, and its performance may suffer if such securities are not correctly identified or if a theme or sub-theme develops in an unexpected manner. Performance may also suffer if the stocks included in the Index do not benefit from the development of such themes or sub-themes. Performance may also be impacted by the inclusion of non-theme relevant exposures in the Index. There is no guarantee that the Index will reflect the theme and sub-theme exposures intended.

 

Tracking Risk. The Fund’s return may not track the return of the Index for a number of reasons. For example, the Fund incurs a number of operating expenses not applicable to the Index, and incurs costs in buying and selling securities, especially when rebalancing the Fund’s securities holdings to reflect changes in the composition of the Index. In addition, when the Fund uses a representative sampling approach, the Fund may not be as well correlated with the return of the Index as when the Fund purchases all of the securities in the Index in the proportions in which they are represented in the Index.

 

Valuation Risk. Independent market quotations for certain investments held by the Fund may not be readily available, and such investments may be fair valued or valued by a pricing service at an evaluated price. These valuations involve subjectivity and different market participants may assign different prices to the same investment. As a result, there is a risk that the Fund may not be able to sell an investment at the price assigned to the investment by the Fund. In addition, the securities in which the Fund invests may trade on days that the Fund does not price its shares; as a result, the value of Fund shares may change on days when investors cannot purchase or sell their Fund holdings.

 

Fund Performance

 

Performance information for the Fund is not included because the Fund did not commence operations prior to the date of this Prospectus. In the future, performance for the Fund will be presented in this section. Updated performance information will be available on the Fund’s website at www.ThemesETFs.com or by calling the Fund toll-free at 1-877-337-0500.

 

Management

 

Investment Adviser

 

Themes Management Company, LLC (the “Adviser”) serves as investment adviser to the Fund.

 

Portfolio Managers

 

Dingxun (Kevin) Shao, Vice President, Product Management & Development of the Adviser, and Calvin Tsang, CFA, Head of Product Management & Development of the Adviser, are jointly and primarily responsible for the day-to-day management of the Fund and have served as portfolio managers since the Fund’s inception.

 

Buying and Selling Fund Shares

 

The Fund is an ETF. This means that individual Shares of the Fund may only be purchased and sold in the secondary market through brokers at market prices, rather than NAV. Because Shares trade at market prices rather than NAV, Shares may trade at a price greater than NAV (premium) or less than NAV (discount).

 

The Fund generally issues and redeems shares at NAV only in large blocks of shares known as “Creation Units,” which only institutions or large investors may purchase or redeem. The Fund generally issues and redeems Creation Units in exchange for a portfolio of securities (the “Deposit Securities”) and/or a designated amount of U.S. cash that the Fund specifies each day.

 

Investors may incur costs attributable to the difference between the highest price a buyer is willing to pay to purchase Shares (bid) and the lowest price a seller is willing to accept for Shares (ask) when buying or selling Shares in the secondary market (the “bid-ask spread”). Recent information about the Fund, including its net asset value, market price, premiums and discounts, and bid-ask spreads is available on the Fund’s website at www.ThemesETFs.com.

 

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Tax Information

 

Fund distributions are generally taxable as ordinary income, qualified dividend income, or capital gains (or a combination), unless your investment is in an IRA or other tax-advantaged retirement account. Distributions may be taxable upon withdrawal from tax-deferred accounts.

 

Payments to Broker-Dealers and Other Financial Intermediaries

 

If you purchase the Fund through a broker or other financial intermediary (such as a bank), the Adviser and its related companies may pay the intermediary for activities related to the marketing and promotion of the Fund. These payments may create a conflict of interest by influencing the broker-dealer or other intermediary and your sales person to recommend the Fund over another investment. Ask your sales person or visit your financial intermediary’s website for more information.

 

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Themes European Luxury ETF

 

 

Investment Objective

 

The Themes European Luxury ETF (the “Fund”) is an exchange traded fund (“ETF”) that seeks to track the performance, before fees and expenses, of an index composed of European companies that have business operations in the luxury industry.

 

Fees and Expenses of the Fund

 

The following table describes the fees and expenses you may pay if you buy, hold, and sell shares of the Fund (“Shares”). You may pay other fees, such as brokerage commissions and other fees to financial intermediaries, which are not reflected in the table and Example below.

 

Annual Fund Operating Expenses (expenses that you pay each year as a percentage of the value of your investment)  
Management Fees 0.35%
Distribution and/or Service (12b-1) Fees None
Other Expenses* 0.00%
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses 0.35%

 

* Estimated for the current fiscal year

 

Example

The following example is intended to help retail investors compare the cost of investing in the Fund with the cost of investing in other funds. It illustrates the hypothetical expenses that such investors would incur over various periods if they were to invest $10,000 in the Fund for the time periods indicated and then redeem all of the Shares at the end of those periods. This example assumes that the Fund provides a return of 5% a year and that operating expenses remain the same. Although your actual costs may be higher or lower, based on these assumptions, your costs would be:

 

1 Year 3 Years
$36 $113

 

Portfolio Turnover

The Fund pays transaction costs, such as commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or “turns over” its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover rate may indicate higher transaction costs and may result in higher taxes when Fund Shares are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are not reflected in annual fund operating expenses or in the example, affect the Fund’s performance. Because the Fund is newly organized, portfolio turnover information is not yet available.

 

Principal Investment Strategies of the Fund

 

The Fund employs a “passive management” (or indexing) investment approach designed to track the performance, before fees and expenses, of the Solactive European Luxury Index (the “Index”). The Index is based on a proprietary methodology developed and maintained by Solactive AG (the “Index Provider”), which is an organization that is independent of, and unaffiliated with, the Fund and Themes Management Company, LLC, the Fund’s investment adviser (the “Adviser”).

 

The Index

 

The Index is designed to provide exposure to European companies that have business operations in the luxury industry. The Index is denominated in U.S. dollars. As of June 30, 2023, the Index was comprised of 25 companies with a market capitalization range of between approximately $1 billion and $473 billion and a weighted average market capitalization of approximately $46 billion.

 

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In constructing or adjusting the Index, the Index Provider identifies an “Index Universe” of companies that, on Selection Days (as defined below), fulfill the following requirements: 1) have a primary listing in a country classified as a developed country according to the Index Provider (Australia, Austria, Belgium, Canada, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Hong Kong, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Japan, the Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Singapore, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, the United Kingdom, and the United States), 2) are headquartered in one of the following European countries: Austria, Belgium, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Ireland, Italy, the Netherlands, Norway, Portugal, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland or the United Kingdom, 3) have a market capitalization of at least $100,000,000 and 4) have a minimum Average Daily Value Traded of at least $1 million over 1 month and over 6 months prior to and including the Selection Day. The Average Daily Value Traded for a security is the sum of daily value traded over the specified period divided by the number of trading days that fall in the specified period.

 

Based on the Index Universe, the initial composition of the Index, as well as any selection for an ordinary rebalance, is determined on the Selection Day by first screening publicly available information such as financial news, business profiles and company publications using the Index Provider’s proprietary natural language processing algorithm (“ARTIS®”) to identify companies that have or are expected to have exposure to the provision of products and/or services that contribute to the luxury industry. Companies are only eligible if they generate at least 50% of their revenues from the luxury industry, including companies involved in:

 

Luxury Accessories — Companies involved in the design, manufacturing and sale of luxury and designer accessories, including handbags, precision timepieces, jewelry, eyewear, leather goods, luggage and lifestyle products.

 

Premium Clothing — Companies engaged in the design, manufacture and sale of high-end or designer clothing, including men’s and women’s ready-to-wear garments, lingerie, sportswear, outerwear and footwear.

 

Luxury Beauty — Companies involved in the development, manufacture and distribution of high end beauty products, including perfumes and colognes, cosmetic and makeup products, premium haircare, skincare and bodycare products.

 

Cars and Yachts — Companies engaged in the design, production and sale of exclusive and luxurious automobiles and boats, including hypercars, supercars, sportscars and yachts.

 

Upscale Hospitality — Companies involved in the luxury or high-end hospitality business, including luxury hotels, resorts and spas.

 

Each company identified by ARTIS® receives a score that reflects its exposure to the Index strategy. This set of companies is then reviewed by the Index Provider and companies are removed from the selection process if they don’t have business operations consistent with the Index’s luxury theme. The remaining companies (“European Luxury Companies”) are ranked by their score (in descending order) and the top 25 companies are selected for inclusion in the Index (“Index Components”). The determination of the Index Universe and the selection of Index Components is made by the Index Provider based on its proprietary methodology.

 

“Selection Day” is 10 weekdays before the Rebalance Day. “Rebalance Day” is the third Friday in January and July. On each Selection Day, each Index Component is assigned an equal weight. Adjustments to the Index are made on Rebalance Day. The Index Components may change over time.

 

The Fund’s Investment Strategy

 

The Fund will invest, under normal circumstances, at least 80% of its net assets, plus the amount of any borrowings for investment purposes, in securities that comprise the Index and in American Depositary Receipts (“ADRs”) and Global Depositary Receipts (“GDRs”) based on the securities in the Index. The Fund will also invest, under normal circumstances, at least 80% of its net assets, plus borrowings for investment purposes, in securities of European Luxury Companies and in ADRs and GDRs based on such securities. The Index may include securities of large-, mid- and small-capitalization companies. The Fund’s 80% Policies are non-fundamental and require 60 days prior written notice to shareholders before each can be changed.

 

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The Fund uses a “passive” or indexing approach to try to achieve the Fund’s investment objective. Unlike many investment companies, the Fund does not try to beat the Index and does not seek temporary defensive positions when markets decline or appear overvalued. Indexing may eliminate the chance that the Fund will substantially outperform the Index but also may reduce some of the risks of active management, such as poor security selection. Indexing seeks to achieve lower costs and better after-tax performance by aiming to keep portfolio turnover low in comparison to actively managed investment companies.

 

The Fund will generally use a “replication” strategy to achieve its investment objective, meaning it will invest in all of the component securities of the Index in the same approximate proportion as in the Index. However, the Fund may utilize a representative sampling strategy with respect to the Index when a replication strategy might be detrimental or disadvantageous to shareholders, such as when there are practical difficulties or substantial costs involved in compiling a portfolio of equity securities to replicate the Index, in instances in which a security in the Index becomes temporarily illiquid, unavailable or less liquid, or as a result of legal restrictions or limitations (such as tax diversification requirements) that apply to the Fund but not the Index. The Adviser expects that, over time, the correlation between the Fund’s performance and that of the Index, before fees and expenses, will be 95% or better. If the Fund uses a replication strategy, it can be expected to have greater correlation to the Index than if it uses a representative sampling strategy.

 

The Fund is considered to be non-diversified, which means that it may invest more of its assets in the securities of a single issuer or a smaller number of issuers than if it were a diversified fund. To the extent the Index is concentrated (i.e., holds 25% or more of its total assets) in a particular industry or group of industries, the Fund is expected to be concentrated in that industry or group of industries to approximately the same extent that the Index concentrates in an industry or group of industries. As of June 30, 2023, a significant portion of the Index is represented by securities of companies in the luxury industry and the consumer discretionary sector. The degree to which Index Components represent certain sectors or industries may change over time. 

 

The Fund may lend securities representing up to one-third of the value of the Fund’s total assets (including the value of any collateral received).

 

Principal Risks of Investing in the Fund

 

You can lose money on your investment in the Fund. The Fund is subject to the risks summarized below. Some or all of these risks may adversely affect the Fund’s net asset value per share (“NAV”), trading price, yield, total return and/or ability to meet its objectives. For more information about the risks of investing in the Fund, see the section in the Fund’s prospectus entitled “Additional Information about the Principal Risks of Investing in the Funds.” Each risk summarized below is considered a “principal risk” of investing in the Fund, regardless of the order in which it appears.

 

Concentration Risk. To the extent that the Index concentrates in investments related to a particular industry or group of industries, the Fund will also concentrate its investments to approximately the same extent. In such event, the Fund’s performance will be particularly susceptible to adverse events impacting such industry, which may include, but are not limited to, the following: general economic conditions or cyclical market patterns that could negatively affect supply and demand; competition for resources; adverse labor relations; political or world events; obsolescence of technologies; and increased competition or new product introductions that may affect the profitability or viability of companies in a particular industry. As a result, the value of the Fund’s investments may rise and fall more than the value of shares of a fund that invests in securities of companies in a broader range of industries.

 

Luxury Industry Risk. Companies in the luxury goods industry may face intense competition and may be dependent on their ability to maintain brand image. Companies may be subject to changes in consumer preferences, and technologies employed by luxury goods companies may become obsolete. Companies in this industry are dependent on consumer spending and, as such, are likely to be sensitive to any downturns in the broader economy. Demand for products may be seasonal, and incorrect assessment of future demand can lead to overproduction or underproduction, which can impact company profitability.

 

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Calculation Methodology Risk. The Index relies directly or indirectly on various sources of information to assess the criteria of issuers included in the Index, including information that may be based on assumptions and estimates. Neither the Fund, the Index Provider, or the Adviser (as defined below) can offer assurances that the Index’s calculation methodology or sources of information will provide an accurate assessment of included issuers or a correct valuation of securities, nor can they guarantee the availability or timeliness of the production of the Index.

 

Currency Risk. The Fund may invest in securities denominated in foreign currencies. Because the Fund’s NAV is determined in U.S. dollars, the Fund’s NAV could decline if currencies of the underlying securities depreciate against the U.S. dollar or if there are delays or limits on repatriation of such currencies. Currency exchange rates can be very volatile and can change quickly and unpredictably. As a result, the Fund’s NAV may change quickly and without warning, which could have a significant negative impact on the Fund.

 

Depositary Receipts Risk. The Fund may invest in depositary receipts (e.g., ADRs and GDRs) which involve similar risks to those associated with investments in foreign securities. Investments in depositary receipts may be less liquid than the underlying shares in their primary trading market and, if not included in the Index, may negatively affect the Fund’s ability to replicate the performance of the Index. The issuers of depositary receipts may discontinue issuing new depositary receipts and withdraw existing depositary receipts at any time, which may result in costs and delays in the distribution of the underlying assets to the Fund and may negatively impact the Fund’s performance and the Fund’s ability to replicate/track the performance of its Index.

 

Equity Market Risk. The equity securities held in the Fund’s portfolio may experience sudden, unpredictable drops in value or long periods of decline in value. This may occur because of factors that affect securities markets generally or factors affecting specific industries, sectors or companies in which the Fund invests. Common stocks are susceptible to general stock market fluctuations and to volatile increases and decreases in value as market confidence in and perceptions of their issuers change. The Fund’s NAV and market price may fluctuate significantly in response to these and other factors. As a result, an investor could lose money over short or long periods of time.

 

ETF Risks. The Fund is an ETF and, as a result of an ETF’s structure, is exposed to the following risks:

 

Authorized Participants (“APs”), Market Makers, and Liquidity Providers Concentration Risk. The Fund has a limited number of financial institutions that may act as APs. In addition, there may be a limited number of market makers and/or liquidity providers in the marketplace. To the extent either of the following events occur, shares of the Fund may trade at a material discount to NAV and possibly face delisting: (i) APs exit the business or otherwise become unable to process creation and/or redemption orders and no other APs step forward to perform these services, or (ii) market makers and/or liquidity providers exit the business or significantly reduce their business activities and no other entities step forward to perform their functions.

 

Costs of Buying or Selling Shares of the Fund. Due to the costs of buying or selling shares of the Fund, including brokerage commissions imposed by brokers and bid/ask spreads, frequent trading of shares of the Fund may significantly reduce investment results and an investment in shares of the Fund may not be advisable for investors who anticipate regularly making small investments.

 

Shares of the Fund May Trade at Prices Other Than NAV. As with all ETFs, shares of the Fund may be bought and sold in the secondary market at market prices. The price of shares of the Fund, like the price of all traded securities, will be subject to factors such as supply and demand, as well as the current value of the Fund’s portfolio holdings. Although it is expected that the market price of the shares of the Fund will approximate the Fund’s NAV, there may be times when the market price of the shares is more than the NAV intra-day (premium) or less than the NAV intra-day (discount). This risk is heightened in times of market volatility, periods of steep market declines, and periods when there is limited trading activity for shares in the secondary market, in which case such premiums or discounts may be significant.

 

Trading. Although shares of the Fund are listed for trading on a national securities exchange, such as The NASDAQ Stock Market LLC (the “Exchange”), and may be traded on U.S. exchanges other than the Exchange, there can be no assurance that shares of the Fund will trade with any volume, or at all, on any stock exchange. In stressed market conditions, the liquidity of shares of the Fund may begin to mirror the liquidity of the Fund’s underlying portfolio holdings, which can be significantly less liquid than shares of the Fund, and this could lead to differences between the market price of the shares of the Fund and the underlying value of those shares.

 

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Foreign Securities Risk. The Fund’s investments in foreign securities can be riskier than U.S. securities investments. Investments in the securities of foreign issuers (including investments in ADRs and GDRs) are subject to the risks associated with investing in those foreign markets, such as heightened risks of inflation or nationalization. The prices of foreign securities and the prices of U.S. securities have, at times, moved in opposite directions. In addition, securities of foreign issuers may lose value due to political, economic and geographic events affecting a foreign issuer or market. During periods of social, political or economic instability in a country or region, the value of a foreign security traded on U.S. exchanges could be affected by, among other things, increasing price volatility, illiquidity, or the closure of the primary market on which the security (or the security underlying the ADR or GDR) is traded. You may lose money due to political, economic and geographic events affecting a foreign issuer or market.

 

Geographic Risk. A natural, biological or other disaster could occur in a geographic region in which the Fund invests, which could affect the economy or particular business operations of companies in the specific geographic region, causing an adverse impact on the Fund’s investments in the affected region or in a region economically tied to the affected region. The securities in which the Fund invests and, consequently, the Fund are also subject to specific risks as a result of their business operations, including, but not limited to:

 

Risk of Investing in Developed Markets. The Fund’s investment in a developed country issuer may subject the Fund to regulatory, political, currency, security, economic and other risks associated with developed countries. Developed countries tend to represent a significant portion of the global economy and have generally experienced slower economic growth than some less developed countries. Certain developed countries have experienced security concerns, such as terrorism and strained international relations. Incidents involving a country’s or region’s security may cause uncertainty in its markets and may adversely affect its economy and the Fund’s investments. In addition, developed countries may be impacted by changes to the economic conditions of certain key trading partners, regulatory burdens, debt burdens and the price or availability of certain commodities.

 

Risk of Investing in Europe. The economies of Europe are highly dependent on each other, both as key trading partners and, in many cases, as fellow members maintaining the euro. Decreasing European imports, new trade regulations, changes in exchange rates, a recession in Europe, or a slowing of economic growth in this region could have an adverse impact on the securities in which the Fund invests. Reduction in trading activity among European countries may cause an adverse impact on each nation’s individual economies. The Economic and Monetary Union of the European Union (the “EU”) requires compliance with restrictions on inflation rates, deficits, interest rates, debt levels and fiscal and monetary controls, each of which may significantly affect every country in Europe, including those countries that are not members of the EU. Decreasing imports or exports, changes in governmental or EU regulations on trade, changes in the exchange rate of the euro, the default or threat of default by an EU member country on its sovereign debt, and recessions in an EU member country may have a significant adverse effect on the economies of EU member countries and their trading partners.

 

Tracking Risk. The Fund’s return may not track the return of the Index for a number of reasons. For example, the Fund incurs a number of operating expenses not applicable to the Index, and incurs costs in buying and selling securities, especially when rebalancing the Fund’s securities holdings to reflect changes in the composition of the Index. In addition, when the Fund uses a representative sampling approach, the Fund may not be as well correlated with the return of the Index as when the Fund purchases all of the securities in the Index in the proportions in which they are represented in the Index.

 

International Closed Market Trading Risk. To the extent that the underlying investments held by the Fund trade on foreign exchanges that may be closed when the securities exchange on which the Fund’s Shares trade is open, there are likely to be deviations between the current price of such an underlying security and the last quoted price for the underlying security (i.e., the Fund’s quote from the closed foreign market). These deviations could result in premiums or discounts to the Fund’s NAV that may be greater than those experienced by other ETFs.

 

Large-Capitalization Investing Risk. The Fund’s performance may be adversely affected if securities of large-capitalization companies underperform securities of smaller-capitalization companies or the market as a whole. The securities of large-capitalization companies may be relatively mature compared to smaller companies and therefore subject to slower growth during times of economic expansion.

 

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Liquidity Risk. The Fund’s investments are subject to liquidity risk, which exists when an investment is or becomes difficult or impossible to purchase or sell at an advantageous time and price. If a transaction is particularly large or if the relevant market is or becomes illiquid, it may not be possible to initiate a transaction or liquidate a position, which may cause the Fund to suffer significant losses and difficulties in meeting redemptions. Liquidity risk may be the result of, among other things, market turmoil, the reduced number and capacity of traditional market participants, or the lack of an active trading market. Markets for securities or financial instruments could be disrupted by a number of events, including, but not limited to, an economic crisis, natural disasters, new legislation or regulatory changes inside or outside the U.S. Liquid investments may become less liquid after being purchased by the Fund, particularly during periods of market stress. In addition, if a number of securities held by the Fund stop trading, it may have a cascading effect and cause the Fund to halt trading. Volatility in market prices will increase the risk of the Fund being subject to a trading halt. Certain countries in which the Fund may invest may be subject to extended settlement delays and/or foreign holidays, during which the Fund will unlikely be able to convert holdings to cash.

 

Mid-Capitalization Companies Risk. Mid-capitalization companies may have greater price volatility, lower trading volume and less liquidity than large-capitalization companies. In addition, mid-capitalization companies may have smaller revenues, narrower product lines, less management depth and experience, smaller shares of their product or service markets, fewer financial resources and less competitive strength than large-capitalization companies.

 

New Adviser Risk. Although the Adviser’s principals and the Fund’s portfolio managers have experience managing investments in the past, the Adviser is a newly-formed entity and has no experience managing investments for an ETF, which may limit the Adviser’s effectiveness.

 

New Fund Risk. The Fund is new with no operating history. As a result, there can be no assurance that the Fund will grow to or maintain an economically viable size, in which case it may experience greater tracking error to its Index than it otherwise would at higher asset levels, or it could ultimately liquidate. The Fund’s distributor does not maintain a secondary market in Fund shares.

 

Non-Diversification Risk. Although the Fund intends to invest in a variety of securities and instruments, the Fund is considered to be non-diversified, which means that it may invest more of its assets in the securities of a single issuer or a smaller number of issuers than if it were a diversified fund. As a result, the Fund may be more exposed to the risks associated with and developments affecting an individual issuer or a smaller number of issuers than a fund that invests more widely. This may increase the Fund’s volatility and cause the performance of a relatively smaller number of issuers to have a greater impact on the Fund’s performance.

 

Operational Risk. The Fund is exposed to operational risks arising from a number of factors, including, but not limited to, human error, processing and communication errors, errors of the Fund’s service providers, counterparties or other third parties, failed or inadequate processes and technology or systems failures. The Fund and the Adviser seek to reduce these operational risks through controls and procedures. However, these measures do not address every possible risk and may be inadequate to address significant operational risks.

 

Cybersecurity Risk. Failures or breaches of the electronic systems of the Fund and/or the Fund’s service providers, including the Adviser, Index Provider, market makers, Authorized Participants or the issuers of securities in which the Fund invests have the ability to cause disruptions, negatively impact the Fund’s business operations and/or potentially result in financial losses to the Fund and its shareholders. While the Fund has established business continuity plans and risk management systems seeking to address system breaches or failures, there are inherent limitations in such plans and systems. Furthermore, the Fund cannot control the cybersecurity plans and systems of the Fund’s Index Provider, Adviser, other service providers, market makers, Authorized Participants or issuers of securities in which the Fund invests.

 

Passive Investment Risk. The Fund is not actively managed and the Adviser would not sell a security due to current or projected underperformance of a security, industry or sector, unless that security is removed from the Index or the selling of shares of that security is otherwise required upon a reconstitution of the Index in accordance with the Index methodology. The Fund invests in securities included in the Index, regardless of their investment merits. The Fund does not take defensive positions under any market conditions, including conditions that are adverse to the performance of the Fund.

 

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Sector Risk. To the extent the Fund invests more heavily in particular sectors of the economy, its performance will be especially sensitive to developments that significantly affect those sectors.

 

Consumer Discretionary Sector Risk. The success of consumer product manufacturers and retailers is tied closely to the performance of domestic and international economies, interest rates, exchange rates, competition, consumer confidence, changes in demographics and consumer preferences. Companies in the consumer discretionary sector depend heavily on disposable household income and consumer spending, and may be strongly affected by social trends and marketing campaigns. These companies may be subject to severe competition, which may have an adverse impact on their profitability.

 

Securities Lending Risk. To the extent the Fund lends its securities, it may be subject to the following risks: (1) the securities in which the collateral is invested may not perform sufficiently to cover the applicable rebate rates paid to borrowers and related administrative costs; (2) delays may occur in the recovery of securities from borrowers, which could interfere with the Fund’s ability to vote proxies or to settle transactions; and (3) although borrowers of the Fund’s securities typically provide collateral in the form of cash that is reinvested in securities, there is the risk of possible loss of rights in the collateral should the borrower fail financially.

 

Small-Capitalization Companies Risk. Compared to mid- and large-capitalization companies, small-capitalization companies may be less stable and more susceptible to adverse developments, and their securities may be more volatile and less liquid.

 

Thematic Investing Risk. The Fund relies on the Index Provider for the identification of securities for inclusion in the Index that reflect themes and sub-themes, and its performance may suffer if such securities are not correctly identified or if a theme or sub-theme develops in an unexpected manner. Performance may also suffer if the stocks included in the Index do not benefit from the development of such themes or sub-themes. Performance may also be impacted by the inclusion of non-theme relevant exposures in the Index. There is no guarantee that the Index will reflect the theme and sub-theme exposures intended.

 

Natural Language Processing (NLP) Model Risk. The Index Provider uses NLP models to assist in the development of the Fund’s Index. The Index’s investment theme is created by the Index Provider and the Index Provider’s description of the theme is used by the NLP screening models to identify relevant companies for index consideration. The investment theme must be accurately described in order for the NLP models to identify companies that reflect the themes and sub-themes of the Index. If the description of the theme is incorrect or incomplete, the NLP model may identify companies that are not relevant to the Fund’s investment theme or fail to identify companies that are relevant. As a result, securities may be included in or excluded from the Index that would have been excluded or included had the description of the theme been correct and complete. If the composition of the Index reflects such errors, the Fund’s portfolio can be expected to also reflect the errors. There is no guarantee that the Index will reflect the theme and sub-theme exposures intended. The Index Provider relies on the integrity of the data being analyzed and its review processes could be adversely affected if erroneous or outdated data is utilized.

 

Valuation Risk. Independent market quotations for certain investments held by the Fund may not be readily available, and such investments may be fair valued or valued by a pricing service at an evaluated price. These valuations involve subjectivity and different market participants may assign different prices to the same investment. As a result, there is a risk that the Fund may not be able to sell an investment at the price assigned to the investment by the Fund. In addition, the securities in which the Fund invests may trade on days that the Fund does not price its shares; as a result, the value of Fund shares may change on days when investors cannot purchase or sell their Fund holdings.

 

Fund Performance

 

Performance information for the Fund is not included because the Fund did not commence operations prior to the date of this Prospectus. In the future, performance for the Fund will be presented in this section. Updated performance information will be available on the Fund’s website at www.ThemesETFs.com or by calling the Fund toll-free at _________.

 

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Management

 

Investment Adviser

 

Themes Management Company, LLC (the “Adviser”) serves as investment adviser to the Fund.

 

Portfolio Managers

 

Dingxun (Kevin) Shao, Vice President, Product Management & Development of the Adviser, and Calvin Tsang, CFA, Head of Product Management & Development of the Adviser, are jointly and primarily responsible for the day-to-day management of the Fund and have served as portfolio managers since the Fund’s inception.

 

Buying and Selling Fund Shares

 

The Fund is an ETF. This means that individual Shares of the Fund may only be purchased and sold in the secondary market through brokers at market prices, rather than NAV. Because Shares trade at market prices rather than NAV, Shares may trade at a price greater than NAV (premium) or less than NAV (discount).

 

The Fund generally issues and redeems shares at NAV only in large blocks of shares known as “Creation Units,” which only institutions or large investors may purchase or redeem. The Fund generally issues and redeems Creation Units in exchange for a portfolio of securities (the “Deposit Securities”) and/or a designated amount of U.S. cash that the Fund specifies each day.

 

Investors may incur costs attributable to the difference between the highest price a buyer is willing to pay to purchase Shares (bid) and the lowest price a seller is willing to accept for Shares (ask) when buying or selling Shares in the secondary market (the “bid-ask spread”). Recent information about the Fund, including its net asset value, market price, premiums and discounts, and bid-ask spreads is available on the Fund’s website at www.ThemesETFs.com.

 

Tax Information

 

Fund distributions are generally taxable as ordinary income, qualified dividend income, or capital gains (or a combination), unless your investment is in an IRA or other tax-advantaged retirement account. Distributions may be taxable upon withdrawal from tax-deferred accounts.

 

Payments to Broker-Dealers and Other Financial Intermediaries

 

If you purchase the Fund through a broker or other financial intermediary (such as a bank), the Adviser and its related companies may pay the intermediary for activities related to the marketing and promotion of the Fund. These payments may create a conflict of interest by influencing the broker-dealer or other intermediary and your sales person to recommend the Fund over another investment. Ask your sales person or visit your financial intermediary’s website for more information.

 

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Themes Future of Farming ETF

 

 

Investment Objective

 

The Themes Future of Farming ETF (the “Fund”) is an exchange traded fund (“ETF”) that seeks to track the performance, before fees and expenses, of an index composed of companies that have business operations in the agricultural industry.

 

Fees and Expenses of the Fund

 

The following table describes the fees and expenses you may pay if you buy, hold, and sell shares of the Fund (“Shares”). You may pay other fees, such as brokerage commissions and other fees to financial intermediaries, which are not reflected in the table and Example below.

 

Annual Fund Operating Expenses (expenses that you pay each year as a percentage of the value of your investment)  
Management Fees 0.35%
Distribution and/or Service (12b-1) Fees None
Other Expenses* 0.00%
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses 0.35%

 

* Estimated for the current fiscal year

 

Example

The following example is intended to help retail investors compare the cost of investing in the Fund with the cost of investing in other funds. It illustrates the hypothetical expenses that such investors would incur over various periods if they were to invest $10,000 in the Fund for the time periods indicated and then redeem all of the Shares at the end of those periods. This example assumes that the Fund provides a return of 5% a year and that operating expenses remain the same. Although your actual costs may be higher or lower, based on these assumptions, your costs would be:

 

1 Year 3 Years
$36 $113

 

Portfolio Turnover

The Fund pays transaction costs, such as commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or “turns over” its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover rate may indicate higher transaction costs and may result in higher taxes when Fund Shares are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are not reflected in annual fund operating expenses or in the example, affect the Fund’s performance. Because the Fund is newly organized, portfolio turnover information is not yet available.

 

Principal Investment Strategies of the Fund

 

The Fund employs a “passive management” (or indexing) investment approach designed to track the performance, before fees and expenses, of the Solactive Smart Farming and Agriscience Index (the “Index”). The Index is based on a proprietary methodology developed and maintained by Solactive AG (the “Index Provider”), which is an organization that is independent of, and unaffiliated with, the Fund and Themes Management Company, LLC, the Fund’s investment adviser (the “Adviser”).

 

The Index

 

The Index is designed to provide exposure to companies that have business operations in the agricultural industry. The Index is denominated in U.S. dollars. As of June 30, 2023, the Index was comprised of 35 companies with a market capitalization range of between approximately $57 million and $119 billion and a weighted average market capitalization of approximately $21 billion.

 

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In constructing or adjusting the Index, the Index Provider identifies an “Index Universe” of companies that, on Selection Days (as defined below), fulfill the following requirements: 1) have a primary listing in a country classified as a developed country according to the Index Provider (Australia, Austria, Belgium, Canada, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Hong Kong, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Japan, the Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Singapore, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, the United Kingdom, and the United States); 2) have a market capitalization of at least $100 million; 3) have a minimum Average Daily Value Traded of at least $1 million over 1 month and over 6 months prior to and including the Selection Day. The Average Daily Value Traded for a security is the sum of daily value traded over the specified period divided by the number of trading days that fall in the specified period.

 

Based on the Index Universe, the initial composition of the Index, as well as any selection for an ordinary rebalance, is determined on the Selection Day by first screening publicly available information such as financial news, business profiles and company publications using the Index Provider’s proprietary natural language processing algorithm (“ARTIS®”) to identify companies that have or are expected to have exposure to the provision of products and/or services that contribute to the innovative and forward-looking aspects of the agricultural industry. The Index Provider identifies relevant search terms for ARTIS® that best represent the industries and areas of such innovation (i.e., drones, agtech, high-tech agriculture, hydroponics, agricultural robot and farming software). The investment strategy’s focus extends beyond traditional agricultural practices and production to include technology-enabled agricultural processes, encompassing everything from crop monitoring to precision agriculture, digital farming, and smart agriculture - growing trends shaping the future of farming. Companies are only eligible for inclusion in the Index if they generate at least 50% of their revenues from agricultural related business operations. This encompasses companies involved in the following: 1) agricultural production – includes companies engaged in the production and distribution of crops and animal products, including fresh fruit and vegetable products, live animals, eggs, seeds and other agricultural commodities, animal feed and farm animal veterinary products; 2) agricultural machinery - includes companies that are involved in the production and distribution of equipment which supports the agriculture industry. This includes irrigation, seeding, and tillage equipment, specialized storage solutions, and as innovative technologies and equipment designed to improve agricultural output and sustainability; 3) agricultural chemicals & fuels – includes companies that are involved in the development and production of chemicals and fuels that support the agriculture industry. This includes fertilizers, crop protection products, crop nutrients, insect control products, and biofuels; and 4) agriscience & technology – includes companies involved in crop monitoring, planting, management, and harvesting, as well as precision agriculture, digital farming (combines on-the-ground insights provided by farmers with aggregated data from satellites and third parties and machine learning techniques to understand what’s happening in their fields), and smart agriculture, including research and development of crop nutrition and plant science. This also comprises the production of agricultural equipment, crop yield maximization, agritech, agribusiness, and sustainable farming practices.

 

Each company identified by ARTIS® receives a score that reflects its exposure to the Index strategy. This set of companies is then reviewed by the Index Provider and companies are removed from the selection process if they don’t have business operations consistent with the Index’s future of agriculture theme. The remaining companies (“Agricultural Companies”) are ranked by their score (in descending order) and the top 35 companies are selected for inclusion in the Index (“Index Components”). The determination of the Index Universe and the selection of Index Components is made by the Index Provider based on its proprietary methodology.

 

“Selection Day” is 10 weekdays before the Rebalance Day. “Rebalance Day” is the third Friday in January and July. On each Selection Day, each Index Component is assigned a weight according to market capitalization. A weight cap is applied for each Index Component by-redistributing any weight which is larger than 4.5% to other Index Components proportionally in an iterative manner. Adjustments to the Index are made on Rebalance Day. The Index Components may change over time.

 

The Fund’s Investment Strategy

 

The Fund will invest, under normal circumstances, at least 80% of its net assets, plus the amount of any borrowings for investment purposes, in securities that comprise the Index and in American Depositary Receipts (“ADRs”) and Global Depositary Receipts (“GDRs”) based on the securities in the Index. The Fund will also invest, under normal circumstances, at least 80% of its net assets, plus borrowings for investment purposes, in securities of Agricultural Companies and in ADRs and GDRs based on such securities. The Index may include securities of large-, mid- and small-capitalization companies. The Fund’s 80% Policies are non-fundamental and require 60 days prior written notice to shareholders before each can be changed.

 

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The Fund uses a “passive” or indexing approach to try to achieve the Fund’s investment objective. Unlike many investment companies, the Fund does not try to beat the Index and does not seek temporary defensive positions when markets decline or appear overvalued. Indexing may eliminate the chance that the Fund will substantially outperform the Index but also may reduce some of the risks of active management, such as poor security selection. Indexing seeks to achieve lower costs and better after-tax performance by aiming to keep portfolio turnover low in comparison to actively managed investment companies.

 

The Fund will generally use a “replication” strategy to achieve its investment objective, meaning it will invest in all of the component securities of the Index in the same approximate proportion as in the Index. However, the Fund may utilize a representative sampling strategy with respect to the Index when a replication strategy might be detrimental or disadvantageous to shareholders, such as when there are practical difficulties or substantial costs involved in compiling a portfolio of equity securities to replicate the Index, in instances in which a security in the Index becomes temporarily illiquid, unavailable or less liquid, or as a result of legal restrictions or limitations (such as tax diversification requirements) that apply to the Fund but not the Index. The Adviser expects that, over time, the correlation between the Fund’s performance and that of the Index, before fees and expenses, will be 95% or better. If the Fund uses a replication strategy, it can be expected to have greater correlation to the Index than if it uses a representative sampling strategy.

 

The Fund is considered to be non-diversified, which means that it may invest more of its assets in the securities of a single issuer or a smaller number of issuers than if it were a diversified fund. To the extent the Index is concentrated (i.e., holds 25% or more of its total assets) in a particular industry or group of industries, the Fund is expected to be concentrated in that industry or group of industries to approximately the same extent that the Index concentrates in an industry or group of industries. As of June 30, 2023, a significant portion of the Index is represented by securities of companies in the agriculture production industry and the chemicals and food products industry, and the agriculture and livestock, industrials and materials sectors. The degree to which Index Components represent certain sectors or industries may change over time.

 

The Fund may lend securities representing up to one-third of the value of the Fund’s total assets (including the value of any collateral received).

 

Principal Risks of Investing in the Fund

 

You can lose money on your investment in the Fund. The Fund is subject to the risks summarized below. Some or all of these risks may adversely affect the Fund’s net asset value per share (“NAV”), trading price, yield, total return and/or ability to meet its objectives. For more information about the risks of investing in the Fund, see the section in the Fund’s prospectus entitled “Additional Information about the Principal Risks of Investing in the Funds.” Each risk summarized below is considered a “principal risk” of investing in the Fund, regardless of the order in which it appears.

 

Concentration Risk. To the extent that the Index concentrates in investments related to a particular industry or group of industries, the Fund will also concentrate its investments to approximately the same extent. In such event, the Fund’s performance will be particularly susceptible to adverse events impacting such industry, which may include, but are not limited to, the following: general economic conditions or cyclical market patterns that could negatively affect supply and demand; competition for resources; adverse labor relations; political or world events; obsolescence of technologies; and increased competition or new product introductions that may affect the profitability or viability of companies in a particular industry. As a result, the value of the Fund’s investments may rise and fall more than the value of shares of a fund that invests in securities of companies in a broader range of industries.

 

Agricultural Production Industry Risk. Companies engaged in agricultural production may be adversely affected by changes or trends in commodity prices and labor costs, which may be influenced by unpredictable factors. Many companies in the agricultural production industry are subject to government subsidy policies and environmental, health and safety laws and regulations. Any changes to these policies and regulations, or the imposition of tariffs or other trade restraints, may have a material adverse effect on companies operating in this industry. Adverse weather conditions (such as floods or droughts), natural disasters and other factors, such as disease outbreaks, war or other conflict, also may adversely affect companies operating in this industry.

 

Calculation Methodology Risk. The Index Provider relies directly or indirectly on various sources of information to assess the criteria of issuers included in the Index, including information that may be based on assumptions and estimates. Neither the Fund, the Index Provider, or the Adviser can offer assurances that the Index’s calculation methodology or sources of information will provide an accurate assessment of included issuers or a correct valuation of securities, nor can they guarantee the availability or timeliness of the production of the Index.

 

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Commodity Risk. The Fund invests in companies that are susceptible to fluctuations in certain commodity markets and to price changes due to trade relations. Any negative changes in commodity markets that may be due to changes in supply and demand for commodities, market events, war, regulatory developments, other catastrophic events, or other factors that the Fund cannot control could have an adverse impact on those companies.

 

Currency Risk. The Fund may invest in securities denominated in foreign currencies. Because the Fund’s NAV is determined in U.S. dollars, the Fund’s NAV could decline if currencies of the underlying securities depreciate against the U.S. dollar or if there are delays or limits on repatriation of such currencies. Currency exchange rates can be very volatile and can change quickly and unpredictably. As a result, the Fund’s NAV may change quickly and without warning, which could have a significant negative impact on the Fund.

 

Depositary Receipts Risk. Depositary receipts (e.g., ADRs and GDRs) which involve similar risks to those associated with investments in foreign securities. Investments in depositary receipts may be less liquid than the underlying shares in their primary trading market and, if not included in the Index, may negatively affect the Fund’s ability to replicate the performance of the Index. The issuers of depositary receipts may discontinue issuing new depositary receipts and withdraw existing depositary receipts at any time, which may result in costs and delays in the distribution of the underlying assets to the Fund and may negatively impact the Fund’s performance and the Fund’s ability to replicate/track the performance of its Index.

 

Equity Market Risk. The equity securities held in the Fund’s portfolio may experience sudden, unpredictable drops in value or long periods of decline in value. This may occur because of factors that affect securities markets generally or factors affecting specific industries, sectors or companies in which the Fund invests. Common stocks are susceptible to general stock market fluctuations and to volatile increases and decreases in value as market confidence in and perceptions of their issuers change. The Fund’s NAV and market price may fluctuate significantly in response to these and other factors. As a result, an investor could lose money over short or long periods of time.

 

ETF Risks. The Fund is an ETF and, as a result of an ETF’s structure, is exposed to the following risks:

 

Authorized Participants (“APs”), Market Makers, and Liquidity Providers Concentration Risk. The Fund has a limited number of financial institutions that may act as APs. In addition, there may be a limited number of market makers and/or liquidity providers in the marketplace. To the extent either of the following events occur, shares of the Fund may trade at a material discount to NAV and possibly face delisting: (i) APs exit the business or otherwise become unable to process creation and/or redemption orders and no other APs step forward to perform these services, or (ii) market makers and/or liquidity providers exit the business or significantly reduce their business activities and no other entities step forward to perform their functions.

 

Costs of Buying or Selling Shares of the Fund. Due to the costs of buying or selling shares of the Fund, including brokerage commissions imposed by brokers and bid/ask spreads, frequent trading of shares of the Fund may significantly reduce investment results and an investment in shares of the Fund may not be advisable for investors who anticipate regularly making small investments.

 

Shares of the Fund May Trade at Prices Other Than NAV. As with all ETFs, shares of the Fund may be bought and sold in the secondary market at market prices. The price of shares of the Fund, like the price of all traded securities, will be subject to factors such as supply and demand, as well as the current value of the Fund’s portfolio holdings. Although it is expected that the market price of the shares of the Fund will approximate the Fund’s NAV, there may be times when the market price of the shares is more than the NAV intra-day (premium) or less than the NAV intra-day (discount). This risk is heightened in times of market volatility, periods of steep market declines, and periods when there is limited trading activity for shares in the secondary market, in which case such premiums or discounts may be significant.

 

Trading. Although shares of the Fund are listed for trading on a national securities exchange, such as The NASDAQ Stock Market LLC (the “Exchange”), and may be traded on U.S. exchanges other than the Exchange, there can be no assurance that shares of the Fund will trade with any volume, or at all, on any stock exchange. In stressed market conditions, the liquidity of shares of the Fund may begin to mirror the liquidity of the Fund’s underlying portfolio holdings, which can be significantly less liquid than shares of the Fund, and this could lead to differences between the market price of the shares of the Fund and the underlying value of those shares.

 

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Foreign Securities Risk. The Fund’s investments in foreign securities can be riskier than U.S. securities investments. Investments in the securities of foreign issuers (including investments in ADRs and GDRs) are subject to the risks associated with investing in those foreign markets, such as heightened risks of inflation or nationalization. The prices of foreign securities and the prices of U.S. securities have, at times, moved in opposite directions. In addition, securities of foreign issuers may lose value due to political, economic and geographic events affecting a foreign issuer or market. During periods of social, political or economic instability in a country or region, the value of a foreign security traded on U.S. exchanges could be affected by, among other things, increasing price volatility, illiquidity, or the closure of the primary market on which the security (or the security underlying the ADR or GDR) is traded. You may lose money due to political, economic and geographic events affecting a foreign issuer or market.

 

Geographic Risk. A natural, biological or other disaster could occur in a geographic region in which the Fund invests, which could affect the economy or particular business operations of companies in the specific geographic region, causing an adverse impact on the Fund’s investments in the affected region or in a region economically tied to the affected region. The securities in which the Fund invests and, consequently, the Fund are also subject to specific risks as a result of their business operations, including, but not limited to:

 

Risk of Investing in Developed Markets. The Fund’s investment in a developed country issuer may subject the Fund to regulatory, political, currency, security, economic and other risks associated with developed countries. Developed countries tend to represent a significant portion of the global economy and have generally experienced slower economic growth than some less developed countries. Certain developed countries have experienced security concerns, such as terrorism and strained international relations. Incidents involving a country’s or region’s security may cause uncertainty in its markets and may adversely affect its economy and the Fund’s investments. In addition, developed countries may be impacted by changes to the economic conditions of certain key trading partners, regulatory burdens, debt burdens and the price or availability of certain commodities.

 

Tracking Risk. The Fund’s return may not track the return of the Index for a number of reasons. For example, the Fund incurs a number of operating expenses not applicable to the Index, and incurs costs in buying and selling securities, especially when rebalancing the Fund’s securities holdings to reflect changes in the composition of the Index. In addition, when the Fund uses a representative sampling approach, the Fund may not be as well correlated with the return of the Index as when the Fund purchases all of the securities in the Index in the proportions in which they are represented in the Index.

 

International Closed Market Trading Risk. To the extent that the underlying investments held by the Fund trade on foreign exchanges that may be closed when the securities exchange on which the Fund’s Shares trade is open, there are likely to be deviations between the current price of such an underlying security and the last quoted price for the underlying security (i.e., the Fund’s quote from the closed foreign market). These deviations could result in premiums or discounts to the Fund’s NAV that may be greater than those experienced by other ETFs.

 

Large-Capitalization Investing Risk. The Fund’s performance may be adversely affected if securities of large-capitalization companies underperform securities of smaller-capitalization companies or the market as a whole. The securities of large-capitalization companies may be relatively mature compared to smaller companies and therefore subject to slower growth during times of economic expansion.

 

Liquidity Risk. The Fund’s investments are subject to liquidity risk, which exists when an investment is or becomes difficult or impossible to purchase or sell at an advantageous time and price. If a transaction is particularly large or if the relevant market is or becomes illiquid, it may not be possible to initiate a transaction or liquidate a position, which may cause the Fund to suffer significant losses and difficulties in meeting redemptions. Liquidity risk may be the result of, among other things, market turmoil, the reduced number and capacity of traditional market participants, or the lack of an active trading market. Markets for securities or financial instruments could be disrupted by a number of events, including, but not limited to, an economic crisis, natural disasters, new legislation or regulatory changes inside or outside the U.S. Liquid investments may become less liquid after being purchased by the Fund, particularly during periods of market stress. In addition, if a number of securities held by the Fund stop trading, it may have a cascading effect and cause the Fund to halt trading. Volatility in market prices will increase the risk of the Fund being subject to a trading halt. Certain countries in which the Fund may invest may be subject to extended settlement delays and/or foreign holidays, during which the Fund will unlikely be able to convert holdings to cash.

 

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Mid-Capitalization Companies Risk. Mid-capitalization companies may have greater price volatility, lower trading volume and less liquidity than large-capitalization companies. In addition, mid-capitalization companies may have smaller revenues, narrower product lines, less management depth and experience, smaller shares of their product or service markets, fewer financial resources and less competitive strength than large-capitalization companies.

 

New Adviser Risk. Although the Adviser’s principals and the Fund’s portfolio managers have experience managing investments in the past, the Adviser is a newly-formed entity and has no experience managing investments for an ETF, which may limit the Adviser’s effectiveness.

 

New Fund Risk. The Fund is new with no operating history. As a result, there can be no assurance that the Fund will grow to or maintain an economically viable size, in which case it may experience greater tracking error to its Index than it otherwise would at higher asset levels, or it could ultimately liquidate. The Fund’s distributor does not maintain a secondary market in Fund shares.

 

Non-Diversification Risk. Although the Fund intends to invest in a variety of securities and instruments, the Fund is considered to be non-diversified, which means that it may invest more of its assets in the securities of a single issuer or a smaller number of issuers than if it were a diversified fund. As a result, the Fund may be more exposed to the risks associated with and developments affecting an individual issuer or a smaller number of issuers than a fund that invests more widely. This may increase the Fund’s volatility and cause the performance of a relatively smaller number of issuers to have a greater impact on the Fund’s performance.

 

Operational Risk. The Fund is exposed to operational risks arising from a number of factors, including, but not limited to, human error, processing and communication errors, errors of the Fund’s service providers, counterparties or other third parties, failed or inadequate processes and technology or systems failures. The Fund and the Adviser seek to reduce these operational risks through controls and procedures. However, these measures do not address every possible risk and may be inadequate to address significant operational risks.

 

Cybersecurity Risk. Failures or breaches of the electronic systems of the Fund and/or the Fund’s service providers, including the Adviser, Index Provider, market makers, Authorized Participants or the issuers of securities in which the Fund invests have the ability to cause disruptions, negatively impact the Fund’s business operations and/or potentially result in financial losses to the Fund and its shareholders. While the Fund has established business continuity plans and risk management systems seeking to address system breaches or failures, there are inherent limitations in such plans and systems. Furthermore, the Fund cannot control the cybersecurity plans and systems of the Fund’s Index Provider, Adviser, other service providers, market makers, Authorized Participants or issuers of securities in which the Fund invests.

 

Passive Investment Risk. The Fund is not actively managed and the Adviser would not sell a security due to current or projected underperformance of a security, industry or sector, unless that security is removed from the Index or the selling of shares of that security is otherwise required upon a reconstitution of the Index in accordance with the Index methodology. The Fund invests in securities included in the Index, regardless of their investment merits. The Fund does not take defensive positions under any market conditions, including conditions that are adverse to the performance of the Fund.

 

Sector Risk. To the extent the Fund invests more heavily in particular sectors of the economy, its performance will be especially sensitive to developments that significantly affect those sectors.

 

 

Risk of Investing in Agriculture and Livestock Sectors. Investments in the agricultural and livestock sectors may be volatile and change unpredictably as a result of many factors, such as legislative or regulatory developments relating to food safety, the imposition of tariffs or other trade restraints, and the supply and demand of each commodity. Increased competition and changes in consumer tastes and spending can also influence the demand for agricultural and livestock products, affecting the price of such commodities and the performance of the Fund.

 

Industrials Sector Risk. Companies in the industrials sector may be adversely affected by changes in the supply of and demand for products and services, product obsolescence, claims for environmental damage or product liability and changes in general economic conditions, among other factors.

 

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Materials Sector Risk. Companies in the materials sector could be adversely affected by commodity price volatility, exchange rates, import controls and increased competition. Production of industrial materials often exceeds demand as a result of overbuilding or economic downturns, leading to poor investment returns. Companies in the materials sector are at risk for environmental damage and product liability claims. Companies in the materials sector may be adversely affected by depletion of resources, technical progress, labor relations, and government regulations.

 

Securities Lending Risk. To the extent the Fund lends its securities, it may be subject to the following risks: (1) the securities in which the collateral is invested may not perform sufficiently to cover the applicable rebate rates paid to borrowers and related administrative costs; (2) delays may occur in the recovery of securities from borrowers, which could interfere with the Fund’s ability to vote proxies or to settle transactions; and (3) although borrowers of the Fund’s securities typically provide collateral in the form of cash that is reinvested in securities, there is the risk of possible loss of rights in the collateral should the borrower fail financially.

 

Small-Capitalization Companies Risk. Compared to mid- and large-capitalization companies, small-capitalization companies may be less stable and more susceptible to adverse developments, and their securities may be more volatile and less liquid.

 

Thematic Investing Risk. The Fund relies on the Index Provider for the identification of securities for inclusion in the Index that reflect themes and sub-themes, and its performance may suffer if such securities are not correctly identified or if a theme or sub-theme develops in an unexpected manner. Performance may also suffer if the stocks included in the Index do not benefit from the development of such themes or sub-themes. Performance may also be impacted by the inclusion of non-theme relevant exposures in the Index. There is no guarantee that the Index will reflect the theme and sub-theme exposures intended.

 

Natural Language Processing (NLP) Model Risk. The Index Provider uses NLP models to assist in the development of the Fund’s Index. The Index’s investment theme is created by the Index Provider and the Index Provider’s description of the theme is used by the NLP screening models to identify relevant companies for index consideration. The investment theme must be accurately described in order for the NLP models to identify companies that reflect the themes and sub-themes of the Index. If the description of the theme is incorrect or incomplete, the NLP model may identify companies that are not relevant to the Fund’s investment theme or fail to identify companies that are relevant. As a result, securities may be included in or excluded from the Index that would have been excluded or included had the description of the theme been correct and complete. If the composition of the Index reflects such errors, the Fund’s portfolio can be expected to also reflect the errors.There is no guarantee that the Index will reflect the theme and sub-theme exposures intended. The Index Provider relies on the integrity of the data being analyzed and its review processes could be adversely affected if erroneous or outdated data is utilized.

 

Valuation Risk. Independent market quotations for certain investments held by the Fund may not be readily available, and such investments may be fair valued or valued by a pricing service at an evaluated price. These valuations involve subjectivity and different market participants may assign different prices to the same investment. As a result, there is a risk that the Fund may not be able to sell an investment at the price assigned to the investment by the Fund. In addition, the securities in which the Fund invests may trade on days that the Fund does not price its shares; as a result, the value of Fund shares may change on days when investors cannot purchase or sell their Fund holdings.

 

Fund Performance

 

Performance information for the Fund is not included because the Fund did not commence operations prior to the date of this Prospectus. In the future, performance for the Fund will be presented in this section. Updated performance information will be available on the Fund’s website at www.ThemesETFs.com or by calling the Fund toll-free at _________.

 

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Management

 

Investment Adviser

 

Themes Management Company, LLC (the “Adviser”) serves as investment adviser to the Fund.

 

Portfolio Managers

 

Dingxun (Kevin) Shao, Vice President, Product Management & Development of the Adviser, and Calvin Tsang, CFA, Head of Product Management & Development of the Adviser, are jointly and primarily responsible for the day-to-day management of the Fund and have served as portfolio managers since the Fund’s inception.

 

Buying and Selling Fund Shares

 

The Fund is an ETF. This means that individual Shares of the Fund may only be purchased and sold in the secondary market through brokers at market prices, rather than NAV. Because Shares trade at market prices rather than NAV, Shares may trade at a price greater than NAV (premium) or less than NAV (discount).

 

The Fund generally issues and redeems shares at NAV only in large blocks of shares known as “Creation Units,” which only institutions or large investors may purchase or redeem. The Fund generally issues and redeems Creation Units in exchange for a portfolio of securities (the “Deposit Securities”) and/or a designated amount of U.S. cash that the Fund specifies each day.

 

Investors may incur costs attributable to the difference between the highest price a buyer is willing to pay to purchase Shares (bid) and the lowest price a seller is willing to accept for Shares (ask) when buying or selling Shares in the secondary market (the “bid-ask spread”). Recent information about the Fund, including its net asset value, market price, premiums and discounts, and bid-ask spreads is available on the Fund’s website at www.ThemesETFs.com.

 

Tax Information

 

Fund distributions are generally taxable as ordinary income, qualified dividend income, or capital gains (or a combination), unless your investment is in an IRA or other tax-advantaged retirement account. Distributions may be taxable upon withdrawal from tax-deferred accounts.

 

Payments to Broker-Dealers and Other Financial Intermediaries

 

If you purchase the Fund through a broker or other financial intermediary (such as a bank), the Adviser and its related companies may pay the intermediary for activities related to the marketing and promotion of the Fund. These payments may create a conflict of interest by influencing the broker-dealer or other intermediary and your sales person to recommend the Fund over another investment. Ask your sales person or visit your financial intermediary’s website for more information.

 

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Themes Generative Artificial Intelligence ETF

 

 

Investment Objective

 

The Themes Generative Artificial Intelligence ETF (the “Fund”) is an exchange traded fund (“ETF”) that seeks to track the performance, before fees and expenses, of an index composed of companies that have business operations in the field of artificial intelligence (AI) related industries.

 

Fees and Expenses of the Fund

 

The following table describes the fees and expenses you may pay if you buy, hold, and sell shares of the Fund (“Shares”). You may pay other fees, such as brokerage commissions and other fees to financial intermediaries, which are not reflected in the table and Example below.

 

Annual Fund Operating Expenses (expenses that you pay each year as a percentage of the value of your investment)  
Management Fees 0.35%
Distribution and/or Service (12b-1) Fees None
Other Expenses* 0.00%
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses 0.35%

 

* Estimated for the current fiscal year

 

Example

The following example is intended to help retail investors compare the cost of investing in the Fund with the cost of investing in other funds. It illustrates the hypothetical expenses that such investors would incur over various periods if they were to invest $10,000 in the Fund for the time periods indicated and then redeem all of the Shares at the end of those periods. This example assumes that the Fund provides a return of 5% a year and that operating expenses remain the same. Although your actual costs may be higher or lower, based on these assumptions, your costs would be:

 

1 Year 3 Years
$36 $113

 

Portfolio Turnover

The Fund pays transaction costs, such as commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or “turns over” its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover rate may indicate higher transaction costs and may result in higher taxes when Fund Shares are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are not reflected in annual fund operating expenses or in the example, affect the Fund’s performance. Because the Fund is newly organized, portfolio turnover information is not yet available.

 

Principal Investment Strategies of the Fund

 

The Fund employs a “passive management” (or indexing) investment approach designed to track the performance, before fees and expenses, of the Solactive Generative Artificial Intelligence Index (the “Index”). The Index is based on a proprietary methodology developed and maintained by Solactive AG (the “Index Provider”), which is an organization that is independent of, and unaffiliated with, the Fund and Themes Management Company, LLC, the Fund’s investment adviser (the “Adviser”).

 

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The Index

 

The Index is designed to provide exposure to companies that have business operations in AI related industries. The Index is denominated in U.S. dollars. As of June 30, 2023, the Index was comprised of 40 companies with a market capitalization range of between approximately $37 million and $3 trillion and a weighted average market capitalization of approximately $456 billion.

 

In constructing or adjusting the Index, the Index Provider identifies an “Index Universe” of companies that, on Selection Days (as defined below), fulfill the following requirements: 1) have a primary listing in a country classified as a developed country according to the Index Provider (Australia, Austria, Belgium, Canada, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Hong Kong, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Japan, the Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Singapore, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, the United Kingdom, and the United States); 2) have a market capitalization of at least $100 million; 3) have a minimum Average Daily Value Traded of at least $1 million over 1 month and over 6 months prior to and including the Selection Day. The Average Daily Value Traded for a security is the sum of daily value traded over the specified period divided by the number of trading days that fall in the specified period.

Based on the Index Universe, the initial composition of the Index, as well as any selection for an ordinary rebalance, is determined on the Selection Day by first screening publicly available information such as financial news, business profiles and company publications using the Index Provider’s proprietary natural language processing algorithm (“ARTIS®”) to identify companies that have or are expected to have exposure to the provision of products and/or services that contribute to AI related industries. Companies are only eligible for inclusion in the Index if they generate at least 50% of their revenues from the following AI related industries: 1) artificial intelligence (AI) – comprises companies involved in the provision of AI computing solutions, software for digital transformation, processors and services to a variety of industries such as media, pharmaceutical and computers. Generative AI describes algorithms that can be used to create new content, including audio, code, images, text, simulations, and videos; 2) data analytics and big data – comprises companies involved in data-related technologies such as data mining (i.e., the process of extracting information from a large amount of data by using statistical, mathematical and analytics tools), predictive analytics (i.e., use of advanced analytics to make predictions about future outcomes using historical data), and machine learning. It also comprises companies engaged in the provision of business specific process management and business solutions data analytics; 3) natural language processing – comprises companies involved in delivering natural language processing, speech recognition, semantic networks (i.e., a type of graphical model that shows relationships between concepts, ideas and objects), ontology engineering (i.e., the study of methods and methodologies for building a set of concepts and categories in a subject area or domain that shows their properties and the relations between them to allow the AI to make inferences based on content and relationships), logic programming (i.e., a programming strategy that tells a model what goal to accomplish, rather than how to accomplish it), cognitive science, and theory of mind (i.e., the study of the mind and its processes and investigates how we ascribe mental states to other persons and how we use the states to explain and predict the actions of those other persons). It also includes the provision of algorithm-based solutions for machine learning; and 4) AI-driven services – comprises companies that develop and use AI-powered applications, such as chatbots, virtual assistants, predictive analytics, marketing technology and recommendation engines, as well as those that produce hardware and software components for AI systems, such as computer chips, graphics processing units, and specialized algorithms. Each company identified by ARTIS® receives a score that reflects its exposure to the Index strategy. This set of companies is then reviewed by the Index Provider and companies are removed from the selection process if they don’t have relevant business operations. The remaining companies (“Generative AI Companies”) are ranked by their score (in descending order) and the top 40 companies are selected for inclusion in the Index (“Index Components”) each weighted based on its relevance to its ARTIS® score. The determination of the Index Universe and the selection of Index Components is made by the Index Provider based on its proprietary methodology.

“Selection Day” is 10 weekdays before the Rebalance Day. “Rebalance Day” is the last weekday in February and August. The Index is rebalanced and reconstituted on each Rebalance Day based on data as of Selection Day. At the time of rebalancing, the Index is generally re-weighted based on the latest ARTIS® scores. This is designed such that the greater the exposure an Index Component has to AI related industries, the higher its weight will be. The Index Components may change over time.

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The Fund’s Investment Strategy

 

The Fund will invest, under normal circumstances, at least 80% of its net assets, plus the amount of any borrowings for investment purposes, in securities that comprise the Index and in American Depositary Receipts (“ADRs”) and Global Depositary Receipts (“GDRs”) based on the securities in the Index. The Fund will also invest, under normal circumstances, at least 80% of its net assets, plus borrowings for investment purposes, in securities of Generative AI Companies and in ADRs and GDRs based on such securities. The Index may include securities of large-, mid- and small-capitalization companies. The Fund’s 80% Policies are non-fundamental and require 60 days prior written notice to shareholders before each can be changed.

 

The Fund uses a “passive” or indexing approach to try to achieve the Fund’s investment objective. Unlike many investment companies, the Fund does not try to beat the Index and does not seek temporary defensive positions when markets decline or appear overvalued. Indexing may eliminate the chance that the Fund will substantially outperform the Index but also may reduce some of the risks of active management, such as poor security selection. Indexing seeks to achieve lower costs and better after-tax performance by aiming to keep portfolio turnover low in comparison to actively managed investment companies.

 

The Fund will generally use a “replication” strategy to achieve its investment objective, meaning it will invest in all of the component securities of the Index in the same approximate proportion as in the Index. However, the Fund may utilize a representative sampling strategy with respect to the Index when a replication strategy might be detrimental or disadvantageous to shareholders, such as when there are practical difficulties or substantial costs involved in compiling a portfolio of equity securities to replicate the Index, in instances in which a security in the Index becomes temporarily illiquid, unavailable or less liquid, or as a result of legal restrictions or limitations (such as tax diversification requirements) that apply to the Fund but not the Index. The Adviser expects that, over time, the correlation between the Fund’s performance and that of the Index, before fees and expenses, will be 95% or better. If the Fund uses a replication strategy, it can be expected to have greater correlation to the Index than if it uses a representative sampling strategy.

 

The Fund is considered to be non-diversified, which means that it may invest more of its assets in the securities of a single issuer or a smaller number of issuers than if it were a diversified fund. To the extent the Index is concentrated (i.e., holds 25% or more of its total assets) in a particular industry or group of industries, the Fund is expected to be concentrated in that industry or group of industries to approximately the same extent that the Index concentrates in an industry or group of industries. As of June 30, 2023, a significant portion of the Index is represented by securities of companies that have business operations in the artificial intelligence and data services, semiconductors, software, and internet industries, and in the information technology sector. The degree to which components of the Index represent certain sectors or industries may change over time. 

 

The Fund may lend securities representing up to one-third of the value of the Fund’s total assets (including the value of any collateral received).

 

Principal Risks of Investing in the Fund

 

You can lose money on your investment in the Fund. The Fund is subject to the risks summarized below. Some or all of these risks may adversely affect the Fund’s net asset value per share (“NAV”), trading price, yield, total return and/or ability to meet its objectives. For more information about the risks of investing in the Fund, see the section in the Fund’s prospectus entitled “Additional Information about the Principal Risks of Investing in the Funds.” Each risk summarized below is considered a “principal risk” of investing in the Fund, regardless of the order in which it appears.

 

Concentration Risk. To the extent that the Index concentrates in investments related to a particular industry or group of industries, the Fund is expected to also concentrate its investments to approximately the same extent. In such event, the Fund’s performance will be particularly susceptible to adverse events impacting such industry, which may include, but are not limited to, the following: general economic conditions or cyclical market patterns that could negatively affect supply and demand; competition for resources; adverse labor relations; political or world events; obsolescence of technologies; and increased competition or new product introductions that may affect the profitability or viability of companies in a particular industry. As a result, the value of the Fund’s investments may rise and fall more than the value of shares of a fund that invests in securities of companies in a broader range of industries.

 

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Artificial Intelligence and Data Services Industry Risk. Companies involved in, or exposed to, data services and artificial intelligence-related businesses may have limited product lines, markets, financial resources or personnel. These companies face intense competition and potentially rapid product obsolescence, and many depend significantly on retaining and growing the consumer base of their respective products and services. Many of these companies are also reliant on the end user demand of products and services in various industries that may in part utilize artificial intelligence and/or data services. Further, many companies involved in, or exposed to, artificial intelligence-related businesses and data services (as determined by the Index Provider) may be substantially exposed to the market and business risks of other industries or sectors, and the Fund may be adversely affected by negative developments impacting those companies, industries or sectors. In addition, these companies are heavily dependent on intellectual property rights and may be adversely affected by loss or impairment of those rights. There can be no assurance that companies involved in artificial intelligence and data services will be able to successfully protect their intellectual property to prevent the misappropriation of their technology, or that competitors will not develop technology that is substantially similar or superior to such companies’ technology. Artificial intelligence and data services companies are potential targets for cyberattacks, which can have a materially adverse impact on the performance of these companies. In addition, the collection of data from consumers and other sources could face increased scrutiny as regulators consider how the data is collected, stored, safeguarded and used. Artificial intelligence and data services companies may face regulatory fines and penalties, including potential forced break-ups, that could hinder the ability of the companies to operate on an ongoing basis. Artificial intelligence companies typically engage in significant amounts of spending on research and development, and there is no guarantee that the products or services produced by these companies will be successful. Artificial intelligence and data services companies, especially smaller companies, tend to be more volatile than companies that do not rely heavily on technology.

 

Internet Industry Risk. Many Internet-related companies have incurred large losses since their inception and may continue to incur large losses in the hope of capturing market share and generating future revenues. Accordingly, many such companies expect to incur significant operating losses for the foreseeable future, and may never be profitable. The markets in which many Internet companies compete face rapidly evolving industry standards, frequent new service and product announcements, introductions and enhancements, and changing customer demands. The failure of an Internet company to adapt to such changes could have a material adverse effect on the company’s business. Additionally, the widespread adoption of new Internet, networking, telecommunications technologies, or other technological changes could require substantial expenditures by an Internet company to modify or adapt its services or infrastructure, which could have a material adverse effect on an Internet company’s business.

 

Semiconductor Industry Risk. Semiconductor companies may have limited product lines, markets, financial resources or personnel. Semiconductor companies typically face intense competition, potentially rapid product obsolescence and high capital costs and are dependent on third-party suppliers and the availability of materials. They are also heavily dependent on intellectual property rights and may be adversely affected by loss or impairment of those rights. Semiconductor companies are also affected by the economic performance of their customers.

 

Software Industry Risk. The software industry can be significantly affected by intense competition, aggressive pricing, technological innovations, and product obsolescence. Companies in the application software industry, in particular, may also be negatively affected by the decline or fluctuation of subscription renewal rates for their products and services, which may have an adverse effect on profit margins. Companies in the systems software industry may be adversely affected by, among other things, actual or perceived security vulnerabilities in their products and services, which may result in individual or class action lawsuits, state or federal enforcement actions and other remediation costs.

 

Calculation Methodology Risk. The Index Provider relies directly or indirectly on various sources of information to assess the criteria of issuers included in the Index, including information that may be based on assumptions and estimates. Neither the Fund, the Index Provider, or the Adviser can offer assurances that the Index’s calculation methodology or sources of information will provide an accurate assessment of included issuers or a correct valuation of securities, nor can they guarantee the availability or timeliness of the production of the Index.

 

Currency Risk. The Fund may invest in securities denominated in foreign currencies. Because the Fund’s NAV is determined in U.S. dollars, the Fund’s NAV could decline if currencies of the underlying securities depreciate against the U.S. dollar or if there are delays or limits on repatriation of such currencies. Currency exchange rates can be very volatile and can change quickly and unpredictably. As a result, the Fund’s NAV may change quickly and without warning, which could have a significant negative impact on the Fund.

 

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Depositary Receipts Risk. Depositary receipts (e.g., ADRs and GDRs) which involve similar risks to those associated with investments in foreign securities. Investments in depositary receipts may be less liquid than the underlying shares in their primary trading market and, if not included in the Index, may negatively affect the Fund’s ability to replicate the performance of the Index. The issuers of depositary receipts may discontinue issuing new depositary receipts and withdraw existing depositary receipts at any time, which may result in costs and delays in the distribution of the underlying assets to the Fund and may negatively impact the Fund’s performance and the Fund’s ability to replicate/track the performance of its Index.

 

Equity Market Risk. The equity securities held in the Fund’s portfolio may experience sudden, unpredictable drops in value or long periods of decline in value. This may occur because of factors that affect securities markets generally or factors affecting specific industries, sectors or companies in which the Fund invests. Common stocks are susceptible to general stock market fluctuations and to volatile increases and decreases in value as market confidence in and perceptions of their issuers change. The Fund’s NAV and market price may fluctuate significantly in response to these and other factors. As a result, an investor could lose money over short or long periods of time.

 

ETF Risks. The Fund is an ETF and, as a result of an ETF’s structure, is exposed to the following risks:

 

Authorized Participants (“APs”), Market Makers, and Liquidity Providers Concentration Risk. The Fund has a limited number of financial institutions that may act as APs. In addition, there may be a limited number of market makers and/or liquidity providers in the marketplace. To the extent either of the following events occur, shares of the Fund may trade at a material discount to NAV and possibly face delisting: (i) APs exit the business or otherwise become unable to process creation and/or redemption orders and no other APs step forward to perform these services, or (ii) market makers and/or liquidity providers exit the business or significantly reduce their business activities and no other entities step forward to perform their functions.

 

Costs of Buying or Selling Shares of the Fund. Due to the costs of buying or selling shares of the Fund, including brokerage commissions imposed by brokers and bid/ask spreads, frequent trading of shares of the Fund may significantly reduce investment results and an investment in shares of the Fund may not be advisable for investors who anticipate regularly making small investments.

 

Shares of the Fund May Trade at Prices Other Than NAV. As with all ETFs, shares of the Fund may be bought and sold in the secondary market at market prices. The price of shares of the Fund, like the price of all traded securities, will be subject to factors such as supply and demand, as well as the current value of the Fund’s portfolio holdings. Although it is expected that the market price of the shares of the Fund will approximate the Fund’s NAV, there may be times when the market price of the shares is more than the NAV intra-day (premium) or less than the NAV intra-day (discount). This risk is heightened in times of market volatility, periods of steep market declines, and periods when there is limited trading activity for shares in the secondary market, in which case such premiums or discounts may be significant.

 

Trading. Although shares of the Fund are listed for trading on a national securities exchange, such as The Nasdaq Stock Market LLC (the “Exchange”), and may be traded on U.S. exchanges other than the Exchange, there can be no assurance that shares of the Fund will trade with any volume, or at all, on any stock exchange. In stressed market conditions, the liquidity of shares of the Fund may begin to mirror the liquidity of the Fund’s underlying portfolio holdings, which can be significantly less liquid than shares of the Fund, and this could lead to differences between the market price of the shares of the Fund and the underlying value of those shares.

 

Foreign Securities Risk. The Fund’s investments in foreign securities can be riskier than U.S. securities investments. Investments in the securities of foreign issuers (including investments in ADRs and GDRs) are subject to the risks associated with investing in those foreign markets, such as heightened risks of inflation or nationalization. The prices of foreign securities and the prices of U.S. securities have, at times, moved in opposite directions. In addition, securities of foreign issuers may lose value due to political, economic and geographic events affecting a foreign issuer or market. During periods of social, political or economic instability in a country or region, the value of a foreign security traded on U.S. exchanges could be affected by, among other things, increasing price volatility, illiquidity, or the closure of the primary market on which the security (or the security underlying the ADR or GDR) is traded. You may lose money due to political, economic and geographic events affecting a foreign issuer or market.

 

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Geographic Risk. A natural, biological or other disaster could occur in a geographic region in which the Fund invests, which could affect the economy or particular business operations of companies in the specific geographic region, causing an adverse impact on the Fund’s investments in the affected region or in a region economically tied to the affected region. The securities in which the Fund invests and, consequently, the Fund are also subject to specific risks as a result of their business operations, including, but not limited to:

 

Risk of Investing in Developed Markets. The Fund’s investment in a developed country issuer may subject the Fund to regulatory, political, currency, security, economic and other risks associated with developed countries. Developed countries tend to represent a significant portion of the global economy and have generally experienced slower economic growth than some less developed countries. Certain developed countries have experienced security concerns, such as terrorism and strained international relations. Incidents involving a country’s or region’s security may cause uncertainty in its markets and may adversely affect its economy and the Fund’s investments. In addition, developed countries may be impacted by changes to the economic conditions of certain key trading partners, regulatory burdens, debt burdens and the price or availability of certain commodities.

 

Risk of Investing in North America. A decrease in imports or exports, changes in trade regulations or an economic recession in any North American country can have a significant economic effect on the entire North American region and on some or all of the North American countries to which the Fund has economic exposure. The U.S. is Canada’s and Mexico’s largest trading and investment partner. The Canadian and Mexican economies are significantly affected by developments in the U.S. economy. Since the implementation of the North American Free Trade Agreement (“NAFTA”) in 1994 among Canada, the U.S. and Mexico, total merchandise trade among the three countries has increased. However, political developments in the U.S., including the renegotiation of NAFTA and imposition of tariffs by the U.S., may have implications for the trade arrangements among the U.S., Mexico and Canada, which could negatively affect the value of securities held by the Fund. Policy and legislative changes in any of the three countries may have a significant effect on North American economies generally, as well as on the value of certain securities held by the Fund.

 

Tracking Risk. The Fund’s return may not track the return of the Index for a number of reasons. For example, the Fund incurs a number of operating expenses not applicable to the Index, and incurs costs in buying and selling securities, especially when rebalancing the Fund’s securities holdings to reflect changes in the composition of the Index. In addition, when the Fund uses a representative sampling approach, the Fund may not be as well correlated with the return of the Index as when the Fund purchases all of the securities in the Index in the proportions in which they are represented in the Index.

 

International Closed Market Trading Risk. To the extent that the underlying investments held by the Fund trade on foreign exchanges that may be closed when the securities exchange on which the Fund’s Shares trade is open, there are likely to be deviations between the current price of such an underlying security and the last quoted price for the underlying security (i.e., the Fund’s quote from the closed foreign market). These deviations could result in premiums or discounts to the Fund’s NAV that may be greater than those experienced by other ETFs.

 

Large-Capitalization Investing Risk. The Fund’s performance may be adversely affected if securities of large-capitalization companies underperform securities of smaller-capitalization companies or the market as a whole. The securities of large-capitalization companies may be relatively mature compared to smaller companies and therefore subject to slower growth during times of economic expansion.

 

Liquidity Risk. The Fund’s investments are subject to liquidity risk, which exists when an investment is or becomes difficult or impossible to purchase or sell at an advantageous time and price. If a transaction is particularly large or if the relevant market is or becomes illiquid, it may not be possible to initiate a transaction or liquidate a position, which may cause the Fund to suffer significant losses and difficulties in meeting redemptions. Liquidity risk may be the result of, among other things, market turmoil, the reduced number and capacity of traditional market participants, or the lack of an active trading market. Markets for securities or financial instruments could be disrupted by a number of events, including, but not limited to, an economic crisis, natural disasters, new legislation or regulatory changes inside or outside the U.S. liquid investments may become less liquid after being purchased by the Fund, particularly during periods of market stress. In addition, if a number of securities held by the Fund stop trading, it may have a cascading effect and cause the Fund to halt trading. Volatility in market prices will increase the risk of the Fund being subject to a trading halt. Certain countries in which the Fund may invest may be subject to extended settlement delays and/or foreign holidays, during which the Fund will unlikely be able to convert holdings to cash.

 

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Mid-Capitalization Companies Risk. Mid-capitalization companies may have greater price volatility, lower trading volume and less liquidity than large-capitalization companies. In addition, mid-capitalization companies may have smaller revenues, narrower product lines, less management depth and experience, smaller shares of their product or service markets, fewer financial resources and less competitive strength than large-capitalization companies.

 

New Adviser Risk. Although the Adviser’s principals and the Fund’s portfolio managers have experience managing investments in the past, the Adviser is a newly-formed entity and has no experience managing investments for an ETF, which may limit the Adviser’s effectiveness.

 

New Fund Risk. The Fund is new with no operating history. As a result, there can be no assurance that the Fund will grow to or maintain an economically viable size, in which case it may experience greater tracking error to its Index than it otherwise would at higher asset levels, or it could ultimately liquidate. The Fund’s distributor does not maintain a secondary market in Fund shares.

 

Non-Diversification Risk. Although the Fund intends to invest in a variety of securities and instruments, the Fund is considered to be non-diversified, which means that it may invest more of its assets in the securities of a single issuer or a smaller number of issuers than if it were a diversified fund. As a result, the Fund may be more exposed to the risks associated with and developments affecting an individual issuer or a smaller number of issuers than a fund that invests more widely. This may increase the Fund’s volatility and cause the performance of a relatively smaller number of issuers to have a greater impact on the Fund’s performance.

 

Operational Risk. The Fund is exposed to operational risks arising from a number of factors, including, but not limited to, human error, processing and communication errors, errors of the Fund’s service providers, counterparties or other third parties, failed or inadequate processes and technology or systems failures. The Fund and the Adviser seek to reduce these operational risks through controls and procedures. However, these measures do not address every possible risk and may be inadequate to address significant operational risks.

 

Cybersecurity Risk. Failures or breaches of the electronic systems of the Fund and/or the Fund’s service providers, including the Adviser, Index Provider, market makers, Authorized Participants or the issuers of securities in which the Fund invests have the ability to cause disruptions, negatively impact the Fund’s business operations and/or potentially result in financial losses to the Fund and its shareholders. While the Fund has established business continuity plans and risk management systems seeking to address system breaches or failures, there are inherent limitations in such plans and systems. Furthermore, the Fund cannot control the cybersecurity plans and systems of the Fund’s Index Provider, Adviser, other service providers, market makers, Authorized Participants or issuers of securities in which the Fund invests.

 

Passive Investment Risk. The Fund is not actively managed and the Adviser would not sell a security due to current or projected underperformance of a security, industry or sector, unless that security is removed from the Index or the selling of shares of that security is otherwise required upon a reconstitution of the Index in accordance with the Index methodology. The Fund invests in securities included in the Index, regardless of their investment merits. The Fund does not take defensive positions under any market conditions, including conditions that are adverse to the performance of the Fund.

 

Sector Risk. To the extent the Fund invests more heavily in particular sectors of the economy, its performance will be especially sensitive to developments that significantly affect those sectors.

 

Information Technology Sector Risk. Market or economic factors impacting information technology companies and companies that rely heavily on technological advances could have a significant effect on the value of the Fund’s investments. The value of stocks of information technology companies and companies that rely heavily on technology is particularly vulnerable to rapid changes in technology product cycles, rapid product obsolescence, government regulation and competition, both domestically and internationally, including competition from foreign competitors with lower production costs. Stocks of information technology companies and companies that rely heavily on technology, especially those of smaller, less-seasoned companies, tend to be more volatile than the overall market. Information technology companies are heavily dependent on patent and intellectual property rights, the loss or impairment of which may adversely affect profitability.

 

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Securities Lending Risk. To the extent the Fund lends its securities, it may be subject to the following risks: (1) the securities in which the collateral is invested may not perform sufficiently to cover the applicable rebate rates paid to borrowers and related administrative costs; (2) delays may occur in the recovery of securities from borrowers, which could interfere with the Fund’s ability to vote proxies or to settle transactions; and (3) although borrowers of the Fund’s securities typically provide collateral in the form of cash that is reinvested in securities, there is the risk of possible loss of rights in the collateral should the borrower fail financially.

 

Small-Capitalization Companies Risk. Compared to mid- and large-capitalization companies, small-capitalization companies may be less stable and more susceptible to adverse developments, and their securities may be more volatile and less liquid.

 

Thematic Investing Risk. The Fund relies on the Index Provider for the identification of securities for inclusion in the Index that reflect themes and sub-themes, and its performance may suffer if such securities are not correctly identified or if a theme or sub-theme develops in an unexpected manner. Performance may also suffer if the stocks included in the Index do not benefit from the development of such themes or sub-themes. Performance may also be impacted by the inclusion of non-theme relevant exposures in the Index. There is no guarantee that the Index will reflect the theme and sub-theme exposures intended.

 

Natural Language Processing (NLP) Model Risk. The Index Provider uses NLP models to assist in the development of the Fund’s Index. The Index’s investment theme is created by the Index Provider and the Index Provider’s description of the theme is used by the NLP screening models to identify relevant companies for index consideration. The investment theme must be accurately described in order for the NLP models to identify companies that reflect the themes and sub-themes of the Index. If the description of the theme is incorrect or incomplete, the NLP model may identify companies that are not relevant to the Fund’s investment theme or fail to identify companies that are relevant. As a result, securities may be included in or excluded from the Index that would have been excluded or included had the description of the theme been correct and complete. If the composition of the Index reflects such errors, the Fund’s portfolio can be expected to also reflect the errors. There is no guarantee that the Index will reflect the theme and sub-theme exposures intended. The Index Provider relies on the integrity of the data being analyzed and its review processes could be adversely affected if erroneous or outdated data is utilized.

 

Valuation Risk. Independent market quotations for certain investments held by the Fund may not be readily available, and such investments may be fair valued or valued by a pricing service at an evaluated price. These valuations involve subjectivity and different market participants may assign different prices to the same investment. As a result, there is a risk that the Fund may not be able to sell an investment at the price assigned to the investment by the Fund. In addition, the securities in which the Fund invests may trade on days that the Fund does not price its shares; as a result, the value of Fund shares may change on days when investors cannot purchase or sell their Fund holdings.

 

Fund Performance

 

Performance information for the Fund is not included because the Fund did not commence operations prior to the date of this Prospectus. In the future, performance for the Fund will be presented in this section. Updated performance information will be available on the Fund’s website at www.ThemesETFs.com or by calling the Fund toll-free at _________.

 

Management

 

Investment Adviser

 

Themes Management Company, LLC (the “Adviser”) serves as investment adviser to the Fund.

 

Portfolio Managers

 

Dingxun (Kevin) Shao, Vice President, Product Management & Development of the Adviser, and Calvin Tsang, CFA, Head of Product Management & Development of the Adviser, are jointly and primarily responsible for the day-to-day management of the Fund and have served as portfolio managers since the Fund’s inception.

 

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Buying and Selling Fund Shares

 

The Fund is an ETF. This means that individual Shares of the Fund may only be purchased and sold in the secondary market through brokers at market prices, rather than NAV. Because Shares trade at market prices rather than NAV, Shares may trade at a price greater than NAV (premium) or less than NAV (discount).

 

The Fund generally issues and redeems shares at NAV only in large blocks of shares known as “Creation Units,” which only institutions or large investors may purchase or redeem. The Fund generally issues and redeems Creation Units in exchange for a portfolio of securities (the “Deposit Securities”) and/or a designated amount of U.S. cash that the Fund specifies each day.

 

Investors may incur costs attributable to the difference between the highest price a buyer is willing to pay to purchase Shares (bid) and the lowest price a seller is willing to accept for Shares (ask) when buying or selling Shares in the secondary market (the “bid-ask spread”). Recent information about the Fund, including its net asset value, market price, premiums and discounts, and bid-ask spreads is available on the Fund’s website at www.ThemesETFs.com.

 

Tax Information

 

Fund distributions are generally taxable as ordinary income, qualified dividend income, or capital gains (or a combination), unless your investment is in an IRA or other tax-advantaged retirement account. Distributions may be taxable upon withdrawal from tax-deferred accounts.

 

Payments to Broker-Dealers and Other Financial Intermediaries

 

If you purchase the Fund through a broker or other financial intermediary (such as a bank), the Adviser and its related companies may pay the intermediary for activities related to the marketing and promotion of the Fund. These payments may create a conflict of interest by influencing the broker-dealer or other intermediary and your sales person to recommend the Fund over another investment. Ask your sales person or visit your financial intermediary’s website for more information.

 

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Themes Global Systemically Important Banks ETF

 

 

Investment Objective

 

The Themes Global Systemically Important Banks ETF (the “Fund”) seeks growth of capital.

 

Fees and Expenses of the Fund

 

The following table describes the fees and expenses you may pay if you buy, hold, and sell shares of the Fund (“Shares”). You may pay other fees, such as brokerage commissions and other fees to financial intermediaries, which are not reflected in the table and Example below.

 

Annual Fund Operating Expenses (expenses that you pay each year as a percentage of the value of your investment)  
Management Fees 0.35%
Distribution and/or Service (12b-1) Fees None
Other Expenses* 0.00%
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses 0.35%

 

* Estimated for the current fiscal year

 

Example

The following example is intended to help retail investors compare the cost of investing in the Fund with the cost of investing in other funds. It illustrates the hypothetical expenses that such investors would incur over various periods if they were to invest $10,000 in the Fund for the time periods indicated and then redeem all of the Shares at the end of those periods. This example assumes that the Fund provides a return of 5% a year and that operating expenses remain the same. Although your actual costs may be higher or lower, based on these assumptions, your costs would be:

 

1 Year 3 Years
$36 $113

 

Portfolio Turnover

The Fund pays transaction costs, such as commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or “turns over” its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover rate may indicate higher transaction costs and may result in higher taxes when Fund Shares are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are not reflected in annual fund operating expenses or in the example, affect the Fund’s performance. Because the Fund is newly organized, portfolio turnover information is not yet available.

 

Principal Investment Strategies of the Fund

 

The Fund is an actively managed exchange-traded fund (“ETF”) that will invest in the equity securities of companies that operate in the global banking sector. Under normal circumstances, the Fund will invest at least 80% of its net assets, plus the amount of any borrowings for investment purposes, in securities that are part of the global banking sector and in American Depositary Receipts (“ADRs”) and Global Depositary Receipts (“GDRs”) that represent such companies in the banking sector. The Fund’s 80% Policy is non-fundamental and requires 60 days prior written notice to shareholders before it can be changed. The banks included in the Fund’s portfolio will generally be classified as large-capitalization companies.

 

The Fund’s investment universe will include all banks included in the list of Global Systemically Important Banks (“G-SIBs”), published annually by the Financial Stability Board. Currently, there are 28 publicly traded banks that are classified as G-SIBs. The Fund’s investment adviser, Themes Management Company, LLC (the “Adviser”) will manage the Fund’s portfolio by investing the Fund’s assets on an equally weighted basis in the equity securities issued by the G-SIB banks. The banks selected for investment by the Fund are selected solely based on their classification as G-SIBs. The Adviser expects to rebalance the Fund’s portfolio on a quarterly basis and will do an annual reconstitution of the portfolio, as applicable.

 

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G-SIBs are banks that are believed to be so systemically important to the global banking system that the bank’s failure could trigger a wider financial crisis and threaten the global economy. The Basel Committee on Banking Supervision (“BCBS”), which is considered the primary global standard setter for the prudential regulation of banks, is responsible for identifying G-SIBs. BCBS consists of 45 members representing central bank and bank supervisors from 28 jurisdictions. BCBS has developed an indicator-based measurement approach to identify G-SIBs. A G-SIB designation does not represent an investment recommendation by BCBS, but it is designed to identify those banks that are systemically important to the global banking system. The measurement approach, which is risk based, considers the following five categories and the underlying indicators of each category, as applicable:

 

1. Size of the banks – A bank’s distress or failure is more likely to damage the global economy or financial markets if its activities comprise a large share of global activity. The larger the bank, the more difficult it is for its activities to be quickly replaced by other banks and therefore the greater the chance that its distress or failure would cause disruption to the financial markets in which it operates. The distress or failure of a large bank is also more likely to damage confidence in the financial system as a whole. Size is therefore a key measure of systemic importance.

 

2. Interconnectedness – Financial distress at one institution can materially increase the likelihood of distress at other institutions given the network of contractual obligations in which these firms operate. A bank’s systemic impact is likely to be positively related to its interconnectedness vis-à-vis other financial institutions. Three indicators are used to measure interconnectedness: (i) intra-financial system assets; (ii) intra-financial system liabilities; and (iii) securities outstanding. All three indicators include insurance subsidiaries of a bank in their measurements.

 

3. Substitutability/financial institution infrastructure – The systemic impact of a bank’s distress or failure is expected to be negatively related to its degree of substitutability as both a market participant and a client service provider. For example, the greater a bank’s role in a particular business line, or as a service provider in underlying market infrastructure (e.g., payment systems), the larger the disruption will likely be following its failure, in terms of both service gaps and reduced flow of market and infrastructure liquidity. At the same time, the cost to the failed bank’s customers in having to seek the same service from another institution is likely to be higher for a failed bank with relatively greater market share in providing the service. Four indicators are used to measure substitutability/financial institution infrastructure: (i) assets under custody; (ii) payments activity; (iii) underwritten transactions in debt and equity markets; and (iv) trading volume.

 

4. Cross-jurisdictional activity – The objective of this indicator is to capture banks’ global footprint. Two indicators in this category measure the importance of the bank’s activities outside its home (headquarter) jurisdiction relative to overall activity of other banks in the sample: (i) cross-jurisdictional claims; and (ii) cross-jurisdictional liabilities. The idea is that the international impact of a bank’s distress or failure would vary in line with its share of cross-jurisdictional assets and liabilities. The greater a bank’s global reach, the more difficult it is to coordinate its resolution and the more widespread the spillover effects from its failure.

 

5. Complexity – The systemic impact of a bank’s distress or failure is expected to be positively related to its overall complexity – that is, its business, structural and operational complexity. The more complex a bank is, the greater the costs and time needed to resolve the matters impacting the bank. Three indicators are used to measure complexity: (i) notional amount of OTC derivatives; (ii) amount of level 3 assets (i.e., are those assets fair valued using observable inputs that require significant adjustment based on unobservable inputs); and (iii) trading and available-for-sale securities. The first two indicators include insurance subsidiaries of a bank in their measurements.

 

The Fund is considered to be non-diversified, which means that it may invest more of its assets in the securities of a single issuer or a smaller number of issuers than if it were a diversified fund. As a result of its investment strategies, the Fund will concentrate (i.e., invest more than 25% of its total assets) its investments in the banking industry and the financials sector. The banks being classified as G-SIBs may change over time, which would result in the Fund’s portfolio changing as well.

 

The Fund may lend securities representing up to one-third of the value of the Fund’s total assets (including the value of any collateral received).

 

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Principal Risks of Investing in the Fund

 

You can lose money on your investment in the Fund. The Fund is subject to the risks summarized below. Some or all of these risks may adversely affect the Fund’s net asset value per share (“NAV”), trading price, yield, total return and/or ability to meet its objectives. For more information about the risks of investing in the Fund, see the section in the Fund’s prospectus entitled “Additional Information about the Principal Risks of Investing in the Funds.” Each risk summarized below is considered a “principal risk” of investing in the Fund, regardless of the order in which it appears.

 

Concentration Risk. The Fund may be susceptible to an increased risk of loss, including losses due to adverse events that affect the Fund’s investments more than the market as a whole, to the extent that the Fund’s investments are concentrated in the securities of particular issuers, country, group of countries, region, market, industry, group of industries, sector, market segment or asset class.

 

Banking Industry Risk. Performance of companies in the banking industry may be adversely impacted by many factors, including, among others, changes in government regulations, economic conditions, and interest rates, credit rating downgrades, and decreased liquidity in credit markets. Extensive governmental regulations may limit the amounts and types of loans and other financial commitments companies in the banking industry can make, the interest rates and fees they can charge, the scope of their activities, the prices they can charge and the amount of capital they must maintain. Profitability is heavily dependent on the availability and cost of capital funds and can fluctuate significantly when interest rates change or due to increased competition. Credit losses resulting from financial difficulties of borrowers can negatively impact banking companies. The extent to which the Fund may invest in a company that engages in securities-related activities or banking is limited by applicable law. The impact of changes in capital requirements and recent or future regulation of any individual banking company, or of the financials sector as a whole, cannot be predicted. In recent years, cyberattacks and technology malfunctions and failures have become increasingly frequent in this industry and have caused significant losses to companies in this industry, which may negatively impact the Fund.

 

Equity Market Risk. The equity securities held in the Fund’s portfolio may experience sudden, unpredictable drops in value or long periods of decline in value. This may occur because of factors that affect securities markets generally or factors affecting specific industries, sectors or companies in which the Fund invests. Common stocks are susceptible to general stock market fluctuations and to volatile increases and decreases in value as market confidence in and perceptions of their issuers change. The Fund’s NAV and market price may fluctuate significantly in response to these and other factors. As a result, an investor could lose money over short or long periods of time.

 

Active Management Risk. The Fund is actively-managed and may not meet its investment objective based on the Adviser’s success or failure to implement investment strategies for the Fund. The success of the Fund’s investment program depends largely on the investment techniques applied by the Adviser. It is possible the investment techniques employed on behalf of the Fund will not produce the desired results.

 

Sector Risk. To the extent the Fund invests more heavily in the financials sector of the economy, and its performance will therefore be especially sensitive to developments that significantly affect that sector.

 

Financials Sector Risk. Performance of companies in the financials sector may be adversely impacted by many factors, including, among others, changes in government regulations, economic conditions, and interest rates, credit rating downgrades, and decreased liquidity in credit markets. The extent to which the Fund may invest in a company that engages in securities-related activities or banking is limited by applicable law. The impact of changes in capital requirements and recent or future regulation of any individual financial company, or of the financials sector as a whole, cannot be predicted. In recent years, cyberattacks and technology malfunctions and failures have become increasingly frequent in this sector and have caused significant losses to companies in this sector, which may negatively impact the Fund.

 

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Bank Crisis Risk. Economic downturns and changes in monetary policies could potentially impact G-SIBs or the banking industry negatively. Until 2022, most U.S. banks allocated their reserves to low-yielding government securities, encompassing Agency Mortgage-Backed and U.S. Treasury Securities. However, the Federal Reserve’s decision to increase interest rates in 2022 led to a large decrease in bond prices. This development eroded the value of bank capital reserves, driving some banks into the sphere of unrealized losses.

 

Further stress was added to the industry when Silvergate Bank announced its plan to liquidate in March 2023. This triggered widespread panic leading to a series of bank runs, beginning with Silicon Valley Bank, progressing to Signature Bank, and then at First Republic Bank. In response to this potential systemic threat, global industry regulators intervened, providing liquidity to government securities and facilitating acquisitions within the banking industry to restore confidence.

 

The regional banking crisis in the U.S. triggered unease among international investors, leading to apprehension regarding other potentially unstable banks. Consequently, Credit Suisse’s share price saw a significant decline. In an effort to reinforce investor confidence and bring stability, the Swiss government, in collaboration with the Financial Market Supervisory Authority, oversaw Credit Suisse’s acquisition by UBS. Despite the status of G-SIBs, there is no guarantee that G-SIBs can withstand a banking crisis better than other banking institutions.

 

Currency Risk. The Fund may invest in securities denominated in foreign currencies. Because the Fund’s NAV is determined in U.S. dollars, the Fund’s NAV could decline if currencies of the underlying securities depreciate against the U.S. dollar or if there are delays or limits on repatriation of such currencies. Currency exchange rates can be very volatile and can change quickly and unpredictably. As a result, the Fund’s NAV may change quickly and without warning, which could have a significant negative impact on the Fund.

 

Depositary Receipts Risk. Depositary receipts (e.g., ADRs and GDRs) which involve similar risks to those associated with investments in foreign securities. Investments in depositary receipts may be less liquid than the underlying shares in their primary trading market. The issuers of depositary receipts may discontinue issuing new depositary receipts and withdraw existing depositary receipts at any time, which may result in costs and delays in the distribution of the underlying assets to the Fund and may negatively impact the Fund’s performance.

 

Emerging Markets Risk. Investments in securities and instruments traded in developing or emerging markets, or that provide exposure to such securities or markets, can involve additional risks relating to political, economic, or regulatory conditions not associated with investments in U.S. securities and instruments or investments in more developed international markets. Such conditions may impact the ability of the Fund to buy, sell or otherwise transfer securities, adversely affect the trading market and price for Shares and cause the Fund to decline in value. Less developed markets are more likely to experience problems with the clearing and settling of trades and the holding of securities by local banks, agents and depositories.

 

Foreign Securities Risk. The Fund’s investments in foreign securities can be riskier than U.S. securities investments. Investments in the securities of foreign issuers (including investments in ADRs and GDRs) are subject to the risks associated with investing in those foreign markets, such as heightened risks of inflation or nationalization. The prices of foreign securities and the prices of U.S. securities have, at times, moved in opposite directions. In addition, securities of foreign issuers may lose value due to political, economic and geographic events affecting a foreign issuer or market. During periods of social, political or economic instability in a country or region, the value of a foreign security traded on U.S. exchanges could be affected by, among other things, increasing price volatility, illiquidity, or the closure of the primary market on which the security (or the security underlying the ADR or GDR) is traded. You may lose money due to political, economic and geographic events affecting a foreign issuer or market.

 

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Geographic Risk. A natural, biological or other disaster could occur in a geographic region in which the Fund invests, which could affect the economy or particular business operations of companies in the specific geographic region, causing an adverse impact on the Fund’s investments in the affected region or in a region economically tied to the affected region. The securities in which the Fund invests and, consequently, the Fund are also subject to specific risks as a result of their business operations, including, but not limited to:

 

Risk of Investing in Developed Markets. The Fund’s investment in a developed country issuer may subject the Fund to regulatory, political, currency, security, economic and other risks associated with developed countries. Developed countries tend to represent a significant portion of the global economy and have generally experienced slower economic growth than some less developed countries. Certain developed countries have experienced security concerns, such as terrorism and strained international relations. Incidents involving a country’s or region’s security may cause uncertainty in its markets and may adversely affect its economy and the Fund’s investments. In addition, developed countries may be impacted by changes to the economic conditions of certain key trading partners, regulatory burdens, debt burdens and the price or availability of certain commodities.

 

Risk of Investing in North America. A decrease in imports or exports, changes in trade regulations or an economic recession in any North American country can have a significant economic effect on the entire North American region and on some or all of the North American countries to which the Fund has economic exposure. The U.S. is Canada’s and Mexico’s largest trading and investment partner. The Canadian and Mexican economies are significantly affected by developments in the U.S. economy. Since the implementation of the North American Free Trade Agreement (“NAFTA”) in 1994 among Canada, the U.S. and Mexico, total merchandise trade among the three countries has increased. However, political developments in the U.S., including the renegotiation of NAFTA and imposition of tariffs by the U.S., may have implications for the trade arrangements among the U.S., Mexico and Canada, which could negatively affect the value of securities held by the Fund. Policy and legislative changes in any of the three countries may have a significant effect on North American economies generally, as well as on the value of certain securities held by the Fund.

 

Risk of Investing in Asia. Many Asian economies have experienced rapid growth and industrialization in recent years, but there is no assurance that this growth rate will be maintained. Other Asian economies, however, have experienced high inflation, high unemployment, currency devaluations and restrictions, and over-extension of credit. Geopolitical hostility, political instability, as well as economic or environmental events in any one Asian country may have a significant economic effect on the entire Asian region, as well as on major trading partners outside Asia. Any adverse event in the Asian markets may have a significant adverse effect on some or all of the economies of the countries in which the Fund invests. Many Asian countries are subject to political risk, including political instability, corruption and regional conflict with neighboring countries. North Korea and South Korea each have substantial military capabilities, and historical tensions between the two countries present the risk of war. Escalated tensions involving the two countries and any outbreak of hostilities between the two countries, or even the threat of an outbreak of hostilities, could have a severe adverse effect on the entire Asian region. Certain Asian countries have also developed increasingly strained relationships with the U.S., and if these relations were to worsen, they could adversely affect Asian issuers that rely on the U.S. for trade. In addition, many Asian countries are subject to social and labor risks associated with demands for improved political, economic and social conditions.

 

Risk of Investing in China. The Chinese economy is generally considered an emerging market and can be significantly affected by economic and political conditions in China and surrounding Asian countries and may demonstrate significantly higher volatility from time to time in comparison to developed markets. China may be subject to considerable degrees of economic, political and social instability. Over the last few decades, the Chinese government has undertaken reform of economic and market practices and has expanded the sphere of private ownership of property in China. However, Chinese markets generally continue to experience inefficiency, volatility and pricing anomalies resulting from governmental influence, a lack of publicly available information and/or political and social instability. Chinese companies are also subject to the risk that Chinese authorities can intervene in their operations and structure. In addition, the Chinese economy is export-driven and highly reliant on trading with key partners. A downturn in the economies of China’s primary trading partners could slow or eliminate the growth of the Chinese economy and adversely impact the Fund’s investments. The Chinese government strictly regulates the payment of foreign currency denominated obligations and sets monetary policy. The Chinese government may introduce new laws and regulations that could have an adverse effect on the Fund. Although China has begun the process of privatizing certain sectors of its economy, privatized entities may lose money and/or be re-nationalized.

 

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In the Chinese securities markets, a small number of issuers may represent a large portion of the entire market. The Chinese securities markets are subject to more frequent trading halts, low trading volume and price volatility. Recent developments in relations between the United States and China have heightened concerns of increased tariffs and restrictions on trade between the two countries. An increase in tariffs or trade restrictions, or even the threat of such developments, could lead to a significant reduction in international trade, which could have a negative impact on China’s export industry and a commensurately negative impact on the Fund.

 

In recent years, Chinese entities have incurred significant levels of debt and Chinese financial institutions currently hold relatively large amounts of non-performing debt. Thus, there exists a possibility that widespread defaults could occur, which could trigger a financial crisis, freeze Chinese debt and finance markets and make Chinese securities illiquid.

 

In addition, trade relations between the U.S. and China have recently been strained. Worsening trade relations between the two countries could adversely impact the Fund, particularly to the extent that the Chinese government restricts foreign investments in on-shore Chinese companies or the U.S. government restricts investments by U.S. investors in China. Worsening trade relations may also result in market volatility and volatility in the price of Fund shares.

 

Disclosure and regulatory standards in emerging market countries, such as China, are in many respects less stringent than U.S. standards. There is substantially less publicly available information about Chinese issuers than there is about U.S. issuers.

 

Hong Kong Risk. The economy of Hong Kong has few natural resources and any fluctuation or shortage in the commodity markets could have a significant adverse effect on the Hong Kong economy. Hong Kong is also heavily dependent on international trade and finance. Additionally, the continuation and success of the current political, economic, legal and social policies of Hong Kong is dependent on and subject to the control of the Chinese government. China may change its policies regarding Hong Kong at any time. Any such change may adversely affect market conditions and the performance of Chinese and Hong Kong issuers and, thus, the value of securities in the Fund’s portfolio.

 

International Closed Market Trading Risk. To the extent that the underlying investments held by the Fund trade on foreign exchanges that may be closed when the securities exchange on which the Fund’s Shares trade is open, there are likely to be deviations between the current price of such an underlying security and the last quoted price for the underlying security (i.e., the Fund’s quote from the closed foreign market). These deviations could result in premiums or discounts to the Fund’s NAV that may be greater than those experienced by other ETFs.

 

ETF Risks. The Fund is an ETF and, as a result of an ETF’s structure, is exposed to the following risks:

 

Authorized Participants (“APs”), Market Makers, and Liquidity Providers Concentration Risk. The Fund has a limited number of financial institutions that may act as APs. In addition, there may be a limited number of market makers and/or liquidity providers in the marketplace. To the extent either of the following events occur, shares of the Fund may trade at a material discount to NAV and possibly face delisting: (i) APs exit the business or otherwise become unable to process creation and/or redemption orders and no other APs step forward to perform these services, or (ii) market makers and/or liquidity providers exit the business or significantly reduce their business activities and no other entities step forward to perform their functions.

 

Costs of Buying or Selling Shares of the Fund. Due to the costs of buying or selling shares of the Fund, including brokerage commissions imposed by brokers and bid/ask spreads, frequent trading of shares of the Fund may significantly reduce investment results and an investment in shares of the Fund may not be advisable for investors who anticipate regularly making small investments.

 

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Shares of the Fund May Trade at Prices Other Than NAV. As with all ETFs, shares of the Fund may be bought and sold in the secondary market at market prices. The price of shares of the Fund, like the price of all traded securities, will be subject to factors such as supply and demand, as well as the current value of the Fund’s portfolio holdings. Although it is expected that the market price of the shares of the Fund will approximate the Fund’s NAV, there may be times when the market price of the shares is more than the NAV intra-day (premium) or less than the NAV intra-day (discount). This risk is heightened in times of market volatility, periods of steep market declines, and periods when there is limited trading activity for shares in the secondary market, in which case such premiums or discounts may be significant.

 

Trading. Although shares of the Fund are listed for trading on a national securities exchange, such as The Nasdaq Stock Market LLC (the “Exchange”), and may be traded on U.S. exchanges other than the Exchange, there can be no assurance that shares of the Fund will trade with any volume, or at all, on any stock exchange. In stressed market conditions, the liquidity of shares of the Fund may begin to mirror the liquidity of the Fund’s underlying portfolio holdings, which can be significantly less liquid than shares of the Fund, and this could lead to differences between the market price of the shares of the Fund and the underlying value of those shares.

 

Non-Diversification Risk. Although the Fund intends to invest in a variety of securities, the Fund is considered to be non-diversified, which means that it may invest more of its assets in the securities of a single issuer or a smaller number of issuers than if it were a diversified fund. As a result, the Fund may be more exposed to the risks associated with and developments affecting an individual issuer or a smaller number of issuers than a fund that invests more widely. This may increase the Fund’s volatility and cause the performance of a relatively smaller number of issuers to have a greater impact on the Fund’s performance.

 

Large-Capitalization Investing Risk. The Fund’s performance may be adversely affected if securities of large-capitalization companies underperform securities of smaller-capitalization companies or the market as a whole. The securities of large-capitalization companies may be relatively mature compared to smaller companies and therefore subject to slower growth during times of economic expansion.

 

Mid-Capitalization Companies Risk. Mid-capitalization companies may have greater price volatility, lower trading volume and less liquidity than large-capitalization companies. In addition, mid-capitalization companies may have smaller revenues, narrower product lines, less management depth and experience, smaller shares of their product or service markets, fewer financial resources and less competitive strength than large-capitalization companies.

 

New Adviser Risk. Although the Adviser’s principals and the Fund’s portfolio managers have experience managing investments in the past, the Adviser is a newly-formed entity and has no experience managing investments for an ETF, which may limit the Adviser’s effectiveness.

 

New Fund Risk. The Fund is new with no operating history. As a result, there can be no assurance that the Fund will grow to or maintain an economically viable size and may ultimately liquidate. The Fund’s distributor does not maintain a secondary market in Fund shares.

 

Securities Lending Risk. To the extent the Fund lends its securities, it may be subject to the following risks: (1) the securities in which the collateral is invested may not perform sufficiently to cover the applicable rebate rates paid to borrowers and related administrative costs; (2) delays may occur in the recovery of securities from borrowers, which could interfere with the Fund’s ability to vote proxies or to settle transactions; and (3) although borrowers of the Fund’s securities typically provide collateral in the form of cash that is reinvested in securities, there is the risk of possible loss of rights in the collateral should the borrower fail financially.

 

Operational Risk. The Fund is exposed to operational risks arising from a number of factors, including, but not limited to, human error, processing and communication errors, errors of the Fund’s service providers, counterparties or other third parties, failed or inadequate processes and technology or systems failures. The Fund and the Adviser seek to reduce these operational risks through controls and procedures. However, these measures do not address every possible risk and may be inadequate to address significant operational risks.

 

Cybersecurity Risk. Failures or breaches of the electronic systems of the Fund and/or the Fund’s service providers, including the Adviser, Index Provider, market makers, Authorized Participants or the issuers of securities in which the Fund invests have the ability to cause disruptions, negatively impact the Fund’s business operations and/or potentially result in financial losses to the Fund and its shareholders. While the Fund has established business continuity plans and risk management systems seeking to address system breaches or failures, there are inherent limitations in such plans and systems. Furthermore, the Fund cannot control the cybersecurity plans and systems of the Fund’s Index Provider, Adviser, other service providers, market makers, Authorized Participants or issuers of securities in which the Fund invests.

 

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Liquidity Risk. The Fund’s investments are subject to liquidity risk, which exists when an investment is or becomes difficult or impossible to purchase or sell at an advantageous time and price. If a transaction is particularly large or if the relevant market is or becomes illiquid, it may not be possible to initiate a transaction or liquidate a position, which may cause the Fund to suffer significant losses and difficulties in meeting redemptions. Liquidity risk may be the result of, among other things, market turmoil, the reduced number and capacity of traditional market participants, or the lack of an active trading market. Markets for securities or financial instruments could be disrupted by a number of events, including, but not limited to, an economic crisis, natural disasters, new legislation or regulatory changes inside or outside the U.S. liquid investments may become less liquid after being purchased by the Fund, particularly during periods of market stress. In addition, if a number of securities held by the Fund stop trading, it may have a cascading effect and cause the Fund to halt trading. Volatility in market prices will increase the risk of the Fund being subject to a trading halt. Certain countries in which the Fund may invest may be subject to extended settlement delays and/or foreign holidays, during which the Fund will unlikely be able to convert holdings to cash.

 

Valuation Risk. Independent market quotations for certain investments held by the Fund may not be readily available, and such investments may be fair valued or valued by a pricing service at an evaluated price. These valuations involve subjectivity and different market participants may assign different prices to the same investment. As a result, there is a risk that the Fund may not be able to sell an investment at the price assigned to the investment by the Fund. In addition, the securities in which the Fund invests may trade on days that the Fund does not price its shares; as a result, the value of Fund shares may change on days when investors cannot purchase or sell their Fund holdings.

 

Fund Performance

 

Performance information for the Fund is not included because the Fund did not commence operations prior to the date of this Prospectus. In the future, performance for the Fund will be presented in this section. Updated performance information will be available on the Fund’s website at www.ThemesETFs.com or by calling the Fund toll-free at _________.

 

Management

 

Investment Adviser

 

Themes Management Company, LLC (the “Adviser”) serves as investment adviser to the Fund.

 

Portfolio Managers

 

Dingxun (Kevin) Shao, Vice President, Product Management & Development of the Adviser, and Calvin Tsang, CFA, Head of Product Management & Development of the Adviser, are jointly and primarily responsible for the day-to-day management of the Fund and have served as portfolio managers since the Fund’s inception. 

 

Buying and Selling Fund Shares

 

The Fund is an ETF. This means that individual Shares of the Fund may only be purchased and sold in the secondary market through brokers at market prices, rather than NAV. Because Shares trade at market prices rather than NAV, Shares may trade at a price greater than NAV (premium) or less than NAV (discount).

 

The Fund generally issues and redeems shares at NAV only in large blocks of shares known as “Creation Units,” which only institutions or large investors may purchase or redeem. The Fund generally issues and redeems Creation Units in exchange for a portfolio of securities (the “Deposit Securities”) and/or a designated amount of U.S. cash that the Fund specifies each day.

 

Investors may incur costs attributable to the difference between the highest price a buyer is willing to pay to purchase Shares (bid) and the lowest price a seller is willing to accept for Shares (ask) when buying or selling Shares in the secondary market (the “bid-ask spread”). Recent information about the Fund, including its net asset value, market price, premiums and discounts, and bid-ask spreads is available on the Fund’s website at www.ThemesETFs.com.

 

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Tax Information

 

Fund distributions are generally taxable as ordinary income, qualified dividend income, or capital gains (or a combination), unless your investment is in an IRA or other tax-advantaged retirement account. Distributions may be taxable upon withdrawal from tax-deferred accounts.

 

Payments to Broker-Dealers and Other Financial Intermediaries

 

If you purchase the Fund through a broker or other financial intermediary (such as a bank), the Adviser and its related companies may pay the intermediary for activities related to the marketing and promotion of the Fund. These payments may create a conflict of interest by influencing the broker-dealer or other intermediary and your sales person to recommend the Fund over another investment. Ask your sales person or visit your financial intermediary’s website for more information.

 

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Themes Gold Miners ETF

 

 

Investment Objective

 

The Themes Gold Miners ETF (the “Fund”) is an exchange traded fund (“ETF”) that seeks to track the performance, before fees and expenses, of an index composed of companies that are active in the gold mining industry.

 

Fees and Expenses of the Fund

 

The following table describes the fees and expenses you may pay if you buy, hold, and sell shares of the Fund (“Shares”). You may pay other fees, such as brokerage commissions and other fees to financial intermediaries, which are not reflected in the table and Example below.

 

Annual Fund Operating Expenses (expenses that you pay each year as a percentage of the value of your investment)  
Management Fees 0.35%
Distribution and/or Service (12b-1) Fees None
Other Expenses* 0.00%
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses 0.35%

 

* Estimated for the current fiscal year

 

Example

The following example is intended to help retail investors compare the cost of investing in the Fund with the cost of investing in other funds. It illustrates the hypothetical expenses that such investors would incur over various periods if they were to invest $10,000 in the Fund for the time periods indicated and then redeem all of the Shares at the end of those periods. This example assumes that the Fund provides a return of 5% a year and that operating expenses remain the same. Although your actual costs may be higher or lower, based on these assumptions, your costs would be:

 

1 Year 3 Years
$36

$113

 

Portfolio Turnover

The Fund pays transaction costs, such as commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or “turns over” its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover rate may indicate higher transaction costs and may result in higher taxes when Fund Shares are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are not reflected in annual fund operating expenses or in the example, affect the Fund’s performance. Because the Fund is newly organized, portfolio turnover information is not yet available.

 

Principal Investment Strategies of the Fund

 

The Fund employs a “passive management” (or indexing) investment approach designed to track the performance, before fees and expenses, of the Solactive Global Pure Gold Miners Index, or any successor thereto (the “Index”). The Index is based on a proprietary methodology developed and maintained by Solactive AG (the “Index Provider”), which is an organization that is independent of, and unaffiliated with, the Fund and Themes Management Company, LLC, the Fund’s investment adviser (the “Adviser”).

 

The Index

 

The Index is designed to provide exposure to companies that are active in the gold mining industry and is denominated in U.S. dollars. As of June 30, 2023, the Index was comprised of 23 companies with a market capitalization range of between approximately $920 million and $29.7 billion and a weighted average market capitalization of approximately $6 billion.

 

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In constructing or adjusting the Index, the Index Provider identifies a universe of companies (the “Index Universe”) that, on Selection Days (as defined below), 1) are listed on a regulated stock exchange in the form of shares tradable for foreign investors without restrictions, 2) have significant business operations in the gold mining industry, evidenced by having at least 90% of the company’s revenues generated in gold mining for companies included in the Index on the Selection Day (an “Index Component”) or at least 95% of the company’s revenues generated in gold mining for companies that are not Index Components (“Gold Mining Companies”), 3) have a free float market capitalization of at least $750 million for companies which are Index Components and of at least $1 billion for companies which are not Index Components, 4) have an average daily trading volume in the last 3 months of at least $1 million for companies which are Index Components and $2 million for companies which are not Index Components, and 5) have an average monthly trading volume of at least 75,000 shares in each of the last 6 months (“Liquidity Criterion”). The Index Provider may decide to include companies in the Index Universe which do not fulfil the Liquidity Criterion.

 

The companies in the Index Universe are ranked according to their free float market capitalization. The company with the largest free float market capitalization is assigned rank number 1, the company with the second-largest free float market capitalization rank number 2…etc. For clarification, rank number 1 is higher than rank number 2. The companies with the highest ranks are then chosen as Index Components and the new index composition determined this way is valid starting the business day immediately following the last business day in February (“Adjustment Day”). Selection Day is the business day 10 business days before the Adjustment Day.

 

The minimum number of Index Components is 20 and the maximum number of Index Components is 30. The Index Provider may decide to increase the maximum number of Index Components on a Selection Day. In case the rank assigned to a company which is an existing Index Component on a Selection Day is not sufficient to be selected as an Index Component, it shall only be removed from the Index if its rank exceeds the maximum number of Index Components by more than 10 ranks. The company with the lowest rank which is selected as an Index Component on this Selection Day but which is not currently an Index Component on the Selection Day is not included in the Index in this case. The determination of the Index Universe and the selection of Index Components is made by the Index Provider based on its proprietary methodology. The Index Components may change over time.

 

The composition of the Index is ordinarily adjusted once a year on Adjustment Day after the close of business. The composition of the Index is reviewed on the Selection Day and the appropriate decision made is announced. On each Selection Day and on the business day five business days before the last business day in August (“Reweighting Day”), each Index Component of the Index is weighted proportionally according to its free float market capitalization. The percentage weight of each Index Component is capped at 4.75% on the Selection Days and on the business days five business days before the Reweighting Days. The excess weight is allocated proportionally to all Index Components whose percentage weight is not capped at 4.75%. The new index composition and weightings are implemented after the close of trading on the Adjustment Day and Reweighting Day. The cumulative Percentage Weight of the Index Components which do not fulfil the Liquidity Criterion is capped at 10% on the Adjustment Days and on the business day five business days before the Reweighting Days. The excess weight is allocated proportionally to all Index Components whose Percentage Weight is not capped. These caps represent general guidelines set by the Index Provider and, at times, the Fund may hold positions that exceed the caps based on market activity and/or timing of Reweighting Day.

 

The Fund’s Investment Strategy

 

The Fund will invest, under normal circumstances, at least 80% of its net assets, plus the amount of any borrowings for investment purposes, in the securities that comprise the Index and in American Depositary Receipts (“ADRs”) and Global Depositary Receipts (“GDRs”) based on the securities in the Index. The Fund will also invest, under normal circumstances, at least 80% of its net assets, plus borrowings for investment purposes, in securities of Gold Mining Companies and in ADRs and GDRs based on such securities. Such securities may include those of small-, mid- and large-capitalization companies and foreign issuers. The Fund’s 80% Policies are non-fundamental and require 60 days prior written notice to shareholders before each can be changed.

 

The Fund uses a “passive” or indexing approach. Unlike many investment companies, the Fund does not try to beat the Index and does not seek temporary defensive positions when markets decline or appear overvalued. Indexing may eliminate the chance that the Fund will substantially outperform the Index but also may reduce some of the risks of active management, such as poor security selection. Indexing seeks to achieve lower costs and better after-tax performance by aiming to keep portfolio turnover low in comparison to actively managed investment companies.

 

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The Fund will generally use a “replication” strategy to achieve its investment objective, meaning it will invest in all of the component securities of the Index in the same approximate proportion as in the Index. However, the Fund may utilize a representative sampling strategy with respect to the Index when a replication strategy might be detrimental or disadvantageous to shareholders, such as when there are practical difficulties or substantial costs involved in compiling a portfolio of equity securities to replicate the Index, in instances in which a security in the Index becomes temporarily illiquid, unavailable or less liquid, or as a result of legal restrictions or limitations (such as tax diversification requirements) that apply to the Fund but not the Index. The Adviser expects that, over time, the correlation between the Fund’s performance and that of the Index, before fees and expenses, will be 95% or better. If the Fund uses a replication strategy, it can be expected to have greater correlation to the Index than if it uses a representative sampling strategy.

 

The Fund is considered to be non-diversified, which means that it may invest more of its assets in the securities of a single issuer or a smaller number of issuers than if it were a diversified fund. To the extent the Index is concentrated (i.e., holds 25% or more of its total assets) in a particular industry or group of industries, the Fund is expected to be concentrated in that industry or group of industries to approximately the same extent that the Index concentrates in an industry or group of industries. As of June, 2023, securities of companies in the gold mining industry and materials sector represented a significant portion of the Index. The degree to which components of the Index represent certain sectors or industries may change over time.

 

The Fund may lend securities representing up to one-third of the value of the Fund’s total assets (including the value of any collateral received).

 

Principal Risks of Investing in the Fund

 

You can lose money on your investment in the Fund. The Fund is subject to the risks summarized below. Some or all of these risks may adversely affect the Fund’s net asset value per share (“NAV”), trading price, yield, total return and/or ability to meet its objectives. For more information about the risks of investing in the Fund, see the section in the Fund’s prospectus entitled “Additional Information about the Principal Risks of Investing in the Funds.” Each risk summarized below is considered a “principal risk” of investing in the Fund, regardless of the order in which it appears.

 

Concentration Risk. To the extent that the Index concentrates in investments related to a particular industry or group of industries, the Fund is expected to also concentrate its investments to approximately the same extent. In such event, the Fund’s performance will be particularly susceptible to adverse events impacting such industry, which may include, but are not limited to, the following: general economic conditions or cyclical market patterns that could negatively affect supply and demand; competition for resources; adverse labor relations; political or world events; obsolescence of technologies; and increased competition or new product introductions that may affect the profitability or viability of companies in a particular industry. As a result, the value of the Fund’s investments may rise and fall more than the value of shares of a fund that invests in securities of companies in a broader range of industries.

 

Gold Mining Industry Risk. The Fund will be sensitive to, and its performance will depend to a greater extent on, the overall condition of gold mining companies. Investments related to gold are considered speculative and are affected by a variety of factors. Competitive pressures may have a significant effect on the financial condition of gold mining companies. Also, gold mining companies are highly dependent on the price of gold bullion and may be adversely affected by a variety of worldwide economic, financial and political factors. The price of gold may fluctuate substantially over short periods of time so the Fund’s share price may be more volatile than other types of investments. Fluctuation in the price of gold may be due to a number of factors, including changes in inflation, changes in currency exchange rates and changes in industrial and commercial demand for metals (including fabricator demand). Additionally, increased environmental or labor costs may depress the value of metal investments.

 

Risks Related to Investing in the Exploration Industry. The exploration and development of mineral deposits involve significant financial risks over a significant period of time, which even a combination of careful evaluation, experience and knowledge may not eliminate. Few properties which are explored are ultimately developed into producing mines. Major expenditures may be required to establish reserves by drilling and to construct mining and processing facilities at a site. In addition, mineral exploration companies typically operate at a loss and are dependent on securing equity and/or debt financing, which might be more difficult to secure for an exploration company than for a more established counterpart.

 

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Risks Related to Investing in the Metals and Mining Industry. Securities in the Fund’s portfolio may be significantly subject to the effects of competitive pressures in the gold mining industry and the price of gold bullion. The price of gold may be affected by changes in inflation rates, interest rates, monetary policy, economic conditions, and political stability. Commodity prices may fluctuate substantially over short periods of time; therefore, the Fund’s Share price may be more volatile than other types of investments. In addition, metals and mining companies may also be significantly affected by import controls, worldwide competition, liability for environmental damage, depletion of resources, and mandated expenditures for safety and pollution control devices. Metals and mining companies may have significant operations in areas at risk for social and political unrest, security concerns and environmental damage. These companies may also be at risk for increased government regulation and intervention. Such risks may adversely affect the issuers to which the Fund has exposure.

 

Sector Risk. To the extent the Fund invests more heavily in particular sectors of the economy, its performance will be especially sensitive to developments that significantly affect those sectors.

 

Materials Sector Risk. The Fund will be sensitive to, and its performance will depend to a greater extent on, the overall condition of the basic materials sector. Companies engaged in the production and distribution of basic materials may be adversely affected by changes in world events, political and economic conditions, energy conservation, environmental policies, commodity price volatility, changes in exchange rates, imposition of import controls, increased competition, depletion of resources and labor relations. Many companies in this sector are significantly affected by the level and volatility of commodity prices, the exchange value of the dollar, import controls, and worldwide competition. At times, worldwide production of industrial materials has exceeded demand as a result of over-building or economic downturns, leading to poor investment returns or losses. This sector may also be affected by economic cycles, interest rates, resource availability, technical progress, labor relations, and government regulations.

 

Calculation Methodology Risk. The Index Provider relies directly or indirectly on various sources of information to assess the criteria of issuers included in the Index, including information that may be based on assumptions and estimates. Neither the Fund, the Index Provider, or the Adviser can offer assurances that the Index’s calculation methodology or sources of information will provide an accurate assessment of included issuers or a correct valuation of securities, nor can they guarantee the availability or timeliness of the production of the Index.

 

Commodity Risk. The Fund invests in companies that are susceptible to fluctuations in certain commodity markets and to price changes due to trade relations. Any negative changes in commodity markets that may be due to changes in supply and demand for commodities, market events, war, regulatory developments, other catastrophic events, or other factors that the Fund cannot control could have an adverse impact on those companies.

 

Commodity Price Relationship Risk. The Index measures the performance of companies involved in the gold mining industry and not the performance of the price of gold bullion itself. The securities of companies involved in the gold mining industry may under- or over-perform the price of gold bullion over the short-term or the long-term.

 

Currency Risk. The Fund may invest in securities denominated in foreign currencies. Because the Fund’s NAV is determined in U.S. dollars, the Fund’s NAV could decline if currencies of the underlying securities depreciate against the U.S. dollar or if there are delays or limits on repatriation of such currencies. Currency exchange rates can be very volatile and can change quickly and unpredictably. As a result, the Fund’s NAV may change quickly and without warning, which could have a significant negative impact on the Fund.

 

Depositary Receipts Risk. Depositary receipts (e.g., ADRs and GDRs) involve similar risks to those associated with investments in foreign securities. Investments in depositary receipts may be less liquid than the underlying shares in their primary trading market and, if not included in the Index, may negatively affect the Fund’s ability to replicate the performance of the Index. The issuers of depositary receipts may discontinue issuing new depositary receipts and withdraw existing depositary receipts at any time, which may result in costs and delays in the distribution of the underlying assets to the Fund and may negatively impact the Fund’s performance and the Fund’s ability to replicate/track the performance of its Index.

 

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Emerging Markets Risk. Investments in securities and instruments traded in developing or emerging markets, or that provide exposure to such securities or markets, can involve additional risks relating to political, economic, or regulatory conditions not associated with investments in U.S. securities and instruments or investments in more developed international markets. Such conditions may impact the ability of the Fund to buy, sell or otherwise transfer securities, adversely affect the trading market and price for Shares and cause the Fund to decline in value. Less developed markets are more likely to experience problems with the clearing and settling of trades and the holding of securities by local banks, agents and depositories.

 

Equity Market Risk. The equity securities held in the Fund’s portfolio may experience sudden, unpredictable drops in value or long periods of decline in value. This may occur because of factors that affect securities markets generally or factors affecting specific industries, sectors or companies in which the Fund invests. Common stocks are susceptible to general stock market fluctuations and to volatile increases and decreases in value as market confidence in and perceptions of their issuers change. The Fund’s NAV and market price may fluctuate significantly in response to these and other factors. As a result, an investor could lose money over short or long periods of time.

 

ETF Risks. The Fund is an ETF and, as a result of an ETF’s structure, is exposed to the following risks:

 

Authorized Participants (“APs”), Market Makers, and Liquidity Providers Concentration Risk. The Fund has a limited number of financial institutions that may act as APs. In addition, there may be a limited number of market makers and/or liquidity providers in the marketplace. To the extent either of the following events occur, shares of the Fund may trade at a material discount to NAV and possibly face delisting: (i) APs exit the business or otherwise become unable to process creation and/or redemption orders and no other APs step forward to perform these services, or (ii) market makers and/or liquidity providers exit the business or significantly reduce their business activities and no other entities step forward to perform their functions.

 

Costs of Buying or Selling Shares of the Fund. Due to the costs of buying or selling shares of the Fund, including brokerage commissions imposed by brokers and bid/ask spreads, frequent trading of shares of the Fund may significantly reduce investment results and an investment in shares of the Fund may not be advisable for investors who anticipate regularly making small investments.

 

Shares of the Fund May Trade at Prices Other Than NAV. As with all ETFs, shares of the Fund may be bought and sold in the secondary market at market prices. The price of shares of the Fund, like the price of all traded securities, will be subject to factors such as supply and demand, as well as the current value of the Fund’s portfolio holdings. Although it is expected that the market price of the shares of the Fund will approximate the Fund’s NAV, there may be times when the market price of the shares is more than the NAV intra-day (premium) or less than the NAV intra-day (discount). This risk is heightened in times of market volatility, periods of steep market declines, and periods when there is limited trading activity for shares in the secondary market, in which case such premiums or discounts may be significant.

 

Trading. Although shares of the Fund are listed for trading on a national securities exchange, such as The Nasdaq Stock Market LLC (the “Exchange”), and may be traded on U.S. exchanges other than the Exchange, there can be no assurance that shares of the Fund will trade with any volume, or at all, on any stock exchange. In stressed market conditions, the liquidity of shares of the Fund may begin to mirror the liquidity of the Fund’s underlying portfolio holdings, which can be significantly less liquid than shares of the Fund, and this could lead to differences between the market price of the shares of the Fund and the underlying value of those shares.

 

Foreign Securities Risk. The Fund’s investments in foreign securities can be riskier than U.S. securities investments. Investments in the securities of foreign issuers (including investments in ADRs and GDRs) are subject to the risks associated with investing in those foreign markets, such as heightened risks of inflation or nationalization. The prices of foreign securities and the prices of U.S. securities have, at times, moved in opposite directions. In addition, securities of foreign issuers may lose value due to political, economic and geographic events affecting a foreign issuer or market. During periods of social, political or economic instability in a country or region, the value of a foreign security traded on U.S. exchanges could be affected by, among other things, increasing price volatility, illiquidity, or the closure of the primary market on which the security (or the security underlying the ADR or GDR) is traded. You may lose money due to political, economic and geographic events affecting a foreign issuer or market.

 

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Geographic Risk. A natural, biological or other disaster could occur in a geographic region in which the Fund invests, which could affect the economy or particular business operations of companies in the specific geographic region, causing an adverse impact on the Fund’s investments in the affected region or in a region economically tied to the affected region. The securities in which the Fund invests and, consequently, the Fund are also subject to specific risks as a result of their business operations, including, but not limited to:

 

Risk of Investing in Developed Markets. The Fund’s investment in a developed country issuer may subject the Fund to regulatory, political, currency, security, economic and other risks associated with developed countries. Developed countries tend to represent a significant portion of the global economy and have generally experienced slower economic growth than some less developed countries. Certain developed countries have experienced security concerns, such as terrorism and strained international relations. Incidents involving a country’s or region’s security may cause uncertainty in its markets and may adversely affect its economy and the Fund’s investments. In addition, developed countries may be impacted by changes to the economic conditions of certain key trading partners, regulatory burdens, debt burdens and the price or availability of certain commodities.

 

Risk of Investing in North America. A decrease in imports or exports, changes in trade regulations or an economic recession in any North American country can have a significant economic effect on the entire North American region and on some or all of the North American countries to which the Fund has economic exposure. The U.S. is Canada’s and Mexico’s largest trading and investment partner. The Canadian and Mexican economies are significantly affected by developments in the U.S. economy. Since the implementation of the North American Free Trade Agreement (“NAFTA”) in 1994 among Canada, the U.S. and Mexico, total merchandise trade among the three countries has increased. However, political developments in the U.S., including the renegotiation of NAFTA and imposition of tariffs by the U.S., may have implications for the trade arrangements among the U.S., Mexico and Canada, which could negatively affect the value of securities held by the Fund. Policy and legislative changes in any of the three countries may have a significant effect on North American economies generally, as well as on the value of certain securities held by the Fund.

 

Risk of Investing in Canada. Investments in securities of Canadian issuers, including issuers located outside of Canada that generate significant revenue from Canada, involve risks and special considerations not typically associated with investments in the U.S. securities markets. The Canadian economy is very dependent on the demand for, and supply and price of, natural resources. The Canadian market is relatively concentrated in issuers involved in the production and distribution of natural resources. There is a risk that any changes in natural resources sectors could have an adverse impact on the Canadian economy. Additionally, the Canadian economy is heavily dependent on relationships with certain key trading partners including the United States, countries in the European Union and China. Because the United States is Canada’s largest trading partner and foreign investor, the Canadian economy is dependent on and may be significantly affected by the U.S. economy. Reduction in spending on Canadian products and services or changes in the U.S. economy may adversely impact the Canadian economy. Trade agreements may further increase Canada’s dependency on the U.S. economy, and uncertainty as to future trade agreements may cause a decline in the value of the Fund’s Shares. Past periodic demands by the Province of Quebec for sovereignty have significantly affected equity valuations and foreign currency movements in the Canadian market and such demands may have this effect in the future. In addition, certain sectors of Canada’s economy may be subject to foreign ownership limitations. This may negatively impact the Fund’s ability to invest in Canadian issuers and to track the Index.

 

Risk of Investing in Australia. Securities of issuers located in Australia may be subject to regulatory, political, currency, security, environmental, and economic risk specific to Australia. The Australian economy is heavily dependent on exports from the agricultural and mining sectors. As a result, the Australian economy is susceptible to fluctuations in the commodity markets. The Australian economy is also becoming increasingly dependent on its growing services industry. The Australian economy is dependent on trading with key trading partners, including the United States, China, Japan, Singapore and certain European countries. Reduction in spending on Australian products and services, or changes in any of the economies, may cause an adverse impact on the Australian economy. Additionally, Australia is located in a part of the world that has historically been prone to natural disasters, such as hurricanes and droughts, and is economically sensitive to environmental events. Any such event may adversely impact the Australian economy, causing an adverse impact on the value of the Fund.

 

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Risk of Investing in Africa and the Middle East. Many African and Middle Eastern countries have histories of dictatorships, political and military unrest, social instability, and financial troubles, and their markets should be considered extremely volatile even when compared with those of other emerging market countries. Many of these countries tend to be highly reliant on exporting oil and other commodities so their economies can be significantly impacted by fluctuations in commodity prices and the global demand for certain commodities.

 

International Closed Market Trading Risk. To the extent that the underlying investments held by the Fund trade on foreign exchanges that may be closed when the securities exchange on which the Fund’s Shares trade is open, there are likely to be deviations between the current price of such an underlying security and the last quoted price for the underlying security (i.e., the Fund’s quote from the closed foreign market). These deviations could result in premiums or discounts to the Fund’s NAV that may be greater than those experienced by other ETFs.

 

Large-Capitalization Investing Risk. The Fund’s performance may be adversely affected if securities of large-capitalization companies underperform securities of smaller-capitalization companies or the market as a whole. The securities of large-capitalization companies may be relatively mature compared to smaller companies and therefore subject to slower growth during times of economic expansion.

 

Liquidity Risk. The Fund’s investments are subject to liquidity risk, which exists when an investment is or becomes difficult or impossible to purchase or sell at an advantageous time and price. If a transaction is particularly large or if the relevant market is or becomes illiquid, it may not be possible to initiate a transaction or liquidate a position, which may cause the Fund to suffer significant losses and difficulties in meeting redemptions. Liquidity risk may be the result of, among other things, market turmoil, the reduced number and capacity of traditional market participants, or the lack of an active trading market. Markets for securities or financial instruments could be disrupted by a number of events, including, but not limited to, an economic crisis, natural disasters, new legislation or regulatory changes inside or outside the U.S. Liquid investments may become less liquid after being purchased by the Fund, particularly during periods of market stress. In addition, if a number of securities held by the Fund stop trading, it may have a cascading effect and cause the Fund to halt trading. Volatility in market prices will increase the risk of the Fund being subject to a trading halt. Certain countries in which the Fund may invest may be subject to extended settlement delays and/or foreign holidays, during which the Fund will unlikely be able to convert holdings to cash.

 

Mid-Capitalization Companies Risk. Mid-capitalization companies may have greater price volatility, lower trading volume and less liquidity than large-capitalization companies. In addition, mid-capitalization companies may have smaller revenues, narrower product lines, less management depth and experience, smaller shares of their product or service markets, fewer financial resources and less competitive strength than large-capitalization companies.

 

New Adviser Risk. Although the Adviser’s principals and the Fund’s portfolio managers have experience managing investments in the past, the Adviser is a newly-formed entity and has no experience managing investments for an ETF, which may limit the Adviser’s effectiveness.

 

New Fund Risk. The Fund is new with no operating history. As a result, there can be no assurance that the Fund will grow to or maintain an economically viable size, in which case it may experience greater tracking error to its Index than it otherwise would at higher asset levels, or it could ultimately liquidate. The Fund’s distributor does not maintain a secondary market in Fund shares.

 

Non-Diversification Risk. Although the Fund intends to invest in a variety of securities and instruments, the Fund is considered to be non-diversified, which means that it may invest more of its assets in the securities of a single issuer or a smaller number of issuers than if it were a diversified fund. As a result, the Fund may be more exposed to the risks associated with and developments affecting an individual issuer or a smaller number of issuers than a fund that invests more widely. This may increase the Fund’s volatility and cause the performance of a relatively smaller number of issuers to have a greater impact on the Fund’s performance.

 

Operational Risk. The Fund is exposed to operational risks arising from a number of factors, including, but not limited to, human error, processing and communication errors, errors of the Fund’s service providers, counterparties or other third parties, failed or inadequate processes and technology or systems failures. The Fund and the Adviser seek to reduce these operational risks through controls and procedures. However, these measures do not address every possible risk and may be inadequate to address significant operational risks.

 

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Cybersecurity Risk. Failures or breaches of the electronic systems of the Fund and/or the Fund’s service providers, including the Adviser, Index Provider, market makers, Authorized Participants or the issuers of securities in which the Fund invests have the ability to cause disruptions, negatively impact the Fund’s business operations and/or potentially result in financial losses to the Fund and its shareholders. While the Fund has established business continuity plans and risk management systems seeking to address system breaches or failures, there are inherent limitations in such plans and systems. Furthermore, the Fund cannot control the cybersecurity plans and systems of the Fund’s Index Provider, Adviser, other service providers, market makers, Authorized Participants or issuers of securities in which the Fund invests.

 

Passive Investment Risk. The Fund is not actively managed and the Adviser would not sell a security due to current or projected underperformance of a security, industry or sector, unless that security is removed from the Index or the selling of shares of that security is otherwise required upon a reconstitution of the Index in accordance with the Index methodology. The Fund invests in securities included in the Index, regardless of their investment merits. The Fund does not take defensive positions under any market conditions, including conditions that are adverse to the performance of the Fund.

 

Securities Lending Risk. To the extent the Fund lends its securities, it may be subject to the following risks: (1) the securities in which the collateral is invested may not perform sufficiently to cover the applicable rebate rates paid to borrowers and related administrative costs; (2) delays may occur in the recovery of securities from borrowers, which could interfere with the Fund’s ability to vote proxies or to settle transactions; and (3) although borrowers of the Fund’s securities typically provide collateral in the form of cash that is reinvested in securities, there is th