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Prospectus
February 28, 2023
Class: A (ABRZX), C (ABRCX), R (ABRRX), Y (ABRYX), R5 (ABRIX), R6 (ALLFX)

Invesco Balanced-Risk Allocation Fund
As with all other mutual fund securities, the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) and the Commodity Futures Trading Commission (CFTC) have not approved or disapproved these securities or passed upon the adequacy of this prospectus. Any representation to the contrary is a criminal offense.
An investment in the Fund:
◾ 
is not FDIC insured;
◾ 
may lose value; and
◾ 
is not guaranteed by a bank.


Table of Contents
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Back Cover
        Invesco Balanced-Risk Allocation Fund


Fund Summary
Investment Objective(s)
The Fund's investment objective is to provide total return with a low to moderate correlation to traditional financial market indices.
Fees and Expenses of the Fund
This table describes the fees and expenses that you may pay if you buy, hold and sell shares of the Fund. Fees and expenses of Invesco Cayman Commodity Fund I Ltd., a wholly-owned subsidiary of the Fund (Subsidiary), are included in the table.
The table and Examples below do not reflect any transaction fees that may be charged by financial intermediaries or commissions that a shareholder may be required to pay directly to its financial intermediary when buying or selling Class Y or Class R6 shares. You may qualify for sales charge discounts if you and your family invest, or agree to invest in the future, at least $50,000 in the Invesco Funds. More information about these and other discounts is available from your financial professional and in the section “Shareholder Account Information – Initial Sales Charges (Class A Shares Only)” on page A-3 of the prospectus and the section “Purchase, Redemption and Pricing of Shares – Purchase and Redemption of Shares” on page L-1 of the statement of additional information (SAI).

Shareholder Fees (fees paid directly from your investment)
Class:
A
C
R
Y
R5
R6
Maximum Sales Charge (Load) Imposed on
Purchases (as a percentage of offering price)
5.50%
None
None
None
None
None
Maximum Deferred Sales Charge (Load) (as a
percentage of original purchase price or
redemption proceeds, whichever is less)
None1
1.00%
None
None
None
None

Annual Fund Operating Expenses (expenses that you pay each year as a percentage of the value of your investment)
Class:
A
C
R
Y
R5
R6
Management Fees
0.90%
0.90%
0.90%
0.90%
0.90%
0.90%
Distribution and/or Service (12b-1) Fees
0.25
1.00
0.50
None
None
None
Other Expenses
0.20
0.20
0.20
0.20
0.18
0.11
Acquired Fund Fees and Expenses
0.07
0.07
0.07
0.07
0.07
0.07
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses
1.42
2.17
1.67
1.17
1.15
1.08
Fee Waiver and/or Expense Reimbursement2
0.04
0.04
0.04
0.04
0.04
0.04
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses After Fee
Waiver and/or Expense Reimbursement
1.38
2.13
1.63
1.13
1.11
1.04
1
A contingent deferred sales charge may apply in some cases. See “Shareholder Account Information-Contingent Deferred Sales Charges (CDSCs).”
2
Invesco Advisers, Inc. (Invesco or the Adviser) has contractually agreed to waive a portion of the Fund's management fee in an amount equal to the net management fee that Invesco earns on the Fund's investments in certain affiliated funds, which will have the effect of reducing the Acquired Fund Fees and Expenses. Unless Invesco continues the fee waiver agreement, it will terminate on June 30, 2024. During its term, the fee waiver agreement cannot be terminated or amended to reduce the advisory fee waiver without approval of the Board of Trustees.
Example. This Example is intended to help you compare the cost of investing in the Fund with the cost of investing in other mutual funds.
The Example assumes that you invest $10,000 in the Fund for the time periods indicated and then redeem all of your shares at the end of those periods. This Example does not include commissions and/or other forms of compensation that investors may pay on transactions in Class Y and Class R6 shares. The Example also assumes that your investment has a 5% return each year and that the Fund’s operating expenses remain equal to the Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses After Fee Waiver and/or Expense Reimbursement in the first year and the Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses thereafter.
Although your actual costs may be higher or lower, based on these assumptions, your costs would be:
 
1 Year
3 Years
5 Years
10 Years
Class A
$683
$971
$1,280
$2,155
Class C
$316
$675
$1,161
$2,310
Class R
$166
$523
$904
$1,973
Class Y
$115
$368
$640
$1,417
Class R5
$113
$361
$629
$1,394
Class R6
$106
$340
$592
$1,314
You would pay the following expenses if you did not redeem your shares:
 
1 Year
3 Years
5 Years
10 Years
Class A
$683
$971
$1,280
$2,155
Class C
$216
$675
$1,161
$2,310
Class R
$166
$523
$904
$1,973
Class Y
$115
$368
$640
$1,417
Class R5
$113
$361
$629
$1,394
Class R6
$106
$340
$592
$1,314
Portfolio Turnover. The Fund pays transaction costs, such as commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or “turns over” its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover rate may indicate higher transaction costs and may result in higher taxes when Fund shares are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are not reflected in annual fund operating expenses or in the Example, affect the Fund’s performance. During the most recent fiscal year, the Fund’s portfolio turnover rate was 92% of the average value of its portfolio.
Principal Investment Strategies of the Fund
The Fund’s investment strategy is designed to provide capital loss protection during down markets by investing across multiple macro factors. Under normal market conditions, the Fund’s portfolio management team allocates across three macro factors: growth, defensive and real return, such that no one macro factor drives the Fund’s performance. The Fund’s exposure to these three macro factors will be achieved primarily through investments in derivative instruments (generally having aggregate notional exposure exceeding 65% of the Fund’s net assets), including but not limited to futures, options, currency forward contracts and swap agreements. The portfolio managers manage the Fund’s portfolio using two different processes. One is strategic asset allocation, which the portfolio managers use to express their long-term views of the market. The portfolio managers apply their strategic process to, on average, approximately 80% of the Fund’s portfolio risk, as determined by the portfolio managers’ proprietary risk analysis. The other process is tactical asset allocation, which is used by the portfolio managers to reflect their shorter-term views of the market. The strategic and tactical processes are intended to adjust the Fund’s portfolio risk in a variety of market conditions.
The portfolio managers implement their investment decisions primarily through the use of derivatives and other investments that create leverage. The Fund uses derivatives and other leveraged instruments to create and adjust exposures to the three macro factors. The portfolio managers make these adjustments to balance risk exposure when they believe it will benefit the Fund. Using derivatives often allows the portfolio managers to implement their views more efficiently and to gain more exposure to the macro factors than investing in more traditional assets such as stocks and bonds would allow. The Fund may hold long and short positions in derivatives and in investments in each of the three macro factors; however, the Fund will typically maintain net long exposure to each macro factor, such that the Fund is expected to benefit from general price appreciation of
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investments in that macro factor. The Fund’s use of derivatives and the leveraged investment exposure created by its use of derivatives are expected to be significant and greater than most mutual funds. The Fund may use quantitative models as part of the investment selection process.
The Fund’s net asset value over a short to intermediate term is expected to be volatile because of the significant use of derivatives and other instruments that provide leverage, including futures contracts, options, swaps and commodity-linked notes. Volatility measures the range of returns of a security, fund, index or other investment, as indicated by the annualized standard deviation of its returns. Higher volatility generally indicates higher risk and is often reflected by frequent and sometimes significant movements up and down in value. The Fund will have the potential for greater gains, as well as the potential for greater losses, than if the Fund did not use derivatives or other instruments that have a leveraging effect. Leveraging tends to magnify, sometimes significantly depending on the amount of leverage used, the effect of any increase or decrease in the Fund’s exposure to a macro factor and may cause the Fund’s net asset value to be more volatile than a fund that does not use leverage. For example, if the Fund gains exposure to a specific macro factor through an instrument that provides leveraged exposure to the class, and that leveraged instrument increases in value, the gain to the Fund will be magnified; however, if the leveraged instrument decreases in value, the loss to the Fund will be magnified.
The Adviser’s investment process has three steps. The first step involves investment selection within the three macro factors. The portfolio managers select investments to represent each of the three macro factors from a universe of over fifty investments. The selection process (1) evaluates a particular investment’s theoretical case for long-term excess returns relative to cash; (2) screens the identified investments against minimum liquidity criteria; and (3) reviews the expected correlation among the investments, meaning the likelihood that the value of the investments will move in the same direction at the same time, and the expected risk of each investment to determine whether the selected investments are likely to improve the expected risk adjusted return of the Fund.
The second step in the investment process involves portfolio construction. The portfolio managers use their own estimates for risk and correlation to weight each macro factor and the investments within each macro factor selected in the first step to construct a portfolio that they believe is risk-balanced across the three macro factors. Periodically, the management team re-estimates the risk contributed by each macro factor and investment and rebalances the portfolio; the portfolio also may be rebalanced when the Fund makes new investments. Taken together, the first two steps in the process result in the strategic allocation.
In the third step of the investment process, using a systematic approach based on fundamental principles, the portfolio management team analyzes the macro factors and investments, considering the following factors: valuation, economic environment and historic price movements. Regarding valuation, the portfolio managers evaluate whether a macro factor and investments in that macro factor are attractively priced relative to fundamentals. Next, the portfolio managers assess the economic environment and consider the effect that monetary policy and other determinants of economic growth, inflation and market volatility will have on a macro factor and related investments. Lastly, the portfolio managers assess the impact of historic price movements for each macro factor and related investments on likely future returns.
Utilizing the results from the analysis described above, the portfolio managers determine tactical short-term over-weight positions (incurring additional exposure relative to the strategic allocation) and under-weight positions (incurring less exposure relative to the strategic allocation) for the macro factors and investments. The management team actively adjusts portfolio positions to reflect the near-term market environment, while remaining consistent with the balanced-risk long-term portfolio structure described in step two above.
The Fund’s growth exposure will be achieved primarily through investments in derivatives that track equity indices comprised of shares of companies in developed and/or emerging market countries, including equity indices that emphasize exposure to companies associated with certain characteristics, known as style factors, including high dividend, quality, value, growth, low volatility, size (large-, mid- or small-cap) and momentum. In addition, the Fund may invest directly in shares of such companies and in exchange-traded funds (ETFs) that provide equity exposure, including ETFs that track factor-based indices that emphasize the style factors noted above. The Fund may also buy and write (sell) put and call options on equities, equity indices and ETFs, including in combination, to adjust the Fund’s equity exposure or to generate income. Additionally, the Fund can use currency forward contracts to hedge against the risk that the value of the foreign currencies in which its equity investments are denominated will depreciate against the U.S. dollar.
The Fund’s defensive exposure will be achieved primarily through derivatives that offer exposure to the debt or credit of issuers in developed and/or emerging markets that are rated investment grade or are unrated but deemed to be investment grade quality by the Adviser, including U.S. and foreign government debt securities having intermediate (5 – 10 years) and long (10 plus years) term maturity.
The Fund’s real return exposure will be achieved primarily through investments in commodity futures and swaps, commodity related ETFs and exchange-traded notes (ETNs) and commodity-linked notes, some or all of which will be owned through Invesco Cayman Commodity Fund I Ltd., a wholly-owned subsidiary of the Fund organized under the laws of the Cayman Islands (Subsidiary). The commodity investments will be focused in four sectors of the commodities market: energy, precious metals, industrial metals and agriculture/livestock.
The Fund will invest in the Subsidiary to gain exposure to commodities markets. The Subsidiary, in turn, will invest in commodity futures and swaps, commodity related ETFs and ETNs and commodity-linked notes. The Subsidiary is advised by the Adviser, has the same investment objective as the Fund and generally employs the same investment strategy. Unlike the Fund, however, the Subsidiary may invest without limitation in commodity-linked derivatives and other investments that may provide leveraged and non-leveraged exposure to commodities. The Subsidiary holds cash and can invest in cash equivalent instruments, including affiliated money market funds, some or all of which may serve as margin or collateral for the Subsidiary’s derivative positions. Because the Subsidiary is wholly-owned by the Fund, the Fund will be subject to the risks associated with any investment by the Subsidiary.
The Fund generally will maintain a substantial portion of its net assets (including assets held by the Subsidiary) in cash and cash equivalent instruments, including affiliated money market funds, as margin or collateral for the Fund’s obligations under derivative transactions, or for cash management purposes. The larger the value of the Fund’s derivative positions, as opposed to positions held in non-derivative instruments, the more the Fund will be required to maintain cash and cash equivalents as margin or collateral for such derivatives.
Principal Risks of Investing in the Fund
As with any mutual fund investment, loss of money is a risk of investing. An investment in the Fund is not a deposit in a bank and is not insured or guaranteed by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation or any other governmental agency. The risks associated with an investment in the Fund can increase during times of significant market volatility. The principal risks of investing in the Fund are:
Market Risk. The market values of the Fund’s investments, and therefore the value of the Fund’s shares, will go up and down, sometimes rapidly or unpredictably. Market risk may affect a single issuer, industry or section of the economy, or it may affect the market as a whole. The value of the Fund’s investments may go up or down due to general market conditions that are not specifically related to the particular issuer, such as
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real or perceived adverse economic conditions, changes in the general outlook for revenues or corporate earnings, changes in interest or currency rates, regional or global instability, natural or environmental disasters, widespread disease or other public health issues, war, military conflict, acts of terrorism, economic crisis or adverse investor sentiment generally. During a general downturn in the financial markets, multiple asset classes may decline in value. When markets perform well, there can be no assurance that specific investments held by the Fund will rise in value.
Correlation Risk. Because the Fund’s investment strategy seeks to balance risk across three asset classes and, within each asset class, across different countries and investments, to the extent either the asset classes or the selected countries and investments become correlated in a way not anticipated by the Adviser, the Fund’s risk allocation process may result in magnified risks and loss instead of balancing (reducing) the risk of loss.
Derivatives Risk. The value of a derivative instrument depends largely on (and is derived from) the value of an underlying security, currency, commodity, interest rate, index or other asset (each referred to as an underlying asset). In addition to risks relating to the underlying assets, the use of derivatives may include other, possibly greater, risks, including counterparty, leverage and liquidity risks. Counterparty risk is the risk that the counterparty to the derivative contract will default on its obligation to pay the Fund the amount owed or otherwise perform under the derivative contract. Derivatives create leverage risk because they do not require payment up front equal to the economic exposure created by holding a position in the derivative. As a result, an adverse change in the value of the underlying asset could result in the Fund sustaining a loss that is substantially greater than the amount invested in the derivative or the anticipated value of the underlying asset, which may make the Fund’s returns more volatile and increase the risk of loss. Derivative instruments may also be less liquid than more traditional investments and the Fund may be unable to sell or close out its derivative positions at a desirable time or price. This risk may be more acute under adverse market conditions, during which the Fund may be most in need of liquidating its derivative positions. Derivatives may also be harder to value, less tax efficient and subject to changing government regulation that could impact the Fund’s ability to use certain derivatives or their cost. Derivatives strategies may not always be successful. For example, derivatives used for hedging or to gain or limit exposure to a particular market segment may not provide the expected benefits, particularly during adverse market conditions. These risks are greater for the Fund than most other mutual funds because the Fund will implement its investment strategy primarily through derivative instruments rather than direct investments in stocks/bonds.
Investing in Stocks Risk. The value of the Fund’s portfolio may be affected by changes in the stock markets. Stock markets may experience significant short-term volatility and may fall or rise sharply at times. Adverse events in any part of the equity or fixed-income markets may have unexpected negative effects on other market segments. Different stock markets may behave differently from each other and U.S. stock markets may move in the opposite direction from one or more foreign stock markets.
The prices of individual stocks generally do not all move in the same direction at the same time. However, individual stock prices tend to go up and down more dramatically than those of certain other types of investments, such as bonds. A variety of factors can negatively affect the price of a particular company’s stock. These factors may include, but are not limited to: poor earnings reports, a loss of customers, litigation against the company, general unfavorable performance of the company’s sector or industry, or changes in government regulations affecting the company or its industry. To the extent that securities of a particular type are emphasized (for example foreign stocks, stocks of small- or mid-cap companies, growth or value stocks, or stocks of companies in a particular industry), fund share values may fluctuate more in response to events affecting the market for those types of securities.
Debt Securities Risk. The prices of debt securities held by the Fund will be affected by changes in interest rates, the creditworthiness of the
issuer and other factors. An increase in prevailing interest rates typically causes the value of existing debt securities to fall and often has a greater impact on longer-duration debt securities and higher quality debt securities. Falling interest rates will cause the Fund to reinvest the proceeds of debt securities that have been repaid by the issuer at lower interest rates. Falling interest rates may also reduce the Fund’s distributable income because interest payments on floating rate debt instruments held by the Fund will decline. The Fund could lose money on investments in debt securities if the issuer or borrower fails to meet its obligations to make interest payments and/or to repay principal in a timely manner. Changes in an issuer’s financial strength, the market’s perception of such strength or in the credit rating of the issuer or the security may affect the value of debt securities. The Adviser’s credit analysis may fail to anticipate such changes, which could result in buying a debt security at an inopportune time or failing to sell a debt security in advance of a price decline or other credit event.
Commodity Risk. The Fund may have investment exposure to the commodities markets and/or a particular sector of the commodities markets, which may subject the Fund to greater volatility than investments in traditional securities, such as stocks and bonds. Volatility in the commodities markets may be caused by changes in overall market movements, domestic and foreign political and economic events and policies, war, acts of terrorism, changes in domestic or foreign interest rates and/or investor expectations concerning interest rates, domestic and foreign inflation rates, investment and trading activities of mutual funds, hedge funds and commodities funds, and factors such as drought, floods, weather, livestock disease, embargoes, tariffs and other regulatory developments or supply and demand disruptions. Because the Fund’s performance may be linked to the performance of volatile commodities, investors should be willing to assume the risks of potentially significant fluctuations in the value of the Fund’s shares.
Commodities Tax Risk. The tax treatment of commodity-linked derivative instruments may be adversely affected by changes in legislation, regulations or other legally binding authority. If, as a result of any such adverse action, the income of the Fund from certain commodity-linked derivatives was treated as non-qualifying income, the Fund might fail to qualify as a regulated investment company and be subject to federal income tax at the Fund level. As a result of an announcement by the Internal Revenue Service (IRS), the Fund intends to invest in commodity-linked notes: (a) directly, relying on an opinion of counsel confirming that income from such investments should be qualifying income because such commodity-linked notes constitute securities under section 2(a)(36) of the 1940 Act or (b) indirectly through the Subsidiary. Should the IRS issue further guidance, or Congress enact legislation, that adversely affects the tax treatment of the Fund’s use of commodity-linked notes or the Subsidiary (which guidance might be applied to the Fund retroactively), it could, among other consequences, limit the Fund’s ability to pursue its investment strategy.
Changing Fixed Income Market Conditions Risk. Increases in the federal funds and equivalent foreign rates or other changes to monetary policy or regulatory actions may expose fixed income markets to heightened volatility and reduced liquidity for certain fixed income investments, particularly those with longer maturities. It is difficult to predict the impact of interest rate changes on various markets. In addition, decreases in fixed income dealer market-making capacity may also potentially lead to heightened volatility and reduced liquidity in the fixed income markets. As a result, the value of the Fund’s investments and share price may decline. Changes in central bank policies could also result in higher than normal redemptions by shareholders, which could potentially increase the Fund’s portfolio turnover rate and transaction costs.
Foreign Securities Risk. The Fund's foreign investments may be adversely affected by political and social instability, changes in economic or taxation policies, difficulty in enforcing obligations, decreased liquidity or increased volatility. Foreign investments also involve the risk of the possible seizure, nationalization or expropriation of the issuer or foreign deposits (in
3        Invesco Balanced-Risk Allocation Fund

which the Fund could lose its entire investments in a certain market) and the possible adoption of foreign governmental restrictions such as exchange controls. Foreign companies generally may be subject to less stringent regulations than U.S. companies, including financial reporting requirements and auditing and accounting controls, and may therefore be more susceptible to fraud or corruption. There may be less public information available about foreign companies than U.S. companies, making it difficult to evaluate those foreign companies. Unless the Fund has hedged its foreign currency exposure, foreign securities risk also involves the risk of negative foreign currency rate fluctuations, which may cause the value of securities denominated in such foreign currency (or other instruments through which the Fund has exposure to foreign currencies) to decline in value. Currency exchange rates may fluctuate significantly over short periods of time. Currency hedging strategies, if used, are not always successful.
Emerging Market Securities Risk. Emerging markets (also referred to as developing markets) are generally subject to greater market volatility, political, social and economic instability, uncertain trading markets and more governmental limitations on foreign investment than more developed markets. In addition, companies operating in emerging markets may be subject to lower trading volume and greater price fluctuations than companies in more developed markets. Such countries’ economies may be more dependent on relatively few industries or investors that may be highly vulnerable to local and global changes. Companies in emerging market countries generally may be subject to less stringent regulatory, disclosure, financial reporting, accounting, auditing and recordkeeping standards than companies in more developed countries. As a result, information, including financial information, about such companies may be less available and reliable, which can impede the Fund’s ability to evaluate such companies. Securities law and the enforcement of systems of taxation in many emerging market countries may change quickly and unpredictably, and the ability to bring and enforce actions (including bankruptcy, confiscatory taxation, expropriation, nationalization of a company’s assets, restrictions on foreign ownership of local companies, restrictions on withdrawing assets from the country, protectionist measures and practices such as share blocking), or to obtain information needed to pursue or enforce such actions, may be limited. In addition, the ability of foreign entities to participate in privatization programs of certain developing or emerging market countries may be limited by local law. Investments in emerging market securities may be subject to additional transaction costs, delays in settlement procedures, unexpected market closures, and lack of timely information.
Foreign Government Debt Risk. Investments in foreign government debt securities (sometimes referred to as sovereign debt securities) involve certain risks in addition to those relating to foreign securities or debt securities generally. The issuer of the debt or the governmental authorities that control the repayment of the debt may be unable or unwilling to repay principal or interest when due in accordance with the terms of such debt, and the Fund may have limited recourse in the event of a default against the defaulting government. Without the approval of debt holders, some governmental debtors have in the past been able to reschedule or restructure their debt payments or declare moratoria on payments.
LIBOR Transition Risk. The Fund may have investments in financial instruments that utilize the London Interbank Offered Rate (“LIBOR”) as the reference or benchmark rate for variable interest rate calculations. LIBOR is intended to measure the rate generally at which banks can lend and borrow from one another in the relevant currency on an unsecured basis. Regulators and financial industry working groups in several jurisdictions have worked over the past several years to identify alternative reference rates (“ARRs”) to replace LIBOR and to assist with the transition to the new ARRs. For example, the Federal Reserve Bank of New York has identified the Secured Overnight Financing Rate (“SOFR”) as the intended replacement to USD LIBOR and foreign regulators have proposed other interbank offered rates, such as the Sterling Overnight Index Average (“SONIA”) and other
replacement rates, which could also be adopted. Consequently, the publication of most LIBOR rates ceased at the end of 2021, but a selection of widely used USD LIBOR rates continues to be published until June 2023 to allow for an orderly transition away from these rates. Additionally, key regulators have instructed banking institutions to cease entering into new contracts that reference these USD LIBOR settings after December 31, 2021, subject to certain limited exceptions.
There remains uncertainty and risks relating to the continuing LIBOR transition and its effects on the Fund and the instruments in which the Fund invests. For example, there can be no assurance that the composition or characteristics of any ARRs or financial instruments in which the Fund invests that utilize ARRs will be similar to or produce the same value or economic equivalence as LIBOR or that these instruments will have the same volume or liquidity. Additionally, although regulators have generally prohibited banking institutions from entering into new contracts that reference those USD LIBOR settings that continue to exist, there remains uncertainty and risks relating to certain “legacy” USD LIBOR instruments that were issued or entered into before December 31, 2021 and the process by which a replacement interest rate will be identified and implemented into these instruments when USD LIBOR is ultimately discontinued. The effects of such uncertainty and risks in “legacy” USD LIBOR instruments held by the Fund could result in losses to the Fund.
Commodity-Linked Notes Risk. In addition to risks associated with the underlying commodities, investments in commodity-linked notes may be subject to additional risks, such as non-payment of interest and loss of principal, counterparty risk, lack of a secondary market and risk of greater volatility than traditional equity and debt securities. The value of the commodity-linked notes the Fund buys may fluctuate significantly because the values of the underlying investments to which they are linked are themselves volatile. Additionally, certain commodity-linked notes employ “economic” leverage by requiring payment by the issuer of an amount that is a multiple of the price increase or decrease of the underlying commodity, commodity index, or other economic variable. Such economic leverage will increase the volatility of the value of these commodity-linked notes and the Fund to the extent it invests in such notes.
Short Position Risk. Because the Fund’s potential loss on a short position arises from increases in the value of the asset sold short, the Fund will incur a loss on a short position, which is theoretically unlimited, if the price of the asset sold short increases from the short sale price. The counterparty to a short position or other market factors may prevent the Fund from closing out a short position at a desirable time or price and may reduce or eliminate any gain or result in a loss. In a rising market, the Fund’s short positions will cause the Fund to underperform the overall market and its peers that do not engage in shorting. If the Fund holds both long and short positions, and both positions decline simultaneously, the short positions will not provide any buffer (hedge) from declines in value of the Fund’s long positions. Certain types of short positions involve leverage, which may exaggerate any losses, potentially more than the actual cost of the investment, and will increase the volatility of the Fund’s returns.
Exchange-Traded Funds Risk. In addition to the risks associated with the underlying assets held by the exchange-traded fund, investments in exchange-traded funds are subject to the following additional risks: (1) an exchange-traded fund’s shares may trade above or below its net asset value; (2) an active trading market for the exchange-traded fund’s shares may not develop or be maintained; (3) trading an exchange-traded fund’s shares may be halted by the listing exchange; (4) a passively managed exchange-traded fund may not track the performance of the reference asset; and (5) a passively managed exchange-traded fund may hold troubled securities. Investment in exchange-traded funds may involve duplication of management fees and certain other expenses, as the Fund indirectly bears its proportionate share of any expenses paid by the exchange-traded funds in which it invests. Further, certain exchange-traded funds in which the Fund may invest are leveraged, which may result in economic leverage, permitting the Fund to gain exposure that is greater
4        Invesco Balanced-Risk Allocation Fund

than would be the case in an unlevered instrument and potentially resulting in greater volatility.
Exchange-Traded Notes Risk. Exchange-traded notes are subject to credit risk, counterparty risk, and the risk that the value of the exchange-traded note may drop due to a downgrade in the issuer's credit rating. The value of an exchange-traded note may also be influenced by time to maturity, level of supply and demand for the exchange-traded note, volatility and lack of liquidity in the underlying market, changes in the applicable interest rates, and economic, legal, political, or geographic events that affect the referenced underlying market or assets. The Fund will bear its proportionate share of any fees and expenses borne by an exchange-traded note in which it invests. For certain exchange-traded notes, there may be restrictions on the Fund’s right to redeem its investment, which is meant to be held until maturity.
Factor-Based Strategy Risk. Although the Fund may have investments that track equity indices that emphasize exposure to companies associated with certain characteristics, known as style factors, there is no guarantee that this strategy will be successful.
Quantitative Models Risk. Quantitative models are based upon many factors that measure individual securities relative to each other. Quantitative models may be highly reliant on the gathering, cleaning, culling and analysis of large amounts of data from third parties and other external sources. Any errors or imperfections in the factors, or the data on which measurements of those factors are based, could adversely affect the use of the quantitative models. The factors used in models may not identify securities that perform well in the future, and the securities selected may perform differently from the market as a whole or from their expected performance.
Volatility Risk. Certain of the Fund's investments may appreciate or decrease significantly in value over short periods of time. This may cause the Fund’s net asset value per share to experience significant increases or declines in value over short periods of time.
Subsidiary Risk. By investing in the Subsidiary, the Fund is indirectly exposed to risks associated with the Subsidiary’s investments. The Subsidiary is not registered under the Investment Company Act of 1940, as amended (1940 Act), and, except as otherwise noted in this prospectus, is not subject to the investor protections of the 1940 Act. Changes in the laws of the United States and/or the Cayman Islands, under which the Fund and the Subsidiary, respectively, are organized, could result in the inability of the Fund and/or the Subsidiary to operate as described in this prospectus and the SAI, and could negatively affect the Fund and its shareholders.
Money Market Fund Risk. Although money market funds generally seek to preserve the value of an investment at $1.00 per share, the Fund may lose money by investing in money market funds. A money market fund's sponsor has no legal obligation to provide financial support to the money market fund. The credit quality of a money market fund's holdings can change rapidly in certain markets, and the default of a single holding could have an adverse impact on the money market fund's share price. A money market fund's share price can also be negatively affected during periods of high redemption pressures, illiquid markets and/or significant market volatility.
U.S. Government Obligations Risk. Obligations of U.S. Government agencies and authorities receive varying levels of support and may not be backed by the full faith and credit of the U.S. Government, which could affect the Fund’s ability to recover should they default. No assurance can be given that the U.S. Government will provide financial support to its agencies and authorities if it is not obligated by law to do so.
Financial Markets Regulatory Risk. Policy changes by the U.S. government or its regulatory agencies and political events within the U.S. and abroad may, among other things, affect investor and consumer confidence and increase volatility in the financial markets, perhaps suddenly and to a significant degree, which may adversely impact the Fund’s operations, universe of potential investment options, and return potential.
Management Risk. The Fund is actively managed and depends heavily on the Adviser’s judgment about markets, interest rates or the attractiveness, relative values, liquidity, or potential appreciation of particular investments made for the Fund’s portfolio. The Fund could experience losses if these judgments prove to be incorrect. Because the Fund’s investment process relies heavily on its asset allocation process, market movements that are counter to the portfolio managers’ expectations may have a significant adverse effect on the Fund’s net asset value.  Additionally, legislative, regulatory, or tax developments may adversely affect management of the Fund and, therefore, the ability of the Fund to achieve its investment objective.
Performance Information
The bar chart and performance table provide an indication of the risks of investing in the Fund. The bar chart shows changes in the performance of the Fund from year to year as of December 31. The performance table compares the Fund's performance to that of a style-specific benchmark, a peer group benchmark comprised of funds with investment objectives and strategies similar to those of the Fund and a broad-based securities market benchmark (in that order). The Fund's past performance (before and after taxes) is not necessarily an indication of its future performance.
Fund performance reflects any applicable fee waivers and expense reimbursements. Performance returns would be lower without applicable fee waivers and expense reimbursements.
Updated performance information is available on the Fund's website at www.invesco.com/us.

Annual Total Returns
The bar chart does not reflect sales loads. If it did, the annual total returns shown would be lower.
Class A
Period Ended
Returns
Best Quarter
December 31, 2020
10.48%
Worst Quarter
March 31, 2020
-12.14%
5        Invesco Balanced-Risk Allocation Fund


Average Annual Total Returns (for the periods ended December 31, 2022)
 
Inception
Date
1
Year
5
Years
10
Years
Class A
 
 
 
 
Return Before Taxes
6/2/2009
-19.61%
0.43%
2.48%
Return After Taxes on Distributions
 
-19.61
-2.07
-0.08
Return After Taxes on Distributions and Sale of Fund
Shares
 
-11.61
-0.48
0.98
Class C
6/2/2009
-16.52
0.81
2.45
Class R
6/2/2009
-15.33
1.30
2.79
Class Y
6/2/2009
-14.82
1.82
3.31
Class R5
6/2/2009
-14.80
1.86
3.35
Class R6
9/24/2012
-14.77
1.91
3.42
Custom Invesco Balanced-Risk Allocation Style
Index is composed of 60% MSCI World Index (Net)
(reflects reinvested dividends net of withholding
taxes, but reflects no deduction for fees, expenses
or other taxes) and 40% Bloomberg U.S.
Aggregate Bond Index (reflects no deduction for
fees, expenses or taxes)
 
-15.72
4.10
5.98
Lipper Alternative Global Macro Funds Index
 
-10.28
2.94
3.17
S&P 500® Index (reflects no deduction for fees,
expenses or taxes)
 
-18.11
9.42
12.56
After-tax returns are calculated using the historical highest individual federal marginal income tax rates and do not reflect the impact of state and local taxes. Actual after-tax returns depend on an investor's tax situation and may differ from those shown, and after-tax returns shown are not relevant to investors who hold their Fund shares through tax-advantaged arrangements, such as 401(k) plans, 529 college savings plans or individual retirement accounts. After-tax returns are shown for Class A shares only and after-tax returns for other classes will vary.
Management of the Fund
Investment Adviser: Invesco Advisers, Inc.
Portfolio Managers
Title
Length of Service on the Fund
Mark Ahnrud, CFA
Portfolio Manager
2009
John Burrello, CFA
Portfolio Manager
2022
Chris Devine, CFA
Portfolio Manager
2009
Scott Hixon, CFA
Portfolio Manager
2009
Christian Ulrich, CFA
Portfolio Manager
2009
Scott Wolle, CFA
Portfolio Manager
2009
Purchase and Sale of Fund Shares
You may purchase, redeem or exchange shares of the Fund on any business day through your financial adviser or by telephone at 800-959-4246. Shares of the Fund, other than Class R5 and Class R6 shares, may also be purchased, redeemed or exchanged on any business day through our website at www.invesco.com/us or by mail to Invesco Investment Services, Inc., P.O. Box 219078, Kansas City, MO 64121-9078.
The minimum investments for Class A, C, R and Y shares for fund accounts are as follows:
Type of Account
Initial
Investment
Per Fund
Additional
Investments
Per Fund
Asset or fee-based accounts managed by your financial adviser
None
None
Employer Sponsored Retirement and Benefit Plans and
Employer Sponsored IRAs
None
None
IRAs and Coverdell ESAs if the new investor is purchasing
shares through a systematic purchase plan
$25
$25
All other types of accounts if the investor is purchasing shares
through a systematic purchase plan
50
50
IRAs and Coverdell ESAs
250
25
All other accounts
1,000
50
With respect to Class R5 and Class R6 shares, there is no minimum initial investment for Employer Sponsored Retirement and Benefit Plans investing through a retirement platform that administers at least $2.5 billion in retirement plan assets. All other Employer Sponsored Retirement and
Benefit Plans must meet a minimum initial investment of at least $1 million in each Fund in which it invests.
For all other institutional investors purchasing Class R5 or Class R6 shares, the minimum initial investment in each share class is $1 million, unless such investment is made by (i) an investment company, as defined under the Investment Company Act of 1940, as amended (1940 Act), that is part of a family of investment companies which own in the aggregate at least $100 million in securities, or (ii) an account established with a 529 college savings plan managed by Invesco, in which case there is no minimum initial investment.
There are no minimum investment amounts for Class R6 shares held through retail omnibus accounts maintained by an intermediary, such as a broker, that (i) generally charges an asset-based fee or commission in addition to those described in this prospectus, and (ii) maintains Class R6 shares and makes them available to retail investors.
Tax Information
The Fund’s distributions generally are taxable to you as ordinary income, capital gains, or some combination of both, unless you are investing through a tax-advantaged arrangement, such as a 401(k) plan, 529 college savings plan or individual retirement account. Any distributions from a 401(k) plan or individual retirement account may be taxed as ordinary income when withdrawn from such plan or account.
Payments to Broker-Dealers and Other Financial Intermediaries
If you purchase the Fund through a broker-dealer or other financial intermediary (such as a bank), the Fund, the Fund’s distributor or its related companies may pay the intermediary for the sale of Fund shares and related services. These payments may create a conflict of interest by influencing the broker-dealer or other intermediary and your salesperson or financial adviser to recommend the Fund over another investment. Ask your salesperson or financial adviser or visit your financial intermediary’s website for more information.

Investment Objective(s), Strategies, Risks and Portfolio Holdings
Objective(s) and Strategies
The Fund’s investment objective is to provide total return with a low to moderate correlation to traditional financial market indices. The Fund’s investment objective may be changed by the Board of Trustees (the Board) without shareholder approval.
The Fund’s investment strategy is designed to provide capital loss protection during down markets by investing across multiple macro factors. Under normal market conditions, the Fund’s portfolio management team allocates across three macro factors: growth, defensive and real return, such that no one macro factor drives the Fund’s performance. The Fund’s exposure to these three macro factors will be achieved primarily through investments in derivative instruments (generally having aggregate notional exposure exceeding 65% of the Fund’s net assets), including but not limited to futures, options, currency forward contracts and swap agreements. The portfolio managers manage the Fund’s portfolio using two different processes. One is strategic asset allocation, which the portfolio managers use to express their long-term views of the market. The portfolio managers apply their strategic process to, on average, approximately 80% of the Fund’s portfolio risk, as determined by the portfolio managers’ proprietary risk analysis. The other process is tactical asset allocation, which is used by the portfolio managers to reflect their shorter-term views of the market. The strategic and tactical processes are intended to adjust the Fund’s portfolio risk in a variety of market conditions.
The portfolio managers implement their investment decisions primarily through the use of derivatives and other investments that create leverage.
6        Invesco Balanced-Risk Allocation Fund

The Fund uses derivatives and other leveraged instruments to create and adjust exposures to the three macro factors. The portfolio managers make these adjustments to balance risk exposure when they believe it will benefit the Fund. Using derivatives often allows the portfolio managers to implement their views more efficiently and to gain more exposure to the macro factors than investing in more traditional assets such as stocks and bonds would allow. The Fund may hold long and short positions in derivatives and in investments in each of the three macro factors; however, the Fund will typically maintain net long exposure to each macro factor, such that the Fund is expected to benefit from general price appreciation of investments in that macro factor. The Fund’s use of derivatives and the leveraged investment exposure created by its use of derivatives are expected to be significant and greater than most mutual funds. The Fund may use quantitative models as part of the investment selection process.
The Fund’s net asset value over a short to intermediate term is expected to be volatile because of the significant use of derivatives and other instruments that provide leverage, including futures contracts, options, swaps and commodity-linked notes. Volatility measures the range of returns of a security, fund, index or other investment, as indicated by the annualized standard deviation of its returns. Higher volatility generally indicates higher risk and is often reflected by frequent and sometimes significant movements up and down in value. The Fund will have the potential for greater gains, as well as the potential for greater losses, than if the Fund did not use derivatives or other instruments that have a leveraging effect. Leveraging tends to magnify, sometimes significantly depending on the amount of leverage used, the effect of any increase or decrease in the Fund’s exposure to a macro factor and may cause the Fund’s net asset value to be more volatile than a fund that does not use leverage. For example, if the Fund gains exposure to a specific macro factor through an instrument that provides leveraged exposure to the class, and that leveraged instrument increases in value, the gain to the Fund will be magnified; however, if the leveraged instrument decreases in value, the loss to the Fund will be magnified.
The Adviser’s investment process has three steps. The first step involves investment selection within the three macro factors. The portfolio managers select investments to represent each of the three macro factors from a universe of over fifty investments. The selection process (1) evaluates a particular investment’s theoretical case for long-term excess returns relative to cash; (2) screens the identified investments against minimum liquidity criteria; and (3) reviews the expected correlation among the investments, meaning the likelihood that the value of the investments will move in the same direction at the same time, and the expected risk of each investment to determine whether the selected investments are likely to improve the expected risk adjusted return of the Fund.
The second step in the investment process involves portfolio construction. The portfolio managers use their own estimates for risk and correlation to weight each macro factor and the investments within each macro factor selected in the first step to construct a portfolio that they believe is risk-balanced across the three macro factors. Periodically, the management team re-estimates the risk contributed by each macro factor and investment and rebalances the portfolio; the portfolio also may be rebalanced when the Fund makes new investments. Taken together, the first two steps in the process result in the strategic allocation.
In the third step of the investment process, using a systematic approach based on fundamental principles, the portfolio management team analyzes the macro factors and investments, considering the following factors: valuation, economic environment and historic price movements. Regarding valuation, the portfolio managers evaluate whether a macro factor and investments in that macro factor are attractively priced relative to fundamentals. Next, the portfolio managers assess the economic environment and consider the effect that monetary policy and other determinants of economic growth, inflation and market volatility will have on a macro factor and related investments. Lastly, the portfolio managers
assess the impact of historic price movements for each macro factor and related investments on likely future returns.
Utilizing the results from the analysis described above, the portfolio managers determine tactical short-term over-weight positions (incurring additional exposure relative to the strategic allocation) and under-weight positions (incurring less exposure relative to the strategic allocation) for the macro factors and investments. The management team actively adjusts portfolio positions to reflect the near-term market environment, while remaining consistent with the balanced-risk long-term portfolio structure described in step two above.
The Fund’s growth exposure will be achieved primarily through investments in derivatives that track equity indices comprised of shares of companies in developed and/or emerging market countries, including equity indices that emphasize exposure to companies associated with certain characteristics, known as style factors, including high dividend, quality, value, growth, low volatility, size (large-, mid- or small-cap) and momentum. In addition, the Fund may invest directly in shares of such companies and in exchange-traded funds (ETFs) that provide equity exposure, including ETFs that track factor-based indices that emphasize the style factors noted above. The Fund may also buy and write (sell) put and call options on equities, equity indices and ETFs, including in combination, to adjust the Fund’s equity exposure or to generate income. Additionally, the Fund can use currency forward contracts to hedge against the risk that the value of the foreign currencies in which its equity investments are denominated will depreciate against the U.S. dollar.
The Fund’s defensive exposure will be achieved primarily through derivatives that offer exposure to the debt or credit of issuers in developed and/or emerging markets that are rated investment grade or are unrated but deemed to be investment grade quality by the Adviser, including U.S. and foreign government debt securities having intermediate (5 – 10 years) and long (10 plus years) term maturity.
The Fund’s real return exposure will be achieved primarily through investments in commodity futures and swaps, commodity related ETFs and exchange-traded notes (ETNs) and commodity-linked notes, some or all of which will be owned through Invesco Cayman Commodity Fund I Ltd., a wholly-owned subsidiary of the Fund organized under the laws of the Cayman Islands (Subsidiary). The commodity investments will be focused in four sectors of the commodities market: energy, precious metals, industrial metals and agriculture/livestock.
The Fund will invest in the Subsidiary to gain exposure to commodities markets. The Subsidiary, in turn, will invest in commodity futures and swaps, commodity related ETFs and ETNs and commodity-linked notes. The Subsidiary is advised by the Adviser, has the same investment objective as the Fund and generally employs the same investment strategy. Unlike the Fund, however, the Subsidiary may invest without limitation in commodity-linked derivatives and other investments that may provide leveraged and non-leveraged exposure to commodities. The Subsidiary holds cash and can invest in cash equivalent instruments, including affiliated money market funds, some or all of which may serve as margin or collateral for the Subsidiary’s derivative positions. Because the Subsidiary is wholly-owned by the Fund, the Fund will be subject to the risks associated with any investment by the Subsidiary.
The Fund generally will maintain a substantial portion of its net assets (including assets held by the Subsidiary) in cash and cash equivalent instruments, including affiliated money market funds, as margin or collateral for the Fund’s obligations under derivative transactions, or for cash management purposes. The larger the value of the Fund’s derivative positions, as opposed to positions held in non-derivative instruments, the more the Fund will be required to maintain cash and cash equivalents as margin or collateral for such derivatives.
ETFs are traded on an exchange and generally hold a portfolio of securities, commodities or commodity futures and/or currencies that are designed to replicate an index. Some ETFs are actively managed and instead of replicating an index, they seek to outperform an index.
7        Invesco Balanced-Risk Allocation Fund

ETNs are senior, unsecured, unsubordinated debt securities issued by a bank or other sponsor, the returns of which are linked to the performance of a particular market, asset, index, benchmark or strategy. ETNs are traded on an exchange; however, investors can also hold an ETN until maturity. At maturity, the issuer pays to the investor a cash amount equal to the principal amount, multiplied by a factor that represents the performance of the referenced market, asset, index, benchmark or strategy.
A commodity-linked note is a debt security issued by a bank or other sponsor that pays a return linked to the performance of a commodities index or basket of commodity futures contracts. In some cases, the return will be based on a multiple of the performance of the index or basket and this embedded leverage will magnify the positive return or losses the Fund earns from these notes as compared to the performance of the index or basket.
A futures contract is a standardized agreement between two parties to buy or sell a specified quantity of an underlying asset at a specified price at a specified future time, with both the purchaser and the seller equally obligated to complete the transaction at that future time. The value of a futures contract tends to increase and decrease in tandem with the value of the underlying asset. Depending on the terms of the particular contract, futures contracts are settled by purchasing an offsetting contract, physically delivering the underlying asset on the settlement date or paying a cash settlement amount on the settlement date.
An option is an agreement between two parties that gives the purchaser of the option the right to buy or sell a particular asset (commonly a stock (including a share of an ETF), a bond, an index, a currency or a futures contract) at a later date at an agreed upon price referred to as the “strike” price. A call option gives the purchaser of the option the right (but not the obligation) to buy the underlying asset at the strike price, while a put option gives the purchaser the right (but not the obligation) to sell the underlying asset at the strike price. In either case, the writer (seller) of the option incurs the corresponding obligation to fulfill the transaction if the option is exercised. The price of an option derives from the difference between the strike price and the value of the underlying asset, the expected volatility of that underlying asset and the time remaining until the expiration of the option.
By selling put and call options, the Fund receives a premium from the option buyer, which increases the Fund’s return if the option is closed at a gain or expires out-of-the-money. An option is “out-of-the-money” if the strike price of the option is below (for a put) or above (for a call) the value of the relevant underlying asset. If, however, the strike price of the option is above (for a put) or below (for a call) the value of the relevant underlying asset and/or the option’s price increases above the price at which it was sold, the Fund may (1) if the buyer has not exercised the option, close the option contract at a loss or (2) if the buyer has exercised the option, (i) pay the buyer the difference between the strike price and the value of underlying asset, or (ii) deliver (if a call) or purchase (if a put) the underlying asset, depending on whether the option is cash settled or deliverable.
A swap contract is an agreement between two parties pursuant to which the parties exchange payments at specified dates on the basis of a specified notional amount, with the payments calculated by reference to the price, value or level of a specified underlying asset, which can be a security, index, reference rate, commodity, currency or other asset, or a basket of any of the foregoing. The notional amount of a swap is based on the nominal or face amount of the reference asset that is used to calculate payments made under that swap; the notional amount typically is not exchanged between counterparties. The parties to the swap use variations in the price, value or level of the underlying asset to calculate payments between them through the life of the swap.
In anticipation of or in response to market, economic, political, or other conditions, the Fund’s portfolio managers may temporarily use a different investment strategy for defensive purposes. If the Fund’s portfolio managers do so, different factors could affect the Fund’s performance and the Fund may not achieve its investment objective.
The Fund’s investments in the types of securities and other investments described in this prospectus vary from time to time, and, at any time, the Fund may not be invested in all of the types of securities and other investments described in this prospectus. The Fund may also invest in securities and other investments not described in this prospectus.
For more information, see “Description of the Funds and Their Investments and Risks” in the Fund’s SAI.
Risks
The principal risks of investing in the Fund are:
Market Risk. The market values of the Fund’s investments, and therefore the value of the Fund’s shares, will go up and down, sometimes rapidly or unpredictably. Market risk may affect a single issuer, industry or section of the economy, or it may affect the market as a whole. The value of the Fund’s investments may go up or down due to general market conditions that are not specifically related to the particular issuer, such as real or perceived adverse economic conditions, changes in the general outlook for revenues or corporate earnings, changes in interest or currency rates, regional or global instability, or adverse investor sentiment generally. The value of the Fund’s investments may also go up or down due to factors that affect an individual issuer or a particular industry or sector, such as changes in production costs and competitive conditions within an industry. In addition, natural or environmental disasters, widespread disease or other public health issues, war, military conflict, acts of terrorism, economic crisis or other events may have a significant impact on the value of the Fund’s investments, as well as the financial markets and global economy generally. Such circumstances may also impact the ability of the Adviser to effectively implement the Fund’s investment strategy. During a general downturn in the financial markets, multiple asset classes may decline in value. When markets perform well, there can be no assurance that specific investments held by the Fund will rise in value.
◾ 
Market Disruption Risks Related to Russia-Ukraine Conflict. Following Russia’s invasion of Ukraine in late February 2022, various countries, including the United States, as well as North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) member countries and the European Union, issued broad-ranging economic sanctions against Russia. The war in Ukraine (and the potential for further sanctions in response to Russia’s continued military activity) may escalate. These and other corresponding events, have had, and could continue to have, severe negative effects on regional and global economic and financial markets, including increased volatility, reduced liquidity, and overall uncertainty. The negative impacts may be particularly acute in certain sectors including, but not limited to, energy and financials. Russia may take additional countermeasures or retaliatory actions (including cyberattacks), which could exacerbate negative consequences on global financial markets. The duration of the conflict and corresponding sanctions and related events cannot be predicted. The foregoing may result in a negative impact on Fund performance and the value of an investment in the Fund, even beyond any direct investment exposure the Fund may have to Russian issuers or the adjoining geographic regions.
◾ 
COVID-19. The “COVID-19” strain of coronavirus has resulted in instances of market closures and dislocations, extreme volatility, liquidity constraints and increased trading costs. Efforts to contain its spread have resulted in travel restrictions, disruptions of healthcare systems, business operations (including business closures) and supply chains, layoffs, lower consumer demand and employee availability, and defaults and credit downgrades, among other significant economic impacts that have disrupted global economic activity across many industries. Such economic impacts may exacerbate other pre-existing political, social and economic risks locally or globally and cause general concern and uncertainty. The full economic impact and ongoing effects of COVID-19 (or other future
8        Invesco Balanced-Risk Allocation Fund

epidemics or pandemics) at the macro-level and on individual businesses are unpredictable and may result in significant and prolonged effects on the Fund’s performance.
Correlation Risk. Changes in the value of the asset classes in which the Fund invests or specific investments within those asset classes may not track or offset each other in the manner anticipated by the Adviser. Because the Fund’s investment strategy seeks to balance risk across three asset classes and, within each asset class, to balance risk across different countries and investments, to the extent either the three asset classes or the selected countries and investments become correlated in a way not anticipated by the Adviser, the Fund’s risk allocation process may not produce the intended result of balancing risk and could instead result in magnified risks and loss.
Derivatives Risk. A derivative is an instrument whose value depends largely on (and is derived from) the value of an underlying security, currency, commodity, interest rate, index or other asset (each referred to as an underlying asset). In addition to risks relating to the underlying assets, the use of derivatives may include other, possibly greater, risks, which are described below. These risks are greater for the Fund than most other mutual funds because the Fund will implement its investment strategy primarily through derivative instruments rather than direct investments in stocks/bonds.
◾ 
Counterparty Risk. Certain derivatives do not trade on an established exchange (referred to as over-the-counter (OTC) derivatives) and are simply financial contracts between the Fund and a counterparty. When the Fund is owed money on an OTC derivative, the Fund is dependent on the counterparty to pay or, in some cases, deliver the underlying asset, unless the Fund can otherwise sell its derivative contract to a third party prior to its expiration. Many counterparties are financial institutions such as banks and broker-dealers and their creditworthiness (and ability to pay or perform) may be negatively impacted by factors affecting financial institutions generally. In addition, in the event that a counterparty becomes bankrupt or insolvent, the Fund’s ability to recover the collateral that the Fund has on deposit with the counterparty could be delayed or impaired. For derivatives traded on a centralized exchange, the Fund generally is dependent upon the solvency of the relevant exchange clearing house (which acts as a guarantor for each contractual obligation under such derivatives) for payment on derivative instruments for which the Fund is owed money.
◾ 
Leverage Risk. Many derivatives do not require a payment up front equal to the economic exposure created by holding a position in the derivative, which creates a form of leverage. As a result, an adverse change in the value of the underlying asset could result in the Fund sustaining a loss that is substantially greater than the amount invested in the derivative or the anticipated value of the underlying asset. In addition, some derivatives have the potential for unlimited loss, regardless of the size of the Fund’s initial investment. Leverage may therefore make the Fund’s returns more volatile and increase the risk of loss. In certain market conditions, losses on derivative instruments can grow larger while the value of the Fund’s other assets fall, resulting in the Fund’s derivative positions becoming a larger percentage of the Fund’s investments.
◾ 
Liquidity Risk. There is a smaller pool of buyers and sellers for certain derivatives, particularly OTC derivatives, than more traditional investments such as stocks. These buyers and sellers are often financial institutions that may be unable or unwilling to buy or sell derivatives during times of financial or market stress. Derivative instruments may therefore be less liquid than more traditional investments and the Fund may be unable to sell or exit its derivative positions at a desirable time or price. This risk may be more acute under adverse market conditions, during which the Fund may be most in need of liquidating its derivative positions. To the extent that the Fund is unable to exit a derivative position because of market
illiquidity, the Fund may not be able to prevent further losses of value in its derivatives holdings and the liquidity of the Fund and its ability to meet redemption requests may be impaired to the extent that a substantial portion of the Fund’s otherwise liquid assets must be used as margin. Another consequence of illiquidity is that the Fund may be required to hold a derivative instrument to maturity and take or make delivery of the underlying asset that the Adviser would otherwise avoid.
◾ 
Regulatory Risk. Changes in government regulation of derivative instruments could affect the character, timing and amount of the Fund’s taxable income or gains, and may limit or prevent the Fund from using certain types of derivative instruments as a part of its investment strategy, which could make the investment strategy more costly to implement or require the Fund to change its investment strategy. 
◾ 
Forward Foreign Currency Contracts Risk. Forward foreign currency contracts are used to lock in the U.S. dollar price of a security denominated in a foreign currency or protect against possible losses from changes in the relative value of the U.S. dollar against a foreign currency. They are subject to the risk that anticipated currency movements will not be accurately predicted or do not correspond accurately to changes in the value of the fund's holdings, which could result in losses and additional transaction costs. The use of forward contracts could reduce performance if there are unanticipated changes in currency prices. A contract to sell a foreign currency would limit any potential gain that might be realized if the value of the currency increases. A forward foreign currency contract may also result in losses in the event of a default or bankruptcy of the counterparty.
◾ 
Forward Contracts Risk. The projection of short-term currency market movements is extremely difficult, and the successful execution of a short-term hedging strategy is highly uncertain. The precise matching of the amounts under forward contracts and the value of the securities involved generally will not be possible because the future value of securities denominated in foreign currencies will change as a consequence of market movements between the date the forward contract is entered into and the date it is sold. Investments in forward contracts involve the risk that anticipated currency movements will not be accurately predicted, causing the Fund to sustain losses on these contracts and to pay additional transaction costs.
◾ 
Futures Contracts Risk. The volatility of futures contracts prices has been historically greater than the volatility of stocks and bonds. The liquidity of the futures market depends on participants entering into offsetting transactions rather than making or taking delivery. To the extent participants decide to make or take delivery, liquidity in the futures market could be reduced. In addition, futures exchanges often impose a maximum permissible price movement on each futures contract for each trading session. The Fund may be disadvantaged if it is prohibited from executing a trade outside the daily permissible price movement.
◾ 
Options Risk. If the Fund sells a put option, there is a risk that the Fund may be required to buy the underlying investment at a disadvantageous price. If the Fund sells a call option, there is a risk that the Fund may be required to sell the underlying investment at a disadvantageous price. If the Fund sells a call option on an investment that the Fund owns (a “covered call”) and the investment has increased in value when the option is exercised, the Fund will be required to sell the investment at the call price and will not be able to realize any of the investment’s value above the call price. Options may involve economic leverage, which could result in greater price volatility than other investments.
◾ 
Swap Transactions Risk. Under U.S. financial reform legislation enacted in 2010, certain types of swaps are required to be executed
9        Invesco Balanced-Risk Allocation Fund

on a regulated market and cleared through a central clearing house counterparty, which may entail further risks and costs for the Fund.  Swap agreements are privately negotiated in the over-the-counter market and may be entered into as a bilateral contract or may be centrally cleared. In a centrally cleared swap, immediately following execution of the swap agreement, the swap agreement is submitted for clearing to a central clearing house counterparty, and the Fund faces the central clearing house counterparty by means of an account with a futures commission merchant that is a member of the clearing house.
◾ 
Other Risks. Compared to other types of investments, derivatives may be harder to value and may also be less tax efficient, as described under the “Taxes” section of the prospectus. Derivatives strategies may not always be successful. For example, to the extent that the Fund uses derivatives for hedging or to gain or limit exposure to a particular market or market segment, there may be imperfect correlation between the value of the derivative instrument and the value of the instrument being hedged or the relevant market or market segment, in which case the Fund may not realize the intended benefits. There is also the risk that during adverse market conditions, an instrument which would usually operate as a hedge provides no hedging benefits at all. The Fund’s use of derivatives may be limited by the requirements for taxation of the Fund as a regulated investment company.
Investing in Stocks Risk. Common stock represents an ownership interest in a company. It ranks below preferred stock and debt securities in claims for dividends and in claims for assets of the issuer in a liquidation or bankruptcy. Common stocks may be exchange-traded or over-the-counter securities. Over-the-counter securities may be less liquid than exchange-traded securities.
The value of the Fund’s portfolio may be affected by changes in the stock markets. Stocks and other equity securities fluctuate in price in response to changes to equity markets in general. Stock markets may experience significant short-term volatility and may fall or rise sharply at times. Adverse events in any part of the equity or fixed-income markets may have unexpected negative effects on other market segments. Different stock markets may behave differently from each other and U.S. stock markets may move in the opposite direction from one or more foreign stock markets.
The prices of individual stocks generally do not all move in the same direction at the same time. However, individual stock prices tend to go up and down more dramatically than those of certain other types of investments, such as bonds. A variety of factors can negatively affect the price of a particular company’s stock. These factors may include, but are not limited to: poor earnings reports, a loss of customers, litigation against the company, general unfavorable performance of the company’s sector or industry, or changes in government regulations affecting the company or its industry. To the extent that securities of a particular type are emphasized (for example foreign stocks, stocks of small- or mid-cap companies, growth or value stocks, or stocks of companies in a particular industry), fund share values may fluctuate more in response to events affecting the market for those types of securities.
Debt Securities Risk. The prices of debt securities held by the Fund will be affected by changes in interest rates, the creditworthiness of the issuer and other factors. An increase in prevailing interest rates typically causes the value of existing debt securities to fall and often has a greater impact on longer-duration debt securities and higher quality debt securities. Falling interest rates will cause the Fund to reinvest the proceeds of debt securities that have been repaid by the issuer at lower interest rates. Falling interest rates may also reduce the Fund’s distributable income because interest payments on floating rate debt instruments held by the Fund will decline. The Fund could lose money on investments in debt securities if the issuer or borrower fails to meet its obligations to make interest payments and/or to repay principal in a timely manner. If an issuer seeks to restructure the terms of its borrowings or the Fund is required to seek recovery upon a
default in the payment of interest or the repayment of principal, the Fund may incur additional expenses. Changes in an issuer’s financial strength, the market’s perception of such strength or in the credit rating of the issuer or the security may affect the value of debt securities. The Adviser’s credit analysis may fail to anticipate such changes, which could result in buying a debt security at an inopportune time or failing to sell a debt security in advance of a price decline or other credit event.
Commodity Risk. The Fund may have investment exposure to the commodities markets and/or a particular sector of the commodities markets, which may subject the Fund to greater volatility than investments in traditional securities, such as stocks and bonds. The commodities markets may fluctuate widely based on a variety of factors, including changes in overall market movements, domestic and foreign political and economic events and policies, war, acts of terrorism, changes in domestic or foreign interest rates and/or investor expectations concerning interest rates, domestic and foreign inflation rates and investment and trading activities of mutual funds, hedge funds and commodities funds. Prices of various commodities may also be affected by factors such as drought, floods, weather, livestock disease, embargoes, tariffs and other regulatory developments. The prices of commodities can also fluctuate widely due to supply and demand disruptions in major producing or consuming regions and changes in transportation, handling and storage costs. Certain commodities may be produced in a limited number of countries and may be controlled by a small number of producers or groups of producers. As a result, political, economic and supply related events in such countries could have a disproportionate impact on the prices of such commodities. Because the Fund’s performance may be linked to the performance of volatile commodities, investors should be willing to assume the risks of potentially significant fluctuations in the value of the Fund’s shares.
Commodities Tax Risk. The tax treatment of commodity-linked derivative instruments may be adversely affected by changes in legislation, regulations or other legally binding authority. If, as a result of any such adverse action, the income of the Fund from certain commodity-linked derivatives was treated as non-qualifying income, the Fund might fail to qualify as a regulated investment company and be subject to federal income tax at the Fund level. As a regulated investment company, the Fund must derive at least 90% of its gross income for each taxable year from sources treated as qualifying income under the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended (the Code). The Fund has received private letter rulings from the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) confirming that income derived from the Fund's investments in the Subsidiary and a form of commodity-linked note constitutes qualifying income to the Fund.  However, the portion of such rulings relating to the treatment of a corporation as a regulated investment company that require a determination of whether a financial instrument or position is a security under section 2(a)(36) of the 1940 Act was revoked because of changes in the IRS's position. (A financial instrument or position that constitutes a security under section 2(a)(36) of the 1940 Act generates qualifying income for a corporation taxed as a regulated investment company.) Accordingly, the Fund may invest in certain commodity-linked notes: (a) directly, relying on an opinion of counsel confirming that income from such investments should be qualifying income because such commodity-linked notes constitute securities under section 2(a)(36) of the 1940 Act or (b) indirectly through the Subsidiary. Should the IRS issue further guidance, or Congress enact legislation, that adversely affects the tax treatment of the Fund’s use of commodity-linked notes or the Subsidiary (which guidance might be applied to the Fund retroactively), it could limit the Fund’s ability to pursue its investment strategy and the Fund might not qualify as a regulated investment company for one or more years. In this event, the Fund’s Board of Trustees may authorize a significant change in investment strategy or other action. In lieu of potential disqualification, the Fund is permitted to pay a tax for certain failures to satisfy the income requirement, which, in general, are limited to those due to reasonable cause and not willful neglect. The Fund also may incur transaction and other costs to comply with any new or additional guidance from the IRS.
10        Invesco Balanced-Risk Allocation Fund

Changing Fixed Income Market Conditions Risk. Increases in the federal funds and equivalent foreign rates or other changes to monetary policy or regulatory actions may expose fixed income markets to heightened volatility and reduced liquidity for certain fixed income investments, particularly those with longer maturities. It is difficult to predict the impact of interest rate changes on various markets. In addition, decreases in fixed income dealer market-making capacity may also potentially lead to heightened volatility and reduced liquidity in the fixed income markets. As a result, the value of the Fund’s investments and share price may decline. Changes in central bank policies could also result in higher than normal redemptions by shareholders, which could potentially increase the Fund’s portfolio turnover rate and transaction costs and potentially lower the Fund’s performance returns.
Foreign Securities Risk. The value of the Fund's foreign investments may be adversely affected by political and social instability in the home countries of the issuers of the investments, by changes in economic or taxation policies in those countries, or by the difficulty in enforcing obligations in those countries. Foreign investments also involve the risk of the possible seizure, nationalization or expropriation of the issuer or foreign deposits (in which the Fund could lose its entire investments in a certain market) and the possible adoption of foreign governmental restrictions such as exchange controls. Foreign companies generally may be subject to less stringent regulations than U.S. companies, including financial reporting requirements and auditing and accounting controls, and may therefore be more susceptible to fraud or corruption. Also, there may be less publicly available information about companies in certain foreign countries than about U.S. companies making it more difficult for the Adviser to evaluate those companies. The laws of certain countries may put limits on the Fund’s ability to recover its assets held at a foreign bank if the foreign bank, depository or issuer of a security, or any of their agents, goes bankrupt. Trading in many foreign securities may be less liquid and more volatile than U.S. securities due to the size of the market or other factors. Changes in political and economic factors in one country or region could adversely affect conditions in another country or region. Investments in foreign securities may also expose the Fund to time-zone arbitrage risk. At times, the Fund may emphasize investments in a particular country or region and may be subject to greater risks from adverse events that occur in that country or region. Unless the Fund has hedged its foreign currency exposure, foreign securities risk also involves the risk of negative foreign currency rate fluctuations, which may cause the value of securities denominated in such foreign currency (or other instruments through which the Fund has exposure to foreign currencies) to decline in value. Currency exchange rates may fluctuate significantly over short periods of time. Currency hedging strategies, if used, are not always successful. For instance, currency forward contracts, if used by the Fund, could reduce performance if there are unanticipated changes in currency exchange rates.
Emerging Market Securities Risk. Emerging markets (also referred to as developing markets) are generally subject to greater market volatility, political, social and economic instability, uncertainty regarding the existence of trading markets and more governmental limitations on foreign investment than more developed markets. In addition, companies operating in emerging markets may have greater concentration in a few industries resulting in greater vulnerability to regional and global trade conditions and also may be subject to lower trading volume and greater price fluctuations than companies in more developed markets. Unexpected market closures may also affect investments in emerging markets. Settlement procedures may differ from those of more established securities markets, and settlement delays may result in the inability to invest assets or dispose of portfolio securities in a timely manner. As a result there could be subsequent declines in value of the portfolio security, a decrease in the level of liquidity of the portfolio, or, if there is a contract to sell the security, a possible liability to the purchaser.
Such countries’ economies may be more dependent on relatively few industries or investors that may be highly vulnerable to local and global
changes. Emerging market countries may also have higher rates of inflation and more rapid and extreme fluctuations in inflation rates and greater sensitivity to interest rate changes. Further, companies in emerging market countries generally may be subject to less stringent regulatory, disclosure, financial reporting, accounting, auditing and recordkeeping standards than companies in more developed countries and, as a result, the nature and quality of such information may vary. Information about such companies may be less available and reliable and, therefore, the ability to conduct adequate due diligence in emerging markets may be limited which can impede the Fund’s ability to evaluate such companies. In addition, certain emerging market countries may impose material limitations on PCAOB inspection, investigation and enforcement capabilities, which can hinder the PCAOB’s ability to engage in independent oversight or inspection of accounting firms located in or operating in certain emerging markets. There is no guarantee that the quality of financial reporting or the audits conducted by audit firms of emerging market issuers meet PCAOB standards.
Securities law in many emerging market countries is relatively new and unsettled. Therefore, laws regarding foreign investment in emerging market securities, securities regulation, title to securities, and shareholder rights may change quickly and unpredictably. Emerging market countries also may have less developed legal systems allowing for enforcement of private property rights and/or redress for injuries to private property (including bankruptcy, confiscatory taxation, expropriation, nationalization of a company’s assets, restrictions on foreign ownership of local companies, restrictions on withdrawing assets from the country, protectionist measures and practices such as share blocking). Certain governments may require approval for the repatriation of investment income, capital or the proceeds of sales of securities by foreign investors. The ability to bring and enforce actions in emerging market countries, or to obtain information needed to pursue or enforce such actions, may be limited and shareholder claims may be difficult or impossible to pursue. In addition, the taxation systems at the federal, regional and local levels in emerging market countries may be less transparent and inconsistently enforced, and subject to sudden change.
Emerging market countries may have a higher degree of corruption and fraud than developed market countries, as well as counterparties and financial institutions with less financial sophistication, creditworthiness and/or resources. The governments in some emerging market countries have been engaged in programs to sell all or part of their interests in government-owned or controlled enterprises. However, in certain emerging market countries, the ability of foreign entities to participate in privatization programs may be limited by local law. There can be no assurance that privatization programs will be successful.
Other risks of investing in emerging market securities may include additional transaction costs, delays in settlement procedures, unexpected market closures, and lack of timely information.
Foreign Government Debt Risk. Investments in foreign government debt securities (sometimes referred to as sovereign debt securities) involve certain risks in addition to those relating to foreign securities or debt securities generally. The issuer of the debt or the governmental authorities that control the repayment of the debt may be unable or unwilling to repay principal or interest when due in accordance with the terms of such debt, and the Fund may have limited recourse in the event of a default against the defaulting government. A foreign government debtor’s willingness or ability to repay principal and pay interest in a timely manner may be affected by, among other factors, its cash flow situation, the extent of its foreign currency reserves, the availability of sufficient foreign exchange, the relative size of the debt burden, the foreign government debtor’s policy toward its principal international lenders and local political constraints. Certain issuers of foreign government debt may be dependent on disbursements from foreign governments, multinational agencies and other entities to reduce principal and interest arrearages on their debt. Without the approval of debt
11        Invesco Balanced-Risk Allocation Fund

holders, some governmental debtors have in the past been able to reschedule or restructure their debt payments or declare moratoria on payments.
LIBOR Transition Risk. The Fund may have investments in financial instruments that utilize the London Interbank Offered Rate (“LIBOR”) as the reference or benchmark rate for variable interest rate calculations. LIBOR is intended to measure the rate generally at which banks can lend and borrow from one another in the relevant currency on an unsecured basis. In the years following the 2008 financial crisis, the integrity of LIBOR was increasingly questioned because several banks contributing to its calculation were accused of rate manipulation and because of a general contraction in the unsecured interbank lending market. As a result, regulators and financial industry working groups in several jurisdictions have worked over the past several years to identify alternative reference rates (“ARRs”) to replace LIBOR and to assist with the transition to the new ARRs. For example, the Federal Reserve Bank of New York has identified the Secured Overnight Financing Rate (“SOFR”) as the intended replacement to USD LIBOR and foreign regulators have proposed other interbank offered rates, such as the Sterling Overnight Index Average (“SONIA”) and other replacement rates, which could also be adopted. Consequently, the publication of most LIBOR rates ceased at the end of 2021, but a selection of widely used USD LIBOR rates continues to be published until June 2023 to allow for an orderly transition away from these rates. Additionally, key regulators have instructed banking institutions to cease entering into new contracts that reference these USD LIBOR settings after December 31, 2021, subject to certain limited exceptions.
There remains uncertainty and risks relating to the continuing LIBOR transition and its effects on the Fund and the instruments in which the Fund invests. For example, there can be no assurance that the composition or characteristics of any ARRs or financial instruments in which the Fund invests that utilize ARRs will be similar to or produce the same value or economic equivalence as LIBOR or that these instruments will have the same volume or liquidity. Additionally, although regulators have generally prohibited banking institutions from entering into new contracts that reference those USD LIBOR settings that continue to exist, there remains uncertainty and risks relating to certain “legacy” USD LIBOR instruments that were issued or entered into before December 31, 2021 and the process by which a replacement interest rate will be identified and implemented into these instruments when USD LIBOR is ultimately discontinued. The effects of such uncertainty and risks in “legacy” USD LIBOR instruments held by the Fund could result in losses to the Fund.
Commodity-Linked Notes Risk. In addition to risks associated with the underlying commodities, investments in commodity-linked notes may be subject to additional risks, such as non-payment of interest and loss of principal, counterparty risk, lack of a secondary market and risk of greater volatility than traditional equity and debt securities.
The Fund might not receive all or a portion of the interest due on its investment or a return of its principal if there is a loss of value of the commodity, commodity index or other economic variable to which the interest is linked. A liquid secondary market may not exist for certain commodity-linked notes, which may make it difficult for the Fund to sell them at an acceptable time or price or to accurately value them. Commodity-linked notes are also subject to counterparty risk, which is the risk that the issuer of the commodity-linked note will default or become bankrupt and not make timely payment of principal and interest. The value of the commodity-linked notes the Fund buys may fluctuate significantly because the values of the underlying investments to which they are linked are themselves volatile. Additionally, certain commodity-linked notes employ “economic” leverage by requiring payment by the issuer of an amount that is a multiple of the price increase or decrease of the underlying commodity, commodity index, or other economic variable. For example, the value of a three-times leveraged note will change by a magnitude of three for every percentage change (positive or negative) in the value of the underlying commodity, index or other economic variable. Such economic leverage will
increase the volatility of the value of these commodity-linked notes and the Fund to the extent it invests in such notes.
Short Position Risk. The Fund will incur a loss on a short position if the price of the asset sold short increases from the short sale price. Because the Fund’s potential loss on a short position arises from increases in the value of the asset sold short, the extent of such loss, like the price of the asset sold short, is theoretically unlimited. Short sales are speculative transactions and involve greater reliance on the Adviser’s ability to accurately anticipate the future value of an asset or markets in general. Any gain on a short position is decreased, and any loss is increased, by the amount of any payment, dividend, interest or other transaction costs that the Fund may be required to pay with respect to the asset sold short. The counterparty to a short position or market factors, such as a sharp increase in prices, may prevent the Fund from closing out a short position at a desirable time or price and may reduce or eliminate any gain or result in a loss. In a rising market, the Fund’s short positions will cause the Fund to underperform the overall market and its peers that do not engage in shorting. If the Fund holds both long and short positions, both positions may decline simultaneously, in which case the short positions will not provide any buffer (hedge) from declines in value of the Fund’s long positions. Certain types of short positions involve leverage, which may exaggerate any losses, potentially more than the actual cost of the investment, and will increase the volatility of the Fund’s returns.
Exchange-Traded Funds Risk. In addition to the risks associated with the underlying assets held by the exchange-traded fund, investments in exchange-traded funds are subject to the following additional risks: (1) the market price of an exchange-traded fund’s shares may trade above or below its net asset value; (2) an active trading market for the exchange-traded fund’s shares may not develop or be maintained; (3) trading an exchange-traded fund’s shares may be halted if the listing exchange’s officials deem such action appropriate; (4) a passively managed exchange-traded fund may not accurately track the performance of the reference asset; and (5) a passively managed exchange-traded fund would not necessarily sell a security because the issuer of the security was in financial trouble unless the security is removed from the index that the exchange-traded fund seeks to track. Investment in exchange-traded funds may involve duplication of management fees and certain other expenses, as the Fund indirectly bears its proportionate share of any expenses paid by the exchange-traded funds in which it invests. Further, certain exchange-traded funds in which the Fund may invest are leveraged. Investing in leveraged exchange-traded funds may result in economic leverage, which does not result in the possibility of the Fund incurring obligations beyond its investments, but nonetheless permits the Fund to gain exposure that is greater than would be the case in an unlevered instrument, which can result in greater volatility.
Exchange-Traded Notes Risk. Exchange-traded notes are subject to the credit risk of the issuer, and the value of the exchange-traded note may drop due to a downgrade in the issuer's credit rating, despite the underlying market benchmark or assets remaining unchanged. The value of an exchange-traded note may also be influenced by time to maturity, level of supply and demand for the exchange-traded note, volatility and lack of liquidity in the underlying market, changes in the applicable interest rates, and economic, legal, political, or geographic events that affect the referenced underlying market or assets. Exchange-traded notes are also subject to the risk that the other party to the contract will not fulfill its contractual obligations, which may cause losses or additional costs to the Fund. When the Fund invests in exchange-traded notes it will bear its proportionate share of any fees and expenses borne by the exchange-traded note. For certain exchange-traded notes, there may be restrictions on the Fund’s right to redeem its investment in an exchange-traded note, which is meant to be held until maturity.
Factor-Based Strategy Risk. Although the Fund may have investments that track equity indices that emphasize exposure to companies associated with certain characteristics, known as style factors, there is no
12        Invesco Balanced-Risk Allocation Fund

guarantee that this strategy will be successful. In addition, there may be periods when a particular style of investing or factor is out of favor and therefore, during such periods, the investment performance of the Fund may suffer.
Quantitative Models Risk. Quantitative models are based upon many factors that measure individual securities relative to each other. Quantitative models may be highly reliant on the gathering, cleaning, culling and analysis of large amounts of data from third parties and other external sources. Any errors or imperfections in the factors, or the data on which measurements of those factors are based, could adversely affect the use of the quantitative models. The factors used in models may not identify securities that perform well in the future, and the securities selected may perform differently from the market as a whole or from their expected performance.
Volatility Risk. Certain of the Fund's investments may appreciate or decrease significantly in value over short periods of time. This may cause the Fund’s net asset value per share to experience significant increases or declines in value over short periods of time.
Subsidiary Risk. By investing in the Subsidiary, the Fund is indirectly exposed to risks associated with the Subsidiary’s investments. The derivatives and other investments held by the Subsidiary are generally similar to those that are permitted to be held by the Fund and are subject to the same risks that apply to similar investments if held directly by the Fund. There can be no assurance that the investment objective of the Subsidiary will be achieved. The Subsidiary is not registered under the 1940 Act and, except as otherwise noted in the Fund’s prospectus, is not subject to the investor protections of the 1940 Act. In addition, changes in the laws of the United States and/or the Cayman Islands could result in the inability of the Fund and/or the Subsidiary to operate as described in this prospectus and the SAI and could adversely affect the Fund. For example, the government of the Cayman Islands does not currently impose any income, corporate or capital gains tax, estate duty, inheritance tax, gift tax or withholding tax on the Subsidiary. If Cayman Islands law changes such that the Subsidiary must pay Cayman Islands taxes, Fund shareholders would likely suffer decreased investment returns.
Money Market Fund Risk. Although money market funds generally seek to preserve the value of an investment at $1.00 per share, the Fund may lose money by investing in money market funds. A money market fund's sponsor has no legal obligation to provide financial support to the money market fund. The credit quality of a money market fund's holdings can change rapidly in certain markets, and the default of a single holding could have an adverse impact on the money market fund's share price. A money market fund's share price can also be negatively affected during periods of high redemption pressures, illiquid markets and/or significant market volatility.
U.S. Government Obligations Risk. Obligations of U.S. Government agencies and authorities receive varying levels of support and may not be backed by the full faith and credit of the U.S. Government, which could affect the Fund’s ability to recover should they default. No assurance can be given that the U.S. Government will provide financial support to its agencies and authorities if it is not obligated by law to do so.
Financial Markets Regulatory Risk. Policy changes by the U.S. government or its regulatory agencies and political events within the U.S. and abroad, changes to the monetary policy by the Federal Reserve or other regulatory actions, the U.S. government’s inability at times to agree on a long-term budget and deficit reduction plan or other legislation aimed at addressing financial or economic conditions, the threat of a federal government shutdown, and threats not to increase or suspend the federal government’s debt limit, may affect investor and consumer confidence, increase volatility in the financial markets, perhaps suddenly and to a significant degree, result in higher interest rates, and even raise concerns about the U.S. government’s credit rating and ability to service its debt. Such changes and events may adversely impact the Fund’s operations, universe of potential investment options, and return potential.
Management Risk. The Fund is actively managed and depends heavily on the Adviser’s judgment about markets, interest rates or the attractiveness, relative values, liquidity, or potential appreciation of particular investments made for the Fund’s portfolio. The Fund could experience losses if these judgments prove to be incorrect. Because the Fund’s investment process relies heavily on its asset allocation process, market movements that are counter to the portfolio managers’ expectations may have a significant adverse effect on the Fund’s net asset value. There can be no guarantee that the Adviser’s investment techniques or investment decisions will produce the desired results. Additionally, legislative, regulatory, or tax developments may affect the investments or investment strategies available to the Adviser in connection with managing the Fund, which may also adversely affect the ability of the Fund to achieve its investment objective.
Portfolio Holdings
A description of Fund policies and procedures with respect to the disclosure of Fund portfolio holdings is available in the SAI, which is available at www.invesco.com/us.

Fund Management
The Adviser(s)
Invesco serves as the Fund’s investment adviser. The Adviser manages the investment operations of the Fund as well as other investment portfolios that encompass a broad range of investment objectives, and has agreed to perform or arrange for the performance of the Fund’s day-to-day management. The Adviser is located at 1555 Peachtree Street, N.E., Atlanta, Georgia 30309. The Adviser, as successor in interest to multiple investment advisers, has been an investment adviser since 1976.
Sub-Advisers. Invesco has entered into one or more Sub-Advisory Agreements with certain affiliates to serve as sub-advisers to the Fund (the Sub-Advisers). Invesco may appoint the Sub-Advisers from time to time to provide discretionary investment management services, investment advice, and/or order execution services to the Fund. The Sub-Advisers and the Sub-Advisory Agreements are described in the SAI.
Regulation under the Commodity Exchange Act
The Adviser is registered as a “commodity pool operator” (CPO) under the Commodity Exchange Act and the rules of the CFTC and is subject to CFTC regulation with respect to the Fund. The CFTC has adopted rules regarding the disclosure, reporting and recordkeeping requirements that apply with respect to the Fund as a result of the Adviser’s registration as a CPO. Generally, these rules allow for substituted compliance with CFTC disclosure and shareholder reporting requirements, based on the Adviser’s compliance with comparable SEC requirements. This means that for most of the CFTC’s disclosure and shareholder reporting requirements applicable to the Adviser as the Fund’s CPO, the Adviser’s compliance with SEC disclosure and shareholder reporting requirements will be deemed to fulfill the Adviser’s CFTC compliance obligations. However, as a result of CFTC regulation with respect to the Fund, the Fund may incur additional compliance and other expenses. The Adviser is also registered as a “commodity trading advisor” (CTA) but, with respect to the Fund, relies on an exemption from CTA regulation available for a CTA that also serves as the Fund’s CPO.
Adviser Compensation
During the fiscal year ended October 31, 2022, the Adviser received compensation of 0.86% of the Fund's average daily net assets, after fee waiver and/or expense reimbursement, if any.
A discussion regarding the basis for the Board’s approval of the investment advisory agreement and investment sub-advisory agreements of the Fund is available in the Fund’s most recent annual or semi-annual report to shareholders.
13        Invesco Balanced-Risk Allocation Fund

Portfolio Managers
The following individuals are jointly and primarily responsible for the day-to-day management of the Fund’s portfolio:
◾ 
Mark Ahnrud, CFA, Portfolio Manager, who has been responsible for the Fund since 2009 and has been associated with Invesco and/or its affiliates since 2000.
◾ 
John Burrello, CFA, Portfolio Manager, who has been responsible for the Fund since 2022 and has been associated with Invesco and/or its affiliates since 2012.
◾ 
Chris Devine, CFA, Portfolio Manager, who has been responsible for the Fund since 2009 and has been associated with Invesco and/or its affiliates since 1998.
◾ 
Scott Hixon, CFA, Portfolio Manager, who has been responsible for the Fund since 2009 and has been associated with Invesco and/or its affiliates since 1994.
◾ 
Christian Ulrich, CFA, Portfolio Manager, who has been responsible for the Fund since 2009 and has been associated with Invesco and/or its affiliates since 2000.
◾ 
Scott Wolle, CFA, Portfolio Manager, who has been responsible for the Fund since 2009 and has been associated with Invesco and/or its affiliates since 1999.
The portfolio managers are assisted by investment professionals from Invesco's Global Asset Allocation Team. Members of the team may change from time to time.
More information on the portfolio managers may be found at www.invesco.com/us. The website is not part of this prospectus.
The Fund's SAI provides additional information about the portfolio managers’ investments in the Fund, a description of the compensation structure and information regarding other accounts managed.

Other Information
Sales Charges
Purchases of Class A shares of the Fund are subject to the maximum 5.50% initial sales charge as listed under the heading “Category I Initial Sales Charges” in the “Shareholder Account Information—Initial Sales Charges (Class A Shares Only)” section of the prospectus. Purchases of Class C shares are subject to a contingent deferred sales charge (CDSC) if you sell Class C shares within one year of purchase; however, the CDSC shall not apply to the purchases of Class C shares where the selling broker-dealer was not paid a commission at the time of purchase. For more information on CDSCs, see the “Shareholder Account Information—Contingent Deferred Sales Charges (CDSCs)” section of this prospectus.
Dividends and Distributions
The Fund expects, based on its investment objective and strategies, that its distributions, if any, will consist of ordinary income, capital gains, or some combination of both.
Dividends
The Fund generally declares and pays dividends from net investment income, if any, annually.
Capital Gains Distributions
The Fund generally distributes long-term and short-term capital gains (net of any available capital loss carryovers), if any, at least annually. Capital gains distributions may vary considerably from year to year as a result of the Fund's normal investment activities and cash flows. During a time of economic volatility, the Fund may experience capital losses and unrealized depreciation in value of investments, the effect of which may be to reduce or eliminate capital gains distributions for a period of time. Even though the
Fund may experience a current year loss, it may nonetheless distribute prior year capital gains.
14        Invesco Balanced-Risk Allocation Fund


Consolidated Financial Highlights
The consolidated financial highlights show the Fund’s financial history for the past five fiscal years or, if shorter, the period of operations of the Fund or any of its share classes. The consolidated financial highlights table is intended to help you understand the Fund’s financial performance. Certain information reflects financial results for a single Fund share.
The total returns in the table represent the rate that an investor would have earned (or lost) on an investment in the Fund (assuming reinvestment of all dividends and distributions).
This information has been audited by PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP, an independent registered public accounting firm, whose report, along with the Fund’s consolidated financial statements, is included in the Fund’s annual report, which is available upon request.
 
Net asset
value,
beginning
of period
Net
investment
income
(loss)(a)
Net gains
(losses)
on securities
(both
realized and
unrealized)
Total from
investment
operations
Dividends
from net
investment
income
Distributions
from net
realized
gains
Total
distributions
Net asset
value, end
of period
Total
return (b)
Net assets,
end of period
(000's omitted)
Ratio of
expenses
to average
net assets
with fee waivers
and/or
expenses
absorbed
Ratio of
expenses
to average net
assets without
fee waivers
and/or
expenses
absorbed
Ratio of net
investment
income
(loss)
to average
net assets
Portfolio
turnover (c)
Class A
Year ended 10/31/22
$12.09
$(0.04)
$(1.29)
$(1.33)
$(1.43)
$(1.09)
$(2.52)
$8.24
(13.99)%
$852,412
1.31%
1.35%
(0.47)%
92%
Year ended 10/31/21
10.12
(0.15)
2.25
2.10
(0.13)
(0.13)
12.09
20.91
1,093,094
1.31
1.33
(1.26)
16
Year ended 10/31/20
11.33
(0.05)
0.01
(0.04)
(0.67)
(0.50)
(1.17)
10.12
(0.55)
831,513
1.24
1.30
(0.53)
81
Year ended 10/31/19
10.21
0.10
1.02
1.12
11.33
10.97
968,345
1.24
1.29
0.95
11
Year ended 10/31/18
11.28
0.03
(0.40)
(0.37)
(0.70)
(0.70)
10.21
(3.57)
1,016,131
1.21
1.27
0.32
116
Class C
Year ended 10/31/22
11.36
(0.11)
(1.19)
(1.30)
(1.31)
(1.09)
(2.40)
7.66
(14.57)
100,109
2.06
2.10
(1.22)
92
Year ended 10/31/21
9.50
(0.22)
2.12
1.90
(0.04)
(0.04)
11.36
20.04
167,794
2.06
2.08
(2.01)
16
Year ended 10/31/20
10.69
(0.12)
0.00
(0.12)
(0.57)
(0.50)
(1.07)
9.50
(1.36)
349,294
1.99
2.05
(1.28)
81
Year ended 10/31/19
9.70
0.02
0.97
0.99
10.69
10.21
527,251
1.99
2.04
0.20
11
Year ended 10/31/18
10.83
(0.04)
(0.39)
(0.43)
(0.70)
(0.70)
9.70
(4.31)
735,308
1.96
2.02
(0.43)
116
Class R
Year ended 10/31/22
11.82
(0.07)
(1.25)
(1.32)
(1.39)
(1.09)
(2.48)
8.02
(14.21)
16,270
1.56
1.60
(0.72)
92
Year ended 10/31/21
9.90
(0.17)
2.19
2.02
(0.10)
(0.10)
11.82
20.52
17,666
1.56
1.58
(1.51)
16
Year ended 10/31/20
11.10
(0.08)
0.02
(0.06)
(0.64)
(0.50)
(1.14)
9.90
(0.77)
15,202
1.49
1.55
(0.78)
81
Year ended 10/31/19
10.02
0.07
1.01
1.08
11.10
10.78
18,343
1.49
1.54
0.70
11
Year ended 10/31/18
11.11
0.01
(0.40)
(0.39)
(0.70)
(0.70)
10.02
(3.82)
19,989
1.46
1.52
0.07
116
Class Y
Year ended 10/31/22
12.34
(0.02)
(1.31)
(1.33)
(1.46)
(1.09)
(2.55)
8.46
(13.66)
792,547
1.06
1.10
(0.22)
92
Year ended 10/31/21
10.33
(0.12)
2.29
2.17
(0.16)
(0.16)
12.34
21.18
1,062,698
1.06
1.08
(1.01)
16
Year ended 10/31/20
11.55
(0.03)
0.01
(0.02)
(0.70)
(0.50)
(1.20)
10.33
(0.34)
1,000,148
0.99
1.05
(0.28)
81
Year ended 10/31/19
10.37
0.13
1.05
1.18
11.55
11.38
1,431,442
0.99
1.04
1.20
11
Year ended 10/31/18
11.43
0.06
(0.42)
(0.36)
(0.70)
(0.70)
10.37
(3.42)
1,718,473
0.96
1.02
0.57
116
Class R5
Year ended 10/31/22
12.35
(0.02)
(1.31)
(1.33)
(1.47)
(1.09)
(2.56)
8.46
(13.72)
12,874
1.04
1.08
(0.20)
92
Year ended 10/31/21
10.34
(0.12)
2.30
2.18
(0.17)
(0.17)
12.35
21.22
16,750
1.02
1.04
(0.97)
16
Year ended 10/31/20
11.56
(0.03)
0.02
(0.01)
(0.71)
(0.50)
(1.21)
10.34
(0.26)
15,707
0.94
1.00
(0.23)
81
Year ended 10/31/19
10.38
0.14
1.04
1.18
11.56
11.37
45,497
0.92
0.97
1.27
11
Year ended 10/31/18
11.43
0.07
(0.42)
(0.35)
(0.70)
(0.70)
10.38
(3.34)
50,691
0.92
0.98
0.61
116
Class R6
Year ended 10/31/22
12.38
(0.01)
(1.32)
(1.33)
(1.47)
(1.09)
(2.56)
8.49
(13.62)
38,385
0.97
1.01
(0.13)
92
Year ended 10/31/21
10.37
(0.11)
2.30
2.19
(0.18)
(0.18)
12.38
21.26
49,008
0.95
0.97
(0.90)
16
Year ended 10/31/20
11.59
(0.02)
0.02
0.00
(0.72)
(0.50)
(1.22)
10.37
(0.21)
159,353
0.86
0.92
(0.15)
81
Year ended 10/31/19
10.40
0.15
1.04
1.19
11.59
11.44
255,753
0.87
0.92
1.32
11
Year ended 10/31/18
11.44
0.07
(0.41)
(0.34)
(0.70)
(0.70)
10.40
(3.24)
398,406
0.86
0.92
0.67
116
(a)
Calculated using average shares outstanding.
(b)
Includes adjustments in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America and as such, the net asset value for financial reporting purposes and the returns
based upon those net asset values may differ from the net asset value and returns for shareholder transactions. Does not include sales charges and is not annualized for periods less than one
year, if applicable.
(c)
Portfolio turnover is calculated at the fund level and is not annualized for periods less than one year, if applicable.
15        Invesco Balanced-Risk Allocation Fund


Hypothetical Investment and Expense Information
In connection with the final settlement reached between Invesco and certain of its affiliates with certain regulators, including the New York Attorney General’s Office, the SEC and the Colorado Attorney General’s Office (the settlement) arising out of certain market timing and unfair pricing allegations made against Invesco and certain of its affiliates, Invesco and certain of its affiliates agreed, among other things, to disclose certain hypothetical information regarding investment and expense information to Fund shareholders. The chart below is intended to reflect the annual and cumulative impact of the Fund’s expenses, including investment advisory fees and other Fund costs, on the Fund’s returns over a 10-year period. The example reflects the following:
◾ 
You invest $10,000 in the Fund and hold it for the entire 10-year period;
◾ 
Your investment has a 5% return before expenses each year;
◾ 
The Fund’s current annual expense ratio includes, if applicable, any contractual fee waiver or expense reimbursement that would apply for the period for which it was committed;
◾ 
Hypotheticals both with and without any applicable initial sales charge applied; and
◾ 
There is no sales charge on reinvested dividends.
There is no assurance that the annual expense ratio will be the expense ratio for the Fund’s classes for any of the years shown. This is only a hypothetical presentation made to illustrate what expenses and returns would be under the above scenarios; your actual returns and expenses are likely to differ (higher or lower) from those shown below.
Class A (Includes Maximum Sales
Charge)
Year 1
Year 2
Year 3
Year 4
Year 5
Year 6
Year 7
Year 8
Year 9
Year 10
Annual Expense Ratio1
1.38%
1.42%
1.42%
1.42%
1.42%
1.42%
1.42%
1.42%
1.42%
1.42%
Cumulative Return Before Expenses
5.00%
10.25%
15.76%
21.55%
27.63%
34.01%
40.71%
47.75%
55.13%
62.89%
Cumulative Return After Expenses
(2.08%)
1.43%
5.06%
8.82%
12.71%
16.75%
20.93%
25.26%
29.74%
34.39%
End of Year Balance
$9,792.09
$10,142.65
$10,505.75
$10,881.86
$11,271.43
$11,674.95
$12,092.91
$12,525.84
$12,974.26
$13,438.74
Estimated Annual Expenses
$682.77
$141.54
$146.60
$151.85
$157.29
$162.92
$168.75
$174.79
$181.05
$187.53
Class A (Without Maximum Sales
Charge)
Year 1
Year 2
Year 3
Year 4
Year 5
Year 6
Year 7
Year 8
Year 9
Year 10
Annual Expense Ratio1
1.38%
1.42%
1.42%
1.42%
1.42%
1.42%
1.42%
1.42%
1.42%
1.42%
Cumulative Return Before Expenses
5.00%
10.25%
15.76%
21.55%
27.63%
34.01%
40.71%
47.75%
55.13%
62.89%
Cumulative Return After Expenses
3.62%
7.33%
11.17%
15.15%
19.27%
23.54%
27.97%
32.55%
37.29%
42.21%
End of Year Balance
$10,362.00
$10,732.96
$11,117.20
$11,515.20
$11,927.44
$12,354.44
$12,796.73
$13,254.85
$13,729.38
$14,220.89
Estimated Annual Expenses
$140.50
$149.77
$155.14
$160.69
$166.44
$172.40
$178.57
$184.97
$191.59
$198.45
Class C2
Year 1
Year 2
Year 3
Year 4
Year 5
Year 6
Year 7
Year 8
Year 9
Year 10
Annual Expense Ratio1
2.13%
2.17%
2.17%
2.17%
2.17%
2.17%
2.17%
2.17%
1.42%
1.42%
Cumulative Return Before Expenses
5.00%
10.25%
15.76%
21.55%
27.63%
34.01%
40.71%
47.75%
55.13%
62.89%
Cumulative Return After Expenses
2.87%
5.78%
8.77%
11.85%
15.02%
18.27%
21.62%
25.06%
29.54%
34.18%
End of Year Balance
$10,287.00
$10,578.12
$10,877.48
$11,185.32
$11,501.86
$11,827.36
$12,162.08
$12,506.26
$12,953.99
$13,417.74
Estimated Annual Expenses
$216.06
$226.39
$232.79
$239.38
$246.16
$253.12
$260.29
$267.65
$180.77
$187.24
Class R
Year 1
Year 2
Year 3
Year 4
Year 5
Year 6
Year 7
Year 8
Year 9
Year 10
Annual Expense Ratio1
1.63%
1.67%
1.67%
1.67%
1.67%
1.67%
1.67%
1.67%
1.67%
1.67%
Cumulative Return Before Expenses
5.00%
10.25%
15.76%
21.55%
27.63%
34.01%
40.71%
47.75%
55.13%
62.89%
Cumulative Return After Expenses
3.37%
6.81%
10.37%
14.04%
17.84%
21.77%
25.82%
30.01%
34.34%
38.81%
End of Year Balance
$10,337.00
$10,681.22
$11,036.91
$11,404.44
$11,784.20
$12,176.62
$12,582.10
$13,001.08
$13,434.02
$13,881.37
Estimated Annual Expenses
$165.75
$175.50
$181.35
$187.39
$193.63
$200.07
$206.74
$213.62
$220.73
$228.08
Class Y
Year 1
Year 2
Year 3
Year 4
Year 5
Year 6
Year 7
Year 8
Year 9
Year 10
Annual Expense Ratio1
1.13%
1.17%
1.17%
1.17%
1.17%
1.17%
1.17%
1.17%
1.17%
1.17%
Cumulative Return Before Expenses
5.00%
10.25%
15.76%
21.55%
27.63%
34.01%
40.71%
47.75%
55.13%
62.89%
Cumulative Return After Expenses
3.87%
7.85%
11.98%
16.27%
20.72%
25.34%
30.14%
35.13%
40.30%
45.68%
End of Year Balance
$10,387.00
$10,784.82
$11,197.88
$11,626.76
$12,072.06
$12,534.42
$13,014.49
$13,512.95
$14,030.49
$14,567.86
Estimated Annual Expenses
$115.19
$123.86
$128.60
$133.52
$138.64
$143.95
$149.46
$155.19
$161.13
$167.30
Class R5
Year 1
Year 2
Year 3
Year 4
Year 5
Year 6
Year 7
Year 8
Year 9
Year 10
Annual Expense Ratio1
1.11%
1.15%
1.15%
1.15%
1.15%
1.15%
1.15%
1.15%
1.15%
1.15%
Cumulative Return Before Expenses
5.00%
10.25%
15.76%
21.55%
27.63%
34.01%
40.71%
47.75%
55.13%
62.89%
Cumulative Return After Expenses
3.89%
7.89%
12.04%
16.36%
20.84%
25.49%
30.32%
35.34%
40.55%
45.96%
End of Year Balance
$10,389.00
$10,788.98
$11,204.35
$11,635.72
$12,083.69
$12,548.92
$13,032.05
$13,533.78
$14,054.84
$14,595.95
Estimated Annual Expenses
$113.16
$121.77
$126.46
$131.33
$136.39
$141.64
$147.09
$152.75
$158.63
$164.74
Class R6
Year 1
Year 2
Year 3
Year 4
Year 5
Year 6
Year 7
Year 8
Year 9
Year 10
Annual Expense Ratio1
1.04%
1.08%
1.08%
1.08%
1.08%
1.08%
1.08%
1.08%
1.08%
1.08%
Cumulative Return Before Expenses
5.00%
10.25%
15.76%
21.55%
27.63%
34.01%
40.71%
47.75%
55.13%
62.89%
Cumulative Return After Expenses
3.96%
8.04%
12.27%
16.67%
21.24%
26.00%
30.94%
36.07%
41.40%
46.95%
End of Year Balance
$10,396.00
$10,803.52
$11,227.02
$11,667.12
$12,124.47
$12,599.75
$13,093.66
$13,606.93
$14,140.32
$14,694.63
Estimated Annual Expenses
$106.06
$114.48
$118.96
$123.63
$128.47
$133.51
$138.74
$144.18
$149.84
$155.71
1
Your actual expenses may be higher or lower than those shown.
2
The hypothetical assumes you hold your investment for a full 10 years. Therefore, any applicable deferred sales charge that might apply in year one for Class C has not been deducted.
16        Invesco Balanced-Risk Allocation Fund


Shareholder Account Information
In addition to the Fund(s), the Adviser serves as investment adviser to many other Invesco mutual funds that are offered to investors (Invesco Funds or Funds). The following information is about all of the Invesco Funds (except Invesco SMA High Yield Bond Fund and Invesco SMA Municipal Bond Fund) and their share classes that have different fees and expenses. The prospectuses for Invesco SMA High Yield Bond Fund and Invesco SMA Municipal Bond Fund contain information relevant to those funds.
Some investments in the Funds are made through accounts that are maintained by intermediaries (and not in the name of an individual investor) and some investments are made indirectly through products that use the Funds as underlying investments, such as Retirement and Benefit Plans, funds of funds, qualified tuition plans, and variable insurance contracts (these products are generally referred to as conduit investment vehicles). If shares of the Funds are held in an account maintained by an intermediary or in the name of a conduit investment vehicle (and not in the name of an individual investor), the intermediary or conduit investment vehicle may impose rules that differ from, and/or charge a transaction or other fee in addition to, those described in this prospectus. As a result, the availability of certain share classes and/or shareholder privileges or services described in this prospectus will depend on the policies, procedures and trading platforms of the financial intermediary or conduit investment vehicle. Accordingly, through your financial intermediary you may be invested in a share class that is subject to higher annual fees and expenses than other share classes that are offered in this prospectus. Investing in a share class subject to higher annual fees and expenses may have an adverse impact on your investment return. Please consult your financial adviser to consider your options, including your eligibility to qualify for the share classes and/or shareholder privileges or services described in this prospectus.
The Fund is not responsible for any additional share class eligibility requirements, investment minimums, exchange privileges, or other policies imposed by financial intermediaries or for notifying shareholders of any changes to them. Please consult your financial adviser or other financial intermediary for details.
Unless otherwise provided, the following are certain defined terms used throughout this prospectus:
◾ 
Employer Sponsored Retirement and Benefit Plans include (i) employer sponsored pension or profit sharing plans that qualify under section
401(a) of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended (the Code), including 401(k), money purchase pension, profit sharing and defined benefit plans; (ii) 403(b) and non-qualified deferred compensation arrangements that operate similar to plans described under (i) above, such as 457 plans and executive deferred compensation arrangements; (iii) health savings accounts maintained pursuant to Section 223 of the Code; and (iv) voluntary employees’ beneficiary arrangements maintained pursuant to Section 501(c)(9) of the Code.
◾ 
Individual Retirement Accounts (IRAs) include Traditional and Roth IRAs.
◾ 
Employer Sponsored IRAs include Simplified Employee Pension (SEP), Salary Reduction Simplified Employee Pension (SAR-SEP), and Savings Incentive Match Plan for Employees of Small Employers (SIMPLE) IRAs.
◾ 
Retirement and Benefit Plans include Employer Sponsored Retirement and Benefit Plans, IRAs and Employer Sponsored IRAs.
Shareholder Account Information and additional information is available on the Internet at www.invesco.com/us. To access your account, go to the tab for “Account & Services,” then click on “Accounts Overview.” For additional information about Invesco Funds, consult the Fund’s prospectus and SAI, which are available on that same website or upon request free of charge. The website is not part of this prospectus.
Choosing a Share Class
Each Fund may offer multiple classes of shares and not all Funds offer all share classes discussed herein. Each class represents an interest in the same portfolio of investments. Certain classes have higher expenses than other classes which may lower the return on your investment when compared to a less expensive class. In deciding which class of shares to purchase, you should consider the following attributes of the various share classes, among other things: (i) the eligibility requirements that apply to purchases of a particular class and any eligibility requirements of your financial intermediary, (ii) the initial sales charges and contingent deferred sales charges (CDSCs), if any, applicable to the class, (iii) the 12b-1 fee, if any, paid by the class, and (iv) any services you may receive from a financial intermediary. Please contact your financial adviser to assist you in making your decision. Please refer to the prospectus fee table for more information on the fees and expenses of a particular Fund’s share classes.
Share Classes
 
 
 
 
Class A
Class C
Class R
Class Y
Class R5 and R6
▪ Initial sales charge which may be
waived or reduced1
▪ No initial sales charge
▪ No initial sales charge
▪ No initial sales charge
▪ No initial sales charge
▪ CDSC on certain redemptions1
▪ CDSC on redemptions within one
year if a commission has been paid
▪ No CDSC
▪ No CDSC
▪ No CDSC
▪ 12b-1 fee of up to 0.25%2
▪ 12b-1 fee of up to 1.00%3
▪ 12b-1 fee of up to 0.50%
▪ No 12b-1 fee
▪ No 12b-1 fee
 
▪ Investors may only open an
account to purchase Class C
shares if they have appointed a
financial intermediary that allows
for new accounts in Class C shares
to be opened. This restriction does
not apply to Employer Sponsored
Retirement and Benefit Plans.
▪ Does not convert to Class A shares
▪ Does not convert to Class A shares
▪ Does not convert to Class A shares
A-1        The Invesco Funds
MCF—02/23

Share Classes
 
 
 
 
Class A
Class C
Class R
Class Y
Class R5 and R6
 
▪ Eligible for automatic conversion to
Class A shares. See “Automatic
Conversion of Class C and Class
CX Shares” herein.
▪ Intended for Retirement and
Benefit Plans4
 
▪ Special eligibility requirements and
investment minimums apply (see
“Share Class Eligibility – Class R5
and R6 shares” below)
 
▪ Purchase maximums apply
 
 
 
1
Invesco Conservative Income Fund, Invesco Government Money Market Fund and Invesco Short Term Municipal Fund do not have initial sales charges or CDSCs on redemptions in most cases.
2
Class A2 shares of Invesco Limited Term Municipal Income Fund and Investor Class shares of Invesco Government Money Market Fund, Invesco Premier Portfolio and Invesco Premier U.S. Government Money Portfolio do not have a 12b-1 fee; Invesco Short Term Bond Fund Class A shares and Invesco Short Duration Inflation Protected Fund Class A2 shares have a 12b-1 fee of 0.15%; and Invesco Conservative Income Fund Class A shares have a 12b-1 fee of 0.10%.
3
The 12b-1 fee for Class C shares of certain Funds is less than 1.00%. The “Fees and Expenses of the Fund—Annual Fund Operating Expenses” section of this prospectus reflects the actual 12b-1 fees paid by a Fund.
4
Your financial intermediary may have additional eligibility criteria for Class R shares. Please see the “Financial Intermediary- Specific Arrangements” section of this prospectus for further information.
In addition to the share classes shown in the chart above, the following Funds offer the following additional share classes further described in this prospectus:
◾ 
Investor Class shares: Invesco Diversified Dividend Fund, Invesco Dividend Income Fund, Invesco Energy Fund, Invesco EQV European Equity Fund, Invesco Health Care Fund, Invesco High Yield Fund, Invesco Income Fund, Invesco International Core Equity Fund, Invesco Income Advantage U.S. Fund, Invesco Government Money Market Fund, Invesco Municipal Income Fund, Invesco Real Estate Fund, Invesco Small Cap Growth Fund, Invesco Technology Fund, Invesco Premier Portfolio and Invesco Premier U.S. Government Money Portfolio.
◾ 
Class A2 shares: Invesco Short Duration Inflation Protected Fund and Invesco Limited Term Municipal Income Fund;
◾ 
Class AX shares: Invesco Government Money Market Fund;
◾ 
Class CX shares: Invesco Government Money Market Fund;
◾ 
Class P shares: Invesco Summit Fund;
◾ 
Class S shares: Invesco Charter Fund, Invesco Select Risk: Moderately Conservative Investor Fund, Invesco Select Risk: Growth Investor Fund, Invesco Select Risk: Moderate Investor Fund and Invesco Summit Fund; and
◾ 
Invesco Cash Reserve Shares: Invesco Government Money Market Fund and Invesco U.S. Government Money Portfolio.
Share Class Eligibility
The availability of certain share classes will depend on how you purchased your shares. Intermediaries may have different policies regarding the availability of certain share classes than those described below. You should consult your financial adviser to consider your options, including your eligibility to qualify for the share classes described below. The Fund is not responsible for eligibility requirements imposed by financial intermediaries or for notifying shareholders of any changes to them. See “Financial Intermediary-Specific Arrangements” for more information on certain intermediary-specific eligibility requirements. Please consult with your financial intermediary if you have any questions regarding their policies.
Class A, C and Invesco Cash Reserve Shares
Class A, C and Invesco Cash Reserve Shares are generally available to all retail investors, including individuals, trusts, corporations, business and charitable organizations and Retirement and Benefit Plans. Investors may only open an account to purchase Class C shares if they have appointed a financial intermediary that allows for new accounts in Class C shares to be opened. This restriction does not apply to Employer Sponsored Retirement and Benefit Plans. The share classes offer different fee structures that are intended to compensate financial intermediaries for services provided in connection with the sale of shares and continued maintenance of the customer relationship. You should consider the services provided by your financial adviser and any other financial intermediaries who will be involved in the servicing of your account when choosing a share class.
Class A2 Shares
Class A2 shares, which are offered only on Invesco Short Duration Inflation Protected Fund and Invesco Limited Term Municipal Income Fund, are closed to new investors. All references in this “Shareholder Account Information” section of this prospectus to Class A shares shall include Class A2 shares, unless otherwise noted.
Class AX and CX Shares
Class AX and CX shares are closed to new investors. Only investors who have continuously maintained an account in Class AX or CX of a specific Fund may make additional purchases into Class AX and CX, respectively, of such specific Fund. All references in this “Shareholder Account Information” section of this prospectus to Class A, C or R shares of the Invesco Funds shall include Class AX (excluding Invesco Government Money Market Fund), or CX shares, respectively, of the Invesco Funds, unless otherwise noted. All references in this “Shareholder Account Information” section of this prospectus to Invesco Cash Reserve Shares of Invesco Government Money Market Fund shall include Class AX shares of Invesco Government Money Market Fund, unless otherwise noted.
Class P Shares
In addition to the other share classes discussed herein, the Invesco Summit Fund offers Class P shares, which were historically sold only through the AIM Summit Investors Plans I and II (each a Plan and, collectively, the Summit Plans). Class P shares are sold with no initial sales charge and have a 12b-1 fee of 0.10%. However, Class P shares are not sold to members of the general public. Only shareholders who had accounts in the Summit Plans at the close of business on December 8, 2006 may purchase Class P shares and only until the total of their combined investments in the Summit Plans and in Class P shares directly equals the face amount of their former Plan under the 30 year extended investment option. The face amount of a Plan is the combined total of all scheduled monthly investments under the Plan. For a Plan with a scheduled monthly investment of $100.00, the face amount would have been $36,000.00 under the 30 year extended investment option.
Class R Shares
Class R shares are intended for Retirement and Benefit Plans. Certain financial intermediaries have additional eligibility criteria regarding Class R shares. If you received Class R shares as a result of a merger or reorganization of a predecessor fund into any of the Funds, you will be permitted to make additional Class R shares purchases.
Class R5 and R6 Shares
Class R5 and R6 shares of the Funds (except for the Invesco Master Loan Fund) are available for use by Employer Sponsored Retirement and Benefit Plans, held either at the plan level or through omnibus accounts, that generally process no more than one net redemption and one net purchase transaction each day.
Class R5 and R6 shares of the Funds are also available to institutional investors. Institutional investors are: banks, trust companies, collective trust funds, entities acting for the account of a public entity (e.g., Taft-Hartley
A-2        The Invesco Funds

funds, states, cities or government agencies), funds of funds or other pooled investment vehicles, 529 college savings plans, financial intermediaries and corporations investing for their own accounts, endowments and foundations. For information regarding investment minimums for Class R5 and R6 shares, please see “Minimum Investments” below.
Class R6 shares of the Funds are also available through an intermediary that has agreed with Invesco Distributors, Inc. to make such shares available for use in retail omnibus accounts that generally process no more than one net redemption and one net purchase transaction each day.
The Invesco Master Loan Fund is only available for purchase by other Funds in the Invesco fund family and other Invesco pooled investment vehicles.
Shareholders eligible to purchase Class R6 Shares must meet the requirements specified by their intermediary. Not all intermediaries offer Class R6 Shares to their customers.
Class S Shares
Class S shares are limited to investors who purchase shares with the proceeds received from a systematic contractual investment plan redemption within the 12 months prior to purchasing Class S shares, and who purchase through an approved financial intermediary that has an agreement with the distributor to sell Class S shares. Class S shares are not otherwise sold to members of the general public. An investor purchasing Class S shares will not pay an initial sales charge. The investor will no longer be eligible to purchase additional Class S shares at that point where the value of the contributions to the prior systematic contractual investment plan combined with the subsequent Class S share contributions equals the face amount of what would have been the investor’s systematic contractual investment plan under the 30-year investment option. The face amount of a systematic contractual investment plan is the combined total of all scheduled monthly investments under that plan. For a plan with a scheduled monthly investment of $100.00, the face amount would have been $36,000.00 under the 30-year extended investment option.
Class Y Shares
Class Y shares are available to (i) investors who purchase through an account that is charged an asset-based fee or commission by a financial intermediary, including through brokerage platforms, where a broker is acting as the investor’s agent, that may require the payment by the investor of a commission and/or other form of compensation to that broker, (ii) endowments, foundations, or Employer Sponsored Retirement and Benefit Plans (with the exception of “Solo 401(k)” Plans and 403(b) custodial accounts held directly at Invesco), (iii) banks or bank trust departments acting on their own behalf or as trustee or manager for trust accounts, or (iv) any current, former or retired trustee, director, officer or employee (or immediate family members of a current, former or retired trustee, director, officer or employee) of any Invesco Fund or of Invesco Ltd. or any of its subsidiaries.
Subject to any conditions or limitations imposed on the servicing of Class Y shares by your financial adviser, if you received Class Y shares as a result of a merger or reorganization of a predecessor fund into any of the Funds, you will be permitted to make additional Class Y share purchases. In addition, you will be permitted to make additional Class Y shares purchases if you owned Class Y shares in a “Solo 401(k)” Plan or 403(b) custodial account held directly at Invesco if you held such shares in your account on or prior to May 24, 2019.
Investor Class Shares
Investor Class shares are sold with no initial sales charge and have a maximum 12b-1 fee of 0.25%. Only the following persons may purchase Investor Class shares:
◾ 
Investors who established accounts prior to April 1, 2002, in Investor Class shares with Invesco Distributors, Inc. (Invesco Distributors) who have continuously maintained an account in Investor Class shares (this includes anyone listed in the registration of an account, such as a joint owner, trustee or custodian, and immediate family members of such persons) without a designated intermediary. These investors are referred to as “Investor Class grandfathered investors.”
◾ 
Customers of a financial intermediary that has had an agreement with the Funds’ distributor or any Funds that offered Investor Class shares prior to April 1, 2002, that has continuously maintained such agreement. These intermediaries are referred to as “Investor Class grandfathered intermediaries.”
◾ 
Any current, former or retired trustee, director, officer or employee (or immediate family member of a current, former or retired trustee, director, officer or employee) of any Invesco Fund or of Invesco Ltd. or any of its subsidiaries.
For additional shareholder eligibility requirements with respect to Invesco Premier Portfolio, please see “Shareholder Account Information – Purchasing Shares and Shareholder Eligibility – Invesco Premier Portfolio.”
Distribution and Service (12b-1) Fees
Except as noted below, each Fund has adopted a service and/or distribution plan pursuant to SEC Rule 12b-1. A 12b-1 plan allows a Fund to pay distribution and service fees to Invesco Distributors to compensate or reimburse, as applicable, Invesco Distributors for its efforts in connection with the sale and distribution of the Fund’s shares, all or a substantial portion of which are paid to the dealer of record. Because the Funds pay these fees out of their assets on an ongoing basis, over time these fees will increase the cost of your investment and may cause you to pay more than the maximum permitted initial sales charges described in this prospectus.
The following Funds and share classes do not have 12b-1 plans:
◾ 
Invesco Limited Term Municipal Income Fund, Class A2 shares.
◾ 
Invesco Government Money Market Fund, Investor Class shares.
◾ 
Invesco Premier Portfolio, Investor Class shares.
◾ 
Invesco Premier U.S. Government Money Portfolio, Investor Class shares.
◾ 
All Funds, Class Y, Class R5 and Class R6 shares
Under the applicable service and/or distribution plan, the Funds may pay distribution and/or service fees up to the following annual rates with respect to each Fund’s average daily net assets with respect to such class (subject to the exceptions noted on page A-1):
◾ 
Class A shares: 0.25%
◾ 
Class C shares: 1.00%
◾ 
Class P shares: 0.10%
◾ 
Class R shares: 0.50%
◾ 
Class S shares: 0.15%
◾ 
Invesco Cash Reserve Shares: 0.15%
◾ 
Investor Class shares: 0.25%
Please refer to the prospectus fee table for more information on a particular Fund’s 12b-1 fees.
Initial Sales Charges (Class A Shares Only)
The Funds are grouped into six categories for determining initial sales charges. The “Other Information” section of each Fund’s prospectus will tell you the sales charge category in which the Fund is classified. Additionally, Class A shares of Invesco Conservative Income Fund and Invesco Short Term Municipal Fund do not have initial sales charges. As used below, the term “offering price” with respect to all categories of Class A shares includes the initial sales charge.
If you purchase $1,000,000 or more of Class A shares of Category I, II or V Funds or $250,000 or more of Class A shares of Category IV or VI Funds (a Large Purchase) the initial sales charge set forth below will be waived; though your shares will be subject to a 1% CDSC if you don’t hold such shares for at least 18 months.
Category I Initial Sales Charges
 
Investor’s Sales Charge
Amount invested
As a % of
Offering Price
As a % of
Investment
Less than
$50,000
5.50%
5.82%
$50,000 but less than
$100,000
4.50
4.71
$100,000 but less than
$250,000
3.50
3.63
$250,000 but less than
$500,000
2.75
2.83
$500,000 but less than
$1,000,000
2.00
2.04
A-3        The Invesco Funds

Category II Initial Sales Charges
 
Investor’s Sales Charge
Amount invested
As a % of
Offering Price
As a % of
Investment
Less than
$100,000
4.25%
4.44%
$100,000 but less than
$250,000
3.50
3.63
$250,000 but less than
$500,000
2.50
2.56
$500,000 but less than
$1,000,000
2.00
2.04
Category III Initial Sales Charges
 
Investor’s Sales Charge
Amount invested
As a % of
Offering Price
As a % of
Investment
Less than
$100,000
1.00%
1.01%
$100,000 but less than
$250,000
0.75
0.76
$250,000 but less than
$1,000,000
0.50
0.50
Category IV Initial Sales Charges
 
Investor’s Sales Charge
Amount invested
As a % of
Offering Price
As a % of
Investment
Less than
$100,000
2.50%
2.56%
$100,000 but less than
$250,000
1.75
1.78
Category V Initial Sales Charges
 
Investor’s Sales Charge
Amount invested
As a % of
Offering Price
As a % of
Investment
Less than
$100,000
3.25%
3.36%
$100,000 but less than
$250,000
2.75
2.83
$250,000 but less than
$500,000
1.75
1.78
$500,000 but less than
$1,000,000
1.50
1.52
Category VI Initial Sales Charges
 
Investor’s Sales Charge
Amount invested
As a % of
Offering Price
As a % of
Investment
Less than
$50,000
5.50%
5.82%
$50,000 but less than
$100,000
4.50
4.71
$100,000 but less than
$250,000
3.50
3.63
Class A Shares Sold Without an Initial Sales Charge
The availability of certain sales charge waivers and discounts will depend on how you purchase your shares. Intermediaries may have different policies and procedures regarding the availability of front-end sales load waivers or contingent deferred (back-end) sales load (“CDSC”) waivers, exchanges or conversions between classes or exchanges between Funds; account investment minimums; and minimum account balances, which are discussed below. In all instances, it is the purchaser’s responsibility to notify the Fund or the purchaser’s financial intermediary at the time of purchase of any relationship or other facts qualifying the purchaser for sales charge waivers, discounts or other special arrangements. For waivers and discounts not available through a particular intermediary, shareholders should consult their financial advisor to consider their options.
The following types of investors may purchase Class A shares without paying an initial sales charge:
Waivers Offered by the Fund
◾ 
Investors who purchase shares through a fee-based advisory account with an approved financial intermediary. In a fee based advisory program, a financial intermediary typically charges each investor a fee based on the value of the investor’s account in exchange for servicing that account.
◾ 
Employer Sponsored Retirement and Benefit Plans maintained on retirement platforms or by the Funds’ transfer agent or its affiliates (but not including plans utilizing the Invesco 403(b)(7) Custodial Account program, or the individual custodial accounts thereunder):
◾ 
with assets of at least $1 million; or
◾ 
with at least 100 employees eligible to participate in the plan; or
◾ 
that execute plan level or multiple-plan level transactions through a single omnibus account per Fund.
◾ 
Any investor who purchases his or her shares with the proceeds of an in kind rollover, transfer or distribution from a Retirement and Benefit Plan where the account being funded by such rollover is to be maintained by the same financial intermediary, trustee, custodian or administrator that maintained the plan from which the rollover distribution funding such rollover originated, or an affiliate thereof.
◾ 
Investors who own Investor Class shares of a Fund, who purchase Class A shares of a different Fund through the same account in which the Investor Class Shares were first purchased.
◾ 
Funds of funds or other pooled investment vehicles.
◾ 
Insurance company separate accounts.
◾ 
Any current or retired trustee, director, officer or employee of any Invesco Fund or of Invesco Ltd. or any of its subsidiaries.
◾ 
Any registered representative or employee of any financial intermediary who has an agreement with Invesco Distributors to sell shares of the Invesco Funds (this includes any members of his or her immediate family).
◾ 
Any investor purchasing shares through a financial intermediary that has a written arrangement with the Funds’ distributor in which the Funds’ distributor has agreed to participate in a no transaction fee program in which the financial intermediary will make Class A shares available without the imposition of a sales charge.
◾ 
Former shareholders of Atlas Strategic Income Fund who purchase shares of a Fund into which shareholders of Invesco Global Strategic Income Fund may exchange if permitted by the intermediary’s policies.
◾ 
Former shareholders of Oppenheimer Total Return Fund Periodic Investment Plan who purchase shares of a Fund into which shareholders of Invesco Main Street Fund may exchange if permitted by the intermediary’s policies.
In addition, investors may acquire Class A shares without paying an initial sales charge in connection with:
◾ 
reinvesting dividends and distributions;
◾ 
exchanging shares of one Fund that were previously assessed a sales charge for shares of another Fund;
◾ 
purchasing shares in connection with the repayment of an Employer Sponsored Retirement and Benefit Plan loan administered by the Funds’ transfer agent; and
◾ 
purchasing Class A shares with proceeds from the redemption of Class C, Class R, Class R5, Class R6 or Class Y shares where the redemption and purchase are effectuated on the same business day due to the distribution of a Retirement and Benefit Plan maintained by the Funds’ transfer agent or one of its affiliates.
Invesco Distributors also permits certain other investors to invest in Class A shares without paying an initial charge as a result of the investor’s current or former relationship with the Invesco Funds. For additional information about such eligibility, please reference the Funds’ SAI.
Financial Intermediary-Specific Arrangements
The financial intermediary-specific waivers, discounts, policies regarding exchanges and conversions, account investment minimums, minimum account balances, and share class eligibility requirements that follow are only available to clients of those financial intermediaries specifically named below and to Invesco funds that offer the share class(es) to which the arrangements relate. Please contact your financial intermediary for questions regarding your eligibility and for more information with respect to your financial intermediary’s sales charge waivers, discounts, investment minimums, minimum account balances, and share class eligibility requirements and other special arrangements. Financial intermediary-specific sales charge waivers, discounts, investment minimums, minimum account balances, and share class eligibility
A-4        The Invesco Funds

requirements and other special arrangements are implemented and administered by each financial intermediary. It is the responsibility of your financial intermediary (and not the Funds) to ensure that you obtain proper financial intermediary-specific waivers, discounts, investment minimums, minimum account balances and other special arrangements and that you are placed in the proper share class for which you are eligible through your financial intermediary. In all instances, it is the purchaser’s responsibility to notify the Fund or the purchaser’s financial intermediary at the time of purchase of any relationship or other facts qualifying the purchaser for sales charge waivers or discounts or other financial intermediary-specific arrangements as disclosed herein. Please contact your financial intermediary for more information regarding the sales charge waivers, discounts, investment minimums, minimum account balances, share class eligibility requirements and other special arrangements available to you and to ensure that you understand the steps you must take to qualify for such arrangements. The terms and availability of these waivers and special arrangements may be amended or terminated at any time.
Merrill Lynch
Shareholders purchasing Fund shares through a Merrill Lynch platform or account will be eligible only for the following load waivers (front-end sales charge waivers and contingent deferred, or back-end, sales charge waivers) and discounts, which may differ from those disclosed elsewhere in this Fund’s prospectus or SAI.
◾ 
Front-end Sales Load Waivers on Class A Shares available at Merrill Lynch
◾ 
Employer-sponsored retirement, deferred compensation and employee benefit plans (including health savings accounts) and trusts used to fund those plans, provided that the shares are not held in a commission-based brokerage account and shares are held for the benefit of the plan;
◾ 
Shares purchased by a 529 Plan (does not include 529 Plan unit or 529-specific share classes or equivalents);
◾ 
Shares purchased through a Merrill Lynch affiliated investment advisory program;
◾ 
Shares exchanged due to the holdings moving from a Merrill Lynch affiliated investment advisory program to a Merrill Lynch brokerage (non-advisory) account pursuant to Merrill Lynch’s policies relating to sales load discounts and waivers;
◾ 
Shares purchased by third party investment advisors on behalf of their advisory clients through Merrill Lynch’s platform;
◾ 
Shares of funds purchased through the Merrill Edge Self-Directed platform (if applicable);
◾ 
Shares purchased through reinvestment of capital gains distributions and dividend reinvestment when purchasing shares of the same fund (but not any other fund within the fund family);
◾ 
Shares exchanged from Class C (i.e. level-load) shares of the same fund pursuant to Merrill Lynch’s policies relating to sales load discounts and waivers;
◾ 
Employees and registered representatives of Merrill Lynch or its affiliates and their family members;
◾ 
Directors or Trustees of the Fund, and employees of the Fund’s investment adviser or any of its affiliates, as described in this prospectus; and
◾ 
Eligible shares purchased from the proceeds of redemptions within the same fund family, provided (1) the repurchase occurs within 90 days following the redemption, (2) the redemption and purchase occur in the same account, and (3) redeemed shares were subject to a front-end or deferred sales load (known as Rights of Reinstatement). Automated transactions (i.e. systematic purchases and withdrawals) and purchases made after shares are automatically sold to pay Merrill Lynch’s account maintenance fees are not eligible for reinstatement.
◾ 
CDSC Waivers on A and C Shares available at Merrill Lynch
◾ 
Death or disability of the shareholder;
◾ 
Shares sold as part of a systematic withdrawal plan as described in the Fund’s prospectus;
◾ 
Return of excess contributions from an IRA Account;
◾ 
Shares sold as part of a required minimum distribution for IRA and retirement accounts pursuant to the Internal Revenue Code;
◾ 
Shares sold to pay Merrill Lynch fees but only if the transaction is initiated by Merrill Lynch;
◾ 
Shares acquired through a right of reinstatement;
◾ 
Shares held in retirement brokerage accounts, that are converted to a lower cost share class due to transfer to a fee based account or platform (applicable to A and C shares only); and
◾ 
Shares received through an exchange due to the holdings moving from a Merrill Lynch affiliated investment advisory program to a Merrill Lynch brokerage (non-advisory) account pursuant to Merrill Lynch’s policies relating to sales load discounts and waivers.
◾ 
Front-end load Discounts Available at Merrill Lynch: Breakpoints, Rights of Accumulation & Letters of Intent
◾ 
Breakpoints as described in this prospectus;
◾ 
Rights of Accumulation (ROA) which entitle shareholders to breakpoint discounts as described in the Fund’s prospectus will be automatically calculated based on the aggregated holding of fund family assets held by accounts (including 529 program holdings, where applicable) within the purchaser’s household at Merrill Lynch. Eligible fund family assets not held at Merrill Lynch may be included in the ROA calculation only if the shareholder notifies his or her financial advisor about such assets; and
◾ 
Letters of Intent (LOI) which allow for breakpoint discounts based on anticipated purchases within a fund family, through Merrill Lynch, over a 13-month period of time (if applicable).
Ameriprise Financial
The following information applies to Class A shares purchases if you have an account with or otherwise purchase Fund shares through Ameriprise Financial:
Shareholders purchasing Fund shares through an Ameriprise Financial retail brokerage account are eligible for the following front-end sales charge waivers, which may differ from those disclosed elsewhere in this Fund’s prospectus or SAI.
◾ 
Employer-sponsored retirement plans (e.g., 401(k) plans, 457 plans, employer-sponsored 403(b) plans, profit sharing and money purchase pension plans and defined benefit plans). For purposes of this provision, employer-sponsored retirement plans do not include SEP IRAs, Simple IRAs or SAR-SEPs.
◾ 
Shares purchased through reinvestment of capital gains distributions and dividend reinvestment when purchasing shares of the same Fund (but not any other fund within the same fund family).
◾ 
Shares exchanged from Class C shares of the same fund in the month of or following the 7-year anniversary of the purchase date. To the extent that this prospectus elsewhere provides for a waiver with respect to exchanges of Class C shares or conversion of Class C shares following a shorter holding period, that waiver will apply.
◾ 
Employees and registered representatives of Ameriprise Financial or its affiliates and their immediate family members.
◾ 
Shares purchased by or through qualified accounts (including IRAs, Coverdell Education Savings Accounts, 401(k)s, 403(b) TSCAs subject to ERISA and defined benefit plans) that are held by a covered family member, defined as an Ameriprise financial advisor and/or the advisor’s spouse, advisor’s lineal ascendant (mother, father, grandmother, grandfather, great grandmother, great grandfather), advisor’s lineal descendant (son, step-son, daughter, step-daughter, grandson, granddaughter, great grandson, great granddaughter) or any spouse of a covered family member who is a lineal descendant.
◾ 
Shares purchased from the proceeds of redemptions within the same fund family, provided (1) the repurchase occurs within 90 days following the redemption, (2) the redemption and purchase occur in the same account, and (3) redeemed shares were subject to a front-end or deferred sales load (i.e. Rights of Reinstatement).
A-5        The Invesco Funds

Morgan Stanley Wealth Management
Shareholders purchasing Fund shares through a Morgan Stanley Wealth Management transactional brokerage account will be eligible only for the following front-end sales charge waivers with respect to Class A shares, which may differ from and may be more limited than those disclosed elsewhere in this Fund’s Prospectus or SAI.
◾ 
Front-end Sales Charge Waivers on Class A Shares available at Morgan Stanley Wealth Management
◾ 
Employer-sponsored retirement plans (e.g., 401(k) plans, 457 plans, employer-sponsored 403(b) plans, profit sharing and money purchase pension plans and defined benefit plans). For purposes of this provision, employer-sponsored retirement plans do not include SEP IRAs, Simple IRAs, SAR-SEPs or Keogh plans;
◾ 
Morgan Stanley employee and employee-related accounts according to Morgan Stanley’s account linking rules;
◾ 
Shares purchased through reinvestment of dividends and capital gains distributions when purchasing shares of the same fund;
◾ 
Shares purchased through a Morgan Stanley self-directed brokerage account;
◾ 
Class C (i.e., level-load) shares that are no longer subject to a contingent deferred sales charge and are converted to Class A shares of the same fund pursuant to Morgan Stanley Wealth Management’s share class conversion program; and
◾ 
Shares purchased from the proceeds of redemptions within the same fund family, provided (i) the repurchase occurs within 90 days following the redemption, (ii) the redemption and purchase occur in the same account, and (iii) redeemed shares were subject to a front-end or deferred sales charge.
Raymond James Financial Services, Inc.
Shareholders purchasing Fund shares through a Raymond James Financial Services, Inc., Raymond James affiliates and each entity’s affiliates (Raymond James) platform or account, or through an introducing broker-dealer or independent registered investment adviser for which Raymond James provides trade execution, clearance, and/or custody services, will be eligible only for the following load waivers (front-end sales charge waivers and contingent deferred, or back-end, sales charge waivers) and discounts, which may differ from those disclosed elsewhere in this Fund’s prospectus or SAI.
◾ 
Front-end sales load waivers on Class A shares available at Raymond James
◾ 
Shares purchased in an investment advisory program.
◾ 
Shares purchased within the same fund family through a systematic reinvestment of capital gains distributions and dividend distributions.
◾ 
Employees and registered representatives of Raymond James or its affiliates and their family members as designated by Raymond James.
◾ 
Shares purchased from the proceeds of redemptions within the same fund family, provided (1) the repurchase occurs within 90 days following the redemption, (2) the redemption and purchase occur in the same account, and (3) redeemed shares were subject to a front-end or deferred sales load (known as Rights of Reinstatement).
◾ 
A shareholder in the Fund’s Class C shares will have their shares converted at net asset value to Class A shares (or the appropriate share class) of the Fund if the shares are no longer subject to a CDSC and the conversion is in line with the policies and procedures of Raymond James.
◾ 
CDSC Waivers on Classes A and C shares available at Raymond James
◾ 
Death or disability of the shareholder.
◾ 
Shares sold as part of a systematic withdrawal plan as described in the fund’s prospectus.
◾ 
Return of excess contributions from an IRA Account.
◾ 
Shares sold as part of a required minimum distribution for IRA and retirement accounts due to the shareholder reaching the qualified age based on applicable IRS regulations as described in the fund’s prospectus.
◾ 
Shares sold to pay Raymond James fees but only if the transaction is initiated by Raymond James.
◾ 
Shares acquired through a right of reinstatement.
◾ 
Front-end load discounts available at Raymond James: breakpoints, rights of accumulation, and/or letters of intent
◾ 
Breakpoints as described in this prospectus.
◾ 
Rights of accumulation which entitle shareholders to breakpoint discounts will be automatically calculated based on the aggregated holding of fund family assets held by accounts within the purchaser’s household at Raymond James. Eligible fund family assets not held at Raymond James may be included in the calculation of rights of accumulation only if the shareholder notifies his or her financial advisor about such assets.
◾ 
Letters of intent which allow for breakpoint discounts based on anticipated purchases within a fund family, over a 13-month time period. Eligible fund family assets not held at Raymond James may be included in the calculation of letters of intent only if the shareholder notifies his or her financial advisor about such assets.
D.A. Davidson &. Co. (“D.A. Davidson”)
Shareholders purchasing fund shares including existing fund shareholders through a D.A. Davidson platform or account, or through an introducing broker-dealer or independent registered investment advisor for which D.A. Davidson provides trade execution, clearance, and/or custody services, will be eligible for the following sales charge waivers (front-end sales charge waivers and contingent deferred, or back-end, sales charge waivers) and discounts, which may differ from those disclosed elsewhere in this Fund’s prospectus or SAI.
◾ 
Front-End Sales Charge Waivers on Class A Shares available at D.A. Davidson
◾ 
Shares purchased within the same fund family through a systematic reinvestment of capital gains and dividend distributions.
◾ 
Employees and registered representatives of D.A. Davidson or its affiliates and their family members as designated by D.A. Davidson.
◾ 
Shares purchased from the proceeds of redemptions within the same fund family, provided (1) the repurchase occurs within 90 days following the redemption, (2) the redemption and purchase occur in the same account, and (3) redeemed shares were subject to a front-end or deferred sales charge (known as Rights of Reinstatement).
◾ 
A shareholder in the Fund’s Class C shares will have their shares converted at net asset value to Class A shares (or the appropriate share class) of the Fund if the shares are no longer subject to a CDSC and the conversion is consistent with D.A. Davidson’s policies and procedures.
◾ 
CDSC Waivers on Classes A and C shares available at D.A. Davidson
◾ 
Death or disability of the shareholder.
◾ 
Shares sold as part of a systematic withdrawal plan as described in the fund’s prospectus.
◾ 
Return of excess contributions from an IRA Account.
◾ 
Shares sold as part of a required minimum distribution for IRA or other qualifying retirement accounts as described in the fund’s prospectus beginning in the calendar year the shareholder turns age 72.
◾ 
Shares acquired through a right of reinstatement.
◾ 
Front-end sales charge discounts available at D.A. Davidson: breakpoints, rights of accumulation and/or letters of intent
◾ 
Breakpoints as described in this prospectus.