Prospectus
January 31, 2022

Leuthold Core Investment Fund

Retail Class Shares LCORX
Institutional
Class Shares LCRIX

Leuthold Global Fund

Retail Class SharesGLBLX
Institutional
Class SharesGLBIX

Leuthold Select Industries Fund

LSLTX

Grizzly Short Fund

GRZZX

Leuthold Core ETF

LCR
Listed on NYSE Arca, Inc.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Securities and Exchange Commission has not approved or disapproved these securities or determined if this Prospectus is accurate or complete. Any representation to the contrary is a criminal offense. An investment in the Funds is not a deposit of a bank and is not insured or guaranteed by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation or any other government agency.

Table of Contents

Summary Information

1

Leuthold Core Investment Fund

1

Leuthold Global Fund

7

Leuthold Select Industries Fund

13

Grizzly Short Fund

17

Leuthold Core ETF

21

Important Additional Fund Information

28

Other Information About Principal Investment Objectives and Strategies, and Non-Principal Risks
Leuthold Core Investment Fund, Leuthold Select Industries Fund, Leuthold Global Fund, and
Grizzly Short Fund

29

Other Information About Principal Investment Objectives and Strategies, and Non-Principal Risks
Leuthold Core ETF

33

Management of the Funds

42

The Funds’ Share Prices Leuthold Core Investment Fund, Leuthold Select Industries Fund,
Leuthold Global Fund, and Grizzly Short Fund

44

Purchasing Shares Leuthold Core Investment Fund, Leuthold Select Industries Fund,
Leuthold Global Fund, and Grizzly Short Fund

45

Redeeming Shares Leuthold Core Investment Fund, Leuthold Select Industries Fund,
Leuthold Global Fund, and Grizzly Short Fund

49

Exchanging Shares Leuthold Core Investment Fund, Leuthold Select Industries Fund,
Leuthold Global Fund, and Grizzly Short Fund

54

How to Buy and Sell Shares Leuthold Core ETF

55

Dividends, Distributions, and Taxes Leuthold Core Investment Fund, Leuthold Select Industries Fund,
Leuthold Global Fund, and Grizzly Short Fund

57

Dividends, Distributions, and Taxes Leuthold Core ETF

58

Index and Category Descriptions

60

Premium/Discount Information Leuthold Core ETF

61

Additional Notices Leuthold Core ETF

61

Financial Highlights

61

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1

SUMMARY INFORMATION

Leuthold Core Investment Fund

Investment Objective

Leuthold Core Investment Fund seeks capital appreciation and income (or “total return”) in amounts attainable by assuming only prudent investment risk over the long term.

Fund Fees and Expenses

The following table describes the fees and expenses that you may pay if you buy, hold, and sell shares of the Fund. You may pay other fees, such as brokerage commissions and other fees to financial intermediaries, which are not reflected in the table and example below.

Retail (LCORX)

Institutional (LCRIX)

Shareholder Fees

(fees paid directly from your investment)

           

Maximum Sales Charge (Load)
Imposed on Purchases

None

None

Maximum Deferred Sales
Charge (Load)

None

None

Maximum Deferred Sales Charge
(Load) Imposed on Reinvested Dividends and Distributions

None

None

Redemption Fee (as a percentage of amount redeemed within 5 business days of purchase)

2%

2%

Exchange Fee (as a percentage of amount exchanged within 5 business days of purchase)

2%

2%

 

Annual Fund Operating Expenses

(expenses that you pay each year as a percentage
of the value of your investment)

           

Management Fees

0.90%

0.90%

Distribution (12b-1) Fees

None

None

Other Expenses

0.51%

0.41%

Service Fees

0.10%

None

Dividends on Securities Sold Short

0.10%

0.10%

All Remaining Other Expenses

0.26%

0.26%

Acquired Fund Fees and Expenses

0.05%

1

0.05%

1

Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses

1.41%

1.31%

  

1 Acquired Fund Fees and Expenses are not directly borne by the Fund, and they are not reflected in the Fund’s financial statements, with the result that the information presented in the expense table may differ from that presented in the financial highlights.

Example

This Example is intended to help you compare the cost of investing in the Fund with the cost of investing in other mutual funds. The Example assumes that you invest $10,000 in the Fund for the time periods indicated and then redeem all of your shares at the end of these periods. The Example also assumes that your investment has a 5% return each year and that the Fund’s operating expenses remain the same. Although your actual costs may be higher or lower, based on these assumptions your costs would be:

One Year

Three Years

Five Years

Ten Years

Retail (LCORX)

$144

$446

$771

$1,691

Institutional (LCRIX)

$133

$415

$718

$1,579

Portfolio Turnover

The Fund pays transaction costs, such as commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or “turns over” its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover rate may indicate higher transaction costs and may result in higher taxes when Fund shares are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are not reflected in annual fund operating expenses or in the example, affect the Fund’s performance. During the most recent fiscal year, the Fund’s portfolio turnover rate was 41.42% of the average value of its portfolio.

Principal Investment Strategies of the Fund

The Fund is a “flexible” fund, meaning that it allocates its investments among:

Common stocks and other equity securities (including common stocks, preferred stocks, convertible preferred stocks, warrants, options, and American Depository Receipts, and may engage in short sales of equity securities);

Bonds and other debt securities (including U.S. and some developed and emerging foreign government-related securities (including those issued by sovereign and local governments and their sponsored entities), U.S. and some foreign corporate securities, and securitized debts, both above and below investment grade);

Real estate investment trusts;

 


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Commodities (including both physical commodities and commodity-based exchange-traded funds); and

Money market instruments;

in proportions which reflect the judgment of Leuthold Weeden Capital Management (referred to as the Adviser) of the potential returns and risks of each asset class. The Adviser considers a number of factors when making these allocations, including economic conditions and monetary factors, inflation and interest rate levels and trends, investor confidence, and technical stock market measures.

The Fund expects that normally:

30% to 70% of its net assets will be invested in common stocks and other equity securities;

30% to 70% of its net assets will be invested in bonds and other debt securities (other than money market instruments), except during prolonged periods of low interest rates; and

up to 20% of its assets will be invested in money market instruments.

The Fund’s investments in common stocks and other equity securities may consist of:

Large, mid, or small capitalization common stocks;

Growth stocks, value stocks, or cyclical stocks;

Aggressive stocks or defensive stocks;

Stocks in any industry or sector;

Equity mutual funds and exchange-traded funds;

Stocks in emerging and less developed markets;

Common stocks of foreign issuers; and

Options.

In investing in equity securities and debt securities, the Fund uses a disciplined, unemotional, quantitative investment approach that is based on the belief investors can achieve superior investment performance through group selection (Select Industries Strategy).

Pursuant to the Select Industries Strategy, the Adviser believes that as shifts among industry groups in the equity market have become more dramatic, group

selection has become as important as individual stock selection in determining investment performance. The Adviser considers a group to be a collection of stocks whose investment performance tends to be similarly influenced by a variety of factors. The Adviser currently monitors about 120 groups. The major types of groups the Adviser monitors as part of the Select Industries Strategy are Industry Specific Groups comprised of narrower themes. Examples include “Airlines,” “Health Care Facilities” or “Semiconductors”.

The Adviser continuously updates its investment discipline and adjusts the Fund’s portfolio as necessary to keep the Fund invested in stocks in those groups which the Adviser believes are the most attractive. Such adjustments usually result in high portfolio turnover.

The Fund may invest in U.S. and some foreign (developed and emerging) government-related securities, including those issued by sovereign and local governments and their sponsored entities, U.S. and some foreign corporate securities, and securitized debts. The Funds may invest in both above and below investment grade securities or mutual funds and exchange-traded funds that invest in these securities.

The Fund may engage in short sales of index-related and other equity securities to reduce its equity exposure or to profit from an anticipated decline in the price of the security sold short.

The Fund’s investments are allocated among common stocks, corporate bonds, government bonds, real estate investment trusts, commodities (including both physical commodities and commodity-based exchange-traded funds), and cash equivalents. Portfolio weightings in these asset classes are driven by models that (1) determine the relative appeal of each asset class in relation to the others, and (2) the return potential of each asset class on an absolute, or stand-alone, basis.

Principal Risks of Investing in the Fund

Investors in the Fund may lose money. The principal risks of investing in the Fund, including the risks to which the Fund’s portfolio as a whole is subject and the circumstances reasonably likely to affect adversely the Fund’s performance, are summarized below.

Market Risk: The prices of the securities in which the Fund invests may decline in response to adverse


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3

issuer, political, regulatory, market, economic or other developments that may cause broad changes in market value, public perceptions concerning these developments, and adverse investor sentiment or publicity. Similarly, the impact of any epidemic, pandemic or natural disaster, such as the novel coronavirus (COVID-19), or widespread fear that such events may occur, could negatively affect the global economy, as well as the economies of individual countries, the financial performance of individual companies and sectors, and the markets in general in significant and unforeseen ways. The price declines of common stocks, in particular, may be steep, sudden and/or prolonged. Price and liquidity changes may occur in the market as a whole, or they may occur in only a particular company, industry, sector, or geographical region of the market. These effects could negatively impact the Fund’s performance.

Interest Rate Risk: In general, the value of bonds and other debt securities falls when interest rates rise. Longer term obligations are usually more sensitive to interest rate changes than shorter term obligations. While bonds and other debt securities normally fluctuate less in price than common stocks, there have been extended periods of increases in interest rates that have caused significant declines in bond prices. Many debt securities utilize LIBOR as the reference or benchmark rate for variable interest rate calculations. The UK Financial Conduct Authority (“FCA”), which regulates LIBOR, no longer persuades nor requires banks to submit rates for the calculation of LIBOR and certain other reference rates. Although many LIBOR rates will be phased out as of the end of 2021, as originally intended, a selection of widely used U.S. dollar-based LIBOR rates will continue to be published until June 2023 in order to assist with the transition away from LIBOR. The impact of the discontinuation of LIBOR and the transition to an alternative rate on the Fund’s portfolio remains uncertain. There can be no guarantee that financial instruments that transition to an alternative reference rate will retain the same value or liquidity as they would otherwise have had. This announcement and any additional regulatory or market changes that occur as a result of the transition away from LIBOR and the adoption of alternative reference rates may have an adverse

impact on the value of the Fund’s investments, performance or financial condition, and might lead to increased volatility and illiquidity in markets that currently rely on LIBOR to determine interest rates.

Credit Risk: The issuers of the bonds and other debt securities held by the Fund or by the mutual funds in which the Fund invests may not be able to make interest or principal payments. Even if these issuers are able to make interest or principal payments, they may suffer adverse changes in financial condition that would lower the credit quality of the security, leading to greater volatility in the price of the security.

Foreign and Emerging Markets Securities Risk: The securities of foreign issuers may be less liquid and more volatile than securities of comparable U.S. issuers. The costs associated with securities transactions are often higher in foreign countries than the U.S. The U.S. dollar value of foreign securities traded in foreign currencies (and any dividends and interest earned) held by the Fund or by mutual funds in which the Fund invests may be affected unfavorably by changes in foreign currency exchange rates. An increase in the U.S. dollar relative to these other currencies will adversely affect the Fund. Additionally, investments in foreign securities, even those publicly traded in the United States, may involve risks which are in addition to those inherent in domestic investments. Foreign companies may be subject to significantly higher levels of taxation than U.S. companies, including potentially confiscatory levels of taxation, thereby reducing the earnings potential of such foreign companies. Substantial withholding taxes may apply to distributions from foreign companies. Foreign companies may not be subject to the same regulatory requirements of U.S. companies, and as a consequence, there may be less publicly available information about such companies. Policy and legislative changes in foreign countries and other events affecting global markets, such as the United Kingdom’s exit from the European Union (or Brexit), may contribute to decreased liquidity and increased volatility in the financial markets. Also, foreign companies may not be subject to uniform accounting, auditing, and financial reporting standards and requirements comparable to those applicable to U.S. companies.


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Prospectus

Foreign governments and foreign economies often are less stable than the U.S. government and the U.S. economy. The risks associated with international investing will be greater in emerging markets than in more developed foreign markets because, among other things, emerging markets may have less stable political and economic environments.

Short Sales Risk: The Fund will suffer a loss if it sells a security short and the value of the security rises rather than falls. It is possible that the Fund’s long positions will decline in value at the same time that the value of its securities sold short increase, thereby increasing potential losses to the Fund. Short sales expose the Fund to the risk that it will be required to buy the security sold short (also known as “covering” the short position) at a time when the security has appreciated in value, thus resulting in a loss to the Fund. The Fund’s investment performance will also suffer if it is required to close out a short position earlier than it had intended. In addition, the Fund may be subject to expenses related to short sales that are not typically associated with investing in securities directly, such as costs of borrowing and margin account maintenance costs associated with the Fund’s open securities sold short. These expenses may negatively impact the performance of the Fund. Securities sold short introduce more risk to the Fund than long positions (purchases) because the maximum sustainable loss on a security purchased (held long) is limited to the amount paid for the security plus the transaction costs, whereas there is no maximum attainable price of the shorted security. Therefore, in theory, securities sold short have unlimited risk.

Asset Allocation Risk: The Fund’s performance will also be affected by the Adviser’s ability to anticipate correctly the relative potential returns and risks of the asset classes in which the Fund invests. For example, the Fund’s relative investment performance would suffer if only a small portion of its assets were allocated to stocks during a significant stock market advance, and its absolute investment performance would suffer if a major portion of its assets were allocated to stocks during a market decline. Finally, since the Fund intends to assume only prudent investment risk, there will be periods in which the Fund underperforms mutual funds that are willing to assume greater risk.

Quantitative Investment Approach Risk: The Fund utilizes a quantitative investment approach. While the Adviser continuously reviews and refines, if necessary, its investment approach, there may be market conditions where the quantitative investment approach performs poorly.

Liquidity Risk: Liquidity risk is the risk, due to certain investments trading in lower volumes or to market and economic conditions, that the Fund may be unable to find a buyer for its investments when it seeks to sell them or to receive the price it expects based on the Fund’s valuation of the investments. Events that may lead to increased redemptions, such as market disruptions, may also negatively impact the liquidity of the Fund’s investments when it needs to dispose of them. If the Fund is forced to sell its investments at an unfavorable time and/or under adverse conditions in order to meet redemption requests, such sales could negatively affect the Fund. Liquidity issues may also make it difficult to value the Fund’s investments.

   Tax Law Change Risk: Tax law is subject to change, possibly with retroactive effect, or to different interpretations. In particular, Congress is considering substantial changes to U.S. federal income tax laws, and some with retroactive effect, that could result in substantial adverse U.S. federal income tax consequences to the Fund and its shareholders. Any future changes are highly uncertain, and the impact on the Fund or its shareholders cannot be predicted. Prospective shareholders should consult their own tax advisors regarding the impact to them of possible changes in tax laws.

As a result, the Fund is a suitable investment only for those investors who have medium to long-term investment goals. Prospective investors who are uncomfortable with an investment that may decrease in value should not invest in the Fund. The Adviser does not intend the Fund to be a fixed, balanced investment program. Rather, the Fund is intended to be a flexible core investment suitable for long-term investors. Long-term investors may wish to supplement an investment in the Fund with other investments to satisfy their short-term financial needs and to diversify their exposure to various markets and asset classes.


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5

Performance Information

The bar chart and table that follow provide some indication of the risks of investing in the Fund by showing changes in its performance from year to year and how its average annual returns over various periods compare with those of an index that reflects a broad measure of market performance, as well as additional benchmarks that reflect the performance of investments similar to those of the Fund. For additional information on the indices, please see “Index Descriptions” in the Prospectus. The bar chart shows the performance of the Fund’s Retail Class shares, and performance of the Fund’s Institutional Class shares will differ from those shown to the extent that the classes of shares do not have the same expenses or inception date. Please remember that the Fund’s past performance (before and after taxes) is not necessarily an indication of its future performance. It may perform better or worse in the future. Updated performance information is available on the Fund’s website, https://funds.leutholdgroup.com.

Leuthold Core Investment Fund
Total Return of the Retail Shares

(per calendar year)

 

  

Note: During the ten-year period shown on the bar chart, the Fund’s highest total return for a quarter was 10.42% (quarter ended June 30, 2020) and the lowest total return for a quarter was -10.97% (quarter ended March 31, 2020).

 

Average Annual Total Returns

(for the periods ended December 31, 2021)

Past Year

Past Five Years

Past Ten Years

Leuthold Core Investment Fund (Retail – LCORX)

Return Before Taxes

15.17%

8.96%

8.34%

Return After Taxes on
Distributions

13.86%

7.95%

7.21%

Return After Taxes on
Distributions and
Sale of Fund Shares

9.91%

6.93%

6.47%

 

Leuthold Core Investment Fund (Institutional – LCRIX)

Return Before Taxes

15.28%

9.07%

8.45%

S&P 500® Index

28.71%

18.47%

16.55%

Morningstar Tactical Allocation
Category Average

13.16%

7.94%

5.95%

Bloomberg Global Aggregate Index

-4.71%

3.36%

1.77%

  

We use the Morningstar Tactical Allocation Category Average and Bloomberg Global Aggregate Index as additional benchmarks because those benchmarks compare the Fund’s performance with the returns of peer groups reflecting the performance of investments similar to those of the Fund.

The after-tax returns are calculated using the historical highest individual marginal income tax rates and do not reflect the impact of state and local taxes. Actual after-tax returns depend on an investor’s tax situation and may differ from those shown, and the after-tax returns shown are not relevant to investors who hold their Fund shares through tax-deferred arrangements such as 401(k) plans or individual retirement accounts. The Fund’s return after taxes on distributions and sale of Fund shares may be higher than the other return figures for the same period due to a tax benefit of realizing a capital loss upon the sale of Fund shares.

 


6

Prospectus

Investment Adviser

The Leuthold Group, LLC (d/b/a Leuthold Weeden Capital Management) is the investment adviser to the Fund.

Portfolio Managers

Douglas R. Ramsey, CFA, Chun Wang, CFA, Greg M. Swenson, CFA, and Scott D. Opsal, CFA, are the portfolio managers of the Fund. Mr. Ramsey is the chief investment officer and a portfolio manager of the Adviser and has been a senior analyst of The Leuthold Group since 2005. Mr. Wang is a portfolio manager of the Adviser and has been a senior analyst of The Leuthold Group since 2009. Mr. Swenson is a portfolio manager of the Adviser and has been a senior analyst of The Leuthold Group since 2006. Mr. Opsal is a portfolio manager of the Adviser and has been Director of Research and Equities for The Leuthold Group since 2016.

For important information about purchase and sale of Fund shares, tax information, and payments to financial intermediaries, please turn to “Important Additional Fund Information” on page 28 of this Prospectus.

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7

Leuthold Global Fund

Investment Objective

Leuthold Global Fund seeks capital appreciation and income (or “total return”) in amounts attainable by assuming only prudent investment risk over the long term.

Fund Fees and Expenses

The following table describes the fees and expenses that you may pay if you buy, hold, and sell shares of the Fund. You may pay other fees, such as brokerage commissions and other fees to financial intermediaries, which are not reflected in the table and example below.

Retail (GLBLX)

Institutional (GLBIX)

Shareholder Fees

(fees paid directly from your investment)

           

Maximum Sales Charge (Load)
Imposed on Purchases

None

None

Maximum Deferred Sales
Charge (Load)

None

None

Maximum Deferred Sales Charge
(Load) Imposed on Reinvested Dividends and Distributions

None

None

Redemption Fee (as a percentage of amount redeemed within 5 business days of purchase)

2%

2%

Exchange Fee (as a percentage of amount exchanged within 5 business days of purchase)

2%

2%

 

Annual Fund Operating Expenses

(expenses that you pay each year as a percentage of the value of your investment)

           

Management Fees

0.90%

0.90%

Distribution (12b-1) Fees

0.06%

None

Other Expenses

1.09%

1.09%

Dividends on Securities Sold Short

0.19%

0.19%

Expense Recoupment

0.04%

1

0.05%

1

All Remaining Other Expenses

0.82%

0.81%

Acquired Fund Fees and Expenses

0.04%

2

0.04%

2

Total Annual Fund
Operating Expenses

2.05%

1.99%

  

1 The Fund’s investment adviser has contractually agreed in the investment advisory agreement to waive its advisory fee to the extent necessary to insure that Net Expenses (excluding Acquired Fund Fees and Expenses) do not exceed 1.85% of the average daily net assets of the Fund. The investment advisory agreement may be terminated by the Fund or the Fund’s investment adviser for any reason upon sixty days’ prior written notice, but is expected to continue indefinitely. In any of the following three fiscal years, the Fund’s investment adviser may recover waived fees, but in no event may the Fund’s expenses exceed the expense limitation above.
1 The Fund’s investment adviser has contractually agreed in the investment advisory agreement to waive its advisory fee to the extent necessary to insure that Net Expenses (excluding Acquired Fund Fees and Expenses) do not exceed 1.85% of the average daily net assets of the Fund. The investment advisory agreement may be terminated by the Fund or the Fund’s investment adviser for
any reason upon sixty days’ prior written notice, but is expected to continue indefinitely. In any of the following three fiscal years, the Fund’s investment adviser may recover waived fees, but in no event may the Fund’s expenses exceed the expense limitation above.
2 Acquired Fund Fees and Expenses are not directly borne by the Fund, and they are not reflected in the Fund’s financial statements, with the result that the information presented in the expense table may differ from that presented in the financial highlights.

Example

This Example is intended to help you compare the cost of investing in the Fund with the cost of investing in other mutual funds.

The Example assumes that you invest $10,000 in the Fund for the time periods indicated and then redeem all of your shares at the end of these periods. The Example also assumes that your investment has a 5% return each year and that the Fund’s operating expenses remain the same. Although your actual costs may be higher or lower, based on these assumptions your costs would be:

One Year

Three Years

Five Years

Ten Years

Retail (GLBLX)

$208

$634

$1,087

$2,341

Institutional (GLBIX)

$202

$614

$1,052

$2,268

Portfolio Turnover

The Fund pays transaction costs, such as commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or “turns over” its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover rate may indicate higher transaction costs and may result in higher taxes when Fund shares are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are not reflected in annual fund operating expenses or in the example, affect the Fund’s performance. During the most recent fiscal year, the Fund’s portfolio turnover rate was 49.39% of the average value of its portfolio.

Principal Investment Strategies of the Fund

Leuthold Global Fund is a “flexible” fund, meaning that it allocates its investments among:

Common stocks and other equity securities (including common stocks, preferred stocks, convertible preferred stocks, warrants, options, and American Depository Receipts, and may engage in short sales of equity securities);

 


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Prospectus

Bonds and other debt securities (including global developed and emerging government-related securities (including those issued by sovereign and local governments and their sponsored entities), global corporate securities, and securitized debts both above and below investment grade); and

Money market instruments from around the world;

in proportions which reflect the judgment of Leuthold Weeden Capital Management (referred to as the Adviser) of the potential returns and risks of each asset class.

The Adviser considers a number of factors when making these allocations, including economic conditions and monetary factors, inflation and interest rate levels and trends, investor confidence, and technical stock market measures. Normally, the Fund will invest at least 40% of its assets in securities from international markets, unless market conditions are not deemed favorable by the Adviser, in which case the Fund may invest less than 40% of its assets in securities from international markets (but in any event not less than 30%). While at least 40% of the Fund’s assets will be invested in securities from international markets, the Fund’s investments will be allocated among the following categories, with portions of each being made up of domestic and international securities:

30% to 70% of its net assets will be invested in common stocks and other equity securities;

30% to 70% of its net assets will be invested in bonds and other debt securities (other than money market instruments), except during prolonged periods of low interest rates; and

up to 20% of its assets will be invested in money market instruments.

The Fund’s investments in common stocks and other equity securities may consist of the following from around the world:

Large, mid, or small capitalization common stocks;

Growth stocks, value stocks, or cyclical stocks;

Aggressive stocks or defensive stocks;

Stocks in any industry or sector;

Equity mutual funds and exchange-traded funds; and

Options.

In investing in equity securities and debt securities, the Fund utilizes a disciplined, unemotional, quantitative investment approach that is based on the belief investors can achieve superior investment performance through group selection (Global Group Strategy). The Fund will invest in domestic and foreign companies of all sizes and industries as well as in “growth” stocks and “value” stocks.

The Adviser currently monitors about 90 global groups. The major types of groups the Adviser monitors are Industry Specific Groups comprised of narrower themes. Examples include “Airlines,” “Health Care Facilities” or “Semiconductors”.

The Adviser continuously updates its investment discipline and adjusts the Fund’s portfolio as necessary to keep the Fund invested in stocks in those groups which the Adviser believes are the most attractive. Such adjustments may result in high portfolio turnover.

The Fund may invest in global (developed and emerging) government related securities, including those issued by sovereign and local governments and their sponsored entities, global corporate securities, and securitized debts. The Fund may invest in both above and below investment grade securities or mutual funds and exchange-traded funds that invest in these securities.

The Fund may engage in short sales of index-related and other equity securities to reduce its equity exposure or to profit from an anticipated decline in the price of the security sold short.


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9

Principal Risks of Investing in the Fund

Investors in the Fund may lose money. The principal risks of investing in the Fund, including the risks to which the Fund’s portfolio as a whole is subject and the circumstances reasonably likely to affect adversely the Fund’s performance, are summarized below.

Market Risk: The prices of the securities, particularly the common stocks, in which the Fund invests may decline for a number of reasons. The price declines of common stocks, in particular, may be steep, sudden, and/or prolonged. In the past decade financial markets throughout the world have experienced increased volatility and heightened uncertainty. A rise in protectionist trade policies, slowing global economic growth, risks associated with the United Kingdom’s vote to leave the European Union, the trade dispute between the United States and China, the risk of trade disputes with other countries, and the possibility of changes to some international trade agreements, could affect the economies of many nations, including the United States, in ways that cannot necessarily be foreseen at the present time, and may negatively impact the financial markets. The novel coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic and efforts to contain its spread are likely to negatively affect the value, volatility, and liquidity of the securities and other assets in which the Fund invests and exacerbate other risks that apply to the Fund. These effects could negatively impact the Fund’s performance.

Interest Rate Risk: In general, the value of bonds and other debt securities falls when interest rates rise. Longer term obligations are usually more sensitive to interest rate changes than shorter term obligations. While bonds and other debt securities normally fluctuate less in price than common stocks, there have been extended periods of increases in interest rates that have caused significant declines in bond prices. Many debt securities utilize LIBOR as the reference or benchmark rate for variable interest rate calculations. The UK Financial Conduct Authority (“FCA”), which regulates LIBOR, no longer persuades nor requires banks to submit rates for the calculation of LIBOR and certain other reference rates. Although many LIBOR rates will be phased out as of the end of 2021, as originally intended, a selection of widely used U.S. dollar-based LIBOR

rates will continue to be published until June 2023 in order to assist with the transition away from LIBOR. The impact of the discontinuation of LIBOR and the transition to an alternative rate on the Fund’s portfolio remains uncertain. There can be no guarantee that financial instruments that transition to an alternative reference rate will retain the same value or liquidity as they would otherwise have had. This announcement and any additional regulatory or market changes that occur as a result of the transition away from LIBOR and the adoption of alternative reference rates may have an adverse impact on the value of the Fund’s investments, performance or financial condition, and might lead to increased volatility and illiquidity in markets that currently rely on LIBOR to determine interest rates.

Credit Risk: The issuers of the bonds and other debt securities held by the Fund or by the mutual funds in which the Fund invests may not be able to make interest or principal payments. Even if these issuers are able to make interest or principal payments, they may suffer adverse changes in financial condition that would lower the credit quality of the security, leading to greater volatility in the price of the security.

Foreign Securities Risk: The securities of foreign issuers may be less liquid and more volatile than securities of comparable U.S. issuers. The costs associated with securities transactions are often higher in foreign countries than the U.S. The U.S. dollar value of foreign securities traded in foreign currencies (and any dividends and interest earned) held by the Fund or by mutual funds in which the Fund invests may be affected unfavorably by changes in foreign currency exchange rates. An increase in the U.S. dollar relative to these other currencies will adversely affect the Fund. Additionally, investments in foreign securities, even those publicly traded in the United States, may involve risks which are in addition to those inherent in domestic investments. Foreign companies may be subject to significantly higher levels of taxation than U.S. companies, including potentially confiscatory levels of taxation, thereby reducing the earnings potential of such foreign companies. Substantial withholding taxes may apply to distributions from foreign companies. Foreign companies may not be subject to the same regulatory requirements of U.S. companies, and as a consequence, there may be less


10

Prospectus

publicly available information about such companies. Policy and legislative changes in foreign countries and other events affecting global markets, such as the United Kingdom’s exit from the European Union (or Brexit), may contribute to decreased liquidity and increased volatility in the financial markets. Also, foreign companies may not be subject to uniform accounting, auditing, and financial reporting standards and requirements comparable to those applicable to U.S. companies. Foreign governments and foreign economies often are less stable than the U.S. government and the U.S. economy.

Short Sales Risk: The Fund will suffer a loss if it sells a security short and the value of the security rises rather than falls. It is possible that the Fund’s long positions will decline in value at the same time that the value of its securities sold short increase, thereby increasing potential losses to the Fund. Short sales expose the Fund to the risk that it will be required to buy the security sold short (also known as “covering” the short position) at a time when the security has appreciated in value, thus resulting in a loss to the Fund. The Fund’s investment performance will also suffer if it is required to close out a short position earlier than it had intended. In addition, the Fund may be subject to expenses related to short sales that are not typically associated with investing in securities directly, such as costs of borrowing and margin account maintenance costs associated with the Fund’s open securities sold short. These expenses may negatively impact the performance of the Fund. Securities sold short introduce more risk to the Fund than long positions (purchases) because the maximum sustainable loss on a security purchased (held long) is limited to the amount paid for the security plus the transaction costs, whereas there is no maximum attainable price of the shorted security. Therefore, in theory, securities sold short have unlimited risk.

High Portfolio Turnover Risk: The Fund’s annual portfolio turnover rate may exceed 100%. (Generally speaking, a turnover rate of 100% occurs when the Fund replaces securities valued at 100% of its average net assets within a one year period.) High portfolio turnover (100% or more) will result in the Fund incurring more transaction costs such as brokerage commissions or mark-ups or mark-downs. Payment of those transaction costs reduces total return. High

portfolio turnover could result in the payment by the Fund’s stockholders of increased taxes on realized gains. Distributions to the Fund’s stockholders, to the extent they are short-term capital gains, will be taxed at ordinary income rates for federal income tax purposes, rather than at lower capital gains rates.

Asset Allocation Risk: The Fund’s performance will also be affected by the Adviser’s ability to anticipate correctly the relative potential returns and risks of the asset classes in which the Fund invests. For example, the Fund’s relative investment performance would suffer if only a small portion of its assets were allocated to stocks during a significant stock market advance, and its absolute investment performance would suffer if a major portion of its assets were allocated to stocks during a market decline. Finally, since the Fund intends to assume only prudent investment risk, there will be periods in which the Fund underperforms mutual funds that are willing to assume greater risk.

Quantitative Investment Approach Risk: The Fund utilizes a quantitative investment approach. While the Adviser continuously reviews and refines, if necessary, its investment approach, there may be market conditions where the quantitative investment approach performs poorly.

Liquidity Risk: Liquidity risk is the risk, due to certain investments trading in lower volumes or to market and economic conditions, that the Fund may be unable to find a buyer for its investments when it seeks to sell them or to receive the price it expects based on the Fund’s valuation of the investments. Events that may lead to increased redemptions, such as market disruptions, may also negatively impact the liquidity of the Fund’s investments when it needs to dispose of them. If the Fund is forced to sell its investments at an unfavorable time and/or under adverse conditions in order to meet redemption requests, such sales could negatively affect the Fund. Liquidity issues may also make it difficult to value the Fund’s investments.

   Tax Law Change Risk: Tax law is subject to change, possibly with retroactive effect, or to different interpretations. In particular, Congress is considering substantial changes to U.S. federal income tax laws, and some with retroactive effect, that could result in substantial adverse U.S. federal income tax


Prospectus

11

consequences to the Fund and its shareholders. Any future changes are highly uncertain, and the impact on the Fund or its shareholders cannot be predicted. Prospective shareholders should consult their own tax advisors regarding the impact to them of possible changes in tax laws.

As a result, the Fund is a suitable investment only for those investors who have medium to long-term investment goals. Prospective investors who are uncomfortable with an investment that may decrease in value should not invest in the Fund. The Adviser does not intend the Fund to be a fixed, balanced investment program. Rather, the Fund is intended to be a flexible core investment suitable for long-term investors. Long-term investors may wish to supplement an investment in the Fund with other investments to satisfy their short-term financial needs and to diversify their exposure to various markets and asset classes.

Performance Information

The bar chart and table that follow provide some indication of the risks of investing in the Fund by showing changes in its performance from year to year and how its average annual returns over various periods compare with those of an index that reflects a broad measure of market performance, as well as additional indices that reflect the performance of investments similar to those of the Fund. For additional information on the indices, please see “Index Descriptions” in the Prospectus. The bar chart shows the performance of the Fund’s Retail Class shares, and performance of the Fund’s Institutional Class shares will differ from those shown to the extent that the classes of shares do not have the same expenses or inception date. Please remember that the Fund’s past performance (before and after taxes) is not necessarily an indication of its future performance. It may perform better or worse in the future. Updated performance information is available on the Fund’s website, https://funds.leutholdgroup.com.

 

Leuthold Global Fund
Total Return of the Retail Shares

(per calendar year)

 

  

Note: During the ten-year period shown on the bar chart, the Fund’s highest total return for a quarter was 9.99% (quarter ended June 30, 2020) and the lowest return for a quarter was -13.13% (quarter-ended March 31, 2020).

Average Annual Total Returns

(for the periods ended December 31, 2021)

Past Year

Past Five Years

Past Ten Years

Leuthold Global Fund
(Retail – GLBLX)

Return Before Taxes

15.01%

6.40%

6.20%

Return After Taxes on 
Distributions

14.35%

5.33%

4.73%

Return After Taxes on
Distributions and
Sale of Shares

9.11%

4.77%

4.60%

 

Leuthold Global Fund
(Institutional – GLBIX)

Return Before Taxes

15.01%

6.59%

6.41%

MSCI ACWI

18.54%

14.40%

11.85%

Bloomberg Global Aggregate Index

-4.71%

3.36%

1.77%

S&P 500® Index

28.71%

18.47%

16.55%

  

We use the Bloomberg Global Aggregate Index and the S&P 500® Index as additional indices because those indices compare the Fund’s performance with the returns of indices reflecting the performance of investments similar to those of the Fund.

The after-tax returns are calculated using the historical highest individual marginal income tax rates and do not reflect the impact of state and local taxes. Actual after-tax returns depend on an investor’s tax situation and may differ from those shown, and the after-tax returns shown are not relevant to investors who hold their Fund shares through tax-deferred arrangements such as 401(k) plans or individual retirement accounts. The Fund’s return after taxes on distributions and sale of Fund shares may be higher than the other return figures for the same period due to a tax benefit of realizing a capital loss upon the sale of Fund shares.

 


12

Prospectus

Investment Adviser

The Leuthold Group, LLC (d/b/a Leuthold Weeden Capital Management) is the investment adviser to the Fund.

Portfolio Managers

Douglas R. Ramsey, CFA, Chun Wang, CFA, and Greg M. Swenson, CFA, are the portfolio managers of the Fund. Mr. Ramsey is the chief investment officer and a portfolio manager of the Adviser and has been a senior analyst of The Leuthold Group since 2005. Mr. Wang is a portfolio manager of the Adviser and has been a senior analyst of The Leuthold Group since 2009. Mr. Swenson is a portfolio manager of the Adviser and has been a senior analyst of The Leuthold Group since 2006.

For important information about purchase and sale of Fund shares, tax information, and payments to financial intermediaries, please turn to “Important Additional Fund Information” on page 28 of this Prospectus.

Prospectus

13

Leuthold Select Industries Fund

Investment Objective

Leuthold Select Industries Fund (LSLTX) seeks capital appreciation.

Fund Fees and Expenses

The following table describes the fees and expenses that you may pay if you buy, hold, and sell shares of the Fund. You may pay other fees, such as brokerage commissions and other fees to financial intermediaries, which are not reflected in the table and example below.

Shareholder Fees

(fees paid directly from your investment)

     

Maximum Sales Charge (Load)
Imposed on Purchases

None

Maximum Deferred Sales Charge (Load)

None

Maximum Deferred Sales Charge (Load) Imposed on Reinvested Dividends and Distributions

None

Redemption Fee

None

Exchange Fee

None

 

Annual Fund Operating Expenses

(expenses that you pay each year as a percentage
of the value of your investment)

     

Management Fees

1.00%

Distribution (12b-1) Fees

None

Other Expenses

1.03%

Service Fees

0.10%

All Remaining Other Expenses

0.93%

Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses

2.03%

Expense Reimbursement1

0.53%

Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses
After Expense Reimbursement

1.50%

  

1 The Fund’s investment adviser has contractually agreed in the investment advisory agreement to waive its advisory fee to the extent necessary to insure that Net Expenses (excluding Acquired Fund Fees and Expenses) do not exceed 1.50% of the average daily net assets of the Fund. The investment advisory agreement may be terminated by the Fund or the Fund’s investment adviser for any reason upon sixty days’ prior written notice, but is expected to continue indefinitely. In any of the following three fiscal years, the Fund’s investment adviser may recover waived fees, but in no event may the Fund’s expenses exceed the expense limitation above.

Example

This Example is intended to help you compare the cost of investing in the Fund with the cost of investing in other mutual funds.

The Example assumes that you invest $10,000 in the Fund for the time periods indicated and then redeem all of your shares at the end of these periods. The Example also assumes that your investment has a 5% return each year and that the Fund’s operating expenses remain the same. Although your actual costs may be higher or lower, based on these assumptions your costs would be:

One Year

Three Years

Five Years

Ten Years

$153

$585

$1,044

$2,316

Portfolio Turnover

The Fund pays transaction costs, such as commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or “turns over” its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover rate may indicate higher transaction costs and may result in higher taxes when Fund shares are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are not reflected in annual fund operating expenses or in the example, affect the Fund’s performance. During the most recent fiscal year, the Fund’s portfolio turnover rate was 62.93% of the average value of its portfolio.

Principal Investment Strategies of the Fund

The Fund seeks capital appreciation by investing substantially all of its assets in equity securities traded in the U.S. securities markets (including common stocks, preferred stocks, convertible preferred stocks, warrants, options, and American Depository Receipts). The Fund invests in companies of all sizes and industries as well as in “growth” stocks and “value” stocks. In investing in equity securities, the Fund uses a disciplined, unemotional, quantitative investment approach that is based on the belief investors can achieve superior investment performance through group selection (Select Industries Strategy).

Pursuant to the Select Industries Strategy, Leuthold Weeden Capital Management (referred to as the Adviser) believes that as shifts among industry groups in the equity market have become more dramatic, group selection has become as important as individual stock selection in determining investment performance. The Adviser considers a group to be a collection of stocks whose


14

Prospectus

investment performance tends to be similarly influenced by a variety of factors. The Adviser currently monitors about 120 groups. The major types of groups the Adviser monitors are Industry Specific Groups comprised of narrower themes. Examples include “Airlines,” “Health Care Facilities” or “Semiconductors”.

The Adviser continuously updates its investment discipline and adjusts the Fund’s portfolio as necessary to keep the Fund invested in stocks in those groups which the Adviser believes are the most attractive. Such adjustments usually result in high portfolio turnover.

Principal Risks of Investing in the Fund

Investors in the Fund may lose money. The principal risks of investing in the Fund, including the risks to which the Fund’s portfolio as a whole is subject and the circumstances reasonably likely to affect adversely the Fund’s performance, are summarized below.

Market Risk: The prices of the securities in which the Fund invests may decline in response to adverse issuer, political, regulatory, market, economic or other developments that may cause broad changes in market value, public perceptions concerning these developments, and adverse investor sentiment or publicity. Similarly, the impact of any epidemic, pandemic or natural disaster, such as the novel coronavirus (COVID-19), or widespread fear that such events may occur, could negatively affect the global economy, as well as the economies of individual countries, the financial performance of individual companies and sectors, and the markets in general in significant and unforeseen ways. The price declines of common stocks, in particular, may be steep, sudden and/or prolonged. Price and liquidity changes may occur in the market as a whole, or they may occur in only a particular company, industry, sector, or geographical region of the market. These effects could negatively impact the Fund’s performance.

Foreign Securities Risk: The securities of foreign issuers may be less liquid and more volatile than securities of comparable U.S. issuers. The costs associated with securities transactions are often higher in foreign countries than the U.S. The U.S. dollar value of foreign securities traded in foreign currencies (and any dividends and interest earned)

held by the Fund or by mutual funds in which the Fund invests may be affected unfavorably by changes in foreign currency exchange rates. An increase in the U.S. dollar relative to these other currencies will adversely affect the Fund. Additionally, investments in foreign securities, even those publicly traded in the United States, may involve risks which are in addition to those inherent in domestic investments. Foreign companies may be subject to significantly higher levels of taxation than U.S. companies, including potentially confiscatory levels of taxation, thereby reducing the earnings potential of such foreign companies. Substantial withholding taxes may apply to distributions from foreign companies. Foreign companies may not be subject to the same regulatory requirements of U.S. companies, and as a consequence, there may be less publicly available information about such companies. Policy and legislative changes in foreign countries and other events affecting global markets, such as the United Kingdom’s exit from the European Union (or Brexit), may contribute to decreased liquidity and increased volatility in the financial markets. Also, foreign companies may not be subject to uniform accounting, auditing, and financial reporting standards and requirements comparable to those applicable to U.S. companies. Foreign governments and foreign economies often are less stable than the U.S. government and the U.S. economy.

High Portfolio Turnover Risk: The Fund’s annual portfolio turnover rate may exceed 100%. (Generally speaking, a turnover rate of 100% occurs when the Fund replaces securities valued at 100% of its average net assets within a one year period.) High portfolio turnover (100% or more) will result in the Fund incurring more transaction costs such as brokerage commissions or mark-ups or mark-downs. Payment of those transaction costs reduces total return. High portfolio turnover could result in the payment by the Fund’s stockholders of increased taxes on realized gains. Distributions to the Fund’s stockholders, to the extent they are short-term capital gains, will be taxed at ordinary income rates for federal income tax purposes, rather than at lower capital gains rates.


Prospectus

15

Quantitative Investment Approach Risk: The Fund utilizes a quantitative investment approach. While the Adviser continuously reviews and refines, if necessary, its investment approach, there may be market conditions where the quantitative investment approach performs poorly.

Liquidity Risk: Liquidity risk is the risk, due to certain investments trading in lower volumes or to market and economic conditions, that the Fund may be unable to find a buyer for its investments when it seeks to sell them or to receive the price it expects based on the Fund’s valuation of the investments. Events that may lead to increased redemptions, such as market disruptions, may also negatively impact the liquidity of the Fund’s investments when it needs to dispose of them. If the Fund is forced to sell its investments at an unfavorable time and/or under adverse conditions in order to meet redemption requests, such sales could negatively affect the Fund. Liquidity issues may also make it difficult to value the Fund’s investments.

   Tax Law Change Risk: Tax law is subject to change, possibly with retroactive effect, or to different interpretations. In particular, Congress is considering substantial changes to U.S. federal income tax laws, and some with retroactive effect, that could result in substantial adverse U.S. federal income tax consequences to the Fund and its shareholders. Any future changes are highly uncertain, and the impact on the Fund or its shareholders cannot be predicted. Prospective shareholders should consult their own tax advisors regarding the impact to them of possible changes in tax laws.

As a result, the Fund is a suitable investment only for those investors who have long-term investment goals. Prospective investors who are uncomfortable with an investment that may decrease in value should not invest in the Fund.

Performance Information

The bar chart and table that follow provide some indication of the risks of investing in the Fund by showing changes in its performance from year to year and how its average annual returns over various periods compare to the performance with those of an index that reflects a broad measure of market performance, as

well as additional indices that reflect the performance of investments similar to those of the Fund. For additional information on the indices, please see “Index Descriptions” in the Prospectus. Please remember that the Fund’s past performance (before and after taxes) is not necessarily an indication of its future performance. It may perform better or worse in the future. Updated performance information is available on the Fund’s website, https://funds.leutholdgroup.com.

Leuthold Select Industries
Fund Total Return

(per calendar year)

  

Note: During the ten-year period shown on the bar chart, the Fund’s highest total return for a quarter was 24.86% (quarter ended June 30, 2020) and the lowest total return for a quarter was -24.30% (quarter ended March 31, 2020).

Average Annual Total Returns

(for the periods ended December 31, 2021)

Past Year

Past Five Years

Past Ten Years

Leuthold Select Industries Fund (LSLTX)

Return before taxes

29.53%

15.50%

14.78%

Return after taxes on distributions

27.60%

13.80%

13.89%

Return after taxes on distributions and sale of Fund shares

18.53%

11.99%

12.24%

S&P 500® Index

28.71%

18.47%

16.55%

S&P MidCap 400® Index

24.76%

13.09%

14.20%

S&P 600® Index

26.82%

12.42%

14.50%

  

The Fund changed the order of its broad-based securities market indices to reflect the S&P 500® Index as its primary broad-based securities market index because the returns of that index of securities are closer to those of the securities in which the Fund invests. The Fund still reports the returns of the other broad-based securities market index, the S&P 600® Index. We use the S&P MidCap 400® Index (newly added as an index) and the S&P 600® Index as additional indices because those indices compare the Fund’s performance with the returns of indices reflecting the performance of investments similar to those of the Fund.

 


16

Prospectus

The after-tax returns are calculated using the historical highest individual marginal income tax rates and do not reflect the impact of state and local taxes. Actual after-tax returns depend on an investor’s tax situation and may differ from those shown, and the after-tax returns shown are not relevant to investors who hold their Fund shares through tax-deferred arrangements, such as 401(k) plans or individual retirement accounts. The Fund’s return after taxes on distributions and sale of Fund shares may be higher than the other return figures for the same period due to a tax benefit of realizing a capital loss upon the sale of Fund shares.

Investment Adviser

The Leuthold Group, LLC (d/b/a Leuthold Weeden Capital Management) is the investment adviser to the Fund.

Portfolio Managers

Chun Wang, CFA, Greg M. Swenson, CFA, and Scott D. Opsal, CFA, are the portfolio managers of the Fund. Mr. Wang is a portfolio manager of the Adviser and has been a senior analyst of The Leuthold Group since 2009. Mr. Swenson is a portfolio manager of the Adviser and has been a senior analyst of The Leuthold Group since 2006. Mr. Opsal is a portfolio manager of the Adviser and has been Director of Research and Equities of The Leuthold Group since 2016.

For important information about purchase and sale of Fund shares, tax information, and payments to financial intermediaries, please turn to “Important Additional Fund Information” on page 28 of this Prospectus.

Prospectus

17

Grizzly Short Fund

Investment Objective

Grizzly Short Fund (GRZZX) seeks capital appreciation.

Fund Fees and Expenses

The following table describes the fees and expenses that you may pay if you buy, hold, and sell shares of the Fund. You may pay other fees, such as brokerage commissions and other fees to financial intermediaries, which are not reflected in the table and example below.

Shareholder Fees

(fees paid directly from your investment)

       

Maximum Sales Charge (Load)
Imposed on Purchases

None

Maximum Deferred Sales Charge (Load)

None

Maximum Deferred Sales Charge (Load) Imposed
on Reinvested Dividends and Distributions

None

Redemption Fee

None

Exchange Fee

None

Annual Fund Operating Expenses

(expenses that you pay each year as a percentage
of the value of your investment)

       

Management Fees

1.25%

Distribution (12b-1) Fees

None

Other Expenses

1.73%

Service Fees

0.07%

Dividends on Securities Sold Short

0.96%

All Remaining Other Expenses

0.65%

Acquired Fund Fees and Expenses

0.05%

1

Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses

2.98%

  

1 Acquired Fund Fees and Expenses are not directly borne by the Fund, and they are not reflected in the Fund’s financial statements, with the result that the information presented in the expense table may differ from that presented in the financial highlights.

Example

This Example is intended to help you compare the cost of investing in the Fund with the cost of investing in other mutual funds.

The Example assumes that you invest $10,000 in the Fund for the time periods indicated and then redeem all of your shares at the end of these periods. The Example also assumes that your investment has a 5% return each year and that the Fund’s operating expenses remain the same. Although your actual costs may be higher or lower, based on these assumptions your costs would be:

One Year

Three Years

Five Years

Ten Years

$301

$921

$1,567

$3,299

Portfolio Turnover

The Fund pays transaction costs, such as commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or “turns over” its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover rate may indicate higher transaction costs and may result in higher taxes when Fund shares are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are not reflected in annual fund operating expenses or in the example, affect the Fund’s performance. During the most recent fiscal year, the Fund’s portfolio turnover rate was 0.00% of the average value of its portfolio.

Principal Investment Strategies of the Fund

Grizzly Short Fund sells stocks and exchange traded funds short. Short selling involves the sale of borrowed securities. When the Fund sells a stock short, it incurs an obligation to replace the stock borrowed at whatever its price may be at the time it purchases the stock for delivery to the securities lender. The Fund will realize a gain if at that time the price of the stock is less than the price of the stock when it was sold short, and will realize a loss if at that time the price of the stock is greater than the price of the stock when it was sold short. The aggregate amount of its outstanding securities sold short typically will be approximately equal to, or slightly less than, its net assets. When the Fund’s outstanding securities sold short equal its net assets, it is “100% short.” The Fund utilizes a disciplined, unemotional, quantitative investment approach.

 


18

Prospectus

The Fund believes that in all market conditions there will exist some companies whose stocks are overvalued by the market and that capital appreciation can be realized by selling short those stocks. However, the best overall results typically will be achieved in declining stock markets. In rising stock markets the risk of loss is likely.

The Fund may increase the number of stocks it sells short if market conditions warrant an increase. In determining which stocks to sell short, Leuthold Weeden Capital Management (referred to as the Adviser) calculates a quantitative index for each security that it follows that is designed to identify those securities that are most likely to decline in price or underperform the market (the “Vulnerability Index”). In calculating a Vulnerability Index, the Adviser considers twelve or more components. Some of the components include fundamental factors such as earnings growth or dividends, while other components consider market factors such as institutional trading activity or insider buying or selling. From time to time the Fund may sell short index-related securities. The Fund will do so to rapidly increase its short position.

The Fund also follows a disciplined approach in determining when to cover its securities sold short. The factors the Adviser considers in determining when to cover securities sold short include:

Price movements of the stocks sold short;

Changes in the Vulnerability Index;

Daily trading volume of the stock; and

News and articles concerning the stock appearing in financial services and publications.

Principal Risks of Investing in the Fund

Investors in the Fund may lose money. The principal risks of investing in the Fund, including the risks to which the Fund’s portfolio as a whole is subject and the circumstances reasonably likely to affect adversely the Fund’s performance, are summarized below.

Market Risk: The prices of the securities in which the Fund invests may increase in response to issuer, political, regulatory, market, economic or other developments that may cause broad changes in market value, public perceptions concerning these developments, and shifting investor sentiment or publicity. Similarly, the impact of any epidemic,

pandemic or natural disaster, such as the novel coronavirus (COVID-19), or widespread fear that such events may occur, could affect the global economy, as well as the economies of individual countries, the financial performance of individual companies and sectors, and the markets in general in significant and unforeseen ways. The price increases of common stocks, in particular, may be steep, sudden and/or prolonged. Price and liquidity changes may occur in the market as a whole, or they may occur in only a particular company, industry, sector, or geographical region of the market. These effects could negatively impact the Fund’s performance.

Short Sales Risk: The Fund will suffer a loss if it sells a security short and the value of the security rises rather than falls. It is possible that the Fund’s long positions will decline in value at the same time that the value of its securities sold short increase, thereby increasing potential losses to the Fund. Short sales expose the Fund to the risk that it will be required to buy the security sold short (also known as “covering” the short position) at a time when the security has appreciated in value, thus resulting in a loss to the Fund. The Fund’s investment performance will also suffer if it is required to close out a short position earlier than it had intended. In addition, the Fund may be subject to expenses related to short sales that are not typically associated with investing in securities directly, such as costs of borrowing and margin account maintenance costs associated with the Fund’s open securities sold short. These expenses may negatively impact the performance of the Fund. Securities sold short introduce more risk to the Fund than long positions (purchases) because the maximum sustainable loss on a security purchased (held long) is limited to the amount paid for the security plus the transaction costs, whereas there is no maximum attainable price of the shorted security. Therefore, in theory, securities sold short have unlimited risk.

Rising Stock Market Risk: The Fund typically will be approximately “100% short.” Accordingly, in rising stock markets its risk of loss will be greater than in declining stock markets. Over time stock markets have risen more often than they have declined.


Prospectus

19

Smaller and Medium Capitalization Companies Risk: The securities of smaller capitalization companies are generally riskier than larger capitalization companies since they don’t have the financial resources or the well established businesses of the larger companies. Generally, the share prices of stocks of smaller capitalization companies are more volatile than those of larger capitalization companies. The returns of stocks of smaller capitalization companies may vary, sometimes significantly, from the returns of the overall market. Smaller capitalization companies tend to perform poorly during times of economic stress. Finally, relative to large company stocks, the stocks of smaller capitalization companies may be thinly traded, and purchases and sales may result in higher transaction costs. The securities of medium capitalization companies generally trade in lower volumes than those of large capitalization companies and tend to be more volatile because mid-cap companies tend to be more susceptible to adverse business or economic events than larger more established companies.

Quantitative Investment Approach Risk: The Fund utilizes a quantitative investment approach. While the Adviser continuously reviews and refines, if necessary, its investment approach, there may be market conditions where the quantitative investment approach performs poorly.

Liquidity Risk: Liquidity risk is the risk, due to certain investments trading in lower volumes or to market and economic conditions, that the Fund may be unable to find a buyer for its investments when it seeks to sell them or to receive the price it expects based on the Fund’s valuation of the investments. Events that may lead to increased redemptions, such as market disruptions, may also negatively impact the liquidity of the Fund’s investments when it needs to dispose of them. If the Fund is forced to sell its investments at an unfavorable time and/or under adverse conditions in order to meet redemption requests, such sales could negatively affect the Fund. Liquidity issues may also make it difficult to value the Fund’s investments.

   Tax Law Change Risk: Tax law is subject to change, possibly with retroactive effect, or to different interpretations. In particular, Congress is considering substantial changes to U.S. federal income tax laws, and some with retroactive effect, that could result in substantial adverse U.S. federal income tax consequences to the Fund and its shareholders. Any future changes are highly uncertain, and the impact on the Fund or its shareholders cannot be predicted. Prospective shareholders should consult their own tax advisors regarding the impact to them of possible changes in tax laws.

Investors who wish to hedge some or all of their stock portfolios might find that investment goal consistent with an investment in the Fund.

However, because movements in the prices of the stocks the Fund has sold short are unlikely to correlate perfectly with the stocks in an investor’s portfolio, such an investor could incur both a loss on the investor’s stock portfolio and the investor’s investment in the Fund.

Performance Information

The bar chart and table that follow provide some indication of the risks of investing in the Fund by showing changes in its performance from year to year and how its average annual returns over various periods compare with those of an index that reflects a broad measure of market performance, as well as additional indices that reflect the performance of investments similar to those of the Fund. For additional information on the indices, please see “Index Descriptions” in the Prospectus. Please remember that the Fund’s past performance (before and after taxes) is not necessarily an indication of its future performance. It may perform better or worse in the future. Updated performance information is available on the Fund’s website, https://funds.leutholdgroup.com.

 


20

Prospectus

Grizzly Short Fund
Total Return

(per calendar year)

  

Note: During the ten-year period shown on the bar chart, the Fund’s highest total return for a quarter was 25.81% (quarter ended March 31, 2020) and the lowest total return for a quarter was -29.82% (quarter ended June 30, 2020).

Average Annual Total Returns

(for the periods ended December 31, 2021)

Past Year

Past Five Years

Past Ten Years

Grizzly Short Fund (GRZZX)

Return before taxes

-15.87%

-22.44%

-18.56%

Return after taxes on
distributions

-15.87%

-22.51%

-18.59%

Return after taxes on
distributions and
sale of Fund shares

-9.39%

-14.69%

-10.34%

S&P 500® Index

28.71%

18.47%

16.55%

S&P MidCap 400® Index

24.76%

13.09%

14.20%

  

The Fund changed the order of its broad-based securities market indices to reflect the S&P 500® Index as its primary broad-based securities market index because the returns of that index of securities are closer to those of the securities in which the Fund invests. The Fund still reports the returns of the other broad-based securities market index, the S&P MidCap 400® Index. We use the S&P MidCap 400® Index as an additional index because this index compares the Fund’s performance with the returns of an index reflecting the performance of investments similar to those of the Fund.

The after-tax returns are calculated using the historical highest individual marginal income tax rates and do not reflect the impact of state and local taxes. Actual after-tax returns depend on an investor’s tax situation and may differ from those shown, and the after-tax returns shown are not relevant to investors who hold their Fund shares through tax-deferred arrangements, such as 401(k) plans or individual retirement accounts. The Fund’s return after taxes on distributions and sale of Fund shares may be higher than the other return figures for the same period due to a tax benefit of realizing a capital loss upon the sale of Fund shares.

 

Investment Adviser

The Leuthold Group, LLC (d/b/a Leuthold Weeden Capital Management) is the investment adviser to the Fund.

Portfolio Managers

Greg M. Swenson, CFA, and Kristen J. Perleberg, CFA, are the portfolio managers of the Fund. Mr. Swenson is a portfolio manager of the Adviser and has been a senior analyst of The Leuthold Group since 2006. Ms. Perleberg is a portfolio manager of the Adviser, has been a senior analyst of The Leuthold Group since 2015, an analyst of The Leuthold Group between 2010-2015, and was a trader with The Leuthold Group from 2007-2010.

For important information about purchase and sale of Fund shares, tax information, and payments to financial intermediaries, please turn to “Important Additional Fund Information” on page 28 of this Prospectus.


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21

Leuthold Core ETF

Investment Objective

The Leuthold Core ETF (the “Fund”) seeks capital appreciation and income (or “total return”).

Fund Fees and Expenses

This table describes the fees and expenses that you may pay if you buy, hold, and sell shares of the Fund (“Shares”). You may pay other fees, such as brokerage commissions and other fees to financial intermediaries, which are not reflected in the table and example below.

Annual Fund Operating Expenses

(expenses that you pay each year as a percentage
of the value of your investment)

     

Management Fees

0.50%

Distribution (12b-1) Fees

None

Other Expenses

1.14%

All Remaining Other Expenses

0.93%

Acquired Fund Fees and Expenses1

0.21%

Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses

1.64%

Expense Reimbursement2

0.78%

Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses
After Expense Reimbursement

0.86%

  

1 Acquired Fund Fees and Expenses are not directly borne by the Fund, and they are not reflected in the Fund’s financial statements, with the result that the information presented in the expense table may differ from that presented in the financial highlights.
2 The Fund’s investment adviser has contractually agreed to waive its advisory fee to the extent necessary to insure that Net Expenses (excluding Acquired Fund Fees and Expenses) do not exceed 0.65% of the average daily net assets of the Fund. The expense limitation agreement will remain in effect until January 31, 2023. The Fund’s investment adviser may recover waived fees for three years from the time the expenses were waived or incurred, provided total expenses, including such recovery, are limited to the lesser of (1) the expense limitation in effect at the time of the waiver and (2) the expense limitation in effect at the time of recovery.

Example

The Example assumes that you invest $10,000 in the Fund for the time periods indicated and then redeem all of your Shares at the end of these periods. The Example also assumes that your investment has a 5% return each year and that the Fund’s expenses are equal to the net Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses After Expense Reimbursement for the first year and the Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses for the remaining years. The return of 5% and estimated expenses are for illustration purposes only, and should not be considered indicators of expected Fund expenses or performance, which may be greater or less than the estimates. Although your actual costs may be higher or lower, based on these assumptions your costs would be:

One Year

Three Years

Five Years

Ten Years

$88

$441

$ 818

$1,878

Portfolio Turnover

The Fund pays transaction costs, such as commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or “turns over” its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover rate may indicate higher transaction costs and may result in higher taxes when Fund Shares are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are not reflected in annual fund operating expenses or in the example, affect the Fund’s performance. During the most recent fiscal year, the Fund’s portfolio turnover rate was 70.83% of the average value of its portfolio.

Principal Investment Strategies of the Fund

The Fund is an actively-managed “exchange-traded fund of funds” and seeks to achieve its objective by investing primarily in other registered investment companies, including other actively-managed exchange-traded funds (“ETFs”) and index-based ETFs (collectively, “Underlying Funds”), that provide exposure to a broad range of asset classes. The Fund will not invest more than 25% in any Underlying Fund. The Underlying Funds may invest in equity securities of U.S. or foreign companies; debt obligations of U.S. or foreign companies or governments; or investments such as volatility indexes and managed futures. The Fund allocates its assets across asset classes, geographic regions, and industries, subject to certain diversification and liquidity considerations. The Fund’s investments in foreign countries may include exposure to emerging markets. The Fund generally defines emerging market countries as countries that are not included in the MSCI World Index of major world economies.

 


22

Prospectus

The Fund considers a number of factors when making its allocations, including economic conditions and monetary factors, inflation and interest rate levels and trends, investor confidence, and technical stock market measures. Specifically, the Fund uses a disciplined, unemotional, quantitative investment approach that is based on the belief investors can achieve superior investment performance through sector selection. Pursuant to this approach, the investment adviser believes that as shifts among industry sectors in the equity market have become more dramatic, sector selection has become an important aspect in determining investment performance. The investment adviser considers a sector to be a collection of stocks whose investment performance tends to be similarly influenced by a variety of factors. Examples include “Information Technology,” “Health Care,” and “Consumer Discretionary.” The investment adviser continuously updates its investment discipline and adjusts the Fund’s portfolio as necessary to keep the Fund invested in sectors which the Adviser believes are the most attractive.

Section 12(d)(1)(A) of the Investment Company Act, in relevant part, prohibits a registered investment company from acquiring shares of an investment company if after such acquisition the securities represent more than 3% of the total outstanding voting stock of the acquired company, more than 5% of the total assets of the acquiring company, or, together with the securities of any other investment companies, more than 10% of the total assets of the acquiring company except in reliance on certain exceptions contained in the Investment Company Act and the rules and regulations thereunder. As permitted by the Securities and Exchange Commission in the adopting release for Rule 6c-11, the Fund is permitted to invest in both affiliated and unaffiliated investment companies, including Underlying Funds in excess of the limits in Section 12 of the Investment Company Act subject to the terms and conditions in recent ETF exemptive orders.

The Fund expects that normally:

30% to 70% of its total assets will be invested in Underlying Funds that principally invest in common stocks and other equity securities (such Underlying Funds may invest principally in specific sectors of the economy, such as healthcare, financials, real estate, and energy or in broader swaths of domestic, foreign, or global equity market;

30% to 70% of its net assets will be invested in Underlying Funds that principally invest in bonds and other debt securities (other than money market instruments), except during prolonged periods of low interest rates; and

up to 20% of its assets will be invested in Underlying Funds that principally invest in near-cash investments.

Underlying Funds that invest in bonds and other debt securities may invest in U.S. government debt, sovereign debt, U.S. and foreign corporate debt, high-yield debt (also known as “junk bonds”), U.S. government agency issued mortgage debt, structured debt, and U.S. government agency issued asset-backed securities. Such Underlying Funds may hold debt denominated in U.S. dollars or foreign currencies. The Fund has no limitation on the range of maturities or credit quality of the debt in which Underlying Funds may invest.

Underlying Funds used for real estate exposure may invest some or all of their assets in real estate investment trusts (“REITs”), and Underlying Funds used for energy exposure may invest some or all of their assets in master limited partnerships (“MLPs”), but investments in these type of Underlying Funds will not be a principal investment strategy.

In addition to the Underlying Funds, the Fund may invest in non-investment company exchange-traded products (“ETPs” and together with the Underlying Funds, “Underlying Investments”).

The Fund may invest up to 20% of its total assets in Underlying Investments that invest some or all of their assets in commodities, volatility indexes, and managed futures. The Fund may engage, on a non-principal basis, in short sales of index-related and other equity securities to reduce its equity exposure or to profit from an anticipated decline in the price of the security sold short.

The Fund will invest in Underlying Investments that may include the following equity strategies:

Large, mid, or small capitalization common stocks;

Growth stocks, value stocks, or cyclical stocks;

Aggressive stocks or defensive stocks;

Stocks in any industry or sector;


Prospectus

23

Stocks in emerging and less developed markets;

Common stocks of foreign issuers; and

Options.

Leuthold Weeden Capital Management (referred to as the “Adviser”) selects specific Underlying Investments based on an evaluation of their market exposure, liquidity, cost, and historic tracking error relative to their underlying index or benchmark. The Adviser continuously updates its investment discipline and adjusts the Fund’s portfolio as necessary to keep the Fund invested in Underlying Investments which the Adviser believes are the most attractive. Such adjustments usually result in high portfolio turnover.

Principal Risks of Investing in the Fund

The principal risks of investing in the Fund, including those related to the Fund’s Underlying Investments, are summarized below. As with any investment, there is a risk that you could lose all or a portion of your investment in the Fund. The following risks could affect the value of your investment in the Fund:

Market Risk: The prices of the securities in which the Fund invests may decline in response to adverse issuer, political, regulatory, market, economic or other developments that may cause broad changes in market value, public perceptions concerning these developments, and adverse investor sentiment or publicity. Similarly, the impact of any epidemic, pandemic or natural disaster, such as the novel coronavirus (COVID-19), or widespread fear that such events may occur, could negatively affect the global economy, as well as the economies of individual countries, the financial performance of individual companies and sectors, and the markets in general in significant and unforeseen ways. The price declines of common stocks, in particular, may be steep, sudden and/or prolonged. Price and liquidity changes may occur in the market as a whole, or they may occur in only a particular company, industry, sector, or geographical region of the market. These effects could negatively impact the Fund’s performance.

Interest Rate Risk: In general, the value of bonds and other debt securities falls when interest rates rise. Longer term obligations are usually more sensitive to interest rate changes than shorter term obligations.

While bonds and other debt securities normally fluctuate less in price than common stocks, there have been extended periods of increases in interest rates that have caused significant declines in bond prices. Many debt securities utilize LIBOR as the reference or benchmark rate for variable interest rate calculations. The UK Financial Conduct Authority (“FCA”), which regulates LIBOR, no longer persuades nor requires banks to submit rates for the calculation of LIBOR and certain other reference rates. Although many LIBOR rates will be phased out as of the end of 2021, as originally intended, a selection of widely used U.S. dollar-based LIBOR rates will continue to be published until June 2023 in order to assist with the transition away from LIBOR. The impact of the discontinuation of LIBOR and the transition to an alternative rate on the Fund’s portfolio remains uncertain. There can be no guarantee that financial instruments that transition to an alternative reference rate will retain the same value or liquidity as they would otherwise have had. This announcement and any additional regulatory or market changes that occur as a result of the transition away from LIBOR and the adoption of alternative reference rates may have an adverse impact on the value of the Fund’s investments, performance or financial condition, and might lead to increased volatility and illiquidity in markets that currently rely on LIBOR to determine interest rates.

Credit Risk: The issuers of the bonds and other debt securities held by the Underlying Investments in which the Fund invests may not be able to make interest or principal payments. Even if these issuers are able to make interest or principal payments, they may suffer adverse changes in financial condition that would lower the credit quality of the security, leading to greater volatility in the price of the security.

Foreign and Emerging Markets Securities Risk: The securities of foreign issuers may be less liquid and more volatile than securities of comparable U.S. issuers. The costs associated with securities transactions are often higher in foreign countries than the U.S. The U.S. dollar value of foreign securities traded in foreign currencies (and any dividends and interest earned) held by the Underlying Investments in which the Fund invests may be affected unfavorably by changes in


24

Prospectus

foreign currency exchange rates. An increase in the U.S. dollar relative to these other currencies will adversely affect the Fund. Additionally, investments in foreign securities, even those publicly traded in the United States, may involve risks which are in addition to those inherent in domestic investments. Foreign companies may be subject to significantly higher levels of taxation than U.S. companies, including potentially confiscatory levels of taxation, thereby reducing the earnings potential of such foreign companies. Substantial withholding taxes may apply to distributions from foreign companies. Foreign companies may not be subject to the same regulatory requirements of U.S. companies, and as a consequence, there may be less publicly available information about such companies. Policy and legislative changes in foreign countries and other events affecting global markets, such as the United Kingdom’s exit from the European Union (or Brexit), may contribute to decreased liquidity and increased volatility in the financial markets. Also, foreign companies may not be subject to uniform accounting, auditing, and financial reporting standards and requirements comparable to those applicable to U.S. companies. Foreign governments and foreign economies often are less stable than the U.S. government and the U.S. economy. The risks associated with international investing will be greater in emerging markets than in more developed foreign markets because, among other things, emerging markets may have less stable political and economic environments.

Currency Exchange Rate Risk. Changes in currency exchange rates and the relative value of non-U.S. currencies will affect the value of the Fund’s Underlying Investments with underlying foreign shares and the value of your Shares. Because the Fund’s NAV is determined on the basis of U.S. dollars, the U.S. dollar value of your investment in the Fund may go down if the value of the local currency of the non-U.S. markets in which the Fund invests through Underlying Investments depreciates against the U.S. dollar. This is true even if the local currency value of securities held by the Fund goes up. Conversely, the dollar value of your investment in the Fund may go up if the value of the local currency appreciates against the U.S. dollar. The value of the U.S. dollar measured against other currencies is influenced by a variety of

factors. These factors include: national debt levels and trade deficits, changes in balances of payments and trade, domestic and foreign interest and inflation rates, global or regional political, economic or financial events, monetary policies of governments, actual or potential government intervention, and global energy prices. Political instability, the possibility of government intervention and restrictive or opaque business and investment policies may also reduce the value of a country’s currency. Government monetary policies and the buying or selling of currency by a country’s government may also influence exchange rates. Currency exchange rates can be very volatile and can change quickly and unpredictably. As a result, the value of an investment in the Fund may change quickly and without warning, and you may lose money.

High Portfolio Turnover Risk: The Fund’s annual portfolio turnover may exceed 100%. (Generally speaking, a turnover rate of 100% occurs when the Fund replaces securities valued at 100% of its average net assets within a one year period.) High portfolio turnover (100% or more) will result in the Fund incurring more transaction costs such as brokerage commissions or mark-ups or mark-downs. Payment of those transaction costs reduces total return. High portfolio turnover could result in the payment by the Fund’s stockholders of increased taxes on realized gains. Distributions to the Fund’s stockholders, to the extent they are short-term capital gains, will be taxed at ordinary income rates for federal income tax purposes, rather than at lower capital gains rates.

Asset Allocation Risk: The Fund’s performance will also be affected by the Adviser’s ability to anticipate correctly the relative potential returns and risks of the asset classes in which the Fund invests. For example, the Fund’s relative investment performance would suffer if only a small portion of its assets were allocated to Underlying Investments invested in stocks during a significant stock market advance, and its absolute investment performance would suffer if a major portion of its assets were allocated to Underlying Investments invested in stocks during a market decline. Finally, since the Fund intends to assume only prudent investment risk, there will be periods in which the Fund underperforms mutual funds that are willing to assume greater risk.


Prospectus

25

Quantitative Investment Approach Risk: The Fund utilizes a quantitative investment approach. While the Adviser continuously reviews and refines, if necessary, its investment approach, there may be market conditions where the quantitative investment approach performs poorly.

Liquidity Risk: Liquidity risk is the risk, due to certain investments trading in lower volumes or to market and economic conditions, that the Fund may be unable to find a buyer for its investments when it seeks to sell them or to receive the price it expects based on the Fund’s valuation of the investments. Events that may lead to increased redemptions, such as market disruptions, may also negatively impact the liquidity of the Fund’s investments when it needs to dispose of them. If the Fund is forced to sell its investments at an unfavorable time and/or under adverse conditions in order to meet redemption requests, such sales could negatively affect the Fund. Liquidity issues may also make it difficult to value the Fund’s investments.

High-Yield Securities Risk. The Fund may invest in Underlying Investments that primarily invest in high-yield securities (also known as “junk bonds”). Although high-yield securities generally pay higher rates of interest than investment grade bonds, high-yield securities are speculative, high risk investments that may cause income and principal losses for such Underlying Investments and, consequently, negatively affect the value of the Fund’s investment in such Underlying Investments. High-yield securities may be issued by companies that are restructuring, are smaller and less creditworthy, or are more highly indebted than other companies. This means that they may have more difficulty making scheduled payments of principal and interest. Changes in the value of high-yield securities are influenced more by changes in the financial and business position of the issuing company than by changes in interest rates when compared to investment grade securities. The Fund’s exposure to high-yield securities may subject it to a substantial degree of credit risk.

Investment Company Risk. The risks of investing in investment companies, such as the Underlying Funds, typically reflect the risks of the types of instruments in which the investment companies

invest. By investing in another investment company, the Fund becomes a shareholder of that investment company and bears its proportionate share of the fees and expenses of the other investment company. The Fund may be subject to statutory limits with respect to the amount it can invest in other ETFs, which may adversely affect the Fund’s ability to achieve its investment objective. Investments in ETFs are also subject to the following risks: (i) an ETF’s shares may trade at a market price above or below their net asset value (“NAV”); (ii) an active trading market for an ETF’s shares may not develop or be maintained; and (iii) trading of an ETF’s shares may be halted for a number of reasons.

Managed Futures Strategy/Commodities Risk. The Fund may invest in Underlying Investments that principally invest in the commodities markets through investment in managed futures programs. Such investments may subject an Underlying Investment to greater volatility than investments in traditional securities. Commodities are real assets such as oil, agriculture, livestock, industrial metals, and precious metals such as gold or silver. Prices of commodities and related contracts may fluctuate significantly over short periods for a variety of reasons, including weather and natural disasters; governmental, agricultural, trade, fiscal, monetary and exchange control programs and policies; acts of terrorism, tariffs and U.S. and international economic, political, military and regulatory developments. The demand and supply of these commodities may also fluctuate widely based on such factors as interest rates, investors’ expectations with respect to the rate of inflation, currency exchange rates, the production and cost levels of the producers and/or forward selling by such producers, global or regional political, economic or financial events, purchases and sales by central banks, and trading activities by hedge funds and other commodity funds. Commodity Underlying Investments may use derivatives, such as futures, options, and swaps, which expose them to further risks, including counterparty risk (i.e., the risk that the institution on the other side of the trade will default).

Mortgage- and Asset-Backed Securities Risk. The Fund may invest in Underlying Investments that principally invest in mortgage- and asset-backed securities. Such securities are subject to credit,


26

Prospectus

interest rate, prepayment, and extension risks (see “Fixed Income Securities Risk”). These securities also are subject to risk of default on the underlying mortgage or asset, particularly during periods of economic downturn. Small movements in interest rates may quickly and significantly reduce the value of certain mortgage-backed securities.

REIT Investment Risk. The Fund may invest in Underlying Investments that primarily invest in REITs. Investments in REITs involve unique risks. REITs may have limited financial resources, may trade less frequently and in limited volume, and may be more volatile than other securities. The risks of investing in REITs include certain risks associated with the direct ownership of real estate and the real estate industry in general. REITs are also subject to heavy cash flow dependency, defaults by borrowers, and self-liquidation.

Sector Risk. To the extent the Fund invests in Underlying Investments that are more heavily invested in particular sectors of the economy, its performance will be especially sensitive to developments that significantly affect those sectors.

Shares May Trade at Prices Other Than NAV. As with all ETFs, Shares may be bought and sold in the secondary market at market prices. Although it is expected that the market price of Shares will approximate the Fund’s NAV, there may be times when the market price of Shares is more than the NAV intra-day (premium) or less than the NAV intra-day (discount) due to supply and demand of Shares or during periods of market volatility. This risk is heightened in times of market volatility, periods of steep market declines, and periods when there is limited trading activity for Shares in the secondary market, in which case such premiums or discounts may be significant.

Small and Mid-Capitalization Company Stock Risk. The Fund may invest in Underlying Investments that primarily invest in the common stock of small- or mid-capitalization companies. Small to mid-capitalization company stocks have historically been subject to greater investment risk than large company stocks. The prices of small- to mid-capitalization company stocks tend to be more volatile and less liquid than large company stocks.

   New Fund Risk. The Fund is a recently organized, diversified management investment company with a limited operating history. As a result, prospective investors have a limited track record or history on which to base their investment decision.

   Tax Law Change Risk: Tax law is subject to change, possibly with retroactive effect, or to different interpretations. In particular, Congress is considering substantial changes to U.S. federal income tax laws, and some with retroactive effect, that could result in substantial adverse U.S. federal income tax consequences to the Fund and its shareholders. Any future changes are highly uncertain, and the impact on the Fund or its shareholders cannot be predicted. Prospective shareholders should consult their own tax advisors regarding the impact to them of possible changes in tax laws.

As a result, the Fund is a suitable investment only for those investors who have medium to long-term investment goals. Prospective investors who are uncomfortable with an investment that may decrease in value should not invest in the Fund. The Adviser does not intend the Fund to be a fixed, balanced investment program. Rather, the Fund is intended to be a flexible core investment suitable for long-term investors. Long-term investors may wish to supplement an investment in the Fund with other investments to satisfy their short-term financial needs and to diversify their exposure to various markets and asset classes.

Performance Information

The bar chart and table that follow provide some indication of the risks of investing in the Fund by showing changes in its performance from year to year and how its average annual returns over various periods compare with those of an index that reflects a broad measure of market performance, as well as additional benchmarks that reflect the performance of investments similar to those of the Fund. For additional information on the indices, please see “Index Descriptions” in the Prospectus. Please remember that the Fund’s past performance (before and after taxes) is not necessarily an indication of its future performance. It may perform better or worse in the future. Updated performance information is available on the Fund’s website, https://funds.leutholdgroup.com.

 


Prospectus

27

Leuthold Core ETF
Total Return

(per calendar year)

 

  

Note: During the period shown on the bar chart, the Fund’s highest total return for a quarter was 5.09% (quarter ended December 31, 2021) and the lowest total return for a quarter was -0.49% (quarter ended September 30, 2021).

Average Annual Total Returns

(for the periods ended December 31, 2021)

Past Year

Since Inception

Leuthold Core ETF (LCR)  

Return before taxes

11.92%

12.80%

Return after taxes on distributions

11.86%

12.66%

Return after taxes on distributions and sale of ETF shares

7.09%

9.85%

S&P 500® Index

28.71%

23.42%

Morningstar Tactical Allocation Category Average

13.16%

N/A

Bloomberg Global Aggregate Index

-4.71%

1.84%

  

We use the Morningstar Tactical Allocation Category Average and Bloomberg Global Aggregate Index as additional benchmarks because those benchmarks compare the Fund’s performance with the returns of peer groups reflecting the performance of investments similar to those of the Fund.

The after-tax returns are calculated using the historical highest individual marginal income tax rates and do not reflect the impact of state and local taxes. Actual after-tax returns depend on an investor’s tax situation and may differ from those shown, and the after-tax returns shown are not relevant to investors who hold their Fund shares through tax-deferred arrangements, such as 401(k) plans or individual retirement accounts. The Fund’s return after taxes on distributions and sale of Fund shares may be higher than the other return figures for the same period due to a tax benefit of realizing a capital loss upon the sale of Fund shares.

 

Investment Adviser

The Leuthold Group, LLC (d/b/a Leuthold Weeden Capital Management) is the investment adviser to the Fund.

Portfolio Managers

Douglas R. Ramsey, CFA, Scott D. Opsal, CFA, and Chun Wang, CFA, are the portfolio managers of the Fund. Mr. Ramsey is the chief investment officer and a portfolio manager of the Adviser and has been a senior analyst of The Leuthold Group since 2005. Mr. Opsal is a portfolio manager of the Adviser and has been Director of Research and Equities of The Leuthold Group since 2016. Mr. Wang is a portfolio manager of the Adviser and has been a senior analyst of The Leuthold Group since 2009.

For important information about purchase and sale of Fund shares, tax information, and payments to financial intermediaries, please turn to “Important Additional Fund Information” on page 28 of this Prospectus.


28

Prospectus

IMPORTANT ADDITIONAL FUND INFORMATION

Purchase and Sale of Fund Shares – Leuthold Core Investment Fund, Leuthold Select Industries Fund, Leuthold Global Fund, and Grizzly Short Fund

To purchase shares of the Leuthold Core Investment Fund, Leuthold Select Industries Fund, Leuthold Global Fund, and Grizzly Short Fund, you should contact your broker-dealer or other financial intermediary, or to purchase shares directly with the Leuthold Funds, you should call 1-800-273-6886. You may buy shares of the Funds each day the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) is open. The minimum initial investment in a Fund’s shares (other than Institutional Class shares) is $10,000, $1,000 for Individual Retirement Accounts. The minimum initial investment in a Fund’s Institutional Class shares is $1,000,000. There is a $100 subsequent investment requirement for all of the Funds. A $50 minimum exists for each additional investment made through the Automatic Investment Plan for all Funds.

You may redeem shares of the Funds each day the NYSE is open. You may redeem Fund shares by mail (Leuthold Funds, Inc., c/o U.S. Bancorp Fund Services, P.O. Box 701, Milwaukee, WI 53201-0701), or by telephone at 1-800-273-6886. Investors who wish to redeem shares through a broker-dealer or other financial intermediary should contact the intermediary regarding the hours during which orders to redeem shares of the Funds may be placed.

See “Purchasing Shares Leuthold Core Investment Fund, Leuthold Select Industries Fund, Leuthold Global Fund, and Grizzly Short Fund” beginning on page 45 and “Redeeming Shares Leuthold Core Investment Fund, Leuthold Select Industries Fund, Leuthold Global Fund, and Grizzly Short Fund” beginning on page 49 for more information on purchasing and redeeming shares of these Funds.

Purchase and Sale of Shares –
Leuthold Core ETF

Individual Shares of the Leuthold Core ETF are listed on NYSE Arca, Inc. (the “Exchange”), and may only

be bought and sold in the secondary market through a broker or dealer at a market price. Because Shares trade at market prices rather than NAV, Shares may trade at a price greater than NAV (premium) or less than NAV (discount).

An investor may incur costs attributable to the difference between the highest price a buyer is willing to pay to purchase shares (bid) and the lowest price a seller is willing to accept for shares (ask) when buying or selling shares in the secondary market (the “bid-ask spread”).

For recent information about the Fund, including the Fund’s NAV, market price, premiums and discounts, bid-ask spreads, and the median bid-ask spread for the Fund’s most recent fiscal years, visit the Fund’s website, https://funds.leutholdgroup.com.

See “How to Buy and Sell Shares Leuthold Core ETF” beginning on page 55 for more information on purchasing and redeeming shares of this Fund.

Tax Information – All Funds

A Fund’s distributions generally will be taxable to you, whether they are paid in cash or reinvested in Fund shares, unless you invest through a tax-deferred arrangement, such as a 401(k) plan or an individual retirement account, in which case such distributions may be taxable at a later date.

Payments to Broker-Dealers and Other Financial Intermediaries – Leuthold Core Investment Fund, Leuthold Select Industries Fund, Leuthold Global Fund, and Grizzly Short Fund

If you purchase the Leuthold Core Investment Fund, Leuthold Select Industries Fund, Leuthold Global Fund, or Grizzly Short Fund through a broker-dealer or other financial intermediary (such as a bank), the Funds and their related companies may pay the intermediary for the sale of Fund shares and related services. These payments may create a conflict of interest by influencing the broker-dealer or other financial intermediary and your salesperson to recommend the Fund over another investment. Ask your salesperson or visit your financial intermediary’s Internet website for more information.


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29

Financial Intermediary Compensation – Leuthold Core ETF

If you purchase Shares of the Leuthold Core ETF through a broker-dealer or other financial intermediary (such as a bank) (an “Intermediary”), the Adviser or its affiliates may pay Intermediaries for certain activities related to the Fund, including participation in activities that are designed to make Intermediaries more knowledgeable about exchange traded products, including the Fund, or for other activities, such as marketing, educational training or other initiatives related to the sale or promotion of Shares. These payments may create a conflict of interest by influencing the Intermediary and your salesperson to recommend the Fund over another investment. Any such arrangements do not result in increased Fund expenses. Ask your salesperson or visit the Intermediary’s website for more information.

OTHER INFORMATION ABOUT PRINCIPAL INVESTMENT OBJECTIVES AND STRATEGIES, AND NON-PRINCIPAL RISKS LEUTHOLD CORE INVESTMENT FUND, LEUTHOLD SELECT INDUSTRIES FUND, LEUTHOLD GLOBAL FUND, AND GRIZZLY SHORT FUND

The Leuthold Core Investment Fund and the Leuthold Global Fund seek capital appreciation and income (or “total return”). The Adviser believes that maintaining profits when markets decline is as important as earning profits when markets rise. The Leuthold Select Industries Fund and the Grizzly Short Fund seek capital appreciation.

Each Fund’s investment objective, including, if applicable, its policy of investing at least 80% of the value of its net assets in the particular type of investments suggested by the Fund’s name, is a non-fundamental policy. If the Fund’s Board of Directors determines

to change this non-fundamental policy, the Fund will provide 60 days prior notice to the stockholders before implementing the change of policy. Please remember that an investment objective is not a guarantee. An investment in each Fund might not appreciate and investors could lose money.

Neither of the Leuthold Select Industries Fund or the Grizzly Short Fund will take temporary defensive positions. Although neither of these Funds will take a temporary defensive position, each Fund will invest in money market instruments (like U.S. Treasury Bills, commercial paper, or repurchase agreements) and hold some cash so that it can pay expenses and satisfy redemption requests. Because the Grizzly Short Fund’s principal investment strategy is to effect short sales, a significant portion of its assets will be held in liquid securities, including money market instruments, as “cover” for its short sales. Typically the obligations associated with the Grizzly Short Fund’s outstanding short sales will be approximately equal to the Grizzly Short Fund’s investments in money market instruments.

Unlike the Leuthold Select Industries Fund and the Grizzly Short Fund, the Leuthold Core Investment Fund, and the Leuthold Global Fund may, in response to adverse market, economic, political, or other conditions, take temporary defensive positions. A Fund may not be able to achieve its investment objective when it takes a temporary defensive position. This means that these Funds may invest more than 20% of their assets in money market instruments (like U.S. Treasury Bills, commercial paper, or repurchase agreements). None of these Funds will seek capital appreciation to the extent that it invests in money market instruments since these securities earn interest but do not appreciate in value. When these Funds are not taking a temporary defensive position, they still may hold some cash and money market instruments so that they can pay their expenses, satisfy redemption requests, take advantage of investment opportunities, or as part of their normal asset allocation process. A description of how the Funds allocate their assets, if applicable, and make individual securities selections follows.


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How Leuthold Core Investment Fund Allocates Assets

The Adviser allocates the Leuthold Core Investment Fund’s investments among asset classes as follows:

First, the absolute, or stand-alone, investment appeal of each major asset class is evaluated with models containing inputs that are typically unique to each respective asset class. For instance, The Leuthold Group’s Major Trend Index is designed to identify the investment appeal of common stocks independent of either the price movements or valuation appeal of other asset classes.

Second, the relative investment appeal of major asset classes—stocks, bonds, real estate investment trusts, commodities, and cash—are evaluated based on a three-pronged model that considers long-term expected returns, cyclical conditions, and intermediate-term technical market action.

Finally, the Adviser considers the output of both the “relative” and “absolute” sets of asset class models in continually adjusting asset allocation.

How Leuthold Core Investment Fund Makes Individual Security Selections

After the Adviser has determined the appropriate allocations among asset classes, it selects individual investments as follows:

For investments in bonds and debt securities (other than money market instruments), the Adviser will first compare the anticipated returns and risks of U.S. Treasury Notes and Bonds, foreign government debt securities (without limitation as to rating), and corporate fixed-income securities (without limitation as to rating) and determine how much to invest in each sector. Next, the Adviser will consider interest rate trends and economic indicators to determine the desired maturity of the portfolio of debt securities for the Leuthold Core Investment Fund. The Fund may invest indirectly in fixed-income securities by investing in mutual funds, exchange-traded funds, or closed-end investment companies which invest in such securities. It may do so to obtain a diversified exposure to high yield or “junk” bonds.

For the Leuthold Core Investment Fund’s investments in common stocks and other equity securities, the Adviser uses the Select Industries Strategy.

In addition to investing in individual stocks, the Leuthold Core Investment Fund may invest in mutual funds, exchange-traded funds, unit investment trusts, or closed-end investment companies which invest in a specific category of common stocks. The Leuthold Core Investment Fund may do so to obtain (a) exposure to international equity markets by investing in international funds, (b) increased exposure to a particular industry by investing in a sector fund, or (c) a broad exposure to small capitalization stocks by investing in small cap funds.

How Leuthold Global Fund Allocates Assets

The Adviser allocates the Fund’s investments among the three asset classes as follows:

First, the Adviser analyzes the global bond market with the goal of determining the risks and returns that debt securities issued by governments and companies in the United States and in foreign countries present over the next one to five years.

Next, the Adviser assesses the probability that common stocks of United States and foreign companies as an asset class will perform better than the global bond market. In doing so, it considers The Leuthold Group’s Major Trend Index. This proprietary index is evaluated weekly by The Leuthold Group.

Finally, the Adviser implements the asset allocation strategy. In doing so, the Adviser may purchase put or call options on stock indexes or engage in short sales of index-related and other securities to adjust the exposure of the Fund.

How Leuthold Global Fund Makes Individual Security Selections

For the Leuthold Global Fund’s investments in bonds and debt securities (other than money market instruments), the Adviser will first compare the anticipated returns and risks of U.S. government debt securities, foreign government debt securities (without limitation as to rating), and domestic and foreign corporate fixed-


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income securities (without limitation as to rating) and determine how much to invest in each sector. Next, the Adviser will consider interest rate trends and economic indicators to determine the desired maturity of the portfolio of debt securities for the Fund. The Fund may invest indirectly in fixed-income securities by investing in mutual funds, exchange-traded funds, or closed-end investment companies which invest in such securities. It may do so to obtain a diversified exposure to high yield or “junk” bonds.

For the Leuthold Global Fund’s investments in common stocks and other equity securities, the Adviser uses the Global Group Strategy as well as other quantitative investment strategies.

The Leuthold Global Fund may invest in mutual funds, exchange-traded funds, unit investment trusts, or closed-end investment companies which invest in a specific category of common stocks. The Fund may do so to obtain (a) exposure to certain foreign markets by investing in international funds, (b) increased exposure to a particular industry by investing in a sector fund, or (c) a broad exposure to small capitalization stocks by investing in small cap funds.

Non-Principal Risks for Leuthold Core Investment Fund and Leuthold Global Fund

There are a number of non-principal risks associated with the various securities in which the Leuthold Core Investment Fund and the Leuthold Global Fund (unless otherwise noted) will at times invest. These include:

Risks associated with Zero-Coupon U.S. Treasury Securities. Zero-coupon U.S. Treasury securities are U.S. Treasury Notes and Bonds that have been stripped of their unmatured interest coupons by the U.S. Department of Treasury. Zero-coupon U.S. Treasury securities are generally subject to greater fluctuation in value in response to changing interest rates than debt obligations that pay interest currently.

Risks associated with Small Cap Stocks. Stocks of smaller capitalization companies tend to be riskier investments than stocks of larger capitalization companies. Smaller capitalization companies may have limited product lines, markets, market share, and financial resources or they may be dependent on a small or inexperienced management team. Stocks of smaller

capitalization companies may trade less frequently and in more limited volume and may be subject to greater and more abrupt price swings than stocks of larger companies.

Risks associated with High Yield Securities. These Funds may invest directly or indirectly in high yield securities, including high yield debt instruments of foreign corporations. High yield securities (or “junk bonds”) provide greater income and opportunity for gains than higher-rated securities but entail greater risk of loss of principal. High yield securities are predominantly speculative with respect to the issuer’s capacity to pay interest and repay principal in accordance with the terms of the obligation. The market for high yield securities is generally less active than the market for higher quality securities. This may limit the ability of the Funds, or investment companies in which they invest, to sell high yield securities at the price at which it is being valued for purposes of calculating net asset value.

Risks associated with purchasing Put and Call Options. If one of these Funds purchases a put or call option and does not exercise or sell it prior to the option’s expiration date, the Fund will realize a loss in the amount of the entire premium paid, plus commission costs. It is possible, although not likely, that there may be times when a market for the Funds’ outstanding options does not exist.

Additional costs associated with Registered Investment Companies. When one of the Funds invests in a mutual fund or exchange-traded fund, the Fund’s stockholders bear not only their proportionate share of the expenses of the Fund (such as operating costs and investment advisory fees) but also, indirectly, similar expenses of the other funds in which the Fund invests.

Risks associated with investing in Metals. Each of the Funds may invest directly in metals such as aluminum, copper, zinc, lead, nickel, tin, silver, palladium, and other industrial and precious metals. In connection with such investments, the Fund may enter into agreements where it “pre-pays” for metals which are delivered at a later date (“Pre-Paid Physical Agreements”). The prices of such metals may be subject to substantial price fluctuations and may be affected by broad economic, financial, and political factors, including inflation, metal sales by governments or international agencies, speculation, changes in industrial and commercial demand, currency


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devaluations or revaluations, trade imbalances, and governmental prohibitions or restrictions. Further, investments in metals can present concerns such as delivery, storage and maintenance, possible illiquidity, and the unavailability of accurate market valuations. There is also the risk that parties that act as custodians for the metals held by the Fund or with which it has entered into Pre-Paid Physical Agreements may become insolvent and file for bankruptcy protection.

Risks associated with Commodity-Related Investments. The value of commodities investments will generally be affected by overall market movements and factors specific to a particular industry or commodity, which may include demand for the commodity, weather, embargoes, tariffs, and economic health, political, international, regulatory and other developments. Exposure to commodities and commodities markets may subject the value of a Fund’s investments to greater volatility than other types of investments. Commodities investments may also subject a Fund to counterparty risk and liquidity risk.

Risks associated with Real Estate Investment Trusts (REITs). Investments in REITs expose a Fund to risks similar to investing directly in real estate. REITs are characterized as equity REITs, mortgage REITs, and hybrid REITs, which combine the characteristics of both equity and mortgage REITs. The value of securities issued by REITs is affected by tax and regulatory requirements and by perceptions of management skill. They also may be affected by general economic conditions and are subject to heavy cash flow dependency, defaults by borrowers or tenants, self-liquidation at an economically disadvantageous time, and the possibility of failing to qualify for favorable tax treatment under applicable U.S. or foreign law and/or to maintain exempt status under the Investment Company Act.

Risks associated with Emerging Markets. Investing in emerging market countries involves certain risks not typically associated with investing in the United States, and imposes risks greater than, or in addition to, risks of investing in more developed foreign countries.

Non-Principal Risks for All Funds

The Funds are subject to the following non-principal risks:

Cybersecurity Risk. Cybersecurity incidents may allow an unauthorized party to gain access to Fund assets, customer data (including private stockholder information), or proprietary information, or cause a Fund, the Adviser and/or the Funds’ service providers (including, but not limited to, Fund accountants, custodians, sub-custodians, transfer agents and financial intermediaries) to suffer data breaches, data corruption or lose operational functionality.

Redemption Risk. A Fund may experience periods of heavy redemptions that could cause the Fund to liquidate its assets at inopportune times or at a loss or depressed value, particularly during periods of declining or illiquid markets. Redemption risk is greater to the extent that a Fund has investors with large shareholdings, short investment horizons, or unpredictable cash flow needs. In addition, redemption risk is heightened during periods of overall market turmoil. The redemption by one or more large stockholders of their holdings in a Fund could hurt performance and/or cause the remaining stockholders in the Fund to lose money. If a Fund is forced to liquidate its assets under unfavorable conditions or at inopportune times, the value of your investment could decline.

Cash Management and Defensive Investing Risk. The value of the investments held by a Fund for cash management or defensive investing purposes can fluctuate. If a Fund holds cash uninvested it will be subject to the credit risk of the depository institution holding the cash. If a Fund holds cash uninvested, the Fund will not earn income on the cash. If a significant amount of a Fund’s assets are used for cash management or defensive investing purposes, it may not achieve its investment objective.

Disclosure of Portfolio Holdings

A description of the Funds’ policies and procedures with respect to the disclosure of each Fund’s portfolio securities is available in the Funds’ Statement of Additional Information.


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OTHER INFORMATION ABOUT PRINCIPAL INVESTMENT OBJECTIVES AND STRATEGIES, AND NON-PRINCIPAL RISKS LEUTHOLD CORE ETF

Investment Objective and Principal Investment Strategies of the Fund

The Leuthold Core ETF seeks capital appreciation and income (or “total return”). The Fund’s investment objective has been adopted as a non-fundamental investment policy and may be changed without shareholder approval upon written notice to shareholders.

The Fund is an actively-managed “exchange-traded fund of funds” and seeks to achieve its objective by investing primarily in other registered investment companies, including other actively-managed exchange-traded funds (“ETFs”) and index-based ETFs (collectively, “Underlying Funds”), that provide exposure to a broad range of asset classes. The Fund will not invest more than 25% in any Underlying Fund. The Underlying Funds may invest in equity securities of U.S. or foreign companies; debt obligations of U.S. or foreign companies or governments; or investments such as volatility indexes and managed futures. The Fund allocates its assets across asset classes, geographic regions, and industries, subject to certain diversification and liquidity considerations. The Fund’s investments in foreign countries may include exposure to emerging markets. The Fund generally defines emerging market countries as countries that are not included in the MSCI World Index of major world economies.

The Fund considers a number of factors when making its allocations, including economic conditions and monetary factors, inflation and interest rate levels and trends, investor confidence, and technical stock market measures. Specifically, the Fund uses a disciplined, unemotional, quantitative investment approach that is based on the belief investors can achieve superior investment performance through sector selection. Pursuant to this approach, the investment adviser believes that as shifts among industry sectors in the equity

market have become more dramatic, sector selection has become an important aspect in determining investment performance. The investment adviser considers a sector to be a collection of stocks whose investment performance tends to be similarly influenced by a variety of factors. Examples include “Information Technology,” “Health Care,” and “Consumer Discretionary.” The investment adviser continuously updates its investment discipline and adjusts the Fund’s portfolio as necessary to keep the Fund invested in sectors which the Adviser believes are the most attractive.

Section 12(d)(1)(A) of the Investment Company Act, in relevant part, prohibits a registered investment company from acquiring shares of an investment company if after such acquisition the securities represent more than 3% of the total outstanding voting stock of the acquired company, more than 5% of the total assets of the acquiring company, or, together with the securities of any other investment companies, more than 10% of the total assets of the acquiring company except in reliance on certain exceptions contained in the Investment Company Act and the rules and regulations thereunder. As permitted by the Securities and Exchange Commission in the adopting release for Rule 6c-11, the Fund is permitted to invest in both affiliated and unaffiliated investment companies, including Underlying Funds in excess of the limits in Section 12 of the Investment Company Act subject to the terms and conditions in recent ETF exemptive orders.

The Fund expects that normally:

30% to 70% of its total assets will be invested in Underlying Funds that principally invest in common stocks and other equity securities (such Underlying Funds may invest principally in specific sectors of the economy, such as healthcare, financials, real estate, and energy or in broader swaths of domestic, foreign, or global equity market;

30% to 70% of its net assets will be invested in Underlying Funds that principally invest in bonds and other debt securities (other than money market instruments), except during prolonged periods of low interest rates; and

up to 20% of its assets will be invested in Underlying Funds that principally invest in near-cash investments.


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Underlying Funds that invest in bonds and other debt securities may invest in U.S. government debt, sovereign debt, U.S. and foreign corporate debt, high-yield debt (also known as “junk bonds”), U.S. government agency issued mortgage debt, structured debt, and U.S. government agency issued asset-backed securities. Such Underlying Funds may hold debt denominated in U.S. dollars or foreign currencies. The Fund has no limitation on the range of maturities or credit quality of the debt in which Underlying Funds may invest.

Underlying Funds used for real estate exposure may invest some or all of their assets in real estate investment trusts (“REITs”), and Underlying Funds used for energy exposure may invest some or all of their assets in master limited partnerships (“MLPs”), but investments in these type of Underlying Funds will not be a principal investment strategy.

In addition to the Underlying Funds, the Fund may invest in non-investment company exchange-traded products (“ETPs” and together with the Underlying Funds, “Underlying Investments”).

The Fund may invest up to 20% of its total assets in Underlying Investments that invest some or all of their assets in commodities, volatility indexes, and managed futures. The Fund may engage, on a non-principal basis, in short sales of index-related and other equity securities to reduce its equity exposure or to profit from an anticipated decline in the price of the security sold short.

The Fund will invest in Underlying Investments that may include the following equity strategies:

Large, mid, or small capitalization common stocks;

Growth stocks, value stocks, or cyclical stocks;

Aggressive stocks or defensive stocks;

Stocks in any industry or sector;

Stocks in emerging and less developed markets;

Common stocks of foreign issuers; and

Options.

Leuthold Weeden Capital Management (referred to as the “Adviser”) selects specific Underlying Investments based on an evaluation of their market exposure, liquidity, cost, and historic tracking error relative to

their underlying index or benchmark. The Adviser continuously updates its investment discipline and adjusts the Fund’s portfolio as necessary to keep the Fund invested in Underlying Investments which the Adviser believes are the most attractive. Such adjustments usually result in high portfolio turnover.

Principal Risks of Investing in the Fund

The following information is in addition to, and should be read along with, the description of the Fund’s principal investment risks discussed above. Each of the factors below could have a negative impact on Fund performance and trading prices.

Asset Allocation Risk. The Fund may favor an asset category or investment strategy that performs poorly relative to other asset categories and investment strategies for short or long periods of time. The Adviser’s decisions as to the allocation of assets may be based on historic information and may not reflect more recent technical or fundamental metrics. Additionally, because the Fund may weight certain asset categories or investment strategies at zero, the Fund may miss positive changes in an asset category’s or investment strategy’s performance and fail to capture upside performance for an asset category or investment strategy.

Currency Exchange Rate Risk. Changes in currency exchange rates and the relative value of non-U.S. currencies will affect the value of the Fund’s Underlying Investments with underlying foreign shares and the value of your Shares. Because the Fund’s NAV is determined on the basis of U.S. dollars, the U.S. dollar value of your investment in the Fund may go down if the value of the local currency of the non-U.S. markets in which the Fund invests through Underlying Investments depreciates against the U.S. dollar. This is true even if the local currency value of securities held by the Fund goes up. Conversely, the dollar value of your investment in the Fund may go up if the value of the local currency appreciates against the U.S. dollar. The value of the U.S. dollar measured against other currencies is influenced by a variety of factors. These factors include: national debt levels and trade deficits, changes in balances of payments and trade, domestic and foreign interest and inflation rates, global or regional political, economic or financial events, monetary policies of governments, actual or potential government intervention, and global energy prices. Political instability, the possibility of


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government intervention and restrictive or opaque business and investment policies may also reduce the value of a country’s currency. Government monetary policies and the buying or selling of currency by a country’s government may also influence exchange rates. Currency exchange rates can be very volatile and can change quickly and unpredictably. As a result, the value of an investment in the Fund may change quickly and without warning, and you may lose money.

Foreign and Emerging Markets Securities Risk. Investments in securities and instruments traded in developing or emerging markets, or that provide exposure to such securities or markets, can involve additional risks relating to political, economic, or regulatory conditions not associated with investments in U.S. securities and instruments. For example, developing and emerging markets may be subject to (i) greater market volatility, (ii) lower trading volume and liquidity, (iii) greater social, political and economic uncertainty, (iv) governmental controls on foreign investments and limitations on repatriation of invested capital, (v) lower disclosure, corporate governance, auditing and financial reporting standards, (vi) fewer protections of property rights, (vii) restrictions on the transfer of securities or currency, and (viii) settlement and trading practices that differ from those in U.S. markets. Each of these factors may impact the ability of an Underlying Investment to buy, sell or otherwise transfer securities, adversely affect the trading market and price for Underlying Investment shares and cause the Fund to decline in value.

Capital Controls and Sanctions Risk. Economic conditions, such as volatile currency exchange rates and interest rates, political events, military action and other conditions may, without prior warning, lead to government intervention (including intervention by the U.S. government with respect to foreign governments, economic sectors, foreign companies and related securities and interests) and the imposition of capital controls and/or sanctions, which may also include retaliatory actions of one government against another government, such as seizure of assets. Capital controls and/or sanctions include the prohibition of, or restrictions on, the ability to transfer currency, securities or other assets. Levies may be placed on profits repatriated by foreign entities (such as the Underlying Investments). Capital controls and/or sanctions may also impact the ability of an Underlying Investment to buy, sell or

otherwise transfer securities or currency, negatively impact the value and/or liquidity of such instruments, adversely affect the trading market and price for shares of the Underlying Investments, and cause the Underlying Investment and the Fund to decline in value.

Geopolitical Risk. Some countries and regions in which the Underlying Investments invest have experienced security concerns, war or threats of war and aggression, terrorism, economic uncertainty, natural and environmental disasters and/or systemic market dislocations that have led, and in the future may lead, to increased short-term market volatility and may have adverse long-term effects on the U.S. and world economies and markets generally. Such geopolitical and other events may also disrupt securities markets and, during such market disruptions, the Fund’s exposure to the other risks described herein, through the Underlying Investments, will likely increase. Each of the foregoing may negatively impact the Fund’s investments.

Market Risk. Common stocks are susceptible to general stock market fluctuations and to volatile increases and decreases in value as market confidence in and perceptions of their issuers change. These investor perceptions are based on various and unpredictable factors including: expectations regarding government, economic, monetary and fiscal policies; inflation and interest rates; economic expansion or contraction; and global or regional political, economic and banking crises. If you held common stock, or common stock equivalents, of any given issuer, you would generally be exposed to greater risk than if you held preferred stocks and debt obligations of the issuer because common stockholders, or holders of equivalent interests, generally have inferior rights to receive payments from issuers in comparison with the rights of preferred stockholders, bondholders, and other creditors of such issuers.

The prices of the securities, particularly the common stocks in which Underlying Investments may invest, may decline for a number of reasons. The price declines of common stocks, in particular, may be steep, sudden, and/or prolonged. In the past decade financial markets throughout the world have experienced increased volatility and heightened uncertainty. A rise in protectionist trade policies, slowing global economic growth, risks associated with the United Kingdom’s vote to leave the European Union, the trade dispute between the United States and China, the risk of trade disputes


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with other countries, and the possibility of changes to some international trade agreements, could affect the economies of many nations, including the United States, in ways that cannot necessarily be foreseen at the present time.

Fixed Income Securities Risk. Fixed income securities, such as bonds and certain asset-backed securities, involve certain risks, which include:

Credit Risk. Credit risk refers to the possibility that the issuer of a security will not be able to make principal and interest payments when due. Changes in an issuer’s credit rating or the market’s perception of an issuer’s creditworthiness may also affect the value of the Underlying Investment’s investment in that issuer. The degree of credit risk depends on both the financial condition of the issuer and the terms of the obligation.

Event Risk. Event risk is the risk that corporate issuers may undergo restructurings, such as mergers, leveraged buyouts, takeovers, or similar events financed by increased debt. As a result of the added debt, the credit quality and market value of a company’s bonds and/or other debt securities may decline significantly.

Extension Risk. When interest rates rise, certain obligations will be paid off by the obligor more slowly than anticipated, causing the value of these securities to fall. Rising interest rates tend to extend the duration of securities, making them more sensitive to future changes in interest rates. The value of longer-term securities generally changes more in response to changes in interest rates than the value of shorter-term securities. As a result, in a period of rising interest rates, securities may exhibit additional volatility and may lose value.

Interest Rate Risk. Generally, the value of fixed income securities will change inversely with changes in interest rates. As interest rates rise, the market value of fixed income securities tends to decrease. Conversely, as interest rates fall, the market value of fixed income securities tends to increase. This risk will be greater for long-term securities than for short-term securities. An Underlying Investment may take steps to attempt to reduce the exposure of its portfolio to interest rate changes; however, there can be no guarantee that the Fund will take such actions or that the Fund will be successful in reducing the impact of interest rate changes on the portfolio. In recent periods, governmental financial regulators, including the U.S. Federal Reserve,

have taken steps to maintain historically low interest rates. Changes in government intervention may have adverse effects on investments, volatility, and illiquidity in debt markets.

Prepayment Risk. When interest rates fall, certain obligations will be paid off by the obligor more quickly than originally anticipated, and the Fund may have to invest the proceeds in securities with lower yields. In periods of falling interest rates, the rate of prepayments tends to increase (as does price fluctuation) as borrowers are motivated to pay off debt and refinance at new lower rates. During such periods, reinvestment of the prepayment proceeds by the management team will generally be at lower rates of return than the return on the assets that were prepaid. Prepayment reduces the yield to maturity and the average life of the security.

Variable and Floating Rate Instrument Risk. The absence of an active market for these securities could make it difficult for the Underlying Investment to dispose of them if the issuer defaults.

Foreign Securities Risk. Investments in foreign securities involve certain risks that may not be present with investments in U.S. securities. For example, investments in foreign securities may be subject to risk of loss due to foreign currency fluctuations or to political or economic instability. There may be less information publicly available about a foreign issuer than a U.S. issuer. Foreign issuers may be subject to different accounting, auditing, financial reporting and investor protection standards than U.S. issuers. Investments in foreign securities may be subject to withholding or other taxes and may be subject to additional trading, settlement, custodial, and operational risks. With respect to certain countries, there is the possibility of government intervention and expropriation or nationalization of assets. Because legal systems differ, there is also the possibility that it will be difficult to obtain or enforce legal judgments in certain countries. Since foreign exchanges may be open on days when the Underlying Investment does not price its shares, the value of the securities in the Underlying Investment’s portfolio may change on days when shareholders will not be able to purchase or sell the Underlying Investment’s or the Fund’s shares. Conversely, the Underlying Investment’s and the Fund’s shares may trade on days when foreign exchanges are closed. Each of these factors can make investments in the Fund more volatile and potentially less liquid than other types of investments.


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High Portfolio Turnover Risk: The Fund’s annual portfolio turnover may exceed 100%. (Generally speaking, a turnover rate of 100% occurs when the Fund replaces securities valued at 100% of its average net assets within a one year period.) High portfolio turnover (100% or more) will result in the Fund incurring more transaction costs such as brokerage commissions or mark-ups or mark-downs. Payment of those transaction costs reduces total return. High portfolio turnover could result in the payment by the Fund’s stockholders of increased taxes on realized gains. Distributions to the Fund’s stockholders, to the extent they are short-term capital gains, will be taxed at ordinary income rates for federal income tax purposes, rather than at lower capital gains rates.

Quantitative Investment Approach Risk: The Fund utilizes a quantitative investment approach. While the Adviser continuously reviews and refines, if necessary, its investment approach, there may be market conditions where the quantitative investment approach performs poorly.

Liquidity Risk: Liquidity risk is the risk, due to certain investments trading in lower volumes or to market and economic conditions, that the Fund may be unable to find a buyer for its investments when it seeks to sell them or to receive the price it expects based on the Fund’s valuation of the investments. Events that may lead to increased redemptions, such as market disruptions, may also negatively impact the liquidity of the Fund’s investments when it needs to dispose of them. If the Fund is forced to sell its investments at an unfavorable time and/or under adverse conditions in order to meet redemption requests, such sales could negatively affect the Fund. Liquidity issues may also make it difficult to value the Fund’s investments.

High-Yield Securities Risk. Unrated or lower-rated fixed income securities and other instruments, sometimes referred to as “high yield” or “junk” bonds, may include securities that have the lowest rating or are in default. Investing in lower-rated or unrated securities involves special risks in addition to the risks associated with investments in higher-rated fixed income securities, including a high degree of credit risk. Lower-rated or unrated securities may be regarded as predominately speculative with respect to the issuer’s continuing ability to meet principal and interest payments. Analysis of the creditworthiness of issuers/issues of lower-rated

or unrated securities may be more complex than for issuers/issues of higher quality debt securities. Lower-rated or unrated securities may be more susceptible to losses and real or perceived adverse economic and competitive industry conditions than higher-grade securities. Securities that are in the lowest rating category are considered to have extremely poor prospects of ever attaining any real investment standing, to have a current identifiable vulnerability to default, and to be unlikely to have the capacity to pay interest and repay principal. The secondary markets on which lower-rated or unrated securities are traded may be less liquid than the market for higher-grade securities. Less liquidity in the secondary trading markets could adversely affect and cause large fluctuations in the value of such investments. Adverse publicity and investor perceptions, whether or not based on fundamental analysis, may decrease the values and liquidity of lower-rated or unrated securities, especially in a thinly traded market. It is possible that a major economic recession could disrupt severely the market for such securities and may have an adverse impact on the value of such securities. In addition, it is possible that any such economic downturn could adversely affect the ability of the issuers of such securities to repay principal and pay interest thereon and increase the incidence of default of such securities. Furthermore, with respect to certain residential and commercial mortgage-backed securities, it is difficult to obtain current reliable information regarding delinquency rates, prepayment rates, servicing records, as well as updated cash flows. The use of credit ratings as the sole method of evaluating lower-rated or unrated securities can involve certain risks. For example, credit ratings evaluate the safety of principal and interest payments, not the market value risk of lower-rated securities. In addition, credit rating agencies may fail to change credit ratings in a timely fashion to reflect events since the security was rated.

Investment Company Risk. The Fund may invest in shares of investment companies, such as ETFs, that invest in a wide range of instruments designed to track the performance of a particular securities market index (or sector of an index) or that are actively-managed. The risks of investment in these securities typically reflect the risks of the types of instruments in which the investment company invests. When the Fund invests in investment company securities, shareholders of the Fund bear indirectly their proportionate share of their fees and expenses, as well as their share of the Fund’s fees and


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expenses. As a result, an investment by the Fund in an investment company will cause the Fund’s operating expenses (taking into account indirect expenses such as the fees and expenses of the investment company) to be higher and, in turn, performance to be lower than if it were to invest directly in the instruments underlying the investment company. Additionally, there may not be an active trading market available for shares of some ETFs. Shares of an ETF may also trade in the market at a premium or discount to their NAV.

Managed Futures Strategy/Commodities Risk. Investments in managed futures programs may subject an Underlying Investment to greater volatility than investments in traditional securities. Commodities are real assets such as oil, agriculture, livestock, industrial metals, and precious metals such as gold or silver. Prices of commodities and related contracts may fluctuate significantly over short periods for a variety of reasons, including weather and natural disasters; governmental, agricultural, trade, fiscal, monetary and exchange control programs and policies; acts of terrorism, tariffs and U.S. and international economic, political, military and regulatory developments. The demand and supply of these commodities may also fluctuate widely based on such factors as interest rates, investors’ expectation with respect to the rate of inflation, currency exchange rates, the production and cost levels of the producers and/or forward selling by such producers, global or regional political, economic or financial events, purchases and sales by central banks, and trading activities by hedge funds and other commodity funds. Commodity Underlying Investments may use derivatives, such as futures, options, and swaps, which expose them to further risks, including counterparty risk (i.e., the risk that the institution on the other side of the trade will default).

Management Risk. The Fund is actively-managed and may not meet its investment objective based on the Adviser’s success or failure to implement investment strategies for the Fund.

Mortgage- and Asset-Backed Securities Risk. Mortgage-backed securities (residential and commercial) and asset-backed securities represent interests in “pools” of mortgages or other assets, including consumer loans or receivables held in trust. Although asset-backed and commercial mortgage-backed securities (“CMBS”) generally experience less prepayment risk than residential mortgage-backed securities (“RMBS”),

each of RMBS, CMBS and asset-backed securities, like traditional fixed-income securities, are subject to credit, interest rate, prepayment and extension risks. See “Fixed Income Securities Risk” above.

Small movements in interest rates (both increases and decreases) may quickly and significantly reduce the value of certain mortgage-backed securities. The Fund’s investments in asset-backed securities are subject to risks similar to those associated with mortgage-related securities, as well as additional risks associated with the nature of the assets and the servicing of those assets. These securities also are subject to the risk of default on the underlying mortgage or assets, particularly during periods of economic downturn. Certain CMBS are issued in several classes with different levels of yield and credit protection. The Fund’s investments in CMBS with several classes may be in the lower classes that have greater risks than the higher classes, including greater interest rate, credit and prepayment risks.

Asset-backed securities entail certain risks not presented by mortgage-backed securities, including the risk that in certain states it may be difficult to perfect the liens securing the collateral backing certain asset-backed securities. In addition, certain asset-backed securities are based on loans that are unsecured, which means that there is no collateral to seize if the underlying borrower defaults. Certain mortgage-backed securities in which the Fund may invest may also provide a degree of investment leverage, which could cause the Fund to lose all or substantially all of its investment.

Residential Mortgage-Backed Securities Risk. The Fund may invest in RMBS. Holders of RMBS bear various risks, including credit, market, interest rate, structural, and legal risks. RMBS represent interests in pools of residential mortgage loans secured by one to four family residential mortgage loans. RMBS are particularly susceptible to prepayment risks, as they generally do not contain prepayment penalties and a reduction in interest rates will increase the prepayments on the RMBS.

The rate of defaults and losses on residential mortgage loans will be affected by a number of factors, including general economic conditions and those in the geographic area where the mortgaged property is located, the terms of the mortgage loan, the borrower’s equity in the mortgaged property, and the financial circumstances of the borrower. Certain mortgage loans


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may be of sub-prime credit quality (i.e., do not meet the customary credit standards of Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac). Delinquencies and liquidation proceedings are more likely with sub-prime mortgage loans than with mortgage loans that satisfy customary credit standards. If a portfolio of RMBS is backed by loans with disproportionately large aggregate principal amounts secured by properties in only a few states or regions in the United States, residential mortgage loans may be more susceptible to geographic risks relating to such areas. Violation of laws, public policies, and principles designed to protect consumers may limit the servicer’s ability to collect all or part of the principal or interest on a residential mortgage loan, entitle the borrower to a refund of amounts previously paid by it, or subject the servicer to damages and administrative enforcement. Any such violation could also result in cash flow delays and losses on the related issue of RMBS. It is not expected that RMBS will be guaranteed or insured by any U.S. governmental agency or instrumentality or by any other person. Distributions on RMBS will depend solely upon the amount and timing of payments and other collections on the related underlying mortgage loans.

Non-Investment-Grade RMBS Risk. The Fund may invest in RMBS that are non-investment grade, which means that major rating agencies rate them below the top four investment-grade rating categories (i.e., “AAA” through “BBB”). Non-investment grade RMBS tend to be less liquid, may have a higher risk of default, and may be more difficult to value than investment grade bonds. Recessions or poor economic or pricing conditions in the markets associated with RMBS may cause defaults or losses on loans underlying such securities. Non-investment grade securities are considered speculative, and their capacity to pay principal and interest in accordance with the terms of their issue is not certain, which may impair the Fund’s performance and reduce the return on its investments.

New Fund Risk. The Fund is a recently organized, diversified management investment company with a limited operating history. As a result, prospective investors have a limited track record or history on which to base their investment decision.

REIT Investment Risk. Investments in REITs involve unique risks. REITs may have limited financial resources, may trade less frequently and in limited volume, and may be more volatile than other securities. In addition, to the

extent the Fund holds interests in REITs, it is expected that investors in the Fund will bear two layers of asset-based management fees and expenses (directly at the Fund level and indirectly at the REIT level). The risks of investing in REITs include certain risks associated with the direct ownership of real estate and the real estate industry in general. These include risks related to general, regional and local economic conditions; fluctuations in interest rates and property tax rates; shifts in zoning laws, environmental regulations and other governmental action such as the exercise of eminent domain; cash flow dependency; increased operating expenses; lack of availability of mortgage funds; losses due to natural disasters; overbuilding; losses due to casualty or condemnation; changes in property values and rental rates; and other factors.

In addition to these risks, residential/diversified REITs and commercial equity REITs may be affected by changes in the value of the underlying property owned by the trusts, while mortgage REITs may be affected by the quality of any credit extended. Further, REITs are dependent upon management skills and generally may not be diversified. REITs are also subject to heavy cash flow dependency, defaults by borrowers and self-liquidation. In addition, REITs could possibly fail to qualify for the beneficial tax treatment available to REITs under the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 (the “Code”), or to maintain their exemptions from registration under the Investment Company Act of 1940, as amended (the “1940 Act”). The Fund expects that dividends received from a REIT and distributed to Fund shareholders generally will be taxable to the shareholder as ordinary income. The above factors may also adversely affect a borrower’s or a lessee’s ability to meet its obligations to the REIT. In the event of a default by a borrower or lessee, the REIT may experience delays in enforcing its rights as a mortgagee or lessor and may incur substantial costs associated with protecting investments.

Sector Risk. The Fund’s investing approach may dictate an emphasis on certain sectors, industries, or sub-sectors of the market at any given time. To the extent the Fund invests more heavily in one sector, industry, or sub-sector of the market, it thereby presents a more concentrated risk and its performance will be especially sensitive to developments that significantly affect those sectors, industries, or sub-sectors. In addition, the value of Shares may change at different rates compared to the


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value of shares of a fund with investments in a more diversified mix of sectors and industries. An individual sector, industry, or sub-sector of the market may have above-average performance during particular periods, but may also move up and down more than the broader market. The several industries that constitute a sector may all react in the same way to economic, political or regulatory events. The Fund’s performance could also be affected if the sectors, industries, or sub-sectors do not perform as expected. Alternatively, the lack of exposure to one or more sectors or industries may adversely affect performance.

Shares May Trade at Prices Other Than NAV. As with all ETFs, Shares may be bought and sold in the secondary market at market prices. Although it is expected that the market price of the Shares will approximate the Fund’s NAV, there may be times when the market price and the NAV vary significantly, including due to supply and demand of the Fund’s Shares and/or during periods of market volatility. Thus, you may pay more (or less) than NAV intra-day when you buy Shares in the secondary market, and you may receive more (or less) than NAV when you sell those Shares in the secondary market. This risk is heightened in times of market volatility, periods of steep market declines, and periods when there is limited trading activity for Shares in the secondary market, in which case such premiums or discounts may be significant.

Because securities held by the Underlying Investments in which the Fund invests may trade on foreign exchanges that are closed when the Fund’s and each Underlying Investment’s primary listing exchange is open, there are likely to be deviations between the current price of an Underlying Investment’s underlying security and the security’s last quoted price from the closed foreign market. This may result in premiums and discounts that are greater than those experienced by domestic ETFs.

Small and Mid-Capitalization Company Risk. Small and mid-capitalization companies may be more vulnerable to adverse issuer, market, political, or economic developments than securities of larger-capitalization companies. The securities of small-and mid-capitalization companies generally trade in lower volumes and are subject to greater and more unpredictable price changes than larger capitalization stocks or the stock market as a whole. Some smaller capitalization companies have limited product lines,

markets, and financial and managerial resources and tend to concentrate on fewer geographical markets relative to larger capitalization companies. There is typically less publicly available information concerning smaller-capitalization companies than for larger, more established companies. Smaller-capitalization companies also may be particularly sensitive to changes in interest rates, government regulation, borrowing costs and earnings.

Tax Law Change Risk: Tax law is subject to change, possibly with retroactive effect, or to different interpretations. In particular, Congress is considering substantial changes to U.S. federal income tax laws, and some with retroactive effect, that could result in substantial adverse U.S. federal income tax consequences to the Fund and its shareholders. Any future changes are highly uncertain, and the impact on the Fund or its shareholders cannot be predicted. Prospective shareholders should consult their own tax advisors regarding the impact to them of possible changes in tax laws.

Non-Principal Risks of Investing in the Fund

This section provides additional information regarding certain non-principal risks of investing in the Leuthold Core ETF. Each of the factors below could have a negative impact on the Fund’s performance and trading prices.

MLP Risk. MLPs involve risks related to limited control and limited rights to vote on matters affecting the MLP, risks related to potential conflicts of interest between the MLP and the MLP’s general partner, and cash flow risks. MLP common units and other equity securities can be affected by macroeconomic and other factors affecting the stock market in general, expectations of interest rates, investor sentiment towards MLPs or the energy sector, changes in a particular issuer’s financial condition or unfavorable or unanticipated poor performance of a particular issuer (in the case of MLPs, generally measured in terms of distributable cash flow). Prices of common units of individual MLPs and other equity securities also can be affected by fundamentals unique to the partnership or company, including earnings power and coverage ratios. If an Underlying Fund holds an MLP until its cost basis for tax purposes is reduced to zero, subsequent distributions received by the Underlying Fund will be taxed at ordinary income rates, and a shareholder may receive a corrected Form 1099.


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MLPs typically do not pay U.S. federal income tax at the partnership level. Instead, each partner is allocated a share of the partnership’s income, gains, losses, deductions and expenses. A change in current tax law or in the underlying business mix of a given MLP could result in an MLP being treated as a corporation for U.S. federal income tax purposes, which would result in such MLP being required to pay U.S. federal income tax on its taxable income. The classification of an MLP as a corporation for U.S. federal income tax purposes would have the effect of reducing the amount of cash available for distribution by the MLP. Thus, if any of the MLPs owned by an Underlying Investment were treated as corporations for U.S. federal income tax purposes, it could result in a reduction of the value of the Fund’s investment in the Underlying Investment and lower income, as compared to an MLP that is not taxed as a corporation.

Short Sales Risk: The Fund will suffer a loss if it sells a security short and the value of the security rises rather than falls. It is possible that the Fund’s long positions will decline in value at the same time that the value of its securities sold short increase, thereby increasing potential losses to the Fund. Short sales expose the Fund to the risk that it will be required to buy the security sold short (also known as “covering” the short position) at a time when the security has appreciated in value, thus resulting in a loss to the Fund. The Fund’s investment performance will also suffer if it is required to close out a short position earlier than it had intended. In addition, the Fund may be subject to expenses related to short sales that are not typically associated with investing in securities directly, such as costs of borrowing and margin account maintenance costs associated with the Fund’s open securities sold short. These expenses may negatively impact the performance of the Fund. Securities sold short introduce more risk to the Fund than long positions (purchases) because the maximum sustainable loss on a security purchased (held long) is limited to the amount paid for the security plus the transaction costs, whereas there is no maximum attainable price of the shorted security. Therefore, in theory, securities sold short have unlimited risk.

Government Obligations Risk. The total public debt of the United States as a percentage of gross domestic product has grown rapidly since the beginning of the 2008-2009 financial downturn. Although high debt

levels do not necessarily indicate or cause economic problems, they may create certain systemic risks if sound debt management practices are not implemented. A high national debt can raise concerns that the U.S. government will not be able to make principal or interest payments when they are due. This increase has also necessitated the need for the U.S. Congress to negotiate adjustments to the statutory debt ceiling to increase the cap on the amount the U.S. government is permitted to borrow to meet its existing obligations and finance current budget deficits. In August 2011, S&P lowered its long-term sovereign credit rating on the U.S. In explaining the downgrade at that time, S&P cited, among other reasons, controversy over raising the statutory debt limit and growth in public spending. Any controversy or ongoing uncertainty regarding the statutory debt ceiling negotiations may impact the U.S. long-term sovereign credit rating and may cause market uncertainty. As a result, market prices and yields of securities supported by the full faith and credit of the U.S. government may be adversely affected.

Temporary Investments. The Fund may, in response to adverse market, economic, political or other conditions, take temporary defensive positions. This means that the Fund will invest some or all of its assets in money market instruments (like U.S. Treasury Bills, commercial paper, deposit accounts or repurchase agreements). The Fund will not be able to achieve its investment objective of long-term capital appreciation to the extent that it invests in money market instruments since these securities do not appreciate in value. When the Fund is not taking a temporary defensive position, it still will hold some cash and money market instruments so that it can pay its expenses, satisfy redemption requests or take advantage of investment opportunities.

Trading. Although the Shares are listed for trading on the Exchange and may be listed or traded on U.S. and non-U.S. stock exchanges other than the Exchange, there can be no assurance that an active trading market for Shares will develop or be maintained. Trading in Shares may be halted due to market conditions or for reasons that, in the view of the Exchange, make trading in Shares inadvisable. In addition, trading in Shares on the Exchange is subject to trading halts caused by extraordinary market volatility pursuant to Exchange “circuit breaker” rules, which temporarily halt trading on the Exchange when a decline in the S&P 500 Index during a single day reaches certain


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thresholds (e.g., 7%, 13% and 20%). Additional rules applicable to the Exchange may halt trading in Shares when extraordinary volatility causes sudden, significant swings in the market price of Shares. There can be no assurance