485BPOS
STATEMENT OF ADDITIONAL INFORMATION
BlackRock Bond Fund, Inc.
BlackRock Total Return Fund
100 Bellevue Parkway, Wilmington, Delaware 19809 • Phone No. (800) 441-7762

    
This Statement of Additional Information of the BlackRock Total Return Fund (the “Fund”), a series of BlackRock Bond Fund, Inc. (the “Corporation”), is not a prospectus and should be read in conjunction with the Prospectuses of the Fund, dated January 28, 2023, as they may be amended or supplemented from time to time, which have been filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission (the “Commission”) and can be obtained, without charge, by calling (800) 441-7762 or by writing to the Corporation at the above address. The Fund’s Prospectuses are incorporated by reference into this Statement of Additional Information, and Part I of this Statement of Additional Information and the portions of Part II of this Statement of Additional Information that relate to the Fund have been incorporated by reference into the Fund’s Prospectuses. The portions of Part II of this Statement of Additional Information that do not relate to the Fund do not form a part of the Fund’s Statement of Additional Information, have not been incorporated by reference into the Fund’s Prospectuses and should not be relied upon by investors in the Fund. The audited financial statements of the Fund and of Master Total Return Portfolio of Master Bond LLC are incorporated into this Statement of Additional Information by reference to the Fund’s 2022 Annual Report to Shareholders for the fiscal year ended September 30, 2022 (the “Annual Report”). You may request a copy of the Annual Report at no charge by calling 1-800-441-7762 between 8:00 a.m. and 6:00 p.m. Eastern time on any business day.
References to the Investment Company Act of 1940, as amended (the “Investment Company Act”), or other applicable law, will include any rules promulgated thereunder and any guidance, interpretations or modifications by the Commission, Commission staff or other authority with appropriate jurisdiction, including court interpretations, and exemptive, no-action or other relief or permission from the Commission, Commission staff or other authority.
Class   Ticker Symbol
Investor A Shares

  MDHQX
Investor C Shares

  MFHQX
Institutional Shares

  MAHQX
Class R Shares

  MRCBX
Service Shares

  MSHQX
Class K Shares

  MPHQX
Investor A1 Shares

  MEHQX
  

BlackRock Advisors, LLC — Manager
BlackRock Investments, LLC — Distributor

The date of this Statement of Additional Information is January 28, 2023.


TABLE OF CONTENTS
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PART II  

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PART I: INFORMATION ABOUT BLACKROCK BOND FUND, INC.
Part I of this Statement of Additional Information (“SAI”) sets forth information about the BlackRock Total Return Fund (the “Total Return Fund” or the “Fund”), a series of BlackRock Bond Fund, Inc. (the “Corporation”). It includes information about the Corporation’s Board of Directors (the “Board”), the management services provided to and the management fees applicable to the Fund and information about other fees applicable to and services provided to the Fund. This Part I of this SAI should be read in conjunction with the Fund’s Prospectuses and those portions of Part II of this SAI that pertain to the Fund.
I. Investment Objective and Policies
In implementing the Fund’s investment strategy, from time to time, BlackRock Advisors, LLC (“BlackRock” or the “Manager”), the Fund’s investment manager, may consider and employ techniques and strategies designed to minimize and defer the U.S. federal income taxes which may be incurred by shareholders in connection with their investment in the Fund.
Set forth below is a listing of some of the types of investments and investment strategies that the Fund may use, and the risks and considerations associated with those investments and investment strategies. Please see Part II of this SAI for further information on these investments and investment strategies. Information contained in Part II about the risks and considerations associated with investments and/or investment strategies applies only to the extent the Fund makes each type of investment or uses each investment strategy. Information that does not apply to the Fund does not form a part of the Fund’s SAI and should not be relied on by investors in the Fund.
Only information that is clearly identified as applicable to the Fund is considered to form a part of the Fund’s SAI.
  Total Return Fund
144A Securities X
Asset-Backed Securities X
Asset-Based Securities X
Precious Metal-Related Securities X
Borrowing and Leverage X
Cash Flows; Expenses X
Cash Management X
Collateralized Debt Obligations X
Collateralized Bond Obligations X
Collateralized Loan Obligations X
Commercial Paper X
Commodity-Linked Derivative Instruments and Hybrid Instruments X
Qualifying Hybrid Instruments X
Hybrid Instruments Without Principal Protection X
Limitations on Leverage X
Counterparty Risk X
Convertible Securities X
Corporate Loans X
Direct Lending X
Credit Linked Securities X
Cyber Security Issues X
Debt Securities X
Inflation-Indexed Bonds X
Investment Grade Debt Obligations X
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  Total Return Fund
High Yield Investments (“Junk Bonds”) X
Mezzanine Investments X
Pay-in-kind Bonds X
Supranational Entities X
Depositary Receipts (ADRs, EDRs and GDRs) X
Derivatives X
Hedging X
Speculation X
Risk Factors in Derivatives X
Correlation Risk X
Counterparty Risk X
Credit Risk X
Currency Risk X
Illiquidity Risk X
Leverage Risk X
Market Risk X
Valuation Risk X
Volatility Risk X
Futures X
Swap Agreements X
Credit Default Swaps and Similar Instruments X
Interest Rate Swaps, Floors and Caps X
Total Return Swaps X
Options X
Options on Securities and Securities Indices X
Call Options X
Put Options X
Options on Government National Mortgage Association (“GNMA”) Certificates X
Options on Swaps (“Swaptions”) X
Foreign Exchange Transactions X
Spot Transactions and FX Forwards X
Currency Futures X
Currency Options X
Currency Swaps X
Distressed Securities X
Environmental, Social and Governance (“ESG”) Integration X
Equity Securities X
Real Estate-Related Securities X
Securities of Smaller or Emerging Growth Companies X
Exchange-Traded Notes (“ETNs”) X
Foreign Investments X
Foreign Investment Risks X
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  Total Return Fund
Foreign Market Risk X
Foreign Economy Risk X
Currency Risk and Exchange Risk X
Governmental Supervision and Regulation/Accounting Standards X
Certain Risks of Holding Fund Assets Outside the United States X
Publicly Available Information X
Settlement Risk X
Sovereign Debt X
Withholding Tax Reclaims Risk X
Funding Agreements  
Guarantees X
Illiquid Investments X
Index Funds  
Tracking Error Risk  
S&P 500 Index  
Russell Indexes  
MSCI Indexes  
FTSE Indexes  
Bloomberg Indexes  
ICE BofA Indexes  
Indexed and Inverse Securities X
Inflation Risk X
Initial Public Offering (“IPO”) Risk X
Interfund Lending Program X
Borrowing, to the extent permitted by the Fund’s investment policies and restrictions X
Lending, to the extent permitted by the Fund’s investment policies and restrictions X
Investment in Emerging Markets X
Brady Bonds X
China Investments Risk X
Investment in Other Investment Companies X
Exchange-Traded Funds X
Lease Obligations X
LIBOR Risk X
Life Settlement Investments  
Liquidity Risk Management X
Master Limited Partnerships X
Merger Transaction Risk  
Money Market Obligations of Domestic Banks, Foreign Banks and Foreign Branches of U.S. Banks X
Money Market Securities X
Mortgage-Related Securities X
Mortgage-Backed Securities X
Collateralized Mortgage Obligations (“CMOs”) X
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  Total Return Fund
Adjustable Rate Mortgage Securities X
CMO Residuals X
Stripped Mortgage-Backed Securities X
Tiered Index Bonds X
TBA Commitments X
Mortgage Dollar Rolls X
Net Interest Margin (NIM) Securities  
Municipal Investments X
Risk Factors and Special Considerations Relating to Municipal Bonds X
Description of Municipal Bonds X
General Obligation Bonds X
Revenue Bonds X
Private Activity Bonds (“PABs”) X
Moral Obligation Bonds X
Municipal Notes X
Municipal Commercial Paper X
Municipal Lease Obligations X
Tender Option Bonds  
Yields X
Variable Rate Demand Obligations (“VRDOs”) X
Transactions in Financial Futures Contracts on Municipal Indexes X
Call Rights X
Municipal Interest Rate Swap Transactions X
Insured Municipal Bonds X
Build America Bonds X
Tax-Exempt Municipal Investments X
Participation Notes  
Portfolio Turnover Rates X
Preferred Stock X
Tax-Exempt Preferred Shares  
Trust Preferred Securities X
Real Estate Investment Trusts (“REITs”) X
Recent Market Events X
Repurchase Agreements and Purchase and Sale Contracts X
Restricted Securities X
Reverse Repurchase Agreements X
Rights Offerings and Warrants to Purchase X
Securities Lending X
Short Sales  
Special Purpose Acquisition Companies X
Standby Commitment Agreements X
Stripped Securities X
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  Total Return Fund
Structured Notes X
Taxability Risk  
Temporary Defensive Measures X
U.S. Government Obligations X
U.S. Treasury Obligations X
U.S. Treasury Rolls  
Utility Industries X
When-Issued Securities, Delayed Delivery Securities and Forward Commitments X
Yields and Ratings X
Zero Coupon Securities X
  
The primary investment objective of the Total Return Fund is to realize a total return that exceeds that of the Bloomberg U.S. Aggregate Bond Index. This investment objective is a fundamental policy of the Fund and may not be changed without a vote of the majority of the outstanding voting securities of the Fund as defined in the Investment Company Act. The Fund seeks to realize a total return that exceeds that of the Bloomberg U.S. Aggregate Bond Index before the fees and expenses of the Fund. There can be no assurance that the objectives of any Fund can be achieved. The Fund is classified as a diversified open-end investment company under the Investment Company Act.
Total Return Fund: The Total Return Fund typically invests more than 90% of its assets in a diversified portfolio of fixed-income securities such as corporate bonds and notes, mortgage-backed securities, asset-backed securities, convertible securities, preferred securities and government obligations. Both U.S. and foreign companies and governments may issue these securities. Under normal circumstances, the Fund invests at least 80% of its assets in bonds and invests primarily in investment grade fixed-income securities. For the purposes of this strategy, “bonds” include the following: obligations issued or guaranteed by the U.S. Government or a foreign government or their agencies, instrumentalities or political subdivisions; mortgage-backed securities, including agency mortgage pass-through securities and commercial mortgage-backed securities; mortgage to-be-announced (“TBA”) securities; debt obligations of U.S. or foreign issuers; municipal securities; and asset-backed securities. The Fund may invest in fixed-income securities of any duration or maturity.
The Total Return Fund may invest up to 30% of its net assets in securities of foreign issuers, of which 20% (as a percentage of the Fund’s net assets) may be in emerging markets issuers. Investments in U.S. dollar-denominated securities of foreign issuers, excluding issuers from emerging markets, are permitted beyond the 30% limit. This means that the Fund may invest in such U.S dollar-denominated securities of foreign issuers without limit. The Fund may also invest in derivative securities for hedging purposes or to increase the return on its investments. The Fund may also invest in credit-linked notes, credit-linked trust certificates, structured notes, or other instruments evidencing interests in special purpose vehicles, trusts, or other entities that hold or represent interests in fixed-income securities.
The Fund may invest up to 20% of its net assets in fixed-income securities that are rated below investment grade by the Nationally Recognized Statistical Rating Organizations (“NRSROs”), including Moody’s Investor Services, Inc., S&P Global Ratings or Fitch Ratings, Inc., or in unrated securities of equivalent credit quality. Split rated bonds will be considered to have the higher credit rating.
The Total Return Fund may invest up to 15% of its net assets in collateralized debt obligations (“CDOs”), of which 10% (as a percentage of the Fund’s net assets) may be in collateralized loan obligations (“CLOs”). CDOs are types of asset-backed securities. CLOs are ordinarily issued by a trust or other special purpose entity and are typically collateralized by a pool of loans, which may include, among others, domestic and non-U.S. senior secured loans, senior unsecured loans, and subordinate corporate loans, including loans that may be rated below investment grade or equivalent unrated loans, held by such issuer.
The Fund may enter into to-be-announced (“TBA”) commitments, which are forward agreements for the purchase or sale of mortgage-backed securities for a fixed price, with payment and delivery on an agreed upon future settlement date. When the Fund enters into a TBA commitment for the sale of mortgage-backed securities for a fixed price, with payment and delivery on an agreed upon future settlement date, the Fund may or may not hold the types of mortgage-backed securities required to be delivered. The Fund may also enter into mortgage dollar rolls.
The Total Return Fund is a “feeder” fund that invests all of its assets in a corresponding “master” portfolio, Master Total Return Portfolio (the “Master Portfolio”) a series of Master Bond LLC (the “Master LLC”), which has the
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same investment objectives and strategies as the Total Return Fund. All investments will be at the level of the Master Portfolio. This structure is sometimes called a “master/feeder” structure. The Total Return Fund’s investment results will correspond directly to the investment results of the underlying Master Portfolio in which it invests. For simplicity, this Statement of Additional Information, like the Prospectuses, uses the term “Total Return Fund” or “Fund” to include the Master Portfolio, as applicable.
The Fund’s primary vehicle for gaining exposure to the commodities markets is expected to be through investments in the BlackRock Cayman Master Total Return Portfolio II, Ltd. (the “Subsidiary”), a wholly owned subsidiary of the Master Portfolio formed in the Cayman Islands, which invests primarily in commodity-related instruments. The Subsidiary may also hold cash and invest in other instruments, including fixed income securities, either as investments or to serve as margin or collateral for the Subsidiary’s derivative positions.
The Fund may engage in active and frequent trading of portfolio securities to achieve its primary investment strategies.
Investments in the Subsidiary. The Master Portfolio may invest up to 25% of its total assets in the shares of its wholly-owned and controlled Subsidiary. Investments in the Subsidiary are expected to provide the Fund, through its investment in the Master Portfolio, with exposure to the commodity markets within the limitations of Subchapter M of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended, and Internal Revenue Service guidance, as discussed below. The Subsidiary is advised by the Manager. The Subsidiary (unlike the Fund and the Master Portfolio) may invest without limitation in commodity-related instruments. However, the Subsidiary is otherwise subject to the same fundamental, non-fundamental and certain other investment restrictions as the Fund and the Master Portfolio, including the timing and method of the valuation of the Subsidiary’s portfolio investments and shares of the Subsidiary. The Subsidiary is managed pursuant to compliance policies and procedures that are the same, in all material respects, as the policies and procedures adopted by the Fund and the Master Portfolio. The Subsidiary is a company organized under the laws of the Cayman Islands, and is overseen by its own board of directors, which is comprised of John M. Perlowski, a Director, President and Chief Executive Officer of the Fund, and Trent Walker, Chief Financial Officer of the Fund. The Master Portfolio is the sole shareholder of the Subsidiary, and shares of the Subsidiary will not be sold or offered to other investors.
The Subsidiary invests primarily in commodity-related instruments. Although the Master Portfolio may invest in these commodity-related instruments directly, the Master Portfolio will likely gain exposure to these commodity-related instruments indirectly by investing in the Subsidiary. To the extent that BlackRock believes that these commodity-related instruments provide suitable exposure to the commodities market, the Master Portfolio’s investment in the Subsidiary will likely increase. The Subsidiary may also hold cash and invest in other instruments, including fixed income securities, either as investments or to serve as margin or collateral for the Subsidiary’s derivative positions.
The Manager manages the assets of the Subsidiary pursuant to a separate investment management agreement (the “Subsidiary Management Agreement”), but receives no additional compensation for doing so. The Manager has entered into sub-advisory agreements with BlackRock International Limited and BlackRock (Singapore) Limited with respect to the Subsidiary. BlackRock also provides certain administrative services for the Subsidiary, but receives no additional compensation for doing so. The Subsidiary will also enter into separate contracts for the provision of custody, accounting agent and audit services with the same or with affiliates of the same service providers that provide those services to the Fund.
The financial statements of the Subsidiary will be consolidated with the Master Portfolio’s financial statements in the Fund’s annual and semi-annual reports. The Fund’s annual and semi-annual reports are distributed to shareholders. Copies of the Fund’s Annual Report are provided without charge upon request as indicated on the front cover of this SAI.
The Subsidiary is not registered under the Investment Company Act, and, unless otherwise noted in the Fund’s prospectus or this SAI, is not subject to all the investor protections of the Investment Company Act. However, the Master Portfolio wholly owns and controls the Subsidiary, and the Master Portfolio and the Subsidiary are both managed by BlackRock, making it unlikely that the Subsidiary will take action contrary to the interests of the Fund and its shareholders. The Fund’s Board of Directors has oversight responsibility for the investment activities of the Fund and the Master Portfolio, including the Master Portfolio’s investment in the Subsidiary, and the Master Portfolio’s role as sole shareholder of the Subsidiary. As noted above, the Subsidiary will be subject to the same investment restrictions and limitations as the Fund.
The Subsidiary is managed pursuant to compliance policies and procedures that are the same, in all material respects, as the policies and procedures adopted by the Fund. In addition, changes in the laws of the United States and/or the Cayman Islands could result in the inability of the Fund, the Master Portfolio and/or the Subsidiary to operate as described in the Fund’s prospectus and this SAI and could adversely affect the Fund. For example, the
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Cayman Islands does not currently impose any income, corporate or capital gains tax, estate duty, inheritance tax, gift tax or withholding tax on the Subsidiary. If Cayman Islands law changes such that the Subsidiary must pay Cayman Islands taxes, Fund shareholders would likely suffer decreased investment returns.
The Fund, as a “regulated investment company” under the tax rules, is required to realize at least 90 percent of its annual gross income from investment-related sources, specifically from dividends, interest, proceeds from securities lending, gains from the sales of stocks, securities and foreign currencies, other income (including, but not limited to, gains from options, futures or forward contracts) derived with respect to its business of investing in such stock, securities or currencies, or certain types of publicly traded partnerships (referred to as qualifying income). The Fund, through its investment in the Master Portfolio, invests in commodity-related instruments indirectly through the Subsidiary because direct investments by a regulated investment company in commodity-related instruments generally do not, under published IRS rulings, produce qualifying income. Based on final regulations on which taxpayers may rely for taxable years beginning after September 28, 2016, the Fund expects its income and gain with respect to the Subsidiary to be qualifying income. However, in the future, if the IRS issues regulations or other guidance, or Congress enacts legislation limiting the circumstances in which the Fund’s income with respect to the Subsidiary will be considered “qualifying income,” the Fund might be required to make changes to its operations, which may reduce the Fund’s ability to gain investment exposure to commodities. Fund shareholders may also experience adverse tax consequences in such circumstances.
The Subsidiary will not be subject to U.S. federal income tax. It will, however, be considered a controlled foreign corporation, and the Fund and the Master Portfolio will be required to include as income annually amounts earned by the Subsidiary during that year, whether or not the Subsidiary distributes such amounts to the Master Portfolio. (Previously taxed income will not, however, be taxable again when distributed.) Furthermore, the requirement for the Master Portfolio to distribute net investment income, if any, and net realized capital gain, if any, at least annually, will apply to such Subsidiary income, whether or not the Subsidiary makes a distribution to the Master Portfolio during the taxable year. If the Subsidiary incurs net losses in any year, such losses will not offset the Master Portfolio’s income or gains nor carryforward to future years.
Regulation Regarding Derivatives.
The Commodity Futures Trading Commission (“CFTC”) subjects advisers to registered investment companies to regulation by the CFTC if a fund that is advised by the investment adviser either (i) invests, directly or indirectly, more than a prescribed level of its liquidation value in CFTC-regulated futures, options and swaps (“CFTC Derivatives”), or (ii) markets itself as providing investment exposure to such instruments. Due to the Fund’s potential use of CFTC Derivatives above the prescribed levels, however, the Fund will be considered a “commodity pool” under the Commodity Exchange Act. Accordingly, BlackRock, the Fund’s investment adviser, has registered as a “commodity pool operator” and is subject to CFTC regulation in respect of the Fund..
II. Investment Restrictions
The Corporation, on behalf of the Fund, has adopted restrictions and policies relating to the investment of the Fund’s assets and its activities. Certain of the restrictions are fundamental policies of the Corporation and may not be changed without the approval of the holders of a majority of the Fund’s outstanding voting securities (which for this purpose and under the Investment Company Act, means the lesser of (i) 67% of the shares represented at a meeting at which more than 50% of the outstanding shares are represented or (ii) more than 50% of the outstanding shares). The Corporation, on behalf of the Fund, has also adopted certain non-fundamental investment restrictions, which may be changed by the Board of Directors without shareholder approval. None of the following fundamental and non-fundamental investment restrictions shall prevent the Fund from investing all of its assets in shares of another registered investment company with the same investment objectives and fundamental policies (in a master/ feeder structure).
Set forth below are the Fund’s fundamental and non-fundamental investment restrictions. The Master Portfolio has adopted investment restrictions substantially identical to those set forth below, which are fundamental and non-fundamental, as applicable, policies of the Master Portfolio. The Master Portfolio’s fundamental policies may not be changed without the approval of the holders of a majority of interests of the Master Portfolio. Unless otherwise provided, all references below to the assets of the Fund are in terms of current market value.
Under the Fund’s fundamental investment restrictions, the Fund may not:
1. Concentrate its investments in a particular industry, as that term is used in the Investment Company Act.
2. Borrow money, except as permitted under the Investment Company Act.
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3. Issue senior securities to the extent such issuance would violate the Investment Company Act.
4. Purchase or hold real estate, except the Fund may purchase and hold securities or other instruments that are secured by, or linked to, real estate or interests therein, securities of real estate investment trusts, mortgage-related securities and securities of issuers engaged in the real estate business, and the Fund may purchase and hold real estate as a result of the ownership of securities or other instruments.
5. Underwrite securities issued by others, except to the extent that the sale of portfolio securities by the Fund may be deemed to be an underwriting or as otherwise permitted by applicable law.
6. Purchase or sell commodities or commodity contracts, except as permitted by the Investment Company Act.
7. Make loans to the extent prohibited by the Investment Company Act.
8. Make any investment inconsistent with the Fund’s classification as a diversified company under the Investment Company Act.
Notations Regarding the Fund’s Fundamental Investment Restrictions
The following notations are not considered to be part of the Fund’s fundamental investment restrictions and are subject to change without shareholder approval.
With respect to the fundamental policy relating to concentration set forth in (1) above, the Investment Company Act does not define what constitutes “concentration” in an industry. The Commission staff has taken the position that investment of 25% or more of a fund’s total assets in one or more issuers conducting their principal activities in the same industry or group of industries constitutes concentration. It is possible that interpretations of concentration could change in the future. The policy in (1) above will be interpreted to refer to concentration as that term may be interpreted from time to time. The policy also will be interpreted to permit investment without limit in the following: securities of the U.S. government and its agencies or instrumentalities; securities of state, territory, possession or municipal governments and their authorities, agencies, instrumentalities or political subdivisions; and repurchase agreements collateralized by any such obligations. Accordingly, issuers of the foregoing securities will not be considered to be members of any industry. There also will be no limit on investment in issuers domiciled in a single jurisdiction or country. Finance companies will be considered to be in the industries of their parents if their activities are primarily related to financing the activities of the parents. Each foreign government will be considered to be a member of a separate industry. With respect to the Fund’s industry classifications, the Fund currently utilizes any one or more of the industry sub-classifications used by one or more widely recognized market indexes or rating group indexes, and/or as defined by Fund management. The policy also will be interpreted to give broad authority to the Fund as to how to classify issuers within or among industries.
With respect to the fundamental policy relating to borrowing money set forth above, the Investment Company Act permits the Fund to borrow money in amounts of up to one-third of the Fund’s total assets from banks for any purpose, and to borrow up to 5% of the Fund’s total assets from banks or other lenders for temporary purposes. (The Fund’s total assets include the amounts being borrowed.) In addition, the Fund has received an exemptive order from the SEC permitting it to borrow through the Interfund Lending Program (discussed below), subject to the conditions of the exemptive order. To limit the risks attendant to borrowing, the Investment Company Act requires the Fund to maintain at all times an “asset coverage” of at least 300% of the amount of its borrowings. Asset coverage means the ratio that the value of the Fund’s total assets (including amounts borrowed), minus liabilities other than borrowings, bears to the aggregate amount of all borrowings. Borrowing money to increase portfolio holdings is known as “leveraging.” Certain trading practices and investments, such as reverse repurchase agreements, may be considered to be borrowings or involve leverage and thus are subject to the Investment Company Act restrictions. In accordance with Rule 18f-4 under the Investment Company Act, when the Fund engages in reverse repurchase agreements and similar financing transactions, the Fund may either (i) maintain asset coverage of at least 300% with respect to such transactions and any other borrowings in the aggregate, or (ii) treat such transactions as “derivatives transactions” and comply with Rule 18f-4 with respect to such transactions. Short-term credits necessary for the settlement of securities transactions and arrangements with respect to securities lending will not be considered to be borrowings under the policy. Practices and investments that may involve leverage but are not considered to be borrowings are not subject to the policy.
With respect to the fundamental policy relating to underwriting set forth in (5) above, the Investment Company Act does not prohibit the Fund from engaging in the underwriting business or from underwriting the securities of other issuers; in fact, in the case of diversified funds, the Investment Company Act permits the Fund to have underwriting
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commitments of up to 25% of its assets under certain circumstances. Those circumstances currently are that the amount of the Fund’s underwriting commitments, when added to the value of the Fund’s investments in issuers where the Fund owns more than 10% of the outstanding voting securities of those issuers, cannot exceed the 25% cap. A fund engaging in transactions involving the acquisition or disposition of portfolio securities may be considered to be an underwriter under the Securities Act of 1933, as amended (the “Securities Act”). Although it is not believed that the application of the Securities Act provisions described above would cause the Fund to be engaged in the business of underwriting, the policy in (5) above will be interpreted not to prevent the Fund from engaging in transactions involving the acquisition or disposition of portfolio securities, regardless of whether the Fund may be considered to be an underwriter under the Securities Act or is otherwise engaged in the underwriting business to the extent permitted by applicable law.
With respect to the fundamental policy relating to lending set forth in (7) above, the Investment Company Act does not prohibit the Fund from making loans (including lending its securities); however, Commission staff interpretations currently prohibit funds from lending more than one-third of their total assets (including lending its securities), except through the purchase of debt obligations or the use of repurchase agreements. In addition, collateral arrangements with respect to options, forward currency and futures transactions and other derivative instruments (as applicable), as well as delays in the settlement of securities transactions, will not be considered loans.
The Fund is currently classified as a diversified fund under the Investment Company Act. This means that the Fund may not purchase securities of an issuer (other than (i) obligations issued or guaranteed by the U.S. government, its agencies or instrumentalities and (ii) securities of other investment companies) if, with respect to 75% of its total assets, (a) more than 5% of the Fund’s total assets would be invested in securities of that issuer or (b) the Fund would hold more than 10% of the outstanding voting securities of that issuer. With respect to the remaining 25% of its total assets, the Fund can invest more than 5% of its assets in one issuer. Under the Investment Company Act, the Fund cannot change its classification from diversified to non-diversified without shareholder approval.
Under its non-fundamental investment restrictions, which may be changed by the Board without shareholder approval, the Fund may not:
a. Purchase securities of other investment companies, except to the extent permitted by the Investment Company Act. As a matter of policy, however, the Fund will not purchase shares of any registered open-end investment company or registered unit investment trust, in reliance on Section 12(d)(1)(F) or (G) (the “fund of funds” provisions) of the Investment Company Act, at any time the Fund has knowledge that its shares are purchased by another investment company investor in reliance on the provisions of subparagraph (G) of Section 12(d)(1).
b. Make short sales of securities or maintain a short position, except to the extent permitted by the Fund’s Prospectus and Statement of Additional Information, as amended from time to time, and applicable law.
Unless otherwise indicated, all limitations under the Fund’s fundamental or non-fundamental investment restrictions apply only at the time that a transaction is undertaken. Any change in the percentage of the Fund’s assets invested in certain securities or other instruments resulting from market fluctuations or other changes in the Fund’s total assets will not require the Fund to dispose of an investment until BlackRock determines that it is practicable to sell or close out the investment without undue market or tax consequences.
The Subsidiary will follow the Fund’s and the Master Portfolio’s fundamental and non-fundamental investment restrictions, described above, with respect to its investments.
III. Information on Directors and Officers
The Board consists of ten individuals (each a “Director”), eight of whom are not “interested persons” of the Corporation as defined in the Investment Company Act (the “Independent Directors”). The same individuals serve on the Board of Directors of the Master LLC. The registered investment companies advised by the Manager or its affiliates (the “BlackRock-advised Funds”) are organized into the BlackRock Multi-Asset Complex, the BlackRock Fixed-Income Complex, and the iShares Complex (each, a “BlackRock Fund Complex”). The Corporation and the Master LLC are included in the BlackRock Fund Complex referred to as the BlackRock Fixed-Income Complex. The Directors also oversee as board members the operations of the other open-end and closed-end registered investment companies included in the BlackRock Fixed-Income Complex.
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The Board has overall responsibility for the oversight of the Corporation and the Fund. The Chair of the Board and the Chief Executive Officer are different people. Not only is the Chair of the Board an Independent Director, but also the Chair of each Board committee (each, a “Committee”) is an Independent Director. The Board has five standing Committees: an Audit Committee, a Governance and Nominating Committee, a Compliance Committee, a Performance Oversight Committee and an Executive Committee. The role of the Chair of the Board is to preside over all meetings of the Board and to act as a liaison with service providers, officers, attorneys, and other Directors between meetings. The Chair of each Committee performs a similar role with respect to the Committee. The Chair of the Board or a Committee may also perform such other functions as may be delegated by the Board or the Committee from time to time. The Independent Directors meet regularly outside the presence of the Fund’s management, in executive sessions or with other service providers to the Fund. The Board has regular meetings five times a year, including a meeting to consider the approval of the Fund’s investment management agreement, and, if necessary, may hold special meetings before its next regular meeting. Each Committee meets regularly to conduct the oversight functions delegated to that Committee by the Board and reports its findings to the Board. The Board and each standing Committee conduct annual assessments of their oversight function and structure. The Board has determined that the Board’s leadership structure is appropriate because it allows the Board to exercise independent judgment over management and to allocate areas of responsibility among Committees and the Board to enhance oversight.
The Board decided to separate the roles of Chief Executive Officer from the Chair because it believes that having an independent Chair:
increases the independent oversight of the Fund and enhances the Board’s objective evaluation of the Chief Executive Officer;
allows the Chief Executive Officer to focus on the Fund’s operations instead of Board administration;
provides greater opportunities for direct and independent communication between shareholders and the Board; and
provides an independent spokesman for the Fund.
The Board has engaged the Manager to manage the Fund on a day-to-day basis. The Board is responsible for overseeing the Manager, sub-advisers, other service providers, the operations of the Fund and associated risks in accordance with the provisions of the Investment Company Act, state law, other applicable laws, the Fund’s charter, and the Fund’s investment objective and strategies. The Board reviews, on an ongoing basis, the Fund’s performance, operations, and investment strategies and techniques. The Board also conducts reviews of the Manager and its role in running the operations of the Fund.
Day-to-day risk management with respect to the Fund is the responsibility of the Manager, sub-advisers or other service providers (depending on the nature of the risk), subject to the supervision of the Manager. The Fund is subject to a number of risks, including investment, compliance, operational and valuation risks, among others. While there are a number of risk management functions performed by the Manager, sub-advisers or other service providers, as applicable, it is not possible to eliminate all of the risks applicable to the Fund. Risk oversight is part of the Board’s general oversight of the Fund and is addressed as part of various Board and Committee activities. The Board, directly or through Committees, also reviews reports from, among others, management, the independent registered public accounting firm for the Fund, the Manager, sub-advisers and internal auditors for the Manager or its affiliates, as appropriate, regarding risks faced by the Fund and management’s or the service provider’s risk functions. The Committee system facilitates the timely and efficient consideration of matters by the Directors and facilitates effective oversight of compliance with legal and regulatory requirements and of the Fund’s activities and associated risks. The Board has approved the appointment of a Chief Compliance Officer (“CCO”), who oversees the implementation and testing of the Fund’s compliance program and reports regularly to the Board regarding compliance matters for the Fund and its service providers. The Independent Directors have engaged independent legal counsel to assist them in performing their oversight responsibilities.
Audit Committee. The Board has a standing Audit Committee composed of Catherine A. Lynch (Chair), Frank J. Fabozzi, Lorenzo A. Flores and J. Phillip Holloman, all of whom are Independent Directors. The principal responsibilities of the Audit Committee are to assist the Board in fulfilling its oversight responsibilities relating to the accounting and financial reporting policies and practices of the Fund. The Audit Committee’s responsibilities include, without limitation: (i) approving, and recommending to the full Board for approval, the selection, retention, termination and compensation of the Fund’s independent registered public accounting firm (the “Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm”) and evaluating the independence and objectivity of the Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm; (ii) approving all audit engagement terms and fees for the Fund; (iii) reviewing the conduct and results of each audit; (iv) reviewing any issues raised by the Fund’s Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm or management
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regarding the accounting or financial reporting policies and practices of the Fund, its internal controls, and, as appropriate, the internal controls of certain service providers and management’s response to any such issues; (v) reviewing and discussing the Fund’s audited and unaudited financial statements and disclosure in the Fund’s shareholder reports relating to the Fund’s performance; (vi) assisting the Board’s responsibilities with respect to the internal controls of the Fund and its service providers with respect to accounting and financial matters; and (vii) resolving any disagreements between the Fund’s management and the Fund’s Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm regarding financial reporting. The Board has adopted a written charter for the Board’s Audit Committee. During the fiscal year ended September 30, 2022, the Audit Committee met thirteen times.
Governance and Nominating Committee. The Board has a standing Governance and Nominating Committee composed of W. Carl Kester (Chair), Cynthia L. Egan, J. Phillip Holloman, R. Glenn Hubbard and Catherine A. Lynch, all of whom are Independent Directors. The principal responsibilities of the Governance and Nominating Committee are: (i) identifying individuals qualified to serve as Independent Directors and recommending Board nominees that are not “interested persons” of the Fund (as defined in the Investment Company Act) for election by shareholders or appointment by the Board; (ii) advising the Board with respect to Board composition, procedures and Committees of the Board (other than the Audit Committee); (iii) overseeing periodic self-assessments of the Board and Committees of the Board (other than the Audit Committee); (iv) reviewing and making recommendations in respect to Independent Director compensation; (v) monitoring corporate governance matters and making recommendations in respect thereof to the Board; (vi) acting as the administrative committee with respect to Board policies and procedures, committee policies and procedures (other than the Audit Committee) and codes of ethics as they relate to the Independent Directors; and (vii) reviewing and making recommendations to the Board in respect of Fund share ownership by the Independent Directors. The Board has adopted a written charter for the Board’s Governance and Nominating Committee. During the fiscal year ended September 30, 2022, the Governance and Nominating Committee met six times.
The Governance and Nominating Committee of the Board seeks to identify individuals to serve on the Board who have a diverse range of viewpoints, qualifications, experiences, backgrounds and skill sets so that the Board will be better suited to fulfill its responsibility of overseeing the Fund’s activities. In so doing, the Governance and Nominating Committee reviews the size of the Board, the ages of the current Directors and their tenure on the Board, and the skills, background and experiences of the Directors in light of the issues facing the Fund in determining whether one or more new directors should be added to the Board. The Board as a group strives to achieve diversity in terms of gender, race and geographic location. The Governance and Nominating Committee believes that the Directors as a group possess the array of skills, experiences and backgrounds necessary to guide the Fund. The Directors’ biographies included herein highlight the diversity and breadth of skills, qualifications and expertise that the Directors bring to the Fund.
The Governance and Nominating Committee may consider nominations for Directors made by the Fund’s shareholders as it deems appropriate. Under the Corporation’s Bylaws, shareholders must follow certain procedures to nominate a person for election as a Director at a shareholder meeting at which Directors are to be elected. Under these advance notice procedures, shareholders must submit the proposed nominee by delivering a notice to the Secretary of the Fund at its principal executive offices not later than the close of business on the 5th day following the day on which notice of the date of the meeting was mailed or public disclosure of the date of the meeting was made, whichever first occurs.
The Corporation’s Bylaws provide that notice of a proposed nomination must include certain information about the shareholder and the nominee, as well as certain other information, including a written consent of the proposed nominee to serve if elected. Reference is made to the Corporation’s Bylaws for more details.
Compliance Committee. The Board has a Compliance Committee composed of Cynthia L. Egan (Chair), Stayce D. Harris, R. Glenn Hubbard and W. Carl Kester, all of whom are Independent Directors. The Compliance Committee’s purpose is to assist the Board in fulfilling its responsibility with respect to the oversight of regulatory and fiduciary compliance matters involving the Fund, the fund-related activities of BlackRock, and any sub-advisers and the Fund’s other third party service providers. The Compliance Committee’s responsibilities include, without limitation: (i) overseeing the compliance policies and procedures of the Fund and its service providers and recommending changes or additions to such policies and procedures; (ii) reviewing information on and, where appropriate, recommending policies concerning the Fund’s compliance with applicable law; (iii) reviewing information on any significant correspondence with or other actions by regulators or governmental agencies with respect to the Fund and any employee complaints or published reports that raise concerns regarding compliance matters; and (iv) reviewing reports from, overseeing the annual performance review of, and making certain recommendations in respect of, the Fund’s CCO, including, without limitation, determining the amount and structure of the CCO’s compensation. The
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Board has adopted a written charter for the Board’s Compliance Committee. During the fiscal year ended September 30, 2022, the Compliance Committee met four times.
Performance Oversight Committee. The Board has a Performance Oversight Committee composed of Frank J. Fabozzi (Chair), Cynthia L. Egan, Lorenzo A. Flores, Stayce D. Harris, J. Phillip Holloman, R. Glenn Hubbard, W. Carl Kester and Catherine A. Lynch, all of whom are Independent Directors. The Performance Oversight Committee’s purpose is to assist the Board in fulfilling its responsibility to oversee the Fund’s investment performance relative to the Fund’s investment objective, policies and practices. The Performance Oversight Committee’s responsibilities include, without limitation: (i) reviewing the Fund’s investment objective, policies and practices; (ii) recommending to the Board any required action in respect of changes in fundamental and non-fundamental investment restrictions; (iii) reviewing information on appropriate benchmarks and competitive universes; (iv) reviewing the Fund’s investment performance relative to such benchmarks; (v) reviewing information on unusual or exceptional investment matters; (vi) reviewing whether the Fund has complied with its investment policies and restrictions; and (vii) overseeing policies, procedures and controls regarding valuation of the Fund’s investments. The Board has adopted a written charter for the Board’s Performance Oversight Committee. During the fiscal year ended September 30, 2022, the Performance Oversight Committee met four times.
Executive Committee. The Board has an Executive Committee composed of R. Glenn Hubbard (Chair) and W. Carl Kester, both of whom are Independent Directors, and John M. Perlowski, who serves as an interested Director. The principal responsibilities of the Executive Committee include, without limitation: (i) acting on routine matters between meetings of the Board; (ii) acting on such matters as may require urgent action between meetings of the Board; and (iii) exercising such other authority as may from time to time be delegated to the Executive Committee by the Board. The Board has adopted a written charter for the Board’s Executive Committee. During the fiscal year ended September 30, 2022, the Executive Committee did not meet.
The Independent Directors have adopted a statement of policy that describes the experiences, qualifications, skills and attributes that are necessary and desirable for potential Independent Director candidates (the “Statement of Policy”). The Board believes that each Independent Director satisfied, at the time he or she was initially elected or appointed a Director, and continues to satisfy, the standards contemplated by the Statement of Policy as well as the standards set forth in the Fund’s Bylaws. Furthermore, in determining that a particular Director was and continues to be qualified to serve as a Director, the Board has considered a variety of criteria, none of which, in isolation, was controlling. The Board believes that, collectively, the Directors have balanced and diverse experiences, skills, attributes and qualifications, which allow the Board to operate effectively in governing the Fund and protecting the interests of shareholders. Among the attributes common to all Directors is their ability to review critically, evaluate, question and discuss information provided to them, to interact effectively with the Manager, sub-advisers, other service providers, counsel and independent auditors, and to exercise effective business judgment in the performance of their duties as Directors. Each Director’s ability to perform his or her duties effectively is evidenced by his or her educational background or professional training; business, consulting, public service or academic positions; experience from service as a board member of the Corporation or the other funds in the BlackRock Fund Complexes (and any predecessor funds), other investment funds, public companies, or not-for-profit entities or other organizations; ongoing commitment and participation in Board and Committee meetings, as well as his or her leadership of standing and other committees throughout the years; or other relevant life experiences.
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The table below discusses some of the experiences, qualifications and skills of each Director that support the conclusion that he or she should serve on the Board.
Directors   Experience, Qualifications and Skills
Independent Directors    
R. Glenn Hubbard   R. Glenn Hubbard has served in numerous roles in the field of economics, including as the Chairman of the U.S. Council of Economic Advisers of the President of the United States. Dr. Hubbard has served as the Dean of Columbia Business School, as a member of the Columbia Faculty and as a Visiting Professor at the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University, the Harvard Business School and the University of Chicago. Dr. Hubbard’s experience as an adviser to the President of the United States adds a dimension of balance to the Fund’s governance and provides perspective on economic issues. Dr. Hubbard’s service on the boards of ADP and Metropolitan Life Insurance Company provides the Board with the benefit of his experience with the management practices of other financial companies. Dr. Hubbard’s long-standing service on the boards of directors/trustees of the closed-end funds in the BlackRock Fixed-Income Complex also provides him with a specific understanding of the Fund, its operations, and the business and regulatory issues facing the Fund. Dr. Hubbard’s independence from the Fund and the Manager enhances his service as Chair of the Board, Chair of the Executive Committee and a member of the Governance and Nominating Committee, the Compliance Committee and the Performance Oversight Committee.
W. Carl Kester   The Board benefits from W. Carl Kester’s experiences as a professor and author in finance, and his experience as the George Fisher Baker Jr. Professor of Business Administration at Harvard Business School and as Deputy Dean of Academic Affairs at Harvard Business School from 2006 through 2010 adds to the Board a wealth of expertise in corporate finance and corporate governance. Dr. Kester has authored and edited numerous books and research papers on both subject matters, including co-editing a leading volume of finance case studies used worldwide. Dr. Kester’s long-standing service on the boards of directors/trustees of the closed-end funds in the BlackRock Fixed-Income Complex also provides him with a specific understanding of the Fund, its operations, and the business and regulatory issues facing the Fund. Dr. Kester’s independence from the Fund and the Manager enhances his service as Vice Chair of the Board, Chair of the Governance and Nominating Committee and a member of the Executive Committee, the Compliance Committee and the Performance Oversight Committee.
Cynthia L. Egan   Cynthia L. Egan brings to the Board a broad and diverse knowledge of investment companies and the retirement industry as a result of her many years of experience as President, Retirement Plan Services, for T. Rowe Price Group, Inc. and her various senior operating officer positions at Fidelity Investments, including her service as Executive Vice President of FMR Co., President of Fidelity Institutional Services Company and President of the Fidelity Charitable Gift Fund. Ms. Egan has also served as an advisor to the U.S. Department of Treasury as an expert in domestic retirement security. Ms. Egan began her professional career at the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve and the Federal Reserve Bank of New York. Ms. Egan is also a director of UNUM Corporation, a publicly traded insurance company providing personal risk reinsurance, and of The Hanover Group, a public property casualty insurance company. Ms. Egan’s independence from the Fund and the Manager enhances her service as Chair of the Compliance Committee, and a member of the Governance and Nominating Committee and the Performance Oversight Committee.
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Directors   Experience, Qualifications and Skills
Frank J. Fabozzi   Frank J. Fabozzi has served for over 25 years on the boards of registered investment companies. Dr. Fabozzi holds the designations of Chartered Financial Analyst and Certified Public Accountant. Dr. Fabozzi was inducted into the Fixed Income Analysts Society’s Hall of Fame and is the 2007 recipient of the C. Stewart Sheppard Award and the 2015 recipient of the James R. Vertin Award, both given by the CFA Institute. The Board benefits from Dr. Fabozzi’s experiences as a professor and author in the field of finance. Dr. Fabozzi’s experience as a professor at various institutions, including EDHEC Business School, Yale, MIT, and Princeton, as well as Dr. Fabozzi’s experience as a Professor in the Practice of Finance and Becton Fellow at the Yale University School of Management and as editor of the Journal of Portfolio Management demonstrates his wealth of expertise in the investment management and structured finance areas. Dr. Fabozzi has authored and edited numerous books and research papers on topics in investment management and financial econometrics, and his writings have focused on fixed income securities and portfolio management, many of which are considered standard references in the investment management industry. Dr. Fabozzi’s long-standing service on the boards of directors/trustees of the closed-end funds in the BlackRock Fixed-Income Complex also provides him with a specific understanding of the Fund, its operations and the business and regulatory issues facing the Fund. Moreover, Dr. Fabozzi’s knowledge of financial and accounting matters qualifies him to serve as a member of the Audit Committee. Dr. Fabozzi’s independence from the Fund and the Manager enhances his service as Chair of the Performance Oversight Committee.
Lorenzo A. Flores   The Board benefits from Lorenzo A. Flores’s many years of business, leadership and financial experience in his roles at various public and private companies. In particular, Mr. Flores’s service as Chief Financial Officer and Corporate Controller of Xilinx, Inc. and Vice Chairman of Kioxia, Inc. and his long experience in the technology industry allow him to provide insight to into financial, business and technology trends. Mr. Flores’s knowledge of financial and accounting matters qualifies him to serve as a member of the Audit Committee. Mr. Flores’s independence from the Fund and the Manager enhances his service as a member of the Performance Oversight Committee.
Stayce D. Harris   The Board benefits from Stayce D. Harris’s leadership and governance experience gained during her extensive military career, including as a three-star Lieutenant General of the United States Air Force. In her most recent role, Ms. Harris reported to the Secretary and Chief of Staff of the Air Force on matters concerning Air Force effectiveness, efficiency and the military discipline of active duty, Air Force Reserve and Air National Guard forces. Ms. Harris’s experience on governance matters includes oversight of inspection policy and the inspection and evaluation system for all Air Force nuclear and conventional forces; oversight of Air Force counterintelligence operations and service on the Air Force Intelligence Oversight Panel; investigation of fraud, waste and abuse; and oversight of criminal investigations and complaints resolution programs. Ms. Harris’s independence from the Fund and the Manager enhances her service as a member of the Compliance Committee and the Performance Oversight Committee.
J. Phillip Holloman   The Board benefits from J. Phillip Holloman’s many years of business and leadership experience as an executive, director and advisory board member of various public and private companies. In particular, Mr. Holloman’s service as President and Chief Operating Officer of Cintas Corporation and director of PulteGroup, Inc. and Rockwell Automation Inc. allows him to provide insight into business trends and conditions. Mr. Holloman’s knowledge of financial and accounting matters qualifies him to serve as a member of the Audit Committee. Mr. Holloman’s independence from the Fund and the Manager enhances his service as a member of the Governance and Nominating Committee and the Performance Oversight Committee.
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Directors   Experience, Qualifications and Skills
Catherine A. Lynch   Catherine A. Lynch, who served as the Chief Executive Officer and Chief Investment Officer of the National Railroad Retirement Investment Trust, benefits the Board by providing business leadership and experience and a diverse knowledge of pensions and endowments. Ms. Lynch also holds the designation of Chartered Financial Analyst. Ms. Lynch’s knowledge of financial and accounting matters qualifies her to serve as Chair of the Audit Committee. Ms. Lynch’s independence from the Fund and the Manager enhances her service as a member of the Governance and Nominating Committee and the Performance Oversight Committee.
Interested Directors    
Robert Fairbairn   Robert Fairbairn has more than 25 years of experience with BlackRock, Inc. and over 30 years of experience in finance and asset management. In particular, Mr. Fairbairn’s positions as Vice Chairman of BlackRock, Inc., Member of BlackRock’s Global Executive and Global Operating Committees and Co-Chair of BlackRock’s Human Capital Committee provide the Board with a wealth of practical business knowledge and leadership. In addition, Mr. Fairbairn has global investment management and oversight experience through his former positions as Global Head of BlackRock’s Retail and iShares® businesses, Head of BlackRock’s Global Client Group, Chairman of BlackRock’s international businesses and his previous oversight over BlackRock’s Strategic Partner Program and Strategic Product Management Group. Mr. Fairbairn also serves as a board member for the funds in the BlackRock Multi-Asset Complex.
John M. Perlowski   John M. Perlowski’s experience as Managing Director of BlackRock, Inc. since 2009, as the Head of BlackRock Global Accounting and Product Services since 2009, and as President and Chief Executive Officer of the Fund provides him with a strong understanding of the Fund, its operations, and the business and regulatory issues facing the Fund. Mr. Perlowski’s prior position as Managing Director and Chief Operating Officer of the Global Product Group at Goldman Sachs Asset Management, and his former service as Treasurer and Senior Vice President of the Goldman Sachs Mutual Funds and as Director of the Goldman Sachs Offshore Funds provides the Board with the benefit of his experience with the management practices of other financial companies. Mr. Perlowski also serves as a board member for the funds in the BlackRock Multi-Asset Complex. Mr. Perlowski’s experience with BlackRock enhances his service as a member of the Executive Committee.
  
Biographical Information
Certain biographical and other information relating to the Directors is set forth below, including their address and year of birth, principal occupations for at least the last five years, length of time served, total number of registered investment companies and investment portfolios overseen in the BlackRock-advised Funds and any currently held public company and other investment company directorships.
Name
and Year of Birth1,2
  Position(s)
Held
(Length of Service)3
  Principal Occupation(s)
During Past Five Years
  Number of
BlackRock-
Advised
Registered
Investment
Companies
(“RICs”)
Consisting of
Investment
Portfolios
(“Portfolios”)
Overseen
  Public
Company
and Other
Investment
Company
Directorships
Held During
Past Five Years
Independent Directors                
R. Glenn Hubbard
1958
  Chair of the Board
(Since 2022) and
Director
(Since 2019)
  Dean, Columbia Business School from 2004 to 2019; Faculty member, Columbia Business School since 1988.   70 RICs consisting of 102 Portfolios   ADP (data and information services) from 2004 to 2020; Metropolitan Life Insurance Company (insurance); TotalEnergies SE (multi-energy)
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Name
and Year of Birth1,2
  Position(s)
Held
(Length of Service)3
  Principal Occupation(s)
During Past Five Years
  Number of
BlackRock-
Advised
Registered
Investment
Companies
(“RICs”)
Consisting of
Investment
Portfolios
(“Portfolios”)
Overseen
  Public
Company
and Other
Investment
Company
Directorships
Held During
Past Five Years
W. Carl Kester4
1951
  Vice Chair of the Board
(Since 2022) and
Director
(Since 2019)
  George Fisher Baker Jr. Professor of Business Administration, Harvard Business School since 2008; Deputy Dean for Academic Affairs from 2006 to 2010; Chairman of the Finance Unit, from 2005 to 2006; Senior Associate Dean and Chairman of the MBA Program from 1999 to 2005; Member of the faculty of Harvard Business School since 1981.   72 RICs consisting of 104 Portfolios   None
Cynthia L. Egan
1955
  Director
(Since 2019)
  Advisor, U.S. Department of the Treasury from 2014 to 2015; President, Retirement Plan Services, for T. Rowe Price Group, Inc. from 2007 to 2012; executive positions within Fidelity Investments from 1989 to 2007.   70 RICs consisting of 102 Portfolios   Unum (insurance); The Hanover Insurance Group (Board Chair); Huntsman Corporation (Lead Independent Director and non-Executive Vice Chair of the Board) (chemical products)
Frank J. Fabozzi4
1948
  Director
(Since 2019)
  Editor of The Journal of Portfolio Management since 1986; Professor of Finance, EDHEC Business School (France) from 2011 to 2022; Professor of Practice, Johns Hopkins University since 2021; Professor in the Practice of Finance, Yale University School of Management from 1994 to 2011 and currently a Teaching Fellow in Yale’s Executive Programs; Visiting Professor, Rutgers University for the Spring 2019 semester; Visiting Professor, New York University for the 2019 academic year; Adjunct Professor of Finance, Carnegie Mellon University in fall 2020 semester.   72 RICs consisting of 104 Portfolios   None
Lorenzo A. Flores
1964
  Director
(Since 2021)
  Vice Chairman, Kioxia, Inc. since 2019; Chief Financial Officer, Xilinx, Inc. from 2016 to 2019; Corporate Controller, Xilinx, Inc. from 2008 to 2016.   70 RICs consisting of 102 Portfolios   None
Stayce D. Harris
1959
  Director
(Since 2021)
  Lieutenant General, Inspector General, Office of the Secretary of the United States Air Force from 2017 to 2019; Lieutenant General, Assistant Vice Chief of Staff and Director, Air Staff, United States Air Force from 2016 to 2017; Major General, Commander, 22nd Air Force, AFRC, Dobbins Air Reserve Base, Georgia from 2014 to 2016; Pilot, United Airlines from 1990 to 2020.   70 RICs consisting of 102 Portfolios   The Boeing Company (airplane manufacturer)
J. Phillip Holloman
1955
  Director
(Since 2021)
  President and Chief Operating Officer, Cintas Corporation from 2008 to 2018.   70 RICs consisting of 102 Portfolios   PulteGroup, Inc. (home construction); Rockwell Automation Inc. (industrial automation)
Catherine A. Lynch4
1961
  Director
(Since 2019)
  Chief Executive Officer, Chief Investment Officer and various other positions, National Railroad Retirement Investment Trust from 2003 to 2016; Associate Vice President for Treasury Management, The George Washington University from 1999 to 2003; Assistant Treasurer, Episcopal Church of America from 1995 to 1999.   72 RICs consisting of 104 Portfolios   PennyMac Mortgage Investment Trust
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Name
and Year of Birth1,2
  Position(s)
Held
(Length of Service)3
  Principal Occupation(s)
During Past Five Years
  Number of
BlackRock-
Advised
Registered
Investment
Companies
(“RICs”)
Consisting of
Investment
Portfolios
(“Portfolios”)
Overseen
  Public
Company
and Other
Investment
Company
Directorships
Held During
Past Five Years
Interested Directors5                
Robert Fairbairn
1965
  Director
(Since 2015)
  Vice Chairman of BlackRock, Inc. since 2019; Member of BlackRock’s Global Executive and Global Operating Committees; Co-Chair of BlackRock’s Human Capital Committee; Senior Managing Director of BlackRock, Inc. from 2010 to 2019; oversaw BlackRock’s Strategic Partner Program and Strategic Product Management Group from 2012 to 2019; Member of the Board of Managers of BlackRock Investments, LLC from 2011 to 2018; Global Head of BlackRock’s Retail and iShares® businesses from 2012 to 2016.   98 RICs consisting of 267 Portfolios   None
John M. Perlowski4
1964
  Director
(Since 2015)
President
and Chief
Executive
Officer
(Since 2010)
  Managing Director of BlackRock, Inc. since 2009; Head of BlackRock Global Accounting and Product Services since 2009; Advisory Director of Family Resource Network (charitable foundation) since 2009.   100 RICs consisting of 269 Portfolios   None
  

1 The address of each Director is c/o BlackRock, Inc., 55 East 52nd Street, New York, New York 10055.
2 Each Independent Director holds office until his or her successor is duly elected and qualifies or until his or her earlier death, resignation, retirement or removal as provided by the Corporation’s by-laws or charter or statute, or until December 31 of the year in which he or she turns 75. Directors who are “interested persons,” as defined in the Investment Company Act, serve until their successor is duly elected and qualifies or until their earlier death, resignation, retirement or removal as provided by the Corporation’s by-laws or statute, or until December 31 of the year in which they turn 72. The Board may determine to extend the terms of Independent Directors on a case-by-case basis, as appropriate.
3 Following the combination of Merrill Lynch Investment Managers, L.P. (“MLIM”) and BlackRock, Inc. in September 2006, the various legacy MLIM and legacy BlackRock fund boards were realigned and consolidated into three new fund boards in 2007. Certain Independent Directors first became members of the boards of other legacy MLIM or legacy BlackRock funds as follows: Frank J. Fabozzi, 1988; R. Glenn Hubbard, 2004; and W. Carl Kester, 1995. Certain other Independent Directors became members of the boards of the closed-end funds in the BlackRock Fixed-Income Complex as follows: Cynthia L. Egan, 2016; and Catherine A. Lynch, 2016.
4 Dr. Fabozzi, Dr. Kester, Ms. Lynch and Mr. Perlowski are also trustees of the BlackRock Credit Strategies Fund and BlackRock Private Investments Fund.
5 Mr. Fairbairn and Mr. Perlowski are both “interested persons,” as defined in the Investment Company Act, of the Corporation and the Master LLC based on their positions with BlackRock, Inc. and its affiliates. Mr. Fairbairn and Mr. Perlowski are also board members of the BlackRock Multi-Asset Complex.
Certain biographical and other information relating to the officers of the Corporation who are not Directors is set forth below, including their address and year of birth, principal occupations for at least the last five years and length of time served.
Name
and Year of Birth1,2
  Position(s) Held
(Length of Service)
  Principal Occupation(s)
During Past Five Years
Officers Who Are Not Directors        
Jennifer McGovern
1977
  Vice President
(Since 2014)
  Managing Director of BlackRock, Inc. since 2016; Director of BlackRock, Inc. from 2011 to 2015; Head of Americas Product Development and Governance for BlackRock’s Global Product Group since 2019; Head of Product Structure and Oversight for BlackRock’s U.S. Wealth Advisory Group from 2013 to 2019.
Trent Walker
1974
  Chief
Financial
Officer
(Since 2021)
  Managing Director of BlackRock, Inc. since September 2019; Executive Vice President of PIMCO from 2016 to 2019; Senior Vice President of PIMCO from 2008 to 2015; Treasurer from 2013 to 2019 and Assistant Treasurer from 2007 to 2017 of PIMCO Funds, PIMCO Variable Insurance Trust, PIMCO ETF Trust, PIMCO Equity Series, PIMCO Equity Series VIT, PIMCO Managed Accounts Trust, 2 PIMCO-sponsored interval funds and 21 PIMCO-sponsored closed-end funds.
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Name
and Year of Birth1,2
  Position(s) Held
(Length of Service)
  Principal Occupation(s)
During Past Five Years
Jay M. Fife
1970
  Treasurer
(Since 2007)
  Managing Director of BlackRock, Inc. since 2007.
Charles Park
1967
  Chief Compliance Officer
(Since 2014)
  Anti-Money Laundering Compliance Officer for certain BlackRock-advised Funds from 2014 to 2015; Chief Compliance Officer of BlackRock Advisors, LLC and the BlackRock-advised Funds in the BlackRock Multi-Asset Complex and the BlackRock Fixed-Income Complex since 2014; Principal of and Chief Compliance Officer for iShares® Delaware Trust Sponsor LLC since 2012 and BlackRock Fund Advisors (“BFA”) since 2006; Chief Compliance Officer for the BFA-advised iShares® exchange traded funds since 2006; Chief Compliance Officer for BlackRock Asset Management International Inc. since 2012.
Lisa Belle
1968
  Anti-Money Laundering Compliance Officer
(Since 2019)
  Managing Director of BlackRock, Inc. since 2019; Global Financial Crime Head for Asset and Wealth Management of JP Morgan from 2013 to 2019; Managing Director of RBS Securities from 2012 to 2013; Head of Financial Crimes for Barclays Wealth Americas from 2010 to 2012.
Janey Ahn
1975
  Secretary
(Since 2019)
  Managing Director of BlackRock, Inc. since 2018; Director of BlackRock, Inc. from 2009 to 2017.
  

1 The address of each Officer is c/o BlackRock, Inc., 55 East 52nd Street, New York, New York 10055.
2 Officers of the Corporation and the Master LLC serve at the pleasure of the Board.
Share Ownership
Information relating to each Director’s share ownership in the Fund and in all BlackRock-advised Funds that are currently overseen by the respective Director (“Supervised Funds”) as of December 31, 2022 is set forth in the chart below. Amounts shown may include shares as to which a Director has indirect beneficial ownership, such as through participation in certain family accounts, 529 college savings plan interests, or similar arrangements where the Director has beneficial economic interest but not a direct ownership interest.
Name   Dollar Range
of Equity Securities in
the Total Return Fund
  Aggregate Dollar Range
of Equity Securities in
Supervised Funds *
Independent Directors:        
Cynthia L. Egan

  None   Over $100,000
Frank J. Fabozzi

  $10,001 - $50,000   Over $100,000
Lorenzo A. Flores

  $10,001 - $50,000   Over $100,000
Stayce D. Harris

  $10,001 - $50,000   Over $100,000
J. Phillip Holloman

  $10,001 - $50,000   Over $100,000
R. Glenn Hubbard

  Over $100,000   Over $100,000
W. Carl Kester

  $10,001 - $50,000   Over $100,000
Catherine A. Lynch

  $10,001 - $50,000   Over $100,000
Interested Directors:        
Robert Fairbairn

  None   Over $100,000
John M. Perlowski

  None   Over $100,000
  

* Includes share equivalents owned under the deferred compensation plan in the Supervised Funds by certain Independent Directors who have participated in the deferred compensation plan of the Supervised Funds.
As of January 4, 2023, the Directors and officers of the Corporation as a group directly or indirectly beneficially owned an aggregate of less than 1% of any class of the outstanding shares of the Fund. As of December 31, 2022, none of the Independent Directors of the Corporation or their immediate family members owned beneficially or of record any securities of the Fund’s investment adviser, sub-adviser, principal underwriter, or any person directly or indirectly controlling, controlled by, or under common control with such entities.
Compensation of Directors
Each Director who is an Independent Director is paid an annual retainer of $370,000 per year for his or her services as a Board member of the BlackRock-advised Funds, including the Fund and the Master Portfolio, and each Independent Director may also receive a $10,000 Board meeting fee for special unscheduled meetings or meetings in excess of six Board meetings held in a calendar year, together with out-of-pocket expenses in accordance with a
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Board policy on travel and other business expenses relating to attendance at meetings. In addition, the Chair of the Board and the Vice Chair of the Board are paid an additional annual retainer of $100,000 and $60,000, respectively. The Chairs of the Audit Committee, Performance Oversight Committee, Compliance Committee, and Governance and Nominating Committee are paid an additional annual retainer of $45,000, $37,500, $45,000 and $37,500, respectively. Each of the members of the Audit Committee, Compliance Committee, and Governance and Nominating Committee are paid an additional annual retainer of $30,000, $25,000 and $25,000, respectively, for his or her service on such committee. The Fund will pay a pro rata portion quarterly (based on relative net assets) of the foregoing Director fees paid by the funds in the BlackRock Fixed-Income Complex.
The Independent Directors have agreed that a maximum of 50% of each Independent Director’s total compensation paid by funds in the BlackRock Fixed-Income Complex may be deferred pursuant to the BlackRock Fixed-Income Complex’s deferred compensation plan. Under the deferred compensation plan, deferred amounts earn a return for the Independent Directors as though equivalent dollar amounts had been invested in shares of certain funds in the BlackRock Fixed-Income Complex selected by the Independent Directors. This has approximately the same economic effect for the Independent Directors as if they had invested the deferred amounts in such funds in the BlackRock Fixed-Income Complex. The deferred compensation plan is not funded and obligations thereunder represent general unsecured claims against the general assets of a fund and are recorded as a liability for accounting purposes.
The following table sets forth the compensation paid to the Directors by the Master LLC, on behalf of the Fund, for the fiscal year ended September 30, 2022, and the aggregate compensation, including deferred compensation amounts, paid to them by all BlackRock-advised Funds for the calendar year ended December 31, 2022. With respect to the Fund, the compensation is paid by the Master Portfolio as shown below.
Name1   Compensation
from the
Master Portfolio
  Estimated
Annual
Benefits upon
Retirement
  Aggregate
Compensation
from the
Master Portfolio
and Other
BlackRock-
Advised Funds2,3
Independent Directors:            
Michael J. Castellano4

  $6,034   None   N/A
Richard E. Cavanagh5

  $6,729   None   N/A
Cynthia L. Egan

  $24,907   None   $465,000
Frank J. Fabozzi

  $23,729   None   $497,500
Lorenzo A. Flores

  $21,630   None   $400,000
Stayce D. Harris

  $21,588   None   $395,000
J. Phillip Holloman6

  $22,438   None   $415,453
R. Glenn Hubbard

  $27,117   None   $520,000
W. Carl Kester

  $26,459   None   $587,500
Catherine A. Lynch7

  $24,045   None   $520,453
Karen P. Robards8

  $18,241   None   $212,500
Interested Directors:            
Robert Fairbairn

  None   None   None
John M. Perlowski

  None   None   None
  

1 For the number of BlackRock-advised Funds from which each Director receives compensation, see “Biographical Information” beginning on page I-15.
2 For the Independent Directors, this amount represents the aggregate compensation earned by such persons from the funds in the BlackRock Fixed-Income Complex during the calendar year ended December 31, 2022. Of this amount, Dr. Fabozzi, Mr. Flores, Ms. Harris, Mr. Holloman, Dr. Hubbard, Dr. Kester and Ms. Lynch deferred $74,625, $200,000, $197,500, $207,726, $260,000, $88,125 and $78,067, respectively, pursuant to the BlackRock Fixed-Income Complex’s deferred compensation plan.
3 Total amount of deferred compensation payable by the BlackRock Fixed-Income Complex to Dr. Fabozzi, Mr. Flores, Ms. Harris, Mr. Holloman, Dr. Hubbard, Dr. Kester and Ms. Lynch is $1,172,873, $239,580, $238,473, $249,920, $3,546,573, $1,645,645 and $425,559, respectively, as of December 31, 2022. Ms. Egan did not participate in the deferred compensation plan as of December 31, 2022.
4 Mr. Castellano retired as a director of the Fund and Chair of the Audit Committee effective December 31, 2021.
5 Mr. Cavanagh retired as a director of the Fund and Co-Chair of the Board effective December 31, 2021.
6 Mr. Holloman was appointed as a member of the Governance and Nominating Committee effective May 20, 2022.
7 Ms. Lynch was appointed as a member of the Governance and Nominating Committee effective May 20, 2022.
8 Ms. Robards retired and resigned as a Director of the Fund effective May 31, 2022.
IV. Management, Advisory and Other Service Arrangements
The Corporation, on behalf of the Fund, and the Master LLC, on behalf of the Master Portfolio, each have entered into management agreements with the Manager (each, a “Management Agreement” and collectively, the “Management Agreements”) under which the Manager provides investment management and certain administrative services. Pursuant to each Management Agreement, the Manager receives for its services to each of the Fund and the Master Portfolio a monthly fee at an annual rate of the average daily net assets of the Fund and the Master
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Portfolio. The Manager does not receive separate compensation from the Fund or the Master Portfolio for providing each with investment management or administrative services. The Fund invests all of its assets in shares of the Master Portfolio; therefore, all portfolio management for the Fund occurs at the Master Portfolio level. Under each Management Agreement, the administrative services provided by the Manager include, but are not limited to, the following: maintaining office facilities for the Fund and the Master Portfolio; furnishing the Fund and the Master Portfolio with clerical, bookkeeping and administrative services; overseeing the determination and publication of the Fund’s and the Master Portfolio’s net asset value; overseeing the preparation and filing of Federal, state and local income tax returns; preparing certain reports required by regulatory authorities; calculating various contractual expenses; determining the amount of dividends and distributions available for payment by the Fund and the Master Portfolio to its shareholders; preparing and arranging for the printing of dividend notices to shareholders; providing the Fund’s and the Master Portfolio’s service providers with such information as is required to effect the payment of dividends and distributions; and serving as liaison with the Corporation’s and the Master LLC’s officers, independent accountants, legal counsel, custodian, accounting agent and transfer and dividend disbursing agent in establishing the accounting policies of each entity and monitoring financial and shareholder accounting services.
Under the Management Agreements, BlackRock receives for its services to each of the Fund and the Master Portfolio a fee as a percentage of average daily net assets. With respect to the Fund and the Master Portfolio, the maximum actual management fees payable to BlackRock (as a percentage of average daily net assets) are calculated as follows:
    Rates of Management Fees
Average Daily Net Assets   Total Return
Fund1
  Master
Portfolio
First $250 million

  0.32%   0.16%
$250 million – $500 million

  0.31%   0.12%
$500 million – $750 million

  0.30%   0.08%
Over $750 million

  0.29%   0.05%
  

1 Under the terms of the management agreement between the Corporation, on behalf of the Fund, and BlackRock, this contractual management fee applies to the Fund for as long as the Fund invests in the Master Portfolio or another master fund advised by BlackRock or an affiliate thereof in a master-feeder structure. If the Fund ceases to operate as a feeder fund in a master/feeder structure, the maximum actual management fees payable to BlackRock (as a percentage of average daily net assets) by the Fund are as follows: 0.48% (first $250 million), 0.43% ($250 million–$500 million), 0.38% ($500 million–$750 million) and 0.34% (over $750 million). In addition, the Manager has contractually agreed to waive and/or reimburse fees or expenses in order to limit Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses After Fee Waivers and/or Expense Reimbursements (excluding Dividend Expense, Interest Expense, Acquired Fund Fees and Expenses and certain other Fund expenses (as defined in the Fund’s Prospectuses)) as a percentage of average daily net assets to 0.78% (for Investor A Shares), 1.44% (for Investor C Shares), 0.44% (for Institutional Shares), 0.39% (for Class K Shares), 0.75% (for Service Shares), 1.03% (for Class R Shares) and 0.59% (for Investor A1 Shares) through June 30, 2024.
With the exception of the Fund’s investment in the Master Portfolio, BlackRock has contractually agreed to waive the management fee of the Fund and the Master Portfolio with respect to any portion of the Fund’s and the Master Portfolio’s assets estimated to be attributable to investments in other equity and fixed-income mutual funds and exchange-traded funds managed by BlackRock or its affiliates that have a contractual management fee, through June 30, 2024. In addition, effective January 28, 2020, BlackRock has contractually agreed to waive its management fees by the amount of investment advisory fees the Fund or the Master Portfolio pays to BlackRock indirectly through its investment in money market funds managed by BlackRock or its affiliates, through June 30, 2024. Prior to January 28, 2020, such agreement to waive a portion of the Fund’s or the Master Portfolio’s management fee in connection with the Fund’s or the Master Portfolio’s investment in affiliated money market funds was voluntary. The contractual agreements may be terminated upon 90 days’ notice by a majority of the non-interested directors of the Corporation or the Master Portfolio or by a vote of a majority of the outstanding voting securities of the Fund or the Master Portfolio.
Pursuant to the Management Agreement, the Manager may from time to time, in its sole discretion to the extent permitted by applicable law, appoint one or more sub-advisers, including, without limitation, affiliates of the Manager, to perform investment advisory services with respect to the Fund. In addition, the Manager may delegate certain of its investment advisory functions under the Management Agreement to one or more of its affiliates to the extent permitted by applicable law. The Manager may terminate any or all sub-advisers or such delegation arrangements in its sole discretion at any time to the extent permitted by applicable law.
The Manager has entered into a sub-advisory agreement with each of BlackRock International Limited (“BIL”) and BlackRock (Singapore) Limited (“BSL,” and together with BIL the “Sub-Advisers”) pursuant to which, with respect to the Fund and the Master Portfolio, the Sub-Advisers receive for their services for that portion of the Fund for which each Sub-Adviser serves as sub-adviser a monthly fee at an annual rate equal to a percentage of the management fee paid to the Manager under the Management Agreements with respect to the Fund or the Master Portfolio.
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The table below sets forth information about the total management fees paid by the Fund and the Master Portfolio to the Manager (which includes amounts paid by the Manager to the Sub-Advisers) and the amounts waived and/or reimbursed by the Manager for the periods indicated:
    Total Return Fund   Master Portfolio
Fiscal Year Ended September 30,   Paid to the
Manager
  Waived by
the Manager
  Reimbursements
by the Manager
  Paid to the
Manager
  Waived by
the Manager
2022

  $56,953,606   $0   $2,101,562   $10,791,596   $775,777
2021

  $57,697,406   $0   $2,682,064   $11,030,489   $545,932
2020

  $49,132,692   $0   $2,806,516   $9,403,300   $933,305
  
Information Regarding the Portfolio Managers
Rick Rieder, Bob Miller, David Rogal and Chi Chen are the Fund’s portfolio managers and are primarily responsible for the day-to-day management of the Fund’s portfolio. On or about March 31, 2023, Bob Miller will retire from BlackRock, Inc., and will no longer serve as a portfolio manager of the Fund.
Other Funds and Accounts Managed
The following table sets forth information about the funds and accounts other than the Fund for which the portfolio managers are jointly and primarily responsible for the day-to-day portfolio management as of September 30, 2022.
  Number of Other Accounts Managed
and Assets by Account Type
Number of Other Accounts and Assets
for Which Advisory Fee is Performance-Based
Name of Portfolio Manager Other
Registered
Investment
Companies
Other Pooled
Investment
Vehicles
Other
Accounts
Other
Registered
Investment
Companies
Other Pooled
Investment
Vehicles
Other
Accounts
Chi Chen 9 5 1 0 0 0
  $33.47 Billion $9.21 Billion $53.99 Million $0 $0 $0
Bob Miller* 18 18 15 0 0 7
  $63.21 Billion $21.64 Billion $5.05 Billion $0 $0 $3.30 Billion
Rick Rieder 23 35 18 0 7 3
  $86.75 Billion $37.34 Billion $2.96 Billion $0 $1.05 Billion $259.67 Million
David Rogal 17 13 20 0 0 0
  $62.12 Billion $18.59 Billion $11.24 Billion $0 $0 $0
  
* On or about March 31, 2023, Bob Miller will retire from BlackRock, Inc., and will no longer serve as a portfolio manager of the Fund.
Portfolio Manager Compensation Overview
The discussion below describes the portfolio managers’ compensation as of September 30, 2022.
BlackRock’s financial arrangements with its portfolio managers, its competitive compensation and its career path emphasis at all levels reflect the value senior management places on key resources. Compensation may include a variety of components and may vary from year to year based on a number of factors. The principal components of compensation include a base salary, a performance-based discretionary bonus, participation in various benefits programs and one or more of the incentive compensation programs established by BlackRock.
Base Compensation. Generally, portfolio managers receive base compensation based on their position with the firm.
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Discretionary Incentive Compensation
Discretionary incentive compensation is a function of several components: the performance of BlackRock, Inc., the performance of the portfolio manager’s group within BlackRock, the investment performance, including risk-adjusted returns, of the firm’s assets under management or supervision by that portfolio manager relative to predetermined benchmarks, and the individual’s performance and contribution to the overall performance of these portfolios and BlackRock. In most cases, these benchmarks are the same as the benchmark or benchmarks against which the performance of the Fund or other accounts managed by the portfolio managers are measured. Among other things, BlackRock’s Chief Investment Officers make a subjective determination with respect to each portfolio manager’s compensation based on the performance of the Fund and other accounts managed by each portfolio manager relative to the various benchmarks. Performance of fixed income funds is measured on a pre-tax and/or after-tax basis over various time periods including 1-, 3- and 5- year periods, as applicable. With respect to these portfolio managers, such benchmarks for the Fund and other accounts are: a combination of market-based indices (e.g., Bloomberg U.S. Aggregate Bond Index), certain customized indices and certain fund industry peer groups.
Distribution of Discretionary Incentive Compensation. Discretionary incentive compensation is distributed to portfolio managers in a combination of cash, deferred BlackRock, Inc. stock awards, and/or deferred cash awards that notionally track the return of certain BlackRock investment products.
Portfolio managers receive their annual discretionary incentive compensation in the form of cash. Portfolio managers whose total compensation is above a specified threshold also receive deferred BlackRock, Inc. stock awards annually as part of their discretionary incentive compensation. Paying a portion of discretionary incentive compensation in the form of deferred BlackRock, Inc. stock puts compensation earned by a portfolio manager for a given year “at risk” based on BlackRock’s ability to sustain and improve its performance over future periods. In some cases, additional deferred BlackRock, Inc. stock may be granted to certain key employees as part of a long-term incentive award to aid in retention, align interests with long-term shareholders and motivate performance. Deferred BlackRock, Inc. stock awards are generally granted in the form of BlackRock, Inc. restricted stock units that vest pursuant to the terms of the applicable plan and, once vested, settle in BlackRock, Inc. common stock. The portfolio managers of this Fund have deferred BlackRock, Inc. stock awards.
For certain portfolio managers, a portion of the discretionary incentive compensation is also distributed in the form of deferred cash awards that notionally track the returns of select BlackRock investment products they manage, which provides direct alignment of portfolio manager discretionary incentive compensation with investment product results. Deferred cash awards vest ratably over a number of years and, once vested, settle in the form of cash. Only portfolio managers who manage specified products and whose total compensation is above a specified threshold are eligible to participate in the deferred cash award program.
Other Compensation Benefits. In addition to base salary and discretionary incentive compensation, portfolio managers may be eligible to receive or participate in one or more of the following:
Incentive Savings Plans — BlackRock, Inc. has created a variety of incentive savings plans in which BlackRock employees are eligible to participate, including a 401(k) plan, the BlackRock Retirement Savings Plan (RSP), and the BlackRock Employee Stock Purchase Plan (ESPP). The employer contribution components of the RSP include a company match equal to 50% of the first 8% of eligible pay contributed to the plan capped at $5,000 per year, and a company retirement contribution equal to 3-5% of eligible compensation up to the Internal Revenue Service limit ($305,000 for 2022). The RSP offers a range of investment options, including registered investment companies and collective investment funds managed by the firm. BlackRock contributions follow the investment direction set by participants for their own contributions or, absent participant investment direction, are invested into a target date fund that corresponds to, or is closest to, the year in which the participant attains age 65. The ESPP allows for investment in BlackRock common stock at a 5% discount on the fair market value of the stock on the purchase date. Annual participation in the ESPP is limited to the purchase of 1,000 shares of common stock or a dollar value of $25,000 based on its fair market value on the purchase date. All of the eligible portfolio managers are eligible to participate in these plans.
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Portfolio Manager Beneficial Holdings
As of September 30, 2022, the Fund’s most recently completed fiscal year end, the dollar range of securities beneficially owned by each portfolio manager in the Fund is shown below:
Portfolio Manager   Dollar Range of
Equity Securities of
the Fund Owned
Chi Chen

  None
Bob Miller*

  $500,001 – $1,000,000
Rick Rieder

  Over $1 Million
David Rogal

  $50,001 – $100,000
  

* On or about March 31, 2023, Bob Miller will retire from BlackRock, Inc., and will no longer serve as a portfolio manager of the Fund.
Portfolio Manager Potential Material Conflicts of Interest
BlackRock has built a professional working environment, firm-wide compliance culture and compliance procedures and systems designed to protect against potential incentives that may favor one account over another. BlackRock has adopted policies and procedures that address the allocation of investment opportunities, execution of portfolio transactions, personal trading by employees and other potential conflicts of interest that are designed to ensure that all client accounts are treated equitably over time. Nevertheless, BlackRock furnishes investment management and advisory services to numerous clients in addition to the Fund, and BlackRock may, consistent with applicable law, make investment recommendations to other clients or accounts (including accounts which are hedge funds or have performance or higher fees paid to BlackRock, or in which portfolio managers have a personal interest in the receipt of such fees), which may be the same as or different from those made to the Fund. In addition, BlackRock, its affiliates and significant shareholders and any officer, director, shareholder or employee may or may not have an interest in the securities whose purchase and sale BlackRock recommends to the Fund. BlackRock, or any of its affiliates or significant shareholders, or any officer, director, shareholder, employee or any member of their families may take different actions than those recommended to the Fund by BlackRock with respect to the same securities. Moreover, BlackRock may refrain from rendering any advice or services concerning securities of companies of which any of BlackRock’s (or its affiliates’ or significant shareholders’) officers, directors or employees are directors or officers, or companies as to which BlackRock or any of its affiliates or significant shareholders or the officers, directors and employees of any of them has any substantial economic interest or possesses material non-public information. Certain portfolio managers also may manage accounts whose investment strategies may at times be opposed to the strategy utilized for the Fund. It should also be noted that Messrs. Miller, Rieder and Rogal and Ms. Chen may be managing hedge fund and/or long only accounts, or may be part of a team managing hedge fund and/or long only accounts, subject to incentive fees. Messrs. Miller, Rieder and Rogal and Ms. Chen may therefore be entitled to receive a portion of any incentive fees earned on such accounts.
As a fiduciary, BlackRock owes a duty of loyalty to its clients and must treat each client fairly. When BlackRock purchases or sells securities for more than one account, the trades must be allocated in a manner consistent with its fiduciary duties. BlackRock attempts to allocate investments in a fair and equitable manner among client accounts, with no account receiving preferential treatment. To this end, BlackRock has adopted policies that are intended to ensure reasonable efficiency in client transactions and provide BlackRock with sufficient flexibility to allocate investments in a manner that is consistent with the particular investment discipline and client base, as appropriate.
Custodian
The Bank of New York Mellon, which has its principal offices at 240 Greenwich Street, New York, NY 10286, serves as the custodian for the Fund.
Transfer Agency and Shareholders’ Administrative Services
BNY Mellon Investment Servicing (US) Inc. (“BNY Mellon”), which has its principal place of business at 301 Bellevue Parkway, Wilmington, Delaware 19809, serves as the transfer and dividend disbursement agent for the Fund.
Pursuant to a Shareholders’ Administrative Services Agreement, the Manager provides certain shareholder liaison services in connection with the Fund’s investor service center. The Fund reimburses the Manager for its costs in maintaining the service center, which costs include, among other things, employee salaries, leasehold expenses, and other out-of-pocket expenses which are a component of the transfer agency fees in the Fund’s annual report.
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The following table sets forth the fees paid by the Fund to the Manager pursuant to the Shareholders’ Administrative Services Agreement for the periods indicated:
    Total Return Fund
Paid to Manager
  Total Return Fund
Waiver by the Manager
Fiscal Year Ended September 30,  
2022

  $44,814   $27,220
2021

  $97,420   $65,020
2020

  $73,791   $44,844
  
Accounting Services
BNY Mellon is the accounting services provider to the Fund and the Master Portfolio. BNY Mellon records investment, capital share and income and expense activities; verifies and transmits trade tickets; maintains accounting ledgers for investment securities; maintains tax lots; reconciles cash with the Fund’s and the Master Portfolio’s custodian; reports cash balances to the Manager; prepares certain financial statements; calculates expenses, gains, losses and income; controls disbursements; works with independent pricing sources; and computes and reports net asset value. In connection with its accounting services, BNY Mellon also provides certain administration services. The table below shows the amounts paid by the Master Portfolio to BNY Mellon and the Manager for accounting services for the periods indicated:
  September 30, 2022   September 30, 2021   September 30, 2020
Paid to
BNY
Mellon
  Paid to
the
Manager
  Paid to
BNY
Mellon
  Paid to
the
Manager
  Paid to
BNY
Mellon
  Paid to
the
Manager
Master Portfolio1

$508,383   $0   $510,000   $151,412   $510,100   $219,313
  

1 For providing services to the Master Portfolio and each feeder fund which invests its assets in the Master Portfolio.
Organization and Management of Wholly-Owned Subsidiary
The Master Portfolio intends to gain exposure to commodity markets by investing up to 25% of its total assets in the Subsidiary. The Subsidiary invests primarily in commodity-related instruments.
The Subsidiary is a company organized under the laws of the Cayman Islands, whose registered office is located at the offices of Maples Corporate Services Limited, P.O. Box 309, Ugland House, Grand Cayman KYI-1104, Cayman Islands. The Subsidiary’s affairs are overseen by a board of directors, which is comprised of John M. Perlowski and Trent Walker.
The Manager provides investment management and administrative services to the Subsidiary. The Manager does not receive separate compensation from the Subsidiary for providing it with investment advisory or administrative services. However, the Fund and the Master Portfolio pay the Manager based on the Fund’s assets and the Master Portfolio’s assets, respectively, including the assets invested in the Subsidiary. The Subsidiary entered into contracts for the provision of custody, accounting agent and audit services with the same service providers that provide those services to the Fund.
The Subsidiary is managed pursuant to compliance policies and procedures that are the same, in all material respects, as the policies and procedures adopted by the Fund and the Master Portfolio. As a result, the Manager, in managing the Subsidiary’s portfolio, is subject to the same investment policies and restrictions that apply to the management of the Fund and the Master Portfolio, and, in particular, to the requirements relating to portfolio leverage, liquidity, brokerage, and the timing and method of the valuation of the Subsidiary’s portfolio investments and shares of the Subsidiary. These policies and restrictions are described elsewhere in detail in this SAI. The Fund’s Chief Compliance Officer oversees implementation of the Subsidiary’s policies and procedures, and makes periodic reports to the Board regarding the Subsidiary’s compliance with its policies and procedures. The Fund, the Master Portfolio and the Subsidiary test for compliance with certain investment restrictions on a consolidated basis.
Credit Agreement
The Master LLC, on behalf of the Master Portfolio, along with certain other funds managed by the Manager and its affiliates (“Participating Funds”), is a party to a 364-day, $2.5 billion credit agreement with a group of lenders, which facility terminates on April 13, 2023, unless otherwise extended or renewed (the “Credit Agreement”). Excluding commitments designated for certain Participating Funds, the Participating Funds, including the Master LLC, can borrow up to an aggregate commitment amount of $1.75 billion at any time outstanding, subject to asset
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coverage and other limitations as specified in the Credit Agreement. The Master LLC may borrow under the Credit Agreement to meet shareholder redemptions and for other lawful purposes. However, the Master LLC may not borrow under the Credit Agreement for leverage. The Master LLC may borrow up to the maximum amount allowable under the Fund’s current Prospectus and SAI, subject to various other legal, regulatory or contractual limits. Borrowing results in interest expense and other fees and expenses for the Master LLC which may impact the Master LLC’s and the Fund’s net expenses. The costs of borrowing may reduce the Master LLC’s and the Fund’s returns. The Master LLC is charged its pro rata share of upfront fees and commitment fees on the aggregate commitment amount based on its net assets. If the Master LLC borrows pursuant to the Credit Agreement, the Master LLC is charged interest at a variable rate.
V. Information on Sales Charges and Distribution Related Expenses
Set forth below is information on sales charges (including any contingent deferred sales charges (“CDSCs”)) received by the Fund, including the amounts paid to affiliates of the Manager (“Affiliates”) for each of the Fund’s last three fiscal years. BlackRock Investments, LLC (“BRIL” or the “Distributor”), an affiliate of the Manager, acts as the Fund’s sole distributor.
Investor A and Investor A1, Sales Charge Information
    Investor A Shares
For the Fiscal Year Ended September 30,   Gross Sales
Charges
Collected
  Sales Charges
Retained by
BRIL
  Sales Charges
Paid to
Affiliates
  CDSCs Received on
Redemption of
Load-Waived Shares
2022

  $296,401   $19,888   $19,888   $133,830
2021

  $798,801   $54,776   $54,776   $122,055
2020

  $960,931   $65,873   $65,873   $106,681
  
    
    Investor A1 Shares
For the Fiscal Year Ended September 30,   Gross Sales
Charges
Collected
  Sales Charges
Retained by
BRIL
  Sales Charges
Paid to
Affiliates
  CDSCs Received on
Redemption of
Load-Waived Shares
2022

  $0   $0   $0   $0
2021

  $0   $0   $0   $0
2020

  $0   $0   $0   $0
  
Investor C Sales Charge Information
    Investor C Shares
For the Fiscal Year Ended September 30,   CDSCs Received
by BRIL
  CDSCs Paid
to Affiliates
2022

  $11,153   $11,153
2021

  $16,362   $16,362
2020

  $14,742   $14,742
  
The table below provides information for the fiscal year ended September 30, 2022 about the 12b-1 fees the Fund paid to BRIL under the Fund’s 12b-1 plans. A significant amount of the fees collected by BRIL were paid to affiliates, for providing shareholder servicing activities for Investor A, Investor A1 and Service shares and for providing shareholder servicing and distribution-related activities and services for Investor C and Class R Shares.
    Paid to BRIL
Total Return Fund
Class Name  
Investor A Shares

  $4,028,481
Investor A1 Shares

  $22,330
Investor C Shares

  $785,845
Service Shares

  $127,876
Class R Shares

  $393,152
  
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VI. Computation of Offering Price Per Share
An illustration of the computation of the public offering price of the Investor A Shares of the Fund based on the value of the Fund’s Investor A Shares’ net assets and the number of Investor A Shares outstanding on September 30, 2022, is set forth below.
  Total Return Fund
  Investor A
Shares
  Investor A1
Shares
Net Assets

$1,330,459,460   $20,123,537
Number of Shares Outstanding

136,196,945   2,061,731
Net Asset Value Per Share (net assets divided by number of shares outstanding)

$9.77   $9.76
Sales Charge (for Investor A and Investor A1 shares: 4.00% and 1.00% of offering price; 4.17% and 1.01% of net asset value per share, respectively)1

$0.41   $0.10
Offering Price

$10.18   $9.86
  

1 Rounded to the nearest one-hundredth percent; assumes maximum sales charge is applicable.
The offering price for the Fund’s other share classes is equal to the share class’ net asset value computed as set forth above for Investor A Shares. Though not subject to a sales charge, certain share classes may be subject to a CDSC on redemption. For more information on the purchasing and valuation of shares, please see “Purchase of Shares” and “Pricing of Shares” in Part II of this Statement of Additional Information.
The Subsidiary is subject to the same valuation policies as the Fund and the Master Portfolio as described in “Pricing of Shares” in Part II of this SAI. The Master Portfolio’s investment in the Subsidiary is valued based on the value of the Subsidiary’s portfolio investments. The Subsidiary prices its portfolio investments pursuant to the same pricing and valuation methodologies and procedures used by the Fund and the Master Portfolio, which require, among other things, that each of the Subsidiary’s portfolio investments be marked-to-market (that is, the value on the Subsidiary’s books changes) each business day to reflect changes in the market value of the investment.
VII. Portfolio Transactions and Brokerage
See “Portfolio Transactions and Brokerage” in Part II of this Statement of Additional Information for more information.
Information about the brokerage commissions paid by the Master Portfolio, including commissions paid to Affiliates, for the last three fiscal years is set forth in the following table:
  Aggregate Brokerage Commissions Paid
For the Fiscal Year Ended September 30,
  Commissions Paid to Affiliates
For the Fiscal Year Ended September 30,
  2022   2021   2020   2022   2021   2020
Master Portfolio

$7,113,489   $7,896,341   $7,430,427   $0   $0   $0
  
The following table shows the dollar amount of brokerage commissions paid by the Master Portfolio to brokers for providing third-party research services and the approximate dollar amount of the transactions involved for the fiscal year ended September 30, 2022. The provision of third-party research services was not necessarily a factor in the placement of all brokerage business with such brokers.
  Amount of Commissions
Paid to Brokers for
Providing
Research Services
  Amount of Brokerage
Transactions Involved
 
  $65,478   $95,016,964  
  
The Fund paid no brokerage commissions to brokers for providing research services for the fiscal year ended September 30, 2022.
As of September 30, 2022, the value of the Master Portfolio’s holdings of the securities of its regular brokers or dealers (as defined in Rule 10b-1 under the Investment Company Act), if any portion of such holdings were purchased during the fiscal year ended September 30, 2022, are as follows:
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Master Portfolio:
Regular Broker/Dealer   Debt (D)/Equity (E)   Aggregate Holdings (000’s)
BofA Securities, Inc.

  D   $316,408
Goldman Sachs & Co.

  D   $279,193
Morgan Stanley & Co., LLC

  D   $194,308
J.P. Morgan Securities LLC

  D   $162,139
Citigroup Global Markets, Inc.

  D   $116,798
Wells Fargo Securities LLC

  D   $40,344
Barclays Capital, Inc.

  D   $18,515
Mizuho Securities USA LLC

  D   $17,963
Credit Suisse Securities (USA) LLC

  D   $13,240
UBS Securities LLC

  D   $8,814
  
The Subsidiary follows the same brokerage practices as the Fund and the Master Portfolio.
Securities Lending
The Master LLC conducts its securities lending pursuant to an exemptive order from the Commission permitting it to lend portfolio securities to borrowers affiliated with the Fund and to retain an affiliate of the Fund as lending agent. To the extent that the Master LLC engages in securities lending, BlackRock Investment Management, LLC (“BIM”), an affiliate of the Manager, acts as securities lending agent for the Fund, subject to the overall supervision of the Manager. BIM administers the lending program in accordance with guidelines approved by the Fund’s Board.
The Master LLC retains a portion of securities lending income and remits a remaining portion to BIM as compensation for its services as securities lending agent. Securities lending income is equal to the total of income earned from the reinvestment of cash collateral (and excludes collateral investment expenses as defined below), and any fees or other payments to and from borrowers of securities. As securities lending agent, BIM bears all operational costs directly related to securities lending. Master LLC is responsible for expenses in connection with the investment of cash collateral received for securities on loan (the “collateral investment expenses”). The cash collateral is invested in a private investment company managed by the Manager or its affiliates. However, BIM has agreed to cap the collateral investment expenses of the private investment company to an annual rate of 0.04%. In addition, in accordance with the exemptive order, the investment adviser to the private investment company will not charge any advisory fees with respect to shares purchased by the Master LLC. Such shares also will not be subject to a sales load, distribution fee or service fee. If the private investment company’s weekly liquid assets fall below 30% of its total assets, BIM, as managing member of the private investment company, is permitted at any time, if it determines it to be in the best interests of the private investment company, to impose a liquidity fee of up to 2% of the value of units withdrawn or impose a redemption gate that temporarily suspends the right of withdrawal out of the private investment company. In addition, if the private investment company’s weekly liquid assets fall below 10% of its total assets at the end of any business day, the private investment company will impose a liquidity fee in the default amount of 1% of the amount withdrawn, generally effective as of the next business day, unless BIM determines that a higher (not to exceed 2%) or lower fee level or not imposing a liquidity fee is in the best interests of the private investment company. The shares of the private investment company purchased by the Master LLC would be subject to any such liquidity fee or redemption gate imposed.
Under the securities lending program, the Master LLC is categorized into a specific asset class. The determination of the Master LLC’s asset class category (fixed income, domestic equity, international equity, or fund of funds), each of which may be subject to a different fee arrangement, is based on a methodology agreed to between the Master LLC and BIM.
Pursuant to the current securities lending agreement: (i) the Master LLC retains 81% of securities lending income (which excludes collateral investment expenses), and (ii) this amount can never be less than 70% of the sum of securities lending income plus collateral investment expenses.
In addition, commencing the business day following the date that the aggregate securities lending income earned across the BlackRock Fixed-Income Complex in a calendar year exceeds a specified threshold, the Master LLC, pursuant to the current securities lending agreement, will receive for the remainder of that calendar year securities lending income as follows: (i) 81% of securities lending income (which excludes collateral investment expenses); and (ii) this amount can never be less than 70% of the sum of securities lending income plus collateral investment expenses.
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The services provided to the Master LLC by BIM, in the most recent fiscal year ended September 30, 2022, primarily included the following:
(1) selecting borrowers from an approved list of borrowers and executing a securities lending agreement as agent on behalf of the Master LLC with each such borrower;
(2) negotiating the terms of securities loans, including the amount of fees;
(3) directing the delivery of loaned securities;
(4) monitoring the daily value of the loaned securities and directing the payment of additional collateral or the return of excess collateral, as necessary;
(5) investing cash collateral received in connection with any loaned securities;
(6) monitoring distributions on loaned securities (for example, interest and dividend activity);
(7) in the event of default by a borrower with respect to any securities loan, using the collateral or the proceeds of the liquidation of collateral to purchase replacement securities of the same issue, type, class and series as that of the loaned securities; and
(8) terminating securities loans and arranging for the return of loaned securities to the Master LLC at loan termination.
The following table shows the dollar amounts of income and fees/compensation related to the securities lending activities of the Master LLC during its most recent fiscal year ended September 30, 2022.
  Master Total
Return Portfolio
Gross income from securities lending activities

$796,689
Fees and/or compensation for securities lending activities and related services  
Securities lending income paid to BIM for services as securities lending agent

$123,755
Cash collateral management expenses not included in securities lending income paid to BIM

$2,126
Administrative fees not included in securities lending income paid to BIM

$0
Indemnification fees not included in securities lending income paid to BIM

$0
Rebates (paid to borrowers)

$104,713
Other fees not included in securities lending income paid to BIM

$0
Aggregate fees/compensation for securities lending activities

$230,594
Net income from securities lending activities

$566,095
  
VIII. Additional Information
Description of Shares
The Corporation is a diversified, open-end management investment company organized under the laws of the State of Maryland that commenced operations on November 10, 1978 as the Merrill Lynch High Income Fund, Inc., consisting solely of the High Income Portfolio. The Corporation was reorganized on September 8, 1980 to change its name from the Merrill Lynch High Income Fund, Inc. to the Merrill Lynch Corporate Bond Fund, Inc. and to add the High Quality Portfolio and the Intermediate Term Portfolio. The High Quality Portfolio and the Intermediate Term Portfolio commenced operations on October 31, 1980. The Corporation changed its name to Merrill Lynch Bond Fund, Inc. on January 22, 2001. The High Quality Portfolio changed its name to Core Bond Portfolio on January 22, 2001. Effective October 1, 2003, Core Bond Portfolio converted to a master/feeder structure. Effective September 29, 2006, the Corporation changed its name to BlackRock Bond Fund, Inc., and High Income Portfolio and Core Bond Portfolio changed their names to BlackRock High Income Fund and BlackRock Bond Fund, respectively. Effective September 24, 2007, BlackRock Bond Fund changed its name to BlackRock Total Return Fund. Effective October 15, 2021, the Corporation added BlackRock Sustainable Total Return Fund as a new series. BlackRock Sustainable Total Return Fund commenced operations on October 15, 2021.
On October 16, 2006, the Total Return Fund acquired substantially all the assets and assumed certain stated liabilities of Intermediate Term Portfolio pursuant to a plan of reorganization. Shareholders of Intermediate Term Portfolio received shares of the Total Return Fund of the same aggregate net asset value as the shares of Intermediate Term Portfolio they held prior to the reorganization and thereafter Intermediate Term Portfolio was terminated as a series of the Corporation. On September 24, 2007, the Total Return Fund acquired substantially all of the assets and certain stated liabilities of BlackRock Total Return Portfolio (the “Predecessor Fund”), a portfolio of
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BlackRock Funds II (the “Reorganization”). In connection with the Reorganization, (i) the Total Return Fund issued Investor C, Class R and newly-created BlackRock and Service Shares. Although the Total Return Fund was the surviving entity in the Reorganization, the Predecessor Fund was the accounting survivor. As a result, the Total Return Fund assumed the performance history of the Predecessor Fund at the closing of the Reorganization. On September 12, 2011, BlackRock High Yield Bond Portfolio, a series of BlackRock Funds II, acquired substantially all the assets and assumed certain stated liabilities of the High Income Fund pursuant to a plan of reorganization. Shareholders of High Income Fund received shares of the BlackRock High Yield Bond Portfolio of the same aggregate net asset value as the shares of the High Income Fund they held prior to the reorganization and thereafter the High Income Fund was terminated as a series of the Corporation.
The authorized capital stock of the Corporation consists of 4,800,000,000 shares of Common Stock, having a par value of $0.10 per share. The authorized shares of Common Stock are divided as follows:
Common Stock1   Total Return Fund   Sustainable Total Return Fund
Investor A

  450,000,000   300,000,000
Investor A1

  50,000,000   -
Investor C

  100,000,000   -
Institutional

  1,600,000,000   500,000,000
Class R

  250,000,000   -
Class K

  1,000,000,000   500,000,000
Service

  50,000,000   -
  
The Fund’s shares have equal dividend, distribution, liquidation and voting rights, except that only shares of each respective Fund are entitled to vote on matters concerning only that Fund and Investor A, Investor A1, Investor C and Class R Shares bear certain shareholder servicing expenses and/or expenses related to the distribution of such shares and have exclusive voting rights with respect to matters relating to such account maintenance and distribution expenditures.
Effective on the close of business on February 24, 2020, all of the issued and outstanding Investor C1 and Investor C2 Shares of the Fund converted into Investor A Shares of the Fund.
Counsel. Willkie Farr & Gallagher LLP, 787 Seventh Avenue, New York, New York 10019 serves as the Corporation’s counsel.
Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm. Deloitte & Touche LLP, with offices at 200 Berkeley Street, Boston, Massachusetts 02116 serves as the Fund’s independent registered public accountant.
Principal Shareholders
To the knowledge of the Fund, the following entities owned of record or beneficially 5% or more of a class of the Fund’s shares as of January 4, 2023:
Name   Address   Percentage   Class
Edward D. Jones and Co   12555 Manchester Rd.
St. Louis, MO 63131-3710
  39.19%   Investor A Shares
Merrill Lynch Pierce Fenner & Smith Incorporated   4800 East Deer Lake Drive
3rd Floor
Jacksonville, FL 32246-6484
  30.05%   Investor A Shares
Merrill Lynch Pierce Fenner & Smith Incorporated   4800 East Deer Lake Drive
3rd Floor
Jacksonville, FL 32246-6484
  89.53%   Investor A1 Shares
Pershing LLC   1 Pershing Plaza
Jersey City, NJ 07399-0001
  13.91%   Investor C Shares
Merrill Lynch Pierce Fenner & Smith Incorporated   4800 East Deer Lake Drive
3rd Floor
Jacksonville, FL 32246-6484
  12.94%   Investor C Shares
Morgan Stanley Smith Barney LLC   1 New York Plaza, Fl. 12
New York, NY 10004-1901
  12.61%   Investor C Shares
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Name   Address   Percentage   Class
Wells Fargo Clearing Services   2801 Market Street
Saint Louis, MO 63103
  11.11%   Investor C Shares
American Enterprise Investment SVC   707 2nd Avenue South
Minneapolis, MN 55402-2405
  6.78%   Investor C Shares
Edward D. Jones and Co   12555 Manchester Road
St. Louis, MO 63131-3710
  5.39%   Investor C Shares
Raymond James   880 Carillon Parkway
St. Petersburg, FL 33716-1102
  5.17%   Investor C Shares
UBS Financial Services, Inc.   1000 Harbor Blvd.
Weehawken, NJ 07086-6761
  5.12%   Investor C Shares
Morgan Stanley Smith Barney LLC   1 New York Plaza, Fl. 12
New York, NY 10004-1901
  25.21%   Institutional Class
Pershing LLC   1 Pershing Plaza
Jersey City, NJ 07399-0001
  18.28%   Institutional Class
National Financial Services LLC   499 Washington Blvd.
Jersey City, NJ 07310-2010
  8.55%   Institutional Class
American Enterprise Investment SVC   707 2nd Avenue South
Minneapolis, MN 55402-2405
  7.35%   Institutional Class
Merrill Lynch Pierce Fenner & Smith Incorporated   4800 East Deer Lake Drive
3rd Floor
Jacksonville, FL 32246-6484
  6.73%   Institutional Class
Charles Schwab & Co. Inc.   101 Montgomery Street
San Francisco, CA 94104-4122
  5.84%   Institutional Class
Edward D. Jones and Co.   12555 Manchester Road
St. Louis, MO 63131-3710
  25.73%   Class K Shares
Toyota Motor Insurance Services Inc.   6565 Headquarters Drive
Mailstop W2-3D
Plano, TX 75024-5965
  11.29%   Class K Shares
TD Ameritrade Inc.   P.O. Box 2226
Omaha, NE 68103
  10.40%   Class K Shares
National Financial Services LLC   499 Washington Blvd.
Jersey City, NJ 07310-2010
  9.62%   Class K Shares
Massachusetts Mutual Life
Insurance Company
  1295 State Street
Springfield, MA 01111-0000
  17.07%   Class R Shares
State Street Bank and Trust TTEE   1 Lincoln Street
Boston, MA 02111
  8.71%   Class R Shares
Massachusetts Mutual Life
Insurance Company
  1295 State Street
Springfield, MA 01111
  17.92%   Service Shares
Lincoln Retirement Services Company   P.O. Box 7876
Fort Wayne, IN 46801-7876
  9.58%   Service Shares
Mid Atlantic Trust Company   1251 Waterfront Place
Suite 525
Pittsburgh, PA 15222
  5.66%   Service Shares
  
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IX. Financial Statements
The audited financial statements, financial highlights and notes thereto in the Fund’s Annual Report to Shareholders for the fiscal year ended September 30, 2022 (the “2022 Annual Report”) are incorporated in this Statement of Additional Information by reference. In addition, the audited financial statements of the Master Portfolio and notes thereto are incorporated in this Statement of Additional Information by reference to the 2022 Annual Report. No other parts of the 2022 Annual Report are incorporated by reference herein. The financial statements and financial highlights included in the 2022 Annual Report have been audited by Deloitte & Touche LLP. The report of Deloitte & Touche LLP is incorporated herein by reference. Such financial statements and financial highlights have been incorporated herein in reliance upon the report of such firm given their authority as experts in accounting and auditing. Additional copies of the 2022 Annual Report may be obtained at no charge by telephoning the Distributor at the telephone number appearing on the front page of this SAI.
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PART II
Throughout this Statement of Additional Information (“SAI”), each BlackRock-advised fund may be referred to as a “Fund” or collectively with others as the “Funds.” Certain Funds may also be referred to as “Municipal Funds” if they invest certain of their assets in municipal investments described below.
Each Fund is organized either as a Maryland corporation, a Massachusetts business trust or a Delaware statutory trust. In each jurisdiction, nomenclature varies. For ease and clarity of presentation, shares of common stock and shares of beneficial interest are referred to herein as “shares” or “Common Stock,” holders of shares of Common Stock are referred to as “shareholders,” the trustees or directors of each Fund are referred to as “Directors,” the boards of trustees/directors of each Fund are referred to as the “Board of Directors” or the “Board,” BlackRock Advisors, LLC, BlackRock Fund Advisors or their respective affiliates is the investment adviser or manager of each Fund and is referred to herein as the “Manager” or “BlackRock,” and the investment advisory agreement or management agreement applicable to each Fund is referred to as the “Management Agreement.” Each Fund’s Articles of Incorporation or Declaration of Trust, together with all amendments thereto, is referred to as its “charter.” The Investment Company Act of 1940, as amended, is referred to herein as the “Investment Company Act.” The Securities Act of 1933, as amended, is referred to herein as the “Securities Act.” The Securities and Exchange Commission is referred to herein as the “Commission” or the “SEC.”
Certain Funds are “feeder” funds (each, a “Feeder Fund”) that invest all or a portion of their assets in a corresponding “master” portfolio (each, a “Master Portfolio”) of a master limited liability company (each, a “Master LLC”), a mutual fund that has the same objective and strategies as the Feeder Fund. All investments are generally made at the level of the Master Portfolio. This structure is sometimes called a “master/feeder” structure. A Feeder Fund’s investment results will correspond directly to the investment results of the underlying Master Portfolio in which it invests. For simplicity, this SAI uses the term “Fund” to include both a Feeder Fund and its Master Portfolio.
In addition to containing information about the Funds, Part II of this SAI contains general information about all funds in the BlackRock-advised fund complex. Certain information contained herein may not be relevant to a particular Fund.
Investment Risks and Considerations
Set forth below are descriptions of some of the types of investments and investment strategies that one or more of the Funds may use, and the risks and considerations associated with those investments and investment strategies. Please see each Fund’s prospectuses (the “Prospectus”) and the “Investment Objective and Policies” or “Investment Objectives and Policies” section, as applicable, of Part I of this SAI for further information on each Fund’s investment policies and risks. Information contained in this section about the risks and considerations associated with a Fund’s investments and/or investment strategies applies only to those Funds specifically identified in Part I of this SAI as making each type of investment or using each investment strategy (each, a “Covered Fund”). Information that does not apply to a Covered Fund does not form a part of that Covered Fund’s SAI and should not be relied on by investors in that Covered Fund. Only information that is clearly identified as applicable to a Covered Fund is considered to form a part of that Covered Fund’s SAI.
144A Securities. A Fund may purchase securities that can be offered and sold only to “qualified institutional buyers” pursuant to Rule 144A under the Securities Act. See “Restricted Securities” below.
Asset-Backed Securities. Asset-backed securities are securities backed by home equity loans, installment sale contracts, credit card receivables or other assets. Asset-backed securities are “pass-through” securities, meaning that principal and interest payments — net of expenses — made by the borrower on the underlying assets (such as credit card receivables) are passed through to a Fund. The value of asset-backed securities, like that of traditional fixed-income securities, typically increases when interest rates fall and decreases when interest rates rise. However, asset-backed securities differ from traditional fixed-income securities because of their potential for prepayment. The price paid by a Fund for its asset-backed securities, the yield the Fund expects to receive from such securities and the average life of the securities are based on a number of factors, including the anticipated rate of prepayment of the underlying assets. In a period of declining interest rates, borrowers may prepay the underlying assets more quickly than anticipated, thereby reducing the yield to maturity and the average life of the asset-backed securities. Moreover, when a Fund reinvests the proceeds of a prepayment in these circumstances, it will likely receive a rate of interest that is lower than the rate on the security that was prepaid. To the extent that a Fund purchases asset-backed securities at a premium, prepayments may result in a loss to the extent of the premium paid. If a Fund buys such securities at a discount, both scheduled payments and unscheduled prepayments will increase current and total returns and unscheduled prepayments will also accelerate the recognition of income which, when distributed to
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shareholders, will be taxable as ordinary income. In a period of rising interest rates, prepayments of the underlying assets may occur at a slower than expected rate, creating maturity extension risk. This particular risk may effectively change a security that was considered short- or intermediate-term at the time of purchase into a longer term security. Since the value of longer-term securities generally fluctuates more widely in response to changes in interest rates than does the value of shorter-term securities, maturity extension risk could increase the volatility of the Fund. When interest rates decline, the value of an asset-backed security with prepayment features may not increase as much as that of other fixed-income securities, and, as noted above, changes in market rates of interest may accelerate or retard prepayments and thus affect maturities.
Asset-Based Securities. Certain Funds may invest in debt, preferred or convertible securities, the principal amount, redemption terms or conversion terms of which are related to the market price of some natural resource asset such as gold bullion. These securities are referred to as “asset-based securities.” A Fund will purchase only asset-based securities that are rated, or are issued by issuers that have outstanding debt obligations rated, investment grade (for example, AAA, AA, A or BBB by S&P Global Ratings (“S&P”) or Fitch Ratings (“Fitch”), or Baa by Moody’s Investors Service, Inc. (“Moody’s”) or commercial paper rated A-1 by S&P or Prime-1 by Moody’s) or by issuers that the Manager has determined to be of similar creditworthiness. Obligations ranked in the fourth highest rating category, while considered “investment grade,” may have certain speculative characteristics and may be more likely to be downgraded than securities rated in the three highest rating categories. If an asset-based security is backed by a bank letter of credit or other similar facility, the Manager may take such backing into account in determining the creditworthiness of the issuer. While the market prices for an asset-based security and the related natural resource asset generally are expected to move in the same direction, there may not be perfect correlation in the two price movements. Asset-based securities may not be secured by a security interest in or claim on the underlying natural resource asset. The asset-based securities in which a Fund may invest may bear interest or pay preferred dividends at below market (or even relatively nominal) rates. Certain asset-based securities may be payable at maturity in cash at the stated principal amount or, at the option of the holder, directly in a stated amount of the asset to which it is related. In such instance, because no Fund presently intends to invest directly in natural resource assets, a Fund would sell the asset-based security in the secondary market, to the extent one exists, prior to maturity if the value of the stated amount of the asset exceeds the stated principal amount and thereby realize the appreciation in the underlying asset.
Precious Metal-Related Securities. A Fund may invest in the equity and other securities of companies that explore for, extract, process or deal in precious metals (e.g., gold, silver and platinum), and in asset-based securities indexed to the value of such metals. Such securities may be purchased when they are believed to be attractively priced in relation to the value of a company’s precious metal-related assets or when the values of precious metals are expected to benefit from inflationary pressure or other economic, political or financial uncertainty or instability. Based on historical experience, during periods of economic or financial instability the securities of companies involved in precious metals may be subject to extreme price fluctuations, reflecting the high volatility of precious metal prices during such periods. In addition, the instability of precious metal prices may result in volatile earnings of precious metal-related companies, which may, in turn, adversely affect the financial condition of such companies. The major producers of gold include the Republic of South Africa, Russia, Canada, the United States, Brazil and Australia. Sales of gold by Russia are largely unpredictable and often relate to political and economic considerations rather than to market forces. Economic, financial, social and political factors within South Africa may significantly affect South African gold production.
Borrowing and Leverage. Each Fund may borrow as a temporary measure for extraordinary or emergency purposes, including to meet redemptions or to settle securities transactions. Certain Funds will not purchase securities at any time when borrowings exceed 5% of their total assets, except (a) to honor prior commitments or (b) to exercise subscription rights when outstanding borrowings have been obtained exclusively for settlements of other securities transactions.
Certain Funds may also borrow in order to make investments, to the extent disclosed in such Fund’s Prospectus. The purchase of securities while borrowings are outstanding will have the effect of leveraging the Fund. Such leveraging increases the Fund’s exposure to capital risk, and borrowed funds are subject to interest costs that will reduce net income. The use of leverage by a Fund creates an opportunity for greater total return, but, at the same time, creates special risks. For example, leveraging may exaggerate changes in the net asset value (“NAV”) of Fund shares and in the yield on the Fund’s portfolio. Although the principal of such borrowings will be fixed, the Fund’s assets may change in value during the time the borrowings are outstanding. Borrowings will create interest expenses for the Fund that can exceed the income from the assets purchased with the borrowings. To the extent the income or capital appreciation derived from securities purchased with borrowed funds exceeds the interest the Fund will have to pay on the borrowings, the Fund’s return will be greater than if leverage had not been used. Conversely, if the income
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or capital appreciation from the securities purchased with such borrowed funds is not sufficient to cover the cost of borrowing, the return to the Fund will be less than if leverage had not been used and, therefore, the amount available for distribution to shareholders as dividends will be reduced. In the latter case, the Manager in its best judgment nevertheless may determine to maintain the Fund’s leveraged position if it expects that the benefits to the Fund’s shareholders of maintaining the leveraged position will outweigh the current reduced return.
Certain types of borrowings by a Fund may result in the Fund being subject to covenants in credit agreements relating to asset coverage, portfolio composition requirements and other matters. It is not anticipated that observance of such covenants would impede the Manager from managing a Fund’s portfolio in accordance with the Fund’s investment objectives and policies. However, a breach of any such covenants not cured within the specified cure period may result in acceleration of outstanding indebtedness and require the Fund to dispose of portfolio investments at a time when it may be disadvantageous to do so.
Each Fund may at times borrow from affiliates of the Manager, provided that the terms of such borrowings are no less favorable than those available from comparable sources of funds in the marketplace.
To the extent permitted by a Fund’s investment policies and restrictions and subject to the conditions of an exemptive order issued by the SEC, as described below under “Investment Risks and Considerations—Interfund Lending Program,” such Fund may borrow for temporary purposes through the Interfund Lending Program (as defined below).
Cash Flows; Expenses. The ability of each Fund to satisfy its investment objective depends to some extent on the Manager’s ability to manage cash flow (primarily from purchases and redemptions and distributions from the Fund’s investments). The Manager will make investment changes to a Fund’s portfolio to accommodate cash flow while continuing to seek to replicate the total return of the Fund’s target index. Investors should also be aware that the investment performance of each index is a hypothetical number which does not take into account brokerage commissions and other transaction costs, custody and other costs of investing, and any incremental operating costs (e.g., transfer agency and accounting costs) that will be borne by the Funds. Finally, since each Fund seeks to replicate the total return of its target index, the Manager generally will not attempt to judge the merits of any particular security as an investment.
Cash Management. Generally, the Manager will employ futures and options on futures to provide liquidity necessary to meet anticipated redemptions or for day-to-day operating purposes. However, if considered appropriate in the opinion of the Manager, a portion of a Fund’s assets may be invested in certain types of instruments with remaining maturities of 397 days or less for liquidity purposes. Such instruments would consist of: (i) obligations of the U.S. Government, its agencies, instrumentalities, authorities or political subdivisions (“U.S. Government Securities”); (ii) other fixed-income securities rated Aa or higher by Moody’s or AA or higher by S&P or, if unrated, of comparable quality in the opinion of the Manager; (iii) commercial paper; (iv) bank obligations, including negotiable certificates of deposit, time deposits and bankers’ acceptances; and (v) repurchase agreements. At the time the Fund invests in commercial paper, bank obligations or repurchase agreements, the issuer or the issuer’s parent must have outstanding debt rated Aa or higher by Moody’s or AA or higher by S&P or outstanding commercial paper, bank obligations or other short-term obligations rated Prime-1 by Moody’s or A-1 by S&P; or, if no such ratings are available, the instrument must be of comparable quality in the opinion of the Manager. For more information on money market instruments, see “Money Market Securities” below.
Collateralized Debt Obligations. Certain Funds may invest in collateralized debt obligations (“CDOs”), which include collateralized bond obligations (“CBOs”), collateralized loan obligations (“CLOs”) and other similarly structured securities. CDOs are types of asset-backed securities. A CBO is ordinarily issued by a trust or other special purpose entity (“SPE”) and is typically backed by a diversified pool of fixed-income securities (which may include high risk, below investment grade securities) held by such issuer. A CLO is ordinarily issued by a trust or other SPE and is typically collateralized by a pool of loans, which may include, among others, domestic and non-U.S. senior secured loans, senior unsecured loans, and subordinate corporate loans, including loans that may be rated below investment grade or equivalent unrated loans, held by such issuer. Investments in a CLO organized outside of the United States may not be deemed to be foreign securities if the CLO is collateralized by a pool of loans, a substantial portion of which are U.S. loans. Although certain CDOs may benefit from credit enhancement in the form of a senior-subordinate structure, over-collateralization or bond insurance, such enhancement may not always be present, and may fail to protect a Fund against the risk of loss on default of the collateral. Certain CDO issuers may use derivatives contracts to create “synthetic” exposure to assets rather than holding such assets directly, which entails the risks of derivative instruments described elsewhere in this SAI. CDOs may charge management fees and administrative expenses, which are in addition to those of a Fund.
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For both CBOs and CLOs, the cash flows from the SPE are split into two or more portions, called tranches, varying in risk and yield. The riskiest portion is the “equity” tranche, which bears the first loss from defaults from the bonds or loans in the SPE and serves to protect the other, more senior tranches from default (though such protection is not complete). Since it is partially protected from defaults, a senior tranche from a CBO or CLO typically has higher ratings and lower yields than its underlying securities, and may be rated investment grade. Despite the protection from the equity tranche, CBO or CLO tranches can experience substantial losses due to actual defaults, downgrades of the underlying collateral by rating agencies, forced liquidation of the collateral pool due to a failure of coverage tests, increased sensitivity to defaults due to collateral default and disappearance of protecting tranches, market anticipation of defaults as well as investor aversion to CBO or CLO securities as a class. Interest on certain tranches of a CDO may be paid in kind or deferred and capitalized (paid in the form of obligations of the same type rather than cash), which involves continued exposure to default risk with respect to such payments.
The risks of an investment in a CDO depend largely on the type of the collateral securities and the class of the CDO in which a Fund invests. Normally, CBOs, CLOs and other CDOs are privately offered and sold, and thus are not registered under the securities laws. However, an active dealer market may exist for CDOs, allowing a CDO to qualify for Rule 144A transactions. In addition to the normal risks associated with fixed-income securities and asset-backed securities generally discussed elsewhere in this SAI, CDOs carry additional risks including, but not limited to: (i) the possibility that distributions from collateral securities will not be adequate to make interest or other payments; (ii) the risk that the collateral may default or decline in value or be downgraded, if rated by a nationally recognized statistical rating organization (“NRSRO”); (iii) a Fund may invest in tranches of CDOs that are subordinate to other tranches; (iv) the structure and complexity of the transaction and the legal documents could lead to disputes among investors regarding the characterization of proceeds; (v) the investment return achieved by the Fund could be significantly different than those predicted by financial models; (vi) the lack of a readily available secondary market for CDOs; (vii) the risk of forced “fire sale” liquidation due to technical defaults such as coverage test failures; and (viii) the CDO’s manager may perform poorly.
Commercial Paper. Certain Funds may purchase commercial paper. Commercial paper purchasable by each Fund includes “Section 4(a)(2) paper,” a term that includes debt obligations issued in reliance on the “private placement” exemption from registration afforded by Section 4(a)(2) of the Securities Act. Section 4(a)(2) paper is restricted as to disposition under the Federal securities laws, and is frequently sold (and resold) to institutional investors such as the Fund through or with the assistance of investment dealers who make a market in the Section 4(a)(2) paper, thereby providing liquidity. Certain transactions in Section 4(a)(2) paper may qualify for the registration exemption provided in Rule 144A under the Securities Act. Most Funds can purchase commercial paper rated (at the time of purchase) “A-1” by S&P or “Prime-1” by Moody’s or when deemed advisable by a Fund’s Manager or sub-adviser, “high quality” issues rated “A-2”, “Prime-2” or “F-2” by S&P, Moody’s or Fitch, respectively.
Commodity-Linked Derivative Instruments and Hybrid Instruments. Certain Funds seek to gain exposure to the commodities markets primarily through investments in hybrid instruments. Hybrid instruments are either equity or debt derivative securities with one or more commodity-dependent components that have payment features similar to a commodity futures contract, a commodity option contract, or a combination of both. Therefore, these instruments are “commodity-linked.” They are considered “hybrid” instruments because they have both commodity-like and security-like characteristics. Hybrid instruments are derivative instruments because at least part of their value is derived from the value of an underlying commodity, futures contract, index or other readily measurable economic variable.
The prices of commodity-linked derivative instruments may move in different directions than investments in traditional equity and debt securities when the value of those traditional securities is declining due to adverse economic conditions. As an example, during periods of rising inflation, debt securities have historically tended to decline in value due to the general increase in prevailing interest rates. Conversely, during those same periods of rising inflation, the prices of certain commodities, such as oil and metals, have historically tended to increase. Of course, there cannot be any guarantee that these investments will perform in that manner in the future, and at certain times the price movements of commodity-linked instruments have been parallel to those of debt and equity securities. Commodities have historically tended to increase and decrease in value during different parts of the business cycle than financial assets. Nevertheless, at various times, commodities prices may move in tandem with the prices of financial assets and thus may not provide overall portfolio diversification benefits. Under favorable economic conditions, the Fund’s investments may be expected to under-perform an investment in traditional securities. Over the long term, the returns on the Fund’s investments are expected to exhibit low or negative correlation with stocks and bonds.
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Qualifying Hybrid Instruments. Certain Funds may invest in hybrid instruments that qualify for exclusion from regulation under the Commodity Exchange Act and the regulations adopted thereunder. A hybrid instrument that qualifies for this exclusion from regulation must be “predominantly a security.” A hybrid instrument is considered to be predominantly a security if (a) the issuer of the hybrid instrument receives payment in full of the purchase price of the hybrid instrument, substantially contemporaneously with delivery of the hybrid instrument; (b) the purchaser or holder of the hybrid instrument is not required to make any payment to the issuer in addition to the purchase price paid under subparagraph (a), whether as margin, settlement payment, or otherwise, during the life of the hybrid instrument or at maturity; (c) the issuer of the hybrid instrument is not subject by the terms of the instrument to mark-to-market margining requirements; and (d) the hybrid instrument is not marketed as a contract of sale of a commodity for future delivery (or option on such a contract) subject to applicable provisions of the Commodity Exchange Act. Hybrid instruments may be principal protected, partially protected, or offer no principal protection. A principal protected hybrid instrument means that the issuer will pay, at a minimum, the par value of the note at maturity. Therefore, if the commodity value to which the hybrid instrument is linked declines over the life of the note, the Fund will receive at maturity the face or stated value of the note. With a principal protected hybrid instrument, the Fund will receive at maturity the greater of the par value of the note or the increase in its value based on the underlying commodity or index. This protection is, in effect, an option whose value is subject to the volatility and price level of the underlying commodity. The Manager’s decision whether to use principal protection depends in part on the cost of the protection. In addition, the protection feature depends upon the ability of the issuer to meet its obligation to buy back the security, and, therefore, depends on the creditworthiness of the issuer. With full principal protection, the Fund will receive at maturity of the hybrid instrument either the stated par value of the hybrid instrument, or potentially, an amount greater than the stated par value if the underlying commodity, index, futures contract or economic variable to which the hybrid instrument is linked has increased in value. Partially protected hybrid instruments may suffer some loss of principal if the underlying commodity, index, futures contract or economic variable to which the hybrid instrument is linked declines in value during the term of the hybrid instrument. However, partially protected hybrid instruments have a specified limit as to the amount of principal that they may lose.
Hybrid Instruments Without Principal Protection. Certain Funds may invest in hybrid instruments that offer no principal protection. At maturity, there is a risk that the underlying commodity price, futures contract, index or other economic variable may have declined sufficiently in value such that some or all of the face value of the hybrid instrument might not be returned. The Manager, at its discretion, may invest in a partially protected principal structured note or a note without principal protection. In deciding to purchase a note without principal protection, the Manager may consider, among other things, the expected performance of the underlying commodity futures contract, index or other economic variable over the term of the note, the cost of the note, and any other economic factors that the Manager believes are relevant.
Limitations on Leverage. Some of the hybrid instruments in which a Fund may invest may involve leverage. To avoid being subject to undue leverage risk, a Fund will seek to limit the amount of economic leverage it has under any one hybrid instrument that it buys and the leverage of the Fund’s overall portfolio. A Fund will not invest in a hybrid instrument if, at the time of purchase: (i) that instrument’s “leverage ratio” exceeds 300% of the price increase in the underlying commodity, futures contract, index or other economic variable or (ii) the Fund’s “portfolio leverage ratio” exceeds 150%, measured at the time of purchase. “Leverage ratio” is the expected increase in the value of a hybrid instrument, assuming a one percent price increase in the underlying commodity, futures contract, index or other economic factor. In other words, for a hybrid instrument with a leverage factor of 150%, a 1% gain in the underlying economic variable would be expected to result in a 1.5% gain in value for the hybrid instrument. Conversely, a hybrid instrument with a leverage factor of 150% would suffer a 1.5% loss if the underlying economic variable lost 1% of its value. “Portfolio leverage ratio” is defined as the average (mean) leverage ratio of all instruments in a Fund’s portfolio, weighted by the market values of such instruments or, in the case of futures contracts, their notional values. A Fund may at times or from time to time decide not to use leverage in its investments or use less leverage than may otherwise be allowable.
Counterparty Risk. A significant risk of hybrid instruments is counterparty risk. Unlike exchange-traded futures and options, which are standard contracts, hybrid instruments are customized securities, tailor-made by a specific issuer. With a listed futures or options contract, an investor’s counterparty is the exchange clearinghouse. Exchange clearinghouses are capitalized by the exchange members and typically have high investment grade ratings (e.g., ratings of AAA or AA by S&P). Therefore, the risk is small that an exchange clearinghouse might be unable to meet its obligations at maturity. However, with a hybrid instrument, a Fund will take on the counterparty credit risk of the issuer. That is, at maturity of the hybrid instrument, there is a risk that the issuer may be unable to perform its obligations under the structured note.
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Convertible Securities. A convertible security is a bond, debenture, note, preferred stock or other security that may be converted into or exchanged for a prescribed amount of common stock or other equity security of the same or a different issuer within a particular period of time at a specified price or formula. A convertible security entitles the holder to receive interest paid or accrued on debt or the dividend paid on preferred stock until the convertible security matures or is redeemed, converted or exchanged. Before conversion, convertible securities have characteristics similar to nonconvertible income securities in that they ordinarily provide a stable stream of income with generally higher yields than those of common stocks of the same or similar issuers, but lower yields than comparable nonconvertible securities. The value of a convertible security is influenced by changes in interest rates, with investment value declining as interest rates increase and increasing as interest rates decline. The credit standing of the issuer and other factors also may have an effect on the convertible security’s investment value. Convertible securities rank senior to common stock in a corporation’s capital structure but are usually subordinated to comparable nonconvertible securities. Convertible securities may be subject to redemption at the option of the issuer at a price established in the convertible security’s governing instrument.
The characteristics of convertible securities make them potentially attractive investments for an investment company seeking a high total return from capital appreciation and investment income. These characteristics include the potential for capital appreciation as the value of the underlying common stock increases, the relatively high yield received from dividend or interest payments as compared to common stock dividends and decreased risks of decline in value relative to the underlying common stock due to their fixed-income nature. As a result of the conversion feature, however, the interest rate or dividend preference on a convertible security is generally less than would be the case if the securities were issued in nonconvertible form.
In analyzing convertible securities, the Manager will consider both the yield on the convertible security relative to its credit quality and the potential capital appreciation that is offered by the underlying common stock, among other things.
Convertible securities are issued and traded in a number of securities markets. Even in cases where a substantial portion of the convertible securities held by a Fund are denominated in U.S. dollars, the underlying equity securities may be quoted in the currency of the country where the issuer is domiciled. As a result, fluctuations in the exchange rate between the currency in which the debt security is denominated and the currency in which the share price is quoted will affect the value of the convertible security. With respect to convertible securities denominated in a currency different from that of the underlying equity securities, the conversion price may be based on a fixed exchange rate established at the time the security is issued, which may increase the effects of currency risk. As described below, a Fund is authorized to enter into foreign currency hedging transactions in which it may seek to reduce the effect of exchange rate fluctuations.
Apart from currency considerations, the value of convertible securities is influenced by both the yield on nonconvertible securities of comparable issuers and by the value of the underlying common stock. The value of a convertible security viewed without regard to its conversion feature (i.e., strictly on the basis of its yield) is sometimes referred to as its “investment value.” To the extent interest rates change, the investment value of the convertible security typically will fluctuate. At the same time, however, the value of the convertible security will be influenced by its “conversion value,” which is the market value of the underlying common stock that would be obtained if the convertible security were converted. Conversion value fluctuates directly with the price of the underlying common stock. If the conversion value of a convertible security is substantially below its investment value, the price of the convertible security is governed principally by its investment value. To the extent the conversion value of a convertible security increases to a point that approximates or exceeds its investment value, the price of the convertible security will be influenced principally by its conversion value. A convertible security will sell at a premium over the conversion value to the extent investors place value on the right to acquire the underlying common stock while holding a fixed-income security. The yield and conversion premium of convertible securities issued in Japan and the Euromarket are frequently determined at levels that cause the conversion value to affect their market value more than the securities’ investment value.
Holders of convertible securities generally have a claim on the assets of the issuer prior to the common stockholders but may be subordinated to other debt securities of the same issuer. A convertible security may be subject to redemption at the option of the issuer at a price established in a charter provision, indenture or other governing instrument pursuant to which the convertible security was issued. If a convertible security held by a Fund is called for redemption, the Fund will be required to redeem the security, convert it into the underlying common stock or sell it to a third party. Certain convertible debt securities may provide a put option to the holder, which entitles the holder to cause the security to be redeemed by the issuer at a premium over the stated principal amount of the debt security under certain circumstances.
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A Fund may also invest in synthetic convertible securities. Synthetic convertible securities may include either Cash-Settled Convertibles or Manufactured Convertibles. “Cash-Settled Convertibles” are instruments that are created by the issuer and have the economic characteristics of traditional convertible securities but may not actually permit conversion into the underlying equity securities in all circumstances. As an example, a private company may issue a Cash-Settled Convertible that is convertible into common stock only if the company successfully completes a public offering of its common stock prior to maturity and otherwise pays a cash amount to reflect any equity appreciation. “Manufactured Convertibles” are created by the Manager or another party by combining separate securities that possess one of the two principal characteristics of a convertible security, i.e., fixed-income (“fixed-income component”) or a right to acquire equity securities (“convertibility component”). The fixed-income component is achieved by investing in nonconvertible fixed-income securities, such as nonconvertible bonds, preferred stocks and money market instruments. The convertibility component is achieved by investing in call options, warrants, or other securities with equity conversion features (“equity features”) granting the holder the right to purchase a specified quantity of the underlying stocks within a specified period of time at a specified price or, in the case of a stock index option, the right to receive a cash payment based on the value of the underlying stock index.
A Manufactured Convertible differs from traditional convertible securities in several respects. Unlike a traditional convertible security, which is a single security that has a unitary market value, a Manufactured Convertible is comprised of two or more separate securities, each with its own market value. Therefore, the total “market value” of such a Manufactured Convertible is the sum of the values of its fixed-income component and its convertibility component.
More flexibility is possible in the creation of a Manufactured Convertible than in the purchase of a traditional convertible security. Because many corporations have not issued convertible securities, the Manager may combine a fixed-income instrument and an equity feature with respect to the stock of the issuer of the fixed-income instrument to create a synthetic convertible security otherwise unavailable in the market. The Manager may also combine a fixed-income instrument of an issuer with an equity feature with respect to the stock of a different issuer when the Manager believes such a Manufactured Convertible would better promote a Fund’s objective than alternative investments. For example, the Manager may combine an equity feature with respect to an issuer’s stock with a fixed-income security of a different issuer in the same industry to diversify the Fund’s credit exposure, or with a U.S. Treasury instrument to create a Manufactured Convertible with a higher credit profile than a traditional convertible security issued by that issuer. A Manufactured Convertible also is a more flexible investment in that its two components may be purchased separately and, upon purchasing the separate securities, “combined” to create a Manufactured Convertible. For example, the Fund may purchase a warrant for eventual inclusion in a Manufactured Convertible while postponing the purchase of a suitable bond to pair with the warrant pending development of more favorable market conditions.
The value of a Manufactured Convertible may respond to certain market fluctuations differently from a traditional convertible security with similar characteristics. For example, in the event a Fund created a Manufactured Convertible by combining a short-term U.S. Treasury instrument and a call option on a stock, the Manufactured Convertible would be expected to outperform a traditional convertible of similar maturity that is convertible into that stock during periods when Treasury instruments outperform corporate fixed-income securities and underperform during periods when corporate fixed-income securities outperform Treasury instruments.
Corporate Loans. Certain Funds may invest in corporate loans. Corporate loans are generally non-investment grade floating rate instruments. Usually, they are freely callable at the issuer’s option. Certain Funds may invest in fixed and floating rate loans (“Loans”) arranged through private negotiations between a corporate borrower or a foreign sovereign entity and one or more financial institutions or institutional investors (“Lenders”). A Fund may invest in such Loans in the form of participations in Loans (“Participations”) and assignments of all or a portion of Loans from third parties (“Assignments”). A Fund considers these investments to be investments in debt securities for purposes of its investment policies. Participations typically will result in the Fund having a contractual relationship only with the Lender, not with the borrower. The Fund will have the right to receive payments of principal, interest and any fees to which it is entitled only from the Lender selling the Participation and only upon receipt by the Lender of the payments from the borrower. In connection with purchasing Participations, the Fund generally will have no right to enforce compliance by the borrower with the terms of the loan agreement relating to the Loans, nor any rights of set-off against the borrower, and the Fund may not benefit directly from any collateral supporting the Loan in which it has purchased the Participation. As a result, the Fund will assume the credit risk of both the borrower and the Lender that is selling the Participation. In the event of the insolvency of the Lender selling the Participation, the Fund may be treated as a general creditor of the Lender and may not benefit from any set-off between the Lender and the borrower. The Fund will acquire Participations only if the Lender interpositioned between the Fund and the borrower is determined by the Fund’s manager to be creditworthy. When the Fund purchases Assignments from Lenders, the
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Fund will acquire direct rights against the borrower on the Loan, and will not have exposure to a counterparty’s credit risk. The Funds may enter into Participations and Assignments on a forward commitment or “when-issued” basis, whereby a Fund would agree to purchase a Participation or Assignment at set terms in the future. For more information on forward commitments and when-issued securities, see “When-Issued Securities, Delayed Delivery Securities and Forward Commitments” below.
A Fund may have difficulty disposing of Assignments and Participations. In certain cases, the market for such instruments may lack sufficient liquidity, and therefore the Fund anticipates that in such cases such instruments could be sold only to a limited number of institutional investors. The lack of a sufficiently liquid secondary market may have an adverse impact on the value of such instruments and on the Fund’s ability to dispose of particular Assignments or Participations in response to a specific economic event, such as deterioration in the creditworthiness of the borrower.
Leading financial institutions often act as agent for a broader group of Lenders, generally referred to as a syndicate. The syndicate’s agent arranges the loans, holds collateral and accepts payments of principal and interest. If the agent develops financial problems, a Fund may not recover its investment or recovery may be delayed.
The Loans in which the Fund may invest are subject to the risk of loss of principal and income. Although borrowers frequently provide collateral to secure repayment of these obligations they do not always do so. If they do provide collateral, the value of the collateral may not completely cover the borrower’s obligations at the time of a default. If a borrower files for protection from its creditors under the U.S. bankruptcy laws, these laws may limit a Fund’s rights to its collateral. In addition, the value of collateral may erode during a bankruptcy case. In the event of a bankruptcy, the holder of a Loan may not recover its principal, may experience a long delay in recovering its investment and may not receive interest during the delay.
Transactions in corporate loans may settle on a delayed basis. As a result, the proceeds from the sale of corporate loans may not be readily available to make additional investments or to meet a Fund’s redemption obligations. To the extent the extended settlement process gives rise to short-term liquidity needs, a Fund may hold additional cash, sell investments or temporarily borrow from banks and other lenders.
In certain circumstances, Loans may not be deemed to be securities under certain federal securities laws. Therefore, in the event of fraud or misrepresentation by a borrower or an arranger, Lenders and purchasers of interests in Loans, such as the Funds, may not have the protection of the anti-fraud provisions of the federal securities laws as would otherwise be available for bonds or stocks. Instead, in such cases, parties generally would rely on the contractual provisions in the Loan agreement itself and common-law fraud protections under applicable state law.
Direct Lending. The Fund may act as the originator for direct loans and engage in direct lending. Direct loans between the Fund and a borrower may not be administered by an underwriter or agent bank. The Fund may provide financing to commercial borrowers directly or through companies acquired (or created) and owned by or otherwise affiliated with the Fund. The terms of the direct loans are negotiated with borrowers in private transactions. Furthermore, a direct loan may be secured or unsecured.
In determining whether to make a direct loan, the Fund will rely primarily upon the creditworthiness of the borrower and/or any collateral for payment of interest and repayment of principal. The risks associated with direct loans are substantially similar to those associated with investing in corporate loans. In making a direct loan, the Fund is exposed to the risk that the borrower may default or become insolvent and, consequently, that the Fund will lose money on the loan. Furthermore, direct loans may subject the Fund to liquidity and interest rate risk and certain direct loans may be deemed illiquid. Direct loans are not publicly traded and may not have a secondary market. The lack of a secondary market for direct loans may have an adverse impact on the ability of the Fund to dispose of a direct loan and/or to value the direct loan.
When engaging in direct lending, the Fund’s performance may depend, in part, on the ability of the Fund to originate loans on advantageous terms. In originating loans, the Fund will compete with a broad spectrum of lenders. Increased competition for, or a diminishment in the available supply of, qualifying loans could result in lower yields on such loans, which could reduce Fund performance.
As part of its lending activities, the Fund may originate loans to companies that are experiencing significant financial or business difficulties, including companies involved in bankruptcy or other reorganization and liquidation proceedings. Although the terms of such financing may result in significant financial returns to the Fund, they involve a substantial degree of risk. The level of analytical sophistication, both financial and legal, necessary for successful financing to companies experiencing significant business and financial difficulties is unusually high.
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Credit Linked Securities. Among the income producing securities in which a Fund may invest are credit linked securities, which are issued by a limited purpose trust or other vehicle that, in turn, invests in a derivative instrument or basket of derivative instruments, such as credit default swaps, interest rate swaps and other securities, in order to provide exposure to certain fixed-income markets. For instance, a Fund may invest in credit linked securities as a cash management tool in order to gain exposure to a certain market and/or to remain fully invested when more traditional income producing securities are not available.
Like an investment in a bond, investments in these credit linked securities represent the right to receive periodic income payments (in the form of distributions) and payment of principal at the end of the term of the security.
However, these payments are conditioned on the issuer’s receipt of payments from, and the issuer’s potential obligations to, the counterparties to the derivative instruments and other securities in which the issuer invests. For instance, the issuer may sell one or more credit default swaps, under which the issuer would receive a stream of payments over the term of the swap agreements provided that no event of default has occurred with respect to the referenced debt obligation upon which the swap is based. If a default occurs, the stream of payments may stop and the issuer would be obligated to pay the counterparty the par (or other agreed upon value) of the referenced debt obligation. This, in turn, would reduce the amount of income and principal that a Fund would receive. A Fund’s investments in these instruments are indirectly subject to the risks associated with derivative instruments, including, among others, credit risk, default or similar event risk, counterparty risk, interest rate risk, leverage risk and management risk. It is also expected that the securities will be exempt from registration under the Securities Act. Accordingly, there may be no established trading market for the securities and they may constitute illiquid investments.
Cyber Security Issues. With the increased use of technologies such as the Internet to conduct business, each Fund is susceptible to operational, information security and related risks. In general, cyber incidents can result from deliberate attacks or unintentional events. Cyber attacks include, but are not limited to, gaining unauthorized access to digital systems (e.g., through “hacking” or malicious software coding) for purposes of misappropriating assets or sensitive information, corrupting data, or causing operational disruption. Cyber attacks may also be carried out in a manner that does not require gaining unauthorized access, such as causing denial-of-service attacks on websites (i.e., efforts to make network services unavailable to intended users). Cyber security failures or breaches by a Fund’s adviser, sub-adviser(s) and other service providers (including, but not limited to, Fund accountants, custodians, transfer agents and administrators), and the issuers of securities in which the Funds invest, have the ability to cause disruptions and impact business operations, potentially resulting in financial losses, interference with a Fund’s ability to calculate its NAV, impediments to trading, the inability of Fund shareholders to transact business, violations of applicable privacy and other laws, regulatory fines, penalties, reputational damage, reimbursement or other compensation costs, or additional compliance costs. In addition, substantial costs may be incurred in order to prevent any cyber incidents in the future. While the Funds have established business continuity plans in the event of, and risk management systems to prevent, such cyber attacks, there are inherent limitations in such plans and systems including the possibility that certain risks have not been identified. Furthermore, the Funds cannot control the cyber security plans and systems put in place by service providers to the Funds and issuers in which the Funds invest. The Funds and their shareholders could be negatively impacted as a result.
Debt Securities. Debt securities, such as bonds, involve credit risk. This is the risk that the issuer will not make timely payments of principal and interest. The degree of credit risk depends on the issuer’s financial condition and on the terms of the debt securities. Changes in an issuer’s credit rating or the market’s perception of an issuer’s creditworthiness may also affect the value of a Fund’s investment in that issuer. Credit risk is reduced to the extent a Fund limits its debt investments to U.S. Government Securities.
All debt securities, however, are subject to interest rate risk. This is the risk that the value of the security may fall when interest rates rise. If interest rates move sharply in a manner not anticipated by Fund management, a Fund’s investments in debt securities could be adversely affected and the Fund could lose money. In general, the market price of debt securities with longer maturities will go up or down more in response to changes in interest rates than will the market price of shorter-term debt securities.
During periods of rising interest rates, the average life of certain fixed-income securities is extended because of slower than expected principal payments. This may lock in a below-market interest rate and extend the duration of these fixed-income securities, especially mortgage-related securities, making them more sensitive to changes in interest rates. As a result, in a period of rising interest rates, these securities may exhibit additional volatility and lose value. This is known as extension risk.
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The value of fixed-income securities in the Funds can be expected to vary inversely with changes in prevailing interest rates. Fixed-income securities with longer maturities, which tend to produce higher yields, are subject to potentially greater capital appreciation and depreciation than securities with shorter maturities. The Funds are not restricted to any maximum or minimum time to maturity in purchasing individual portfolio securities, and the average maturity of a Fund’s assets will vary.
Inflation-Indexed Bonds. Certain Funds may invest in inflation-indexed bonds, which are fixed-income securities or other instruments whose principal value is periodically adjusted according to the rate of inflation. Two structures are common. The U.S. Treasury and some other issuers use a structure that accrues inflation into the principal value of the bond. Most other issuers pay out the Consumer Price Index (“CPI”) accruals as part of a semi-annual coupon.
Inflation-indexed securities issued by the U.S. Treasury have maturities of five, ten or thirty years, although it is possible that securities with other maturities will be issued in the future. The U.S. Treasury securities pay interest on a semi-annual basis, equal to a fixed percentage of the inflation-adjusted principal amount. For example, if a Fund purchased an inflation-indexed bond with a par value of $1,000 and a 3% real rate of return coupon (payable 1.5% semi-annually), and inflation over the first six months was 1%, the mid-year par value of the bond would be $1,010 and the first semi-annual interest payment would be $15.15 ($1,010 times 1.5%). If inflation during the second half of the year resulted in the whole year’s inflation equaling 3%, the end-of-year par value of the bond would be $1,030 and the second semi-annual interest payment would be $15.45 ($1,030 times 1.5%).
If the periodic adjustment rate measuring inflation falls, the principal value of inflation-indexed bonds will be adjusted downward, and, consequently, the interest payable on these securities (calculated with respect to a smaller principal amount) will be reduced. Repayment of the original bond principal upon maturity (as adjusted for inflation) is guaranteed in the case of U.S. Treasury inflation-indexed bonds, even during a period of deflation. However, the current market value of the bonds is not guaranteed, and will fluctuate. Certain Funds may also invest in other inflation related bonds which may or may not provide a similar guarantee. If a guarantee of principal is not provided, the adjusted principal value of the bond repaid at maturity may be less than the original principal. In addition, if the Fund purchases inflation-indexed bonds offered by foreign issuers, the rate of inflation measured by the foreign inflation index may not be correlated to the rate of inflation in the United States.
The value of inflation-indexed bonds is expected to change in response to changes in real interest rates. Real interest rates, in turn, are tied to the relationship between nominal interest rates and the rate of inflation. Therefore, if inflation were to rise at a faster rate than nominal interest rates, real interest rates might decline, leading to an increase in value of inflation-indexed bonds. In contrast, if nominal interest rates increased at a faster rate than inflation, real interest rates might rise, leading to a decrease in value of inflation-indexed bonds. There can be no assurance, however, that the value of inflation-indexed bonds will be directly correlated to changes in interest rates.
While these securities are expected to be protected from long-term inflationary trends, short-term increases in inflation may lead to a decline in value. If interest rates rise due to reasons other than inflation (for example, due to changes in currency exchange rates), investors in these securities may not be protected to the extent that the increase is not reflected in the bond’s inflation measure.
In general, the measure used to determine the periodic adjustment of U.S. inflation-indexed bonds is the Consumer Price Index for Urban Consumers (“CPI-U”), which is calculated monthly by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. The CPI-U is a measurement of changes in the cost of living, made up of components such as housing, food, transportation and energy. Inflation-indexed bonds issued by a foreign government are generally adjusted to reflect a comparable inflation index, calculated by that government. There can be no assurance that the CPI-U or any foreign inflation index will accurately measure the real rate of inflation in the prices of goods and services. Moreover, there can be no assurance that the rate of inflation in a foreign country will be correlated to the rate of inflation in the United States.
Any increase in the principal amount of an inflation-indexed bond will be considered taxable ordinary income, even though investors do not receive their principal until maturity.
Investment Grade Debt Obligations. Certain Funds may invest in “investment grade securities,” which are securities rated in the four highest rating categories of an NRSRO or deemed to be of equivalent quality by a Fund’s Manager. Certain Funds may invest in debt securities rated Aaa by Moody’s or AAA by S&P. It should be noted that debt obligations rated in the lowest of the top four ratings (i.e., “Baa” by Moody’s or “BBB” by S&P) are considered to have some speculative characteristics and are more sensitive to economic change than higher rated securities. If an investment grade security of a Fund is subsequently downgraded below investment grade, the Fund’s Manager will consider such an event in determining whether the Fund should continue to hold the security. Subject to its investment strategies, there is no limit on the amount of such downgraded securities a Fund may hold.
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See Appendix A to this SAI for a description of applicable securities ratings.
High Yield Investments (“Junk Bonds”).
Non-investment grade or “high yield” fixed-income or convertible securities commonly known to investors as “junk bonds” are debt securities that are rated below investment grade by the major rating agencies or are securities that Fund management believes are of comparable quality. While generally providing greater income and opportunity for gain, non-investment grade debt securities may be subject to greater risks than securities which have higher credit ratings, including a high risk of default, and their yields will fluctuate over time. High yield securities will generally be in the lower rating categories of recognized rating agencies (rated “Ba” or lower by Moody’s or “BB” or lower by S&P) or will be non-rated. The credit rating of a high yield security does not necessarily address its market value risk, and ratings may from time to time change, positively or negatively, to reflect developments regarding the issuer’s financial condition. High yield securities are considered to be speculative with respect to the capacity of the issuer to timely repay principal and pay interest or dividends in accordance with the terms of the obligation and may have more credit risk than higher rated securities.
The major risks in junk bond investments include the following:
Junk bonds may be issued by less creditworthy companies. These securities are vulnerable to adverse changes in the issuer’s industry and to general economic conditions. Issuers of junk bonds may be unable to meet their interest or principal payment obligations because of an economic downturn, specific issuer developments or the unavailability of additional financing.
The issuers of junk bonds may have a larger amount of outstanding debt relative to their assets than issuers of investment grade bonds. If the issuer experiences financial stress, it may be unable to meet its debt obligations. The issuer’s ability to pay its debt obligations also may be lessened by specific issuer developments, or the unavailability of additional financing. Issuers of high yield securities are often in the growth stage of their development and/or involved in a reorganization or takeover.
Junk bonds are frequently ranked junior to claims by other creditors. If the issuer cannot meet its obligations, the senior obligations are generally paid off before the junior obligations, which will potentially limit a Fund’s ability to fully recover principal or to receive interest payments when senior securities are in default. Thus, investors in high yield securities have a lower degree of protection with respect to principal and interest payments then do investors in higher rated securities.
Junk bonds frequently have redemption features that permit an issuer to repurchase the security from a Fund before it matures. If an issuer redeems the junk bonds, a Fund may have to invest the proceeds in bonds with lower yields and may lose income.
Prices of junk bonds are subject to extreme price fluctuations. Negative economic developments may have a greater impact on the prices of junk bonds than on those of other higher rated fixed-income securities.
Junk bonds may be less liquid than higher rated fixed-income securities even under normal economic conditions. Under certain economic and/or market conditions, a Fund may have difficulty disposing of certain high yield securities due to the limited number of investors in that sector of the market. There are fewer dealers in the junk bond market, and there may be significant differences in the prices quoted for junk bonds by the dealers, and such quotations may not be the actual prices available for a purchase or sale. Because junk bonds are less liquid than higher rated bonds, judgment may play a greater role in valuing certain of a Fund’s portfolio securities than in the case of securities trading in a more liquid market.
The secondary markets for high yield securities are not as liquid as the secondary markets for higher rated securities. The secondary markets for high yield securities are concentrated in relatively few market makers and participants in the markets are mostly institutional investors, including insurance companies, banks, other financial institutions and mutual funds. In addition, the trading volume for high yield securities is generally lower than that for higher rated securities and the secondary markets could contract under adverse market or economic conditions independent of any specific adverse changes in the condition of a particular issuer. Under certain economic and/or market conditions, a Fund may have difficulty disposing of certain high yield securities due to the limited number of investors in that sector of the market. An illiquid secondary market may adversely affect the market price of the high yield security, which may result in increased difficulty selling the particular issue and obtaining accurate market quotations on the issue when valuing a Fund’s assets. Market quotations on high yield securities are available only from a limited number of dealers, and such quotations may not be the actual prices available for a purchase or sale. When the secondary market for high yield securities becomes more illiquid, or in the absence of readily available market quotations for such securities, the relative lack of
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  reliable objective data makes it more difficult to value a Fund’s securities, and judgment plays a more important role in determining such valuations.
A Fund may incur expenses to the extent necessary to seek recovery upon default or to negotiate new terms with a defaulting issuer.
The junk bond markets may react strongly to adverse news about an issuer or the economy, or to the perception or expectation of adverse news, whether or not it is based on fundamental analysis. Additionally, prices for high yield securities may be affected by legislative and regulatory developments. These developments could adversely affect a Fund’s NAV and investment practices, the secondary market for high yield securities, the financial condition of issuers of these securities and the value and liquidity of outstanding high yield securities, especially in a thinly traded market. For example, federal legislation requiring the divestiture by federally insured savings and loan associations of their investments in high yield bonds and limiting the deductibility of interest by certain corporate issuers of high yield bonds adversely affected the market in the past.
The rating assigned by a rating agency evaluates the issuing agency’s assessment of the safety of a non-investment grade security’s principal and interest payments, but does not address market value risk. Because such ratings of the ratings agencies may not always reflect current conditions and events, in addition to using recognized rating agencies and other sources, the sub-adviser performs its own analysis of the issuers whose non-investment grade securities a Fund holds. Because of this, the Fund’s performance may depend more on the sub-adviser’s own credit analysis than in the case of mutual funds investing in higher-rated securities.
In selecting non-investment grade securities, the adviser or sub-adviser considers factors such as those relating to the creditworthiness of issuers, the ratings and performance of the securities, the protections afforded the securities and the diversity of the Fund. The sub-adviser continuously monitors the issuers of non-investment grade securities held by the Fund for their ability to make required principal and interest payments, as well as in an effort to control the liquidity of the Fund so that it can meet redemption requests. If a security’s rating is reduced below the minimum credit rating that is permitted for a Fund, the Fund’s sub-adviser will consider whether the Fund should continue to hold the security.
In the event that a Fund investing in high yield securities experiences an unexpected level of net redemptions, the Fund could be forced to sell its holdings without regard to the investment merits, thereby decreasing the assets upon which the Fund’s rate of return is based.
The costs attributable to investing in the junk bond markets are usually higher for several reasons, such as higher investment research costs and higher commission costs.
Mezzanine Investments. Certain Funds, consistent with their restrictions on investing in securities of a specific credit quality, may invest in certain high yield securities known as mezzanine investments, which are subordinated debt securities which are generally issued in private placements in connection with an equity security (e.g., with attached warrants). Such mezzanine investments may be issued with or without registration rights. Similar to other high yield securities, maturities of mezzanine investments are typically seven to ten years, but the expected average life is significantly shorter at three to five years. Mezzanine investments are usually unsecured and subordinate to other obligations of the issuer.
Pay-in-kind Bonds. Certain Funds may invest in pay-in-kind, or PIK, bonds. PIK bonds are bonds which pay interest through the issuance of additional debt or equity securities. Similar to zero coupon obligations, pay-in-kind bonds also carry additional risk as holders of these types of securities realize no cash until the cash payment date unless a portion of such securities is sold and, if the issuer defaults, a Fund may obtain no return at all on its investment. The market price of pay-in-kind bonds is affected by interest rate changes to a greater extent, and therefore tends to be more volatile, than that of securities which pay interest in cash. Additionally, current U.S. federal tax law requires the holder of pay-in-kind bonds to accrue income with respect to these securities prior to the receipt of cash payments. To maintain its qualification as a regulated investment company and avoid liability for U.S. federal income and excise taxes, each Fund may be required to distribute income accrued with respect to these securities and may have to dispose of portfolio securities under disadvantageous circumstances in order to generate cash to satisfy these distribution requirements.
Supranational Entities. A Fund may invest in debt securities of supranational entities. Examples of such entities include the International Bank for Reconstruction and Development (the World Bank), the European Steel and Coal Community, the Asian Development Bank and the Inter-American Development Bank. The government members, or “stockholders,” usually make initial capital contributions to the supranational entity and in many cases are committed to make additional capital contributions if the supranational entity is unable to repay its borrowings. There is no guarantee that one or more stockholders of a supranational entity will continue to make any necessary
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additional capital contributions. If such contributions are not made, the entity may be unable to pay interest or repay principal on its debt securities, and a Fund may lose money on such investments.
Depositary Receipts (ADRs, EDRs and GDRs). Certain Funds may invest in the securities of foreign issuers in the form of Depositary Receipts or other securities convertible into securities of foreign issuers. Depositary Receipts may not necessarily be denominated in the same currency as the underlying securities into which they may be converted. The Fund may invest in both sponsored and unsponsored American Depositary Receipts (“ADRs”), European Depositary Receipts (“EDRs”), Global Depositary Receipts (“GDRs”) and other similar global instruments. ADRs typically are issued by an American bank or trust company and evidence ownership of underlying securities issued by a foreign corporation. EDRs, which are sometimes referred to as Continental Depositary Receipts, are receipts issued in Europe, typically by foreign banks and trust companies, that evidence ownership of either foreign or domestic underlying securities. GDRs are depositary receipts structured like global debt issues to facilitate trading on an international basis. In addition to investment risks associated with the underlying issuer, Depositary Receipts expose a Fund to additional risks associated with the non-uniform terms that apply to Depositary Receipt programs, credit exposure to the depository bank and to the sponsors and other parties with whom the depository bank establishes the programs, currency risk and the risk of an illiquid market for Depositary Receipts. Unsponsored ADR, EDR and GDR programs are organized independently and without the cooperation of the issuer of the underlying securities. Unsponsored programs generally expose investors to greater risks than sponsored programs and do not provide holders with many of the shareholder benefits that come from investing in a sponsored Depositary Receipt. Available information concerning the issuer may not be as current as for sponsored ADRs, EDRs and GDRs, and the prices of unsponsored ADRs, EDRs and GDRs may be more volatile than if such instruments were sponsored by the issuer. Depositary Receipts are generally subject to the same risks as the foreign securities that they evidence or into which they may be converted. Investments in ADRs, EDRs and GDRs present additional investment considerations as described under “Foreign Investment Risks.”
Derivatives.
General. Each Fund may use instruments referred to as derivatives, which are financial instruments that derive their value from one or more securities, commodities (such as gold or oil), currencies, interest rates, credit events or indices (a measure of value or rates, such as the S&P 500 Index or the prime lending rate). Derivatives may allow a Fund to increase or decrease the level of risk to which the Fund is exposed more quickly and efficiently than with other transactions. Certain Funds may use derivatives to maintain a portion of their long and short positions. Unless otherwise permitted, no Fund may use derivatives to gain exposure to an asset or asset class it is prohibited by its investment restrictions from purchasing directly. As described below, derivatives can be used for hedging or speculative purposes. Funds will engage in transaction-level payment netting, i.e., the payment obligations of derivatives contracts are netted against one another with the Fund receiving or paying, as the case may be, only the net amount of the two payment streams.
Hedging. Each Fund may use derivatives for hedging purposes, in which a derivative is used to offset the risks associated with other Fund holdings. Losses on other investments may be substantially reduced by gains on a derivative that reacts in an opposite manner to market movements. Although hedging may reduce losses, it may also reduce or eliminate gains. In addition, hedging may cause losses if the market moves in an unanticipated manner, or if the cost of the derivative outweighs the benefit of the hedge. The effectiveness of hedging may be reduced by correlation risk, i.e., the risk that changes in the value of the derivative will not match those of the holdings being hedged as expected by a Fund, which may result in additional losses to the Fund. The inability to close or offset derivatives could also reduce the effectiveness of a Fund’s hedging. There is no assurance that a Fund’s hedging will be effective. No Fund is required to use derivatives to hedge.
Speculation. Certain Funds may also use derivatives for speculative purposes to seek to enhance returns. The use of a derivative is speculative if the Fund is primarily seeking to achieve gains, rather than offset the risk of other positions. To the extent a Fund invests in a derivative for speculative purposes, the Fund will be fully exposed to the risks of loss of that derivative, which may sometimes be greater than the derivative’s cost, and the potential for loss in certain cases may be unlimited.
Regulation of Derivatives.
Rule 18f-4 Under the Investment Company Act. Rule 18f-4 under the Investment Company Act permits a Fund to enter into Derivatives Transactions (as defined below) and certain other transactions notwithstanding the restrictions on the issuance of “senior securities” under Section 18 of the Investment Company Act. Section 18 of the
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Investment Company Act, among other things, prohibits open-end funds, including the Funds, from issuing or selling any “senior security,” other than borrowing from a bank (subject to a requirement to maintain 300% “asset coverage”).
Under Rule 18f-4, “Derivatives Transactions” include the following: (1) any swap, security-based swap (including a contract for differences), futures contract, forward contract, option (excluding purchased options), any combination of the foregoing, or any similar instrument, under which a Fund is or may be required to make any payment or delivery of cash or other assets during the life of the instrument or at maturity or early termination, whether as margin or settlement payment or otherwise; (2) any short sale borrowing; (3) reverse repurchase agreements and similar financing transactions (e.g., recourse and non-recourse tender option bonds, and borrowed bonds), if a Fund elects to treat these transactions as Derivatives Transactions under Rule 18f-4; and (4) when-issued or forward-settling securities (e.g., firm and standby commitments, including to-be-announced (“TBA”) commitments, and dollar rolls) and non-standard settlement cycle securities, unless such transactions meet the Delayed-Settlement Securities Provision (as defined below under “—When-Issued Securities, Delayed Delivery Securities and Forward Commitments”).
Unless a Fund is relying on the Limited Derivatives User Exception (as defined below), the Fund must comply with Rule 18f-4 with respect to its Derivatives Transactions. Rule 18f-4, among other things, requires a Fund to adopt and implement a comprehensive written derivatives risk management program (“DRMP”) and comply with a relative or absolute limit on Fund leverage risk calculated based on value-at-risk (“VaR”). The DRMP is administered by a “derivatives risk manager,” who is appointed by the Fund’s Board, including a majority of the independent Directors, and periodically reviews the DRMP and reports to the Fund’s Board.
Rule 18f-4 provides an exception from the DRMP, VaR limit and certain other requirements if a Fund’s “derivatives exposure” is limited to 10% of its net assets (as calculated in accordance with Rule 18f-4) and the Fund adopts and implements written policies and procedures reasonably designed to manage its derivatives risks (the “Limited Derivatives User Exception”).
Dodd-Frank Regulations. The Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act (“Dodd-Frank”), enacted in July 2010, includes provisions that comprehensively regulate the over-the-counter (“OTC”) derivatives markets for the first time. While the Commodity Futures Trading Commission (“CFTC”) and other U.S. regulators have adopted many of the required Dodd-Frank regulations, certain regulations have only recently become effective and other regulations remain to be adopted. The full impact of Dodd-Frank on the Funds remains uncertain.
OTC derivatives dealers are now required to register with the CFTC as “swap dealers” and will ultimately be required to register with the SEC as “security-based swap dealers”. Registered swap dealers are subject to various regulatory requirements, including, but not limited to, margin, recordkeeping, reporting, transparency, position limits, limitations on conflicts of interest, business conduct standards, minimum capital requirements and other regulatory requirements.
The CFTC requires that certain interest rate swaps and certain credit default swaps must be executed in regulated markets and be submitted for clearing to regulated clearinghouses. The SEC is also expected to impose similar requirements on certain security-based derivatives in the future. OTC derivatives trades submitted for clearing are subject to minimum initial and variation margin requirements set by the relevant clearinghouse, as well as margin requirements mandated by the CFTC, SEC and/or federal prudential regulators. In addition, futures commission merchants (“FCMs”), who act as clearing members on behalf of customers for cleared OTC derivatives and futures contracts, also have discretion to increase a Fund’s margin requirements for these transactions beyond any regulatory and clearinghouse minimums subject to any restrictions on such discretion in the documentation between the FCM and the customer. These regulatory requirements may make it more difficult and costly for the Funds to enter into highly tailored or customized transactions, potentially rendering certain investment strategies impossible or not economically feasible. If a Fund decides to execute and clear cleared OTC derivatives and/or futures contracts through execution facilities, exchanges or clearinghouses, either indirectly through an executing broker, clearing member FCM or as a direct member, a Fund would be required to comply with the rules of the execution facility, exchange or clearinghouse and other applicable law.
With respect to cleared OTC derivatives and futures contracts and options on futures, a Fund will not face a clearinghouse directly but rather will do so through a FCM that is registered with the CFTC and/or SEC and that acts as a clearing member. A Fund may face the indirect risk of the failure of another clearing member customer to meet its obligations to its clearing member. Such scenario could arise due to a default by the clearing member on its obligations to the clearinghouse simultaneously with a customer’s failure to meet its obligations to the clearing member.
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Clearing member FCMs are required to post initial margin to the clearinghouses through which they clear their customers’ cleared OTC derivatives and futures contracts, instead of using such initial margin in their businesses, as was widely permitted before Dodd-Frank. While an FCM may require its customer to post initial margin in excess of clearinghouse requirements, and certain clearinghouses may share a portion of their earnings on initial margin with their clearing members, some portion of the initial margin that is passed through to the clearinghouse does not generate earnings for the FCM. The inability of FCMs to earn the same levels of returns on initial margin for cleared OTC derivatives as they could earn with respect to non-cleared OTC derivatives may cause FCMs to charge higher fees, or provide less favorable pricing on cleared OTC derivatives than swap dealers will provide for non-cleared OTC derivatives. Furthermore, customers, including the Funds, are subject to additional fees payable to FCMs with respect to cleared OTC derivatives, which may raise the cost to Funds of clearing as compared to trading non-cleared OTC derivatives bilaterally.
With respect to uncleared swaps, swap dealers are required to collect variation margin from a Fund and may be required by applicable regulations to collect initial margin from a Fund. Both initial and variation margin may be comprised of cash and/or securities, subject to applicable regulatory haircuts. Shares of investment companies (other than certain money market funds) may not be posted as collateral under applicable regulations.
The CFTC and the U.S. commodities exchanges impose limits on the maximum net long or net short speculative positions that any person may hold or control in any particular futures or options contracts traded on U.S. commodities exchanges. For example, the CFTC has historically imposed speculative position limits on a number of agricultural commodities (e.g., corn, oats, wheat, soybeans and cotton) and United States commodities exchanges currently impose speculative position limits on many other commodities. A Fund could be required to liquidate positions it holds in order to comply with position limits or may not be able to fully implement trading instructions generated by its trading models, in order to comply with position limits. Any such liquidation or limited implementation could result in substantial costs to a Fund.
Dodd-Frank significantly expanded the CFTC’s authority to impose position limits with respect to agricultural commodities and other physical commodity futures contracts, options on these futures contracts and economically equivalent swaps. In October 2020, the CFTC adopted a new set of speculative position limit rules with respect to agricultural commodities and other physical commodity futures contracts, options on these futures contracts (“core referenced futures contracts”) and economically equivalent swaps. An economically equivalent swap is a swap with identical material contractual specifications, terms and conditions to a core referenced futures contract, disregarding differences with respect to any of the following: (1) lot size specifications or notional amounts, (2) post-trade risk management arrangements and (3) delivery dates for physically-settled swaps as long as these delivery dates diverge by less than one calendar day from the referenced contract’s delivery date (or, for natural gas, two calendar days). A cash-settled swap could only be deemed to be economically equivalent to a cash-settled referenced contract, and a physically-settled swap could only be deemed to be economically equivalent to a physically-settled referenced contract. However, a cash-settled swap that initially did not qualify as economically equivalent due to the fact that there was no corresponding cash-settled core referenced futures contract could subsequently become an economically equivalent swap if a cash-settled futures contract market were to subsequently be developed. The CFTC’s new position limits rules include an exemption from limits for bona fide hedging transactions or positions. A bona fide hedging transaction or position may exceed the applicable federal position limits if the transaction or position: (1) represents a substitute for transactions or positions made or to be made at a later time in a physical marketing channel; (2) is economically appropriate to the reduction of price risks in the conduct and management of a commercial enterprise; and (3) arises from the potential change in value of (A) assets which a person owns, produces, manufactures, processes or merchandises, or anticipates owning, producing, manufacturing, processing or merchandising; (B) liabilities which a person owes or anticipates incurring; or (C) services that a person provides or purchases, or anticipates providing or purchasing. The CFTC’s new position rules set forth a list of enumerated bona fide hedges for which a market participant is not required to request prior approval from the CFTC in order to hold a bona fide hedge position above the federal position limit. However, a market participant holding an enumerated bona fide hedge position still would need to request an exemption from the relevant exchange for exchange-set limits. For non-enumerated bona fide hedge positions, a market participant may request CFTC approval which must be granted prior to exceeding the applicable federal position limit, except where there is a demonstrated sudden or unforeseen increase in bona fide hedging needs (in which case the application must be submitted within five business days after the market participant exceeds the applicable limit). The compliance dates for the CFTC’s new federal speculative position limits are January 1, 2022 for the core referenced futures contracts and January 1, 2023 for economically equivalent swaps. While the ultimate effect of the final position limit rules are not yet known, these limits will likely restrict the ability of many market participants to trade in the commodities markets to the same extent as they have
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in the past. These rules may, among other things, reduce liquidity, increase market volatility, limit the size and duration of positions available to market participants, and increase costs in these markets, which could adversely affect a Fund.
These new regulations and the resulting increased costs and regulatory oversight requirements may result in market participants being required or deciding to limit their trading activities, which could lead to decreased market liquidity and increased market volatility. In addition, transaction costs incurred by market participants are likely to be higher due to the increased costs of compliance with the new regulations. These consequences could adversely affect a Fund’s returns.
Additional Regulation of Derivatives. Regulatory bodies outside the U.S. have also passed, proposed, or may propose in the future, legislation similar to Dodd-Frank or other legislation that could increase the costs of participating in, or otherwise adversely impact the liquidity of, participating in the commodities markets. For example, the European Market Infrastructure Regulation (Regulation (EU) No 648/2012) (“EMIR”) introduced certain requirements in respect of OTC derivatives including: (i) the mandatory clearing of OTC derivative contracts declared subject to the clearing obligation; (ii) risk mitigation techniques in respect of uncleared OTC derivative contracts, including the mandatory margining of uncleared OTC derivative contracts; and (iii) reporting and recordkeeping requirements in respect of all derivatives contracts. By way of further example, the European Union Markets in Financial Instruments Directive (Directive 2014/65/EU) and Markets in Financial Instruments Regulation (Regulation (EU) No 600/2014) (together “MiFID II”), which have applied since January 3, 2018, govern the provision of investment services and activities in relation to, as well as the organized trading of, financial instruments such as shares, bonds, units in collective investment schemes and derivatives. In particular, MiFID II requires European Union Member States to apply position limits to the size of a net position a person can hold at any time in commodity derivatives traded on European Union trading venues and in “economically equivalent” OTC contracts. If the requirements of EMIR and MiFID II apply, the cost of derivatives transactions is expected to increase.
In addition, regulations adopted by global prudential regulators that are now in effect require certain prudentially regulated entities and certain of their affiliates and subsidiaries (including swap dealers) to include in their derivatives contracts and certain other financial contracts, terms that delay or restrict the rights of counterparties (such as the Funds) to terminate such contracts, foreclose upon collateral, exercise other default rights or restrict transfers of credit support in the event that the prudentially regulated entity and/or its affiliates are subject to certain types of resolution or insolvency proceedings. Similar regulations and laws have been adopted in non-U.S. jurisdictions that may apply to a Fund’s counterparties located in those jurisdictions. It is possible that these new requirements, as well as potential additional related government regulation, could adversely affect a Fund’s ability to terminate existing derivatives contracts, exercise default rights or satisfy obligations owed to it with collateral received under such contracts.
Risk Factors in Derivatives.
There are significant risks that apply generally to derivatives transactions, including:
Correlation Risk — the risk that changes in the value of a derivative will not match the changes in the value of the portfolio holdings that are being hedged or of the particular market or security to which the Fund seeks exposure. There are a number of factors which may prevent a derivative instrument from achieving the desired correlation (or inverse correlation) with an underlying asset, rate or index, such as the impact of fees, expenses and transaction costs, the timing of pricing, and disruptions or illiquidity in the markets for such derivative instrument.
Counterparty Risk — the risk that a derivatives transaction counterparty will be unable or unwilling to make payments or otherwise honor its obligations to a Fund and the related risks of having concentrated exposure to such a counterparty. In particular, derivatives traded in OTC markets often are not guaranteed by an exchange or clearing corporation and often do not require payment of margin, and to the extent that the Fund has unrealized gains in such instruments or has deposited collateral with its counterparties the Fund is at risk that its counterparties will become bankrupt or otherwise fail to honor their obligations. A Fund will typically attempt to minimize counterparty risk by engaging in OTC derivatives transactions only with creditworthy entities that have substantial capital or that have provided the Fund with a third-party guaranty or other credit support.
Credit Risk — the risk that the reference entity in a credit default swap or similar derivative will not be able to honor its financial obligations.
Currency Risk — the risk that changes in the exchange rate between two currencies will adversely affect the value (in U.S. dollar terms) of a derivative.
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Illiquidity Risk — the risk that certain securities or instruments may be difficult or impossible to sell at the time or at the price desired by the counterparty in connection with payments of margin, collateral, or settlement payments. There can be no assurance that a Fund will be able to unwind or offset a derivative at its desired price, in a secondary market or otherwise. It may, therefore, not be possible for the Fund to unwind its position in a derivative without incurring substantial losses (if at all). Certain OTC derivatives, including swaps and OTC options, involve substantial illiquidity risk. Illiquidity may also make it more difficult for a Fund to ascertain a market value for such derivatives. A Fund will, therefore, acquire illiquid OTC derivatives (i) if the agreement pursuant to which the instrument is purchased contains a formula price at which the instrument may be terminated or sold, or (ii) for which the Manager anticipates the Fund can receive on each business day at least two independent bids or offers, unless a quotation from only one dealer is available, in which case that dealer’s quotation may be used. The illiquidity of the derivatives markets may be due to various factors, including congestion, disorderly markets, limitations on deliverable supplies, the participation of speculators, government regulation and intervention, and technical and operational or system failures. In addition, the liquidity of a secondary market in an exchange-traded derivative contract may be adversely affected by “daily price fluctuation limits” established by the exchanges which limit the amount of fluctuation in an exchange-traded contract price during a single trading day. Once the daily limit has been reached in the contract, no trades may be entered into at a price beyond the limit, thus preventing the liquidation of open positions. Prices have in the past moved beyond the daily limit on a number of consecutive trading days. If it is not possible to close an open derivative position entered into by the Fund, the Fund would continue to be required to make daily cash payments of variation margin in the event of adverse price movements. In such a situation, if the Fund has insufficient cash, it may have to sell portfolio securities to meet daily variation margin requirements at a time when it may be disadvantageous to do so.
Index Risk — if the derivative is linked to the performance of an index, it will be subject to the risks associated with changes in that index. If the index changes, the Fund could receive lower interest payments or experience a reduction in the value of the derivative to below the price that the Fund paid for such derivative.
Legal Risk — the risk of insufficient documentation, insufficient capacity or authority of counterparty, or legality or enforceability of a contract.
Leverage Risk — the risk that a Fund’s derivatives transactions can magnify the Fund’s gains and losses. Relatively small market movements may result in large changes in the value of a derivatives position and can result in losses that greatly exceed the amount originally invested.
Market Risk — the risk that changes in the value of one or more markets or changes with respect to the value of the underlying asset will adversely affect the value of a derivative. In the event of an adverse movement, a Fund may be required to pay substantial additional margin to maintain its position or the Fund’s returns may be adversely affected.
Operational Risk — the risk related to potential operational issues, including documentation issues, settlement issues, systems failures, inadequate controls and human error.
Valuation Risk — the risk that valuation sources for a derivative will not be readily available in the market. This is possible especially in times of market distress, since many market participants may be reluctant to purchase complex instruments or quote prices for them.
Volatility Risk — the risk that the value of derivatives will fluctuate significantly within a short time period.
Types of Derivatives Transactions.
A Fund may enter into derivatives transactions in accordance with its investment guidelines and restrictions, including the following:
Futures.
A Fund may enter into futures contracts (“futures”) and options on futures contracts. Futures are standardized, exchange-traded contracts that require a purchaser to take delivery, and a seller to make delivery, of a specified amount of an asset at a specified future date and price. Upon purchasing or selling a futures contract, a Fund is required to deposit initial margin equal to a percentage (generally less than 10%) of the contract value. Futures contracts are marked to market daily for the duration of the contract, and the Fund will either post additional margin or be entitled to a payment, as applicable, based on the mark-to-market movement of the contract.
A Fund may sell a futures contract prior to the completion of its term to limit its risk of loss from a decline in the market value of portfolio holdings correlated with the futures contract. However, in the event the market value of the portfolio holdings correlated with the futures contract increases rather than decreases, a Fund will realize a loss on
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the futures position and a lower return on the portfolio holdings than would have been realized without the purchase of the futures contract.
The purchase of a futures contract may provide a Fund a lower cost alternative to purchasing securities or commodities directly. In the event that such securities or commodities decline in value or a Fund determines not to complete an anticipatory hedge transaction relating to a futures contract, however, the Fund may realize a loss relating to the futures position.
Futures contracts are also subject to position limits. In order to comply with position limits, a Fund may be required to liquidate positions or may not be able to fully implement trading instructions. Any such liquidation or limited implementation could result in substantial costs to a Fund. See “—Regulation of Derivatives — Dodd-Frank Regulations” above.
A Fund is also permitted to purchase or sell call and put options on futures contracts, including financial futures and stock indices. Generally, these strategies would be used under the same market and market sector conditions (i.e., conditions relating to specific types of investments) in which the Fund entered into futures transactions. A Fund may purchase put options or write call options on futures contracts and stock indices in lieu of selling the underlying futures contract in anticipation of a decrease in the market value of its securities. Similarly, a Fund can purchase call options, or write put options on futures contracts and stock indices, as a substitute for the purchase of such futures contracts to hedge against the increased cost resulting from an increase in the market value of securities which the Fund intends to purchase.
To maintain greater flexibility, a Fund may invest in instruments which have characteristics similar to futures contracts. These instruments may take a variety of forms, such as debt securities with interest or principal payments determined by reference to the value of a security, an index of securities or a commodity at a future point in time. The risks of such investments could reflect the risks of investing in futures and securities, including volatility and illiquidity.
Futures contracts and options on futures contracts are subject to significant correlation risk, leverage risk, illiquidity risk, market risk and counterparty risk with respect to a Fund’s futures broker or the clearinghouse. See “—Risk Factors in Derivatives” above.
Certain Funds may invest in futures based on carbon “allowances.” Under certain regulatory regimes, a limit is set by a regulator, such as a government entity, on the total amount of specific greenhouse gases, such as CO2, that can be emitted by regulated entities, such as manufacturers or energy producers. The regulator then may issue or sell individual “emission allowances” to regulated entities, which can then be traded on the open market. Commodity futures contracts linked to the value of emission allowances are known as “carbon futures.”
The price for carbon futures contracts is based on a number of factors, including the supply of and the demand for carbon futures contracts. Market conditions and expectations, position limits, collateral requirements, and other factors each can impact the supply of and demand for carbon futures contracts. The market for carbon futures contracts is still developing and may be subject to periods of illiquidity. During such times it may be difficult or impossible to buy or sell a position at the desired price. Market disruptions or volatility can also make it difficult to find a counterparty willing to transact at a reasonable price and sufficient size.
Swap Agreements.
A Fund may enter into swap agreements for hedging purposes or speculative purposes. Swap agreements are OTC contracts entered into primarily by financial institutions and institutional investors which may or may not be cleared by a central clearinghouse. In a standard “swap” transaction, two parties agree to exchange the returns earned or realized from one or more underlying assets or rates of return, which may be adjusted for an interest factor. The gross returns to be exchanged or “swapped” between the parties are generally calculated with respect to a “notional amount,” e.g., the return or increase in value of a particular dollar amount invested at a particular interest rate, in a particular foreign currency, or in a “basket” of securities representing a particular index. The notional amount of the swap agreement is only used to calculate the obligations that the parties to a swap agreement have agreed to exchange. A Fund’s obligations (or rights) under a swap agreement will generally be equal only to the net amount to be paid or received under the agreement based on the relative values of the positions held by each party to the agreement. Swaps that are not cleared involve substantial counterparty risk. A Fund will typically attempt to mitigate this counterparty risk by entering into swap agreements only with creditworthy entities that have substantial capital or that have provided the Fund with a third-party guaranty or other credit support. A Fund’s ability to use swap agreements may be restricted by the tax rules applicable to registered investment companies.
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Credit Default Swaps and Similar Instruments. Certain Funds may enter into credit default swaps and similar instruments. Credit default swaps are standardized agreements in which the protection “buyer” pays the protection “seller” an up-front payment, or a periodic stream of payments, over the term of the contract, provided generally that no credit event on a reference obligation has occurred. If a credit event occurs, the seller generally must pay the buyer the difference between the notional amount of the contract and the value of a portfolio of securities issued by the reference entity. A Fund may be either the buyer or seller in the transaction. The Funds may enter into credit default swaps that reference the obligations of a single entity (“single-name CDS”) or the obligations of entities that make up an index (“index CDS”). References to “credit default swaps” shall collectively refer to single-name CDS and index CDS.
Credit default swaps have as reference obligations one or more securities or loans that are not currently held by a Fund. In circumstances in which a Fund does not own the securities or loans that are deliverable under a credit default swap, the Fund is exposed to the risk that deliverable securities will not be available in the market, or will be available only at unfavorable prices, as would be the case in a so-called “short squeeze.” In certain instances of issuer defaults or restructurings, it has been unclear under the standard industry documentation for credit default swaps whether or not a “credit event” triggering the seller’s payment obligation had occurred. Certain initiatives adopted by derivatives market participants, including the International Swaps and Derivatives Association (“ISDA”), are designed to implement uniform settlement terms into standard credit default swap documentation, as well as refine the practices for the transparent conduct of the credit default swap market generally. Among these initiatives are the ISDA Credit Derivatives Determination Committee and the implementation of market-wide cash settlement protocols applicable to all market-standard credit default swaps. These initiatives are intended to reduce both the uncertainty as to the occurrence of credit events and the risk of a “short squeeze” by providing that the ISDA Credit Derivatives Determinations Committee will make determinations as to whether a credit event has occurred, establish an auction to determine a settlement price and identify the deliverable securities for purposes of the auction, although the ISDA Credit Derivatives Determinations Committee may in certain limited circumstances refrain from doing so. In the event the ISDA Credit Derivatives Determinations Committee cannot reach a timely resolution with respect to a “credit event” or otherwise does not establish a cash settlement auction, a Fund may not be able to realize the full value of the credit default swap upon a default by the reference entity. Furthermore, a Fund may enter into certain credit default swaps or similar instruments that may not be covered by these initiatives.
If a Fund is a buyer, it will lose the payments made under the terms of the credit default swap and recover nothing should no credit event occur. If a Fund is a seller and a credit event occurs, the value of any deliverable obligation received by the Fund or the amount of cash settlement received by the Fund pursuant to the relevant cash settlement auction, together with the up-front or periodic payments previously received, may be less than the amount it pays to the buyer, resulting in a loss of value to the Fund. A Fund that sells credit default swaps incurs leveraged exposure to the credit of one or more reference entities and is subject to many of the same risks it would incur if it were holding debt securities issued by the relevant reference entity. However, a Fund will not have any legal recourse against any reference entity and will not benefit from any collateral securing the reference entity’s debt obligations. In the event the ISDA Credit Derivatives Determinations Committee does not establish a cash settlement auction and identify the relevant deliverable securities or loans, the credit default swap buyer will have broad discretion to select which of the reference entity’s debt obligations to deliver to the Fund following a credit event and will likely choose the obligations with the lowest market value in order to maximize the payment obligations of the Fund. In addition, credit default swaps generally trade on the basis of theoretical pricing and valuation models, which may not accurately value such swap positions when established or when subsequently traded or unwound under actual market conditions.
Dodd-Frank requires that certain index CDS be executed in regulated markets and submitted for clearing to regulated clearinghouses. See “—Derivatives — Regulation of Derivatives — Dodd-Frank Regulations” above. Other single-name CDS and index CDS are permitted, although not required, to be cleared through regulated clearinghouses. The Funds clear all credit default swaps that are subject to mandatory clearing and may voluntarily clear some, but not all, of the other credit default swaps not subject to mandatory clearing. The Funds face counterparty risk with respect to the clearinghouse when entering into cleared single-name CDS and cleared index CDS. The Funds face significant counterparty risk with respect to their counterparties to non-cleared credit default swaps and similar instruments. A Fund typically will enter into non-cleared credit default swaps and similar instruments with swap dealers and creditworthy entities that have substantial capital or that have provided the Fund with a third-party guaranty or other credit support.
In addition, credit default swaps and similar instruments generally involve greater risks than if a Fund had invested in the reference obligation directly and are subject to significant credit risk, correlation risk, leverage risk, illiquidity risk and market risk. See “—Risk Factors in Derivatives” above.
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Interest Rate Swaps, Floors and Caps. Certain Funds may enter into OTC derivatives in the form of interest rate swaps and interest rate caps and floors. As described in further detail below, a Fund may enter into these transactions primarily to preserve a return or spread on a particular investment or portion of its holdings, as a duration management technique, to protect against an increase in the price of securities a Fund anticipates purchasing at a later date, or for speculation to increase returns.
Dodd-Frank requires that certain interest rate swaps be executed in regulated markets and submitted for clearing to regulated clearinghouses. See “—Regulation of Derivatives — Dodd-Frank Regulations” above. Other interest rate swaps are permitted, although not required, to be cleared. Most of the interest rate swaps entered into by the Funds are cleared. The Funds face counterparty risk with respect to the clearinghouse when entering into cleared interest rate swaps.
The Funds face significant counterparty risk with respect to their counterparties to non-cleared interest rate swaps and interest rate caps and floors. The typical counterparties for a Fund’s non-cleared interest rate derivatives transactions are swap dealers and other creditworthy entities that have substantial capital or that have provided the Fund with a third-party guaranty or other credit support. If the Fund’s counterparty defaults on such a transaction, a Fund will have contractual remedies with respect to the transaction. The market for interest rate swaps is relatively liquid in comparison with other similar instruments traded in the interbank market. A Fund may be limited in its ability to enter into certain interest rate derivatives due to applicable income tax requirements.
Interest rate swaps are transactions in which each party makes periodic interest payments based on a fixed or variable interest rate, index or asset in return for periodic payments from its counterparty based on a different fixed or variable interest rate, index or asset.
The purchase of an interest rate floor entitles the purchaser, to the extent that a specified index falls below a predetermined interest rate, to receive payments of interest on a notional principal amount from the party selling such interest rate floor.
The purchase of an interest rate cap entitles the purchaser, to the extent that a specified index rises above a predetermined interest rate, to receive payments of interest on a notional principal amount from the party selling such interest rate cap.
A Fund may enter into an interest rate swap to effectively exchange with another party their respective commitments to pay or receive interest, e.g., an exchange of fixed rate payments for floating rate payments. For example, if a Fund holds a mortgage-backed security with an interest rate that is reset only once each year, it may swap the right to receive interest at this fixed rate for the right to receive interest at a rate that is reset every week. This would enable a Fund to offset a decline in the value of the mortgage-backed security due to rising interest rates but would also limit its ability to benefit from falling interest rates. Conversely, if a Fund holds a mortgage-backed security with an interest rate that is reset every week and it would like to lock in what it believes to be a high interest rate for one year, it may swap the right to receive interest at this variable weekly rate for the right to receive interest at a rate that is fixed for one year. Such a swap would protect the Fund from a reduction in yield due to falling interest rates and may permit the Fund to enhance its income through the positive differential between one week and one year interest rates, but would preclude it from taking full advantage of rising interest rates.
Gains from transactions in interest rate swaps distributed to shareholders will be taxable as ordinary income or, in certain circumstances, as long term capital gains to shareholders.
Interest rate swaps and interest rate caps and floors may be subject to correlation risk, leverage risk, illiquidity risk and market risk. See “—Risk Factors in Derivatives” above.
Total Return Swaps. Total return swaps are contracts in which one party agrees to make periodic payments to the other party based on the return of the assets underlying the contract in exchange for periodic payments based on a fixed or variable interest rate or the total return from different underlying assets. The return of the assets underlying the contract includes both the income generated by the asset and the change in market value of the asset. The asset underlying the contract may include a specified security, basket of securities or securities indices. Total return swaps on a specified security, basket of securities or securities indices may sometimes be referred to as “contracts for difference.”
Total return swaps may be used to obtain exposure to a security or market without owning or taking physical custody of such security or investing directly in such market. Upon entering into a total return swap, a Fund is required to deposit initial margin but the parties do not exchange the notional amount. As a result, total return swaps may effectively add leverage to the Fund’s portfolio because the Fund would be subject to investment exposure on the notional amount of the swap.
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Total return swaps are subject to significant correlation risk, leverage risk, illiquidity risk, market risk and counterparty risk. See “—Risk Factors in Derivatives” above.
Options
Options on Securities and Securities Indices. A Fund may engage in transactions in options on individual securities, baskets of securities or securities indices, or particular measurements of value or rates, such as an index of the price of treasury securities or an index representative of short-term interest rates. Such investments may be made on exchanges and in the OTC markets. In general, exchange-traded options have standardized exercise prices and expiration dates and require the parties to post margin against their obligations, and the performance of the parties’ obligations in connection with such options is guaranteed by the exchange or a related clearing corporation. OTC options have more flexible terms negotiated between the buyer and the seller, but are subject to greater credit risk. OTC options also involve greater illiquidity risk.
A Fund may also engage in transactions in options which have additional features that result in different payment structures and/or expirations (commonly referred to as exotic options). For example, barrier options are exotic options that can only be exercised (or automatically expire) if the price of the underlying asset reaches one or more predetermined levels on or before expiration. Binary options are another example of exotic options which have a fixed all-or-nothing payout if one or more predetermined conditions are met. Exotic options are typically traded in OTC markets.
There are several risks associated with transactions in options on securities and indexes. For example, there are significant differences between the securities and options markets that could result in an imperfect correlation between these markets, causing a given transaction not to achieve its objectives. In addition, a liquid secondary market for particular options, whether traded OTC or on a national securities exchange (“Exchange”) may be absent for reasons which include the following: there may be insufficient trading interest in certain options; restrictions may be imposed by an Exchange on opening transactions or closing transactions or both; trading halts, suspensions or other restrictions may be imposed with respect to particular classes or series of options or underlying securities; unusual or unforeseen circumstances may interrupt normal operations on an Exchange; the facilities of an Exchange or the Options Clearing Corporation may not at all times be adequate to handle current trading volume; or one or more Exchanges could, for economic or other reasons, decide or be compelled at some future date to discontinue the trading of options (or a particular class or series of options), in which event the secondary market on that Exchange (or in that class or series of options) would cease to exist, although outstanding options that had been issued by the Options Clearing Corporation as a result of trades on that Exchange would continue to be exercisable in accordance with their terms.
Call Options. A Fund may purchase call options on any of the types of securities or instruments in which it may invest. A purchased call option gives a Fund the right to buy, and obligates the seller to sell, the underlying security at the exercise price at any time during the option period. A Fund also may purchase and sell call options on indices. Index options are similar to options on securities except that, rather than taking or making delivery of securities underlying the option at a specified price upon exercise, an index option gives the holder the right to receive cash upon exercise of the option if the level of the index upon which the option is based is greater than the exercise price of the option.
A written call option is covered if a Fund holds a call on the same security or index as the call written where the exercise price of the call held is (i) equal to or less than the exercise price of the call written, or (ii) greater than the exercise price of the call written provided the difference is maintained by the Fund in assets which are not considered illiquid investments under the Funds’ Liquidity Program (as defined below) (“liquid assets”) designated on the Manager’s or sub-adviser’s books and records to the extent required by Commission guidelines.
A Fund may write (i.e., sell) covered call options on the securities or instruments in which it may invest and to enter into closing purchase transactions with respect to certain of such options. A covered call option is an option in which a Fund, in return for a premium, gives another party a right to buy specified securities owned by the Fund at a specified future date and price set at the time of the contract. The principal reason for writing call options is the attempt to realize, through the receipt of premiums, a greater return than would be realized on the securities alone. By writing covered call options, a Fund gives up the opportunity, while the option is in effect, to profit from any price increase in the underlying security above the option exercise price. In addition, a Fund’s ability to sell the underlying security will be limited while the option is in effect unless the Fund enters into a closing purchase transaction. A closing purchase transaction cancels out a Fund’s position as the writer of an option by means of an offsetting purchase of an identical option prior to the expiration of the option it has written. Covered call options also serve as a partial hedge to the extent of the premium received against the price of the underlying security declining.
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A Fund may write (i.e., sell) uncovered call options on securities or instruments in which it may invest but that are not currently held by the Fund. The principal reason for writing uncovered call options is to realize income without committing capital to the ownership of the underlying securities or instruments. When writing uncovered call options, a Fund must deposit and maintain sufficient margin with the broker-dealer through which it made the uncovered call option as collateral to ensure that the securities can be purchased for delivery if and when the option is exercised. During periods of declining securities prices or when prices are stable, writing uncovered calls can be a profitable strategy to increase a Fund’s income with minimal capital risk. Uncovered calls are riskier than covered calls because there is no underlying security held by a Fund that can act as a partial hedge. Uncovered calls have speculative characteristics and the potential for loss is unlimited. When an uncovered call is exercised, a Fund must purchase the underlying security to meet its call obligation. There is also a risk, especially with preferred and debt securities that lack sufficient liquidity, that the securities may not be available for purchase. If the purchase price exceeds the exercise price, a Fund will lose the difference.
Put Options. A Fund may purchase put options to seek to hedge against a decline in the value of its securities or to enhance its return. By buying a put option, a Fund acquires a right to sell the underlying securities or instruments at the exercise price, thus limiting the Fund’s risk of loss through a decline in the market value of the securities or instruments until the put option expires. The amount of any appreciation in the value of the underlying securities or instruments will be partially offset by the amount of the premium paid for the put option and any related transaction costs. Prior to its expiration, a put option may be sold in a closing sale transaction and profit or loss from the sale will depend on whether the amount received is more or less than the premium paid for the put option plus the related transaction costs. A closing sale transaction cancels out a Fund’s position as the purchaser of an option by means of an offsetting sale of an identical option prior to the expiration of the option it has purchased. A Fund also may purchase uncovered put options.
A Fund also may write (i.e., sell) put options on the types of securities or instruments that may be held by the Fund. A Fund will receive a premium for writing a put option, which increases the Fund’s return.
A Fund also may write (i.e., sell) uncovered put options on securities or instruments in which it may invest but with respect to which the Fund does not currently have a corresponding short position or has not deposited as collateral cash equal to the exercise value of the put option with the broker-dealer through which it made the uncovered put option. The principal reason for writing uncovered put options is to receive premium income and to acquire such securities or instruments at a net cost below the current market value. A Fund has the obligation to buy the securities or instruments at an agreed upon price if the price of the securities or instruments decreases below the exercise price. If the price of the securities or instruments increases during the option period, the option will expire worthless and a Fund will retain the premium and will not have to purchase the securities or instruments at the exercise price.
Options on Government National Mortgage Association (“GNMA”) Certificates. The following information relates to the unique characteristics of options on GNMA Certificates. Since the remaining principal balance of GNMA Certificates declines each month as a result of mortgage payments, a Fund, as a writer of a GNMA call holding GNMA Certificates as “cover” to satisfy its delivery obligation in the event of exercise, may find that the GNMA Certificates it holds no longer have a sufficient remaining principal balance for this purpose. Should this occur, a Fund will purchase additional GNMA Certificates from the same pool (if obtainable) or other GNMA Certificates in the cash market in order to maintain its “cover.”
A GNMA Certificate held by a Fund to cover an option position in any but the nearest expiration month may cease to represent cover for the option in the event of a decline in the GNMA coupon rate at which new pools are originated under the FHA/VA loan ceiling in effect at any given time. If this should occur, a Fund will no longer be covered, and the Fund will either enter into a closing purchase transaction or replace such Certificate with a certificate that represents cover. When a Fund closes its position or replaces such Certificate, it may realize an unanticipated loss and incur transaction costs.
Options on Swaps (“Swaptions”). A swaption gives a counterparty the option (but not the obligation) to enter into a new swap agreement or to shorten, extend, cancel or otherwise modify an existing swap agreement, at a designated future time on specified terms. A Fund may write (i.e., sell) and purchase put and call swaptions. Depending on the terms of the particular option agreement, a Fund will generally incur a greater degree of risk when it writes a swaption than it will incur when it purchases a swaption. When a Fund purchases a swaption, it risks losing only the amount of the premium it has paid should it decide to let the option expire unexercised. However, when a Fund writes a swaption, upon exercise of the option the Fund will become obligated according to the terms of the underlying agreement and the potential for loss may be unlimited. Certain swaptions are permitted, although not required, to be cleared.
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A Fund will likely enter into these transactions to preserve a return or spread on a particular investment or portion of its portfolio or to protect against any increase in the price of securities the Fund anticipates purchasing at a later date. A Fund generally will use these transactions for hedging purposes, not for speculation.
Swaptions may be subject to correlation risk, leverage risk, illiquidity risk and market risk. See “—Risk Factors in Derivatives” above.
Foreign Exchange Transactions.
A Fund may enter into spot foreign exchange transactions, forward foreign exchange transactions (“FX forwards”) and currency swaps, purchase and sell currency options, currency futures and related options thereon (collectively, “Currency Instruments”) for purposes of hedging against the decline in the value of currencies in which its portfolio holdings are denominated against the U.S. dollar or, with respect to certain Funds, to seek to enhance returns.
Such transactions could be effected to hedge with respect to foreign dollar denominated securities owned by a Fund, sold by a Fund but not yet delivered, or committed or anticipated to be purchased by a Fund. As an illustration, a Fund may use such techniques to hedge the stated value in U.S. dollars of an investment in a yen-denominated security. For example, the Fund may purchase a foreign currency put option enabling it to sell a specified amount of yen for dollars at a specified price by a future date. To the extent the hedge is successful, a loss in the value of the yen relative to the dollar will tend to be offset by an increase in the value of the put option. To offset, in whole or in part, the cost of acquiring such a put option, the Fund may also sell a call option which, if exercised, requires it to sell a specified amount of yen for dollars at a specified price by a future date (a technique called a “straddle”). By selling such a call option in this illustration, the Fund gives up the opportunity to profit without limit from increases in the relative value of the yen to the dollar. “Straddles” of the type that may be used by a Fund are considered hedging transactions. Certain Funds have a fundamental investment restriction that restricts currency option strategies.
Hedging transactions involving Currency Instruments involve substantial risks, including correlation risk. A Fund’s use of Currency Instruments to effect hedging strategies is intended to reduce the volatility of the NAV of the Fund’s shares; however, the use of such hedging strategies will not prevent the NAV of the Fund’s shares from fluctuating. Moreover, although Currency Instruments will be used with the intention of hedging against adverse currency movements, transactions in Currency Instruments involve the risk that anticipated currency movements will not be accurately predicted and that the Fund’s hedging strategies will be ineffective. To the extent that a Fund hedges against anticipated currency movements that do not occur, the Fund may realize losses and decrease its total return. Furthermore, a Fund will only engage in hedging activities from time to time and may not be engaging in hedging activities when movements in currency exchange rates actually occur.
In connection with its trading in forward foreign currency contracts, a Fund will contract with a foreign or domestic bank, or foreign or domestic securities dealer, to make or take future delivery of a specified amount of a particular currency. There are no limitations on daily price moves in such forward contracts, and banks and dealers are not required to continue to make markets in such contracts. There have been periods during which certain banks or dealers have refused to quote prices for such forward contracts or have quoted prices with an unusually wide spread between the price at which the bank or dealer is prepared to buy and that at which it is prepared to sell. Governmental imposition of currency controls might limit any such forward contract trading. With respect to its trading of forward contracts, if any, a Fund will be subject to counterparty risk. Any such failure to perform by a counterparty would deprive the Fund of any profit potential or force the Fund to cover its commitments for resale, if any, at the then market price and could result in a loss to the Fund.
It may not be possible for a Fund to hedge against currency exchange rate movements, even if correctly anticipated, in the event that (i) the currency exchange rate movement is so generally anticipated that the Fund is not able to enter into a hedging transaction at an effective price, or (ii) the currency exchange rate movement relates to a market with respect to which Currency Instruments are not available and it is not possible to engage in effective foreign currency hedging. The cost to a Fund of engaging in foreign currency transactions varies with such factors as the currencies involved, the length of the contract period and the market conditions then prevailing. Since transactions in foreign currency exchange usually are conducted on a principal basis, no fees or commissions are involved.
A Fund will not hedge a currency in excess of the aggregate market value of the securities that it owns (including receivables for unsettled securities sales), or has committed to purchase or anticipates purchasing, which are denominated in such currency.
Spot Transactions and FX Forwards. FX forwards are OTC contracts to purchase or sell a specified amount of a specified currency or multinational currency unit at a specified price and specified future date. Spot foreign exchange
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transactions are similar but are settled in the current, or “spot”, market. A Fund will enter into foreign exchange transactions for purposes of hedging either a specific transaction or a portfolio position, or, with respect to certain Funds, to seek to enhance returns. FX forwards involve substantial currency risk, credit risk and liquidity risk. A Fund may enter into a foreign exchange transaction for purposes of hedging a specific transaction by, for example, purchasing a currency needed to settle a security transaction or selling a currency in which the Fund has received or anticipates receiving a dividend or distribution. A Fund may enter into a foreign exchange transaction for purposes of hedging a portfolio position by selling forward a currency in which a portfolio position of the Fund is denominated or by purchasing a currency in which the Fund anticipates acquiring a portfolio position in the near future. A Fund may also hedge a currency by entering into a transaction in a Currency Instrument denominated in a currency other than the currency being hedged (a “cross-hedge”). A Fund will only enter into a cross-hedge if the Manager believes that (i) there is a demonstrably high correlation between the currency in which the cross-hedge is denominated and the currency being hedged, and (ii) executing a cross-hedge through the currency in which the cross-hedge is denominated will be significantly more cost-effective or provide substantially greater liquidity than executing a similar hedging transaction by means of the currency being hedged.
A Fund may also engage in proxy hedging transactions to reduce the effect of currency fluctuations on the value of existing or anticipated holdings of portfolio securities. Proxy hedging is often used when the currency to which the Fund is exposed is difficult to hedge, or to hedge against the U.S. dollar. Proxy hedging entails entering into a forward contract to sell a currency whose changes in value are generally considered to be linked to a currency or currencies in which some or all of the Fund’s securities are, or are expected to be, denominated, and to buy U.S. dollars. Proxy hedging involves some of the same risks and considerations as other transactions with similar instruments. Currency transactions can result in losses to the Fund if the currency being hedged fluctuates in value to a degree or in a direction that is not anticipated. In addition, there is the risk that the perceived linkage between various currencies may not be present, including during the particular time that a Fund is engaging in proxy hedging.
A Fund may also cross-hedge currencies by entering into forward contracts to sell one or more currencies that are expected to decline in value relative to other currencies to which the Fund has or in which the Fund expects to have portfolio exposure. For example, a Fund may hold both Canadian government bonds and Japanese government bonds, and the Manager or sub-adviser may believe that Canadian dollars will deteriorate against Japanese yen. The Fund would sell Canadian dollars to reduce its exposure to that currency and buy Japanese yen. This strategy would be a hedge against a decline in the value of Canadian dollars, although it would expose the Fund to declines in the value of the Japanese yen relative to the U.S. dollar.
Some of the forward non-U.S. currency contracts entered into by the Funds are classified as non-deliverable forwards (“NDFs”). NDFs are cash-settled, short-term forward contracts that may be thinly traded or are denominated in non-convertible foreign currency, where the profit or loss at the time at the settlement date is calculated by taking the difference between the agreed upon exchange rate and the spot rate at the time of settlement, for an agreed upon notional amount of funds. All NDFs have a fixing date and a settlement date. The fixing date is the date at which the difference between the prevailing market exchange rate and the agreed upon exchange rate is calculated. The settlement date is the date by which the payment of the difference is due to the party receiving payment. NDFs are commonly quoted for time periods of one month up to two years, and are normally quoted and settled in U.S. dollars. They are often used to gain exposure to and/or hedge exposure to foreign currencies that are not internationally traded.
Currency Futures. A Fund may seek to enhance returns or hedge against the decline in the value of a currency through use of currency futures or options on currency futures. Currency futures are similar to forward foreign exchange transactions except that futures are standardized, exchange-traded contracts while forward foreign exchange transactions are traded in the OTC market. Currency futures involve substantial currency risk as well as the risks discussed above in “—Futures.”
Currency Options. A Fund may seek to enhance returns or hedge against the decline in the value of a currency through the use of currency options. Certain Funds have fundamental investment restrictions that permit the purchase of currency options, but prohibit the writing of currency options. Currency options are similar to options on securities. For example, in consideration for an option premium the writer of a currency option is obligated to sell (in the case of a call option) or purchase (in the case of a put option) a specified amount of a specified currency on or before the expiration date for a specified amount of another currency. A Fund may engage in transactions in options on currencies either on exchanges or OTC markets. Such transactions in options may include exotic options on currencies, which are typically traded in OTC markets and have additional features that result in different payment structures and/or expirations. Where a Fund is permitted to write currency options, it may write covered call options
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on up to 100% of the currencies in its portfolio. See “—Options” above. Currency options involve substantial currency risk, and may also involve credit, leverage or illiquidity risk.
Currency Swaps. A Fund may enter into currency swaps in order to protect against currency fluctuations or to hedge portfolio positions. Currency swaps are transactions in which one currency is simultaneously bought for a second currency on a spot basis and sold for the second currency on a forward basis. Currency swaps involve the exchange of the rights of a Fund and another party to make or receive payments in specified currencies, and typically require the delivery of the entire principal value of one designated currency in exchange for the other designated currency. As a result, the entire principal value of a currency swap is subject to the risk that the other party to the swap will default on its contractual delivery obligations.
Distressed Securities. A Fund may invest in securities, including loans purchased in the secondary market, that are the subject of bankruptcy proceedings or otherwise in default or in risk of being in default as to the repayment of principal and/or interest at the time of acquisition by the Fund or that are rated in the lower rating categories by one or more nationally recognized statistical rating organizations (for example, Ca or lower by Moody’s and CC or lower by S&P or Fitch) or, if unrated, are in the judgment of the Manager of equivalent quality (“Distressed Securities”). Investment in Distressed Securities is speculative and involves significant risks.
A Fund will generally make such investments only when the Manager believes it is reasonably likely that the issuer of the Distressed Securities will make an exchange offer or will be the subject of a plan of reorganization pursuant to which the Fund will receive new securities in return for the Distressed Securities. However, there can be no assurance that such an exchange offer will be made or that such a plan of reorganization will be adopted. In addition, a significant period of time may pass between the time at which a Fund makes its investment in Distressed Securities and the time that any such exchange offer or plan of reorganization is completed. During this period, it is unlikely that a Fund will receive any interest payments on the Distressed Securities, the Fund will be subject to significant uncertainty as to whether or not the exchange offer or plan of reorganization will be completed and the Fund may be required to bear certain extraordinary expenses to protect and recover its investment. Therefore, to the extent the Fund seeks capital appreciation through investment in distressed securities, the Fund’s ability to achieve current income for its shareholders may be diminished. The Fund also will be subject to significant uncertainty as to when and in what manner and for what value the obligations evidenced by the distressed securities will eventually be satisfied (e.g., through a liquidation of the obligor’s assets, an exchange offer or plan of reorganization involving the distressed securities or a payment of some amount in satisfaction of the obligation). Even if an exchange offer is made or plan of reorganization is adopted with respect to Distressed Securities held by a Fund, there can be no assurance that the securities or other assets received by a Fund in connection with such exchange offer or plan of reorganization will not have a lower value or income potential than may have been anticipated when the investment was made or no value. Moreover, any securities received by a Fund upon completion of an exchange offer or plan of reorganization may be restricted as to resale. Similarly, if a Fund participates in negotiations with respect to any exchange offer or plan of reorganization with respect to an issuer of Distressed Securities, the Fund may be restricted from disposing of such securities. To the extent that a Fund becomes involved in such proceedings, the Fund may have a more active participation in the affairs of the issuer than that assumed generally by an investor. The Fund, however, will not make investments for the purpose of exercising day-to-day management of any issuer’s affairs.
Environmental, Social and Governance (“ESG”) Integration. Although a Fund does not seek to implement a specific sustainability strategy unless disclosed in its Prospectus, Fund management will consider ESG characteristics as part of the investment process for actively managed Funds. These considerations will vary depending on a Fund’s particular investment strategies and may include consideration of third-party research as well as consideration of proprietary BlackRock research across the ESG risks and opportunities regarding an issuer. Fund management will consider such ESG characteristics it deems relevant or additive, if any, when making investment decisions for a Fund. The ESG characteristics utilized in a Fund’s investment process are anticipated to evolve over time and one or more characteristics may not be relevant with respect to all issuers that are eligible for investment.
ESG characteristics are not the sole considerations when making investment decisions for a Fund. Further, investors can differ in their views of what constitutes positive or negative ESG characteristics. As a result, a Fund may invest in issuers that do not reflect the beliefs and values with respect to ESG of any particular investor. ESG considerations may affect a Fund’s exposure to certain companies or industries and a Fund may forego certain investment opportunities. While Fund management views ESG considerations as having the potential to contribute to a Fund’s long-term performance, there is no guarantee that such results will be achieved.
Certain Funds incorporate specific sustainability considerations into their investment objectives, strategies, and/or processes, as described in the applicable Fund’s Prospectus.
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Equity Securities. Certain Funds may invest in equity securities, which include common stock and, for certain Funds, preferred stock (including convertible preferred stock); bonds, notes and debentures convertible into common or preferred stock; stock purchase warrants and rights; equity interests in trusts; general and limited partnerships and limited liability companies; and depositary receipts. Stock markets are volatile. The price of equity securities will fluctuate and can decline and reduce the value of a portfolio investing in equities. The price of equity securities fluctuates based on changes in a company’s financial condition and overall market and economic conditions. The value of equity securities purchased by the Fund could decline if the financial condition of the companies the Fund invests in decline or if overall market and economic conditions deteriorate. They may also decline due to factors that affect a particular industry or industries, such as labor shortages or increase in production costs and competitive conditions within an industry. In addition, they may decline due to general market conditions that are not specifically related to a company or industry, such as real or perceived adverse economic conditions, changes in the general outlook for corporate earnings, changes in interest or currency rates or generally adverse investor sentiment.
From time to time certain of the Funds may invest in shares of companies through initial public offerings (“IPOs”). IPOs have the potential to produce, and have in fact produced, substantial gains for certain Funds. There is no assurance that any Fund will have continued access to profitable IPOs and therefore investors should not rely on these past gains as an indication of future performance. The investment performance of a Fund during periods when it is unable to invest significantly or at all in IPOs may be lower than during periods when it is able to do so. In addition, as a Fund increases in size, the impact of IPOs on its performance will generally decrease. Securities issued in IPOs are subject to many of the same risks as investing in companies with smaller market capitalizations. Securities issued in IPOs have no trading history, and information about the companies may be available for very limited periods. In addition, the prices of securities sold in IPOs may be highly volatile or may decline shortly after the initial public offering.
The Funds may invest in companies that have relatively small market capitalizations. These organizations will normally have more limited product lines, markets and financial resources and will be dependent upon a more limited management group than larger capitalized companies. In addition, it is more difficult to get information on smaller companies, which tend to be less well known, have shorter operating histories, do not have significant ownership by large investors and are followed by relatively few securities analysts. The securities of smaller capitalized companies are often traded in the OTC markets and may have fewer market makers and wider price spreads. This may result in greater price movements and less ability to sell a Fund’s investment than if the Fund held the securities of larger, more established companies.
For a discussion of the types of equity securities in which your Fund may invest and the risks associated with investing in such equity securities, see your Fund’s Prospectus.
Real Estate-Related Securities. Although no Fund may invest directly in real estate, certain Funds may invest in equity securities of issuers that are principally engaged in the real estate industry. Such investments are subject to certain risks associated with the ownership of real estate and with the real estate industry in general. These risks include, among others: possible declines in the value of real estate; risks related to general and local economic conditions; possible lack of availability of mortgage funds or other limitations on access to capital; overbuilding; risks associated with leverage; market illiquidity; extended vacancies of properties; increase in competition, property taxes, capital expenditures and operating expenses; changes in zoning laws or other governmental regulation; costs resulting from the clean-up of, and liability to third parties for damages resulting from, environmental problems; tenant bankruptcies or other credit problems; casualty or condemnation losses; uninsured damages from floods, earthquakes or other natural disasters; limitations on and variations in rents, including decreases in market rates for rents; investment in developments that are not completed or that are subject to delays in completion; and changes in interest rates. To the extent that assets underlying a Fund’s investments are concentrated geographically, by property type or in certain other respects, the Fund may be subject to certain of the foregoing risks to a greater extent. Investments by a Fund in securities of companies providing mortgage servicing will be subject to the risks associated with refinancings and their impact on servicing rights.
In addition, if a Fund receives rental income or income from the disposition of real property acquired as a result of a default on securities the Fund owns, the receipt of such income may adversely affect the Fund’s ability to retain its tax status as a regulated investment company because of certain income source requirements applicable to regulated investment companies under the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended (the “Code”).
Securities of Smaller or Emerging Growth Companies. Investment in smaller or emerging growth companies involves greater risk than is customarily associated with investments in more established companies. The securities of smaller or emerging growth companies may be subject to more abrupt or erratic market movements than larger,
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more established companies or the market average in general. These companies may have limited product lines, markets or financial resources, or they may be dependent on a limited management group.
While smaller or emerging growth company issuers may offer greater opportunities for capital appreciation than large cap issuers, investments in smaller or emerging growth companies may involve greater risks and thus may be considered speculative. Fund management believes that properly selected companies of this type have the potential to increase their earnings or market valuation at a rate substantially in excess of the general growth of the economy. Full development of these companies and trends frequently takes time.
Small cap and emerging growth securities will often be traded only in the OTC market or on a regional securities exchange and may not be traded every day or in the volume typical of trading on a national securities exchange. As a result, the disposition by a Fund of portfolio securities to meet redemptions or otherwise may require the Fund to make many small sales over a lengthy period of time, or to sell these securities at a discount from market prices or during periods when, in Fund management’s judgment, such disposition is not desirable.
The process of selection and continuous supervision by Fund management does not, of course, guarantee successful investment results; however, it does provide access to an asset class not available to the average individual due to the time and cost involved. Careful initial selection is particularly important in this area as many new enterprises have promise but lack certain of the fundamental factors necessary to prosper. Investing in small cap and emerging growth companies requires specialized research and analysis. In addition, many investors cannot invest sufficient assets in such companies to provide wide diversification.
Small companies are generally little known to most individual investors although some may be dominant in their respective industries. Fund management believes that relatively small companies will continue to have the opportunity to develop into significant business enterprises. A Fund may invest in securities of small issuers in the relatively early stages of business development that have a new technology, a unique or proprietary product or service, or a favorable market position. Such companies may not be counted upon to develop into major industrial companies, but Fund management believes that eventual recognition of their special value characteristics by the investment community can provide above-average long-term growth to the portfolio.
Equity securities of specific small cap issuers may present different opportunities for long-term capital appreciation during varying portions of economic or securities market cycles, as well as during varying stages of their business development. The market valuation of small cap issuers tends to fluctuate during economic or market cycles, presenting attractive investment opportunities at various points during these cycles.
Smaller companies, due to the size and kinds of markets that they serve, may be less susceptible than large companies to intervention from the Federal government by means of price controls, regulations or litigation.
Exchange-Traded Notes (“ETNs”). Certain Funds may invest in ETNs. ETNs are generally notes representing debt of the issuer, usually a financial institution. ETNs combine both aspects of bonds and exchange-traded funds (“ETFs”). An ETN’s returns are based on the performance of one or more underlying assets, reference rates or indexes, minus fees and expenses. Similar to ETFs, ETNs are listed on an exchange and traded in the secondary market. However, unlike an ETF, an ETN can be held until the ETN’s maturity, at which time the issuer will pay a return linked to the performance of the specific asset, index or rate (“reference instrument”) to which the ETN is linked minus certain fees. Unlike regular bonds, ETNs do not make periodic interest payments, and principal is not protected.
The value of an ETN may be influenced by, among other things, time to maturity, level of supply and demand for the ETN, volatility and lack of liquidity in underlying markets, changes in the applicable interest rates, the performance of the reference instrument, changes in the issuer’s credit rating and economic, legal, political or geographic events that affect the reference instrument. An ETN that is tied to a reference instrument may not replicate the performance of the reference instrument. ETNs also incur certain expenses not incurred by their applicable reference instrument. Some ETNs that use leverage may, at times, be illiquid and may be difficult to purchase or sell at a fair price. Levered ETNs are subject to the same risk as other instruments that use leverage in any form. While leverage allows for greater potential return, the potential for loss is also greater. Finally, additional losses may be incurred if the investment loses value because, in addition to the money lost on the investment, the loan still needs to be repaid.
Because the return on the ETN is dependent on the issuer’s ability or willingness to meet its obligations, the value of the ETN may change due to a change in the issuer’s credit rating, despite no change in the underlying reference instrument. The market value of ETN shares may differ from the value of the reference instrument. This difference in price may be due to the fact that the supply and demand in the market for ETN shares at any point in
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time is not always identical to the supply and demand in the market for the assets underlying the reference instrument that the ETN seeks to track.
There may be restrictions on the Fund’s