ck0001572661-20230630
PRINCIPAL EXCHANGE-TRADED FUNDS
("PETF" or the "Trust")
The date of this Prospectus is November 1, 2023.
FUNDS OF THE TRUST
(each, a "Fund" and, together, the "Funds")
Fund
Ticker Symbol
Principal U.S. Listing Exchange
Principal Active High Yield ETF
YLD
NYSE Arca
Principal Focused Blue Chip ETF BCHP Cboe BZX
Principal Healthcare Innovators ETF
BTEC
Nasdaq
Principal Investment Grade Corporate Active ETF
IG
NYSE Arca
Principal Quality ETF
PSET
Nasdaq
Principal Real Estate Active Opportunities ETF BYRE NYSE Arca
Principal Spectrum Preferred Securities Active ETF
PREF
NYSE Arca
Principal Spectrum Tax-Advantaged Dividend Active ETF PQDI NYSE Arca
Principal U.S. Mega-Cap ETF
USMC
Nasdaq
Principal U.S. Small-Cap ETF (f/k/a Principal U.S. Small-Cap Multi-Factor ETF)
PSC
Nasdaq
Principal Value ETF
PY
Nasdaq
The Principal Focused Blue Chip ETF and the Principal Real Estate Active Opportunities ETF (each a "Non-Transparent ETF" and, together, the "Non-Transparent ETFs") are different from traditional ETFs.
Traditional ETFs tell the public what assets they hold each day. The Non-Transparent ETFs will not. This may create additional risks for your investment. For example:
You may have to pay more money to trade a Non-Transparent ETF's shares. The Non-Transparent ETFs will provide less information to traders, who tend to charge more for trades when they have less information.
The price you pay to buy ETF shares on an exchange may not match the value of the ETF's portfolio. The same is true when you sell shares. These price differences may be greater for the Non-Transparent ETFs compared to other ETFs because it provides less information to traders.
These additional risks may be even greater in bad or uncertain market conditions.
The Non-Transparent ETFs will publish on their website each day a "Tracking Basket" designed to help trading in shares of the Non-Transparent ETFs. While the Tracking Basket includes some of each Non-Transparent ETF's holdings, it is not the Non-Transparent ETF's actual portfolio.
The differences between the Non-Transparent ETFs and other ETFs may also have advantages. By keeping certain information about the Non-Transparent ETFs secret, the Non-Transparent ETFs may face less risk that other traders can predict or copy its investment strategy. This may improve the Non-Transparent ETF’s performance. If other traders are able to copy or predict the Non-Transparent ETF's investment strategy, however, this may hurt the Non-Transparent ETF's performance.
For additional information regarding the unique attributes and risks of the Non-Transparent ETFs, see the "Principal Risks" section (in the "Fund Summary" section) for the Non-Transparent ETFs, the "Additional Information about Investment Strategies and Risks" section for the Non-Transparent ETFs, and the "Additional Fund-Specific Information" section for the Non-Transparent ETFs below.
The Securities and Exchange Commission has not approved or disapproved these securities or passed upon the adequacy of this Prospectus. Any representation to the contrary is a criminal offense.



TABLE OF CONTENTS
FUND SUMMARIES
PRINCIPAL ACTIVE HIGH YIELD ETF
PRINCIPAL FOCUSED BLUE CHIP ETF
PRINCIPAL HEALTHCARE INNOVATORS ETF
PRINCIPAL INVESTMENT GRADE CORPORATE ACTIVE ETF
PRINCIPAL QUALITY ETF
PRINCIPAL REAL ESTATE ACTIVE OPPORTUNITIES ETF
PRINCIPAL SPECTRUM PREFERRED SECURITIES ACTIVE ETF
PRINCIPAL SPECTRUM TAX-ADVANTAGED DIVIDEND ACTIVE ETF
PRINCIPAL U.S. MEGA-CAP ETF
PRINCIPAL U.S. SMALL-CAP ETF
PRINCIPAL VALUE ETF
ADDITIONAL INFORMATION ABOUT INVESTMENT STRATEGIES AND RISKS
PORTFOLIO HOLDINGS INFORMATION
MANAGEMENT OF THE FUNDS
DISTRIBUTOR AND OTHER FUND SERVICE PROVIDERS
PRICING OF FUND SHARES
PURCHASE AND SALE OF FUND SHARES
DIVIDENDS AND DISTRIBUTIONS
FREQUENT PURCHASES AND REDEMPTIONS
TAX CONSIDERATIONS
DISTRIBUTION PLANS AND INTERMEDIARY COMPENSATION
FUND ACCOUNT INFORMATION
ADDITIONAL FUND-SPECIFIC INFORMATION
APPENDIX A - DESCRIPTION OF BOND RATINGS
A-1
APPENDIX B - FINANCIAL HIGHLIGHTS
B-1
ADDITIONAL INFORMATION
C


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PRINCIPAL ACTIVE HIGH YIELD ETF
Objective:    The Fund seeks to provide a high level of current income.
Fees and Expenses of the Fund
This table describes the fees and expenses that you may pay if you buy, hold, and sell shares of the Fund ("Shares"). You may pay other fees, such as brokerage commissions and other fees to financial intermediaries, which are not reflected in the table or the example below.
Annual Fund Operating Expenses
(expenses that you pay each year as a percentage of the value of your investment)
Management Fees 0.39%
Other Expenses
%
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses (1)
0.39%
(1)    The investment management agreement (the “Management Agreement”) between the Fund and Principal Global Investors, LLC (“PGI”) provides that, for the duration of the Management Agreement, PGI will pay all operating expenses of the Fund, except for the management fee, payments made under the Fund's Rule 12b-1 plan (if or when such fees are imposed), brokerage commissions and other expenses connected to the execution of portfolio transactions, interest expense, taxes, acquired fund fees and expenses, litigation expenses, and other extraordinary expenses.
Example
This Example is intended to help you compare the cost of investing in the Fund with the cost of investing in other funds. The Example assumes that you invest $10,000 in the Fund for the time periods indicated and then redeem all of your shares at the ends of those periods. The Example also assumes that your investment has a 5% return each year and that the Fund’s operating expenses remain the same. Although your actual costs may be higher or lower, based on these assumptions your costs would be:
1 year
3 years
5 years
10 years
Principal Active High Yield ETF $40 $125 $219 $493
Portfolio Turnover
The Fund pays transaction costs, such as commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or "turns over" its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover rate may indicate higher transaction costs and may result in higher taxes when Fund shares are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are not reflected in annual fund operating expenses or in the example, affect the Fund’s performance. During the most recent fiscal year, the Fund's portfolio turnover rate was 34.5% of the average value of its portfolio.
Principal Investment Strategies
The Fund is an actively managed exchange-traded fund ("ETF") that seeks to achieve its investment objective by investing, under normal circumstances, at least 80% of its net assets, plus any borrowings for investment purposes, in below-investment-grade (commonly known as "junk" or "high yield") fixed-income securities, such as bonds and bank loans. "Below investment grade" securities are rated Ba1 or lower by Moody’s Investors Service, Inc. and BB+ or lower by S&P Global Ratings. If securities are rated differently by the rating agencies, the highest rating is used. If the security has been rated by only one of those agencies, that rating will determine whether the security is below investment grade. If the security has not been rated by either of those agencies, those selecting such investments will determine whether the security is of a quality comparable to those rated below investment grade. To select investments for the Fund, the Advisor incorporates top-down perspective (using macroeconomic and risk perspective while reviewing sectors based on their fundamental, technical, and valuations factors) followed by bottom-up perspective (using fundamental credit analysis).
The Fund invests in U.S. treasury securities, investment grade bank loans (also known as senior floating rate interests), and preferred securities. The Fund's investments include securities of foreign issuers, including those located in developing or emerging markets. Under normal circumstances, the Fund maintains an average portfolio duration that is within ±25% of the duration of the Bloomberg U.S. Corporate High Yield 2% Issuer Capped Index, which as of September 30, 2023 was 3.69 years. The Fund is not managed to a particular maturity.
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The Fund invests in derivatives, including currency swaps and credit default swaps, for hedging purposes and to manage fixed-income exposure in an effort to increase or decrease, in an efficient manner, exposures to certain sectors or individual issuers. A derivative is a financial arrangement, the value of which is derived from, or based on, a traditional security, asset, or market index.
Principal Risks
The value of your investment in the Fund changes with the value of the Fund’s investments. Many factors affect that value, and it is possible to lose money by investing in the Fund. An investment in the Fund is not a deposit of a bank and is not insured or guaranteed by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation or any other government agency. The principal risks of investing in the Fund are listed below in alphabetical order and not in order of significance.
Active Management Risk. There is no guarantee that the investment techniques, analyses, or judgments that the Fund’s investment advisor and/or sub-advisor applies in making investment decisions for the Fund will produce the intended outcome or that the investments the advisor selects for the Fund will perform as well as other securities that were not selected for the Fund. The Fund may not achieve its investment objective, and it is not intended to be a complete investment program.
Bank Loans Risk. Changes in economic conditions are likely to cause issuers of bank loans (also known as senior floating rate interests) to be unable to meet their obligations. In addition, the value of the collateral securing the loan (if any) may decline, causing a loan to be substantially unsecured. Underlying credit agreements governing the bank loans, reliance on market makers, priority of repayment, and overall market volatility may harm the liquidity of loans.
Counterparty Risk. Counterparty risk is the risk that the counterparty to a contract or other obligation will be unable or unwilling to honor its obligations.
Derivatives Risk. Derivatives may not move in the direction anticipated by the portfolio manager. Transactions in derivatives may increase volatility, cause the liquidation of portfolio positions when not advantageous to do so, and result in disproportionate losses that may be substantially greater than a fund’s initial investment.
Credit Default Swaps. Credit default swaps involve special risks in addition to those associated with swaps generally because they are difficult to value, are highly susceptible to liquidity and credit risk, and generally pay a return to the party that has paid the premium only in the event of an actual default by the issuer of the underlying obligation (as opposed to a credit downgrade or other indication of financial difficulty). The protection “buyer” in a credit default contract may be obligated to pay the protection “seller” an up-front payment or a periodic stream of payments over the term of the contract, provided, generally, that no credit event on a reference obligation has occurred. If a credit event occurs, the seller generally must pay the buyer the “par value” (i.e., full notional value) of the swap in exchange for an equal face amount of deliverable obligations of the reference entity described in the swap, or the seller may be required to deliver the related net cash amount, if the swap is cash settled. The Fund may be either the buyer or seller in the transaction.
Currency Contracts. Derivatives related to currency contracts involve the specific risk of government action through exchange controls that would restrict the ability of the fund to deliver or receive currency.
Swaps. Swaps involve specific risks, including: the imperfect correlation between the change in market value of the instruments held by the Fund and the price of the swap; possible lack of a liquid secondary market for a swap and the resulting inability to close a swap when desired; counterparty risk; and if the Fund has insufficient cash, it may have to sell securities from its portfolio to meet daily variation margin requirements.
Emerging Markets Risk. Investments in emerging markets may have more risk than those in developed markets because the emerging markets are less developed and more illiquid. Emerging markets can also be subject to increased social, economic, regulatory, and political uncertainties and can be extremely volatile. The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission, the U.S. Department of Justice, and other U.S. authorities may be limited in their ability to pursue bad actors in emerging markets, including with respect to fraud.
Fixed-Income Securities Risk. Fixed-income securities are subject to interest rate, credit quality, and liquidity risks. The market value of fixed-income securities generally declines when interest rates rise, and increased interest rates may adversely affect the liquidity of certain fixed-income securities. Moreover, an issuer of fixed-income securities could default on its payment obligations due to increased interest rates or for other reasons.
Foreign Currency Risk. Risks of investing in securities denominated in, or that trade in, foreign (non-U.S.) currencies include changes in foreign exchange rates and foreign exchange restrictions.
Foreign Securities Risk. The risks of foreign securities include loss of value as a result of: political or economic instability; nationalization, expropriation, or confiscatory taxation; settlement delays; and limited government regulation (including less stringent reporting, accounting, and disclosure standards than are required of U.S. companies).
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Hedging Risk. A fund that implements a hedging strategy using derivatives and/or securities could expose the fund to the risk that can arise when a change in the value of a hedge does not match a change in the value of the asset it hedges. In other words, the change in value of the hedge could move in a direction that does not match the change in value of the underlying asset, resulting in a risk of loss to the fund.
High Yield Securities Risk. High yield fixed-income securities (commonly referred to as “junk bonds”) are subject to greater credit quality risk than higher rated fixed-income securities and should be considered speculative.
Market Trading Risks. The Fund faces numerous market trading risks, including the potential lack of an active market for Fund shares, losses from trading in secondary markets, and disruption to the activities of market makers, authorized participants, or other participants and in the creation/redemption process of the Fund. ANY OF THESE FACTORS MAY LEAD TO THE FUND’S SHARES TRADING AT A PREMIUM OR DISCOUNT TO NAV.
Portfolio Duration Risk. Portfolio duration is a measure of the expected life of a fixed-income security and its sensitivity to changes in interest rates. The longer a fund’s average portfolio duration, the more sensitive the fund will be to changes in interest rates, which means funds with longer average portfolio durations may be more volatile than those with shorter durations.
Preferred Securities Risk. Because preferred securities have a lower priority claim on assets or earnings than senior bonds and other debt instruments in a company’s capital structure, they are subject to greater credit and liquidation risk than more senior debt instruments. In addition, preferred securities are subject to other risks, such as limited or no voting rights, deferring or skipping distributions, interest rate risk, and redeeming the security prior to any stated maturity date.
Redemption and Large Transaction Risk. Ownership of the Fund’s shares may be concentrated in one or a few large investors (such as funds of funds, institutional investors, and asset allocation programs) that may sell or purchase Fund shares in large quantities on the secondary market. These secondary market transactions may cause authorized participants to increase their purchases and redemptions of creation units from the Fund. Purchases and redemptions of creation units primarily with cash rather than through in-kind delivery of portfolio securities may cause the Fund to incur certain costs, such as brokerage costs or taxable gains or losses that it might not have incurred if it had made a redemption in kind. These costs could be imposed on the Fund and thus decrease its NAV to the extent that the costs are not offset by a transaction fee payable by an authorized participant.
U.S. Government Securities Risk. Yields available from U.S. government securities are generally lower than yields from many other fixed-income securities.
Performance
The following information provides some indication of the risks of investing in the Fund. Past performance (before and after taxes) is not necessarily an indication of how the Fund will perform in the future. You may get updated performance information at www.PrincipalAM.com.
The bar chart shows the investment returns of the Fund's shares for each full calendar year of operations for 10 years (or, if shorter, the life of the Fund). The table shows for the last one, five, and ten calendar year periods (or, if shorter, the life of the Fund), how the Fund's average annual total returns compare with those of one or more broad measures of market performance.
Life of Fund returns are measured from the date the Fund's shares were first sold (July 8, 2015).
Prior to September 1, 2021, the Fund was known as the Principal Active Income ETF, and the objective and strategy of the Fund differed from its current objective and strategy. Accordingly, performance of the Fund for periods prior to September 1, 2021 may not be representative of the performance the Fund would have achieved had the Fund been following its current objective and strategy.
5


Total Returns as of December 31 (1)
9345848902713
Highest return for a quarter during the period of the bar chart above:
2Q 2020 12.56%
Lowest return for a quarter during the period of the bar chart above:
1Q 2020 (19.62)%
(1) The year-to-date return as of September 30, 2023 is 5.85%.
Average Annual Total Returns (Based on NAV)
For the periods ended December 31, 2022 (1)
1 Year
5 Year
Life of Fund
Return Before Taxes (8.57)% 2.26% 3.69%
Return After Taxes on Distributions (10.85)% 0.27% 1.63%
Return After Taxes on Distributions and Sale of Fund Shares (5.04)% 0.97% 2.01%
Bloomberg U.S. Aggregate Bond Index (reflects no deductions for fees, expenses, or taxes)
(13.01)% 0.02% 0.85%
Bloomberg U.S. Corporate High Yield 2% Issuer Capped Index (reflects no deductions for fees, expenses, or taxes) (11.18)% 2.30% 3.75%
(1) Prior to September 1, 2021, the Fund was known as the Principal Active Income ETF, and the objective and strategy of the Fund differed from its current objective and strategy. Accordingly, performance of the Fund for periods prior to September 1, 2021 may not be representative of the performance the Fund would have achieved had the Fund been following its current objective and strategy.
After-tax returns are calculated using the historical highest individual federal marginal income tax rates and do not reflect the impact of state and local taxes. Actual after-tax returns depend on an investor's tax situation and may differ from those shown. The after-tax returns shown are not relevant to investors who hold their Fund shares through tax-deferred arrangements, such as 401(k) plans or individual retirement accounts.
Effective November 1, 2023, the Fund changed its primary broad-based index to the Bloomberg U.S. Aggregate Bond Index in order to meet the revised definition of “broad-based securities market index.” The Bloomberg U.S. Corporate High Yield 2% Issuer Capped Index is included as an additional index for the Fund as it shows how the Fund’s performance compares with the returns of an index of funds with similar investment objectives.
Investment Advisor and Portfolio Managers
Principal Global Investors, LLC
Mark P. Denkinger (since 2021), Portfolio Manager
Joshua Rank (since 2021), Portfolio Manager
Darrin E. Smith (since 2021), Portfolio Manager
Purchase and Sale of Fund Shares
The Fund issues and redeems Shares at net asset value ("NAV") only with authorized participants ("APs") who have entered into agreements with the Fund's distributor and only in blocks of 50,000 Shares (each block of Shares is called a "Creation Unit"), or multiples thereof ("Creation Unit Aggregations"), in exchange for the deposit or delivery of a basket of securities that the Fund specifies each day. Except when aggregated in Creation Units, the Shares are not redeemable securities of the Fund. Typically, the basket of assets will be made up of securities, but may include a cash component. (See "Purchase and Redemption of Creation Units" in the Statement of Additional Information for more information.)
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Shares of the Fund are listed for trading on NYSE Arca, Inc. Individual Shares may only be bought and sold in the secondary market through a broker or dealer at a market price. Because Shares trade at market prices rather than NAV, Shares may trade at prices greater than NAV (at a premium), at NAV, or less than NAV (at a discount). An investor may incur costs attributable to the difference between the highest price a buyer is willing to pay to purchase Shares (bid) and the lowest price a seller is willing to accept for Shares (ask) when buying or selling Shares on the secondary market (the bid-ask spread).
You can access recent information, including information on the Fund's net asset value, market price, premiums and discounts, and bid-ask spreads at www.PrincipalAM.com.
Tax Information
The Fund's distributions you receive are generally subject to federal income tax as ordinary income or capital gain and may also be subject to state and local taxes, unless you are tax-exempt or your account is tax-deferred in which case your distributions would be taxed when withdrawn from the tax-deferred account.
Payments to Broker-Dealers and Other Financial Intermediaries
If you purchase the Fund through a broker-dealer or other financial intermediary, the Fund and its related companies may pay the intermediary for the sale of Fund shares and related services. These payments may create a conflict of interest by influencing the broker-dealer or other intermediary and your salesperson to recommend the Fund over another investment. Ask your salesperson or visit your financial intermediary's website for more information.

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PRINCIPAL FOCUSED BLUE CHIP ETF
Objective:     The Fund seeks long-term growth of capital.
Fees and Expenses of the Fund
This table describes the fees and expenses that you may pay if you buy, hold, and sell shares of the Fund ("Shares"). You may pay other fees, such as brokerage commissions and other fees to financial intermediaries, which are not reflected in the table or the example below.
Annual Fund Operating Expenses
(expenses that you pay each year as a percentage of the value of your investment)
Management Fees
0.58%
Other Expenses
%
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses (1)
0.58%
(1)    The investment management agreement (the “Management Agreement”) between the Fund and Principal Global Investors, LLC (“PGI”) provides that, for the duration of the Management Agreement, PGI will pay all operating expenses of the Fund, except the management fee, payments made under the Fund's Rule 12b-1 plan (if or when such fees are imposed), brokerage commissions and other expenses connected to the execution of portfolio transactions, interest expense, taxes, acquired fund fees and expenses, litigation expenses, and other extraordinary expenses.
Example
This Example is intended to help you compare the cost of investing in the Fund with the cost of investing in other funds. The Example assumes that you invest $10,000 in the Fund for the time periods indicated and then redeem all of your shares at the ends of those periods. The Example also assumes that your investment has a 5% return each year and that the Fund’s operating expenses remain the same. Although your actual costs may be higher or lower, based on these assumptions your costs would be:
1 year 3 years
Principal Focused Blue Chip ETF $59 $186
Portfolio Turnover
The Fund pays transaction costs, such as commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or "turns over" its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover rate may indicate higher transaction costs and may result in higher taxes when Fund shares are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are not reflected in annual fund operating expenses or in the example, affect the Fund’s performance. This is a new fund and does not have a portfolio turnover rate to disclose.
Principal Investment Strategies
Under normal circumstances, the Fund invests at least 80% of its net assets, plus any borrowings for investment purposes, in equity securities of companies with large market capitalizations at the time of purchase that, in the opinion of Principal Global Investors, LLC (“PGI”), the Fund’s investment advisor, display characteristics of a “blue chip” company. For this Fund, companies with large market capitalizations are those with market capitalizations similar to companies in the Russell 1000® Growth Index (as of September 30, 2023, this was between approximately $1.3 billion and $2.7 trillion). Blue chip companies are firms that, in PGI’s view, are well established in their industries and have the potential for growth of capital and an expectation for above-average earnings. In selecting securities for the Fund’s portfolio, PGI uses a bottom-up, fundamental process, focusing on, among other things, competitive position, company management and culture, free cash flow, and risk. The Fund invests in securities of foreign companies. The Fund also invests in the securities of companies that are in the financials and information technology sectors.
The Fund is considered non-diversified, which means it can invest a higher percentage of assets in securities of individual issuers than a diversified fund. As a result, changes in the value of a single investment could cause greater fluctuations in the Fund’s share price than would occur in a more diversified fund. The Fund's portfolio is expected to have a limited number of holdings (e.g., ranging from as few as twenty to as many as thirty holdings).
The Fund is an actively managed non-transparent ETF that operates pursuant to an exemptive order from the Securities and Exchange Commission (Non-Transparent Order) and does not publicly disclose its complete portfolio holdings each business day. Instead, the Fund publishes each business day on its website a “Tracking Basket,” which is designed to closely track the daily performance of the Fund but is not the Fund’s actual portfolio. The Tracking Basket is comprised of: (1) select recently disclosed portfolio holdings (Strategy Components); (2) liquid ETFs that convey information about the types of instruments (that are not otherwise fully represented by the Strategy Components) in which the Fund invests (Representative ETFs); and (3) cash and cash equivalents. For additional information regarding the Tracking Basket, see “Additional Fund Specific Information – Tracking basket structure” in the Prospectus.
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The Fund also publishes each business day on its website the "Tracking Basket Weight Overlap," which is the percentage weight overlap between the holdings of the prior business day’s Tracking Basket compared to the holdings of the Fund that formed the basis for the Fund’s calculation of net asset value per share (NAV) at the end of the prior business day. The Tracking Basket Weight Overlap is designed to provide investors with an understanding of how similar the Tracking Basket is to the Fund’s actual portfolio in percentage terms.
Note:    "Russell 1000 Growth Index" is a trademark of FTSE Russell Company and has been licensed by Principal. The Fund is not sponsored, endorsed, sold, or promoted by FTSE Russell Company, and FTSE Russell Company makes no representation regarding the advisability of investing in the Fund.
Principal Risks
The value of your investment in the Fund changes with the value of the Fund's investments. Many factors affect that value, and it is possible to lose money by investing in the Fund. An investment in the Fund is not a deposit of a bank and is not insured or guaranteed by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation or any other government agency. The principal risks of investing in the Fund are listed below in alphabetical order and not in order of significance.
Active Management Risk. There is no guarantee that the investment techniques, analyses, or judgments that the Fund’s investment advisor and/or sub-advisor applies in making investment decisions for the Fund will produce the intended outcome or that the investments the advisor selects for the Fund will perform as well as other securities that were not selected for the Fund. The Fund may not achieve its investment objective, and it is not intended to be a complete investment program.
Arbitrage Risk. Unlike ETFs that publicly disclose their complete portfolio holdings each business day, the Fund provides certain other information (the Tracking Basket) intended to allow market participants to estimate the value of positions in Fund shares. Although this information is designed to facilitate arbitrage opportunities in Fund shares to reduce bid-ask spread and minimize discounts or premiums between the market price and NAV of Fund shares, there is no guarantee the Fund’s arbitrage mechanism will operate as intended and that the Fund will not experience wide bid-ask spreads and/or large discounts or premiums to NAV. Further, the effectiveness of the Tracking Basket as an arbitrage mechanism is contingent upon, among other things, the Tracking Basket performing in a manner substantially identical to the performance of the Fund’s actual portfolio. The Fund’s investment advisor may not always be successful in creating a Tracking Basket that performs in a manner substantially identical to the performance of the Fund’s actual portfolio. In addition, market participants may attempt to use the disclosed information to "reverse engineer" the Fund’s trading strategy, which, if successful, could increase opportunities for predatory trading practices that may have the potential to negatively impact the Fund’s performance.
Equity Securities Risk. A variety of factors can negatively impact the value of equity securities held by a fund, including a decline in the issuer’s financial condition, unfavorable performance of the issuer’s sector or industry, or changes in response to overall market and economic conditions. A fund’s principal market segment(s) (such as market capitalization or style) may underperform other market segments or the equity markets as a whole.
Growth Style Risk. Growth investing entails the risk that if growth companies do not increase their earnings at a rate expected by investors, the market price of their stock may decline significantly, even if earnings show an absolute increase. Growth company stocks also typically lack the dividend yield that can lessen price declines in market downturns.
Financials Sector Risk. A fund that invests significantly in financial services companies may be more susceptible to adverse economic or regulatory occurrences affecting financial services companies. Financial companies may be adversely affected in certain market cycles, including periods of rising interest rates, which may restrict the availability and increase the cost of capital, and declining economic conditions, which may cause credit losses due to financial difficulties of borrowers. Because many types of financial companies are especially vulnerable to these economic cycles, the Fund’s investments in these companies may lose significant value during such periods.
Foreign Securities Risk. The risks of foreign securities include loss of value as a result of: political or economic instability; nationalization, expropriation, or confiscatory taxation; settlement delays; and limited government regulation (including less stringent reporting, accounting, and disclosure standards than are required of U.S. companies).
Information Technology Sector Risk. Companies in the information technology sector may face dramatic and often unpredictable changes in growth rates and are particularly vulnerable to changes in technology product cycles, product obsolescence, government regulation, and competition, both domestically and internationally. Such companies are heavily dependent on patent and intellectual property rights, the loss or impairment of which may adversely affect profitability.

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Market Trading Risks. The Fund faces numerous market trading risks, including the potential lack of an active market for Fund shares, losses from trading in secondary markets, and disruption to the activities of market makers, authorized participants, or other participants and in the creation/redemption process of the Fund. ANY OF THESE FACTORS MAY LEAD TO THE FUND’S SHARES TRADING AT A PREMIUM OR DISCOUNT TO NAV.
These market trading risks may be more pronounced for the Fund versus an ETF that makes its daily holdings public, particularly during periods of market disruption or volatility. As a result, it may cost investors more to trade Fund shares than shares of other ETFs.
Non-Diversification Risk.A non-diversified fund may invest a high percentage of its assets in the securities of a small number of issuers and is more likely than diversified funds to be significantly affected by a specific security’s poor performance.
Redemption and Large Transaction Risk. Ownership of the Fund’s shares may be concentrated in one or a few large investors (such as funds of funds, institutional investors, and asset allocation programs) that may sell or purchase Fund shares in large quantities on the secondary market. These secondary market transactions may cause authorized participants to increase their purchases and redemptions of creation units from the Fund. Purchases and redemptions of creation units primarily with cash rather than through in-kind delivery of portfolio securities may cause the Fund to incur certain costs, such as brokerage costs or taxable gains or losses that it might not have incurred if it had made a redemption in kind. These costs could be imposed on the Fund and thus decrease its NAV to the extent that the costs are not offset by a transaction fee payable by an authorized participant.
Tracking Basket Structure Risk. The Fund's Tracking Basket structure may affect the price at which shares of the Fund trade in the secondary market. Although the Tracking Basket is intended to provide investors with enough information to allow for an effective arbitrage mechanism that will keep the market price of the Fund at or close to the Fund’s NAV, there is a risk that market prices will vary significantly from NAV. ETFs trading on the basis of a published Tracking Basket may trade at a wider bid-ask spread than ETFs that publish their portfolios on a daily basis and, therefore, may cost investors more to trade. These risks may increase during periods of market disruption or volatility. At certain thresholds for such premiums/discounts, bid/ask spreads and tracking error, the Fund’s Board will consider possible remedial measures, which may include liquidation or conversion to a fully transparent, active ETF or a mutual fund. In addition, although the Fund seeks to benefit from keeping its portfolio information secret, market participants may attempt to use the Tracking Basket to identify the Fund’s trading strategy. If successful, this could result in such market participants engaging in certain predatory trading practices that may have the potential to harm the Fund and its shareholders, such as front running the Fund’s trades of portfolio securities.
Trading Halt Risk. There may be circumstances where a security held in the Fund's portfolio but not in the Tracking Basket does not have readily available market quotations. If PGI determines that such circumstance may affect the reliability of the Tracking Basket as an arbitrage vehicle, that information, along with the identity and weighting of that security in the Fund's portfolio, will be publicly disclosed on the Fund's website, and PGI will assess appropriate remedial measures. In these circumstances, market participants may use this information to engage in certain predatory trading practices that may have the potential to harm the Fund and its shareholders. In addition, if securities representing 10% or more of the Fund's portfolio do not have readily available market quotations, PGI would promptly request the exchange to halt trading on the Fund, meaning that investors would not be able to trade their shares. Trading may also be halted in other circumstances, for example, due to market conditions.
Performance
No performance information is shown because the Fund has not yet had a calendar year of performance. The Fund's performance will be benchmarked against the Russell 1000 Index and the Russell 1000 Growth Index. The Russell 1000 Index is the Fund's primary broad-based index and is included to meet the revised definition of "broad-based securities market index." The Russell 1000 Growth Index is included as an additional index for the Fund as it shows how the Fund’s performance compares with the returns of an index of funds with similar investment objectives.
Performance information provides an indication of the risks of investing in the Fund. Past performance (before and after taxes) is not necessarily an indication of how the Fund will perform in the future. You may get updated performance information at www.PrincipalAM.com.
Investment Advisor and Portfolio Managers
Principal Global Investors, LLC
K. William Nolin (since 2023), Portfolio Manager
Tom Rozycki (since 2023), Portfolio Manager
10


Purchase and Sale of Fund Shares
The Fund issues and redeems Shares at net asset value ("NAV") only with authorized participants ("APs") who have entered into agreements with the Fund’s distributor and only in blocks of 20,000 Shares (each block of Shares is called a "Creation Unit"), or multiples thereof ("Creation Unit Aggregations"), in exchange for the deposit or delivery of a basket of securities that the Fund specifies each day. Except when aggregated in Creation Units, the Shares are not redeemable securities of the Fund. Typically, the basket of assets will be made up of securities but may include a cash component. (See "Purchase and Redemption of Creation Units" in the Statement of Additional Information for more information.)
Shares of the Fund are listed for trading on Cboe BZX Exchange, Inc. Individual Shares may only be bought and sold in the secondary market through a broker or dealer at a market price. Because Shares trade at market prices rather than NAV, Shares may trade at prices greater than NAV (at a premium), at NAV, or less than NAV (at a discount). An investor may incur costs attributable to the difference between the highest price a buyer is willing to pay to purchase Shares (bid) and the lowest price a seller is willing to accept for Shares (ask) when buying or selling Shares on the secondary market (the bid-ask spread).
You can access recent information, including information on the Fund's net asset value, market price, premiums and discounts, and bid-ask spreads at www.PrincipalAM.com.
Tax Information
The Fund’s distributions you receive are generally subject to federal income tax as ordinary income or capital gain and may also be subject to state and local taxes, unless you are tax-exempt or your account is tax-deferred in which case your distributions would be taxed when withdrawn from the tax-deferred account.
Payments to Broker-Dealers and Other Financial Intermediaries
If you purchase the Fund through a broker-dealer or other financial intermediary, the Fund and its related companies may pay the intermediary for the sale of Fund shares and related services. These payments may create a conflict of interest by influencing the broker-dealer or other intermediary and your salesperson to recommend the Fund over another investment. Ask your salesperson or visit your financial intermediary's website for more information.

11


PRINCIPAL HEALTHCARE INNOVATORS ETF
Objective:     The Fund seeks long-term growth of capital.
Fees and Expenses of the Fund
This table describes the fees and expenses that you may pay if you buy, hold, and sell shares of the Fund ("Shares"). You may pay other fees, such as brokerage commissions and other fees to financial intermediaries, which are not reflected in the table or the example below.
Annual Fund Operating Expenses
(expenses that you pay each year as a percentage of the value of your investment)
Management Fees
0.42%
Other Expenses
%
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses (1)
0.42%
(1)     The investment management agreement (the “Management Agreement”) between the Fund and Principal Global Investors, LLC (“PGI”) provides that, for the duration of the Management Agreement, PGI will pay all operating expenses of the Fund, except for the management fee, payments made under the Fund's Rule 12b-1 plan (if or when such fees are imposed), brokerage commissions and other expenses connected to the execution of portfolio transactions, interest expense, taxes, acquired fund fees and expenses, litigation expenses, and other extraordinary expenses.
Example
This Example is intended to help you compare the cost of investing in the Fund with the cost of investing in other funds. The Example assumes that you invest $10,000 in the Fund for the time periods indicated and then redeem all of your shares at the ends of those periods. The Example also assumes that your investment has a 5% return each year and that the Fund’s operating expenses remain the same. Although your actual costs may be higher or lower, based on these assumptions your costs would be:
1 year 3 years 5 years 10 years
Principal Healthcare Innovators ETF $43 $135 $235 $530
Portfolio Turnover
The Fund pays transaction costs, such as commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or "turns over" its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover rate may indicate higher transaction costs and may result in higher taxes when Fund shares are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are not reflected in annual fund operating expenses or in the example, affect the Fund’s performance. During the most recent fiscal year, the Fund's portfolio turnover rate was 56.6% of the average value of its portfolio.
Principal Investment Strategies
Under normal circumstances, the Fund invests at least 80% of its net assets, plus any borrowings for investment purposes, in equity securities of companies in the healthcare sector. For this Fund, healthcare companies are those classified as Health Care according to Global Industry Classification Standard. For security selection and portfolio construction, Principal Global Investors, LLC ("PGI") uses a proprietary quantitative model designed to identify equity securities (emphasizing growth stock) of small and medium capitalization in the Russell 3000 Healthcare Index, while seeking to exclude the least liquid securities, meaning the securities that would be the hardest to trade without significantly impacting their value based on recent average daily trading volumes. As of September 30, 2023, the market capitalization range of the companies in the Russell 3000 Healthcare Index was between approximately $451.3 million and $509.9 billion. The Fund invests significantly in early-stage companies within the healthcare equipment and supplies, pharmaceuticals, biotechnology, and life sciences industries that are not yet consistently profitable. Examples include companies developing products and services in such industries and companies in the pre-marketing stage seeking regulatory approvals.
The Fund's holdings are expected to be rebalanced at least annually. However, PGI may make any adjustments to the model and Fund holdings at its discretion. In constructing and revising the model and managing the Fund's investments, PGI uses insights from diverse sources, including internal investment research, industry reports, and data from third-party consultants and other service providers, to develop and refine its investment themes and identify and take advantage of trends that may impact the Fund and its holdings.
The Fund will concentrate its investments (invest more than 25% of its assets) in one or more industries within the healthcare sector.
Note:    "Russell 3000 Healthcare Index" is a trademark of FTSE Russell Company and has been licensed by Principal. The Fund is not sponsored, endorsed, sold, or promoted by FTSE Russell Company, and FTSE Russell Company makes no representation regarding the advisability of investing in the Fund.
12


Principal Risks
The value of your investment in the Fund changes with the value of the Fund’s investments. Many factors affect that value, and it is possible to lose money by investing in the Fund. An investment in the Fund is not a deposit of a bank and is not insured or guaranteed by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation or any other government agency. The principal risks of investing in the Fund are listed below in alphabetical order and not in order of significance.
Active Management Risk. There is no guarantee that the investment techniques, analyses, or judgments that the Fund’s investment advisor and/or sub-advisor applies in making investment decisions for the Fund will produce the intended outcome or that the investments the advisor selects for the Fund will perform as well as other securities that were not selected for the Fund. The Fund may not achieve its investment objective, and it is not intended to be a complete investment program.
Equity Securities Risk. A variety of factors can negatively impact the value of equity securities held by a fund, including a decline in the issuer’s financial condition, unfavorable performance of the issuer’s sector or industry, or changes in response to overall market and economic conditions. A fund’s principal market segment(s) (such as market capitalization or style) may underperform other market segments or the equity markets as a whole.
Growth Style Risk. Growth investing entails the risk that if growth companies do not increase their earnings at a rate expected by investors, the market price of their stock may decline significantly, even if earnings show an absolute increase. Growth company stocks also typically lack the dividend yield that can lessen price declines in market downturns.
Smaller Companies Risk. Investments in smaller companies may involve greater risk and price volatility than investments in larger, more mature companies. Smaller companies may have limited product lines, markets, or financial resources; lack the competitive strength of larger companies; have less experienced managers; or depend on a few key employees. Their securities often are less widely held and trade less frequently and in lesser quantities, and their market prices often fluctuate more, than securities of larger companies.
Industry Concentration Risk. A fund that concentrates investments in a particular industry or group of industries has greater exposure than other funds to market, economic, and other factors affecting that industry or group of industries.
Healthcare Sector Risk. The Fund invests 25% or more of its assets in one or more industries within the healthcare sector. A fund that invests in securities of companies in the healthcare sector (which includes companies involved in several industries, including biotechnology research and production, drugs and pharmaceuticals, and health care equipment and services) is subject to the direct risks of investing in such companies. These companies are subject to extensive competition (due to, among others, generic drug sales or the loss of patent protection), product liability litigation, and increased government regulation. Research and development costs of bringing new drugs to market are substantial, and there is no guarantee that a proposed product will ever come to market. Such companies are heavily dependent on patent and intellectual property rights, the loss or impairment of which may adversely affect profitability. Healthcare facility operators may be affected by the demand for services, efforts by government or insurers to limit rates, restriction of government financial assistance, and competition from other providers.
Market Trading Risks. The Fund faces numerous market trading risks, including the potential lack of an active market for Fund shares, losses from trading in secondary markets, and disruption to the activities of market makers, authorized participants, or other participants and in the creation/redemption process of the Fund. ANY OF THESE FACTORS MAY LEAD TO THE FUND’S SHARES TRADING AT A PREMIUM OR DISCOUNT TO NAV.
Model Risk. Because PGI uses quantitative models to select and hold securities, the Fund may hold securities that present risks that an investment advisor researching individual securities might seek to avoid. Moreover, models may be predictive in nature and depend heavily on the accuracy and reliability of historical data that is supplied by others and may be incorrect or incorrectly input. The Fund bears the risk that the quantitative models used will not be successful in identifying trends or in determining the size and direction of investment positions that will enable the Fund to achieve its investment objective.
Redemption and Large Transaction Risk. Ownership of the Fund’s shares may be concentrated in one or a few large investors (such as funds of funds, institutional investors, and asset allocation programs) that may sell or purchase Fund shares in large quantities on the secondary market. These secondary market transactions may cause authorized participants to increase their purchases and redemptions of creation units from the Fund. Purchases and redemptions of creation units primarily with cash rather than through in-kind delivery of portfolio securities may cause the Fund to incur certain costs, such as brokerage costs or taxable gains or losses that it might not have incurred if it had made a redemption in kind. These costs could be imposed on the Fund and thus decrease its NAV to the extent that the costs are not offset by a transaction fee payable by an authorized participant.
13


Performance
The following information provides some indication of the risks of investing in the Fund. Past performance (before and after taxes) is not necessarily an indication of how the Fund will perform in the future. You may get updated performance information at www.PrincipalAM.com.
The bar chart shows the investment returns of the Fund's shares for each full calendar year of operations for 10 years (or, if shorter, the life of the Fund). The table shows for the last one, five, and ten calendar year periods (or, if shorter, the life of the Fund), how the Fund’s average annual total returns compare with those of one or more broad measures of market performance.
Life of Fund returns are measured from the date the Fund's shares were first sold (August 19, 2016).
Prior to July 15, 2022, the objective and strategy of the Fund differed from its current objective and strategy. Accordingly, performance of the Fund for periods prior to that date may not be representative of the performance the Fund would have achieved had the Fund been following its current objective and strategy.
Total Returns as of December 31 (1)
6074
Highest return for a quarter during the period of the bar chart above:
2Q 2020 40.76%
Lowest return for a quarter during the period of the bar chart above:
4Q 2018 (24.91)%
(1) The year-to-date return as of September 30, 2023 is (10.75)%.
Average Annual Total Returns (Based on NAV)
For the periods ended December 31, 2022(1)
1 Year
5 Year
Life of Fund
Return Before Taxes (28.84)% 1.77% 5.04%
Return After Taxes on Distributions (28.84)% 1.67% 4.95%
Return After Taxes on Distributions and Sale of Fund Shares (17.07)% 1.34% 3.93%
Russell 3000 Index (reflects no deductions for fees, expenses, or taxes) (19.21)% 8.79% 10.75%
Russell 2000 Healthcare Index (reflects no deductions for fees, expenses or taxes)
(28.99)% 0.68% 5.22%
(1) Prior to July 15, 2022, the objective and strategy of the Fund differed from its current objective and strategy. Accordingly, performance of the Fund for periods prior to that date may not be representative of the performance the Fund would have achieved had the Fund been following its current objective and strategy.
After-tax returns are calculated using the historical highest individual federal marginal income tax rates and do not reflect the impact of state and local taxes. Actual after-tax returns depend on an investor’s tax situation and may differ from those shown. The after-tax returns shown are not relevant to investors who hold their Fund shares through tax-deferred arrangements, such as 401(k) plans or individual retirement accounts.
Effective November 1, 2023, the Fund changed its primary broad-based index to the Russell 3000 Index in order to meet the revised definition of “broad-based securities market index.” The Russell 2000 Healthcare Index is included as an additional index for the Fund as it shows how the Fund’s performance compares with the returns of an index of funds with similar investment objectives.
Investment Advisor and Portfolio Managers
Principal Global Investors, LLC
Christopher Ibach (since 2023), Portfolio Manager
Aaron J. Siebel (since 2020), Portfolio Manager
14


Purchase and Sale of Fund Shares
The Fund issues and redeems Shares at net asset value ("NAV") only with authorized participants ("APs") who have entered into agreements with the Fund’s distributor and only in blocks of 20,000 Shares (each block of Shares is called a "Creation Unit"), or multiples thereof ("Creation Unit Aggregations"), in exchange for the deposit or delivery of a basket of securities that the Fund specifies each day. Except when aggregated in Creation Units, the Shares are not redeemable securities of the Fund. Typically, the basket of assets will be made up of securities, but may include a cash component. (See "Purchase and Redemption of Creation Units" in the Statement of Additional Information for more information.)
Shares of the Fund are listed for trading on The Nasdaq Stock Market LLC. Individual Shares may only be bought and sold in the secondary market through a broker or dealer at a market price. Because Shares trade at market prices rather than NAV, Shares may trade at prices greater than NAV (at a premium), at NAV, or less than NAV (at a discount). An investor may incur costs attributable to the difference between the highest price a buyer is willing to pay to purchase Shares (bid) and the lowest price a seller is willing to accept for Shares (ask) when buying or selling Shares on the secondary market (the bid-ask spread).
You can access recent information, including information on the Fund’s net asset value, market price, premiums and discounts, and bid-ask spreads at www.PrincipalAM.com.
Tax Information
The Fund’s distributions you receive are generally subject to federal income tax as ordinary income or capital gain and may also be subject to state and local taxes, unless you are tax-exempt or your account is tax-deferred in which case your distributions would be taxed when withdrawn from the tax-deferred account.
Payments to Broker-Dealers and Other Financial Intermediaries
If you purchase the Fund through a broker-dealer or other financial intermediary, the Fund and its related companies may pay the intermediary for the sale of Fund shares and related services. These payments may create a conflict of interest by influencing the broker-dealer or other intermediary and your salesperson to recommend the Fund over another investment. Ask your salesperson or visit your financial intermediary's website for more information.

15


PRINCIPAL INVESTMENT GRADE CORPORATE ACTIVE ETF
Objective:    The Fund seeks to provide current income and, as a secondary objective, capital appreciation.
Fees and Expenses of the Fund
This table describes the fees and expenses that you may pay if you buy, hold, and sell shares of the Fund ("Shares"). You may pay other fees, such as brokerage commissions and other fees to financial intermediaries, which are not reflected in the table or the example below.
Annual Fund Operating Expenses
(expenses that you pay each year as a percentage of the value of your investment)
Management Fees 0.19%
Other Expenses
%
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses (1)
0.19%
(1)    The investment management agreement (the “Management Agreement”) between the Fund and Principal Global Investors, LLC (“PGI”) provides that, for the duration of the Management Agreement, PGI will pay all operating expenses of the Fund, except for the management fee, payments made under the Fund's Rule 12b-1 plan (if or when such fees are imposed), brokerage commissions and other expenses connected to the execution of portfolio transactions, interest expense, taxes, acquired fund fees and expenses, litigation expenses, and other extraordinary expenses.
Example
This Example is intended to help you compare the cost of investing in the Fund with the cost of investing in other funds. The Example assumes that you invest $10,000 in the Fund for the time periods indicated and then redeem all of your shares at the ends of those periods. The Example also assumes that your investment has a 5% return each year and that the Fund’s operating expenses remain the same. Although your actual costs may be higher or lower, based on these assumptions your costs would be:
1 year
3 years
5 years 10 years
Principal Investment Grade Corporate Active ETF
$19 $61 $107 $243
Portfolio Turnover
The Fund pays transaction costs, such as commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or "turns over" its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover rate may indicate higher transaction costs and may result in higher taxes when Fund shares are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are not reflected in annual fund operating expenses or in the example, affect the Fund’s performance. During the most recent fiscal year, the Fund's portfolio turnover rate was 61.0% of the average value of its portfolio.
Principal Investment Strategies
The Fund is an actively managed exchange-traded fund ("ETF") that seeks to achieve its investment objective by investing, under normal circumstances, at least 80% of its net assets, plus any borrowings for investment purposes, in investment-grade corporate bonds and other fixed-income securities at the time of purchase. "Investment grade" securities are rated BBB- or higher by S&P Global Ratings ("S&P Global") or Baa3 or higher by Moody's Investors Service, Inc. ("Moody's") or, if unrated, of comparable quality in the opinion of those selecting such investments. If the security has been rated by only one of those agencies, that rating will determine whether the security is investment grade. If securities are rated differently by the rating agencies, the highest rating is used.
The fixed-income securities in which the Fund invests include foreign securities, corporate securities, securities issued or guaranteed by the U.S. government or its agencies and instrumentalities, and securities issued or guaranteed by foreign governments payable in U.S. dollars. The portfolio is not managed to a particular maturity. Under normal circumstances, the Fund maintains an average portfolio duration that is within +/- 10% of the duration of the Bloomberg U.S. Corporate Investment Grade Bond Index, which as of September 30, 2023 was 6.77 years. The Fund actively trades securities.
The Fund invests in derivatives, including treasury futures for hedging or to otherwise manage fixed-income exposure, as well as credit default swaps, including buying and selling on individual securities and/or baskets of securities, to efficiently manage exposures to certain sectors or individual issuers. A derivative is a financial arrangement, the value of which is derived from, or based on, a traditional security, asset, or market index.
Principal Risks
The value of your investment in the Fund changes with the value of the Fund’s investments. Many factors affect that value, and it is possible to lose money by investing in the Fund. An investment in the Fund is not a deposit of a bank and is not insured or guaranteed by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation or any other government agency. The principal risks of investing in the Fund are listed below in alphabetical order and not in order of significance.
16


Active Management Risk. There is no guarantee that the investment techniques, analyses, or judgments that the Fund’s investment advisor and/or sub-advisor applies in making investment decisions for the Fund will produce the intended outcome or that the investments the advisor selects for the Fund will perform as well as other securities that were not selected for the Fund. The Fund may not achieve its investment objective, and it is not intended to be a complete investment program.
Counterparty Risk. Counterparty risk is the risk that the counterparty to a contract or other obligation will be unable or unwilling to honor its obligations.
Derivatives Risk. Derivatives may not move in the direction anticipated by the portfolio manager. Transactions in derivatives may increase volatility, cause the liquidation of portfolio positions when not advantageous to do so, and result in disproportionate losses that may be substantially greater than a fund’s initial investment.
Credit Default Swaps. Credit default swaps involve special risks in addition to those associated with swaps generally because they are difficult to value, are highly susceptible to liquidity and credit risk, and generally pay a return to the party that has paid the premium only in the event of an actual default by the issuer of the underlying obligation (as opposed to a credit downgrade or other indication of financial difficulty). The protection “buyer” in a credit default contract may be obligated to pay the protection “seller” an up-front payment or a periodic stream of payments over the term of the contract, provided, generally, that no credit event on a reference obligation has occurred. If a credit event occurs, the seller generally must pay the buyer the “par value” (i.e., full notional value) of the swap in exchange for an equal face amount of deliverable obligations of the reference entity described in the swap, or the seller may be required to deliver the related net cash amount, if the swap is cash settled. The Fund may be either the buyer or seller in the transaction.
Futures. Futures contracts involve specific risks, including: the imperfect correlation between the change in market value of the instruments held by the Fund and the price of the futures contract; possible lack of a liquid secondary market for a futures contract and the resulting inability to close a futures contract when desired; counterparty risk; and if the Fund has insufficient cash, it may have to sell securities from its portfolio to meet daily variation margin requirements.
Fixed-Income Securities Risk. Fixed-income securities are subject to interest rate, credit quality, and liquidity risks. The market value of fixed-income securities generally declines when interest rates rise, and increased interest rates may adversely affect the liquidity of certain fixed-income securities. Moreover, an issuer of fixed-income securities could default on its payment obligations due to increased interest rates or for other reasons.
Foreign Securities Risk. The risks of foreign securities include loss of value as a result of: political or economic instability; nationalization, expropriation, or confiscatory taxation; settlement delays; and limited government regulation (including less stringent reporting, accounting, and disclosure standards than are required of U.S. companies).
Hedging Risk. A fund that implements a hedging strategy using derivatives and/or securities could expose the fund to the risk that can arise when a change in the value of a hedge does not match a change in the value of the asset it hedges. In other words, the change in value of the hedge could move in a direction that does not match the change in value of the underlying asset, resulting in a risk of loss to the fund.
Market Trading Risks. The Fund faces numerous market trading risks, including the potential lack of an active market for Fund shares, losses from trading in secondary markets, and disruption to the activities of market makers, authorized participants, or other participants and in the creation/redemption process of the Fund. ANY OF THESE FACTORS MAY LEAD TO THE FUND’S SHARES TRADING AT A PREMIUM OR DISCOUNT TO NAV.
Portfolio Duration Risk. Portfolio duration is a measure of the expected life of a fixed-income security and its sensitivity to changes in interest rates. The longer a fund’s average portfolio duration, the more sensitive the fund will be to changes in interest rates, which means funds with longer average portfolio durations may be more volatile than those with shorter durations.
Redemption and Large Transaction Risk. Ownership of the Fund’s shares may be concentrated in one or a few large investors (such as funds of funds, institutional investors, and asset allocation programs) that may sell or purchase Fund shares in large quantities on the secondary market. These secondary market transactions may cause authorized participants to increase their purchases and redemptions of creation units from the Fund. Purchases and redemptions of creation units primarily with cash rather than through in-kind delivery of portfolio securities may cause the Fund to incur certain costs, such as brokerage costs or taxable gains or losses that it might not have incurred if it had made a redemption in kind. These costs could be imposed on the Fund and thus decrease its NAV to the extent that the costs are not offset by a transaction fee payable by an authorized participant.
17


U.S. Government Securities Risk. Yields available from U.S. government securities are generally lower than yields from many other fixed-income securities.
U.S. Government-Sponsored Securities Risk. Securities issued by U.S. government-sponsored enterprises such as the Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation, the Federal National Mortgage Association, and the Federal Home Loan Banks are not issued or guaranteed by the U.S. government.
Performance
The following information provides some indication of the risks of investing in the Fund. Past performance (before and after taxes) is not necessarily an indication of how the Fund will perform in the future. You may get updated performance information at www.PrincipalAM.com.
The bar chart shows the investment returns of the Fund’s shares for each full calendar year of operations for 10 years (or, if shorter, the life of the Fund). The table shows for the last one, five, and ten calendar year periods (or, if shorter, the life of the Fund), how the Fund’s average annual total returns compare with those of one or more broad measures of market performance.
Life of Fund returns are measured from the date the Fund's shares were first sold (April 18, 2018).
Total Returns as of December 31 (1)
5163
Highest return for a quarter during the period of the bar chart above:
2Q 2020 10.29%
Lowest return for a quarter during the period of the bar chart above:
2Q 2022 (8.40)%
(1) The year-to-date return as of September 30, 2023 is (0.71)%.
Average Annual Total Returns (Based on NAV)
For the periods ended December 31, 2022
1 Year
Life of Fund
Return Before Taxes (16.92)% 0.88%
Return After Taxes on Distributions (19.17)% (1.14)%
Return After Taxes on Distributions and Sale of Fund Shares (9.96)% (0.03)%
Bloomberg U.S. Aggregate Bond Index (reflects no deductions for fees, expenses or taxes) (13.01)% 0.36%
Bloomberg U.S. Corporate Investment Grade Bond Index (reflects no deductions for fees, expenses, or taxes)
(15.76)% 0.95%
After-tax returns are calculated using the historical highest individual federal marginal income tax rates and do not reflect the impact of state and local taxes. Actual after-tax returns depend on an investor’s tax situation and may differ from those shown. The after-tax returns shown are not relevant to investors who hold their Fund shares through tax-deferred arrangements, such as 401(k) plans or individual retirement accounts.
Effective November 1, 2023, the Fund changed its primary broad-based index to the Bloomberg U.S. Aggregate Bond Index in order to meet the revised definition of “broad-based securities market index.” The Bloomberg U.S. Corporate Investment Grade Bond Index is included as an additional index for the Fund as it shows how the Fund’s performance compares with the returns of an index of funds with similar investment objectives.
18


Investment Advisor and Portfolio Managers
Principal Global Investors, LLC
Jonathan S. Curran (since 2022), Portfolio Manager
Darryl Trunnel (since 2022), Portfolio Manager
Purchase and Sale of Fund Shares
The Fund issues and redeems Shares at net asset value ("NAV") only with authorized participants ("APs") who have entered into agreements with the Fund’s distributor and only in blocks of 50,000 Shares (each block of Shares is called a "Creation Unit"), or multiples thereof ("Creation Unit Aggregations"), in exchange for the deposit or delivery of a basket of securities that the Fund specifies each day. Except when aggregated in Creation Units, the Shares are not redeemable securities of the Fund. Typically, the basket of assets will be made up of securities, but may include a cash component. (See "Purchase and Redemption of Creation Units" in the Statement of Additional Information for more information.)
Shares of the Fund are listed for trading on NYSE Arca, Inc. Individual Shares may only be bought and sold in the secondary market through a broker or dealer at a market price. Because Shares trade at market prices rather than NAV, Shares may trade at prices greater than NAV (at a premium), at NAV, or less than NAV (at a discount). An investor may incur costs attributable to the difference between the highest price a buyer is willing to pay to purchase Shares (bid) and the lowest price a seller is willing to accept for Shares (ask) when buying or selling Shares on the secondary market (the bid-ask spread).
You can access recent information, including information on the Fund's net asset value, market price, premiums and discounts, and bid-ask spreads at www.PrincipalAM.com.
Tax Information
The Fund's distributions you receive are generally subject to federal income tax as ordinary income or capital gain and may also be subject to state and local taxes, unless you are tax-exempt or your account is tax-deferred in which case your distributions would be taxed when withdrawn from the tax-deferred account.
Payments to Broker-Dealers and Other Financial Intermediaries
If you purchase the Fund through a broker-dealer or other financial intermediary, the Fund and its related companies may pay the intermediary for the sale of Fund shares and related services. These payments may create a conflict of interest by influencing the broker-dealer or other intermediary and your salesperson to recommend the Fund over another investment. Ask your salesperson or visit your financial intermediary's website for more information.
19


PRINCIPAL QUALITY ETF
Objective:     The Fund seeks long-term growth of capital.
Fees and Expenses of the Fund
This table describes the fees and expenses that you may pay if you buy, hold, and sell shares of the Fund ("Shares"). You may pay other fees, such as brokerage commissions and other fees to financial intermediaries, which are not reflected in the table or the example below.
Annual Fund Operating Expenses
(expenses that you pay each year as a percentage of the value of your investment)
Management Fees 0.15%
Other Expenses
%
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses (1)
0.15%
(1)    The investment management agreement (the “Management Agreement”) between the Fund and Principal Global Investors, LLC (“PGI”) provides that, for the duration of the Management Agreement, PGI will pay all operating expenses of the Fund, except the management fee, payments made under the Fund's Rule 12b-1 plan (if or when such fees are imposed), brokerage commissions and other expenses connected to the execution of portfolio transactions, interest expense, taxes, acquired fund fees and expenses, litigation expenses, and other extraordinary expenses.
Example
This Example is intended to help you compare the cost of investing in the Fund with the cost of investing in other funds. The Example assumes that you invest $10,000 in the Fund for the time periods indicated and then redeem all of your shares at the ends of those periods. The Example also assumes that your investment has a 5% return each year and that the Fund’s operating expenses remain the same. Although your actual costs may be higher or lower, based on these assumptions your costs would be:
1 year
3 years
5 years
10 years
Principal Quality ETF $15 $48 $85 $192
Portfolio Turnover
The Fund pays transaction costs, such as commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or "turns over" its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover rate may indicate higher transaction costs and may result in higher taxes when Fund shares are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are not reflected in annual fund operating expenses or in the example, affect the Fund's performance. During the most recent fiscal year, the Fund's portfolio turnover rate was 47.7% of the average value of its portfolio.
Principal Investment Strategies
Under normal circumstances, the Fund primarily invests in equity securities. For security selection and portfolio construction, Principal Global Investors, LLC ("PGI") uses a proprietary quantitative model designed to identify equity securities in the S&P 500 Index or S&P 400 Index that exhibit higher quality, growth potential, and pricing power. "Higher quality" means securities that PGI believes possess higher quality characteristics relative to their peers, measured by profitability, earnings quality, balance sheet strength, and solvency. "Pricing power" refers to the extent to which a company can raise the prices of its products without reducing the demand for them. As of September 30, 2023, the market capitalization range of the companies in the S&P 500 Index was between approximately $4.0 billion and $2.7 trillion. As of September 30, 2023, the market capitalization range of the companies in the S&P 400 Index was between approximately $1.3 billion and $16.8 billion. The Fund invests in equity securities of different market capitalizations (medium or large) and styles (growth or value).
The Fund's holdings are expected to be rebalanced at least annually. However, PGI may make any adjustments to the model and Fund holdings at its discretion. In constructing and revising the model and managing the Fund’s investments, PGI uses insights from diverse sources, including internal investment research, industry reports, and data from third-party consultants and other service providers, to develop and refine its investment themes and identify and take advantage of trends that may impact the Fund and its holdings.
The Fund invested significantly in one or more industries within the healthcare sector and information technology sector as of September 30, 2023.
Note: "Standard & Poor's 500", "Standard & Poor's 400", "S&P 500®" and "S&P 400®" are trademarks of Standard & Poor's Financial Services LLC and have been licensed by Principal. The Fund is not sponsored, endorsed, sold, or promoted by Standard & Poor's Financial Services LLC, and Standard & Poor's Financial Services LLC makes no representation regarding the advisability of investing in the Fund.
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Principal Risks
The value of your investment in the Fund changes with the value of the Fund’s investments. Many factors affect that value, and it is possible to lose money by investing in the Fund. An investment in the Fund is not a deposit of a bank and is not insured or guaranteed by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation or any other government agency. The principal risks of investing in the Fund are listed below in alphabetical order and not in order of significance.
Active Management Risk. There is no guarantee that the investment techniques, analyses, or judgments that the Fund’s investment advisor and/or sub-advisor applies in making investment decisions for the Fund will produce the intended outcome or that the investments the advisor selects for the Fund will perform as well as other securities that were not selected for the Fund. The Fund may not achieve its investment objective, and it is not intended to be a complete investment program.
Equity Securities Risk. A variety of factors can negatively impact the value of equity securities held by a fund, including a decline in the issuer’s financial condition, unfavorable performance of the issuer’s sector or industry, or changes in response to overall market and economic conditions. A fund’s principal market segment(s) (such as market capitalization or style) may underperform other market segments or the equity markets as a whole.
Growth Style Risk. Growth investing entails the risk that if growth companies do not increase their earnings at a rate expected by investors, the market price of their stock may decline significantly, even if earnings show an absolute increase. Growth company stocks also typically lack the dividend yield that can lessen price declines in market downturns.
Value Style Risk. Value investing entails the risk that value stocks may continue to be undervalued by the market for extended periods, including the entire period during which the stock is held by a fund, or the events that would cause the stock price to increase may not occur as anticipated or at all. Moreover, a stock that appears to be undervalued actually may be appropriately priced at a low level and, therefore, would not be profitable for the fund.
Healthcare Sector Risk. A fund that invests in securities of companies in the healthcare sector (which includes companies involved in several industries, including biotechnology research and production, drugs and pharmaceuticals and health care facilities and services) is subject to the direct risks of investing in such companies. These companies are subject to extensive competition (due to, among others, generic drug sales or the loss of patent protection), product liability litigation and increased government regulation. Research and development costs of bringing new drugs to market are substantial, and there is no guarantee that a proposed product will ever come to market. Such companies are heavily dependent on patent and intellectual property rights, the loss or impairment of which may adversely affect profitability. Healthcare facility operators may be affected by the demand for services, efforts by government or insurers to limit rates, restriction of government financial assistance and competition from other providers.
Information Technology Sector Risk. Companies in the information technology sector may face dramatic and often unpredictable changes in growth rates and are particularly vulnerable to changes in technology product cycles, product obsolescence, government regulation, and competition, both domestically and internationally. Such companies are heavily dependent on patent and intellectual property rights, the loss or impairment of which may adversely affect profitability.
Market Trading Risks. The Fund faces numerous market trading risks, including the potential lack of an active market for Fund shares, losses from trading in secondary markets, and disruption to the activities of market makers, authorized participants, or other participants and in the creation/redemption process of the Fund. ANY OF THESE FACTORS MAY LEAD TO THE FUND’S SHARES TRADING AT A PREMIUM OR DISCOUNT TO NAV.
Model Risk. Because PGI uses quantitative models to select and hold securities, the Fund may hold securities that present risks that an investment advisor researching individual securities might seek to avoid. Moreover, models may be predictive in nature and depend heavily on the accuracy and reliability of historical data that is supplied by others and may be incorrect or incorrectly input. The Fund bears the risk that the quantitative models used will not be successful in identifying trends or in determining the size and direction of investment positions that will enable the Fund to achieve its investment objective.
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Redemption and Large Transaction Risk. Ownership of the Fund’s shares may be concentrated in one or a few large investors (such as funds of funds, institutional investors, and asset allocation programs) that may sell or purchase Fund shares in large quantities on the secondary market. These secondary market transactions may cause authorized participants to increase their purchases and redemptions of creation units from the Fund. Purchases and redemptions of creation units primarily with cash rather than through in-kind delivery of portfolio securities may cause the Fund to incur certain costs, such as brokerage costs or taxable gains or losses that it might not have incurred if it had made a redemption in kind. These costs could be imposed on the Fund and thus decrease its NAV to the extent that the costs are not offset by a transaction fee payable by an authorized participant.
Performance
The following information provides some indication of the risks of investing in the Fund. Past performance (before and after taxes) is not necessarily an indication of how the Fund will perform in the future. You may get updated performance information at www.PrincipalAM.com.
The bar chart shows the investment returns of the Fund's shares for each full calendar year of operations for 10 years (or, if shorter, the life of the Fund). The table shows for the last one, five, and ten calendar year periods (or, if shorter, the life of the Fund), how the Fund’s average annual total returns compare with those of one or more broad measures of market performance.
Life of Fund returns are measured from the date the Fund's shares were first sold (March 21, 2016).
During 2020, the Fund experienced a one-time gain of approximately $1.13 per share as the result of a one-time infusion of capital by the Advisor due to an operational error by a third party. If such gain had not been recognized, the total return amounts would have been lower.
Prior to June 17, 2022, the objective and strategy of the Fund differed from its current objective and strategy. Accordingly, performance of the Fund for periods prior to that date may not be representative of the performance the Fund would have achieved had the Fund been following its current objective and strategy.
Total Returns as of December 31 (1)
7169
Highest return for a quarter during the period of the bar chart above:
2Q 2020 20.69%
Lowest return for a quarter during the period of the bar chart above:
1Q 2020 (19.38)%
(1) The year-to-date return as of September 30, 2023 is 10.14%.
Average Annual Total Returns (Based on NAV)
For the periods ended December 31, 2022(1)
1 Year
5 Year
Life of Fund
Return Before Taxes (16.42)% 10.61% (2) 12.14% (2)
Return After Taxes on Distributions (16.71)% 10.27% 11.79%
Return After Taxes on Distributions and Sale of Fund Shares (9.52)% 8.39% 9.81%
S&P 500 Index (reflects no deductions for fees, expenses or taxes)
(18.11)% 9.42% 11.74%
(1) Prior to June 17, 2022, the objective and strategy of the Fund differed from its current objective and strategy. Accordingly, performance of the Fund for periods prior to that date may not be representative of the performance the Fund would have achieved had the Fund been following its current objective and strategy.
(2) During 2020, the Fund experienced a one-time gain of approximately $1.13 per share as the result of a one-time infusion of capital by the Advisor due to an operational error by a third party. If such gain had not been recognized, the total return amounts would have been lower.
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After-tax returns are calculated using the historical highest individual federal marginal income tax rates and do not reflect the impact of state and local taxes. Actual after-tax returns depend on an investor's tax situation and may differ from those shown. The after-tax returns shown are not relevant to investors who hold their Fund shares through tax-deferred arrangements, such as 401(k) plans or individual retirement accounts.
Investment Advisor and Portfolio Managers
Principal Global Investors, LLC
Christopher Ibach (since 2023), Portfolio Manager
Aaron J. Siebel (since 2020), Portfolio Manager
Purchase and Sale of Fund Shares
The Fund issues and redeems Shares at net asset value ("NAV") only with authorized participants ("APs") who have entered into agreements with the Fund’s distributor and only in blocks of 20,000 Shares (each block of Shares is called a "Creation Unit"), or multiples thereof ("Creation Unit Aggregations"), in exchange for the deposit or delivery of a basket of securities that the Fund specifies each day. Except when aggregated in Creation Units, the Shares are not redeemable securities of the Fund. Typically, the basket of assets will be made up of securities, but may include a cash component. (See "Purchase and Redemption of Creation Units" in the Statement of Additional Information for more information.)
Shares of the Fund are listed for trading on The Nasdaq Stock Market LLC. Individual Shares may only be bought and sold in the secondary market through a broker or dealer at a market price. Because Shares trade at market prices rather than NAV, Shares may trade at prices greater than NAV (at a premium), at NAV, or less than NAV (at a discount). An investor may incur costs attributable to the difference between the highest price a buyer is willing to pay to purchase Shares (bid) and the lowest price a seller is willing to accept for Shares (ask) when buying or selling Shares on the secondary market (the bid-ask spread).
You can access recent information, including information on the Fund's net asset value, market price, premiums and discounts, and bid-ask spreads at www.PrincipalAM.com.
Tax Information
The Fund's distributions you receive are generally subject to federal income tax as ordinary income or capital gain and may also be subject to state and local taxes, unless you are tax-exempt or your account is tax-deferred in which case your distributions would be taxed when withdrawn from the tax-deferred account.
Payments to Broker-Dealers and Other Financial Intermediaries
If you purchase the Fund through a broker-dealer or other financial intermediary, the Fund and its related companies may pay the intermediary for the sale of Fund shares and related services. These payments may create a conflict of interest by influencing the broker-dealer or other intermediary and your salesperson to recommend the Fund over another investment. Ask your salesperson or visit your financial intermediary's website for more information.
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PRINCIPAL REAL ESTATE ACTIVE OPPORTUNITIES ETF
Objective:     The Fund seeks total return.
Fees and Expenses of the Fund
This table describes the fees and expenses that you may pay if you buy, hold, and sell shares of the Fund ("Shares"). You may pay other fees, such as brokerage commissions and other fees to financial intermediaries, which are not reflected in the table or the example below.
Annual Fund Operating Expenses
(expenses that you pay each year as a percentage of the value of your investment)
Management Fees 0.65%
Other Expenses
%
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses (1)
0.65%
(1)    The investment management agreement (the “Management Agreement”) between the Fund and Principal Global Investors, LLC (“PGI”) provides that, for the duration of the Management Agreement, PGI will pay all operating expenses of the Fund, except the management fee, payments made under the Fund's Rule 12b-1 plan (if or when such fees are imposed), brokerage commissions and other expenses connected to the execution of portfolio transactions, interest expense, taxes, acquired fund fees and expenses, litigation expenses, and other extraordinary expenses.
Example
This Example is intended to help you compare the cost of investing in the Fund with the cost of investing in other funds. The Example assumes that you invest $10,000 in the Fund for the time periods indicated and then redeem all of your shares at the ends of those periods. The Example also assumes that your investment has a 5% return each year and that the Fund’s operating expenses remain the same. Although your actual costs may be higher or lower, based on these assumptions your costs would be:
1 year 3 years 5 years 10 years
Principal Real Estate Active Opportunities ETF $66 $208 $362 $810
Portfolio Turnover
The Fund pays transaction costs, such as commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or "turns over" its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover rate may indicate higher transaction costs and may result in higher taxes when Fund shares are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are not reflected in annual fund operating expenses or in the example, affect the Fund’s performance. During the most recent fiscal year, the Fund's portfolio turnover rate was 17.6% of the average value of its portfolio.
Principal Investment Strategies
Under normal circumstances, the Fund invests at least 80% of its net assets, plus any borrowings for investment purposes, in securities of companies principally engaged in the real estate industry at the time of purchase. A real estate company has at least 50% of its assets, income, or profits derived from investments, products, or services related to the real estate industry. Real estate companies include real estate investment trusts ("REITs") and non-REITs.
REITs are pooled investment vehicles that invest in income-producing real estate, real estate-related loans, or other types of real estate interests. REITs are corporations or business trusts that are permitted to eliminate corporate level federal income taxes by meeting certain requirements of the Internal Revenue Code.
The Fund seeks to minimize its investments in traditional real estate sectors (e.g., conventional office, retail, apartments, and industrial). The Fund, instead, seeks to favor investments in growing non-traditional real estate sectors that may benefit from changing investor preferences and economic and societal shifts (e.g., data centers, wireless towers, and single-family rentals). The investment process relies on the professional judgment of the team’s portfolio managers and analysts to carry out a fundamental-based approach to source ideas in a bottom-up fashion. The analysts assess each potential company across multiple categories, including, among others, market outlook, business outlook, management skill and experience, capital structure, and income durability. Portfolio managers will consider this fundamental quality assessment, relative valuation, and recognition catalysts when selecting securities and constructing the Fund’s portfolio.
The Fund invests primarily in equity securities of U.S. companies, including those of small companies. The Fund concentrates its investments (invests more than 25% of its net assets) in securities in the real estate industry.
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The Fund is considered non-diversified, which means it can invest a higher percentage of assets in securities of individual issuers than a diversified fund. As a result, changes in the value of a single investment could cause greater fluctuations in the Fund's share price than would occur in a more diversified fund.
The Fund is an actively managed ETF that operates pursuant to an exemptive order from the Securities and Exchange Commission (Non-Transparent Order) and does not publicly disclose its complete portfolio holdings each business day. Instead, the Fund publishes each business day on its website a “Tracking Basket,” which is designed to closely track the daily performance of the Fund but is not the Fund’s actual portfolio. The Tracking Basket is comprised of: (1) select recently disclosed portfolio holdings (Strategy Components); (2) liquid ETFs that convey information about the types of instruments (that are not otherwise fully represented by the Strategy Components) in which the Fund invests (Representative ETFs); and (3) cash and cash equivalents. For additional information regarding the Tracking Basket, see “Additional Fund Specific Information – Tracking basket structure” in the Prospectus.
The Fund also publishes each business day on its website the "Tracking Basket Weight Overlap," which is the percentage weight overlap between the holdings of the prior business day’s Tracking Basket compared to the holdings of the Fund that formed the basis for the Fund’s calculation of net asset value per share (NAV) at the end of the prior business day. The Tracking Basket Weight Overlap is designed to provide investors with an understanding of how similar the Tracking Basket is to the Fund’s actual portfolio in percentage terms.
Principal Risks
The value of your investment in the Fund changes with the value of the Fund’s investments. Many factors affect that value, and it is possible to lose money by investing in the Fund. An investment in the Fund is not a deposit of a bank and is not insured or guaranteed by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation or any other government agency. The principal risks of investing in the Fund are listed below in alphabetical order and not in order of significance.
Active Management Risk. There is no guarantee that the investment techniques, analyses, or judgments that the Fund’s investment advisor and/or sub-advisor applies in making investment decisions for the Fund will produce the intended outcome or that the investments the advisor selects for the Fund will perform as well as other securities that were not selected for the Fund. The Fund may not achieve its investment objective, and it is not intended to be a complete investment program.
Arbitrage Risk. Unlike ETFs that publicly disclose their complete portfolio holdings each business day, the Fund provides certain other information (the Tracking Basket) intended to allow market participants to estimate the value of positions in Fund shares. Although this information is designed to facilitate arbitrage opportunities in Fund shares to reduce bid-ask spread and minimize discounts or premiums between the market price and NAV of Fund shares, there is no guarantee the Fund’s arbitrage mechanism will operate as intended and that the Fund will not experience wide bid-ask spreads and/or large discounts or premiums to NAV. Further, the effectiveness of the Tracking Basket as an arbitrage mechanism is contingent upon, among other things, the Tracking Basket performing in a manner substantially identical to the performance of the Fund’s actual portfolio. The Fund’s investment advisor may not always be successful in creating a Tracking Basket that performs in a manner substantially identical to the performance of the Fund’s actual portfolio. In addition, market participants may attempt to use the disclosed information to "reverse engineer" the Fund’s trading strategy, which, if successful, could increase opportunities for predatory trading practices that may have the potential to negatively impact the Fund’s performance.
Equity Securities Risk. A variety of factors can negatively impact the value of equity securities held by a fund, including a decline in the issuer’s financial condition, unfavorable performance of the issuer’s sector or industry, or changes in response to overall market and economic conditions. A fund’s principal market segment(s) (such as market capitalization or style) may underperform other market segments or the equity markets as a whole.
Growth Style Risk. Growth investing entails the risk that if growth companies do not increase their earnings at a rate expected by investors, the market price of their stock may decline significantly, even if earnings show an absolute increase. Growth company stocks also typically lack the dividend yield that can lessen price declines in market downturns.
Smaller Companies Risk. Investments in smaller companies may involve greater risk and price volatility than investments in larger, more mature companies. Smaller companies may have limited product lines, markets, or financial resources; lack the competitive strength of larger companies; have less experienced managers; or depend on a few key employees. Their securities often are less widely held and trade less frequently and in lesser quantities, and their market prices often fluctuate more, than securities of larger companies.
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Value Style Risk. Value investing entails the risk that value stocks may continue to be undervalued by the market for extended periods, including the entire period during which the stock is held by a fund, or the events that would cause the stock price to increase may not occur as anticipated or at all. Moreover, a stock that appears to be undervalued actually may be appropriately priced at a low level and, therefore, would not be profitable for the fund.
Industry Concentration Risk. A fund that concentrates investments in a particular industry or group of industries has greater exposure than other funds to market, economic, and other factors affecting that industry or group of industries.
Real Estate. A fund concentrating in the real estate industry is subject to the risks associated with direct ownership of real estate, securities of companies in the real estate industry, and/or real estate investment trusts.These risks are explained more fully below in Real Estate Investment Trusts (REITs) Risk and Real Estate Securities Risk.
Market Trading Risks. The Fund faces numerous market trading risks, including the potential lack of an active market for Fund shares, losses from trading in secondary markets, and disruption to the activities of market makers, authorized participants, or other participants and in the creation/redemption process of the Fund. ANY OF THESE FACTORS MAY LEAD TO THE FUND’S SHARES TRADING AT A PREMIUM OR DISCOUNT TO NAV.
These market trading risks may be more pronounced for the Fund versus an ETF that makes its daily holdings public, particularly during periods of market disruption or volatility. As a result, it may cost investors more to trade Fund shares than shares of other ETFs.
Non-Diversification Risk.A non-diversified fund may invest a high percentage of its assets in the securities of a small number of issuers and is more likely than diversified funds to be significantly affected by a specific security’s poor performance.
Real Estate Investment Trusts (“REITs”) Risk. In addition to risks associated with investing in real estate securities, REITs are dependent upon management skills, are not diversified, and are subject to heavy cash flow dependency, risks of default by borrowers, and self-liquidation. Investment in REITs also involves risks similar to risks of investing in small market capitalization companies, such as limited financial resources, less frequent and limited volume trading, and may be subject to more abrupt or erratic price movements than larger company securities. A REIT could fail to qualify for tax-free pass-through of income under the Internal Revenue Code. Fund shareholders will indirectly bear their proportionate share of the expenses of REITs in which the fund invests.
Real Estate Securities Risk. Investing in real estate securities subjects the fund to the risks associated with the real estate market (which are similar to the risks associated with direct ownership in real estate), including declines in real estate values, loss due to casualty or condemnation, property taxes, interest rate changes, increased expenses, cash flow of underlying real estate assets, regulatory changes (including zoning, land use, and rents), and environmental problems, as well as to the risks related to the management skill and creditworthiness of the issuer.
Redemption and Large Transaction Risk. Ownership of the Fund’s shares may be concentrated in one or a few large investors (such as funds of funds, institutional investors, and asset allocation programs) that may sell or purchase Fund shares in large quantities on the secondary market. These secondary market transactions may cause authorized participants to increase their purchases and redemptions of creation units from the Fund. Purchases and redemptions of creation units primarily with cash rather than through in-kind delivery of portfolio securities may cause the Fund to incur certain costs, such as brokerage costs or taxable gains or losses that it might not have incurred if it had made a redemption in kind. These costs could be imposed on the Fund and thus decrease its NAV to the extent that the costs are not offset by a transaction fee payable by an authorized participant.
Tracking Basket Structure Risk. The Fund's Tracking Basket structure may affect the price at which shares of the Fund trade in the secondary market. Although the Tracking Basket is intended to provide investors with enough information to allow for an effective arbitrage mechanism that will keep the market price of the Fund at or close to the Fund’s NAV, there is a risk that market prices will vary significantly from NAV. ETFs trading on the basis of a published Tracking Basket may trade at a wider bid-ask spread than ETFs that publish their portfolios on a daily basis and, therefore, may cost investors more to trade. These risks may increase during periods of market disruption or volatility. At certain thresholds for such premiums/discounts, bid/ask spreads and tracking error, the Fund’s Board will consider possible remedial measures, which may include liquidation or conversion to a fully transparent, active ETF or a mutual fund. In addition, although the Fund seeks to benefit from keeping its portfolio information secret, market participants may attempt to use the Tracking Basket to identify the Fund’s trading strategy. If successful, this could result in such market participants engaging in certain predatory trading practices that may have the potential to harm the Fund and its shareholders, such as front running the Fund’s trades of portfolio securities.
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Trading Halt Risk. There may be circumstances where a security held in the Fund's portfolio but not in the Tracking Basket does not have readily available market quotations. If PGI determines that such circumstance may affect the reliability of the Tracking Basket as an arbitrage vehicle, that information, along with the identity and weighting of that security in the Fund's portfolio, will be publicly disclosed on the Fund's website, and PGI will assess appropriate remedial measures. In these circumstances, market participants may use this information to engage in certain predatory trading practices that may have the potential to harm the Fund and its shareholders. In addition, if securities representing 10% or more of the Fund's portfolio do not have readily available market quotations, PGI would promptly request the exchange to halt trading on the Fund, meaning that investors would not be able to trade their shares. Trading may also be halted in other circumstances, for example, due to market conditions.
Performance
No performance information is shown because the Fund has not yet had a calendar year of performance. The Fund's performance is benchmarked against the Russell 3000 Index and the FTSE NAREIT All Equity REITs Index. Performance information provides an indication of the risks of investing in the Fund. Past performance (before and after taxes) is not necessarily an indication of how the Fund will perform in the future. You may get updated performance information at www.PrincipalAM.com.
Effective November 1, 2023, the Fund changed its primary broad-based index to the Russell 3000 Index in order to meet the revised definition of “broad-based securities market index.” The FTSE NAREIT All Equity REITs Index is included as an additional index for the Fund as it shows how the Fund’s performance compares with the returns of an index of funds with similar investment objectives.
Investment Advisor
Principal Global Investors, LLC
Sub-Advisor and Portfolio Managers
Principal Real Estate Investors, LLC
Keith Bokota (since 2022), Portfolio Manager
Anthony Kenkel (since 2022), Portfolio Manager
Kelly D. Rush (since 2022), Portfolio Manager
Purchase and Sale of Fund Shares
The Fund issues and redeems Shares at net asset value ("NAV") only with authorized participants ("APs") who have entered into agreements with the Fund’s distributor and only in blocks of 20,000 Shares (each block of Shares is called a "Creation Unit"), or multiples thereof ("Creation Unit Aggregations"), in exchange for the deposit or delivery of a basket of securities that the Fund specifies each day. Except when aggregated in Creation Units, the Shares are not redeemable securities of the Fund. Typically, the basket of assets will be made up of securities, but may include a cash component. (See "Purchase and Redemption of Creation Units" in the Statement of Additional Information for more information.)
Shares of the Fund are listed for trading on NYSE Arca, Inc. Individual Shares may only be bought and sold in the secondary market through a broker or dealer at a market price. Because Shares trade at market prices rather than NAV, Shares may trade at prices greater than NAV (at a premium), at NAV, or less than NAV (at a discount). An investor may incur costs attributable to the difference between the highest price a buyer is willing to pay to purchase Shares (bid) and the lowest price a seller is willing to accept for Shares (ask) when buying or selling Shares on the secondary market (the bid-ask spread).
You can access recent information, including information on the Fund's net asset value, market price, premiums and discounts, and bid-ask spreads at www.PrincipalAM.com.
Tax Information
The Fund’s distributions you receive are generally subject to federal income tax as ordinary income or capital gain and may also be subject to state and local taxes, unless you are tax-exempt or your account is tax-deferred in which case your distributions would be taxed when withdrawn from the tax-deferred account.
Payments to Broker-Dealers and Other Financial Intermediaries
If you purchase the Fund through a broker-dealer or other financial intermediary, the Fund and its related companies may pay the intermediary for the sale of Fund shares and related services. These payments may create a conflict of interest by influencing the broker-dealer or other intermediary and your salesperson to recommend the Fund over another investment. Ask your salesperson or visit your financial intermediary's website for more information.
27


PRINCIPAL SPECTRUM PREFERRED SECURITIES ACTIVE ETF
Objective:    The Fund seeks to provide current income.
Fees and Expenses of the Fund
This table describes the fees and expenses that you may pay if you buy, hold, and sell shares of the Fund ("Shares"). You may pay other fees, such as brokerage commissions and other fees to financial intermediaries, which are not reflected in the table or the example below.
Annual Fund Operating Expenses
(expenses that you pay each year as a percentage of the value of your investment)
Management Fees
0.55%
Other Expenses
%
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses (1)
0.55%
(1)    The investment management agreement (the “Management Agreement”) between the Fund and Principal Global Investors, LLC (“PGI”) provides that, for the duration of the Management Agreement, PGI will pay all operating expenses of the Fund, except for the management fee, payments made under the Fund's Rule 12b-1 plan (if or when such fees are imposed), brokerage commissions and other expenses connected to the execution of portfolio transactions, interest expense, taxes, acquired fund fees and expenses, litigation expenses, and other extraordinary expenses.
Example
This Example is intended to help you compare the cost of investing in the Fund with the cost of investing in other funds. The Example assumes that you invest $10,000 in the Fund for the time periods indicated and then redeem all of your shares at the ends of those periods. The Example also assumes that your investment has a 5% return each year and that the Fund’s operating expenses remain the same. Although your actual costs may be higher or lower, based on these assumptions your costs would be:
1 year 3 years 5 years 10 years
Principal Spectrum Preferred Securities Active ETF $56 $176 $307 $689
Portfolio Turnover
The Fund pays transaction costs, such as commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or "turns over" its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover rate may indicate higher transaction costs and may result in higher taxes when Fund shares are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are not reflected in annual fund operating expenses or in the example, affect the Fund’s performance. During the most recent fiscal year, the Fund's portfolio turnover rate was 16.7% of the average value of its portfolio.
Principal Investment Strategies
Under normal circumstances, the Fund invests at least 80% of its net assets, plus any borrowings for investment purposes, in preferred securities at the time of purchase. Examples of preferred securities include preferred stock, certain depositary receipts, and various types of junior subordinated debt (such debt generally includes the contractual ability to defer payment of interest without accelerating an immediate default event). In particular, the Fund focuses on preferred securities known as “$1,000 par preferred securities,” which are issued in large, institutional lot sizes, typically by U.S. and non-U.S. financial services companies (i.e., banking, insurance, and commercial finance companies) and other corporations. Preferred securities generally pay fixed and floating rate distributions and are junior to all forms of the company's senior debt, but may have "preference" over common stock in the payment of distributions and the liquidation of a company's assets. The Fund may invest its assets in below-investment-grade preferred securities (sometimes called "high yield" or "junk"), which are rated at the time of purchase Ba1 or lower by Moody's Investors Service, Inc. ("Moody’s") and BB+ or lower by Standard & Poor’s Rating Service ("S&P") (if a security is rated differently by the rating agencies, the highest rating is used; if the security has been rated by only one of those agencies, that rating will determine whether the security is below investment grade; if the security has not been rated by either of those agencies, the sub-advisor will determine whether the security is of a quality comparable to those rated below investment grade).
The Fund concentrates its investments (invests more than 25% of its net assets) in securities in one or more industries (i.e., banking, insurance, and commercial finance) within the financial services sector.
Principal Risks
The value of your investment in the Fund changes with the value of the Fund’s investments. Many factors affect that value, and it is possible to lose money by investing in the Fund. An investment in the Fund is not a deposit of a bank and is not insured or guaranteed by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation or any other government agency. The principal risks of investing in the Fund are listed below in alphabetical order and not in order of significance.
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Active Management Risk. There is no guarantee that the investment techniques, analyses, or judgments that the Fund’s investment advisor and/or sub-advisor applies in making investment decisions for the Fund will produce the intended outcome or that the investments the advisor selects for the Fund will perform as well as other securities that were not selected for the Fund. The Fund may not achieve its investment objective, and it is not intended to be a complete investment program.
Fixed-Income Securities Risk. Fixed-income securities are subject to interest rate, credit quality, and liquidity risks. The market value of fixed-income securities generally declines when interest rates rise, and increased interest rates may adversely affect the liquidity of certain fixed-income securities. Moreover, an issuer of fixed-income securities could default on its payment obligations due to increased interest rates or for other reasons.
Foreign Securities Risk. The risks of foreign securities include loss of value as a result of: political or economic instability; nationalization, expropriation, or confiscatory taxation; settlement delays; and limited government regulation (including less stringent reporting, accounting, and disclosure standards than are required of U.S. companies).
High Yield Securities Risk. High yield fixed-income securities (commonly referred to as “junk bonds”) are subject to greater credit quality risk than higher rated fixed-income securities and should be considered speculative.
Industry Concentration Risk. A fund that concentrates investments in a particular industry or group of industries has greater exposure than other funds to market, economic, and other factors affecting that industry or group of industries.
Financial Services. A fund concentrating in financial services companies may be more susceptible to adverse economic or regulatory occurrences affecting financial services companies. Financial companies may be adversely affected in certain market cycles, including periods of rising interest rates, which may restrict the availability and increase the cost of capital, and declining economic conditions, which may cause credit losses due to financial difficulties of borrowers. Because many types of financial companies are especially vulnerable to these economic cycles, the Fund’s investments in these companies may lose significant value during such periods.
Liquidity Risk. A Fund is exposed to liquidity risk when trading volume, lack of a market maker, or legal restrictions impair the Fund's ability to sell particular securities or close derivative positions at an advantageous price. Funds with principal investment strategies that involve certain fixed-income securities, securities of companies with smaller market capitalizations, foreign securities, derivatives, high yield bonds, and bank loans or securities with substantial market and/or credit risk tend to have the greatest exposure to liquidity risk.
Market Trading Risks. The Fund faces numerous market trading risks, including the potential lack of an active market for Fund shares, losses from trading in secondary markets, and disruption to the activities of market makers, authorized participants, or other participants and in the creation/redemption process of the Fund. ANY OF THESE FACTORS MAY LEAD TO THE FUND’S SHARES TRADING AT A PREMIUM OR DISCOUNT TO NAV.
Portfolio Duration Risk. Portfolio duration is a measure of the expected life of a fixed-income security and its sensitivity to changes in interest rates. The longer a fund’s average portfolio duration, the more sensitive the fund will be to changes in interest rates, which means funds with longer average portfolio durations may be more volatile than those with shorter durations.
Preferred Securities Risk. Because preferred securities have a lower priority claim on assets or earnings than senior bonds and other debt instruments in a company’s capital structure, they are subject to greater credit and liquidation risk than more senior debt instruments. In addition, preferred securities are subject to other risks, such as limited or no voting rights, deferring or skipping distributions, interest rate risk, and redeeming the security prior to any stated maturity date.
Redemption and Large Transaction Risk. Ownership of the Fund’s shares may be concentrated in one or a few large investors (such as funds of funds, institutional investors, and asset allocation programs) that may sell or purchase Fund shares in large quantities on the secondary market. These secondary market transactions may cause authorized participants to increase their purchases and redemptions of creation units from the Fund. Purchases and redemptions of creation units primarily with cash rather than through in-kind delivery of portfolio securities may cause the Fund to incur certain costs, such as brokerage costs or taxable gains or losses that it might not have incurred if it had made a redemption in kind. These costs could be imposed on the Fund and thus decrease its NAV to the extent that the costs are not offset by a transaction fee payable by an authorized participant.
Performance
The following information provides some indication of the risks of investing in the Fund. Past performance (before and after taxes) is not necessarily an indication of how the Fund will perform in the future. You may get updated performance information at www.PrincipalAM.com.
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The bar chart shows the investment returns of the Fund’s shares for each full calendar year of operations for 10 years (or, if shorter, the life of the Fund). The table shows for the last one, five, and ten calendar year periods (or, if shorter, the life of the Fund), how the Fund’s average annual total returns compare with those of one or more broad measures of market performance.
Life of Fund returns are measured from the date the Fund's shares were first sold (July 10, 2017).
Total Returns as of December 31 (1)
5563
Highest return for a quarter during the period of the bar chart above:
2Q 2020 12.14%
Lowest return for a quarter during the period of the bar chart above:
1Q 2020 (12.33)%
(1) The year-to-date return as of September 30, 2023 is 1.54%.
Average Annual Total Returns (Based on NAV)
For the periods ended December 31, 2022
1 Year
5 Year
Life of Fund
Return Before Taxes (11.58)% 1.55% 1.79%
Return After Taxes on Distributions (12.72)% 0.11% 0.31%
Return After Taxes on Distributions and Sale of Fund Shares (6.38)% 0.87% 1.02%
Bloomberg Global Aggregate Bond Index (reflects no deductions for fees, expenses, or taxes) (16.25)% (1.66)% (0.87)%
ICE BofA Merrill Lynch U.S. Investment Grade Institutional Capital Securities Index (reflects no deductions for fees, expenses, or taxes)
(10.18)% 2.43% 2.65%
After-tax returns are calculated using the historical highest individual federal marginal income tax rates and do not reflect the impact of state and local taxes. Actual after-tax returns depend on an investor’s tax situation and may differ from those shown. The after-tax returns shown are not relevant to investors who hold their Fund shares through tax-deferred arrangements, such as 401(k) plans or individual retirement accounts.
Effective November 1, 2023, the Fund changed its primary broad-based index to the Bloomberg Global Aggregate Bond Index in order to meet the revised definition of “broad-based securities market index.” The ICE BofA Merrill Lynch U.S. Investment Grade Institutional Capital Securities Index is included as an additional index for the Fund as it shows how the Fund’s performance compares with the returns of an index of funds with similar investment objectives.
Investment Advisor
Principal Global Investors, LLC
Sub-Advisor and Portfolio Managers
Spectrum Asset Management, Inc.
Roberto Giangregorio (since 2017), Portfolio Manager
L. Phillip Jacoby, IV (since 2017), Chief Investment Officer and Portfolio Manager
Manu Krishnan (since 2017), Portfolio Manager
Mark A. Lieb (since 2017), President and Chief Executive Officer
Kevin Nugent (since 2021), Portfolio Manager
Satomi Yarnell (since 2021), Portfolio Manager
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Purchase and Sale of Fund Shares
The Fund issues and redeems Shares at net asset value ("NAV") only with authorized participants ("APs") who have entered into agreements with the Fund’s distributor and only in blocks of 50,000 Shares (each block of Shares is called a "Creation Unit"), or multiples thereof ("Creation Unit Aggregations"), in exchange for the deposit or delivery of a basket of securities that the Fund specifies each day. Except when aggregated in Creation Units, the Shares are not redeemable securities of the Fund. Typically, the basket of assets will be made up of securities, but may include a cash component. (See "Purchase and Redemption of Creation Units" in the Statement of Additional Information for more information.)
Shares of the Fund are listed for trading on NYSE Arca, Inc. Individual Shares may only be bought and sold in the secondary market through a broker or dealer at a market price. Because Shares trade at market prices rather than NAV, Shares may trade at prices greater than NAV (at a premium), at NAV, or less than NAV (at a discount). An investor may incur costs attributable to the difference between the highest price a buyer is willing to pay to purchase Shares (bid) and the lowest price a seller is willing to accept for Shares (ask) when buying or selling Shares on the secondary market (the bid-ask spread).
You can access recent information, including information on the Fund’s net asset value, market price, premiums and discounts, and bid-ask spreads at www.PrincipalAM.com.
Tax Information
The Fund's distributions you receive are generally subject to federal income tax as ordinary income or capital gain and may also be subject to state and local taxes, unless you are tax-exempt or your account is tax-deferred in which case your distributions would be taxed when withdrawn from the tax-deferred account.
Payments to Broker-Dealers and Other Financial Intermediaries
If you purchase the Fund through a broker-dealer or other financial intermediary, the Fund and its related companies may pay the intermediary for the sale of Fund shares and related services. These payments may create a conflict of interest by influencing the broker-dealer or other intermediary and your salesperson to recommend the Fund over another investment. Ask your salesperson or visit your financial intermediary's website for more information.
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PRINCIPAL SPECTRUM TAX-ADVANTAGED DIVIDEND ACTIVE ETF
Objective:     The Fund seeks to provide current income.
Fees and Expenses of the Fund
This table describes the fees and expenses that you may pay if you buy, hold, and sell shares of the Fund ("Shares"). You may pay other fees, such as brokerage commissions and other fees to financial intermediaries, which are not reflected in the table or the example below.
Annual Fund Operating Expenses
(expenses that you pay each year as a percentage of the value of your investment)
Management Fees
0.60%
Other Expenses
%
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses (1)
0.60%
(1)    The investment management agreement (the “Management Agreement”) between the Fund and Principal Global Investors, LLC (“PGI”) provides that, for the duration of the Management Agreement, PGI will pay all operating expenses of the Fund, except for the management fee, payments made under the Fund's Rule 12b-1 plan (if or when such fees are imposed), brokerage commissions and other expenses connected to the execution of portfolio transactions, interest expense, taxes, acquired fund fees and expenses, litigation expenses, and other extraordinary expenses.
Example
This Example is intended to help you compare the cost of investing in the Fund with the cost of investing in other funds. The Example assumes that you invest $10,000 in the Fund for the time periods indicated and then redeem all of your shares at the ends of those periods. The Example also assumes that your investment has a 5% return each year and that the Fund’s operating expenses remain the same. Although your actual costs may be higher or lower, based on these assumptions your costs would be:
1 year 3 years 5 years 10 years
Principal Spectrum Tax-Advantaged Dividend Active ETF $61 $192 $335 $750
Portfolio Turnover
The Fund pays transaction costs, such as commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or “turns over” its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover rate may indicate higher transaction costs and may result in higher taxes when Fund shares are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are not reflected in annual fund operating expenses or in the example, affect the Fund’s performance. During the most recent fiscal year, the Fund's portfolio turnover rate was 12.8% of the average value of its portfolio.
Principal Investment Strategies
Under normal circumstances, the Fund invests at least 80% of its net assets, plus any borrowings for investment purposes, in dividend-paying securities at the time of purchase. Such securities include, without limitation, preferred securities and capital securities of U.S. and non-U.S. issuers. The Fund invests significantly in securities that, at the time of issuance, are eligible to pay dividends that qualify for favorable U.S. federal income tax treatment, such as dividends treated as “qualified dividend income” ("QDI") and qualified dividends from real estate investment trusts ("REITs"). However, the Fund also invests in securities that are not eligible for such treatment.
Examples of preferred securities in which the Fund invests include preferred stock, certain depositary receipts, and various types of junior subordinated debt. Such preferred securities generally pay fixed and floating rate distributions and are junior to all forms of the company's senior debt, but may have "preference" over common stock in the payment of distributions and the liquidation of a company's assets. Capital securities are securities issued by financial institutions and other corporate issuers for purposes of satisfying regulatory capital requirements of obtaining agency credit. Examples of capital securities in which the Fund invests include subordinated debt securities, certain preferred securities, and contingent convertible securities (“Cocos”). Cocos are hybrid debt securities typically issued by non-US banking institutions that have contractual equity conversion or principal write-down features that are triggered by regulatory capital thresholds or regulatory actions calling into question the issuing banking institution’s continued viability as a going-concern if the conversion trigger were not exercised. The Fund defines "dividend-paying securities" to include preferred and capital securities that make payments and distributions that are treated as dividends for U.S. federal income tax purposes.
The Fund invests in investment-grade securities and in below-investment-grade securities (sometimes called "high yield" or "junk"). The Fund is not managed to a particular maturity or duration. The Fund concentrates its investments (invests more than 25% of its net assets) in securities in one or more industries (i.e., banking, insurance, and commercial finance) within the financial services sector.
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The Fund also invests in derivative instruments, such as futures and options, for hedging and for income generation purposes. A derivative is a financial arrangement, the value of which is derived from, or based on, a traditional security, asset, or market index.
Principal Risks
The value of your investment in the Fund changes with the value of the Fund’s investments. Many factors affect that value, and it is possible to lose money by investing in the Fund. An investment in the Fund is not a deposit of a bank and is not insured or guaranteed by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation or any other government agency. The principal risks of investing in the Fund are listed below in alphabetical order and not in order of significance.
Active Management Risk. There is no guarantee that the investment techniques, analyses, or judgments that the Fund’s investment advisor and/or sub-advisor applies in making investment decisions for the Fund will produce the intended outcome or that the investments the advisor selects for the Fund will perform as well as other securities that were not selected for the Fund. The Fund may not achieve its investment objective, and it is not intended to be a complete investment program.
Capital Securities Risk. In addition to the risks associated with other types of preferred securities and fixed-income securities, investing in capital securities includes the risk that the value of securities may decline in response to changes in legislation and regulations applicable to financial institutions and financial markets, increased competition, adverse changes in general or industry-specific economic conditions, or unfavorable interest rates.
Contingent Convertible Securities Risk. In addition to the general risks associated with fixed-income securities and convertible securities, the risks of investing in contingent convertible securities (“CoCos”) include the risk that a CoCo may be written down, written off, or converted into an equity security when the issuer’s capital ratio falls below a specified trigger level, or in a regulator’s discretion depending on the regulator’s judgment about the issuer’s solvency prospects. Due to these features, CoCos may have substantially greater risk than other securities in times of financial stress. If the trigger level is breached, the issuer’s decision to write down, write off, or convert a CoCo may result in the fund’s complete loss on an investment in CoCos with no chance of recovery even if the issuer remains in existence.
Derivatives Risk. Derivatives may not move in the direction anticipated by the portfolio manager. Transactions in derivatives may increase volatility, cause the liquidation of portfolio positions when not advantageous to do so, and result in disproportionate losses that may be substantially greater than a fund’s initial investment.
Futures. Futures contracts involve specific risks, including: the imperfect correlation between the change in market value of the instruments held by the Fund and the price of the futures contract; possible lack of a liquid secondary market for a futures contract and the resulting inability to close a futures contract when desired; counterparty risk; and if the Fund has insufficient cash, it may have to sell securities from its portfolio to meet daily variation margin requirements.
Options. Options involve specific risks, including: the imperfect correlation between the change in market value of the instruments held by the Fund and the price of the options; counterparty risk; difference in trading hours for the options markets and the markets for the underlying securities (rate movements can take place in the underlying markets that cannot be reflected in the options markets); and an insufficient liquid secondary market for particular options.
Dividend-Oriented Stocks Risk. Companies that have paid regular dividends to shareholders may decrease or eliminate dividend payments in the future. For example, a sharp rise in interest rates or economic downturn could cause a company to unexpectedly reduce or eliminate its dividend. Additionally, the Fund’s performance during a broad market advance could suffer because dividend-paying securities may not experience the same capital appreciation as non-dividend paying securities.
Fixed-Income Securities Risk. Fixed-income securities are subject to interest rate, credit quality, and liquidity risks. The market value of fixed-income securities generally declines when interest rates rise, and increased interest rates may adversely affect the liquidity of certain fixed-income securities. Moreover, an issuer of fixed-income securities could default on its payment obligations due to increased interest rates or for other reasons.
Foreign Securities Risk. The risks of foreign securities include loss of value as a result of: political or economic instability; nationalization, expropriation, or confiscatory taxation; settlement delays; and limited government regulation (including less stringent reporting, accounting, and disclosure standards than are required of U.S. companies).
High Yield Securities Risk. High yield fixed-income securities (commonly referred to as “junk bonds”) are subject to greater credit quality risk than higher rated fixed-income securities and should be considered speculative.
33


Industry Concentration Risk. A fund that concentrates investments in a particular industry or group of industries has greater exposure than other funds to market, economic, and other factors affecting that industry or group of industries.
Financial Services. A fund concentrating in financial services companies may be more susceptible to adverse economic or regulatory occurrences affecting financial services companies. Financial companies may be adversely affected in certain market cycles, including periods of rising interest rates, which may restrict the availability and increase the cost of capital, and declining economic conditions, which may cause credit losses due to financial difficulties of borrowers. Because many types of financial companies are especially vulnerable to these economic cycles, the Fund’s investments in these companies may lose significant value during such periods.
Market Trading Risks. The Fund faces numerous market trading risks, including the potential lack of an active market for Fund shares, losses from trading in secondary markets, and disruption to the activities of market makers, authorized participants, or other participants and in the creation/redemption process of the Fund. ANY OF THESE FACTORS MAY LEAD TO THE FUND’S SHARES TRADING AT A PREMIUM OR DISCOUNT TO NAV.
Portfolio Duration Risk. Portfolio duration is a measure of the expected life of a fixed-income security and its sensitivity to changes in interest rates. The longer a fund’s average portfolio duration, the more sensitive the fund will be to changes in interest rates, which means funds with longer average portfolio durations may be more volatile than those with shorter durations.
Preferred Securities Risk. Because preferred securities have a lower priority claim on assets or earnings than senior bonds and other debt instruments in a company’s capital structure, they are subject to greater credit and liquidation risk than more senior debt instruments. In addition, preferred securities are subject to other risks, such as limited or no voting rights, deferring or skipping distributions, interest rate risk, and redeeming the security prior to any stated maturity date.
Real Estate Investment Trusts (“REITs”) Risk. In addition to risks associated with investing in real estate securities, REITs are dependent upon management skills, are not diversified, and are subject to heavy cash flow dependency, risks of default by borrowers, and self-liquidation. Investment in REITs also involves risks similar to risks of investing in small market capitalization companies, such as limited financial resources, less frequent and limited volume trading, and may be subject to more abrupt or erratic price movements than larger company securities. A REIT could fail to qualify for tax-free pass-through of income under the Internal Revenue Code. Fund shareholders will indirectly bear their proportionate share of the expenses of REITs in which the fund invests.
Real Estate Securities Risk. Investing in real estate securities subjects the fund to the risks associated with the real estate market (which are similar to the risks associated with direct ownership in real estate), including declines in real estate values, loss due to casualty or condemnation, property taxes, interest rate changes, increased expenses, cash flow of underlying real estate assets, regulatory changes (including zoning, land use, and rents), and environmental problems, as well as to the risks related to the management skill and creditworthiness of the issuer.
Redemption and Large Transaction Risk. Ownership of the Fund’s shares may be concentrated in one or a few large investors (such as funds of funds, institutional investors, and asset allocation programs) that may sell or purchase Fund shares in large quantities on the secondary market. These secondary market transactions may cause authorized participants to increase their purchases and redemptions of creation units from the Fund. Purchases and redemptions of creation units primarily with cash rather than through in-kind delivery of portfolio securities may cause the Fund to incur certain costs, such as brokerage costs or taxable gains or losses that it might not have incurred if it had made a redemption in kind. These costs could be imposed on the Fund and thus decrease its NAV to the extent that the costs are not offset by a transaction fee payable by an authorized participant.
Tax-Advantaged Strategy Risk. There can be no assurance as to the portion of the Fund’s distributions that will qualify for favorable federal income tax treatment. The Fund may make investments and pay dividends that are ineligible for favorable tax treatment or that otherwise do not meet the requirements for such treatment, and shareholders must satisfy certain requirements to take advantage of beneficial tax treatment.
For example, only certain individual and non-corporate taxpayers (and not corporate and other certain taxpayers) are eligible for reduced income tax rates (0%-20%) on QDI or to deduct up to 20% of qualified dividends from REITs (“QRD”). Additionally, in order to benefit from QDI or QRD treatment, both the Fund and eligible shareholders must meet holding period requirements. Some taxpayers (including certain individuals, trusts, and estates) may be subject to an additional 3.8% tax on QDI. Current regulations provide for favorable QRD treatment only for dividends distributed during the 2018-2025 tax years.

34


Moreover, the Internal Revenue Service may take a contrary position as to the tax treatment of certain dividends. Federal income tax laws with respect to qualified dividends or other favorable tax treatment may change, and any applicable reduced income tax rate or deduction may change or be eliminated for some or all taxpayers. Therefore, some or all of the Fund’s dividends may be subject to ordinary income tax rates and/or may not qualify for any special deduction under U.S. federal income tax laws. Any dividends made by the Fund will also be subject to applicable state and local tax.
Because the Fund makes investment decisions based in part on tax considerations, the Fund’s pre-tax performance may be lower than the performance of similar funds that are not tax-managed.
Performance
The following information provides some indication of the risks of investing in the Fund. Past performance (before and after taxes) is not necessarily an indication of how the Fund will perform in the future. You may get updated performance information at www.PrincipalAM.com.
The bar chart shows the investment returns of the Fund’s shares for each full calendar year of operations for 10 years (or, if shorter, the life of the Fund). The table shows for the last one, five, and ten calendar year periods (or, if shorter, the life of the Fund), how the Fund’s average annual total returns compare with those of one or more broad measures of market performance.
Life of Fund returns are measured from the date the Fund's shares were first sold (June 16, 2020).
Total Returns as of December 31 (1)
1099511642836
Highest return for a quarter during the period of the bar chart above:
2Q 2021 2.75%
Lowest return for a quarter during the period of the bar chart above:
2Q 2022 (6.10)%
(1) The year-to-date return as of September 30, 2023 is 0.75%.
Average Annual Total Returns (Based on NAV)
For the periods ended December 31, 2022
1 Year
Life of Fund
Return Before Taxes (9.59)% 0.92%
Return After Taxes on Distributions (10.74)% (0.32)%
Return After Taxes on Distributions and Sale of Fund Shares (4.83)% 0.77%
Bloomberg Global Aggregate Bond Index (reflects no deductions for fees, expenses, or taxes) (16.25)% (6.33)%
ICE BofA Merrill Lynch 7% Constrained DRD Eligible Preferred Securities Index (reflects no deductions for fees, expenses, or taxes)
(13.99)% (1.20)%
After-tax returns are calculated using the historical highest individual federal marginal income tax rates and do not reflect the impact of state and local taxes. Actual after-tax returns depend on an investor’s tax situation and may differ from those shown. The after-tax returns shown are not relevant to investors who hold their Fund shares through tax-deferred arrangements, such as 401(k) plans or individual retirement accounts.
Effective November 1, 2023, the Fund changed its primary broad-based index to the Bloomberg Global Aggregate Bond Index in order to meet the revised definition of “broad-based securities market index.” The ICE BofA Merrill Lynch 7% Constrained DRD Eligible Preferred Securities Index is included as an additional index for the Fund as it shows how the Fund’s performance compares with the returns of an index of funds with similar investment objectives.
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Investment Advisor
Principal Global Investors, LLC
Sub-Advisor and Portfolio Managers
Spectrum Asset Management, Inc.
Fred Diaz (since 2020), Portfolio Manager
Roberto Giangregorio (since 2020), Portfolio Manager
L. Phillip Jacoby, IV (since 2020), Chief Investment Officer and Portfolio Manager
Manu Krishnan (since 2020), Portfolio Manager
Mark A. Lieb (since 2020), President and Chief Executive Officer
Kevin Nugent (since 2020), Portfolio Manager
Satomi Yarnell (since 2021), Portfolio Manager
Purchase and Sale of Fund Shares
The Fund issues and redeems Shares at net asset value ("NAV") only with authorized participants ("APs") who have entered into agreements with the Fund’s distributor and only in blocks of 50,000 Shares (each block of Shares is called a "Creation Unit"), or multiples thereof ("Creation Unit Aggregations"), in exchange for the deposit or delivery of a basket of securities that the Fund specifies each day. Except when aggregated in Creation Units, the Shares are not redeemable securities of the Fund. Typically, the basket of assets will be made up of securities, but may include a cash component. (See "Purchase and Redemption of Creation Units" in the Statement of Additional Information for more information.)
Shares of the Fund are listed for trading on NYSE Arca, Inc. Individual Shares may only be bought and sold in the secondary market through a broker or dealer at a market price. Because Shares trade at market prices rather than NAV, Shares may trade at prices greater than NAV (at a premium), at NAV, or less than NAV (at a discount). An investor may incur costs attributable to the difference between the highest price a buyer is willing to pay to purchase Shares (bid) and the lowest price a seller is willing to accept for Shares (ask) when buying or selling Shares on the secondary market (the bid-ask spread).
You can access recent information, including information on the Fund’s net asset value, market price, premiums and discounts, and bid-ask spreads at www.PrincipalAM.com.
Tax Information
The Fund’s distributions you receive are generally subject to federal income tax as ordinary income or capital gain and may also be subject to state and local taxes, unless you are tax-exempt or your account is tax-deferred in which case your distributions would be taxed when withdrawn from the tax-deferred account.
Payments to Broker-Dealers and Other Financial Intermediaries
If you purchase the Fund through a broker-dealer or other financial intermediary, the Fund and its related companies may pay the intermediary for the sale of Fund shares and related services. These payments may create a conflict of interest by influencing the broker-dealer or other intermediary and your salesperson to recommend the Fund over another investment. Ask your salesperson or visit your financial intermediary's website for more information.
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PRINCIPAL U.S. MEGA-CAP ETF
Objective:     The Fund seeks long-term growth of capital.
Fees and Expenses of the Fund
This table describes the fees and expenses that you may pay if you buy, hold, and sell shares of the Fund ("Shares"). You may pay other fees, such as brokerage commissions and other fees to financial intermediaries, which are not reflected in the table or the example below.
Annual Fund Operating Expenses
(expenses that you pay each year as a percentage of the value of your investment)
Management Fees
0.15%
Other Expenses
%
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses (1)
0.15%
Fee Waiver and/or Expense Reimbursement (2)
(0.03)%
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses After Fee Waiver and/or Expense Reimbursement
0.12%
(1)    The investment management agreement (the “Management Agreement”) between the Fund and Principal Global Investors, LLC (“PGI”) provides that, for the duration of the Management Agreement, PGI will pay all operating expenses of the Fund, except for the management fee, payments made under the Fund's Rule 12b-1 plan (if or when such fees are imposed), brokerage commissions and other expenses connected to the execution of portfolio transactions, interest expense, taxes, acquired fund fees and expenses, litigation expenses, and other extraordinary expenses.
(2)    Principal Global Investors, LLC ("PGI") has contractually agreed to reduce total annual fund operating expenses for the Fund by waiving a portion of its management fee, or reimbursing the Fund, to the extent that total expenses exceed 0.12% (excluding interest expense, expenses related to fund investments, acquired fund fees and expenses, and tax reclaim recovery expenses and other extraordinary expenses) expressed as a percent of average net assets on an annualized basis. It is expected that the expense limit will continue through the period ending October 31, 2024; however, Principal Exchange-Traded Funds and PGI, the parties to the agreement, may mutually agree to terminate the expense limit prior to the end of the period. Subject to applicable expense limits, the Fund may reimburse PGI for expenses incurred during the current fiscal year.
Example
This Example is intended to help you compare the cost of investing in the Fund with the cost of investing in other funds. The Example assumes that you invest $10,000 in the Fund for the time periods indicated and then redeem all of your shares at the ends of those periods. The Example also assumes that your investment has a 5% return each year and that the Fund’s operating expenses remain the same. The calculation of costs takes into account contractual fee waivers and/or expense reimbursements for the period noted in the table above. Although your actual costs may be higher or lower, based on these assumptions your costs would be:
1 year 3 years 5 years 10 years
Principal U.S. Mega-Cap ETF $12 $45 $82 $189
Portfolio Turnover
The Fund pays transaction costs, such as commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or "turns over" its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover rate may indicate higher transaction costs and may result in higher taxes when Fund shares are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are not reflected in annual fund operating expenses or in the example, affect the Fund’s performance. During the most recent fiscal year, the Fund's portfolio turnover rate was 28.8% of the average value of its portfolio.
Principal Investment Strategies
Under normal circumstances, the Fund invests at least 80% of its net assets, plus any borrowings for investment purposes, in equity securities of U.S. companies with very large ("mega") market capitalizations at the time of purchase. For this Fund, companies with mega capitalizations are those with market capitalizations in the top 50th percentile of the S&P 500 Index at the time of purchase. As of September 30, 2023, the market capitalization range of the companies in the S&P 500 Index was between approximately $4.0 billion and $2.7 trillion, and the market capitalization range of companies with mega capitalizations in the S&P 500 Index was between approximately $187.3 billion and $2.7 trillion.
For security selection and portfolio construction, Principal Global Investors, LLC ("PGI") uses a proprietary quantitative model. The model is designed to identify equity securities of companies in the S&P 500 Index that have the largest market capitalizations, while typically applying higher weight to securities that PGI expects to be less volatile, meaning the share price of the security has a lower degree of fluctuation over time. The Fund invests in equity securities of different styles (growth or value).

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The Fund's holdings are expected to be rebalanced at least annually. However, PGI may make any adjustments to the model and Fund holdings at its discretion. In constructing and revising the model and managing the Fund’s investments, PGI uses insights from diverse sources, including internal investment research, industry reports, and data from third-party consultants and other service providers, to develop and refine its investment themes and identify and take advantage of trends that may impact the Fund and its holdings.
The Fund invested significantly in one or more industries within the healthcare sector and information technology sector as of September 30, 2023.
Note: "Standard & Poor's 500" and "S&P 500®" are trademarks of Standard & Poor's Financial Services LLC and have been licensed by Principal. The Fund is not sponsored, endorsed, sold, or promoted by Standard & Poor's Financial Services LLC, and Standard & Poor's Financial Services LLC makes no representation regarding the advisability of investing in the Fund.
Principal Risks
The value of your investment in the Fund changes with the value of the Fund’s investments. Many factors affect that value, and it is possible to lose money by investing in the Fund. An investment in the Fund is not a deposit of a bank and is not insured or guaranteed by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation or any other government agency. The principal risks of investing in the Fund are listed below in alphabetical order and not in order of significance.
Active Management Risk. There is no guarantee that the investment techniques, analyses, or judgments that the Fund’s investment advisor and/or sub-advisor applies in making investment decisions for the Fund will produce the intended outcome or that the investments the advisor selects for the Fund will perform as well as other securities that were not selected for the Fund. The Fund may not achieve its investment objective, and it is not intended to be a complete investment program.
Equity Securities Risk. A variety of factors can negatively impact the value of equity securities held by a fund, including a decline in the issuer’s financial condition, unfavorable performance of the issuer’s sector or industry, or changes in response to overall market and economic conditions. A fund’s principal market segment(s) (such as market capitalization or style) may underperform other market segments or the equity markets as a whole.
Growth Style Risk. Growth investing entails the risk that if growth companies do not increase their earnings at a rate expected by investors, the market price of their stock may decline significantly, even if earnings show an absolute increase. Growth company stocks also typically lack the dividend yield that can lessen price declines in market downturns.
Value Style Risk. Value investing entails the risk that value stocks may continue to be undervalued by the market for extended periods, including the entire period during which the stock is held by a fund, or the events that would cause the stock price to increase may not occur as anticipated or at all. Moreover, a stock that appears to be undervalued actually may be appropriately priced at a low level and, therefore, would not be profitable for the fund.
Healthcare Sector Risk. A fund that invests in securities of companies in the healthcare sector (which includes companies involved in several industries, including biotechnology research and production, drugs and pharmaceuticals and health care facilities and services) is subject to the direct risks of investing in such companies. These companies are subject to extensive competition (due to, among others, generic drug sales or the loss of patent protection), product liability litigation and increased government regulation. Research and development costs of bringing new drugs to market are substantial, and there is no guarantee that a proposed product will ever come to market. Such companies are heavily dependent on patent and intellectual property rights, the loss or impairment of which may adversely affect profitability. Healthcare facility operators may be affected by the demand for services, efforts by government or insurers to limit rates, restriction of government financial assistance and competition from other providers.
Information Technology Sector Risk. Companies in the information technology sector may face dramatic and often unpredictable changes in growth rates and are particularly vulnerable to changes in technology product cycles, product obsolescence, government regulation, and competition, both domestically and internationally. Such companies are heavily dependent on patent and intellectual property rights, the loss or impairment of which may adversely affect profitability.
Market Trading Risks. The Fund faces numerous market trading risks, including the potential lack of an active market for Fund shares, losses from trading in secondary markets, and disruption to the activities of market makers, authorized participants, or other participants and in the creation/redemption process of the Fund. ANY OF THESE FACTORS MAY LEAD TO THE FUND’S SHARES TRADING AT A PREMIUM OR DISCOUNT TO NAV.
38


Model Risk. Because PGI uses quantitative models to select and hold securities, the Fund may hold securities that present risks that an investment advisor researching individual securities might seek to avoid. Moreover, models may be predictive in nature and depend heavily on the accuracy and reliability of historical data that is supplied by others and may be incorrect or incorrectly input. The Fund bears the risk that the quantitative models used will not be successful in identifying trends or in determining the size and direction of investment positions that will enable the Fund to achieve its investment objective.
Redemption and Large Transaction Risk. Ownership of the Fund’s shares may be concentrated in one or a few large investors (such as funds of funds, institutional investors, and asset allocation programs) that may sell or purchase Fund shares in large quantities on the secondary market. These secondary market transactions may cause authorized participants to increase their purchases and redemptions of creation units from the Fund. Purchases and redemptions of creation units primarily with cash rather than through in-kind delivery of portfolio securities may cause the Fund to incur certain costs, such as brokerage costs or taxable gains or losses that it might not have incurred if it had made a redemption in kind. These costs could be imposed on the Fund and thus decrease its NAV to the extent that the costs are not offset by a transaction fee payable by an authorized participant.
Performance
The following information provides some indication of the risks of investing in the Fund. Past performance (before and after taxes) is not necessarily an indication of how the Fund will perform in the future. You may get updated performance information at www.PrincipalAM.com.
The bar chart shows the investment returns of the Fund’s shares for each full calendar year of operations for 10 years (or, if shorter, the life of the Fund). The table shows for the last one, five, and ten calendar year periods (or, if shorter, the life of the Fund), how the Fund’s average annual total returns compare with those of one or more broad measures of market performance.
Life of Fund returns are measured from the date the Fund's shares were first sold (October 11, 2017).
Prior to June 10, 2022, the objective and strategy of the Fund differed from its current objective and strategy. Accordingly, performance of the Fund for periods prior to that date may not be representative of the performance the Fund would have achieved had the Fund been following its current objective and strategy.
Total Returns as of December 31 (1)
6445
Highest return for a quarter during the period of the bar chart above:
2Q 2020 16.44%
Lowest return for a quarter during the period of the bar chart above:
1Q 2020 (17.17)%
(1) The year-to-date return as of September 30, 2023 is 19.41%.
39


Average Annual Total Returns (Based on NAV)
For the periods ended December 31, 2022(1)
1 Year
5 Year
Life of Fund
Return Before Taxes (17.03)% 8.75% 9.33%
Return After Taxes on Distributions (17.37)% 8.26% 8.84%
Return After Taxes on Distributions and Sale of Fund Shares (9.83)% 6.86% 7.35%
S&P 500 Index (reflects no deductions for fees, expenses or taxes)
(18.11)% 9.42% 10.08%
(1) Prior to June 10, 2022, the objective and strategy of the Fund differed from its current objective and strategy. Accordingly, performance of the Fund for periods prior to that date may not be representative of the performance the Fund would have achieved had the Fund been following its current objective and strategy.
After-tax returns are calculated using the historical highest individual federal marginal income tax rates and do not reflect the impact of state and local taxes. Actual after-tax returns depend on an investor’s tax situation and may differ from those shown. The after-tax returns shown are not relevant to investors who hold their Fund shares through tax-deferred arrangements, such as 401(k) plans or individual retirement accounts.
Investment Advisor and Portfolio Managers
Principal Global Investors, LLC
Christopher Ibach (since 2023), Portfolio Manager
Aaron J. Siebel (since 2020), Portfolio Manager
Purchase and Sale of Fund Shares
The Fund issues and redeems Shares at net asset value ("NAV") only with authorized participants who have entered into agreements with the Fund's distributor and only in blocks of 20,000 Shares (each block of Shares is called a "Creation Unit"), or multiples thereof ("Creation Unit Aggregations"), in exchange for the deposit or delivery of a basket of securities that the Fund specifies each day. Except when aggregated in Creation Units, the Shares are not redeemable securities of the Fund. Typically, the basket of assets will be made up of securities, but may include a cash component. (See "Purchase and Redemption of Creation Units" in the Statement of Additional Information for more information.)
Shares of the Fund are listed for trading on The Nasdaq Stock Market LLC. Individual Shares may only be bought and sold in the secondary market through a broker or dealer at a market price. Because Shares trade at market prices rather than NAV, Shares may trade at prices greater than NAV (at a premium), at NAV, or less than NAV (at a discount). An investor may incur costs attributable to the difference between the highest price a buyer is willing to pay to purchase Shares (bid) and the lowest price a seller is willing to accept for Shares (ask) when buying or selling Shares on the secondary market (the bid-ask spread).
You can access recent information, including information on the Fund’s net asset value, market price, premiums and discounts, and bid-ask spreads at www.PrincipalAM.com.
Tax Information
The Fund’s distributions you receive are generally subject to federal income tax as ordinary income or capital gain and may also be subject to state and local taxes, unless you are tax-exempt or your account is tax-deferred in which case your distributions would be taxed when withdrawn from the tax-deferred account.
Payments to Broker-Dealers and Other Financial Intermediaries
If you purchase the Fund through a broker-dealer or other financial intermediary, the Fund and its related companies may pay the intermediary for the sale of Fund shares and related services. These payments may create a conflict of interest by influencing the broker-dealer or other intermediary and your salesperson to recommend the Fund over another investment. Ask your salesperson or visit your financial intermediary's website for more information.

40


PRINCIPAL U.S. SMALL-CAP ETF (f/k/a Principal U.S. Small-Cap Multi-Factor ETF)
Objective:    The Fund seeks long-term growth of capital.
Fees and Expenses of the Fund
This table describes the fees and expenses that you may pay if you buy, hold, and sell shares of the Fund ("Shares"). You may pay other fees, such as brokerage commissions and other fees to financial intermediaries, which are not reflected in the table or the example below.
Annual Fund Operating Expenses
(expenses that you pay each year as a percentage of the value of your investment)
Management Fees
0.38%
Other Expenses
%
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses (1)
0.38%
(1)    The investment management agreement (the “Management Agreement”) between the Fund and Principal Global Investors, LLC (“PGI”) provides that, for the duration of the Management Agreement, PGI will pay all operating expenses of the Fund, except for the management fee, payments made under the Fund's Rule 12b-1 plan (if or when such fees are imposed), brokerage commissions and other expenses connected to the execution of portfolio transactions, interest expense, taxes, acquired fund fees and expenses, litigation expenses, and other extraordinary expenses.
Example
This Example is intended to help you compare the cost of investing in the Fund with the cost of investing in other funds. The Example assumes that you invest $10,000 in the Fund for the time periods indicated and then redeem all of your shares at the ends of those periods. The Example also assumes that your investment has a 5% return each year and that the Fund’s operating expenses remain the same. Although your actual costs may be higher or lower, based on these assumptions your costs would be:
1 year 3 years 5 years 10 years
Principal U.S. Small-Cap ETF $39 $122 $213 $480
Portfolio Turnover
The Fund pays transaction costs, such as commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or “turns over” its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover rate may indicate higher transaction costs and may result in higher taxes when Fund shares are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are not reflected in annual fund operating expenses or in the example, affect the Fund’s performance. During the most recent fiscal year, the Fund's portfolio turnover rate was 74.1% of the average value of its portfolio.
Principal Investment Strategies
Under normal circumstances, the Fund invests at least 80% of its net assets, plus any borrowings for investment purposes, in equity securities of U.S. companies with small market capitalizations at the time of purchase. For this Fund, companies with small market capitalizations are those with market capitalizations within the range of companies comprising the Russell 2000 Index. As of September 30, 2023, the market capitalization range of the companies in the Russell 2000 Index was between approximately $25.5 million to $14.5 billion.
For security selection and portfolio construction, Principal Global Investors, LLC ("PGI") uses a proprietary quantitative model designed to identify and rank equity securities (including growth and value stock) of small-capitalization companies in the Russell 2000 Index that PGI believes display (i) value characteristics (companies with low share prices relative to their fundamental value), (ii) higher quality (companies that possess higher quality characteristics relative to their peers, measured by profitability, earnings quality, balance sheet strength, and solvency), and (iii) higher momentum (companies that have share prices and earnings that are trending up). In weighting securities, the model first weights the preceding three characteristics approximately equally and then seeks to assign greater weight to securities that PGI determines are more liquid (meaning the securities that would be the easiest to trade without significantly impacting their value based on recent average trading volumes) and less volatile (meaning the share price of the security has a lower degree of fluctuation over time).
The Fund's holdings are expected to be rebalanced at least annually. However, PGI may make any adjustments to the model and Fund holdings at its discretion. In constructing and revising the model and managing the Fund’s investments, PGI uses insights from diverse sources, including internal investment research, industry reports, and data from third-party consultants and other service providers, to develop and refine its investment themes and identify and take advantage of trends that may impact the Fund and its holdings.
Note:    "Russell 2000" is a trademark of FTSE Russell Company and has been licensed by Principal. The Fund is not sponsored, endorsed, sold, or promoted by FTSE Russell Company, and FTSE Russell Company makes no representation regarding the advisability of investing in the Fund.
41


Principal Risks
The value of your investment in the Fund changes with the value of the Fund’s investments. Many factors affect that value, and it is possible to lose money by investing in the Fund. An investment in the Fund is not a deposit of a bank and is not insured or guaranteed by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation or any other government agency. The principal risks of investing in the Fund are listed below in alphabetical order and not in order of significance.
Active Management Risk. There is no guarantee that the investment techniques, analyses, or judgments that the Fund’s investment advisor and/or sub-advisor applies in making investment decisions for the Fund will produce the intended outcome or that the investments the advisor selects for the Fund will perform as well as other securities that were not selected for the Fund. The Fund may not achieve its investment objective, and it is not intended to be a complete investment program.
Equity Securities Risk. A variety of factors can negatively impact the value of equity securities held by a fund, including a decline in the issuer’s financial condition, unfavorable performance of the issuer’s sector or industry, or changes in response to overall market and economic conditions. A fund’s principal market segment(s) (such as market capitalization or style) may underperform other market segments or the equity markets as a whole.
Growth Style Risk. Growth investing entails the risk that if growth companies do not increase their earnings at a rate expected by investors, the market price of their stock may decline significantly, even if earnings show an absolute increase. Growth company stocks also typically lack the dividend yield that can lessen price declines in market downturns.
Smaller Companies Risk. Investments in smaller companies may involve greater risk and price volatility than investments in larger, more mature companies. Smaller companies may have limited product lines, markets, or financial resources; lack the competitive strength of larger companies; have less experienced managers; or depend on a few key employees. Their securities often are less widely held and trade less frequently and in lesser quantities, and their market prices often fluctuate more, than securities of larger companies.
Value Style Risk. Value investing entails the risk that value stocks may continue to be undervalued by the market for extended periods, including the entire period during which the stock is held by a fund, or the events that would cause the stock price to increase may not occur as anticipated or at all. Moreover, a stock that appears to be undervalued actually may be appropriately priced at a low level and, therefore, would not be profitable for the fund.
Market Trading Risks. The Fund faces numerous market trading risks, including the potential lack of an active market for Fund shares, losses from trading in secondary markets, and disruption to the activities of market makers, authorized participants, or other participants and in the creation/redemption process of the Fund. ANY OF THESE FACTORS MAY LEAD TO THE FUND’S SHARES TRADING AT A PREMIUM OR DISCOUNT TO NAV.
Model Risk. Because PGI uses quantitative models to select and hold securities, the Fund may hold securities that present risks that an investment advisor researching individual securities might seek to avoid. Moreover, models may be predictive in nature and depend heavily on the accuracy and reliability of historical data that is supplied by others and may be incorrect or incorrectly input. The Fund bears the risk that the quantitative models used will not be successful in identifying trends or in determining the size and direction of investment positions that will enable the Fund to achieve its investment objective.
Momentum Style Risk. Stocks that previously exhibited high momentum characteristics may not experience positive momentum or may experience more volatility than the market as a whole. In addition, there may be periods when momentum style is out of favor, during which the investment performance of a Fund that uses momentum-based strategies may suffer.
Redemption and Large Transaction Risk. Ownership of the Fund’s shares may be concentrated in one or a few large investors (such as funds of funds, institutional investors, and asset allocation programs) that may sell or purchase Fund shares in large quantities on the secondary market. These secondary market transactions may cause authorized participants to increase their purchases and redemptions of creation units from the Fund. Purchases and redemptions of creation units primarily with cash rather than through in-kind delivery of portfolio securities may cause the Fund to incur certain costs, such as brokerage costs or taxable gains or losses that it might not have incurred if it had made a redemption in kind. These costs could be imposed on the Fund and thus decrease its NAV to the extent that the costs are not offset by a transaction fee payable by an authorized participant.



42


Performance
The following information provides some indication of the risks of investing in the Fund. Past performance (before and after taxes) is not necessarily an indication of how the Fund will perform in the future. You may get updated performance information at www.PrincipalAM.com.
The bar chart shows the investment returns of the Fund’s shares for each full calendar year of operations for 10 years (or, if shorter, the life of the Fund). The table shows for the last one, five, and ten calendar year periods (or, if shorter, the life of the Fund), how the Fund’s average annual total returns compare with those of one or more broad measures of market performance.
Life of Fund returns are measured from the date the Fund's shares were first sold (September 21, 2016).
Prior to July 8, 2022, the objective and strategy of the Fund differed from its current objective and strategy. Accordingly, performance of the Fund for periods prior to that date may not be representative of the performance the Fund would have achieved had the Fund been following its current objective and strategy.
Total Returns as of December 31 (1)
7201
Highest return for a quarter during the period of the bar chart above:
4Q 2020 30.83%
Lowest return for a quarter during the period of the bar chart above:
1Q 2020 (32.95)%
(1) The year-to-date return as of September 30, 2023 is 5.03%.
Average Annual Total Returns (Based on NAV)
For the periods ended December 31, 2022(1)
1 Year
5 Year
Life of Fund
Return Before Taxes (15.99)% 6.35% 8.91%
Return After Taxes on Distributions (16.37)% 5.96% 8.54%
Return After Taxes on Distributions and Sale of Fund Shares (9.20)% 4.93% 7.07%
Russell 3000 Index (reflects no deductions for fees, expenses, or taxes) (19.21)% 8.79% 11.24%
Russell 2000 Index (reflects no deductions for fees, expenses, or taxes)
(20.44)% 4.13% 7.31%
(1) Prior to July 8, 2022, the objective and strategy of the Fund differed from its current objective and strategy. Accordingly, performance of the Fund for periods prior to that date may not be representative of the performance the Fund would have achieved had the Fund been following its current objective and strategy.
After-tax returns are calculated using the historical highest individual federal marginal income tax rates and do not reflect the impact of state and local taxes. Actual after-tax returns depend on an investor’s tax situation and may differ from those shown. The after-tax returns shown are not relevant to investors who hold their Fund shares through tax-deferred arrangements, such as 401(k) plans or individual retirement accounts.
Effective November 1, 2023, the Fund changed its primary broad-based index to the Russell 3000 Index in order to meet the revised definition of “broad-based securities market index.” The Russell 2000 Index is included as an additional index for the Fund as it shows how the Fund’s performance compares with the returns of an index of funds with similar investment objectives.
Investment Advisor and Portfolio Managers
Principal Global Investors, LLC
Christopher Ibach (since 2023), Portfolio Manager
Aaron J. Siebel (since 2020), Portfolio Manager
43


Purchase and Sale of Fund Shares
The Fund issues and redeems Shares at net asset value ("NAV") only with authorized participants ("APs") who have entered into agreements with the Fund’s distributor and only in blocks of 20,000 Shares (each block of Shares is called a "Creation Unit"), or multiples thereof ("Creation Unit Aggregations"), in exchange for the deposit or delivery of a basket of securities that the Fund specifies each day. Except when aggregated in Creation Units, the Shares are not redeemable securities of the Fund. Typically, the basket of assets will be made up of securities, but may include a cash component. (See "Purchase and Redemption of Creation Units" in the Statement of Additional Information for more information.)
Shares of the Fund are listed for trading on The Nasdaq Stock Market LLC. Individual Shares may only be bought and sold in the secondary market through a broker or dealer at a market price. Because Shares trade at market prices rather than NAV, Shares may trade at prices greater than NAV (at a premium), at NAV, or less than NAV (at a discount). An investor may incur costs attributable to the difference between the highest price a buyer is willing to pay to purchase Shares (bid) and the lowest price a seller is willing to accept for Shares (ask) when buying or selling Shares on the secondary market (the bid-ask spread).
You can access recent information, including information on the Fund’s net asset value, market price, premiums and discounts, and bid-ask spreads at www.PrincipalAM.com.
Tax Information
The Fund’s distributions you receive are generally subject to federal income tax as ordinary income or capital gain and may also be subject to state and local taxes, unless you are tax-exempt or your account is tax-deferred in which case your distributions would be taxed when withdrawn from the tax-deferred account.
Payments to Broker-Dealers and Other Financial Intermediaries
If you purchase the Fund through a broker-dealer or other financial intermediary, the Fund and its related companies may pay the intermediary for the sale of Fund shares and related services. These payments may create a conflict of interest by influencing the broker-dealer or other intermediary and your salesperson to recommend the Fund over another investment. Ask your salesperson or visit your financial intermediary's website for more information.

44


PRINCIPAL VALUE ETF
Objective:     The Fund seeks long-term growth of capital.
Fees and Expenses of the Fund
This table describes the fees and expenses that you may pay if you buy, hold, and sell shares of the Fund ("Shares"). You may pay other fees, such as brokerage commissions and other fees to financial intermediaries, which are not reflected in the table or the example below.
Annual Fund Operating Expenses
(expenses that you pay each year as a percentage of the value of your investment)
Management Fees 0.15%
Other Expenses
%
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses (1)
0.15%
(1)    The investment management agreement (the "Management Agreement") between the Fund and Principal Global Investors, LLC ("PGI") provides that, for the duration of the Management Agreement, PGI will pay all operating expenses of the Fund, except the management fee, payments made under the Fund's Rule 12b-1 plan (if or when such fees are imposed), brokerage commissions and other expenses connected to the execution of portfolio transactions, interest expense, taxes, acquired fund fees and expenses, litigation expenses, and other extraordinary expenses.
Example
This Example is intended to help you compare the cost of investing in the Fund with the cost of investing in other funds. The Example assumes that you invest $10,000 in the Fund for the time periods indicated and then redeem all of your shares at the ends of those periods. The Example also assumes that your investment has a 5% return each year and that the Fund’s operating expenses remain the same. Although your actual costs may be higher or lower, based on these assumptions your costs would be:
1 year
3 years
5 years
10 years
Principal Value ETF $15 $48 $85 $192
Portfolio Turnover
The Fund pays transaction costs, such as commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or "turns over" its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover rate may indicate higher transaction costs and may result in higher taxes when Fund shares are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are not reflected in annual fund operating expenses or in the example, affect the Fund’s performance. During the most recent fiscal year, the Fund's portfolio turnover rate was 1.8% of the average value of its portfolio.
Principal Investment Strategies
Under normal circumstances, the Fund primarily invests in equity securities, focusing on value stocks. For security selection and portfolio construction, Principal Global Investors, LLC ("PGI") uses a proprietary quantitative model designed to identify equity securities of mid- to large-capitalization companies in the S&P 500 Index that exhibit higher degrees of shareholder yield (meaning how much money a company distributes to shareholders through dividends and share repurchases). As of September 30, 2023, the market capitalization range of the companies in the S&P 500 Index was between approximately $4.0 billion and $2.7 trillion. The model includes securities that have paid a regular dividend in the prior year.
The Fund's holdings are expected to be rebalanced at least annually. However, PGI may make any adjustments to the model and Fund holdings at its discretion. In constructing and revising the model and managing the Fund’s investments, PGI uses insights from diverse sources, including internal investment research, industry reports, and data from third-party consultants and other service providers, to develop and refine its investment themes and identify and take advantage of trends that may impact the Fund and its holdings.
The Fund invested significantly in one or more industries within the following sectors as of September 30, 2023: financials, industrials, and information technology.
Note: "Standard & Poor's 500" and "S&P 500®" are trademarks of Standard & Poor's Financial Services LLC and have been licensed by Principal. The Fund is not sponsored, endorsed, sold, or promoted by Standard & Poor's Financial Services LLC, and Standard & Poor's Financial Services LLC makes no representation regarding the advisability of investing in the Fund.
45


Principal Risks
The value of your investment in the Fund changes with the value of the Fund’s investments. Many factors affect that value, and it is possible to lose money by investing in the Fund. An investment in the Fund is not a deposit of a bank and is not insured or guaranteed by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation or any other government agency. The principal risks of investing in the Fund are listed below in alphabetical order and not in order of significance.
Active Management Risk. There is no guarantee that the investment techniques, analyses, or judgments that the Fund’s investment advisor and/or sub-advisor applies in making investment decisions for the Fund will produce the intended outcome or that the investments the advisor selects for the Fund will perform as well as other securities that were not selected for the Fund. The Fund may not achieve its investment objective, and it is not intended to be a complete investment program.
Equity Securities Risk. A variety of factors can negatively impact the value of equity securities held by a fund, including a decline in the issuer’s financial condition, unfavorable performance of the issuer’s sector or industry, or changes in response to overall market and economic conditions. A fund’s principal market segment(s) (such as market capitalization or style) may underperform other market segments or the equity markets as a whole.
Value Style Risk. Value investing entails the risk that value stocks may continue to be undervalued by the market for extended periods, including the entire period during which the stock is held by a fund, or the events that would cause the stock price to increase may not occur as anticipated or at all. Moreover, a stock that appears to be undervalued actually may be appropriately priced at a low level and, therefore, would not be profitable for the fund.
Financials Sector Risk. A fund that invests significantly in financial services companies may be more susceptible to adverse economic or regulatory occurrences affecting financial services companies. Financial companies may be adversely affected in certain market cycles, including periods of rising interest rates, which may restrict the availability and increase the cost of capital, and declining economic conditions, which may cause credit losses due to financial difficulties of borrowers. Because many types of financial companies are especially vulnerable to these economic cycles, the Fund’s investments in these companies may lose significant value during such periods.
Industrials Sector Risk. To the extent that a fund invests significantly in the industrials sector, the fund will be sensitive to changes in, and the fund’s performance may depend to a greater extent on, the overall condition of the industrials sector. Among other factors, companies in the industrials sector may be adversely affected by changes in the supply of and demand for products and services, claims for environmental damage or product liability, government regulation, and general economic conditions.
Information Technology Sector Risk. Companies in the information technology sector may face dramatic and often unpredictable changes in growth rates and are particularly vulnerable to changes in technology product cycles, product obsolescence, government regulation, and competition, both domestically and internationally. Such companies are heavily dependent on patent and intellectual property rights, the loss or impairment of which may adversely affect profitability.
Market Trading Risks. The Fund faces numerous market trading risks, including the potential lack of an active market for Fund shares, losses from trading in secondary markets, and disruption to the activities of market makers, authorized participants, or other participants and in the creation/redemption process of the Fund. ANY OF THESE FACTORS MAY LEAD TO THE FUND’S SHARES TRADING AT A PREMIUM OR DISCOUNT TO NAV.
Model Risk. Because PGI uses quantitative models to select and hold securities, the Fund may hold securities that present risks that an investment advisor researching individual securities might seek to avoid. Moreover, models may be predictive in nature and depend heavily on the accuracy and reliability of historical data that is supplied by others and may be incorrect or incorrectly input. The Fund bears the risk that the quantitative models used will not be successful in identifying trends or in determining the size and direction of investment positions that will enable the Fund to achieve its investment objective.
Redemption and Large Transaction Risk. Ownership of the Fund’s shares may be concentrated in one or a few large investors (such as funds of funds, institutional investors, and asset allocation programs) that may sell or purchase Fund shares in large quantities on the secondary market. These secondary market transactions may cause authorized participants to increase their purchases and redemptions of creation units from the Fund. Purchases and redemptions of creation units primarily with cash rather than through in-kind delivery of portfolio securities may cause the Fund to incur certain costs, such as brokerage costs or taxable gains or losses that it might not have incurred if it had made a redemption in kind. These costs could be imposed on the Fund and thus decrease its NAV to the extent that the costs are not offset by a transaction fee payable by an authorized participant.
46


Performance
The following information provides some indication of the risks of investing in the Fund. Past performance (before and after taxes) is not necessarily an indication of how the Fund will perform in the future. You may get updated performance information at www.PrincipalAM.com.
The bar chart shows the investment returns of the Fund’s shares for each full calendar year of operations for 10 years (or, if shorter, the life of the Fund). The table shows for the last one, five, and ten calendar year periods (or, if shorter, the life of the Fund), how the Fund’s average annual total returns compare with those of one or more broad measures of market performance.
Life of Fund returns are measured from the date the Fund's shares were first sold (March 21, 2016).
Prior to June 24, 2022, the objective and strategy of the Fund differed from its current objective and strategy. Accordingly, performance of the Fund for periods prior to that date may not be representative of the performance the Fund would have achieved had the Fund been following its current objective and strategy.
Total Returns as of December 31 (1)
6655
Highest return for a quarter during the period of the bar chart above:
2Q 2020 22.18%
Lowest return for a quarter during the period of the bar chart above:
1Q 2020 (33.36)%
(1) The year-to-date return as of September 30, 2023 is (2.52)%.
Average Annual Total Returns (Based on NAV)
For the periods ended December 31, 2022(1)
1 Year
5 Year
Life of Fund
Return Before Taxes (4.92)% 7.74% 10.41%
Return After Taxes on Distributions (5.72)% 7.00% 9.70%
Return After Taxes on Distributions and Sale of Fund Shares (2.56)% 5.96% 8.25%
S&P 500 Index (reflects no deductions for fees, expenses or taxes)
(18.11)% 9.42% 11.74%
(1) Prior to June 24, 2022, the objective and strategy of the Fund differed from its current objective and strategy. Accordingly, performance of the Fund for periods prior to that date may not be representative of the performance the Fund would have achieved had the Fund been following its current objective and strategy.
After-tax returns are calculated using the historical highest individual federal marginal income tax rates and do not reflect the impact of state and local taxes. Actual after-tax returns depend on an investor’s tax situation and may differ from those shown. The after-tax returns shown are not relevant to investors who hold their Fund shares through tax-deferred arrangements, such as 401(k) plans or individual retirement accounts.
Investment Advisor and Portfolio Managers
Principal Global Investors, LLC
Christopher Ibach (since 2023), Portfolio Manager
Aaron J. Siebel (since 2020), Portfolio Manager
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Purchase and Sale of Fund Shares
The Fund issues and redeems Shares at net asset value ("NAV") only with authorized participants ("APs") who have entered into agreements with the Fund’s distributor and only in blocks of 20,000 Shares (each block of Shares is called a "Creation Unit"), or multiples thereof ("Creation Unit Aggregations"), in exchange for the deposit or delivery of a basket of securities that the Fund specifies each day. Except when aggregated in Creation Units, the Shares are not redeemable securities of the Fund. Typically, the basket of assets will be made up of securities, but may include a cash component. (See "Purchase and Redemption of Creation Units" in the Statement of Additional Information for more information.)
Shares of the Fund are listed for trading on The Nasdaq Stock Market LLC. Individual Shares may only be bought and sold in the secondary market through a broker or dealer at a market price. Because Shares trade at market prices rather than NAV, Shares may trade at prices greater than NAV (at a premium), at NAV, or less than NAV (at a discount). An investor may incur costs attributable to the difference between the highest price a buyer is willing to pay to purchase Shares (bid) and the lowest price a seller is willing to accept for Shares (ask) when buying or selling Shares on the secondary market (the bid-ask spread).
You can access recent information, including information on the Fund’s net asset value, market price, premiums and discounts, and bid-ask spreads at www.PrincipalAM.com.
Tax Information
The Fund’s distributions you receive are generally subject to federal income tax as ordinary income or capital gain and may also be subject to state and local taxes, unless you are tax-exempt or your account is tax-deferred in which case your distributions would be taxed when withdrawn from the tax-deferred account.
Payments to Broker-Dealers and Other Financial Intermediaries
If you purchase the Fund through a broker-dealer or other financial intermediary, the Fund and its related companies may pay the intermediary for the sale of Fund shares and related services. These payments may create a conflict of interest by influencing the broker-dealer or other intermediary and your salesperson to recommend the Fund over another investment. Ask your salesperson or visit your financial intermediary's website for more information.
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ADDITIONAL INFORMATION ABOUT INVESTMENT STRATEGIES AND RISKS
Each Fund's investment objective is described in the summary section for each Fund. The summary section also describes each Fund’s principal investment strategies, including the types of securities in which each Fund invests, and the principal risks of investing in each Fund. The principal investment strategies are not the only investment strategies available to each Fund, but they are the ones each Fund primarily uses to achieve its investment objective.
Except for Fundamental Restrictions described in the Trust's Statement of Additional Information ("SAI"), the Trust's Board (the "Board") may change any Fund's objective or investment strategies without a shareholder vote if it determines such a change is in the best interests of the Fund. If there is a material change to a Fund's investment objective or investment strategies, you should consider whether the Fund remains an appropriate investment for you. There is no guarantee that each Fund will meet its objective.
Each Fund is designed to be a portion of an investor's portfolio. No Fund is intended to be a complete investment program. Investors should consider the risks of a Fund before making an investment; it is possible to lose money by investing in a Fund.
The following investment strategies and risks (before the "Strategy and Risk Table" below) apply to the Funds and, depending on market conditions, can materially impact the management of the Funds.
Cash Management
A Fund may have uninvested cash balances pending investment in other securities, pending payment of redemptions, or in other circumstances where liquidity is necessary or desirable. A Fund may hold uninvested cash; invest it in cash equivalents such as money market funds, including the Principal Funds, Inc. Government Money Market Fund; lend it to other Funds pursuant to the Funds' interfund lending facility; and/or invest in other instruments that those managing the Fund’s assets deem appropriate for cash management purposes. Generally, these types of investments offer less potential for gains than other types of securities. For example, to attempt to provide returns similar to its benchmark, a Fund (regardless of how it designates usage of derivatives and investment companies in the table below) may invest uninvested cash in derivatives, such as stock index futures contracts, or exchange-traded funds (“ETFs”), including Principal Exchange-Traded Funds ETFs. In selecting such investments, Principal Global Investors, LLC (“PGI”), the Funds’ advisor, may have conflicts of interest due to economic or other incentives to make or retain an investment in certain affiliated funds instead of in other investments that may be appropriate for a Fund.
High Portfolio Turnover
"Portfolio turnover" is the term used in the industry for measuring the amount of trading that occurs in a fund's portfolio during the year. For example, a 100% turnover rate means that on average every security in the portfolio has been replaced once during the year. Funds with high turnover rates (more than 100%) often have higher transaction costs (which are paid by the fund), may result in higher taxes when fund shares are held in a taxable account, and may lower the fund's performance. High portfolio turnover can result in a lower capital gain distribution due to higher transaction costs added to the basis of the assets or can result in lower ordinary income distributions to shareholders when the transaction costs cannot be added to the basis of assets. Both events reduce fund performance.
Please consider all the factors when you compare the turnover rates of different funds. You should also be aware that the "total return" line in the Financial Highlights section reflects portfolio turnover costs.
Liquidity
The Funds have established a liquidity risk management program as required by the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission’s (the “SEC”) Liquidity Rule. Under the program, PGI assesses, manages, and periodically reviews each Fund’s liquidity risk, which is the risk that a Fund could not meet requests to redeem shares issued by the Fund without significant dilution of the remaining investors’ interests in the Fund. As part of the program, PGI classifies each investment as a “highly liquid investment,” “moderately liquid investment,” “less liquid investment,” or “illiquid investment.” The liquidity of a Fund’s portfolio investments is determined based on relevant market, trading, and investment-specific considerations under the program. To the extent that an investment is deemed to be an illiquid investment or a less liquid investment, a Fund can expect to be exposed to greater liquidity risk.
Certain fund holdings may be deemed to be less liquid or illiquid because they cannot be readily sold without significantly impacting the value of the holdings. A fund is exposed to liquidity risk when trading volume, lack of a market maker, or legal restrictions impair its ability to sell particular securities or close derivative positions at an advantageous price. Funds with principal investment strategies that involve securities of companies with smaller market capitalizations, foreign securities, derivatives, high yield bonds, and bank loans, or securities with substantial market and/or credit risk, tend to have the greatest exposure to liquidity risk.
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Liquidity risk also refers to the risk of unusually high redemption requests, redemption requests by certain large shareholders such as institutional investors or asset allocators, or other unusual market conditions that may make it difficult for a fund to sell investments within the allowable time period to meet redemptions. Meeting such redemption requests could require a fund to sell securities at reduced prices or under unfavorable conditions, which would reduce the value of the fund.
Additional liquidity risks that apply to ETFs are described under "Market Trading Risks" below.
Market Volatility and Securities Issuers
The value of a fund’s portfolio securities may decrease in response to overall stock or bond market movements. Markets tend to move in cycles, with periods of rising prices and periods of falling prices. Stocks tend to go up and down in value more than bonds. The value of a security may decline for reasons directly related to the issuer, such as management performance, financial leverage, and reduced demand for the issuer’s goods or services. As a result, the value of an individual security or particular type of security can be more volatile than the market as a whole and can perform differently from the value of the market as a whole.
Additionally, U.S. and world economies, as well as markets (or certain market sectors), may experience greater volatility in response to the occurrence of natural or man-made disasters and geopolitical events, such as war, acts of terrorism, pandemics, military actions, trade disputes, or political instability. Moreover, if a fund’s investments are concentrated in certain sectors, its performance could be worse than the overall market.
Recent events are impacting the securities markets. Russia's invasion of Ukraine in 2022 has resulted in sanctions being levied by the United States, European Union, and other countries against Russia. Russia's military actions and the resulting sanctions could adversely affect global energy and financial markets and, thus, could affect the value of the fund's investments, even beyond any direct exposure the fund may have to Russian issuers or the adjoining geographic regions. The extent and duration of the military action, sanctions, and resulting market disruptions could be substantial.
Other recent market disruption events include the pandemic spread of the novel coronavirus designated as COVID-19. The transmission of COVID-19 and efforts to contain its spread resulted in border closings and other travel restrictions and disruptions; disruptions to business operations, supply chains, and customer activity; event cancellations and restrictions; service cancellations and reductions; significant challenges in the healthcare industry; and quarantines. As experienced with the COVID-19 pandemic, health crises may exacerbate other pre-existing political, social, economic, market, and financial risks and negatively affect the global economy, as well as the economies of individual countries, the financial performance of individual companies and sectors, and the markets in general in significant ways.
Market disruption events could also impair the information technology and other operational systems upon which a fund’s investment advisor or sub-advisor rely, and could otherwise disrupt the ability of the fund’s service providers to perform essential tasks. In certain cases, an exchange or market may close or issue trading halts on either specific securities or even the entire market, which may result in a fund being, among other things, unable to buy or sell certain securities or financial instruments or accurately price its investments.
Governmental and quasi-governmental authorities and regulators throughout the world, such as the Federal Reserve, have in the past responded to major economic disruptions with a variety of significant fiscal and monetary policy changes, including but not limited to, direct capital infusions into companies, new monetary programs, and dramatic changes to interest rates. Certain of those policy changes were implemented or considered in response to the COVID-19 outbreak and inflationary pressures. Such policy changes may adversely affect the value, volatility, and liquidity of dividend and interest-paying securities.
The impact of current and future market disruption events may last for an extended period of time and could result in a substantial economic downturn or recession. Such events could have significant adverse direct or indirect effects on the funds and their investments, and may result in a fund’s inability to achieve its investment objective, cause funds to experience significant redemptions, cause the postponement of reconstitution/rebalance dates of passive funds’ underlying indices, adversely affect the prices and liquidity of the securities and other instruments in which a fund invests, negatively impact the fund’s performance, and cause losses on your investment in the fund. You should also review this Prospectus and the SAI to understand each fund’s discretion to implement temporary defensive measures, as well as the circumstances in which a fund may satisfy redemption requests in-kind.
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Securities Lending
To generate additional income, a Fund may lend its portfolio securities to broker-dealers and other institutional borrowers to the extent permitted under the Investment Company Act of 1940, as amended (the “1940 Act”) or the rules, regulations, or interpretations thereunder. A Fund that lends its securities will continue to receive amounts equal to the interest or dividend payments generated by the loaned securities. In addition to receiving these amounts, the Fund generates income on the loaned securities by receiving a fee from the borrower, and by earning interest on the collateral received from the borrower. A negotiated portion of the income is paid to a securities lending agent (e.g., a bank or trust company) that arranged the loan. During the term of the loan, the Fund’s investment performance will reflect changes in the value of the loaned securities.
A borrower’s obligations under a securities loan is secured continuously by collateral posted by the borrower and held by the custodian in an amount at least equal to the market value of the loaned securities. Generally, cash collateral that a Fund receives from securities lending activities will be invested in the Principal Funds, Inc. Government Money Market Fund, which is managed by PGI and for which PGI receives a management fee. The collateral may also be invested in unaffiliated money market funds.
Securities lending involves exposure to certain risks, including the risk of losses resulting from problems in the settlement and accounting process, the risk of a mismatch between the return on cash collateral reinvestments and the fees each Fund has agreed to pay a borrower, and credit, legal, counterparty, and market risk. A Fund’s participation in a securities lending transaction may affect the amount, timing, and character of distributions derived from such transaction to shareholders. Qualified dividend income does not include “payments in lieu of dividends,” which the Funds anticipate they will receive in securities lending transactions.
Temporary Defensive Measures
From time to time, as part of its investment strategy, a Fund may invest without limit in cash and cash equivalents for temporary defensive purposes in response to adverse market, economic, or political conditions. For this purpose, cash equivalents include: bank notes, bank certificates of deposit, bankers’ acceptances, repurchase agreements, commercial paper, and commercial paper master notes, which are floating rate debt instruments without a fixed maturity. In addition, a Fund may purchase U.S. government securities, preferred stocks, and debt securities, whether or not convertible into or carrying rights for common stock. There is no limit on the extent to which a Fund may take temporary defensive measures. In taking such measures, a Fund may lose the benefit of upswings and may limit its ability to meet, or fail to achieve, its investment objective.
Trading Issues
Although the shares of the Funds are expected to be listed on the exchange identified in the fund summary for each Fund, there can be no assurance that an active trading market for such shares will develop or be maintained. Trading in Shares on the exchange may be halted due to market conditions or for reasons that, in the view of the exchange, make trading in Shares inadvisable. In addition, trading in Shares on the exchange is subject to trading halts caused by extraordinary market volatility pursuant to the exchange's "circuit breaker" rules. There can be no assurance that the requirements of the exchange necessary to maintain the listing of a Fund will continue to be met or will remain unchanged.
Strategy and Risk Table
The following table lists each Fund and identifies whether the strategies and risks discussed in this section (listed in alphabetical order and not in order of significance) are principal for a Fund. Each Fund is also subject to the risks of any underlying funds in which it invests.
The SAI contains additional information about investment strategies and their related risks.
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INVESTMENT STRATEGIES AND RISKS Principal Active High Yield ETF Principal Focused Blue Chip ETF Principal Healthcare Innovators ETF Principal Investment Grade Corporate Active ETF
Active Management X X X X
Arbitrage Risk X
Bank Loans (also known as Senior Floating Rate Interests) X
Contingent Convertible Securities
Convertible Securities
Counterparty Risk X X
Derivatives X X
Emerging Markets X
Equity Securities X X
Growth Style
X X
Smaller Companies
X
Value Style
Fixed-Income Securities X X
Foreign Currency X
Foreign Securities X X X
Hedging X X
High Yield Securities X
Industry Concentration X
Market Trading Risks X X X X
Momentum Style
Portfolio Duration X X
Preferred Securities X
Real Estate Investment Trusts (REITs)
Real Estate Securities
Redemption and Large Transaction Risk X X X X
Tracking Basket Structure Risk X
Trading Halt Risk X
U.S. Government and U.S. Government-Sponsored Securities X X

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INVESTMENT STRATEGIES AND RISKS
Principal
Quality ETF
Principal Real Estate Active Opportunities ETF
Principal Spectrum Preferred Securities
Active ETF
Principal Spectrum Tax-Advantaged Dividend
Active ETF
Active Management X X X X
Arbitrage Risk X
Bank Loans (also known as Senior Floating Rate Interests)
Contingent Convertible Securities X
Convertible Securities
Counterparty Risk
Derivatives X
Emerging Markets
Equity Securities X X
Growth Style
X X
Smaller Companies
X
Value Style
X X
Fixed-Income Securities X X
Foreign Currency
Foreign Securities X X
Hedging
High Yield Securities X X
Industry Concentration X X X
Market Trading Risks X X X X
Momentum Style
Portfolio Duration X X
Preferred Securities X X
Real Estate Investment Trusts (REITs) X X
Real Estate Securities X X
Redemption and Large Transaction Risk X X X X
Tracking Basket Structure Risk X
Trading Halt Risk X
U.S. Government and U.S. Government-Sponsored Securities

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INVESTMENT STRATEGIES AND RISKS Principal U.S. Mega-Cap ETF Principal
U.S. Small-Cap ETF
Principal
Value ETF
Active Management X X X
Arbitrage Risk
Bank Loans (also known as Senior Floating Rate Interests)
Contingent Convertible Securities
Convertible Securities
Counterparty Risk
Derivatives
Emerging Markets
Equity Securities X X X
Growth Style
X X
Smaller Companies
X
Value Style
X X X
Fixed-Income Securities
Foreign Currency
Foreign Securities
Hedging
High Yield Securities
Industry Concentration
Market Trading Risks X X X
Momentum Style X
Portfolio Duration
Preferred Securities
Real Estate Investment Trusts (REITs)
Real Estate Securities
Redemption and Large Transaction Risk X X X
Tracking Basket Structure Risk
Trading Halt Risk
U.S. Government and U.S. Government-Sponsored Securities

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Active Management
The performance of a fund that is actively managed (including hybrid funds or passively-managed funds that use a sampling approach that includes some actively managed components) will reflect in part the ability of those managing the investments of the fund to make investment decisions that are suited to achieving the fund's investment objective. Actively managed funds may invest differently from the benchmark against which the fund's performance is compared. When making decisions about whether to buy or sell equity securities, considerations may include, among other things, a company’s strength in fundamentals, its potential for earnings growth over time, its ability to navigate certain macroeconomic environments, the current price of its securities relative to their perceived worth and relative to others in its industry, and analysis from computer models. When making decisions about whether to buy or sell fixed-income investments, considerations may include, among other things, the strength of certain sectors of the fixed-income market relative to others, interest rates, a range of economic, political, and financial factors, the balance between supply and demand for certain asset classes, the credit quality of individual issuers, the fundamental strengths of corporate and municipal issuers, and other general market conditions.
Models, which may assist portfolio managers and analysts in formulating their securities trading and allocation decisions by providing investment and risk management insights, may also expose a fund to risks. Models may be predictive in nature, which models depend heavily on the accuracy and reliability of historical data that is supplied by others and may be incorrect or incorrectly input. The fund bears the risk that the quantitative models used will not be successful in identifying trends or in determining the size and direction of investment positions that will enable the fund to achieve its investment objective. In addition, "model prices" will often differ substantially from market prices, especially for instruments with complex characteristics, such as derivative instruments.
An active fund's investment performance depends upon the successful allocation of the fund's assets among asset classes, geographical regions, industry sectors, and specific issuers and investments. There is no guarantee that these allocation techniques and decisions will produce the desired results. It is possible to lose money on an investment in a fund as a result of these allocation decisions. If a fund's investment strategies do not perform as expected, the fund could underperform other funds with similar investment objectives or lose money. Moreover, buying and selling securities to adjust the fund’s asset allocation may increase portfolio turnover and generate transaction costs.
Investment advisors with large assets under management in a Fund, or in other funds that have the same strategy as a Fund, may have difficulty fully investing such Fund’s assets according to its investment objective due to potential liquidity constraints and high transaction costs. Typically, small-cap, mid-cap and emerging market equity funds are more susceptible to such a risk. A Fund may add additional investment advisors or close the Fund to new investors to address such risks.
Arbitrage Risk
Unlike ETFs that publicly disclose their complete portfolio holdings each business day, the Fund provides certain other information (the Tracking Basket) intended to allow market participants to estimate the value of positions in Fund shares. Although this information is designed to facilitate arbitrage opportunities in Fund shares to reduce bid-ask spread and minimize discounts or premiums between the market price and NAV of Fund shares, there is no guarantee the Fund’s arbitrage mechanism will operate as intended and that the Fund will not experience wide bid-ask spreads and/or large discounts or premiums to NAV. Further, the effectiveness of the Tracking Basket as an arbitrage mechanism is contingent upon, among other things, the Tracking Basket performing in a manner substantially identical to the performance of the Fund’s actual portfolio. The Fund’s investment advisor may not always be successful in creating a Tracking Basket that performs in a manner substantially identical to the performance of the Fund’s actual portfolio. In addition, market participants may attempt to use the disclosed information to “reverse engineer” the Fund’s trading strategy, which, if successful, could increase opportunities for predatory trading practices that may have the potential to negatively impact the Fund’s performance.
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Bank Loans (also known as Senior Floating Rate Interests)
Bank loans typically hold the most senior position in the capital structure of a business entity (the "Borrower"), are secured by specific collateral, and have a claim on the Borrower's assets and/or stock that is senior to that held by the Borrower's unsecured subordinated debtholders and stockholders. The proceeds of bank loans primarily are used to finance leveraged buyouts, recapitalizations, mergers, acquisitions, stock repurchases, dividends, and, to a lesser extent, to finance internal growth and for other corporate purposes. Bank loans are typically structured and administered by a financial institution that acts as the agent of the lenders participating in the bank loan. The Funds may purchase bank loans that are rated below-investment-grade (sometimes called “junk”) or will be comparable if unrated, which means they are more likely to default than investment-grade loans. A default could lead to non-payment of income which would result in a reduction of income to the fund, and there can be no assurance that the liquidation of any collateral would satisfy the Borrower's obligation in the event of non-payment of scheduled interest or principal payments, or that such collateral could be readily liquidated. Most bank loans are not traded on any national securities exchange. Bank loans generally have less liquidity than investment-grade bonds and there may be less public information available about them. Bank loan interests may not be considered "securities," and purchasers therefore may not be entitled to rely on the anti-fraud protections of the federal securities laws.
The primary and secondary market for bank loans may be subject to irregular trading activity, wide bid/ask spreads and extended trade settlement periods, which may cause a fund to be unable to realize full value and thus cause a material decline in a fund's net asset value. Because transactions in bank loans may be subject to extended settlement periods, a fund may not receive proceeds from the sale of a bank loan for a period of time after the sale. As a result, sale proceeds may not be available to make additional investments or to meet a fund's redemption obligations for a period of time after the sale of the bank loans, which could lead to a fund having to sell other investments, borrow to meet obligations, or borrow to remain fully invested while awaiting settlement.
Bank loans pay interest at rates which are periodically reset by reference to a base lending rate plus a spread. These base lending rates are generally the prime rate offered by a designated U.S. bank, the London InterBank Offered Rate (LIBOR), the Secured Overnight Financing Rate (SOFR), a similar reference rate, or the prime rate offered by one or more major U.S. banks.
Bank loans generally are subject to mandatory and/or optional prepayment. Because of these prepayment conditions and because there may be significant economic incentives for the borrower to repay, prepayments may occur.
Contingent Convertible Securities ("CoCos")
Contingent convertible securities (“CoCos”) are hybrid debt securities intended to either convert into equity or have their principal written down upon the occurrence of certain “triggers.” The triggers are generally linked to regulatory capital thresholds or regulatory actions calling into question the issuing banking institution’s continued viability as a going-concern, if the conversion trigger were not exercised. CoCos’ unique equity conversion or principal write-down features are tailored to the issuing banking institution and its regulatory requirements. Some additional risks associated with CoCos include, but are not limited to, the following:
The occurrence of a conversion event is inherently unpredictable and depends on many factors, some of which will be outside the issuer’s control. Because of the uncertainty regarding whether a conversion event will occur, it may be difficult to predict when, if at all, a CoCo will be converted to equity, and a fund may suffer losses as a result.
CoCos may have no stated maturity and fully discretionary coupons. This means coupon (i.e., interest) payments can be canceled at the banking institution’s discretion or at the request of the relevant regulatory authority in order to help the bank absorb losses, without causing a default.
CoCos are usually issued in the form of subordinated debt instruments to provide the appropriate regulatory capital treatment. If an issuer liquidates, dissolves or winds-up before a conversion to equity has occurred, the rights and claims of the holders of the CoCos (such as a fund) against the issuer generally rank junior to the claims of holders of unsubordinated obligations of the issuer. In addition, if the CoCos are converted into the issuer’s underlying equity securities after a conversion event (i.e., a “trigger”), each holder will be further subordinated.
The value of CoCos is unpredictable and is influenced by many factors including, without limitation: the creditworthiness of the issuer and/or fluctuations in such issuer’s applicable capital ratios; supply and demand for CoCos; general market conditions and available liquidity; and economic, financial and political events that affect the issuer, its particular market or the financial markets in general. Moreover, the performance of CoCos may be correlated with one another and as a result negative information of one issuer may cause decline in the value of CoCos of many other issuers.
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Due to these features, CoCos may have substantially greater risk than other securities in times of financial stress. If the trigger level is breached, the issuer’s decision to write down, write off or convert a CoCo may result in the fund's complete loss on an investment in CoCos with no chance of recovery even if the issuer remains in existence.
Convertible Securities
Convertible securities are usually fixed-income securities that a fund has the right to exchange for equity securities at a specified conversion price. Convertible securities could also include corporate bonds, notes or preferred stocks of U.S. or foreign issuers. Convertible securities allow a fund to realize additional returns if the market price of the equity securities exceeds the conversion price. For example, a fund may hold fixed-income securities that are convertible into shares of common stock at a conversion price of $10 per share. If the market value of the shares of common stock reached $12, the fund could realize an additional $2 per share by converting its fixed-income securities.
Convertible securities have lower yields than comparable fixed-income securities. In addition, at the time a convertible security is issued the conversion price exceeds the market value of the underlying equity securities. Thus, convertible securities may provide lower returns than non-convertible fixed-income securities or equity securities depending upon changes in the price of the underlying equity securities. However, convertible securities permit a fund to realize some of the potential appreciation of the underlying equity securities with less risk of losing its initial investment.
Depending on the features of the convertible security, a fund will treat a convertible security as a fixed-income security, equity security, or preferred security for purposes of investment policies and limitations because of the unique characteristics of convertible securities. Funds that invest in convertible securities may invest in convertible securities that are below investment grade (sometimes referred to as "junk"). Many convertible securities are relatively illiquid.
Counterparty Risk
Counterparty risk is the risk that the counterparty to a contract or other obligation will be unable or unwilling to honor its obligations. If a counterparty fails to meet its contractual obligations, goes bankrupt, or otherwise experiences a business interruption, a fund could miss investment opportunities or otherwise hold investments it would prefer to sell, resulting in losses for the fund. In addition, a fund may suffer losses if a counterparty fails to comply with applicable laws or other requirements. Counterparty risk is pronounced during unusually adverse market conditions and is particularly acute in environments in which financial services firms are exposed to systemic risks.
Derivatives
Generally, a derivative is a financial arrangement, the value of which is derived from, or based on, a traditional security, asset, or market index. A fund may invest in certain derivative strategies to earn income, manage or adjust the risk profile of the fund, replace more direct investments, or obtain exposure to certain markets. A fund may enter into forward commitment agreements, which call for the fund to purchase or sell a security on a future date at a fixed price. A fund may also enter into contracts to sell its investments either on demand or at a specific interval.
The risks associated with derivative investments include:
increased volatility of a fund and/or the failure of the investment to mitigate volatility as intended;
the inability of those managing investments of the fund to predict correctly the direction of securities prices, interest rates, currency exchange rates, asset values, and other economic factors;
losses caused by unanticipated market movements, which may be substantially greater than a fund's initial investment and are potentially unlimited;
the possibility that there may be no liquid secondary market which may make it difficult or impossible to close out a position when desired;
the possibility that the counterparty may fail to perform its obligations; and
the inability to close out certain hedged positions to avoid adverse tax consequences.
There are many different types of derivatives and many different ways to use them. The specific derivatives that are principal strategies of each Fund are listed in its Fund Summary.
Commodity Index-Linked Notes are derivative debt instruments issued by U.S. and foreign banks, brokerage firms, insurance companies and other corporations with principal and/or coupon payments linked to the performance of commodity indices. These notes expose a fund to movements in commodity prices. They are also subject to credit, counterparty, and interest rate risk. Commodity index-linked notes are often leveraged, increasing the volatility of each note's market value relative to changes in the underlying commodity index. At the maturity of the note, a fund may receive more or less principal than it originally invested. A fund may also receive interest payments on the note that are less than the stated coupon interest payments.
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Credit Default Swap Agreements may be entered into by a fund as a "buyer" or "seller" of credit protection. Credit default swap agreements involve special risks because they may be difficult to value, are highly susceptible to liquidity and credit risk, and generally pay a return to the party that has paid the premium only in the event of an actual default by the issuer of the underlying obligation (as opposed to a credit downgrade or other indication of financial difficulty). Credit default swaps can increase credit risk because a fund has exposure to both the issuer of the referenced obligation and the counterparty to the credit default swap.
Foreign Currency Contracts (such as foreign currency options and foreign currency forward and swap agreements) may be used by funds to increase exposure to a foreign currency or to shift exposure to foreign currency fluctuations from one country to another. A forward currency contract involves a privately negotiated obligation to purchase or sell a specific currency at a future date at a price set in the contract. For currency contracts, there is also a risk of government action through exchange controls that would restrict the ability of a fund to deliver or receive currency.
Forwards, futures contracts and options thereon (including commodities futures); options (including put or call options); and swap agreements and over-the-counter swap agreements (e.g., interest rate swaps, total return swaps and credit default swaps) may be used by funds for hedging purposes in order to try to mitigate or protect against potential losses due to changing interest rates, securities prices, asset values, currency exchange rates, and other market conditions; non-hedging purposes to seek to increase the fund’s income or otherwise enhance return; and as a low-cost method of gaining exposure to a particular market without investing directly in those securities or assets. These derivative investments are subject to special risk considerations, particularly the imperfect correlation between the change in market value of the instruments held by a fund and the price of the derivative instrument. If a fund has insufficient cash, it may have to sell securities from its portfolio to meet daily variation margin requirements, even when it may be disadvantageous to do so. Options and Swap Agreements also involve counterparty risk. With respect to options, there may be difference in trading hours for the options markets and the markets for the underlying securities (rate movements can take place in the underlying markets that cannot be reflected in the options markets) and an insufficient liquid secondary market for particular options.
Index/structured securities. Certain derivative securities are described more accurately as index/structured securities, which are derivative securities whose value or performance is linked to other equity securities (such as depositary receipts), currencies, interest rates, indices, or other financial indicators (reference indices).
Emerging Markets
The Funds consider a security to be tied economically to an emerging market (an “emerging market security”) if the issuer of the security has its principal place of business or principal office in an emerging market, has its principal securities trading market in an emerging market, or derives a majority of its revenue from emerging markets.
Usually, the term "emerging market" (also called a "developing market") means any market that is considered to be an emerging market by the international financial community (such as markets tied to securities included in the MSCI Emerging Markets Index or Bloomberg Emerging Markets USD Aggregate Bond Index). Emerging markets generally exclude the U.S., Canada, Japan, Australia, New Zealand, Hong Kong, and Singapore and most nations located in Western Europe.
Investments in companies in emerging markets are subject to higher risks than investments in companies in more developed markets. These risks include:
increased social, political, and economic instability;
a smaller market for these securities and low or nonexistent trading volume that results in a lack of liquidity and greater price volatility;
lack of publicly available information, including reports of payments of dividends or interest on outstanding securities;
foreign government policies that may restrict opportunities, including restrictions on investment in issuers or industries deemed sensitive to national interests;
relatively new capital market structure or market-oriented economy;
the possibility that recent favorable economic developments may be slowed or reversed by unanticipated political or social events in these countries;
restrictions that may make it difficult or impossible for a fund to vote proxies, exercise shareholder rights, pursue legal remedies, and obtain judgments in foreign courts; and
possible losses through the holding of securities in domestic and foreign custodial banks and depositories.
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In addition, many developing markets have experienced substantial and, in some periods, extremely high rates of inflation for many years. Inflation and rapid fluctuations in inflation rates have had and may continue to have negative effects on the economies, currencies, interest rates, and securities markets of those markets.
Repatriation of investment income, capital, and proceeds of sales by foreign investors may require governmental registration and/or approval in some developing markets. A fund could be adversely affected by delays in or a refusal to grant any required governmental registration or approval for repatriation.
Further, the economies of developing markets generally are heavily dependent upon international trade and, accordingly, have been and may continue to be adversely affected by trade barriers, exchange controls, managed adjustments in relative currency values and other protectionist measures imposed or negotiated by the countries with which they trade.
The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission, the U.S. Department of Justice, and other U.S. authorities may be limited in their ability to pursue bad actors, including instances of fraud in emerging markets. For example, in certain emerging markets, there are significant legal obstacles to obtaining information needed for investigations or litigation. Similar limitations apply to the pursuit of actions against individuals, including officers, who may have engaged in fraud or wrongdoing. In addition, local authorities often are constrained in their ability to assist U.S. authorities and overseas investors more generally. There are also legal or other obstacles to seeking access to funds in a foreign country.
Equity Securities
Equity securities include common stocks, convertible securities, depositary receipts, rights (an offering of common stock to investors who currently own shares which entitle them to buy subsequent issues at a discount from the offering price), and warrants (the right to purchase securities from the issuer at a specified price, normally higher than the current market price). Common stocks, the most familiar type, represent an equity (ownership) interest in a corporation. The value of a company's stock may fall as a result of factors directly relating to that company, such as decisions made by its management or lower demand for the company's products or services. A stock's value may also fall because of factors affecting not just the company, but also companies in the same industry or in a number of different industries, such as increases in production costs. The value of a company's stock may also be affected by changes in financial markets that are relatively unrelated to the company or its industry, such as changes in interest rates or currency exchange rates. In addition, a company's stock generally pays dividends only after the company invests in its own business and makes required payments to holders of its bonds and other debt. For this reason, the value of a company's stock will usually react more strongly than its bonds and other debt to actual or perceived changes in the company's financial condition or prospects.
Some funds focus their investments on certain market capitalization ranges. Market capitalization is defined as total current market value of a company's outstanding equity securities. The market capitalization of companies in a fund’s portfolios and their related indexes will change over time, and, except to the extent consistent with its principal investment strategies (for example, for an index fund that uses a replication strategy), a fund will not automatically sell a security just because it falls outside of the market capitalization range of its index(es).
Growth Style
The prices of growth stocks may be based largely on expectations of future earnings, and their prices can decline rapidly and significantly in reaction to negative news about such factors as earnings, revenues, the economy, political developments, or other news. Growth stocks may underperform value stocks and stocks in other broad style categories (and the stock market as a whole) over any period of time and may shift in and out of favor with investors generally, sometimes rapidly, depending on changes in market, economic, and other factors. As a result, a fund that holds substantial investments in growth stocks may underperform other funds that invest more broadly or favor different investment styles. Because growth companies typically reinvest their earnings, growth stocks typically do not pay dividends at levels associated with other types of stocks, if at all.
Smaller Companies
Investments in companies with smaller market capitalizations may involve greater risks and price volatility (wide, rapid fluctuations) than investments in larger, more mature companies. Small company stocks may decline in price as large company stocks rise, or rise in price while larger company stocks decline. The net asset value of a fund that invests a substantial portion of its assets in small company stocks may therefore be more volatile than the shares of a fund that invests solely in larger company stocks. Small companies may be less significant within their industries and may be at a competitive disadvantage relative to their larger competitors. Smaller companies may be less mature than larger companies. At this earlier stage of development, the companies may have limited product lines, reduced market liquidity for their shares, limited financial resources, or less depth in management than larger or more established companies. While smaller companies may be subject to these additional risks, they may also realize more substantial growth than larger or more established companies.
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Unseasoned issuers are companies with a record of less than three years continuous operation, including the operation of predecessors and parents. Many unseasoned issuers also may be small companies and involve the risks and price volatility associated with smaller companies. Unseasoned issuers by their nature have only a limited operating history that can be used for evaluating the company's growth prospects. As a result, these securities may place a greater emphasis on current or planned product lines and the reputation and experience of the company's management and less emphasis on fundamental valuation factors than would be the case for more mature growth companies.
Value Style
Value stocks present the risk that they may decline in price or never reach their expected full market value because the market fails to recognize the stock's intrinsic worth. Value stocks may underperform growth stocks and stocks in other broad style categories (and the stock market as a whole) over any period of time and may shift in and out of favor with investors generally, sometimes rapidly, depending on changes in market, economic, and other factors. As a result, a fund that holds substantial investments in value stocks may underperform other funds that invest more broadly or favor different investment styles.
Fixed-Income Securities
Fixed-income securities include bonds and other debt instruments that are used by issuers to borrow money from investors (examples include corporate bonds, convertible securities, asset- and mortgage-backed securities, and municipal, agency, and U.S. government securities). The issuer of a fixed-income security generally pays the investor a fixed, variable, or floating rate of interest. The amount borrowed must be repaid at maturity. Some debt securities, such as zero-coupon bonds, do not pay current interest, but are sold at a discount from their face values.
Fixed-income securities are sensitive to changes in interest rates. Interest rate changes can be sudden and unpredictable, and are influenced by a number of factors, including governmental policy, monetary policy, inflation expectations, perceptions of risk, and supply and demand for fixed‑income securities. In general, fixed-income security prices rise when interest rates fall and fall when interest rates rise. An increase in interest rates from a low interest rate environment may lead to heightened volatility, rapid sales of fixed‑income securities, and redemptions alongside reduced liquidity and dealer market-making capacity in fixed income markets.
If interest rates fall, issuers of callable bonds may call (repay) securities with high interest rates before their maturity dates; this is known as call risk. In this case, a fund would likely reinvest the proceeds from these securities at lower interest rates, resulting in a decline in the fund's income. Very low interest rates, including rates that fall below zero (where banks charge for depositing money), may detract from a fund’s performance and its ability to maintain positive returns to the extent the fund is exposed to such interest rates. To the extent a fund holds an investment with a negative interest rate to maturity, the fund would generate a negative return on that investment. Floating rate securities generally are less sensitive to interest rate changes but may decline in value if their interest rates do not rise as much, or as quickly, as interest rates in general. Conversely, floating rate securities will not generally increase in value if interest rates decline.
In June 2023, the Secured Overnight Financing Rate (“SOFR”) replaced the London InterBank Offered Rate (“LIBOR”) as the benchmark interest rate for dollar-denominated derivatives and loans in the United States pursuant to the Adjustable Interest Rate (LIBOR) Act. Prior to the adoption of SOFR, LIBOR was the globally accepted benchmark for interest rates; however, the United Kingdom’s Financial Conduct Authority, which regulated LIBOR, ceased publication of non-U.S. dollar LIBOR, 1-week U.S. dollar LIBOR, and 2-month U.S. dollar LIBOR rates on December 31, 2021 and, the remaining, most widely used U.S. dollar LIBOR rates stopped being published on June 30, 2023. Countries outside of the United States have opted to use different alternatives to LIBOR than SOFR. The effect of LIBOR's discontinuation and replacement on new or existing financial instruments or operational processes will vary depending on a number of factors, including, for example, fallback provisions in contracts, replacement language in contracts, and legislative action. In addition, LIBOR’s discontinuation and replacement may affect the value, liquidity, or return on certain Fund investments and may result in costs in connection with closing out positions and entering into new trades. These impacts are likely to persist until new reference rates and fallbacks for both legacy and new instruments and contracts are commercially accepted and market practices become settled. SOFR is calculated by short-term repurchase agreements, backed by U.S. Treasuries. LIBOR was a forward-looking rate, while SOFR reflects an overnight rate, making SOFR much less susceptible to market fluctuations and manipulations than LIBOR.
Fixed-income securities are also affected by the credit quality of the issuer. Investment grade debt securities are medium and high quality securities. Some bonds, such as lower grade or "junk" bonds, may have speculative characteristics and may be particularly sensitive to economic conditions and the financial condition of the issuers. Credit risk refers to the possibility that the issuer of the security will not be able to make principal and interest payments when due.
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Additionally, a Fund's investments in companies with smaller market capitalizations may involve greater risks, price volatility (wide, rapid fluctuations), and less liquidity than investments in larger, more mature companies.
Foreign Currency
Certain of a fund's investments will be denominated in foreign currencies or traded in securities markets in which settlements are made in foreign currencies. Any income on such investments is generally paid to a fund in foreign currencies. In addition, funds may engage in foreign currency transactions for both hedging and investment purposes, as well as to increase exposure to a foreign currency or to shift exposure to foreign currency fluctuations from one country to another.
The value of foreign currencies relative to the U.S. dollar varies continually, causing changes in the dollar value of a fund’s portfolio investments (even if the local market price of the investments is unchanged) and changes in the dollar value of a fund’s income available for distribution to its shareholders. The effect of changes in the dollar value of a foreign currency on the dollar value of a fund’s assets and on the net investment income available for distribution may be favorable or unfavorable. Transactions in non-U.S. currencies are also subject to many of the risks of investing in foreign (non-U.S.) securities; for example, changes in foreign economies and political climates are more likely to affect a fund that has foreign currency exposure than a fund that invests exclusively in U.S. companies and currency. There also may be less government supervision of foreign markets, resulting in non-uniform accounting practices and less publicly available information. Transactions in foreign currencies, foreign currency denominated debt and certain foreign currency options, futures contracts and forward contracts (and similar instruments) may give rise to ordinary income or loss to the extent such income or loss results from fluctuations in the value of the foreign currency concerned.
A fund may incur costs in connection with conversions between various currencies. In addition, a fund may be required to liquidate portfolio assets, or may incur increased currency conversion costs, to compensate for a decline in the dollar value of a foreign currency occurring between the time when a fund declares and pays a dividend, or between the time when a fund accrues and pays an operating expense in U.S. dollars. To protect against a change in the foreign currency exchange rate between the date on which a fund contracts to purchase or sell a security and the settlement date for the purchase or sale, to gain exposure to one or more foreign currencies or to "lock in" the equivalent of a dividend or interest payment in another currency, a fund might purchase or sell a foreign currency on a spot (i.e., cash) basis at the prevailing spot rate.
Currency hedging involves some of the same general risks and considerations as other transactions with similar instruments (i.e., derivative instruments) and hedging. Currency transactions are also subject to additional risks. Because currency control is of great importance to the issuing governments and influences economic planning and policy, purchases and sales of currency and related instruments can be adversely affected by government exchange controls, limitations or restrictions on repatriation of currency, and manipulations or exchange restrictions imposed by governments. These forms of governmental actions can result in losses to a fund if it is unable to deliver or receive currency or monies in settlement of obligations. They could also cause hedges the fund has entered into to be rendered useless, resulting in full currency exposure as well as incurring transaction costs. Settlement of a currency forward contract for the purchase of most currencies must occur at a bank based in the issuing nation. The ability to establish and close out positions on trading options on currency futures contracts is subject to the maintenance of a liquid market that may not always be available.
Foreign Securities
The Funds consider a security to be tied economically to countries outside the U.S. (a "foreign security") if the issuer of the security has its principal place of business or principal office outside the U.S., has its principal securities trading market outside the U.S., or derives a majority of its revenue from outside the U.S.
The Principal Real Estate Active Opportunities ETF and the Principal Focused Blue Chip ETF are limited in their ability to invest in foreign securities but may have exposure to foreign markets if they were to invest, for example, in exchange-traded American depositary receipts or common stocks listed on a foreign exchange that trade on such exchange contemporaneously with these ETF’s shares.
There may be less publicly available information about foreign companies than U.S. companies, and information about foreign securities in which the Funds invest may be less reliable or complete. Foreign companies, including those listed on U.S. securities exchanges, may not be subject to the same uniform accounting, auditing, and financial reporting practices as are required of U.S. companies with respect to such matters as insider trading rules, tender offer regulation, accounting standards or auditor oversight, stockholder proxy requirements and the requirements mandating timely and accurate disclosure of information. For example, the Chinese government has taken positions that prevent the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board from inspecting the audit work and practices of accounting firms in mainland China and Hong Kong for compliance with U.S. law and professional standards. In
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addition, securities of many foreign companies are less liquid and more volatile than securities of comparable U.S. companies. Commissions on foreign securities exchanges may be generally higher than those on U.S. exchanges.
Foreign markets also have different clearance and settlement procedures than those in U.S. markets. In certain markets, there have been times when settlements have been unable to keep pace with the volume of securities transactions, making it difficult to conduct these transactions. Delays in settlement could result in temporary periods when a portion of fund assets is not invested and earning no return. If a fund is unable to make intended security purchases due to settlement problems, the fund may miss attractive investment opportunities. In addition, a fund may incur a loss as a result of a decline in the value of its portfolio if it is unable to sell a security.
With respect to certain foreign countries, there is the possibility of nationalization, expropriation or confiscatory taxation, political or social instability, or diplomatic developments that could affect a fund's investments in those countries. In addition, a fund may also suffer losses due to differing accounting practices and treatments. Investments in foreign securities are subject to laws of the foreign country that may limit the amount and types of foreign investments. Changes of governments or of economic or monetary policies, in the U.S. or abroad, changes in dealings between nations, currency convertibility or exchange rates could result in investment losses for a fund.
Foreign securities are often traded with less frequency and volume, and therefore may have greater price volatility than is the case with many U.S. securities. Brokerage commissions, custodial services, and other costs relating to investment in foreign countries are generally more expensive than in the U.S. Though the fund intends to acquire the securities of foreign issuers where there are public trading markets, economic or political turmoil in a country in which a fund has a significant portion of its assets or deterioration of the relationship between the U.S. and a foreign country may reduce the liquidity of a fund's portfolio. The Fund may have difficulty meeting a large number of redemption requests. Furthermore, there may be difficulties in obtaining or enforcing judgments against foreign issuers.
A fund may invest in a foreign company by purchasing depositary receipts. Depositary receipts are certificates of ownership of shares in a foreign-based issuer held by a bank or other financial institution. They are alternatives to purchasing the underlying security but are subject to the foreign securities risks to which they relate.
A fund may file claims to recover foreign withholding taxes on dividend and interest income (if any) received from issuers in certain countries and capital gains on the disposition of stocks or securities where such withholding tax reclaim is possible. Whether or when a fund will receive a withholding tax refund is within the control of the tax authorities in such countries. Where a fund expects to recover withholding taxes, the net asset value of a fund generally includes accruals for such tax refunds. If the likelihood of recovery materially decreases, accruals in the fund’s net asset value for such refunds may be written down partially or in full, which will adversely affect the fund’s net asset value. Shareholders in the fund at the time an accrual is written down will bear the impact of the resulting reduction in net asset value regardless of whether they were shareholders during the accrual period. Conversely, if a fund receives a tax refund that has not been previously accrued, shareholders in the fund at the time of the successful recovery will benefit from the resulting increase in the fund’s net asset value. Shareholders who sold their shares prior to such time will not benefit from such increase in the fund’s net asset value.
If a fund's portfolio invests significantly in a certain geographic region, any negative development affecting that region will have a greater impact on the fund than a fund that is not as heavily invested in that region. For example, with respect to funds that invest significantly in China or the EU:
Investing in China involves certain heightened risks and considerations including, among others: frequent trading suspensions and government interventions (including by nationalizing assets); currency exchange rate fluctuations or blockages; limits on using brokers and on foreign ownership; different financial reporting standards, as described above; higher dependence on exports and international trade; political and social instability; infectious disease outbreaks; regional and global conflicts; increased trade tariffs, embargoes and other trade limitations; custody and other risks associated with programs used to access Chinese securities; and uncertainties in tax rules that could result in unexpected tax liabilities for the Fund. Significant portions of the Chinese securities markets may become rapidly illiquid, as Chinese issuers have the ability to suspend the trading of their equity securities. Moreover, actions by the U.S. government, such as delisting of certain Chinese companies from U.S. securities exchanges or otherwise restricting their operations in the U.S., may negatively impact the value of such securities held by the funds.
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Funds that invest in the United Kingdom (the "UK") face risks related to the UK's departure from the European Union (the "EU"), commonly known as "Brexit." Brexit has resulted in significant uncertainties and instability in the financial markets, and considerable uncertainty remains related to the potential consequences associated with the exit, how the negotiations for the withdrawal and new trade agreements will be conducted, and whether the UK's exit will increase the likelihood of other countries also departing the EU. Brexit may have significant political and financial consequences in the UK, as well as in European markets and the broader global economy, which may result in increased volatility and illiquidity, and potentially lower economic growth in markets in the UK, Europe and globally.
Hedging
Hedging is a strategy that can be used to attempt to mitigate or protect against potential losses due to changing interest rates, securities prices, asset values, currency exchange rates, and other market conditions. The success of a fund’s hedging strategy will be subject to the ability of those managing the fund's investments to correctly assess the degree of correlation between the performance of the instruments used in the hedging strategy and the performance of the investments in the portfolio being hedged. Since the characteristics of many securities change as markets change or time passes, the success of a fund’s hedging strategy will also be subject to the ability of those managing the fund's investments to continually recalculate, readjust, and execute hedges in an efficient and timely manner. For a variety of reasons, those managing the fund's investments may not seek to establish a perfect correlation between such hedging instruments and the portfolio holdings being hedged. Such imperfect correlation may prevent a fund from achieving the intended hedge or expose a fund to risk of loss. In addition, it is not possible to hedge fully or perfectly against any risk, and hedging entails its own costs.
High Yield Securities
Below investment grade securities are fixed income securities that are rated at the time of purchase Ba1 or lower by Moody's Investors Service, Inc. ("Moody's") and BB+ or lower by S&P Global Ratings ("S&P Global") (if the security has been rated by only one of those agencies, that rating will determine if the security is below investment grade; if the security has not been rated by either of those agencies, those managing investments of a Fund will determine whether the security is of a quality comparable to those rated below investment grade). Below investment grade securities are sometimes referred to as high yield or "junk bonds" and are considered speculative, particularly with respect to the issuer's continuing ability to meet principal and interest payments. Such securities could be in default at time of purchase.
Investing in high yield securities involves special risks in addition to those associated with investing in investment grade securities.
High yield securities may be less liquid than investment grade securities.
The secondary market on which high yield securities are traded may be less liquid, which may reduce the price of the security and adversely affect and cause large fluctuations in the daily price of the Fund's shares.
Analysis of the creditworthiness of issuers of high yield securities is more complex. To the extent a Fund invests in high yield securities, its ability to meet its objective may be more dependent on such credit analyses.
High yield securities may be more susceptible to real or perceived adverse economic and competitive industry conditions. Although high yield securities prices tend to be less sensitive to interest rate changes than those of investment grade securities, they tend to be more sensitive to adverse economic downturns or individual corporate developments. Adverse publicity and investor perceptions, whether or not based on fundamental analysis, may decrease the value and liquidity of high yield securities, especially in a thinly traded market.
If the issuer of high yield securities defaults, a Fund may incur additional expenses to seek recovery.
If an issuer of high yield securities undergoes a corporate restructuring, such high yield securities may become exchanged for or converted into reorganized equity of the underlying issuer. Moreover, to the extent that a bond indenture or loan agreement does not contain sufficiently protective covenants or otherwise permits the issuer to take certain actions to the Fund's detriment (such as distributing cash to equity holders, incurring additional indebtedness, and disposing of assets), the underlying value of the high yield security may decline.
The use of credit ratings for evaluating high yield securities also involves certain risks. For example, credit ratings reflect the safety of principal and interest payments, not the market value risk of high yield securities. Also, credit rating agencies may fail to change credit ratings in a timely manner to reflect subsequent events. If a credit rating agency changes the rating of a portfolio security held by a Fund, the Fund may retain the security.
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Industry Concentration
A fund that concentrates its investments (invests more than 25% of its net assets) in a particular industry (or group of industries) is more exposed to the overall condition of the particular industry than a fund that invests in a wider variety of industries. A particular industry could be affected by economic, business, supply-and-demand, political, or regulatory factors. Companies within the same industry could react similarly to such factors. As a result, a fund’s concentration in a particular industry would increase the possibility that the fund’s performance will be affected by such factors.
Market Trading Risks
The net asset value ("NAV") of the Shares generally will fluctuate with changes in the market value of each Fund's holdings. The market prices of the Shares generally will fluctuate in accordance with changes in NAV, as well as the relative supply of and demand for Shares on the respective exchanges, PGI cannot predict whether the Shares will trade below, at or above their NAV. Price differences may be due largely to the fact that supply and demand forces at work in the secondary trading market for the Shares will be related, but not identical, to the forces influencing the prices of the securities held by the Fund (individually or in the aggregate) at any time.
Only authorized participants ("APs") may engage in creation or redemption transactions directly with each Fund. (See "Purchase and Sale of Fund Shares-Generally.") The Fund has a limited number of institutions that may act as APs, none of which are or will be obligated to engage in creation or redemption transactions. To the extent that these institutions exit the business or are unable or unwilling to proceed with creation and/or redemption orders with respect to the Fund, and no other AP is able or willing to step forward to create or redeem Creation Units, Fund shares may trade at a discount to NAV and possibly face trading halts and/or delisting. Such disruptions to creations and redemptions or the existence of extreme market volatility may result in trading prices that differ significantly from NAV.
This limited number of APs risk may be heightened for the Principal Real Estate Active Opportunities ETF and the Principal Focused Blue Chip ETF due to the fact that these ETFs do not disclose portfolio holdings daily, unlike certain other actively managed ETFs, and could be greater during market disruptions or periods of volatility.
With respect to funds that invest in foreign securities, since foreign exchanges may be open on days when such a fund does not price its shares, the value of the fund’s portfolio may change on days when shareholders will not be able to purchase or sell the fund’s Shares, and may result in trading prices that differ significantly from NAV. Additionally, such funds may be subject to heightened risks since APs may be required to post collateral with such investments, which only certain APs are able to do. Moreover, to the extent that an AP is unable or unwilling to trade on an agency basis for foreign securities, there could be a diminished trading market for ETF shares, and shares may trade at a discount to NAV.
If a shareholder purchases at a time when the market price is at a premium to the NAV or sells at a time when the market price is at a discount to the NAV, the shareholder may sustain losses. Given that Shares can be created and redeemed only in Creation Units at NAV, PGI believes that large discounts and premiums should not be sustained over the long term.
Momentum Style
Investing in or having exposure to securities with positive momentum entails investing in securities that have had above-average recent returns.  These securities may be more volatile than a broad cross-section of securities.  Returns on securities that have previously exhibited momentum may be less than returns on other styles of investing or the overall stock market.  Momentum can turn quickly and cause significant variation from other types of investments, and stocks that previously exhibited high momentum may not experience continued positive momentum.  In addition, there may be periods when the momentum style is out of favor, and during which the investment performance of the Fund using a momentum strategy may suffer.
Portfolio Duration
Average duration is a mathematical calculation of the average life of a bond (or for a bond fund, the average life of the fund's underlying bonds, weighted by the percentage of the fund's assets that each represents) that serves as a useful measure of its price risk. Duration is an estimate of how much the value of the bonds held by a fund will fluctuate in response to a change in interest rates. For example, if a fund has an average duration of 4 years and interest rates rise by 1%, the value of the bonds held by the fund will decline by approximately 4%, and if the interest rates decline by 1%, the value of the bonds held by the fund will increase by approximately 4%. Longer term bonds and zero coupon bonds are generally more sensitive to interest rate changes. Duration, which measures price sensitivity to interest rate changes, is not necessarily equal to average maturity.
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Preferred Securities
Preferred securities include preferred stock and various types of junior subordinated debt and trust preferred securities. Preferred securities may pay fixed rate or adjustable rate distributions and generally have a payment "preference" over common stock, but are junior to the issuer's senior debt in a liquidation of the issuer’s assets. Preference would mean that a company must pay on its preferred securities before paying on its common stock, and that any claims of the preferred security holder would typically be ahead of common stockholders' claims on assets in a corporate liquidation.
Holders of preferred securities usually have no right to vote for corporate directors or on other matters. The market value of preferred securities is sensitive to changes in interest rates as they are typically fixed income securities; the fixed-income payments are expected to be the primary source of long-term investment return. While some preferred securities are issued with a final maturity date, others are perpetual in nature. In certain instances, a final maturity date may be extended and/or the final payment of principal may be deferred at the issuer’s option for a specified time without triggering an event of default for the issuer. In addition, an issuer of preferred securities may have the right to redeem the securities before their stated maturity date. For instance, for certain types of preferred securities, a redemption may be triggered by a change in federal income tax or securities laws. As with call provisions, a redemption by the issuer may reduce the return of the security held by the fund. Preferred securities may be subject to provisions that allow an issuer, under certain circumstances to skip (indefinitely) or defer (possibly up to 10 years) distributions. If a fund owns a preferred security that is deferring its distribution, the fund may be required to report income for tax purposes while it is not receiving any income.
Preferred securities are typically issued by corporations, generally in the form of interest or dividend bearing instruments, or by an affiliated business trust of a corporation, generally in the form of beneficial interests in subordinated debentures or similarly structured securities. The preferred securities market is generally divided into the $25 par "retail" and the $1,000 par "institutional" segments. The $25 par segment includes securities that are listed on the New York Stock Exchange (exchange traded), which trade and are quoted with accrued dividend or interest income, and which are often callable at par value five years after their original issuance date. The institutional segment includes $1,000 par value securities that are not exchange-listed (over the counter), which trade and are quoted on a "clean" price, i.e., without accrued dividend or interest income, and which often have a minimum of 10 years of call protection from the date of their original issuance. Preferred securities can also be issued by real estate investment trusts and involve risks similar to those associated with investing in real estate investment trust companies.
Real Estate Investment Trusts ("REITs")
REITs involve certain unique risks in addition to the risks associated with investing in the real estate industry in general (such as possible declines in the value of real estate, lack of availability of mortgage funds, or extended vacancies of property). REITs are characterized as: equity REITs, which primarily own property and generate revenue from rental income; mortgage REITs, which invest in real estate mortgages; and hybrid REITs, which combine the characteristics of both equity and mortgage REITs. Equity REITs may be affected by changes in the value of the underlying property owned by the REITs, while mortgage REITs may be affected by the quality of any credit extended. REITs are dependent upon management skills, are not diversified, and are subject to heavy cash flow dependency, risks of default by borrowers, and self-liquidation. A fund that invests in a REIT is subject to the REIT’s expenses, including management fees, and will remain subject to the fund's advisory fees with respect to the assets so invested. REITs are also subject to the possibilities of failing to qualify for the special tax treatment accorded REITs under the Internal Revenue Code, and failing to maintain their exemptions from registration under the 1940 Act.
Regular REIT dividends received by a Fund from a REIT will not qualify for the corporate dividends-received deduction and generally will not constitute qualified dividend income for U.S. income tax purposes. Any distribution of income attributable to regular REIT dividends from a Fund’s investment in a REIT will not qualify for the deduction that would be available to a non-corporate shareholder were the shareholder to own such REIT directly.
Investment in REITs also involves risks similar to those associated with investing in small market capitalization companies. REITs may have limited financial resources, may trade less frequently and in a limited volume, and may be subject to more abrupt or erratic price movements than larger company securities.
Real Estate Securities
Investing in securities of companies in the real estate industry subjects a fund to the special risks associated with the real estate market and the real estate industry in general. Generally, companies in the real estate industry are considered to be those that have principal activity involving the development, ownership, construction, management or sale of real estate; have significant real estate holdings, such as hospitality companies, healthcare facilities, supermarkets, mining, lumber and/or paper companies; and/or provide products or services related to the real estate industry, such as financial institutions that make and/or service mortgage loans and manufacturers or distributors of
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building supplies. Securities of companies in the real estate industry are sensitive to factors such as loss to casualty or condemnation, changes in real estate values, property taxes, interest rates, cash flow of underlying real estate assets, occupancy rates, government regulations affecting zoning, land use and rents, and the management skill and creditworthiness of the issuer. Companies in the real estate industry may also be subject to liabilities under environmental and hazardous waste laws.
Redemption and Large Transaction Risk
Ownership of a Fund's shares may be concentrated in one or a few large investors (such as funds of funds, institutional investors, and asset allocation programs) that may sell or purchase Fund shares in large quantities on the secondary market. These secondary market transactions may cause authorized participants to increase their purchases and redemptions of creation units from the Fund. Purchases and redemptions of creation units primarily with cash rather than through in kind delivery of portfolio securities may cause the Fund to incur certain costs, such as brokerage costs or taxable gain or losses that it might not have incurred if it had made a redemption in kind. These costs could be imposed on the Fund and thus decrease its NAV to the extent that the costs are not offset by a transaction fee payable by an authorized participant.
As an example, as of June 30, 2023, Principal Funds, Inc. ("PFI") and Principal Variable Contracts Funds, Inc. ("PVC") funds of funds owned the following percentages, in the aggregate, of the outstanding shares of the underlying funds listed below. Principal Global Investors, LLC ("PGI") is the advisor to the PFI and PVC funds of funds and is committed to minimizing the potential impact of redemption and large transaction risk on underlying funds to the extent consistent with pursuing the investment objectives of the funds of funds that it manages. However, PGI and its affiliates may face conflicts of interest in fulfilling responsibilities to all such funds.
Fund
Total Percentage
of Outstanding
Shares Owned
Principal Active High Yield ETF 38.16%
Principal U.S. Mega-Cap ETF 82.39%
Principal U.S. Small-Cap ETF 75.79%
Purchases and redemptions of creation units primarily with cash rather through in kind delivery of portfolio securities may cause the ETF to incur certain costs, such as brokerage costs or taxable gains or losses that it might not have incurred if it had made redemption in kind. These costs could be imposed on the ETF and thus decrease its NAV to the extent that the costs are not offset by a transaction fee payable by an authorized participant.
Tracking Basket Structure Risk
A Fund's Tracking Basket structure may affect the price at which shares of the Fund trade in the secondary market. Although the Tracking Basket is intended to provide investors with enough information to allow for an effective arbitrage mechanism that will keep the market price of the Fund at or close to the Fund’s NAV, there is a risk that market prices will vary significantly from NAV. ETFs trading on the basis of a published Tracking Basket may trade at a wider bid-ask spread than ETFs that publish their portfolios on a daily basis and, therefore, may cost investors more to trade. These risks may increase during periods of market disruption or volatility. At certain thresholds for such premiums/discounts, bid/ask spreads and tracking error, the Fund’s Board will consider possible remedial measures, which may include liquidation or conversion to a fully transparent, active ETF or a mutual fund. For more information about these thresholds and possible remedial measures, please see the SAI in paragraph entitled "Monitoring of Thresholds" under the section entitled "Features Specific to Non-Transparent ETFs." In addition, although the Fund seeks to benefit from keeping its portfolio information secret, market participants may attempt to use the Tracking Basket to identify the fund’s trading strategy. If successful, this could result in such market participants engaging in certain predatory trading practices that may have the potential to harm the Fund and its shareholders, such as front running the Fund’s trades of portfolio securities.
Trading Halt Risk
There may be circumstances where a security held in the Fund’s portfolio but not in the Tracking Basket does not have readily available market quotations. If PGI determines that such circumstance may affect the reliability of the Tracking Basket as an arbitrage vehicle, that information, along with the identity and weighting of that security in the Fund’s portfolio, will be publicly disclosed on the Fund’s website, and PGI will assess appropriate remedial measures. For more information about these circumstances, please see the SAI in the paragraph entitled "Lack of Readily Available Market Quotations" under the section entitled "Features Specific to Non-Transparent ETFs." In these circumstances, market participants may use this information to engage in certain predatory trading practices that may have the potential to harm the Fund and its shareholders. In addition, if securities representing 10% or more of the Fund’s portfolio do not have readily available market quotations, PGI would promptly request the Exchange to halt trading on the Fund, meaning that investors would not be able to trade their shares. Trading may also be halted in
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other circumstances, for example, due to market conditions.
U.S. Government and U.S. Government-Sponsored Securities
U.S. Government securities, such as Treasury bills, notes and bonds and mortgage-backed securities guaranteed by the Government National Mortgage Association ("Ginnie Mae"), are supported by the full faith and credit of the United States; others are supported by the right of the issuer to borrow from the U.S. Treasury; others are supported by the discretionary authority of the U.S. Government to purchase the agency's obligations; and still others are supported only by the credit of the issuing agency, instrumentality, or enterprise.
Although U.S. Government-sponsored enterprises such as the Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation ("Freddie Mac") and the Federal National Mortgage Association ("Fannie Mae") may be chartered or sponsored by Congress, they are not funded by Congressional appropriations, and their securities are not issued by the U.S. Treasury nor supported by the full faith and credit of the U.S. Government.
There is no assurance that the U.S. Government would provide financial support to its agencies and instrumentalities if not required to do so. In addition, certain governmental entities have been subject to regulatory scrutiny regarding their accounting policies and practices and other concerns that may result in legislation, changes in regulatory oversight and/or other consequences that could adversely affect the credit quality, availability, or investment character of securities issued by these entities. The value and liquidity of U.S. Government securities may be affected adversely by changes in the ratings of those securities.
PORTFOLIO HOLDINGS INFORMATION
A description of the Funds' policies and procedures with respect to disclosure of the Funds' portfolio securities is available in the Funds' SAI.
On each business day, before commencement of trading on the exchange, each Fund, except the Principal Focused Blue Chip ETF and the Principal Real Estate Active Opportunities ETF, will disclose on www.PrincipalAM.com the identities and quantities of the Fund’s portfolio holdings that will form the basis for the Fund’s calculation of the Fund’s net asset value at the end of the business day. The Principal Focused Blue Chip ETF and Principal Real Estate Active Opportunities ETF will disclose on their website each Fund's Tracking Basket and Tracking Basket Weight Overlap each business day before the commencement of trading.
MANAGEMENT OF THE FUNDS
The Manager and Advisor
Principal Global Investors, LLC ("PGI"), an indirect subsidiary of Principal Financial Group, Inc. ("Principal®"), serves as the manager and advisor for the Funds. Through the Management Agreement with the Trust, PGI provides investment advisory services and certain corporate administrative services for the Funds.
Advisor:    Principal Global Investors, LLC (doing business as Principal Asset Management), 711 High Street, Des Moines, IA 50392, is part of a diversified global asset management organization that utilizes specialized investment teams and affiliates to provide institutional investors and individuals with diverse investment capabilities, including fixed income, equities, real estate, currency, asset allocation, and stable value. In addition to its asset management offices in the U.S., PGI has asset management offices of affiliate advisors located in Europe, Asia, Latin America, and Australia. PGI has been a registered investment advisor since 1998.
Funds:    In fulfilling its investment advisory responsibilities, PGI provides the day-to-day discretionary investment services (directly making decisions to purchase or sell securities) for each Fund. For some Funds, these services are provided by the sub-advisor, as described below.
Portfolio Managers
As reflected in the Fund Summaries, the day-to-day portfolio management for some Funds is shared by multiple portfolio managers. In each such case, the portfolio managers operate as a team, sharing authority and responsibility for research and the day-to-day management of the Fund's portfolio with no limitation on the authority of one portfolio manager in relation to another.
The Fund summary identifies the portfolio managers of the Fund. Additional information about the portfolio managers follows. References to Principal® include the entire Principal organization. The SAI provides additional information about each portfolio manager's compensation, other accounts the portfolio managers manage, and each portfolio manager's ownership of securities in the Fund.
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Jonathan S. Curran has been with Principal® since 2022. Prior to that, Mr. Curran was a Senior Vice President and Portfolio Manager for abrdn (formerly known as Standard Life Aberdeen) since 2010. He earned a bachelor’s degree in Economics from Princeton University. Mr. Curran has earned the right to use the Chartered Financial Analyst designation.
Mark P. Denkinger has been with Principal® since 1990. He earned a bachelor’s degree in Finance and an M.B.A. with a Finance emphasis from the University of Iowa. Mr. Denkinger has earned the right to use the Chartered Financial Analyst designation.
Christopher Ibach has been with Principal® since 2000. He earned a bachelor’s degree in Electrical Engineering and an M.B.A. in Finance from the University of Iowa. Mr. Ibach has earned the right to use the Chartered Financial Analyst designation.
K. William Nolin has been with Principal® since 1993. He earned a bachelor’s degree in Finance from the University of Iowa and an M.B.A. from the Yale School of Management. Mr. Nolin has earned the right to use the Chartered Financial Analyst designation.
Josh Rank has been with Principal® since 2013. He earned a bachelor’s degree in Finance from Iowa State University. Mr. Rank has earned the right to use the Chartered Financial Analyst designation.
Tom Rozycki has been with Principal® since 2001. He earned a bachelor’s degree in Finance from Drake University. Mr. Rozycki has earned the right to use the Chartered Financial Analyst designation.
Aaron J. Siebel has been with Principal® since 2005. He earned a bachelor’s degree in Finance from the University of Iowa. Mr. Siebel has earned the right to use the Chartered Financial Analyst designation.
Darrin E. Smith has been with Principal® since 2007. He earned a bachelor’s degree in Economics from Iowa State University and an M.B.A. from Drake University. Mr. Smith has earned the right to use the Chartered Financial Analyst designation.
Darryl Trunnel has been with Principal® since 2008. He earned a bachelor’s degree in Agricultural Business from Iowa State University. Mr. Trunnel has earned the right to use the Chartered Financial Analyst designation.
The Sub-Advisors
PGI has signed contracts with various sub-advisors. Under the sub-advisory agreements, the sub-advisor agrees to assume the obligations of PGI to provide investment advisory services to the portion of the assets of a specific Fund allocated to it by PGI. For these services, PGI pays the sub-advisor a fee.
PGI or the sub-advisor provides the Board with a recommended investment program. The program must be consistent with the Fund’s investment objective and policies. Within the scope of the approved investment program, the sub-advisor advises the Fund on its investment policy and determines which securities are bought or sold, and in what amounts.
The Fund Summaries identified the sub-advisors, portfolio managers, and the Funds they manage. Additional information follows.
Sub-Advisor:
Principal Real Estate Investors, LLC (doing business as Principal Real Estate) (“Principal - REI”), 711 High Street, Des Moines, IA 50392, was founded in 2000 and manages commercial real estate across the spectrum of public and private equity and debt investments, primarily for institutional investors.
Fund(s): Principal Real Estate Active Opportunities ETF
The portfolio managers operate as a team, sharing authority and responsibility for research and the day-to-day management of the portfolio with no limitation on the authority of one portfolio manager in relation to another.
Keith Bokota has been with Principal - REI since 2007. He earned a bachelor’s degree in Finance and International Business from Georgetown University. Mr. Bokota has earned the right to use the Chartered Financial Analyst designation.
Anthony Kenkel has been with Principal - REI since 2005. He earned a bachelor’s degree in Finance from Drake University and an M.B.A. from the University of Chicago Graduate School of Business. Mr. Kenkel has earned the right to use the Chartered Financial Analyst and Financial Risk Manager designations.
Kelly D. Rush has been with Principal - REI since 2000 and the predecessor firms since 1987. He earned a bachelor's degree in Finance and an M.B.A. in Business Administration from the University of Iowa. Mr. Rush has earned the right to use the Chartered Financial Analyst designation.
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Sub-Advisor:
Spectrum Asset Management, Inc. (“Spectrum”), 2 High Ridge Park, Stamford, CT 06905, founded in 1987, manages portfolios of preferred securities for corporate, pension fund, insurance, and endowment clients; open-end and closed-end mutual funds; and separately managed account programs for high net worth individual investors, as well as provides volatility mitigation solutions for some client portfolios.
Fund(s):
Principal Spectrum Preferred Securities Active ETF
Principal Spectrum Tax-Advantaged Dividend Active ETF
The day-to-day portfolio management for these Funds is shared by multiple portfolio managers. The portfolio managers operate as a team, sharing authority and responsibility for research and the day-to-day management of each Fund's portfolio with no limitation on the authority of one portfolio manager in relation to another.
Fernando (“Fred”) Diaz joined Spectrum in 2000.
Roberto Giangregorio joined Spectrum in 2003. Mr. Giangregorio earned a B.S. and M.S. in Mechanical Engineering from S.U.N.Y. at Stony Brook and the University of Wisconsin-Madison, respectively. He also earned an M.B.A. in Finance from Cornell University.
L. Phillip Jacoby, IV joined Spectrum in 1995. Mr. Jacoby earned a B.S. in Finance from the Boston University School of Management.
Manu Krishnan joined Spectrum in 2004. Mr. Krishnan earned a B.S. in Mechanical Engineering from the College of Engineering, Osmania University, India, an M.S. in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Delaware, and an M.B.A. in Finance from Cornell University. Mr. Krishnan has earned the right to use the Chartered Financial Analyst designation.
Mark A. Lieb founded Spectrum in 1987. Mr. Lieb earned a B.A. in Economics from Central Connecticut State College and an M.B.A. in Finance from the University of Hartford.
Kevin Nugent joined Spectrum in 2012. Mr. Nugent earned a B.A. from Ohio Wesleyan University.
Satomi Yarnell joined Spectrum in 2015. Ms. Yarnell earned a M.A. in Economics from Waseda University. Ms. Yarnell has earned the right to use the Chartered Financial Analyst designation and is a Chartered Member of Security Analyst Association of Japan (CMA).
Participating Affiliate Agreement
In rendering investment advisory services to a Fund, the advisor and each sub-advisor may use the resources of one or more of its respective foreign (non-U.S.) affiliates that are not registered under the Investment Advisers Act of 1940, as amended, to provide portfolio management, research, and trading services to the Fund. Under a Participating Affiliate Agreement, and pursuant to applicable guidance from the Staff of the SEC, U.S. registered advisors are allowed to use investment advisory and trading resources of such unregistered advisory affiliates subject to the regulatory supervision of the registered advisor. For example, some Principal Fund Complex assets are managed by employees of Principal Global Investors (Europe) Limited pursuant to such an arrangement. Each such affiliate and any of their respective employees who provide services to a Fund are considered under the Participating Affiliate Agreement to be “supervised persons” of the advisor or sub-advisor (as applicable) as that term is defined in the Investment Advisers Act of 1940, as amended.
Fees Paid to PGI
The Fund pays PGI a fee for its services, which includes the fee PGI pays to sub-advisors, as applicable, and to State Street Bank and Trust for fund administration, fund accounting, and other services. Pursuant to the Management Agreement between the Trust, on behalf of each Fund, and PGI, PGI pays all operating expenses of each Fund, except interest expenses, taxes, brokerage commissions and other expenses connected with executing portfolio transactions, acquired fund fees and expenses, future distribution fees or expenses, and extraordinary expenses.
The management fee schedules for Funds that have not completed a full fiscal year are as follows:
Fund
All Assets
Principal Focused Blue Chip ETF 0.58%
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The fee the Funds paid (as a percentage of the average daily net assets) for the fiscal year ended June 30, 2023 was:
Fund
Fee
Principal Active High Yield ETF 0.39%
Principal Healthcare Innovators ETF
0.42%
Principal Investment Grade Corporate Active ETF 0.19%
Principal Quality ETF 0.15%
Principal Real Estate Active Opportunities ETF 0.65%
Principal Spectrum Preferred Securities Active ETF 0.55%
Principal Spectrum Tax-Advantaged Dividend Active ETF 0.60%
Principal U.S. Mega-Cap ETF 0.15%
Principal U.S. Small-Cap ETF 0.38%
Principal Value ETF 0.15%
Availability of the discussions regarding the basis for the Board's approval of the various management and sub-advisory agreements is available for all Funds in the Semi-Annual Report to Shareholders for the period ending December 31, 2023.
Manager of Managers
The Trust operates as a Manager of Managers. Under an order received from the SEC (the "Order"), the Trust and PGI may enter into and materially amend agreements with unaffiliated and wholly-owned affiliated sub-advisors (affiliated sub-advisors that are at least 95% owned, directly or indirectly, by PGI or an affiliated person of PGI) without obtaining shareholder approval, including to:
hire one or more sub-advisors;
change sub-advisors; and
reallocate management fees between PGI and sub-advisors.
Although there is no present intent to do so, the Funds may, in the future, rely on current SEC Staff guidance that expands relief under the Order to allow PGI to enter into and materially amend agreements with majority-owned affiliated sub-advisors (affiliated sub-advisors that are at least 50% owned, directly or indirectly, by PGI or an affiliated person of PGI), and, further, to all sub-advisors regardless of the degree of affiliation with PGI.
In order to rely on the varying degrees of relief granted by the Order and/or the SEC Staff guidance, a Fund must receive approval from its shareholders (or, in the case of a new Fund, the Fund’s sole initial shareholder before the Fund is available to the other purchasers).
The shareholders of each Fund have approved such Fund’s reliance on the Order, as supplemented by the SEC Staff guidance, as follows:
Fund
Unaffiliated
Sub-Advisors
Wholly-Owned Affiliated
Sub-Advisors
Majority-Owned Affiliated
Sub-Advisors
Any Other Sub-Advisors Regardless of Degree of Affiliation
Principal Investment Grade Corporate Active ETF
X
X
X
Principal Quality ETF
X
X
X
Principal Value ETF
X
X
X
All Other Funds
X