Guggenheim Funds Trust
Front Cover
 
 
 
 
 
Mutual Funds
|
Fixed-Income
|
1.31.2023
Guggenheim Funds Prospectus
Class A, Class C, Institutional and Class P
January 31, 2023, as supplemented May 26, 2023
Ticker Symbol
Fund Name
Class A
Class C
Institutional
Class P
 
GIFAX
GIFCX
GIFIX
GIFPX
Guggenheim Floating Rate Strategies Fund
SIHAX
SIHSX
SHYIX
SIHPX
Guggenheim High Yield Fund
SIUSX
SDICX
GIUSX
SIUPX
Guggenheim Core Bond Fund
GILDX
GILFX
GILHX
GILPX
Guggenheim Limited Duration Fund
GIOAX
GIOCX
GIOIX
GIOPX
Guggenheim Macro Opportunities Fund
GIJAX
GIJCX
GIJIX
GIJPX
Guggenheim Municipal Income Fund
GIBAX
GIBCX
GIBIX
GIBLX
Guggenheim Total Return Bond Fund
GIYAX
GIYIX
GIYPX*
Guggenheim Ultra Short Duration Fund
* Class P shares of the Fund are not currently offered for sale.
The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission and the Commodity Futures Trading Commission have not approved or disapproved these securities, or passed upon the accuracy or adequacy of this Prospectus. Any representation to the contrary is a criminal offense.
GISIF-1-0523x0124
guggenheiminvestments.com

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A-1

Guggenheim Floating Rate Strategies Fund
INVESTMENT OBJECTIVE
The Guggenheim Floating Rate Strategies Fund (the “Fund”) seeks to provide a high level of current income while maximizing total return.
FEES AND EXPENSES OF THE FUND
This table describes the fees and expenses that you may pay if you buy, hold and sell shares of the Fund. You may pay other fees, such as brokerage commissions and other fees to financial intermediaries, which are not reflected in the tables and examples below.You may qualify for sales charge discounts if you and your family invest, or agree to invest in the future, at least $50,000 in the Family of Funds, as defined on page 192 of the Fund’s prospectus. This amount may vary depending on the Guggenheim Fund in which you invest. More information about these and other discounts is available from your financial professional and in the “Sales Charges-Class A Shares” section on page 129 of the Fund’s prospectus and the “How to Purchase Shares” section on page 92 of the Fund’s Statement of Additional Information. Different intermediaries and financial professionals may impose different sales charges or offer different sales charge waivers or discounts. These variations are described in Appendix A to the Fund’s prospectus (Intermediary-Specific Sales Charge Waivers and Discounts).

SHAREHOLDER FEES (fees paid directly from your investment)
 
Class A
Class C
Institutional
Class
Class P
Maximum Sales Charge (Load) Imposed on
Purchases (as a percentage of offering price)
3.00
%
None
None
None
Maximum Deferred Sales Charge (Load) (as a
percentage of original purchase price or
redemption proceeds, whichever is lower)
None
*
1.00
%**
None
None
*
A 1.00% deferred sales charge will normally be imposed on purchases of $1,000,000 or more on Fund shares purchased without an initial sales charge that are redeemed within 12 months of purchase.
**
A 1.00% deferred sales charge will be imposed if Fund shares are redeemed within 12 months of purchase.

ANNUAL FUND OPERATING EXPENSES (expenses that you pay each year as a percentage of the value of your investment)
 
Class A
Class C
Institutional
Class
Class P
Management Fees
0.65
%
0.65
%
0.65
%
0.65
%
Distribution and/or Service (12b-1) Fees
0.25
%
1.00
%
None
0.25
%
Other Expenses
0.21
%
0.26
%
0.22
%
0.24
%
Interest and Other Related Expenses
0.02%
0.02%
0.02%
0.02%
Remaining Other Expenses
0.19%
0.24%
0.20%
0.22%
Acquired Fund Fees and Expenses
0.02
%
0.02
%
0.02
%
0.02
%
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses
1.13
%
1.93
%
0.89
%
1.16
%
Fee Waiver (and/or expense reimbursement)1
-0.09
%
-0.14
%
-0.09
%
-0.12
%
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses After Fee
Waiver (and/or expense reimbursement)
1.04
%
1.79
%
0.80
%
1.04
%
1
Guggenheim Partners Investment Management, LLC, also known as Guggenheim Investments (the “Investment Manager”), has contractually agreed through February 1, 2024 to waive fees and/or reimburse expenses to the extent necessary to limit the ordinary operating expenses (including distribution (12b-1) fees (if any), but exclusive of brokerage costs, dividends on securities sold short, acquired fund fees and expenses, interest, taxes, litigation, indemnification, and extraordinary expenses) (“Operating Expenses”) of the Fund to the annual percentage of average daily net assets for each class of shares as follows: Class A-1.02%, Class C-1.77%, Institutional Class-0.78%, and Class P-1.02%. The Investment Manager is entitled to reimbursement by the Fund of fees waived or expenses reimbursed during any of the previous 36 months beginning on the date of the expense limitation agreement, provided that the Operating Expenses do not exceed the then-applicable expense cap. The agreement will expire when it reaches its termination or when the Investment Manager ceases to serve as such and it can be terminated by the Fund’s Board of Trustees, with certain waived fees and reimbursed expenses subject to the recoupment rights of the Investment Manager.
PROSPECTUS | 1

EXAMPLE
This Example is intended to help you compare the cost of investing in the Fund with the cost of investing in other mutual funds.
The Example assumes that you invest $10,000 in the Fund for the time periods indicated and then redeem all of your shares at the end of those periods, unless otherwise indicated. The Example also assumes that your investment has a 5% return each year and that the Fund’s operating expenses remain the same. Although your actual costs may be higher or lower, based on these assumptions your costs would be:
 
1 Year
3 Years
5 Years
10 Years
Class A
$403
$640
$895
$1,626
Class C
$282
$593
$1,029
$2,242
Institutional
$82
$275
$484
$1,088
Class P
$106
$357
$627
$1,398
You would pay the following expenses if you did not redeem your shares:
 
1 Year
3 Years
5 Years
10 Years
Class C
$182
$593
$1,029
$2,242
The above Example reflects applicable contractual fee waiver/expense reimbursement arrangements for the current duration of the arrangements only.
PORTFOLIO TURNOVER
The Fund pays transaction costs, such as commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or “turns over” its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover rate may indicate higher transaction costs and may result in higher taxes when Fund shares are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are not reflected in annual fund operating expenses or in the example, affect the Fund’s performance. During the most recent fiscal year, the Fund’s portfolio turnover rate was 30% of the average value of its portfolio.
PRINCIPAL INVESTMENT STRATEGIES
The Fund will, under normal circumstances, invest at least 80% of its assets (net assets, plus the amount of any borrowings for investment purposes) in floating rate senior secured syndicated bank loans, floating rate revolving credit facilities (“revolvers”), floating rate unsecured loans, floating rate asset backed securities (including floating rate collateralized loan obligations (“CLOs”)), other floating rate bonds, loans, notes and other securities (which may include, principally, senior secured, senior unsecured and subordinated bonds), fixed income instruments with respect to which the Fund has entered into derivative instruments to effectively convert the fixed rate interest payments into floating rate income payments, and derivative instruments (based on their notional value for purposes of this 80% strategy) that provide exposure (i.e., economic characteristics similar) to floating rate or variable rate loans, obligations or other securities. The loans in which the Fund will invest, generally made by banks and other lending institutions, are made to (or issued by) corporations, partnerships and other business entities. Floating rate loans feature rates that reset regularly, maintaining a fixed spread over a reference rate, such as the London Interbank Offered Rate (“LIBOR”) (or a replacement rate for LIBOR), the Secured Overnight Financing Rate ("SOFR") and other references rates derived from SOFR or the prime rates of large money-center banks. The interest rates for floating rate loans typically reset quarterly, although rates on some loans may adjust at other intervals.
The Fund invests in other fixed-income instruments of various maturities which may be represented by bonds, debt securities, commercial paper, forwards, derivatives or other similar instruments that Guggenheim Partners Investment Management, LLC, also known as Guggenheim Investments (the “Investment Manager”), believes provide the potential to deliver a high level of current income. Securities in which the Fund invests also may include corporate bonds, convertible securities (including those that are deemed to be “busted” because they are trading well below their equity conversion value), agency and non-agency mortgage-backed securities, asset-backed securities (including collateralized mortgage-backed securities) and CLOs. The Fund may invest in a variety of investment vehicles, such as closed-end funds, exchange-traded funds (“ETFs”) and other mutual funds.
2 | PROSPECTUS

The Fund may hold securities of any quality, rated or unrated, including those that are rated below investment grade, or, if unrated, determined to be of comparable quality (also known as “high yield securities” or “junk bonds”). The Fund may hold below investment grade securities with no limit. The Fund may hold non-registered or restricted securities (consisting of securities originally issued in reliance on Rule 144A and Regulation S securities). The Fund may also invest in securities of real estate investment trusts (“REITs”) and other real estate companies.
The Fund will principally invest in U.S. dollar denominated loans and other securities of U.S. companies, but may also invest in securities of non-U.S. companies, non-U.S. dollar denominated loans and securities (including, but not limited to, denominated in Euros, British pounds, Swiss francs or Canadian dollars), including loans and securities of emerging market countries, sovereign debt securities and Eurodollar bonds and obligations. The Investment Manager may attempt to reduce foreign currency exchange rate risk by entering into contracts with banks, brokers or dealers to purchase or sell securities or foreign currencies at a future date (“forward contracts”).
The Fund also may seek exposures through derivative transactions, including: foreign exchange forward contracts; futures on securities, indices, currencies and other investments; Eurodollar futures; options; interest rate swaps; cross-currency swaps; total return swaps; and credit default swaps, which may also create economic leverage in the Fund. The Fund may engage in derivative transactions for speculative purposes to enhance total return, to seek to hedge against fluctuations in securities prices, interest rates or currency rates, to change the effective duration of its portfolio, to manage certain investment risks, as a substitute for the purchase or sale of securities or currencies and/or to obtain or replicate market exposure. The Fund may use leverage to the extent permitted by applicable law by entering into reverse repurchase agreements and transactions equivalent to a borrowing for investment purposes.
The Fund also may engage, without limitation, in repurchase agreements, forward commitments, short sales and securities lending. The Fund may, without limitation, seek to obtain exposure to the securities in which it primarily invests by entering into a series of purchase and sale contracts or by using other investment techniques (such as dollar rolls).
The Investment Manager’s investment philosophy is predicated upon the belief that thorough research and independent thought are rewarded with performance that has the potential to outperform benchmark indexes with both lower volatility and lower correlation of returns as compared to such benchmark indexes.
The Investment Manager may determine to sell a security for several reasons, including but not limited to the following: (1) to adjust the portfolio’s average maturity or duration, or to shift assets into or out of higher-yielding securities; (2) if a security’s credit rating has been changed, the Investment Manager's credit outlook has changed, or for other similar reasons; (3) to meet redemption requests; (4) to take gains; or (5) due to relative value. Under certain circumstances, the Fund may invest in securities that are in default at the time of purchase. If a security defaults subsequent to purchase by the Fund, the Investment Manager will determine in its discretion whether to hold or dispose of such security. Under adverse or unstable market conditions or abnormal circumstances (for example, in the event of credit events, where it is deemed opportune to preserve gains, or to preserve the relative value of investments or in the case of large cash inflows or anticipated large redemptions), the Fund can make temporary investments and may not be able to pursue or achieve its investment objective.
PRINCIPAL RISKS
The value of an investment in the Fund will fluctuate and is subject to investment risks, which means investors could lose money, including all or part of their investments in the Fund. An investment in the Fund is not a bank deposit and is not insured or guaranteed by the FDIC or any governmental agency. There is no assurance that the Fund will achieve its investment objective. The Fund is subject to certain risks and the principal risks of investing in the Fund are summarized below in alphabetical order, and not in the order of importance or potential exposure.
Asset-Backed Securities Risk—Investors in asset-backed securities, including residential mortgage-backed securities, commercial mortgage-backed securities and other structured finance investments (such as collateralized mortgage obligations), generally receive payments that are part interest and part return of principal. These payments may vary based on the rate at which the underlying borrowers pay off their loans. Some asset-backed securities, including mortgage-backed securities, may have structures that make their performance based on changes in interest rates and other factors difficult to predict, causing their prices to be volatile. These instruments are particularly subject to interest rate, credit and liquidity and valuation risks. Additional risks relating to investments in asset-backed securities may arise principally because of the type of asset-backed securities in which the Fund invests, with such risks primarily associated with the particular assets collateralizing the asset-backed securities and the structure of such asset-backed securities. In addition, the terms of many structured finance investments and
PROSPECTUS | 3

other instruments are tied to interbank reference rates (referred to collectively as the “London Interbank Offered Rate” or “LIBOR”), which function as a reference rate or benchmark for many underlying collateral investments, securities and transactions. It is anticipated that LIBOR ultimately will be discontinued, which may cause increased volatility and illiquidity in the markets for instruments with terms tied to LIBOR or other adverse consequences, such as decreased yields and reduction in value, for these instruments. These events may adversely affect the Fund and its investments in such instruments.
Commercial Mortgage-Backed Securities—Investments in commercial mortgage-backed securities (“CMBS”) are backed by commercial mortgage loans that may be secured by office properties, retail properties, hotels, mixed use properties or multi-family apartment buildings and are particularly subject to the credit risk of the borrower and the tenants of the properties securing the commercial mortgage loans. CMBS are subject to the risks of asset-backed securities generally and particularly subject to credit risk, interest rate risk, and liquidity and valuation risk. Economic downturns, tightening lending standards and increased interest and lending rates, developments adverse to the commercial real estate markets, and other developments that limit or reduce the activities of and demand for commercial retail and office spaces adversely impact the value of, and income generated by, such securities.
Residential Mortgage-Backed Securities—Residential mortgage-backed securities may be particularly sensitive to changes in interest rates given that changing interest rates tend to adjust the duration of fixed-rate mortgage-backed securities. As a result, a changing interest rate environment can cause the prices of mortgage-backed securities to be increasingly volatile, which may adversely affect the Fund’s holdings of mortgage-backed securities. Investments in non-agency residential mortgage-backed securities are subject to increased interest rate risk and other risks, such as credit and liquidity and valuation risks.
Collateralized Loan Obligations and Collateralized Debt Obligations Risk—Collateralized loan obligations (“CLOs”) bear many of the same risks as other forms of asset-backed securities, including interest rate risk, credit risk and default risk. As they are backed primarily by commercial loans, CLOs also bear many of the same risks as investing in loans directly. However, in addition to the risks associated with investing in commercial loans, the complex structure and highly leveraged nature of a CLO poses additional risks. CLOs incur indebtedness by issuing classes or “tranches” that vary in risk and yield. CLOs may experience substantial losses attributable to loan defaults or trading losses. Such losses on the underlying assets are borne first by the holders of subordinate tranches, which may take the form of an equity interest. The Fund’s investments in CLOs may decrease in market value when the CLO’s assets experience loan defaults or credit impairment, losses that exceed the most subordinate tranches, or market anticipation of loan defaults and investor aversion to CLO securities as a class.
Collateralized debt obligations (“CDOs”) are structured similarly to CLOs and bear many of the same risks as CLOs, including interest rate risk, credit risk and default risk. CDOs are subject to additional risks because they are backed by pools of assets other than commercial loans, including securities (such as other asset-backed securities), synthetic instruments or bonds, and may be highly leveraged. Like CLOs, losses incurred by a CDO are borne first by holders of the most subordinate tranches. Accordingly, the risks of CDOs depend largely on the type of underlying collateral and the tranche of CDOs in which the Fund invests. Moreover, CDOs that obtain their exposure through synthetic investments are exposed to risks associated with derivative instruments.
The terms of many structured finance investments, including CLOs and CDOs, are tied to LIBOR, which functions as a reference rate or benchmark for many underlying collateral investments, securities and transactions. LIBOR is scheduled to be discontinued, which discontinuation may cause increased volatility and illiquidity in the markets for instruments with terms tied to LIBOR or other adverse consequences, such as decreased yields and reduction in value, for these instruments. Some structured finance investments are tied to relatively new and developing reference rates, such as SOFR or other reference rates based on SOFR. These relatively new and developing rates may behave differently than LIBOR would have or may not match the reference rate applicable to the underlying assets related to these investments. These events may adversely affect the Fund and its investments in CLOs and CDOs, including their value, volatility and liquidity.
Commercial Paper Risk—The value of the Fund’s investment in commercial paper, which is an unsecured promissory note that generally has a maturity date between one and 270 days and is issued by a U.S. or foreign entity, is susceptible to changes in the issuer’s financial condition or credit quality. Investments in commercial paper are usually discounted from their value at maturity. Commercial paper can be fixed-rate or variable rate and can be adversely affected by changes in interest rates.
4 | PROSPECTUS

Convertible Securities Risk—Convertible securities may be subordinate to other securities. The total return for a convertible security depends, in part, upon the performance of the underlying security into which it can be converted. The value of convertible securities tends to decline as interest rates increase. Convertible securities generally offer lower interest or dividend yields than non-convertible securities of similar quality.
Counterparty Credit Risk—The Fund makes investments in financial instruments and OTC-traded derivatives involving counterparties to gain exposure to a particular group of securities, index, asset class or other reference asset without actually purchasing those securities or investments, to hedge a position, or for other investment purposes. Through these investments and related arrangements (e.g., prime brokerage or securities lending arrangements or derivatives transactions), the Fund is exposed to credit risks that the counterparty may be unwilling or unable to make timely payments or otherwise to meet its contractual obligations. If the counterparty becomes bankrupt or defaults on (or otherwise becomes unable or unwilling to perform) its payment or other obligations to the Fund, the Fund may not receive the full amount that it is entitled to receive or may experience delays in recovering the collateral or other assets held by, or on behalf of, the counterparty. If this occurs, the value of your shares in the Fund will decrease. Counterparty credit risk also includes the related risk of having concentrated exposure to such a counterparty.
Credit Risk—The Fund could lose money if the issuer or guarantor of a fixed-income or other debt instrument or a counterparty to a derivatives transaction or other transaction is unable or unwilling, or perceived to be unable or unwilling, to pay interest or repay principal on time, defaults or otherwise fails to meet its obligations. Actual or perceived changes in economic, social, public health, financial or political conditions in general or that affect a particular type of instrument, issuer, guarantor or counterparty can reduce the ability of the party to meet its obligations, which can affect the credit quality, liquidity and/or value of an instrument. The value of an instrument also may decline for reasons that relate directly to the issuer, guarantor or counterparty, such as management performance, financial leverage and reduced demand for goods and services. The issuer, guarantor or counterparty could also suffer a rapid decline in credit rating, which would adversely affect the volatility of the value and liquidity of the instrument. Credit ratings may not be an accurate assessment of liquidity or credit risk.
Currency Risk—Indirect and direct exposure to foreign currencies subjects the Fund to the risk that those currencies will decline in value relative to the U.S. Dollar, which would cause a decline in the U.S. value of the holdings of the Fund. Currency rates in foreign countries may fluctuate significantly over short periods of time for a number of reasons, including changes in interest rates and the imposition of currency controls or other political, economic and tax developments in the U.S. or abroad.
Derivatives Risk—Derivatives and other similar instruments (collectively referred to in this paragraph as “derivatives”) pose risks in addition to and greater than those associated with investing directly in securities, currencies or other investments, including risks relating to leverage, market conditions and market risk, imperfect correlations with underlying investments or the Fund’s other portfolio holdings, high price volatility, lack of availability, counterparty credit, illiquidity, valuation, operational and legal restrictions and risk. Their use is a highly specialized activity that involves investment techniques and risks different from those associated with ordinary portfolio securities transactions. Changes in the value of a derivative may also create sudden margin delivery or settlement payment obligations for the Fund, which can materially affect the performance of the Fund and its liquidity and other risk profiles. If the Investment Manager is incorrect about its expectations of market conditions, the use of derivatives could also result in a loss, which in some cases may be unlimited. In addition, the Fund’s use of derivatives may cause the Fund to realize higher amounts of short term capital gains (generally taxed at ordinary income tax rates) than if the Fund had not used such instruments. Some of the derivatives in which the Fund invests may be traded (and privately negotiated) in the OTC market. OTC derivatives are subject to heightened counterparty credit, legal, liquidity and valuation risks.
Forward Foreign Currency Exchange Contracts Risk—A forward foreign currency exchange contract is an OTC obligation to purchase or sell a specific currency at a future date at a price set at the time of the contract. Foreign currency transactions can be affected unpredictably by intervention (or the failure to intervene) by U.S. or foreign governments or central banks, or by currency controls or political developments. Such events may prevent or restrict the Fund’s ability to enter into foreign currency transactions, force the Fund to exit a foreign currency transaction at a disadvantageous time or price or result in penalties for the Fund, any of which may result in a loss to the Fund. A contract to sell a foreign currency would limit any potential gain that might be realized if the value of the currency increases. Suitable hedging transactions may not be available in all circumstances. Engaging in forward foreign currency exchange contracts will subject the Fund to counterparty credit risk and any failure to perform by a counterparty could result in a loss to the Fund.
PROSPECTUS | 5

Dollar Roll Transaction Risk—The Fund may enter into dollar roll transactions, in which the Fund sells a mortgage-backed or other security for settlement on one date and buys back a substantially similar security for settlement at a later date. Dollar rolls involve a risk of loss if the market value of the securities that the Fund is committed to buy declines below the price of the securities the Fund has sold.
Emerging Markets Risk—Investments in or exposure to emerging markets are generally subject to a greater level of those risks associated with investing in or being exposed to developed foreign markets, as emerging markets are considered to be less developed. Furthermore, investments in or exposure to emerging markets are generally subject to additional risks, including the risks associated with trading in smaller markets, lower volumes of trading, and being subject to lower levels of government regulation and less extensive and transparent accounting, auditing, recordkeeping, financial reporting and other requirements.
Extension Risk—Certain debt instruments, including mortgage- and other asset-backed securities, are subject to the risk that payments on principal may occur at a slower rate or later than expected. In this event, the expected maturity could lengthen and the Fund’s investment may sharply decrease in value and the Fund’s income from the investment may quickly decline. These types of instruments are particularly subject to extension risk, and offer less potential for gains, during periods of rising interest rates. In addition, the Fund may be delayed in its ability to reinvest income or proceeds from these instruments in potentially higher yielding investments, which would adversely affect the Fund.
Foreign Securities and Currency Risk—Foreign securities carry unique or additional risks when compared to U.S. securities, including currency fluctuations, adverse political (including geopolitical) and economic developments, unreliable or untimely information, less liquidity and more volatility, limited legal recourse and higher transactional costs.
High Yield and Unrated Securities Risk—High yield, below investment grade and unrated high risk debt securities (which also may be known as “junk bonds”) may present additional risks because these securities may be less liquid, and therefore more difficult to value accurately and sell at an advantageous price or time, and present more credit risk than investment grade bonds. The price of high yield securities tends to be subject to greater volatility due to issuer-specific factors, such as operating results and outlook and to real or perceived adverse economic and competitive industry conditions. This exposure may be obtained through investments in other investment companies. Based on its investment strategies, a significant portion of the Fund’s investments can be comprised of high yield and unrated securities and thus particularly prone to the foregoing risks, which may result in losses to the Fund.
Interest Rate Risk—Fixed-income and other debt instruments are subject to the possibility that interest rates could change. Changes in interest rates may adversely affect the Fund’s investments in these instruments, such as the value or liquidity of, and income generated by, the investments. Interest rates may change as a result of a variety of factors, and the change may be sudden and significant, with unpredictable impacts on the financial markets and the Fund’s investments. Fixed-income and other debt instruments with longer durations are more sensitive to changes in interest rates and, thus, subject to more volatility than similar instruments with shorter durations. Generally, when interest rates increase, the values of fixed-income and other debt instruments decline, sometimes suddenly and significantly. When interest rates decrease, the values of fixed-income and other debt instruments generally rise. During periods of rising interest rates, because changes in interest rates on adjustable rate securities may lag behind changes in market rates, the value of such securities may decline until their interest rates reset to market rates. During periods of declining interest rates, because the interest rates on adjustable rate securities generally reset downward, their market value is unlikely to rise to the same extent as the value of comparable fixed rate securities. During periods when interest rates are low or negative, the Fund’s yield and performance may be adversely affected and the Fund may be unable to maintain positive returns or minimize the volatility of the Fund's net asset value per share. Changes in monetary policy may exacerbate the risks associated with changing interest rates.
Investment in Investment Vehicles Risk—Investing in other investment vehicles, including ETFs, closed-end funds and other mutual funds, subjects the Fund to those risks affecting the investment vehicle, including the possibility that the value of the underlying securities held by the investment vehicle could decrease or the portfolio becomes illiquid. Moreover, the Fund and its shareholders will incur its pro rata share of the underlying vehicles’ expenses, which will reduce the Fund’s performance. In addition, investments in an ETF or a listed closed-end fund are subject to, among other risks, the risk that the shares may trade at a discount or premium relative to the net asset value of the shares and the listing exchange may halt trading of the shares.
6 | PROSPECTUS

Investment in Loans Risk—The Fund may invest in loans directly or indirectly through assignments or participations. Investments in loans, including loan syndicates and other direct lending opportunities, involve special types of risks, including credit risk, interest rate risk, counterparty risk, prepayment risk and extension risk. Loans may offer a fixed or floating interest rate. Loans are often below investment grade and may be unrated. The Fund’s investments in loans can also be difficult to value accurately and may be more susceptible to liquidity risk than fixed-income instruments of similar credit quality and/or maturity. The Fund is also subject to the risk that the value of any collateral for the loan may be insufficient or unavailable to cover the borrower’s obligations should the borrower fail to make payments, become insolvent, or otherwise default. Transactions in loans are often subject to long settlement periods and often require consent from borrowers and/or an agent acting for the lenders, thus potentially limiting the ability of the Fund to invest sale proceeds in other investments and to use proceeds to meet its current redemption obligations. The Fund thus is subject to the risk of selling other investments at disadvantageous times or prices or taking other actions necessary to raise cash to meet its redemption obligations. Participations in loans may subject the Fund to the credit risk of both the borrower and the seller of the participation and may make enforcement of loan covenants, if any, more difficult for the Fund as legal action may have to go through the seller of the participation (or an agent acting on its behalf). Covenants contained in loan documentation are intended to protect lenders and investors by imposing certain restrictions and other limitations on a borrower’s and the credit group’s operations or assets and by providing certain information and consent rights to lenders. In addition to operational covenants, loans and other debt obligations often contain financial covenants, which require a borrower and the related credit group to satisfy certain financial tests at periodic intervals or to maintain compliance with certain financial metrics. The Fund invests in or is exposed to loans and other similar debt obligations that are sometimes referred to as “covenant-lite” loans or obligations, which generally are loans or other similar debt obligations that lack financial maintenance covenants or possess fewer or contingent financial maintenance covenants and other financial protections for lenders and investors. These “covenant-lite” loans or obligations typically are particularly subject to the risks associated with investments in loans as described above.
Leverage Risk—The Fund’s use of leverage, through borrowings or instruments such as derivatives and reverse repurchase agreements, may cause the Fund to be more volatile and riskier and magnify the Fund's losses to an extent greater than if it had not been leveraged.
Liquidity and Valuation Risk—It may be difficult for the Fund to purchase and sell particular investments within a reasonable time at a fair price, or the price at which it has been valued by the Investment Manager for purposes of the Fund’s net asset value, causing the Fund to be less liquid and unable to realize what the Investment Manager believes should be the price of the investment. Valuation of portfolio investments may be difficult, such as during periods of market turmoil or reduced liquidity, and for investments that may, for example, trade infrequently or irregularly. In these and other circumstances, an investment may be valued using fair value methodologies, which are inherently subjective, reflect good faith judgments based on available information and may not accurately estimate the price at which the Fund could sell the investment at that time. These risks are heightened in a changing interest rate environment. Based on its investment strategies, a significant portion of the Fund's investments can be difficult to value and potentially less liquid and thus particularly prone to the foregoing risks.
Management Risk—The Fund is actively managed, which means that investment decisions are made based on investment views. There is no guarantee that the investment views will produce the desired results or expected returns. As a result of these and other factors, the Fund may lose value or fail to meet its investment objective or underperform its benchmark index or funds with similar investment objectives and strategies. Furthermore, active and frequent trading that can accompany active management, also called “high turnover,” may have a negative impact on performance. Active and frequent trading may result in higher brokerage costs or mark-up charges and tax costs, which are ultimately passed on to shareholders of the Fund. Active and frequent trading may also result in adverse tax consequences.
Market Risk—The value of, or income generated by, the investments held by the Fund may fluctuate rapidly and unpredictably. These fluctuations may be frequent and significant. In addition, the Fund may incur losses as a result of various market and economic factors, such as those affecting individual companies or issuers or particular industries. In addition, developments related to economic, political (including geopolitical), social, public health, market or other conditions may cause volatility in financial markets and reduced liquidity in equity, credit and/or debt markets, which could adversely impact the Fund and its investments and their value and performance. Under such conditions, the Fund may experience significant redemption activity by shareholders and could be forced to sell portfolio securities or other assets at unfavorable prices in an effort to generate sufficient cash to pay redeeming shareholders. The Fund's investments may perform poorly or underperform the general securities markets or other types of securities.
PROSPECTUS | 7

Prepayment Risk—Certain debt instruments, including loans and mortgage- and other asset-backed securities, are subject to the risk that payments on principal may occur more quickly or earlier than expected. If this occurs, the Fund might be forced to forego future interest income on the principal repaid early and to reinvest income or proceeds at generally lower interest rates, thus reducing the Fund’s yield. These types of instruments are particularly subject to prepayment risk, and offer less potential for gains, during periods of declining interest rates.
Real Estate Investments Risk—The Fund may invest in securities of real estate companies and companies related to the real estate industry, including real estate investment trusts (“REITs”), which are subject to the same risks as direct investments in real estate and the real estate market generally. The real estate industry is particularly sensitive to, among other things, economic downturns, changes in interest rates, changes in national, state or local real estate conditions, changes in the availability, cost and terms of mortgages (and other types of financing) and fluctuations in occupancy levels and demand for properties.
Regulatory and Legal Risk—U.S. and non-U.S. governmental agencies and other regulators regularly implement additional regulations and legislators pass new laws that affect the investments held by the Fund, the strategies used by the Fund or the level of regulation or taxation applying to the Fund (such as regulations related to investments in derivatives and other transactions). These regulations and laws impact the investment strategies, performance, costs and operations of the Fund or taxation of shareholders.
Repurchase Agreements and Reverse Repurchase Agreements Risk—In the event of the insolvency of the counterparty to a repurchase agreement or reverse repurchase agreement, recovery of the repurchase price owed to the Fund or, in the case of a reverse repurchase agreement, the securities or other assets sold by the Fund, may be delayed. Because reverse repurchase agreements may be considered to be the practical equivalent of borrowing funds, they constitute a form of leverage. If the Fund reinvests the proceeds of a reverse repurchase agreement at a rate lower than the cost of the agreement, entering into the agreement will lower the Fund’s yield.
Restricted Securities Risk—Restricted securities generally cannot be sold to the public and may involve a high degree of business, financial and liquidity risk, which may result in substantial losses to the Fund.
Securities Lending Risk—Securities lending involves a risk that the borrower may fail to return the securities or deliver the proper amount of collateral, which may result in a loss to the Fund. In the event of bankruptcy of the borrower, the Fund could experience losses or delays in recovering the loaned securities.
Short Sale Risk—Short selling a security involves selling a borrowed security with the expectation that the value of that security will decline so that the security may be purchased at a lower price when returning the borrowed security. The loss on a short sale, which, in some cases, may be theoretically unlimited, may be greater than the original value of the securities sold short because the price of the borrowed security may rise, thereby increasing the price at which the security must be purchased. Government actions also may affect the Fund’s ability to engage in short selling.
Sovereign Debt Risk—The debt securities issued by sovereign entities may decline as a result of default or other adverse credit event resulting from a sovereign debtor's unwillingness or inability to repay principal and pay interest in a timely manner, which may be affected by a variety of factors, including its cash flow situation, the extent of its reserves, the availability of sufficient foreign exchange on the date a payment is due, the relative size of the debt service burden to the economy as a whole, the sovereign debtor's policy toward international lenders, and the political constraints to which a sovereign debtor may be subject. Sovereign debt risk is greater for issuers in emerging markets than issuers in developed countries.
Special Situation Investments/Securities in Default Risk—Investments in the securities and debt of distressed issuers or issuers in default involve far greater risk than investing in issuers whose debt obligations are being met and whose debt trades at or close to its “par” or full value because the investments in the securities and debt of distressed issuers or issuers in default are highly speculative with respect to the issuer’s ability to make interest payments and/or to pay its principal obligations in full and/or on time.
When Issued, Forward Commitment and Delayed-Delivery Transactions Risk—When-issued, forward-commitment and delayed-delivery transactions involve a commitment to purchase or sell specific securities at a predetermined price or yield in which payment and delivery take place after the customary settlement period for that type of security. When purchasing securities pursuant to one of these transactions, payment for the securities is not required until the delivery date. However, the purchaser assumes the rights and risks of ownership, including the risks of price and yield fluctuations and the risk that the security will not be issued as anticipated.
8 | PROSPECTUS

PERFORMANCE INFORMATION
The following chart and table provide some indication of the risks of investing in the Fund by showing the Fund’s Class A share calendar year performance from year to year and average annual returns for the one, five and ten year or, if shorter, since inception periods, as applicable, for the Fund’s Class A, Class C, Institutional Class, and Class P shares compared to those of a broad measure of market performance. Performance of the benchmark index shown in the table below is shown for the same periods as shown for performance of Class A shares. As with all mutual funds, past performance (before and after taxes) is not necessarily an indication of how the Fund will perform in the future. Updated performance information is available on the Fund’s website at www.guggenheiminvestments.com or by calling 800.820.0888.
The bar chart does not reflect the impact of the sales charge applicable to Class A shares which, if reflected, would lower the returns shown. Performance reflects applicable fee waivers and/or expense limitations in effect during the periods shown.
During the periods shown in
the chart above:
Quarter Ended
Return
Highest Quarter
June 30, 2020
8.15%
Lowest Quarter
March 31, 2020
-13.68%
AVERAGE ANNUAL TOTAL RETURNS (for the periods ended December 31, 2022)
After-tax returns shown in the table are calculated using the historical highest individual federal marginal income tax rates and do not reflect the impact of any state or local taxes. Actual after-tax returns depend on an investor’s tax situation and may differ from those shown. After-tax returns shown are not relevant to investors who hold their Fund shares through tax-deferred arrangements, such as 401(k) plans or individual retirement accounts (“IRAs”). After-tax returns are shown for Class A only. After-tax returns for Class C, Institutional Class, and Class P will vary. The returns shown below reflect applicable sales charges, if any.
 
Inception
1 Year
5 Years
10 Years or,
if Shorter,
Since Inception
Class A
11/30/2011
Return Before Taxes
-3.97%
1.70%
2.75%
Return After Taxes on Distributions
-5.76%
-0.01%
0.92%
Return After Taxes on Distributions and Sale of Fund
Shares
-2.36%
0.56%
1.27%
Class C—Before Taxes
11/30/2011
-2.70%
1.55%
2.48%
Institutional Class—Before Taxes
11/30/2011
-0.82%
2.56%
3.49%
Class P—Before Taxes
5/1/2015
-1.02%
2.31%
2.69%
PROSPECTUS | 9

 
Inception
1 Year
5 Years
10 Years or,
if Shorter,
Since Inception
Index
Credit Suisse Leveraged Loan Index (reflects no deduction
for fees, expenses or taxes)
-1.06%
3.24%
3.78%
MANAGEMENT OF THE FUND
Guggenheim Partners Investment Management, LLC, also known as Guggenheim Investments, serves as the investment manager of the Fund. Guggenheim Investments utilizes a team-based approach that follows a disciplined investment process. The portfolio managers for the Fund are:
Name*
Experience with the Fund
Primary Title with Investment Manager
Anne B. Walsh
Since 2011
Managing Partner, Chief Investment Officer, and Portfolio
Manager
Thomas J. Hauser
Since 2014
Senior Managing Director and Portfolio Manager
*
Each portfolio manager is primarily responsible for the day-to-day management of the Fund.
PURCHASE AND SALE OF FUND SHARES
You may purchase or redeem Fund shares through your broker/dealer, other financial intermediary that has an agreement with Guggenheim Funds Distributors, LLC, the Fund’s distributor, or, for shares of each class other than Class P shares, through the Fund’s transfer agent. You may purchase, redeem or exchange shares of any class of the Fund on any day the New York Stock Exchange is open for business. The minimum initial investment for Class A and Class C shares is $2,500. The minimum subsequent investment is $100. Class A and Class C do not have a minimum account balance.
The Institutional Class minimum initial investment is $2 million, although the Investment Manager may waive this requirement at its discretion. The Institutional Class has a minimum account balance of $1 million. Due to the relatively high cost of maintaining accounts below the minimum account balance, the Fund reserves the right to redeem shares if an account balance falls below the minimum account balance for any reason. Investors will be given 60 days' notice to reestablish the minimum account balance. If the account balance is not increased, the account may be closed and the proceeds sent to the investor. Institutional Class shares of the Fund will be redeemed at net asset value on the day the account is closed.
Class P shares of the Fund are offered through broker/dealers and other financial intermediaries with which Guggenheim Funds Distributors, LLC has an agreement for the use of Class P shares of the Fund in investment products, programs or accounts. Class P shares do not have a minimum initial investment amount, minimum subsequent investment amount or a minimum account balance. The Fund reserves the right to modify its minimum investment amount and account balance requirements at any time, with or without prior notice to you.
TAX INFORMATION
Fund distributions are taxable as ordinary income or capital gains (or a combination of both), unless your investment is through an IRA or other tax-advantaged retirement account. Investments through tax-advantaged accounts may sometimes become taxable upon withdrawal.
PAYMENTS TO BROKER/DEALERS AND OTHER FINANCIAL INTERMEDIARIES
If you purchase Fund shares through a broker/dealer or other financial intermediary, the Fund and its related companies may pay the intermediary for the sale of Fund shares and related services. These payments may create a conflict of interest by influencing the broker/dealer or other intermediary and your sales person to recommend the Fund over another investment. Ask your sales person or visit your financial intermediary’s website for more information.
10 | PROSPECTUS

Guggenheim High Yield Fund
INVESTMENT OBJECTIVE
The Guggenheim High Yield Fund (the “Fund”) seeks high current income. Capital appreciation is a secondary objective.
FEES AND EXPENSES OF THE FUND
This table describes the fees and expenses that you may pay if you buy, hold and sell shares of the Fund. You may pay other fees, such as brokerage commissions and other fees to financial intermediaries, which are not reflected in the tables and examples below.You may qualify for sales charge discounts if you and your family invest, or agree to invest in the future, at least $50,000 in the Family of Funds, as defined on page 192 of the Fund’s prospectus. This amount may vary depending on the Guggenheim Fund in which you invest. More information about these and other discounts is available from your financial professional and in the “Sales Charges-Class A Shares” section on page 129 of the Fund’s prospectus and the “How to Purchase Shares” section on page 92 of the Fund’s Statement of Additional Information. Different intermediaries and financial professionals may impose different sales charges or offer different sales charge waivers or discounts. These variations are described in Appendix A to the Fund’s prospectus (Intermediary-Specific Sales Charge Waivers and Discounts).

SHAREHOLDER FEES (fees paid directly from your investment)
 
Class A
Class C
Institutional
Class
Class P
Maximum Sales Charge (Load) Imposed on
Purchases (as a percentage of offering price)
4.00
%
None
None
None
Maximum Deferred Sales Charge (Load) (as a
percentage of original purchase price or
redemption proceeds, whichever is lower)
None
*
1.00
%**
None
None
Redemption Charge (as a percentage of amount
redeemed or exchanged)
2.00
%***
2.00
%***
2.00
%***
2.00
%***
*
A 1.00% deferred sales charge will normally be imposed on purchases of $1,000,000 or more on Fund shares purchased without an initial sales charge that are redeemed within 12 months of purchase.
**
A 1.00% deferred sales charge will be imposed if Fund shares are redeemed within 12 months of purchase.
***
A 2.00% redemption charge will be imposed if Fund shares are redeemed within 90 days of purchase. The Fund reserves the right to waive the redemption charge in its discretion.

ANNUAL FUND OPERATING EXPENSES (expenses that you pay each year as a percentage of the value of your investment)
 
Class A
Class C
Institutional
Class
Class P
Management Fees
0.60
%
0.60
%
0.60
%
0.60
%
Distribution and/or Service (12b-1) Fees
0.25
%
1.00
%
None
0.25
%
Other Expenses
0.29
%
0.34
%
0.35
%
0.43
%
Interest and Other Related Expenses
0.01%
0.01%
0.01%
0.01%
Remaining Other Expenses
0.28%
0.33%
0.34%
0.42%
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses
1.14
%
1.94
%
0.95
%
1.28
%
Fee Waiver (and/or expense reimbursement)1,2
-0.04
%
-0.04
%
-0.07
%
-0.13
%
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses After Fee
Waiver (and/or expense reimbursement)
1.10
%
1.90
%
0.88
%
1.15
%
1
Security Investors, LLC, also known as Guggenheim Investments (the “Investment Manager”), has contractually agreed through February 1, 2024 to waive fees and/or reimburse expenses to the extent necessary to limit the ordinary operating expenses (including distribution (12b-1) fees (if any), but exclusive of brokerage costs, dividends on securities sold short, acquired fund fees and expenses, interest, taxes, litigation, indemnification, and extraordinary expenses) (“Operating Expenses”) of the Fund to the annual percentage of average daily net assets for each class of shares as follows: Class A-1.16%, Class C-1.91%, Institutional Class-0.91%, and Class P-1.16%. The Investment Manager is entitled to reimbursement by the Fund of fees waived or expenses reimbursed during any of the previous 36
PROSPECTUS | 11

months beginning on the date of the expense limitation agreement, provided that the Operating Expenses do not exceed the then-applicable expense cap. The agreement will expire when it reaches its termination or when the Investment Manager ceases to serve as such and it can be terminated by the Fund’s Board of Trustees, with certain waived fees and reimbursed expenses subject to the recoupment rights of the Investment Manager.
2
The Investment Manager has contractually agreed through February 1, 2024, to waive the amount of the Fund’s management fee to the extent necessary to offset the proportionate share of any management fee paid by the Fund with respect to any Fund investment in an underlying fund for which the Investment Manager or any of its affiliates also serves as investment manager. The agreement will expire when it reaches its termination or when the Investment Manager ceases to serve as such and it can be terminated by the Fund’s Board of Trustees.
EXAMPLE
This Example is intended to help you compare the cost of investing in the Fund with the cost of investing in other mutual funds.
The Example assumes that you invest $10,000 in the Fund for the time periods indicated and then redeem all of your shares at the end of those periods, unless otherwise indicated. The Example also assumes that your investment has a 5% return each year and that the Fund’s operating expenses remain the same. Although your actual costs may be higher or lower, based on these assumptions your costs would be:
 
1 Year
3 Years
5 Years
10 Years
Class A
$508
$744
$999
$1,727
Class C
$293
$605
$1,043
$2,261
Institutional
$90
$296
$519
$1,160
Class P
$117
$393
$690
$1,534
You would pay the following expenses if you did not redeem your shares:
 
1 Year
3 Years
5 Years
10 Years
Class C
$193
$605
$1,043
$2,261
The above Example reflects applicable contractual fee waiver/expense reimbursement arrangements for the current duration of the arrangements only.
PORTFOLIO TURNOVER
The Fund pays transaction costs, such as commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or “turns over” its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover rate may indicate higher transaction costs and may result in higher taxes when Fund shares are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are not reflected in annual fund operating expenses or in the example, affect the Fund’s performance. During the most recent fiscal year, the Fund’s portfolio turnover rate was 42% of the average value of its portfolio.
PRINCIPAL INVESTMENT STRATEGIES
The Fund pursues its objective by investing at least 80% of its assets (net assets, plus the amount of any borrowings for investment purposes), under normal circumstances, in a broad range of high yield, high risk debt securities rated below the top four long-term rating categories by a nationally recognized statistical rating organization or, if unrated, determined by Security Investors, LLC, also known as Guggenheim Investments (the “Investment Manager”), to be of comparable quality (also known as “junk bonds”). If nationally recognized statistical rating organizations assign different ratings to the same security, the Fund will use the higher rating for purposes of determining the security’s credit quality. These debt securities may include, without limitation: corporate bonds and notes, convertible securities, commercial paper, discount notes, securities issued by the U.S. government or its agencies and instrumentalities (including those not backed by the full faith and credit of the U.S. government), agency and non-agency mortgage-backed securities and other asset-backed securities (including collateralized debt obligations), participations in and assignments of loans (such as senior floating rate loans, syndicated bank loans, secured or unsecured loans, bridge loans and other loans), floating rate revolving credit facilities (“revolvers”), debtor-in-possession loans (“DIPs”) and other loans, and sovereign debt securities and Eurodollar bonds and obligations. These securities may pay fixed or variable rates of interest. These securities also may be restricted securities, including Rule 144A securities that are eligible for resale to qualified institutional buyers.
The Fund also may invest in a variety of investment vehicles, principally closed-end funds, exchange-traded funds (“ETFs”) and other mutual funds. The Fund may invest up to 10% of its net assets in securities that are in default at the time of purchase. The debt securities in which the Fund invests will primarily be domestic securities, but may also
12 | PROSPECTUS

include foreign securities. Such securities may be denominated in foreign currencies. The Investment Manager may attempt to reduce foreign currency exchange rate risk by entering into contracts with banks, brokers or dealers to purchase or sell securities or foreign currencies at a future date. The Fund may also invest in preferred securities.
The Fund also may seek exposures through derivative transactions, including: foreign exchange forward contracts; futures on securities, indices, currencies and other investments; Eurodollar futures; options; interest rate swaps; cross-currency swaps; total return swaps; and credit default swaps, which may also create economic leverage in the Fund. The Fund may engage in derivative transactions for speculative purposes to enhance total return, to seek to hedge against fluctuations in securities prices, interest rates or currency rates, to change the effective duration of its portfolio, to manage certain investment risks, as a substitute for the purchase or sale of securities or currencies and/or to obtain or replicate market exposure. The Fund may use leverage to the extent permitted by applicable law by entering into reverse repurchase agreements and transactions equivalent to a borrowing for investment purposes.
The Fund also may engage, without limitation, in repurchase agreements, forward commitments, short sales and securities lending. The Fund may, without limitation, seek to obtain exposure to the securities in which it primarily invests by entering into a series of purchase and sale contracts or by using other investment techniques (such as dollar rolls).
The Investment Manager selects securities and other investments for purchase and sale based on intensive credit research involving extensive due diligence on each issuer, region and sector, and also considers macroeconomic outlook and geopolitical issues.
The Investment Manager may determine to sell a security for several reasons, including but not limited to the following: (1) to adjust the portfolio’s average maturity or duration, or to shift assets into or out of higher-yielding securities; (2) if a security’s credit rating has been changed, the Investment Manager's credit outlook has changed, or for other similar reasons; (3) to meet redemption requests; (4) to take gains; or (5) due to relative value. Under adverse or unstable market conditions or abnormal circumstances (for example, in the event of credit events, where it is deemed opportune to preserve gains, or to preserve the relative value of investments or in the case of large cash inflows or anticipated large redemptions), the Fund can make temporary investments and may not be able to pursue or achieve its investment objective.
PRINCIPAL RISKS
The value of an investment in the Fund will fluctuate and is subject to investment risks, which means investors could lose money, including all or part of their investments in the Fund. An investment in the Fund is not a bank deposit and is not insured or guaranteed by the FDIC or any governmental agency. There is no assurance that the Fund will achieve its investment objective. The Fund is subject to certain risks and the principal risks of investing in the Fund are summarized below in alphabetical order, and not in the order of importance or potential exposure.
Asset-Backed Securities Risk—Investors in asset-backed securities, including residential mortgage-backed securities, commercial mortgage-backed securities and other structured finance investments (such as collateralized mortgage obligations), generally receive payments that are part interest and part return of principal. These payments may vary based on the rate at which the underlying borrowers pay off their loans. Some asset-backed securities, including mortgage-backed securities, may have structures that make their performance based on changes in interest rates and other factors difficult to predict, causing their prices to be volatile. These instruments are particularly subject to interest rate, credit and liquidity and valuation risks. Additional risks relating to investments in asset-backed securities may arise principally because of the type of asset-backed securities in which the Fund invests, with such risks primarily associated with the particular assets collateralizing the asset-backed securities and the structure of such asset-backed securities. In addition, the terms of many structured finance investments and other instruments are tied to interbank reference rates (referred to collectively as the “London Interbank Offered Rate” or “LIBOR”), which function as a reference rate or benchmark for many underlying collateral investments, securities and transactions. It is anticipated that LIBOR ultimately will be discontinued, which may cause increased volatility and illiquidity in the markets for instruments with terms tied to LIBOR or other adverse consequences, such as decreased yields and reduction in value, for these instruments. These events may adversely affect the Fund and its investments in such instruments.
Collateralized Loan Obligations and Collateralized Debt Obligations Risk—Collateralized loan obligations (“CLOs”) bear many of the same risks as other forms of asset-backed securities, including interest rate risk, credit risk and default risk. As they are backed primarily by commercial loans, CLOs also bear many of the same risks as investing in loans directly. However, in addition to the risks associated with investing in commercial loans, the complex
PROSPECTUS | 13

structure and highly leveraged nature of a CLO poses additional risks. CLOs incur indebtedness by issuing classes or “tranches” that vary in risk and yield. CLOs may experience substantial losses attributable to loan defaults or trading losses. Such losses on the underlying assets are borne first by the holders of subordinate tranches, which may take the form of an equity interest. The Fund’s investments in CLOs may decrease in market value when the CLO’s assets experience loan defaults or credit impairment, losses that exceed the most subordinate tranches, or market anticipation of loan defaults and investor aversion to CLO securities as a class.
Collateralized debt obligations (“CDOs”) are structured similarly to CLOs and bear many of the same risks as CLOs, including interest rate risk, credit risk and default risk. CDOs are subject to additional risks because they are backed by pools of assets other than commercial loans, including securities (such as other asset-backed securities), synthetic instruments or bonds, and may be highly leveraged. Like CLOs, losses incurred by a CDO are borne first by holders of the most subordinate tranches. Accordingly, the risks of CDOs depend largely on the type of underlying collateral and the tranche of CDOs in which the Fund invests. Moreover, CDOs that obtain their exposure through synthetic investments are exposed to risks associated with derivative instruments.
The terms of many structured finance investments, including CLOs and CDOs, are tied to LIBOR, which functions as a reference rate or benchmark for many underlying collateral investments, securities and transactions. LIBOR is scheduled to be discontinued, which discontinuation may cause increased volatility and illiquidity in the markets for instruments with terms tied to LIBOR or other adverse consequences, such as decreased yields and reduction in value, for these instruments. Some structured finance investments are tied to relatively new and developing reference rates, such as SOFR or other reference rates based on SOFR. These relatively new and developing rates may behave differently than LIBOR would have or may not match the reference rate applicable to the underlying assets related to these investments. These events may adversely affect the Fund and its investments in CLOs and CDOs, including their value, volatility and liquidity.
Commercial Paper Risk—The value of the Fund’s investment in commercial paper, which is an unsecured promissory note that generally has a maturity date between one and 270 days and is issued by a U.S. or foreign entity, is susceptible to changes in the issuer’s financial condition or credit quality. Investments in commercial paper are usually discounted from their value at maturity. Commercial paper can be fixed-rate or variable rate and can be adversely affected by changes in interest rates.
Convertible Securities Risk—Convertible securities may be subordinate to other securities. The total return for a convertible security depends, in part, upon the performance of the underlying security into which it can be converted. The value of convertible securities tends to decline as interest rates increase. Convertible securities generally offer lower interest or dividend yields than non-convertible securities of similar quality.
Counterparty Credit Risk—The Fund makes investments in financial instruments and OTC-traded derivatives involving counterparties to gain exposure to a particular group of securities, index, asset class or other reference asset without actually purchasing those securities or investments, to hedge a position, or for other investment purposes. Through these investments and related arrangements (e.g., prime brokerage or securities lending arrangements or derivatives transactions), the Fund is exposed to credit risks that the counterparty may be unwilling or unable to make timely payments or otherwise to meet its contractual obligations. If the counterparty becomes bankrupt or defaults on (or otherwise becomes unable or unwilling to perform) its payment or other obligations to the Fund, the Fund may not receive the full amount that it is entitled to receive or may experience delays in recovering the collateral or other assets held by, or on behalf of, the counterparty. If this occurs, the value of your shares in the Fund will decrease. Counterparty credit risk also includes the related risk of having concentrated exposure to such a counterparty.
Credit Risk—The Fund could lose money if the issuer or guarantor of a fixed-income or other debt instrument or a counterparty to a derivatives transaction or other transaction is unable or unwilling, or perceived to be unable or unwilling, to pay interest or repay principal on time, defaults or otherwise fails to meet its obligations. Actual or perceived changes in economic, social, public health, financial or political conditions in general or that affect a particular type of instrument, issuer, guarantor or counterparty can reduce the ability of the party to meet its obligations, which can affect the credit quality, liquidity and/or value of an instrument. The value of an instrument also may decline for reasons that relate directly to the issuer, guarantor or counterparty, such as management performance, financial leverage and reduced demand for goods and services. The issuer, guarantor or counterparty could also suffer a rapid decline in credit rating, which would adversely affect the volatility of the value and liquidity of the instrument. Credit ratings may not be an accurate assessment of liquidity or credit risk.
14 | PROSPECTUS

Currency Risk—Indirect and direct exposure to foreign currencies subjects the Fund to the risk that those currencies will decline in value relative to the U.S. Dollar, which would cause a decline in the U.S. value of the holdings of the Fund. Currency rates in foreign countries may fluctuate significantly over short periods of time for a number of reasons, including changes in interest rates and the imposition of currency controls or other political, economic and tax developments in the U.S. or abroad.
Derivatives Risk—Derivatives and other similar instruments (collectively referred to in this paragraph as “derivatives”) pose risks in addition to and greater than those associated with investing directly in securities, currencies or other investments, including risks relating to leverage, market conditions and market risk, imperfect correlations with underlying investments or the Fund’s other portfolio holdings, high price volatility, lack of availability, counterparty credit, illiquidity, valuation, operational and legal restrictions and risk. Their use is a highly specialized activity that involves investment techniques and risks different from those associated with ordinary portfolio securities transactions. Changes in the value of a derivative may also create sudden margin delivery or settlement payment obligations for the Fund, which can materially affect the performance of the Fund and its liquidity and other risk profiles. If the Investment Manager is incorrect about its expectations of market conditions, the use of derivatives could also result in a loss, which in some cases may be unlimited. In addition, the Fund’s use of derivatives may cause the Fund to realize higher amounts of short term capital gains (generally taxed at ordinary income tax rates) than if the Fund had not used such instruments. Some of the derivatives in which the Fund invests may be traded (and privately negotiated) in the OTC market. OTC derivatives are subject to heightened counterparty credit, legal, liquidity and valuation risks.
Forward Foreign Currency Exchange Contracts Risk—A forward foreign currency exchange contract is an OTC obligation to purchase or sell a specific currency at a future date at a price set at the time of the contract. Foreign currency transactions can be affected unpredictably by intervention (or the failure to intervene) by U.S. or foreign governments or central banks, or by currency controls or political developments. Such events may prevent or restrict the Fund’s ability to enter into foreign currency transactions, force the Fund to exit a foreign currency transaction at a disadvantageous time or price or result in penalties for the Fund, any of which may result in a loss to the Fund. A contract to sell a foreign currency would limit any potential gain that might be realized if the value of the currency increases. Suitable hedging transactions may not be available in all circumstances. Engaging in forward foreign currency exchange contracts will subject the Fund to counterparty credit risk and any failure to perform by a counterparty could result in a loss to the Fund.
Dollar Roll Transaction Risk—The Fund may enter into dollar roll transactions, in which the Fund sells a mortgage-backed or other security for settlement on one date and buys back a substantially similar security for settlement at a later date. Dollar rolls involve a risk of loss if the market value of the securities that the Fund is committed to buy declines below the price of the securities the Fund has sold.
Equity Securities Risk—Equity securities include common stocks and other equity and equity-related securities (and securities convertible into stocks). The prices of equity securities generally fluctuate more than those of fixed-income investments, may rise or fall rapidly or unpredictably, and may reflect real or perceived changes in the issuing company’s financial condition and changes in the overall market or economy. A decline in the value of equity securities held by the Fund will adversely affect the value of your investment in the Fund. Common stocks generally represent the riskiest investment in a company and dividend payments (if declared) to preferred stockholders generally rank junior to payments due to a company’s debtholders. The Fund may lose a substantial part, or even all, of its investment in a company’s stock.
Extension Risk—Certain debt instruments, including mortgage- and other asset-backed securities, are subject to the risk that payments on principal may occur at a slower rate or later than expected. In this event, the expected maturity could lengthen and the Fund’s investment may sharply decrease in value and the Fund’s income from the investment may quickly decline. These types of instruments are particularly subject to extension risk, and offer less potential for gains, during periods of rising interest rates. In addition, the Fund may be delayed in its ability to reinvest income or proceeds from these instruments in potentially higher yielding investments, which would adversely affect the Fund.
Foreign Securities and Currency Risk—Foreign securities carry unique or additional risks when compared to U.S. securities, including currency fluctuations, adverse political (including geopolitical) and economic developments, unreliable or untimely information, less liquidity and more volatility, limited legal recourse and higher transactional costs.
PROSPECTUS | 15

High Yield and Unrated Securities Risk—High yield, below investment grade and unrated high risk debt securities (which also may be known as “junk bonds”) may present additional risks because these securities may be less liquid, and therefore more difficult to value accurately and sell at an advantageous price or time, and present more credit risk than investment grade bonds. The price of high yield securities tends to be subject to greater volatility due to issuer-specific factors, such as operating results and outlook and to real or perceived adverse economic and competitive industry conditions. This exposure may be obtained through investments in other investment companies. Based on its investment strategies, a significant portion of the Fund’s investments can be comprised of high yield and unrated securities and thus particularly prone to the foregoing risks, which may result in losses to the Fund.
Interest Rate Risk—Fixed-income and other debt instruments are subject to the possibility that interest rates could change. Changes in interest rates may adversely affect the Fund’s investments in these instruments, such as the value or liquidity of, and income generated by, the investments. Interest rates may change as a result of a variety of factors, and the change may be sudden and significant, with unpredictable impacts on the financial markets and the Fund’s investments. Fixed-income and other debt instruments with longer durations are more sensitive to changes in interest rates and, thus, subject to more volatility than similar instruments with shorter durations. Generally, when interest rates increase, the values of fixed-income and other debt instruments decline, sometimes suddenly and significantly. When interest rates decrease, the values of fixed-income and other debt instruments generally rise. During periods of rising interest rates, because changes in interest rates on adjustable rate securities may lag behind changes in market rates, the value of such securities may decline until their interest rates reset to market rates. During periods of declining interest rates, because the interest rates on adjustable rate securities generally reset downward, their market value is unlikely to rise to the same extent as the value of comparable fixed rate securities. During periods when interest rates are low or negative, the Fund’s yield and performance may be adversely affected and the Fund may be unable to maintain positive returns or minimize the volatility of the Fund's net asset value per share. Changes in monetary policy may exacerbate the risks associated with changing interest rates.
Investment in Investment Vehicles Risk—Investing in other investment vehicles, including ETFs, closed-end funds and other mutual funds, subjects the Fund to those risks affecting the investment vehicle, including the possibility that the value of the underlying securities held by the investment vehicle could decrease or the portfolio becomes illiquid. Moreover, the Fund and its shareholders will incur its pro rata share of the underlying vehicles’ expenses, which will reduce the Fund’s performance. In addition, investments in an ETF or a listed closed-end fund are subject to, among other risks, the risk that the shares may trade at a discount or premium relative to the net asset value of the shares and the listing exchange may halt trading of the shares.
Investment in Loans Risk—The Fund may invest in loans directly or indirectly through assignments or participations. Investments in loans, including loan syndicates and other direct lending opportunities, involve special types of risks, including credit risk, interest rate risk, counterparty risk, prepayment risk and extension risk. Loans may offer a fixed or floating interest rate. Loans are often below investment grade and may be unrated. The Fund’s investments in loans can also be difficult to value accurately and may be more susceptible to liquidity risk than fixed-income instruments of similar credit quality and/or maturity. The Fund is also subject to the risk that the value of any collateral for the loan may be insufficient or unavailable to cover the borrower’s obligations should the borrower fail to make payments, become insolvent, or otherwise default. Transactions in loans are often subject to long settlement periods and often require consent from borrowers and/or an agent acting for the lenders, thus potentially limiting the ability of the Fund to invest sale proceeds in other investments and to use proceeds to meet its current redemption obligations. The Fund thus is subject to the risk of selling other investments at disadvantageous times or prices or taking other actions necessary to raise cash to meet its redemption obligations. Participations in loans may subject the Fund to the credit risk of both the borrower and the seller of the participation and may make enforcement of loan covenants, if any, more difficult for the Fund as legal action may have to go through the seller of the participation (or an agent acting on its behalf). Covenants contained in loan documentation are intended to protect lenders and investors by imposing certain restrictions and other limitations on a borrower’s and the credit group’s operations or assets and by providing certain information and consent rights to lenders. In addition to operational covenants, loans and other debt obligations often contain financial covenants, which require a borrower and the related credit group to satisfy certain financial tests at periodic intervals or to maintain compliance with certain financial metrics. The Fund invests in or is exposed to loans and other similar debt obligations that are sometimes referred to as “covenant-lite” loans or obligations, which generally are loans or other similar debt obligations that lack financial maintenance covenants or possess fewer or contingent financial maintenance covenants and other financial protections for lenders and investors. These “covenant-lite” loans or obligations typically are particularly subject to the risks associated with investments in loans as described above.
16 | PROSPECTUS

Investments by Investing Funds and Other Large Shareholders and Redemption Risk—Shares of the Fund are offered as an investment to certain other investment companies, large retirement plans and other large investors. The Fund is subject to the risk that a large investor will purchase or redeem a large percentage of Fund shares at any time. To meet large redemption requests, the Fund may have to hold large uninvested cash positions or sell a significant amount of investments to raise the cash needed to satisfy redemption requests at times when it would not otherwise do so. In turn, the Fund’s performance may suffer and the Fund will incur higher turnover, brokerage costs, realize gains or losses at inopportune times, lose money or hold a less liquid portfolio.
Leverage Risk—The Fund’s use of leverage, through borrowings or instruments such as derivatives and reverse repurchase agreements, may cause the Fund to be more volatile and riskier and magnify the Fund's losses to an extent greater than if it had not been leveraged.
Liquidity and Valuation Risk—It may be difficult for the Fund to purchase and sell particular investments within a reasonable time at a fair price, or the price at which it has been valued by the Investment Manager for purposes of the Fund’s net asset value, causing the Fund to be less liquid and unable to realize what the Investment Manager believes should be the price of the investment. Valuation of portfolio investments may be difficult, such as during periods of market turmoil or reduced liquidity, and for investments that may, for example, trade infrequently or irregularly. In these and other circumstances, an investment may be valued using fair value methodologies, which are inherently subjective, reflect good faith judgments based on available information and may not accurately estimate the price at which the Fund could sell the investment at that time. These risks are heightened in a changing interest rate environment. Based on its investment strategies, a significant portion of the Fund's investments can be difficult to value and potentially less liquid and thus particularly prone to the foregoing risks.
Management Risk—The Fund is actively managed, which means that investment decisions are made based on investment views. There is no guarantee that the investment views will produce the desired results or expected returns. As a result of these and other factors, the Fund may lose value or fail to meet its investment objective or underperform its benchmark index or funds with similar investment objectives and strategies. Furthermore, active and frequent trading that can accompany active management, also called “high turnover,” may have a negative impact on performance. Active and frequent trading may result in higher brokerage costs or mark-up charges and tax costs, which are ultimately passed on to shareholders of the Fund. Active and frequent trading may also result in adverse tax consequences.
Market Risk—The value of, or income generated by, the investments held by the Fund may fluctuate rapidly and unpredictably. These fluctuations may be frequent and significant. In addition, the Fund may incur losses as a result of various market and economic factors, such as those affecting individual companies or issuers or particular industries. In addition, developments related to economic, political (including geopolitical), social, public health, market or other conditions may cause volatility in financial markets and reduced liquidity in equity, credit and/or debt markets, which could adversely impact the Fund and its investments and their value and performance. Under such conditions, the Fund may experience significant redemption activity by shareholders and could be forced to sell portfolio securities or other assets at unfavorable prices in an effort to generate sufficient cash to pay redeeming shareholders. The Fund's investments may perform poorly or underperform the general securities markets or other types of securities.
Preferred Securities Risk—A company’s preferred stock generally pays dividends only after the company makes required payments to holders of its bonds and other debt. For this reason, the value of preferred stock will usually react more strongly than bonds and other debt to actual or perceived changes in the company’s financial condition or prospects.
Prepayment Risk—Certain debt instruments, including loans and mortgage- and other asset-backed securities, are subject to the risk that payments on principal may occur more quickly or earlier than expected. If this occurs, the Fund might be forced to forego future interest income on the principal repaid early and to reinvest income or proceeds at generally lower interest rates, thus reducing the Fund’s yield. These types of instruments are particularly subject to prepayment risk, and offer less potential for gains, during periods of declining interest rates.
Regulatory and Legal Risk—U.S. and non-U.S. governmental agencies and other regulators regularly implement additional regulations and legislators pass new laws that affect the investments held by the Fund, the strategies used by the Fund or the level of regulation or taxation applying to the Fund (such as regulations related to investments in derivatives and other transactions). These regulations and laws impact the investment strategies, performance, costs and operations of the Fund or taxation of shareholders.
PROSPECTUS | 17

Repurchase Agreements and Reverse Repurchase Agreements Risk—In the event of the insolvency of the counterparty to a repurchase agreement or reverse repurchase agreement, recovery of the repurchase price owed to the Fund or, in the case of a reverse repurchase agreement, the securities or other assets sold by the Fund, may be delayed. Because reverse repurchase agreements may be considered to be the practical equivalent of borrowing funds, they constitute a form of leverage. If the Fund reinvests the proceeds of a reverse repurchase agreement at a rate lower than the cost of the agreement, entering into the agreement will lower the Fund’s yield.
Restricted Securities Risk—Restricted securities generally cannot be sold to the public and may involve a high degree of business, financial and liquidity risk, which may result in substantial losses to the Fund.
Securities Lending Risk—Securities lending involves a risk that the borrower may fail to return the securities or deliver the proper amount of collateral, which may result in a loss to the Fund. In the event of bankruptcy of the borrower, the Fund could experience losses or delays in recovering the loaned securities.
Short Sale Risk—Short selling a security involves selling a borrowed security with the expectation that the value of that security will decline so that the security may be purchased at a lower price when returning the borrowed security. The loss on a short sale, which, in some cases, may be theoretically unlimited, may be greater than the original value of the securities sold short because the price of the borrowed security may rise, thereby increasing the price at which the security must be purchased. Government actions also may affect the Fund’s ability to engage in short selling.
Sovereign Debt Risk—The debt securities issued by sovereign entities may decline as a result of default or other adverse credit event resulting from a sovereign debtor's unwillingness or inability to repay principal and pay interest in a timely manner, which may be affected by a variety of factors, including its cash flow situation, the extent of its reserves, the availability of sufficient foreign exchange on the date a payment is due, the relative size of the debt service burden to the economy as a whole, the sovereign debtor's policy toward international lenders, and the political constraints to which a sovereign debtor may be subject. Sovereign debt risk is greater for issuers in emerging markets than issuers in developed countries.
Special Situation Investments/Securities in Default Risk—Investments in the securities and debt of distressed issuers or issuers in default involve far greater risk than investing in issuers whose debt obligations are being met and whose debt trades at or close to its “par” or full value because the investments in the securities and debt of distressed issuers or issuers in default are highly speculative with respect to the issuer’s ability to make interest payments and/or to pay its principal obligations in full and/or on time.
U.S. Government Securities Risk—U.S. government securities may or may not be backed by the full faith and credit of the U.S. government. U.S. government securities are subject to the risks associated with fixed-income and debt securities, particularly interest rate risk and credit risk.
When Issued, Forward Commitment and Delayed-Delivery Transactions Risk—When-issued, forward-commitment and delayed-delivery transactions involve a commitment to purchase or sell specific securities at a predetermined price or yield in which payment and delivery take place after the customary settlement period for that type of security. When purchasing securities pursuant to one of these transactions, payment for the securities is not required until the delivery date. However, the purchaser assumes the rights and risks of ownership, including the risks of price and yield fluctuations and the risk that the security will not be issued as anticipated.
PERFORMANCE INFORMATION
The following chart and table provide some indication of the risks of investing in the Fund by showing the Fund’s Class A share calendar year performance from year to year and average annual returns for the one, five and ten year or, if shorter, since inception periods, as applicable, for the Fund’s Class A, Class C, Institutional Class, and Class P shares compared to those of a broad measure of market performance. Performance of the benchmark index shown in the table below is shown for the same periods as shown for performance of Class A shares. As with all mutual funds, past performance (before and after taxes) is not necessarily an indication of how the Fund will perform in the future. Updated performance information is available on the Fund’s website at www.guggenheiminvestments.com or by calling 800.820.0888.
18 | PROSPECTUS

The bar chart does not reflect the impact of the sales charge applicable to Class A shares which, if reflected, would lower the returns shown. Performance reflects applicable fee waivers and/or expense limitations in effect during the periods shown.
During the periods shown in
the chart above:
Quarter Ended
Return
Highest Quarter
June 30, 2020
9.64%
Lowest Quarter
March 31, 2020
-13.97%
AVERAGE ANNUAL TOTAL RETURNS (for the periods ended December 31, 2022)
After-tax returns shown in the table are calculated using the historical highest individual federal marginal income tax rates and do not reflect the impact of any state or local taxes. Actual after-tax returns depend on an investor’s tax situation and may differ from those shown. After-tax returns shown are not relevant to investors who hold their Fund shares through tax-deferred arrangements, such as 401(k) plans or individual retirement accounts (“IRAs”). After-tax returns are shown for Class A only. After-tax returns for Class C, Institutional Class, and Class P will vary. The returns shown below reflect applicable sales charges, if any.
 
Inception
1 Year
5 Years
10 Years or,
if Shorter,
Since Inception
Class A
8/5/1996
Return Before Taxes
-12.92%
0.78%
3.50%
Return After Taxes on Distributions
-15.00%
-1.52%
0.84%
Return After Taxes on Distributions and Sale of Fund
Shares
-7.63%
-0.35%
1.49%
Class C—Before Taxes
5/1/2000
-10.88%
0.81%
3.21%
Institutional Class—Before Taxes
7/11/2008
-9.07%
1.84%
4.27%
Class P—Before Taxes
5/1/2015
-9.36%
1.54%
3.11%
Index
Bloomberg U.S. Corporate High Yield Index (reflects no
deduction for fees, expenses or taxes)
-11.19%
2.31%
4.03%
MANAGEMENT OF THE FUND
Security Investors, LLC, also known as Guggenheim Investments, serves as the investment manager of the Fund. Guggenheim Investments utilizes a team-based approach that follows a disciplined investment process. The portfolio manager for the Fund is:
PROSPECTUS | 19

Name*
Experience with the Fund
Primary Title with Investment Manager
Thomas J. Hauser
Since 2017
Senior Managing Director and Portfolio Manager
*
The portfolio manager is primarily responsible for the day-to-day management of the Fund.
PURCHASE AND SALE OF FUND SHARES
You may purchase or redeem Fund shares through your broker/dealer, other financial intermediary that has an agreement with Guggenheim Funds Distributors, LLC, the Fund’s distributor, or, for shares of each class other than Class P shares, through the Fund’s transfer agent. You may purchase, redeem or exchange shares of any class of the Fund on any day the New York Stock Exchange is open for business. The minimum initial investment for Class A and Class C shares is $2,500. The minimum subsequent investment is $100. Class A and Class C do not have a minimum account balance.
The Institutional Class minimum initial investment is $2 million, although the Investment Manager may waive this requirement at its discretion. The Institutional Class has a minimum account balance of $1 million. Due to the relatively high cost of maintaining accounts below the minimum account balance, the Fund reserves the right to redeem shares if an account balance falls below the minimum account balance for any reason. Investors will be given 60 days' notice to reestablish the minimum account balance. If the account balance is not increased, the account may be closed and the proceeds sent to the investor. Institutional Class shares of the Fund will be redeemed at net asset value on the day the account is closed.
Class P shares of the Fund are offered through broker/dealers and other financial intermediaries with which Guggenheim Funds Distributors, LLC has an agreement for the use of Class P shares of the Fund in investment products, programs or accounts. Class P shares do not have a minimum initial investment amount, minimum subsequent investment amount or a minimum account balance. The Fund reserves the right to modify its minimum investment amount and account balance requirements at any time, with or without prior notice to you.
TAX INFORMATION
Fund distributions are taxable as ordinary income or capital gains (or a combination of both), unless your investment is through an IRA or other tax-advantaged retirement account. Investments through tax-advantaged accounts may sometimes become taxable upon withdrawal.
PAYMENTS TO BROKER/DEALERS AND OTHER FINANCIAL INTERMEDIARIES
If you purchase Fund shares through a broker/dealer or other financial intermediary, the Fund and its related companies may pay the intermediary for the sale of Fund shares and related services. These payments may create a conflict of interest by influencing the broker/dealer or other intermediary and your sales person to recommend the Fund over another investment. Ask your sales person or visit your financial intermediary’s website for more information.
20 | PROSPECTUS

Guggenheim Core Bond Fund
INVESTMENT OBJECTIVE
The Guggenheim Core Bond Fund (the “Fund”) seeks to provide current income.
FEES AND EXPENSES OF THE FUND
This table describes the fees and expenses that you may pay if you buy, hold and sell shares of the Fund. You may pay other fees, such as brokerage commissions and other fees to financial intermediaries, which are not reflected in the tables and examples below. You may qualify for sales charge discounts if you and your family invest, or agree to invest in the future, at least $50,000 in the Family of Funds, as defined on page 192 of the Fund’s prospectus. This amount may vary depending on the Guggenheim Fund in which you invest. More information about these and other discounts is available from your financial professional and in the “Sales Charges-Class A Shares” section on page 129 of the Fund’s prospectus and the “How to Purchase Shares” section on page 92 of the Fund’s Statement of Additional Information. Different intermediaries and financial professionals may impose different sales charges or offer different sales charge waivers or discounts. These variations are described in Appendix A to the Fund’s prospectus (Intermediary-Specific Sales Charge Waivers and Discounts).

SHAREHOLDER FEES (fees paid directly from your investment)
 
Class A
Class C
Institutional
Class
Class P
Maximum Sales Charge (Load) Imposed on
Purchases (as a percentage of offering price)
4.00
%
None
None
None
Maximum Deferred Sales Charge (Load) (as a
percentage of original purchase price or
redemption proceeds, whichever is lower)
None
*
1.00
%**
None
None
*
A 1.00% deferred sales charge will normally be imposed on purchases of $1,000,000 or more on Fund shares purchased without an initial sales charge that are redeemed within 12 months of purchase.
**
A 1.00% deferred sales charge will be imposed if Fund shares are redeemed within 12 months of purchase.

ANNUAL FUND OPERATING EXPENSES (expenses that you pay each year as a percentage of the value of your investment)
 
Class A
Class C
Institutional
Class
Class P
Management Fees
0.39
%
0.39
%
0.39
%
0.39
%
Distribution and/or Service (12b-1) Fees
0.25
%
1.00
%
None
0.25
%
Other Expenses
0.18
%
0.22
%
0.21
%
0.30
%
Interest and Other Related Expenses
0.01%
0.01%
0.01%
0.01%
Remaining Other Expenses
0.17%
0.21%
0.20%
0.29%
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses
0.82
%
1.61
%
0.60
%
0.94
%
Fee Waiver (and/or expense reimbursement)1
-0.04
%
-0.08
%
-0.11
%
-0.16
%
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses After Fee
Waiver (and/or expense reimbursement)
0.78
%
1.53
%
0.49
%
0.78
%
1
Security Investors, LLC, also known as Guggenheim Investments (the “Investment Manager”), has contractually agreed through February 1, 2024 to waive fees and/or reimburse expenses to the extent necessary to limit the ordinary operating expenses (including distribution (12b-1) fees (if any), but exclusive of brokerage costs, dividends on securities sold short, acquired fund fees and expenses, interest, taxes, litigation, indemnification, and extraordinary expenses) (“Operating Expenses”) of the Fund to the annual percentage of average daily net assets for each class of shares as follows: Class A-0.79%, Class C-1.54%, Institutional Class-0.50%, and Class P-0.79%. The Investment Manager is entitled to reimbursement by the Fund of fees waived or expenses reimbursed during any of the previous 36 months beginning on the date of the expense limitation agreement, provided that the Operating Expenses do not exceed the then-applicable expense cap. The agreement will expire when it reaches its termination or when the Investment Manager ceases to serve as such and it can be terminated by the Fund’s Board of Trustees, with certain waived fees and reimbursed expenses subject to the recoupment rights of the Investment Manager.
PROSPECTUS | 21

EXAMPLE
This Example is intended to help you compare the cost of investing in the Fund with the cost of investing in other mutual funds.
The Example assumes that you invest $10,000 in the Fund for the time periods indicated and then redeem all of your shares at the end of those periods, unless otherwise indicated. The Example also assumes that your investment has a 5% return each year and that the Fund’s operating expenses remain the same. Although your actual costs may be higher or lower, based on these assumptions your costs would be:
 
1 Year
3 Years
5 Years
10 Years
Class A
$476
$647
$833
$1,369
Class C
$256
$500
$869
$1,904
Institutional
$50
$181
$324
$740
Class P
$80
$284
$504
$1,140
You would pay the following expenses if you did not redeem your shares:
 
1 Year
3 Years
5 Years
10 Years
Class C
$156
$500
$869
$1,904
The above Example reflects applicable contractual fee waiver/expense reimbursement arrangements for the current duration of the arrangements only.
PORTFOLIO TURNOVER
The Fund pays transaction costs, such as commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or “turns over” its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover rate may indicate higher transaction costs and may result in higher taxes when Fund shares are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are not reflected in annual fund operating expenses or in the example, affect the Fund’s performance. During the most recent fiscal year, the Fund’s portfolio turnover rate was 49% of the average value of its portfolio.
PRINCIPAL INVESTMENT STRATEGIES
In pursuit of its objective, the Fund will invest, under normal circumstances, at least 80% of its assets (net assets, plus the amount of any borrowings for investment purposes) in investment grade fixed-income securities (i.e., rated in the top four long-term rating categories by a nationally recognized statistical rating organization or, if unrated, determined by Security Investors, LLC, also known as Guggenheim Investments (the “Investment Manager”), to be of comparable quality). If nationally recognized statistical rating organizations assign different ratings to the same security, the Fund will use the higher rating for purposes of determining the security’s credit quality. Such fixed-income securities may include corporate bonds and other corporate debt securities, commercial paper, securities issued by the U.S. government or its agencies and instrumentalities (including those not backed by the full faith and credit of the U.S. government), sovereign debt securities, Eurodollar bonds and obligations, agency and non-agency residential and commercial mortgage-backed securities and other asset-backed securities (such as corporate, consumer and commercial asset-backed securities) including collateralized debt, loan and mortgage obligations, participations in and assignments of loans (such as senior floating rate loans, syndicated bank loans, secured or unsecured loans, bridge loans and other loans), zero-coupon bonds, municipal bonds, payment-in-kind debt securities (such as payment-in-kind bonds), convertible fixed-income securities, non-registered or restricted securities (including securities originally issued in reliance on Rule 144A and Regulation S securities), certain preferred securities and step-up securities (such as step-up bonds). These securities may pay fixed or variable rates of interest. Although the Fund will invest at least 80% of its assets in investment grade fixed-income securities, such securities (especially those in the lowest of the top four long-term rating categories) may have speculative characteristics.
The Fund may, without limitation, seek to obtain exposure to the securities in which it primarily invests through a variety of investment vehicles, principally closed-end funds, exchange-traded funds (“ETFs”) and other mutual funds. The Fund may invest up to 20% of its assets in preferred stock. While the Fund will principally invest in securities listed, traded or dealt in developed markets countries globally, it may also invest without limitation in securities listed, traded or dealt in other countries, including emerging markets countries. Such securities may be denominated in foreign currencies. The Investment Manager may attempt to reduce foreign currency exchange rate risk by entering into contracts with banks, brokers or dealers to purchase or sell securities or foreign currencies at a future date.
22 | PROSPECTUS

Consistent with its investment objective and principal investment strategies, the Fund also may invest in debt securities or loans that are not investment grade (also known as “high yield/high risk securities” or “junk bonds”). The Fund also may seek exposures through derivative transactions, principally foreign exchange forward contracts, futures on securities, indices, currencies and other investments, Eurodollar futures, options, interest rate swaps, cross-currency swaps, total return swaps, and credit default swaps, which may also create economic leverage in the Fund. The Fund may engage in derivative transactions for speculative purposes to enhance total return, to seek to hedge against fluctuations in securities prices, interest rates or currency rates, to change the effective duration of its portfolio, to manage certain investment risks, as a substitute for the purchase or sale of securities or currencies and/or to obtain or replicate market exposure. The Fund may use leverage to the extent permitted by applicable law by entering into reverse repurchase agreements and transactions equivalent to a borrowing for investment purposes. The Fund also may engage, without limitation, in repurchase agreements. The Fund may also seek to obtain market exposure to the securities in which it primarily invests by entering into a series of purchase and sale contracts or by using other investment techniques (such as “To Be Announced” (“TBA”) transactions and/or dollar rolls).
The Fund employs a diversified, multi-sector strategy focused on under-researched areas of the fixed-income universe, including sectors not typically included in benchmark indices. Through its actively managed approach, the Fund seeks to potentially capitalize on changing relative values in fixed-income sectors. The Investment Manager selects securities and other investments for purchase and sale based on intensive credit research involving extensive due diligence on each issuer, region and sector. The Investment Manager also considers macroeconomic outlook and geopolitical issues, and may employ a tactical asset or sector allocation strategy to seek to capitalize on total return potential created by changing market and economic conditions.
The Investment Manager may determine to sell a security for several reasons, including but not limited to the following: (1) to adjust the portfolio’s average maturity or duration, or to shift assets into or out of higher-yielding securities; (2) if a security’s credit rating has been changed, the Investment Manager's credit outlook has changed, or for other similar reasons; (3) to meet redemption requests; (4) to take gains; or (5) due to relative value. Under adverse or unstable market conditions or abnormal circumstances (for example, in the event of credit events, where it is deemed opportune to preserve gains, or to preserve the relative value of investments or in the case of large cash inflows or anticipated large redemptions), the Fund can make temporary investments and may not be able to pursue or achieve its investment objective.
PRINCIPAL RISKS
The value of an investment in the Fund will fluctuate and is subject to investment risks, which means investors could lose money, including all or part of their investments in the Fund. An investment in the Fund is not a bank deposit and is not insured or guaranteed by the FDIC or any governmental agency. There is no assurance that the Fund will achieve its investment objective. The Fund is subject to certain risks and the principal risks of investing in the Fund are summarized below in alphabetical order, and not in the order of importance or potential exposure.
Asset-Backed Securities Risk—Investors in asset-backed securities, including residential mortgage-backed securities, commercial mortgage-backed securities and other structured finance investments (such as collateralized mortgage obligations), generally receive payments that are part interest and part return of principal. These payments may vary based on the rate at which the underlying borrowers pay off their loans. Some asset-backed securities, including mortgage-backed securities, may have structures that make their performance based on changes in interest rates and other factors difficult to predict, causing their prices to be volatile. These instruments are particularly subject to interest rate, credit and liquidity and valuation risks. Additional risks relating to investments in asset-backed securities may arise principally because of the type of asset-backed securities in which the Fund invests, with such risks primarily associated with the particular assets collateralizing the asset-backed securities and the structure of such asset-backed securities. In addition, the terms of many structured finance investments and other instruments are tied to interbank reference rates (referred to collectively as the “London Interbank Offered Rate” or “LIBOR”), which function as a reference rate or benchmark for many underlying collateral investments, securities and transactions. It is anticipated that LIBOR ultimately will be discontinued, which may cause increased volatility and illiquidity in the markets for instruments with terms tied to LIBOR or other adverse consequences, such as decreased yields and reduction in value, for these instruments. These events may adversely affect the Fund and its investments in such instruments.
Commercial Mortgage-Backed Securities—Investments in commercial mortgage-backed securities (“CMBS”) are backed by commercial mortgage loans that may be secured by office properties, retail properties, hotels, mixed use properties or multi-family apartment buildings and are particularly subject to the credit risk of the borrower and the tenants of the properties securing the commercial mortgage loans. CMBS
PROSPECTUS | 23

are subject to the risks of asset-backed securities generally and particularly subject to credit risk, interest rate risk, and liquidity and valuation risk. Economic downturns, tightening lending standards and increased interest and lending rates, developments adverse to the commercial real estate markets, and other developments that limit or reduce the activities of and demand for commercial retail and office spaces adversely impact the value of, and income generated by, such securities.
Residential Mortgage-Backed Securities—Residential mortgage-backed securities may be particularly sensitive to changes in interest rates given that changing interest rates tend to adjust the duration of fixed-rate mortgage-backed securities. As a result, a changing interest rate environment can cause the prices of mortgage-backed securities to be increasingly volatile, which may adversely affect the Fund’s holdings of mortgage-backed securities. Investments in non-agency residential mortgage-backed securities are subject to increased interest rate risk and other risks, such as credit and liquidity and valuation risks.
Collateralized Loan Obligations and Collateralized Debt Obligations Risk—Collateralized loan obligations (“CLOs”) bear many of the same risks as other forms of asset-backed securities, including interest rate risk, credit risk and default risk. As they are backed primarily by commercial loans, CLOs also bear many of the same risks as investing in loans directly. However, in addition to the risks associated with investing in commercial loans, the complex structure and highly leveraged nature of a CLO poses additional risks. CLOs incur indebtedness by issuing classes or “tranches” that vary in risk and yield. CLOs may experience substantial losses attributable to loan defaults or trading losses. Such losses on the underlying assets are borne first by the holders of subordinate tranches, which may take the form of an equity interest. The Fund’s investments in CLOs may decrease in market value when the CLO’s assets experience loan defaults or credit impairment, losses that exceed the most subordinate tranches, or market anticipation of loan defaults and investor aversion to CLO securities as a class.
Collateralized debt obligations (“CDOs”) are structured similarly to CLOs and bear many of the same risks as CLOs, including interest rate risk, credit risk and default risk. CDOs are subject to additional risks because they are backed by pools of assets other than commercial loans, including securities (such as other asset-backed securities), synthetic instruments or bonds, and may be highly leveraged. Like CLOs, losses incurred by a CDO are borne first by holders of the most subordinate tranches. Accordingly, the risks of CDOs depend largely on the type of underlying collateral and the tranche of CDOs in which the Fund invests. Moreover, CDOs that obtain their exposure through synthetic investments are exposed to risks associated with derivative instruments.
The terms of many structured finance investments, including CLOs and CDOs, are tied to LIBOR, which functions as a reference rate or benchmark for many underlying collateral investments, securities and transactions. LIBOR is scheduled to be discontinued, which discontinuation may cause increased volatility and illiquidity in the markets for instruments with terms tied to LIBOR or other adverse consequences, such as decreased yields and reduction in value, for these instruments. Some structured finance investments are tied to relatively new and developing reference rates, such as SOFR or other reference rates based on SOFR. These relatively new and developing rates may behave differently than LIBOR would have or may not match the reference rate applicable to the underlying assets related to these investments. These events may adversely affect the Fund and its investments in CLOs and CDOs, including their value, volatility and liquidity.
Commercial Paper Risk—The value of the Fund’s investment in commercial paper, which is an unsecured promissory note that generally has a maturity date between one and 270 days and is issued by a U.S. or foreign entity, is susceptible to changes in the issuer’s financial condition or credit quality. Investments in commercial paper are usually discounted from their value at maturity. Commercial paper can be fixed-rate or variable rate and can be adversely affected by changes in interest rates.
Convertible Securities Risk—Convertible securities may be subordinate to other securities. The total return for a convertible security depends, in part, upon the performance of the underlying security into which it can be converted. The value of convertible securities tends to decline as interest rates increase. Convertible securities generally offer lower interest or dividend yields than non-convertible securities of similar quality.
Counterparty Credit Risk—The Fund makes investments in financial instruments and OTC-traded derivatives involving counterparties to gain exposure to a particular group of securities, index, asset class or other reference asset without actually purchasing those securities or investments, to hedge a position, or for other investment purposes. Through these investments and related arrangements (e.g., prime brokerage or securities lending arrangements or derivatives transactions), the Fund is exposed to credit risks that the counterparty may be unwilling or unable to make timely payments or otherwise to meet its contractual obligations. If the counterparty becomes
24 | PROSPECTUS

bankrupt or defaults on (or otherwise becomes unable or unwilling to perform) its payment or other obligations to the Fund, the Fund may not receive the full amount that it is entitled to receive or may experience delays in recovering the collateral or other assets held by, or on behalf of, the counterparty. If this occurs, the value of your shares in the Fund will decrease. Counterparty credit risk also includes the related risk of having concentrated exposure to such a counterparty.
Credit Risk—The Fund could lose money if the issuer or guarantor of a fixed-income or other debt instrument or a counterparty to a derivatives transaction or other transaction is unable or unwilling, or perceived to be unable or unwilling, to pay interest or repay principal on time, defaults or otherwise fails to meet its obligations. Actual or perceived changes in economic, social, public health, financial or political conditions in general or that affect a particular type of instrument, issuer, guarantor or counterparty can reduce the ability of the party to meet its obligations, which can affect the credit quality, liquidity and/or value of an instrument. The value of an instrument also may decline for reasons that relate directly to the issuer, guarantor or counterparty, such as management performance, financial leverage and reduced demand for goods and services. The issuer, guarantor or counterparty could also suffer a rapid decline in credit rating, which would adversely affect the volatility of the value and liquidity of the instrument. Credit ratings may not be an accurate assessment of liquidity or credit risk.
Currency Risk—Indirect and direct exposure to foreign currencies subjects the Fund to the risk that those currencies will decline in value relative to the U.S. Dollar, which would cause a decline in the U.S. value of the holdings of the Fund. Currency rates in foreign countries may fluctuate significantly over short periods of time for a number of reasons, including changes in interest rates and the imposition of currency controls or other political, economic and tax developments in the U.S. or abroad.
Derivatives Risk—Derivatives and other similar instruments (collectively referred to in this paragraph as “derivatives”) pose risks in addition to and greater than those associated with investing directly in securities, currencies or other investments, including risks relating to leverage, market conditions and market risk, imperfect correlations with underlying investments or the Fund’s other portfolio holdings, high price volatility, lack of availability, counterparty credit, illiquidity, valuation, operational and legal restrictions and risk. Their use is a highly specialized activity that involves investment techniques and risks different from those associated with ordinary portfolio securities transactions. Changes in the value of a derivative may also create sudden margin delivery or settlement payment obligations for the Fund, which can materially affect the performance of the Fund and its liquidity and other risk profiles. If the Investment Manager is incorrect about its expectations of market conditions, the use of derivatives could also result in a loss, which in some cases may be unlimited. In addition, the Fund's use of derivatives may cause the Fund to realize higher amounts of short term capital gains (generally taxed at ordinary income tax rates) than if the Fund had not used such instruments.  Some of the derivatives in which the Fund invests may be traded (and privately negotiated) in the OTC market. OTC derivatives are subject to heightened counterparty credit, legal, liquidity and valuation risks. Certain risks also are specific to the derivatives in which the Fund invests.
Forward Foreign Currency Exchange Contracts Risk—A forward foreign currency exchange contract is an OTC obligation to purchase or sell a specific currency at a future date at a price set at the time of the contract. Foreign currency transactions can be affected unpredictably by intervention (or the failure to intervene) by U.S. or foreign governments or central banks, or by currency controls or political developments. Such events may prevent or restrict the Fund’s ability to enter into foreign currency transactions, force the Fund to exit a foreign currency transaction at a disadvantageous time or price or result in penalties for the Fund, any of which may result in a loss to the Fund. A contract to sell a foreign currency would limit any potential gain that might be realized if the value of the currency increases. Suitable hedging transactions may not be available in all circumstances. Engaging in forward foreign currency exchange contracts will subject the Fund to counterparty credit risk and any failure to perform by a counterparty could result in a loss to the Fund.
Futures Contracts Risk—Futures contracts are exchange-traded contracts that call for the future delivery of an asset at a certain price and date, or cash settlement of the terms of the contract. Risks of futures contracts may be caused by an imperfect correlation between movements in the price of the instruments and the price of the underlying assets. In addition, there is a risk that the Fund may not be able to enter into a closing transaction because of an illiquid market. Exchanges can limit the number of positions that can be held or controlled by the Fund or the Investment Manager, thus limiting the ability to implement the Fund’s strategies. Futures markets are highly volatile and the use of futures may increase the volatility of the Fund’s net asset value (“NAV”). Futures are also subject to leverage and liquidity risks.
PROSPECTUS | 25

Options Risk—Options and options on futures contracts give the holder of the option the right, but not the obligation, to buy (or to sell) a position in a security or in a contract to the writer of the option, at a certain price. Options are subject to correlation risk because there may be an imperfect correlation between the options and the markets for underlying instruments that could cause a given transaction to fail to achieve its objectives. The successful use of options depends on the Investment Manager’s  ability to predict correctly future price fluctuations and the degree of correlation between the markets for options and the underlying instruments. Exchanges can limit the number of positions that can be held or controlled by the Fund or the Investment Manager, thus limiting the ability to implement the Fund’s strategies. Options are also particularly subject to leverage risk and can be subject to liquidity risk.
Swap Agreements Risk—Swap agreements are contracts among the Fund and a counterparty to exchange the return of the pre-determined underlying investment (such as the rate of return of the underlying index). Swap agreements may be negotiated bilaterally and traded OTC between two parties or, for certain standardized swaps, must be exchange-traded through a futures commission merchant and/or cleared through a clearinghouse that serves as a central counterparty. Risks associated with the use of swap agreements are different from those associated with ordinary portfolio securities transactions, due in part to the fact they could be considered illiquid and many swaps trade on the OTC market. Swaps are particularly subject to counterparty credit, correlation, valuation, liquidity and leveraging risks. While exchange trading and central clearing are intended to reduce counterparty credit risk and increase liquidity, they do not make swap transactions risk-free. Additionally, applicable regulators have adopted rules imposing certain margin requirements, including minimums, on OTC swaps, which may result in the Fund and its counterparties posting higher margin amounts for OTC swaps, which could increase the cost of swap transactions to the Fund and impose added operational complexity.
Dollar Roll Transaction Risk—The Fund may enter into dollar roll transactions, in which the Fund sells a mortgage-backed or other security for settlement on one date and buys back a substantially similar security for settlement at a later date. Dollar rolls involve a risk of loss if the market value of the securities that the Fund is committed to buy declines below the price of the securities the Fund has sold.
Emerging Markets Risk—Investments in or exposure to emerging markets are generally subject to a greater level of those risks associated with investing in or being exposed to developed foreign markets, as emerging markets are considered to be less developed. Furthermore, investments in or exposure to emerging markets are generally subject to additional risks, including the risks associated with trading in smaller markets, lower volumes of trading, and being subject to lower levels of government regulation and less extensive and transparent accounting, auditing, recordkeeping, financial reporting and other requirements.
Extension Risk—Certain debt instruments, including mortgage- and other asset-backed securities, are subject to the risk that payments on principal may occur at a slower rate or later than expected. In this event, the expected maturity could lengthen and the Fund’s investment may sharply decrease in value and the Fund’s income from the investment may quickly decline. These types of instruments are particularly subject to extension risk, and offer less potential for gains, during periods of rising interest rates. In addition, the Fund may be delayed in its ability to reinvest income or proceeds from these instruments in potentially higher yielding investments, which would adversely affect the Fund.
Foreign Securities and Currency Risk—Foreign securities carry unique or additional risks when compared to U.S. securities, including currency fluctuations, adverse political (including geopolitical) and economic developments, unreliable or untimely information, less liquidity and more volatility, limited legal recourse and higher transactional costs.
High Yield and Unrated Securities Risk—High yield, below investment grade and unrated high risk debt securities (which also may be known as “junk bonds”) may present additional risks because these securities may be less liquid, and therefore more difficult to value accurately and sell at an advantageous price or time, and present more credit risk than investment grade bonds. The price of high yield securities tends to be subject to greater volatility due to issuer-specific factors, such as operating results and outlook and to real or perceived adverse economic and competitive industry conditions. This exposure may be obtained through investments in other investment companies. Based on its investment strategies, a significant portion of the Fund’s investments can be comprised of high yield and unrated securities and thus particularly prone to the foregoing risks, which may result in losses to the Fund.
26 | PROSPECTUS

Interest Rate Risk—Fixed-income and other debt instruments are subject to the possibility that interest rates could change. Changes in interest rates may adversely affect the Fund’s investments in these instruments, such as the value or liquidity of, and income generated by, the investments. Interest rates may change as a result of a variety of factors, and the change may be sudden and significant, with unpredictable impacts on the financial markets and the Fund’s investments. Fixed-income and other debt instruments with longer durations are more sensitive to changes in interest rates and, thus, subject to more volatility than similar instruments with shorter durations. Generally, when interest rates increase, the values of fixed-income and other debt instruments decline, sometimes suddenly and significantly. When interest rates decrease, the values of fixed-income and other debt instruments generally rise. During periods of rising interest rates, because changes in interest rates on adjustable rate securities may lag behind changes in market rates, the value of such securities may decline until their interest rates reset to market rates. During periods of declining interest rates, because the interest rates on adjustable rate securities generally reset downward, their market value is unlikely to rise to the same extent as the value of comparable fixed rate securities. During periods when interest rates are low or negative, the Fund’s yield and performance may be adversely affected and the Fund may be unable to maintain positive returns or minimize the volatility of the Fund's net asset value per share. Changes in monetary policy may exacerbate the risks associated with changing interest rates.
Investment in Investment Vehicles Risk—Investing in other investment vehicles, including ETFs, closed-end funds and other mutual funds, subjects the Fund to those risks affecting the investment vehicle, including the possibility that the value of the underlying securities held by the investment vehicle could decrease or the portfolio becomes illiquid. Moreover, the Fund and its shareholders will incur its pro rata share of the underlying vehicles’ expenses, which will reduce the Fund’s performance. In addition, investments in an ETF or a listed closed-end fund are subject to, among other risks, the risk that the shares may trade at a discount or premium relative to the net asset value of the shares and the listing exchange may halt trading of the shares.
Investment in Loans Risk—The Fund may invest in loans directly or indirectly through assignments or participations. Investments in loans, including loan syndicates and other direct lending opportunities, involve special types of risks, including credit risk, interest rate risk, counterparty risk, prepayment risk and extension risk. Loans may offer a fixed or floating interest rate. Loans are often below investment grade and may be unrated. The Fund’s investments in loans can also be difficult to value accurately and may be more susceptible to liquidity risk than fixed-income instruments of similar credit quality and/or maturity. The Fund is also subject to the risk that the value of any collateral for the loan may be insufficient or unavailable to cover the borrower’s obligations should the borrower fail to make payments, become insolvent, or otherwise default. Transactions in loans are often subject to long settlement periods and often require consent from borrowers and/or an agent acting for the lenders, thus potentially limiting the ability of the Fund to invest sale proceeds in other investments and to use proceeds to meet its current redemption obligations. The Fund thus is subject to the risk of selling other investments at disadvantageous times or prices or taking other actions necessary to raise cash to meet its redemption obligations. Participations in loans may subject the Fund to the credit risk of both the borrower and the seller of the participation and may make enforcement of loan covenants, if any, more difficult for the Fund as legal action may have to go through the seller of the participation (or an agent acting on its behalf). Covenants contained in loan documentation are intended to protect lenders and investors by imposing certain restrictions and other limitations on a borrower’s and the credit group’s operations or assets and by providing certain information and consent rights to lenders. In addition to operational covenants, loans and other debt obligations often contain financial covenants which require a borrower and the related credit group to satisfy certain financial tests at periodic intervals or to maintain compliance with certain financial metrics. The Fund may invest in or have exposure to loans and other similar debt obligations that are sometimes referred to as “covenant-lite” loans or obligations, which generally are loans or other similar debt obligations that lack financial maintenance covenants or possess fewer or contingent financial maintenance covenants and other financial protections for lenders and investors. These “covenant-lite” loans or obligations typically are particularly subject to the risks associated with investments in loans as described above.
Leverage Risk—The Fund’s use of leverage, through borrowings or instruments such as derivatives and reverse repurchase agreements, may cause the Fund to be more volatile and riskier and magnify the Fund's losses to an extent greater than if it had not been leveraged.
Liquidity and Valuation Risk—It may be difficult for the Fund to purchase and sell particular investments within a reasonable time at a fair price, or the price at which it has been valued by the Investment Manager for purposes of the Fund’s net asset value, causing the Fund to be less liquid and unable to realize what the Investment Manager believes should be the price of the investment. Valuation of portfolio investments may be difficult, such as during periods of market turmoil or reduced liquidity, and for investments that may, for example, trade infrequently or irregularly. In these and other circumstances, an investment may be valued using fair value methodologies, which are
PROSPECTUS | 27

inherently subjective, reflect good faith judgments based on available information and may not accurately estimate the price at which the Fund could sell the investment at that time. These risks are heightened in a changing interest rate environment. Based on its investment strategies, a significant portion of the Fund's investments can be difficult to value and potentially less liquid and thus particularly prone to the foregoing risks.
Management Risk—The Fund is actively managed, which means that investment decisions are made based on investment views. There is no guarantee that the investment views will produce the desired results or expected returns. As a result of these and other factors, the Fund may lose value or fail to meet its investment objective or underperform its benchmark index or funds with similar investment objectives and strategies. Furthermore, active and frequent trading that can accompany active management, also called “high turnover,” may have a negative impact on performance. Active and frequent trading may result in higher brokerage costs or mark-up charges and tax costs, which are ultimately passed on to shareholders of the Fund. Active and frequent trading may also result in adverse tax consequences.
Market Risk—The value of, or income generated by, the investments held by the Fund may fluctuate rapidly and unpredictably. These fluctuations may be frequent and significant. In addition, the Fund may incur losses as a result of various market and economic factors, such as those affecting individual companies or issuers or particular industries. In addition, developments related to economic, political (including geopolitical), social, public health, market or other conditions may cause volatility in financial markets and reduced liquidity in equity, credit and/or debt markets, which could adversely impact the Fund and its investments and their value and performance. Under such conditions, the Fund may experience significant redemption activity by shareholders and could be forced to sell portfolio securities or other assets at unfavorable prices in an effort to generate sufficient cash to pay redeeming shareholders. The Fund's investments may perform poorly or underperform the general securities markets or other types of securities.
Municipal Securities Risk—Municipal securities are subject to a variety of risks, including credit, interest, prepayment, liquidity, and valuation risks. In addition, municipal securities can be adversely affected by (i) unfavorable legislative, political, or other developments or events, including natural disasters and public health conditions, and (ii) changes in the economic and fiscal conditions of issuers of municipal securities or the federal government (in cases where it provides financial support to such issuers). Municipal securities may be fully or partially backed by the taxing authority or revenue of a local government, the credit of a private issuer, or the current or anticipated revenues from a specific project, which may be adversely affected as a result of economic and public health conditions. To the extent the Fund invests a substantial portion of its assets in municipal securities issued by issuers in a particular state, municipality or project, the Fund will be particularly sensitive to developments and events adversely affecting such state or municipality or with respect to a particular project. Certain sectors of the municipal bond market have special risks that can affect them more significantly than the market as a whole. Because many municipal instruments are issued to finance similar projects (such as education, health care, transportation and utilities), conditions in these industries can significantly affect the overall municipal market. Municipal securities that are insured may be adversely affected by developments relevant to that particular insurer, or more general developments relevant to the market as a whole. Municipal securities can be difficult to value and be less liquid than other investments, which may affect performance or the ability to meet Fund redemption requests.
Preferred Securities Risk—A company’s preferred stock generally pays dividends only after the company makes required payments to holders of its bonds and other debt. For this reason, the value of preferred stock will usually react more strongly than bonds and other debt to actual or perceived changes in the company’s financial condition or prospects.
Prepayment Risk—Certain debt instruments, including loans and mortgage- and other asset-backed securities, are subject to the risk that payments on principal may occur more quickly or earlier than expected. If this occurs, the Fund might be forced to forego future interest income on the principal repaid early and to reinvest income or proceeds at generally lower interest rates, thus reducing the Fund’s yield. These types of instruments are particularly subject to prepayment risk, and offer less potential for gains, during periods of declining interest rates.
Regulatory and Legal Risk—U.S. and non-U.S. governmental agencies and other regulators regularly implement additional regulations and legislators pass new laws that affect the investments held by the Fund, the strategies used by the Fund or the level of regulation or taxation applying to the Fund (such as regulations related to investments in derivatives and other transactions). These regulations and laws impact the investment strategies, performance, costs and operations of the Fund or taxation of shareholders.
28 | PROSPECTUS

Repurchase Agreements and Reverse Repurchase Agreements Risk—In the event of the insolvency of the counterparty to a repurchase agreement or reverse repurchase agreement, recovery of the repurchase price owed to the Fund or, in the case of a reverse repurchase agreement, the securities or other assets sold by the Fund, may be delayed. Because reverse repurchase agreements may be considered to be the practical equivalent of borrowing funds, they constitute a form of leverage. If the Fund reinvests the proceeds of a reverse repurchase agreement at a rate lower than the cost of the agreement, entering into the agreement will lower the Fund’s yield.
Restricted Securities Risk—Restricted securities generally cannot be sold to the public and may involve a high degree of business, financial and liquidity risk, which may result in substantial losses to the Fund.
Sovereign Debt Risk—The debt securities issued by sovereign entities may decline as a result of default or other adverse credit event resulting from a sovereign debtor's unwillingness or inability to repay principal and pay interest in a timely manner, which may be affected by a variety of factors, including its cash flow situation, the extent of its reserves, the availability of sufficient foreign exchange on the date a payment is due, the relative size of the debt service burden to the economy as a whole, the sovereign debtor's policy toward international lenders, and the political constraints to which a sovereign debtor may be subject. Sovereign debt risk is greater for issuers in emerging markets than issuers in developed countries.
To Be Announced (“TBA”) Transactions Risk—The Fund may enter into “To Be Announced” (“TBA”) transactions to purchase or sell mortgage-backed securities for a fixed price at a future date. In a TBA transaction, a seller agrees to deliver a mortgage-backed security to the Fund at a future date, but the seller does not specify the particular security to be delivered. Instead, the Fund agrees to accept or sell any security that meets specified terms. TBA purchase commitments involve a risk of loss if the value of the securities to be purchased declines prior to settlement date or if the counterparty may not deliver the securities as promised. Selling a TBA involves a risk of loss if the value of the securities to be sold goes up prior to settlement date. Recently finalized FINRA rules include mandatory margin requirements that will require the Fund to post collateral in connection with its TBA transactions, which could increase the cost of TBA transactions to the Fund and impose added operational complexity.
U.S. Government Securities Risk—U.S. government securities may or may not be backed by the full faith and credit of the U.S. government. U.S. government securities are subject to the risks associated with fixed-income and debt securities, particularly interest rate risk and credit risk.
Zero Coupon and Payment-In-Kind Securities Risk—Zero coupon and payment-in-kind securities pay no cash interest income and usually are sold at substantial discounts from their value at maturity. Zero coupon and payment-in-kind securities are subject to greater market value fluctuations from changing interest rates than debt obligations of comparable maturities that make current cash-pay interest payments.
PERFORMANCE INFORMATION
The following chart and table provide some indication of the risks of investing in the Fund by showing the Fund’s Class A share calendar year performance from year to year and average annual returns for the one, five and ten year or, if shorter, since inception periods, as applicable, for the Fund’s Class A, Class C, Institutional Class, and Class P shares compared to those of a broad measure of market performance. Performance of the benchmark index shown in the table below is shown for the same periods as shown for performance of Class A shares. As with all mutual funds, past performance (before and after taxes) is not necessarily an indication of how the Fund will perform in the future. Updated performance information is available on the Fund’s website at www.guggenheiminvestments.com or by calling 800.820.0888.
Effective January 28, 2013, the Fund changed its name and principal investment strategies. Performance information prior to that date reflects the Fund’s prior principal investment strategies.
PROSPECTUS | 29

The bar chart does not reflect the impact of the sales charge applicable to Class A shares which, if reflected, would lower the returns shown. Performance reflects applicable fee waivers and/or expense limitations in effect during the periods shown.
During the periods shown in
the chart above:
Quarter Ended
Return
Highest Quarter
June 30, 2020
5.46%
Lowest Quarter
June 30, 2022
-7.05%
AVERAGE ANNUAL TOTAL RETURNS (for the periods ended December 31, 2022)
After-tax returns shown in the table are calculated using the historical highest individual federal marginal income tax rates and do not reflect the impact of any state or local taxes. Actual after-tax returns depend on an investor’s tax situation and may differ from those shown. After-tax returns shown are not relevant to investors who hold their Fund shares through tax-deferred arrangements, such as 401(k) plans or individual retirement accounts (“IRAs”). After-tax returns are shown for Class A only. After-tax returns for Class C, Institutional Class, and Class P will vary. The returns shown below reflect applicable sales charges, if any.
 
Inception
1 Year
5 Years
10 Years or,
if Shorter,
Since Inception
Class A
8/15/1985
Return Before Taxes
-19.47%
-0.77%
1.81%
Return After Taxes on Distributions
-20.49%
-1.98%
0.35%
Return After Taxes on Distributions and Sale of Fund
Shares
-11.50%
-1.00%
0.77%
Class C—Before Taxes
5/1/2000
-17.59%
-0.69%
1.55%
Institutional Class—Before Taxes
1/29/2013
-15.90%
0.35%
2.58%
Class P—Before Taxes
5/1/2015
-16.17%
0.03%
1.44%
Index
Bloomberg U.S. Aggregate Bond Index (reflects no
deduction for fees, expenses or taxes)
-13.01%
0.02%
1.06%
MANAGEMENT OF THE FUND
Security Investors, LLC, also known as Guggenheim Investments, serves as the investment manager of the Fund. Guggenheim Investments utilizes a team-based approach that follows a disciplined investment process. The portfolio managers for the Fund are:
30 | PROSPECTUS

Name*
Experience with the Fund
Primary Title with Investment Manager
Anne B. Walsh
Since 2012
Managing Partner, Chief Investment Officer, and Portfolio
Manager
Steven H. Brown
Since 2017
Chief Investment Officer, Total Return and Macro
Strategies and Senior Managing Director and Portfolio
Manager
Adam J. Bloch
Since 2017
Managing Director and Portfolio Manager
Evan L. Serdensky
Since January 2023
Director and Portfolio Manager
*
Each portfolio manager is primarily responsible for the day-to-day management of the Fund.
PURCHASE AND SALE OF FUND SHARES
You may purchase or redeem Fund shares through your broker/dealer, other financial intermediary that has an agreement with Guggenheim Funds Distributors, LLC, the Fund’s distributor, or, for shares of each class other than Class P shares, through the Fund’s transfer agent. You may purchase, redeem or exchange shares of any class of the Fund on any day the New York Stock Exchange is open for business. The minimum initial investment for Class A and Class C shares is $2,500. The minimum subsequent investment is $100. Class A and Class C do not have a minimum account balance.
The Institutional Class minimum initial investment is $2 million, although the Investment Manager may waive this requirement at its discretion. The Institutional Class has a minimum account balance of $1 million. Due to the relatively high cost of maintaining accounts below the minimum account balance, the Fund reserves the right to redeem shares if an account balance falls below the minimum account balance for any reason. Investors will be given 60 days' notice to reestablish the minimum account balance. If the account balance is not increased, the account may be closed and the proceeds sent to the investor. Institutional Class shares of the Fund will be redeemed at net asset value on the day the account is closed.
Class P shares of the Fund are offered through broker/dealers and other financial intermediaries with which Guggenheim Funds Distributors, LLC has an agreement for the use of Class P shares of the Fund in investment products, programs or accounts. Class P shares do not have a minimum initial investment amount, minimum subsequent investment amount or a minimum account balance. The Fund reserves the right to modify its minimum investment amount and account balance requirements at any time, with or without prior notice to you.
TAX INFORMATION
Fund distributions are taxable as ordinary income or capital gains (or a combination of both), unless your investment is through an IRA or other tax-advantaged retirement account. Investments through tax-advantaged accounts may sometimes become taxable upon withdrawal.
PAYMENTS TO BROKER/DEALERS AND OTHER FINANCIAL INTERMEDIARIES
If you purchase Fund shares through a broker/dealer or other financial intermediary, the Fund and its related companies may pay the intermediary for the sale of Fund shares and related services. These payments may create a conflict of interest by influencing the broker/dealer or other intermediary and your sales person to recommend the Fund over another investment. Ask your sales person or visit your financial intermediary’s website for more information.
PROSPECTUS | 31

Guggenheim Limited Duration Fund
INVESTMENT OBJECTIVE
The Guggenheim Limited Duration Fund (the “Fund”) seeks to provide a high level of income consistent with preservation of capital.
FEES AND EXPENSES OF THE FUND
This table describes the fees and expenses that you may pay if you buy, hold and sell shares of the Fund. You may pay other fees, such as brokerage commissions and other fees to financial intermediaries, which are not reflected in the tables and examples below.You may qualify for sales charge discounts if you and your family invest, or agree to invest in the future, at least $100,000 in the Family of Funds, as defined on page 192 of the Fund’s prospectus. This amount may vary depending on the Guggenheim Fund in which you invest. More information about these and other discounts is available from your financial professional and in the “Sales Charges-Class A Shares” section on page 129 of the Fund’s prospectus and the “How to Purchase Shares” section on page 92 of the Fund’s Statement of Additional Information. Different intermediaries and financial professionals may impose different sales charges or offer different sales charge waivers or discounts. These variations are described in Appendix A to the Fund’s prospectus (Intermediary-Specific Sales Charge Waivers and Discounts).

SHAREHOLDER FEES (fees paid directly from your investment)
 
Class A
Class C
Institutional
Class
Class P
Maximum Sales Charge (Load) Imposed on
Purchases (as a percentage of offering price)
2.25
%
None
None
None
Maximum Deferred Sales Charge (Load) (as a
percentage of original purchase price or
redemption proceeds, whichever is lower)
None
*
1.00
%**
None
None
*
A 1.00% deferred sales charge will normally be imposed on purchases of $250,000 or more on Fund shares purchased without an initial sales charge that are redeemed within 12 months of purchase.
**
A 1.00% deferred sales charge will be imposed if Fund shares are redeemed within 12 months of purchase.

ANNUAL FUND OPERATING EXPENSES (expenses that you pay each year as a percentage of the value of your investment)
 
Class A
Class C
Institutional
Class
Class P
Management Fees
0.39
%
0.39
%
0.39
%
0.39
%
Distribution and/or Service (12b-1) Fees
0.25
%
1.00
%
None
0.25
%
Other Expenses
0.16
%
0.19
%
0.17
%
0.31
%
Interest and Other Related Expenses
0.01%
0.00%
0.00%
0.01%
Remaining Other Expenses
0.15%
0.19%
0.17%
0.30%
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses
0.80
%
1.58
%
0.56
%
0.95
%
Fee Waiver (and/or expense reimbursement)1
-0.06
%
-0.09
%
-0.07
%
-0.21
%
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses After Fee
Waiver (and/or expense reimbursement)
0.74
%
1.49
%
0.49
%
0.74
%
1
Guggenheim Partners Investment Management, LLC, also known as Guggenheim Investments (the “Investment Manager”), has contractually agreed through February 1, 2024 to waive fees and/or reimburse expenses to the extent necessary to limit the ordinary operating expenses (including distribution (12b-1) fees (if any), but exclusive of brokerage costs, dividends on securities sold short, acquired fund fees and expenses, interest, taxes, litigation, indemnification, and extraordinary expenses) (“Operating Expenses”) of the Fund to the annual percentage of average daily net assets for each class of shares as follows: Class A-0.75%, Class C-1.50%, Institutional Class-0.50%, and Class P-0.75%. The Investment Manager is entitled to reimbursement by the Fund of fees waived or expenses reimbursed during any of the previous 36 months beginning on the date of the expense limitation agreement, provided that the Operating Expenses do not exceed the then-applicable expense cap. The agreement will expire when it reaches its termination or when the Investment Manager ceases to serve as such and it can be terminated by the Fund’s Board of Trustees, with certain waived fees and reimbursed expenses subject to the recoupment rights of the Investment Manager.
32 | PROSPECTUS

EXAMPLE
This Example is intended to help you compare the cost of investing in the Fund with the cost of investing in other mutual funds.
The Example assumes that you invest $10,000 in the Fund for the time periods indicated and then redeem all of your shares at the end of those periods, unless otherwise indicated. The Example also assumes that your investment has a 5% return each year and that the Fund’s operating expenses remain the same. Although your actual costs may be higher or lower, based on these assumptions your costs would be:
 
1 Year
3 Years
5 Years
10 Years
Class A
$299
$469
$653
$1,187
Class C
$252
$490
$852
$1,871
Institutional
$50
$172
$306
$695
Class P
$76
$282
$505
$1,147
You would pay the following expenses if you did not redeem your shares:
 
1 Year
3 Years
5 Years
10 Years
Class C
$152
$490
$852
$1,871
The above Example reflects applicable contractual fee waiver/expense reimbursement arrangements for the current duration of the arrangements only.
PORTFOLIO TURNOVER
The Fund pays transaction costs, such as commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or “turns over” its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover rate may indicate higher transaction costs and may result in higher taxes when Fund shares are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are not reflected in annual fund operating expenses or in the example, affect the Fund’s performance. During the most recent fiscal year, the Fund’s portfolio turnover rate was 23% of the average value of its portfolio.
PRINCIPAL INVESTMENT STRATEGIES
The Fund intends to pursue its investment objective by investing, under normal circumstances, at least 80% of its assets (net assets, plus the amount of any borrowings for investment purposes) in a diversified portfolio of debt securities, financial instruments that should perform similarly to debt securities and investment vehicles that provide exposure to debt securities, and debt-like securities, including individual securities, investment vehicles and derivatives giving exposure (i.e., similar economic characteristics) to fixed-income markets. Such debt securities may include corporate bonds and other corporate debt securities, securities issued by the U.S. government or its agencies and instrumentalities (including those not backed by the full faith and credit of the U.S. government), sovereign debt securities, Eurodollar bonds and obligations, agency and non-agency mortgage-backed securities and other asset-backed securities, repurchase agreements, participations in and assignments of bank and bridge loans, commercial paper (including asset-backed commercial paper), zero-coupon bonds, municipal bonds, payment-in-kind securities (such as payment-in-kind bonds), convertible fixed-income securities, non-registered or restricted securities (including those issued in reliance on Rule 144A and Regulation S securities), certain preferred securities and step-up securities (such as step-up bonds). These securities may pay fixed or variable rates of interest and may include adjustable rate securities.
While the Fund will principally invest in debt securities listed, traded or dealt in developed markets countries globally, it may also invest without limitation in securities listed, traded or dealt in other countries, including emerging markets countries. Such securities may be denominated in foreign currencies. However, the Fund may not invest more than 35% of its total assets in debt securities listed, traded or dealt in emerging market countries as determined by Guggenheim Partners Investment Management, LLC, also known as Guggenheim Investments (the “Investment Manager”), and non-U.S. dollar denominated securities. Emerging market countries are generally considered to be countries with developing economies or markets and may include any country recognized to be an emerging market country by the International Monetary Fund, MSCI, Inc. or Standard & Poor’s Corporation or recognized to be a developing country by the United Nations. The Fund may also invest in preferred stock and convertible securities. The Fund may seek to obtain exposure to the securities in which it primarily invests through a variety of investment vehicles, including closed-end funds, exchange-traded funds (“ETFs”) and other mutual funds.
PROSPECTUS | 33

The Fund may hold fixed-income securities of any quality, rated or unrated, including those that are rated below investment grade (also known as “high yield securities” or “junk bonds”), or if unrated, determined by the Investment Manager to be of comparable quality. If nationally recognized statistical rating organizations assign different ratings to the same security, the Fund will use the higher rating for purposes of determining the security’s credit quality. However, the Fund may not invest more than 35% of its total assets in fixed-income securities that are below investment grade. These may include securities that are in default at the time of purchase.
The Fund may hold securities of any duration or maturity but expects, under normal circumstances, to maintain a dollar-weighted average duration of generally less than 3.5 years. Duration is a measure of the price volatility of a debt instrument as a result of changes in market rates of interest, based on the weighted average timing of the instrument’s expected principal and interest payments. Duration differs from maturity in that it considers a security’s yield, coupon payments, principal payments and call features in addition to the amount of time until the security matures. As the value of a security changes over time, so will its duration.
The Fund may invest in repurchase agreements, which are fixed-income securities in the form of agreements backed by collateral. These agreements, which may be viewed as a type of secured lending by the Fund, typically involve the acquisition by the Fund of securities from the selling institution (such as a bank or a broker-dealer), coupled with the agreement that the selling institution will repurchase the underlying securities at a specified price and at a fixed time in the future (or on demand). The Fund may accept a wide variety of underlying securities as collateral for the repurchase agreements entered into by the Fund. Such collateral may include U.S. government securities, corporate obligations, equity securities, municipal debt securities, asset- and mortgage-backed securities, convertible securities and other fixed-income securities. Any such securities serving as collateral are marked-to-market daily in order to maintain full collateralization (typically purchase price plus accrued interest).
With respect to mortgage-backed securities (“MBS”) and other asset-backed securities, the Fund may invest in MBS issued or guaranteed by federal agencies and/or U.S. government sponsored instrumentalities, such as the Government National Mortgage Administration (“GNMA”), the Federal Housing Administration (“FHA”), the Federal National Mortgage Association (“FNMA”) and the Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation (“FHLMC”). In addition to securities issued or guaranteed by such agencies or instrumentalities, the Fund may invest in MBS or other asset-backed securities issued or guaranteed by private issuers. The MBS in which the Fund may invest may also include residential mortgage-backed securities (“RMBS”), collateralized mortgage obligations (“CMOs”) and commercial mortgage-backed securities (“CMBS”). The asset-backed securities in which the Fund may invest include collateralized debt obligations (“CDOs”). CDOs include collateralized bond obligations (“CBOs”), collateralized loan obligations (“CLOs”), commercial real estate CDOs (“CRE CDOs”) and other similarly structured securities. A CBO is a trust which is backed by a diversified pool of below investment grade fixed-income securities. A CLO is a trust typically collateralized by a pool of loans, which may include domestic and foreign senior secured loans, senior unsecured loans, and subordinate corporate loans, including loans that may be rated below investment grade or equivalent unrated loans.
With respect to bank loans, the Fund may purchase participations in, or assignments of, floating rate bank loans that may be secured by real estate or other assets. These participations may be interests in, or assignments of, the loan and may be acquired from banks or brokers that have made the loan or members of the lending syndicate.
To enhance the Fund’s debt exposure, to hedge against investment risk, or to increase the Fund’s yield, at the discretion of the Investment Manager, the direct debt strategy may be combined with a derivative strategy. This strategy could include: foreign exchange forward contracts; futures on securities, indices, currencies and other investments; Eurodollar futures; options; interest rate swaps; cross-currency swaps; total return swaps; and credit default swaps. The Fund may engage in derivative transactions for speculative purposes to enhance total return, to seek to hedge against fluctuations in securities prices, interest rates or currency rates, to change the effective duration of its portfolio, to manage certain investment risks, as a substitute for the purchase or sale of securities or currencies and/or to obtain or replicate market exposure. These transactions may also create economic leverage in the Fund. The Fund may seek to obtain market exposure to the securities in which it primarily invests by entering into a series of purchase and sale contracts or by using other investment techniques (such as “To Be Announced” (“TBA”) transactions and/or dollar rolls). The Fund may also engage in securities lending.
The Fund may use leverage to the extent permitted by applicable law by entering into reverse repurchase agreements and transactions equivalent to a borrowing for investment purposes.
34 | PROSPECTUS

The Fund invests in a broad universe of fixed-income securities in an attempt to maximize yield and diversification and manage risk. Through its actively managed approach, the Fund seeks to potentially capitalize on changing relative values in fixed-income securities/sectors. The Investment Manager selects securities and other investments for purchase and sale based on intensive credit research involving extensive due diligence on each investment (including the investment’s structure), issuer, region and sector. The Investment Manager also considers macroeconomic outlook and geopolitical issues.
The Investment Manager may determine to sell a security for several reasons, including but not limited to the following: (1) to adjust the portfolio’s average maturity or duration, or to shift assets into or out of higher-yielding securities; (2) if a security’s credit rating has been changed, the Investment Manager's credit outlook has changed, or for other similar reasons; (3) to meet redemption requests; (4) to take gains; or (5) due to relative value. Under adverse or unstable market conditions or abnormal circumstances (for example, in the event of credit events, where it is deemed opportune to preserve gains, or to preserve the relative value of investments or in the case of large cash inflows or anticipated large redemptions), the Fund can make temporary investments and may not be able to pursue or achieve its investment objective.
PRINCIPAL RISKS
The value of an investment in the Fund will fluctuate and is subject to investment risks, which means investors could lose money, including all or part of their investments in the Fund. An investment in the Fund is not a bank deposit and is not insured or guaranteed by the FDIC or any governmental agency. There is no assurance that the Fund will achieve its investment objective. The Fund is subject to certain risks and the principal risks of investing in the Fund are summarized below in alphabetical order, and not in the order of importance or potential exposure.
Asset-Backed Securities Risk—Investors in asset-backed securities, including residential mortgage-backed securities, commercial mortgage-backed securities and other structured finance investments (such as collateralized mortgage obligations), generally receive payments that are part interest and part return of principal. These payments may vary based on the rate at which the underlying borrowers pay off their loans. Some asset-backed securities, including mortgage-backed securities, may have structures that make their performance based on changes in interest rates and other factors difficult to predict, causing their prices to be volatile. These instruments are particularly subject to interest rate, credit and liquidity and valuation risks. Additional risks relating to investments in asset-backed securities may arise principally because of the type of asset-backed securities in which the Fund invests, with such risks primarily associated with the particular assets collateralizing the asset-backed securities and the structure of such asset-backed securities. In addition, the terms of many structured finance investments and other instruments are tied to interbank reference rates (referred to collectively as the “London Interbank Offered Rate” or “LIBOR”), which function as a reference rate or benchmark for many underlying collateral investments, securities and transactions. It is anticipated that LIBOR ultimately will be discontinued, which may cause increased volatility and illiquidity in the markets for instruments with terms tied to LIBOR or other adverse consequences, such as decreased yields and reduction in value, for these instruments. These events may adversely affect the Fund and its investments in such instruments.
Commercial Mortgage-Backed Securities—Investments in commercial mortgage-backed securities (“CMBS”) are backed by commercial mortgage loans that may be secured by office properties, retail properties, hotels, mixed use properties or multi-family apartment buildings and are particularly subject to the credit risk of the borrower and the tenants of the properties securing the commercial mortgage loans. CMBS are subject to the risks of asset-backed securities generally and particularly subject to credit risk, interest rate risk, and liquidity and valuation risk. Economic downturns, tightening lending standards and increased interest and lending rates, developments adverse to the commercial real estate markets, and other developments that limit or reduce the activities of and demand for commercial retail and office spaces adversely impact the value of, and income generated by, such securities.
Residential Mortgage-Backed Securities—Residential mortgage-backed securities may be particularly sensitive to changes in interest rates given that changing interest rates tend to adjust the duration of fixed-rate mortgage-backed securities. As a result, a changing interest rate environment can cause the prices of mortgage-backed securities to be increasingly volatile, which may adversely affect the Fund’s holdings of mortgage-backed securities. Investments in non-agency residential mortgage-backed securities are subject to increased interest rate risk and other risks, such as credit and liquidity and valuation risks.
Collateralized Loan Obligations and Collateralized Debt Obligations Risk—Collateralized loan obligations (“CLOs”) bear many of the same risks as other forms of asset-backed securities, including interest rate risk, credit risk and default risk. As they are backed primarily by commercial loans, CLOs also bear many of the same risks as
PROSPECTUS | 35

investing in loans directly. However, in addition to the risks associated with investing in commercial loans, the complex structure and highly leveraged nature of a CLO poses additional risks. CLOs incur indebtedness by issuing classes or “tranches” that vary in risk and yield. CLOs may experience substantial losses attributable to loan defaults or trading losses. Such losses on the underlying assets are borne first by the holders of subordinate tranches, which may take the form of an equity interest. The Fund’s investments in CLOs may decrease in market value when the CLO’s assets experience loan defaults or credit impairment, losses that exceed the most subordinate tranches, or market anticipation of loan defaults and investor aversion to CLO securities as a class.
Collateralized debt obligations (“CDOs”) are structured similarly to CLOs and bear many of the same risks as CLOs, including interest rate risk, credit risk and default risk. CDOs are subject to additional risks because they are backed by pools of assets other than commercial loans, including securities (such as other asset-backed securities), synthetic instruments or bonds, and may be highly leveraged. Like CLOs, losses incurred by a CDO are borne first by holders of the most subordinate tranches. Accordingly, the risks of CDOs depend largely on the type of underlying collateral and the tranche of CDOs in which the Fund invests. Moreover, CDOs that obtain their exposure through synthetic investments are exposed to risks associated with derivative instruments.
The terms of many structured finance investments, including CLOs and CDOs, are tied to LIBOR, which functions as a reference rate or benchmark for many underlying collateral investments, securities and transactions. LIBOR is scheduled to be discontinued, which discontinuation may cause increased volatility and illiquidity in the markets for instruments with terms tied to LIBOR or other adverse consequences, such as decreased yields and reduction in value, for these instruments. Some structured finance investments are tied to relatively new and developing reference rates, such as SOFR or other reference rates based on SOFR. These relatively new and developing rates may behave differently than LIBOR would have or may not match the reference rate applicable to the underlying assets related to these investments. These events may adversely affect the Fund and its investments in CLOs and CDOs, including their value, volatility and liquidity.
Commercial Paper Risk—The value of the Fund’s investment in commercial paper, which is an unsecured promissory note that generally has a maturity date between one and 270 days and is issued by a U.S. or foreign entity, is susceptible to changes in the issuer’s financial condition or credit quality. Investments in commercial paper are usually discounted from their value at maturity. Commercial paper can be fixed-rate or variable rate and can be adversely affected by changes in interest rates. The Fund may invest in commercial paper collateralized by other financial assets, such as asset-backed commercial paper. These securities are exposed not only to the risks relating to commercial paper, but also the risks relating to the collateral.
Convertible Securities Risk—Convertible securities may be subordinate to other securities. The total return for a convertible security depends, in part, upon the performance of the underlying security into which it can be converted. The value of convertible securities tends to decline as interest rates increase. Convertible securities generally offer lower interest or dividend yields than non-convertible securities of similar quality.
Counterparty Credit Risk—The Fund makes investments in financial instruments and OTC-traded derivatives involving counterparties to gain exposure to a particular group of securities, index, asset class or other reference asset without actually purchasing those securities or investments, to hedge a position, or for other investment purposes. Through these investments and related arrangements (e.g., prime brokerage or securities lending arrangements or derivatives transactions), the Fund is exposed to credit risks that the counterparty may be unwilling or unable to make timely payments or otherwise to meet its contractual obligations. If the counterparty becomes bankrupt or defaults on (or otherwise becomes unable or unwilling to perform) its payment or other obligations to the Fund, the Fund may not receive the full amount that it is entitled to receive or may experience delays in recovering the collateral or other assets held by, or on behalf of, the counterparty. If this occurs, the value of your shares in the Fund will decrease. Counterparty credit risk also includes the related risk of having concentrated exposure to such a counterparty.
Credit Risk—The Fund could lose money if the issuer or guarantor of a fixed-income or other debt instrument or a counterparty to a derivatives transaction or other transaction is unable or unwilling, or perceived to be unable or unwilling, to pay interest or repay principal on time, defaults or otherwise fails to meet its obligations. Actual or perceived changes in economic, social, public health, financial or political conditions in general or that affect a particular type of instrument, issuer, guarantor or counterparty can reduce the ability of the party to meet its obligations, which can affect the credit quality, liquidity and/or value of an instrument. The value of an instrument also may decline for reasons that relate directly to the issuer, guarantor or counterparty, such as management
36 | PROSPECTUS

performance, financial leverage and reduced demand for goods and services. The issuer, guarantor or counterparty could also suffer a rapid decline in credit rating, which would adversely affect the volatility of the value and liquidity of the instrument. Credit ratings may not be an accurate assessment of liquidity or credit risk.
Currency Risk—Indirect and direct exposure to foreign currencies subjects the Fund to the risk that those currencies will decline in value relative to the U.S. Dollar, which would cause a decline in the U.S. value of the holdings of the Fund. Currency rates in foreign countries may fluctuate significantly over short periods of time for a number of reasons, including changes in interest rates and the imposition of currency controls or other political, economic and tax developments in the U.S. or abroad.
Derivatives Risk—Derivatives and other similar instruments (collectively referred to in this paragraph as “derivatives”) pose risks in addition to and greater than those associated with investing directly in securities, currencies or other investments, including risks relating to leverage, market conditions and market risk, imperfect correlations with underlying investments or the Fund’s other portfolio holdings, high price volatility, lack of availability, counterparty credit, illiquidity, valuation, operational and legal restrictions and risk. Their use is a highly specialized activity that involves investment techniques and risks different from those associated with ordinary portfolio securities transactions. Changes in the value of a derivative may also create sudden margin delivery or settlement payment obligations for the Fund, which can materially affect the performance of the Fund and its liquidity and other risk profiles. If the Investment Manager is incorrect about its expectations of market conditions, the use of derivatives could also result in a loss, which in some cases may be unlimited. In addition, the Fund's use of derivatives may cause the Fund to realize higher amounts of short term capital gains (generally taxed at ordinary income tax rates) than if the Fund had not used such instruments.  Some of the derivatives in which the Fund invests may be traded (and privately negotiated) in the OTC market. OTC derivatives are subject to heightened counterparty credit, legal, liquidity and valuation risks. Certain risks also are specific to the derivatives in which the Fund invests.
Forward Foreign Currency Exchange Contracts Risk—A forward foreign currency exchange contract is an OTC obligation to purchase or sell a specific currency at a future date at a price set at the time of the contract. Foreign currency transactions can be affected unpredictably by intervention (or the failure to intervene) by U.S. or foreign governments or central banks, or by currency controls or political developments. Such events may prevent or restrict the Fund’s ability to enter into foreign currency transactions, force the Fund to exit a foreign currency transaction at a disadvantageous time or price or result in penalties for the Fund, any of which may result in a loss to the Fund. A contract to sell a foreign currency would limit any potential gain that might be realized if the value of the currency increases. Suitable hedging transactions may not be available in all circumstances. Engaging in forward foreign currency exchange contracts will subject the Fund to counterparty credit risk and any failure to perform by a counterparty could result in a loss to the Fund.
Futures Contracts Risk—Futures contracts are exchange-traded contracts that call for the future delivery of an asset at a certain price and date, or cash settlement of the terms of the contract. Risks of futures contracts may be caused by an imperfect correlation between movements in the price of the instruments and the price of the underlying assets. In addition, there is a risk that the Fund may not be able to enter into a closing transaction because of an illiquid market. Exchanges can limit the number of positions that can be held or controlled by the Fund or the Investment Manager, thus limiting the ability to implement the Fund’s strategies. Futures markets are highly volatile and the use of futures may increase the volatility of the Fund’s net asset value (“NAV”). Futures are also subject to leverage and liquidity risks.
Options Risk—Options and options on futures contracts give the holder of the option the right, but not the obligation, to buy (or to sell) a position in a security or in a contract to the writer of the option, at a certain price. Options are subject to correlation risk because there may be an imperfect correlation between the options and the markets for underlying instruments that could cause a given transaction to fail to achieve its objectives. The successful use of options depends on the Investment Manager’s  ability to predict correctly future price fluctuations and the degree of correlation between the markets for options and the underlying instruments. Exchanges can limit the number of positions that can be held or controlled by the Fund or the Investment Manager, thus limiting the ability to implement the Fund’s strategies. Options are also particularly subject to leverage risk and can be subject to liquidity risk.
Swap Agreements Risk—Swap agreements are contracts among the Fund and a counterparty to exchange the return of the pre-determined underlying investment (such as the rate of return of the underlying index). Swap agreements may be negotiated bilaterally and traded OTC between two parties or, for certain standardized swaps, must be exchange-traded through a futures commission merchant and/or cleared through
PROSPECTUS | 37

a clearinghouse that serves as a central counterparty. Risks associated with the use of swap agreements are different from those associated with ordinary portfolio securities transactions, due in part to the fact they could be considered illiquid and many swaps trade on the OTC market. Swaps are particularly subject to counterparty credit, correlation, valuation, liquidity and leveraging risks. While exchange trading and central clearing are intended to reduce counterparty credit risk and increase liquidity, they do not make swap transactions risk-free. Additionally, applicable regulators have adopted rules imposing certain margin requirements, including minimums, on OTC swaps, which may result in the Fund and its counterparties posting higher margin amounts for OTC swaps, which could increase the cost of swap transactions to the Fund and impose added operational complexity.
Dollar Roll Transaction Risk—The Fund may enter into dollar roll transactions, in which the Fund sells a mortgage-backed or other security for settlement on one date and buys back a substantially similar security for settlement at a later date. Dollar rolls involve a risk of loss if the market value of the securities that the Fund is committed to buy declines below the price of the securities the Fund has sold.
Emerging Markets Risk—Investments in or exposure to emerging markets are generally subject to a greater level of those risks associated with investing in or being exposed to developed foreign markets, as emerging markets are considered to be less developed. Furthermore, investments in or exposure to emerging markets are generally subject to additional risks, including the risks associated with trading in smaller markets, lower volumes of trading, and being subject to lower levels of government regulation and less extensive and transparent accounting, auditing, recordkeeping, financial reporting and other requirements.
Extension Risk—Certain debt instruments, including mortgage- and other asset-backed securities, are subject to the risk that payments on principal may occur at a slower rate or later than expected. In this event, the expected maturity could lengthen and the Fund’s investment may sharply decrease in value and the Fund’s income from the investment may quickly decline. These types of instruments are particularly subject to extension risk, and offer less potential for gains, during periods of rising interest rates. In addition, the Fund may be delayed in its ability to reinvest income or proceeds from these instruments in potentially higher yielding investments, which would adversely affect the Fund.
Foreign Securities and Currency Risk—Foreign securities carry unique or additional risks when compared to U.S. securities, including currency fluctuations, adverse political (including geopolitical) and economic developments, unreliable or untimely information, less liquidity and more volatility, limited legal recourse and higher transactional costs.
High Yield and Unrated Securities Risk—High yield, below investment grade and unrated high risk debt securities (which also may be known as “junk bonds”) may present additional risks because these securities may be less liquid, and therefore more difficult to value accurately and sell at an advantageous price or time, and present more credit risk than investment grade bonds. The price of high yield securities tends to be subject to greater volatility due to issuer-specific factors, such as operating results and outlook and to real or perceived adverse economic and competitive industry conditions. This exposure may be obtained through investments in other investment companies. Based on its investment strategies, a significant portion of the Fund’s investments can be comprised of high yield and unrated securities and thus particularly prone to the foregoing risks, which may result in losses to the Fund.
Interest Rate Risk—Fixed-income and other debt instruments are subject to the possibility that interest rates could change. Changes in interest rates may adversely affect the Fund’s investments in these instruments, such as the value or liquidity of, and income generated by, the investments. Interest rates may change as a result of a variety of factors, and the change may be sudden and significant, with unpredictable impacts on the financial markets and the Fund’s investments. Fixed-income and other debt instruments with longer durations are more sensitive to changes in interest rates and, thus, subject to more volatility than similar instruments with shorter durations. Generally, when interest rates increase, the values of fixed-income and other debt instruments decline, sometimes suddenly and significantly. When interest rates decrease, the values of fixed-income and other debt instruments generally rise. During periods of rising interest rates, because changes in interest rates on adjustable rate securities may lag behind changes in market rates, the value of such securities may decline until their interest rates reset to market rates. During periods of declining interest rates, because the interest rates on adjustable rate securities generally reset downward, their market value is unlikely to rise to the same extent as the value of comparable fixed rate securities. During periods when interest rates are low or negative, the Fund’s yield and performance may be adversely affected and the Fund may be unable to maintain positive returns or minimize the volatility of the Fund's net asset value per share. Changes in monetary policy may exacerbate the risks associated with changing interest rates.
38 | PROSPECTUS

Investment in Investment Vehicles Risk—Investing in other investment vehicles, including ETFs, closed-end funds and other mutual funds, subjects the Fund to those risks affecting the investment vehicle, including the possibility that the value of the underlying securities held by the investment vehicle could decrease or the portfolio becomes illiquid. Moreover, the Fund and its shareholders will incur its pro rata share of the underlying vehicles’ expenses, which will reduce the Fund’s performance. In addition, investments in an ETF or a listed closed-end fund are subject to, among other risks, the risk that the shares may trade at a discount or premium relative to the net asset value of the shares and the listing exchange may halt trading of the shares.
Investment in Loans Risk—The Fund may invest in loans directly or indirectly through assignments or participations. Investments in loans, including loan syndicates and other direct lending opportunities, involve special types of risks, including credit risk, interest rate risk, counterparty risk, prepayment risk and extension risk. Loans may offer a fixed or floating interest rate. Loans are often below investment grade and may be unrated. The Fund’s investments in loans can also be difficult to value accurately and may be more susceptible to liquidity risk than fixed-income instruments of similar credit quality and/or maturity. The Fund is also subject to the risk that the value of any collateral for the loan may be insufficient or unavailable to cover the borrower’s obligations should the borrower fail to make payments, become insolvent, or otherwise default. Transactions in loans are often subject to long settlement periods and often require consent from borrowers and/or an agent acting for the lenders, thus potentially limiting the ability of the Fund to invest sale proceeds in other investments and to use proceeds to meet its current redemption obligations. The Fund thus is subject to the risk of selling other investments at disadvantageous times or prices or taking other actions necessary to raise cash to meet its redemption obligations. Participations in loans may subject the Fund to the credit risk of both the borrower and the seller of the participation and may make enforcement of loan covenants, if any, more difficult for the Fund as legal action may have to go through the seller of the participation (or an agent acting on its behalf). Covenants contained in loan documentation are intended to protect lenders and investors by imposing certain restrictions and other limitations on a borrower’s and the credit group’s operations or assets and by providing certain information and consent rights to lenders. In addition to operational covenants, loans and other debt obligations often contain financial covenants, which require a borrower and the related credit group to satisfy certain financial tests at periodic intervals or to maintain compliance with certain financial metrics. The Fund invests in or is exposed to loans and other similar debt obligations that are sometimes referred to as “covenant-lite” loans or obligations, which generally are loans or other similar debt obligations that lack financial maintenance covenants or possess fewer or contingent financial maintenance covenants and other financial protections for lenders and investors. These “covenant-lite” loans or obligations typically are particularly subject to the risks associated with investments in loans as described above.
Leverage Risk—The Fund’s use of leverage, through borrowings or instruments such as derivatives and reverse repurchase agreements, may cause the Fund to be more volatile and riskier and magnify the Fund's losses to an extent greater than if it had not been leveraged.
Liquidity and Valuation Risk—It may be difficult for the Fund to purchase and sell particular investments within a reasonable time at a fair price, or the price at which it has been valued by the Investment Manager for purposes of the Fund’s net asset value, causing the Fund to be less liquid and unable to realize what the Investment Manager believes should be the price of the investment. Valuation of portfolio investments may be difficult, such as during periods of market turmoil or reduced liquidity, and for investments that may, for example, trade infrequently or irregularly. In these and other circumstances, an investment may be valued using fair value methodologies, which are inherently subjective, reflect good faith judgments based on available information and may not accurately estimate the price at which the Fund could sell the investment at that time. These risks are heightened in a changing interest rate environment. Based on its investment strategies, a significant portion of the Fund's investments can be difficult to value and potentially less liquid and thus particularly prone to the foregoing risks.
Management Risk—The Fund is actively managed, which means that investment decisions are made based on investment views. There is no guarantee that the investment views will produce the desired results or expected returns. As a result of these and other factors, the Fund may lose value or fail to meet its investment objective or underperform its benchmark index or funds with similar investment objectives and strategies. Furthermore, active and frequent trading that can accompany active management, also called “high turnover,” may have a negative impact on performance. Active and frequent trading may result in higher brokerage costs or mark-up charges and tax costs, which are ultimately passed on to shareholders of the Fund. Active and frequent trading may also result in adverse tax consequences.
Market Risk—The value of, or income generated by, the investments held by the Fund may fluctuate rapidly and unpredictably. These fluctuations may be frequent and significant. In addition, the Fund may incur losses as a result of various market and economic factors, such as those affecting individual companies or issuers or particular
PROSPECTUS | 39

industries. In addition, developments related to economic, political (including geopolitical), social, public health, market or other conditions may cause volatility in financial markets and reduced liquidity in equity, credit and/or debt markets, which could adversely impact the Fund and its investments and their value and performance. Under such conditions, the Fund may experience significant redemption activity by shareholders and could be forced to sell portfolio securities or other assets at unfavorable prices in an effort to generate sufficient cash to pay redeeming shareholders. The Fund's investments may perform poorly or underperform the general securities markets or other types of securities.
Municipal Securities Risk—Municipal securities are subject to a variety of risks, including credit, interest, prepayment, liquidity, and valuation risks. In addition, municipal securities can be adversely affected by (i) unfavorable legislative, political, or other developments or events, including natural disasters and public health conditions, and (ii) changes in the economic and fiscal conditions of issuers of municipal securities or the federal government (in cases where it provides financial support to such issuers). Municipal securities may be fully or partially backed by the taxing authority or revenue of a local government, the credit of a private issuer, or the current or anticipated revenues from a specific project, which may be adversely affected as a result of economic and public health conditions. To the extent the Fund invests a substantial portion of its assets in municipal securities issued by issuers in a particular state, municipality or project, the Fund will be particularly sensitive to developments and events adversely affecting such state or municipality or with respect to a particular project. Certain sectors of the municipal bond market have special risks that can affect them more significantly than the market as a whole. Because many municipal instruments are issued to finance similar projects (such as education, health care, transportation and utilities), conditions in these industries can significantly affect the overall municipal market. Municipal securities that are insured may be adversely affected by developments relevant to that particular insurer, or more general developments relevant to the market as a whole. Municipal securities can be difficult to value and be less liquid than other investments, which may affect performance or the ability to meet Fund redemption requests.
Preferred Securities Risk—A company’s preferred stock generally pays dividends only after the company makes required payments to holders of its bonds and other debt. For this reason, the value of preferred stock will usually react more strongly than bonds and other debt to actual or perceived changes in the company’s financial condition or prospects.
Prepayment Risk—Certain debt instruments, including loans and mortgage- and other asset-backed securities, are subject to the risk that payments on principal may occur more quickly or earlier than expected. If this occurs, the Fund might be forced to forego future interest income on the principal repaid early and to reinvest income or proceeds at generally lower interest rates, thus reducing the Fund’s yield. These types of instruments are particularly subject to prepayment risk, and offer less potential for gains, during periods of declining interest rates.
Real Estate Investments Risk—The Fund may invest in securities of real estate companies and companies related to the real estate industry, including real estate investment trusts (“REITs”), which are subject to the same risks as direct investments in real estate and the real estate market generally. The real estate industry is particularly sensitive to, among other things, economic downturns, changes in interest rates, changes in national, state or local real estate conditions, changes in the availability, cost and terms of mortgages (and other types of financing) and fluctuations in occupancy levels and demand for properties.
Regulatory and Legal Risk—U.S. and non-U.S. governmental agencies and other regulators regularly implement additional regulations and legislators pass new laws that affect the investments held by the Fund, the strategies used by the Fund or the level of regulation or taxation applying to the Fund (such as regulations related to investments in derivatives and other transactions). These regulations and laws impact the investment strategies, performance, costs and operations of the Fund or taxation of shareholders.
Repurchase Agreements and Reverse Repurchase Agreements Risk—In the event of the insolvency of the counterparty to a repurchase agreement or reverse repurchase agreement, recovery of the repurchase price owed to the Fund or, in the case of a reverse repurchase agreement, the securities or other assets sold by the Fund, may be delayed. Because reverse repurchase agreements may be considered to be the practical equivalent of borrowing funds, they constitute a form of leverage. If the Fund reinvests the proceeds of a reverse repurchase agreement at a rate lower than the cost of the agreement, entering into the agreement will lower the Fund’s yield.
Restricted Securities Risk—Restricted securities generally cannot be sold to the public and may involve a high degree of business, financial and liquidity risk, which may result in substantial losses to the Fund.
40 | PROSPECTUS

Securities Lending Risk—Securities lending involves a risk that the borrower may fail to return the securities or deliver the proper amount of collateral, which may result in a loss to the Fund. In the event of bankruptcy of the borrower, the Fund could experience losses or delays in recovering the loaned securities.
Sovereign Debt Risk—The debt securities issued by sovereign entities may decline as a result of default or other adverse credit event resulting from a sovereign debtor's unwillingness or inability to repay principal and pay interest in a timely manner, which may be affected by a variety of factors, including its cash flow situation, the extent of its reserves, the availability of sufficient foreign exchange on the date a payment is due, the relative size of the debt service burden to the economy as a whole, the sovereign debtor's policy toward international lenders, and the political constraints to which a sovereign debtor may be subject. Sovereign debt risk is greater for issuers in emerging markets than issuers in developed countries.
Special Situation Investments/Securities in Default Risk—Investments in the securities and debt of distressed issuers or issuers in default involve far greater risk than investing in issuers whose debt obligations are being met and whose debt trades at or close to its “par” or full value because the investments in the securities and debt of distressed issuers or issuers in default are highly speculative with respect to the issuer’s ability to make interest payments and/or to pay its principal obligations in full and/or on time.
To Be Announced (“TBA”) Transactions Risk—The Fund may enter into “To Be Announced” (“TBA”) transactions to purchase or sell mortgage-backed securities for a fixed price at a future date. In a TBA transaction, a seller agrees to deliver a mortgage-backed security to the Fund at a future date, but the seller does not specify the particular security to be delivered. Instead, the Fund agrees to accept or sell any security that meets specified terms. TBA purchase commitments involve a risk of loss if the value of the securities to be purchased declines prior to settlement date or if the counterparty may not deliver the securities as promised. Selling a TBA involves a risk of loss if the value of the securities to be sold goes up prior to settlement date. Recently finalized FINRA rules include mandatory margin requirements that will require the Fund to post collateral in connection with its TBA transactions, which could increase the cost of TBA transactions to the Fund and impose added operational complexity.
U.S. Government Securities Risk—U.S. government securities may or may not be backed by the full faith and credit of the U.S. government. U.S. government securities are subject to the risks associated with fixed-income and debt securities, particularly interest rate risk and credit risk.
Zero Coupon and Payment-In-Kind Securities Risk—Zero coupon and payment-in-kind securities pay no cash interest income and usually are sold at substantial discounts from their value at maturity. Zero coupon and payment-in-kind securities are subject to greater market value fluctuations from changing interest rates than debt obligations of comparable maturities that make current cash-pay interest payments.
PERFORMANCE INFORMATION
The following chart and table provide some indication of the risks of investing in the Fund by showing the Fund’s Class A share calendar year performance from year to year and average annual returns for the one, five and ten year or, if shorter, since inception periods, as applicable, for the Fund’s Class A, Class C, Institutional Class, and Class P shares compared to those of a broad measure of market performance. Performance of the benchmark index shown in the table below is shown for the same periods as shown for performance of Class A shares. As with all mutual funds, past performance (before and after taxes) is not necessarily an indication of how the Fund will perform in the future. Updated performance information is available on the Fund’s website at www.guggenheiminvestments.com or by calling 800.820.0888.
PROSPECTUS | 41

The bar chart does not reflect the impact of the sales charge applicable to Class A shares which, if reflected, would lower the returns shown. Performance reflects applicable fee waivers and/or expense limitations in effect during the periods shown.
During the periods shown in
the chart above:
Quarter Ended
Return
Highest Quarter
June 30, 2020
4.22%
Lowest Quarter
March 31, 2022
-2.39%
AVERAGE ANNUAL TOTAL RETURNS (for the periods ended December 31, 2022)
After-tax returns shown in the table are calculated using the historical highest individual federal marginal income tax rates and do not reflect the impact of any state or local taxes. Actual after-tax returns depend on an investor’s tax situation and may differ from those shown. After-tax returns shown are not relevant to investors who hold their Fund shares through tax-deferred arrangements, such as 401(k) plans or individual retirement accounts (“IRAs”). After-tax returns are shown for Class A only. After-tax returns for Class C, Institutional Class, and Class P will vary. The returns shown below reflect applicable sales charges, if any.
 
Inception
1 Year
5 Years
Since Inception
Class A
12/16/2013
Return Before Taxes
-6.68%
0.59%
1.47%
Return After Taxes on Distributions
-7.58%
-0.27%
0.45%
Return After Taxes on Distributions and Sale of Fund
Shares
-3.95%
0.10%
0.68%
Class C—Before Taxes
12/16/2013
-6.17%
0.29%
0.97%
Institutional Class—Before Taxes
12/16/2013
-4.33%
1.29%
1.99%
Class P—Before Taxes
5/1/2015
-4.52%
1.05%
1.57%
Index
Bloomberg U.S. Aggregate Bond 1-3 Year Total Return
Index (reflects no deduction for fees, expenses or taxes)
-3.72%
0.86%
0.88%
MANAGEMENT OF THE FUND
Guggenheim Partners Investment Management, LLC, also known as Guggenheim Investments, serves as the investment manager of the Fund.  Guggenheim Investments utilizes a team-based approach that follows a disciplined investment process. The portfolio managers for the Fund are:
Name*
Experience with the Fund
Primary Title with Investment Manager
Anne B. Walsh
Since inception (2013)
Managing Partner, Chief Investment Officer, and Portfolio
Manager
42 | PROSPECTUS

Name*
Experience with the Fund
Primary Title with Investment Manager
Steven H. Brown
Since inception (2013)
Chief Investment Officer, Total Return and Macro
Strategies and Senior Managing Director and Portfolio
Manager
Adam J. Bloch
Since 2017
Managing Director and Portfolio Manager
Evan L. Serdensky
Since January 2023
Director and Portfolio Manager
*
Each portfolio manager is primarily responsible for the day-to-day management of the Fund.
PURCHASE AND SALE OF FUND SHARES
You may purchase or redeem Fund shares through your broker/dealer, other financial intermediary that has an agreement with Guggenheim Funds Distributors, LLC, the Fund’s distributor, or, for shares of each class other than Class P shares, through the Fund’s transfer agent. You may purchase, redeem or exchange shares of any class of the Fund on any day the New York Stock Exchange is open for business. The minimum initial investment for Class A and Class C shares is $2,500. The minimum subsequent investment is $100. Class A and Class C do not have a minimum account balance.
The Institutional Class minimum initial investment is $2 million, although the Investment Manager may waive this requirement at its discretion. The Institutional Class has a minimum account balance of $1 million. Due to the relatively high cost of maintaining accounts below the minimum account balance, the Fund reserves the right to redeem shares if an account balance falls below the minimum account balance for any reason. Investors will be given 60 days' notice to reestablish the minimum account balance. If the account balance is not increased, the account may be closed and the proceeds sent to the investor. Institutional Class shares of the Fund will be redeemed at net asset value on the day the account is closed.
Class P shares of the Fund are offered through broker/dealers and other financial intermediaries with which Guggenheim Funds Distributors, LLC has an agreement for the use of Class P shares of the Fund in investment products, programs or accounts. Class P shares do not have a minimum initial investment amount, minimum subsequent investment amount or a minimum account balance. The Fund reserves the right to modify its minimum investment amount and account balance requirements at any time, with or without prior notice to you.
TAX INFORMATION
Fund distributions are taxable as ordinary income or capital gains (or a combination of both), unless your investment is through an IRA or other tax-advantaged retirement account. Investments through tax-advantaged accounts may sometimes become taxable upon withdrawal.
PAYMENTS TO BROKER/DEALERS AND OTHER FINANCIAL INTERMEDIARIES
If you purchase Fund shares through a broker/dealer or other financial intermediary, the Fund and its related companies may pay the intermediary for the sale of Fund shares and related services. These payments may create a conflict of interest by influencing the broker/dealer or other intermediary and your sales person to recommend the Fund over another investment. Ask your sales person or visit your financial intermediary’s website for more information.
PROSPECTUS | 43

Guggenheim Macro Opportunities Fund
INVESTMENT OBJECTIVE
The Guggenheim Macro Opportunities Fund (the “Fund”) seeks to provide total return, comprised of current income and capital appreciation.
FEES AND EXPENSES OF THE FUND
This table describes the fees and expenses that you may pay if you buy, hold and sell shares of the Fund. You may pay other fees, such as brokerage commissions and other fees to financial intermediaries, which are not reflected in the tables and examples below.You may qualify for sales charge discounts if you and your family invest, or agree to invest in the future, at least $50,000 in the Family of Funds, as defined on page 192 of the Fund’s prospectus. This amount may vary depending on the Guggenheim Fund in which you invest. More information about these and other discounts is available from your financial professional and in the “Sales Charges-Class A Shares” section on page 129 of the Fund’s prospectus and the “How to Purchase Shares” section on page 92 of the Fund’s Statement of Additional Information. Different intermediaries and financial professionals may impose different sales charges or offer different sales charge waivers or discounts. These variations are described in Appendix A to the Fund’s prospectus (Intermediary-Specific Sales Charge Waivers and Discounts).

SHAREHOLDER FEES (fees paid directly from your investment)
 
Class A
Class C
Institutional
Class
Class P
Maximum Sales Charge (Load) Imposed on
Purchases (as a percentage of offering price)
4.00
%
None
None
None
Maximum Deferred Sales Charge (Load) (as a
percentage of original purchase price or
redemption proceeds, whichever is lower)
None