Legg Mason Global Asset Management Trust
LOGO
 
Prospectus   LOGO   May 1, 2023
 
Share class (Symbol): A (GOBAX), C (LGOCX), C1 (GOBCX), FI (GOBFX), R (LBORX), I (GOBIX), IS (GOBSX)
 
 
BRANDYWINEGLOBAL —
GLOBAL OPPORTUNITIES
BOND FUND
 
 
 
 
LOGO
 
The Securities and Exchange Commission has not approved or disapproved these securities or determined whether this Prospectus is accurate or complete. Any statement to the contrary is a crime.
 
 
INVESTMENT PRODUCTS: NOT FDIC INSURED • NO BANK GUARANTEE • MAY LOSE VALUE
 
 

Contents       
Investment objective      2  
Fees and expenses of the fund      2  
Principal investment strategies      3  
Principal risks      4  
Performance      8  
Management      9  
Purchase and sale of fund shares      9  
Tax information      10  
Payments to broker/dealers and other financial intermediaries      10  
More on the fund’s investment strategies, investments and risks      11  
More on fund management      24  
Choosing a share class      28  
Share class features summary      28  
Share class availability      29  
Additional information about each share class      31  
Buying shares      36  
Exchanging shares      38  
Redeeming shares      40  
Other things to know about transactions      42  
Dividends, other distributions and taxes      46  
Share price      48  
Financial highlights      49  
Appendix: Waivers and Discounts Available from Certain Service Agents      A-1  
Investment objective
Maximize total return consisting of income and capital appreciation.
Fees and expenses of the fund
The accompanying table describes the fees and expenses that you may pay if you buy, hold and sell shares of the fund. You may pay other fees, such as brokerage commissions and other fees to financial intermediaries, which are not reflected in the tables and examples below. 
You may qualify for sales charge discounts if you and your family invest, or agree to invest in the future, at least $100,000 in funds distributed through Franklin Distributors, LLC (“Franklin Distributors” or the “Distributor”), the fund’s distributor. More information about these and other discounts is available from your Service Agent, in the fund’s Prospectus on page 31 under the heading “Additional information about each share class,” in the appendix titled “Appendix: Waivers and Discounts Available from Certain Service Agents” on page A-1 of the fund’s Prospectus and in the fund’s Statement of Additional Information (“SAI”) on page 99 under the heading “Sales Charge Waivers and Reductions for Class A Shares.” “Service Agents” include banks, brokers, dealers, insurance companies, investment advisers, financial consultants or advisers, mutual fund supermarkets and other financial intermediaries that have entered into an agreement with the Distributor to sell shares of the fund. 
If you purchase Class I shares or Class IS shares through a Service Agent acting solely as an agent on behalf of its customers, that Service Agent may charge you a commission. Such commissions, if any, are not charged by the fund and are not reflected in the fee table or expense example below. 
 
Shareholder fees
(fees paid directly from your investment)                         
      Class A   Class C    Class C1    Class FI    Class R    Class I    Class IS
Maximum sales charge (load) imposed on purchases (as a % of offering price)    3.751,2   None    None    None    None    None    None
Maximum deferred sales charge (load) (as a % of the lower of net asset value at purchase or redemption)3    None4   1.00    1.00    None    None    None    None
Small account fee5    $15   $15    $15    None    None    None    None
                   
Annual fund operating expenses (%)                         
(expenses that you pay each year as a percentage of the value of your investment)          
      Class A   Class C    Class C1    Class FI    Class R    Class I    Class IS
Management fees    0.50   0.50    0.50    0.50    0.50    0.50    0.50
Distribution and/or service (12b-1) fees    0.25   1.00    0.70    0.25    0.50    None    None
Other expenses    0.25   0.17    0.33    0.25    0.26    0.17    0.06
Total annual fund operating expenses    1.00   1.67    1.53    1.00    1.26    0.67    0.56
Fees waived and/or expenses reimbursed6         (0.08)       (0.01)      
Total annual fund operating expenses after waiving fees and/or reimbursing expenses    1.00   1.67    1.45    1.00    1.25    0.67    0.56
 
1 
The sales charge is waived for shareholders purchasing Class A shares through accounts where Franklin Distributors is the broker-dealer of record (“Distributor Accounts”).
2 
Shareholders purchasing Class A shares through certain Service Agents or in certain types of accounts may be eligible for a waiver of the sales charge. For additional information, see “Additional information about each share class — Sales charges” in the Prospectus.
3 
Maximum deferred sales charge (load) may be reduced over time.
4 
You may buy Class A shares in amounts of $500,000 or more at net asset value (without an initial sales charge), but if you redeem those shares within 18 months of their purchase, you will pay a contingent deferred sales charge of 1.00%.
 
2     BrandywineGLOBAL— Global Opportunities Bond Fund

5 
If the value of your account is below $1,000 ($250 for retirement plans that are not employer-sponsored), the fund may charge you a fee of $3.75 per account that is determined and assessed quarterly by the fund or your Service Agent (with an annual maximum of $15.00 per account). Please contact your Service Agent or the fund for more information.
6 
The manager has agreed to waive fees and/or reimburse operating expenses (other than interest, brokerage commissions, dividend expense on short sales, taxes, extraordinary expenses and acquired fund fees and expenses) so that the ratio of total annual fund operating expenses will not exceed 1.00% for Class A shares, 1.75% for Class C shares, 1.45% for Class C1 shares, 1.00% for Class FI shares, 1.25% for Class R shares, 0.75% for Class I shares and 0.65% for Class IS shares, subject to recapture as described below. In addition, the ratio of total annual fund operating expenses for Class IS shares will not exceed the ratio of total annual fund operating expenses for Class I shares, subject to recapture as described below. These arrangements cannot be terminated prior to December 31, 2024 without the Board of Trustees’ consent. The manager is permitted to recapture amounts waived and/or reimbursed to a class within three years after the fiscal year in which the manager earned the fee or incurred the expense if the class’ total annual fund operating expenses have fallen to a level below the limits described above. In no case will the manager recapture any amount that would result, on any particular business day of the fund, in the class’ total annual fund operating expenses exceeding the applicable limits described above or any other lower limit then in effect. In addition, the manager has agreed to waive the fund’s management fee to an extent sufficient to offset the net management fee payable in connection with any investment in an affiliated money market fund. This management fee waiver is not subject to the recapture provision discussed above.
Example
This example is intended to help you compare the cost of investing in the fund with the cost of investing in other mutual funds. The example assumes:
 
 
You invest $10,000 in the fund for the time periods indicated
 
 
Your investment has a 5% return each year and the fund’s operating expenses remain the same (except that any applicable fee waiver or expense reimbursement is reflected only through its expiration date)
 
 
You reinvest all distributions and dividends without a sales charge
Although your actual costs may be higher or lower, based on these assumptions your costs would be:
 
Number of years you own your shares ($)                            
       1 year      3 years      5 years      10 years
Class A (with or without redemption at end of period)      473      681      906      1,552
Class C (with redemption at end of period)      270      526      907      1,799
Class C (without redemption at end of period)      170      526      907      1,799
Class C1 (with redemption at end of period)      248      476      828      1,675
Class C1 (without redemption at end of period)      148      476      828      1,675
Class FI (with or without redemption at end of period)      102      318      552      1,224
Class R (with or without redemption at end of period)      127      398      690      1,521
Class I (with or without redemption at end of period)      68      214      373      834
Class IS (with or without redemption at end of period)      57      179      312      701
Portfolio turnover. The fund pays transaction costs, such as commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or “turns over” its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover rate may indicate higher transaction costs and may result in higher taxes when shares are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are not reflected in annual fund operating expenses or in the example, affect the fund’s performance. During the most recent fiscal year, the fund’s portfolio turnover rate was 90% of the average value of its portfolio.
Principal investment strategies
Under normal market conditions, the fund will invest at least 80% of its net assets in fixed income securities of issuers located in developed market countries. Any country that, at the time of purchase, has a sovereign debt rating of A- or better from at least one nationally recognized statistical ratings organization (“NRSRO”) or is included in the FTSE World Government Bond Index will be considered a developed country. The fund will invest in both investment grade and below investment grade fixed income securities, and intends to invest less than 35% of its net assets in below investment grade fixed income securities (commonly known as “high yield debt” or “junk bonds”). The portfolio managers intend to maintain an average weighted portfolio quality of A- or better, whether composed of rated securities or unrated securities deemed by the portfolio managers to be of comparable quality. The fund’s investments may include securities of sovereign governments and supranational organizations. The fund may invest up to 25% of its net assets in convertible debt securities.
The fund may invest in currency forwards in order to hedge its currency exposure in bond positions or to gain currency exposure. In addition, the fund may invest in bond futures, interest rate futures, swaps (including interest rate and total return swaps), credit default swaps (including buying and selling credit default swaps), and options. The fund may use derivatives to enhance total return, to hedge against fluctuations in securities prices, interest rates or currency exchange rates, to change the effective duration of its portfolio, to manage certain investment risks and/or as a substitute for the purchase or sale of securities or currencies. These investments may be significant at times. Although the portfolio managers have the flexibility to use these instruments for hedging purposes, they may choose not to for a variety of reasons, even under very volatile market conditions. Derivative instruments are taken into account when determining compliance with the fund’s 80% investment policy.
  
BrandywineGLOBAL— Global Opportunities Bond Fund       3   

The fund will normally hold a portfolio of fixed income securities of issuers located in a minimum of six countries. 
Although the fund invests primarily in issuers in developed market countries as defined above, the fund may also invest in issuers in emerging market countries, and some of the countries that the fund considers to be developed may still have certain economic or other characteristics that are considered developing and are similar to emerging market countries. 
The fund may invest in securities of any maturity. The weighted average effective duration of the fund’s portfolio, including derivatives, is expected to range from 1 to 10 years but for individual markets may be greater or lesser depending on the portfolio managers’ view of the prospects for lower interest rates and the potential for capital gains. 
The fund is classified as “non-diversified,” which means it may invest a larger percentage of its assets in a smaller number of issuers than a diversified fund. 
Principal risks
Risk is inherent in all investing. The value of your investment in the fund, as well as the amount of return you receive on your investment, may fluctuate significantly. You may lose part or all of your investment in the fund or your investment may not perform as well as other similar investments. An investment in the fund is not insured or guaranteed by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation or by any bank or government agency. The following is a summary description of certain risks of investing in the fund. 
Market and interest rate risk. The market prices of the fund’s securities may go up or down, sometimes rapidly or unpredictably, due to general market conditions, such as real or perceived adverse economic or political conditions, tariffs and trade disruptions, inflation, substantial economic downturn or recession, changes in interest rates, lack of liquidity in the bond markets or adverse investor sentiment. If the market prices of the fund’s securities fall, the value of your investment will decline. The value of your investment will generally go down when interest rates rise. A rise in rates tends to have a greater impact on the prices of longer term or duration securities. A general rise in interest rates may cause investors to move out of fixed income securities on a large scale, which could adversely affect the price and liquidity of fixed income securities and could also result in increased redemptions from the fund. Recently, there have been inflationary price movements. As such, fixed income securities markets may experience heightened levels of interest rate volatility and liquidity risk. Recently, the U.S. Federal Reserve has been raising interest rates from historically low levels. It may continue to raise interest rates. Any additional interest rate increases in the future could cause the value of the fund’s holdings to decrease.  
The maturity of a security may be significantly longer than its duration. A security’s maturity and other features may be more relevant than its duration in determining the security’s sensitivity to other factors affecting the issuer or markets generally such as changes in credit quality or in the yield premium that the market may establish for certain types of securities. 
Market events risk. The market values of securities or other assets will fluctuate, sometimes sharply and unpredictably, due to changes in general market conditions, overall economic trends or events, governmental actions or intervention, actions taken by the U.S. Federal Reserve or foreign central banks, market disruptions caused by trade disputes or other factors, political developments, armed conflicts, economic sanctions and countermeasures in response to sanctions, major cybersecurity events, investor sentiment, the global and domestic effects of a pandemic, and other factors that may or may not be related to the issuer of the security or other asset. Economies and financial markets throughout the world are increasingly interconnected. Economic, financial or political events, trading and tariff arrangements, public health events, terrorism, wars, natural disasters and other circumstances in one country or region could have profound impacts on global economies or markets. As a result, whether or not the fund invests in securities of issuers located in or with significant exposure to the countries or markets directly affected, the value and liquidity of the fund’s investments may be negatively affected. Following Russia’s invasion of Ukraine, Russian stocks lost all, or nearly all, of their market value. Other securities or markets could be similarly affected by past or future geopolitical or other events or conditions. Furthermore, events involving limited liquidity, defaults, non-performance or other adverse developments that affect one industry, such as the financial services industry, or concerns or rumors about any events of these kinds, have in the past and may in the future lead to market-wide liquidity problems, may spread to other industries, and could negatively affect the value and liquidity of the fund’s investments.  
The fallout from the COVID-19 pandemic and its subsequent variants, and the long-term impact on economies, markets, industries and individual issuers, are not known. Some sectors of the economy and individual issuers have experienced or may experience particularly large losses. Periods of extreme volatility in the financial markets; reduced liquidity of many instruments; and disruptions to supply chains, consumer demand and employee availability, may continue for some time. 
Raising the ceiling on U.S. government debt has become increasingly politicized. Any failure to increase the total amount that the U.S. government is authorized to borrow could lead to a default on U.S. government obligations, with unpredictable consequences for economies and markets in the U.S. and elsewhere. Recently, inflation and interest rates have increased and may rise further. These circumstances could adversely affect the value and liquidity of the fund’s investments, impair the fund’s ability to satisfy redemption requests, and negatively impact the fund’s performance. 
The United States and other countries are periodically involved in disputes over trade and other matters, which may result in tariffs, investment restrictions and adverse impacts on affected companies and securities. For example, the United States has imposed tariffs and other trade barriers on Chinese exports, has restricted sales of certain categories of goods to China, and has established barriers to investments in China. Trade disputes may adversely affect the economies of the United States and its trading partners, as well as companies directly or indirectly affected and financial markets generally. In addition, the Chinese government is involved in a longstanding dispute with Taiwan that has included threats of invasion. If the 
 
4     BrandywineGLOBAL— Global Opportunities Bond Fund

political climate between the United States and China does not improve or continues to deteriorate, if China were to attempt unification of Taiwan by force, or if other geopolitical conflicts develop or get worse, economies, markets and individual securities may be severely affected both regionally and globally, and the value of the fund’s assets may go down. 
LIBOR risk. The fund’s investments, payment obligations, and financing terms may be based on floating rates, such as the London Interbank Offered Rate, or “LIBOR,” which is the offered rate for short-term Eurodollar deposits between major international banks. In 2017, the U.K. Financial Conduct Authority (“FCA”) announced its intention to cease compelling banks to provide the quotations needed to sustain LIBOR after 2021. ICE Benchmark Administration, the administrator of LIBOR, ceased publication of most LIBOR settings on a representative basis at the end of 2021 and is expected to cease publication of the remaining U.S. dollar LIBOR settings on a representative basis after June 30, 2023. In addition, global regulators have announced that, with limited exceptions, no new LIBOR-based contracts should be entered into after 2021. Actions by regulators have resulted in the establishment of alternative reference rates to LIBOR in most major currencies. In March 2022, the U.S. federal government enacted legislation to establish a process for replacing LIBOR in certain existing contracts that do not already provide for the use of a clearly defined or practicable replacement benchmark rate as described in the legislation. Generally speaking, for contracts that do not contain a fallback provision as described in the legislation, a benchmark replacement recommended by the Federal Reserve Board will effectively automatically replace the USD LIBOR benchmark in the contract after June 30, 2023. The recommended benchmark replacement will be based on the Secured Overnight Financing Rate (SOFR) published by the Federal Reserve Bank of New York, including certain spread adjustments and benchmark replacement conforming changes. Various financial industry groups have been planning for the transition away from LIBOR, but there remains uncertainty regarding the impact of the transition from LIBOR on the fund’s transactions and the financial markets generally. The transition away from LIBOR may lead to increased volatility and illiquidity in markets that rely on LIBOR and may adversely affect the fund’s performance. The transition may also result in a reduction in the value of certain LIBOR-based investments held by the fund or reduce the effectiveness of related transactions such as hedges. Any such effects of the transition away from LIBOR, as well as other unforeseen effects, could result in losses for the fund. Since the usefulness of LIBOR as a benchmark could also deteriorate during the transition period, effects could occur at any time.  
Credit risk. If an issuer or guarantor of a security held by the fund or a counterparty to a financial contract with the fund defaults or its credit is downgraded, or is perceived to be less creditworthy, or if the value of the assets underlying a security declines, the value of your investment will typically decline. Changes in actual or perceived creditworthiness may occur quickly. The fund could be delayed or hindered in its enforcement of rights against an issuer, guarantor or counterparty. Subordinated securities (meaning securities that rank below other securities with respect to claims on the issuer’s assets) are more likely to suffer a credit loss than non-subordinated securities of the same issuer and will be disproportionately affected by a default, downgrade or perceived decline in creditworthiness.  
High yield (“junk”) bonds risk. High yield bonds are generally subject to greater credit risks than higher-grade bonds, including the risk of default on the payment of interest or principal. High yield bonds are considered speculative, typically have lower liquidity and are more difficult to value than higher grade bonds. High yield bonds tend to be volatile and more susceptible to adverse events, credit downgrades and negative sentiments and may be difficult to sell at a desired price, or at all, during periods of uncertainty or market turmoil.  
Prepayment or call risk. Many issuers have a right to prepay their fixed income securities. Issuers may be more likely to prepay their securities if interest rates fall. If this happens, the fund may not benefit from the rise in the market price of the securities that normally accompanies a decline in interest rates, and will be forced to reinvest prepayment proceeds at a time when yields on securities available in the market are lower than the yield on prepaid securities. The fund may also lose any premium it paid to purchase the securities.  
Issuer risk. The market price of a security can go up or down more than the market as a whole and can perform differently from the value of the market as a whole, due to factors specifically relating to the security’s issuer, such as disappointing earnings reports by the issuer, unsuccessful products or services, loss of major customers, changes in management, corporate actions, negative perception in the marketplace, or major litigation or changes in government regulations affecting the issuer or the competitive environment. An individual security may also be affected by factors relating to the industry or sector of the issuer. The fund may experience a substantial or complete loss on an individual security. A change in financial condition or other event affecting a single issuer may adversely impact the industry or sector of the issuer or securities markets as a whole.  
Non-diversification risk. The fund is classified as “non-diversified,” which means it may invest a larger percentage of its assets in a smaller number of issuers than a diversified fund. To the extent the fund invests its assets in a smaller number of issuers, the fund will be more susceptible to negative events affecting those issuers than a diversified fund.  
Foreign investments and emerging markets risk. The fund’s investments in securities of foreign issuers or issuers with significant exposure to foreign markets involve additional risk as compared to investments in U.S. securities or issuers with predominantly domestic exposure, such as less liquid, less transparent, less regulated and more volatile markets. The value of the fund’s investments may decline because of factors affecting the particular issuer as well as foreign markets and issuers generally, such as unfavorable or unsuccessful government actions, reduction of government or central bank support, inadequate accounting standards and auditing and financial recordkeeping requirements, lack of information, political, economic, financial or social instability, terrorism, armed conflicts and other geopolitical events, and the impact of tariffs and other restrictions on trade or economic sanctions. Geopolitical or other events such as nationalization or expropriation could even cause the loss of the fund’s entire investment in one or more countries.  
In addition, there may be significant obstacles to obtaining information necessary for investigations into or litigation against issuers located in or operating in certain foreign markets, particularly emerging market countries, and shareholders may have limited legal remedies. To the extent the 
 
BrandywineGLOBAL— Global Opportunities Bond Fund       5   

fund focuses its investments in a single country or only a few countries in a particular geographic region, economic, political, regulatory or other conditions affecting such country or region may have a greater impact on fund performance relative to a more geographically diversified fund. 
The value of investments in foreign currencies or securities denominated in foreign currencies increases or decreases as the rates of exchange between those currencies and the U.S. dollar change. Currency conversion costs and currency fluctuations could erase investment gains or add to investment losses. Currency exchange rates can be volatile, and are affected by factors such as general economic and political conditions, the actions of the U.S. and foreign governments or central banks, the imposition of currency controls and speculation. The fund may be unable or may choose not to hedge its foreign currency exposure. 
Less developed markets are more likely to experience problems with the clearing and settling of trades and the holding of securities by local banks, agents and depositories. Settlement of trades in these markets can take longer than in other markets and the fund may not receive its proceeds from the sale of certain securities for an extended period (possibly several weeks or even longer). 
The risks of foreign investments are heightened when investing in issuers in emerging market countries. Emerging market countries tend to have economic, political and legal systems that are less developed and are less stable than those of more developed countries. Their economies tend to be less diversified than those of more developed countries. They typically have fewer medical and economic resources than more developed countries, and thus they may be less able to control or mitigate the effects of a pandemic or a natural disaster. They are often particularly sensitive to market movements because their market prices tend to reflect speculative expectations. Low trading volumes may result in a lack of liquidity and in extreme price volatility. 
Sovereign debt risk. Sovereign government and supranational debt involve many of the risks of foreign and emerging markets investments as well as the risk of debt moratorium, repudiation or renegotiation, and the fund may be unable to enforce its rights against the issuers. Sovereign debt risk is increased for emerging market issuers.  
Portfolio management risk. The value of your investment may decrease if the subadviser’s judgment about the quality, relative yield, value or market trends affecting a particular security, industry, sector or region, or about interest rates or other market factors, is incorrect or does not produce the desired results, or if there are imperfections, errors or limitations in the models, tools and data used by the subadviser. In addition, the fund’s investment strategies or policies may change from time to time. Those changes may not lead to the results intended by the subadviser and could have an adverse effect on the value or performance of the fund.  
Convertible securities risk. Convertible securities are subject to stock market and other risks associated with equity securities, as well as the credit, interest rate and other risks associated with fixed income securities. Credit risk is the risk that the issuer or obligor will not make timely payments of principal or interest or that its credit may be downgraded or perceived to be less creditworthy. Interest rate risk is the risk that the value of a fixed income security will fall when interest rates rise. A rise in rates tends to have a greater impact on the prices of longer term or duration securities. A general rise in interest rates may cause investors to move out of fixed income securities on a large scale, which could adversely affect the price and liquidity of fixed income securities. As the market price of the equity security underlying a convertible security falls, the convertible security tends to trade on the basis of its yield and other fixed income characteristics. As the market price of the equity security underlying a convertible security rises, the convertible security tends to trade on the basis of its equity conversion features.  
Model risk. The subadviser’s investment models may not adequately take into account certain factors and may result in the fund having a lower return than if the fund were managed using another model or investment strategy. When a model or data used in managing the fund contains an error, or is incorrect or incomplete, any investment decision made in reliance on the model or data may not produce the desired results and the fund may realize losses.  
Industry or sector focus risk. The fund may be susceptible to an increased risk of loss, including losses due to events that adversely affect the fund’s investments more than the market as a whole, to the extent that the fund may, from time to time, have greater exposure to the securities of a particular issuer or issuers within the same industry or sector.  
Portfolio turnover risk. Active and frequent trading will increase a shareholder’s tax liability and the fund’s transaction costs, which could detract from fund performance.  
Illiquidity risk. Some assets held by the fund may be or become impossible or difficult to sell and some assets that the fund wants to invest in may be impossible or difficult to purchase, particularly during times of market turmoil or due to adverse changes in the conditions of a particular issuer. These illiquid assets may also be volatile and difficult to value. Markets may become illiquid when, for instance, there are few, if any, interested buyers or sellers or when dealers are unwilling or unable to make a market for certain securities. As a general matter, dealers have been less willing to make markets for fixed income securities. Federal banking regulations may also cause certain dealers to reduce their inventories of certain securities, which may further decrease the fund’s ability to buy or sell such securities. During times of market turmoil, there have been, and may be, no buyers or sellers for securities in entire asset classes. If the fund is forced to sell an illiquid asset to meet redemption requests or other cash needs, or to try to limit losses, the fund may be forced to sell at a substantial loss or may not be able to sell at all. The fund may not receive its proceeds from the sale of certain securities for an extended period (for example, several weeks or even longer).  
Extension risk. When interest rates rise, repayments of fixed income securities may occur more slowly than anticipated, extending the effective duration of these fixed income securities at below market interest rates and causing their market prices to decline more than they would have declined due to the rise in interest rates alone. This may cause the fund’s share price to be more volatile.  
 
6     BrandywineGLOBAL— Global Opportunities Bond Fund

Derivatives risk. Using derivatives can increase fund losses and reduce opportunities for gains, such as when market prices, interest rates, currencies, or the derivatives themselves behave in a way not anticipated by the fund’s subadviser. Using derivatives also can have a leveraging effect and increase fund volatility. Certain derivatives have the potential for unlimited loss, regardless of the size of the initial investment. Derivatives may not be available at the time or price desired, may be difficult to sell, unwind or value, and the counterparty may default on its obligations to the fund. Derivatives are generally subject to the risks applicable to the assets, rates, indices or other indicators underlying the derivative. The value of a derivative may fluctuate more than the underlying assets, rates, indices or other indicators to which it relates. Use of derivatives may have different tax consequences for the fund than an investment in the underlying asset, and those differences may affect the amount, timing and character of income distributed to shareholders. The U.S. government and foreign governments have adopted and implemented or are in the process of adopting and implementing regulations governing derivatives markets, including mandatory clearing of certain derivatives, margin and reporting requirements. The ultimate impact of the regulations remains unclear. Additional regulation of derivatives may make derivatives more costly, limit their availability or utility, otherwise adversely affect their performance or disrupt markets.  
Credit default swap contracts involve heightened risks and may result in losses to the fund. Credit default swaps may be illiquid and difficult to value. When the fund sells credit protection via a credit default swap, credit risk increases since the fund has exposure to both the issuer whose credit is the subject of the swap and the counterparty to the swap. 
Currency derivatives risk. Currency futures, forwards or options may not always work as intended, and in specific cases the fund may be worse off than if it had not used such instrument(s). There may not always be suitable hedging instruments available. Even where suitable hedging instruments are available, the portfolio managers may determine not to hedge the fund’s currency risks.  
Leverage risk. The value of your investment may be more volatile if the fund borrows or uses instruments, such as derivatives, that have a leveraging effect on the fund’s portfolio. Other risks described in the Prospectus also will be compounded because leverage generally magnifies the effect of a change in the value of an asset and creates a risk of loss of value on a larger pool of assets than the fund would otherwise have had. The fund may also have to sell assets at inopportune times to satisfy its obligations created by the use of leverage or derivatives. The use of leverage is considered to be a speculative investment practice and may result in the loss of a substantial amount, and possibly all, of the fund’s assets. In addition, the fund’s portfolio will be leveraged if it exercises its right to delay payment on a redemption, and losses will result if the value of the fund’s assets declines between the time a redemption request is deemed to be received by the fund and the time the fund liquidates assets to meet redemption requests.  
Hedging risk. There can be no assurance that the fund will engage in hedging transactions at any given time, even under volatile market conditions, or that any hedging transactions the fund engages in will be successful. Hedging transactions involve costs and may reduce gains or result in losses.  
Valuation risk. The sales price the fund could receive for any particular portfolio investment may differ from the fund’s valuation of the investment, particularly for securities that trade in thin or volatile markets or that are valued using a fair value methodology. These differences may increase significantly and affect fund investments more broadly during periods of market volatility. Investors who purchase or redeem fund shares on days when the fund is holding fair-valued securities may receive fewer or more shares or lower or higher redemption proceeds than they would have received if the fund had not fair-valued securities or had used a different valuation methodology. The fund’s ability to value its investments may be impacted by technological issues and/or errors by pricing services or other third party service providers. The valuation of the fund’s investments involves subjective judgment, which may prove to be incorrect.  
Redemption risk. The fund may experience heavy redemptions that could cause the fund to liquidate its assets at inopportune times or unfavorable prices or increase or accelerate taxable gains or transaction costs and may negatively affect the fund’s net asset value, performance, or ability to satisfy redemptions in a timely manner, which could cause the value of your investment to decline.  
Cybersecurity risk. Cybersecurity incidents, whether intentionally caused by third parties or otherwise, may allow an unauthorized party to gain access to fund assets, fund or customer data (including private shareholder information) or proprietary information, cause the fund, the manager, the subadviser and/or their service providers (including, but not limited to, fund accountants, custodians, sub-custodians, transfer agents and financial intermediaries) to suffer data breaches, data corruption or loss of operational functionality, or prevent fund investors from purchasing, redeeming or exchanging shares, receiving distributions or receiving timely information regarding the fund or their investment in the fund. The fund, the manager, and the subadviser have limited ability to prevent or mitigate cybersecurity incidents affecting third party service providers, and such third party service providers may have limited indemnification obligations to the fund, the manager, and/or the subadviser. Cybersecurity incidents may result in financial losses to the fund and its shareholders, and substantial costs may be incurred in order to prevent or mitigate any future cybersecurity incidents. Issuers of securities in which the fund invests are also subject to cybersecurity risks, and the value of these securities could decline if the issuers experience cybersecurity incidents.  
Because technology is frequently changing, new ways to carry out cyber attacks are always developing. Therefore, there is a chance that some risks have not been identified or prepared for, or that an attack may not be detected, which puts limitations on the fund’s ability to plan for or respond to a cyber attack. Like other funds and business enterprises, the fund, the manager, the subadviser and their service providers are subject to the risk of cyber incidents occurring from time to time. 
These and other risks are discussed in more detail in the Prospectus or in the Statement of Additional Information. 
 
BrandywineGLOBAL— Global Opportunities Bond Fund       7   

Performance
The accompanying bar chart and table provide some indication of the risks of investing in the fund. The bar chart shows changes in the fund’s performance from year to year for Class IS shares. The table shows the average annual total returns of each class of the fund that has been in operation for at least one full calendar year and also compares the fund’s performance with the average annual total returns of an index or other benchmark. Performance for classes other than those shown may vary from the performance shown to the extent the expenses for those classes differ. The fund makes updated performance information, including its current net asset value, available at www.franklintempleton.com/mutualfunds (select fund and share class), or by calling the fund at 877-6LM-FUND/656-3863.
The fund’s past performance (before and after taxes) is not necessarily an indication of how the fund will perform in the future.
Sales charges are not reflected in the accompanying bar chart, and if those charges were included, returns would be less than those shown.
 
LOGO  
Best Quarter (06/30/2020): 10.63    Worst Quarter (06/30/2022): (11.33
 
Average annual total returns (%)                     
(for periods ended December 31, 2022)         
Class IS    1 year      5 years        10 years  
Return before taxes    (15.67)      (1.34)        0.34  
Return after taxes on distributions    (17.86)      (2.43)        (0.87)  
Return after taxes on distributions and sale of fund shares    (9.28)      (1.43)        (0.19)  
Other Classes (Return before taxes only)           
Class A    (19.59)      (2.59)        (0.48)  
Class C    (17.39)      (2.44)        (0.78)  
Class C1    (17.15)      (1.63)        (0.21)  
Class FI    (16.05)      (1.73)        (0.06)  
Class R    (16.19)      (2.01)        (0.33)  
Class I    (15.80)      (1.45)        0.23  
FTSE World Government Bond Index (unhedged) (reflects no deduction for fees, expenses or taxes)    (18.26)      (2.54)        (1.22)  
The after-tax returns are shown only for Class IS shares, are calculated using the historical highest individual federal marginal income tax rates and do not reflect the impact of state and local taxes. Actual after-tax returns depend on an investor’s tax situation and may differ from those shown, and the after-tax returns shown are not relevant to investors who hold their fund shares through tax-deferred arrangements, such as 401(k) plans or individual retirement accounts. After-tax returns for classes other than Class IS will vary from returns shown for Class IS. Returns after taxes on distributions and sale of fund shares are higher than returns before taxes for certain periods shown because they reflect the tax benefit of capital losses realized on the redemption of fund shares.
 
8     BrandywineGLOBAL— Global Opportunities Bond Fund

Management
Investment manager: Legg Mason Partners Fund Advisor, LLC (“LMPFA”)
Subadviser: Brandywine Global Investment Management, LLC (“Brandywine Global”)
Portfolio managers: Primary responsibility for the day-to-day management of the fund lies with the following portfolio managers.
 
Portfolio manager    Title    Portfolio manager of the fund since
 
Tracy Chen, CFA, CAIA
   Portfolio Manager    2020
 
David F. Hoffman, CFA
   Portfolio Manager    2006
 
Brian L. Kloss, JD, CPA
   Portfolio Manager    2020
 
John P. McIntyre, CFA
   Portfolio Manager    2012
 
Anujeet Sareen, CFA
   Portfolio Manager    2017
Purchase and sale of fund shares
You may purchase, redeem or exchange shares of the fund each day the New York Stock Exchange is open, at the fund’s net asset value determined after receipt of your request in good order, subject to any applicable sales charge.
The fund’s initial and subsequent investment minimums generally are set forth in the accompanying table:
 
Investment minimum initial/additional investment ($)     
      Class A      Class C1      Class C12      Class FI3      Class R      Class I    Class IS
General    1,000/50      1,000/50      1,000/50      N/A      N/A      1 million/None4    N/A
Uniform Gifts or Transfers to Minor Accounts    1,000/50      1,000/50      1,000/50      N/A      N/A      1 million/None4    N/A
IRAs    250/50      250/50      250/50      N/A      N/A      1 million/None4,5    N/A5
SIMPLE IRAs    None/None      None/None      None/None      N/A      N/A      1 million/None4    N/A
Systematic Investment Plans    25/25      25/25      25/25      N/A      N/A      1 million/None4,6    N/A6
Clients of Eligible Financial Intermediaries    None/None      N/A      N/A      None/None      None/None      None/None7    None/None7
Eligible Investment Programs    None/None      N/A      N/A      None/None      None/None      None/None    None/None
Omnibus Retirement Plans    None/None      None/None      N/A      None/None      None/None      None/None    None/None
Individual Retirement Plans except as noted    None/None      None/None      N/A      N/A      N/A      1 million/None4    N/A
Institutional Investors    1,000/50      1,000/50      1,000/50      N/A      N/A      1 million/None    1 million/None
 
1 
Initial investments in Class C shares may be combined with existing investment amounts in Class C1 shares for the purposes of satisfying the initial investment minimums of Class C shares. Class C shares are not available for purchase through Distributor Accounts.
2 
Class C1 shares are not available for purchase by new or existing investors (except for certain retirement plan programs authorized by the Distributor prior to August 1, 2012). Class C1 shares will continue to be available for dividend reinvestment and incoming exchanges.
3 
Class FI shares are not available for purchase through Distributor Accounts.
4 
Available to investors investing directly with the fund.
5 
IRA accountholders who purchase Class I or Class IS shares through a Service Agent acting as agent on behalf of its customers are subject to the initial and subsequent minimums of $250/$50. If a Service Agent does not have this arrangement in place with the Distributor, the initial and subsequent minimums listed in the table apply. Please contact your Service Agent for more information.
6 
Investors investing through a Systematic Investment Plan who purchase Class I or Class IS shares through a Service Agent acting as agent on behalf of its customers are subject to the initial and subsequent minimums of $25/$25. If a Service Agent does not have this arrangement in place with the Distributor, the initial and subsequent minimums listed in the table apply. Please contact your Service Agent for more information.
7 
Individual investors who purchase Class I shares or Class IS shares through a Service Agent acting as agent on behalf of its customers are subject to the initial and subsequent minimums of $1,000/$50. If a Service Agent does not have this arrangement in place with the Distributor, the initial and subsequent minimums listed in the table apply. Please contact your Service Agent for more information.
 
BrandywineGLOBAL— Global Opportunities Bond Fund       9  

Your Service Agent may impose higher or lower investment minimums, or may impose no minimum investment requirement.
For more information about how to purchase, redeem or exchange shares, and to learn which classes of shares are available to you, you should contact your Service Agent, or, if you hold your shares or plan to purchase shares through the fund, you should contact the fund by phone at 877-6LM-FUND/656-3863, by regular mail at Legg Mason Funds, P.O. Box 33030, St. Petersburg, FL 33733-8030 or by express, certified or registered mail at Legg Mason Funds, 100 Fountain Parkway, St. Petersburg, FL 33716-1205.
Tax information
The fund’s distributions are generally taxable as ordinary income or capital gains.
Payments to broker/dealers and other financial intermediaries
The fund’s related companies pay Service Agents for the sale of fund shares, shareholder services and other purposes. These payments create a conflict of interest by influencing your Service Agent or its employees or associated persons to recommend the fund over another investment. Ask your financial adviser or salesperson or visit your Service Agent’s or salesperson’s website for more information.
 
10     BrandywineGLOBAL— Global Opportunities Bond Fund

More on the fund’s investment strategies, investments and risks
Important information
The fund’s investment objective is to maximize total return consisting of income and capital appreciation.
Under normal market conditions, the fund will invest at least 80% of its net assets in fixed income securities of issuers located in developed market countries.
Any country that, at the time of purchase, has a sovereign debt rating of A- or better from at least one nationally recognized statistical ratings organization (“NRSRO”) or is included in the FTSE World Government Bond Index will be considered a developed country.
An issuer is considered by the portfolio managers to be located in a developed country if such issuer meets one or more of the following criteria:
 
 
Has a class of its securities listed in a developed country;
 
Is organized (i.e., is incorporated or otherwise formed) under the laws of, or has a principal office (i.e., is headquartered) in, a developed country;
 
Derives 50% or more of its total revenue from goods produced, sales made or services provided in one or more developed countries; or
 
Maintains 50% or more of its assets in one or more developed countries.
Although the fund invests primarily in issuers in developed market countries as defined above, the fund may also invest in emerging market countries, and some of the countries that the fund considers to be developed may still have certain economic or other characteristics that are considered developing and are similar to emerging market countries.
The fund’s investment objective may be changed by the Board of Trustees (the “Board”) without shareholder approval and on notice to shareholders.
There is no assurance that the fund will meet its investment objective.
The fund is classified as “non-diversified,” which means it may invest a larger percentage of its assets in a smaller number of issuers than a diversified fund.
The fund’s 80% investment policy may be changed by the Board without shareholder approval upon 60 days’ prior notice to shareholders. For purposes of this 80% policy, net assets include borrowings for investment purposes, if any.
The fund’s other investment strategies and policies may be changed from time to time without shareholder approval, unless specifically stated otherwise in this Prospectus or in the statement of additional information (“SAI”).
Maturity and duration
The fund may invest in securities of any maturity. The maturity of a fixed income security is a measure of the time remaining until the final payment on the security is due. The weighted average effective duration of the fund’s portfolio, including derivatives, however, is expected to range from 1 to 10 years. The fund’s investments may be of any duration.
Effective duration seeks to measure the expected sensitivity of market price to changes in interest rates, taking into account the anticipated effects of particular features of a security (for example, some bonds can be prepaid by the issuer). The assumptions that are made about a security’s features and options when calculating effective duration may prove to be incorrect. As a result, investors should be aware that effective duration is not an exact measurement and may not reliably predict a security’s price sensitivity to changes in yield or interest rates.
Generally, the longer a fund’s effective duration, the more sensitive it will be to changes in interest rates. For example, if interest rates rise by 1%, a fund with a two-year effective duration would expect the value of its portfolio to decrease by 2% and a fund with a ten-year effective duration would expect the value of its portfolio to decrease by 10%, all other factors being equal.
The maturity of a security may be significantly longer than its effective duration. A security’s maturity may be more relevant than its effective duration in determining the security’s sensitivity to other factors such as changes in credit quality or in the difference in yield between U.S. Treasuries and certain other types of securities.
Fixed income securities
Fixed income securities represent obligations of corporations, governments and other entities to repay money borrowed, usually at the maturity of the security. These securities may pay fixed, variable or floating rates of interest. However, some fixed income securities, such as zero coupon bonds, do not pay current interest but are issued at a discount from their face values. Other debt instruments, such as certain mortgage-backed and other asset-backed securities, make periodic payments of interest and/or principal. Some debt instruments are partially or fully secured by collateral supporting the payment of interest and principal. “Fixed income securities” are commonly referred to as “fixed income instruments,” “fixed income obligations,” “notes,” “loans,” “debt,” “debt obligations,” “debt instruments,” “debt securities,” “corporate debt,” “bonds” and “corporate bonds.” Fixed income securities also include certain hybrid securities, such as preferred stock. When these terms are used in this Prospectus, they are not intended to be limiting.
Fixed income securities in which the fund may invest are high yield debt (often called “junk bonds”); debt securities issued or guaranteed by national governments, their agencies or instrumentalities and political sub-divisions (including inflation index linked securities and municipal bonds); debt
 
BrandywineGLOBAL— Global Opportunities Bond Fund       11  

securities of supranational organizations such as bonds, debentures and freely transferable promissory notes; corporate debt securities, including debentures, bonds (including zero coupon bonds), convertible and non-convertible notes, commercial paper, certificates of deposits, freely transferable promissory notes and bankers acceptances issued by industrial, utility, finance, commercial banking or bank holding company organizations; mortgage-backed securities (including collateralized debt obligations); asset-backed securities; and emerging markets debt.
Credit quality
The fund may hold debt securities of any credit quality, whether rated or unrated. As a general guideline, the fund intends to maintain an average weighted portfolio quality of A- or better, whether composed of rated securities or unrated securities deemed by the subadviser to be of comparable quality. The fund will invest in both investment grade and below investment grade securities and currencies of developed and emerging market countries. Fixed income securities rated below investment grade are commonly known as “junk bonds.” Investment grade securities are securities rated at the time of purchase by at least one NRSRO within one of the top four categories (without regard to +/- designations), or, if unrated, judged by the subadviser to be of comparable credit quality.
Derivatives
The fund may engage in a variety of transactions using derivatives, such as futures, options, forward foreign currency transactions and swaps (including buying and selling credit default swaps). Derivatives are financial instruments whose value depends upon, or is derived from, the value of something else, such as one or more underlying investments, indexes or currencies. Derivatives may be used by the fund for any of the following purposes:
 
 
As a hedging technique in an attempt to manage risk in the fund’s portfolio
 
As a substitute for buying or selling securities
 
As a means of changing investment characteristics of the fund’s portfolio
 
As a cash flow management technique
 
As a means of attempting to enhance returns
 
As a means of providing additional exposure to types of investments or market factors
The fund from time to time may sell protection on debt securities by entering into credit default swaps. In these transactions, the fund is generally required to pay the par (or other agreed-upon) value of a referenced debt security to the counterparty in the event of a default on or downgrade of the debt security and/or a similar credit event. In return, the fund receives from the counterparty a periodic stream of payments over the term of the contract. If no default occurs, the fund keeps the stream of payments and has no payment obligations. As the seller, the fund would effectively add leverage to its portfolio because, in addition to its net assets, the fund would be subject to loss on the par (or other agreed-upon) value it had undertaken to pay. Credit default swaps may also be structured based on an index or the debt of a basket of issuers, rather than a single issuer, and may be customized with respect to the default event that triggers purchase or other factors (for example, a particular number of defaults within a basket, or defaults by a particular combination of issuers within the basket, may trigger a payment obligation).
The fund may buy credit default swaps to hedge against the risk of default of debt securities held in its portfolio or for other reasons. As the buyer of a credit default swap, the fund would make the stream of payments described in the preceding paragraph to the seller of the credit default swap and would expect to receive from the seller a payment in the event of a default on the underlying debt security or other specified event.
Using derivatives, especially for non-hedging purposes, may involve greater risks to the fund than investing directly in securities, particularly as these instruments may be very complex and may not behave in the manner anticipated by the fund. Certain derivative transactions may have a leveraging effect on the fund.
Use of derivatives or similar instruments may have different tax consequences for the fund than an investment in the underlying asset, and those differences may affect the amount, timing and character of income distributed to shareholders.
Instead of, and/or in addition to, investing directly in particular securities, the fund may use derivatives and other synthetic instruments that are intended to provide economic exposure to securities, issuers or other measures of market or economic value. The fund may use one or more types of these instruments without limit, subject to applicable regulatory requirements.
Rule 18f-4 under the Investment Company Act of 1940, as amended, which became effective August 19, 2022, governs the use of derivative investments and certain financing transactions (e.g. reverse repurchase agreements) by registered investment companies. Among other things, Rule 18f-4 requires funds that invest in derivative instruments beyond a specified limited amount to apply a value-at-risk based limit to their use of certain derivative instruments and financing transactions and to adopt and implement a derivatives risk management program. A fund that uses derivative instruments in a limited amount is not subject to the full requirements of Rule 18f-4. Compliance with Rule 18f-4 by the fund could, among other things, make derivatives more costly, limit their availability or utility, or otherwise adversely affect their performance. Rule 18f-4 may limit the fund’s ability to use derivatives as part of its investment strategy.
The fund’s subadviser may choose not to make use of derivatives.
 
12     BrandywineGLOBAL— Global Opportunities Bond Fund

Corporate debt
Corporate debt securities are fixed income securities usually issued by businesses to finance their operations. Various types of business entities may issue these securities, including corporations, trusts, limited partnerships, limited liability companies and other types of non-governmental legal entities. Notes, bonds, debentures and commercial paper are the most common types of corporate debt securities, with the primary difference being their maturities and secured or unsecured status. Commercial paper has the shortest term and is usually unsecured. The broad category of corporate debt securities includes debt issued by U.S. or non-U.S. companies of all kinds, including those with small, mid and large capitalizations. Corporate debt may carry variable or floating rates of interest.
Loans
The primary risk in an investment in loans is that borrowers may be unable to meet their interest and/or principal payment obligations. Loans in which the fund invests may be made to finance highly leveraged borrowers which may make such loans especially vulnerable to adverse changes in economic or market conditions. Loans in which the fund may invest may be either collateralized or uncollateralized and senior or subordinate. Investments in uncollateralized and/or subordinate loans entail a greater risk of nonpayment than do investments in loans that hold a more senior position in the borrower’s capital structure and/or are secured with collateral. In addition, loans are generally subject to illiquidity risk. The fund may acquire an interest in loans by purchasing participations in and/or assignments of portions of loans from third parties or by investing in pools of loans, such as collateralized debt obligations as further described under “Mortgage-backed and asset-backed securities.” Transactions in loans may settle on a delayed basis. As a result, the proceeds from the sale of a loan may not be available to make additional investments or to meet the fund’s redemption obligations. Bank loans may not be considered securities and therefore, the fund may not have the protections afforded by U.S. federal securities laws with respect to such investments.
Variable and floating rate securities
Variable rate securities reset at specified intervals, while floating rate securities reset whenever there is a change in a specified index rate. In most cases, these reset provisions reduce the impact of changes in market interest rates on the value of the security. However, the value of these securities may decline if their interest rates do not rise as much, or as quickly, as other interest rates. Conversely, these securities will not generally increase in value if interest rates decline. The fund may also invest in inverse floating rate debt instruments (“inverse floaters”). Interest payments on inverse floaters vary inversely with changes in interest rates. Inverse floaters pay higher interest (and therefore generally increase in value) when interest rates decline, and vice versa. An inverse floater may exhibit greater price volatility than a fixed rate obligation of similar credit quality.
Foreign and emerging markets securities
The fund may invest without limit in both U.S. dollar and non-U.S. dollar denominated securities of foreign issuers. The value of the fund’s foreign securities may decline because of unfavorable government actions, political instability or the more limited availability of accurate information about foreign issuers, as well as factors affecting the particular issuers. The fund may invest in foreign securities issued by issuers located in emerging market countries. To the extent the fund invests in these securities, the risks associated with investment in foreign issuers will generally be more pronounced.
Sovereign debt
The fund may invest in sovereign debt, including emerging market sovereign debt. Sovereign debt securities may include:
 
 
Fixed income securities issued or guaranteed by governments, governmental agencies or instrumentalities and their political subdivisions
 
Fixed income securities issued by government-owned, controlled or sponsored entities
 
Interests issued for the purpose of restructuring the investment characteristics of instruments issued by any of the above issuers
 
Brady Bonds, which are debt securities issued under the framework of the Brady Plan as a means for debtor nations to restructure their outstanding external indebtedness
 
Participations in loans between governments and financial institutions
 
Fixed income securities issued by supranational entities such as the World Bank. A supranational entity is a bank, commission or company established or financially supported by the national governments of one or more countries to promote reconstruction or development
Sovereign government and supranational debt involve many of the risks of foreign and emerging markets investments as well as the risk of debt moratorium, repudiation or renegotiation and the fund may be unable to enforce its rights against the issuers.
Repurchase agreements
In a repurchase agreement, the fund purchases securities from a counterparty, upon the agreement of the counterparty to repurchase the securities from the fund at a later date, and at a specified price, which is typically higher than the purchase price paid by the fund. The securities purchased serve as the fund’s collateral for the obligation of the counterparty to repurchase the securities. If the counterparty does not repurchase the securities, the fund is entitled to sell the securities, but the fund may not be able to sell them for the price at which they were purchased, thus causing a loss. Additionally, if the counterparty becomes insolvent, there is some risk that the fund will not have a right to the securities, or the immediate right to sell the securities.
 
BrandywineGLOBAL— Global Opportunities Bond Fund       13  

Borrowings and reverse repurchase agreements
The fund may enter into borrowing transactions. Borrowing may make the value of an investment in the fund more volatile and increase the fund’s overall investment exposure. The fund may be required to liquidate portfolio securities at a time when it would be disadvantageous to do so in order to make payments with respect to any borrowings. Interest on any borrowings will be a fund expense and will reduce the value of the fund’s shares.
The fund may enter into reverse repurchase agreements, which have characteristics like borrowings. In a reverse repurchase agreement, the fund sells securities to a counterparty, in return for cash, and the fund agrees to repurchase the securities at a later date and for a higher price, representing the cost to the fund for the cash received.
Non-U.S. currency transactions
The fund may engage in non-U.S. currency exchange transactions in an effort to protect against uncertainty in the level of future exchange rates or to enhance returns based on expected changes in exchange rates. Non-U.S. currency exchange transactions may take the form of options, futures, options on futures, swaps, warrants, structured notes, forwards or spot (cash) transactions. The value of these non-U.S. currency transactions depends on, and will vary based on fluctuations in, the value of the underlying currency relative to the U.S. dollar.
U.S. government obligations
U.S. government obligations include U.S. Treasury obligations and other obligations of, or guaranteed by, the U.S. government, its agencies or government-sponsored entities. Although the U.S. government guarantees principal and interest payments on securities issued by the U.S. government and some of its agencies, such as securities issued by the U.S. Government National Mortgage Association (“Ginnie Mae”), this guarantee does not apply to losses resulting from declines in the market value of these securities. U.S. government obligations include zero coupon securities that make payments of interest and principal only upon maturity and which therefore tend to be subject to greater volatility than interest bearing securities with comparable maturities.
Some of the U.S. government securities that the fund may hold are not guaranteed or backed by the full faith and credit of the U.S. government, such as those issued by Fannie Mae (formally known as the Federal National Mortgage Association) and Freddie Mac (formally known as the Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation). The maximum potential liability of the issuers of some U.S. government obligations may greatly exceed their current resources, including any legal right to support from the U.S. government.
Mortgage-backed and asset-backed securities
Mortgage-backed securities may be issued by private issuers, by U.S. government-sponsored entities such as Fannie Mae or Freddie Mac or by agencies of the U.S. government, such as Ginnie Mae. Mortgage-backed securities represent direct or indirect participations in, or are collateralized by and payable from, mortgage loans secured by real property.
Unlike mortgage-backed securities issued or guaranteed by agencies of the U.S. government or government-sponsored entities, mortgage-backed securities issued by private issuers do not have a government or government-sponsored entity guarantee (but may have other credit enhancement), and may, and frequently do, have less favorable collateral, credit risk or other underwriting characteristics.
Residential mortgage-backed securities (“RMBS”) are comprised of a pool of mortgage loans created by banks and other financial institutions. Commercial mortgage-backed securities (“CMBS”) are a type of mortgage-backed security backed by commercial mortgages rather than residential real estate.
Asset-backed securities represent participations in, or are secured by and payable from, assets such as installment sales or loan contracts, leases, credit card receivables and other categories of receivables.
Collateralized mortgage obligations (“CMOs”) are debt obligations collateralized by mortgage loans or mortgage pass-through securities. CMOs are a type of mortgage-backed security. Typically, CMOs are collateralized by Ginnie Mae, Fannie Mae or Freddie Mac Certificates, but may also be collateralized by whole loans or private pass-throughs (referred to as “Mortgage Assets”). Payments of principal and of interest on the Mortgage Assets, and any reinvestment income thereon, provide the issuer with income to pay debt service on the CMOs. In a CMO, a series of bonds or certificates is issued in multiple classes. Each class of CMOs, often referred to as a “tranche,” is issued at a specified fixed or floating coupon rate and has a stated maturity or final distribution date. Principal prepayments on the Mortgage Assets may cause the CMOs to be retired substantially earlier than their stated maturities or final distribution dates. Interest is paid or accrues on all classes of the CMOs on a monthly, quarterly or semi-annual basis. The principal of and interest on the Mortgage Assets may be allocated among the several classes of a series of a CMO in innumerable ways. As market conditions change, and particularly during periods of rapid or unanticipated changes in market interest rates, the attractiveness of the CMO classes and the ability of the structure to provide the anticipated investment characteristics may be significantly reduced. Such changes can result in volatility in the market value, and in some instances reduced liquidity, of the CMO class.
Collateralized debt obligations (“CDOs”) are a type of asset-backed security. CDOs include collateralized bond obligations (“CBOs”), collateralized loan obligations (“CLOs”) and other similarly structured securities. A CBO is a trust or other special purpose entity which is typically backed by a diversified pool of fixed income securities (which may include high risk, below investment grade securities). A CLO is a trust or other special purpose entity that is typically collateralized by a pool of loans, which may also include, among others, domestic and non-U.S. senior secured loans, senior unsecured loans, and subordinated corporate loans, including loans that may be rated below investment grade or equivalent unrated loans. Like
 
14     BrandywineGLOBAL— Global Opportunities Bond Fund

CMOs, CDOs generally issue separate series or “tranches” which vary with respect to risk and yield. These tranches can experience substantial losses due to actual defaults, increased sensitivity to defaults due to collateral default and disappearance of subordinate tranches, market anticipation of defaults, as well as investor aversion to CDO securities as a class. Interest on certain tranches of a CDO may be paid in kind (paid in the form of obligations of the same type rather than cash), which involves continued exposure to default risk with respect to such payments.
When-issued securities, delayed delivery, to be announced and forward commitment transactions
Securities purchased in when-issued, delayed delivery, to be announced or forward commitment transactions will not be delivered or paid for immediately. Such transactions involve a risk of loss, for example, if the value of the securities declines prior to the settlement date. Therefore, these transactions may have a leveraging effect on the fund, making the value of an investment in the fund more volatile and increasing the fund’s overall investment exposure. Typically, no income accrues on securities the fund has committed to purchase prior to the time delivery of the securities is made. Financial Industry Regulatory Authority (“FINRA”) rules may impose mandatory margin requirements for certain types of when-issued, to be announced or forward commitment transactions, with limited exceptions.
Forward roll transactions
In a forward roll transaction (also referred to as a mortgage dollar roll), the fund sells a mortgage-backed security while simultaneously agreeing to purchase a similar security from the same party (the counterparty) on a specified future date at a lower fixed price. During the roll period, the fund forgoes principal and interest paid on the securities. The fund is compensated by the difference between the current sales price and the forward price for the future purchase as well as by the interest earned on the cash proceeds of the initial sale. The fund may enter into a forward roll transaction with the intention of entering into an offsetting transaction whereby, rather than accepting delivery of the security on the specified date, the fund sells the security and agrees to repurchase a similar security at a later time.
Investments in forward roll transactions involve a risk of loss if the value of the securities that the fund is obligated to purchase declines below the purchase price prior to the repurchase date. Forward roll transactions may have a leveraging effect on the fund (see “When-issued securities, delayed delivery, to be announced and forward commitment transactions”).
Preferred stock and convertible securities
The fund may invest in preferred stock and convertible securities. Preferred stock represents equity ownership of an issuer that generally entitles the holder to receive, in preference to the holders of common stock, dividends and a fixed share of the proceeds resulting from a liquidation of the company. Preferred stocks may pay dividends at fixed or variable rates. Convertible fixed income securities convert into shares of common stock of their issuer. Preferred stock and convertible fixed income securities share investment characteristics of both fixed income and equity securities. However, the value of these securities tends to vary more with fluctuations in the underlying common stock and less with fluctuations in interest rates and tends to exhibit greater volatility.
Municipal securities
Municipal securities include debt obligations issued by any of the 50 U.S. states and the District of Columbia or their political subdivisions, agencies and public authorities, certain other U.S. governmental issuers (such as Puerto Rico, the U.S. Virgin Islands and Guam) and other qualifying issuers, participation or other interests in these securities and other structured securities. Although municipal securities are issued by qualifying issuers, payments of principal and interest on municipal securities may be derived solely from revenues from certain facilities, mortgages or private industries, and may not be backed by the issuers themselves. These securities include participation or other interests in municipal securities issued or backed by banks, insurance companies and other financial institutions.
Municipal securities include general obligation bonds, revenue bonds, housing authority bonds, private activity bonds, industrial development bonds, residual interest bonds, tender option bonds, tax and revenue anticipation notes, bond anticipation notes, tax-exempt commercial paper, municipal leases, participation certificates and custodial receipts. General obligation bonds are backed by the full faith and credit of the issuing entity. Revenue bonds are typically used to fund public works projects, such as toll roads, airports and transportation facilities, that are expected to produce income sufficient to make the payments on the bonds, since they are not backed by the full taxing power of the municipality. Housing authority bonds are used primarily to fund low to middle income residential projects and may be backed by the payments made on the underlying mortgages. Tax and revenue anticipation notes are generally issued in order to finance short-term cash needs or, occasionally, to finance construction. Tax and revenue anticipation notes are expected to be repaid from taxes or designated revenues in the related fiscal period, and they may or may not be general obligations of the issuing entity. Bond anticipation notes are issued with the expectation that their principal and interest will be paid out of proceeds from renewal notes or bonds and may be issued to finance such items as land acquisition, facility acquisition and/or construction and capital improvement projects.
Municipal securities include municipal lease obligations, which are undivided interests issued by a state or municipality in a lease or installment purchase contract which generally relates to equipment or facilities. In some cases, payments under municipal leases do not have to be made unless money is specifically approved for that purpose by an appropriate legislative body.
 
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Credit downgrades and other credit events
Credit rating or credit quality of a security is determined at the time of purchase. If, after purchase, the credit rating on a security is downgraded or the credit quality deteriorates, or if the duration of a security is extended, the subadviser will decide whether the security should be held or sold. Upon the occurrence of certain triggering events or defaults on a security held by the fund, or if an obligor of such a security has difficulty meeting its obligations, the fund may obtain a new or restructured security or underlying assets. In that case, the fund may become the holder of securities or other assets that it could not purchase or might not otherwise hold (for example, because they are of lower quality or are subordinated to other obligations of the issuer) at a time when those assets may be difficult to sell or can be sold only at a loss. In addition, the fund may incur expenses in an effort to protect the fund’s interest in securities experiencing these events.
Cash management
The fund may hold cash pending investment, may invest in money market instruments and may enter into repurchase agreements and reverse repurchase agreements (which have characteristics like borrowings) for cash management purposes. The fund may invest in money market funds, which may or may not be affiliated with the fund’s manager or the subadviser. The amount of assets the fund may hold for cash management purposes will depend on market conditions and the need to meet expected redemption requests.
Defensive investing
The fund may depart from its principal investment strategies in response to adverse market, economic or political conditions by taking temporary defensive positions, including by investing in any type of money market instruments and short-term debt securities or holding cash without regard to any percentage limitations. If a significant amount of the fund’s assets is used for defensive investing purposes, the fund will be less likely to achieve its investment objective. Although the subadviser has the ability to take defensive positions, it may choose not to do so for a variety of reasons, even during volatile market conditions.
Other investments
The fund may also use other strategies and invest in other investments that are described, along with their risks, in the Statement of Additional Information (“SAI”). However, the fund might not use all of the strategies and techniques or invest in all of the types of investments described in this Prospectus or in the SAI.
Percentage and other limitations
For purposes of the fund’s limitations expressed as a percentage of assets or net assets, the term “assets” or “net assets,” as applicable, means net assets plus the amount of any borrowings for investment purposes. The fund’s compliance with its investment limitations and requirements described in this Prospectus is usually determined at the time of investment. If such a percentage limitation is complied with at the time of an investment, any subsequent change in percentage resulting from a change in asset values or characteristics, a sale of securities or a change in credit quality will not constitute a violation of that limitation.
Selection process
The portfolio managers follow a value approach to investing and therefore seek to identify relative value in the global bond markets. The portfolio managers define as undervalued those markets where they believe real interest rates are high and the currency is undervalued with the potential to appreciate. The portfolio managers will focus investments in those undervalued markets where they believe cyclical business conditions as well as secular economic and political trends provide the best opportunity for declining interest rates and a return to lower real rates over time. The portfolio managers believe that such economic conditions provide the best potential to achieve capital appreciation. The fund employs a top-down, value-oriented, and macro driven investment approach.
Alongside traditional financial and economic analyses, the subadviser typically assesses the potential impacts of material environmental, social and governance (ESG) factors on an issuer to determine whether, in the subadviser’s view, an issuer’s ESG practices present a financial opportunity or risk for an investment. Consideration of ESG factors and risks is only one potential input in the subadviser’s assessment of eligible investments and, as with any inputs considered by the subadviser, may not be a determinative factor in the subadviser’s final decision on whether to purchase (or sell) a security. In addition, where ESG factors are considered, the weight given to ESG factors may vary across types of investments, industries, regions and issuers and ESG factors and weights considered may change over time. The subadviser may not assess every investment for ESG factors and, when it does, not every ESG factor may be identified or evaluated. Investments in derivatives and cash management instruments will not be assessed for ESG factors.
More on risks of investing in the fund
Following is more information on the principal risks summarized above and additional risks of investing in the fund.
Market and interest rate risk. The market prices of the fund’s securities may go up or down, sometimes rapidly or unpredictably. If the market prices of the fund’s securities fall, the value of your investment in the fund will decline. The market price of a security may fall due to general market conditions, such as real or perceived adverse economic or political conditions, tariffs and trade disruptions, inflation, substantial economic downturn or recession, changes in interest or currency rates, lack of liquidity in the bond markets or adverse investor sentiment. Changes in market conditions will not typically have the same impact on all types of securities. The market price of a security may also fall due to specific conditions that affect a
 
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particular sector of the securities market or a particular issuer. Your fund shares at any point in time may be worth less than what you invested, even after taking into account the reinvestment of fund dividends and distributions.
The market prices of securities may fluctuate significantly when interest rates change. When interest rates rise, the value of fixed income securities, and therefore the value of your investment in the fund, generally goes down. Generally, the longer the maturity or duration of a fixed income security, the greater the impact of a rise in interest rates on the security’s market price. However, calculations of duration and maturity may be based on estimates and may not reliably predict a security’s price sensitivity to changes in interest rates. Recently, there have been inflationary price movements. As such, fixed income securities markets may experience heightened levels of interest rate volatility and liquidity risk. Recently, the U.S. Federal Reserve has been raising interest rates from historically low levels. It may continue to raise interest rates. Any additional interest rate increases in the future could cause the value of the fund’s holdings to decrease. Moreover, securities can change in value in response to other factors, such as credit risk. In addition, different interest rate measures (such as short- and long-term interest rates and U.S. and non-U.S. interest rates), or interest rates on different types of securities or securities of different issuers, may not necessarily change in the same amount or in the same direction. When interest rates go down, the fund’s yield will decline. Also, when interest rates decline, investments made by the fund may pay a lower interest rate, which would reduce the income received by the fund.
Market events risk. The market values of securities or other assets will fluctuate, sometimes sharply and unpredictably, due to changes in general market conditions, overall economic trends or events, governmental actions or intervention, actions taken by the U.S. Federal Reserve or foreign central banks, market disruptions caused by trade disputes or other factors, political developments, armed conflicts, economic sanctions and countermeasures in response to sanctions, major cybersecurity events, investor sentiment, the global and domestic effects of a pandemic, and other factors that may or may not be related to the issuer of the security or other asset. Economies and financial markets throughout the world are increasingly interconnected. Economic, financial or political events, trading and tariff arrangements, public health events, terrorism, wars, natural disasters and other circumstances in one country or region could have profound impacts on global economies or markets. As a result, whether or not the fund invests in securities of issuers located in or with significant exposure to the countries or markets directly affected, the value and liquidity of the fund’s investments may be negatively affected. Following Russia’s invasion of Ukraine, Russian stocks lost all, or nearly all, of their market value. Other securities or markets could be similarly affected by past or future geopolitical or other events or conditions. Furthermore, events involving limited liquidity, defaults, non-performance or other adverse developments that affect one industry, such as the financial services industry, or concerns or rumors about any events of these kinds, have in the past and may in the future lead to market-wide liquidity problems, may spread to other industries, and could negatively affect the value and liquidity of the fund’s investments.
The fallout from the COVID-19 pandemic and its subsequent variants, and the long-term impact on economies, markets, industries and individual issuers, are not known. Some sectors of the economy and individual issuers have experienced or may experience particularly large losses. Periods of extreme volatility in the financial markets; reduced liquidity of many instruments; and disruptions to supply chains, consumer demand and employee availability, may continue for some time. The U.S. government and the Federal Reserve, as well as certain foreign governments and central banks, have taken extraordinary actions to support local and global economies and the financial markets in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. This and other government intervention into the economy and financial markets may not work as intended, and have resulted in a large expansion of government deficits and debt, the long term consequences of which are not known. In addition, the COVID-19 pandemic, and measures taken to mitigate its effects, could result in disruptions to the services provided to the fund by its service providers.
Raising the ceiling on U.S. government debt has become increasingly politicized. Any failure to increase the total amount that the U.S. government is authorized to borrow could lead to a default on U.S. government obligations, with unpredictable consequences for economies and markets in the U.S. and elsewhere. Recently, inflation and interest rates have increased and may rise further. These circumstances could adversely affect the value and liquidity of the fund’s investments, impair the fund’s ability to satisfy redemption requests, and negatively impact the fund’s performance.
The United States and other countries are periodically involved in disputes over trade and other matters, which may result in tariffs, investment restrictions and adverse impacts on affected companies and securities. For example, the United States has imposed tariffs and other trade barriers on Chinese exports, has restricted sales of certain categories of goods to China, and has established barriers to investments in China. Trade disputes may adversely affect the economies of the United States and its trading partners, as well as companies directly or indirectly affected and financial markets generally. The United States government has prohibited U.S. persons from investing in Chinese companies designated as related to the Chinese military. These and possible future restrictions could limit the fund’s opportunities for investment and require the sale of securities at a loss or make them illiquid. Moreover, the Chinese government is involved in a longstanding dispute with Taiwan that has included threats of invasion. If the political climate between the United States and China does not improve or continues to deteriorate, if China were to attempt unification of Taiwan by force, or if other geopolitical conflicts develop or get worse, economies, markets and individual securities may be severely affected both regionally and globally, and the value of the fund’s assets may go down.
LIBOR risk. The fund’s investments, payment obligations, and financing terms may be based on floating rates, such as the London Interbank Offered Rate, or “LIBOR,” which is the offered rate for short-term Eurodollar deposits between major international banks. In 2017, the U.K. Financial Conduct Authority (“FCA”) announced its intention to cease compelling banks to provide the quotations needed to sustain LIBOR after 2021. ICE Benchmark Administration, the administrator of LIBOR, ceased publication of most LIBOR settings on a representative basis at the end of 2021 and is expected to cease publication of the remaining U.S. dollar LIBOR settings on a representative basis after June 30, 2023. In addition, global regulators have announced that, with limited exceptions, no new LIBOR-based contracts should be entered into after 2021. Actions by regulators have resulted in the establishment of alternative reference rates to LIBOR in most major currencies. In March 2022, the U.S. federal government enacted legislation to
 
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establish a process for replacing LIBOR in certain existing contracts that do not already provide for the use of a clearly defined or practicable replacement benchmark rate as described in the legislation. Generally speaking, for contracts that do not contain a fallback provision as described in the legislation, a benchmark replacement recommended by the Federal Reserve Board will effectively automatically replace the USD LIBOR benchmark in the contract after June 30, 2023. The recommended benchmark replacement will be based on the Secured Overnight Financing Rate (SOFR) published by the Federal Reserve Bank of New York, including certain spread adjustments and benchmark replacement conforming changes. Various financial industry groups have been planning for the transition away from LIBOR, but there remains uncertainty regarding the impact of the transition from LIBOR on the fund’s transactions and the financial markets generally. The transition away from LIBOR may lead to increased volatility and illiquidity in markets that rely on LIBOR and may adversely affect the fund’s performance. The transition may also result in a reduction in the value of certain LIBOR-based investments held by the fund or reduce the effectiveness of related transactions such as hedges. Any such effects of the transition away from LIBOR, as well as other unforeseen effects, could result in losses for the fund. Since the usefulness of LIBOR as a benchmark could also deteriorate during the transition period, effects could occur at any time.
Credit risk. The value of your investment in the fund could decline if the issuer of a security held by the fund or another obligor for that security (such as a party offering credit enhancement) fails to pay, otherwise defaults, is perceived to be less creditworthy, becomes insolvent or files for bankruptcy. The value of your investment in the fund could also decline if the credit rating of a security held by the fund is downgraded or the credit quality or value of any assets underlying the security declines. Changes in actual or perceived creditworthiness may occur quickly. If the fund enters into financial contracts (such as certain derivatives, repurchase agreements, reverse repurchase agreements, and when-issued, delayed delivery and forward commitment transactions), the fund will be subject to the credit risk presented by the counterparty. In addition, the fund may incur expenses in an effort to protect the fund’s interests or to enforce its rights against an issuer, guarantor or counterparty or may be hindered or delayed in exercising those rights. Credit risk is broadly gauged by the credit ratings of the securities in which the fund invests. However, ratings are only the opinions of the companies issuing them and are not guarantees as to quality. Securities rated in the lowest category of investment grade (Baa/BBB) may possess certain speculative characteristics. Credit risk is typically greatest for the fund’s high yield debt securities (“junk” bonds), which are rated below the Baa/BBB categories or unrated securities of comparable quality.
The fund may invest in subordinated securities, which are securities that rank below other securities with respect to claims on an issuer’s assets, or securities which represent interests in pools of such subordinated securities. The fund is more likely to suffer a credit loss on subordinated securities than on non-subordinated securities of the same issuer. If there is a default, bankruptcy or liquidation of the issuer, most subordinated securities are paid only if sufficient assets remain after payment of the issuer’s non-subordinated securities. In addition, any recovery of interest or principal may take more time. As a result, even a perceived decline in creditworthiness of the issuer is likely to have a greater adverse impact on subordinated securities.
High yield (“junk”) bonds risk. High yield bonds, often called “junk” bonds, have a higher risk of issuer default or may be in default and are considered speculative. Changes in economic conditions or developments regarding the individual issuer are more likely to cause price volatility and weaken the capacity of such securities to make principal and interest payments than is the case for higher grade debt securities. The value of lower-quality debt securities often fluctuates in response to company, political, or economic developments and can decline significantly over short as well as long periods of time or during periods of general or regional economic difficulty. High yield bonds may also have lower liquidity as compared to higher-rated securities, which means the fund may have difficulty selling them at times, and it may have to apply a greater degree of judgment in establishing a price for purposes of valuing fund shares. High yield bonds generally are issued by less creditworthy issuers. Issuers of high yield bonds may have a larger amount of outstanding debt relative to their assets than issuers of investment grade bonds. In the event of an issuer’s bankruptcy, claims of other creditors may have priority over the claims of high yield bond holders, leaving few or no assets available to repay high yield bond holders. The fund may incur expenses to the extent necessary to seek recovery upon default or to negotiate new terms with a defaulting issuer. High yield bonds frequently have redemption features that permit an issuer to repurchase the security from the fund before it matures. If the issuer redeems high yield bonds, the fund may have to invest the proceeds in bonds with lower yields and may lose income.
Prepayment or call risk. Many fixed income securities give the issuer the option to repay or call the security prior to its maturity date. Issuers often exercise this right when interest rates fall. Accordingly, if the fund holds a fixed income security subject to prepayment or call risk, it may not benefit fully from the increase in value that other fixed income securities generally experience when interest rates fall. Upon prepayment of the security, the fund would also be forced to reinvest the proceeds at then current yields, which would be lower than the yield of the security that was paid off. In addition, if the fund purchases a fixed income security at a premium (at a price that exceeds its stated par or principal value), the fund may lose the amount of the premium paid in the event of prepayment. Prepayment further tends to reduce the yield to maturity and the average life of the security.
Issuer risk. The market price of a security can go up or down more than the market as a whole and can perform differently from the value of the market as a whole, due to factors specifically relating to the security’s issuer, such as disappointing earnings reports by the issuer, unsuccessful products or services, loss of major customers, changes in management, corporate actions, negative perception in the marketplace, or major litigation or changes in government regulations affecting the issuer or the competitive environment. An individual security may also be affected by factors relating to the industry or sector of the issuer. The fund may experience a substantial or complete loss on an individual security. A change in financial condition or other event affecting a single issuer may adversely impact the industry or sector of the issuer or securities markets as a whole.
Non-diversification risk. The fund is classified as “non-diversified,” which means it may invest a larger percentage of its assets in a smaller number of issuers than a diversified fund. To the extent the fund invests its assets in a smaller number of issuers, the fund will be more susceptible to negative events affecting those issuers than a diversified fund.
 
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Foreign investments and emerging markets risk. The fund’s investments in securities of foreign issuers or issuers with significant exposure to foreign markets involve additional risk as compared to investments in U.S. securities or issuers with predominantly domestic exposure, such as less liquid, less regulated, less transparent and more volatile markets. The markets for some foreign securities are relatively new, and the rules and policies relating to these markets are not fully developed and may change. The value of the fund’s investments may decline because of factors affecting the particular issuer as well as foreign markets and issuers generally, such as unfavorable or unsuccessful government actions, tariffs and trade disputes, economic sanctions, reduction of government or central bank support, inadequate accounting standards and auditing and financial recordkeeping requirements, lack of information, political, economic, financial or social instability, terrorism, armed conflicts and other geopolitical events. Geopolitical or other events such as nationalization or expropriation could even cause the loss of the fund’s entire investment in one or more countries.
The Public Company Accounting Oversight Board, which regulates auditors of U.S. public companies, is unable to inspect audit work papers in certain foreign or emerging market countries. Investors in foreign countries often have limited rights and few practical remedies to pursue shareholder claims, including class actions or fraud claims, and the ability of the Securities and Exchange Commission, the U.S. Department of Justice and other authorities to bring and enforce actions against foreign issuers or foreign persons is limited. Foreign investments may also be adversely affected by U.S. government or international interventions, restrictions or economic sanctions, which could negatively affect the value of an investment or result in the fund selling an investment at a disadvantageous time. To the extent the fund focuses its investments in a single country or only a few countries in a particular geographic region, economic, political, regulatory or other conditions affecting such country or region may have a greater impact on fund performance relative to a more geographically diversified fund.
The value of the fund’s foreign investments may also be affected by foreign tax laws, special U.S. tax considerations and restrictions on receiving the investment proceeds from a foreign country. Dividends or interest on, or proceeds from the sale or disposition of, foreign securities may be subject to non-U.S. withholding or other taxes.
It may be difficult for the fund to pursue claims against a foreign issuer or other parties in the courts of a foreign country. Some securities issued by non-U.S. governments or their subdivisions, agencies and instrumentalities may not be backed by the full faith and credit of such governments. Even where a security is backed by the full faith and credit of a government, it may be difficult for the fund to pursue its rights against the government. In the past, some non-U.S. governments have defaulted on principal and interest payments.
If the fund buys securities denominated in a foreign currency, receives income in foreign currencies, or holds foreign currencies from time to time, the value of the fund’s assets, as measured in U.S. dollars, can be affected unfavorably by changes in exchange rates relative to the U.S. dollar or other foreign currencies. Currency exchange rates can be volatile, and are affected by factors such as general economic and political conditions, the actions of the U.S. and foreign governments or central banks, the imposition of currency controls and speculation. The fund may be unable or may choose not to hedge its foreign currency exposure.
In certain foreign markets, settlement and clearance of trades may experience delays in payment for or delivery of securities not typically associated with settlement and clearance of U.S. investments. Settlement of trades in these markets can take longer than in other markets and the fund may not receive its proceeds from the sale of certain securities for an extended period (possibly several weeks or even longer) due to, among other factors, low trading volumes and volatile prices. The custody or holding of securities, cash and other assets by local banks, agents and depositories in securities markets outside the United States may entail additional risks. Governments or trade groups may compel local agents to hold securities in designated depositories that may not be subject to independent evaluation. Local agents are held only to the standards of care of their local markets, and thus may be subject to limited or no government oversight. In extreme cases, the fund’s securities may be misappropriated or the fund may be unable to sell its securities. In general, the less developed a country’s securities market is, the greater the likelihood of custody problems.
The risks of foreign investments are heightened when investing in issuers in emerging market countries. Emerging market countries tend to have economic, political and legal systems that are less developed and are less stable than those of more developed countries. Their economies tend to be less diversified than those of more developed countries. They typically have fewer medical and economic resources than more developed countries, and thus they may be less able to control or mitigate the effects of a pandemic or a natural disaster. They are often particularly sensitive to market movements because their market prices tend to reflect speculative expectations. Low trading volumes may result in a lack of liquidity and in extreme price volatility. Investors should be able to tolerate sudden, sometimes substantial, fluctuations in the value of investments in emerging markets. Emerging market countries may have policies that restrict investment by foreigners or that prevent foreign investors from withdrawing their money at will.
Risks related to Russia’s invasion of Ukraine. Russia’s military invasion of Ukraine in February 2022, the resulting responses by the United States and other countries, and the potential for wider conflict have increased volatility and uncertainty in the financial markets and adversely affected regional and global economies. The United States and other countries have imposed broad-ranging economic sanctions on Russia and certain Russian individuals, banking entities and corporations as a response to its invasion of Ukraine. The United States and other countries have also imposed economic sanctions on Belarus and may impose sanctions on other countries that support Russia’s military invasion. These sanctions, as well as any other economic consequences related to the invasion, such as additional sanctions, boycotts or changes in consumer or purchaser preferences or cyberattacks on governments, companies or individuals, may further decrease the value and liquidity of certain Russian securities and securities of issuers in other countries that are subject to economic sanctions related to the invasion. To the extent that the fund has exposure to Russian investments or investments in countries affected by the invasion, the fund’s ability to price, buy, sell, receive or deliver such investments may be impaired. The fund may determine that certain affected securities have zero value. In addition, any exposure that the fund may have to
 
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counterparties in Russia or in countries affected by the invasion could negatively impact the fund’s portfolio. The extent and duration of Russia’s military actions and the repercussions of such actions (including any retaliatory actions or countermeasures that may be taken by those subject to sanctions) are impossible to predict, but could continue to result in significant market disruptions, including in the oil and natural gas markets, and may continue to negatively affect global supply chains (including global food supplies), inflation and global growth. These and any related events could significantly impact the fund’s performance and the value of an investment in the fund, even beyond any direct exposure the fund may have to Russian issuers or issuers in other countries directly affected by the invasion.
Portfolio management risk. The value of your investment may decrease if the subadviser’s judgment about the quality, relative yield, value or market trends affecting a particular security, industry, sector or region, or about interest rates or other market factors, is incorrect or does not produce the desired results, or if there are imperfections, errors or limitations in the models, tools and data used by the subadviser. In addition, the fund’s investment strategies or policies may change from time to time. Those changes may not lead to the results intended by the subadviser and could have an adverse effect on the value or performance of the fund.
Convertible securities risk. Convertible securities are subject to stock market and other risks associated with equity securities, as well as the credit, interest rate and other risks associated with fixed income securities. Credit risk is the risk that the issuer or obligor will not make timely payments of principal or interest or that its credit may be downgraded or perceived to be less creditworthy. Interest rate risk is the risk that the value of a fixed income security will fall when interest rates rise. A rise in rates tends to have a greater impact on the prices of longer term or duration securities. A general rise in interest rates may cause investors to move out of fixed income securities on a large scale, which could adversely affect the price and liquidity of fixed income securities. As the market price of the equity security underlying a convertible security falls, the convertible security tends to trade on the basis of its yield and other fixed income characteristics. As the market price of the equity security underlying a convertible security rises, the convertible security tends to trade on the basis of its equity conversion features.
Model risk. Investment models may not adequately take into account certain factors and may result in the fund having a lower return than if the fund were managed using another model or investment strategy. In addition, investment models used by the subadviser to evaluate securities or securities markets are based on certain assumptions concerning the interplay of market factors. The markets or the prices of individual securities may be affected by factors not foreseen in developing the models. When a model or data used in managing the fund contains an error, or is incorrect or incomplete, any investment decision made in reliance on the model or data may not produce the desired results and the fund may realize losses.
Risks relating to investments in municipal securities. Issuers of municipal securities tend to derive a significant portion of their revenue from taxes, particularly property and income taxes, and decreases in personal income levels and property values and other unfavorable economic factors, such as a general economic recession, adversely affect municipal securities. Municipal issuers may also be adversely affected by rising health care costs, increasing unfunded pension liabilities and by the phasing out of U.S. federal programs providing financial support. Also, if the Internal Revenue Service determines that an issuer of a municipal security has not complied with applicable tax requirements, interest from the security could become taxable and the security could decline significantly in value. Where municipal securities are issued to finance particular projects, such as those relating to education, health care, transportation, and utilities, issuers often depend on revenues from those projects to make principal and interest payments. Adverse conditions and developments in those sectors can result in lower revenues to issuers of municipal securities, potentially resulting in defaults, and can also have an adverse effect on the broader municipal securities market.
There may be less public information available on municipal issuers or projects than other issuers, and valuing municipal securities may be more difficult. In addition, the secondary market for municipal securities is less well developed and may have lower liquidity as compared to other markets, and dealers may be less willing to offer and sell municipal securities in times of market turbulence. Changes in the financial condition of one or more individual municipal issuers (or one or more insurers of municipal issuers), or one or more defaults by municipal issuers or insurers, can adversely affect liquidity and valuations in the overall market for municipal securities. The value of municipal securities can also be adversely affected by regulatory and political developments affecting the ability of municipal issuers to pay interest or repay principal, actual or anticipated tax law changes or other legislative actions, and by uncertainties and public perceptions concerning these and other factors. In the past, a number of municipal issuers have defaulted on obligations, were downgraded or commenced insolvency proceedings.
The cost associated with combating the novel coronavirus (COVID-19) and its negative impact on tax revenues has adversely affected the financial condition of state and local governments. The lingering economic effects of this outbreak could continue to affect the ability of state and local governments to make payments on debt obligations when due and could adversely impact the value of their bonds, which could negatively impact the performance of the fund.
Portfolio turnover risk. Active and frequent trading will increase a shareholder’s tax liability and the fund’s transaction costs, which could detract from fund performance.
Illiquidity risk. Illiquidity risk exists when particular investments are or may become impossible or difficult to sell and some assets that the fund wants to invest in may be impossible or difficult to purchase. Although most of the fund’s investments must be liquid at the time of investment, investments may be or become illiquid after purchase by the fund, particularly during periods of market turmoil or due to adverse changes in the conditions of a particular issuer. Markets may become illiquid when, for instance, there are few, if any, interested buyers or sellers or when dealers are unwilling or unable to make a market for certain securities. As a general matter, dealers have been less willing to make markets for fixed income securities. Federal banking regulations may also cause certain dealers to reduce their inventories of certain securities, which may further decrease the ability to buy or sell such securities. When the fund holds illiquid investments, the portfolio may be harder to value, especially in changing
 
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markets, and if the fund is forced to sell these investments to meet redemption requests or for other cash needs, or to try to limit losses, the fund may be forced to sell at a loss or may not be able to sell at all. The fund may experience heavy redemptions that could cause the fund to liquidate its assets at inopportune times or at a loss or depressed value, which could cause the value of your investment to decline. In addition, when there is illiquidity in the market for certain investments, the fund, due to limitations on illiquid investments, may be unable to achieve its desired level of exposure to a certain sector, industry or issuer. The liquidity of certain assets, particularly of privately-issued and non-investment grade mortgage-backed securities, asset-backed securities and collateralized debt obligations, may be difficult to ascertain and may change over time. Transactions in less liquid or illiquid securities may entail transaction costs that are higher than those for transactions in liquid securities. Further, such securities, once sold, may not settle for an extended period (for example, several weeks or even longer). The fund will not receive its sales proceeds until that time, which may constrain the fund’s ability to meet its obligations (including obligations to redeeming shareholders).
Mortgage-backed and asset-backed securities risk. Mortgage-backed securities are particularly susceptible to prepayment and extension risks, because prepayments on the underlying mortgages tend to increase when interest rates fall and decrease when interest rates rise. Prepayments may also occur on a scheduled basis or due to foreclosure. When market interest rates increase, mortgage refinancings and prepayments slow, which lengthens the effective duration of these securities. As a result, the negative effect of the interest rate increase on the market value of mortgage-backed securities is usually more pronounced than it is for other types of fixed income securities, potentially increasing the volatility of the fund. Conversely, when market interest rates decline, while the value of mortgage-backed securities may increase, the rates of prepayment of the underlying mortgages tend to increase, which shortens the effective duration of these securities. Mortgage-backed securities are also subject to the risk that underlying borrowers will be unable to meet their obligations.
At times, some of the mortgage-backed securities in which the fund may invest will have higher than market interest rates and therefore will be purchased at a premium above their par value. Prepayments may cause losses on securities purchased at a premium.
The value of mortgage-backed securities may be affected by changes in credit quality or value of the mortgage loans or other assets that support the securities. In addition, for mortgage-backed securities, when market conditions result in an increase in the default rates on the underlying mortgages and the foreclosure values of the underlying real estate are below the outstanding amount of the underlying mortgages, collection of the full amount of accrued interest and principal on these investments may be doubtful. For mortgage derivatives and structured securities that have embedded leverage features, small changes in interest or prepayment rates may cause large and sudden price movements. Mortgage derivatives can also become illiquid and hard to value in declining markets.
Asset-backed securities are structured like mortgage-backed securities and are subject to many of the same risks. The ability of an issuer of asset-backed securities to enforce its security interest in the underlying assets or to otherwise recover from the underlying obligor may be limited. Certain asset-backed securities present a heightened level of risk because, in the event of default, the liquidation value of the underlying assets may be inadequate to pay any unpaid principal or interest.
Extension risk. When interest rates rise, repayments of fixed income securities may occur more slowly than anticipated, extending the effective duration of these fixed income securities at below market interest rates and causing their market prices to decline more than they would have declined due to the rise in interest rates alone. This may cause the fund’s share price to be more volatile.
Borrowing risk. Certain borrowings may create an opportunity for increased return but, at the same time, will create additional risks. For example, if the fund invests the proceeds of the borrowing, it will have a leveraging effect on its portfolio, the value of the fund will be more volatile and all other risks tend to be compounded. This is because leverage generally magnifies the effect of any increase or decrease in the value of the fund’s underlying assets or creates investment risk with respect to a larger pool of assets than the fund would otherwise have. The fund may be required to liquidate fund securities at a time when it would be disadvantageous to do so in order to make payments with respect to any borrowing. Interest on any borrowing will be a fund expense and will reduce the value of the fund’s shares.
Leverage risk. The use of traditional borrowing (including to meet redemption requests), reverse repurchase agreements and derivatives creates leverage (i.e., a fund’s investment exposures exceed its net asset value). Leverage increases a fund’s losses when the value of its investments (including derivatives) declines. Because many derivatives have a leverage component (i.e., a notional value in excess of the assets needed to establish or maintain the derivative position), adverse changes in the value or level of the underlying asset, rate, or index may result in a loss substantially greater than the amount invested in the derivative itself. In the case of swaps, the risk of loss generally is related to a notional principal amount, even if the parties have not made any initial investment. Some derivatives, similar to short sales, have the potential for unlimited loss, regardless of the size of the initial investment. Similarly, the fund’s portfolio will be leveraged and can incur losses if the value of the fund’s assets declines between the time a redemption request is received or deemed to be received by the fund (which in some cases may be the business day prior to actual receipt of the transaction activity by the fund) and the time at which the fund liquidates assets to meet redemption requests. In the case of redemptions representing a significant portion of the fund’s portfolio, the leverage effects described above can be significant and could expose a fund and non-redeeming shareholders to material losses.
The fund may manage some of its derivative positions by offsetting derivative positions against one another or against other assets. To the extent offsetting positions do not behave in relation to one another as expected, the fund may perform as if it were leveraged.
To the extent the fund purchases securities on margin or sells securities short, it will create leverage in the fund’s portfolio. To the extent the market prices of securities pledged to counterparties to secure the fund’s margin account or short sale decline, the fund may be required to deposit additional funds with the counterparty to avoid having the pledged securities liquidated to compensate for the decline.
 
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New derivatives regulations require the fund, to the extent it uses derivatives beyond a specified limited amount, to, among other things, comply with certain overall limits on leverage. These regulations may limit the ability of the fund to pursue its investment strategies and may not be effective to mitigate the fund’s risk of loss from derivatives.
Derivatives risk. Derivatives involve special risks and costs and may result in losses to the fund, even when used for hedging purposes. Using derivatives can increase losses and reduce opportunities for gains, such as when market prices, interest rates, currencies, or the derivatives themselves behave in a way not anticipated by the fund’s subadviser, especially in abnormal market conditions. Using derivatives also can have a leveraging effect which may increase investment losses and increase the fund’s volatility, which is the degree to which the fund’s share price may fluctuate within a short time period. Certain derivatives have the potential for unlimited loss, regardless of the size of the initial investment. The other parties to certain derivatives transactions present the same types of credit risk as issuers of fixed income securities.
The fund’s counterparty to a derivative transaction may not honor its obligations in respect to the transaction. In certain cases, the fund may be hindered or delayed in exercising remedies against or closing out derivative instruments with a counterparty, which may result in additional losses.
Derivatives also tend to involve greater illiquidity risk and they may be difficult to value. The fund may be unable to terminate or sell its derivative positions. In fact, many over-the-counter derivatives will not have liquidity except through the counterparty to the instrument. Derivatives are generally subject to the risks applicable to the assets, rates, indices or other indicators underlying the derivative. The value of a derivative may fluctuate more than the underlying assets, rates, indices or other indicators to which it relates. Use of derivatives or similar instruments may have different tax consequences for the fund than an investment in the underlying asset, and those differences may affect the amount, timing and character of income distributed to shareholders. The fund’s use of derivatives may also increase the amount of taxes payable by shareholders. The U.S. government and foreign governments have adopted and implemented or are in the process of adopting and implementing regulations governing derivatives markets, including mandatory clearing of certain derivatives, margin, and reporting requirements. The ultimate impact of the regulations remains unclear. Additional regulation of derivatives may make derivatives more costly, limit their availability or utility, otherwise adversely affect their performance or disrupt markets. The fund may be exposed to additional risks as a result of the additional regulations. The extent and impact of the additional regulations are not yet fully known and may not be for some time.
Swap agreements tend to shift the fund’s investment exposure from one type of investment to another. For example, the fund may enter into interest rate swaps, which involve the exchange of interest payments by the fund with another party, such as an exchange of floating rate payments for fixed interest rate payments with respect to a notional amount of principal. If an interest rate swap intended to be used as a hedge negates a favorable interest rate movement, the investment performance of the fund would be less than what it would have been if the fund had not entered into the interest rate swap.
Credit default swap contracts involve heightened risks and may result in losses to the fund. Credit default swaps may be illiquid and difficult to value. If the fund buys a credit default swap, it will be subject to the risk that the credit default swap may expire worthless, as the credit default swap would only generate income in the event of a default on the underlying debt security or other specified event. As a buyer, the fund would also be subject to credit risk relating to the seller’s payment of its obligations in the event of a default (or similar event). If the fund sells a credit default swap, it will be exposed to the credit risk of the issuer of the obligation to which the credit default swap relates. As a seller, the fund would also be subject to leverage risk, because it would be liable for the full notional amount of the swap in the event of a default (or similar event).
The absence of a central exchange or market for over-the-counter swap transactions may lead, in some instances, to difficulties in trading and valuation, especially in the event of market disruptions. Relatively recent legislation requires certain swaps to be executed through a centralized exchange or regulated facility and be cleared through a regulated clearinghouse. Although this clearing mechanism is generally expected to reduce counterparty credit risk, it may disrupt or limit the swap market and may not result in swaps being easier to trade or value. As swaps become more standardized, the fund may not be able to enter into swaps that meet its investment needs. The fund also may not be able to find a clearinghouse willing to accept a swap for clearing. In a cleared swap, a central clearing organization will be the counterparty to the transaction. The fund will assume the risk that the clearinghouse and/or the broker through which it holds its position may be unable to perform its obligations.
The fund will be required to maintain its positions with a clearing organization through one or more clearing brokers. The clearing organization will require the fund to post margin and the broker may require the fund to post additional margin to secure the fund’s obligations. The amount of margin required may change from time to time. In addition, cleared transactions may be more expensive to maintain than over-the-counter transactions and may require the fund to deposit larger amounts of margin. The fund may not be able to recover margin amounts if the broker has financial difficulties. Also, the broker may require the fund to terminate a derivatives position under certain circumstances. This may cause the fund to lose money.
Futures are standardized, exchange-traded contracts that obligate a purchaser to buy, and a seller to sell, a specific amount of an asset on a specified future date at a specified price. The primary risks associated with the use of futures contracts are: (a) the imperfect correlation between the change in market value of the instruments held by the fund and the price of the futures contract; (b) the possible lack of a liquid secondary market for a futures contract and the resulting inability to close a futures contract when desired; (c) losses caused by unanticipated market movements, which are potentially unlimited; (d) the subadviser’s inability to predict correctly the direction of securities prices, interest rates, currency exchange rates and other economic factors; and (e) the possibility that the counterparty will default in the performance of its obligations.
An option is an agreement that, for a premium payment or fee, gives the option holder (the purchaser) the right but not the obligation to buy (a “call option”) or sell (a “put option”) the underlying asset (or settle for cash in an amount based on an underlying asset, rate, or index) at a specified price (the “exercise price”) during a period of time or on a specified date. The fund may write a call or put option where it (i) owns or is short the
 
22     BrandywineGLOBAL— Global Opportunities Bond Fund

underlying security in the case of a call or put option, respectively (sometimes referred to as a “covered option”), or (ii) does not own or is not short such security (sometimes referred to as a “naked option”). When the fund purchases an option, it may lose the total premium paid for it if the price of the underlying security or other assets decreased, remained the same or failed to increase to a level at or beyond the exercise price (in the case of a call option) or increased, remained the same or failed to decrease to a level at or below the exercise price (in the case of a put option). If a put or call option purchased by the fund were permitted to expire without being sold or exercised, its premium would represent a loss to the fund. To the extent that the fund writes or sells an option, in particular a naked option, if the decline or increase in the underlying asset is significantly below or above the exercise price of the written option, the fund could experience a substantial loss.
Risks associated with the use of derivatives are magnified to the extent that an increased portion of the fund’s assets is committed to derivatives in general or is invested in just one or a few types of derivatives.
Currency derivatives risk. The fund’s use of currency futures, forwards or options, whether for hedging or speculative purposes, may not always work as intended, and in specific cases the fund may be worse off than if it had not used a hedging instrument. Currency derivatives involve similar risks as other derivatives, including credit, counterparty, leverage and illiquidity risk. There may not always be suitable hedging instruments available. Even where suitable hedging instruments are available, the portfolio managers may determine not to hedge the fund’s currency risks.
Hedging risk. The decision as to whether and to what extent the fund will engage in hedging transactions to hedge against risks such as currency risk, credit risk, and interest rate risk will depend on a number of factors, including prevailing market conditions, the composition of the fund, the availability of suitable transactions and regulatory restrictions. The fund may not engage in hedging transactions even when it would have been advantageous to do so. Hedges are sometimes subject to imperfect matching between the derivative and the underlying asset or index, so the fund could lose money on both a hedging transaction and the transaction being hedged; accordingly, there can be no assurance that hedging strategies, if used, will be successful. Hedging transactions involve costs and may reduce gains or result in losses.
In addition to the policies described elsewhere in this Prospectus, the fund may from time to time attempt to hedge a portion of its currency risk using a variety of techniques, including currency futures (and options thereon), forwards, and options. However, these instruments may not always work as intended, and in certain cases the fund may be worse off than if it had not used a hedging instrument. For most emerging market currencies, there are not suitable hedging instruments available.
Cash management and defensive investing risk. The value of the investments held by the fund for cash management or defensive investing purposes can fluctuate. Like other fixed income securities, they are subject to risk, including market, interest rate and credit risk. If the fund holds cash uninvested, the cash will be subject to the credit risk of the depository institution holding the cash and the fund will not earn income on the cash. If a significant amount of the fund’s assets is used for cash management or defensive investing purposes, the fund will be less likely to achieve its investment objective. Defensive investing may not work as intended and the value of an investment in the fund may still decline.
Valuation risk. Many factors may influence the price at which the fund could sell any particular portfolio investment. The sales price may well differ—higher or lower—from the fund’s last valuation, and such differences could be significant, particularly for illiquid securities and securities that trade in relatively thin markets and/or markets that experience extreme volatility. If market conditions make it difficult to value some investments, the fund may value these investments using more subjective methods, such as fair value methodologies. These differences may increase significantly and affect fund investments more broadly during periods of market volatility. Investors who purchase or redeem fund shares on days when the fund is holding fair-valued securities may receive fewer or more shares, or lower or higher redemption proceeds, than they would have received if the fund had not fair-valued securities or had used a different valuation methodology. The value of non-U.S. securities, certain fixed income securities and currencies, as applicable, may be materially affected by events after the close of the markets in which they are traded, but before the fund determines its net asset value. The fund’s ability to value its investments may also be impacted by technological issues and/or errors by pricing services or other third party service providers. The valuation of the fund’s investments involves subjective judgment, which may prove to be incorrect.
Risk of increase in expenses. Your actual costs of investing in the fund may be higher than the expenses shown in “Annual fund operating expenses” for a variety of reasons. For example, expenses may be higher if the fund’s average net assets decrease, as a result of redemptions or otherwise, or if a fee limitation is changed or terminated. Net assets are more likely to decrease and fund expense ratios are more likely to increase when markets are volatile.
Redemptions by affiliated funds and by other significant investors. The fund may be an investment option for mutual funds and ETFs that are managed by LMPFA and its affiliates, including Franklin Templeton investment managers, unaffiliated mutual funds and ETFs and other investors with substantial investments in the fund. As a result, from time to time, the fund may experience relatively large redemptions and could be required to liquidate its assets at inopportune times or at a loss or depressed value, which could cause the value of your investment to decline.
Redemption risk. The fund may experience periods of heavy redemptions, particularly during periods of declining or illiquid markets, that could cause the fund to liquidate its assets at inopportune times or unfavorable prices or increase or accelerate taxable gains or transaction costs and may negatively affect the fund’s net asset value, performance, or ability to satisfy redemptions in a timely manner which could cause the value of your investment to decline. Redemption risk is greater to the extent that the fund has investors with large shareholdings, short investment horizons, unpredictable cash flow needs or where one decision maker has control of fund shares owned by separate fund shareholders, including clients or affiliates of the fund’s manager. In addition, redemption risk is heightened during periods of overall market turmoil. The redemption by one or more large shareholders of their holdings in the fund could hurt performance and/or cause the remaining shareholders in the fund to lose money.
 
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Environmental, social and governance (ESG) considerations risk. ESG considerations are one of a number of factors that the subadviser examines when considering investments for the fund’s portfolio. In light of this, the issuers in which the fund invests may not be considered ESG-focused issuers and may have lower or adverse ESG assessments. Consideration of ESG factors may affect the fund’s exposure to certain issuers or industries. In addition, ESG considerations assessed as part of the fund’s investment process may vary across types of eligible investments and issuers. The subadviser may not assess every investment for ESG factors and, when it does, not every ESG factor may be identified or evaluated. The subadviser’s assessment of an issuer’s ESG factors is subjective and may differ from that of investors, third-party service providers (e.g., ratings providers) and other funds. As a result, securities selected by the subadviser may not reflect the beliefs and values of any particular investor. The subadviser also may be dependent on the availability of timely, complete and accurate ESG data reported by issuers and/or third party research providers, the timeliness, completeness and accuracy of which is out of the subadviser’s control. ESG factors are often not uniformly measured or defined, which could impact the subadviser’s ability to assess an issuer. While the subadviser views ESG considerations as having the potential to contribute to the fund’s long-term performance, there is no guarantee that such results will be achieved.
Operational risk. Your ability to transact with the fund or the valuation of your investment may be negatively impacted because of the operational risks arising from factors such as processing errors and human errors, inadequate or failed internal or external processes, failures in systems and technology (including those due to cybersecurity incidents), changes in personnel, and errors caused by third party service providers or trading counterparties. It is not possible to identify all of the operational risks that may affect the fund or to develop processes and controls that eliminate or mitigate the occurrence of such failures. The fund and its shareholders could be negatively impacted as a result.
Cybersecurity risk. Cybersecurity incidents, whether intentionally caused by third parties or otherwise, may allow an unauthorized party to gain access to fund assets, fund or customer data (including private shareholder information) or proprietary information, cause the fund, the manager, the subadviser and/or their service providers (including, but not limited to, fund accountants, custodians, sub-custodians, transfer agents and financial intermediaries) to suffer data breaches, data corruption or loss of operational functionality, or prevent fund investors from purchasing, redeeming or exchanging shares, receiving distributions or receiving timely information regarding the fund or their investment in the fund. The fund, the manager, and the subadviser have limited ability to prevent or mitigate cybersecurity incidents affecting third party service providers, and such third party service providers may have limited indemnification obligations to the fund, the manager, and/or the subadviser. Cybersecurity incidents may result in financial losses to the fund and its shareholders, and substantial costs may be incurred in order to prevent or mitigate any future cybersecurity incidents. Issuers of securities in which the fund invests are also subject to cybersecurity risks, and the value of these securities could decline if the issuers experience cybersecurity incidents.
Because technology is frequently changing, new ways to carry out cyber attacks are always developing. Therefore, there is a chance that some risks have not been identified or prepared for, or that an attack may not be detected, which puts limitations on the fund’s ability to plan for or respond to a cyber attack. Like other funds and business enterprises, the fund, the manager, the subadviser and their service providers are subject to the risk of cyber incidents occurring from time to time.
Please note that there are other factors that could adversely affect your investment and that could prevent the fund from achieving its investment objective. More information about risks appears in the SAI. Before investing, you should carefully consider the risks that you will assume.
Portfolio holdings
A description of the fund’s policies and procedures with respect to the disclosure of its portfolio holdings is available in the SAI. The fund posts its complete portfolio holdings at www.franklintempleton.com/mutualfunds (click on the name of the fund) on a quarterly basis. The fund intends to post its complete portfolio holdings 14 calendar days following the quarter-end. The fund intends to post partial information concerning the fund’s portfolio holdings (such as top 10 holdings or sector breakdowns, for example) on the fund’s website on a monthly basis. The fund intends to post this partial information 10 business days following each month-end. Such information will remain available until the next month’s or quarter’s holdings are posted.
More on fund management
Legg Mason Partners Fund Advisor, LLC (“LMPFA” or the “manager”) is the fund’s investment manager. LMPFA, with offices at 280 Park Avenue, New York, New York 10017, also serves as the investment manager of other Legg Mason-sponsored funds. LMPFA provides administrative and certain oversight services to the fund. As of December 31, 2022, LMPFA’s total assets under management were approximately $190.4 billion.
Brandywine Global Investment Management, LLC (“Brandywine Global” or the “subadviser”) provides the day-to-day portfolio management of the fund. Brandywine Global has offices at 1735 Market Street, 18th Floor, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19103. Brandywine Global acts as adviser or subadviser to individuals, public funds, corporations, pension and profit sharing plans, Taft-Hartley Plans, endowments and foundations, as well as to investment company portfolios. As of December 31, 2022, Brandywine Global managed approximately $52.40 billion on a discretionary basis and $2.84 billion on a non-discretionary basis.
LMPFA and Brandywine Global are indirect, wholly-owned subsidiaries of Franklin Resources, Inc. (“Franklin Resources”). Franklin Resources, whose principal executive offices are at One Franklin Parkway, San Mateo, California 94403, is a global investment management organization operating, together with its subsidiaries, as Franklin Templeton. As of December 31, 2022, Franklin Templeton’s asset management operations had aggregate assets under management of approximately $1.39 trillion.
 
24     BrandywineGLOBAL— Global Opportunities Bond Fund

Portfolio managers
Primary responsibility for the day-to-day management of the fund lies with the following portfolio managers.
 
Portfolio manager    Title and recent biography    Portfolio manager of the fund since
 
Tracy Chen, CFA, CAIA
  
Ms. Chen joined Brandywine Global in 2008. As portfolio manager, she leads Brandywine Global’s structured credit investing, including investments in U.S. and European RMBS, CMBS, and ABS as well as CLO and other structured products. Prior to joining Brandywine Global, she was with UBS Investment Bank as Director of Structured Products (2006-2008); GMAC Mortgage Group (2002-2006), focusing on mortgage whole loan pricing and trading; and Deloitte Consulting (2001-2002). Tracy earned her M.B.A. with a concentration in Finance from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. She also holds an M.A. in American Studies and a B.A. from University of Electronic Science & Technology of China.
  
 
2020
 
David F. Hoffman, CFA
  
Mr. Hoffman is a Managing Director of Brandywine Global and has been employed at Brandywine Global since 1995. Previously, he was president of Hoffman Capital, a global financial futures investment firm (1991-1995); head of fixed income investments at Columbus Circle Investors (1983-1990); senior vice president and portfolio manager at INA Capital Management (1979-1982), and fixed income portfolio manager at Provident National Bank (1975-1979). Mr. Hoffman earned a B.A. in Art History from Williams College.
  
 
2006
 
John (Jack) P. McIntyre, CFA
  
Mr. McIntyre is a Portfolio Manager and has been employed at Brandywine Global since 1998. Previously, he held positions as market strategist with McCarthy, Crisanti & Maffei, Inc. (1995-1998); senior fixed income analyst with Technical Data, a division of Thomson Financial Services (1992-1995); quantitative associate with Brown Brothers Harriman & Co. (1990), and investment analyst with the Public Employee Retirement Administration of Massachusetts (1987-1989). Mr. McIntyre earned an M.B.A. in Finance from the Leonard N. Stern Graduate School of Business at New York University and a B.B.A. in Finance from the University of Massachusetts, Amherst.
  
 
2012
 
Brian L. Kloss, JD, CPA
  
Mr. Kloss joined Brandywine Global in 2009. As portfolio manager, he leads Brandywine Global’s credit research capabilities bringing over 20 years of high yield and distressed debt experience. Previously, Brian was co-portfolio manager at Dreman Value Management, LLC (2007-2009); high yield analyst/trader at Gartmore Global Investments (2002-2007); high yield and equity portfolio manager and general analyst at Penn Capital Management, Ltd. (2000-2002); an analyst with The Concord Advisory Group, Ltd. (1998-2000); and an international tax consultant with Deloitte & Touche LLP (1995-1998). Brian earned his J.D. from Villanova School of Law
  
 
2020
 
BrandywineGLOBAL— Global Opportunities Bond Fund       25  

    
and graduated summa cum laude with a B.S. in Accounting from University of Scranton. He is a member of the New Jersey and Pennsylvania Bar Associations.
    
 
Anujeet Sareen, CFA
  
Mr. Sareen is a Portfolio Manager and has been employed at Brandywine Global since 2016. Previously, he was a managing director of global fixed income and a global macro strategist, as well as a chair of the Currency Strategy Group at Wellington Management in Boston. Over his 22-year career at Wellington (1994-2016), he held a variety of roles while cultivating extensive fixed income and currency management experience. Mr. Sareen earned a B.A. in Computer Science from Brown University.
  
 
2017
The SAI provides information about the compensation of the portfolio managers, other accounts managed by the portfolio managers and any fund shares held by the portfolio managers.
Management fee
The fund pays a management fee at an annual rate of 0.50% of its average daily net assets.
For the fiscal year ended December 31, 2022, the fund paid LMPFA an effective management fee of 0.50% of the fund’s average daily net assets for management services. The effective management fee reflects any fees waived by the manager (including any fees waived in connection with investments by the fund in affiliated investment companies for which the fund paid a management fee).
A discussion regarding the basis for the Board’s approval of the fund’s management agreement and subadvisory agreement is available in the fund’s Semi-Annual Report for the period ended June 30, 2022.
Expense limitation
The manager has agreed to waive fees and/or reimburse operating expenses (other than interest, brokerage commissions, dividend expense on short sales, taxes, extraordinary expenses and acquired fund fees and expenses) so that the ratio of total annual fund operating expenses will not exceed 1.00% for Class A shares, 1.75% for Class C shares, 1.45% for Class C1 shares, 1.00% for Class FI shares, 1.25% for Class R shares, 0.75% for Class I shares and 0.65% for Class IS shares, subject to recapture as described below. In addition, the ratio of total annual fund operating expenses for Class IS shares will not exceed the ratio of total annual fund operating expenses for Class I shares, subject to recapture as described below. These arrangements are expected to continue until December 31, 2024, may be terminated prior to that date by agreement of the manager and the Board, and may be terminated at any time after that date by the manager. These arrangements, however, may be modified by the manager to decrease total annual fund operating expenses at any time. The manager is also permitted to recapture amounts waived and/or reimbursed to a class within three years after the fiscal year in which the manager earned the fee or incurred the expense if the class’ total annual fund operating expenses have fallen to a level below the limit described above. In no case will the manager recapture any amount that would result, on any particular business day of the fund, in the class’ total annual fund operating expenses exceeding the applicable limits described above or any other lower limit then in effect. In addition, the manager has agreed to waive the fund’s management fee to an extent sufficient to offset the net management fee payable in connection with any investment in an affiliated money market fund. This management fee waiver is not subject to the recapture provision discussed above.
Additional information
The fund enters into contractual arrangements with various parties, including, among others, the fund’s manager and the subadviser, who provide services to the fund. Shareholders are not parties to, or intended (or “third-party”) beneficiaries of, those contractual arrangements.
This Prospectus and the SAI provide information concerning the fund that you should consider in determining whether to purchase shares of the fund. The fund may make changes to this information from time to time. Neither this Prospectus nor the SAI is intended to give rise to any contract rights or other rights in any shareholder, other than rights conferred by federal or state securities laws.
Distribution
Franklin Distributors, LLC (“Franklin Distributors” or the “Distributor”), an indirect, wholly-owned broker/dealer subsidiary of Franklin Resources, serves as the fund’s sole and exclusive distributor.
The fund has adopted a shareholder services and distribution plan pursuant to Rule 12b-1 under the Investment Company Act of 1940, as amended. Under the plan, the fund pays distribution and/or service fees based on an annualized percentage of average daily net assets of up to 0.25% for Class A shares; up to 1.00% for Class C shares; up to 0.70% for Class C1 shares; up to 0.25% for Class FI shares and up to 0.50% for Class R shares.
 
26     BrandywineGLOBAL— Global Opportunities Bond Fund

Payments by the fund under its plan go to the Distributor, financial intermediaries and other parties that provide services in connection with or are otherwise involved in the distribution of its shares or administration of plans or programs that use its shares as their funding medium, and to reimburse certain other expenses and payments. From time to time, the Distributor and/or financial intermediaries may agree to a reduction or waiver of these fees. These fees are an ongoing expense and, over time, will increase the cost of your investment and may cost you more than other types of sales charges. Class I shares and Class IS shares are not subject to distribution and/or service fees under the plan.
Additional payments
In addition to payments made to intermediaries under the fund’s shareholder services and distribution plan and other payments made by the fund for shareholder services and/or recordkeeping, the Distributor, the manager and/or their affiliates make payments for distribution, shareholder servicing, marketing and promotional activities and related expenses out of their profits and other available sources, including profits from their relationships with the fund. These payments are not reflected as additional expenses in the fee table contained in this Prospectus. The recipients of these payments may include the Distributor and affiliates of the manager, as well as Service Agents through which investors may purchase shares of the fund, including your Service Agent. The total amount of these payments is substantial, may be substantial to any given recipient and may exceed the costs and expenses incurred by the recipient for any fund-related marketing or shareholder servicing activities. The payments described in this paragraph are often referred to as “revenue sharing payments.” Revenue sharing arrangements are separately negotiated between the Distributor, the manager and/or their affiliates, and the recipients of these payments.
Revenue sharing payments create an incentive for an intermediary or its employees or associated persons to recommend or sell shares of the fund to you. Contact your Service Agent for details about revenue sharing payments it receives or may receive. Additional information about revenue sharing payments is available in the SAI. Revenue sharing payments, as well as payments by the fund under the shareholder services and distribution plan or for recordkeeping and/or shareholder services, also benefit the manager, the Distributor and their affiliates to the extent the payments result in more assets being invested in the fund on which fees are being charged.
 
BrandywineGLOBAL— Global Opportunities Bond Fund       27  

Choosing a share class
The fund offers multiple share classes. Each share class represents an investment in the same portfolio of securities, but each has different availability (for example, not all Service Agents offer all share classes), eligibility criteria, expense structures and arrangements for shareholder services or distribution, allowing you to choose the class that best meets your needs. You should read this section carefully and speak with your Service Agent (if applicable) to determine which share class is most appropriate for you. When choosing the appropriate share class, you should consider the following factors:
 
 
the amount you plan to invest;
 
the length of time you expect to own the shares;
 
the total costs associated with your investment, including any sales charges that you pay when you buy or sell fund shares and expenses that are paid out of fund assets over time;
 
whether you qualify for any reduction or waiver of the sales charge;
 
the availability of the share class;
 
the services that will be available to you and whether you meet any eligibility criteria; and
 
the amount of compensation that your Service Agent will receive.
For example, when choosing between Class A or Class C shares, you should be aware that, generally speaking, the larger the size of your investment and the longer your investment horizon, the more likely it will be that Class C shares will not be as advantageous as Class A shares. The annual distribution and/or service fees on Class C shares may cost you more over the longer term than the front-end sales charge and service fees you would pay for larger purchases of Class A shares. If you are eligible to purchase Class I shares, you should be aware that Class I shares are not subject to a front-end sales charge or distribution or service fees and generally have lower annual expenses than Class A or Class C shares.
Generally speaking, Class A shares have lower annual operating expenses than Class C/Class C1 shares but not as low as Class I/Class IS shares. Overall, Class IS shares generally have the lowest annual expenses of all share classes.
More information about the fund’s classes of shares is available through the fund’s website. You’ll find detailed information, free of charge and in a clear and prominent format, about sales charges and ways you can qualify for reduced or waived sales charges.
The fund’s shares are distributed by Franklin Distributors.
Share class features summary
The following table summarizes key features of the fund’s share classes. In addition, you should read carefully this Prospectus, including the fee table and the expense example at the front of this Prospectus before choosing your share class. If you are not purchasing shares directly from the fund, you should contact your Service Agent for help choosing a share class that may be appropriate for you. Capitalized terms used in the table have the definition given to them in this Prospectus.
 
     Minimum initial investments1  
Initial sales
charge
 
Contingent deferred
sales charge
 
Annual distribution
and/or service (12b‑1)
fees
  Exchange privilege2  
Conversion to Class A
shares
Class A  
Generally, $1,000 for all accounts except:
(i)   $25 if establishing a Systematic Investment Plan;
(ii) $250 for IRAs; and
(iii)  none for certain fee-based programs and retirement plans
 
Up to 3.75%; reduced or
waived for large purchases
and certain investors. No charge for purchases of
$500,000 or more
  1.00% on purchases of $500,000 or more if you redeem within 18 months of purchase; waived for certain investors   0.25% of average daily net assets   Class A shares of funds sold by the Distributor   N/A
Class C  
Generally, $1,000 for all accounts except:
(i)   $25 if establishing a Systematic Investment Plan;
(ii) $250 for IRAs; and
(iii)  none for certain fee-based programs and retirement plans
  None  
1.00% if you redeem within 1 year of
purchase; waived for certain investors
  1.00% of average daily net assets   Class C shares of funds sold by the Distributor   Yes; generally converts to Class A in the month of, or the month following, the 8 year anniversary of the Class C share purchase date (conversion date occurs typically on a Friday in the middle of the month); please consult your Service Agent for more information
Class C1  
  Class C1 shares are not available for purchase by new or existing investors
  None  
1.00% if you redeem within 1 year of
purchase; waived for
  0.70% of average daily net assets  
Class C1 shares of funds sold by the Distributor
or if a fund does not
  Yes; generally converts to Class A in the month of, or the month following, the 8
 
28     BrandywineGLOBAL— Global Opportunities Bond Fund

   
(except for investors previously authorized prior to the closure of such share class)
  Class C1 shares will continue to be available for dividend reinvestment and incoming exchanges
      certain investors       offer Class C1 shares, Class C shares   year anniversary of the Class C1 share purchase date (conversion date occurs typically on a Friday in the middle of the month); please consult your Service Agent for more information
Class FI   None   None   None   0.25% of average daily net assets   Class FI shares of funds sold by the Distributor*   No
Class R   None   None   None   0.50% of average daily net assets   Class R shares of funds sold by the Distributor*   No
Class I  
  $1,000,000;
  Waived for certain Service Agents with arrangements with the Distributor, Omnibus Retirement Plans and certain individuals affiliated with Legg Mason;
  However, investors investing through a Service Agent acting as agent on behalf of its customers will be subject to the following minimums:
(i)   if investing through a Systematic Investment Plan, $25;
(ii) if an individual investor, $1,000; and
(iii)  none for certain fee-based programs
  None   None   None   Class I shares of funds sold by the Distributor*   No
Class IS  
  $1,000,000;
  Waived for certain Service Agents with arrangements with the Distributor and Omnibus Retirement Plans
  However, investors investing through a Service Agent acting as agent on behalf of its customers will be subject to the following minimums:
(i)   if investing through a Systematic Investment Plan, $25;
(ii) if an individual investor $1,000; and
(iii)  none for certain fee-based programs
  None   None   None   Class IS shares of funds sold by the Distributor*   No
 
1 
Please note that the minimum initial investment amount must be met on a per class basis. However, initial investments in Class C shares may be combined with existing investment amounts in Class C1 shares for the purposes of satisfying the initial investment minimums of Class C shares. In addition, your Service Agent may impose higher or lower investment minimums, or may impose no minimum investment requirement.
2 
You or your Service Agent may instruct the fund to exchange shares of any class for shares of the same class of any other fund sold by the Distributor, provided that the fund shares to be acquired in the exchange are available to new investors in such other fund and that you are eligible to invest in such shares. For investors investing through retirement and benefit plans or fee-based programs, you should contact your Service Agent that administers your plan or sponsors the fee-based program to request an exchange. Certain retirement plan programs with exchange features in effect prior to November 20, 2006, as approved by the Distributor, remain eligible for exchange from Class C shares to Class A shares in accordance with the program terms. Please see the SAI for more details. In addition, you may exchange shares of the fund for another share class of the same fund if you meet the eligibility requirements of that particular class. Please contact your Service Agent or the fund about funds available for exchange.
* 
If this share class is not available, you may be eligible to exchange into a different share class of such fund; see “Exchanging shares — Exchangeability between funds without the same share class” below.
Share class availability
You may buy shares of the fund either directly from the fund or through a Service Agent. Please note that your Service Agent may not offer all classes of shares since each Service Agent determines which share class(es) to make available to its clients. Your Service Agent may receive
 
BrandywineGLOBAL— Global Opportunities Bond Fund       29  

different compensation for selling one class of shares than for selling another class, which may depend on, among other things, the type of investor account and the practices adopted by your Service Agent. Each class of shares, except Class IS shares, is authorized to pay fees for recordkeeping services, account servicing, networking, or similar services to Service Agents. As a result, operating expenses of classes that incur new or additional recordkeeping fees may increase over time. Certain Service Agents may impose their own investment fees and maintain their own practices for purchasing and selling fund shares, including higher or lower investment minimums or none at all; these practices are not described in this Prospectus or the SAI and will depend on the policies, procedures and trading platforms of the Service Agent. Your Service Agent may provide shareholder services that differ from the services provided by other Service Agents. Services provided by your Service Agent may vary by class.
Plan sponsors, plan fiduciaries and other Service Agents may choose to impose qualification requirements that differ from the fund’s share class eligibility standards as stated in this Prospectus. In certain cases, this could result in the selection of a share class with higher distribution and/or service fees than otherwise would have been incurred. The fund is not responsible for, and has no control over, the decision of any plan sponsor, plan fiduciary or Service Agent to impose such differing requirements. Please consult with your plan sponsor, plan fiduciary or Service Agent for more information about available share classes.
Please contact your Service Agent about the availability of fund shares, the shareholder services it provides for each class, the compensation it receives in connection with the sale of each share class and the Service Agent’s practices and other information.
The following table provides information on the availability of each share class based on investor type, subject to the share class’ eligibility requirements. Your Service Agent can help you determine which share class is appropriate for you. The fund reserves the right to modify or waive the eligibility policies for share class availability at any time.
 
      A    C1    C1    FI1    R    I    IS
Individual Investors                         2, 3     2 
Omnibus Retirement Plans          4        1       
Individual Retirement Plans                           
Clients of Eligible Financial Intermediaries                     5     5 
Institutional Investors                           
 
1 
Shares are not available for purchase through accounts where the Distributor is the broker-dealer of record (“Distributor Accounts”).
2
Individual investors investing through a Service Agent may be eligible to invest in Class I or Class IS shares, if such Service Agent is acting solely as an agent on behalf of its customers pursuant to an agreement with the Distributor and such investor’s shares are held in an omnibus account on the books of the fund. Please contact your Service Agent for more information.
3
Class I shares may be purchased directly from the fund by the following persons: (i) current employees of the manager and its affiliates; (ii) former employees of the manager and its affiliates with existing accounts; (iii) current and former board members of investment companies managed by affiliates of Franklin Resources; (iv) current and former board members of Franklin Resources; and (v) the “immediate families” of such persons. “Immediate families” are such person’s spouse (including the surviving spouse of a deceased board member), parents, grandparents, and children and grandchildren (including step-relationships). For such investors, the minimum initial investment is $1,000 and the minimum for each purchase of additional shares is $50. Current employees may purchase additional Class I shares through a systematic investment plan.
4
Class C1 shares are not available for purchase by new or existing investors (except for certain retirement plan programs authorized by the Distributor prior to August 1, 2012). Class C1 shares will continue to be available for dividend reinvestment and incoming exchanges.
5
Investors who qualify as Clients of Eligible Financial Intermediaries or who participate in Eligible Investment Programs made available through their Service Agents (such as investors in fee-based advisory or mutual fund “wrap” programs) are eligible to purchase, directly or via exchange, Class I or Class IS shares, among other share classes. In such cases your ability to hold Class I or Class IS shares may be premised on your continuing participation in a fee-based advisory or mutual fund wrap program. Your Service Agent may reserve the right to redeem your Class I or Class IS shares or exchange your Class I or Class IS shares or exchange them for Class A shares of the same fund, as applicable, if you terminate your fee-based advisory or mutual fund wrap program and are no longer eligible for Class I or Class IS shares. You may be subject to an initial sales charge in connection with such exchange, and you will be subject to the annual distribution and/or service fee applicable to Class A shares. Any redemption may generate a taxable gain or loss and significantly change the asset allocation of your account.
 
 
Omnibus Retirement Plans are retirement plans held on the books of the fund in a plan level or omnibus level account and include: (i) 401(k) plans; (ii) 457 plans; (iii) employer-sponsored 403(b) plans; (iv) profit-sharing plans; (v) non-qualified deferred compensation plans; (vi) employer-sponsored benefit plans (including health savings accounts); (vii) defined benefit plans; (viii) other similar employer-sponsored retirement and benefit plans; (ix) individual retirement accounts that are administered on the same IRA recordkeeping platform and that invest in the fund through a single omnibus account pursuant to a special contractual arrangement with the fund or the Distributor; and (x) investors who rollover fund shares from a retirement plan into an individual retirement account administered on the same retirement plan platform. SIMPLE IRAs are considered Omnibus Retirement Plans if they are employer-sponsored and held at the plan level.
Individual Retirement Plans include: (i) retirement plans investing through brokerage accounts; (ii) certain retirement plans with direct relationships to the fund that are not Institutional Investors nor investing through omnibus accounts; and (iii) individual retirement vehicles not held through an omnibus account, such as: (a) traditional and Roth IRAs; (b) Coverdell education savings accounts; (c) individual 403(b)(7) custodial accounts; (d) Keogh plans; (e) SEPs; (f) SARSEPs; and (g) SIMPLE IRAs or similar accounts. Individual Retirement Plans include plans held at the individual participant level. Individual Retirement Plans are treated like individual investors for purposes of determining sales charges and any
 
30     BrandywineGLOBAL— Global Opportunities Bond Fund

applicable sales charge reductions or waivers.
Clients of Eligible Financial Intermediaries include: investors who invest in the fund through Service Agents that (a) charge such investors an ongoing fee for advisory, investment, consulting or similar services, or (b) have entered into an agreement with the Distributor to offer Class A, Class C, Class FI, Class R, Class I or Class IS shares through a no-load network or platform (including college savings vehicles) (“Eligible Investment Programs”). These investors may include (i) investors who invest in the fund through the program of a Service Agent where the investor typically invests $10 million or more in assets under management in accounts with the Service Agent (“Management Accounts”); (ii) pension and profit sharing plans; (iii) other employee benefit trusts; (iv) endowments; (v) foundations; (vi) corporations; (vii) college savings vehicles such as Section 529 plans; and (viii) direct retail investment platforms through mutual fund “supermarkets,” where the sponsor links its client’s account (including IRA accounts on such platforms) to a master account in the sponsor’s name.
Institutional Investors may include: (i) corporations; (ii) banks; (iii) trust companies; (iv) insurance companies; (v) investment companies; (vi) foundations; (vii) endowments; and (viii) other similar entities. The Distributor or the Service Agent may impose additional eligibility requirements or criteria to determine if an investor, including the types of investors listed above, qualifies as an Institutional Investor.
To visit the website, go to www.franklintempleton.com/mutualfunds, and click on the name of the fund. On the selected fund’s page, scroll to the bottom of the page and click on the disclosure labeled “Click here for funds sales charge and breakpoint information.”
Additional information about each share class
Class A shares
The public offering price of Class A shares is the net asset value per share plus the applicable sales charge, unless you qualify for a sales charge waiver.
Sales charges
The following table shows the front-end sales charge that you may pay, depending on the amount you purchase. You pay a lower rate as the size of your investment increases to certain levels called breakpoints. You do not pay a sales charge on the fund’s distributions or dividends that you reinvest in additional Class A shares.
It also shows the amount of compensation that will be paid to your Service Agent out of the sales charge if you buy shares from a Service Agent. As shown below, the sales charge may be allocated between your Service Agent and the Distributor. Service Agents will receive a distribution and/or service fee payable on Class A shares at an annual rate of up to 0.25% of the average daily net assets represented by the Class A shares serviced by them. The Distributor may not pay Service Agents selling Class A shares to Omnibus Retirement Plans a commission on the purchase price of Class A shares sold by them. However, for Omnibus Retirement Plans that are permitted to purchase shares at net asset value, the Distributor may pay Service Agents commissions of up to 1.00% of the purchase price of the Class A shares that are purchased with regular ongoing plan contributions. Please contact your Service Agent for more information.
 
Amount of investment     
Sales charge
as a % of
offering price
      
Sales charge
as a % of net
amount
invested
      
Service Agent
commission as
a % of
offering price
 
Less than $100,000        3.75          3.90          3.50  
$100,000 but less than $250,000        3.25          3.36          3.00  
$250,000 but less than $500,000        2.25          2.30          2.25  
$500,000 or more1        -0-          -0-          up to 1.00  
 
1 
The Distributor may pay a commission of up to 1.00% to a Service Agent for purchase amounts of $500,000 or more. In such cases, starting in the thirteenth month after purchase, the Service Agent will also receive an annual distribution and/or service fee of up to 0.25% of the average daily net assets represented by the Class A shares held by its clients. Prior to the thirteenth month, the Distributor will retain this fee. Where the Service Agent does not receive the payment of this commission, the Service Agent will instead receive the annual distribution and/or service fee starting immediately after purchase. Please contact your Service Agent for more information.
Reductions, waivers or elimination of sales charges for Class A shares
Larger purchases
You may reduce or eliminate your Class A front-end sales charge by purchasing greater quantities. You pay a lower rate as the size of your investment increases to the breakpoint levels indicated in the chart above. You do not pay an initial sales charge when you buy $500,000 or more of Class A shares. However, if you redeem these Class A shares within 18 months of purchase, you will pay a contingent deferred sales charge of 1.00%. Please see “Contingent deferred sales charges—Class A, Class C and Class C1 shares” below.
 
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Letter of intent and accumulation privilege
There are several ways you can combine Eligible Purchases (as defined below) within Eligible Accounts (as defined below) to take advantage of the breakpoints in the Class A sales charge schedule. In order to take advantage of reductions in sales charges that may be available to you when you purchase fund shares, you must inform your Service Agent or the fund if you believe you are eligible for a letter of intent or a right of accumulation. Whether you made Eligible Purchases through one or more Service Agents, directly from the fund or through a combination of the foregoing, it is your responsibility to inform your Service Agent or the fund if you own Eligible Purchases that you believe are eligible to be aggregated with your purchases. If you do not do so, you may not receive all sales charge reductions for which you are eligible. Account statements may be necessary in order to verify your eligibility for a reduced sales charge.
Eligible Purchases include: (i) any class of shares of any other Legg Mason or Franklin Templeton fund other than shares of such funds offered through separately managed accounts that are managed by Legg Mason or Franklin Templeton; and (ii) units of a Section 529 Plan managed by Legg Mason or Franklin Templeton. For purposes of a letter of intent and the accumulation privilege, Legg Mason and Franklin Templeton funds include BrandywineGLOBAL funds, ClearBridge Investments funds, Martin Currie funds, and Western Asset funds. They do not include the funds in the Franklin Templeton Variable Insurance Products Trust, Legg Mason Partners Variable Equity Trust, Legg Mason Partners Variable Income Trust or Legg Mason Partners Money Market Trust (except for shares held in Distributor Accounts). Please contact your Service Agent or the fund for more information.
Eligible Accounts include shares of Legg Mason and Franklin Templeton funds registered to (or held by a financial intermediary for):
 
   
You, individually;
   
Your “family member,” defined as your spouse or domestic partner, as recognized by applicable state law, or your children;
   
You jointly with one or more family members;
   
You jointly with one or more persons who are not family members if that other person has not included the value of the jointly-owned shares for purposes of the accumulation privilege (as described below) for that person’s separate investments in Legg Mason or Franklin Templeton fund shares;
   
A Coverdell Education Savings account for which you or a family member is the identified responsible person;
   
A trustee/custodian of an IRA (which includes a Roth IRA and an employer sponsored IRA such as a SIMPLE IRA) or your non-ERISA covered 403(b) plan account, if the shares are registered/recorded under your or a family member’s Social Security number;
   
A 529 college savings plan over which you or a family member has investment discretion and control;
   
Any entity over which you or a family member has individual or shared authority, as principal, has investment discretion and control (for example, an UGMA/UTMA account for a child on which you or a family member is the custodian, a trust on which you or a family member is the trustee, a business account (not to include retirement plans) for your solely owned business (or the solely owned business of a family member) on which you or a family member is the authorized signer); or
   
A trust established by you or a family member as grantor.
Legg Mason and Franklin Templeton fund shares held through an administrator or trustee/custodian of an Employer Sponsored Retirement Plan (see definition below) such as a 401(k) plan do not qualify for the accumulation privilege.
Legg Mason and Franklin Templeton fund assets held in multiple Employer Sponsored Retirement Plans (as defined below) may be combined in order to qualify for sales charge breakpoints at the plan level if the plans are sponsored by the same employer.
An “Employer Sponsored Retirement Plan” is a Qualified Retirement Plan (as defined below), ERISA covered 403(b) plan or certain non-qualified deferred compensation arrangements that operate in a similar manner to a Qualified Retirement Plan, such as 457 plans and executive deferred compensation arrangements, but not including employer sponsored IRAs. A “Qualified Retirement Plan” is an employer sponsored pension or profit sharing plan that qualifies under section 401(a) of the Internal Revenue Code, including 401(k), money purchase pension, profit sharing and defined benefit plans.
Letter of intent. You may qualify for a reduced front-end sales charge by signing a “Letter of Intent”. A Letter of Intent allows you to combine the current or cost value, whichever is higher, of Eligible Purchases in Eligible Accounts with the value that you intend to purchase within the next 13 months, which would, if bought all at once, qualify you for a reduced sales charge. In addition, current holdings under the accumulation privilege may be included in the Letter of Intent. Shares or units redeemed or sold prior to reaching the threshold for a reduced sales charge will not be counted for these purposes. The 13-month period begins when the Letter of Intent is received by the fund or your Service Agent and you must inform your Service Agent or the fund that later purchases are subject to a Letter of Intent. Account statements may be necessary in order to verify your eligibility. If you hold Eligible Purchases in accounts at two or more Service Agents, please contact your Service Agent to determine which shares/units may be credited toward the Letter of Intent. Certain directors, trustees and fiduciaries may be entitled to combine accounts in determining their sales charge.
During the term of the Letter of Intent, the fund will hold Class A shares representing up to 5% of the indicated amount in an escrow account for payment of the sales charge due if you do not meet the intended asset level goal during the 13-month term of the Letter of Intent. If the full amount is not purchased during the 13-month period, shares in the amount of any sales charge due, based on the amount of actual purchases will be redeemed from your account.
 
32     BrandywineGLOBAL— Global Opportunities Bond Fund

Accumulation privilege. The accumulation privilege allows you to combine the current or cost value, whichever is higher, of Eligible Purchases in Eligible Accounts with the dollar amount of your next purchase of Class A shares in determining whether you qualify for a breakpoint and a reduced front-end sales charge. The current value of shares is determined by multiplying the number of shares as of the day prior to your current purchase by their public offering price. The cost value of shares is determined by aggregating the amount of Eligible Purchases in Eligible Accounts (including reinvested dividends and capital gains, but excluding capital appreciation), less any withdrawals, as of the date prior to your current purchase. The cost value of Eligible Purchases in Eligible Accounts, however, may only be aggregated for share purchases that took place within 18 months of your current purchase or your letter of intent start date, if applicable. You must inform your Service Agent or the fund if you are eligible for the accumulation privilege and of the other Eligible Purchases you own that are eligible to be aggregated with your purchases. Account statements may be necessary in order to verify your eligibility. If you hold Eligible Purchases in accounts at two or more Service Agents, please contact your Service Agent to determine which Eligible Purchases may be credited toward the accumulation privilege.
Waivers for certain Class A investors
Class A initial sales charges are waived for certain types of investors, including:
 
 
Shareholders investing in Class A shares through Distributor Accounts
 
Investors who redeemed at least the same amount of Class A shares of a fund sold by the Distributor in the past 90 days, if the investor’s Service Agent is notified
 
Directors and officers of any Legg Mason or Franklin Templeton fund
 
Employees of Franklin Resources and its subsidiaries
 
Investors investing through certain retirement plans
 
Investors who rollover fund shares from an employer-sponsored retirement plan into an individual retirement account administered on the same retirement plan platform
If you qualify for a waiver of the Class A initial sales charge, you must notify your Service Agent or the fund at 877-6LM-FUND/656-3863 at the time of purchase and provide sufficient information at the time of purchase to permit verification that the purchase qualifies for the initial sales charge waiver.
Different Service Agents may impose different sales loads or offer different ways to reduce sales loads. These variations are described at the end of this Prospectus in the appendix titled “Appendix: Waivers and Discounts Available from Certain Service Agents.”
For additional information regarding waivers of Class A initial sales charges, contact your Service Agent or the fund, consult the SAI or visit www.franklintempleton.com/mutualfunds and click on the name of the fund. On the selected fund’s page, scroll to the bottom of the page and click on the disclosure labeled “Click here for funds sales charge and breakpoint information.”
Class C shares
You buy Class C shares at net asset value with no initial sales charge. However, if you redeem your Class C shares within one year of purchase, you will pay a contingent deferred sales charge of 1.00%. Omnibus Retirement Plans may not be subject to a contingent deferred sales charge.
Except as noted below, the Distributor generally will pay Service Agents selling Class C shares a commission of up to 1.00% of the purchase price of the Class C shares they sell. The Distributor will retain the contingent deferred sales charges and an annual distribution and/or service fee of up to 1.00% of the average daily net assets represented by the Class C shares serviced by these Service Agents until the thirteenth month after purchase. Starting in the thirteenth month after purchase, these Service Agents will receive an annual distribution and/or service fee of up to 1.00% of the average daily net assets represented by the Class C shares serviced by them. The Distributor may not pay Service Agents selling Class C shares to Omnibus Retirement Plans a commission on the purchase price of Class C shares sold by them. Instead, immediately after purchase, the Distributor may pay these Service Agents an annual distribution and/or service fee of up to 1.00% of the average daily net assets represented by the Class C shares serviced by them.
Class C1 shares
Class C1 shares are not available for purchase by new or existing investors (except for certain retirement plan programs authorized by the Distributor prior to August 1, 2012). Class C1 shares are available for dividend reinvestment and incoming exchanges of Class C1 shares from other funds sold by the Distributor. You buy Class C1 shares at net asset value with no initial sales charge. However, if you redeem your Class C1 shares within one year of purchase, you will pay a contingent deferred sales charge of 1.00%. However, if you exchange Class C1 shares that were not subject to a contingent deferred sales charge when initially purchased for Class C1 shares of a fund that imposes a contingent deferred sales charge, your contingent deferred sales charge will be measured from the date of your exchange.
The Distributor will retain the contingent deferred sales charges and an annual distribution and/or service fee of up to 0.70% of the average daily net assets represented by the Class C1 shares serviced by these Service Agents until the thirteenth month after purchase. Starting in the thirteenth month after purchase, these Service Agents will receive an annual distribution and/or service fee of up to 0.70% of the average daily net assets represented by the Class C1 shares serviced by them.
 
BrandywineGLOBAL— Global Opportunities Bond Fund       33  

Class C and Class C1 share conversion
Except as noted below, Class C and Class C1 shares automatically convert to Class A shares after the shares have been held for 8 years from the purchase date; the shares will be converted in the month of, or the month following, the 8-year anniversary of purchase. The monthly conversion processing date typically occurs around the middle of every month and generally falls on a Friday. It is the responsibility of your Service Agent and not the fund or the Distributor to ensure that you are credited with the proper holding period. If your Service Agent does not have records verifying that your shares have been held for at least 8 years, your Service Agent may not convert your Class C or Class C1 shares to Class A shares. Group retirement plans held in an omnibus recordkeeping platform through a Service Agent that does not track participant-level share lot aging may not convert Class C or Class C1 shares to Class A shares. Customers of certain Service Agents may be subject to different terms or conditions, as set by their Service Agent, in connection with such conversions. Please refer to the appendix titled “Appendix: Waivers and Discounts Available from Certain Service Agents” on page A-1 of this Prospectus or contact your Service Agent for more information.
For Class C and Class C1 shares that have been acquired through an exchange from another fund sold by the Distributor, the purchase date is calculated from the date the shares were originally acquired in the other fund. When Class C and Class C1 shares that a shareholder acquired through a purchase or exchange convert, any other Class C and Class C1 shares that the shareholder acquired as reinvested dividends and distributions related to those shares also will convert into Class A shares on a pro rata basis.
All conversions from Class C or Class C1 shares to Class A shares will be based on the per share net asset value without the imposition of any sales load, fee or other charge. The conversion from Class C or Class C1 shares to Class A shares is not considered a taxable event for federal income tax purposes.
Contingent deferred sales charges – Class A, Class C and Class C1 shares
The contingent deferred sales charge is based on the net asset value at the time of purchase or redemption, whichever is less, and therefore you do not pay a sales charge on amounts representing appreciation or depreciation.
In addition, you do not pay a contingent deferred sales charge:
 
 
When you exchange shares for shares of the same share class of another fund sold by the Distributor
 
On shares representing reinvested distributions and dividends
 
On shares no longer subject to the contingent deferred sales charge
Each time you place a request to redeem shares, the fund will first redeem any shares in your account that are not subject to a contingent deferred sales charge and then redeem the shares in your account that have been held the longest.
If you redeem shares of a fund sold by the Distributor and pay a contingent deferred sales charge, you may, under certain circumstances, reinvest all or part of the redemption proceeds within 90 days in any other fund sold by the Distributor and receive pro rata credit for any contingent deferred sales charge imposed on the prior redemption. Please contact your Service Agent or the fund for additional information.
The Distributor receives contingent deferred sales charges as partial compensation for its expenses in selling shares, including the payment of compensation to your Service Agent.
Contingent deferred sales charge waivers
The contingent deferred sales charge for each share class will generally be waived:
 
 
On payments made through certain systematic withdrawal plans
 
On certain distributions from a retirement plan
 
For certain Omnibus Retirement Plans
 
For involuntary redemptions of small account balances
 
For 12 months following the death or disability of a shareholder
 
On redemptions with respect to investors where the Distributor did not pay the Service Agent a commission
To have your contingent deferred sales charge waived, you or your Service Agent must let the fund know at the time you redeem shares that you qualify for such a waiver.
Different Service Agents may offer different contingent deferred sales charge waivers. These variations are described at the end of this Prospectus in the appendix titled “Appendix: Waivers and Discounts Available from Certain Service Agents.”
For additional information regarding waivers of contingent deferred sales charges, contact your Service Agent or the fund, consult the SAI or visit the fund’s website, www.franklintempleton.com/mutualfunds, and click on the name of the fund. On the selected fund’s page, scroll to the bottom of the page and click on the disclosure labeled “Click here for funds sales charge and breakpoint information.”
 
34     BrandywineGLOBAL— Global Opportunities Bond Fund

Class FI shares
You buy Class FI shares at net asset value with no initial sales charge and no contingent deferred sales charge when redeemed. Service Agents receive an annual distribution and/or service fee of up to 0.25% of the average daily net assets represented by the Class FI shares serviced by them.
Class R shares
You buy Class R shares at net asset value with no initial sales charge and no contingent deferred sales charge when redeemed.
Service Agents receive an annual distribution and/or service fee of up to 0.50% of the average daily net assets represented by the Class R shares serviced by them.
Class I and Class IS shares
You buy Class I or Class IS shares at net asset value with no initial sales charge, no contingent deferred sales charge when redeemed and no asset-based fee for sales or distribution. However, if you purchase Class I or Class IS shares through a Service Agent acting solely as an agent on behalf of its customers pursuant to an agreement with the Distributor, that Service Agent may charge you a commission in an amount determined and separately disclosed to you by the Service Agent.
Because the fund is not a party to any commission arrangement between you and your Service Agent, any purchases and redemptions of Class I or Class IS shares will be made by the fund at the applicable net asset value (before imposition of the sales commission). Any commissions charged by a Service Agent are not reflected in the fees and expenses listed in the fee table or expense example in this Prospectus nor are they reflected in the performance in the bar chart and table in this Prospectus because these commissions are not charged by the fund.
 
BrandywineGLOBAL— Global Opportunities Bond Fund       35  

Buying shares
 
   
Generally   
You may buy shares at their net asset value next determined after receipt by your Service Agent or the transfer agent of your purchase request in good order, plus any applicable sales charge.
 
The fund may not be available for sale in certain states. Prospective investors should inquire as to whether the fund is available for sale in their state of residence.
 
You must provide the following information for your order to be processed:
 
   Name of fund being bought
 
   Class of shares being bought
 
   Dollar amount or number of shares being bought (as applicable)
 
   Account number (if existing account)
Through a
Service Agent
  
You should contact your Service Agent to open an account and make arrangements to buy shares.
 
Your Service Agent may charge an annual account maintenance fee.
Through the
fund
  
Investors should contact the fund at 877-6LM-FUND/656-3863 to open an account and make arrangements to buy shares.
 
For initial purchases, complete and send your account application to the fund at one of the following addresses:
 
Regular Mail:
 
Legg Mason Funds
P.O. Box 33030
St. Petersburg, FL 33733-8030
 
Express, Certified or Registered Mail:
 
Legg Mason Funds
100 Fountain Parkway
St. Petersburg, FL 33716-1205
 
Subsequent purchases should be sent to the same address. Enclose a check to pay for the shares. The fund will accept checks from other fund families and investment companies as long as the registration name on your fund account is the same as that listed on the check.
Through a
systematic
investment
plan
  
You may authorize your Service Agent or the fund transfer agent to transfer funds automatically from (i) a regular bank account, (ii) cash held in a brokerage account with a Service Agent, (iii) another fund sold by the Distributor or (iv) certain money market funds, in order to buy shares on a regular basis.
 
   Amounts transferred must meet the applicable minimums (see “Purchase and sale of fund shares”)
 
   If you do not have sufficient funds in your account on a transfer date, you may be charged a fee
 
   For amounts transferred from other funds sold by the Distributor, please see the section titled “Exchanging shares—Through a systematic exchange plan” in such fund’s prospectus
 
For more information, please contact your Service Agent or the fund, or consult the SAI.
Franklin
Templeton
VIP Services®
   You may be eligible for Franklin Templeton VIP Services® if you currently have $500,000 or more invested in Franklin Templeton affiliated funds based solely on shares registered directly with the fund and excluding shares held indirectly through brokerage accounts. Franklin Templeton VIP Services® shareholders enjoy enhanced services and transaction capabilities. Please contact Shareholder Services at (800) 632-2301 for additional information on this program.
Additional information about purchases
If you pay with a check or electronic transfer (ACH) that does not clear or if your payment is not received in a timely manner, your purchase may be cancelled and you may be liable for any loss to the fund. Please note that the fund will not accept cash, third-party checks, credit card convenience
 
36     BrandywineGLOBAL— Global Opportunities Bond Fund

checks, pre-paid debit cards, non-bank money orders, traveler’s checks or checks drawn on foreign banks for purchase of fund shares. The fund and its agents have the right to reject or cancel any purchase due to nonpayment.
Account registration changes
Changes in registration or certain account options for accounts held directly with the fund must be made in writing. Medallion signature guarantees may be required. (See “Other things to know about transactions—Medallion signature guarantees” below.) All correspondence must include the account number and must be sent to one of the following addresses:
Regular Mail:
Legg Mason Funds
P.O. Box 33030
St. Petersburg, FL 33733-8030
Express, Certified or Registered Mail:
Legg Mason Funds
100 Fountain Parkway
St. Petersburg, FL 33716-1205
 
BrandywineGLOBAL— Global Opportunities Bond Fund       37  

Exchanging shares
 
   
Generally   
You or your Service Agent may instruct the fund to exchange shares of any class for shares of the same class of any other fund sold by the Distributor, provided that the fund shares to be acquired in the exchange are available to new investors in such other fund and you are eligible to invest in such shares. Additionally, if the fund into which you wish to exchange your shares does not offer the class of shares in which you are currently invested, you may be able to exchange for a different share class (see “Exchangeability between funds without the same share class” below).
 
In addition, you may exchange shares of a fund for a different share class of the same fund provided you meet the eligibility requirements of the share class into which you are exchanging. You may exchange shares of the fund for the same class of shares (or a different share class, if permitted) of other funds sold by the Distributor on any day that both the fund and the fund into which you are exchanging are open for business. Please contact your Service Agent or the fund about funds available for exchange.
 
If you hold Class C1 shares, you may exchange those shares for Class C1 shares of other funds sold by the distributor, or if a fund does not offer Class C1 shares, for Class C shares. However, once you exchange Class C1 shares for Class C shares, you would not be permitted to exchange from Class C shares back to Class C1 shares.
 
An exchange of shares of one fund for shares of another fund is considered a sale and generally results in a capital gain or loss for federal income tax purposes, unless you are investing through an IRA, 401(k) or other tax-advantaged account. An exchange of shares of one class directly for shares of another class of the same fund normally should not be taxable for federal income tax purposes. You should talk to your tax professional before making an exchange.
 
The exchange privilege is not intended as a vehicle for short-term trading. The fund may suspend or terminate your exchange privilege if you engage in a pattern of excessive exchanges.
Exchangeability between funds without the same share class   
If the fund you are exchanging into does not offer your share class, you may be able to exchange your shares for a different share class.
      Exchange from share class    Exchangeable for     
    Class I   
Class A shares of Franklin U.S. Government
Money Fund, Advisor Class or Class Z
  
                    
    Class IS    Advisor Class, Class Z or Class R6   
    Class FI    Class R   
    Class R    Class FI   
                
Franklin Templeton offers a distinctive family of funds tailored to help meet the varying needs of large and small investors   
You may exchange shares at their net asset value next determined after receipt by your Service Agent or the transfer agent of your exchange request in good order.
 
   If you bought shares through a Service Agent, contact your Service Agent to learn which funds your Service Agent makes available to you for exchanges
 
   If you bought shares directly from the fund, contact the fund at 877-6LM-FUND/656-3863 to learn which funds are available to you for exchanges
 
   Generally, exchanges may be made only between accounts that have identical registrations, unless you send written instructions with a signature guarantee
 
   Not all funds offer all classes
 
   Some funds are offered only in a limited number of states. Your Service Agent or the fund will provide information about the funds offered in your state
 
Always be sure to read the prospectus of the fund into which you are exchanging shares.
 
38     BrandywineGLOBAL— Global Opportunities Bond Fund

Investment minimums, sales charges and other requirements   
   In most instances, your shares will not be subject to an initial sales charge or a contingent deferred sales charge at the time of the exchange. You may be charged an initial or contingent deferred sales charge if the shares being exchanged were not subject to a sales charge
 
   Except as noted above, your contingent deferred sales charge (if any) will continue to be measured from the date of your original purchase of shares subject to a contingent deferred sales charge, and you will be subject to the contingent deferred sales charge of the fund that you originally purchased
 
   You will generally be required to meet the minimum investment requirement for the class of shares of the fund or share class into which your exchange is made (except in the case of systematic exchange plans or in exchanges of an entire account balance)
 
   Your exchange will also be subject to any other requirements of the fund or share class into which you are exchanging shares
 
   The fund may suspend or terminate your exchange privilege if you engage in a pattern of excessive exchanges
By telephone    Contact your Service Agent or, if you hold shares directly with the fund, call the fund at 877-6LM-FUND/656-3863 for information. Exchanges are priced at the net asset value next determined. Telephone exchanges may be made only between accounts that have identical registrations and may be made on any day the New York Stock Exchange (“NYSE”) is open.
By mail   
Contact your Service Agent or, if you hold shares directly with the fund, write to the fund at one of the following addresses:
 
Regular Mail:
 
Legg Mason Funds
P.O. Box 33030
St. Petersburg, FL 33733-8030
 
Express, Certified or Registered Mail:
 
Legg Mason Funds
100 Fountain Parkway
St. Petersburg, FL 33716-1205
Through a systematic exchange plan   
You may be permitted to schedule automatic exchanges of shares of the fund for shares of other funds available for exchange. All requirements for exchanging shares described above apply to these exchanges. In addition:
 
   Exchanges may be made monthly, every alternate month, quarterly, semi-annually or annually
 
   Each exchange must meet the applicable investment minimums for systematic investment plans (see “Purchase and sale of fund shares”)
 
For more information, please contact your Service Agent or the fund or consult the SAI.
 
BrandywineGLOBAL— Global Opportunities Bond Fund       39  

Redeeming shares
 
   
Generally   
You may redeem shares at their net asset value next determined after receipt by your Service Agent or the fund transfer agent of your redemption request in good order, less any applicable contingent deferred sales charge. Redemptions made through your Service Agent may be subject to transaction fees or other conditions as set by your Service Agent.
 
If the shares are held by a fiduciary or corporation, partnership or similar entity, other documents may be required.
Redemption proceeds   
Your redemption proceeds normally will be sent within 2 business days after your request is received in good order, but in any event within 7 days, regardless of the method the fund uses to make such payment (e.g., check, wire or electronic transfer (ACH)). If you make a redemption request before the fund has collected payment for the purchase of shares, the fund may delay your proceeds until payment is collected, for up to 10 days.
Your redemption proceeds may be delayed, or your right to receive redemption proceeds suspended beyond 7 days, if the NYSE is closed (other than on weekends or holidays) or trading is restricted, if an emergency exists, or otherwise as permitted by order of the Securities and Exchange Commission.
 
If you have a brokerage account with a Service Agent, your redemption proceeds may be sent to your Service Agent. Your redemption proceeds can be sent by check to your address of record or by wire or electronic transfer (ACH) to a bank account designated by you. To change the bank account designated to receive wire or electronic transfers, you will be required to deliver a new written authorization and may be asked to provide other documents. You may be charged a fee by your bank on a wire or an electronic transfer (ACH).
 
In other cases, unless you direct otherwise, your proceeds will be paid by check mailed to your address of record.
 
Under normal circumstances, the fund expects to meet redemption requests by using cash or cash equivalents in its portfolio and/or selling portfolio assets to generate cash. The fund also may pay redemption proceeds using cash obtained through borrowing arrangements that may be available from time to time.
 
The fund may pay all or a portion of your redemption proceeds by giving you securities (for example, if the fund reasonably believes that a cash redemption may have a substantial impact on the fund and its remaining shareholders). You may pay transaction costs to dispose of the securities, and you may receive less for them than the price at which they were valued for purposes of the redemption.
 
The fund has available an unsecured revolving credit facility (the “Global Credit Facility”) that may be used as an additional source of liquidity to fund redemptions of shares. There can be no assurance that the Global Credit Facility will remain available to the fund generally or that any available credit under the Global Credit Facility will be available to the fund when the fund seeks to draw on the Global Credit Facility.
 
During periods of deteriorating or stressed market conditions, when an increased portion of the fund’s portfolio may be comprised of investments that have lower liquidity, or during extraordinary or emergency circumstances, the fund may be more likely to pay redemption proceeds with cash obtained through short-term borrowing arrangements (if available) or by giving you securities.
By mail   
Contact your Service Agent or, if you hold shares directly with the fund, write to the fund at one of the following addresses:
 
Regular Mail:
 
Legg Mason Funds
P.O. Box 33030
St. Petersburg, FL 33733-8030
 
Express, Certified or Registered Mail:
 
Legg Mason Funds
100 Fountain Parkway
St. Petersburg, FL 33716-1205
 
Your written request must provide the following:
 
   The fund name, the class of shares being redeemed and your account number
 
   The dollar amount or number of shares being redeemed
 
   Signature of each owner exactly as the account is registered
 
   Medallion signature guarantees, as applicable (see “Other things to know about transactions”)
 
40     BrandywineGLOBAL— Global Opportunities Bond Fund

By telephone   
If your account application permits, you may be eligible to redeem shares by telephone. Contact your Service Agent or, if you hold shares directly with the fund, call 877-6LM-FUND/656-3863 for more information. Please have the following information ready when you call:
 
   Name of fund being redeemed
 
   Class of shares being redeemed
 
   The dollar amount or number of shares being redeemed
 
   Account number
Systematic withdrawal plans   
You may be permitted to schedule automatic redemptions of a portion of your shares. To qualify, you must own shares of the fund with a value of at least $5,000 and each automatic redemption must be at least $50 per transaction per month. For retirement plans subject to mandatory distribution requirements, the minimum withdrawal amounts will not apply.
 
The following conditions apply:
 
   Redemptions may be made monthly, quarterly, semi-annually or annually. Redemptions may be processed on the 1st, 5th, 10th, 15th, 20th and 25th days of the month, if no day is indicated, redemptions will be made on the 20th day of the month.
 
   If your shares are subject to a contingent deferred sales charge, the charge will be required to be paid upon redemption. However, the charge will be waived if your automatic redemptions do not exceed 1% monthly, 3% quarterly, 6% semiannually or 12% annually of your account’s net asset value, depending on the frequency of your plan.
 
   Your Service Agent may impose a lower minimum amount for each automatic redemption on a monthly and quarterly basis.
 
For more information, please contact your Service Agent or the fund or consult the SAI.
 
BrandywineGLOBAL— Global Opportunities Bond Fund       41  

Other things to know about transactions
When you buy, exchange or redeem shares, your request must be in good order. This means you have provided the following information, without which your request may not be processed:
 
 
Name of the fund
 
Your account number
 
In the case of a purchase (including a purchase as part of an exchange transaction), the class of shares being bought
 
In the case of an exchange or redemption, the class of shares being exchanged or redeemed (if you own more than one class)
 
Dollar amount or number of shares being bought, exchanged or redeemed
 
In certain circumstances, the signature of each owner exactly as the account is registered (see “Redeeming shares”)
In certain circumstances, such as during periods of market volatility, severe weather and emergencies, shareholders may experience difficulties placing exchange or redemption orders by telephone. In that case, shareholders should consider using the fund’s other exchange and redemption procedures described under “Exchanging shares” and “Redeeming shares.”
The transfer agent or the fund will employ reasonable procedures to confirm that any telephone, electronic or other exchange or redemption request is genuine, which may include recording calls, asking the caller to provide certain personal identification information, employing identification numbers, sending you a written confirmation or requiring other confirmation procedures from time to time. If these procedures are followed, neither the fund nor its agents will bear any liability for these transactions, subject to applicable law.
The fund does not consider the U.S. Postal Service or private delivery services to be its agents. Therefore, deposits in the mail or with such delivery services, or receipt at the fund’s post office box, of purchase requests or redemption orders, do not constitute receipt by the fund or its transfer agent.
The fund has the right to:
 
 
Suspend the offering of shares permanently or for a period of time
 
Waive or change minimum initial and additional investment amounts
 
Reject any purchase or exchange order
 
Change, revoke or suspend the exchange privilege
 
Suspend telephone transactions
 
Suspend or postpone redemptions of shares on any day when trading on the NYSE is restricted or as otherwise permitted by the SEC
 
Redeem shares if information provided in the application should prove to be incorrect in any manner judged by the fund to be material (e.g., in a manner such as to render the shareholder ineligible to purchase shares of that class)
 
Delay sending out redemption proceeds for up to seven days if, in the judgment of the subadviser, the fund could be adversely affected by immediate payment. The fund may delay redemptions beyond seven days, or suspend redemptions, only as permitted by the SEC or the Investment Company Act of 1940, as amended
 
Close your account after a period of inactivity, as determined by state law, and transfer your shares to the appropriate state
For your protection, the fund or your Service Agent may request additional information in connection with large redemptions, unusual activity in your account, or otherwise to ensure your redemption request is in good order. Please contact your Service Agent or the fund for more information.
Medallion signature guarantees
To be in good order, you may be asked to include a Medallion signature guarantee with your redemption request if you:
 
 
are redeeming shares and sending the proceeds to an address or bank account not currently on file or to an account in another fund sold by the Distributor with a different account registration
 
are redeeming more than $250,000 worth of shares
 
changed your account registration or your address within 15 calendar days
 
want the check paid to someone other than the account owner(s)
 
are transferring the redemption proceeds to an account with a different registration
For other types of transactions involving changes to your account registration information, please contact the fund or your Service Agent.
When a Medallion signature guarantee is called for, the shareholder should have a Medallion signature guarantee stamped under his or her signature. You can obtain a signature guarantee from most banks, dealers, brokers, credit unions and federal savings and loan institutions, national securities exchanges, registered securities associations and clearing agencies (each an “Eligible Guarantor Institution”), but not from a notary public.
The fund and its agents reserve the right to reject any Medallion signature guarantee pursuant to written signature guarantee standards or procedures, which may be revised in the future to permit them to reject Medallion signature guarantees from Eligible Guarantor Institutions. The fund may change the signature guarantee requirements from time to time without prior notice to shareholders.
 
42     BrandywineGLOBAL— Global Opportunities Bond Fund

Restrictions on the availability of the fund outside the United States
The distribution of this Prospectus and the offering of shares of the fund are restricted in certain jurisdictions. This Prospectus is not an offer or solicitation in any jurisdiction where such offer or solicitation is unlawful, where the person making an offer or solicitation is not authorized to make it or a person receiving an offer or solicitation may not lawfully receive it or may not lawfully invest in the fund. Investors should inform themselves as to the legal requirements within their own country before investing in the fund.
This Prospectus, and the offer of shares hereunder, are not directed at persons outside the United States. In particular, the fund is not intended to be marketed to prospective investors in any member state of the European Union, Iceland, Liechtenstein or Norway (collectively, the “European Economic Area” or “EEA”). No notification or application has been made to the competent authority of any member state of the EEA under the Alternative Investment Fund Managers Directive (or any applicable legislation or regulations made thereunder) to market the fund to investors in the EEA and it is not intended that any such notification or application shall be made.
U.S. citizens with addresses in the United States, and non-U.S. citizens who reside in the United States and have U.S. addresses, are permitted to establish accounts with the fund. For these purposes, the “United States” and “U.S.” include U.S. territories.
The fund generally does not permit persons who do not reside in the United States or who do not have U.S. addresses to establish accounts. Therefore, U.S. citizens residing in foreign countries, as well as non-U.S. citizens residing in foreign countries, generally will not be permitted to establish accounts with the fund.
For further information, you or your Service Agent may contact the fund at 877-6LM-FUND/656-3863.
Anti-money laundering
Federal anti-money laundering regulations require all financial institutions to obtain, verify and record information that identifies each person who opens an account. When you sign your account application, you may be asked to provide additional information in order for the fund to verify your identity in accordance with these regulations. If you are opening the account in the name of a legal entity (e.g. partnership, limited liability company, business trust, corporation, etc.), you may also be required to supply the identity of the beneficial owners and a control individual with management authority, prior to the opening of your account. Accounts may be restricted and/or closed, and the monies withheld, pending verification of this information or as otherwise required under these and other federal regulations.
Small account fees/Mandatory redemptions
Small accounts may be subject to a small account fee or to mandatory redemption, as described below. Please contact your Service Agent or the fund for information on the policy applicable to your account.
Small account fees
To offset the relatively higher impact on fund expenses of servicing smaller accounts, the fund may charge you a fee of $3.75 per account that is determined and assessed quarterly by your Service Agent or by the Distributor for Distributor Accounts on the next-to-last business day of the quarter (with an annual maximum of $15.00 per account) if the value of your account is below $1,000 (if applicable, $250 for retirement plans that are not employer-sponsored) for any reason (including declines in net asset value). The small account fee will be charged by redeeming shares in your account. If the value of your account is $3.75 or less, the amount in the account may be exhausted to pay the small account fee. If your Service Agent or the Distributor assesses a small account fee, the small account fee will not be assessed on systematic investment plans until the end of the first quarter after the account has been established for 21 months. Payment of the small account fee through a redemption of fund shares may result in tax consequences to you (see “Taxes” for more information).
The small account fee will not be charged on, if applicable: (i) retirement plans (but will be charged on other plans that are not employer-sponsored such as traditional and Roth individual retirement accounts, Coverdell education savings accounts, individual 403(b)(7) custodial accounts, Keogh plans, SEPs, SARSEPs, SIMPLE IRAs or similar accounts); (ii) Legg Mason funds that have been closed to subsequent purchases for all classes; (iii) accounts that do not have a valid address as evidenced by mail being returned to the fund or its agents; (iv) Class FI, Class R, Class I and Class IS shares; and (v) for new accounts (except for new accounts opened by way of an exchange), a small account fee will not be charged during the calendar quarter in which you open your account.
If your share class is no longer offered, you may not be able to bring your account up to the minimum investment amount (although you may exchange into existing accounts of other funds sold by the Distributor in which you hold the same share class, to the extent otherwise permitted by those funds and subject to any applicable sales charges).
The small account fee is calculated on a fund-by-fund basis. If you have accounts in multiple funds, they will not be aggregated for the purpose of calculating the small account fee.
Some shareholders who hold accounts in Classes A, C and C1 of the same fund may have those accounts aggregated for the purposes of these calculations. Please contact the fund or your Service Agent for more information.
Small account balance liquidations
The fund reserves the right to ask you to bring your account up to a minimum investment amount determined by your Service Agent if your account has been open for more than one year and the aggregate value of the fund shares in your account is less than $500. You will be notified in writing
 
BrandywineGLOBAL— Global Opportunities Bond Fund       43  

and will have 30 days to make an additional investment to bring your account value up to the required level. If you choose not to do so within this 30-day period, the fund may close your account and send you the redemption proceeds. You will not be charged a contingent deferred sales charge, if applicable, if your account is closed for this reason. If your share class is no longer offered, you may not be able to bring your account up to the minimum investment amount.
If your account is closed, you will not be eligible to have your account reinstated without imposition of any sales charges that may apply to your new purchase. Please contact your Service Agent for more information. Any redemption of fund shares may result in tax consequences to you (see “Taxes” for more information).
This policy does not apply to: (i) certain broker-controlled accounts established through the National Securities Clearing Corporation’s Networking system; (ii) Class A accounts established pursuant to a conversion from Class C or C1, and any remaining Class C or C1 accounts involved in the conversion with a low balance due to the conversion; (iii) tax-deferred retirement plan accounts; (iv) accounts with an active systematic investment plan; (v) accounts held through a 529 college saving program; (vi) accounts that do not have a valid address as evidenced by mail being returned to the fund or its agents, (vii) Coverdell Education Saving Plan accounts; and (viii) accounts identified to us by the applicable Service Agent as being fee-based accounts.
General
The fund may, with prior notice, change the minimum size of accounts subject to mandatory redemption, which may vary by class, implement fees for other small accounts or change the amount of the fee for small direct accounts.
Subject to applicable law, the fund may, with prior notice, adopt other policies from time to time requiring mandatory redemption of shares in certain circumstances.
For more information, please contact your Service Agent or the fund or consult the SAI.
Frequent trading of fund shares
The Board has adopted the following policies and procedures with respect to frequent trading in fund shares (“Frequent Trading Policy”).
The fund does not intend to accommodate short-term or frequent purchases and redemptions of fund shares that may be detrimental to the fund. For example, this type of trading activity could interfere with the efficient management of the fund’s portfolio or materially increase the fund’s transaction costs, administrative costs or taxes.
In addition, since the fund invests in foreign securities, it may be vulnerable to a form of short-term trading that is sometimes referred to as “time-zone arbitrage.” Time-zone arbitrage occurs when an investor seeks to take advantage of delays between changes in the value of a mutual fund’s portfolio holdings and the reflection of those changes in the fund’s net asset value per share. These delays are more likely to occur in the case of foreign investments, due to differences between the times during which the fund’s international portfolio securities trade on foreign markets and the time as of which the fund’s net asset value is calculated (generally as of the close of the NYSE). Time-zone arbitrage traders seek to purchase or redeem shares of a fund based on events occurring after foreign market closing prices are established, but before calculation of the fund’s net asset value. This can result in the value of the fund’s shares being diluted. One of the objectives of the fund’s fair value pricing procedures is to minimize the possibility of this type of arbitrage; however, there can be no assurance that the fund’s valuation procedures will be successful in eliminating it.
Since the fund may invest in securities that are, or may be, restricted, unlisted, traded infrequently, thinly traded, or relatively illiquid (“relatively illiquid securities”), it may be particularly vulnerable to arbitrage short-term trading. Such arbitrage traders may seek to take advantage of a possible differential between the last available market prices for one or more of those relatively illiquid securities that are used to calculate the fund’s net asset value and the latest indications of market values for those securities. One of the objectives of the fund’s fair value pricing procedures is to minimize the possibilities of this type of arbitrage; however, there can be no assurance that the fund’s valuation procedures will be successful in eliminating it.
Through its transfer agent, the fund performs ongoing monitoring of shareholder trading in shares of the fund and other Franklin Templeton affiliated funds in order to try and identify shareholder trading patterns that suggest an ongoing short-term trading strategy. If shareholder trading patterns identified by the transfer agent through monitoring or from other information regarding the shareholder’s trading activity in non-Franklin Templeton affiliated funds leads the transfer agent to reasonably conclude that such trading may be detrimental to the fund as described in this Frequent Trading Policy, the transfer agent, on behalf of the fund, may temporarily or permanently bar future purchases into the fund or, alternatively, may limit the amount, number or frequency of any future purchases and/or the method by which you may request future purchases and redemptions (including purchases and/or redemptions by an exchange or transfer between the fund and any other mutual fund).
In considering an investor’s trading patterns, the fund may consider, among other factors, the investor’s trading history both directly and, if known, through financial intermediaries, in the fund, in other Franklin Templeton affiliated funds, in non-Franklin Templeton affiliated mutual funds, or in accounts under common control or ownership. The transfer agent may also reject any purchase request, whether or not it represents part of any ongoing trading pattern, if the manager or the fund’s transfer agent reasonably concludes that the amount of the requested transaction may disrupt or otherwise interfere with the efficient management of the fund’s portfolio. In determining what actions should be taken, the fund’s transfer agent may consider a variety of factors, including the potential impact of such remedial actions on the fund and its shareholders. If the fund is a “fund of
 
44     BrandywineGLOBAL— Global Opportunities Bond Fund

funds,” the fund’s transfer agent may consider the impact of the trading activity and of any proposed remedial action on both the fund and the affiliated underlying funds in which the fund invests.
Frequent trading through financial intermediaries. You are an investor subject to this Frequent Trading Policy whether you are a direct shareholder of the fund or you are investing indirectly in the fund through a financial intermediary, such as a broker-dealer, bank, trust company, insurance company product such as an annuity contract, investment advisor, or an administrator or trustee of an IRS-recognized tax-deferred savings plan such as a 401(k) retirement plan and a 529 college savings plan.
Some financial intermediaries maintain master accounts with the fund on behalf of their customers (“omnibus accounts”). The fund has entered into “information sharing agreements” with these financial intermediaries, which permit the fund to obtain, upon request, information about the trading activity of the intermediary’s customers that invest in the fund. If the fund’s transfer agent identifies omnibus account level trading patterns that have the potential to be detrimental to the fund, the transfer agent may, in its sole discretion, request from the financial intermediary information concerning the trading activity of its customers. Based upon its review of the information, if the transfer agent determines that the trading activity of any customer may be detrimental to the fund, it may, in its sole discretion, request the financial intermediary to restrict or limit further trading in the fund by that customer. There can be no assurance that the transfer agent’s monitoring of omnibus account level trading patterns will enable it to identify all short-term trading by a financial intermediary’s customers.
Record ownership
If you hold shares through a Service Agent, your Service Agent may establish and maintain your account and be the shareholder of record. In the event that the fund holds a shareholder meeting, your Service Agent, as record holder, will be entitled to vote your shares and may seek voting instructions from you. If you do not give your Service Agent voting instructions, your Service Agent, under certain circumstances, may nonetheless be entitled to vote your shares.
Confirmations and account statements
If you bought shares directly from the fund, you will receive a confirmation from the fund after each transaction (except a reinvestment of dividends or capital gain distributions, an investment made through the Systematic Investment Plan, exchanges made through a systematic exchange plan and withdrawals made through the Systematic Withdrawal Plan). Shareholders will receive periodic account statements.
To assist you in the management of your account you may direct the transfer agent to send copies of your confirmations and/or periodic statements to another party whom you designate, at no charge.
 
BrandywineGLOBAL— Global Opportunities Bond Fund       45  

Dividends, other distributions and taxes
Dividends and other distributions
The fund generally pays dividends quarterly from its net investment income, if any, and from short-term capital gain (if any). Shares will generally begin to earn dividends on the settlement date of purchase. The fund generally distributes long-term capital gain, if any, once in December and at such other times as are necessary. The fund may pay additional distributions and dividends in order to avoid a federal tax.
You can elect to receive dividends and/or other distributions in cash.
Unless you elect to receive dividends and/or other distributions in cash, your dividends and capital gain distributions will be automatically reinvested in shares of the same class you hold, at the net asset value determined on the reinvestment date. You do not pay a sales charge on reinvested distributions or dividends.
If you hold shares directly with the fund and you elect to receive dividends and/or distributions in cash, you have the option to receive such dividends and/or distributions via a direct deposit to your bank account or by check.
If you hold Class A, Class C1 or Class C shares directly with the fund, you may instruct the fund to have your dividends and/or distributions invested in the corresponding class of shares (or if Class C1 shares are not available, Class C shares) of another fund sold by the Distributor (excluding Western Asset Government Reserves), subject to the following conditions:
 
 
You meet the minimum initial investment requirement of the other fund; and
 
The other fund is available for sale in your state.
To change those instructions, you must notify your Service Agent or the fund at least three days before the next distribution is to be paid.
Please contact your Service Agent or the fund to discuss what options are available to you for receiving your dividends and other distributions.
The Board reserves the right to revise the dividend policy or postpone the payment of dividends, if warranted in the Board’s judgment, due to unusual circumstances.
Taxes
The following discussion is very general, applies only to shareholders who are U.S. persons, and does not address shareholders subject to special rules, such as those who hold fund shares through an IRA, 401(k) plan or other tax-advantaged account. Except as specifically noted, the discussion is limited to federal income tax matters, and does not address state, local, foreign or non-income taxes. Further information regarding taxes, including certain federal income tax considerations relevant to non-U.S. persons, is included in the SAI. Because each shareholder’s circumstances are different and special tax rules may apply, you should consult your tax professional about federal, state, local and/or foreign tax considerations that may be relevant to your particular situation.
In general, redeeming shares, exchanging shares and receiving dividends and distributions (whether received in cash or reinvested in additional shares or shares of another fund) are all taxable events. An exchange between classes of shares of the same fund normally is not taxable for federal income tax purposes, whether or not the shares are held in a taxable account.
The following table summarizes the tax status of certain transactions related to the fund.
 
Transaction   Federal income tax status
Redemption or exchange of shares   Usually capital gain or loss; long-term only if shares are owned more than one year
Dividends of investment income and distributions of net short-term capital gain   Ordinary income
Distributions of net capital gain (excess of net long-term capital gain over net
short-term capital loss)
  Long-term capital gain if reported as capital gain dividends by the fund
Distributions attributable to short-term capital gains are taxable to you as ordinary income. The fund does not expect any distributions to be treated as qualified dividend income, which for noncorporate shareholders may be taxable at reduced rates. Distributions of net capital gain reported by the fund as capital gain dividends are taxable to you as long-term capital gain regardless of how long you have owned your shares. Noncorporate shareholders ordinarily pay tax at reduced rates on long-term capital gain.
If the fund realizes capital gains in excess of realized capital losses in any fiscal year, it generally expects to make capital gain distributions to shareholders. You may receive distributions that are attributable to appreciation of portfolio securities that happened before you made your investment but had not been realized at the time you made your investment, or that are attributable to capital gains or other income that, although realized by the fund, had not yet been distributed at the time you made your investment. Unless you purchase shares through a tax-advantaged account, these distributions will be taxable to you even though they economically represent a return of a portion of your investment. You may want
 
46     BrandywineGLOBAL— Global Opportunities Bond Fund

to avoid buying shares when the fund is about to declare a dividend or capital gain distribution. You should consult your tax professional before buying shares no matter when you are investing.
A Medicare contribution tax is imposed at the rate of 3.8% on all or a portion of net investment income of U.S. individuals if their income exceeds specified thresholds and on all or a portion of undistributed net investment income of certain estates and trusts. Net investment income generally includes for this purpose dividends and capital gain distributions paid by the fund and gain on the redemption or exchange of fund shares.
A dividend declared by the fund in October, November or December and paid during January of the following year will, in certain circumstances, be treated as paid in December for tax purposes.
If the fund meets certain requirements with respect to its holdings, it may elect to “pass through” to shareholders foreign taxes that it pays, in which case each shareholder will include the amount of such taxes in computing gross income, but will be eligible to claim a credit or deduction for such taxes, subject to generally applicable limitations on such deductions and credits. If the fund does not so elect, the foreign taxes paid or withheld will nonetheless reduce the fund’s taxable income. In addition, the fund’s investment in certain foreign securities, foreign currencies or foreign currency derivatives may affect the amount, timing, and character of fund distributions to shareholders.
After the end of each year, your Service Agent or the fund will provide you with information about the distributions and dividends you received and any redemptions of shares during the previous year. Because each shareholder’s circumstances are different and special tax rules may apply, you should consult your tax professional about your investment in the fund.
 
BrandywineGLOBAL— Global Opportunities Bond Fund       47  

Share price
You may buy, exchange or redeem shares at their net asset value next determined after receipt of your request in good order, adjusted for any applicable sales charge. The fund’s net asset value per share is the value of its assets minus its liabilities divided by the number of shares outstanding. Net asset value is calculated separately for each class of shares.
The fund calculates its net asset value every day the NYSE is open. The fund generally values its securities and other assets and calculates its net asset value as of the scheduled close of regular trading on the NYSE, normally at 4:00 p.m. (Eastern time). If the NYSE closes at a time other than the scheduled closing time, the fund will calculate its net asset value as of the scheduled closing time. The NYSE is closed on certain holidays listed in the SAI.
In order to buy, redeem or exchange shares at a certain day’s price, you must place your order with your Service Agent or the fund transfer agent before the scheduled close of regular trading on the NYSE on that day to receive that day’s price. If the NYSE closes early on that day, you must place your order prior to the scheduled closing time. It is the responsibility of the Service Agent to transmit all orders to buy, exchange or redeem shares to the fund transfer agent on a timely basis.
Valuation of the fund’s securities and other assets is performed in accordance with the valuation policy approved by the Board. As of the date of this Prospectus, the fund’s manager serves as the fund’s valuation designee for purposes of compliance with Rule 2a-5 under the Investment Company Act of 1940, as amended. Under the valuation policy, assets are valued as follows:
 
 
The valuations for fixed income securities and certain derivative instruments are typically the prices supplied by independent third party pricing services, which may use market prices or broker/dealer quotations or a variety of fair valuation techniques and methodologies.
 
Equity securities and certain derivative instruments that are traded on an exchange are valued at the closing price (which may be reported at a different time than the time at which the fund’s net asset value is calculated) or, if that price is unavailable or deemed by the manager not representative of market value, the last sale price. Where a security is traded on more than one exchange (as is often the case overseas), the security is generally valued at the price on the exchange considered by the manager to be the primary exchange. In the case of securities not traded on an exchange, or if exchange prices are not otherwise available, the prices are typically determined by independent third party pricing services that use a variety of techniques and methodologies. Investments in mutual funds are valued at the net asset value per share of the class of the underlying fund held by the fund as determined on each business day.
 
The valuations of securities traded on foreign markets and certain fixed income securities will generally be based on prices determined as of the earlier closing time of the markets in which they primarily trade. The prices of foreign equity securities typically are adjusted using a fair value model developed by an independent third party pricing service to estimate the value of those securities at the time of closing of the NYSE. When the fund holds securities or other assets that are denominated in a foreign currency, the fund will normally use the currency exchange rates as of 4:00 p.m. (Eastern time). Foreign markets are open for trading on weekends and other days when the fund does not price its shares. Therefore, the value of the fund’s shares may change on days when you will not be able to purchase or redeem the fund’s shares.
 
If independent third party pricing services are unable to supply prices for a portfolio investment, or if the prices supplied are deemed by the manager to be unreliable, the market price may be determined by the manager using quotations from one or more broker/dealers. When such prices or quotations are not available, or when the manager believes that they are unreliable, the manager may price securities in accordance with the valuation policy. The valuation policy permits, among other things, the use of a formula or other method that takes into consideration market indices, yield curves and other specific adjustments to determine fair value. These determinations are subject to the Board’s oversight. Fair value of a security is the amount, as determined by the manager in good faith, that the fund might reasonably expect to receive upon a current sale of the security. The fund may also use fair value procedures if the manager determines that a significant event has occurred between the time at which a market price is determined and the time at which the fund’s net asset value is calculated.
Many factors may influence the price at which the fund could sell any particular portfolio investment. The sales price may well differ—higher or lower—from the fund’s last valuation, and such differences could be significant, particularly for securities that trade in relatively thin markets and/or markets that experience extreme volatility. Moreover, valuing securities using fair value methodologies involves greater reliance on judgment than valuing securities based on market quotations. A fund that uses fair value methodologies may value those securities higher or lower than another fund using market quotations or its own fair value methodologies to price the same securities. There can be no assurance that the fund could obtain the value assigned to a security if it were to sell the security at approximately the time at which the fund determines its net asset value. Investors who purchase or redeem fund shares on days when the fund is holding fair-valued securities may receive a greater or lesser number of shares, or higher or lower redemption proceeds, than they would have received if the fund had not fair-valued the security or had used a different methodology.
 
48     BrandywineGLOBAL— Global Opportunities Bond Fund

Financial highlights
The financial highlights tables are intended to help you understand the performance of each class for the past five years, unless otherwise noted. Certain information reflects financial results for a single fund share. Total return represents the rate that an investor would have earned (or lost) on an investment in the fund, assuming reinvestment of all dividends and other distributions. Unless otherwise noted, this information has been audited by the fund’s independent registered public accounting firm, PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP, whose report, along with the fund’s financial statements, is incorporated by reference into the fund’s SAI (see back cover) and is included in the fund’s annual report. The fund’s annual report is available upon request by calling toll-free 877-6LM-FUND/656-3863 or via the following hyperlink: (https://www.sec.gov/Archives/edgar/data/1474103/000119312523055615/d434404dncsr.htm).
 
For a share of each class of beneficial interest outstanding throughout each year ended December 31:  
Class A Shares1      2022        2021        2020        2019        2018  
Net asset value, beginning of year        $11.08          $11.96          $10.68          $9.94          $10.85  
Income (loss) from operations:                         
Net investment income
       0.26          0.20          0.27          0.32          0.32  
Net realized and unrealized gain (loss)
       (2.04)          (0.88)          1.03          0.55          (0.88)  
Total income (loss) from operations
       (1.78)          (0.68)          1.30          0.87          (0.56)  
Less distributions from:                         
Net investment income
       (0.54)          (0.20)                   (0.11)          (0.34)  
Net realized gains
                                           (0.01)  
Return of capital
                         (0.02)          (0.02)           
Total distributions
       (0.54)          (0.20)          (0.02)          (0.13)          (0.35)  
Net asset value, end of year        $8.76          $11.08          $11.96          $10.68          $9.94  
Total return2
       (16.03)        (5.68)        12.17        8.82        (5.28)
Net assets, end of year (000s)        $98,888          $130,976          $151,095          $160,399          $157,146  
Ratios to average net assets:                         
Gross expenses
       1.00        1.00 %3         1.01        1.01 %3         0.97
Net expenses4
       1.00 5         1.00 3,5         1.00 5         1.00 3,5         0.97  
Net investment income
       2.66          1.72          2.51          3.16          3.06  
Portfolio turnover rate        90        51        99        103 %6         58
 
1 
Per share amounts have been calculated using the average shares method.
 
2 
Performance figures, exclusive of sales charges, may reflect compensating balance arrangements, fee waivers and/or expense reimbursements. In the absence of compensating balance arrangements, fee waivers and/or expense reimbursements, the total return would have been lower. Past performance is no guarantee of future results.
 
3 
Reflects recapture of expenses waived/reimbursed from prior fiscal years.
 
4 
As a result of an expense limitation arrangement, the ratio of total annual fund operating expenses, other than interest, brokerage commissions, dividend expense on short sales, taxes, extraordinary expenses and acquired fund fees and expenses, to average net assets of Class A shares did not exceed 1.00%. This expense limitation arrangement cannot be terminated prior to December 31, 2024 without the Board of Trustees’ consent. In addition, the manager has agreed to waive the Fund’s management fee to an extent sufficient to offset the net management fee payable in connection with any investment in an affiliated money market fund.
 
5 
Reflects fee waivers and/or expense reimbursements.
 
6 
Excludes securities delivered as a result of a redemption in-kind.
 
BrandywineGLOBAL— Global Opportunities Bond Fund       49  

For a share of each class of beneficial interest outstanding throughout each year ended December 31:  
Class C Shares1      2022        2021        2020        2019        2018  
Net asset value, beginning of year        $10.81          $11.67          $10.47          $9.77          $10.67  
Income (loss) from operations:                         
Net investment income
       0.18          0.12          0.19          0.25          0.24  
Net realized and unrealized gain (loss)
       (1.98)          (0.86)          1.01          0.52          (0.87)  
Total income (loss) from operations
       (1.80)          (0.74)          1.20          0.77          (0.63)  
Less distributions from:                         
Net investment income
       (0.47)          (0.12)                   (0.06)          (0.26)  
Net realized gains
                                           (0.01)  
Return of capital
                                  (0.01)           
Total distributions
       (0.47)          (0.12)                   (0.07)          (0.27)  
Net asset value, end of year        $8.54          $10.81          $11.67          $10.47          $9.77  
Total return2
       (16.60)        (6.31)        11.46        7.94        (5.98)
Net assets, end of year (000s)        $2,355          $6,198          $7,815          $10,447          $14,972  
Ratios to average net assets:                         
Gross expenses
       1.67        1.69        1.69        1.73        1.71
Net expenses3
       1. 664         1.69 4         1.69 4         1. 73         1.71 4 
Net investment income
       1.85          1.03          1.82          2.45          2.33  
Portfolio turnover rate        90        51        99        103 %5         58
 
1 
Per share amounts have been calculated using the average shares method.
 
2 
Performance figures, exclusive of CDSC, may reflect compensating balance arrangements, fee waivers and/or expense reimbursements. In the absence of compensating balance arrangements, fee waivers and/or expense reimbursements, the total return would have been lower. Past performance is no guarantee of future results.
 
3 
As a result of an expense limitation arrangement, the ratio of total annual fund operating expenses, other than interest, brokerage commissions, dividend expense on short sales, taxes, extraordinary expenses and acquired fund fees and expenses, to average net assets of Class C shares did not exceed 1.75%. This expense limitation arrangement cannot be terminated prior to December 31, 2024 without the Board of Trustees’ consent. In addition, the manager has agreed to waive the Fund’s management fee to an extent sufficient to offset the net management fee payable in connection with any investment in an affiliated money market fund.
 
4 
Reflects fee waivers and/or expense reimbursements.
 
5 
Excludes securities delivered as a result of a redemption in-kind.
 
50     BrandywineGLOBAL— Global Opportunities Bond Fund

For a share of each class of beneficial interest outstanding throughout each year ended December 31:  
Class C1 Shares1      2022        2021        2020        2019        2018  
Net asset value, beginning of year        $11.32          $11.80          $10.56          $9.84          $10.74  
Income (loss) from operations:                         
Net investment income
       0.23          0.16          0.22          0.29          0.27  
Net realized and unrealized gain (loss)
       (2.09)          (0.60)          1.02          0.53          (0.87)  
Total income (loss) from operations
       (1.86)          (0.44)          1.24          0.82          (0.60)  
Less distributions from:                         
Net investment income
       (0.51)          (0.04)                   (0.08)          (0.29)  
Net realized gains
                                           (0.01)  
Return of capital
                                  (0.02)           
Total distributions
       (0.51)          (0.04)                   (0.10)          (0.30)  
Net asset value, end of year        $8.95          $11.32          $11.80          $10.56          $9.84  
Total return2
       (16.38)        (3.70) %3         11.74        8.35        (5.64)
Net assets, end of year (000s)        $58          $64          $1,061          $2,562          $5,746  
Ratios to average net assets:                         
Gross expenses
       1.53        1.45        1.41        1.39        1.38
Net expenses4
       1.45 5         1. 455         1.41 5         1.39          1. 38 
Net investment income
       2.28          1.37          2.11          2.82          2.64  
Portfolio turnover rate        90        51        99        103 %6         58
 
1 
Per share amounts have been calculated using the average shares method.
 
2 
Performance figures, exclusive of CDSC, may reflect compensating balance arrangements, fee waivers and/or expense reimbursements. In the absence of compensating balance arrangements, fee waivers and/or expense reimbursements, the total return would have been lower. Past performance is no guarantee of future results.
 
3 
The total return includes a payment by an affiliate to reimburse for an error. Absent this payment, total return would have been (6.25)% for the year ended December 31, 2021.
 
4 
As a result of an expense limitation arrangement, the ratio of total annual fund operating expenses, other than interest, brokerage commissions, dividend expense on short sales, taxes, extraordinary expenses and acquired fund fees and expenses, to average net assets of Class C1 shares did not exceed 1.45%. This expense limitation arrangement cannot be terminated prior to December 31, 2024 without the Board of Trustees’ consent. In addition, the manager has agreed to waive the Fund’s management fee to an extent sufficient to offset the net management fee payable in connection with any investment in an affiliated money market fund.
 
5 
Reflects fee waivers and/or expense reimbursements.
 
6 
Excludes securities delivered as a result of a redemption in-kind.
 
BrandywineGLOBAL— Global Opportunities Bond Fund       51  

For a share of each class of beneficial interest outstanding throughout each year ended December 31:  
Class FI Shares1      2022        2021        2020        2019        2018  
Net asset value, beginning of year        $10.94          $11.81          $10.54          $9.82          $10.71  
Income (loss) from operations:                         
Net investment income
       0.25          0.20          0.27          0.32          0.31  
Net realized and unrealized gain (loss)
       (2.01)          (0.86)          1.01          0.53          (0.86)  
Total income (loss) from operations
       (1.76)          (0.66)          1.28          0.85          (0.55)  
Less distributions from:                         
Net investment income
       (0.54)          (0.21)                   (0.11)          (0.33)  
Net realized gains
                                           (0.01)  
Return of capital
                         (0.01)          (0.02)           
Total distributions
       (0.54)          (0.21)          (0.01)          (0.13)          (0.34)  
Net asset value, end of year        $8.64          $10.94          $11.81          $10.54          $9.82  
Total return2
       (16.05)        (5.62)        12.23        8.74        (5.22)
Net assets, end of year (000s)        $15,826          $22,278          $16,906          $18,227          $27,623  
Ratios to average net assets:                         
Gross expenses
       1.00        0.97        0.98        0.98        0.99
Net expenses3
       1.00 4         0.97 4         0.98 4         0.98          0.99 4 
Net investment income
       2.63          1.73          2.53          3.20          2.99  
Portfolio turnover rate        90        51        99        103 %5         58
 
1 
Per share amounts have been calculated using the average shares method.
 
2 
Performance figures may reflect compensating balance arrangements, fee waivers and/or expense reimbursements. In the absence of compensating balance arrangements, fee waivers and/or expense reimbursements, the total return would have been lower. Past performance is no guarantee of future results.
 
3 
As a result of an expense limitation arrangement, the ratio of total annual fund operating expenses, other than interest, brokerage commissions, dividend expense on short sales, taxes, extraordinary expenses and acquired fund fees and expenses, to average net assets of Class FI shares did not exceed 1.00%. This expense limitation arrangement cannot be terminated prior to December 31, 2024 without the Board of Trustees’ consent. In addition, the manager has agreed to waive the Fund’s management fee to an extent sufficient to offset the net management fee payable in connection with any investment in an affiliated money market fund.
 
4 
Reflects fee waivers and/or expense reimbursements.
 
5 
Excludes securities delivered as a result of a redemption in-kind.
 
52     BrandywineGLOBAL— Global Opportunities Bond Fund

For a share of each class of beneficial interest outstanding throughout each year ended December 31:  
Class R Shares1      2022        2021        2020        2019        2018  
Net asset value, beginning of year        $10.98          $11.86          $10.60          $9.88          $10.79  
Income (loss) from operations:                         
Net investment income
       0.23          0.17          0.24          0.30          0.29  
Net realized and unrealized gain (loss)
       (2.01)          (0.87)          1.02          0.53          (0.88)  
Total income (loss) from operations
       (1.78)          (0.70)          1.26          0.83          (0.59)  
Less distributions from:                         
Net investment income
       (0.52)          (0.18)                   (0.09)          (0.31)  
Net realized gains
                                           (0.01)  
Return of capital
                                  (0.02)           
Total distributions
       (0.52)          (0.18)                   (0.11)          (0.32)  
Net asset value, end of year        $8.68          $10.98          $11.86          $10.60          $9.88  
Total return2
       (16.19)        (5.95)        11.89        8.47        (5.55)
Net assets, end of year (000s)        $6,500          $8,083          $6,717          $9,658          $11,832  
Ratios to average net assets:                         
Gross expenses
       1.26        1.30        1.31        1.30 %3         1.30 %3 
Net expenses4,5
       1.25          1.25          1.25          1.25 3         1.25 3 
Net investment income
       2.44          1.44          2.26          2.91          2.78  
Portfolio turnover rate        90        51        99        103 %6         58
 
1 
Per share amounts have been calculated using the average shares method.
 
2 
Performance figures may reflect compensating balance arrangements, fee waivers and/or expense reimbursements. In the absence of compensating balance arrangements, fee waivers and/or expense reimbursements, the total return would have been lower. Past performance is no guarantee of future results.
 
3 
Reflects recapture of expenses waived/reimbursed from prior fiscal years.
 
4 
As a result of an expense limitation arrangement, the ratio of total annual fund operating expenses, other than interest, brokerage commissions, dividend expense on short sales, taxes, extraordinary expenses and acquired fund fees and expenses, to average net assets of Class R shares did not exceed 1.25%. This expense limitation arrangement cannot be terminated prior to December 31, 2024 without the Board of Trustees’ consent. In addition, the manager has agreed to waive the Fund’s management fee to an extent sufficient to offset the net management fee payable in connection with any investment in an affiliated money market fund.
 
5 
Reflects fee waivers and/or expense reimbursements.
 
6 
Excludes securities delivered as a result of a redemption in-kind.
 
BrandywineGLOBAL— Global Opportunities Bond Fund       53