The information in this Prospectus is not complete and may be changed. We may not sell these securities until the registration statement filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission is effective. This Prospectus is not an offer to sell these securities, and it is not soliciting an offer to buy these securities in any state where the offer or sale is not permitted.
SUBJECT TO COMPLETION
PRELIMINARY PROSPECTUS DATED DECEMBER 2, 2022
Prospectus
J.P. Morgan Exchange-Traded Funds
[ ], 2023
 
Ticker
Listing Exchange
JPMorgan BetaBuilders USD Investment Grade Corporate Bond
ETF
(formerly, JPMorgan Corporate Bond Research Enhanced ETF)
BBCB
NYSE Arca
JPMorgan BetaBuilders USD High Yield Corporate Bond ETF
(formerly, JPMorgan High Yield Research Enhanced ETF)
BBHY
Cboe BZX Exchange, Inc.
JPMorgan BetaBuilders U.S. Aggregate Bond ETF
(formerly, JPMorgan U.S. Aggregate Bond ETF)
BBAG
NYSE Arca
The Securities and Exchange Commission and the Commodity Futures Trading Commission have not approved or disapproved of these securities or determined if this prospectus is truthful or complete. Any representation to the contrary is a criminal offense.

Contents
 
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48
Back cover


JPMorgan BetaBuilders USD Investment Grade Corporate Bond ETF
(formerly, JPMorgan Corporate Bond Research Enhanced ETF)
Ticker: BBCB
What is the goal of the Fund?
The Fund seeks investment results that closely correspond, before fees and expenses, to the performance of the Bloomberg U.S. Corporate Bond Index.
Fees and Expenses of the Fund
The following table describes the fees and expenses that you may pay if you buy, hold and sell Shares of the Fund. You may pay other fees, such as brokerage commissions and other fees to financial intermediaries, which are not reflected in the tables and examples below.
ANNUAL FUND OPERATING EXPENSES1
(Expenses that you pay each year as a percentage of the value
of your investment)
Management Fees
0.09%
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses
0.09
1
The Fund’s management agreement provides that the adviser will pay substantially all expenses of the Fund (including expenses of the Trust relating to the Fund), except for the management fees, payments under the Fund’s 12b-1 plan (if any), interest expenses, dividend and interest expenses related to short sales, taxes, acquired fund fees and expenses (other than fees for funds advised by the adviser and/or its affiliates), costs of holding shareholder meetings, and litigation and potential litigation and other extraordinary expenses not incurred in the ordinary course of the Fund’s business. Additionally, the Fund shall be responsible for its non-operating expenses, including brokerage commissions and fees and expenses associated with the Fund’s securities lending program, if applicable.
Example
This Example is intended to help you compare the cost of investing in the Fund with the cost of investing in other funds. The Example does not take into account brokerage commissions that you pay when purchasing or selling Shares of the Fund. The Example assumes that you invest $10,000 in the Fund for the time periods indicated. The Example also assumes that your investment has a 5% return each year and that the Fund’s operating expenses remain the same. Your actual costs may be higher or lower.
WHETHER OR NOT YOU SELL YOUR SHARES, YOUR
COST WOULD BE:
 
1 Year
3 Years
5 Years
10 Years
SHARES ($)
[ ]
[ ]
[ ]
[ ]
Portfolio Turnover
The Fund pays transaction costs, such as commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or “turns over” its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover rate may indicate higher transaction costs and may result in higher taxes when Shares are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are not reflected in annual
fund operating expenses or in the Example, affect the Fund’s performance. During the Fund’s most recent fiscal year, the Fund’s portfolio turnover rate was 36% of the average value of its portfolio.
What are the Fund’s main investment strategies?
The Fund seeks investment results that closely correspond, before fees and expenses, to the performance of the Bloomberg U.S. Corporate Bond Index (the Underlying Index), which measures the investment grade, fixed-rate, taxable corporate bond market and includes USD denominated securities publicly issued by US and non-US industrial, utility and financial issuers. Bloomberg Index Services Limited is the index provider for the Underlying Index (the Index Provider). The Fund will invest at least 80% of its Assets in securities included in the Underlying Index. “Assets” means net assets, plus the amount of borrowings for investment purposes. The Fund will provide shareholders with at least 60 days prior notice of any change to this policy. The Underlying Index is market capitalization weighted and is designed to measure the performance of U.S. dollar denominated investment grade corporate debt publicly issued in the U.S. domestic market. The Underlying Index is a component of the Bloomberg US Credit and Bloomberg US Aggregate indices. As of September 30, 2022, the duration of the Underlying Index was 7.04 years.
As part of its principal strategy, the Fund invests in corporate bonds structured as corporate debt securities, debt securities of master limited partnerships (MLPs), public or private placements, restricted securities and other unregistered securities.

Beta is a measure of the volatility of a security or a portfolio relative to a market benchmark. The term “BetaBuilders” in the Fund’s name conveys the intended outcome of providing investors with passive exposure and return that generally correspond to a market cap weighted benchmark. The Fund, along with other JPMorgan BetaBuilders Funds, can be used to help an investor build a portfolio of passive exposure to various markets.
The Fund, using a “passive” or indexing investment approach, attempts to closely correspond to the performance of the Underlying Index. Unlike many actively-managed funds, the Fund does not seek to outperform the Underlying Index and does not seek temporary defensive positions when markets decline or appear overvalued.
The Fund intends to utilize a “representative sampling” strategy whereby securities are chosen in order to attempt to approximate the investment characteristics of the constituent securities. Targeted investment characteristics of the collective portfolio include asset class exposure, industry weightings, liquidity, and other fixed income specific attributes (such as yield, duration, credit quality, spread and maturity). Even when the Fund utilizes representative sampling, it must still invest at
[ ], 2023  |  1

JPMorgan BetaBuilders USD Investment Grade Corporate Bond ETF (continued)
least 80% of its Assets in securities included in the Underlying Index. The Fund’s portfolio will be rebalanced monthly in accordance with the rebalancing of the Underlying Index.
The Fund will not invest more than 25% of the value of its total assets in the securities of companies conducting their principal business activities in the same industry, except that, to the extent that an industry represents 20% or more of the Fund’s Underlying Index at the time of investment, the Fund may invest up to 35% of its total assets in that industry.
The Fund may invest in U.S. dollar-denominated securities of foreign issuers.
In addition to direct investments in securities, derivatives, which are instruments that have a value based on another instrument, exchange rate or index, may be used as substitutes for securities in which the Fund can invest. The Fund may use futures contracts as tools in the management of portfolio assets. The Fund may use derivatives to hedge various investments, for risk management and/or to increase income or gain to the Fund. In particular, the Fund may invest in futures to manage duration.
The Fund will not invest in asset classes that are not present in the Underlying Index.
The Fund’s Main Investment Risks
The Fund is subject to management risk and may not achieve its objective if the adviser’s expectations regarding particular instruments or markets are not met.

An investment in this Fund or any other fund may not provide a complete investment program. The suitability of an investment in the Fund should be considered based on the investment objective, strategies and risks described in this prospectus, considered in light of all of the other investments in your portfolio, as well as your risk tolerance, financial goals and time horizons. You may want to consult with a financial advisor to determine if this Fund is suitable for you.
The Fund is subject to the main risks noted below, any of which may adversely affect the Fund’s net asset value (NAV), market price, performance and ability to meet its investment objective.
General Market Risk. Economies and financial markets throughout the world are becoming increasingly interconnected, which increases the likelihood that events or conditions in one country or region will adversely impact markets or issuers in other countries or regions. Securities in the Underlying Index or in the Fund’s portfolio may underperform in comparison to securities in general financial markets, a particular financial market or other asset classes due to a number of factors, including inflation (or expectations for inflation), deflation (or expectations for deflation), interest rates, global demand for particular products or resources, market instability, debt crises and downgrades, embargoes, tariffs, sanctions and other trade barriers, regulatory events, other governmental trade or market control programs and related
geopolitical events. In addition, the value of the Fund’s investments may be negatively affected by the occurrence of global events such as war, terrorism, environmental disasters, natural disasters or events, country instability, and infectious disease epidemics or pandemics.
For example, the outbreak of COVID-19 has negatively affected economies, markets and individual companies throughout the world, including those in which the Fund invests. The effects of this pandemic to public health and business and market conditions, including, among other things, reduced consumer demand and economic output, supply chain disruptions and increased government spending, may continue to have a significant negative impact on the performance of the Fund’s investments, increase the Fund’s volatility, negatively impact the Fund’s arbitrage and pricing mechanisms, exacerbate pre-existing political, social and economic risks to the Fund, and negatively impact broad segments of businesses and populations. In addition, governments, their regulatory agencies, or self-regulatory organizations have taken or may take actions in response to the pandemic that affect the instruments in which the Fund invests, or the issuers of such instruments, in ways that could have a significant negative impact on the Fund’s investment performance. The duration and extent of COVID-19 and associated economic and market conditions and uncertainty over the long-term cannot be reasonably estimated at this time. The ultimate impact of COVID-19 and the extent to which the associated conditions impact the Fund will also depend on future developments, which are highly uncertain, difficult to accurately predict and subject to frequent changes.
Index Related Risk. The Fund’s return may not track the return of the Underlying Index for a number of reasons and therefore may not achieve its investment objective. For example, the Fund incurs a number of operating expenses not applicable to the Underlying Index, and incurs costs in buying and selling securities, especially when rebalancing the Fund’s securities holdings to reflect changes in the composition of the Underlying Index. In addition, the Fund’s return may differ from the return of the Underlying Index as a result of, among other things, pricing differences between the valuation of securities in the Underlying Index and in the Fund’s NAV and the inability to purchase certain securities included in the Underlying Index due to regulatory or other restrictions.
In addition, because the Fund uses a representative sampling approach, the Fund may not be as well correlated with the return of the Underlying Index as when the Fund purchases all of the securities in the Underlying Index in the proportions in which they are represented in the Underlying Index.
Errors in the construction or calculation of the Underlying Index may occur from time to time. Any such errors may not be identified and corrected by the Index Provider for some period of time, which may have an adverse impact on the Fund and its shareholders.
2  |  J.P. Morgan Exchange-Traded Funds

The risk that the Fund may not track the performance of the Underlying Index may be heightened during times of increased market volatility or other unusual market conditions.
Passive Management Risk. Unlike many investment companies, the Fund is not “actively” managed. Therefore, it would not generally sell a security because the security’s issuer was in financial trouble unless that security is removed from the Underlying Index. As a result, the Fund’s performance could be lower than funds that actively shift their portfolio assets to take advantage of market opportunities or lessen the impact of a market decline or a decline in the value of one or more issuers. The Fund will not take defensive positions under any market conditions, including in declining markets.
Sampling Risk. To the extent the Fund uses a representative sampling approach, it will hold a smaller number of securities than are in the Underlying Index. As a result, an adverse development respecting an issuer of securities held by the Fund could result in a greater decline in the Fund’s NAV than would be the case if the Fund held all of the securities in the Underlying Index. Conversely, a positive development relating to an issuer of securities in the Underlying Index that is not held by the Fund could cause the Fund to underperform the Underlying Index. To the extent the assets in the Fund are smaller, these risks may be greater.
Interest Rate Risk. The Fund’s investments in bonds and other debt securities will change in value based on changes in interest rates. If rates rise, the value of these investments generally declines. Securities with greater interest rate sensitivity and longer maturities generally are subject to greater fluctuations in value. The Fund may face a heightened level of interest rate risk due to certain changes in monetary policy. It is difficult to predict the pace at which central banks or monetary authorities may increase interest rates or the timing, frequency, or magnitude of such increases. Any such changes could be sudden and could expose debt markets to significant volatility and reduced liquidity for Fund investments.
Credit Risk. The Fund’s investments are subject to the risk that issuers and/or counterparties will fail to make payments when due or default completely. If an issuer’s or counterparty’s financial condition worsens, the credit quality of the issuer or counterparty may deteriorate, making it difficult for the Fund to sell such investments.
Foreign Securities Risk. Investments in foreign currencies and foreign issuers are subject to additional risks, including political and economic risks, civil conflicts and war, greater volatility, expropriation and nationalization risks, sanctions or other measures by the United States or other governments, currency fluctuations, higher transaction costs, delayed settlement, possible foreign controls on investment, liquidity risks, and less stringent investor protection and disclosure standards of foreign markets. In certain markets where securities and other instruments are not traded “delivery versus payment,” the Fund may not receive timely payment for securities or other instruments it has delivered or receive delivery of securities paid for
and may be subject to increased risk that the counterparty will fail to make payments or delivery when due or default completely.
Geographic Focus Risk. The Fund may focus its investments in one or more regions or small groups of countries. As a result, the Fund’s performance may be subject to greater volatility than a more geographically diversified fund.
Prepayment Risk. The issuer of certain securities may repay principal in advance, especially when yields fall. Changes in the rate at which prepayments occur can affect the return on investment of these securities. When debt obligations are prepaid or when securities are called, the Fund may have to reinvest in securities with a lower yield. The Fund also may fail to recover additional amounts (i.e., premiums) paid for securities with higher coupons, resulting in an unexpected capital loss.
Privately Placed Securities Risk. Privately placed securities generally are less liquid than publicly traded securities and the Fund may not always be able to sell such securities without experiencing delays in finding buyers or reducing the sale price for such securities. The disposition of some of the securities held by the Fund may be restricted under federal securities laws. As a result, the Fund may not be able to dispose of such investments at a time when, or at a price at which, it desires to do so and may have to bear expenses of registering these securities, if necessary. These securities may also be difficult to value.
Industry and Sector Focus Risk. At times the Fund may increase the relative emphasis of its investments in a particular industry or sector. The prices of securities of issuers in a particular industry or sector may be more susceptible to fluctuations due to changes in economic or business conditions, government regulations, availability of basic resources or supplies, or other events that affect that industry or sector more than securities of issuers in other industries and sectors. To the extent that the Fund increases the relative emphasis of its investments in a particular industry or sector, the Fund’s Share values may fluctuate in response to events affecting that industry or sector.
Financials Sector Risk. Financial services companies are subject to extensive governmental regulation which may limit both the amounts and types of loans and other financial commitments they can make, the interest rates and fees they can charge, the scope of their activities, the prices they can charge and the amount of capital they must maintain. Profitability is largely dependent on the availability and cost of capital funds and can fluctuate significantly when interest rates change or due to increased competition. In addition, deterioration of the credit markets generally may cause an adverse impact in a broad range of markets, including U.S. and international credit and interbank money markets generally, thereby affecting a wide range of financial institutions and markets. Certain events in the financial sector may cause an unusually high degree of volatility in the financial markets, both domestic and foreign, and cause certain financial services companies to incur large losses.
[ ], 2023  |  3

JPMorgan BetaBuilders USD Investment Grade Corporate Bond ETF (continued)
Securities of financial services companies may experience a dramatic decline in value when such companies experience substantial declines in the valuations of their assets, take action to raise capital (such as the issuance of debt or equity securities), or cease operations. Credit losses resulting from financial difficulties of borrowers and financial losses associated with investment activities can negatively impact the sector. Insurance companies may be subject to severe price competition. Adverse economic, business or political developments could adversely affect financial institutions engaged in mortgage finance or other lending or investing activities directly or indirectly connected to the value of real estate.
Foreign Issuer Risk. U.S. dollar-denominated securities of foreign issuers or U.S. affiliates of foreign issuers may be subject to additional risks not faced by domestic issuers. These risks include political and economic risks, civil conflicts and war, greater volatility, expropriation and nationalization risks, sanctions or other measures by the United States or other governments, and regulatory issues facing issuers in such countries.
Concentration Risk. The Fund will not invest more than 25% of the value of its total assets in the securities of companies conducting their principal business activities in the same industry, except that, to the extent that an industry represents 20% or more of the Fund’s Underlying Index at the time of investment, the Fund may invest up to 35% of its assets in that industry. Concentrating Fund investments in companies conducting business in the same industry will subject the Fund to a greater risk of loss as a result of adverse economic, business or other developments affecting that industry than if its investments were not so concentrated.
MLP Risk. Debt securities of MLPs are subject to the risks of debt securities in general. For example, such securities are more sensitive to interest rates than equity interests in MLPs. The managing general partner of an MLP may receive an incentive allocation based on increases in the amount and growth of cash distributions to investors in the MLP. This method of compensation may create an incentive for the managing general partner to make investments that are riskier or more speculative than would be the case in the absence of such compensation arrangements. Certain MLPs may operate in, or have exposure to, the energy sector. The energy sector can be significantly affected by changes in the prices and supplies of oil and other energy fuels, energy conservation, the success of exploration projects, and tax and other government regulations, policies of the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) and relationships among OPEC members and between OPEC and oil importing nations.
ETF Shares Trading Risk. Shares are listed for trading on the NYSE Arca Inc. (the “Exchange”) and are bought and sold in the secondary market at market prices. The market prices of Shares are expected to fluctuate, in some cases materially, in response to changes in the Fund’s NAV, the intraday value of the Fund’s holdings and supply and demand for Shares. The adviser cannot predict whether Shares will trade above, below or at
their NAV. Disruptions to creations and redemptions, the existence of significant market volatility or potential lack of an active trading market for the Shares (including through a trading halt), as well as other factors, may result in the Shares trading significantly above (at a premium) or below (at a discount) to NAV or to the intraday value of the Fund’s holdings. During such periods, you may incur significant losses if you sell your Shares.
The securities held by the Fund may be traded in markets that close at a different time than the Exchange. Liquidity in those securities may be reduced after the applicable closing times. Accordingly, during the time when the Exchange is open but after the applicable market closing, fixing or settlement times, bid-ask spreads on the Exchange and the corresponding premium or discount to the Shares’ NAV may widen.
Authorized Participant Concentration Risk. Only an authorized participant may engage in creation or redemption transactions directly with the Fund. The Fund has a limited number of intermediaries that act as authorized participants and none of these authorized participants is or will be obligated to engage in creation or redemption transactions. To the extent that these intermediaries exit the business or are unable to or choose not to proceed with creation and/or redemption orders with respect to the Fund and no other authorized participant creates or redeems, Shares may trade at a discount to NAV and possibly face trading halts and/or delisting.
Risk Associated with the Fund Holding Cash, Money Market Instruments and Other Short-Term Investments. The Fund will, at times, hold assets in cash, money market instruments and other short-term investments, which may hurt the Fund’s performance. These positions may also subject the Fund to additional risks and costs. 
Cash Transactions Risk. Unlike certain ETFs, the Fund may effect creations and redemptions in cash or partially in cash. Therefore, it may be required to sell portfolio securities and subsequently recognize gains on such sales that the Fund might not have recognized if it were to distribute portfolio securities in-kind. As such, investments in Shares may be less tax-efficient than an investment in an ETF that distributes portfolio securities entirely in-kind.

Investments in the Fund are not deposits or obligations of, or guaranteed or endorsed by, any bank and are not insured or guaranteed by the FDIC, the Federal Reserve Board or any other government agency.
You could lose money investing in the Fund.
The Fund’s Past Performance
This section provides some indication of the risks of investing in the Fund. The bar chart shows the performance of the Fund’s Shares over the past three calendar years. The table shows the average annual total returns for the past one year and life of
4  |  J.P. Morgan Exchange-Traded Funds

the Fund. It compares that performance to the Bloomberg U.S. Corporate Bond Index. As of [  ], the Fund changed its investment strategies. In view of these changes, the Fund’s performance record prior to this period might be less pertinent for investors considering whether to purchase shares of the Fund. Past performance (before and after taxes) is not necessarily an indication of how the Fund will perform in the future. Updated performance information is available by visiting www.jpmorganfunds.com or by calling 1-844-457-6883 (844-4JPM ETF).
YEAR-BY-YEAR RETURNS
Best Quarter
2nd quarter, 2020
8.59%
Worst Quarter
1st quarter, 2021
-5.03%
The Fund’s year-to-date total return
through
3/31/22
was
-7.48%
.
AVERAGE ANNUAL TOTAL RETURNS
(For periods ended December 31, 2021)
 
Past
Life of Fund
since
 
1 Year
12/12/2018
SHARES
 
 
Return Before Taxes
-1.78%
7.34%
Return After Taxes on Distributions
-2.99
5.58
Return After Taxes on Distributions and Sale
of Fund Shares
-0.91
4.96
BLOOMBERG U.S. CORPORATE INDEX
(Reflects No Deduction for Fees, Expenses, or
Taxes)
-1.04
7.68
After-tax returns are calculated using the historical highest individual federal marginal income tax rates and do not reflect the impact of state and local taxes. Actual after-tax returns depend on the investor’s tax situation and may differ from
those shown, and the after-tax returns shown are not relevant to investors who hold their shares through tax-deferred arrangements such as 401(k) plans or individual retirement accounts.
Management
J.P. Morgan Investment Management Inc. (the adviser)
Portfolio Manager
Managed the
Fund Since
Primary Title with
Investment Adviser
Eric Isenberg
2023
Managing Director
Naveen Kumar
2021
Executive Director
Qiwei Zhu
2021
Executive Director
Jonathan Msika
2023
Vice President
Purchase and Sale of Shares
Individual Shares of the Fund may only be purchased and sold in secondary market transactions through brokers or financial intermediaries. Shares of the Fund are listed for trading on the Exchange, and because Shares trade at market prices rather than net asset value (NAV), Shares of the Fund may trade at a price greater than NAV (premium) or less than NAV (discount). Certain affiliates of the Fund and the adviser may purchase and resell Shares pursuant to this prospectus.
An investor may incur costs attributable to the difference between the highest price a buyer is willing to pay to purchase Shares of the Fund (bid) and the lowest price a seller is willing to accept for Shares (ask) when buying or selling Shares in the secondary market (the bid-ask spread).
Recent information, including information about the Fund’s NAV, market price, premiums and discounts, and bid-ask spreads, is included on the Fund’s website at jpmorganfunds.com.
Tax Information
To the extent the Fund makes distributions, those distributions will be taxed as ordinary income or capital gains, except when your investment is in an IRA, 401(k) plan or other tax-advantaged investment plan, in which case you may be subject to federal income tax upon withdrawal from the tax-advantaged investment plan.
Payments to Broker-Dealers and Other Financial Intermediaries
If you purchase Shares of the Fund through a broker-dealer or other financial intermediary (such as a bank), the adviser and its related companies may pay the financial intermediary for the sale of Shares and related services. These payments may create a conflict of interest by influencing the broker-dealer or financial intermediary and your salesperson to recommend the Fund over another investment. Ask your salesperson or visit your financial intermediary’s website for more information.
[ ], 2023  |  5

JPMorgan BetaBuilders USD High Yield Corporate Bond ETF
(formerly, JPMorgan High Yield Research Enhanced ETF)
Ticker: BBHY
What is the goal of the Fund?
The Fund seeks investment results that closely correspond, before fees and expenses, to the performance of the ICE BofA U.S. High Yield Total Return Index.
Fees and Expenses of the Fund
The following table describes the fees and expenses that you may pay if you buy, hold and sell Shares of the Fund. You may pay other fees, such as brokerage commissions and other fees to financial intermediaries, which are not reflected in the tables and examples below.
ANNUAL FUND OPERATING EXPENSES1
(Expenses that you pay each year as a percentage of the value
of your investment)
Management Fees
0.15%
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses
0.15
1
The Fund’s management agreement provides that the adviser will pay substantially all expenses of the Fund (including expenses of the Trust relating to the Fund), except for the management fees, payments under the Fund’s 12b-1 plan (if any), interest expenses, dividend and interest expenses related to short sales, taxes, acquired fund fees and expenses (other than fees for funds advised by the adviser and/or its affiliates), costs of holding shareholder meetings, and litigation and potential litigation and other extraordinary expenses not incurred in the ordinary course of the Fund’s business. Additionally, the Fund shall be responsible for its non-operating expenses, including brokerage commissions and fees and expenses associated with the Fund’s securities lending program, if applicable.
Example
This Example is intended to help you compare the cost of investing in the Fund with the cost of investing in other funds. The Example does not take into account brokerage commissions that you pay when purchasing or selling Shares of the Fund. The Example assumes that you invest $10,000 in the Fund for the time periods indicated. The Example also assumes that your investment has a 5% return each year and that the Fund’s operating expenses remain the same. Your actual costs may be higher or lower.
WHETHER OR NOT YOU SELL YOUR SHARES, YOUR
COST WOULD BE:
 
1 Year
3 Years
5 Years
10 Years
SHARES ($)
[ ]
[ ]
[ ]
[ ]
Portfolio Turnover
The Fund pays transaction costs, such as commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or “turns over” its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover rate may indicate higher transaction costs and may result in higher taxes when Shares are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are not reflected in annual
fund operating expenses or in the Example, affect the Fund’s performance. During the Fund’s most recent fiscal year, the Fund’s portfolio turnover rate was 46% of the average value of its portfolio.
What are the Fund’s main investment strategies?
The Fund seeks investment results that closely correspond, before fees and expenses, to the performance of the ICE BofA U.S. High Yield Total Return Index (the Underlying Index), which is market capitalization weighted and is designed to measure the performance of U.S. dollar denominated below investment grade (commonly referred to as “junk”) corporate debt publicly issued in the U.S. domestic market. To be included in the Underlying Index, securities must be rated below investment grade (based on an average of Moody’s, S&P, and Fitch ratings), have at least 18 months to final maturity at time of issuance, at least one year remaining term to final maturity as of rebalance date, a fixed coupon schedule and a minimum amount outstanding of $250 million. Securities must have risk exposure to countries that are members of the FX-G10, Western Europe or territories of the US and Western Europe. Securities that are original issue zero coupon bonds, 144A securities, pay-in-kind securities, callable perpetual securities (provided they are at least one year from the first call date), and fixed-to-floating (provided they are callable within the fixed rate period and at least one year from last call prior to transition date) are also eligible for inclusion in the index. As of September 30, 2022 the effective duration of the Underlying Index was 4.25 years.
The Fund will invest at least 80% of its Assets in securities included in the Underlying Index. “Assets” means net assets, plus the amount of borrowings for investment purposes. The Fund will provide shareholders with at least 60 days prior notice of any change to this policy.
The Fund may invest up to 100% of its total assets in below investment grade or unrated securities. Such securities are also known as “junk bonds,” “high yield bonds” and “non-investment grade bonds.” Such securities may include “distressed debt.” Distressed debt includes securities of issuers experiencing financial or operating difficulties, securities where the issuer has defaulted in the payment of interest or principal or in the performance of its covenants or agreements, securities of issuers that may be involved in bankruptcy proceedings, reorganizations or financial restructurings of securities of issuers operating in troubled industries.
Additionally, as part of its principal strategy, the Fund invests in corporate bonds structured as corporate debt securities, public or private placements, restricted securities and other unregistered securities. The Fund may invest in U.S. dollar-denominated securities of foreign issuers.
6  |  J.P. Morgan Exchange-Traded Funds

Beta is a measure of the volatility of a security or a portfolio relative to a market benchmark. The term “BetaBuilders” in the Fund’s name conveys the intended outcome of providing investors with passive exposure and return that generally correspond to a market cap weighted benchmark. The Fund, along with other JPMorgan BetaBuilders Funds, can be used to help an investor build a portfolio of passive exposure to various markets.
The Fund, using a “passive” or indexing investment approach, attempts to closely correspond to the performance of the Underlying Index. Unlike many actively-managed funds, the Fund does not seek to outperform the Underlying Index and does not seek temporary defensive positions when markets decline or appear overvalued.
The Fund intends to utilize a “representative sampling” strategy whereby securities are chosen in order to attempt to approximate the investment characteristics of the constituent securities. Targeted investment characteristics of the collective portfolio include asset class exposure, industry weightings, liquidity, and other fixed income specific attributes (such as yield, duration, credit quality, spread and maturity). Even when the Fund utilizes representative sampling, it must still invest at least 80% of its Assets in securities included in the Underlying Index. The Fund’s portfolio will be rebalanced monthly in accordance with the monthly rebalancing of the Underlying Index.
The Fund will not invest 25% or more of the value of its total assets in the securities of companies conducting their principal business activities in the same industry.
The Fund’s Main Investment Risks
The Fund is subject to management risk and may not achieve its objective if the adviser’s expectations regarding particular instruments or markets are not met.

An investment in this Fund or any other fund may not provide a complete investment program. The suitability of an investment in the Fund should be considered based on the investment objective, strategies and risks described in this prospectus, considered in light of all of the other investments in your portfolio, as well as your risk tolerance, financial goals and time horizons. You may want to consult with a financial advisor to determine if this Fund is suitable for you.
The Fund is subject to the main risks noted below, any of which may adversely affect the Fund’s net asset value (NAV), market price, performance and ability to meet its investment objective.
General Market Risk. Economies and financial markets throughout the world are becoming increasingly interconnected, which increases the likelihood that events or conditions in one country or region will adversely impact markets or issuers in other countries or regions. Securities in the Underlying
Index or in the Fund’s portfolio may underperform in comparison to securities in general financial markets, a particular financial market or other asset classes due to a number of factors, including inflation (or expectations for inflation), deflation (or expectations for deflation), interest rates, global demand for particular products or resources, market instability, debt crises and downgrades, embargoes, tariffs, sanctions and other trade barriers, regulatory events, other governmental trade or market control programs and related geopolitical events. In addition, the value of the Fund’s investments may be negatively affected by the occurrence of global events such as war, terrorism, environmental disasters, natural disasters or events, country instability, and infectious disease epidemics or pandemics.
For example, the outbreak of COVID-19 has negatively affected economies, markets and individual companies throughout the world, including those in which the Fund invests. The effects of this pandemic to public health and business and market conditions, including, among other things, reduced consumer demand and economic output, supply chain disruptions and increased government spending, may continue to have a significant negative impact on the performance of the Fund’s investments, increase the Fund’s volatility, negatively impact the Fund’s arbitrage and pricing mechanisms, exacerbate pre-existing political, social and economic risks to the Fund, and negatively impact broad segments of businesses and populations. In addition, governments, their regulatory agencies, or self-regulatory organizations have taken or may take actions in response to the pandemic that affect the instruments in which the Fund invests, or the issuers of such instruments, in ways that could have a significant negative impact on the Fund’s investment performance. The duration and extent of COVID-19 and associated economic and market conditions and uncertainty over the long-term cannot be reasonably estimated at this time. The ultimate impact of COVID-19 and the extent to which the associated conditions impact the Fund will also depend on future developments, which are highly uncertain, difficult to accurately predict and subject to frequent changes.
Index Related Risk. The Fund’s return may not track the return of the Underlying Index for a number of reasons and therefore may not achieve its investment objective. For example, the Fund incurs a number of operating expenses not applicable to the Underlying Index, and incurs costs in buying and selling securities, especially when rebalancing the Fund’s securities holdings to reflect changes in the composition of the Underlying Index. In addition, the Fund’s return may differ from the return of the Underlying Index as a result of, among other things, pricing differences between the valuation of securities in the Underlying Index and in the Fund’s NAV and the inability to purchase certain securities included in the Underlying Index due to regulatory or other restrictions.
[ ], 2023  |  7

JPMorgan BetaBuilders USD High Yield Corporate Bond ETF (continued)
In addition, because the Fund uses a representative sampling approach, the Fund may not be as well correlated with the return of the Underlying Index as when the Fund purchases all of the securities in the Underlying Index in the proportions in which they are represented in the Underlying Index.
Errors in the construction or calculation of the Underlying Index may occur from time to time. Any such errors may not be identified and corrected by the Index Provider for some period of time, which may have an adverse impact on the Fund and its shareholders.
The risk that the Fund may not track the performance of the Underlying Index may be heightened during times of increased market volatility or other unusual market conditions.
Passive Management Risk. Unlike many investment companies, the Fund is not “actively” managed. Therefore, it would not generally sell a security because the security’s issuer was in financial trouble unless that security is removed from the Underlying Index. As a result, the Fund’s performance could be lower than funds that actively shift their portfolio assets to take advantage of market opportunities or lessen the impact of a market decline or a decline in the value of one or more issuers. The Fund will not take defensive positions under any market conditions, including in declining markets.
Sampling Risk. To the extent the Fund uses a representative sampling approach, it will hold a smaller number of securities than are in the Underlying Index. As a result, an adverse development respecting an issuer of securities held by the Fund could result in a greater decline in the Fund’s NAV than would be the case if the Fund held all of the securities in the Underlying Index. Conversely, a positive development relating to an issuer of securities in the Underlying Index that is not held by the Fund could cause the Fund to underperform the Underlying Index. To the extent the assets in the Fund are smaller, these risks may be greater.
High Yield Securities Risk. The Fund invests in securities including junk bonds and instruments that are issued by companies that are highly leveraged, less creditworthy or financially distressed. These investments are considered to be speculative and may be subject to greater risk of loss, greater sensitivity to economic changes, valuation difficulties and potential illiquidity. Such investments may be subject to additional risks including subordination to other creditors, no collateral or limited rights in collateral, lack of a regular trading market, liquidity risks, prepayment risks, and lack of publicly available information. High yield securities that are deemed to be liquid at the time of purchase may become illiquid.
In recent years, there has been a broad trend of weaker or less restrictive covenant protections in the high yield market. Among other things, under such weaker or less restrictive covenants, borrowers might be able to exercise more flexibility with respect to certain activities than borrowers who are subject to stronger or more protective covenants. For example, borrowers might be able to incur more debt, including secured
debt, return more capital to shareholders, remove or reduce assets that are designated as collateral securing high yield securities, increase the claims against assets that are permitted against collateral securing high yield securities or otherwise manage their business in ways that could impact creditors negatively. In addition, certain privately held borrowers might be permitted to file less frequent, less detailed or less timely financial reporting or other information, which could negatively impact the value of the high yield securities issued by such borrowers. Each of these factors might negatively impact the high yield instruments held by the Fund.
No active trading market may exist for some instruments and certain investments may be subject to restrictions on resale. The inability to dispose of the Fund’s securities and other investments in a timely fashion could result in losses to the Fund. Because some instruments may have a more limited secondary market, liquidity and valuation risk may be more pronounced for the Fund. When instruments are prepaid, the Fund may have to reinvest in instruments with a lower yield or fail to recover additional amounts (i.e., premiums) paid for these instruments, resulting in an unexpected capital loss and/or a decrease in the amount of dividends and yield.
Interest Rate Risk. The Fund’s investments in bonds and other debt securities will change in value based on changes in interest rates. If rates rise, the value of these investments generally declines. Securities with greater interest rate sensitivity and longer maturities are subject to greater fluctuations in value. The Fund may invest in variable and floating rate loans and other variable and floating rate securities. Although these instruments are generally less sensitive to interest rate changes than fixed rate instruments, the value of floating rate loans and other securities may decline if their interest rates do not rise as quickly, or as much, as general interest rates. The Fund may face a heightened level of interest rate risk due to certain changes in monetary policy. It is difficult to predict the pace at which central banks or monetary authorities may increase interest rates or the timing, frequency, or magnitude of such increases. Any such changes could be sudden and could expose debt markets to significant volatility and reduced liquidity for Fund investments.
Credit Risk. The Fund’s investments are subject to the risk that issuers and/or counterparties will fail to make payments when due or default completely. If an issuer’s or counterparty’s financial condition worsens, the credit quality of the issuer or counterparty may deteriorate, making it difficult for the Fund to sell such investments.
Smaller Company Risk. Investments in securities of smaller companies (mid cap and small cap companies) may be riskier, less liquid, more volatile and more vulnerable to economic, market and industry changes than securities of larger, more established companies. The securities of smaller companies may trade less frequently and in smaller volumes than securities of larger companies. As a result, changes in the price of securities issued by such companies may be more sudden or
8  |  J.P. Morgan Exchange-Traded Funds

erratic than the prices of securities of large capitalization companies, especially over the short term. These risks are higher for small cap companies.
Foreign Securities Risk. U.S. dollar denominated securities of foreign issuers or U.S. affiliates of foreign issuers may be subject to additional risks not faced by domestic issuers. These risks include political and economic risks, civil conflicts and war, greater volatility, expropriation and nationalization risks, sanctions or other measures by the United States or other governments, higher transaction costs, delayed settlement, possible foreign controls on investments, liquidity risks and less stringent investor protection and disclosure standards of foreign markets. In certain markets where securities and other instruments are not traded “delivery versus payment,” the Fund may not receive timely payment for securities or other instruments it has delivered or receive delivery of securities paid for and may be subject to increased risk that the counterparty will fail to make payments or delivery when due or default completely. Events and evolving conditions in certain economies or markets may alter the risks associated with investments tied to countries or regions that historically were perceived as comparatively stable becoming riskier and more volatile.
Foreign Issuer Risk. U.S. dollar-denominated securities of foreign issuers or U.S. affiliates of foreign issuers may be subject to additional risks not faced by domestic issuers. These risks include political and economic risks, civil conflicts and war, greater volatility, expropriation and nationalization risks, sanctions or other measures by the United States or other governments, and regulatory issues facing issuers in such countries.
ETF Shares Trading Risk. Shares are listed for trading on the Cboe BZX Exchange, Inc. (the “Exchange”) and are bought and sold in the secondary market at market prices. The market prices of Shares are expected to fluctuate, in some cases materially, in response to changes in the Fund’s NAV, the intraday value of the Fund’s holdings, and supply and demand for Shares. The adviser cannot predict whether Shares will trade above, below or at their NAV. Disruptions to creations and redemptions, the existence of significant market volatility or potential lack of an active trading market for the Shares (including through a trading halt), as well as other factors, may result in the Shares trading significantly above (at a premium) or below (at a discount) to NAV or to the intraday value of the Fund’s holdings. During such periods, you may incur significant losses if you sell your Shares.
The securities held by the Fund may be traded in markets that close at a different time than the Exchange. Liquidity in those securities may be reduced after the applicable closing times. Accordingly, during the time when the Exchange is open but after the applicable market closing, fixing or settlement times, bid-ask spreads on the Exchange and the corresponding premium or discount to the Shares’ NAV may widen.
Authorized Participant Concentration Risk. Only an authorized participant may engage in creation or redemption transactions directly with the Fund. The Fund has a limited number of intermediaries that act as authorized participants and none of these authorized participants is or will be obligated to engage in creation or redemption transactions. To the extent that these intermediaries exit the business or are unable to or choose not to proceed with creation and/or redemption orders with respect to the Fund and no other authorized participant creates or redeems, Shares may trade at a discount to NAV and possibly face trading halts and/or delisting.
Industry and Sector Focus Risk. At times the Fund may increase the relative emphasis of its investments in a particular industry or sector. The prices of securities of issuers in a particular industry or sector may be more susceptible to fluctuations due to changes in economic or business conditions, government regulations, availability of basic resources or supplies, or other events that affect that industry or sector more than securities of issuers in other industries and sectors. To the extent that the Fund increases the relative emphasis of its investments in a particular industry or sector, the Fund’s Share values may fluctuate in response to events affecting that industry or sector.
Privately Placed Securities Risk. Privately placed securities generally are less liquid than publicly traded securities and the Fund may not always be able to sell such securities without experiencing delays in finding buyers or reducing the sale price for such securities. The disposition of some of the securities held by the Fund may be restricted under federal securities laws. As a result, the Fund may not be able to dispose of such investments at a time when, or at a price at which, it desires to do so and may have to bear expenses of registering these securities, if necessary. These securities may also be difficult to value.
Cash Transactions Risk. Unlike certain ETFs, the Fund may effect creations and redemptions in cash or partially in cash. Therefore, it may be required to sell portfolio securities and subsequently recognize gains on such sales that the Fund might not have recognized if it were to distribute portfolio securities in kind. As such, investments in Shares may be less tax-efficient than an investment in an ETF that distributes portfolio securities entirely in kind.

Investments in the Fund are not deposits or obligations of, or guaranteed or endorsed by, any bank and are not insured or guaranteed by the FDIC, the Federal Reserve Board or any other government agency.
You could lose money investing in the Fund.
The Fund’s Past Performance
This section provides some indication of the risks of investing in the Fund. The bar chart shows the performance of the Fund’s Shares over the past five calendar years. The table shows the average annual total returns for the past one year, five years
[ ], 2023  |  9

JPMorgan BetaBuilders USD High Yield Corporate Bond ETF (continued)
and life of the Fund. It compares that performance to the ICE BofA U.S. High Yield Total Return Index and Bloomberg U.S. Corporate High Yield - 2% Issuer Capped Index. As of [ ], the Fund changed its investment strategies. In view of these changes, the Fund’s performance record prior to this period might be less pertinent for investors considering whether to purchase shares of the Fund. Past performance (before and after taxes) is not necessarily an indication of how the Fund will perform in the future. Updated performance information is available by visiting www.jpmorganfunds.com or by calling 1-844-457-6383 (844-4JPM ETF).
YEAR-BY-YEAR RETURNS
Best Quarter
2nd quarter, 2020
8.55%
Worst Quarter
1st quarter, 2020
-11.81%
The Fund’s year-to-date total return
through
3/31/22
was
-4.72%
.
AVERAGE ANNUAL TOTAL RETURNS
(For periods ended December 31, 2021)
 
Past
Past
Life of Fund
since
 
1 Year
5 Years
09/14/2016
SHARES
 
 
 
Return Before Taxes
4.06%
5.40%
5.53%
Return After Taxes on Distributions
2.35
3.35
3.47
Return After Taxes on Distributions
and Sale of Fund Shares
2.39
3.23
3.32
ICE BOFA US HIGH YIELD TOTAL
RETURN INDEX
(Reflects No Deduction for Fees,
Expenses, or Taxes)
[ ]
[ ]
[ ]
BLOOMBERG U.S. CORPORATE HIGH
YIELD - 2% ISSUER CAPPED INDEX1
(Reflects No Deduction for Fees,
Expenses, or Taxes)
5.26
6.28
6.51
1
Effective [ ], 2023, the ICE BofA U.S. High Yield Total Return Index replaced
the Bloomberg U.S. Corporate High Yield - 2% Issuer Capped Index as the Fund's benchmark. The index history for MSCI REIT Custom Capped Index reflects a combination of the performance of the current index and the previous index.
After-tax returns are calculated using the historical highest individual federal marginal income tax rates and do not reflect the impact of state and local taxes. Actual after-tax returns depend on the investor’s tax situation and may differ from those shown, and the after-tax returns shown are not relevant to investors who hold their shares through tax-deferred arrangements such as 401(k) plans or individual retirement accounts.
Management
J.P. Morgan Investment Management Inc. (the adviser)
Portfolio Manager
Managed the
Fund Since
Primary Title with
Investment Adviser
Eric Isenberg
2023
Managing Director
Naveen Kumar
2021
Executive Director
Qiwei Zhu
2021
Executive Director
Jonathan Msika
2023
Vice President
Purchase and Sale of Shares
Individual Shares of the Fund may only be purchased and sold in secondary market transactions through brokers or financial intermediaries. Shares of the Fund are listed for trading on the Exchange, and because Shares trade at market prices rather than net asset value (NAV), Shares of the Fund may trade at a price greater than NAV (premium) or less than NAV (discount). Certain affiliates of the Fund and the adviser may purchase and resell Shares pursuant to this prospectus.
An investor may incur costs attributable to the difference between the highest price a buyer is willing to pay to purchase Shares of the Fund (bid) and the lowest price a seller is willing to accept for Shares (ask) when buying or selling Shares in the secondary market (the bid-ask spread).
Recent information, including information about the Fund’s NAV, market price, premiums and discounts, and bid-ask spreads, is included on the Fund’s website at jpmorganfunds.com.
Tax Information
To the extent the Fund makes distributions, those distributions will be taxed as ordinary income or capital gains, except when your investment is in an IRA, 401(k) plan or other tax-advantaged investment plan, in which case you may be subject to federal income tax upon withdrawal from the tax-advantaged investment plan.
10  |  J.P. Morgan Exchange-Traded Funds

Payments to Broker-Dealers and Other Financial Intermediaries
If you purchase Shares of the Fund through a broker-dealer or other financial intermediary (such as a bank), the adviser and its related companies may pay the financial intermediary for the sale of Shares and related services. These payments may
create a conflict of interest by influencing the broker-dealer or financial intermediary and your salesperson to recommend the Fund over another investment. Ask your salesperson or visit your financial intermediary’s website for more information.
[ ], 2023  |  11

JPMorgan BetaBuilders U.S. Aggregate Bond ETF
(formerly, JPMorgan U.S. Aggregate Bond ETF)
Ticker: BBAG
What is the goal of the Fund?
The Fund seeks investment results that closely correspond, before fees and expenses, to the performance of the Bloomberg U.S. Aggregate Bond Index.
Fees and Expenses of the Fund
The following table describes the fees and expenses that you may pay if you buy, hold and sell Shares of the Fund. You may pay other fees, such as brokerage commissions and other fees to financial intermediaries, which are not reflected in the tables and examples below.
ANNUAL FUND OPERATING EXPENSES1
(Expenses that you pay each year as a percentage of the value
of your investment)
Management Fees
0.03%
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses
0.03
1
The Fund’s management agreement provides that the adviser will pay substantially all expenses of the Fund (including expenses of the Trust relating to the Fund), except for the management fees, payments under the Fund’s 12b-1 plan (if any), interest expenses, dividend and interest expenses related to short sales, taxes, acquired fund fees and expenses (other than fees for funds advised by the adviser and/or its affiliates), costs of holding shareholder meetings, and litigation and potential litigation and other extraordinary expenses not incurred in the ordinary course of the Fund’s business. Additionally, the Fund shall be responsible for its non-operating expenses, including brokerage commissions and fees and expenses associated with the Fund’s securities lending program, if applicable.
Example
This Example is intended to help you compare the cost of investing in the Fund with the cost of investing in other funds. The Example does not take into account brokerage commissions that you pay when purchasing or selling Shares of the Fund. The Example assumes that you invest $10,000 in the Fund for the time periods indicated. The Example also assumes that your investment has a 5% return each year and that the Fund’s operating expenses remain the same. Your actual costs may be higher or lower.
WHETHER OR NOT YOU SELL YOUR SHARES, YOUR
COST WOULD BE:
 
1 Year
3 Years
5 Years
10 Years
SHARES ($)
[ ]
[ ]
[ ]
[ ]
Portfolio Turnover
The Fund pays transaction costs, such as commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or “turns over” its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover rate may indicate higher transaction costs and may result in higher taxes when Shares are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are not reflected in annual
fund operating expenses or in the Example, affect the Fund’s performance. During the Fund’s most recent fiscal year, the Fund’s portfolio turnover rate was 78% of the average value of its portfolio.
What are the Fund’s main investment strategies?
The Fund seeks investment results that closely correspond, before fees and expenses, to the performance of the Bloomberg U.S. Aggregate Bond Index (the Underlying Index), which represents securities that are SEC-registered, taxable, and US dollar denominated. The Underlying Index covers the U.S. investment grade fixed rate bond market, with index components for government and corporate securities, mortgage pass-through securities, and asset-backed securities. Bloomberg Index Services Limited is the index provider for the Underlying Index (the Index Provider). The Fund will invest at least 80% of its Assets in securities included in the Underlying Index. “Assets” means net assets, plus the amount of borrowings for investment purposes. The Fund will provide shareholders with at least 60 days prior notice of any change in this policy. As of September 30, 2022 the effective duration of the Underlying Index was 6.16 years.
As part of its principal strategy, the Fund invests in corporate bonds structured as corporate debt securities, U.S. dollar denominated foreign debt securities, asset-backed securities, mortgage-backed securities, mortgage dollar rolls, and U.S. Government obligations, which may include direct obligations of the U.S. Treasury, including Treasury bills, notes and bonds.

Beta is a measure of the volatility of a security or a portfolio relative to a market benchmark. The term “BetaBuilders” in the Fund’s name conveys the intended outcome of providing investors with passive exposure and return that generally correspond to a market cap weighted benchmark. The Fund, along with other JPMorgan BetaBuilders Funds, can be used to help an investor build a portfolio of passive exposure to various markets.
The Fund, using a “passive” or indexing investment approach, attempts to closely correspond to the performance of the Underlying Index. Unlike many actively-managed funds, the Fund does not seek to outperform the Underlying Index and does not seek temporary defensive positions when markets decline or appear overvalued.
The Fund intends to utilize a “representative sampling” strategy whereby securities are chosen in order to attempt to approximate the investment characteristics of the constituent securities. Targeted investment characteristics of the collective portfolio include asset class exposure, industry weightings, liquidity, and other fixed income specific attributes (such as yield, duration, credit quality, spread and maturity). Even when the Fund utilizes representative sampling, it must still invest at
12  |  J.P. Morgan Exchange-Traded Funds

least 80% of its Assets in securities included in the Underlying Index. The Fund’s portfolio will be rebalanced monthly in accordance with the monthly rebalancing of the Underlying Index.
The Fund will primarily invest in bonds that are included in the Bloomberg U.S. Aggregate Bond Index, but may invest in bonds that are not included in the Bloomberg U.S. Bond Aggregate Index.
The Fund may invest in Mortgage TBAs. Mortgage TBAs provide for the forward or delayed delivery of the underlying instrument with settlement up to 180 days. The term TBA comes from the fact that the actual mortgage-backed security that will be delivered to fulfill a TBA trade is not designated at the time the trade is made, but rather is announced 48 hours before the settlement date.
The Fund may invest in debt obligations, denominated in U.S. dollars, that are issued by a foreign corporation or a U.S. affiliate of a foreign corporation or a foreign government or its agencies and instrumentalities.
The Fund will not invest in asset classes that are not present in the Underlying Index. The Fund will not invest in debt securities that are rated below investment grade (i.e., high yield and junk bonds).
The Fund will not invest more than 25% of the value of its total assets in the securities of companies conducting their principal business activities in the same industry.
The Fund’s Main Investment Risks
The Fund is subject to management risk and may not achieve its objective if the adviser’s expectations regarding particular instruments or markets are not met.

An investment in this Fund or any other fund may not provide a complete investment program. The suitability of an investment in the Fund should be considered based on the investment objective, strategies and risks described in this prospectus, considered in light of all of the other investments in your portfolio, as well as your risk tolerance, financial goals and time horizons. You may want to consult with a financial advisor to determine if this Fund is suitable for you.
The Fund is subject to the main risks noted below, any of which may adversely affect the Fund’s net asset value (NAV), market price, performance and ability to meet its investment objective.
General Market Risk. Economies and financial markets throughout the world are becoming increasingly interconnected, which increases the likelihood that events or conditions in one country or region will adversely impact markets or issuers in other countries or regions. Securities in the Underlying Index or in the Fund’s portfolio may underperform in comparison to securities in general financial markets, a particular financial market or other asset classes due to a number of factors, including inflation (or expectations for infla
tion), deflation (or expectations for deflation), interest rates, global demand for particular products or resources, market instability, debt crises and downgrades, embargoes, tariffs, sanctions and other trade barriers, regulatory events, other governmental trade or market control programs and related geopolitical events. In addition, the value of the Fund’s investments may be negatively affected by the occurrence of global events such as war, terrorism, environmental disasters, natural disasters or events, country instability, and infectious disease epidemics or pandemics.
For example, the outbreak of COVID-19 has negatively affected economies, markets and individual companies throughout the world, including those in which the Fund invests. The effects of this pandemic to public health and business and market conditions, including, among other things, reduced consumer demand and economic output, supply chain disruptions and increased government spending, may continue to have a significant negative impact on the performance of the Fund’s investments, increase the Fund’s volatility, negatively impact the Fund’s arbitrage and pricing mechanisms, exacerbate pre-existing political, social and economic risks to the Fund, and negatively impact broad segments of businesses and populations. In addition, governments, their regulatory agencies, or self-regulatory organizations have taken or may take actions in response to the pandemic that affect the instruments in which the Fund invests, or the issuers of such instruments, in ways that could have a significant negative impact on the Fund’s investment performance. The duration and extent of COVID-19 and associated economic and market conditions and uncertainty over the long-term cannot be reasonably estimated at this time. The ultimate impact of COVID-19 and the extent to which the associated conditions impact the Fund will also depend on future developments, which are highly uncertain, difficult to accurately predict and subject to frequent changes.
Index Related Risk. The Fund’s return may not track the return of the Underlying Index for a number of reasons and therefore may not achieve its investment objective. For example, the Fund incurs a number of operating expenses not applicable to the Underlying Index, and incurs costs in buying and selling securities, especially when rebalancing the Fund’s securities holdings to reflect changes in the composition of the Underlying Index. In addition, the Fund’s return may differ from the return of the Underlying Index as a result of, among other things, pricing differences between the valuation of securities in the Underlying Index and in the Fund’s NAV and the inability to purchase certain securities included in the Underlying Index due to regulatory or other restrictions.
In addition, because the Fund uses a representative sampling approach, the Fund may not be as well correlated with the return of the Underlying Index as when the Fund purchases all of the securities in the Underlying Index in the proportions in which they are represented in the Underlying Index.
[ ], 2023  |  13

JPMorgan BetaBuilders U.S. Aggregate Bond ETF (continued)
Errors in the construction or calculation of the Underlying Index may occur from time to time. Any such errors may not be identified and corrected by the Index Provider for some period of time, which may have an adverse impact on the Fund and its shareholders.
The risk that the Fund may not track the performance of the Underlying Index may be heightened during times of increased market volatility or other unusual market conditions.
Passive Management Risk. Unlike many investment companies, the Fund is not “actively” managed. Therefore, it would not generally sell a security because the security’s issuer was in financial trouble unless that security is removed from the Underlying Index. As a result, the Fund’s performance could be lower than funds that actively shift their portfolio assets to take advantage of market opportunities or lessen the impact of a market decline or a decline in the value of one or more issuers. The Fund will not take defensive positions under any market conditions, including in declining markets.
Sampling Risk. To the extent the Fund uses a representative sampling approach, it will hold a smaller number of securities than are in the Underlying Index. As a result, an adverse development respecting an issuer of securities held by the Fund could result in a greater decline in the Fund’s NAV than would be the case if the Fund held all of the securities in the Underlying Index. Conversely, a positive development relating to an issuer of securities in the Underlying Index that is not held by the Fund could cause the Fund to underperform the Underlying Index. To the extent the assets in the Fund are smaller, these risks may be greater.
Interest Rate Risk. The Fund’s investments in bonds and other debt securities will change in value based on changes in interest rates. If rates rise, the value of these investments generally declines. Securities with greater interest rate sensitivity and longer maturities generally are subject to greater fluctuations in value. The Fund may face a heightened level of interest rate risk due to certain changes in monetary policy. It is difficult to predict the pace at which central banks or monetary authorities may increase interest rates or the timing, frequency, or magnitude of such increases. Any such changes could be sudden and could expose debt markets to significant volatility and reduced liquidity for Fund investments.
Credit Risk. The Fund’s investments are subject to the risk that issuers and/or counterparties will fail to make payments when due or default completely. If an issuer’s or counterparty’s financial condition worsens, the credit quality of the issuer or counterparty may deteriorate, making it difficult for the Fund to sell such investments.
Geographic Focus Risk. The Fund will focus its investments in the United States. As a result, the Fund’s performance may be subject to greater volatility than a more geographically diversified fund.
Prepayment Risk. The issuer of certain securities may repay principal in advance, especially when yields fall. Changes in the rate at which prepayments occur can affect the return on investment of these securities. When debt obligations are prepaid or when securities are called, the Fund may have to reinvest in securities with a lower yield. The Fund also may fail to recover additional amounts (i.e., premiums) paid for securities with higher coupons, resulting in an unexpected capital loss.
Asset-Backed, Mortgage-Related and Mortgage-Backed Securities Risk. The Fund may invest in asset-backed, mortgage-related and mortgage-backed securities including so-called “sub-prime” mortgages that are subject to certain other risks including prepayment and call risks. When mortgages and other obligations are prepaid and when securities are called, the Fund may have to reinvest in securities with a lower yield or fail to recover additional amounts (i.e., premiums) paid for securities with higher interest rates, resulting in an unexpected capital loss and/or a decrease in the amount of dividends and yield. In periods of either rising or declining interest rates, the Fund may be subject to extension risk, and may receive principal later than expected. As a result, in periods of rising interest rates, the Fund may exhibit additional volatility. During periods of difficult or frozen credit markets, significant changes in interest rates, or deteriorating economic conditions, such securities may decline in value, face valuation difficulties, become more volatile and/or become illiquid. Additionally, asset-backed, mortgage-related and mortgage-backed securities are subject to risks associated with their structure and the nature of the assets underlying the securities and the servicing of those assets. Certain asset-backed, mortgage-related and mortgage-backed securities may face valuation difficulties and may be less liquid than other types of asset-backed, mortgage-related and mortgage-backed securities, or debt securities.
Collateralized mortgage obligations (CMOs) and stripped mortgage-backed securities, including those structured as Interest-Only (IOs) and Principal-Only (POs), are more volatile and may be more sensitive to the rate of prepayments than other mortgage-related securities.
Government Securities Risk. The Fund invests in securities issued or guaranteed by the U.S. government or its agencies and instrumentalities (such as securities issued by the Government National Mortgage Association (Ginnie Mae), the Federal National Mortgage Association (Fannie Mae), or the Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation (Freddie Mac)).
U.S. government securities are subject to market risk, interest rate risk and credit risk. Securities, such as those issued or guaranteed by Ginnie Mae or the U.S. Treasury, that are backed by the full faith and credit of the United States are guaranteed only as to the timely payment of interest and principal when held to maturity and the market prices for such securities will fluctuate. Notwithstanding that these securities are backed by the full faith and credit of the United States, circumstances could arise that would prevent the payment of interest or
14  |  J.P. Morgan Exchange-Traded Funds

principal. This would result in losses to the Fund. Securities issued or guaranteed by U.S. government-related organizations, such as Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, are not backed by the full faith and credit of the U.S. government and no assurance can be given that the U.S. government will provide financial support. Therefore, U.S. government-related organizations may not have the funds to meet their payment obligations in the future.
Industry and Sector Focus Risk. At times the Fund may increase the relative emphasis of its investments in a particular industry or sector. The prices of securities of issuers in a particular industry or sector may be more susceptible to fluctuations due to changes in economic or business conditions, government regulations, availability of basic resources or supplies, or other events that affect that industry or sector more than securities of issuers in other industries and sectors. To the extent that the Fund increases the relative emphasis of its investments in a particular industry or sector, the Fund’s Share values may fluctuate in response to events affecting that industry or sector.
ETF Shares Trading Risk. Shares are listed for trading on the NYSE Arca, Inc. (the “Exchange”) and are bought and sold in the secondary market at market prices. The market prices of Shares are expected to fluctuate, in some cases materially, in response to changes in the Fund’s NAV, the intraday value of the Fund’s holdings and supply and demand for Shares. The adviser cannot predict whether Shares will trade above, below or at their NAV. Disruptions to creations and redemptions, the existence of significant market volatility or potential lack of an active trading market for the Shares (including through a trading halt), as well as other factors, may result in the Shares trading significantly above (at a premium) or below (at a discount) to NAV or to the intraday value of the Fund’s holdings. During such periods, you may incur significant losses if you sell your Shares.
The securities held by the Fund may be traded in markets that close at a different time than the Exchange. Liquidity in those securities may be reduced after the applicable closing times. Accordingly, during the time when the Exchange is open but after the applicable market closing, fixing or settlement times, bid-ask spreads on the Exchange and the corresponding premium or discount to the Shares’ NAV may widen.
Authorized Participant Concentration Risk. Only an authorized participant may engage in creation or redemption transactions directly with the Fund. The Fund has a limited number of intermediaries that act as authorized participants and none of these authorized participants is or will be obligated to engage in creation or redemption transactions. To the extent that these intermediaries exit the business or are unable to or choose not to proceed with creation and/or redemption orders with respect to the Fund and no other authorized participant creates or redeems, Shares may trade at a discount to NAV and possibly face trading halts and/or delisting.
Cash Transactions Risk. Unlike certain ETFs, the Fund may effect creations and redemptions in cash or partially in cash. Therefore, it may be required to sell portfolio securities and
subsequently recognize gains on such sales that the Fund might not have recognized if it were to distribute portfolio securities in-kind. As such, investments in Shares may be less tax-efficient than an investment in an ETF that distributes portfolio securities entirely in-kind.
ETF and Investment Company Risk. Shareholders bear both their proportionate share of the Fund’s expenses and similar expenses of an ETF or other investment company in which the Fund may invest. The price and movement of an index-based ETF may not track its underlying index and may result in a loss. ETFs may trade at a price below their NAV (also known as a discount).
Foreign Securities Risk. Investments in foreign issuers are subject to additional risks, including political and economic risks, civil conflicts and war, greater volatility, expropriation and nationalization risks, sanctions or other measures by the United States or other governments, higher transaction costs, delayed settlement, possible foreign controls on investment, liquidity risks, and less stringent investor protection and disclosure standards of foreign markets. In certain markets where securities and other instruments are not traded “delivery versus payment,” the Fund may not receive timely payment for securities or other instruments it has delivered or receive delivery of securities paid for and may be subject to increased risk that the counterparty will fail to make payments or delivery when due or default completely.
Foreign Issuer Risk. U.S. dollar-denominated securities of foreign issuers or U.S. affiliates of foreign issuers may be subject to additional risks not faced by domestic issuers. These risks include political and economic risks, civil conflicts and war, greater volatility, expropriation and nationalization risks, sanctions or other measures by the United States or other governments, and regulatory issues facing issuers in such countries.

Investments in the Fund are not deposits or obligations of, or guaranteed or endorsed by, any bank and are not insured or guaranteed by the FDIC, the Federal Reserve Board or any other government agency.
You could lose money investing in the Fund.
The Fund’s Past Performance
This section provides some indication of the risks of investing in the Fund. The bar chart shows the performance of the Fund’s Shares over the past three calendar years. The table shows the average annual total returns for the past one year and life of the Fund. It compares that performance to the Bloomberg U.S. Aggregate Bond Index. As of [  ], the Fund changed its investment strategies. In view of these changes, the Fund’s performance record prior to this period might be less pertinent for investors considering whether to purchase shares of the Fund. Past performance (before and after taxes) is not necessarily an indication of how the Fund will perform in the future.
[ ], 2023  |  15

JPMorgan BetaBuilders U.S. Aggregate Bond ETF (continued)
Updated performance information is available by visiting www.jpmorganfunds.com or by calling 1-844-457-6883 (844-4JPM ETF).
YEAR-BY-YEAR RETURNS
Best Quarter
1st quarter, 2020
3.07%
Worst Quarter
1st quarter, 2021
-3.49%
The Fund’s year-to-date total return
through
3/31/22
was
-5.86%
.
AVERAGE ANNUAL TOTAL RETURNS
(For periods ended December 31, 2021)
 
Past
Life of Fund
since
 
1 Year
12/12/2018
SHARES
 
 
Return Before Taxes
-1.82%
4.75%
Return After Taxes on Distributions
-2.37
3.83
Return After Taxes on Distributions and Sale
of Fund Shares
-1.06
3.27
BLOOMBERG U.S. AGGREGATE BOND INDEX
(Reflects No Deduction for Fees, Expenses, or
Taxes)
-1.54
5.07
After-tax returns are calculated using the historical highest individual federal marginal income tax rates and do not reflect the impact of state and local taxes. Actual after-tax returns depend on the investor’s tax situation and may differ from those shown, and the after-tax returns shown are not relevant to investors who hold their shares through tax-deferred arrangements such as 401(k) plans or individual retirement accounts.
Management
J.P. Morgan Investment Management Inc. (the adviser)
Portfolio Manager
Managed the
Fund Since
Primary Title with
Investment Adviser
Eric Isenberg
2018
Managing Director
Naveen Kumar
2018
Executive Director
Jonathan Msika
2021
Vice President
Purchase and Sale of Shares
Individual Shares of the Fund may only be purchased and sold in secondary market transactions through brokers or financial intermediaries. Shares of the Fund are listed for trading on the Exchange, and because Shares trade at market prices rather than net asset value (NAV), Shares of the Fund may trade at a price greater than NAV (premium) or less than NAV (discount). Certain affiliates of the Fund and the adviser may purchase and resell Shares pursuant to this prospectus.
An investor may incur costs attributable to the difference between the highest price a buyer is willing to pay to purchase Shares of the Fund (bid) and the lowest price a seller is willing to accept for Shares (ask) when buying or selling Shares in the secondary market (the bid-ask spread).
Recent information, including information about the Fund’s NAV, market price, premiums and discounts, and bid-ask spreads, is included on the Fund’s website at jpmorganfunds.com.
Tax Information
To the extent the Fund makes distributions, those distributions will be taxed as ordinary income or capital gains, except when your investment is in an IRA, 401(k) plan or other tax-advantaged investment plan, in which case you may be subject to federal income tax upon withdrawal from the tax-advantaged investment plan.
Payments to Broker-Dealers and Other Financial Intermediaries
If you purchase Shares of the Fund through a broker-dealer or other financial intermediary (such as a bank), the adviser and its related companies may pay the financial intermediary for the sale of Shares and related services. These payments may create a conflict of interest by influencing the broker-dealer or financial intermediary and your salesperson to recommend the Fund over another investment. Ask your salesperson or visit your financial intermediary’s website for more information.
16  |  J.P. Morgan Exchange-Traded Funds

More About the Funds
Additional Information About the Funds' Investment Strategies
Each Fund, using a passive” or indexing investment approach, attempts to closely correspond to the performance of its respective Underlying Index. Each Underlying Index is a financial calculation based on a group of financial instruments that is not an investment product and cannot be purchased directly like the Fund. Unlike many actively-managed investment companies, each Fund does not seek to outperform the Underlying Index and does not seek temporary defensive positions when markets decline or appear overvalued.
Credit Quality. Certain Funds may invest all, or are required to invest a certain percentage, of their investments in investment grade securities or the unrated equivalent, while other Funds may invest all or a portion of their investments in below investment grade securities. Below investment grade securities are also called “high yield bonds”, “junk bonds” and “non-investment grade bonds.” These securities generally are rated in the fifth or lower rating categories (for example, the equivalent of BB+ or lower). These securities generally offer a higher yield than investment grade securities, but involve a higher degree of risk.
A security’s quality is determined at the time of purchase and securities that are rated investment grade or the unrated equivalent may be downgraded or decline in credit quality such that subsequently they would be deemed to be below investment grade. The adviser will consider such an event in determining whether a Fund should continue to hold the security and is not required to sell a security in the event of a downgrade. The Funds use the methodology described below to determine the credit quality of their investments.
For the Funds, investment grade securities are securities that have been determined to be investment grade (for example, the equivalent of BBB- or higher) based on ratings by the following NRSROs - Moody’s Investors Service Inc. (Moody’s), Standard & Poor’s Corporation (S&P) or Fitch Ratings (Fitch) and the following methodology. If all three of these NRSROs rate the security, the middle rating is used to determine whether the security is investment grade. If only two of the three NRSROs rate the security, the lower rating is used to determine whether the security is investment grade. If only one of the three NRSROs rates a security, that rating will be used to determine if the security is investment grade. If none of these NRSROs rate a security, the adviser must determine that it is of comparable quality to an investment grade security or a non-investment grade security, respectively, in order for such security to be treated as an investment grade or a non-investment grade security, respectively.
As indicated in the risk/return summaries, some of the Funds may invest in “sub-prime” mortgage-related securities. “Sub-prime” loans, which have higher interest rates, are made to borrowers with low credit ratings or other factors that increase the risk for default. In generally, these borrowers have impaired or limited credit history.
BetaBuilders USD Investment Grade Corporate Bond ETF
The Fund seeks investment results that closely correspond, before fees and expenses, to the performance of the Bloomberg US Corporate Bond Index (the Underlying Index), which measures the investment grade, fixed-rate, taxable corporate bond market and includes USD denominated securities publicly issued by US and non-US industrial, utility and financial issuers. Bloomberg Index Services Limited is the index provider for the Underlying Index (the Index Provider). The Fund will invest at least 80% of its Assets in securities included in the Underlying Index. “Assets” means net assets, plus the amount of borrowings for investment purposes. The Fund will provide shareholders with at least 60 days prior notice of any change to this policy. The Underlying Index is market capitalization weighted and is designed to measure the performance of U.S. dollar denominated investment grade corporate debt publicly issued in the U.S. domestic market. The Underlying Index is a component of the Bloomberg US Credit and Bloomberg US Aggregate indices. As of September 30, 2022, the duration of the Underlying Index was 7.04 years.
As part of its principal strategy, the Fund invests in corporate bonds structured as corporate debt securities, debt securities of master limited partnerships (MLPs), public or private placements, restricted securities and other unregistered securities.

Beta is a measure of the volatility of a security or a portfolio relative to a market benchmark. The term “BetaBuilders” in the Fund’s name conveys the intended outcome of providing investors with passive exposure and return that generally correspond to a market cap weighted benchmark. The Fund, along with other JPMorgan BetaBuilders Funds, can be used to help an investor build a portfolio of passive exposure to various markets.
The Fund, using a “passive” or indexing investment approach, attempts to closely correspond to the performance of the Underlying Index. Unlike many actively-managed funds, the Fund does not seek to outperform the Underlying Index and does not seek temporary defensive positions when markets decline or appear overvalued.
[ ], 2023  |  17

More About the Funds (continued)
The Fund intends to utilize a “representative sampling” strategy whereby securities are chosen in order to attempt to approximate the investment characteristics of the constituent securities. Targeted investment characteristics of the collective portfolio include asset class exposure, industry weightings, liquidity, and other fixed income specific attributes (such as yield, duration, credit quality, spread and maturity). Even when the Fund utilizes representative sampling, it must still invest at least 80% of its Assets in securities included in the Underlying Index. The Fund’s portfolio will be rebalanced monthly in accordance with the rebalancing of the Underlying Index.
The Fund will not invest more than 25% of the value of its total assets in the securities of companies conducting their principal business activities in the same industry, except that, to the extent that an industry represents 20% or more of the Fund’s Underlying Index at the time of investment, the Fund may invest up to 35% of its total assets in that industry.
The Fund may invest in U.S. dollar-denominated securities of foreign issuers.
In addition to direct investments in securities, derivatives, which are instruments that have a value based on another instrument, exchange rate or index, may be used as substitutes for securities in which the Fund can invest. The Fund may use futures contracts as tools in the management of portfolio assets. The Fund may use derivatives to hedge various investments, for risk management and/or to increase income or gain to the Fund. In particular, the Fund may invest in futures to manage duration.
The Fund will not invest in asset classes that are not present in the Underlying Index.
Additional Investment Strategies. In addition to purchasing the securities that are included in its Underlying Index or described above, the Fund may also utilize the following:
Other fixed income securities that are not included in the Underlying Index.
Derivatives, including exchange-traded futures contracts and swaps, including CDX swaps, for the efficient management of cash flows, to hedge various investments, for risk management and to manage duration relative to the benchmark.
U.S. Government Agency Securities
Convertible securities
Shares of affiliated money market funds
Although the Fund predominantly invests in corporate bonds, the Fund may also invest in U.S. Treasury securities including for cash management purposes and for duration management.
The frequency with which the Fund buys and sells securities will vary from year to year, depending on the composition of the Underlying Index.
BetaBuilders USD High Yield Corporate Bond ETF
The Fund seeks investment results that closely correspond, before fees and expenses, to the performance of the ICE BofA U.S. High Yield Total Return Index (the Underlying Index), which is market capitalization weighted and is designed to measure the performance of U.S. dollar denominated below investment grade (commonly referred to as “junk”) corporate debt publicly issued in the U.S. domestic market. To be included in the index securities must be rated below investment grade (based on an average of Moody’s, S&P, and Fitch ratings), have at least 18 months to final maturity at time of issuance, at least one year remaining term to final maturity as of rebalance date, a fixed coupon schedule and a minimum amount outstanding of $250 million. Securities must have risk exposure to countries that are members of the FX-G10, Western Europe or territories of the US and Western Europe. Securities that are original issue zero coupon bonds, 144A securities, pay-in-kind securities, callable perpetual securities (provided they are at least one year from the first call date), and fixed-to-floating (provided they are callable within the fixed rate period and at least one year from last call prior to transition date) are also eligible for inclusion in the index.
The Fund will invest at least 80% of its Assets in securities included in the Underlying Index. “Assets” means net assets, plus the amount of borrowings for investment purposes. The Fund will provide shareholders with at least 60 days prior notice of any change to this policy.
Additionally, as part of its principal strategy, the Fund invests in corporate bonds structured as corporate debt securities, public or private placements, restricted securities and other unregistered securities.

Beta is a measure of the volatility of a security or a portfolio relative to a market benchmark. The term BetaBuilders” in the Fund’s name conveys the intended outcome of providing investors with passive exposure and return that generally correspond to a market cap weighted benchmark. The Fund, along with other JPMorgan BetaBuilders Funds, can be used to help an investor build a portfolio of passive exposure to various markets.
18  |  J.P. Morgan Exchange-Traded Funds

The Fund, using a passive” or indexing investment approach, attempts to closely correspond to the performance of the Underlying Index. Unlike many actively-managed funds, the Fund does not seek to outperform the Underlying Index and does not seek temporary defensive positions when markets decline or appear overvalued.
The Fund intends to utilize a representative sampling” strategy whereby securities are chosen in order to attempt to approximate the investment characteristics of the constituent securities. Targeted investment characteristics of the collective portfolio include asset class exposure, industry weightings, liquidity, and other fixed income specific attributes (such as yield, duration, credit quality, spread and maturity). Even when the Fund utilizes representative sampling, it must still invest at least 80% of its Assets in securities included in the Underlying Index. The Funds portfolio will be rebalanced monthly in accordance with the rebalancing of the Underlying Index.
The Fund will not invest more than 25% of the value of its total assets in the securities of companies conducting their principal business activities in the same industry.
Additional Investment Strategies. Although the Fund predominantly invests in debt securities, it may also invest in common stock (or rights to acquire such securities) in connection with an amendment, waiver, conversion or exchange of fixed income securities, as a result of the bankruptcy or work- out of distressed fixed income securities, or upon the exercise of a right or warrant obtained on account of a fixed income security. The Fund may invest in debt securities issued by small and mid-cap companies. Investments may include securities issued by entities that are owned by government or quasi-government entities. Such ownership may be significant and allow such entities to control the issuer of a corporate bond.
In addition to purchasing the securities that are included in its Underlying Index or described above, the Fund may also utilize the following:
Other fixed income securities that are not included in the Underlying Index.
Derivatives, including exchange-traded futures contracts and CDX swaps, for the efficient management of cash flows, to hedge various investments, for risk management and to manage duration relative to the benchmark.
The frequency with which the Fund buys and sells securities will vary from year to year, depending on the composition of the Underlying Index.
The Fund may also invest in shares of unaffiliated ETFs and affiliated money market funds. ETFs, which are pooled investment vehicles whose ownership interests are purchased and sold on a securities exchange, may be passively or actively managed. Passively managed ETFs generally seek to track the performance of a particular market index, including broad-based market indexes, as well as indexes relating to particular sectors, markets, regions or industries. Actively managed ETFs do not seek to track the performance of a particular market index. Ordinarily, the Fund must limit its investments in a single non-affiliated ETF to 5% of its total assets and in all non-affiliated ETFs to 10% of its total assets.
The Securities and Exchange Commission has adopted an exemptive rule that allows any fund to disregard these 5% and 10% limitations, subject to certain conditions. The price movement of an index-based ETF may not track the underlying index and may result in a loss. In addition, ETFs may trade at a price above (premium) or below (discount) their net asset value, especially during periods of significant market volatility or stress, causing investors to pay or receive significantly more or less than the value of the ETF’s underlying portfolio when they purchase or sell their ETF shares, respectively.
BetaBuilders U.S. Aggregate Bond ETF
The Fund seeks investment results that closely correspond, before fees and expenses, to the performance of the Bloomberg U.S. Aggregate Bond Index (the Underlying Index), which represents securities that are SEC-registered, taxable, and dollar denominated. The index covers the U.S. investment grade fixed rate bond market, with index components for government and corporate securities, mortgage pass-through securities, and asset-backed securities. The Fund will invest at least 80% of its Assets in securities included in the Underlying Index.. “Assets” means net assets, plus the amount of borrowings for investment purposes. The Fund will provide shareholders with at least 60 days prior notice of any change in this policy. A “bond” is defined as a debt security issued by the U.S. government (or its agencies and instrumentalities), a corporation or non-governmental entity with a maturity of 90 days or more at the time of its issuance, and includes mortgage pass-through securities sold in the “to-be-announced” or TBA market (Mortgage TBAs).
As part of its principal strategy, the Fund invests in corporate bonds structured as corporate debt securities, foreign debt securities, mortgaged-backed securities, mortgage dollar rolls, and U.S. Government obligations, which may include direct obligations of the U.S. Treasury, including Treasury bills, notes and bonds.
[ ], 2023  |  19

More About the Funds (continued)

Beta is a measure of the volatility of a security or a portfolio relative to a market benchmark. The term “BetaBuilders” in the Fund’s name conveys the intended outcome of providing investors with passive exposure and return that generally correspond to a market cap weighted benchmark. The Fund, along with other JPMorgan BetaBuilders Funds, can be used to help an investor build a portfolio of passive exposure to various markets.
The Fund, using a “passive” or indexing investment approach, attempts to closely correspond to the performance of the Underlying Index. Unlike many actively-managed funds, the Fund does not seek to outperform the Underlying Index and does not seek temporary defensive positions when markets decline or appear overvalued.
The Fund intends to utilize a representative sampling” strategy whereby securities are chosen in order to attempt to approximate the investment characteristics of the constituent securities. Targeted investment characteristics of the collective portfolio include asset class exposure, industry weightings, liquidity, and other fixed income specific attributes (such as yield, duration, credit quality, spread and maturity). Even when the Fund utilizes representative sampling, it must still invest at least 80% of its Assets in securities included in the Underlying Index. The Fund’s portfolio will be rebalanced monthly in accordance with the rebalancing of the Underlying Index.
The Fund may invest in Mortgage TBAs. Mortgage TBAs provide for the forward or delayed delivery of the underlying instrument with settlement up to 180 days. The term TBA comes from the fact that the actual mortgage-backed security that will be delivered to fulfill a TBA trade is not designated at the time the trade is made, but rather is announced 48 hours before the settlement date.
The Fund may invest in debt obligations, denominated in U.S. dollars, that are issued by a foreign corporation or a U.S. affiliate of a foreign corporation or a foreign government or its agencies and instrumentalities.
The Fund will not invest in asset classes that are not present in the Underlying Index. The Fund will not invest in debt securities that are rated below investment grade (i.e., high yield and junk bonds).
Additional Investment Strategies. Although not part of its principal investment strategy, the Fund may invest in debt obligations issued or guaranteed by a foreign sovereign government or its agencies, authorities or political subdivisions and debt obligations issued or guaranteed by U.S. Government agencies. The Fund may invest in privately placed, restricted and unregistered securities.
In addition to purchasing the securities that are included in its Underlying Index or described above, the Fund may also utilize the following:
Other fixed income securities that are not included in the Underlying Index.
Derivatives, including exchange-traded futures contracts and swaps, including CDX swaps, for the efficient management of cash flows, to hedge various investments, for risk management and to manage duration relative to the benchmark.
The frequency with which the Fund buys and sells securities will vary from year to year, depending on the composition of the Underlying Index.
The Fund has adopted a policy that requires the Fund to provide shareholders with at least 60 days notice prior to any change in its policy to invest at least 80% of its Assets in securities included in its Underlying Index. The Board of Trustees of the Trust may change the Fund’s investment strategies and other policies without shareholder approval, except as otherwise indicated.
The Fund may also invest in shares of unaffiliated ETFs and affiliated money market funds. ETFs, which are pooled investment vehicles whose ownership interests are purchased and sold on a securities exchange, may be passively or actively managed. Passively managed ETFs generally seek to track the performance of a particular market index, including broad-based market indexes, as well as indexes relating to particular sectors, markets, regions or industries. Actively managed ETFs do not seek to track the performance of a particular market index. Ordinarily, the Fund must limit its investments in a single non-affiliated ETF to 5% of its total assets and in all non-affiliated ETFs to 10% of its total assets.
The Securities and Exchange Commission has adopted an exemptive rule that allows any fund to disregard these 5% and 10% limitations, subject to certain conditions. The price movement of an index-based ETF may not track the underlying index and may result in a loss. In addition, ETFs may trade at a price above (premium) or below (discount) their net asset value, especially during periods of significant market volatility or stress, causing investors to pay or receive significantly more or less than the value of the ETF’s underlying portfolio when they purchase or sell their ETF shares, respectively.
20  |  J.P. Morgan Exchange-Traded Funds

NON-FUNDAMENTAL INVESTMENT OBJECTIVES
An investment objective is fundamental if it cannot be changed without the consent of a majority of the outstanding Shares of each
Fund. Each Fund’s investment objective is not fundamental and may be changed without the consent of a majority of the outstanding
Shares of the Fund.
Securities Lending. Each Fund may engage in securities lending to increase its income. Securities lending involves the lending of securities owned by a Fund to financial institutions such as certain broker-dealers in exchange for cash collateral. A Fund will invest cash collateral in one or more money market funds advised by the adviser or its affiliates. The adviser or its affiliates will receive additional compensation from the affiliated money market funds on a Fund’s investment in such money market funds. During the term of the loan, the Fund is entitled to receive amounts equivalent to distributions paid on the loaned securities as well as the return on the cash collateral investments. Upon termination of the loan, the Fund is required to return the cash collateral to the borrower plus any agreed upon rebate. Cash collateral investments will be subject to market depreciation or appreciation, and a Fund will be responsible for any loss that might result from its investment of cash collateral. If the adviser determines to make securities loans, the value of the securities loaned may not exceed 33 13% of the value of total assets of a Fund. Loan collateral (including any investment of that collateral) is not subject to the percentage limitations regarding a Fund’s investments described elsewhere in this prospectus.
The Funds also may use other non-principal strategies that are not described herein, but which are described in “Investment Practices” later in the prospectus and/or in the Statement of Additional Information.
Investment Risks
There can be no assurance that each Fund will achieve its investment objective.
The main risks associated with investing in each Fund are summarized in the “Risk/Return Summary” at the front of this prospectus. In addition to each Fund’s main risks, each Fund may be subject to additional risks in connection with investments and strategies used by each Fund from time to time. The table below identifies main risks and some of the additional risks for each Fund.
Each Fund is subject to management risk and may not achieve its objective if the adviser’s expectations regarding particular instruments or markets are not met.

An investment in a Fund or any other fund may not provide a complete investment program. The suitability of an investment in a Fund should be considered based on the investment objective, strategies and risks described in this prospectus, considered in light of all of the other investments in your portfolio, as well as your risk tolerance, financial goals and time horizons. You may want to consult with a financial advisor to determine if a Fund is suitable for you.
The Funds are subject to the main risks designated as such in the table below, any of which may adversely affect a Fund’s NAV, market price, performance and ability to meet its investment objective. Each Fund may also be subject to additional risks that are noted in the table below, as well as those that are not described herein but which are described in the Statement of Additional Information.
 
BetaBuilders USD
Investment Grade
Corporate Bond ETF
BetaBuilders USD
High Yield
Corporate Bond ETF
BetaBuilders U.S.
Aggregate Bond
ETF
Asset-Backed, Mortgage-Related and Mortgage-Backed Securi-
ties Risk
 
 
Authorized Participant Concentration Risk
Cash Transactions Risk
Concentration Risk
 
 
Convertible Securities Risk
 
Credit Risk
Cyber Security Risk
Main Risks
Additional Risks
[ ], 2023  |  21

More About the Funds (continued)
 
BetaBuilders USD
Investment Grade
Corporate Bond ETF
BetaBuilders USD
High Yield
Corporate Bond ETF
BetaBuilders U.S.
Aggregate Bond
ETF
Derivatives Risk
Equity Market Risk
 
 
ETF and Other Investment Company Risk
 
Financials Sector Risk
 
 
Foreign Issuer Risk
Foreign Securities and Emerging Markets Risk
General Market Risk
Geographic Focus Risk
 
Government Securities Risk
 
High Portfolio Turnover Risk
 
 
High Yield Securities Risk
 
Index Related Risk
Industry and Sector Focus Risk
Interest Rate Risk
Market Trading Risk
MLP Risk
 
 
Passive Management Risk
Preferred Stock Risk
 
 
Prepayment Risk
 
Privately Placed Securities Risk
REITs Risk
 
 
Risk Associated with the Fund Holding Cash, Money Market
Instruments and Other Short-Term Investments
 
 
Sampling Risk
Securities Lending Risk
Smaller Company Risk
 
 
Transactions and Liquidity Risk
Volcker Rule Risk
When-Issued, Delayed Settlement and Forward Commitment
Transactions Risk
 
 
Zero-Coupon, Pay-In-Kind and Deferred Payment Securities Risk
 
 
Main Risks
Additional Risks
General Market Risk. Economies and financial markets throughout the world are becoming increasingly interconnected, which increases the likelihood that events or conditions in one country or region will adversely impact markets or issuers in other countries or regions. Securities in the Underlying Index or in a Fund’s portfolio may underperform in comparison to securities in general financial markets, a particular financial market or other asset classes due to a number of factors, including inflation (or expectations for inflation), deflation (or expectations for deflation), interest rates, global demand for particular products or resources, market instability, debt crises and downgrades, embargoes, tariffs, sanctions and other trade barriers, regulatory events, other governmental trade or market control programs and related geopolitical events. In addition, the value of a Fund’s investments may be negatively affected by the occurrence of global events such as war, terrorism, environmental disasters, natural disasters or events, country instability, and infectious disease epidemics or pandemics.
For example, the outbreak of COVID-19 has negatively affected economies, markets and individual companies throughout the world, including those in which a Fund invests. The effects of this pandemic to public health and business and market conditions, including, among other things, reduced consumer demand and economic output, supply chain disruptions and increased government spending,
22  |  J.P. Morgan Exchange-Traded Funds

may continue to have a significant negative impact on the performance of a Fund’s investments, increase a Fund’s volatility, negatively impact a Fund’s arbitrage and pricing mechanisms, exacerbate pre-existing political, social and economic risks to a Fund, and negatively impact broad segments of businesses and populations. In addition, governments, their regulatory agencies, or self-regulatory organizations have taken or may take actions in response to the pandemic that affect the instruments in which a Fund invests, or the issuers of such instruments, in ways that could have a significant negative impact on a Fund’s investment performance. The duration and extent of COVID-19 and associated economic and market conditions and uncertainty over the long-term cannot be reasonably estimated at this time. The ultimate impact of COVID-19 and the extent to which the associated conditions impact a Fund will also depend on future developments, which are highly uncertain, difficult to accurately predict and subject to frequent changes.
Interest Rate Risk. Each Fund invest in debt securities that change in value based on changes in interest rates. If rates increase, the value of these investments generally declines. On the other hand, if rates fall, the value of these investments generally increases. Your investment will decline in value if the value of these investments decreases. Securities with greater interest rate sensitivity and longer maturities generally are subject to greater fluctuations in value. The Funds may invest in variable and floating rate securities. Although these instruments are generally less sensitive to interest rate changes than fixed rate instruments, the value of variable and floating rate securities may decline if their interest rates do not rise as quickly or as much as general interest rates. Many factors can cause interest rates to rise. Some examples include central bank monetary policy, rising inflation rates and general economic conditions. The Funds may face a heightened level of interest rate risk due to certain changes or uncertainty in monetary policy. It is difficult to predict the pace at which central banks or monetary authorities may increase interest rates or the timing. Any such changes could be sudden and could expose debt markets to significant volatility and reduced liquidity for Fund investments.
Debt market conditions are highly unpredictable and some parts of the market are subject to dislocations. Beginning in March 2022, the Federal Reserve Board began increasing interest rates and has signaled the possibility of further increases. It is difficult to accurately predict the pace at which the Federal Reserve Board will increase interest rates any further, or the timing, frequency or magnitude of any such increases, and the evaluation of macro-economic and other conditions could cause a change in approach in the future. Any such changes could be sudden and could expose debt markets to significant volatility and reduced liquidity for Fund investments.
Credit Risk. There is a risk that issuers and/or counterparties will not make payments on securities, repurchase agreements or other investments held by a Fund. The risk of defaults across issuers and/or counterparties increases in adverse market and economic conditions, including the conditions resulting from the COVID-19 pandemic. Such defaults could result in losses to a Fund. In addition, the credit quality of securities held by a Fund may be lowered if an issuer’s or counterparty’s financial condition changes. Lower credit quality may lead to greater volatility in the price of a security and in shares of a Fund. Lower credit quality also may affect liquidity and make it difficult for the Fund to sell the security. The Funds may invest in securities that are rated in the lowest investment grade category. Such securities also are considered to have speculative characteristics similar to high yield securities, and issuers or counterparties of such securities are more vulnerable to changes in economic conditions than issuers or counterparties of higher grade securities. Prices of the Funds' investments may be adversely affected if any of the issuers or counterparties it is invested in are subject to an actual or perceived deterioration in their credit quality. Credit spreads may increase, which may reduce the market values of the Funds' securities. Credit spread risk is the risk that economic and market conditions or any actual or perceived credit deterioration may lead to an increase in the credit spreads (i.e., the difference in yield between two securities of similar maturity but different credit quality) and a decline in price of the issuer’s securities.
Government Securities Risk. A Fund invests in securities issued or guaranteed by the U.S. government or its agencies and instrumentalities (such as securities issued by Ginnie Mae, Fannie Mae, or Freddie Mac). U.S. government securities are subject to market risk, interest rate risk and credit risk. Securities, such as those issued or guaranteed by Ginnie Mae or the U.S. Treasury, that are backed by the full faith and credit of the United States are guaranteed only as to the timely payment of interest and principal when held to maturity and the market prices for such securities will fluctuate. Notwithstanding that these securities are backed by the full faith and credit of the United States, circumstances could arise that would prevent the payment of interest or principal. This would result in losses to a Fund. Securities issued or guaranteed by U.S. government-related organizations, such as Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, are not backed by the full faith and credit of the U.S. government and no assurance can be given that the U.S. government will provide financial support. Therefore, U.S. government-related organizations may not have the funds to meet their payment obligations in the future. U.S. government securities include zero-coupon securities, which tend to be subject to greater market risk than interest-paying securities of similar maturities.
Foreign Securities and Emerging Markets Risk. Because a Fund invests in U.S. dollar denominated foreign securities, it is subject to special risks in addition to those applicable to U.S. investments. These risks include political and economic risks, civil conflicts and war, greater volatility, expropriation and nationalization risks, sanctions or other measures by the United States or other governments, currency fluctuations, higher transaction costs, delayed settlement, possible foreign controls on investment, liquidity risks and less stringent investor protection and disclosure standards of foreign markets. The securities markets of many foreign countries are relatively small, with a limited number of companies representing a small number of industries. In certain markets where securities
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and other instruments are not traded “delivery versus payment,” a Fund may not receive timely payment for securities or other instruments it has delivered or receive delivery of securities paid for and may be subject to increased risk that the counterparty will fail to make payments or delivery when due or default completely.
Securities registration, custody, and settlement may in some instances be subject to delays and legal and administrative uncertainties. Foreign investment in the securities markets of certain foreign countries is restricted or controlled to varying degrees. These restrictions or controls may at times limit or preclude investment in certain securities and may increase the costs and expenses of a Fund. In addition, the repatriation of investment income, capital or the proceeds of sales of securities from certain of the countries is controlled under regulations, including in some cases the need for certain advance government notification or authority, and if a deterioration occurs in a country’s balance of payments, the country could impose temporary restrictions on foreign capital remittances. A Fund also could be adversely affected by delays in, or a refusal to grant, any required governmental approval for repatriation, as well as by the application to it of other restrictions on investment.
Events and evolving conditions in certain economies or markets may alter the risks associated with investments tied to countries or regions that historically were perceived as comparatively stable becoming riskier and more volatile. The risks associated with foreign securities are magnified in countries in “emerging markets.” These countries may have relatively unstable governments and less-established market economies than developed countries. Emerging markets may face greater social, economic, regulatory and political uncertainties. In addition, emerging markets typically present greater illiquidity and price volatility concerns due to smaller or limited capital markets and greater difficulty in determining market valuations of securities due to limited public information on issuers. A Fund may focus in a single country or small group of countries and be subject to greater volatility than a more geographically diversified fund. Certain emerging market countries may be subject to less stringent requirements regarding accounting, auditing, financial reporting and record keeping and therefore, material information related to an investment may not be available or reliable. In addition, a Fund is limited in its ability to exercise its legal rights or enforce a counterparty’s legal obligations in certain jurisdictions outside of the United States, in particular, in emerging markets countries. In addition, due to jurisdictional limitations, U.S. regulators may be limited in their ability to enforce regulatory or legal obligations in emerging market countries. A Fund’s investments in foreign and emerging market securities may also be subject to foreign withholding taxes and/or taxes, which would decrease the Fund’s yield on those securities.
In addition to the more general foreign and emerging market risks above, a Fund may focus its investments in one or more foreign regions or small group of companies. As a result, such Fund’s performance may be subject to greater volatility than a more geographically diversified fund and may be subject to the risks facing certain regions.
EMEA (Europe/Middle East/Africa) Region Risk. The economies of EMEA countries are all considered emerging market economies. The democratization process in Eastern Europe is still relatively new, and political turmoil and uprising remains a threat. Russia is establishing a new political outlook and market economy, but political risks remain high and steps that Russia may take to assert its geopolitical influence may increase the tensions in the region and affect economic growth. Many Middle Eastern economies have little or no democratic tradition and are currently facing greater political and economic uncertainty, which could result in significant economic downturn. Many African nations have a history of dictatorship, military intervention and corruption. Russia, the Middle East and many African nations are also highly reliant on income from sales of commodities (such as oil), and their economies are therefore vulnerable to changes in the global prices of these commodities and currencies. As global demand for commodities fluctuates, the Russian economy and many Middle Eastern and African economies may be significantly impacted.
European Market Risk. A Fund’s performance will be affected by political, social and economic conditions in Europe, such as growth of the economic output (the gross national product), the rate of inflation, the rate at which capital is reinvested into European economies, the success of governmental actions to reduce budget deficits, the resource self-sufficiency of European countries and interest and monetary exchange rates between European countries. European financial markets may experience volatility due to concerns about high government debt levels, credit rating downgrades, rising unemployment, the future of the euro as a common currency, possible restructuring of government debt and other government measures responding to those concerns, and fiscal and monetary controls imposed on member countries of the European Union. The risk of investing in Europe may be heightened due to steps taken by the United Kingdom to exit the European Union. On January 31, 2020, the United Kingdom officially withdrew from the European Union and entered a transition period, which ended on December 31, 2020. On December 30, 2020, the European Union and the United Kingdom signed the EU-UK Trade and Cooperation Agreement (“TCA”), an agreement on the terms governing certain aspects of the European Union’s and the United Kingdom’s relationship following the end of the transition period. Notwithstanding the TCA, following the transition period, there is likely to be considerable uncertainty as to the United Kingdom’s post transition framework. The impact on the United Kingdom and European economies and the broader global economy could be significant, resulting in increased volatility and illiquidity, currency fluctuations, impacts on arrangements for trading and on other existing cross-border cooperation arrangements (whether economic, tax, fiscal, legal, regulatory or otherwise), and in potentially lower growth for
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companies in the United Kingdom, Europe and globally, which could have an adverse effect on the value of a Fund’s investments. In addition, if one or more other countries were to exit the European Union or abandon the use of the euro as a currency, the value of investments tied to those countries or the euro could decline significantly and unpredictably.
Japan Risk. The Japanese economy may be subject to economic, political and social instability, which could have a negative impact on Japanese securities. In the past, Japan’s economic growth rate has remained relatively low, and it may remain low in the future. At times, the Japanese economy has been adversely impacted by government intervention and protectionism, changes in its labor market, and an unstable financial services sector. International trade, government support of the financial services sector and other troubled sectors, government policy, natural disasters and/or geopolitical developments could significantly affect the Japanese economy. A significant portion of Japan’s trade is conducted with developing nations and can be affected by conditions in these nations or by currency fluctuations. Japan is an island state with few natural resources and limited land area and is reliant on imports for its commodity needs. Any fluctuations or shortages in the commodity markets could have a negative impact on the Japanese economy.
India Risk. Government actions, bureaucratic obstacles and inconsistent economic reform within the Indian government have had a significant effect on the economy and could adversely affect market conditions, economic growth and the profitability of private enterprises. Global economic developments may inhibit the flow of foreign capital on which India is dependent to sustain its growth. Large portions of many Indian companies remain in the hands of individuals and corporate governance standards of Indian companies may be weaker and less transparent, which may increase the risk of loss and unequal treatment of investors. Investments in India are subject to risks presented by investments in an emerging market country, including liquidity risk, which may result in extreme volatility in the prices of Indian securities. Religious, cultural and military disputes persist in India, and between India and Pakistan (as well as between sectarian groups within each country). In addition, the Indian economy could be adversely impacted by natural disasters and acts of terrorism. Both India and Pakistan have tested nuclear arms, and the threat of deployment of such weapons could hinder development of the Indian economy, and escalating tensions could impact the broader region.
Latin American Market Risk. The economies of countries in Latin America are all considered emerging market economies. High interest, inflation (in some cases substantial and prolonged), and unemployment rates generally characterize each economy. Because commodities such as agricultural products, minerals, and metals represent a significant percentage of exports of many Latin American countries, the economies of those countries are particularly sensitive to fluctuations in commodity prices. Investments in the region may also be subject to currency risks, such as restrictions on the flow of money in and out of the country, extreme volatility relative to the U.S. dollar, and devaluation, all of which could decrease the value of a Fund.
Governments of many Latin American countries exercise substantial influence over many aspects of the private sector, and any such exercise could have a significant effect on companies in which the Fund invests. Other Latin American market risks include foreign exchange controls, difficulties in pricing securities, defaults on sovereign debt, difficulties in enforcing favorable legal judgments in local courts, political and social instability and the significant percentage of the market represented by a small number of issuers.
Geographic Focus Risk. In addition to the more general Foreign Securities and Emerging Markets Risk above, a Fund may focus its investments in one or more foreign regions or small groups of countries. As a result, a Fund’s performance may be subject to greater volatility than a more geographically diversified fund and may be subject to the risks facing certain regions.
Asset-Backed, Mortgage-Related and Mortgage-Backed Securities Risk. Asset-backed, mortgage-related and mortgage-backed securities differ from conventional debt securities and are subject to certain additional risks because principal is paid back over the life of the security rather than at maturity. The value of these securities will be influenced by the factors affecting the housing market and the assets underlying such securities. As a result, during periods of difficult or frozen credit markets, significant changes in interest rates, or deteriorating economic conditions, mortgage-related and asset-backed securities may decline in value, face valuation difficulties, become more volatile and/or become illiquid. Additionally, during such periods and also under normal conditions, these securities are also subject to prepayment and call risk. Gains and losses associated with prepayments will increase or decrease a Fund’s yield and the income available for distribution by a Fund. When mortgages and other obligations are prepaid and when securities are called, a Fund may have to reinvest in securities with a lower yield or fail to recover additional amounts (i.e., premiums) paid for securities with higher interest rates, resulting in an unexpected capital loss and/or a decrease in the amount of dividends and yield. In periods of either rising or declining interest rates, a Fund may be subject to extension risk, and may receive principal later than expected. As a result, in periods of rising interest rates, a Fund may exhibit additional volatility. Some of these securities may receive little or no collateral protection from the underlying assets and are thus subject to the risk of default described under “Credit Risk.” The risk of such defaults is generally higher in the case of asset-backed, mortgage-related and mortgage-backed investments that include so-called “sub-prime” mortgages, (which are loans made to borrowers with low credit ratings or other factors that increase the risk of default), credit risk transfer securities and credit-linked notes issued by government-related organizations. The structure of some of these securities may be complex and there may be less available information than other types of debt securities. Additionally, asset-backed, mortgage-related and mortgage-backed securities are subject to risks associated with their structure and
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the nature of the assets underlying the securities and the servicing of those assets. Certain asset-backed, mortgage-related and mortgage-backed securities may face valuation difficulties and may be less liquid than other types of asset-backed, mortgage-related and mortgage-backed securities, or debt securities.
The mortgage loans underlying privately issued mortgage-related securities may not be subject to the same underwriting requirements for the underlying mortgages that are applicable to those mortgage-related securities that have government or government-sponsored entity guarantees. As a result, the mortgage loans underlying privately issued mortgage-related securities may have less favorable collateral, credit risk or other underwriting characteristics than government or government-sponsored mortgage-related securities and have wider variances in a number of terms including interest rate, term, size, purpose and borrower characteristics. In addition, certain mortgage-related securities which may include loans that originally qualified under standards established by government-sponsored entities (for example, certain REMICs that include Fannie Mae mortgages) are not considered as government securities for purposes of a Fund’s investment strategies or policies. There is no government or government-sponsored guarantee for such privately issued investments.
A Fund may invest in CMOs. CMOs are debt obligations collateralized by mortgage loans or mortgage pass-through securities. CMOs are issued in multiple classes, and each class may have its own interest rate and/or final payment date. A class with an earlier final payment date may have certain preferences in receiving principal payments or earning interest. As a result, the value of some classes in which a Fund invests may be particularly sensitive to changes in prevailing interest rates. The values of IO and PO mortgage-backed securities are more volatile than other types of mortgage-related securities. They are very sensitive not only to changes in interest rates, but also to the rate of prepayments. A rapid or unexpected increase in prepayments can significantly depress the price of interest-only securities, while a rapid or unexpected decrease could have the same effect on principal-only securities. In addition, because there may be a drop in trading volume, an inability to find a ready buyer, or the imposition of legal restrictions on the resale of securities, these instruments may be illiquid.
A Fund may also invest in CLOs. A CLO is a trust or other SPE that is typically collateralized by a pool of loans, which may include, among others, domestic and non-U.S. senior secured loans, senior unsecured loans, and subordinate corporate loans, including loans that may be rated below investment grade or equivalent unrated loans. As a result, CLOs are subject to the same risks as other investments in asset-backed securities, including the risks described above and in “Interest Rate Risk” and “Credit Risk.” Like CMOs, CLOs are issued in different classes or “tranches” that may vary with respect to levels of risk and yield. CLOs carry additional risks including, but not limited to: (i) the possibility that distributions from collateral securities will not be adequate to make interest or other payments; (ii) the risk that the collateral may default or decline in value or be downgraded, if rated by a nationally recognized statistical rating organization; (iii) the structure and complexity of the transaction and the legal documents could lead to disputes among investors regarding the characterization of proceeds; (iv) the investment return achieved by a Fund could be significantly different than those predicted by financial models; (v) the lack of a readily available secondary market for CLOs; (vi) risk of forced “fire sale” liquidation due to technical defaults such as coverage test failures; and (vii) the CLO’s manager may perform poorly. To the extent a Fund invests in a subordinate tranche, these risks may be magnified.
Credit risk transfer securities and credit-linked notes are general obligations issued by a government-related organization or SPV, respectively, and are unguaranteed. Unlike mortgage-backed securities, investors in credit risk transfer securities and credit-linked notes issued by a government-related organization have no recourse to the underlying mortgage loans. In addition, some or all of the mortgage default risk associated with the underlying mortgage loans is transferred to the noteholder. There can be no assurance that losses will not occur on an investment. These investments are also subject to the risks described under “Prepayment Risk,” below.
Prepayment Risk. The issuer of certain securities may repay principal in advance, especially when yields fall. Changes in the rate at which prepayments occur can affect the return on investment of these securities. When debt obligations are prepaid or when securities are called, a Fund may have to reinvest in securities with a lower yield. A Fund also may fail to recover additional amounts (i.e., premiums) paid for securities with higher coupons, resulting in an unexpected capital loss.
High Yield Securities Risk. Some of the Funds may invest in high yield, high risk securities (also known as junk bonds) which are considered to be speculative. These investments may be issued by companies which are highly leveraged, less creditworthy or financially distressed. Non-investment grade debt securities can be more sensitive to short-term corporate, economic and market developments. During periods of economic uncertainty and change, the market price of a Fund’s investments and a Fund’s NAV may be volatile. Furthermore, though these investments generally provide a higher yield than higher-rated debt securities, the high degree of risk involved in these investments can result in substantial or total losses. These securities are subject to greater risk of loss, greater sensitivity to economic changes, valuation difficulties, and a potential lack of a secondary or public market for securities. The market price of these securities can change suddenly and unexpectedly. As a result, certain Funds are intended for investors who are able and willing to assume a high degree of risk.
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In recent years, there has been a broad trend of weaker or less restrictive covenant protections in the high yield market. Among other things, under such weaker or less restrictive covenants, borrowers might be able to exercise more flexibility with respect to certain activities than borrowers who are subject to stronger or more protective covenants. For example, borrowers might be able to incur more debt, including secured debt, return more capital to shareholders, remove or reduce assets that are designated as collateral securing high yield securities, increase the claims against assets that are permitted against collateral securing high yield securities or otherwise manage their business in ways that could impact creditors negatively. In addition, certain privately held borrowers might be permitted to file less frequent, less detailed or less timely financial reporting or other information, which could negatively impact the value of the high yield securities issued by such borrowers. Each of these factors might negatively impact the high yield instruments held by a Fund.
Derivatives Risk. A Fund may use derivatives in connection with its investment strategies. Derivatives may be riskier than other types of investments because they may be more sensitive to changes in economic or market conditions than other types of investments and could result in losses that significantly exceed a Fund’s original investment. Derivatives are subject to the risk that changes in the value of a derivative may not correlate perfectly with the underlying asset, rate or index. The use of derivatives may not be successful, resulting in losses to a Fund and the cost of such strategies may reduce a Fund’s returns. Certain derivatives also expose a Fund to counterparty risk (the risk that the derivative counterparty will not fulfill its contractual obligations), including credit risk of the derivative counterparty. Certain derivatives are synthetic instruments that attempt to replicate the performance of certain reference assets. With regard to such derivatives, a Fund does not have a claim on the reference assets and is subject to enhanced counterparty risk. In addition, a Fund may use derivatives for non-hedging purposes, which increases that Fund’s potential for loss.
Investing in derivatives will result in a form of leverage. Leverage involves special risks. A Fund may be more volatile than if a Fund had not been leveraged because leverage tends to exaggerate any effect on the value of a Fund’s portfolio securities. A Fund cannot assure you that the use of leverage will result in a higher return on your investment, and using leverage could result in a net loss on your investment. Registered investment companies are limited in their ability to engage in derivative transactions and are required to identify and earmark assets to provide asset coverage for derivative transactions.
The possible lack of a liquid secondary market for derivatives and the resulting inability of a Fund to sell or otherwise close a derivatives position could expose a Fund to losses and could make derivatives more difficult for a Fund to value accurately.
Certain of a Fund’s transactions in futures contracts, swaps, foreign currency derivatives and other derivatives could also affect the amount, timing and character of distributions to shareholders which may result in a Fund realizing more short-term capital gain and ordinary income subject to tax at ordinary income tax rates than it would if it did not engage in such transactions, which may adversely impact a Fund’s after-tax return. Derivatives may not perform as expected, so a Fund may not realize the intended benefits. When used for hedging, the change in value of a derivative may not correlate as expected with the currency, security or other risk being hedged. In addition, given their complexity, derivatives expose a Fund to risks of mispricing or improper valuations.
In addition to the risks associated with derivatives in general, a Fund will also be subject to risks related to swap agreements. Because swap agreements are not exchange-traded, but are private contracts into which a Fund and a swap counterparty enter as principals, a Fund may experience a loss or delay in recovering assets if the counterparty defaults on its obligations. A Fund will segregate or earmark liquid assets at its custodian bank in an amount sufficient to cover its obligations under swap agreements.
WHAT IS A DERIVATIVE?
Derivatives are securities or contracts (for example, futures and options) that derive their value from the performance of underlying
assets or securities.
Privately Placed Securities Risk. Privately placed securities generally are less liquid than publicly traded securities and a Fund may not always be able to sell such securities without experiencing delays in finding buyers or reducing the sale price for such securities. The disposition of some of the securities held by a Fund may be restricted under federal securities laws or by the relevant exchange or by a governmental or supervisory authority. As a result, a Fund may not be able to dispose of such investments at a time when, or at a price at which, it desires to do so and may have to bear expenses of registering these securities, if necessary. These securities may also be difficult to value.
Industry and Sector Focus Risk. Because a Fund may invest a significant portion of its assets in securities of companies in the banking industry, developments affecting the banking industry may have a disproportionate impact on a Fund. At times a Fund may increase the relative emphasis of its investments in a particular industry or sector. The prices of securities of issuers in a particular industry or sector may be more susceptible to fluctuations due to changes in economic or business conditions, government regulations, availability of basic resources or supplies, or other events that affect that industry or sector more than securities of issuers in other industries and sectors. To the extent that a Fund increases the relative emphasis of its investments in a particular industry or
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sector, a Fund’s share values may fluctuate in response to events affecting that industry or sector. These risks generally include interest rate risk, credit risk and risk associated with regulatory changes in the banking industry. The profitability of banks depends largely on the availability and cost of funds, which can change depending on economic conditions.
Market Trading Risk
Risk that Shares of a Fund May Trade at Prices Other Than NAV. Shares of a Fund may trade on the Exchange at prices above, below or at their most recent NAV. The NAV of a Fund’s Shares, which is calculated at the end of each business day, will generally fluctuate with changes in the market value of that Fund’s holdings. The market prices of the Shares will also fluctuate, in some cases materially, in accordance with changes in NAV and the intraday value of a Fund’s holdings, as well as the relative supply of and demand for the Shares on the Exchange. Differences between secondary market prices of Shares and the intraday value of a Fund’s holdings may be due largely to supply and demand forces in the secondary market, which may not be the same forces as those influencing prices for securities held by the Fund at a particular time.
Given the fact that Shares can be created and redeemed by authorized participants in Creation Units, the adviser believes that large discounts or premiums to the NAV of Shares should not be sustained in the long-term. While the creation/ redemption feature is designed to make it likely that Shares normally will trade close to the value of a Fund’s holdings, market prices are not expected to correlate exactly to a Fund’s NAV due to timing reasons, supply and demand imbalances and other factors. In addition, disruptions to creations and redemptions, adverse developments impacting market makers, authorized participants or other market participants, or high market volatility may result in market prices for Shares of the Fund that differ significantly from its NAV or to the intraday value of the Fund’s holdings. As a result of these factors, among others, a Fund’s Shares may trade at a premium or discount to NAV, especially during periods of significant market volatility.
Given the nature of the relevant markets for certain of the securities for the Fund, Shares may trade at a larger premium or discount to NAV than shares of other kinds of ETFs. In addition, the securities held by such Funds may be traded in markets that close at a different time than the Exchange. Liquidity in those securities may be reduced after the applicable closing times. Accordingly, during the time when the Exchange is open but after the applicable market closing, fixing or settlement times, bid/ask spreads and the resulting premium or discount to the Shares’ net asset value may widen.
Cost of Buying or Selling Shares. When you buy or sell Shares of a Fund through a broker, you will likely incur a brokerage commission or other charges imposed by brokers. In addition, the market price of Shares, like the price of any exchange-traded security, includes a “bid-ask spread” charged by the market makers or other participants that trade the particular security. The spread of a Fund’s Shares varies over time based on the Fund’s trading volume and market liquidity and may increase if the Fund’s trading volume, the spread of the Fund’s underlying securities, or market liquidity decrease. In times of severe market disruption, including when trading of a Fund’s holdings may be halted, the bid-ask spread may increase significantly. This means that Shares may trade at a discount to a Fund’s NAV, and the discount is likely to be greatest during significant market volatility.
Short Selling Risk. Shares of the Fund, similar to shares of other issuers listed on a stock exchange, may be sold short and are therefore subject to the risk of increased volatility and price decreases associated with being sold short.
No Guarantee of Active Trading Market Risk. While Shares are listed on the Exchange, there can be no assurance that active trading markets for the Shares will be maintained by market makers or by authorized participants. JPMorgan Distribution Services, Inc., the distributor of a Fund’s Shares (the Distributor), does not maintain a secondary market in the Shares.
Trading Issues Risk. Trading in Shares on the Exchange may be halted due to market conditions or for reasons that, in the view of the Exchange, make trading in Shares inadvisable. In addition, trading in Shares on the Exchange is subject to trading halts caused by extraordinary market volatility pursuant to the Exchange “circuit breaker” rules. If a trading halt or unanticipated early closing of the Exchange occurs, a shareholder may be unable to purchase or sell Shares of a Fund.
There can be no assurance that the requirements of the Exchange necessary to maintain the listing of a Fund will continue to be met or will remain unchanged.
Authorized Participant Concentration Risk. Only an authorized participant may engage in creation or redemption transactions directly with a Fund. Each Fund has a limited number of intermediaries that act as authorized participants and none of these authorized participants is or will be obligated to engage in creation or redemption transactions. To the extent that these intermediaries exit the business or are unable to or choose not to proceed with creation and/or redemption orders with respect to a Fund and no other authorized participant creates or redeems, Shares may trade at a discount to NAV and possibly face trading halts and/or delisting.
Risk Associated with the Fund Holding Cash, Money Market Instruments and Other Short-Term Investments. A Fund will, at times, hold assets in cash, money market instruments and other short-term investments, which may hurt the Fund’s performance. These positions may also subject a Fund to additional risks and costs.
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Cash Transactions Risk. Unlike certain ETFs, a Fund may effect its creations and redemptions in cash or partially in cash. As a result, an investment in a Fund may be less tax-efficient than an investment in such ETFs. Other ETFs generally are able to make in-kind redemptions and avoid realizing gains in connection with transactions designed to raise cash to meet redemption requests. If a Fund effects a portion of redemptions for cash, it may be required to sell portfolio securities in order to obtain the cash needed to distribute redemption proceeds, which also involves transaction costs. If a Fund recognizes gain on these sales, this generally will cause a Fund to recognize gain it might not otherwise have recognized if it were to distribute portfolio securities in-kind, or to recognize such gain sooner than would otherwise be required. A Fund generally intends to distribute these gains to shareholders to avoid being taxed on this gain at a Fund level and otherwise comply with the special tax rules that apply to it. This strategy may cause shareholders to be subject to tax on gains they would not otherwise be subject to, or at an earlier date than, if they had made an investment in a different ETF.
ETF and Other Investment Company Risk. The Funds may invest in shares of other investment companies, including ETFs. Shareholders bear both their proportionate share of a Fund’s expenses and similar expenses of the underlying investment company or ETF when a Fund invests in shares of another investment company or ETF. A Fund is subject to the risks associated with the ETF or investment company’s investments. The price and movement of an ETF or closed-end fund designed to track an index may not track the index and may result in a loss. In addition, ETFs and closed-end investment companies may trade at a price above (premium) or below (discount) their net asset value, especially during periods of significant market volatility or stress, causing investors to pay or receive significantly more or less than the value of the ETF’s underlying portfolio when they purchase or sell their ETF shares, respectively. Certain ETFs or closed-end funds traded on exchanges may be thinly traded and experience large spreads between the “ask” price quoted by a seller and the “bid” price offered by a buyer. Some of the Funds may invest in investment companies that include common and preferred shares of closed-end funds. In addition to the risks applicable to investment companies generally, to the extent that a Fund invests in auction rate preferred shares of closed-end funds, such securities are subject to additional risks.
Certain Funds may also invest in pooled investment vehicles that are not registered investment companies or commodity pools. These pooled investment vehicles do not have the protections available to those types of investments under federal securities or commodities laws. For example, unlike registered investment companies, these vehicles are not subject to federal securities laws that limit transactions with affiliates, require redemption of shares, or limit sales load. Although shares of these vehicles may be traded on an exchange, there may be no active market for such shares and such shares may be highly illiquid.
Foreign Issuer Risk. Some of the Funds invests in U.S. dollar-denominated securities of foreign issuers or U.S. affiliates of for issuers. Although, these securities are not subject to all of the risks summarized in “Foreign Securities and Emerging Markets Risk,” they may be subject to additional risks not faced by domestic issuers. These risks include political and economic risks, civil conflicts and war, greater volatility, expropriation and nationalization risks, and regulatory issuers facing issuers in such foreign countries.
Zero-Coupon, Pay-In-Kind and Deferred Payment Securities Risk. The market value of a zero-coupon, pay-in-kind or deferred payment security is generally more volatile than the market value of, and is more likely to respond to a greater degree to changes in interest rates and credit quality than, other fixed income securities with similar maturities and credit quality that pay interest periodically. In addition, federal income tax law requires that the holder of a zero-coupon security accrue a portion of the discount at which the security was purchased as taxable income each year even though the holder receives no interest payments on the note during the year. A fund must distribute substantially all of its net income (including non-cash income attributable to zero-coupon securities) to its share holders each year to maintain its status as a regulated investment company and to eliminate tax at the Fund level. Accordingly, such accrued discount must be taken into account in determining the amount of taxable distributions to shareholders. A fund may consequently have to dispose of portfolio securities under disadvantageous circumstances to generate cash to satisfy such distribution requirements. These actions may reduce the assets to which a fund’s expenses could otherwise be allocated and may reduce a fund’s rate of return.
In addition, (1) the higher yields and interest rates on certain pay-in-kind securities (PIK) reflect the payment deferral and increased credit risk associated with such instruments and such investments may represent a significantly higher credit risk than coupon loans; (2) PIK securities may have higher price volatility because their continuing accruals require continuing judgments about the collectability of the deferred payments and the value of any associated collateral; (3) PIK interest has the effect of generating investment income; and (4) the deferral of PIK interest may also reduce the loan-to-value ratio at a compounding rate.
High Portfolio Turnover Risk. A Fund will likely engage in active and frequent trading leading to increased portfolio turnover, higher transaction costs and the possibility that the recognition of capital gains will be accelerated, including short-term capital gains that will generally be taxable to shareholders as ordinary income.
Convertible Securities Risk. A convertible security generally entitles the holder to receive interest paid or accrued on debt securities or the dividend paid on preferred stock until the convertible security matures or is redeemed, converted or exchanged. Before conversion, convertible securities generally have characteristics similar to both debt and equity securities. The value of convertible securities tends to decline as interest rates rise and, because of the conversion feature, tends to vary with fluctuations in the market
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value of the underlying securities. Convertible securities ordinarily provide a stream of income with generally higher yields than those of common stock of the same or similar issuers. Convertible securities generally rank senior to common stock in a corporation’s capital structure but are usually subordinated to comparable non-convertible securities. Convertible securities generally do not participate directly in any dividend increases or decreases of the underlying securities, although the market prices of convertible securities may be affected by any dividend changes or other changes in the underlying securities. Contingent convertible securities are subject to additional risks factors. A contingent convertible security is a hybrid debt security typically issued by a non-U.S. bank that may be convertible into equity or may be written down if a pre-specified trigger event such as a decline in capital ratio below a prescribed threshold occurs. If such a trigger event occurs, a Fund may lose the principal amount invested on a permanent or temporary basis or the contingent convertible security may be converted to equity. Coupon payments on contingent convertible securities may be discretionary and may be cancelled by the issuer. Holders of contingent convertible securities may suffer a loss of capital when comparable equity holders do not.
REITs Risk. A Fund’s investments in debt and convertible securities of REITs are subject to the same risks as direct investments in real estate and mortgages. Real estate values rise and fall in response to many factors, including local, regional and national economic conditions, the demand for rental property, and interest rates. When economic growth is slowing, demand for property decreases and prices may fall. Rising interest rates, which drive up mortgage and financing costs, can affect the profitability and liquidity of properties in the real estate market. Property values may also decrease because of overbuilding, extended vacancies, increase in property taxes and operating expenses, zoning laws, environmental regulations, clean-up of and liability for environmental hazards, uninsured casualty or condemnation losses, or a general decline in neighborhood values. A Fund’s investments and your investment may decline in value in response to declines in property values or other adverse changes to the real estate market. In addition, federal and state laws may restrict the remedies that a lender of underlying REIT assets has when a borrower defaults on loans. The performance of real estate securities is also largely dependent on the organization, skill and capital funding of the managers and operators of the underlying real estate. Debt and convertible securities of REITs are subject to the risks of debt and convertible securities in general. For example, such securities are more sensitive to interest rates than equity securities of REITs.
Financials Sector Risk. Financial services companies are subject to extensive governmental regulation which may limit both the amounts and types of loans and other financial commitments they can make, the interest rates and fees they can charge, the scope of their activities, the prices they can charge and the amount of capital they must maintain. Profitability is largely dependent on the availability and cost of capital funds and can fluctuate significantly when interest rates change or due to increased competition. In addition, deterioration of the credit markets generally may cause an adverse impact in a broad range of markets, including U.S. and international credit and interbank money markets generally, thereby affecting a wide range of financial institutions and markets. Certain events in the financial sector may cause an unusually high degree of volatility in the financial markets, both domestic and foreign, and cause certain financial services companies to incur large losses. Securities of financial services companies may experience a dramatic decline in value when such companies experience substantial declines in the valuations of their assets, take action to raise capital (such as the issuance of debt or equity securities), or cease operations. Credit losses resulting from financial difficulties of borrowers and financial losses associated with investment activities can negatively impact the sector. Insurance companies may be subject to severe price competition. Adverse economic, business or political developments could adversely affect financial institutions engaged in mortgage finance or other lending or investing activities directly or indirectly connected to the value of real estate.
Concentration Risk. A Fund will not invest more than 25% of the value of its total assets in the securities of companies conducting their principal business activities in the same industry, except for the BetaBuilders Investment Grade Corporate Bond ETF, which, to the extent that an industry represents 20% or more of a Fund’s Underlying Index at the time of investment, a Fund may invest up to 35% of its total assets in that industry. Concentrating Fund investments in companies conducting business in the same industry will subject a Fund to a greater risk of loss as a result of adverse economic, business or other developments affecting that industry than if its investments were not so concentrated.
MLP Risk. MLPs may trade infrequently and in limited volume and they may be subject to more abrupt or erratic price movements than securities of larger or more broadly-based companies. The managing general partner of an MLP may receive an incentive allocation based on increases in the amount and growth of cash distributions to investors in the MLP. This method of compensation may create an incentive for the managing general partner to make investments that are riskier or more speculative than would be the case in the absence of such compensation arrangements. Debt securities of MLPs are subject to the risks of debt securities in general. For example, such securities are more sensitive to interest rates than equity securities of MLPs. Certain MLPs may operate in, or have exposure to, the energy sector. The energy sector can be significantly affected by changes in the prices and supplies of oil and other energy fuels, energy conservation, the success of exploration projects, and tax and other government regulations, policies of the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) and relationships among OPEC members and between OPEC and oil importing nations.
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Smaller Company Risk. Investments in securities of smaller companies (mid cap and small cap companies) may be riskier, less liquid, more volatile and more vulnerable to economic, market and industry changes than securities of larger, more established companies. The securities of smaller companies may trade less frequently and in smaller volumes than securities of larger companies. As a result, changes in the price of securities issued by such companies may be more sudden or erratic than the prices of securities of large capitalization companies, especially over the short term. These risks are higher for small cap companies.
Preferred Stock Risk. Preferred stock generally has a preference as to dividends and liquidation over an issuer’s common stock but ranks junior to debt securities in an issuer’s capital structure. Unlike interest payments on debt securities, preferred stock dividends are payable only if declared by the issuer’s board of directors. Preferred stock also may be subject to optional or mandatory redemption provisions. Because preferred stocks generally pay dividends only after the issuing company makes required payments to holders of its bonds and other debt, the value of preferred stocks generally is more sensitive than bonds and other debt to actual or perceived changes in the company’s financial condition or prospects.
Index Related Risk. A Fund’s return may not track the return of its Underlying Index for a number of reasons and therefore may not achieve its investment objective. For example, a Fund incurs a number of operating expenses not applicable to its Underlying Index, and incurs costs in buying and selling securities, especially when rebalancing a Fund’s securities holdings to reflect changes in the composition of the Underlying Index. These transaction costs may be higher for a Fund investing in foreign securities. In addition, a Fund’s return may differ from the return of its Underlying Index as a result of, among other things, pricing differences (including differences between a security’s price at the local market close and a Fund’s valuation of a security at the time of calculation of a Fund’s NAV) and the inability to purchase certain securities included in the Underlying Index due to regulatory or other restrictions.
In addition, when a Fund uses a representative sampling approach, a Fund may not be as well correlated with the return of its Underlying Index as when a Fund purchases all of the securities in the Underlying Index in the proportions in which they are represented in the Underlying Index.
Corporate actions affecting securities held by a Fund (such as mergers and spin-offs) or a Fund’s ability to purchase round lots of the securities may also cause a deviation between the performance of a Fund and its Underlying Index.
Errors in the construction or calculation of the Underlying Index may occur from time to time. Any such errors may not be identified and corrected for some period of time, which may negatively impact a Fund and its shareholders. For example, during a period when the Underlying Index contains inaccurate constituents, a Fund would have market exposure to such constituents and would be underexposed to the Underlying Index’s other constituents.
Unusual market conditions may cause the Index Provider to postpone a scheduled rebalance, which could cause an Underlying Index to vary from its normal or expected composition. The postponement of a scheduled rebalance in a time of market volatility could mean that constituents that would otherwise be removed at rebalance due to changes in market capitalizations or other reasons may remain, causing the performance and constituents of the Underlying Index to vary from those expected under normal conditions and potentially increasing transaction costs to a Fund. Apart from scheduled rebalances, the Index Provider or its agents may carry out additional ad hoc rebalances to the Underlying Index in order, for example, to correct an error in the selection of index constituents. When an Underlying Index is rebalanced and a Fund in turn rebalances its portfolio to attempt to increase the correlation between the Fund’s portfolio and its Underlying Index, any transaction costs and market exposure arising from such portfolio rebalancing may be borne directly by the Fund and its shareholders. Therefore, errors and additional ad hoc rebalances carried out by the Index Provider or its agents to the Underlying Index may increase the costs to and the tracking error risk of the Fund.
It is also possible that the composition of a Fund may not exactly replicate the composition of its Underlying Index if the Fund has to adjust its portfolio holdings in order to continue to qualify as a “regulated investment company” under the U.S. Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended (the Internal Revenue Code).
The risk that a Fund may not track the performance of the Underlying Index may be heightened during times of increased market volatility or other unusual market conditions.
Passive Management Risk. Unlike many investment companies, a Fund’s is not “actively” managed. As a result, it would not generally sell a security because the security’s issuer was in financial trouble unless that security is removed from the Underlying Index. As a result, a Fund’s performance could be lower than funds that may actively shift their portfolio assets to take advantage of market opportunities or lessen the impact of a market decline or a decline in the value of one or more issuers. A Fund will not take defensive positions under any market conditions, including in declining markets.
Sampling Risk. To the extent a Fund uses a representative sampling approach, it will hold a smaller number of securities than are in the Underlying Index. As a result, an adverse development respecting an issuer of securities held by a Fund could result in a greater decline in a Fund’s NAV than would be the case if a Fund held all of the securities in the Underlying Index. Conversely, a positive development relating to an issuer of securities in the Underlying Index that is not held by a Fund could cause a Fund to underperform the Underlying Index. To the extent the assets in a Fund are smaller, these risks may be greater.
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More About the Funds (continued)
Equity Market Risk. The price of equity securities may rise or fall because of changes in the broad market or changes in a company’s financial condition, sometimes rapidly or unpredictably. These price movements may result from factors affecting individual companies, sectors or industries selected for a Fund’s portfolio or the securities market as a whole, such as changes in economic or political conditions. Equity securities are subject to “stock market risk” meaning that stock prices in general (or in particular, the prices of the types of securities in which a Fund invests) may decline over short or extended periods of time. When the value of a Fund’s securities goes down, your investment in a Fund decreases in value. A Fund’s investments in preferred shares and convertible securities are also subject to equity market risk.
When-Issued, Delayed Settlement and Forward Commitment Transactions Risk. A Fund may purchase or sell securities which it is eligible to purchase or sell on a when-issued basis, may purchase and sell such securities for delayed delivery and may make contracts to purchase or sell such securities for a fixed price at a future date beyond normal settlement time (forward commitments). When-issued transactions, delayed delivery purchases and forward commitments involve the risk that the security a Fund buys will lose value prior to its delivery. There also is the risk that the security will not be issued or that the other party to the transaction will not meet its obligation. If this occurs, a Fund loses both the investment opportunity for the assets it set aside to pay for the security and any gain in the security’s price.
Securities Lending Risk. Each Fund may engage in securities lending. Securities lending involves counterparty risk, including the risk that the loaned securities may not be returned or returned in a timely manner and/or a loss of rights in the collateral if the borrower or the lending agent defaults. This risk is increased when a Fund’s loans are concentrated with a single or limited number of borrowers. In addition, a Fund bears the risk of loss in connection with its investments of the cash collateral it receives from the borrower. To the extent that the value or return of a Fund’s investments of the cash collateral declines below the amount owed to a borrower, a Fund may incur losses that exceed the amount it earned on lending the security. In situations where the adviser does not believe that it is prudent to sell the cash collateral investments in the market, a Fund may borrow money to repay the borrower the amount of cash collateral owed to the borrower upon return of the loaned securities. This will result in financial leverage, which may cause a Fund to be more volatile because financial leverage tends to exaggerate the effect of any increase or decrease in the value of a Fund’s portfolio securities.
Transactions and Liquidity Risk. A Fund could experience a loss when selling securities to meet redemption requests and its liquidity may be negatively impacted. The risk of loss increases if the redemption requests are large or frequent, occur in times of overall market turmoil or declining prices for the securities sold, or when the securities a Fund wishes to, or is required to, sell are illiquid. To the extent a large proportion of Shares are held by a small number of shareholders (or a single shareholder) including funds or accounts over which the adviser or its affiliates have investment discretion, a Fund is subject to the risk that these shareholders will purchase or redeem Shares in large amounts rapidly or unexpectedly, including as a result of an asset allocation decision made by the adviser or its affiliates. To the extent these larger shareholders transact in the secondary market, such transactions may account for a large percentage of a Fund’s trading volume on the Exchange, which may have a material effect (upward or downward) on the market price of Shares. In addition to the other risks described in this section, these transactions could adversely affect the ability of a Fund to conduct its investment program. A Fund may be unable to sell illiquid securities at its desired time or price or the price at which the securities have been valued for purposes of a Fund’s NAV. Illiquidity can be caused by a drop in overall market trading volume, an inability to find a ready buyer, or legal restrictions on the securities’ resale. Other market participants may be attempting to sell debt securities at the same time as a Fund, causing downward pricing pressure and contributing to illiquidity. The capacity for bond dealers to engage in trading or “make a market” in debt securities has not kept pace with the growth of bond markets. Liquidity and valuation risk may be magnified in a rising interest rate environment, when credit quality is deteriorating or in other circumstances where investor redemptions from fixed income funds may be higher than normal. Certain securities that were liquid when purchased may later become illiquid, particularly in times of overall economic distress. Similarly, large purchases of Shares may adversely affect a Fund’s performance to the extent that a Fund is delayed in investing new cash and is required to maintain a larger cash position than it ordinarily would. Large redemptions also could accelerate the realization of capital gains, increase a Fund’s transaction costs and impact a Fund’s performance.
Cyber Security Risk. As the use of technology has become more prevalent in the course of business, the Funds have become more susceptible to operational and financial risks associated with cyber security, including: theft, loss, misuse, improper release, corruption and destruction of, or unauthorized access to, confidential or highly restricted data relating to a Fund and its shareholders; and compromises or failures to systems, networks, devices and applications relating to the operations of a Fund and its service providers. Cyber security risks may result in financial losses to a Fund and its shareholders; the inability of a Fund to transact business with its shareholders; delays or mistakes in the calculation of a Fund’s NAV or other materials provided to shareholders; the inability to process transactions with shareholders or other parties; violations of privacy and other laws; regulatory fines, penalties and reputational damage; and compliance and remediation costs, legal fees and other expenses. A Fund’s service providers (including, but not limited to, the adviser, any sub-advisers, administrator, transfer agent, and custodian or their agents), financial intermediaries, companies in which a Fund invests and parties with which a Fund engages in portfolio or other transactions also may be
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adversely impacted by cyber security risks in their own businesses, which could result in losses to a Fund or its shareholders. While measures have been developed which are designed to reduce the risks associated with cyber security, there is no guarantee that those measures will be effective, particularly since the Funds do not directly control the cyber security defenses or plans of their service providers, financial intermediaries and companies in which they invest or with which they do business.
Volcker Rule Risk. Pursuant to Section 619 of the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act and certain rules promulgated thereunder known as the Volcker Rule, if the adviser and/or its affiliates own 25% or more of the outstanding ownership interests of a Fund after the permitted seeding period from the implementation of a Fund’s investment strategy, a Fund could be subject to restrictions on trading that would adversely impact a Fund’s ability to execute its investment strategy. Generally, the permitted seeding period is three years from the implementation of the Fund’s investment strategy. As a result, the adviser and/or its affiliates may be required to reduce their ownership interests in a Fund at a time that is sooner than would otherwise be desirable, which may result in a Fund’s liquidation or, if a Fund is able to continue operating, may result in losses, increased transaction costs and adverse tax consequences as a result of the sale of portfolio securities.
For more information about risks associated with the types of investments that a Fund purchases, please read the “Risk/ Return Summary” and the “Investment Practices” sections later in the prospectus and the Statement of Additional Information.
Conflicts of Interest
An investment in a Fund is subject to a number of actual or potential conflicts of interest. For example, the Adviser and/or its affiliates provide a variety of different services to a Fund, for which the Fund compensates them. As a result, the Adviser and/or its affiliates have an incentive to enter into arrangements with a Fund, and face conflicts of interest when balancing that incentive against the best interests of a Fund. The Adviser and/or its affiliates also face conflicts of interest in their service as investment adviser to other clients, and, from time to time, make investment decisions that differ from and/or negatively impact those made by the Adviser on behalf of a Fund. In addition, affiliates of the Adviser provide a broad range of services and products to their clients and are major participants in the global currency, equity, commodity, fixed income and other markets in which a Fund invests or will invest. In certain circumstances by providing services and products to their clients, these affiliates’ activities will disadvantage or restrict the Funds and/or benefit these affiliates. The Adviser may also acquire material non-public information which would negatively affect the Adviser’s ability to transact in securities for a Fund. JPMorgan and the Funds have adopted policies and procedures reasonably designed to appropriately prevent, limit or mitigate conflicts of interest. In addition, many of the activities that create these conflicts of interest are limited and/or prohibited by law, unless an exception is available. For more information about conflicts of interest, see the Potential Conflicts of Interest section in the Statement of Additional Information.
Index Construction
Bloomberg U.S. Corporate Bond Index
The Underlying Index is designed to measure the performance of U.S. corporate bonds that have a maturity of greater than or equal to 10 years. The Underlying Index is a component of the Bloomberg U.S. Corporate Bond Index and includes investment grade, fixed-rate, taxable, U.S. dollar-denominated debt with $300 million or more of par amount outstanding, issued by U.S. and non-U.S. industrial, utility, and financial institutions. Subordinated issues, securities with normal call and put provisions and sinking funds, medium-term notes (if they are publicly underwritten), 144A securities with registration rights, and global issues that are SEC-registered are included. Structured notes with embedded swaps or other special features, as well as private placements, floating-rate securities, and Eurobonds are excluded from the Index. The Underlying Index is rebalanced monthly, on the last business day of the month. To be included in the index securities must be rated investment grade (using the middle rating of Moody’s, S&P, and Fitch ratings, unless only two are available in which case lower is used), denominated in US dollars, have at least one year until final maturity, are fully taxable, and have either a fixed-rate coupon, callable fixed-to-floating (during fixed rate term only) or a step-up coupon with a predetermined schedule. Eligible security types include bullet, puttable, sinkable/amortizing and callable bonds, original issue zero coupon bonds, underwritten MTN, enhanced equipment trust certificates (EETC), certificates of deposit, and fixed-rate and fixed-to-float capital securities. Securities must be SEC registered, exempt from registration at time of issuance or 144a securities to be eligible.
ICE BofA U.S. High Yield Total Return Index
The bonds eligible for inclusion in the Underlying Index include U.S. dollar-denominated high yield corporate bonds that: (i) are issued by companies having risk exposure” to countries (i.e., issuers that are subject to the risks of one or more of these countries as a result of the principal country of domicile of the issuers (as determined by the index provider)) that are members of the FX-G10, which include Australia, Austria, Belgium, Canada, Cyprus, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, the Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Portugal, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, the
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More About the Funds (continued)
U.K. and the U.S. and their respective territories; (ii) have an average rating of below investment grade (ratings from Fitch, Moody’s or S&P Global Ratings are considered; if more than one agency provides a rating, the average rating is attached to the bond); (iii) are registered with the SEC, exempt from registration at issuance, or offered pursuant to Rule 144A under the 1933 Act, with or without registration rights; (iv) have at least $250 million of outstanding face value; (v) have an original maturity date of at least 18 months; and (vi) have at least one year to maturity.
Bloomberg U.S. Aggregate Bond Index
The Underlying Index provides a measure of the performance of the U.S. investment-grade bond market, which includes investment-grade (must be Baa3/BBB- or higher using the middle rating of Moody’s, S&P Global Ratings, and Fitch) U.S. Treasury bonds, government-related bonds, investment-grade corporate bonds, MBS, CMBS and ABS that are publicly offered for sale in the U.S. The securities in the Underlying Index must have $[…] or more of outstanding face value and must have at least one year remaining to maturity, with the exception of amortizing securities such as ABS and MBS, which have lower minimum thresholds as defined by the Index Provider. In addition, the securities must be denominated in U.S. dollars and must be fixed-rate, non-convertible, and taxable. Certain types of securities are excluded from the Underlying Index, including structured notes with embedded swaps or other special features, private placements, floating rate securities and Eurobonds. The Underlying Index is market capitalization weighted and the securities in the Underlying Index are updated on the last business day of each month. As of […], approximately […]% of the bonds represented in the Underlying Index were U.S. fixed-rate agency MBS. U.S. fixed-rate agency MBS are securities issued by entities such as Ginnie Mae, Freddie Mac and Fannie Mae that are backed by pools of mortgages. Most transactions in fixed-rate MBS occur through standardized contracts for future delivery in which the exact mortgage pools to be delivered are not specified until a few days prior to settlement (TBA transactions).
Bloomberg® Description and Disclaimer
“Bloomberg®” and the Bloomberg indices listed herein (the “Indices”) are service marks of Bloomberg Finance L.P. and its affiliates, including Bloomberg Index Services Limited (“BISL”), the administrator of the index (collectively, “Bloomberg”), and have been licensed for use for certain purposes by the distributor hereof (the “Licensee”).
The financial products named herein (the “Products”) are not sponsored, endorsed, sold or promoted by Bloomberg. Bloomberg does not make any representation or warranty, express or implied, to the owners of or counterparties to the Products or any member of the public regarding the advisability of investing in securities or commodities generally or in the Products particularly. The only relationship of Bloomberg to the Licensee is the licensing of certain trademarks, trade names and service marks and of the Indices, which are determined, composed and calculated by BISL without regard to the Licensee or the Products. Bloomberg has no obligation to take the needs of the Licensee or the owners of the Products into consideration in determining, composing or calculating the Indices. Bloomberg is not responsible for and has not participated in the determination of the timing, price, or quantities of the Products to be issued. Bloomberg shall not have any obligation or liability, including, without limitation, to customers of the Products, in connection with the administration, marketing or trading of the Products.
BLOOMBERG DOES NOT GUARANTEE THE ACCURACY AND/OR THE COMPLETENESS OF THE INDICES OR ANY DATA RELATED THERETO AND SHALL HAVE NO LIABILITY FOR ANY ERRORS, OMISSIONS OR INTERRUPTIONS THEREIN. BLOOMBERG DOES NOT MAKE ANY WARRANTY, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, AS TO RESULTS TO BE OBTAINED BY LICENSEE, OWNERS OF THE PRODUCT OR ANY OTHER PERSON OR ENTITY FROM THE USE OF THE INDICES OR ANY DATA RELATED THERETO. BLOOMBERG DOES NOT MAKE ANY EXPRESS OR IMPLIED WARRANTIES AND EXPRESSLY DISCLAIMS ALL WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY OR FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE OR USE WITH RESPECT TO THE INDICES OR ANY DATA RELATED THERETO. WITHOUT LIMITING ANY OF THE FOREGOING, TO THE MAXIMUM EXTENT ALLOWED BY LAW, BLOOMBERG, ITS LICENSORS, AND BLOOMBERG AND ITS LICENSORS’ RESPECTIVE EMPLOYEES, CONTRACTORS, AGENTS, SUPPLIERS, AND VENDORS SHALL HAVE NO LIABILITY OR RESPONSIBILITY WHATSOEVER FOR ANY INJURY OR DAMAGES—WHETHER DIRECT, INDIRECT, CONSEQUENTIAL, INCIDENTAL, PUNITIVE OR OTHERWISE—ARISING IN CONNECTION WITH THE PRODUCTS OR INDICES OR ANY DATA OR VALUES RELATING THERETO—WHETHER ARISING FROM THEIR NEGLIGENCE OR OTHERWISE, EVEN IF NOTIFIED OF THE POSSIBILITY THEREOF.
ICE Data Description and Disclaimer
Source Ice Data Indices, LLC (“ICE Data”), is used with permission. “[SM/®]” is a service/trade mark of ICE Data Indices, LLC or its affiliates and has been licensed, along with the [ ] Index (“Index”) for use by [name of LICENSEE] in connection with [Product name] (the Product”). Neither the [name of LICENSEE], [Trust name] (the Trust”) nor the Product, as applicable, is sponsored, endorsed, sold or promoted by ICE Data Indices, LLC, its affiliates or its Third Party Suppliers (“ICE Data and its Suppliers). ICE Data and its Suppliers make no representations or warranties regarding the advisability of investing in securities generally, in the Product particularly, the Trust or the ability of the Index to track general stock market performance. ICE Data’s only relationship to [name of LICENSEE] is the licensing of certain trademarks and trade names and the Index or components thereof. The Index is determined, composed and
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calculated by ICE Data without regard to the LICENSEE or the Product or its holders. ICE Data has no obligation to take the needs of the Licensee or holders of the Product into consideration in determining, composing or calculating the Index. ICE Data is not responsible for and has not participated in the determination of the timing of, prices of, or quantities of the Product to be issued or in the determination or calculation of the equation by which the Product is to be priced, sold, purchased, or redeemed. Except for certain custom index calculation services, all information provided by ICE Data is general in nature and not tailored to the needs of LICENSEE or any other person, entity or group of persons. ICE Data has no obligation or liability in connection with the administration, marketing, or trading of the Product. ICE Data is not an investment advisor. Inclusion of a security within an index is not a recommendation by ICE Data to buy, sell, or hold such security, nor is it considered to be investment advice.
ICE DATA AND ITS SUPPLIERS DISCLAIM ANY AND ALL WARRANTIES AND REPRESENTATIONS, EXPRESS AND/OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING ANY WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY OR FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE OR USE, INCLUDING THE INDICES, INDEX DATA AND ANY INFORMATION INCLUDED IN, RELATED TO, OR DERIVED THEREFROM (“INDEX DATA”). ICE DATA AND ITS SUPPLIERS SHALL NOT BE SUBJECT TO ANY DAMAGES OR LIABILITY WITH RESPECT TO THE ADEQUACY, ACCURACY, TIMELESSNESS OR COMPLETENESS OF THE INDICES AND THE INDEX DATA, WHICH ARE PROVIDED ON AN “AS IS” BASIS AND YOUR USE IS AT YOUR OWN RISK.
Disclosure of Portfolio Holdings
A description of the policies and procedures with respect to the disclosure of the Funds' portfolio securities is available in the Funds' Statement of Additional Information.
Additional Fee Waiver and/or Expense Reimbursement
Service providers to a Fund may, from time to time, voluntarily waive all or a portion of any fees to which they are entitled and/or reimburse certain expenses as they may determine from time to time. A Fund’s service providers may discontinue or modify these voluntary actions at any time without notice. Performance for a Fund will reflect the voluntary waiver of fees and/or the reimbursement of expenses, if any. Without these voluntary waivers and/or expense reimbursements, performance would be less favorable.
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The Funds' Management and Administration
The Funds' Management and Administration
Each Fund is a series of J.P. Morgan Exchange-Traded Fund Trust, a Delaware statutory trust (the Trust). The Trust is governed by the Board of Trustees, which is responsible for overseeing all business activities of the Funds.
The Funds' Investment Adviser and Administrator
J.P. Morgan Investment Management Inc. (JPMIM or the adviser) is the investment adviser and administrator to the Funds. JPMIM is located at 383 Madison Avenue, New York, NY 10179. In addition to managing the Funds' portfolio, JPMIM also provides administrative services for and oversees the other service providers of the Funds.
JPMIM is a wholly-owned subsidiary of JPMorgan Asset Management Holdings Inc., which is a wholly-owned subsidiary of JPMorgan Chase & Co. (JPMorgan Chase), a bank holding company.
In rendering investment advisory services to certain Funds, JPMIM uses the portfolio management, research and other resources of a foreign (non-U.S.) affiliate of JPMIM and may provide services to a Fund through a “participating affiliate” arrangement, as that term is used in relief granted by the staff of the SEC. Under this relief, U.S. registered investment advisers are allowed to use portfolio management or research resources of advisory affiliates subject to the regulatory supervision of the registered investment adviser.
Management Fee and Other Expenses
Pursuant to each Fund’s management agreement, JPMIM is entitled to a management fee, incurred daily and paid monthly of a Fund’s average daily net assets. During the most recent fiscal year ended 2/28/22, JPMIM was paid management fees, as shown below, as a percentage of a Fund’s average daily net assets:
BetaBuilders USD Investment Grade Corporate Bond ETF
0.09%
BetaBuilders USD High Yield Corporate Bond ETF
0.15
BetaBuilders U.S. Aggregate Bond ETF
0.03
Under the management agreement, JPMIM is responsible for substantially all the expenses of each Fund (including expenses of the Trust relating to each Fund), except for the management fees, payments under a Fund’s 12b-1 plan (if any), interest expenses, dividend and interest expenses related to short sales, taxes, acquired fund fees and expenses (other than fees for funds advised by the adviser and/or its affiliates), costs of holding shareholder meetings, and litigation and potential litigation and other extraordinary expenses not incurred in the ordinary course of each Fund’s business. Additionally, each Fund shall be responsible for its non-operating expenses, including brokerage commissions and fees and expenses associated with a Fund’s securities lending program, if applicable.
A discussion of the basis the Board of Trustees of the Trust used in approving the management agreement for the Funds is available in the annual report dated February 28, 2022.
The Portfolio Managers
BetaBuilders USD Investment Grade Corporate Bond ETF
The portfolio management team utilizes a team-based approach, and the Fund’s portfolio management team is comprised of Eric Isenberg, Naveen Kumar, Qiwei Zhu, and Jonathan Msika. The team is responsible for managing the Fund on a day-to-day basis. Each portfolio manager is responsible for various functions related to portfolio management, including, but not limited to, investing cash inflows, implementing investment strategy, researching and reviewing investment strategy and overseeing members of the portfolio management team that have more limited responsibilities.
Mr. Isenberg is the lead portfolio manager for the Fund. Mr. Isenberg, Managing Director of JPMIM, is the Head of Fixed Income Portfolio Management for Quantitative Beta Strategies. In this role, Mr. Isenberg is responsible for portfolio management of all of J.P. Morgan Asset Management Holdings Inc. passive fixed income funds, including index replication and smart beta fixed income funds. Prior to joining the firm in 2016,Mr. Isenberg worked at VanEck beginning in 2015, where he was a Fixed Income Portfolio Manager for all of the VanEck Vectors Fixed Income ETFs, including the municipal, international and high yield funds and worked at Credit Suisse from 2003 until 2015 in various roles, including Head of Fixed Income Index Products and Head of Bond Index Products. Mr. Isenberg graduated from Binghamton University in 2001 with a Bachelor of Science in computer science and economics.
Mr. Kumar, Executive Director of JPMIM, has been a portfolio manager in the Quantitative Beta Strategies Team since 2016. An employee since 2011, he previously worked for the Global Head of Strategic Product Management from 2014 to 2016 and on the JPMorgan Private Bank Manager Selection Team specializing in equities from 2011 to 2014. Mr. Kumar holds a B.A. in Economics from Northwestern University.
36  |  J.P. Morgan Exchange-Traded Funds

Mr. Zhu, Executive Director and CFA charterholder, is a member of the GFICC group and a quantitative analyst responsible for developing systematic alpha strategies, scorecards, indicators, and risk models in fixed income, currencies, commodities, and related derivatives. Prior to joining the firm in 2012, Mr. Zhu was a technology associate at Morgan Stanley Investment Management working on performance, attribution and risk.
Mr. Msika, Vice President of JPMIM, has been a research analyst and portfolio manager in the Quantitative Beta Strategies Team since 2016. An employee since 2011, he was previously a quantitative analyst in the Quantitative Portfolio Strategies Team in JPMIM’s Multi-Asset Solutions Team from 2011 to 2016.
BetaBuilders USD High Yield Corporate Bond ETF
The portfolio management team utilizes a team-based approach, and the Fund’s portfolio management team is comprised of Eric Isenberg, Naveen Kumar, Jonathan Msika and Qiwei Zhu. The team is responsible for managing the Fund on a day-to-day basis. Each portfolio manager is responsible for various functions related to portfolio management, including, but not limited to, investing cash inflows, implementing investment strategy, researching and reviewing investment strategy and overseeing members of the portfolio management team that have more limited responsibilities.
Information about Messrs. Isenberg, Kumar, Msika and Zhu is discussed earlier in this section.
BetaBuilders U.S. Aggregate Bond ETF
The portfolio management team utilizes a team-based approach, and the Fund’s portfolio management team is comprised of Eric Isenberg, Naveen Kumar and Jonathan Msika. The team is responsible for managing the Fund on a day-to-day basis. Each portfolio manager is responsible for various functions related to portfolio management, including, but not limited to, investing cash inflows, implementing investment strategy, researching and reviewing investment strategy and overseeing members of the portfolio management team that have more limited responsibilities.
Information about Messers. Isenberg, Kumar, and Msika is discussed earlier in this section.
The Statement of Additional Information provides additional information about the portfolio managers' compensation, other accounts managed by the portfolio managers and the portfolio managers' ownership of securities in the Funds.
The Funds' Distributor
JPMorgan Distribution Services, Inc. (the Distributor) is the distributor of the Funds' Shares. The Distributor or its agent distributes Creation Units for the Funds on an agency basis. The Distributor does not maintain a secondary market in Shares of the Funds. The Distributor has no role in determining the investment policies of the Funds or the securities that are purchased or sold by the Funds. The Distributor’s principal address is 1111 Polaris Parkway, Columbus, OH 43240.
Payments to Financial Intermediaries
JPMIM and, from time to time, other affiliates of JPMorgan Chase may, at their own expense and out of their own legitimate profits, provide cash payments to Financial Intermediaries whose customers invest in Shares of the Funds. For this purpose, Financial Intermediaries include financial advisors, investment advisers, brokers, financial planners, banks, insurance companies, retirement or 401(k) plan administrators and others, including various affiliates of JPMorgan Chase, that may enter into agreements with JPMIM and/or its affiliates. These cash payments may relate to marketing activities and presentations, educational training programs, the support of technology platforms and/or reporting systems, or the Financial Intermediaries’ making Shares of the Funds available to their customers. Such compensation may provide such Financial Intermediaries with an incentive to favor sales of Shares of the Funds over other investment options they make available to their customers. See the Statement of Additional Information for more information.
[ ], 2023  |  37

Purchase and Redemption of Shares
Buying and Selling Shares
In the Secondary Market. Most investors will buy and sell Shares of the Funds in secondary market transactions through brokers. Shares of the Funds are listed and traded on the secondary market on the Exchange. Shares can be bought and sold throughout the trading day like other publicly traded shares. There is no minimum investment. Although Shares are generally purchased and sold in “round lots” of 100 Shares, brokerage firms typically permit investors to purchase or sell Shares in smaller “odd lots,” at no per-Share price differential. When buying or selling Shares through a broker, you will incur customary brokerage commissions and charges, and you may pay some or all of the spread between the bid and the offered price in the secondary market on each leg of a round trip (purchase and sale) transaction. The spread varies over time for Shares of each Fund based on the Fund’s trading volume and market liquidity, and is generally lower if the Fund has a lot of trading volume and market liquidity.
Shares of the Funds trade on the Exchange at prices that may differ to varying degrees from the daily NAV of the Shares.
Directly with the Fund. Each Fund’s Shares are issued or redeemed by the Fund at NAV per Share only in a large specified number of Shares called a “Creation Unit” or multiples thereof. Investors such as market makers, large investors and institutions who wish to deal in Creation Units directly with the Fund must have entered into an authorized participant agreement with the Distributor, or purchase through a dealer that has entered into such an agreement. Set forth below is a brief description of the procedures applicable to purchases and redemptions of Creation Units. For more detailed information, see “Creation and Redemption of Creation Unit Aggregations” in the Funds' Statement of Additional Information.
Beneficial Ownership. The Depository Trust Company (DTC) serves as securities depository for the Shares. (The Shares may be held only in book-entry form; stock certificates will not be issued.) DTC, or its nominee, is the record or registered owner of all outstanding Shares. Beneficial ownership of Shares will be shown on the records of DTC or its participants (described below). Beneficial owners of Shares are not entitled to have Shares registered in their names, will not receive or be entitled to receive physical delivery of certificates in definitive form and are not considered the registered holder thereof. Accordingly, to exercise any rights of a holder of Shares, each beneficial owner must rely on the procedures of: (i) DTC; (ii) “DTC Participants” (i.e., securities brokers and dealers, banks, trust companies, clearing corporations and certain other organizations), some of whom (and/or their representatives) own DTC; and (iii) “Indirect Participants” (i.e., brokers, dealers, banks and trust companies that clear through or maintain a custodial relationship with a DTC Participant, either directly or indirectly, through which such beneficial owner holds its interests). The Trust understands that under existing industry practice, in the event the Trust requests any action of holders of Shares, or a beneficial owner desires to take any action that DTC, as the record owner of all outstanding Shares, is entitled to take, DTC would authorize the DTC Participants to take such action and that the DTC Participants would authorize the Indirect Participants and beneficial owners acting through such DTC Participants to take such action and would otherwise act upon the instructions of beneficial owners owning through them. As described above, the Trust recognizes DTC or its nominee as the owner of all Shares for all purposes. For more detailed information, see “Book Entry Only System” in the Funds' Statement of Additional Information.
Premium/Discount Information
Information about the differences between the daily market price on the Exchange for Shares of a Fund and the Fund’s NAV can be found on the Fund’s website, www.jpmorganfunds.com. NAV is the price at which a Fund issues and redeems Shares. It is calculated in accordance with a Fund’s pricing and valuation policies. The market price (“Market Price”) is generally the official closing price of a Fund’s Shares on the Exchange. Prior to December 9, 2019, the market price was generally determined using the midpoint between the highest bid and the lowest ask on the Exchange, as of the time that the Fund’s NAV was calculated. A Fund’s Market Price may be at, above (at a premium) or below (at a discount) its NAV. The NAV of a Fund will fluctuate with changes in the value of its portfolio holdings. The Market Price of a Fund will fluctuate in accordance with changes in its NAV, as well as market supply and demand. Shareholders may pay more than NAV when they buy Fund Shares and receive less than NAV when they sell those Shares, because Shares are bought and sold at current market prices. The Market Price is also used to calculate market returns of a Fund.
Pricing Shares
Investors that purchase or sell Shares on the secondary market transact at the market price on the Exchange. The market price may differ from the Fund’s daily NAV and can be affected by market forces of supply and demand, economic conditions and other factors.
The Exchange disseminates the approximate value of Shares of each Fund periodically throughout the trading day. This approximate value should not be viewed as a “real-time” update of the NAV per Share of the Fund because the approximate value may not be calculated in the same manner as the NAV, which is computed only once a day. The approximate value is generally determined by using both current market quotations and/or price quotations obtained from broker-dealers and other market intermediaries that may trade in the portfolio securities held by the Fund. The Funds are not involved in, or responsible for, the calculation or dissemination of the approximate value and the Funds do not make any representation or warranty as to its accuracy.
38  |  J.P. Morgan Exchange-Traded Funds

NAV is calculated each business day as of the close of the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) or Cboe BZX Exchange, Inc. (Cboe), as applicable, which is typically 4:00 p.m. E.T. On occasion, the NYSE or the Cboe will close before 4:00 p.m. E.T. When that happens, NAV will be calculated as of the time the NYSE or the Cboe closes, as applicable. The Funds will not treat an intraday unscheduled disruption or closure in NYSE or the Cboe trading as a closure of the NYSE or the Cboe, as applicable and will calculate NAV as of 4:00 p.m. E.T. if the particular disruption or closure directly affects only the NYSE or the Cboe. The price at which a purchase of a Creation Unit is effected is based on the next calculation of NAV after the order is received in proper form in accordance with this prospectus. To the extent a Fund invests in securities that are primarily listed on foreign exchanges or other markets that trade on weekends or other days when the Fund does not price its Shares, the value of the Fund’s Shares may change on days when you will not be able to purchase or redeem your Shares. The NAV per share of each Fund is equal to the value of all its assets minus its liabilities, divided by the number of outstanding shares.
Securities for which market quotations are readily available are generally valued at their current market value. Other securities and assets, including securities for which market quotations are not readily available, market quotations are determined not to be reliable, or their value has been materially affected by events occurring after the close of trading on the exchange or market on which the security is principally traded but before the Fund’s NAV is calculated, may be valued at fair value in accordance with policies and procedures adopted by the Trust’s Board of Trustees. Fair value represents a good faith determination of the value of a security or other asset based upon specifically applied procedures. Fair valuation may require subjective determinations. There can be no assurance that the fair value of an asset is the price at which the asset could have been sold during the period in which the particular fair value was used in determining the Fund’s NAV. Use of fair value prices and certain current market valuations could result in a difference between the prices used to calculate the Fund’s NAV and the prices used by the Underlying Index, which, in turn, could result in a difference between the Fund’s performance the performance of the Underlying Index.
Equity securities listed on a North American, Central American, South American or Caribbean securities exchange are generally valued at the last sale price on the exchange on which the security is principally traded. Other foreign equity securities are fair valued using quotations from independent pricing services, as applicable. The value of securities listed on the NASDAQ Stock Market, Inc. is generally the NASDAQ official closing price.
Fixed income securities are valued using prices supplied by an approved independent third party or affiliated pricing services or broker/dealers. Those prices are determined using a variety of inputs and factors as more fully described in the Statement of Additional Information.
Assets and liabilities initially expressed in foreign currencies are converted into U.S. dollars at the prevailing market rates from an approved independent pricing service as of 4:00 p.m. E.T.
Shares of ETFs are generally valued at the last sale price on the exchange on which the ETF is principally traded. Shares of other open-end investment companies are valued at their respective NAVs.
Options traded on U.S. securities exchanges are valued at the composite mean price, using the National Best Bid and Offer quotes.
Options traded on foreign exchanges are valued at the settled price, or if no settled price is available, at the last sale price available prior to the calculation of the Fund’s NAV and will be fair valued by applying fair value factors provided by independent pricing services, as applicable, for any options involving equity reference obligations listed on exchanges other than North American, Central American, South American or Caribbean securities exchanges.
Exchange traded futures are valued at the last sale price available prior to the calculation of the Fund’s NAV. Any futures involving equity reference obligations listed on exchanges other than North American, Central American, South American or Caribbean securities exchanges will be fair valued by applying fair value factors provided by independent pricing services, as applicable.
Non-listed over-the-counter futures are valued utilizing market quotations provided by approved pricing services.
Swaps and structured notes are priced generally by an approved independent third party or affiliated pricing service or at an evaluated price provided by a counterparty or broker/dealer.
Any derivatives involving equity reference obligations listed on exchanges other than North American, Central American, South American or Caribbean securities exchanges will be fair valued by applying fair value factors provided by independent pricing services, as applicable.
Frequent Purchases and Redemptions
The Funds impose no restrictions on the frequency of purchases and redemptions. The Board of Trustees evaluated the risks of market timing activities by the Funds' shareholders when they considered that no restriction or policy was necessary. The Board considered that, unlike mutual funds, each Fund issues and redeems its Shares at NAV only in Creation Units, and the Fund’s Shares may be purchased and sold on the Exchange at prevailing market prices.
[ ], 2023  |  39

Shareholder Information
Taxes on Distributions
Each Fund has elected to be treated and intends to qualify each taxable year as a regulated investment company. A regulated investment company is not subject to tax at the corporate level on income and gains from investments that are distributed to shareholders. A Fund’s failure to qualify as a regulated investment company would result in corporate-level taxation and, consequently, a reduction in income available for distribution to shareholders.
Each Fund can earn income and realize capital gain. Each Fund deducts any expenses and then pays out the earnings, if any, to shareholders as distributions.
Each Fund generally declares and distributes net investment income, if any, at least monthly. Each Fund will distribute net realized capital gain, if any, at least annually. For each taxable year, each Fund will distribute substantially all of its net investment income and net realized capital gain. The amounts of the Fund’s distributions are driven by federal tax requirements. Such required taxable distributions to shareholders may be significant even if the Fund’s overall performance for the applicable taxable year is negative.
A Fund may invest a portion of its assets in securities that generate income subject to federal, state, and/or local taxes. For federal income tax purposes, distributions of net investment income that are not properly reported as exempt-interest dividends generally are taxable as ordinary income from dividends. Dividends of net investment income paid to a non-corporate U.S. shareholder that are properly reported as qualified dividend income generally will be taxable to such shareholder at a maximum individual federal income tax rate applicable to “qualified dividend income” of either 15% or 20%, depending on whether the individual’s income exceeds certain threshold amounts. The amount of dividend income that may be so reported by a Fund generally will be limited to the aggregate of the eligible dividends received by that Fund. In addition, a Fund must meet certain holding period and other requirements with respect to the shares on which the Fund received the eligible dividends, and the non-corporate U.S. shareholder must meet certain holding period and other requirements with respect to the Fund. The amount of a Fund’s distributions that would otherwise qualify for this favorable tax treatment may be reduced as a result of a Fund’s securities lending activities or high portfolio turnover rate. Dividends of net investment income that are not reported as qualified dividend income and dividends of net short-term capital gain will be taxable to a U.S. shareholder as ordinary income. Given the investment strategies of the Funds, it is not anticipated that a significant portion of the distributions paid by a Fund will be eligible to be designated as qualified dividend income.
Distributions of net capital gain (that is, the excess of the net gains from the sale of investments that a Fund owned for more than one year over the net losses from investments that the Fund owned for one year or less) that are properly reported by a Fund as capital gain dividends will be taxable as long-term capital gain, regardless of how long you have held your Shares in the Fund. The maximum individual federal income tax rate applicable to long-term capital gains is generally either 15% or 20%, depending on whether the individual’s income exceeds certain threshold amounts. Distributions of net short-term capital gain (that is, the excess of any net short-term capital gain over net long-term capital loss), if any, will be taxable to U.S. shareholders as ordinary income. Capital gain of a corporate shareholder is taxed at the same rate as ordinary income.
An additional 3.8% Medicare tax is imposed on certain net investment income (including ordinary dividends and capital gain distributions received from a Fund and net gains from redemptions or other taxable dispositions of Shares, but excluding any exempt-interest dividends received from a Fund) of U.S. individuals, estates and trusts to the extent that such person’s “modified adjusted gross income” (in the case of an individual) or “adjusted gross income” (in the case of an estate or trust) exceeds certain threshold amounts.
If you buy Shares of a Fund just before a distribution, you will be subject to tax on the entire amount of the taxable distribution you receive. Distributions are taxable to you even if they are paid from income or gain earned by a Fund before your investment (and thus were included in the price you paid for your Shares). Any gain resulting from the sale or exchange of Shares generally will be taxable as long-term or short-term gain, depending upon how long you have held the Shares.
A Fund is generally subject to foreign withholding or other foreign taxes, which in some cases can be significant, on any income or gain from investments in foreign stocks or securities. In that case, a Fund’s total return on those securities would be decreased. A Fund may generally deduct these taxes in computing its taxable income. Rather than deducting these foreign taxes, if the Fund invests more than 50% of its assets in the stock or securities of foreign corporations or foreign governments at the end of its taxable year it may make an election to treat a proportionate amount of eligible foreign taxes as constituting a taxable distribution to each shareholder, which would, subject to certain limitations, generally allow the shareholders to either (i) credit that proportionate amount of taxes against U.S. Federal income tax liability as a foreign tax credit or (ii) take that amount as an itemized deduction. Any foreign tax withheld on payments made “in lieu of” dividends or interest with respect to loaned securities will not qualify for the pass-through of foreign tax credits to shareholders. Although in some cases a Fund may be able to apply for a refund or a portion of such taxes, the ability to successfully obtain such a refund may be uncertain.
40  |  J.P. Morgan Exchange-Traded Funds

A Fund may invest a significant portion of its net assets in below investment grade instruments. Investments in these types of instruments may present special tax issues for the Fund. U.S. federal income tax rules are not entirely clear about issues such as when a Fund may cease to accrue interest, original issue discount or market discount, when and to what extent deductions may be taken for bad debts or worthless instruments, how payments received on obligations in default should be allocated between principal and income and whether exchanges of debt obligations in a bankruptcy or workout context are taxable. These and other issues will be addressed by a Fund to the extent necessary in order to seek to ensure that it distributes sufficient income that it does not become subject to U.S. federal income or excise tax.
A Fund’s investment in certain debt obligations and derivatives instruments may require the Fund to accrue and distribute income not yet received. In order to generate sufficient cash to make the requisite distributions, a Fund may be required to liquidate other investments in its portfolio that it otherwise would have continued to hold, including at times when it is not advantageous to do so.
BetaBuilders USD High Yield Corporate Bond ETF investment in REIT securities may also result in the Fund’s receipt of cash in excess of the REIT’s earnings; if the Fund distributes such amounts, such distribution could constitute a return of capital to Fund shareholders for federal income tax purposes.
A Fund’s transactions in futures contracts, swaps and other derivatives will be subject to special tax rules, the effect of which may be to accelerate income to the Fund, defer losses to the Fund, cause adjustments in the holding periods of the Fund’s securities, and convert short-term capital losses into long-term capital losses. These rules could therefore affect the amount, timing and character of distributions to shareholders. A Fund’s use of these types of transactions may result in the Fund realizing more short-term capital gain and ordinary income subject to tax at ordinary income tax rates than it would if it did not engage in such transactions.
Please see the Statement of Additional Information for additional discussion of the tax consequences of the above-described and other investments to a Fund and its shareholders.
The dates on which dividends and capital gain, if any, will be distributed are available online at www.jpmorganfunds.com.
Early in each calendar year, you will receive a notice showing the amount of distributions you received during the preceding calendar year and the tax status of those distributions.
Any foreign shareholder would generally be subject to U.S. tax- withholding on distributions by the Funds, as discussed in the Statement of Additional Information.
Any investor for whom a Fund does not have a valid Taxpayer Identification Number may be subject to backup withholding.
The tax considerations described in this section do not apply to tax-deferred accounts or other non-taxable entities.
Taxes on Exchange-Listed Shares Sales
Currently, any capital gain or loss realized upon a sale of Shares is generally treated as long-term capital gain or loss if the Shares have been held for more than one year and as short-term capital gain or loss if the Shares have been held for one year or less. Capital loss realized on the sale or exchange of Shares held for six months or less will be treated as long-term capital loss to the extent of any capital gain dividends received by the shareholder. The ability to deduct capital losses may be limited.
Taxes on Purchase and Redemption of Creation Units
At the time of purchase, an Authorized Participant who exchanges equity securities for Creation Units generally will recognize a gain or loss. The gain or loss will be equal to the difference between the market value of the Creation Units at the time and the exchanger’s aggregate basis in the securities surrendered and the cash paid. At redemption, a person who exchanges Creation Units for equity securities will generally recognize a gain or loss equal to the difference between the exchanger’s basis in the Creation Units and the aggregate market value of the securities received and the cash received in connection with the redemption. The Internal Revenue Service, however, may assert that a loss realized upon an exchange of securities for Creation Units cannot be deducted currently under the rules governing “wash sales” on the basis that there has been no significant change in economic position. Persons exchanging securities should consult their own tax advisor with respect to whether the wash sale rules apply and when a loss might be deductible.
Under current federal tax laws, any capital gain or loss realized upon redemption of Creation Units is generally treated as long-term capital gain or loss if the Shares have been held for more than one year and as a short-term capital gain or loss if the Shares have been held for one year or less.
If you purchase or redeem Creation Units, you will be sent a confirmation statement showing how many and at what price you purchased or sold Shares.
[ ], 2023  |  41

Shareholder Information (continued)
The above is a general summary of tax implications of investing in the Funds. Because each investor’s tax consequences are unique, please consult your tax advisor to see how investing in a Fund and, for individuals and S corporations, selection of a particular cost method of accounting will affect your own tax situation.
Availability of Proxy Voting Record
The Trustees have delegated the authority to vote proxies for securities owned by the Funds to JPMIM. A copy of each Fund’s voting record for the most recent 12-month period ended June 30 is available on the SEC’s website at www.sec.gov or on the Funds' website at www.jpmorganfunds.com no later than August 31 of each year. Each Fund’s proxy voting record will include, among other things, a brief description of the matter voted on for each portfolio security, and will state how each vote was cast, for example, for or against the proposal.
Other Information
For purposes of the Investment Company Act of 1940 (1940 Act), each Fund is treated as a registered investment company. Section 12(d)(1) of the 1940 Act restricts investments by investment companies in the securities of other investment companies, including Shares of the Funds. Registered investment companies are permitted to invest in a Fund beyond the limits set forth in Section 12(d)(1) subject to certain terms and conditions.
42  |  J.P. Morgan Exchange-Traded Funds

Investment Practices
The table discusses the types of investments which can be held by the Funds. In each case, the related types of risk are also listed.
FUND NAME
FUND CODE
BetaBuilders USD Investment Grade Corporate Bond ETF
1
BetaBuilders USD High Yield Corporate Bond ETF
2
BetaBuilders U.S. Aggregate Bond ETF
3
INSTRUMENT
FUND CODE
RISK TYPE
Adjustable Rate Mortgage Loans (ARMs): Loans in a mortgage pool which provide for a fixed
initial mortgage interest rate for a specified period of time, after which the rate may be subject
to periodic adjustments.
3
Credit
Interest Rate
Liquidity
Market
Political
Prepayment
Valuation
Asset-Backed Securities: Securities secured by company receivables, home equity loans, truck
and auto loans, leases, and credit card receivables or other securities backed by other types of
receivables or other assets and pools of loans, such as collateralized loan obligations.
3
Credit
Interest Rate
Liquidity
Market
Political
Prepayment
Valuation
Common Stock: Shares of ownership of a company.
2
Market
Common Stock Warrants and Rights: Securities, typically issued with preferred stock or bonds,
that give the holder the right to buy a proportionate amount of common stock at a specified
price.
2
Credit
Market
Convertible Securities: Bonds or preferred stock that can convert to common stock including
contingent convertible securities.
1-2
Credit
Currency
Interest Rate
Liquidity
Market
Political
Valuation
Corporate Debt Securities: May include bonds and other debt securities of domestic and foreign
issuers, including obligations of industrial, utility, banking and other corporate issuers.
1-3
Credit
Currency
Interest Rate
Liquidity
Market
Political
Valuation
Credit Default Swaps (CDSs): A swap agreement between two parties pursuant to which one
party pays the other a fixed periodic coupon for the specified life of the agreement. The other
party makes no payment unless a credit event, relating to a predetermined reference asset,
occurs. If such an event occurs, the party will then make a payment to the first party, and the
swap will terminate.
1-3
Credit
Currency
Interest Rate
Leverage
Liquidity
Management
Market
Political
Valuation
[ ], 2023  |  43

Investment Practices (continued)
INSTRUMENT
FUND CODE
RISK TYPE
Emerging Market Securities: Securities issued by issuers or governments in countries with
emerging economies or securities markets which may be undergoing significant evolution and
rapid development.
1, 3
Foreign Investment
Credit
Currency
Interest Rate
Market
Liquidity
Political
Exchange-Traded Funds (ETFs): Ownership interest in unit investment trusts, depositary receipts,
and other pooled investment vehicles that hold a portfolio of securities or stocks designed to
track the price performance and dividend yield of a particular broad-based, sector or
international index. ETFs include a wide range of investments.
3
Investment Company
Market
Foreign Investments: Equity and debt securities (e.g., bonds and commercial paper) of foreign
entities and obligations of foreign branches of U.S. banks and foreign banks. Foreign securities
may also include American Depositary Receipts (ADRs), Global Depositary Receipts (GDRs),
European Depositary Receipts (EDRs) and American Depositary Securities (ADSs).
1-3
Foreign Investment
Interest Rate
Liquidity
Market
Political
Prepayment
High Yield/High Risk Securities/Junk Bonds: Securities that are generally rated below investment
grade by the primary rating agencies or are unrated but are deemed by a Fund’s adviser to be of
comparable quality.
1-3
Credit
Currency
High Yield Securities
Interest Rate
Liquidity
Market
Political
Portfolio Quality
Valuation
Investment Company Securities: Shares of other investment companies, including money market
funds for which the adviser and/or its affiliates serve as investment adviser or administrator.
The adviser will waive certain fees when investing in funds for which it serves as investment
adviser, to the extent required by law or by contract.
1-3
Investment Company
Market
Mortgage-Backed Securities: Debt obligations secured by real estate loans and pools of loans
such as collateralized mortgage obligations (CMOs), commercial mortgage-backed securities
(CMBSs) and other asset-backed structures.
3
Credit
Currency
Extension
Interest Rate
Leverage
Liquidity
Market
Political
Prepayment
Tax
Valuation
Municipal Securities: Securities issued by a state or political subdivision to obtain funds for
various public purposes. Municipal securities include, among others, private activity bonds and
industrial development bonds, as well as general obligation notes, tax anticipation notes, bond
anticipation notes, revenue anticipation notes, other short-term tax-exempt obligations,
municipal leases, obligations of municipal housing authorities and single family revenue bonds.
3
Credit
Interest Rate
Market
Natural Event
Political
Prepayment
Tax
44  |  J.P. Morgan Exchange-Traded Funds

INSTRUMENT
FUND CODE
RISK TYPE
Obligations of Supranational Agencies: Obligations which are chartered to promote economic
development and are supported by various governments and governmental agencies.
3
Credit
Foreign Investment
Liquidity
Political
Valuation
Options and Futures Transactions: A Fund may purchase and sell (a) exchange traded and over
the counter put and call options on securities, indexes of securities and futures contracts on
securities, indexes of securities, interest rate futures contracts and interest rate swaps and (b)
futures contracts on securities and indexes of securities.
1, 3
Credit
Interest Rate
Leverage
Liquidity
Management
Market
Preferred Stock: A class of stock that generally pays a dividend at a specified rate and has
preference over common stock in the payment of dividends and in liquidation.
2
Interest Rate
Market
Private Placements, Restricted Securities and Other Unregistered Securities: Securities not
registered under the Securities Act of 1933, such as privately placed commercial paper and Rule
144A securities.
1-3
Liquidity
Market
Valuation
Real Estate Investment Trusts (REITs): Pooled investment vehicles which invest primarily in
income producing real estate or real estate related loans or interest.
2, 3
Credit
Interest Rate
Liquidity
Management
Market
Political
Prepayment
Tax
Valuation
Securities Issued in Connection with Reorganization and Corporate Restructuring: In connection
with reorganizing or restructuring of an issuer, an issuer may issue common stock or other
securities to holders of its debt securities.
2, 3
Market
Securities Lending: The lending of up to 33 13% of a Fund’s total assets. In return, a Fund will
receive cash, other securities, and/or letters of credit as collateral.
1, 3
Credit
Leverage
Market
Sovereign Obligations: Investments in debt obligations issued or guaranteed by a foreign
sovereign government or its agencies, authorities or political subdivisions.
3
Credit
Foreign Investment
Interest Rate
Liquidity
Political
Valuation
Temporary Defensive Positions: To respond to unusual circumstances a Fund may invest in cash
and cash equivalents for temporary defensive purposes.
2
Credit
Interest Rate
Liquidity
Market
Trust Preferred: Securities with characteristics of both subordinated debt and preferred stock.
Trust preferreds are generally long term securities that make periodic fixed or variable interest
payments.
2
Credit
Currency
Interest Rate
Liquidity
Market
Political
Valuation
[ ], 2023  |  45

Investment Practices (continued)
INSTRUMENT
FUND CODE
RISK TYPE
U.S. Government Agency Securities: Securities issued or guaranteed by agencies and
instrumentalities of the U.S. government. These include all types of securities issued by Ginnie
Mae, Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, including funding notes, subordinated benchmark notes,
CMOs and REMICs.
1-3
Credit
Government Securities
Interest Rate
Market
U.S. Government Obligations: May include direct obligations of the U.S. Treasury, including
Treasury bills, notes and bonds, all of which are backed as to principal and interest payments by
the full faith and credit of the United States, and separately traded principal and interest
component parts of such obligations that are transferable through the Federal book-entry
system known as Separate Trading of Registered Interest and Principal of Securities (STRIPS)
and Coupons Under Book Entry Safekeeping (CUBES).
3
Interest Rate
Market
Variable and Floating Rate Instruments: Obligations with interest rates which are reset daily,
weekly, quarterly or some other frequency and which may be payable to a Fund on demand or
at the expiration of a specified term.
2-3
Credit
Liquidity
Market
Valuation
When-Issued Securities, Delayed Delivery Securities and Forward Commitments: Purchase or
contract to purchase securities at a fixed price for delivery at a future date.
2-3
Credit
Leverage
Liquidity
Market
Valuation
Zero-Coupon, Pay-in-Kind and Deferred Payment Securities: Zero-coupon securities are securities
that are sold at a discount to par value and on which interest payments are not made during the
life of the security. Pay-in-kind securities are securities that have interest payable by delivery of
additional securities. Deferred payment securities are zero-coupon debt securities which
convert on a specified date to interest bearing debt securities.
2-3
Credit
Currency
Interest Rate
Liquidity
Market
Political
Valuation
Zero-Coupon
Securities
46  |  J.P. Morgan Exchange-Traded Funds

Risk related to certain investments held by the Funds:
Credit risk The risk that a financial obligation will not be met by the issuer of a security or the counterparty to a contract, resulting in a loss to the purchaser.
Currency risk The risk that currency exchange rate fluctuations may reduce gains or increase losses on foreign investments.
Environmental risk The risk that an owner or operator of real estate may be liable for the costs associated with hazardous or toxic substances located on the property.
Extension risk The risk that a rise in interest rates will extend the life of a security to a date later than the anticipated prepayment date, causing the value of the investment to fall.
Foreign investment risk The risk associated with higher transaction costs, delayed settlements, currency controls and adverse economic developments. This also includes the risk that fluctuations in the exchange rates between the U.S. dollar and foreign currencies may negatively affect an investment. Adverse changes in exchange rates may erode or reverse any gains produced by foreign currency denominated investments and may widen any losses. Exchange rate volatility also may affect the ability of an issuer to repay U.S. dollar denominated debt, thereby increasing credit risk.
Government securities risk The Fund may invest in securities issued or guaranteed by the U.S. government or its agencies or instrumentalities (such as securities issued by Fannie Mae, Ginnie Mae or Freddie Mac securities). U.S. government securities are subject to market risk, interest rate risk and credit risk. Securities, such as those issued or guaranteed by Ginnie Mae or the U.S. Treasury, that are backed by the full faith and credit of the United States are guaranteed only as to the timely payment of interest and principal when held to maturity and the market prices for such securities will fluctuate. Notwithstanding that these securities are backed by the full faith and credit of the United States, circumstances could arise that would prevent the payment of interest or principal. This would result in losses to the Fund. Securities issued or guaranteed by U.S. government-related organizations, such as Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, are not backed by the full faith of the U.S. government and no assurance can be given that the U.S. government will provide financial support. Therefore, U.S. government-related organizations may not have the funds to meet their payment obligations in the future.
High yield securities risk The risk that the Fund may invest in high yield, high risk securities (also known as junk bonds) which are considered to be speculative. These investments may be issued by companies which are highly leveraged, less creditworthy or financially distressed. Non-investment grade debt securities can be more sensitive to short-term corporate, economic and market developments. During periods of economic uncertainty and change, the market price of the Fund’s investments and the Fund’s NAV may be volatile. Furthermore, though these investments generally provide a higher yield than higher-rated debt securities, the high degree of risk involved in these investments can result in substantial or total losses. These securities are subject to great risk of loss, greater sensitivity to economic changes, valuation difficulties, and a potential lack of a secondary or public market for securities. The market price of these securities can change suddenly and unexpectedly.
Interest rate risk The risk that a change in interest rates will adversely affect the value of an investment. The value of fixed income securities generally moves in the opposite direction of interest rates (decreases when interest rates rise and increases when interest rates fall). A Fund may face a heightened level of interest rate risk due to certain changes in monetary policy, such as an interest rate increase by the Federal Reserve.
Investment company risk If a Fund invests in shares of another investment company, shareholders would bear not only their proportionate share of the Fund’s expenses, but also similar expenses of the investment company. The price movement of an investment company that is an ETF may not track the underlying index and may result in a loss.
Leverage risk The risk that gains or losses will be disproportionately higher than the amount invested.
Liquidity risk The risk that the holder may not be able to sell the security at the time or price it desires.
Management risk The risk that a strategy used by a Fund’s management may fail to produce the intended result. This includes the risk that changes in the value of a hedging instrument will not match those of the asset being hedged. Incomplete matching can result in unanticipated risks.
Market risk The risk that when the market as a whole declines, the value of a specific investment will decline proportionately. This systematic risk is common to all investments and the mutual funds that purchase them.
Natural event risk The risk that a natural disaster, such as a hurricane or similar event, will cause severe economic losses and default in payments by the issuer of the security.
Political risk The risk that governmental policies or other political actions will negatively impact the value of the investment.
Portfolio quality risk The risks associated with below investment grade securities including greater risk of default, greater sensitivity to interest rates and economic changes, potential valuation difficulties, and sudden and unexpected changes in credit quality.
Prepayment risk The risk that declining interest rates or other factors will result in unexpected prepayments, causing the value of the investment to fall.
Tax risk The risk that the issuer of the securities will fail to comply with certain requirements of the Internal Revenue Code, which could cause adverse tax consequences. Also the risk that the tax treatment of municipal or other securities could be changed by Congress thereby affecting the value of outstanding securities.
Valuation risk The risk that the estimated value of a security does not match the actual amount that can be realized if the security is sold.
Zero-Coupon securities risk The market value of these securities are generally more volatile than the market value of, and is more likely to respond to a greater degree to changes in interest rates than, other fixed income securities with similar maturities and credit quality that pay interest periodically. Actions required by federal income tax law may reduce the assets to which a Fund’s expenses could otherwise be allocated and may reduce a Fund’s rate of return.
[ ], 2023  |  47

Financial Highlights
The financial highlights table is intended to help you understand a Fund’s financial performance for the past five fiscal years or the period of a Fund’s operations, as applicable. Certain information reflects financial results for a single Fund share. The total returns in the table represent the rate that an investor would have earned (or lost) on an investment in a Fund (assuming reinvestment of all dividends and distributions). The information for each period presented has been audited by [ ], whose reports, along with a Fund’s financial statements, are included in the Fund’s annual report, which is available upon request.
To the extent a Fund invests in other funds, the Total Annual Operating Expenses included in the fee table will not correlate to the ratio of expenses to average net assets in the financial highlights below.
 
Per share operating performance
 
 
Investment operations
Distributions
Net asset
value,
beginning of
period
Net
investment
income
(loss) (b)
Net realized
and unrealized
gains (losses)
on investments
Total from
investment
operations
Net
investment
income
Net
realized
gain
Total
distributions
JPMorgan BetaBuilders USD Investment Grade
Corporate Bond ETF (formerly JPMorgan Corporate
Bond Research Enhanced ETF)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Six Months Ended August 31, 2022 (Unaudited)
$[ ]
$[ ]
$[ ]
$[ ]
$[ ]
$[ ]
$[ ]
Year Ended February 28, 2022
$55.33
$1.38
$(3.34)
$(1.96)
$(1.40)
$(0.49)
$(1.89)
Year Ended February 28, 2021
56.27
1.58
(0.31)
1.27
(1.46)
(0.75)
(2.21)
Year Ended February 29, 2020
51.19
1.95
5.96
7.91
(1.93)
(0.90)
(2.83)
December 12, 2018 (g) through February 28, 2019
50.00
0.44
1.19
1.63
(0.44)
(0.44)
JPMorgan BetaBuilders USD High Yield Corporate
Bond ETF (formerly JPMorgan High Yield Research
Enhanced ETF)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Six Months Ended August 31, 2022 (Unaudited)
[ ]
[ ]
[ ]
[ ]
[ ]
[ ]
[ ]
Year Ended February 28, 2022
51.64
1.97
(1.79)
0.18
(2.21)
(2.21)
Year Ended February 28, 2021
50.31
2.12
1.31(i)
3.43
(2.07)
(0.03)