ck0001548609-20230630

STATEMENT OF ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

BROWN ADVISORY FUNDS
October 31, 2023
Investment Adviser:

Brown Advisory LLC
901 South Bond Street
Suite 400
Baltimore, MD 21231
Account Information and Shareholder Services:

Brown Advisory Funds
c/o U.S. Bank Global Fund Services
P.O. Box 701
Milwaukee, WI 53201
(800) 540-6807 (toll free) or (414) 203-9064
BROWN ADVISORY GROWTH EQUITY FUND
Institutional Shares (BAFGX)
Investor Shares (BIAGX)
Advisor Shares (BAGAX)
BROWN ADVISORY SUSTAINABLE INTERNATIONAL LEADERS FUND
Institutional Shares (BAILX)
Investor Shares (BISLX)
Advisor Shares (Not Available for Sale)
BROWN ADVISORY FLEXIBLE EQUITY FUND
Institutional Shares (BAFFX)
Investor Shares (BIAFX)
Advisor Shares (BAFAX)
BROWN ADVISORY INTERMEDIATE INCOME FUND
Institutional Shares (Not Available for Sale)
Investor Shares (BIAIX)
Advisor Shares (BAIAX)
BROWN ADVISORY EQUITY INCOME FUND
Institutional Shares (BAFDX)
Investor Shares (BIADX)
Advisor Shares (BADAX)
BROWN ADVISORY SUSTAINABLE BOND FUND
Institutional Shares (BAISX)
Investor Shares (BASBX)
Advisor Shares (Not Available for Sale)
BROWN ADVISORY SUSTAINABLE GROWTH FUND
Institutional Shares (BAFWX)
Investor Shares (BIAWX)
Advisor Shares (BAWAX)
BROWN ADVISORY MARYLAND BOND FUND
Institutional Shares (Not Available for Sale)
Investor Shares (BIAMX)
Advisor Shares (Not Available for Sale)
BROWN ADVISORY MID-CAP GROWTH FUND
Institutional Shares (BAFMX)
Investor Shares (BMIDX)
Advisor Shares (Not Available for Sale)
BROWN ADVISORY TAX-EXEMPT BOND FUND
Institutional Shares (BTEIX)
Investor Shares (BIAEX)
Advisor Shares (Not Available for Sale)
BROWN ADVISORY SMALL-CAP GROWTH FUND
  Institutional Shares (BAFSX)
  Investor Shares (BIASX)
  Advisor Shares (BASAX)
BROWN ADVISORY TAX-EXEMPT SUSTAINABLE BOND FUND
               Institutional Shares (Not Available for Sale)
               Investor Shares (BITEX)
               Advisor Shares (Not Available for Sale)
BROWN ADVISORY SMALL-CAP FUNDAMENTAL VALUE FUND
  Institutional Shares (BAUUX)
  Investor Shares (BIAUX)
  Advisor Shares (BAUAX)
BROWN ADVISORY MORTGAGE SECURITIES FUND
Institutional Shares (BAFZX)
Investor Shares (BIAZX)
Advisor Shares (Not Available for Sale)
BROWN ADVISORY SUSTAINABLE SMALL-CAP CORE FUND
  Institutional Shares (BAFYX)
  Investor Shares (BIAYX)
  Advisor Shares (Not Available for Sale)
BROWN ADVISORY – WMC STRATEGIC EUROPEAN EQUITY FUND
Institutional Shares (BAFHX)
Investor Shares (BIAHX)
Advisor Shares (BAHAX)
BROWN ADVISORY SUSTAINABLE VALUE FUND
Institutional Shares (BASVX)
Investor Shares (BISVX)
Advisor Shares (Not Available for Sale)

BROWN ADVISORY EMERGING MARKETS SELECT FUND
Institutional Shares (BAFQX)
Investor Shares (BIAQX)
Advisor Shares (BAQAX)
BROWN ADVISORY GLOBAL LEADERS FUND
Institutional Shares (BAFLX)
Investor Shares (BIALX)
Advisor Shares (Not Available for Sale)
BROWN ADVISORY – BEUTEL GOODMAN LARGE-CAP VALUE FUND
Institutional Shares (BVALX)
Investor Shares (BIAVX)
Advisor Shares (Not Available for Sale)



This Statement of Additional Information (the “SAI”) provides additional information to the Prospectus dated October 31, 2023, as may be amended from time to time. This SAI is not a prospectus and should only be read in conjunction with the Prospectus. You may obtain the Prospectus without charge by contacting U.S. Bank Global Fund Services at the address or telephone number listed above or by visiting the Funds’ website at www.brownadvisory.com/mf.

Investors in the Funds will be informed of the Funds’ progress through periodic reports.  Financial statements certified by an independent registered public accounting firm will be submitted to shareholders at least annually.   Financial Statements for the Funds for the fiscal year ended June 30, 2023, included in the Annual Report to shareholders, are incorporated into this SAI by reference. Copies of the Annual Report may be obtained, without charge, upon request by contacting U.S. Bank Global Fund Services at the address or telephone number listed above.




TABLE OF CONTENTS
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A-1
B-1




GLOSSARY

As used in this SAI, the following terms have the meanings listed:
“Accountant” means U.S. Bank Global Fund Services.
“Administrator” means U.S. Bancorp Fund Services, LLC, doing business as U.S. Bank Global Fund Services.
“Adviser” means Brown Advisory LLC, the Funds’ investment adviser.
“Board” means the Board of Trustees of the Trust.
“CFTC” means Commodity Futures Trading Commission.
“Code” means the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended the rules thereunder, IRS interpretations and any private letter rulings or similar authority upon which the Funds may rely.
“Custodian” means U.S. Bank National Association.
“Distributor” means ALPS Distributors, Inc.
“Fund” means each of Brown Advisory Growth Equity Fund, Brown Advisory Flexible Equity Fund, Brown Advisory Equity Income Fund, Brown Advisory Sustainable Growth Fund, Brown Advisory Mid-Cap Growth Fund, Brown Advisory Small-Cap Growth Fund, Brown Advisory Small-Cap Fundamental Value Fund, Brown Advisory Sustainable Small-Cap Core Fund, Brown Advisory Sustainable Value Fund, Brown Advisory Global Leaders Fund, Brown Advisory Sustainable International Leaders Fund, Brown Advisory Intermediate Income Fund, Brown Advisory Sustainable Bond Fund, Brown Advisory Maryland Bond Fund, Brown Advisory Tax-Exempt Bond Fund, Brown Advisory Tax-Exempt Sustainable Bond Fund, Brown Advisory Mortgage Securities Fund, Brown Advisory – WMC Strategic European Equity Fund, Brown Advisory Emerging Markets Select Fund, and Brown Advisory – Beutel Goodman Large-Cap Value Fund.
“Fund Services” means U.S. Bancorp Fund Services, LLC, doing business as U.S. Bank Global Fund Services.
“Independent Trustee” means a Trustee that is not an interested person of the Trust as that term is defined in Section 2(a)(19) of the 1940 Act.
“IRS” means U.S. Internal Revenue Service.
“Moody’s” means Moody’s Investors Service.
“NAV” means net asset value per share.
“NRSRO” means a nationally recognized statistical rating organization.
“SAI” means Statement of Additional Information.
“SEC” means the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission.
“S&P” means S&P Global Ratings.
“Sub-Adviser” means Brown Advisory Limited, Wellington Management Company LLP, Pzena Investment Management, LLC, and Beutel, Goodman & Company Ltd.
“Transfer Agent” means U.S. Bancorp Fund Services, LLC, doing business as U.S. Bank Global Fund Services.
“Trust” means Brown Advisory Funds.
“U.S.” means United States.
“U.S. Government Securities” means obligations issued or guaranteed by the U.S. Government, its agencies or instrumentalities.
“1933 Act” means the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, and including rules and regulations as promulgated thereunder.
“1934 Act” means the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended, and including rules and regulations as promulgated thereunder.
“1940 Act” means the Investment Company Act of 1940, as amended, and including rules and regulations, SEC interpretations and any exemptive order applicable to the Funds or interpretive relief promulgated thereunder.



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THE TRUST

The Trust is a Delaware statutory trust organized on May 1, 2012, and is registered with the SEC as an open-end management investment company. The Trust’s Declaration of Trust (the “Declaration of Trust”) permits the Trust’s Board of Trustees (the “Board”) to issue an unlimited number of full and fractional shares of beneficial interest, without par value, which may be issued in any number of series and classes, with each series representing a separate portfolio of investments with its own investment objectives, policies and restrictions. The Board may, from time to time, issue additional series, the assets and liabilities of which will be separate and distinct from any other series. The Trust currently offers 20 separate investment series, or mutual funds (the “Funds”): Brown Advisory Growth Equity Fund, Brown Advisory Flexible Equity Fund, Brown Advisory Equity Income Fund, Brown Advisory Sustainable Growth Fund, Brown Advisory Mid-Cap Growth Fund, Brown Advisory Small-Cap Growth Fund, Brown Advisory Small-Cap Fundamental Value Fund, Brown Advisory Sustainable Small-Cap Core Fund, Brown Advisory Sustainable Value Fund, Brown Advisory Global Leaders Fund, Brown Advisory Sustainable International Leaders Fund, Brown Advisory Intermediate Income Fund, Brown Advisory Sustainable Bond Fund, Brown Advisory Maryland Bond Fund, Brown Advisory Tax-Exempt Bond Fund, Brown Advisory Tax-Exempt Sustainable Bond Fund, Brown Advisory Mortgage Securities Fund, Brown Advisory – WMC Strategic European Equity Fund, Brown Advisory Emerging Markets Select Fund, and Brown Advisory – Beutel Goodman Large-Cap Value Fund.

As a Delaware statutory trust, the Trust is subject to Delaware law, including the Delaware Statutory Trust Act. The Delaware Statutory Trust Act provides that a shareholder of a Delaware statutory trust shall be entitled to the same limitation of personal liability extended to shareholders of Delaware corporations, and the Declaration of Trust further provides that no shareholder of the Trust shall be personally liable for the obligations of the Trust or of any series or class thereof except by reason of his or her own acts or conduct.

Fund History

The Trust’s initial two funds, the Brown Advisory Sustainable Growth Fund and the Brown Advisory Tax-Exempt Bond Fund (the “Initial Funds”), became effective on June 29, 2012. Each of the other Funds in the Trust (other than the Initial Funds, the Brown Advisory Mid-Cap Growth Fund, the Brown Advisory Global Leaders Fund, the Brown Advisory Sustainable Bond Fund, the Brown Advisory Mortgage Securities Fund, the Brown Advisory – WMC Strategic European Equity Fund, the Brown Advisory Emerging Markets Select Fund, the Brown Advisory – Beutel Goodman Large-Cap Value Fund, the Brown Advisory Sustainable Small-Cap Core Fund, the Brown Advisory Sustainable International Leaders Fund, the Brown Advisory Sustainable Value Fund and the Brown Advisory Tax-Exempt Sustainable Bond Fund) became effective on October 19, 2012 and are the successors in interest to certain funds having the same names and investment objectives that were included as series of another investment company, Professionally Managed Portfolios (the “PMP Trust”) and that were also advised by the Funds’ investment adviser, Brown Advisory LLC (the “Predecessor Funds”). On September 26, 2012, the shareholders of each of the Predecessor Funds approved the reorganization of the Predecessor Funds with and into their corresponding series of the Trust (the “Successor Funds”) and effective as of the close of business on October 19, 2012, the assets and liabilities of each of the Predecessor Funds were transferred to the Trust in exchange for shares of each of the applicable Successor Funds.

In addition, also on September 26, 2012, the shareholders of the Winslow Green Growth Fund, also a separate investment series of the PMP Trust, approved the transfer of the assets and liabilities of the Winslow Green Growth Fund into the Brown Advisory Sustainable Growth Fund. The effective date of the reorganization of the Winslow Green Growth Fund into the Brown Advisory Sustainable Growth Fund was the close of business on October 19, 2012.

On May 24, 2023, the Brown Advisory Total Return Fund was reorganized with and into the Brown Advisory Sustainable Bond Fund. The Brown Advisory Total Return Fund maintained a different investment objective but the same fundamental policies to that of the Brown Advisory Sustainable Bond Fund.

Prior to February 22, 2019, the Brown Advisory Emerging Markets Select Fund was named the Brown Advisory – Somerset Emerging Markets Fund.


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Prior to August 15, 2013, the Brown Advisory Flexible Equity Fund was named the Brown Advisory Flexible Value Fund, and prior to October 1, 2008, this Fund was named the Flag Investors – Equity Opportunity Fund.

Prior to July 1, 2013, the Brown Advisory Sustainable Growth Fund was named the Brown Advisory Winslow Sustainability Fund.

On December 30, 2005, the Nevis Fund, Inc. (the “Nevis Predecessor Fund”), a registered investment company, reorganized with and into the Brown Advisory Opportunity Fund. The Nevis Predecessor Fund maintained the same investment objective and similar investment policies to that of the Brown Advisory Opportunity Fund. The Board approved the transfer of the assets and liabilities of the Brown Advisory Opportunity Fund into the Brown Advisory Global Leaders Fund. The effective date of the reorganization of the Brown Advisory Opportunity Fund into the Brown Advisory Global Leaders Fund was the close of business on October 23, 2015.

Prior to April 30, 2004, the Brown Advisory Intermediate Income Fund was named the Brown Advisory Intermediate Bond Fund. Prior to November 18, 2002, the Fund was named the BrownIA Intermediate Bond Fund.

Prior to November 18, 2002, the Brown Advisory Small-Cap Growth Fund was named the BrownIA Small-Cap Growth Fund and the Brown Advisory Growth Equity Fund was named the BrownIA Growth Equity Fund.

On September 20, 2002, the Short-Intermediate Income Fund, Inc. reorganized with and into the Brown Advisory Intermediate Income Fund. The Short-Intermediate Income Fund maintained the same investment objective and similar investment policies to that of the Brown Advisory Intermediate Income Fund.

Each of the Funds (other than the Brown Advisory Maryland Bond Fund, Brown Advisory Tax-Exempt Bond Fund, Brown Advisory Tax-Exempt Sustainable Bond Fund and Brown Advisory – Beutel Goodman Large-Cap Value Fund) are diversified series of the Trust.  The Brown Advisory Maryland Bond Fund, Brown Advisory Tax-Exempt Bond Fund, Brown Advisory Tax-Exempt Sustainable Bond Fund, and Brown Advisory – Beutel Goodman Large-Cap Value Fund are non-diversified series of the Trust.  Please see the Prospectus for a discussion of the principal investment policies and risks of investing in the Funds.

The Funds’ Prospectus and this SAI are a part of the Trust’s Registration Statement filed with the SEC. Copies of the Trust’s complete Registration Statement may be obtained from the SEC upon payment of the prescribed fee or may be accessed free of charge at the SEC’s website at www.sec.gov.

INVESTMENT POLICIES AND RISKS

Each Fund’s principal investment strategies and the risks associated with the same are described in the “Summary Section,” “Additional Information about the Funds’ Principal Investment Strategies” and “Principal Risks” sections of the Prospectus. The following discussion provides additional information about those principal investment strategies and related risks, as well as information about investment strategies (and related risks) that a Fund may utilize, even though they are not considered to be “principal” investment strategies. Accordingly, an investment strategy (and related risk) that is described below, but which is not described in a Fund’s Prospectus, should not be considered to be a principal strategy (or related risk) applicable to that Fund.

Not all securities or techniques discussed below are eligible investments for each of the Funds.

Equity Securities

Common and Preferred Stock

General. Each Fund may invest in common stock. Common stock represents an equity (ownership) interest in a company, and usually possesses voting rights and earns dividends. Dividends on common stock are not fixed but are declared at the discretion of the issuer. Common stock generally represents the riskiest investment in a company. In addition, common stock generally has the greatest appreciation and depreciation potential because increases and decreases in earnings are usually reflected in a company’s stock price.


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Each Fund may invest in preferred stock. Preferred stock is a class of stock having a preference over common stock as to the payment of dividends and the recovery of investment should a company be liquidated, although preferred stock is usually junior to the debt securities of the issuer. Preferred stock typically does not possess voting rights and its market value may change based on changes in interest rates.

Risks. The fundamental risk of investing in common and preferred stock is the risk that the value of the stock might decrease. Stock values fluctuate in response to the activities of an individual company or in response to general market and/or economic conditions. Historically, common stocks have provided greater long-term returns and have entailed greater short-term risks than preferred stocks, fixed-income and money market investments. The market value of all securities, including common and preferred stocks, is based upon the market’s perception of value and not necessarily the book value of an issuer or other objective measures of a company’s worth. If you invest in a Fund, you should be willing to accept the risks of the stock market and should consider an investment in the Fund only as a part of your overall investment portfolio.

Convertible Securities

General. Each Fund may invest in convertible securities. Each Fund may also invest in U.S. or foreign securities convertible into foreign common stock. Convertible securities include debt securities, preferred stock or other securities that may be converted into or exchanged for a given amount of common stock of the same or a different issuer during a specified period and at a specified price in the future. A convertible security entitles the holder to receive interest on debt or the dividend on preferred stock until the convertible security matures or is redeemed, converted or exchanged.

Convertible securities rank senior to common stock in a company’s capital structure but are usually subordinated to comparable nonconvertible securities. Convertible securities have unique investment characteristics in that they generally: (1) have higher yields than common stocks, but lower yields than comparable non-convertible securities; (2) are less subject to fluctuation in value than the underlying stocks since they have fixed income characteristics; and (3) provide the potential for capital appreciation if the market price of the underlying common stock increases.

A convertible security may be subject to redemption at the option of the issuer at a price established in the convertible security’s governing instrument. If a convertible security is called for redemption, a Fund will be required to permit the issuer to redeem the security, convert it into the underlying common stock or sell it to a third party.

Risks. Investment in convertible securities generally entails less risk than an investment in the issuer’s common stock. Convertible securities are typically issued by smaller capitalization companies whose stock price may be volatile. Therefore, the price of a convertible security may reflect variations in the price of the underlying common stock in a way that nonconvertible debt does not. The extent to which such risk is reduced, however, depends in large measure upon the degree to which the convertible security sells above its value as a fixed income security.

Security Ratings Information. Each Fund’s investments in convertible securities are subject to the credit risk relating to the financial condition of the issuers of the securities that each Fund holds. Each Fund may purchase convertible securities of any rating – investment grade or non-investment grade. Each Fund may purchase unrated convertible securities and preferred stock if, at the time of purchase, the Adviser and/or Sub-Adviser believes that they are of comparable quality to rated securities that the Fund may purchase.

Unrated securities may not be as actively traded as rated securities. A Fund may retain securities whose rating has been lowered below the lowest permissible rating category (or that are unrated and determined by the Adviser and/or Sub-Adviser to be of comparable quality to securities whose rating has been lowered below the lowest permissible rating category) if the Adviser and/or Sub-Advisers determine that retaining such security is in the best interests of the Fund. Because a downgrade often results in a reduction in the market price of the security, the sale of a downgraded security may result in a loss.

Moody’s, S&P and other NRSROs are private services that provide ratings of the credit quality of debt obligations, including convertible securities. A description of the range of ratings assigned to various types of bonds and other securities by several NRSROs is included in Appendix A to this SAI. Each Fund may use these ratings to determine

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whether to purchase, sell or hold a security. Ratings are general and are not absolute standards of quality. Securities with the same maturity, interest rate and rating may have different market prices. To the extent that the ratings given by an NRSRO may change as a result of changes in such organizations or their rating systems, the Adviser and/or Sub-Advisers will attempt to substitute comparable ratings. Credit ratings attempt to evaluate the safety of principal and interest payments and do not evaluate the risks of fluctuations in market value. Also, rating agencies may fail to make timely changes in credit ratings. An issuer’s current financial condition may be better or worse than a rating indicates.

Credit ratings for debt securities provided by rating agencies evaluate the safety of principal and interest payments, not market value risk. The rating of an issuer is a rating agency’s view of past and future potential developments related to the issuer and may not necessarily reflect actual outcomes. There can be a lag between the time of developments relating to an issuer and the time a rating is assigned and updated. See Appendix A for additional information on credit ratings.

Warrants

General. Each Fund may invest in warrants. Warrants are securities, typically issued with preferred stock or bonds that give the holder the right to purchase a given number of shares of common stock at a specified price and time. The price of the warrant usually represents a premium over the applicable market value of the common stock at the time of the warrant’s issuance. Warrants have no voting rights with respect to the common stock, receive no dividends and have no rights with respect to the assets of the issuer.

Risks. Investments in warrants involve certain risks, including the possible lack of a liquid market for the resale of the warrants, potential price fluctuations due to adverse market conditions or other factors and failure of the price of the common stock to rise. If the warrant is not exercised within the specified time period, it becomes worthless.

Depositary Receipts

General. Each Fund may invest in sponsored and unsponsored American Depositary Receipts (“ADRs”), European Depositary Receipts (“EDRs”), Global Depositary Receipts (“GDRs”), Holding Company Depositary Receipts (“HOLDRs”), New York Registered Shares (“NYRs”) American Depositary Shares (“ADSs”), or Non-Voting Depositary Receipts (“NVDRs”). ADRs typically are issued by a U.S. bank or trust company, evidence ownership of underlying securities issued by a foreign company, and are designed for use in U.S. securities markets. EDRs are issued by European financial institutions and typically trade in Europe and GDRs are issued by European financial institutions and typically trade in both Europe and the United States. HOLDRs trade on the American Stock Exchange and are fixed baskets of U.S. or foreign stocks that give an investor an ownership interest in each of the underlying stocks. NYRs, also known as Guilder Shares since most of the issuing companies are Dutch, are dollar-denominated certificates issued by foreign companies specifically for the U.S. market. ADSs are shares issued under a deposit agreement that represents an underlying security in the issuer’s home country. (An ADS is the actual share trading, while an ADR represents a bundle of ADSs). NVDRs are listed securities through which investors receive the same financial benefits as those who invest directly in a company’s common stock; however, unlike common stockholders, NVDR holders cannot be involved in proxy voting if the company solicits votes from stockholders.

Each Fund invests in depositary receipts in order to obtain exposure to foreign securities markets. For purposes of a Fund’s investment policies, the Fund’s investment in an ADR will be considered an investment in the underlying securities of the applicable foreign company.

Risks. Unsponsored depositary receipts may be created without the participation of the foreign issuer. Holders of these receipts generally bear all the costs of the depositary receipt facility, whereas foreign issuers typically bear certain costs of a sponsored depositary receipt. The bank or trust company depositary of an unsponsored depositary receipt may be under no obligation to distribute shareholder communications received from the foreign issuer or to pass through voting rights. Accordingly, available information concerning the issuer may not be current and the prices of unsponsored depositary receipts may be more volatile than the prices of sponsored depositary receipts.


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Foreign Securities

Each Fund may invest in foreign securities. Investments in the securities of foreign issuers may involve risks in addition to those normally associated with investments in the securities of U.S. issuers. All foreign investments are subject to risks of: (1) foreign political and economic instability such as war, hyperinflation, currency devaluations and overdependence on particular industries; (2) adverse movements in foreign exchange rates; (3) the imposition or tightening of exchange controls or other limitations on repatriation of foreign capital; and (4) changes in foreign governmental attitudes towards private investment, including potential nationalization, increased taxation or confiscation of a Fund’s assets. Each Fund may invest in non-US dollar denominated securities including debt obligations denominated in foreign or composite currencies (such as the European Currency Unit) issued by (1) foreign national, provincial, state or municipal governments or their political subdivisions; (2) international organizations designated or supported by governmental entities (e.g., the World Bank and the European Community); (3) non-dollar securities issued by the U.S. Government; and (4) foreign corporations. Economic sanctions could among other things, effectively restrict or eliminate a Fund's ability to purchase or sell securities or groups of securities for a substantial period of time, and may make the Fund;s investments in such securities harder to value.

International trade tensions may arise from time to time which could result in trade tariffs, embargoes or other restrictions or limitations on trade. The imposition of any actions on trade could trigger a significant reduction in international trade, an oversupply of certain manufactured goods, substantial price reductions of goods and possible failure of individual companies or industries which could have a negative impact on Fund's performance. Events such as these are difficult to predict and may or may not occur in the future.

In addition, interest and dividends payable on foreign securities may be subject to foreign withholding taxes, thereby reducing the income available for distribution to you. Some foreign brokerage commissions and custody fees are higher than those in the U.S. Foreign accounting, auditing and financial reporting standards differ from those in the U.S. and therefore, less information may be available about foreign companies than is available about issuers of comparable U.S. companies. Foreign securities also may trade less frequently and with lower volume and may exhibit greater price volatility than U.S. securities.

Changes in foreign exchange rates will affect the U.S. dollar value of all foreign currency-denominated securities held by a Fund. Exchange rates are influenced generally by the forces of supply and demand in the foreign currency markets and by numerous other political and economic events occurring outside the United States, many of which may be difficult, if not impossible, to predict.

Income from foreign securities will be received and realized in foreign currencies and a Fund is required to compute and distribute income in U.S. dollars. Accordingly, a decline in the value of a particular foreign currency against the U.S. dollar after a Fund’s income has been earned and computed in U.S. dollars may require the Fund to liquidate portfolio securities to acquire sufficient U.S. dollars to make a distribution. Similarly, if the exchange rate declines between the time a Fund incurs expenses in U.S. dollars and the time such expenses are paid, the Fund may be required to liquidate additional foreign securities to purchase the U.S. dollars required to meet such expenses.

Emerging Markets

Investing in emerging markets can have more risk than investing in developed foreign markets. The risks of investing in these markets may be exacerbated relative to investments in foreign markets. Governments of developing and emerging market countries may be more unstable as compared to more developed countries. Developing and emerging market countries may have less developed securities markets or exchanges, and legal and accounting systems. In addition, companies in emerging market countries may not be subject to accounting, auditing, financial reporting and recordkeeping requirements that are as robust as those in more developed countries, and therefore, material information about a company may be unavailable or unreliable, and U.S. regulators may be unable to enforce a company’s regulatory obligations. It may be more difficult to sell securities at acceptable prices and security prices may be more volatile than in countries with more mature markets. Currency values may fluctuate more in developing or emerging markets. Developing or emerging market countries may be more likely to impose government restrictions, including confiscatory taxation, expropriation or nationalization of a company’s assets, and restrictions on foreign ownership of local companies. In addition, emerging markets may impose

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restrictions on the Fund’s ability to repatriate investment income or capital and thus, may adversely affect the operations of the Fund. Certain emerging markets may impose constraints on currency exchange and some currencies in emerging markets may have been devalued significantly against the U.S. dollar. For these and other reasons, the prices of securities in emerging markets can fluctuate more significantly than the prices of securities of companies in developed countries. The less developed the country, the greater effect these risks may have on the Fund. Investors should be able to tolerate sudden, sometimes substantial, fluctuations in the value of their investments.

European Securities Risks

European countries can be significantly affected by the actions of their own individual governments as well as the actions of other European institutions, such as the European Union (“EU”), the European Economic and Monetary Union (“EMU”) and the European Central Bank. The EU is an intergovernmental and supranational union consisting of 28 member states. One of the key responsibilities of the EU is to create and administer a unified trade policy. The member states created the EMU that established different stages and commitments that member states need to follow to achieve greater economic policy coordination and monetary cooperation. Member states relinquish their monetary control to the European Central Bank and use a single unified currency, the euro.

Investments in Europe are also subject to currency risks. Further, because many countries are dependent on foreign exports, any fluctuations in the euro exchange rate could have a negative effect on an issuer’s profitability and performance.

The EU has been extending its influence to the east as it has accepted several new Eastern European countries as members. Some of the new members remain burdened by the inherited inefficiencies of centrally planned economies. Additionally, these countries are dependent on Western Europe for trade and credit. The current and future status of the EU continues to be the subject of political and regulatory controversy, with widely differing views both within and between member countries.

The European financial markets have experienced uncertainty over the past few years, largely because of concerns about rising government debt levels and increased budget deficits. Political and regulatory responses to address structural and policy issues have created even greater instability throughout the region. The high levels of public debt increases the likelihood that certain European issuers will either default or restructure their debt obligations, which would have a negative effect on asset values. The use of austerity measures in countries such as Spain, Italy, Greece, Portugal and Ireland during times in which the eurozone has high levels of unemployment has limited economic growth. European countries can be adversely affected by the tight fiscal and monetary controls that the EMU requires its members to comply with. Due to the severity and prolonged economic crisis in Europe, it is possible that one or more of the EU members could abandon the euro and revert to a national currency, or otherwise cease to be a member of the EU. Although it is impossible to predict the effects of one or more countries exiting the EU, the outcome would likely lead to economic instability that would impact not only the EU member countries but the global economy as well.

In June 2016, the United Kingdom (“UK”) approved a referendum to leave the EU. The withdrawal, known colloquially as “Brexit”, was agreed to and ratified by the UK Parliament, and the UK left the EU on January 31, 2020. It began an 11-month transition period in which to negotiate a new trading relationship for goods and services that ended on December 31, 2020. The UK and EU reached an agreement, effective January 1, 2021, on the terms of their future trading relationship, which principally relates to the trading of goods. Further discussions are to be held between the UK and the EU in relation to matters not covered by the trade agreement, such as financial services. Brexit may have significant political and financial consequences for the Eurozone markets, including greater volatility in the global stock markets and illiquidity, fluctuations in currency and exchange rates, and an increased likelihood of a recession in the UK. At this time, the impact of Brexit cannot be predicted; however, market disruption in the EU and globally may have a negative effect on the value of a Fund’s investments. Additionally, the risks related to Brexit could be more pronounced if one or more additional EU member states seek to leave the EU.

On February 24, 2022, Russia commenced a military attack on Ukraine. The outbreak of hostilities between the two countries could result in more widespread conflict and could have a severe adverse effect on the region and the markets. In addition, sanctions imposed on Russia, Russian companies and financial institutions, Russian individuals

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and others by the United States and other countries, and any sanctions imposed in the future could have a significant adverse impact on the Russian economy and related markets. The price and liquidity of investments may fluctuate widely as a result of the conflict and related events. How long such conflict and related events will last and whether it will escalate further cannot be predicted.

Derivatives

Some of the instruments in which the Funds may invest may be referred to as “derivatives,” because their value “derives” from the value of an underlying asset, reference rate or index. These instruments include options, futures contracts, forward currency contracts, swaps and other similar instruments. For regulatory reasons, certain structured securities that may involve a future payment obligation for a Fund may also be classified as derivatives. The market value of derivative instruments and securities sometimes may be more volatile than those of other instruments and each type of derivative instrument may have its own special risks. The use of derivatives is a highly specialized activity that involves strategies and risks that are different from those involving ordinary portfolio securities transactions, and generally depends on the manager’s ability to predict market movements. Moreover, even if the Adviser or a Sub-Adviser is correct in its forecast, there is still a risk that a derivative position may not perform as initially anticipated. Participation in the markets for derivative instruments involves investment risks and transaction costs to which a Fund may not be subject absent the use of these strategies.

Some over-the-counter ("OTC") derivative instruments may expose a Fund to the credit risk of its counterparty.  In the event the counterparty to such a derivative instrument becomes insolvent, a Fund potentially could lose all or a large portion of its investment in the derivative instrument.

Investing for hedging purposes or to increase a Fund’s return may result in certain additional transaction costs that may reduce the Fund’s performance.  In addition, when used for hedging purposes, no assurance can be given that each derivative position will achieve a close correlation with the security or currency that is the subject of the hedge, or that a particular derivative position will be available when sought by the Adviser.  While hedging strategies involving derivatives can reduce the risk of loss, they can also reduce the opportunity for gain or even result in losses by offsetting favorable price movements in other Fund investments.  Certain derivatives may create a risk of loss greater than the amount invested.

It is possible that additional government regulation of various types of derivative instruments, including futures, options and swap agreements, and regulation of certain market participants’ use of the same, may limit or prevent a Fund from using such instruments as a part of its investment strategy. It is not possible to fully predict the effects of current or future legislation and regulation by multiple regulators in this area, but the effects could be substantial and adverse. The futures, options and swaps markets are subject to comprehensive statutes, regulations, and margin requirements. The SEC recently implemented new regulations governing the use of derivatives by registered investment companies. Rule 18f-4 under the 1940 Act imposes limits on the amount of derivatives transactions a fund can enter into and requires funds whose use of derivatives is more than a limited specified exposure to establish and maintain a comprehensive derivatives risk management program and appoint a derivatives risk manager.

In addition, the SEC, CFTC and the exchanges are authorized to take extraordinary actions in the event of a market emergency, including, for example, the implementation or reduction of speculative position limits, the implementation of higher margin requirements, the establishment of daily price limits and the suspension of trading. The regulation of futures, options and swaps transactions in the United States is a changing area of law and is subject to modification by government and judicial action.

Swaps

Certain Funds may engage in swap transactions, including OTC swaps. OTC swaps are bilateral contracts entered into primarily by institutional investors for periods ranging from a few weeks to more than one year. In a standard OTC swap transaction, two parties agree to exchange the returns (or differentials in rates of return) earned or realized on particular predetermined investments or instruments. Whether a Fund’s use of swaps will be successful will depend on the Adviser’s or Sub-Adviser’s ability to predict correctly whether certain types of investments are likely to produce greater returns than other investments. Moreover, a Fund bears the risk of loss of the amount expected to be received under a swap agreement in the event of the default or bankruptcy of a swap agreement

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counterparty. Swaps are highly specialized instruments that require investment techniques, risk analyses, and tax planning different from those associated with traditional investments. The use of a swap requires an understanding not only of the reference asset, reference rate, or index but also of the swap itself, without the benefit of observing the performance of the swap under all possible market conditions. Additionally, because OTC swaps are bilateral contracts, they may be subject to contractual restrictions on transferability and termination.

The Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act (“Dodd-Frank Act”) and related regulatory developments require the clearing and exchange-trading of certain standardized OTC derivative instruments that the CFTC and SEC have defined as “swaps” and “security-based swaps.” The CFTC has implemented mandatory exchange-trading and clearing requirements under the Dodd-Frank Act and the CFTC continues to approve contracts for central clearing. Central clearing is designed to reduce counterparty credit risk compared to uncleared OTC swaps because central clearing interposes the central clearinghouse as the counterparty to each participant’s swap, but it does not eliminate those risks completely. Uncleared swaps and uncleared security-based swaps are subject to certain margin requirements that mandate the posting and collection of minimum margin amounts on certain uncleared transactions, which may result in the Fund and its counterparties posting higher margin amounts for uncleared swaps and uncleared security-based swaps than would otherwise be the case.

Credit Default Swaps

General

Certain Funds may utilize credit default swaps (CDS).  This may be in the form of swaps on individual companies or CDS indices.  These Funds may use CDS to gain long or short exposure to the underlying credit and/or index of credits.

A CDS contract is an agreement between the Fund and a counterparty that enables the Fund to buy or sell protection against a credit event related to a particular issuer. One party, acting as a “protection buyer,” makes periodic payments to the other party, a “protection seller,” in exchange for a promise by the protection seller to make a payment to the protection buyer if a negative credit event (such as a delinquent payment or default) occurs with respect to a referenced bond or group of bonds. CDS contracts may also be structured based on the debt of a basket of issuers, rather than a single issuer, and may be customized with respect to the default event that triggers purchase or other factors (for example, the Nth default within a basket, or defaults by a particular combination of issuers within the basket, may trigger a payment obligation). The Fund may enter into CDS contracts for investment purposes. As a credit protection seller in a CDS contract, the Fund would be required to pay the par (or other agreed-upon) value of a referenced debt obligation to the counterparty in the event of a default by a third party, such as a U.S. or non-U.S. corporate issuer, on the debt obligation. In return for its obligation, the Fund would receive from the counterparty a periodic stream of payments over the term of the contract provided that no event of default has occurred. If no default occurs, the Fund would keep the stream of payments and would have no payment obligations. As the seller, the Fund would be subject to investment exposure on the notional amount of the swap.

Risks of Credit Default Swaps

The Brown Advisory Sustainable Bond Fund may also purchase CDS contracts in order to hedge against the risk of default of the debt of a particular issuer or basket of issuers or profit from changes in the creditworthiness of the particular issuer(s) (also known as “buying credit protection”). In these cases, the Fund would function as the counterparty referenced in the preceding paragraph.  This would involve the risk that the investment may expire worthless and would only generate income in the event of an actual default by the issuer(s) of the underlying obligation(s) (or, as applicable, a credit downgrade or other indication of financial instability). It would also involve the risk that the seller may fail to satisfy its payment obligations to the Fund in the event of a default.  The purchase of CDS contracts involves costs, which will reduce the Fund’s return.


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Options and Futures

General

Each Fund may (1) purchase or write options on securities in which it may invest or on market indices based in whole or in part on the securities in which it may invest; (2) invest in futures contracts on market indices based in whole or in part on securities in which it may invest; and (3) purchase or write put and call options on these futures contracts. The Brown Advisory Maryland Bond Fund, Brown Advisory Tax-Exempt Bond Fund, Brown Advisory Tax-Exempt Sustainable Bond Fund and the Brown Advisory Sustainable International Leaders Fund may invest in futures contracts on indices based in whole or in part on the securities in which it may invest including municipal bond futures and Treasury bond and note futures. A Fund will participate in such transactions to enhance the Fund’s performance or hedge against a decline in the value of securities owned by the Fund or an increase in the price of securities that the Fund plans to purchase.

Options purchased or written by a Fund must be traded on an exchange or over-the-counter. Options and futures contracts are considered to be derivatives. Use of these instruments, including the exchanges on which they are traded, is subject to regulation by the SEC and CFTC, as applicable. No assurance can be given that any hedging or income strategy will achieve its intended result.

Each Fund may invest more than 5% of their respective net assets in options and futures for purposes of achieving their investment objective, portfolio management, risk mitigation, hedging, equitizing cash or for purposes of enhancing total return.

To the extent that a Fund uses futures and/or options on futures and/or swaps, it will do so in accordance with Rule 4.5 under the Commodity Exchange Act (“CEA”).

Options and Futures Contracts

Options on Securities. A call option is a contract under which the purchaser of the call option, in return for a premium paid, has the right to buy the security (or index) underlying the option at a specified price at any time during the term of the option. The writer of the call option, who receives the premium, has the obligation upon exercise of the option to deliver the underlying security against payment of the exercise price. A put option gives its purchaser, in return for a premium, the right to sell the underlying security at a specified price during the term of the option. The writer of the put, who receives the premium, has the obligation to buy, upon exercise of the option, the underlying security (or a cash amount equal to the value of the index) at the exercise price. The amount of a premium received or paid for an option is based upon certain factors including the market price of the underlying security, the relationship of the exercise price to the market price, the historical price volatility of the underlying security, the option period and interest rates.

Options on Stock Indices. A stock index assigns relative values to the stock included in the index, and the index fluctuates with changes in the market values of the stocks included in the index. Stock index options operate in the same way as the more traditional options on securities except that stock index options are settled exclusively in cash and do not involve delivery of securities. Thus, upon exercise of stock index options, the purchaser and writer of the option will exchange an amount based on the differences between the exercise price and the closing price of the stock index.

Options on Foreign Currency (Brown Advisory Small-Cap Fundamental Value Fund, Brown Advisory Sustainable Small-Cap Core Fund, Brown Advisory Global Leaders Fund, Brown Advisory Mortgage Securities Fund, Brown Advisory – WMC Strategic European Equity Fund, Brown Advisory Sustainable Bond Fund, Brown Advisory Emerging Markets Select Fund, and Brown Advisory Sustainable International Leaders Fund).
Options on foreign currency operate in the same way as more traditional options on securities except that currency options are settled exclusively in the currency subject to the option. The value of a currency option is dependent upon the value of the currency relative to the U.S. dollar and has no relationship to the investment merits of a foreign security. Because foreign currency transactions occurring in the interbank market involve substantially larger amounts than those that may be involved in the use of foreign currency options, a Fund may be disadvantaged by

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having to deal in an odd lot market (generally consisting in transactions of less than $1 million) for the underlying currencies at prices that are less favorable than round lots. To the extent that the U.S. options markets are closed while the market for the underlying currencies are open, significant price and rate movements may take place in the underlying markets that cannot be reflected in the options markets.

Options on Futures. Options on futures contracts are similar to options on securities except that an option on a futures contract gives the purchaser the right, in return for the premium paid, to assume a position in a futures contract rather than to purchase or sell a security, at a specified exercise price at any time during the period of the option. Upon exercise of the option, the delivery of the futures position to the holder of the option will be accompanied by transfer to the holder of an accumulated balance representing the amount by which the market price of the futures contract exceeds, in the case of a call, or is less than, in the case of a put, the exercise price of the option on the future.

Futures Contracts and Index Futures Contracts. A futures contract is a bilateral agreement where one party agrees to accept, and the other party agrees to make, delivery of cash or an underlying asset, as called for in the contract, at a specified date and at an agreed upon price.

An index futures contract involves the delivery of an amount of cash equal to a specified dollar amount multiplied by the difference between the index value at the close of trading of the contract and at the price designated by the futures contract. No physical delivery of the securities comprising the index is made. Generally, these futures contracts are closed out prior to the expiration date of the contracts.

A municipal bond futures contract is based on the value of the Bond Buyer Index (“BBI”) which is comprised of 40 actively traded general obligation and revenue bonds. The rating of a BBI issue must be at least “A.” To be considered, the issue must have at least 19 years remaining to maturity, a first call date between 7 and 16 years, and at least one call at par prior to redemption. No physical delivery of the securities is made in connection with municipal bond futures. Rather these contracts are usually settled in cash if they are not closed out prior to their expiration date.

A Treasury bond futures contract is based on the value of an equivalent 20-year, 6% Treasury bond. Generally, any Treasury bond with a remaining maturity or term to call of 15 years as of the first day of the month in which the contracts are scheduled to be exercised will qualify as a deliverable security pursuant to a Treasury bond futures contract. A Treasury note futures contract is based on the value of an equivalent 10-year, 6% Treasury note. Generally, any Treasury note with a remaining maturity or term to call of 6 1/2 years or 10 years, respectively, as of the first day of the month in which the contracts are scheduled to be exercised will qualify as a deliverable security pursuant to Treasury note futures contract.

Since a number of different Treasury notes will qualify as a deliverable security upon the exercise of the option, the price that the buyer will actually pay for those securities will depend on which Treasury notes are actually delivered. Normally, the exercise price of the futures contract is adjusted by a conversion factor that takes into consideration the value of the deliverable security if it were yielding 6% as of the first day of the month in which the contract is scheduled to be exercised.

Risks of Options and Futures Transactions

There are certain investment risks associated with options and futures transactions. These risks include: (1) dependence on the Adviser’s or Sub-Adviser’s ability to predict movements in the prices of individual securities and fluctuations in the general securities markets; (2) imperfect correlation between movements in the prices of options or futures contracts and movements in the price of the securities (or indices) underlying the instrument; (3) the fact that the skills and techniques needed to trade these instruments are different from those needed to select the securities in which a Fund invests; and (4) lack of assurance that a liquid secondary market will exist for any particular instrument at any particular time, which, among other things, may hinder a Fund’s ability to limit exposures by closing its positions. The potential loss to a Fund from investing in certain types of futures transactions is unlimited.


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Other risks include the inability of a Fund, as the writer of covered call options, to benefit from any appreciation of the underlying securities above the exercise price, and the possible loss of the entire premium paid for options purchased by a Fund. In addition, the futures exchanges may limit the amount of fluctuation permitted in certain futures contract prices or related options during a single trading day. A Fund may be forced, therefore, to liquidate or close out a futures contract position at a disadvantageous price. There is no assurance that a counterparty in an over-the-counter option transaction will be able to perform its obligations. A Fund may use various futures contracts that are relatively new instruments without a significant trading history. As a result, there can be no assurance that an active secondary market in those contracts will develop or continue to exist. A Fund’s activities in the futures and options markets may result in higher portfolio turnover rates and additional brokerage costs, which could reduce a Fund’s yield.

Short Sales

Each Fund may make short sales as a part of overall portfolio management or to offset a potential decline in the value of a security.  A short sale involves the sale of a security that the Fund does not own, or if the Fund owns the security, is not to be delivered upon consummation of the sale.  When the Fund makes a short sale of a security that it does not own, it must borrow from a broker-dealer the security sold short and deliver the security to the broker-dealer upon conclusion of the short sale.

If the price of the security sold short increases between the time of the short sale and the time the Fund replaces the borrowed security, the Fund will incur a loss; conversely, if the price declines, the Fund will realize a short-term capital gain.  Although the Fund’s gain is limited to the price at which it sold the security short, its potential loss is theoretically unlimited.

Each Fund will fully-collateralize its shorts sales.

Typically, each Fund will only make short sales “against the box,” which occurs when the Fund enters into a short sale transaction with respect to a security it either owns or has the right to obtain at no additional cost.  However, with respect to each Fund the dollar amount of short sales at any one time (not including short sales against the box) may not exceed 25% of the net assets of the Fund, and it is expected that normally the dollar amount of such sales will not exceed 10% of the net assets of the Fund.

Participatory Notes

The Brown Advisory Global Leaders Fund, Brown Advisory – WMC Strategic European Equity Fund, and Brown Advisory Emerging Markets Select Fund may invest in participatory notes which are issued by banks or broker-dealers and that are designed to replicate the performance of certain corporate issuers and markets. Participatory notes are a type of equity-linked derivative which generally are traded over-the-counter. The performance results of participatory notes will not replicate exactly the performance of the corporate issuers or markets that the notes seek to replicate due to transaction costs and other expenses. Investments in participatory notes involve the same risks associated with a direct investment in the shares of the companies the notes seek to replicate. The holder of a participatory note that is linked to a particular underlying security or instrument may be entitled to receive any dividends paid in connection with that underlying security or instrument, but typically does not receive voting rights as is would if it directly owned the underlying security or instrument. In addition, participatory notes are subject to counterparty risk, which is the risk that the broker-dealer or bank that issues the notes will not fulfill its contractual obligation to complete the transaction with the Fund. Participatory notes constitute general unsecured contractual obligations of the banks or broker-dealers that issue them, and the Fund is relying on the creditworthiness of such banks or broker-dealers and has no rights under a participatory note against the issuers of the securities underlying such participatory notes. Participatory notes involve transaction costs. Participatory notes may be considered illiquid and, therefore, participatory notes considered illiquid will be subject to the Fund’s percentage limitation for investments in illiquid securities.

Master Limited Partnerships (“MLPs”)

The Brown Advisory Equity Income Fund may invest up to 25% of its net assets in publicly traded Master Limited Partnerships (“MLPs”). MLPs are businesses organized as limited partnerships that trade their proportionate shares

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of the partnership (units) on a public exchange.  MLPs are required to pay out most or all of their earnings in distributions.  Generally speaking, MLP investment returns are enhanced during periods of declining or low interest rates and tend to be negatively influenced when interest rates are rising.  As an income vehicle, the unit price may be influenced by general interest rate trends independent of specific underlying fundamentals.  In addition, most MLPs are fairly leveraged and typically carry a portion of “floating” rate debt.  As such, a significant upward swing in interest rates would also drive interest expense higher.  Furthermore, most MLPs grow by acquisitions partly financed by debt, and higher interest rates could make it more difficult to make acquisitions.

Risks. Investing in Master Limited Partnerships (“MLPs”) entails risks related to fluctuations in energy prices, decreases in the supply of or demand for energy commodities, decreases in demand for MLPs in rising interest rate environments, unique tax consequences, such as treatment as a qualifying security investment by the Fund only to a limited extent, due to the partnership structure, and potentially limited liquidity.

While most MLPs are currently subject to U.S. Federal tax as partnerships, a change in current tax law, or a change in the underlying business of a given MLP, could result in the MLP being treated as a corporation for U.S. Federal tax purposes, which would result in such MLP being required to pay U.S. Federal income tax on its taxable income. Such treatment also would have the effect of reducing the amount of cash available for distribution by the affected MLP, thus, if any MLP owned by the Fund were treated as a corporation for U.S. Federal tax purposes, such treatment could result in a reduction in the value of the Fund’s investment in such MLP.

Illiquid and Restricted Securities

Illiquid Investments. A Fund may not acquire any illiquid investment if, immediately after the acquisition, the Fund would have invested more than 15% of its net assets in illiquid investments that are assets. An “illiquid investment” is any investment that may not reasonably be expected to be sold or disposed of in current market conditions in seven calendar days or less without the sale or disposition significantly changing the market value of the investment. The Adviser will monitor the amount of illiquid investments in each Fund’s portfolio, under the supervision of the Board, to ensure compliance with the Fund’s investment restrictions. If securities that were liquid at the time of purchase subsequently become illiquid and result in the Fund holding illiquid investments in excess of 15% of its net assets, the Fund will no longer purchase additional illiquid investments and will reduce its holdings of illiquid investments in an orderly manner, but it is not required to dispose of illiquid holdings immediately if it is not in the interest of the Fund.

Historically, illiquid investments have included securities subject to contractual or legal restrictions on resale because they have not been registered under the Securities Act of 1933, as amended (the “Securities Act”), securities which are otherwise not readily marketable and repurchase agreements having a maturity of longer than seven days. As described below, in some cases, securities subject to legal or contractual restrictions on resales may not be deemed to be illiquid (see “Restricted Securities” below). Mutual funds do not typically hold a significant amount of these illiquid securities because of the potential for delays on resale and uncertainty in valuation. Limitations on resale may have an adverse effect on the marketability of portfolio securities, and a Fund might be unable to dispose of illiquid investment promptly or at reasonable prices and might thereby experience difficulty satisfying redemption requests within seven days.

The Funds have adopted a liquidity risk management program (the “LRM Program”) pursuant to which each Fund identifies illiquid investments. Under the LRM Program, the Adviser has been designated to administer the LRM Program and the Adviser has in turn delegated certain responsibilities to a Liquidity Risk Management Committee, which is comprised of certain operations, compliance, trading, and portfolio management representatives of the Adviser. The Adviser preliminarily identifies illiquid investments based on, among other things, the trading characteristics and market depth of a particular investment.

The Adviser classifies all portfolio holdings of a Fund at least monthly into one of four liquidity classifications pursuant to the procedure set forth in the LRM Program. The liquidity classifications, which are defined in Rule 22e-4 under the 1940 Act, are highly liquid, moderately liquid, less liquid, and illiquid investments. In determining these classifications, the Adviser will consider the relevant market, trading, and investment-specific considerations for a particular investment. Moreover, in making such classification determinations, the Adviser must determine whether trading varying portions of a position in a particular portfolio investment or asset class would be reasonably

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expected to significantly affect a Fund’s liquidity. In addition, the Adviser may also consider the following factors in its liquidity determinations: (i) the existence of an active market; (ii) whether the investment is exchange-traded; (iii) frequency of trades or quotes and average daily trading volume; (iv) volatility of trading prices; (v) bid-ask spreads; (vi) whether the asset has a relatively standardized and simple structure; (vii) the maturity and date of issue (as applicable); and (viii) any restrictions on transfer.

Restricted Securities. The Funds may invest in securities that are subject to restrictions on resale because they have not been registered under the Securities Act. These securities are sometimes referred to as private placements. Although securities which may be resold only to “qualified institutional buyers” in accordance with the provisions of Rule 144A under the Securities Act are technically considered “restricted securities,” the Funds may purchase Rule 144A securities without regard to the limitation on investments in illiquid securities described above in the “Illiquid Investments” section, provided that a determination is made that such securities have a readily available trading market. The Funds may also purchase certain commercial paper issued in reliance on the exemption from regulations in Section 4(a)(2) of the Securities Act (“4(a)(2) Paper”). The Adviser and/or Sub-Advisers, as appropriate, will determine the liquidity of Rule 144A securities and 4(a)(2) Paper under the supervision of the Adviser and the Board. The liquidity of Rule 144A securities and 4(a)(2) Paper will be monitored by the Adviser and/or Sub-Advisers, as appropriate, and if as a result of changed conditions it is determined that a Rule 144A security or 4(a)(2) Paper is no longer liquid, a Fund’s holdings of illiquid securities will be reviewed to determine what action, if any, is appropriate. A Fund may determine that it is appropriate to continue to hold such instrument for a period of time to avoid a distressed sale which would be harmful to shareholders.

Limitations on the resale of restricted securities may have an adverse effect on the marketability of portfolio securities and a Fund might be unable to dispose of restricted securities promptly or at reasonable prices and might thereby experience difficulty satisfying redemption requirements. A Fund might also have to register such restricted securities in order to dispose of them, resulting in additional expense and delay. Adverse market conditions could impede such a public offering of securities.

Determination of Liquidity

The Board has the ultimate responsibility for determining whether specific securities are liquid or illiquid and has delegated the function of making determinations of liquidity to the Valuation Committee and the Adviser, pursuant to guidelines approved by the Board. The Adviser and/or the Sub-Advisers (under the supervision of the Adviser), determines and monitors the liquidity of the portfolio securities and reports periodically on their decisions to the Board. In making such determinations they take into account a number of factors in reaching liquidity decisions, including but not limited to: (1) the frequency of trades and quotations for the security; (2) the number of dealers willing to purchase or sell the security and the number of other potential buyers; (3) the willingness of dealers to undertake to make a market in the security; and (4) the nature of the marketplace trades, including the time needed to dispose of the security, the method of soliciting offers and the mechanics of the transfer.

Private placement and other restricted securities may be considered illiquid securities as they typically are subject to restrictions on resale as a matter of contract or under federal securities laws. Restricted securities that are “illiquid” are subject to the Fund’s policy of not investing more than 15% of its net assets in illiquid securities. The Adviser and/or Sub-Advisers will evaluate the liquidity characteristics of restricted securities on a case-by-case basis and will consider the factors described above in connection with its evaluation.

An institutional market has developed for certain restricted securities. Accordingly, contractual or legal restrictions on the resale of a security may not be indicative of the liquidity of the security. If such securities are eligible for purchase by institutional buyers in accordance with Rule 144A under the 1933 Act or other exemptions, the Adviser and/or Sub-Advisers may determine that the securities are liquid.

Risks. Limitations on resale may have an adverse effect on the marketability of a security and the Fund might also have to register a restricted security in order to dispose of it, resulting in expense and delay. The Fund might not be able to dispose of private placements, restricted or illiquid securities promptly or at reasonable prices and might thereby experience difficulty satisfying redemption requests. There can be no assurance that a liquid market will exist for any security at any particular time. Any security, including securities determined by the Adviser to be liquid, can become illiquid.

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Investment Company Securities

Open-End and Closed-End Investment Companies

General. Each Fund may invest in other open-end and closed-end investment companies consistent with the Fund’s investment objectives and strategies. Each Fund may also invest in money market mutual funds, pending investment of cash balances. Each Fund will limit its investment in the securities of other open-end and closed-end investment companies to the extent permitted by the 1940 Act and the rules, regulations and exemptive orders thereuender. With certain exceptions, such provisions generally permit the Funds to invest up to 5% of their assets in another investment company, up to 10% of their assets in investment companies generally and hold up to 3% of the shares of another investment company, and may invest greater than 10% of their assets in other investment companies subject to applicable provisions of the 1940 Act and the rules adopted thereunder. The Funds’ investment in other investment companies may include money market mutual funds, which are not subject to certain of the percentage limitations set forth above. The Funds may invest in investment companies in excess of the statutory limits imposed by the 1940 Act in reliance on Rule 12d1-4 under the 1940 Act. These investments in other investment companies are subject to the applicable conditions of Rule 12d1-4, which, among other things, imposes certain limits on the investments and operations of the underlying investment company (including such underlying fund’s ability to invest in other investment companies and certain structured finance vehicles).

Risks. Each Fund, as a shareholder of another investment company, will bear its pro-rata portion of the other investment company’s advisory fee and other expenses, in addition to its own expenses and will be exposed to the investment risks associated with the other investment company. To the extent that the Fund invests in closed-end companies that invest primarily in the common stock of companies located outside the United States, see the risks related to foreign securities set forth in the section entitled “Investment Policies and Risks – Equity Securities – Foreign Securities Risks” above.

Exchange-Traded Funds and Exchange-Traded Notes

General. Each Fund may invest in exchange-traded funds (“ETFs”). ETFs are investment companies that are bought and sold on a securities exchange. An ETF represents a fixed portfolio of securities designed to track a particular market segment or index. Each Fund may also invest in exchange-traded notes (“ETNs”), which are structured debt securities. Whereas ETFs’ liabilities are secured by their portfolio securities, ETNs’ liabilities are unsecured general obligations of the issuer. Most ETFs and ETNs are designed to track a particular market segment or index. ETFs and ETNs have expenses associated with their operation, typically including, with respect to ETFs, advisory fees. When a Fund invests in an ETF or ETN, in addition to directly bearing expenses associated with its own operations, it will bear its pro rata portion of the ETF’s or ETN’s expenses. A Fund’s investments in ETFs are also subject to the limitations on investments in other investment companies discussed above.

Risks. The risks of owning an ETF or ETN generally reflect the risks of owning the underlying market segment or index it is designed to track. Lack of liquidity in an ETF, however, could result in it being more volatile than the underlying portfolio of securities. In addition, a Fund will incur expenses in connection with investing in ETFs and ETNs that may increase the cost of investing in the ETF or ETN versus the cost of directly owning the securities in the ETF or an ETN. The value of an ETN security should also be expected to fluctuate with the credit rating of the issuer.

Trust Securities and Unit Investment Trusts

General. The Funds may invest in trusts and unit investment trusts (“UITs”), including HOLDRS. HOLDRS are trust-issued receipts that represent beneficial ownership in the specific group of stocks held by the issuing trust. UITs are registered investment companies that are similarly unmanaged, or passively managed, and as such generally hold a static portfolio of securities, or track an index. The liabilities of trusts (including HOLDRS trusts) and UITs incur some expenses in connection with their operations; thus, when the Fund invests in a trust, HOLDR or UIT, in addition to directly bearing expenses associated with its own operations, it will bear its pro rata portion of the trust’s, HOLDRS’ or UIT’s expenses. Like ETFs, HOLDRS are exchange-listed and, therefore, may be

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purchased and sold on the secondary market. Each Fund will limit its investment in the securities of trusts and unit investment trusts to the extent permitted by the 1940 Act.

Risks. The risks of owning a trust security (including a HOLDR) or a UIT security generally reflect the risks of owning the securities in the trust or UIT’s portfolio. Due to the unmanaged or passively managed nature of such vehicles, the relative weights of their portfolio securities may change over time, resulting in a change in the nature of the investment. In addition, due to the additional expenses associated with trusts (including HOLDRS trusts) and UITs, it may be more costly to own their securities than it would be directly to own their portfolio securities. In addition, there could be a lack of liquidity in the secondary market for HOLDRS, which could cause the market for HOLDRS to be more volatile than the market for the underlying portfolio securities.

Other Pooled Investment Vehicles

General. Each Fund may invest in pooled investment vehicles, including limited partnerships. Examples of such vehicles include private equity funds and private equity funds of funds. A private equity fund generally invests in non-public companies that the fund’s manager believes will experience significant growth over a certain time period. A private equity fund of funds invests in other private equity funds of the type described. Investments in private equity funds, once made, typically may not be redeemed for several years, though they may be sold to other investors under certain circumstances. Each Fund will limit its investment in the securities of pooled investment vehicles, including limited partnerships, to the extent permitted by the 1940 Act.

Risks. To the extent that a Fund invests in Pooled Investment Vehicles, such investments generally will be deemed illiquid. (See “Illiquid and Restricted Securities” for the risks of investing in illiquid securities above). If such an investment is determined by the Adviser or Sub-Adviser to be illiquid, it is subject to each Fund’s policy of not investing more than 15% of its net assets in illiquid securities. In addition, a Fund will bear its ratable share of such vehicles’ expenses, including its management expenses and performance fees. Performance fees are fees paid to the vehicle’s manager based on the vehicle’s investment performance (or returns) as compared to some benchmark. The fees a Fund pays to invest in a Pooled Investment Vehicle may be higher than the fees it would pay if the manager of the Pooled Investment Vehicle managed the Fund’s assets directly. Further, the performance fees payable to the manager of a Pooled Investment Vehicle may create an incentive for the manager to make investments that are riskier or more speculative than those it might make in the absence of an incentive fee.

Fixed Income Securities

Municipal Securities

General. The Brown Advisory Intermediate Income Fund, Brown Advisory Sustainable Bond Fund, Brown Advisory Maryland Bond Fund, Brown Advisory Tax-Exempt Bond Fund, Brown Advisory Tax-Exempt Sustainable Bond Fund, and Brown Advisory Mortgage Securities Fund may invest in municipal securities. Municipal securities are issued by the states, territories and possessions of the United States, their political subdivisions (such as cities, counties and towns) and various authorities (such as public housing or redevelopment authorities), instrumentalities, public corporations and special districts (such as water, sewer or sanitary districts) of the states, territories, and possessions of the United States or their political subdivisions. In addition, municipal securities include securities issued by or on behalf of public authorities to finance various privately operated facilities, such as industrial development bonds, that are backed only by the assets and revenues of the non-governmental user (such as hospitals and airports). The Brown Advisory Intermediate Income Fund, the Brown Advisory Maryland Bond Fund, the Brown Advisory Tax-Exempt Bond Fund and the Brown Advisory Tax-Exempt Sustainable Bond Fund may invest up to 5% of their total assets in municipal securities of issuers located in any one territory or possession of the United States. The Brown Advisory Tax-Exempt Bond Fund and the Brown Advisory Tax-Exempt Sustainable Bond Fund will not invest in municipal securities rated “B” or lower by an NRSRO (or if unrated, determined by the Adviser to be of comparable quality) at the time of purchase.

Municipal securities are issued to obtain funds for a variety of public purposes, including general financing for state and local governments, or financing for specific projects or public facilities. Municipal securities are classified as general obligation or revenue bonds or notes. General obligation securities are secured by the issuer’s pledge of its full faith, credit and taxing power for the payment of principal and interest. Revenue securities are payable from

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revenue derived from a particular facility, class of facilities, or the proceeds of a special excise tax or other specific revenue source, but not from the issuer’s general taxing power. The Fund will not invest more than 25% of its total assets in a single type of revenue bond. Private activity bonds and industrial revenue bonds do not carry the pledge of the credit of the issuing municipality, but generally are guaranteed by the corporate entity on whose behalf they are issued.

Municipal leases are entered into by state and local governments and authorities to acquire equipment and facilities such as fire and sanitation vehicles, telecommunications equipment, and other assets. Municipal leases (which normally provide for title to the leased assets to pass eventually to the government issuer) have evolved as a means for governmental issuers to acquire property and equipment without meeting the constitutional and statutory requirements for the issuance of debt. The debt-issuance limitations of many state constitutions and statutes are deemed to be inapplicable because of the inclusion in many leases or contracts of “non-appropriation” clauses that provide that the governmental issuer has no obligation to make future payments under the lease or contract unless money is appropriated for such purpose by the appropriate legislative body on a yearly or other periodic basis.

Maryland Municipal Securities. The Brown Advisory Maryland Bond Fund invests at least 80% of the value of its net assets (plus borrowing for investments purposes) in Maryland bonds, including bonds issued on behalf of the state of Maryland, its local government and public financing authorities.

The Brown Advisory Maryland Bond Fund may invest up to 5% of its total assets in municipal securities of issuers located in any one territory or possession of the United States. The Fund will not invest in municipal securities rated ‘B’ or lower by an NRSRO at the time of purchase.

Tender Option Bond Securities. The Brown Advisory Maryland Bond Fund, Brown Advisory Tax-Exempt Bond Fund, and Brown Advisory Tax-Exempt Sustainable Bond Fund may invest in tender option bond (“TOB”) securities. In a typical TOB transaction, a Fund or another party deposits fixed-rate municipal bonds or other securities into a special purposes entity, referred to as a tender option bond trust (a “TOB Trust”). The TOB Trust generally issues short-term floating rate interests (“Floaters”), which are generally sold to third party investors (often money market funds) and residual interests (“Residual Interests”), which are generally held by the Fund or party that contributed the securities to the TOB Trust. The interest rates payable on the Residual Interests bear an inverse relationship to the interest rate on the Floaters. The interest rate on the Floaters is reset by a remarketing process typically every 7 to 35 days. After income is paid on the Floaters at current, short-term rates, the residual income from the underlying bond held by the TOB Trust goes to the Residual Interests. If a Fund is the depositor of the municipal bonds or other securities to the TOB Trust, the Fund will receive the proceeds from the TOB Trust’s sale of the Floaters, less certain transaction costs. These proceeds may be used by the Fund to invest in other securities, which would have a leveraging effect on the Fund. Each Fund does not currently intend to invest in Residual Interests issued by a TOB Trust that was not formed for the Fund, although each Fund reserves the right to do so in the future. Each of the Brown Advisory Maryland Bond Fund, the Brown Advisory Tax-Exempt Bond Fund and the Brown Advisory Tax-Exempt Sustainable Bond Fund may invest up to 5% of its net assets in TOB Trust-related investments.

Residual Interests may be more volatile and less liquid than other municipal bonds of comparable maturity. In most circumstances, the holder of the Residual Interests bears substantially all of the underlying bond’s downside investment risk and also benefits from any appreciation in the value of the underlying bond. Investments in Residual Interests typically will involve greater risk than investments in the underlying municipal bond, including the risk of loss of principal. Because changes in the interest rate on the Floaters inversely affect the residual interest paid on the Residual Interests, the value of the Residual Interests is generally more volatile than that of a fixed-rate municipal bond. Floaters and Residual Interests are subject to interest rate adjustment formulas which generally reduce or, in the extreme, eliminate the interest received by the Residual Interests when short-term interest rates rise, and increase the interest received when short-term interest rates fall.

The Residual Interests held by a Fund provide the Fund with the right to: (1) cause the holders of the Floaters to tender their notes at par, and (2) cause the sale of the underlying bond held by the TOB Trust, thereby collapsing the TOB Trust. A Fund may invest in a TOB Trust on either a non-recourse and recourse basis. Each Fund does not currently intend to invest in a TOB Trust on a recourse basis, although each Fund reserves the right to do so in the future. TOB Trusts are typically supported by a liquidity facility provided by a third-party bank or other financial

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institution (the “Liquidity Provider”) that allows the holders of the Floaters to tender their Floaters in exchange for payment of par plus accrued interest on any business day (subject to the non-occurrence of a TOTE, as such term is defined below). Depending on the structure of the TOB Trust, the Liquidity Provider may purchase the tendered Floaters, or the TOB Trust may draw upon a loan from the Liquidity Provider to purchase the tendered Floaters.

When a Fund invests in TOB Trusts on a non-recourse basis, and the Liquidity Provider is required to make a payment under the liquidity facility, the Liquidity Provider will typically liquidate all or a portion of the municipal bonds held in the TOB Trust and then fund the balance, if any, of the amount owed under the liquidity facility over the liquidation proceeds (the “Liquidation Shortfall”). If a Fund invests in a TOB Trust on a recourse basis, it will typically enter into a reimbursement agreement with the Liquidity Provider pursuant to which the Fund is required to reimburse the Liquidity Provider the amount of any Liquidation Shortfall. As a result, if the Fund invests in a recourse TOB Trust, the Fund will bear the risk of loss with respect to any Liquidation Shortfall.

The TOB Trust may also be collapsed without the consent of a Fund, as the holder of the Residual Interest, upon the occurrence of certain “tender option termination events” (or “TOTEs”) as defined in the TOB Trust agreements. Such termination events typically include the bankruptcy or default of the municipal bond, a substantial downgrade in credit quality of the municipal bond, or a judgment or ruling that interest on the underlying municipal bond is subject to federal income taxation. Upon the occurrence of a TOTE, the TOB Trust would generally be liquidated in full with the proceeds typically applied first to any accrued fees owed to the trustee, remarketing agent and liquidity provider, and then to the holders of the Floaters up to par plus accrued interest owed on the Floaters and a portion of gain share, if any, with the balance paid out to the holder of the Residual Interests. In the case of a mandatory termination event, as defined in the TOB Trust agreements, after the payment of fees, the holders of the Floaters would be paid before the holders of the Residual Interests (i.e., the Fund). In contrast, in the case of a TOTE, after payment of fees, the holders of the Floaters and the holders of the Residual Interests would be paid pro rata in proportion to the respective face values of their certificates.

Under accounting rules, securities of a Fund that are deposited into a TOB Trust are treated as investments of the Fund, and are presented on the Fund’s Schedule of Investments and outstanding Floaters issued by a TOB Trust are presented as liabilities in the Fund’s Statement of Assets and Liabilities. Interest income from the underlying security is recorded by the Fund on an accrual basis. Interest expense incurred on the Floaters and other expenses related to remarketing, administration and trustee services to a TOB Trust are reported as expenses of the Fund. In addition, under accounting rules, loans made to a TOB Trust sponsored by a Fund may be presented as loans of the Fund in the Fund’s financial statements even if there is no recourse with respect to the Fund’s assets.

Interests in Residual Interests in which a Fund will invest will pay interest or income that, in the opinion of counsel to the Funds, is exempt from regular U.S. Federal income tax. Neither the Funds, nor the Adviser, will conduct its own analysis of the tax status of the interest or income paid by the Residual Interests held by a Fund, but will rely on the opinion of counsel to the Funds. There can be no assurances that the IRS will agree with such counsel’s opinion and, accordingly, there is a risk that the IRS may find that the Fund is not the owner of the underlying municipal bond and that the Fund is therefore not entitled to treat such interest or income as exempt from U.S. Federal income tax. Moreover, the U.S. Federal income tax treatment of certain other aspects of TOB Trust-related investments is uncertain.

U.S. Government Securities

General. Each Fund may invest in U.S. Government Securities. U.S. Government Securities include securities issued by the U.S. Treasury and by U.S. Government agencies and instrumentalities. U.S. Government Securities may be supported by the full faith and credit of the United States; by the right of the issuer to borrow from the U.S. Treasury; by the discretionary authority of the U.S. Treasury to lend to the issuer; or solely by the creditworthiness of the issuer. Holders of U.S. Government Securities not backed by the full faith and credit of the United States must look principally to the agency or instrumentality issuing the obligation for repayment and may not be able to assert a claim against the United States in the event that the agency or instrumentality does not meet its commitment. No assurance can be given that the U.S. Government would provide support if it were not obligated to do so by law. Neither the U.S. Government nor any of its agencies or instrumentalities guarantees the market value of the securities they issue. On September 7, 2008, the Federal Housing Finance Agency (the “FHFA”) placed Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac into conservatorship, which, in effect, has caused Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac to become

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supported by the U.S. Government.  No assurance can be given as to whether the U.S. Government will continue to support Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac.

Yields on short-, intermediate- and long-term U.S. government securities are dependent on a variety of factors, including the general conditions of the money and bond markets, the size of a particular offering and the maturity of the obligation. Debt securities with longer maturities tend to produce higher capital appreciation and depreciation than obligations with shorter maturities and lower yields. The market value of U.S. government securities generally varies inversely with changes in the market interest rates. An increase in interest rates, therefore, generally would reduce the market value of a Fund’s portfolio investments in U.S. government securities, while a decline in interest rates generally would increase the market value of a Fund’s portfolio investments in these securities.

Corporate Debt Obligations

General. Each Fund may invest in corporate debt obligations. Corporate debt obligations include corporate bonds, debentures, notes, commercial paper and other similar corporate debt instruments. These instruments are used by companies to borrow money from investors. The issuer pays the investor a fixed or variable rate of interest and must repay the amount borrowed at maturity. Commercial paper (short-term unsecured promissory notes) is issued by companies to finance their current obligations and normally has a maturity of less than 9 months. The Funds may also invest in corporate fixed income securities registered and sold in the U.S. by foreign issuers (Yankee bonds) and those sold outside the U.S. by foreign or U.S. issuers (Eurobonds).

Mortgage-Backed Securities

General. The Brown Advisory Intermediate Income Fund, Brown Advisory Sustainable Bond Fund, Brown Advisory Maryland Bond Fund, Brown Advisory Tax-Exempt Bond Fund, Brown Advisory Tax-Exempt Sustainable Bond Fund, and Brown Advisory Mortgage Securities Fund may invest in mortgage-backed securities. Mortgage-backed securities represent interests in a pool of mortgage loans originated by lenders such as commercial banks, savings associations and mortgage bankers and brokers. Mortgage-backed securities may be issued by governmental or government-related entities or by non-governmental entities such as special purpose trusts created by commercial lenders.

Pools of mortgages consist of whole mortgage loans or participations in mortgage loans. The majority of these loans are made to purchasers of 1-4 family homes. The terms and characteristics of the mortgage instruments are generally uniform within a pool but may vary among pools. For example, in addition to fixed-rate, fixed-term mortgages, the Fund may purchase pools of adjustable-rate mortgages, growing equity mortgages, graduated payment mortgages and other types. Mortgage poolers apply qualification standards to lending institutions, which originate mortgages for the pools as well as credit standards and underwriting criteria for individual mortgages included in the pools. In addition, many mortgages included in pools are insured through private mortgage insurance companies.

Mortgage-backed securities differ from other forms of fixed income securities, which normally provide for periodic payment of interest in fixed amounts with principal payments at maturity or on specified call dates. Most mortgage-backed securities, however, are pass-through securities, which means that investors receive payments consisting of a pro-rata share of both principal and interest (less servicing and other fees), as well as unscheduled prepayments, as loans in the underlying mortgage pool are paid off by the borrowers. Additional prepayments to holders of these securities are caused by prepayments resulting from the sale or foreclosure of the underlying property or refinancing of the underlying loans. As prepayment rates of individual pools of mortgage loans vary widely, it is not possible to predict accurately the average life of a particular mortgage-backed security. Although mortgage-backed securities are issued with stated maturities of up to forty years, unscheduled or early payments of principal and interest on the mortgages may shorten considerably the securities’ effective maturities.

Government and Agency Mortgage-Backed Securities. Each Fund may invest in government agency and mortgage-backed securities. The principal issuers or guarantors of mortgage-backed securities are the Government National Mortgage Association (“GNMA”), Fannie Mae (“FNMA”) and the Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation (“FHLMC” or “Freddie Mac”). GNMA, a wholly-owned U.S. Government corporation creates pass-through securities from pools of government guaranteed (Farmers’ Home Administration, Federal Housing

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Authority or Veterans Administration) mortgages. The principal and interest on GNMA pass-through securities are backed by the full faith and credit of the U.S. Government.

FNMA and Freddie Mac are U.S. Government-sponsored corporations and are subject to regulation by the Office of Federal Housing Enterprise Oversight (“OFHEO”). Both issue pass-through securities from pools of conventional and Federally insured and/or guaranteed residential mortgages. FNMA guarantees full and timely payment of all interest and principal, and FHLMC guarantees timely payment of interest and ultimate collection of principal of its pass-through securities. Mortgage-backed securities from FNMA and FHLMC are not backed by the full faith and credit of the U.S. Government. The U.S. Department of the Treasury has the authority to support FNMA and FHLMC by purchasing limited amounts of their respective obligations, and the U.S. government has, in the past, provided financial support to FNMA and FHLMC with respect to their debt obligations. However, no assurance can be given that the U.S. government will always do so or would do so yet again. Congress has been considering proposals to reduce the U.S. Government’s role in the mortgage market and whether to wind down Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac.  The proposals include, among others, whether Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac should be nationalized, privatized, restructured or eliminated.  The FHFA has announced plans to consider taking Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac out of conservatorship. It is unclear how the capital structure of Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac would be constructed post-conservatorship, and what effects, if any, the privatization of Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac will have on their creditworthiness and guarantees of certain mortgage-backed securities. Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac also are the subject of several continuing legal actions and investigations over certain accounting, disclosure and corporate governance matters, which may have an adverse effect on these entities.  As a result, the future for Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac is uncertain, as is the impact of such proposals, actions and investigations on a Fund’s investments in securities issued by Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac.

Except for U.S. Treasury securities, obligations of U.S. Government agencies and instrumentalities may or may not be supported by the full faith and credit of the United States.  Some are backed by the right of the issuer to borrow from the Treasury; others by discretionary authority of the U.S. Government to purchase the agencies’ obligations; while still others are supported only by the credit of the instrumentality. In the case of securities not backed by the full faith and credit of the United States, the investor must look principally to the agency or instrumentality issuing or guaranteeing the obligation for ultimate repayment and may not be able to assert a claim against the United States itself in the event the agency or instrumentality does not meet its commitment.  Each Fund will invest in securities of such agencies or instrumentalities only when the Adviser and/or Sub-Advisers is satisfied that the credit risk is acceptable.

Privately Issued Mortgage-Backed Securities. The Brown Advisory Intermediate Income Fund, Brown Advisory Sustainable Bond Fund, Brown Advisory Tax-Exempt Sustainable Bond Fund, and Brown Advisory Mortgage Securities Fund may invest in privately issued mortgage-backed securities. Mortgage-backed securities offered by private issuers include pass-through securities consisting of pools of residential mortgage loans, mortgage-backed bonds, which are considered to be debt obligations of the institution issuing the bonds and are collateralized by mortgage loans; and bonds and collateralized mortgage obligations that may be collateralized by mortgage-backed securities issued by GNMA, FNMA or FHLMC or by pools of conventional mortgages of multi-family or of commercial mortgage loans.

Privately-issued mortgage-backed securities generally offer a higher rate of interest (but greater credit and interest rate risk) than securities issued by U.S. Government issuers because there are no direct or indirect governmental guarantees of payment. Many non-governmental issuers or servicers of mortgage-backed securities guarantee or provide insurance for timely payment of interest and principal on the securities. The market for privately-issued mortgage-backed securities is smaller and less liquid than the market for mortgage-backed securities issued by U.S. government issuers.

Stripped Mortgage-Backed Securities. The Brown Advisory Intermediate Income Fund, Brown Advisory Sustainable Bond Fund, Brown Advisory Tax-Exempt Sustainable Bond Fund, and Brown Advisory Mortgage Securities Fund may invest in stripped mortgage-backed securities. Stripped mortgage-backed securities are multi-class mortgage-backed securities that are created by separating the securities into their principal and interest components and selling each piece separately. Stripped mortgage-backed securities are usually structured with different classes that receive different proportions of the interest and principal distributions in a pool of mortgage assets.

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Collateralized Mortgage Obligations. The Brown Advisory Intermediate Income Fund, Brown Advisory Sustainable Bond Fund, Brown Advisory Tax-Exempt Sustainable Bond Fund, and Brown Advisory Mortgage Securities Fund may invest in collateralized mortgage obligations (“CMOs”) that are collateralized by mortgage-backed securities, including those issued by GNMA, FHLMC or FNMA (“Mortgage Assets”). CMOs are multiple-class debt obligations. Payments of principal and interest on the Mortgage Assets are passed through to the holders of the CMOs as they are received, although certain classes (often referred to as “tranches”) of CMOs have priority over other classes with respect to the receipt of mortgage prepayments. Each tranche is issued at a specific or floating coupon rate and has a stated maturity or final distribution date. Interest is paid or accrues in all tranches on a monthly, quarterly or semi-annual basis. Payments of principal and interest on Mortgage Assets are commonly applied to the tranches in the order of their respective maturities or final distribution dates, so that generally, no payment of principal will be made on any tranche until all other tranches with earlier stated maturity or distribution dates have been paid in full.

Risks – Specific to Mortgage-Backed Securities. The value of mortgage-backed securities may be significantly affected by changes in interest rates, the markets’ perception of issuers, the structure of the securities and the creditworthiness of the parties involved. The ability of the Fund to successfully utilize mortgage-backed securities depends in part upon the ability of the Adviser to forecast interest rates and other economic factors correctly. Some mortgage-backed securities have structures that make their reaction to interest rate changes and other factors difficult to predict.

Prepayments of principal of mortgage-backed securities by mortgagors or mortgage foreclosures affect the average life of the mortgage-backed securities. The occurrence of mortgage prepayments is affected by various factors, including the level of interest rates, general economic conditions, the location and age of the mortgages and other social and demographic conditions. In periods of rising interest rates, the prepayment rate tends to decrease, lengthening the average life of a pool of mortgage-backed securities. In periods of falling interest rates, the prepayment rate tends to increase, shortening the average life of a pool. The volume of prepayments of principal on the mortgages underlying a particular mortgage-backed security will influence the yield of that security, affecting the Fund’s yield. Because prepayments of principal generally occur when interest rates are declining, it is likely that the Fund, to the extent it retains the same percentage of fixed income securities, may have to reinvest the proceeds of prepayments at lower interest rates than those of their previous investments. If this occurs, the Fund’s yield will correspondingly decline. Thus, mortgage-backed securities may have less potential for capital appreciation in periods of falling interest rates (when prepayment of principal is more likely) than other fixed income securities of comparable duration, although they may have a comparable risk of decline in market value in periods of rising interest rates. A decrease in the rate of prepayments may extend the effective maturities of mortgage-backed securities, increasing their sensitivity to changes in market interest rates. To the extent that the Fund purchases mortgage-backed securities at a premium, unscheduled prepayments, which are made at par, result in a loss equal to an unamortized premium.

To the extent that a Fund invests in commercial mortgage-backed securities (“CMBS”), CMBS are subject to credit risk and prepayment risk.  Although prepayment risk is present, it is of a lesser degree in CMBS than in the residential mortgage market; commercial real estate property loans often contain provisions which substantially reduce the likelihood that such securities will be prepaid (e.g., significant prepayment penalties on loans and, in some cases, prohibition on principal payments for several years following origination).

To lessen the effect of the failures by obligors on Mortgage Assets to make payments, CMOs and other mortgage-backed securities may contain elements of credit enhancement, consisting of either (1) liquidity protection; or (2) protection against losses resulting after default by an obligor on the underlying assets and allocation of all amounts recoverable directly from the obligor and through liquidation of the collateral. This protection may be provided through guarantees, insurance policies or letters of credit obtained by the issuer or sponsor from third parties, through various means of structuring the transaction or through a combination of these. The Fund will not pay any additional fees for credit enhancements for mortgage-backed securities, although the credit enhancement may increase the costs of the mortgage-backed securities.

A Fund may manage counterparty exposure for forward-settling agency mortgage-backed securities (“MBS”) transactions, including TBA purchase commitments, by requiring that such transactions be bilaterally margined.

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TBA Purchase Commitments.  The Brown Advisory Intermediate Income Fund, Brown Advisory Sustainable Bond Fund, Brown Advisory Tax-Exempt Sustainable Bond Fund, Brown Advisory Mortgage Securities Fund, and Brown Advisory – Beutel Goodman Large-Cap Value Fund may enter into “To Be Announced” (“TBA”) purchase commitments to purchase mortgage-backed securities for a fixed price at a future date. TBA purchase commitments may be considered securities in themselves and involve a risk of loss if the value of the security to be purchased declines prior to settlement date, which risk is in addition to the risk of decline in the value of the  Fund’s other assets.  In addition, the counterparty may not deliver the securities as promised.  Unsettled TBA purchase commitments are valued at the current market value of the underlying securities.  It may be expected that the Fund’s net assets will fluctuate to a greater degree when it sets aside portfolio securities to cover such purchase commitments than when it sets aside cash.  On delivery dates for such transactions, the Fund will meet its obligations from cash flow.  If the Fund chooses to dispose of the TBA security prior to its settlement, it could, as with the disposition of any other portfolio obligation, incur a gain or loss due to market fluctuation.

Asset-Backed Securities

General. Each Fund may invest in asset-backed securities. Asset-backed securities have structural characteristics similar to mortgage-backed securities but have underlying assets that are not mortgage loans or interests in mortgage loans. Asset-backed securities represent fractional interests in, or are secured by and payable from, pools of assets such as motor vehicle installment sales contracts, installment loan contracts, leases of various types of real and personal property and receivables from revolving credit (for example, credit card) agreements. Assets are securitized through the use of trusts and special purpose corporations that issue securities that are often backed by a pool of assets representing the obligations of a number of different parties. Repayments relating to the assets underlying the asset-backed securities depend largely on the cash flows generated by such assets. The credit quality of most asset-backed securities depends primarily on the credit quality of the assets underlying such securities, how well the entity issuing the security is insulated from the credit risk of the originator or any other affiliated entities, and the amount and quality of any credit enhancements associated with the securities. Payments or distributions of principal and interest on asset-backed securities may be supported by credit enhancements including letters of credit, an insurance guarantee, reserve funds and over collateralization. Asset-backed securities have structures and characteristics similar to those of mortgage-backed securities and, accordingly, are subject to many of the same risks, although often, to a greater extent.

Risks – Specific to Asset-Backed Securities. Like mortgages-backed securities, the collateral underlying asset-backed securities are subject to prepayment, which may reduce the overall return to holders of asset-backed securities. Asset-backed securities present certain additional and unique risks. Primarily, these securities do not always have the benefit of a security interest in collateral comparable to the security interests associated with mortgage-backed securities. Credit card receivables are generally unsecured and the debtors are entitled to the protection of a number of state and Federal consumer credit laws, many of which give such debtors the right to set-off certain amounts owed on the credit cards, thereby reducing the balance due. Automobile receivables generally are secured by automobiles. Most issuers of automobile receivables permit the loan servicers to retain possession of the underlying obligations. If the servicer were to sell these obligations to another party, there is a risk that the purchaser would acquire an interest superior to that of the holders of the asset-backed securities. In addition, because of the large number of vehicles involved in a typical issuance and the technical requirements under state laws, the trustee for the holders of the automobile receivables may not have a proper security interest in the underlying automobiles. As a result, the risk that recovery on repossessed collateral might be unavailable or inadequate to support payments on asset-backed securities is greater for asset-backed securities than for mortgage-backed securities. In addition, because asset-backed securities are relatively new, the market experience in these securities is limited and the market’s ability to sustain liquidity through all phases of an interest rate or economic cycle has not been tested.

Variable Amount Master Demand Notes

General. Each Fund may invest in variable amount master demand notes. Variable amount master demand notes are unsecured demand notes that permit investment of fluctuating amounts of money at variable rates of interest pursuant to arrangements with issuers who meet certain quality criteria. All variable amount master demand notes acquired by a Fund will be payable within a prescribed notice period not to exceed seven days.

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Variable and Floating Rate Securities

Each Fund may invest in variable and floating rate securities. Fixed Income securities that have variable or floating rates of interest may, under certain limited circumstances, have varying principal amounts. These securities pay interest at rates that are adjusted periodically according to a specified formula, usually with reference to one or more interest rate indices or market interest rates (the “underlying index”). The interest paid on these securities is a function primarily of the underlying index upon which the interest rate adjustments are based. These adjustments minimize changes in the market value of the obligation. Similar to fixed rate debt instruments, variable and floating rate instruments are subject to changes in value based on changes in market interest rates or changes in the issuer’s creditworthiness. The rate of interest on securities may be tied to U.S. Government Securities or indices on those securities as well as any other rate of interest or index, such as the London Interbank Offered Rate ("LIBOR"). As of January 1, 2022, the Financial Conduct Authority (“FCA”), the United Kingdom’s financial regulatory body and regulator of LIBOR, ceased its active encouragement of banks to provide the quotations needed to sustain most LIBOR rates due to the absence of an active market for interbank unsecured lending and other reasons. In connection with supervisory guidance from U.S. regulators, some U.S. regulated entities have generally ceased entering into new LIBOR contracts with limited exceptions. On March 15, 2022, the Adjustable Interest Rate (LIBOR) Act was signed into law. This law provides a statutory fallback mechanism on a nationwide basis to replace LIBOR with a benchmark rate that is selected by the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System and based on SOFR (defined below) for tough legacy contracts. On February 27, 2023, the Federal Reserve System’s final rule in connection with this law became effective, establishing benchmark replacements based on SOFR and Term SOFR (a forward-looking measurement of market expectations of SOFR implied from certain derivatives markets) for applicable tough legacy contracts governed by U.S. law. In addition, the FCA has announced that it will require the publication of synthetic LIBOR for the one-month, three-month and six-month U.S. dollar LIBOR settings after June 30, 2023 through at least September 30, 2024. Although the transition process away from LIBOR for many instruments has been completed, some LIBOR use is continuing and there are potential effects related to the transition away from LIBOR or continued use of LIBOR on a Fund.

In June 2017, the Alternative Reference Rates Committee, a group of large U.S. banks working with the Federal Reserve, announced a replacement for LIBOR, the Secured Overnight Funding Rate ("SOFR"). The Federal Reserve Bank of New York began publishing the SOFR in April 2018, which is a broad measure of the cost of overnight borrowing of cash collateralized by Treasury securities. SOFR is intended to serve as a reference rate for U.S. dollar-based debt and derivatives and ultimately reduce the markets' dependence on LIBOR. At times, SOFR has proven to be more volatile than the 3-month LIBOR. Bank working groups and regulators in other countries have suggested other alternatives for their markets, including the Sterling Overnight Interbank Average Rate (“SONIA”) in the UK.

Alteration of the terms of a debt instrument or a modification of the terms of other types of contracts to replace LIBOR or another interbank offered rate (“IBOR”) with a new reference rate could result in a taxable exchange and the realization of income and gain/loss for U.S. Federal income tax purposes. The IRS has issued final regulations regarding the tax consequences of the transition from IBOR to a new reference rate in debt instruments and non-debt contracts. Under the final regulations, alteration or modification of the terms of a debt instrument to replace an operative rate that uses a discontinued IBOR with a qualified rate (as defined in the final regulations) including true up payments equalizing the fair market value of contracts before and after such IBOR transition, to add a qualified rate as a fallback rate to a contract whose operative rate uses a discontinued IBOR or to replace a fallback rate that uses a discontinued IBOR with a qualified rate would not be taxable. The IRS may provide additional guidance, with potential retroactive effect.

Variable and floating rate demand notes of corporations are redeemable upon a specified period of notice. These obligations include master demand notes that permit investment of fluctuating amounts at varying interest rates under direct arrangements with the issuer of the instrument. The issuer of these obligations often has the right, after a given period, to prepay the outstanding principal amount of the obligations upon a specified number of days’ notice.

Certain securities may have an initial principal amount that varies over time based on an interest rate index, and, accordingly, the Fund might be entitled to less than the initial principal amount of the security upon the security’s

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maturity. A Fund intends to purchase these securities only when the Adviser believes the interest income from the instrument justifies any principal risks associated with the instrument. The Adviser may attempt to limit any potential loss of principal by purchasing similar instruments that are intended to provide an offsetting increase in principal. There can be no assurance that the Adviser will be able to limit the effects of principal fluctuations and, accordingly, the Fund may incur losses on those securities even if held to maturity without issuer default.

There may not be an active secondary market for any particular floating or variable rate instruments, which could make it difficult for a Fund to dispose of the instrument during periods that the Fund is not entitled to exercise any demand rights it may have. The Fund could, for this or other reasons, suffer a loss with respect to those instruments. The Adviser monitors the liquidity of the Fund’s investment in variable and floating rate instruments, but there can be no guarantee that an active secondary market will exist.

Non-U.S. Dollar Denominated Securities and Other Fixed Income Securities

Each Fund may invest in short-term money market instruments issued in the U.S. or abroad, denominated in U.S. dollars or any foreign currency. Short-term money market instruments include repurchase agreements, short-term fixed or variable rate certificates of deposit, time deposits with a maturity no greater than 180 days, bankers’ acceptances, commercial paper rated A-1 by S&P or Prime-1 by Moody’s or in similar other money market securities. Certificates of deposit represent an institution’s obligation to repay funds deposited with it that earn a specified interest rate over a given period. Bankers’ acceptances are negotiable obligations of a bank to pay a draft, which has been drawn by a customer, and are usually backed by goods in international trade. Time deposits are non-negotiable deposits with a banking institution that earn a specified interest rate over a given period. Certificates of deposit and time deposits generally may be withdrawn on demand by the Fund but may be subject to early withdrawal penalties that could reduce the Fund’s performance.

Each Fund may also invest in other high quality fixed income securities denominated in U.S. dollars, any foreign currency or in a multi-national currency unit (e.g. the European Currency Unit).

Each Fund may invest in non-U.S. dollar denominated securities including debt obligations denominated in foreign or composite currencies (such as the European Currency Unit) issued by (1) foreign national, provincial, state or municipal governments or their political subdivisions; (2) international organizations designated or supported by governmental entities (e.g., the World Bank and the European Community); (3) non-dollar securities issued by the U.S. Government; and (4) foreign corporations.

Inflation-Protected Securities.

Each Fund may invest in U.S. Treasury Inflation Protected Securities (“U.S. TIPS”), to the extent permitted by the Prospectus. U.S. TIPS are fixed income securities issued by the U.S. Department of Treasury, the principal amounts of which are adjusted daily based upon changes in the rate of inflation. The Fund may also invest in other inflation-protected securities issued by non-U.S. governments or by private issuers. U.S. TIPS pay interest on a semi-annual basis, equal to a fixed percentage of the inflation-adjusted principal amount. The interest rate on these bonds is fixed at issuance, but over the life of the bond this interest may be paid on an increasing or decreasing principal value that has been adjusted for inflation.

Repayment of the original bond principal upon maturity (as adjusted for inflation) is guaranteed for U.S. TIPS, even during a period of deflation. However, because the principal amount of U.S. TIPS would be adjusted downward during a period of deflation, the Fund will be subject to deflation risk with respect to its investments in these securities. In addition, the current market value of the bonds is not guaranteed, and will fluctuate. If the Fund purchases in the secondary market U.S. TIPS whose principal values have been adjusted upward due to inflation since issuance, the Fund may experience a loss if there is a subsequent period of deflation. The Fund may also invest in other inflation-related bonds which may or may not provide a guarantee of principal. If a guarantee of principal is not provided, the adjusted principal value of the bond repaid at maturity may be less than the original principal amount.

The periodic adjustment of U.S. TIPS is currently tied to the Consumer Price Index for All Urban Consumers (“CPI-U”), which is calculated by the U.S. Department of Treasury. The CPI-U is a measurement of changes in the cost of

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living, made up of components such as housing, food, transportation and energy. Inflation-protected bonds issued by a non-U.S. government are generally adjusted to reflect a comparable inflation index, calculated by that government. There can no assurance that the CPI-U or any non-U.S. inflation index will accurately measure the real rate of inflation in the prices of goods and services. If interest rates rise due to reasons other than inflation (for example, due to changes in currency exchange rates), investors in these securities may not be protected to the extent that the increase is not reflected in the bond’s inflation measure. In addition, there can be no assurance that the rate of inflation in a non-U.S. country will be correlated to the rate of inflation in the United States.

In general, the value of inflation-protected bonds is expected to fluctuate in response to changes in real interest rates, which are in turn tied to the relationship between nominal interest rates and the rate of inflation. Therefore, if inflation were to rise at a faster rate than nominal interest rates, real interest rates might decline, leading to an increase in value of inflation-protected bonds. In contrast, if nominal interest rates increased at a faster rate than inflation, real interest rates might rise, leading to a decrease in value of inflation-protected bonds. If inflation is lower than expected during the period the Fund holds the security, the Fund may earn less on the security than on a conventional bond. Any increase in principal value is taxable in the year the increase occurs, even though holders do not receive cash representing the increase at that time. As a result, when the Fund invests in inflation-protected securities, it could be required at times to liquidate other investments, including when it is not advantageous to do so, in order to satisfy its distribution requirements as a regulated investment company (“RIC”) and to eliminate any fund-level income tax liability under the Code.

Infrastructure Investments.

Each Fund may invest in securities and other obligations of U.S. and non-U.S. issuers providing exposure to infrastructure investment.  Infrastructure investments may be related to physical structures and networks that provide necessary services to society, such as transportation and communications networks, water and energy utilities, and public service facilities.  Securities, instruments and obligations of infrastructure-related companies and projects are more susceptible to adverse economic or regulatory occurrences affecting their industries.  Infrastructure companies may be subject to a variety of factors that may adversely affect their business or operations, including high interest costs in connection with capital construction programs, high leverage, costs associated with environmental and other regulations, the effects of economic slowdown, surplus capacity, increased competition from other providers of services, uncertainties concerning the availability of fuel at reasonable prices, the effects of energy conservation policies and other factors.  Infrastructure companies and projects also may be affected by or subject to (i) regulation by various government authorities, including rate regulation; (ii) service interruption due to environmental, operational or other mishaps; (iii) the imposition of special tariffs and changes in tax laws, regulatory policies and accounting standards; and (iv) general changes in market sentiment towards infrastructure and utilities assets.

Short-Term Instruments

Each Fund may invest in short-term money market instruments issued in the U.S. or abroad, denominated in U.S. dollars or any foreign currency. Short-term money market instruments include repurchase agreements, short-term fixed or variable rate certificates of deposit, time deposits with a maturity no greater than 180 days, bankers’ acceptances, commercial paper rated A-1 by S&P or Prime-1 by Moody’s or in similar other money market securities. Certificates of deposit represent an institution’s obligation to repay funds deposited with it that earn a specified interest rate over a given period. Bankers’ acceptances are negotiable obligations of a bank to pay a draft, which has been drawn by a customer, and are usually backed by goods in international trade. Time deposits are non-negotiable deposits with a banking institution that earn a specified interest rate over a given period. Certificates of deposit and time deposits generally may be withdrawn on demand by the Fund but may be subject to early withdrawal penalties that could reduce the Fund’s performance.

Each Fund may also invest in other high quality fixed income securities denominated in U.S. dollars, any foreign currency or in a multi-national currency unit (e.g. the European Currency Unit).

Risks of Debt Securities

General. Yields on debt securities, including municipal securities, are dependent on a variety of factors, including the general conditions of the debt securities markets, the size of a particular offering, the maturity of the obligation

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and the rating of the issue. Debt securities with longer maturities tend to produce higher yields and are generally subject to greater price movements than obligations with shorter maturities. A portion of the municipal securities held by Brown Advisory Equity Income Fund, Brown Advisory Intermediate Income Fund, Brown Advisory Sustainable Bond Fund, Brown Advisory Maryland Bond Fund, Brown Advisory Tax-Exempt Bond Fund, Brown Advisory Mortgage Securities Fund and the Brown Advisory Tax-Exempt Sustainable Bond Fund may be supported by credit and liquidity enhancements such as letters of credit (which are not covered by federal deposit insurance) or puts or demand features of third party financial institutions, general domestic and foreign banks.

Debt securities may be subject to extension or prepayment risk, which refers to the change in total return on a security resulting from an extension or abbreviation of the security’s maturity, respectively. If an issuer redeems the debt securities prior to final maturity, a Fund may have to replace these securities with lower yielding securities, which could result in a lower return. This is known as prepayment risk and is more likely occur in a falling interest rate environment. In a rising interest rate environment, prepayment on outstanding debt securities is less likely to occur. This is known as extension risk and may cause the value of debt securities to depreciate as a result of the higher market interest rates.

Issuers may prepay fixed rate debt securities when interest rates fall, forcing the Fund to invest in securities with lower interest rates. Issuers of debt securities are also subject to the provisions of bankruptcy, insolvency and other laws affecting the rights and remedies of creditors that may restrict the ability of the issuer to pay, when due, the principal of and interest on its debt securities. The possibility exists therefore, that, as a result of bankruptcy, litigation or other conditions, the ability of an issuer to pay, when due, the principal of and interest on its debt securities may become impaired.

Interest Rate Risk. The market value of the interest-bearing debt securities held by a Fund will be affected by changes in interest rates. There is normally an inverse relationship between the market value of securities sensitive to prevailing interest rates and actual changes in interest rates. The longer the remaining maturity (and duration) of a security, the more sensitive the security is to changes in interest rates. All debt securities, including U.S. Government Securities, can change in value when there is a change in interest rates. As a result, an investment in a Fund is subject to risk even if all debt securities in the Fund’s investment portfolio are paid in full at maturity. In the past few years, the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (the “Fed”) has occasionally raised the “federal funds rate,” and has also implemented reductions in the "federal funds rate." During periods of rising interest rates, the Funds are subject to heightened levels of interest rate risk.  Over the past several years, the Fed has maintained the level of interest rates at or near historic lows, however, more recently, interest rates have begun to increase as a result of action that has been taken by the Fed which has raised, and may continue to raise, interest rates, which may negatively impact the Funds’ performance or otherwise adversely impact the Funds. Interest rate increases may have sudden and unpredictable effects on the markets and the Funds’ investments.  Debt securities with longer durations tend to be more sensitive to changes in interest rates, often making them more volatile in response to interest rate changes than debt securities with shorter durations.

Credit Risk. Changes in the ability of an issuer to make payments of interest and principal and in the markets’ perception of an issuer’s creditworthiness will also affect the market value of that issuer’s debt securities. The financial condition of an issuer of a debt security held by the Fund may cause it to default on interest or principal payments due on a security. This risk generally increases as security credit ratings fall.

To limit credit risk, each Fund may purchase unrated fixed income securities if, at the time of purchase, the Adviser and/or Sub-Advisers believe that they are of comparable quality to rated securities that the Fund may purchase.

Moody’s, S&P and other NRSROs are private services that provide ratings of the credit quality of debt obligations, including convertible securities. A description of the range of ratings assigned to various types of bonds and other securities by several NRSROs is included in Appendix A to this SAI. The Adviser may use these ratings to determine whether to purchase, sell or hold a security. Ratings are general and are not absolute standards of quality. Securities with the same maturity, interest rate and rating may have different market prices. If an issue of securities ceases to be rated or if its rating is reduced after it is purchased by a Fund, the Adviser will determine whether the Fund should continue to hold the obligation. Credit ratings attempt to evaluate the safety of principal and interest payments and do not evaluate the risks of fluctuations in market value. The rating of an issuer is a rating agency’s view of potential developments related to the issuer and may not necessarily reflect actual outcomes. Also, rating

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agencies may fail to make timely changes in credit ratings. An issuer’s current financial condition may be better or worse than a rating indicates. Unrated securities may not be as actively traded as rated securities. Because a downgrade often results in a reduction in the market price of the security, the sale of a downgraded security may result in a loss.

Credit ratings for debt securities provided by rating agencies evaluate the safety of principal and interest payments, not market value risk. The rating of an issuer is a rating agency’s view of past and future potential developments related to the issuer and may not necessarily reflect actual outcomes. There can be a lag between the time of developments relating to a issuer and the time a rating is assigned and updated.

High Yield Debt or Junk Bond Securities.  Brown Advisory Small-Cap Fundamental Value Fund, Brown Advisory Sustainable Small-Cap Core Fund, Brown Advisory Sustainable Value Fund, Brown Advisory Sustainable International Leaders Fund, Brown Advisory Sustainable Bond Fund, Brown Advisory Tax-Exempt Bond Fund, Brown Advisory Mortgage Securities Fund, and Brown Advisory – Beutel Goodman Large-Cap Value Fund may invest in securities rated below investment grade; that is, rated at or below Ba by Moody’s or BB by S&P, or the equivalent by any other NRSRO and may invest in securities rated as low as C by Moody’s or D by S&P, or the equivalent by any other NRSRO. Each Fund may invest in unrated debt securities determined by the Adviser or Sub-Adviser, as applicable, to be of comparable quality or that is trading at a substantial discount to par value.

The Brown Advisory Equity Income Fund, Brown Advisory Sustainable Bond Fund, Brown Advisory Tax-Exempt Bond Fund, and Brown Advisory Mortgage Securities Fund will limit their investments in High Yield or Junk Bond securities to no greater than 20% of each Fund’s total assets. 

Distressed Debt Securities. The Brown Advisory Small-Cap Fundamental Value Fund, Brown Advisory Sustainable Small-Cap Core Fund, and Brown Advisory Sustainable International Leaders Fund will limit their investment in distressed debt securities, rated as low as C by Moody’s or D by S&P, to 5% of the Fund’s total assets. Distressed debt securities are regarded as predominantly speculative with respect to the issuer’s capacity to pay interest and repay principal in accordance with the terms of the obligations and involve major risk exposure to adverse business, financial, economic or political conditions. See Appendix A for additional information on the bond ratings of Moody’s and S&P.

Foreign Debt Securities Risks. To the extent that a Fund invests in fixed income securities of companies located outside the United States, see the risks related to foreign securities set forth in the section entitled “Investment Policies and Risks – Equity Securities – Foreign Securities Risks” above.

Foreign Currencies Transactions

General

Each Fund may temporarily hold funds in bank deposits in foreign currencies during the completion of investment programs and may conduct foreign currency exchange transactions either on a cash basis or at the rate prevailing in the foreign exchange market.

Each Fund may enter into a forward foreign currency contract. A forward currency contract (“forward contract”) involves an obligation to purchase or sell a specific amount of a specific currency at a future date, which may be any fixed number of days (usually less than one year) from the date of the contract agreed upon by the parties, at a price set at the time of the contract. At or before settlement of a forward currency contract, a Fund may either deliver the currency or terminate its contractual obligation to deliver the currency by purchasing an offsetting contract. If a Fund makes delivery of the foreign currency at or before the settlement of a forward contract, it may be required to obtain the currency through the conversion of assets of the Fund into the currency. Each Fund may close out a forward contract obligating it to purchase currency by selling an offsetting contract, in which case, it will realize a gain or a loss.

Forward contracts are considered derivatives. A Fund enters into forward contracts in order to “lock in” the exchange rate between the currency it will deliver and the currency it will receive for the duration of the contract. In addition, each Fund may enter into forward contracts to hedge against risks arising from securities the Fund owns or

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anticipates purchasing, or the U.S. dollar value of interest and dividends paid on those securities. The Funds do not intend to enter into forward contracts on a regular or continuing basis and the Funds will not enter these contracts for speculative purposes.

The Brown Advisory Small-Cap Fundamental Value Fund, Brown Advisory Sustainable Small-Cap Core Fund, Brown Advisory Global Leaders Fund, Brown Advisory – WMC Strategic European Equity Fund, Brown Advisory Sustainable Bond Fund, Brown Advisory Emerging Markets Select Fund and Brown Advisory Sustainable International Leaders Fund will not have more than 10% of their respective total assets committed to forward contracts, or maintain a net exposure to forward contracts that would obligate the Fund to deliver an amount of foreign currency in excess of the value of the Fund's investment securities or other assets denominated in that currency.

Risks

Foreign currency transactions involve certain costs and risks. A Fund incurs foreign exchange expenses in converting assets from one currency to another. Forward contracts involve a risk of loss if the Adviser and/or Sub‑Advisers are inaccurate in their prediction of currency movements. The projection of short-term currency market movements is extremely difficult and the successful execution of a short-term hedging strategy is highly uncertain. The precise matching of forward contract amounts and the value of the securities involved is generally not possible. Accordingly, it may be necessary for a Fund to purchase additional foreign currency if the market value of the security is less than the amount of the foreign currency the Fund is obligated to deliver under the forward contract and the decision is made to sell the security and make delivery of the foreign currency. The use of forward contracts as a hedging technique does not eliminate fluctuations in the prices of the underlying securities the Fund owns or intends to acquire, but it does fix a rate of exchange in advance. Although forward contracts can reduce the risk of loss due to a decline in the value of the hedged currencies, they also limit any potential gain that might result from an increase in the value of the currencies. There is also the risk that the other party to the transaction may fail to deliver currency when due which may result in a loss to a Fund.

Leverage Transactions

General

Each Fund may use leverage to increase potential returns. Each Fund does not currently intend to use leverage in excess of 15% of total assets. Leverage involves special risks and may involve speculative investment techniques. Leverage exists when cash made available to a Fund through an investment technique is used to make additional Fund investments. Leverage transactions include borrowing for other than temporary or emergency purposes, lending portfolio securities, entering into reverse repurchase agreements, and purchasing securities on a when-issued, delayed delivery or forward commitment basis. A Fund uses these investment techniques only when the Adviser believes that the leveraging and the returns available to a Fund from investing the cash will provide investors with a potentially higher return. (See “Risks” below.)

Borrowing. Each Fund (other than Brown Advisory Intermediate Income Fund, Brown Advisory Maryland Bond Fund and Brown Advisory Tax-Exempt Bond Fund) may borrow money as a temporary measure for extraordinary or emergency purposes in amounts up to 331/3% of the Fund’s total assets at the time of borrowing. The Brown Advisory Flexible Equity Fund, Brown Advisory Small-Cap Fundamental Value Fund, Brown Advisory Sustainable Small-Cap Core Fund, Brown Advisory Global Leaders Fund, Brown Advisory Sustainable International Leaders Fund, Brown Advisory – WMC Strategic European Equity Fund, and Brown Advisory Emerging Markets Select Fund may invest in reverse repurchase agreements for other than temporary or emergency purposes, but such investments in reverse repurchase agreements are limited to 331/3% of the Fund’s total assets at the time of investments.

Senior Securities. Pursuant to Section 18(f)(1) of the 1940 Act, a Fund may not issue any class of senior security or sell any senior security of which it is the issuer, except that the Fund shall be permitted to borrow from any bank so long as immediately after such borrowings, there is an asset coverage of at least 300% and that in the event such asset coverage falls below this percentage, the Fund shall reduce the amount of its borrowings, within 3 days, excluding holidays and Sundays, to an extent that the asset coverage shall be at least 300%. In accordance with

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Section 18 of the 1940 Act, a Fund will not mortgage, pledge or hypothecate its assets in an amount exceeding 331/3% of the value of its total assets.

Securities Lending. Each Fund may lend portfolio securities in an amount up to 331/3% of its total assets (10% of total assets for Brown Advisory Maryland Bond Fund, Brown Advisory Tax-Exempt Bond Fund and Brown Advisory Tax-Exempt Sustainable Bond Fund) to brokers, dealers and other financial institutions. The Brown Advisory Equity Income Fund does not intend to lend securities.  If it did, the Fund would need Board approval to lend securities from its portfolio to brokers, dealers and financial institutions (but not individuals) in order to increase the return on its portfolio. 

In a portfolio securities lending transaction, the Fund receives from the borrower an amount equal to the interest paid or the dividends declared on the loaned securities during the term of the loan as well as the interest on the collateral securities, less any fees (such as finders or administrative fees) the Fund pays in arranging the loan. The Fund may share the interest it receives on the collateral securities with the borrower. The terms of the Fund’s loans permit the Fund to reacquire loaned securities on five business days’ notice or in time to vote on any important matter. Loans are subject to termination at the option of the Fund or the borrower at any time, and the borrowed securities must be returned when the loan is terminated. The Fund may pay fees to arrange for securities loans.

The SEC currently requires that the following conditions must be met whenever a Fund’s portfolio securities are loaned: (1) the Fund must receive at least 100% cash collateral from the borrower; (2) the borrower must increase such collateral whenever the market value of the securities rises above the level of such collateral; (3) the Fund must be able to terminate the loan at any time; (4) the Fund must receive reasonable interest on the loan, as well as any dividends, interest or other distributions on the loaned securities, and any increase in market value; (5) the Fund may pay only reasonable custodian fees approved by the Board in connection with the loan; (6) while voting rights on the loaned securities may pass to the borrower, the Board must terminate the loan and regain the right to vote the securities if a material event adversely affecting the investment occurs, and (7) the Fund may not loan its portfolio securities so that the value of the loaned securities is more than one-third of its total asset value, including collateral received from such loans. These conditions may be subject to future modification. Such loans will be terminable at any time upon specified notice. A Fund might experience the risk of loss if the institution with which it has engaged in a portfolio loan transaction breaches its agreement with the Fund. In addition, a Fund will not enter into any portfolio security lending arrangement having a duration of longer than one year. The principal risk of portfolio lending is potential default or insolvency of the borrower. In either of these cases, a Fund could experience delays in recovering securities or collateral or could lose all or part of the value of the loaned securities. All of the Funds’ collateral received in connection with securities lending transactions is held as cash or cash equivalents or in the form received from the borrower (if securities) or invested in other funds that are managed in accordance with the investment restrictions of Rule 2a-7 under the1940 Act. In addition, all investments made with the collateral received are subject to the risks associated with such investments. If such investments lose value, a Fund will have to cover the loss when repaying the collateral.

Any loans of portfolio securities are fully collateralized based on values that are marked-to-market daily. Any securities that a Fund may receive as collateral will not become part of the Fund’s investment portfolio at the time of the loan and, in the event of a default by the borrower, the Fund will, if permitted by law, dispose of such collateral except for such part thereof that is a security in which the Fund is permitted to invest. During the time securities are on loan, the borrower will pay a Fund any accrued income on those securities, and the Fund may invest the cash collateral and earn income or receive an agreed-upon fee from a borrower that has delivered cash-equivalent collateral.

Reverse Repurchase Agreements. Each Fund may enter into reverse repurchase agreements which are transactions in which a Fund sells a security and simultaneously agrees to repurchase that security from the seller at an agreed upon price on an agreed upon future date, normally, one to seven days later. Such reverse repurchase agreements would represent no more than 15% of the foregoing Fund’s assets (5% of total assets for the Brown Advisory Tax-Exempt Bond Fund and the Brown Advisory Tax-Exempt Sustainable Bond Fund).

Reverse repurchase agreements involve the risk that the market value of securities retained in lieu of sale by a Fund may decline below the price of the securities such Fund has sold but is obliged to repurchase. If the buyer of securities under a reverse repurchase agreement files for bankruptcy or becomes insolvent, such buyer or its trustee

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or receiver may receive an extension of time to determine whether to enforce a Fund’s obligation to repurchase the securities. During that time, a Fund’s use of the proceeds of the reverse repurchase agreement effectively may be restricted.

When-Issued Securities and Forward Commitments. Each Fund may invest in securities offered on a “when-issued” and “forward commitment” basis (including a delayed delivery basis). Securities purchased on a “when-issued” or “forward commitment basis” are securities not available for immediate delivery despite the fact that a market exists for those securities. A purchase is made on a “delayed delivery” basis when the transaction is structured to occur sometime in the future.

When these transactions are negotiated, the price, which is generally expressed in yield terms, is fixed at the time the commitment is made, but delivery and payment for the securities take place at a later date. Normally, the settlement date occurs within two months after the transaction, but delayed settlements beyond two months may be negotiated. During the period between a commitment and settlement, no payment is made for the securities purchased by the purchaser and, thus, no interest accrues to the purchaser from the transaction. At the time a Fund makes the commitment to purchase securities on a when-issued basis or forward commitment, the Fund will record the transaction as a purchase and thereafter reflect the value each day of such securities in determining its NAV. No when-issued or forward commitments will be made by a Fund (except Brown Advisory Intermediate Income Fund, Brown Advisory Sustainable Bond Fund, Brown Advisory Maryland Bond Fund, Brown Advisory Tax-Exempt Bond Fund, Brown Advisory Tax-Exempt Sustainable Bond Fund and Brown Advisory Mortgage Securities Fund) if, as a result, more than 25% of a Fund’s total assets would be committed to such transactions.

Risks

Leverage creates the risk of magnified capital losses. Leverage may involve the creation of a liability that requires the Fund to pay interest (for instance, reverse repurchase agreements) or the creation of a liability that does not entail any interest costs (for instance, forward commitment costs).

The risks of leverage include a higher volatility of the NAV of a Fund’s securities which may be magnified by favorable or adverse market movements or changes in the cost of cash obtained by leveraging and the yield from invested cash. So long as a Fund is able to realize a net return on its investment portfolio that is higher than interest expense incurred, if any, leverage will result in higher current net investment income for the Fund than if the Fund were not leveraged. Changes in interest rates and related economic factors could cause the relationship between the cost of leveraging and the yield to change so that rates involved in the leveraging arrangement may substantially increase relative to the yield on the obligations in which the proceeds of the leveraging have been invested. To the extent that the interest expense involved in leveraging approaches the net return on a Fund’s investment portfolio, the benefit of leveraging will be reduced, and, if the interest expense incurred as a result of leveraging on borrowings were to exceed the net return to investors, the Fund’s use of leverage would result in a lower rate of return than if the Fund were not leveraged. In an extreme case, if a Fund’s current investment income were not sufficient to meet the interest expense of leveraging, it could be necessary for the Fund to liquidate certain of its investments at an inappropriate time.

Repurchase Agreements

General

Each Fund may enter into repurchase agreements which are transactions in which a Fund purchases a security and simultaneously agrees to resell that security to the seller at an agreed upon price on an agreed upon future date, normally, one to seven days later. If a Fund enters into a repurchase agreement, it will maintain possession of the purchased securities and any underlying collateral. For purposes of the 1940 Act, a repurchase agreement is deemed to be a loan from a Fund to the seller of the security subject to the repurchase agreement. Repurchase agreements are not considered to be the making of loans for purposes of the Funds’ fundamental investment limitations.


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Risks

Repurchase transactions also involve credit risk. Credit risk is the risk that a counterparty to a transaction will be unable to honor its financial obligation. In the event that bankruptcy, insolvency or similar proceedings are commenced against a counterparty, a Fund may have difficulties in exercising its rights to the underlying securities or currencies, as applicable. A Fund may incur costs and expensive time delays in disposing of the underlying securities and it may suffer a loss of principal or a decline in interest payments regarding affected securities. Failure by the other party to deliver a security or currency purchased by a Fund may result in a missed opportunity to make an alternative investment. Certain repurchase agreements that a Fund may enter into may or may not be subject to an automatic stay in bankruptcy proceedings. Favorable insolvency laws that allow a Fund, among other things, to liquidate the collateral held in the event of the bankruptcy of the counterparty reduce counterparty insolvency risk.

Real Estate Investment Trusts

The Funds may invest in real estate investment trusts (“REITs”).  Equity REITs invest directly in real property while mortgage REITs invest in mortgages on real property.  REITs may be subject to certain risks associated with the direct ownership of real estate, including declines in the value of real estate, risks related to general and local economic conditions, overbuilding and increased competition, increases in property taxes and operating expenses and variations in rental income. To the extent a Fund invests in REITs, the Fund will also be subject to risks associated with extended vacancies of properties or defaults by borrowers or tenants, particularly during periods of disruptions to business operations or an economic downturn. REITs pay dividends to their shareholders based upon available funds from operations. It is quite common for these dividends to exceed a REIT’s taxable earnings and profits, resulting in the excess portion of such dividends being designated as a return of capital.  The Fund intends to include the gross dividends from such REITs in its distribution to its shareholders and, accordingly, a portion of the Fund’s distributions may also be designated as a return of capital.

Changing Fixed Income Market Conditions

Because the Fed has begun, and may continue, to raise the federal funds rate, there is a risk that interest rates across the U.S. financial system will continue to rise. These policy changes may expose the market for debt instruments and related markets to heightened volatility and may reduce liquidity for certain Fund investments, which could cause the value of a Fund’s investments and share price to decline. Because certain Funds may invest in derivatives tied to fixed income markets a Fund may be more substantially exposed to these risks than a fund that does not invest in derivatives. To the extent that a Fund experiences high redemptions because of these policy changes, the Fund may experience increased portfolio turnover, which will increase the costs that a Fund incurs and may lower a Fund’s performance. The liquidity levels of a Fund’s portfolio may also be affected.
 
Bond markets have consistently grown over the past three decades while the capacity for traditional dealer counterparties to engage in fixed income trading has not kept pace and in some cases has decreased. As a result, dealer inventories of corporate bonds, which provide a core indication of the ability of financial intermediaries to “make markets,” are at or near historic lows in relation to market size. Because market makers provide stability to a market through their intermediary services, the significant reduction in dealer inventories could potentially lead to decreased liquidity and increased volatility in the fixed income markets. Such issues may be exacerbated during periods of economic uncertainty.

Temporary Defensive Position

Under normal circumstances, each Fund may have money received from the purchase of Fund shares, or money received on the sale of its portfolio securities for which suitable investments consistent with such Fund’s investment objectives are not immediately available.  Under these circumstances, each Fund may have such monies invested in cash or cash equivalents in order to earn income on this portion of its assets.  Cash equivalents include investments such as short-term U.S. Government Securities, commercial paper, bankers’ acceptances, certificates of deposit, interest-bearing savings deposits of commercial banks, repurchase agreements concerning securities in which the Fund may invest and money market mutual funds.


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In addition, each Fund may reduce its holdings in equity and other securities and may invest in cash, prime quality cash equivalents such as prime commercial paper and other money market instruments, for temporary defensive purposes, during periods in which the Adviser and/or Sub-Advisers believe changes in economic, financial or political conditions make it advisable. Prime quality instruments are those instruments that are rated in one of the two highest short-term rating categories by an NRSRO or, if not rated, determined by the Adviser and/or Sub-Advisers to be of comparable quality.

With respect to the Brown Advisory Maryland Bond, Brown Advisory Tax-Exempt Bond Fund and Brown Advisory Tax-Exempt Sustainable Bond Fund, the Fund may invest in municipal securities whose interest is subject to the Federal alternative minimum tax, or other securities whose interest is subject to federal tax, for temporary defensive purposes.

Cyber Security Risk

As technology becomes more integrated into the Funds’ operations, the Funds will face greater operational risks through breaches in cyber security. A breach in cyber security refers to both intentional and unintentional events that may cause the Funds to lose proprietary information, suffer data corruption, or lose operational capacity. This in turn could cause the Funds to incur regulatory penalties, reputational damage, additional compliance costs associated with corrective measures, and/or financial loss. Cyber security threats may result from unauthorized access to the Funds’ digital information systems (e.g., through “hacking” or malicious software coding), but may also result from outside attacks such as denial-of-service attacks (i.e., efforts to make network services unavailable to intended users). In addition, because the Funds work closely with third-party service providers (e.g., administrators, transfer agents, custodians and sub-advisers), cyber security breaches at such third-party service providers may subject the Funds to many of the same risks associated with direct cyber security breaches. The Funds may experience investment losses in the event of cyber security breaches at any of the issuers in which the Funds may invest. While the Funds have established risk management systems designed to reduce the risks associated with cyber security, there can be no assurance that such measures will succeed.

Contracts for Differences

The Brown Advisory Emerging Markets Select Fund may enter into contracts for differences (“CFDs”). CFDs are leveraged derivative instruments that allows the Fund to take a position on the change in the market price of an underlying asset, such as a stock, or the value of an index or currency exchange rate. With a long CFD, the Fund is seeking to profit from increases in the market price of a particular asset. With a short CFD the Fund is seeking to profit from falls in the market price of the asset. CFDs are subject to liquidity risk because the liquidity of CFDs is based on the liquidity of the underlying instrument, and are subject to counterparty risk, i.e., the risk that the counterparty to the CFD transaction may be unable or unwilling to make payments or to otherwise honor its financial obligations under the terms of the contract. It is also possible that the market price of the CFD will move between the time the order is placed by the Fund and when it is executed by the issuer, which can result in the trade being executed at a less favorable price. CFDs, like many other derivative instruments, involve the risk that, if the derivative security declines in value, additional margin would be required to maintain the margin level. The seller may require the Fund to deposit additional sums to cover this, and this may be at short notice. If additional margin is not provided in time, the seller may liquidate the positions at a loss for which the Fund is liable. Most CFDs are traded over-the-counter. CFDs are not registered with the SEC or any U.S. regulator, and are not subject to U.S. regulation.

Geographic Focus Risk

Because the Brown Advisory Emerging Markets Select Fund invests primarily in equity securities of issuers in emerging markets, the Fund’s investments may have greater exposure to the limited number of countries in which it invests. To the extent that the Fund focuses its investments in a particular geographic region or country, the Fund may be subject to increased currency, political, social, environmental, regulatory and other risks not typically associated with investing in a larger number of regions or countries. In addition, certain emerging markets economies may themselves be focused in particular industries or more vulnerable to political changes than the U.S. economy, which may have a direct impact on the Fund’s investments. As a result, the Fund may be subject to greater price volatility and risk of loss than a fund holding more geographically diverse investments.

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The Fund may, from time to time, focus on specific geographic regions within the emerging markets, including countries in Asia, such as China, Hong Kong and Taiwan, thus providing exposure to the risks associated with investment in Asian markets. Parts of the Asian region may be subject to a greater degree of economic, political and social instability than is the case in the United States. Investments in countries in the Asian region will be impacted by the market conditions, legislative or regulatory changes, competition, or political, economic and other developments in Asia.

Investments in China may subject the Fund to certain additional risks, including exposure to currency fluctuations, less liquidity, expropriation, confiscatory taxation, nationalization, exchange control regulations (including currency blockage), trading halts, imposition of tariffs, limitations on repatriation and differing legal standards. The Chinese economy is largely export-driven and highly reliant on trade. A downturn in the economies of China’s primary trading partners could slow or eliminate the growth of the Chinese economy and adversely impact the Fund’s investments. There has also been increased attention from the SEC and the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (the “PCAOB”) with respect to international accounting standards of U.S. companies with significant operations in China and PCAOB-registered auditing firms located in China. Because the SEC and the PCAOB are currently only able to get limited information about these auditing firms and are restricted from inspecting the audit work and practices of registered accountants in China, there is the risk that material information about Chinese issuers may not be available. The Chinese government strictly regulates the payment of foreign currency denominated obligations and sets monetary policy. The Chinese government may introduce new laws and regulations that could have an adverse effect on the Fund. Although China has begun the process of privatizing certain sectors of its economy, privatized entities may lose money and/or be re-nationalized. The securities markets in China are characterized by a relatively small number of issuers and relatively low trading volume, resulting in substantially less liquidity and greater price volatility and potentially fewer investment opportunities. The Chinese government exercises significant control over the economy, and may at any time alter or discontinue economic reforms.

Pandemic Risk

Disease outbreaks that affect local economies or the global economy may materially and adversely impact the Funds and/or the Adviser’s or Sub-Advisers' business. For example, uncertainties regarding the novel Coronavirus (“COVID-19”) outbreak have resulted in serious economic disruptions across the globe. These types of outbreaks can be expected to cause severe decreases in core business activities such as manufacturing, purchasing, tourism, business conferences and workplace participation, among others. These disruptions lead to instability in the market place, including stock market losses and overall volatility, as has occurred in connection with COVID-19. In the face of such instability, governments may take extreme and unpredictable measures to combat the spread of disease and mitigate the resulting market disruptions and losses. The Adviser and the Sub-Advisers have in place business continuity plans reasonably designed to ensure that they maintain normal business operations, and they periodically test those plans. However, in the event of a pandemic or an outbreak, there can be no assurance that the Adviser, the Sub-Advisers, or the Funds’ service providers will be able to maintain normal business operations for an extended period of time or will not lose the services of key personnel on a temporary or long-term basis due to illness or other reasons. Although vaccines for COVID-19 are widely available, the full impacts of a pandemic or disease outbreaks are unknown and the pace of recovery may vary from market to market, resulting in a high degree of uncertainty for potentially extended periods of time.


INVESTMENT LIMITATIONS

For purposes of all investment policies of each Fund: (1) the term “1940 Act” includes the rules thereunder, SEC interpretations and any exemptive order upon which a Fund may rely; and (2) the term “Code” includes the rules thereunder, IRS interpretations and any private letter ruling or similar authority upon which a Fund may rely.

The Funds have adopted the following policies and investment restrictions as fundamental policies (unless otherwise noted), which may not be changed without the affirmative vote of the holders of a “majority” of the outstanding voting securities of the Fund. Under the 1940 Act, the “vote of the holders of a majority of the outstanding voting securities” means the vote of the holders of the lesser of (i) 67% of the shares of the Fund represented at a meeting at

33


which the holders of more than 50% of the Fund’s outstanding shares are represented or (ii) more than 50% of the outstanding shares of a Fund.

Except with respect to borrowing, if a percentage or rating restriction on investment or use of assets set forth herein or in the Prospectus is adhered to at the time a transaction is effected, later changes in the percentage or rating resulting from any cause other than actions by the Fund will not be considered a violation of the Fund’s investment restrictions.  If the value of the Fund’s holdings of illiquid securities at any time exceeds the percentage limitation applicable due to subsequent fluctuations in value or other reasons, the Board will consider what actions, if any, are appropriate to maintain adequate liquidity.

Fundamental Limitations

Each Fund has adopted the following investment limitations that cannot be changed by the Board without shareholder approval.

1.Borrowing Money

The Brown Advisory Growth Equity Fund, Brown Advisory Flexible Equity Fund, Brown Advisory Equity Income Fund, Brown Advisory Sustainable Growth Fund, Brown Advisory Mid-Cap Growth Fund, Brown Advisory Small-Cap Growth Fund, Brown Advisory Small-Cap Fundamental Value Fund, Brown Advisory Sustainable Small-Cap Core Fund, Brown Advisory Sustainable Value Fund, Brown Advisory Global Leaders Fund, Brown Advisory Sustainable International Leaders Fund, Brown Advisory Sustainable Bond Fund, Brown Advisory Mortgage Securities Fund, Brown Advisory – WMC Strategic European Equity Fund, Brown Advisory Emerging Markets Select Fund, and Brown Advisory – Beutel Goodman Large-Cap Value Fund may not borrow money if, as a result, outstanding borrowings would exceed an amount equal to 331/3% of the Fund’s total assets.

The Brown Advisory Maryland Bond Fund. Brown Advisory Tax-Exempt Bond Fund, and Brown Advisory Tax-Exempt Sustainable Bond Fund may not borrow money, except for temporary or emergency purposes (including the meeting of redemption requests) and except for entering into reverse repurchase agreements, and provided that borrowings do not exceed 331/3% of the Fund’s total assets (computed immediately after the borrowing).

The Brown Advisory Intermediate Income Fund may not borrow money, except for temporary or emergency purposes (including the meeting of redemption requests), and provided that borrowings do not exceed 10% of the Fund’s total assets (computed immediately after the borrowing).

2.Concentration

Excluding the Brown Advisory Sustainable Growth Fund, a Fund may not purchase a security if, as a result, more than 25% of the Fund’s total assets would be invested in securities of issuers conducting their principal business activities in the same industry. For purposes of this limitation, there is no limit on: (1) investments in U.S. government securities, in repurchase agreements covering U.S. government securities, in tax-exempt securities issued by the states, territories or possessions of the United States (“municipal securities”) or in foreign government securities; or (2)  investments in issuers domiciled in a single jurisdiction. Notwithstanding anything to the contrary, to the extent permitted by the 1940 Act, a Fund may invest in one or more investment companies; provided that, except to the extent the Fund invests in other investment companies pursuant to Section 12(d)(1)(A) or (F) of the 1940 Act, the Fund treats the assets of the investment companies in which it invests as its own for purposes of this policy.

For the Brown Advisory Sustainable Growth Fund, the Fund may not purchase a security if, as a result, more than 25% of the Fund’s total assets would be invested in securities of issuers conducting their principal business activities in the same industry. For purposes of this limitation, there is no limit on investments in U.S. government securities and in repurchase agreements covering U.S. government securities. Notwithstanding anything to the contrary, to the extent permitted by the 1940 Act, the Fund may invest in one or more investment companies; provided that, except

34


to the extent the Fund invests in other investment companies pursuant to Section 12(d)(1)(A) or (F) of the 1940 Act, the Fund treats the assets of the investment companies in which it invests as its own for purposes of this policy.

For the Brown Advisory Intermediate Income Fund (1) “mortgage related securities” and “asset-backed securities”, as such terms are defined in the 1934 Act, are treated as securities of an issuer in the industry of the primary type of asset backing the security, (2) financial service companies are classified according to the end users of their services (for example, automobile finance, bank finance and diversified finance) and (3) utility companies are classified according to their services (for example, gas, gas transmission, electric and gas, electric and telephone).

3.Diversification

Excluding the Brown Advisory Maryland Bond Fund, Brown Advisory Tax-Exempt Bond Fund, Brown Advisory Tax-Exempt Sustainable Bond Fund, and Brown Advisory – Beutel Goodman Large-Cap Value Fund, with respect to 75% of the Fund’s total assets, a Fund may not purchase the securities of any issuer (other than securities issued or guaranteed by the U.S. government or any of its agencies or instrumentalities, or, to the extent permitted by the 1940 Act, the rules and regulations thereunder and any applicable exemptive relief, securities of other investment companies) if, as a result, (1) more than 5% of the Fund’s total assets would be invested in the securities of that issuer; or (2) the Fund would hold more than 10% of the outstanding voting securities of that issuer.

The District of Columbia, each state and territory, each political subdivision, agency, instrumentality and authority thereof, and each multi-state agency of which the District of Columbia, a state or territory is a member is deemed to be a separate “issuer.” When the assets and revenues of an agency, authority, instrumentality or other political subdivision are separate from the government creating the subdivision and the security is backed only by the assets and revenues of the subdivision, such subdivision is treated as the issuer. Similarly, in the case of private activity bonds, if the bond is backed only by the assets and revenues of the non-governmental user, then the non-governmental user is treated as the issuer. If in either case, however, the creating government or some other agency guarantees a security, that guarantee is considered a separate security and is treated as an issue of such government or other agency.

The Brown Advisory Maryland Bond Fund, Brown Advisory Tax-Exempt Bond Fund, Brown Advisory Tax-Exempt Sustainable Bond Fund, and Brown Advisory – Beutel Goodman Large-Cap Value Fund are non-diversified, which means that there is no restriction under the Investment Company Act of 1940 on how much the Fund may invest in the securities of one issuer.  However, to qualify for tax treatment as a regulated investment company under the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended (the “Code”), the Fund is required to comply, as of the end of each taxable quarter, with certain diversification requirements imposed by the Code.  Pursuant to these requirements, at the end of each taxable quarter, the Fund, among other things, will not have investments in the securities of any one issuer (other than U.S. government securities and securities of other regulated investment companies) of more than 25% of the value of the Fund’s total assets.  In addition, the Fund, with respect to 50% of its total assets, will not have investments in the securities of any issuer equal to 5% of its total assets, and will not purchase more than 10% of the outstanding voting securities of any one issuer.  As non-diversified investment companies, such Funds may be subject to greater risks than diversified companies because of the larger impact of fluctuation in the values of securities of fewer issues.

4.Underwriting Activities

A Fund may not underwrite securities issued by others, except to the extent that the Fund may be considered an underwriter within the meaning of the Securities Act of 1933 in the disposition of restricted securities or in connection with investments in other investment companies.

5.Making Loans

Excluding the Brown Advisory Flexible Equity Fund, a Fund may not make loans to other parties. For purposes of this limitation, entering into repurchase agreements, lending securities and acquiring any debt security are not deemed to be the making of loans.


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The Brown Advisory Flexible Equity Fund may make loans only as permitted under the 1940 Act, the rules and regulations thereunder and any applicable exemptive relief.

(While the Brown Advisory Flexible Equity Fund is eligible to make loans to other parties to the extent permitted under the Investment Company Act of 1940, the rules and regulations thereunder and any applicable exemptive relief, the Fund has undertaken to not make any loans to other parties, although the Fund is eligible to enter into repurchase agreements, lend securities and acquire any debt security as these activities are not deemed to be the making of loans).

6.Purchases and Sales of Real Estate

A Fund may not purchase or sell real estate, except that, to the extent permitted by law, the Fund may (a) invest in securities or other instruments directly or indirectly secured by real estate, and (b) invest in securities or other instruments issued by issuers that invest in real estate.

7.Purchases and Sales of Commodities

A Fund may not purchase or sell commodities or commodity contracts unless acquired as a result of ownership of securities or other instruments issued by persons that purchase or sell commodities or commodities contracts; but this shall not prevent the Fund from purchasing, selling and entering into financial futures contracts (including futures contracts on indices of securities, interest rates and currencies), options on financial futures contracts (including futures contracts on indices of securities, interest rates and currencies), warrants, swaps, forward contracts, foreign currency spot and forward contracts or other derivative instruments that are not related to physical commodities.

8.Issuance of Senior Securities

A Fund may not issue senior securities except pursuant to Section 18 of the 1940 Act, the rules and regulations thereunder, and any applicable exemptive or interpretive relief.

9.Pooled Funds

Notwithstanding any other fundamental investment policy or limitation, the Brown Advisory Flexible Equity Fund may not invest all of its assets in the securities of a single open-end management investment company with substantially the same fundamental investment objective, policies, and limitations as the Fund.

_____
With respect to Fundamental Limitation #2, each Fund, other than the Brown Advisory – WMC Strategic European Equity Fund, will limit investments in foreign government securities to no more than 25% of the Fund’s total assets. In addition, with respect to Fundamental Limitation #2, municipal securities may include industrial development or other private activity bonds.  For purposes of determining compliance with Fundamental Limitation #2, any investment by the Fund in private activity bonds that are ultimately payable by a governmental entity (as opposed to a non-governmental entity) will be considered “municipal securities” for these purposes and therefore will not be subject to the 25% limitation discussed above.


MANAGEMENT

Trustees and Executive Officers

The Board is responsible for the overall management of the Trust, including general supervision and review of the investment activities of the funds managed by the Adviser (together, the “Funds”). The Board, in turn, elects the Officers of the Trust, who are responsible for administering the day-to-day operations of the Trust and each of the Funds. The current Trustees and Officers of the Trust, their ages and positions with the Trust, term of office with the Trust and length of time served, their principal occupations for the past five years and other directorships held during the past five years are set forth in the following table.

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Name, Address
And Age
Position with
the Trust
Term of Office and Length of Time Served Principal Occupation(s) During Past 5 Years Number of Portfolios in Fund Complex Overseen by Trustees
Other Directorships Held During the Past 5 Years(2)
Independent Trustees of the Trust(1)
Henry H. Hopkins
Age: 80
c/o Brown Advisory LLC
901 South Bond Street
Suite 400
Baltimore, MD 21231
Trustee


Indefinite Term; Since 2012
Retired; Formerly, Vice President and Chief Legal Counsel, T. Rowe Price Associates, Inc. (investment management firm)(1998 to 2008)
20 None
Georgette D. Kiser
Age: 56
c/o Brown Advisory LLC
901 South Bond Street
Suite 400
Baltimore, MD 21231
Trustee
Indefinite Term; Since November 2021
Operating Executive, The Carlyle Group (investment management firm) (since 2019); Operating Partner, Broad Sky Partners LLC (private equity firm) (since 2021); formerly, Chief Information Officer, The Carlyle Group (2015 to 2019); Vice President and Head of Enterprise Solutions and Capabilities, T. Rowe Price Associates, Inc. (investment management firm) (2012 to 2015) and executive officer, various positions, T. Rowe Price Associates, Inc. (1996 to 2012)
20
Aflac Inc.; (insurance firm) Jacobs Engineering Group Inc. (technical professional and consulting services firm); NCR Corp. (enterprise technology firm); Adtalem Global Education Inc. (workforce solutions firm)
Kyle Prechtl Legg
Age: 71
c/o Brown Advisory LLC
901 South Bond Street
Suite 400
Baltimore, MD 21231
Trustee Indefinite Term;
Since 2012
Retired; Formerly President and Chief Executive Officer, Legg Mason Capital Management, LLC (investment management firm)(2006 to 2009)
20 Director, SunTrust Banks, Inc. (bank holding company) (2011 to 2018)
Director, BrightSphere Investment Group plc (asset management holding company) (2014 to 2018)

Thomas F. O’Neil III
Age: 66
c/o Brown Advisory LLC
901 South Bond Street
Suite 400
Baltimore, MD 21231
Chairman
                                         


Trustee
Indefinite Term;
Since 2023


Indefinite Term:
Since 2012
Managing Director, Berkeley Research Group (global management consulting firm) (since 2021); Governance and Compliance Adviser (for healthcare, financial services and retail businesses) and President, The Saranac Group LLC (strategic consulting firm) (2010 to 2016 and since 2021). Formerly, Global Chief Compliance Officer, Cigna Corporation (health services company) (2016 to 2020)
20 None
Neal F. Triplett, CFA
Age: 52
c/o Brown Advisory LLC
901 South Bond Street
Suite 400
Baltimore, MD 21231
Trustee Indefinite Term;
Since 2012
President, DUMAC, Inc. (university endowment investment organization) (since 1999)
20 None
Interested Trustees and Officers of the Trust

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Name, Address
And Age
Position with
the Trust
Term of Office and Length of Time Served Principal Occupation(s) During Past 5 Years Number of Portfolios in Fund Complex Overseen by Trustees
Other Directorships Held During the Past 5 Years(2)
Margaret W. Adams, CAIA(3)
Age: 61
c/o Brown Advisory LLC
901 South Bond Street
Suite 400
Baltimore, MD 21231

Trustee Indefinite Term
Since March 2023
Managing Director, Membership Engagement, FCLT Global (non-profit organization focused on innovative global investment-related initiatives) (since 2018);formerly, Partner and Senior Managing Director, Wellington Management Company LLP(institutional investment management firm) (2006-2017)
20 None
Michael D. Hankin(3)
Age: 65
c/o Brown Advisory Incorporated
901 South Bond Street
Suite 400
Baltimore, MD 21231

Trustee Indefinite Term
Since 2012
President and Chief Executive Officer, Brown Advisory Incorporated and affiliates (investment management firm)(since 1993)
20 Stanley Black & Decker, Inc. (industrial tools and hardware) (since 2016)
Paul J. Chew
Age: 57
c/o Brown Advisory Incorporated
901 South Bond Street
Suite 400
Baltimore, MD 21231
President/ Principal Executive Officer

Senior Vice President
Indefinite Term;
Since October 2018



2016 to October 2018

Chief Investment Officer, Brown Advisory Incorporated and affiliates (investment management firm) (since 1995)
Not Applicable Not Applicable
Carey E. Buxton
Age: 36
c/o Brown Advisory Incorporated
901 South Bond Street
Suite 400
Baltimore, MD 21231
Vice President Indefinite Term;
Since 2015
Head of Sustainable Investing Business (since 2020); Chief Operating Officer, Institutional Investing (since 2018); Product Manager, Brown Advisory Incorporated and affiliates (investment management firm)(2013 to 2018).
Not Applicable Not Applicable
Nicole Nesbitt
Age: 51
c/o Brown Advisory LLC
901 South Bond Street
Suite 400
Baltimore, MD 21231
Vice President Indefinite Term;
Since November 2022
Head of U.S. Institutional
Sales and Client Service
(since 2018); Head of
Institutional Relationship
Management, Brown
Advisory Incorporated and
affiliates (investment
management firm) (2008 to
2018).
Not Applicable Not Applicable
Jason T. Meix
Age: 44
c/o Brown Advisory LLC
901 South Bond Street
Suite 400
Baltimore, MD 21231
Treasurer / Principal Financial Officer Indefinite Term;
Since 2012
Vice President, U.S. Bancorp Fund Services, LLC (fund administrative services firm)(since 2008)

Not Applicable Not Applicable
Edward L. Paz
Age: 52
c/o Brown Advisory LLC
901 South Bond Street
Suite 400
Baltimore, MD 21231
Secretary Indefinite Term;
Since 2012
Vice President and Counsel, U.S. Bancorp Fund Services, LLC (fund administrative services firm) (since 2007)
Not Applicable
Not Applicable
Brett D. Rogers
Age: 47
c/o Brown Advisory Incorporated
901 South Bond Street
Suite 400
Baltimore, MD 21231
Chief Compliance Officer

Anti-Money Laundering Officer
Indefinite Term;
Since 2012


Indefinite Term:
Since 2012
General Counsel and Chief Compliance Officer, Brown Advisory Incorporated and affiliates (investment management firm) (since 2009)
Not Applicable Not Applicable
(1)The Trustees of the Trust who are not “interested persons” of the Trust as defined in the 1940 Act (“Independent Trustees”).
(2)The directorships disclosed in this column include only the directorships of those companies that a Trustee serves on that are required to report to the SEC under applicable Federal securities laws including publicly traded corporations that are registered with the SEC under the 1934 Act and investment companies that are registered with the SEC under the 1940 Act, and it therefore excludes various other types of directorships that the Trustees of the Trust may currently hold in

38


other types of organizations, including private companies and not-for-profit organizations, which are expressly excluded from the disclosure requirements for mutual fund board members.
(3)Mr. Hankin is considered an “interested person” of the Trust, as defined in the 1940 Act, because of his current position with Brown Advisory Incorporated, the parent company of the Adviser and of Brown Advisory Limited, and Ms. Adams is considered an “interested person” of the Trust, as defined in the 1940 Act, because of the financial interest that she currently has in Wellington Management Company LLP (“Wellington”), a Sub-Adviser to two of the series in the Trust, as the result of certain payments that she is entitled to receive from Wellington as the result of her previous employment with the firm. Ms. Adams has not been employed by Wellington during the past five years.

Additional Information Concerning the Board of Trustees

The Role of the Board

The Board oversees the management and operations of the Trust. Like all mutual funds, the day-to-day management and operation of the Trust is the responsibility of the various service providers to the Trust, such as the Adviser, the Sub-Advisers, the Distributor, the Administrator, the Custodian and the Transfer Agent, each of whom are discussed in greater detail in this Statement of Additional Information. The Board has appointed various senior employees of the Adviser and Administrator as officers of the Trust, with responsibility to monitor and report to the Board on the Trust’s operations. In conducting this oversight, the Board receives regular reports from these officers and the service providers. For example, the Treasurer reports as to financial reporting matters. In addition, the Adviser and/or Sub-Advisers provide regular reports on the investment strategy and performance of the Funds. The Board has appointed a Chief Compliance Officer who administers the Trust’s compliance program and regularly reports to the Board as to compliance matters. These reports are provided as part of the Board’s regular quarterly Board Meetings, which are typically held quarterly, in person, and involve the Board’s review of recent operations.

Board Structure, Leadership

The Board has structured itself in a manner that it believes allows it to perform its oversight function effectively. It has established four standing committees – (1) an Audit Committee; (2) a Nominating and Corporate Governance Committee; (3) a Compliance Oversight Committee; and (4) a Valuation Committee – which are discussed in greater detail below under “Trust Committees.” A majority of the Board is comprised of Independent Trustees who are not affiliated with the Adviser, the Sub-Advisers, the principal underwriter, or their affiliates. The Nominating and Corporate Governance Committee, Audit Committee and Compliance Oversight Committee are each comprised of a majority of Independent Trustees.

Except for any duties specified herein or pursuant to the Trust’s Declaration of Trust and By-Laws, the designation of Chairman for Mr. O’Neil does not impose any duties, obligations or liabilities that are greater than the duties, obligations or liabilities imposed on each such person as a member of the Board. The majority of the Board is comprised of Independent Trustees and the Board believes that maintaining a Board that has a majority of Independent Trustees allows the Board to operate in a manner that provides for an appropriate level of independent oversight and action.  In accordance with applicable regulations regarding the governance of the Trust, the Independent Trustees meet in a separate quarterly session in conjunction with each quarterly meeting of the Board during which they review matters relating to their independent oversight of the Trust.  In addition, each of the Board committees is comprised of a majority of Independent Trustees and the Chair of each of the Board committees is an Independent Trustee. The Board reviews annually the structure and operation of the Board and its committees.

Board Oversight of Risk Management

As part of its oversight function, the Board of Trustees receives and reviews various risk management reports and discusses these matters with appropriate management and other personnel. Because risk management is a broad concept comprised of many elements (e.g., investment risk, issuer and counterparty risk, compliance risk, operational risks, business continuity risks, etc.), the oversight of different types of risks is handled in different ways. For example, the Audit Committee meets with the Treasurer and the Trust’s independent registered public accounting firm to discuss, among other things, the internal control structure of the Trust’s financial reporting function. The Board meets regularly with the Chief Compliance Officer to discuss compliance and operational risks and how they are managed. The Board also receives reports from the Adviser and Sub-Advisers as to investment risks of the Funds.

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Information about Each Trustee’s Qualification, Experience, Attributes or Skills

The Board believes that each of the Trustees has the qualifications, experience, attributes and skills (“Trustee Attributes”) appropriate to their continued service as Trustees of the Trust in light of the Trust’s business and structure. In addition to a demonstrated record of business and/or professional accomplishment, each of the Trustees has demonstrated a commitment to discharging their oversight duties as trustees in the interests of shareholders. The Board annually conducts a “self-assessment” wherein the effectiveness of the Board is reviewed.

In addition to the information provided in the chart above, below is certain additional information concerning each particular Trustee and his/her Trustee Attributes.

Ms. Adams’ Trustee Attributes. Ms. Adams has extensive experience in the investment management industry and is an accomplished global financial services executive. Ms. Adams currently serves as Managing Director for Member Engagement for a non-profit organization that is focused on innovative global investment-related initiatives by engaging top tier global asset management industry leaders and corporations in actionable research and idea exchanges. Prior to this position, Ms. Adams served as a Partner and Senior Managing Director at Wellington, a global institutional investment management firm that provides advisory and sub-advisory services to mutual funds and other types of institutional clients, where she was employed from2006 through 2017. Ms. Adams is also a Chartered Alternative Investment Analyst (“CAIA”) Charterholder. Prior to joining Wellington, Ms. Adams had held positions as a portfolio manager at large asset management organizations, including MFS Investment Management and JP Morgan & Co., Inc. The Board believes Ms. Adams’ qualifications, attributes and skills and diverse experiences on an individual basis and in combination with those of the other Trustees lead to the conclusion that she possesses the requisite skills and attributes as a Trustee to carry out oversight responsibilities with respect to the Trust.

Mr. Hankin’s Trustee Attributes. As President and Chief Executive Officer of Brown Advisory Incorporated, the ultimate parent of the Adviser, Mr. Hankin is ultimately responsible for the management of the Funds’ day-to-day operations. Mr. Hankin has spent over 20 years assisting a wide range of individuals and institutions on their investment and financial matters. Mr. Hankin also currently serves on the board of Stanley Black & Decker, Inc. an industrial tool and hardware company. Prior to working in the investment management industry, Mr. Hankin was a Partner with the law firm of Piper & Marbury LLP (now DLA Piper US LLP). The Board believes that Mr. Hankin’s experience, qualifications, attributes and skills on an individual basis and in combination with those of the other Trustees lead to the conclusion that he possesses the requisite skills and attributes as a Trustee to carry out oversight responsibilities with respect to the Trust.

Mr. Hopkins’ Trustee Attributes. Mr. Hopkins brings over 35 years of prior legal experience in the mutual fund industry. In particular, Mr. Hopkins served as a legal counsel with T. Rowe Price Associates, Inc., a publicly traded investment management firm, from 1972 until 2008, where he held the position of Vice President and Chief Legal Counsel from 1998 until 2008, and Mr. Hopkins served as Chair of the firm’s Ethics Committee for 35 years. During that time, he also served in various capacities and on various committees for the Investment Company Institute, the primary mutual fund trade association and the Investment Adviser Association, the primary investment adviser trade association. Mr. Hopkins is the former Chairman of ICI Mutual Insurance Company, the captive insurance company for the mutual fund industry. From 2015 to April 2023, Mr. Hopkins served as Lead Independent Trustee. The Board believes Mr. Hopkins’ experience, qualifications, attributes and skills on an individual basis and in combination with those of the other Trustees lead to the conclusion that he possesses the requisite skills and attributes as a Trustee to carry out oversight responsibilities with respect to the Trust.

Ms. Kiser’s Trustee Attributes. Ms. Kiser has senior executive experience in the investment management industry through her current experience as an Operating Executive, and previously as a Managing Director and the Chief Information Officer, at The Carlyle Group, an investment management firm. In addition, prior to joining The Carlyle Group, Ms. Kiser served in various executive positions at T. Rowe Price Associates, Inc., another investment management firm, including serving most recently as Vice President and Head of Enterprise Solutions and Capabilities within the Services and Technology Organization. Ms. Kiser also currently serves as a director of several corporations, including for Aflac Inc. (a global insurance company), Jacobs Engineering Group Inc. (a technical professional and consulting services firm), NCR Corporation (an enterprise technology provider) and

40


Adtalem Global Education Inc. (a workforce solutions provider). The Board believes Ms. Kiser’s qualifications, attributes and skills and diverse experiences on an individual basis and in combination with those of the other Trustees lead to the conclusion that she possesses the requisite skills and attributes as a Trustee to carry out oversight responsibilities with respect to the Trust.

Ms. Legg’s Trustee Attributes. Ms. Legg has senior executive experience in the investment management industry through her experience as the former President and Chief Executive Officer of Legg Mason Capital Management (“LMCM”), an investment management firm. Prior to joining LMCM, Ms. Legg was a securities analyst with Alex. Brown & Sons, an investment banking firm. In total, Ms. Legg has more than 30 years of professional experience in the investment management and investment banking industries. Ms. Legg previously served as a director of BrightSphere Investment Group plc, an asset management holding company, and also served as a director of Sun Trust Banks, Inc., a bank holding company, and Eastman Kodak Co., a printing equipment and supplies company. The Board believes Ms. Legg’s experience, qualifications, attributes and skills on an individual basis and in combination with those of the other Trustees lead to the conclusion that she possesses the requisite skills and attributes as a Trustee to carry out oversight responsibilities with respect to the Trust.

Mr. O’Neil’s Trustee Attributes. Mr. O’Neil currently serves as Managing Director of Berkely Research Group, a global management consulting firm serving multiple industries and markets, which he joined in 2021, and he also serves as a governance and compliance adviser and has served as a member of the boards of various private companies. Prior to January 2020, Mr. O’Neal served as the Global Chief Compliance Officer of Cigna Corporation, a health services company. Mr. O’Neil is the Founder and President of The Saranac Group LLC, a strategic consulting firm that advises boards of directors, board committees and senior management in the areas of business ethics, corporate crises, governance and compliance, resolutions of complex government controversies and monitoring. Prior to founding The Saranac Group LLC, Mr. O’Neil served in various senior management positions at WellCare Health Plans, Inc. and as a Partner and Joint Global Practice Group Leader at the international law firm DLA Piper US LLP. Effective March 31, 2023, Mr. O’Neil serves as Chairman of the Board of Trustees. The Board believes Mr. O’Neil’s experience, qualifications, attributes and skills on an individual basis and in combination with those of the other Trustees lead to the conclusion that he possesses the requisite skills and attributes as a Trustee to carry out oversight responsibilities with respect to the Trust.

Mr. Triplett’s Trustee Attributes. Mr. Triplett is the President of DUMAC, Inc. (“DUMAC”), a professionally-staffed investment management organization controlled by Duke University that manages the school’s endowment funds. He joined DUMAC in July 1999 and he was appointed President in January 2007. Since joining DUMAC Mr. Triplett has been directly involved with managing securities. Prior to completing business school, Mr. Triplett was a credit officer for the corporate and real estate portfolios at Wachovia Bank. Mr. Triplett holds the Chartered Financial Analyst designation. The Board believes Mr. Triplett’s experience, qualifications, attributes and skills on an individual basis and in combination with those of the other Trustees lead to the conclusion that he possesses the requisite skills and attributes as a Trustee to carry out oversight responsibilities with respect to the Trust.

Trust Committees

The Trust has four standing committees: (1) the Audit Committee; (2) the Nominating and Corporate Governance Committee; (3) the Compliance Oversight Committee; and (4) the Valuation Committee.

The Audit Committee is comprised of all of the Independent Trustees. The function of the Audit Committee is to review the scope and results of the annual audit of each of the Funds and any matters bearing on the audit or a Fund’s financial statements and to ensure the integrity of the Funds’ financial reporting. The Audit Committee also recommends to the Board of Trustees the annual selection of the independent registered public accounting firm for the Funds and it reviews and pre-approves audit and certain non-audit services to be provided by the independent registered public accounting firm. During the fiscal year ended June 30, 2023, the Audit Committee met four times.

The Nominating and Corporate Governance Committee, comprised of all of the Independent Trustees, is responsible for seeking and reviewing candidates for consideration as nominees for Trustees and overseeing Board governance matters.  Although the Nominating and Corporate Governance Committee does not have a policy with respect to the consideration of candidates for Trustee submitted by shareholders, if the Nominating and Corporate Governance Committee determined that it would be in the best interests of the Trust to fill a vacancy on the Board of Trustees,

41


and a shareholder submitted a candidate for consideration by the Board of Trustees to fill the vacancy, the Nominating and Corporate Governance Committee would evaluate that candidate in the same manner as it evaluates nominees identified by the Nominating and Corporate Governance Committee. Nominee recommendations may be submitted to the Secretary of the Trust at the Trust’s principal business address. The Committee meets on an as needed basis.  During the fiscal year ended June 30, 2023, the Nominating and Corporate Governance Committee met four times.

The Compliance Oversight Committee is comprised of all of the Independent Trustees and Ms. Adams. The function of the Compliance Oversight Committee is to review and monitor compliance matters relating to the Funds and to oversee the functions of the Funds’ compliance program. The Committee meets on an as-needed basis. During the fiscal year ended June 30, 2023, the Compliance Oversight Committee met twice.

The Valuation Committee includes all of the Independent Trustees and Ms. Adams. The function of the Valuation Committee is to review quarterly reports from the Adviser, as the Funds’ valuation designee pursuant to Rule 2a-5 under the 1940 Act, pursuant to the procedures used by the Adviser to value securities held by any of the Funds for which current and reliable market quotations are not “readily available” (as defined by Rule 2a-5 under the 1940 Act). The actions of the Valuation Committee are subsequently reviewed and ratified by the Board. The Valuation Committee meets quarterly and also on an as needed basis when deemed necessary. During the fiscal year ended June 30, 2023, the Valuation Committee met four times.

The Board has designated the Adviser as the Funds’ valuation designee pursuant to Rule 2a-5 under the 1940 Act and has delegated fair value determinations to the Adviser, subject to the supervision of the Board. The Adviser, as the valuation designee, is responsible for periodically assessing any material risks associated with the determination of the fair value of a Fund’s investments, establishing and applying fair value methodologies, testing the appropriateness of fair value methodologies and overseeing and evaluating third-party pricing services. The Adviser has a pricing committee which assists with its designated responsibilities as valuation designee.

Trustee Ownership of Fund Shares and Other Interests

The following table shows the aggregate dollar range of equity securities in all registered investment companies overseen by the Trustees in the family of investment companies owned by the Trustees as of December 31, 2022 using the following ranges: None, $1-$10,000, $10,001-$50,000, $50,001-$100,000, and Over $100,000.
Name of Fund(1)(2)
Margaret W. Adams
Interested
Trustee(3)
Michael D. Hankin
Interested
Trustee
Henry H. Hopkins
Independent
Trustee
Georgette D.
Kiser
Independent
Trustee
Kyle Prechtl
Legg
Independent
Trustee
Thomas F.
O’Neil III
Independent
Trustee
Neal F.
Triplett
Independent
Trustee
Brown Advisory Growth Equity Fund None Over $100,000 None $50,001-
$100,000
None None $50,001-
$100,000
Brown Advisory Flexible Equity Fund None Over $100,000 None None Over $100,000 None Over $100,000
Brown Advisory Equity Income Fund None None None None None None $10,001-
$50,000
Brown Advisory Sustainable Growth Fund None Over $100,000 None $50,001-
$100,000
Over $100,000 Over $100,000 None
Brown Advisory Mid-Cap Growth Fund None None None None None None $1-$10,000
Brown Advisory Small-Cap Growth Fund None Over $100,000 None None Over $100,000 $10,001-
$50,000
$50,001-
$100,000
Brown Advisory Small-Cap Fundamental Value Fund None Over $100,000 None None Over $100,000 $50,001-
$100,000
$50,001-
$100,000
Brown Advisory Sustainable Small-Cap Core Fund None None None None None $50,001-
$100,000
None

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Name of Fund(1)(2)
Margaret W. Adams
Interested
Trustee(3)
Michael D. Hankin
Interested
Trustee
Henry H. Hopkins
Independent
Trustee
Georgette D.
Kiser
Independent
Trustee
Kyle Prechtl
Legg
Independent
Trustee
Thomas F.
O’Neil III
Independent
Trustee
Neal F.
Triplett
Independent
Trustee
Brown Advisory Global Leaders Fund None Over $100,000 None None None None Over $100,000
Brown Advisory Sustainable International Leaders Fund None None None None None None None
Brown Advisory Intermediate Income Fund None None None None None $10,001-
$50,000
None
Brown Advisory Sustainable Bond Fund None Over $100,000 None None None None None
Brown Advisory Maryland Bond Fund None None None None None None None
Brown Advisory Tax-Exempt Bond Fund None $1-$10,000 None None None None $10,001-
$50,000
Brown Advisory Tax-Exempt Sustainable Bond Fund None $50,001-
$100,000
None None None None None
Brown Advisory Mortgage Securities Fund None None None None None None None
Brown Advisory – WMC Strategic European Equity Fund None None None None None None $1-$10,000
Brown Advisory Emerging Markets Select Fund None None Over $100,000 None None None Over $100,000
Brown Advisory – Beutel Goodman Large-Cap Value Fund None None None None None $50,001-
$100,000
Over $100,000
Aggregate Dollar Range of Equity Securities in All Registered Investment Companies Overseen by Trustee in Family of Investment Companies None Over $100,000 Over $100,000 Over
$100,000
Over $100,000 Over $100,000 Over $100,000
(1)Beneficial ownership is determined in accordance with Rule 16a-1(a)(2) under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended.
(2)Brown Advisory Sustainable Value Fund commenced operations on February 28, 2023 and thus was not offered for sale as of December 31, 2022.
(3)Ms. Adams was appointed to serve as a member of the Board effective March 31, 2023 and thus was not yet a member of the Board as of December 31, 2022.

Neither the Independent Trustees nor members of their immediate family, own securities beneficially or of record in the Adviser, the Sub-Advisers, the Funds’ principal underwriter, or any of their affiliates. Accordingly, during the two most recently completed calendar years neither the Independent Trustees nor members of their immediate family have had a direct or indirect interest, the value of which exceeds $120,000, in the Adviser, the Sub-Advisers, the Trust’s principal underwriter or any of its affiliates. Ms. Adams had an indirect interest, the value of which exceeded $120,000, in Wellington, a Sub-Adviser to each of the Brown Advisory-WMC Strategic European Equity Fund and the Brown Advisory Emerging Markets Select Fund, as the result of certain payments that Ms. Adams is entitled to receive in connection with her previous employment with the firm.

Compensation

Trustees who are not employees of the Adviser receive a retainer fee of $120,000 per year and $6,000 for each meeting attended, as well as reimbursement for reasonable expenses incurred in connection with attendance at meetings.  In addition, the Board Chair, the Audit Committee Chair, the Nominating and Corporate Governance Committee Chair, the Valuation Committee Chair and the Compliance Oversight Committee Chair receive additional annual compensation of $15,000, $12,500, $10,000, $10,000 and $10,000, respectively. Furthermore,

43


prior to April 2023, the Lead Independent Trustee received additional annual compensation of $12,500. No other compensation or retirement benefits are received by any Trustee or officer from the Funds.

The following compensation figures represent compensation for the fiscal year ended June 30, 2023 for each of the Trustees:
Name of Person/Position
Aggregate Compensation from the Funds(1)
Pension or Retirement Benefits Accrued as Part of Fund Expenses Estimated Annual
Benefits Upon Retirement
Total Compensation from the Funds and Fund Complex(2) Paid to Trustees
Henry H. Hopkins, Trustee $166,500 $0 $0 $166,500
Georgette D. Kiser, Trustee $108,000 $0 $0 $108,000
Kyle Prechtl Legg, Trustee $150,500 $0 $0 $150,500
Thomas F. O’Neil III, Trustee $154,000 $0 $0 $154,000
Neal F. Triplett, Trustee $154,000 $0 $0 $154,000
Margaret W. Adams, Trustee(3)
$6,000 $0 $0 $6,000
Michael D. Hankin, Trustee $0 $0 $0 $0
Joseph R. Hardiman, Trustee(4)
$153,000 $0 $0 $153,000
(1)Trustee fees and expenses are allocated among the Funds in the Trust.
(2)The Fund Complex currently consists of the 20 Funds in the Trust.
(3)Margaret W. Adams was appointed as a Trustee effective March 31, 2023.
(4)Joseph R. Hardiman retired as a Trustee effective March 31, 2023.

Investment Adviser

Services of the Adviser

The Adviser serves as investment adviser to each Fund pursuant to an investment advisory agreement with the Trust (the “Advisory Agreement”). The Advisory Agreement was initially approved by the Board of Trustees on May 2, 2012 for a two year period. The Advisory Agreement with respect to the Brown Advisory Emerging Markets Select Fund was initially approved by the Board of Trustees on October 26, 2012 for a two year period. The Advisory Agreement with respect to the Brown Advisory – WMC Strategic European Equity Fund was initially approved by the Board of Trustees on September 6, 2013 for a two year period. The Advisory Agreement with respect to the Brown Advisory Mortgage Securities Fund was initially approved by the Board of Trustees on October 30, 2013 for a two year period. The Advisory Agreement with respect to the Brown Advisory Global Leaders Fund was initially approved by the Board of Trustees on May 6, 2015 for an initial two year period. The Advisory Agreement with respect to the Brown Advisory Sustainable Bond Fund was initially approved by the Board of Trustees on May 16, 2017 for an initial two year period. The Advisory Agreement with respect to the Brown Advisory Mid-Cap Growth Fund was initially approved by the Board of Trustees on September 12, 2017 for an initial two year period. The Advisory Agreement with respect to the Brown Advisory – Beutel Goodman Large-Cap Value Fund was initially approved by the Board of Trustees on February 8, 2018 for an initial two year period. The Advisory Agreement with respect to the Brown Advisory Tax-Exempt Sustainable Bond Fund was initially approved by the Board of Trustees on November 13, 2019 for an initial two year period. The Advisory Agreement with respect to the Brown Advisory Sustainable Small-Cap Core Fund was initially approved by the Board of Trustees on May 11, 2021 for an initial two year period. The Advisory Agreement with respect to the Brown Advisory Sustainable International Leaders Fund was initially approved by the Board of Trustees on November 10, 2021 for an initial two year period. The Advisory Agreement with respect to the Brown Advisory Sustainable Value Fund was initially approved by the Board of Trustees on November 2, 2022 for an initial two year period. After the initial two year term, the Advisory Agreement will continue in effect from year to year as long as the continuance is approved at least annually (i) by the Trustees or by vote of a majority of the outstanding voting securities of each Fund, and (ii) by a vote of the majority of the Independent Trustees.  The Adviser monitors the performance of each Fund and continuously reviews, supervises and administers its investment program, subject to the direction of, and policies established by, the Board.

Under the Advisory Agreement, the Adviser furnishes, at its own expense, all services, facilities and personnel necessary in connection with managing each Fund’s investments and effecting portfolio transactions for each Fund.

44


The Adviser may also pay fees to certain brokers/dealers to have the Funds available for sale through such institutions as well for certain shareholder services provided to customers purchasing Fund shares through such institutions.

Ownership of the Adviser

The Adviser is a wholly-owned subsidiary of Brown Advisory Management, LLC, a Maryland limited liability company.  Brown Advisory Management, LLC is controlled by Brown Advisory Incorporated, a holding company incorporated under the laws of Maryland in 1998. The Adviser does business under the name of Brown Advisory. The Adviser and its affiliates (“Brown Advisory”) have provided investment advisory and management services to clients for over 20 years. 

Information Regarding Portfolio Managers

The following information regarding each Fund’s portfolio managers has been provided by the Adviser.

Other Accounts Under Management. The table below identifies, for each portfolio manager of each Fund, the number of accounts managed (excluding the Funds) and the total assets in such accounts, within each of the following categories: registered investment companies, other pooled investment vehicles, and other accounts. Information in the table is shown as of June 30, 2023. Asset amounts are approximate and have been rounded.
Number of Other Accounts Managed
and Assets by Account Type
Number of Accounts and Assets for which Advisory Fee is Performance Based
Fund and
Portfolio Manager
Registered Investment Companies Other Pooled Investment Vehicles Other
Accounts
Registered Investment Companies Other Pooled Investment Vehicles Other Accounts
Maneesh Bajaj 0 1 154 0 0 0
$0 $405 million $2.7 billion $0 $0 $0
Christopher A. Berrier 0 1 45 0 0 0
$0 $187 million $3.6 billion $0 $0 $0
Garritt Conover 0 0 0 0 0 0
$0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Emily Dwyer 0 0 0 0 0 0
$0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Karina Funk 0 1 7 0 0 0
$0 $4.2 billion $2.1 billion $0 $0 $0
Brian E. Graney 0 0 9 0 0 0
$0 $0 $268 million $0 $0 $0
Timothy Hathaway 0 1 12 0 0 0
$0 $23 million $230 million $0 $0 $0
Amy Hauter 0 0 182 0 0 0
$0 $0 $181 million $0 $0 $0
Joshua R. Perry 0 0 0 0 0 0
$0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Michael Poggi 0 1 0 0 0 0
$0 $159,000 $0 $0 $0 $0
David Powell 0 0 172 0 0 0
$0 $0 $9.0 billion $0 $0 $0
Chris Roof 0 0 0 0 0 0
$0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0

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Number of Other Accounts Managed
and Assets by Account Type
Number of Accounts and Assets for which Advisory Fee is Performance Based
George Sakellaris 0 0 6 0 0 0
$0 $0 $123 million $0 $0 $0
J. David Schuster 0 3 21 0 0 0
$0 $43 million $229 million $0 $0 $0
Stephen M. Shutz 0 0 115 0 0 0
$0 $0 $145 million $0 $0 $0
Kenneth M. Stuzin 0 2 246 0 0 1
$0 $808 million $11.0 billion $0 $0 $176 million
Jason Vlosich 0 0 33 0 0 0
$0 $0 $298 million $0 $0 $0
Emmy Wachtmeister
0 0 0 0 0 0
$0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0

Conflicts of Interest for the Portfolio Managers. Actual or apparent conflicts of interest may arise when a portfolio manager has day-to-day management responsibilities with respect to more than one Fund or other account. More specifically, portfolio managers who manage multiple Funds and/or other accounts may experience the following potential conflicts: The management of multiple accounts may result in a portfolio manager devoting unequal time and attention to the management of each account. Investment decisions for client accounts are also made consistent with a client’s individual investment objective and needs. Accordingly, there may be circumstances when purchases or sales of securities for one or more client accounts will have an adverse effect on other clients. The Adviser may seek to manage such competing interests by: (1) having a portfolio manager focus on a particular investment discipline; (2) utilizing a quantitative model in managing accounts; and/or (3) reviewing performance differences between similarly managed accounts on a periodic basis to ensure that any such differences are attributable to differences in investment guidelines and timing of cash flows. The Adviser also maintains a Code of Ethics to establish standards and procedures for the detection and prevention of activities by which persons having knowledge of the investments and investment intentions of the Fund may abuse their fiduciary duties to the Fund.

If a portfolio manager identifies a limited investment opportunity that may be suitable for more than one client, the Fund may not be able to take full advantage of that opportunity due to an allocation of filled purchase or sale orders across all eligible accounts. To deal with these situations, the Adviser has adopted procedures for allocating portfolio transactions across multiple accounts and conducting trades on a soft dollar basis, if applicable.

With respect to securities transactions for clients, the Adviser determines which broker to use to execute each order. However, the Adviser may direct securities transactions to a particular broker/dealer for various reasons including receipt of research or participation interests in initial public offerings that may or may not benefit the Fund. To deal with these situations, the Adviser has adopted procedures to help ensure best execution of all client transactions.

Finally, the appearance of a conflict of interest may arise where the Adviser has an incentive, such as a performance-based management fee, which relates to the management of one but not all accounts for which a portfolio manager has day-to-day management responsibilities.

Information Concerning Compensation of Portfolio Managers. Each portfolio manager of the Adviser and Brown Advisory Limited receives a compensation package that includes various components, including a base salary and variable incentive bonus. A portfolio manager who is also a member of the Adviser’s management team maintains a significant equity interest in Brown Advisory Holdings Incorporated. The incentive bonus is subjective. It takes into consideration a number of factors including but not limited to performance, client satisfaction and service and the profitability of the Adviser’s business. When evaluating a portfolio manager’s performance the Adviser compares the pre-tax performance of a portfolio manager’s accounts to a relative broad-based market index over a trailing 1, 3, and 5 year time period. Accounts managed in the below referenced styles are typically compared to the following indices:

46


Growth Equity Fund
Russell 1000® Growth Index
Flexible Equity Fund
S&P 500® Index
Equity Income Fund
S&P 500® Index
Sustainable Growth Fund
Russell 1000® Growth Index
Mid-Cap Growth Fund
Russell Midcap® Growth Index
Small-Cap Growth Fund
Russell 2000® Growth Index
Small-Cap Fundamental Value Fund
Russell 2000® Value Index
Sustainable Small-Cap Core Fund
Russell 2000® Index
Sustainable Value Fund
Russell 1000® Value Index
Intermediate Income Fund Bloomberg Intermediate US Aggregate Bond Index
Sustainable Bond Fund Bloomberg Intermediate US Aggregate Bond Index
Maryland Bond Fund Bloomberg 1-10 Year Blended Municipal Bond Index
Tax-Exempt Bond Fund Bloomberg 1-10 Year Blended Municipal Bond Index
Tax-Exempt Sustainable Bond Fund Bloomberg 1-10 Year Blended Municipal Bond Index
Mortgage Securities Fund Bloomberg Mortgage Backed Securities Index

All portions of a portfolio manager’s compensation package are paid by the Adviser and not by any client account.

Portfolio Managers Ownership in the Funds. As of June 30, 2023, each portfolio manager that retained decision making authority over a Fund’s management beneficially owned shares of each Fund as summarized in the following table using the following ranges: None, $1-$10,000, $10,001-$50,000, $50,001-$100,000, $100,001-$500,000, $500,001-$1,000,000, and over $1,000,000.

47


Fund/Portfolio Manager Dollar Range of Beneficial Ownership in the Fund as of 6/30/23
Brown Advisory Growth Equity Fund
Kenneth M. Stuzin over $1,000,000
Brown Advisory Flexible Equity Fund
Maneesh Bajaj $500,001-$1,000,000
Brown Advisory Equity Income Fund
Brian E. Graney $100,001-$500,000
Brown Advisory Sustainable Growth Fund
Karina Funk over $1,000,000
David Powell over $1,000,000
Brown Advisory Mid-Cap Growth Fund
Christopher A. Berrier None
George Sakellaris $500,001-$1,000,000
Emmy Wachtmeister over $1,000,000
Brown Advisory Small-Cap Growth Fund
Christopher A. Berrier over $1,000,000
George Sakellaris None
Brown Advisory Small-Cap Fundamental Value Fund
J. David Schuster $500,001-$1,000,000
Brown Advisory Sustainable Small-Cap Core Fund
Christopher A. Berrier None
Timothy Hathaway None
Emily Dwyer $10,001-$50,000
J. David Schuster None
Brown Advisory Sustainable Value Fund(1)
Michael Poggi $100,001-$500,000
Brown Advisory Intermediate Income Fund
Jason Vlosich $10,001-$50,000
Brown Advisory Sustainable Bond Fund
Amy Hauter $50,001-$100,000
Jason Vlosich None
Brown Advisory Maryland Bond Fund
Stephen M. Shutz None
Joshua R. Perry $10,001-$50,000
Brown Advisory Tax-Exempt Bond Fund
Stephen M. Shutz $10,001-$50,000
Joshua R. Perry $50,001-$100,000
Brown Advisory Tax-Exempt Sustainable Bond Fund
Amy Hauter $50,001-$100,000
Stephen M. Shutz $50,001-$100,000
Brown Advisory Mortgage Securities Fund
Garritt Conover $10,001-$50,000
Chris Roof None
(1) The Brown Advisory Sustainable Value Fund commenced operations on February 28, 2023.

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Investment Sub-Adviser– Brown Advisory Global Leaders Fund and Brown Advisory Sustainable International Leaders Fund

Services of the Sub-Adviser – Brown Advisory Limited

Pursuant to each of the Sub-Advisory Agreements (“Sub-Advisory Agreements”) entered into between the Adviser and Brown Advisory Limited on behalf of the Brown Advisory Global Leaders Fund and Brown Advisory Sustainable International Leaders Fund, Brown Advisory Limited manages the securities of the Funds and makes investment decisions for the Funds subject to such policies as the Board of Trustees may determine.  By their terms, each Sub-Advisory Agreement will continue in effect for as long as such continuance is specifically approved at least annually by the Board of Trustees or by a vote of a majority of the outstanding voting securities of each fund, and, in either case, by a majority of the Trustees who are not parties to the Sub-Advisory Agreements or interested persons of any such party, at a meeting called for the purpose of voting on the Sub-Advisory Agreements.  The Sub-Advisory Agreements can be terminated at any time by the Board of Trustees, the Adviser, or by a vote of a majority of the outstanding voting securities of the Funds, without payment of any penalty, on not less than 60 days’ written notice to Brown Advisory Limited, and Brown Advisory Limited may at any time, without the payment of any penalty, terminate the Sub-Advisory Agreements on not less than 60 days’ written notice to the Adviser.  The Sub-Advisory Agreements automatically and immediately will terminate in the event of their assignment (as defined in the 1940 Act).  The Adviser pays Brown Advisory Limited a fee equal to an annual rate of 0.39% and 0.375% of the average daily net assets of the Brown Advisory Global Leaders Fund and Brown Advisory Sustainable International Leaders Fund, respectively.

Brown Advisory Limited’s activities are subject to general supervision by the Adviser and the Board of Trustees.  Although the Adviser and the Board do not evaluate the investment merits of Brown Advisory Limited’s specific securities selections, they do review the performance of Brown Advisory Limited relative to the selection criteria.

The Adviser has ultimate responsibility for the investment performance of the Brown Advisory Global Leaders Fund and Brown Advisory Sustainable International Leaders Fund pursuant to its responsibility to oversee Brown Advisory Limited and recommend its hiring and/or replacement.

Ownership of the Sub-Adviser

Brown Advisory Limited is located at 18 Hanover Square, London, W1S 1JY, United Kingdom. Brown Advisory Limited is an affiliate of the Adviser, and is controlled by Brown Advisory Incorporated, a holding company incorporated under the laws of Maryland in 1998. 
Information Regarding the Portfolio Managers

Other Accounts Under Management. The table below identifies, for the portfolio managers of the Brown Advisory Global Leaders Fund and Brown Advisory Sustainable International Leaders Fund, the number of accounts managed (excluding each Fund) and the total assets in such accounts, within each of the following categories: registered investment companies, other pooled investment vehicles, and other accounts. The Fund’s portfolio managers do not provide day-to-day management of accounts with performance-based advisory fees. Information in the table is shown as of June 30, 2023. Asset amounts are approximate and have been rounded.


49


Brown Advisory Global Leaders Fund
Number of Other Accounts Managed
and Assets by Account Type
Number of Accounts and Assets for which Advisory Fee is Performance Based
Portfolio Manager Registered Investment Companies Other Pooled Investment Vehicles Other
Accounts
Registered Investment Companies Other Pooled Investment Vehicles Other Accounts
Michael Dillon 0 5 15 0 0 2
$0 $3.9 billion $3.3 billion $0 $0 $163 million
Bertie Thomson 0 0 8 0 0 0
$0 $0 $87 million $0 $0 $0


Brown Advisory Sustainable International Leaders Fund

Number of Other Accounts Managed
and Assets by Account Type
Number of Accounts and Assets for which Advisory Fee is Performance Based
Portfolio Manager Registered Investment Companies Other Pooled Investment Vehicles Other
Accounts
Registered Investment Companies Other Pooled Investment Vehicles Other Accounts
Priyanka Agnihotri
0 0 2 0 0 0
$0 $0 $2 million $0 $0 $0

Conflicts of Interest for the Portfolio Manager. Actual or apparent conflicts of interest may arise when a portfolio manager has day-to-day management responsibilities with respect to more than the Fund or other accounts. More specifically, portfolio managers who manage multiple Funds and/or other accounts may experience the following potential conflicts: The management of multiple accounts may result in a portfolio manager devoting unequal time and attention to the management of each account. Investment decisions for client accounts are also made consistent with a client’s individual investment objective and needs. Accordingly, there may be circumstances when purchases or sales of securities for one or more client accounts will have an adverse effect on other clients. Brown Advisory Limited may seek to manage such competing interests by: (1) having a portfolio manager focus on a particular investment discipline; (2) utilizing a quantitative model in managing accounts; and/or (3) reviewing performance differences between similarly managed accounts on a periodic basis to ensure that any such differences are attributable to differences in investment guidelines and timing of cash flows. Brown Advisory Limited also maintains a Code of Ethics to establish standards and procedures for the detection and prevention of activities by which persons having knowledge of the investments and investment intentions of a Fund may abuse their fiduciary duties to the Fund.

If a portfolio manager identifies a limited investment opportunity that may be suitable for more than one client, a Fund may not be able to take full advantage of that opportunity due to an allocation of filled purchase or sale orders across all eligible accounts. To deal with these situations, Brown Advisory Limited has adopted procedures for allocating portfolio transactions across multiple accounts and conducting trades on a soft dollar basis, if applicable.

With respect to securities transactions for clients, Brown Advisory Limited determines which broker to use to execute each order. However, Brown Advisory Limited may direct securities transactions to a particular broker/dealer for various reasons including receipt of research or participation interests in initial public offerings that may or may not benefit the Fund. To deal with these situations, Brown Advisory Limited has adopted procedures to help ensure best execution of all client transactions.

Finally, the appearance of a conflict of interest may arise where Brown Advisory Limited has an incentive, such as a performance-based management fee, which relates to the management of one but not all accounts for which a portfolio manager has day-to-day management responsibilities.


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Information Concerning Compensation of Portfolio Managers. Brown Advisory Limited receives a fee based on the assets under management of the Brown Advisory Global Leaders Fund and Brown Advisory Sustainable International Leaders Fund as set forth in each Investment Sub-Advisory Agreement between Brown Advisory Limited and the Adviser on behalf of the Fund.  Brown Advisory Limited pays its investment professionals out of its total revenues, including the advisory fees earned with respect to the Funds.

The portfolio managers of Brown Advisory Limited receive a compensation package that includes various components, including a base salary and variable incentive bonus. The incentive bonus takes into consideration a number of factors including, but not limited to, performance, client satisfaction and service and the profitability of Brown Advisory Limited’s business. When evaluating a portfolio manager’s performance Brown Advisory Limited compares the pre-tax performance of a portfolio manager’s accounts to a relative broad-based market index over a trailing 1, 3, and 5 year time period.
Fund
Benchmark Index
Brown Advisory Global Leaders Fund
MSCI ACWI Index
Brown Advisory Sustainable International Leaders Fund
MSCI ACWI ex U.S. Index
All portions of a portfolio manager’s compensation package are paid by Brown Advisory Limited and not by any client account.

Portfolio Managers Ownership in the Funds. As of June 30, 2023, the portfolio managers that retained decision making authority over the Brown Advisory Global Leaders Fund and Brown Advisory Sustainable International Leaders Fund beneficially owned shares of the Funds as summarized in the following table using the following ranges: None, $1-$10,000, $10,001-$50,000, $50,001-$100,000, $100,001-$500,000, $500,001-$1,000,000, and over $1,000,000.
Funds/Portfolio Managers Dollar Range of Beneficial Ownership in the Fund as of 6/30/23
Brown Advisory Global Leaders Fund
Michael Dillon
None(1)
Bertie Thomson
None(2)
Brown Advisory Sustainable International Leaders Fund
Priyanka Agnihotri
None
(1) As of June 30, 2023, Mr. Dillon beneficially owned over $1,000,000 of the shares of the Brown Advisory Global Leaders Fund, a portfolio of Brown Advisory Funds plc, an Irish-registered investment company which has a principal investment strategy that is substantially similar to that of the Fund and for which Mr. Dillon also serves as a portfolio manager.

(2) As of June 30, 2023, Mr. Thomson beneficially owned between $500,001-$1,000,000 of the shares of the Brown Advisory Global Leaders Fund, a portfolio of Brown Advisory Funds plc, an Irish-registered investment company which has a principal investment strategy that is substantially similar to that of the Fund and for which Mr. Thomson also serves as a portfolio manager.

Investment Sub-Adviser – Brown Advisory – WMC Strategic European Equity Fund and Brown Advisory Emerging Markets Select Fund

Services of the Sub-Adviser – Wellington Management Company LLP

Pursuant to the Sub-Advisory Agreements (“Sub-Advisory Agreements”) entered into between the Adviser and Wellington Management Company LLP (“Wellington Management”) on behalf of each of the Brown Advisory – WMC Strategic European Equity Fund and Brown Advisory Emerging Markets Select Fund, Wellington Management manages the securities of the Funds and makes investment decisions for the Funds subject to such policies as the Board of Trustees may determine. By its terms, the Sub-Advisory Agreements will continue in effect for so as long as such continuance is specifically approved at least annually by the Board of Trustees or by a vote of a majority of the outstanding voting securities of each Fund, and, in either case, by a majority of the Trustees who are not parties to the Sub-Advisory Agreements or interested persons of any such party, at a meeting called for the purpose of voting on the Sub-Advisory Agreements. The Sub-Advisory Agreements can be terminated at any time by the Board of Trustees, the Adviser, or by a majority of the outstanding voting securities of a Fund, without

51


payment of any penalty, on not less than 60 days’ written notice to Wellington Management, and Wellington Management may at any time, without the payment of any penalty, terminate these Sub-Advisory Agreements on not less than 60 days’ written notice to the Adviser. The Sub-Advisory Agreements automatically and immediately will terminate in the event of its assignment (as defined in the 1940 Act). The Adviser pays Wellington Management a fee equal to an annual rate of 0.55% of the average daily net assets of the Brown Advisory – WMC Strategic European Equity Fund, and 0.55% of the average daily net assets of the Brown Advisory Emerging Markets Select Fund.

Wellington Management’s activities are subject to general supervision by the Adviser and the Board of Trustees. Although the Adviser and the Board do not evaluate the investment merits of each of Wellington Management’s specific securities selections, they do review the performance of Wellington Management relative to the selection criteria.

The Adviser has ultimate responsibility for the investment performance of each Fund pursuant to its responsibility to oversee Wellington Management and recommend its hiring and/or replacement.

Ownership of the Sub-Adviser

Wellington Management Company LLP, is a Delaware limited liability partnership with principal offices at 280 Congress Street, Boston, Massachusetts 02210. Wellington Management is a professional investment counseling firm which provides investment services to investment companies, employee benefit plans, endowments, foundations and other institutions. Wellington Management and its predecessor organizations have provided investment advisory services for over 80 years. Wellington Management is owned by the partners of Wellington Management Group LLP, a Massachusetts limited liability partnership.

Information Regarding the Portfolio Managers

The following information regarding each Fund’s portfolio manager(s) has been provided by Wellington Management.

Other Accounts Under Management. The table below identifies, for the portfolio manager of the Brown Advisory – WMC Strategic European Equity Fund, and the portfolio manager of the Brown Advisory Emerging Markets Select Fund, the number of accounts managed (excluding the Funds) and the total assets in such accounts, within each of the following categories: registered investment companies, other pooled investment vehicles, and other accounts. Information in the table is shown as of June 30, 2023. Asset amounts are approximate and have been rounded.
Number of Other Accounts Managed
and Assets by Account Type
Number of Accounts and Assets for which Advisory Fee is Performance Based
Fund and
Portfolio Manager
Registered Investment Companies Other Pooled Investment Vehicles Other
Accounts
Registered Investment Companies Other Pooled Investment Vehicles Other Accounts
Brown Advisory – WMC Strategic European Equity Fund
C. Dirk Enderlein 0 10 20 0 1 7
$0 $3.5 billion $6.2 billion $0 $278 million $4.1 billion
Brown Advisory Emerging Markets Select Fund
Niraj Bhagwat 0 5 6 0 1 2
$0 $1.1 billion $2.8 billion $0 $302 million $1.3 billion

Conflicts of Interest for the Portfolio Managers

Individual investment professionals at Wellington Management manage multiple accounts for multiple clients. These accounts may include mutual funds, separate accounts (assets managed on behalf of institutions such, as

52


pension funds, insurance companies, foundations, or separately managed account programs sponsored by financial intermediaries), bank common trust accounts, and hedge funds. Each Fund’s portfolio manager is primarily responsible for the day-to-day management of that Fund and may manage accounts in several different investment styles. These accounts may have investment objectives, strategies, time horizons, tax considerations, and risk profiles that differ from those of the Fund. The portfolio managers make investment decisions for each account, including the relevant Fund, based on the investment objectives, policies, practices, benchmarks, cash flows, tax, and other relevant investment considerations applicable to that account.  Consequently, the portfolio manager may purchase or sell securities, including IPOs, for one account and not another account, and the performance of securities purchased for one account may vary from the performance of securities purchased for other accounts. Alternatively, these accounts may be managed in a similar fashion to the relevant Fund and thus the accounts may have similar, and in some cases nearly identical, objectives, strategies, and/or holdings to the relevant Fund.

The portfolio manager or other investment professional at Wellington Management may place transactions on behalf of other accounts that are directly or indirectly contrary to investment decisions made on behalf of the relevant Fund, or make investment decisions that are similar to those made for the relevant Fund, both of which have the potential to adversely impact the relevant Fund depending on market conditions. For example, an investment professional may purchase a security in one account while appropriately selling that same security in another account. Similarly, the portfolio manager may purchase the same security for the Funds and one or more other accounts at or about the same time. In those instances, the other accounts will have access to their respective holdings prior to the public disclosure of the Funds’ holdings. In addition, some of these accounts have fee structures, including performance fees, which are or have the potential to be higher, in some cases significantly higher, than the fees Wellington Management receives for managing the Fund. Mr. Enderlein and Mr. Bhagwat also manage accounts which pay performance allocations to Wellington Management or its affiliates. Because incentive payments paid by Wellington Management to the portfolio manager are tied to revenues earned by Wellington Management and, where noted, to the performance achieved by the manager in each account, the incentives associated with any given account may be significantly higher or lower than those associated with other accounts managed by a given portfolio manager. Finally, the portfolio manager may hold shares or investments in the other pooled investment vehicles and/or other accounts identified above.

Wellington Management’s goal is to meet its fiduciary obligation to treat all clients fairly and provide high quality investment services to all of its clients. Wellington Management has adopted and implemented policies and procedures, including brokerage and trade allocation policies and procedures that it believes address the conflicts associated with managing multiple accounts for multiple clients. In addition, Wellington Management monitors a variety of areas, including compliance with primary account guidelines, the allocation of IPOs, and compliance with the firm’s Code of Ethics, and places additional investment restrictions on investment professionals who manage hedge funds and certain other accounts. Furthermore, senior investment and business personnel at Wellington Management periodically review the performance of Wellington Management’s investment professionals. Although Wellington Management does not track the time an investment professional spends on a single account, Wellington Management does periodically assess whether an investment professional has adequate time and resources to effectively manage the investment professional’s various client mandates.

Information Concerning Compensation of Portfolio Managers.

Wellington Management receives a fee based on the assets under management of each Fund as set forth in the Investment Sub-Advisory Agreement between Wellington Management and the Adviser on behalf of the Funds.  Wellington Management pays its investment professionals out of its total revenues, including the advisory fees earned with respect to each Fund. The following information is as of June 30, 2023.

Wellington Management’s compensation structure is designed to attract and retain high-caliber investment professionals necessary to deliver high quality investment management services to its clients. Wellington Management’s compensation of each Fund’s manager listed in the prospectus who is primarily responsible for the day-to-day management of that Fund (“Portfolio Manager”) includes a base salary and incentive components. The base salary for each Portfolio Manager who is a partner (a “Partner”) of Wellington Management Group LLP, the ultimate holding company of Wellington Management, is generally a fixed amount that is determined by the managing partners of Wellington Management Group LLP.  Each Portfolio Manager is eligible to receive an incentive payment based on the revenues earned by Wellington Management from the Funds managed by the

53


Portfolio Manager and generally each other account managed by such Portfolio Manager.  Each Portfolio Manager’s incentive payment relating to the Funds is linked to the gross pre-tax performance of the portion of each Fund managed by the Portfolio Manager compared to the benchmark index and/or peer group identified below over one, three and five-year periods, with an emphasis on five-year results. Wellington Management applies similar incentive compensation structures (although the benchmarks or peer groups, time periods and rates may differ) to other accounts managed by the Portfolio Manager, including accounts with performance fees.

Portfolio-based incentives across all accounts managed by an investment professional can, and typically do, represent a significant portion of an investment professional’s overall compensation; incentive compensation varies significantly by individual and can vary significantly from year to year.  The Portfolio Manager may also be eligible for bonus payments based on their overall contribution Wellington Management’s business operations.  Senior management at Wellington Management may reward individuals as it deems appropriate based on other factors.  Each Partner is eligible to participate in a Partner-funded tax qualified retirement plan, the contributions to which are made pursuant to an actuarial formula.  Messrs. Enderlein, and Bhagwat are Partners.
Fund
Benchmark Index and/or Peer Group for Incentive Period
Brown Advisory WMC Strategic European Equity Fund
MSCI Europe Index

Brown Advisory Emerging Markets Select Fund MSCI Emerging markets Index

Portfolio Managers Ownership in the Funds. As of June 30, 2023, the portfolio managers that retained decision making authority over the Brown Advisory – WMC Strategic European Equity Fund and the Brown Advisory Emerging Markets Select Fund beneficially owned shares of such Funds as summarized in the following table using the following ranges: None, $1-$10,000, $10,001-$50,000, $50,001-$100,000, $100,001-$500,000, $500,001-$1,000,000, and over $1,000,000.
Fund/Portfolio Manager Dollar Range of Beneficial Ownership in the Fund as of 6/30/23
Brown Advisory – WMC Strategic European Equity Fund
C. Dirk Enderlein None
Brown Advisory Emerging Markets Select Fund
Niraj Bhagwat None

Investment Sub-Adviser – Brown Advisory Emerging Markets Select Fund

Services of the Sub-Adviser – Pzena Investment Management, LLC

Pursuant to a Sub-Advisory Agreement (“Sub-Advisory Agreement”) entered into between the Adviser and Pzena Investment Management, LLC (“Pzena”), Pzena manages the securities of the Brown Advisory Emerging Markets Select Fund and makes investment decisions for the Fund subject to such policies as the Board of Trustees may determine. By its terms, the Sub-Advisory Agreement will continue in effect for so as long as such continuance is specifically approved at least annually by the Board of Trustees or by a vote of a majority of the outstanding voting securities of the Fund, and, in either case, by a majority of the Trustees who are not parties to the Sub-Advisory Agreement or interested persons of any such party, at a meeting called for the purpose of voting on the Sub-Advisory Agreement. The Sub-Advisory Agreement can be terminated at any time by the Board of Trustees, the Adviser, or by a vote of a majority of the outstanding voting securities of the Brown Advisory Emerging Markets Select Fund, without payment of any penalty, on not less than 60 days’ written notice to Pzena, and Pzena may at any time, without the payment of any penalty, terminate this Agreement on not less than 60 days’ written notice to the Adviser. The Sub-Advisory Agreement automatically and immediately will terminate in the event of its assignment (as defined in the 1940 Act). The Adviser pays Pzena a fee equal to an annual rate of 0.58% of the average daily net assets of the Fund.


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Pzena’s activities are subject to general supervision by the Adviser and the Board of Trustees. Although the Adviser and the Board do not evaluate the investment merits of each of Pzena’s specific securities selections, they do review the performance of Pzena relative to the selection criteria.

The Adviser has ultimate responsibility for the investment performance of the Fund pursuant to its responsibility to oversee Pzena and recommend its hiring and/or replacement.

Ownership of the Sub-Adviser

Pzena Investment Management, LLC is an investment adviser which is registered under the Investment Advisers Act of 1940 and is headquartered in New York. Pzena Investment Management, LLC manages assets in a variety of value-oriented investment strategies across a wide range of market capitalizations in both U.S. and non-U.S. capital markets. Pzena Investment Management, Inc. functions as the sole managing member of, and owns approximately 25% of Pzena Investment Management, LLC. Richard Pzena is the Co-Chief Investment Officer of the firm and Caroline Cai, CFA, a portfolio manager for the Brown Advisory Emerging Markets Select Fund, serves as Chief Executive Officer of the firm. The remaining owners include employees, former employees and other non-employee members.

Information Regarding Portfolio Managers

The following information regarding the portfolio managers for the Brown Advisory Emerging Markets Select Fund has been provided by Pzena.

Other Accounts Under Management. The table below identifies, for the portfolio manager of the Brown Advisory Emerging Markets Select Fund, the number of accounts managed (excluding the Fund) and the total assets in such accounts, within each of the following categories: registered investment companies, other pooled investment vehicles, and other accounts. Information in the table is shown as of June 30, 2023. Asset amounts are approximate and have been rounded.
Number of Other Accounts Managed
and Assets by Account Type
Number of Accounts and Assets for which Advisory Fee is Performance Based
Fund and
Portfolio Manager
Registered Investment Companies Other Pooled Investment Vehicles Other
Accounts
Registered Investment Companies Other Pooled Investment Vehicles Other Accounts
Brown Advisory Emerging Markets Select Fund
Rakesh Bordia 12 23 37 1 0 0
$8.1 billion $2.2 billion $7.3 billion $198 million $0 $0
Caroline Cai 13 47 56 2 3 0
$9.9 billion $16.7 billion $10.9 billion $2.0 billion $237 million $0
Allison Fisch 12 23 37 1 0 0
$8.1billion $2.1 billion $7.3 billion $198 million $0 $0
Akhil Subramanian 2 11 18 1 0 0
$1.4 billion $1.4 billion $4.1 billion $198 million $0 $0

Conflicts of Interest for the Portfolio Managers

When a portfolio manager is responsible for the management of more than one account, the potential arises for the portfolio manager to favor one account over another. The principal types of potential conflicts of interest that may arise are discussed below. For the reasons outlined below, Pzena does not believe that any material conflicts are likely to arise out of a portfolio manager’s responsibility for the management of the Fund as well as one or more

55


other accounts. Pzena has adopted procedures that are intended to monitor compliance with the policies referred to in the following paragraphs. Generally, the risks of such conflicts of interest are increased to the extent that a portfolio manager has a financial incentive to favor one account over another. Pzena has structured its compensation arrangements in a manner that is intended to limit such potential for conflicts of interest.

A portfolio manager could favor one account over another in allocating new investment opportunities that have limited supply, such as IPOs and private placements. If, for example, an IPO that was expected to appreciate in value significantly shortly after the offering was allocated to a single account, that account may be expected to have better investment performance than other accounts that did not receive an allocation in the IPO. Pzena has policies that require a portfolio manager to allocate such investment opportunities in an equitable manner and generally to allocate such investments proportionally among all accounts with similar investment objectives.

A portfolio manager could favor one account over another in the order in which trades for the accounts are placed. If a portfolio manager determines to purchase a security for more than one account in an aggregate amount that may influence the market price of the security, accounts that purchased or sold the security first may receive a more favorable price than accounts that made subsequent transactions. The less liquid the market for the security or the greater the percentage that the proposed aggregate purchases or sales represent of average daily trading volume, the greater the potential for accounts that make subsequent purchases or sales to receive a less favorable price. When a portfolio manager intends to trade the same security for more than one account, the procedures of Pzena generally result in such trades being "bunched," which means that the trades for the individual accounts are aggregated and each account receives the same price. There are some types of accounts as to which bunching may not be possible for contractual reasons (such as directed brokerage arrangements). Circumstances also may arise where the trader believes that bunching the orders may not result in the best possible price. Where those accounts or circumstances are involved, Pzena will place the order in a manner intended to result in as favorable a price as possible for such client.

A portfolio manager may favor an account if the portfolio manager's compensation is tied to the performance of that account rather than all accounts managed by the portfolio manager. If, for example, the portfolio manager receives a bonus based upon the performance of certain accounts relative to a benchmark while other accounts are disregarded for this purpose, the portfolio manager will have a financial incentive to seek to have the accounts that determine the portfolio manager's bonus achieve the best possible performance to the possible detriment of other accounts. Similarly, if Pzena receives a performance-based advisory fee, the portfolio manager may favor that account, whether or not the performance of that account directly determines the portfolio manager's compensation. The investment performance on specific accounts is not a factor in determining the portfolio manager's compensation.

A portfolio manager may favor an account if the portfolio manager has a beneficial interest in the account, in order to benefit a large client or to compensate a client that had poor returns. For example, if the portfolio manager held an interest in an investment partnership that was one of the accounts managed by the portfolio manager, the portfolio manager would have an economic incentive to favor the account in which the portfolio manager held an interest. Pzena imposes certain trading restrictions and reporting requirements for accounts in which a portfolio manager or certain family members have a personal interest in order to confirm that such accounts are not favored over other accounts.

If the different accounts have materially and potentially conflicting investment objectives or strategies, a conflict of interest may arise. For example, where a portfolio manager is responsible-for accounts with differing investment objectives and policies, it is possible that the portfolio manager will conclude that it is in the best interest of one account to sell a portfolio security while another account continues to hold or increase the holding in such security. While these accounts have many similarities, the investment performance of each account will be different due to differences in fees, expenses and cash flows.

Information Concerning Compensation of Portfolio Managers

Portfolio managers and other investment professionals at Pzena are compensated through a combination of a fixed base salary (set annually), performance bonus and equity ownership, if appropriate due to superior performance. The time frame that Pzena examines for bonus compensation is annual. Pzena considers both quantitative and qualitative

56


factors when determining performance bonuses; however, performance bonuses are not based on investment performance or assets under management. For investment professionals, Pzena examines such things as effort, efficiency, ability to focus on the correct issues, stock modeling ability, and ability to successfully interact with company management. However, Pzena always looks at the person as a whole and contributions that he/she has made and is likely to make in the future. Pzena avoids a compensation model that is driven by individual security performance, as this can lead to short-term thinking which is contrary to the firm's value investment philosophy. Ultimately, equity ownership is the primary tool used by Pzena for attracting and retaining the best people.

As a part of Pzena’s compensation package, eligible employees whose compensation is in excess of certain thresholds are required to defer a portion of that excess. These deferred amounts may be invested, at the employee's discretion, in certain designated investment options.

In terms of a retirement plan, Pzena offers a defined contribution profit sharing plan with a 401(k) deferral component. All full-time employees and certain part-time employees who have met the age and length of service requirements are eligible to participate in the plan. The plan allows participating employees to make elective deferrals of compensation up to the annual limits which are set by law. The plan provides for a discretionary annual contribution by the operating company which is determined by a formula based on the salaries of eligible employees as defined by the plan.

Portfolio Managers Ownership in the Fund. As of June 30, 2023, each portfolio manager that retained decision making authority over the Brown Advisory Emerging Markets Select Fund’s management beneficially owned shares of the Fund as summarized in the following table using the following ranges: None, $1-$10,000, $10,001-$50,000, $50,001-$100,000, $100,001-$500,000, $500,001-$1,000,000, and over $1,000,000.
Fund/Portfolio Manager Dollar Range of Beneficial Ownership in the Fund as of 6/30/23
Brown Advisory Emerging Markets Select Fund
Rakesh Bordia None
Caroline Cai None
Allison Fisch None
Akhil Subramanian None

Investment Sub-Adviser Brown Advisory – Beutel Goodman Large-Cap Value Fund

Services of the Sub-Adviser – Beutel, Goodman & Company Ltd.

Pursuant to a Sub-Advisory Agreement (“Sub-Advisory Agreement”) entered into between the Adviser and Beutel, Goodman & Company Ltd. (“Beutel Goodman” or the “Sub-Adviser”), on behalf of the Fund, Beutel Goodman manages the securities of the Fund and makes investment decisions for the Fund subject to such policies as the Board of Trustees may determine. By its terms, the Sub-Advisory Agreement will continue in effect for so as long as such continuance is specifically approved at least annually by the Board of Trustees or by a vote of a majority of the outstanding voting securities of the Fund, and, in either case, by a majority of the Trustees who are not parties to the Sub-Advisory Agreement or interested persons of any such party, at a meeting called for the purpose of voting on the Sub-Advisory Agreement. The Sub-Advisory Agreement can be terminated at any time by the Board of Trustees, the Adviser, or by a vote of a majority of the outstanding voting securities of the Fund, without payment of any penalty, on not less than 60 days’ written notice to Beutel Goodman, and Beutel Goodman may at any time, without the payment of any penalty, terminate the Sub-Advisory Agreement on not less than 60 days’ written notice to the Adviser. The Sub-Advisory Agreement automatically and immediately will terminate in the event of its assignment (as defined in the 1940 Act). The Adviser pays Beutel Goodman a fee equal to an annual rate of 0.225% of the average daily net assets of the segment of the Fund that it sub-advises.

Beutel Goodman’s activities are subject to general supervision by the Adviser and the Board of Trustees. Although the Adviser and the Board do not evaluate the investment merits of each of Beutel Goodman’s specific securities selections, they do review the performance of Beutel Goodman relative to the selection criteria.


57


The Adviser has ultimate responsibility for the investment performance of the Fund pursuant to its responsibility to oversee Beutel Goodman and recommend its hiring and/or replacement.

Ownership of the Sub-Adviser

Beutel Goodman is a privately-owned, independent Canadian investment manager with principal offices at 20 Eglinton Avenue West, Suite 2000, P.O. Box 2005, Toronto, Ontario, Canada M4R 1K8. Beutel Goodman is majority owned by its employees. Affiliated Managers Group, Inc., a Boston-based asset management holding company, holds a minority interest in the firm.

Information Regarding Portfolio Managers

The following information regarding the Brown Advisory – Beutel Goodman Large-Cap Value Fund’s portfolio managers has been provided by the Beutel Goodman.

Other Accounts Under Management. The table below identifies, for the portfolio managers of the Brown Advisory – Beutel Goodman Large-Cap Value, the number of accounts managed (excluding the Fund) and the total assets in such accounts, within each of the following categories: registered investment companies, other pooled investment vehicles, and other accounts. Information in the table is shown as of June 30, 2023. Asset amounts are approximate and have been rounded.
Number of Other Accounts Managed
and Assets by Account Type
Number of Accounts and Assets for which Advisory Fee is Performance Based
Portfolio Manager Registered Investment Companies Other Pooled Investment Vehicles Other
Accounts
Registered Investment Companies Other Pooled Investment Vehicles Other Accounts
Rui Cardoso 0 35 33 0 0 0
$0 $1.7 billion $3.7 billion $0 $0 $0
Glenn Fortin 0 35 33 0 0 0
$0 $1.7 billion $3.7 billion $0 $0 $0

Conflicts of Interest for the Portfolio Managers.

Beutel Goodman has adopted policies and procedures that address conflicts of interest that may arise between a portfolio manager’s management of the Fund and their management of other accounts.  Potential areas of conflict could involve allocation of investment opportunities and trades among the Fund and other accounts, use of information regarding the timing of the Fund’s trades, and personal investing activities.  Beutel Goodman has adopted policies and procedures that it believes are reasonably designed to address these conflicts.  However, there is no guarantee that such policies and procedures will be effective or that Beutel Goodman will anticipate all potential conflicts of interest.

Information Concerning Compensation of the Portfolio Managers.

The portfolio managers are compensated in various forms.  The portfolio managers’ salary and retirement plan benefits are not based directly on the performance of the Brown Advisory – Beutel Goodman Large-Cap Value Fund or the value of the Fund’s assets. Bonus compensation is based on the Brown Advisory – Beutel Goodman Large-Cap Value Fund’s performance as compared to peers and relevant indices, paid over rolling 3-year periods. Portfolio managers are also compensated through their ownership of private shares of Beutel Goodman.

Portfolio Managers Ownership in the Fund. As of June 30, 2023, each portfolio manager that retained decision making authority over the Brown Advisory – Beutel Goodman Large-Cap Value Fund’s management beneficially owned shares of the Fund as summarized in the following table using the following ranges: None, $1-$10,000, $10,001-$50,000, $50,001-$100,000, $100,001-$500,000, $500,001-$1,000,000, and over $1,000,000.

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Fund/Portfolio Manager Dollar Range of Beneficial Ownership in the Fund as of 6/30/23
Brown Advisory – Beutel Goodman Large-Cap Value
Rui Cardoso None
Glenn Fortin None

Advisory Fees

The Adviser’s fee is calculated as a percentage of each Fund’s average daily net assets. The fee, if not waived, is accrued daily by each Fund and is assessed to each class based on average net assets for the previous month. The Adviser’s fee is paid monthly based on average net assets for the prior month.

In addition to receiving its advisory fee from each Fund, the Adviser may also act and be compensated as investment manager for its clients with respect to assets they invested in each Fund. If you have a separately managed account with the Adviser with assets invested in a Fund, the Adviser will credit an amount equal to all or a portion of the fees received by the Adviser against any investment management fee received from you.

The Adviser may also receive compensation from certain omnibus account providers for providing shareholder services to Fund shareholders.

The following table shows the dollar amount of the fees payable by each Fund to the Adviser, the amount of fees waived by the Adviser, if any, and the actual fees received by the Adviser. The data presented are for the past three fiscal years (or shorter period depending on the Fund’s commencement of operations).
Advisory Fee Accrued Advisory Fee Waived and/or Expenses Reimbursed Recouped Fees and Expenses
Net Advisory Fee Received
Brown Advisory Growth Equity Fund
Year Ended June 30, 2023 $13,506,965 $0 $0 $13,506,965
Year Ended June 30, 2022 $18,486,503 $0 $0 $18,486,503
Year Ended June 30, 2021 $17,978,858 $0 $0 $17,978,858
Brown Advisory Flexible Equity Fund
Year Ended June 30, 2023 $2,735,029 $0 $0 $2,735,029
Year Ended June 30, 2022 $3,030,313 $0 $0 $3,030,313
Year Ended June 30, 2021 $2,584,772 $0 $0 $2,584,772
Brown Advisory Equity Income Fund
Year Ended June 30, 2023 $448,827 $40,287 $0 $408,540
Year Ended June 30, 2022 $536,524 $22,413 $0 $514,111
Year Ended June 30, 2021 $499,046 $20,506 $0 $478,540
Brown Advisory Sustainable Growth Fund
Year Ended June 30, 2023 $33,265,353 $0 $0 $33,265,353
Year Ended June 30, 2022 $34,035,634 $0 $0 $34,035,634
Year Ended June 30, 2021 $24,279,680 $0 $0 $24,279,680
Brown Advisory Mid-Cap Growth Fund
Year Ended June 30, 2023 $666,233 $11,288 $0 $654,945
Year Ended June 30, 2022 $1,109,834 $0 $0 $1,109,834
Year Ended June 30, 2021 $1,076,388 $53,751 $0 $1,022,637
Brown Advisory Small-Cap Growth Fund
Year Ended June 30, 2023 $17,438,315 $0 $0 $17,438,315
Year Ended June 30, 2022 $18,875,630 $0 $0 $18,875,630

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Advisory Fee Accrued Advisory Fee Waived and/or Expenses Reimbursed Recouped Fees and Expenses
Net Advisory Fee Received
Year Ended June 30, 2021 $18,464,400 $0 $0 $18,464,400
Brown Advisory Small-Cap Fundamental Value Fund
Year Ended June 30, 2023 $9,970,471 $0 $0 $9,970,471
Year Ended June 30, 2022 $10,801,132 $0 $0 $10,801,132
Year Ended June 30, 2021 $8,527,662 $0 $0 $8,527,662
Brown Advisory Sustainable Small-Cap Core Fund
Year Ended June 30, 2023 $356,117 $96,918 $0 $259,199
Period Ended June 30, 2022(1)
$174,352 $89,225 $0 $85,127
Brown Advisory Sustainable Value Fund
Period Ended June 30, 2023(2)
$72,075 $56,368 $0 $15,707
Brown Advisory Global Leaders Fund
Year Ended June 30, 2023 $8,068,001 $0 $0 $8,068,001
Year Ended June 30, 2022 $8,644,228 $0 $0 $8,644,228
Year Ended June 30, 2021 $6,218,766 $84,839 $0 $6,133,927
Brown Advisory Sustainable International Leaders Fund
Year Ended June 30, 2023 $113,574 $110,385 $0 $3,189
Period Ended June 30, 2022(3)
$13,196 $59,952 $0 $0
Brown Advisory Intermediate Income Fund
Year Ended June 30, 2023 $394,077 $47,084 $0 $346,993
Year Ended June 30, 2022 $480,515 $57,830 $0 $422,685
Year Ended June 30, 2021 $515,920 $61,405 $0 $454,515
Brown Advisory Sustainable Bond Fund
Year Ended June 30, 2023 $1,009,823 $0 $0 $1,009,823
Year Ended June 30, 2022 $830,744 $0 $0 $830,744
Year Ended June 30, 2021 $571,165 $0 $0 $571,165
Brown Advisory Maryland Bond Fund
Year Ended June 30, 2023 $497,156 $0 $0 $497,156
Year Ended June 30, 2022 $544,599 $0 $0 $544,599
Year Ended June 30, 2021 $537,860 $0 $0 $537,860
Brown Advisory Tax-Exempt Bond Fund
Year Ended June 30, 2023 $2,255,552 $0 $0 $2,255,552
Year Ended June 30, 2022 $3,409,119 $0 $0 $3,409,119
Year Ended June 30, 2021 $3,502,039 $0 $0 $3,502,039
Brown Advisory Tax-Exempt Sustainable Bond Fund
Year Ended June 30, 2023 $907,428 $0 $0 $907,428
Year Ended June 30, 2022 $687,162 $0 $0 $687,162
Year Ended June 30, 2021 $556,202 $0 $0 $556,202
Brown Advisory Mortgage Securities Fund
Year Ended June 30, 2023 $925,904 $0 $0 $925,904
Year Ended June 30, 2022 $981,317 $0 $0 $981,317
Year Ended June 30, 2021 $847,679 $0 $0 $847,679

60


Advisory Fee Accrued Advisory Fee Waived and/or Expenses Reimbursed Recouped Fees and Expenses
Net Advisory Fee Received
Brown Advisory – WMC Strategic European Equity Fund
Year Ended June 30, 2023 $1,944,111 $0 $0 $1,944,111
Year Ended June 30, 2022 $3,814,032 $0 $0 $3,814,032
Year Ended June 30, 2021 $3,363,975 $0 $0 $3,363,975
Brown Advisory Emerging Markets Select Fund
Year Ended June 30, 2023 $4,475,037 $0 $0 $4,475,037
Year Ended June 30, 2022 $5,087,303 $0 $0 $5,087,303
Year Ended June 30, 2021 $3,581,760 $0 $0 $3,581,760
Brown Advisory – Beutel Goodman Large-Cap Value Fund
Year Ended June 30, 2023 $6,619,867 $0 $0 $6,619,867
Year Ended June 30, 2022 $5,464,300 $0 $0 $5,464,300
Year Ended June 30, 2021 $3,455,323 $0 $0 $3,455,323
1.The Brown Advisory Sustainable Small-Cap Core Fund commenced operations on October 1, 2021.
2.The Brown Advisory Sustainable Value Fund commenced operations on February 28, 2023.
3.The Brown Advisory Sustainable International Leaders Fund commenced operations on March 1, 2022.

For the fiscal year ended June 30, 2023, the Adviser waived $40,287 in expenses for the Equity Income Fund, $11,288 in expenses for the Mid-Cap Growth Fund, $96,918 in expenses for the Sustainable Small-Cap Core Fund, $56,368 in expenses for the Sustainable Value Fund, and $110,385 in expenses for the Sustainable International Leaders Fund. The Adviser may recoup any waived amounts from the Funds if such reimbursement does not cause the Funds to exceed its existing expense limitations or the limitation in place at the time the reduction was originally made and the amount recouped is made within three years after the date on which the Adviser incurred the expense. The Funds must pay their current ordinary operating expenses before the Adviser is entitled to any recoupment of previously waived fees and/or expenses. At June 30, 2023, the cumulative amounts of previously waived fees that the Adviser may recoup from the Funds is shown in the following table:
Fund June 30,
2024 2025 2026 Total
Brown Advisory Equity Income Fund $20,506 $22,413 $40,287 $83,206
Brown Advisory Mid-Cap Growth Fund $53,751 $11,288 $65,039
Brown Advisory Sustainable Small-Cap Core Fund N/A