Neuberger Berman Income Funds

 

 

    Investor Class
Neuberger Berman Core Bond Fund   NCRIX
Neuberger Berman High Income Bond Fund   NHINX
Neuberger Berman Municipal Intermediate Bond Fund   NMUIX
Neuberger Berman Short Duration Bond Fund   NSBIX

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Prospectus February 28, 2023

 

These securities, like the securities of all mutual funds, have not been approved or disapproved by the Securities and Exchange Commission, and the Securities and Exchange Commission has not determined if this prospectus is accurate or complete. Any representation to the contrary is a criminal offense.

 

 

Table of Contents

 

 

Contents

NEUBERGER BERMAN INCOME FUNDS

Fund Summaries    
Neuberger Berman Core Bond Fund   2
Neuberger Berman High Income Bond Fund   12
Neuberger Berman Municipal Intermediate Bond Fund   22
Neuberger Berman Short Duration Bond Fund   31
Descriptions of Certain Practices and Security Types   41
Additional Information about Principal Investment Risks   42
Information about Additional Risks and Other Practices   56
Descriptions of Indices   56
Management of the Funds   57
Financial Highlights   60
YOUR INVESTMENT    
Share Prices   64
Privileges and Services   65
Distributions and Taxes   66
Maintaining Your Account   68
Buying Shares   73
Selling Shares   74
Market Timing Policy   75
Portfolio Holdings Policy   75
Fund Structure   76

 

 

Table of Contents

 

Fund Summaries

Neuberger Berman Core Bond Fund

Investor Class Shares (NCRIX)

 

GOAL

The Fund seeks to maximize total return consistent with capital preservation.

 

FEES AND EXPENSES

These tables describe the fees and expenses that you may pay if you buy, hold or sell shares of the Fund. You may pay other fees, such as brokerage commissions and other fees to financial intermediaries, which are not reflected in the table and example below.

 

     
Shareholder Fees (fees paid directly from your investment)   None

     
Annual Fund Operating Expenses (expenses that you pay each year as a % of the value of your investment)    
Management fees   0.45
Distribution and/or shareholder service (12b-1) fees   0.25
Other expenses   0.23
Total annual operating expenses   0.93
Fee waivers and/or expense reimbursement   0.15
Total annual operating expenses after fee waiver and/or expense reimbursement1   0.78

 

1 Neuberger Berman Investment Advisers LLC (“Manager”) has contractually undertaken to waive and/or reimburse certain fees and expenses of Investor Class so that the total annual operating expenses (excluding interest, brokerage commissions, acquired fund fees and expenses, taxes including any expenses relating to tax reclaims, dividend and interest expenses relating to short sales, and extraordinary expenses, if any) (“annual operating expenses”) of that class are limited to 0.78% of average net assets. This undertaking lasts until 10/31/2026 and may not be terminated during its term without the consent of the Board of Trustees. The Fund has agreed that Investor Class will repay the Manager for fees and expenses waived or reimbursed for the class provided that repayment does not cause annual operating expenses to exceed 0.78% of the class’ average net assets. Any such repayment must be made within three years after the year in which the Manager incurred the expense.

 

Expense Example

The expense example can help you compare costs among mutual funds. The example assumes that you invested $10,000 for the periods shown, that you redeemed all of your shares at the end of those periods, that the Fund earned a hypothetical 5% total return each year, and that the Fund’s expenses were those in the table. Actual performance and expenses may be higher or lower.

 

    1 Year   3 Years   5 Years   10 Years
Investor Class   $80   $249   $468   $1,099

 

Portfolio Turnover

The Fund pays transaction costs, such as commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or “turns over” its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover rate may indicate higher transaction costs and may result in higher taxes when Fund shares are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are not reflected in annual operating expenses or in the example, affect the Fund’s performance. During the most recent fiscal year, the Fund’s portfolio turnover rate was 164% of the average value of its portfolio. During the most recent fiscal year, the Fund’s portfolio turnover rate including to-be-announced (“TBA”) roll transactions was 226%.

 

PRINCIPAL INVESTMENT STRATEGIES

To pursue its goal, the Fund normally invests in a diversified mix of debt securities, which primarily include government bonds, corporate bonds, mortgage-backed securities and asset-backed securities.

 

The Fund may invest in a broad array of securities, including: securities issued or guaranteed as to principal or interest by the U.S. government or any of its agencies or instrumentalities; municipal securities; foreign securities, including emerging markets; securities issued by supranational entities (e.g., World Bank, IMF); corporate bonds; mortgage-backed and asset-backed securities; inflation-linked debt securities; and commercial paper. Securities in which the Fund may invest may be issued by domestic and foreign governments, corporate entities and trusts and may be structured as fixed rate debt, floating rate debt, and debt that may not pay interest from the time of issuance. The Fund may also engage in when-issued and forward-settling securities (such as to-be-announced (“TBA”) mortgage-backed securities), which involve a commitment by the Fund to purchase securities that will be issued or settled at a later date. The Fund may enter into a TBA agreement and “roll over” such agreement prior to the settlement

 

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date by selling the obligation to purchase the securities set forth in the agreement and entering into a new TBA agreement for future delivery of pools of mortgage-backed securities.

 

The debt securities in which the Fund invests primarily are investment grade. The Fund considers debt securities to be investment grade if, at the time of investment, they are rated within the four highest categories by at least one independent credit rating agency or, if unrated, are determined by the Portfolio Managers to be of comparable quality.

 

The Fund may also invest in derivative instruments as a means of hedging risk and/or for investment or efficient portfolio management purposes, which may include altering the Fund’s exposure to currencies, interest rates, inflation, sectors and individual issuers. These derivative instruments may include futures, forward foreign currency contracts, and swaps, such as total return swaps, credit default swaps and interest rate swaps.

 

The Fund normally will not invest more than 15% of its total assets in non-U.S. dollar denominated securities and, through hedging strategies, will attempt to limit its exposure to currencies other than the U.S. dollar to 5% of its total assets.

 

Additionally, the Fund may invest in preferred securities. The Fund may also invest a significant amount of its assets in U.S. Treasury securities or other money market instruments depending on market conditions.

 

The Fund normally seeks to maintain its target average duration within one year of the average duration of the bonds in the Bloomberg U.S. Aggregate Bond Index, and, depending on market conditions, at times, the Fund may generally seek to maintain its target average duration within a maximum of two years of the average duration of the bonds in the Bloomberg U.S. Aggregate Bond Index.

 

In an effort to achieve its goal, the Fund may engage in active and frequent trading.

 

The Fund normally invests at least 80% of its net assets in bonds and other debt securities and other investment companies that provide investment exposure to such debt securities. The Fund will not alter this policy without providing shareholders at least 60 days’ notice. This test is applied at the time the Fund invests; later percentage changes caused by a change in Fund assets, market values or company circumstances will not require the Fund to dispose of a holding.

 

Investment Philosophy and Process

The Portfolio Management Team’s investment philosophy is rooted in the belief that positive results can be achieved through a consistently applied, risk-managed approach to portfolio management that leverages the strengths of its proprietary fundamental research capabilities, decision-making frameworks, and quantitative risk management tools. The Portfolio Management Team employs an integrated investment process in managing the Fund.

 

Portfolio Strategy: The Portfolio Management Team establishes the investment profile for the Fund, which it monitors on an ongoing basis, including exposures to sectors (such as government, structured debt, credit, etc.) and duration/yield curve positioning, utilizing internally generated data that are produced by specialty sector investment teams in conjunction with asset allocation tools.

 

Strategy Implementation: Once the Portfolio Management Team establishes the investment profile for the Fund, the specialty sector investment teams and the Portfolio Management Team determine industry/sub-sector weightings and make securities selections within the types of securities that the Fund can purchase, such as investment grade securities and non-U.S. dollar denominated securities.

 

When assessing the value of a particular security, the teams utilize internally generated research and proprietary quantitatively driven tools and frameworks (including an analysis of cash flows, ability to pay principal and interest, balance sheet composition, and market positioning) to a) establish an internal outlook, b) evaluate the market’s outlook as it is reflected in asset prices, and c) contrast the two. As part of their fundamental investment analysis, the Portfolio Managers consider Environmental, Social and Governance (ESG) factors they believe are financially material to individual investments, where applicable, as described below. While this analysis is inherently subjective and may be informed by internally generated and third-party metrics, data and other information, the Portfolio Managers believe that the consideration of financially material ESG factors, alongside traditional financial metrics, may improve credit analysis, security selection, relative value analysis and enhance the Fund’s overall investment process. The specific ESG factors considered and scope and application of integration may vary depending on the specific investment and/or investment type. The consideration of ESG factors does not apply to certain instruments, such as certain derivative instruments, other registered investment companies, cash and cash equivalents. The consideration of ESG factors as part of the investment process does not mean that the Fund pursues a specific “impact” or “sustainable” investment strategy.

 

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The teams will generally purchase securities if their internal outlook suggests a security is undervalued by the market and sell securities if their internal outlook suggests a security is overvalued by the market. The goal is to identify and evaluate investment opportunities that others may have missed.

 

PRINCIPAL INVESTMENT RISKS

Most of the Fund’s performance depends on what happens in the market for debt instruments, the Portfolio Managers’ evaluation of those developments, and the success of the Portfolio Managers in implementing the Fund’s investment strategies. The Fund’s use of derivative instruments will result in leverage, which amplifies the risks that are associated with these markets. The market’s behavior can be difficult to predict, particularly in the short term. There can be no guarantee that the Fund will achieve its goal. The Fund may take temporary defensive and cash management positions; to the extent it does, it will not be pursuing its principal investment strategies.

 

The actual risk exposure taken by the Fund in its investment program will vary over time, depending on various factors including the Portfolio Managers’ evaluation of issuer, political, regulatory, market, or economic developments. There can be no guarantee that the Portfolio Managers will be successful in their attempts to manage the risk exposure of the Fund or will appropriately evaluate or weigh the multiple factors involved in investment decisions, including issuer, market and/or instrument-specific analysis, valuation and environmental, social and governance factors.

 

The Fund is a mutual fund, not a bank deposit, and is not guaranteed or insured by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation or any other government agency. The value of your investment may fall, sometimes sharply, and you could lose money by investing in the Fund.

 

Each of the following risks, which are described in alphabetical order and not in order of any presumed importance, can significantly affect the Fund’s performance. The relative importance of, or potential exposure as a result of, each of these risks will vary based on market and other investment-specific considerations.

 

Call Risk. Upon the issuer’s desire to call a security, or under other circumstances where a security is called, including when interest rates are low and issuers opt to repay the obligation underlying a “callable security” early, the Fund may have to reinvest the proceeds in an investment offering a lower yield and may not benefit from any increase in value that might otherwise result from declining interest rates.

 

Commercial Paper Risk. Commercial paper is a short-term debt security issued by a corporation, bank, municipality, or other issuer. Issuers generally do not register their commercial paper with the SEC. While some unregistered commercial paper normally is deemed illiquid, the Manager may in certain cases determine that such paper is liquid. In some cases, the ratings of commercial paper issuers have been downgraded abruptly, leaving holders with little opportunity to avoid losses.

 

Credit Risk. Credit risk is the risk that issuers, guarantors, or insurers may fail, or become less able or unwilling, to pay interest and/or principal when due. Changes in the actual or perceived creditworthiness of an issuer or a downgrade or default affecting any of the Fund’s securities could affect the Fund’s performance by affecting the credit quality or value of the Fund’s securities. Generally, the longer the maturity and the lower the credit quality of a security, the more sensitive it is to credit risk.

 

Currency Risk. Currency risk is the risk that foreign currencies will decline in value relative to the U.S. dollar. To the extent that the Fund invests in securities or other instruments denominated in or indexed to foreign currencies, changes in currency exchange rates could adversely impact investment gains or add to investment losses. Currency exchange rates may fluctuate significantly over short periods of time and can be affected unpredictably by various factors, including investor perception and changes in interest rates; intervention, or failure to intervene, by U.S. or foreign governments, central banks, or supranational entities; or by currency controls or political developments in the U.S. or abroad.

 

Derivatives Risk. Use of derivatives is a highly specialized activity that can involve investment techniques and risks different from, and in some respects greater than, those associated with investing in more traditional investments, such as stocks and bonds. Derivatives can be highly complex and highly volatile and may perform in unanticipated ways. Derivatives can create leverage, and the Fund could lose more than the amount it invests; some derivatives can have the potential for unlimited losses. Derivatives may at times be highly illiquid, and the Fund may not be able to close out or sell a derivative at a particular time or at an anticipated price. Derivatives can be difficult to value and valuation may be more difficult in times of market turmoil. The value of a derivative instrument depends largely on (and is derived from) the value of the reference instrument underlying the derivative. There may be imperfect correlation between the behavior of a derivative and that of the reference instrument underlying the derivative. An abrupt change in the price of a reference instrument could render a derivative worthless. Derivatives may involve risks different from, and possibly greater than, the risks associated with investing directly in the reference instrument. Suitable derivatives may not be available in all circumstances, and there can be no assurance that the Fund will use derivatives to reduce

 

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exposure to other risks when that might have been beneficial. Derivatives involve counterparty risk, which is the risk that the other party to the derivative will fail to make required payments or otherwise comply with the terms of the derivative. That risk is generally thought to be greater with over-the-counter (OTC) derivatives than with derivatives that are exchange traded or centrally cleared. When the Fund uses derivatives, it will likely be required to provide margin or collateral; these practices are intended to satisfy contractual undertakings and regulatory requirements and will not prevent the Fund from incurring losses on derivatives. The need to provide margin or collateral could limit the Fund’s ability to pursue other opportunities as they arise. Ongoing changes to regulation of the derivatives markets and actual and potential changes in the regulation of funds using derivative instruments could limit the Fund’s ability to pursue its investment strategies. New regulation of derivatives may make them more costly, or may otherwise adversely affect their liquidity, value or performance.

 

Additional risks associated with certain types of derivatives are discussed below:

 

Forward Contracts. There are no limitations on daily price movements of forward contracts. Changes in foreign exchange regulations by governmental authorities might limit the trading of forward contracts on currencies.

 

Futures. Futures contracts are subject to the risk that an exchange may impose price fluctuation limits, which may make it difficult or impossible for a fund to close out a position when desired. In the absence of such limits, the liquidity of the futures market depends on participants entering into offsetting transactions rather than taking or making delivery. To the extent a Fund enters into futures contracts requiring physical delivery (e.g., certain commodities contracts), the inability of the Fund to take or make physical delivery can negatively impact performance.

 

Swaps. The risk of loss with respect to swaps generally is limited to the net amount of payments that the Fund is contractually obligated to make or, in the case of the other party to a swap defaulting, the net amount of payments that the Fund is contractually entitled to receive. If the Fund sells a credit default swap, however, the risk of loss may be the entire notional amount of the swap.

 

Some swaps are now executed through an organized exchange or regulated facility and cleared through a regulated clearing organization. The absence of an organized exchange or market for swap transactions may result in difficulties in trading and valuation, especially in the event of market disruptions. The use of an organized exchange or market for swap transactions is expected to result in swaps being easier to trade or value, but this may not always be the case.

 

Foreign and Emerging Market Risk. Foreign securities, including those issued by foreign governments, involve risks in addition to those associated with comparable U.S. securities. Additional risks include exposure to less developed or less efficient trading markets; social, political, diplomatic, or economic instability; trade barriers and other protectionist trade policies (including those of the U.S.); imposition of economic sanctions against a particular country or countries, organizations, companies, entities and/or individuals; significant government involvement in an economy and/or market structure; fluctuations in foreign currencies or currency redenomination; potential for default on sovereign debt; nationalization or expropriation of assets; settlement, custodial or other operational risks; higher transaction costs; confiscatory withholding or other taxes; and less stringent auditing and accounting, corporate disclosure, governance, and legal standards. As a result, foreign securities may fluctuate more widely in price, and may also be less liquid, than comparable U.S. securities. Regardless of where a company is organized or its stock is traded, its performance may be affected significantly by events in regions from which it derives its profits or in which it conducts significant operations.

 

Investing in emerging market countries involves risks in addition to and greater than those generally associated with investing in more developed foreign countries. The governments of emerging market countries may be more unstable and more likely to impose capital controls, nationalize a company or industry, place restrictions on foreign ownership and on withdrawing sale proceeds of securities from the country, intervene in the financial markets, and/or impose burdensome taxes that could adversely affect security prices. To the extent a foreign security is denominated in U.S. dollars, there is also the risk that a foreign government will not let U.S. dollar-denominated assets leave the country. In addition, the economies of emerging market countries may be dependent on relatively few industries that are more susceptible to local and global changes. Emerging market countries may also have less developed legal and accounting systems, and their legal systems may deal with issuer bankruptcies and defaults differently than U.S. law would. Securities markets in emerging market countries are also relatively small and have substantially lower trading volumes. Securities of issuers in emerging market countries may be more volatile and less liquid than securities of issuers in foreign countries with more developed economies or markets and the situation may require that the Fund fair value its holdings in those countries.

 

Securities of issuers traded on foreign exchanges may be suspended, either by the issuers themselves, by an exchange, or by governmental authorities. The likelihood of such suspensions may be higher for securities of issuers in emerging or less-developed

 

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market countries than in countries with more developed markets. Trading suspensions may be applied from time to time to the securities of individual issuers for reasons specific to that issuer, or may be applied broadly by exchanges or governmental authorities in response to market events. Suspensions may last for significant periods of time, during which trading in the securities and in instruments that reference the securities, such as derivative instruments, may be halted. In the event that the Fund holds material positions in such suspended securities or instruments, the Fund’s ability to liquidate its positions or provide liquidity to investors may be compromised and the Fund could incur significant losses.

 

High Portfolio Turnover. The Fund may engage in active and frequent trading and may have a high portfolio turnover rate, which may increase the Fund’s transaction costs, may adversely affect the Fund’s performance and may generate a greater amount of capital gain distributions to shareholders than if the Fund had a low portfolio turnover rate.

 

Inflation-Linked Debt Securities Risk. Inflation-linked debt securities are structured to provide protection against inflation. The value of the principal or the interest income paid on an inflation-linked debt security is adjusted to track changes in an official inflation measure. There can be no assurance that the inflation measure used will accurately measure the real rate of inflation in the prices of goods and services. The value of inflation-linked debt securities is expected to change in response to changes in real interest rates. Real interest rates are tied to the relationship between nominal interest rates and the rate of inflation. In general, the price of an inflation-linked debt security falls when real interest rates rise, and rises when real interest rates fall. Interest payments on inflation-linked debt securities will vary as the principal and/or interest is adjusted for inflation and can be unpredictable. In periods of deflation, the Fund may have no income at all from such investments.

 

The principal value of an investment in the Fund is not protected or otherwise guaranteed by virtue of the Fund’s investments in inflation-linked debt securities.

 

Interest Rate Risk. The Fund’s yield and share price will fluctuate in response to changes in interest rates. In general, the value of investments with interest rate risk, such as debt securities, will move in the direction opposite to movements in interest rates. If interest rates rise, the value of such securities may decline. Typically, the longer the maturity or duration of a debt security, the greater the effect a change in interest rates could have on the security’s price. Thus, the sensitivity of the Fund’s debt securities to interest rate risk will increase with any increase in the duration of those securities.

 

Issuer-Specific Risk. An individual security may be more volatile, and may perform differently, than the market as a whole.

 

Leverage Risk. Leverage amplifies changes in the Fund’s net asset value and may make the Fund more volatile. Derivatives and when-issued and forward-settling securities may create leverage and can result in losses to the Fund that exceed the amount originally invested and may accelerate the rate of losses. There can be no assurance that the Fund’s use of any leverage will be successful. The Fund’s investment exposure can exceed its net assets, sometimes by a significant amount.

 

Liquidity Risk. From time to time, the trading market for a particular investment in which the Fund invests, or a particular type of instrument in which the Fund is invested, may become less liquid or even illiquid. Illiquid investments frequently can be more difficult to purchase or sell at an advantageous price or time, and there is a greater risk that the investments may not be sold for the price at which the Fund is carrying them. Certain investments that were liquid when the Fund purchased them may become illiquid, sometimes abruptly. Additionally, market closures due to holidays or other factors may render a security or group of securities (e.g., securities tied to a particular country or geographic region) illiquid for a period of time. An inability to sell a portfolio position can adversely affect the Fund’s value or prevent the Fund from being able to take advantage of other investment opportunities. Market prices for such securities or other investments may be volatile. During periods of substantial market volatility, an investment or even an entire market segment may become illiquid, sometimes abruptly, which can adversely affect the Fund’s ability to limit losses.

 

Unexpected episodes of illiquidity, including due to market or political factors, instrument or issuer-specific factors and/or unanticipated outflows, may limit the Fund’s ability to pay redemption proceeds within the allowable time period. To meet redemption requests during periods of illiquidity, the Fund may be forced to sell securities at an unfavorable time and/or under unfavorable conditions.

 

Market Volatility Risk. Markets may be volatile and values of individual securities and other investments, including those of a particular type, may decline significantly in response to adverse issuer, political, regulatory, market, economic or other developments that may cause broad changes in market value, public perceptions concerning these developments, and adverse investor sentiment or publicity. Geopolitical and other risks, including environmental and public health risks may add to instability in world economies and markets generally. Changes in value may be temporary or may last for extended periods. If the Fund sells a portfolio position before it reaches its market peak, it may miss out on opportunities for better performance.

 

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Mortgage- and Asset-Backed Securities Risk. The value of mortgage- and asset-backed securities, including collateralized mortgage instruments, will be influenced by the factors affecting the housing market or the assets underlying the securities. These securities tend to be more sensitive to changes in interest rates than other types of debt securities. In addition, investments in mortgage- and asset-backed securities may be subject to prepayment risk and extension risk, call risk, credit risk, valuation risk, and illiquid investment risk, sometimes to a higher degree than various other types of debt securities. These securities are also subject to the risk of default on the underlying mortgages or assets, particularly during periods of market downturn, and an unexpectedly high rate of defaults on the underlying assets will adversely affect the security’s value.

 

Municipal Securities Risk. The municipal securities market could be significantly affected by adverse political and legislative changes, as well as uncertainties related to taxation or the rights of municipal security holders. Changes in the financial health of a municipality or other issuer, or an insurer of municipal securities, may make it difficult for it to pay interest and principal when due and may affect the overall municipal securities market. To the extent that the Fund invests a significant portion of its assets in the municipal securities of a particular state or U.S. territory or possession, there is greater risk that political, regulatory, economic or other developments within that jurisdiction may have a significant impact on the Fund’s investment performance. Declines in real estate prices and general business activity may reduce the tax revenues of state and local governments. Municipal issuers have on occasion defaulted on obligations, been downgraded, or commenced insolvency proceedings.

 

Because many municipal securities are issued to finance similar types of projects, especially those related to education, health care, housing, transportation, and utilities, conditions in those sectors can affect the overall municipal securities market. Interest on municipal securities paid out of current or anticipated revenues from a specific project or specific asset (so-called “private activity bonds”) are generally not backed by the creditworthiness or taxing authority of the issuing governmental entity; rather, a particular business or facility may be the only source of revenue supporting payment of interest and principal, and declines in general business activity could affect the economic viability of that business or facility.

 

Municipal bonds may be bought or sold at a market discount (i.e., a price less than the bond’s principal amount or, in the case of a bond issued with original issue discount (“OID”), a price less than the amount of the issue price plus accrued OID). If the market discount is more than a de minimis amount, and if the bond has a maturity date of more than one year from the date it was issued, then any market discount that accrues annually, or any gains earned on the disposition of the bond, generally will be subject to federal income taxation as ordinary (taxable) income rather than as capital gains. Some municipal securities may include transfer restrictions similar to restricted securities (e.g., may only be transferred to qualified institutional buyers and purchasers meeting other qualification requirements set by the issuer). As such, it may be difficult to sell municipal securities at a time when it may otherwise be desirable to do so or the Fund may be able to sell them only at prices that are less than what the Fund regards as their fair market value.

 

Preferred Securities Risk. Preferred securities, which are a form of hybrid security (i.e., a security with both debt and equity characteristics), may pay fixed or adjustable rates of return. Preferred securities are subject to issuer-specific and market risks applicable generally to equity securities, however, unlike common stocks, participation in the growth of an issuer may be limited. Distributions on preferred securities are generally payable at the discretion of the issuer’s board of directors and after the company makes required payments to holders of its debt securities. For this reason, preferred securities are subject to greater credit, interest, and liquidation risk than debt securities, and the value of preferred securities will usually react more strongly than debt securities to actual or perceived changes in the company’s financial condition or prospects. Preferred securities of smaller companies may be more vulnerable to adverse developments than preferred securities of larger companies. Preferred securities may be less liquid than common stocks.

 

Prepayment and Extension Risk. The Fund’s performance could be affected if borrowers pay back principal on certain debt securities, such as mortgage- or asset-backed securities, before (prepayment) or after (extension) the market anticipates such payments, shortening or lengthening their duration. Due to a decline in interest rates or an excess in cash flow into the issuer, a debt security might be called or otherwise converted, prepaid or redeemed before maturity. As a result of prepayment, the Fund may have to reinvest the proceeds in an investment offering a lower yield, may not benefit from any increase in value that might otherwise result from declining interest rates, and may lose any premium it paid to acquire the security. Conversely, rising market interest rates generally result in slower payoffs or extension, which effectively increases the duration of certain debt securities, heightening interest rate risk and increasing the magnitude of any resulting price declines.

 

Recent Market Conditions. Both U.S. and international markets have experienced significant volatility in recent months and years. As a result of such volatility, investment returns may fluctuate significantly. National economies are substantially interconnected, as are global financial markets, which creates the possibility that conditions in one country or region might

 

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adversely impact issuers in a different country or region. However, the interconnectedness of economies and/or markets may be diminishing, which may impact such economies and markets in ways that cannot be foreseen at this time.

 

Although interest rates were unusually low in recent years in the U.S. and abroad, recently, the Federal Reserve and certain foreign central banks began to raise interest rates as part of their efforts to address rising inflation. It is difficult to accurately predict the pace at which interest rates might increase, or the timing, frequency or magnitude of any such increases in interest rates. Additionally, various economic and political factors could cause the Federal Reserve or other foreign central banks to change their approach in the future and such actions may result in an economic slowdown both in the U.S. and abroad. Unexpected increases in interest rates could lead to market volatility or reduce liquidity in certain sectors of the market. Deteriorating economic fundamentals may, in turn, increase the risk of default or insolvency of particular issuers, negatively impact market value, cause credit spreads to widen, and reduce bank balance sheets. Any of these could cause an increase in market volatility or reduce liquidity across various markets.

 

Some countries, including the U.S., have in recent years adopted more protectionist trade policies. Slowing global economic growth, the rise in protectionist trade policies, changes to some major international trade agreements, risks associated with the trade agreement between the United Kingdom and the European Union, and the risks associated with ongoing trade negotiations with China, could affect the economies of many nations in ways that cannot necessarily be foreseen at the present time. In addition, the current strength of the U.S. dollar may decrease foreign demand for U.S. assets, which could have a negative impact on certain issuers and/or industries.

 

Regulators in the U.S. have proposed a number of changes to regulations involving the markets and issuers, some of which would apply to the Fund. While it is not currently known whether any of these regulations will be adopted, due to the current scope of regulations being proposed, any changes to regulation could limit the Fund’s ability to pursue its investment strategies or make certain investments, may make it more costly for it to operate, which, may in turn, impact performance.

 

Russia’s invasion of the Ukraine, and corresponding events in late February 2022, have had, and could continue to have, severe adverse effects on regional and global economic markets for securities and commodities. Moreover, those events have, and could continue to have, an adverse effect on global markets performance and liquidity, thereby negatively affecting the value of the Fund’s investments. The duration of ongoing hostilities and the vast array of sanctions and related events cannot be predicted. Those events present material uncertainty and risk with respect to markets globally and the performance of the Fund and its investments or operations could be negatively impacted.

 

The impact of the COVID-19 pandemic has negatively affected and could continue to affect the economies of many nations, individual companies and the global securities and commodities markets, including their liquidity, in ways that cannot necessarily be foreseen at the present time. Epidemics and/or pandemics, such as the coronavirus, have and may further result in, among other things, closing borders, extended quarantines and stay-at-home orders, order cancellations, disruptions to supply chains and customer activity, widespread business closures and layoffs, as well as general concern and uncertainty.

 

High public debt in the U.S. and other countries creates ongoing systemic and market risks and policymaking uncertainty. There is no assurance that the U.S. Congress will act to raise the nation’s debt ceiling; a failure to do so could cause market turmoil and substantial investment risks that cannot now be fully predicted. Unexpected political, regulatory and diplomatic events within the U.S. and abroad may affect investor and consumer confidence and may adversely impact financial markets and the broader economy.

 

There is widespread concern about the potential effects of global climate change on property and security values. Certain issuers, industries and regions may be adversely affected by the impact of climate change in ways that cannot be foreseen. The impact of legislation, regulation and international accords related to climate change may negatively impact certain issuers and/or industries.

 

LIBOR Transition. Certain financial contracts around the world specify rates that are based on the London Interbank Offered Rate (LIBOR), which is produced daily by averaging the rates for inter-bank lending reported by a number of banks. As previously announced by the United Kingdom’s Financial Conduct Authority, most maturities and currencies of LIBOR were phased out at the end of 2021, with the remaining ones to be phased out on June 30, 2023. There are risks that the financial services industry will not have a suitable substitute in place by that time and that there will not be time to perform the substantial work necessary to revise the many existing contracts that rely on LIBOR. The transition process, or a failure of the industry to transition properly, might lead to increased volatility and illiquidity in markets that currently rely on LIBOR. It also could lead to a reduction in the value of some LIBOR-based investments and reduce the effectiveness of new hedges placed against existing LIBOR-based instruments. New York and federal legislation has been enacted to ease the transition from LIBOR, but there is no assurance whether such legislation will adequately address all issues or be subject to litigation.

 

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Redemption Risk. The Fund may experience periods of large or frequent redemptions that could cause the Fund to sell assets at inopportune times, which could have a negative impact on the Fund’s overall liquidity, or at a loss or depressed value. Redemption risk is greater to the extent that one or more investors or intermediaries control a large percentage of investments in the Fund and the risk is heightened during periods of declining or illiquid markets. Large redemptions could hurt the Fund’s performance, increase transaction costs, and create adverse tax consequences. A general rise in interest rates has the potential to cause investors to move out of fixed income securities on a large scale, which may increase redemptions from mutual funds that hold large amounts of fixed income securities; such a move, coupled with a reduction in the ability or willingness of dealers and other institutional investors to buy or hold fixed income securities, may result in decreased liquidity and increased volatility in the fixed income markets.

 

Sector Risk. From time to time, based on market or economic conditions, the Fund may have significant positions in one or more sectors of the market. To the extent the Fund invests more heavily in particular sectors, its performance will be especially sensitive to developments that significantly affect those sectors. Individual sectors may be more volatile, and may perform differently, than the broader market. The industries that constitute a sector may all react in the same way to economic, political or regulatory events.

 

Sovereign and Supranational Entities Debt Risk. Sovereign debt securities are subject to the risk that a governmental entity may delay or refuse to pay interest or principal on its sovereign debt, due, for example, to cash flow problems, insufficient foreign currency reserves, political considerations, the size of the governmental entity’s debt position in relation to the economy, its policy toward international lenders or the failure to put in place economic reforms required by multilateral agencies. If a governmental entity defaults, it may ask for more time in which to pay or for further loans. There may be no legal process for collecting sovereign debt that a government does not pay nor are there bankruptcy proceedings through which all or part of the sovereign debt that a governmental entity has not repaid may be collected. Sovereign debt risk is increased for emerging market issuers.

 

The Fund may also invest in obligations issued or guaranteed by supranational entities, such as the World Bank. Supranational entities have no taxing authority and are dependent on their members for payments of interest and principal. If one or more members of a supranational entity fails to make necessary contributions, such entity may be unable to pay interest or repay principal on its debt securities. Political changes in principal donor nations may unexpectedly disrupt the finances of supranational entities.

 

U.S. Government Securities Risk. Although the Fund may hold securities that carry U.S. government guarantees, these guarantees do not extend to shares of the Fund itself and do not guarantee the market prices of the securities. Furthermore, not all securities issued by the U.S. government and its agencies and instrumentalities are backed by the full faith and credit of the U.S. Treasury. Securities not backed by the full faith and credit of the U.S. Treasury carry at least some risk of non-payment or default.

 

Variable and Floating Rate Instruments Risk. The market prices of instruments with variable and floating interest rates are generally less sensitive to interest rate changes than are the market prices of instruments with fixed interest rates. Variable and floating rate instruments may decline in value if market interest rates or interest rates paid by such instruments do not move as expected. Certain types of floating rate instruments, such as interests in bank loans, may be subject to greater liquidity risk than other debt securities.

 

When-Issued and Forward-Settling Securities Risk. When-issued and forward-settling securities can have a leverage-like effect on the Fund, which can increase fluctuations in the Fund’s share price; may cause the Fund to liquidate positions when it may not be advantageous to do so, in order to satisfy its purchase obligations; and are subject to the risk that the security will not be issued or that a counterparty will fail to complete the sale or purchase of the security, in which case the Fund may lose the opportunity to purchase or sell the security at the agreed upon price and any gain in the security’s price.

 

A summary of the Fund’s additional principal investment risks is as follows:

 

Risk of Increase in Expenses. A decline in the Fund’s average net assets during the current fiscal year due to market volatility or other factors could cause the Fund’s expenses for the current fiscal year to be higher than the expense information presented in “Fees and Expenses.”

 

Operational and Cybersecurity Risk. The Fund and its service providers, and your ability to transact with the Fund, may be negatively impacted due to operational matters arising from, among other problems, human errors, systems and technology disruptions or failures, or cybersecurity incidents. Cybersecurity incidents may allow an unauthorized party to gain access to fund assets, customer data, or proprietary information, or cause the Fund or its service providers, as well as the securities trading venues and their service providers, to suffer data corruption or lose operational functionality. Cybersecurity incidents can result from deliberate attacks or unintentional events. It is not possible for the Manager or the other Fund service providers to identify all of

 

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the cybersecurity or other operational risks that may affect the Fund or to develop processes and controls to completely eliminate or mitigate their occurrence or effects. Most issuers in which the Fund invests are heavily dependent on computers for data storage and operations, and require ready access to the internet to conduct their business. Thus, cybersecurity incidents could also affect issuers of securities in which the Fund invests, leading to significant loss of value.

 

Risk Management. Risk is an essential part of investing. No risk management program can eliminate the Fund’s exposure to adverse events; at best, it may only reduce the possibility that the Fund will be affected by such events, and especially those risks that are not intrinsic to the Fund’s investment program. The Fund could experience losses if judgments about risk prove to be incorrect.

 

Valuation Risk. The Fund may not be able to sell an investment at the price at which the Fund has valued the investment. Such differences could be significant, particularly for illiquid securities and securities that trade in relatively thin markets and/or markets that experience extreme volatility. If market or other conditions make it difficult to value an investment, the Fund may be required to value such investments using more subjective methods, known as fair value methodologies. Using fair value methodologies to price investments may result in a value that is different from an investment’s most recent price and from the prices used by other funds to calculate their NAVs. The Fund uses pricing services to provide values for certain securities and there is no assurance that the Fund will be able to sell an investment at the price established by such pricing services. The Fund’s ability to value its investments in an accurate and timely manner may be impacted by technological issues and/or errors by third party service providers, such as pricing services or accounting agents.

 

PERFORMANCE

The following bar chart and table provide an indication of the risks of investing in the Fund. The bar chart shows how the Fund’s performance has varied from year to year. The table below the bar chart shows what the returns would equal if you averaged out actual performance over various lengths of time and compares the returns with the returns of a broad-based market index. The index, which is described in “Descriptions of Indices” in the prospectus, has characteristics relevant to the Fund’s investment strategy.

 

Returns would have been lower if the Manager had not reimbursed certain expenses and/or waived a portion of the investment management fees during certain of the periods shown.

 

Past performance (before and after taxes) is not a prediction of future results. Visit www.nb.com or call 800-877-9700 for updated performance information.

 

YEAR-BY-YEAR % RETURNS AS OF 12/31 EACH YEAR

 

 

Years

Best quarter:    Q2 ’20,5.45%

Worst quarter:    Q1 ’22, -5.84%

 

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AVERAGE ANNUAL TOTAL % RETURNS AS OF 12/31/22

 

Core Bond Fund   1 Year   5 Years   10 Years
Return Before Taxes   -13.99   -0.16   0.71
Return After Taxes on Distributions   -15.02   -1.30   -0.37
Return After Taxes on Distributions and Sale of Fund Shares   -8.26   -0.57   0.08
Bloomberg U.S. Aggregate Bond Index (reflects no deduction for fees, expenses or taxes)   -13.01   0.02   1.06
After-tax returns are calculated using the historical highest individual federal marginal income tax rates and do not reflect the impact of state and local taxes. Actual after-tax returns depend on an investor’s tax situation and may differ from those shown. After-tax returns are not relevant to investors who hold their Fund shares through tax-deferred arrangements, such as 401(k) plans or individual retirement accounts. Return After Taxes on Distributions and Sale of Fund Shares may be higher than other returns for the same period due to a tax benefit of realizing a capital loss upon the sale of Fund shares.

 

INVESTMENT MANAGER

Neuberger Berman Investment Advisers LLC (“Manager”) is the Fund’s investment manager.

 

PORTFOLIO MANAGERS

The Fund is managed by Thanos Bardas (Managing Director and Co-Head of Global Investment Grade Fixed Income of the Manager), David M. Brown, CFA (Managing Director and Co-Head of Global Investment Grade Fixed Income of the Manager), Nathan Kush (Managing Director of the Manager), Olumide Owolabi (Managing Director of the Manager), and Brad Tank (Managing Director, Chief Investment Officer and Global Head of Fixed Income of the Manager). Messrs. Bardas and Brown have managed the Fund since February 2008, Mr. Tank has managed the Fund since April 2009, Mr. Kush has managed the Fund since December 2017, and Olumide Owolabi has managed the Fund since February 2023.

 

BUYING AND SELLING SHARES

Investor Class of the Fund is closed to new investors. Only certain investors are allowed to purchase Investor Class shares of the Fund. See “Maintaining Your Account” in the prospectus.

 

You may purchase, redeem (sell) or exchange shares of the Fund on any day the New York Stock Exchange is open, at the Fund’s net asset value per share next determined after your order is received in proper form. Shares of the Fund generally are available only through certain investment providers, such as banks, brokerage firms, workplace retirement programs, and financial advisers. Contact any investment provider authorized to sell the Fund’s shares.

 

For certain investors, shares of the Fund may be available directly from Neuberger Berman BD LLC by regular, first class mail (Neuberger Berman Funds, P.O. Box 219189, Kansas City, MO 64121-9189), by express delivery, registered mail, or certified mail (Neuberger Berman Funds, 430 West 7th Street, Suite 219189, Kansas City, MO 64105-1407), or by wire, fax, telephone, exchange, or systematic investment or withdrawal (call 800-877-9700 for instructions). See “Maintaining Your Account” in the prospectus for eligibility requirements for direct purchases of Investor Class shares and for instructions on buying and redeeming (selling) shares directly.

 

The minimum initial investment in Investor Class is $2,000. Additional investments can be as little as $100. These minimums may be waived in certain cases.

 

TAX INFORMATION

Unless you invest in the Fund through a tax-advantaged retirement plan or account or are a tax-exempt investor, you will be subject to tax on Fund distributions to you of ordinary income and/or net capital gains. Those distributions generally are not taxable to such a plan or account or a tax-exempt investor, although withdrawals from certain retirement plans and accounts generally are subject to federal income tax.

 

PAYMENTS TO INVESTMENT PROVIDERS AND OTHER FINANCIAL INTERMEDIARIES

If you purchase shares of the Fund through an investment provider or other financial intermediary, such as a bank, brokerage firm, workplace retirement program, or financial adviser (who may be affiliated with Neuberger Berman), the Fund and/or Neuberger Berman BD LLC and/or its affiliates may pay the intermediary for the sale of Fund shares and related services. These payments may create a conflict of interest by influencing the investment provider or other financial intermediary and its employees to recommend the Fund over another investment. Ask your investment provider or visit its website for more information.

 

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Neuberger Berman High Income Bond Fund

Investor Class Shares (NHINX)

 

GOAL

The Fund seeks high total return consistent with capital preservation.

 

FEES AND EXPENSES

These tables describe the fees and expenses that you may pay if you buy, hold or sell shares of the Fund. You may pay other fees, such as brokerage commissions and other fees to financial intermediaries, which are not reflected in the table and example below.

 

     
Shareholder Fees (fees paid directly from your investment)   None

     
Annual Fund Operating Expenses (expenses that you pay each year as a % of the value of your investment)    
Management fees   0.75
Distribution and/or shareholder service (12b-1) fees   None
Other expenses   0.13
Total annual operating expenses   0.88

 

Expense Example

The expense example can help you compare costs among mutual funds. The example assumes that you invested $10,000 for the periods shown, that you redeemed all of your shares at the end of those periods, that the Fund earned a hypothetical 5% total return each year, and that the Fund’s expenses were those in the table. Actual performance and expenses may be higher or lower.

 

    1 Year   3 Years   5 Years   10 Years
Investor Class   $90   $281   $488   $1,084

 

Portfolio Turnover

The Fund pays transaction costs, such as commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or “turns over” its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover rate may indicate higher transaction costs and may result in higher taxes when Fund shares are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are not reflected in annual operating expenses or in the example, affect the Fund’s performance. During the most recent fiscal year, the Fund’s portfolio turnover rate was 72% of the average value of its portfolio.

 

PRINCIPAL INVESTMENT STRATEGIES

To pursue its goal, the Fund normally invests mainly in a diversified portfolio of U.S. dollar-denominated, High-Yield Bonds (as defined below), with an emphasis on debt securities rated below investment grade (commonly called “junk bonds”). For purposes of this Fund, High-Yield Bonds are generally defined as those debt securities that, at the time of investment, are rated in the lowest investment grade category (BBB by S&P Global Ratings, Baa by Moody’s Investors Service, Inc. (“Moody’s”), or comparably rated by at least one independent credit rating agency) or lower or, if unrated, determined by the Portfolio Managers to be of comparable quality. The Fund may invest in floating rate senior secured loans issued in U.S. dollars by U.S. and foreign corporations, partnerships, and other business entities. The Fund considers floating rate senior secured loans to be High-Yield Bonds. The Fund may invest a significant amount of its assets in loans, including in participation interests in loans.

 

The Fund normally expects to have a weighted averaged maturity between five and ten years. The Fund endeavors to manage credit risk through disciplined credit analysis and diversification of credit quality. The Fund intends to opportunistically rotate quality and sector exposures throughout the credit cycle, maintaining a higher quality bias in High-Yield Bonds when the Portfolio Managers believe an economic downturn is underway and increasing lower quality holdings of High-Yield Bonds when the Portfolio Managers believe an economic expansion is underway. With regard to interest rate risk, the Portfolio Managers are sensitive to the overall duration of the portfolio in relation to its benchmark and evaluate the duration of potential new portfolio acquisitions in conjunction with their credit analysis. The Fund invests its assets in a broad range of issuers and industries.

 

The Portfolio Managers will seek positive returns through in-depth credit research utilizing proprietary analytics processes to assess the strength of a company’s credit profile, examples of which include but are not limited to: their ability to pay principal and interest, their cash flow and balance sheet composition, and their market position relative to competitors. As part of their fundamental investment analysis the Portfolio Managers consider Environmental, Social and Governance (ESG) factors they

 

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believe are financially material to individual investments, where applicable, as described below. While this analysis is inherently subjective and may be informed by internally generated and third-party metrics, data and other information, the Portfolio Managers believe that the consideration of financially material ESG factors, alongside traditional financial metrics, may improve credit analysis, security selection, relative value analysis and enhance the Fund’s overall investment process. As part of this analysis, the Portfolio Managers also regularly engage with the management teams of issuers on issues that the Portfolio Managers believe are material to the credit risk of an issuer. The specific ESG factors considered and scope and application of integration may vary depending on the specific investment and/or investment type. The consideration of ESG factors does not apply to certain instruments, such as certain derivative instruments, other registered investment companies, cash and cash equivalents. The consideration of ESG factors as part of the investment process does not mean that the Fund pursues a specific “impact” or “sustainable” investment strategy.

 

In addition, the Portfolio Managers analyze and adjust weightings based on general and sector-specific economic and market conditions, while diversifying across industries, companies and investment size.

 

The Fund may also invest in derivative instruments as a means of hedging risk and/or for investment or efficient portfolio management purposes, which may include altering the Fund’s exposure to currencies, interest rates, inflation, sectors and individual issuers. These derivative instruments may include futures, forward foreign currency contracts, and swaps, such as total return swaps, credit default swaps and interest rate swaps.

 

The Fund may invest in other investment companies, including exchange-traded funds (“ETFs”), if the investment companies invest principally in the types of investments in which the Fund may invest directly.

 

The Fund does not normally invest in or continue to hold securities that are in default or have defaulted with respect to the payment of interest or repayment of principal, but may do so depending on market or other conditions. The Fund may invest in or continue to hold securities that the Portfolio Managers believe have ratings or other factors that imply an imminent risk of default with respect to such payments. The Fund may also invest in restricted securities.

 

In an effort to achieve its goal, the Fund may engage in active and frequent trading. The Fund may invest in foreign securities, including obligations of issuers in emerging market countries, denominated in any currency, but the Fund normally will not invest more than 20% of its net assets at the time of investment in non-U.S. dollar denominated securities.

 

The Fund is suitable for investors who seek a total return in excess of the return typically offered by U.S. Treasury securities and who are comfortable with the risks associated with investing in a portfolio made up mainly of intermediate-term, U.S. dollar-denominated, High-Yield Bonds.

 

The Fund normally invests at least 80% of its net assets, plus the amount of any borrowings for investment purposes, in High-Yield Bonds (as defined above) and other investment companies that provide investment exposure to such bonds. The Fund will not alter this policy without providing shareholders at least 60 days’ notice. This test is applied at the time the Fund invests; later percentage changes caused by a change in Fund assets, market values or company circumstances will not require the Fund to dispose of a holding.

 

PRINCIPAL INVESTMENT RISKS

Most of the Fund’s performance depends on what happens in the market for high-yield debt and loan instruments, the Portfolio Managers’ evaluation of those developments, and the success of the Portfolio Managers in implementing the Fund’s investment strategies. The market’s behavior can be difficult to predict, particularly in the short term. There can be no guarantee that the Fund will achieve its goal. The Fund may take temporary defensive and cash management positions; to the extent it does, it will not be pursuing its principal investment strategies.

 

The actual risk exposure taken by the Fund in its investment program will vary over time, depending on various factors including the Portfolio Managers’ evaluation of issuer, political, regulatory, market, or economic developments. There can be no guarantee that the Portfolio Managers will be successful in their attempts to manage the risk exposure of the Fund or will appropriately evaluate or weigh the multiple factors involved in investment decisions, including issuer, market and/or instrument-specific analysis, valuation and environmental, social and governance factors.

 

The Fund is a mutual fund, not a bank deposit, and is not guaranteed or insured by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation or any other government agency. The value of your investment may fall, sometimes sharply, and you could lose money by investing in the Fund.

 

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Each of the following risks, which are described in alphabetical order and not in order of any presumed importance, can significantly affect the Fund’s performance. The relative importance of, or potential exposure as a result of, each of these risks will vary based on market and other investment-specific considerations.

 

Call Risk. Upon the issuer’s desire to call a security, or under other circumstances where a security is called, including when interest rates are low and issuers opt to repay the obligation underlying a “callable security” early, the Fund may have to reinvest the proceeds in an investment offering a lower yield and may not benefit from any increase in value that might otherwise result from declining interest rates.

 

Credit Risk. Credit risk is the risk that issuers, guarantors, or insurers may fail, or become less able or unwilling, to pay interest and/or principal when due. Changes in the actual or perceived creditworthiness of an issuer or a downgrade or default affecting any of the Fund’s securities could affect the Fund’s performance by affecting the credit quality or value of the Fund’s securities. Generally, the longer the maturity and the lower the credit quality of a security, the more sensitive it is to credit risk.

 

Currency Risk. Currency risk is the risk that foreign currencies will decline in value relative to the U.S. dollar. To the extent that the Fund invests in securities or other instruments denominated in or indexed to foreign currencies, changes in currency exchange rates could adversely impact investment gains or add to investment losses. Currency exchange rates may fluctuate significantly over short periods of time and can be affected unpredictably by various factors, including investor perception and changes in interest rates; intervention, or failure to intervene, by U.S. or foreign governments, central banks, or supranational entities; or by currency controls or political developments in the U.S. or abroad.

 

Derivatives Risk. Use of derivatives is a highly specialized activity that can involve investment techniques and risks different from, and in some respects greater than, those associated with investing in more traditional investments, such as stocks and bonds. Derivatives can be highly complex and highly volatile and may perform in unanticipated ways. Derivatives can create leverage, and the Fund could lose more than the amount it invests; some derivatives can have the potential for unlimited losses. Derivatives may at times be highly illiquid, and the Fund may not be able to close out or sell a derivative at a particular time or at an anticipated price. Derivatives can be difficult to value and valuation may be more difficult in times of market turmoil. The value of a derivative instrument depends largely on (and is derived from) the value of the reference instrument underlying the derivative. There may be imperfect correlation between the behavior of a derivative and that of the reference instrument underlying the derivative. An abrupt change in the price of a reference instrument could render a derivative worthless. Derivatives may involve risks different from, and possibly greater than, the risks associated with investing directly in the reference instrument. Suitable derivatives may not be available in all circumstances, and there can be no assurance that the Fund will use derivatives to reduce exposure to other risks when that might have been beneficial. Derivatives involve counterparty risk, which is the risk that the other party to the derivative will fail to make required payments or otherwise comply with the terms of the derivative. That risk is generally thought to be greater with over-the-counter (OTC) derivatives than with derivatives that are exchange traded or centrally cleared. When the Fund uses derivatives, it will likely be required to provide margin or collateral; these practices are intended to satisfy contractual undertakings and regulatory requirements and will not prevent the Fund from incurring losses on derivatives. The need to provide margin or collateral could limit the Fund’s ability to pursue other opportunities as they arise. Ongoing changes to regulation of the derivatives markets and actual and potential changes in the regulation of funds using derivative instruments could limit the Fund’s ability to pursue its investment strategies. New regulation of derivatives may make them more costly, or may otherwise adversely affect their liquidity, value or performance.

 

Additional risks associated with certain types of derivatives are discussed below:

 

Forward Contracts. There are no limitations on daily price movements of forward contracts. Changes in foreign exchange regulations by governmental authorities might limit the trading of forward contracts on currencies.

 

Futures. Futures contracts are subject to the risk that an exchange may impose price fluctuation limits, which may make it difficult or impossible for a fund to close out a position when desired. In the absence of such limits, the liquidity of the futures market depends on participants entering into offsetting transactions rather than taking or making delivery. To the extent a Fund enters into futures contracts requiring physical delivery (e.g., certain commodities contracts), the inability of the Fund to take or make physical delivery can negatively impact performance.

 

Swaps. The risk of loss with respect to swaps generally is limited to the net amount of payments that the Fund is contractually obligated to make or, in the case of the other party to a swap defaulting, the net amount of payments that the Fund is contractually entitled to receive. If the Fund sells a credit default swap, however, the risk of loss may be the entire notional amount of the swap.

 

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Some swaps are now executed through an organized exchange or regulated facility and cleared through a regulated clearing organization. The absence of an organized exchange or market for swap transactions may result in difficulties in trading and valuation, especially in the event of market disruptions. The use of an organized exchange or market for swap transactions is expected to result in swaps being easier to trade or value, but this may not always be the case.

 

Distressed Securities Risk. Distressed securities may present a substantial risk of default, including the loss of the entire investment, or may be in default. The Fund may not receive interest payments on the distressed securities and may incur costs to protect its investment. The prices of such securities may be subject to periods of abrupt and erratic market movements and above-average price volatility and it may be difficult to value such securities. In certain periods, there may be little or no liquidity in the markets for distressed securities meaning that the Fund may be unable to exit its position.

 

Foreign and Emerging Market Risk. Foreign securities involve risks in addition to those associated with comparable U.S. securities. Additional risks include exposure to less developed or less efficient trading markets; social, political, diplomatic, or economic instability; trade barriers and other protectionist trade policies (including those of the U.S.); imposition of economic sanctions against a particular country or countries, organizations, companies, entities and/or individuals; significant government involvement in an economy and/or market structure; fluctuations in foreign currencies or currency redenomination; potential for default on sovereign debt; nationalization or expropriation of assets; settlement, custodial or other operational risks; higher transaction costs; confiscatory withholding or other taxes; and less stringent auditing and accounting, corporate disclosure, governance, and legal standards. As a result, foreign securities may fluctuate more widely in price, and may also be less liquid, than comparable U.S. securities. Regardless of where a company is organized or its stock is traded, its performance may be affected significantly by events in regions from which it derives its profits or in which it conducts significant operations.

 

Investing in emerging market countries involves risks in addition to and greater than those generally associated with investing in more developed foreign countries. The governments of emerging market countries may be more unstable and more likely to impose capital controls, nationalize a company or industry, place restrictions on foreign ownership and on withdrawing sale proceeds of securities from the country, intervene in the financial markets, and/or impose burdensome taxes that could adversely affect security prices. To the extent a foreign security is denominated in U.S. dollars, there is also the risk that a foreign government will not let U.S. dollar-denominated assets leave the country. In addition, the economies of emerging market countries may be dependent on relatively few industries that are more susceptible to local and global changes. Emerging market countries may also have less developed legal and accounting systems, and their legal systems may deal with issuer bankruptcies and defaults differently than U.S. law would. Securities markets in emerging market countries are also relatively small and have substantially lower trading volumes. Securities of issuers in emerging market countries may be more volatile and less liquid than securities of issuers in foreign countries with more developed economies or markets and the situation may require that the Fund fair value its holdings in those countries.

 

Securities of issuers traded on foreign exchanges may be suspended, either by the issuers themselves, by an exchange, or by governmental authorities. The likelihood of such suspensions may be higher for securities of issuers in emerging or less-developed market countries than in countries with more developed markets. Trading suspensions may be applied from time to time to the securities of individual issuers for reasons specific to that issuer, or may be applied broadly by exchanges or governmental authorities in response to market events. Suspensions may last for significant periods of time, during which trading in the securities and in instruments that reference the securities, such as derivative instruments, may be halted. In the event that the Fund holds material positions in such suspended securities or instruments, the Fund’s ability to liquidate its positions or provide liquidity to investors may be compromised and the Fund could incur significant losses.

 

High Portfolio Turnover. The Fund may engage in active and frequent trading and may have a high portfolio turnover rate, which may increase the Fund’s transaction costs, may adversely affect the Fund’s performance and may generate a greater amount of capital gain distributions to shareholders than if the Fund had a low portfolio turnover rate.

 

Interest Rate Risk. The Fund’s yield and share price will fluctuate in response to changes in interest rates. In general, the value of investments with interest rate risk, such as debt securities, will move in the direction opposite to movements in interest rates. If interest rates rise, the value of such securities may decline. Typically, the longer the maturity or duration of a debt security, the greater the effect a change in interest rates could have on the security’s price. Thus, the sensitivity of the Fund’s debt securities to interest rate risk will increase with any increase in the duration of those securities.

 

Issuer-Specific Risk. An individual security may be more volatile, and may perform differently, than the market as a whole.

 

Liquidity Risk. From time to time, the trading market for a particular investment in which the Fund invests, or a particular type of instrument in which the Fund is invested, may become less liquid or even illiquid. Illiquid investments frequently can be more

 

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difficult to purchase or sell at an advantageous price or time, and there is a greater risk that the investments may not be sold for the price at which the Fund is carrying them. Certain investments that were liquid when the Fund purchased them may become illiquid, sometimes abruptly. Additionally, market closures due to holidays or other factors may render a security or group of securities (e.g., securities tied to a particular country or geographic region) illiquid for a period of time. An inability to sell a portfolio position can adversely affect the Fund’s value or prevent the Fund from being able to take advantage of other investment opportunities. Market prices for such securities or other investments may be volatile. During periods of substantial market volatility, an investment or even an entire market segment may become illiquid, sometimes abruptly, which can adversely affect the Fund’s ability to limit losses.

 

Unexpected episodes of illiquidity, including due to market or political factors, instrument or issuer-specific factors and/or unanticipated outflows, may limit the Fund’s ability to pay redemption proceeds within the allowable time period. To meet redemption requests during periods of illiquidity, the Fund may be forced to sell securities at an unfavorable time and/or under unfavorable conditions.

 

Loan Interests Risk. Loan interests generally are subject to restrictions on transfer, and the Fund may be unable to sell its loan interests at a time when it may otherwise be desirable to do so or may be able to sell them promptly only at prices that are less than what the Fund regards as their fair market value. Accordingly, loan interests may at times be illiquid. Loan interests may be difficult to value and may have extended settlement periods (the settlement cycle for many bank loans exceeds 7 days). Extended settlement periods may result in cash not being immediately available to the Fund. As a result, during periods of unusually heavy redemptions, the Fund may have to sell other investments or borrow money to meet its obligations. A significant portion of floating rate loans may be “covenant lite” loans that may contain fewer or less restrictive constraints on the borrower and/or may contain other characteristics that would be favorable to the borrower, limiting the ability of lenders to take legal action to protect their interests in certain situations. Interests in loans made to finance highly leveraged companies or to finance corporate acquisitions or other transactions may be especially vulnerable to adverse changes in economic or market conditions. Interests in secured loans have the benefit of collateral and, typically, of restrictive covenants limiting the ability of the borrower to further encumber its assets. There is a risk that the value of any collateral securing a loan in which the Fund has an interest may decline and that the collateral may not be sufficient to cover the amount owed on the loan. In the event the borrower defaults, the Fund’s access to the collateral may be limited or delayed by bankruptcy or other insolvency laws. Further, in the event of a default, second or lower lien secured loans, and unsecured loans, will generally be paid only if the value of the collateral exceeds the amount of the borrower’s obligations to the senior secured lenders, and the remaining collateral may not be sufficient to cover the full amount owed on the loan in which the Fund has an interest. Further, there is a risk that a court could take action with respect to a loan that is adverse to the holders of the loan and the Fund may need to retain legal counsel to enforce its rights in any resulting event of default, bankruptcy, or similar situation. Interests in loans expose the Fund to the credit risk of the underlying borrower and may expose the Fund to the credit risk of the lender.

 

The Fund may acquire a loan interest by direct investment as a lender, by obtaining an assignment of all or a portion of the interests in a particular loan that are held by an original lender or a prior assignee or by participation in a loan interest that is held by another party. As an assignee, the Fund normally will succeed to all rights and obligations of its assignor with respect to the portion of the loan that is being assigned. However, the rights and obligations acquired by the purchaser of a loan assignment may differ from, and be more limited than, those held by the original lenders or the assignor. When the Fund’s loan interest is a participation, the Fund may have less control over the exercise of remedies than the party selling the participation interest, and the Fund normally would not have any direct rights against the borrower. It is possible that the Fund could be held liable, or may be called upon to fulfill other obligations, with respect to loans in which it receives an assignment in whole or in part, or in which it owns a participation. The potential for such liability is greater for an assignee than for a participant.

 

Lower-Rated Debt Securities Risk. Lower-rated debt securities (commonly known as “junk bonds”) and unrated debt securities determined to be of comparable quality involve greater risks than investment grade debt securities. Such securities may fluctuate more widely in price and yield and may fall in price during times when the economy is weak or is expected to become weak. These securities also may require a greater degree of judgment to establish a price and may be difficult to sell at the time and price the Fund desires. Lower-rated debt securities are considered by the major rating agencies to be predominantly speculative with respect to the issuer’s continuing ability to pay principal and interest and carry a greater risk that the issuer of such securities will default in the timely payment of principal and interest. Issuers of securities that are in default or have defaulted may fail to resume principal or interest payments, in which case the Fund may lose its entire investment. The creditworthiness of issuers of these securities may be more complex to analyze than that of issuers of investment grade debt securities, and the overreliance on credit ratings may present additional risks.

 

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Market Volatility Risk. Markets may be volatile and values of individual securities and other investments, including those of a particular type, may decline significantly in response to adverse issuer, political, regulatory, market, economic or other developments that may cause broad changes in market value, public perceptions concerning these developments, and adverse investor sentiment or publicity. Geopolitical and other risks, including environmental and public health risks may add to instability in world economies and markets generally. Changes in value may be temporary or may last for extended periods. If the Fund sells a portfolio position before it reaches its market peak, it may miss out on opportunities for better performance.

 

Other Investment Company Risk. To the extent the Fund invests in other investment companies, including money market funds and exchange-traded funds (ETFs), its performance will be affected by the performance of those other investment companies. Investments in other investment companies are subject to the risks of the other investment companies’ investments, as well as to the other investment companies’ expenses.

 

An ETF may trade in the secondary market at a price below the value of its underlying portfolio and may not be liquid. An actively managed ETF’s performance will reflect its adviser’s ability to make investment decisions that are suited to achieving the ETF’s investment objectives. A passively managed ETF may not replicate the performance of the index it intends to track.

 

Prepayment and Extension Risk. The Fund’s performance could be affected if borrowers pay back principal on certain debt securities before (prepayment) or after (extension) the market anticipates such payments, shortening or lengthening their duration. Due to a decline in interest rates or an excess in cash flow into the issuer, a debt security might be called or otherwise converted, prepaid or redeemed before maturity. As a result of prepayment, the Fund may have to reinvest the proceeds in an investment offering a lower yield, may not benefit from any increase in value that might otherwise result from declining interest rates, and may lose any premium it paid to acquire the security. Conversely, rising market interest rates generally result in slower payoffs or extension, which effectively increases the duration of certain debt securities, heightening interest rate risk and increasing the magnitude of any resulting price declines.

 

Private Placements and Other Restricted Securities Risk. Private placements and other restricted securities, including securities for which Fund management has material non-public information, are securities that are subject to legal and/or contractual restrictions on their sales. These securities may not be sold to the public unless certain conditions are met, which may include registration under the applicable securities laws. As a result of the absence of a public trading market, the prices of these securities may be more difficult to determine than publicly traded securities and these securities may involve heightened risk as compared to investments in securities of publicly traded companies. Private placements and other restricted securities may be illiquid, and it frequently can be difficult to sell them at a time when it may otherwise be desirable to do so or the Fund may be able to sell them only at prices that are less than what the Fund regards as their fair market value. Transaction costs may be higher for these securities. In addition, the Fund may get only limited information about the issuer of a private placement or other restricted security.

 

Recent Market Conditions. Both U.S. and international markets have experienced significant volatility in recent months and years. As a result of such volatility, investment returns may fluctuate significantly. National economies are substantially interconnected, as are global financial markets, which creates the possibility that conditions in one country or region might adversely impact issuers in a different country or region. However, the interconnectedness of economies and/or markets may be diminishing, which may impact such economies and markets in ways that cannot be foreseen at this time.

 

Although interest rates were unusually low in recent years in the U.S. and abroad, recently, the Federal Reserve and certain foreign central banks began to raise interest rates as part of their efforts to address rising inflation. It is difficult to accurately predict the pace at which interest rates might increase, or the timing, frequency or magnitude of any such increases in interest rates. Additionally, various economic and political factors could cause the Federal Reserve or other foreign central banks to change their approach in the future and such actions may result in an economic slowdown both in the U.S. and abroad. Unexpected increases in interest rates could lead to market volatility or reduce liquidity in certain sectors of the market. Deteriorating economic fundamentals may, in turn, increase the risk of default or insolvency of particular issuers, negatively impact market value, cause credit spreads to widen, and reduce bank balance sheets. Any of these could cause an increase in market volatility or reduce liquidity across various markets.

 

Some countries, including the U.S., have in recent years adopted more protectionist trade policies. Slowing global economic growth, the rise in protectionist trade policies, changes to some major international trade agreements, risks associated with the trade agreement between the United Kingdom and the European Union, and the risks associated with ongoing trade negotiations with China, could affect the economies of many nations in ways that cannot necessarily be foreseen at the present time. In addition, the current strength of the U.S. dollar may decrease foreign demand for U.S. assets, which could have a negative impact on certain issuers and/or industries.

 

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Regulators in the U.S. have proposed a number of changes to regulations involving the markets and issuers, some of which would apply to the Fund. While it is not currently known whether any of these regulations will be adopted, due to the current scope of regulations being proposed, any changes to regulation could limit the Fund’s ability to pursue its investment strategies or make certain investments, may make it more costly for it to operate, which, may in turn, impact performance.

 

Russia’s invasion of the Ukraine, and corresponding events in late February 2022, have had, and could continue to have, severe adverse effects on regional and global economic markets for securities and commodities. Moreover, those events have, and could continue to have, an adverse effect on global markets performance and liquidity, thereby negatively affecting the value of the Fund’s investments. The duration of ongoing hostilities and the vast array of sanctions and related events cannot be predicted. Those events present material uncertainty and risk with respect to markets globally and the performance of the Fund and its investments or operations could be negatively impacted.

 

The impact of the COVID-19 pandemic has negatively affected and could continue to affect the economies of many nations, individual companies and the global securities and commodities markets, including their liquidity, in ways that cannot necessarily be foreseen at the present time. Epidemics and/or pandemics, such as the coronavirus, have and may further result in, among other things, closing borders, extended quarantines and stay-at-home orders, order cancellations, disruptions to supply chains and customer activity, widespread business closures and layoffs, as well as general concern and uncertainty.

 

High public debt in the U.S. and other countries creates ongoing systemic and market risks and policymaking uncertainty. There is no assurance that the U.S. Congress will act to raise the nation’s debt ceiling; a failure to do so could cause market turmoil and substantial investment risks that cannot now be fully predicted. Unexpected political, regulatory and diplomatic events within the U.S. and abroad may affect investor and consumer confidence and may adversely impact financial markets and the broader economy.

 

There is widespread concern about the potential effects of global climate change on property and security values. Certain issuers, industries and regions may be adversely affected by the impact of climate change in ways that cannot be foreseen. The impact of legislation, regulation and international accords related to climate change may negatively impact certain issuers and/or industries.

 

LIBOR Transition. Certain financial contracts around the world specify rates that are based on the London Interbank Offered Rate (LIBOR), which is produced daily by averaging the rates for inter-bank lending reported by a number of banks. As previously announced by the United Kingdom’s Financial Conduct Authority, most maturities and currencies of LIBOR were phased out at the end of 2021, with the remaining ones to be phased out on June 30, 2023. There are risks that the financial services industry will not have a suitable substitute in place by that time and that there will not be time to perform the substantial work necessary to revise the many existing contracts that rely on LIBOR. The transition process, or a failure of the industry to transition properly, might lead to increased volatility and illiquidity in markets that currently rely on LIBOR. It also could lead to a reduction in the value of some LIBOR-based investments and reduce the effectiveness of new hedges placed against existing LIBOR-based instruments. New York and federal legislation has been enacted to ease the transition from LIBOR, but there is no assurance whether such legislation will adequately address all issues or be subject to litigation.

 

Redemption Risk. The Fund may experience periods of large or frequent redemptions that could cause the Fund to sell assets at inopportune times, which could have a negative impact on the Fund’s overall liquidity, or at a loss or depressed value. Redemption risk is greater to the extent that one or more investors or intermediaries control a large percentage of investments in the Fund and the risk is heightened during periods of declining or illiquid markets. Large redemptions could hurt the Fund’s performance, increase transaction costs, and create adverse tax consequences. A general rise in interest rates has the potential to cause investors to move out of fixed income securities on a large scale, which may increase redemptions from mutual funds that hold large amounts of fixed income securities; such a move, coupled with a reduction in the ability or willingness of dealers and other institutional investors to buy or hold fixed income securities, may result in decreased liquidity and increased volatility in the fixed income markets.

 

Sector Risk. From time to time, based on market or economic conditions, the Fund may have significant positions in one or more sectors of the market. To the extent the Fund invests more heavily in particular sectors, its performance will be especially sensitive to developments that significantly affect those sectors. Individual sectors may be more volatile, and may perform differently, than the broader market. The industries that constitute a sector may all react in the same way to economic, political or regulatory events.

 

Variable and Floating Rate Instruments Risk. The market prices of instruments with variable and floating interest rates are generally less sensitive to interest rate changes than are the market prices of instruments with fixed interest rates. Variable and

 

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floating rate instruments may decline in value if market interest rates or interest rates paid by such instruments do not move as expected. Certain types of floating rate instruments, such as interests in bank loans, may be subject to greater liquidity risk than other debt securities.

 

A summary of the Fund’s additional principal investment risks is as follows:

 

Risk of Increase in Expenses. A decline in the Fund’s average net assets during the current fiscal year due to market volatility or other factors could cause the Fund’s expenses for the current fiscal year to be higher than the expense information presented in “Fees and Expenses.”

 

Operational and Cybersecurity Risk. The Fund and its service providers, and your ability to transact with the Fund, may be negatively impacted due to operational matters arising from, among other problems, human errors, systems and technology disruptions or failures, or cybersecurity incidents. Cybersecurity incidents may allow an unauthorized party to gain access to fund assets, customer data, or proprietary information, or cause the Fund or its service providers, as well as the securities trading venues and their service providers, to suffer data corruption or lose operational functionality. Cybersecurity incidents can result from deliberate attacks or unintentional events. It is not possible for the Manager or the other Fund service providers to identify all of the cybersecurity or other operational risks that may affect the Fund or to develop processes and controls to completely eliminate or mitigate their occurrence or effects. Most issuers in which the Fund invests are heavily dependent on computers for data storage and operations, and require ready access to the internet to conduct their business. Thus, cybersecurity incidents could also affect issuers of securities in which the Fund invests, leading to significant loss of value.

 

Risk Management. Risk is an essential part of investing. No risk management program can eliminate the Fund’s exposure to adverse events; at best, it may only reduce the possibility that the Fund will be affected by such events, and especially those risks that are not intrinsic to the Fund’s investment program. The Fund could experience losses if judgments about risk prove to be incorrect.

 

Valuation Risk. The Fund may not be able to sell an investment at the price at which the Fund has valued the investment. Such differences could be significant, particularly for illiquid securities and securities that trade in relatively thin markets and/or markets that experience extreme volatility. If market or other conditions make it difficult to value an investment, the Fund may be required to value such investments using more subjective methods, known as fair value methodologies. Using fair value methodologies to price investments may result in a value that is different from an investment’s most recent price and from the prices used by other funds to calculate their NAVs. The Fund uses pricing services to provide values for certain securities and there is no assurance that the Fund will be able to sell an investment at the price established by such pricing services. The Fund’s ability to value its investments in an accurate and timely manner may be impacted by technological issues and/or errors by third party service providers, such as pricing services or accounting agents.

 

PERFORMANCE

The following bar chart and table provide an indication of the risks of investing in the Fund. The bar chart shows how the Fund’s performance has varied from year to year. The table below the bar chart shows what the returns would equal if you averaged out actual performance over various lengths of time and compares the returns with the returns of a broad-based market index. The index, which is described in “Descriptions of Indices” in the prospectus, has characteristics relevant to the Fund’s investment strategy.

 

Returns would have been lower/higher if Neuberger Berman Investment Advisers LLC had not reimbursed/recouped certain expenses and/or waived a portion of the investment management fees during certain of the periods shown.

 

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Past performance (before and after taxes) is not a prediction of future results. Visit www.nb.com or call 800-877-9700 for updated performance information.

 

YEAR-BY-YEAR % RETURNS AS OF 12/31 EACH YEAR

 

Years

 

Best quarter:    Q2 ’20, 9.90%

Worst quarter:    Q1 ’20, -13.42%

 

AVERAGE ANNUAL TOTAL % RETURNS AS OF 12/31/22

 

High Income Bond Fund   1 Year   5 Years   10 Years
Return Before Taxes   -11.77   1.64   3.04
Return After Taxes on Distributions   -13.74   -0.48   0.66
Return After Taxes on Distributions and Sale of Fund Shares   -6.94   0.39   1.23
ICE BofA U.S. High Yield Constrained Index (reflects no deduction for fees, expenses or taxes)   -11.21   2.10   3.94
After-tax returns are calculated using the historical highest individual federal marginal income tax rates and do not reflect the impact of state and local taxes. Actual after-tax returns depend on an investor’s tax situation and may differ from those shown. After-tax returns are not relevant to investors who hold their Fund shares through tax-deferred arrangements, such as 401(k) plans or individual retirement accounts. Return After Taxes on Distributions and Sale of Fund Shares may be higher than other returns for the same period due to a tax benefit of realizing a capital loss upon the sale of Fund shares.

 

INVESTMENT MANAGER

Neuberger Berman Investment Advisers LLC (“Manager”) is the Fund’s investment manager.

 

PORTFOLIO MANAGERS

The Fund is managed by Joseph Lind (Managing Director and Co-Head of U.S. High Yield of the Manager), and Christopher Kocinski (Managing Director and Co-Head of U.S. High Yield of the Manager). Mr. Lind has co-managed the Fund since July 2018, and Mr. Kocinski has co-managed the Fund since May 2019.

 

BUYING AND SELLING SHARES

Investor Class of the Fund is closed to new investors. Only certain investors are allowed to purchase Investor Class shares of the Fund. See “Maintaining Your Account” in the prospectus.

 

You may purchase, redeem (sell) or exchange shares of the Fund on any day the New York Stock Exchange is open, at the Fund’s net asset value per share next determined after your order is received in proper form. Shares of the Fund generally are available only through certain investment providers, such as banks, brokerage firms, workplace retirement programs, and financial advisers. Contact any investment provider authorized to sell the Fund’s shares.

 

For certain investors, shares of the Fund may be available directly from Neuberger Berman BD LLC by regular, first class mail (Neuberger Berman Funds, P.O. Box 219189, Kansas City, MO 64121-9189), by express delivery, registered mail, or certified mail (Neuberger Berman Funds, 430 West 7th Street, Suite 219189, Kansas City, MO 64105-1407), or by wire, fax, telephone, exchange, or systematic investment or withdrawal (call 800-877-9700 for instructions). See “Maintaining Your Account” in the

 

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prospectus for eligibility requirements for direct purchases of Investor Class shares and for instructions on buying and redeeming (selling) shares directly.

 

The minimum initial investment in Investor Class is $2,000. Additional investments can be as little as $100. These minimums may be waived in certain cases.

 

TAX INFORMATION

Unless you invest in the Fund through a tax-advantaged retirement plan or account or are a tax-exempt investor, you will be subject to tax on Fund distributions to you of ordinary income and/or net capital gains. Those distributions generally are not taxable to such a plan or account or a tax-exempt investor, although withdrawals from certain retirement plans and accounts generally are subject to federal income tax.

 

PAYMENTS TO INVESTMENT PROVIDERS AND OTHER FINANCIAL INTERMEDIARIES

If you purchase shares of the Fund through an investment provider or other financial intermediary, such as a bank, brokerage firm, workplace retirement program, or financial adviser (who may be affiliated with Neuberger Berman), the Fund and/or Neuberger Berman BD LLC and/or its affiliates may pay the intermediary for the sale of Fund shares and related services. These payments may create a conflict of interest by influencing the investment provider or other financial intermediary and its employees to recommend the Fund over another investment. Ask your investment provider or visit its website for more information.

 

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Neuberger Berman Municipal Intermediate Bond Fund

Investor Class Shares (NMUIX)

 

GOAL

 

 

The Fund seeks high current income exempt from federal income tax that is consistent with low risk to principal and liquidity; total return is a secondary goal.

 

FEES AND EXPENSES

These tables describe the fees and expenses that you may pay if you buy, hold or sell shares of the Fund. You may pay other fees, such as brokerage commissions and other fees to financial intermediaries, which are not reflected in the table and example below.

 

     
Shareholder Fees (fees paid directly from your investment)   None

     
Annual Fund Operating Expenses (expenses that you pay each year as a % of the value of your investment)    
Management fees   0.41
Distribution and/or shareholder service (12b-1) fees   None
Other expenses   0.26
Total annual operating expenses   0.67
Fee waivers and/or expense reimbursement   0.22
Total annual operating expenses after fee waiver and/or expense reimbursement1   0.45

 

1 Neuberger Berman Investment Advisers LLC (“Manager”) has contractually undertaken to waive and/or reimburse certain fees and expenses of Investor Class so that the total annual operating expenses (excluding interest, brokerage commissions, acquired fund fees and expenses, taxes including any expenses relating to tax reclaims, dividend and interest expenses relating to short sales, and extraordinary expenses, if any) (“annual operating expenses”) of that class are limited to 0.45% of average net assets. This undertaking lasts until 10/31/2026 and may not be terminated during its term without the consent of the Board of Trustees. The Fund has agreed that Investor Class will repay the Manager for fees and expenses waived or reimbursed for the class provided that repayment does not cause annual operating expenses to exceed 0.45% of the class’ average net assets. Any such repayment must be made within three years after the year in which the Manager incurred the expense.

 

Expense Example

The expense example can help you compare costs among mutual funds. The example assumes that you invested $10,000 for the periods shown, that you redeemed all of your shares at the end of those periods, that the Fund earned a hypothetical 5% total return each year, and that the Fund’s expenses were those in the table. Actual performance and expenses may be higher or lower.

 

    1 Year   3 Years   5 Years   10 Years
Investor Class   $46   $144   $304   $768

 

Portfolio Turnover

The Fund pays transaction costs, such as commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or “turns over” its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover rate may indicate higher transaction costs and may result in higher taxes when Fund shares are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are not reflected in annual operating expenses or in the example, affect the Fund’s performance. During the most recent fiscal year, the Fund’s portfolio turnover rate was 49% of the average value of its portfolio.

 

PRINCIPAL INVESTMENT STRATEGIES

To pursue its goals, the Fund normally invests at least 80% of its total assets in securities of municipal issuers within the U.S. and its territories; however, the Fund may invest without limit in municipal securities the interest on which may be an item of tax preference for purposes of the federal alternative minimum tax (“Tax Preference Item”). The Fund’s dividends are generally exempt from federal income tax, although shareholders may have to pay an alternative minimum tax on income deemed to be a Tax Preference Item. A portion of the dividends you receive may also be exempt from state and local income taxes, depending on where you live.

 

Municipal securities include securities issued by U.S. states, any of their political subdivisions, agencies, or instrumentalities, or by U.S. territories and possessions, such as Guam, the U.S. Virgin Islands, and Puerto Rico, and their political subdivisions and public corporations.

 

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The Fund may invest in debt securities across the credit spectrum, including investment grade securities, below investment grade securities (commonly known as “junk bonds”), and unrated securities. The Fund normally will not invest more than 15% of its total assets in below investment grade securities. The Fund considers debt securities to be below investment grade if, at the time of investment, they are rated below the four highest categories by at least one independent credit rating agency or, if unrated, are determined by the Portfolio Managers to be of comparable quality. The Fund may invest in or continue to hold securities that the Portfolio Managers believe have ratings or other factors that imply an imminent risk of default or that are in default or have defaulted with respect to the payment of interest or repayment of principal, depending on the Portfolio Managers’ evaluation of the investment opportunity.

 

The Fund seeks to minimize its exposure to credit risk by diversifying its assets among many municipal issuers and among the different types and maturities of municipal securities available. The Portfolio Managers monitor national trends in the municipal securities market, as well as a range of economic, financial and political factors. As part of the investment process, the Portfolio Managers analyze individual issues and look for securities that they believe offer compelling risk-adjusted return potential (based on some or all of the following, among other things, an analysis of cash flows, ability to pay principal and interest, balance sheet composition, and market positioning), with a secondary emphasis on duration control (i.e., monitoring and managing interest rate risk) and yield curve positioning (i.e., seeking attractive maturities on the yield curve). As part of their fundamental investment analysis the Portfolio Managers consider Environmental, Social and Governance (ESG) factors they believe are financially material to individual investments, where applicable, as described below. While this analysis is inherently subjective and may be informed by internally generated and third-party metrics, data and other information, the Portfolio Managers believe that the consideration of financially material ESG factors, alongside traditional financial metrics, may improve credit analysis, security selection, relative value analysis and enhance the Fund’s overall investment process. The specific ESG factors considered and scope and application of integration may vary depending on the specific investment and/or investment type. The consideration of ESG factors does not apply to certain instruments, such as certain derivative instruments, other registered investment companies, cash and cash equivalents. The consideration of ESG factors as part of the investment process does not mean that the Fund pursues a specific “impact” or “sustainable” investment strategy.

 

The Fund may sell securities if the Portfolio Managers find an opportunity they believe is more compelling or if the Portfolio Managers’ outlook on the investment or the market changes.

 

The Fund may invest in tender option bonds (which include inverse floaters created as part of tender option bond transactions). The Fund may also invest in derivative instruments as a means of hedging risk and/or for investment or efficient portfolio management purposes, which may include altering the Fund’s exposure to interest rates, sectors and individual issuers and increasing the Fund’s investment exposure beyond that which it could achieve by investing directly in more conventional securities. These derivative instruments may include options, futures (including Treasury futures), inverse floating rate securities and swaps, such as total return swaps, credit default swaps and interest rate swaps. In an effort to achieve its goal, the Fund may engage in active and frequent trading.

 

Although it may invest in securities of any maturity, the Fund normally seeks to maintain an average weighted portfolio duration of between three and seven years.

 

The Fund may not change its fundamental policy of normally investing at least 80% of its total assets in securities of municipal issuers without shareholder approval. This test is applied at the time the Fund invests; later percentage changes caused by a change in Fund assets or market values will not require the Fund to dispose of a holding.

 

The Fund is not an appropriate investment for tax-advantaged retirement accounts, such as 401(k) plan accounts or individual retirement accounts or for investors subject to the federal alternative minimum tax, and may not be beneficial for investors in low tax brackets.

 

PRINCIPAL INVESTMENT RISKS

Most of the Fund’s performance depends on what happens in the market for municipal debt instruments, the Portfolio Managers’ evaluation of those developments, and the success of the Portfolio Managers in implementing the Fund’s investment strategies. The market’s behavior can be difficult to predict, particularly in the short term. There can be no guarantee that the Fund will achieve its goal. The Fund may take temporary defensive and cash management positions; to the extent it does, it will not be pursuing its principal investment strategies.

 

The actual risk exposure taken by the Fund in its investment program will vary over time, depending on various factors including the Portfolio Managers’ evaluation of issuer, political, regulatory, market, or economic developments. There can be no guarantee that the Portfolio Managers will be successful in their attempts to manage the risk exposure of the Fund or will appropriately

 

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evaluate or weigh the multiple factors involved in investment decisions, including issuer, market and/or instrument-specific analysis, valuation and environmental, social and governance factors.

 

The Fund is a mutual fund, not a bank deposit, and is not guaranteed or insured by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation or any other government agency. The value of your investment may fall, sometimes sharply, and you could lose money by investing in the Fund.

 

Each of the following risks, which are described in alphabetical order and not in order of any presumed importance, can significantly affect the Fund’s performance. The relative importance of, or potential exposure as a result of, each of these risks will vary based on market and other investment-specific considerations.

 

Call Risk. Upon the issuer’s desire to call a security, or under other circumstances where a security is called, including when interest rates are low and issuers opt to repay the obligation underlying a “callable security” early, the Fund may have to reinvest the proceeds in an investment offering a lower yield and may not benefit from any increase in value that might otherwise result from declining interest rates. In addition, the Fund may also realize a taxable gain or loss on such securities.

 

Credit Risk. Credit risk is the risk that issuers, guarantors, or insurers may fail, or become less able or unwilling, to pay interest and/or principal when due. Changes in the actual or perceived creditworthiness of an issuer or a downgrade or default affecting any of the Fund’s securities could affect the Fund’s performance by affecting the credit quality or value of the Fund’s securities. Generally, the longer the maturity and the lower the credit quality of a security, the more sensitive it is to credit risk.

 

Derivatives Risk. Use of derivatives is a highly specialized activity that can involve investment techniques and risks different from, and in some respects greater than, those associated with investing in more traditional investments, such as stocks and bonds. Derivatives can be highly complex and highly volatile and may perform in unanticipated ways. Derivatives can create leverage, and the Fund could lose more than the amount it invests; some derivatives can have the potential for unlimited losses. Derivatives may at times be highly illiquid, and the Fund may not be able to close out or sell a derivative at a particular time or at an anticipated price. Derivatives can be difficult to value and valuation may be more difficult in times of market turmoil. The value of a derivative instrument depends largely on (and is derived from) the value of the reference instrument underlying the derivative. There may be imperfect correlation between the behavior of a derivative and that of the reference instrument underlying the derivative. An abrupt change in the price of a reference instrument could render a derivative worthless. Derivatives may involve risks different from, and possibly greater than, the risks associated with investing directly in the reference instrument. Suitable derivatives may not be available in all circumstances, and there can be no assurance that the Fund will use derivatives to reduce exposure to other risks when that might have been beneficial. Derivatives involve counterparty risk, which is the risk that the other party to the derivative will fail to make required payments or otherwise comply with the terms of the derivative. That risk is generally thought to be greater with over-the-counter (OTC) derivatives than with derivatives that are exchange traded or centrally cleared. When the Fund uses derivatives, it will likely be required to provide margin or collateral; these practices are intended to satisfy contractual undertakings and regulatory requirements and will not prevent the Fund from incurring losses on derivatives. The need to provide margin or collateral could limit the Fund’s ability to pursue other opportunities as they arise. Ongoing changes to regulation of the derivatives markets and actual and potential changes in the regulation of funds using derivative instruments could limit the Fund’s ability to pursue its investment strategies. New regulation of derivatives may make them more costly, or may otherwise adversely affect their liquidity, value or performance.

 

Additional risks associated with certain types of derivatives are discussed below:

 

Futures. Futures contracts are subject to the risk that an exchange may impose price fluctuation limits, which may make it difficult or impossible for a fund to close out a position when desired. In the absence of such limits, the liquidity of the futures market depends on participants entering into offsetting transactions rather than taking or making delivery. To the extent a Fund enters into futures contracts requiring physical delivery (e.g., certain commodities contracts), the inability of the Fund to take or make physical delivery can negatively impact performance.

 

Options. The use of options involves investment strategies and risks different from those associated with ordinary portfolio securities transactions. By writing put options, the Fund takes on the risk of declines in the value of the underlying instrument, including the possibility of a loss up to the entire strike price of each option it sells, but without the corresponding opportunity to benefit from potential increases in the value of the underlying instrument. When the Fund writes a put option, it assumes the risk that it must purchase the underlying instrument at a strike price that may be higher than the market price of the instrument. If there is a broad market decline and the Fund is not able to close out its written put options, it may result in substantial losses to the Fund. By writing a call option, the Fund may be obligated to deliver instruments underlying an option at less than the market price. When the Fund writes a covered call

 

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option, it gives up the opportunity to profit from a price increase in the underlying instrument above the strike price. If a covered call option that the Fund has written is exercised, the Fund will experience a gain or loss from the sale of the underlying instrument, depending on the price at which the Fund purchased the instrument and the strike price of the option. The Fund will receive a premium from writing options, but the premium received may not be sufficient to offset any losses sustained from exercised options. In the case of a covered call, the premium received may be offset by a decline in the market value of the underlying instrument during the option period. If an option that the Fund has purchased is never exercised or closed out, the Fund will lose the amount of the premium it paid and the use of those funds.

 

Swaps. The risk of loss with respect to swaps generally is limited to the net amount of payments that the Fund is contractually obligated to make or, in the case of the other party to a swap defaulting, the net amount of payments that the Fund is contractually entitled to receive. If the Fund sells a credit default swap, however, the risk of loss may be the entire notional amount of the swap.

 

Some swaps are now executed through an organized exchange or regulated facility and cleared through a regulated clearing organization. The absence of an organized exchange or market for swap transactions may result in difficulties in trading and valuation, especially in the event of market disruptions. The use of an organized exchange or market for swap transactions is expected to result in swaps being easier to trade or value, but this may not always be the case.

 

Distressed Securities Risk. Distressed securities may present a substantial risk of default, including the loss of the entire investment, or may be in default. The Fund may not receive interest payments on the distressed securities and may incur costs to protect its investment. The prices of such securities may be subject to periods of abrupt and erratic market movements and above-average price volatility and it may be difficult to value such securities. In certain periods, there may be little or no liquidity in the markets for distressed securities meaning that the Fund may be unable to exit its position.

 

High Portfolio Turnover. The Fund may engage in active and frequent trading and may have a high portfolio turnover rate, which may increase the Fund’s transaction costs, may adversely affect the Fund’s performance and may generate a greater amount of capital gain distributions to shareholders than if the Fund had a low portfolio turnover rate.

 

Interest Rate Risk. The Fund’s yield and share price will fluctuate in response to changes in interest rates. In general, the value of investments with interest rate risk, such as debt securities, will move in the direction opposite to movements in interest rates. If interest rates rise, the value of such securities may decline. Typically, the longer the maturity or duration of a debt security, the greater the effect a change in interest rates could have on the security’s price. Thus, the sensitivity of the Fund’s debt securities to interest rate risk will increase with any increase in the duration of those securities.

 

Inverse Floater Risk. An inverse floater earns interest at rates that vary inversely to changes in short-term interest rates. An inverse floater produces less income (and may produce no income) and may decline in value when market rates rise. An investment in an inverse floater may involve greater risk than an investment in a fixed rate security. Inverse floaters generally will underperform the market for fixed rate securities in a rising interest rate environment. An inverse floater may involve leverage, which may make the Fund’s returns more volatile, increase interest rate risk and can magnify the Fund’s losses.

 

Issuer-Specific Risk. An individual security may be more volatile, and may perform differently, than the market as a whole.

 

Liquidity Risk. From time to time, the trading market for a particular investment in which the Fund invests, or a particular type of instrument in which the Fund is invested, may become less liquid or even illiquid. Illiquid investments frequently can be more difficult to purchase or sell at an advantageous price or time, and there is a greater risk that the investments may not be sold for the price at which the Fund is carrying them. Certain investments that were liquid when the Fund purchased them may become illiquid, sometimes abruptly. Additionally, market closures due to holidays or other factors may render a security or group of securities (e.g., securities tied to a particular country or geographic region) illiquid for a period of time. An inability to sell a portfolio position can adversely affect the Fund’s value or prevent the Fund from being able to take advantage of other investment opportunities. Market prices for such securities or other investments may be volatile. During periods of substantial market volatility, an investment or even an entire market segment may become illiquid, sometimes abruptly, which can adversely affect the Fund’s ability to limit losses.

 

Unexpected episodes of illiquidity, including due to market or political factors, instrument or issuer-specific factors and/or unanticipated outflows, may limit the Fund’s ability to pay redemption proceeds within the allowable time period. To meet redemption requests during periods of illiquidity, the Fund may be forced to sell securities at an unfavorable time and/or under unfavorable conditions.

 

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Lower-Rated Debt Securities Risk. Lower-rated debt securities (commonly known as “junk bonds”) and unrated debt securities determined to be of comparable quality involve greater risks than investment grade debt securities. Such securities may fluctuate more widely in price and yield and may fall in price during times when the economy is weak or is expected to become weak. These securities also may require a greater degree of judgment to establish a price and may be difficult to sell at the time and price the Fund desires. Lower-rated debt securities are considered by the major rating agencies to be predominantly speculative with respect to the issuer’s continuing ability to pay principal and interest and carry a greater risk that the issuer of such securities will default in the timely payment of principal and interest. Issuers of securities that are in default or have defaulted may fail to resume principal or interest payments, in which case the Fund may lose its entire investment. The creditworthiness of issuers of these securities may be more complex to analyze than that of issuers of investment grade debt securities, and the overreliance on credit ratings may present additional risks.

 

Market Volatility Risk. Markets may be volatile and values of individual securities and other investments, including those of a particular type, may decline significantly in response to adverse issuer, political, regulatory, market, economic or other developments that may cause broad changes in market value, public perceptions concerning these developments, and adverse investor sentiment or publicity. Geopolitical and other risks, including environmental and public health risks may add to instability in world economies and markets generally. Changes in value may be temporary or may last for extended periods. If the Fund sells a portfolio position before it reaches its market peak, it may miss out on opportunities for better performance.

 

Municipal Securities Risk. The municipal securities market could be significantly affected by adverse political and legislative changes, as well as uncertainties related to taxation or the rights of municipal security holders. Changes in the financial health of a municipality or other issuer, or an insurer of municipal securities, may make it difficult for it to pay interest and principal when due and may affect the overall municipal securities market. To the extent that the Fund invests a significant portion of its assets in the municipal securities of a particular state or U.S. territory or possession, there is greater risk that political, regulatory, economic or other developments within that jurisdiction may have a significant impact on the Fund’s investment performance. Declines in real estate prices and general business activity may reduce the tax revenues of state and local governments. Municipal issuers have on occasion defaulted on obligations, been downgraded, or commenced insolvency proceedings.

 

Because many municipal securities are issued to finance similar types of projects, especially those related to education, health care, housing, transportation, and utilities, conditions in those sectors can affect the overall municipal securities market. Interest on municipal securities paid out of current or anticipated revenues from a specific project or specific asset (so-called “private activity bonds”) are generally not backed by the creditworthiness or taxing authority of the issuing governmental entity; rather, a particular business or facility may be the only source of revenue supporting payment of interest and principal, and declines in general business activity could affect the economic viability of that business or facility. To the extent that the Fund earns interest income on private activity bonds, a part of its dividends will be a Tax Preference Item.

 

Municipal bonds may be bought or sold at a market discount (i.e., a price less than the bond’s principal amount or, in the case of a bond issued with original issue discount (“OID”), a price less than the amount of the issue price plus accrued OID). If the market discount is more than a de minimis amount, and if the bond has a maturity date of more than one year from the date it was issued, then any market discount that accrues annually, or any gains earned on the disposition of the bond, generally will be subject to federal income taxation as ordinary (taxable) income rather than as capital gains. Some municipal securities, including those in the high yield market, may include transfer restrictions similar to restricted securities (e.g., may only be transferred to qualified institutional buyers and purchasers meeting other qualification requirements set by the issuer). As such, it may be difficult to sell municipal securities at a time when it may otherwise be desirable to do so or the Fund may be able to sell them only at prices that are less than what the Fund regards as their fair market value.

 

Recent Market Conditions. Both U.S. and international markets have experienced significant volatility in recent months and years. As a result of such volatility, investment returns may fluctuate significantly. National economies are substantially interconnected, as are global financial markets, which creates the possibility that conditions in one country or region might adversely impact issuers in a different country or region. However, the interconnectedness of economies and/or markets may be diminishing, which may impact such economies and markets in ways that cannot be foreseen at this time.

 

Although interest rates were unusually low in recent years in the U.S. and abroad, recently, the Federal Reserve and certain foreign central banks began to raise interest rates as part of their efforts to address rising inflation. It is difficult to accurately predict the pace at which interest rates might increase, or the timing, frequency or magnitude of any such increases in interest rates. Additionally, various economic and political factors could cause the Federal Reserve or other foreign central banks to change their approach in the future and such actions may result in an economic slowdown both in the U.S. and abroad. Unexpected increases in interest rates could lead to market volatility or reduce liquidity in certain sectors of the market. Deteriorating economic

 

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fundamentals may, in turn, increase the risk of default or insolvency of particular issuers, negatively impact market value, cause credit spreads to widen, and reduce bank balance sheets. Any of these could cause an increase in market volatility or reduce liquidity across various markets.

 

Some countries, including the U.S., have in recent years adopted more protectionist trade policies. Slowing global economic growth, the rise in protectionist trade policies, changes to some major international trade agreements, risks associated with the trade agreement between the United Kingdom and the European Union, and the risks associated with ongoing trade negotiations with China, could affect the economies of many nations in ways that cannot necessarily be foreseen at the present time. In addition, the current strength of the U.S. dollar may decrease foreign demand for U.S. assets, which could have a negative impact on certain issuers and/or industries.

 

Regulators in the U.S. have proposed a number of changes to regulations involving the markets and issuers, some of which would apply to the Fund. While it is not currently known whether any of these regulations will be adopted, due to the current scope of regulations being proposed, any changes to regulation could limit the Fund’s ability to pursue its investment strategies or make certain investments, may make it more costly for it to operate, which, may in turn, impact performance.

 

Russia’s invasion of the Ukraine, and corresponding events in late February 2022, have had, and could continue to have, severe adverse effects on regional and global economic markets for securities and commodities. Moreover, those events have, and could continue to have, an adverse effect on global markets performance and liquidity, thereby negatively affecting the value of the Fund’s investments. The duration of ongoing hostilities and the vast array of sanctions and related events cannot be predicted. Those events present material uncertainty and risk with respect to markets globally and the performance of the Fund and its investments or operations could be negatively impacted.

 

The impact of the COVID-19 pandemic has negatively affected and could continue to affect the economies of many nations, individual companies and the global securities and commodities markets, including their liquidity, in ways that cannot necessarily be foreseen at the present time. Epidemics and/or pandemics, such as the coronavirus, have and may further result in, among other things, closing borders, extended quarantines and stay-at-home orders, order cancellations, disruptions to supply chains and customer activity, widespread business closures and layoffs, as well as general concern and uncertainty.

 

An economic slowdown could cause municipal issuers to suffer declines in tax revenue and it may be difficult to evaluate the effect on any single issuer. Some municipal issuers may be prohibited by law from borrowing, and those that can borrow may face higher interest rates. This situation may result in disruption of municipal programs and services.

 

High public debt in the U.S. and other countries creates ongoing systemic and market risks and policymaking uncertainty. There is no assurance that the U.S. Congress will act to raise the nation’s debt ceiling; a failure to do so could cause market turmoil and substantial investment risks that cannot now be fully predicted. Unexpected political, regulatory and diplomatic events within the U.S. and abroad may affect investor and consumer confidence and may adversely impact financial markets and the broader economy.

 

There is widespread concern about the potential effects of global climate change on property and security values. Certain issuers, industries and regions may be adversely affected by the impact of climate change in ways that cannot be foreseen. The impact of legislation, regulation and international accords related to climate change may negatively impact certain issuers and/or industries.

 

Redemption Risk. The Fund may experience periods of large or frequent redemptions that could cause the Fund to sell assets at inopportune times, which could have a negative impact on the Fund’s overall liquidity, or at a loss or depressed value. Redemption risk is greater to the extent that one or more investors or intermediaries control a large percentage of investments in the Fund and the risk is heightened during periods of declining or illiquid markets. Large redemptions could hurt the Fund’s performance, increase transaction costs, and create adverse tax consequences. A general rise in interest rates has the potential to cause investors to move out of fixed income securities on a large scale, which may increase redemptions from mutual funds that hold large amounts of fixed income securities; such a move, coupled with a reduction in the ability or willingness of dealers and other institutional investors to buy or hold fixed income securities, may result in decreased liquidity and increased volatility in the fixed income markets.

 

Sector Risk. From time to time, based on market or economic conditions, the Fund may have significant positions in one or more sectors of the market. To the extent the Fund invests more heavily in particular sectors, its performance will be especially sensitive to developments that significantly affect those sectors. Individual sectors may be more volatile, and may perform differently, than the broader market. The industries that constitute a sector may all react in the same way to economic, political or regulatory events.

 

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Tender Option Bonds and Related Securities Risk. The Fund’s use of tender option bonds may reduce the Fund’s return and/or increase volatility. Tender option bonds are created when municipal bonds are deposited into a trust or other special purpose vehicle, which issues two classes of certificates with varying economic interests. Holders of floating rate certificates receive tax-exempt interest based on short-term rates and may tender the certificates to the trust at face value. Holders of residual income certificates (“inverse floaters”) receive tax-exempt interest at a rate based on the difference between the interest rate earned on the underlying bonds and the interest paid to floating rate certificate holders, and bear the risk that the underlying bonds decline in value. Investments in tender option bonds expose the Fund to counterparty risk and leverage risk. An investment in tender option bonds typically will involve greater risk than an investment in a municipal fixed rate security, including greater risk of loss of principal. Certain tender option bonds may be illiquid. A trust may be terminated if, for example, the issuer of the underlying bond defaults on interest payments or the credit rating assigned to the issuer of the underlying bond is downgraded.

 

A summary of the Fund’s additional principal investment risks is as follows:

 

Risk of Increase in Expenses. A decline in the Fund’s average net assets during the current fiscal year due to market volatility or other factors could cause the Fund’s expenses for the current fiscal year to be higher than the expense information presented in “Fees and Expenses.”

 

Operational and Cybersecurity Risk. The Fund and its service providers, and your ability to transact with the Fund, may be negatively impacted due to operational matters arising from, among other problems, human errors, systems and technology disruptions or failures, or cybersecurity incidents. Cybersecurity incidents may allow an unauthorized party to gain access to fund assets, customer data, or proprietary information, or cause the Fund or its service providers, as well as the securities trading venues and their service providers, to suffer data corruption or lose operational functionality. Cybersecurity incidents can result from deliberate attacks or unintentional events. It is not possible for the Manager or the other Fund service providers to identify all of the cybersecurity or other operational risks that may affect the Fund or to develop processes and controls to completely eliminate or mitigate their occurrence or effects. Most issuers in which the Fund invests are heavily dependent on computers for data storage and operations, and require ready access to the internet to conduct their business. Thus, cybersecurity incidents could also affect issuers of securities in which the Fund invests, leading to significant loss of value.

 

Risk Management. Risk is an essential part of investing. No risk management program can eliminate the Fund’s exposure to adverse events; at best, it may only reduce the possibility that the Fund will be affected by such events, and especially those risks that are not intrinsic to the Fund’s investment program. The Fund could experience losses if judgments about risk prove to be incorrect.

 

Valuation Risk. The Fund may not be able to sell an investment at the price at which the Fund has valued the investment. Such differences could be significant, particularly for illiquid securities and securities that trade in relatively thin markets and/or markets that experience extreme volatility. If market or other conditions make it difficult to value an investment, the Fund may be required to value such investments using more subjective methods, known as fair value methodologies. Using fair value methodologies to price investments may result in a value that is different from an investment’s most recent price and from the prices used by other funds to calculate their NAVs. The Fund uses pricing services to provide values for certain securities and there is no assurance that the Fund will be able to sell an investment at the price established by such pricing services. The Fund’s ability to value its investments in an accurate and timely manner may be impacted by technological issues and/or errors by third party service providers, such as pricing services or accounting agents.

 

PERFORMANCE

The following bar chart and table provide an indication of the risks of investing in the Fund. The bar chart shows how the Fund’s performance has varied from year to year. The table below the bar chart shows what the returns would equal if you averaged out actual performance over various lengths of time and compares the returns with the returns of a broad-based market index. The index, which is described in “Descriptions of Indices” in the prospectus, has characteristics relevant to the Fund’s investment strategy.

 

Returns would have been lower if the Manager had not reimbursed certain expenses and/or waived a portion of the investment management fees during certain of the periods shown.

 

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Past performance (before and after taxes) is not a prediction of future results. Visit www.nb.com or call 800-877-9700 for updated performance information.

 

YEAR-BY-YEAR % RETURNS AS OF 12/31 EACH YEAR

 

 

Years

Best quarter:    Q4 ’22, 2.86%

Worst quarter:    Q1 ’22, -6.32%

 

AVERAGE ANNUAL TOTAL % RETURNS AS OF 12/31/22

 

Municipal Intermediate Bond Fund   1 Year   5 Years   10 Years
Return Before Taxes   -9.40   0.52   1.33
Return After Taxes on Distributions   -9.40   0.41   1.23
Return After Taxes on Distributions and Sale of Fund Shares   -4.80   0.78   1.40
Bloomberg 7-Year G.O. Index (reflects no deduction for fees, expenses or taxes)   -5.67   1.56   1.91
After-tax returns are calculated using the historical highest individual federal marginal income tax rates and do not reflect the impact of state and local taxes. Actual after-tax returns depend on an investor’s tax situation and may differ from those shown. Return After Taxes on Distributions and Sale of Fund Shares may be higher than other returns for the same period due to a tax benefit of realizing a capital loss upon the sale of Fund shares.

 

INVESTMENT MANAGER

Neuberger Berman Investment Advisers LLC (“Manager”) is the Fund’s investment manager.

 

PORTFOLIO MANAGERS

The Fund is managed by James L. Iselin (Managing Director of the Manager) and S. Blake Miller, CFA (Managing Director of the Manager). Mr. Iselin has managed the Fund since 2007, and Mr. Miller has managed the Fund since 2010.

 

BUYING AND SELLING SHARES

Investor Class of the Fund is closed to new investors. Only certain investors are allowed to purchase Investor Class shares of the Fund. See “Maintaining Your Account” in the prospectus.

 

You may purchase, redeem (sell) or exchange shares of the Fund on any day the New York Stock Exchange is open, at the Fund’s net asset value per share next determined after your order is received in proper form. Shares of the Fund generally are available only through certain investment providers, such as banks, brokerage firms, and financial advisers. Contact any investment provider authorized to sell the Fund’s shares.

 

For certain investors, shares of the Fund may be available directly from Neuberger Berman BD LLC by regular, first class mail (Neuberger Berman Funds, P.O. Box 219189, Kansas City, MO 64121-9189), by express delivery, registered mail, or certified mail (Neuberger Berman Funds, 430 West 7th Street, Suite 219189, Kansas City, MO 64105-1407), or by wire, fax, telephone, exchange, or systematic investment or withdrawal (call 800-877-9700 for instructions). See “Maintaining Your Account” in the

 

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prospectus for eligibility requirements for direct purchases of Investor Class shares and for instructions on buying and redeeming (selling) shares directly.

 

The minimum initial investment in Investor Class is $2,000. Additional investments can be as little as $100. These minimums may be waived in certain cases.

 

TAX INFORMATION

The part of the Fund’s dividends that it reports as “exempt-interest dividends” will be excludable from your gross income for federal income tax purposes. (Accordingly, investment in the Fund’s shares is not appropriate for tax-exempt investors, including retirement plans and accounts, which will not benefit from that exclusion.) Distributions of the Fund’s taxable net investment income and net capital gains, if any, will be taxable to you. Exempt-interest dividends the Fund pays may be subject to state and local income taxes. In addition, a portion of those dividends is expected to be attributable to interest on private activity bonds that you must treat as a Tax Preference Item for purposes of calculating your liability, if any, for the federal alternative minimum tax.

 

PAYMENTS TO INVESTMENT PROVIDERS AND OTHER FINANCIAL INTERMEDIARIES

If you purchase shares of the Fund through an investment provider or other financial intermediary, such as a bank, brokerage firm, or financial adviser (who may be affiliated with Neuberger Berman), the Fund and/or Neuberger Berman BD LLC and/or its affiliates may pay the intermediary for the sale of Fund shares and related services. These payments may create a conflict of interest by influencing the investment provider or other financial intermediary and its employees to recommend the Fund over another investment. Ask your investment provider or visit its website for more information.

 

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Neuberger Berman Short Duration Bond Fund

Investor Class Shares (NSBIX)

 

GOAL

 

The Fund seeks the highest available current income consistent with liquidity and low risk to principal; total return is a secondary goal.

 

FEES AND EXPENSES

These tables describe the fees and expenses that you may pay if you buy, hold or sell shares of the Fund. You may pay other fees, such as brokerage commissions and other fees to financial intermediaries, which are not reflected in the table and example below.

 

     
Shareholder Fees (fees paid directly from your investment)   None

     
Annual Fund Operating Expenses (expenses that you pay each year as a % of the value of your investment)    
Management fees   0.44
Distribution and/or shareholder service (12b-1) fees   None
Other expenses   0.39
Total annual operating expenses   0.83
Fee waivers and/or expense reimbursement   0.28
Total annual operating expenses after fee waiver and/or expense reimbursement1   0.55

 

1 Neuberger Berman Investment Advisers LLC (“Manager”) has contractually undertaken to waive and/or reimburse certain fees and expenses of Investor Class so that the total annual operating expenses (excluding interest, brokerage commissions, acquired fund fees and expenses, taxes including any expenses relating to tax reclaims, dividend and interest expenses relating to short sales, and extraordinary expenses, if any) (“annual operating expenses”) of that class are limited to 0.54% of average net assets. This undertaking lasts until 10/31/2026 and may not be terminated during its term without the consent of the Board of Trustees. The Fund has agreed that Investor Class will repay the Manager for fees and expenses waived or reimbursed for the class provided that repayment does not cause annual operating expenses to exceed 0.54% of the class’ average net assets. Any such repayment must be made within three years after the year in which the Manager incurred the expense.

 

Expense Example

The expense example can help you compare costs among mutual funds. The example assumes that you invested $10,000 for the periods shown, that you redeemed all of your shares at the end of those periods, that the Fund earned a hypothetical 5% total return each year, and that the Fund’s expenses were those in the table. Actual performance and expenses may be higher or lower.

 

    1 Year   3 Years   5 Years   10 Years
Investor Class   $56   $176   $373   $943

 

Portfolio Turnover

The Fund pays transaction costs, such as commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or “turns over” its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover rate may indicate higher transaction costs and may result in higher taxes when Fund shares are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are not reflected in annual operating expenses or in the example, affect the Fund’s performance. During the most recent fiscal year, the Fund’s portfolio turnover rate was 76% of the average value of its portfolio.

 

PRINCIPAL INVESTMENT STRATEGIES

To pursue its goals, the Fund invests mainly in fixed and floating rate investment-grade bonds and other debt securities issued by domestic and foreign governments, corporate entities, and trusts. These may include mortgage- and asset-backed securities, collateralized debt obligations (“CDOs”), including collateralized loan obligations (“CLOs”), and credit risk transfer securities. The Fund considers debt securities to be investment grade if, at the time of investment, they are rated within the four highest categories by at least one independent credit rating agency or, if unrated, are determined by the Portfolio Managers to be of comparable quality.

 

The Portfolio Managers monitor trends in the corporate and government securities markets, as well as a range of economic and financial factors utilizing internally generated data that are produced by specialty sector investment teams in conjunction with asset allocation tools. If particular sectors of the bond market appear relatively inexpensive, the Portfolio Managers may increase the Fund’s exposure in those sectors and decrease exposure in other sectors. The Portfolio Managers look for securities that appear

 

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under-priced compared to securities of similar structure and credit quality. The Fund may sell securities if the Portfolio Managers find an opportunity they believe is more compelling or if the Portfolio Managers’ outlook on the investment or the market changes.

 

To enhance yield and add diversification, the Fund may invest up to 20% of its net assets in securities that are below investment grade (commonly known as “junk bonds”). In choosing lower-rated securities, the Portfolio Managers generally look for bonds from issuers whose financial health appears comparatively strong, and that may have their credit ratings raised. The Fund does not normally invest in or continue to hold securities that are in default or have defaulted with respect to the payment of interest or repayment of principal, but may do so depending on market or other conditions.

 

The Fund may invest in foreign securities, including obligations of issuers in emerging market countries, denominated in any currency, but the Fund normally will not invest more than 20% of its total assets at the time of investment in non-US dollar denominated securities. The Fund considers emerging market countries to be countries included in the JPMorgan Emerging Markets Bond Index - Global Diversified, the JPMorgan Corporate Emerging Markets Bond Index - Diversified, the JPMorgan Emerging Local Markets Index or the JPMorgan Government Bond Index - Emerging Markets Global Diversified, as well as those countries which are not defined as High Income Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) member countries by the World Bank.

 

The Fund may also invest in derivative instruments as a means of hedging risk and/or for investment or efficient portfolio management purposes, which may include altering the Fund’s exposure to interest rates, currencies, sectors and individual issuers. These derivative instruments may include futures, forward foreign currency contracts, and swaps.

 

The Fund may also invest a significant amount of its assets in U.S. Treasury securities or other money market instruments depending on market conditions. Additionally, the Fund may invest in restricted securities. The Fund may also engage in when-issued and forward-settling securities (such as to-be-announced (“TBA”) mortgage-backed securities), which involve a commitment by the Fund to purchase securities that will be issued or settled at a later date.

 

The Fund seeks to reduce credit risk by diversifying among many issuers and different types of securities. As part of the investment process, the Portfolio Managers analyze individual issues (including an analysis of cash flows, ability to pay principal and interest, balance sheet composition, and market positioning). As part of their fundamental investment analysis the Portfolio Managers consider Environmental, Social and Governance (ESG) factors they believe are financially material to individual investments, where applicable, as described below. While this analysis is inherently subjective and may be informed by internally generated and third-party metrics, data and other information, the Portfolio Managers believe that the consideration of financially material ESG factors, alongside traditional financial metrics, may improve credit analysis, security selection, relative value analysis and enhance the Fund’s overall investment process. The specific ESG factors considered and scope and application of integration may vary depending on the specific investment and/or investment type. The consideration of ESG factors does not apply to certain instruments, such as certain derivative instruments, other registered investment companies, cash and cash equivalents. The consideration of ESG factors as part of the investment process does not mean that the Fund pursues a specific “impact” or “sustainable” investment strategy.

 

Although it may invest in securities of any maturity, the Fund normally seeks to maintain an average portfolio duration of three years or less.

 

The Fund may invest in other investment companies, including exchange-traded funds (“ETFs”), if the investment companies invest principally in the types of investments in which the Fund may invest directly.

 

In an effort to achieve its goal, the Fund may engage in frequent and active trading.

 

The Fund normally invests at least 80% of its net assets in bonds and other debt securities and other investment companies that provide investment exposure to such debt securities. The Fund will not alter this policy without providing shareholders at least 60 days’ notice. This test is applied at the time the Fund invests; later percentage changes caused by a change in Fund assets, market values or company circumstances will not require the Fund to dispose of a holding.

 

PRINCIPAL INVESTMENT RISKS

Most of the Fund’s performance depends on what happens in the market for debt instruments, the Portfolio Managers’ evaluation of those developments, and the success of the Portfolio Managers in implementing the Fund’s investment strategies. The Fund’s use of derivative instruments will result in leverage, which amplifies the risks that are associated with these markets. The market’s behavior can be difficult to predict, particularly in the short term. There can be no guarantee that the Fund will achieve its goal.

 

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The Fund may take temporary defensive and cash management positions; to the extent it does, it will not be pursuing its principal investment strategies.

 

The actual risk exposure taken by the Fund in its investment program will vary over time, depending on various factors including the Portfolio Managers’ evaluation of issuer, political, regulatory, market, or economic developments. There can be no guarantee that the Portfolio Managers will be successful in their attempts to manage the risk exposure of the Fund or will appropriately evaluate or weigh the multiple factors involved in investment decisions, including issuer, market and/or instrument-specific analysis, valuation and environmental, social and governance factors.

 

The Fund is a mutual fund, not a bank deposit, and is not guaranteed or insured by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation or any other government agency. The value of your investment may fall, sometimes sharply, and you could lose money by investing in the Fund. While this Fund may have a shorter duration than many other income funds, this Fund is not intended to operate like a money market fund.

 

Each of the following risks, which are described in alphabetical order and not in order of any presumed importance, can significantly affect the Fund’s performance. The relative importance of, or potential exposure as a result of, each of these risks will vary based on market and other investment-specific considerations.

 

Call Risk. Upon the issuer’s desire to call a security, or under other circumstances where a security is called, including when interest rates are low and issuers opt to repay the obligation underlying a “callable security” early, the Fund may have to reinvest the proceeds in an investment offering a lower yield and may not benefit from any increase in value that might otherwise result from declining interest rates.

 

Collateralized Debt Obligations Risk. CDOs, which include collateralized loan obligations (CLOs), issue classes or “tranches” of securities that vary in risk and yield and may experience substantial losses due to interest rate fluctuations, actual defaults, collateral defaults, disappearance of subordinate tranches, market anticipation of defaults, and investor aversion to CDO securities as a class. The risks of investing in CDOs depend largely on the quality and type of the underlying debt, which may include loans, bonds and mortgages, and the tranche of the CDO in which the Fund invests. In addition, CDOs that obtain their exposure through derivative instruments entail the additional risks associated with such instruments. CDOs can be difficult to value, may at times be illiquid, may be highly leveraged (which could make them highly volatile), and may produce unexpected investment results due to their complex structure. In addition, CDOs involve many of the same risks of investing in debt securities and asset-backed securities including, but not limited to, interest rate risk, credit risk, liquidity risk, and valuation risk.

 

Credit Risk. Credit risk is the risk that issuers, guarantors, or insurers may fail, or become less able or unwilling, to pay interest and/or principal when due. Changes in the actual or perceived creditworthiness of an issuer or a downgrade or default affecting any of the Fund’s securities could affect the Fund’s performance by affecting the credit quality or value of the Fund’s securities. Generally, the longer the maturity and the lower the credit quality of a security, the more sensitive it is to credit risk.

 

Currency Risk. Currency risk is the risk that foreign currencies will decline in value relative to the U.S. dollar. To the extent that the Fund invests in securities or other instruments denominated in or indexed to foreign currencies, changes in currency exchange rates could adversely impact investment gains or add to investment losses. Currency exchange rates may fluctuate significantly over short periods of time and can be affected unpredictably by various factors, including investor perception and changes in interest rates; intervention, or failure to intervene, by U.S. or foreign governments, central banks, or supranational entities; or by currency controls or political developments in the U.S. or abroad.

 

Derivatives Risk. Use of derivatives is a highly specialized activity that can involve investment techniques and risks different from, and in some respects greater than, those associated with investing in more traditional investments, such as stocks and bonds. Derivatives can be highly complex and highly volatile and may perform in unanticipated ways. Derivatives can create leverage, and the Fund could lose more than the amount it invests; some derivatives can have the potential for unlimited losses. Derivatives may at times be highly illiquid, and the Fund may not be able to close out or sell a derivative at a particular time or at an anticipated price. Derivatives can be difficult to value and valuation may be more difficult in times of market turmoil. The value of a derivative instrument depends largely on (and is derived from) the value of the reference instrument underlying the derivative. There may be imperfect correlation between the behavior of a derivative and that of the reference instrument underlying the derivative. An abrupt change in the price of a reference instrument could render a derivative worthless. Derivatives may involve risks different from, and possibly greater than, the risks associated with investing directly in the reference instrument. Suitable derivatives may not be available in all circumstances, and there can be no assurance that the Fund will use derivatives to reduce exposure to other risks when that might have been beneficial. Derivatives involve counterparty risk, which is the risk that the other party to the derivative will fail to make required payments or otherwise comply with the terms of the derivative. That risk is

 

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generally thought to be greater with over-the-counter (OTC) derivatives than with derivatives that are exchange traded or centrally cleared. When the Fund uses derivatives, it will likely be required to provide margin or collateral; these practices are intended to satisfy contractual undertakings and regulatory requirements and will not prevent the Fund from incurring losses on derivatives. The need to provide margin or collateral could limit the Fund’s ability to pursue other opportunities as they arise. Ongoing changes to regulation of the derivatives markets and actual and potential changes in the regulation of funds using derivative instruments could limit the Fund’s ability to pursue its investment strategies. New regulation of derivatives may make them more costly, or may otherwise adversely affect their liquidity, value or performance.

 

Additional risks associated with certain types of derivatives are discussed below:

 

Forward Contracts. There are no limitations on daily price movements of forward contracts. Changes in foreign exchange regulations by governmental authorities might limit the trading of forward contracts on currencies.

 

Futures. Futures contracts are subject to the risk that an exchange may impose price fluctuation limits, which may make it difficult or impossible for a fund to close out a position when desired. In the absence of such limits, the liquidity of the futures market depends on participants entering into offsetting transactions rather than taking or making delivery. To the extent a Fund enters into futures contracts requiring physical delivery (e.g., certain commodities contracts), the inability of the Fund to take or make physical delivery can negatively impact performance.

 

Swaps. The risk of loss with respect to swaps generally is limited to the net amount of payments that the Fund is contractually obligated to make or, in the case of the other party to a swap defaulting, the net amount of payments that the Fund is contractually entitled to receive. If the Fund sells a credit default swap, however, the risk of loss may be the entire notional amount of the swap.

 

Some swaps are now executed through an organized exchange or regulated facility and cleared through a regulated clearing organization. The absence of an organized exchange or market for swap transactions may result in difficulties in trading and valuation, especially in the event of market disruptions. The use of an organized exchange or market for swap transactions is expected to result in swaps being easier to trade or value, but this may not always be the case.

 

Foreign and Emerging Market Risk. Foreign securities, including those issued by foreign governments, involve risks in addition to those associated with comparable U.S. securities. Additional risks include exposure to less developed or less efficient trading markets; social, political, diplomatic, or economic instability; trade barriers and other protectionist trade policies (including those of the U.S.); imposition of economic sanctions against a particular country or countries, organizations, companies, entities and/or individuals; significant government involvement in an economy and/or market structure; fluctuations in foreign currencies or currency redenomination; potential for default on sovereign debt; nationalization or expropriation of assets; settlement, custodial or other operational risks; higher transaction costs; confiscatory withholding or other taxes; and less stringent auditing and accounting, corporate disclosure, governance, and legal standards. As a result, foreign securities may fluctuate more widely in price, and may also be less liquid, than comparable U.S. securities. Regardless of where a company is organized or its stock is traded, its performance may be affected significantly by events in regions from which it derives its profits or in which it conducts significant operations.

 

Investing in emerging market countries involves risks in addition to and greater than those generally associated with investing in more developed foreign countries. The governments of emerging market countries may be more unstable and more likely to impose capital controls, nationalize a company or industry, place restrictions on foreign ownership and on withdrawing sale proceeds of securities from the country, intervene in the financial markets, and/or impose burdensome taxes that could adversely affect security prices. To the extent a foreign security is denominated in U.S. dollars, there is also the risk that a foreign government will not let U.S. dollar-denominated assets leave the country. In addition, the economies of emerging market countries may be dependent on relatively few industries that are more susceptible to local and global changes. Emerging market countries may also have less developed legal and accounting systems, and their legal systems may deal with issuer bankruptcies and defaults differently than U.S. law would. Securities markets in emerging market countries are also relatively small and have substantially lower trading volumes. Securities of issuers in emerging market countries may be more volatile and less liquid than securities of issuers in foreign countries with more developed economies or markets and the situation may require that the Fund fair value its holdings in those countries.

 

Securities of issuers traded on foreign exchanges may be suspended, either by the issuers themselves, by an exchange, or by governmental authorities. The likelihood of such suspensions may be higher for securities of issuers in emerging or less-developed market countries than in countries with more developed markets. Trading suspensions may be applied from time to time to the securities of individual issuers for reasons specific to that issuer, or may be applied broadly by exchanges or governmental

 

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authorities in response to market events. Suspensions may last for significant periods of time, during which trading in the securities and in instruments that reference the securities, such as derivative instruments, may be halted. In the event that the Fund holds material positions in such suspended securities or instruments, the Fund’s ability to liquidate its positions or provide liquidity to investors may be compromised and the Fund could incur significant losses.

 

High Portfolio Turnover. The Fund may engage in active and frequent trading and may have a high portfolio turnover rate, which may increase the Fund’s transaction costs, may adversely affect the Fund’s performance and may generate a greater amount of capital gain distributions to shareholders than if the Fund had a low portfolio turnover rate.

 

Interest Rate Risk. The Fund’s yield and share price will fluctuate in response to changes in interest rates. In general, the value of investments with interest rate risk, such as debt securities, will move in the direction opposite to movements in interest rates. If interest rates rise, the value of such securities may decline. Typically, the longer the maturity or duration of a debt security, the greater the effect a change in interest rates could have on the security’s price. Thus, the sensitivity of the Fund’s debt securities to interest rate risk will increase with any increase in the duration of those securities.

 

Issuer-Specific Risk. An individual security may be more volatile, and may perform differently, than the market as a whole.

 

Leverage Risk. Leverage amplifies changes in the Fund’s net asset value and may make the Fund more volatile. Derivatives and when-issued and forward-settling securities may create leverage and can result in losses to the Fund that exceed the amount originally invested and may accelerate the rate of losses. There can be no assurance that the Fund’s use of any leverage will be successful. The Fund’s investment exposure can exceed its net assets, sometimes by a significant amount.

 

Liquidity Risk. From time to time, the trading market for a particular investment in which the Fund invests, or a particular type of instrument in which the Fund is invested, may become less liquid or even illiquid. Illiquid investments frequently can be more difficult to purchase or sell at an advantageous price or time, and there is a greater risk that the investments may not be sold for the price at which the Fund is carrying them. Certain investments that were liquid when the Fund purchased them may become illiquid, sometimes abruptly. Additionally, market closures due to holidays or other factors may render a security or group of securities (e.g., securities tied to a particular country or geographic region) illiquid for a period of time. An inability to sell a portfolio position can adversely affect the Fund’s value or prevent the Fund from being able to take advantage of other investment opportunities. Market prices for such securities or other investments may be volatile. During periods of substantial market volatility, an investment or even an entire market segment may become illiquid, sometimes abruptly, which can adversely affect the Fund’s ability to limit losses.

 

Unexpected episodes of illiquidity, including due to market or political factors, instrument or issuer-specific factors and/or unanticipated outflows, may limit the Fund’s ability to pay redemption proceeds within the allowable time period. To meet redemption requests during periods of illiquidity, the Fund may be forced to sell securities at an unfavorable time and/or under unfavorable conditions.

 

Lower-Rated Debt Securities Risk. Lower-rated debt securities (commonly known as “junk bonds”) and unrated debt securities determined to be of comparable quality involve greater risks than investment grade debt securities. Such securities may fluctuate more widely in price and yield and may fall in price during times when the economy is weak or is expected to become weak. These securities also may require a greater degree of judgment to establish a price and may be difficult to sell at the time and price the Fund desires. Lower-rated debt securities are considered by the major rating agencies to be predominantly speculative with respect to the issuer’s continuing ability to pay principal and interest and carry a greater risk that the issuer of such securities will default in the timely payment of principal and interest. Issuers of securities that are in default or have defaulted may fail to resume principal or interest payments, in which case the Fund may lose its entire investment. The creditworthiness of issuers of these securities may be more complex to analyze than that of issuers of investment grade debt securities, and the overreliance on credit ratings may present additional risks.

 

Market Volatility Risk. Markets may be volatile and values of individual securities and other investments, including those of a particular type, may decline significantly in response to adverse issuer, political, regulatory, market, economic or other developments that may cause broad changes in market value, public perceptions concerning these developments, and adverse investor sentiment or publicity. Geopolitical and other risks, including environmental and public health risks may add to instability in world economies and markets generally. Changes in value may be temporary or may last for extended periods. If the Fund sells a portfolio position before it reaches its market peak, it may miss out on opportunities for better performance.

 

Mortgage- and Asset-Backed Securities Risk. The value of mortgage- and asset-backed securities, including collateralized mortgage instruments, will be influenced by the factors affecting the housing market or the assets underlying the securities. These securities tend to be more sensitive to changes in interest rates than other types of debt securities. In addition, investments in

 

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mortgage- and asset-backed securities may be subject to prepayment risk and extension risk, call risk, credit risk, valuation risk, and illiquid investment risk, sometimes to a higher degree than various other types of debt securities. These securities are also subject to the risk of default on the underlying mortgages or assets, particularly during periods of market downturn, and an unexpectedly high rate of defaults on the underlying assets will adversely affect the security’s value.

 

Other Investment Company Risk. To the extent the Fund invests in other investment companies, including money market funds and exchange-traded funds (ETFs), its performance will be affected by the performance of those other investment companies. Investments in other investment companies are subject to the risks of the other investment companies’ investments, as well as to the other investment companies’ expenses.

 

An ETF may trade in the secondary market at a price below the value of its underlying portfolio and may not be liquid. An actively managed ETF’s performance will reflect its adviser’s ability to make investment decisions that are suited to achieving the ETF’s investment objectives. A passively managed ETF may not replicate the performance of the index it intends to track.

 

Prepayment and Extension Risk. The Fund’s performance could be affected if borrowers pay back principal on certain debt securities, such as mortgage- or asset-backed securities, before (prepayment) or after (extension) the market anticipates such payments, shortening or lengthening their duration. Due to a decline in interest rates or an excess in cash flow into the issuer, a debt security might be called or otherwise converted, prepaid or redeemed before maturity. As a result of prepayment, the Fund may have to reinvest the proceeds in an investment offering a lower yield, may not benefit from any increase in value that might otherwise result from declining interest rates, and may lose any premium it paid to acquire the security. Conversely, rising market interest rates generally result in slower payoffs or extension, which effectively increases the duration of certain debt securities, heightening interest rate risk and increasing the magnitude of any resulting price declines.

 

Private Placements and Other Restricted Securities Risk. Private placements and other restricted securities, including securities for which Fund management has material non-public information, are securities that are subject to legal and/or contractual restrictions on their sales. These securities may not be sold to the public unless certain conditions are met, which may include registration under the applicable securities laws. As a result of the absence of a public trading market, the prices of these securities may be more difficult to determine than publicly traded securities and these securities may involve heightened risk as compared to investments in securities of publicly traded companies. Private placements and other restricted securities may be illiquid, and it frequently can be difficult to sell them at a time when it may otherwise be desirable to do so or the Fund may be able to sell them only at prices that are less than what the Fund regards as their fair market value. Transaction costs may be higher for these securities. In addition, the Fund may get only limited information about the issuer of a private placement or other restricted security.

 

Recent Market Conditions. Both U.S. and international markets have experienced significant volatility in recent months and years. As a result of such volatility, investment returns may fluctuate significantly. National economies are substantially interconnected, as are global financial markets, which creates the possibility that conditions in one country or region might adversely impact issuers in a different country or region. However, the interconnectedness of economies and/or markets may be diminishing, which may impact such economies and markets in ways that cannot be foreseen at this time.

 

Although interest rates were unusually low in recent years in the U.S. and abroad, recently, the Federal Reserve and certain foreign central banks began to raise interest rates as part of their efforts to address rising inflation. It is difficult to accurately predict the pace at which interest rates might increase, or the timing, frequency or magnitude of any such increases in interest rates. Additionally, various economic and political factors could cause the Federal Reserve or other foreign central banks to change their approach in the future and such actions may result in an economic slowdown both in the U.S. and abroad. Unexpected increases in interest rates could lead to market volatility or reduce liquidity in certain sectors of the market. Deteriorating economic fundamentals may, in turn, increase the risk of default or insolvency of particular issuers, negatively impact market value, cause credit spreads to widen, and reduce bank balance sheets. Any of these could cause an increase in market volatility or reduce liquidity across various markets.

 

Some countries, including the U.S., have in recent years adopted more protectionist trade policies. Slowing global economic growth, the rise in protectionist trade policies, changes to some major international trade agreements, risks associated with the trade agreement between the United Kingdom and the European Union, and the risks associated with ongoing trade negotiations with China, could affect the economies of many nations in ways that cannot necessarily be foreseen at the present time. In addition, the current strength of the U.S. dollar may decrease foreign demand for U.S. assets, which could have a negative impact on certain issuers and/or industries.

 

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Regulators in the U.S. have proposed a number of changes to regulations involving the markets and issuers, some of which would apply to the Fund. While it is not currently known whether any of these regulations will be adopted, due to the current scope of regulations being proposed, any changes to regulation could limit the Fund’s ability to pursue its investment strategies or make certain investments, may make it more costly for it to operate, which, may in turn, impact performance.

 

Russia’s invasion of the Ukraine, and corresponding events in late February 2022, have had, and could continue to have, severe adverse effects on regional and global economic markets for securities and commodities. Moreover, those events have, and could continue to have, an adverse effect on global markets performance and liquidity, thereby negatively affecting the value of the Fund’s investments. The duration of ongoing hostilities and the vast array of sanctions and related events cannot be predicted. Those events present material uncertainty and risk with respect to markets globally and the performance of the Fund and its investments or operations could be negatively impacted.

 

The impact of the COVID-19 pandemic has negatively affected and could continue to affect the economies of many nations, individual companies and the global securities and commodities markets, including their liquidity, in ways that cannot necessarily be foreseen at the present time. Epidemics and/or pandemics, such as the coronavirus, have and may further result in, among other things, closing borders, extended quarantines and stay-at-home orders, order cancellations, disruptions to supply chains and customer activity, widespread business closures and layoffs, as well as general concern and uncertainty.

 

High public debt in the U.S. and other countries creates ongoing systemic and market risks and policymaking uncertainty. There is no assurance that the U.S. Congress will act to raise the nation’s debt ceiling; a failure to do so could cause market turmoil and substantial investment risks that cannot now be fully predicted. Unexpected political, regulatory and diplomatic events within the U.S. and abroad may affect investor and consumer confidence and may adversely impact financial markets and the broader economy.

 

There is widespread concern about the potential effects of global climate change on property and security values. Certain issuers, industries and regions may be adversely affected by the impact of climate change in ways that cannot be foreseen. The impact of legislation, regulation and international accords related to climate change may negatively impact certain issuers and/or industries.

 

LIBOR Transition. Certain financial contracts around the world specify rates that are based on the London Interbank Offered Rate (LIBOR), which is produced daily by averaging the rates for inter-bank lending reported by a number of banks. As previously announced by the United Kingdom’s Financial Conduct Authority, most maturities and currencies of LIBOR were phased out at the end of 2021, with the remaining ones to be phased out on June 30, 2023. There are risks that the financial services industry will not have a suitable substitute in place by that time and that there will not be time to perform the substantial work necessary to revise the many existing contracts that rely on LIBOR. The transition process, or a failure of the industry to transition properly, might lead to increased volatility and illiquidity in markets that currently rely on LIBOR. It also could lead to a reduction in the value of some LIBOR-based investments and reduce the effectiveness of new hedges placed against existing LIBOR-based instruments. New York and federal legislation has been enacted to ease the transition from LIBOR, but there is no assurance whether such legislation will adequately address all issues or be subject to litigation.

 

Redemption Risk. The Fund may experience periods of large or frequent redemptions that could cause the Fund to sell assets at inopportune times, which could have a negative impact on the Fund’s overall liquidity, or at a loss or depressed value. Redemption risk is greater to the extent that one or more investors or intermediaries control a large percentage of investments in the Fund and the risk is heightened during periods of declining or illiquid markets. Large redemptions could hurt the Fund’s performance, increase transaction costs, and create adverse tax consequences. A general rise in interest rates has the potential to cause investors to move out of fixed income securities on a large scale, which may increase redemptions from mutual funds that hold large amounts of fixed income securities; such a move, coupled with a reduction in the ability or willingness of dealers and other institutional investors to buy or hold fixed income securities, may result in decreased liquidity and increased volatility in the fixed income markets.

 

Sector Risk. From time to time, based on market or economic conditions, the Fund may have significant positions in one or more sectors of the market. To the extent the Fund invests more heavily in particular sectors, its performance will be especially sensitive to developments that significantly affect those sectors. Individual sectors may be more volatile, and may perform differently, than the broader market. The industries that constitute a sector may all react in the same way to economic, political or regulatory events.

 

Sovereign Debt Risk. Sovereign debt securities are subject to the risk that a governmental entity may delay or refuse to pay interest or principal on its sovereign debt, due, for example, to cash flow problems, insufficient foreign currency reserves, political considerations, the size of the governmental entity’s debt position in relation to the economy, its policy toward international

 

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lenders or the failure to put in place economic reforms required by multilateral agencies. If a governmental entity defaults, it may ask for more time in which to pay or for further loans. There may be no legal process for collecting sovereign debt that a government does not pay nor are there bankruptcy proceedings through which all or part of the sovereign debt that a governmental entity has not repaid may be collected. Sovereign debt risk is increased for emerging market issuers.

 

U.S. Government Securities Risk. Although the Fund may hold securities that carry U.S. government guarantees, these guarantees do not extend to shares of the Fund itself and do not guarantee the market prices of the securities. Furthermore, not all securities issued by the U.S. government and its agencies and instrumentalities are backed by the full faith and credit of the U.S. Treasury. Securities not backed by the full faith and credit of the U.S. Treasury carry at least some risk of non-payment or default.

 

Variable and Floating Rate Instruments Risk. The market prices of instruments with variable and floating interest rates are generally less sensitive to interest rate changes than are the market prices of instruments with fixed interest rates. Variable and floating rate instruments may decline in value if market interest rates or interest rates paid by such instruments do not move as expected. Certain types of floating rate instruments, such as interests in bank loans, may be subject to greater liquidity risk than other debt securities.

 

When-Issued and Forward-Settling Securities Risk. When-issued and forward-settling securities can have a leverage-like effect on the Fund, which can increase fluctuations in the Fund’s share price; may cause the Fund to liquidate positions when it may not be advantageous to do so, in order to satisfy its purchase obligations; and are subject to the risk that the security will not be issued or that a counterparty will fail to complete the sale or purchase of the security, in which case the Fund may lose the opportunity to purchase or sell the security at the agreed upon price and any gain in the security’s price.

 

A summary of the Fund’s additional principal investment risks is as follows:

 

Risk of Increase in Expenses. A decline in the Fund’s average net assets during the current fiscal year due to market volatility or other factors could cause the Fund’s expenses for the current fiscal year to be higher than the expense information presented in “Fees and Expenses.”

 

Operational and Cybersecurity Risk. The Fund and its service providers, and your ability to transact with the Fund, may be negatively impacted due to operational matters arising from, among other problems, human errors, systems and technology disruptions or failures, or cybersecurity incidents. Cybersecurity incidents may allow an unauthorized party to gain access to fund assets, customer data, or proprietary information, or cause the Fund or its service providers, as well as the securities trading venues and their service providers, to suffer data corruption or lose operational functionality. Cybersecurity incidents can result from deliberate attacks or unintentional events. It is not possible for the Manager or the other Fund service providers to identify all of the cybersecurity or other operational risks that may affect the Fund or to develop processes and controls to completely eliminate or mitigate their occurrence or effects. Most issuers in which the Fund invests are heavily dependent on computers for data storage and operations, and require ready access to the internet to conduct their business. Thus, cybersecurity incidents could also affect issuers of securities in which the Fund invests, leading to significant loss of value.

 

Risk Management. Risk is an essential part of investing. No risk management program can eliminate the Fund’s exposure to adverse events; at best, it may only reduce the possibility that the Fund will be affected by such events, and especially those risks that are not intrinsic to the Fund’s investment program. The Fund could experience losses if judgments about risk prove to be incorrect.

 

Valuation Risk. The Fund may not be able to sell an investment at the price at which the Fund has valued the investment. Such differences could be significant, particularly for illiquid securities and securities that trade in relatively thin markets and/or markets that experience extreme volatility. If market or other conditions make it difficult to value an investment, the Fund may be required to value such investments using more subjective methods, known as fair value methodologies. Using fair value methodologies to price investments may result in a value that is different from an investment’s most recent price and from the prices used by other funds to calculate their NAVs. The Fund uses pricing services to provide values for certain securities and there is no assurance that the Fund will be able to sell an investment at the price established by such pricing services. The Fund’s ability to value its investments in an accurate and timely manner may be impacted by technological issues and/or errors by third party service providers, such as pricing services or accounting agents.

 

PERFORMANCE

The following bar chart and table provide an indication of the risks of investing in the Fund. The bar chart shows how the Fund’s performance has varied from year to year. The table below the bar chart shows what the returns would equal if you averaged out actual performance over various lengths of time and compares the returns with the returns of a broad-based market index. The index, which is described in “Descriptions of Indices” in the prospectus, has characteristics relevant to the Fund’s investment strategy.

 

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Returns would have been lower if the Manager had not reimbursed certain expenses and/or waived a portion of the investment management fees during certain of the periods shown.

 

Past performance (before and after taxes) is not a prediction of future results. Visit www.nb.com or call 800-877-9700 for updated performance information.

 

YEAR-BY-YEAR % RETURNS AS OF 12/31 EACH YEAR

 

Years

 

Best quarter:    Q2 ’20, 6.54%

Worst quarter:   Q1 ’20, -5.92%

 

 

AVERAGE ANNUAL TOTAL % RETURNS AS OF 12/31/22

 

Short Duration Bond Fund   1 Year   5 Years   10 Years
Return Before Taxes   -5.02   0.85   0.71
Return After Taxes on Distributions   -6.26   -0.28   -0.12
Return After Taxes on Distributions and Sale of Fund Shares   -2.90   0.20   0.19
Bloomberg 1-3 Year U.S. Government/Credit Bond Index (reflects no deduction for fees, expenses or taxes)   -3.69   0.92   0.88
After-tax returns are calculated using the historical highest individual federal marginal income tax rates and do not reflect the impact of state and local taxes. Actual after-tax returns depend on an investor’s tax situation and may differ from those shown. After-tax returns are not relevant to investors who hold their Fund shares through tax-deferred arrangements, such as 401(k) plans or individual retirement accounts. Return After Taxes on Distributions and Sale of Fund Shares may be higher than other returns for the same period due to a tax benefit of realizing a capital loss upon the sale of Fund shares.

 

INVESTMENT MANAGER

Neuberger Berman Investment Advisers LLC (“Manager”) is the Fund’s investment manager.

 

PORTFOLIO MANAGERS

The Fund is managed by Michael Foster (Managing Director of the Manager), Matthew McGinnis (Senior Vice President of the Manager), Ashok Bhatia, CFA (Managing Director and Deputy Chief Investment Officer of Fixed Income of the Manager) and David M. Brown, CFA (Managing Director and Co-Head of Global Investment Grade Fixed Income of the Manager). Mr. Foster has managed the Fund since 2008. Mr. McGinnis has managed the Fund since February 2017. Mr. Brown has managed the Fund since May 2021. Mr. Bhatia has managed the Fund since July 2022.

 

BUYING AND SELLING SHARES

Investor Class of the Fund is closed to new investors. Only certain investors are allowed to purchase Investor Class shares of the Fund. See “Maintaining Your Account” in the prospectus.

 

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You may purchase, redeem (sell) or exchange shares of the Fund on any day the New York Stock Exchange is open, at the Fund’s net asset value per share next determined after your order is received in proper form. Shares of the Fund generally are available only through certain investment providers, such as banks, brokerage firms, workplace retirement programs, and financial advisers. Contact any investment provider authorized to sell the Fund’s shares.

 

For certain investors, shares of the Fund may be available directly from Neuberger Berman BD LLC by regular, first class mail (Neuberger Berman Funds, P.O. Box 219189, Kansas City, MO 64121-9189), by express delivery, registered mail, or certified mail (Neuberger Berman Funds, 430 West 7th Street, Suite 219189, Kansas City, MO 64105-1407), or by wire, fax, telephone, exchange, or systematic investment or withdrawal (call 800-877-9700 for instructions). See “Maintaining Your Account” in the prospectus for eligibility requirements for direct purchases of Investor Class shares and for instructions on buying and redeeming (selling) shares directly.

 

The minimum initial investment in Investor Class is $2,000. Additional investments can be as little as $100. These minimums may be waived in certain cases.

 

TAX INFORMATION

Unless you invest in the Fund through a tax-advantaged retirement plan or account or are a tax-exempt investor, you will be subject to tax on Fund distributions to you of ordinary income and/or net capital gains. Those distributions generally are not taxable to such a plan or account or a tax-exempt investor, although withdrawals from certain retirement plans and accounts generally are subject to federal income tax.

 

PAYMENTS TO INVESTMENT PROVIDERS AND OTHER FINANCIAL INTERMEDIARIES

If you purchase shares of the Fund through an investment provider or other financial intermediary, such as a bank, brokerage firm, workplace retirement program, or financial adviser (who may be affiliated with Neuberger Berman), the Fund and/or Neuberger Berman BD LLC and/or its affiliates may pay the intermediary for the sale of Fund shares and related services. These payments may create a conflict of interest by influencing the investment provider or other financial intermediary and its employees to recommend the Fund over another investment. Ask your investment provider or visit its website for more information.

 

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Descriptions of Certain Practices and Security Types

 

Derivatives. A derivative is generally a financial contract the value of which depends on, or is derived from, changes in the value of one or more “reference instruments,” such as underlying assets (including securities), reference rates, indices or events. Derivatives may relate to stocks, bonds, credit, interest rates, commodities, currencies or currency exchange rates, or related indices. A derivative may also contain leverage to magnify the exposure to the reference instrument. Derivatives may be traded on organized exchanges and/or through clearing organizations, or in private transactions with other parties in the over-the-counter (“OTC”) market with a single dealer or a prime broker acting as an intermediary with respect to an executing dealer. Derivatives may be used for hedging purposes and non-hedging (or speculative) purposes. Some derivatives require one or more parties to post “margin,” which means that a party must deposit assets with, or for the benefit of, a third party, such as a futures commission merchant, in order to initiate and maintain the derivatives position. Margin is typically adjusted daily, and adverse market movements may require a party to post additional margin.

 

Call Options. A call option gives the purchaser the right to buy an underlying asset or other reference instrument at a specified price, regardless of the instrument’s market price at the time. Writing (selling) a call option obligates the writer (seller) to sell the underlying asset or other reference instrument to the purchaser at a specified price if the purchaser decides to exercise the option. A call option is “covered” if the writer (seller) simultaneously holds an equivalent position in the security underlying the option. The writer (seller) receives a premium when it writes a call option. Purchasing a call option gives the purchaser the right to buy the underlying asset or other reference instrument from the writer (seller) at a specified price if the purchaser decides to exercise the option. The purchaser pays a premium when it purchases a call option.

 

Forward Foreign Currency Contracts (“Forward Contracts”). A forward contract is a contract for the purchase or sale of a specific foreign currency at a future date at a fixed price. Forward contracts are not required to be traded on organized exchanges or cleared through regulated clearing organizations.

 

Futures. A futures contract is a standardized agreement to buy or sell a set quantity of an underlying asset at a future date, or to make or receive a cash payment based on the value of a securities index or other reference instrument at a future date.

 

Put Options. A put option gives the purchaser the right to sell an underlying asset or other reference instrument at a specified price, regardless of the instrument’s market price at the time. Writing (selling) a put option obligates the writer (seller) to buy the underlying asset or other reference instrument from the purchaser at a specified price if the purchaser decides to exercise the option. The writer (seller) receives a premium when it writes a put option. Purchasing a put option gives the purchaser the right to sell the underlying asset or other reference instrument to the writer (seller) at a specified price if the purchaser decides to exercise the option. The purchaser pays a premium when it purchases a put option.

 

Swaps. In a standard swap transaction, two parties agree to exchange one or more payments based, for example, on the returns (or differentials in rates of return) earned or realized on particular predetermined reference instruments. Swap transactions generally may be used to obtain exposure to a reference instrument without owning or taking physical custody of the reference instrument and generally do not involve delivery of the notional amount of the agreement. Swaps have historically been OTC instruments; however, recent legislation requires many swaps to be executed through an organized exchange or regulated facility and cleared through a regulated clearing organization.

 

There are various types of swaps including, but not limited to, the following: interest rate swaps (exchanging a floating interest rate for a fixed interest rate); total return swaps (exchanging a floating interest rate for the total return of a reference instrument); credit default swaps (buying or selling protection against certain designated credit events); and options on swaps (“swaptions”) (options to enter into a swap agreement).

 

Emerging Market Countries. Emerging market countries are generally considered to be those countries whose economies are less developed than the economies of countries such as the United States or most nations in Western Europe.

 

Fixed Income Securities. Debt securities may consist of fixed and floating rate obligations of various credit quality and duration and may be issued by: corporate entities; trusts; domestic issuers, including securities issued or guaranteed as to principal or interest by the U.S. government or any of its agencies or instrumentalities; foreign issuers, including in emerging markets, and including foreign governments and supranational entities; and municipal issuers, including within the U.S. and its territories. Such obligations may include: bonds, loans, inflation-linked debt securities, when-issued and forward-settling securities, commercial paper, mortgage-backed securities and other asset-backed securities, and hybrid securities (including convertible securities).

 

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Foreign Markets. There are many promising opportunities for investment outside the United States. Foreign markets can respond to different factors and therefore may follow cycles that are different from each other. For this reason, many investors put a portion of their portfolios in foreign investments as a way of gaining further diversification.

 

Inflation-Linked Debt Securities. Inflation-linked debt securities are debt securities whose principal value is periodically adjusted according to the rate of inflation. If the index measuring inflation falls, the principal value of inflation-linked debt securities will be adjusted downward, and consequently the interest payable on these securities (calculated with respect to a smaller principal amount) will be reduced.

 

Loans. Loans are a type of debt security that may be made in connection with, among other things, recapitalizations, acquisitions, leveraged buyouts, dividend issuances and refinancings. The loans in which a Fund typically invests are structured and administered by a third party that acts as agent for a group of lenders that make or hold interests in the loan. A Fund may acquire interests in such loans by taking an assignment of all or a portion of a direct interest in a loan previously held by another institution or by acquiring a participation in an interest in a loan that continues to be held by another institution.

 

Lower-Rated Debt Securities. Lower-rated debt securities (commonly known as “junk bonds”) typically offer investors higher yields than other fixed income securities. The higher yields are usually justified by the weaker credit profiles of these issuers as compared to investment grade issuers. Lower-rated debt securities may include debt obligations of all types issued by U.S. and non-U.S. corporate and governmental entities, including bonds, debentures and notes, loan interests and preferred stocks that have priority over any other class of stock of the entity as to the distribution of assets or the payment of dividends.

 

Municipal Securities. Municipal securities include, among other types of instruments, general obligation bonds, revenue bonds, private activity bonds, anticipation notes and tax-exempt commercial paper. General obligation bonds are backed by the full taxing power of the issuing governmental entity. Revenue bonds are backed only by the income from a specific project, facility, or tax. Private activity bonds are issued by or on behalf of public authorities to finance various privately operated facilities, and are generally supported only by revenue from those facilities, if any. They are not backed by the credit of any governmental or public authority. Anticipation notes are issued by municipalities in expectation of future proceeds from the issuance of bonds or from taxes or other revenues and are payable from those bond proceeds, taxes, or revenues. Tax-exempt commercial paper is issued by municipalities to help finance short-term capital or operating requirements.

 

Additional Information about Principal Investment Risks

 

This section provides additional information about a Fund’s principal investment risks described in its Fund Summary section. The following risks are described in alphabetical order and not in order of any presumed importance or potential exposure.

 

Call Risk. Upon the issuer’s desire to call a security, or under other circumstances where a security is called, including when interest rates are low and issuers opt to repay the obligation underlying a “callable security” early, the Fund may have to reinvest the proceeds in an investment offering a lower yield or other less favorable characteristics. This may reduce the amount of the Fund’s distributions. In addition, the Fund may not benefit from any increase in value in the securities that might otherwise result from declining interest rates. The likelihood of a call also may impact the price of a security.

 

Collateralized Debt Obligations Risk. CDOs, which include collateralized loan obligations (CLOs), issue classes or “tranches” of securities that vary in risk and yield and may experience substantial losses due to interest rate fluctuations, actual defaults, collateral defaults, disappearance of subordinate tranches, market anticipation of defaults, and investor aversion to CDO securities as a class. CDOs carry risks including, but not limited to, (i) the possibility that distributions from the underlying debt securities will not be adequate to make interest or other payments, (ii) the quality of the underlying debt securities may decline in value or default, particularly during periods of economic downturn, (iii) the Fund may invest in CDOs that are subordinate to other classes of securities, (iv) the investment return could be significantly different than those predicted by financial models; (v) the risk of forced “fire sale” liquidation due to technical defaults such as coverage test failures, (vi) the manager of the CDO may perform poorly, and (vii) the complex structure may produce disputes with the issuer or unexpected investment results. The risks of investing in CDOs depend largely on the quality and type of the underlying debt, which may include loans, bonds and mortgages, and the tranche of the CDO in which the Fund invests. In addition, CDOs that obtain their exposure through derivative instruments entail the additional risks associated with such instruments. CDOs can be difficult to value, may at times be illiquid, may be highly leveraged (which could make them highly volatile), and may produce unexpected investment results due to their complex structure. In addition, CDOs involve many of the same risks of investing in debt securities and asset-backed securities including, but not limited to, interest rate risk, credit risk, liquidity risk, and valuation risk.

 

Commercial Paper Risk. Commercial paper is a short-term debt security issued by a corporation, bank, municipality, or other issuer, usually for purposes such as financing current operations. Issuers generally do not register their commercial paper with the

 

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SEC. A Fund may invest in commercial paper that cannot be resold to the public without an effective registration statement under the 1933 Act. While some unregistered commercial paper normally is deemed illiquid, the Manager may in certain cases determine that such paper is liquid. In some cases, the ratings of commercial paper issuers have been downgraded abruptly, leaving holders with little opportunity to avoid losses.

 

Credit Risk. Credit risk is the risk that issuers, guarantors, or insurers may fail, or become less able or unwilling, to pay interest and/or principal when due. Changes in the actual or perceived creditworthiness of an issuer, factors affecting an issuer directly (such as management changes, labor relations, collapse of key suppliers or customers, or material changes in overhead costs), factors affecting the industry in which a particular issuer operates (such as competition or technological advances) and changes in general social, economic or political conditions can increase the risk of default by an issuer, which may affect a security’s credit quality or value. A downgrade or default affecting any of the Fund’s securities could affect the Fund’s performance by affecting the credit quality or value of the Fund’s securities.

 

Generally, the longer the maturity and the lower the credit quality of a security, the more sensitive it is to credit risk. In addition, lower credit quality may lead to greater volatility in the price of a security and may negatively affect a security’s liquidity. Ratings represent a rating agency’s opinion regarding the quality of a security and are not a guarantee of quality, and do not protect against a decline in the value of a security. In addition, rating agencies may fail to make timely changes to credit ratings in response to subsequent events and a rating may become stale in that it fails to reflect changes in an issuer’s financial condition. The credit quality of a security or instrument can deteriorate suddenly and rapidly, which may negatively impact its liquidity and value. The securities in which the Fund invests may be subject to credit enhancement (for example, guarantees, letters of credit, or bond insurance). Entities providing credit or liquidity support also may be affected by credit risk. Credit enhancement is designed to help assure timely payment of the security; it does not protect the Fund against losses caused by declines in a security’s value due to changes in market conditions.

 

Currency Risk. Currency risk is the risk that foreign currencies will decline in value relative to the U.S. dollar. To the extent that the Fund invests in securities or other instruments denominated in or indexed to foreign currencies, changes in currency exchange rates could adversely impact investment gains or add to investment losses. Domestic issuers that hold substantial foreign assets may be similarly affected. Currency exchange rates may fluctuate in response to factors external to a country’s economy, which makes the forecasting of currency market movements extremely difficult. Currency exchange rates may fluctuate significantly over short periods of time and can be affected unpredictably by various factors, including investor perception of a country’s economy and changes in interest rates; intervention, or failure to intervene, by U.S. or foreign governments, central banks, or supranational entities, such as the International Monetary Fund; or by currency controls or political developments in the U.S. or abroad. To the extent the Fund invests or hedges based on the perceived relationship between two currencies, there is a risk that the correlation between those currencies may not behave as anticipated.

 

Derivatives Risk. Use of derivatives is a highly specialized activity that can involve investment techniques and risks different from, and in some respects greater than, those associated with investing in more traditional investments, such as stocks and bonds. Derivatives can be highly complex and highly volatile and may perform in unanticipated ways. Derivatives can create leverage, which can magnify the impact of a decline in the value of the reference instrument underlying the derivative, and the Fund could lose more than the amount it invests. Derivatives can have the potential for unlimited losses, for example, where the Fund may be called upon to deliver a security it does not own. Derivatives may at times be highly illiquid, and the Fund may not be able to close out or sell a derivative at a particular time or at an anticipated price. Derivatives can be difficult to value and valuation may be more difficult in times of market turmoil. The value of a derivative instrument depends largely on (and is derived from) the value of the reference instrument underlying the derivative. There may be imperfect correlation between the behavior of a derivative and that of the reference instrument underlying the derivative, and the reference instrument may not perform as anticipated. An abrupt change in the price of a reference instrument could render a derivative worthless. Derivatives may involve risks different from, and possibly greater than, the risks associated with investing directly in the reference instrument. Suitable derivatives may not be available in all circumstances, and there can be no assurance that the Fund will use derivatives to reduce exposure to other risks when that might have been beneficial. Derivatives may involve fees, commissions, or other costs that may reduce the Fund’s gains or exacerbate losses from the derivatives. In addition, the Fund’s use of derivatives may have different tax consequences for the Fund than an investment in the reference instruments, and those differences may increase the amount and affect the timing of income recognition and character of taxable distributions payable to shareholders. Thus, the Fund could be required at times to liquidate other investments in order to satisfy its distribution requirements. Certain aspects of the regulatory treatment of derivative instruments, including federal income tax, are currently unclear and may be affected by changes in legislation, regulations, or other legally binding authority. In October 2020, the SEC adopted Rule 18f-4 under the 1940 Act which regulates the use of derivatives for certain funds registered under the Investment Company Act (“Rule 18f-4”). The Fund has adopted a Rule 18f-4 Policy which provides, among other things, that unless the Fund qualifies as a “limited derivatives user” as defined in Rule 18f-4, the Fund is subject to a comprehensive derivatives risk management program, to comply with certain

 

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value-at-risk based leverage limits, and to provide additional disclosure both publicly and to the SEC regarding its derivatives positions. If a Fund qualifies as a limited derivatives user, Rule 18f-4 requires the Fund to have policies and procedures to manage its aggregate derivatives risk.

 

Derivatives involve counterparty risk, which is the risk that the other party to the derivative will fail to make required payments or otherwise comply with the terms of the derivative. Counterparty risk may arise because of market activities and developments, the counterparty’s financial condition (including financial difficulties, bankruptcy, or insolvency), or other reasons. Not all derivative transactions require a counterparty to post collateral, which may expose the Fund to greater losses in the event of a default by a counterparty. Counterparty risk is generally thought to be greater with OTC derivatives than with derivatives that are exchange traded or centrally cleared. However, derivatives that are traded on organized exchanges and/or through clearing organizations involve the possibility that the futures commission merchant or clearing organization will default in the performance of its obligations.

 

When the Fund uses derivatives, it will likely be required to provide margin or collateral; these practices are intended to satisfy contractual undertakings and regulatory requirements and will not prevent the Fund from incurring losses on derivatives. The need to provide margin or collateral could limit the Fund’s ability to pursue other opportunities as they arise. Derivatives that have margin requirements involve the risk that if the Fund has insufficient cash or eligible margin securities to meet daily variation margin requirements, it may have to sell securities or other instruments from its portfolio at a time when it may be disadvantageous to do so. The Fund normally will remain obligated to meet margin requirements until a derivatives position is closed.

 

Ongoing changes to regulation of the derivatives markets and actual and potential changes in the regulation of funds using derivative instruments could limit the Fund’s ability to pursue its investment strategies. New regulation of derivatives may make them more costly, or may otherwise adversely affect their liquidity, value or performance.

 

Although the Fund may use derivatives to attempt to hedge against certain risks, the hedging instruments may not perform as expected and could produce losses.

 

Additional risks associated with certain types of derivatives are discussed below:

 

Forward Contracts. There are no limitations on daily price movements of forward contracts. Changes in foreign exchange regulations by governmental authorities might limit the trading of forward contracts on currencies. There have been periods during which certain counterparties have refused to continue to quote prices for forward contracts or have quoted prices with an unusually wide spread (the difference between the price at which the counterparty is prepared to buy and the price at which it is prepared to sell).

 

Futures. There can be no assurance that, at all times, a liquid market will exist for offsetting a futures contract that the Fund has previously bought or sold and this may result in the inability to close a futures position when desired. This could be the case if, for example, a futures price has increased or decreased by the maximum allowable daily limit and there is no buyer (or seller) willing to purchase (or sell) the futures contract that the Fund needs to sell (or buy) at that limit price. In the absence of such limits, the liquidity of the futures market depends on participants entering into offsetting transactions rather than taking or making delivery. To the extent a Fund enters into futures contracts requiring physical delivery (e.g., certain commodities contracts), the inability of the Fund to take or make physical delivery can negatively impact performance.

 

Options. The use of options involves investment strategies and risks different from those associated with ordinary portfolio securities transactions. If a strategy is applied at an inappropriate time or market conditions or trends are judged incorrectly, the use of options may lower the Fund’s return. There can be no guarantee that the use of options will increase the Fund’s return or income. In addition, there may be an imperfect correlation between the movement in prices of options and the securities underlying them and there may at times not be a liquid secondary market for various options. An abrupt change in the price of an underlying security could render an option worthless. The prices of options are volatile and are influenced by, among other things, actual and anticipated changes in the value of the underlying instrument, or in interest or currency exchange rates, including the anticipated volatility of the underlying instrument (known as implied volatility), which in turn are affected by the performance of the issuer of the underlying instrument, by fiscal and monetary policies and by national and international political and economic events. As such, prior to the exercise or expiration of the option, the Fund is exposed to implied volatility risk, meaning the value, as based on implied volatility, of an option may increase due to market and economic conditions or views based on the sector or industry in which issuers of the underlying instrument participate, including company-specific factors.

 

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By writing put options, the Fund takes on the risk of declines in the value of the underlying instrument, including the possibility of a loss up to the entire strike price of each option it sells, but without the corresponding opportunity to benefit from potential increases in the value of the underlying instrument. When the Fund writes a put option, it assumes the risk that it must purchase the underlying instrument at a strike price that may be higher than the market price of the instrument. If there is a broad market decline and the Fund is not able to close out its written put options, it may result in substantial losses to the Fund. By writing a call option, the Fund may be obligated to deliver instruments underlying an option at less than the market price. When the Fund writes a covered call option, it gives up the opportunity to profit from a price increase in the underlying instrument above the strike price. If a covered call option that the Fund has written is exercised, the Fund will experience a gain or loss from the sale of the underlying instrument, depending on the price at which the Fund purchased the instrument and the strike price of the option. The Fund will receive a premium from writing options, but the premium received may not be sufficient to offset any losses sustained from exercised options. In the case of a covered call, the premium received may be offset by a decline in the market value of the underlying instrument during the option period. If an option that the Fund has purchased is never exercised or closed out, the Fund will lose the amount of the premium it paid and the use of those funds.

 

Swaps. Swap transactions generally do not involve delivery of reference instruments or payment of the notional amount of the contract. Accordingly, the risk of loss with respect to swaps generally is limited to the net amount of payments that the Fund is contractually obligated to make or, in the case of the other party to a swap defaulting, the net amount of payments that the Fund is contractually entitled to receive. If the Fund sells a credit default swap, however, the risk of loss may be the entire notional amount of the swap.

 

Some swaps are now executed through an organized exchange or regulated facility and cleared through a regulated clearing organization. The absence of an organized exchange or market for swap transactions may result in difficulties in trading and valuation, especially in the event of market disruptions. The use of an organized exchange or market for swap transactions is expected to result in swaps being easier to trade or value, but this may not always be the case.

 

Distressed Securities Risk. Distressed securities are securities of companies that are in financial distress and that may be in or about to enter bankruptcy or some other legal proceeding. The Fund may not receive interest payments on the distressed securities and may incur costs to protect its investment. These securities may present a substantial risk of default, including the loss of the entire investment, or may be in default. The Fund may incur additional expenses to the extent it is required to seek recovery upon a default in the payment of principal of or interest on its portfolio holdings. Distressed securities include loans, bonds and notes, many of which are not publicly traded, and may involve a substantial degree of risk. In certain periods, there may be little or no liquidity in the markets for distressed securities meaning that the Fund may be unable to exit its position. Distressed securities and any securities received in an exchange for such securities may be subject to restrictions on resale. In addition, the prices of such securities may be subject to periods of abrupt and erratic market movements and above-average price volatility. It may be difficult to obtain information regarding the financial condition of a borrower or issuer, and its financial condition may change rapidly. Also, it may be difficult to value such securities and the spread between the bid/ask prices of such securities may be greater than expected. The Fund may lose a substantial portion or all of its investment in distressed securities or may be required to accept cash, securities or other property with a value less than its original investment.

 

Foreign and Emerging Market Risk. Foreign securities, including those issued by foreign governments, involve risks in addition to those associated with comparable U.S. securities. Additional risks include exposure to less developed or less efficient trading markets; social, political, diplomatic, or economic instability; trade barriers and other protectionist trade policies (including those of the U.S.); imposition of economic sanctions against a particular country or countries, organizations, companies, entities and/or individuals; significant government involvement in an economy and/or market structure; fluctuations in foreign currencies or currency redenomination; potential for default on sovereign debt; nationalization or expropriation of assets; settlement, custodial or other operational risks; higher transaction costs; confiscatory withholding or other taxes; and less stringent auditing and accounting, corporate disclosure, governance, and legal standards. The Fund may have limited or no legal recourse in the event of default with respect to certain foreign securities. In addition, key information about the issuer, the markets or the local government or economy may be unavailable, incomplete, or inaccurate. As a result, foreign securities may fluctuate more widely in price, and may also be less liquid, than comparable U.S. securities. World markets, or those in a particular region, may all react in similar fashion to important economic or political developments. In addition, securities issued by U.S. entities with substantial foreign operations may involve risks relating to political, economic, or regulatory conditions in foreign countries, as well as currency exchange rates. Regardless of where a company is organized or its stock is traded, its performance may be affected significantly by events in regions from which it derives its profits or in which it conducts significant operations.

 

Investing in emerging market countries involves risks in addition to and greater than those generally associated with investing in more developed foreign countries. The governments of emerging market countries may be more unstable and more likely to

 

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impose capital controls, nationalize a company or industry, place restrictions on foreign ownership and on withdrawing sale proceeds of securities from the country, intervene in the financial markets, and/or impose burdensome taxes that could adversely affect security prices. To the extent a foreign security is denominated in U.S. dollars, there is also the risk that a foreign government will not let U.S. dollar-denominated assets leave the country. In addition, the economies of emerging market countries may be dependent on relatively few industries that are more susceptible to local and global changes, and may suffer from extreme and volatile debt burdens or inflation rates. Emerging market countries may also have less developed legal and accounting systems, and their legal systems may deal with issuer bankruptcies and defaults differently than U.S. law would. Shareholder claims and legal remedies that are common in the United States may be difficult or impossible to pursue in many emerging market countries. In addition, due to jurisdictional limitations, matters of comity and various other factors, U.S. authorities may be limited in their ability to bring enforcement actions against non-U.S. companies and non-U.S. persons in certain emerging market countries. Most foreign and emerging market companies are not subject to the uniform accounting, auditing and financial reporting requirements applicable to issuers in the United States, which may impact the availability and quality of information about foreign and emerging market issuers. Securities markets in emerging market countries are also relatively small and have substantially lower trading volumes. Additionally, in times of market stress, regulatory authorities of different emerging market countries may apply varying techniques and degrees of intervention, which can have an effect on prices. Securities of issuers in emerging market countries may be more volatile and less liquid than securities of issuers in foreign countries with more developed economies or markets and the situation may require that the Fund fair value its holdings in those countries.

 

Securities of issuers traded on foreign exchanges may be suspended, either by the issuers themselves, by an exchange, or by governmental authorities. The likelihood of such suspensions may be higher for securities of issuers in emerging or less-developed market countries than in countries with more developed markets. Trading suspensions may be applied from time to time to the securities of individual issuers for reasons specific to that issuer, or may be applied broadly by exchanges or governmental authorities in response to market events. Suspensions may last for significant periods of time, during which trading in the securities and in instruments that reference the securities, such as derivative instruments, may be halted. In the event that the Fund holds material positions in such suspended securities or instruments, the Fund’s ability to liquidate its positions or provide liquidity to investors may be compromised and the Fund could incur significant losses.

 

In addition, foreign markets may perform differently than the U.S. markets. Over a given period of time, foreign securities may underperform U.S. securities — sometimes for years. The Fund could also underperform if it invests in countries or regions whose economic performance falls short. To the extent that the Fund invests a portion of its assets in one country, state, region or currency, an adverse economic, business or political development may affect the value of the Fund’s investments more than if its investments were not so invested.

 

The effect of economic instability on specific foreign markets or issuers may be difficult to predict or evaluate. Some national economies continue to show profound instability, which may in turn affect their international trading and financial partners or other members of their currency bloc.

 

High Portfolio Turnover. The Fund may engage in active and frequent trading and may have a high portfolio turnover rate, which may increase the Fund’s transaction costs, may adversely affect the Fund’s performance and may generate a greater amount of capital gain distributions to shareholders than if the Fund had a low portfolio turnover rate.

 

Inflation-Linked Debt Securities Risk. Inflation-linked debt securities are structured to provide protection against inflation. The value of the principal or the interest income paid on an inflation-linked debt security is adjusted to track changes in an official inflation measure. There can be no assurance that the inflation index used will accurately measure the real rate of inflation in the prices of goods and services. The Fund’s investments in inflation-linked debt securities may lose value in the event that the actual rate of inflation is different than the rate of the inflation measure. In addition, any inflation measure used could be discontinued, substituted or changed in a manner that could adversely impact such securities.

 

Repayment of the original principal upon maturity (as adjusted upward for inflation, as needed) is guaranteed in the case of U.S. Treasury inflation-indexed debt securities. For inflation-linked debt securities that do not provide a similar guarantee, the adjusted principal value of the securities repaid at maturity may be less than the original principal value. The value of inflation-linked debt securities is expected to change in response to changes in real interest rates. Real interest rates are tied to the relationship between nominal interest rates and the rate of inflation. In general, the price of an inflation-linked debt security falls when real interest rates rise, (i.e., when nominal interest rates increase at a faster rate than inflation), and rises when real interest rates fall (i.e., when inflation rises at a faster rate than nominal interest rates). Interest payments on inflation-linked debt securities will vary as the principal and/or interest is adjusted for inflation and can be unpredictable. In periods of deflation, the Fund may have no income at all from such investments.

 

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Any increase in the principal value of an inflation-linked debt security is taxable in the year the increase occurs, even though the security’s holders do not receive cash representing the increase until the security matures. Thus, the Fund could be required at times to liquidate other investments in order to satisfy its distribution requirements.

 

The principal value of an investment in the Fund is not protected or otherwise guaranteed by virtue of the Fund’s investments in inflation-linked debt securities.

 

Interest Rate Risk. In general, the value of investments with interest rate risk, such as debt securities, will move in the direction opposite to movements in interest rates. If interest rates rise, the value of such securities may decline. Interest rates may change in response to the supply and demand for credit, changes to government monetary policy and other initiatives, inflation rates, and other factors. Debt securities have varying levels of sensitivity to changes in interest rates. Typically, the longer the maturity (i.e., the term of a debt security) or duration (i.e., a measure of the sensitivity of a debt security to changes in market interest rates, based on the entire cash flow associated with the security) of a debt security, the greater the effect a change in interest rates could have on the security’s price. For example, if interest rates increase by 1%, a debt security with a duration of two years will decrease in value by approximately 2%. Thus, the Fund’s sensitivity to interest rate risk will increase with any increase in the Fund’s overall duration. Short-term securities tend to react to changes in short-term interest rates, and long-term securities tend to react to changes in long-term interest rates. Short-term and long-term interest rates, and interest rates in different countries, do not necessarily move in the same direction or by the same amount. The link between interest rates and debt security prices tends to be weaker with lower-rated debt securities than with investment grade debt securities.

 

Inverse Floater Risk. An inverse floater earns interest at rates that vary inversely to changes in short-term interest rates. An inverse floater produces less income (and may produce no income) and may decline in value when market rates rise, and produces more income and may increase in value when market rates fall. Whereas ordinary fixed income securities suffer a decline in value when market rates rise, this phenomenon is exacerbated in the case of inverse floaters, because when market rates rise, the rate paid by the inverse floater declines, producing greater price and income volatility than a conventional fixed-rate bond with comparable credit quality and maturity. An investment in an inverse floater involves the risk of loss of principal and may involve greater risk than an investment in a fixed rate security. Inverse floaters generally will underperform the market for fixed rate securities in a rising interest rate environment. An inverse floater may involve leverage, which may make the Fund’s returns more volatile, increase interest rate risk and can magnify the Fund’s losses. Accordingly, the holder of an inverse floater could lose more than its principal investment.

 

Issuer-Specific Risk. An individual security may be more volatile, and may perform differently, than the market as a whole. The value of an issuer’s securities may deteriorate because of a variety of factors, including disappointing earnings reports by the issuer, unsuccessful products or services, loss of major customers, major litigation against the issuer, or changes in government regulations affecting the issuer or the competitive environment. Certain unanticipated events, such as natural disasters, may have a significant adverse effect on the value of an issuer’s securities.

 

Leverage Risk. Leverage amplifies changes in the Fund’s net asset value and may make the Fund more volatile. Derivatives and when-issued and forward-settling securities may create leverage and can result in losses to the Fund that exceed the amount originally invested and may accelerate the rate of losses. For certain instruments or transactions that create leverage, or have embedded leverage, relatively small market fluctuations may result in large changes in the value of such investments. In addition, the costs that the Fund pays to engage in these practices are additional costs borne by the Fund and could reduce or eliminate any net investment profits. Unless the profits from engaging in these practices exceed the costs of engaging in these practices, the use of leverage will diminish the investment performance of the Fund compared with what it would have been had the Fund not used leverage. There can be no assurance that the Fund’s use of any leverage will be successful. The Fund’s investment exposure can exceed its net assets, sometimes by a significant amount. When the Fund uses leverage or utilizes certain of these practices, it may need to dispose of some of its holdings at unfavorable times or prices in order to satisfy its obligations or to comply with certain asset coverage requirements.

 

Liquidity Risk. From time to time, the trading market for a particular investment or type of investment in which the Fund invests is or may become less liquid or even illiquid. Illiquid investments frequently can be more difficult to purchase or sell at an advantageous price or time. An illiquid investment means any investment that the Fund reasonably expects cannot be sold or disposed of in current market conditions in seven calendar days or less without the sale or disposition significantly changing the market value of the investment. Judgment plays a greater role in pricing these investments than it does in pricing investments having more active markets, and there is a greater risk that the investments may not be sold for the price at which the Fund is carrying them. The Fund may receive illiquid securities as a result of its investment in securities involved in restructurings. Certain investments that were liquid when the Fund purchased them may become illiquid, sometimes abruptly, particularly during periods of increased market volatility or adverse investor perception. Additionally, market closures due to holidays or other factors may render a security or group of securities (e.g., securities tied to a particular country or geographic region) illiquid for a period

 

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of time. An inability to sell a portfolio position can adversely affect the Fund’s value or prevent the Fund from being able to take advantage of other investment opportunities. Market prices for such securities or other investments may be volatile. Market participants attempting to sell the same or a similar investment at the same time as the Fund could decrease the liquidity of such investments, especially during times of market volatility. During periods of substantial market volatility, an investment or even an entire market segment may become illiquid, sometimes abruptly, which can adversely affect the Fund’s ability to limit losses.

 

Unexpected episodes of illiquidity, including due to market or political factors, instrument or issuer-specific factors and/or unanticipated outflows, may limit the Fund’s ability to pay redemption proceeds within the allowable time period. To meet redemption requests during periods of illiquidity, the Fund may be forced to sell securities at an unfavorable time and/or under unfavorable conditions.

 

Loan Interests Risk. Loan interests generally are subject to restrictions on transfer, and the Fund may be unable to sell its loan interests at a time when it may otherwise be desirable to do so or may be able to sell them promptly only at prices that are less than what the Fund regards as their fair market value. Accordingly, loan interests may at times be illiquid. Loan interests may be difficult to value and may have extended settlement periods (the settlement cycle for many bank loans exceeds 7 days). Extended settlement periods may result in cash not being immediately available to the Fund. As a result, during periods of unusually heavy redemptions, the Fund may have to sell other investments or borrow money to meet its obligations. A significant portion of floating rate loans may be “covenant lite” loans that may contain fewer or less restrictive constraints on the borrower and/or may contain other characteristics that would be favorable to the borrower, limiting the ability of lenders to take legal action to protect their interests in certain situations. Interests in loans made to finance highly leveraged companies or to finance corporate acquisitions or other transactions may be especially vulnerable to adverse changes in economic or market conditions.

 

Interests in secured loans have the benefit of collateral and, typically, of restrictive covenants limiting the ability of the borrower to further encumber its assets, although many covenants may be waived or modified with the consent of a certain percentage of the holders of the loans even if the Fund does not consent. There is a risk that the value of any collateral securing a loan in which the Fund has an interest may decline and that the collateral may not be sufficient to cover the amount owed on the loan. In most loan agreements there is no formal requirement to pledge additional collateral. In the event the borrower defaults, the Fund’s access to the collateral may be limited or delayed by bankruptcy or other insolvency laws. Further, in the event of a default, second or lower lien secured loans, and unsecured loans, will generally be paid only if the value of the collateral exceeds the amount of the borrower’s obligations to the senior secured lenders, and the remaining collateral may not be sufficient to cover the full amount owed on the loan in which the Fund has an interest. In addition, if a secured loan is foreclosed, the Fund may bear the costs and liabilities associated with owning and disposing of the collateral. The collateral may be difficult to sell and the Fund would bear the risk that the collateral may decline in value while the Fund is holding it. Further, there is a risk that a court could take action with respect to a loan that is adverse to the holders of the loan and the Fund may need to retain legal counsel to enforce its rights in any resulting event of default, bankruptcy, or similar situation, which may increase the Fund’s operating expenses. Interests in loans expose the Fund to the credit risk of the underlying borrower and may expose the Fund to the credit risk of the lender.

 

The Fund may acquire a loan interest by direct investment as a lender, by obtaining an assignment of all or a portion of the interests in a particular loan that are held by an original lender or a prior assignee or by participation in a loan interest that is held by another party. As an assignee, the Fund normally will succeed to all rights and obligations of its assignor with respect to the portion of the loan that is being assigned. However, the rights and obligations acquired by the purchaser of a loan assignment may differ from, and be more limited than, those held by the original lenders or the assignor.

 

When the Fund’s loan interest is a participation, the Fund may have less control over the exercise of remedies than the party selling the participation interest, and the Fund normally would not have any direct rights against the borrower. As a participant, the Fund also would be subject to the risk that the lending bank or other party selling the participation interest would not remit the Fund’s pro rata share of loan payments to the Fund. It may be difficult for the Fund to obtain an accurate picture of a lending bank’s financial condition. It is possible that the Fund could be held liable, or may be called upon to fulfill other obligations, with respect to loans in which it receives an assignment in whole or in part, or in which it owns a participation. The potential for such liability is greater for an assignee than for a participant.

 

The liquidity of floating rate loans, including the volume and frequency of secondary market trading in such loans, may vary, sometimes significantly, over time and among individual floating rate loans and loans may be subject to wide bid/ask spreads. During periods of infrequent trading, valuing a floating rate loan can be more difficult; and buying and selling a floating rate loan at an acceptable price can be more difficult and delayed.

 

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Courts have held in some situations that loan interests are not “securities,” and purchasers, such as the Fund, therefore may not have the benefit of the anti-fraud protections of the federal securities laws. Also, if Fund management receives material non-public information about the issuer (which is not uncommon in the loan market), the Fund may, as a result, be unable to sell the issuer’s securities.

 

Lower-Rated Debt Securities Risk. Lower-rated debt securities (commonly known as “junk bonds”) and unrated debt securities determined to be of comparable quality involve greater risks than investment grade debt securities. Such securities may fluctuate more widely in price and yield and may fall in price during times when the economy is weak or is expected to become weak. These securities may be less liquid and also may require a greater degree of judgment to establish a price, may be difficult to sell at the time and price the Fund desires, and may carry higher transaction costs. In particular, these securities may be issued by smaller companies or by highly indebted companies, which are generally less able than more financially stable companies to make scheduled payments of interest and principal. Lower-rated debt securities are considered by the major rating agencies to be predominantly speculative with respect to the issuer’s continuing ability to pay principal and interest and carry a greater risk that the issuer of such securities will default in the timely payment of principal and interest. Such securities are susceptible to such a default or decline in market value due to real or perceived adverse economic and business developments relating to the issuer, the industry in general, market interest rates and market liquidity. Issuers of securities that are in default or have defaulted may fail to resume principal or interest payments, in which case the Fund may lose its entire investment. Where it deems it appropriate and in the best interests of Fund shareholders, the Fund may incur additional expenses to seek recovery on a defaulted security and/or to pursue litigation to protect the Fund’s investment.

 

The credit rating of a security may not accurately reflect the actual credit risk associated with such a security. The creditworthiness of issuers of these securities may be more complex to analyze than that of issuers of investment grade debt securities, and the overreliance on credit ratings may present additional risks.

 

Adverse publicity and investor perceptions, whether or not based on fundamental analysis, may decrease the values and liquidity of such securities, especially in a thinly traded or illiquid market. To the extent the Fund owns or may acquire illiquid or restricted lower-rated debt securities or unrated debt securities of comparable quality, these securities may involve special registration responsibilities, liabilities, costs, and liquidity and valuation difficulties.

 

Market Volatility Risk. Markets may be volatile and values of individual securities and other investments, including those of a particular type, may decline significantly in response to adverse issuer, political, regulatory, market, economic or other developments that may cause broad changes in market value, public perceptions concerning these developments, and adverse investor sentiment or publicity. Changes in the financial condition of a single issuer may impact a market as a whole. Changes in value may be temporary or may last for extended periods. If the Fund sells a portfolio position before it reaches its market peak, it may miss out on opportunities for better performance. Geopolitical risks, including terrorism, tensions or open conflict between nations, or political or economic dysfunction within some nations that are major players on the world stage or major producers of oil, may lead to overall instability in world economies and markets generally and have led, and may in the future lead, to increased market volatility and may have adverse long-term effects. Similarly, environmental and public health risks, such as natural disasters or epidemics, or widespread fear that such events may occur, may impact markets and economies adversely and cause market volatility in both the short- and long-term.

 

Mortgage- and Asset-Backed Securities Risk. The value of mortgage- and asset-backed securities, including collateralized mortgage instruments, will be influenced by the factors affecting the housing market or the assets underlying the securities. These securities differ from more traditional debt securities because the principal is paid back over the life of the security rather than at the security’s maturity; however, principal may be repaid early if a decline in interest rates causes many borrowers to refinance (known as prepayment risk), or repaid more slowly if a rise in rates causes refinancings to slow down (known as extension risk). Thus, they tend to be more sensitive to changes in interest rates than other types of debt securities and as a result, these securities may exhibit additional volatility during periods of interest rate turmoil. In addition, investments in mortgage- and asset-backed securities may be subject to call risk, credit risk, valuation risk, and illiquid investment risk, sometimes to a higher degree than various other types of debt securities. These securities are also subject to the risk of default on the underlying mortgages or assets, particularly during periods of market downturn, and an unexpectedly high rate of defaults on the underlying assets will adversely affect the security’s value. Further, such securities may have credit support, the utility of which could be negatively affected by such conditions as well.

 

Municipal Securities Risk. The municipal securities market could be significantly affected by adverse political and legislative changes or litigation at the federal or state level, as well as uncertainties related to taxation or the rights of municipal security holders. Changes in the financial health of a municipality may hinder its ability to pay interest and principal. To the extent that the Fund invests a significant portion of its assets in the municipal securities of a particular state or U.S. territory or possession, there is greater risk that political, regulatory, economic or other developments within that jurisdiction may have a significant

 

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impact on the Fund’s investment performance. The amount of public information available about municipal securities is generally less than that available about corporate securities.

 

In the case of insured municipal securities, insurance supports the commitment that interest payments will be made on time and the principal will be repaid at maturity. Insurance does not, however, protect the Fund or its shareholders against losses caused by declines in a municipal security’s market value. The Portfolio Managers generally look to the credit quality of the issuer of a municipal security to determine whether the security meets the Fund’s quality restrictions, even if the security is covered by insurance. However, a downgrade in the claims-paying ability of an insurer of a municipal security could have an adverse effect on the market value of the security.

 

Municipal issuers may be adversely affected by high labor costs and increasing unfunded pension liabilities, and by the phasing out of federal programs providing financial support. In addition, changes in the financial condition of one or more individual municipal issuers or insurers of municipal issuers can affect the overall municipal securities market. At times, the secondary market for municipal securities may not be liquid, which could limit the Fund’s ability to sell securities it is holding. Declines in real estate prices and general business activity may reduce the tax revenues of state and local governments. Municipal issuers have on occasion defaulted on obligations, been downgraded, or commenced insolvency proceedings. Financial difficulties of municipal issuers may continue or get worse. Further, the application of state law to municipal issuers could produce varying results among the states or among municipal securities issuers within a state.

 

Some municipal securities, including those in the high yield market, may include transfer restrictions similar to restricted securities (e.g., may only be transferred to qualified institutional buyers and purchasers meeting other qualification requirements set by the issuer). As such, it may be difficult to sell municipal securities at a time when it may otherwise be desirable to do so or the Fund may be able to sell them only at prices that are less than what the Fund regards as their fair market value.

 

Because many municipal securities are issued to finance similar types of projects, especially those related to education, health care, housing, transportation and utilities, conditions in those sectors can affect the overall municipal securities market. Interest on municipal securities paid out of current or anticipated revenues from a specific project or specific asset (so-called “private activity bonds”) are generally not backed by the creditworthiness or taxing authority of the issuing governmental entity; rather, a particular business or facility may be the only source of revenue supporting payment of interest and principal, and declines in general business activity could affect the economic viability of that business or facility. To the extent that Neuberger Berman Municipal Intermediate Bond Fund invests in private activity bonds, a part of its dividends will be a Tax Preference Item. Consult your tax adviser for more information.

 

Generally, the Fund purchases municipal securities the interest on which, in the opinion of counsel to the issuer, is excludable from gross income for federal income tax purposes. There is no guarantee that such an opinion will be correct, and there is no assurance that the Internal Revenue Service will agree with such an opinion. Municipal securities generally must meet certain regulatory and statutory requirements to distribute interest that is excludable from gross income for federal income tax. If any municipal security held by Neuberger Berman Municipal Intermediate Bond Fund fails to meet such requirements, the interest received by the Fund from such security and distributed to shareholders would be taxable. Proposals also may be introduced before state legislatures that would affect the state tax treatment of a municipal fund’s distributions. If such proposals were enacted, the availability of municipal securities and the value of a municipal fund’s holdings would be affected.

 

Operational and Cybersecurity Risk. The Fund and its service providers, and your ability to transact with the Fund, may be negatively impacted due to operational matters arising from, among other problems, human errors, systems and technology disruptions or failures, or cybersecurity incidents. Cybersecurity incidents may allow an unauthorized party to gain access to fund assets, customer data, or proprietary information, or cause the Fund or its service providers, as well as the securities trading venues and their service providers, to suffer data corruption or lose operational functionality. Cybersecurity incidents can result from deliberate attacks (e.g., malicious software coding, ransomware, or “hacking”) or unintentional events (e.g., inadvertent release of confidential information). A cybersecurity incident could, among other things, result in the loss or theft of customer data or funds, customers or employees being unable to access electronic systems (“denial of services”), loss or theft of proprietary information or corporate data, physical damage to a computer or network system, or remediation costs associated with system repairs. A cybersecurity incident may not permit the Fund and its service providers to access electronic systems to perform critical duties for the Fund, such as trading and calculating net asset value. Any cybersecurity incident could have a substantial adverse impact on the Fund and its shareholders.

 

The occurrence of any of these problems could result in a loss of information, regulatory scrutiny, reputational damage and other consequences, any of which could have a material adverse effect on the Fund or its shareholders. The Manager, through its monitoring and oversight of Fund service providers, endeavors to determine that service providers take appropriate precautions to avoid and mitigate risks that could lead to such problems. While the Manager has established business continuity plans and risk

 

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management systems seeking to address these problems, there are inherent limitations in such plans and systems, and it is not possible for the Manager or the other Fund service providers to identify all of the cybersecurity or other operational risks that may affect the Fund or to develop processes and controls to completely eliminate or mitigate their occurrence or effects. Most issuers in which the Fund invests are heavily dependent on computers for data storage and operations, and require ready access to the internet to conduct their business. Thus, cybersecurity incidents could also affect issuers of securities in which the Fund invests, leading to significant loss of value.

 

Other Investment Company Risk. To the extent the Fund invests in other investment companies, money market funds and exchange-traded funds (ETFs), its performance will be affected by the performance of those other investment companies and to the allocation of its assets among those other investment companies. Investments in other investment companies are subject to the risks of the other investment companies’ investments, as well as to the other investment companies’ expenses. If the Fund invests in other investment companies, the Fund may receive distributions of taxable gains from portfolio transactions by that investment company and may recognize taxable gains from transactions in shares of that investment company, which could be taxable to the Fund’s shareholders when distributed to them.

 

An ETF may trade in the secondary market at a price below the value of its underlying portfolio and may not be liquid. An actively managed ETF’s performance will reflect its adviser’s ability to make investment decisions that are suited to achieving the ETF’s investment objectives. A passively managed ETF may not replicate the performance of the index it intends to track because of, for example, the temporary unavailability of certain index securities in the secondary market or discrepancies between the ETF and the index with respect to the weighting of securities or the number of stocks held. A passively managed ETF may not be permitted to sell poorly performing stocks that are included in its index.

 

Preferred Securities Risk. Preferred securities, which are a form of hybrid security (i.e., a security with both debt and equity characteristics), may pay fixed or adjustable rates of return. Preferred securities are subject to issuer-specific and market risks applicable generally to equity securities, however, unlike common stocks, participation in the growth of an issuer may be limited. Distributions on preferred securities are generally payable at the discretion of the issuer’s board of directors and after the company makes required payments to holders of its debt securities. For this reason, preferred securities are subject to greater credit, interest, and liquidation risk than debt securities, and the value of preferred securities will usually react more strongly than debt securities to actual or perceived changes in the company’s financial condition or prospects. Preferred securities of smaller companies may be more vulnerable to adverse developments than preferred securities of larger companies. Preferred securities may be less liquid than common stocks, and there is a risk an issuer of preferred securities may call or redeem prior to any stated maturity. Preferred securities may include provisions that permit the issuer, at its discretion, to defer or omit distributions for a stated period without any adverse consequences to the issuer. Preferred shareholders may have certain rights if distributions are not paid but generally have no legal recourse against the issuer, may suffer a loss of value if distributions are not paid, and may be required to report the deferred distribution on its tax returns, even though it may not have received any cash. Generally, preferred shareholders have no voting rights with respect to the issuer unless distributions to preferred shareholders have not been paid for a stated period, at which time the preferred shareholders may elect a number of directors to the issuer’s board. Generally, once all the distributions have been paid to preferred shareholders, the preferred shareholders no longer have voting rights.

 

Prepayment and Extension Risk. The Fund’s performance could be affected if borrowers pay back principal on certain debt securities, such as mortgage- or asset-backed securities, before (prepayment) or after (extension) the market anticipates such payments, shortening or lengthening their duration. Due to a decline in interest rates or an excess in cash flow into the issuer, a debt security might be called or otherwise converted, prepaid or redeemed before maturity. As a result of prepayment, the Fund may have to reinvest the proceeds in an investment offering a lower yield, may not benefit from any increase in value that might otherwise result from declining interest rates, and may lose any premium it paid to acquire the security. Prepayments could also create capital gains tax liability in some instances. Conversely, rising market interest rates generally result in slower payoffs or extension, which effectively increases the duration of certain debt securities, heightening interest rate risk and increasing the magnitude of any resulting price declines. If the Fund’s investments are locked in at a lower interest rate for a longer period of time, the Fund may be unable to capitalize on securities with higher interest rates or wider spreads.

 

Private Placements and Other Restricted Securities Risk. Private placements and other restricted securities, including securities for which Fund management has material non-public information, are securities that are subject to legal and/or contractual restrictions on their sales. These securities may not be sold to the public unless certain conditions are met, which may include registration under the applicable securities laws. These securities may not be listed on an exchange and may have no active trading market. As a result of the absence of a public trading market, the prices of these securities may be more volatile and more difficult to determine than publicly traded securities and these securities may involve heightened risk as compared to investments in securities of publicly traded companies. Private placements and other restricted securities may be illiquid, and it frequently can be difficult to sell them at a time when it may otherwise be desirable to do so or the Fund may be able to sell them only at prices that

 

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are less than what the Fund regards as their fair market value. A security that was liquid at the time of purchase may subsequently become illiquid. In addition, transaction costs may be higher for private placements and other restricted securities. The Fund may have to bear the expense of registering such securities for sale and there may be substantial delays in effecting the registration. If, during such a delay, adverse market conditions were to develop, the Fund might obtain a less favorable price than prevailed at the time it decided to seek registration of the securities. In addition, the Fund may get only limited information about the issuer of a private placement or other restricted security, so it may be less able to anticipate a loss. Also, if Fund management receives material non-public information about the issuer, the Fund may, as a result, be legally prohibited from selling the securities.

 

Recent Market Conditions. Both U.S. and international markets have experienced significant volatility in recent months and years. As a result of such volatility, investment returns may fluctuate significantly. National economies are substantially interconnected, as are global financial markets, which creates the possibility that conditions in one country or region might adversely impact issuers in a different country or region. However, the interconnectedness of economies and/or markets may be diminishing, which may impact such economies and markets in ways that cannot be foreseen at this time.

 

Although interest rates were unusually low in recent years in the U.S. and abroad, recently, the Federal Reserve and certain foreign central banks began to raise interest rates as part of their efforts to address rising inflation. In addition, ongoing inflation pressures from tight labor markets and supply chain disruptions could continue to cause an increase in interest rates and/or negatively impact companies. It is difficult to accurately predict the pace at which interest rates might increase, or the timing, frequency or magnitude of any such increases in interest rates. Additionally, various economic and political factors could cause the Federal Reserve or other foreign central banks to change their approach in the future and such actions may result in an economic slowdown both in the U.S. and abroad. Deteriorating economic fundamentals may, in turn, increase the risk of default or insolvency of particular issuers, negatively impact market value, increase market volatility, cause credit spreads to widen, and reduce liquidity. Unexpected increases in interest rates could lead to market volatility or reduce liquidity in certain sectors of the market. Also, regulators have expressed concern that rate increases may cause investors to sell fixed income securities faster than the market can absorb them, contributing to price volatility. Over the longer term, rising interest rates may present a greater risk than has historically been the case due to the prior period of relatively low rates and the effect of government fiscal and monetary policy initiatives and potential market reaction to those initiatives, or their alteration or cessation. Historical patterns of correlation among asset classes may break down in unanticipated ways during times of high volatility, disrupting investment programs and potentially causing losses.

 

Some countries, including the U.S., have in recent years adopted more protectionist trade policies. Slowing global economic growth, the rise in protectionist trade policies, changes to some major international trade agreements, risks associated with the trade agreement between the United Kingdom and the European Union, and the risks associated with ongoing trade negotiations with China, could affect the economies of many nations in ways that cannot necessarily be foreseen at the present time.

 

Regulators in the U.S. have proposed a number of changes to regulations involving the markets and issuers, some of which would apply to the Fund. While it is not currently known whether any of these regulations will be adopted, due to the current scope of regulations being proposed, any changes to regulation could limit the Fund’s ability to pursue its investment strategies or make certain investments, may make it more costly for it to operate, which, may in turn, impact performance.

 

Russia’s invasion of the Ukraine, and corresponding events in late February 2022, have had, and could continue to have, severe adverse effects on regional and global economic markets for securities and commodities. Following Russia’s actions, various governments, including the United States, have issued broad-ranging economic sanctions against Russia, including, among other actions, a prohibition on doing business with certain Russian companies, large financial institutions, officials and oligarchs; the removal by certain countries and the European Union of selected Russian banks from the Society for Worldwide Interbank Financial Telecommunications (“SWIFT”), the electronic banking network that connects banks globally; and restrictive measures to prevent the Russian Central Bank from undermining the impact of the sanctions. The current events, including sanctions and the potential for future sanctions, including any impacting Russia’s energy sector, and other actions, and Russia’s retaliatory responses to those sanctions and actions, may continue to adversely impact the Russian economy and economies of surrounding countries and may result in the further decline of the value and liquidity of Russian securities and securities of surrounding countries, a continued weakening of currencies in the region and continued exchange closures, and may have other adverse consequences on the economies of countries in the region that could impact the value of investments in the region and impair the ability of a Fund to buy, sell, receive or deliver securities of companies in the region or a Fund’s ability to collect interest payments on fixed income securities in the region. Moreover, those events have, and could continue to have, an adverse effect on global markets performance and liquidity, thereby negatively affecting the value of a Fund’s investments beyond any direct exposure to issuers in the region. The duration of ongoing hostilities and the vast array of sanctions and related events cannot be predicted. Those events present material uncertainty and risk with respect to markets globally and the performance of a Fund and its investments or operations could be negatively impacted.

 

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Certain illnesses spread rapidly and have the potential to significantly and adversely affect the global economy. Outbreaks such as the novel coronavirus, COVID-19, or other similarly infectious diseases may have material adverse impacts on a Fund. Epidemics and/or pandemics, such as the coronavirus, have and may further result in, among other things, closing borders, extended quarantines and stay-at-home orders, order cancellations, disruptions to supply chains and customer activity, widespread business closures and layoffs, as well as general concern and uncertainty. The impact of this virus, and other epidemics and/or pandemics that may arise in the future, has negatively affected and may continue to affect the economies of many nations, individual companies and the global securities and commodities markets, including their liquidity, in ways that cannot necessarily be foreseen at the present time. The impact of any outbreak may last for an extended period of time.

 

An economic slowdown could cause municipal issuers to suffer declines in tax revenue and it may be difficult to evaluate the effect on any single issuer. Some municipal issuers may be prohibited by law from borrowing, and those that can borrow may face higher interest rates. This situation may result in disruption of municipal programs and services.

 

High public debt in the U.S. and other countries creates ongoing systemic and market risks and policymaking uncertainty. There is no assurance that the U.S. Congress will act to raise the nation’s debt ceiling; a failure to do so could cause market turmoil and substantial investment risks that cannot now be fully predicted. Unexpected political, regulatory and diplomatic events within the U.S. and abroad may affect investor and consumer confidence and may adversely impact financial markets and the broader economy.

 

China’s economy, which has been sustained in recent years largely through a debt-financed housing boom, may be approaching the limits of that strategy and may experience a significant slowdown as a result of debt that cannot be repaid. Due to the size of China’s economy, such a slowdown could impact a number of other countries.

 

There is widespread concern about the potential effects of global climate change on property and security values. Certain issuers, industries and regions may be adversely affected by the impact of climate change in ways that cannot be foreseen. The impact of legislation, regulation and international accords related to climate change may negatively impact certain issuers and/or industries.

 

A rise in sea levels, a change in weather patterns, including an increase in powerful storms and large wildfires, and/or a climate-driven increase in flooding could cause properties to lose value or become unmarketable altogether. Unlike previous declines in the real estate market, properties in affected zones may not ever recover their value. The U.S. administration appears concerned about the climate change problem and is focusing regulatory and public works projects around those concerns. Regulatory changes and divestment movements tied to concerns about climate change could adversely affect the value of certain land and the viability of industries whose activities or products are seen as accelerating climate change.

 

Losses related to climate change could adversely affect corporate issuers and mortgage lenders, the value of mortgage-backed securities, the bonds of municipalities that depend on tax or other revenues and tourist dollars generated by affected properties, and insurers of the property and/or of corporate, municipal or mortgage-backed securities. Since property and security values are driven largely by buyers’ perceptions, it is difficult to know the time period over which these market effects might unfold.

 

LIBOR Transition. Certain financial contracts around the world specify rates that are based on the London Interbank Offered Rate (LIBOR), which is produced daily by averaging the rates for inter-bank lending reported by a number of banks. As previously announced by the United Kingdom’s Financial Conduct Authority, most maturities and currencies of LIBOR were phased out at the end of 2021, with the remaining ones to be phased out on June 30, 2023. There are risks that the financial services industry will not have a suitable substitute in place by that time and that there will not be time to perform the substantial work necessary to revise the many existing contracts that rely on LIBOR. The transition process, or a failure of the industry to transition properly, might lead to increased volatility and illiquidity in markets that currently rely on LIBOR. It also could lead to a reduction in the value of some LIBOR-based investments and reduce the effectiveness of new hedges placed against existing LIBOR-based instruments. New York and federal legislation has been enacted to ease the transition from LIBOR, but there is no assurance whether such legislation will adequately address all issues or be subject to litigation.

 

Redemption Risk. The Fund may experience periods of large or frequent redemptions that could cause the Fund to sell assets at inopportune times, which could have a negative impact on the Fund’s overall liquidity, or at a loss or depressed value. Redemption risk is greater to the extent that one or more investors or intermediaries control a large percentage of investments in the Fund, have short investment horizons, or have unpredictable cash flow needs. In addition, the risk is heightened if redemption requests are unusually large or frequent or occur during periods of declining or illiquid markets. Large redemptions could hurt the Fund’s performance, increase transaction costs and create adverse tax consequences.

 

A general rise in interest rates has the potential to cause investors to move out of fixed income securities on a large scale, which may increase redemptions from mutual funds that hold large amounts of fixed income securities; such a move, coupled with a

 

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reduction in the ability or willingness of dealers and other institutional investors to buy or hold fixed income securities, may result in decreased liquidity and increased volatility in the fixed income markets.

 

Risk Management. Management undertakes certain analyses with the intention of identifying particular types of risks and reducing the Fund’s exposure to them. However, risk is an essential part of investing, and the degree of return an investor might expect is often tied to the degree of risk the investor is willing to accept. By its very nature, risk involves exposure to the possibility of adverse events. Accordingly, no risk management program can eliminate the Fund’s exposure to such events; at best, it may only reduce the possibility that the Fund will be affected by adverse events, and especially those risks that are not intrinsic to the Fund’s investment program. While the prospectus describes material risk factors associated with the Fund’s investment program, there is no assurance that as a particular situation unfolds in the markets, management will identify all of the risks that might affect the Fund, rate their probability or potential magnitude correctly, or be able to take appropriate measures to reduce the Fund’s exposure to them. The Fund could experience losses if judgments about risk prove to be incorrect. Measures taken with the intention of decreasing exposure to identified risks might have the unintended effect of increasing exposure to other risks.

 

Sector Risk. From time to time, based on market or economic conditions, the Fund may have significant positions in one or more sectors of the market. To the extent the Fund invests more heavily in one sector, industry, or sub-sector of the market, its performance will be especially sensitive to developments that significantly affect those sectors, industries, or sub-sectors. An individual sector, industry, or sub-sector of the market may be more volatile, and may perform differently, than the broader market. The industries that constitute a sector may all react in the same way to economic, political or regulatory events. The Fund’s performance could also be affected if the sectors, industries, or sub-sectors do not perform as expected. Alternatively, the lack of exposure to one or more sectors or industries may adversely affect performance. For information about the risks of investing in particular sectors, see the Fund’s Statement of Additional Information.

 

Sovereign and Supranational Entities Debt Risk. Sovereign debt securities are subject to the risk that a governmental entity may delay or refuse to pay interest or principal on its sovereign debt, due, for example, to cash flow problems, insufficient foreign currency reserves, political considerations, the size of the governmental entity’s debt position in relation to the economy, its policy toward international lenders or the failure to put in place economic reforms required by multilateral agencies. If a governmental entity defaults, it may ask for more time in which to pay or for further loans. There may be no legal process for collecting sovereign debt that a government does not pay nor are there bankruptcy proceedings through which all or part of the sovereign debt that a governmental entity has not repaid may be collected. Sovereign debt risk is increased for emerging market issuers. Certain emerging market or developing countries are among the largest debtors to commercial banks and foreign governments. At times, certain emerging market countries have declared moratoria on the payment of principal and interest on external debt. Certain emerging market countries have experienced difficulty in servicing their sovereign debt on a timely basis that led to defaults and the restructuring of certain indebtedness.

 

The Fund may also invest in obligations issued by supranational entities, such as the World Bank. A supranational entity is financially supported by the governments of one or more countries, has no taxing authority, and is dependent on its members for payments of interest and principal. There is no guarantee that the members will continue to make capital contributions. If such contributions are not made, the entity may be unable to pay interest or repay principal on its debt securities. Political changes in principal donor nations may unexpectedly disrupt the finances of supranational entities.

 

Tender Option Bonds and Related Securities Risk. The Fund’s use of tender option bonds may reduce the Fund’s return and/or increase volatility. Tender option bonds are created when municipal bonds are deposited into a trust or other special purpose vehicle, which issues two classes of certificates with varying economic interests. Holders of the first class of interests, or floating rate certificates, receive tax-exempt interest based on short-term rates and may tender the certificates to the trust at face value. A remarketing agent for the trust is required to attempt to resell any tendered floating rate certificates and if the remarketing agent is unsuccessful, the trust’s liquidity provider must contribute cash to ensure that the tendering holders receive the purchase price of their securities on the repurchase date. Holders of the second class of interests, or residual income certificates (commonly referred to as “inverse floaters”), receive tax-exempt interest at a rate based on the difference between the interest rate earned on the underlying bonds and the interest paid to floating rate certificate holders, and bear the risk that the underlying bonds decline in value. Investments in tender option bonds expose the Fund to counterparty risk and leverage risk. An investment in tender option bonds typically will involve greater risk than an investment in a municipal fixed rate security, including greater risk of loss of principal. Certain tender option bonds may be illiquid. In certain instances, a trust may be terminated if, for example, the issuer of the underlying bond defaults on interest payments, the credit rating assigned to the issuer of the underlying bond is downgraded, or tendered floating rate certificates cannot be resold.

 

U.S. Government Securities Risk. Although the Fund may hold securities that carry U.S. government guarantees, these guarantees do not extend to shares of the Fund itself and do not guarantee the market prices of the securities. Furthermore, not all securities issued by the U.S. government and its agencies and instrumentalities are backed by the full faith and credit of the U.S.

 

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Treasury. Some are backed by the issuer’s right to borrow from the U.S. Treasury, while others are backed only by the credit of the issuing agency or instrumentality. These securities carry at least some risk of non-payment or default by the issuer. The maximum potential liability of the issuers of some U.S. government securities may greatly exceed their current resources, including their legal right to support from the U.S. Treasury. It is possible that these issuers will not have the funds to meet their payment obligations in the future.

 

In recent periods, the values of U.S. government securities have been affected substantially by increased demand for them around the world. Increases or decreases in the demand for U.S. government securities may occur at any time and may result in increased volatility in the values of those securities. In recent years, credit rating agencies have shown some concern about whether the U.S. government has the political will necessary to service all of its outstanding and expected future debt, and some have adjusted their ratings or outlook for U.S. government debt accordingly. These developments, and the factors underlying them, could cause an increase in interest rates and borrowing costs, which may negatively impact both the perception of credit risk associated with the debt securities issued by the U.S. and the government’s ability to access the debt markets on favorable terms. In addition, these developments could create broader financial turmoil and uncertainty, which could increase volatility in both stock and bond markets. These events could result in significant adverse impacts on issuers of securities held by the Fund.

 

Valuation Risk. The Fund may not be able to sell an investment at the price at which the Fund has valued the investment. Such differences could be significant, particularly for illiquid securities and securities that trade in relatively thin markets and/or markets that experience extreme volatility. If market or other conditions make it difficult to value an investment, the Fund may be required to value such investments using more subjective methods, known as fair value methodologies. Using fair value methodologies to price investments may result in a value that is different from an investment’s most recent closing price and from the prices used by other funds to calculate their NAVs. Investors who purchase or redeem Fund shares on days when the Fund is holding fair-valued securities may receive fewer or more shares, or lower or higher redemption proceeds, than they would have received if the Fund had not held fair-valued securities or had used a different methodology. The value of foreign securities, certain futures, fixed income securities, and currencies may be materially affected by events after the close of the markets on which they are traded but before the Fund determines its net asset value. The Fund uses pricing services to provide values for certain securities and there is no assurance that the Fund will be able to sell an investment at the price established by such pricing services. Different pricing services use different valuation methodologies, potentially resulting in different values for the same investments. As a result, if the Fund were to change pricing services, or if a pricing service were to change its valuation methodology, the value of the Fund’s investments could be impacted. The Fund’s ability to value its investments in an accurate and timely manner may be impacted by technological issues and/or errors by third party service providers, such as pricing services or accounting agents.

 

Variable and Floating Rate Instruments Risk. The market prices of instruments with variable and floating interest rates are generally less sensitive to interest rate changes than are the market prices of instruments with fixed interest rates. Variable and floating rate instruments may decline in value if market interest rates or interest rates paid by such instruments do not move as expected. Conversely, variable and floating rate instruments will not generally rise in value if market interest rates decline. Thus, investing in variable and floating rate instruments generally allows less opportunity for capital appreciation and depreciation than investing in instruments with a fixed interest rate. Certain types of floating rate instruments, such as interests in bank loans, may be subject to greater liquidity risk than other debt securities.

 

Certain variable and floating rate instruments have an interest rate floor feature, which prevents the interest rate payable by the instrument from dropping below a specified level as compared to a reference interest rate (the “reference rate”), such as SOFR. Such a floor protects the Fund from losses resulting from a decrease in the reference rate below the specified level. However, if the reference rate is below the floor, there will be a lag between a rise in the reference rate and a rise in the interest rate payable by the instrument, and the Fund may not benefit from increasing interest rates for a significant period of time. Rates on certain variable rate instruments typically only reset periodically. As a result, changes in prevailing interest rates, particularly sudden and significant changes, can cause some fluctuations in the Fund’s value to the extent that it invests in variable rate instruments.

 

When-Issued and Forward-Settling Securities Risk. When-issued and forward-settling securities (such as to-be-announced (TBA) mortgage-backed securities) involve a commitment by the Fund to purchase or deliver securities at a later date. Because the Fund is committed to buying them at a certain price, any change in the value of these securities, even prior to their issuance, affects the Fund’s share value. Accordingly, the purchase of such securities involves a risk of loss if the value of the security to be purchased declines before the settlement date. When-issued and forward-settling securities can have a leverage-like effect on the Fund, which can increase fluctuations in the Fund’s share price. When-issued and forward-settling securities may cause the Fund to liquidate positions when it may not be advantageous to do so, in order to satisfy its purchase obligations. When-issued and forward-settling securities also are subject to the risk that the security will not be issued or that a counterparty will fail to complete the sale or purchase of the security. If this occurs, the Fund may lose the opportunity to purchase or sell the security at the agreed upon price and may forgo any gain in the security’s price. The Fund may sell securities it has committed to purchase before those

 

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securities are delivered to the Fund on the settlement date. In addition, the purchase of mortgage-backed securities on a TBA basis may result in a Fund incurring increased prepayment risks because the underlying mortgages may be less favorable than anticipated by the Fund.

 

Information about Additional Risks and Other Practices

 

As discussed in the Statement of Additional Information, a Fund may engage in certain practices and invest in certain securities in addition to those described as its “principal investment strategies” in its Fund Summary section. For example, should a Fund engage in borrowing or securities lending, or should a Fund use derivatives or invest in foreign securities, it will be subject to the additional risks associated with these practices.

 

Borrowing money, securities lending, or using derivatives would create investment leverage, meaning that certain gains or losses would be amplified, increasing share price movements.

 

Foreign securities, including those issued by foreign governments, involve risks in addition to those associated with comparable U.S. securities, and can fluctuate more widely in price, and may also be less liquid, than comparable U.S. securities. Securities issued by U.S. entities with substantial foreign operations may involve risks relating to political, economic, or regulatory conditions in foreign countries.

 

As part of its liquidity management practices, including for cash management purposes or to facilitate short-term liquidity, a Fund may invest in reverse repurchase agreements. In a reverse repurchase agreement, a Fund sells portfolio securities to another party, such as a bank or broker-dealer, in return for cash and agrees to repurchase the securities at an agreed-upon price and date, which reflects an interest payment to that party. Reverse repurchase agreements involve the risk that the other party will fail to return the securities in a timely manner, or at all, which may result in losses to a Fund. A Fund could lose money if it is unable to recover the securities and the value of the cash collateral held by the Fund is less than the value of the securities. These events could also trigger adverse tax consequences to a Fund. Reverse repurchase agreements also involve the risk that the market value of the securities sold will decline below the price at which a Fund is obligated to repurchase them. Reverse repurchase agreements may be viewed as a form of borrowing by a Fund. When a Fund enters into a reverse repurchase agreement, any fluctuations in the market value of either the securities transferred to another party or the securities in which the proceeds may be invested would affect the market value of the Fund’s assets. During the term of the agreement, a Fund may also be obligated to pledge additional cash and/or securities in the event of a decline in the fair value of the transferred security. The Manager monitors the creditworthiness of counterparties to reverse repurchase agreements.

 

In addition, a Fund may be an investment option for a Neuberger Berman mutual fund that is managed as a “fund of funds.” As a result, from time to time, a Fund may experience relatively large redemptions or investments and could be required to sell securities or to invest cash at a time when it is not advantageous to do so.

 

In anticipation of adverse or uncertain market, economic, political, or other temporary conditions, including during periods of high cash inflows or outflows, a Fund may temporarily depart from its goal and use a different investment strategy (including leaving a significant portion of its assets uninvested) for defensive purposes. Doing so could help a Fund avoid losses, but may mean lost opportunities. In addition, in doing so different factors could affect a Fund’s performance and a Fund may not achieve its goal. Furthermore, Neuberger Berman Municipal Intermediate Bond Fund could earn income that is not exempt from federal income tax. In addition, to the extent a Fund is new or is undergoing a transition (such as a change in strategy, rebalancing, reorganization, liquidation or experiencing large inflows or outflows) or takes a temporary defensive position, it may deviate from its principal investment strategies during such period.

 

A Fund may change its goal without shareholder approval, although none currently intend to do so.

 

Please see the Statement of Additional Information for more information.

 

Descriptions of Indices

 

The Bloomberg 1-3 Year U.S. Government/Credit Bond Index is the 1-3 year component of the Bloomberg U.S. Government/Credit Index. The Bloomberg U.S. Government/Credit Index is the non-securitized component of the Bloomberg U.S. Aggregate Bond Index and includes Treasuries and government-related (agency, sovereign, supranational, and local authority debt guaranteed by the U.S. Government) and investment grade corporate securities.

 

The Bloomberg 7-Year General Obligation (G.O.) Index is the 7-year (6-8 years to maturity) component of the Bloomberg G.O. Index. The Bloomberg G.O. Index measures the investment grade, U.S. dollar-denominated, long-term, tax-exempt state and local general obligation bond market.

 

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The Bloomberg U.S. Aggregate Bond Index measures the investment grade, U.S. dollar-denominated, fixed-rate, taxable bond market and includes Treasuries, government-related and corporate securities, mortgage-backed securities (MBS) (agency fixed-rate and hybrid adjustable rate mortgage (ARM) pass-throughs), asset-backed securities (ABS), and commercial mortgage-backed securities (CMBS) (agency and nonagency).

 

The ICE BofA U.S. High Yield Constrained Index tracks the performance of U.S. dollar-denominated below investment grade corporate debt publicly issued in the U.S. domestic market. In addition to meeting other criteria, qualifying securities must have a below investment grade rating (based on an average of Moody’s, S&P and Fitch ratings), and have risk exposure to countries that are members of the FX-G10, Western Europe or territories of the U.S. and Western Europe. Securities in legal default are excluded from the index. Index constituents are capitalization-weighted, provided the total allocation to an individual issuer does not exceed 2%. Transaction costs will be incorporated into the calculation of total return for ICE fixed income indices beginning in July 2022.

 

Management of the Funds

 

Investment Manager

 

Neuberger Berman Investment Advisers LLC (“Manager”), located at 1290 Avenue of the Americas, New York, NY 10104, is each Fund’s investment manager and administrator. Neuberger Berman BD LLC (“Distributor”), located at 1290 Avenue of the Americas, New York, NY 10104, is each Fund’s distributor. Pursuant to an investment advisory agreement, the Manager is responsible for choosing a Fund’s investments and handling its day-to-day business. The services provided by the Manager as the investment manager and administrator include, among others, overall responsibility for providing all supervisory, management, and administrative services reasonably necessary for the operation of the Funds, which may include, among others, compliance monitoring, operational and investment risk management, legal and administrative services and portfolio accounting services. The Manager carries out its duties subject to the policies established by the Board of Trustees. The investment advisory agreement establishes the fees a Fund pays to the Manager for its services as the Fund’s investment manager and the expenses paid directly by the Fund. Together, the Neuberger Berman affiliates manage approximately $427 billion in total assets (as of 12/31/2022) and continue an asset management history that began in 1939.

 

NBIA may engage one or more of foreign affiliates that are not registered under the Investment Advisers Act of 1940, as amended (“participating affiliates”) in accordance with applicable SEC no-action letters. As participating affiliates, whether or not registered with the SEC, the affiliates may provide designated investment personnel to associate with NBIA as “associated persons” of NBIA and perform specific advisory services for NBIA, including services for the Funds, which may involve, among other services, portfolio management and/or placing orders for securities and other instruments. The designated employees of a participating affiliate act for NBIA and are subject to certain NBIA policies and procedures as well as supervision and periodic monitoring by NBIA. The Funds will pay no additional fees and expenses as a result of any such arrangements.

 

A discussion regarding the basis for the Board of Trustees’ approval of the Funds’ investment advisory agreements is available in the Funds’ annual report for the fiscal period ended October 31, 2022.

 

Neither this Prospectus nor the Statement of Additional Information is intended to give rise to any contract rights or other rights in any shareholder, other than any rights conferred explicitly by federal or state securities laws that have not been waived. The Funds enter into contractual arrangements with various parties, including, among others, the Manager, who provide services to the Funds. Shareholders are not parties to, or intended to be third party beneficiaries of, those contractual arrangements. Where shareholders are not third party beneficiaries of contractual arrangements, those contractual arrangements cannot be enforced by shareholders acting on their own behalf.

 

Neuberger Berman Core Bond Fund: For the 12 months ended 10/31/2022, the management fees (i.e., advisory and administration fees) paid to the Manager by the Fund’s Investor Class were 0.45% of its average daily net assets.

 

Neuberger Berman High Income Bond Fund: For the 12 months ended 10/31/2022, the management fees (i.e., advisory and administration fees) paid to the Manager by the Fund’s Investor Class were 0.75% of its average daily net assets.

 

Neuberger Berman Municipal Intermediate Bond Fund: For the 12 months ended 10/31/2022, the management fees (i.e., advisory and administration fees) paid to the Manager by the Fund’s Investor Class were 0.41% of its average daily net assets.

 

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Neuberger Berman Short Duration Bond Fund: For the 12 months ended 10/31/2022, the management fees (i.e., advisory and administration fees) paid to the Manager by the Fund’s Investor Class were 0.44% of its average daily net assets.

 

Portfolio Managers

 

Please see the Statement of Additional Information for additional information about each Portfolio Manager’s compensation, other accounts managed by each Portfolio Manager, and each Portfolio Manager’s ownership of shares in the Fund(s) that he manages.

 

Neuberger Berman Core Bond Fund

Thanos Bardas is a Managing Director of the Manager. He joined the firm in 1998 and is the Co-Head of Global Investment Grade Fixed Income. In addition, he is a member of the Asset Allocation Committee. Mr. Bardas has been a Portfolio Manager of the Fund since February 2008.

 

David M. Brown, CFA, is a Managing Director of the Manager. He re-joined the firm in January 2003 and is the Co-Head of Global Investment Grade Fixed Income. Mr. Brown has been a Portfolio Manager of the Fund since February 2008.

 

Nathan Kush is a Managing Director of the Manager. He joined the firm in 2001. He is a member of the portfolio management team for the firm’s Global Investment Grade strategies. Additionally, he is involved in investment grade credit research and, previously, covered the banking, brokerage, finance, insurance and REIT sectors. Mr. Kush has been a Portfolio Manager of the Fund since December 2017.

 

Olumide Owolabi is a Managing Director of the Manager. He joined the firm in 2003. He is the Head of the U.S. Rates team and has investment and research responsibilities across global interest rate and inflation markets. Mr. Owolabi has been a Portfolio Manager of the Fund since February 2023.

 

Brad Tank is a Managing Director of the Manager. He joined the firm in 2002 and is the Chief Investment Officer and Global Head of Fixed Income. He is a member of the firm’s Operating, Investment Risk, Asset Allocation and Fixed Income’s Investment Strategy Committees, and leads the Fixed Income Multi-Sector Group. He joined the firm after 23 years of experience in trading and asset management. Mr. Tank has been a Portfolio Manager of the Fund since April 2009.

 

Neuberger Berman High Income Bond Fund

Joseph Lind, CFA, is a Managing Director of the Manager. He has co-managed the Fund since July 2018 and is Co-Head of U.S. High Yield. Prior to joining the firm in 2018, he served as a high yield strategy portfolio manager at another asset manager from 2012 to 2018.

 

Christopher Kocinski, CFA, is a Managing Director of the Manager. Mr. Kocinski joined the firm in 2006 and is Co-Head of U.S. High Yield. Before being named co-portfolio manager to the Fund in 2019, Mr. Kocinski was co-director of non-investment grade credit research and a senior research analyst for the Manager.

 

Neuberger Berman Municipal Intermediate Bond Fund

James L. Iselin and S. Blake Miller, CFA, are Managing Directors of the Manager. Mr. Iselin has managed the Fund since 2007. Mr. Iselin joined the firm in 2006. Previously, Mr. Iselin was a portfolio manager for another investment adviser working in the Municipal Fixed Income group since 1993. Mr. Miller has managed the Fund since 2010. Mr. Miller joined the firm in 2008. Prior to this, he was the head of Municipal Fixed Income investing at another firm where he worked since 1986.

 

Neuberger Berman Short Duration Bond Fund

Ashok Bhatia, CFA, is a Managing Director of the Manager. He joined the firm in July 2017 and is the Deputy Chief Investment Officer of Fixed Income. Prior to joining the firm, Mr. Bhatia was a senior portfolio manager and co-leader of the customized fixed income team at another asset manager. He has over 24 years’ experience in the investment industry. Mr. Bhatia has been a Portfolio Manager of the Fund since July 2022.

 

Michael Foster is a Managing Director of the Manager. He has been a Portfolio Manager of the Fund since 2008. Mr. Foster has been a portfolio manager at the firm since 2004.

 

Matthew McGinnis is a Senior Vice President of the Manager. Mr. McGinnis joined the firm in 2008 and has been a Portfolio Manager of the Fund since February 2017. Prior to being named co-portfolio manager of the Fund, Mr. McGinnis was a Senior Trader on the Enhanced Cash and Short Duration portfolio management teams.

 

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David M. Brown, CFA, is a Managing Director of the Manager. He re-joined the firm in January 2003 and is the Co-Head of Global Investment Grade Fixed Income. Mr. Brown has been a Portfolio Manager of the Fund since May 2021.

 

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Financial Highlights

 

These financial highlights describe the performance of the Fund’s Investor Class shares for the fiscal periods indicated. All figures for the fiscal year ended October 31, 2022 have been derived from the financial statements audited by Ernst & Young LLP, the Fund’s independent registered public accounting firm. Their report, along with full financial statements, appears in the Fund’s most recent annual shareholder report (see back cover). The information for the prior fiscal years or periods was audited by a different independent public accounting firm.

 

Neuberger Berman Core Bond Fund — Investor Class

 

YEAR ENDED OCTOBER 31,   2018     2019     2020     2021     2022  
PER-SHARE DATA ($)                                        
Data apply to a single share throughout each year indicated. You can see what the Fund earned (or lost), what it distributed to investors, and how its share price changed.                                        
Share price (NAV) at beginning of year     10.31       9.77       10.51       10.91       10.61  
Plus:                                        
Income from investment operations                                        
Net investment income (loss)(3)      0.23       0.26       0.23       0.13       0.20  
Net gain/(losses) — realized and unrealized     (0.52 )     0.78       0.47       (0.02 )     (1.94 )
Subtotal: income (loss) from investment operations     (0.29 )     1.04       0.70       0.11       (1.74 )
Minus:                                        
Distributions to shareholders                                        
Income dividends     0.22       0.24       0.30       0.23       0.26  
Capital gain distributions                       0.18        
Tax return of capital     0.03       0.06                    
Subtotal: distributions to shareholders     0.25       0.30       0.30       0.41       0.26  
Equals:                                        
Share price (NAV) at end of year     9.77       10.51       10.91       10.61       8.61  
RATIOS (% OF AVERAGE NET ASSETS)                                        
The ratios show the Fund’s expenses and net investment income (loss) — as they actually are as well as how they would have been if certain expense reimbursement and/or waiver arrangements had not been in effect.                                        
Net expenses — actual     0.86       0.85       0.80       0.78       0.78  
Gross expenses(1)      1.12       1.12       0.99       0.88       0.93  
Net investment income (loss) — actual     2.32       2.60       2.12       1.17       2.04  
OTHER DATA                                        
Total return shows how an investment in the Fund would have performed over each year, assuming all distributions were reinvested. The turnover rate reflects how actively the Fund bought and sold securities.                                        
Total return (%)(2)      (2.83 )     10.81       6.76       0.97       (16.65 )
Net assets at end of year (in millions of dollars)     9.8       11.3       14.1       13.7       10.3  
Portfolio turnover rate (%)(4)      136       147       111       151       164  

 

(1)  Shows what this ratio would have been if there had been no expense reimbursement and/or waiver of a portion of the investment management fee.
(2)  Would have been lower if the Manager had not reimbursed certain expenses and/or waived a portion of the investment management fee.
(3)  The per share amounts have been calculated based on the average number of shares outstanding during each fiscal period.
(4)  The portfolio turnover rates including TBA roll transactions were 226%, 243%, 186%, 187%, and 224% for the years ended October 31, 2022, 2021, 2020, 2019 and 2018, respectively.

 

 

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Financial Highlights

 

These financial highlights describe the performance of the Fund’s Investor Class shares for the fiscal periods indicated. All figures have been derived from the financial statements audited by Ernst & Young LLP, the Fund’s independent registered public accounting firm. Their report, along with full financial statements, appears in the Fund’s most recent annual shareholder report (see back cover).

 

Neuberger Berman High Income Bond Fund — Investor Class

 

YEAR ENDED OCTOBER 31,   2018     2019     2020     2021     2022  
PER-SHARE DATA ($)                                        
Data apply to a single share throughout each year indicated. You can see what the Fund earned (or lost), what it distributed to investors, and how its share price changed.                                        
Share price (NAV) at beginning of year     8.79       8.35       8.52       8.33       8.68  
Plus:                                        
Income from investment operations                                        
Net investment income (loss)(1)      0.45       0.46       0.41       0.40       0.40  
Net gain/(losses) — realized and unrealized     (0.44 )     0.17       (0.18 )     0.36       (1.39 )
Subtotal: income (loss) from investment operations     0.01       0.63       0.23       0.76       (0.99 )
Minus:                                        
Distributions to shareholders