The information in this prospectus is not complete and may be changed. We may not sell these securities until the registration statement filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission is effective. This prospectus is not an offer to sell these securities and it is not soliciting an offer to buy these securities in any jurisdiction where the offer or sale is not permitted.
 
Subject to Completion
Preliminary Prospectus dated September 7, 2022
 
Hashdex Bitcoin Futures ETF
 
Hashdex Bitcoin Futures ETF (the “Fund” or “DEFI”) is designed to provide investors with a means to gain price exposure to the bitcoin market. The Fund issues Shares (“Shares”) that trade on the NYSE Arca stock exchange (“NYSE Arca”) under the symbol “DEFI.” Shares can be purchased and sold by investors through their broker-dealer. Under its current investment objective, the Fund will not hold, purchase, or otherwise own any bitcoin. Purchasing Shares of the Fund is subject to the risks of bitcoin as well as the additional risks of investing in the Fund.
 
The Fund’s investment objective is for changes in the Shares’ NAV to reflect the daily changes of the price of the Hashdex U.S. Bitcoin Futures Fund Benchmark (the “Benchmark”), less expenses from the Fund’s operations. The Benchmark is currently the average of the closing settlement prices for the first to expire and second to expire bitcoin futures contracts (“Bitcoin Futures Contracts”) listed on the Chicago Mercantile Exchange Inc. (“CME”). The Bitcoin Futures Contracts that at any given time make up the Benchmark are referred to hereinafter as the “Benchmark Component Futures Contracts.” Under normal market conditions, the Fund invests in Benchmark Component Futures Contracts and cash and cash equivalents. Because the Fund’s investment objective is to track the price of the Benchmark by investing in Benchmark Futures Contracts rather than bitcoin, changes in the price of the Shares will vary from changes in the spot price of bitcoin.
 
An investment in the Fund is subject to the risks of an investment in futures contracts, which are complex instruments that are often subject to a high degree of price variability. Because the price of Bitcoin Futures Contracts is linked to the price of bitcoin, an investment in the Fund may be riskier than other exchange-traded products that do not hold financial instruments related to bitcoin and may not be suitable for all investors. In addition, Bitcoin Futures Contracts may experience pronounced and swift price changes. Accordingly, there is a potential for movement in the price of Shares between the time an investor places an order to purchase or sell with its broker-dealer and the time of the actual purchase or sale resulting from the price volatility of Bitcoin Futures Contracts.
 
Investing in the Fund involves significant risks. See “What Are the Risk Factors Involved with an Investment in the Fund?” beginning on page 14. The Fund is not a mutual fund registered under the Investment Company Act of 1940, and Fund shareholder will not be afforded the protections associated with ownership of shares in a registered investment company. See “The Fund is not a registered investment company, so you do not have the protections of the Investment Company Act of 1940” on page 20.
 
THE COMMODITY FUTURES TRADING COMMISSION HAS NOT PASSED UPON THE MERITS OF PARTICIPATING IN THIS POOL NOR HAS THE COMMISSION PASSED ON THE ADEQUACY OR ACCURACY OF THIS DISCLOSURE DOCUMENT.
 
NEITHER THE SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION (“SEC”) NOR ANY STATE SECURITIES COMMISSION HAS APPROVED OR DISAPPROVED OF THE SECURITIES OFFERED IN THIS PROSPECTUS OR DETERMINED IF THIS PROSPECTUS IS TRUTHFUL OR COMPLETE. ANY REPRESENTATION TO THE CONTRARY IS A CRIMINAL OFFENSE.
 
The Fund is a series of the Teucrium Commodity Trust (the “Trust”). Shareholders have no voting rights with respect to the Trust or the Fund except as expressly provided in the Trust’s Fifth Amended and Restated Declaration of Trust and Trust Agreement (the “Trust Agreement”). The sponsor to the Fund is Teucrium Trading, LLC (the “Sponsor”), which receives a management fee. The principal office address and telephone number of both the Fund and the Sponsor is Three Main Street, Suite 215, Burlington, Vermont 05401 and (802) 540-0019. Toroso Investments, LLC (“Toroso”), Tidal ETF Services LLC (“Tidal”) and Victory Capital Management Inc. (“Victory Capital”) “(the “Marketing Agents”) assist the Fund and the Sponsor with certain functions and duties relating to distribution and marketing, which include the following: marketing, sales strategy, and distribution related services. Hashdex Asset Management Ltd. (“Hashdex”) will serve as the Fund’s Digital Asset Adviser and will assist the Sponsor and Marketing Agents with research and investment analysis regarding bitcoin and bitcoin markets for use in the marketing of the Fund. Hashdex will also provide the Fund with branding, marketing services including, but not limited to, the issuance of press releases, preparation of website data content, holding promotional webinars and engaging in promotional activities through social media outlets. Hashdex has no role in maintaining, calculating or publishing the Benchmark. Hashdex also has no responsibility for the investment or management of the Fund’s investment portfolio or for the overall performance or operation of the Fund.
 
The Marketing Agents, Digital Asset Advisor and Sponsor have entered into an agreement (the “Support Agreement”) that sets forth the terms and conditions applicable to the launch, marketing, promotion, development, and ongoing operation of the Fund, as well the respective rights in profits and obligations for expenses. Additionally, the Parties believe that it would further certain of their long-term business goals to transfer sponsorship of the Fund from the Sponsor to Toroso. Specifically, Hashdex and Toroso have experience in the digital asset and exchange-traded fund industry, and seek to offer a bitcoin futures based fund as part of their long-term business goals. The Parties believe that the Sponsor is best positioned for the initial establishment and operation of the Fund, given the Sponsor’s experience in forming and operating similarly structured exchanged-traded products registered under the Securities Act of 1933 (the “1933 Act”). Accordingly, the Sponsor is responsible for the initial creation and operation of the Fund. Then, when Hashdex and Toroso have the necessary experience and resources to operate the Fund, the eventual transfer to Toroso will effectuate Hashdex and Toroso’s long-term business goals. The Parties do not believe that the long-term business goals will have any impact on a shareholder’s investment in the Fund.
 
Accordingly, the Support Agreement provides that the Parties expect that Toroso will use commercially reasonable efforts to organize a new Delaware statutory trust (the “New Trust”) and a new series thereof (the “New Fund”) and enter into an agreement pursuant to which, among other things, the assets of the Fund will be transferred to the New Fund as a series of the New Trust. The Trust's Declaration of Trust permits the Sponsor, without a Shareholder vote, to transfer the assets of the Fund to the New Fund. The transfer is not expected to materially modify the rights of Fund shareholders. There is no timeline for this transaction. The transaction may require registration under the 1933 Act, or an exemption from such registration, an amendment to the Fund’s existing listing standards and receipt of other regulatory approvals. The Fund and the New Fund will file current reports on Form 8-K including a press release notifying shareholders that the definitive transaction has been consummated.
 
While investors will purchase and sell Shares through their broker-dealer, the Fund continuously offers creation baskets consisting of 10,000 Shares (“Creation Baskets”) at their net asset value (“NAV”) to certain parties who have entered into an agreement with the Sponsor (“Authorized Purchasers”). Authorized Purchasers, in turn, may sell such Shares, which are listed on NYSE Arca, to the public at per-Share offering prices that are expected to reflect, among other factors, the trading price of the Shares on the NYSE Arca, the NAV of the Fund at the time the Authorized Purchaser purchased the Creation Baskets and the NAV at the time of the offer of the Shares to the public, the supply of and demand for Shares at the time of sale, and the liquidity of the markets for Bitcoin Futures Contracts in which the Fund invests. A list of the Fund’s Authorized Purchasers as of the date of this Prospectus can be found under “Plan of Distribution – Distributor and Authorized Purchasers,” on page 41. The prices of Shares offered by Authorized Purchasers are expected to fall between the Fund’s NAV and the trading price of the Shares on the NYSE Arca at the time of sale. The Fund’s Shares may trade in the secondary market on the NYSE Arca at prices that are lower or higher than their NAV per Share.
 
This is a best efforts offering; the distributor, Foreside Fund Services, LLC (the “Distributor”) is not required to sell any specific number or dollar amount of Shares but will use its best efforts to sell Shares. The initial Authorized Purchaser is a statutory underwriter of the Fund’s Shares. It is expected that on the effective date, the initial Authorized Purchaser will purchase one or more initial Creation Baskets of 10,000 Shares at a per Share price of $25.00. The initial offering price of $25.00 was set as an appropriate and convenient price that would facilitate secondary market trading of Shares. The Shares of the Fund acquired by the Sponsor in connection with its initial capital contribution were purchased at a price of $25.00 per Share. An Authorized Purchaser is under no obligation to purchase Shares. This is intended to be a continuous offering that will terminate on September [], 2025 unless suspended or terminated at any earlier time for certain reasons specified in this prospectus or unless extended as permitted under the rules of the Securities Act of 1933. See “Prospectus Summary – The Shares” and “Creation and Redemption of Shares – Rejection of Purchase Orders” below.
 
The Fund is a commodity pool and the Sponsor is a commodity pool operator subject to regulation by the Commodity Futures Trading Commission and the National Futures Association under the Commodity Exchange Act (“CEA”).
 
This prospectus is in two parts: a disclosure document and a statement of additional information. These parts are bound together, and both contain important information.
 
The date of this prospectus is  September [], 2022.
 
 
 
 
COMMODITY FUTURES TRADING COMMISSION
 
RISK DISCLOSURE STATEMENT
 
 
YOU SHOULD CAREFULLY CONSIDER WHETHER YOUR FINANCIAL CONDITION PERMITS YOU TO PARTICIPATE IN A COMMODITY POOL. IN SO DOING, YOU SHOULD BE AWARE THAT COMMODITY INTEREST TRADING CAN QUICKLY LEAD TO LARGE LOSSES AS WELL AS GAINS. SUCH TRADING LOSSES CAN SHARPLY REDUCE THE NET ASSET VALUE OF THE POOL AND CONSEQUENTLY THE VALUE OF YOUR INTEREST IN THE POOL. IN ADDITION, RESTRICTIONS ON REDEMPTIONS MAY AFFECT YOUR ABILITY TO WITHDRAW YOUR PARTICIPATION IN THE POOL.
 
FURTHER, COMMODITY POOLS MAY BE SUBJECT TO SUBSTANTIAL CHARGES FOR MANAGEMENT, AND ADVISORY AND BROKERAGE FEES. IT MAY BE NECESSARY FOR THOSE POOLS THAT ARE SUBJECT TO THESE CHARGES TO MAKE SUBSTANTIAL TRADING PROFITS TO AVOID DEPLETION OR EXHAUSTION OF THEIR ASSETS. THIS DISCLOSURE DOCUMENT CONTAINS A COMPLETE DESCRIPTION OF EACH EXPENSE TO BE CHARGED THIS POOL AT PAGE 40 AND A STATEMENT OF THE PERCENTAGE RETURN NECESSARY TO BREAK EVEN, THAT IS, TO RECOVER THE AMOUNT OF YOUR INITIAL INVESTMENT, AT PAGE 11.
 
THIS BRIEF STATEMENT CANNOT DISCLOSE ALL THE RISKS AND OTHER FACTORS NECESSARY TO EVALUATE YOUR PARTICIPATION IN THIS COMMODITY POOL. THEREFORE, BEFORE YOU DECIDE TO PARTICIPATE IN THIS COMMODITY POOL, YOU SHOULD CAREFULLY STUDY THIS DISCLOSURE DOCUMENT, INCLUDING A DESCRIPTION OF THE PRINCIPAL RISK FACTORS OF THIS INVESTMENT, AT PAGE 9 AND THE “RISK FACTORS” SECTION BEGINNING ON PAGE 14.
 
 
 
 
TABLE OF CONTENTS
 
 
PAGE
 
 
 
 
 
PROSPECTUS SUMMARY
 
This is only a summary of the prospectus and, while it contains material information about the Fund and its Shares, it does not contain or summarize all of the information about the Fund and the Shares contained in this prospectus that is material and/or which may be important to you. You should read this entire prospectus, including “What Are the Risk Factors Involved with an Investment in the Fund?” beginning on page 14, before making an investment decision about the Shares. In addition, this prospectus includes a statement of additional information that follows and is bound together with the primary disclosure document. Both the primary disclosure document and the statement of additional information contain important information.
 
Principal Offices of the Fund and the Sponsor
 
The Fund is a series of the Trust. The principal offices of the Sponsor, the Trust and the Fund are located at Three Main Street, Suite 215, Burlington, Vermont 05401. The telephone number is (802) 540-0019.
 
Breakeven Point
 
The amount of trading income required for the redemption value of a Share at the end of one year to equal the selling price of the Share, assuming an initial price of $25.00, is $0.23 or 0.92% of the selling price. For more information, see “Breakeven Analysis” below.
 
The Fund’s Investment Objective
 
The Fund is a commodity pool that issues Shares that may be purchased and sold on NYSE Arca. The Fund’s investment objective is for changes in the Shares’ NAV to reflect the daily changes of the price of the Benchmark, less expenses from the Fund’s operations. Under normal market conditions, the Fund invests in Benchmark Component Futures Contracts and cash and cash equivalents. Because the Fund’s investment objective is to track the price of the Benchmark by investing in Benchmark Futures Contracts rather than bitcoin, changes in the price of the Shares will vary from changes in the spot price of bitcoin. The NYSE Arca rule under which the Shares will be listed and traded prevents the Fund from utilizing leverage. ICE Data Indices, LLC calculates an approximate net asset value every 15 seconds throughout each day that the Fund’s Shares are traded on the NYSE Arca for as long as the CME’s main pricing mechanism is open.
 
Bitcoin is a digital asset or cryptocurrency that is a unit of account on the “Bitcoin Network,” an open source, decentralized peer-to-peer computer network. The ownership and operation of bitcoin is determined by purchasers in the Bitcoin Network. The Bitcoin Network connects computers that run publicly accessible, or open source, software that follows the rules and procedures governing the Bitcoin Network. This is commonly referred to as the Bitcoin Protocol. Bitcoin may be held, may be used to purchase goods and services or may be exchanged for fiat currency. No single entity owns or operates the Bitcoin Network, and the value of bitcoin is not backed by any government, corporation or other entity. Instead the value of bitcoin is determined in part by the supply and demand in markets created to facilitate the trading of bitcoin. Public key cryptography protects the ownership and transaction records for bitcoin. Because the source code for the Bitcoin Network is open source, anyone can contribute to its development. At this time, the ultimate supply of bitcoin is finite and limited to 21 million “coins” with the number of bitcoin available increasing gradually as new bitcoin supplies are mined until the 21 million current protocol cap is reached. The following factors, among others, may affect the price and market for bitcoin: The Fund does not invest directly in bitcoin.
 
How widely bitcoin is adopted, including the use of bitcoin as a payment.
 
The regulatory environment for cryptocurrencies, which continues to evolve in the U.S., and which may delay, impede, or restrict the adoption or use of bitcoin.
 
Speculative activity in the market for bitcoin, including by holders of large amounts of bitcoin, which may increase volatility.
 
Cyberattacks, including the risk that malicious actors will exploit flaws in the code or structure of bitcoin, control the blockchain, steal information or cause disruptions to the internet.
 
Rewards for mining bitcoin are designed to decline over time, which may lessen the incentive for miners to process and confirm transactions on the Bitcoin Network.
 
The open-source nature of the Bitcoin Network may result in forks, or changes to the underlying code of bitcoin that result in the creation of new, separate digital assets.
 
Fraud, manipulation, security failure or operational problems at bitcoin exchanges that result in a decline in adoption or acceptance of bitcoin.
 
Scalability as the use of bitcoin expands to a greater number of users.
 
5
 
The Fund is organized as a series of the Trust, a Delaware statutory trust organized on September 11, 2009. The Trust and the Fund operate pursuant to the Trust Agreement, dated April 26, 2019. The Trust Agreement may be found on the SEC’s EDGAR filing database at https://www.sec.gov/Archives/edgar/data/1471824/000165495419004865/ex31.htm. The Fund was formed and is managed and controlled by the Sponsor, a limited liability company formed in Delaware on July 28, 2009. The Sponsor is registered as a commodity pool operator (“CPO”) and a commodity trading adviser (“CTA”) with the Commodity Futures Trading Commission (“CFTC”) and is a member of the National Futures Association (“NFA”). The Fund intends to be treated as a partnership for U.S. federal income tax purposes.
 
The Benchmark currently is the average of the closing settlement prices for the first to expire and second to expire bitcoin futures contracts (“Bitcoin Futures Contracts”) listed on the CME. These futures contracts are the Benchmark Component Futures Contracts. The CME currently offers two Bitcoin Futures Contracts, one contract representing 5 bitcoin (“BTC Contracts”) and another contract representing 0.10 bitcoin (“MBT Contracts”). The Fund will invest in BTC Contracts and MBT Contracts to the extent necessary to achieve maximum exposure to the bitcoin futures market. Because the Fund’s investment objective is to track the price of the Benchmark by investing in Benchmark Futures Contracts rather than bitcoin, changes in the price of the Shares will vary from changes in the spot price of bitcoin. The Fund will purchase MBT Contracts only if the Fund has proceeds remaining from the sale of a Creation Basket that are less than the price of a BTC contract. BTC and MBT will count toward an aggregate position limit.
 
BTC Contracts began trading on the CME Globex trading platform on December 15, 2017 under the CME ClearPort ticker symbol “BTC” and are cash settled in U.S. dollars. MBT Contracts began trading on the CME Globex trading platform on May 3, 2021 under the CME ClearPort ticker symbol “MBT” and are also cash settled in U.S. dollars. The daily settlement prices for MBT Contracts are derived directly from the settlements in the BTC Contracts. BTC Contracts and MBT Contracts each trade six consecutive monthly contracts plus two additional December contract months (if the 6 consecutive months include December, only one additional December contract month is listed).
 
Because BTC Contracts and MBT Contracts are exchange-listed, they allow investors to gain price exposure to bitcoin without having to hold the underlying cryptocurrency. Like a futures contract on a commodity or stock index, BTC Contracts and MBT Contracts provide a means for investors to hedge investment positions or speculate on the future price of the bitcoin market.
 
CME Bitcoin Futures Contracts are cash-settled and based on the CME CF Bitcoin Reference Rate (BRR) and CME CF Bitcoin Real-Time Index (BRTI). The BRR is a daily reference rate of the U.S. dollar price of one bitcoin calculated daily as of 4:00 p.m. London time. It is calculated based on the bitcoin trading activity on specified constituent bitcoin exchanges during a calculation window between 3:00 p.m. and 4:00 p.m. London time, which currently include Bitstamp, Coinbase, Gemini, itBit Kraken and LMAX Digital. BRTI is a real time index of the U.S. dollar price of one bitcoin, published once per second, 24 hours per day, 7 days per week, and 365 days per year. The CME launched the BRR and BRTI on November 14, 2016.
 
The CME selects constituent exchanges for the BRR on the basis of the following criteria, which each exchange must demonstrate that it continues to fulfil on an ongoing basis:
 
The exchange has policies to ensure fair and transparent market conditions at all times and has processes in place to identify and impede illegal, unfair or manipulative trading practices.
 
The exchange does not impose undue barriers to entry or restrictions on market participants, and utilizing the venue does not expose market participants to undue credit risk, operational risk, legal risk or other risks.
 
The exchange complies with applicable law and regulation, including, but not limited to capital markets regulations, money transmission regulations, client money custody regulations, know-your-client (KYC) regulations and anti-money-laundering (AML) regulations.
 
The exchange cooperates with inquiries and investigations of regulators and the administrator upon request and has to execute data sharing agreements with the CME.
 
            Should the average daily contribution of a constituent exchange fall below 3%, then the continued inclusion of the venue as a constituent exchange is assessed.
 
            Qualifying transactions from the constituent exchanges that take place during the one-hour calculation window are added to a list, with the trade price and size for each transaction recorded. The one-hour calculation is partitioned into twelve intervals of five minutes each, and for each partition, the volume-weighted median trade price is calculated from the trade prices and sizes of relevant transactions. (A volume-weighted median differs from a standard median in that a weighting factor, in this case trade size, is factored into the calculation.) The BRR is the equally-weighted average of the volume-weighted medians of all twelve partitions.
 
6
 
The Fund’s Investment Strategies
 
The Fund seeks to achieve its investment objective by investing in Benchmark Component Futures Contracts. Under normal market conditions, the Fund expects that the Fund’s assets will be invested in Benchmark Component Futures Contracts and in cash and cash equivalents, such as short-term Treasury bills, money market funds, and demand deposit accounts. The term “normal market conditions” includes, but is not limited to, the absence of: trading halts in the applicable financial markets generally; operational issues (e.g., systems failure) causing dissemination of inaccurate market information; or force majeure type events such as natural or man-made disaster, act of God, armed conflict, act of terrorism, riot or labor disruption or any similar intervening circumstance.
 
The Sponsor created and maintains the Benchmark and ICE Data Indices, LLC will publish the Benchmark. ICE Data Indices, LLC disseminates the intraday indicative value (also referred to in this prospectus as "approximate net asset value") of the Fund's Shares through the facilities of Consolidated Tape Association's Consolidated Quotation High Speed Lines (also known as the "CTA/QC High Speed Lines"). ICE Data Indices, LLC will make the Benchmark information available through online information services, such as Yahoo Finance, Bloomberg and Reuters. The Benchmark will only include BTC Contracts.
 
The Fund's futures contract positions will be rolled on a monthly basis by closing out the first to expire contracts prior to their final settlement date and then entering into the third to expire contracts which will become the new second to expire - maintaining an equal weight of 50% first to expire and 50% second to expire. A first to expire contract is the contract with the nearest expiration date. A second to expire contract follows the first - it is the contract that will expire second in line after the first contract has expired. For example, when a first to expire contract expires, the second to expire contract becomes the first to expire contract.
 
Fund rolling will take place on the market business day preceding the last trading day of the first to expire contract. The last trading day of the first to expire contact is currently defined as the last business Friday of each month. By way of example, as of the date of this prospectus the Fund’s futures contract positions will be entered and exited according to the roll schedule below. For example, on August 15, 2022, if the fund held 100 futures contracts, 50 contracts would be expiring in August 2022 and 50 contracts would be expiring in September 2022.
 
 
Hashdex Bitcoin Futures ETF (DEFI) – Roll Schedule Aug 2022 – Dec 2022
 
Roll Date
Contract Expiring
(Exiting Position)
New Contract
(Entering Position)
 
First to Expire Contract
(Resulting Position)
Second to Expire Contract
(Resulting Position)
8/28/2022
August (BTCQ2)
October (BTCV2)
 
September (BTCU2)
October (BTCV2)
9/29/2022
September (BTCU2)
November (BTCX2)
 
October (BTCV2)
November (BTCX2)
10/27/2022
October (BTCV2
December (BTCZ2)
 
November (BTCX2)
December (BTCZ2)
11/23/2022
November (BTCX2)
January (BTCF3)
 
December (BTCZ2)
January (BTCF3)
12/29/2022
December (BTCZ2)
February (BTCG3)
 
January (BTCF3)
February (BTCG3)
 
One factor determining the total return from investing in futures contracts is the price relationship between soon to expire contracts and later to expire contracts. The design of the Fund’s Benchmark is such that the Benchmark Component Futures Contracts will change on a monthly basis, with the contracts with the shortest maturity being replaced with contracts with a longer maturity. Sometimes the Fund will have to pay more for longer maturity contracts to replace existing shorter maturity contracts about to expire. This situation is known as “contango” in the futures markets. In the event of a prolonged period of contango, and absent the impact of rising or falling bitcoin prices, this could have a negative impact on the Fund’s NAV and total return, which in turn may have a negative impact on your investment in the Fund. By way of example, during the period from 1/1/2019 to 6/30/2022, the market for Bitcoin Component Futures Contracts were in contango approximately 90% of the time, which resulted in an average annual negative roll yield of approximately 7%. If the futures market is in a state of backwardation (i.e., when the price of bitcoin in the future is to be less than the current price), the Fund will buy later to expire contracts for a lower price than the soon to expire contracts that it sells.
 
Consistent with applicable provisions of the Trust Agreement and Delaware law, the Fund has broad authority to make changes to the Fund’s operations. The Fund may change its investment objective, Benchmark, or investment strategies and Shareholders of the Fund will not have any rights with respect to these changes. The Fund has no current intention to make any such change, and any change is subject to applicable regulatory requirements, including, but not limited to, any requirement to amend applicable listing rules of the NYSE.
 
The reasons for and circumstances that may trigger any such changes may vary widely and cannot be predicted. However, by way of example, the Fund may change the term structure or underlying components of the Benchmark in furtherance of the Fund’s investment objective of tracking the price of the Benchmark Component Futures Contracts if, due to market conditions, a potential or actual imposition of position limits by the CFTC or futures exchange rules, or the imposition of risk mitigation measures by a futures commission merchant, restricts the ability of the Fund to invest in the current Benchmark Component Futures Contracts. The Fund would, among other things, file a current report on Form 8-K and a prospectus supplement to describe any such change and the effective date of the change. Shareholders may modify their holdings of the Fund’s Shares in response to any change by purchasing or selling Fund Shares through their broker-dealer.
 
The Fund invests in Benchmark Component Futures Contracts to the fullest extent possible without being leveraged or unable to satisfy its expected current or potential margin or collateral obligations with respect to its investments in Benchmark Component Futures Contracts. After fulfilling such margin and collateral requirements, the Fund invests the remainder of its proceeds from the sale of baskets in short term financial instruments of the type commonly known as “cash and cash equivalents.”
 
7
 
The Sponsor employs a “neutral” investment strategy intended to track the changes in the Benchmark regardless of whether the Benchmark goes up or goes down. The Fund’s “neutral” investment strategy is designed to permit investors generally to purchase and sell the Fund’s Shares for the purpose of investing indirectly in the bitcoin market in a cost-effective manner. The Sponsor endeavors to place the Fund’s trades in Benchmark Component Futures Contracts and otherwise manage the Fund’s investments so that the Fund’s average daily tracking error against the Benchmark will be less than 10 percent over any period of 30 trading days. However, the Fund incurs certain expenses in connection with its operations, which cause imperfect correlation between changes in the Fund’s NAV and changes in the Benchmark because the Benchmark does not reflect expenses or income. As a result, investors may incur a partial or complete loss of their investment even when the performance of the Benchmark is positive.
 
Investors may purchase and sell Shares through their broker-dealers. However, the Fund creates and redeems Shares only in blocks called Creation Baskets and Redemption Baskets, respectively, and only Authorized Purchasers may purchase or redeem Creation Baskets or Redemption Baskets. An Authorized Purchaser is under no obligation to create or redeem baskets, and an Authorized Purchaser is under no obligation to offer to the public Shares of any baskets it does create. Baskets are generally created when there is a demand for Shares, including, but not limited to, when the market price per Share is at (or perceived to be at) a premium to the NAV per Share. Similarly, baskets are generally redeemed when the market price per Share is at (or perceived to be at) a discount to the NAV per Share. Retail investors seeking to purchase or sell Shares on any day are expected to affect such transactions in the secondary market, on the NYSE Arca, at the market price per Share, rather than in connection with the creation or redemption of baskets.
 
The Sponsor believes that by investing in Benchmark Component Futures Contracts, the Fund’s net asset value (“NAV”) will closely track the Benchmark. The Sponsor also believes that because of market arbitrage opportunities, the market price at which investors will purchase and sell Shares through their broker-dealer will closely track the Fund’s NAV. The Sponsor believes that the net effect of these relationships is that the Fund’s market price on the NYSE Arca at which investors purchase and sell Shares will closely track the bitcoin market, as measured by the Benchmark.
 
The CFTC and U.S. designated contract markets, such as the CME, have established position limits and accountability levels on the maximum net long or net short Bitcoin Futures Contracts that the Fund may hold, own or control. The current CME established position limit level for investments in BTC Contracts for the spot month is 4,000 contracts. A position accountability level of 5,000 contracts will be applied to positions in single months outside the spot month and in all months combined. The MBT Contracts have a spot month limit of 200,000 contracts and a position accountability level of 250,000 contracts. Open positions in MBT Contracts will count as 1/50 of a BTC Contract for the purposes of determining the aggregate position limit. Accountability levels are not fixed ceilings but rather thresholds above which the exchange may exercise greater scrutiny and control over an investor, including limiting the Fund to holding no more Bitcoin Futures Contracts than the amount established by the accountability levels. The potential for the Fund to reach position or accountability limits will depend on if and how quickly the Fund’s net assets increase.
 
In addition to position limits and accountability limits, the CME and other exchanges have set dynamic price fluctuation limits on Bitcoin Futures Contracts. The dynamic price limit functionality under the special price fluctuation limits mechanism assigns a price limit variant which equals a percentage of the prior trading day’s settlement price, or a price deemed appropriate. During the trading day, the dynamic variant is utilized in continuous rolling 60-minute look-back periods to establish dynamic upper and lower price fluctuation limits. Once the dynamic price fluctuation limit has been reached in a particular Bitcoin Futures Contract, no trades may be made at a price beyond that limit. The CME has adopted daily dynamic price fluctuation limit functionality effective March 11, 2019, specifically, Rule 589 which is found in the following link: https://www.cmegroup.com/content/dam/cmegroup/notices/ser/2019/03/SER-8351.pdf. When a Bitcoin Futures Contract has closed at its daily price fluctuation limit, that limit price will be the daily settlement price that the CME publishes. The Fund will use the published settlement price to price its Shares on that day. If the CME halted trading in Bitcoin Futures Contracts for other reasons, including if trading were halted for an entire trading day or several trading days, the Fund would value its Bitcoin Futures Contracts by using the settlement price that the CME publishes.
 
Position limits, accountability limits and dynamic price fluctuation limits may limit the Fund’s ability to invest the proceeds of Creation Baskets in Bitcoin Futures Contracts. As a result, when the Fund offers to sell Creation Baskets it may be limited in its ability to invest in Bitcoin Futures Contracts, including the Benchmark Component Futures Contracts. The Fund may hold larger amounts of cash and cash equivalents, which will impair the Fund’s ability to meet its investment objective of tracking the Benchmark.
 
There is a minimum number of baskets and associated Shares specified for the Fund. If the Fund experiences redemptions that cause the number of Shares outstanding to decrease to the minimum level of Shares required to be outstanding, until the minimum number of Shares is again exceeded through the purchase of a new Creation Basket, there can be no more redemptions by an Authorized Purchaser. In such case, market makers may be less willing to purchase Shares from investors in the secondary market, which may in turn limit the ability of Shareholders of the Fund to sell their Shares in the secondary market. These minimum levels for the Fund are 50,000 Shares, representing five baskets. The minimum level of Shares specified for the Fund is subject to change.
 
The Sponsor maintains a public website on behalf of the Fund, http://hashdex-etfs.com/, which contains information about the Trust, the Fund, and the Shares.
 
Note to Secondary Market Investors: Except when aggregated in Redemption Baskets, Shares are not individually redeemable. Shares can be directly purchased from the Fund only in Creation Baskets, and only by Authorized Purchasers. Each Creation Basket consists of 10,000 Shares and therefore requires a significant financial commitment to purchase. Accordingly, investors who do not have such resources or who are not Authorized Purchasers should be aware that some of the information contained in this prospectus, including information about purchases and redemptions of Shares directly with the Fund, is only relevant to Authorized Purchasers. There is no guarantee that Shares will trade at prices that are at or near the per-Share NAV. When buying or selling Shares on the secondary market through a broker, most investors incur customary brokerage commissions and charges.
 
As noted, the Fund invests in Bitcoin Futures Contracts traded on the CME. The Fund expressly disclaims any association with the CME or endorsement of the Fund by such exchange and acknowledges that “CME” is a registered trademark of such exchange.
 
Voting Rights
 
As interests in separate series of a Delaware statutory trust, the Shares do not involve the rights normally associated with the ownership of shares of a corporation (including, for example, the right to bring shareholder oppression and derivative actions). In addition, the Shares have limited voting and distribution rights (for example, shareholders do not have the right to elect directors, as the Trust does not have a board of directors, and generally will not receive regular distributions of the net income and capital gains earned by the Fund).
 
8
 
Shareholders have no voting rights with respect to the Trust or the Fund except as expressly provided in the Trust Agreement. The Trust Agreement provides that Shareholders representing at least a majority (over 50%) of the outstanding Shares of the Trust, voting together as a single class (excluding Shares acquired by the Sponsor in connection with its initial capital contribution to any Trust series), may vote to (i) continue the Trust by electing a successor Sponsor as described above, and (ii) approve amendments to the Trust Agreement that impair the right to surrender Redemption Baskets for redemption. In addition, Fund shareholders holding Shares representing seventy-five percent (75%) of the outstanding Shares of the Trust, voting together as a single class (excluding Shares acquired by the Sponsor in connection with its initial capital contribution to any Trust series) may vote to dissolve the Trust upon not less than ninety (90) days’ notice to the Sponsor.
 
Principal Investment Risks of an Investment in the Fund
 
An investment in the Fund involves a degree of risk and you could incur a partial or total loss of your investment in the Fund. Some of the risks you may face are summarized below. A more extensive discussion of these risks appears in the “What Are the Risk Factors Involved with an Investment in the Fund?” section, beginning on page 14.
 
The Fund has no operating history, so there is no performance history to serve as a basis for you to evaluate an investment in the Fund. In addition, the Fund may not be successful in implementing its investment objective or may fail to attract sufficient assets.
 
Bitcoin and Bitcoin Futures Contracts are a relatively new asset class and bitcoin is subject to rapid changes, uncertainty and regulation that may adversely affect the value of the bitcoin futures or the nature of an investment in the Fund and may adversely affect the ability of the Fund to buy and sell Bitcoin Futures Contracts or achieve its investment objective.
 
Historically, bitcoin and Bitcoin Futures Contracts have been subject to significant price volatility. The price of Bitcoin Futures Contracts may differ significantly from the spot price of bitcoin.
 
The market for Bitcoin Futures Contracts is less developed than older, more established futures markets (such as corn or wheat futures) and may be more volatile and less liquid.
 
Unlike mutual funds, commodity pools and other investment pools that manage their investments so as to realize income and gains for distribution to their investors, the Fund generally does not distribute dividends to holders of Fund Shares (“Shareholders”). You should not invest in the Fund if you will need cash distributions from the Fund to pay taxes on your share of income and gains of the Fund, if any, or for other purposes.
 
Investors may choose to use the Fund as a means of investing indirectly in bitcoin, and there are risks involved in this investment strategy. The risks and hazards that are inherent in the market for bitcoin may cause the price of bitcoin and Bitcoin Futures Contracts to fluctuate widely.
 
Only an Authorized Purchaser may engage in creation or redemption transactions with the Fund. The Fund has a limited number of institutions that act as Authorized Purchasers. To the extent these institutions exit the business or are unable or unwilling to proceed with creation and/or redemption orders with respect to the Fund, Fund Shares may, particularly in times of market stress, trade at a discount to the NAV per Share and possibly face trading halts and/or delisting.
 
In some cases, the near month Bitcoin Futures Contract’s price will be lower than the next month’s contract prices (a situation known as “contango” in the futures markets). In the event of a prolonged period of contango, and absent the impact of rising or falling bitcoin prices, this could have a significant negative impact on the Fund’s NAV and total return, and you could incur a partial or total loss of your investment in the Fund. By way of example, during the period from 1/1/2019 to 6/30/2022, the market for Bitcoin Component Futures Contracts were in contango approximately 90% of the time, which resulted in an average annual negative roll yield of approximately 7%.
 
You will have no rights to participate in the management of the Fund and will have to rely on the duties and judgment of the Sponsor to manage the Fund.
 
The Fund seeks to have changes in its Shares’ NAV track changes in the Benchmark, rather than profit from speculative trading of Bitcoin Futures Contracts or from the use of leverage (i.e., the Sponsor manages the Fund so that the aggregate value of the Fund’s exposure to losses from its investments in Benchmark Component Futures Contracts at any time will not exceed the value of the Fund’s assets).
 
Bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies are a new and developing asset class subject to both developmental and regulatory uncertainty. Future U.S. or foreign regulatory changes may alter the nature of an investment in the Fund, or the ability of the Fund to continue to implement its investment strategy.
 
Failures or breaches of the electronic systems of the Fund, the Sponsor, or third parties or other events such as the recent COVID-19 pandemic have the ability to cause disruptions and negatively impact the Fund’s business operations, potentially resulting in financial losses to the Fund and its Shareholders.
 
The Fund is subject to position limits, accountability limits and dynamic price fluctuation limits that could limit the Fund’s ability to invest the proceeds of Creation Baskets in Bitcoin Futures Contracts. Position limits, accountability limits and dynamic price fluctuation limits may cause tracking error or may impair the Fund’s ability to meet its investment objective of tracking the Benchmark.
 
War and other geopolitical events in Eastern Europe, including but not limited to Russia and Ukraine, may cause volatility in bitcoin prices. These events are unpredictable and may lead to extended periods of price volatility.
 
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The Fund currently has two futures commission merchants (“FCMs”) through which it buys and sells futures contracts. Volatility in the bitcoin futures market may lead one or both of the Fund’s FCMs to impose risk mitigation procedures that could limit the Fund’s investment in Bitcoin Futures Contracts beyond the accountability and position limits imposed by the CME futures contract exchange as discussed herein. An FCM could impose a financial ceiling on initial margin that could change and become more or less restrictive on the Fund’s activities depending upon a variety of conditions beyond the Sponsor’s control. If the Fund’s other current FCM were to impose position limits, or if any other FCM with which the Fund establishes a relationship in the future were to impose position limits, the Fund’s ability to meet its investment objective could be negatively impacted. The Fund continues to monitor and manage its existing relationships with its FCMs and will continue to seek additional relationships with FCMs as needed.
 
The occurrence of a severe weather event, natural disaster, terrorist attack, geopolitical event, outbreak or public health emergency as declared by the World Health Organization, the continuation or expansion of war or other hostilities, or a prolonged government shutdown may have significant adverse effects on the Fund and its investments and alter current assumptions and expectations. For example, in late February 2022, Russia invaded Ukraine, significantly amplifying already existing geopolitical tensions among Russia and other countries in the region and in the West. The responses of countries and political bodies to Russia’s actions, the larger overarching tensions, and Ukraine’s military response and the potential for wider conflict may increase financial market volatility generally, have severe adverse effects on regional and global economic markets, and cause volatility in the price of bitcoin, bitcoin futures and the Share price of the Fund.
 
The ability of Authorized Purchasers to create or redeem Shares may be suspended for several reasons, including but not limited to the Fund voluntarily imposing such restrictions. A suspension in the ability of Authorized Purchasers to create or redeem Shares would have no impact on the Fund’s investment objective – the Fund would continue to seek to track its benchmark. However, with respect to the impact of a suspension on the price of Fund Shares in the secondary market, investors may have to pay a higher price to buy Shares and receive a lower price when they sell their Shares. This “spread” may continue to widen the longer the suspension lasts.
 
Market fraud and/or manipulation and other fraudulent trading practices such as the intentional dissemination of false or misleading information (e.g., false rumors) can, among other things, lead to a disruption of the orderly functioning of bitcoin and Bitcoin Futures Contract markets, significant market volatility, and cause the value of Bitcoin Futures Contracts to fluctuate quickly and without warning. Depending on the timing of an investor’s purchases and sales of the Fund’s Shares, these pricing anomalies could cause the investor to incur losses.
 
The Sponsor, Hashdex and the Marketing Agents have entered into a “support agreement” that, among other things, reflects the intention of the Parties to transition some or all of Teucrium’s obligations to Toroso, Tidal, Hashdex, and/or Victory Capital on a time schedule to be mutually agreed. The Sponsor will remain the sole sponsor of the Fund until all necessary regulatory approvals have been received. There can be no assurance that the transferee parties are capable of continuing to manage the Fund so as to achieve its investment objective.
 
For additional risks, see “What Are the Risk Factors Involved with an Investment in the Fund?”
 
Determination of NAV
 
The Fund’s NAV is determined as of the earlier of the close of the New York Stock Exchange or 4:00 p.m. (ET) on each day that the NYSE Arca is open for trading.
 
Defined Terms
 
For a glossary of defined terms, see Appendix A.
 
10
 
Breakeven Analysis
 
The breakeven analysis set forth below is a hypothetical illustration of the approximate dollar returns and percentage returns for the redemption value of a single Share to equal the amount invested twelve months after the investment is made. For purposes of this breakeven analysis, an initial selling price of $25.00 per Share, is assumed. The breakeven analysis is an approximation only and assumes a constant month-end Net Asset Value. In order for a hypothetical investment in Shares to breakeven over the next 12 months, assuming a selling price of $25.00 per Share, the investment would have to generate a 0.92% or $0.23 return. The numbers in the chart below have been rounded to the nearest 0.01.
 
 
 
Per Share
 
 
 
 
 
Assumed initial selling price per Share (1)
 $25.00 
Management Fee (0.94%) (2)
 $0.24 
Estimated Brokerage Commissions and Fees (3)
 $0.18 
Other Fund Fees and Expenses (4)
 $0.00 
Interest and Other Income (1.50%) (5)
 $(0.19)
Amount of trading income (loss) required for the redemption value at the end of one year to equal the selling price of the Share
 $0.23 
Percentage of initial selling price per Share (6)
  0.92%
 
(1)
In order to show how a hypothetical investment in Shares would break even over the next 12 months, this breakeven analysis uses an assumed initial selling price of $25.00 per Share. Investors should note that, because ‘DEFI’s NAV will change on a daily basis, the breakeven amount on any given day could be higher or lower than the amount reflected here.
 
(2)
From the Management Fee, the Sponsor pays all of the routine operational, administrative and other ordinary expenses of each Fund, generally as determined by the Sponsor, including but not limited to, fees and expenses of the Administrator, Custodian, Distributor, Transfer Agent, licensors, accounting and audit fees and expenses, tax preparation expenses, legal fees, ongoing SEC registration fees, individual Schedule K-1 preparation and mailing fees, and report preparation and mailing expenses. These fees and expenses are not included in the breakeven table because they are paid for by the Sponsor through the proceeds from the Management Fee.
 
(3)
Reflects estimated brokerage commissions and fees for Bitcoin Futures Contract purchase or sale and reflected on a per trade basis. The actual amount of brokerage commissions and trading fees to be incurred will vary based upon the trading frequency of the Fund. The Sponsor may elect to pay or waive a portion of these fees. The Fund may elect to waive fees in order to reduce the Fund’s expenses.
 
(4)
 
The Fund pays all of its non-recurring and unusual fees and expenses, if any, as determined by the Sponsor. Non-recurring and unusual fees and expenses are unexpected or unusual in nature, such as legal claims and liabilities and litigation costs or indemnification or other unanticipated expenses. Extraordinary fees and expenses also include material expenses which are not currently anticipated obligations of the Fund. Routine operational, administrative and other ordinary expenses are not deemed extraordinary expenses.
 
(5)
The Fund seeks to earn interest and other income in high credit quality, short-duration instruments or deposits associated with the pool’s cash management strategy that may be used to offset expenses. These investments may include, but are not limited to, short-term Treasury Securities, demand deposits, and money market funds. Management estimates that the blended interest rate will be 1.50% for assets not held in initial margin, based on the current interest rate environment and outlook as of July 31, 2022. The actual rate may vary and not all assets of the Fund will earn interest.
 
(6)
This represents the estimated approximate percentage for the redemption value of a hypothetical initial investment in a single Share to equal the amount invested twelve months after the investment was made. The estimated approximate percentage of selling price is 0.92% or $0.23 per Share.
 
 
11
 
THE OFFERING
 
Offering
The Fund’s Shares are listed on the NYSE Arca and investors may purchase and sell Shares through their broker-dealer. The Fund only offers Creation Baskets consisting of 10,000 Shares through the Distributor to Authorized Purchasers. Authorized Purchasers may purchase Creation Baskets consisting of 10,000 Shares at the Fund’s NAV.
 
Use of Proceeds
The Sponsor applies substantially all of the Fund’s assets toward investing in Benchmark Component Futures Contracts, cash, and cash equivalents. The Sponsor deposits a portion of the Fund’s net assets with its futures commission merchant (“FCM”) or other financial institutions to be used to meet its current or potential margin or collateral requirements in connection with its investment in Benchmark Component Futures Contracts. The Fund uses only cash and cash equivalents to satisfy these requirements. The Sponsor expects that all entities that will hold or trade the Fund’s assets will be based in the United States and will be subject to United States regulations. The Sponsor believes that approximately 32% of the Fund’s assets will normally be committed as margin for Benchmark Component Futures Contracts. However, from time to time, the percentage of assets committed as margin/collateral may be substantially more, or less, than such range due to, among others, price volatility caused by changes in the fundamentals of the underlying bitcoin cryptocurrency markets resulting in increased margin requirements by the exchange. The remaining portion of the Fund’s assets is held in cash or cash equivalents. All interest or other income earned on these investments is retained for the Fund’s benefit.
 
NYSE Arca Symbol
“DEFI”
 
Creation and Redemption
Authorized Purchasers pay a $300 fee per order to create Creation Baskets, and a $300 fee per order for Redemption Baskets, which is paid to the Custodian. Authorized Purchasers are not required to sell any specific number or dollar amount of Shares. The per Share price of Shares offered in Creation Baskets is the total NAV of the Fund calculated as of the close of the NYSE Arca on that day divided by the number of issued and outstanding Shares.
 
Inter-Series Limitation on Liability
While the Fund will be one of six separate series of the Trust, additional series may be created in the future. The Trust has been formed and will be operated with the goal that the Fund and any other series of the Trust will be liable only for obligations of such series, and a series will not be responsible for or affected by any liabilities or losses of or claims against any other series. If any creditor or Shareholder in any particular series (such as the Fund) were to successfully assert against a series a claim with respect to its indebtedness or Shares, the creditor or Shareholder could recover only from that particular series and its assets. Accordingly, the debts and other obligations incurred, contracted for or otherwise existing solely with respect to a particular series would be enforceable only against the assets of that series, and not against any other series or the Trust generally or any of their respective assets. The assets of the Fund and any other series will include only those funds and other assets that are paid to, held by or distributed to the series on account of and for the benefit of that series, including, without limitation, amounts delivered to the Trust for the purchase of Shares in a series.
 
Registration Clearance and Settlement
Individual certificates are not issued for the Shares. Instead, Shares will be represented by one or more global certificates, which are deposited by the transfer agent with the Depository Trust Company (“DTC”) and registered in the name of Cede & Co., as nominee for DTC. The global certificates evidence all of the Shares outstanding at any time. Beneficial interests in Shares are held through DTC’s book-entry system, which means that Shareholders are limited to: (1) purchasers in DTC such as banks, brokers, dealers and trust companies, (2) those who maintain, either directly or indirectly, a custodial relationship with a DTC purchaser, and (3) those who hold interests in the Shares through DTC purchasers or indirect purchasers, in each case who satisfy the requirements for transfers of Shares. DTC purchasers acting on behalf of investors holding Shares through such DTC purchasers’ accounts in DTC will follow the delivery practice applicable to securities eligible for DTC’s Same-Day Funds Settlement System. Shares are credited to DTC purchasers’ securities accounts following confirmation of receipt of payment.
 
Net Asset Value
The NAV is calculated by taking the current market value of the Fund’s total assets and subtracting any liabilities and dividing the balance by the number of Shares. Under the Fund’s current operational procedures, U.S. Bancorp Fund Services, LLC, doing business as U.S. Bank Global Fund Services (“Global Fund Services”), the Fund’s “Administrator” calculates the NAV of the Fund’s Shares as of the earlier of 4:00 p.m. (ET) or the close of the New York Stock Exchange each day. ICE Data Indices, LLC calculates and disseminates an approximate net asset value every 15 seconds throughout each day that the Fund’s Shares are traded on the NYSE Arca for as long as the CME’s main pricing mechanism is open.
 
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Fund Expenses
The Fund pays the Sponsor a Management Fee, monthly in arrears, in an amount equal to 0.94% per annum of the daily NAV of the Fund. The Management Fee is paid in consideration of the Sponsor’s services related to the management of the Fund’s business and affairs, including the provision of commodity futures trading advisory services. The Fund pays all of its respective brokerage commissions, including applicable exchange fees, NFA fees and give-up fees, and other transaction related fees and expenses charged in connection with trading activities for the Fund’s investments in CFTC regulated investments. The Fund bears other transaction costs related to the FCM capital requirements on a monthly basis. The Sponsor pays all of the routine operational, administrative and other ordinary expenses of the Fund, generally as determined by the Sponsor, including but not limited to, fees and expenses of the Administrator, Custodian, Distributor, Transfer Agent, licensors, accounting and audit fees and expenses, tax preparation expenses, legal fees, ongoing SEC registration fees, individual Schedule K-1 preparation and mailing fees, and report preparation and mailing expenses. The Fund pays all of its non-recurring and unusual fees and expenses, if any, as determined by the Sponsor. Non-recurring and unusual fees and expenses are unexpected or unusual in nature, such as legal claims and liabilities and litigation costs or indemnification or other unanticipated expenses. Extraordinary fees and expenses also include material expenses which are not currently anticipated obligations of the Fund. Routine operational, administrative and other ordinary expenses are not deemed extraordinary expenses. The estimated amount of fees and expenses that are anticipated to be incurred in a single Share during the first twelve (12) months of ownership is $0.23 or 0.92% of the selling price. The total estimated fees and expenses are expressed as a percentage of an estimated $2,500,000 million in assets.
 
The Sponsor, Marketing Agents and Digital Asset Advisor will bear the costs and expenses related to the initial offer and sale of Shares, including registration fees paid or to be paid to the SEC, Financial Industry Regulatory Authority (“FINRA”) or any other regulatory body or self-regulatory organization. None of the costs and expenses related to the initial offer and sale of Shares, which are expected to total approximately $270,000, are chargeable to the Fund, and the Sponsor, Marketing Agents, and Digital Asset Advisor may not recover any of these costs and expenses from the Fund. Total fees to be paid by the Fund are currently estimated to be approximately 0.92% of the daily net assets of the Fund for the twelve-month period after issuance, though this amount may change in future years.
 
General expenses of the Trust will be allocated among the existing Teucrium Funds and any future series of the Trust as determined by the Sponsor in its discretion. The Trust may be required to indemnify the Sponsor, and the Trust and/or the Sponsor may be required to indemnify the Trustee, Distributor or Administrator, under certain circumstances.
 
Termination Events
The Trust and the Fund shall continue in existence from the date of their formation in perpetuity, unless the Trust or the Fund, as the case may be, is sooner terminated upon the occurrence of certain events specified in the Trust Agreement, including the following: (1) the filing of a certificate of dissolution or cancellation of the Sponsor or revocation of the Sponsor’s charter or the withdrawal of the Sponsor, unless Shareholders holding a majority of the outstanding Shares of the Trust, voting together as a single class, elect within ninety (90) days after such event to continue the business of the Trust and appoint a successor Sponsor; (2) the occurrence of any event which would make the existence of the Trust or the Fund unlawful; (3) the suspension, revocation, or termination of the Sponsor’s registration as a CPO with the CFTC or membership with the NFA; (4) the insolvency or bankruptcy of the Trust or the Fund; (5) a vote by the Shareholders holding at least seventy-five percent (75%) of the outstanding Shares of the Trust, voting together as a single class, to dissolve the Trust subject to certain conditions; (6) the determination by the Sponsor to dissolve the Trust or the Fund, subject to certain conditions.; (7) the Trust is required to be registered as an investment company under the Investment Company Act of 1940, and (8) DTC is unable or unwilling to continue to perform its functions and a comparable replacement is unavailable. Upon termination of the Fund, the affairs of the Fund shall be wound up and all of its debts and liabilities discharged or otherwise provided for in the order of priority as provided by law. The fair market value of the remaining assets of the Fund shall then be determined by the Sponsor. Thereupon, the assets of the Fund shall be distributed pro rata to the Shareholders in accordance with their Shares.
 
Authorized Purchasers
A list of the Fund’s Authorized Purchasers as of the date of this prospectus can be found under “Plan of Distribution – Distributor and Authorized Purchasers,” on page 41. Authorized Purchasers must be (1) registered broker-dealers or other securities market purchasers, such as banks and other financial institutions, which are not required to register as broker-dealers to engage in securities transactions, and (2) DTC purchasers. To become an Authorized Purchaser, a person must enter into an Authorized Purchaser Agreement with the Sponsor.
 
Conflicts of Interest
There are present and potential future conflicts of interest related to the Trust’s structure and operation that you should consider before you purchase Shares. These include, among others, conflicts related to the Sponsor serving as the Sponsor to the other Teucrium Funds and to commodity pools other than the Teucrium Funds in the future. A description of such conflicts of interest can be found under “The Sponsor Has Conflicts of Interest” on page 48.
 
 
13
 
WHAT ARE THE RISK FACTORS INVOLVED WITH AN INVESTMENT IN THE FUND?
 
You should consider carefully the risks described below before making an investment decision. You should also refer to the other information included in this prospectus, and the Fund’s and the Trust’s financial statements and the related notes incorporated by reference herein. See “Incorporation by Reference of Certain Information.”
 
Risks Associated with Investing in Bitcoin
 
Further Development and Acceptance of Bitcoin and the Bitcoin Network Is Uncertain.
 
The further development and acceptance of the Bitcoin Network, which is part of a new and rapidly changing industry, is subject to a variety of factors that are difficult to evaluate. The slowing, stopping or reversing of the development or acceptance of the Bitcoin Network may adversely affect the price of bitcoin and therefore cause the Fund to suffer losses. Regulatory changes or actions may alter the nature of an investment in bitcoin or restrict the use of bitcoin or the operations of the Bitcoin Network or venues on which bitcoin trades in a manner that adversely affects the price of bitcoin and, therefore, the Fund’s Bitcoin Futures Contracts. Bitcoin generally operates without central authority (such as a bank) and is not backed by any government. Bitcoin is not legal tender and federal, state and/or foreign governments may restrict the use and exchange of bitcoin, and regulation in the United States is still developing. For example, it may become difficult or illegal to acquire, hold, sell or use bitcoin in one or more countries, which could adversely impact the price of bitcoin, and therefore the value of the Fund’s Bitcoin Futures Contracts.
 
“Forks” in Bitcoin Network Could Have Adverse Effects.
 
From time to time, developers of the bitcoin network suggest changes to the bitcoin software. If a sufficient number of users and miners elect not to adopt the changes, a new digital asset, operating on the earlier version of the bitcoin software, may be created. This is often referred to as a “fork.”
 
In August 2017, bitcoin “forked” into bitcoin and a new digital asset, bitcoin cash, as a result of a several-year dispute over how to increase the rate of transactions that the Bitcoin network can process. Since then, bitcoin has been forked numerous times to launch new digital assets, such as bitcoin gold, bitcoin silver and bitcoin diamond. Additional hard forks of the Bitcoin blockchain could adversely affect the market for Bitcoin Futures in which the Fund invests and, therefore, an investment in the Fund. A substantial giveaway of bitcoin (sometimes referred to as an “air drop”) may also result in significant and unexpected declines in the value of bitcoin, Bitcoin Futures Contracts, and the Fund.
 
Rewards for mining bitcoin are designed to decline over time, which may lessen the incentive for miners to process and confirm transactions on the Bitcoin Network.
 
Transactions in bitcoin are processed by miners who are primarily compensated by receiving newly issued bitcoin as a reward for successfully solving cryptological puzzles according to a payment schedule that declines over time (in some instances, miners are also compensated through voluntary fees paid by Bitcoin Network participants). If this compensation is not sufficient to incentivize miners to process transactions, the confirmation process for transactions, which acts as security for the Bitcoin Network, may become slower and the Bitcoin Network may become more vulnerable. These and similar events may have a significant adverse effect on the price and liquidity of bitcoin and the value of an investment in the Fund.
 
The Bitcoin Network may face scalability challenges as it expands to a greater number of users.
 
As with other digital asset networks, the Bitcoin Network faces significant scaling challenges because public blockchains generally face a tradeoff between security and scalability. A decentralized network is less susceptible to manipulation or capture if more participants, or “nodes,” are involved in the processing and maintenance of such network. However, a greater number of nodes decreases the network’s efficiency in processing transactions and may result in increased settlement times. Increased settlement times could discourage certain uses for bitcoin (for example, micropayments), and could reduce demand for and price of bitcoin, which could adversely impact the value of an investment in the Fund.
 
Bitcoin Markets Are Susceptible To Extreme Price Fluctuations, Theft, Loss and Destruction.
 
The market price of bitcoin has been subject to extreme fluctuations. If bitcoin markets continue to be subject to sharp fluctuations, the Fund’s Shareholders may experience losses. Similar to fiat currencies (i.e., a currency that is backed by a central bank or a national, supra-national or quasi-national organization), bitcoin is susceptible to theft, loss and destruction. Accordingly, the Fund’s Bitcoin Futures are also susceptible to these risks. Cybersecurity risks of the Bitcoin Protocol and of entities that custody or facilitate the transfers or trading of bitcoin could result in a loss of public confidence in bitcoin, a decline in the value of bitcoin and, as a result, adversely impact the Fund’s Bitcoin Futures Contracts.
 
Bitcoin Ownership is Concentrated in a Small Number of Holders Referred to as ‘Whales.’
 
A significant portion of bitcoin is held by a small number of holders who have the ability to affect the price of bitcoin and who are sometimes referred to as “whales.” Because bitcoin is lightly regulated, bitcoin whales have the ability, alone or in coordination, to manipulate the price of bitcoin by restricting or expanding the supply of bitcoin. Activities of bitcoin whales that reduce user confidence in bitcoin, the Bitcoin Network or the fairness of bitcoin trading venues, or that affect the price of bitcoin, could have a negative impact on the value of an investment in the Fund.
 
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Bitcoin Exchanges Are Unregulated and May Be More Exposed to Fraud and Failure.
 
Bitcoin exchanges and other trading venues on which bitcoin trades are relatively new and, in most cases, largely unregulated and may therefore be more exposed to fraud and failure than established, regulated exchanges for securities, derivatives and other currencies. The Fund’s indirect investment in bitcoin remains subject to volatility experienced by the bitcoin exchanges and other bitcoin trading venues. Such volatility can adversely affect an investment in the Fund. Bitcoin exchanges have in the past stopped and may in the future stop operating or permanently shut down due to fraud, cybersecurity issues, manipulation, technical glitches, hackers or malware, which may also affect the price of bitcoin and thus the Fund’s indirect investment in bitcoin. Fraud and failure related to such bitcoin exchanges could result in a loss of public confidence in bitcoin and a decline in the value of bitcoin, which could adversely impact the adoption of bitcoin or acceptance of bitcoin and cause a decline in value of the Fund’s Bitcoin Futures Contracts.
 
Networked Systems Are Vulnerable to Attacks.
 
All networked systems are vulnerable to various kinds of attacks. As with any computer network, the Bitcoin network contains certain flaws. For example, the Bitcoin network is currently vulnerable to a “51% attack” where, if a mining pool were to gain control of more than 50% of the “hash” rate, or the amount of computing and process power being contributed to the network through mining, a malicious actor would be able to gain full control of the network and the ability to manipulate the blockchain. A significant portion of bitcoin is held by a small number of holders sometimes referred to as “whales.” These holders have the ability to manipulate the price of bitcoin.
 
Cybersecurity Risk.
 
As a digital asset, bitcoin is subject to cybersecurity risks, including the risk that malicious actors will exploit flaws in its code or structure that will allow them to, among other things, steal bitcoin held by others, control the blockchain, steal personally identifying information, or issue significant amounts of bitcoin in contravention of the Bitcoin Protocols. The occurrence of any of these events is likely to have a significant adverse impact on the price and liquidity of bitcoin and Bitcoin Futures Contracts and therefore the value of an investment in the Fund. Additionally, the Bitcoin network’s functionality relies on the Internet. A significant disruption of Internet connectivity affecting large numbers of users or geographic areas could impede the functionality of the Bitcoin network. Any technical disruptions or regulatory limitations that affect Internet access may have an adverse effect on the Bitcoin network, the price of bitcoin and Bitcoin Futures Contracts, and the value of an investment in the Fund.
 
Limited Adoption and Ability to Use Bitcoin to Purchase Goods.
 
Currently, there is relatively limited use of bitcoin in the retail and commercial marketplace in comparison to relatively extensive use as a store of value, thus contributing to price volatility that could adversely affect the Fund’s Bitcoin Futures Contracts. Bitcoin is not currently a form of legal tender in the United States and has only recently become selectively accepted as a means of payment for goods and services by some retail and commercial outlets, and the use of bitcoin by consumers to pay such retail and commercial outlets remains limited. Banks and other established financial institutions may refuse to process funds for bitcoin transactions; process wire transfers to or from bitcoin trading venues, bitcoin-related companies or service providers; or maintain accounts for persons or entities transacting in bitcoin or providing bitcoin-related services. In addition, some taxing jurisdictions, including the U.S., treat the use of bitcoin as a medium of exchange for goods and services to be a taxable sale of bitcoin, which could discourage the use of bitcoin as a medium of exchange, especially for a holder of bitcoin that has appreciated in value.
 
Risks to Bitcoin from Other parts of the Cryptocurrency Market.
 
The price of bitcoin and the bitcoin market generally may be adversely impacted by developments in other parts of the cryptocurrency market. The acceptance of bitcoin and cryptocurrency generally depends on a number of factors, including adverse developments in the cryptocurrency market that could impact investor confidence. For example, “stablecoins” have been developed to enhance the value of cryptocurrency to be used like fiat currency in transactions in goods and services. Adverse developments such as the recent “depegging”: of the TerraUSD stablecoin may undermine confidence in the cryptocurrency markets generally and cause decreases in the price of cryptocurrencies such as bitcoin.
 
Hacking Risk of Theft of Private Keys.
 
Due to the nature of private keys, bitcoin transactions are irrevocable and stolen or incorrectly transferred bitcoin may be irretrievable, and as a result, any incorrectly executed bitcoin transactions could adversely affect the price and liquidity of bitcoin, which may indirectly affect the price and liquidity of the Bitcoin Futures Contracts.
 
Environmental risks from bitcoin mining.
 
Bitcoin mining currently requires computing hardware that consumes large amounts of electricity. By way of electrical power generation, many bitcoin miners rely on fossil fuels to power their operations. Public perception of the impact of bitcoin mining on climate change may reduce demand for bitcoin and increase the likelihood of regulation that limits bitcoin mining or restricts energy usage by bitcoin miners. Such events could have an impact on the price of bitcoin, bitcoin futures, and the performance of the Fund.
 
15
 
Risks Associated with Investing in Bitcoin Futures Contracts
 
Investing in Bitcoin Futures Contracts subjects the Fund to the Risks of the Bitcoin Market.
 
The Fund is subject to the risks and hazards of the bitcoin market because it invests in Bitcoin Futures Contracts listed on the CME. The risks and hazards that are inherent in the bitcoin market may cause the price of bitcoin and the Fund’s Shares to fluctuate widely and you could incur a partial or total loss of your investment in the Fund. The prices of bitcoin and bitcoin futures contracts have historically been highly volatile. The value of the Fund’s investments in bitcoin futures – and therefore the value of an investment in the Fund – could decline significantly and without warning, including to zero. If you are not prepared to accept significant and unexpected changes in the value of the Fund and the possibility that you could lose your entire investment in the Fund you should not invest in the Fund.
 
The Bitcoin Futures Contracts listed on the CME are a relatively new type of futures contract that may be less developed than other, more established futures markets.
 
The Bitcoin Futures Contracts listed on the CME are a relatively new type of futures contract that may be less developed than more established futures markets (such as the futures markets for corn or wheat). Accordingly, although BTC Contracts have traded on the CME since December 2017 and MBT Contracts have traded on the CME since May 2021 and the market for exchange listed Bitcoin Futures Contracts has grown since inception, the market for Bitcoin Futures Contracts may be riskier, less liquid, more volatile and more vulnerable to economic, market, industry, regulatory and other changes than more established futures contracts. The liquidity of the market for BTC Contracts and MBT Contracts will depend on, among other things, the supply and demand for Bitcoin Futures Contracts, speculative interest in the market for Bitcoin Futures Contracts and the potential ability to hedge against the price of bitcoin with Bitcoin Futures Contracts.
 
An investment in the Fund is subject to the risks of an investment in futures contracts.
 
An investment in the Fund is subject to the risks of an investment in futures contracts, which are complex instruments that are often subject to a high degree of price variability. Because the price of Bitcoin Futures Contracts is linked to the price of bitcoin, an investment in the Fund may be riskier than other exchange-traded products that do not hold financial instruments related to bitcoin and may not be suitable for all investors.
 
Futures contracts are subject to inherent leverage risk because they are typically secured by margin deposits representing a small percentage of a futures contract’s entire market value.
 
Commodity pools’ trading positions in futures contracts are typically required to be secured by the deposit of margin funds that represent only a small percentage of a futures contract’s entire market value. This feature creates the potential for commodity pools to “leverage” their assets by purchasing or selling futures contracts with an aggregate notional amount in excess of the commodity pool’s assets. While futures contracts are generally subject to leverage risk, the NYSE Arca rule under which the Fund’s Shares will be listed and traded prevents the Fund from utilizing leverage.
 
Pricing anomalies in the bitcoin futures market could cause losses.
 
Market fraud and/or manipulation and other fraudulent trading practices such as the intentional dissemination of false or misleading information (e.g., false rumors) can, among other things, lead to a disruption of the orderly functioning of markets, significant market volatility, and cause the value of bitcoin futures to fluctuate quickly and without warning. Depending on the timing of an investor’s purchases and sales of the Fund’s Shares, these pricing anomalies could case the investor to incur losses.
 
Risks of Government Regulation.
 
The Financial Industry Regulatory Authority (“FINRA”) issued a notice on March 8, 2022 seeking comment on measures that could prevent or restrict investors from buying a broad range of public securities and products designated as “complex products” – which could include each Exchange Traded Product offered by the Sponsor. The ultimate impact, if any, of these measures remain unclear. However, if regulations are adopted, they could, among other things, prevent or restrict investors’ ability to buy the Fund.
 
Correlation Risk
 
The Benchmark is not designed to correlate with the spot price of bitcoin, and this could cause the changes in the price of the Shares to substantially vary from the changes in the spot price of bitcoin. Therefore, you may not be able to effectively use the Fund to hedge against bitcoin related losses or to indirectly invest in bitcoin.
 
The correlation between changes in such Bitcoin Futures Contracts and the spot price of bitcoin will be only approximate. Weak correlation between the Benchmark and the spot price of bitcoin may result from the factors discussed above. Imperfect correlation may also result from speculation in Benchmark Component Futures Contracts, and/or technical or other factors that may influence the trading of Benchmark Component Futures Contracts. If there is a weak correlation between the Benchmark and the spot price of bitcoin, then the price of Shares may not accurately track the spot price of bitcoin and you may not be able to effectively use the Fund as a way to hedge the risk of losses in your bitcoin related transactions or as a way to indirectly invest in bitcoin.
 
Moreover, while there is a spot bitcoin index calculated by the CME that is based on price feeds from certain designated bitcoin spot market exchanges, the Fund will generally not directly price off of this index. This is because the Fund will roll its futures holdings prior to settlement of the expiring contract and intends to never carry futures positions all the way to cash settlement (the only date that the BTC Contracts and MBT Contracts settle to the CME spot price index). The Fund will only price off of Bitcoin Futures Contracts volume-weighted average price (VWAP) daily settlement price, which might cause the Fund’s NAV to differ from spot bitcoin prices.
 
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Changes in the Fund’s NAV may not correlate well with changes in the price of the Benchmark. If this were to occur, you may not be able to effectively use the Fund as a way to hedge against bitcoin related losses or as a way to indirectly invest in bitcoin.
 
The Sponsor endeavors to invest the Fund’s assets as fully as possible in Benchmark Component Futures Contracts so that the changes in the NAV closely correlate with the changes in the Benchmark. However, changes in the Fund’s NAV may not correlate with the changes in the Benchmark for various reasons, including those set forth below.
 
The Fund incurs certain expenses in connection with its operations and holds most of its assets in income producing, short-term financial instruments for margin and other liquidity purposes and to meet redemptions that may be necessary on an ongoing basis. To the extent these expenses are not covered by the Management Fee, and income from short-term financial instruments may cause imperfect correlation between changes in the Fund’s NAV and changes in the Benchmark. Differences between returns based on the price of bitcoin and an investment in the Fund may also be attributable to additional costs related to futures investing and other fund expenses.
 
The Sponsor may not be able to invest the Fund’s assets in Benchmark Component Futures Contracts having an aggregate notional amount exactly equal to the Fund’s NAV. As a standardized contract, a single BTC Contract is for a specified amount of bitcoin, and the Fund’s NAV and the proceeds from the sale of a Creation Basket is unlikely to be an exact multiple of that amount. In such case, the Fund might not invest the entire proceeds from the purchase of the Creation Basket in such futures contracts. (As an example, assume that a Creation Basket is sold by the Fund, and that the Fund’s closing NAV per Share is $25.00. In that case, the Fund would receive $250,000 in proceeds from the sale of the Creation Basket ($25.00 NAV per Share multiplied by 10,000 Shares and ignoring the Creation Basket fee of $300). If one were to assume further that the Sponsor wants to invest the entire proceeds from the Creation Basket in the Benchmark Component Futures Contracts and that the market value of each such Benchmark Component Futures Contracts is $188,175 (or otherwise not a round number), the Fund would be unable to buy an exact number of BTC Contracts with an aggregate market value equal to $250,000. In this case, the Fund would be able to purchase 1 BTC Contract with an aggregate market value of approximately $188,175 and 16 MBT Contracts at $3,750 with an aggregate market value of approximately $60,000, bringing the aggregate value of proceeds to $248,175.) Any amounts not invested in Benchmark Component Futures Contracts are held in cash and cash equivalents.
 
The Benchmark Component Futures Contracts reflect the price of bitcoin for future delivery, not the current spot price of bitcoin, so at best the correlation between changes in such Bitcoin Futures Contracts and the spot price of bitcoin will be only approximate. Weak correlation between the Benchmark and the spot price of bitcoin may result from fluctuations in bitcoin prices discussed above. Imperfect correlation may also result from speculation in Benchmark Component Futures Contracts, technical factors in the trading of Benchmark Component Futures Contracts, and expected inflation in the economy as a whole. If there is a weak correlation between the Benchmark and the spot price of bitcoin, then the price of Shares may not accurately track the spot price of bitcoin and you may not be able to effectively use the Fund as a way to hedge the risk of losses in your bitcoin related transactions or as a way to indirectly invest in bitcoin.
 
As Fund assets increase, there may be more or less correlation. On the one hand, as the Fund grows it should be able to invest in Benchmark Component Futures Contracts with a notional amount that is closer on a percentage basis to the Fund’s NAV. For example, if the Fund’s NAV is equal to 4.9 times the value of a single futures contract, it can purchase only four futures contracts, which would cause only 81.6% of the Fund’s assets to be exposed to the bitcoin market. On the other hand, if the Fund’s NAV is equal to 100.9 times the value of a single Bitcoin Futures Contract, it can purchase 100 such contracts, resulting in 99.1% exposure.
 
There may be significant volatility in the market for Bitcoin Futures Contracts. This volatility, in turn, may make it more difficult for Authorized Purchasers and other market purchasers to be able to identify a reliable price for Bitcoin Futures Contracts. Without reliable prices, Authorized Purchasers and other market purchasers may reduce their role in the market arbitrage process or “step away” from these activities. This, in turn, might inhibit the effectiveness of the arbitrage process in maintaining the relationship between the underlying value of the Fund’s Bitcoin Futures Contracts and the Fund’s market price. This reduced effectiveness could result in Fund Shares trading at a price which differs materially from NAV and also in greater than normal intraday bid/ask spreads for Fund Shares.
 
Position limits, accountability levels and dynamic price fluctuation limits set by the CFTC and the exchanges have the potential to cause tracking error, which could cause the price of Shares to substantially vary from the Benchmark and prevent you from being able to effectively use the Fund as a way to hedge against bitcoin related losses or as a way to indirectly invest in bitcoin.
 
The CFTC and U.S. designated contract markets, such as the CME, have established position limits and accountability levels on the maximum net long or net short BTC Contracts that the Fund may hold, own or control. Spot position limits are set at 4,000 contracts. A position accountability level of 5,000 contracts will be applied to positions in single months outside the spot month and in all months combined. The MBT Contracts have a spot month limit of 200,000 contracts and a position accountability level of 250,000 contracts. Accountability levels are not fixed ceilings but rather thresholds above which the exchange may exercise greater scrutiny and control over an investor, including limiting the Fund to holding no more Bitcoin Futures Contracts than the amount established by the accountability level. The potential for the Fund to reach position or accountability limits will depend on if and how quickly the Fund’s net assets increase.
 
In addition to position limits and accountability limits, the CME places daily price fluctuation limits on Bitcoin Futures Contracts that represent the maximum daily price range permitted for a contract. Once a price fluctuation limit has been reached, no trades may be made at a price beyond that limit. Under the price fluctuation mechanism that was initially put into place when Bitcoin Futures Contracts were launched on the CME in December 2017, price fluctuation limits were triggered 116 times. In March 2019, the CME adopted a dynamic price fluctuation mechanism. This mechanism assigns an initial opening price fluctuation limit equal to a percentage of the prior trading day’s settlement price (or a different price if deemed more appropriate), which then moves with the market throughout the day. Since dynamic price fluctuation limits were introduced, price limits have been triggered 89 times and there has been one "hard limit move." A hard limit move is when the price of Bitcoin Futures Contracts exceeds a price limit that defines the minimum/maximum price to which such Bitcoin Futures Contracts can move for the given trade date. If the hard limit is reached, trade matching will not occur at prices above the maximum price or below the minimum price.
 
Position limits, accountability limits and dynamic price fluctuation limits may limit the Fund’s ability to invest the proceeds of Creation Baskets in Bitcoin Futures Contracts. As result, when the Fund sells Creation Baskets it may be limited in its ability to invest in Bitcoin Futures Contracts, including the Benchmark Component Futures Contracts. In such case, the Fund may hold larger amounts of cash and cash equivalents, which will impair the Fund’s ability to meet its investment objective of tracking the Benchmark.
 
Price fluctuation limits may contribute to a lack of liquidity and have a negative impact on Fund performance. During periods of market illiquidity, including periods of market disruption and volatility, it may be difficult or impossible for the Fund to buy or sell futures at desired prices or at all.
 
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An investment in the Fund may provide you little or no diversification benefits. Thus, in a declining market, the Fund may have no gains to offset your losses from other investments, and you may suffer losses on your investment in the Fund at the same time you incur losses with respect to other asset classes.
 
It cannot be predicted to what extent the performance of Benchmark Component Futures Contracts will or will not correlate to the performance of other broader asset classes such as stocks and bonds. If the Fund’s performance were to move more directly with the financial markets, you will obtain little or no diversification benefits from an investment in the Shares. In such a case, the Fund may have no gains to offset your losses from other investments, and you may suffer losses on your investment in the Fund at the same time you incur losses with respect to other investments.
 
Variables such as cost of electricity, regulation, market disruptions, cyber-attacks and political events may have a larger impact on bitcoin and bitcoin interest prices than on traditional securities and broader financial markets. These additional variables may create additional investment risks that subject the Fund’s investments to greater volatility than investments in traditional securities.
 
Lower correlation should not be confused with negative correlation, where the performance of two asset classes would be opposite of each other. There is no historic evidence that the spot price of bitcoin and prices of other financial assets, such as stocks and bonds, are negatively correlated. In the absence of negative correlation, the Fund cannot be expected to be automatically profitable during unfavorable periods for the stock market, or vice versa.
 
If changes in the Fund’s NAV do not correlate with changes in the Benchmark, then investing in the Fund may not be an effective way to hedge against bitcoin related losses or indirectly invest in bitcoin.
 
Futures Commission Merchant Risks
 
The Fund Has Two Futures Commission Merchants.
 
The Fund currently has two futures commission merchants (“FCMs”) through which it buys and sells futures contracts. Volatility in the bitcoin futures market may lead one or both of the Fund’s FCMs to impose risk mitigation procedures that could limit the Fund’s investment in Bitcoin Futures Contracts beyond the accountability and position limits imposed by the CME futures contract exchange as discussed herein. An FCM could impose a financial ceiling on initial margin that could change and become more or less restrictive on the Fund’s activities depending upon a variety of conditions beyond the Sponsor’s control. If the Fund’s FCMs were to impose position limits, or if any other FCM with which the Fund establishes a relationship in the future were to impose position limits, the Fund’s ability to meet its investment objective could be negatively impacted. The Fund continues to monitor and manage its existing relationships with its FCMs and will continue to seek additional relationships with FCMs as needed.
 
Risks Associated With the Fund’s Investment In Cash and Cash Equivalents
 
The Fund may experience a loss if it is required to sell cash equivalents at a price lower than the price at which they were acquired.
 
If the Fund is required to sell its cash equivalents at a price lower than the price at which they were acquired, the Fund will experience a loss. This loss may adversely impact the price of the Shares and may decrease the correlation between the price of the Shares, the Benchmark, and the spot price of bitcoin. The value of cash equivalents held by the Fund generally moves inversely with movements in interest rates. The prices of longer maturity securities are subject to greater market fluctuations as a result of changes in interest rates. While the short-term nature of the Fund’s investments in cash equivalents should minimize the interest rate risk to which the Fund is subject, it is possible that the cash equivalents held by the Fund will decline in value.
 
Risk Related To Lack of Liquidity
 
Certain of the Fund’s Investments Could Be Illiquid, Which Could Cause Large Losses to Investors at any Time or from Time to Time.
 
If the Fund’s ability to obtain exposure to Bitcoin Futures Contracts in accordance with its investment objective is disrupted for any reason including, because of limited liquidity in the bitcoin futures market, a disruption to the bitcoin futures market, or as a result of margin requirements or position limits imposed by the Fund’s futures commission merchants, the CME, or the CFTC, the Fund may not be able to achieve its investment objective and may experience significant losses. Any disruption in the Fund’s ability to obtain exposure to Bitcoin Futures Contracts will cause the Fund’s performance to deviate from the performance of Bitcoin Futures Contracts. In addition, the Fund might grow to a size where a lack of liquidity in the futures market meant that the Fund could not sell enough futures contracts to honor redemption requests. For further information regarding the impact if suspending redemptions, see “Suspension or Rejection of Redemption” on page 45.
 
A market disruption, such as a government taking regulatory or other actions that disrupt the market in bitcoin, can also make it difficult to liquidate a position. Unexpected market illiquidity may cause major losses to investors at any time or from time to time. In addition, the Fund does not intend at this time to establish a credit facility, which would provide an additional source of liquidity, but instead will rely only on the cash and cash equivalents that it holds to meet its liquidity needs. The anticipated value of the positions in Benchmark Component Futures Contracts that the Sponsor will acquire or enter into for the Fund increases the risk of illiquidity. Because Benchmark Component Futures Contracts may be illiquid, the Fund’s holdings may be more difficult to liquidate at favorable prices in periods of illiquid markets and losses may be incurred during the period in which positions are being liquidated.
 
The Fund and Other Funds with Similar Investment Strategies May Try To Exit Positions at the Same Time.
 
If the Fund and other funds with similar investment strategies try to exit their Bitcoin Futures Contract positions at the same time, such a mass exit could have detrimental effect on price and liquidity, and you could incur losses in your investment in Shares of the Fund.
 
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Hedging Risk
 
If the nature of the purchasers in the futures market shifts such that bitcoin purchasers are the predominant hedgers in the market, the Fund might have to reinvest at higher futures prices or choose other bitcoin interests.
 
The changing nature of the purchasers in the bitcoin market will influence whether bitcoin futures prices are above or below the expected future spot price. Holders of bitcoin will typically seek to hedge against falling bitcoin prices by selling Bitcoin Futures Contracts. Therefore, if holders of bitcoin become the predominant hedgers in the futures market, prices of Bitcoin Futures Contracts will typically be below expected future spot prices. Conversely, if the predominant hedgers in the futures market are the holders of bitcoin who purchase Bitcoin Futures Contracts to hedge against a rise in prices, prices of Bitcoin Futures Contracts will likely be higher than expected future spot prices. This can have significant implications for the Fund when it is time to sell a Bitcoin Futures Contract that is no longer a Benchmark Component Futures Contract and purchase a new Bitcoin Futures Contract or to sell a Bitcoin Futures Contract to meet redemption requests.
 
The price relationship between the Benchmark Component Futures Contracts at any point in time and the Bitcoin Futures Contracts that will become Benchmark Component Futures Contracts on the next roll date will vary and may impact both the Fund’s total return and the degree to which its total return tracks that of bitcoin price indices.
 
The design of the Fund’s Benchmark is such that the Benchmark Component Futures Contracts will change on a monthly basis, and the Fund’s investments may be rolled periodically to reflect the changing composition of the Benchmark. In the event of a bitcoin futures market where near to expire contracts trade at a higher price than longer to expire contracts, a situation referred to as “backwardation,” then absent the impact of the overall movement in bitcoin prices the value of the Benchmark Component Futures Contracts would tend to rise as they approach expiration. As a result, the Fund may benefit because it may be selling more expensive contracts and buying less expensive ones on an ongoing basis. Conversely, in the event of a bitcoin futures market where near to expire contracts trade at a lower price than longer to expire contracts, a situation referred to as “contango,” then absent the impact of the overall movement in bitcoin prices the value of the Benchmark Component Futures Contracts would tend to decline as they approach expiration. As a result, the Fund’s total return may be lower than might otherwise be the case because it may be selling less expensive contracts and buying more expensive ones. The impact of backwardation and contango may lead the total return of the Fund to vary significantly from the total return of other price references, such as the spot price of bitcoin. In the event of a prolonged period of contango, and absent the impact of rising or falling bitcoin prices, this could have a significant negative impact on the Fund’s NAV and total return, and you could incur a partial or total loss of your investment in the Fund.
 
The design of the Fund’s Benchmark is such that the Benchmark Component Futures Contracts will change on a monthly basis, with the contracts with the shortest maturity being replaced with contracts with a longer maturity. Sometimes the Fund will have to pay more for longer maturity contracts to replace existing shorter maturity contracts about to expire. This situation is known as “contango” in the futures markets. In the event of a prolonged period of contango, and absent the impact of rising or falling bitcoin prices, this could have a negative impact on the Fund’s NAV and total return, which in turn may have a negative impact on your investment in the Fund. By way of example, during the period from 1/1/2019 to 6/30/2022, the market for Bitcoin Component Futures Contracts were in contango approximately 90% of the time, which resulted in an average annual negative roll yield of approximately 7%.
 
If the futures market is in contango (i.e., when the price of bitcoin in the future is to be more than the current price), the Fund will buy later to expire contracts for a higher price than the soon to expire contracts that it sells. All other things being equal, a situation involving prolonged periods of contango may adversely impact the returns of the Fund.
 
Regulatory Risk
 
Lack of Regulation of the Bitcoin Market.
 
Bitcoin, the Bitcoin Network and the bitcoin trading venues are relatively new and, in most cases, largely unregulated. As a result of this lack of regulation, individuals, or groups may engage in insider trading, fraud or market manipulation with respect to bitcoin. Such manipulation could cause investors in bitcoin to lose money, possibly the entire value of their investments. Over the past several years, a number of bitcoin trading venues have been closed due to fraud, failure or security breaches. The nature of the assets held at bitcoin trading venues make them appealing targets for hackers and a number of bitcoin trading venues have been victims of cybercrimes and other fraudulent activity. These activities have caused significant, in some cases total, losses for bitcoin investors. Investors in bitcoin may have little or no recourse should such theft, fraud or manipulation occur. There is no central registry showing which individuals or entities own bitcoin or the quantity of bitcoin that is owned by any particular person or entity. There are no regulations in place that would prevent a large holder of bitcoin or a group of holders from selling their bitcoins, which could depress the price of bitcoin, or otherwise attempting to manipulate the price of bitcoin or the Bitcoin Network. Events that reduce user confidence in bitcoin, the Bitcoin Network and the fairness of bitcoin trading venues could have a negative impact on the price of bitcoin and the value of an investment in the Fund.
 
Risk of Illicit Activities.
 
As bitcoins have grown in both popularity and market size, the U.S. Congress and a number of U.S. federal and state agencies (including the Financial Crimes Enforcement Network of the U.S. Department of the Treasury (“FinCEN”), SEC, CFTC, the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, Inc. (“FINRA”), the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (“CFPB”), the Department of Justice, the Department of Homeland Security, the Federal Bureau of Investigation, the IRS, and state financial institution regulators) have been examining the Bitcoin Network, bitcoin users and the Bitcoin Exchange Market, with particular focus on the extent to which bitcoins can be used to launder the proceeds of illegal activities or fund criminal or terrorist enterprises and the safety and soundness of exchanges or other service providers that hold bitcoins for users. The imposition of stricter governmental regulation of the bitcoin market may adversely impact the activities of the Fund, for example, by reducing the liquidity of the bitcoin markets.
 
Regulation of futures markets, futures contracts and futures exchanges is extensive and constantly changing; future regulatory developments are impossible to predict but may significantly and adversely affect the Fund. This risk is especially heightened for cryptocurrency derivatives and cryptocurrencies.
 
The regulation of futures markets, futures contracts and futures exchanges has historically been comprehensive. The CFTC and the exchanges are authorized to take extraordinary actions in the event of a market emergency including, for example, the retroactive implementation of speculative position limits, increased margin requirements, the establishment of dynamic price limits and the suspension of trading on an exchange or trading facility.
 
The regulation of bitcoin interest and crypto derivatives transactions in the United States is a rapidly changing area of law and is subject to ongoing modification by governmental and judicial action. Congress enacted the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act (the “Dodd-Frank Act”) in 2010. As the Dodd-Frank Act continues to be implemented by the CFTC and the SEC, there is a possibility of future regulatory changes within the United States altering, perhaps to a material extent, the nature of an investment in the Fund, or the ability for the Fund to continue to implement its investment strategy. In addition, various national governments outside of the United States have expressed concern regarding the disruptive effects of speculative trading in the commodities and crypto derivatives markets and the need to regulate the derivatives markets in general. The effect of any future regulatory change on the Fund is impossible to predict but could be substantial and adverse.
 
The regulation of cryptocurrency derivatives and cryptocurrencies continues to evolve. Inconsistent, changing and sometimes conflicting regulations may make it more difficult for Bitcoin businesses to provide services, which may slow the adoption of the Bitcoin economy and may impede consumer adoption of Bitcoin. Future regulatory changes may materially alter the ability to buy and sell Bitcoin and Bitcoin futures or could impact the ability of the Fund to achieve its investment objective. This may alter the nature of an investment in the Fund or the ability of the Fund to continue to operate as planned.
 
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The Fund’s Operating Risks
 
The Fund may change its investment objective, Benchmark or investment strategies at any time without Shareholder approval or advance notice.
 
Consistent with applicable provisions of the Trust Agreement and Delaware law, the Fund has broad authority to make changes to the Fund’s operations. The Fund may change its investment objective, Benchmark, or investment strategies and Shareholders of the Fund will not have any rights with respect to these changes. Changes are subject to applicable regulatory requirements, including, but not limited to, any requirement to amend applicable listing rules of the NYSE. The reasons for and circumstances that may trigger any such changes may vary widely and cannot be predicted. By way of example, the Fund may change the term structure or underlying components of the Benchmark in furtherance of the Fund’s investment objective if, due to market conditions, a potential or actual imposition of position limits by the CFTC or futures exchange rules, or the imposition of risk mitigation measures by a futures commission merchant restricts the ability of the Fund to invest in the current Benchmark Futures Contracts. Shareholders may experience losses on their investments in the Fund as a result of such changes.
 
The Fund is not a registered investment company, so you do not have the protections of the Investment Company Act of 1940.
 
The Fund is not an investment company subject to the Investment Company Act of 1940. Accordingly, you do not have the protections expressly provided by that statute, including provisions preventing Fund insiders from managing the Fund to their benefit and to the detriment of Fund Shareholders; provisions preventing the Fund from issuing securities having inequitable or discriminatory provisions; provisions preventing Fund management by irresponsible persons; provisions preventing the use of unsound or misleading methods of computing Fund earnings and asset value; provisions prohibiting suspension of redemptions (except under limited circumstances); provisions limiting fund leverage; provisions imposing a fiduciary duty on fund managers with respect to receipt of compensation for services; and provisions preventing changes in the Fund's character without the consent of Fund Shareholders.
 
The Sponsor is leanly staffed and relies heavily on key personnel to manage trading activities.
 
In managing and directing the day to day activities and affairs of the Fund, the Sponsor relies almost entirely on a small number of individuals, including Mr. Sal Gilbertie, Mr. Steve Kahler and Ms. Cory Mullen-Rusin. If Mr. Gilbertie, Mr. Kahler or Ms. Mullen-Rusin were to leave or be unable to carry out their present responsibilities, it may have an adverse effect on the management of the Fund. To the extent that the Sponsor establishes additional commodity pools, even greater demands will be placed on these individuals.
 
The Sponsor has limited capital and may be unable to continue to manage the Fund if it sustains continued losses.
 
The Sponsor was formed for the purpose of managing the Trust, including the Fund, the other Teucrium Funds, and any other series of the Trust that may be formed in the future, and has been provided with capital primarily by its principals and a small number of outside investors. If the Sponsor operates at a loss for an extended period, its capital will be depleted, and it may be unable to obtain additional financing necessary to continue its operations. If the Sponsor were unable to continue to provide services to the Fund, the Fund would be terminated if a replacement sponsor could not be found. Any expenses related to the operation of the Fund would need to be paid by the Fund at the time of termination.
 
There are technical and fundamental risks inherent in the trading system the Sponsor intends to employ.
 
The Sponsor’s trading system is quantitative in nature, and it is possible that the Sponsor may make errors. Any errors or imperfections in the Sponsor’s trading system’s quantitative models, or in the data on which they are based, could adversely affect the Sponsor’s effective use of such trading systems. It is not possible or practicable for the Sponsor’s trading system to factor all relevant, available data into quantitative systems and/or trading decision. There is no guarantee that the Sponsor will use any specific data or type of data in making trading decisions on behalf of the Fund, nor is there any guarantee that the data actually utilized in making trading decisions on behalf of the Fund will be the most accurate data or free from errors. In addition, it is possible that a computer or software program may malfunction and cause an error in computation.
 
You cannot be assured of the Sponsor’s continued services, and discontinuance may be detrimental to the Fund.
 
You cannot be assured that the Sponsor will be willing or able to continue to service the Fund for any length of time. The Sponsor was formed for the purpose of sponsoring the Fund and other commodity pools and has limited financial resources and no significant source of income apart from its management fees from such commodity pools to support its continued service for the Fund. If the Sponsor discontinues its activities on behalf of the Fund or another series of the Trust, the Fund may be adversely affected. If the Sponsor’s registrations with the CFTC or memberships in the NFA were revoked or suspended, the Sponsor would no longer be able to provide services to the Fund.
 
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The Fund could terminate at any time and cause the liquidation and potential loss of your investment and could upset the overall maturity and timing of your investment portfolio.
 
The Fund may terminate at any time, regardless of whether the Fund has incurred losses, subject to the terms of the Trust Agreement. For example, the dissolution or resignation of the Sponsor would cause the Trust to terminate unless Shareholders holding a majority of the outstanding Shares of the Trust, voting together as a single class, elect within 90 days of the event to continue the Trust and appoint a successor Sponsor. In addition, the Sponsor may terminate the Fund if it determines that the Fund’s aggregate net assets in relation to its operating expenses make the continued operation of the Fund unreasonable or imprudent. As of the date of this prospectus, the Sponsor pays the fees, costs, and expenses of the Fund. If the Sponsor and the Fund are unable to raise sufficient funds so that the expenses are reasonable in relation to the Fund’s NAV, the Fund may be forced to terminate, and investors may lose all or part of their investment. Any expenses related to the operation of the Fund would need to be paid by the Sponsor at the time of termination.
 
However, no level of losses will require the Sponsor to terminate the Fund. The Fund’s termination would result in the liquidation of its investments and the distribution of its remaining assets to the Shareholders on a pro rata basis in accordance with their Shares, and the Fund could incur losses in liquidating its investments in connection with a termination. Termination could also negatively affect the overall maturity and timing of your investment portfolio.
 
The Sponsor may manage a large amount of assets, and this could affect the Fund’s ability to trade profitably.
 
Increases in assets under management may affect trading decisions. While the Fund’s assets are currently at manageable levels, the Sponsor does not intend to limit the amount of Fund assets. The more assets the Sponsor manages, the more difficult it may be for it to trade profitably because of the difficulty of trading larger positions without adversely affecting prices and performance and of managing risk associated with larger positions.
 
The liability of the Sponsor and the Trustee are limited, and the value of the Shares will be adversely affected if the Fund is required to indemnify the Trustee or the Sponsor.
 
Under the Trust Agreement, the Trustee and the Sponsor are not liable, and have the right to be indemnified, for any liability or expense incurred absent gross negligence or willful misconduct on the part of the Trustee or Sponsor, as the case may be. That means the Sponsor may require the assets of the Fund to be sold in order to cover losses or liability suffered by the Sponsor or by the Trustee. Any sale of that kind would reduce the NAV of the Fund and the value of its Shares.
 
The Fund may incur higher fees and expenses upon renewing existing or entering into new contractual relationships.
 
The arrangements between clearing brokers and counterparties on the one hand and the Fund on the other generally are terminable by the clearing brokers or counterparty upon notice to the Fund. In addition, the agreements between the Fund and its third-party service providers, such as the Distributor and the Custodian, are generally terminable at specified intervals. Upon termination, the Sponsor may be required to renegotiate or make other arrangements for obtaining similar services if the Fund intends to continue to operate. Comparable services from another party may not be available, or even if available, these services may not be available on the terms as favorable as those of the expired or terminated arrangements.
 
The Fund may experience a higher breakeven if interest rates decline.
 
The Fund seeks to earn interest on cash balances available for investment. If actual interest rates earned were lower than the current rate estimated and if the Sponsor were not able to waive expenses sufficient to cover the deficit, the breakeven estimated by the Fund in this prospectus could be higher.
 
The Fund is not actively managed.
 
The Fund is not actively managed and is designed to track a benchmark, regardless of whether the price of the Benchmark Component Futures Contracts is flat, declining or rising. As a result, the Fund may sustain losses that may have been avoidable if the Fund was actively managed.
 
The Net Asset Value calculation of the Fund may be overstated or understated due to the valuation method employed when a settlement price is not available on the date of net asset value calculation.
 
The Fund’s NAV includes, in part, any unrealized profits or losses on open positions. Under normal circumstances, the NAV reflects the quoted CME settlement price of open futures contracts on the date when the NAV is being calculated. In instances when the quoted settlement price of futures contracts traded on an exchange may not be reflective of fair value based on market condition, generally due to the operation of daily limits or other rules of the exchange or otherwise, the NAV may not reflect the fair value of open futures contracts on such date. For purposes of financial statements and reports, when a bitcoin futures contract has closed at its price fluctuation limit the Fund will use the daily CME settlement price for the determination of NAV.
 
21
 
Purchases or redemptions of creation units in cash may cause the Fund to incur certain costs or recognize gains or losses.
 
Purchases and redemptions of creation units will be transacted in cash rather than ‘in-kind’ where creation units are purchased and redeemed in exchange for underlying constituent securities. Purchases of creation baskets with cash may cause the Fund to incur certain costs including brokerage commissions and redemptions of creation baskets with cash may result in the recognition of gains or losses that the Fund might not have incurred if it had made redemptions in-kind.
 
An unanticipated number of redemption requests during a short period of time could have an adverse effect on the NAV of the Fund.
 
If a substantial number of requests for redemption of Redemption Baskets are received by the Fund during a relatively short period of time, the Fund may not be able to satisfy the requests from the Fund’s assets not committed to trading. As a consequence, it could be necessary to liquidate the Fund’s trading positions before the time that its trading strategies would otherwise call for liquidation, which may result in losses.
 
Fund assets may be depleted if investment performance does not exceed fees.
 
In addition to certain fees paid to the Fund’s service providers, the Fund pays the Sponsor a fee of 0.94% of asset under management per annum, regardless of Fund performance. Over time, the Fund’s assets could be depleted if investment performance does not exceed such fees.
 
The liquidity of the Shares may be affected by the withdrawal from participation of Authorized Purchasers, market makers, or other significant secondary-market purchasers which could adversely affect the market price of the Shares.
 
Only an Authorized Purchaser may engage in creation or redemption transactions directly with the Fund. The Fund has a limited number of institutions that act as Authorized Purchasers. To the extent that these institutions exit the business or are unable to proceed with creation and/or redemption orders with respect to the Fund and no other Authorized Purchaser is able to step forward to create or redeem creation units, Fund Shares may trade at a discount to NAV and possibly face trading halts and/or delisting. In addition, a decision by a market maker, lead market maker, or other large investor to cease activities for the Fund or a decision by a secondary market purchaser to sell a significant number of the Fund’s Shares could adversely affect liquidity, the spread between the bid and ask quotes, and potentially the price of the Shares. The Sponsor can make no guarantees that participation by Authorized Purchasers or market makers will continue.
 
If a minimum number of Shares is outstanding, market makers may be less willing to purchase Shares in the secondary market which may limit your ability to sell Shares.
 
There is a minimum number of baskets and associated Shares specified for the Fund. If the Fund experienced redemptions that caused the number of Shares outstanding to decrease to the minimum level of Shares required to be outstanding, until the minimum number of Shares is again exceeded through the purchase of a new Creation Basket, there can be no more redemptions by an Authorized Purchaser. In such case, market makers may be less willing to purchase Shares from investors in the secondary market, which may in turn limit the ability of Shareholders of the Fund to sell their Shares in the secondary market. These minimum levels for the Fund are 50,000 Shares representing five baskets. The minimum level of Shares specified for the Fund is subject to change. (The current number of Shares outstanding will be posted daily on our website, http://hashdex-etfs.com/.)
 
The postponement, suspension or rejection of purchase or redemption orders could adversely affect a Shareholder redeeming their Shares in the Fund.
 
The postponement, suspension or rejection of creation or redemption orders may adversely affect an investment in the Shares of the Fund. To the extent orders are suspended or rejected, the arbitrage mechanism resulting from the process through which Authorized Purchasers create and redeem Shares directly with the Fund may fail to closely link the price of the Shares to the value of the underlying Bitcoin Futures Contracts, as measured using the Benchmark. If this is the case, the liquidity of the Shares may decline, and the price of the Shares may fluctuate independently of the Benchmark and may fall.
 
There are no limitations on the Sponsor’s discretion to postpone, suspend or reject purchase or redemption orders under the Securities Act, NYSE Arca rules, or SEC listing orders permitting the listing and trading of the fund’s Shares on NYSE Arca. In addition, Shareholders of the Fund will not have the protections provided in this regard that are applicable to funds regulated under the Investment Company Act of 1940.
 
Investors may not be able to buy or sell Shares of the Fund through their current brokerages.
 
Because of volatility and other risks associated with bitcoin-related investments, brokerage firms may limit or not permit trading in such investments. Because of current or future brokerage policies regarding bitcoin-linked securities, investors could have difficulty selling Shares through their brokerage and potentially face restrictions when or how they could trade their Shares.
 
22
 
The failure or bankruptcy of a clearing broker could result in substantial losses for the Fund; the clearing broker could be subject to proceedings that impair its ability to execute the Fund’s trades.
 
Under CFTC regulations, a clearing broker with respect to the Fund’s exchange-traded bitcoin interests must maintain customers’ assets in a bulk segregated account. If a clearing broker fails to do so or is unable to satisfy a substantial deficit in a customer account, its other customers may be subject to risk of a substantial loss of their funds in the event of that clearing broker’s bankruptcy. In that event, the clearing broker’s customers, such as the Fund, are entitled to recover, even in respect of property specifically traceable to them, only a proportional share of all property available for distribution to all of that clearing broker’s customers. The Fund also may be subject to the risk of the failure of, or delay in performance by, any exchanges and markets and their clearing organizations, if any, on which bitcoin interests are traded.
 
From time to time, the clearing brokers may be subject to legal or regulatory proceedings in the ordinary course of their business. A clearing broker’s involvement in costly or time-consuming legal proceedings may divert financial resources or personnel away from the clearing broker’s trading operations, which could impair the clearing broker’s ability to successfully execute and clear the Fund’s trades.
 
The failure or insolvency of the Fund’s Custodian or other financial institution in which the Fund has deposits could result in a substantial loss of the Fund’s assets.
 
As noted above, the vast majority of the Fund’s assets are held in cash and cash equivalents with the Custodian and other financial institutions, if applicable. The insolvency of the Custodian and any financial institution in which the Fund holds cash and cash equivalents could result in a complete loss of the Fund’s assets.
 
Third parties may infringe upon or otherwise violate intellectual property rights or assert that the Sponsor has infringed or otherwise violated their intellectual property rights, which may result in significant costs, litigation, and diverted attention of Sponsor’s management.
 
Third parties may assert that the Sponsor has infringed or otherwise violated their intellectual property rights. Third parties may independently develop business methods, trademarks or proprietary software and other technology similar to that of the Sponsor and claim that the Sponsor has violated their intellectual property rights, including their copyrights, trademark rights, trade names, trade secrets and patent rights. As a result, the Sponsor may have to litigate in the future to determine the validity and scope of other parties’ proprietary rights or defend itself against claims that it has infringed or otherwise violated other parties’ rights. Any litigation of this type, even if the Sponsor is successful and regardless of the merits, may result in significant costs, divert resources from the Fund, or require the Sponsor to change its proprietary software and other technology or enter into royalty or licensing agreements.
 
The Fund may experience substantial losses on transactions if the computer or communications system fails.
 
The Fund’s trading activities depend on the integrity and performance of the computer and communications systems supporting them. Extraordinary transaction volume, hardware or software failure, power or telecommunications failure, a natural disaster, cyber-attack or other catastrophe could cause the computer systems to operate at an unacceptably slow speed or even fail. Any significant degradation or failure of the systems that the Sponsor uses to gather and analyze information, enter orders, process data, monitor risk levels and otherwise engage in trading activities may result in substantial losses on transactions, liability to other parties, lost profit opportunities, damages to the Sponsor’s and Fund’s reputations, increased operational expenses and diversion of technical resources.
 
If the computer and communications systems are not upgraded when necessary, the Fund’s financial condition could be harmed.
 
The development of complex computer and communications systems and new technologies may render the existing computer and communications systems supporting the Fund’s trading activities obsolete. In addition, these computer and communications systems must be compatible with those of third parties, such as the systems of exchanges, clearing brokers and the executing brokers. As a result, if these third parties upgrade their systems, the Sponsor will need to make corresponding upgrades to effectively continue its trading activities. The Sponsor may have limited financial resources for these upgrades or other technological changes. The Fund’s future success may depend on the Sponsor’s ability to respond to changing technologies on a timely and cost-effective basis.
 
The Fund depends on the reliable performance of the computer and communications systems of third parties, such as brokers and futures exchanges, and may experience substantial losses on transactions if they fail.
 
The Fund depends on the proper and timely function of complex computer and communications systems maintained and operated by the futures exchanges, brokers and other data providers that the Sponsor uses to conduct trading activities. Failure or inadequate performance of any of these systems could adversely affect the Sponsor’s ability to complete transactions, including its ability to close out positions, and result in lost profit opportunities and significant losses on cryptocurrency derivative transactions. This could have a material adverse effect on revenues and materially reduce the Fund’s available capital. For example, unavailability of price quotations from third parties may make it difficult or impossible for the Sponsor to conduct trading activities so that the Fund will closely track the Benchmark. Unavailability of records from brokerage firms may make it difficult or impossible for the Sponsor to accurately determine which transactions have been executed or the details, including price and time, of any transaction executed. This unavailability of information also may make it difficult or impossible for the Sponsor to reconcile its records of transactions with those of another party or to accomplish settlement of executed transactions.
 
23
 
An investment in a Fund faces numerous risks from its Shares being traded in the secondary market, any of which may lead to the Fund’s Shares trading at a premium or discount to NAV.
 
Although the Fund’s Shares are listed for trading on the NYSE Arca, there can be no assurance that an active trading market for such Shares will develop or be maintained. Trading in the Fund’s Shares may be halted due to market conditions or for reasons that, in the view of the NYSE Arca, make trading in Shares inadvisable. There can be no assurance that the requirements of the NYSE Arca necessary to maintain the listing of the Fund will continue to be met or will remain unchanged or that the Shares will trade with any volume, or at all. The NAV of the Fund’s Shares will generally fluctuate with changes in the market value of the Fund’s portfolio holdings. The market prices of Shares will generally fluctuate in accordance with changes in the Fund’s NAV and supply and demand of Shares on the NYSE Arca. It cannot be predicted whether the Fund’s Shares will trade below at or above their NAV. Investors who buy the Fund’s Shares at a market price that is a premium to NAV face a risk of loss if the market price of their Shares subsequently converges with NAV per Share. Investors buying or selling Fund Shares in the secondary market will pay brokerage commissions or other charges imposed by brokers as determined by that broker. Brokerage commissions are often a fixed amount and may be a significant proportional cost for investors seeking to buy or sell relatively small amounts of Shares.
 
The NYSE Arca may halt trading in the Shares which would adversely impact your ability to sell Shares.
 
Trading in Shares of the Fund may be halted by the NYSE Arca due to market conditions or, in light of NYSE Arca rules and procedures, for reasons that, in view of the NYSE Arca, make trading in Shares inadvisable. Such market conditions or other reasons may include when there is significant news directly related to the Fund that, in NYSE Arca’s view or per existing NYSE Arca rules, requires a trading halt, such as when the Sponsor announces news relating to changes/disruptions in the Fund’s create/redeem process during market trading hours. In addition, market conditions that would result in trading halts may also include extraordinary market volatility that trigger rules requiring trading to be halted for a specified period based on a specified market decline. NYSE Arca might also halt trading if there is insufficient trading in BTC or MBT Contracts. There can be no assurance that the requirements necessary to maintain the listing of the Shares will continue to be met or will remain unchanged. The Fund will be terminated if its Shares are delisted.
 
A Pause in Bitcoin Futures Contracts May lead To Gaps Between Prices in Spot and Futures Markets.
 
On May 19, 2021, the CME Group temporarily paused trading of bitcoin futures after the bitcoin futures market opened to a large price gap between the derivatives and the underlying crypto asset that triggered CME circuit breakers. Due to the misaligned trading periods between spot and futures markets, such gaps, which can be positive or negative, have the potential to frequently exist and, when CME circuit breakers limit the trading in bitcoin futures markets, bid/ask spreads in Shares of the Fund trading on the NYSE ARCA may be significantly wider than when bitcoin futures markets are trading without restrictions, which may adversely impact your ability to buy or sell Shares in the Fund at a particular price.
 
The lack of active trading markets for the Shares of the Fund may result in losses on your investment in the Fund at the time of disposition of your Shares.
 
Although the Shares of the Fund will be listed and traded on the NYSE Arca, there can be no guarantee that an active trading market for the Shares of the Fund will be maintained. If you need to sell your Shares at a time when no active market for them exists, the price you receive for your Shares, assuming that you are able to sell them, likely will be lower than what you would receive if an active market did exist.
 
The Fund is newly formed and may not be successful in implementing its investment objective or attracting sufficient assets.
 
The Fund is a new fund, with a limited or no operating history and a small asset base. There can be no assurance that the Fund will grow to or maintain a viable size. Due to the Fund’s small asset base, the Fund’s portfolio transaction costs and any costs that are not paid by the Sponsor pursuant to the Management Fee, may be relatively higher than those of a fund with a larger asset base. To the extent that the Fund does not grow to or maintain a viable size, it may be liquidated, and the expenses, timing and tax consequences of such liquidation may not be favorable to some Shareholders. In this regard, as of the date of this prospectus there are three bitcoin futures-based ETFs. The first fund launched has obtained significantly more assets than the other two. To the extent that this "first mover" advantage continues to favor the first fund launched, this might constrain the Fund's growth.
 
Sponsoring the Fund will be the Sponsor’s first experience in the crypto asset markets.
 
There are risks related to the Sponsor’s lack of experience in the crypto asset markets, particularly with respect to marketing the Fund. To address this risk, the Sponsor has entered into the Support Agreement discussed above, under which Hashdex and Victory Capital will provide crypto asset related marketing services. To the extent that the Fund does not grow to or maintain a viable size, it may be liquidated, and the expenses, timing and tax consequences of such liquidation may not be favorable to some Shareholders.
 
Existing or future bitcoin futures based ETFs may have significantly lower management fees, which may impede the growth of the Fund.
 
Existing and future bitcoin futures based ETFs may have fees that are significantly lower than the Fund's. To the extent that the Fund has relatively higher fees than other such funds, this could impede growth of the Fund, possibly result in a lower NAV per Share, and otherwise pose a material risk to investors.
 
24
 
There are risks related to the Support Agreement and the planned transfer of operations to new management.
 
There are risks related to the Support Agreement and the planned transfer of operations to new management. Among other things, following the transfer of operations to Toroso, Toroso may not manage the Fund as effectively as the Sponsor. In addition, because a timeline for the transfer has not yet been determined, it is not known when the transfer of management will occur.
 
The Market for Bitcoin Futures-Based ETFs May Reach Saturation
 
The market for bitcoin futures-based ETFs like the Fund may reach a point where there is little or no additional investor demand. If this happens, there can be no assurance that the Fund will grow to or maintain a viable size. Due to the Fund’s small asset base, certain of the Fund’s expenses and its portfolio transaction costs may be higher than those of a fund with a larger asset base. To the extent that the Fund does not grow to or maintain a viable size, it may be liquidated, and the expenses, timing and tax consequences of such liquidation may not be favorable to some Shareholders.
 
Potential Conflicts of Interest
 
The Fund and the Sponsor may have conflicts of interest, which may cause them to favor their own interests to your detriment.
 
The Fund and the Sponsor may have inherent conflicts to the extent the Sponsor attempts to maintain the Fund’s asset size in order to preserve its fee income and this may not always be consistent with the Fund’s objective of having the value of its Shares’ NAV track changes in the Benchmark. The Sponsor’s officers and employees do not devote their time exclusively to the Fund. These persons may be directors, officers or employees of other entities. They could have a conflict between their responsibilities to the Fund and to those other entities.
 
The Sponsor’s principals, officers or employees may trade securities and futures and related contracts for their own accounts.
 
In addition, the Sponsor’s principals, officers or employees may trade securities and futures and related contracts for their own accounts. A conflict of interest may exist if their trades are in the same markets and occur at the same time as the Fund trades using the clearing broker to be used by the Fund. A potential conflict also may occur if the Sponsor’s principals, officers or employees trade their accounts more aggressively or take positions in their accounts that are opposite, or ahead of, the positions taken by the Fund.
 
The Sponsor has sole current authority to manage the investments and operations of the Fund, and this may allow it to act in a way that furthers its own interests and in conflict with your best interests, including the authority of the Sponsor to allocate expenses to and between the Funds. Shareholders have very limited voting rights, which will limit the ability to influence matters such as amendment of the Trust Agreement, changes in the Fund’s basic investment policies, dissolution of the Fund, or the sale or distribution of the Fund’s assets.
 
Shareholder Voting Rights and Liability
 
Shareholders have only very limited voting rights and generally will not have the power to replace the Sponsor. Shareholders will not participate in the management of the Fund and do not control the Sponsor so they will not have influence over basic matters that affect the Fund.
 
Shareholders will have very limited voting rights with respect to the Fund’s affairs. Shareholders may elect a replacement sponsor only if the current Sponsor resigns voluntarily or loses its corporate charter. Shareholders will not be permitted to participate in the management or control of the Fund or the conduct of its business. Shareholders must therefore rely upon the duties and judgment of the Sponsor to manage the Fund’s affairs.
 
Although the Shares of the Fund are limited liability investments, certain circumstances such as bankruptcy could increase a Shareholder’s liability.
 
The Shares of the Fund are limited liability investments; Shareholders may not lose more than the amount that they invest plus any profits recognized on their investment. However, Shareholders could be required, as a matter of bankruptcy law, to return to the estate of the Fund any distribution they received at a time when the Fund was in fact insolvent or that was made in violation of its Trust Agreement.
 
25
 
As a Shareholder, you will not have the rights enjoyed by investors in certain other types of entities.
 
As interests in separate series of a Delaware statutory trust, the Shares do not involve the rights normally associated with the ownership of shares of a corporation (including, for example, the right to bring Shareholder oppression and derivative actions). In addition, the Shares have limited voting and distribution rights (for example, Shareholders do not have the right to elect directors, as the Trust does not have a board of directors, and generally will not receive regular distributions of the net income and capital gains earned by the Fund). The Fund is also not subject to certain investor protection provisions of the Sarbanes Oxley Act of 2002 and the NYSE Arca governance rules (for example, audit committee requirements).
 
A court could potentially conclude that the assets and liabilities of the Fund are not segregated from those of another series of the Trust, thereby potentially exposing assets in the Fund to the liabilities of another series.
 
The Fund is a series of a Delaware statutory trust and not itself a legal entity separate from the other Teucrium Funds. The Delaware Statutory Trust Act provides that if certain provisions are included in the formation and governing documents of a statutory trust organized in series and if separate and distinct records are maintained for any series and the assets associated with that series are held in separate and distinct records and are accounted for in such separate and distinct records separately from the other assets of the statutory trust, or any series thereof, then the debts, liabilities, obligations and expenses incurred by a particular series are enforceable against the assets of such series only, and not against the assets of the statutory trust generally or any other series thereof. Conversely, none of the debts, liabilities, obligations and expenses incurred with respect to any other series thereof is enforceable against the assets of such series. The Sponsor is not aware of any court case that has interpreted this inter-series limitation on liability or provided any guidance as to what is required for compliance. The Sponsor intends to maintain separate and distinct records for the Fund and account for the Fund separately from any other Trust series, but it is possible a court could conclude that the methods used do not satisfy the Delaware Statutory Trust Act, which would potentially expose assets in the Fund to the liabilities of one or more of the Teucrium Funds and/or any other Trust series created in the future.
 
The Fund does not expect to make cash distributions.
 
The Sponsor intends to re-invest any income and realized gains of the Fund in additional Benchmark Component Futures Contracts or cash and cash equivalents rather than distributing cash to Shareholders. Therefore, unlike mutual funds, commodity pools or other investment pools that generally distribute income and gains to their investors, the Fund generally will not distribute cash to Shareholders. You should not invest in the Fund if you will need cash distributions from the Fund to pay taxes on your Share of income and gains of the Fund, if any, or for any other reason. Although the Fund does not intend to make cash distributions, it reserves the right to do so in the Sponsor’s sole discretion, in certain situations, including for example, if the income earned from its investments held directly or posted as margin may reach levels that merit distribution, e.g., at levels where such income is not necessary to support its underlying investments in Benchmark Component Futures Contracts and investors adversely react to being taxed on such income without receiving distributions that could be used to pay such tax. Cash distributions may be made in these and similar instances.
 
Event Risk
 
The occurrence of a severe weather event, natural disaster, terrorist attack, outbreak or public health emergency as declared by the World Health Organization, the continuation or expansion of war or other hostilities, or a prolonged government shutdown may have significant adverse effects on the Fund and its investments and alter current assumptions and expectations.
 
The operations of the Fund, the exchanges, brokers and counterparties with which the Fund does business, and the markets in which the Fund does business could be severely disrupted in the event of a severe weather event, natural disaster, major terrorist attack, cyber-attack, data breach, outbreak or public health emergency as declared by the World Health Organization (such as the recent pandemic spread of the novel coronavirus known as COVID-19), or the continuation or expansion of war or other hostilities. Global terrorist attacks, anti-terrorism initiatives, and political unrest, as well as the adverse impact the COVID-19 pandemic will have on the global and U.S. markets and economy, continue to fuel this concern. For example, the COVID-19 pandemic may adversely impact the level of services currently provided by the U.S. government, could weaken the U.S. economy, interfere with the commodities markets that rely upon data published by U.S. federal government agencies, and prevent the Fund from receiving necessary regulatory review or approvals. The types of events discussed above, including the COVID-19 pandemic, are highly disruptive to economies and markets and have recently led, and may continue to lead, to increased market volatility and significant market losses.
 
More generally, a climate of uncertainty and panic, including the contagion of the COVID-19 virus and other infectious viruses or diseases, may adversely affect global, regional, and local economies and reduce the availability of potential investment opportunities, and increases the difficulty of performing due diligence and modeling market conditions, potentially reducing the accuracy of financial projections. Under these circumstances, the Fund may have difficulty achieving its investment objective which may adversely impact performance. Further, such events can be highly disruptive to economies and markets, significantly disrupt the operations of individual companies (including, but not limited to, the Fund’s Sponsor and third party service providers), sectors, industries, markets, securities and commodity exchanges, currencies, interest and inflation rates, credit ratings, investor sentiment, and other factors affecting the value of the Fund’s investments. These factors could cause substantial market volatility, exchange trading suspensions and closures that could impact the ability of the Fund to complete redemptions and otherwise affect Fund performance and Fund trading in the secondary market. A widespread crisis may also affect the global economy in ways that cannot necessarily be foreseen at the current time. How long such events will last and whether they will continue or recur cannot be predicted. Impacts from these events could have significant impact on the Fund’s performance, resulting in losses to your investment. The past, current and future global economic impact may cause the underlying assumptions and expectations of the Fund to become outdated quickly or inaccurate, resulting in significant losses.
 
26
 
Failures or breaches of electronic systems could disrupt the Fund’s trading activity and materially affect the Fund’s profitability.
 
Failures or breaches of the electronic systems of the Fund, the Sponsor, the Custodian or other financial institutions in which the Fund invests, or the Fund’s other service providers, market makers, Authorized Purchasers, NYSE Arca, exchanges on which Bitcoin Futures Contracts or other bitcoin interests are traded or cleared, or counterparties have the ability to cause disruptions and negatively impact the Fund’s business operations, potentially resulting in financial losses to the Fund and its Shareholders. Such failures or breaches may include intentional cyber-attacks that may result in an unauthorized party gaining access to electronic systems in order to misappropriate the Fund’s assets or sensitive information. While the Fund has established business continuity plans and risk management systems seeking to address system breaches or failures, there are inherent limitations in such plans and systems. Furthermore, the Fund cannot control the cyber security plans and systems of the Custodian or other financial institutions in which the Fund invests, or the Fund’s other service providers, market makers, Authorized Purchasers, NYSE Arca, exchanges on which bitcoin Futures Contracts or other bitcoin interests are traded or cleared, or counterparties.
 
Risk of Volatility
 
The price of bitcoin can be volatile which could cause large fluctuations in the price of Shares.
 
As discussed in more detail above, price movements for bitcoin are influenced by, among other things, the environment, natural or man-made disasters, governmental oversight and regulation, demographics, economic conditions, infrastructure limitations, existing and future technological developments, and a variety of other factors now known and unknown, any and all of which can have an impact on the supply, demand, and price fluctuations in the bitcoin markets. More generally, cryptocurrency prices may be influenced by economic and monetary events such as changes in interest rates, changes in balances of payments and trade, U.S. and international inflation rates, currency valuations and devaluations, U.S. and international economic events, and changes in the philosophies and emotions of market purchasers. Because the Fund invests in futures contracts in a single cryptocurrency, it is not a diversified investment vehicle, and therefore may be subject to greater volatility than a diversified portfolio of stocks or bonds or a more diversified commodity or cryptocurrency pool.
 
Volatility is a statistical measure of the dispersion of returns for a given security or market index. Volatility represents how large an asset’s prices swing around the mean price—it is a statistical measure of its dispersion of returns.
 
According to Bloomberg from 1/1/2019 to 5/27/2022 front month Bitcoin Futures Contracts exhibited an average implied 30-Day volatility of 67.71. The highest volatility during that period was 134.07 on 7/25/19 and the lowest was 25.62 on 4/1/2019.
 
Bitcoin can be highly volatile, for example after a 774% price increase from 1/1/2020 prices peaked in May 2021 and front month Bitcoin Futures Contracts began to decline with a peak to trough retracement of 47.06% by 7/20/2021. Prices then rose from that low until 11/9/2021 resulting in a price increase of 127.58%. Front month Bitcoin Futures Contracts prices peaked on 11/9/2021 and have since seen a retracement of 57.05% as of 5/27/2022. Front month bitcoin futures prices have declined 54.51% since May 2021.
 
The table below includes significant single day price declines since inception of the Bitcoin Futures Contracts in December 2017 for both bitcoin (as measured by the BRR) and for Bitcoin Futures Contracts (as measured by the front month Bitcoin Futures Contract), including the single day price decline that occurred on September 7, 2021, followed by a brief narrative disclosure describing the significant declines:
 
Date
BTC1 Daily % Change
BRR Daily % Change
Notes
3/12/2020
-23.49%
-21.89%
The selloff in Bitcoin futures coincided with broader financial market duress at the onset of the COVID pandemic.
6/27/2019
-21.82%
-9.31%
Potentially signals near term profit taking as the front month contract gained, after gaining approximately 22% in the prior session.
6/13/2022
-20.09%
-15.45%
Selling picked up after failing to hold the $30,000 level, filling the gap created on the way up during December 2020.
1/16/2018
-19.97%
-13.50%
Bitcoin futures were relatively new and there was significant selling interest early on that carried through December 2018.
2/5/2018
-15.43%
-14.16%
Bitcoin futures were relatively new and there was significant selling interest early on that carried through December 2018.
5/9/2022
-13.90%
-4.85%
After failing to close back above $40,000 on May 4th, selling accelerated as market participants zeroed in on $30,000 as the next potential area of price support.
1/21/2022
-10.53%
-10.75%
The downtrend that began in November of 2021 showed signs of accelerating as prices traded at their lowest levels since July of 2021.
5/5/2022
-9.10%
-0.65%
After failing to close back above $40,000 on May 4th, selling accelerated as market participants appear to be testing ~$35,000 for potential support.
8/19/2022
-9.02%
-8.70%
Bitcoin futures had been trending higher for much of the summer as market participants assumed a "risk on" posture that was reflected in stock market during the same period. However, sentiment changed to "Risk off" as market participants began to re-think the Fed's tightening cycle, and potential for prolonged/deeper economic slowdown.
12/6/2021
-8.56%
0.56%
The previous session saw front-month Bitcoin futures get rejected after testing the 50-day moving average and reversing lower. Prices gapped lower on 12/06.
9/20/2021
-7.81%
-7.61%
After advancing nearly 70% since July 20th prices began to retrace on September 7th. Yet it wasn't until 09/20 that prices tested both the 50- and 100-day moving averages at the technical point where the 50-day was about to cross back above the 100-day. Suggests that this selling was technical in nature.
9/7/2021
-7.75%
-3.35%
The selling may have been the result of profit taking as Bitcoin futures closed over $50,000 for the first time in the prior session.
 
27
 
Tax Risk
 
Please refer to “U.S. Federal Income Tax Considerations” for information regarding the U.S. federal income tax consequences of the purchase, ownership and disposition of Shares.
 
The Fund could be treated as a corporation for U.S. federal income tax purposes, which may substantially reduce the value of your Shares.
 
The Trust has received an opinion of counsel that, under current U.S. federal income tax laws, the Fund more likely than not will be treated as a partnership that is not taxable as a corporation for U.S. federal income tax purposes, provided that, among other things, (i) at least 90 percent of the Fund’s annual gross income consists of “qualifying income” as defined in the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended (the “Code”), (ii) the Fund is organized and operated in accordance with its governing agreements and applicable law, and (iii) the Fund does not elect to be taxed as a corporation for U.S. federal income tax purposes. Opinions of counsel are not binding on the Internal Revenue Service (the “IRS”) and no assurance can be given that the IRS or a court will agree with counsel’s opinion. Although the Sponsor anticipates that the Fund will satisfy the “qualifying income” requirement for all of its taxable years, that result cannot be assured. There is very limited authority on the U.S. federal income tax treatment of bitcoin and no direct authority on bitcoin derivatives. The Fund has not requested and will not request any ruling from the IRS with respect to its classification as a partnership not taxable as a corporation for U.S. federal income tax purposes. If the IRS were to successfully assert that the Fund is taxable as a corporation for U.S. federal income tax purposes in any taxable year, rather than passing through its income, gains, losses and deductions proportionately to Shareholders, the Fund would be subject to tax on its net income for the year at corporate tax rates. In addition, although the Sponsor does not currently intend to make distributions with respect to Shares, any such distributions would be taxable to Shareholders as dividend income to the extent of the Fund’s current and accumulated earnings and profits, then treated as a tax-free return of capital to the extent of the Shareholder’s basis in the Shares (and will reduce the basis), and, to the extent it exceeds a Shareholder’s basis in such Shares, as capital gain for Shareholders who hold their Shares as capital assets. Taxation of the Fund as a corporation could materially reduce the after-tax return on an investment in Shares and could substantially reduce the value of your Shares.
 
Your tax liability from holding Shares may exceed the amount of distributions, if any, on your Shares.
 
Cash or property will be distributed by the Fund at the sole discretion of the Sponsor, and the Sponsor currently does not intend to make cash or other distributions with respect to Shares. Assuming the Fund qualifies to be taxed as a partnership for U.S. federal income tax purposes, you will be required to pay U.S. federal income tax and, in some cases, state, local, or foreign income tax, on your allocable share of the Fund’s taxable income, without regard to whether you receive distributions or the amount of any distributions. Therefore, the tax liability resulting from your ownership of Shares may exceed the amount of cash or value of property (if any) distributed.
 
Your allocable share of income or loss for U.S. federal income tax purposes may differ from your economic income or loss on your Shares.
 
Due to the application of the assumptions and conventions applied by the Fund in making allocations for U.S. federal income tax purposes and other factors, your allocable share of the Fund’s income, gain, deduction or loss may be different than your economic profit or loss from your Shares for a taxable year. This difference could be temporary or permanent and, if permanent, could result in your being taxed on amounts in excess of your economic income.
 
Items of income, gain, deduction, loss and credit with respect to Shares could be reallocated and the Fund itself could be liable for U.S. federal income tax along with any interest or penalties if the IRS does not accept the assumptions and conventions applied by the Fund in allocating those items, with potential adverse consequences for you.
 
The Fund intends to be treated as a partnership for U.S. federal income tax purposes. The U.S. tax rules pertaining to entities taxed as partnerships are complex and their application to publicly traded partnerships such as the Fund, is in many respects uncertain. The Fund will apply certain assumptions and conventions in an attempt to comply with the intent of the applicable rules and to report taxable income, gains, deductions, losses and credits in a manner that properly reflects Shareholders’ economic gains and losses. These assumptions and conventions may not fully comply with all aspects of the Code, and applicable Treasury Regulations, however, and it is possible that the IRS will successfully challenge our allocation methods and require us to reallocate items of income, gain, deduction, loss or credit in a manner that adversely affects you.
 
The Fund may be liable for U.S. federal income tax on any “imputed underpayment” of tax resulting from an adjustment as a result of an IRS audit. The amount of the imputed underpayment generally includes increases in allocations of items of income or gains to any investor and decreases in allocations of items of deduction, loss, or credit to any investor without any offset for any corresponding reductions in allocations of items of income or gain to any investor or increases in allocations of items of deduction, loss, or credit to any investor. If the Fund is required to pay any U.S. federal income tax on any imputed underpayment, the resulting tax liability would reduce the net assets of the Fund and would likely have an adverse impact on the value of the Shares. In such a case, the tax liability would in effect be borne by Shareholders that own Shares at the time of such assessment, which may be different persons, or persons with different ownership percentages, than persons owning Shares for the tax year under audit. Under certain circumstances, the Fund may be eligible to make an election to cause Shareholders to take into account the amount of any imputed underpayment, including any interest and penalties. The ability of a publicly traded partnership such as the Fund to make this election is uncertain. If the election is made, the Fund would be required to provide Shareholders who owned beneficial interests in the Shares in the year to which the adjusted allocations relate with a statement setting forth their proportionate shares of the adjustment (“Adjusted K-1s”). The investors would be required to take the adjustment into account in the taxable year in which the Adjusted K-1s are issued. For an additional discussion please see “U.S. Federal Income Tax Considerations – Other Tax Matters.”
 
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If the Fund is required to withhold tax with respect to any Non-U.S. Shareholders, all Shareholders may bear the cost of such withholding.
 
Under certain circumstances, the Fund may be required to pay withholding tax with respect to allocations to Non-U.S. Shareholders. Although the Trust Agreement provides that any such withholding will be treated as being distributed to the Non-U.S. Shareholder, the Fund may not be able to cause the economic cost of such withholding to be borne by the Non-U.S. Shareholder on whose behalf such amounts were withheld since the Fund does not intend to make any distributions. Under such circumstances, all Shareholders may bear the economic cost of the withholding, not just the Shareholders on whose behalf such amounts were withheld. This could have a material impact on the value of your Shares.
 
Shareholders will receive partner information tax returns on Schedule K-1, which could increase the complexity of tax returns.
 
The partner information tax returns on Schedule K-1, which the Fund will distribute to Shareholders, will contain information regarding the income items and expense items of the Fund. If you have not received Schedule K-1s from other investments, you may find that preparing your income tax returns may require additional time, or it may be necessary for you to retain an accountant or other tax preparer, at an additional expense to you, to assist you in the preparation of your returns.
 
Shareholders of the Fund may recognize significant amounts of ordinary income and short-term capital gain.
 
Due to the investment strategy of the Fund, the Fund may realize and pass through to Shareholders significant amounts of ordinary income and short-term capital gains as opposed to long-term capital gains. Ordinary income and short-term capital gains are generally taxed at higher U.S. federal income tax rates than the preferential U.S. federal income rates applicable to long-term capital gains.
 
Tax legislation that has been or could be enacted may affect you with respect to your investment in the Fund.
 
Legislative, regulatory or administrative changes could be enacted or promulgated at any time, either prospectively or with retroactive effect, and may adversely affect the Fund and its Shareholders. Please consult a tax advisor regarding the implications of an investment in Shares of the Teucrium Funds, including without limitation the federal, state, local and foreign tax consequences.
 
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PROSPECTIVE INVESTORS ARE STRONGLY URGED TO CONSULT THEIR OWN TAX ADVISORS WITH RESPECT TO THE POSSIBLE TAX CONSEQUENCES TO THEM OF AN INVESTMENT IN SHARES; SUCH TAX CONSEQUENCES MAY DIFFER IN RESPECT OF DIFFERENT INVESTORS.
 
THE OFFERING
The Fund in General
 
The Fund seeks to provide investors with a way to gain price exposure to the bitcoin market. In furtherance of this goal, the Fund’s investment objective is for changes in the Shares’ NAV to reflect the daily changes of the price of the Benchmark, less expenses from the Fund’s operations. The Sponsor developed the Benchmark as a representation of the bitcoin market. The Fund does not invest directly in bitcoin.
 
Under normal market conditions, the Fund will invest in the Benchmark Component Futures Contracts and cash and cash equivalents. The Sponsor believes that by investing in Benchmark Component Futures Contracts, the Fund’s net asset value (“NAV”) will closely track the Benchmark. The Sponsor also believes that because of market arbitrage opportunities, the market price at which investors will purchase and sell Shares through their broker-dealer will closely track the Fund’s NAV. The Sponsor believes that the net effect of these relationships is that the Fund’s market price on the NYSE Arca at which investors purchase and sell Shares will closely track the bitcoin market, as measured by the Benchmark. However, the Fund may not be successful in implementing its investment objective because the Fund is newly formed and because the BTC Contracts and MBT Contracts listed on the CME are a relatively new type of futures contract that may be less developed than more established futures markets (such as the futures markets for corn or wheat). The Fund will purchase MBT contracts only if the Fund has proceeds remaining from the sale of a Creation Basket that are less than the price of a BTC contract. BTC and MBT will count toward an aggregate position limit.
 
Consistent with applicable provisions of the Trust Agreement and Delaware law, the Fund has broad authority to make changes to the Fund’s operations. The Fund may change its investment objective, Benchmark, or investment strategies and Shareholders of the Fund will not have any rights with respect to these changes. The Fund has no current intention to make any such change, and any change is subject to applicable regulatory requirements, including, but not limited to, any requirement to amend applicable listing rules of the NYSE.
 
The reasons for and circumstances that may trigger any such changes may vary widely and cannot be predicted. However, by way of example, the Fund may change the term structure or underlying components of the Benchmark in furtherance of the Fund’s investment objective of tracking the price of the Benchmark Component Futures Contracts if, due to market conditions, a potential or actual imposition of position limits by the CFTC or futures exchange rules, or the imposition of risk mitigation measures by a futures commission merchant restricts the ability of the Fund to invest in the current Benchmark Futures Contracts. The Fund would file a current report on Form 8-K and a prospectus supplement to describe any such change and the effective date of the change. Shareholders may modify their holdings of the Fund’s Shares in response to any change by purchasing or selling Fund Shares through their broker-dealer.
 
The Fund is organized as a series of the Teucrium Commodity Trust, a statutory trust organized under the laws of the State of Delaware on September 11, 2009. Currently, the Trust has six series that are separate operating commodity pools: the Teucrium Corn Fund, the Teucrium Wheat Fund, the Teucrium Soybean Fund, the Teucrium Sugar Fund, the Teucrium Agricultural Fund, and the Hashdex Bitcoin Futures ETF. Additional series of the Trust may be created in the future at the Sponsor’s discretion. The Fund maintains its main business office at Three Main Street, Suite 215, Burlington Vermont 05401. The Fund is a commodity pool. It operates pursuant to the terms of the Trust Agreement, which is dated as of April 26, 2019 and grants full management control to the Sponsor.
 
The Sponsor
 
The Sponsor of the Trust is Teucrium Trading, LLC, a Delaware limited liability company. The principal office of the Sponsor and the Trust is located at Three Main Street, Suite 215, Burlington, Vermont 05401. The Sponsor registered as a CPO with the CFTC and became a member of the NFA on November 10, 2009. The Sponsor registered as a Commodity Trading Advisor (“CTA”) with the CFTC effective September 8, 2017. The Sponsor has sponsored the Trust since 2010. Sponsoring the Fund will be the Sponsor’s first experience in the crypto asset markets. The Sponsor’s responsibilities are discussed in the following paragraph. Teucrium Investment Advisors, LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Teucrium Trading, LLC, is a Delaware limited liability company, which was formed on January 4, 2022. Teucrium Investment Advisors, LLC is a U.S. SEC registered investment advisor. Teucrium Investment Advisors, LLC was registered with the CFTC as a CPO on May 2, 2022, a CTA on May 2, 2022, and approved as a Swap Firm on May 9, 2022. Teucrium Investment Advisors, LLC became a member of the NFA on May 9, 2022. The Sponsor became a listed principal of Teucrium Investment Advisors, LLC on May 20, 2022.
 
Under the Trust Agreement, the Sponsor is solely responsible for management and conducts or directs the conduct of the business of the Trust, the Fund, and any series of the Trust that may from time to time be established and designated by the Sponsor. The Sponsor is required to oversee the purchase and sale of Shares by Authorized Purchasers and to manage the Fund’s investments, including to evaluate the credit risk of FCMs and swap counterparties and to review daily positions and margin/collateral requirements. The Sponsor has the power to enter into agreements as may be necessary or appropriate for the offer and sale of the Fund’s Shares and the conduct of the Trust’s activities. Accordingly, the Sponsor is responsible for selecting the Trustee, Administrator, Distributor, the independent registered public accounting firm of the Trust, and any legal counsel employed by the Trust. The Sponsor is also responsible for preparing and filing periodic reports on behalf of the Trust with the SEC and will provide any required certification for such reports. The Sponsor may determine to engage marketing agents who will assist the Sponsor in marketing the Shares. See “Plan of Distribution” for more information. The Sponsor has discretion to appoint one or more of its affiliates as additional Sponsors. No person other than the Sponsor and its principals was involved in the organization of the Trust or the Fund. The Sponsor maintains a public website on behalf of the Fund, http://hashdex-etfs.com/, which contains information about the Trust, the Fund, and the Shares, and oversees certain services for the benefit of Shareholders.
 
The Fund pays the Sponsor a Management Fee, monthly in arrears, in an amount equal to 0.94% per annum of the daily NAV of the Fund. The Management Fee is paid in consideration of the Sponsor’s services related to the management of the Fund’s business and affairs, including the provision of commodity futures trading advisory services. The Fund is newly organized and as of the date of this prospectus has not paid any management fees to the Sponsor. The Sponsor pays all of the routine operational, administrative and other ordinary expenses of each Fund, generally as determined by the Sponsor, including but not limited to, fees and expenses of the Administrator, Custodian, Distributor, Transfer Agent, licensors, accounting and audit fees and expenses, tax preparation expenses, legal fees, ongoing SEC registration fees, individual Schedule K-1 preparation and mailing fees, and report preparation and mailing expenses. None of the costs and expenses related to the initial registration, offer and sale of Shares, which are estimated to be approximately $160,000, will be or are chargeable to the Fund, and the Sponsor did not and may not recover any of these costs and expenses from the Fund.
 
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Shareholders have no right to elect the Sponsor on an annual or any other continuing basis or to remove the Sponsor. If the Sponsor voluntarily withdraws, the holders of a majority of the Trust’s outstanding Shares (excluding for purposes of such determination Shares owned by the withdrawing Sponsor and its affiliates) may elect its successor. Prior to withdrawing, the Sponsor must give ninety days’ written notice to the Shareholders and the Trustee.
 
Ownership or “membership” interests in the Sponsor are owned by persons referred to as “members.” The Sponsor currently has three voting or “Class A” members – Mr. Sal Gilbertie, Mr. Dale Riker and Mr. Carl N. Miller III – and a small number of non-voting or “Class B” members who have provided working capital to the Sponsor. Messrs. Gilbertie and Riker each currently own 45.7% of the Sponsor’s Class A membership interests while Mr. Miller holds the remainder, which is 8.52%.
 
The Sponsor has an information security program and policy in place. The program takes reasonable care to look beyond the security and controls developed and implemented for the Trust and the Funds directly to the platforms and controls in place for the key service providers. Such review of cybersecurity and information technology plans of key service providers are part of the Sponsor’s disaster recovery and business continuity planning. The Sponsor provides regular training to all employees of the Sponsor regarding cybersecurity topics, in addition to real-time dissemination of information regarding cybersecurity matters as needed. The information security plan is reviewed and updated as needed, but at a minimum on an annual basis.
 
Management of the Sponsor
 
Since the inception of the CORN fund in 2010, the Sponsor has sponsored all of the funds of the Trust and an ETF registered and regulated under the Investment Company Act of 1940. Sponsoring the Fund will be the Sponsor’s first experience in the crypto asset markets. In general, under the Sponsor’s Amended and Restated Limited Liability Company Operating Agreement, as amended from time to time, the Sponsor (and as a result the Trust and each Fund) is managed by the officers of the Sponsor. The Chief Executive Officer of the Sponsor is responsible for the overall strategic direction of the Sponsor and has general control of its business. The Chief Investment Officer and President of the Sponsor is primarily responsible for new investment product development with respect to the Funds. The Chief Operating Officer has primary responsibility for trade operations, trade execution, and portfolio activities with respect to the Fund. The Chief Financial Officer, Chief Accounting Officer and Chief Compliance Officer acts as the Sponsor’s principal financial and accounting officer. Furthermore, certain fundamental actions regarding the Sponsor, such as the removal of officers, the addition or substitution of members, or the incurrence of liabilities other than those incurred in the ordinary course of business and de minimis liabilities, may not be taken without the affirmative vote of a majority of the Class A members (which is generally defined as the affirmative vote of Mr. Gilbertie and one of the other two Class A members). The Sponsor has no board of directors, and the Trust has no board of directors or officers. The three Class A members of the Sponsor are Mr. Sal Gilbertie, Mr. Dale Riker and Mr. Carl N. Miller III.
 
The Officers of the Sponsor, one of whom is a Class A Member of the Sponsor, are the following:
 
Mr. Sal Gilbertie has been the President of the Sponsor since its inception, its Chief Investment Officer since September 2011, and its Chief Executive Officer and Secretary since September 17, 2018, and was approved by the NFA as a principal of the Sponsor on September 23, 2009 and registered as an associated person of the Sponsor on November 10, 2009. He maintains his main business office at 65 Adams Road, Easton, Connecticut 06612. Effective July 16, 2012, Mr. Gilbertie was registered with the NFA as the Branch Manager for this location. Mr. Gilbertie is an officer of Teucrium Investment Advisors, LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Teucrium Trading, LLC effective January 21, 2022. Mr. Gilbertie was approved by the NFA as a Principal of Teucrium Investment Advisors, LLC on April 28, 2022. Mr. Gilbertie was registered as an associated person of Teucrium Investment Advisors LLC on May 2, 2022. Mr. Gilbertie will generally assume the same roles and duties held in the parent company within the subsidiary. From October 2005 until December 2009, Mr. Gilbertie was employed by Newedge USA, LLC, an FCM and broker-dealer registered with the CFTC and the SEC, where he headed the Renewable Fuels/Energy Derivatives OTC Execution Desk and was an active futures contract and over the counter derivatives trader and market maker in multiple classes of commodities. (Between January 2008 and October 2008, he also held a comparable position with Newedge Financial, Inc., an FCM and an affiliate of Newedge USA, LLC.) From October 1998 until October 2005, Mr. Gilbertie was principal and co-founder of Cambial Asset Management, LLC, an adviser to two private funds that focused on equity options, and Cambial Financing Dynamics, a private boutique investment bank. While at Cambial Asset Management, LLC and Cambial Financing Dynamics, Mr. Gilbertie served as principal and managed the day to day activities of the business and the portfolio of both companies. Mr. Gilbertie is 62 years old.
 
Ms. Cory Mullen-Rusin has been the Chief Financial Officer, Chief Accounting Officer and Chief Compliance Officer of the Sponsor since September 17, 2018 and Ms. Mullen-Rusin has primary responsibility for the financial management, compliance and reporting of the Sponsor and is in charge of its books of account and accounting records, and its accounting procedures. She maintains her main business office at Three Main Street, Suite 215, Burlington, Vermont 05401. Ms. Mullen-Rusin was approved by the NFA as a Principal of the Sponsor on October 8, 2018. Ms. Mullen-Rusin began working for the Sponsor in September 2011 and worked directly with the former CFO at the Sponsor for seven years. Her responsibilities included aspects of financial planning, financial operations, and financial reporting for the Trust and the Sponsor. Additionally, Ms. Mullen-Rusin assisted in developing, instituting, and monitoring the effectiveness of processes and procedures to comply with all regulatory agency requirements. Ms. Mullen-Rusin is an officer of Teucrium Investment Advisors, LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Teucrium Trading, LLC effective January 21, 2022. Ms. Mullen-Rusin was approved by the NFA as a Principal of Teucrium Investment Advisors, LLC on April 28, 2022. Ms. Mullen-Rusin will generally assume the same roles and duties held in the parent company within the subsidiary. Ms. Mullen-Rusin graduated from Boston College with a Bachelor of Arts and Science in Communications in 2009, where she was a four-year scholarship player on the NCAA Division I Women’s Basketball team. In 2017, she earned a Master of Business Administration from Nichols College. Ms. Mullen-Rusin is 34 years old.
 
Mr. Steve Kahler, Chief Operating Officer, began working for the Sponsor in November 2011 as Managing Director in the trading division. He became the Chief Operating Officer on May 24, 2012 and served in that capacity through September 6, 2018, at which time he resigned. Mr. Kahler was unemployed from September 7, 2018 until October 10, 2018, when he was reappointed as Chief Operating Officer. Mr. Kahler is primarily responsible for making trading and investment decisions for the Funds, and for directing each Fund’s trades for execution. Mr. Kahler was listed as a Principal of the Sponsor from May 16, 2012 to September 7, 2018 and again was listed as a Principal on October 16, 2018. Mr. Kahler was registered as an Associated Person of the Sponsor on November 8, 2011 to September 7, 2018 and re-registered as an Associated Person on October 5, 2018. Mr. Kahler was registered as a Branch Manager of the Sponsor on March 16, 2012 to September 7, 2018 and was registered again from October 5, 2018 to September 29, 2021. Mr. Kahler is an officer of Teucrium Investment Advisors, LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Teucrium Trading, LLC effective January 21, 2022. Mr. Kahler was approved by the NFA as a Principal of Teucrium Investment Advisors, LLC on June 2, 2022. Mr. Kahler was registered as an associated person of Teucrium Investment Advisors LLC on May 2, 2022. Mr. Kahler will generally assume the same roles and duties held in the parent company within the subsidiary. Prior to his employment with the Sponsor, Mr. Kahler worked for Cargill Inc., an international producer and marketer of food, agricultural, financial and industrial products and services, from April 2006 until November 2011 in the Energy Division as Senior Petroleum Trader. In October 2006 and while employed at Cargill Inc., Mr. Kahler was approved as an Associated Person of Cargill Commodity Services Inc., a commodity trading affiliate of Cargill Inc. from September 13, 2006 to November 9, 2011. Mr. Kahler graduated from the University of Minnesota with a Bachelors of Agricultural Business Administration and is 54 years old.
 
Messrs. Gilbertie, Riker, Kahler and Ms. Mullen-Rusin are individual “principals,” as that term is defined in CFTC Rule 3.1, of Teucrium Trading, LLC and Teucrium Investment Advisors, LLC. These individuals are principals due to their positions and/or due to their ownership interests in the Sponsor. GFI Group LLC is a principal under CFTC Rules due to its ownership of certain non-voting securities of Teucrium Trading, LLC and Teucrium Investment Advisors, LLC. NMSIC Classic LLC is a principal under CFTC Rules due to its greater than 10% capital contribution to Teucrium Trading, LLC. Teucrium Trading, LLC is a listed principal of Teucrium Investments Advisors, LLC due to its 100% ownership of the entity.
 
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  Prior Performance of the Fund
THIS POOL HAS NOT COMMENCED TRADING AND DOES NOT HAVE ANY PERFORMANCE HISTORY.
 
For performance information of the Sponsor’s other commodity pools, see “General Pool Disclosure — Performance of the Other Commodity Pools Operated by the Commodity Pool Operator” on page 61.
 
 
The Trustee
 
The sole Trustee of the Trust is Wilmington Trust Company, a Delaware banking corporation. The Trustee’s principal offices are located at 1100 North Market Street, Wilmington, Delaware 19890-0001. The Trustee is unaffiliated with the Sponsor. The Trustee’s duties and liabilities with respect to the offering of Shares and the management of the Trust and the Fund are limited to its express obligations under the Trust Agreement.
 
The Trustee will accept service of legal process on the Trust in the State of Delaware and will make certain filings under the Delaware Statutory Trust Act. The Trustee does not owe any other duties to the Trust, the Sponsor or the Shareholders. The Trustee is permitted to resign upon at least sixty (60) days’ notice to the Sponsor. If no successor trustee has been appointed by the Sponsor within such sixty-day period, the Trustee may, at the expense of the Trust, petition a court to appoint a successor. The Trust Agreement provides that the Trustee is entitled to reasonable compensation for its services from the Sponsor or an affiliate of the Sponsor (including the Trust), and is indemnified by the Sponsor against any expenses it incurs relating to or arising out of the formation, operation or termination of the Trust, or any action or inaction of the Trustee under the Trust Agreement, except to the extent that such expenses result from the gross negligence or willful misconduct of the Trustee. The Sponsor has the discretion to replace the Trustee.
 
The Trustee has not signed the registration statement of which this prospectus is a part and is not subject to issuer liability under the federal securities laws for the information contained in this prospectus and under federal securities laws with respect to the issuance and sale of the Shares. Under such laws, neither the Trustee, either in its capacity as Trustee or in its individual capacity, nor any director, officer or controlling person of the Trustee is, or has any liability as, the issuer or a director, officer or controlling person of the issuer of the Shares.
 
Under the Trust Agreement, the Trustee has delegated to the Sponsor the exclusive management and control of all aspects of the business of the Trust and the Fund. The Trustee has no duty or liability to supervise or monitor the performance of the Sponsor, nor does the Trustee have any liability for the acts or omissions of the Sponsor.
 
Because the Trustee has delegated substantially all of its authority over the operation of the Trust to the Sponsor, the Trustee itself is not registered in any capacity with the CFTC.
 
Operation of the Fund
 
The investment objective of the Fund is for changes in the Shares’ NAV to reflect the daily changes of the price of the Benchmark, less expenses from the Fund’s operations. Under normal market conditions, the Fund expects that the Fund’s assets will be used to invest in Bitcoin Futures Contracts and cash and cash equivalents, such as short-term Treasury bills, money market funds, and demand deposit accounts. The term “normal market conditions” includes, but is not limited to, the absence of: trading halts in the applicable financial markets generally; operational issues (e.g., systems failure) causing dissemination of inaccurate market information; or force majeure type events such as natural or man-made disaster, act of God, armed conflict, act of terrorism, riot or labor disruption or any similar intervening circumstance. The NYSE Arca rule under which the Shares will be listed and traded prevents the Fund from utilizing leverage.
 
The Fund invests in Benchmark Component Futures Contracts to the fullest extent possible without being leveraged or unable to satisfy its current or potential margin or collateral obligations with respect to its investments in Benchmark Component Futures Contracts. After fulfilling such margin and collateral requirements, the Fund invests the remainder of its proceeds from the sale of baskets in cash and cash equivalents, including money-market funds, and/or merely holds such assets in cash in interest-bearing accounts. The Fund seeks to earn interest and other income from the cash equivalents that it purchases, and on the cash, it holds at financial institutions.
 
The Fund seeks to achieve its investment objective primarily by investing in Benchmark Component Futures Contracts such that the changes in its NAV are expected to closely track the changes in the Benchmark, less expenses from the Fund’s operations. The Benchmark is the average of the closing settlement prices for the first to expire and second to expire Bitcoin futures contracts listed on the CME. The Benchmark will roll prior the expiration of the spot month CME Bitcoin Futures. The Benchmark is not designed to track the spot price of bitcoin. The Sponsor endeavors to place the Fund’s trades in Benchmark Component Futures Contracts and otherwise manage the Fund’s investments so that the Fund’s average daily tracking error against the Benchmark is less than 10 percent over any period of 30 trading days.
 
The Fund’s total portfolio composition is disclosed each business day that the NYSE Arca is open for trading on the Fund’s website at http://hashdex-etfs.com/. The website disclosure of portfolio holdings is made daily and includes, as applicable, the security name, market price, CUSIP, and total weight of each futures contract month reflected as a percentage, and value of each cash and cash equivalents held in the Fund. The Fund’s website also includes the NAV, the 4 p.m. (ET) Bid/Ask Midpoint as reported by the NYSE Arca, the last trade price as reported by the NYSE Arca, the Median bid-ask spread for the past 30 days, the Shares outstanding, the Shares available for issuance. Historical premium/discount information will be updated quarterly and daily as needed. The prospectus, Monthly Statements of Account, Quarterly Performance of the Midpoint versus the NAV (as required by the CFTC), and the Roll Dates, as well as Forms 10-Q, Forms 10-K, and other SEC filings for the Fund, are also posted on the website. The Fund’s website is publicly accessible at no charge.
 
The Fund’s investment objective is to provide investors with a way to gain price exposure to the bitcoin market. The Sponsor developed the Benchmark as a representation of the bitcoin market. Under normal market conditions, the Fund will invest in the Benchmark Component Futures Contracts. The Sponsor believes that by investing in Benchmark Component Futures Contracts, the Fund’s net asset value (“NAV”) will closely track the Benchmark. The Sponsor also believes that because of market arbitrage opportunities, the market price at which investors will purchase and sell Shares through their broker-dealer will closely track the Fund’s NAV. The Sponsor believes that the net effect of these relationships is that the Fund’s market price on the NYSE Arca at which investors purchase and sell Shares will closely track the bitcoin market, as measured by the Benchmark.
 
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An investment in the Shares can potentially provide a means for diversifying an investor’s portfolio or hedging exposure to changes in bitcoin prices. An investment in the Shares allows both retail and institutional investors to easily gain this exposure to the bitcoin market in a transparent, cost-effective manner.
 
The Sponsor employs a “neutral” investment strategy intended to track changes in the Benchmark regardless of whether the Benchmark goes up or goes down. The Fund’s “neutral” investment strategy is designed to permit investors generally to purchase and sell the Fund’s Shares for the purpose of investing indirectly in the bitcoin market. Such investors may include those seeking to hedge the risk of losses in their bitcoin related transactions as well as investors seeking exposure to the bitcoin market. Accordingly, depending on the investment objective of an individual investor, the risks generally associated with investing in the bitcoin market and/or the risks involved in hedging may exist. In addition, the Fund does not expect there to be any meaningful correlation between the performance of the Fund’s investments in cash and cash equivalents and the changes in the price of bitcoin or Benchmark Component Futures Contracts. While the level of interest earned on, or the market price of, these investments may in some respects correlate to changes in the price of bitcoin, this correlation is not anticipated as part of the Fund’s efforts to meet its objective. This and certain risk factors discussed in this prospectus may cause a lack of correlation between changes in the Fund’s NAV and changes in the price of bitcoin.
 
The Shares issued by the Fund may only be purchased by Authorized Purchasers and only in blocks of 10,000 Shares called Creation Baskets. The amount of the purchase payment for a Creation Basket is equal to the total NAV of Shares in the Creation Basket. Similarly, only Authorized Purchasers may redeem Shares and only in blocks of 10,000 Shares called Redemption Baskets. The amount of the redemption proceeds for a Redemption Basket is equal to the total NAV of Shares in the Redemption Basket. The purchase price for Creation Baskets and the redemption price for Redemption Baskets are the actual NAV calculated at the end of the business day when a request for a purchase or redemption is received by the Fund. The NYSE Arca publishes an approximate NAV intra-day based on the prior day’s NAV and the current price of the Benchmark Component Futures Contracts, but the price of Creation Baskets and Redemption Baskets is determined based on the actual NAV calculated at the end of each trading day.
 
While the Fund issues Shares only in Creation Baskets, Shares may also be purchased and sold in much smaller increments on the NYSE Arca. These transactions, however, are effected at the bid and ask prices established by the specialist firm(s). Like any listed security, Shares can be purchased and sold at any time a secondary market is open.
 
The Fund’s Investment Strategy
 
In managing the Fund’s assets, the Sponsor does not use a technical trading system that automatically issues buy and sell orders. Instead, each time one or more baskets are purchased or redeemed, the Sponsor purchases or sells Benchmark Component Futures Contracts with an aggregate market value that approximates the amount of cash received or paid upon the purchase or redemption of the basket(s).
 
As an example, assume that a Creation Basket is sold by the Fund, and that the Fund’s closing NAV per Share is $25.00. In that case, the Fund would receive $250,000 in proceeds from the sale of the Creation Basket ($25.00 NAV per Share multiplied by 10,000 Shares and ignoring the Creation Basket fee of $300). If one were to assume further that the Sponsor wants to invest the entire proceeds from the Creation Basket in the Benchmark Component Futures Contracts and that the market value of each such Benchmark Component Futures Contracts is $188,175 (or otherwise not a round number), the Fund would be unable to buy an exact number of Bitcoin Futures Contracts with an aggregate market value equal to $250,000. In this case, the Fund would be able to purchase 1 BTC Contract with an aggregate market value of approximately $188,175 and 16 MBT Contracts (each of which represent 0.10 bitcoin) at $3,763 per contract with an aggregate market value of approximately $60,208, bringing the aggregate value of proceeds to $248,383. Assuming a margin requirement equal to 32% of the notional amount based on the previous settlement price of the BTC Contracts and MBT Contracts, the Fund would be required to deposit approximately $79,483 in cash with the FCM through which the Bitcoin Futures Contracts were purchased. The remainder of the proceeds from the sale of the Creation Basket, approximately $170,517, composed of the approximately $168,900 not deposited with the FCM and the remaining $1,617 that was unable to be invested in Bitcoin Futures Contracts, would remain invested in cash and/or cash equivalents, as determined by the Sponsor from time to time based on factors such as potential calls for margin or anticipated redemptions.
 
The Benchmark Component Futures Contracts are cash-settled, and the Fund will not be required to take delivery of bitcoin. Positions may also be closed out to meet orders for Redemption Baskets, in which case the proceeds from closing the positions will not be reinvested.
 
Futures Contracts
 
Futures contracts are agreements between two parties that are executed on a designated contract market (“DCM”), i.e., a commodity futures exchange, and that are cleared and margined through a derivatives clearing organization (“DCO”), i.e., a clearing house. Bitcoin Futures Contacts are financially settled, which means that one party agrees to buy a commodity such as bitcoin from the other party at a later date at a price and quantity agreed upon when the contract is made, but instead of taking physical delivery of the commodity at such later date, settlement occurs in a dollar amount that is equivalent to the amount of bitcoin agreed to in the contract. In market terminology, a party who purchases a futures contract is long in the market and a party who sells a futures contract is short in the market. The contractual obligations of a buyer or seller may generally be satisfied by financial settlement or by making an offsetting sale or purchase of an identical futures contract on the same or linked exchange before the designated date of delivery. The difference between the price at which the futures contract is purchased or sold and the price paid for the offsetting sale or purchase, after allowance for brokerage commissions, constitutes the profit or loss to the trader.
 
If the price of the cryptocurrency increases after the original futures contract is entered into, the buyer of the futures contract will generally be able to sell a futures contract to close out its original long position at a price higher than that at which the original contract was purchased, generally resulting in a profit to the buyer. Conversely, the seller of a futures contract will generally profit if the price of the underlying bitcoin cryptocurrency decreases, as it will generally be able to buy a futures contract to close out its original short position at a price lower than that at which the original contract was sold. Because the Fund seeks to track the Benchmark directly, the Fund intends to hold only long positions in bitcoin futures contracts and intends to roll its CME Bitcoin Futures Contracts prior to expiration via sales of existing long positions and the acquisition of new long positions as replacements for contracts sold. Futures contracts are typically traded on futures exchanges (i.e. DCMs) such as the CME, which provide centralized market facilities in which multiple persons may trade contracts. Members of a particular futures exchange and the trades executed on such exchange are subject to the rules of that exchange. Futures exchanges and their related clearing organizations (i.e. DCOs) are given reasonable latitude in promulgating rules and regulations to control and regulate their members.
 
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Trades on a futures exchange are generally cleared by the DCO, which provides services designed to mutualize or transfer the credit risk arising from the trading of contracts on an exchange. The clearing organization effectively becomes the other party to the trade, and each clearing member party to the trade looks only to the clearing organization for performance.
 
Bitcoin Futures Contracts
 
CME began offering trading in BTC Contracts in 2017 (and in MBT Contracts in 2021). The CME needed a transparent and readily available way to determine the price of bitcoin for its futures contract customers. However, there are numerous exchanges on which one can buy and sell bitcoin, and the prices of bitcoin can differ greatly from exchange to exchange. CME wanted to use pricing information from what it considered to be reputable bitcoin exchanges to calculate a once-a-day reference rate of the U.S. dollar price of bitcoin.
 
The CME developed the CME CF Bitcoin Reference Rate (the "BRR") to serve these purposes. Each of the BTC and MBT contract’s final daily cash settlement is based on the BRR. It serves as a once-a-day reference rate of the U.S. dollar price of bitcoin and is used as the rate on which bitcoin futures contracts are cash-settled in U.S. dollars at the close of CME daily trading. The BRR is calculated by collecting purchase and sale transactions from specified constituent bitcoin exchanges, which currently include Bitstamp, Coinbase, Gemini, itBit, Kraken and LMAX Digital, during a calculation window between 3:00 p.m. and 4:00 p.m. London time. It is published at 4:00 p.m. London time each day.
 
The CME selects constituent exchanges for the BRR on the basis of the following criteria, which each exchange must demonstrate that it continues to fulfil on an ongoing basis:
 
The exchange has policies to ensure fair and transparent market conditions at all times and has processes in place to identify and impede illegal, unfair or manipulative trading practices.
 
The exchange does not impose undue barriers to entry or restrictions on market participants, and utilizing the venue does not expose market participants to undue credit risk, operational risk, legal risk or other risks.
 
The exchange complies with applicable law and regulation, including, but not limited to capital markets regulations, money transmission regulations, client money custody regulations, know-your-client (KYC) regulations and anti-money-laundering (AML) regulations.
 
The exchange cooperates with inquiries and investigations of regulators and the administrator upon request and has to execute data sharing agreements with the CME.
 
            Should the average daily contribution of a constituent exchange fall below 3%, then the continued inclusion of the venue as a constituent exchange is assessed.
 
            Qualifying transactions from the constituent exchanges that take place during the one-hour calculation window are added to a list, with the trade price and size for each transaction recorded. The one-hour calculation is partitioned into twelve intervals of five minutes each, and for each partition, the volume-weighted median trade price is calculated from the trade prices and sizes of relevant transactions. (A volume-weighted median differs from a standard median in that a weighting factor, in this case trade size, is factored into the calculation.) The BRR is the equally-weighted average of the volume-weighted medians of all twelve partitions.
 
Impact of Position Limits, Accountability Levels, and Price Fluctuation Limits.
 
Position Limits, Accountability Levels, and Dynamic Price Fluctuation Limits may potentially cause a tracking error between the price of the Shares and the Benchmark. This may in turn prevent you from being able to effectively use the Fund as a way to hedge against bitcoin related losses or as a way to indirectly invest in bitcoin.
 
The Fund does not intend to limit the size of the offering and will attempt to expose substantially all of its proceeds to Benchmark Component Futures Contracts and cash and cash equivalents. If the Fund encounters position limits, accountability levels, or price fluctuation limits for Bitcoin Futures Contracts, it could force the Fund to limit the number of Creation Baskets that it sells.
 
Price Volatility
 
Despite dynamic price limits, the price volatility of futures contracts generally has been historically greater than that for traditional securities such as stocks and bonds. Price volatility often is greater day to day as opposed to intra-day. Economic factors that may cause volatility in Bitcoin Futures Contracts include but are not limited to cost of electricity, regulation, market disruptions, cyber-attacks, political events and existing and future technologic developments. There are also various other factors now known and unknown, any and all of which can have an impact on the supply, demand, and price fluctuations in the bitcoin markets. See “Risks Associated with Investing Directly or Indirectly in Bitcoin.” Because the Fund invests a significant portion of its assets in futures contracts, the assets of the Fund, and therefore the price of the Fund’s Shares, may be subject to greater volatility than traditional securities.
 
Term Structure of Futures Contracts and the Impact on Total Return
 
Over time, the price of bitcoin fluctuates based on a number of market factors, including demand for bitcoin. The value of Bitcoin Futures Contracts likewise fluctuates in reaction to a number of market factors. Because the Fund seeks to maintain its holdings in Bitcoin Futures Contracts, the Fund must periodically “roll” futures contract positions, closing out soon to expire contracts that will no longer be part of the Benchmark and entering into subsequent to expire contracts. One factor determining the total return from investing in futures contracts is the price relationship between soon to expire contracts and later to expire contracts.
 
If the futures market is in a state of backwardation (i.e., when the price of bitcoin in the future is expected to be less than the current price), the Fund will buy later to expire contracts for a lower price than the sooner to expire contracts that it sells. Hypothetically, and assuming no changes to either prevailing bitcoin prices or the price relationship between soon to expire contracts and later to expire contracts, the value of a contract will rise as it approaches expiration. Over time, if backwardation remained constant, the differences would continue to increase. If the futures market is in contango, the Fund will buy later to expire contracts for a higher price than the sooner to expire contracts that it sells. Hypothetically, and assuming no other changes to either prevailing bitcoin prices or the price relationship between the spot price, soon to expire contracts and later to expire contracts, the value of a contract will fall as it approaches expiration. Over time, if contango remained constant, the difference would continue to increase. All other things being equal, a situation involving prolonged periods of contango may adversely impact the returns of the Fund; conversely a situation involving prolonged periods of backwardation may positively impact the returns of the Fund. By way of example, during the period from 1/1/2019 to 6/30/2022, the market for Bitcoin Component Futures Contracts were in contango approximately 90% of the time, which resulted in an average annual negative roll yield of approximately 7%.
 
Margin Requirements and Marking to Market Futures Positions
 
“Initial margin” is an amount of funds that must be deposited by a bitcoin interest trader with the trader’s broker to initiate an open position in futures contracts. A margin deposit is like a cash performance bond. It helps assure the trader’s performance of the futures contracts that he or she purchases or sells. Futures contracts are customarily bought and sold on initial margin that represents a small percentage of the aggregate purchase or sales price of the contract. The amount of margin required in connection with a particular futures contract is set by the exchange on which the contract is traded. Brokerage firms, such as the Fund’s clearing broker, carrying accounts for traders in bitcoin interest contracts may require higher amounts of margin as a matter of policy to further protect themselves.
 
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Futures contracts are marked to market at the end of each trading day and the margin required with respect to such contracts is adjusted accordingly. This process of marking to market is designed to prevent losses from accumulating in any futures account. Therefore, if the Fund’s futures positions have declined in value, the Fund may be required to post “variation margin” to cover this decline. Alternatively, if the Fund’s futures positions have increased in value, this increase will be credited to the Fund’s account.
 
The Fund’s Investments in Cash and Cash Equivalents
 
The Fund seeks to have the aggregate “notional” amount of the Benchmark Component Futures Contracts it holds approximate at all times the Fund’s total NAV. At any given time, however, most of the Fund’s investments are in cash and cash equivalents that support the Fund’s positions in Benchmark Component Futures Contracts. For example, the purchase of a BTC Contract with a stated or notional amount of $188,175 would not require the Fund to pay $188,175 upon entering into the contract; rather, only a margin deposit, approximately 32% of the notional amount based on the previous settlement price, would be required. To secure its BTC Contract obligations, the Fund would deposit the required margin with the FCM and would separately hold its remaining assets through its Custodian or other financial institution in cash and cash equivalents, specifically in demand deposits, in short-term Treasury Securities held by the FCM, or in money-market funds. Such remaining assets may be used to meet future margin payments that the Fund is required to make on its BTC Contracts and/or MBT Contracts.
 
The Fund earns interest and other income from the cash equivalents that it purchases, and on the cash, it holds through the Custodian or other financial institutions. The earned interest and other income increase the Fund’s NAV. The Fund applies the earned interest and other income to the acquisition of additional investments or uses it to pay its expenses. When the Fund reinvests the earned interest and other income, it makes investments that are consistent with its investment objectives.
 
Any cash equivalent invested in by the Fund will have a remaining maturity of less than 90 days at the time of investment or will be subject to a demand feature that enables that Fund to sell the security within that time period at approximately the security’s face value (plus accrued interest). Any cash equivalents invested in by the Fund will be or will be deemed by the Sponsor to be of investment grade credit quality.
 
Other Trading Policies of the Fund
 
Exchange for Related Position
 
An “exchange for related position” (“EFRP”) can be used by the Fund as a technique to facilitate the exchanging of a futures hedge position against a creation or redemption order, and thus the Fund may use an EFRP transaction in connection with the creation and redemption of Shares. The market specialist/market maker that is the ultimate purchaser or seller of Shares in connection with the creation or redemption basket, respectively, agrees to sell or purchase a corresponding offsetting Shares or futures position which is then settled on the same business day as a cleared futures transaction by the FCMs. The Fund will become subject to the credit risk of the market specialist/market maker until the EFRP is settled within the business day, which is typically 7 hours or less. The Fund reports all activity related to EFRP transactions under the procedures and guidelines of the CFTC and the exchanges on which the futures are traded. EFRPs are subject to specific rules of the CME and CFTC guidance.
 
Liquidity
 
The Fund invests only in Bitcoin Futures Contracts that, in the opinion of the Sponsor, are traded in sufficient volume to permit the ready taking and liquidation of positions in these financial interests or other bitcoin interests based on the spot price of bitcoin.
 
Spot Commodities
 
While most futures contracts can be physically settled, the Bitcoin Futures Contracts are cash settled.
 
Borrowings
 
The Fund does not intend to nor foresee the need to borrow money or establish credit lines. The Fund maintains cash and cash equivalents, either held by the Fund or posted as margin or collateral, with a value that at all times approximates the aggregate market value of its obligations under Benchmark Component Futures Contracts. The Fund meets its liquidity needs in the normal course of business from the proceeds of the sale of its investments or from the cash and cash equivalents that it intends to hold at all times.
 
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The Bitcoin Industry
 
Bitcoin
 
Bitcoin is a digital asset that serves as the unit of account on an open-source, decentralized, peer-to-peer computer network. Bitcoin may be used to pay for goods and services, stored for future use, or converted to a fiat currency. As of the date of this prospectus, the adoption of bitcoin for these purposes has been limited. The value of bitcoin is not backed by any government, corporation, or other identified body.
 
The value of bitcoin is determined in part by the supply of (which is limited), and demand for, bitcoin in the markets for exchange that have been organized to facilitate the trading of bitcoin. By design, the supply of bitcoin is limited to 21 million bitcoins. As of the date of this prospectus, there are approximately 19 million bitcoins in circulation.
 
Bitcoin is maintained on the decentralized, open source, peer-to-peer computer network (the “Bitcoin Network”). No single entity owns or operates the Bitcoin Network. The Bitcoin Network is accessed through software and governs bitcoin’s creation and movement. The source code for the Bitcoin Network, often referred to as the Bitcoin Protocol, is open-source, and anyone can contribute to its development.
 
The Bitcoin Network
 
The infrastructure of the Bitcoin Network is collectively maintained by purchasers in the Bitcoin Network, which include miners, developers, and users. Miners validate transactions and are currently compensated for that service in bitcoin. Developers maintain and contribute updates to the Bitcoin Network’s source code, often referred to as the Bitcoin Protocol. Users access the Bitcoin Network using open-source software. Anyone can be a user, developer, or miner.
 
Bitcoin is “stored” on a digital transaction ledger commonly known as a “blockchain.” A blockchain is a type of shared and continually reconciled database, stored in a decentralized manner on the computers of certain users of the digital asset and is protected by cryptography. The Bitcoin Blockchain contains a record and history for each bitcoin transaction.
 
New bitcoin is created by “mining.” Miners use specialized computer software and hardware to solve a highly complex mathematical problem presented by the Bitcoin Protocol. The first miner to successfully solve the problem is permitted to add a block of transactions to the Bitcoin Blockchain. The new block is then confirmed through acceptance by a majority of users who maintain versions of the blockchain on their individual computers. Miners that successfully add a block to the Bitcoin Blockchain are automatically rewarded with a fixed amount of bitcoin for their effort plus any transaction fees paid by transferors whose transactions are recorded in the block. This reward system is the means by which new bitcoin enter circulation and is the mechanism by which versions of the blockchain held by users on a decentralized network are kept in consensus.
 
The Bitcoin Protocol
 
The Bitcoin Protocol is an open source project with no official company or group in control. Anyone can review the underlying code and suggest changes. There are, however, a number of individual developers that regularly contribute to a specific distribution of bitcoin software known as the “Bitcoin Core.” Developers of the Bitcoin Core loosely oversee the development of the source code. There are many other compatible versions of the bitcoin software, but Bitcoin Core is the most widely adopted and currently provides the de facto standard for the Bitcoin Protocol. The core developers are able to access, and can alter, the Bitcoin Network source code and, as a result, they are responsible for quasi-official releases of updates and other changes to the Bitcoin Network’s source code.
 
However, because bitcoin has no central authority, the release of updates to the Bitcoin Network’s source code by the core developers does not guarantee that the updates will be automatically adopted by the other purchasers. Users and miners must accept any changes made to the source code by downloading the proposed modification and that modification is effective only with respect to those bitcoin users and miners who choose to download it. As a practical matter, a modification to the source code becomes part of the Bitcoin Network only if it is accepted by purchasers that collectively have a majority of the processing power on the Bitcoin Network. If a modification is accepted by only a percentage of users and miners, a division will occur such that one network will run the pre-modification source code and the other network will run the modified source code. Such a division is known as a “fork.”
 
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The Fund’s Service Providers
 
Contractual Arrangements with the Sponsor and Third-Party Service Providers
 
Sponsor
 
The Sponsor is responsible for investing the assets of the Fund in accordance with the objectives and policies of the Fund. In addition, the Sponsor arranges for one or more third parties to provide administrative, custodial, accounting, transfer agency and other necessary services to the Fund. For these third-party services, the Fund pays the fees set forth in the table below entitled “Contractual Fees and Compensation Arrangements with the Sponsor and Third-Party Service Providers.” For the Sponsor’s services, the Fund is contractually obligated to pay a monthly management fee to the Sponsor, based on average daily net assets, at a rate equal to 0.94% per annum.
 
Custodian, Registrar, Transfer Agent, Fund Accountant, and Fund Administrator
 
In its capacity as the Fund’s custodian, the Custodian, currently U.S. Bank, N.A., holds the Fund’s securities, cash and/or cash equivalents pursuant to a custodial agreement. U.S. Bank Global Fund Services (“Global Fund Services”), an entity affiliated with U.S. Bank, N.A., is the registrar and transfer agent for the Fund’s Shares. In addition, Global Fund Services also serves as Administrator for the Fund, performing certain administrative, and accounting services, and preparing certain SEC and CFTC reports on behalf of the Fund. The Custodian is located at 1555 North Rivercenter Drive, Suite 302, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53212. U.S. Bank N.A. is a nationally chartered bank, regulated by the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency, Department of the Treasury, and is subject to regulation by the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System. The principal address for Global Fund Services is 615 East Michigan Street, Milwaukee, WI, 53202.
 
Distributor
 
The Fund employs Foreside Fund Services, LLC as the Distributor for the Fund. The Distribution Services Agreement among the Distributor, the Sponsor, and the Trust calls for the Distributor to work with the Custodian in connection with the receipt and processing of orders for Creation Baskets and Redemption Baskets and the review and approval of all Fund sales literature and advertising material. The Distributor’s principal business address is Three Canal Plaza, Suite 100, Portland, Maine 04101. The Distributor is a broker-dealer registered with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”) and a member of FINRA.
 
Marketing Agents
 
Toroso Investments, LLC (“Toroso”), Tidal ETF Services LLC (“Tidal”) and Victory Capital Management Inc. (“Victory Capital”) “(the “Marketing Agents”) assist the Fund and the Sponsor with certain functions and duties relating to distribution and marketing, which include the following: marketing and sales strategy, and marketing and distribution related services.
 
Digital Asset Adviser
 
Hashdex Asset Management Ltd. (“Hashdex” or the “Digital Asset Adviser”“) is a Cayman Islands investment manager (and an Exempt Reporting Advisor under SEC rules) that specializes in, among other things, the management, research, investment analysis and other investment support services of funds and ETFs with investment strategies involving bitcoin and other crypto assets. As Digital Asset Adviser, Hashdex is responsible for providing the Sponsor and Marketing Agents with research and analysis regarding bitcoin and bitcoin markets for use in the operation and marketing of the Fund. Hashdex has no role in maintaining, calculating or publishing the Benchmark. Hashdex also has no responsibility for the investment or management of the Fund’s portfolio or for the overall performance or operation of the Fund.
 
The Marketing Agents, Digital Asset Advisor and Sponsor (the “Parties”) have entered into an agreement (the “Support Agreement”) that sets forth certain terms and conditions applicable to the launch, marketing, promotion, development, and ongoing operation of the Fund, as well the respective rights in profits and obligations for expenses. Hashdex and Toroso have experience in the digital asset and exchange-traded fund industry, and seek to offer a bitcoin futures based fund as part of their long-term business goals. The Parties believe that the Sponsor is best positioned for the initial establishment and operation of the Fund, given the Sponsor’s experience in forming and operating similarly structured exchanged-traded products registered under the Securities Act of 1933 (the “1933 Act”). Accordingly, the Sponsor is responsible for the initial creation and operation of the Fund. Then, when Hashdex and Toroso have the necessary experience and resources to operate the Fund, the eventual transfer to Toroso will effectuate Hashdex and Toroso’s long-term business goals. The Parties do not believe that the long-term business goals will have any impact on a shareholder’s investment in the Fund.
 
The Support Agreement provides that the Parties expect that Toroso will use commercially reasonable efforts to organize a new Delaware statutory trust (the “New Trust”) and a new series thereof (the “New Fund”) and enter into an agreement pursuant to which, among other things, the assets of the Fund (and certain other assets as applicable) will be transferred to the New Fund as a series of the New Trust, as successor to the Fund and the Trustee will transfer to Toroso sponsorship of the Fund. There is no timeline for this transaction. The transaction may require registration under the 1933 Act, or an exemption from such registration, an amendment to the Fund’s existing listing standards and receipt of other regulatory approvals. The Fund and the New Fund will file current reports on Form 8-K including a press release notifying shareholders that the definitive transaction has been consummated.
 
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The primary responsibilities and rights of each Party with respect to the Fund are described below:
 
The Support Agreement provides that Hashdex will provide to the other Parties research and analysis regarding bitcoin and bitcoin markets for use in the operation and marketing of the Fund. Subject to mutual agreement of the Parties, Victory Capital will provide sub-advisory and sales support services for the Fund.
 
The Sponsor, Toroso, Hashdex and Victory Capital are responsible for paying for all listing, legal, and regulatory costs and expenses incurred in connection with the regulatory process related to the launch of the Fund, including drafting the Fund’s registration statement, exchange listing fees, and other regulatory or service provider fees, as determined in the Support Agreement (“Start-Up Costs”). The Fund will not be responsible for the Start-Up Costs. Each Party is responsible for its own internal expenses.
 
The Sponsor will receive a sponsor fee, administrative fee and trading fee, which are paid out of the proceeds from the Management Fee of the Fund (if sufficient) and/or from Toroso and Hashdex/Victory Capital (if insufficient). After an additional deduction of operational costs from the Management Fee, the resulting profits or losses will be shared equally among Toroso, on the one hand, and Hashdex and Victory Capital, on the other.
 
Following the transfer of the assets of the Fund to the New Fund, the primary responsibilities and rights of each Party with respect to the New Fund are expected to be as follows:
 
The Sponsor’s responsibilities as sponsor will cease. Toroso’s responsibilities as sponsor are expected to be substantially the same as the Sponsor’s existing responsibilities. As sponsor of the New Fund, Toroso will be generally authorized to perform all acts deemed necessary to carry out the purposes of the New Trust and the New Fund. Toroso is expected to be responsible for management of the New Fund (and, as noted below, it is anticipated that Victory Capital will provide sub-advisory services for the New Fund). Toroso is expected to oversee the purchase and sale of Shares by Authorized Purchasers, manage the Fund’s investments, and evaluate the credit risk of FCMs and swap counterparties and review daily positions and margin/collateral requirements. The Sponsor is also expected to be responsible for selecting the service providers to the New Trust and New Fund and preparing and filing periodic reports on behalf of the Trust with the SEC and provide any required certification for such reports.
 
Tidal will provide fund administration and related services for the New Fund. Hashdex will provide to Toroso research and analysis regarding bitcoin and bitcoin markets for use in the operation and marketing of the New Fund. Victory Capital shall provide sub-advisory and sales support services for the New Fund. The formalization of such roles with respect to the New Fund will be made in the format and at a time mutually agreed among the Sponsor, Toroso, Tidal, Hashdex, and Victory Capital, taking into account the operations of the New Fund and any applicable regulatory requirements.
 
The Sponsor will be entitled to receive a monthly amount equal to seven (7) percent of the Management Fee of the New Fund; provided, however, that such fee will never be less than 0.04% of monthly average net assets of the Fund. After an additional deduction of operational costs from the Management Fee, the resulting profits and losses will be shared equally among Toroso, on the one hand, and Hashdex and Victory Capital, on the other. The Management Fee for the New Fund is not expected to change.
 
Clearing Brokers
 
StoneX Financial Inc. – FCM (f/k/a INTL FCStone Financial Inc. - FCM Division) (“StoneX”), and Phillip Capital Inc. (“Phillip Capital”) serve as the Fund’s clearing brokers (the “Clearing Brokers”) to execute and clear the Fund’s futures transactions and provide other brokerage-related services. The Clearing Brokers are each registered as an FCM with the CFTC, are members of the National Futures Association (“NFA”) and are clearing members of all major U.S. futures exchanges. The Clearing Brokers are registered as broker-dealers (“BDs”) with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”) and are each a member of the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, Inc. (“FINRA”).
 
Except as indicated below, there have been no material civil, administrative, or criminal proceedings pending, on appeal, or concluded against the Clearing Brokers or their principals in the past five (5) years.
 
Litigation disclosure for Phillip Capital
 
Phillip Capital Inc. is a registered futures commission merchant and is a member of the NFA. Its main office is located at 141 West Jackson Blvd., Suite 1531A, Chicago, Illinois 60604. In the normal course of its business, Phillip Capital is involved in various legal actions incidental to its commodities business. None of these actions are expected either individually or in aggregate to have a material adverse impact on Phillip Capital. Except for the below, neither Phillip Capital nor any of its principals have been the subject of any material administrative, civil or criminal actions within the past five years.
 
On September 12, 2019, the U.S. Commodity Futures Trading Commission issued an order settling charges against Phillip Capital for allowing cyber criminals to breach PCI email systems, access customer information, and successfully withdrawing $1 million in PCI customer funds. The order found that PCI failed to disclose the cyber breach to its customers in a timely manner and that PCI failed to supervise its employees with respect to cybersecurity policy and procedures, a written information systems security program, and customer disbursements. The order imposed monetary sanctions totaling $1.5 million, which includes a civil monetary penalty of $500,000, and a $1 million in restitution. PCI was credited the $1 million restitution based on its prompt reimbursement of the customer funds when the fraud was discovered. The order also required PCI to, among other things, provide reports to the Commission on its remediation efforts.
 
On June 11, 2021, pursuant to an offer of settlement in which Phillip Capital neither admitted nor denied the rule violation upon which the penalty is based, the Clearing House Risk Committee found that Phillip Capital violated CME Rule 980.A – Required Records and Reports. In accordance with the settlement offer, the Committee imposed a $50,000 fine for non-current books and records due to an issue with the firm’s middleware provider. In a related matter, the CME Group had previously fined Phillip Capital on March 19, 2021, for its violation of Rule 811 and 561. During the month of February 2021, Phillip Capital inaccurately reported its open interest and large trader positions in several instances of CME, CBT, NYMEX, and COMEX contracts due to the aforementioned middleware issue. A fine in the amount of $5,000 was assessed against Phillip Capital.
 
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Litigation disclosure for StoneX
 
Below is a list of material, administrative, civil, enforcement, or criminal complaints or actions filed against StoneX that are outstanding, and any enforcement actions or complaints filed against StoneX in the past five years which meet the materiality thresholds in CTFC regulations 4.24.(l) and 4.34(k).
 
On November 14, 2017,StoneX, without admission, denial, or liability, entered into a settlement with the Commodity Futures Trading Commission (“CFTC”). The CFTC found that StoneX failed to have adequate compliance controls to identify trades improperly designated as EFRPs. According to the CFTC Order, the firm failed to determine that the EFPs at issue had the necessary corresponding and related cash or OTC derivative position required for EFRPs. The CFTC Order also found that the firm failed to ensure that the EFPs at issue were documented properly. Finally, the firm failed to ensure that its employees involved in the execution, handling, and processing of EFRPs understood the requirements for executing, handing, and processing valid EFRPs. StoneX, and its affiliate FCStone Merchant Services, jointly paid a $280,000 civil monetary penalty to the CFTC.
 
After a historic move in the natural gas market in November of 2018, StoneX experienced a number of customer deficits. StoneX soon thereafter initiated NFA arbitrations, seeking to collect these debits, and has also been countersued and sued in a number of these arbitrations. These accounts were managed by Optionsellers.com, (“Optionsellers”) who is a Commodity Trading Advisor (“CTA”) authorized by investors to act as attorney-in-fact with exclusive trading authority over these investors’ trading accounts. These accounts cleared through StoneX. After this significant and historic natural gas market movement, the accounts declined below required maintenance margin levels. StoneX’s role in managing the accounts was limited. As a clearing firm, StoneX did not provide any investment advice, trading advice, or recommendations to customers of Optionsellers who chose to clear with StoneX. Instead, it simply executed and cleared trades placed by Optionsellers on behalf of Optionsellers’ customers. Optionsellers is a CFTC registered CTA operating under a CFTC Rule 4.7 exemption from registration. Optionsellers engaged in a strategy that primarily involved selling options on futures products. The arbitrations between StoneX, Optionsellers, and the Optionsellers customers are currently ongoing.
 
StoneX is subject to litigation and regulatory enforcement in the normal course of business. Except as discussed above, the current or pending civil litigation, administrative proceedings, or enforcement actions in which the firm is involved are not expected to have a material effect upon its condition, financial or otherwise. The firm vigorously defends, as a matter of policy, civil litigation, reparation, arbitration proceedings, and enforcement actions brought against it.
 
The clearing brokers, in their capacity as registered FCMs, will serve as the Fund’s clearing brokers and, as such, will arrange for the execution and clearing of the Fund’s futures and options on futures transactions. Each broker acts as clearing broker for many other funds and individuals.
 
Investors should be advised that the Clearing Brokers are not affiliated with and do not act as a supervisor of the Fund or the Fund’s Sponsor, investment managers, members, officers, administrators, transfer agents, registrars or organizers. Additionally, the Clearing Brokers do not act as an underwriter or sponsor of the offering of any Shares or interests in the Fund and have not passed upon the adequacy of this prospectus, the merits of participating in this offering or on the accuracy of the information contained herein.
 
Additionally, the Clearing Brokers do not provide any commodity trading advice regarding the Fund’s trading activities. Investors should not rely upon the Clearing Brokers in deciding whether to invest in the Fund or retain their interests in the Fund. Investors should also note that the Fund may select additional clearing brokers or replace one or both Clearing Brokers as the Fund’s clearing brokers.
 
Commodity Trading Advisor
 
Currently, the Sponsor does not employ commodity trading advisors. If, in the future, the Sponsor does employ commodity trading advisors, it will choose each advisor based on arm’s length negotiations and will consider the advisor’s experience, fees, and reputation.
 
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Contractual Fees and Compensation Arrangements with the Sponsor and Third-Party Service Providers
 
Service Provider
Compensation Paid by the Fund
Teucrium Trading, LLC, Sponsor
0.94% of average net assets annually
 
 
Phillip Capital Inc., Futures Commission Merchant and Clearing Broker
The Fund pays $35.00-$45.00 per Futures Contract half-turn exclusive of pass through fees for the exchange, NFA, execution fees, and platform and exchange data fees.
 
 
StoneX Financial Inc., Futures Commission Merchant and Clearing Broker
The Fund pays $10.00-$25.00 per Futures Contract half-turn exclusive of pass through fees for the exchange and NFA. Additionally, if the monthly commissions paid do not equal or exceed 20% return on the StoneX Capital Requirement at 9.6% of Exchange Maintenance Margin, the Fund will pay a true up to meet that return at the end of each month.
 
 
Wilmington Trust Company, Trustee
$3,300 annually for the Trust
 
Other Non-Contractual Payments by the Fund
 
The Fund pays the Sponsor a Management Fee, monthly in arrears, in an amount equal to 0.94% per annum of the daily NAV of the Fund. The Management Fee is paid in consideration of the Sponsor’s services related to the management of the Fund’s business and affairs, including the provision of commodity futures trading advisory services. Purchases of creation units with cash may cause the Fund to incur certain costs including brokerage commissions and redemptions of creation units with cash may result in the recognition of gains or losses that the Fund might not have incurred if it had made redemptions in-kind. The Fund pays all of its respective brokerage commissions, including applicable exchange fees, NFA fees and give-up fees, and other transaction related fees and expenses charged in connection with trading activities for each Fund’s investments in CFTC regulated investments. The Fund bears other transaction costs related to the FCM capital requirements on a monthly basis. The Sponsor pays all of the routine operational, administrative and other ordinary expenses of the Fund, generally as determined by the Sponsor, including but not limited to, fees and expenses of the Administrator, Custodian, Distributor, Transfer Agent, licensors, accounting and audit fees and expenses, tax preparation expenses, legal fees, ongoing SEC registration fees, individual Schedule K-1 preparation and mailing fees, and report preparation and mailing expenses. The Fund pays all of its non-recurring and unusual fees and expenses, if any, as determined by the Sponsor. Non-recurring and unusual fees and expenses are unexpected or unusual in nature, such as legal claims and liabilities and litigation costs or indemnification or other unanticipated expenses. Extraordinary fees and expenses also include material expenses which are not currently anticipated obligations of the Fund. Routine operational, administrative and other ordinary expenses are not deemed extraordinary expenses.
 
Form of Shares
 
Registered Form
 
Shares are issued in registered form in accordance with the Trust Agreement. Global Fund Services has been appointed registrar and transfer agent for the purpose of transferring Shares in certificated form. Global Fund Services keeps a record of all Shareholders and holders of the Shares in certificated form in the registry (“Register”). The Sponsor recognizes transfers of Shares in certificated form only if done in accordance with the Trust Agreement. The beneficial interests in such Shares are held in book-entry form through purchasers and/or accountholders in DTC.
 
Book Entry
 
Individual certificates are not issued for the Shares. Instead, Shares are represented by one or more global certificates, which are deposited by the Administrator with DTC and registered in the name of Cede & Co., as nominee for DTC. The global certificates evidence all of the Shares outstanding at any time. Shareholders are limited to (1) purchasers in DTC such as banks, brokers, dealers and trust companies, (2) those who maintain, either directly or indirectly, a custodial relationship with a DTC purchaser, and (3) those who hold interests in the Shares through DTC purchasers or Indirect purchasers, in each case who satisfy the requirements for transfers of Shares. DTC purchasers acting on behalf of investors holding Shares through such purchasers’ accounts in DTC will follow the delivery practice applicable to securities eligible for DTC’s Same Day Funds Settlement System. Shares are credited to DTC purchasers’ securities accounts following confirmation of receipt of payment.
 
DTC
 
DTC is a limited purpose trust company organized under the laws of the State of New York and is a member of the Federal Reserve System, a “clearing corporation” within the meaning of the New York Uniform Commercial Code and a “clearing agency” registered pursuant to the provisions of Section 17A of the Exchange Act. DTC holds securities for DTC purchasers and facilitates the clearance and settlement of transactions between DTC purchasers through electronic book-entry changes in accounts of DTC purchasers.
 
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Transfer of Shares
 
The Shares are only transferable through the book-entry system of DTC. Shareholders who are not DTC purchasers may transfer their Shares through DTC by instructing the DTC purchaser holding their Shares (or by instructing the Indirect purchaser or other entity through which their Shares are held) to transfer the Shares. Transfers are made in accordance with standard securities industry practice.
 
Transfers of interests in Shares with DTC are made in accordance with the usual rules and operating procedures of DTC and the nature of the transfer. DTC has established procedures to facilitate transfers among the Purchasers and/or accountholders of DTC. Because DTC can only act on behalf of DTC Purchasers, who in turn act on behalf of Indirect Purchasers, the ability of a person or entity having an interest in a global certificate to pledge such interest to persons or entities that do not participate in DTC, or otherwise take actions in respect of such interest, may be affected by the lack of a certificate or other definitive document representing such interest.
 
DTC has advised us that it will take any action permitted to be taken by a Shareholder (including, without limitation, the presentation of a global certificate for exchange) only at the direction of one or more DTC purchasers in whose account with DTC interests in global certificates are credited and only in respect of such portion of the aggregate principal amount of the global certificate as to which such DTC purchaser or purchasers has or have given such direction.
 
Inter-Series Limitation on Liability
 
Because the Trust was established as a Delaware statutory trust, each Teucrium Fund and each other series that may be established under the Trust in the future will be operated so that it will be liable only for obligations attributable to such series and will not be liable for obligations of any other series or affected by losses of any other series. If any creditor or Shareholder of any particular series (such as the Fund) asserts against the series a valid claim with respect to its indebtedness or Shares, the creditor or Shareholder will only be able to obtain recovery from the assets of that series and not from the assets of any other series or the Trust generally. The assets of the Fund and any other series will include only those funds and other assets that are paid to, held by or distributed to the series on account of and for the benefit of that series, including, without limitation, amounts delivered to the Trust for the purchase of Shares in a series. This limitation on liability is referred to as the Inter-Series Limitation on Liability. The Inter-Series Limitation on Liability is expressly provided for under the Delaware Statutory Trust Act, which provides that if certain conditions (as set forth in Section 3804(a)) are met, then the debts of any particular series will be enforceable only against the assets of such series and not against the assets of any other series or the Trust generally. In furtherance of the Inter-Series Limitation on Liability, every party providing services to the Trust, the Fund or the Sponsor on behalf of the Trust or the Fund, will acknowledge and consent in writing to the Inter-Series Limitation on Liability with respect to such party’s claims.
 
 
The existence of a Trustee should not be taken as an indication of any additional level of management or supervision over the Fund. Consistent with Delaware law, the Trustee acts in an entirely passive role, delegating all authority for the management and operation of the Fund and the Trust to the Sponsor. The Trustee does not provide custodial services with respect to the assets of the Fund.
 
Plan of Distribution
 
Buying and Selling Shares
 
Most investors buy and sell Shares of the Fund in secondary market transactions through brokers. Shares trade on the NYSE Arca under the ticker symbol “DEFI.” Shares are bought and sold throughout the trading day like other publicly traded securities. When buying or selling Shares through a broker, most investors incur customary brokerage commissions and charges. Investors are encouraged to review the terms of their brokerage account for details on applicable charges and, as discussed below under “U.S. Federal Income Tax Considerations,” any provisions authorizing the broker to borrow Shares held on your behalf.
 
Distributor and Authorized Purchasers
 
The offering of the Fund’s Shares is a best efforts offering. The Fund continuously offers Creation Baskets consisting of 10,000 Shares at their NAV through the Distributor, to Authorized Purchasers. The initial Authorized Purchaser is a statutory underwriter of the Fund’s Shares. It is expected that on the effective date, the initial Authorized Purchaser will purchase ten initial Creation Baskets of 10,000 Shares at a per Share price of $25.00. The initial offering price of $25.00 was set as an appropriate and convenient price that would facilitate secondary market trading of Shares, and the Shares of the Fund acquired by the Sponsor in connection with its initial capital contribution were purchased at a price of $25.00 per Share. All Authorized Purchasers pay a $300 fee for each Creation Basket order.
 
The following entities have entered into Authorized Purchaser Agreements with respect to the Fund: J.P. Morgan Securities LLC; Merrill Lynch Professional Clearing Corp.; Goldman Sachs & Co.; Citadel Securities LLC; and Virtu Americas LLC.
 
Because new Shares can be created and issued on an ongoing basis, at any point during the life of the Fund, a “distribution,” as such term is used in the 1933 Act, will be occurring. Authorized Purchasers, other broker-dealers and other persons are cautioned that some of their activities may result in their being deemed purchasers in a distribution in a manner that would render them statutory underwriters and subject them to the prospectus delivery and liability provisions of the 1933 Act. For example, an Authorized Purchaser, other broker-dealer firm or its client will be deemed a statutory underwriter if it purchases a basket from the Fund, breaks the basket down into the constituent Shares and sells the Shares to its customers; or if it chooses to couple the creation of a supply of new Shares with an active selling effort involving solicitation of secondary market demand for the Shares. In contrast, Authorized Purchasers may engage in secondary market or other transactions in Shares that would not be deemed “underwriting.” For example, an Authorized Purchaser may act in the capacity of a broker or dealer with respect to Shares that were previously distributed by other Authorized Purchasers. A determination of whether a particular market purchaser is an underwriter must take into account all the facts and circumstances pertaining to the activities of the broker-dealer or its client in the particular case, and the examples mentioned above should not be considered a complete description of all the activities that would lead to designation as an underwriter and subject them to the prospectus delivery and liability provisions of the 1933 Act.
 
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Dealers who are neither Authorized Purchasers nor “underwriters” but are nonetheless participating in a distribution (as contrasted to ordinary secondary trading transactions), and thus dealing with Shares that are part of an “unsold allotment” within the meaning of Section 4(a)(3)(C) of the 1933 Act, would be unable to take advantage of the prospectus delivery exemption provided by Section 4(a)(3) of the 1933 Act.
 
Investors are cautioned that they might not be able to buy or sell Shares of the Fund through their current brokerages. Moreover, even if an investor were able to purchase Shares through their current brokerage, that brokerage might decide to stop trading in bitcoin-linked securities and the investor would potentially face restrictions on when and or how they could trade their existing bitcoin position.
 
The Sponsor expects that any broker-dealers selling Shares will be members of FINRA. Investors intending to create or redeem baskets through Authorized Purchasers in transactions not involving a broker-dealer registered in such investor’s state of domicile or residence should consult their legal advisor regarding applicable broker-dealer regulatory requirements under the state securities laws prior to such creation or redemption.
 
While the Authorized Purchasers may be indemnified by the Sponsor, they will not be entitled to receive a discount or commission from the Trust or the Sponsor for their purchases of Creation Baskets.
 
Calculating NAV
 
The Fund’s NAV per Share is calculated by:
 
taking the current market value of its total assets, and
subtracting any liabilities and dividing the balance by the number of Shares.
 
Global Fund Services, in its capacity as the Administrator calculates the NAV of the Fund once each trading day. It calculates the NAV as of the earlier of the close of the New York Stock Exchange or 4:00 p.m. (ET). The NAV for a particular trading day is released after 4:15 p.m. (ET).
 
In determining the value of Bitcoin Futures Contracts, the Administrator uses the settlement price for the Benchmark Component Futures Contracts, as reported on the CME. CME Group staff determines the daily settlements for the Benchmark Component Futures Contracts based on trading activity on CME Globex exchange between 14:59:00 and 15:00:00 Central Time (CT), the settlement period, except that the “fair value” of Bitcoin Futures Contracts (as described in more detail below) may be used when Bitcoin Futures Contracts close at their price fluctuation limit for the day. The Administrator determines the value of all other Fund investments as of the earlier of the close of the New York Stock Exchange or 4:00 p.m. (ET), in accordance with the current Services Agreement between the Administrator and the Trust. NAV includes any unrealized profit or loss on open bitcoin interests and any other credit or debit accruing to the Fund but unpaid or not received by the Fund.
 
The fair value of a bitcoin interest is determined by the Sponsor in good faith and in a manner that assesses the bitcoin interest’s value based on a consideration of all available facts and all available information on the valuation date. When a Bitcoin Futures Contract has closed at its daily price fluctuation limit, that limit price will be the daily settlement price that the CME publishes. The Fund will use the published settlement price to price its Shares on that day. If the CME halted trading in Bitcoin Futures Contracts for other reasons, including if trading were halted for an entire trading day or several trading days, the Fund would value its Bitcoin Futures Contracts by using the settlement price that the CME publishes.
 
In addition, in order to provide updated information relating to the Fund for use by investors and market professionals, ICE Data Indices, LLC calculates and disseminates throughout the trading day an updated “indicative fund value.” The indicative fund value is calculated by using the prior day’s closing NAV per Share of the Fund as a base and updating that value throughout the trading day to reflect changes in the value of the Fund’s bitcoin interests during the trading day. Changes in the value of cash equivalents are not included in the calculation of indicative value. For this and other reasons, the indicative fund value disseminated during NYSE Arca trading hours should not be viewed as an actual real time update of the NAV. NAV is calculated only once at the end of each trading day.
 
The indicative fund value is disseminated on a per Share basis every 15 seconds during regular NYSE Arca trading hours of 9:30 a.m. (ET) to 4:00 p.m. (ET). The trading hours for the CME can be found at: https://www.cmegroup.com/education/bitcoin/cme-bitcoin-futures-frequently-asked-questions.html.
 
ICE Data Indices, LLC disseminates the indicative fund value through the facilities of CTA/CQ High Speed Lines. In addition, the indicative fund value is available through on-line information services such as Bloomberg and Reuters.
 
Dissemination of the indicative fund value provides additional information that is not otherwise available to the public and is useful to investors and market professionals in connection with the trading of Fund Shares on the NYSE Arca. Investors and market professionals are able throughout the trading day to compare the market price of the Fund and the indicative fund value. If the market price of Fund Shares diverges significantly from the indicative fund value, market professionals may have an incentive to execute arbitrage trades. For example, if the Fund appears to be trading at a discount compared to the indicative fund value, a market professional could buy Fund Shares on the NYSE Arca, aggregate them into Redemption Baskets, and receive the NAV of such Shares by redeeming them to the Trust provided that there is not a minimum number of Shares outstanding for the Fund. Such arbitrage trades can tighten the tracking between the market price of the Fund and the indicative fund value.
 
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Creation and Redemption of Shares
 
The Fund creates and redeems Shares from time to time, but only in one or more Creation Baskets or Redemption Baskets. To the extent creations and redemptions involve the exchange of cash and cash equivalents, the Fund may incur certain costs including brokerage costs or recognize gains or losses that it might not have incurred if the transaction were made in-kind. Authorized Purchasers are the only persons that may place orders to create and redeem baskets. Authorized Purchasers must be (1) either registered broker-dealers or other securities market purchasers, such as banks and other financial institutions, which are not required to register as broker-dealers to engage in securities transactions as described below, and (2) DTC purchasers. To become an Authorized Purchaser, a person must enter into an Authorized Purchaser Agreement with the Sponsor. The Authorized Purchaser Agreement provides the procedures for the creation and redemption of baskets and for the delivery of the cash and cash equivalents required for such creations and redemptions. The Authorized Purchaser Agreement and the related procedures attached thereto may be amended by the Sponsor, without the consent of any Shareholder, and the related procedures may generally be amended by the Sponsor without the consent of the Authorized Purchaser. Authorized Purchasers pay a transaction fee of $300 to the Custodian for each creation order they place and a fee of $300 per order for redemptions, which is a nominal fee. Authorized Purchasers who make deposits with the Fund in exchange for baskets receive no fees, commissions or other form of compensation or inducement of any kind from either the Trust or the Sponsor, and no such person will have any obligation or responsibility to the Trust or the Sponsor to effect any sale or resale of Shares.
 
Certain Authorized Purchasers are expected to be capable of participating directly in the physical bitcoin and the bitcoin interest markets. Some Authorized Purchasers or their affiliates may from time to time buy or sell bitcoin or bitcoin interests and may profit in these instances.
 
Each Authorized Purchaser will be required to be registered as a broker-dealer under the Exchange Act and a member in good standing with FINRA or be exempt from being or otherwise not required to be registered as a broker-dealer or a member of FINRA, and will be qualified to act as a broker or dealer in the states or other jurisdictions where the nature of its business so requires. Certain Authorized Purchasers may also be regulated under federal and state banking laws and regulations. Each Authorized Purchaser has its own set of rules and procedures, internal controls and information barriers it deems appropriate in light of its own regulatory regime.
 
Under the Authorized Purchaser Agreement, the Sponsor has agreed to indemnify the Authorized Purchasers against certain liabilities, including liabilities under the 1933 Act, and to contribute to the payments the Authorized Purchasers may be required to make in respect of those liabilities.
 
The following description of the procedures for the creation and redemption of baskets is only a summary and an investor should refer to the relevant provisions of the Trust Agreement and the form of Authorized Purchaser Agreement for more detail, each of which has been incorporated by reference as an exhibit to the registration statement of which this prospectus is a part. See “Where You Can Find More Information” for information about where you can obtain the registration statement.
 
Creation Procedures
 
On any business day, an Authorized Purchaser may place an order with Global Fund Services in its capacity as the transfer agent to create one or more baskets. For purposes of processing purchase and redemption orders, a “business day” means any day other than a day when any of the NYSE Arca, the CME, or the New York Stock Exchange is closed for regular trading. Purchase orders must be placed by 3:00 p.m. (ET) or the close of regular trading on the New York Stock Exchange, whichever is earlier. The day on which the Distributor receives a valid purchase order is referred to as the purchase order date.
 
By placing a purchase order, an Authorized Purchaser agrees to deposit cash and/or cash equivalents with the Fund, as described below. Prior to the delivery of baskets for a purchase order, the Authorized Purchaser must also have wired to the Sponsor the non-refundable transaction fee due for the purchase order. Authorized Purchasers may not withdraw a purchase order without the prior consent of the Sponsor in its discretion.
 
Determination of Required Deposits
 
The total deposit required to create each basket (“Creation Basket Deposit”) is the amount of cash and/or cash equivalents that is in the same proportion to the total assets of the Fund (net of estimated accrued but unpaid fees, expenses and other liabilities) on the purchase order date as the number of Shares to be created under the purchase order is in proportion to the total number of Shares outstanding on the purchase order date. The Sponsor determines, directly in its sole discretion or in consultation with the Custodian and the Administrator, the requirements for cash and/or cash equivalents, including the remaining maturities of the cash equivalents, which may be included in deposits to create baskets. If cash equivalents are to be included in a Creation Basket Deposit for orders placed on a given business day, the Administrator will publish an estimate of the Creation Basket Deposit requirements at the beginning of such day.
 
Delivery of Required Deposits
 
An Authorized Purchaser who places a purchase order is responsible for transferring to the Fund’s account with the Custodian the required amount of cash and cash equivalents by the end of the next business day following the purchase order date or by the end of such later business day, not to exceed three business days after the purchase order date, as agreed to between the Authorized Purchaser and the Custodian when the purchase order is placed (the “Purchase Settlement Date”). Upon receipt of the deposit amount, the Custodian directs DTC to credit the number of baskets ordered to the Authorized Purchaser’s DTC account on the Purchase Settlement Date.
 
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Because orders to purchase baskets must be placed by 3:00 p.m., (ET), but the total payment required to create a basket during the continuous offering period will not be determined until 4:00 p.m., (ET), on the date the purchase order is received, Authorized Purchasers will not know the total amount of the payment required to create a basket at the time they submit an irrevocable purchase order for the basket. The Fund’s NAV and the total amount of the payment required to create a basket could rise or fall substantially between the time an irrevocable purchase order is submitted and the time the amount of the purchase price in respect thereof is determined.
 
Rejection of Purchase Orders
 
The Sponsor acting by itself or through the Distributor or transfer agent may reject a purchase order or a Creation Basket Deposit if:
 
it determines that, due to position limits or otherwise, investment alternatives that will enable the Fund to meet its investment objective are not available or practicable at that time;
 
it determines that the purchase order or the Creation Basket Deposit is not in proper form;
 
it believes that acceptance of the purchase order or the Creation Basket Deposit would have adverse tax consequences to the Fund or its Shareholders;
 
 
the acceptance or receipt of the Creation Basket Deposit would, in the opinion of counsel to the Sponsor, be unlawful;
 
circumstances outside the control of the Sponsor, Distributor or transfer agent make it, for all practical purposes, not feasible to process creations of baskets;
 
there is a possibility that any or all of the Benchmark Component Futures Contracts of the Fund on the CME from which the NAV of the Fund is calculated will be priced at a dynamic price limit restriction; or
 
if, in the sole discretion of the Sponsor, the execution of such an order would not be in the best interest of the Fund or its Shareholders.
 
None of the Sponsor, Distributor or transfer agent will be liable for the rejection of any purchase order or Creation Basket Deposit.
 
Redemption Procedures
 
The procedures by which an Authorized Purchaser can redeem one or more baskets mirror the procedures for the creation of baskets. On any business day, an Authorized Purchaser may place an order with the transfer agent to redeem one or more baskets. Redemption orders must be placed by 3:00 p.m. (ET) or the close of regular trading on the New York Stock Exchange, whichever is earlier. A redemption order so received will be effective on the date it is received in satisfactory form by the Distributor. The redemption procedures allow Authorized Purchasers to redeem baskets and do not entitle an individual Shareholder to redeem any Shares in an amount less than a Redemption Basket, or to redeem baskets other than through an Authorized Purchaser. By placing a redemption order, an Authorized Purchaser agrees to deliver the baskets to be redeemed through DTC’s book-entry system to the Fund by the end of the next business day following the effective date of the redemption order or by the end of such later business day. Prior to the delivery of the redemption distribution for a redemption order, the Authorized Purchaser must also have wired to the Sponsor’s account at the Custodian the non-refundable transaction fee due for the redemption order. An Authorized Purchaser may not withdraw a redemption order without the prior consent of the Sponsor in its discretion.
 
Determination of Redemption Distribution
 
The redemption distribution from the Fund consists of a transfer to the redeeming Authorized Purchaser of an amount of cash and/or cash equivalents that is in the same proportion to the total assets of the Fund (net of estimated accrued but unpaid fees, expenses and other liabilities) on the date the order to redeem is properly received as the number of Shares to be redeemed under the redemption order is in proportion to the total number of Shares outstanding on the date the order is received. The Sponsor, directly or in consultation with the Custodian and the Administrator, determines the requirements for cash and/or cash equivalents, including the remaining maturities of the cash equivalents and cash, which may be included in distributions to redeem baskets. If cash equivalents are to be included in a redemption distribution for orders placed on a given business day, the Custodian and Administrator will publish an estimate of the redemption distribution composition as of the beginning of such day.
 
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Delivery of Redemption Distribution
 
The redemption distribution due from a Fund will be delivered to the Authorized Purchaser on the Redemption Settlement Date if the Fund’s DTC account has been credited with the baskets to be redeemed. If the Fund’s DTC account has not been credited with all of the baskets to be redeemed by the end of such date, the redemption distribution will be delivered to the extent of whole baskets received. Any remainder of the redemption distribution will be delivered on the next business day after the Redemption Settlement Date to the extent of remaining whole baskets received. Pursuant to information from the Sponsor, the Custodian will also be authorized to deliver the redemption distribution notwithstanding that the baskets to be redeemed are not credited to the Fund’s DTC account by noon (ET) on the Redemption Settlement Date if the Authorized Purchaser has collateralized its obligation to deliver the baskets through DTC’s book-entry system on such terms as the Sponsor may from time to time determine.
 
Suspension or Rejection of Redemption Orders
 
The Sponsor may, in its discretion, suspend the right of redemption, or postpone the redemption settlement date, (1) for any period during which the NYSE Arca or CME is closed other than customary weekend or holiday closings, or trading on the NYSE Arca or CME is suspended or restricted, (2) for any period during which an emergency exists as a result of which delivery, disposal or evaluation of cash equivalents is not reasonably practicable, (3) for such other period as the Sponsor determines to be necessary for the protection of the Shareholders, (4) if there is a possibility that any or all of the Benchmark Component Futures Contracts of the Fund on the CME from which the NAV of the Fund is calculated will be priced at a daily price limit restriction, or (5) if, in the sole discretion of the Sponsor, the execution of such an order would not be in the best interest of the Fund or its Shareholders. For example, the Sponsor may determine that it is necessary to suspend redemptions to allow for the orderly liquidation of the Fund’s assets at an appropriate value to fund a redemption. If the Sponsor has difficulty liquidating the Fund’s positions, e.g., because of a market disruption event in the futures markets, it may be appropriate to suspend redemptions until such time as such circumstances are rectified. None of the Sponsor, the Distributor, or the transfer agent will be liable to any person or in any way for any loss or damages that may result from any such suspension or postponement.
 
Redemption orders must be made in whole baskets. The Sponsor will reject a redemption order if the order is not in proper form as described in the Authorized Purchaser Agreement or if the fulfillment of the order, in the opinion of its counsel, might be unlawful. The Sponsor may also reject a redemption order if the number of Shares being redeemed would reduce the remaining outstanding Shares below 50,000 Shares (i.e., five baskets of 10,000 Shares each) or less, unless the Sponsor has reason to believe that the placer of the redemption order does in fact possess all the outstanding Shares of the Fund and can deliver them.
 
Creation and Redemption Transaction Fees
 
To compensate for expenses in connection with the creation and redemption of baskets, an Authorized Purchaser is required to pay a transaction fee of $300 per order to the Custodian. The transaction fees may be reduced, increased or otherwise changed by the Sponsor.
 
Tax Responsibility
 
Authorized Purchasers are responsible for any transfer tax, sales or use tax, stamp tax, recording tax, value added tax or similar tax or governmental charge applicable to the creation or redemption of baskets, regardless of whether or not such tax or charge is imposed directly on the Authorized Purchaser, and agree to indemnify the Sponsor and the Fund if they are required by law to pay any such tax, together with any applicable penalties, additions to tax and interest thereon.
 
Secondary Market Transactions
 
As noted, the Fund will create and redeem Shares from time to time, but only in one or more Creation Baskets or Redemption Baskets. The creation and redemption of baskets are only made in exchange for delivery to the Fund or the distribution by the Fund of the amount of cash and cash equivalents equal to the total NAV of the number of Shares included in the baskets being created or redeemed determined on the day the order to create or redeem baskets is properly received.
 
As discussed above, Authorized Purchasers are the only persons that may place orders to create and redeem baskets. Authorized Purchasers must be registered broker-dealers or other securities market purchasers, such as banks and other financial institutions that are not required to register as broker-dealers to engage in securities transactions. An Authorized Purchaser is under no obligation to create or redeem baskets, and an Authorized Purchaser is under no obligation to offer to the public Shares of any baskets it does create. Authorized Purchasers that do offer to the public Shares from the baskets they create will do so at per Share offering prices that are expected to reflect, among other factors, the trading price of the Shares on the NYSE Arca, the NAV of the Shares at the time the Authorized Purchaser purchased the Creation Baskets, the NAV of the Shares at the time of the offer of the Shares to the public, the supply of and demand for Shares at the time of sale, and the liquidity of the bitcoin interest markets. The prices of Shares offered by Authorized Purchasers are expected to fall between the Fund’s NAV and the trading price of the Shares on the NYSE Arca at the time of sale. Shares initially comprising the same basket but offered by Authorized Purchasers to the public at different times may have different offering prices. An order for one or more baskets may be placed by an Authorized Purchaser on behalf of multiple clients. Shares are expected to trade in the secondary market on the NYSE Arca. Shares may trade in the secondary market at prices that are lower or higher relative to their NAV per Share. The amount of the discount or premium in the trading price relative to the NAV per Share may be influenced by various factors, including the number of investors who seek to purchase or sell Shares in the secondary market and the liquidity of the bitcoin interest markets. While the Shares trade on the NYSE Arca until 4:00 p.m. (ET), liquidity in the markets for bitcoin interests may be reduced after the close of the CME. As a result, during this time, trading spreads, and the resulting premium or discount, on the Shares may widen.
 
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Use of Proceeds
 
The Sponsor causes the Fund to transfer the proceeds of the sale of Creation Baskets to the Custodian or another financial institution for use in trading activities and/or investment in Benchmark Component Futures Contracts and cash and cash equivalents. Under normal market conditions, the Sponsor invests the Fund’s assets in Benchmark Component Futures Contracts and cash and cash equivalents. When the Fund purchases Benchmark Component Futures Contracts, the Fund is required to deposit with the FCM on behalf of the exchange a portion of the value of the contract or other interest as security to ensure payment for the obligation under the Benchmark Component Futures Contracts at maturity. This deposit is known as initial margin. The Sponsor invests the Fund’s assets that remain after margin and collateral is posted in cash and cash equivalents. Subject to these margin and collateral requirements, the Sponsor has sole authority to determine the percentage of assets that will be:
 
●  
held as margin or collateral with FCMs or other custodian;
●  
used for other investments; and
●  
held in bank accounts to pay current obligations and as reserves.
 
In general, the Fund expects that it will be required to post approximately 32% of the previous day settlement price of a Benchmark Component Futures Contracts as initial margin. Ongoing margin and collateral payments will generally be required for exchange-traded bitcoin interests based on changes in the value of the bitcoin interests. In light of the differing requirements for initial payments under exchange-traded bitcoin interests and the fluctuating nature of ongoing margin and collateral payments, it is not possible to estimate what portion of the Fund’s assets will be posted as margin or collateral at any given time. Cash and cash equivalents held by the Fund constitute reserves that are available to meet ongoing margin and collateral requirements. All interest or other income is used for the Fund’s benefit.
 
An FCM, counterparty, government agency or exchange could increase margin or collateral requirements applicable to the Fund to hold trading positions at any time. Moreover, margin is merely a security deposit and has no bearing on the profit or loss potential for any positions held.
 
The approximate 8-10% of the Fund’s assets held by the FCM are held in segregation pursuant to the CEA and CFTC regulations.
 
The Trust Agreement
 
The following paragraphs are a summary of certain provisions of the Trust Agreement. The following discussion is qualified in its entirety by reference to the Trust Agreement.
 
Authority of the Sponsor
 
The Sponsor is generally authorized to perform all acts deemed necessary to carry out the purposes of the Trust and to conduct the business of the Trust. The Trust and the Fund will continue to exist until terminated in accordance with the Trust Agreement.
 
The Sponsor’s Obligations
 
In addition to the duties imposed by the Delaware Trust Statute, under the Trust Agreement the Sponsor has obligations as a Sponsor of the Trust, which include, among others, responsibility for certain organizational and operational requirements of the Trust, as well as fiduciary responsibility for the safekeeping and use of the Trust’s assets, whether or not in the Sponsor’s immediate possession or control.
 
To the extent that, at law (common or statutory) or in equity, the Sponsor has duties (including fiduciary duties) and liabilities relating thereto to the Trust, the Fund, the Shareholders or to any other person, the Sponsor will not be liable to the Trust, the Fund, the Shareholders or to any other person for its good faith reliance on the provisions of the Trust Agreement or this prospectus unless such reliance constitutes gross negligence or willful misconduct on the part of the Sponsor. The provisions of the Trust Agreement, to the extent they restrict or eliminate the duties and liabilities of the Sponsor otherwise existing at law or in equity, replace such other duties and liabilities of the Sponsor.
 
Liability and Indemnification
 
Under the Trust Agreement, the Sponsor, the Trustee and their respective Affiliates (collectively, “Covered Persons”) shall have no liability to the Trust, the Fund, or to any Shareholder for any loss suffered by the Trust or the Fund which arises out of any action or inaction of such Covered Person if such Covered Person, in good faith, determined that such course of conduct was in the best interest of the Trust or the Fund and such course of conduct did not constitute gross negligence or willful misconduct of such Covered Person. Subject to the foregoing, neither the Sponsor nor any other Covered Person shall be personally liable for the return or repayment of all or any portion of the capital or profits of any Shareholder or assignee thereof, it being expressly agreed that any such return of capital or profits made pursuant to the Trust Agreement shall be made solely from the assets of the applicable Teucrium Fund without any rights of contribution from the Sponsor or any other Covered Person. A Covered Person shall not be liable for the conduct or willful misconduct of any administrator or other delegate selected by the Sponsor with reasonable care, provided, however, that the Trustee and its Affiliates shall not, under any circumstances be liable for the conduct or willful misconduct of any administrator or other delegate or any other person selected by the Sponsor to provide services to the Trust.
 
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The Trust Agreement also provides that the Sponsor shall be indemnified by the Trust (or by a series separately to the extent the matter in question relates to a single series or disproportionately affects a specific series in relation to other series) against any losses, judgments, liabilities, expenses (excluding any taxes on the compensation received for services as Sponsor or on indemnity payments received), and amounts paid in settlement of any claims sustained by it in connection with its activities for the Trust, provided that (i) the Sponsor was acting on behalf of or performing services for the Trust and has determined, in good faith, that such course of conduct was in the best interests of the Trust and such liability or loss was not the result of gross negligence, willful misconduct, or a breach of the Trust Agreement on the part of the Sponsor and (ii) any such indemnification will only be recoverable from the assets of the applicable series. The Sponsor’s rights to indemnification permitted under the Trust Agreement shall not be affected by the dissolution or other cessation to exist of the Sponsor, or the withdrawal, adjudication of bankruptcy or insolvency of the Sponsor, or the filing of a voluntary or involuntary petition in bankruptcy under Title 11 of the Bankruptcy Code by or against the Sponsor.
 
Notwithstanding the above, the Sponsor shall not be indemnified for any losses, liabilities or expenses arising from or out of an alleged violation of U.S. federal or state securities laws unless (i) there has been a successful adjudication on the merits of each count involving alleged securities law violations as to the particular indemnitee and the court approves the indemnification of such expenses (including, without limitation, litigation costs), (ii) such claims have been dismissed with prejudice on the merits by a court of competent jurisdiction as to the particular indemnitee and the court approves the indemnification of such expenses (including, without limitation, litigation costs), or (iii) a court of competent jurisdiction approves a settlement of the claims against a particular indemnitee and finds that indemnification of the settlement and related costs should be made.
 
The payment of any indemnification shall be allocated, as appropriate, among the Trust’s series. The Trust and its series shall not incur the cost of that portion of any insurance which insures any party against any liability, the indemnification of which is prohibited under the Trust Agreement.
 
Expenses incurred in defending a threatened or pending action, suit or proceeding against the Sponsor shall be paid by the Trust in advance of the final disposition of such action, suit or proceeding, if (i) the legal action relates to the performance of duties or services by the Sponsor on behalf of the Trust; (ii) the legal action is initiated by a party other than the Trust; and (iii) the Sponsor undertakes to repay the advanced funds with interest to the Trust in cases in which it is not entitled to indemnification.
 
The Trust Agreement provides that the Sponsor and the Trust shall indemnify the Trustee and its successors, assigns, legal representatives, officers, directors, Shareholders, employees, agents and servants (the “Trustee Indemnified Parties”) against any liabilities, obligations, losses, damages, penalties, taxes (excluding any taxes on the compensation received for services as Trustee or on indemnity payments received), claims, actions, suits, costs, expenses or disbursements which may be imposed on a Trustee Indemnified Party relating to or arising out of the formation, operation or termination of the Trust, the execution, delivery and performance of any other agreements to which the Trust is a party, or the action or inaction of the Trustee under the Trust Agreement or any other agreement, except for expenses resulting from the gross negligence or willful misconduct of a Trustee Indemnified Party. Further, certain officers of the Sponsor are insured against liability for certain errors or omissions which an officer may incur or that may arise out of his or her capacity as such.
 
In the event the Trust is made a party to any claim, dispute, demand or litigation or otherwise incurs any liability or expense as a result of or in connection with any Shareholder’s (or assignee’s) obligations or liabilities unrelated to the Trust business, such Shareholder (or assignees cumulatively) is required under the Trust Agreement to indemnify the Trust for all such liability and expense incurred, including attorneys’ and accountants’ fees.
 
Withdrawal of the Sponsor
 
The Sponsor may withdraw voluntarily as the Sponsor of the Trust only upon ninety (90) days’ prior written notice to the holders of the Trust’s outstanding Shares and the Trustee. If the withdrawing Sponsor is the last remaining Sponsor, Shareholders holding a majority (over 50%) of the outstanding Shares of the Teucrium Funds, voting together as a single class (not including Shares acquired by the Sponsor through its initial capital contribution) may vote to elect a successor Sponsor. The successor Sponsor will continue the business of the Trust. Shareholders have no right to remove the Sponsor.
 
In the event of withdrawal, the Sponsor is entitled to a redemption of the Shares it acquired through its initial capital contribution to any of the series of the Trust at their NAV per Share. If the Sponsor withdraws and a successor Sponsor is named, the withdrawing Sponsor shall pay all expenses as a result of its withdrawal.
 
Meetings
 
Meetings of the Trust’s Shareholders may be called by the Sponsor and will be called by it upon the written request of Shareholders holding at least 25% of the outstanding Shares of the Trust or the Fund, as applicable (not including Shares acquired by the Sponsor through its initial capital contribution). The Sponsor shall deposit in the United States mail or electronically transmit written notice to all Shareholders of the Fund of the meeting and the purpose of the meeting, which shall be held on a date not less than 30 nor more than 60 days after the date of mailing of such notice, at a reasonable time and place. Where the meeting is called upon the written request of the Shareholders of the Fund, or any other Teucrium Fund, as applicable, such written notice shall be mailed or transmitted not more than 45 days after such written request for a meeting was received by the Sponsor.
 
Voting Rights
 
Shareholders have no voting rights with respect to the Trust or the Fund except as expressly provided in the Trust Agreement. The Trust Agreement provides that Shareholders representing at least a majority (over 50%) of the outstanding Shares of the Teucrium Funds voting together as a single class (excluding Shares acquired by the Sponsor in connection with its initial capital contribution to any Trust series) may vote to (i) continue the Trust by electing a successor Sponsor as described above, and (ii) approve amendments to the Trust Agreement that impair the right to surrender Redemption Baskets for redemption. (Trustee consent to any amendment to the Trust Agreement is required if the Trustee reasonably believes that such amendment adversely affects any of its rights, duties or liabilities.) In addition, Shareholders holding Shares representing seventy-five percent (75%) of the outstanding Shares of the Teucrium Funds, voting together as a single class (excluding Shares acquired by the Sponsor in connection with its initial capital contribution to any Trust series) may vote to dissolve the Trust upon not less than ninety (90) days’ notice to the Sponsor.
 
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Limited Liability of Shareholders
 
Shareholders shall be entitled to the same limitation of personal liability extended to stockholders of private corporations for profit organized under the general corporation law of Delaware, and no Shareholder shall be liable for claims against, or debts of the Trust or the Fund in excess of his Share of the Fund’s assets. The Trust or the Fund shall not make a claim against a Shareholder with respect to amounts distributed to such Shareholder or amounts received by such Shareholder upon redemption unless, under Delaware law, such Shareholder is liable to repay such amount.
 
The Trust or the Fund shall indemnify to the full extent permitted by law and the Trust Agreement each Shareholder (excluding the Sponsor to the extent of its ownership of any Shares acquired through its initial capital contribution) against any claims of liability asserted against such Shareholder solely because of its ownership of Shares (other than for taxes on income from Shares for which such Shareholder is liable).
 
The Trust Agreement provides that every written note, bond, contract, instrument, certificate or undertaking made or issued by or on behalf of the Fund shall give notice to the effect that the obligations of such instrument are not binding upon the Shareholders individually but are binding only upon the assets and property of the Fund.
 
The Sponsor Has Conflicts of Interest
 
There are present and potential future conflicts of interest in the Trust’s structure and operation you should consider before you purchase Shares. The Sponsor may use this notice of conflicts as a defense against any claim or other proceeding made.
 
The Sponsor’s principals, officers and employees, do not devote their time exclusively to the Fund. Notwithstanding obligations and expectations related to the management of the Sponsor, the Sponsor’s principals, officers and employees may be directors, officers or employees of other entities, and may manage assets of other entities, including the other Teucrium Funds, through the Sponsor or otherwise. As a result, the principals could have a conflict between responsibilities to the Fund on the one hand and to those other entities on the other.
 
The Sponsor and its principals, officers and employees may trade securities, futures and related contracts for their own accounts, creating the potential for preferential treatment of their own accounts. Shareholders will not be permitted to inspect the trading records of such persons, or any written policies of the Sponsor related to such trading. A conflict of interest may exist if their trades are in the same markets and at approximately the same times as the trades for the Fund. A potential conflict also may occur when the Sponsor’s principals trade their accounts more aggressively or take positions in their accounts which are opposite, or ahead of, the positions taken by the Fund.
 
The Sponsor has sole current authority to manage the investments and operations of the Fund, and this may allow it to act in a way that furthers its own interests which may create a conflict with your best interests, including the authority of the Sponsor to allocate expenses to and between the Teucrium Funds. Shareholders have very limited voting rights with respect to the Fund, which will limit the ability to influence matters such as amendment of the Trust Agreement, change in the Fund’s basic investment policies, or dissolution of the Fund or the Trust.
 
The Sponsor serves as the Sponsor to the Teucrium Funds and may in the future serve as the Sponsor or investment adviser to commodity pools other than the Teucrium Funds. The Sponsor may have a conflict to the extent that its trading decisions for the Fund may be influenced by the effect they would have on the other pools it manages. In addition, the Sponsor may be required to indemnify the officers and directors of the other pools, if the need for indemnification arises. This potential indemnification will cause the Sponsor’s assets to decrease. If the Sponsor’s other sources of income are not sufficient to compensate for the indemnification, it could cease operations, which could in turn result in Fund losses and/or termination of the Fund.
 
In addition, the Sponsor may be required to indemnify the officers and directors of the other pools, if the need for indemnification arises. This potential indemnification will cause the Sponsor’s assets to decrease. If the Sponsor’s other sources of income are not sufficient to compensate for the indemnification, it could cease operations, which could in turn result in Fund losses and/or termination of the Fund.
 
If the Sponsor acquires knowledge of a potential transaction or arrangement that may be an opportunity for the Fund, it shall have no duty to offer such opportunity to the Fund. The Sponsor will not be liable to the Fund or the Shareholders for breach of any fiduciary or other duty if the Sponsor pursues such opportunity or directs it to another person or does not communicate such opportunity to the Fund and is not required to share income or profits derived from such business ventures with the Fund.
 
The Sponsor might have a potential future conflict of interest if the Sponsor, a new sponsor, or sub-adviser were to register as a broker-dealer or become affiliated with a broker-dealer. In such case, the Sponsor, new sponsor, or sub-adviser, as the case may be, would develop and implement appropriate procedures designed to prevent the use and dissemination of material non-public information regarding the Fund’s holdings.
 
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Resolution of Conflicts Procedures
 
The Trust Agreement provides that whenever a conflict of interest exists between the Sponsor or any of its Affiliates, on the one hand, and the Trust, any Shareholder of a Trust series, or any other person, on the other hand, the Sponsor shall resolve such conflict of interest, take such action or provide such terms, considering in each case the relative interest of each party (including its own interest) to such conflict, agreement, transaction or situation and the benefits and burdens relating to such interests, any customary or accepted industry practices, and any applicable generally accepted accounting practices or principles. In the absence of bad faith by the Sponsor, the resolution, action or terms so made, taken or provided by the Sponsor shall not constitute a breach of the Trust Agreement or any other agreement contemplated therein or of any duty or obligation of the Sponsor at law or in equity or otherwise.
 
Ownership or Beneficial Interest in the Fund
 
As of the date of this prospectus, the Sponsor owns four (4) Shares of the Fund. As of the date of this Prospectus, none of the principals of the Sponsor have an ownership interest in the Fund.
 
Interests of Named Experts and Counsel
 
No expert hired by the Fund to give advice on the preparation of this offering document has been hired on a contingent fee basis, nor do any of them have any present or future expectation of interest in the Sponsor, Distributor, Authorized Purchasers, Custodian/Administrator or other service providers to the Fund.
 
Provisions of Federal and State Securities Laws
 
This offering is made pursuant to federal and state securities laws. The SEC and state securities agencies take the position that indemnification of the Sponsor that arises out of an alleged violation of such laws is prohibited unless certain conditions are met. Those conditions require that no indemnification of the Sponsor or any underwriter for the Fund may be made in respect of any losses, liabilities or expenses arising from or out of an alleged violation of federal or state securities laws unless: (i) there has been a successful adjudication on the merits of each count involving alleged securities law violations as to the party seeking indemnification and the court approves the indemnification; (ii) such claim has been dismissed with prejudice on the merits by a court of competent jurisdiction as to the party seeking indemnification; or (iii) a court of competent jurisdiction approves a settlement of the claims against the party seeking indemnification and finds that indemnification of the settlement and related costs should be made, provided that, before seeking such approval, the Sponsor or other indemnitee must apprise the court of the position held by regulatory agencies against such indemnification.
 
Books and Records
 
The Trust keeps its books of record and account at its office located at Three Main Street, Suite 215, Burlington, VT 05401, or at the offices of the Administrator, U.S. Bancorp Fund Services, LLC, doing business as U.S. Bank Global Fund Services, located at 777 E. Wisconsin Ave, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53202, or such office, including of an administrative agent, as it may subsequently designate upon notice. The books of account of the Fund are open to inspection by any Shareholder (or any duly constituted designee of a Shareholder) at all times during the usual business hours of the Fund upon reasonable advance notice to the extent such access is required under CFTC rules and regulations. In addition, the Trust keeps a copy of the Trust Agreement on file in its office which will be available for inspection by any Shareholder at all times during its usual business hours upon reasonable advance notice.
 
Statements, Filings, and Reports to Shareholders
 
The Trust will furnish annual reports (as of the end of each fiscal year) for the Fund to DTC purchasers for distribution to Shareholders, as required to be provided to Shareholders by the CFTC and the NFA. These annual reports will contain financial statements prepared by the Sponsor and audited by an independent registered public accounting firm designated by the Sponsor. The Trust will also post monthly reports to the Fund’s website (http://hashdex-etfs.com/). These monthly reports will contain certain unaudited financial information regarding the Fund, including the Fund’s NAV. The Sponsor will furnish to the Shareholders other reports or information which the Sponsor, in its discretion, determines to be necessary or appropriate. In addition, under SEC rules the Trust will be required to file quarterly and annual reports for the Fund with the SEC, which need not be sent to Shareholders but will be publicly available through the SEC. The Trust will post the same information that would otherwise be provided in the Trust’s CFTC, NFA and SEC reports on the Fund’s website: http://hashdex-etfs.com/.
 
The accountants’ report on its audit of the Fund’s financial statements will be furnished by the Trust to Shareholders upon request. The Trust will file such tax returns, and prepare, disseminate and file such tax reports for the Fund as it is advised by its counsel or accountants are from time to time required by any applicable statute, rule or regulation and will make such tax elections for the Fund as it deems advisable.
 
PricewaterhouseCoopers (“PwC”) will provide tax information in accordance with the Code and applicable U.S. Treasury Regulations. Persons treated as intermediaries for purposes of these regulations may obtain tax information regarding the Fund from PwC or from the Fund’s website, http://hashdex-etfs.com/.
 
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Fiscal Year
 
The fiscal year of the Fund is the calendar year.
 
Governing Law
 
The rights of the Sponsor, the Trust, the Fund, DTC (as registered owner of the Fund’s global certificate for Shares) and the Shareholders are governed by the laws of the State of Delaware, except with respect to causes of action for violations of U.S. federal or state securities laws. The Trust Agreement and the effect of every provision thereof shall control over any contrary or limiting statutory or common law of the State of Delaware, other than the Delaware Trust Statute.
 
Legal Matters
 
Litigation and Claims
 
On November 30, 2020, certain officers and members of Teucrium Trading, LLC (the “Sponsor”), along with the Sponsor, filed a Verified Complaint (as amended through the Amended Verified Complaint filed on February 18, 2021) (the “Gilbertie complaint”) in the Delaware Court of Chancery, C.A. No. 2020-1018-AGB. The Gilbertie complaint asserts various claims against Dale Riker, the Sponsor’s former Chief Executive Officer and Barbara Riker, the Sponsor’s former Chief Financial Officer and Chief Compliance Officer. Sal Gilbertie v. Dale Riker, et al., C.A. No. 2020-1018-AGB (Del. Ch.) (the “Gilbertie case”).
 
Among other things, the Gilbertie complaint responded to and addressed certain allegations that Mr. Riker had made in a draft complaint that he threatened to file (and subsequently did file) in New York Supreme Court. See Dale Riker v. Sal Gilbertie, et al., No. 656794-2020 (N.Y. Sup. Ct.). On April 22, 2021, the Supreme Court of the State of New York, New York County dismissed Mr. Riker’s case without prejudice to the case being refiled after the conclusion of the Gilbertie case in Delaware Chancery Court. See Dale Riker, et al. v. Teucrium Trading, LLC et al, Decision + Order on Motions, No. 6567943-2020 (N.Y. Sup. Ct) (Apr. 22, 2021).
 
The Gilbertie complaint asserts claims for a declaration concerning the effects of the final order and judgment in an earlier books and records action; for a declaration concerning Mr. Riker’s allegation that Mr. Gilbertie had entered into an agreement to purchase Mr. Riker’s equity in the Sponsor; for an order compelling the return of property from Mr. Riker; for a declaration concerning Mr. Riker’s allegations that the Sponsor and certain of the plaintiffs had improperly removed him as an officer and caused purportedly false financial information to be published; for breach of Ms. Riker’s separation agreement with the Sponsor; for tortious interference by Mr. Riker with Ms. Riker’s separation agreement; for a declaration concerning the releases that had been provided to Ms. Riker through her separation agreement; for breach of the Sponsor’s Operating Agreement by Mr. Riker; and for breach of fiduciary duty by Mr. Riker. The claims for declaratory relief and for return of property have since been dismissed.
 
On June 28, 2021, Dale Riker, individually and derivatively on behalf of the Sponsor, filed a new suit in the Court of Chancery of the State of Delaware against the Sponsor’s officers and certain of the Sponsor’s Class A Members. See Dale Riker v. Salvatore Gilbertie et al., C.A. No. 2021-0561-LWW. (the “Riker case”). The Court ordered Mr. Riker’s newly filed Delaware action consolidated with the Gilbertie case. As a result, on September 7, 2021, Dale Riker and Barbara Riker filed their answers to the Gilbertie complaint, and the claims in the Riker case were re-filed as counterclaims in the Gilbertie case, along with claims by Barbara Riker, which accompanied the Rikers’ answers. The now-consolidated Gilbertie case and the Riker case is captioned Sal Gilbertie, Cory Mullen-Rusin, Steve Kahler, Carl Miller III, and Teucrium Trading LLC v. Dale Riker and Barbara Riker, C.A. No. 2020-1018-LWW.
 
Through their counterclaims, the Rikers asserted direct and derivative claims for breach of fiduciary duty, breach of contract, declaratory relief, specific performance, unjust enrichment, fraud, and conspiracy to commit fraud. The Sponsor and the individual plaintiffs/counterclaim-defendants moved to dismiss the Rikers’ claims.
 
On April 6, 2022, the Court announced its decision on the motion to dismiss in an oral ruling, which was subsequently implemented in a written order dated April 18, 2022. The Court dismissed all of the Rikers’ counterclaims, except for a portion of one count alleging breach of contract against Messrs. Gilbertie and Miller. All of the dismissals were with prejudice, with the exception of the dismissal of Mr. Riker’s claim against Mr. Gilbertie that sought specific performance of an alleged agreement for Mr. Gilbertie to purchase Mr. Riker’s equity in the Company. The Court dismissed that claim without prejudice. On April 25, 2022, Mr. Riker filed a motion for reconsideration of the Court’s dismissal of his derivative claims for breach of contract against Mr. Gilbertie and for unjust enrichment against Mr. Gilbertie, Mr. Miller, Mr. Kahler, and Ms. Mullen-Rusin, both of which concern the Company’s advancement of legal fees on behalf of those individuals. On May 11, 2022, the Court denied Mr. Riker’s motion for reconsideration. On May 2, 2022, the Rikers filed an amended counterclaim, which reasserted the claim against Mr. Gilbertie that the Court had dismissed without prejudice.
 
The Sponsor intends to pursue its claims and defend vigorously against the Rikers’ counterclaims in Delaware.
 
Except as described above, within the past 10 years of the date of this prospectus, there have been no material administrative, civil or criminal actions against the Sponsor, the Trust or the Fund, or any principal or affiliate of any of them. This includes any actions pending, on appeal, concluded, threatened, or otherwise known to them.
 
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Legal Opinion
 
Vedder Price, P.C. (“Vedder Price”) has been retained to advise the Trust and the Sponsor with respect to the Shares being offered hereby and has passed upon the validity of the Shares being issued hereunder. Vedder Price has also provided the Sponsor with its opinion with respect to U.S. federal income tax matters addressed below in “U.S. Federal Income Tax Considerations.”
 
Experts
 
The financial statements of the Trust incorporated by reference in this prospectus and elsewhere in the registration statement have been so incorporated by reference in reliance upon the reports of Grant Thornton LLP (“Grant Thornton”), independent registered public accountants, upon the authority of said firm as experts in accounting and auditing. The financial statement of the Fund included in this prospectus and elsewhere in the registration statement has been so included in reliance upon the report of Grant Thornton, independent registered public accountants, upon the authority of said firm as experts in accounting and auditing.
 
Privacy Policy
 
The following discussion is qualified in its entirety by reference to the privacy policy. A copy of the privacy policy is available at www.teucrium.com.
 
The Sponsor, the Trust, and the Teucrium Funds have adopted a privacy policy relating to the collection, maintenance, and use of nonpublic personal information about the Teucrium Funds’ current and former investors, as required under federal law. Federal law gives investors the right to limit some but not all sharing of their nonpublic personal information. Federal law also requires the Sponsor to tell investors how it collects, Shares, and protects such nonpublic personal information.
 
Collection of Nonpublic Personal Information
 
The Sponsor may collect or have access to nonpublic personal information about current and former Fund investors for certain purposes relating to the operation of the Funds. This information may include information received from investors, such as their name, social security number, telephone number, and address, and information about investors’ holdings and transactions in Shares of the Teucrium Funds.
 
Use and Disclosure of Nonpublic Personal Information
 
The Sponsor does not sell nonpublic personal information to any third parties. The Sponsor primarily uses investors’ nonpublic personal information to complete financial transactions that may be requested. The Sponsor may disclose investors’ nonpublic personal information to third parties under specific circumstances described in the privacy policy. These circumstances include, among others, information needed to complete financial transactions, information released at the direction of an investor, and certain information requested by courts, regulators, law enforcement, or tax authorities. Investors may not opt out of these disclosures.
 
Investors’ nonpublic personal information, particularly information about investors’ holdings and transactions in Shares of the Teucrium Funds, may be shared between and amongst the Sponsor and the Teucrium Funds. An investor cannot opt-out of the sharing of nonpublic personal information between and amongst the Sponsor and the Teucrium Funds. However, the Sponsor and the Teucrium Funds will not use this information for any cross-marketing purposes. In other words, all investors will be treated as having “opted out” of receiving marketing solicitations from Teucrium Funds other than the Teucrium Fund(s) in which it invests.
 
Protection of Nonpublic Personal Information
 
As described in the privacy policy, the Sponsor takes safeguards to protect investors’ nonpublic personal information, which include, among others, restricting access to such information, requiring third parties to follow appropriate standards of security and confidentiality, and maintaining physical, technical, administrative, and procedural safeguards.
 
The Sponsor’s Website is hosted in the United States and any data provided to the Sponsor is stored in the United States. If you choose to provide Personal Data from regions outside of the United States, then by your submission of such data, you acknowledge and agree that: (a) you are transferring your personal information outside of those regions to the United States voluntarily and with consent; (b) the laws and regulations of the United States shall govern your use of the provision of your information, which laws and regulations may differ from those of your country of residence; and (c) you permit your personal information to be used for the purposes herein and in the Privacy Policy above.
 
U.S. Federal Income Tax Considerations
 
The following discussion summarizes the material U.S. federal income tax consequences of the purchase, ownership and disposition of Shares of the Fund and the U.S. federal income tax treatment of the Fund. Except where noted otherwise, it deals only with the U.S. federal income tax consequences relating to Shares held as capital assets by U.S. Shareholders (as defined below) who are not subject to special tax treatment. For example, in general it does not address the tax consequences, such as, but not limited to dealers in securities or currencies or commodities, traders in securities or dealers or traders in commodities that elect to use a mark to market method of accounting, financial institutions, regulated investment companies (except as discussed below), tax-exempt entities (except as discussed below), insurance companies, persons holding Shares as a part of a position in a “straddle” or as part of a “hedging,” “conversion” or other integrated transaction for U.S. federal income tax purposes, persons with “applicable financial statements” within the meaning of section 451(b) of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended (the “Code”), or holders of Shares whose “functional currency” is not the U.S. dollar. Furthermore, the discussion below is based on the provisions of the Code, and regulations (“Treasury Regulations”), rulings and judicial decisions thereunder as of the date hereof, and such authorities may be repealed, revoked or modified (possibly with retroactive effect) so as to result in U.S. federal income tax consequences different from those discussed below.
 
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The Sponsor has received the opinion of Vedder Price, counsel to the Trust, that the material U.S. federal income tax consequences to the Fund and to U.S. Shareholders and Non-U.S. Shareholders (as defined below) will be as described in the following paragraphs. In rendering its opinion, Vedder Price has relied on the facts and assumptions described in this prospectus as well as certain factual representations made by the Trust, the Fund, and the Sponsor. This opinion is not binding on the Internal Revenue Service (the “IRS”) and will not be a guarantee of the results. No ruling has been requested from the IRS with respect to any matter affecting the Fund or prospective investors, and the IRS may disagree with the tax positions taken by the Trust. If the IRS were to challenge the Trust’s tax positions in litigation, they might not be sustained by the courts. No statutory, administrative or judicial authority directly addresses the treatment of the Shares or instruments similar to the Shares for U.S. federal income tax purposes. As a result, the Trust cannot assure investors that the IRS or the courts will agree with the tax consequences described herein. A different treatment from that described below could adversely affect the amount, timing and character of income, gain or loss in respect of an investment in the Shares and could adversely affect the value of the Shares.
 
As used herein, the term “U.S. Shareholder” means a Shareholder that is, for U.S. federal income tax purposes, (i) a citizen or resident of the United States, (ii) a corporation created or organized in or under the laws of the United States or any political subdivision thereof, (iii) an estate the income of which is subject to U.S. federal income taxation regardless of its source or (iv) a trust that (a) is subject to the supervision of a court within the United States and the control of one or more United States persons as described in section 7701(a)(30) of the Code, or (b) has a valid election in effect under applicable Treasury Regulations to be treated as a United States person. A “Non-U.S. Shareholder” is a holder that is not a U.S. Shareholder. If a partnership or other entity or arrangement treated as a partnership holds our Shares, the tax treatment of a partner will generally depend upon the status of the partner and the activities of the partnership. If you are a partner of a partnership holding our Shares, the discussion below may not be applicable to you and you should consult your own tax advisor regarding the tax consequences of acquiring, owning and disposing of Shares.
 
EACH PROSPECTIVE INVESTOR IS ADVISED TO CONSULT ITS OWN TAX ADVISOR REGARDING THE U.S. FEDERAL INCOME TAX CONSEQUENCES OF AN INVESTMENT IN SHARES, AS WELL AS ANY APPLICABLE STATE, LOCAL OR FOREIGN TAX CONSEQUENCES, IN LIGHT OF ITS PARTICULAR CIRCUMSTANCES.
 
Tax Classification of the Trust and the Fund
 
The Trust is organized and will be operated as a statutory trust in accordance with the provisions of the Trust Agreement and applicable Delaware law. Notwithstanding the Trust’s status as a statutory trust and the Fund’s status as a series of the Trust, due to the nature of its activities the Fund will not be classified as a trust for U.S. federal income tax purposes, but rather will be classified as a partnership for such purposes. The trading of Shares on the NYSE Arca will cause the Fund to be classified as a “publicly traded partnership” for U.S. federal income tax purposes. Under section 7704 of the Code, a publicly traded partnership is generally taxable as a corporation. In the case of an entity not registered under the Investment Company Act of 1940 as amended, (such as the Fund) and not meeting certain other conditions, however, an exception to this general rule applies if at least 90% of the entity’s gross income is “qualifying income” for each taxable year of its existence (the “qualifying income exception”). For this purpose, qualifying income is defined as including, in pertinent part, interest (other than from a financial business), dividends, and gains from the sale or disposition of capital assets held for the production of interest or dividends. In the case of a partnership of which a principal activity is the buying and selling of commodities other than as inventory or of futures, forwards and options with respect to commodities, “qualifying income” also includes income and gains from commodities and from such futures, forwards, options, and, provided the partnership is a trader or investor with respect to such assets, swaps and other notional principal contracts with respect to commodities.
 
There is very limited authority on the U.S. federal income tax treatment of bitcoin and no direct authority on bitcoin derivatives, such as Bitcoin Futures Contracts. Vedder Price is of the opinion that Bitcoin Futures Contracts more likely than not will be considered futures with respect to commodities for purposes of the qualifying income exception under section 7704 of the Code. Based on the opinion of Vedder Price and a CFTC determination that treats bitcoin as a commodity under the CEA, the Fund intends to take the position that Bitcoin Futures Contracts consist of futures on commodities for purposes of the qualifying income exception under section 7704 of the Code. Shareholders should be aware that the Fund’s position is not binding on the IRS, and no assurance can be given that the IRS will not challenge the Fund’s position, or that the IRS or a court will not ultimately reach a contrary conclusion, which would result in the material adverse consequences to Shareholders and the Fund discussed below.
 
The Trust and the Sponsor have represented the following to Vedder Price:
 
assuming Bitcoin Futures Contracts consist of futures on commodities for purposes of the qualifying income exception under section 7704(d) of the Code, at least 90% of the Fund’s gross income for each taxable year will constitute “qualifying income” within the meaning of Code section 7704 (as described above);
 
the Fund is organized and will be operated in accordance with its governing documents and applicable law; and
 
the Fund has not elected, and will not elect, to be classified as a corporation for U.S. federal income tax purposes.
 
Based in part on these representations, Vedder Price is of the opinion that the Fund more likely than not will be treated as a partnership that it is not taxable as a corporation for U.S. federal income tax purposes. The Fund’s taxation as a partnership rather than a corporation will require the Sponsor to conduct the Fund’s business activities in such a manner that it satisfies the requirements of the qualifying income exception on a continuing basis. No assurances can be given that the Fund’s operations for any given year will produce income that satisfies these requirements. Vedder Price will not review the Fund’s ongoing compliance with these requirements and will have no obligation to advise the Trust, the Fund or the Fund’s Shareholders in the event of any subsequent change in the facts, representations or applicable law relied upon in reaching its opinion.
 
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If the Fund failed to satisfy the qualifying income exception in any year, other than a failure that is determined by the IRS to be inadvertent and that is cured within a reasonable time after discovery (in which case, as a condition of relief, the Fund could be required to pay the government amounts determined by the IRS), the Fund would be taxable as a corporation for U.S. federal income tax purposes and would pay U.S. federal income tax on its income at regular corporate tax rates. In that event, Shareholders would not report their share of the Fund’s income or loss on their tax returns. Distributions by the Fund (if any) would be treated as dividend income to the Shareholders to the extent of the Fund’s current and accumulated earnings and profits, then treated as a tax-free return of capital to the extent of the Shareholder’s basis in the Shares (and will reduce the basis), and, to the extent it exceeds a Shareholder’s basis in such Shares, as capital gain for Shareholders who hold their Shares as capital assets. Accordingly, if the Fund were to be taxable as a corporation, it would likely have a material adverse effect on the economic return from an investment in the Fund and on the value of the Shares.
 
The remainder of this summary assumes that the Fund is classified for U.S. federal income tax purposes as a partnership that it is not taxable as a corporation.
 
U.S. Shareholders
 
Tax Consequences of Ownership of Shares
 
Taxation of the Fund’s Income. No U.S. federal income tax is paid by the Fund on its income. Instead, the Fund files annual partnership returns, and each U.S. Shareholder is required to report on its U.S. federal income tax return its allocable share of the income, gain, loss, deductions and credits reflected on such partnership returns. If the Fund recognizes income, including interest on cash equivalents and net capital gains from cash settlement of Benchmark Component Futures Contracts for a taxable year, Shareholders must report their share of these items even though the Fund makes no distributions of cash or property during the taxable year. Consequently, a Shareholder may be taxable on income or gain recognized by the Fund but receive no cash distribution with which to pay the resulting tax liability or may receive a distribution that is insufficient to pay such liability. Because the Sponsor currently does not intend to make distributions, it is likely that a U.S. Shareholder that realizes net income or gain with respect to Shares for a taxable year will be required to pay any resulting tax from sources other than Fund distributions. Additionally, individuals with modified adjusted gross income in excess of $200,000 ($250,000 in the case of married individuals filing jointly) and certain estates and trusts are subject to an additional 3.8% tax on their “net investment income,” which generally includes net income from interest, dividends, annuities, royalties, and rents, and net capital gains (other than certain amounts earned from trades or businesses). Also included as income subject to the additional 3.8% tax is income from businesses involved in the trading of financial instruments or commodities. Shareholders subject to this provision may be required to pay this 3.8% tax on interest income and capital gains allocated to them by the Fund.
 
Monthly Conventions for Allocations of the Fund’s Profit and Loss and Capital Account Restatements. Under Code section 704, the determination of a partner’s distributive share of any item of income, gain, loss, deduction or credit is governed by the applicable organizational document unless the allocation provided by such document lacks “substantial economic effect.” An allocation that lacks substantial economic effect nonetheless will be respected if it is in accordance with the partners’ interests in the partnership, determined by considering all facts and circumstances relating to the economic arrangements among the partners. Subject to the possible exception for certain conventions to be used by the Fund as discussed below, allocations pursuant to the Trust Agreement should be considered as having substantial economic effect or being in accordance with Shareholders’ interests in the Fund.
 
In situations where a partner’s interest in a partnership is redeemed or sold during a taxable year, the Code generally requires that partnership tax items for the year be allocated to the partner using either an interim closing of the books or a daily proration method. The Fund intends to allocate tax items using an interim closing of the book’s method under which income, gains, losses and deductions will be determined on a monthly basis, taking into account the Fund’s accrued income and deductions and gains and losses (both realized and unrealized) for the month. The tax items for each month during a taxable year will then be allocated among the holders of Shares in proportion to the number of Shares owned by them as of the close of trading on the last trading day of the preceding month (the “monthly allocation convention”).
 
Under the monthly allocation convention, an investor who disposes of a Share during the current month will be treated as disposing of the Share as of the end of the last day of the calendar month. For example, an investor who buys a Share on April 10 of a year and sells it on May 20 of the same year will be allocated all of the tax items attributable to May (because it is deemed to hold the Share through the last day of May) but none of those attributable to April. The tax items attributable to that Share for April will be allocated to the person who held the Share as of the close of trading on the last trading day of March. Under the monthly allocation convention, an investor who purchases and sells a Share during the same month, and therefore does not hold (and is not deemed to hold) the Share at the close of the last trading day of either that month or the previous month, will receive no allocations with respect to that Share for any period. Accordingly, investors may receive no allocations with respect to Shares that they actually held or may receive allocations with respect to Shares attributable to periods that they did not actually hold the Shares.
 
By investing in Shares, a U.S. Shareholder agrees that, in the absence of new legislation, regulatory or administrative guidance, or judicial rulings to the contrary, it will file its U.S. income tax returns in a manner that is consistent with the monthly allocation convention as described above and with the IRS Schedule K-1 or any successor form provided to Shareholders by the Fund or the Trust.
 
For any month in which a Creation Basket is issued or a Redemption Basket is redeemed, the Fund will credit or debit the “book” capital accounts of existing Shareholders with the amount of any unrealized gain or loss, respectively, on Fund assets. For this purpose, the Fund will use a convention whereby unrealized gain or loss will be computed based on the lowest NAV of the Fund’s assets during the month in which Shares are issued or redeemed, which may be different than the value of the assets on the date of an issuance or redemption. The capital accounts as adjusted in this manner will be used in making tax allocations intended to account for differences between the tax basis and fair market value of property owned by the Fund at the time new Shares are issued or outstanding Shares are redeemed (so-called “reverse Code section 704(c) allocations”). The intended effect of these adjustments is to equitably allocate among Shareholders any unrealized appreciation or depreciation in the Fund’s assets existing at the time of a contribution or redemption for book and tax purposes.
The conventions used by the Fund, as noted above, in making tax allocations may cause a Shareholder to be allocated more or less income or loss for U.S. federal income tax purposes than its proportionate share of the economic income or loss realized by the Fund during the period it held its Shares. This mismatch between taxable and economic income or loss in some cases may be temporary, reversing itself in a later year when the Shares are sold, but could be permanent. As one example, a Shareholder could be allocated income accruing after it sold its Shares, resulting in an increase in the basis of the Shares (see “Tax Basis of Shares,” below). In connection with the disposition of the Shares, the additional basis might produce a capital loss the deduction of which may be limited (see “Limitations on Deductibility of Losses and Certain Expenses,” below).
 
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Section 754 election. The Fund intends to make the election permitted by section 754 of the Code, which election is irrevocable without the consent of the IRS. The effect of this election is that when a secondary market sale of Shares occurs, the Fund adjusts the purchaser’s proportionate share of the tax basis of the Fund’s assets to fair market value, as reflected in the price paid for the Shares, as if the purchaser had directly acquired an interest in the Fund’s assets. The section 754 election is intended to eliminate disparities between a partner’s basis in its partnership interest and its share of the tax basis of the partnership’s assets, so that the partner’s allocable share of taxable gain or loss on a disposition of an asset will correspond to its share of the appreciation or depreciation in the value of the asset since it acquired its interest. Depending on the price paid for Shares and the tax basis of the Fund’s assets at the time of the purchase, the effect of the section 754 election on a purchaser of Shares may be favorable or unfavorable. In order to make the appropriate basis adjustments in a cost-effective manner, the Fund will use certain simplifying conventions and assumptions. In particular, the Fund will obtain information regarding secondary market transactions in its Shares and use this information to adjust the Shareholders’ indirect basis in the Fund’s assets. It is possible the IRS could successfully assert that the conventions and assumptions applied are improper and require different basis adjustments to be made, which could adversely affect some Shareholders.
 
Section 1256 Contracts. Under the Code, special rules apply to instruments constituting “section 1256 contracts.” A section 1256 contract is defined as including, in relevant part: (1) a futures contract that is traded on or subject to the rules of a national securities exchange which is registered with the SEC, a domestic board of trade designated as a contract market by the CFTC, or any other board of trade or exchange designated by the Secretary of the Treasury (a “qualified board or exchange”), and with respect to which the amount required to be deposited and the amount that may be withdrawn depends on a system of “marking to market”; and (2) a non-equity option traded on or subject to the rules of a qualified board or exchange. Section 1256 contracts held at the end of each taxable year are treated as if they were sold for their fair market value on the last business day of the taxable year (i.e., are “marked to market”). In addition, any gain or loss realized from a disposition, termination or marking to market of a section 1256 contract is treated as long-term capital gain or loss to the extent of 60% thereof, and as short-term capital gain or loss to the extent of 40% thereof, without regard to the actual holding period (“60-40 treatment”).
 
The Sponsor expects that many of the Fund’s Bitcoin Futures Contracts will qualify as “section 1256 contracts” under the Code. Some other bitcoin interests that are cleared through a qualified board or exchange will also constitute section 1256 contracts. Any gain or loss recognized as a result of the disposition, termination or marking to market of the Fund’s section 1256 contracts will be subject to 60-40 treatment and allocated to Shareholders in accordance with the monthly allocation convention. Commodity swaps will most likely not qualify as section 1256 contracts. If a commodity swap is not taxable as a section 1256 contract, any gain or loss on the swap will be recognized at the time of disposition or termination as long-term or short-term capital gain or loss depending on the holding period of the swap in the Fund’s hands.
 
Foreign exchange gains and losses realized by the Fund in connection with certain transactions involving foreign currency-denominated debt securities, certain futures contracts, forward contracts, options and similar investments denominated in a foreign currency, and payables or receivables denominated in a foreign currency are subject to section 988 of the Code, which generally causes such gain and loss to be treated as ordinary income or loss. To the extent the Fund hold foreign investments, it may be subject to withholding and other taxes imposed by foreign countries. Tax treaties between certain countries and the United States may reduce or eliminate such taxes. Because the amount of the Fund’s investments in various countries will change from time to time, it is not possible to determine the effective rate of such taxes in advance.
 
Limitations on Deductibility of Losses and Certain Expenses. A number of different provisions of the Code may defer or disallow the deduction of losses or expenses allocated to Shareholders by the Fund, including but not limited to those described below.
 
A Shareholder’s deduction of its allocable share of any loss of the Fund is limited to the lesser of (1) the tax basis in its Shares or (2) in the case of a Shareholder that is an individual or a closely held corporation, the amount which the Shareholder is considered to have “at risk” with respect to the Fund’s activities. In general, the amount at risk initially will be a Shareholder’s invested capital. Losses in excess of the amount at risk must be deferred until years in which the Fund generates additional taxable income against which to offset such carryover losses or until additional capital is placed at risk.
 
Individuals and other non-corporate taxpayers are permitted to deduct capital losses only to the extent of their capital gains for the taxable year plus $3,000 of other income. Unused capital losses can be carried forward and used in future years, subject to these same limitations. In addition, an individual taxpayer may elect to carry back net losses on section 1256 contracts to each of the three preceding years and use them to offset section 1256 contract gains in those years, subject to certain limitations. Corporate taxpayers generally may deduct capital losses only to the extent of capital gains, subject to special carryback and carryforward rules.
 
The deduction for expenses incurred by non-corporate taxpayers constituting “miscellaneous itemized deductions,” generally including investment-related expenses (other than interest and certain other specified expenses), is suspended for taxable years beginning after December 31, 2017 and before January 1, 2026. During these taxable years, non-corporate taxpayers will not be able to deduct miscellaneous itemized deductions. Provided the suspension is not extended, for taxable years ending on or after January 1, 2026, miscellaneous itemized deductions are deductible only to the extent they exceed 2% of the taxpayer’s adjusted gross income for the year. Although the matter is not free from doubt, we believe management fees the Fund pays to the Sponsor and other expenses of the Fund will constitute investment-related expenses subject to this miscellaneous itemized deduction limitation, rather than expenses incurred in connection with a trade or business and will report these expenses consistent with that interpretation. For taxable years beginning on or after January 1, 2026, the Code imposes additional limitations on the amount of certain itemized deductions allowable to individuals with adjusted gross income in excess of certain amounts by reducing the otherwise allowable portion of such deductions by an amount equal to the lesser of:
 
3% of the individual’s adjusted gross income in excess of certain threshold amounts; or
 
80% of the amount of certain itemized deductions otherwise allowable for the taxable year.
 
Non-corporate Shareholders generally may deduct “investment interest expense” only to the extent of their “net investment income.” Investment interest expense of a Shareholder will generally include any interest expense accrued by the Fund and any interest paid or accrued on direct borrowings by a Shareholder to purchase or carry its Shares, such as interest with respect to a margin account. Net investment income generally includes gross income from property held for investment (including “portfolio income” under the passive loss rules but not, absent an election, long-term capital gains or certain qualifying dividend income) less deductible expenses other than interest directly connected with the production of investment income.
 
If the Fund incurs indebtedness that is treated as allocable to a trade or business, the Fund’s ability to deduct interest on such indebtedness allocable is limited to an amount equal to the sum of (1) the Fund’s business interest income during the year and (2) 30% of the Fund’s adjusted taxable income for such taxable year. If the Fund is not entitled to fully deduct its business interest in any taxable year, such excess business interest expense will be allocated to each Shareholder as excess business interest and can be carried forward by the Shareholder to successive taxable years and used to offset any excess taxable income allocated by the Fund to such Shareholder. Any excess business interest expense allocated to a Shareholder will reduce such Shareholder’s basis in its Shares in the year of the allocation even if the expense does not give rise to a deduction to the Shareholder in that year. Immediately prior to a Shareholder’s disposition of its Shares, the Shareholder’s basis will be increased by the amount by which such basis reduction exceeds the excess interest expense that has been deducted by such Shareholder.
 
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To the extent that the Fund allocates losses or expenses to you that must be deferred or are disallowed as a result of these or other limitations in the Code, you may be taxed on income in excess of your economic income or distributions (if any) on your Shares. As one example, you could be allocated and required to pay tax on your share of interest income accrued by the Fund for a particular taxable year, and in the same year be allocated a share of a capital loss that you cannot deduct currently because you have insufficient capital gains against which to offset the loss. As another example, you could be allocated and required to pay tax on your share of interest income and capital gain for a year but be unable to deduct some or all of your share of management fees and/or margin account interest incurred by you with respect to your Shares. Shareholders are urged to consult their own tax advisor regarding the effect of limitations under the Code on their ability to deduct their allocable share of the Fund’s losses and expenses.
 
Tax Basis of Shares
 
A Shareholder’s tax basis in its Shares is important in determining (1) the amount of taxable gain or loss it will realize on the sale or other disposition of its Shares, (2) the amount of non-taxable distributions that it may receive from the Fund, and (3) its ability to utilize its distributive share of any losses of the Fund on its U.S. federal income tax return. A Shareholder’s initial tax basis of its Shares will equal its cost for the Shares plus its share of the Fund’s liabilities (if any) at the time of purchase. In general, a Shareholder’s “share” of those liabilities will equal the sum of (i) the entire amount of any otherwise nonrecourse liability of the Fund as to which the Shareholder or certain affiliates of the Shareholder is the creditor (a “partner nonrecourse liability”) and (ii) a pro rata share of any nonrecourse liabilities of the Fund that are not partner nonrecourse liabilities as to any Shareholder.
 
A Shareholder’s tax basis in its Shares generally will be (1) increased by (a) its allocable share of the Fund’s taxable income and gain and (b) any additional contributions by the Shareholder to the Fund and (2) decreased (but not below zero) by (a) its allocable share of the Fund’s tax deductions and losses and (b) any distributions by the Fund to the Shareholder. For this purpose, an increase in a Shareholder’s share of the Fund’s liabilities will be treated as a contribution of cash by the Shareholder to the Fund and a decrease in that share will be treated as a distribution of cash by the Fund to the Shareholder. Pursuant to certain IRS rulings, a Shareholder will be required to maintain a single, “unified” basis in all Shares that it owns. As a result, when a Shareholder that acquired its Shares at different prices sells less than all of its Shares, such Shareholder will not be entitled to specify particular Shares (e.g., those with a higher basis) as having been sold. Rather, it must determine its gain or loss on the sale by using an “equitable apportionment” method to allocate a portion of its unified basis in its Shares to the Shares sold.
 
Treatment of Fund Distributions. If the Fund makes non-liquidating distributions to Shareholders, such distributions generally will not be taxable to the Shareholders for U.S. federal income tax purposes except to the extent that the amount of money distributed exceeds the Shareholder’s adjusted basis of its interest in the Fund immediately before the distribution. Any money distributed that is in excess of a Shareholder’s tax basis generally will be treated as gain from the sale or exchange of Shares. For purposes of determining the gain recognized on a distribution from a partnership, a marketable security distributed to a partner is generally treated as money. This treatment, however, does not apply to distributions to “eligible partners” of an “investment partnership,” as those terms are defined in the Code.
 
Tax Consequences of Disposition of Shares
 
If a Shareholder sells its Shares, it will recognize gain or loss equal to the difference between the amount realized and its adjusted tax basis for the Shares sold. A Shareholder’s amount realized will be the sum of the cash or the fair market value of other property received plus its share of the Fund’s liabilities.
 
Gain or loss recognized by a Shareholder on the sale or exchange of Shares held for more than one year will generally be taxable as long-term capital gain or loss; otherwise, such gain or loss will generally be taxable as short-term capital gain or loss. A special election is available under the Treasury Regulations that allows Shareholders to identify and use the actual holding periods for the Shares sold for purposes of determining whether the gain or loss recognized on a sale of Shares will give rise to long-term or short-term capital gain or loss. It is expected that most Shareholders will be eligible to elect, and generally will elect, to identify and use the actual holding period for Shares sold. If a Shareholder who has differing holding periods for its Shares fails to make the election or is not able to identify the holding periods of the Shares sold, the Shareholder will have a split holding period in the Shares sold. Under such circumstances, a Shareholder will be required to determine its holding period in the Shares sold by first determining the portion of its entire interest in the Fund that would give rise to long-term capital gain or loss if its entire interest were sold and the portion that would give rise to short-term capital gain or loss if the entire interest were sold. The Shareholder would then treat each Share sold as giving rise to long-term capital gain or loss and short-term capital gain or loss in the same proportions as if it had sold its entire interest in the Fund.
 
Under Section 751 of the Code, a portion of a Shareholder’s gain or loss from the sale of Shares (regardless of the holding period for such Shares), will be separately computed and taxed as ordinary income or loss to the extent attributable to “unrealized receivables” or “inventory” owned by the Fund. The term “unrealized receivables” includes, among other things, market discount bonds and short-term debt instruments to the extent such items would give rise to ordinary income if sold by the Fund. However, the short-term capital gain on section 1256 contracts resulting from 60-40 treatment, described above, should not be subject to this rule.
 
If some or all of a Shareholder’s Shares are lent by its broker or other agent to a third party — for example, for use by the third party in covering a short sale — the Shareholder may be considered as having made a taxable disposition of the loaned Shares, in which case —
 
the Shareholder may recognize taxable gain or loss to the same extent as if it had sold the Shares for cash;
 
any of the income, gain, loss or deduction allocable to those Shares during the period of the loan is not reportable by the Shareholder for U.S. federal income tax purposes; and
 
any distributions the Shareholder receives with respect to the Shares under the loan agreement will be fully taxable to the Shareholder, most likely as ordinary income for U.S. federal income tax purposes.
 
Shareholders desiring to avoid these and other possible consequences of a deemed disposition of their Shares should consider modifying any applicable brokerage account agreements to prohibit the lending of their Shares.
 
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Other U.S. Federal Income Tax Matters
 
Information Reporting. The Fund provides tax information to the Shareholders and to the IRS, as required. Shareholders of the Fund are treated as partners for U.S. federal income tax purposes. Accordingly, the Fund will furnish Shareholders each year, with tax information on IRS Schedule K-1 (Form 1065), which will be used by the Shareholders in completing their U.S. federal income tax returns. The IRS has ruled that assignees of partnership interests who have not been admitted to a partnership as partners but who have the capacity to exercise substantial dominion and control over the assigned partnership interests will be considered partners for U.S. federal income tax purposes. On the basis of this ruling, except as otherwise provided herein, we will treat as a Shareholder any person whose Shares are held on their behalf by a broker or other nominee if that person has the right to direct the nominee in the exercise of all substantive rights attendant to the ownership of the Shares.
 
Persons who hold an interest in the Fund as a nominee for another person are required to furnish to us the following information: (1) the name, address and taxpayer identification number of the beneficial owner and the nominee; (2) whether the beneficial owner is (a) a person that is not a U.S. person, (b) a foreign government, an international organization or any wholly-owned agency or instrumentality of either of the foregoing, or (c) a tax-exempt entity; (3) the number and a description of Shares acquired or transferred for the beneficial owner; and (4) certain information including the dates of acquisitions and transfers, means of acquisitions and transfers, and acquisition cost for purchases, as well as the amount of net proceeds from sales. Brokers and financial institutions are required to furnish additional information, including whether they are U.S. persons and certain information on Shares they acquire, hold or transfer for their own account. A penalty of $250 per failure (as adjusted for inflation), up to a maximum of $3,000,000 per calendar year (as adjusted for inflation), is imposed by the Code for failure to report such information correctly to the Fund. If the failure to furnish such information correctly is determined to be willful, the per failure penalty increases to $500 (as adjusted for inflation) or, if greater, 10% of the aggregate amount of items required to be reported, and the $3,000,000 maximum does not apply. The nominee is required to supply the beneficial owner of the Shares with the U.S. federal income tax information furnished by the Fund.
 
Partnership Audit Procedures. The IRS may audit the U.S. federal income tax returns filed by the Fund. Partnerships are generally treated as separate entities for purposes of U.S. federal tax audits, judicial review of administrative adjustments by the IRS, and tax settlement proceedings. The tax treatment of partnership items of income, gain, loss and deduction are determined at the partnership level in a unified partnership proceeding rather than in separate proceedings with the partners.
 
Tax deficiencies (including interest and penalties) that arise from an adjustment to partnership items generally are assessed and collected from the partnership (rather than from the partners), and generally are calculated using maximum applicable tax rates (although such partnership level tax may be reduced or eliminated under limited circumstances). A narrow category of partnerships (generally, partnerships having no more than 100 partners that consist exclusively of individuals, C corporations, S corporations and estates) are permitted to elect out of the partnership-level audit rules. As an alternative to partnership-level tax liability, a partnership may elect to furnish adjusted Schedule K-1s to the IRS and to each person who was a partner in the audit year, stating such partner’s share of any partnership adjustments, and each such partner would then take the adjustments into account on its tax returns in the year in which it receives its adjusted Schedule K-1 (rather than by amending their tax returns for the audited year). If the Fund were subject to a partnership level tax, the economic return of all Shareholders (including Shareholders that did not own Shares in the Fund during the taxable year to which the audit relates) may be affected.
 
The Trust Agreement provides that if the Fund becomes subject to any tax as a result of any adjustment to taxable income, gain, loss, deduction or credit for any taxable year of the Fund (pursuant to a tax audit or otherwise), such Shareholder (and each former Shareholder) is obligated to indemnify the Fund and the Sponsor against any such taxes (including any interest and penalties) to the extent such tax (or portion thereof) is properly attributable to such Shareholder (or former Shareholder). In addition, the Sponsor, on behalf of the Fund, will be authorized to take any action permitted under applicable law to avoid the assessment of any such taxes against the Fund (including an election to issue adjusted Schedule K-1s to the Shareholders (and/or former Shareholders) that take such adjustments to taxable income, gain, loss, deduction or credit into account, resulting in each such Shareholder taking those adjustments into account on its tax returns.
 
Reportable Transaction Rules. In certain circumstances the Code and Treasury Regulations require that the IRS be notified of transactions through a disclosure statement attached to a taxpayer’s U.S. federal income tax return. These disclosure rules may apply to transactions irrespective of whether they are structured to achieve particular tax benefits. They could require disclosure by the Trust or Shareholders if a Shareholder incurs a loss in excess of a specified threshold from a sale or redemption of its Shares and possibly in other circumstances. While these rules generally do not require disclosure of a loss recognized on the disposition of an asset in which the taxpayer has a “qualifying basis” (generally a basis equal to the amount of cash paid by the taxpayer for such asset), they apply to a loss recognized with respect to interests in a pass-through entity, such as the Shares, even if the taxpayer’s basis in such interests is equal to the amount of cash it paid. In addition, significant monetary penalties may be imposed in connection with a failure to comply with these reporting requirements. Investors should consult their own tax advisor concerning the application of these reporting requirements to their specific situation.
 
Tax-Exempt Organizations. Subject to numerous exceptions, qualified retirement plans and individual retirement accounts, charitable organizations and certain other organizations that otherwise are exempt from U.S. federal income tax (collectively, “exempt organizations”) nonetheless are subject to the tax on unrelated business taxable income (“UBTI”). Generally, UBTI means the gross income derived by an exempt organization from a trade or business that it regularly carries on, the conduct of which is not substantially related to the exercise or performance of its exempt purpose or function, less allowable deductions directly connected with that trade or business. If the Fund were to regularly carry on (directly or indirectly) a trade or business that is unrelated with respect to an exempt organization Shareholder, then in computing its UBTI, the Shareholder must include its share of (1) the Fund’s gross income from the unrelated trade or business, whether or not distributed, and (2) the Fund’s allowable deductions directly connected with that gross income. An exempt organization that has more than one unrelated trade or business generally must compute its UBTI separately for each such trade or business.
 
UBTI generally does not include dividends, interest, or payments with respect to securities loans and gains from the sale of property (other than property held for sale to customers in the ordinary course of a trade or business). Nonetheless, income on, and gain from the disposition of, “debt-financed property” is UBTI. Debt-financed property generally is income-producing property (including securities), the use of which is not substantially related to the exempt organization’s tax-exempt purposes, and with respect to which there is “acquisition indebtedness” at any time during the taxable year (or, if the property was disposed of during the taxable year, the 12-month period ending with the disposition). Acquisition indebtedness includes debt incurred to acquire property, debt incurred before the acquisition of property if the debt would not have been incurred but for the acquisition, and debt incurred subsequent to the acquisition of property if the debt would not have been incurred but for the acquisition and at the time of acquisition the incurrence of debt was foreseeable. The portion of the income from debt-financed property attributable to acquisition indebtedness is equal to the ratio of the average outstanding principal amount of acquisition indebtedness over the average adjusted basis of the property for the year. The Fund currently does not anticipate that it will borrow money to acquire investments; however, the Fund cannot be certain that it will not borrow for such purpose in the future, which could result in an exempt organization Shareholder having UBTI. In addition, an exempt organization Shareholder that incurs acquisition indebtedness to purchase its Shares in the Fund may have UBTI.
 
56
 
The U.S. federal income tax rate applicable to an exempt organization Shareholder on its UBTI generally will be either the corporate or trust tax rate, depending upon the Shareholder’s form of organization. The Fund may report to each such Shareholder information as to the portion, if any, of the Shareholder’s income and gains from the Fund for any year that will be treated as UBTI; the calculation of that amount is complex, and there can be no assurance that the Fund’s calculation of UBTI will be accepted by the IRS. An exempt organization Shareholder will be required to make payments of estimated U.S. federal income tax with respect to its UBTI.
 
Regulated Investment Companies. Interests in and income from “qualified publicly traded partnerships” satisfying certain gross income tests are treated as qualifying assets and income, respectively, for purposes of determining eligibility for regulated investment company (“RIC”) status. A RIC may invest up to 25% of its assets in interests in qualified publicly traded partnerships. The determination of whether a publicly traded partnership such as the Fund is a qualified publicly traded partnership is made on an annual basis. While the tax treatment of bitcoin derivatives is not entirely clear, it is possible that the Fund may be a qualified publicly traded partnership. However, such qualification is not assured, and prospective RIC investors should consult a tax advisor regarding the treatment of an investment in the Fund under current tax rules and in light of their particular circumstances.
 
Non-U.S. Shareholders
 
Generally, non-U.S. persons who derive U.S. source income or gain from investing or engaging in a U.S. business are taxable on two categories of income. The first category consists of amounts that are fixed or determinable, annual or periodic income, such as interest, dividends and rent that are not connected with the operation of a U.S. trade or business (“FDAP”). The second category is income that is effectively connected with the conduct of a U.S. trade or business (“ECI”). FDAP income (other than interest that is considered “portfolio interest;” as discussed below) is generally subject to a 30% withholding tax, which may be reduced for certain categories of income by a treaty between the U.S. and the recipient’s country of residence. In contrast, ECI is generally subject to U.S. tax on a net basis at graduated rates upon the filing of a U.S. tax return. Where a non-U.S. person has ECI as a result of an investment in a partnership, the ECI is currently subject to a withholding tax at a rate of 37% for individual Shareholders and a rate of 21% for corporate Shareholders. The tax withholding on ECI, which is the highest tax rate under Code section 1 for non-corporate Non-U.S. Shareholders and Code section 11(b) for corporate Non-U.S. Shareholders, may increase in future tax years if tax rates increase from their current levels.
 
Withholding on Allocations and Distributions. The Code provides that a non-U.S. person who is a partner in a partnership that is engaged in a U.S. trade or business during a taxable year will also be considered to be engaged in a U.S. trade or business during that year. Classifying an activity by a partnership as an investment or an operating business is a factual determination. Under certain safe harbors in the Code, an investment fund whose activities consist of trading in stocks, securities, or commodities for its own account generally will not be considered to be engaged in a U.S. trade or business unless it is a dealer in such stocks, securities, or commodities. This safe harbor applies to investments in commodities only if the commodities are of a kind customarily dealt in on an organized commodity exchange and if the transaction is of a kind customarily consummated at such place. As noted above, there is limited authority on the U.S. federal income tax treatment of bitcoin and no direct authority on bitcoin derivatives. However, based on the CFTC treatment of bitcoin as a commodity and on the assumption that the Fund will invest in Bitcoin Futures Contracts through the CME, the Fund intends to take the position that investing in Bitcoin Futures Contracts falls within the commodities trading safe harbor. Thus, the Fund anticipates that the activities directly conducted by the Fund should not result in the Fund being engaged in a trade or business within the United States for purposes of this rule. However, there can be no assurance that the IRS would not successfully assert, or that a court would not decide, that the Fund’s activities constitute a U.S. trade or business.
 
In the event that the Fund’s activities were considered to constitute a U.S. trade or business, the Fund would be required to withhold at the highest rate specified in Code section 1 (currently 37%) on allocations of our income to non-corporate Non-U.S. Shareholders and the highest rate specified in Code section 11(b) (currently 21%) on allocations of our income to corporate Non-U.S. Shareholders, when such income is distributed. Non-U.S. Shareholders would also be subject to a 10% withholding tax on the consideration payable upon a sale or exchange of such Non-U.S. Shareholder’s Shares, although the IRS has temporarily suspended this withholding for transfers of interests in publicly traded partnerships that occur before January 1, 2023. Such withholding will be required on transactions occurring on or after January 1, 2023. In the case of a transfer made through a broker, the obligation to withhold will generally be imposed on the transferor’s broker. A Non-U.S. Shareholder with ECI will generally be required to file a U.S. federal income tax return, and the return will provide the Non-U.S. Shareholder with the mechanism to seek a refund of any withholding in excess of such Shareholder’s actual U.S. federal income tax liability. Any amount withheld by the Fund will be treated as a distribution to the Non-U.S. Shareholder to the extent possible. In some cases, the Fund may not be able to match the economic cost of satisfying its withholding obligations to a particular Non-U.S. Shareholder, which may result in said cost being borne by the Fund, generally, and accordingly, by all Shareholders.
 
If the Fund is not treated as engaged in a U.S. trade or business, a Non-U.S. Shareholder may nevertheless be treated as having FDAP income, which would be subject to a 30% withholding tax (possibly subject to reduction by treaty), with respect to some or all of its distributions from the Fund or its allocable share of Fund income. Amounts withheld on behalf of a Non-U.S. Shareholder will be treated as being distributed to such Shareholder. If the Fund is not able to match the economic cost of satisfying its withholding obligation to a particular Non-U.S. Shareholder, said cost may have to be borne by the Fund and accordingly by all Shareholders.
 
To the extent any interest income allocated to a Non-U.S. Shareholder that otherwise constitutes FDAP is considered “portfolio interest,” neither the allocation of such interest income to the Non-U.S. Shareholder nor a subsequent distribution of such interest income to the Non-U.S. Shareholder will be subject to withholding, provided that the Non-U.S. Shareholder is not otherwise engaged in a trade or business in the U.S. and provides the Fund with a timely and properly completed and executed IRS Form W-8BEN or other applicable form. In general, portfolio interest is interest paid on debt obligations issued in registered form, unless the recipient owns 10% or more of the voting power of the issuer. A Non-U.S. Shareholder’s allocable share of interest on U.S. bank deposits, certificates of deposit and discount obligations with maturities from original issue of 183 days or less should also not be subject to withholding. Generally, other interest from U.S. sources paid to the Fund and allocable to Non-U.S. Shareholders will be subject to withholding.
In order for the Fund to avoid withholding on any interest income allocable to Non-U.S. Shareholders that would qualify as portfolio interest, it will be necessary for all Non-U.S. Shareholders to provide the Fund with a timely and properly completed and executed Form W-8BEN (or other applicable form).
 
Gain from Sale of Shares. Gain from the sale or exchange of Shares may be taxable to a Non-U.S. Shareholder if the Non-U.S. Shareholder is a nonresident alien individual who is present in the U.S. for 183 days or more during the taxable year. In such case, the nonresident alien individual may be subject to a 30% withholding tax on the amount of such individual’s gain.
 
Branch Profits Tax on Corporate Non-U.S. Shareholders. In addition to the taxes noted above, any Non-U.S. Shareholders that are corporations may also be subject to an additional tax, the branch profits tax, at a rate of 30%. The branch profits tax is imposed on a non-U.S. corporation’s dividend equivalent amount, which generally consists of the corporation’s after-tax earnings and profits that are effectively connected with the corporation’s U.S. trade or business but are not reinvested in a U.S. business. This tax may be reduced or eliminated by an income tax treaty between the United States and the country in which the Non-U.S. Shareholder is a “qualified resident.”
 
57
 
Foreign Account Tax Compliance Act. Legislation commonly referred to as the Foreign Account Tax Compliance Act or “FATCA,” generally imposes a 30% U.S. withholding tax on payments of certain types of income to foreign financial institutions that fail to enter into an agreement with the United States Treasury to report certain required information with respect to accounts held by U.S. persons (or held by foreign entities that have U.S. persons as substantial owners). The types of income subject to the withholding tax include U.S.-source interest and dividends and the gross proceeds from the sale of any property that could produce U.S.-source interest or dividends. Proposed Treasury Regulations, however, generally eliminate withholding under FATCA on gross proceeds. Taxpayers generally may rely on these proposed Treasury Regulations until final Treasury Regulations are issued. The information required to be reported includes the identity and taxpayer identification number of each account holder that is a U.S. person and transaction activity within the holder’s account. In addition, subject to certain exceptions, this legislation also imposes a 30% U.S. withholding tax on payments to foreign entities that are not financial institutions unless the foreign entity certifies that it does not have a greater than 10% U.S. owner or provides the withholding agent with identifying information on each greater than 10% U.S. owner. Depending on the status of a Non-U.S. Shareholder and the status of the intermediaries through which it holds Shares, a Non-U.S. Shareholder could be subject to this 30% U.S. withholding tax with respect to distributions on its Shares. Under certain circumstances, a Non-U.S. Shareholder may be eligible for a refund or credit of such taxes.
 
Prospective Non-U.S. Shareholders should consult their own tax advisor regarding these and other tax issues unique to Non-U.S. Shareholders.
 
Backup Withholding
 
The Fund may be required to withhold U.S. federal income tax (“backup withholding”) from payments to: (1) any Shareholder who fails to furnish the Fund with his, her or its correct taxpayer identification number or a certificate that the Shareholder is exempt from backup withholding, and (2) any Shareholder with respect to whom the IRS notifies the Fund that the Shareholder is subject to backup withholding. Backup withholding is not an additional tax and may be returned or credited against a taxpayer’s regular U.S. federal income tax liability if appropriate information is provided to the IRS. The backup withholding rate is the fourth lowest rate applicable to individuals under Code section 1(c) (currently 24%) and may increase in future tax years.
 
Other Tax Considerations
 
In addition to U.S. federal income taxes, a Shareholder may be subject to other taxes, such as state and local income taxes, unincorporated business taxes, business franchise taxes, and estate, gift, inheritance or intangible taxes that may be imposed by the various jurisdictions in which the Fund does business or owns property or where the Shareholder resides. Although an analysis of those various taxes is not presented here, each prospective Shareholder should consider their potential impact on its investment in the Fund. It is each Shareholder’s responsibility to file the appropriate U.S. federal, state, local, and foreign tax returns. Vedder Price has not provided an opinion concerning any aspects of state, local or foreign tax and its opinion on U.S. federal tax issues is limited to those issues discussed under the heading “U.S. Federal Income Tax Considerations.”
 
Investment by ERISA Accounts
 
General
 
Most employee benefit plans and individual retirement accounts (“IRAs”) are subject to the Employee Retirement Income Security Act of 1974, as amended (“ERISA”), or the Code, or both. This section discusses certain considerations that arise under ERISA and the Code that a fiduciary of: (i) an employee benefit plan as defined in ERISA; (ii) a plan as defined in Section 4975 of the Code; or (iii) entity whose underlying assets include “plan assets” by reason of an employee benefits plan or other plan’s investment in the entity (“plan asset entity”) who has investment discretion should take into account before deciding to invest the plan’s assets in the Fund. Employee benefit plans under ERISA, plans under the Code and plan asset entities are collectively referred to below as “plans,” and fiduciaries with investment discretion are referred to below as “plan fiduciaries.”
 
This summary is based on the provisions of ERISA and the Code as of the date hereof. This summary is not intended to be complete, but only to address certain questions under ERISA and the Code likely to be raised by your advisors. The summary does not include state or local law.
 
Potential plan investors are urged to consult with their own professional advisors concerning the appropriateness of an investment in the Fund and the manner in which Shares should be purchased.
 
Special Investment Considerations
 
Each plan fiduciary must consider the facts and circumstances that are relevant to an investment in the Fund, including the role that an investment in the Fund would play in the plan’s overall investment portfolio. Each plan fiduciary, before deciding to invest in the Fund, must be satisfied that the investment is prudent for the plan, that the investments of the plan are diversified so as to minimize the risk of large losses, and that an investment in the Fund complies with the terms of the plan. The Sponsor is not undertaking to provide investment advice, or to give advice in a fiduciary capacity, in connection with a plan’s investment in the Fund.
 
58
 
The Fund and Plan Assets
 
A regulation issued under ERISA contains rules for determining when an investment by a plan in an equity interest of a statutory trust will result in the underlying assets of the statutory trust being deemed plan assets for purposes of ERISA and Section 4975 of the Code. Those rules provide that assets of a statutory trust will not be plan assets of a plan that purchases an equity interest in the statutory trust if the equity interest purchased is a publicly offered security. If the underlying assets of a statutory trust are considered to be assets of any plan for purposes of ERISA or Section 4975 of the Code, the operations of that trust would be subject to and, in some cases, limited by the provisions of ERISA and Section 4975 of the Code.
 
The publicly offered security exception described above applies if the equity interest is a security that is:
 
(1)
freely transferable (determined based on the relevant facts and circumstances);
 
(2)
part of a class of securities that is widely held (meaning that the class of securities is owned by 100 or more investors independent of the issuer and of each other); and
 
(3)
either (a) part of a class of securities registered under Section 12(b) or 12(g) of the Exchange Act or (b) sold to the plan as part of a public offering pursuant to an effective registration statement under the 1933 Act and the class of which such security is a part is registered under the Exchange Act within 120 days (or such later time as may be allowed by the SEC) after the end of the fiscal year of the issuer in which the offering of such security occurred.
 
The plan asset regulations under ERISA state that the determination of whether a security is freely transferable is to be made based on all the relevant facts and circumstances. In the case of a security that is part of an offering in which the minimum investment is $10,000 or less, the following requirements, alone or in combination, ordinarily will not affect a finding that the security is freely transferable: (1) a requirement that no transfer or assignment of the security or rights relating to the security be made that would violate any federal or state law; and (2) a requirement that no transfer or assignment be made without advance written notice given to the entity that issued the security.
 
The Sponsor believes that the conditions described above are satisfied with respect to the Shares. The Sponsor believes that the Shares therefore constitute publicly offered securities, and the underlying assets of the Fund should not be considered to constitute plan assets of any plan that purchases Shares.
 
Prohibited Transactions
 
ERISA and the Code generally prohibit certain transactions involving a plan and persons who have certain specified relationships to the plan. In general, Shares may not be purchased with the assets of a plan if the Sponsor, the clearing brokers, the trading advisors (if any), or any of their affiliates, agents or employees either:
 
exercise any discretionary authority or discretionary control with respect to management of the plan;
 
exercise any authority or control with respect to management or disposition of the assets of the plan;
 
render investment advice for a fee or other compensation, direct or indirect, with respect to any moneys or other property of the plan;
 
have any authority or responsibility to render investment advice with respect to any monies or other property of the plan; or
 
have any discretionary authority or discretionary responsibility in the administration of the plan.
 
Also, a prohibited transaction may occur under ERISA or the Code when circumstances indicate that (1) the investment in Shares is made or retained for the purpose of avoiding application of the fiduciary standards of ERISA, (2) the investment in Shares constitutes an arrangement under which the Fund is expected to engage in transactions that would otherwise be prohibited if entered into directly by the plan purchasing the Shares, (3) the investing plan, by itself, has the authority or influence to cause the Fund to engage in such transactions, or (4) a person who is prohibited from transacting with the investing plan may, but only with the aid of certain of its affiliates and the investing plan, cause the Fund to engage in such transactions with such person.
 
59
 
Special IRA Rules
 
IRAs are not subject to ERISA’s fiduciary standards, but are subject to their own rules, including the prohibited transaction rules of Section 4975 of the Code, which generally mirror ERISA’s prohibited transaction rules. For example, IRAs are subject to special custody rules and must maintain a qualifying IRA custodial arrangement separate and distinct from the Fund and its custodial arrangement. If a separate qualifying custodial arrangement is not maintained, an investment in the Shares will be treated as a distribution from the IRA. Second, IRAs are prohibited from investing in certain commingled investments, and the Sponsor makes no representation regarding whether an investment in Shares is an inappropriate commingled investment for an IRA. Third, in applying the prohibited transaction provisions of Section 4975 of the Code, in addition to the rules summarized above, the individual for whose benefit the IRA is maintained is also treated as the creator of the IRA. For example, if the owner or beneficiary of an IRA enters into any transaction, arrangement, or agreement involving the assets of his or her IRA to benefit the IRA owner or beneficiary (or his or her relatives or business affiliates) personally, or with the understanding that such benefit will occur, directly or indirectly, such transaction could give rise to a prohibited transaction that is not exempted by any available exemption. Moreover, in the case of an IRA, the consequences of a non-exempt prohibited transaction are that the IRA’s assets will be treated as if they were distributed, causing immediate U.S. federal income taxation of the assets (including any early distribution penalty tax applicable under Section 72 of the Code), in addition to any other fines or penalties that may apply.
 
Exempt Plans
 
Certain employee benefit plans may be governmental plans or church plans. Governmental plans and church plans are generally not subject to ERISA, nor do the prohibited transaction provisions described above apply to them. These plans are, however, subject to prohibitions against certain related-party transactions under Section 503 of the Code, which are similar to the prohibited transaction rules described above. In addition, the fiduciary of any governmental or church plan must consider any applicable state or local laws and any restrictions and duties of common law imposed upon the plan.
 
No view is expressed as to whether an investment in the Fund (and any continued investment in the Fund), or the operation and administration of the fund, is appropriate or permissible for any governmental plan or church plan under Code Section 503, or under any state, county, local or other law relating to that type of plan.
 
Allowing an investment in the Fund is not to be construed as a representation by the Trust, the Fund, the Sponsor, any trading advisor, any clearing broker, the Distributor or legal counsel or other advisors to such parties or any other party that this investment meets some or all of the relevant legal requirements with respect to investments by any particular plan or that this investment is appropriate for any such particular plan. The person with investment discretion should consult with the plan’s attorney and financial advisors as to the propriety of an investment in the Fund in light of the circumstances of the particular plan, current tax law and ERISA.
 
 
60
 
GENERAL POOL DISCLOSURE
 
PERFORMANCE OF THE OTHER COMMODITY POOLS OPERATED BY THE COMMODITY POOL OPERATOR
 
All summary performance information is as of June 30, 2022. Performance information is set forth, in accordance with CFTC regulations, on a monthly basis for each other commodity pool’s past five calendar years and for the year to date. No performance information is presented with respect to the Hashdex Bitcoin Futures ETF, which has not commenced investment operations prior to the date of this Prospectus, and which will not begin trading until after the initial creation units of the Fund are purchased by the initial Authorized Participant (all as described in the “Plan of Distribution” Section of this Prospectus). The performance of the Hashdex Bitcoin Futures ETF will be materially different from the funds and the past performance summaries of the other funds below are generally not representative of how the funds might perform in the future. Teucrium Trading, LLC serves as the commodity trading advisor for two series of the ConvexityShares Trust registrant, which commenced operations on August 15, 2022.
 
The monthly rate of return for each fund presented below is calculated by dividing the ending NAV for a given month by the ending NAV for the previous month, subtracting 1 and multiplying this number by 100 to arrive at a percentage increase or decrease.
 
A drawdown is a loss experienced by the fund over a specified period. Drawdowns are measured on the basis of monthly returns only and do not reflect intra-month figures. The worst monthly percentage drawdown reflects the largest single month loss sustained over the most recent five calendar years and the current year-to-date.
 
The worst peak-to-valley drawdown is the largest percentage decline in the NAV per unit over the most recent five calendar years and the current year to date. This need not be a continuous decline but can be a series of positive and negative returns. Worst peak-to-valley drawdown represents the greatest percentage decline from any month end NAV per unit that occurs without such month end NAV per unit being equaled or exceeded as of a subsequent month end. For example, if the NAV per unit declined by $1 in each of January and February, increased by $1 in March and declined again by $2 in April, a “peak to valley drawdown” analysis conducted as of the end of April would consider that “drawdown” to be continuing and to be $3 in amount, whereas if the NAV per unit had increased by $2 in March, the drawdown would have ended as of the end of February at the $2 level.
 
Teucrium Corn Fund (TICKER: CORN)
 
The Teucrium Corn Fund commenced trading and investment operations on June 9, 2010. The Fund is listed on NYSE Arca and is neither: (i) a privately offered pool pursuant to Section 4(a)(2) of the 1933 Act; (ii) a multi-advisor pool as defined in CFTC Regulation 4.10(d)(2); or (iii) a principal-protected pool as defined in CFTC Regulation 4.10(d)(3).
 
Units of beneficial interest issued (from inception until June 30, 2022)
  44,125,000 
Aggregate gross sale price for units issued
 $980,601,057 
Pool NAV as of June 30, 2022
 $238,731,929 
NAV per Share as of June 30, 2022
 $25.06 
Largest monthly percentage drawdown
 
-11.37% / June 2022
 
Worst peak to valley drawdown
 
-76.94% / Aug 2012 - Jul 2020
 
 
 
61
 
PAST PERFORMANCE IS NOT NECESSARILY INDICATIVE OF FUTURE RESULTS
 
Rates of Return
Month
2017
 
2018
 
2019
 
2020
 
2021
 
2022
 
January
2.24
%
2.51
%
0.50
%
(2.64)
%
8.71
%
4.63
%
February
1.56
%
2.74
%
(3.09)
%
(4.44)
%
1.72
%
8.39
%
March
(2.36)
%
1.98
%
(3.00)
%
(6.11)
%
2.47
%
11.02
%
April
(1.37)
%
0.94
%
(1.12)
%
(6.81)
%
17.62
%
10.31
%
May
1.23
%
(0.77)
%
11.03
%
0.43
%
(2.07)
%
(5.65)
%
June
0.58
%
(8.82)
%
(1.86)
%
2.37
%
5.72
%
(11.37)
%
July
(1.36)
%
3.41
%
(3.14)
%
(5.48)
%
(6.07)
%
 
%
August
(6.00)
%
(4.71)
%
(6.86)
%
7.39
%
(0.56)
%
 
%
September
(0.56)
%
(2.16)
%
2.87
%
4.43
%
1.04
%
 
%
October
(2.27)
%
1.83
%
(0.42)
%
1.84
%
5.38
%
 
%
November
(1.28)
%
0.37
%
(4.34)
%
5.48
%
(1.40)
%
 
%
December
(1.35)
%
(0.49)
%
2.21
%
10.02
%
2.63
%
 
%
Annual Rate of Return
(10.76)
%
(3.82)
%
(8.00)
%
4.83
%
38.88
%
16.14
%
 
Teucrium Soybean Fund (TICKER: SOYB)
 
The Teucrium Soybean Fund commenced trading and investment operations on September 19, 2011. The Fund is listed on NYSE Arca and is neither: (i) a privately offered pool pursuant to Section 4(a)(2) of the 1933 Act; (ii) a multi-advisor pool as defined in CFTC Regulation 4.10(d)(2); or (iii) a principal-protected pool as defined in CFTC Regulation 4.10(d)(3).
 
Units of beneficial interest issued (from inception until June 30, 2022)
  15,475,000 
Aggregate gross sale price for units issued
 $275,006,319 
Pool NAV as of June 30, 2022
 $75,109,727 
NAV per Share as of June 30, 2022
 $27.07 
Largest monthly percentage drawdown
 
-13.03% / Jun 2018
 
Worst peak to valley drawdown
 
-52.02% / Aug 2012 - May 2020
 
 
62
 
PAST PERFORMANCE IS NOT NECESSARILY INDICATIVE OF FUTURE RESULTS
 
Rates of Return
Month
2017
 
2018
 
2019
 
2020
 
2021
 
2022
 
January
1.68
%
3.31
%
2.16
%
(7.92)
%
3.63
%
9.30
%
February
0.52
%
3.69
%
(1.75)
%
(0.00)
%
4.15
%
7.40
%
March
(7.13)
%
(0.42)
%
(2.89)
%
(4.07)
%
2.59
%
0.11
%
April
(0.28)
%
(0.63)
%
(4.56)
%
(2.08)
%
6.16
%
6.70
%
May
(3.05)
%
(1.43)
%
2.46
%
(0.50)
%
2.17
%
(1.48)
%
June
3.37
%
(13.03)
%
1.81
%
2.52
%
1.61
%
(3.79)
%
July
4.70
%
4.38
%
(3.35)
%
1.67
%
(2.81)
%
 
%
August
(3.27)
%
(7.03)
%
(1.36)
%
5.94
%
(2.57)
%
 
%
September
(2.02)
%
0.57
%
3.45
%
5.32
%
(2.38)
%
 
%
October
2.73
%
(1.01)
%
1.48
%
1.81
%
(0.99)
%
 
%
November
0.11
%
4.47
%
(5.36)
%
9.72
%
(2.80)
%
 
%
December
(3.36)
%
(1.04)
%
6.42
%
9.98
%
7.59
%
 
%
Annual Rate of Return
(6.45)
%
(9.24)
%
(2.16)
%
22.98
%
16.82
%
18.86
%
 
Teucrium Sugar Fund (TICKER: CANE)
 
The Teucrium Sugar Fund commenced trading and investment operations on September 19, 2011. The Fund is listed on NYSE Arca and is neither: (i) a privately offered pool pursuant to Section 4(a)(2) of the 1933 Act; (ii) a multi-advisor pool as defined in CFTC Regulation 4.10(d)(2); or (iii) a principal-protected pool as defined in CFTC Regulation 4.10(d)(3).
 
Units of beneficial interest issued (from inception until June 30, 2022)
  11,150,000 
Aggregate gross sale price for units issued
 $99,782,714 
Pool NAV as of June 30, 2022
 $32,383,073 
NAV per Share as of June 30, 2022
 $9.32 
Largest monthly percentage drawdown
 
-23.51% / Mar 2020
 
Worst peak to valley drawdown
 
-78.60% / Sep 2011 - Apr 2020
 
 
63
 
PAST PERFORMANCE IS NOT NECESSARILY INDICATIVE OF FUTURE RESULTS
 
Rates of Return
Month
2017
 
2018
 
2019
 
2020
 
2021
 
2022
 
January
6.62
%
(8.58)
%
6.36
%
3.83
%
2.81
%
(3.86)
%
February
(5.34)
%
(1.56)
%
0.13
%
(1.68)
%
7.93
%
(0.89)
%
March
(10.14)
%
(5.90)
%
(3.05)
%
(23.51)
%
(5.73)
%
9.43
%
April
(5.17)
%
(7.48)
%
(1.78)
%
(2.76)
%
13.55
%
(0.34)
%
May
(6.89)
%
4.95
%
(1.95)
%
1.25
%
3.01
%
2.25
%
June
(7.40)
%
(5.34)
%
1.00
%
5.83
%
3.17
%
(4.93)
%
July
7.57
%
(9.84)
%
(1.70)
%
4.77
%
1.25
%
 
%
August
(3.09)
%
(1.89)
%
(7.08)
%
0.89
%
12.51
%
 
%
September
(6.17)
%
(1.63)
%
2.58
%
0.90
%
(0.97)
%
 
%
October
3.08
%
15.99
%
(0.87)
%
0.16
%
(2.31)
%
 
%
November
0.82
%
(2.34)
%
2.09
%
4.00
%
(3.42)
%
 
%
December
(0.10)
%
(5.86)
%
4.56
%
5.64
%
2.22
%
 
%
Annual Rate of Return
(24.52)
%
(27.78)
%
(0.48)
%
(4.51)
%
37.31
%
1.01
%
 
Teucrium Wheat Fund (TICKER: WEAT)
 
The Teucrium Wheat Fund commenced trading and investment operations on September 19, 2011. The Teucrium Wheat Fund is listed on NYSE Arca and is neither: (i) a privately offered pool pursuant to Section 4(a)(2) of the 1933 Act; (ii) a multi-advisor pool as defined in CFTC Regulation 4.10(d)(2); or (iii) a principal protected pool as defined in CFTC Regulation 4.10(d)(3).
 
Units of beneficial interest issued (from inception until June 30, 2022)
  109,925,000 
Aggregate gross sale price for units issued
 $1,083,020,909 
Pool NAV as of June 30, 2022
 $450,519,572 
NAV per Share as of June 30, 2022
 $9.03 
Largest monthly percentage drawdown
 
-17.43% / June 2022
 
Worst peak to valley drawdown
 
-80.30% / Sept 2011 - Apr 2019
 
 
64
 
PAST PERFORMANCE IS NOT NECESSARILY INDICATIVE OF FUTURE RESULTS
 
Rates of Return
Month
2017
 
2018
 
2019
 
2020
 
2021
 
2022
 
January
2.90
%
5.68
%
1.51
%
(1.87)
%
2.18
%
(0.91)
%
February
2.26
%
5.85
%
(11.26)
%
(4.81)
%
0.33
%
19.78
%
March
(4.41)
%
(7.61)
%
(1.12)
%
5.87
%
(5.08)
%
12.24
%
April
(1.73)
%
8.40
%
(6.98)
%
(6.75)
%
18.28
%
7.02
%
May
(0.29)
%
2.53
%
14.00
%
(1.01)
%
(6.94)
%
4.01
%
June
15.46
%
(7.41)
%
2.31
%
(5.49)
%
2.31
%
(17.43)
%
July
(7.02)
%
8.95
%
(7.47)
%
7.11
%
2.75
%
 
%
August
(11.52)
%
(4.18)
%
(6.38)
%
2.51
%
2.12
%
 
%
September
1.86
%
(6.17)
%
6.57