J.P. Morgan Exchange-Traded Fund Trust
Prospectus
J.P. Morgan Exchange-Traded Funds
March 1, 2024
 
Ticker
Listing Exchange
JPMorgan Active China ETF
JCHI
NYSE Arca, Inc.
JPMorgan ActiveBuilders Emerging Markets Equity ETF
JEMA
Cboe BZX Exchange, Inc.
JPMorgan Global Select Equity ETF
JGLO
The NASDAQ Stock Market® LLC
JPMorgan Hedged Equity Laddered Overlay ETF
HELO
NYSE Arca, Inc.
JPMorgan International Growth ETF
JIG
NYSE Arca, Inc.
JPMorgan International Value ETF
JIVE
The NASDAQ Stock Market® LLC
The Securities and Exchange Commission and the Commodity Futures Trading Commission have not approved or disapproved of these securities or determined if this prospectus is truthful or complete. Any representation to the contrary is a criminal offense.

Contents


JPMorgan Active China ETF
Ticker: JCHI
What is the goal of the Fund?
The Fund seeks to provide long-term capital appreciation.
Fees and Expenses of the Fund
The following table describes the fees and expenses that you may pay if you buy, hold and sell Shares of the Fund. You may pay other fees, such as brokerage commissions and other fees to financial intermediaries, which are not reflected in the table and example below.
ANNUAL FUND OPERATING EXPENSES1
(Expenses that you pay each year as a percentage of the value
of your investment)
Management Fees
0.65%
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses
0.65
1
The Fund’s management agreement provides that the adviser will pay substantially all expenses of the Fund (including expenses of the Trust relating to the Fund), except for the management fees, payments under the Fund’s 12b-1 plan (if any), interest expenses, dividend and interest expenses related to short sales, taxes, acquired fund fees and expenses (other than fees for funds advised by the adviser and/or its affiliates), costs of holding shareholder meetings, and litigation and potential litigation and other extraordinary expenses not incurred in the ordinary course of the Fund’s business. Additionally, the Fund shall be responsible for its non-operating expenses, including brokerage commissions and fees and expenses associated with the Fund’s securities lending program, if applicable.
Example
This Example is intended to help you compare the cost of investing in the Fund with the cost of investing in other funds. The Example does not take into account brokerage commissions that you pay when purchasing or selling Shares of the Fund. The Example assumes that you invest $10,000 in the Fund for the time periods indicated. The Example also assumes that your investment has a 5% return each year and that the Fund’s operating expenses remain the same. Your actual costs may be higher or lower.
WHETHER OR NOT YOU SELL YOUR SHARES, YOUR COST
WOULD BE:
 
1 Year
3 Years
5 Years
10 Years
SHARES ($)
66
208
362
810
Portfolio Turnover
The Fund pays transaction costs, such as commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or “turns over” its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover rate may indicate higher transaction costs and may result in higher taxes when Shares are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are not reflected in annual fund operating expenses or in the Example, affect the Fund’s
performance. During the Fund’s most recent fiscal period (March 15, 2023 through October 31, 2023), the Fund’s portfolio turnover rate was 17% of the average value of its portfolio.
What are the Fund’s main investment strategies?
Under normal circumstances, the Fund will invest at least 80% of the value of its Assets in equity securities and equity-related instruments that are tied economically to China. “Assets” means net assets, plus the amount of borrowings for investment purposes. China means Mainland China, and includes its administrative and other districts, such as Hong Kong and Macau. The equity securities and equity-related instruments in which the Fund may invest include, but are not limited to, common stock, preferred stock, convertible securities, depositary receipts, units, stapled securities, equity securities of real estate investment trusts (REITs), privately placed securities, warrants and rights, participation notes or other structured notes, initial public offering and secondary placings, and other instruments that provide economic exposure to one or more equity securities. The Fund may invest in all types of issuers (including government-owned issuers) of equity securities and equity-related instruments that are tied economically to China, and in all types of publicly-issued shares of such issuers, including those listed on Chinese or U.S. exchanges. A significant portion of the equity securities in which the Fund invests are expected to be issued by companies that rely on variable interest entity (VIE) structures.
Because the Fund invests at least 80% of the value of its Assets in equity securities and equity-related instruments that are tied economically to China, it presents different risks than funds that do not so invest. See The Fund’s Main Investment Risks below.
Securities and instruments tied economically to China include: (i) securities of issuers that are organized under the laws of China or that maintain their principal place of business (generally their headquarters) in China; (ii) securities that are traded principally in China; (iii) securities of issuers that, during their most recent fiscal year, derived at least 50% of their revenues or profits from goods produced or sold, investments made, or services performed in China or that have at least 50% of their assets in China; or (iv) securities or other instruments, including, but not limited to, participation notes, futures and other types of derivatives, that expose the Fund to the economic fortunes and risks of China. Under normal circumstances, the Fund will typically hold between 40 and 70 securities.
Derivatives, which are instruments that have a value based on another instrument, exchange rate or index, may also be used as substitutes for securities in which the Fund can invest. The Fund may utilize currency forwards to manage currency exposures, where practical, for the purpose of risk management, including hedging non-dollar currency exposure back to the U.S. dollar. The Fund may also use exchange-traded funds,
March 1, 2024  |  1

JPMorgan Active China ETF (continued)
exchange-traded futures (primarily futures on indexes) and participation notes to gain exposure to particular foreign securities or markets and for the efficient management of cash flows.
The Fund may invest in securities denominated in any currency and will invest substantially in securities denominated in foreign currencies. However, the Fund may from time to time hedge a portion of its foreign currency exposure into the U.S. dollar using currency forwards.
The Fund may invest in securities across all market capitalizations, although the Fund may invest a significant portion of its assets in companies of any one particular market capitalization category. At times, the Fund may increase the relative emphasis of its investments in a particular industry or sector, but the Fund may invest in any industry or sector.
The Fund is non-diversified and may invest a greater percentage of its assets in a particular issuer or group of issuers than a diversified fund would.
Investment Process: The Fund is managed by JPMorgan Asset Management (Asia Pacific) Limited (the sub-adviser). In managing the Fund, the sub-adviser adheres to an investment process that is primarily driven by bottom-up stock selection, while being mindful of macro and policy considerations. The sub-adviser seeks to add value primarily through security selection decisions.
The portfolio managers are primarily responsible for implementing the recommendations of the research analysts, who make their recommendations based on the security ranking system described below. Utilizing this research process, the sub-adviser aims to identify what it believes to be attractively-valued industry leaders within its coverage universe, with an emphasis on those companies the sub-adviser believes are or will be profitable with sustainable earnings and disciplined capital management.
Research analysts use their local expertise to identify, research, and rank companies according to the sub-adviser’s expectation of the companies’ future performance. Securities are assessed using a two-part analysis which considers the sub-adviser’s expectations for (1) total returns on a medium term forward basis (five year expected returns) and (2) longer-term business growth characteristics and qualitative factors (strategic classifications). As part of its investment process, the sub-adviser seeks to assess the impact of environmental, social and governance (ESG) factors on many issuers in the universe in which the Fund may invest. The sub-adviser’s assessment is based on an analysis of key opportunities and risks across industries to seek to identify financially material issues with respect to the Fund’s investments in securities and ascertain key issues that merit engagement with issuers. These assessments may not be conclusive, and securities of issuers that may be negatively impacted by such factors may be purchased and retained by the Fund, while the Fund may divest or not invest in securities of issuers that may be positively impacted by such
factors. In order to encourage creativity, considerable autonomy is given to research analysts at the stock idea generation stage of the process.
The Fund’s Main Investment Risks
The Fund is subject to management risk and may not achieve its objective if the adviser’s expectations regarding particular instruments or markets are not met.
An investment in this Fund or any other fund may not provide a complete investment program. The suitability of an investment in the Fund should be considered based on the investment objective, strategies and risks described in this prospectus, considered in light of all of the other investments in your portfolio, as well as your risk tolerance, financial goals and time horizons. You may want to consult with a financial advisor to determine if this Fund is suitable for you.
The Fund is subject to the main risks noted below, any of which may adversely affect the Fund’s net asset value (NAV), market price, performance and ability to meet its investment objective.
China Region Risk. In addition to the risks listed under “Foreign Securities and Emerging Markets Risk,” investments in Mainland China, Hong Kong and Macau are subject to significant legal, regulatory, monetary and economic risks, as well as the potential for regional and global conflicts, including actions that are contrary to the interests of the U.S. As a result, the Fund may not be suitable for all investors and should be used only by investors who understand the risks of investing in securities and instruments economically tied to China. Like all fund investments, investors in the Fund should monitor their investment. An investor in the Fund could potentially lose the full value of their investment.
Investments in Mainland China involve political and legal uncertainties, currency fluctuations and aggressive currency controls, the risk of confiscatory taxation, and nationalization or expropriation of assets, which could adversely affect and significantly diminish the values of the Mainland Chinese companies in which the Fund invests. The Mainland Chinese securities markets are emerging markets characterized by greater price volatility. Mainland China is dominated by the one-party rule of the Communist Party, and the Mainland Chinese government exercises significant control over Mainland China’s economic growth. There is the potential of increased tariffs and restrictions on trade between the United States and Mainland China. An increase in tariffs or trade restrictions, or even the threat of such developments, could lead to a significant reduction in international trade, which could have a negative impact on Mainland Chinese companies and a commensurately negative impact on the Fund.
The political reunification of Mainland China and Taiwan, over which Mainland China continues to claim sovereignty, is a highly complex issue. There is the potential for future political, military or economic disturbances that may have an adverse
2  |  J.P. Morgan Exchange-Traded Funds

impact on the values of the Fund’s investments in Mainland China and elsewhere, or make certain Fund investments impractical or impossible. Any escalation of hostility between Mainland China and Taiwan would likely have a significant adverse impact on the value and liquidity of the Fund’s investments in both Mainland China and elsewhere, causing substantial investment losses for the Fund.
Hong Kong is a Special Administrative Region of the People's Republic of China. Since Hong Kong reverted to Chinese sovereignty in 1997, it has been governed by the Basic Law. Under the Basic Law, Hong Kong was guaranteed a high degree of autonomy in certain matters, including economic matters, until 2047. Attempts by the government of Mainland China to exert greater control over Hong Kong’s economic, political or legal structures or its existing social policy could negatively affect investor confidence in Hong Kong (as has been the case previously during certain periods), which in turn could negatively affect markets and business performance.
Variable Interest Entities Risk. Chinese operating companies sometimes rely on VIE structures to raise capital from non-Chinese investors, even though such arrangements are not formally recognized under Chinese law. In a VIE structure, a Mainland China-based operating company establishes an entity (typically offshore) that enters into service and other contracts with the Mainland Chinese company designed to provide economic exposure to the company. The offshore entity then issues exchange-traded shares that are sold to the public, including non-Chinese investors (such as the Fund). Shares of the offshore entity are not equity ownership interests in the Mainland Chinese operating company and therefore the ability of the offshore entity to control the activities at the Mainland Chinese company are limited and the Mainland Chinese company may engage in activities that negatively impact investment value. Under a VIE structure, the Fund will typically have little or no ability to influence the Mainland China-based operating company through proxy voting or other means because it is not a Mainland Chinese company owner/shareholder. The VIE structure is designed to provide the offshore entity (and in turn, investors in the entity) with economic exposure to the Mainland Chinese company that replicates equity ownership, without actual equity ownership of the Mainland Chinese operating company. VIE structures are used due to Mainland Chinese government prohibitions on foreign ownership of companies in certain industries and it is not clear that the contracts are enforceable or that the structures will otherwise work as intended. There may also be conflicts of interest between the legal owners of the Mainland Chinese company and non-Chinese investors (such as the Fund).
Although the China Securities Regulatory Commission published that they do not object to the use of VIE structures for Mainland Chinese Companies to raise capital from non-Chinese investors, there is no guarantee that the Mainland Chinese government or a Mainland Chinese regulator will not otherwise interfere with the operation of VIE structures. Intervention by the Mainland
Chinese government with respect to VIE structures could adversely affect the Mainland Chinese operating company’s performance, the enforceability of the offshore entity’s contractual arrangements with the Mainland Chinese company and the value of the offshore entity’s shares. Under extreme circumstances, China might prohibit the use of VIE structures, or sever their ability to transmit economic and governance rights to non-Chinese investors. It remains unclear whether the Mainland China government will withdraw its implicit acceptance of the VIE structure, or whether any new laws, rules or regulations relating to VIE structures will be adopted or, if adopted, what impact they would have on the interests of non-Chinese investors (such as the Fund). Further, if the Mainland Chinese government determines that the agreements establishing the VIE structure do not comply with Mainland Chinese law and regulations, including those related to prohibitions on foreign ownership, the Mainland Chinese government could subject the Mainland Chinese company to penalties, revocation of business and operating licenses or forfeiture of ownership interests. The offshore entity’s control over the Mainland Chinese company may also be jeopardized if certain legal formalities are not observed in connection with the agreements, if the agreements are breached or if the agreements are otherwise determined not to be enforceable. If any of the foregoing were to occur, a non-Chinese investor may have little or no legal recourse and the market value of the Fund’s associated portfolio holdings would likely fall, causing substantial investment losses for the Fund.
China Stock Connect Programs Risk. The universe of A-share issues currently available via the Shanghai-Hong Kong Stock Connect program or the Shenzhen-Hong Kong Stock Connect Program (the Programs) in Mainland China to the Fund may be limited as compared with the universe of equity securities available in other markets. There are significant risks inherent in investing in China A-shares through the Programs. There may be a lower level of liquidity in the China A-share markets accessed through the Programs, which are relatively smaller in terms of both combined total market value and the number of A-shares which are available for investments compared to other markets. This could potentially lead to severe price volatility in China A-shares. Investments in China A-shares are heavily regulated and the recoupment and repatriation of assets invested in China A-shares is subject to restrictions by the Mainland Chinese government. In addition, investments in China A-shares through the Programs are subject to trading, clearance and settlement procedures that could increase the risk of loss to the Fund and/or affect the Fund's ability to effectively pursue its investment strategy, such as the prohibition on same day (turnaround) trading through the Programs. China A-shares currently eligible for trading under a Program may also lose such designation. Further, all China A-shares trades must be settled in renminbi (RMB), which requires the Fund to have timely access to a reliable supply of RMB in Hong Kong, which cannot be assured.
March 1, 2024  |  3

JPMorgan Active China ETF (continued)
Foreign Securities and Emerging Markets Risk. Investments in foreign issuers and foreign securities (including depositary receipts) are subject to additional risks, including political and economic risks, unstable governments, civil conflicts and war, greater volatility, decreased market liquidity, expropriation and nationalization risks, sanctions or other measures by the United States or other governments, currency fluctuations, higher transaction costs, delayed settlement, possible foreign controls on investment, and less stringent investor protection and disclosure standards of foreign markets. In certain markets where securities and other instruments are not traded “delivery versus payment,” the Fund may not receive timely payment for securities or other instruments it has delivered or receive delivery of securities paid for and may be subject to increased risk that the counterparty will fail to make payments or delivery when due or default completely. Foreign market trading hours, clearance and settlement procedures, and holiday schedules may limit the Fund's ability to buy and sell securities.
Sanctions, or even the threat of sanctions, against one or more foreign countries may result in the decline of the value and liquidity of the securities of those countries or other adverse consequences to those countries’ economies. As a result, sanctions may impair the Fund’s performance or its ability to meet its investment objective. For example, the Fund may be prohibited from investing in securities issued by companies subject to such sanctions. In addition, sanctions may require the Fund to freeze its existing investments related to such foreign companies, prohibiting the Fund from selling or otherwise transacting in these investments. This could negatively impact the Fund’s ability to sell securities or other financial instruments as needed. Sanctions could result in the sanctioned foreign country taking counter measures or retaliatory actions, which may further impair the value or liquidity of the securities of those countries and negatively impact the Fund.
Events and evolving conditions in certain economies or markets may alter the risks associated with investments tied to countries or regions that historically were perceived as comparatively stable becoming riskier and more volatile. These risks are magnified in “emerging markets.” Emerging market countries typically have less-established market economies than developed countries and may face greater social, economic, regulatory and political uncertainties. In addition, emerging markets typically present greater illiquidity and price volatility concerns due to smaller or limited local capital markets and greater difficulty in determining market valuations of securities due to limited public information on issuers. Certain emerging market countries may be subject to less stringent requirements regarding accounting, auditing, financial reporting and record keeping and therefore, material information related to an investment may not be available or reliable. Additionally, the Fund may have substantial difficulties exercising its legal rights or enforcing a counterparty’s legal obligations in certain jurisdictions outside of the United States, in particular in emerging market countries, which can increase the risks of loss.
Equity Market Risk. The price of equity securities may rise or fall because of changes in the broad market or changes in a company’s financial condition, sometimes rapidly or unpredictably. These price movements may result from factors affecting individual companies, sectors or industries selected for the Fund’s portfolio or the securities market as a whole, such as changes in economic or political conditions. When the value of the Fund’s portfolio securities goes down, your investment in the Fund decreases in value.
General Market Risk. Economies and financial markets throughout the world are becoming increasingly interconnected, which increases the likelihood that events or conditions in one country or region will adversely impact markets or issuers in other countries or regions. Securities in the Fund’s portfolio may underperform in comparison to securities in general financial markets, a particular financial market or other asset classes due to a number of factors, including inflation (or expectations for inflation), deflation (or expectations for deflation), interest rates, global demand for particular products or resources, market instability, financial system instability, debt crises and downgrades, embargoes, tariffs, sanctions and other trade barriers, regulatory events, other governmental trade or market control programs and related geopolitical events. In addition, the value of the Fund’s investments may be negatively affected by the occurrence of global events such as war, terrorism, environmental disasters, natural disasters or events, country instability, and infectious disease epidemics or pandemics.
Geographic Focus Risk. The Fund may focus its investments in one or more regions or small groups of countries. As a result, the Fund’s performance may be subject to greater volatility than a more geographically diversified fund.
Large Cap Company Risk. Because the Fund invests in large cap company securities, it may underperform other funds during periods when the Fund’s large cap securities are out of favor.
Smaller Company Risk. Investments in securities of smaller companies (mid cap and small cap companies) may be riskier, less liquid, more volatile and more vulnerable to economic, market and industry changes than securities of larger, more established companies. The securities of smaller companies may trade less frequently and in smaller volumes than securities of larger companies. As a result, changes in the price of securities issued by such companies may be more sudden or erratic than the prices of securities of large capitalization companies, especially over the short term. These risks are higher for small cap companies.
Depositary Receipts Risk. The Fund’s investments may take the form of depositary receipts, including unsponsored depositary receipts. Unsponsored depositary receipts may not provide as much information about the underlying issuer and may not carry the same voting privileges as sponsored depositary
4  |  J.P. Morgan Exchange-Traded Funds

receipts. Unsponsored depositary receipts are issued by one or more depositaries in response to market demand, but without a formal agreement with the company that issues the underlying securities.
Derivatives Risk. Derivatives, including currency forwards and futures, may be riskier than other types of investments because they may be more sensitive to changes in economic or market conditions than other types of investments and could result in losses that significantly exceed the Fund’s original investment. Many derivatives create leverage thereby causing the Fund to be more volatile than it would be if it had not used derivatives. Certain derivatives also expose the Fund to counterparty risk (the risk that the derivative counterparty will not fulfill its contractual obligations), including the credit risk of the derivative counterparty. Certain derivatives are synthetic instruments that attempt to replicate performance of certain reference assets. With regard to such derivatives, the Fund does not have a claim on the reference assets and is subject to enhanced counterparty risk. Derivatives may not perform as expected, so the Fund may not realize the intended benefits. When used for hedging, the change in value of a derivative may not correlate as expected with the currency, security or other risk being hedged. In addition, given their complexity, derivatives expose the Fund to risks of mispricing or improper valuation. Derivatives also can expose the Fund to derivative liquidity risk, which includes risks involving the liquidity demands that derivatives can create to make payments of margin, collateral, or settlement payments to counterparties, legal risk, which includes the risk of loss resulting from insufficient or unenforceable contractual documentation, insufficient capacity or authority of the Fund’s counterparty and operational risk, which includes documentation or settlement issues, system failures, inadequate controls and human error.
Structured Instrument Risk. Instruments that have similar economic characteristics to equity securities, such as participation notes or other structured instruments (structured instruments), are structured, synthetic instruments that generally attempt to replicate the performance of a particular equity or market (reference assets). There can be no assurance that structured instruments will trade at the same price or have the same value as the reference assets. In addition, structured instruments may be subject to transfer restrictions and may be illiquid or thinly traded and less liquid than other types of securities, which may also expose the Fund to risks of mispricing or improper valuation. Structured instruments typically are not secured by the reference assets and are therefore dependent solely upon the counterparty for repayment. Structured instruments also have the same risks associated with a direct investment in the reference assets.
Currency Risk. Changes in foreign currency exchange rates will affect the value of the Fund’s securities and may affect the price of the Fund’s Shares. Generally, when the value of the U.S. dollar rises in value relative to a foreign currency, an investment impacted by that currency loses value because that currency is
worth less in U.S. dollars. Currency exchange rates may fluctuate significantly over short periods of time for a number of reasons, including changes in interest rates. Devaluation of a currency by a country’s government or banking authority also will have a significant impact on the value of any investments denominated in that currency. Currency markets generally are not as regulated as securities markets, may be riskier than other types of investments and may increase the volatility of the Fund. Although the Fund may attempt to hedge its currency exposure into the U.S. dollar, it may not be successful in reducing the effects of currency fluctuations. The Fund may also hedge from one foreign currency to another. In addition, the Fund’s use of currency hedging may not be successful, including due to delays in placing trades and other operational limitations, and the use of such strategies may lower the Fund’s potential returns.
Mainland China may utilize formal or informal currency-exchange controls or “capital controls.” Capital controls may impose restrictions on the Fund’s ability to repatriate investments or income. Such controls may also affect the value of the Fund’s holdings.
Industry and Sector Focus Risk. At times, the Fund may increase the relative emphasis of its investments in a particular industry or sector. The prices of securities of issuers in a particular industry or sector may be more susceptible to fluctuations due to changes in economic or business conditions, government regulations, availability of basic resources or supplies, contagion risk within a particular industry or sector or to other industries or sectors, or other events that affect that industry or sector more than securities of issuers in other industries and sectors. To the extent that the Fund increases the relative emphasis of its investments in a particular industry or sector, the value of the Fund’s Shares may fluctuate in response to events affecting that industry or sector.
ETF Shares Trading Risk. Shares are listed for trading on the NYSE Arca, Inc. (the Exchange) and are bought and sold in the secondary market at market prices. The market prices of Shares are expected to fluctuate, in some cases materially, in response to changes in the Fund’s NAV, the intraday value of the Fund’s holdings and supply and demand for Shares. The adviser cannot predict whether Shares will trade above, below or at their NAV. Disruptions to creations and redemptions, the existence of significant market volatility or potential lack of an active trading market for the Shares (including through a trading halt), as well as other factors, may result in the Shares trading significantly above (at a premium) or below (at a discount) to NAV or to the intraday value of the Fund’s holdings. During such periods, you may incur significant losses if you sell your Shares.
The securities held by the Fund may be traded in markets that close at a different time than the Exchange. Liquidity in those securities may be reduced after the applicable closing times. Accordingly, during the time when the Exchange is open but
March 1, 2024  |  5

JPMorgan Active China ETF (continued)
after the applicable market closing, fixing or settlement times, bid-ask spreads on the Exchange and the corresponding premium or discount to the Shares’ NAV may widen.
Authorized Participant Concentration Risk. Only an authorized participant may engage in creation or redemption transactions directly with the Fund. The Fund has a limited number of intermediaries that act as authorized participants and none of these authorized participants is or will be obligated to engage in creation or redemption transactions. To the extent that these intermediaries exit the business or are unable to or choose not to proceed with creation and/or redemption orders with respect to the Fund and no other authorized participant creates or redeems, Shares may trade at a discount to NAV and possibly face trading halts and/or delisting.
Non-Diversified Fund Risk. Since the Fund is non-diversified, it may invest a greater percentage of its assets in a particular issuer or group of issuers than a diversified fund would. This increased investment in fewer issuers may result in the Fund’s Shares being more sensitive to economic results among those issuing the securities. The value of the Fund’s Shares may also be more volatile than the value of a fund which invests in more securities.
Cash Transactions Risk. Unlike certain ETFs, the Fund expects to generally effect its creations and redemptions entirely for cash, rather than for in-kind securities. Therefore, it may be required to sell portfolio securities and subsequently recognize gains on such sales that the Fund might not have recognized if it were to distribute portfolio securities in-kind. As such, investments in Shares may be less tax-efficient than an investment in an ETF that effects its creations and redemptions for in-kind securities.
Investments in the Fund are not deposits or obligations of, or guaranteed or endorsed by, any bank and are not insured or guaranteed by the FDIC, the Federal Reserve Board or any other government agency.
You could lose money investing in the Fund.
The Fund’s Past Performance
The Fund has not operated for a full calendar year as of the date of this prospectus and therefore, has no reportable performance history. Once the Fund has operated for at least one calendar year, a bar chart and performance table will be included in the prospectus to show the performance of the Fund. When such information is included, this section will provide some indication of the risks of investing in the Fund by showing changes in the Fund’s performance history from year to year and showing how the Fund’s average annual total returns compare with those of a broad measure of market performance. Although past performance of the Fund is no guarantee of how it will perform in the future, historical performance may give you some indication of the risks of
investing in the Fund. Updated performance information is available by visiting www.jpmorganfunds.com or by calling 1-844-457-6383 (844-4JPM ETF).
Management
Investment Adviser
J.P. Morgan Investment Management Inc. (the adviser)
Investment Sub-adviser
JPMorgan Asset Management (Asia Pacific) Limited (the sub-advier)
Portfolio Manager
Managed the
Fund Since
Primary Title with
Investment Sub-adviser
Li Tan
2023
Executive Director
Rebecca Jiang
2023
Managing Director
Purchase and Sale of Shares
Individual Shares of the Fund may only be purchased and sold in secondary market transactions through brokers or financial intermediaries. Shares of the Fund are listed for trading on the Exchange, and because Shares trade at market prices rather than NAV, Shares of the Fund may trade at a price greater than NAV (premium) or less than NAV (discount). Certain affiliates of the Fund and the adviser may purchase and resell Shares pursuant to this prospectus.
An investor may incur costs attributable to the difference between the highest price a buyer is willing to pay to purchase Shares of the Fund (bid) and the lowest price a seller is willing to accept for Shares (ask) when buying or selling Shares in the secondary market (the bid-ask spread).
Recent information, including information about the Fund’s NAV, market price, premiums and discounts, and bid-ask spreads, is included on the Fund’s website at jpmorganfunds.com.
Tax Information
To the extent the Fund makes distributions, those distributions will be taxed as ordinary income or capital gains, except when your investment is in an IRA, 401(k) plan or other tax-advantaged investment plan, in which case you may be subject to federal income tax upon withdrawal from the tax-advantaged investment plan.
Payments to Broker-Dealers and Other Financial Intermediaries
If you purchase Shares of the Fund through a broker-dealer or other financial intermediary (such as a bank), the adviser and its related companies may pay the financial intermediary for the sale of Shares and related services. These payments may create a conflict of interest by influencing the broker-dealer or
6  |  J.P. Morgan Exchange-Traded Funds

financial intermediary and your salesperson to recommend the Fund over another investment. Ask your salesperson or visit your financial intermediary’s website for more information.
March 1, 2024  |  7

JPMorgan ActiveBuilders Emerging Markets Equity ETF
Ticker: JEMA
What is the goal of the Fund?
The Fund seeks to provide long-term capital appreciation.
Fees and Expenses of the Fund
The following table describes the fees and expenses that you may pay if you buy, hold and sell Shares of the Fund. You may pay other fees, such as brokerage commissions and other fees to financial intermediaries, which are not reflected in the table and example below.
ANNUAL FUND OPERATING EXPENSES1
(Expenses that you pay each year as a percentage of the value
of your investment)
Management Fees
0.33%
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses
0.33
1
The Fund’s management agreement provides that the adviser will pay substantially all expenses of the Fund (including expenses of the Trust relating to the Fund), except for the management fees, payments under the Fund’s 12b-1 plan (if any), interest expenses, dividend and interest expenses related to short sales, taxes, acquired fund fees and expenses (other than fees for funds advised by the adviser and/or its affiliates), costs of holding shareholder meetings, and litigation and potential litigation and other extraordinary expenses not incurred in the ordinary course of the Fund’s business. Additionally, the Fund shall be responsible for its non-operating expenses, including brokerage commissions and fees and expenses associated with the Fund’s securities lending program, if applicable.
Example
This Example is intended to help you compare the cost of investing in the Fund with the cost of investing in other funds. The Example does not take into account brokerage commissions that you pay when purchasing or selling Shares of the Fund. The Example assumes that you invest $10,000 in the Fund for the time periods indicated. The Example also assumes that your investment has a 5% return each year and that the Fund’s operating expenses remain the same. Your actual costs may be higher or lower.
WHETHER OR NOT YOU SELL YOUR SHARES, YOUR COST
WOULD BE:
 
1 Year
3 Years
5 Years
10 Years
SHARES ($)
34
106
185
418
Portfolio Turnover
The Fund pays transaction costs, such as commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or “turns over” its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover rate may indicate higher transaction costs and may result in higher taxes when Shares are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are not reflected in annual fund operating expenses or in the Example, affect the Fund’s
performance. During the Fund’s most recent fiscal year, the Fund’s portfolio turnover rate was 46% of the average value of its portfolio.
What are the Fund’s main investment strategies?
Under normal circumstances, the Fund invests at least 80% of its Assets in equity securities and equity-related instruments that are tied economically to emerging markets. “Assets” means net assets, plus the amount of borrowings for investment purposes. Emerging markets include most countries in the world except Australia, Canada, Japan, New Zealand, the United Kingdom, the United States, most of the countries of Western Europe and Hong Kong, although the Fund may invest in securities tied to those countries as well.
The Fund’s investments represent allocations to a variety of the adviser’s actively managed emerging market equity strategies, including country, region and style strategies, among others. The adviser selects the strategies utilized in the portfolio based on risk/return analyses and relative value considerations.
The Fund will overweight or underweight countries and sectors relative to the MSCI Emerging Markets Index (net total return) 1 (the Benchmark). In implementing its strategy, the Fund seeks to construct a portfolio of holdings that will outperform the Benchmark over time while maintaining similar risk characteristics, including sector and geographic risks.
The equity securities and equity-related instruments in which the Fund may invest include, but are not limited to, common stock, participation notes or other structured notes, and other instruments that provide economic exposure to one or more equity securities.
Certain of the equity securities in which the Fund invests are expected to be issued by companies that rely on variable interest entity (VIE) structures.
The Fund may invest in securities across all market capitalizations, although the Fund may invest a significant portion of its assets in companies of any one particular market capitalization category.
Securities and equity-related instruments tied economically to an emerging market include: (i) securities of issuers that are organized under the laws of an emerging market country or that maintain their principal place of business in an emerging market country; (ii) securities that are traded principally in an emerging market country; (iii) securities of issuers that, during their most recent fiscal year, derived at least 50% of their revenues or profits from goods produced or sold, investments made, or services performed in an emerging market country or that have at least 50% of their assets in an emerging market country; or (iv) securities or other instruments that expose the Fund to the economic fortunes and risks of one or more emerging market countries.

1MSCI Emerging Markets Index is a registered service mark of MSCI, Inc., which does not sponsor and is in no way affiliated with the Fund.
8  |  J.P. Morgan Exchange-Traded Funds

There is no limit on the number of countries in which the Fund may invest, and the Fund may focus its investments in a single country or a small group of countries The Fund may use exchange-traded funds to gain exposure to particular foreign securities or markets and for the efficient management of cash flows. The Fund will have significant exposure to investments in the China Region, South Korea and India.
The Fund may invest in securities denominated in any currency and will invest substantially in securities denominated in foreign currencies.
Derivatives, which are instruments that have a value based on another instrument, exchange rate or index, may also be used as substitutes for securities in which the Fund can invest. The Fund may utilize currency forwards (including nondeliverable forwards) to manage currency exposures, where practical, for the purpose of risk management, including hedging non-dollar currency exposure back to the U.S. dollar. The Fund may also use exchanged-traded futures for the efficient management of cash flows.
Investment Process: In managing the Fund, the adviser uses both a top down and bottom up research process as well as a combination of fundamental and quantitative inputs to allocate the Fund’s assets among a range of sectors. In buying and selling investments for the Fund, the adviser looks for countries and individual securities that it believes will perform well over time. A proprietary multi-factor model is used to quantitatively rank countries, which informs the Fund’s portfolio construction. The adviser selects individual securities after performing a risk/reward analysis to address the Fund’s objective of providing a high total return. Research produced by the adviser includes in-depth, fundamental research into individual securities conducted by research analysts, who emphasize each issuer’s long-term prospects, and disciplined top-down macro and quantitative research using the latest technology available to the firm. Research analysts use their local expertise to identify, research, and rank companies according to their expected performance.
As part of its investment process, the adviser seeks to assess the impact of environmental, social and governance (ESG) factors on many issuers in the universe in which the Fund may invest. The adviser’s assessment is based on an analysis of key opportunities and risks across industries to seek to identify financially material issues with respect to the Fund’s investments in securities and ascertain key issues that merit engagement with issuers. These assessments may not be conclusive, and securities of issuers that may be negatively impacted by such factors may be purchased and retained by the Fund, while the Fund may divest or not invest in securities of issuers that may be positively impacted by such factors.
The Fund’s Main Investment Risks
The Fund is subject to management risk and may not achieve its objective if the adviser’s expectations regarding particular instruments or markets are not met.
An investment in this Fund or any other fund may not provide a complete investment program. The suitability of an investment in the Fund should be considered based on the investment objective, strategies and risks described in this prospectus, considered in light of all of the other investments in your portfolio, as well as your risk tolerance, financial goals and time horizons. You may want to consult with a financial advisor to determine if this Fund is suitable for you.
The Fund is subject to the main risks noted below, any of which may adversely affect the Fund’s net asset value (NAV), market price, performance and ability to meet its investment objective.
Equity Market Risk. The price of equity securities may rise or fall because of changes in the broad market or changes in a company’s financial condition, sometimes rapidly or unpredictably. These price movements may result from factors affecting individual companies, sectors or industries selected for the Fund’s portfolio or the securities market as a whole, such as changes in economic or political conditions. When the value of the Fund’s portfolio securities goes down, your investment in the Fund decreases in value.
General Market Risk. Economies and financial markets throughout the world are becoming increasingly interconnected, which increases the likelihood that events or conditions in one country or region will adversely impact markets or issuers in other countries or regions. Securities in the Fund’s portfolio may underperform in comparison to securities in general financial markets, a particular financial market or other asset classes due to a number of factors, including inflation (or expectations for inflation), deflation (or expectations for deflation), interest rates, global demand for particular products or resources, market instability, financial system instability, debt crises and downgrades, embargoes, tariffs, sanctions and other trade barriers, regulatory events, other governmental trade or market control programs and related geopolitical events. In addition, the value of the Fund’s investments may be negatively affected by the occurrence of global events such as war, terrorism, environmental disasters, natural disasters or events, country instability, and infectious disease epidemics or pandemics.
Foreign Securities and Emerging Markets Risk. Investments in foreign issuers and foreign securities (including depositary receipts) are subject to additional risks, including political and economic risks, unstable governments, civil conflicts and war, greater volatility, decreased market liquidity, expropriation and nationalization risks, sanctions or other measures by the United States or other governments, currency fluctuations, higher transaction costs, delayed settlement, possible foreign controls on investment, and less stringent investor protection and disclosure standards of foreign markets. In certain markets where securities and other instruments are not traded “delivery versus payment,” the Fund may not receive timely payment for securities or other instruments it has delivered or receive
March 1, 2024  |  9

JPMorgan ActiveBuilders Emerging Markets Equity ETF (continued)
delivery of securities paid for and may be subject to increased risk that the counterparty will fail to make payments or delivery when due or default completely. Foreign market trading hours, clearance and settlement procedures, and holiday schedules may limit the Fund's ability to buy and sell securities.
Events and evolving conditions in certain economies or markets may alter the risks associated with investments tied to countries or regions that historically were perceived as comparatively stable becoming riskier and more volatile. These risks are magnified in “emerging markets.” Emerging market countries typically have less-established market economies than developed countries and may face greater social, economic, regulatory and political uncertainties. In addition, emerging markets typically present greater illiquidity and price volatility concerns due to smaller or limited local capital markets and greater difficulty in determining market valuations of securities due to limited public information on issuers. Certain emerging market countries may be subject to less stringent requirements regarding accounting, auditing, financial reporting and record keeping and therefore, material information related to an investment may not be available or reliable. Additionally, the Fund may have substantial difficulties exercising its legal rights or enforcing a counterparty’s legal obligations in certain jurisdictions outside of the United States, in particular in emerging market countries, which can increase the risks of loss.
Geographic Focus Risk. The Fund may focus its investments in one or more regions or small groups of countries. As a result, the Fund’s performance may be subject to greater volatility than a more geographically diversified fund.
Greater China Region Risk. In addition to the risks listed under “Foreign Securities and Emerging Markets Risk,” investments in Mainland China, Hong Kong and Taiwan are subject to significant legal, regulatory, monetary and economic risks, as well as the potential for regional and global conflicts, including actions that are contrary to the interests of the U.S.
Investments in Mainland China involve political and legal uncertainties, currency fluctuations and aggressive currency controls, the risk of confiscatory taxation, and nationalization or expropriation of assets, which could adversely affect and significantly diminish the values of the Mainland Chinese companies in which the Fund invests. The Mainland Chinese securities markets are emerging markets characterized by greater price volatility. Mainland China is dominated by the one-party rule of the Communist Party, and the Mainland Chinese government exercises significant control over Mainland China’s economic growth. There is the potential of increased tariffs and restrictions on trade between the United States and Mainland China. An increase in tariffs or trade restrictions, or even the threat of such developments, could lead to a significant reduction in international trade, which could have a negative impact on Mainland Chinese companies and a commensurately negative impact on the Fund.
The political reunification of Mainland China and Taiwan, over which Mainland China continues to claim sovereignty, is a highly complex issue. There is the potential for future political, military or economic disturbances that may have an adverse impact on the values of the Fund’s investments in Mainland China and elsewhere, or make certain Fund investments impractical or impossible. Any escalation of hostility between Mainland China and Taiwan would likely have a significant adverse impact on the value and liquidity of the Fund’s investments in both Mainland China and elsewhere, causing substantial investment losses for the Fund.
Hong Kong is a Special Administrative Region of the People's Republic of China. Since Hong Kong reverted to Chinese sovereignty in 1997, it has been governed by the Basic Law. Under the Basic Law, Hong Kong was guaranteed a high degree of autonomy in certain matters, including economic matters, until 2047. Attempts by the government of Mainland China to exert greater control over Hong Kong’s economic, political or legal structures or its existing social policy could negatively affect investor confidence in Hong Kong (as has been the case previously during certain periods), which in turn could negatively affect markets and business performance.
Chinese operating companies sometimes rely on variable interest entity (VIE) structures to raise capital from non-Chinese investors, even though such arrangements are not formally recognized under Chinese law. In a VIE structure, a Mainland China-based operating company establishes an entity (typically offshore) that enters into service and other contracts with the Mainland Chinese company designed to provide economic exposure to the company. The offshore entity then issues exchange-traded shares that are sold to the public, including non-Chinese investors (such as the Fund). Shares of the offshore entity are not equity ownership interests in the Mainland Chinese operating company and therefore the ability of the offshore entity to control the activities at the Mainland Chinese company are limited and the Mainland Chinese company may engage in activities that negatively impact investment value. Under a VIE structure, the Fund will typically have little or no ability to influence the Mainland China-based operating company through proxy voting or other means because it is not a Mainland Chinese company owner/shareholder. The VIE structure is designed to provide the offshore entity (and in turn, investors in the entity) with economic exposure to the Mainland Chinese company that replicates equity ownership, without actual equity ownership of the Mainland Chinese operating company. VIE structures are used due to Mainland Chinese government prohibitions on foreign ownership of companies in certain industries and it is not clear that the contracts are enforceable or that the structures will otherwise work as intended. Intervention by the Mainland Chinese government with respect to VIE structures could adversely affect the Mainland Chinese operating company’s performance, the enforceability of the offshore entity’s contractual arrangements with the Mainland Chinese company and the value of the
10  |  J.P. Morgan Exchange-Traded Funds

offshore entity’s shares. If this were to occur, the market value of the Fund’s associated portfolio holdings would likely fall, causing substantial investment losses for the Fund.
Asia Pacific Market Risk. The economies in the Asia Pacific region are in all stages of economic development and may be intertwined. The small size of securities markets and the low trading volume in some countries in the Asia Pacific Region may lead to a lack of liquidity. Also, some Asia Pacific economies and financial markets have been extremely volatile in recent years. Many of the countries in the region are developing, both politically and economically. They may have relatively unstable governments and economies based on only a few commodities or industries. The share prices of companies in the region tend to be volatile and there is a significant possibility of loss. Also, some companies in the region may have less established product markets or a small management group and they may be more vulnerable to political or economic conditions, like nationalization. In addition, some countries have restricted the flow of money in and out of the country.
Certain of the currencies in the Asia Pacific region have experienced extreme volatility relative to the U.S. dollar. For example, Thailand, Indonesia, the Philippines and South Korea have had currency crises and have sought help from the International Monetary Fund. Holding securities in currencies that are devalued (or in companies whose revenues are substantially in currencies that are devalued) will likely decrease the value of the Fund.
The trading volume on some Asia Pacific region stock exchanges is much lower than in the United States, and Asia Pacific region securities of some companies are less liquid and more volatile than similar U.S. securities. In addition, brokerage commissions on regional stock exchanges are fixed and are generally higher than the negotiated commissions in the United States. The imposition of tariffs or other trade barriers, or a downturn in the economy of a significant trading partner could adversely impact Asia Pacific companies. If the Fund concentrates in the Asia Pacific region, the Fund’s performance may be more volatile than that of a fund that invests globally. If Asia Pacific securities fall out of favor, it may cause the Fund to underperform funds that do not concentrate in the Asia Pacific region.
India Risk. Government actions, bureaucratic obstacles and inconsistent economic reform within the Indian government have had a significant effect on the economy and could adversely affect market conditions, economic growth and the profitability of private enterprises. Global economic developments may inhibit the flow of foreign capital on which India is dependent to sustain its growth. Large portions of many Indian companies remain in the hands of individuals and corporate governance standards of Indian companies may be weaker and less transparent, which may increase the risk of loss and unequal treatment of investors. Investments in Indian securities may be limited or prevented, at times, due to the limits on foreign ownership imposed by the Reserve Bank of India.
Investments in India are subject to risks presented by investments in an emerging market country, including liquidity risk, which may result in extreme volatility in the prices of Indian securities. Religious, cultural and military disputes persist in India, and between India and Pakistan (as well as between sectarian groups within each country). In addition, the Indian economy could be adversely impacted by natural disasters and acts of terrorism. Both India and Pakistan have tested nuclear arms, and the threat of deployment of such weapons could hinder development of the Indian economy, and escalating tensions could impact the broader region.
Depositary Receipts Risk. The Fund’s investments may take the form of depositary receipts, including unsponsored depositary receipts. Unsponsored depositary receipts may not provide as much information about the underlying issuer and may not carry the same voting privileges as sponsored depositary receipts. Unsponsored depositary receipts are issued by one or more depositaries in response to market demand, but without a formal agreement with the company that issues the underlying securities.
Smaller Company Risk. Investments in securities of smaller companies (mid cap and small cap companies) may be riskier, less liquid, more volatile and more vulnerable to economic, market and industry changes than securities of larger, more established companies. The securities of smaller companies may trade less frequently and in smaller volumes than securities of larger companies. As a result, changes in the price of securities issued by such companies may be more sudden or erratic than the prices of securities of large capitalization companies, especially over the short term. These risks are higher for small cap companies.
Derivatives Risk. Derivatives, including currency forwards and futures, may be riskier than other types of investments because they may be more sensitive to changes in economic or market conditions than other types of investments and could result in losses that significantly exceed the Fund’s original investment. Many derivatives create leverage thereby causing the Fund to be more volatile than it would be if it had not used derivatives. Certain derivatives also expose the Fund to counterparty risk (the risk that the derivative counterparty will not fulfill its contractual obligations), including the credit risk of the derivative counterparty. Certain derivatives are synthetic instruments that attempt to replicate performance of certain reference assets. With regard to such derivatives, the Fund does not have a claim on the reference assets and is subject to enhanced counterparty risk. Derivatives may not perform as expected, so the Fund may not realize the intended benefits. When used for hedging, the change in value of a derivative may not correlate as expected with the currency, security or other risk being hedged. In addition, given their complexity, derivatives expose the Fund to risks of mispricing or improper valuation. Derivatives also can expose the Fund to derivative liquidity risk, which includes risks involving the liquidity demands that derivatives
March 1, 2024  |  11

JPMorgan ActiveBuilders Emerging Markets Equity ETF (continued)
can create to make payments of margin, collateral, or settlement payments to counterparties, legal risk, which includes the risk of loss resulting from insufficient or unenforceable contractual documentation, insufficient capacity or authority of the Fund’s counterparty and operational risk, which includes documentation or settlement issues, system failures, inadequate controls and human error.
Currency Risk. Changes in foreign currency exchange rates will affect the value of the Fund’s securities and may affect the price of the Fund’s Shares. Generally, when the value of the U.S. dollar rises in value relative to a foreign currency, an investment impacted by that currency loses value because that currency is worth less in U.S. dollars. Currency exchange rates may fluctuate significantly over short periods of time for a number of reasons, including changes in interest rates. Devaluation of a currency by a country’s government or banking authority also will have a significant impact on the value of any investments denominated in that currency. Currency markets generally are not as regulated as securities markets, may be riskier than other types of investments and may increase the volatility of the Fund. Although the Fund may attempt to hedge its currency exposure into the U.S. dollar, it may not be successful in reducing the effects of currency fluctuations. The Fund may also hedge from one foreign currency to another. In addition, the Fund’s use of currency hedging may not be successful, including due to delays in placing trades and other operational limitations, and the use of such strategies may lower the Fund’s potential returns.
Industry and Sector Focus Risk. At times, the Fund may increase the relative emphasis of its investments in a particular industry or sector. The prices of securities of issuers in a particular industry or sector may be more susceptible to fluctuations due to changes in economic or business conditions, government regulations, availability of basic resources or supplies, contagion risk within a particular industry or sector or to other industries or sectors, or other events that affect that industry or sector more than securities of issuers in other industries and sectors. To the extent that the Fund increases the relative emphasis of its investments in a particular industry or sector, the value of the Fund’s Shares may fluctuate in response to events affecting that industry or sector.
ETF Shares Trading Risk. Shares are listed for trading on the Cboe BZX Exchange, Inc. (the Exchange) and are bought and sold in the secondary market at market prices. The market prices of Shares are expected to fluctuate, in some cases materially, in response to changes in the Fund’s NAV, the intraday value of the Fund’s holdings and supply and demand for Shares. The adviser cannot predict whether Shares will trade above, below or at their NAV. Disruptions to creations and redemptions, the existence of significant market volatility or potential lack of an active trading market for the Shares (including through a trading halt), as well as other factors, may result in the Shares trading significantly above (at a premium) or
below (at a discount) to NAV or to the intraday value of the Fund’s holdings. During such periods, you may incur significant losses if you sell your Shares.
The securities held by the Fund may be traded in markets that close at a different time than the Exchange. Liquidity in those securities may be reduced after the applicable closing times. Accordingly, during the time when the Exchange is open but after the applicable market closing, fixing or settlement times, bid-ask spreads on the Exchange and the corresponding premium or discount to the Shares’ NAV may widen.
Authorized Participant Concentration Risk. Only an authorized participant may engage in creation or redemption transactions directly with the Fund. The Fund has a limited number of intermediaries that act as authorized participants and none of these authorized participants is or will be obligated to engage in creation or redemption transactions. To the extent that these intermediaries exit the business or are unable to or choose not to proceed with creation and/or redemption orders with respect to the Fund and no other authorized participant creates or redeems, Shares may trade at a discount to NAV and possibly face trading halts and/or delisting.
Exchange-Traded Fund (ETF) and Other Investment Company Risk. The Fund may invest in shares of other investment companies and ETFs. Shareholders bear both their proportionate share of the Fund’s expenses and similar expenses of the underlying investment company or ETF when the Fund invests in shares of another investment company or ETF. The Fund is subject to the risks associated with the ETF or investment company’s investments. The price movement of an index-based ETF may not track the underlying index and may result in a loss. In addition, ETFs may trade at a price above (premium) or below (discount) their NAV, especially during periods of significant market volatility or stress, causing investors to pay or receive significantly more or less than the value of the ETF’s underlying portfolio when they purchase or sell their ETF shares, respectively. Certain ETFs traded on exchanges may be thinly traded and experience large spreads between the “ask” price quoted by a seller and the “bid” price offered by a buyer.
Cash Transactions Risk. Unlike certain ETFs, the Fund expects to generally effect its creations and redemptions partially for cash, rather than primarily for in-kind securities. Therefore, it will be required to sell portfolio securities and subsequently recognize gains on such sales that the Fund might not have recognized if it were to distribute portfolio securities in kind. As such, investments in Shares may be less tax-efficient than an investment in an ETF that distributes portfolio securities entirely in kind.
Investments in the Fund are not deposits or obligations of, or guaranteed or endorsed by, any bank and are not insured or guaranteed by the FDIC, the Federal Reserve Board or any other government agency.
You could lose money investing in the Fund.
12  |  J.P. Morgan Exchange-Traded Funds

The Fund’s Past Performance
This section provides some indication of the risks of investing in the Fund. The bar chart shows how the performance of the Fund’s Shares has varied from year to year for the past two calendar years. The table shows the average annual total returns for the past one year and life of the Fund. It compares that performance to the MSCI Emerging Markets Index (net total return). Past performance (before and after taxes) is not necessarily an indication of how the Fund will perform in the future. Updated performance information is available by visiting www.jpmorganfunds.com or by calling 1-844-457-6383 (844-4JPM ETF).
Source: MSCI. The MSCI information may only be used for your internal use, may not be reproduced or redisseminated in any form and may not be used as a basis for or a component of any financial instruments or products or indices. None of the MSCI information is intended to constitute investment advice or a recommendation to make (or refrain from making) any kind of investment decision and may not be relied on as such. Historical data and analysis should not be taken as an indication or guarantee of any future performance analysis, forecast, or prediction. The MSCI information is provided on an “as is” basis and the user of this information assumes the entire risk of any use made of this information. MSCI, each of its affiliates and each other person involved in or related to compiling, computing or creating any MSCI information (collectively, the “MSCI Parties”) expressly disclaims all warranties (including, without limitation, any warranties of originality, accuracy, completeness, timeliness, non-infringement, merchantability and fitness for a particular purpose) with respect to this information. Without limiting any of the foregoing, in no event shall any MSCI Party have any liability for any direct, indirect, special, incidental, punitive, consequential (including, without limitation, lost profits) or any other damages. (www.msci.com)
YEAR-BY-YEAR RETURNS
Best Quarter
4th quarter, 2022
10.28%
Worst Quarter
3rd quarter, 2022
-12.40%
AVERAGE ANNUAL TOTAL RETURNS
(For periods ended December 31, 2023)
 
Past
Life of Fund
since
 
1 Year
03/10/2021
SHARES
Return Before Taxes
8.75
%
-7.27
%
Return After Taxes on Distributions
8.07
-7.81
Return After Taxes on Distributions and Sale
of Fund Shares
5.78
-5.43
MSCI EMERGING MARKETS INDEX
(Net Total Return)
(Reflects No Deduction for Fees, Expenses, or
Taxes, Except Foreign Withholding Taxes)
9.83
-6.35
After-tax returns are calculated using the historical highest individual federal marginal income tax rates and do not reflect the impact of state and local taxes. Actual after-tax returns depend on the investor’s tax situation and may differ from those shown, and the after-tax returns shown are not relevant to investors who hold their Shares through tax-deferred arrangements such as 401(k) plans or individual retirement accounts. In some cases, the “Return After Taxes on Distributions and Sale of Fund Shares” may exceed the “Return Before Taxes” due to an assumed benefit from any losses on a sale of Shares at the end of the measurement period.
March 1, 2024  |  13

JPMorgan ActiveBuilders Emerging Markets Equity ETF (continued)
Management
J.P. Morgan Investment Management Inc. (the adviser)
Portfolio Manager
Managed the
Fund Since
Primary Title with
Investment Adviser
Anuj Arora
2021
Managing Director
Joyce Weng
2021
Executive Director
Harold Yu
2022
Executive Director
Purchase and Sale of Shares
Individual Shares of the Fund may only be purchased and sold in secondary market transactions through brokers or financial intermediaries. Shares of the Fund are listed for trading on the Exchange, and because Shares trade at market prices rather than NAV, Shares of the Fund may trade at a price greater than NAV (premium) or less than NAV (discount). Certain affiliates of the Fund and the adviser may purchase and resell Shares pursuant to this prospectus.
An investor may incur costs attributable to the difference between the highest price a buyer is willing to pay to purchase Shares of the Fund (bid) and the lowest price a seller is willing to accept for Shares (ask) when buying or selling Shares in the secondary market (the bid-ask spread).
Recent information, including information about the Fund’s NAV, market price, premiums and discounts, and bid-ask spreads, is included on the Fund’s website at jpmorganfunds.com.
Tax Information
To the extent the Fund makes distributions, those distributions will be taxed as ordinary income or capital gains, except when your investment is in an IRA, 401(k) plan or other tax-advantaged investment plan, in which case you may be subject to federal income tax upon withdrawal from the tax-advantaged investment plan.
Payments to Broker-Dealers and Other Financial Intermediaries
If you purchase Shares of the Fund through a broker-dealer or other financial intermediary (such as a bank), the adviser and its related companies may pay the financial intermediary for the sale of Shares and related services. These payments may create a conflict of interest by influencing the broker-dealer or financial intermediary and your salesperson to recommend the Fund over another investment. Ask your salesperson or visit your financial intermediary’s website for more information.
14  |  J.P. Morgan Exchange-Traded Funds

JPMorgan Global Select Equity ETF
Ticker: JGLO
What is the goal of the Fund?
The Fund seeks to provide long-term capital appreciation.
Fees and Expenses of the Fund
The following table describes the fees and expenses that you may pay if you buy, hold and sell Shares of the Fund. You may pay other fees, such as brokerage commissions and other fees to financial intermediaries, which are not reflected in the table and example below.
ANNUAL FUND OPERATING EXPENSES1
(Expenses that you pay each year as a percentage of the value
of your investment)
Management Fees
0.47%
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses
0.47
1
The Fund’s management agreement provides that the adviser will pay substantially all expenses of the Fund (including expenses of the Trust relating to the Fund), except for the management fees, payments under the Fund’s 12b-1 plan (if any), interest expenses, dividend and interest expenses related to short sales, taxes, acquired fund fees and expenses (other than fees for funds advised by the adviser and/or its affiliates), costs of holding shareholder meetings, and litigation and potential litigation and other extraordinary expenses not incurred in the ordinary course of the Fund’s business. Additionally, the Fund shall be responsible for its non-operating expenses, including brokerage commissions and fees and expenses associated with the Fund’s securities lending program, if applicable.
Example
This Example is intended to help you compare the cost of investing in the Fund with the cost of investing in other funds. The Example does not take into account brokerage commissions that you pay when purchasing or selling Shares of the Fund. The Example assumes that you invest $10,000 in the Fund for the time periods indicated. The Example also assumes that your investment has a 5% return each year and that the Fund’s operating expenses remain the same. Your actual costs may be higher or lower.
WHETHER OR NOT YOU SELL YOUR SHARES, YOUR COST
WOULD BE:
 
1 Year
3 Years
SHARES ($)
48
151
Portfolio Turnover
The Fund pays transaction costs, such as commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or “turns over” its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover rate may indicate higher transaction costs and may result in higher taxes when Shares are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are not reflected in annual fund operating expenses or in the Example, affect the Fund’s
performance. During the Fund’s most recent fiscal period (September 13, 2023 through October 31, 2023), the Fund’s portfolio turnover rate was 8% of the average value of its portfolio.
What are the Fund’s main investment strategies?
The Fund invests primarily in equity securities of companies in global developed markets. The Fund also may invest in global emerging markets. Global developed markets include Australia, Canada, Israel, Japan, New Zealand, Singapore, the United Kingdom, the United States, most of the countries of Western Europe and Hong Kong; global emerging markets include most of the other countries in the world. Generally, the Fund expects to maintain, over time, regional geographic and sector exposures similar to those of its benchmark, the MSCI World Index (net total return)1, although the Fund may deviate from these exposures in the adviser’s discretion. Under normal circumstances, the Fund will typically hold between 70 and 100 securities.
Under normal circumstances, the Fund will invest at least 80% of the value of its Assets in equity securities and equity-related instruments. “Assets” means net assets, plus the amount of borrowings for investment purposes. The equity securities and equity-related instruments in which the Fund may invest include, but are not limited to, common stock, preferred shares, convertible securities, depositary receipts, exchange-traded funds (ETFs), equity securities of real estate investment trusts (REITs), warrants and rights, and privately placed securities, and other instruments that provide economic exposure to one or more equity securities.
Derivatives, which are instruments that have a value based on another instrument, exchange rate or index, may also be used as substitutes for securities in which the Fund can invest. The Fund may use futures contracts, swaps, participation notes, forwards and other instruments to more effectively gain targeted equity exposure from its cash positions, to hedge various investments and for risk management. The Fund may use exchange-traded futures to manage cash flows.
The Fund may invest in securities denominated in U.S. dollars, other major reserve currencies, such as the euro, yen and pound sterling, and currencies of other countries in which it can invest. However, a substantial portion (if not all) of the Fund's foreign investments will be denominated in foreign currencies, and the Fund may, but does not currently expect to, hedge its currency exposure.
The Fund will invest primarily in the securities of large cap market capitalization companies, although the Fund may also invest in mid cap and small cap securities.
Investment Process: In managing the Fund, the adviser focuses on individual equity selection, emphasizing those equity securities that are identified as attractive according to the proprietary

1MSCI World Index is a registered service mark of MSCI, Inc., which does not sponsor and is in no way affiliated with the Fund.
March 1, 2024  |  15

JPMorgan Global Select Equity ETF (continued)
research of the adviser. This process generally looks for securities that the adviser believes are attractively valued, possess strong free cash flow and have the potential for sustainable earnings growth. The adviser’s analysis includes a review of proprietary data, information self-reported by companies, data from third party vendors and internal fundamental research. As part of its investment process, the adviser seeks to assess the impact of environmental, social and governance (ESG) factors on many issuers in the universe in which the Fund may invest. The adviser’s assessment is based on an analysis of key opportunities and risks across industries to seek to identify financially material issues with respect to the Fund’s investments in securities and ascertain key issues that merit engagement with issuers. These assessments may not be conclusive, and securities of issuers that may be negatively impacted by such factors may be purchased and retained by the Fund, while the Fund may divest or not invest in securities of issuers that may be positively impacted by such factors.
The Fund may sell securities if the adviser’s conviction in a security changes, if the issuer’s fundamentals change, or if the adviser believes the security is no longer attractively valued. Investments may also be sold if certain adverse political and economic events occur or if the adviser identifies a security that it believes offers a better investment opportunity.
The Fund’s Main Investment Risks
The Fund is subject to management risk and may not achieve its objective if the adviser’s expectations regarding particular instruments or markets are not met.
An investment in this Fund or any other fund may not provide a complete investment program. The suitability of an investment in the Fund should be considered based on the investment objective, strategies and risks described in this prospectus, considered in light of all of the other investments in your portfolio, as well as your risk tolerance, financial goals and time horizons. You may want to consult with a financial advisor to determine if this Fund is suitable for you.
The Fund is subject to the main risks noted below, any of which may adversely affect the Fund’s net asset value (NAV), market price, performance and ability to meet its investment objective.
Equity Market Risk. The price of equity securities may rise or fall because of changes in the broad market or changes in a company’s financial condition, sometimes rapidly or unpredictably. These price movements may result from factors affecting individual companies, sectors or industries selected for the Fund’s portfolio or the securities market as a whole, such as changes in economic or political conditions. When the value of the Fund’s portfolio securities goes down, your investment in the Fund decreases in value.
General Market Risk. Economies and financial markets throughout the world are becoming increasingly interconnected, which increases the likelihood that events or conditions
in one country or region will adversely impact markets or issuers in other countries or regions. Securities in the Fund’s portfolio may underperform in comparison to securities in general financial markets, a particular financial market or other asset classes due to a number of factors, including inflation (or expectations for inflation), deflation (or expectations for deflation), interest rates, global demand for particular products or resources, market instability, financial system instability, debt crises and downgrades, embargoes, tariffs, sanctions and other trade barriers, regulatory events, other governmental trade or market control programs and related geopolitical events. In addition, the value of the Fund’s investments may be negatively affected by the occurrence of global events such as war, terrorism, environmental disasters, natural disasters or events, country instability, and infectious disease epidemics or pandemics.
Foreign Securities and Emerging Markets Risk. Investments in foreign issuers and foreign securities (including depositary receipts) are subject to additional risks, including political and economic risks, unstable governments, civil conflicts and war, greater volatility, decreased market liquidity, expropriation and nationalization risks, sanctions or other measures by the United States or other governments, currency fluctuations, higher transaction costs, delayed settlement, possible foreign controls on investment, and less stringent investor protection and disclosure standards of foreign markets. In certain markets where securities and other instruments are not traded “delivery versus payment,” the Fund may not receive timely payment for securities or other instruments it has delivered or receive delivery of securities paid for and may be subject to increased risk that the counterparty will fail to make payments or delivery when due or default completely. Foreign market trading hours, clearance and settlement procedures, and holiday schedules may limit the Fund's ability to buy and sell securities.
Events and evolving conditions in certain economies or markets may alter the risks associated with investments tied to countries or regions that historically were perceived as comparatively stable becoming riskier and more volatile. These risks are magnified in “emerging markets.” Emerging market countries typically have less-established market economies than developed countries and may face greater social, economic, regulatory and political uncertainties. In addition, emerging markets typically present greater illiquidity and price volatility concerns due to smaller or limited local capital markets and greater difficulty in determining market valuations of securities due to limited public information on issuers. Certain emerging market countries may be subject to less stringent requirements regarding accounting, auditing, financial reporting and record keeping and therefore, material information related to an investment may not be available or reliable. Additionally, the Fund may have substantial difficulties exercising its legal rights or enforcing a counterparty’s legal obligations in certain jurisdictions outside of the United States, in particular in emerging market countries, which can increase the risks of loss.
16  |  J.P. Morgan Exchange-Traded Funds

Geographic Focus Risk. The Fund may focus its investments in one or more regions or small groups of countries. As a result, the Fund’s performance may be subject to greater volatility than a more geographically diversified fund.
Depositary Receipts Risk. The Fund’s investments may take the form of depositary receipts, including unsponsored depositary receipts. Unsponsored depositary receipts may not provide as much information about the underlying issuer and may not carry the same voting privileges as sponsored depositary receipts. Unsponsored depositary receipts are issued by one or more depositaries in response to market demand, but without a formal agreement with the company that issues the underlying securities.
Risk of Investing in Japan. The Japanese economy may be subject to economic, political and social instability, which could have a negative impact on Japanese securities. In the past, Japan’s economic growth rate has remained relatively low, and it may remain low in the future. Furthermore, the Japanese economic growth rate could be impacted by Bank of Japan monetary policies, rising interest rates, tax increases, budget deficits, consumer confidence and volatility in the Japanese yen. At times, the Japanese economy has been adversely impacted by government intervention and protectionism, changes in its labor market, and an unstable financial services sector. International trade, government support of the financial services sector and other troubled sectors, government policy, natural disasters, an aging demographic and declining population and/or geopolitical developments associated with actual or potential conflicts with one or more countries in Asia could significantly affect the Japanese economy. Strained foreign relations with neighboring countries (China, South Korea, North Korea and Russia) may not only negatively impact the Japanese economy, but also the geographic region as well as globally. A significant portion of Japan’s trade is conducted with developing nations and can be affected by conditions in these nations or by currency fluctuations. Japan is an island state with few natural resources and limited land area and is reliant on imports for its commodity needs. Any fluctuations or shortages in the commodity markets could have a negative impact on the Japanese economy. In addition, Japan's economy has in the past and could in the future be significantly impacted by natural disasters.
European Market Risk. The Fund’s performance will be affected by political, social and economic conditions in Europe, such as growth of the economic output (the gross national product), the rate of inflation, the rate at which capital is reinvested into European economies, the success of governmental actions to reduce budget deficits, the resource self-sufficiency of European countries and interest and monetary exchange rates between European countries. European financial markets may experience volatility due to concerns about high government debt levels, credit rating downgrades, rising unemployment, the future of the euro as a common currency, possible restructuring of government debt and other government measures respond
ing to those concerns, and fiscal and monetary controls imposed on member countries of the European Union. The risk of investing in Europe may be heightened due to steps taken by the United Kingdom to exit the European Union. On January 31, 2020, the United Kingdom officially withdrew from the European Union. As of May 1, 2021, the EU-UK Trade and Cooperation Agreement (TCA) governs certain aspects of the European Union’s and the United Kingdom’s relationship, many of which are still to be determined, including those related to financial services. Notwithstanding the TCA, significant uncertainty remains in the market regarding the ramifications of the United Kingdom’s withdrawal from the European Union. The impact on the United Kingdom and European economies and the broader global economy could be significant, resulting in increased volatility and illiquidity, currency fluctuations, impacts on arrangements for trading and on other existing cross-border cooperation arrangements (whether economic, tax, fiscal, legal, regulatory or otherwise), and in potentially lower growth for companies in the United Kingdom, Europe and globally, which could have an adverse effect on the value of the Fund’s investments. In addition, if one or more other countries were to exit the European Union or abandon the use of the euro as a currency, the value of investments tied to those countries or the euro could decline significantly and unpredictably.
Currency Risk. Changes in foreign currency exchange rates will affect the value of the Fund’s securities and may affect the price of the Fund’s Shares. Generally, when the value of the U.S. dollar rises in value relative to a foreign currency, an investment impacted by that currency loses value because that currency is worth less in U.S. dollars. Currency exchange rates may fluctuate significantly over short periods of time for a number of reasons, including changes in interest rates. Devaluation of a currency by a country’s government or banking authority also will have a significant impact on the value of any investments denominated in that currency. Currency markets generally are not as regulated as securities markets, may be riskier than other types of investments and may increase the volatility of the Fund. The Fund does not currently expect to hedge its currency exposure.
Large Cap Company Risk. Because the Fund invests in large cap company securities, it may underperform other funds during periods when the Fund’s large cap securities are out of favor.
Derivatives Risk. Derivatives, including futures contracts, options, swaps, participation notes and forwards, may be riskier than other types of investments because they may be more sensitive to changes in economic or market conditions than other types of investments and could result in losses that significantly exceed the Fund’s original investment. Many derivatives create leverage thereby causing the Fund to be more volatile than it would be if it had not used derivatives. Certain derivatives also expose the Fund to counterparty risk (the risk that the derivative counterparty will not fulfill its contractual obligations), including the credit risk of the derivative counterparty. Certain derivatives are synthetic instruments
March 1, 2024  |  17

JPMorgan Global Select Equity ETF (continued)
that attempt to replicate performance of certain reference assets. With regard to such derivatives, the Fund does not have a claim on the reference assets and is subject to enhanced counterparty risk. Derivatives may not perform as expected, so the Fund may not realize the intended benefits. When used for hedging, the change in value of a derivative may not correlate as expected with the currency, security or other risk being hedged. In addition, given their complexity, derivatives expose the Fund to risks of mispricing or improper valuation. Derivatives also can expose the Fund to derivative liquidity risk, which includes risks involving the liquidity demands that derivatives can create to make payments of margin, collateral, or settlement payments to counterparties, legal risk, which includes the risk of loss resulting from insufficient or unenforceable contractual documentation, insufficient capacity or authority of the Fund’s counterparty and operational risk, which includes documentation or settlement issues, system failures, inadequate controls and human error.
Industry and Sector Focus Risk. At times, the Fund may increase the relative emphasis of its investments in a particular industry or sector. The prices of securities of issuers in a particular industry or sector may be more susceptible to fluctuations due to changes in economic or business conditions, government regulations, availability of basic resources or supplies, contagion risk within a particular industry or sector or to other industries or sectors, or other events that affect that industry or sector more than securities of issuers in other industries and sectors. To the extent that the Fund increases the relative emphasis of its investments in a particular industry or sector, the value of the Fund’s Shares may fluctuate in response to events affecting that industry or sector.
ETF Shares Trading Risk. Shares are listed for trading on The NASDAQ Stock Market LLC (the Exchange) and are bought and sold in the secondary market at market prices. The market prices of Shares are expected to fluctuate, in some cases materially, in response to changes in the Fund’s NAV, the intraday value of the Fund’s holdings and supply and demand for Shares. The adviser cannot predict whether Shares will trade above, below or at their NAV. Disruptions to creations and redemptions, the existence of significant market volatility or potential lack of an active trading market for the Shares (including through a trading halt), as well as other factors, may result in the Shares trading significantly above (at a premium) or below (at a discount) to NAV or to the intraday value of the Fund’s holdings. During such periods, you may incur significant losses if you sell your Shares.
The securities held by the Fund may be traded in markets that close at a different time than the Exchange. Liquidity in those securities may be reduced after the applicable closing times. Accordingly, during the time when the Exchange is open but after the applicable market closing, fixing or settlement times, bid-ask spreads on the Exchange and the corresponding premium or discount to the Shares’ NAV may widen.
Authorized Participant Concentration Risk. Only an authorized participant may engage in creation or redemption transactions directly with the Fund. The Fund has a limited number of intermediaries that act as authorized participants and none of these authorized participants is or will be obligated to engage in creation or redemption transactions. To the extent that these intermediaries exit the business or are unable to or choose not to proceed with creation and/or redemption orders with respect to the Fund and no other authorized participant creates or redeems, Shares may trade at a discount to NAV and possibly face trading halts and/or delisting.
Investments in the Fund are not deposits or obligations of, or guaranteed or endorsed by, any bank and are not insured or guaranteed by the FDIC, the Federal Reserve Board or any other government agency.
You could lose money investing in the Fund.
The Fund’s Past Performance
The Fund has not operated for a full calendar year as of the date of this prospectus and therefore, has no reportable performance history. Once the Fund has operated for at least one calendar year, a bar chart and performance table will be included in the prospectus to show the performance of the Fund. When such information is included, this section will provide some indication of the risks of investing in the Fund by showing changes in the Fund’s performance history from year to year and showing how the Fund’s average annual total returns compare with those of a broad measure of market performance. Although past performance of the Fund is no guarantee of how it will perform in the future, historical performance may give you some indication of the risks of investing in the Fund. Updated performance information is available by visiting www.jpmorganfunds.com or by calling 1-844-457-6383 (844-4JPM ETF).
Management
J.P. Morgan Investment Management Inc. (the adviser)
Portfolio Manager
Managed the
Fund Since
Primary Title with
Investment Adviser
Helge Skibeli
2023
Managing Director
Christian Pecher
2023
Managing Director
Purchase and Sale of Shares
Individual Shares of the Fund may only be purchased and sold in secondary market transactions through brokers or financial intermediaries. Shares of the Fund are listed for trading on the Exchange, and because Shares trade at market prices rather than NAV, Shares of the Fund may trade at a price greater than
18  |  J.P. Morgan Exchange-Traded Funds

NAV (premium) or less than NAV (discount). Certain affiliates of the Fund and the adviser may purchase and resell Shares pursuant to this prospectus.
An investor may incur costs attributable to the difference between the highest price a buyer is willing to pay to purchase Shares of the Fund (bid) and the lowest price a seller is willing to accept for Shares (ask) when buying or selling Shares in the secondary market (the bid-ask spread).
Recent information, including information about the Fund’s NAV, market price, premiums and discounts, and bid-ask spreads, is included on the Fund’s website at jpmorganfunds.com.
Tax Information
To the extent the Fund makes distributions, those distributions will be taxed as ordinary income or capital gains, except when your investment is in an IRA, 401(k) plan or other tax-
advantaged investment plan, in which case you may be subject to federal income tax upon withdrawal from the tax-advantaged investment plan.
Payments to Broker-Dealers and Other Financial Intermediaries
If you purchase Shares of the Fund through a broker-dealer or other financial intermediary (such as a bank), the adviser and its related companies may pay the financial intermediary for the sale of Shares and related services. These payments may create a conflict of interest by influencing the broker-dealer or financial intermediary and your salesperson to recommend the Fund over another investment. Ask your salesperson or visit your financial intermediary’s website for more information.
March 1, 2024  |  19

JPMorgan Hedged Equity Laddered Overlay ETF
Ticker: HELO
What is the goal of the Fund?
The Fund seeks to provide capital appreciation.
Fees and Expenses of the Fund
The following table describes the fees and expenses that you may pay if you buy, hold and sell Shares of the Fund. You may pay other fees, such as brokerage commissions and other fees to financial intermediaries, which are not reflected in the table and example below.
ANNUAL FUND OPERATING EXPENSES1
(Expenses that you pay each year as a percentage of the value
of your investment)
Management Fees
0.50%
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses
0.50
1
The Fund’s management agreement provides that the adviser will pay substantially all expenses of the Fund (including expenses of the Trust relating to the Fund), except for the management fees, payments under the Fund’s 12b-1 plan (if any), interest expenses, dividend and interest expenses related to short sales, taxes, acquired fund fees and expenses (other than fees for funds advised by the adviser and/or its affiliates), costs of holding shareholder meetings, and litigation and potential litigation and other extraordinary expenses not incurred in the ordinary course of the Fund’s business. Additionally, the Fund shall be responsible for its non-operating expenses, including brokerage commissions and fees and expenses associated with the Fund’s securities lending program, if applicable.
Example
This Example is intended to help you compare the cost of investing in the Fund with the cost of investing in other funds. The Example does not take into account brokerage commissions that you pay when purchasing or selling Shares of the Fund. The Example assumes that you invest $10,000 in the Fund for the time periods indicated. The Example also assumes that your investment has a 5% return each year and that the Fund’s operating expenses remain the same. Your actual costs may be higher or lower.
WHETHER OR NOT YOU SELL YOUR SHARES, YOUR COST
WOULD BE:
 
1 Year
3 Years
SHARES ($)
51
160
Portfolio Turnover
The Fund pays transaction costs, such as commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or “turns over” its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover rate may indicate higher transaction costs and may result in higher taxes when Shares are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are not reflected in annual fund operating expenses or in the Example, affect the Fund’s
performance. During the Fund’s most recent fiscal period (September 28, 2023 through October 31, 2023), the Fund’s portfolio turnover rate was 4% of the average value of its portfolio.
What are the Fund’s main investment strategies?
The Fund seeks to provide capital appreciation through participation in the broad equity markets while hedging overall market exposure relative to traditional long-only equity strategies.
Under normal circumstances, the Fund invests at least 80% of its Assets in equity securities. “Assets” means net assets plus the amount of borrowings for investment purposes. The Fund uses an enhanced index strategy to invest in equity securities similar to those in the S&P 500 Index, which primarily consist of common stocks of large capitalization U.S. companies. The Fund will also purchase and sell exchange-traded put options and sell exchange-traded call options, employing an options overlay strategy designed to provide a continuous market hedge for the portfolio. The options will typically be based on exchange-traded funds (ETFs) that replicate the S&P 500 Index (S&P 500 ETFs). The combination of the diversified portfolio of equity securities, combined with the options overlay, is intended to provide the Fund with a significant portion of the returns associated with equity market investments, while exposing investors to less risk than traditional long-only equity strategies. Specifically, the Fund seeks to provide a competitive risk-adjusted return over a full market cycle (defined as three to five years) relative to the S&P 500 Index with lower volatility than traditional long-only equity strategies.
The Fund’s investments in equity securities will be primarily in common stocks of U.S. companies with market capitalizations similar to those within the universe of the S&P 500 Index. Because the Fund uses an enhanced index strategy, not all of the stocks in the S&P 500 Index, its primary benchmark, are included in the Fund, and the Fund’s position in an individual stock may be overweighted or underweighted when compared to the index. As of January 31, 2024, the market capitalization of the companies in the S&P 500 Index ranged from $2.9 billion to $2.95 trillion. Sector by sector, the Fund’s weightings are similar to those of the S&P 500 Index. Within each sector, however, the Fund modestly overweights equity securities that it considers undervalued or fairly valued while modestly underweighting or not holding equity securities that appear overvalued. Because each stock’s weighting in the Fund is controlled relative to that stock’s weight in the S&P 500 Index, the Fund’s weighted average market capitalization will be close to that of the S&P 500 Index.
In implementing the options overlay strategy, the Fund seeks to provide “laddered” exposure. To do this, the Fund typically holds options for multiple (normally, three) three-month periods (each, a hedge period) staggered a month apart for the purpose of seeking to provide lower volatility in any market cycle. Laddered investing refers to the implementation of the
20  |  J.P. Morgan Exchange-Traded Funds

strategy with different hedge periods, with the goal of mitigating potential risks associated with only one hedge period. The portfolio management team will have discretion to determine the amount of exposure related to each hedge period and will have flexibility to allocate the assets to a particular hedge period for various reasons, including reacting opportunistically to market conditions, managing investor flows in or out of the Fund and improving tax management of the Fund. The options overlay strategy is an actively managed process and is designed to provide a continuous market hedge for the portfolio. The options overlay strategy is constructed by buying a put option at a higher strike price while selling a put option at a relatively lower strike price (together, this is referred to as a put option spread) and simultaneously selling a call option that substantially offsets the cost of the put option spread. Each put option spread is generally maintained at a level intended to reduce the Fund’s exposure to a market decline by offsetting losses resulting from a decrease in the market. The Fund’s investment strategies may not always provide greater market protection than other equity investments, particularly in rising equity markets when the Fund is expected to underperform traditional long-only equity strategies. In addition, as a result of selling call options to offset the costs associated with the options overlay strategy, some upside may be foregone in certain market environments.
While the Fund will not generally invest directly in ETFs, there may be times when it will purchase shares or receive shares of S&P 500 ETFs in order to settle its options positions. The adviser will not normally maintain such positions for an extended period.
In addition to the use of the options overlay strategy, the Fund may use future contracts, primarily futures on indexes, to more effectively gain targeted equity exposure from its cash positions and to hedge the Fund’s portfolio if it is unable to purchase or write the necessary options for the options overlay strategy.
Investment Process – Enhanced Index: To implement the enhanced index strategy, the adviser employs a three-step process that combines research, valuation and stock selection. The adviser takes an in-depth look at company prospects over a period as long as five years, which is designed to provide insight into a company’s real growth potential. The research findings allow the adviser to rank the companies in each sector group according to their relative value.
As part of its investment process, the adviser seeks to assess the impact of environmental, social and governance (ESG) factors on many issuers in the universe in which the Fund may invest. The adviser’s assessment is based on an analysis of key opportunities and risks across industries to seek to identify financially material issues with respect to the Fund’s investments in securities and ascertain key issues that merit engagement with issuers. These assessments may not be conclusive, and securities of issuers that may be negatively impacted by
such factors may be purchased and retained by the Fund, while the Fund may divest or not invest in securities of issuers that may be positively impacted by such factors.
On behalf of the Fund, the adviser then buys and sells equity securities, using the research and valuation as a basis. In general, the adviser buys securities that are identified as attractive and considers selling them when they appear less attractive based on the Fund’s process. Along with attractive valuation, the adviser often considers a number of other criteria, including:
impact on the overall risk of the portfolio relative to the S&P 500 Index
high perceived potential reward compared to perceived potential risk
possible temporary mispricings caused by apparent market overreactions
catalysts, such as improving company fundamentals, that could trigger a rise in a stock’s price
Investment Process – Options Overlay Strategy: The Fund’s options overlay strategy is designed to use options to hedge the Fund’s overall market exposure relative to traditional long-only strategies. Specifically, the options overlay strategy is intended to provide the Fund with downside protection, while foregoing some upside potential. The downside protection comes from the purchase of put options, which give the owner the right, but not the obligation, to sell shares of the underlying reference asset at an agreed upon price (strike price). To implement the strategy, the adviser utilizes exchange-traded equity options that typically have a reference asset of an S&P 500 ETF, but will also be based on S&P 500 Index options. These puts generally increase in price as the price of the reference asset falls, offering a measure of protection against falling market prices. To partially offset the initial cost of these purchased put options, the Fund will simultaneously sell put options at a lower strike price. This effectively limits the amount of downside protection offered by the puts, and together is referred to as a “put option spread.” Entering into put option spreads is typically less expensive than a strategy of only purchasing put options, and the Fund may benefit in a flat to upwardly moving market by reducing the cost of the downside protection; the downside protection of the put option spread, however, is limited as compared to just owning a put option. The Fund is not expected to provide market protection when the market is only down slightly; during such periods, the Fund is expected to perform in line with broad equity markets.
While put option spreads are less expensive than outright puts, put option spreads still require some upfront costs. To substantially offset this upfront cost, the Fund will sell call options, which give the owner the right, but not the obligation, to buy shares of the underlying reference asset at a specified strike price. While the sale of these call options will substantially offset the remaining cost of the protective put spread, it will potentially reduce the Fund’s ability to profit from increases in the value of its equity portfolio. As the price of call
March 1, 2024  |  21

JPMorgan Hedged Equity Laddered Overlay ETF (continued)
options rise along with the price of the underlying asset, the Fund’s short position in calls will decrease in value as the market rises, potentially offsetting a portion of the equity portfolio gains. The options overlay strategy is an actively managed process and is designed to provide a continuous market hedge for the portfolio. The strategy will own multiple positions that expire at various dates. For each hedge period, a portion of the options overlay strategy may be reset as the applicable options approach expiration.
The Fund’s Main Investment Risks
The Fund is subject to management risk and may not achieve its objective if the adviser’s expectations regarding particular instruments or markets are not met.
An investment in this Fund or any other fund may not provide a complete investment program. The suitability of an investment in the Fund should be considered based on the investment objective, strategies and risks described in this prospectus, considered in light of all of the other investments in your portfolio, as well as your risk tolerance, financial goals and time horizons. You may want to consult with a financial advisor to determine if this Fund is suitable for you.
The Fund is subject to the main risks noted below, any of which may adversely affect the Fund’s net asset value (NAV), market price, performance and ability to meet its investment objective.
Equity Market Risk. The price of equity securities may rise or fall because of changes in the broad market or changes in a company’s financial condition, sometimes rapidly or unpredictably. These price movements may result from factors affecting individual companies, sectors or industries selected for the Fund’s portfolio or the securities market as a whole, such as changes in economic or political conditions. When the value of the Fund’s portfolio securities goes down, your investment in the Fund decreases in value.
General Market Risk. Economies and financial markets throughout the world are becoming increasingly interconnected, which increases the likelihood that events or conditions in one country or region will adversely impact markets or issuers in other countries or regions. Securities in the Fund’s portfolio may underperform in comparison to securities in general financial markets, a particular financial market or other asset classes due to a number of factors, including inflation (or expectations for inflation), deflation (or expectations for deflation), interest rates, global demand for particular products or resources, market instability, financial system instability, debt crises and downgrades, embargoes, tariffs, sanctions and other trade barriers, regulatory events, other governmental trade or market control programs and related geopolitical events. In addition, the value of the Fund’s investments may be negatively affected by the occurrence of global events such as war, terror
ism, environmental disasters, natural disasters or events, country instability, and infectious disease epidemics or pandemics.
Strategy Risk. The “laddered” component of the strategy is designed to mitigate potential risks associated with only one hedge period, but there is no guarantee that the adviser will be able to do so successfully. The Fund’s investment strategies may not always provide greater market protection than other equity instruments, particularly in rising equity markets when the Fund is expected to underperform traditional long-only equity strategies. In addition, as a result of the structure of the options overlay strategy, the Fund is not expected to provide market protection during times when the market is only down slightly; during such periods, the Fund is expected to perform in line with broad equity markets.
Options Risk. The value of the Fund’s option positions will fluctuate in response to changes in the value of the underlying ETF or index. The value of options is affected by changes in the value and dividend rates of the securities held by the S&P 500 ETFs or represented in the S&P 500 Index underlying the option, changes in interest rates, changes in the actual or perceived volatility of the S&P 500 ETFs or the S&P 500 Index and the remaining time to the options' expiration, as well as trading conditions in the options market. Selling call options can reduce equity market risk, but it limits the opportunity to profit from an increase in the market value of stocks in exchange for upfront cash at the time of selling the call option. The Fund also risks losing all or part of the cash paid for purchasing put options. Unusual market conditions or the lack of a ready market for any particular option at a specific time may reduce the effectiveness of the Fund’s option strategies, and for these and other reasons, the Fund’s option strategies may not reduce the Fund’s volatility to the extent desired and could result in losses.
S&P 500 ETF Risk. The Fund invests in options that derive their value from the S&P 500 ETFs, and therefore the Fund’s investment performance is influenced by the investment performance of the S&P 500 ETFs. The value of the S&P 500 ETFs will fluctuate over time based on fluctuations in the values of the securities held by the S&P 500 ETFs, which may be affected by changes in general economic conditions, expectations for future growth and profits, interest rates and the supply and demand for those securities. In addition, the S&P 500 ETFs are subject to index related and passive management risks and ETF shares trading risk, including risks relating to the absence of an active market and premium/discount risk. Brokerage, tax and other expenses may negatively impact the performance of an S&P 500 ETF and, in turn, the value of the Fund’s investments. The S&P 500 ETFs seek to track the S&P 500 Index, but may not exactly match the performance of the S&P 500 Index due to differences between the portfolio of an S&P 500 ETF and the components of the S&P 500 Index, fees and expenses, transaction costs, and other factors.
22  |  J.P. Morgan Exchange-Traded Funds

Large Cap Company Risk. Because the Fund invests in large cap company securities, it may underperform other funds during periods when the Fund’s large cap securities are out of favor.
Smaller Company Risk. Investments in securities of smaller companies (mid cap and small cap companies) may be riskier, less liquid, more volatile and more vulnerable to economic, market and industry changes than securities of larger, more established companies. The securities of smaller companies may trade less frequently and in smaller volumes than securities of larger companies. As a result, changes in the price of securities issued by such companies may be more sudden or erratic than the prices of securities of large capitalization companies, especially over the short term. These risks are higher for small cap companies.
Derivatives Risk. Derivatives, including options and futures contracts, may be riskier than other types of investments and may increase the volatility of the Fund. Derivatives may be sensitive to changes in economic and market conditions and may create leverage, which could result in losses that significantly exceed the Fund’s original investment. The Fund may be more volatile than if the Fund had not been leveraged because the leverage tends to exaggerate any effect on the value of the Fund’s portfolio securities. Certain derivatives expose the Fund to counterparty risk, which is the risk that the derivative counterparty will not fulfill its contractual obligations (and includes credit risk associated with the counterparty). Certain derivatives are synthetic instruments that attempt to replicate the performance of certain reference assets. With regard to such derivatives, the Fund does not have a claim on the reference assets and is subject to enhanced counterparty risk. Derivatives may not perform as expected, so the Fund may not realize the intended benefits. When used for hedging, the change in value of a derivative may not correlate as expected with the security or other risk being hedged. In addition, given their complexity, derivatives expose the Fund to risks of mispricing or improper valuation. Derivatives also can expose the Fund to derivative liquidity risk, which includes risks involving the liquidity demands that derivatives can create to make payments of margin, collateral, or settlement payments to counterparties, legal risk, which includes the risk of loss resulting from insufficient or unenforceable contractual documentation, insufficient capacity or authority of the Fund’s counterparty and operational risk, which includes documentation or settlement issues, system failures, inadequate controls and human error.
Industry and Sector Focus Risk. At times, the Fund may increase the relative emphasis of its investments in a particular industry or sector. The prices of securities of issuers in a particular industry or sector may be more susceptible to fluctuations due to changes in economic or business conditions, government regulations, availability of basic resources or supplies, contagion risk within a particular industry or sector or to other industries or sectors, or other events that affect that industry or sector more than securities of issuers in other industries and
sectors. To the extent that the Fund increases the relative emphasis of its investments in a particular industry or sector, the value of the Fund’s Shares may fluctuate in response to events affecting that industry or sector.
Information Technology Sector Risk. Technology companies face intense competition, both domestically and internationally, which may have an adverse effect on their profit margins. Technology companies may have limited product lines, markets, financial resources or personnel. The products of technology companies may face obsolescence due to rapid technological developments, frequent new product introduction, unpredictable changes in growth rates and competition for the services of qualified personnel. Companies in the information technology sector are heavily dependent on patent and intellectual property rights. The loss or impairment of these rights may adversely affect the profitability of these companies.
ETF Shares Trading Risk. Shares are listed for trading on the NYSE Arca, Inc. (the Exchange) and are bought and sold in the secondary market at market prices. The market prices of Shares are expected to fluctuate, in some cases materially, in response to changes in the Fund’s NAV, the intraday value of the Fund’s holdings and supply and demand for Shares. The adviser cannot predict whether Shares will trade above, below or at their NAV. Disruptions to creations and redemptions, the existence of significant market volatility or potential lack of an active trading market for the Shares (including through a trading halt), as well as other factors, may result in the Shares trading significantly above (at a premium) or below (at a discount) to NAV or to the intraday value of the Fund’s holdings. During such periods, you may incur significant losses if you sell your Shares.
Authorized Participant Concentration Risk. Only an authorized participant may engage in creation or redemption transactions directly with the Fund. The Fund has a limited number of intermediaries that act as authorized participants and none of these authorized participants is or will be obligated to engage in creation or redemption transactions. To the extent that these intermediaries exit the business or are unable to or choose not to proceed with creation and/or redemption orders with respect to the Fund and no other authorized participant creates or redeems, Shares may trade at a discount to NAV and possibly face trading halts and/or delisting.
Investments in the Fund are not deposits or obligations of, or guaranteed or endorsed by, any bank and are not insured or guaranteed by the FDIC, the Federal Reserve Board or any other government agency.
You could lose money investing in the Fund.
The Fund’s Past Performance
The Fund has not operated for a full calendar year as of the date of this prospectus and therefore, has no reportable performance history. Once the Fund has operated for at least
March 1, 2024  |  23

JPMorgan Hedged Equity Laddered Overlay ETF (continued)
one calendar year, a bar chart and performance table will be included in the prospectus to show the performance of the Fund. When such information is included, this section will provide some indication of the risks of investing in the Fund by showing changes in the Fund’s performance history from year to year and showing how the Fund’s average annual total returns compare with those of a broad measure of market performance. Although past performance of the Fund is no guarantee of how it will perform in the future, historical performance may give you some indication of the risks of investing in the Fund. Updated performance information is available by visiting www.jpmorganfunds.com or by calling 1-844-457-6383 (844-4JPM ETF).
Management
J.P. Morgan Investment Management Inc. (the adviser)
Portfolio Manager
Managed the
Fund Since
Primary Title with
Investment Adviser
Hamilton Reiner
2023
Managing Director
Raffaele Zingone
2023
Managing Director
Purchase and Sale of Shares
Individual Shares of the Fund may only be purchased and sold in secondary market transactions through brokers or financial intermediaries. Shares of the Fund are listed for trading on the Exchange, and because Shares trade at market prices rather than NAV, Shares of the Fund may trade at a price greater than NAV (premium) or less than NAV (discount). Certain affiliates of the Fund and the adviser may purchase and resell Shares pursuant to this prospectus.
An investor may incur costs attributable to the difference between the highest price a buyer is willing to pay to purchase Shares of the Fund (bid) and the lowest price a seller is willing to accept for Shares (ask) when buying or selling Shares in the secondary market (the bid-ask spread).
Recent information, including information about the Fund’s NAV, market price, premiums and discounts, and bid-ask spreads, is included on the Fund’s website at jpmorganfunds.com.
Tax Information
To the extent the Fund makes distributions, those distributions will be taxed as ordinary income or capital gains, except when your investment is in an IRA, 401(k) plan or other tax-advantaged investment plan, in which case you may be subject to federal income tax upon withdrawal from the tax-advantaged investment plan.
Payments to Broker-Dealers and Other Financial Intermediaries
If you purchase Shares of the Fund through a broker-dealer or other financial intermediary (such as a bank), the adviser and its related companies may pay the financial intermediary for the sale of Shares and related services. These payments may create a conflict of interest by influencing the broker-dealer or financial intermediary and your salesperson to recommend the Fund over another investment. Ask your salesperson or visit your financial intermediary’s website for more information.
24  |  J.P. Morgan Exchange-Traded Funds

JPMorgan International Growth ETF
Ticker: JIG
What is the goal of the Fund?
The Fund seeks long-term capital appreciation.
Fees and Expenses of the Fund
The following table describes the fees and expenses that you may pay if you buy, hold and sell Shares of the Fund. You may pay other fees, such as brokerage commissions and other fees to financial intermediaries, which are not reflected in the table and example below.
ANNUAL FUND OPERATING EXPENSES1
(Expenses that you pay each year as a percentage of the value
of your investment)
Management Fees
0.55%
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses
0.55
1
The Fund’s management agreement provides that the adviser will pay substantially all expenses of the Fund (including expenses of the Trust relating to the Fund), except for the management fees, payments under the Fund’s 12b-1 plan (if any), interest expenses, dividend and interest expenses related to short sales, taxes, acquired fund fees and expenses (other than fees for funds advised by the adviser and/or its affiliates), costs of holding shareholder meetings, and litigation and potential litigation and other extraordinary expenses not incurred in the ordinary course of the Fund’s business. Additionally, the Fund shall be responsible for its non-operating expenses, including brokerage commissions and fees and expenses associated with the Fund’s securities lending program, if applicable.
Example
This Example is intended to help you compare the cost of investing in the Fund with the cost of investing in other funds. The Example does not take into account brokerage commissions that you pay when purchasing or selling Shares of the Fund. The Example assumes that you invest $10,000 in the Fund for the time periods indicated. The Example also assumes that your investment has a 5% return each year and that the Fund’s operating expenses remain the same. Your actual costs may be higher or lower.
WHETHER OR NOT YOU SELL YOUR SHARES, YOUR COST
WOULD BE:
 
1 Year
3 Years
5 Years
10 Years
SHARES ($)
56
176
307
689
Portfolio Turnover
The Fund pays transaction costs, such as commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or “turns over” its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover rate may indicate higher transaction costs and may result in higher taxes when Shares are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are not reflected in annual fund operating expenses or in the Example, affect the Fund’s
performance. During the Fund’s most recent fiscal year, the Fund’s portfolio turnover rate was 53% of the average value of its portfolio.
What are the Fund’s main investment strategies?
The Fund primarily invests in equity securities of foreign companies. Typically, in implementing its strategy, the Fund invests in common stocks of large and mid-capitalization foreign companies with a history of above-average growth or those that the adviser believes are expected to enter periods of above-average growth. Large and mid-capitalization foreign companies are companies with market capitalizations equal to those within the universe of the MSCI ACWI ex-USA Growth Index at the time of purchase. The Fund will generally invest in companies located in at least three foreign countries, although it may invest a substantial portion of its assets in just one foreign country. The Fund may invest in issuers located in both developed foreign and emerging market countries. Developed foreign countries include Australia, Canada, Japan, New Zealand, the United Kingdom, most of the countries of Western Europe and Hong Kong; emerging market countries include most of the other countries in the world.
The equity securities in which the Fund may invest include, but are not limited to, common stock, preferred stock, trust or partnership interests, depositary receipts and warrants and rights.
The Fund may invest in securities denominated in any currency and will invest substantially in securities denominated in foreign currencies.
Derivatives, which are instruments that have a value based on another instrument, exchange rate or index, may also be used as substitutes for securities in which the Fund can invest. The Fund may utilize currency forwards (including nondeliverable forwards) to manage currency exposures, where practical, for the purpose of risk management, including hedging non-dollar currency exposure back to the U.S. dollar. The Fund may also use exchanged-traded futures for the efficient management of cash flows.
Investment Process: In managing the Fund, the adviser employs a fundamental bottom-up approach that seeks to identify companies with strong growth and quality characteristics. The adviser identifies these companies through internal research and by subjecting them to a disciplined set of growth, quality and valuation criteria. Companies that display attractive characteristics and for which the growth is believed to be sustainable will be considered candidates for purchase. Conversely, companies become candidates for sale if the expected growth is believed to be at risk or when valuations are no longer attractive.
As part of its investment process, the adviser seeks to assess the impact of environmental, social and governance (ESG) factors on many issuers in the universe in which the Fund may invest. The adviser’s assessment is based on an analysis of key opportunities and risks across industries to seek to identify
March 1, 2024  |  25

JPMorgan International Growth ETF (continued)
financially material issues with respect to the Fund’s investments in securities and ascertain key issues that merit engagement with issuers. These assessments may not be conclusive, and securities of issuers that may be negatively impacted by such factors may be purchased and retained by the Fund, while the Fund may divest or not invest in securities of issuers that may be positively impacted by such factors.
The Fund’s Main Investment Risks
The Fund is subject to management risk and may not achieve its objective if the adviser’s expectations regarding particular instruments or markets are not met.
An investment in this Fund or any other fund may not provide a complete investment program. The suitability of an investment in the Fund should be considered based on the investment objective, strategies and risks described in this prospectus, considered in light of all of the other investments in your portfolio, as well as your risk tolerance, financial goals and time horizons. You may want to consult with a financial advisor to determine if this Fund is suitable for you.
The Fund is subject to the main risks noted below, any of which may adversely affect the Fund’s net asset value (NAV), market price, performance and ability to meet its investment objective.
Equity Market Risk. The price of equity securities may rise or fall because of changes in the broad market or changes in a company’s financial condition, sometimes rapidly or unpredictably. These price movements may result from factors affecting individual companies, sectors or industries selected for the Fund’s portfolio or the securities market as a whole, such as changes in economic or political conditions. When the value of the Fund’s portfolio securities goes down, your investment in the Fund decreases in value.
General Market Risk. Economies and financial markets throughout the world are becoming increasingly interconnected, which increases the likelihood that events or conditions in one country or region will adversely impact markets or issuers in other countries or regions. Securities in the Fund’s portfolio may underperform in comparison to securities in general financial markets, a particular financial market or other asset classes due to a number of factors, including inflation (or expectations for inflation), deflation (or expectations for deflation), interest rates, global demand for particular products or resources, market instability, financial system instability, debt crises and downgrades, embargoes, tariffs, sanctions and other trade barriers, regulatory events, other governmental trade or market control programs and related geopolitical events. In addition, the value of the Fund’s investments may be negatively affected by the occurrence of global events such as war, terrorism, environmental disasters, natural disasters or events, country instability, and infectious disease epidemics or pandemics.
Foreign Securities and Emerging Markets Risk. Investments in foreign issuers and foreign securities (including depositary receipts) are subject to additional risks, including political and economic risks, unstable governments, civil conflicts and war, greater volatility, decreased market liquidity, expropriation and nationalization risks, sanctions or other measures by the United States or other governments, currency fluctuations, higher transaction costs, delayed settlement, possible foreign controls on investment, and less stringent investor protection and disclosure standards of foreign markets. In certain markets where securities and other instruments are not traded “delivery versus payment,” the Fund may not receive timely payment for securities or other instruments it has delivered or receive delivery of securities paid for and may be subject to increased risk that the counterparty will fail to make payments or delivery when due or default completely. Foreign market trading hours, clearance and settlement procedures, and holiday schedules may limit the Fund's ability to buy and sell securities.
Events and evolving conditions in certain economies or markets may alter the risks associated with investments tied to countries or regions that historically were perceived as comparatively stable becoming riskier and more volatile. These risks are magnified in “emerging markets.” Emerging market countries typically have less-established market economies than developed countries and may face greater social, economic, regulatory and political uncertainties. In addition, emerging markets typically present greater illiquidity and price volatility concerns due to smaller or limited local capital markets and greater difficulty in determining market valuations of securities due to limited public information on issuers. Certain emerging market countries may be subject to less stringent requirements regarding accounting, auditing, financial reporting and record keeping and therefore, material information related to an investment may not be available or reliable. Additionally, the Fund may have substantial difficulties exercising its legal rights or enforcing a counterparty’s legal obligations in certain jurisdictions outside of the United States, in particular in emerging market countries, which can increase the risks of loss.
Geographic Focus Risk. The Fund may focus its investments in one or more regions or small groups of countries. As a result, the Fund’s performance may be subject to greater volatility than a more geographically diversified fund.
Growth Investing Risk. Because growth investing attempts to identify companies that the adviser believes will experience rapid earnings growth relative to value or other types of stocks, growth stocks may trade at higher multiples of current earnings compared to value or other stocks, leading to inflated prices and thus potentially greater declines in value.
Smaller Company Risk. Investments in securities of smaller companies (mid cap and small cap companies) may be riskier, less liquid, more volatile and more vulnerable to economic, market and industry changes than securities of larger, more established companies. The securities of smaller companies
26  |  J.P. Morgan Exchange-Traded Funds

may trade less frequently and in smaller volumes than securities of larger companies. As a result, changes in the price of securities issued by such companies may be more sudden or erratic than the prices of securities of large capitalization companies, especially over the short term. These risks are higher for small cap companies.
Derivatives Risk. Derivatives, including currency forwards and futures, may be riskier than other types of investments because they may be more sensitive to changes in economic or market conditions than other types of investments and could result in losses that significantly exceed the Fund’s original investment. Many derivatives create leverage thereby causing the Fund to be more volatile than it would be if it had not used derivatives. Certain derivatives also expose the Fund to counterparty risk (the risk that the derivative counterparty will not fulfill its contractual obligations), including the credit risk of the derivative counterparty. Certain derivatives are synthetic instruments that attempt to replicate performance of certain reference assets. With regard to such derivatives, the Fund does not have a claim on the reference assets and is subject to enhanced counterparty risk. Derivatives may not perform as expected, so the Fund may not realize the intended benefits. When used for hedging, the change in value of a derivative may not correlate as expected with the currency, security or other risk being hedged. In addition, given their complexity, derivatives expose the Fund to risks of mispricing or improper valuation. Derivatives also can expose the Fund to derivative liquidity risk, which includes risks involving the liquidity demands that derivatives can create to make payments of margin, collateral, or settlement payments to counterparties, legal risk, which includes the risk of loss resulting from insufficient or unenforceable contractual documentation, insufficient capacity or authority of the Fund’s counterparty and operational risk, which includes documentation or settlement issues, system failures, inadequate controls and human error.
Currency Risk. Changes in foreign currency exchange rates will affect the value of the Fund’s securities and may affect the price of the Fund’s Shares. Generally, when the value of the U.S. dollar rises in value relative to a foreign currency, an investment impacted by that currency loses value because that currency is worth less in U.S. dollars. Currency exchange rates may fluctuate significantly over short periods of time for a number of reasons, including changes in interest rates. Devaluation of a currency by a country’s government or banking authority also will have a significant impact on the value of any investments denominated in that currency. Currency markets generally are not as regulated as securities markets, may be riskier than other types of investments and may increase the volatility of the Fund. Although the Fund may attempt to hedge its currency exposure into the U.S. dollar, it may not be successful in reducing the effects of currency fluctuations. The Fund may also hedge from one foreign currency to another. In addition, the Fund’s use of currency hedging may not be successful, including
due to delays in placing trades and other operational limitations, and the use of such strategies may lower the Fund’s potential returns.
Industry and Sector Focus Risk. At times, the Fund may increase the relative emphasis of its investments in a particular industry or sector. The prices of securities of issuers in a particular industry or sector may be more susceptible to fluctuations due to changes in economic or business conditions, government regulations, availability of basic resources or supplies, contagion risk within a particular industry or sector or to other industries or sectors, or other events that affect that industry or sector more than securities of issuers in other industries and sectors. To the extent that the Fund increases the relative emphasis of its investments in a particular industry or sector, the value of the Fund’s Shares may fluctuate in response to events affecting that industry or sector.
Preferred Stock Risk. Preferred stock generally has a preference as to dividends and liquidation over an issuer’s common stock but ranks junior to debt securities in an issuer’s capital structure. Unlike interest payments on debt securities, preferred stock dividends are payable only if declared by the issuer’s board of directors. As a consequence, if the board of directors of an issuer does not declare dividends or distributions for the relevant dividend or distribution periods, the issuer will not be obligated to pay dividends or distributions on the relevant payment date, and such dividends and distributions may be forfeited. Holders of preferred securities typically do not have voting rights except in certain circumstances where they may be given only limited voting rights. Preferred stock also may be subject to optional or mandatory redemption provisions.
ETF Shares Trading Risk. Shares are listed for trading on the NYSE Arca, Inc. (the Exchange) and are bought and sold in the secondary market at market prices. The market prices of Shares are expected to fluctuate, in some cases materially, in response to changes in the Fund’s NAV, the intraday value of the Fund’s holdings and supply and demand for Shares. The adviser cannot predict whether Shares will trade above, below or at their NAV. Disruptions to creations and redemptions, the existence of significant market volatility or potential lack of an active trading market for the Shares (including through a trading halt), as well as other factors, may result in the Shares trading significantly above (at a premium) or below (at a discount) to NAV or to the intraday value of the Fund’s holdings. During such periods, you may incur significant losses if you sell your Shares.
The securities held by the Fund may be traded in markets that close at a different time than the Exchange. Liquidity in those securities may be reduced after the applicable closing times. Accordingly, during the time when the Exchange is open but after the applicable market closing, fixing or settlement times, bid-ask spreads on the Exchange and the corresponding premium or discount to the Shares’ NAV may widen.
March 1, 2024  |  27

JPMorgan International Growth ETF (continued)
Authorized Participant Concentration Risk. Only an authorized participant may engage in creation or redemption transactions directly with the Fund. The Fund has a limited number of intermediaries that act as authorized participants and none of these authorized participants is or will be obligated to engage in creation or redemption transactions. To the extent that these intermediaries exit the business or are unable to or choose not to proceed with creation and/or redemption orders with respect to the Fund and no other authorized participant creates or redeems, Shares may trade at a discount to NAV and possibly face trading halts and/or delisting.
Investments in the Fund are not deposits or obligations of, or guaranteed or endorsed by, any bank and are not insured or guaranteed by the FDIC, the Federal Reserve Board or any other government agency.
You could lose money investing in the Fund.
The Fund’s Past Performance
This section provides some indication of the risks of investing in the Fund. The bar chart shows how the performance of the Fund’s Shares has varied from year to year for the past three calendar years. The table shows the average annual total returns for the past one year and life of the Fund. It compares that performance to the MSCI ACWI ex USA Growth Index (net total return). Past performance (before and after taxes) is not necessarily an indication of how the Fund will perform in the future. Updated performance information is available by visiting www.jpmorganfunds.com or by calling 1-844-457-6383 (844-4JPM ETF).
Source: MSCI. The MSCI information may only be used for your internal use, may not be reproduced or redisseminated in any form and may not be used as a basis for or a component of any financial instruments or products or indices. None of the MSCI information is intended to constitute investment advice or a recommendation to make (or refrain from making) any kind of investment decision and may not be relied on as such. Historical data and analysis should not be taken as an indication or guarantee of any future performance analysis, forecast, or prediction. The MSCI information is provided on an “as is” basis and the user of this information assumes the entire risk of any use made of this information. MSCI, each of its affiliates and each other person involved in or related to compiling, computing or creating any MSCI information (collectively, the “MSCI Parties”) expressly disclaims all warranties (including, without limitation, any warranties of originality, accuracy, completeness, timeliness, non-infringement, merchantability and fitness for a particular purpose) with respect to this information. Without limiting any of the foregoing, in no event shall any MSCI Party have any liability for any direct, indirect, special, incidental, punitive, consequential (including, without limitation, lost profits) or any other damages. (www.msci.com)
YEAR-BY-YEAR RETURNS
Best Quarter
4th quarter, 2022
12.55%
Worst Quarter
1st quarter, 2022
-18.61%
AVERAGE ANNUAL TOTAL RETURNS
(For periods ended December 31, 2023)
 
Past
Life of Fund
since
 
1 Year
05/20/2020
SHARES
Return Before Taxes
13.37
%
4.51
%
Return After Taxes on Distributions
13.03
4.31
Return After Taxes on Distributions and Sale
of Fund Shares
8.34
3.57
MSCI ACWI EX USA GROWTH INDEX
(Net Total Return)
(Reflects No Deduction for Fees, Expenses, or
Taxes, Except Foreign Withholding Taxes)
14.03
6.02
After-tax returns are calculated using the historical highest individual federal marginal income tax rates and do not reflect the impact of state and local taxes. Actual after-tax returns depend on the investor’s tax situation and may differ from those shown, and the after-tax returns shown are not relevant to investors who hold their Shares through tax-deferred arrangements such as 401(k) plans or individual retirement accounts.
28  |  J.P. Morgan Exchange-Traded Funds

Management
J.P. Morgan Investment Management Inc. (the adviser)
Portfolio Manager
Managed the
Fund Since
Primary Title with
Investment Adviser
Shane Duffy
2020
Managing Director
Thomas Murray
2020
Managing Director
James Andrew
2023
Managing Director
Purchase and Sale of Shares
Individual Shares of the Fund may only be purchased and sold in secondary market transactions through brokers or financial intermediaries. Shares of the Fund are listed for trading on the Exchange, and because Shares trade at market prices rather than NAV, Shares of the Fund may trade at a price greater than NAV (premium) or less than NAV (discount). Certain affiliates of the Fund and the adviser may purchase and resell Shares pursuant to this prospectus.
An investor may incur costs attributable to the difference between the highest price a buyer is willing to pay to purchase Shares of the Fund (bid) and the lowest price a seller is willing to accept for Shares (ask) when buying or selling Shares in the secondary market (the bid-ask spread).
Recent information, including information about the Fund’s NAV, market price, premiums and discounts, and bid-ask spreads, is included on the Fund’s website at jpmorganfunds.com.
Tax Information
To the extent the Fund makes distributions, those distributions will be taxed as ordinary income or capital gains, except when your investment is in an IRA, 401(k) plan or other tax-advantaged investment plan, in which case you may be subject to federal income tax upon withdrawal from the tax-advantaged investment plan.
Payments to Broker-Dealers and Other Financial Intermediaries
If you purchase Shares of the Fund through a broker-dealer or other financial intermediary (such as a bank), the adviser and its related companies may pay the financial intermediary for the sale of Shares and related services. These payments may create a conflict of interest by influencing the broker-dealer or financial intermediary and your salesperson to recommend the Fund over another investment. Ask your salesperson or visit your financial intermediary’s website for more information.
March 1, 2024  |  29

JPMorgan International Value ETF
Ticker: JIVE
What is the goal of the Fund?
The Fund seeks to provide long-term capital appreciation.
Fees and Expenses of the Fund
The following table describes the fees and expenses that you may pay if you buy, hold and sell Shares of the Fund. You may pay other fees, such as brokerage commissions and other fees to financial intermediaries, which are not reflected in the table and example below.
ANNUAL FUND OPERATING EXPENSES1
(Expenses that you pay each year as a percentage of the value
of your investment)
Management Fees
0.55%
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses
0.55
1
The Fund’s management agreement provides that the adviser will pay substantially all expenses of the Fund (including expenses of the Trust relating to the Fund), except for the management fees, payments under the Fund’s 12b-1 plan (if any), interest expenses, dividend and interest expenses related to short sales, taxes, acquired fund fees and expenses (other than fees for funds advised by the adviser and/or its affiliates), costs of holding shareholder meetings, and litigation and potential litigation and other extraordinary expenses not incurred in the ordinary course of the Fund’s business. Additionally, the Fund shall be responsible for its non-operating expenses, including brokerage commissions and fees and expenses associated with the Fund’s securities lending program, if applicable.
Example
This Example is intended to help you compare the cost of investing in the Fund with the cost of investing in other funds. The Example does not take into account brokerage commissions that you pay when purchasing or selling Shares of the Fund. The Example assumes that you invest $10,000 in the Fund for the time periods indicated. The Example also assumes that your investment has a 5% return each year and that the Fund’s operating expenses remain the same. Your actual costs may be higher or lower.
WHETHER OR NOT YOU SELL YOUR SHARES, YOUR COST
WOULD BE:
 
1 Year
3 Years
SHARES ($)
56
176
Portfolio Turnover
The Fund pays transaction costs, such as commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or “turns over” its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover rate may indicate higher transaction costs and may result in higher taxes when Shares are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are not reflected in annual fund operating expenses or in the Example, affect the Fund’s
performance. During the Fund’s most recent fiscal period (September 13, 2023 through October 31, 2023), the Fund’s portfolio turnover rate was 4% of the average value of its portfolio.
What are the Fund’s main investment strategies?
The Fund invests primarily in equity securities and equity-related instruments of foreign companies, including foreign subsidiaries of U.S. companies. The Fund may invest in issuers located in both developed foreign and emerging market countries. Developed foreign countries include Australia, Canada, Israel, Japan, New Zealand, Singapore, the United Kingdom, most of the countries of Western Europe and Hong Kong; emerging market countries include most of the other countries in the world. An issuer of a security will be deemed to be located in a particular country if: (i) the principal trading market for the security is in such country, (ii) the issuer is organized under the laws of such country or maintains its principal place of business (generally its headquarters) in such country (iii) the issuer, during its most recent fiscal year, derived at least 50% of its revenues or profits from goods produced or sold, investments made, or services performed in such country or has at least 50% of its total assets situated in such country or (iv) the security or other instrument, including, but not limited to, futures and other types of derivatives, expose the Fund to the economic fortunes and risks of such country. The Fund typically does not invest in U.S. issuers that do not qualify as foreign issuers. Generally, the Fund expects to maintain, over time, regional geographic and sector exposures similar to those of its secondary benchmark, the MSCI ACWI ex USA Value Index (net total return)1, although the Fund may deviate from these exposures in the adviser’s discretion.
The equity securities and equity-related instruments in which the Fund may invest include, but are not limited to, common stock, preferred stock, exchange-traded funds (ETFs), depositary receipts, real estate investment trusts (REITs), exchange-traded futures, units, stapled securities, and other instruments that provide economic exposure to one or more equity securities. Certain of the equity securities in which the Fund invests are expected to be issued by companies that rely on variable interest entity (VIE) structures.
Derivatives, which are instruments that have a value based on another instrument, exchange rate or index, may also be used as substitutes for securities in which the Fund can invest. The Fund may utilize currency forwards (including non-deliverable forwards) to manage currency exposures, where practical, for the purpose of risk management, including hedging non-dollar currency exposure back to the U.S. dollar. The Fund may use exchange-traded futures (such as futures on indexes) and ETFs to gain exposure to particular securities or markets and for the efficient management of cash flows.

1MSCI ACWI ex USA Value Index is a registered service mark of MSCI, Inc., which does not sponsor and is in no way affiliated with the Fund.
30  |  J.P. Morgan Exchange-Traded Funds

The Fund may invest in securities denominated in U.S. dollars, other major reserve currencies, such as the euro, yen and pound sterling, and currencies of other countries in which it can invest. The Fund typically maintains full currency exposure to those markets in which it invests. However, the Fund may from time to time hedge a portion of its foreign currency exposure into the U.S. dollar.
The Fund may invest in securities across all market capitalizations, although the Fund may invest a significant portion of its assets in companies of any one particular market capitalization category.
Investment Process: In managing the Fund, the adviser seeks to identify securities that it believes present attractive valuations through the best of behavioral-based and quantitative screens, alongside in-depth fundamental analysis. The adviser’s analysis includes a review of proprietary data, information self-reported by companies, data from third party vendors and internal fundamental research.
The adviser believes that investors frequently behave irrationally in systematic and predictable ways because human psychology affects investment decision-making. The adviser believes that this investor behavior can result in market inefficiencies that persist over time, creating valuation opportunities that the adviser seeks to identify through both quantitative and fundamental analysis. Securities are subjected to further in-depth analysis, including consideration of whether or not the underlying businesses are fundamentally sound, and hence the securities are more likely to experience an increase in valuation and drive positive shareholder returns, or whether the adviser believes them to be undervalued for a reason, and hence less likely to experience an increase in valuation. As part of its investment process, the adviser seeks to assess the impact of environmental, social and governance (ESG) factors on many issuers in the universe in which the Fund may invest. The adviser’s assessment is based on an analysis of key opportunities and risks across industries to seek to identify financially material issues with respect to the Fund’s investments in securities and ascertain key issues that merit engagement with issuers. These assessments may not be conclusive, and securities of issuers that may be negatively impacted by such factors may be purchased and retained by the Fund, while the Fund may divest or not invest in securities of issuers that may be positively impacted by such factors. Ordinarily, the adviser expects to invest across a large number of issuers in an effort to limit specific issuer risk.
The Fund may sell securities if the adviser’s conviction in a security changes, if the issuer’s fundamentals change, or if the adviser believes the security is no longer attractively valued. Investments may also be sold if certain adverse political and economic events occur or if the adviser identifies a security that it believes offers a better investment opportunity.
The Fund’s Main Investment Risks
The Fund is subject to management risk and may not achieve its objective if the adviser’s expectations regarding particular instruments or markets are not met.
An investment in this Fund or any other fund may not provide a complete investment program. The suitability of an investment in the Fund should be considered based on the investment objective, strategies and risks described in this prospectus, considered in light of all of the other investments in your portfolio, as well as your risk tolerance, financial goals and time horizons. You may want to consult with a financial advisor to determine if this Fund is suitable for you.
The Fund is subject to the main risks noted below, any of which may adversely affect the Fund’s net asset value (NAV), market price, performance and ability to meet its investment objective.
Equity Market Risk. The price of equity securities may rise or fall because of changes in the broad market or changes in a company’s financial condition, sometimes rapidly or unpredictably. These price movements may result from factors affecting individual companies, sectors or industries selected for the Fund’s portfolio or the securities market as a whole, such as changes in economic or political conditions. When the value of the Fund’s portfolio securities goes down, your investment in the Fund decreases in value.
General Market Risk. Economies and financial markets throughout the world are becoming increasingly interconnected, which increases the likelihood that events or conditions in one country or region will adversely impact markets or issuers in other countries or regions. Securities in the Fund’s portfolio may underperform in comparison to securities in general financial markets, a particular financial market or other asset classes due to a number of factors, including inflation (or expectations for inflation), deflation (or expectations for deflation), interest rates, global demand for particular products or resources, market instability, financial system instability, debt crises and downgrades, embargoes, tariffs, sanctions and other trade barriers, regulatory events, other governmental trade or market control programs and related geopolitical events. In addition, the value of the Fund’s investments may be negatively affected by the occurrence of global events such as war, terrorism, environmental disasters, natural disasters or events, country instability, and infectious disease epidemics or pandemics.
Foreign Securities and Emerging Markets Risk. Investments in foreign issuers and foreign securities (including depositary receipts) are subject to additional risks, including political and economic risks, unstable governments, civil conflicts and war, greater volatility, decreased market liquidity, expropriation and nationalization risks, sanctions or other measures by the United States or other governments, currency fluctuations, higher transaction costs, delayed settlement, possible foreign controls on investment, and less stringent investor protection
March 1, 2024  |  31

JPMorgan International Value ETF (continued)
and disclosure standards of foreign markets. In certain markets where securities and other instruments are not traded “delivery versus payment,” the Fund may not receive timely payment for securities or other instruments it has delivered or receive delivery of securities paid for and may be subject to increased risk that the counterparty will fail to make payments or delivery when due or default completely. Foreign market trading hours, clearance and settlement procedures, and holiday schedules may limit the Fund's ability to buy and sell securities.
Events and evolving conditions in certain economies or markets may alter the risks associated with investments tied to countries or regions that historically were perceived as comparatively stable becoming riskier and more volatile. These risks are magnified in “emerging markets.” Emerging market countries typically have less-established market economies than developed countries and may face greater social, economic, regulatory and political uncertainties. In addition, emerging markets typically present greater illiquidity and price volatility concerns due to smaller or limited local capital markets and greater difficulty in determining market valuations of securities due to limited public information on issuers. Certain emerging market countries may be subject to less stringent requirements regarding accounting, auditing, financial reporting and record keeping and therefore, material information related to an investment may not be available or reliable. Additionally, the Fund may have substantial difficulties exercising its legal rights or enforcing a counterparty’s legal obligations in certain jurisdictions outside of the United States, in particular in emerging market countries, which can increase the risks of loss.
Geographic Focus Risk. The Fund may focus its investments in one or more regions or small groups of countries. As a result, the Fund’s performance may be subject to greater volatility than a more geographically diversified fund.
Value Investing Risk. A value stock may decrease in price or may not increase in price as anticipated by the adviser if other investors fail to recognize the company’s value or the factors that the adviser believes will cause the stock price to increase do not occur.
Depositary Receipts Risk. The Fund’s investments may take the form of depositary receipts, including unsponsored depositary receipts. Unsponsored depositary receipts may not provide as much information about the underlying issuer and may not carry the same voting privileges as sponsored depositary receipts. Unsponsored depositary receipts are issued by one or more depositaries in response to market demand, but without a formal agreement with the company that issues the underlying securities.
European Market Risk. The Fund’s performance will be affected by political, social and economic conditions in Europe, such as growth of the economic output (the gross national product), the rate of inflation, the rate at which capital is reinvested into European economies, the success of governmental actions to reduce budget deficits, the resource self-sufficiency of
European countries and interest and monetary exchange rates between European countries. European financial markets may experience volatility due to concerns about high government debt levels, credit rating downgrades, rising unemployment, the future of the euro as a common currency, possible restructuring of government debt and other government measures responding to those concerns, and fiscal and monetary controls imposed on member countries of the European Union. The risk of investing in Europe may be heightened due to steps taken by the United Kingdom to exit the European Union. On January 31, 2020, the United Kingdom officially withdrew from the European Union. As of May 1, 2021, the EU-UK Trade and Cooperation Agreement (TCA) governs certain aspects of the European Union’s and the United Kingdom’s relationship, many of which are still to be determined, including those related to financial services. Notwithstanding the TCA, significant uncertainty remains in the market regarding the ramifications of the United Kingdom’s withdrawal from the European Union. The impact on the United Kingdom and European economies and the broader global economy could be significant, resulting in increased volatility and illiquidity, currency fluctuations, impacts on arrangements for trading and on other existing cross-border cooperation arrangements (whether economic, tax, fiscal, legal, regulatory or otherwise), and in potentially lower growth for companies in the United Kingdom, Europe and globally, which could have an adverse effect on the value of the Fund’s investments. In addition, if one or more other countries were to exit the European Union or abandon the use of the euro as a currency, the value of investments tied to those countries or the euro could decline significantly and unpredictably.
Preferred Securities Risk. Preferred securities generally have a preference as to dividends and liquidation over an issuer’s common stock but ranks junior to debt securities in an issuer’s capital structure. Unlike interest payments on debt securities, dividends on preferred securities are payable only if declared by the issuer’s board of directors. As a consequence, if the board of directors of an issuer does not declare dividends or distributions for the relevant dividend or distribution periods, the issuer will not be obligated to pay dividends or distributions on the relevant payment date, and such dividends and distributions may be forfeited. Holders of preferred securities typically do not have voting rights except in certain circumstances where they may be given only limited voting rights. Preferred securities also may be subject to optional or mandatory redemption provisions.
Asia Pacific Market Risk. The economies in the Asia Pacific region are in all stages of economic development and may be intertwined. The small size of securities markets and the low trading volume in some countries in the Asia Pacific Region may lead to a lack of liquidity. Also, some Asia Pacific economies and financial markets have been extremely volatile in recent years. Many of the countries in the region are developing, both politically and economically. They may have relatively unstable governments and economies based on only a few commodities or industries. The share prices of companies in the region tend
32  |  J.P. Morgan Exchange-Traded Funds

to be volatile and there is a significant possibility of loss. Also, some companies in the region may have less established product markets or a small management group and they may be more vulnerable to political or economic conditions, like nationalization. In addition, some countries have restricted the flow of money in and out of the country.
Certain of the currencies in the Asia Pacific region have experienced extreme volatility relative to the U.S. dollar. For example, Thailand, Indonesia, the Philippines and South Korea have had currency crises and have sought help from the International Monetary Fund. Holding securities in currencies that are devalued (or in companies whose revenues are substantially in currencies that are devalued) will likely decrease the value of the Fund.
The trading volume on some Asia Pacific region stock exchanges is much lower than in the United States, and Asia Pacific region securities of some companies are less liquid and more volatile than similar U.S. securities. In addition, brokerage commissions on regional stock exchanges are fixed and are generally higher than the negotiated commissions in the United States. The imposition of tariffs or other trade barriers, or a downturn in the economy of a significant trading partner could adversely impact Asia Pacific companies. If the Fund concentrates in the Asia Pacific region, the Fund’s performance may be more volatile than that of a fund that invests globally. If Asia Pacific securities fall out of favor, it may cause the Fund to underperform funds that do not concentrate in the Asia Pacific region.
Greater China Region Risk. In addition to the risks listed under “Foreign Securities and Emerging Markets Risk,” investments in Mainland China, Hong Kong and Taiwan are subject to significant legal, regulatory, monetary and economic risks, as well as the potential for regional and global conflicts, including actions that are contrary to the interests of the U.S.
Investments in Mainland China involve political and legal uncertainties, currency fluctuations and aggressive currency controls, the risk of confiscatory taxation, and nationalization or expropriation of assets, which could adversely affect and significantly diminish the values of the Mainland Chinese companies in which the Fund invests. The Mainland Chinese securities markets are emerging markets characterized by greater price volatility. Mainland China is dominated by the one-party rule of the Communist Party, and the Mainland Chinese government exercises significant control over Mainland China’s economic growth. There is the potential of increased tariffs and restrictions on trade between the United States and Mainland China. An increase in tariffs or trade restrictions, or even the threat of such developments, could lead to a significant reduction in international trade, which could have a negative impact on Mainland Chinese companies and a commensurately negative impact on the Fund.
The political reunification of Mainland China and Taiwan, over which Mainland China continues to claim sovereignty, is a highly complex issue. There is the potential for future political,
military or economic disturbances that may have an adverse impact on the values of the Fund’s investments in Mainland China and elsewhere, or make certain Fund investments impractical or impossible. Any escalation of hostility between Mainland China and Taiwan would likely have a significant adverse impact on the value and liquidity of the Fund’s investments in both Mainland China and elsewhere, causing substantial investment losses for the Fund.
Hong Kong is a Special Administrative Region of the People's Republic of China. Since Hong Kong reverted to Chinese sovereignty in 1997, it has been governed by the Basic Law. Under the Basic Law, Hong Kong was guaranteed a high degree of autonomy in certain matters, including economic matters, until 2047. Attempts by the government of Mainland China to exert greater control over Hong Kong’s economic, political or legal structures or its existing social policy could negatively affect investor confidence in Hong Kong (as has been the case previously during certain periods), which in turn could negatively affect markets and business performance.
Chinese operating companies sometimes rely on VIE structures to raise capital from non-Chinese investors, even though such arrangements are not formally recognized under Chinese law. In a VIE structure, a Mainland China-based operating company establishes an entity (typically offshore) that enters into service and other contracts with the Mainland Chinese company designed to provide economic exposure to the company. The offshore entity then issues exchange-traded shares that are sold to the public, including non-Chinese investors (such as the Fund). Shares of the offshore entity are not equity ownership interests in the Mainland Chinese operating company and therefore the ability of the offshore entity to control the activities at the Mainland Chinese company are limited and the Mainland Chinese company may engage in activities that negatively impact investment value. Under a VIE structure, the Fund will typically have little or no ability to influence the Mainland China-based operating company through proxy voting or other means because it is not a Mainland Chinese company owner/shareholder. The VIE structure is designed to provide the offshore entity (and in turn, investors in the entity) with economic exposure to the Mainland Chinese company that replicates equity ownership, without actual equity ownership of the Mainland Chinese operating company. VIE structures are used due to Mainland Chinese government prohibitions on foreign ownership of companies in certain industries and it is not clear that the contracts are enforceable or that the structures will otherwise work as intended. Intervention by the Mainland Chinese government with respect to VIE structures could adversely affect the Mainland Chinese operating company’s performance, the enforceability of the offshore entity’s contractual arrangements with the Mainland Chinese company and the value of the offshore entity’s shares. If this were to occur, the market value of the Fund’s associated portfolio holdings would likely fall, causing substantial investment losses for the Fund.
March 1, 2024  |  33

JPMorgan International Value ETF (continued)
China Stock Connect Programs Risk. The universe of A-share issues currently available via the Shanghai-Hong Kong Stock Connect program or the Shenzhen-Hong Kong Stock Connect Program (the Programs) in Mainland China to the Fund may be limited as compared with the universe of equity securities available in other markets. There are significant risks inherent in investing in China A-shares through the Programs. There may be a lower level of liquidity in the China A-share markets accessed through the Programs, which are relatively smaller in terms of both combined total market value and the number of A-shares which are available for investments compared to other markets. This could potentially lead to severe price volatility in China A-shares. Investments in China A-shares are heavily regulated and the recoupment and repatriation of assets invested in China A-shares is subject to restrictions by the Mainland Chinese government. In addition, investments in China A-shares through the Programs are subject to trading, clearance and settlement procedures that could increase the risk of loss to the Fund and/or affect the Fund's ability to effectively pursue its investment strategy, such as the prohibition on same day (turnaround) trading through the Programs. China A-shares currently eligible for trading under a Program may also lose such designation. Further, all China A-shares trades must be settled in renminbi (RMB), which requires the Fund to have timely access to a reliable supply of RMB in Hong Kong, which cannot be assured.
Japan Risk. The Japanese economy may be subject to economic, political and social instability, which could have a negative impact on Japanese securities. In the past, Japan’s economic growth rate has remained relatively low, and it may remain low in the future. Furthermore, the Japanese economic growth rate could be impacted by Bank of Japan’s monetary policies, rising interest rates, tax increases, budget deficits, consumer confidence and volatility in the Japanese yen. At times, the Japanese economy has been adversely impacted by government intervention and protectionism, changes in its labor market, and an unstable financial services sector. International trade, government support of the financial services sector and other troubled sectors, government policy, natural disasters, an aging demographic and declining population and/or geopolitical developments associated with actual or potential conflicts with one or more countries in Asia could significantly affect the Japanese economy. Strained foreign relations with neighboring countries (China, South Korea, North Korea and Russia) may not only negatively impact the Japanese economy, but also the geographic region as well as globally. A significant portion of Japan’s trade is conducted with developing nations and can be affected by conditions in these nations or by currency fluctuations. Japan is an island state with few natural resources and limited land area and is reliant on imports for its commodity needs. Any fluctuations or shortages in the commodity markets could have a negative impact on the Japanese economy. In addition, Japan's economy has in the past and could in the future be significantly impacted by natural disasters.
Risk of Investing in Canada. Investments in Canadian issuers may subject the Fund to economic risk specific to Canada. Among other things, the Canadian economy is heavily dependent on relationships with certain key trading partners, including the United States, the United Kingdom and China. The Canadian economy is sensitive to fluctuations in certain commodity markets, including those in the energy sector. Any negative changes in commodity markets that may be due to changes in supply and demand for commodities, market events, regulatory developments or other factors that the Fund cannot control could have an adverse impact on the Canadian economy.
Smaller Company Risk. Investments in securities of smaller companies (mid cap and small cap companies) may be riskier, less liquid, more volatile and more vulnerable to economic, market and industry changes than securities of larger, more established companies. The securities of smaller companies may trade less frequently and in smaller volumes than securities of larger companies. As a result, changes in the price of securities issued by such companies may be more sudden or erratic than the prices of securities of large capitalization companies, especially over the short term. These risks are higher for small cap companies.
Derivatives Risk. Derivatives, including currency forwards and futures, may be riskier than other types of investments because they may be more sensitive to changes in economic or market conditions than other types of investments and could result in losses that significantly exceed the Fund’s original investment. Many derivatives create leverage thereby causing the Fund to be more volatile than it would be if it had not used derivatives. Certain derivatives also expose the Fund to counterparty risk (the risk that the derivative counterparty will not fulfill its contractual obligations), including the credit risk of the derivative counterparty. Certain derivatives are synthetic instruments that attempt to replicate performance of certain reference assets. With regard to such derivatives, the Fund does not have a claim on the reference assets and is subject to enhanced counterparty risk. Derivatives may not perform as expected, so the Fund may not realize the intended benefits. When used for hedging, the change in value of a derivative may not correlate as expected with the currency, security or other risk being hedged. In addition, given their complexity, derivatives expose the Fund to risks of mispricing or improper valuation. Derivatives also can expose the Fund to derivative liquidity risk, which includes risks involving the liquidity demands that derivatives can create to make payments of margin, collateral, or settlement payments to counterparties, legal risk, which includes the risk of loss resulting from insufficient or unenforceable contractual documentation, insufficient capacity or authority of the Fund’s counterparty and operational risk, which includes documentation or settlement issues, system failures, inadequate controls and human error.
34  |  J.P. Morgan Exchange-Traded Funds

Currency Risk. Changes in foreign currency exchange rates will affect the value of the Fund’s securities and may affect the price of the Fund’s Shares. Generally, when the value of the U.S. dollar rises in value relative to a foreign currency, an investment impacted by that currency loses value because that currency is worth less in U.S. dollars. Currency exchange rates may fluctuate significantly over short periods of time for a number of reasons, including changes in interest rates. Devaluation of a currency by a country’s government or banking authority also will have a significant impact on the value of any investments denominated in that currency. Currency markets generally are not as regulated as securities markets, may be riskier than other types of investments and may increase the volatility of the Fund. Although the Fund may attempt to hedge its currency exposure into the U.S. dollar, it may not be successful in reducing the effects of currency fluctuations. The Fund may also hedge from one foreign currency to another. In addition, the Fund’s use of currency hedging may not be successful, including due to delays in placing trades and other operational limitations, and the use of such strategies may lower the Fund’s potential returns.
Industry and Sector Focus Risk. At times, the Fund may increase the relative emphasis of its investments in a particular industry or sector. The prices of securities of issuers in a particular industry or sector may be more susceptible to fluctuations due to changes in economic or business conditions, government regulations, availability of basic resources or supplies, contagion risk within a particular industry or sector or to other industries or sectors, or other events that affect that industry or sector more than securities of issuers in other industries and sectors. To the extent that the Fund increases the relative emphasis of its investments in a particular industry or sector, the value of the Fund’s Shares may fluctuate in response to events affecting that industry or sector.
ETF Shares Trading Risk. Shares are listed for trading on The NASDAQ Stock Market LLC (the Exchange) and are bought and sold in the secondary market at market prices. The market prices of Shares are expected to fluctuate, in some cases materially, in response to changes in the Fund’s NAV, the intraday value of the Fund’s holdings and supply and demand for Shares. The adviser cannot predict whether Shares will trade above, below or at their NAV. Disruptions to creations and redemptions, the existence of significant market volatility or potential lack of an active trading market for the Shares (including through a trading halt), as well as other factors, may result in the Shares trading significantly above (at a premium) or below (at a discount) to NAV or to the intraday value of the Fund’s holdings. During such periods, you may incur significant losses if you sell your Shares.
The securities held by the Fund may be traded in markets that close at a different time than the Exchange. Liquidity in those securities may be reduced after the applicable closing times. Accordingly, during the time when the Exchange is open but
after the applicable market closing, fixing or settlement times, bid-ask spreads on the Exchange and the corresponding premium or discount to the Shares’ NAV may widen.
Authorized Participant Concentration Risk. Only an authorized participant may engage in creation or redemption transactions directly with the Fund. The Fund has a limited number of intermediaries that act as authorized participants and none of these authorized participants is or will be obligated to engage in creation or redemption transactions. To the extent that these intermediaries exit the business or are unable to or choose not to proceed with creation and/or redemption orders with respect to the Fund and no other authorized participant creates or redeems, Shares may trade at a discount to NAV and possibly face trading halts and/or delisting.
Investments in the Fund are not deposits or obligations of, or guaranteed or endorsed by, any bank and are not insured or guaranteed by the FDIC, the Federal Reserve Board or any other government agency.
You could lose money investing in the Fund.
The Fund’s Past Performance
The Fund has not operated for a full calendar year as of the date of this prospectus and therefore, has no reportable performance history. Once the Fund has operated for at least one calendar year, a bar chart and performance table will be included in the prospectus to show the performance of the Fund. When such information is included, this section will provide some indication of the risks of investing in the Fund by showing changes in the Fund’s performance history from year to year and showing how the Fund’s average annual total returns compare with those of a broad measure of market performance. Although past performance of the Fund is no guarantee of how it will perform in the future, historical performance may give you some indication of the risks of investing in the Fund. Updated performance information is available by visiting www.jpmorganfunds.com or by calling 1-844-457-6383 (844-4JPM ETF).
March 1, 2024  |  35

JPMorgan International Value ETF (continued)
Management
J.P. Morgan Investment Management Inc. (the adviser)
Portfolio Manager
Managed the
Fund Since
Primary Title with
Investment Adviser
Thomas Buckingham
2023
Executive Director
Joyce Weng
2023
Executive Director
Ian Butler
2023
Executive Director
Kyle Williams
2023
Executive Director
Michael Barakos
2023
Managing Director
Purchase and Sale of Shares
Individual Shares of the Fund may only be purchased and sold in secondary market transactions through brokers or financial intermediaries. Shares of the Fund are listed for trading on the Exchange, and because Shares trade at market prices rather than NAV, Shares of the Fund may trade at a price greater than NAV (premium) or less than NAV (discount). Certain affiliates of the Fund and the adviser may purchase and resell Shares pursuant to this prospectus.
An investor may incur costs attributable to the difference between the highest price a buyer is willing to pay to purchase Shares of the Fund (bid) and the lowest price a seller is willing to accept for Shares (ask) when buying or selling Shares in the secondary market (the bid-ask spread).
Recent information, including information about the Fund’s NAV, market price, premiums and discounts, and bid-ask spreads, is included on the Fund’s website at jpmorganfunds.com.
Tax Information
To the extent the Fund makes distributions, those distributions will be taxed as ordinary income or capital gains, except when your investment is in an IRA, 401(k) plan or other tax-advantaged investment plan, in which case you may be subject to federal income tax upon withdrawal from the tax-advantaged investment plan.
Payments to Broker-Dealers and Other Financial Intermediaries
If you purchase Shares of the Fund through a broker-dealer or other financial intermediary (such as a bank), the adviser and its related companies may pay the financial intermediary for the sale of Shares and related services. These payments may create a conflict of interest by influencing the broker-dealer or financial intermediary and your salesperson to recommend the Fund over another investment. Ask your salesperson or visit your financial intermediary’s website for more information.
36  |  J.P. Morgan Exchange-Traded Funds

More About the Funds
Additional Information About the Funds’ Investment Strategies
Each Fund is an ETF, which is a fund that trades like other publicly-traded securities. Each Fund is not an index fund. Each Fund is actively managed and does not seek to replicate the performance of a specified index.
The name, investment objective and policies of a Fund are similar to other funds advised by the adviser or its affiliates. However, the investment results of a Fund may be higher or lower than, and there is no guarantee that the investment results of the Fund will be comparable to, any other of these funds. A new fund or a fund with fewer assets under management may be more significantly affected by purchases and redemptions of its Creation Units (as defined below) than a fund with relatively greater assets under management would be affected by purchases and redemptions of its shares. As compared to a larger fund, a new or smaller fund is more likely to sell a comparatively large portion of its portfolio to meet significant Creation Unit redemptions, or invest a comparatively large amount of cash to facilitate Creation Unit purchases, in each case when a fund otherwise would not seek to do so. Such transactions may cause funds to make investment decisions at inopportune times or prices or miss attractive investment opportunities. Such transactions may also accelerate the realization of taxable income if sales of securities resulted in gains and a fund redeems Creation Units for cash, or otherwise cause a fund to perform differently than intended. While such risks may apply to funds of any size, such risks are heightened in funds with fewer assets under management. In addition, new funds may not be able to fully implement their investment strategy immediately upon commencing investment operations, which could reduce investment performance.
Main Investment Strategies
Active China ETF
Under normal circumstances, the Fund will invest at least 80% of the value of its Assets in equity securities and equity-related instruments that are tied economically to China. “Assets” means net assets, plus the amount of borrowings for investment purposes. China means Mainland China, and includes its administrative and other districts, such as Hong Kong and Macau. The equity securities and equity-related instruments in which the Fund may invest include, but are not limited to, common stock, preferred stock, convertible securities, depositary receipts, units, stapled securities, equity securities of REITs, privately placed securities, warrants and rights, participation notes or other structured notes, initial public offering and secondary placings, and other instruments that provide economic exposure to one or more equity securities. The Fund may invest in all types of issuers (including government-owned issuers) of equity securities and equity-related instruments that are tied economically to China, and in all types of publicly-issued shares of such issuers, including those listed on Chinese or U.S. exchanges. A significant portion of the equity securities in which the Fund invests are expected to be issued by companies that rely on VIE structures.
Because the Fund invests at least 80% of the value of its Assets in equity securities and equity-related instruments that are tied economically to China, it presents different risks than funds that do not so invest. See Investment Risks below.
Securities and instruments tied economically to China include: (i) securities of issuers that are organized under the laws of China or that maintain their principal place of business (generally their headquarters) in China; (ii) securities that are traded principally in China; (iii) securities of issuers that, during their most recent fiscal year, derived at least 50% of their revenues or profits from goods produced or sold, investments made, or services performed in China or that have at least 50% of their assets in China; or (iv) securities or other instruments, including, but not limited to, participation notes, futures and other types of derivatives, that expose the Fund to the economic fortunes and risks of China. Under normal circumstances, the Fund will typically hold between 40 and 70 securities.
Derivatives, which are instruments that have a value based on another instrument, exchange rate or index, may also be used as substitutes for securities in which the Fund can invest. The Fund may utilize currency forwards to manage currency exposures, where practical, for the purpose of risk management, including hedging non-dollar currency exposure back to the U.S. dollar. The Fund may also use exchange-traded funds, exchange-traded futures (primarily futures on indexes) and participation notes to gain exposure to particular foreign securities or markets and for the efficient management of cash flows.
The Fund may invest in securities denominated in any currency and will invest substantially in securities denominated in foreign currencies. However, the Fund may from time to time hedge a portion of its foreign currency exposure into the U.S. dollar using currency forwards.
The Fund may invest in securities across all market capitalizations, although the Fund may invest a significant portion of its assets in companies of any one particular market capitalization category. At times, the Fund may increase the relative emphasis of its investments in a particular industry or sector, but the Fund may invest in any industry or sector.
March 1, 2024  |  37

More About the Funds (continued)
The Fund has adopted a policy that requires the Fund to provide shareholders with at least 60 days’ notice prior to any change in its policy to invest at least 80% of its Assets in equity securities and equity-related instruments that are tied economically to China. The Board of Trustees of the Trust may change the Fund’s investment strategy and other policies without shareholder approval, except as otherwise indicated.
Investment Process: The Fund is managed by the sub-adviser. In managing the Fund, the sub-adviser adheres to an investment process that is primarily driven by bottom-up stock selection, while being mindful of macro and policy considerations. The sub-adviser seeks to add value primarily through security selection decisions.
The portfolio managers are primarily responsible for implementing the recommendations of the research analysts, who make their recommendations based on the security ranking system described below. Utilizing this research process, the sub-adviser aims to identify what it believes to be attractively-valued industry leaders within its coverage universe, with an emphasis on those companies the sub-adviser believes are or will be profitable with sustainable earnings and disciplined capital management.
Research analysts use their local expertise to identify, research, and rank companies according to the sub-adviser’s expectation of their future performance. Securities are assessed using a two part analysis which considers the sub-adviser’s expectations for (1) total returns on a medium term forward basis (five year expected returns) and (2) longer-term business growth characteristics and qualitative factors (strategic classifications). The sub-adviser also integrates financially material ESG factors as part of the Fund’s investment process (ESG Integration). ESG Integration is the systematic inclusion of ESG issues in investment analysis and investment decisions. As part of its investment process, the sub-adviser seeks to assess the impact of ESG factors on many issuers in the universe in which the Fund may invest. The sub-adviser’s assessment is based on an analysis of key opportunities and risks across industries to identify financially material issues with respect to the Fund’s investments in issuers and ascertain key issues that merit engagement with issuers. These assessments may not be conclusive, and securities of issuers that may be negatively impacted by such factors may be purchased and retained by the Fund, while the Fund may divest or not invest in securities of issuers that may be positively impacted by such factors. In particular, ESG Integration does not change the Fund’s investment objective, exclude specific types of industries or companies or limit the Fund’s investable universe. The Fund is not designed for investors who wish to screen out particular types of companies or investments or are looking for funds that meet specific ESG goals. In order to encourage creativity, considerable autonomy is given to research analysts at the stock idea generation stage of the process.
The sub-adviser may sell a security for several reasons. A security may be sold due to a change in the company’s fundamentals or if the sub-adviser believes the security is no longer attractively valued. Investments may also be sold if the sub-adviser identifies a security that it believes offers a better investment opportunity.
ActiveBuilders Emerging Markets Equity ETF
Under normal circumstances, the Fund invests at least 80% of its Assets in equity securities and equity-related instruments that are tied economically to emerging markets. “Assets” means net assets, plus the amount of borrowings for investment purposes. Emerging markets include most countries in the world except Australia, Canada, Japan, New Zealand, the United Kingdom, the United States, most of the countries of Western Europe and Hong Kong, although the Fund may invest in securities tied to those countries as well.
The Fund’s investments represent allocations to a variety of the adviser’s actively managed emerging market equity strategies, including country, region and style strategies, among others. The adviser selects the strategies utilized in the portfolio based on risk/return analyses and relative value considerations.
The Fund will overweight or underweight countries and sectors relative to the Benchmark. In implementing its strategy, the Fund seeks to construct a portfolio of holdings that will outperform the Benchmark over time while maintaining similar risk characteristics, including sector and geographic risks.
The equity securities and equity-related instruments in which the Fund may invest include, but are not limited to, common stock, participation notes or other structured notes, and other instruments that provide economic exposure to one or more equity securities.
Certain of the equity securities in which the Fund invests are expected to be issued by companies that rely on VIE structures.
The Fund may invest in securities across all market capitalizations, although the Fund may invest a significant portion of its assets in companies of any one particular market capitalization category.
Securities and equity-related instruments tied economically to an emerging market include: (i) securities of issuers that are organized under the laws of an emerging market country or that maintain their principal place of business in an emerging market country; (ii) securities that are traded principally in an emerging market country; (iii) securities of issuers that, during their most recent fiscal
38  |  J.P. Morgan Exchange-Traded Funds

year, derived at least 50% of their revenues or profits from goods produced or sold, investments made, or services performed in an emerging market country or that have at least 50% of their assets in an emerging market country; or (iv) securities or other instruments that expose the Fund to the economic fortunes and risks of one or more emerging market countries.
There is no limit on the number of countries in which the Fund may invest, and the Fund may focus its investments in a single country or a small group of countries The Fund may use exchange-traded funds to gain exposure to particular foreign securities or markets and for the efficient management of cash flows. The Fund will have significant exposure to investments in the China Region, South Korea and India.
The Fund may invest in securities denominated in any currency and will invest substantially in securities denominated in foreign currencies.
Derivatives, which are instruments that have a value based on another instrument, exchange rate or index, may also be used as substitutes for securities in which the Fund can invest. The Fund may utilize currency forwards (including nondeliverable forwards) to manage currency exposures, where practical, for the purpose of risk management, including hedging non-dollar currency exposure back to the U.S. dollar. The Fund may also use exchanged-traded futures for the efficient management of cash flows.
Investment Process: In managing the Fund, the adviser uses both a top down and bottom up research process as well as a combination of fundamental and quantitative inputs to allocate the Fund’s assets among a range of sectors. In buying and selling investments for the Fund, the adviser looks for countries and individual securities that it believes will perform well over time. A proprietary multi-factor model is used to quantitatively rank countries, which informs the Fund’s portfolio construction. The adviser selects individual securities after performing a risk/reward analysis to address the Fund’s objective of providing a high total return. Research produced by the adviser includes in-depth, fundamental research into individual securities conducted by research analysts, who emphasize each issuer’s long-term prospects, and disciplined top-down macro and quantitative research using the latest technology available to the firm. Research analysts use their local expertise to identify, research, and rank companies according to their expected performance.
The adviser also integrates financially material ESG factors as part of the Fund’s investment process (ESG integration). ESG integration is the systematic inclusion of ESG issues in investment analysis and investment decisions. As part of its investment process, the adviser seeks to assess the impact of ESG factors on many issuers in the universe in which the Fund may invest. The adviser’s assessment is based on an analysis of key opportunities and risks across industries to seek to identify financially material issues with respect to the Fund’s investments in securities and ascertain key issues that merit engagement with issuers. These assessments may not be conclusive, and securities of issuers that may be negatively impacted by such factors may be purchased and retained by the Fund, while the Fund may divest or not invest in securities of issuers that may be positively impacted by such factors. In particular, ESG integration does not change the Fund’s investment objective, exclude specific types of industries or companies or limit the Fund’s investable universe. The Fund is not designed for investors who wish to screen out particular types of companies or investments or are looking for funds that meet specific ESG goals.
The Fund has adopted a policy that requires the Fund to provide shareholders with at least 60 days notice prior to any change in its policy to invest at least 80% of its Assets in equity securities and equity-related instruments that are tied economically to emerging markets. The Board of Trustees of the Trust may change the Fund’s investment strategy and other policies without shareholder approval, except as otherwise indicated.
Global Select Equity ETF
The Fund invests primarily in equity securities of companies in global developed markets. The Fund also may invest in global emerging markets. Global developed markets include Australia, Canada, Israel, Japan, New Zealand, Singapore, the United Kingdom, the United States, most of the countries of Western Europe and Hong Kong; global emerging markets include most of the other countries in the world. Generally, the Fund expects to maintain, over time, regional geographic and sector exposures similar to those of its benchmark, the MSCI World Index (net total return)1, although the Fund may deviate from these exposures in the adviser’s discretion. Under normal circumstances, the Fund will typically hold between 70 and 100 securities.
Under normal circumstances, the Fund will invest at least 80% of the value of its Assets in equity securities and equity-related instruments. “Assets” means net assets, plus the amount of borrowings for investment purposes. The equity securities and equity-related instruments in which the Fund may invest include, but are not limited to, common stock, preferred shares, convertible securities, depositary receipts, exchange-traded funds (ETFs), equity securities of real estate investment trusts (REITs), warrants and rights, and privately placed securities, and other instruments that provide economic exposure to one or more equity securities.

1MSCI World Index is a registered service mark of MSCI, Inc., which does not sponsor and is in no way affiliated with the Fund.
March 1, 2024  |  39

More About the Funds (continued)
Derivatives, which are instruments that have a value based on another instrument, exchange rate or index, may also be used as substitutes for securities in which the Fund can invest. The Fund may use futures contracts, swaps, participation notes, forwards and other instruments to more effectively gain targeted equity exposure from its cash positions, to hedge various investments and for risk management. The Fund may use exchange-traded futures to manage cash flows.
The Fund may invest in securities denominated in U.S. dollars, other major reserve currencies, such as the euro, yen and pound sterling, and currencies of other countries in which it can invest. However, a substantial portion (if not all) of the Fund's foreign investments will be denominated in foreign currencies, and the Fund may, but does not currently expect to, hedge its currency exposure.
The Fund will invest primarily in the securities of large cap market capitalization companies, although the Fund may also invest in mid cap and small cap securities.
The Fund has adopted a policy that requires the Fund to provide shareholders with at least 60 days’ notice prior to any change in its policy to invest at least 80% of its Assets in equity securities and equity-related instruments. The Board of Trustees of the Trust may change the Fund’s investment strategy and other policies without shareholder approval, except as otherwise indicated.
Investment Process: In managing the Fund, the adviser focuses on individual equity selection, emphasizing those equity securities that are identified as attractive according to the proprietary research of the adviser. This process generally looks for securities that the adviser believes are attractively valued, possess strong free cash flow and have the potential for sustainable earnings growth. The adviser’s analysis includes a review of proprietary data, information self-reported by companies, data from third party vendors and internal fundamental research. The adviser also integrates financially material ESG factors as part of the Fund’s investment process (ESG integration). ESG integration is the systematic inclusion of ESG issues in investment analysis and investment decisions. As part of its investment process, the adviser seeks to assess the impact of ESG factors on many issuers in the universe in which the Fund may invest. The adviser’s assessment is based on an analysis of key opportunities and risks across industries to seek to identify financially material issues with respect to the Fund’s investments in securities and ascertain key issues that merit engagement with issuers. These assessments may not be conclusive, and securities of issuers that may be negatively impacted by such factors may be purchased and retained by the Fund, while the Fund may divest or not invest in securities of issuers that may be positively impacted by such factors. In particular, ESG integration does not change the Fund’s investment objective, exclude specific types of industries or companies or limit the Fund’s investable universe. The Fund is not designed for investors who wish to screen out particular types of companies or investments or are looking for funds that meet specific ESG goals.
The Fund may sell securities if the adviser’s conviction in a security changes, if the issuer’s fundamentals change, or if the adviser believes the security is no longer attractively valued. Investments may also be sold if certain adverse political and economic events occur or if the adviser identifies a security that it believes offers a better investment opportunity.
Hedged Equity Laddered Overlay ETF
The Fund seeks to provide capital appreciation through participation in the broad equity markets while hedging overall market exposure relative to traditional long-only equity strategies.
Under normal circumstances, the Fund invests at least 80% of its Assets in equity securities. “Assets” means net assets plus the amount of borrowings for investment purposes. The Fund uses an enhanced index strategy to invest in equity securities similar to those in the S&P 500 Index, which primarily consist of common stocks of large capitalization U.S. companies. The Fund will also purchase and sell exchange-traded put options and sell exchange-traded call options, employing an options overlay strategy designed to provide a continuous market hedge for the portfolio. The options will typically be based on exchange-traded funds (ETFs) that replicate the S&P 500 Index (S&P 500 ETFs). The combination of the diversified portfolio of equity securities, combined with the options overlay, is intended to provide the Fund with a significant portion of the returns associated with equity market investments, while exposing investors to less risk than traditional long-only equity strategies. Specifically, the Fund seeks to provide a competitive risk-adjusted return over a full market cycle (defined as three to five years) relative to the S&P 500 Index with lower volatility than traditional long-only equity strategies.
The Fund’s investments in equity securities will be primarily in common stocks of U.S. companies with market capitalizations similar to those within the universe of the S&P 500 Index. Because the Fund uses an enhanced index strategy, not all of the stocks in the S&P 500 Index, its primary benchmark, are included in the Fund, and the Fund’s position in an individual stock may be overweighted or underweighted when compared to the index. As of January 31, 2024, the market capitalization of the companies in the S&P 500 Index ranged from $2.9 billion to $2.95 trillion. Sector by sector, the Fund’s weightings are similar to those of the S&P 500 Index. Within each sector, however, the Fund modestly overweights equity securities that it considers undervalued or fairly valued while modestly underweighting or not holding equity securities that appear overvalued. Because each stock’s weighting in the Fund is controlled relative to that stock’s weight in the S&P 500 Index, the Fund’s weighted average market capitalization will be close to that of the S&P 500 Index.
40  |  J.P. Morgan Exchange-Traded Funds

In implementing the options overlay strategy, the Fund seeks to provide “laddered” exposure. To do this, the Fund typically holds options for multiple (normally, three) three-month periods (each, a hedge period) staggered a month apart for the purpose of seeking to provide lower volatility in any market cycle. Laddered investing refers to the implementation of the strategy with different hedge periods, with the goal of mitigating potential risks associated with only one hedge period. The portfolio management team will have discretion to determine the amount of exposure related to each hedge period and will have flexibility to allocate the assets to a particular hedge period for various reasons, including reacting opportunistically to market conditions, managing investor flows in or out of the Fund and improving tax management of the Fund. The options overlay strategy is an actively managed process and is designed to provide a continuous market hedge for the portfolio. The options overlay strategy is constructed by buying a put option at a higher strike price while selling a put option at a relatively lower strike price (together, this is referred to as a put option spread) and simultaneously selling a call option that substantially offsets the cost of the put option spread. Each put option spread is generally maintained at a level intended to reduce the Fund’s exposure to a market decline by offsetting losses resulting from a decrease in the market. The Fund’s investment strategies may not always provide greater market protection than other equity investments, particularly in rising equity markets when the Fund is expected to underperform traditional long-only equity strategies. In addition, as a result of selling call options to offset the costs associated with the options overlay strategy, some upside may be foregone in certain market environments.
While the Fund will not generally invest directly in ETFs, there may be times when it will purchase shares or receive shares of S&P 500 ETFs in order to settle its options positions. The adviser will not normally maintain such positions for an extended period. ETFs, which are pooled investment vehicles whose ownership interests are purchased and sold on a securities exchange, may be passively or actively managed. Passively managed ETFs, such as the S&P 500 ETFs, generally seek to track the performance of a particular market index, including broad-based market indexes, as well as indexes relating to particular sectors, markets, regions or industries. Actively managed ETFs do not seek to track the performance of a particular market index. Ordinarily, the Fund must limit its investments in a single ETF to 5% of its total assets and in all ETFs and other investment companies to 10% of its total assets. The Securities and Exchange Commission adopted an exemptive rule that allows any fund to disregard these 5% and 10% limitations, subject to certain conditions. The price movement of an index-based ETF may not track the underlying index and may result in a loss. In addition, ETFs may trade at a price above (premium) or below (discount) their NAV, especially during periods of significant market volatility or stress, causing investors to pay or receive significantly more or less than the value of the ETF’s underlying portfolio when they purchase or sell their ETF shares, respectively.
In addition to the use of the options overlay strategy, the Fund may use future contracts, primarily futures on indexes, to more effectively gain targeted equity exposure from its cash positions and to hedge the Fund’s portfolio if it is unable to purchase or write the necessary options for the options overlay strategy.
Investment Process – Enhanced Index: To implement the enhanced index strategy, the adviser employs a three-step process that combines research, valuation and stock selection. The adviser takes an in-depth look at company prospects over a period as long as five years, which is designed to provide insight into a company’s real growth potential. The research findings allow the adviser to rank the companies in each sector group according to their relative value.
The adviser also integrates financially material environmental, social and governance (ESG) factors as part of the Fund’s investment process (ESG Integration). ESG Integration is the systematic inclusion of ESG issues in investment analysis and investment decisions. As part of its investment process, the adviser seeks to assess the impact of ESG factors on many issuers in the universe in which the Fund may invest. The adviser’s assessment is based on an analysis of key opportunities and risks across industries to seek to identify financially material issues with respect to the Fund’s investments in securities and ascertain key issues that merit engagement with issuers. These assessments may not be conclusive, and securities of issuers that may be negatively impacted by such factors may be purchased and retained by the Fund, while the Fund may divest or not invest in securities of issuers that may be positively impacted by such factors. In particular, ESG Integration does not change the Fund’s investment objective, exclude specific types of industries or companies or limit the Fund’s investable universe. The Fund is not designed for investors who wish to screen out particular types of companies or investments or are looking for funds that meet specific ESG goals.
On behalf of the Fund, the adviser then buys and sells equity securities, using the research and valuation as a basis. In general, the adviser buys securities that are identified as attractive and considers selling them when they appear less attractive based on the Fund’s process. Along with attractive valuation, the adviser often considers a number of other criteria, including:
impact on the overall risk of the portfolio relative to the S&P 500 Index
high perceived potential reward compared to perceived potential risk
possible temporary mispricings caused by apparent market overreactions
catalysts, such as improving company fundamentals, that could trigger a rise in a stock’s price
March 1, 2024  |  41

More About the Funds (continued)
Investment Process – Options Overlay Strategy: The Fund’s options overlay strategy is designed to use options to hedge the Fund’s overall market exposure relative to traditional long-only strategies. Specifically, the options overlay strategy is intended to provide the Fund with downside protection, while foregoing some upside potential. The downside protection comes from the purchase of put options, which give the owner the right, but not the obligation, to sell shares of the underlying reference asset at an agreed upon price (strike price). To implement the strategy, the adviser utilizes exchange-traded equity options that typically have a reference asset of an S&P 500 ETF, but will also be based on S&P 500 Index options. These puts generally increase in price as the price of the reference asset falls, offering a measure of protection against falling market prices. To partially offset the initial cost of these purchased put options, the Fund will simultaneously sell put options at a lower strike price. This effectively limits the amount of downside protection offered by the puts, and together is referred to as a “put option spread.” Entering into put option spreads is typically less expensive than a strategy of only purchasing put options, and the Fund may benefit in a flat to upwardly moving market by reducing the cost of the downside protection; the downside protection of the put option spread, however, is limited as compared to just owning a put option. The Fund is not expected to provide market protection when the market is only down slightly; during such periods, the Fund is expected to perform in line with broad equity markets.
While put option spreads are less expensive than outright puts, put option spreads still require some upfront costs. To substantially offset this upfront cost, the Fund will sell call options, which give the owner the right, but not the obligation, to buy shares of the underlying reference asset at a specified strike price. While the sale of these call options will substantially offset the remaining cost of the protective put spread, it will potentially reduce the Fund’s ability to profit from increases in the value of its equity portfolio. As the price of call options rise along with the price of the underlying asset, the Fund’s short position in calls will decrease in value as the market rises, potentially offsetting a portion of the equity portfolio gains. The options overlay strategy is an actively managed process and is designed to provide a continuous market hedge for the portfolio. The strategy will own multiple positions that expire at various dates. For each hedge period, a portion of the options overlay strategy may be reset as the applicable options approach expiration.
International Growth ETF
The Fund primarily invests in equity securities of foreign companies. Typically, in implementing its strategy, the Fund invests in common stocks of large and mid-capitalization foreign companies with a history of above-average growth or those that the adviser believes are expected to enter periods of above-average growth. Large and mid-capitalization foreign companies are companies with market capitalizations equal to those within the universe of the MSCI ACWI ex-USA Growth Index at the time of purchase. The Fund will generally invest in companies located in at least three foreign countries, although it may invest a substantial portion of its assets in just one foreign country. The Fund may invest in issuers located in both developed foreign and emerging market countries. Developed foreign countries include Australia, Canada, Japan, New Zealand, the United Kingdom, most of the countries of Western Europe and Hong Kong; emerging market countries include most of the other countries in the world.
An issuer of a security will be deemed to be located in a particular country if: (i) the principal trading market for the security is in such country, (ii) the issuer is organized under the laws of such country or (iii) the issuer derives at least 50% of its revenues or profits from such country or has at least 50% of its total assets situated in such country.
The equity securities in which the Fund may invest include, but are not limited to, common stock, preferred stock, trust or partnership interests, depositary receipts and warrants and rights.
The Fund may invest in securities denominated in any currency and will invest substantially in securities denominated in foreign currencies.
Derivatives, which are instruments that have a value based on another instrument, exchange rate or index, may also be used as substitutes for securities in which the Fund can invest. The Fund may utilize currency forwards (including nondeliverable forwards) to manage currency exposures, where practical, for the purpose of risk management, including hedging non-dollar currency exposure back to the U.S. dollar. The Fund may also use exchanged-traded futures for the efficient management of cash flows.
Investment Process: In managing the Fund, the adviser employs a fundamental bottom-up approach that seeks to identify companies with strong growth and quality characteristics. The adviser identifies these companies through internal research and by subjecting them to a disciplined set of growth, quality and valuation criteria. Companies that display attractive characteristics and for which the growth is believed to be sustainable will be considered candidates for purchase. Conversely, companies become candidates for sale if the expected growth is believed to be at risk or when valuations are no longer attractive.
The adviser also integrates financially material ESG factors as part of the Fund’s investment process (ESG integration). ESG integration is the systematic inclusion of ESG issues in investment analysis and investment decisions. As part of its investment process, the adviser seeks to assess the impact of ESG factors on many issuers in the universe in which the Fund may invest. The adviser’s assessment is based on an analysis of key opportunities and risks across industries to seek to identify financially material issues with respect to the Fund’s investments in securities and ascertain key issues that merit engagement with issuers. These assessments may
42  |  J.P. Morgan Exchange-Traded Funds

not be conclusive, and securities of issuers that may be negatively impacted by such factors may be purchased and retained by the Fund, while the Fund may divest or not invest in securities of issuers that may be positively impacted by such factors. In particular, ESG integration does not change the Fund’s investment objective, exclude specific types of industries or companies or limit the Fund’s investable universe. The Fund is not designed for investors who wish to screen out particular types of companies or investments or are looking for funds that meet specific ESG goals.
International Value ETF
The Fund invests primarily in equity securities and equity-related instruments of foreign companies, including foreign subsidiaries of U.S. companies. The Fund may invest in issuers located in both developed foreign and emerging market countries. Developed foreign countries include Australia, Canada, Israel, Japan, New Zealand, Singapore, the United Kingdom, most of the countries of Western Europe and Hong Kong; emerging market countries include most of the other countries in the world. An issuer of a security will be deemed to be located in a particular country if: (i) the principal trading market for the security is in such country, (ii) the issuer is organized under the laws of such country or maintains its principal place of business (generally its headquarters) in such country (iii) the issuer, during its most recent fiscal year, derived at least 50% of its revenues or profits from goods produced or sold, investments made, or services performed in such country or has at least 50% of its total assets situated in such country or (iv) the security or other instrument, including, but not limited to, futures and other types of derivatives, expose the Fund to the economic fortunes and risks of such country. The Fund typically does not invest in U.S. issuers that do not qualify as foreign issuers. Generally, the Fund expects to maintain, over time, regional geographic and sector exposures similar to those of its secondary benchmark, the MSCI ACWI ex USA Value Index (net total return)1, although the Fund may deviate from these exposures in the adviser’s discretion.
The equity securities and equity-related instruments in which the Fund may invest include, but are not limited to, common stock, preferred stock, exchange-traded funds (ETFs), depositary receipts, real estate investment trusts (REITs), exchange-traded futures, units, stapled securities and other instruments that provide economic exposure to one or more equity securities. Certain of the equity securities in which the Fund invests are expected to be issued by companies that rely on variable interest entity (VIE) structures.
Derivatives, which are instruments that have a value based on another instrument, exchange rate or index, may also be used as substitutes for securities in which the Fund can invest. The Fund may utilize currency forwards (including non-deliverable forwards) to manage currency exposures, where practical, for the purpose of risk management, including hedging non-dollar currency exposure back to the U.S. dollar. The Fund may use exchange-traded futures (such as futures on indexes) and ETFs to gain exposure to particular securities or markets and for the efficient management of cash flows.
The Fund may invest in securities denominated in U.S. dollars, other major reserve currencies, such as the euro, yen and pound sterling, and currencies of other countries in which it can invest. The Fund typically maintains full currency exposure to those markets in which it invests. However, the Fund may from time to time hedge a portion of its foreign currency exposure into the U.S. dollar.
The Fund may invest in securities across all market capitalizations, although the Fund may invest a significant portion of its assets in companies of any one particular market capitalization category.
Investment Process: In managing the Fund, the adviser seeks to identify securities that it believes present attractive valuations through the best of behavioral-based and quantitative screens, alongside in-depth fundamental analysis. The adviser’s analysis includes a review of proprietary data, information self-reported by companies, data from third party vendors and internal fundamental research.
The adviser believes that investors frequently behave irrationally in systematic and predictable ways because human psychology affects investment decision-making. The adviser believes that this investor behavior can result in market inefficiencies that persist over time, creating valuation opportunities that the adviser seeks to identify through both quantitative and fundamental analysis. Securities are subjected to further in-depth analysis, including consideration of whether or not the underlying businesses are fundamentally sound, and hence the securities are more likely to experience an increase in valuation and drive positive shareholder returns, or whether the adviser believes them to be undervalued for a reason, and hence less likely to experience an increase in valuation. The adviser also integrates financially material ESG factors as part of the Fund’s investment process (ESG integration). ESG integration is the systematic inclusion of ESG issues in investment analysis and investment decisions. As part of its investment process, the adviser seeks to assess the impact of ESG factors on many issuers in the universe in which the Fund may invest. The adviser’s assessment is based on an analysis of key opportunities and risks across industries to seek to identify financially material issues with respect to the Fund’s investments in securities and ascertain key issues that merit engagement with issuers. These assessments may not be conclusive, and securities of issuers that may be negatively impacted by such factors may be purchased and retained by the Fund, while the Fund may divest or not invest in securities of issuers that may be positively impacted by such factors.
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More About the Funds (continued)
In particular, ESG integration does not change the Fund’s investment objective, exclude specific types of industries or companies or limit the Fund’s investable universe. The Fund is not designed for investors who wish to screen out particular types of companies or investments or are looking for funds that meet specific ESG goals.
The Fund may sell securities if the adviser’s conviction in a security changes, if the issuer’s fundamentals change, or if the adviser believes the security is no longer attractively valued. Investments may also be sold if certain adverse political and economic events occur or if the adviser identifies a security that it believes offers a better investment opportunity.
Additional Investment Strategies
The Funds invest primarily in equity securities as described above. The Funds invest in common stock as a main strategy. Although not generally part of the Funds’ main investment strategies, the Funds may also utilize the following:
preferred securities
warrants and rights to buy common stock
convertible securities
equity securities purchased in initial public offerings
trust or partnership interests
private placement securities, restricted securities and other unregistered securities
ETFs (which are a main investment for the Hedged Equity Laddered Overlay ETF).
In addition to the securities described above, all of these securities may be included as equity securities for the purpose of calculating a Fund’s 80% policy.
Although not main strategies, the Funds’ may also utilize the following, some of which may be equity securities:
REITs, which are pooled vehicles which invest primarily in income-producing real estate or loans related to real estate
affiliated money market funds
securities lending.
In addition to using options and futures as described above, a Fund may also utilize derivatives, including futures contracts, options and swaps, in order to hedge various investments, for risk management. Under certain market conditions, a Fund’s use of derivatives for cash management or other investment management purposes could be significant.
A Fund, except International Growth ETF and International Value ETF, will provide shareholders with at least 60 days’ prior notice of any change in its 80% investment policies as described below.
The frequency with which a Fund buys and sells securities will vary from year to year, depending on market conditions.
ETFs, which are pooled investment vehicles whose ownership interests are purchased and sold on a securities exchange, may be passively or actively managed. Passively managed ETFs generally seek to track the performance of a particular market index, including broad-based market indexes, as well as indexes relating to particular sectors, markets, regions or industries. Actively managed ETFs do not seek to track the performance of a particular market index. Ordinarily, a Fund must not hold more than 3% of the total assets of another ETF or other investment company and must limit its investments in a single ETF to 5% of its total assets and in all ETFs and other investment companies to 10% of its total assets. The Securities and Exchange Commission adopted an exemptive rule that allows any fund to disregard these 3%, 5% and 10% limitations, subject to certain conditions. The price movement of an index-based ETF may not track the underlying index and may result in a loss. In addition, ETFs may trade at a price above (premium) or below (discount) their NAV, especially during periods of significant market volatility or stress, causing investors to pay or receive significantly more or less than the value of the ETF’s underlying portfolio when they purchase or sell their ETF shares, respectively.
NON-FUNDAMENTAL INVESTMENT OBJECTIVES
An investment objective is fundamental if it cannot be changed without the consent of a majority of the outstanding Shares of each
Fund. Each Fund’s investment objective is not fundamental and may be changed without the consent of a majority of the outstanding
Shares of the Fund.
Securities Lending. Each Fund may engage in securities lending to increase its income. Securities lending involves the lending of securities owned by a Fund to financial institutions such as certain broker-dealers in exchange for cash collateral. A Fund will invest cash collateral in one or more money market funds advised by the adviser or its affiliates. The adviser or its affiliates will receive additional compensation from the affiliated money market funds on a Fund’s investment in such money market funds. During the
44  |  J.P. Morgan Exchange-Traded Funds

term of the loan, each Fund is entitled to receive amounts equivalent to distributions paid on the loaned securities as well as the return on the cash collateral investments. Upon termination of the loan, each Fund is required to return the cash collateral to the borrower plus any agreed upon rebate. Cash collateral investments will be subject to market depreciation or appreciation, and a Fund will be responsible for any loss that might result from its investment of cash collateral. If the adviser determines to make securities loans, the value of the securities loaned may not exceed 33 13% of the value of total assets of a Fund. Loan collateral (including any investment of that collateral) is not subject to the percentage limitations regarding a Fund’s investments described elsewhere in this prospectus. Securities lending is not a principal strategy of the Funds.
The Funds also may use other non-principal strategies that are not described herein, but which are described in the Statement of Additional Information.
Investment Risks
There can be no assurance that each Fund will achieve its investment objective.
The main risks associated with investing in each Fund are summarized in the “Risk/Return Summaries” at the front of this prospectus. In addition to each Fund’s main risks, each Fund may be subject to additional risks in connection with investments and strategies used by each Fund from time to time. The table below identifies main risks and some of the additional risks for each Fund.
Each Fund is subject to management risk and may not achieve its objective if the adviser’s expectations regarding particular instruments or markets are not met.
An investment in a Fund or any other fund may not provide a complete investment program. The suitability of an investment in a Fund should be considered based on the investment objective, strategies and risks described in this prospectus, considered in light of all of the other investments in your portfolio, as well as your risk tolerance, financial goals and time horizons. You may want to consult with a financial advisor to determine if a Fund is suitable for you.
The Funds are subject to the main risks designated as such in the table below, any of which may adversely affect a Fund’s net asset value (NAV), market price, performance and ability to meet its investment objective. Each Fund may also be subject to additional risks that are noted in the table below, as well as those that are not described herein but which are described in the Statement of Additional Information.
 
Active China ETF
ActiveBuilders Emerging Markets Equity ETF
Global Select Equity ETF
Hedged Equity Laddered Overlay ETF
International Growth ETF
International Value ETF
Asia Pacific Market Risk
 
 
 
Authorized Participant Concentration Risk
Cash Transactions Risk
 
 
China Region Risk
 
 
 
 
 
China Stock Connect Program Risk
 
 
Main Risks
Additional Risks
March 1, 2024  |  45

More About the Funds (continued)
 
Active China ETF
ActiveBuilders Emerging Markets Equity ETF
Global Select Equity ETF
Hedged Equity Laddered Overlay ETF
International Growth ETF
International Value ETF
Convertible Securities Risk
 
 
 
Currency Risk
 
Cyber Security Risk
Depositary Receipts Risk
 
 
Derivatives Risk
Developed Asia Pacific (ex-Japan) Market Risk
 
 
 
 
 
Equity Market Risk
European Market Risk
 
 
 
Exchange-Traded Fund (ETF) and Other Investment Company Risk
 
 
Foreign Securities and Emerging Markets Risk
 
General Market Risk
Geographic Focus Risk
 
Greater China Region Risk
 
 
 
Growth Investing Risk
 
 
 
 
 
India Risk
 
 
 
 
Industry and Sector Focus Risk
Information Technology Sector Risk
 
 
 
 
 
Initial Public Offering (IPO) Risk
 
 
 
 
Interest Rate Risk
 
 
 
 
 
Large Cap Company Risk
 
 
 
Market Trading Risk
Middle East and Africa Risk
 
 
 
New Fund Risk
Non-Diversified Fund Risk
 
 
 
 
 
Options Risk
 
 
 
 
Preferred Securities Risk
 
 
 
Privately Placed Securities Risk
 
 
 
 
 
Real Estate Securities Risk
 
 
 
Regulatory and Legal Risk
Risk of Investing in Canada
 
 
 
 
Main Risks
Additional Risks
46  |  J.P. Morgan Exchange-Traded Funds

 
Active China ETF
ActiveBuilders Emerging Markets Equity ETF
Global Select Equity ETF
Hedged Equity Laddered Overlay ETF
International Growth ETF
International Value ETF
Risk of Investing in Japan
 
 
 
S&P 500 ETF Risk
 
 
 
 
 
Securities Lending Risk
Smaller Company Risk
Strategy Risk
 
 
 
 
 
Structured Instrument Risk
 
 
 
 
Transactions and Liquidity Risk
Value Investing Risk
 
 
 
 
 
Variable Interest Entities Risk
 
 
Volcker Rule Risk
Main Risks
Additional Risks
Equity Market Risk. The price of equity securities may rise or fall because of changes in the broad market or changes in a company’s financial condition, sometimes rapidly or unpredictably. These price movements may result from factors affecting individual companies, sectors or industries selected for a Fund’s portfolio or the securities market as a whole, such as changes in economic or political conditions. Equity securities are subject to “stock market risk” meaning that stock prices in general (or in particular, the prices of the types of securities in which a Fund invests) may decline over short or extended periods of time. When the value of a Fund’s portfolio securities goes down, your investment in a Fund decreases in value.
General Market Risk. Economies and financial markets throughout the world are becoming increasingly interconnected, which increases the likelihood that events or conditions in one country or region will adversely impact markets or issuers in other countries or regions. Securities in a Fund’s portfolio may underperform in comparison to securities in general financial markets, a particular financial market or other asset classes due to a number of factors, including inflation (or expectations for inflation), deflation (or expectations for deflation), interest rates, global demand for particular products or resources, market instability, financial system instability, debt crises and downgrades, embargoes, tariffs, sanctions and other trade barriers, regulatory events, other governmental trade or market control programs and related geopolitical events. In addition, the value of a Fund’s investments may be negatively affected by the occurrence of global events such as war, terrorism, environmental disasters, natural disasters or events, country instability, and infectious disease epidemics or pandemics.
For example, the outbreak of COVID-19 negatively affected economies, markets and individual companies throughout the world, including those in which a Fund invests. The effects of any future pandemic or other global event to public health and business and market conditions may have a significant negative impact on the performance of a Fund’s investments, increase a Fund’s volatility, negatively impact a Fund’s arbitrage and pricing mechanisms, exacerbate pre-existing political, social and economic risks to a Fund, and negatively impact broad segments of businesses and populations. In addition, governments, their regulatory agencies, or self regulatory organizations have taken or may take actions in response to a pandemic or other global event that affect the instruments
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in which a Fund invests, or the issuers of such instruments, in ways that could have a significant negative impact on a Fund’s investment performance. The ultimate impact of any pandemic or other global event and the extent to which the associated conditions and governmental responses impact a Fund will also depend on future developments, which are highly uncertain, difficult to accurately predict and subject to frequent changes.
Foreign Securities and Emerging Markets Risk. (Active China ETF) Investments in foreign securities (including depositary receipts) are subject to special risks in addition to those of U.S. investments. These risks include political and economic risks, unstable governments, civil conflicts and war, greater volatility, decreased market liquidity, expropriation and nationalization risks, sanctions or other measures by the United States or other governments, currency fluctuations, higher transaction costs, delayed settlement, possible foreign controls on investment, and less stringent investor protection and disclosure standards of foreign markets. The securities markets of many foreign countries are relatively small, with a limited number of companies representing a small number of industries. If foreign securities are denominated and traded in a foreign currency, the value of the Fund’s foreign holdings can be affected by currency exchange rates and exchange control regulations. In certain markets where securities and other instruments are not traded “delivery versus payment,” the Fund may not receive timely payment for securities or other instruments it has delivered or receive delivery of securities paid for and may be subject to increased risk that the counterparty will fail to make payments or delivery when due or default completely. Foreign market trading hours, clearance and settlement procedures, and holiday schedules may limit the Fund's ability to buy and sell securities. Investments in foreign markets may also be adversely affected by governmental actions such as the imposition of capital controls, nationalization of companies or industries, expropriation of assets or the imposition of punitive taxes. The governments of certain countries may prohibit or impose substantial restrictions on foreign investing in their capital markets or in certain sectors or industries. In addition, a foreign government may limit or cause delay in the convertibility or repatriation of its currency which would adversely affect the U.S. dollar value and/or liquidity of investments denominated in that currency. Certain foreign investments may become less liquid in response to market developments or adverse investor perceptions, or become illiquid after purchase by the Fund, particularly during periods of market turmoil. Moreover, the growing interconnectivity of global economies and financial markets has increased the probability that adverse developments and conditions in one country or region will affect the stability of economies and financial markets in other countries or regions. A reduction in trading in securities of issuers located in countries whose economies are heavily dependent upon trading with key partners may have an adverse impact on the Fund’s investments.
Sanctions, or even the threat of sanctions, against one or more foreign countries may result in the decline of the value and liquidity of the securities of those countries or other adverse consequences to those countries’ economies. As a result, sanctions may impair the Fund’s performance or its ability to meet its investment objective. For example, the Fund may be prohibited from investing in securities issued by companies subject to such sanctions. In addition, sanctions may require the Fund to freeze its existing investments related to such foreign companies, prohibiting the Fund from selling or otherwise transacting in these investments. This could negatively impact the Fund’s ability to sell securities or other financial instruments as needed. Sanctions could result in the sanctioned foreign country taking counter measures or retaliatory actions, which may further impair the value or liquidity of the securities of those countries and negatively impact the Fund.
Securities registration, custody, and settlement may in some instances be subject to delays and legal and administrative uncertainties. Foreign investment in the securities markets of certain foreign countries is restricted or controlled to varying degrees. These restrictions or controls may at times limit or preclude investment in certain securities and may increase the costs and expenses of the Fund. In addition, the repatriation of investment income, capital or the proceeds of sales of securities from certain of the countries is controlled under regulations, including in some cases the need for certain advance government notification or authority, and if a deterioration occurs in a country’s balance of payments, the country could impose temporary restrictions on foreign capital remittances. The Fund also could be adversely affected by delays in, or a refusal to grant, any required governmental approval for repatriation, as well as by the application to it of other restrictions on investment.
Events and evolving conditions in certain economies or markets may alter the risks associated with investments tied to countries or regions that historically were perceived as comparatively stable becoming riskier and more volatile. The risks associated with foreign securities are magnified in “emerging markets.” These countries may have relatively unstable governments and less-established market economies than developed countries. Emerging markets may face greater social, economic, regulatory and political uncertainties. These risks make emerging market securities more volatile and less liquid than securities issued in more developed countries and you may sustain sudden, and sometimes substantial, fluctuations in the value of your investments. Certain emerging market countries may be subject to less stringent requirements regarding accounting, auditing, financial reporting and record keeping and therefore, material information related to an investment may not be available or reliable. Additionally, the Fund may have substantial difficulties exercising its legal rights or enforcing a counterparty’s legal obligations in certain jurisdictions outside of the United States, in particular in emerging market countries, which can increase the risks of loss. The Fund’s investments in foreign and
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emerging market securities may also be subject to foreign withholding and/or other taxes, which would decrease the Fund’s yield on those securities. Emerging markets are more likely than developed markets to experience problems with the clearing and settling of trades, as well as the holding of securities by local banks, agents, and depositories.
Foreign Securities and Emerging Markets Risk. Investments in foreign securities (including depositary receipts) are subject to special risks in addition to those of U.S. investments. These risks include political and economic risks, unstable governments, civil conflicts and war, greater volatility, decreased market liquidity, expropriation and nationalization risks, sanctions or other measures by the United States or other governments, currency fluctuations, higher transaction costs, delayed settlement, possible foreign controls on investment, and less stringent investor protection and disclosure standards of foreign markets. The securities markets of many foreign countries are relatively small, with a limited number of companies representing a small number of industries. If foreign securities are denominated and traded in a foreign currency, the value of a Fund’s foreign holdings can be affected by currency exchange rates and exchange control regulations. In certain markets where securities and other instruments are not traded “delivery versus payment,” a Fund may not receive timely payment for securities or other instruments it has delivered or receive delivery of securities paid for and may be subject to increased risk that the counterparty will fail to make payments or delivery when due or default completely.
Foreign market trading hours, clearance and settlement procedures, and holiday schedules may limit a Fund’s ability to buy and sell securities. Investments in foreign markets may also be adversely affected by governmental actions such as the imposition of capital controls, nationalization of companies or industries, expropriation of assets or the imposition of punitive taxes. The governments of certain countries may prohibit or impose substantial restrictions on foreign investing in their capital markets or in certain sectors or industries. In addition, a foreign government may limit or cause delay in the convertibility or repatriation of its currency which would adversely affect the U.S. dollar value and/or liquidity of investments denominated in that currency. Certain foreign investments may become less liquid in response to market developments or adverse investor perceptions, or become illiquid after purchase by a Fund, particularly during periods of market turmoil. Moreover, the growing interconnectivity of global economies and financial markets has increased the probability that adverse developments and conditions in one country or region will affect the stability of economies and financial markets in other countries or regions. A reduction in trading in securities of issuers located in countries whose economies are heavily dependent upon trading with key partners may have an adverse impact on a Fund’s investments.
Securities registration, custody, and settlement may in some instances be subject to delays and legal and administrative uncertainties. Foreign investment in the securities markets of certain foreign countries is restricted or controlled to varying degrees. These restrictions or controls may at times limit or preclude investment in certain securities and may increase the costs and expenses of a Fund. In addition, the repatriation of investment income, capital or the proceeds of sales of securities from certain of the countries is controlled under regulations, including in some cases the need for certain advance government notification or authority, and if a deterioration occurs in a country’s balance of payments, the country could impose temporary restrictions on foreign capital remittances. A Fund also could be adversely affected by delays in, or a refusal to grant, any required governmental approval for repatriation, as well as by the application to it of other restrictions on investment.
Events and evolving conditions in certain economies or markets may alter the risks associated with investments tied to countries or regions that historically were perceived as comparatively stable becoming riskier and more volatile. The risks associated with foreign securities are magnified in “emerging markets.” These countries may have relatively unstable governments and less-established market economies than developed countries. Emerging markets may face greater social, economic, regulatory and political uncertainties. These risks make emerging market securities more volatile and less liquid than securities issued in more developed countries and you may sustain sudden, and sometimes substantial, fluctuations in the value of your investments. Certain emerging market countries may be subject to less stringent requirements regarding accounting, auditing, financial reporting and record keeping and therefore, material information related to an investment may not be available or reliable. Additionally, a Fund may have substantial difficulties exercising its legal rights or enforcing a counterparty’s legal obligations in certain jurisdictions outside of the United States, in particular in emerging market countries, which can increase the risks of loss. A Fund’s investments in foreign and emerging market securities may also be subject to foreign withholding and/or other taxes, which would decrease a Fund’s yield on those securities. Emerging markets are more likely than developed markets to experience problems with the clearing and settling of trades, as well as the holding of securities by local banks, agents, and depositories.
Geographic Focus Risk. In addition to the more general Foreign Securities and Emerging Markets Risk above, a Fund may focus its investments in one or more foreign regions or small groups of countries. As a result, a Fund’s performance may be subject to greater volatility than a more geographically diversified fund and may be subject to the risks facing certain regions.
China Region Risk. (Active China ETF) In addition to the risks listed under “Foreign Securities and Emerging Markets Risk,” investments in Mainland China, Hong Kong and Macau are subject to significant legal, regulatory, monetary and economic risks, as well as the potential for regional and global conflicts, including actions that are contrary to the interests of the U.S. As a result, the Fund may
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not be suitable for all investors and should be used only by investors who understand the risks of investing in securities and instruments economically tied to China. Like all fund investments, investors in the Fund should monitor their investment. An investor in the Fund could potentially lose the full value of their investment.
Investments in Mainland China involve political and legal uncertainties, currency fluctuations and aggressive currency controls, the risk of confiscatory taxation, and nationalization or expropriation of assets, which could adversely affect and significantly diminish the values of the Mainland Chinese companies in which the Fund invests. The Mainland Chinese securities markets are emerging markets characterized by greater price volatility. Mainland China is dominated by the one-party rule of the Communist Party, and the Mainland Chinese government exercises significant control over Mainland China’s economic growth. There is the potential of increased tariffs and restrictions on trade between the United States and Mainland China. An increase in tariffs or trade restrictions, or even the threat of such developments, could lead to a significant reduction in international trade, which could have a negative impact on Mainland Chinese companies and a commensurately negative impact on the Fund.
The political reunification of Mainland China and Taiwan, over which Mainland China continues to claim sovereignty, is a highly complex issue. There is the potential for future political, military or economic disturbances that may have an adverse impact on the values of the Fund’s investments in Mainland China and elsewhere, or make certain Fund investments impractical or impossible. Any escalation of hostility between Mainland China and Taiwan would likely have a significant adverse impact on the value and liquidity of the Fund’s investments in both Mainland China and elsewhere, causing substantial investment losses for the Fund.
Hong Kong is a Special Administrative Region of the People’s Republic of China. Since Hong Kong reverted to Chinese sovereignty in 1997, it has been governed by the Basic Law. Under the Basic Law, Hong Kong was guaranteed a high degree of autonomy in certain matters, including economic matters, until 2047. Attempts by the government of Mainland China to exert greater control over Hong Kong’s economic, political or legal structures or its existing social policy, could negatively affect investor confidence in Hong Kong (as has been the case previously during certain periods), which in turn could negatively affect markets and business performance.
The growing interconnectivity of global economies and financial markets has increased the possibility that conditions in one country or region might adversely impact the issuers of securities in a different country or region. In particular, the adoption or continuation of protectionist trade policies by one or more countries, or a slowdown in the U.S. economy, could lead to a decrease in demand for products in Greater China and reduced flows of private capital to these economies.
Brokerage commissions and other fees may be higher for securities traded in Mainland Chinese markets than more developed markets.
At times, there is a high correlation among the markets in the Greater China region. Political, social or economic disruptions in the region, including conflicts and currency devaluations, even in countries in which the Fund is not invested, may adversely affect security values in other countries in the region and thus the Fund’s holdings.
Greater China Region Risk. In addition to the risks listed under “Foreign Securities and Emerging Markets Risk,” investments in Mainland China, Hong Kong and Taiwan are subject to significant legal, regulatory, monetary and economic risks, as well as the potential for regional and global conflicts, including actions that are contrary to the interests of the U.S.
Investments in Mainland China involve political and legal uncertainties, currency fluctuations and aggressive currency controls, the risk of confiscatory taxation, and nationalization or expropriation of assets, which could adversely affect and significantly diminish the values of the Mainland Chinese companies in which a Fund invests. The Mainland Chinese securities markets are emerging markets characterized by greater price volatility. Mainland China is dominated by the one-party rule of the Communist Party, and the Mainland Chinese government exercises significant control over Mainland China’s economic growth. There is the potential of increased tariffs and restrictions on trade between the United States and Mainland China. An increase in tariffs or trade restrictions, or even the threat of such developments, could lead to a significant reduction in international trade, which could have a negative impact on Mainland Chinese companies and a commensurately negative impact on a Fund.
The political reunification of Mainland China and Taiwan, over which Mainland China continues to claim sovereignty, is a highly complex issue. There is the potential for future political, military or economic disturbances that may have an adverse impact on the values of a Fund’s investments in Mainland China and elsewhere, or make certain Fund investments impractical or impossible. Any escalation of hostility between Mainland China and Taiwan would likely have a significant adverse impact on the value and liquidity of a Fund’s investments in both Mainland China and elsewhere, causing substantial investment losses for the Fund.
Hong Kong is a Special Administrative Region of the People’s Republic of China. Since Hong Kong reverted to Chinese sovereignty in 1997, it has been governed by the Basic Law. Under the Basic Law, Hong Kong was guaranteed a high degree of autonomy in certain matters, including economic matters, until 2047. Attempts by the government of Mainland China to exert greater control over Hong Kong’s economic, political or legal structures or its existing social policy, could negatively affect investor confidence in Hong Kong (as has been the case previously during certain periods), which in turn could negatively affect markets and business performance.
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The growing interconnectivity of global economies and financial markets has increased the possibility that conditions in one country or region might adversely impact the issuers of securities in a different country or region. In particular, the adoption or continuation of protectionist trade policies by one or more countries, or a slowdown in the U.S. economy, could lead to a decrease in demand for products in Greater China and reduced flows of private capital to these economies.
Brokerage commissions and other fees may be higher for securities traded in Mainland Chinese and Taiwanese markets than more developed markets. At times, there is a high correlation among the markets in the Greater China region. Political, social or economic disruptions in the region, including conflicts and currency devaluations, even in countries in which a Fund is not invested, may adversely affect security values in other countries in the region and thus a Fund’s holdings.
Variable Interest Entities Risk. Chinese operating companies sometimes rely on VIE structures to raise capital from non-Chinese investors, even though such arrangements are not formally recognized under Chinese law. In a VIE structure, a Mainland China-based operating company establishes an entity (typically offshore) that enters into service and other contracts with the Mainland Chinese company designed to provide economic exposure to the company. The offshore entity then issues exchange-traded shares that are sold to the public, including non-Chinese investors (such as a Fund). Shares of the offshore entity are not equity ownership interests in the Mainland Chinese operating company and therefore the ability of the offshore entity to control the activities at the Mainland Chinese company are limited and the Mainland Chinese company may engage in activities that negatively impact investment value.
Under a VIE structure, a Fund will typically have little or no ability to influence the Mainland China-based operating company through proxy voting or other means because it is not a Mainland Chinese company owner/shareholder. The VIE structure is designed to provide the offshore entity (and in turn, investors in the entity) with economic exposure to the Mainland Chinese company that replicates equity ownership, without actual equity ownership of the Mainland Chinese operating company. VIE structures are used due to Mainland Chinese government prohibitions on foreign ownership of companies in certain industries and it is not clear that the contracts are enforceable or that the structures will otherwise work as intended. There may also be conflicts of interest between the legal owners of the Mainland Chinese company and non-Chinese investors (such as a Fund).
Although the China Securities Regulatory Commission published that they do not object to the use of VIE structures for Mainland Chinese Companies to raise capital from non-Chinese investors, there is no guarantee that the Mainland Chinese government or a Mainland Chinese regulator will not otherwise interfere with the operation of VIE structures. Intervention by the Mainland Chinese government with respect to VIE structures could adversely affect the Mainland Chinese operating company’s performance, the enforceability of the offshore entity’s contractual arrangements with the Mainland Chinese company and the value of the offshore entity’s shares. Under extreme circumstances, China might prohibit the use of VIE structures, or sever their ability to transmit economic and governance rights to non-Chinese investors. It remains unclear whether the Mainland China government will withdraw its implicit acceptance of the VIE structure, or whether any new laws, rules or regulations relating to VIE structures will be adopted or, if adopted, what impact they would have on the interests of non-Chinese investors (such as a Fund). Further, if the Mainland Chinese government determines that the agreements establishing the VIE structure do not comply with Mainland Chinese law and regulations, including those related to prohibitions on foreign ownership, the Mainland Chinese government could subject the Mainland Chinese company to penalties, revocation of business and operating licenses or forfeiture of ownership interests. The offshore entity’s control over the Mainland Chinese company may also be jeopardized if certain legal formalities are not observed in connection with the agreements, if the agreements are breached or if the agreements are otherwise determined not to be enforceable.
If any of the foregoing were to occur, a non-Chinese investor may have little or no legal recourse and the market value of a Fund’s associated portfolio holdings would likely fall, causing substantial investment losses for the Fund.
In addition, Mainland Chinese companies listed on U.S. exchanges, including American Depositary Receipts and companies that rely on VIE structures, may be delisted if they do not meet U.S. accounting standards and auditor oversight requirements. Delisting could significantly decrease the liquidity and value of the securities of these companies, decrease the ability of a Fund to invest in such securities and increase the cost of the Fund if it is required to seek alternative markets in which to invest in such securities.
China Stock Connect Programs Risk. The universe of A-share issues currently available via the Shanghai-Hong Kong Stock Connect program or the Shenzhen-Hong Kong Stock Connect Program (the Programs) in Mainland China to a Fund may be limited as compared with the universe of equity securities available in other markets. There are significant risks inherent in investing in China A-shares through the Programs. There may be a lower level of liquidity in the China A-share markets accessed through the Programs, which are relatively smaller in terms of both combined total market value and the number of A-shares which are available for investments compared to other markets. This could potentially lead to severe price volatility in China A-shares. Investments in China A-shares are heavily regulated and the recoupment and repatriation of assets invested in China A-shares is subject to restrictions by the Mainland Chinese government. In addition, investments in China A-shares through the Programs are subject to trading, clearance
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and settlement procedures that could increase the risk of loss to a Fund and/or affect a Fund’s ability to effectively pursue its investment strategy, such as the prohibition on same day (turnaround) trading through the Programs. China A-shares currently eligible for trading under a Program may also lose such designation. Further, all China A-shares trades must be settled in renminbi (RMB), which requires a Fund to have timely access to a reliable supply of RMB in Hong Kong, which cannot be assured.
Asia Pacific Market Risk. The economies in the Asia Pacific region are in all stages of economic development and may be intertwined. The small size of securities markets and the low trading volume in some countries in the Asia Pacific Region may lead to a lack of liquidity. Also, some Asia Pacific economies and financial markets have been extremely volatile in recent years. Many of the countries in the region are developing, both politically and economically. They may have relatively unstable governments and economies based on only a few commodities or industries. The share prices of companies in the region tend to be volatile and there is a significant possibility of loss. Also, some companies in the region may have less established product markets or a small management group and they may be more vulnerable to political or economic conditions, like nationalization. In addition, some countries have restricted the flow of money in and out of the country.
Certain of the currencies in the Asia Pacific region have experienced extreme volatility relative to the U.S. dollar. For example, Thailand, Indonesia, the Philippines and South Korea have had currency crises and have sought help from the International Monetary Fund. Holding securities in currencies that are devalued (or in companies whose revenues are substantially in currencies that are devalued) will likely decrease the value of a Fund’s holdings.
The trading volume on some Asia Pacific region stock exchanges is much lower than in the United States, and Asia Pacific region securities of some companies are less liquid and more volatile than similar U.S. securities. In addition, brokerage commissions on regional stock exchanges are fixed and are generally higher than the negotiated commissions in the United States. The imposition of tariffs or other trade barriers, or a downturn in the economy of a significant trading partner could adversely impact Asia Pacific companies. If a Fund concentrates in the Asia Pacific region, the Fund’s performance may be more volatile than that of a fund that invests globally. If Asia Pacific securities fall out of favor, it may cause a Fund that concentrates in the Asia Pacific region to underperform funds that do not concentrate in the Asia Pacific region.
Developed Asia Pacific (ex-Japan) Market Risk. Investments in securities of issuers in developed Asia Pacific countries (ex-Japan) involve risks that are specific to the Asia Pacific region, including certain legal, regulatory, political and economic risks. Certain Asia Pacific countries have experienced expropriation and/or nationalization of assets, political and social instability and armed conflict. Some economies in this region are dependent on a range of commodities and are strongly affected by international commodity prices. The market for securities in this region may also be directly influenced by the flow of international capital, and by the economic and market conditions of neighboring countries. Some developed Asia Pacific economies are highly dependent on trade and economic conditions in other countries. Although a Fund only intends to invest in developed countries in the Asia Pacific region, the Fund may be impacted by risks associated with investing in developing and emerging market countries in the Asia Pacific region because the economies of countries (including developed countries) in the Asia Pacific region may be heavily dependent on one another.
India Risk. Government actions, bureaucratic obstacles and inconsistent economic reform within the Indian government have had a significant effect on the economy and could adversely affect market conditions, economic growth and the profitability of private enterprises. Global economic developments may inhibit the flow of foreign capital on which India is dependent to sustain its growth. Large portions of many Indian companies remain in the hands of individuals and corporate governance standards of Indian companies may be weaker and less transparent, which may increase the risk of loss and unequal treatment of investors. Investments in Indian securities may be limited or prevented, at times, due to the limits on foreign ownership imposed by the Reserve Bank of India. Investments in India are subject to risks presented by investments in an emerging market country, including liquidity risk, which may result in extreme volatility in the prices of Indian securities. Religious, cultural and military disputes persist in India, and between India and Pakistan (as well as between sectarian groups within each country). In addition, the Indian economy could be adversely impacted by natural disasters and acts of terrorism. Both India and Pakistan have tested nuclear arms, and the threat of deployment of such weapons could hinder development of the Indian economy, and escalating tensions could impact the broader region.
European Market Risk. A Fund’s performance will be affected by political, social and economic conditions in Europe, such as growth of the economic output (the gross national product), the rate of inflation, the rate at which capital is reinvested into European economies, the success of governmental actions to reduce budget deficits, the resource self-sufficiency of European countries and interest and monetary exchange rates between European countries. European financial markets may experience volatility due to concerns about high government debt levels, credit rating downgrades, rising unemployment, the future of the euro as a common currency, possible restructuring of government debt and other government measures responding to those concerns, and fiscal and monetary controls imposed on member countries of the European Union. The risk of investing in Europe may be heightened due to steps taken by the United Kingdom to exit the European Union. On January 31, 2020, the United Kingdom officially withdrew from the European Union. As of May 1, 2021, the EU-UK Trade and Cooperation Agreement (TCA) governs certain aspects of the European
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Union’s and the United Kingdom’s relationship, many of which are still to be determined, including those related to financial services. Notwithstanding the TCA, significant uncertainty remains in the market regarding the ramifications of the United Kingdom’s withdrawal from the European Union. The impact on the United Kingdom and European economies and the broader global economy could be significant, resulting in increased volatility and illiquidity, currency fluctuations, impacts on arrangements for trading and on other existing cross-border cooperation arrangements (whether economic, tax, fiscal, legal, regulatory or otherwise), and in potentially lower growth for companies in the United Kingdom, Europe and globally, which could have an adverse effect on the value of a Fund’s investments. In addition, if one or more other countries were to exit the European Union or abandon the use of the euro as a currency, the value of investments tied to those countries or the euro could decline significantly and unpredictably.
Risk of Investing in Japan. The Japanese economy may be subject to economic, political and social instability, which could have a negative impact on Japanese securities. In the past, Japan’s economic growth rate has remained relatively low, and it may remain low in the future. Furthermore, the Japanese economic growth rate could be impacted by Bank of Japan monetary policies, rising interest rates, tax increases, budget deficits, consumer confidence and volatility in the Japanese yen. At times, the Japanese economy has been adversely impacted by government intervention and protectionism, changes in its labor market, and an unstable financial services sector. International trade, government support of the financial services sector and other troubled sectors, government policy, natural disasters, an aging demographic and declining population and/or geopolitical developments associated with actual or potential conflicts with one or more countries in Asia could significantly affect the Japanese economy. Strained foreign relations with neighboring countries (China, South Korea, North Korea and Russia) may not only negatively impact the Japanese economy but also the geographic region as well as globally. A significant portion of Japan’s trade is conducted with developing nations and can be affected by conditions in these nations or by currency fluctuations. Japan is an island state with few natural resources and limited land area and is reliant on imports for its commodity needs. Any fluctuations or shortages in the commodity markets could have a negative impact on the Japanese economy. In addition, Japan's economy has in the past and could in the future be significantly impacted by natural disasters.
Risk of Investing in Canada. The United States is Canada’s largest trading and investment partner, and the Canadian economy is significantly affected by developments in the U.S. economy. The Canadian economy is also dependent upon external trade with other key trading partners, including Mexico, China or the United Kingdom. In addition, Canada is a large supplier of natural resources (e.g., oil, natural gas and agricultural products). As a result, the Canadian economy is sensitive to fluctuations in certain commodity prices. Any negative changes in commodity markets that may be due to changes in supply and demand for commodities, market events, regulatory developments or other factors that a Fund cannot control could have an adverse impact on the Canadian economy. The market value of securities issued by companies in the energy sector may decline for many reasons, including, among others, changes in energy prices, energy supply and demand, government regulations, energy conservation efforts and potential civil liabilities.
Middle East and Africa Risk. Certain countries in the region are in early stages of development. As a result, there may be a high concentration of market capitalization and trading volume in a small number of issuers representing a limited number of industries, as well as a high concentration of investors and financial intermediaries. Brokers may be fewer in number and less well capitalized than brokers in more developed regions. Certain economies in the region depend to a significant degree upon exports of commodities and are vulnerable to changes in commodity prices, which in turn may be affected by a variety of factors. In addition, certain governments in the region have exercised substantial influence over the private sector, including ownership or control of companies. Governmental actions in the future could have a significant economic impact. In particular, changes in investment policies or shifts in the prevailing political climate could result in the introduction of changes to government regulations with respect to price controls, export and import controls, income and other taxes, foreign ownership restrictions, foreign exchange and currency controls and labor and welfare benefit policies. Unexpected changes in these policies or regulations could lead to increased investment, operating or compliance expenses. Any such changes could have a material adverse effect on a Fund and the adviser’s business, financial condition and results of operations. Certain countries in the region may be affected by political instability, armed conflict, territorial disputes, historical animosities, regional instability, terrorist activities and religious, ethnic and/or socio-economic unrest. Such developments could have a negative effect on economic growth and could result in significant disruptions in the securities markets, including securities held by a Fund. Specific country risks that may have a material adverse effect on a Fund’s business, financial condition and results of operations are: potential political instability, riots or other forms of civil disturbance or violence; war, terrorism, invasion, rebellion or revolution; government interventions, including expropriation or nationalization of assets, increased protectionism and the introduction of tariffs or subsidies; changing fiscal and regulatory regimes; arbitrary or inconsistent government action; inflation in local economies; cancellation, nullification or unenforceability of contractual rights; and underdeveloped industrial and economic infrastructure. In particular, since late 2010, there have been significant civil disturbances and events resulting from political turmoil affecting several countries in the Middle East and Africa region (MENA Region), which to date have led to the collapse, or near collapse, of the political regimes of Syria, Tunisia, Egypt and Libya. There are on-going protests in other countries in the MENA Region, including strikes, demonstrations, marches and rallies. In addition, since late 2011 tensions between western nations and Iran in respect of Iran’s nuclear program have escalated, with Iran threatening to block the Strait of Hormuz and
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western nations implementing more severe economic sanctions against Iran. Such continuing instability and unrest in the MENA Region may significantly impact economies in the region. Such impacts could occur through a lower flow of foreign direct investment into the region, the outflow of expatriate residents or capital, or increased volatility in the global and regional financial markets. Certain Middle Eastern and African countries have currencies pegged to the U.S. dollar, which, if abandoned, could cause sudden and significant currency adjustments, which could impact a Fund’s investment returns in those countries. The legal systems, and the unpredictability thereof, in certain countries in the region also may have an adverse impact on a Fund and may expose the Fund to significant or unlimited liabilities. Investment in certain countries in the region by a Fund may be restricted or prohibited under applicable regulation, and the Fund, as a foreign investor, may be required to obtain approvals and may have to invest on less advantageous terms (including price) than nationals. A Fund’s investments in securities of a country in the region may be subject to economic sanctions or other government restrictions, which may negatively impact the value or liquidity of the Fund’s investments. Investments in the region may adversely impact the operations of a Fund through the delay of the Fund’s ability to exercise its rights as a security holder. Substantial limitations may exist in the region with respect to a Fund’s ability to repatriate investment income, capital gains or its investments. Securities which are subject to material legal restrictions on repatriation of assets will be considered illiquid securities by a Fund and subject to the limitations on illiquid investments.
Depositary Receipts Risk. A Fund’s investments may take the form of depositary receipts, including unsponsored depositary receipts. Unsponsored depositary receipts may not provide as much information about the underlying issuer and may not carry the same voting privileges as sponsored depositary receipts. Unsponsored depositary receipts are issued by one or more depositaries in response to market demand, but without a formal agreement with the company that issues the underlying securities.
Large Cap Company Risk. If a Fund invests in large cap company securities, it may underperform other funds during periods when a Fund’s large cap securities are out of favor.
Smaller Company Risk. (Small Cap Company and Mid Cap Company Risks) Investments in securities of smaller companies (mid cap and small cap companies) may be riskier, less liquid, more volatile and more vulnerable to economic, market and industry changes than securities of larger, more established companies. The securities of smaller companies may trade less frequently and in smaller volumes than securities of larger companies. As a result, changes in the price of securities issued by such companies may be more sudden or erratic than the prices of securities of large capitalization companies, especially over the short term. These risks are higher for small cap companies.
Derivatives Risk. A Fund may use derivatives in connection with its investment strategies. Derivatives may be riskier than other types of investments because they may be more sensitive to changes in economic or market conditions than other types of investments and could result in losses that significantly exceed a Fund’s original investment. Derivatives are subject to the risk that changes in the value of a derivative may not correlate perfectly with the underlying asset, rate or index. The use of derivatives may not be successful, resulting in losses to a Fund, and the cost of such strategies may reduce the Fund’s returns. Certain derivatives also expose a Fund to counterparty risk (the risk that the derivative counterparty will not fulfill its contractual obligations), including credit risk of the derivative counterparty. In addition, a Fund may use derivatives for non-hedging purposes, which increases the Fund’s potential for loss. Certain derivatives are synthetic instruments that attempt to replicate the performance of certain reference assets. With regard to such derivatives, a Fund does not have a claim on the reference assets and is subject to enhanced counterparty risk. Derivatives may not perform as expected, so a Fund may not realize the intended benefits. When used for hedging, the change in value of a derivative may not correlate as expected with the security or other risk being hedged. In addition, given their complexity, derivatives expose a Fund to risks of mispricing or improper valuation.
Investing in derivatives will result in a form of leverage. Leverage involves special risks. A Fund may be more volatile than if the Fund had not been leveraged because the leverage tends to exaggerate any effect on the value of the Fund’s portfolio securities. Registered investment companies are limited in their ability to engage in derivative transactions.
The possible lack of a liquid secondary market for derivatives and the resulting inability of a Fund to sell or otherwise close a derivatives position could expose the Fund to losses and could make derivatives more difficult for the Fund to value accurately. Derivatives also can expose a Fund to derivative liquidity risk, which includes risks involving the liquidity demands that derivatives can create to make payments of margin, collateral, or settlement payments to counterparties, legal risk, which includes the risk of loss resulting from insufficient or unenforceable contractual documentation, insufficient capacity or authority of a Fund’s counterparty and operational risk, which includes documentation or settlement issues, system failures, inadequate controls and human error.
A Fund’s transactions in currency forwards, futures contracts and other derivatives could also affect the amount, timing and character of distributions to shareholders, which may result in the Fund realizing more short-term capital gain and ordinary income subject to tax at ordinary income tax rates than it would if it did not engage in such transactions, which may adversely impact the Fund’s after-tax return.
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WHAT IS A DERIVATIVE?
Derivatives are securities or contracts (for example, futures and options) that derive their value from the performance of underlying
assets or securities.
Structured Instrument Risk. A Fund may invest in instruments that have similar economic characteristics to equity securities, such as participation notes or other structured instruments that may be developed from time to time (structured instruments). Structured instruments are notes that are issued by banks, broker-dealers or their affiliates and are designed to offer a return linked to a particular underlying equity or market.
If the structured instrument were held to maturity, the issuer would pay to the purchaser the underlying instrument’s value at maturity with any necessary adjustments. The holder of a structured instrument that is linked to a particular underlying security or instrument may be entitled to receive dividends paid in connection with that underlying security or instrument, but typically does not receive voting rights as it would if it directly owned the underlying security or instrument. Structured instruments have transaction costs. In addition, there can be no assurance that there will be a trading market for a structured instrument or that the trading price of a structured instrument will equal the underlying value of the security, instrument or market that it seeks to replicate. Unlike a direct investment in equity securities, structured instruments typically involve a term or expiration date, potentially increasing a Fund’s turnover rate, transaction costs and tax liability.
Due to transfer restrictions, the secondary markets on which a structured instrument is traded may be less liquid than the market for other securities, or may be completely illiquid, which may expose a Fund to risks of mispricing or improper valuation. Structured instruments typically constitute general unsecured contractual obligations of the banks, broker-dealers or their relevant affiliates that issue them, which subjects a Fund to counterparty risk (and this risk may be amplified if the Fund purchases structured instruments from only a small number of issuers). Structured instruments also have the same risks associated with a direct investment in the underlying securities, instruments or markets that they seek to replicate.
Currency Risk. (Active China ETF) Changes in foreign currency exchange rates will affect the value of the Fund’s securities and may affect the price of the Fund’s Shares. Generally, when the value of the U.S. dollar rises in value relative to a foreign currency, an investment in that country loses value because that currency is worth less in U.S. dollars. Currency exchange rates may fluctuate significantly over short periods of time for a number of reasons, including changes in interest rates. Devaluation of a currency by a country’s government or banking authority also will have a significant impact on the value of any investments denominated in that currency. Currency markets generally are not as regulated as securities markets, may be riskier than other types of investments and may increase the volatility of the Fund. The Fund may engage in various strategies to hedge against currency risk. These strategies may consist of use of forward currency contracts including non-deliverable forward contracts and foreign currency futures contracts. To the extent the Fund enters into such transactions in markets other than in the United States, the Fund may be subject to certain currency, settlement, liquidity, trading and other risks similar to those described in this prospectus with respect to the Fund’s investments in foreign securities. There can be no assurance that the Fund’s hedging activities will be effective, and the Fund will incur costs in connection with the hedging. Currency hedging may limit the Fund’s return if the relative values of currencies change. Furthermore, the Fund may only engage in hedging activities from time to time and may not necessarily be engaging in hedging activities when movements in currency exchange rates occur.
Mainland China may utilize formal or informal currency-exchange controls or “capital controls.” Capital controls may impose restrictions on the Fund’s ability to repatriate investments or income. Such controls may also affect the value of the Fund’s holdings.
Currency Risk. Changes in foreign currency exchange rates will affect the value of a Fund’s securities and may affect the price of a Fund’s Shares. Generally, when the value of the U.S. dollar rises in value relative to a foreign currency, an investment in that country loses value because that currency is worth less in U.S. dollars. Currency exchange rates may fluctuate significantly over short periods of time for a number of reasons, including changes in interest rates. Devaluation of a currency by a country’s government or banking authority also will have a significant impact on the value of any investments denominated in that currency. Currency markets generally are not as regulated as securities markets, may be riskier than other types of investments and may increase the volatility of a Fund. A Fund may engage in various strategies to hedge against currency risk. These strategies may consist of use of forward currency contracts including non-deliverable forward contracts and foreign currency futures contracts. To the extent a Fund enters into such transactions in markets other than in the United States, a Fund may be subject to certain currency, settlement, liquidity, trading and other risks similar to those described in this prospectus with respect to a Fund’s investments in foreign securities. There can be no assurance that a Fund’s hedging activities will be effective, and a Fund will incur costs in connection with the hedging. Currency hedging may limit a Fund’s return if the relative values of currencies change. Furthermore, a Fund may only engage in hedging activities from time to time and may not necessarily be engaging in hedging activities when movements in currency exchange rates occur.
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More About the Funds (continued)
Industry and Sector Focus Risk. At times, a Fund may increase the relative emphasis of its investments in a particular industry or sector. The prices of securities of issuers in a particular industry or sector may be more susceptible to fluctuations due to changes in economic or business conditions, government regulations, availability of basic resources or supplies, contagion risk within a particular industry or sector or to other industries or sectors, or other events that affect that industry or sector more than securities of issuers in other industries and sectors. To the extent that a Fund increases the relative emphasis of its investments in a particular industry or sector, the value of a Fund’s Shares may fluctuate in response to events affecting that industry or sector.
Market Trading Risk
Risk that Shares of a Fund May Trade at Prices Other Than NAV. Shares of a Fund may trade on the Exchange at prices above, below or at their most recent NAV. The NAV of a Fund’s Shares, which is calculated at the end of each business day, will generally fluctuate with changes in the market value of the Fund’s holdings. The market prices of the Shares will also fluctuate, in some cases materially, in accordance with changes in NAV and the intraday value of a Fund’s holdings, as well as the relative supply of and demand for the Shares on the Exchange. Differences between secondary market prices of Shares and the intraday value of a Fund’s holdings may be due largely to supply and demand forces in the secondary market, which may not be the same forces as those influencing prices for securities held by the Fund at a particular time.
Given the fact that Shares can be created and redeemed by authorized participants in Creation Units, the adviser believes that large discounts or premiums to the NAV of Shares should not be sustained in the long-term. While the creation/ redemption feature is designed to make it likely that Shares normally will trade close to the value of a Fund’s holdings, market prices are not expected to correlate exactly to a Fund’s NAV due to timing reasons, supply and demand imbalances and other factors. In addition, disruptions to creations and redemptions, adverse developments impacting market makers, authorized participants or other market participants, or high market volatility may result in market prices for Shares of a Fund that differ significantly from its NAV or to the intraday value of the Fund’s holdings. As a result of these factors, among others, a Fund’s Shares may trade at a premium or discount to NAV, especially during periods of significant market volatility.
Given the nature of the relevant markets for certain of the securities for a Fund, Shares may trade at a larger premium or discount to NAV than shares of other kinds of ETFs. In addition, the securities held by such Funds may be traded in markets that close at a different time than the Exchange. Liquidity in those securities may be reduced after the applicable closing times. Accordingly, during the time when the Exchange is open but after the applicable market closing, fixing or settlement times, bid/ask spreads and the resulting premium or discount to the Shares’ NAV may widen.
Cost of Buying or Selling Shares. When you buy or sell Shares of a Fund through a broker, you will likely incur a brokerage commission or other charges imposed by brokers. In addition, the market price of Shares, like the price of any exchange-traded security, includes a “bid-ask spread” charged by the market makers or other participants that trade the particular security. The spread of a Fund’s Shares varies over time based on the Fund’s trading volume and market liquidity and may increase if the Fund’s trading volume, the spread of the Fund’s underlying securities, or market liquidity decrease. In times of severe market disruption, including when trading of a Fund’s holdings may be halted, the bid-ask spread may increase significantly. This means that Shares may trade at a discount to a Fund’s NAV, and the discount is likely to be greatest during significant market volatility.
Short Selling Risk. Shares of a Fund, similar to shares of other issuers listed on a stock exchange, may be sold short and are therefore subject to the risk of increased volatility and price decreases associated with being sold short.
No Guarantee of Active Trading Market Risk. While Shares are listed on the Exchange, there can be no assurance that active trading markets for the Shares will be maintained by market makers or by authorized participants. JPMorgan Distribution Services, Inc., the distributor of a Fund’s Shares (the Distributor), does not maintain a secondary market in the Shares.
Trading Issues Risk. Trading in Shares on the Exchange may be halted due to market conditions or for reasons that, in the view of the Exchange, make trading in Shares inadvisable. In addition, trading in Shares on the Exchange is subject to trading halts caused by extraordinary market volatility pursuant to the Exchange “circuit breaker” rules. If a trading halt or unanticipated early closing of the Exchange occurs, a shareholder may be unable to purchase or sell Shares of a Fund.
There can be no assurance that the requirements of the Exchange necessary to maintain the listing of a Fund will continue to be met or will remain unchanged.
Authorized Participant Concentration Risk. Only an authorized participant may engage in creation or redemption transactions directly with a Fund. Each Fund has a limited number of intermediaries that act as authorized participants and none of these authorized participants is or will be obligated to engage in creation or redemption transactions. To the extent that these intermediaries exit the business or are unable to or choose not to proceed with creation and/or redemption orders with respect to a Fund and no other authorized participant creates or redeems, Shares may trade at a discount to NAV and possibly face trading halts and/or delisting.
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Exchange-Traded Fund (ETF) and Other Investment Company Risk. A Fund may invest in shares of other investment companies and ETFs. Shareholders bear both their proportionate share of a Fund’s expenses and similar expenses of the underlying investment company or ETF when the Fund invests in shares of another investment company or ETF. A Fund is subject to the risks associated with the ETF or investment company’s investments. The price movement of an index-based ETF may not track the underlying index and may result in a loss. In addition, ETFs may trade at a price above (premium) or below (discount) their NAV, especially during periods of significant market volatility or stress, causing investors to pay or receive significantly more or less than the value of the ETF’s underlying portfolio when they purchase or sell their ETF shares, respectively. Certain ETFs traded on exchanges may be thinly traded and experience large spreads between the “ask” price quoted by a seller and the “bid” price offered by a buyer.
Cash Transactions Risk. Unlike certain ETFs, a Fund effects its creations and redemptions partially for cash, rather than in-kind securities. As a result, an investment in a Fund may be less tax-efficient than an investment in an ETF that distributes portfolio securities entirely in-kind. Other ETFs generally are able to make in-kind redemptions and avoid realizing gains in connection with transactions designed to raise cash to meet redemption requests. Because a Fund currently intends to effect a portion of redemptions for cash, rather than in-kind distributions, it may be required to sell portfolio securities in order to obtain the cash needed to distribute redemption proceeds, which also involves transaction costs. If a Fund recognizes gain on these sales, this generally will cause the Fund to recognize gain it might not otherwise have recognized if it were to distribute portfolio securities in-kind, or to recognize such gain sooner than would otherwise be required. A Fund generally intends to distribute these gains to shareholders to avoid being taxed on this gain at the Fund level and otherwise comply with the special tax rules that apply to it. This strategy may cause shareholders to be subject to tax on gains they would not otherwise be subject to, or at an earlier date than, if they had made an investment in a different ETF.
Real Estate Securities Risk. The value of real estate securities in general, and REITs in particular, are subject to the same risks as direct investments in real estate and mortgages, which include, but are not limited to, sensitivity to changes in real estate values and property taxes, interest rate risk, tax and regulatory risk, fluctuations in rent schedules and operating expenses, adverse changes in local, regional or general economic conditions, including reduced demand for commercial and office space as well as increased maintenance or tenant improvement costs to convert properties for other uses, default risk of tenants and borrowers, the financial condition of tenants, buyers and sellers, and the inability to re-lease space on attractive terms or to obtain mortgage financing on a timely basis or at all, unfavorable changes in zoning, building, environmental and other laws, the need for unanticipated renovations and unexpected increases in the cost of energy and environmental factors. Furthermore, a REIT could fail to qualify for tax-free pass-through of its income under the Internal Revenue Code or fail to maintain its exemption from registration under the Investment Company Act of 1940 (1940 Act), which could produce adverse economic consequences for the REIT and its investors, including a Fund.
The underlying mortgage loans may be subject to the risks of default or of prepayments that occur earlier or later than expected, and such loans may also include so-called “sub-prime” mortgages. The value of REITs will also rise and fall in response to the management skill and creditworthiness of the issuer. In particular, the value of these securities may decline when interest rates rise and will also be affected by the real estate market and by the management of the underlying properties. REITs may be more volatile and/or more illiquid than other types of equity securities. Each Fund will indirectly bear its proportionate share of expenses, including management fees, paid by each REIT in which it invests in addition to the expenses of a Fund.
In addition, certain of the companies in which a Fund intends to invest may have developed or commenced development on properties and may develop additional properties in the future. Real estate development involves significant risks in addition to those involved in the ownership and operation of established properties, including the risks that financing, if needed, may not be available on favorable terms for development projects, that construction may not be completed on schedule (resulting in increased debt service expense and construction costs), that estimates of the costs of construction may prove to be inaccurate and that properties may not be leased, rented or operated on profitable terms and therefore will fail to perform in accordance with expectations. As a result, the value of a Fund’s investment may decrease in value. Real estate securities have limited diversification and are, therefore, subject to risks inherent in operating and financing a limited number of projects. Real estate securities are also subject to heavy cash flow dependency and defaults by borrowers or tenants.
Non-Diversified Fund Risk. If a Fund is non-diversified, it may invest a greater percentage of its assets in a particular issuer or group of issuers than a diversified fund would. This increased concentration in fewer issuers may result in a Fund’s Shares being more sensitive to economic results of those issuing the securities. The value of a Fund’s Shares may also be more volatile than the value of a Fund which invests in more securities.
Strategy Risk. (Hedged Equity Laddered Overlay ETF) The “laddered” component of the strategy is designed to mitigate potential risks associated with only one hedge period, but there is no guarantee that the adviser will be able to do so successfully. The Fund’s investment strategies may not always provide greater market protection than other equity instruments, particularly in rising equity
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More About the Funds (continued)
markets when the Fund is expected to underperform traditional long-only equity strategies. In addition, as a result of the structure of the options overlay strategy, the Fund is not expected to provide market protection during times when the market is down slightly; during such periods, the Fund is expected to perform in line with broad equity markets.
Options Risk. (Hedged Equity Laddered Overlay ETF) The value of the Fund’s positions in options on S&P 500 ETFs and S&P 500 Index options will fluctuate in response to changes in the value of the underlying ETF or index. The value of options is affected by changes in the value and dividend rates of the securities held by the S&P 500 ETFs or represented in the S&P 500 Index underlying the option, changes in interest rates, changes in the actual or perceived volatility of the S&P 500 ETFs or the S&P 500 Index and the remaining time to the options' expiration, as well as trading conditions in the options market. Selling call options on S&P 500 ETFs or the S&P 500 Index can reduce equity market risk, but it limits the opportunity to profit from an increase in the market value of stocks in exchange for upfront cash at the time of selling the call option. The Fund also risks losing all or part of the cash paid for purchasing put options. Unusual market conditions or the lack of a ready market for any particular option at a specific time may reduce the effectiveness of the Fund’s option strategies, and for these and other reasons, the Fund’s option strategies may not reduce the Fund’s volatility to the extent desired and could result in losses.
S&P 500 ETF Risk. (Hedged Equity Laddered Overlay ETF) The Fund invests in options that derive their value from the S&P 500 ETFs, and therefore the Fund’s investment performance is influenced by the investment performance of the S&P 500 ETFs. The value of the S&P 500 ETFs will fluctuate over time based on fluctuations in the values of the securities held by the S&P 500 ETFs, which may be affected by changes in general economic conditions, expectations for future growth and profits, interest rates and the supply and demand for those securities. In addition, the S&P 500 ETFs are subject to index related and passive management risks and ETF shares trading risk, including risks relating to the absence of an active market and premium/discount risk. Brokerage, tax and other expenses may negatively impact the performance of an S&P 500 ETF and, in turn, the value of the Fund’s investments. The S&P 500 ETFs seek to track the S&P 500 Index, but may not exactly match the performance of the S&P 500 Index due to differences between the portfolio of an S&P 500 ETF and the components of the S&P 500 Index, fees and expenses, transaction costs, and other factors.
Options Risk. The value of a Fund’s positions in Index options or options on ETFs will fluctuate in response to changes in the value of the underlying index. Writing index call options or options on ETFs can reduce equity market risk, but it limits the opportunity to profit from an increase in the market value of stocks in exchange for upfront cash at the time of selling the call option. A Fund also risks losing all or part of the cash paid for purchasing put options. Unusual market conditions or the lack of a ready market for any particular option at a specific time may reduce the effectiveness of a Fund’s option strategies, and for these and other reasons, a Fund’s option strategies may not reduce a Fund’s volatility to the extent desired and could result in losses.
Initial Public Offering (IPO) Risk. IPO securities have no trading history, and information about the companies may be available for very limited periods. The prices of securities sold in IPOs may be highly volatile and their purchase may involve high transaction costs. At any particular time or from time to time, a Fund may not be able to invest in securities issued in IPOs, or invest to the extent desired, because, for example, only a small portion (if any) of the securities being offered in an IPO may be made available to a Fund. In addition, under certain market conditions, a relatively small number of companies may issue securities in IPOs. Similarly, as the number of purchasers to which IPO securities are allocated increases, the number of securities issued to a Fund may decrease. The performance of a Fund during periods when it is unable to invest significantly or at all in IPOs may be lower than during periods when a Fund is able to do so. In addition, as a Fund increases in size, the impact of IPOs on the Fund’s performance will generally decrease.
Growth Investing Risk. Growth investing attempts to identify companies that the adviser believes will experience rapid earnings growth relative to value or other types of stocks. The value of these stocks generally is much more sensitive to current or expected earnings than stocks of other types of companies. Short-term events, such as a failure to meet industry earnings expectations, can cause dramatic decreases in the growth stock price compared to other types of stock. Growth stocks may also trade at higher multiples of current earnings compared to value or other stocks, leading to inflated prices and thus potentially greater declines in value. The Fund’s performance may be better or worse than the performance of equity funds that focus on value stocks or that have a broader investment style.
Value Investing Risk. Value investing attempts to identify companies that, according to the adviser’s estimate of their true worth, are undervalued. The adviser selects stocks at prices that it believes are temporarily low relative to factors such as the company’s earnings, cash flow or dividends. A value stock may decrease in price or may not increase in price as anticipated by the adviser if other investors fail to recognize the company’s value or the factors that the adviser believes will cause the stock price to increase do not occur. The Fund’s performance may be better or worse than the performance of equity funds that focus on growth stocks or that have a broader investment style.
Interest Rate Risk. A Fund’s debt securities will increase or decrease in value based on changes in interest rates. If rates increase, the value of a Fund’s investments generally declines. On the other hand, if rates fall, the value of these investments generally increases. Your investment will decline in value if the value of these investments decreases. Securities with greater interest rate sensitivity and longer maturities tend to produce higher yields, but generally are subject to greater fluctuations in value. The Funds
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may invest in variable and floating rate securities. Although these instruments are generally less sensitive to interest rate changes than fixed rate instruments, the value of variable and floating rate securities may decline if their interest rates do not rise as quickly or as much as general interest rates. Many factors can cause interest rates to rise. Some examples include central bank monetary policy, rising inflation rates and general economic conditions. The Funds may face a heightened level of interest rate risk due to certain changes or uncertainty in monetary policy, such as an interest rate increase by the Federal Reserve.
Debt market conditions are highly unpredictable and some parts of the market are subject to dislocations. Beginning in March 2022, the Federal Reserve Board began increasing interest rates and has signaled the possibility of further increases. It is difficult to accurately predict the pace at which the Federal Reserve Board will increase interest rates any further, or the timing, frequency or magnitude of any such increases, and the evaluation of macro-economic and other conditions could cause a change in approach in the future. Any such changes could be sudden and could expose debt markets to significant volatility and reduced liquidity for Fund investments.
Privately Placed Securities Risk. Privately placed securities generally are less liquid than publicly traded securities and a Fund may not always be able to sell such securities without experiencing delays in finding buyers or reducing the sale price for such securities. The disposition of some of the securities held by the Fund may be restricted under federal securities laws or by the relevant exchange by a governmental or supervisory authority. As a result, the Fund may not be able to dispose of such investments at a time when, or at a price at which, it desires to do so and may have to bear expenses of registering these securities, if necessary. These securities may also be difficult to value.
Preferred Securities Risk. Preferred securities generally have a preference as to dividends and liquidation over an issuer’s common stock but ranks junior to debt securities in an issuer’s capital structure. Unlike interest payments on debt securities, dividends on preferred securities are payable only if declared by the issuer’s board of directors. As a consequence, if the board of directors of an issuer does not declare dividends or distributions for the relevant dividend or distribution periods, the issuer will not be obligated to pay dividends or distributions on the relevant payment date, and such dividends and distributions may be forfeited. Holders of preferred securities typically do not have voting rights except in certain circumstances where they may be given only limited voting rights. Preferred securities also may be subject to optional or mandatory redemption provisions. Preferred securities may carry different rights or obligations in jurisdictions outside of the United States.
Convertible Securities Risk. A convertible security generally entitles the holder to receive interest paid or accrued on debt securities or the dividend paid on preferred stock until the convertible security matures or is redeemed, converted or exchanged. Before conversion, convertible securities generally have characteristics similar to both debt and equity securities. The value of convertible securities tends to decline as interest rates rise and, because of the conversion feature, tends to vary with fluctuations in the market value of the underlying securities. Convertible securities ordinarily provide a stream of income with generally higher yields than those of common stock of the same or similar issuers. Convertible securities generally rank senior to common stock in a corporation’s capital structure but are usually subordinated to comparable non-convertible securities. Convertible securities generally do not participate directly in any dividend increases or decreases of the underlying securities, although the market prices of convertible securities may be affected by any dividend changes or other changes in the underlying securities. Contingent convertible securities are subject to additional risk factors. A contingent convertible security is a hybrid debt security typically issued by a non-U.S. bank that may be convertible into equity or may be written down if a pre-specified trigger event such as a decline in capital ratio below a prescribed threshold occurs. If such a trigger event occurs, a Fund may lose the principal amount invested on a permanent or temporary basis or the contingent convertible security may be converted to equity. In addition to being subject to a possible write-down upon the occurrence of a trigger event, contingent convertible securities may also be subject to a permanent write-down or conversion into equity (in whole or in part), if the applicable bank regulator or other public administrative authority having responsibility for managing the orderly dissolution of an institution (the resolution authority) has determined that the issuer is not viable. Coupon payments on contingent convertible securities may be discretionary and may be cancelled by the issuer. Holders of contingent convertible securities may suffer a loss of capital when comparable equity holders do not. As contingent convertible securities may be perpetual or have long-dated maturities, they may face greater interest rate sensitivity and may be subject to greater fluctuations in value than securities with shorter maturity dates. Such securities also may be subject to prepayment risk due to optional or mandatory redemption provisions.
Information Technology Sector Risk. Technology companies face intense competition, both domestically and internationally, which may have an adverse effect on their profit margins. Technology companies may have limited product lines, markets, financial resources or personnel. The products of technology companies may face obsolescence due to rapid technological developments, frequent new product introduction, unpredictable changes in growth rates and competition for the services of qualified personnel. Companies in the information technology sector are heavily dependent on patent and intellectual property rights. The loss or impairment of these rights may adversely affect the profitability of these companies.
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More About the Funds (continued)
Securities Lending Risk. Each Fund may engage in securities lending. Securities lending involves counterparty risk, including the risk that the loaned securities may not be returned or returned in a timely manner and/or a loss of rights in the collateral if the borrower or the lending agent defaults. This risk is increased when a Fund’s loans are concentrated with a single or limited number of borrowers. In addition, a Fund bears the risk of loss in connection with its investments of the cash collateral it receives from the borrower. To the extent that the value or return of a Fund’s investments of the cash collateral declines below the amount owed to a borrower, a Fund may incur losses that exceed the amount it earned on lending the security. In situations where the adviser does not believe that it is prudent to sell the cash collateral investments in the market, a Fund, as applicable, may borrow money to repay the applicable borrower the amount of cash collateral owed to the borrower upon return of the loaned securities. This will result in financial leverage, which may cause a Fund to be more volatile because financial leverage tends to exaggerate the effect of any increase or decrease in the value of a Fund’s portfolio securities.
Transactions and Liquidity Risk. A Fund could experience a loss when selling securities to meet redemption requests and its liquidity may be negatively impacted. The risk of loss increases if the redemption requests are large or frequent, occur in times of overall market turmoil or declining prices for the securities sold, or when the securities a Fund wishes to or is required to sell are illiquid. To the extent a large proportion of Shares are held by a small number of shareholders (or a single shareholder), including funds or accounts over which the adviser or its affiliates have investment discretion, a Fund is subject to the risk that these shareholders will purchase or redeem Shares in large amounts rapidly or unexpectedly, including as a result of an asset allocation decision made by the adviser or its affiliates. To the extent these larger shareholders transact in the secondary market, such transactions may account for a large percentage of a Fund’s trading volume on the Exchange, which may have a material effect (upward or downward) on the market price of Shares. In addition to the other risks described in this section, these transactions could adversely affect the ability of a Fund to conduct its investment program. A Fund may be unable to sell illiquid securities at its desired time or price or the price at which the securities have been valued for purposes of a Fund’s NAV. Illiquidity can be caused by a drop in overall market trading volume, an inability to find a ready buyer, or legal restrictions on the securities’ resale. Certain securities that were liquid when purchased may later become illiquid, particularly in times of overall economic distress.
Similarly, large purchases of Shares may adversely affect a Fund’s performance to the extent that the Fund is delayed in investing new cash and is required to maintain a larger cash position than it ordinarily would. Large redemptions also could accelerate the realization of capital gains, increase a Fund’s transaction costs and impact the Fund’s performance. To the extent redemptions are effected in cash, an investment in a Fund may be less tax-efficient than an investment in an ETF that distributes portfolio securities entirely in-kind.
Cyber Security Risk. As the use of technology has become more prevalent in the course of business, the Funds have become more susceptible to operational and financial risks associated with cyber security, including: theft, loss, misuse, improper release, corruption and destruction of, or unauthorized access to, confidential or highly restricted data relating to a Fund and its shareholders; and compromises or failures to systems, networks, devices and applications relating to the operations of a Fund and its service providers. Cyber security risks may result in financial losses to a Fund and its shareholders; the inability of a Fund to transact business with its shareholders; delays or mistakes in the calculation of a Fund’s NAV or other materials provided to shareholders; the inability to process transactions with shareholders or other parties; violations of privacy and other laws; regulatory fines, penalties and reputational damage; and compliance and remediation costs, legal fees and other expenses. A Fund’s service providers (including, but not limited to, the adviser, any sub-advisers, administrator, transfer agent, and custodian or their agents), financial intermediaries, companies in which a Fund invests and parties with which a Fund engages in portfolio or other transactions also may be adversely impacted by cyber security risks in their own businesses, which could result in losses to a Fund or its shareholders. While measures have been developed which are designed to reduce the risks associated with cyber security, there is no guarantee that those measures will be effective, particularly since the Funds do not directly control the cyber security defenses or plans of their service providers, financial intermediaries and companies in which they invest or with which they do business.
Regulatory and Legal Risk. U.S. and non-U.S. governmental agencies and other regulators regularly implement additional regulations and legislators pass new laws that affect the investments held by a Fund, the strategies used by a Fund or the level of regulation or taxation applying to a Fund (such as regulations related to investments in derivatives and other transactions). These regulations and laws may adversely impact the investment strategies, performance, costs and operations of a Fund or taxation of shareholders.
Volcker Rule Risk. Pursuant to Section 619 of the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act and certain rules promulgated thereunder known as the Volcker Rule, if the adviser and/or its affiliates own 5% or more of the outstanding ownership interests of a Fund after the permitted seeding period from the implementation of a Fund’s investment strategy, a Fund could be subject to restrictions on trading that would adversely impact a Fund’s ability to execute its investment strategy. Generally, the permitted seeding period is three years from the implementation of a Fund’s investment strategy, with permissible extensions under
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certain circumstances. As a result, the adviser and/or its affiliates may be required to reduce their ownership interests in a Fund at a time that is sooner than would otherwise be desirable, which may result in a Fund’s liquidation or, if a Fund is able to continue operating, may result in losses, increased transaction costs and adverse tax consequences as a result of the sale of portfolio securities.
New Fund Risk. Certain Funds are new with limited operating history. As a result, prospective investors have a limited track record or history on which to base their investment decisions. In addition, until a Fund achieves a certain size, the performance of certain of its investments may disproportionately impact the performance of a Fund, which may be subject to heightened volatility. In addition, there can be no assurance that a Fund will grow to or maintain an economically viable size.
For more information about risks associated with the types of investments that a Fund purchases, please read the “Risk/Return Summary” at the front of this prospectus and the Statement of Additional Information.
Conflicts of Interest
An investment in a Fund is subject to a number of actual or potential conflicts of interest. For example, the Adviser and/or its affiliates provide a variety of different services to a Fund, for which the Fund compensates them. As a result, the Adviser and/or its affiliates have an incentive to enter into arrangements with a Fund, and face conflicts of interest when balancing that incentive against the best interests of a Fund. The Adviser and/or its affiliates also face conflicts of interest in their service as investment adviser to other clients, and, from time to time, make investment decisions that differ from and/or negatively impact those made by the Adviser on behalf of a Fund. In addition, affiliates of the Adviser provide a broad range of services and products to their clients and are major participants in the global currency, equity, commodity, fixed income and other markets in which a Fund invests or will invest. In certain circumstances by providing services and products to their clients, these affiliates’ activities will disadvantage or restrict the Funds and/or benefit these affiliates. The Adviser may also acquire material non-public information which would negatively affect the Adviser’s ability to transact in securities for a Fund. JPMorgan and the Funds have adopted policies and procedures reasonably designed to appropriately prevent, limit or mitigate conflicts of interest. In addition, many of the activities that create these conflicts of interest are limited and/or prohibited by law, unless an exception is available. For more information about conflicts of interest, see the Potential Conflicts of Interest section in the Statement of Additional Information.
Temporary Defensive and Cash Positions
For liquidity and to respond to unusual market conditions, the Funds may invest all or most of their total assets in cash and cash equivalents for temporary defensive purposes. These investments may result in a lower yield than lower-quality or longer-term investments.
WHAT IS A CASH EQUIVALENT?
Cash equivalents are highly liquid, high-quality instruments with maturities of three months or less on the date they are purchased.
They include securities issued by the U.S. government, its agencies and instrumentalities, repurchase agreements, certificates of
deposit, bankers’ acceptances, commercial paper, variable rate master demand notes, money market mutual funds, and bank
deposit accounts.
While a Fund is engaged in a temporary defensive position, it may not meet its investment objective. These investments may also be inconsistent with a Fund’s main investment strategies. Therefore, a Fund will pursue a temporary defensive position only when market conditions warrant.
MSCI Disclaimer
Source: MSCI. The MSCI information may only be used for your internal use, may not be reproduced or redisseminated in any form and may not be used as a basis for or a component of any financial instruments or products or indices. None of the MSCI information is intended to constitute investment advice or a recommendation to make (or refrain from making) any kind of investment decision and may not be relied on as such. Historical data and analysis should not be taken as an indication or guarantee of any future performance analysis, forecast, or prediction. The MSCI information is provided on an “as is” basis and the user of this information assumes the entire risk of any use made of this information. MSCI, each of its affiliates and each other person involved in or related to compiling, computing or creating any MSCI information (collectively, the “MSCI Parties”) expressly disclaims all warranties (including, without limitation, any warranties of originality, accuracy, completeness, timeliness, non-infringement, merchantability and fitness for a particular purpose) with respect to this information. Without limiting any of the foregoing, in no event shall any MSCI Party have any liability for any direct, indirect, special, incidental, punitive, consequential (including, without limitation, lost profits) or any other damages. (www.msci.com)
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More About the Funds (continued)
Disclosure of Portfolio Holdings
A description of the policies and procedures with respect to the disclosure of the Funds’ portfolio securities is available in the Funds’ Statement of Additional Information.
Additional Fee Waiver and/or Expense Reimbursement
Service providers to a Fund may, from time to time, voluntarily waive all or a portion of any fees to which they are entitled and/or reimburse certain expenses as they may determine from time to time. A Fund’s service providers may discontinue or modify these voluntary actions at any time without notice. Performance for a Fund will reflect the voluntary waiver of fees and/or the reimbursement of expenses, if any. Without these voluntary waivers and/or expense reimbursements, performance would be less favorable.
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The Funds’ Management and Administration
Each Fund is a series of J.P. Morgan Exchange-Traded Fund Trust, a Delaware statutory trust (the Trust). The Trust is governed by the Board of Trustees, which is responsible for overseeing all business activities of the Funds.
The Funds’ Investment Adviser, Administrator and Sub-Adviser
J.P. Morgan Investment Management Inc. (JPMIM or the adviser) is the investment adviser and administrator to the Funds. JPMIM also provides administrative services for and oversees the other service providers of the Funds. In rendering investment advisory services to certain Funds, JPMIM uses the portfolio management, research and other resources of a foreign (non-U.S.) affiliate of JPMIM and may provide services to a Fund through a “participating affiliate” arrangement, as that term is used in relief granted by the staff of the SEC. Under this relief, U.S. registered investment advisers are allowed to use portfolio management or research resources of advisory affiliates subject to the regulatory supervision of the registered investment adviser. JPMorgan Asset Management (Asia Pacific) Limited (JPMAM (AP) or the sub-adviser) is the investment sub-adviser to Active China ETF. JPMAM (AP) is responsible for the day-to-day investment decisions of the Active China ETF. JPMIM, not the Active China ETF, will pay the sub-adviser for its services.
JPMIM is a wholly-owned subsidiary of JPMorgan Asset Management Holdings Inc., which is a wholly-owned subsidiary of JPMorgan Chase & Co. (JPMorgan Chase), a bank holding company. JPMAM (AP) is an indirect wholly-owned subsidiary of JPMorgan Asset Management Holdings Inc. JPMIM is located at 383 Madison Avenue, New York, NY 10179 and JPMAM (AP) is located at 19th Floor, Chater House, 8 Connaught Road Central, Hong Kong.
Sub-Adviser. JPMIM has the responsibility for the management of the Active China ETF’s affairs, under the supervision of the Trust’s Board of Trustees. The Active China ETF’s investment portfolio is managed on a day-to-day basis by the sub-adviser, under the general oversight of JPMIM and the Board of Trustees. JPMIM has ultimate responsibility, subject to oversight by the Board of Trustees, to oversee the sub-adviser, and it monitors and evaluates the sub-adviser to help assure that the sub-adviser is managing the Active China ETF consistently with the Active China ETF’s investment objective and restrictions and applicable laws and guidelines. In addition, JPMIM has ultimate responsibility to recommend to the Board of Trustees the hiring, termination and replacement of the sub-adviser. The sub-adviser is responsible for deciding which securities to purchase and sell for the Active China ETF and for placing orders for the Active China ETF’s transactions. JPMIM does not determine what investments will be purchased or sold for the Active China ETF.
JPMIM has obtained a “manager of managers” exemptive order from the SEC, as expanded by subsequent SEC staff no-action relief (the Exemptive Order), which grants exemptions from certain provisions of the 1940 Act. Pursuant to the Exemptive Order, JPMIM is permitted, subject to supervision and approval of the Trust’s Board of Trustees, to enter into and materially amend sub-advisory agreements with affiliated and unaffiliated sub-advisers without such agreements being approved by the shareholders of the Active China ETF. Accordingly, the Active China ETF and JPMIM may hire, terminate, or replace affiliated and unaffiliated sub-advisers without shareholder approval, including, without limitation, the replacement or reinstatement of any sub-advisers with respect to which a sub-advisory agreement has automatically terminated as a result of an assignment. JPMIM will continue to have the ultimate responsibility, subject to oversight of the Trust’s Board of Trustees, to oversee the sub-advisers and recommend their hiring, termination and replacement. Currently, the Active China ETF has selected JPMAM (AP) to manage all of the Active China ETF’s assets.
Shareholders will be notified of any changes in sub-advisers. Shareholders of the Active China ETF have the right to terminate the sub-advisory agreement for the Active China ETF at any time by a vote of the majority of the outstanding voting securities of the Active China ETF. The Exemptive Order also permits the Active China ETF to disclose to shareholders the management fees only in the aggregate.
Management Fee and Other Expenses
Pursuant to each Fund’s management agreement, JPMIM is entitled to a management fee, incurred daily and paid monthly, of a Fund’s average daily net assets. During the most recent fiscal year ended 10/31/23, JPMIM was paid management fees, as shown below, as a percentage of a Fund’s average daily net assets: