PROSPECTUS

VIRTUS ALTERNATIVE SOLUTIONS TRUST

February 28, 2023

         

TICKER SYMBOL BY CLASS

FUND

A

C

I

R6

Virtus Duff & Phelps Select MLP and Energy Fund

VLPAX

VLPCX

VLPIX

 

Virtus KAR Long/Short Equity Fund

VLSAX

VLSCX

VLSIX

VLSRX

 

Neither the Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”) nor any state securities commission has approved or disapproved of these securities or determined if this prospectus is truthful or complete. Any representation to the contrary is a criminal offense. This prospectus contains important information that you should know before investing in Virtus Mutual Funds. Please read it carefully and retain it for future reference.

Not FDIC Insured • No Bank Guarantee • May Lose Value


 


Virtus Mutual Funds

 

Table of Contents

   

FUND SUMMARIES

1

Virtus Duff & Phelps Select MLP and Energy Fund

1

Virtus Long/Short Equity Fund

5

MORE INFORMATION ABOUT FUND EXPENSES

10

MORE INFORMATION ABOUT INVESTMENT OBJECTIVES AND PRINCIPAL INVESTMENT STRATEGIES

11

Virtus Duff & Phelps Select MLP and Energy Fund

12

Virtus KAR Long/Short Equity Fund

13

MORE INFORMATION ABOUT RISKS RELATED TO PRINCIPAL INVESTMENT STRATEGIES

14

MANAGEMENT OF THE FUNDS

18

ADDITIONAL RISKS ASSOCIATED WITH INVESTMENT TECHNIQUES AND FUND OPERATIONS

20

PRICING OF FUND SHARES

22

SALES CHARGES

23

YOUR ACCOUNT

28

HOW TO BUY SHARES

29

HOW TO SELL SHARES

30

THINGS YOU SHOULD KNOW WHEN SELLING SHARES

30

ACCOUNT POLICIES

31

COST BASIS REPORTING

34

INVESTOR SERVICES AND OTHER INFORMATION

34

TAX STATUS OF DISTRIBUTIONS

34

FINANCIAL HIGHLIGHTS

36

APPENDIX A-INTERMEDIARY SALES CHARGE DISCOUNTS AND WAIVERS

40

This Prospectus provides information concerning the funds that you should consider in determining whether to purchase shares of the funds. None of this Prospectus, the statement of additional information (“SAI”) or any contract that is an exhibit to the funds’ registration statement is intended to give rise to any agreement or contract between the funds and any investor, or give rise to any contract or other rights in any individual shareholder, group of shareholders or other person other than any rights conferred explicitly by federal or state securities laws that may not be waived.


 


Virtus Duff & Phelps Select MLP and Energy Fund

Investment Objective

The fund has an investment objective of total return with a secondary objective of income.

Fees and Expenses

The tables below illustrate the fees and expenses that you may pay if you buy, hold and sell shares of the fund. You may pay other fees, such as brokerage commissions and other fees to financial intermediaries, which are not reflected in the tables and examples below. You may qualify for sales charge discounts in Class A Shares if you and your family invest, or agree to invest in the future, at least $50,000 in Virtus Funds. More information on these and other discounts is available: (i) from your financial professional or other financial intermediary; (ii) under “Sales Charges” on page 23 of the fund’s prospectus; (iii) with respect to purchase of shares through specific intermediaries, in Appendix A to the fund’s prospectus, entitled “Intermediary Sales Charge Discounts and Waivers;” and (iv) under “Alternative Purchase Arrangements” on page 91 of the fund’s SAI.

         

Shareholder Fees (fees paid directly from your investment)

Class A

Class C

 Class I

Maximum Sales Charge (load) Imposed on Purchases (as a percentage of offering price)

5.50%

None

None

Maximum Deferred Sales Charge (load) (as a percentage of the lesser of purchase price or redemption proceeds) 

None

1.00%(a)

None

 

 

 

 

 

Annual Fund Operating Expenses (expenses that you pay each year as
a percentage of the value of your investment)

Class A

Class C

 Class I

Management Fees

0.90%

0.90%

0.90%

Distribution and Shareholder Servicing (12b-1) Fees

0.25%

1.00%

None

Other Expenses

0.43%

0.39%

0.44%

Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses

1.58%

2.29%

1.34%

Less: Fee Waiver and/or Expense Reimbursement(b)

(0.18)%

(0.14)%

(0.19)%

Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses After Expense Reimbursement(b)(c)

1.40%

2.15%

1.15%

 

   

(a)

The deferred sales charge is imposed on Class C Shares redeemed during the first year only.

 

(b)

The fund’s investment adviser has contractually agreed to limit the fund’s total operating expenses (excluding certain expenses, such as front-end or contingent deferred sales charges, taxes, leverage and borrowing expenses (such as commitment, amendment and renewal expenses on credit or redemption facilities), interest, brokerage commissions, expenses incurred in connection with any merger or reorganization, unusual or infrequently occurring expenses (such as litigation), acquired fund fees and expenses, and dividend expenses, if any) so that such expenses do not exceed 1.40% for Class A Shares, 2.15% for Class C Shares and 1.15% for Class I Shares through February 28, 2024. Following the contractual period, the adviser may discontinue these expense reimbursement arrangements at any time. Under certain conditions, the adviser may recapture operating expenses reimbursed and/or fees waived under these arrangements for a period of three years following the date such waiver or reimbursement occurred, provided that the recapture does not cause the fund to exceed its expense limit in effect at the time of the waiver or reimbursement, and any in effect at the time of recapture, after repayment is taken into account.

(c)

Not included in the table are extraordinary proxy expenses. If such amounts were reflected in this table, the Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses After Expense Reduction/Reimbursement would have been 1.42% for Class A Shares, 2.16% for Class C Shares and 1.17% for Class I Shares.

Example

This example is intended to help you compare the cost of investing in the fund with the cost of investing in other mutual funds. The example assumes that you invest $10,000 in the fund for the time periods indicated and then redeem all of your shares at the end of those periods or continued to hold them. The example also assumes that your investment has a 5% return each year, that the fund’s operating expenses remain the same and that the expense reimbursement agreement remains in place for the contractual period. Although your actual costs may be higher or lower, based on these assumptions your costs would be:

                   

 

Share Status

1 Year

3 Years

5 Years

10 Years

Class A

Sold or Held

$685

 

$1,005

 

$1,347

 

$2,311

 

Class C

Sold

$318

 

$702

 

$1,212

 

$2,615

 

 

Held

$218

 

$702

 

$1,212

 

$2,615

 

Class I

Sold or Held

$117

 

$406

 

$716

 

$1,596

 

Portfolio Turnover

The fund pays transaction costs, such as commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or “turns over” its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover rate may indicate higher transaction costs and may result in higher taxes when fund shares are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are not reflected in annual fund operating expenses or in the example, affect the fund’s performance. During the most recent fiscal year, the fund’s portfolio turnover rate was 43% of the average value of its portfolio.

   

Virtus Duff & Phelps Select MLP and Energy Fund

1


Investments, Risks and Performance

Principal Investment Strategies

Under normal circumstances, the fund invests at least 80% of its assets in securities of master limited partnerships (“MLPs”) and/or other equity securities in energy and energy-related industries. The fund invests in securities of C-corporations, MLPs, general partners of MLPs (“GPs”), and MLP-related securities with a primary focus on midstream energy infrastructure. The companies in which the fund invests engage in the transportation, storage, gathering, processing, treatment, refining, marketing, or distribution of natural gas, natural gas liquids, crude oil, chemicals, electricity and refined products, and/or the generation of electricity from coal, natural gas, nuclear, solar, water, wind, wood and other renewable sources.

MLP-related securities include MLP shares, limited liability companies (“LLCs”) that bear the economic characteristics of MLPs, midstream energy shipping companies structured similarly to MLPs, other companies focused on midstream energy infrastructure including energy-related yieldcos, and exchange-traded notes (“ETNs”) that derive their returns from a master limited partnership index. In determining whether a security is considered by the fund to be energy or energy-related, the subadviser primarily relies upon the issuer’s Global Industry Classification Standard (“GICS”) sector classification; those issuers classified by GICS as being in the energy sector (including renewable energy) and those issuers classified as being in the utility sector that also have substantial exposure to either midstream or renewable energy will be considered to be energy or energy-related. Although the fund’s 80% test does not require it, certain securities, such as LLCs that bear the economic characteristics of MLPs, may be considered by the fund to be both MLPs and energy or energy-related for the purposes of the 80% test.

The subadviser will utilize a deep fundamental, bottom-up approach to capture attractive total return potential and distribution growth opportunities across the energy infrastructure spectrum. The fund is not limited by market capitalizations or country exposure, and may invest in emerging markets issuers, although the subadviser expects that a vast majority of the portfolio will be invested in U.S. equities due to the nature of MLP and midstream energy investing.

As part of its total return strategy, the fund will generate both income and capital appreciation. The fund intends to be taxed as a registered investment company (“RIC”), and comply with all RIC-related restrictions including limiting its investments in qualified publicly-traded MLPs to 25%, thereby avoiding taxation as a C-corporation under the Internal Revenue Code. Qualification as a RIC also requires that at least 50% of the fund’s portfolio consist of positions that are less than 5% of the fund’s assets. There is no limit to investing in MLPs structured as C-corporations for tax purposes. The fund’s allocation to ETNs and/or structured notes will vary over time, has generally been in the 0-3% range, and will not exceed 10% of assets.

The fund is non-diversified under federal securities laws and will concentrate its investments in companies in energy and energy-related industries as defined above.

Principal Risks

The fund may not achieve its objective(s), and it is not intended to be a complete investment program. The value of the fund’s investments that supports your share value may decrease. If between the time you purchase shares and the time you sell shares the value of the fund’s investments decreases, you will lose money. Investment values can decrease for a number of reasons. Conditions affecting the overall economy, specific industries or companies in which the fund invests can be worse than expected, and investments may fail to perform as the subadviser expects. As a result, the value of your shares may decrease. Purchase and redemption activities by fund shareholders may impact the management of the fund and its ability to achieve its investment objective(s). The principal risks of investing in the fund are identified below.

> Equity Securities Risk. The value of the stocks held by the fund may be negatively affected by the financial market, industries in which the fund invests, or issuer-specific events. Focus on a particular style or in small or medium-sized companies may enhance that risk.

> Energy Industry Concentration Risk. The fund’s investments are concentrated in the energy industry and events negatively affecting energy-related industries will cause the value of the fund’s shares to decrease, perhaps significantly.

> Master Limited Partnership (MLP) Risk. Investments in MLPs may be negatively impacted by tax law changes, changes in interest rates, the failure of the MLP’s parent or sponsor to make payments as expected, regulatory developments or other factors affecting the MLP’s underlying assets, which are typically in the natural resources and energy sectors.

> Foreign Investing Risk. Investing in foreign securities subjects the fund to additional risks such as increased volatility; currency fluctuations; less liquidity; less publicly available information about the foreign investment; and political, regulatory, economic, and market risk.

> Non-Diversification Risk. The fund is not diversified and may be more susceptible to factors negatively impacting its holdings to the extent the fund invests more of its assets in the securities of fewer issuers than would a diversified fund.

> Currency Rate Risk. Fluctuations in the exchange rates between the U.S. dollar and foreign currencies may negatively affect the value of the fund’s shares.

> Derivatives Risk. Derivatives may include, among other things, futures, options, forwards and swap agreements and may be used in order to hedge portfolio risks, create leverage or attempt to increase returns. Investments in derivatives may result in increased volatility and the fund may incur a loss greater than its principal investment.

> Emerging Market Risk. Emerging markets securities may be more volatile, or more greatly affected by negative conditions, than those of their counterparts in more established foreign markets.

> Exchange-Traded Note (“ETN”) Risk. The value of an ETN may be more volatile than securities making up the index the ETN is designed to track. The costs to the fund of owning shares of an ETN may exceed those the fund would incur by investing directly in the underlying securities directly.

> Infrastructure-Related Risk. A fund that focuses its investments in infrastructure-related companies will be more sensitive to conditions affecting their business or operations such as local economic and political conditions, regulatory changes, and environmental issues. Such a focus may cause a decrease in the fund’s value, perhaps significantly.

   

2

Virtus Duff & Phelps Select MLP and Energy Fund


> Large Market Capitalization Companies Risk. The value of investments in larger companies may not rise as much as smaller companies, or larger companies may be unable to respond quickly to competitive challenges, such as changes in technology and consumer tastes.

> Liquidity Risk. Certain instruments may be difficult or impossible to sell at a time and price beneficial to the fund.

> Market Volatility Risk. The value of the securities in the fund may go up or down in response to the prospects of individual companies and/or general economic conditions. Price changes may be short- or long-term. Local, regional or global events such as war or military conflict (e.g. Russia’s invasion of Ukraine), acts of terrorism, the spread of infectious illness or other public health issue, recessions, or other events could have a significant impact on the fund and its investments, including hampering the ability of the fund’s portfolio manager(s) to invest the fund’s assets as intended.

> MLP Affiliate Risk. The fund’s investments in securities issued by MLP affiliates may be negatively impacted by the MLPs’ results of operations, financial condition, cash flows or distributions.

> MLP Tax-Deferred Distribution Risk. A fund’s investments in MLPs may cause the fund to receive, and/or to pay to the fund’s shareholders, distributions that represent a return of capital.

> Redemption Risk. One or more large shareholders or groups of shareholders may redeem their holdings in the fund, resulting in an adverse impact on remaining shareholders in the fund by causing the fund to take actions it would not otherwise have taken.

> RIC Compliance Risk. If the fund fails to qualify as a “regulated investment company” under the Internal Revenue Code, the fund’s expenses could increase, reducing its investment performance.

> Short-Term Investments Risk. The fund’s short-term investments may not provide the liquidity or protection intended or may prevent the fund from experiencing positive movements in the fund’s principal investment strategies.

> Small and Medium Market Capitalization Companies Risk. The fund’s investments in small and medium market capitalization companies may increase the volatility and risk of loss to the fund, as compared with investments in larger, more established companies.

Performance Information

The bar chart and table below provide some indication of the potential risks of investing in the fund. The fund’s past performance, before and after taxes, is not necessarily an indication of how the fund will perform in the future.

The bar chart shows changes in the fund’s performance from year to year over the life of the fund. The table shows how the fund’s average annual returns compare to those of a broad-based securities market index. Updated performance information is available at virtus.com or by calling 800-243-1574.

 

Calendar year total returns for Class I Shares

Returns do not reflect sales charges applicable to other share classes and would be lower if they did.

PerformanceBarChartData(2016:31.49,2017:-1.15,2018:-17.16,2019:9.61,2020:-18.79,2021:44.72,2022:30.77)

           

Best Quarter:

2020, Q2:

40.39%

Worst Quarter:

2020, Q1:

-47.94%

   

Virtus Duff & Phelps Select MLP and Energy Fund

3


Average Annual Total Returns (for the periods ended 12/31/22)

Returns reflect deduction of maximum sales charges and full redemption at end of periods shown.

         

 

 

 

 

Since
Inception

 

1 Year

5 Years

(9/9/2015)

Class I Shares

 

 

 

 

Return Before Taxes

30.77%

6.89%

5.38%

 

Return After Taxes on Distributions

30.77%

6.61%

5.02%

 

Return After Taxes on Distributions and Sale of Fund Shares

18.22%

5.29%

4.11%

Class A Shares

 

 

 

 

Return Before Taxes

23.22%

5.44%

4.32%

Class C Shares

 

 

 

 

Return Before Taxes

29.46%

5.86%

4.34%

Alerian Midstream Energy Index (reflects no deduction for fees, expenses or taxes)

21.53%

6.76%

 

 

 

 

 

The Alerian Midstream Energy Index is a capped, float-adjusted, market capitalization-weighted index. The index is a broad-based composite of North American energy infrastructure companies that earn the majority of their cash flow from midstream activities involving energy commodities. The index is unmanaged and not available for direct investment.

After-tax returns are calculated using the historical highest individual federal marginal income tax rates and do not reflect the impact of state and local taxes. After-tax returns are shown only for Class I Shares; after-tax returns for other classes will vary. Actual after-tax returns depend on the investor’s tax situation and may differ from those shown. After-tax returns are not relevant to investors who hold fund shares in tax-deferred accounts or to shares held by non-taxable entities.

Management

The fund’s investment adviser is Virtus Alternative Investment Advisers, Inc. (“VAIA”).

The fund’s subadviser is Duff & Phelps Investment Management Co. (“Duff & Phelps”), an affiliate of VAIA.

Portfolio Management

> Rodney C. Clayton, CFA, Managing Director and Portfolio Manager at Duff & Phelps. Mr. Clayton has served as a Portfolio Manager of the fund since February 2020.

> David D. Grumhaus, Jr., President and Chief Investment Officer of Duff & Phelps. Mr. Grumhaus has served as a Portfolio Manager of the fund since inception in 2015.

Purchase and Sale of Fund Shares

Minimum initial investments applicable to Class A and Class C Shares:

 $2,500, generally

 $100 for Individual Retirement Accounts (IRAs), systematic purchase or exchange accounts

 No minimum for defined contribution plans, asset-based fee programs, profit-sharing plans or employee benefit plans.

Minimum additional investments applicable to Class A and Class C Shares:

 $100, generally

 No minimum for defined contribution plans, asset-based fee programs, profit-sharing plans or employee benefit plans.

For Class I Shares, the minimum initial purchase is $100,000; there is no minimum for additional purchases.

In general, you may buy or sell shares of the fund by mail or telephone on any business day. You also may buy and sell shares through a financial professional, broker-dealer or other financial intermediary.

Taxes

The fund’s distributions are taxable to you as either ordinary income or capital gains, except when your investment is through a tax-deferred arrangement, such as a 401(k) plan or an individual retirement account. Such tax-deferred arrangements may be taxed later upon withdrawal of monies from those arrangements.

Payments to Broker-Dealers and Other Financial Intermediaries

If you purchase the fund through a broker-dealer or other financial intermediary (such as a bank), the fund and its related companies may pay the intermediary for the sale of fund shares and related services. These payments may create a conflict of interest by influencing the broker-dealer or other intermediary and your financial professional to recommend the fund over another investment.

Ask your financial professional or visit your financial intermediary’s website for more information.

   

4

Virtus Duff & Phelps Select MLP and Energy Fund


Virtus KAR Long/Short Equity Fund

Investment Objective

The fund has an investment objective of seeking long-term capital appreciation.

Fees and Expenses

The tables below illustrate the fees and expenses that you may pay if you buy, hold and sell shares of the fund. You may pay other fees, such as brokerage commissions and other fees to financial intermediaries, which are not reflected in the tables and examples below. You may qualify for sales charge discounts in Class A Shares if you and your family invest, or agree to invest in the future, at least $50,000 in Virtus Funds. More information on these and other discounts is available: (i) from your financial professional or other financial intermediary; (ii) under “Sales Charges” on page 23 of the fund’s prospectus; (iii) with respect to purchase of shares through specific intermediaries, in Appendix A to the fund’s prospectus, entitled “Intermediary Sales Charge Discounts and Waivers;” and (iv) under “Alternative Purchase Arrangements” on page 91 of the fund’s SAI.

                           

 Shareholder Fees (fees paid directly from your investment)

Class A

Class C

Class I

Class R6

 Maximum Sales Charge (load) Imposed on Purchases (as a percentage of
 offering price)

 

5.50%

 

 

None

 

 

None

 

 

None

 

 Maximum Deferred Sales Charge (load) (as a percentage of the lesser of 
 purchase price or redemption proceeds)

 

None

 

 

1.00%(a)

 

 

None

 

 

None

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 Annual Fund Operating Expenses (expenses that you pay each year as
 a percentage of the value of your investment)

Class A

Class C

 Class I

Class R6

 Management Fees

 

1.25%

 

 

1.25%

 

 

1.25%

 

 

1.25%

 

 Distribution and Shareholder Servicing (12b-1) Fees

 

0.25%

 

 

1.00%

 

 

None

 

 

None

 

 Total Other Expenses

 

0.79%

 

 

0.70%

 

 

0.77%

 

 

0.63%

 

      Dividend and Interest Expense on Short Sales

 

0.37%

 

 

0.37%

 

 

0.37%

 

 

0.37%

 

      Remaining Other Expenses

 

0.42%

 

 

0.33%

 

 

0.40%

 

 

0.26%

 

 Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses(b)

 

2.29%

 

 

2.95%

 

 

2.02%

 

 

1.88%

 

 Less: Fee Waiver and/or Expense Reimbursement(b)

 

(0.12)%

 

 

(0.03)%

 

 

(0.10)%

 

 

(0.03)%

 

 Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses After Expense Reimbursement(b)(c) 

 

2.17%

 

 

2.92%

 

 

1.92%

 

 

1.85%

 

 

   

(a)

The deferred sales charge is imposed on Class C Shares redeemed during the first year only.

 

(b)

The fund’s investment adviser has contractually agreed to limit the fund’s total operating expenses (excluding certain expenses, such as front-end or contingent deferred sales charges, taxes, leverage and borrowing expenses (such as commitment, amendment and renewal expenses on credit or redemption facilities), interest, brokerage commissions, expenses incurred in connection with any merger or reorganization, unusual or infrequently occurring expenses (such as litigation), acquired fund fees and expenses, and dividend expenses, if any) so that such expenses do not exceed 1.80% for Class A Shares, 2.55% for Class C Shares, 1.55% for Class I Shares and 1.48% for Class R6 Shares through February 28, 2024. Following the contractual period, the adviser may discontinue these expense reimbursement arrangements at any time. Under certain conditions, the adviser may recapture operating expenses reimbursed and/or fees waived under these arrangements for a period of three years following the date such waiver or reimbursement occurred, provided that the recapture does not cause the fund to exceed its expense limit in effect at the time of the waiver or reimbursement, and any in effect at the time of recapture, after repayment is taken into account.

(c)

Not included in the table are extraordinary proxy expenses. If such amounts were reflected in this table, the Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses After Expense Reduction/Reimbursement would have been 2.19% for Class A Shares, 2.93% for Class C Shares and 1.94% for Class I Shares .

Example

This example is intended to help you compare the cost of investing in the fund with the cost of investing in other mutual funds. The example assumes that you invest $10,000 in the fund for the time periods indicated and then redeem all of your shares at the end of those periods or continued to hold them. The example also assumes that your investment has a 5% return each year, that the fund’s operating expenses remain the same and that the expense reimbursement agreement remains in place for the contractual period. Although your actual costs may be higher or lower, based on these assumptions your costs would be:

                   

 

Share Status

1 Year

3 Years

5 Years

10 Years

Class A

Sold or Held

$758

 

$1,215

 

$1,697

 

$3,022

 

Class C

Sold

$395

 

$910

 

$1,550

 

$3,269

 

 

Held

$295

 

$910

 

$1,550

 

$3,269

 

Class I

Sold or Held

$195

 

$624

 

$1,079

 

$2,340

 

Class R6

Sold or Held

$188

 

$588

 

$1,013

 

$2,199

 

Portfolio Turnover

The fund pays transaction costs, such as commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or “turns over” its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover rate may indicate higher transaction costs and may result in higher taxes when fund shares are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are not reflected in annual fund operating expenses or in the example, affect the fund’s performance. During the most recent fiscal period, the fund’s portfolio turnover rate was 26% of the average value of its portfolio.

   

Virtus KAR Long/Short Equity Fund

5


Investments, Risks and Performance

Principal Investment Strategies

The fund pursues long-term capital appreciation by investing in long positions of companies the fund’s subadviser believes to be of high quality and selling short positions in companies the fund’s subadviser believes to be of low quality. The fund takes a long position by purchasing the shares of a company that the subadviser believes will increase in value. A short position is an attempt to profit from an expected drop in the price of a company’s securities by borrowing shares and selling them, and subsequently repurchasing shares of that company.

The long investment strategy aims to purchase the stock of issuers deemed by the subadviser as high quality companies at attractive valuations. Qualities the fund’s subadviser uses to define “high-quality” companies include a durable competitive advantage, strong management team, and reasonable capital structure.

The short investment strategy aims to sell short the stock of low quality companies whose share price the subadviser expects to drop because it does not accurately reflect the poor fundamentals of the business. Qualities the fund’s subadviser uses to define “low-quality” companies include an erratic or mediocre financial performance, poor history of capital allocation, a flawed business model and/or an aggressive capital structure.

The fund’s net market exposure (long exposure minus short exposure) may fluctuate based on the number and quality of investments ideas the fund’s subadviser is able to find as a result of its bottom-up fundamental analysis, but the fund will generally have a net long bias (long exposure will typically exceed short exposure).

Under normal circumstances, the fund invests at least 80% of its assets in equity securities and equity-related instruments, in long and short positions of U.S.-listed equity securities of any capitalization. The fund’s investments may include securities of U.S. and foreign issuers, including securities of issuers in emerging market countries and securities denominated in a currency other than the U.S. dollar. Equity securities consist of common and preferred stocks, exchange traded funds (“ETFs”), S&P Depositary Receipts (“SPDRs”), American Depositary Receipts (“ADRs”) and other similar instruments. To the extent that selling short a particular stock is impractical, or prohibited, the fund may invest in derivative instruments, such as options or futures, as an alternative method to take a short position consistent with the fund’s investment strategy described herein.

The fund is considered non-diversified under federal securities laws, which means that it may concentrate its investments in fewer issuers than permitted for diversified mutual funds. In general, the fund is not constrained by any sector weight limitations, but it is limited to investing a maximum of 25% of its total assets in any one industry.

Principal Risks

The fund may not achieve its objective(s), and it is not intended to be a complete investment program. The value of the fund’s investments that supports your share value may decrease. If between the time you purchase shares and the time you sell shares the value of the fund’s investments decreases, you will lose money. Investment values can decrease for a number of reasons. Conditions affecting the overall economy, specific industries or companies in which the fund invests can be worse than expected, and investments may fail to perform as the subadviser expects. As a result, the value of your shares may decrease. Purchase and redemption activities by fund shareholders may impact the management of the fund and its ability to achieve its investment objective(s). The principal risks of investing in the fund are identified below.

> Equity Securities Risk. The value of the stocks held by the fund may be negatively affected by the financial market, industries in which the fund invests, or issuer-specific events. Focus on a particular style or in small or medium-sized companies may enhance that risk.

> Short Sales Risk. The fund may engage in short sales and may incur a loss if the price of a borrowed security increases between the date of a short sale and the date on which the fund replaces the security.

> Counterparty Risk. There is risk that a party upon whom the fund relies to complete a transaction will default.

> Foreign Investing Risk. Investing in foreign securities subjects the fund to additional risks such as increased volatility; currency fluctuations; less liquidity; less publicly available information about the foreign investment; and political, regulatory, economic, and market risk.

> Non-Diversification Risk. The fund is not diversified and may be more susceptible to factors negatively impacting its holdings to the extent the fund invests more of its assets in the securities of fewer issuers than would a diversified fund.

> Currency Rate Risk. Fluctuations in the exchange rates between the U.S. dollar and foreign currencies may negatively affect the value of the fund’s shares.

> Depositary Receipts Risk. Investments in foreign companies through depositary receipts may expose the fund to the same risks as direct investments in securities of foreign issuers.

> Derivatives Risk. Derivatives may include, among other things, futures, options, forwards and swap agreements and may be used in order to hedge portfolio risks, create leverage or attempt to increase returns. Investments in derivatives may result in increased volatility and the fund may incur a loss greater than its principal investment.

> Emerging Market Risk. Emerging markets securities may be more volatile, or more greatly affected by negative conditions, than those of their counterparts in more established foreign markets.

> Exchange-Traded Funds (ETFs) Risk. The value of an ETF may be more volatile than the underlying portfolio of securities the ETF is designed to track. The costs to the fund of owning shares of an ETF may exceed the cost of investing directly in the underlying securities.

> Foreign Currency Transactions Risk. The fund’s transactions with respect to foreign currency may not be successful or have the effect of limiting gains from favorable market movements.

> Large Market Capitalization Companies Risk. The value of investments in larger companies may not rise as much as smaller companies, or larger companies may be unable to respond quickly to competitive challenges, such as changes in technology and consumer tastes.

   

6

Virtus KAR Long/Short Equity Fund


> Limited Number of Investments Risk. Because the fund may have a limited number of securities, it may be more susceptible to factors adversely affecting its securities than a fund with a greater number of securities.

> Market Volatility Risk. The value of the securities in the fund may go up or down in response to the prospects of individual companies and/or general economic conditions. Price changes may be short- or long-term. Local, regional or global events such as war or military conflict (e.g. Russia’s invasion of Ukraine), acts of terrorism, the spread of infectious illness or other public health issue, recessions, or other events could have a significant impact on the fund and its investments, including hampering the ability of the fund’s portfolio manager(s) to invest the fund’s assets as intended.

> Medium Market Capitalization Companies Risk. The fund’s investments in medium market capitalization companies may increase the volatility and risk of loss to the fund, as compared with investments in larger, more established companies.

> Preferred Stocks Risk. Preferred stocks may decline in price, fail to pay dividends when expected, or be illiquid.

> Redemption Risk. One or more large shareholders or groups of shareholders may redeem their holdings in the fund, resulting in an adverse impact on remaining shareholders in the fund by causing the fund to take actions it would not otherwise have taken.

> Sector Focused Investing Risk. Events negatively affecting a particular market sector in which the fund focuses its investments may cause the value of the fund’s shares to decrease, perhaps significantly.

> Small Market Capitalization Companies Risk. The fund’s investments in small market capitalization companies may be less liquid and more vulnerable to adverse business or economic developments, which may increase the volatility and risk of loss to the fund, as compared with investments in larger, more established companies.

Performance Information

The bar chart and table below provide some indication of the potential risks of investing in the fund. The fund’s past performance, before and after taxes, is not necessarily an indication of how the fund will perform in the future.

The bar chart shows changes in the fund’s performance from year to year over the life of the fund. The table shows how the fund’s average annual returns compare to those of a broad-based securities market index. Updated performance information is available at virtus.com or by calling 800-243-1574.

 

Calendar year total returns for Class I Shares

Returns do not reflect sales charges applicable to other share classes and would be lower if they did.

PerformanceBarChartData(2019:38.34,2020:32.52,2021:12.56,2022:-18.36)

           

Best Quarter:

2020, Q2:

22.90%

Worst Quarter:

2022, Q2:

-11.94%

   

Virtus KAR Long/Short Equity Fund

7


Average Annual Total Returns (for the periods ended 12/31/22)

Returns reflect deduction of maximum sales charges and full redemption at end of periods shown.

       

 

 

 

Since

 

 

 

Inception

 

1 Year

(12/6/2018)

Class I Shares

 

 

 

Return Before Taxes

-18.36%

12.74%

 

Return After Taxes on Distributions

-19.20%

12.35%

 

Return After Taxes on Distributions and Sale of Fund Shares

-10.27%

10.10%

Class A Shares

 

 

 

Return Before Taxes

-23.04%

10.90%

Class C Shares

 

 

 

Return Before Taxes

-19.21%

11.61%

Class R6 Shares

 

 

 

Return Before Taxes

-18.28%

12.81%

Russell 3000® Index (reflects no deduction for fees, expenses or taxes)

-19.21%

10.36%

 

 

 

 

The Russell 3000® Index is a market capitalization-weighted index that measures the performance of the 3,000 largest U.S. companies. The index is calculated on a total return basis with dividends reinvested.The index is unmanaged and not available for direct investment.

After-tax returns are calculated using the historical highest individual federal marginal income tax rates and do not reflect the impact of state and local taxes. After-tax returns are shown only for Class I Shares; after-tax returns for other classes will vary. Actual after-tax returns depend on the investor’s tax situation and may differ from those shown. After-tax returns are not relevant to investors who hold fund shares in tax-deferred accounts or to shares held by non-taxable entities. In certain cases, the Return After Taxes on Distributions and Sale of Fund Shares for a period may be higher than other return figures for the same period. This will occur when a capital loss is realized upon the sale of fund shares and provides an assumed tax benefit that increases the return.

Management

The fund’s investment adviser is Virtus Alternative Investment Advisers, Inc. (“VAIA”).

The fund’s subadviser is Kayne Anderson Rudnick Investment Management, LLC (“KAR”), an affiliate of VAIA.

Portfolio Management

> Julie Biel, CFA, Portfolio Manager and Senior Research Analyst at KAR. Ms. Biel has served as a Portfolio Manager of the fund since March 2022.

> Chris Wright, CFA, Portfolio Manager and Senior Research Analyst at KAR. Mr. Wright has served as Portfolio Manager of the fund since inception in December 2018.

Purchase and Sale of Fund Shares

Minimum initial investments applicable to Class A and Class C Shares:

 $2,500, generally

 $100 for Individual Retirement Accounts (IRAs), systematic purchase or exchange accounts

 No minimum for defined contribution plans, asset-based fee programs, profit-sharing plans or employee benefit plans.

Minimum additional investments applicable to Class A and Class C Shares:

 $100, generally

 No minimum for defined contribution plans, asset-based fee programs, profit-sharing plans or employee benefit plans.

For Class I Shares, the minimum initial purchase is $100,000; there is no minimum for additional purchases.

Class R6 Shares are offered without a minimum initial investment to the following investors in plan level or omnibus accounts only (provided that they do not require or receive any compensation, administrative payments, sub-transfer agency payments or service payments with respect to Class R6 Shares): (i) qualified retirement plans, including, but not limited to, 401(k) plans, 457 plans, employer sponsored 403(b) plans, and defined benefit plans; (ii) banks and trust companies; (iii) insurance companies; (iv) financial intermediaries utilizing such shares in fee-based investment advisory programs; (v) registered investment companies; (vi) 529 portfolios that are advised or sub-advised by Virtus affiliates; and (vii) non-qualified deferred compensation plans. Other institutional investors may be permitted to purchase Class R6 Shares subject to the fund’s determination of eligibility and may be subject to a $2,500,000 minimum initial investment requirement.

In general, you may buy or sell shares of the fund by mail or telephone on any business day. You also may buy and sell shares through a financial professional, broker-dealer or other financial intermediary.

   

8

Virtus KAR Long/Short Equity Fund


Taxes

The fund’s distributions are taxable to you as either ordinary income or capital gains, except when your investment is through a tax-deferred arrangement, such as a 401(k) plan or an individual retirement account. Such tax-deferred arrangements may be taxed later upon withdrawal of monies from those arrangements.

Payments to Broker-Dealers and Other Financial Intermediaries

If you purchase the fund through a broker-dealer or other financial intermediary (such as a bank), the fund and its related companies may pay the intermediary for the sale of fund shares and related services. These payments may create a conflict of interest by influencing the broker-dealer or other intermediary and your financial professional to recommend the fund over another investment.

No compensation, administrative payments, sub-transfer agency payments or service payments are paid to brokers or other entities from fund assets or the Distributor’s or an affiliate’s resources on sales of or investments in Class R6 Shares. Class R6 Shares do not carry sales commissions or pay Rule 12b-1 fees, or make payments to brokers or other entities to assist in, or in connection with, the sale of the fund’s shares.

Ask your financial professional or visit your financial intermediary’s website for more information.

   

Virtus KAR Long/Short Equity Fund

9


More Information About Fund Expenses

VAIA has contractually agreed to limit the total operating expenses (excluding certain expenses, such as front-end or contingent deferred sales charges, taxes, leverage and borrowing expenses (such as commitment, amendment and renewal expenses on credit or redemption facilities), interest, brokerage commissions, expenses incurred in connection with any merger or reorganization, unusual or infrequently occurring expenses (such as litigation), acquired fund fees and expenses, and dividend expenses, if any) through February 28, 2024 of the funds, so that such expenses do not exceed, on an annualized basis, the amounts indicated in the following table:

         
 

Class A Shares

Class C Shares

Class I Shares

Class R6 Shares

Virtus Duff & Phelps Select MLP and Energy Fund

1.40%

2.15%

1.15%

N/A

Virtus KAR Long/Short Equity Fund

1.80%

2.55%

1.55%

1.48%

Following the contractual period, VAIA may discontinue these and/or prior arrangements at any time. Under certain conditions, the Adviser may recapture operating expenses reimbursed and/or fees waived under these arrangements for a period of three years following the date such waiver or reimbursement occurred, provided that the recapture does not cause the applicable fund(s) to exceed its expense limit in effect at the time of the waiver or reimbursement, and any in effect at the time of recapture, after repayment is taken into account.

For those funds operating under an expense reimbursement arrangement or fee waiver during the prior fiscal year, total (net) fund operating expenses, (including certain expenses, such as front-end or contingent deferred sales charges, taxes, leverage and borrowing expenses (such as commitment, amendment and renewal expenses on credit or redemption facilities), interest, brokerage commissions, expenses incurred in connection with any merger or reorganization, unusual or infrequently occurring expenses (such as litigation), acquired fund fees and expenses, and dividend expenses, if any), after effect of any expense reimbursement and/or fee waiver were:

         
 

Class A Shares

Class C Shares

Class I Shares

Class R6 Shares

Virtus Duff & Phelps Select MLP and Energy Fund

1.42%

2.16%

1.17%

N/A

Virtus KAR Long/Short Equity Fund

2.19%

2.93%

1.94%

1.85%

   

10

Virtus Mutual Funds


More Information About Investment Objectives and Principal Investment Strategies

The investment objectives and principal strategies of each fund are described in this section. Each of the following funds has a non-fundamental investment objective. A non-fundamental investment objective may be changed by the Board of Trustees of that fund without shareholder approval. If a fund’s investment objective is changed, the prospectus will be supplemented to reflect the new investment objective and shareholders will be provided with at least 60 days advance notice of such change. There is no guarantee that a fund will achieve its objective.

Please see the SAI for additional information about the securities and investment strategies described in this prospectus and about additional securities and investment strategies that may be used by the funds.

   

Virtus Mutual Funds

11


Virtus Duff & Phelps Select MLP and Energy Fund

Non-Fundamental Investment Objectives:

The fund has an investment objective of total return with a secondary objective of income.

Principal Investment Strategies:

Under normal circumstances, the fund invests at least 80% of its assets in securities of master limited partnerships (“MLPs”) and/or other equity securities in energy and energy-related industries. For this policy, “assets” means net assets plus the amount of any borrowings for investment purposes. The fund invests in securities of C-corporations, MLPs, general partners of MLPs (“GPs”), and MLP-related securities with a primary focus on midstream energy infrastructure. The companies in which the fund invests engage in the transportation, storage, gathering, processing, treatment, refining, marketing, or distribution of natural gas, natural gas liquids, crude oil, chemicals, electricity and refined products, and/or the generation of electricity from coal, natural gas, nuclear, solar, water, wind, wood and other renewable sources.

MLP-related securities include MLP shares, limited liability companies (“LLCs”) that bear the economic characteristics of MLPs, midstream energy shipping companies structured similarly to MLPs, other companies focused on midstream energy infrastructure including energy-related yieldcos, and exchange-traded notes (“ETNs”) that derive their returns from a master limited partnership index. In determining whether a security is considered by the fund to be energy or energy-related, the subadviser primarily relies upon the issuer’s Global Industry Classification Standard (“GICS”) sector classification; those issuers classified by GICS as being in the energy sector (including renewable energy) and those issuers classified as being in the utility sector that also have substantial exposure to either midstream or renewable energy will be considered to be energy or energy-related. Although the fund’s 80% test does not require it, certain securities, such as LLCs that bear the economic characteristics of MLPs, may be considered by the fund to be both MLPs and energy or energy-related for the purposes of the 80% test.

The subadviser will utilize a deep fundamental, bottom-up approach to capture attractive total return potential and distribution growth opportunities across the energy infrastructure spectrum. The fund is not limited by market capitalizations or country exposure, and may invest in emerging markets issuers, although the subadviser expects that a vast majority of the portfolio will be invested in U.S. equities due to the nature of MLP and midstream energy investing.

As part of its total return strategy, the fund will generate both income and capital appreciation. The fund intends to be taxed as a registered investment company (“RIC”), and comply with all RIC-related restrictions including limiting its investments in qualified publicly-traded MLPs to 25%, thereby avoiding taxation as a C-corporation under the Internal Revenue Code. Qualification as a RIC also requires that at least 50% of the fund’s portfolio consist of positions that are less than 5% of the fund’s assets. There is no limit to investing in MLPs structured as C-corporations for tax purposes. The fund’s allocation to ETNs and/or structured notes will vary over time, has generally been in the 0-3% range, and will not exceed 10% of assets.

The fund’s subadviser incorporates and integrates Environmental, Societal and Governance (“ESG”) factors into its investment analysis and decision-making processes consistent with the fund’s investment objectives and strategies. The subadviser’s consideration of ESG factors is intended to improve investment outcomes and decrease risk by identifying companies believed to have better operations, the ability to attract and retain the best talent, increased customer satisfaction and market share, and other means of increasing earnings and cash flow over the long term. By incorporating ESG into its fundamental analysis, the subadviser seeks to improve its understanding of the risks and opportunities that companies face. The subadviser has access to independent, third-party ESG research through Sustainalytics, ISS and Bloomberg, and may use these sources in addition to its own research.

The fund is non-diversified under federal securities laws and will concentrate its investments in companies in energy and energy-related industries as defined above.

Temporary Defensive Strategy: During periods of extreme market fluctuations, the subadviser, at its discretion, may take temporary defensive positions that are inconsistent with its principal investment strategies by investing part or all of the fund’s assets in cash or cash equivalents. When this allocation happens, the fund may not achieve its investment objective.

Please see “More Information About Risks Related to Principal Investment Strategies” for information about the risks of investing in the fund. Please refer to “Additional Risks Associated with Investment Techniques and Fund Operations” for other investment techniques of the fund.

   

12

Virtus Duff & Phelps Select MLP and Energy Fund


Virtus KAR Long/Short Equity Fund

Non-Fundamental Investment Objective:

The fund has an investment objective of seeking long-term capital appreciation.

Principal Investment Strategies:

The fund pursues long-term capital appreciation by investing in long positions of companies the fund’s subadviser believes to be of high quality and selling short positions in companies the fund’s subadviser believes to be of low quality. The fund takes a long position by purchasing the shares of a company that the subadviser believes will increase in value. A short position is an attempt to profit from an expected drop in the price of a company’s securities by borrowing shares and selling them, and subsequently repurchasing shares of that company

The long investment strategy aims to purchase the stock of issuers deemed by the subadviser as high quality companies at attractive valuations. Qualities the fund’s subadviser uses to define “high-quality” companies include a durable competitive advantage, strong management team, and reasonable capital structure.

The short investment strategy aims to sell short the stock of low quality companies whose share price the subadviser expects to drop because it does not accurately reflect the poor fundamentals of the business. Qualities the fund’s subadviser uses to define “low-quality” companies include an erratic or mediocre financial performance, poor history of capital allocation, a flawed business model and/or an aggressive capital structure.

The fund’s subadviser’s assessment of quality is based on a thorough fundamental analysis of each company, which generally includes, but is not limited to: a review of relevant Securities and Exchange Commission filings; discussions with a company’s management, customers, competitors and/or suppliers; a review of various independent sources of news, information and analysis of the company and its industry; an analysis of historical and expected financial performance for the company; an estimation of the company’s intrinsic value; and identifying the source(s) and durability of the company’s protection from competitive threats.

Once the stock of a company is purchased long or sold short, the fund’s subadviser continues to monitor that company’s financial performance, competitive dynamics and stewardship of capital. The fund’s subadviser will generally sell a security (or repurchase a security sold short) if it exceeds the fund’s subadviser’s estimate of the company’s intrinsic value, a more compelling investment idea has emerged, or there has been a structural deterioration (or improvement in the case of a short sale) in the fundamentals of the business.

The fund’s net market exposure (long exposure minus short exposure) may fluctuate based on the number and quality of investments ideas the fund’s subadviser is able to find as a result of its bottom-up fundamental analysis, but will generally have a net long bias (long exposure will typically exceed short exposure). The fund reserves the right to significantly increase its cash holdings as a defensive measure, if warranted by market conditions.

Under normal circumstances, the fund invests at least 80% of its assets in equity securities and equity-related instruments, in long and short positions of U.S.-listed equity securities of any capitalization. For this policy, “assets” means net assets plus the amount of any borrowings for investment purposes. The fund’s investments may include securities of U.S. and foreign issuers, including securities of issuers in emerging market countries and securities denominated in a currency other than the U.S. dollar. Equity securities consist of common and preferred stocks, exchange traded funds (“ETFs”), S&P Depositary Receipts (“SPDRs”), American Depositary Receipts (“ADRs”) and other similar instruments. To the extent that selling short a particular stock is impractical, or prohibited, the fund may invest in derivative instruments, such as options or futures, as an alternative method to take a short position consistent with the fund’s investment strategy described herein. The fund is considered non-diversified under federal securities laws, which means that it may concentrate its investments in fewer issuers than permitted for diversified mutual funds. In general, the fund is not constrained by any sector weight limitations, but it is limited to investing a maximum of 25% of its total assets in any one industry. To the extent consistent with the fund’s investment objective and strategies, the subadviser may consider as an element of its investment research and decision making processes for the fund any environmental, social and/or governance (“ESG”) factors that the subadviser believes may influence risks and rewards of companies under consideration. However, any consideration of ESG factors will be within the context of the subadviser’s overall investment research and evaluation of whether such factors are relevant and financially material to a particular investment opportunity and, where deemed financially material to a particular investment opportunity, whether the subadviser believes such factors are likely to materially impact anticipated long-term capital appreciation of the investment opportunity. Although the specific ESG factors that will be relevant to each investment opportunity will differ, some examples of ESG factors the subadviser believes to be relevant to many investment opportunities are water stress, toxic emissions and waste, corporate governance, product safety and quality, labor management, and diversity & inclusion. In evaluating an existing or prospective investment, ESG is just one of several factors considered by the subadviser when making investments on behalf of the fund. In addition, ESG is not weighted more heavily than other considerations, and the fund could invest in a company even if such company scores poorly when any applicable ESG factors are considered.

The fund’s policy of investing 80% of its assets in equity securities and equity-related instruments may be changed only upon 60 days’ written notice to shareholders.

Temporary Defensive Strategy: If the subadviser does not believe that market conditions are favorable to the fund’s principal investment strategies, the fund may take temporary defensive positions that are inconsistent with its principal strategies by investing in cash or money market instruments, including, but not limited to, U.S. Government obligations maturing within one year from the date of purchase. When this allocation happens, the fund may not achieve its investment objectives.

Please see “More Information About Risks Related to Principal Investment Strategies” for information about the risks of investing in the fund. Please refer to “Additional Risks Associated with Investment Techniques and Fund Operations” for other investment techniques of the fund.

   

Virtus KAR Long/Short Equity Fund

13


More Information About Risks Related to Principal Investment Strategies

Each fund may not achieve its objective, and each fund is not intended to be a complete investment program.

Generally, the value of a fund’s investments that supports your share value may decrease. If between the time you purchase shares and the time you sell shares the value of such fund’s investments decreases, you will lose money.

Investment values can decrease for a number of reasons. Conditions affecting the overall economy, specific industries or companies in which the fund invests can be worse than expected and investments may fail to perform as the adviser or a subadviser expects. As a result, the value of your shares may decrease.

Specific risks of investing in each fund are identified in the below table and described in detail following the table. The risks are listed in alphabetical order, which is not necessarily indicative of importance. For certain funds, the indicated risks apply indirectly through the fund’s investments in other funds.

     

Risks

Virtus Duff & Phelps Select MLP and Energy Fund

Virtus KAR Long/Short Equity Fund

Counterparty

 

X

Depositary Receipts

 

X

Derivatives

X

X

Energy Industry Concentration

X

 

Equity Securities

X

X

Large Market Capitalization Companies

X

X

Medium Market Capitalization Companies

 

X

Small and Medium Market Capitalization Companies

X

 

Small Market Capitalization Companies

 

X

Exchange-Traded Funds

X

X

Exchange-Traded Notes

X

 

Foreign Investing

X

X

Currency Rate

X

X

Emerging Market Investing

X

X

Foreign Currency Transactions

 

X

Infrastructure-Related Investments

X

 

Limited Number of Investments

 

X

Liquidity

X

 

Market Volatility

X

X

Master Limited Partnership

X

 

MLP Affiliate

X

 

MLP Tax-Deferred Distribution

X

 

Non-Diversification

X

X

Preferred Stocks

 

X

Redemption

X

X

RIC Compliance

X

 

Sector Focused Investing

 

X

Short Sales

 

X

Short-Term Investments

X

 

Counterparty

When a fund engages in investment techniques in which it relies on another party to consummate the transaction, the fund is subject to the risk of default by the other party. To the extent that a fund enters into multiple transactions with a single or limited number of counterparties, the fund will be subject to increased levels of counterparty risk.

Depositary Receipts

Certain funds may invest in American Depositary Receipts (ADRs) sponsored by U.S. banks, European Depositary Receipts (EDRs), Global Depositary Receipts (GDRs), ADRs not sponsored by U.S. banks, other types of depositary receipts (including non-voting depositary receipts), and other similar instruments representing securities of foreign companies. The issuers of Depositary Receipts may discontinue issuing new Depositary Receipts and withdraw existing Depositary Receipts at any time, which may result in costs and delays in the distribution of the underlying assets to the fund and may negatively impact the fund’s performance.

   

14

Virtus Mutual Funds


Although certain depositary receipts may reduce or eliminate some of the risks associated with foreign investing, these types of securities generally are subject to many of the same risks as direct investment in securities of foreign issuers.

Derivatives

Derivative transactions are contracts whose value is derived from the value of an underlying asset, index or rate, including futures, options, non-deliverable forwards, foreign currency forward contracts and swap agreements. A fund may use derivatives to hedge against factors that affect the value of its investments, such as interest rates and foreign currency exchange rates. A fund may also utilize derivatives as part of its overall investment technique to gain or lessen exposure to various securities, markets, volatility, dividend payments and currencies.

Derivatives typically involve greater risks than traditional investments. It is generally more difficult to ascertain the risk of, and to properly value, derivative contracts. Many derivatives, and particularly those that are privately negotiated, are complex and often valued subjectively. Improper valuations can result in increased cash payment requirements to counterparties or a loss of value to the fund. The prices of derivatives may move in unexpected ways, especially in abnormal market conditions. Derivatives are usually less liquid than traditional securities and are subject to counterparty risk (the risk that the other party to the contract will default or otherwise not be able to perform its contractual obligations). In addition, some derivatives transactions may involve potentially unlimited losses.

Derivative contracts entered into for hedging purposes may also subject a fund to losses if the contracts do not correlate with the assets, indexes or rates they were designed to hedge. In regard to currency hedging using forward contracts, it is generally not possible to precisely match the foreign currency exposure of such foreign currency forward contracts to the value of the securities involved due to fluctuations in the market values of such securities and cash flows into and out of the fund between the date a foreign currency forward contract is entered into and the date it expires.

Governments, agencies and/or other regulatory bodies may adopt or change laws or regulations that could adversely affect a fund’s ability to invest in derivatives as the fund’s subadviser intends. The Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act (the “Dodd-Frank Act”), among other things, grants the Commodity Futures Trading Commission (the “CFTC”) and SEC broad rulemaking authority to implement various provisions of the Dodd-Frank Act including comprehensive regulation of the over-the-counter (“OTC”) derivatives market. The implementation of the Dodd-Frank Act could adversely affect a fund by placing limits on derivative transactions, and/or increasing transaction and/or regulatory compliance costs. For example, the CFTC has adopted rules that apply a new aggregation standard for position limit purposes, which may further limit a fund’s ability to trade futures contracts and swaps.

There are also special tax rules applicable to certain types of derivatives, which could affect the amount, timing and character of a fund’s income or loss and hence of its distributions to shareholders by causing holding period adjustments, converting short-term capital losses into long-term capital losses, and accelerating a fund’s income or deferring its losses. A fund’s use of derivatives may also increase the amount of taxes payable by shareholders or the resources required by the fund or its adviser and/or subadviser(s) to comply with particular regulatory requirements.

Energy Industry Concentration

The value of the investments of a fund that focuses its investments in a particular industry or market sector will be highly sensitive to financial, economic, political and other developments affecting that industry or market sector, and conditions that negatively impact that industry or market sector will have a greater impact on the fund as compared with a fund that does not have its holdings concentrated in a particular industry or market sector. Events negatively affecting the energy-related industries in which the fund has invested are therefore likely to cause the value of the fund’s shares to decrease, perhaps significantly. Energy-related industries have historically experienced price volatility. At times, the performance of investments in energy-related industries may lag the performance of other sectors or the market as a whole. Specific risks applicable to energy-related industries include fluctuations in commodity prices; reduced consumer demand for commodities such as oil, natural gas or petroleum products; reduced availability of natural gas or other commodities for transporting, processing, storing or delivering; slowdowns in new construction; extreme weather or other natural disasters; and threats of attack by terrorists on energy assets. Additionally, energy-related industries are subject to substantial government regulation, and changes in the regulatory environment for energy and energy-related companies may adversely impact their profitability.

Equity Securities

Generally, prices of equity securities are more volatile than those of fixed income securities. The prices of equity securities will rise and fall in response to a number of different factors. In particular, equity securities will respond to events that affect entire financial markets or industries (such as changes in inflation or consumer demand) and to events that affect particular issuers (such as news about the success or failure of a new product). Equity securities also are subject to “stock market risk,” meaning that stock prices in general may decline over short or extended periods of time. When the value of the stocks held by a fund goes down, the value of the fund’s shares will be affected.

 Large Market Capitalization Companies Risk. The value of investments in larger companies may not rise as much as investments in smaller companies, and larger companies may be unable to respond quickly to competitive challenges, such as changes in technology and consumer tastes.

 Medium Market Capitalization Companies Risk. Medium-sized companies often have narrower markets, fewer products or services to offer, and more limited managerial and financial resources than larger, more established companies. As a result, the performance of medium-sized companies may be more volatile, and they may face a greater risk of business failure, which could increase the volatility and risk of loss to the fund.

 Small and Medium Market Capitalization Companies Risk. Small and medium-sized companies often have narrower markets, fewer products or services to offer, and more limited managerial and financial resources than larger, more established companies. As a result, the performance of small and medium-sized companies may be more volatile, and they may face a greater risk of business failure, which could increase the volatility and risk of loss to the fund.

 Small Market Capitalization Companies Risk. Small companies often have narrower markets, fewer products or services to offer, and more limited managerial and financial resources than larger, more established companies. As a result, the performance of small companies may be more volatile, and they may face a greater risk of business failure, which could increase the volatility and risk of loss to the fund.

   

Virtus Mutual Funds

15


Exchange-Traded Funds (“ETFs”)

ETFs invest in a portfolio of securities designed to track a particular market segment or index. The risks associated with investing in ETFs generally reflect the risks of owning shares of the underlying securities the ETF is designed to track, although lack of liquidity in an ETF could result in its value being more volatile than the underlying portfolio of securities. Assets invested in ETFs incur a layering of expenses, including operating costs and advisory fees that fund shareholders indirectly bear; such expenses may exceed the expenses the fund would incur if it invested directly in the underlying portfolio of securities the ETF is designed to track. Shares of ETFs trade on a securities exchange and may trade at, above, or below their net asset value.

Exchange-Traded Notes (“ETNs”)

ETNs are unsecured, unsubordinated debt instruments that have characteristics and risks similar to those of fixed income securities and trade on an exchange in a manner similar to shares of ETFs. This type of security differs from typical bonds and notes, however, because ETN returns are based upon the performance of a market index minus applicable fees and expenses, no period coupon payments are distributed, and no principal protections exist. The purpose of ETNs is to create a type of security that combines the aspects of both bonds and ETFs. The value of an ETN may be influenced by time to maturity, level of supply and demand for the ETN, volatility and lack of liquidity in underlying commodities or securities markets,changes in the applicable interest rates, changes in the issuer’s credit rating, and economic, legal, political or geographic events that affect the referenced commodity or security. A fund’s decision to sell its ETN holdings also may be limited by the availability of a secondary market. If a fund must sell some or all of its ETN holdings and the secondary market is weak, the fund might have to sell such holdings at a discount. If a fund holds its investment in an ETN until maturity, the issuer will give the fund a cash amount that would be equal to principal amount (subject to the day’s index factor). ETNs also are subject to counterparty risk and debt instruments risks.

Foreign Investing

Investing in securities of non-U.S. companies involves special risks and considerations not typically associated with investing in U.S. companies, and the values of non-U.S. securities may be more volatile than those of U.S. securities. The values of non-U.S. securities are subject to economic, geopolitical, and political developments in countries and regions where the issuers operate or are domiciled, or where the securities are traded, such as changes in economic or monetary policies, and to changes in currency exchange rates. Values may also be affected by restrictions on receiving the investment proceeds from a non-U.S. country.

In general, less information is publicly available about non-U.S. companies than about U.S. companies. Non-U.S. companies are generally not subject to the same accounting, auditing and financial reporting standards as are U.S. companies. In addition , a fund’s investments in non-U.S. securities may be subject to withholding and other taxes imposed by countries outside the U.S., which could reduce the return on an investment in a fund. Certain foreign issuers classified as passive foreign investment companies may be subject to additional taxation risk. Risks associated with foreign investing include the following:

 Currency Rate Risk. Because the foreign securities in which a fund invests generally trade in currencies other than the U.S. dollar, changes in currency exchange rates will affect the fund’s net asset value, the value of dividends and interest earned, and gains and losses realized on the sale of securities. Because the value of each fund’s shares is calculated in U.S. dollars, it is possible for a fund to lose money by investing in a foreign security if the local currency of a foreign market depreciates against the U.S. dollar, even if the local currency value of the fund’s holdings goes up. Generally, a strong U.S. dollar relative to such other currencies will adversely affect the value of the fund’s holdings in foreign securities.

 Emerging Market Risk. The risks of foreign investments are generally greater in countries whose markets are still developing than they are in more developed markets. Emerging market countries typically have economic and political systems that are less fully developed, and can be expected to be less stable than those of more developed countries. For example, the economies of such countries can be subject to rapid and unpredictable rates of inflation or deflation. Since these markets are often small, they may be more likely to suffer sharp and frequent price changes or long-term price depression because of adverse publicity, investor perceptions or the actions of a few large investors. They may also have policies that restrict investment by foreigners, or that prevent foreign investors from withdrawing their money at will. Certain emerging markets may also face other significant internal or external risks, including the imposition of sanctions and risk of war and civil unrest. For all of these reasons, investments in emerging markets may be considered speculative. To the extent that a fund invests a significant portion of its assets in a particular emerging market, the fund will be more vulnerable to financial, economic, political and other developments in that country, and conditions that negatively impact that country will have a greater impact on the fund as compared with a fund that does not have its holdings concentrated in a particular country.

 Foreign Currency Transactions Risk. A fund may engage in foreign currency transactions, including foreign currency forward contracts, options, swaps and other similar strategic transactions. These transactions may be for the purposes of hedging or efficient portfolio management, or may be for investment purposes, and they may be exchange traded or traded directly with market counterparties. Such transactions may not prove successful or may have the effect of limiting gains from favorable markets movements.

A fund may use derivatives to acquire positions in various currencies, which presents the risk that the fund could lose money on its exposure to a particular currency and also lose money on the derivative. A fund also may take positions in currencies that do not correlate to the currency exposure presented by the fund’s other investments. As a result, the fund’s currency exposure may differ, in some cases significantly, from the currency exposure of its other investments and/or its benchmarks.

Infrastructure-Related

Infrastructure-related entities are subject to a variety of factors that may adversely affect their business or operations including high interest costs in connection with capital construction programs, costs associated with environmental and other regulations, the effects of economic slowdown and surplus capacity, increased competition from other providers of services, uncertainties concerning the availability of fuel at reasonable prices, the effects of energy conservation policies and other factors. Additionally, infrastructure-related entities may be subject to regulation by various governmental authorities and may also be affected by governmental regulation of rates charged to customers, service interruption due to environmental, operational or other mishaps and the imposition of special tariffs and changes in tax laws, regulatory policies and accounting standards.

   

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Limited Number of Investments

There is a risk that a fund’s portfolio may be more susceptible to factors adversely affecting issuers of securities in the fund’s portfolio than would a fund holding a greater number of securities.

Liquidity

Certain securities in which a fund invests may be difficult to sell at the time and price beneficial to the fund, for example due to low trading volumes or legal restrictions. When there is no willing buyer or a security cannot be readily sold, the fund may have to sell at a lower price or may be unable to sell the security at all. The sale of such securities may also require the fund to incur expenses in addition to those normally associated with the sale of a security.

In addition to this, certain shareholders, including affiliates of a fund’s investment adviser and/or subadviser(s), may from time to time own or control a significant percentage of the fund’s shares. Redemptions by these shareholders of their shares of the fund may increase the fund’s liquidity risk by causing the fund to have to sell securities at an unfavorable time and/or price.

Market Volatility

The value of the securities in which a fund invests may go up or down in response to the prospects of individual issuers and/or general economic conditions. Such price changes may be temporary or may last for extended periods.

Instability in the financial markets may expose each fund to greater market and liquidity risk and potential difficulty in valuing portfolio instruments that it holds. In response to financial markets that experienced extreme volatility, and in some cases a lack of liquidity, the U.S. Government and other governments have taken a number of unprecedented actions, including acquiring distressed assets from financial institutions and acquiring ownership interests in those institutions. The implications of government ownership and disposition of these assets are unclear. Additional legislation or government regulation may also change the way in which funds themselves are regulated, which could limit or preclude a fund’s ability to achieve its investment objective. Local, regional or global events such as war or military conflict (e.g. Russia’s invasion of Ukraine), acts of terrorism, the spread of infectious illness or other public health issue, recessions, inflation, rapid interest rate changes, supply chain disruptions, sanctions, or other events could have a significant impact on a fund and its investments, hampering the ability of a fund’s portfolio manager(s) to invest a fund’s assets as intended.

Master Limited Partnership (MLP)

An investment in MLP units involves some risks that differ from an investment in the common stock of a corporation. Holders of MLP units have limited control on matters affecting the partnership. MLPs holding credit-related investments are subject to interest rate risk and the risk of default on payment obligations by debt issuers. MLPs that concentrate in a particular industry or a particular geographic region are subject to risks associated with such industry or region. The fees that MLPs charge for transportation of oil and gas products through their pipelines are subject to government regulation, which could negatively impact the revenue stream. Investing in MLPs also involves certain risks related to investing in the underlying assets of the MLPs and risks associated with pooled investment vehicles. These include the risk of environmental incidents, terrorist attacks, demand destruction from high commodity prices, proliferation of alternative energy sources, inadequate supply of external capital, and conflicts of interest with the general partner. The benefit derived from the fund’s investment in MLPs is largely dependent on the MLPs being treated as partnerships for federal income tax purposes, so any change to this status would adversely affect the price of the MLP units.

Certain MLPs in which a fund may invest depend upon their parent or sponsor entities for the majority of their revenues. If their parent or sponsor entities fail to make such payments or satisfy their obligations, the revenues and cash flows of such MLPs and ability of such MLPs to make distributions to unit holders, such as the fund, would be adversely affected.

MLP Affiliate

The performance of securities issued by MLP affiliates, including MLP I-Shares and common shares of corporations that own general partner interests primarily depend on the performance of an MLP. As such, results of operations, financial condition, cash flows and distributions for MLP affiliates primarily depend on an MLP’s results of operations, financial condition and cash flows. The risks and uncertainties that affect the MLP, its results of operations, financial condition, cash flows and distributions also affect the value of securities held by the MLP affiliates. Securities of MLP I-Shares may trade at a market price below that of the MLP affiliate and may be less liquid than securities of their MLP affiliate.

MLP Tax-Deferred Distribution

Because an MLP is treated as a partnership for federal income tax purposes, holders of its equity are taxed on their allocable share of income from the MLP rather than distributions received from the MLP. Many MLPs make cash distributions in excess of their taxable income. The excess of distributions over income reduces the partners’ tax basis in their equity interest in the MLP. Accordingly, the tax on such distributions may be deferred until the MLP interest is sold. Similarly, if a fund makes distributions to its shareholders in excess of its taxable income, such excess will represent a return of capital that reduces shareholders’ tax basis in their shares. Because the basis reduction would increase any future gain on a disposition of the shares the tax may be deferred until each shareholder sells its shares.

Non-Diversification

As a non-diversified investment company, the fund is not limited in the proportion of assets that it may invest in the securities of any one issuer. If the fund takes concentrated positions in a small number of issuers, the fund may be more susceptible to the risks associated with those issuers, or to a single economic, political, regulatory or other event affecting those issuers.

Preferred Stocks

Preferred stocks may provide a higher dividend rate than the interest yield on debt instruments of the same issuer, but are subject to greater risk of fluctuation in market value and greater risk of non-receipt of income. Unlike interest on debt instruments, dividends on preferred stocks must be declared by the issuer’s board of directors before becoming payable. Preferred stocks are in many ways like perpetual debt instruments, providing a stream of income but without stated maturity date. Because they often lack a fixed maturity or redemption date, preferred stocks are likely to fluctuate substantially in price when interest rates

   

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change. Such fluctuations generally are comparable to or exceed those of long-term government or corporate bonds (those with maturities of fifteen to thirty years). Preferred stocks have claims on assets and earnings of the issuer which are subordinate to the claims of all creditors but senior to the claims of common stockholders. A preferred stock rating differs from a bond rating because it applies to an equity issue which is intrinsically different from, and subordinated to, a debt issue. Preferred stock ratings generally represent an assessment of the capacity and willingness of an issuer to pay preferred stock dividends and any applicable sinking fund obligations. Preferred stock also may be subject to optional or mandatory redemption provisions, and may be significantly less liquid than many other securities, such as U.S. Government securities, corporate debt or common stock.

Redemption

The redemption by one or more large shareholders or groups of shareholders of their holdings in a fund could have an adverse impact on the remaining shareholders in the fund by, for example, accelerating the realization of capital gains and/or increasing the fund’s transaction costs.

RIC Compliance

The fund’s investment in MLPs presents unusual challenges in qualifying each year as a “regulated investment company” (a “RIC”) under the Internal Revenue Code, a designation which allows the fund to avoid paying taxes at regular corporate rates on its income. If for any taxable year the fund fails to qualify as a RIC, the fund’s taxable income will be subject to federal income tax at regular corporate rates. The resulting increase to the fund’s expenses will reduce its performance and its income available for distribution to shareholders.

Sector Focused Investing

The value of the investments of a fund that focuses its investments in a particular market sector will be highly sensitive to financial, economic, political and other developments affecting that market sector, and conditions that negatively impact that market sector will have a greater impact on the fund as compared with a fund that does not have its holdings similarly focused. Events negatively affecting the market sectors in which a fund has invested are therefore likely to cause the value of the fund’s shares to decrease, perhaps significantly.

Short Sales

A fund may engage in short sales, which are transactions in which a fund sells a security that it does not own (or that it owns but does not intend to deliver) in anticipation that the price of the security will decline. In order to establish a short position in a security, a fund must first borrow the security from a broker or other institution to complete the sale. The fund may not always be able to borrow a security, or to close out a short position at a particular time or at an acceptable price. If the price of the borrowed security increases between the date of the short sale and the date on which the fund replaces the security, the fund may experience a loss. A fund’s loss on a short sale is limited only by the maximum attainable price of the security (which could be limitless) less the price the fund paid for the security at the time it was borrowed. Short sales are also subject to many of the risks described herein under “Derivatives Risk”.

Short-Term Investments

Short-term investments include money market instruments, repurchase agreements, certificates of deposit and bankers’ acceptances and other short-term instruments that are not U.S. Government securities. These securities generally present less risk than many other investments, but they are generally subject to credit risk and may be subject to other risks as well.

Management of the Funds

The Adviser

Virtus Alternative Investment Advisers, Inc. (“VAIA” or the “Adviser”) is the investment adviser to the funds and is located at One Financial Plaza, Hartford, CT 06103. VAIA, an indirect, wholly-owned subsidiary of Virtus Investment Partners, Inc., a publicly traded multi-manager asset management business, acts as the investment adviser to open- and closed-end funds totaling approximately $988 million in assets under management as of December 31, 2022.

Subject to the direction of the funds’ Board of Trustees, VAIA is responsible for managing the funds’ investment programs and for the general operations of the funds, including oversight of the funds’ subadvisers, and recommending their hiring, termination and replacement.

VAIA has appointed and oversees the activities of each of the subadvisers for the funds as shown in the table below. Each subadviser manages the investments of each funds to conform with its investment policies as described in this prospectus.

   

Virtus Duff & Phelps Select MLP and Energy Fund

Duff & Phelps

Virtus KAR Long/Short Equity Fund

KAR

Management Fees

Virtus Duff & Phelps Select MLP and Energy Fund and Virtus KAR Long/Short Equity Fund pay VAIA an investment management fee that is accrued daily against the value of the fund’s net assets at the following annual rates:

     
 

First $1 billion

$1+ billion

Virtus Duff & Phelps Select MLP and Energy Fund

0.90%

0.85%

Virtus KAR Long/Short Equity Fund

1.25%

1.20%

Out of its investment management fee, VAIA pays each subadviser a subadvisory fee. For its services to Virtus Duff & Phelps Select MLP and Energy Fund, Duff & Phelps receives as its subadvisory fee 50% of the net investment management fee. For its services to Virtus KAR Long/Short Equity Fund, KAR receives as its subadvisory fee 50% of the net investment management fee.

   

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The Subadvisers

Duff & Phelps, an affiliate of VAIA, is located at 200 South Wacker Drive, Suite 500, Chicago, IL 60606. Duff & Phelps acts as subadviser to mutual funds and as adviser or subadviser to closed-end mutual funds and to institutional clients. Duff & Phelps (together with its predecessor) has been in the investment advisory business for more than 70 years.  As of December 31, 2022, Duff & Phelps managed approximately $12 billion, of which $12.006 billion was regulatory assets under management and $340,000 was model/emulation assets under contract. Model/emulation assets refer to assets that Duff & Phelps is under contract to deliver a model portfolio to and are not considered regulatory assets under management.

KAR, an affiliate of VAIA, is located at 2000 Avenue of the Stars, Suite 1110, Los Angeles, CA 90067. KAR acts as subadviser to mutual funds and as investment adviser to institutions and individuals. As of December 31, 2022, KAR managed approximately $47.5 billion, of which $33.5 billion was regulatory assets under management and $14.0 billion was model/emulation assets under contract. Model/emulation assets refer to assets that KAR is under contract to deliver a model portfolio to and are not considered regulatory assets under management.

A discussion regarding the basis for the Board of Trustees approving the investment advisory and subadvisory agreements for the funds is available in the funds’ semiannual report covering the period from November 1, 2021 through April 30, 2022.

The funds operate under a “manager of managers” structure, in which the Adviser provides general management services to the funds, including overall supervisory responsibility for the general management and investment of the funds’ assets, and the Adviser has the ultimate responsibility, subject to oversight by the funds’ Board of Trustees, to oversee the funds’ subadvisers and recommend their hiring, termination and replacement.

Virtus KAR Long/Short Equity Fund and the Adviser have received shareholder approval to rely on an exemptive order and additional exemptive relief from SEC that permits the Adviser, subject to certain conditions, and without the approval of shareholders, to: (a) select unaffiliated subadvisers, partially-owned affiliated subadvisers, and wholly-owned affiliated subadvisers, to manage all or a portion of the assets of the fund, and enter into subadvisory agreements with such subadvisers; (b) materially amend subadvisory agreements with such subadvisers; and (c) to continue the employment of existing subadvisers after events that under the 1940 Act and the relevant subadvisory agreements would otherwise cause an automatic termination of the subadvisory agreements. In such circumstances, shareholders would receive notice of such action. In addition, the exemptive relief permits the fund to disclose its advisory fees as follows: (a) advisory fees paid by the fund to the Adviser and the subadvisory fees paid by the Adviser to wholly-owned affiliated subadvisers for the fund may be disclosed on an aggregate basis, rather than disclosing the amounts paid to each individually; and (b) subadvisory fees paid by the Adviser to multiple unaffiliated and partially-owned affiliated subadvisers for the fund may be disclosed on an aggregate basis, rather than disclosing the amounts paid to each such subadviser individually.

Virtus Duff & Phelps Select MLP and Energy Fund and the Adviser have received shareholder approval to rely on an exemptive order from the SEC that permits the Adviser, subject to certain conditions and without the approval of shareholders to: (a) select both unaffiliated subadvisers and certain wholly-owned affiliated subadvisers to manage all or a portion of the assets of a fund, and enter into subadvisory agreements with such subadvisers; (b) materially amend subadvisory agreements with such subadvisers; and (c) continue the employment of an existing subadviser on the same subadvisory agreement terms where an agreement has been assigned because of a change in control of the subadviser. In such circumstances, shareholders would receive notice of such action, including, if applicable, instructions regarding how to obtain the information concerning the new subadviser that normally is provided in a proxy statement.

Portfolio Management

The following individuals are jointly and primarily responsible for the day-to-day management of the funds’ portfolios.

Duff & Phelps

   

Virtus Duff & Phelps Select MLP and Energy Fund

Rodney C. Clayton, CFA (since February 2020)

David D. Grumhaus, Jr. (since September 2015)

Rodney C. Clayton, CFA. Mr. Clayton serves as Managing Director and Portfolio Manager for Energy Infrastructure at Duff & Phelps. Prior to joining Duff & Phelps in April 2016, Mr. Clayton was a senior manager due diligence analyst at UBS Financial Services, focusing on MLP, and equity income strategies (2013 to 2016); and served as an equity research analyst at J.P. Morgan Securities covering the Exploration & Production, Engineering & Construction, and Environmental Services industries (2004 to 2013).

David D. Grumhaus, Jr. Mr. Grumhaus, President, and Chief Investment Officer of Duff & Phelps. Mr. Grumhaus has served as a Portfolio Manager of the fund since inception in September 2015. Prior to joining Duff & Phelps in 2014, Mr. Grumhaus served as a portfolio manager and director of research for Copia Capital, LLC. Previously, he was an investment banker for Goldman, Sachs & Co., and William Blair & Company, LLC. Mr. Grumhaus began his career in the investment industry in 1989.

KAR

   

Virtus KAR Long/Short Equity Fund

Julie Biel, CFA (since March 2022)

Chris Wright (since the fund’s inception in December 2018)

Julie Biel, CFA. Ms. Biel is a Portfolio Manager and Senior Research Analyst at KAR, with primary research responsibilities for the small- and mid-capitalization technology sector. Before joining KAR in 2013, Ms. Biel worked as an Equity Research Associate at Imperial Capital and before that was an as an Equity Research Associate at Merrill Lynch. She has 14 years of equity research experience.

Chris Wright, CFA. Mr. Wright is a Portfolio Manager and Senior Research Analyst at KAR with primary research responsibilities for the financials and real estate sector. Before joining KAR in 2012, Mr. Wright worked at Alvarez & Marsal as a Senior Associate in Turnarounds and Restructuring and at Houlihan Lokey as an Associate in the Investment Banking Financial Institutions Group. He has approximately 11 years of equity research experience.

Please refer to the SAI for additional information about the funds’ portfolio managers, including the structure of and method of computing compensation, other accounts they manage and their ownership of shares of the funds.

   

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Additional Risks Associated with Investment Techniques and Fund Operations

In addition to the Principal Investment Strategies and Risks Related to Principal Investment Strategies, each of the funds listed in the chart below may engage in additional investment techniques that present additional risks to a fund. Those additional investment techniques in which a fund is expected to engage as of the date of this prospectus are indicated in the chart below, although other techniques may be utilized from time to time. The information below the chart describes the additional investment techniques and their risks. Many of the additional investment techniques that a fund may use, as well as other investment techniques that are relied upon to a lesser degree, are more fully described in the SAI.

     

Risks

Virtus Duff & Phelps Select MLP and Energy Fund

Virtus KAR Long/Short Equity Fund

Cybersecurity

X

X

   

ESG Consideration

X

X

   

Initial Public Offerings (IPOs)

 

X

LIBOR

X

X

Operational

X

X

Private Placements

 

X

Cybersecurity

With the increased use of technologies such as the Internet to conduct business, the funds are potentially more susceptible to operational and information security risks through breaches in cybersecurity. In general, a breach in cybersecurity can result from either a deliberate attack or an unintentional event. Cybersecurity breaches may involve, among other things, infection by computer viruses or other malicious software code or unauthorized access to the digital information systems, networks or devices of the funds or their service providers (including, but not limited to, the funds’ investment adviser, transfer agent, custodian, administrators and other financial intermediaries) through “hacking” or other means, in each case for the purpose of misappropriating assets or sensitive information (including, for example, personal shareholder information), corrupting data or causing operational disruption or failures in the physical infrastructure or operating systems that support the funds. Any such cybersecurity breaches or losses of service may cause the funds to lose proprietary information, suffer data corruption or lose operational capacity, which, in turn, could cause the funds to incur regulatory penalties, reputational damage, additional compliance costs associated with corrective measures, and/or financial loss. While the funds and their service providers have established business continuity plans and risk management systems designed to prevent or reduce the impact of cybersecurity attacks, there are inherent limitations in such plans and systems due in part to the ever-changing nature of technology and cybersecurity attack tactics, and there is a possibility that certain risks have not been adequately identified or prepared for. Cybersecurity risks may also impact issuers of securities in which the funds invest, which may cause the funds’ investments in such issuers to lose value.

ESG Consideration

Certain fund’s consideration of ESG factors could cause it to perform differently compared to funds that do not use such considerations. Certain fund’s consideration of ESG factors could cause it to perform differently compared to funds that do not use such considerations. The relevance and weightings of specific ESG factors may vary across asset classes, sectors and strategies and no one factor is determinative. ESG factors are qualitative and subjective by nature and there are significant differences in interpretations of what it means for a company to have positive or negative ESG factors. There is no guarantee that the factors utilized by a fund’s subadviser or any judgment exercised by the subadviser will reflect the opinions of any particular investor, and the factors analyzed by the subadviser may differ from the factors any particular investor considers relevant in evaluating ESG practices. When integrating ESG factors into the investment process, the subadviser may rely on third-party data that it believes to be reliable, but it does not guarantee the accuracy of such third-party data. ESG information from third-party data providers may be incomplete, inaccurate or unavailable, which may adversely impact the investment process. Moreover, the current lack of common standards may result in different approaches to integrating ESG factors. As a result, the funds may invest in companies that do not reflect the beliefs and values of any particular investor.

The ESG factors that may be evaluated as part of a fund’s investment process are anticipated to evolve over time and one or more characteristics may not be relevant with respect to all issuers that are eligible for investment. Further, the regulatory landscape with respect to ESG integration in the United States is still developing and future rules and regulations may require a fund to modify or alter its investment process with respect to ESG integration.

Initial Public Offerings (“IPOs”)

Certain funds may acquire common and preferred stock of issuers in an IPO. Investment returns from IPOs may be highly volatile and subject to varying patterns of trading volume, and these securities may at times be difficult to sell. In addition, information about the issuers of IPO securities is often difficult to obtain since they are new to the market and may not have lengthy operating histories. From time to time, a fund may purchase stock in an IPO and then immediately sell the stock. This practice will increase portfolio turnover rates and increase costs to the fund, affect fund performance, and may increase capital gain distributions, resulting in greater tax liability to the fund’s shareholders.

LIBOR

The London Interbank Offered Rate (“LIBOR”) historically has been and currently is used extensively in the U.S. and globally as a “benchmark” or “reference rate” for various commercial and financial contracts, including corporate and municipal bonds, bank loans, asset-backed and mortgage-related securities, interest rate swaps and other derivatives. For example, debt instruments in which a fund invests may pay interest at floating rates based on LIBOR or may be subject to interest caps or floors based on LIBOR. A fund’s derivative investments may also reference LIBOR. In addition, issuers of instruments in which a fund invests may obtain financing at floating rates based on LIBOR, and a fund may use leverage or borrowings based on LIBOR. In July 2017, the head of the United Kingdom Financial Conduct Authority announced the intention to phase out the use of LIBOR by the end of 2021. However, after subsequent announcements by the FCA, the LIBOR administrator and other regulators, certain of the most widely used LIBORs have been extended and are expected to continue until mid-2023. Currently, the U.S. and other countries are working to replace LIBOR with alternative reference rates. The transition effort in the U.S. is being led by the Alternative Reference Rate Committee (“ARRC”), a diverse group of market participants convened by the Federal Reserve. After much deliberation, ARRC selected the Secured Overnight Financing Rate (“SOFR”) as the preferred LIBOR successor for U.S. dollar markets. SOFR is a volume-weighted median of borrowing rates from the Treasury

   

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repurchase agreement market. National working groups in other jurisdictions have similarly identified overnight nearly risk-free rates like SOFR as their preferred alternatives to LIBOR. Although the structured transition to the new rates is designed to mitigate the risks of disruption to financial markets, such risks exist. Abandonment of or modifications to LIBOR could lead to significant short- and long-term uncertainty and market instability. The risks associated with this discontinuation and transition may be exacerbated if the work necessary to effect an orderly transition to an alternative reference rate is not completed in a timely manner. It remains uncertain the effects such changes would have on the funds, or issuers of instruments in which the funds invest, and the financial markets generally.

Operational

An investment in a fund, like any mutual fund, can involve operational risks arising from factors such as processing errors, human errors, inadequate or failed internal or external processes, failures in systems and technology, changes in personnel and errors caused by third-party service providers. The occurrence of any of these failures, errors or breaches could result in a loss of information, regulatory scrutiny, reputational damage or other events, any of which could have a material adverse effect on a fund. While the funds seek to minimize such events through controls and oversight, there may still be failures that could cause losses to a fund.

Private Placements

Certain funds may purchase securities which have been privately issued to qualified institutional investors under special rules adopted by the SEC. While such securities may offer higher yields than comparable publicly traded securities, generally, privately placed securities are illiquid and are subject to resale restrictions. Privately issued securities ordinarily can be sold by a fund only in secondary market transactions to certain qualified investors pursuant to rules established by the SEC or privately negotiated transactions to a limited number of purchasers. Therefore, sales of such securities by a fund may involve significant delays and expense.

The funds may buy other types of securities or employ other portfolio management techniques. Please refer to the SAI for more detailed information about these and other investment techniques of the funds.

   

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Pricing of Fund Shares

How is the Share Price determined?

The Board of Trustees has adopted valuation policy and approved procedures for determining the value of investments of each Fund. Pursuant to the valuation policy and Rule 2a-5 under the 1940 Act, the Board of Trustees has designated the Adviser as its “valuation designee” for fair value determinations.

Each fund calculates a share price for each class of its shares. The share price (net asset value or “NAV”) for each class is based on the net assets of the fund and the number of outstanding shares of that class. In general, each fund calculates a share price for each class by:

 adding the values of all securities and other assets of the fund;

 subtracting liabilities; and

 dividing the result by the total number of outstanding shares of that class.

Assets: Equity securities are valued at the official closing price (typically last sale) on the exchange on which the securities are primarily traded, or, if no closing price is available, at the last bid price. Shares of other investment companies are valued at such companies’ NAVs. Debt instruments, including restricted securities, are valued based on evaluated quotations received from independent pricing services or from dealers who make markets in such securities. Other assets, such as accrued interest, accrued dividends and cash are also included in determining the fund’s NAV. As required, some securities and assets are valued at fair value as determined by the Adviser.

Liabilities: Accrued liabilities for class-specific expenses (if any), distribution fees, service fees and other liabilities are deducted from the assets of each class. Accrued expenses and liabilities that are not class-specific (such as management fees) are allocated to each class in proportion to each class’s net assets except where an alternative allocation can be more appropriately made.

Net Asset Value (NAV): The liabilities allocated to a class are deducted from the proportionate interest of such class in the assets of the applicable fund. The resulting amount for each class is then divided by the number of shares outstanding of that class to produce each class’s NAV per share.

The NAV per share of each class of each fund is determined as of the close of regular trading (generally 4:00 PM Eastern Time) on days when the New York Stock Exchange (“NYSE”) is open for trading. A fund will not calculate its NAV per share class on days when the NYSE is closed for trading. If a fund (or underlying fund, as applicable) holds securities that are traded on foreign exchanges that trade on weekends or other holidays when the funds do not price their shares, the NAV of the fund’s shares may change on days when shareholders will not be able to purchase or redeem the fund’s shares.

How are securities fair valued?

If market quotations are not readily available or available prices are not reliable, the funds determine a “fair value” for an investment according to policies and procedures approved by the Board of Trustees. The types of assets for which such pricing might be required include: (i) securities whose trading has been suspended; (ii) securities where the trading market is unusually thin or trades have been infrequent; (iii) debt instruments that have recently gone into default and for which there is no current market quotation; (iv) a security whose market price is not available from an independent pricing source and for which otherwise reliable quotes are not available; (v) securities of an issuer that has entered into a restructuring; (vi) a security whose price as provided by any pricing source does not, in the opinion of the adviser/subadviser, reflect the security’s market value; (vii) foreign securities subject to trading collars for which no or limited trading takes place; (viii) securities where the market quotations are not readily available as a result of “significant” events; and (ix) securities whose principal exchange or trading market is closed for an entire business day on which a fund needs to determine its NAV. This list is not inclusive of all situations that may require a security to be fair valued, nor is it intended to be conclusive in determining whether a specific event requires fair valuation.

The value of any portfolio security held by a fund for which market quotations are not readily available shall be determined in good faith and in a manner that assesses the security’s “fair value” on the valuation date (i.e., the amount that the fund might reasonably expect to receive for the security upon its current sale), based on a consideration of all available facts and all available information, including, but not limited to, the following: (i) the fundamental analytical data relating to the investment; (ii) the value of other relevant financial instruments, including derivative securities, traded on other markets or among dealers; (iii) an evaluation of the forces which influence the market in which these securities are purchased and sold (e.g., the existence of merger proposals or tender offers that might affect the value of the security); (iv) the type of the security; (v) the size of the holding; (vi) the initial cost of the security; (vii) trading volumes on markets, exchanges or among broker-dealers; (viii) price quotes from dealers and/or pricing services; (ix) values of baskets of securities traded on other markets, exchanges, or among dealers; (x) changes in interest rates; (xi) information obtained from the issuer, analysts, other financial institutions and/or the appropriate stock exchange (for exchange traded securities); (xii) an analysis of the company’s financial statements; (xiii) government (domestic or foreign) actions or pronouncements; (xiv) recent news about the security or issuer; (xv) whether two or more dealers with whom the adviser/subadviser regularly effects trades are willing to purchase or sell the security at comparable prices; and (xvi) other news events or relevant matters.

Certain non-U.S. securities may be fair valued in cases where closing prices are not readily available or are deemed not reflective of readily available market prices. For example, significant events (such as movement in the U.S. securities market, or other regional and local developments) may occur between the time that non-U.S. markets close (where the security is principally traded) and the time that a fund calculates its NAV at the close of regular trading on the NYSE (generally 4 p.m. Eastern time) that may impact the value of securities traded in these non-U.S. markets. In such cases, the funds fair value non-U.S. securities using an independent pricing service which considers the correlation of the trading patterns of the non-U.S. security to the intraday trading in the U.S. markets for investments such as ADRs, financial futures, ETFs, and certain indexes, as well as prices for similar securities. Because the frequency of significant events is not predictable, fair valuation of certain non-U.S. common stocks may occur on a frequent basis.

The value of a security, as determined using the fair value process, may not reflect such security’s market value.

At what price are shares purchased?

All investments received by the funds’ authorized agents in good order prior to the close of regular trading on the NYSE (generally 4:00 PM Eastern Time) will be executed based on that day’s NAV; investments received by the funds’ authorized agent in good order after the close of regular trading on the NYSE will be executed

   

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based on the next business day’s NAV. Shares credited to your account from the reinvestment of a fund’s distributions will be in full and fractional shares that are purchased at the closing NAV on the next business day on which the fund’s NAV is calculated following the dividend record date.

Sales Charges

An investor may be required to pay commissions and/or other forms of compensation to a broker for transactions in any share class, which are not reflected in the disclosure in this section.

What are the classes and how do they differ?

Each fund offers multiple classes of shares. Each class of shares has different sales and distribution charges. (See “Fund Fees and Expenses” in each fund’s “Fund Summary,” previously in this prospectus.) For certain classes of shares, the funds have adopted distribution and service plans allowed under Rule 12b-1 of the Investment Company Act of 1940, as amended, that authorize the funds to pay distribution and service fees (“Rule 12b-1 Fees”) for the sale of their shares and for services provided to shareholders.

The Rule 12b-1 Fees for each class of each fund are as follows:

         

Fund

Class A

Class C

Class I

Class R6

Virtus Duff & Phelps Select MLP and Energy Fund

0.25%

1.00%

None

N/A

Virtus KAR Long/Short Equity Fund

0.25%

1.00%

None

None

What arrangement is best for you?

The different classes of shares permit you to choose the method of purchasing shares that is most beneficial to you. In choosing a class of shares, consider the amount of your investment, the length of time you expect to hold the shares, whether you decide to receive distributions in cash or to reinvest them in additional shares, and any other personal circumstances. Depending upon these considerations, the accumulated distribution and service fees and contingent deferred sales charges of one class of shares may be more or less than the initial sales charge and accumulated distribution and service fees of another class of shares bought at the same time. Because distribution and service fees are paid out of a fund’s assets on an ongoing basis, over time these fees will increase the cost of your investment and may cost you more than paying other types of sales charges.

Your financial representative should recommend only those arrangements that are appropriate for you based on known information. In certain instances, you may be entitled to a reduction or waiver of sales charges. For instance, you may be entitled to a sales charge discount on Class A Shares if you purchase more than certain breakpoints.

To determine your eligibility for a sales charge discount on Class A Shares, you may aggregate all of your accounts (including joint accounts, retirement accounts such as individual retirement accounts (“IRAs”), non-IRAs, etc.) and those of your spouse, domestic partner, children and minor grandchildren.

The availability of certain sales charge waivers and discounts may depend on whether you purchase your shares directly from the fund or through a financial intermediary. Different intermediaries may impose different sales charges (including partial reduction in or waivers of sales charges) other than those listed in this section. Such intermediary-specific sales charge variations are described in Appendix A to this prospectus, entitled “Intermediary Sales Charges Discounts and Waivers.” Appendix A is incorporated herein by reference and is legally part of this prospectus.

Your financial representative may request that you provide an account statement or other holdings information to determine your eligibility for a breakpoint and/or waiver and to make certain all involved parties have the necessary data. In all instances, it is the purchaser’s responsibility to notify the fund or the purchaser’s financial representative at the time of purchase of any relationship or other facts qualifying the purchaser for sales charge waivers or discounts. For waivers and discounts not available through a particular intermediary, in order to receive these waivers or discounts shareholders will have to purchase fund shares through another intermediary offering such waivers or discounts or directly from the fund if the fund offers such waivers or discounts.

Additional information about the classes of shares offered, sales charges, breakpoints and discounts follows in this section and also may be found in the SAI in the section entitled “How to Buy Shares.” Intermediary-specific sales charge variations are described in Appendix A to this prospectus, entitled “Intermediary Sales Charges Discounts and Waivers.” This information is available free of charge, and in a clear and prominent format, at the Individual Investors section of virtus.com. Please be sure that you fully understand these choices before investing. If you or your financial representative requires additional assistance, you may also contact Virtus Fund Services by calling toll-free 800-243-1574.

Class A Shares. If you purchase Class A Shares, you will pay a sales charge at the time of purchase equal to 5.50% of the offering price (5.82% of the amount invested). The sales charge may be reduced or waived under certain conditions. (See Initial Sales Charge Alternative—Class A Shares below.) Generally, Class A Shares are not subject to any charges by the funds when redeemed; however, a contingent deferred sales charge (“CDSC”) in an amount equal to 1.00% may be imposed on certain redemptions (including exchanges into the Virtus Seix U.S. Government Securities Ultra-Short Bond Fund or Virtus Seix Ultra-Short Bond Fund (the “Ultra-Short Bond Funds”)) of purchases of $1,000,000 or more of Class A Shares within 18 months of a finder’s fee being paid on such shares. Finder’s fees are paid only on eligible purchases of at least $1 million and will not be paid on purchases for which the financial intermediary involved does not provide the information necessary for the fund’s Transfer Agent to identify the purchase as eligible. To determine whether the required information was provided and/or a finder’s fee was paid on your investment, contact your financial intermediary or call the Transfer Agent toll-free at 800-243-1574. No front-end sales load is applied to purchases of $1,000,000 or more.

The 18-month period begins on the last day of the month preceding the month in which the purchase was made, and shares not subject to a finder’s fee will be deemed to be redeemed first in order to minimize the instances in which the CDSC will be charged. Class A Shares have lower distribution and service fees (0.25%) and as a result pay higher dividends than Class C Shares. If you transact in Class A Shares through a financial intermediary, your financial intermediary may charge you a fee outside of the fund, such as brokerage commission or an investment advisory fee. You should consult your financial intermediary regarding

   

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23


the different share classes available to you, how their fees and expenses differ, and whether the fees charged by your financial intermediary differ depending upon which share class you choose.

Class C Shares. If you purchase Class C Shares, you will not pay a sales charge at the time of purchase. If you sell your Class C Shares within the first year after they are purchased, you will pay a deferred sales charge of 1%. (See “Deferred Sales Charge Alternative— Class C Shares” below.) Class C Shares have higher distribution and services fees (1.00%) and pay lower dividends than Class A Shares. With certain exceptions, Class C Shares will convert to Class A Shares after eight years, thus reducing future annual expenses. If an investor intends to purchase greater than $999,999 of Class C shares, and the purchase would qualify for Class A shares with no load, then the purchase will automatically be made into a purchase of Class A shares, thus reducing expenses. The funds may refuse any order to purchase shares. If you transact in Class C Shares through a financial intermediary, your financial intermediary may charge you a fee outside of the fund, such as brokerage commission or an investment advisory fee. You should consult your financial intermediary regarding the different share classes available to you, how their fees and expenses differ, and whether the fees charged by your financial intermediary differ depending upon which share class you choose.

Class I Shares. Class I Shares are offered primarily to clients of financial intermediaries that (i) charge such clients an ongoing fee for advisory, investment, consulting, or similar services; or (ii) have entered into an agreement with the funds’ distributor to offer Class I Shares through a no-load network or platform. Such clients may include pension and profit sharing plans, other employee benefit trusts, endowments, foundations and corporations. Class I Shares are also offered to private and institutional clients of, or referred by, the adviser, a subadviser or their affiliates, and to Trustees of the funds and trustees/directors of affiliated open- and closed-end funds, and directors, officers and employees of Virtus and its affiliates. If you are eligible to purchase and do purchase Class I Shares, you will pay no sales charge at any time. There are no distribution and service fees applicable to Class I Shares. If you transact in Class I Shares through a financial intermediary, your financial intermediary may charge you a fee outside of the fund, such as brokerage commission or an investment advisory fee. You should consult your financial intermediary regarding the different share classes available to you, how their fees and expenses differ, and whether the fees charged by your financial intermediary differ depending upon which share class you choose.

Class R6 Shares (Virtus KAR Long/Short Equity Fund only). Class R6 Shares are offered without a minimum initial investment to the following investors in plan level or omnibus accounts only (provided that they do not require or receive any compensation, administrative payments, sub-transfer agency payments or service payments with respect to Class R6 Shares): (i) qualified retirement plans, including, but not limited to, 401(k) plans, 457 plans, employer sponsored 403(b) plans, and defined benefit plans; (ii) banks and trust companies; (iii) insurance companies; (iv) financial intermediaries utilizing such shares in fee-based investment advisory programs; (v) registered investment companies; (vi) 529 portfolios that are advised or sub-advised by Virtus affiliates; and (vii) non-qualified deferred compensation plans. Other institutional investors may be permitted to purchase Class R6 Shares subject to the fund’s determination of eligibility and may be subject to a $2,500,000 minimum initial investment requirement. In addition, without a minimum initial investment requirement, Class R6 Shares are available to any trustee of the Virtus Funds and trustees/directors of affiliated open- and closed-end funds, directors, officers and employees of Virtus and its affiliates, and a spouse or domestic partner, child or minor grandchild of any such qualifying individual (in each case either individually or jointly with other investors), provided in each case that those shares are held directly with the Transfer Agent or in an eligible account. The minimum initial investment amount may be waived subject to the fund’s discretion. If you are eligible to purchase and do purchase Class R6 Shares, you will pay no sales charge at any time. There are no distribution and service fees applicable to Class R6 Shares. If you transact in Class R6 Shares through a financial intermediary, your financial intermediary may charge you a fee outside of the fund, such as brokerage commission or an investment advisory fee. You should consult your financial intermediary regarding the different share classes available to you, how their fees and expenses differ, and whether the fees charged by your financial intermediary differ depending upon which share class you choose.

Initial Sales Charge Alternative—Class A Shares. The public offering price of Class A Shares is the NAV plus a sales charge that varies depending on the size of your purchase. (See “Class A Shares—Reduced Initial Sales Charges” in the SAI.) Shares purchased based on the automatic reinvestment of income dividends or capital gain distributions are not subject to any sales charges. The sales charge is divided between your investment dealer and the fund’s underwriter, VP Distributors, LLC (“VP Distributors” or the “Distributor”).

Sales Charge you may pay to purchase Class A Shares

All Funds

     
 

Sales Charge as a percentage of

Amount of Transaction at Offering Price

Offering Price

Amount Invested

Under $50,000

5.50%

5.82%

$50,000 but under $100,000

4.50

4.71

$100,000 but under $250,000

3.50

3.63

$250,000 but under $500,000

2.50

2.56

$500,000 but under $1,000,000

2.00

2.04

$1,000,000 or more

None

None

Class A Sales Charge Reductions and Waivers

Investors may qualify for reduced or no initial (front-end) sales charges, as shown in the table above, through utilization of Combination Purchase Privilege, Letter of Intent, Right of Accumulation, Gifting of Shares, Purchase by Associations or the Account Reinstatement Privilege. These programs are summarized below and are described in greater detail in the SAI. These reductions and waivers do not apply to any CDSC that may be applied to certain Class A Share redemptions.

Combination Purchase Privilege. Your purchase of any class of shares of these funds or any other Virtus Mutual Fund, (other than Class A Shares of the Ultra-Short Bond Funds) if made at the same time by the same person, will be added together with any existing Virtus Mutual Fund account values to determine whether the combined sum entitles you to an immediate reduction in sales charges. A “person” is defined in this and the following sections as either: (a) any individual, his or her spouse or domestic partner, children and minor grandchildren purchasing shares for his, her or their own account (including an IRA account) including his, her or their own sole proprietorship or trust where any of the above is a named beneficiary; (b) a trustee or other fiduciary purchasing for a single trust, estate or single fiduciary account (even though more than one beneficiary may exist); (c) multiple accounts (up to 200) under a qualified employee benefit plan or

   

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Virtus Mutual Funds


administered by a third party administrator; or (d) trust companies, bank trust departments, registered investment advisers, and similar entities placing orders or providing administrative services with respect to accounts over which they exercise discretionary investment authority and which are held in a fiduciary, agency, custodial or similar capacity, provided all shares are held of record in the name, or nominee name, of the entity placing the order.

Letter of Intent. If you sign a Letter of Intent, your purchase of any class of shares of these funds or any other Virtus Mutual Fund, (other than Class A Shares of the Ultra-Short Bond Funds) if made by the same person within a 13-month period, will be added together to determine whether you are entitled to an immediate reduction in sales charges. Sales charges are reduced based on the overall amount you indicate that you will buy under the Letter of Intent. The Letter of Intent is a mutually non-binding arrangement between you and Virtus Mutual Funds. Shares worth 5% of the Letter of Intent amount will be held in escrow (while remaining registered in your name) to secure payment of the higher sales charges applicable to the shares actually purchased in the event the full intended amount is not purchased.

Right of Accumulation. The value of your account(s) in any class of shares of these funds or any other Virtus Mutual Fund, (other than Class A Shares of the Ultra-Short Bond Funds) if made over time by the same person, may be added together at the time of each purchase to determine whether the combined sum entitles you to a prospective reduction in sales charges. You must provide certain account information to Virtus Mutual Funds or their agents at the time of purchase to exercise this right.

Gifting of Shares. If you make a gift of shares of a Virtus Mutual Fund, upon your request you may combine purchases, if made at the same time, of any class of shares of these funds or any other Virtus Mutual Fund at the sales charge discount allowed for the combined purchase. The receiver of the gift may also be entitled to a prospective reduction in sales charges in accordance with the funds’ right of accumulation or other provisions. You or the receiver of the gift must provide certain account information to Virtus Mutual Funds or their agents at the time of purchase to exercise this right.

Purchase by Associations. Certain groups or associations may be treated as a “person” and qualify for reduced Class A Share sales charges. The group or association must: (1) have been in existence for at least six months; (2) have a legitimate purpose other than to purchase mutual fund shares at a reduced sales charge; (3) work through an investment dealer; and (4) not be a group whose sole reason for existing is to consist of members who are credit card holders of a particular company, policyholders of an insurance company, customers of a bank or a broker-dealer or clients of an investment adviser.

Account Reinstatement Privilege. Subject to the funds’ policies and procedures regarding market timing, for 180 days after you sell your Class A Shares on which you previously paid a sales charge, you may purchase Class A Shares of any Virtus Mutual Fund at NAV, with no sales charge, by reinvesting all or part of your proceeds, but not more.

Sales at Net Asset Value. In addition to the programs summarized above, the funds may sell their Class A Shares at NAV without an initial sales charge to certain types of accounts or account holders, as described below.

If you fall within any one of the following categories, you will not have to pay a sales charge on your purchase of Class A Shares, provided that such purchase is made upon the written assurance of the purchaser that the purchase is made for investment purposes and that the shares so acquired will not be resold except to the funds:

(1) Trustee, director or officer of any Virtus Mutual Fund, or any other mutual fund advised, subadvised or distributed by the Adviser, Distributor or any of their corporate affiliates;

(2) Any director or officer, or any full-time employee or sales representative (for at least 90 days), of the applicable fund’s Adviser, subadviser or Distributor;

(3) Any private client of an Adviser or subadviser to any Virtus Mutual Fund;

(4) Registered representatives and employees of securities dealers with whom the Distributor has sales agreements;

(5) Any qualified retirement plan exclusively for persons described above;

(6) Any officer, director or employee of a corporate affiliate of the Adviser, a subadviser or the Distributor;

(7) Any spouse or domestic partner, child, parent, grandparent, brother or sister of any person named in (1), (2), (4) or (6) above;

(8) Employee benefit plans for employees of the Adviser, Distributor and/or their corporate affiliates;

(9) Any employee or agent who retires from the Distributor and/or their corporate affiliates or from Phoenix Life Insurance Company (“PNX”), as long as, with respect to PNX employees or agents, such individual was employed by PNX prior to December 31, 2008;

(10) Any Virtus direct account held in the name of a qualified employee benefit plan, endowment fund or foundation if, on the date of the initial investment, the plan, fund or foundation has assets of $10,000,000 or more or at least 100 eligible employees;

(11) Any person with a direct rollover transfer of shares from an established Virtus Mutual Fund or Virtus qualified plan;

(12) Any state, county, city, department, authority or similar agency prohibited by law from paying a sales charge;

(13) Any unallocated account held by a third party administrator, registered investment adviser, trust company, or bank trust department which exercises discretionary authority and holds the account in a fiduciary, agency, custodial or similar capacity, if in the aggregate such accounts held by such entity equal or exceed $1,000,000;

(14) Any deferred compensation plan established for the benefit of any trustee or director of Virtus, any Virtus Mutual Fund, or any open-or closed-end fund advised, subadvised or distributed by the Adviser, the Distributor or any of their corporate affiliates.

If you fall within any one of the following categories, you also will not have to pay a sales charge on your purchase of Class A Shares:

   

Virtus Mutual Funds

25


(15) Individuals purchasing through an account with an unaffiliated brokerage firm having an agreement with the Distributor to waive sales charges for its clients (see Appendix A to this prospectus for a description of broker-dealers offering various sales load waivers);

(16) Purchasers of Class A Shares bought through investment advisers and financial planners who charge an advisory, consulting or other fee for their services and buy shares for their own accounts or the accounts of their clients;

(17) Retirement plans and deferred compensation plans and trusts used to fund those plans (including, for example, certain plans qualified or created under Sections 401(a), 403(b) or 457 of the Internal Revenue Code (the “Code”)), and “rabbi trusts” that buy shares for their own accounts, in each case if those purchases are made through a broker or agent or other financial intermediary that has made special arrangements with the Distributor for such purchases; or

(18) Clients of investment professionals or financial planners who buy shares for their own accounts but only if their accounts are linked to a master account of their investment professional or financial planner on the books and records of the broker, agent or financial intermediary with which the Distributor has made such special arrangements. (See Appendix A to this prospectus for a description of broker-dealers offering various sales load waivers.) Each of the investors described in (15) through (18) may be charged a fee by the broker, agent or financial intermediary for purchasing shares.

CDSC you may pay on Class A Shares

Investors buying Class A Shares on which a finder’s fee has been paid may incur a CDSC in an amount equal to 1.00% if they redeem their shares (or exchange into the Ultra-Short Bond Funds) within 18 months of a finder’s fee being paid. The 18-month period, as applicable, begins on the last day of the month preceding the month in which the purchase was made, and shares not subject to a finder’s fee will be deemed to be redeemed first. The CDSC will be multiplied by the then current market value or the initial cost of the shares being redeemed, whichever is less.

Deferred Sales Charge Alternative—Class C Shares

Class C Shares are purchased without an initial sales charge; however, shares sold within one year of purchase are subject to a CDSC of 1.00%. The sales charge will be multiplied by the then-current market value or the initial cost of the shares being redeemed, whichever is less. No sales charge will be imposed on increases in NAV or on shares purchased through the reinvestment of income dividends or capital gain distributions. To minimize the sales charge, shares not subject to any charge will be redeemed first, followed by shares held the longest. The date of purchase will be used to calculate the number of shares owned and time period held.

With certain exceptions, Class C Shares, and any reinvested dividends and other distributions paid on such shares, will automatically convert to Class A Shares after eight years. However, for investors invested in Class C Shares through a financial intermediary or recordkeeper, it is the responsibility of the financial intermediary or recordkeeper to ensure that the investor is credited with the proper holding period for the shares redeemed. The automatic conversion of Class C Shares to Class A Shares shall not apply to shares held through intermediaries or recordkeepers that do not track the length of time that a participant has held such shares or that are not otherwise able to operationally support the automatic conversion feature.

In addition, certain Class C Shares may be exchangeable in advance of the automatic conversion. If you hold your shares through a financial intermediary or recordkeeper, please contact your financial intermediary or recordkeeper for additional information. Class C Shares that have been held directly with the fund, and not through a financial intermediary, for fewer than the required number of years may be exchanged for Class A Shares at the fund’s or transfer agent’s discretion if (i) the Class C Shares are not subject to a CDSC, and (ii) a commission was not paid on the sale of such Class C Shares.

All conversions and exchanges from Class C Shares to Class A Shares will be on the basis of the relative NAVs per share, without the imposition of any sales load, fee or other charge. Automatic conversions of Class C shares to Class A shares will generally be processed monthly on or about the 10th day of the month, although for investors invested in Class C Shares through a financial intermediary or recordkeeper, it is the responsibility of the financial intermediary or recordkeeper to determine the timing of the conversions. As of the date of this Prospectus, conversions and exchanges from Class C Shares to Class A Shares of the same fund are not expected to be considered taxable events for Federal income tax purposes. Shareholders should consult their tax professionals regarding their own tax considerations.

Deferred Sales Charge you may pay to sell Class C Shares

     

Year

1

2+

CDSC

1%

0%

Class A Shares and Class C Shares CDSC Reductions and Waivers

The CDSC is waived on the redemption (sale) of Class A Shares and Class C Shares if the redemption is made:

(a) within one year of death;

(i) of the sole shareholder on an individual account,

(ii) of a joint tenant where the surviving joint tenant is the deceased’s spouse or domestic partner,

(iii) of the beneficiary of a Uniform Gifts to Minors Act (UGMA), Uniform Transfers to Minors Act (UTMA) or other custodial account, or

(iv) of the “grantor” on a trust account;

(b) within one year of disability, as defined in Code Section 72(m)(7);

(c) as part of a required minimum distribution for IRA and other retirement accounts due to the shareholder reaching the qualified age based on applicable IRS regulations as described in the funds’ Prospectus;

   

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Virtus Mutual Funds


(d) by 401(k) plans using an approved participant tracking system for participant hardships, death, disability or normal retirement, and loans which are subsequently repaid;

(e) based on the exercise of exchange privileges among Class A Shares and Class C Shares of these funds or any of the Virtus Mutual Funds;

(f) based on any direct rollover transfer of shares from an established Virtus Mutual Fund qualified plan into a Virtus Mutual Fund IRA by participants terminating from the qualified plan; and

(g) based on the systematic withdrawal program, provided such withdrawals do not exceed more than 1% monthly or 3% quarterly of the aggregate net investments. (See “Systematic Withdrawal Program” in this SAI for additional information about these restrictions.)

If, as described in condition (a) above, an account is transferred to an account registered in the name of a deceased’s estate, the CDSC will be waived on any redemption from the estate account occurring within one year of the death.

The availability of certain sales charge waivers and discounts may depend on whether you purchase your shares through a financial intermediary offering them. Different intermediaries may impose different sales charges (including partial reduction in or waivers of sales charges) other than those listed in this section, provided that they do not exceed the maximum sales charge listed. Such intermediary-specific sales charge variations are described in Appendix A to this prospectus, entitled “Intermediary Sales Charge Discounts and Waivers.” Appendix A is incorporated herein by reference and is legally part of this prospectus.

Compensation to Dealers

Class A Shares, Class C Shares and Class I Shares Only

Dealers with whom the Distributor has entered into sales agreements receive a discount or commission on Class A Shares as described below.

All Funds

       

Amount of Transaction at Offering Price

Sales Charge as a Percentage of Offering Price

Sales Charge as a Percentage of Amount Invested

Dealer Discount as a Percentage of Offering Price

Under $50,000

5.50%

5.82%

4.75%

$50,000 but under $100,000

4.50

4.71

4.00

$100,000 but under $250,000

3.50

3.63

3.00

$250,000 but under $500,000

2.50

2.56

2.00

$500,000 but under $1,000,000

2.00

2.04

1.75

$1,000,000 or more

None

None

None

With respect to Class C Shares, the Distributor intends to pay investment dealers a sales commission of 1% of the sale price of Class C Shares sold by such dealers. Your broker, dealer or financial professional may also charge you additional commissions or fees for their services in selling shares to you provided they notify the Distributor of their intention to do so.

Dealers and other entities that enter into special arrangements with the Distributor or the funds’ transfer agent, Virtus Fund Services, LLC (the “Transfer Agent”), may receive compensation for the sale and promotion of shares of these funds. Such fees are in addition to the sales commissions referenced above and may be based upon the amount of sales of fund shares by a dealer; the provision of assistance in marketing of fund shares; access to sales personnel and information dissemination services; and other criteria as established by the Distributor. Depending on the nature of the services, these fees may be paid either from the funds through distribution fees, service fees or, in some cases, the Distributor may pay certain fees from its own profits and resources.

Dealers and other entities that enter into special arrangements with the Distributor or the Transfer Agent may receive compensation from or on behalf of the funds for providing certain recordkeeping and related services to the funds or their shareholders. These fees may also be referred to as shareholder accounting fees, administrative services fees, sub-transfer agent fees or networking fees. They are not for the sale, promotion or marketing of fund shares.

From its own profits and resources, the Distributor may, from time to time, make payments to qualified wholesalers, registered financial institutions and third party marketers for marketing support services and/or retention of assets. These payments are sometimes referred to as “revenue sharing.” Among others, the Distributor has agreed to make such payments for marketing support services to Equitable Advisors, LLC. The Distributor may pay broker-dealers a finder’s fee in an amount equal to 1.00% of eligible Class A Share purchases from $1,000,000 to $3,000,000, 0.50% on amounts of $3,000,001 to $10,000,000, and 0.25% on amounts greater than $10,000,000. Purchases of Class A Shares by an account in the name of a qualified employee benefit plan are eligible for a finder’s fee only if such plan has at least 100 eligible employees. A CDSC of 1.00% may be imposed on certain redemptions of such Class A investments. The CDSC may be imposed on redemptions (including exchanges into the Ultra-Short Bond Funds) within 18 months of a finder’s fee being paid. For purposes of determining the applicability of the CDSC, the 18-month period begins on the last day of the month preceding the month in which the purchase was made. The Distributor will also pay broker-dealers a service fee of 0.25% beginning in the thirteenth month following purchase of Class A Shares on which a finder’s fee has been paid. (For the exact rate for your fund(s), please refer to the chart in the section of this prospectus entitled “Sales Charges” under “What are the classes and how do they differ?”) VP Distributors reserves the right to discontinue or alter such fee payment plans at any time.

From its own resources or pursuant to the distribution and shareholder servicing plans, and subject to the dealers’ prior approval, the Distributor may provide additional compensation to registered representatives of dealers in the form of travel expenses, meals, and lodging associated with training and educational meetings sponsored by the Distributor. The Distributor may also provide gifts amounting in value to less than $100, and occasional meals or entertainment, to registered representatives of dealers. Any such travel expenses, meals, lodging, gifts or entertainment paid will not be preconditioned upon the registered representatives’ or dealers’ achievement of a sales target. The Distributor may, from time to time, reallow the entire portion of the sales charge on Class A Shares which it normally retains to individual selling dealers. However, such additional reallowance generally will be made only when the selling dealer commits to substantial marketing support such as internal wholesaling through dedicated personnel, internal communications and mass mailings.

   

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The Distributor has also agreed to pay fees to certain distributors for preferred marketing opportunities. These arrangements may be viewed as creating a conflict of interest between these distributors and investors. Investors should make due inquiry of their selling agents to ensure that they are receiving the requisite point of sale disclosures and appropriate recommendations free of any influence by reason of these arrangements.

The categories of payments the Distributor and/or the Transfer Agent may make to other parties are not mutually exclusive, and such parties may receive payments under more than one or all categories. These payments could be significant to a party receiving them, creating a conflict of interest for such party in making investment recommendations to investors. Investors should make due inquiry of any party recommending the funds for purchase to ensure that such investors are receiving the requisite point of sale disclosures and appropriate recommendations free of any influence by reason of these arrangements.

A document containing information about sales charges, including breakpoint (volume) discounts, is available free of charge on the Internet at virtus.com. In the Our Products section, go to the “Mutual Funds” tab and click on the link for Breakpoint (Volume) Discounts.

Class R6 Shares Only

No compensation, administrative payments, sub-transfer agency payments or service payments are paid to brokers or other entities from fund assets or the Distributor’s or an affiliate’s resources on sales of or investments in Class R6 Shares. Class R6 Shares do not carry sales commissions or pay Rule 12b-1 fees, or make payments to brokers or other entities to assist in, or in connection with, the sale of the fund’s shares.

Your Account

Opening an Account

Class A Shares, Class C Shares and Class I Shares Only

Your financial professional can assist you with your initial purchase as well as all phases of your investment program. If you are opening an account by yourself, please follow the instructions outlined below.

The funds have established the following preferred methods of payment for fund shares:

 Checks drawn on an account in the name of the investor and made payable to Virtus Mutual Funds;

 Checks drawn on an account in the name of the investor’s company or employer and made payable to Virtus Mutual Funds; or

 Wire transfers or Automated Clearing House (“ACH”) transfers from an account in the name of the investor, or the investor’s company or employer.

Payment in other forms may be accepted at the discretion of the funds; however, the funds generally do not accept such other forms of payment as cash equivalents (such as traveler’s checks, cashier’s checks, money orders or bank drafts), starter checks, credit card convenience checks, or certain third party checks. Please specify the name(s) of the fund or funds in which you would like to invest on the check or transfer instructions.

To help the government fight the funding of terrorism and money laundering activities, federal law requires all financial institutions to obtain, verify and record information that identifies each person who opens an account. Accordingly, when you open an account, we will ask for your name, address, date of birth and other information that will allow us to identify you. We may check the information you provide against publicly available databases, information obtained from consumer reporting agencies, other financial institutions or other sources. If, after reasonable effort, we cannot verify your identity, we reserve the right to close the account and redeem the shares at the NAV next calculated after the decision is made by us to close the account.

Step 1

Your first choice will be the initial amount you intend to invest in each fund.

Minimum initial investments applicable to Class A and Class C Shares:

 $100 for individual retirement accounts (“IRAs”), accounts that use the systematic exchange privilege, or accounts that use the Systematic Purchase program. (See Investor Services and Other Information for additional details.)

 There is no initial dollar requirement for defined contribution plans, asset-based fee programs, profit-sharing plans, or employee benefit plans. There is also no minimum for reinvesting dividends and capital gains into another account.

 $2,500 for all other accounts.

Minimum additional investments applicable to Class A and Class C Shares:

 $100 for any account.

 There is no minimum additional investment requirement for defined contribution plans, asset-based fee programs, profit-sharing plans, or employee benefit plans. There is also no minimum additional investment requirement for reinvesting dividends and capital gains into another account.

Minimum initial investments applicable to Class I Shares:

 $100,000 for any account for qualified investors. (Call Virtus Fund Services at 800-243-1574 for additional details.)

There is no minimum additional investment requirement applicable to Class I Shares.

   

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Step 2

Your second choice will be what class of shares to buy. Each share class, except Class I Shares and Class R6 Shares, has different sales and distribution charges. Because all future investments in your account will be made in the share class you choose when you open your account, you should make your decision carefully. Your financial professional can help you pick the share class that makes the most sense for your situation.

Step 3

Your next choice will be how you want to receive any dividends and capital gain distributions. Your options are:

 Receive both dividends and capital gain distributions in additional shares;

 Receive dividends in additional shares and capital gain distributions in cash;

 Receive dividends in cash and capital gain distributions in additional shares; or

 Receive both dividends and capital gain distributions in cash. No interest will be paid on uncashed distribution checks.

Class R6 Shares Only

If you are investing through a qualified retirement plan, bank or trust company, insurance company or other qualifying financial institution, registered investment company or non-qualified deferred compensation plan, your financial institution or financial intermediary will provide you with the information you need to open an account and buy Class R6 Shares. If you are a qualified institutional investor, or qualified individual investor as described under the heading “What arrangement is best for you?,” please refer to the instructions above for Class A Shares, Class C Shares and Class I Shares, except for the application of any minimum initial and/or additional purchase requirement.

All Share Classes

The funds reserve the right to refuse any purchase order for any reason. The funds will notify the investor of any such rejection in accordance with industry and regulatory standards, which is generally within three business days. The funds further reserve the right to close an account (or to take such other steps as the funds or their agents deem reasonable) for any lawful reason, including but not limited to the suspicion of fraud or other illegal activity in connection with the account.

Listing a Trusted Contact

For shareholders who have a mutual fund account directly with Virtus, you have the option of adding a Trusted Contact to our records. The Trusted Contact is someone you authorize us to contact to address any concerns about fraudulent activity or financial exploitation; to inquire about your status as an active shareholder; and/or to disclose account activity or account details if necessary for protecting your account assets.

The Trusted Contact is not permitted to execute transactions or make changes to your account. Other than the shareholder, only the named financial professional of record on the account, or a Power of Attorney/guardian/ conservator who is named on the account or has submitted instructions, signed in capacity with a Medallion Guarantee, are permitted to execute transactions or make account changes. Your Trusted Contact must be at least 18 years of age, and should not be your financial professional of record or an individual who is already named on the account.

How to Buy Shares

Class A Shares, Class C Shares and Class I Shares Only

   
 

To Open An Account

Through a financial professional

Contact your financial professional. Some financial professionals may charge a fee and may set different minimum investments or limitations on buying shares.

 

Through the mail

Complete a new account application and send it with a check payable to the fund. Mail them to: Virtus Mutual Funds, P.O. Box 534470, Pittsburgh, PA 15253-4470.

Through express delivery

Complete a new account application and send it with a check payable to the fund. Send them to: Virtus Mutual Funds, P.O. Box 534470, Pittsburgh, PA 15253-4470.

 

By Federal Funds wire

Call us at 800-243-1574 (press 1, then 0).

 

By Systematic Purchase

Complete the appropriate section on the application and send it with your initial investment payable to the fund. Mail them to: Virtus Mutual Funds P.O. Box 534470, Pittsburgh, PA 15253-4470.

 

By telephone exchange

Call us at 800-243-1574 (press 1, then 0).

Class R6 Shares Only

If you are investing through a qualified retirement plan, bank or trust company, insurance company or other qualifying financial institution, registered investment company or non-qualified deferred compensation plan, your financial institution or financial intermediary will provide you with the information you need to buy Class R6 Shares. If you are a qualified institutional investor, or qualified individual investor as described under the heading “What arrangement is best for you?,” please refer to the instructions above for Class A Shares, Class C Shares and Class I Shares.

All Share Classes

The price at which a purchase is effected is based on the NAV next determined after receipt of a purchase order in good order by the funds’ Transfer Agent or an authorized agent. A purchase order is generally in “good order” if an acceptable form of payment accompanies the purchase order and the order includes the appropriate application(s) and/or other form(s) and any supporting legal documentation required by the funds’ Transfer Agent or an authorized agent, each in legible form. However, the funds, their Transfer Agent or other authorized agent may consider a request to be not in good order even after receiving all required information if any of them suspects that the request is fraudulent or otherwise not valid.

   

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Each fund reserves the right to refuse any order that may disrupt the efficient management of that fund.

How to Sell Shares

Class A Shares, Class C Shares and Class I Shares Only

   
 

To Sell Shares

Through a financial professional

Contact your financial professional. Some financial professionals may charge a fee and may set different minimums on redemptions of accounts.

 

Through the mail

Send a letter of instruction to: Virtus Mutual Funds, P.O. Box 534470, Pittsburgh, PA 15253-4470. Be sure to include the registered owner’s name, fund and account number and number of shares or dollar value you wish to sell.

Through express delivery

Send a letter of instruction to: Virtus Mutual Funds, P.O. Box 534470, Pittsburgh, PA 15253-4470. Be sure to include the registered owner’s name, fund and account number and number of shares or dollar value you wish to sell.

 

By telephone

For sales up to $50,000, requests can be made by calling 800-243-1574.

By telephone exchange

Call us at 800-243-1574 (press 1, then 0).

Class R6 Shares Only

If you are investing through a qualified retirement plan, bank or trust company, insurance company or other qualifying financial institution, registered investment company or non-qualified deferred compensation plan, your financial institution or financial intermediary will provide you with the information you need to sell Class R6 Shares. If you are a qualified institutional investor, or qualified individual investor as described under the heading “What arrangement is best for you?,” please refer to the instructions above for Class A Shares, Class C Shares and Class I Shares.

All Share Classes

You have the right to have the funds buy back shares at the NAV next determined after receipt of a redemption request in good order by the funds’ Transfer Agent or an authorized agent. In the case of a Class C Share redemption, and certain Class A Share redemptions, you will be subject to the applicable contingent deferred sales charge, if any, for such shares. Subject to certain restrictions, shares may be redeemed by telephone or in writing. In addition, shares may be sold through securities dealers, brokers or agents who may charge customary commissions or fees for their services. The funds do not charge any redemption fees.

Regardless of the method used by the funds for payment (e.g., check, wire or electronic transfer (ACH)), payment for shares redeemed will normally be sent one business day after the request is received in good order by the transfer agent, or one business day after the trade has settled for trades submitted through the NSCC, but will in any case be made within seven days after tender. The funds expect to meet redemption requests, both under normal circumstances and during periods of stressed market conditions, by using cash, by selling portfolio assets to generate cash, or by borrowing funds under a line of credit, subject to availability of capacity in such line of credit, or participating in an interfund lending program in reliance on exemptive relief from the SEC. The right to redeem shares may be suspended and payment postponed during periods when the NYSE is closed, other than customary weekend and holiday closings, or if permitted by rules of the SEC, during periods when trading on the NYSE is restricted or during any emergency which makes it impracticable for a fund to dispose of its securities or to determine fairly the value of its net assets or during any other period permitted by order of the SEC for the protection of investors. Furthermore, the shareholder will not be entitled to and the Transfer Agent will not mail redemption proceeds until checks received for shares purchased have cleared, which may take up to 15 days.

If you are 65 years of age or older, or if we have reason to believe you have a mental or physical impairment that restricts you from protecting your own financial interests, we may temporarily delay the release of redemption proceeds from your account if we reasonably believe that you have been the victim of actual or attempted financial exploitation.

Notice of this temporary delay will be provided to you, and the delay will be for no more than 15 business days while we conduct a review of the suspected financial exploitation. Contacting your Trusted Contact, if you have selected one, may be part of the review. (See “Listing a Trusted Contact” in the section, “Your Account”.)

We may delay an additional 10 business days if we reasonably believe that actual or attempted financial exploitation has occurred or will occur. At the expiration of the delay, if we have not concluded that such exploitation has occurred, the proceeds will be released to you.

Things You Should Know When Selling Shares

You may realize a taxable gain or loss (for federal income tax purposes) if you redeem or exchange shares of the funds.

Class A Shares, Class C Shares and Class I Shares Only

Redemption requests will not be honored until all required documents, in proper form, have been received. Additional documentation will be required for redemptions by organizations, fiduciaries, or retirement plans, or if a redemption is requested by anyone but the shareholder(s) of record. Even after all required documents have been received, a redemption request may not be considered in good order by the funds, their Transfer Agent or other authorized agents if any of them suspects that the request is fraudulent or otherwise not valid. To avoid delay in redemption or transfer, shareholders having questions about specific requirements should contact the funds’ Transfer Agent at 800-243-1574.

Transfers between broker-dealer “street” accounts are governed by the accepting broker-dealer. Questions regarding this type of transfer should be directed to your financial professional.

   

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As stated in the applicable account applications, accounts associated with certain types of retirement plans and individual retirement accounts may incur fees payable to the Transfer Agent in the event of redeeming an account in full. Shareholders with questions about this should contact the funds’ Transfer Agent at 800-243-1574.

Redemptions by Mail

If you are selling shares held individually, jointly, or as custodian under the Uniform Gifts to Minors Act or Uniform Transfers to Minors Act:

Send a clear letter of instruction if both of these apply:

 The proceeds do not exceed $50,000.

 The proceeds are payable to the registered owner at the address on record.

Send a clear letter of instructions with a signature guarantee when any of these apply:

 You are selling more than $50,000 worth of shares.

 The name or address on the account has changed within the last 30 days.

 You want the proceeds to go to a different name or address than on the account.

If you are selling shares held in a corporate or fiduciary account, please contact the funds’ Transfer Agent at 800-243-1574.

The signature guarantee, if required, must be a STAMP 2000 Medallion guarantee made by an eligible guarantor institution as defined by the funds’ Transfer Agent in accordance with its signature guarantee procedures. Guarantees using previous technology medallions will not be accepted. As of the date of this prospectus, the Transfer Agent’s signature guarantee procedures generally permit guarantees by banks, broker-dealers, credit unions, national securities exchanges, registered securities associations, clearing agencies and savings associations.

Selling Shares by Telephone

The Transfer Agent will use reasonable procedures to confirm that telephone instructions are genuine. Address and bank account information are verified, redemption instructions are taped, and all redemptions are confirmed in writing.

The individual investor bears the risk from instructions given by an unauthorized third party that the Transfer Agent reasonably believed to be genuine. The funds, their Transfer Agent and their other authorized agents will not be liable for any loss, liability, cost or expense resulting from acting upon telephone instructions that are reasonably believed to be genuine.

The Transfer Agent may modify or terminate the telephone redemption privilege at any time with 60 days’ notice to shareholders, except for instances of disruptive trading or market timing; in such cases, the telephone redemption privilege may be suspended immediately, followed by written notice. (See “Disruptive Trading and Market Timing” in this prospectus.)

During times of drastic economic or market changes, telephone redemptions may be difficult to make or temporarily suspended; however, shareholders would be able to make redemptions through other methods described above.

Class R6 Shares Only

If you are investing through a qualified retirement plan, bank or trust company, insurance company or other qualifying financial institution, registered investment company or non-qualified deferred compensation plan, your financial institution or financial intermediary will provide you with the information you need to sell Class R6 Shares. If you are a qualified institutional investor, or qualified individual investor as described under the heading “What arrangement is best for you?,” please refer to the instructions above for Class A Shares, Class C Shares and Class I Shares.

All Share Classes

Payment of Redemptions In Kind

Each fund reserves the right to pay large redemptions “in kind” (i.e., in securities owned by the fund) rather than in cash. Large redemptions are those that exceed $250,000 or 1% of the fund’s net assets, whichever is less, over any 90-day period. Additional documentation will be required for redemptions by organizations, fiduciaries, or retirement plans, or if a redemption is requested by anyone but the shareholder(s) of record. Investors who are paid redemption proceeds in kind generally will receive a pro rata share of the fund’s portfolio, which may include illiquid securities. Any securities received remain at market risk until sold. Brokerage commissions and capital gains may be incurred when converting securities received into cash. On any illiquid securities received, the investor will bear the risk of not being able to sell the securities at all.

Account Policies

Account Reinstatement Privilege

Subject to the fund’s policies and procedures regarding market timing, for 180 days after you sell your Class A Shares on which you previously paid a sales charge, you may purchase Class A Shares of any Virtus Mutual Fund at NAV, with no sales charge, by reinvesting all or part of your proceeds, but not more. Send your written request to Virtus Mutual Funds, P.O. Box 534470, Pittsburgh, PA 15253-4470. You can call Virtus Mutual Funds at 800-243-1574 for more information.

Please remember, a redemption and reinvestment are considered to be a sale and purchase for tax-reporting purposes.

   

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Annual Fee on Small Accounts

To help offset the costs associated with maintaining small accounts, the funds reserve the right to assess an annual $25 small account fee on fund accounts with a balance below $2,500. The small account fee may be waived in certain circumstances, such as for accounts that have elected electronic delivery of statements/regulatory documents and accounts owned by shareholders having multiple accounts with a combined value of over $25,000. The small account fee does not apply to accounts held through a financial intermediary.

The small account fee will be collected through the automatic sale of shares in your account. We will send you written notice before we charge the $25 fee so that you may increase your account balance above the minimum, sign up for electronic delivery, consolidate your accounts or liquidate your account. You may take these actions at any time by contacting your investment professional or the Transfer Agent.

Redemption of Small Accounts

Due to the high cost of maintaining small accounts, if your redemption activity causes your account balance to fall below $200, you may receive a notice requesting you to bring the balance up to $200 within 60 days. If you do not, the shares in the account will be sold at NAV, and a check will be mailed to the address of record. Any applicable sales charges will be deducted.

Distributions of Small Amounts

Distributions in amounts less than $10 will automatically be reinvested in additional shares of the fund.

Uncashed Checks

If any correspondence sent by a fund is returned by the postal or other delivery service as “undeliverable,” your dividends or any other distribution may be automatically reinvested in the fund.

If your distribution check is not cashed within six months, the distribution may be reinvested in the fund at the current NAV. You will not receive any interest on uncashed distribution or redemption checks. This provision may not apply to certain retirement or qualified accounts.

Inactive Accounts

As required by the laws of certain states, if no activity occurs in an account within the time period specified by your state law, the funds or their agents may be required to transfer the assets to your state under the state’s abandoned property law.

Exchange Privileges

You should read the prospectus of the Virtus Mutual Fund(s) into which you want to make an exchange before deciding to make an exchange. You can obtain a prospectus from your financial professional; by calling 800-243-4361; or on the Internet at virtus.com.

 You generally may exchange shares of one fund for the same class of shares of another Virtus Mutual Fund (e.g., Class A Shares for Class A Shares). Class C Shares are also exchangeable for Class C1 Shares of those Virtus Mutual Funds offering them. Exchange privileges may not be available for all Virtus Mutual Funds and may be rejected or suspended.

 Class A Shares of the Ultra-Short Bond Funds are exchangeable at net asset value plus the applicable sales charge of the Class A Shares into which you are exchanging. Please note, however, that exchanges into the Ultra-Short Bond Funds may be subject to a CDSC in the event that a finder’s fee was paid on the shares you are exchanging. See the “CDSC you may pay on Class A Shares” section of this prospectus for additional information. In the event that you are charged such a CDSC and later exchange your shares of an Ultra-Short Bond Fund for shares of another Virtus Mutual Fund, your shares of that Virtus Mutual Fund will not be subject to a sales charge or finder’s fee.

 Exchanges may be made by telephone (800-243-1574) or by mail (Virtus Mutual Funds, P.O. Box 534470, Pittsburgh, PA 15253-4470).

 The amount of the exchange must be equal to or greater than the minimum initial investment required, unless the minimum has been waived (as described in the SAI).

 The exchange of shares of one fund for shares of a different fund is treated as a sale of the original fund’s shares and any gain on the transaction may be subject to federal income tax.

 Financial intermediaries are permitted to initiate exchanges from one class of a fund into another class of the same fund if, among other things, the financial intermediary agrees to follow procedures established by the fund, the Distributor or the Transfer Agent, which generally will require that (i) the exchanges be carried out within accounts that are maintained and controlled by the intermediary and meet investor eligibility requirements, if applicable, for the share class or account type, and (ii) no contingent deferred sales charges are outstanding, or the applicable intermediary agrees to cause any outstanding contingent deferred sales charges to be paid in a manner agreed to by the fund, the Distributor or the Transfer Agent. The fund’s ability to make this type of exchange may be limited by operational or other limitations, requiring the fund or its agent to process the transaction as a liquidation and purchase, at the same closing NAV. The financial intermediary will be ultimately responsible for reporting the transaction in accordance with their instruction.

Shareholders owning shares of a fund through accounts established directly with the Transfer Agent (i.e., not established with a financial intermediary who deals with the Transfer Agent exclusively on the investor’s behalf) may be permitted to exchange shares of one class of the fund into another class of the same fund, if they meet the investor eligibility requirements associated with the class into which they wish to exchange, at the discretion of the fund or the Transfer Agent. A shareholder’s ability to make this type of exchange may be limited by operational or other limitations of his or her financial intermediary or the fund.

Under the Code, generally if a shareholder exchanges shares from one class of a fund into another class of the same fund, the transaction should not be subject to U.S. federal income taxes; however, each shareholder should consult both the relevant financial intermediary (if applicable) and the shareholder’s tax professional regarding the treatment of any specific exchange carried out under the terms of this subsection.

   

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Disruptive Trading and Market Timing

These funds are not appropriate for market timers, and market timers are discouraged from becoming investors. Your ability to make exchanges among Virtus Mutual Funds is subject to modification if we determine, in our sole opinion, that your exercise of the exchange privilege may disadvantage or potentially harm the rights or interests of other shareholders.

Frequent purchases, redemptions and exchanges, programmed exchanges, exchanges into and then out of a fund in a short period of time, and exchanges of large amounts at one time may be indicative of market timing and otherwise disruptive trading (“Disruptive Trading”) which can have risks and harmful effects for other shareholders. These risks and harmful effects include:

 dilution of the interests of long-term investors, if market timers or others exchange into a fund at prices that are below the true value or exchange out of a fund at prices that are higher than the true value;

 an adverse effect on portfolio management, as determined by the adviser or subadviser in its sole discretion, such as causing a fund to maintain a higher level of cash than would otherwise be the case, or causing a fund to liquidate investments prematurely; and

 reducing returns to long-term shareholders through increased brokerage and administrative expenses.

Additionally, the nature of the portfolio holdings of certain funds (or the underlying funds as applicable), may expose those funds to investors who engage in the type of market timing trading that seeks to take advantage of possible delays between the change in the value of a mutual fund’s portfolio holdings and the reflection of the change in the NAV of the fund’s shares, sometimes referred to as “time-zone arbitrage.” Arbitrage market timers seek to exploit possible delays between the change in the value of a mutual fund’s portfolio holdings and the NAV of the fund’s shares in funds that hold significant investments in foreign securities because certain foreign markets close several hours ahead of the U.S. markets. If an arbitrageur is successful, the value of the fund’s shares may be diluted if redeeming shareholders receive proceeds (and buying shareholders receive shares) based upon NAVs which do not reflect appropriate fair value prices.

In order to attempt to protect our shareholders from the potential harmful effects of Disruptive Trading, the funds’ Board of Trustees has adopted a policy to safeguard against market timing designed to discourage Disruptive Trading. The Board of Trustees has adopted this policy as a preventive measure to protect all shareholders from the potential effects of Disruptive Trading, while also abiding by any rights that shareholders may have to make exchanges and provide reasonable and convenient methods of making exchanges that do not have the potential to harm other shareholders.

Excessive trading activity is measured by the number of roundtrip transactions in an account. A roundtrip transaction is one where a shareholder buys and then sells, or sells and then buys, shares of any fund within 30 days. Shareholders of the funds are limited to one roundtrip transaction within any rolling 30-day period. Roundtrip transactions are counted at the shareholder level. In considering a shareholder’s trading activity, the funds may consider, among other factors, the shareholder’s trading history both directly and, if known, through financial intermediaries, in the funds, in other funds within the Virtus Mutual Fund complex, in non-Virtus funds or in accounts under common control or ownership. We do not include exchanges made pursuant to the dollar cost averaging or other similar programs when applying our market timing policies. Systematic withdrawal and/or contribution programs, mandatory retirement distributions, and transactions initiated by a plan sponsor also will not count towards the roundtrip limits. The funds may permit exchanges that the funds’ transfer agent believes, in the exercise of its judgment, are not disruptive. The funds also may permit purchases and redemptions by funds of funds that the funds’ transfer agent believes, in the exercise of its judgment, are not disruptive. Considerations such as the size of the fund and the size of the requested transaction may be considered when determining whether or not the transaction would be disruptive.

Shareholders holding shares for at least 30 days following investment will ordinarily be in compliance with the funds’ policy regarding excessive trading activity. The funds may, however, take action if activity is deemed disruptive even if shares are held longer than 30 days, such as a request for a transaction of an unusually large size. The size of the fund and the size of the requested transaction may be considered when determining whether or not the transaction would be disruptive.

Under the funds’ market timing policy, we may modify your exchange privileges for some or all of the funds by not accepting an exchange request from you or from any person, asset allocation service, and/or market timing service made on your behalf. We may also limit the amount that may be exchanged into or out of any fund at any one time, or may revoke your right to make Internet, telephone or facsimile exchanges. We may reinstate Internet, telephone and facsimile exchange privileges after they are revoked, but we will not reinstate these privileges if we have reason to believe that they might be used thereafter for Disruptive Trading.

The funds currently do not charge exchange or redemption fees, or any other administrative charges on fund exchanges. The funds reserve the right to impose such fees and/or charges in the future.

Orders for the purchase of fund shares are subject to acceptance by the relevant fund. We reserve the right to reject, without prior notice, any exchange request into any fund if the purchase of shares in the corresponding fund is not accepted for any reason.

The funds do not have any arrangements with any person, organization or entity to permit frequent purchases and redemptions of fund shares.

We may, without prior notice, take whatever action we deem appropriate to comply with or take advantage of any state or federal regulatory requirement. The funds reserve the right to reject any purchase or exchange transaction at any time. If we reject a purchase or exchange for any reason, we will notify you of our decision in writing.

The funds cannot guarantee that their policies and procedures regarding market timing will be effective in detecting and deterring all Disruptive Trading.

Retirement Plans

Shares of the funds may be used as investments under the following retirement plans: traditional IRA, rollover IRA, SEP-IRA, SIMPLE IRA, Roth IRA, 401(k) plans, profit-sharing, money purchase plans, and certain 403(b) plans. For more information, call 800-243-4361.

   

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Cost Basis Reporting

When you redeem fund shares, the applicable fund or, if you purchase your shares through a financial intermediary, your financial intermediary, generally is required to report to you and the IRS on an IRS Form 1099-B or other applicable form, cost-basis information with respect to those shares, as well as information about whether any gain or loss on your redemption is short- or long-term and whether any loss is disallowed under the “wash sale” rules. This reporting requirement is effective for fund shares acquired by you (including through dividend reinvestment) on or after January 1, 2012, when you subsequently redeem those shares. Such reporting generally is not required for shares held in a retirement or other tax-advantaged account. Cost basis is typically the price you pay for your shares (including reinvested dividends), with adjustments for certain commissions, wash-sales, organizational actions, and other items, including any returns of capital paid to you by a fund in respect of your shares. Cost basis is used to determine your net gains and losses on any shares you redeem in a taxable account.

The applicable fund or your financial intermediary, as applicable, will permit you to select from a list of alternative cost basis reporting methods to determine your cost basis in fund shares acquired on or after January 1, 2012. If you do not select a particular cost basis reporting method, the fund or financial intermediary will apply its default cost basis reporting method to your shares. If you hold your shares directly in a fund account, the funds’ default method (or the method you have selected by notifying the fund) will apply; if you hold your shares in an account with a financial intermediary, the intermediary’s default method (or the method you have selected by notifying the intermediary) will apply. Please contact the relevant fund at 800-243-1574 or your financial intermediary, as applicable, for more information on the available methods for cost basis reporting and how to select or change a particular method. You should consult your tax adviser concerning the application of these rules to your investment in a fund, and to determine which available cost basis method is best for you. Please note that you are responsible for calculating and reporting your cost basis in the shares of each fund acquired prior to January 1, 2012 as this information will not be reported to you by the funds and may not be reported to you by your financial intermediary.

Investor Services and Other Information

Systematic Purchase is a systematic investment plan that allows you to have a specified amount automatically deducted from your checking or savings account and then deposited into your mutual fund account. (Complete the “Systematic Purchase” section on the application and include a voided check.)

Systematic Exchange allows you to automatically move money from one Virtus Mutual Fund to another on a monthly, quarterly, semiannual or annual basis. Shares of one Virtus Mutual Fund will be exchanged for shares of the same class of another Virtus Mutual Fund at the interval you select. (Complete the “Systematic Exchange” section on the application.) Exchange privileges may not be available for all Virtus Mutual Funds and may be rejected or suspended.

Telephone Exchange lets you exchange shares of one Virtus Mutual Fund for the same class of shares in another Virtus Mutual Fund, using our customer service telephone number (800-243-1574). (See the “Telephone Exchange” section on the application.) Exchange privileges may not be available for all Virtus Mutual Funds and may be rejected or suspended.

Systematic Withdrawal allows you to periodically redeem a portion of your account on a predetermined monthly, quarterly, semiannual, or annual basis. Sufficient shares from your account will be redeemed at the closing NAV on the applicable payment date, with proceeds to be mailed to you or sent through ACH to your bank (at your selection). For payments to be mailed, shares will be redeemed on the 15th of the month so that the payment is made about the 20th of the month. For ACH payments, you may select the day of the month for the payments to be made; if no date is specified, the payments will occur on the 15th of the month. The minimum withdrawal is $25, and minimum account balance requirements continue to apply. Shareholders in the program must own Virtus Mutual Fund shares worth at least $5,000.

Disclosure of Fund Portfolio Holdings. A description of the funds’ policies and procedures with respect to the disclosure of the funds’ portfolio holdings is available in the SAI.

Availability and Delivery of Fund Documents. Fund documents such as this prospectus are available for download from the Our Products section of virtus.com, or you may request paper copies of such documents at any time by calling 800-243-1574. The funds will not charge you a fee for paper copies of fund documents, although the funds will incur additional expenses when printing and mailing them, and fund expenses pass indirectly to all shareholders.

Tax Status of Distributions

The funds plan to make distributions from net investment income at intervals stated in the table below and to distribute net realized capital gains, if any, at least annually.

   

Fund

Dividend Paid

Virtus Duff & Phelps Select MLP and Energy Fund

Semiannually

Virtus KAR Long/Short Equity Fund

Semiannually

Distributions of short-term capital gains (gains on securities held for a year or less) and net investment income are taxable to shareholders as ordinary income. Certain distributions of long-term capital gains and certain dividends are taxable at a lower rate than ordinary income. Long-term capital gains, if any, which are distributed to shareholders and which are designated by a fund as capital gain distributions, are taxable to shareholders as long-term capital gain distributions regardless of the length of time you have owned your shares.

Unless you elect to receive distributions in cash, dividends and capital gain distributions are paid in additional shares. All distributions, whether paid in cash or in additional shares, are subject to federal income tax and may be subject to state, local and other taxes.

If, for any fiscal year, the total distributions exceed net investment income and realized net capital gains, the excess, distributed from the fund’s assets, will generally be treated as a tax-free return of capital (up to the amount of the shareholder’s tax basis in the fund shares). The amount treated as a tax-free return of capital will reduce the adjusted basis in the shareholder’s shares, thereby increasing the potential gain or reducing the potential loss upon disposition of those shares. If a fund has return of capital, the fund will provide disclosure with each distribution estimating the percentages of the current distribution that represent

   

34

Virtus Mutual Funds


(1) net investment income, (2) capital gains and (3) return of capital. The fund will send shareholders a Form 1099-DIV for the calendar year that will tell you how to report these distributions for federal income tax purposes.

   

Virtus Mutual Funds

35


Financial Highlights
 

  These tables are intended to help you understand each fund’s financial information for the past five years or since inception. Some of this information reflects financial information for a single fund share. The total returns in the tables represent the rate that an investor would have earned or lost on an investment in a fund (assuming reinvestment of all dividends and distributions). This information has been audited by PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP, the funds’ independent registered public accounting firm. PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP’s reports, together with each fund’s financial statements, is included in the funds’ most recent Annual Report, which is available upon request.

                                                   

 

Net Asset Value,
Beginning of Period

Net Investment Income (Loss)(1)

Net Realized and
Unrealized Gain (Loss)

Total from Investment Operations

Dividends from
Net Investment Income

Return of Capital

Distributions from
Net Realized Gains

Total Distributions

Payment from Affiliate

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Virtus Duff & Phelps Select MLP and Energy Fund

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Class A

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

11/1/21 to 10/31/22

$

9.37

 

 

0.04

 

 

2.69

 

 

2.73

 

 

 

 

(0.35

)

 

 

 

(0.35

)

11/1/20 to 10/31/21

 

5.19

 

 

(0.01

)

 

4.49

 

 

4.48

 

 

(0.08

)

 

(0.22

)

 

 

 

(0.30

)

11/1/19 to 10/31/20

 

8.09

 

 

0.06

 

 

(2.65

)

 

(2.59

)

 

 

 

(0.31

)

 

 

 

(0.31

)

11/1/18 to 10/31/19

 

9.26

 

 

0.14

 

 

(0.82

)

 

(0.68

)

 

(0.12

)

 

(0.37

)

 

 

 

(0.49

)

11/1/17 to 10/31/18

 

9.39

 

 

0.02

 

 

0.07

 

 

0.09

 

 

(0.17

)

 

(0.05

)

 

 

 

(0.22

)

Class C

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

11/1/21 to 10/31/22

$

9.25

 

 

(0.02

)

 

2.62

 

 

2.60

 

 

 

 

(0.26

)

 

 

 

(0.26

)

11/1/20 to 10/31/21

 

5.12

 

 

(0.07

)

 

4.45

 

 

4.38

 

 

(0.07

)

 

(0.18

)

 

 

 

(0.25

)

11/1/19 to 10/31/20

 

8.01

 

 

0.02

 

 

(2.64

)

 

(2.62

)

 

 

 

(0.27

)

 

 

 

(0.27

)

11/1/18 to 10/31/19

 

9.20