CARILLON CHARTWELL FUNDS

STATEMENT OF ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

CARILLON MUTUAL FUNDS

CARILLON CHARTWELL INCOME FUND

CARILLON CHARTWELL MID CAP VALUE FUND

CARILLON CHARTWELL SHORT DURATION BOND FUND

CARILLON CHARTWELL SHORT DURATION HIGH YIELD FUND

CARILLON CHARTWELL SMALL CAP GROWTH FUND

CARILLON CHARTWELL SMALL CAP VALUE FUND

This Statement of Additional Information (“SAI”) dated May 1, 2023 (as supplemented August 7, 2023) should be read in conjunction with the Prospectus dated May 1, 2023 (as supplemented August 7, 2023) describing the shares of six of the series of the Carillon Series Trust (the “Trust”), which are the Carillon Chartwell Income Fund, Carillon Chartwell Mid Cap Value Fund, Carillon Chartwell Short Duration Bond Fund, Carillon Chartwell Short Duration High Yield Fund, Carillon Chartwell Small Cap Growth Fund and Carillon Chartwell Small Cap Value Fund (each a “fund” and, collectively, the “funds”).

This SAI is not a prospectus itself. The financial statements for the funds’ fiscal year ended December 31, 2022, which were audited by BBD LLP, the funds’ independent registered public accounting firm, are incorporated herein by reference to the funds’ Annual Reports to Shareholders dated December 31, 2022. BBD LLP was acquired on March 6, 2023 by Cohen & Company, and Cohen & Company became the auditor of the funds. Copies of the Prospectus and copies of the Trust’s Annual Report to shareholders of the funds are available, and copies of the Trust’s Semiannual Report to shareholders of the funds will be available, without charge, upon request by writing to Carillon Family of Funds at P.O. Box 23572, St. Petersburg, FL, 33742, calling 800.421.4184 or by visiting our website at rjinvestmentmanagement.com.

 

     Class Chartwell  
Carillon Chartwell Income Fund    BERIX
Carillon Chartwell Mid Cap Value Fund    BERCX
Carillon Chartwell Short Duration Bond Fund    CWSDX
Carillon Chartwell Short Duration High Yield Fund    CWFIX
Carillon Chartwell Small Cap Growth Fund    CWSGX
Carillon Chartwell Small Cap Value Fund    CWSIX

Carillon Tower Advisers, Inc.

P.O. Box 23572, St. Petersburg, Florida 33742


 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

I.        General Information     3  
II.      Investment Information     3  
   A.     

Investment Policies, Strategies and Risks

    3  
   B.     

Industry or Sub-Industry Classifications

    47  
III.    Investment Limitations     48  
   A.     

Fundamental Investment Policies for All Funds

    48  
   B.     

Non-Fundamental Investment Policies

    49  
IV.    Net Asset Value     50  
V.    Investing in the Funds     52  
VI.    Investment Programs     52  
   A.     

Retirement Plans

    52  
VII.    Redeeming Shares     53  
   A.     

Receiving Payment

    53  
   B.     

Telephone Transactions

    54  
   C.     

Systematic Withdrawal Plan

    54  
   D.     

Redemptions-in-Kind

    55  
   E.     

Frequent Purchases and Redemptions of Fund Shares

    55  
VIII.    Exchange Privilege     55  
IX.    Disclosure of Portfolio Holdings     56  
X.    Taxes     57  
XI.    Shareholder Information     65  
XII.    Fund Information     65  
   A.     

Management of the Funds

    65  
   B.     

Control Persons and Principal Holders of Securities

    74  
   C.     

Proxy Voting Policies and Procedures

    75  
   D.     

Investment Adviser and Administrator; Sub-adviser

    77  
   E.     

Portfolio Managers

    82  
       

1. Chartwell Investment Partners, LLC

    82  
   F.     

Portfolio Turnover and Brokerage Practices

    87  
   G.     

Distribution of Shares

    90  
   H.     

Payments to Dealers

    92  
XIII.    Additional Services to the Funds     93  

APPENDIX A

    A-1  

APPENDIX B

    B-1  

APPENDIX C

    C-1  

2

 


  I.

General Information

The funds are separate series of Carillon Series Trust (the “Trust”), which was established as a Delaware statutory trust on May 5, 2017. The Trust is registered as an open-end diversified management investment company under the Investment Company Act of 1940, as amended (the “1940 Act”). The Trust offers shares in separate series (each a “fund” and collectively the “funds”), each of which is advised by Carillon Tower Advisers, Inc. (“Carillon Tower” or Manager”). On September 30, 2022, Carillon Tower began also doing business as Raymond James Investment Management. This did not involve any change in Carillon’s structure, ownership, or control.

On November 20, 2017, the Trust adopted and succeeded to the registration statement of Eagle Series Trust. Eagle Series Trust, formerly known as the Heritage Series Trust, was established as a Massachusetts business trust under a Declaration of Trust dated October 28, 1992.

On July 1, 2022, each of the following funds acquired all of the assets and assumed all of the liabilities of the corresponding series of The Chartwell Funds as set forth below.

 

Carillon Chartwell Fund   Formerly

Carillon Chartwell Income Fund

  Chartwell Income Fund

Carillon Chartwell Mid Cap Value Fund

  Chartwell Mid Cap Value Fund

Carillon Chartwell Short Duration Bond Fund

  Chartwell Short Duration Bond Fund

Carillon Chartwell Short Duration High Yield Fund

  Chartwell Short Duration High Yield Fund

Carillon Chartwell Small Cap Growth Fund

  Chartwell Small Cap Growth Fund

Carillon Chartwell Small Cap Value Fund

  Chartwell Small Cap Value Fund

Since, at the time of its acquisition, the objective and policies of each of the funds were the same in all material respects as each fund’s predecessor, and each of the funds engaged as a sub-advisor the investment advisor that previously provided services to its predecessor fund (“Predecessor Fund”), each fund adopted the prior performance and financial history of its Predecessor Fund.

Each fund currently offers Class Chartwell shares, which will be sold without a front-end sales charge, contingent deferred sales charge, or Rule 12b-1 fee.

Each fund described in this SAI operates for many purposes as if it were an independent company. Each fund has its own objective(s), policies, strategies and portfolio managers, among other characteristics.

 

  II.

Investment Information

 

  A.

Investment Policies, Strategies and Risks

This section provides a detailed description of the securities in which a fund may invest to achieve its investment objective(s), the strategies it may employ and the corresponding risks of such

 

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securities and strategies. For more information regarding the description of various types of securities in which a fund may invest, please refer to Appendix A, Investment Types Glossary. A fund may invest in the types of assets described below, either directly or indirectly, unless otherwise noted or as shown in Appendix C. For more information on a fund’s principal strategies and risks, please see the funds’ Prospectus. See Appendix C for a summary of the types of investments in which each fund may invest.

 

     Carillon
Chartwell
Income Fund
    Carillon
Chartwell
Mid Cap
Value
Fund
    Carillon
Chartwell
Short Duration
Bond Fund
    Carillon
Chartwell
Short Duration
High Yield
Fund
    Carillon
Chartwell
Small Cap
Growth Fund
    Carillon
Chartwell
Small Cap
Value Fund
 

Equity Securities

    X       X       X       X       X       X  

Common Stocks

    X       X       X       X       X       X  

Small- and Mid-Capitalization Stocks

    X       X       X       X       X       X  

Convertible Securities

    X       X       X       X       X       X  

Other Investment Companies, including ETFs

    X       X       X       X       X       X  

Closed-End Funds

    X       X       X       X       X       X  

Preferred Stock

    X       X       X       X       X       X  

Master Limited Partnerships

    X                               X          

Real Estate Investment Trusts (“REITs”)

    X       X       X       X       X       X  

Warrants and Rights

    X       X       X       X       X       X  

Debt Securities

    X       X       X       X       X       X  

Debt Securities

    X       X       X       X       X       X  

Corporate Debt Obligations

    X       X       X       X       X       X  
Investment Grade and Lower Rated Securities     X       X       X       X       X       X  

Investment Grade Securities

    X       X       X       X       X       X  

Lower Rated / High Yield Securities

    X       X       X       X       X       X  
Risk Factors of Lower Rated / High Yield Securities     X       X       X       X       X       X  

Interest Rate and Economic Risk

    X       X       X       X       X       X  

Securities Ratings and Credit Ratings

    X       X       X       X       X       X  

Liquidity Risk and Valuation

    X       X       X       X       X       X  
Variable- or Floating-Rate Securities     X       X       X       X       X       X  
Institutional Term Loans     X       X       X       X       X       X  
Municipal Obligations     X       X       X       X       X       X  

 

4


     Carillon
Chartwell
Income Fund
    Carillon
Chartwell
Mid Cap
Value
Fund
    Carillon
Chartwell
Short Duration
Bond Fund
    Carillon
Chartwell
Short Duration
High Yield
Fund
    Carillon
Chartwell
Small Cap
Growth Fund
    Carillon
Chartwell
Small Cap
Value Fund
 
Short-Term Money Market Instruments     X       X       X       X       X       X  

Bankers’ Acceptances

    X       X       X       X       X       X  

Certificates of Deposit (“CDs”)

    X       X       X       X       X       X  

Commercial Paper

    X       X       X       X       X       X  

Bank Time Deposits

    X       X       X       X       X       X  
Repurchase and Reverse Repurchase Agreements     X       X       X       X       X       X  

Repurchase Agreements

    X       X       X       X       X       X  

Reverse Repurchase Agreements

    X       X       X       X       X       X  
Mortgage Dollar Rolls and Sale-Buybacks     X       X       X       X       X       X  
U.S. Government Securities     X       X       X       X       X       X  
Zero Coupon and Pay-In-Kind Securities     X       X       X       X       X       X  
Pass-through Securities     X       X       X       X       X       X  

Mortgage-Backed Securities

    X       X       X       X       X       X  

Asset-Backed Securities

    X       X       X       X       X       X  

Foreign Securities Exposure

    X       X       X       X       X       X  

Depositary Receipts

    X       X       X       X       X       X  

American Depositary Receipts (“ADRs”)

    X       X       X       X       X       X  

Euro/Yankee Bonds

    X       X       X       X       X       X  

Eurodollar Certificates

    X       X       X       X       X       X  

Foreign Securities

    X       X       X       X       X       X  

Emerging Markets

    X       X       X       X       X       X  

European Securities

    X       X       X       X       X       X  
Derivatives – Futures, Forwards, Options and Hedging Transactions     X       X       X       X       X       X  
Options     X       X       X       X       X       X  

Options on Futures

    X       X       X       X       X       X  
Futures     X       X       X       X       X       X  

Risks of Futures Trading

    X       X       X       X       X       X  

Stock and Bond Index Futures

    X       X       X       X       X       X  

Foreign Currency Hedging Strategies

    X       X       X       X       X       X  

Forward Currency Contracts

    X       X       X       X       X       X  

Forward Currency Exchange Contracts

    X       X       X       X       X       X  

 

5


     Carillon
Chartwell
Income Fund
    Carillon
Chartwell
Mid Cap
Value
Fund
    Carillon
Chartwell
Short Duration
Bond Fund
    Carillon
Chartwell
Short Duration
High Yield
Fund
    Carillon
Chartwell
Small Cap
Growth Fund
    Carillon
Chartwell
Small Cap
Value Fund
 

Non-Deliverable Forwards

    X       X       X       X       X       X  

Combined Transactions

    X       X       X       X       X       X  

Swaps, Caps, Floors and Collars

    X       X       X       X       X       X  

Options on Swap Agreements

    X       X       X       X       X       X  

Forward Commitments

    X       X       X       X       X       X  

Illiquid and Restricted Securities

    X       X       X       X       X       X  

Other Investment Practices

    X       X       X       X       X       X  

When-Issued and Delayed Delivery Transactions

    X       X       X       X       X       X  

Foreign Investment Companies

    X       X       X       X       X       X  

Selling Securities Short

    X       X       X       X       X       X  

Temporary Defensive Purposes

    X       X       X       X       X       X  
Large Shareholder Redemption Risk     X       X       X       X       X       X  
Cyber Security     X       X       X       X       X       X  

Equity Securities:

Common Stocks. A fund may invest in common stocks, which represent an equity or ownership interest in an issuer. In the event an issuer is liquidated or declares bankruptcy, the claims of bondholders, other debt holders, owners of preferred stock, and general creditors take precedence over the claims of those who own common stock. Common stocks fluctuate in price in response to many factors including historical and prospective earnings of the issuer, the value of its assets, general economic conditions, interest rates, investor perceptions and market liquidity. An adverse event, such as an unfavorable earnings report, may depress the value of a particular common stock.

Small- and Mid-Capitalization Stocks. A fund may invest in stock of companies with market capitalizations that are small compared to other publicly traded companies. Investments in larger companies present certain advantages in that such companies generally have greater financial resources, more extensive research and development, manufacturing, marketing and service capabilities, and more stability and greater depth of management and personnel. Investments in smaller, less seasoned companies may present greater opportunities for growth but also may involve greater risks than customarily are associated with more established companies. The securities of smaller companies may be subject to more abrupt or erratic market movements than larger, more established companies. These companies may have limited product lines, markets or financial resources, or they may be dependent upon a limited management group. Their securities may be traded in the over-the-counter market or on a regional exchange, or may otherwise have limited liquidity. As a result of owning large positions in this type of security, a fund is subject to the additional risk of possibly having to sell portfolio securities at disadvantageous times and prices if redemptions require the fund to liquidate its securities positions. In addition, it may be prudent for a fund, as its asset size grows, to limit the number of relatively small positions it holds in securities having limited liquidity in order to minimize its exposure to such risks, to minimize transaction costs, and to maximize the benefits of research. As a consequence, as a fund’s asset

 

6


size increases, the fund may reduce its exposure to illiquid small capitalization securities, which could adversely affect performance.

A fund may also invest in stocks of companies with medium market capitalizations (i.e., mid cap companies). Such investments share some of the risk characteristics of investments in stocks of companies with small market capitalizations described above, although mid cap companies tend to have longer operating histories, broader product lines and greater financial resources and their stocks tend to be more liquid and less volatile than those of smaller capitalization issuers.

Convertible Securities. A fund may invest in convertible securities. While no securities investment is without some risk, investments in convertible securities generally entail less risk than the issuer’s common stock, although the extent to which such risk is reduced depends in large measure upon the degree to which the convertible security sells above its value as a fixed income security. The market value of convertible securities tends to decline as interest rates increase and, conversely, increases as interest rates decline. While convertible securities generally offer lower interest or dividend yields than nonconvertible debt securities of similar quality, they do enable the investor to benefit from increases in the market price of the underlying common stock. There are currently no limitations on the ratings of the convertible securities in which the funds may invest.

Other Investment Companies, including ETFs. A fund may invest in shares of other open-end or closed-end investment companies, including money market funds and exchange-traded funds (“ETFs”), up to the limits prescribed in the 1940 Act, the rules thereunder and any exemptive relief. Investments in the securities of other investment companies (which may, in turn invest in equities, bonds, and other financial vehicles) may involve duplication of advisory fees and certain other expenses. By investing in another investment company, a fund becomes a shareholder of that investment company. As a result, fund shareholders indirectly bear the fund’s proportionate share of the fees and expenses paid by shareholders of the other investment company, in addition to the fees and expenses fund shareholders directly bear in connection with the fund’s own operations.

S&P’s Depositary Receipts, S&P’s MidCap 400 Depositary Receipts, and other similar index securities are ETFs and are considered investments in other investment companies (“Index Securities”). Index Securities are subject to the risks of an investment in a broadly based portfolio of common stocks.

As a shareholder, a fund must rely on the other investment company to achieve its investment objective. If the other investment company or ETF fails to achieve its investment objective, the value of a fund’s investment will decline, adversely affecting a fund’s performance. In addition, because ETFs are listed on national stock exchanges and are traded like stocks listed on an exchange, ETF shares may potentially trade at a discount or a premium. Investments in ETFs are also subject to brokerage and other trading costs, which could result in greater expenses to a fund. Finally, because the value of ETF shares depends on the demand in the market, the portfolio manager may not be able to liquidate a fund’s holdings of ETF shares at the most optimal time, adversely affecting the fund’s performance.

A fund’s investment in securities of other investment companies, except for money market funds, is generally limited to: (i) 3% of the total voting stock of any one investment company, (ii) 5% of the fund’s total assets with respect to any one investment company and (iii) 10% of the fund’s total assets in all investment companies in the aggregate. However, a fund may exceed these limits when investing in shares of an ETF or other investment company, subject to a statutory exemption or to the terms and conditions of an exemptive order from the SEC.

 

 

7


The SEC recently adopted revisions to the rules permitting funds to invest in other investment companies to streamline and enhance the regulatory framework applicable to fund of funds arrangements. Rule 12d1-4, under the 1940 Act, permits various types of fund of fund arrangements without an exemptive order, under certain conditions, including limits on control and voting of acquired funds’ shares, evaluations and findings by investment advisers, fund investment agreements, and limits on most three-tier fund structures. Additionally, as part of the streamlining of the fund of fund arrangements, the SEC rescinded certain exemptive orders and withdrew certain no-action letters.

Closed-End Funds. The funds may invest in shares of closed-end funds. Investments in closed-end funds are subject to various risks, including reliance on management’s ability to meet the closed-end fund’s investment objective and to manage the closed-end fund portfolio; fluctuation in the net asset value of closed-end fund shares compared to the changes in the value of the underlying securities that the closed-end fund owns; and bearing a pro rata share of the management fees and expenses of each underlying closed-end fund resulting in a fund’s shareholders being subject to higher expenses than if he or she invested directly in the closed-end fund(s).

Preferred Stock. A fund may invest in preferred stock which is subordinated to all debt obligations in the event of insolvency. An issuer’s failure to make a dividend payment is normally not considered a default entitling the preferred shareholder to take action. Preferred stock generally has no maturity date, meaning that its market value is dependent on the issuer’s future potential for growth over an unspecified period of time. Distributions on preferred stock are generally considered dividends and treated as such for federal income tax purposes.

Master Limited Partnerships. A Fund may invest in MLPs. An MLP is an entity taxed as a partnership under the Code, the interests or “units” of which are traded on securities exchanges like shares of corporate stock. A typical MLP consists of a general partner and limited partners; however, some MLPS are structured as limited liability companies. The general partner manages the partnership; has an ownership stake in the partnership, typically a 2% general partner equity interest and usually additional common units and subordinated units; and is typically eligible to receive an incentive distribution. The limited partners provide capital to the partnership, have a limited (if any) role in the operation and management of the partnership, and receive cash distributions. An MLP typically pays an established minimum quarterly distribution to common unit holders, as provided under the terms of its partnership agreement. Common units have arrearage rights in distributions to the extent that the MLP fails to make minimum quarterly distributions. Once the MLP distributes the minimum quarterly distribution to common units, subordinated units then are entitled to receive distributions of up to the minimum quarterly distribution, but have no arrearage rights. At the discretion of the general partner’s board of directors, any distributable cash that exceeds the minimum quarterly distribution that the MLP distributed to the common and subordinated units is then distributed to both common and subordinated units, typically on a pro rata basis. Incentive distributions are often paid to the general partner such that as the distribution to limited partnership interests increases, the general partner may receive a proportionately larger share of the total distribution. Incentive distributions are designed to encourage the general partner, who controls and operates the partnership, to maximize the partnership’s cash flow and increase distributions to the limited partners.

Generally speaking, MLP investment returns are enhanced during periods of declining or low interest rates and tend to be negatively influenced when interest rates are rising. As an income vehicle, the unit price can be influenced by general interest rate trends independent of specific underlying fundamentals. In addition, most MLPs are leveraged and typically carry a portion of a “floating” rate

 

8


debt, and a significant upward swing in interest rates would also drive interest expense higher. Furthermore, most MLPs grow by acquisitions partly financed by debt, and higher interest rates could make it more difficult to make acquisitions.

Real Estate Investment Trusts (“REITs”). A fund may invest in REITs. The risks associated with REITs include defaults by borrowers, self-liquidation, failure to qualify for tax-free pass-through of distributed net income and net realized gains under the federal tax laws, failure to qualify as an exempt entity under the 1940 Act and the fact that REITs are not diversified.

Warrants and Rights. A fund may invest in warrants and rights. Rights are instruments that permit a fund to acquire, by subscription, the capital stock of a corporation at a set price, regardless of the market price for such stock. The market price of warrants is usually significantly less than the current market price of the underlying stock. Thus, there is a greater risk that warrants might drop in value at a faster rate than the underlying stock.

Debt Securities:

Debt Securities. A fund may invest in debt securities which will fluctuate in value based upon changes in interest rates and the issuer’s credit quality. Also, the value of a fund’s investments in debt securities will change as prevailing interest rates change. Generally, the prices of fixed income securities move inversely to interest rates. For example, the value of a fund’s fixed income investments typically will fall when interest rates rise. A fund may be particularly sensitive to changes in interest rates if it invests in debt securities with intermediate and long terms to maturity. Debt securities with longer durations tend to be more sensitive to changes in interest rates, usually making them more volatile than debt securities with shorter durations. Yields of debt securities will fluctuate over time. Depending upon the particular amount and type of fixed income securities holdings of a fund, these changes may impact the net asset value (“NAV”) of a fund’s shares. During periods of very low or negative interest rates, a fund may be unable to maintain positive returns. To the extent a fund holds an investment with a negative interest rate to maturity, a fund may generate a negative return on that investment. Interest rates may also rise significantly and/or rapidly, potentially resulting in substantial losses to a fund. There is a risk that policy changes by the U.S. Government and/or Federal Reserve, such as interest rate increases, may result in substantial losses to a fund and expose fixed income and related markets to heightened volatility and may reduce liquidity for certain fund investments, which could cause the value of a fund’s investments and share price to decline. A fund that invests in Derivatives (as defined below) tied to fixed income markets may be more substantially exposed to these risks than a fund that does not invest in Derivatives. To the extent a fund experiences high redemptions due to this risk, a fund may experience increased portfolio turnover, which will increase the costs that a fund incurs and may lower a fund’s performance. The liquidity levels of a fund’s portfolios may also be affected.

Corporate Debt Obligations. A fund may invest in corporate debt securities, including corporate bonds, debentures, notes and other similar corporate debt instruments. Please see the discussions of “Investment Grade” and “Lower Rated” securities below for additional information.

Investment Grade and Lower Rated Securities:

Investment Grade Securities. A fund may invest in debt securities rated investment grade. Securities rated in the lowest category of investment grade are considered to have speculative characteristics, and changes in economic conditions are more likely to lead to a weakened capacity to pay

 

9


interest and repay principal than is the case with higher-grade bonds. A fund may retain a security that has been downgraded below investment grade if, in the opinion of its portfolio manager, it is in the fund’s best interest.

Lower Rated / High Yield Securities. A fund may invest in debt securities rated below investment grade. These securities are commonly referred to as “high yield securities” or “junk bonds” and are deemed to be predominantly speculative with respect to the issuer’s capacity to pay interest and repay principal and may involve major risk exposure to adverse conditions. These securities are subject to specific risks that may not be present with investments of higher-grade securities. There are currently no limits on the amount that any fund may invest in investment grade or high-yield securities.

Risk Factors of Lower Rated / High Yield Securities:

Interest Rate and Economic Risk. As with all debt securities, the market values of high yield securities tend to decrease when interest rates rise and increase when interest rates fall. The prices of high yield securities will also fluctuate greatly during periods of economic uncertainty and changes resulting in changes in a fund’s NAV. During these periods, some highly leveraged high yield securities issuers may experience a higher incidence of default due to their inability to meet principal and interest payments, projected business goals or to obtain additional financing. In addition, a fund may need to replace or sell a junk bond that it owns at unfavorable prices or returns. Accordingly, those high yield securities held by a fund may affect its NAV and performance adversely during such times.

In a declining interest rate market, if an issuer of a high yield security containing a redemption or call provision exercises either provision, a fund would have to replace the security, which could result in a decreased return for shareholders. Conversely, if a fund experiences unexpected net redemptions in a rising interest rate market, it might be forced to sell certain securities, regardless of investment merit. While it is impossible to protect entirely against this risk, diversification of a fund’s investment portfolio and its portfolio manager’s careful analysis of prospective investment portfolio securities should help reduce the impact of a decrease in value of a particular security or group of securities in the fund’s investment portfolio.

Securities Ratings and Credit Ratings. Securities ratings are based largely on the issuer’s historical financial information and the rating agencies’ investment analysis at the time of rating. Credit ratings usually evaluate the safety of principal and interest payment of debt securities, such as high yield securities, but may not reflect the true risks of an investment in such securities. A reduction in an issuer’s credit rating may cause that issuer’s high yield securities to decrease in market value. Also, credit rating agencies may fail to change the credit ratings to reflect subsequent events. Consequently, the rating assigned to any particular security is not necessarily a reflection of the issuer’s current financial condition, which may be better or worse than the rating would indicate.

A fund’s portfolio managers continually monitor the investments in its respective investment portfolio and carefully evaluates whether to dispose of or retain high yield securities whose credit ratings have changed. A fund’s portfolio managers primarily rely on their own credit analysis, including a study of existing debt, capital structure, ability to service debt and pay interest, sensitivity to economic conditions and other factors in its determination. See Appendix B for a description of corporate debt ratings.

 

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Liquidity Risk and Valuation. The market for high yield securities tends to be less active and primarily dominated by institutional investors compared to the market for high-quality debt securities. During periods of economic uncertainty or adverse economic changes, the market may be further restricted. In these conditions, a fund may have to dispose of its high yield securities at unfavorable prices or below fair market value. In addition, during such times, reliable objective information may be limited or unavailable and negative publicity may adversely affect the public’s perception of the junk bond market. The Trust’s Board of Trustees (“Board”) or a portfolio manager may have difficulty assessing the value of high yield securities during these times. Consequently, any of these factors could reduce the market value of high yield securities held by a fund.

Variable- or Floating-Rate Securities:

A fund may invest in securities which offer a variable- or floating-rate of interest. Variable-rate securities provide for automatic establishment of a new interest rate at fixed intervals (e.g., daily, monthly, semi-annually, etc.). Floating-rate securities generally provide for automatic adjustment of the interest rate whenever some specified interest rate index changes. The interest rate on variable- or floating-rate securities is ordinarily a percentage of a bank’s prime rate or is determined by reference to the 90-day U.S. Treasury bill rate, the rate of return on commercial paper or bank certificates of deposit, an index of short-term interest rates or some other objective measure.

Variable- or floating-rate securities frequently include a demand feature entitling the holder to sell the securities to the issuer at par value prior to maturity. In many cases, the demand feature can be exercised at any time on seven days’ notice. In other cases, the demand feature is exercisable at any time on 30 days’ notice or on similar notice at intervals of not more than one year. Some securities which do not have variable or floating interest rates may be accompanied by puts producing similar results and price characteristics. When considering the maturity of any instrument which may be sold or put to the issuer or a third party, a fund may consider that instrument’s maturity to be shorter than its stated maturity.

Variable-rate demand notes include master demand notes which are obligations that permit a fund to invest fluctuating amounts, which may change daily without penalty, pursuant to direct arrangements between the fund, as lender, and the borrower. The interest rates on these notes fluctuate from time to time. The issuer of such obligations normally has a corresponding right, after a given period, to prepay in its discretion the outstanding principal amount of the obligations plus accrued interest upon a specified number of days’ notice to the holders of such obligations. The interest rate on a floating-rate demand obligation is based on a known lending rate, such as a bank’s prime rate, and is adjusted automatically each time such rate is adjusted. The interest rate on a variable-rate demand obligation is adjusted automatically at specified intervals. Frequently, such obligations are secured by letters of credit or other credit support arrangements provided by banks. Because these obligations are direct lending arrangements between the lender and borrower, it is not contemplated that such instruments will generally be traded. There generally is not an established secondary market for these obligations, although they are redeemable at face value. Accordingly, where these obligations are not secured by letters of credit or other credit support arrangements, the funds’ right to redeem is dependent on the ability of the borrower to pay principal and interest on demand.

The funds will not invest more than 15% of their respective net assets in variable- and floating-rate demand obligations that are not readily marketable (a variable- or floating-rate demand obligation that may be disposed of on not more than seven days’ notice will be deemed readily marketable and will

 

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not be subject to this limitation). In addition, each variable- or floating-rate obligation must meet the credit quality requirements applicable to all of a fund’s investments at the time of purchase. When determining whether such an obligation meets a fund’s credit quality requirements, the fund may look to the credit quality of the financial guarantor providing a letter of credit or other credit support arrangement.

In determining its weighted average portfolio maturity, a fund will consider a floating- or variable-rate security to have a maturity equal to its stated maturity (or redemption date if it has been called for redemption), except that it may consider (i) variable-rate securities to have a maturity equal to the period remaining until the next readjustment in the interest rate, unless subject to a demand feature, (ii) variable-rate securities subject to a demand feature to have a remaining maturity equal to the longer of (a) the next readjustment in the interest rate or (b) the period remaining until the principal can be recovered through demand, and (iii) floating-rate securities subject to a demand feature to have a maturity equal to the period remaining until the principal can be recovered through demand. Variable- and floating-rate securities generally are subject to less principal fluctuation than securities without these attributes since the securities usually trade at par following the readjustment in the interest rate.

Certain variable or floating securities have coupon rates that are based on ICE LIBOR (“LIBOR”), the Secured Overnight Financing Rate (“SOFR”), Euro Interbank Offered Rate and other similar types of reference rates (each, a “Reference Rate”).

These Reference Rates are generally intended to represent the rate at which contributing banks may obtain short-term borrowings within certain financial markets. LIBOR is produced daily by averaging the rates reported by a number of banks and may be a significant factor in determining a fund’s payment obligations under a derivative instrument, the cost of financing to a fund, or an investment’s value or return to a fund, and may be used in other ways that affect a fund’s performance. Most maturities and currencies of LIBOR were phased out at the end of 2021, with the remaining ones to be phased out on June 30, 2023. These events and any additional regulatory or market changes may have an adverse impact on a fund or its investments, including increased volatility or illiquidity in markets for instruments that rely on LIBOR.

Regulators and market participants are working together to develop successor Reference Rates to LIBOR. SOFR has been selected by a committee established by the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System and the Federal Reserve Bank of New York to replace LIBOR as a Reference Rate in the United States. Other countries have undertaken similar initiatives to identify replacement Reference Rates for LIBOR in their respective markets. However, there are obstacles to converting certain existing investments and transactions to a new Reference Rate, as well as risks associated with using a new Reference Rate with respect to new investments and transactions. It is expected that market participants will focus on the transition mechanisms by which the Reference Rates in existing contracts or instruments may be amended, whether through legislation, market-wide protocols, fallback contractual provisions, bespoke negotiations or amendments or otherwise. Nonetheless, there remains uncertainty regarding the nature of any replacement rate and the impact of the transition from LIBOR on a fund and the financial markets generally, and the termination of certain Reference Rates presents risks to a fund. Financial industry groups have begun transitioning to the use of a different Reference Rate or benchmark rate, but there are obstacles to converting certain securities and transactions to a new Reference Rate or benchmark rate. The transition process, or the failure of an industry to transition, could lead to increased volatility and illiquidity in markets for instruments that currently rely on LIBOR to determine interest rates and a reduction in the values of some LIBOR-based investments, all of which would impact a fund. Various

 

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complexities brought about by significant changes to operational processes and IT systems could take a long time to complete, and coordination with other market participants may become severely impacted, which may negatively impact a fund. Since the usefulness of LIBOR as a benchmark could deteriorate during the transition period, these effects could occur prior to June 30, 2023. While some LIBOR-based instruments may contemplate a scenario where LIBOR becomes unavailable by providing for an alternative rate-setting methodology, not all may have such provisions and there may be significant uncertainty regarding the effectiveness of any such methodologies. Further, U.S. issuers are currently not obligated to include any particular fallback language in transaction documents for new issuances of LIBOR-linked securities. In addition, the alternative reference or benchmark rate may be an ineffective substitute, potentially resulting in prolonged adverse market conditions for a fund. The elimination of a Reference Rate or any other changes or reforms to the determination or supervision of Reference Rates could have an adverse impact on the market for or value of any securities or payments linked to those Reference Rates and other financial obligations held by a fund or on its overall financial condition or results of operations. Any substitute Reference Rate and any pricing adjustments imposed by a regulator or by counterparties or otherwise may adversely affect a fund’s performance and/or NAV. At this time, it is not possible to completely identify or predict the effect of any such changes, any establishment of alternative Reference Rates or any other reforms to Reference Rates that may be enacted.

Institutional Term Loans:

A fund may invest in institutional term loans or other bank loans. These loans are typically originated, negotiated and structured by a U.S. commercial bank or other financial institution that acts as agent for a syndicate of loan investors. A fund may invest in institutional term or bank loans that are structured as senior floating rate debt securities or loan participation interests.

Loan participation interests usually take the form of assignments purchased in the primary or secondary market from loan investors. If a fund purchases these loan participation interests, a fund will typically have a contractual relationship only with the loan investor and not with the underlying borrower. As a result, a fund will receive payments of principal, interest and any fees to which it is entitled only from the loan investor selling the participation interest and only upon receipt by such loan investor of payments from the underlying borrower. A fund generally will have no right to enforce compliance by the underlying borrower with the terms of the loan agreement, nor any rights with respect to any amounts acquired by other loan investors through set-offs against the borrower. Therefore, a fund will not directly benefit from any collateral that supports the underlying loan. As a result, a fund may assume the credit risk of both the underlying borrower and the loan investor selling the loan participation interest. A fund may also be limited with respect to its right as the holder of a loan participation interest to vote on certain changes which may be made to the underlying loan agreement, such as waiving a breach of a covenant by the borrower. However, as the holder of a loan participation interest, a fund will, in almost all cases, have the right to vote on certain fundamental issues such as changes in principal amount, payment dates and interest rate.

In the process of buying, selling and holding institutional term loans or bank loans (whether structured as participation interests or as floating rate debt securities), a fund may receive and/or pay certain fees. These fees are in addition to interest payments received and may include facility fees, commitment fees, commissions and prepayment penalty fees. When a fund buys an institutional term or bank loan it may receive a facility fee and when it sells the loan it may pay a facility fee. On an ongoing basis, a fund may also receive a commitment fee based on the undrawn portion of the underlying line of credit portion of the loan. In certain circumstances, a fund may receive a prepayment penalty fee upon the

 

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prepayment of the loan by the borrower. A fund will be subject to the risk that collateral securing the loan will decline in value or have no value. Such a decline, whether as a result of bankruptcy proceedings or otherwise, could cause the loan to be under-collateralized or unsecured. In most credit agreements there is no formal requirement to pledge additional collateral. If a borrower becomes involved in bankruptcy proceedings, a court may invalidate a fund’s security interest in the loan collateral or subordinate the fund’s rights under the loan to the interests of the borrower’s unsecured creditors or cause interest previously paid to be refunded to the borrower. In addition, if the loan investor from whom a fund purchased a loan participation interest is involved in a bankruptcy proceeding, the fund may be treated as a general creditor of such loan investor even if the underlying loan itself is secured. If a fund’s interest in loan collateral is invalidated or if the fund is subordinated to other debt of a borrower or a loan investor in bankruptcy or other proceedings, the fund would have substantially lower recovery, and perhaps no recovery on the full amount of the principal and interest due on the investment. To the extent that legislation or state or federal regulators that regulate certain financial institutions impose additional requirements or restrictions with respect to the ability of such institutions to make loans, particularly in connection with highly leveraged transactions, the availability of institutional term or bank loans for investment may be adversely affected. Further, such legislation or regulation could depress the market value of these loans.

Municipal Obligations:

General Description. A fund may invest in municipal obligations. Municipal obligations are issued by or on behalf of states, the District of Columbia and U.S. territories and possessions and their political subdivisions, agencies and instrumentalities. The interest on municipal obligations is generally excludable from gross income for federal income tax purposes (“tax-exempt”) but may be an item of tax preference for purposes of the federal alternative minimum tax. A fund will rely on an opinion of the issuer’s bond counsel at the time municipal obligations are issued to determine the excludability of interest thereon.

There are many different types of municipal obligations. The principal types include “general obligation” securities, which are backed by a municipality’s full taxing power, and “revenue” securities, which are backed only by the income from a specific project, facility or tax. Municipal obligations also include (1) private activity bonds (“PABs”), which are issued by or on behalf of public authorities but are not backed by the credit of any governmental or public authority, (2) “anticipation notes,” which are issued by municipalities in expectation of future proceeds from the issuance of bonds or from taxes or other revenues and are payable from those bond proceeds, taxes or revenues and (3) tax-exempt commercial paper, which is issued by municipalities to help finance short-term capital or operating requirements.

A municipal obligation’s value depends on the issuer’s continuing payment of interest and principal when due or, in the case of PABs, the revenues generated by the facility financed by the bonds. An increase in interest rates generally will reduce the value of a fund’s investments in municipal obligations, while a decline in interest rates generally will increase that value. The market for municipal securities may become illiquid. There may also be less information available on the financial condition of municipal security issuers than for public corporations. This means that it may be harder to buy and sell municipal securities, especially on short notice, and that it may be more difficult to value such securities.

 

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Short-Term Money Market Instruments:

Bankers’ Acceptances. A fund may invest in bankers’ acceptances. A bankers’ acceptance is a negotiable instrument in the form of a bill of exchange or time draft drawn on and accepted by a commercial bank. The instrument’s marketability is affected primarily by the reputation of the accepting bank and market demand.

A fund may invest in bankers’ acceptances of domestic banks and savings and loans that have assets of at least $1 billion and capital, surplus and undivided profits of over $100 million as of the close of their most recent fiscal year. These funds may also invest in instruments that are insured by the Bank Insurance Fund or the Savings Institution Insurance Fund of the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (“FDIC”).

Certificates of Deposit (“CDs”). A fund may invest in CDs issued by domestic institutions with assets in excess of $1 billion. CDs carry a minimal amount of inflation risk due to their fixed interest rate and early withdrawal penalties.

Commercial Paper. A fund may invest in commercial paper that is rated Prime-1 or Prime-2 by Moody’s Investors Service, Inc. (“Moody’s”), or A-1 +, A-1 or A-2 by Standard and Poor’s (“S&P”), or F1+, F1 or F2 by Fitch Ratings Ltd. (“Fitch”). In difficult market environments, commercial paper may be subject to liquidity risk. Also, because it is an unsecured promissory note issued by a company, commercial paper is subject to issuer risk.

Bank Time Deposits. A fund may invest in bank time deposits, which are monies kept on deposit with banks or savings and loan associations for a stated period of time at a fixed rate of interest. There may be penalties for the early withdrawal of such time deposits, in which case the yields of these investments will be reduced.

Repurchase and Reverse Repurchase Agreements:

Repurchase Agreements. A fund may enter into repurchase agreements with member banks of the Federal Reserve System, securities dealers who are members of a national securities exchange or market makers in U.S. Government Securities. Although repurchase agreements carry certain risks not associated with direct investment in securities, delays and costs to a fund if the other party becomes bankrupt, a fund intends to enter into repurchase agreements only with banks and dealers in transactions believed by its portfolio manager to present minimal credit risks.

Reverse Repurchase Agreements. A fund may borrow by entering into reverse repurchase agreements with the same parties with whom it may enter into repurchase agreements. Reverse repurchase agreements involve the risk that the market value of securities retained in lieu of sale by a fund may decline below the price of the securities the fund has sold but is obliged to repurchase. If the buyer of securities under a reverse repurchase agreement becomes bankrupt or insolvent, such buyer or its trustee or receiver may receive an extension of time to determine whether to enforce a fund’s obligation to repurchase the securities. During that time, a fund’s use of the proceeds of the reverse repurchase agreement effectively may be restricted. Reverse repurchase agreements create leverage, a speculative factor, and are considered borrowings for the purpose of a fund’s limitation on borrowing.

The reverse repurchase agreements entered into by a fund may be used as arbitrage transactions in which a fund will maintain an offsetting position in investment grade debt obligations or repurchase

 

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agreements that mature on or before the settlement date of the related reverse repurchase agreement. Since a fund will receive interest on the securities or repurchase agreements in which it invests the transaction proceeds, the transactions may involve leverage.

Mortgage Dollar Rolls and Sale-Buybacks:

A fund may enter into mortgage dollar rolls, in which the fund would sell mortgage-backed securities for delivery in the current month and simultaneously contract to purchase similar securities on a specified future date. While a fund would forego principal and interest paid on the mortgage-backed securities during the roll period, it would be compensated by the difference between the current sale price and the lower price for the future purchase as well as by any interest earned on the proceeds of the initial sale. A fund also could be compensated through the receipt of fee income equivalent to a lower forward price. Mortgage dollar roll transactions may be considered a borrowing by a fund under certain circumstances.

A fund also may effect simultaneous purchase and sale transactions that are known as “sale-buybacks.” A sale-buyback is similar to a reverse repurchase agreement, except that in a sale-buyback, the counterparty who purchases the security is entitled to receive any principal or interest payments made on the underlying security pending settlement of the fund’s repurchase of the underlying security.

The mortgage dollar rolls and sale-buybacks entered into by a fund may be used as arbitrage transactions in which a fund will maintain an offsetting position in investment grade debt obligations or repurchase agreements that mature on or before the settlement date of the related mortgage dollar roll or sale-buyback. Since a fund will receive interest on the securities or repurchase agreements in which it invests the transaction proceeds, the transactions may involve leverage.

U.S. Government Securities:

U.S. Government Securities. A fund may invest in U.S. Government Securities. U.S. Government Securities are securities issued or guaranteed by the U.S. Government, its agencies or instrumentalities. Some obligations issued by U.S. Government agencies and instrumentalities are supported by the full faith and credit of the U.S. Treasury; others by the right of the issuer to borrow from the U.S. Treasury; others by discretionary authority of the U.S. Government to purchases certain obligations of the agency or instrumentality; and others only by the credit of the agency or instrumentality. Those securities bear fixed, floating or variable rates of interest. Interest may fluctuate based on generally recognized reference rates or the relationship of rates. While the U.S. Government currently provides financial support to such U.S. Government-sponsored agencies or instrumentalities, no assurance can be given that it will always do so, since it is not so obligated by law. U.S. Government Securities include U.S. Treasury bills, notes and bonds, Federal Home Loan Bank obligations, Federal Intermediate Credit Bank obligations, U.S. Government agency obligations and repurchase agreements secured thereby.

Zero Coupon and Pay-In-Kind Securities:

Zero Coupon, Step Coupon and Pay-In-Kind Securities. A fund may invest in zero coupon securities and step coupon securities. The market value of those securities generally is more volatile than the value of securities that pay interest periodically and is likely to respond to changes in interest rates to a greater degree than do other types of debt securities having similar maturities and credit value. Although zero coupon securities generally are not traded on a national securities exchange, they are widely traded by brokers and dealers.

 

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A fund also may invest in pay-in-kind securities, which allow the issuer the option to pay interest (1) in cash at a specified coupon payment date or (2) by issuing to the holder of the security a similar security with the same coupon rate and a face value equal to the amount of the cash coupon payment that would have been made.

The Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended (“Code”), requires the holder of a zero or step coupon security and certain other securities acquired at a discount, as well as pay-in-kind bonds, to accrue income with respect to these securities prior to the receipt of cash payments. See “Taxes.”

Pass-through Securities:

Mortgage-Backed Securities. A fund may invest in debt securities backed by pools of various types of mortgages. The fund may invest in pass-through securities issued by private, governmental and governmental-related agencies, as well as collateralized mortgage obligations (“CMOs”). Principal and interest payments made on the underlying mortgages or mortgage pools are “passed through” to investors. Mortgage-backed securities may be issued by the U.S. Government or U.S. Government-sponsored agencies, including, but not limited to, the Government National Mortgage Association (“GNMA” or “Ginnie Mae”), a wholly owned U.S. Government corporation within the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, the Federal National Mortgage Association (“FNMA” or “Fannie Mae”), a government sponsored corporation owned entirely by private stockholders, and the Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation (“FHLMC” or “Freddie Mac”), a corporate instrumentality of the United States created pursuant to an act of Congress that is owned entirely by the Federal Home Loan Banks. Mortgage-backed securities issued by private entities have similar structures, but are not guaranteed by a government agency.

In September 2008, the U.S. Treasury and the Federal Housing Finance Agency (“FHFA”) announced that FNMA and FHLMC had been placed in conservatorship. Since that time, FNMA and FHLMC have received significant capital support through Treasury preferred stock purchases, as well as Treasury and Federal Reserve purchases of their mortgage-backed securities. The FHFA and the U.S. Treasury (through its agreement to purchase FNMA and FHLMC preferred stock) have imposed strict limits on the size of their mortgage portfolios. While the mortgage-backed securities purchase programs ended in 2010, the Treasury continued its support for the entities’ capital as necessary to prevent a negative net worth. When a credit rating agency downgraded long-term U.S. Government debt in August 2011, the agency also downgraded FNMA and FHLMC’s bond ratings, from AAA to AA+, based on their direct reliance on the U.S. Government (although that rating did not directly relate to their mortgage-backed securities).

In August 2012, the Treasury amended its preferred stock purchase agreements to provide that FNMA’s and FHLMC’s portfolios will be wound down at an annual rate of 15 percent (up from the previously agreed annual rate of 10 percent), requiring them to reach the $250 billion target by December 31, 2018. On December 21, 2017, a letter agreement between the Treasury and Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac changed the terms of the senior preferred stock certificates to permit the GSEs each to retain a $3 billion capital reserve, quarterly. Under the 2017 letter, each GSE paid a dividend to Treasury equal to the amount that its net worth exceeded $3 billion at the end of each quarter. On September 30, 2019, the Treasury and the FHFA, acting as conservator to Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, announced amendments to the respective senior preferred stock certificates that will permit the GSEs to retain earnings beyond the $3 billion capital reserves previously allowed through the 2017 letter agreements. Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac are now permitted to maintain capital reserves of $25 billion and

 

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$20 billion, respectively. In late 2020, the FHFA issued a new capital rule requiring Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac to hold $283 billion in unadjusted total capital as of June 30, 2020, based on their assets at the time. In January 2021, the FHFA and the U.S. Treasury agreed to amend the preferred stock purchase agreements for the shares in Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac that the federal government continues to hold. The amendments permit Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac to retain all earnings until they have reached the requirements set by the 2020 capital rule.

The problems faced by FNMA and FHLMC, resulting in their being placed into federal conservatorship and receiving significant U.S. Government support, have sparked serious debate among federal policymakers regarding the continued role of the U.S. Government in providing liquidity for mortgage loans. There have been discussions among policymakers, however, as to whether FNMA and FHLMC should be nationalized, privatized, restructured or eliminated altogether. FNMA and FHLMC also are the subject of several continuing legal actions and investigations over certain accounting, disclosure or corporate governance matters, which (along with any resulting financial restatements) may continue to have an adverse effect on the guaranteeing entities.

Under the direction of the FHFA, FNMA and FHLMC jointly developed a common securitization platform for the issuance of a uniform mortgage-backed security (“UMBS”) (the “Single Security Initiative”) that aligns the characteristics of FNMA and FHLMC certificates. In June 2019, under the Single Security Initiative, FNMA and FHLMC started issuing UMBS in place of their prior offerings of TBA-eligible securities. The Single Security Initiative seeks to support the overall liquidity of the TBA market by aligning the characteristics of FNMA and FHLMC certificates. The effects that the Single Security Initiative may have on the market for TBA and other mortgage-backed securities are uncertain.

Asset-Backed Securities. A fund may invest in securities that are backed by other assets, such as automobile loans, consumer loans, credit cards, and equipment leases. Asset-backed securities are subject to the risk of premature pre-payment of principal which can change their effective maturities. These securities are also sensitive to changes in interest rates, the financial situation of the issuer, and the credit quality of the underlying collateral.

Foreign Securities Exposure:

Depositary Receipts. A fund may invest in sponsored or unsponsored European Depositary Receipts (“EDRs”), Fiduciary Depositary Receipts (“FDRs”), Global Depositary Receipts (“GDRs”), International Depositary Receipts (“IDRs”), Special Drawing Rights (“SDRs”) or other similar securities representing interests in or convertible into securities of foreign issuers (collectively, “Depositary Receipts”).

Issuers of the securities underlying unsponsored Depositary Receipts are not obligated to disclose material information in the U.S. and, therefore, there may be less information available regarding such issuers and there may not be a correlation between such information and the market value of these unsponsored Depositary Receipts. For purposes of certain investment limitations, EDRs, GDRs and IDRs are considered to be foreign securities and are subject to many of the risks inherent in investing in foreign securities, as discussed below.

American Depositary Receipts (“ADRs”). A fund may invest in both sponsored and unsponsored ADRs. Holders of unsponsored depository receipts generally bear all the costs of such facilities, and the depository of an unsponsored facility frequently is under no obligation to distribute shareholder communications received from the issuer of the deposited security or to pass through voting rights to the

 

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holders of such receipts of the deposited securities. For purposes of certain investment limitations, ADRs are considered to be foreign securities and are subject to many of the risks inherent in investing in foreign securities, as discussed below.

Euro/Yankee Bonds. A fund may invest in dollar-denominated bonds issued by foreign branches of domestic banks (“Eurobonds”) and dollar-denominated bonds issued by a U.S. branch of a foreign bank and sold in the U.S. (“Yankee bonds”). Investment in Eurobonds and Yankee bonds entails certain risks similar to investment in foreign securities in general. These risks are discussed below.

Eurodollar Certificates. A fund may invest in CDs issued by foreign branches of domestic and foreign banks. Such obligations may be subject to different risks than are those of domestic banks or domestic branches of foreign banks. These risks include foreign economic and political developments, foreign governmental restrictions that may adversely affect payment of principal and interest on the obligations, foreign exchange controls and foreign withholding and other taxes on interest income. Foreign branches of foreign banks are not necessarily subject to the same or similar regulatory requirements, loan limitations, and accounting, auditing and recordkeeping requirements as are domestic banks or domestic branches of foreign banks. In addition, less information may be publicly available about a foreign branch of a domestic bank or a foreign bank than a domestic bank.

Foreign Securities. A fund may invest in foreign equity securities. In most cases, the best available market for foreign securities will be on the exchanges or in over-the-counter (“OTC”) markets located outside the U.S. Foreign stock markets, while growing in volume and sophistication, generally are not as developed as those in the U.S., and securities of some foreign issuers (particularly those located in developing countries) may be less liquid and more volatile than securities of comparable U.S. companies. Their markets and economies may react differently to specific or global events than the U.S. market and economy. In addition, foreign brokerage commissions generally are higher than commissions on securities traded in the U.S. In general, there is less overall governmental supervision and regulation of securities exchanges, brokers and listed companies than in the U.S. Investments in foreign securities also involve the risk of possible adverse changes in investment or exchange control regulations, expropriation or confiscatory taxation, limitation on or delays in the removal of funds or other assets of a fund, custodial issues, political or financial instability or diplomatic and other developments that could affect such investments. Foreign security risk may also apply to ADRs, GDRs and EDRs. The risks associated with investments in governmental or quasi-governmental entities of a foreign country are heightened by the potential for unexpected governmental change, which may lead to default or expropriation, and inadequate government oversight and accounting.

No fund will invest in foreign securities when there are currency or trading restrictions in force or when, in the judgment of its portfolio manager, such restrictions are likely to be imposed. However, certain currencies may become blocked (i.e., not freely available for transfer from a foreign country), resulting in the possible inability of the fund to convert proceeds realized upon sale of portfolio securities of the affected foreign companies into U.S. currency.

When a fund receives dividend and interest income (if any) from issuers in certain countries, such distributions may be subject to partial withholding by local tax authorities in order to satisfy potential local tax obligations. A fund may file claims to recover such withholding tax in jurisdictions where withholding tax reclaim is possible, which may be the case as a result of bilateral treaties between the United States and local governments. Whether or when a fund will receive a withholding tax refund in the future is within the control of the tax authorities in such countries, and a fund may incur costs and

 

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experience delays in receiving any such withholding tax refunds. Where a fund expects to recover withholding tax based on a continuous assessment of probability of recovery, the NAV of a fund generally includes accruals for such tax refunds. The funds continue to evaluate tax developments for potential impact to the probability of recovery. If the likelihood of receiving refunds materially decreases, for example due to a change in tax regulation or approach, accruals in a fund’s NAV for such refunds may need to be written down partially or in full, which will adversely affect that fund’s NAV. Investors in a fund at the time an accrual is written down will bear the impact of any resulting reduction in NAV regardless of whether they were investors during the accrual period. Conversely, if a fund receives a tax refund that has not been previously accrued, investors in the fund at the time the claim is successful will benefit from any resulting increase in the fund’s NAV. Investors who sold their shares prior to such time will not benefit from such NAV increase.

Because investments in foreign companies usually involve currencies of foreign countries and because the funds may temporarily hold funds in bank deposits in foreign currencies during the completion of investment programs, the value of any of the assets of the funds as measured in U.S. dollars may be affected favorably or unfavorably by changes in foreign currency exchange rates and exchange control regulations, and a fund may incur costs in connection with conversions between various currencies. A fund will conduct its foreign currency exchange transactions on a spot (i.e., cash) basis at the spot rate prevailing in the foreign currency exchange market. Additionally, to protect against uncertainty in the level of future exchange rates, a fund may enter into contracts to purchase or sell foreign currencies at a future date (a “forward currency contract” or “forward contract”). When deemed appropriate by the portfolio managers, a fund may from time to time seek to reduce foreign currency risk by hedging some or all of the fund’s foreign currency exposure back into the U.S. dollar. The risks for forward contracts and hedging are discussed below.

Emerging Markets. A fund may invest in emerging markets. Special considerations (in addition to the considerations regarding foreign investments generally) may include greater political uncertainties, an economy’s dependence on revenues from particular commodities or on international aid or development assistance, currency transfer restrictions, a limited number of potential buyers for such securities and delays and disruptions in securities settlement procedures. Compared to the U.S. and other developed countries, emerging market countries may have relatively unstable governments, economies based on only a few industries, present the risk of nationalization of businesses, restrictions on foreign ownership, or prohibitions on repatriation of assets, and may have less protection of property rights than more developed countries and securities markets that are less liquid and trade a smaller number of securities. Prices on these exchanges tend to be volatile and, in the past, securities in these countries have offered greater potential for gain (as well as loss) than securities of companies located in developed countries. Political, legal and economic structures in emerging market countries may be undergoing significant evolution and rapid development, and they may lack the social, political, legal and economic stability characteristics of more developed countries. Their economies may be highly vulnerable to changes in local or global trade conditions and may suffer from extreme and volatile debt burdens or inflation rates.

In addition, many emerging market countries have experienced substantial, and during some periods, extremely high rates of inflation, for many years. Inflation and rapid fluctuations in inflation rates have had, and may continue to have, negative effects on the economies and securities markets of certain countries. Moreover, the economies of some developing market countries may differ unfavorably from the U.S. economy in such respects as growth of gross domestic product, rate of inflation, currency depreciation, reliable access to capital, debt burden, capital reinvestment, resource self-sufficiency and

 

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balance of payments position. The economies of some developing market countries may be based on only a few industries, and may be highly vulnerable to changes in local or global trade conditions.

The issuer or governmental authority that controls the repayment of an emerging market country’s debt may not be able or willing to repay the principal and/or interest when due in accordance with the terms of such debt. A debtor’s willingness or ability to repay principal and interest due in a timely manner may be affected by, among other factors, its cash flow situation, and, in the case of a government debtor, the extent of its foreign reserves, the availability of sufficient foreign exchange on the date a payment is due, the relative size of the debt service burden to the economy as a whole and the political constraints to which a government debtor may be subject. Government debtors may default on their debt and may also be dependent on expected disbursements from foreign governments, multilateral agencies and others abroad to reduce principal and interest arrearages on their debt. Holders of government debt may be requested to participate in the rescheduling of such debt and to extend further loans to government debtors. If such an event occurs, a fund may have limited legal recourse against the issuer and/or guarantor.

Settlement systems in developing market countries may be less organized than in developed countries. Supervisory authorities may also be unable to apply standards which are comparable with those in more developed countries. There may be risks that settlement may be delayed and that cash or securities belonging to a fund may be in jeopardy because of failures of or defects in the settlement systems. Market practice may require that payment be made prior to receipt of the security which is being purchased or that delivery of a security must be made before payment is received. In such cases, default by a broker or bank (the “counterparty”) through whom the relevant transaction is effected might result in a loss being suffered by the fund. A fund seeks, where possible, to use counterparties whose financial status reduces this risk. However, there can be no certainty that the funds will be successful in eliminating or reducing this risk, particularly as counterparties operating in developing market countries frequently lack the substance, capitalization and/or financial resources of those in developed countries. Uncertainties in the operation of settlement systems in individual markets may increase the risk of competing claims to securities held by or to be transferred to a fund. Legal compensation schemes may be non-existent, limited or inadequate to meet a fund’s claims in any of these events.

Securities trading in developing markets presents additional credit and financial risks. A fund may have limited access to, or there may be a limited number of, potential counterparties that trade in the securities of developing market issuers. Governmental regulations may restrict potential counterparties to certain financial institutions located or operating in the particular developing market. Potential counterparties may not possess, adopt or implement creditworthiness standards, financial reporting standards or legal and contractual protections similar to those in developed markets. Currency and other hedging techniques may not be available or may be limited.

The local taxation of income and capital gains accruing to nonresidents varies among developing market countries and may be comparatively high. Developing market countries typically have less well-defined tax laws and procedures and such laws may permit retroactive taxation so that a fund could in the future become subject to local tax liabilities that had not been anticipated in conducting its investment activities or valuing its assets.

Many emerging market countries suffer from uncertainty and corruption in their legal frameworks. Legislation may be difficult to interpret and laws may be too new to provide any precedential value. Laws regarding foreign investment and private property may be weak or non-existent.

 

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Investments in developing market countries may involve risks of nationalization, expropriation and confiscatory taxation. In the event of expropriation, a fund could lose all or a substantial portion of any investments it has made in the affected countries. Many emerging market countries have little experience with the corporate form of business organization and may not have well-developed corporation and business laws or concepts of fiduciary duty in the business context. The organizational structures of certain issuers in emerging markets may not be familiar, and may limit investor rights and recourse.

Remedies must, in some cases, be pursued in the courts of the defaulting party itself, and the ability of the holder of foreign government fixed income securities to obtain recourse may be subject to the political climate in the relevant country. In addition, no assurance can be given that the holders of commercial bank debt will not contest payments to the holders of other foreign government debt obligations in the event of default under their commercial bank loan agreements. A fund may encounter substantial difficulties in obtaining and enforcing judgments against individuals and companies located in certain emerging market countries, either individually or in combination with other shareholders. It may be difficult or impossible to obtain or enforce legislation or remedies against governments, their agencies and sponsored entities. Additionally, in certain emerging market countries, fraud, corruption and attempts at market manipulation may be more prevalent than in developed market countries. Shareholder claims that are common in the U.S. and are generally viewed as determining misconduct, including class action securities law and fraud claims, generally are difficult or impossible to pursue as a matter of law or practicality in many emerging markets.

There may be less publicly available information about emerging markets than would be available in more developed capital markets, and such issuers may not be subject to accounting, auditing and financial reporting standards and requirements comparable to those to which companies in major securities markets are subject. In certain countries with emerging capital markets, reporting standards vary widely. As a result, traditional investment measurements used in the U.S., may not be applicable. Further, certain countries in which the funds may invest may not provide the same degree of investor protection or information to investors as would generally apply. In addition, it is possible that purported securities in which a fund invested may subsequently be found to be fraudulent and as a consequence the fund could suffer losses. Regulatory authorities in some emerging markets currently do not provide the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board with the ability to inspect public accounting firms as required by U.S. law, including sufficient access to inspect audit work papers and practices, or otherwise do not cooperate with U.S. regulators, which potentially could expose investors to significant risks.

Due to political, military or regional conflicts or due to terrorism or war, it is possible that the U.S., other nations or other governmental entities (including supranational entities) could impose sanctions on certain companies located in emerging or developing markets that limit or restrict foreign investment, the movement of assets or other economic activity in a country that is involved in such conflicts. Such sanctions or other intergovernmental actions could result in the devaluation of a country’s currency, a downgrade in the credit ratings of issuers in such country, or a decline in the value and liquidity of securities of issuers in that country. In addition, an imposition of sanctions upon certain issuers in a country could result in an immediate freeze of that issuer’s securities, impairing the ability of a fund to buy, sell, receive or deliver those securities. Counter measures could be taken by the country’s government, which could involve the seizure of a fund’s assets. In addition, such actions could adversely affect a country’s economy, possibly forcing the economy into a recession.

Currencies of developing market countries are subject to significantly greater risks than currencies of developed countries. Some developing market currencies may not be internationally traded

 

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or may be subject to strict controls by local governments resulting in undervalued or overvalued currencies and associated difficulties with the valuation of assets, including a fund’s securities, denominated in that currency. Some developing market countries have experienced balance of payment deficits and shortages in foreign exchange reserves. Governments have responded by restricting currency conversions. Future restrictive exchange controls could prevent or restrict a company’s ability to make dividend or interest payments in the original currency of the obligation (usually U.S. dollars). In addition, even though the currencies of some developing market countries, such as certain Eastern European countries, may be convertible into U.S. dollars, the conversion rates may be artificial to the actual market values and may be adverse to a fund’s shareholders.

The laws in certain countries with emerging capital markets may be based upon or highly influenced by religious codes or rules. The interpretation of how these laws apply to certain investments may change over time, which could have a negative impact on those investments and a fund.

Developing capital markets are emerging in a dynamic political and economic environment brought about by events over recent years that have reshaped political boundaries and traditional ideologies. In such a dynamic environment, there can be no assurance that these capital markets will continue to present viable investment opportunities for a fund.

European Securities. A fund’s performance may be affected by political, social and economic conditions in Europe, such as growth of the economic output (the gross national product), the rate of inflation, the rate at which capital is reinvested into European economies, the success of governmental actions to reduce budget deficits and the resource self-sufficiency of European countries and conflict between European countries. Most developed countries in Western Europe are members of the European Union (“EU”), and many are also members of the European Economic and Monetary Union (“EMU” or “Eurozone”). The EMU is comprised of EU members that have adopted the euro currency. Member states relinquish control of their own monetary policies. The EMU requires Eurozone countries to comply with restrictions on interest rates, deficits, debt levels, and inflation rates, fiscal and monetary controls, and other factors, each of which may significantly impact every European country and their economic partners, including those countries that are not members of the EMU. Changes in imports or exports, changes in governmental or EU regulations on trade, changes in the exchange rate of the euro (the common currency of the EU), the threat of default or actual default by one or more EU member states on its sovereign debt, and/or an economic recession in one or more EU member states and their trading partners.

The European financial markets have experienced and may continue to experience volatility and adverse trends due to concerns relating to economic downturns, rising government debt levels and the possible default on government debt, national unemployment in several European countries, including, but not limited to, Austria, Belgium, Cyprus, France, Greece, Ireland, Italy, Portugal, Spain and Ukraine, and, most recently, the COVID-19 pandemic and the Russian invasion of Ukraine. These events have adversely affected the exchange rate of the euro and may continue to significantly affect European countries. Responses to financial problems by European governments, central banks, and others, including austerity measures and other reforms, may not produce the desired results, may result in social unrest and may limit future growth and economic recovery or may have unintended consequences. In addition, one or more countries may abandon the euro and/or withdraw from the EU. The impact of these actions, especially if they occur in a disorderly fashion, could be significant and far-reaching.

Many EU nations are susceptible to economic risks associated with high levels of debt. Nongovernmental issuers, and even certain governments, have defaulted on, or been forced to restructure,

 

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their debts, and other issuers have faced difficulties obtaining credit or refinancing existing obligations. A default or debt restructuring by any European country could adversely impact holders of that country’s debt and sellers of credit default swaps linked to that country’s creditworthiness, which may be located in other countries. Such a default or debt restructuring could affect exposures to other EU countries and their companies as well. Further defaults on, or restructurings of, the debt of governments or other entities could have additional adverse effects on economies, financial markets and asset valuations around the world. In addition, issuers have faced difficulties obtaining credit or refinancing existing obligations; financial institutions have in many cases required government or central bank support, have needed to raise capital, and/or have been impaired in their ability to extend credit; and financial markets in Europe and elsewhere have experienced extreme volatility and declines in asset values and liquidity. Furthermore, certain EU countries have had to accept assistance from supranational agencies such as the International Monetary Fund, the European Stability Mechanism or others. The European Central Bank has also intervened to purchase Eurozone debt in an attempt to stabilize markets and reduce borrowing costs. There can be no assurance that any creditors or supranational agencies will continue to intervene or provide further assistance, and markets may react adversely to any expected reduction in the financial support provided by these creditors.

Certain European countries have experienced negative interest rates on certain fixed-income instruments. A negative interest rate is an unconventional central bank monetary policy tool where nominal target interest rates are set with a negative value (i.e., below zero percent) intended to help create self-sustaining growth in the local economy. Negative interest rates may result in heightened market volatility and may detract from a fund’s performance to the extent a fund is exposed to such interest rates.

Secessionist movements, such as the Catalan separatist movement in Spain, the independence movement in Scotland, and the Flemish movement in Belgium, as well as government or other responses to such movements, may create instability and uncertainty in the region. In addition, the national politics of European countries have been unpredictable and subject to influence by disruptive political groups and ideologies. European governments may be subject to change and such countries may experience social and political unrest. Unanticipated or sudden political or social developments may result in sudden and significant investment losses. The occurrence of terrorist incidents throughout Europe also could impact financial markets. The impact of these or other events is not clear but could be significant and far-reaching and materially impact the value and liquidity of a fund’s investments.

Russia’s war with Ukraine has negatively impacted European economic activity. The effects on the economies of European countries of the Russia/Ukraine war and Russia’s response to sanctions imposed by the U.S. and other countries are impossible to predict, but have been and could continue to be significant. For example, exports in Eastern Europe have been disrupted for certain key commodities, pushing commodity prices to record highs, and energy prices in Europe have increased significantly.

Derivatives – Futures, Forwards, Options and Hedging Transactions:

General Description. A fund may use certain financial instruments, which may include futures contracts (sometimes referred to as “futures”), options, options on futures, swaps and non-deliverable forward currency contracts (“Derivatives”).

In addition, the funds expect to discover new opportunities in connection with such instruments and, as these new opportunities may become available and regulatory authorities broaden the range of permitted transactions, a fund’s portfolio manager may utilize these opportunities to the extent it is

 

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consistent with a fund’s investment objective(s) and permitted by the fund’s investment limitations and applicable regulatory authorities. (For purposes of this discussion, such new opportunities are included in the defined term Derivatives.) Although a fund may be permitted to use a variety of Derivatives, a fund presently intends to purchase, sell and use for hedging or investment purposes those Derivatives as specified and discussed in the sections that follow.

Regulation.

The enactment of the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act (the “Dodd-Frank Act”) resulted in historic and comprehensive statutory reform of the regulation of Derivatives, including the manner in which they are entered into, reported, recorded, executed, and settled (or “cleared”). In particular, the Dodd-Frank Act mandates the elimination of references to credit ratings in numerous securities laws, including the 1940 Act. Certain swap Derivatives have been and other Derivatives may be mandated for central clearing under the Dodd-Frank Act, which likely will require technological and other changes to the operations of registered investment companies and the market in which they will trade. Central clearing also entails the use of assets of a registered investment company to satisfy margin calls and this may have an effect on the performance of such a fund. Although the Commodity Futures Trading Commission (“CFTC”) released final rules relating to clearing, reporting, recordkeeping and registration requirements under the legislation, many of the provisions of the Dodd-Frank Act are subject to further final rulemaking or phase-in periods, and thus their ultimate impact remains unclear. The banking regulators and the CTFC have issued regulations requiring the posting of initial and variation margin for uncleared swaps. The variation margin requirements are now effective and the initial margin requirements are being phased-in through 2022 based on average daily aggregate notional amount of covered swaps between swap dealers and swap entities. Due to these regulations, a fund could be required to engage in greater documentation and recordkeeping with respect to swap agreements.

The regulators that have been charged with the responsibility for implementing the Dodd-Frank Act (i.e., the Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”), the CFTC, and the banking regulators) have been active in proposing and adopting regulations and guidance on the use of Derivatives by registered investment companies. As discussed below, the CFTC adopted a revision to one of its rules that, as revised, either restricts the use of Derivatives by a registered investment company or requires the fund’s adviser to register as a commodity pool operator (“CPO”).

Historically, advisers of registered investment companies trading commodity interests (such as futures contracts, options on futures contracts, non-deliverable forwards and swaps), including the funds, had been excluded from regulation CPOs pursuant to CFTC Regulation 4.5. In 2012, the CFTC amended Regulation 4.5 to narrow this exclusion. Under the amended Regulation 4.5 exclusion, in order to rely on the exclusion a registered investment company’s commodity interests – other than those used for bona fide hedging purposes (as defined by the CFTC) – must be limited such that the aggregate initial margin and premiums required to establish the positions (after taking into account unrealized profits and unrealized losses on any such positions and excluding the amount by which options that are “in-the-money” at the time of purchase) does not exceed 5% of a fund’s NAV, or alternatively, the aggregate net notional value of the positions, determined at the time the most recent position was established, does not exceed 100% of a fund’s NAV (after taking into account unrealized profits and unrealized losses on any such positions). Further, to qualify for the exclusion in amended Regulation 4.5, a fund must satisfy a marketing test, which requires, among other things, that a fund not hold itself out as a vehicle for trading commodity interests. A fund’s ability to use these instruments may also be limited by

 

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tax considerations. Carillon Tower is registered as an investment adviser under the Investment Advisers Act of 1940, as amended. On behalf of each fund, an exemption from registration or regulation as a commodity pool operator under the Commodity Exchange Act has been claimed with the CFTC under CFTC Regulation 4.5, and Carillon Tower is exempt from registration as a commodity trading adviser under CFTC Regulation 4.14(a)(8) with respect to each fund.

The regulation of cleared and uncleared swap agreements, as well as other Derivatives, is a rapidly changing area of law and is subject to modification by government and judicial action. In addition, the SEC, CFTC and the exchanges are authorized to take extraordinary actions in the event of a market emergency, including, for example, the implementation or reduction of speculative position limits, the implementation of higher margin requirements, the establishment of daily price limits and the suspension of trading.

It is not possible to predict fully the effects of current or future regulation. However, it is possible that developments in government regulation of various types of derivative instruments, such as speculative position limits on certain types of Derivatives, or limits or restrictions on the counterparties with which the funds engage in derivative transactions, may limit or prevent a fund from using or limit a fund’s use of these instruments effectively as a part of its investment strategy, and could adversely affect a fund’s ability to achieve its investment objective(s). Carillon Tower will continue to monitor developments in the area, particularly to the extent regulatory changes affect the funds’ ability to enter into desired swap agreements. New requirements, even if not directly applicable to the funds, may increase the cost of a fund’s investments and cost of doing business.

Effective August 19, 2022 (the “Compliance Date”), Rule 18f-4 under the 1940 Act (the “Derivatives Rule” or “Rule 18f-4”) replaced the asset segregation regime of Investment Company Act Release No. 10666 (“Release 10666”) with a new framework for the use of Derivatives by registered funds. As of the Compliance Date, the SEC rescinded Release 10666 and withdrew no-action letters and similar guidance addressing a fund’s use of Derivatives and began requiring a fund to satisfy the requirements of the Derivatives Rule. Rule 18f-4 permits a fund to enter into Derivatives Transactions (as defined below) and certain other transactions notwithstanding the restrictions on the issuance of senior securities under Section 18 of the 1940 Act. Section 18 of the 1940 Act, among other things, prohibits open-end funds, including the funds, from issuing or selling any “senior security,” other than borrowing from a bank (subject to a requirement to maintain 300% “asset coverage”).

Under Rule 18f-4, “Derivatives Transactions” include the following: (1) any futures contract, forward contract, option (excluding purchased options), swap, security-based swap, any combination of the foregoing, or any similar instrument, under which a fund is or may be required to make any payment or delivery of cash or other assets during the life of the instrument or at maturity or early termination, whether as margin or settlement payment or otherwise; (2) any short sale borrowing; (3) any reverse repurchase agreements or similar financing transactions, if a fund elects to treat these transactions as Derivatives Transactions under Rule 18f-4; and (4) when-issued or forward-settling securities (e.g., firm and standby commitments, including to-be-announced commitments, and dollar rolls) and non-standard settlement cycle securities, unless such transactions meet the Delayed-Settlement Securities Provision (as defined below).

For a fund using a significant amount of Derivatives, the Derivatives Rule mandates a fund adopt and/or implement: (i) value at risk limitations in lieu of asset segregation requirements; (ii) a written derivatives risk management program; (iii) new Board oversight responsibilities; and (iv) new reporting

 

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and recordkeeping requirements. The Derivatives Rule provides an exception to most of its requirements for a fund with Derivatives exposure not exceeding 10% of its net assets, excluding certain currency and interest rate hedging transactions (a “Limited Derivatives User”). A Limited Derivatives User is still required to implement written compliance policies and procedures reasonably designed to manage its Derivatives risks.

The Derivatives Rule also provides special treatment for reverse repurchase agreements, similar financing transactions and unfunded commitment agreements. Under the Derivatives Rule, when a fund trades reverse repurchase agreements or similar financing transactions, it must either (i) aggregate the amount of indebtedness associated with all reverse repurchase agreements or similar financing transactions with the aggregate amount of any other senior securities representing indebtedness (e.g., borrowings, if applicable) when calculating the fund’s asset coverage ratio or (ii) treat all such transactions as Derivatives Transactions. Furthermore, under the Derivatives Rule, a fund will be permitted to enter into an unfunded commitment agreement, and such unfunded commitment agreement will not be subject to the asset coverage requirements under the 1940 Act, if the fund reasonably believes, at the time it enters into such agreement, that it will have sufficient cash and cash equivalents to meet its obligations with respect to all such agreements as they come due. In addition, under the Derivatives Rule, a fund may invest in a security on a when-issued or forward-settling basis, or with a nonstandard settlement cycle, and the transaction will be deemed not to involve a senior security, provided that: (i) the fund intends to physically settle the transaction; and (ii) the transaction will settle within 35 days of its trade date (the “Delayed-Settlement Securities Provision”). A fund may otherwise engage in when-issued, forward-settling and non-standard settlement cycle securities transactions that do not meet the conditions of the Delayed-Settlement Securities Provision so long as the fund treats any such transaction as a Derivatives Transaction for purposes of compliance with the Derivatives Rule.

The requirements of the Derivatives Rule are intended to reduce Derivatives risk, but they may not work as intended. Analyses, judgments and decisions made in connection with administering the derivatives risk management program may be incorrect or otherwise may not produce the desired results. In addition, changes in market conditions, which may occur rapidly and unpredictably, may adversely affect the administration of the program. Complying with the Derivatives Rule may increase the cost of a fund’s investments and cost of doing business, which could adversely affect investors, and the full impact of the Derivatives Rule on a fund remains uncertain.

Special Risks of Hedging Strategies. The use of Derivatives involves special considerations and risks, as described below. Risks pertaining to particular Derivatives are described in the sections that follow.

(1)        Successful use of most Derivatives depends upon a portfolio manager’s ability to predict movements of the overall securities, currency and interest rate markets, which requires different skills than predicting changes in the prices of individual securities. While the funds’ portfolio managers are experienced in the use of Derivatives, there can be no assurance that any particular hedging strategy adopted will succeed.

(2)        There might be imperfect correlation, or even no correlation, between price movements of a Derivative and price movements of the investments being hedged. For example, if the value of a Derivative used in a short hedge increased by less than the decline in value of the hedged investment, the hedge would not be fully successful. Such a lack of correlation might occur due to factors unrelated to the value of the investments being hedged, such as speculative or other pressures on the

 

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markets in which Derivatives are traded. The effectiveness of hedges and using Derivatives on indices will depend on the degree of correlation between price movements in the Derivative and price movements in the securities being hedged.

            To compensate for imperfect correlation, a fund may purchase or sell Derivatives in a greater dollar amount than the hedged investment if the volatility of the hedged investment is historically greater than the volatility of the Derivatives. Conversely, a fund may purchase or sell fewer contracts if the volatility of the price of the hedged investment is historically less than that of the Derivatives.

(3)        Hedging strategies, if successful, can reduce risk of loss by wholly or partially offsetting the negative effect of unfavorable price movements in the investments being hedged. However, hedging strategies can also reduce opportunity for gain by offsetting the positive effect of favorable price movements in the hedged investments. For example, if a fund entered into a short hedge because its portfolio manager projected a decline in the price of a security in the fund’s investment portfolio, and the price of that security increased instead, the gain from that increase might be wholly or partially offset by a decline in the price of the Derivative. Moreover, if the price of the Derivative declined by more than the increase in the price of the security, the fund could suffer a loss. In either such case, the fund would have been in a better position had it not hedged at all. Some Derivatives have the potential for unlimited loss, regardless of the size of a fund’s initial investment.

(4)        A fund’s ability to close out a position in a Derivative prior to expiration or maturity depends on the existence of a liquid secondary market or, in the absence of such a market, the ability and willingness of the other party to the transaction (“counterparty”) to enter into a transaction closing out the position. Therefore, there is no assurance that any hedging position can be closed out at a time and price that is favorable to the fund. Further, not all Derivative transactions require a counterparty to post collateral, which may expose a fund to greater losses in the event of a default by a counterparty.

Options:

A fund may use for hedging, substitution or investment purposes, certain options, including options on securities, equity and debt indices, currencies and futures. Certain risks and special characteristics of these strategies are discussed below.

Risks of Options Trading. The purchase of call options can serve as a long hedge, and the purchase of put options can serve as a short hedge. Writing put or call options can enable the fund to enhance income or yield by reason of the premiums paid by the purchasers of such options. However, if the market price of the security underlying a put option declines to less than the exercise price of the option, minus the premium received, the fund would expect to suffer a loss.

Writing call options can serve as a limited short hedge, because declines in the value of the hedged investment would be offset to the extent of the premium received for writing the option. However, if the security or currency appreciates to a price higher than the exercise price of the call option, it can be expected that the option will be exercised and the fund will be obligated to sell the security or currency at less than its market value. If the call option is a covered option, the securities or other assets used as cover would be considered illiquid to the extent described under “Illiquid and Restricted Securities.”

Writing put options can serve as a limited long hedge because increases in the value of the hedged investment would be offset to the extent of the premium received for writing the option. However,

 

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if the security or currency depreciates to a price lower than the exercise price of the put option, it can be expected that the put option will be exercised and the fund will be obligated to purchase the security or currency at more than its market value. If the put option is a covered option, the securities or other assets used as cover would be considered illiquid to the extent described under “Illiquid and Restricted Securities.”

A fund effectively may terminate its right or obligation under an option by entering into a closing transaction. If the fund wished to terminate its obligation to purchase or sell the investment under a put or call option it has written, a fund may purchase a put or call option of the same series (i.e., an option identical in its terms to the option previously written); this is known as a closing purchase transaction. Conversely, in order to terminate its right to purchase or sell under a call or put option it has purchased, a fund may write a call or put option of the same series; this is known as a closing sale transaction. Closing transactions essentially permit the fund to realize profits or limit losses on its options positions prior to the exercise or expiration of the option. Whether a profit or loss is realized from a closing transaction depends on the price movement of the underlying security, index, currency or futures contract and the market value of the option.

In considering the use of options, particular note should be taken of the following:

(1)        Options on securities and options on securities indices are treated as securities for purposes of CFTC regulation (as discussed above under “CFTC Regulation”). Accordingly, a fund’s positions in such options would not be counted against the de minimis limits in CFTC Regulation 4.5. However, a fund’s positions in options on futures contracts, if applicable, would be counted against such de minimis limits, unless used only for bona fide hedging.

(2)        The value of an option position will reflect, among other things, the current market price of the underlying security, index, currency or futures contract, the time remaining until expiration, the relationship of the exercise price to the market price, the historical price volatility of the underlying instrument and general market conditions. For this reason, the successful use of options depends upon a fund’s portfolio manager’s ability to forecast the direction of price fluctuations in the underlying instrument.

(3)        At any given time, the exercise price of an option may be below, equal to or above the current market value of the underlying instrument. Purchased options that expire unexercised have no value. Unless an option purchased by a fund is exercised or unless a closing transaction is effected with respect to that position, a loss will be realized in the amount of the premium paid.

(4)        A position in an exchange-traded option may be closed out only on an exchange that provides a secondary market for identical options. Most exchange-traded options relate to futures contracts, stocks and currencies. The ability to establish and close out positions on an exchange is subject to the maintenance of a liquid secondary market. Although a fund intends to purchase or write only those options for which there appears to be an active secondary market, there is no assurance that a liquid secondary market will exist for any particular option at any specific time. In such event, it may not be possible to effect closing transactions with respect to certain options, with the result that the fund would have to exercise those options that it has purchased in order to realize any profit.

Unlike exchange-traded options, which are standardized with respect to the underlying instrument, expiration date, contract size and strike price, the terms of over-the-counter (“OTC”) options (options not traded on exchanges) generally are established through negotiation with the other party to the

 

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option contract. While this type of arrangement allows a fund greater flexibility to tailor the option to its needs, OTC options generally involve greater risk than exchange-traded options, which are guaranteed by the clearing organization of the exchange where they are traded. Since closing transactions may be effected with respect to options traded in the OTC markets (currently the primary markets of options on debt securities) only by negotiating directly with the other party to the option contract, or in a secondary market for the option if such market exists, there can be no assurance that a fund will, in fact, be able to close out an OTC option position at a favorable price prior to expiration. In the event of insolvency of the counterparty, a fund might be unable to close out an OTC option position at any time prior to its expiration.

With respect to options written by a fund, the inability to enter into a closing transaction may result in material losses. For example, if a fund maintains a covered position with respect to any call option it writes on a security, it may not sell the underlying security during the period it is obligated under such option. This requirement may impair the fund’s ability to sell a portfolio security or make an investment at a time when such a sale or investment might be advantageous.

(5)        Activities in the options market may result in a higher portfolio turnover rate and additional brokerage costs; however, a fund also may save on commissions by using options as a hedge rather than buying or selling individual securities in anticipation of market movements.

(6)        The risks of investment in options on indices may be greater than options on securities or currencies. Because index options are settled in cash, when a fund writes a call on an index it cannot provide, in advance, for its potential settlement obligations by acquiring and holding the underlying securities. A fund can offset some of the risk of writing a call index option by holding a diversified portfolio of securities similar to those on which the underlying index is based. However, the fund cannot, as a practical matter, acquire and hold an investment portfolio containing exactly the same securities as underlie the index and, as a result, bears a risk that the value of the securities held will vary from the value of the index.

Even if a fund could assemble an investment portfolio that exactly reproduced the composition of the underlying index, it still would not be fully covered from a risk standpoint because of the “timing risk” inherent in writing index options. When an index option is exercised, the amount of cash that the holder is entitled to receive is determined by the difference between the exercise price and the closing index level on the date when the option is exercised. As with other kinds of options, a fund as the call writer will not learn that it has been assigned until the next business day, at the earliest. The time lag between exercise and notice of assignment poses no risk for the writer of a covered call on a specific underlying security, such as common stock, because there the writer’s obligation is to deliver the underlying security, not to pay its value as of a fixed time in the past. So long as the writer already owns the underlying security, it can satisfy its settlement obligations by simply delivering it, and the risk that its value may have declined since the exercise date is borne by the exercising holder. In contrast, even if the writer of an index call holds securities that exactly match the composition of the underlying index, it will not be able to satisfy its assignment obligations by delivering those securities against payment of the exercise price. Instead, it will be required to pay cash in an amount based on the closing index value on the exercise date. By the time a fund learns it has been assigned, the index may have declined, with a corresponding decline in the value of its investment portfolio. This “timing risk” is an inherent limitation on the ability of index call writers to cover their risk exposure by holding securities positions.

If a fund has purchased an index option and exercises it before the closing index value for that day is available, it runs the risk that the level of the underlying index subsequently may change. If such a

 

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change causes the exercised option to fall out-of-the-money, the fund will be required to pay the difference between the closing index value and the exercise price of the option (times the applicable multiplier) to the assigned writer.

A fund may write covered or uncovered call options on securities to increase income in the form of premiums received from the purchasers of the options. Because it can be expected that a call option will be exercised if the market value of the underlying security increases to a level greater than the exercise price, a fund will write call options on securities generally when its portfolio manager believes the premium received by the fund plus anticipated appreciation in the market price of the underlying security up to the exercise price of the option, will be greater than the total appreciation in the price of the security. The strategy also may be used to provide limited protection against a decrease in the market price of the security in an amount equal to the premium received for writing the call option, less any transaction costs. Thus, if the market price of the underlying security held by a fund declines, the amount of such decline will be offset wholly or in part by the amount of the premium received by the fund. If, however, there is an increase in the market price of the underlying security and the option is exercised, the fund will be obligated to sell the security at less than its market value. A fund would lose the ability to participate in the value of such securities above the exercise price of the call option. A fund also gives up the ability to sell the portfolio securities used to cover the call option, if applicable, while the call option is outstanding.

Options on Futures. A fund may purchase and write call and put options on futures contracts that are traded on a U.S. exchange or board of trade. A fund may purchase put options on futures contracts in lieu of, and for the same purpose as, the sale of a futures contract. A fund also may purchase such put options in order to hedge a long position in the underlying futures contract. A fund may purchase call options on futures contracts in lieu of, and for the same purpose as, the actual purchase of the futures contracts.

A fund may write a call option on a futures contract in order to hedge against a decline in the prices of the index or debt securities underlying the futures contracts. If the price of the futures contract at expiration is below the exercise price, the fund would retain the option premium, which would offset, in part, any decline in the value of its portfolio securities. The writing of a put option on a futures contract is similar to the purchase of the futures contracts, except that, if market price declines, a fund would pay more than the market price for the underlying securities or index units. The net cost to that fund would be reduced, however, by the premium received on the sale of the put, less any transaction costs.

While a fund’s use of options on futures contracts for hedging may protect the fund against adverse movements in the general level of interest rates or securities prices, such transactions could also preclude the opportunity to benefit from favorable movement in the level of interest rates or securities prices. There can be no guarantee that a fund’s forecasts about market value, interest rates and other applicable factors will be correct or that there will be a correlation between price movements in the hedging vehicle and in the securities being hedged.

Futures:

A fund may enter into futures contracts. All futures contracts are deemed to be commodity interest for purposes of CFTC Regulation 4.5 (discussed above under “CFTC Regulation”). Thus, a fund’s futures positions will be counted against the de minimis limits in CFTC Regulation 4.5, unless used for bona fide hedging.

 

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Risks of Futures Trading. Although futures contracts by their terms call for actual delivery or acceptance of currencies or financial instruments, in most cases the contracts are closed out before the settlement date without the making or taking of delivery. Closing out a futures contract sale is effected by purchasing a futures contract for the same aggregate amount of the specific type of financial instrument or currency and the same delivery date. If the price of the initial purchase (sale) of the futures contract exceeds the price of the offsetting sale (purchase), the seller earns the difference and realizes a gain. Conversely, if the price of the offsetting purchase (sale) exceeds the price of the initial sale (purchase), the seller realizes a loss.

A fund is required to maintain margin deposits in connection with its transactions in futures contracts. Initial margin deposits vary from contract to contract and are subject to change. Margin balances are adjusted daily to reflect unrealized gains and losses on open contracts. If a fund has market exposure on an open futures contract, the broker will require the fund to deposit variation margin. Conversely, if a fund no longer has market exposure on such contract, the broker will pay any excess variation margin to the fund.

Most of the exchanges on which futures contracts are traded limit the amount of fluctuation permitted in futures prices during a single trading day. The daily price limit establishes the maximum amount the price of a futures contract may vary either up or down from the previous day’s settlement price at the end of a trading session. Once the daily price limit has been reached in a particular type of contract, no trades may be made on that day at a price beyond that limit. The daily price limit governs only price movement during a particular trading day and therefore does not limit potential losses because the limit may prevent the liquidation of unfavorable positions. Futures contract prices occasionally have moved to the daily limit for several consecutive trading days with little or no trading, thereby preventing prompt liquidation of futures positions and subjecting persons trading such futures contracts to substantial losses.

Another risk in employing futures contracts as a hedge is the prospect that prices will correlate imperfectly with the behavior of cash prices for the following reasons. First, rather than meeting additional margin deposit requirements, investors may close contracts through offsetting transactions. Second, the liquidity of the futures market depends on participants entering into offsetting transactions rather than making or taking delivery. To the extent participants decide to make or take delivery, liquidity in the futures market could be reduced, thus producing distortion. Third, from the point of view of speculators, the deposit requirements in the futures market are less onerous than margin requirements in the securities market. Therefore, increased participation by speculators in the futures market may cause temporary price distortions. Due to the possibility of distortion, a correct forecast of general interest rate, currency exchange rate or security price trends by a portfolio manager may still not result in a successful transaction.

In addition, there are significant differences between the securities and futures markets that could result in an imperfect correlation between the markets, causing a given hedge not to achieve its objectives. The degree of imperfection of correlation depends on circumstances such as variations in speculative market demand for futures contracts and futures options on securities, including technical influences in futures contract trading and futures options, and differences between the financial instruments being hedged and the instruments underlying the standard contracts available for trading in such respects as interest rate levels, maturities, and creditworthiness of issuers. A decision as to whether, when and how to hedge involves the exercise of skill and judgment, and even a well-conceived hedge may be unsuccessful to some degree because of market behavior or unexpected interest rate trends.

 

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Futures contracts on U.S. Government securities historically have reacted to an increase or decrease in interest rates in a manner similar to that in which the underlying U.S. Government securities reacted. To the extent, however, that a fund enters into such futures contracts, the value of such futures contracts will not vary in direct proportion to the value of such fund’s holdings of U.S. Government securities. Thus, the anticipated spread between the price of the futures contract and the hedged security may be distorted due to differences in the nature of the markets. The spread also may be distorted by differences in initial and variation margin requirements, the liquidity of such markets and the participation of speculators in such markets.

There can be no assurance that a liquid market will exist at a time when a fund seeks to close out a futures contract or a futures option position, and the fund would remain obligated to meet margin requirements until the position is closed. In addition, many of the contracts discussed above are relatively new instruments without a significant trading history. As a result, there can be no assurance that an active secondary market will develop or continue to exist.

There is a risk of loss by a fund of the initial and variation margin deposits in the event of bankruptcy of the futures commission merchant (“FCM”) with which the fund has an open position in a futures contract. The assets of the fund may not be fully protected in the event of the bankruptcy of the FCM or central counterparty because the fund might be limited to recovering only a pro rata share of all available funds and margin segregated on behalf of a FCM’s customers. If the FCM does not provide accurate reporting, the fund is also subject to the risk that the FCM could use the fund’s assets, which are held in an omnibus account with assets belonging to the FCM’s other customers, to satisfy its own financial obligations or the payment obligations of another customer to the central counterparty.

Because the margin deposits required for futures contracts are generally low with respect to the potential obligation to which a fund is exposed, Futures trading involves an extremely high degree of leverage. As a result, a relatively small price movement in a futures contract may result in immediate and substantial loss or, alternatively, gain, to the investor. For example, if at the time of purchase, 10% of the value of the futures contract is deposited as margin, a subsequent 10% decrease in the value of the futures contract would result in a total loss of the margin deposit, before any deduction for the transaction costs, if the account were then closed out. A 15% decrease would result in a loss equal to 150% of the original margin deposit, if the futures contract were closed out. Thus, a purchase or sale of a futures contract may result in losses in excess of the amount initially invested in the futures contract. However, a fund would presumably have sustained comparable losses if, instead of the futures contract, it had invested in the underlying financial instrument and sold it after the decline.

Stock and Bond Index Futures. A fund may invest in stock and bond index Futures. A stock or bond index assigns relative values to the common stocks or bonds comprised in the index. In an index futures contract, a party agrees to take or make delivery of an amount of cash equal to a specified dollar amount times the difference between the index value at the close of the last trading day of the contract and the price at which the futures contract is originally struck. No physical delivery of the underlying securities in the index is made.

The risk of imperfect correlation between movements in the price of an index futures contract and movements in the price of the securities that are the subject of the hedge increases as the composition of a fund’s portfolio diverges from the securities included in the applicable index. The price of the index futures may move more than or less than the price of the securities being hedged. If the price of the futures contract moves less than the price of the securities that are the subject of the hedge, the hedge will

 

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not be fully effective but, if the price of the securities being hedged has moved in an unfavorable direction, the fund would be in a better position than if it had not hedged at all. If the price of the securities being hedged has moved in a favorable direction, this advantage will be partially offset by the futures contract. If the price of the futures contract moves more than the price of the securities, a fund will experience either a loss or a gain on the futures contract that will not be completely offset by movements in the price of the securities that are the subject of the hedge. To compensate for the imperfect correlation of movements in the price of the securities being hedged and movements in the price of the index futures contracts, a fund may buy or sell index futures contracts in a greater dollar amount than the dollar amount of securities being hedged if the historical volatility of the prices of such securities is more than the historical volatility of the index. It is also possible that, where a fund has sold futures contracts to hedge its securities against decline in the market, the market may advance and the value of securities held by the fund may decline. If this occurred, the fund would lose money on the futures contract and also experience a decline in value in its portfolio securities. However, while this could occur for a very brief period or to a very small degree, over time the value of a diversified portfolio of securities will tend to move in the same direction as the market indices upon which the futures contracts are based.

Where index futures contracts are purchased to hedge against a possible increase in the price of securities before a fund is able to invest in securities in an orderly fashion, it is possible that the market may decline instead. If a fund then concludes not to invest in securities at that time because of concern as to possible further market decline for other reasons, it will realize a loss on the futures contract that is not offset by a reduction in the price of the securities it had anticipated purchasing.

A broad-based securities index will generally have at least ten component issues, while a narrow-based index will generally have nine or fewer. Futures contracts on a broad-based security index are subject to exclusive regulatory jurisdiction of the CFTC, while futures contracts on a narrow-based security index are a class of “security futures” subject to joint SEC-CFTC jurisdiction.

Foreign Currency Hedging Strategies. A fund may use options and futures on foreign currencies, options on futures on foreign currencies and forward currency contracts (i.e., an obligation to purchase or sell a specific foreign currency at a specified future date in exchange for another currency which may be U.S. dollars, which may be any fixed number of days from the contract date agreed upon by the parties, at a price set at the time the contract is entered into). A fund may also purchase and sell foreign currency on a spot basis. A fund may use these instruments for hedging or any other lawful purpose consistent with its investment objective, including transaction hedging, anticipatory hedging, cross hedging, proxy hedging and position hedging. Options traded on a board of trade and futures on foreign currencies are deemed to be commodity interest for purposes of CFTC Regulation 4.5 (discussed above under “CFTC Regulation”). Thus, a fund’s trading in such interests will be counted against the de minimis limits in CFTC Regulation 4.5, unless used for bona fide hedging.

Currency hedges can protect against price movements in a security that a fund owns or intends to acquire that are attributable to changes in the value of the currency in which it is denominated. Furthermore, currency hedges do not protect against price movements in the securities that are attributable to other causes.

For example, a fund might use currency-related derivative instruments to “lock in” a U.S. dollar price for a portfolio investment, thereby enabling the fund to protect itself against a possible loss resulting from an adverse change in the relationship between the U.S. dollar and the subject foreign currency during the period between the date the security is purchased or sold and the date on which payment is

 

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made or received. A fund also might use currency-related derivative instruments when the sub-adviser believes that one currency may experience a substantial movement against another currency, including the U.S. dollar, and it may use currency-related derivative instruments to sell or buy the amount of the former foreign currency, approximating the value of some or all of the fund’s portfolio securities denominated in such foreign currency. Alternatively, where appropriate, a fund may use currency-related derivative instruments to hedge all or part of its foreign currency exposure through the use of a basket of currencies or a proxy currency where such currency or currencies act as an effective proxy for other currencies. The use of this basket hedging technique may be more efficient and economical than using separate currency-related derivative instruments for each currency exposure held by a fund. Furthermore, currency-related derivative instruments may be used for short hedges – for example, a fund may sell a forward currency contract to lock in the U.S. dollar equivalent of the proceeds from the anticipated sale of a security denominated in a foreign currency.

In addition, a fund may use a currency-related derivative instrument to shift exposure to foreign currency fluctuations from one foreign country to another foreign country where it’s anticipated that the foreign currency exposure purchased will appreciate relative to the U.S. dollar and thus better protect the fund against the expected decline in the foreign currency exposure sold. For example, if a fund owns securities denominated in a foreign currency and it is anticipated that the currency will decline, it might enter into a forward contract to sell an appropriate amount of the first foreign currency, with payment to be made in a second foreign currency that would better protect the fund against the decline in the first security than would a U.S. dollar exposure. Hedging transactions that use two foreign currencies are sometimes referred to as “cross hedges.” The effective use of currency-related derivative instruments by a fund in a cross hedge is dependent upon a correlation between price movements of the two currency instruments and the underlying security involved, and the use of two currencies magnifies the risk that movements in the price of one instrument may not correlate or may correlate unfavorably with the foreign currency being hedged. Such a lack of correlation might occur due to factors unrelated to the value of the currency instruments used or investments being hedged, such as speculative or other pressures on the markets in which these instruments are traded.

A fund might seek to hedge against changes in the value of a particular currency when no Derivatives on that currency are available or such Derivatives are more expensive than certain other Derivatives. In such cases, a fund may hedge against price movements in that currency by entering into transactions using Derivatives on another currency or basket of currencies, the values of which its portfolio manager believes will have a high degree of positive correlation to the value of the currency being hedged. The risk that movements in the price of the Derivative will not correlate perfectly with movements in the price of the currency being hedged is magnified when this strategy is used.

The value of Derivatives on foreign currencies depends on the value of the underlying currency relative to the U.S. dollar. In general, if the currency in which a portfolio investment is denominated appreciates against the U.S. dollar, the dollar value of the security will increase. Conversely, a decline in the exchange rate of the currency would adversely affect the value of the portfolio investment expressed in U.S. dollars.

The use of currency-related derivative instruments by a fund involves a number of risks. The value of currency-related derivative instruments depends on the value of the underlying currency relative to the U.S. dollar. Because foreign currency transactions occurring in the interbank market might involve substantially larger amounts than those involved in the use of such derivative instruments, a fund could be disadvantaged by having to deal in the odd lot market (generally consisting of transactions of less than

 

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$1 million) for the underlying foreign currencies at prices that are less favorable than for round lots (generally consisting of transactions of greater than $1 million).

There is no systematic reporting of last sale information for foreign currencies or any regulatory requirement that quotations available through dealers or other market sources be firm or revised on a timely basis. Quotation information generally is representative of very large transactions in the interbank market and thus might not reflect odd-lot transactions where rates might be less favorable. The interbank market in foreign currencies is a global, round-the-clock market. To the extent the U.S. options or futures markets are closed while the markets for the underlying currencies remain open, significant price and rate movements might take place in the underlying markets that cannot be reflected in the markets for the derivative instruments until they re-open.

Settlement of transactions in currency-related derivative instruments might be required to take place within the country issuing the underlying currency. Thus, a fund might be required to accept or make delivery of the underlying foreign currency in accordance with any U.S. or foreign regulations regarding the maintenance of foreign banking arrangements by U.S. residents and might be required to pay any fees, taxes and charges associated with such delivery assessed in the issuing country.

When a fund engages in a transaction in a currency-related derivative instrument, it relies on the counterparty to make or take delivery of the underlying currency at the maturity of the contract or otherwise complete the contract. In other words, a fund will be subject to the risk that a loss may be sustained by the fund as a result of the failure of the counterparty to comply with the terms of the transaction. The counterparty risk for exchange-traded instruments is generally less than for privately-negotiated or OTC currency instruments, since generally a clearing agency, which is the issuer or counterparty to each instrument, provides a guarantee of performance. For privately-negotiated instruments, there is no similar clearing agency guarantee. In all transactions, a fund will bear the risk that the counterparty will default, and this could result in a loss of the expected benefit of the transaction and possibly other losses to the fund. A fund will enter into transactions in currency-related derivative instruments only with counterparties that are reasonably believed to be capable of performing under the contract.

Permissible foreign currency options will include options traded primarily in the OTC market. Although options on foreign currencies are traded primarily in the OTC market, a fund will normally purchase or sell OTC options on foreign currency only when it is believed that a liquid secondary market will exist for a particular option at any specific time.

A fund’s dealing in currency-related derivative instruments will generally be limited to the transactions described above. However, the funds reserve the right to use currency-related derivative instruments for different purposes and under different circumstances. It also should be realized that use of these instruments does not eliminate, or protect against, price movements in a fund’s securities that are attributable to other (i.e., non-currency related) causes. Moreover, while the use of currency-related derivative instruments may reduce the risk of loss due to a decline in the value of a hedged currency, at the same time the use of these instruments tends to limit any potential gain which may result from an increase in the value of that currency.

Forward Currency Contracts. A fund may enter into forward currency exchange contracts and non-deliverable forwards as discussed below. A forward currency exchange contract involves an obligation to purchase or sell a specified currency at a future date, which may be any fixed number of

 

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days from the date of the contract agreed upon by the parties at a price set at the time of the contract. Non-deliverable forwards (“NDFs”) are cash-settled, short-term forward contracts on foreign currencies that are non-convertible and that may be thinly traded or illiquid. NDFs involve an obligation to pay an amount equal to the difference between the prevailing market exchange rate for the relevant currency and the agreed upon exchange rate, with respect to an agreed notional amount.

A fund may enter into forward contracts in order to “lock in” the exchange rate between the currency it will deliver and the currency it will receive for the duration of the contract. In addition, a fund may enter into forward contracts to hedge against risks arising from securities the fund owns or anticipates purchasing or the U.S. Dollar value of interest and dividends paid on those securities.

Forward Currency Exchange Contracts. Forward currency exchange contracts are physically settled through an exchange of currencies. Accordingly, they are traded in the interbank market directly between currency traders (usually large commercial banks) and their customers. In addition, because they are physically settled, they are not treated as commodity interests for purposes of CFTC Regulation 4.5 (discussed above under “CFTC Regulation”). Therefore, a fund’s positions in them is not subject to the de minimis limits in CFTC Regulation 4.5.

The cost to a fund of engaging in forward currency contracts varies with factors such as the currency involved, the length of the contract period and the market conditions prevailing. Because forward currency contracts usually are entered into on a principal basis, no fees or commissions are involved. When a fund enters into a forward currency contract, it relies on the counterparty to make or take delivery of the underlying currency at the maturity of the contract. Failure by the counterparty to do so would result in the loss of any expected benefit of the transaction.

The precise matching of forward currency contract amounts and the value of the securities involved generally will not be possible because the value of such securities, measured in the foreign currency, will change after the forward currency contract has been established. Thus, a fund might need to purchase or sell foreign currencies in the spot (cash) market to the extent such foreign currencies are not covered by forward contracts. The projection of short-term currency market movements is extremely difficult, and the successful execution of a short-term hedging strategy is highly uncertain.

A fund bears the risk of loss of the amount expected to be received under a forward contract in the event of the default or bankruptcy of a counterparty. If such a default occurs, a fund may have contractual remedies pursuant to the forward contract, but such remedies may be subject to bankruptcy and insolvency laws which could affect a fund’s rights as a creditor.

Non-Deliverable Forwards. (“NDFs”) are similar to forward currency exchange contracts, but do not require physical delivery of any currency on the settlement date. Rather, on the settlement date, the only transfer between the counterparties is the monetary settlement amount representing the difference between the contract rate and the prevailing market exchange rate. NDFs typically may have terms from one month up to two years and are settled in U.S. dollars.

A fund will typically use NDFs for hedging purposes or for direct investment in a foreign country for income or gain. The use of NDFs for hedging or to increase income or gain may not be successful, resulting in losses to a fund, and the cost of such strategies may reduce a fund’s respective returns.

NDFs are subject to many of the risks associated with Derivatives in general and forward currency transactions including risks associated with fluctuations in foreign currency and the risk that the

 

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counterparty will fail to fulfill its obligations. In addition, pursuant to the Dodd-Frank Act and implementing regulations, NDFs are deemed to be commodity interests, including for purposes of amended Regulation 4.5. Therefore, funds claiming an exclusion under Regulation 4.5 will limit their investment in NDFs as discussed above under “CFTC Regulation.”

Although NDFs have historically been traded OTC, in the future pursuant to the Dodd-Frank Act, they may be exchange-traded. Under such circumstances, they will be centrally cleared and a secondary market for them will exist. All NDFs are subject to counterparty risk, which is the risk that the counterparty will not perform as contractually required under the NDF. With respect to NDFs that are centrally-cleared, a fund could lose margin payments it has deposited with the clearing organization as well as the net amount of gains not yet paid by the clearing organization if it breaches its obligations under the NDF, becomes insolvent or goes into bankruptcy. In the event of bankruptcy of the clearing organization, the investor may be entitled to the net amount of gains the investor is entitled to receive plus the return of margin owed to it only in proportion to the amount received by the clearing organization’s other customers, potentially resulting in losses to the investor.

Combined Transactions. A fund may purchase and write options in combination with each other, or in combination with futures or forward contracts, to adjust the risk and return characteristics of its overall position. For example, a fund may purchase a put option and write a call option on the same underlying instrument, in order to construct a combined position whose risk and return characteristics are similar to selling a futures contract. Another possible combined position would involve writing a call option at one strike price and buying a call option at a lower price, in order to reduce the risk of the written call option in the event of a substantial price increase. Because combined options positions involve multiple trades, they result in higher transaction costs and may be more difficult to open and close out.

A fund’s options and futures activities may affect its turnover rate and brokerage commission payments, and status under CFTC Regulation 4.5 (as discussed above under “CFTC Regulation”). The exercise of calls or puts written by a fund, and the sale or purchase of futures contracts, may cause it to sell or purchase related investments, thus increasing its turnover rate. Once a fund has received an exercise notice on an option it has written, it cannot effect a closing transaction in order to terminate its obligation under the option and must deliver or receive the underlying securities at the exercise price. The exercise of puts purchased by a fund may also cause the sale of related investments, and increasing turnover; although such exercise is within the fund’s control, holding a protective put might cause it to sell the related investments for reasons that would not exist in the absence of the put. A fund will pay a brokerage commission each time it buys or sells a put or call or purchases or sells a futures contract. Such commissions may be higher than those that would apply to direct purchases or sales.

Swaps, Caps, Floors and Collars:

The swap market has grown substantially in recent years, with a large number of banks and investment banking firms acting both as principals and as agents utilizing standardized swap documentation. As a result, the swap market has become relatively liquid. Caps, floors and collars are more recent innovations for which standardized documentation has not yet been fully developed and, accordingly, less liquid than swaps.

Among the transactions into which a fund may enter are interest rate, currency, index and total return swaps and the purchase or sale of related caps, floors and collars. A fund expects to enter into these transactions primarily to preserve a return or spread on a particular investment or portion of its portfolio,

 

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to protect against currency fluctuations, as a duration management technique or to protect against any increase in the price of securities the fund anticipates purchasing at a later date. Interest rate swaps involve the OTC exchange with another party of respective commitments to pay or receive interest, e.g., an exchange of floating rate payments for fixed rate payments with respect to a notional amount of principal. A fund may also invest in inflation rate swaps, where an inflation rate index is used in place of an interest rate index.

A fund will usually enter into swaps on a net basis. These swaps, caps, floors and collars, which are used for bona fide hedging purposes are not subject to the funds’ borrowing restrictions. In addition, a fund will not enter into any OTC swap, cap, floor or collar transaction unless, at the time of entering into such transaction, the unsecured long-term debt of the counterparty, combined with any credit enhancements, is rated at least A by S&P, Moody’s or Fitch or has an equivalent rating from any other Nationally Recognized Statistical Rating Organization or is determined to be of equivalent credit quality by the portfolio manager. If there is a default by the counterparty, the fund may have contractual remedies pursuant to the agreements related to the transaction.

A fund may enter into credit default swap contracts for investment purposes. As the seller in a credit default swap contract, the fund would be required to pay the par (or other agreed-upon) value of a referenced debt obligation to the counterparty in the event of a default by a third party, such as a U.S. or foreign corporate issuer, on the debt obligation. In return, the fund would receive from the counterparty a periodic stream of payments over the term of the contract, provided that no event of default has occurred. If no default occurs, the fund would keep the stream of payments and would have no payment obligations. As the seller, the fund would be subject to investment exposure on the notional amount of the swap.

A fund may also purchase credit default swap contracts in order to hedge against the risk of default of debt securities held in its portfolio, in which case the fund would function as the counterparty referenced in the preceding paragraph. This would involve the risk that the investment may expire worthless and would only generate income in the event of an actual default by the issuer of the underlying obligation (as opposed to a credit downgrade or other indication of financial instability). It would also involve credit risk, i.e. that the seller may fail to satisfy its payment obligations to the fund in the event of a default.

The spread of a credit default swap is the annual amount the protection buyer must pay the protection seller over the length of the contract, expressed as a percentage of the notional amount. When spreads rise, market perceived credit risk rises and when spreads fall, market perceived credit risk falls. Wider credit spreads and decreasing market values, when compared to the notional amount of the swap, represent a deterioration of the referenced entity’s credit soundness and a greater likelihood or risk of default or other credit event occurring as defined under the terms of the agreement. For credit default swap agreements on asset-backed securities and credit indices, the quoted market prices and resulting values, as well as the annual payment rate, serve as an indication of the current status of the payment/performance risk.

Credit default swap agreements on credit indices involve one party making a stream of payments to another party in exchange for the right to receive a specified return in the event of a write-down, principal shortfall, interest shortfall or default of all or part of the referenced entities comprising the credit index. A credit index is a basket of credit instruments or exposures designed to be representative of some part of the credit market as a whole. These indices are made up of reference credits that are judged by a

 

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poll of dealers to be the most liquid entities in the credit default swap market based on the sector of the index. Components of the indices may include, but are not limited to, investment grade securities, high yield securities, asset-backed securities, emerging markets, and/or various credit ratings within each sector. Credit indices are traded using credit default swaps with standardized terms including a fixed spread and standard maturity dates. An index credit default swap references all the names in the index, and if there is a default, the credit event is settled based on that name’s weight in the index. The composition of the indices changes periodically, usually every six months, and for most indices, each name has an equal weight in the index. A fund may use credit default swaps on credit indices to hedge a portfolio of credit default swaps or bonds, which is less expensive than it would be to buy many credit default swaps to achieve a similar effect. Credit default swaps on indices are benchmarks for protecting investors owning bonds against default, and traders use them to speculate on changes in credit quality.

Credit default swaps sold by a fund may involve greater risks than if a fund had invested in the reference obligation directly. Credit default swaps are subject to general market risk, liquidity risk, and, with respect to OTC credit default swaps, counterparty credit risk and credit risk of the issuer. In addition, the value of the reference obligation received by a fund as a seller if a credit event occurs, coupled with the periodic payments previously received, may be less than the full notional value it pays to the buyer, resulting in a loss of value to the fund. A fund bears the risk that the counterparty will default, and this could result in a loss of the expected benefit of the transaction and possibly other losses to the fund.

Other forms of swap agreements that a fund may invest in include a “quanto” or “differential” swap, which combines both an interest rate and a currency transaction; interest rate caps, under which, in return for a premium, one party agrees to make payments to the other to the extent that interest rates exceed a specified rate, or “cap”; interest rate floors, under which, in return for a premium, one party agrees to make payments to the other to the extent that interest rates fall below a specified rate, or “floor”; and interest rate collars, under which a party sells a cap and purchases a floor or vice versa in an attempt to protect itself against interest rate movements exceeding given minimum or maximum levels.

A fund may invest in commodity swap agreements. For example, an investment in a commodity swap agreement may involve the OTC exchange of floating-rate interest payments for the total return on a commodity index. In a total return commodity swap, a fund will receive the price appreciation of a commodity index, a portion of the index, or a single commodity in exchange for paying an agreed-upon fee. If the commodity swap is for one period, the fund may pay a fixed fee, established at the outset of the swap. However, if the term of the commodity swap is more than one period, with interim swap payments, the funds may pay an adjustable or floating fee. With a “floating” rate, the fee may be pegged to a base rate, such as LIBOR or another Reference Rate, and is adjusted each period. Therefore, if interest rates increase over the term of the swap contract, the funds may be required to pay a higher fee at each swap reset date.

In an uncleared swap, the swap counterparty is typically a brokerage firm, bank or other financial institution. A fund customarily enters into uncleared swaps based on the standard terms and conditions of an International Swaps and Derivatives Association (“ISDA”) Master Agreement. ISDA is a voluntary industry association of participants in the OTC derivatives markets that has developed standardized contracts used by such participants that have agreed to be bound by such standardized contracts.

In the event that one party to a swap transaction defaults and the transaction is terminated prior to its scheduled termination date, one of the parties may be required to make an early termination payment to the other. An early termination payment may be payable by either the defaulting or non-defaulting

 

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party, depending upon which of them is “in-the-money” with respect to the swap at the time of its termination. Early termination payments may be calculated in various ways, but are intended to approximate the amount the “in-the-money” party would have to pay to replace the swap as of the date of its termination.

During the term of an uncleared swap agreement, a fund is usually required to pledge to the swap counterparty, from time to time, an amount of cash and/or other assets equal to the total net amount (if any) that would be payable by the fund to the counterparty if the swap were terminated on the date in question, including any early termination payments. Periodically, changes in the amount pledged are made to recognize changes in value of the contract resulting from, among other things, interest on the notional value of the contract, market value changes in the underlying investment, and/or dividends paid by the issuer of the underlying instrument. Likewise, the counterparty may be required to pledge cash or other assets as collateral for its obligations to the fund. However, the amount pledged may not always be equal to or more than the amount due to the other party. Therefore, if a counterparty defaults in its obligations to the fund, the amount pledged by the counterparty and available to the fund may not be sufficient to cover all the amounts due to the fund and the fund may sustain a loss.

The variation margin and initial margin requirements are now effective and apply based on average daily aggregate notional amount of covered swaps between swap dealers and swap entities. The funds provide initial margin in connection with uncleared swaps as required by the regulations. Due to these regulations, a fund could be required to engage in greater documentation and recordkeeping with respect to swap agreements. Certain standardized swap agreements are subject to mandatory central clearing and exchange-trading. The Dodd-Frank Act and implementing rules will ultimately require the clearing and exchange-trading of many swaps. Mandatory clearing and exchange-trading of swaps will occur on a phased-in basis based on the type of market participant, CFTC approval of contracts for central clearing and public trading facilities making such cleared swaps available to trade. To date, the CFTC has designated only certain of the most common types of credit default index swaps and interest rate swaps as subject to mandatory clearing and certain public trading facilities have made certain of those swaps available to trade, but it is expected that additional categories of swaps will in the future be designated as subject to mandatory clearing and trade execution requirements. Central clearing is intended to reduce counterparty credit risk and increase liquidity, but central clearing does not eliminate these risks and may involve additional costs and risks not involved with uncleared swaps.

In a cleared swap, a fund’s ultimate counterparty is a central clearinghouse rather than a brokerage firm, bank or other financial institution. Cleared swaps are submitted for clearing through each party’s FCM, which must be a member of the clearinghouse that serves as the central counterparty. Transactions executed on a swap execution facility may increase market transparency and liquidity but may require a fund to incur increased expenses to access the same types of swaps that it has used in the past.

When a fund enters into a cleared swap, it must deliver to the central counterparty (via the FCM) an amount referred to as “initial margin.” Initial margin requirements are determined by the central counterparty, but a FCM may require additional initial margin above the amount required by the central counterparty. During the term of the swap agreement, a “variation margin” amount may also be required to be paid by a fund or may be received by the fund in accordance with margin controls set for such accounts, depending upon changes in the marked-to-market value of the swap agreement. At the conclusion of the term of the swap agreement, if a fund has a loss equal to or greater than the margin amount, the margin amount is paid to the FCM along with any loss in excess of the margin amount. If a

 

41


fund has a loss of less than the margin amount, the excess margin is returned to the fund. If the fund has a gain, the full margin amount and the amount of the gain is paid to the fund.

Certain restrictions imposed on a fund by the Code may limit the fund’s ability to use swap agreements. It is possible that developments in the swaps market, including additional government regulation, could adversely affect a fund’s ability to terminate existing swap agreements or to realize amounts to be received under such agreements.

Swaps are highly specialized instruments that require investment techniques, risk analyses and tax planning different from those associated with traditional investments. The use of a swap requires an understanding not only of the referenced asset, reference rate or index but also of the swap itself, without the benefit of observing the performance of the swap under all possible market conditions. Because bilateral swap agreements are structured as two-party contracts that may be subject to contractual restrictions on transferability and termination and because they may have remaining terms of greater than seven days, swap agreements may be considered to be illiquid and subject to a fund’s limitation on investments in illiquid securities. However, Carillon Tower may determine swaps to be liquid under certain circumstances. In addition, central clearing and the trading of cleared swaps on public facilities are intended to increase liquidity. To the extent that a swap is not liquid, it may not be possible to initiate a transaction or liquidate a position at an advantageous time or price, which may result in significant losses.

Like most other investments, swap agreements are subject to the risk that the market value of the instrument will change in a way detrimental to a fund’s interest. A fund bears the risk that the sub-adviser will not accurately forecast future market trends or the values of assets, reference rates, indexes or other economic factors in establishing swap positions for the fund. If the sub-adviser attempts to use a swap as a hedge against, or as a substitute for, a portfolio investment, a fund will be exposed to the risk that the swap will have or will develop imperfect or no correlation with the portfolio investment. This could cause substantial losses for a fund. While hedging strategies involving swap instruments can reduce the risk of loss, they can also reduce the opportunity for gain or even result in losses by offsetting favorable price movements in other fund investments.

Many swaps are complex and often valued subjectively. Rules adopted under the Dodd-Frank Act require centralized reporting of detailed information about many swap agreements, whether cleared or uncleared. This information is available to regulators and also, to a more limited extent and on an anonymous basis, to the public. Reporting of swap data is intended to result in greater market transparency. This may be beneficial to funds that use swaps in their trading strategies. However, public reporting imposes additional recordkeeping burdens on these funds, and the safeguards established to protect anonymity are not yet tested and may not provide protection of trader identities as intended.

Uncleared swaps are typically executed bilaterally with a swap dealer rather than on exchanges. As a result, swap participants may not be as protected as participants on organized exchanges. Performance of a swap agreement is the responsibility only of the swap counterparty and not of any exchange or clearinghouse. As a result, a fund is subject to the risk that a counterparty will be unable or will refuse to perform under such agreement, including because of the counterparty’s bankruptcy or insolvency. A fund risks the loss of the accrued but unpaid amounts under a swap agreement, which could be substantial, in the event of a default, insolvency or bankruptcy by a swap counterparty. In such an event, the fund will have contractual remedies pursuant to the swap agreements, but bankruptcy and insolvency laws could affect the fund’s rights as a creditor. If the counterparty’s creditworthiness declines, the value of a swap agreement would likely decline, potentially resulting in losses. Carillon

 

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Tower will only approve a swap agreement counterparty for a fund if Carillon Tower deems the counterparty to be creditworthy. However, in unusual or extreme market conditions, a counterparty’s creditworthiness and ability to perform may deteriorate rapidly, and the availability of suitable replacement counterparties may become limited.

As noted above, certain types of swap agreements are, and others eventually are expected to be, required to be cleared through a central counterparty, which may affect counterparty risk and other risks faced by the funds. Central clearing is designed to reduce counterparty credit risk and increase liquidity compared to uncleared swaps because central clearing interposes the central clearinghouse as the counterparty to each participant’s swap, but it does not eliminate those risks completely. There is also a risk of loss by a fund of the initial and variation margin deposits in the event of bankruptcy of the FCM with which the fund has an open position, or the central counterparty in a swap contract. The assets of a fund may not be fully protected in the event of the bankruptcy of the FCM or central counterparty because the fund might be limited to recovering only a pro rata share of all available funds and margin segregated on behalf of a FCM’s customers. If the FCM does not provide accurate reporting, a fund is also subject to the risk that the FCM could use the fund’s assets, which are held in an omnibus account with assets belonging to the FCM’s other customers, to satisfy its own financial obligations or the payment obligations of another customer to the central counterparty. Credit risk of cleared swap participants is concentrated in a few clearinghouses, and the consequences of insolvency of a clearinghouse are not clear.

With cleared swaps, a fund may not be able to obtain as favorable terms as it would be able to negotiate for a bilateral, uncleared swap. In addition, a FCM may unilaterally amend the terms of its agreement with a fund, which may include the imposition of position limits or additional margin requirements with respect to the fund’s investment in certain types of swaps. Central counterparties and FCMs can require termination of existing cleared swap transactions upon the occurrence of certain events, and can also require increases in margin above the margin that is required at the initiation of the swap agreement. Currently, depending on a number of factors, the margin required under the rules of the clearinghouse and FCM may be in excess of the collateral required to be posted by the fund to support its obligations under a similar uncleared swap. However, as noted above, regulators have adopted rules imposing margin requirements on uncleared swaps, which are likely to impose higher margin requirements on uncleared swaps.

Finally, a fund is subject to the risk that, after entering into a cleared swap with an executing broker, no FCM or central counterparty is willing or able to clear the transaction. In such an event, the fund may be required to break the trade and make an early termination payment to the executing broker.

Options on Swap Agreements:

A fund may enter into options on swap agreements (“swaptions”). These transactions are entered into in an attempt to obtain a particular return when it is considered desirable to do so, possibly at a lower cost to a fund than if a fund had invested directly in an instrument that yielded that desired return. A fund may write (sell) and purchase put and call swap options. Depending on the terms of a particular option agreement, a fund will generally incur a greater degree of risk when it writes a swap option than it will incur when it purchases a swap option. When a fund purchases a swap option, it risks losing only the amount of the premium it has paid should it decide to let the option expire unexercised. However, when a fund writes a swap option, upon the exercise of the option, a fund will become obligated according to the terms of the underlying agreement. Swaptions are deemed to be commodity interests for purposes of

 

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CFTC Regulation 4.5 (discussed above under “CFTC Regulation”) if the underlying instrument is a swap, which itself would be deemed a commodity interest; therefore, in these circumstances, a fund’s swaptions transactions count against the de minimis limits in CFTC Regulation 4.5, unless done for bona fide hedging purposes. However, if the underlying instrument is a security-based swap, which itself would be deemed a security, then the option thereon would be an option on a security that would not count against the de minimis limits in CFTC Regulation 4.5.

Forward Commitments:

A fund may make contracts to purchase securities for a fixed price at a future date beyond customary settlement time (“forward commitments”). Forward commitments may be considered securities in themselves. They involve a risk of loss if the value of the security to be purchased declines prior to the settlement date, which risk is in addition to the risk of decline in value of a fund’s other assets. When such purchases are made through dealers, a fund relies on the dealer to consummate the sale. The dealer’s failure to do so may result in the loss to the fund of an advantageous yield or price. Although a fund generally will enter into forward commitments with the intention of acquiring securities for its investment portfolios, a fund may dispose of a commitment prior to settlement and may realize short-term profits or losses upon such disposition.

Illiquid and Restricted Securities:

A fund will not purchase or otherwise acquire any illiquid security, agreements maturing in more than seven days, if, as a result, more than 15% of its net assets (taken at current value) would be invested in investments that the fund reasonably expects cannot be sold or disposed of in current market conditions in seven calendar days or less without the sale or disposition significantly changing the market value of the investment. OTC options and their underlying collateral are currently considered to be illiquid investments.

Not all restricted securities are deemed illiquid for the purposes noted in this section. There is a large institutional market for certain securities that are not registered under the Securities Act of 1933, as amended (“1933 Act”). Rule 144A under the 1933 Act, establishes a “safe harbor” from the registration requirements of the 1933 Act for resales of certain securities to qualified institutional buyers. Institutional markets for restricted securities that have developed as a result of Rule 144A provide both readily ascertainable values for certain restricted securities and the ability to liquidate an investment to satisfy share redemption orders. An insufficient number of qualified institutional buyers interested in purchasing Rule 144A eligible securities held by a fund, however, could adversely affect the marketability of such portfolio securities and a fund may be unable to dispose of such securities promptly or at reasonable prices. Under those circumstances, such Rule 144A securities are deemed to be illiquid for purposes of compliance limitations on holdings of illiquid securities.

Other Investment Practices:

When-Issued and Delayed Delivery Transactions. A fund may enter into agreements with banks or broker-dealers for the purchase or sale of securities at an agreed-upon price on a specified future date. Such agreements might be entered into, for example, when a fund anticipates a decline in interest rates and is able to obtain a more advantageous yield by committing currently to purchase securities to be issued later.

On the delivery date, the fund will meet its obligations from securities that are then maturing. When-issued and forward commitment securities may be sold prior to the settlement date. However, if the

 

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fund chooses to dispose of the right to acquire a security prior to its acquisition or dispose of its right to deliver or receive against a forward commitment, it can incur a gain or loss. In addition, there is always the risk that the securities may not be delivered and that the fund may incur a loss.

If the fund disposes of the right to acquire a when-issued or forward commitment security prior to its acquisition or disposes of its right to deliver against a forward commitment, it can incur a gain or loss due to market fluctuation. In some instances prior to the settlement date, the third-party seller of when-issued or forward commitment securities may determine that it will be unable to meet its existing transaction commitments without borrowing securities. In the event that it is advantageous from a yield perspective, the fund may agree to resell its purchase commitment to the third-party seller at the current market price on the date of sale and concurrently enter into another purchase commitment for such securities at a later date. As an inducement for the fund to “roll over” its purchase commitment, the fund may receive a negotiated fee.

Foreign Investment Companies. A fund may invest in foreign investment companies. Some of the securities in which a fund invest may be located in countries that may not permit direct investment by outside investors. Investments in such securities may only be permitted through foreign government-approved or -authorized investment vehicles, which may include other investment companies. Investing through such vehicles may involve frequent or layered fees or expenses and may also be subject to limitation under the 1940 Act. Under the 1940 Act, a fund may invest up to 10% of its assets in shares of investment companies and up to 5% of its assets in any one investment company as long as the investment does not represent more than 3% of the voting stock of the acquired investment company. As discussed above under “Other Investment Companies, including ETFs,” the SEC recently adopted Rule 12d1-4, which will permit registered investment companies to acquire the securities of other registered investment companies in excess of the limits imposed in the 1940 Act, subject to compliance with the rule’s conditions.

Selling Securities Short. A fund may sell securities short if they own or have the right to obtain like securities of an amount equivalent to those sold short without incurring any additional costs. Transactions in swaps, options, future and forward contracts not involving short sales are not considered to be selling securities short.

When Carillon Tower or the sub-adviser believes that the price of a particular security held by a fund may decline, it may make “short sales against the box” to hedge the unrealized gain on such security. Selling short against the box involves selling a security which a fund owns for delivery at a specified date in the future. A fund will limit its transactions in short sales against the box to 5% of their respective net assets.

A fund may make short sales of securities to (i) offset potential declines in long positions in similar securities, (ii) to increase the flexibility of the fund, (iii) for investment return, (iv) as part of a risk arbitrage strategy, and (v) as part of its overall portfolio management strategies involving the use of derivative instruments. A short sale is a transaction in which a fund sells a security it does not own in anticipation that the market price of that security will decline.

When a fund makes a short sale, it will often borrow the security sold short and deliver it to the broker-dealer through which it made the short sale as collateral for its obligation to deliver the security upon conclusion of the sale. In connection with short sales of securities, the fund may pay a fee to borrow securities or maintain an arrangement with a broker to borrow securities, and is often obligated to pay over any accrued interest and dividends on such borrowed securities.

 

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If the price of the security sold short increases between the time of the short sale and the time that the fund replaces the borrowed security, the fund will incur a loss; conversely, if the price declines, the fund will realize a gain. Any gain will be decreased, and any loss increased, by the transaction costs described above. The successful use of short selling may be adversely affected by imperfect correlation between movements in the price of the security sold short and the securities being hedged.

A fund may invest pursuant to a risk arbitrage strategy to take advantage of a perceived relationship between the values of two securities. Frequently, a risk arbitrage strategy involves the short sale of a security.

A short sale is “against the box” to the extent that the fund contemporaneously owns, or has the right to obtain at no added cost, securities identical to those sold short. The fund will engage in short selling to the extent permitted by the federal securities laws and rules and interpretations thereunder. To the extent the fund engages in short selling in foreign (non-U.S.) jurisdictions, the fund will do so to the extent permitted by the laws and regulations of such jurisdiction.

Temporary Defensive Purposes. For temporary defensive purposes during anticipated periods of general market decline, a fund may invest up to 100% of its net assets in: (1) money market instruments, including securities issued by the U.S. Government, its agencies or instrumentalities and repurchase agreements secured thereby; (2) bank CDs and bankers’ acceptances issued by banks having net assets of at least $1 billion as of the end of their most recent fiscal year; (3) high-grade commercial paper; and (4) other long- and short-term debt instruments that are rated A or higher by S&P, Moody’s or Fitch. For a description of S&P, Moody’s and Fitch’s commercial paper and corporate debt ratings, see Appendix B. A fund may also take positions that are inconsistent with its principal investment strategies.

Large Shareholder Redemption Risk:

Certain account holders may from time to time own (beneficially or of record) or control a significant percentage of a fund’s shares. Redemptions by these account holders of their shares in a fund may impact the fund’s liquidity and net asset value. Such redemptions may also force a fund to sell securities at a time when it would not otherwise do so, which may increase the fund’s broker costs and impact shareholder taxes.

Cyber Security:

With the increased use of technologies such as the Internet and the dependence on computer systems to perform necessary business functions, a fund and its service providers may be prone to operational and information security risks resulting from cyber-attacks. In general, cyber incidents can result from deliberate attacks or unintentional events. Cyber-attacks include, among other behaviors, stealing or corrupting data maintained online or digitally (e.g., through “hacking,” computer viruses or other malicious software coding), the theft and holding for ransom of proprietary or confidential information or data (sometimes referred to as “ransomware” attacks), denial of service attacks on websites, “phishing” attempts and other social engineering techniques aimed at personnel or systems, and the unauthorized release of confidential information. Cyber-attacks affecting the funds, their investment adviser, their subadvisers, custodian, transfer agent, intermediaries and other third-party service providers may adversely impact the funds. For instance, cyber-attacks may interfere with the processing of shareholder transactions, result in the loss or theft of shareholder data or funds, impact a fund’s ability to calculate NAV per share, cause the release of private shareholder information or confidential business information, impede trading, subject the funds to regulatory fines or financial losses and/or cause

 

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reputational damage. A cyber-attack may also result in shareholders or service providers being unable to access electronic systems (“denial of services”), loss or theft of proprietary information or corporate data, physical damage to a computer or network system, or remediation costs associated with system repairs. The funds may also incur additional costs for cyber security risk management purposes. Similar types of cyber security risks are also present for issuers or securities in which the funds may invest, which could result in material adverse consequences for such issuers, and may cause the funds’ investment in such companies to lose value. Adverse consequences also could result from cybersecurity incidents affecting counterparties with which a fund engages in transactions, governmental and other regulatory authorities, exchanges and other financial market operators, banks, brokers, dealers, insurance companies, other financial institutions and other parties. A fund’s service providers also may be negatively impacted due to operational risks arising from non-cybersecurity related factors such as processing errors and human errors, inadequate or failed internal or external processes, failures in systems and technology errors or malfunctions, changes in personnel, and errors caused by fund service providers or counterparties.

In addition, other events or circumstances—whether foreseeable, unforeseeable, or beyond our control, such as acts of war, other conflicts, terrorism, natural disaster, widespread disease, pandemic or other public health crises may result in, among other things, quarantines and travel restrictions, workforce displacement and loss or reduction in Personnel and other resources. In the above circumstances, the funds and the Service Providers’ operations may be significantly impacted, or even temporarily halted. The funds’ securities market counterparties or vendors may face the same or similar systems failure, cybersecurity breaches and other business disruptions risks.

Any of these results could have a substantial adverse impact on a fund and its shareholders. For example, if a cybersecurity incident results in a denial of service, shareholders could lose access to their electronic accounts and be unable to buy or sell Shares for an unknown period of time, and service providers could be unable to access electronic systems to perform critical duties for a fund, such as trading, NAV calculation, shareholder accounting or fulfillment of fund share purchases and redemptions. Cybersecurity incidents could cause a fund or fund service provider to incur regulatory penalties, reputational damage, additional compliance costs associated with corrective measures, or financial loss of a significant magnitude and could result in allegations that the fund or fund service provider violated privacy and other laws. There are inherent limitations in risk management systems that seek to reduce the risks associated with cybersecurity and business continuity plans in the event there is a cybersecurity breach, including the possibility that certain risks may not have been adequately identified or prepared for, in large part because different or unknown threats may emerge in the future. Furthermore, the funds do not control the cybersecurity systems and plans of the issuers of securities in which a fund invests or a fund’s third-party service providers or trading counterparties or any other service providers whose operations may affect a fund or its shareholders. The widespread use of remote work arrangements, such as during the COVID-19 pandemic, may increase operational and information security risks.

 

  B.

Industry or Sub-Industry Classifications

For purposes of determining industry or sub-industry classifications, each fund relies primarily upon classifications published by S&P Global Ratings’s Global Industry Classification Standard (“GICS®”). If GICS® does not have an industry or sub-industry classification for a particular security, Carillon Tower, the funds’ investment adviser, will then rely upon classifications published by Bloomberg L.P. If the designated industry or sub-industry no longer appears reasonable, or if any classifications are determined by Carillon Tower to be so broad that the primary economic characteristics of issuers within a single class are materially different, the funds will classify issuers within that class according to the Directory of Companies Filing Annual Reports with the SEC.

 

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  III.

Investment Limitations

 

  A.

Fundamental Investment Policies for All Funds

The funds are subject to the following investment limitations that are fundamental policies and may not be changed without the vote of a majority of the outstanding voting securities of the applicable fund. Under the 1940 Act, a “vote of a majority of the outstanding voting securities” of a fund means the affirmative vote of the lesser of (1) more than 50% of the outstanding shares of the fund or (2) 67% or more of the shares present at a shareholders meeting if more than 50% of the outstanding shares are represented at the meeting in person or by proxy.

No fund may:

1.        Act as underwriter, except to the extent the fund may be deemed to be an underwriter in connection with the sale of securities in its investment portfolio;

2.        Invest 25% or more of its total assets, calculated at the time of purchase and taken at market value, in any one industry or group of industries (other than securities issued by the U.S. Government, its agencies or instrumentalities);

3.        Purchase or sell real estate or interests in real estate or real estate limited partnerships (although the fund may purchase and sell securities which are secured by real estate and securities of companies which invest or deal in real estate, such as real estate investment trusts (“REITs”);

4.        Make loans of money, except (a) for purchases of debt securities consistent with the investment policies of the fund, (b) by engaging in repurchase agreements or, (c) through the loan of portfolio securities in an amount up to 33 1/3% of the fund’s net assets; or

5.        With respect to 75% of the fund’s total assets, purchase the securities of any issuer (other than securities issued or guaranteed by the U.S. Government or any of its agencies or instrumentalities) if, as a result, (a) more than 5% of the fund’s total assets would be invested in the securities of that issuer, or (b) the fund would hold more than 10% of the outstanding voting securities of that issuer.

The following restrictions are fundamental policies for the Carillon Chartwell Short Duration Bond Fund, Carillon Chartwell Short Duration High Yield Fund, Carillon Chartwell Small Cap Growth Fund and Carillon Chartwell Small Cap Value Fund only. No fund may:

1.        Issue senior securities, borrow money or pledge its assets, except that (i) the fund may borrow from banks in amounts not exceeding one-third of its net assets (including the amount borrowed); and (ii) this restriction shall not prohibit the fund from engaging in options transactions or short sales or investing in financial futures, swaps, when-issued or delayed delivery securities, or reverse repurchase agreements.

2.        Purchase or sell commodities or commodity futures contracts (although the fund may invest in financial futures and in companies involved in the production, extraction, or processing of agricultural, energy, base metals, precious metals, and other commodity-related products).

 

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The following restrictions are fundamental policies for the Carillon Chartwell Income Fund and Carillon Chartwell Mid Cap Value Fund only. No fund may:

1.        Issue senior securities, borrow money or pledge its assets, except that (i) each fund may borrow from banks in amounts not exceeding 5% of its net assets (including the amount borrowed); and (ii) this restriction shall not prohibit a fund from engaging in options transactions or short sales or investing in financial futures, swaps, when-issued or delayed delivery securities, or reverse repurchase agreements.

2.        Purchase or sell commodities or commodity futures contracts, puts, calls and straddles.

 

  B.

Non-Fundamental Investment Policies

The funds have adopted the following additional restrictions which, together with certain limits described above, may be changed by the Board without shareholder approval in compliance with applicable law, regulation or regulatory policy.

The following restriction is a non-fundamental policy of each fund:

1.        No fund may invest, in the aggregate, more than 15% of its net assets in securities with legal or contractual restrictions on resale, securities that are not readily marketable and repurchase agreements with more than seven days to maturity.

The following restriction is a non-fundamental policy of the Carillon Chartwell Income Fund and Carillon Chartwell Mid Cap Value Fund only:

1.        No fund may invest in restricted securities (securities that must be registered under the 1933 Act before they may be offered and sold to the public), except that the Carillon Chartwell Income Fund may purchase restricted securities that are eligible for resale pursuant to Rule 144A under the 1933 Act.

The following restrictions are non-fundamental policies of the Carillon Chartwell Mid Cap Value Fund only:

1.        With respect to 50% of its gross assets, the fund will not at the time of purchase invest more than 5% of its gross assets, at market value, in the securities of any one issuer (except the securities of the United States government); and

2.        With respect to the other 50% of its gross assets, the fund will not invest at the time of purchase more than 15% of the market value of its total assets in any single issuer.

Except with respect to borrowing, if a percentage or rating restriction on investment or use of assets set forth herein or in the Prospectus is adhered to at the time a transaction is effected, later changes in percentage resulting from any cause other than actions by the fund will not be considered a violation.

Restrictions listed above that are not fundamental may be changed by the vote of the majority of the Board, but if any of these non-fundamental restrictions are changed, the funds will give shareholders at least 60 days’ written notice.

 

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  IV.

Net Asset Value

The NAV per share of each class of shares is normally determined each business day as of the scheduled close of regular trading on the New York Stock Exchange (the “NYSE”) and the NASDAQ, (typically 4 p.m. Eastern time). A fund will not treat an intraday unscheduled disruption in trading on either the NYSE or NASDAQ as a closure of that particular market, and will price its shares as of the normally scheduled close of the NYSE and NASDAQ if the disruption directly affects only one of those markets. The NYSE and NASDAQ normally are open for business Monday through Friday except the following holidays: New Year’s Day, Martin Luther King Day, President’s Day, Good Friday, Memorial Day, Juneteenth, Independence Day, Labor Day, Thanksgiving Day and Christmas Day.

The Board has designated Carillon Tower its valuation designee, with responsibility for the day-to-day (1) calculation of each fund’s NAV and (2) carrying out certain functions relating to the valuation of portfolio securities and other instruments in connection therewith. Carillon Tower performs these duties through a Valuation Committee, comprised of employees of Carillon Tower and/or its wholly-owned affiliates. Carillon Tower’s Valuation Committee will monitor for circumstances that may necessitate the use of fair value. In the event that (1) market quotations are not readily available, (2) readily available market quotations are not reflective of market value (prices deemed unreliable), or (3) a significant event has been recognized in relation to a security or class of securities, the Valuation Committee shall determine such securities’ fair value in accordance with Carillon Tower’s Pricing and Valuation Procedures, which have been approved by the Board. Significant events include, but are not limited to, single-issuer events such as corporate announcements or earnings, multiple-issuer events such as natural disasters and significant market fluctuations.

As described further in the Prospectus, the funds value securities or assets held in their portfolios as follows:

Credit Default Swaps. Credit default swaps are valued with prices provided by independent pricing services. A newly issued credit default swap may be priced at cost for up to one business day after a purchase if a market price is not available from an approved independent pricing service.

Equity Securities. A security listed or traded on a domestic exchange is valued at its last sales price at the close of the principal exchange on which it is traded. A security listed principally on the NASDAQ Stock Market is normally valued at the NASDAQ Official Closing Price (“NOCP”) provided by NASDAQ each business day. The NOCP is the most recently reported price as of 4:00:02 p.m. Eastern time, unless that price is outside the range of the “inside” bid and asked prices; in that case, NASDAQ will adjust the price to equal the “inside” bid or ask price, whichever is closer. If no last sale is reported at that time or the security is traded in the OTC market, market value is based on the most recent quoted bid price.

Foreign Equity Securities. Portfolio securities traded primarily on foreign exchanges generally are valued at the last quoted sales price, or the most recently determined closing price calculated according to local market convention, available at the time a fund is to be valued. If no sale is reported at that time on any foreign market in which the security trades, the market value shall be based on the most recent quoted bid price. At times, an exchange may modify a published closing price after a fund is priced; in such cases, a fund is not required to be revalued. Because trading hours for certain foreign securities end before the close of the NYSE and the NASDAQ, closing market quotations may become unreliable. Consequently, fair valuation of portfolio securities may occur on a daily basis. The Valuation Committee,

 

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using the Pricing and Valuation Procedures, may fair value a security if certain events occur between the time the trading of a particular security ends in a foreign market and a fund’s NAV calculation. The Valuation Committee, using the Pricing and Valuation Procedures, may also fair value a particular security if the events are significant and make the closing price unavailable or unreliable. If an issuer-specific event has occurred that the Valuation Committee determines, in its judgment, is likely to have affected the closing price of a foreign security, it will price the security at fair value. The Valuation Committee also utilizes a screening process from a pricing vendor to indicate the degree of certainty, based on historical data, that the closing price in the principal market where a foreign security trades is not the current market value as of the close of the NYSE. Securities and other assets quoted in foreign currencies are valued in U.S. dollars based on exchange rates provided by an independent pricing service. The pricing vendor, pricing methodology or degree of certainty may change from time to time. Fund securities primarily traded on foreign markets may trade on days that are not business days of the funds. Because the NAV of a fund’s shares is determined only on business days of the fund, the value of the portfolio securities of a fund that invests in foreign securities may change on days when shareholders would not be able to purchase or redeem shares of the fund.

Fixed Income Securities. Government bonds, corporate bonds, asset-backed bonds, municipal bonds, short-term securities (investments that have a maturity date of 60 days or less) and convertible securities, including high yield or junk bonds, normally are valued on the basis of evaluated prices provided by independent pricing services. Evaluated prices provided by the independent pricing services may be determined without exclusive reliance on quoted prices, and may reflect appropriate factors and appropriate methodologies that have been considered, such as institution-size trading in similar groups of securities, developments related to special securities, dividend rate, maturity and other market data. If the evaluated prices provided by the independent pricing service and independent quoted prices are unavailable or unreliable, the Valuation Committee will fair value the security using the Pricing and Valuation Procedures.

Forward Contracts. Forward contracts are valued daily at current forward rates provided by an independent pricing service. If prices provided by independent pricing services and independent quoted prices are unavailable or unreliable, the Valuation Committee will fair value the security using the Pricing and Valuation Procedures.

Investment Companies and ETFs. Investments in other open-end investment companies are valued at their reported NAV. The prospectuses for these companies explain the circumstances under which these companies will use fair value pricing and the effect of the fair value pricing. In addition, investments in closed-end funds and ETFs are valued on the basis of market quotations, if available and reliable. If the prices provided by independent pricing services and independent quoted prices are unavailable or unreliable, the Valuation Committee will fair value the security using the Procedures.

Options and Futures. Options and futures positions are valued based on market quotations, if available and reliable. Futures and options with no readily available fair market value shall be valued using quotations obtained from independent brokers or, if no quotations are available, the Valuation Committee will fair value the security using the Procedures.

The funds are open each Business Day. Trading in securities on European and Far Eastern securities exchanges and OTC markets normally is completed well before the funds’ close of business on each Business Day. In addition, trading in various foreign markets may not take place on all Business Days or may take place on days that are not Business Days and on which the funds’ NAVs per share are

 

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not calculated. The funds calculate NAV per share and, therefore, effect sales and redemptions, as of the close of regular trading on the NYSE each Business Day. If events materially affecting the value of such securities or other assets occur between the time when their prices are determined (including their value in U.S. dollars by reference to foreign currency exchange rates) and the time when the funds’ NAV is calculated, such securities and other assets may be valued at fair value by methods as determined in good faith by or under procedures established by the Board.

 

  V.

Investing in the Funds

The price at which an order to purchase or sell a fund’s shares is effected is based on the NAV per share of each class of a fund next calculated after the order is placed, plus any applicable sales charge, on Business Days. The procedures for purchasing shares of a fund are explained in the Prospectus under “How to Invest.”

 

  VI.

Investment Programs

 

  A.

Retirement Plans

Carillon Family of Funds IRA. An individual may make limited deductible contributions to an IRA through the purchase of fund shares (“Carillon Family of Funds IRA”). A separate agreement is required to establish a Carillon Family of Funds IRA. A Carillon Family of Funds IRA also may be used for certain “rollovers” from qualified retirement plans and from Section 403(b) annuity plans. For more detailed information on a Carillon Family of Funds IRA, please contact Carillon Tower.

The Code limits the deductibility of IRA contributions to a certain maximum. Additionally, individuals who are age 50 or over by the end of any year may make additional special deductible “catch-up” contributions up to a certain maximum per year. These deductible contributions may be made only by taxpayers who are not active participants (and whose spouses are not active participants) in employer-provided retirement plans or who have adjusted gross income below a certain level; however, a married investor who is not an active participant in such a plan and files a joint income tax return with his or her spouse (and their combined adjusted gross income does not exceed a certain maximum established in the Code) is not affected by the spouse’s active participant status. The Code also permits other individuals to make nondeductible IRA contributions up to certain specified amounts. In addition, individuals whose earnings (together with their spouse’s earnings) do not exceed a certain level may establish a Roth IRA; although contributions to this type of account are nondeductible, withdrawals from it generally is not taxable. The maximums, amounts, and limits referred to in this paragraph generally are adjusted for inflation annually.

If any investment held in an IRA is liquidated or, at our sole discretion, otherwise becomes unavailable as a permissible investment, the liquidation or other proceeds will be invested in accordance with your instructions.

Other Retirement Plans. Fund shares also may be used as the investment medium for qualified retirement plans (defined benefit or defined contribution plans established by corporations, partnerships or sole proprietorships), nonqualified deferred compensation plans, and certain voluntary employee benefit association and post-retirement benefit plans. Contributions to these plans may be made (within certain limits) on behalf of the employees, including owner-employees, of the sponsoring entity.

 

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  VII.

Redeeming Shares

The methods of redeeming shares are described in the section of the Prospectus entitled “How to Sell Your Investment.”

 

  A.

Receiving Payment

If a request for redemption is received by a fund in good order (as described below) before the close of regular trading on the NYSE (usually 4:00 p.m. Eastern time) on a Business Day, the shares will be redeemed at the NAV per share determined as of 4:00 p.m. Eastern time. Requests for redemption received by the fund after 4:00 p.m. Eastern time will be executed at the NAV determined as of 4:00 p.m. Eastern time on the next Business Day. Each fund reserves the right to accept and execute orders to redeem at such other time as designated by the fund if it accepts orders on days when the exchange is closed.

If shares of a fund are redeemed by a shareholder through a participating dealer or participating bank (“Financial Advisor”) or Plan Administrator, the redemption is settled with the shareholder as an ordinary transaction (generally three business days after the order was received). Payment for shares redeemed normally will be made by the fund after settlement to Carillon Fund Distributors, Inc., the funds’ distributor (“Distributor” or “CFD”), or a Financial Adviser or a Plan Administrator on the next business day.

Other supporting legal documents may be required from corporations or other organizations, fiduciaries or persons other than the shareholder of record making the request for redemption. Questions concerning the redemption of fund shares can be directed to the Distributor, a Financial Advisor, a Plan Administrator or to the funds.

For the funds to process a redemption request, it must be in “good order.” Good order means that Carillon Tower has been provided sufficient information necessary to process the request as outlined in this statement of additional information, including:

 

   

The shareholder’s name,

   

The name of the fund,

   

The account number,

   

The share or dollar amount to be redeemed, and

   

The signatures of all registered shareholders with signature guarantees, if applicable.

Further, there must not be any restrictions applied to the account making the redemption request. Certain requests are subject to the transfer agent’s verification procedures before they are considered in good order. A request is not considered to be in “good order” by the funds until it meets these requirements.

Each fund has the right to suspend redemption or postpone payment at times when the exchange is closed (other than customary weekend or holiday closings) or during periods of emergency or other periods as permitted by the SEC. In the case of any such suspension, the shareholder or Plan Administrator may either withdraw the request for redemption or receive payment based upon the NAV next determined, less any applicable CDSC, after the suspension is lifted. If a redemption check remains outstanding after six months, each fund reserves the right to redeposit those funds in any deposit account registered to the shareholder or Plan Administrator.

 

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The Board may suspend the right of redemption or postpone payment for more than seven days at times (1) during which the NYSE is closed other than for the customary weekend and holiday closings, (2) during which trading on the NYSE is restricted as determined by the SEC, (3) during which an emergency exists as a result of which disposal by the funds of securities it owns is not reasonably practicable or it is not reasonably practicable for the funds fairly to determine the value of its net assets or (4) for such other periods as the SEC may by order permit for the protection of the holders of a class of shares.

The Board is authorized by the Trust’s Agreement and Declaration of Trust dated May 5, 2017, to require any shareholder or group of shareholders to redeem shares for any reason, including if the share activity of an account or the ownership of shares by a particular shareholder is deemed by the Trustees either to affect adversely the Trust or any fund, or not to be in the best interests of the remaining shareholders of any fund or class of shares. Prior to making any such redemption, a fund will provide at least 60 days’ written notice to the affected shareholder(s). Unless the shares are redeemed at an earlier date, absent any unforeseen circumstances, the shares will be redeemed at the NAV per share of a fund determined as of the close of regular trading on the NYSE and the NASDAQ (typically 4:00 p.m. ET) on the redemption date.

 

  B.

Telephone Transactions

Shareholders of Class Chartwell may redeem shares by placing a telephone request to a fund. A fund, Carillon Tower, the transfer agent, the Distributor and their trustees, directors, officers and employees are not liable for any loss arising out of telephone instructions they reasonably believe are authentic. In acting upon telephone instructions, these parties use procedures that are reasonably designed to ensure that such instructions are genuine, such as (1) obtaining some or all of the following information: account number, name(s) and social security number(s) registered to the account, and personal identification; (2) recording all telephone transactions; and (3) sending written confirmation of each transaction to the registered owner. If a fund, Carillon Tower, the transfer agent, the Distributor and their trustees, directors, officers and employees do not follow reasonable procedures, some or all of them may be liable for any such losses.

 

  C.

Systematic Withdrawal Plan

Shareholders may elect to make systematic withdrawals from a fund account on a periodic basis. The amounts paid each period are obtained by redeeming sufficient shares from an account to provide the withdrawal amount specified. The Systematic Withdrawal Plan currently is not available for shares held in an IRA, Section 403(b) annuity plan, defined contribution plan, simplified employee pension plan or other retirement plan, unless the shareholder establishes, to the funds’ satisfaction, that withdrawals from such an account may be made without imposition of a penalty. Shareholders may change the amount to be paid by contacting the funds and no charges shall apply.

Redemptions will be made at NAV determined as of the close of regular trading on the Exchange on a day of each month chosen by the shareholders or a day of the last month of each period chosen by the shareholders, whichever is applicable. If the Exchange is not open for business on that day, the shares will be redeemed at NAV determined as of the close of regular trading on the Exchange on the following Business Day. If a shareholder elects to participate in the Systematic Withdrawal Plan, dividends and other distributions on all shares in the account should be reinvested automatically in fund shares. A shareholder may terminate the Systematic Withdrawal Plan at any time without charge or penalty by

 

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giving written notice to the funds. The funds, Carillon Tower, the transfer agent and the Distributor also reserve the right to modify or terminate the Systematic Withdrawal Plan at any time.

A withdrawal payment is treated as proceeds from a sale of shares rather than as a dividend or a capital gain distribution. These payments are taxable to the extent that the total amount of the payments exceeds the tax basis of the shares sold. If the periodic withdrawals exceed reinvested dividends and other distributions, the amount of the original investment may be correspondingly reduced.

Ordinarily, a shareholder should not purchase additional shares of a fund, if maintaining a Systematic Withdrawal Plan of fund shares, because the shareholder may incur tax liabilities in connection with such purchases and withdrawals. A fund will not knowingly accept purchase orders from shareholders for additional shares if they maintain a Systematic Withdrawal Plan unless the purchase is equal to at least one year’s scheduled withdrawals. In addition, a shareholder who maintains such a Systematic Withdrawal Plan may not make periodic investments under each fund’s Automatic Investment Plan.

 

  D.

Redemptions-in-Kind

Although each fund intends to redeem shares in cash, each fund reserves the right to pay the redemption price in whole or in part by a distribution of other assets. However, a fund is obligated to redeem shares for any shareholder for cash during any 90-day period up to $250,000 or 1% of that fund’s NAV, whichever is less. In-kind redemptions are made in accordance with the funds’ in-kind redemption procedures. A redemption-in-kind is not as liquid as a cash redemption. If a redemption is made in kind, a shareholder receiving portfolio securities assumes the risk of a subsequent change in the market value of such securities, the cost of liquidating the securities and the possibility of a lack of a liquid market for those securities.

 

  E.

Frequent Purchases and Redemptions of Fund Shares

“Market timing” typically refers to the practice of frequent trading in the shares of mutual funds in order to exploit inefficiencies in fund pricing. Carillon Tower has no formal or informal arrangements to allow customers to frequently trade in the funds. Carillon Tower and its service providers monitor trading activity in the funds in order to detect and deter market timing activities. In some cases, such monitoring results in rejection of purchase or exchange orders. While there is no guarantee that all market timing will be detected, Carillon Tower has adopted a Market Timing Policy, described in the funds’ Prospectus, to deter such activity.

 

  VIII.

Exchange Privilege

An exchange is effected through the redemption of the shares tendered for exchange and the purchase of shares being acquired, at their respective NAVs, as next determined following receipt by the fund whose shares are being exchanged of: (1) proper instructions and all necessary supporting documents or (2) a telephone request from shareholders, or from Plan Administrators, for such exchange in accordance with the procedures set forth in the Prospectus and below. Telephone requests for an exchange received by a fund before the close of regular trading on the NYSE will be effected at the close of regular trading on that day. Requests for an exchange received after the close of regular trading will be effected on the NYSE’s next trading day.

Each fund reserves the right to: (1) reject any order to acquire its shares through exchange or otherwise, (2) restrict or (3) terminate the exchange privilege at any time. In addition, each fund may terminate this exchange privilege upon 60 days’ notice.

 

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  IX.

Disclosure of Portfolio Holdings

The funds’ policy is to protect the confidentiality of information relating to portfolio holdings and to prevent the selective disclosure of non-public information. To this extent, neither the funds nor Carillon Tower will provide portfolio holdings information to any individual, investor, Plan Administrator or other person unless specifically authorized by the funds’ Chief Compliance Officer (“CCO”) or as described below.

Each fund’s top 20 portfolio holdings, excluding cash and cash equivalents, will be posted on the funds’ website no earlier than 5 business days after a calendar month’s end and the full portfolio holdings (security name and percentage of total net assets) will be posted and available upon request to the funds’ shareholders no earlier than 5 business days after a calendar quarter’s end. Note that, in the event a fund has 20 or fewer holdings, the disclosure of the holdings at month-end will contain full holdings for that fund. In the event of a new fund, the disclosure of holdings may occur on the first day on which the new fund’s portfolio has been fully assembled, at the CCO’s discretion. In addition, each fund’s portfolio holdings as of the end of each fiscal quarter are reported on Form N-PORT and are reported on Form N-CSR for its semiannual and annual periods. See the Prospectus under “Account and Transaction Policies” for more information regarding public disclosure of the funds’ portfolio holdings.

The funds’ Board, officers and certain Carillon Tower employees have regular access to the funds’ portfolio holdings. In addition to being subject to the prohibitions regarding disclosure of, and trading on non-public information described in Carillon Tower’s Code of Ethics, all Carillon Tower personnel must annually certify compliance with the funds’ policy. Specifically, Carillon Tower’s Code of Ethics prohibits employees from revealing non-public information other than to: (1) persons whose responsibilities require knowledge of the information; (2) regulatory authorities who have appropriate jurisdiction with respect to such matters or (3) third parties who utilize such information for ratings or performance analysis. The CCO may approve access to the funds’ portfolio holdings by other persons in Carillon Tower for a limited period of time upon determining that the access is in the best interest of the funds’ shareholders.

Certain employees of the funds’ sub-adviser also have regular access to the funds’ portfolio holdings and must protect the confidentiality of the funds’ portfolio holdings. The funds, Carillon Tower and the sub-adviser are prohibited from entering into any arrangement to disclose the funds’ portfolio holdings for any type of consideration.

The CCO may provide an entity including the funds’ sub-adviser and custodian (“Authorized Service Provider”) with access to a fund’s portfolio holdings more frequently than is publicly available after the CCO’s determination that such access serves a legitimate business purpose. An Authorized Service Provider may not receive portfolio holdings information unless it signs a confidentiality agreement.

Pursuant to arrangements with third-party vendors, Carillon Tower provides the funds’ portfolio holdings information to Asset Management Services, Inc., Refinitiv Financial Solutions, Morningstar, Bloomberg, S&P Global Ratings, Thompson Financial Services, Inc., ISS’ Securities Class Action Services, GainsKeeper, Blaylock Van, LLC and Vickers on a daily, monthly or quarterly basis subject to confidentiality agreements unless the information is publicly available. Public information received by third party vendors is available no earlier than 5 business days after calendar month or quarter end.

The CCO will assess each ad hoc request for access on a case-by-case basis. Each request and the CCO’s response will be documented in writing, provided to Carillon Tower’s compliance department for

 

56


approval and posted on the funds’ website. The CCO will send a response to the person making an ad hoc request at least one day after it is posted on the funds’ website. All ad hoc disclosure requests will be reported to the funds’ Board at its next meeting.

In the event portfolio holdings disclosure made pursuant to the policy present a conflict of interest between the funds’ shareholders and Carillon Tower, the sub-adviser, the Distributor or any affiliated person of the funds, the disclosure will not be made unless a majority of the Independent Trustees (as defined below) or a majority of a board committee consisting solely of Independent Trustees approves such disclosure.

The CCO will make an annual report to the funds’ Board on the operation and effectiveness of the policy and any changes thereto. In addition, the Board will receive any interim reports that the CCO may deem appropriate.

 

  X.

Taxes

General. Each fund is treated as a separate corporation for federal tax purposes and intends to continue to qualify for favorable tax treatment as a “regulated investment company” under the Code (“RIC”). By so qualifying, a fund (but not its shareholders) will be relieved of federal income tax on the part of its investment company taxable income and net capital gain (the excess of net long-term capital gain over net short-term capital loss) that it distributes to its shareholders.

To continue to qualify for treatment as a RIC, a fund must distribute annually to its shareholders at least the sum of 90% of its investment company taxable income (generally consisting of net investment income, the excess of net short-term capital gain over net long-term capital loss and net gains and losses from certain foreign currency transactions, all determined without regard to any deduction for dividends paid) and 90% of its net exempt interest income (“Distribution Requirement”) and must meet several additional requirements. With respect to each fund, these requirements include the following: (1) the fund must derive at least 90% of its gross income each taxable year from dividends, interest, payments with respect to securities loans and gains from the sale or other disposition of stock, securities or foreign currencies, or other income (including gains from options, futures or forward currency contracts) derived with respect to its business of investing in stock, securities or those currencies and net income derived from interests in qualified publicly traded partnerships (“Income Requirement”); and (2) at the close of each quarter of the fund’s taxable year, (a) at least 50% of the value of its total assets must be represented by cash and cash items, Government securities, securities of other RICs and other securities, with those other securities limited, in respect of any one issuer, to an amount that does not exceed 5% of the value of the fund’s total assets and that does not represent more than 10% of the issuer’s outstanding voting securities, and (b) at the close of each quarter of the fund’s taxable year, not more than 25% of the value of its total assets may be invested in securities (other than Government securities or the securities of other RICs) of any one issuer or of two or more issuers the fund controls (by owning 20% or more of their voting power) that are determined to be engaged in the same, similar or related trade or business or the securities of one or more qualified publicly traded partnerships (each, a “Diversification Requirement”).

If a fund failed to qualify for treatment as a RIC for any taxable year – either (1) by failing to satisfy the Distribution Requirement, even if it satisfied the Income Requirement and both Diversification Requirements, or (2) by failing to satisfy the Income Requirement and/or either Diversification Requirement and was unable to, or determined not to, avail itself of Code provisions that enable a RIC to cure a failure to satisfy any of the Income and Diversification Requirements as long as the failure “is due

 

57


to reasonable cause and not due to willful neglect” and the RIC pays a deductible tax calculated in accordance with those provisions and meets certain other requirements – it would be taxed on the full amount of its taxable income for that year without being able to deduct the distributions it makes to its shareholders. Additionally, the shareholders would treat all those distributions, including distributions of net capital gain, as dividends to the extent of the fund’s earnings and profits, taxable as ordinary income (except that, for individual and certain other non-corporate shareholders (each, a “non-corporate shareholder”), all or part of those dividends may be Qualified Dividend Income (defined below)). In addition, the fund could be required to recognize unrealized gains, pay substantial taxes and interest and make substantial distributions before requalifying for RIC treatment.

Each fund will be subject to a nondeductible 4% excise tax (“Excise Tax”) to the extent it fails to distribute by the end of any calendar year substantially all of its ordinary income for that year and its capital gain net income for the one-year period ending on October 31 of that year, plus certain other amounts.

Disposition of Fund Shares and Distributions. A redemption of fund shares will result in a taxable gain or loss to the redeeming shareholder, depending on whether the redemption proceeds are more or less than the shareholder’s adjusted basis in the redeemed shares. An exchange of shares of any fund for shares of another Carillon Mutual Fund generally will have similar tax consequences. In addition, if shares of a fund are purchased (whether pursuant to the reinstatement privilege or otherwise) within 30 days before or after redeeming other shares of that fund (regardless of class) at a loss, all or a portion of that loss will not be deductible and will increase the basis in the newly purchased shares. Any capital gain a non-corporate shareholder recognizes on a redemption or exchange of his or her fund shares that have been held for more than one year will qualify for maximum federal income tax rates of 15% for a single shareholder with taxable income not exceeding $492,300 ($553,850 for married shareholders filing jointly) and 20% for non-corporate shareholders with taxable income exceeding those respective amounts, which are effective for 2023 and will be adjusted for inflation annually.

If shares of a fund are sold at a loss after being held for six months or less, the loss will be treated as long-term, instead of short-term, capital loss to the extent of any capital gain distributions received on those shares. Investors also should be aware that if shares are purchased shortly before the record date for a dividend or other distribution, the shareholder will pay full price for the shares and receive some portion of the price back as a taxable distribution.

Dividends and other distributions a fund declares in the last quarter of any calendar year that are payable to shareholders of record on a date in that quarter will be deemed to have been paid by the fund and received by those shareholders on December 31 of that year if the fund pays them during the following January. Accordingly, those distributions will be taxed to those shareholders for the taxable year in which that December 31 falls.

Dividends from a fund’s investment company taxable income, whether received in cash or reinvested in additional fund shares, are generally taxable to its shareholders as ordinary income, to the extent of its earnings and profits. A portion of those dividends, however, attributable to the aggregate dividends a fund receives from most domestic corporations and certain foreign corporations, or all of those dividends if that aggregate is at least 95% of its gross income (as specially computed) for the taxable year (“Qualified Dividend Income”), may be eligible to be taxed at the 15%/20% maximum federal income tax rates for non-corporate shareholders mentioned above. In addition, the availability of those rates is subject to satisfaction by the fund, and by the shareholder with respect to the fund shares on

 

58


which the dividends are paid, of certain holding period and other restrictions. A portion of a fund’s dividends – not exceeding the aggregate dividends it receives from domestic corporations only – also may be eligible for the dividends-received deduction allowed to corporations, subject to similar holding period and other restrictions; however, dividends a corporate shareholder deducts pursuant to the dividends-received deduction are subject indirectly to the federal alternative minimum tax.

Distributions of net capital gain, if any, designated as capital gains dividends are taxable to a shareholder as long-term capital gains, regardless of how long the shareholder has held fund shares. A distribution of an amount in excess of a fund’s current and accumulated earnings and profits will be treated by a shareholder as a return of capital which is applied against and reduces the shareholder’s basis in his or her shares. To the extent that the amount of any such distribution exceeds the shareholder’s basis in his or her shares, the excess will be treated by the shareholder as gain from a sale or exchange of the shares. Distributions of gains from the sale of investments that the fund owned for one year or less will be taxable as ordinary income.

A fund may elect to retain its net capital gain or a portion thereof for investment and be taxed at corporate rates on the amount retained In such case, it may designate the retained amount as undistributed capital gains in a notice to its shareholders who will be treated as if each received a distribution of his pro rata share of such gain, with the result that each shareholder will (i) be required to report his pro rata share of such gain on his tax return as long-term capital gain, (ii) receive a refundable tax credit for his pro rata share of tax paid by the fund on the gain and (iii) increase the tax basis for his shares by an amount equal to the deemed distribution less the tax credit.

For federal income tax purposes, net capital losses incurred by the fund in a particular taxable year can be carried forward to offset net capital gains in any subsequent year until such loss carry forwards have been fully used, and such capital losses carried forward will retain their character as either short-term or long-term capital losses. To the extent subsequent net capital gains are offset by such losses, they would not result in federal income tax liability to the fund and would not be distributed as such to shareholders.

Shareholders will receive information about the source and tax status of all distributors promptly after the close of each calendar year.

Basis Election and Reporting. A shareholder’s basis in shares of a fund that he or she (1) receives pursuant to the Reorganization in exchange for shares acquired as a shareholder of a fund or its predecessor fund after December 31, 2011, or (2) acquires after the date hereof (collectively, “Covered Shares”) will be determined in accordance with the funds’ default method, which is average basis, unless the shareholder affirmatively elects in writing (which may be electronic) to use a different acceptable basis determination method, such as a specific identification method. The method a fund shareholder elects (or the default method) may not be changed with respect to a redemption (including a redemption that is part of an exchange) of Covered Shares after the settlement date of the redemption.

In addition to the requirement to report the gross proceeds from redemptions of fund shares, each fund (or its administrative agent) must report to the Internal Revenue Service (“IRS”) and furnish to its shareholders the basis information for Covered Shares and indicate whether they had a short-term (one year or less) or long-term (more than one year) holding period. Fund shareholders should consult with their tax advisers to determine the best IRS-accepted basis determination method for their tax situation and to obtain more information about how the basis reporting law applies to them.

 

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Income from Foreign Securities. Dividends and interest a fund receives, and gains it realizes, on foreign securities may be subject to income, withholding or other taxes imposed by foreign countries and U.S. possessions (“foreign taxes”) that would reduce the total return on its securities. Tax conventions between certain countries and the United States may reduce or eliminate foreign taxes, however, and many foreign countries do not impose taxes on capital gains in respect of investments by foreign investors.

If more than 50% of the value of a fund’s total assets at the close of any taxable year consists of securities of foreign corporations, it will be eligible to, and may, file an election with the IRS that would enable its shareholders, in effect, to receive the benefit of the foreign tax credit with respect to any foreign taxes it paid. Pursuant to this election, the fund would treat those taxes as dividends paid to its shareholders and each shareholder (1) would be required to include in gross income, and treat as paid by the shareholder, the shareholder’s proportionate share of those taxes, (2) would treat the shareholder’s share of those taxes and of any dividend the fund paid that represents income from foreign or U.S. possessions sources (“foreign-source income”) as the shareholder’s own income from those sources, and (3) could either use the foregoing information in calculating the foreign tax credit against the shareholder’s federal income tax or, alternatively, deduct the taxes deemed paid by the shareholder in computing the shareholder’s taxable income. If a fund makes this election, it will report to its shareholders shortly after each taxable year their respective shares of foreign-source income and foreign taxes it paid. Individuals who have no more than $300 ($600 for married persons filing jointly) of creditable foreign taxes included on Forms 1099 and have no foreign-source non-passive income will be able to claim a foreign tax credit without having to file the detailed Form 1116 that otherwise is required.

A fund may invest in the stock of passive foreign investment companies (“PFICs”). A PFIC is any foreign corporation (with certain exceptions) that, in general, meets either of the following tests for a taxable year: (1) at least 75% of its gross income is passive or (2) an average of at least 50% of its assets produce, or are held for the production of, passive income. Under certain circumstances, a fund will be subject to federal income tax on a portion of any “excess distribution” it receives on the stock of a PFIC and of any gain on disposition of the stock (collectively, “PFIC income”), plus interest thereon, even if the fund distributes the PFIC income as a taxable dividend to its shareholders. The balance of the PFIC income will be included in the fund’s investment company taxable income and, accordingly, will not be taxable to it to the extent it distributes that income to its shareholders. Fund distributions thereof will not be treated as Qualified Dividend Income.

If a fund invests in a PFIC and is able to and elects to treat the PFIC as a qualified electing fund (“QEF”), then in lieu of the foregoing tax and interest obligation, the fund would be required to include in income each year its pro rata share of the QEF’s annual ordinary earnings and net capital gain – which the fund most likely would have to distribute to satisfy the Distribution Requirement and avoid imposition of the Excise Tax – even if the fund did not receive those earnings and gain from the QEF. In most instances it will be very difficult, if not impossible, to make this election because of certain requirements thereof.

A fund may elect to mark-to-market its stock in any PFIC, in which event it likely would be required to distribute to its shareholders any mark-to-market gains to satisfy the Distribution Requirement and avoid imposition of the Excise Tax. “Marking-to-market,” in this context, means including in gross income each taxable year (and treating as ordinary income) the excess, if any, of the fair market value of a PFIC’s stock over a fund’s adjusted basis therein as of the end of that year. Pursuant to the election, a fund also would be allowed to deduct (as an ordinary, not a capital, loss) the excess, if any, of its adjusted

 

60


basis in PFIC stock over the fair market value thereof as of the taxable year-end, but only to the extent of any net mark-to-market gains with respect to that stock the fund included in income for prior taxable years under the election. A fund’s adjusted basis in each PFIC’s stock subject to the election would be adjusted to reflect the amounts of income included and deductions taken thereunder.

Investors should be aware that determining whether a foreign corporation is a PFIC is a fact-intensive determination that is based on various facts and circumstances and thus is subject to change, and the principles and methodology used therein are subject to interpretation. As a result, a fund may not be able, at the time it acquires a foreign corporation’s shares, to ascertain whether the corporation is a PFIC and a foreign corporation may become a PFIC after a fund acquires shares therein. While each fund generally will seek to minimize its investments in PFIC shares, and to make appropriate elections when they are available, to lessen the adverse tax consequences detailed above, there are no guarantees that it will be able to do so; and each fund reserves the right to make such investments as a matter of its investment policy.

Gains or losses (1) from the disposition of foreign currencies, including forward currency contracts, (2) on the disposition of a foreign-currency-denominated debt security that are attributable to fluctuations in the value of the foreign currency between the dates of acquisition and disposition of the security and (3) that are attributable to exchange rate fluctuations between the time a fund accrues dividends, interest or other receivables, or expenses or other liabilities, denominated in a foreign currency and the time a fund actually collects the receivables or pays the liabilities, generally will be treated as ordinary income or loss. These gains or losses will increase or decrease the amount of a fund’s investment company taxable income available to be distributed to its shareholders as ordinary income, rather than affecting the amount of its net capital gain.

Hedging Strategies. The use of hedging strategies, such as writing (selling) and purchasing options and futures contracts and entering into forward currency contracts, involves complex rules that will determine, for federal income tax purposes, the amount, character and timing of recognition of the gains and losses a fund realizes in connection therewith. Gains from the disposition of foreign currencies (except certain gains that may be excluded by future regulations), and gains from options, futures and forward currency contracts a fund derives with respect to its business of investing in securities or foreign currencies, will be treated as qualifying income under the Income Requirement.

Some futures, foreign currency contracts and “non-equity options” (i.e., certain listed options, such as those on a “broad-based” securities index) – but excluding any “securities futures contract” that is not a “dealer securities futures contract” (both as defined in the Code) and any interest rate swap, currency swap, basis swap, interest rate cap, interest rate floor, commodity swap, equity swap, equity index swap, credit default swap, or similar agreement – in which a fund may invest will be subject to section 1256 of the Code (“Section 1256 Contracts”). Section 1256 Contracts a fund holds at the end of each taxable year, other than Section 1256 Contracts that are part of a “mixed straddle” with respect to which it has made an election not to have the following rules apply, must be “marked-to-market” for federal tax purposes, with the result that unrealized gains or losses will be treated as though they were realized. Sixty percent of any net gain or loss recognized on these deemed sales, and 60% of any net realized gain or loss from any actual sales of Section 1256 Contracts, will be treated as long-term capital gain or loss, and the balance will be treated as short-term capital gain or loss. Section 1256 Contracts also may be marked-to-market for purposes of the Excise Tax. These rules may operate to increase the amount that a fund must distribute to satisfy the Distribution Requirement (i.e., with respect to the portion treated as short-term capital gain, which will be taxable to its shareholders as ordinary income when distributed

 

61


to them), and to increase the net capital gain a fund recognizes, without in either case increasing the cash available to the fund.

Code section 1092 (dealing with straddles) also may affect the taxation of certain Derivatives in which a fund may invest. That section defines a “straddle” as offsetting positions with respect to actively traded personal property; for these purposes, options, futures and forward currency contracts are positions in personal property. Under that section, any loss from the disposition of a position in a straddle generally may be deducted only to the extent the loss exceeds the unrealized gain on the offsetting position(s) of the straddle. In addition, these rules may postpone the recognition of loss that otherwise would be recognized under the mark-to-market rules discussed above. The regulations under section 1092 also provide certain “wash sale” rules, which apply to transactions where a position is sold at a loss and a new offsetting position is acquired within a prescribed period, and “short sale” rules applicable to straddles. If a fund makes certain elections, the amount, character and timing of recognition of gains and losses from the affected straddle positions would be determined under rules that vary according to the elections made. Because only a few of the regulations implementing the straddle rules have been promulgated, the federal income tax consequences to a fund of straddle transactions are not entirely clear.

If a fund has an “appreciated financial position” – generally, an interest (including an interest through an option, futures or forward currency contract or short sale) with respect to any stock, debt instrument (other than “straight debt”) or partnership interest the fair market value of which exceeds its adjusted basis – and enters into a “constructive sale” of the position, the fund will be treated as having made an actual sale thereof, with the result that it will recognize gain at that time. A constructive sale generally consists of a short sale, an offsetting notional principal contract or futures or forward currency contract a fund or a related person enters into with respect to the same or substantially identical property. In addition, if the appreciated financial position is itself a short sale or such a contract, acquisition of the underlying property or substantially identical property will be deemed a constructive sale. The foregoing will not apply, however, to any transaction by a fund during any taxable year that otherwise would be treated as a constructive sale if the transaction is closed within 30 days after the end of that year and the fund holds the appreciated financial position unhedged for 60 days after that closing (i.e., at no time during that 60-day period is the fund’s risk of loss regarding that position reduced by reason of certain specified transactions with respect to substantially identical or related property, such as having an option to sell, being contractually obligated to sell, making a short sale or granting an option to buy substantially identical stock or securities).

Original Issue Discount and Pay-in-Kind Securities. A fund may acquire zero coupon, step coupon or other securities issued with original issue discount (“OID”). As a holder of those securities, such a fund must include in its income the OID that accrues on them during the taxable year, even if it receives no corresponding payment on them during the year. Similarly, each such fund must include in its gross income each taxable year the securities it receives as “interest” on pay-in-kind securities during the year. Because each fund annually must distribute substantially all of its investment company taxable income, including any OID and other non-cash income, to satisfy the Distribution Requirement and avoid imposition of the Excise Tax, it may be required in a particular year to distribute as a dividend an amount that is greater than the total amount of cash it actually receives. Those distributions will be made from a fund’s cash assets or from the proceeds of sales of portfolio securities, if necessary. A fund may realize capital gains or losses from those sales, which would increase or decrease its taxable income and/or net capital gain.

REITs. Each fund may invest in REITs. A fund’s investment in REIT equity securities may result in the receipt of cash in excess of the REIT’s earnings and profits. If a fund distributes the excess, that

 

62


distribution could constitute a “return of capital” (i.e., a non-taxable reduction in each shareholder’s basis in his or her fund shares, with any amount exceeding that reduction taxed to the shareholder as capital gain) to the fund’s shareholders for federal income tax purposes. Dividends a fund receives from a REIT generally will not constitute Qualified Dividend Income. A fund distribution to foreign shareholders may be subject to certain federal withholding and other requirements if the distribution is related to a distribution the fund receives from a REIT that is attributable to a sale of U.S. real property interests.

After calendar year-end, REITs can and often do change the category (e.g., ordinary income dividend, capital gain distribution, or return of capital) of one or more of the distributions they have made during that year, which would result at that time in a fund’s also having to re-categorize some of the distributions it made to its shareholders. These changes would be reflected in the annual Forms 1099 sent to shareholders, together with other tax information. Those forms generally will be distributed to shareholders in February of each year, although a fund may, in one or more years, request from the IRS an extension of time to distribute those forms to enable it to receive the latest information it can from the REITs in which it invests and thereby accurately report that information to each shareholder on a single form (rather than having to send them amended forms).

Effective for taxable years beginning after December 31, 2017 and before January 1, 2026, the Code generally allows non-corporate persons a deduction for 20% of “qualified REIT dividends.” Regulations allow a RIC to pass the character of its qualified REIT dividends through to its shareholders provided certain holding period requirements are met. As a result, a shareholder in a fund that invests in REITs will be able to receive the benefit of the 20% deduction with respect to the fund’s dividends that are based on REIT dividends received by the fund.

A fund may invest in REITs that (1) hold residual interests in “real estate mortgage investment conduits” (“REMICs”) or (2) engage in mortgage securitization transactions that cause the REITs to be taxable mortgage pools (“TMPs”) or have a qualified REIT subsidiary that is a TMP. A part of the net income allocable to REMIC residual interest holders may be an “excess inclusion.” The Code authorizes the issuance of regulations dealing with the taxation and reporting of excess inclusion income of REITs and RICs that hold residual REMIC interests and of REITs, or qualified REIT subsidiaries that are TMPs. Although those regulations have not yet been issued, the U.S. Treasury and the IRS issued a notice in 2006 (“Notice”) announcing that, pending the issuance of further guidance (which has not yet been issued), the IRS would apply the principles in the following paragraphs to all excess inclusion income, whether from REMIC residual interests or TMPs.

The Notice provides that a REIT must (1) determine whether it or its qualified REIT subsidiary (or a part of either) is a TMP and, if so, calculate the TMP’s excess inclusion income under a “reasonable method,” (2) allocate its excess inclusion income to its shareholders generally in proportion to dividends paid, (3) inform shareholders that are not “disqualified organizations” (i.e., governmental units and tax-exempt entities that are not subject to tax on their “unrelated business taxable income” (“UBTI”)) of the amount and character of the excess inclusion income allocated thereto, (4) pay tax (at the highest federal income tax rate imposed on corporations) on the excess inclusion income allocable to its shareholders that are disqualified organizations, and (5) apply the withholding tax provisions with respect to the excess inclusion part of dividends paid to foreign persons without regard to any treaty exception or reduction in tax rate. Excess inclusion income allocated to certain tax-exempt entities (including qualified retirement plans, individual retirement accounts, and public charities) constitutes UBTI to them.

A RIC with excess inclusion income is subject to rules identical to those in clauses (2) through (5) above (substituting “that are nominees” for “that are not ‘disqualified organizations’” in clause (3) and

 

63


inserting “record” after “its” in clause (4)). The Notice further provides that a RIC is not required to report the amount and character of the excess inclusion income allocated to its shareholders that are not nominees, except that (1) a RIC with excess inclusion income from all sources that exceeds 1% of its gross income must do so and (2) any other MC must do so by taking into account only excess inclusion income allocated to the RIC from REITs the excess inclusion income of which exceeded 3% of its dividends. Each fund will not invest directly in REMIC residual interests and does not intend to invest in REITs that, to its knowledge, invest in those interests or are TMPs or have a qualified REIT subsidiary that is a TMP.

Foreign Account Tax Compliance Act (“FATCA”). Under FATCA, “foreign financial institutions” (“FFIs”) and “non-financial foreign entities” (“NFFEs”) that are fund shareholders may be subject to a generally nonrefundable 30% withholding tax on income dividends a fund pays. Proposed regulations (effective while pending) would eliminate the withholding tax with respect to capital gain distributions and the proceeds of redemptions of fund shares that was scheduled to go into effect in 2019. The FATCA withholding tax generally can be avoided (a) by an FFI, if it reports certain information regarding direct and indirect ownership of financial accounts U.S. persons hold with the FFI, and (b) by an NFFE that certifies its status as such and, in certain circumstances, reports information regarding substantial U.S. owners.

An FFI can avoid FATCA withholding by becoming a “participating FFI,” which requires the FFI to enter into a tax compliance agreement with the IRS under the Code. Under such an agreement, a participating FFI agrees to (1) verify and document whether it has U.S. accountholders, (2) report certain information regarding their accounts to the IRS, and (3) meet certain other specified requirements.

The U.S. Treasury has negotiated intergovernmental agreements (“IGAs”) with certain countries with respect to one or more alternative approaches to implement FATCA. An entity in one of those countries may be required to comply with the terms of the IGA instead of U.S. Treasury regulations. An FFI resident in a country that has entered into a Model I IGA with the United States must report to that country’s government (pursuant to the terms of the applicable IGA and applicable law), which will, in turn, report to the IRS. An FFI resident in a Model II IGA country generally must comply with U.S. regulatory requirements, with certain exceptions, including the treatment of recalcitrant accountholders. An FFI resident in one of those countries that complies with whichever of the foregoing applies will be exempt from FATCA withholding.

An NFFE that is the beneficial owner of a payment from a fund can avoid FATCA withholding generally by certifying its status as such and, in certain circumstances, either that (1) it does not have any substantial U.S. owners or (2) it does have one or more such owners and reports the name, address, and taxpayer identification number of each such owner. The NFFE will report to a fund or other applicable withholding agent, which may, in turn, report information to the IRS.

Those foreign shareholders also may fall into certain exempt, excepted, or deemed compliant categories established by U.S. Treasury regulations, IGAs, and other guidance regarding FATCA. An FFI or NFFE that invests in a fund will need to provide the fund with documentation properly certifying the entity’s status under FATCA to avoid FATCA withholding. The requirements imposed by FATCA are different from, and in addition to, the tax certification rules to avoid backup withholding described in the Prospectus. Foreign investors are urged to consult their tax advisers regarding the application of these requirements to their own situation and the impact thereof on their investment in a fund.

*                        *                        *

 

64


The foregoing is only a general summary of some of the important federal tax considerations generally affecting the funds and their shareholders. No attempt is made to present a complete explanation of the federal tax treatment of the funds’ activities, and this discussion is not intended as a substitute for careful tax planning. Accordingly, potential investors are urged to consult their own tax advisers for more detailed information and for information regarding the treatment of an investment in the funds under state and local tax laws, which may differ from the federal tax treatment described above.

 

  XI.

Shareholder Information

Each share of a fund gives the shareholder one vote in matters submitted to shareholders for a vote. Each class of shares of each fund has equal voting rights, except that, in matters affecting only a particular class or series, only shares of that class or series are entitled to vote. As a Delaware statutory trust, the Trust is not required to hold annual shareholder meetings. Shareholder approval will be sought only for certain changes in the Trust’s or a fund’s operation and for the election of Trustees under certain circumstances. For the Trust, a special meeting of shareholders shall be called by the Trustees upon the written request of shareholders owning at least 25% of the Trust’s outstanding shares.

 

  XII.

Fund Information

 

  A.

Management of the Funds

Board of Trustees. The funds are governed by the Board of Trustees (“Board”). The Board is responsible for and oversees the overall management and operations of the Trust and the funds, which includes the general oversight and review of the funds’ investment activities, in accordance with federal law and applicable state law, as well as the stated policies of the funds. The Board oversees the funds’ officers and service providers, including Carillon Tower, which is responsible for the management of the day-to-day operations of the funds based on policies and agreements reviewed and approved by the Board. In carrying out these responsibilities, the Board regularly interacts with and receives reports from senior personnel of service providers, including Carillon Tower personnel, and the funds’ Chief Compliance Officer, who reports regularly to the Board. The Board also is assisted by the funds’ independent auditor (who reports directly to the funds’ Audit Committee), independent counsel and other experts as appropriate, all of whom are selected by the Board.

Risk Oversight

Consistent with its responsibility for oversight of the Trust and the funds, the Board oversees the management of risks relating to the administration and operation of the Trust and the funds. Carillon Tower, as part of its responsibilities for the day-to-day operations of the funds, is responsible for day-to-day risk management for the funds. The Board, in the exercise of its reasonable business judgment, also separately considers potential risks that may impact the funds. The Board performs this risk management oversight directly and, as to certain matters, through its committees (described below) and through the Independent Trustees. The following provides an overview of the principal, but not all, aspects of the Board’s oversight of risk management for the Trust and the funds.

In general, a fund’s risks include, among others, investment risk, credit risk, liquidity risk, valuation risk and operational risk. The Board has adopted, and periodically reviews, policies and procedures designed to address risks to the Trust and the funds. In addition, under the general oversight of the Board, Carillon Tower, the funds’ sub-advisers and other service providers to the funds have themselves adopted a variety of policies, procedures and controls designed to address particular risks to

 

65


the funds. Different processes, procedures and controls are employed with respect to different types of risks. Further, Carillon Tower oversees and regularly monitors the investments, operations and compliance of the funds’ sub-advisers.

The Board also oversees risk management for the Trust and the funds through review of regular reports, presentations and other information from officers of the funds and other persons. The funds’ CCO and senior officers of Carillon Tower regularly report to the Board on a range of matters, including those relating to risk management. The Board also regularly receives reports from Carillon Tower and the funds’ sub-advisers with respect to the funds’ investments. In addition to regular reports from Carillon Tower, the Board also receives reports regarding other service providers to the funds, either directly or through Carillon Tower or the funds’ CCO, on a periodic or regular basis. At least annually, the Board receives a report from the funds’ CCO regarding the effectiveness of the funds’ compliance program. Also, on an annual basis, the Board receives reports, presentations and other information from Carillon Tower and the funds’ sub-advisers in connection with the Board’s consideration of the renewal of: (1) the Trust’s agreements with Carillon Tower and the funds’ sub-advisers; (2) the Trust’s agreements with CFD; and (3) the Trust’s distribution plans under Rule 12b-1 under the 1940 Act.

The funds’ Principal Financial Officer also reports regularly to the Audit Committee on fund valuation matters. In addition, the Audit Committee receives regular reports from the funds’ independent registered public accounting firm on internal control and financial reporting matters. On at least an annual basis, the Independent Trustees meet with the funds’ CCO to discuss matters relating to the funds’ compliance program.

Not all risks that may affect the funds can be identified nor can controls be developed to eliminate or mitigate their occurrence or effects. It may not be practical or cost effective to eliminate or mitigate certain risks, the processes and controls employed to address certain risks may be limited in their effectiveness, and some risks are simply beyond the reasonable control of Carillon Tower, the funds, the sub-advisers or other service providers. Moreover, it is necessary to bear certain risks (such as investment-related risks) in seeking to achieve each fund’s goals. As a result of the foregoing and other factors, the Board’s ability to manage risk is subject to substantial limitations.

Board Structure and Related Matters

Board members who are not “interested persons” of the funds as defined in Section 2(a)(19) of the 1940 Act (“Independent Trustees”) constitute at least three-quarters of the Board. In addition, the Chair of the Board is an Independent Trustee. The Chair presides at all meetings of the Board and acts as a liaison with officers, attorneys, and other Trustees between meetings. The Board believes that its leadership structure, including having an Independent Trustee as Chair, allows for effective communication between the Trustees and fund management and enhances the independent oversight of the funds.

The Trustees discharge their responsibilities collectively as a Board, as well as through Board committees. The Board has established four standing committees, each of which operates pursuant to a charter approved by the Board that delineates the specific responsibilities of that committee: the Audit Committee, the Compliance Committee, the Nominating Committee and the Qualified Legal Compliance Committee. For example, the Audit Committee is responsible for specific matters related to oversight of the funds’ independent auditors, subject to approval of the Audit Committee’s recommendations by the Board. The members and responsibilities of each Board committee are summarized below.

 

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The Board periodically evaluates its structure and composition as well as various aspects of its operations. The Board believes that its leadership structure, including its Independent Trustees, Independent Board Chair and Board committees, is appropriate for the funds in light of, among other factors, the asset size and nature of the funds, the number of funds overseen by the Board, the arrangements for the conduct of the funds’ operations, the number of Trustees, and the Board’s responsibilities. On an annual basis, the Board conducts a self-evaluation that considers, among other matters, whether the Board and its committees are functioning effectively and whether, given the size and composition of the Board and each of its committees, the Trustees are able to oversee effectively the number of funds in the complex.

The Board holds four regularly scheduled in-person meetings each year. The Board may hold special meetings, as needed, either in person or by telephone, to address matters arising between regular meetings. During a portion of each in-person meeting, the Independent Trustees meet outside of management’s presence. The Independent Trustees may hold special meetings, as needed, either in person or by telephone. The Board met four times during the most recent fiscal year.

The Trustees are identified in the tables below, which provide information as to their principal business occupations held during the last five years and certain other information.

Background of Trustees and Officers. The following is a list of the Trustees of the Trust with their principal occupations and present positions, including any affiliation with Raymond James Financial, Inc. (“RJF”), the Distributor or Carillon Tower, the length of service to the Trust, and the position, if any, they hold on the board of directors/trustees of companies other than the Trust. The principal address of each Trustee and Officer is P.O. Box 23572, St. Petersburg, Florida 33742.

 

Trustees  
Name, Birth Year and
Position, Term of Office (a)
and Length of Time Served
   Principal Occupation(s) During
Past Five Years
   Number of
Funds
Overseen
in Fund
Complex (b)
     Other
Directorships
held by Trustee
 

Independent Trustees:

                      

John Carter (1961)

 

Trustee since 2017 (Carillon Series Trust)

 

Trustee from 2016 to 2017 (Eagle Series Trust)

   Law Office of John K. Carter, P.A. since 2015; Founder, Global Recruiters of St. Petersburg 2012 - 2015; President and Chief Executive Officer, Transamerica Asset Management 2006 - 2012; Chairman, Board Member, Transamerica Partners Portfolios, Transamerica Partners Funds Group, Transamerica Partners Funds Group II and Transamerica Asset Allocation Variable Funds 2007 - 2012      16       

 

Trustee, RiverNorth
Funds since 2013
(11 funds)

 

 
 
 

 

Keith B. Jarrett, PhD (1948)

 

Trustee since 2017 (Carillon Series Trust)

 

Trustee from 2005 to 2017 (Eagle Series Trust)

   Managing Partner, PW1 LLC since 2013; Founder, Rockport Funding, LLC (private equity), and Ajax Partners (investment partnership) since 2003      16        N/A  

 

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Trustees
Name, Birth Year and
Position, Term of Office (a)
and Length of Time Served
   Principal Occupation(s) During
Past Five Years
   Number of
Funds
Overseen
in Fund
Complex (b)
   Other
Directorships
held by Trustee

Liana Marante (1963)

 

Trustee since 2017 (Carillon Series Trust)

 

Trustee from 2014 to 2017

(Eagle Series Trust)

   Managing Member, Bay Consulting Partners, LLC since 2010; Executive Director, MCS Foundation, Inc., (a nonprofit organization engaged in hurricane recovery in Puerto Rico) 2017 - 2019    16    N/A

Krishna Memani (1960)

 

Trustee since 2021

(Carillon Series Trust)

   Chief Investment Officer, Lafayette College since 2020; Vice Chairman, Investments, Invesco 2019 - 2020; Chief Investment Officer, OppenheimerFunds 2009 - 2019    16    N/A

Deborah L. Talbot, PhD (1950)

 

Chair of the Board of Trustees since 2018, Trustee since 2017 (Carillon Series Trust)

 

Trustee from 2002 to 2017 (Eagle Series Trust)

   Independent Consultant; Principal, Lazure Enterprises, 2013 - 2019; Deans’ Advisory Board, College of Arts and Sciences, University of Memphis since 2002    16    N/A

 

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Trustees
Name, Birth Year and
Position, Term of Office (a)
and Length of Time Served
   Principal Occupation(s) During
Past Five Years
   Number of
Funds
Overseen
in Fund
Complex (b)
   Other
Directorships
held by Trustee

Jerry A. Webman, PhD, CFA® (1949)

 

Trustee since 2018

(Carillon Series Trust)

   Chief Economist, OppenheimerFunds 2006 - 2016; Senior Investment Officer, Director of Fixed Income, OppenheimerFunds 1996 - 2009    16    Board of Trustees
since 2016, New
Jersey Law and
Education
Empowerment
Project (NJ LEEP);

 

Board Member
since 2017, Chair,
Investment
Committee and
Member, Finance
Committee since
2018, Charity
Navigator;

 

Trustee and
Investment
Committee
Member since
2015, Board
Treasurer and
Finance Committee
Chair since 2022,
Community Service
Society;

 

President, Board of
Managers, 275 W.
10th St.
Condominium
since 2018

(a)

Trustees serve for life or until they are removed, resign or retire. The Board has adopted a Board Governance Policy that requires Independent Trustees to retire no later than at the end of the meeting which occurs immediately after his or her 76th birthday.

(b)

“Fund Complex” is comprised of registered investment companies for which Carillon Tower serves as investment adviser.

In addition to the information set forth in the table above and other relevant qualifications, experience, attributes or skills applicable to a particular Trustee, the following provides further information about the qualifications and experience of each Trustee.

John Carter: Mr. Carter has extensive experience in the investment management business, including as president, chief executive officer and general Counsel of a global asset management firm and service as a chairman of the board of registered investment companies and multiple years of service as a Trustee.

 

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Keith B. Jarrett: Dr. Jarrett has extensive financial and organizational management experience, including as founder of a private equity business and investment partnership, director of numerous private companies and multiple years of service as a Trustee.

Liana Marante: Ms. Marante has extensive financial and organizational management experience, including as founder of a private consulting business, president and CEO of a private company, partner in a public accounting firm, director of numerous private companies and multiple years of service as Board member of the Florida Prepaid College Board and as a Trustee.

Krishna Memani: Mr. Memani has extensive financial and organizational management experience, including service as chief investment officer and vice chairman at different asset management firms.

Deborah L. Talbot: Dr. Talbot has extensive financial and organizational management experience, including service as an executive of a global financial services firm, service on the advisory boards of one private university and one public university, director of community development organizations and multiple years of service as a Trustee.

Jerry A. Webman: Dr. Webman has extensive financial and organizational management experience, including service as a portfolio manager, director of fixed income and chief economist of an asset management firm and as a board chair and investment committee member of several philanthropic organizations.

Board Committees

The Board has an Audit Committee, consisting of Ms. Marante, Dr. Jarrett and Dr. Webman, each of whom is an Independent Trustee. Ms. Marante serves as Chair of the Audit Committee and is the funds’ designated Audit Committee Financial Expert. The primary responsibilities of the Audit Committee are, as set forth in its charter, to make recommendations to the Board Members as to: the engagement or discharge of the funds’ independent auditors (including the audit fees charged by auditors); the supervision of investigations into matters relating to audit matters; the review with the independent auditors and independent consultants of the results of audits; and addressing any other matters regarding audits and financial statements. The Audit Committee met five times during the last fiscal year.

The Board also has a Compliance Committee, consisting of Messrs. Carter and Memani and Dr. Talbot, each of whom is an Independent Trustee. Mr. Carter serves as Chair of the Compliance Committee. The primary responsibilities of the Compliance Committee are: to oversee the funds’ compliance with all regulatory obligations arising under the applicable federal securities law, rules and regulations and oversee management’s implementation and enforcement of the funds’ compliance policies and procedures. The Compliance Committee met four times during the last fiscal year.

The Board also has a Nominating Committee, consisting of Mr. Carter, Dr. Jarrett, Ms. Marante, Mr. Memani, Dr. Talbot and Dr. Webman, each of whom is an Independent Trustee. The Nominating Committee’s primary responsibility is to make recommendations to the Board on issues related to the composition of the Board, communicate with management on those issues and evaluate and nominate Board member candidates. In determining potential candidates’ qualifications for Board membership, the Nominating Committee considers all factors it determines to be relevant to fulfilling the role of being a member of the Board. The Nominating Committee considers potential candidates for nomination

 

70


identified by one or more shareholders of a fund. Shareholders can submit recommendations in writing to the attention of the Chair of the Nominating Committee at an address to be maintained by the fund for this purpose. In order to be considered by the Nominating Committee, any shareholder recommendation must include certain information, such as the candidate’s business, professional or other relevant experience and areas of expertise, current business and home addresses and contact information, other board positions or prior experience and any knowledge and experience relating to investment companies and investment company governance. The Nominating Committee did not meet during the last fiscal year.

The Board also has a Qualified Legal Compliance Committee, consisting of Mr. Carter, Dr. Jarrett, Ms. Marante, Mr. Memani, Dr. Talbot and Dr. Webman, each of whom is an Independent Trustee. The primary responsibility of the Qualified Legal Compliance Committee is to receive, review and take appropriate action with respect to any report made or referred to the Qualified Legal Compliance Committee by: an attorney of evidence of a material violation of applicable international or U.S. federal or state securities law, material breach of a fiduciary duty under international or U.S. federal or state law; or a similar material violation by the funds or by any officer, director, employee, or agent of the funds. The Qualified Legal Compliance Committee of Carillon Series Trust did not meet during the last fiscal year.

The following table shows the amount of equity securities in each fund owned by the Trustees as of December 31, 2022:

 

     Dollar Range of Equity Securities Owned:
     John
Carter
  Keith
Jarrett
  Liana
Marante
  Krishna
Memani
  Deborah
Talbot
  Jerry
Webman

Carillon Chartwell Income Fund

  None   None   None   None   None   None

Carillon Chartwell Mid Cap Value Fund

  None   None   None   None   None   None

Carillon Chartwell Short Duration Bond Fund

  None   None   None   None   None   None

Carillon Chartwell Short Duration High Yield Fund

  None   None   None   None   None   None

Carillon Chartwell Small Cap Growth Fund

  None   None   None   None   None   None

Carillon Chartwell Small Cap Value Fund

  None   None   None   None   None   None

Aggregate Dollar Range of Securities in the Trust

  Over
$100,000
  Over
$100,000
  Over
$100,000
  None   Over
$100,000
  Over
$100,000

The Trustees and officers of the Trust, as a group, own less than 1% of each class of each fund’s shares outstanding. The Trust’s Agreement and Declaration of Trust provides that the Trustees will not be liable for errors of judgment or mistakes of fact or law. However, they are not protected against any liability to which they would otherwise be subject by reason of willful misfeasance, bad faith, gross negligence or reckless disregard of the duties involved in the conduct of their office. In addition, Delaware law provides that a trustee or other person managing the Trust shall not be personally liable to any person other than the trust or a shareholder for any act, omission or obligation of the trust or any trustee thereof.

 

71


Effective January 1, 2023, each Independent Trustee of the Trust who is not an employee of Carillon Tower or its affiliates receives an annual retainer of $90,000 and an additional fee of $8,000 for each combined quarterly meeting of the Trust attended in-person, and 25% of this fee for each combined quarterly meeting of the Trust attended via telephone. For this purpose, the Board considers attendance at regular meetings held by videoconference when in-person meetings are not feasible to constitute in-person attendance at a Board meeting. In addition, each Audit Committee and Compliance Committee member receives $2,000 per meeting (in person or telephonic). The Independent Chair receives an annual retainer of $30,000, the Audit Committee Chairperson receives an annual retainer of $20,000, and the Compliance Committee Chairperson receives an annual retainer of $20,000. Trustees’ fees and expenses are paid equally by each fund. Because Carillon Tower and other unaffiliated service providers perform substantially all of the services necessary for the operation of the Trust, the Trust requires no employees. No officer, director or employee of Carillon Tower receives any compensation from the Trust for acting as a director or officer. The following table shows the compensation earned by each Trustee during the fiscal year ended December 31, 2022.

 

   

Total Compensation from the Carillon Series

Trust Paid to Trustees

    

Trustee Name

        
   

John Carter

   $ 150,000.00  
   

Keith Jarrett

   $ 132,000.00  
   

Liana Marante

   $ 152,000.00  
   

Krishna Memani

   $ 130,000.00  
   

Deborah L. Talbot

   $ 160,000.00  
   

Jerry A. Webman

   $ 132,000.00  

No Trustee will receive any benefits upon retirement. Thus, no pension or retirement benefits have accrued as part of any of the Trust’s expenses.

The following is a list of the Officers of the Trust with their principal occupations and present positions, including any affiliation with RJF, the Distributor, Carillon Tower or the sub-adviser.

 

                 Officers

Name, Birth Year and Position, Term of
Office(a) and Length of Time Served

 

   Principal Occupation(s) During Past Five Years

Susan L. Walzer (1967)

 

President since March 2021
(Carillon Series Trust)

 

Principal Executive Officer since 2017
(Carillon Series Trust)

 

Principal Executive Officer from 2011 to 2017
(Eagle Family of Funds)

   Director of Raymond James Investment Management, since 2022; Director of Carillon Tower, since 2019; Director of Carillon Fund Services, Inc., 2019-2020; Director of Chartwell Investment Partners, since 2022; Director of Carillon Fund Distributors, Inc.®, since 2019; Director of Scout Investments, Inc., since 2019; Senior Vice President of Fund Administration, Raymond James Investment Management, since 2022; Senior Vice President of Fund Administration, Carillon Tower, 2018 – 2022; Vice President of Fund Administration, Carillon Tower,

 

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2017 – 2018; Vice President of Fund Administration, Eagle, 2011 – 2017.

 

                 Officers

Name, Birth Year and Position, Term of
Office(a) and Length of Time Served

 

   Principal Occupation(s) During Past Five Years

Carolyn K. Gill (1978)

 

Principal Financial Officer and Treasurer
since 2017 (Carillon Series Trust)

 

Principal Financial Officer and Treasurer
from 2011 to 2017 (Eagle Family of Funds)

 

   Vice President of Fund Administration, Raymond James Investment Management, since 2022; Vice President of Fund Administration, Carillon Tower, 2018 – 2022; Manager of Fund Accounting for Carillon Tower, 2017 – 2018; Manager of Fund Accounting for Eagle 2005 – 2017 and Fund Reporting for Eagle for 2010 – 2017.

Ludmila M. Chwazik (1965)

 

Chief Compliance Officer and Secretary
since 2020 (Carillon Series Trust)

 

   Vice President of Compliance, Raymond James, since 2020, Chief Compliance Officer, Water Island Capital, 2016 – 2019; Senior Vice President of Legal and Compliance, Neuberger Berman, 2014 – 2016;

 

(a)

Officers each serve one year terms.

 

73


  B.

Control Persons and Principal Holders of Securities

Control Persons are those beneficial owners who may have the power to exercise a controlling influence over the management or policies of a company as a result of their ownership of more than 25% of the voting securities of the company. Listed below are shareholders who owned of record or were known by the funds to own beneficially 5% or more of the outstanding shares of a class of the following funds as of April 4, 2023.

 

     
            Carillon Chartwell Income Fund
     

Name and Address of Principal Holder

   Fund
Percentage
(listed if
over 25%)
   Class Chartwell Shares
     

Charles Schwab and Co. Inc.

San Francisco, CA

        14.42%
     

LPL Financial

San Diego, CA

        6.14%
     

NFS LLC

Jersey City, NJ

        19.52%
     

Ameritrade, Inc.

Omaha, NE

        18.36%
     

Wells Fargo

St. Louis, MO

        7.05%
     

Pershing LLC

Jersey City, NJ

        8.48%
     
            Carillon Chartwell Mid Cap Value Fund
     

Name and Address of Principal Holder

   Fund
Percentage
(listed if
over 25%)
   Class Chartwell Shares
     

Charles Schwab and Co. Inc.

San Francisco, CA

        23.42%
     

NFS LLC

Jersey City, NJ

        23.34%
     

SEI

Oaks, PA

        10.31%
     

Morgan Stanley

New York, NY

   28.16%    28.16%
     
            Carillon Chartwell Short Duration Bond Fund
     

Name and Address of Principal Holder

   Fund
Percentage
(listed if
over 25%)
   Class Chartwell Shares
     

NFS LLC

Jersey City, NJ

   91.72%    91.72%
     

M. Fox

        5.13%

 

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           Carillon Chartwell Short Duration High Yield
Fund
     

Name and Address of Principal Holder

   Fund
Percentage
(listed if
over 25%)
   Class Chartwell Shares
     

Charles Schwab and Co. Inc.

San Francisco, CA

      6.16%
     

NFS LLC

Jersey City, NJ

      12.22%
     

LPL Financial

San Diego, CA

      10.75%
     

Morgan Stanley

New York, NY

      5.22%
     

Capinco

Milwaukee, WI

      23.34%
     
           Carillon Chartwell Small Cap Growth Fund
     

Name and Address of Principal Holder

   Fund
Percentage
(listed if
over 25%)
   Class Chartwell Shares
     

Vanguard Brokerage

Services

Malvern, PA

      8.61%
     

NFS LLC

Jersey City, NJ

   78.33%    78.33%
     

Capinco

Milwaukee, WI

      11.10%
     
           Carillon Chartwell Small Cap Value Fund
     

Name and Address of Principal Holder

   Fund
Percentage
(listed if
over 25%)
   Class Chartwell Shares
     

Charles Schwab and Co. Inc.

San Francisco, CA

      11.57%
     

NFS LLC

Jersey City, NJ

      9.84%
     

UBS

Weehawken, NJ

   27.31%    27.31%
     

Merrill Lynch

Jacksonville, FL

        9.69%

 

  C.

Proxy Voting Policies and Procedures

The Board has adopted Proxy Voting Policies and Procedures (“Proxy Policies”) wherein the Trust has delegated to Carillon Tower, and Carillon Tower has delegated to its Head of Sustainable Investing and Corporate Responsibility, who is the Chair of its Stewardship Committee, the responsibility for voting proxies relating to portfolio securities held by each fund as part of its investment advisory services, subject to the supervision and oversight of Carillon Tower. All such proxy voting duties shall be

 

75


subject to the Board’s continuing oversight. Notwithstanding this delegation of responsibilities, however, each fund retains the right to vote proxies relating to its portfolio securities. The fundamental purpose of the Proxy Policies is to ensure that each vote will be in a manner that reflects the best interest of each fund and its shareholders, taking into account the long-term economic value of a fund’s portfolio securities.

Proxy Voting Guidelines. The Stewardship Committee is the main body responsible for proxy voting and includes representatives from each subadviser as well as Funds’ Chief Compliance Officer (“CCO”). Proxy voting issues are evaluated by the Committee Chair and members representing the Fund’s subadviser for which proxies are being voted. Through this process, proxies will be voted in accordance with the proxy voting guidelines (“Proxy Guidelines”) adopted as part of the Trust’s Proxy Policies. The Committee members may vote a proxy in a manner that is inconsistent with the Proxy Voting Guidelines if the Committee member(s) believe(s) that such a vote is in the Funds’ best interests. On the occasion where Committee member(s) may recommend a vote contrary to the Policy or the Proxy Voting Guidelines, the Committee Chair must document the rationale behind the recommendation to vote contrary to the Policy or the Proxy Voting Guidelines and notify the Funds’ CCO. The Funds’ CCO will review the proxy issue and the recommended vote to ensure that the vote was cast in compliance with the Funds’ overriding obligation to ensure proxies are voted in the best interests of the Funds.

The Proxy Guidelines state how the funds will vote generally with respect to routine proposals. In general, routine proposals are those proposals that do not propose to change the structure, bylaws or operations of the company to the detriment of shareholders. Examples of such proposals would include, among other things, the approval of auditors and the election of directors and/or officers.

Proposals that are not considered to be routine items are those proposals more likely to affect the structure and operations of the company, which would have a greater impact on the value of the underlying security. Examples would include, among other things, decisions as to corporate restructuring, poison pill provisions, and changes in capitalization. These proposals may require special consideration by the Stewardship Committee, depending on whether and how they are addressed in the Proxy Guidelines.

Conflicts of Interest. The Proxy Guidelines also address procedures to be used by the Stewardship Committee when there is a conflict of interest between the interests of its respective fund shareholders and those of Carillon Tower, the sub-adviser, the fund’s principal underwriter or other affiliated persons of the fund. Upon the discovery of a conflict of interest, the Chair of the Stewardship Committee will consult with the funds’ CCO to determine a resolution and, after such consultation, the Chair of the Stewardship Committee will document the issue, including how and why the proxy was voted in a particular manner. In addition, Carillon Tower will provide a quarterly report to the Board that includes information as to how each conflict was resolved.

More Information. Information regarding how proxies for the Carillon Family of Funds were voted during the most recent twelve-month period ended June 30 is available without charge, upon request by calling toll-free, 800.421.4184, visiting our website, rjinvestmentmanagement.com, or by accessing the Trust’s most recently filed report on Form N-PX on the SEC’s website at www.sec.gov. In addition, a copy of the Carillon Family of Funds Proxy Voting Guidelines is also available by calling 800.421.4184 or visiting our website, rjinvestmentmanagement.com. The guidelines will be sent within three business days of receipt of a request.

 

76


  D.

Investment Adviser and Administrator; Sub-adviser

Carillon Tower serves as the investment adviser and administrator for each fund. Carillon Tower was organized as a Florida corporation in 2014. All the capital stock of Carillon Tower is owned by RJF. RJF is a diversified financial services holding company that, through its subsidiaries, is engaged primarily in providing customers with a wide variety of financial services in connection with securities brokerage, limited partnerships, options, investment banking, asset management and related fields.

With respect to each fund, Carillon Tower is responsible for managing the funds’ investment and noninvestment affairs, subject to the direction of each fund’s Board. The Trust, on behalf of each of its series, has entered into an Investment Advisory Agreement with Carillon Tower. Under the Investment Advisory Agreement, Carillon Tower provides a continuous investment program for each fund and determines what securities and other investments will be purchased, retained, sold or loaned by each fund and what portion of such assets will be invested or held uninvested as cash. Carillon Tower also is responsible for effecting transactions for each fund and selecting brokers or dealers to execute such transactions for each fund. Carillon Tower may delegate these duties subject to Board approval, and if required by the 1940 Act, shareholder approval.

Under a separate Subadvisory Agreement, subject to the direction of Carillon Tower and the Trust’s Board, Chartwell Investment Partners, LLC (“Chartwell”) provides investment advice and portfolio management services to the funds, for a fee payable by Carillon Tower.

Chartwell provides professional portfolio managers who make all decisions concerning the investment and reinvestment of the assets of the funds in accordance with each fund’s stated investment objective and policies. Chartwell is a wholly-owned subsidiary of Carillon Tower.

The Advisory Agreement and the Subadvisory Agreement were approved by the Board (including all of the Trustees who are not “interested persons” of Carillon Tower or the sub-adviser, as defined under the 1940 Act) and by the shareholders of the applicable funds in compliance with the 1940 Act. Each Agreement provides that it will be in force for an initial two-year period and it must be approved each year thereafter by (1) a vote, cast in person at a meeting called for that purpose, of a majority of those Trustees who are not “interested persons” of Carillon Tower, the sub-adviser or the Trust, and by (2) the majority vote of either the full Board or the vote of a majority of the outstanding shares of a fund.

Each Advisory and Subadvisory Agreement automatically terminates on assignment, and each is terminable on not more than 60 days written notice by the Trust to either party. In addition, the Advisory Agreements may be terminated on not less than 60 days written notice by Carillon Tower, as applicable, to a fund and the Subadvisory Agreements may be terminated on not less than 60 days written notice by Carillon Tower as applicable, or 90 days written notice by the sub-adviser. Under the terms of the Advisory Agreement, Carillon Tower automatically becomes responsible for the obligations of the sub-adviser upon termination of the Subadvisory Agreements. In the event Carillon Tower ceases to be the investment adviser of a fund or the Distributor ceases to be principal distributor of shares of a fund, the right of a fund to use the identifying name of “Carillon” may be withdrawn.

Carillon Tower and the sub-adviser shall not be liable to any fund or any shareholder for anything done or omitted by them, except acts or omissions involving willful misfeasance, bad faith, gross negligence or reckless disregard of the duties imposed upon them by their agreements with a fund or for any losses that may be sustained in the purchase, holding or sale of any security.

 

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All of the officers of each fund are officers or directors of Carillon Tower or its affiliates. These relationships are described under “Management of the Funds.”

Advisory Fees.

For each fund, the current advisory and subadvisory fees, as applicable, are determined as follows:

 

Fund    Fee Type   Average daily net assets   Rate charged

Carillon Chartwell Income Fund

  

Investment Advisory

  $0 to $1.75 billion   0.40%
         $1.75 billion to $3.5 billion   0.38%
         Over $3.5 billion   0.36%
    

Subadvisory

  $0 to $1.75 billion   0.40%
         $1.75 billion to $3.5 billion   0.38%
         Over $3.5 billion   0.36%
              

Carillon Chartwell Mid Cap Value Fund

  

Investment Advisory

  All Assets   0.65%
    

Subadvisory

  All Assets   0.65%
              

Carillon Chartwell Short Duration Bond Fund

  

Investment Advisory

  All Assets   0.20%
    

Subadvisory

  All Assets   0.20%
              

Carillon Chartwell Short Duration High Yield Fund

  

Investment Advisory

  All Assets   0.30%
    

Subadvisory

  All Assets   0.30%
              

Carillon Chartwell Small Cap Growth Fund

  

Investment Advisory

  All Assets   0.75%
    

Subadvisory

  All Assets   0.75%
              

Carillon Chartwell Small Cap Value Fund

  

Investment Advisory

  All Assets   0.80%
    

Subadvisory

  All Assets   0.80%

 

78


Aggregate investment advisory fees paid to Carillon Tower and subadvisory fees paid by Carillon Tower to the subadvisor, as both a dollar amount and a percentage of net assets, for the period from the commencement of the funds’ operations on July 1, 2022, through the fiscal year ended December 31, 2022, are indicated in the table below.

 

      Aggregate Investment Advisory and
Subadvisory fees paid:
Fund   

07/01/22-

12/31/22

Carillon Chartwell Income Fund    Gross Advisory    $795,980
        0.18%
   (Waived)/Recovered    ($118,908)
        (0.03%)
   Net Advisory    $677,072
        0.15%
Carillon Chartwell Mid Cap Value Fund    Gross Advisory    $132,940
        0.34%
   (Waived)/Recovered    ($87,873)
        (0.22%)
   Net Advisory    $45,067
        0.12%
Carillon Chartwell Short Duration Bond Fund    Gross Advisory    $7,080
        0.11%
   (Waived)/Recovered    ($7,080)
        (0.11%)
     Net Advisory    $0
          0.00%
Carillon Chartwell Short Duration High Yield Fund    Gross Advisory    $298,294
        0.15%
   (Waived)/Recovered    ($127,119)
        (0.06%)
   Net Advisory    $171,175
          0.09%
Carillon Chartwell Small Cap Growth Fund    Gross Advisory    $73,398
        0.35%
   (Waived)/Recovered    ($73,398)
        (0.35%)
   Net Advisory    $0

 

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      Aggregate Investment Advisory and
Subadvisory fees paid:
Fund   

07/01/22-

12/31/22

          0.00%
Carillon Chartwell Small Cap Value Fund    Gross Advisory    $924,558
        0.57%
   (Waived)/Recovered    ($110,804)
        (0.07%)
   Net Advisory    $813,754
          0.50%

Carillon Tower has entered into an administration agreement with the Trust, on behalf of the funds. Under the administration agreement, Carillon Tower provides to each fund certain administrative and clerical services deemed necessary or advisable for the operation of such funds. With the exception of the funds’ Chief Compliance Officer, Carillon Tower pays all salaries, fees and expenses of Officers and Trustees of each fund who are affiliated with Carillon Tower. Carillon Tower and the Trust jointly pay the salary, fees and expenses of the funds’ Chief Compliance Officer. Further, Carillon Tower oversees the activities of the subadvisers, custodian, distributor, transfer agent and other service providers. Carillon Tower also provides office facilities, equipment, and personnel, prepares required regulatory filings, prepares Board materials and coordinates mailing of Prospectuses, notices, proxy statements and other shareholder or investor communications. The fees under the administration agreement are equal to 0.10% of the average daily net assets of a fund. Carillon Tower has entered into a sub-administration agreement with U.S. Bancorp Fund Services, LLC, doing business as U.S. Bank Global Fund Services (“Global Fund Services”). Under the sub-administration agreement, Global Fund Services provides each fund certain financial reporting and tax services.

 

80


The administrative fees paid to Carillon Tower by each fund for the period from the commencement of the funds’ operations on July 1, 2022, through the fiscal year ended December 31, 2022, are indicated in the table below.

 

      Administrative fees paid:
Fund   

07/01/22-

12/31/22

Carillon Chartwell Income Fund    Gross Admin    $198,993
   (Waived)/Recovered    $0
   Net Admin    $198,993
Carillon Chartwell Mid Cap Value Fund    Gross Admin    $20,452
   (Waived)/Recovered    $0
   Net Admin    $20,452
Carillon Chartwell Short Duration Bond Fund    Gross Admin    $3,540
   (Waived)/Recovered    ($3,540)
   Net Admin    $0
Carillon Chartwell Short Duration High Yield Fund    Gross Admin    $99,430
   (Waived)/Recovered    $0
   Net Admin    $99,430
Carillon Chartwell Small Cap Growth Fund    Gross Admin    $9,786
   (Waived)/Recovered    ($9,786)
   Net Admin    $0
Carillon Chartwell Small Cap Value Fund    Gross Admin    $78,069
   (Waived)/Recovered    $0
   Net Admin    $78,069

 

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Carillon Tower has contractually agreed to waive its investment advisory fee and/or reimburse certain expenses of the funds to the extent that annual operating expenses of each class exceed a percentage of the class’ average daily net assets. This expense limitation excludes any interest, taxes, brokerage commissions, costs relating to investments in other investment companies, dividend and interest expenses on short sales, expenses incurred in connection with any merger or reorganization, and extraordinary expenses. The contractual fee waiver can be changed only with the approval of a majority of a fund’s Board. Any reimbursement of fund expenses or reduction in Carillon Tower’s investment advisory fees is subject to reimbursement by the fund within the following two fiscal years, if overall expenses fall below the lesser of its then current expense cap or the expense cap in effect at the time of the fee reimbursement. The following table summarizes the expense caps in effect through July 1, 2024.

 

Fund   Class Chartwell

Carillon Chartwell Income Fund

  0.64%

Carillon Chartwell Mid Cap Value Fund

  0.90%

Carillon Chartwell Short Duration Bond Fund

  0.39%

Carillon Chartwell Short Duration High Yield Fund

  0.49%

Carillon Chartwell Small Cap Growth Fund

  1.05%

Carillon Chartwell Small Cap Value Fund

  1.05%

The amount of the subadvisory fee paid by Carillon Tower to Chartwell is reduced by the amount of the fees waived and/or expenses reimbursed by Carillon Tower, and Carillon Tower provides to Chartwell any recoupment that Carillon Tower receives from the funds. Carillon Tower also may receive payments from the funds’ sub-adviser for certain marketing and related expenses.

Class-Specific Expenses. Each fund may determine to allocate certain of its expenses (in addition to distribution fees) to the specific classes of a fund’s shares to which those expenses are attributable.

 

  E.

Portfolio Managers

Carillon Tower does not employ any portfolio managers for the funds. For each of the funds, Carillon Tower has delegated the responsibility for portfolio management to the sub-adviser. The sub-adviser has provided information regarding its portfolio managers.

1.    Chartwell Investment Partners, LLC

Under a separate Subadvisory Agreement, subject to the direction of Carillon Tower and the Board, Chartwell provides investment advice and portfolio management services to the funds, for a fee payable by Carillon Tower.

The Carillon Chartwell Income Fund is managed by David C. Dalrymple, CFA, T. Ryan Harkins, CFA, Andrew S. Toburen, CFA, Thomas R. Coughlin, CFA, CMT, Jeffrey D. Bilsky, John M. Hopkins, CFA and Christine F. Williams.

The Carillon Chartwell Mid Cap Value Fund and Chartwell Small Cap Value Fund are managed by David C. Dalrymple, CFA and T. Ryan Harkins, CFA.

 

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The Carillon Chartwell Short Duration Bond Fund is managed by Andrew S. Toburen, CFA; Thomas R. Coughlin, CFA, CMT; James Fox; John M. Hopkins, CFA; and Christine F. Williams.

The Carillon Chartwell Short Duration High Yield Fund is managed by Andrew S. Toburen, CFA, John M. Hopkins, CFA, and Christine F. Williams.

The Carillon Chartwell Small Cap Growth Fund is managed by Frank L. Sustersic, CFA, and Theresa H. Tran, CFA.

 

83


As of December 31, 2022, information on other accounts managed by the funds’ portfolio managers is as follows.

 

       
    

Registered

Investment Companies

 

Other Pooled

Investment Vehicles

  Other Accounts
         
Portfolio Managers  

Number of

Accounts

 

Total Assets

(in Million)

 

Number of

Accounts

 

Total Assets

(in Million)

 

Number of

Accounts

 

Total Assets

(in Billion)

Jeffrey D. Bilsky

  0   $0   1   $1.60   19   $0.48

Thomas J. Coughlin, CFA

  0   $0   2   $28.52   257   $4.71

T. Ryan Harkins, CFA

  0   $0   2   $35.30   51   $1.63

John M. Hopkins, CFA

  0   $0   1   $26.79   257   $4.71

Andrew S. Toburen, CFA

  0   $0   2   $27.72   257   $4.71

Christine F. Williams

  0   $0   1   $26.79   257   $4.71

David C. Dalrymple, CFA

  0   $0   1   $35.30   51   $1.63

Frank L. Sustersic

  2   $76.87   1   $1.47   2   $0.96

James Fox

  0   $0   1   $26.79   257   $4.71

Theresa H. Tran, CFA

  2   $76.87   0   0   2   $0.96

 

   
     Number of Accounts with Advisory Fee Based on Performance
       
    

Registered

Investment Companies

 

Other Pooled

Investment Vehicles

  Other Accounts
         
Portfolio Managers  

Number of

Accounts

 

Total Assets

(in Million)

 

Number of

Accounts

 

Total Assets

(in Million)

 

Number of

Accounts

 

Total Assets

(in Million)

Jeffrey D. Bilsky

  0   $0   0   $0   0   $0

Thomas J. Coughlin, CFA

  0   $0   0   $0   0   $0

T. Ryan Harkins, CFA

  0   $0   0   $0   0   $0

John M. Hopkins, CFA

  0   $0   0   $0   0   $0

Andrew S. Toburen, CFA

  0   $0   0   $0   0   $0

Christine F. Williams

  0   $0   0   $0   0   $0

David C. Dalrymple, CFA

  0   $0   0   $0   0   $0

Frank L. Sustersic

  0   $0   0   $0   0   $0

James Fox

  0   $0   0   $0   0   $0

Theresa H. Tran, CFA

  0   $0   0   $0   0   $0

Chartwell has adopted policies regarding material conflicts of interest and portfolio manager compensation. Specific information regarding potential conflicts of interest and the portfolio managers’ compensation follows. This information is provided as of January 1, 2022.

Material Conflicts of Interest: Actual or apparent conflicts of interest may arise when a portfolio manager has day-to-day management responsibilities with respect to more than one fund or

 

84


other account. Where conflicts of interest arise between a fund and other accounts managed by the portfolio manager, Chartwell will proceed in a manner that ensures that the fund will not be treated less favorably. There may be instances in which similar portfolio transactions may be executed for the same security for numerous accounts managed by the portfolio managers. In such instances, securities will be allocated in accordance with Chartwell’s trade allocation policy.

Compensation: The compensation paid to a Chartwell portfolio manager consists of base salary, annual bonus, ownership distributions, and an annual profit-sharing contribution to the firm’s retirement plan.

A portfolio manager’s base salary is determined by Chartwell’s Compensation Committee and is reviewed at least annually. A portfolio manager’s experience, historical performance, and role in firm or product team management are the primary considerations in determining the base salary. Industry benchmarking is utilized by the Compensation Committee on an annual basis.

Annual bonuses are determined by the Compensation Committee based on a number of factors. The primary factor is a performance-based compensation schedule that is applied to all accounts managed by a portfolio manager within a particular investment product, and is not specific to any one account. The bonus is calibrated based on the gross composite performance of such accounts for 1-year and 3-year trailing periods (where applicable) versus (1) the Bloomberg U.S. Aggregate Bond Index, ICE BofA U.S. Cash High Yield Index and the Russell 3000 Value Index for the Carillon Chartwell Income Fund, the Russell Midcap Value Index for the Carillon Chartwell Mid Cap Value Fund, the Bloomberg 1-3 Year U.S. Gov.’t/Credit Index for the Carillon Chartwell Short Duration Bond Fund, the ICE BofA 1-3 Year BB U.S. Cash Pay High Yield Index for the Carillon Chartwell Short Duration High Yield Fund, the Russell 2000 Growth Index for the Carillon Chartwell Small Cap Growth Fund, and the Russell 2000 Value Index for the Carillon Chartwell Small Cap Value Fund, and (2) peer group rankings by product category. Portfolio construction, sector and security weighting, and performance are reviewed by the Compliance Committee and Compensation Committee to prevent a manager from taking undue risks. Additional factors used to determine the annual bonus include the portfolio manager’s contribution as an analyst, product team management, and contribution to the strategic planning and development of the investment group as well as the firm. For employee retention purposes, if an individual employee’s bonus exceeds $50,000 for a given year, an amount equal to 25% of the bonus is deferred and paid 3 years after the initial pay date.

Chartwell’s investment teams participate in a revenue sharing plan and all employees participate in a 401(k) plan, which includes a matching contribution from Chartwell.

The following chart sets forth the dollar range of the portfolio managers’ ownership of the outstanding shares of the applicable Predecessor Fund as of December 31, 2022.

 

   
    

Dollar Range of Fund Shares Owned In

(None, $1-$10,000,

$10,001-$50,000, $50,001-$100,000,

$100,001-$500,000,

$500,001-$1,000,000, Over $1,000,000

         
Name of Portfolio Manager  

Carillon
Chartwell

Income
Fund

 

Carillon
Chartwell

Mid Cap

Value
Fund

 

Carillon
Chartwell

Short
Duration

High
Yield
Fund

 

Carillon
Chartwell

Short
Duration

Bond
Fund

 

Carillon
Chartwell

Small
Cap

Growth
Fund

 

Carillon
Chartwell

Small
Cap

Value
Fund

Jeffrey D. Bilsky

  None   None   None   None   None   None

 

85


   
    

Dollar Range of Fund Shares Owned In

(None, $1-$10,000,

$10,001-$50,000, $50,001-$100,000,

$100,001-$500,000,

$500,001-$1,000,000, Over $1,000,000

         
Name of Portfolio Manager  

Carillon
Chartwell

Income
Fund

 

Carillon
Chartwell

Mid Cap

Value
Fund

 

Carillon
Chartwell

Short
Duration

High
Yield
Fund

 

Carillon
Chartwell

Short
Duration

Bond
Fund

 

Carillon
Chartwell

Small Cap

Growth
Fund

 

Carillon
Chartwell

Small Cap

Value
Fund

Thomas J. Coughlin, CFA

  None   None   None   None   None   None

T. Ryan Harkins, CFA

  $100,001-
$500,000
  $500,001-
$1,000,000
  None   None   None   $500,001-
$1,000,000

John M. Hopkins, CFA

  None   None   $500,001-
$1,000,000
  None   None