Hartford Active ETFs
Annual Report
July 31, 2022
Hartford Core Bond ETF
Hartford Large Cap Growth ETF
Hartford Municipal Opportunities ETF
Hartford Schroders Commodity Strategy ETF
Hartford Schroders ESG US Equity ETF
Hartford Schroders Tax-Aware Bond ETF
Hartford Short Duration ETF
Hartford Sustainable Income ETF
Hartford Total Return Bond ETF


A MESSAGE FROM THE PRESIDENT
Dear Shareholders:
Thank you for investing in Hartford Exchange-Traded Funds. The following is the Funds’ Annual Report covering the period from August 1, 2021 to July 31, 2022.
Market Review
During the 12 months ended July 31, 2022, U.S. stocks, as measured by the S&P 500 Index,1 lost 4.64%. The overall negative returns for the period might have served as a somber bookend to a tumultuous 12 months of record highs and bear-market lows were it not for the July 2022 equity rally that saw the Index deliver its best single-month performance since 2020, a 9.1% gain.
The market’s volatility came against the backdrop of the U.S. Federal Reserve’s (Fed) ongoing efforts to combat the persistent inflation that first appeared in mid-2021 shortly before the start of the Funds’ 2022 fiscal year. In the months that followed, the Consumer Price Index (CPI)2 rose steadily, peaking at a 9.1% annual rate in June 2022, the highest seen in 40 years, before falling back to 8.5% in July.
As the period began, U.S. consumers and businesses were navigating a completely different economic environment. Stocks had been regularly hitting record highs. The U.S. government was pouring billions of stimulus dollars into consumer pocketbooks. The Fed was steadfastly maintaining interest rates near zero and pumping large amounts of liquidity into an economy that had been badly damaged by the COVID-19 pandemic that began in early 2020.
As inflation numbers steadily worsened, Fed policymakers acknowledged that higher prices wouldn’t be as transitory as they’d hoped. And so, in March 2022, the Fed kicked off a vigorous anti-inflation campaign with a quarter-percent increase in the federal funds rate. In reaction to a surprise 8.6% CPI increase in May 2022, the Fed used its June meeting to raise rates by three-quarters of a percent the largest since 1994.
By the end of the period, analysts and investors were debating whether the Fed’s anti-inflation moves might spark a recession. The signals were decidedly mixed. Second-quarter GDP declined by 0.2% following a first-quarter decline of 0.4%, which some analysts cited as evidence that a recession may have already begun. On the other hand, U.S. unemployment for July 2022 ticked down to a pre-pandemic low of 3.5% while hiring for the month surged to 528,000 new jobs.
Any review of the period would be incomplete without noting the impact of the February 24, 2022 invasion of Ukraine by Russia’s armed forces, a decision that continues to threaten global security and strain worldwide food and energy supplies. Western sanctions against Russia have caused European economies to struggle in the face of curtailed natural gas supplies. Global growth has been further dampened by China’s zero-COVID-19 policy, as lockdowns in China have caused widespread economic and trade disruption.
Going forward, investors may be looking for signs of easing inflation, changes in Fed policy, U.S. midterm election results, and potential geopolitical surprises all of which could impact investments. Nowadays, it’s more important than ever to maintain a strong relationship with your financial professional.
Thank you again for investing in Hartford Exchange-Traded Funds. For the most up-to-date information on our funds, please take advantage of all the resources available at hartfordfunds.com.
James Davey
President
Hartford Funds
1 S&P 500 Index is a market capitalization-weighted price index composed of 500 widely held common stocks. The index is unmanaged and not available for direct investment. Past performance does not guarantee future results.
2 The Consumer Price Index is defined by the Bureau of Labor Statistics as a measure of the average change over time in the prices paid by urban consumers for a market basket of consumer goods and services.


Hartford Active ETFs
Table of Contents
Fund Overview (Unaudited) 2
Benchmark Glossary (Unaudited) 31
Expense Examples (Unaudited) 32
Financial Statements:  
Schedules of Investments:  
Hartford Core Bond ETF 33
Hartford Large Cap Growth ETF 45
Hartford Municipal Opportunities ETF 47
Hartford Schroders Commodity Strategy ETF (Consolidated) 54
Hartford Schroders ESG US Equity ETF 56
Hartford Schroders Tax-Aware Bond ETF 59
Hartford Short Duration ETF 63
Hartford Sustainable Income ETF 72
Hartford Total Return Bond ETF 81
Glossary 101
Statements of Assets and Liabilities 102
Statements of Operations 104
Statements of Changes in Net Assets 106
Financial Highlights 111
Notes to Financial Statements 114
Report of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm 139
Operation of the Liquidity Risk Management Program (Unaudited) 140
Trustees and Officers (Unaudited) 141
How to Obtain a Copy of each Fund’s Proxy Voting Policies and Voting Records (Unaudited) 144
Quarterly Portfolio Holdings Information (Unaudited) 144
The views expressed in each Fund’s Manager Discussion contained in the Fund Overview section are views of that Fund’s sub-adviser and sub-sub-adviser, as applicable, and portfolio management team through the end of the period and are subject to change based on market and other conditions. Each Fund’s Manager Discussion is for informational purposes only and does not represent an offer, recommendation or solicitation to buy, hold or sell any security. The specific securities identified and described, if any, do not represent all of the securities purchased or sold and you should not assume that investments in the securities identified and discussed will be profitable.


Table of Contents
Hartford Core Bond ETF
 Fund Overview
 July 31, 2022 (Unaudited) 

Inception 02/19/2020
Sub-advised by Wellington Management Company LLP
Investment objective – The Fund seeks to provide long-term total return.
Comparison of Change in Value of $10,000 Investment (02/19/2020 - 07/31/2022)
The chart above represents the hypothetical growth of a $10,000 investment in the Fund.
Average Annual Total Returns
for the Periods Ended 07/31/2022
  1 Year Since
Inception1
Core Bond ETF (NAV Return) -10.14% -1.86%
Core Bond ETF (Market Price Return) -10.42% -1.94%
Bloomberg US Aggregate Bond Index -9.12% -1.94%
    
1 Inception: 02/19/2020
Information regarding how often shares of the Fund traded on Cboe BZX at a price above (i.e., at a premium) or below (i.e., at a discount) the NAV of the Fund can be found at hartfordfunds.com.
PERFORMANCE DATA QUOTED REPRESENTS PAST PERFORMANCE AND DOES NOT GUARANTEE FUTURE RESULTS. The investment return and principal value of the investment will fluctuate so that investors’ shares, when redeemed or sold, may be worth more or less than their original cost. The chart and table do not reflect the deductions of taxes that a shareholder would pay on Fund distributions or the redemption or sale of Fund shares. Current performance may be lower or higher than the performance data quoted. To obtain performance data current to the most recent month-end, please visit our website hartfordfunds.com.
Total returns for the report period presented in the table may differ from the return in the Financial Highlights. The total return presented in the Financial Highlights section of the report is calculated in the same manner, but also takes into account certain adjustments that are necessary under generally accepted accounting principles.
ETF shares are bought and sold at market price, not net asset value (NAV). Total returns are calculated using the daily 4:00 p.m. Eastern Time NAV. Market price returns reflect the midpoint of the bid/ask spread as of the close of trading on the exchange where Fund shares are listed. Market price returns do not represent the returns an investor would receive if they traded shares at other times. Brokerage commissions apply and will reduce returns.
The index is unmanaged, and its results include reinvested dividends and/or distributions, but do not reflect the effect of sales charges, commissions, expenses or taxes.
You cannot invest directly in an index.
See “Benchmark Glossary” for benchmark descriptions.
The total annual fund operating expense ratio as shown in the Fund’s most recent prospectus was 0.29%. Actual expenses may be higher or lower. Please see the accompanying Financial Highlights for expense ratios for the year ended 07/31/2022.
 

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Table of Contents
Hartford Core Bond ETF
 Fund Overview – (continued)
 July 31, 2022 (Unaudited) 

Portfolio Managers
Joseph F. Marvan, CFA
Senior Managing Director and Fixed Income Portfolio Manager
Wellington Management Company LLP
Campe Goodman, CFA
Senior Managing Director and Fixed Income Portfolio Manager
Wellington Management Company LLP
Robert D. Burn, CFA
Managing Director and Fixed Income Portfolio Manager
Wellington Management Company LLP


Manager Discussion
How did the Fund perform during the period?
Hartford Core Bond ETF returned -10.14% based on net asset value for the one-year period ended July 31, 2022, underperforming its benchmark, the Bloomberg US Aggregate Bond Index, which returned -9.12% for the same period. The Fund underperformed the -9.77 average return of the Lipper Core Bond Funds peer group, a group of funds with investment strategies similar to those of the Fund.
Why did the Fund perform this way?
United States (US) fixed income markets generated negative returns during the trailing one-year period ended July 31, 2022. The Bloomberg US Aggregate Bond Index generated a return of -9.12% during the period. Global sovereign yields moved sharply higher over the same period as most major central banks reacted to high inflation data with more aggressive interest rate hike cycles. Most fixed income spread sectors underperformed government bonds amid increasing concerns that higher interest rates and the resulting tighter financial conditions could tip the global economy into recession.
Global fixed income sectors cemented their worst ever start to a calendar year during the first half 2022, following sharply negative returns during the second quarter of 2022. Inflation pressures remained acute, though commodity prices declined sharply late in the period to provide some relief. U.S. labor market strength persisted over this period, while housing market resilience was tested by surging mortgage rates, lack of inventory, and home price appreciation. Investment-grade corporate spreads widened by 0.58% while high-yield corporate spreads widened by 1.75%, according to Bloomberg Index data.
Within the G10, select central banks including the US Federal Reserve (Fed), the Reserve Bank of Australia (RBA), and the Riksbank significantly raised interest rates. The European Central Bank (ECB) announced its plan to end quantitative easing and start hiking interest rates from July 2022, with President Lagarde suggesting a larger hike would be appropriate in September, if inflation pressures persisted. Emerging market central banks, particularly across Latin America and Central and Eastern Europe Middle East and Africa (CEEMEA), also continued lifting their policy rates in bigger increments, while Asian central banks raised rates more modestly than other emerging market regions. The Bank of Japan (BOJ) and the People’s Bank of China
(PBOC) were the notable exceptions in terms of retaining accommodative policy. Disruptions emanating from COVID-19 related mobility restrictions sharply weakened Chinese economic activity data while inflation remained much more muted in Japan compared to the rest of the world.
Global gross domestic product (GDP) growth largely continued to recover during the first part of the period ended July, 31 2022. By the end of the period, global GDP growth exhibited some divergence, with notable GDP contractions in the US and Japan. After the surprise invasion of Ukraine, sanctions imposed on Russia by the West led to retaliatory measures from Moscow, including restrictions in gas supplies to parts of Europe, raising concerns about Europe’s energy security. By the end of the period, global growth had slowed moderately, driven by tightening financial conditions. Inflation continued to surprise on the upside and most major central banks vowed to increase interest rates more aggressively.
Over the same period, the U.S. dollar rallied strongly versus most currencies, as it became increasingly clear that the Fed would likely tighten policy more aggressively to counter persistently high inflation in the U.S. By the end of the period, the Japanese yen declined to its weakest level since 1998, as the BOJ remained the outlier among major G10 central banks in not tightening policy. Higher-beta commodity-linked currencies across developing markets and emerging markets (South African rand, Norwegian krone, New Zealand dollar, Brazilian real) were the other major underperformers as recession concerns came to the forefront by the end of the period. European currencies generally ended lower versus the U.S. dollar. Absolute and excess returns were negative across fixed income sectors over the same period. On an excess return basis, select securitized sectors were among the best performers.
The Fund’s allocation to securitized sectors, particularly non-agency residential mortgage-backed securities (RMBS), was the primary driver of underperformance relative to the Bloomberg U.S. Aggregate Bond Index (the “Index”) as spreads widened over most of the period in sync with other corporate credit markets. Other securitized exposures including commercial mortgage-backed securities (CMBS), collateralized loan obligations (CLOs), and asset-backed securities (ABS) also detracted from relative performance. The Fund’s allocation to Treasury Inflation Protected Securities (TIPS) had a positive impact on the Fund’s performance relative to the Index as inflation
 

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Table of Contents
Hartford Core Bond ETF
 Fund Overview – (continued)
 July 31, 2022 (Unaudited) 

expectations rose during the period. An overweight to agency mortgage-backed securities (MBS) pass-throughs had a muted impact on the Fund’s relative performance. The Fund held tactical interest rate positions during the period, including interest rate futures and swaps, which detracted from performance relative to the Index. The Fund’s investment-grade credit positioning had an overall negative impact on relative performance during the period on account of positioning within both corporate and non-corporate credit.
What is the outlook as of the end of the period?
The Fund maintained a close to neutral risk posture and are preserving cash/liquidity as of the end of the period. We believe inflation has been slow to respond to policy, and believe a higher terminal rate may be required to cyclically reduce labor demand enough to moderate inflation risks. The Fund ended the period with a modest overweight to investment-grade credit, as we sought to identify what we considered to be inefficiencies in the pricing of risk. The Fund also ended the period with an overweight to agency pass-throughs, focusing on what we believed were relative value opportunities and income. The Fund also held structured finance tied to residential mortgages, high quality CLOs, and senior CMBS tranches with what we considered to be attractive collateral at the end of the period.
Important Risks
Investing involves risk, including the possible loss of principal. The net asset value (NAV) of the Fund's shares may fluctuate due to changes in the market value of the Fund's holdings, which may in-turn fluctuate due to market and economic conditions. The Fund's share price may fluctuate due to changes in the relative supply of and demand for the shares on an exchange. The Fund may allocate a portion of its assets to specialist portfolio managers, which may not work as intended. • Fixed income security risks include credit, liquidity, call, duration, event, and interest-rate risk. As interest rates rise, bond prices generally fall. • Derivatives are generally more volatile and sensitive to changes in market or economic conditions than other securities; their risks include currency, leverage, liquidity, index, pricing, and counterparty risk. • Foreign investments may be more volatile and less liquid than U.S. investments and are subject to the risk of currency fluctuations and adverse political and economic developments. • The risks associated with mortgage-related and asset-backed securities as well as collateralized loan obligations (CLOs) include credit, interest-rate, prepayment, liquidity, default and extension risk. • The purchase of securities in the To-Be-Announced (TBA) market can result in higher portfolio turnover and related expenses as well as price and counterparty risk. • Restricted securities may be more difficult to sell and price than other securities. • Obligations of U.S. Government agencies are supported by varying degrees of credit but are generally not backed by the full faith and credit of the U.S. Government. • In certain instances, unlike other ETFs, the Fund may effect creations and redemptions partly or wholly for cash, rather than in-kind, which may make the Fund less tax-efficient and incur more fees than an ETF that primarily or wholly effects creations and redemptions in-kind.
Composition by Security Type(1)
as of 07/31/2022
Category Percentage of
Net Assets
Fixed Income Securities  
Asset & Commercial Mortgage-Backed Securities 21.9%
Corporate Bonds 30.5
Foreign Government Obligations 2.5
Municipal Bonds 0.7
U.S. Government Agencies(2) 35.2
U.S. Government Securities 36.9
Total 127.7%
Short-Term Investments 0.5
Other Assets & Liabilities (28.2)
Total 100.0%
    
(1) For Fund compliance purposes, the Fund may not use the same classification system. These classifications are used for financial reporting purposes.
(2) All, or a portion of the securities categorized as U.S. Government Agencies, were agency mortgage-backed securities as of July 31, 2022.

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Table of Contents
Hartford Large Cap Growth ETF
 Fund Overview
 July 31, 2022 (Unaudited) 

Inception 11/09/2021
Sub-advised by Wellington Management Company LLP
Investment objective – The Fund seeks capital appreciation.
Comparison of Change in Value of $10,000 Investment (11/09/2021 - 07/31/2022)
The chart above represents the hypothetical growth of a $10,000 investment in the Fund.
Cumulative Total Returns
for the Period Ended 07/31/2022
  Since
Inception1
Large Cap Growth ETF (NAV Return) -35.25%
Large Cap Growth ETF (Market Price Return) -35.20%
Russell 1000 Growth Index -18.90%
    
1 Inception: 11/09/2021
Information regarding how often shares of the Fund traded on Cboe BZX at a price above (i.e., at a premium) or below (i.e., at a discount) the NAV of the Fund can be found at hartfordfunds.com.
PERFORMANCE DATA QUOTED REPRESENTS PAST PERFORMANCE AND DOES NOT GUARANTEE FUTURE RESULTS. The investment return and principal value of the investment will fluctuate so that investors’ shares, when redeemed or sold, may be worth more or less than their original cost. The chart and table do not reflect the deductions of taxes that a shareholder would pay on Fund distributions or the redemption or sale of Fund shares. Current performance may be lower or higher than the performance data quoted. To obtain performance data current to the most recent month-end, please visit our website hartfordfunds.com.
Total returns for the report period presented in the table may differ from the return in the Financial Highlights. The total return presented in the Financial Highlights section of the report is calculated in the same manner, but also takes into account certain adjustments that are necessary under generally accepted accounting principles.
ETF shares are bought and sold at market price, not net asset value (NAV). Total returns are calculated using the daily 4:00 p.m. Eastern Time NAV. Market price returns reflect the midpoint of the bid/ask spread as of the close of trading on the exchange where Fund shares are listed. Market price returns do not represent the returns an investor would receive if they traded shares at other times. Brokerage commissions apply and will reduce returns.
The index is unmanaged, and its results include reinvested dividends and/or distributions, but do not reflect the effect of sales charges, commissions, expenses or taxes.
You cannot invest directly in an index.
See “Benchmark Glossary” for benchmark descriptions.
The total annual fund operating expense ratio as shown in the Fund’s most recent prospectus was 0.59%. Actual expenses may be higher or lower. Please see the accompanying Financial Highlights for expense ratios for the period ended 07/31/2022
 

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Table of Contents
Hartford Large Cap Growth ETF
 Fund Overview – (continued)
 July 31, 2022 (Unaudited) 

Portfolio Managers
Stephen Mortimer
Senior Managing Director and Equity Portfolio Manager
Wellington Management Company LLP
Mario E. Abularach, CFA, CMT
Senior Managing Director and Equity Research Analyst
Wellington Management Company LLP


Manager Discussion
How did the Fund perform during the period?
Hartford Large Cap Growth ETF returned -35.25% based on net asset value for the period from November 9, 2021 (the Fund’s inception date) through July 31, 2022, underperforming its benchmark, the Russell 1000 Growth Index (the “Index”), which returned -18.90% for the same period. For the same period, the Fund underperformed the -23.76% average return of the Lipper Large-Cap Growth Funds peer group, a group of funds with investment strategies similar to those of the Fund.
Why did the Fund perform this way?
United States (U.S.) equities, as measured by the S&P 500 Index, posted negative returns over the period from November 9, 2021 through July 31, 2022. Stocks rallied early in November 2021 amid strong economic data, the passage of a bipartisan infrastructure package, and robust equity inflows. However, risk sentiment waned on inflation fears and concerns about worsening COVID-19 trends and the Omicron variant. Equities rallied in December as strong equity inflows, depressed real yields, several more months of balance sheet expansion by the Federal Reserve (Fed), and potentially less-severe economic impacts from the Omicron variant outweighed challenges posed by central bank policy shifts, ongoing supply-chain problems, and inflation pressures. Markets registered their first quarterly loss since March 2020 in the first quarter of 2022. Fears about the economic implications of Russia’s large-scale military invasion of Ukraine and the prospect of aggressive monetary policy tightening by the Fed drove the S&P 500 Index into correction territory in February 2022. However, stocks rebounded sharply in March 2022 amid Fed Chair Jerome Powell’s assessment that the U.S. economy is strong enough to withstand higher interest rates without slipping into recession. U.S. equities fell sharply during a volatile second quarter of 2022. High inflation and tighter financial conditions negatively affected risk sentiment and increased the consensus view of the probability of recession. Growth stocks significantly underperformed their value counterparts as surging Treasury yields and disappointing earnings results from some of the largest technology companies drove the Nasdaq Composite Index to its largest quarterly loss since September 2001. Rapidly rising prices for food and energy pushed consumer inflation to its highest level in more than four decades. The Fed responded to the larger-than-expected increase in prices by accelerating its pace of interest-rate increases to 0.75% in June 2022, following a 0.50% increase in May 2022. In July 2022, U.S. equities registered their largest monthly gain since November 2020. Despite concerns about aggressive monetary policy tightening, slowing
economic growth, and recession, stocks advanced amid mostly better-than-expected corporate earnings and a decline in medium- and longer-term inflation expectations.
Eight of the 11 sectors in the Russell 1000 Growth Index declined during the period, with the Communication Services (-37%), Consumer Discretionary (-24%), and Financials (-20%) sectors performing the worst. Conversely, the Energy (+34%) and Utilities (+14%) sectors performed the best during the period.
Security selection detracted from the Fund’s performance relative to the Index during the period, with weak selection in the Information Technology, Healthcare and Communication Services sectors, which was partially offset by strong selection within the Materials and Consumer Staples sectors. Sector allocation, a result of the Fund’s bottom-up stock selection process, also detracted from relative performance during the period, due to an overweight to the Communication Services sector and an underweight to the Consumer Staples sector. This was partially offset by the positive impact of an overweight to the Healthcare sector and an underweight to the Industrials sector , which contributed positively to performance.
Top contributors to performance relative to the Index during the period included Netflix (Communication Services), Mastercard (Information Technology), and PayPal (Information Technology). The Fund did not own Netflix for the majority of the period, which benefited the portfolio during the period. Shares of Netflix declined after fourth-quarter subscriber growth fell short of guidance. Shares fell further after the company announced first-quarter earnings where it saw a loss of 200,000 subscribers, the first time the company had lost subscribers since 2011. Shares of Mastercard rose over the period. The company benefited from a strong recovery in overall consumer spending and a large recovery in cross-border travel. Mastercard has also benefited from an inflationary environment as it takes a cut of overall transaction spending. The Fund’s lack of exposure to PayPal contributed positively to performance. Shares of PayPal fell during the period after the payments company provided weak first-quarter and full year 2022 guidance that it attributed in part to inflation weighing on consumer spending and supply chain issues impacting cross-border payments.
Top relative detractors from performance during the period included Apple (Information Technology), Snap (Communication Services), and Spotify Technology (Communication Services). The Fund’s lack of exposure to Apple detracted from performance. The company reported record revenue for the fiscal third quarter of 2022 (which ended June 30, 2022). The company confirmed strong demand for iPhones, and experienced record services revenue while admitting it
 

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Table of Contents
Hartford Large Cap Growth ETF
 Fund Overview – (continued)
 July 31, 2022 (Unaudited) 

could not make enough Macs or iPads to meet demand. Shares of Snap fell during the period after the company announced weak guidance for the second quarter of 2022. Amid concerns of slowing consumer spending and difficulty procuring enough supply to meet the current demand, many companies are reducing their digital advertising spending, which has negatively impacted Snap’s revenues. Shares of Spotify fell during the period after the streaming music service reported first-quarter forecasts for user growth that fell short of consensus expectations. Management blamed the forecast on its strong end to 2021, adding 25 million users in the fourth quarter of 2021. Also weighing on shares was the controversy involving podcast host Joe Rogan, whom users and artists have said is spreading misinformation about COVID-19 vaccines.
Derivatives were not used in the Fund during the period and, therefore, did not have any impact on performance during the period.
What is the outlook as of the end of the period?
We believe market uncertainty will remain high until we get more clarity around inflation, monetary policy, energy security, and the trajectory of earnings. Timing of the recovery in growth equities is difficult to predict, but as we’ve seen in prior drawdowns like the Great Financial Crisis (GFC), stock prices of higher growth, quality companies generally bottom prior to clarity on the economic path forward. We want to ensure that the Fund is invested in what we consider to be the most attractive stocks today to take advantage of that eventual rally while recognizing that there may be a more sustained regime change in the market. As of the end of the period, the Fund also added marginal exposure to some areas of the market that it has not recently been exposed to. At the end of the period, the Fund’s largest overweights were in the Communication Services and Healthcare sectors. The Fund was most underweight to the Information Technology and Consumer Staples sectors.
Important Risks
The Fund is new and has a limited operating history. Investing involves risk, including the possible loss of principal. Security prices fluctuate in value depending on general market and economic conditions and the prospects of individual companies. The net asset value (NAV) of the Fund's shares may fluctuate due to changes in the market value of the Fund's holdings. The Fund's share price may fluctuate due to changes in the relative supply of and demand for the shares on an exchange. • Different investment styles may go in and out of favor, which may cause the Fund to underperform the broader stock market. • To the extent the Fund focuses on one or more sectors, the Fund may be subject to increased volatility and risk of loss if adverse developments occur. • The Fund may have high portfolio turnover, which could increase its transaction costs and an investor's tax liability. • In certain instances, unlike other ETFs, the Fund may effect creations and redemptions partly or wholly for cash, rather than in-kind, which may make the Fund less tax-efficient and incur more fees than an ETF that primarily or wholly effects creations and redemptions in-kind. • Foreign investments may be more volatile and less liquid than U.S. investments and are subject to the risk of currency fluctuations and adverse political, economic and regulatory developments. • The Fund may have a limited number of financial institutions that act as authorized participants, none of which are obligated to engage in creation and/or redemption transactions.
Composition by Sector(1)
as of 07/31/2022
Sector Percentage
of Net Assets
Equity Securities  
Communication Services 17.1%
Consumer Discretionary 20.5
Consumer Staples 1.0
Energy 1.5
Financials 2.3
Health Care 15.4
Industrials 4.5
Information Technology 32.8
Materials 2.6
Real Estate 1.1
Total 98.8%
Short-Term Investments 1.0
Other Assets & Liabilities 0.2
Total 100.0%
    
(1) A sector may be comprised of several industries. For Fund compliance purposes, the Fund may not use the same classification system. These sector classifications are used for financial reporting purposes.

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Table of Contents
Hartford Municipal Opportunities ETF
 Fund Overview
 July 31, 2022 (Unaudited) 

Inception 12/13/2017
Sub-advised by Wellington Management Company LLP
Investment objective – The Fund seeks to provide current income that is generally exempt from federal income taxes and long-term total return.
Comparison of Change in Value of $10,000 Investment (12/13/2017 - 07/31/2022)
The chart above represents the hypothetical growth of a $10,000 investment in the Fund.
Average Annual Total Returns
for the Periods Ended 07/31/2022
  1 Year Since
Inception1
Municipal Opportunities ETF (NAV Return) -6.80% 2.19%
Municipal Opportunities ETF (Market Price Return) -6.83% 2.18%
Bloomberg Municipal Bond 1-15 Year Blend (1-17) Index -5.14% 1.85%
    
1 Inception: 12/13/2017
Information regarding how often shares of the Fund traded on NYSE Arca at a price above (i.e., at a premium) or below (i.e., at a discount) the NAV of the Fund can be found at hartfordfunds.com.
PERFORMANCE DATA QUOTED REPRESENTS PAST PERFORMANCE AND DOES NOT GUARANTEE FUTURE RESULTS. The investment return and principal value of the investment will fluctuate so that investors’ shares, when redeemed or sold, may be worth more or less than their original cost. The chart and table do not reflect the deductions of taxes that a shareholder would pay on Fund distributions or the redemption or sale of Fund shares. Current performance may be lower or higher than the performance data quoted. To obtain performance data current to the most recent month-end, please visit our website hartfordfunds.com.
Total returns for the report period presented in the table may differ from the return in the Financial Highlights. The total return presented in the Financial Highlights section of the report is calculated in the same manner, but also takes into account certain adjustments that are necessary under generally accepted accounting principles.
ETF shares are bought and sold at market price, not net asset value (NAV). Total returns are calculated using the daily 4:00 p.m. Eastern Time NAV. Market price returns reflect the midpoint of the bid/ask spread as of the close of trading on the exchange where Fund shares are listed. Market price returns do not represent the returns an investor would receive if they traded shares at other times. Brokerage commissions apply and will reduce returns.
The index is unmanaged, and its results include reinvested dividends and/or distributions, but do not reflect the effect of sales charges, commissions, expenses or taxes.
You cannot invest directly in an index.
See “Benchmark Glossary” for benchmark descriptions.
The total annual fund operating expense ratio as shown in the Fund’s most recent prospectus was 0.29%. Actual expenses may be higher or lower. Please see the accompanying Financial Highlights for expense ratios for the year ended 07/31/2022.
 

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Table of Contents
Hartford Municipal Opportunities ETF
 Fund Overview – (continued)
 July 31, 2022 (Unaudited) 

Portfolio Managers
Timothy D. Haney, CFA
Senior Managing Director and Fixed Income Portfolio Manager
Wellington Management Company LLP
Brad W. Libby
Managing Director and Fixed Income Portfolio Manager/Credit Analyst
Wellington Management Company LLP


Manager Discussion
How did the Fund perform during the period?
Hartford Municipal Opportunities ETF returned -6.80%, based on net asset value, for the period ended July 31, 2022, underperforming its benchmark, the Bloomberg Municipal Bond 1-15 Year Blend (1-17) Index, which returned -5.14% for the same period. The Fund also underperformed the -6.26% average return of the Lipper Intermediate Municipal Debt Funds peer group, a group of funds with investment strategies similar to those of the Fund.
Why did the Fund perform this way?
Over the one-year period ended July 31, 2022, United States (U.S.) fixed income markets generated negative total returns driven by increases in government bond yields, which results from the Federal Reserve’s (Fed’s) decision in the first half of 2022 to raise interest rates in response to rising inflation expectations. Additionally, credit spread sectors underperformed duration-equivalent U.S. Treasuries, virtually across the board with corporate, non-corporate and securitized debt all underperforming Treasuries. Generally speaking, lower quality debt underperformed higher quality debt as well given investors’ increasing preference for less risky investments. Widening credit spreads during the period were driven primarily by expectations that tighter financial conditions could push the U.S. economy into a recession, and to a lesser extent, by uncertainty arising from the Russia/Ukraine war.
Against this backdrop, tax-exempt municipal bonds, as measured by the Bloomberg Municipal Bond 1-15 Year Blend (1-17) Index, posted a negative total return of -5.14% for the one-year period, underperforming duration-equivalent Treasuries. The yield on 10-year AAA rated general obligation municipal bonds (GOs) increased during the period, as did yields on the 10-year US Treasury. The ratio of yields on 10-year AAA rated GOs to yields on 10-year Treasuries increased over the period from 66.1% to 83.1%.
The primary driver of the Fund’s underperformance relative to the Bloomberg Municipal Bond 1-15 Year Blend (1-17) Index (the “Index”) was the Fund’s duration/yield curve positioning. The Fund maintained an overweight duration stance during the period, which detracted from relative performance as yields increased sharply across the yield curve during the period.
Security selection within investment-grade municipals also detracted from performance relative to the Index. The primary driver of relative performance within investment-grade municipals was security selection within revenue bonds. In particular, selection within housing,
transportation and education sectors detracted from performance relative to the Index while security selection within the industrial development and tobacco sectors partially offset negative performance relative to the Index. Security selection within, and an underweight to investment-grade GO bonds as well as the Fund’s out-of-benchmark allocation to high-yield municipals also detracted from relative performance.
Derivatives were not used in the Fund during the period and, therefore, did not have any impact on performance during the period.
What is the outlook as of the end of the period?
We believe fundamentals are broadly positive based on a bounce-back in economic activity and generous direct and indirect Federal government support. Many municipal sectors have natural outlets for inflationary pressures, but we expect the more labor constrained sectors to be more challenged. Valuations now offer a more attractive entry point in our opinion, especially for investment-grade municipals. We expect municipals to behave defensively in a general market downturn given their high quality. Municipal bonds' taxable equivalent yields are better on average than similar rated corporate bonds at longer maturities. Mutual fund outflows have been elevated amid elevated market volatility and the rising interest rate environment. We expect higher interest rates to drive an increase in bond issuance within the tax-exempt market compared to the taxable market.
In our view, state governments are well positioned to maintain stable credit quality over the next 12 months due to a combination of strong reserve positions, continued personal income growth, and adequate but likely slower revenue performance. In aggregate, state budgets for fiscal year 2023 are increasing about 4%, which follows historic 13.6% spending growth in 2022 (7% inflation adjusted), as revenues significantly outperformed projections and states spent federal recovery funds. According to the National Association of State Budget Directors, Fiscal Survey of States Spring 2022, many states have used excess funds for one-time uses, including to bolster their rainy-day accounts, with the median balance as a share of general fund spending projected to be 11.6% at the end of 2022, a record high.
Within local governments, generally solid reserve levels and a heavy reliance on property taxes will likely continue to provide revenue stability for the sector. We believe that a strong labor market will continue to support local economies and budgets supported by sales taxes, although the rate of sales tax growth is likely to slow following very strong performance in fiscal year 2021. The extent of fixed cost
 

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Table of Contents
Hartford Municipal Opportunities ETF
 Fund Overview – (continued)
 July 31, 2022 (Unaudited) 

burdens will likely remain an important credit driver in the sector and we expect a willingness to fully fund pension obligations to continue to be a credit differentiator.
Within the health-care sector, we believe operating cash flow will underperform pre-COVID -19 levels through the next 12-18 months, pressured by labor and inflationary costs that continue to outpace revenue growth and otherwise high demand for health care services. We expect that health care providers will remain focused on staffing retention and recruitment, overall cost reduction, and careful capital spending to allow for incremental relief through the period. Despite investment market decline, we believe that unrestricted cash reserves remain a healthy cushion for most providers and in excess of 2019 levels. we believe that merger and acquisition activity within the healthcare sector is likely to accelerate as providers look for deeper synergies and cost savings – those in non-contiguous states most likely to be successful. We expect rating agencies to lean more toward negative outlooks and downgrades for those providers with weak operating performance and limited cash cushion due to sector headwinds.
Within the lifecare sector, occupancy and revenues remain low compared to pre-pandemic levels; The omicron COVID-19 variant presents added challenges to sales and marketing. Escalating labor and supply costs have driven higher fee increases, which has been supported by strong housing markets for most credits. Liquidity held stable for most facilities as a result of stimulus funding and Paycheck Protection Program receipts in 2020, and investment returns in 2021 despite weak operating cash flows. We expect continued balance sheet pressure in the remaining months of 2022 without external support.
Within the transportation sector, airline passenger recovery has occurred much faster than anticipated, reaching 90% of pre-pandemic levels. Airports have received $20 billion in stimulus funds which covers more than all of the losses that have occurred at the vast majority of facilities. The Airport financing model has proved to be resilient throughout this pandemic given the rate setting flexibility, strong liquidity and federal/state/local support. Toll road recovery has been much quicker than anticipated, as a full return to pre-pandemic levels is now expected in 2022 as opposed to 2024. Ports have minimum annual guarantees that cover operations and debt service regardless of the volume of throughput at their facilities.
The special tax sector continues to be supported by what we consider to be adequate debt service coverage and debt service reserve funds, providing a much-needed cushion should pledged revenues soften.
Within the public power sector, issuers continue to benefit from unfettered rate setting flexibility, generally affordable rates, and a high level of essentiality. Therefore, the credit quality of the sector is expected to hold up well despite the recent increase in power prices.
Within the higher education sector, credit profiles across private and public universities are generally stable, but endowments have given back some of the outsized gains of 2021. Enrollment declines are moderating, especially at private, not for profit universities. Applications for the class of 2026 are hitting all-time highs and revenues should recover as return to campus drives auxiliary revenue
growth. We expect universities to continue to face tuition pressure, but COVID-19 disruptions have provided many with the will and/or political ability to make headway on expense rationalization.
At the sector level, the Fund was overweight tax-exempt municipal revenue bonds at the end of the period, particularly those in the health care, housing and transportation sectors. The Fund continued to hold an out-of-benchmark allocation to tax-exempt high yield bonds at the end of the period. The Fund was underweight tax-exempt pre-refunded and general obligation debt in favor of revenue and high-yield debt at the end of the period.
Important Risks
Investing involves risk, including the possible loss of principal. The net asset value (NAV) of the Fund’s shares may fluctuate due to changes in the market value of the Fund’s holdings which may in-turn fluctuate due to market and economic conditions. The Fund’s share price may fluctuate due to changes in the relative supply of and demand for the shares on an exchange. • Municipal securities may be adversely impacted by state/local, political, economic, or market conditions. Investors may be subject to the federal Alternative Minimum Tax as well as state and local income taxes. Capital gains, if any, are taxable. • Fixed income security risks include credit, liquidity, call, duration, and interest-rate risk. As interest rates rise, bond prices generally fall. • High-yield ("junk") bonds involve greater risk of price volatility, illiquidity, and default than higher-rated debt securities. • In certain instances, unlike other ETFs, the Fund may effect creations and redemptions partly or wholly for cash, rather than in-kind, which may make the Fund less tax-efficient and incur more fees than an ETF that primarily or wholly effects creations and redemptions in-kind. • Integration of environmental, social, and/or governance (ESG) factors into the investment process may not work as intended.

10


Table of Contents
Hartford Municipal Opportunities ETF
 Fund Overview – (continued)
 July 31, 2022 (Unaudited) 

Composition by Security Type(1)
as of 07/31/2022
Municipal Bonds Percentage of
Net Assets
Airport 6.1%
Development 4.5
Education 1.3
Facilities 0.1
General Obligation 9.1
Higher Education 4.1
Housing 1.0
Medical 9.5
Mello-Roos District 0.6
Multifamily Housing 0.3
Nursing Homes 6.4
Other (2) 15.1
Pollution 0.5
Power 5.7
School District 5.2
Single Family Housing 5.3
Student Loan 2.2
Tobacco 2.7
Transportation 8.8
Utilities 3.5
Water 2.6
Total 94.6%
U.S. Government Agencies(3) 0.4
Short-Term Investments 3.8
Other Assets & Liabilities 1.2
Total 100.0%
    
(1) For Fund compliance purposes, the Fund may not use the same classification system. These classifications are used for financial reporting purposes.
(2) Other refers to Special Tax District Bonds, Tax Increment Bonds and certain Community Development District bonds.
(3) All, or a portion of the securities categorized as U.S. Government Agencies, were agency mortgage-backed securities as of July 31, 2022.

11


Table of Contents
Hartford Schroders Commodity Strategy ETF (Consolidated)
 Fund Overview
 July 31, 2022 (Unaudited) 

Inception 09/14/2021
Sub-advised by Schroder Investment Management North America Inc. and its sub-sub-adviser, Schroder Investment Management North America Limited
Investment objective – The Fund seeks to provide long-term total return.
Comparison of Change in Value of $10,000 Investment (09/14/2021 - 07/31/2022)
The chart above represents the hypothetical growth of a $10,000 investment in the Fund.
Cumulative Total Returns
for the Period Ended 07/31/2022
  Since
Inception1
Commodity Strategy ETF (NAV Return) 25.15%
Commodity Strategy ETF (Market Price Return) 25.30%
Bloomberg Commodity Index Total Return 25.16%
    
1 Inception: 09/14/2021
Information regarding how often shares of the Fund traded on NYSE Arca at a price above (i.e., at a premium) or below (i.e., at a discount) the NAV of the Fund can be found at hartfordfunds.com.
PERFORMANCE DATA QUOTED REPRESENTS PAST PERFORMANCE AND DOES NOT GUARANTEE FUTURE RESULTS. The investment return and principal value of the investment will fluctuate so that investors’ shares, when redeemed or sold, may be worth more or less than their original cost. The chart and table do not reflect the deductions of taxes that a shareholder would pay on Fund distributions or the redemption or sale of Fund shares. Current performance may be lower or higher than the performance data quoted. To obtain performance data current to the most recent month-end, please visit our website hartfordfunds.com.
Total returns for the report period presented in the table may differ from the return in the Financial Highlights. The total return presented in the Financial Highlights section of the report is calculated in the same manner, but also takes into account certain adjustments that are necessary under generally accepted accounting principles.
ETF shares are bought and sold at market price, not net asset value (NAV). Total returns are calculated using the daily 4:00 p.m. Eastern Time NAV. Market price returns reflect the midpoint of the bid/ask spread as of the close of trading on the exchange where Fund shares are listed. Market price returns do not represent the returns an investor would receive if they traded shares at other times. Brokerage commissions apply and will reduce returns.
The index is unmanaged, and its results include reinvested dividends and/or distributions, but do not reflect the effect of sales charges, commissions, expenses or taxes.
You cannot invest directly in an index.
See “Benchmark Glossary” for benchmark descriptions.
The total annual fund operating expense ratio after Fee Waiver as shown in the Fund’s most recent prospectus was 0.89% and total annual fund operating expense ratio was 1.12%. Gross expenses do not reflect contractual fee waiver arrangements with respect to the Fund’s investment in its Cayman Islands subsidiary. Net expenses reflect such arrangements in instances when they reduce gross expenses. The fee waiver remains in effect for as long as the Fund is invested in the Cayman Islands subsidiary. Expenses shown include expenses of the Cayman Islands subsidiary. Actual expenses may be higher or lower. Please see the accompanying Financial Highlights for expense ratios for the period ended 07/31/2022.
 

12


Table of Contents
Hartford Schroders Commodity Strategy ETF (Consolidated)
 Fund Overview – (continued)
 July 31, 2022 (Unaudited) 

Portfolio Managers
James Luke
Portfolio Manager
Schroder Investment Management North America Inc.
Malcolm Melville
Portfolio Manager
Schroder Investment Management North America Inc.
Dravasp Jhabvala
Portfolio Manager
Schroder Investment Management North America Inc.


Manager Discussion
How did the Fund perform during the period?
The Hartford Schroders Commodity Strategy ETF returned 25.15%, based on net asset value, for the period from the Fund’s inception date (September 14, 2021) to July 31, 2022, underperforming its benchmark, the Bloomberg Commodity Total Return Index (the “Index”), which returned 25.16% for the same period. For the same period, the Fund underperformed the 25.46% average return of the Lipper Commodities General Funds peer group, a group of funds with investment strategies similar to those of the Fund.
Why did the Fund perform this way?
The Fund seeks to provide investors with a diversified exposure to commodities primarily through commodity futures. The year 2021 saw commodities outperform bonds and equities for the first time in almost a decade. Very low inventories, improving demand, and a muted supply response to higher prices meant that this outperformance of the asset class has continued thus far into 2022.
The supply side of the oil market has remained as tight as ever. There has been more and more focus on the lack of spare capacity from members of the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries and other producers (OPEC+); as each month goes by, the group has continued to produce below the levels implied by the quota system. Oil inventories in the U.S. continue to decline, despite the release of the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) at the pre-agreed pace of 1 million barrels per day. After a rapid fall in natural gas prices (the main driver being the closing of the Freeport liquified natural gas (LNG) export terminal because of a fire, which led to a rapid short-term decline in demand as there was no availability) and with continued stress in European energy markets, as well as the growing demand for U.S. LNG, prices have bounced back quickly.
Precious metals have been dogged by expectations of monetary policy normalization; in recent interest-rate hiking cycles, gold has historically performed well after the first interest-rate increase is in place and even shown an ability to rally even through periods when the U.S. is strong. However, over the period ended July 31, 2022, the overall trend for gold prices has been lower. In copper, while visible
stocks remain low, short-run (next two years) mine supply growth appears to be ample and, with concerns over China’s economic growth, this market underperformed the broader asset class during the period.
Ukraine wheat production was down more than 40% from levels a year ago as a result of the Russia/Ukraine war. The size of Ukrainian grain shipments out of Romanian ports was constrained as of the end of the period, and elevated freight costs have been prohibitive for Asia. The grain harvest is underway in the U.S., but market conditions have remained poor. Overall, yield losses have been expected in the summer as a result of low fertilizer application. This issue, coupled with poor growing conditions for several key crops, supported many agricultural markets during the period.
Over the period, the Fund’s best absolute returns were sourced from Energy and Agriculture exposures. Base metals generated a positive return relative to the benchmark, but this was offset by negative returns from Precious Metals. Relative to the Index, the Fund outperformed in Agriculture and Energy, while it matched the performance of the Index in Metals.
The Fund primarily uses commodity futures, in a long only and unleveraged manner, to gain market exposures to commodities. Therefore, around 95% of the Fund’s exposure was derived from such derivatives over the period and these positions were the primary contributors to the Fund’s performance for the period ended July 31, 2022.
What is the outlook as of the end of the period?
Fears around recession, and price-related demand destruction, have gathered in intensity in recent months. Downgrades to global growth forecasts have clear drivers, including stagflationary trends in Europe, ongoing COVID-19 disruptions in China, and very weak manufacturing surveys in the U.S. (and globally). With high energy prices (excluding oil) and tightening financial conditions, we believe that the depth of the recessionary fears is understandable and the potential for an economic slowdown or mild recession is now a strong consensus expectation.
 

13


Table of Contents
Hartford Schroders Commodity Strategy ETF (Consolidated)
 Fund Overview – (continued)
 July 31, 2022 (Unaudited) 

Against this backdrop, our fundamental views are clear: we believe that a much more significant global recession would be needed to force a further deep retrenchment in key commodity prices and the best performers within the sector in the second half of 2022 are likely to remain oil and certain agricultural markets such as wheat and coffee.
We believe that oil demand and agricultural demand may be much more resilient on aggregate than industrial metals demand. Demand weakness, particularly as revealed in survey data like the purchasing managers indexes (PMIs), is focused on manufacturing and construction industries. Service sector weakness, to which oil demand is more levered, is far less apparent. Coming out of a pandemic where services sectors were suppressed and durables demand hyper-stimulated, we do not find this too surprising.
We also believe it is under-appreciated that demand, again most obviously in Energy and Agriculture, is being made more resilient by explicit subsidies and state buying. These are common in emerging markets where governments feel impelled to protect citizens from rising basic energy and food costs. In Europe, energy subsidies already amount to well over €188 billion. Even in the U.S., inflation payouts to households (most recently California, Colorado and Montana) are making an appearance. This is not to deny demand destruction is occurring at the margin, it is, but to point out that offsets are meaningful.
On the supply side, we continue to see constraint, particularly in oil. OPEC is failing to meet either its original or revised quotas. Significant decreases in Russian supply still lie ahead, in our view. We also expect that current record U.S. SPR releases will not be present come winter. In agriculture, we believe that, despite wheat prices retreating back to pre-Russia invasion levels, the ability to move Ukrainian supplies through the Black Sea looks optimistic at best, while U.S. crop conditions are also struggling. Copper is again an exception here as we expect supply to grow meaningfully over the next 12-18 months even after applying significantly above average disruption rates to mine supply forecasts.
Longer term, on an absolute return basis we believe that very low inventory levels, growing demand, and the absence of a meaningful supply response are suggestive of even higher commodities prices to come. On a relative basis, commodities continued to perform well against equities and bonds as of the end of the period. Moreover, we believe that an intensifying global focus on climate-change mitigation strategies is an important part of the commodity outlook and is a core reason aggregate supply responses are so limited.
Given the strong trend of rising energy prices, the Fund has maintained a core holding in the Energy sector as of the end of the period. The Fund’s exposures were reduced in February 2022, but they were reinstated as oil and gas prices rose sharply. Metals lagged over the period, leading us to maintain underweights in copper and to a lesser extent gold within the Fund. In agriculture, a core focus has been on grains, with underweight positions in both oilseeds and livestock being maintained as of the period ended July 31, 2022.
Important Risks
The Fund is new and has a limited operating history. Investing involves risk, including the possible loss of principal. The net asset value (NAV) of the Fund's shares may fluctuate due to changes in the market value of the Fund's holdings. The Fund's share price may fluctuate due to changes in the relative supply of and demand for the shares on an exchange. • Investments in the commodities market may increase the Fund's liquidity risk, volatility and risk of loss if adverse developments occur. • Investments linked to prices of commodities may be considered speculative. Significant exposure to commodities may subject the Fund to greater volatility than traditional investments. The value of such instruments may be volatile and fluctuate widely based on a variety of factors. • Derivatives are generally more volatile and sensitive to changes in market or economic conditions than other securities; their risks include currency, leverage, liquidity, index, pricing, regulatory and counterparty risk. • By investing in a Cayman Subsidiary, the Fund is indirectly exposed to the risks associated with a non-U.S. subsidiary and its investments. • To the extent the Fund focuses on one or more sectors, the Fund may be subject to increased volatility and risk of loss if adverse developments occur. • In certain instances, unlike other ETFs, the Fund may effect creations and redemptions partly or wholly for cash, rather than in-kind, which may make the Fund less tax-efficient and incur more fees than an ETF that primarily or wholly effects creations and redemptions in-kind. • Integration of environmental, social, and/or governance (ESG) factors into the investment process may not work as intended.
Composition by Sector(1)
as of 07/31/2022
Sector Percentage
of Net Assets
Equity Securities  
Energy 0.5%
Materials 0.0 *
Total 0.5%
Short-Term Investments 85.6
Other Assets & Liabilities 13.9
Total 100.0%
    
* Percentage rounds to zero.
    
(1) A sector may be comprised of several industries. For Fund compliance purposes, the Fund may not use the same classification system. These sector classifications are used for financial reporting purposes.

14


Table of Contents
Hartford Schroders ESG US Equity ETF
 Fund Overview
 July 31, 2022 (Unaudited) 

Inception 08/10/2021
Sub-advised by Schroder Investment Management North America Inc. and its sub-sub-adviser, Schroder Investment Management North America Limited
Investment objective – The Fund seeks long-term capital appreciation.
Comparison of Change in Value of $10,000 Investment (08/10/2021 - 07/31/2022)
The chart above represents the hypothetical growth of a $10,000 investment in the Fund.
Cumulative Total Returns
for the Period Ended 07/31/2022
  Since
Inception1
ESG US Equity ETF (NAV Return) -7.33%
ESG US Equity ETF (Market Price Return) -7.41%
Russell 1000 Index -7.91%
    
1 Inception: 08/10/2021
Information regarding how often shares of the Fund traded on Cboe BZX at a price above (i.e., at a premium) or below (i.e., at a discount) the NAV of the Fund can be found at hartfordfunds.com.
PERFORMANCE DATA QUOTED REPRESENTS PAST PERFORMANCE AND DOES NOT GUARANTEE FUTURE RESULTS. The investment return and principal value of the investment will fluctuate so that investors’ shares, when redeemed or sold, may be worth more or less than their original cost. The chart and table do not reflect the deductions of taxes that a shareholder would pay on Fund distributions or the redemption or sale of Fund shares. Current performance may be lower or higher than the performance data quoted. To obtain performance data current to the most recent month-end, please visit our website hartfordfunds.com.
Total returns for the report period presented in the table may differ from the return in the Financial Highlights. The total return presented in the Financial Highlights section of the report is calculated in the same manner, but also takes into account certain adjustments that are necessary under generally accepted accounting principles.
ETF shares are bought and sold at market price, not net asset value (NAV). Total returns are calculated using the daily 4:00 p.m. Eastern Time NAV. Market price returns reflect the midpoint of the bid/ask spread as of the close of trading on the exchange where Fund shares are listed. Market price returns do not represent the returns an investor would receive if they traded shares at other times. Brokerage commissions apply and will reduce returns.
The index is unmanaged, and its results include reinvested dividends and/or distributions, but do not reflect the effect of sales charges, commissions, expenses or taxes.
You cannot invest directly in an index.
See “Benchmark Glossary” for benchmark descriptions.
The total annual fund operating expense ratio as shown in the Fund’s most recent prospectus was 0.39%. Actual expenses may be higher or lower. Please see the accompanying Financial Highlights for expense ratios for the period ended 07/31/2022.
 

15


Table of Contents
Hartford Schroders ESG US Equity ETF
 Fund Overview – (continued)
 July 31, 2022 (Unaudited) 

Portfolio Manager
Ashley Lester, PhD
Portfolio Manager
Schroder Investment Management North America Inc.


Manager Discussion
How did the Fund perform during the period?
Hartford Schroders ESG US Equity ETF returned -7.33% based on net asset value for the period from August 10, 2021, the Fund’s inception date, to July 31, 2022, outperforming the Fund’s benchmark, the Russell 1000 Index, which returned -7.91% for the same period. For the same period, the Fund outperformed the -7.69% average return of the Lipper Large-Cap Core Funds peer group, a group of funds with investment strategies similar to those of the Fund.
Why did the Fund perform this way?
In absolute terms, market performance over the period has been dominated by the Russian invasion of Ukraine, which occurred around the midpoint of the period. The invasion drew widespread condemnation and elicited a range of strict sanctions from the U.S. and its allies. The invasion amplified existing concerns over inflation pressures, particularly through food and energy, although U.S. economic data otherwise remained stable.
Declines affected most sectors of the market during the period. There were dramatic declines for some stocks, most notably in the in the Media & Entertainment and Auto sectors. Conversely, Energy stocks saw their share prices soar as Russian sanctions cut global gas supplies.
As markets fell, there has been more resilient performance from cheaper, more profitable companies. However, these stocks did give back some relative performance as markets rallied in July. The Fund’s Governance factor, which measures whether companies can generate returns for shareholders without signs of earnings manipulation or excessive capital expenditure, was a consistent contributor to active returns over the period.
The other investment style factors the Fund targets were flat or a negatively affected performance. Notably, sustainability factors have underperformed relative to the broader equity market year to date for 2022 amid surging commodity prices and other macro concerns.
In general, we aim to generate alpha from our stock selection rather than from industry or sector tilts. As expected, the Fund’s performance over the period was driven primarily by stock selection, with sector positioning producing only modest results. Specifically, the Fund’s positioning in the Technology and Financials sectors benefited performance during the period, more than offsetting the drag from poor performance that was driven by the Fund’s holdings within the Consumer Discretionary and Utilities sectors.
We maintained the positive sustainability profile of the Fund over the period, and in some areas saw a slight improvement. The carbon footprint of the Fund showed a 54% reduction in carbon intensity
against the benchmark level. In the Fund’s sustainability framework, for every $1 million invested in the Fund, this 54% reduction is equivalent to the carbon removed from the atmosphere by over 1,300 tree seedlings grown for 10 years.
The Fund uses derivatives for efficient management purposes, and overall these derivatives had a slightly negative performance impact on the Fund during the period.
What is the outlook as of the end of the period?
We believe that factor investing is a scientific endeavor; therefore, we seek to apply that scientific method to investing, basing our investment decisions on the empirical analysis of data rather than relying on intuition. Making incremental changes to our strategies helps ensure that we stay at the forefront of factor investing. Looking forward, we believe that we remain on target to introduce new environmental and social factors and portfolio construction enhancements to the Fund later this year.
Important Risks
The Fund is new and has a limited operating history. Investing involves risk, including the possible loss of principal. The net asset value (NAV) of the Fund's shares may fluctuate due to changes in the market value of the Fund's holdings. The Fund's share price may fluctuate due to changes in the relative supply of and demand for the shares on an exchange. • The Fund’s environmental, social, and/or governance (ESG) investment strategy limits the types and number of investment opportunities available to the Fund and, as a result, the Fund may underperform other funds that do not have an ESG focus. • In certain instances, unlike other ETFs, the Fund may effect creations and redemptions partly or wholly for cash, rather than in-kind, which may make the Fund less tax-efficient and incur more fees than an ETF that primarily or wholly effects creations and redemptions in-kind.
 

16


Table of Contents
Hartford Schroders ESG US Equity ETF
 Fund Overview – (continued)
 July 31, 2022 (Unaudited) 

Composition by Sector(1)
as of 07/31/2022
Sector Percentage
of Net Assets
Equity Securities  
Communication Services 8.9%
Consumer Discretionary 15.6
Consumer Staples 10.4
Energy 3.5
Financials 8.5
Health Care 15.5
Industrials 8.7
Information Technology 23.2
Materials 3.0
Real Estate 1.2
Utilities 1.1
Total 99.6%
Short-Term Investments 0.3
Other Assets & Liabilities 0.1
Total 100.0%
    
(1) A sector may be comprised of several industries. For Fund compliance purposes, the Fund may not use the same classification system. These sector classifications are used for financial reporting purposes.

17


Table of Contents
Hartford Schroders Tax-Aware Bond ETF
 Fund Overview
 July 31, 2022 (Unaudited) 

Inception 04/18/2018
Sub-advised by Schroder Investment Management North America Inc.
and its sub-sub-adviser, Schroder Investment Management North America Limited
Investment objective – The Fund seeks total return on an after-tax basis.
Comparison of Change in Value of $10,000 Investment (04/18/2018 - 07/31/2022)
The chart above represents the hypothetical growth of a $10,000 investment in the Fund.
Average Annual Total Returns
for the Periods Ended 07/31/2022
  1 Year Since
Inception1
Tax-Aware Bond ETF (NAV Return) -6.58% 2.01%
Tax-Aware Bond ETF (Market Price Return) -6.67% 2.00%
Bloomberg Municipal Bond Index -6.93% 2.19%
    
1 Inception: 04/18/2018
Information regarding how often shares of the Fund traded on NYSE Arca at a price above (i.e., at a premium) or below (i.e., at a discount) the NAV of the Fund can be found at hartfordfunds.com.
PERFORMANCE DATA QUOTED REPRESENTS PAST PERFORMANCE AND DOES NOT GUARANTEE FUTURE RESULTS. The investment return and principal value of the investment will fluctuate so that investors’ shares, when redeemed or sold, may be worth more or less than their original cost. The chart and table do not reflect the deductions of taxes that a shareholder would pay on Fund distributions or the redemption or sale of Fund shares. Current performance may be lower or higher than the performance data quoted. To obtain performance data current to the most recent month-end, please visit our website hartfordfunds.com.
Total returns for the report period presented in the table may differ from the return in the Financial Highlights. The total return presented in the Financial Highlights section of the report is calculated in the same manner, but also takes into account certain adjustments that are necessary under generally accepted accounting principles.
ETF shares are bought and sold at market price, not net asset value (NAV). Total returns are calculated using the daily 4:00 p.m. Eastern Time NAV. Market price returns reflect the midpoint of the bid/ask spread as of the close of trading on the exchange where Fund shares are listed. Market price returns do not represent the returns an investor would receive if they traded shares at other times. Brokerage commissions apply and will reduce returns.
The index is unmanaged, and its results include reinvested dividends and/or distributions, but do not reflect the effect of sales charges, commissions, expenses or taxes.
You cannot invest directly in an index.
See “Benchmark Glossary” for benchmark descriptions.
The total annual fund operating expense ratio as shown in the Fund’s most recent prospectus was 0.39%. Actual expenses may be higher or lower. Please see the accompanying Financial Highlights for expense ratios for the year ended 07/31/2022.
 

18


Table of Contents
Hartford Schroders Tax-Aware Bond ETF
 Fund Overview – (continued)
 July 31, 2022 (Unaudited) 

Portfolio Managers
Lisa Hornby, CFA
Portfolio Manager
Schroder Investment Management North America Inc.
Neil G. Sutherland, CFA
Portfolio Manager
Schroder Investment Management North America Inc.
Julio C. Bonilla, CFA
Portfolio Manager
Schroder Investment Management North America Inc.
David May
Portfolio Manager
Schroder Investment Management North America Inc.


Manager Discussion
How did the Fund perform during the period?
Hartford Schroders Tax-Aware Bond ETF returned -6.58% based on net asset value for the year ended July 31, 2022, outperforming the Fund’s benchmark, the Bloomberg Municipal Bond Index, which returned -6.93% for the same period. The Fund also outperformed the -8.38% average return of the Lipper General & Insured Municipal Debt Funds peer group, a group of funds with investment strategies similar to those of the Fund, during the year.
Why did the Fund perform this way?
The year ended July 31, 2022 was notable for the sizeable decrease in risk tolerance within the market, which began early in 2022 due to a combination of high and rising inflation data and the Russia/Ukraine conflict. Risk assets, including both investment-grade corporate bonds and tax-exempt municipal bonds, experienced negative excess returns relative to U.S. Treasuries for the same period, as investors responded to the Russia/Ukraine conflict, rising inflation, and supply chain issues. For the same period, investment-grade corporate bonds, as represented by the Bloomberg Corporate Bond Index, had excess returns of -2.63% compared to Treasuries.
The Fund outperformed the Bloomberg Municipal Bond Index (the “Index”) for the year as the fund’s shorter relative duration positioning benefitted results as interest rates rose in the period. Additionally, asset allocation was positive as the Fund's underweight position to tax-exempt municipals and allocation to US Treasuries contributed as ratios widened and high quality municipals underperformed duration equivalent Treasuries. Within the Fund’s tax-exempt exposure, there were large positive impacts to relative performance from underweighting General Obligation bonds, other revenue sector bonds, the Transportation sector, and the Utilities sector along with an overweight to Federal Agency securities, which was the best performing sector of the municipal bond market for the year. Conversely, the flattening in the Treasury yield curve during the year negatively impacted the Fund’s performance, since the Fund had more exposure at shorter durations. Additionally, the Fund’s
out-of-benchmark exposure to corporate bonds detracted from performance relative to the Index as spreads widened. Within tax-exempts, issue selection was negative impacted results, generally within the Federal Agency issuances, as many of these positions were longer duration in nature.
Throughout the Fund’s fiscal year, the Fund significantly reduced its Corporate and Treasury allocation to approximately 7.00% and 6.00% percent of the portfolio respectively. The majority of this change occurred in April 2022 when the Fund increased its allocation to tax-exempt municipals and continued to add to these positions throughout the rest of the fiscal year. The Fund ended the year with an approximately 87% allocation to tax-exempt municipals. Within tax-exempt municipals, the largest increases in the Fund’s exposure fiscal year-to-date occurred primarily within general obligation bonds, Federal Agencies, leasing, and other revenue producing holdings.
Additionally, the Fund’s small derivatives exposure, specifically Treasury futures used to manage duration, was neutral to performance for the one-year period.
What is the outlook as of the end of the period?
While the negative returns, particularly in high-quality fixed income, have been significant during 2022, we believe the prospective returns and macroeconomic backdrop for fixed income are likely to become much more favorable in the coming months and quarters due to several factors. Absolute bond yields across a variety of fixed income indices are now trading in the high 90s or 100th percentile over various time periods. Investors also experienced a transformation from the most expensive bond market to nearly the cheapest one in fewer than twelve months.
While the macroeconomic environment still to us suggests further potential downside for risk assets, including credit spreads, we believe fixed income opportunities generically, and particularly for Treasury
 

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Table of Contents
Hartford Schroders Tax-Aware Bond ETF
 Fund Overview – (continued)
 July 31, 2022 (Unaudited) 

yields, is most compelling compared to recent years. We believe absolute returns in fixed income assets will be far more favorable due to three broad factors:
1. Valuations – Bonds now in our view offer the most attractive absolute yields relative to the last decade;
2. Inflation – While it currently remains uncomfortably high, base effect and higher frequency data suggest that we are in the process of peaking;
3. Growth – Higher interest rates and tighter financial conditions are already impacting growth, with market participants anticipating further interest rate increases in the first half of 2023.
In the current environment with bond yields reaching multi-year highs, market volatility increasing and the economy slowing down, we believe bonds now offer an intriguing combination of income, appreciation potential, and diversification.
Important Risks
Investing involves risk, including the possible loss of principal. The net asset value (NAV) of the Fund’s shares may fluctuate due to changes in the market value of the Fund’s holdings which may in-turn fluctuate due to market and economic conditions. The Fund’s share price may fluctuate due to changes in the relative supply of and demand for the shares on an exchange. • Fixed income security risks include credit, liquidity, call, duration, and interest-rate risk. As interest rates rise, bond prices generally fall. • Municipal securities may be adversely impacted by state/local, political, economic, or market conditions; these risks may be magnified if the Fund focuses its assets in municipal securities of issuers in a few select states. Investors may be subject to the federal Alternative Minimum Tax as well as state and local income taxes. Capital gains, if any, are taxable. • The risks associated with mortgage-related and asset-backed securities include credit, interest-rate, prepayment, and extension risk. • Obligations of U.S. Government agencies are supported by varying degrees of credit but are generally not backed by the full faith and credit of the U.S. Government. • The purchase of securities in the To-Be-Announced (TBA) market can result in higher portfolio turnover and related expenses as well as price and counterparty risk. • Derivatives are generally more volatile and sensitive to changes in market or economic conditions than other securities; their risks include currency, leverage, liquidity, index, pricing, and counterparty risk. • Foreign investments may be more volatile and less liquid than U.S. investments and are subject to the risk of currency fluctuations and adverse political and economic developments. • The Fund may have high portfolio turnover, which could increase its transaction costs and an investor’s tax liability. • In certain instances, unlike other ETFs, the Fund may effect creations and redemptions partly or wholly for cash, rather than in-kind, which may make the Fund less tax-efficient and incur more fees than an ETF that primarily or wholly effects creations and redemptions in-kind. • Integration of environmental, social, and/or governance (ESG) factors into the investment process may not work as intended.
Composition by Security Type(1)
as of 07/31/2022
Category Percentage of
Net Assets
Fixed Income Securities  
Corporate Bonds 7.8%
Municipal Bonds 86.0
U.S. Government Securities(2) 5.5
Total 99.3%
Short-Term Investments 5.1
Other Assets & Liabilities (4.4)
Total 100.0%
    
(1) For Fund compliance purposes, the Fund may not use the same classification system. These classifications are used for financial reporting purposes.
(2) All, or a portion of the securities categorized as U.S. Government Agencies, were agency mortgage-backed securities as of July 31, 2022.

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Table of Contents
Hartford Short Duration ETF
 Fund Overview
 July 31, 2022 (Unaudited) 

Inception 05/30/2018
Sub-advised by Wellington Management Company LLP
Investment objective – The Fund seeks to provide current income and long-term total return.
Comparison of Change in Value of $10,000 Investment (05/30/2018 - 07/31/2022)
The chart above represents the hypothetical growth of a $10,000 investment in the Fund.
Average Annual Total Returns
for the Periods Ended 07/31/2022
  1 Year Since
Inception1
Short Duration ETF (NAV Return) -4.01% 1.85%
Short Duration ETF (Market Price Return) -3.98% 1.86%
Bloomberg 1-3 Year US Government/Credit Index -3.22% 1.36%
    
1 Inception: 05/30/2018
Information regarding how often shares of the Fund traded on Cboe BZX at a price above (i.e., at a premium) or below (i.e., at a discount) the NAV of the Fund can be found at hartfordfunds.com.
PERFORMANCE DATA QUOTED REPRESENTS PAST PERFORMANCE AND DOES NOT GUARANTEE FUTURE RESULTS. The investment return and principal value of the investment will fluctuate so that investors’ shares, when redeemed or sold, may be worth more or less than their original cost. The chart and table do not reflect the deductions of taxes that a shareholder would pay on Fund distributions or the redemption or sale of Fund shares. Current performance may be lower or higher than the performance data quoted. To obtain performance data current to the most recent month-end, please visit our website hartfordfunds.com.
Total returns for the report period presented in the table may differ from the return in the Financial Highlights. The total return presented in the Financial Highlights section of the report is calculated in the same manner, but also takes into account certain adjustments that are necessary under generally accepted accounting principles.
ETF shares are bought and sold at market price, not net asset value (NAV). Total returns are calculated using the daily 4:00 p.m. Eastern Time NAV. Market price returns reflect the midpoint of the bid/ask spread as of the close of trading on the exchange where Fund shares are listed. Market price returns do not represent the returns an investor would receive if they traded shares at other times. Brokerage commissions apply and will reduce returns.
The index is unmanaged, and its results include reinvested dividends and/or distributions, but do not reflect the effect of sales charges, commissions, expenses or taxes.
You cannot invest directly in an index.
See “Benchmark Glossary” for benchmark descriptions.
The total annual fund operating expense ratio as shown in the Fund’s most recent prospectus was 0.29%. Actual expenses may be higher or lower. Please see the accompanying Financial Highlights for expense ratios for the year ended 07/31/2022.
 

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Table of Contents
Hartford Short Duration ETF
 Fund Overview – (continued)
 July 31, 2022 (Unaudited) 

Portfolio Manager
Timothy E. Smith
Senior Managing Director and Fixed Income Portfolio Manager
Wellington Management Company LLP


Manager Discussion
How did the Fund perform during the period?
Hartford Short Duration ETF returned -4.01%, based on net asset value for the one-year period ended July 31, 2022, underperforming its benchmark, the Bloomberg 1-3 Year US Government/Credit Index (the “Index”), which returned -3.22% for the same period. The Fund underperformed the -3.98% average return of the Lipper Short Investment Grade Debt Funds peer group, a group of funds with investment strategies similar to those of the Fund.
Why did the Fund perform this way?
Over the one-year period ended July 31, 2022, United States (U.S.) fixed income markets generated negative total returns driven by increases in government bond yields, which resulted from the Federal Reserve’s (Fed’s) decision in the first half of 2022 to raise interest rates in response to rising inflation expectations. Additionally, credit spread sectors underperformed duration-equivalent U.S. Treasuries virtually across the board with corporate, non-corporate and securitized debt all underperforming Treasuries. Generally speaking, lower quality debt underperformed higher quality debt as well given investors’ increasing preference for less risky investments. Widening credit spreads during the period were driven primarily by expectations that tighter financial conditions could push the U.S. economy into a recession, and, to a lesser extent, by uncertainty arising from the Russia/Ukraine war.
The Fund’s out-of-benchmark allocations to the securitized sectors, particularly asset backed securities (ABS) and mortgage-backed securities (MBS), were the primary detractors from performance relative to the Bloomberg 1-3 Year US Government/Credit Index. The Fund’s overweight to and security selection within investment-grade credit also detracted from relative performance. Specifically, security selection within the financials and industrials sectors drove negative returns relative to the Index. Out-of-benchmark allocations to bank loans also detracted from relative performance. Duration/yield curve positioning contributed positively to relative performance, primarily due to an underweight to the front-end portion of the yield curve. Additionally, an out-of-benchmark allocation to high yield fixed income investments contributed positively to the Fund’s performance relative to the Index.
Derivatives were not used in a significant manner in the Fund during the period and did not have a material impact on Fund performance during the period.
What is the outlook as of the end of the period?
At the end of the period, the Fund maintained exposure to bank loans and high yield credit and continued to have an overweight position in investment-grade corporate credit, favoring the financials and industrials sectors. Additionally, the Fund maintained allocations to
agency MBS and non-agency MBS. The Fund’s positioning also continued to favor ABS and higher-quality collateralized loan obligations (CLOs) as well as commercial mortgage-backed securities (CMBS). Market volatility has remained elevated due to the ongoing Russia/Ukraine conflict, sustained inflationary pressures, the Fed engaging in an aggressive interest rate tightening agenda, and the continued spread of COVID-19 variants. The path to a soft landing has narrowed in our view. The Fed's ongoing stance to raise interest rates to combat inflation at a time of slowing growth has pushed the recession narrative to the market's forefront. We believe credit fundamentals have peaked, and we expect there will be greater credit dispersion. Spreads have widened to what we consider to be more reasonable levels but still appear rich relative to the challenges presented by market technicals and fundamentals in our opinion. We believe that ABS fundamentals are supported by strong consumer balance sheets; however, delinquencies are expected to begin to normalize. In our view, recent market volatility has led to cheaper valuations.
Important Risks
Investing involves risk, including the possible loss of principal. The net asset value (NAV) of the Fund’s shares may fluctuate due to changes in the market value of the Fund’s holdings which may in-turn fluctuate due to market and economic conditions. The Fund’s share price may fluctuate due to changes in the relative supply of and demand for the shares on an exchange. The Fund may allocate a portion of its assets to specialist portfolio managers which may not work as intended. • Fixed income security risks include credit, liquidity, call, duration, event, and interest-rate risk. As interest rates rise, bond prices generally fall. • Loans can be difficult to value and less liquid than other types of debt instrument; they are also subject to nonpayment, collateral, bankruptcy, default, extension, prepayment and insolvency risks. • The risks associated with mortgage-related and asset-backed securities include credit, interest-rate, prepayment, liquidity, default and extension risk. • High-yield (“junk”) bonds involve greater risk of price volatility, illiquidity, and default than higher-rated debt securities. • Derivatives are generally more volatile and sensitive to changes in market or economic conditions than other securities; their risks include currency, leverage, liquidity, index, pricing, and counterparty risk. • Foreign investments may be more volatile and less liquid than U.S. investments and are subject to the risk of currency fluctuations and adverse political and economic developments. • Restricted securities may be more difficult to sell and price than other securities. • Obligations of U.S. Government agencies are supported by varying degrees of credit but are generally not backed by the full faith and credit of the U.S. Government. • In certain instances, unlike other ETFs, the Fund may effect creations and redemptions partly or wholly for cash, rather than in-kind, which may make the Fund less tax-efficient and incur more fees than an ETF that primarily or wholly effects creations and redemptions in-kind.
 

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Table of Contents
Hartford Short Duration ETF
 Fund Overview – (continued)
 July 31, 2022 (Unaudited) 

Composition by Security Type(1)
as of 07/31/2022
Category Percentage of
Net Assets
Fixed Income Securities  
Asset & Commercial Mortgage-Backed Securities 22.2%
Corporate Bonds 49.3
Municipal Bonds 0.1
Senior Floating Rate Interests 19.1
U.S. Government Agencies(2) 3.7
U.S. Government Securities 4.8
Total 99.2%
Short-Term Investments 0.3
Other Assets & Liabilities 0.5
Total 100.0%
    
(1) For Fund compliance purposes, the Fund may not use the same classification system. These classifications are used for financial reporting purposes.
(2) All, or a portion of the securities categorized as U.S. Government Agencies, were agency mortgage-backed securities as of July 31, 2022.

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Table of Contents
Hartford Sustainable Income ETF
 Fund Overview
 July 31, 2022 (Unaudited) 

Inception 09/21/2021
Sub-advised by Wellington Management Company LLP
Investment objective – The Fund seeks to provide current income and long-term total return, within a sustainability framework.
Comparison of Change in Value of $10,000 Investment (09/21/2021 - 07/31/2022)
The chart above represents the hypothetical growth of a $10,000 investment in the Fund.
Cumulative Total Returns
for the Period Ended 07/31/2022
  Since
Inception1
Sustainable Income ETF (NAV Return) -13.52%
Sustainable Income ETF (Market Price Return) -13.20%
Bloomberg US Aggregate Bond Index -9.11%
    
1 Inception: 09/21/2021
Information regarding how often shares of the Fund traded on Cboe BZX at a price above (i.e., at a premium) or below (i.e., at a discount) the NAV of the Fund can be found at hartfordfunds.com.
PERFORMANCE DATA QUOTED REPRESENTS PAST PERFORMANCE AND DOES NOT GUARANTEE FUTURE RESULTS. The investment return and principal value of the investment will fluctuate so that investors’ shares, when redeemed or sold, may be worth more or less than their original cost. The chart and table do not reflect the deductions of taxes that a shareholder would pay on Fund distributions or the redemption or sale of Fund shares. Current performance may be lower or higher than the performance data quoted. To obtain performance data current to the most recent month-end, please visit our website hartfordfunds.com.
Total returns for the report period presented in the table may differ from the return in the Financial Highlights. The total return presented in the Financial Highlights section of the report is calculated in the same manner, but also takes into account certain adjustments that are necessary under generally accepted accounting principles.
ETF shares are bought and sold at market price, not net asset value (NAV). Total returns are calculated using the daily 4:00 p.m. Eastern Time NAV. Market price returns reflect the midpoint of the bid/ask spread as of the close of trading on the exchange where Fund shares are listed. Market price returns do not represent the returns an investor would receive if they traded shares at other times. Brokerage commissions apply and will reduce returns.
The index is unmanaged, and its results include reinvested dividends and/or distributions, but do not reflect the effect of sales charges, commissions, expenses or taxes.
You cannot invest directly in an index.
See “Benchmark Glossary” for benchmark descriptions.
The total annual fund operating expense ratio as shown in the Fund’s most recent prospectus was 0.54%. Actual expenses may be higher or lower. Please see the accompanying Financial Highlights for expense ratios for the period ended 07/31/2022.
 

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Table of Contents
Hartford Sustainable Income ETF
 Fund Overview – (continued)
 July 31, 2022 (Unaudited) 

Portfolio Managers
Campe Goodman, CFA
Senior Managing Director and Fixed Income Portfolio Manager
Wellington Management Company LLP
Joseph F. Marvan, CFA
Senior Managing Director and Fixed Income Portfolio Manager
Wellington Management Company LLP
Robert D. Burn, CFA
Managing Director and Fixed Income Portfolio Manager
Wellington Management Company LLP


Manager Discussion
How did the Fund perform during the period?
Hartford Sustainable Income ETF returned -13.52% based on net asset value for the since-inception period from September 21, 2021, through July 31, 2022, underperforming its benchmark, the Bloomberg US Aggregate Bond Index (the “Index”), which returned -9.11% for the same period. For the same period, the Fund underperformed the -8.58% average return of the Lipper Multi-Sector Income Funds peer group, a group of funds with investment strategies similar to those of the Fund.
Why did the Fund perform this way?
United States (U.S.) fixed income markets generated negative returns during the period from September 21, 2021 through July 31, 2022.
The Index generated a return of -9.11% during the period. During the fiscal year ended July 31, 2022, global sovereign debt yields moved sharply higher as most major central banks moved aggressively to raise interest rates to deal with high inflation. Most fixed-income credit risk sectors underperformed government bonds amid increasing concerns that tighter financial conditions resulting from less accommodative monetary policy could tip the global economy into recession. Inflation pressures remained acute throughout the first six months of 2022, although commodity prices declined sharply late in the period to provide some relief. U.S. labor market strength persisted during the same period, while housing market resilience was tested by surging mortgage rates, lack of inventory, and home price appreciation. Investment-grade corporate spreads widened by 0.58%, while high-yield corporate spreads widened by 1.75%, according to Bloomberg Index data.
Within the G10, select central banks, including the U.S. Federal Reserve (Fed), the Reserve Bank of Australia (RBA), and the Riksbank raised interest rates significantly. The European Central Bank (ECB) announced its plan to end quantitative easing and start raising interest rates beginning in July 2022, with President Lagarde suggesting a larger increase would be appropriate in September, if inflation pressures persist. Emerging-markets central banks, particularly across Latin America and Central and Eastern Europe Middle East and Africa (CEEMEA), also continued lifting their policy rates in bigger increments, while Asian central banks raised interest rates more modestly than other emerging-markets regions. The Bank
of Japan (BOJ) and the People’s Bank of China (PBOC) were the notable exceptions in terms of retaining accommodative monetary policy. Disruptions emanating from COVID-19 related mobility restrictions sharply weakened Chinese economic data, while inflation remained much more muted in Japan compared to the rest of the world.
Global gross domestic product (GDP) growth largely continued to recover during the first part of the period. By the end of the period, GDP exhibited some divergence, with notable contraction in the U.S. and Japan. After Russia’s surprise invasion of Ukraine, sanctions imposed on Russia by the West and its allies led to retaliatory measures from Moscow including restrictions in gas supplies to parts of Europe, raising concerns about Europe’s energy security. By the end of the period, global growth had slowed moderately, driven by tightening financial conditions, but inflation continued to surprise on the upside and most major central banks became more focused on tightening monetary policy in response.
Over the period, the U.S. dollar rallied strongly versus most currencies as it became increasingly clear that the Fed would likely raise interest rates more aggressively to counter persistently high inflation. By the end of the period, the Japanese Yen declined to its weakest level since 1998, as the BOJ remained the outlier among major G10 central banks in not tightening monetary policy. Commodity-linked currencies across developing markets and emerging markets that have historically had higher volatility (such as the South African rand, Norwegian krone, New Zealand dollar, and Brazilian real) were the other major underperformers as recession concerns came to the forefront by the end of the period. European currencies generally ended lower versus the U.S. dollar. Absolute and excess returns were negative across fixed income sectors over the period. On an excess return basis, select securitized sectors were among the best performers.
Credit sectors, which include the Fund’s global green bond allocation, underperformed government bonds amid heightened market volatility. The Fund’s exposure to emerging-markets (EM) debt, both corporate and select sovereign debt, detracted the most from the Fund’s performance relative to the Index overall amid sharp spread widening over the period. The Fund maintained a pro-risk bias in EM, as we expected EM fundamentals to gradually improve. EM was broadly impacted by the Real Estate sector in China during the period, as well
 

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Table of Contents
Hartford Sustainable Income ETF
 Fund Overview – (continued)
 July 31, 2022 (Unaudited) 

as the war in Ukraine in the earlier part of the period. Throughout the period, the sector remained under pressure from rising inflation, interest-rate increases, and a strong U.S. dollar.
Out-of-benchmark allocations to high yield debt and bank loans negatively affected performance relative to the Index, particularly Industrials, as spreads widened across credit sectors during the period, although bank loans held up better given the floating interest rates typically associated with bank loans. An allocation to convertible bonds, where the focused exposures in the Technology and Biotech sectors with what we believed to be strong upside potential, also had a negative impact on Fund performance during the period. This negative impact was partially offset by the Fund’s underweight positioning within investment-grade credit, which contributed positively to the Fund’s performance relative to the Index. The Fund’s allocation to securitized sectors – though not immune to the selloff in other sectors of the market – generally held up better than other credit sectors during the period. The Fund’s overall positioning within securitized investments helped performance relative to the Index, led by positive results from an underweight to agency mortgage-backed securities (MBS). However, an allocation to collateralized loan obligations (CLOs) detracted from relative performance. The Fund’s allocation to Treasury Inflation Protected Securities (TIPS) contributed positively to performance relative to the Index as breakeven inflation rates increased during the period. The Fund held tactical interest rate positions during the period, which contributed positively to relative results.
The Fund added new impact issuers to its portfolio during the period to seek to take advantage of what we believed were compelling valuations within credit resulting from what we viewed as attractive valuations and improving fundamentals and alignment with themes.
Select investments within what we have defined as impact issuers and sustainable leaders and improvers contributed positively to performance relative to the Index in several instances. During the period, the Fund added a pan-African telecom and mobile market services provider that enables small- and medium-sized enterprises and small holder farms to engage directly with local markets, facilitating participation in a growing transaction channel, and providing broader suite of services that increase digital connectivity in areas with below-average coverage. The Fund also added green bonds issued by an alternative energy company and a Chinese property developer; the proceeds of each issuer are expected to be used for eligible green projects.
During the period, the Fund used futures and currency forwards to implement non-U.S. rate and currency positions, which overall contributed positively to the Fund’s performance. Credit swaps (CDX and ITRAXX) were used to manage credit exposure and overall portfolio risk. EM credit default swap (CDX) positions had a positive impact on performance during the period, while high yield CDX and ITRAXX detracted from performance during the period.
What is the outlook as of the end of the period?
The Fund maintained a neutral risk posture overall at the end of the period. We are observing several dislocations across credit sectors, creating what we consider to be opportunities for relative value trades.
We also consider some sector valuations to be significantly attractive relative to their fundamentals. Over the longer-term, our base case is still for us to reduce risk gradually as monetary policy tightening continues and risks to 2023 economic growth appear to continue to build, but we expect to continue to rotate sector investments among relative value opportunities in the months ahead to take advantage of dislocations.
As of the end of the period, the Fund continued to seek to maintain shorter duration while striving to preserve cash and liquidity. At the end of the period, the Fund maintained an underweight exposure to investment grade credit and agency MBS in favor of higher-yielding sectors such as high yield – emphasizing index derivatives, bank loan issuers with what we feel are robust cash flows, and select non-agency residential mortgage-backed securities (RMBS). At the end of the period, the Fund also held select convertible bonds focused on digitization and healthcare innovation themes. Additionally, the Fund holds select green bonds that support resource efficiency projects. At the end of the period, we maintained a pro-risk stance in EM and are focusing on country differentiation given what we believe are uneven fiscal vulnerabilities. At the end of the period, the Fund also held EM corporate issuers that we believe have prudent balance-sheet management and low exposure to their home countries.
Important Risks
The Fund is new and has a limited operating history. Investing involves risk, including the possible loss of principal. Security prices fluctuate in value depending on general market and economic conditions and the prospects of individual companies. The net asset value (NAV) of the Fund's shares may fluctuate due to changes in the market value of the Fund's holdings. The Fund's share price may fluctuate due to changes in the relative supply of and demand for the shares on an exchange. • Fixed income security risks include credit, liquidity, call, duration, and interest-rate risk. As interest rates rise, bond prices generally fall. • Investments in high-yield ("junk") bonds involve greater risk of price volatility, illiquidity, and default than higher-rated debt securities. • Foreign investments may be more volatile and less liquid than U.S. investments and are subject to the risk of currency fluctuations and adverse political, economic and regulatory developments. These risks may be greater, and include additional risks, for investments in emerging markets. • Derivatives are generally more volatile and sensitive to changes in market or economic conditions than other securities; their risks include currency, leverage, liquidity, index, pricing, regulatory and counterparty risk. • The risks associated with mortgage-related and asset-backed securities include credit, interest-rate, prepayment, liquidity, default and extension risk. • The purchase of securities in the To-Be-Announced (TBA) market can result in higher portfolio turnover and related expenses as well as price and counterparty risk. • Restricted securities may be more difficult to sell and price than other securities. • Loans can be difficult to value and less liquid than other types of debt instruments; they are also subject to nonpayment, collateral, bankruptcy, default, extension, prepayment and insolvency risks. • Obligations of U.S. Government agencies are supported by varying degrees of credit but are generally not backed by the full faith and credit of the U.S. Government. • Applying sustainability criteria to the investment process may result in foregoing certain investments and underperformance comparative to funds that do not have a similar focus. There is a risk that the

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Table of Contents
Hartford Sustainable Income ETF
 Fund Overview – (continued)
 July 31, 2022 (Unaudited) 

securities identified by the sub-adviser as meeting its sustainable investing criteria do not operate as anticipated. • The Fund may have high portfolio turnover, which could increase its transaction costs and an investor's tax liability. • In certain instances, unlike other ETFs, the Fund may effect creations and redemptions partly or wholly for cash, rather than in-kind, which may make the Fund less tax-efficient and incur more fees than an ETF that primarily or wholly effects creations and redemptions in-kind.
Composition by Security Type(1)
as of 07/31/2022
Category Percentage of
Net Assets
Equity Securities  
Convertible Preferred Stocks 0.5%
Escrows 0.6
Total 1.1%
Fixed Income Securities  
Asset & Commercial Mortgage-Backed Securities 5.3%
Convertible Bonds 2.8
Corporate Bonds 33.9
Foreign Government Obligations 19.7
Senior Floating Rate Interests 13.8
U.S. Government Agencies(2) 10.3
U.S. Government Securities 19.8
Total 105.6%
Other Assets & Liabilities (6.7)
Total 100.0%
    
(1) For Fund compliance purposes, the Fund may not use the same classification system. These classifications are used for financial reporting purposes.
(2) All, or a portion of the securities categorized as U.S. Government Agencies, were agency mortgage-backed securities as of July 31, 2022.

27


Table of Contents
Hartford Total Return Bond ETF
 Fund Overview
 July 31, 2022 (Unaudited) 

Inception 09/27/2017
Sub-advised by Wellington Management Company LLP
Investment objective – The Fund seeks a competitive total return, with income as a secondary objective.
Comparison of Change in Value of $10,000 Investment (09/27/2017 - 07/31/2022)
The chart above represents the hypothetical growth of a $10,000 investment in the Fund.
Average Annual Total Returns
for the Periods Ended 07/31/2022
  1 Year Since
Inception1
Total Return Bond ETF (NAV Return) -10.58% 1.46%
Total Return Bond ETF (Market Price Return) -11.04% 1.38%
Bloomberg US Aggregate Bond Index -9.12% 1.25%
    
1 Inception: 09/27/2017
Information regarding how often shares of the Fund traded on NYSE Arca at a price above (i.e., at a premium) or below (i.e., at a discount) the NAV of the Fund can be found at hartfordfunds.com.
PERFORMANCE DATA QUOTED REPRESENTS PAST PERFORMANCE AND DOES NOT GUARANTEE FUTURE RESULTS. The investment return and principal value of the investment will fluctuate so that investors’ shares, when redeemed or sold, may be worth more or less than their original cost. The chart and table do not reflect the deductions of taxes that a shareholder would pay on Fund distributions or the redemption or sale of Fund shares. Current performance may be lower or higher than the performance data quoted. To obtain performance data current to the most recent month-end, please visit our website hartfordfunds.com.
Total returns for the report period presented in the table may differ from the return in the Financial Highlights. The total return presented in the Financial Highlights section of the report is calculated in the same manner, but also takes into account certain adjustments that are necessary under generally accepted accounting principles.
ETF shares are bought and sold at market price, not net asset value (NAV). Total returns are calculated using the daily 4:00 p.m. Eastern Time NAV. Market price returns reflect the midpoint of the bid/ask spread as of the close of trading on the exchange where Fund shares are listed. Market price returns do not represent the returns an investor would receive if they traded shares at other times. Brokerage commissions apply and will reduce returns.
The index is unmanaged, and its results include reinvested dividends and/or distributions, but do not reflect the effect of sales charges, commissions, expenses or taxes.
You cannot invest directly in an index.
See “Benchmark Glossary” for benchmark descriptions.
The total annual fund operating expense ratio as shown in the Fund’s most recent prospectus was 0.29%. Actual expenses may be higher or lower. Please see the accompanying Financial Highlights for expense ratios for the year ended 07/31/2022.
 

28


Table of Contents
Hartford Total Return Bond ETF
 Fund Overview – (continued)
 July 31, 2022 (Unaudited) 

Portfolio Managers
Joseph F. Marvan, CFA
Senior Managing Director and Fixed Income Portfolio Manager
Wellington Management Company LLP
Campe Goodman, CFA
Senior Managing Director and Fixed Income Portfolio Manager
Wellington Management Company LLP
Robert D. Burn, CFA
Managing Director and Fixed Income Portfolio Manager
Wellington Management Company LLP


Manager Discussion
How did the Fund perform during the period?
Hartford Total Return Bond ETF returned -10.58%, based on net asset value, for the one-year period ended July 31, 2022, underperforming its benchmark, the Bloomberg US Aggregate Bond Index (the “Index”), which returned -9.12% for the same period. The Fund also underperformed the -9.77% average return of the Lipper Core Bond Funds peer group, a group of funds with investment strategies similar to those of the Fund.
Why did the Fund perform this way?
United States (U.S.) fixed income markets generated negative returns during the one-year period ended July 31, 2022. The Index generated a return of -9.12% during the period. During the fiscal year ended July 31, 2022, global sovereign debt yields moved sharply higher as most major central banks moved aggressively to raise interest rates to deal with high inflation. Most fixed-income credit risk sectors underperformed government bonds amid increasing concerns that tighter financial conditions resulting from less accommodative monetary policy could tip the global economy into recession. Inflation pressures remained acute throughout the first six months of 2022, although commodity prices declined sharply late in the period to provide some relief. U.S. labor market strength persisted during the same period, while housing market resilience was tested by surging mortgage rates, lack of inventory, and home price appreciation. Investment-grade corporate spreads widened by 0.58%, while high-yield corporate spreads widened by 1.75%, according to Bloomberg Index data.
Within the G10, select central banks, including the U.S. Federal Reserve (Fed), the Reserve Bank of Australia (RBA), and the Riksbank raised interest rates significantly. The European Central Bank (ECB) announced its plan to end quantitative easing and start raising interest rates beginning in July 2022, with President Lagarde suggesting a larger increase would be appropriate in September, if inflation pressures persist. Emerging-markets central banks, particularly across Latin America and Central and Eastern Europe Middle East and Africa (CEEMEA), also continued lifting their policy rates in bigger increments, while Asian central banks raised interest rates more modestly than other emerging-markets regions. The Bank of Japan (BOJ) and the People’s Bank of China (PBOC) were the
notable exceptions in terms of retaining accommodative monetary policy. Disruptions emanating from COVID-19 related mobility restrictions sharply weakened Chinese economic data, while inflation remained much more muted in Japan compared to the rest of the world.
Global gross domestic product (GDP) growth largely continued to recover during the first part of the period. By the end of the period, GDP exhibited some divergence, with notable contraction in the U.S. and Japan. After Russia’s surprise invasion of Ukraine, sanctions imposed on Russia by the West and its allies led to retaliatory measures from Moscow including restrictions in gas supplies to parts of Europe, raising concerns about Europe’s energy security. By the end of the period, global growth had slowed moderately, driven by tightening financial conditions, but inflation continued to surprise on the upside and most major central banks became more focused on tightening monetary policy in response.
Over the period, the U.S. dollar rallied strongly versus most currencies as it became increasingly clear that the Fed would likely raise interest rates more aggressively to counter persistently high inflation. By the end of the period, the Japanese Yen declined to its weakest level since 1998, as the BOJ remained the outlier among major G10 central banks in not tightening monetary policy. Commodity-linked currencies across developing markets and emerging markets that have historically had higher volatility (such as the South African rand, Norwegian krone, New Zealand dollar, and Brazilian real) were the other major underperformers as recession concerns came to the forefront by the end of the period. European currencies generally ended lower versus the U.S. dollar. Absolute and excess returns were negative across fixed income sectors over the period. On an excess return basis, select securitized sectors were among the best performers.
The Fund’s overweight to and out-of-benchmark exposure to credit risk sectors during the period represented the primary detractors from performance relative to the Index, as government bonds outperformed risk assets in light of heightened market volatility. The Fund’s allocation to structured finance sectors negatively affected relative performance, particularly the Fund’s exposure to non-agency residential mortgage-backed securities (RMBS). An overweight to agency MBS pass-throughs detracted from performance relative to the Index as well given the increase in interest rate volatility, as well as
 

29


Table of Contents
Hartford Total Return Bond ETF
 Fund Overview – (continued)
 July 31, 2022 (Unaudited) 

expectations for balance sheet normalization. Out-of-benchmark exposure to high yield had a negative impact over the period, while exposure to bank loans had a neutral impact as the sector held up much better than high yield given the floating interest rates typically associated with bank loans. The Fund’s allocation to emerging markets (EM) sovereign and corporate debt had a negative impact on relative performance as the sector remained under pressure from rising inflation, interest-rate increases, and a strong U.S. dollar. The Fund’s positioning within investment grade credit contributed positively to performance relative to the Index. The Fund’s allocation to Treasury Inflation Protected Securities (TIPS) contributed positively to relative performance as inflation expectations increased during the period. The Fund held tactical interest rate positions during the period, including interest-rate futures and swaps, which detracted overall from performance relative to the Index during the period.
What is the outlook as of the end of the period?
We observe a number of dislocations across credit sectors, creating what we consider to be opportunities for relative value trades, and we believe some sector valuations are significantly attractive relative to their fundamentals. Over the medium term, our base case is still for us to reduce risk gradually as monetary policy tightening continues and risks to 2023 economic growth appear to continue to build, but we expect to continue to rotate investments among relative value opportunities in the months ahead to take advantage of dislocations.
The Fund ended the period with an underweight positioning to investment-grade credit in favor of higher-yielding and securitized sectors. The Fund maintained an overweight to agency MBS pass-throughs with a focus on what we consider to be relative value opportunities. The Fund also held structured finance exposure tied to residential mortgages, high-quality collateralized loan obligations, collateralized mortgage obligations, and senior CMBS tranches with attractive collateral. Additionally, as of the end of the period the Fund held an out-of-benchmark allocation to high yield as we expect default rates to remain low, and maintained an allocation to bank loans, which we believe will benefit from higher policy rates. The Fund continued to hold select exposure to EM debt as of the end of the period, where we see attractive valuations and improving fundamentals.
Important Risks
Investing involves risk, including the possible loss of principal. The net asset value (NAV) of the Fund’s shares may fluctuate due to changes in the market value of the Fund’s holdings which may in-turn fluctuate due to market and economic conditions. The Fund’s share price may fluctuate due to changes in the relative supply of and demand for the shares on an exchange. The Fund may allocate a portion of its assets to specialist portfolio managers, which may not work as intended. • Fixed income security risks include credit, liquidity, call, duration,
event, and interest-rate risk. As interest rates rise, bond prices generally fall. • The risks associated with mortgage-related and asset-backed securities include credit, interest-rate, prepayment, liquidity, default and extension risk. • The purchase of securities in the To-Be-Announced (TBA) market can result in higher portfolio turnover and related expenses as well as price and counterparty risk. • Derivatives are generally more volatile and sensitive to changes in market or economic conditions than other securities; their risks include currency, leverage, liquidity, index, pricing, and counterparty risk. • Foreign investments may be more volatile and less liquid than U.S. investments and are subject to the risk of currency fluctuations and adverse political and economic developments. These risks may be greater for investments in emerging markets. • High-yield ("junk") bonds involve greater risk of price volatility, illiquidity, and default than higher-rated debt securities. • Obligations of U.S. Government agencies are supported by varying degrees of credit but are generally not backed by the full faith and credit of the U.S. Government. • Restricted securities may be more difficult to sell and price than other securities. • The Fund may have high portfolio turnover, which could increase its transaction costs and an investor’s tax liability. • In certain instances, unlike other ETFs, the Fund may effect creations and redemptions partly or wholly for cash, rather than in-kind, which may make the Fund less tax-efficient and incur more fees than an ETF that primarily or wholly effects creations and redemptions in-kind.
Composition by Security Type(1)
as of 07/31/2022
Category Percentage of
Net Assets
Equity Securities  
Common Stocks 0.0% *
Fixed Income Securities  
Asset & Commercial Mortgage-Backed Securities 25.2%
Corporate Bonds 31.4
Foreign Government Obligations 5.1
Municipal Bonds 1.5
Senior Floating Rate Interests 2.0
U.S. Government Agencies(2) 43.1
U.S. Government Securities 14.5
Total 122.8%
Short-Term Investments 0.5
Other Assets & Liabilities (23.3)
Total 100.0%
    
* Percentage rounds to zero.
    
(1) For Fund compliance purposes, the Fund may not use the same classification system. These classifications are used for financial reporting purposes.
(2) All, or a portion of the securities categorized as U.S. Government Agencies, were agency mortgage-backed securities as of July 31, 2022.
  

30


Table of Contents
Hartford Active ETFs
Benchmark Glossary (Unaudited)

Bloomberg 1-3 Year US Government/Credit Index (reflects no deduction for fees, expenses or taxes) is comprised of the US Government/Credit component of the Bloomberg US Aggregate Bond Index. The 1-3 Year Government/Credit Index includes securities in the 1-3 year maturity range in the Government/Credit Index.
Bloomberg Municipal Bond 1-15 Year Blend (1-17) Index (reflects no deduction for fees, expenses or taxes) is a sub-index of the Bloomberg Municipal Bond Index. It is a rules-based market value-weighted index of bonds with maturities of 1 year to 17 years engineered for the tax-exempt bond market.
Bloomberg Municipal Bond Index (reflects no deduction for fees, expenses or taxes) is designed to cover the USD-denominated long-term tax-exempt bond market.
Bloomberg US Aggregate Bond Index (reflects no deduction for fees, expenses or taxes) is composed of securities that cover the US investment grade fixed rate bond market, with index components for government and corporate securities, mortgage pass-through securities, and asset-backed securities.
Bloomberg Commodity Index Total Return (reflects no deduction for fees, expenses or taxes) is composed of futures contracts and reflects the returns on a fully collateralized investment in the Bloomberg Commodity Index ("BCOM"). This combines the returns of the BCOM with the returns on cash collateral invested in 13 week (3 Month) US Treasury bills.
Russell 1000 Growth Index (reflects no deduction for fees, expenses or taxes) is designed to measure the performance of those Russell 1000 Index companies with higher price-to-book ratios and higher forecasted growth values. The Russell 1000 Index is designed to measure the performance of the 1,000 largest companies in the Russell 3000 Index based on their market capitalization and current index membership.
Russell 1000 Index (reflects no deduction for fees, expenses or taxes) is designed to measure the performance of the 1,000 largest companies in the Russell 3000 Index. The Russell 3000 Index is designed to measure the performance of the 3,000 largest US companies based on total market capitalizations.
“Bloomberg®” and the above referenced Bloomberg index(es) are service marks of Bloomberg Finance L.P. and its affiliates, including Bloomberg Index Services Limited (“BISL”), the administrator of the index (collectively, “Bloomberg”), and have been licensed for use for certain purposes by Hartford Funds Management Company, LLC ("HFMC"). The Funds are not sponsored, endorsed, sold or promoted by Bloomberg. Bloomberg does not make any representation or warranty, express or implied, to the owners of or counterparties to the Funds or any member of the public regarding the advisability of investing in securities generally or in the Funds particularly. The only relationship of Bloomberg to HFMC is the licensing of certain trademarks, trade names and service marks and of the above referenced Bloomberg index(es), which is determined, composed and calculated by BISL without regard to HFMC or the Funds. Bloomberg has no obligation to take the needs of HFMC or the owners of the Funds into consideration in determining, composing or calculating the
above referenced Bloomberg index(es). Bloomberg is not responsible for and has not participated in the determination of the timing of, prices at, or quantities of the Funds to be issued. Bloomberg shall not have any obligation or liability, including, without limitation, to the Funds' customers, in connection with the administration, marketing or trading of the Funds.
BLOOMBERG DOES NOT GUARANTEE THE ACCURACY AND/OR THE COMPLETENESS OF THE ABOVE REFERENCED BLOOMBERG INDEX(ES) OR ANY DATA RELATED THERETO AND SHALL HAVE NO LIABILITY FOR ANY ERRORS, OMISSIONS OR INTERRUPTIONS THEREIN. BLOOMBERG DOES NOT MAKE ANY WARRANTY, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, AS TO RESULTS TO BE OBTAINED BY HFMC, OWNERS OF THE FUNDS OR ANY OTHER PERSON OR ENTITY FROM THE USE OF THE ABOVE REFERENCED BLOOMBERG INDEX(ES) OR ANY DATA RELATED THERETO. BLOOMBERG DOES NOT MAKE ANY EXPRESS OR IMPLIED WARRANTIES AND EXPRESSLY DISCLAIMS ALL WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY OR FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE OR USE WITH RESPECT TO THE ABOVE REFERENCED BLOOMBERG INDEX(ES) OR ANY DATA RELATED THERETO. WITHOUT LIMITING ANY OF THE FOREGOING, TO THE MAXIMUM EXTENT ALLOWED BY LAW, BLOOMBERG, ITS LICENSORS, AND ITS AND THEIR RESPECTIVE EMPLOYEES, CONTRACTORS, AGENTS, SUPPLIERS, AND VENDORS SHALL HAVE NO LIABILITY OR RESPONSIBILITY WHATSOEVER FOR ANY INJURY OR DAMAGES --WHETHER DIRECT, INDIRECT, CONSEQUENTIAL, INCIDENTAL, PUNITIVE OR OTHERWISE --ARISING IN CONNECTION WITH THE ABOVE REFERENCED BLOOMBERG INDEX(ES) OR ANY DATA OR VALUES RELATING THERETO --WHETHER ARISING FROM THEIR NEGLIGENCE OR OTHERWISE, EVEN IF NOTIFIED OF THE POSSIBILITY THEREOF.
 

31


Table of Contents
Hartford Active ETFs
Expense Examples (Unaudited)

Your Fund's Expenses
As a shareholder of a Fund, you incur two types of costs: (1) transaction costs, including brokerage commissions paid on purchases and sales of Fund shares and (2) ongoing costs, including investment management fees and certain other fund expenses. This example is intended to help you understand your ongoing costs (in dollars) of investing in a Fund and to compare these costs with the ongoing costs of investing in other exchange-traded funds. The example is based on an investment of $1,000 invested at the beginning of the period and held for the entire period of February 1, 2022 through July 31, 2022. To the extent a Fund was subject to acquired fund fees and expenses during the period, acquired fund fees and expenses are not included in the annualized expense ratio below.
Actual Expenses
The first set of columns of the table below provides information about actual account values and actual expenses. You may use this information, together with the amount you invested, to estimate the expenses that you paid over the period. Simply divide your account value by $1,000 (for example, an $8,600 account value divided by $1,000 = 8.6), then multiply the result by the number in the line under the heading entitled “Expenses Paid During the Period” to estimate the expenses you paid on your account during this period.
Hypothetical Example for Comparison Purposes
The second set of columns of the table below provides information about hypothetical account values and hypothetical expenses based on a Fund’s actual expense ratio and an assumed rate of return of 5% per year before expenses, which is not the Fund’s actual return. The hypothetical account values and expenses may not be used to estimate the actual ending account balance or expenses you paid for the period. You may use this information to compare the ongoing costs of investing in a Fund and other funds. To do so, compare this 5% hypothetical example with the 5% hypothetical examples that appear in the shareholder reports of the other funds.
Please note that the expenses shown in the table are meant to highlight your ongoing costs only and do not reflect any transactional costs, such as brokerage commissions paid on purchases and sales of shares of the Funds. Therefore, the second set of columns of the table is useful in comparing ongoing costs only, and will not help you determine the relative total costs of owning different exchange-traded funds. In addition, if these transactional costs were included, your costs would be higher. Expense ratios may vary period to period because of various factors, such as an increase in expenses not covered by the management fee (including expenses of the independent trustees and their counsel, extraordinary expenses and interest expense). Expenses are equal to a Fund's annualized expense ratio multiplied by average account value over the period, multiplied by 181/365 (to reflect the one-half year period).
  Actual Return   Hypothetical (5% return before expenses)
  Beginning
Account Value
February 1, 2022
  Ending
Account Value
July 31, 2022
  Expenses Paid
During the Period
February 1, 2022
through
July 31, 2022
  Beginning
Account Value
February 1, 2022
  Ending
Account Value
July 31, 2022
  Expenses Paid
During the Period
February 1, 2022
through
July 31, 2022
  Annualized
expense
ratio
Hartford Core Bond ETF $ 1,000.00   $  929.10   $ 1.39   $ 1,000.00   $ 1,023.36   $ 1.45   0.29%
Hartford Large Cap Growth ETF $ 1,000.00   $  782.00   $ 2.61   $ 1,000.00   $ 1,021.87   $ 2.96   0.59%
Hartford Municipal Opportunities ETF $ 1,000.00   $  960.20   $ 1.41   $ 1,000.00   $ 1,023.36   $ 1.45   0.29%
Hartford Schroders Commodity Strategy ETF (Consolidated) $ 1,000.00   $ 1,152.90   $ 4.75   $ 1,000.00   $ 1,020.38   $ 4.46   0.89%
Hartford Schroders ESG US Equity ETF $ 1,000.00   $  919.50   $ 1.86   $ 1,000.00   $ 1,022.86   $ 1.96   0.39%
Hartford Schroders Tax-Aware Bond ETF $ 1,000.00   $  962.50   $ 1.90   $ 1,000.00   $ 1,022.86   $ 1.96   0.39%
Hartford Short Duration ETF $ 1,000.00   $  968.80   $ 1.42   $ 1,000.00   $ 1,023.36   $ 1.45   0.29%
Hartford Sustainable Income ETF $ 1,000.00   $  903.20   $ 2.55   $ 1,000.00   $ 1,022.12   $ 2.71   0.54%
Hartford Total Return Bond ETF $ 1,000.00   $  921.90   $ 1.38   $ 1,000.00   $ 1,023.36   $ 1.45   0.29%

32


Table of Contents
Hartford Core Bond ETF
Schedule of Investments
July 31, 2022  

Shares or Principal Amount   Market Value†
ASSET & COMMERCIAL MORTGAGE-BACKED SECURITIES - 21.9%
  Asset-Backed - Automobile - 0.4%
$      105,000 Prestige Auto Receivables Trust 1.62%, 11/16/2026(1) $     102,245
    380,000 Santander Drive Auto Receivables Trust 4.42%, 11/15/2027      382,468
     53,643 Tricolor Auto Securitization Trust 0.74%, 04/15/2024(1)       53,377
            Westlake Automobile Receivables Trust  
    105,000 1.65%, 02/17/2026(1)      101,071
    280,000 4.31%, 09/15/2027(1)     278,992
      918,153
  Asset-Backed - Credit Card - 0.0%
110,000 Mercury Financial Credit Card Master Trust 1.54%, 03/20/2026(1) 104,404
  Asset-Backed - Finance & Insurance - 4.9%
380,000 Bain Capital Credit CLO Ltd. 3.96%, 07/25/2034, 3 mo. USD LIBOR + 1.180%(1)(2) 368,230
580,000 Barings CLO Ltd. 3.90%, 10/20/2030, 3 mo. USD LIBOR + 1.190%(1)(2) 572,776
83,475 BHG Securitization Trust 0.90%, 10/17/2034(1) 79,125
  BlueMountain CLO Ltd.  
460,000 2.67%, 11/20/2034, 3 mo. USD LIBOR + 1.190%(1)(2) 446,459
250,000 3.81%, 04/20/2034, 3 mo. USD LIBOR + 1.100%(1)(2) 241,539
470,000 3.89%, 04/19/2034, 3 mo. USD LIBOR + 1.150%(1)(2) 455,258
246,409 Carlyle Global Market Strategies CLO Ltd. 2.46%, 05/15/2031, 3 mo. USD LIBOR + 1.050%(1)(2) 240,694
  Carlyle U.S. CLO Ltd.  
270,000 3.73%, 04/20/2031, 3 mo. USD LIBOR + 1.020%(1)(2) 265,410
250,000 3.79%, 04/20/2034, 3 mo. USD LIBOR + 1.080%(1)(2) 242,973
300,000 CIFC Funding Ltd. 3.88%, 10/20/2034, 3 mo. USD LIBOR + 1.170%(1)(2) 290,244
  Dryden CLO Ltd.  
270,000 3.53%, 04/15/2031, 3 mo. USD LIBOR + 1.020%(1)(2) 264,535
410,000 3.84%, 07/17/2034, 3 mo. USD LIBOR + 1.100%(1)(2) 396,649
15,620 FREED ABS Trust 0.62%, 11/20/2028(1) 15,579
640,000 FS Rialto 3.41%, 11/16/2036, 1 mo. USD LIBOR + 1.250%(1)(2) 615,059
785,000 Galaxy XXIV CLO Ltd. 3.63%, 01/15/2031, 3 mo. USD LIBOR + 1.120%(1)(2) 772,287
  Madison Park Funding Ltd.  
270,000 3.77%, 01/15/2033, 3 mo. USD LIBOR + 1.260%(1)(2) 265,434
385,000 3.86%, 07/17/2034, 3 mo. USD LIBOR + 1.120%(1)(2) 373,090
250,000 Magnetite Ltd. 3.81%, 07/20/2031, 3 mo. USD LIBOR + 1.100%(1)(2) 245,719
99,432 Marlette Funding Trust 0.65%, 12/15/2031(1) 97,370
330,000 MF1 Multifamily Housing Mortgage 3.22%, 02/19/2037, 3 mo USD SOFR + 1.750%(1)(2) 314,360
  Octagon Investment Partners Ltd.  
785,000 2.41%, 02/14/2031, 3 mo. USD LIBOR + 1.000%(1)(2) 767,141
255,000 3.67%, 04/15/2035(1)(2) 244,954
  Progress Residential Trust  
404,782 1.51%, 10/17/2038(1) 365,138
108,000 4.45%, 06/17/2039(1) 109,381
Shares or Principal Amount   Market Value†
ASSET & COMMERCIAL MORTGAGE-BACKED SECURITIES - 21.9% - (continued)
  Asset-Backed - Finance & Insurance - 4.9% - (continued)
$      345,000 Regatta Funding Ltd. 3.87%, 04/20/2034, 3 mo. USD LIBOR + 1.160%(1)(2) $     334,354
    395,000 RR LLC 3.66%, 07/15/2035, 3 mo. USD LIBOR + 1.150%(1)(2)      382,732
    340,000 RR Ltd. 3.62%, 07/15/2036, 3 mo. USD LIBOR + 1.110%(1)(2)      329,017
            Sound Point CLO Ltd.  
    785,000 3.51%, 04/15/2031, 3 mo. USD LIBOR + 1.000%(1)(2)      766,019
    390,000 3.85%, 04/25/2034, 3 mo. USD LIBOR + 1.070%(1)(2)      378,704
217,073 Upstart Securitization Trust 0.84%, 09/20/2031(1) 208,643
  Venture CLO Ltd.  
390,000 3.64%, 04/15/2034, 3 mo. USD LIBOR + 1.130%(1)(2) 373,731
660,000 3.66%, 07/15/2032, 3 mo. USD LIBOR + 1.150%(1)(2) 642,881
150,000 3.75%, 04/15/2034, 3 mo. USD LIBOR + 1.240%(1)(2) 145,843
250,000 Voya CLO Ltd. 3.93%, 10/18/2031, 3 mo. USD LIBOR + 1.190%(1)(2) 245,775
300,000 Wellfleet CLO Ltd. 3.88%, 07/20/2032, 3 mo. USD LIBOR + 1.170%(1)(2) 292,208
      12,149,311
  Commercial Mortgage-Backed Securities - 3.7%
120,000 Barclays Commercial Mortgage Trust 4.60%, 06/15/2055(3) 126,828
  Benchmark Mortgage Trust  
562,182 1.52%, 01/15/2054(3)(4) 54,189
618,054 1.79%, 07/15/2053(3)(4) 54,482
181,302 BX Commercial Mortgage Trust 2.92%, 10/15/2036, 1 mo. USD LIBOR + 0.920%(1)(2) 178,655
69,340 Citigroup Commercial Mortgage Trust 3.61%, 11/10/2048 68,898
  Commercial Mortgage Trust  
100,000 2.82%, 01/10/2039(1) 92,265
35,000 3.18%, 02/10/2048 34,384
150,000 3.31%, 03/10/2048 147,449
110,000 3.38%, 01/10/2039(1) 99,836
210,000 3.61%, 08/10/2049(1)(3) 204,021
30,000 CSAIL Commercial Mortgage Trust 4.36%, 11/15/2051(3) 30,467
97,883 CSMC Trust 2.26%, 08/15/2037(1) 90,776
280,000 DBGS Mortgage Trust 4.47%, 10/15/2051 287,155
  DBJPM Mortgage Trust  
468,466 1.71%, 09/15/2053(3)(4) 36,584
37,192 3.04%, 05/10/2049 36,482
154,711 FirstKey Homes Trust 4.15%, 05/17/2039(1) 153,920
  FREMF Mortgage Trust  
295,000 3.61%, 04/25/2048(1)(3) 290,235
90,000 3.67%, 11/25/2049(1)(3) 88,570
230,000 3.76%, 07/25/2026(1)(3) 225,677
225,000 3.94%, 06/25/2049(1)(3) 222,377
315,000 4.16%, 08/25/2047(1)(3) 313,250
  GS Mortgage Securities Trust  
45,000 2.69%, 08/15/2024, 1 mo. USD SOFR + 0.731% 44,123
375,000 3.44%, 11/10/2049(3) 365,735
200,000 Hawaii Hotel Trust 3.15%, 05/15/2038, 1 mo. USD LIBOR + 1.150%(1)(2) 194,727
1,097,000 JP Morgan Chase Commercial Mortgage Securities Trust 2.82%, 08/15/2049 1,052,598
 
The accompanying notes are an integral part of these financial statements.

33


Table of Contents
Hartford Core Bond ETF
Schedule of Investments – (continued)
July 31, 2022  

Shares or Principal Amount   Market Value†
ASSET & COMMERCIAL MORTGAGE-BACKED SECURITIES - 21.9% - (continued)
  Commercial Mortgage-Backed Securities - 3.7% - (continued)
            JPMBB Commercial Mortgage Securities Trust  
$      113,838 2.95%, 06/15/2049 $     111,775
    150,000 3.24%, 10/15/2050      147,551
     66,350 3.56%, 12/15/2048       65,681
    635,000 3.58%, 03/17/2049      627,425
    632,000 JPMDB Commercial Mortgage Securities Trust 3.14%, 12/15/2049      608,941
  Morgan Stanley Bank of America Merrill Lynch Trust  
    100,000 2.92%, 02/15/2046       99,437
210,000 3.53%, 12/15/2047 207,359
150,000 One Market Plaza Trust 3.61%, 02/10/2032(1) 147,292
50,000 SG Commercial Mortgage Securities Trust 2.63%, 03/15/2037(1) 47,517
100,000 VNDO Mortgage Trust 3.00%, 11/15/2030(1) 99,827
  Wells Fargo Commercial Mortgage Trust  
360,000 3.15%, 05/15/2048 352,692
719,000 3.43%, 03/15/2059 706,881
67,242 3.52%, 12/15/2048 66,438
420,000 3.64%, 03/15/2050 414,737
235,000 3.81%, 12/15/2048 233,891
  Wells Fargo N.A.  
4,016,872 0.64%, 11/15/2062(3)(4) 154,208
962,956 0.94%, 02/15/2052(3)(4) 45,474
1,490,571 1.34%, 11/15/2053(3)(4) 121,763
1,275,198 1.78%, 03/15/2063(3)(4) 137,499
170,000 2.04%, 02/15/2054 147,423
145,000 4.41%, 11/15/2061(3) 149,262
23,447 WFRBS Commercial Mortgage Trust 2.98%, 06/15/2046 23,372
      9,210,128
  Other Asset-Backed Securities - 2.8%
  Affirm Asset Securitization Trust  
47,400 1.90%, 01/15/2025(1) 46,548
18,649 3.46%, 10/15/2024(1) 18,559
100,000 Arbor Realty Commercial Real Estate Notes Ltd. 3.10%, 05/15/2036, 1 mo. USD LIBOR + 1.100%(1)(2) 97,510
150,000 Avant Loans Funding Trust 1.21%, 07/15/2030(1) 141,398
85,207 Bayview Mortgage Fund Trust 3.50%, 01/28/2058(1)(3) 83,569
66,132 Bayview Opportunity Master Fund Trust 3.50%, 06/28/2057(1)(3) 65,410
153,063 Domino's Pizza Master Issuer LLC 2.66%, 04/25/2051(1) 135,072
270,000 KKR CLO Ltd. 3.51%, 04/15/2031, 3 mo. USD LIBOR + 1.000%(1)(2) 264,999
186,650 Navient Private Education Refi Loan Trust 0.97%, 12/16/2069(1) 167,464
330,000 New Residential Advance Receivables Trust 1.43%, 08/15/2053(1) 315,475
305,000 NRZ Advance Receivables Trust 1.48%, 09/15/2053(1) 290,854
  Pretium Mortgage Credit Partners LLC  
210,810 1.74%, 07/25/2051(1)(5) 201,101
577,040 1.84%, 09/25/2051(1)(5) 536,588
135,749 1.87%, 07/25/2051(1)(5) 126,399
263,450 1.99%, 02/25/2061(1)(5) 252,507
492,779 2.36%, 10/27/2060(1)(5) 464,620
585,025 2.49%, 10/25/2051(1)(5) 556,970
  Progress Residential Trust  
145,000 3.20%, 04/17/2039(1) 138,444
400,000 4.44%, 05/17/2041(1) 402,904
Shares or Principal Amount   Market Value†
ASSET & COMMERCIAL MORTGAGE-BACKED SECURITIES - 21.9% - (continued)
  Other Asset-Backed Securities - 2.8% - (continued)
$      100,000 Regional Management Issuance Trust 2.34%, 10/15/2030(1) $      93,754
    123,251 SCF Equipment Leasing 1.19%, 10/20/2027(1)      120,538
     51,777 SoFi Consumer Loan Program Trust 0.49%, 09/25/2030(1)       50,263
     60,000 Stack Infrastructure Issuer LLC 1.89%, 08/25/2045(1)       55,186
     75,000 Summit Issuer LLC 2.29%, 12/20/2050(1)       68,717
    655,000 Tricon Residential Trust 3.86%, 04/17/2039(1)      640,823
85,005 Upstart Securitization Trust 0.83%, 07/20/2031(1) 82,535
235,000 Vantage Data Centers Issuer LLC 1.65%, 09/15/2045(1) 214,664
312,455 VOLT CIII LLC 1.99%, 08/25/2051(1)(5) 299,568
222,639 VOLT XCIII LLC 1.89%, 02/27/2051(1)(5) 210,087
167,190 VOLT XCIV LLC 2.24%, 02/27/2051(1)(5) 159,403
199,936 VOLT XCIX LLC 2.12%, 04/25/2051(1)(5) 190,884
126,514 VOLT XCV LLC 2.24%, 03/27/2051(1)(5) 120,013
202,950 Wendy's Funding LLC 2.37%, 06/15/2051(1) 174,192
99,500 Wingstop Funding LLC 2.84%, 12/05/2050(1) 87,954
      6,874,972
  Packaging & Containers - 0.1%
235,000 245 Park Avenue Trust 3.51%, 06/05/2037(1) 222,703
  Whole Loan Collateral CMO - 10.0%
386,268 510 Asset Backed Trust 2.12%, 06/25/2061(1)(5) 360,683
  Angel Oak Mortgage Trust  
111,208 0.91%, 01/25/2066(1)(3) 102,670
377,750 0.95%, 07/25/2066(1)(3) 353,741
83,908 0.99%, 04/25/2053(1)(3) 80,732
93,600 0.99%, 04/25/2066(1)(3) 88,853
231,806 1.04%, 01/20/2065(1)(3) 198,123
181,145 1.07%, 05/25/2066(1)(3) 162,506
518,838 1.46%, 09/25/2066(1)(3) 442,717
36,789 1.47%, 06/25/2065(1)(3) 35,086
59,521 1.69%, 04/25/2065(1)(3) 54,499
263,781 1.82%, 11/25/2066(1)(3) 239,663
650,167 2.88%, 12/25/2066(1)(5) 610,570
10,132 Angel Oak Mortgage Trust LLC 3.65%, 09/25/2048(1)(3) 10,063
37,324 Arroyo Mortgage Trust 3.81%, 01/25/2049(1)(3) 35,958
178,416 BINOM Securitization Trust 2.03%, 06/25/2056(1)(3) 163,429
  BRAVO Residential Funding Trust  
70,142 0.94%, 02/25/2049(1)(3) 65,502
111,845 0.97%, 03/25/2060(1)(3) 109,035
429,720 1.62%, 03/01/2061(1)(5) 398,122
  Bunker Hill Loan Depositary Trust  
73,201 1.72%, 02/25/2055(1)(3) 70,710
30,760 2.88%, 07/25/2049(1)(5) 29,702
82,375 Cascade MH Asset Trust 1.75%, 02/25/2046(1) 75,577
486,428 CIM Trust 1.43%, 07/25/2061(1)(3) 444,874
  COLT Mortgage Loan Trust  
47,572 0.80%, 07/27/2054(1) 44,054
146,121 0.91%, 06/25/2066(1)(3) 129,015
221,284 0.92%, 08/25/2066(1)(3) 190,572
415,417 0.96%, 09/27/2066(1)(3) 345,272
533,908 1.11%, 10/25/2066(1)(3) 472,632
60,505 1.33%, 10/26/2065(1)(3) 56,905
269,729 1.39%, 01/25/2065(1)(3) 243,502
43,086 1.51%, 04/27/2065(1)(3) 41,221
614,009 2.28%, 12/27/2066(1)(3) 556,464
102,311 4.30%, 03/25/2067(1)(3) 100,789
 
The accompanying notes are an integral part of these financial statements.

34


Table of Contents
Hartford Core Bond ETF
Schedule of Investments – (continued)
July 31, 2022  

Shares or Principal Amount   Market Value†
ASSET & COMMERCIAL MORTGAGE-BACKED SECURITIES - 21.9% - (continued)
  Whole Loan Collateral CMO - 10.0% - (continued)
            CSMC Trust  
$      106,375 0.83%, 03/25/2056(1)(3) $      92,105
    217,005 0.94%, 05/25/2066(1)(3)      186,873
    530,522 1.17%, 07/25/2066(1)(3)      450,830
    204,061 1.18%, 02/25/2066(1)(3)      193,243
    103,413 1.21%, 05/25/2065(1)(5)       97,930
     88,070 1.80%, 12/27/2060(1)(3)       83,535
    261,509 1.84%, 10/25/2066(1)(3)      238,382
184,638 2.00%, 01/25/2060(1)(3) 171,347
624,440 2.27%, 11/25/2066(1)(3) 557,869
  Deephaven Residential Mortgage Trust  
32,917 0.72%, 05/25/2065(1)(3) 31,537
67,496 0.90%, 04/25/2066(1)(3) 58,625
  Ellington Financial Mortgage Trust  
40,531 0.80%, 02/25/2066(1)(3) 36,541
66,640 0.93%, 06/25/2066(1)(3) 59,097
32,983 1.18%, 10/25/2065(1)(3) 31,220
368,487 1.24%, 09/25/2066(1)(3) 326,589
292,366 2.21%, 01/25/2067(1)(3) 266,817
590,000 FirstKey Homes Trust 4.25%, 07/17/2039(1) 587,952
  GCAT Trust  
137,336 0.87%, 01/25/2066(1)(3) 131,164
124,325 1.04%, 05/25/2066(1)(3) 116,007
360,786 1.09%, 08/25/2066(1)(3) 312,394
530,300 1.26%, 07/25/2066(1)(3) 455,811
26,108 1.56%, 04/25/2065(1)(5) 24,949
208,058 1.92%, 08/25/2066(1)(3) 197,516
11,965 2.25%, 01/25/2060(1)(5) 11,613
  Imperial Fund Mortgage Trust  
209,284 1.07%, 09/25/2056(1)(3) 180,594
616,549 2.09%, 01/25/2057(1)(3) 529,962
679,317 3.64%, 03/25/2067(1)(5) 649,710
  Legacy Mortgage Asset Trust  
100,989 1.65%, 11/25/2060(1)(5) 96,677
90,251 1.75%, 04/25/2061(1)(5) 86,335
120,597 1.75%, 07/25/2061(1)(5) 114,679
  MetLife Securitization Trust  
44,285 3.75%, 03/25/2057(1)(3) 43,193
46,081 3.75%, 04/25/2058(1)(3) 45,537
  MFA Trust  
29,805 1.01%, 01/26/2065(1)(3) 28,685
163,604 1.03%, 11/25/2064(1)(3) 146,645
87,268 1.15%, 04/25/2065(1)(3) 84,876
  Mill City Mortgage Loan Trust  
102,688 3.25%, 10/25/2069(1)(3) 99,683
41,291 3.50%, 05/25/2058(1)(3) 40,880
  New Residential Mortgage Loan Trust  
91,272 0.94%, 07/25/2055(1)(3) 83,723
69,350 0.94%, 10/25/2058(1)(3) 66,597
444,901 1.16%, 11/27/2056(1)(3) 395,267
22,072 1.65%, 05/24/2060(1)(3) 20,639
574,913 2.28%, 01/25/2026(1)(3) 516,152
106,863 3.50%, 12/25/2057(1)(3) 104,503
17,878 3.75%, 03/25/2056(1)(3) 17,338
48,566 3.75%, 11/25/2058(1)(3) 47,227
208,792 4.00%, 03/25/2057(1)(3) 205,928
226,944 4.00%, 12/25/2057(1)(3) 221,588
263,116 NMLT Trust 1.19%, 05/25/2056(1)(3) 235,677
  OBX Trust  
260,563 1.05%, 07/25/2061(1)(3) 223,960
180,729 1.07%, 02/25/2066(1)(3) 164,339
518,280 Onslow Bay Financial LLC 2.31%, 11/25/2061(1)(3) 474,511
Shares or Principal Amount   Market Value†
ASSET & COMMERCIAL MORTGAGE-BACKED SECURITIES - 21.9% - (continued)
  Whole Loan Collateral CMO - 10.0% - (continued)
            Preston Ridge Partners Mortgage Trust LLC  
$      104,000 1.32%, 07/25/2051(1)(5) $      96,987
    264,112 1.74%, 09/25/2026(1)(3)      245,418
    167,813 1.79%, 06/25/2026(1)(5)      162,142
    268,475 1.79%, 07/25/2026(1)(5)      251,069
    301,218 1.87%, 04/25/2026(1)(5)     285,581
    415,200 1.87%, 08/25/2026(1)(5)      394,965
     73,374 2.12%, 03/25/2026(1)(3)       70,465
59,398 2.36%, 11/25/2025(1)(5) 56,905
533,936 2.36%, 10/25/2026(1)(5) 505,179
79,818 Residential Mortgage Loan Trust 0.86%, 01/25/2065(1)(3) 76,768
21,183 Seasoned Credit Risk Transfer Trust 2.50%, 08/25/2059 20,454
  Starwood Mortgage Residential Trust  
57,156 0.94%, 05/25/2065(1)(3) 54,757
451,390 1.16%, 08/25/2056(1)(3) 402,801
151,989 1.22%, 05/25/2065(1)(3) 142,342
24,531 1.49%, 04/25/2065(1)(3) 23,841
405,211 1.92%, 11/25/2066(1)(3) 354,469
  Toorak Mortgage Corp. Ltd.  
184,864 1.15%, 07/25/2056(1)(3) 167,111
190,000 2.24%, 06/25/2024(1)(5) 178,121
  Towd Point Mortgage Trust  
129,869 1.75%, 10/25/2060(1) 119,854
286,508 2.16%, 01/25/2052(1)(3) 281,971
97,777 2.75%, 10/25/2056(1)(3) 97,056
189,687 2.75%, 06/25/2057(1)(3) 184,882
109,423 2.75%, 07/25/2057(1)(3) 108,110
178,594 2.75%, 10/25/2057(1)(3) 175,532
54,103 2.90%, 10/25/2059(1)(3) 52,523
365,460 2.92%, 11/30/2060(1)(3) 334,460
44,380 3.25%, 03/25/2058(1)(3) 43,502
211,634 3.67%, 03/25/2058(1)(3) 207,598
  VCAT LLC  
149,302 1.74%, 05/25/2051(1)(5) 142,639
841,524 1.87%, 08/25/2051(1)(5) 796,256
574,877 1.92%, 09/25/2051(1)(5) 533,068
62,391 2.12%, 03/27/2051(1)(5) 59,504
  Verus Securitization Trust  
92,339 0.92%, 02/25/2064(1)(3) 85,507
185,866 0.94%, 07/25/2066(1)(3) 167,208
470,996 1.01%, 09/25/2066(1)(3) 404,141
79,091 1.03%, 02/25/2066(1)(3) 70,531
62,495 1.22%, 05/25/2065(1)(5) 59,126
41,076 1.50%, 05/25/2065(1)(5) 39,029
283,047 1.82%, 11/25/2066(1)(3) 255,613
558,102 1.83%, 10/25/2066(1)(3) 500,254
47,348 2.69%, 11/25/2059(1)(3) 46,159
394,259 2.72%, 01/25/2067(1)(5) 365,301
      24,577,291
  Total Asset & Commercial Mortgage-Backed Securities
(cost $57,802,118)
$  54,056,962
CORPORATE BONDS - 30.5%
  Aerospace/Defense - 0.5%
416,000 Boeing Co. 5.04%, 05/01/2027 $  424,227
  L3Harris Technologies, Inc.  
72,000 3.85%, 06/15/2023 72,042
100,000 4.40%, 06/15/2028 100,807
62,000 Lockheed Martin Corp. 3.80%, 03/01/2045 58,192
 
The accompanying notes are an integral part of these financial statements.

35


Table of Contents
Hartford Core Bond ETF
Schedule of Investments – (continued)
July 31, 2022  

Shares or Principal Amount   Market Value†
CORPORATE BONDS - 30.5% - (continued)
  Aerospace/Defense - 0.5% - (continued)
$      280,000 Northrop Grumman Corp. 5.15%, 05/01/2040 $     298,182
    252,000 Raytheon Technologies Corp. 4.45%, 11/16/2038     250,431
      1,203,881
  Agriculture - 0.6%
     64,000 Altria Group, Inc. 3.88%, 09/16/2046       45,482
            BAT Capital Corp.  
    220,000 2.26%, 03/25/2028      188,506
    370,000 3.56%, 08/15/2027      346,154
466,000 4.74%, 03/16/2032 425,508
  Cargill, Inc.  
255,000 2.13%, 11/10/2031(1) 221,908
170,000 4.00%, 06/22/2032(1) 173,987
      1,401,545
  Beverages - 0.6%
  Anheuser-Busch InBev Worldwide, Inc.  
682,000 3.75%, 07/15/2042 595,256
31,000 4.35%, 06/01/2040 29,819
145,000 Coca-Cola Co. 3.00%, 03/05/2051 123,359
104,000 Constellation Brands, Inc. 3.60%, 02/15/2028 100,746
400,000 Diageo Capital plc 2.00%, 04/29/2030 355,748
210,000 Keurig Dr Pepper, Inc. 3.95%, 04/15/2029 208,790
      1,413,718
  Biotechnology - 0.6%
  CSL Finance plc  
230,000 4.05%, 04/27/2029(1) 231,583
230,000 4.25%, 04/27/2032(1) 234,773
  Gilead Sciences, Inc.  
250,000 1.65%, 10/01/2030 213,793
5,000 3.65%, 03/01/2026 5,023
  Royalty Pharma plc  
160,000 1.75%, 09/02/2027 141,912
280,000 2.15%, 09/02/2031 231,834
485,000 2.20%, 09/02/2030 410,101
      1,469,019
  Chemicals - 0.2%
295,000 Celanese US Holdings LLC 6.17%, 07/15/2027 299,539
45,000 LYB International Finance LLC 1.25%, 10/01/2025 41,257
  Sherwin-Williams Co.  
207,000 2.30%, 05/15/2030 180,401
2,000 2.95%, 08/15/2029 1,846
      523,043
  Commercial Banks - 7.8%
  Bank of America Corp.  
435,000 1.92%, 10/24/2031, (1.92% fixed rate until 10/24/2030; 3 mo. USD SOFR + 1.370% thereafter)(6) 359,001
432,000 2.46%, 10/22/2025, (2.46% fixed rate until 10/22/2024; 3 mo. USD LIBOR + 0.870% thereafter)(6) 415,014
155,000 2.57%, 10/20/2032, (2.57% fixed rate until 10/20/2031; 3 mo. USD SOFR + 1.210% thereafter)(6) 133,096
730,000 2.69%, 04/22/2032, (2.69% fixed rate until 04/22/2031; 3 mo. USD SOFR + 1.320% thereafter)(6) 635,911
485,000 3.00%, 12/20/2023, (3.00% fixed rate until 12/20/2022; 3 mo. USD LIBOR + 0.790% thereafter)(6) 483,711
Shares or Principal Amount   Market Value†
CORPORATE BONDS - 30.5% - (continued)
  Commercial Banks - 7.8% - (continued)
$      155,000 3.31%, 04/22/2042, (3.31% fixed rate until 04/22/2041; 3 mo. USD SOFR + 1.580% thereafter)(6) $     128,930
    671,000 3.97%, 02/07/2030, (3.97% fixed rate until 02/07/2029; 3 mo. USD LIBOR + 1.210% thereafter)(6)      651,233
    503,000 4.08%, 03/20/2051, (4.08% fixed rate until 03/20/2050; 3 mo. USD LIBOR + 3.150% thereafter)(6)      460,478
    300,000 4.95%, 07/22/2028, (4.95% fixed rate until 07/22/2027; 3 mo. USD SOFR + 2.040% thereafter)(6)      308,673
    175,000 5.02%, 07/22/2033, (5.02% fixed rate until 07/22/2032; 3 mo. USD SOFR + 2.160% thereafter)(6)      182,627
    335,000 Bank of Nova Scotia 1.95%, 02/02/2027      308,209
600,000 Bank of NY Mellon Corp. 2.05%, 01/26/2027(7) 562,178
400,000 BNP Paribas S.A. 2.22%, 06/09/2026, (2.22% fixed rate until 06/09/2025; 3 mo. USD SOFR + 2.074% thereafter)(1)(6) 373,643
250,000 BPCE S.A. 2.05%, 10/19/2027, (2.05% fixed rate until 10/19/2026; 3 mo. USD SOFR + 1.087% thereafter)(1)(6) 223,611
  Citigroup, Inc.  
270,000 1.46%, 06/09/2027, (1.46% fixed rate until 06/09/2026; 3 mo. USD SOFR + 0.770% thereafter)(6) 243,078
969,000 3.20%, 10/21/2026 947,218
  Goldman Sachs Group, Inc.  
250,000 0.93%, 10/21/2024, (0.93% fixed rate until 10/21/2023; 3 mo. USD SOFR + 0.486% thereafter)(6)