Janus Investment Fund

October 28, 2022
Janus Investment Fund
Prospectus
 
Class A
Shares
Ticker
Class C
Shares
Ticker
Class S
Shares
Ticker
Class I
Shares
Ticker
Class N
Shares
Ticker
Class R
Shares
Ticker
Class T
Shares
Ticker
Fixed Income
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Janus Henderson Absolute Return Income Opportunities Fund
JUCAX
JUCCX
JUCSX
JUCIX
JUCNX
JUCRX
JUCTX
Janus Henderson Developed World Bond Fund
HFAAX
HFACX
HFASX
HFAIX
HFARX
N/A
HFATX
Janus Henderson Flexible Bond Fund
JDFAX
JFICX
JADFX
JFLEX
JDFNX
JDFRX
JAFIX
Janus Henderson Global Bond Fund
JGBAX
JGBCX
JGBSX
JGBIX
JGLNX
N/A
JHBTX
Janus Henderson High-Yield Fund
JHYAX
JDHCX
JDHYX
JHYFX
JHYNX
JHYRX
JAHYX
Janus Henderson Multi-Sector Income Fund
JMUAX
JMUCX
JMUSX
JMUIX
JMTNX
N/A
JMUTX
Janus Henderson Short Duration Flexible Bond Fund
JSHAX
JSHCX
JSHSX
JSHIX
JSHNX
N/A
JASBX

Neither the Securities and Exchange Commission nor the Commodity Futures Trading Commission, as applicable, has approved or disapproved of these securities or passed on the accuracy or adequacy of this Prospectus. Any representation to the contrary is a criminal offense.

This Prospectus describes seven portfolios (each, a “Fund” and collectively, the “Funds”) of Janus Investment Fund (the “Trust”). Janus Henderson Investors US LLC (formerly Janus Capital Management LLC) (the “Adviser”) serves as investment adviser to each Fund.
The Funds offer multiple classes of shares in order to meet the needs of various types of investors. Class A Shares, Class C Shares, Class S Shares, Class I Shares, Class N Shares, Class R Shares, and Class T Shares (individually and/or collectively, the “Shares”) are offered by this Prospectus.
The Shares are not offered directly to individual investors. Certain financial intermediaries may not offer all classes of Shares. For additional information about these classes of Shares and whether or not you are eligible to purchase these Shares, please refer to the Shareholder’s Guide section of the Prospectus.
For the purpose of this Prospectus, any reference to the “Janus Henderson funds” is inclusive of all series of the Trust, collectively, unless otherwise noted in this Prospectus.

Table of contents
Fund summary
 
2
11
21
29
38
46
55
Additional information about the Funds
 
64
65
73
Management of the Funds
 
86
86
88
92
93
Shareholder’s guide
 
97
99
101
102
103
108
109
111
113
114
159
165
170
1 | Janus Investment Fund

Fund summary
Ticker:
JUCAX
Class A Shares
JUCSX
Class S Shares
JUCNX
Class N Shares
JUCTX
Class T Shares
 
JUCCX
Class C Shares
JUCIX
Class I Shares
JUCRX
Class R Shares
 
 
Investment Objective
Janus Henderson Absolute Return Income Opportunities Fund seeks to maximize total return, consistent with preservation of capital.
Fees and Expenses of the Fund
This table describes the fees and expenses that you may pay if you buy, hold, and sell Shares of the Fund. Each share class has different expenses, but represents an investment in the same Fund. For Class A Shares, you may qualify for sales charge discounts if you and your family invest, or agree to invest in the future, at least $50,000 in the Fund or in other Janus Henderson funds. More information about these and other discounts, as well as eligibility requirements for each share class, is available from your financial professional and in the “Purchases” section on page 103 of the Fund’s Prospectus and in the “Purchases” section on page 77 of the Fund’s Statement of Additional Information. In addition, please see Appendix A – Intermediary Sales Charge Waivers and Discounts. You may also incur brokerage commissions charged by your broker or financial intermediary when buying Class I Shares or Class N Shares of the Fund that are not reflected in the table or in the example below.
SHAREHOLDER FEES
(fees paid directly from your investment)
 
Class A
 
Class C
 
Class S
 
Class I
 
Class N
 
Class R
 
Class T
Maximum Sales Charge (load) Imposed on Purchases (as a percentage of
offering price)
 
4.75%
 
None
 
None
 
None
 
None
 
None
 
None
Maximum Deferred Sales Charge (load) (as a percentage of the lower of
original purchase price or redemption proceeds)
 
None
 
1.00%
 
None
 
None
 
None
 
None
 
None
ANNUAL FUND OPERATING EXPENSES
(expenses that you pay each year as a percentage of the value
of your investment)
 
Class A
 
Class C
 
Class S
 
Class I
 
Class N
 
Class R
 
Class T
Management Fees
 
0.65%
 
0.65%
 
0.65%
 
0.65%
 
0.65%
 
0.65%
 
0.65%
Distribution/Service (12b-1) Fees
 
0.25%
 
1.00%
 
0.25%
 
None
 
None
 
0.50%
 
None
Other Expenses
 
0.45%
 
0.48%
 
2.20%
 
0.44%
 
0.65%
 
1.20%
 
0.64%
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses
 
1.35%
 
2.13%
 
3.10%
 
1.09%
 
1.30%
 
2.35%
 
1.29%
Fee Waiver(1)
 
0.40%
 
0.42%
 
1.96%
 
0.39%
 
0.67%
 
0.97%
 
0.41%
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses After Fee Waiver(1)
 
0.95%
 
1.71%
 
1.14%
 
0.70%
 
0.63%
 
1.38%
 
0.88%
(1)
The Adviser has contractually agreed to waive its investment advisory fee and/or reimburse operating expenses to the extent that the Fund’s total annual fund operating expenses (excluding the fees payable pursuant to a Rule 12b-1 plan, shareholder servicing fees, such as transfer agency fees (including out-of-pocket costs), administrative services fees and any networking/omnibus fees payable by any share class; brokerage commissions; interest; dividends; taxes; acquired fund fees and expenses; and extraordinary expenses) exceed 0.63%. In addition, the Adviser has contractually agreed to waive and/or reimburse a portion of the Fund’s management fee in an amount equal to the management fee it earns as an investment adviser to any affiliated exchange traded funds (“ETFs”) in which the Fund invests. The contractual waivers will remain in effect for at least a one-year period commencing on October 28, 2022. These contractual waivers may be terminated or modified only at the discretion of the Board of Trustees.
EXAMPLE:
The Example is intended to help you compare the cost of investing in the Fund with the cost of investing in other mutual funds. The Example assumes that you invest $10,000 in the Fund for the time periods indicated and reinvest all dividends and distributions. The Example also assumes that your investment has a 5% return each year and that the Fund’s operating expenses are equal to the Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses After Fee Waiver for the first year and the Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses thereafter. Class C Shares automatically convert to Class A Shares after eight years. The Example
2 | Janus Henderson Absolute Return Income Opportunities Fund

for Class C Shares for the ten-year period reflects the conversion to Class A Shares. Although your actual costs may be higher or lower, based on these assumptions your costs would be:
If Shares are redeemed:
1 Year
3 Years
5 Years
10 Years
Class A Shares
$567
$845
$ 1,143
$1,989
Class C Shares
$ 274
$ 627
$ 1,106
$ 2,230
Class S Shares
$116
$772
$ 1,454
$3,274
Class I Shares
$72
$ 308
$563
$ 1,294
Class N Shares
$64
$346
$649
$1,509
Class R Shares
$ 140
$ 641
$ 1,167
$ 2,612
Class T Shares
$90
$369
$668
$1,521
If Shares are not redeemed:
1 Year
3 Years
5 Years
10 Years
Class A Shares
$567
$845
$ 1,143
$1,989
Class C Shares
$ 174
$ 627
$ 1,106
$ 2,230
Class S Shares
$116
$772
$ 1,454
$3,274
Class I Shares
$72
$ 308
$563
$ 1,294
Class N Shares
$64
$346
$649
$1,509
Class R Shares
$ 140
$ 641
$ 1,167
$ 2,612
Class T Shares
$90
$369
$668
$1,521
Portfolio Turnover: The Fund pays transaction costs, such as commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or “turns over” its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover rate may indicate higher transaction costs and may result in higher taxes when Fund shares are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are not reflected in annual fund operating expenses or in the Example, affect the Fund’s performance. During the most recent fiscal year, the Fund’s portfolio turnover rate was 69% of the average value of its portfolio.
Principal investment strategies
The Fund pursues its investment objective by investing, under normal circumstances, at least 80% of its net assets (plus any borrowings for investment purposes) in bonds. For purposes of this 80% policy, the term bonds refers to a variety of fixed-income securities and instruments, and includes, but is not limited to, such investments as government notes and bonds, corporate bonds, convertible securities, commercial paper, commercial and residential mortgage-backed securities, asset-backed securities, collateralized loan obligations, fixed rate notes, floating rate securities, and derivatives such as forwards, swap agreements, futures contracts, and options that provide exposure to various fixed-income instruments (“Fixed-Income Instruments”). The Fund may invest a significant portion of its assets in certain types of Fixed-Income Instruments, including mortgage-backed securities. In pursuing its investment objective, the Fund will have exposure to investments that are economically tied to a number of countries throughout the world.
The Fund employs an “absolute return” strategy, which means that the Fund benchmarks itself to an index of cash instruments, rather than a fixed-income index. In pursuing this strategy, the Fund seeks to achieve positive returns that exceed its benchmark index in a variety of market environments. The Fund seeks value across sectors and geographies using a wide range of instruments to capitalize on investment opportunities to maximize current income, while at the same time seeking to provide low volatility. The Fund seeks to take advantage of market mispricings and dislocations caused by structural inefficiencies in the fixed-income market. For example, the portfolio managers may favor investments in smaller countries or regions that tend to be underrepresented in fixed-income indices that are more heavily focused on the United States or other larger regions globally. A position may be sold if it reaches its total return target, if the investment thesis for owning it changes, or to limit potential losses.
The Fund’s average portfolio duration may range from negative two years to plus four years. As of June 30, 2022, the Fund’s average portfolio duration was 0.98 years. The Fund may invest in securities of varying maturities, although the Fund’s average portfolio maturity is generally less than five years. While the Fund primarily invests in investment-grade debt securities, it may invest up to 25% of its assets in high-yield/high-risk bonds (also known as “junk” bonds). The Fund may invest in securities denominated in foreign currencies and in U.S. dollar-denominated securities of foreign issuers.
3 | Janus Henderson Absolute Return Income Opportunities Fund

The Fund may invest in foreign debt securities, including investments in emerging markets. At times, the Fund may invest a substantial amount of its assets in foreign debt issuers located in a single region. The Fund will normally limit emerging markets investments to 15% of its net assets, measured at the time of purchase. The Fund will normally limit its foreign currency exchange exposure to 15% of its total assets. The Fund may limit its foreign currency exchange exposure by hedging through the use of forward contracts, cross-currency swaps, currency futures, and options. The Fund may invest in cash or cash equivalents such as short-term government bonds, commercial paper, repurchase agreements, and other short-duration fixed-income securities. The Fund may also invest in securities that cannot be offered for public resale unless registered under the applicable securities laws or that have a contractual restriction that prohibits or limits their resale (these are known as “restricted securities”), which may include Rule 144A securities.
The Fund may invest in derivatives, which are instruments that have a value derived from, or directly linked to, an underlying asset, such as equity securities, fixed-income securities, commodities, currencies, interest rates, or market indices. In particular, the Fund may utilize interest rate futures, interest rate swaps, credit default swaps (both single-name and index), options, swaptions, and currency forwards for various investment purposes, such as to manage or hedge portfolio risk, enhance return, or manage duration.
The Fund may invest in short sales of fixed-income securities and derivatives instruments such as options, futures, and swaps.
Principal investment risks
The biggest risk is that the Fund’s returns and yields will vary, and you could lose money. The principal risks associated with investing in the Fund are set forth below.
Market Risk.The value of the Fund’s portfolio may decrease due to short-term market movements and over more prolonged market downturns. As a result, the Fund’s net asset value may fluctuate and it may be more difficult to value or sell the Fund’s holdings. Market risk may affect a single issuer, industry, economic sector, or the market as a whole. Market risk may be magnified if certain social, political, economic, and other conditions and events (such as terrorism, conflicts, including related sanctions, social unrest, natural disasters, epidemics and pandemics, including COVID-19) adversely interrupt the global economy and financial markets. It is important to understand that the value of your investment may fall, sometimes sharply, in response to changes in the market, and you could lose money.
Fixed-Income Securities Risk.Fixed-income securities are generally subject to the following risks:
Interest rate risk is the risk that prices of bonds and other fixed-income securities will increase as interest rates fall and decrease as interest rates rise.
Credit risk is the risk that the credit strength of an issuer of a fixed-income security will weaken and/or that the issuer will be unable to make timely principal and interest payments and that the security may go into default.
Prepayment risk is the risk that, during periods of falling interest rates, certain debt obligations may be paid off quicker than originally anticipated, which may cause the Fund to reinvest its assets in securities with lower yields, resulting in a decline in the Fund’s income or return potential.
Extension risk is the risk that, during periods of rising interest rates, certain debt obligations may be paid off substantially slower than originally anticipated, and as a result, the value of those obligations may fall.
Valuation risk is the risk that one or more of the fixed-income securities in which the Fund invests are priced differently than the value realized upon such security’s sale. In times of market instability, valuation may be more difficult. Valuation may also be affected by changes in the issuer’s financial strength, the market’s perception of such strength, or in the credit rating of the issuer or the security.
Liquidity risk is the risk that fixed-income securities may be difficult or impossible to sell at the time that the portfolio managers would like or at the price the portfolio managers believe the security is currently worth. Consequently, the Fund may have to accept a lower price to sell a security, sell other securities to raise cash, or give up an investment opportunity, any of which could have a negative effect on the Fund’s performance. In unusual market conditions, even normally liquid securities may be affected by a degree of liquidity risk (i.e., if the number and capacity of traditional market participants is reduced).
Foreign Exposure Risk.Foreign markets, including emerging markets, can be more volatile than the U.S. market. As a result, the Fund’s returns and net asset value may be affected by fluctuations in currency exchange rates or political or economic conditions in a particular country. In some foreign markets, there may not be protection against failure by other parties to
4 | Janus Henderson Absolute Return Income Opportunities Fund

complete transactions. It may not be possible for the Fund to repatriate capital, dividends, interest, and other income from a particular country or governmental entity. In addition, a market swing in one or more countries or regions where the Fund has invested a significant amount of its assets may have a greater effect on the Fund’s performance than it would in a more geographically diversified portfolio. The Fund’s investments may be denominated in foreign currencies and therefore, changes in the value of a country’s currency compared to the U.S. dollar may affect the value of the Fund’s investments. The Fund’s investments in emerging market countries, if any, may involve risks greater than, or in addition to, the risks of investing in more developed countries.
Geographic Concentration Risk.To the extent the Fund invests a substantial amount of its assets in issuers located in a single country or region, the economic, political, social, regulatory, or other developments or conditions within such country or region will generally have a greater effect on the Fund than they would on a more geographically diversified fund, which may result in greater losses and volatility. Adverse developments in certain regions could also adversely affect securities of other countries whose economies appear to be unrelated and could have a negative impact on the Fund’s performance.
Australia Risk.The Fund’s investment in Australian issuers may subject the Fund to loss in the event of adverse tax, political, economic, regulatory, and other developments that affect Australia and its fixed-income markets, including fluctuations of Australian currency versus the U.S. dollar. Also, Australia is economically sensitive to environmental events and is located in a part of the world that has historically been prone to natural disasters, such as drought and flooding.
Mortgage- and Asset-Backed Securities Risk.Mortgage- and asset-backed securities represent interests in “pools” of commercial or residential mortgages or other assets, including consumer loans or receivables. The value of mortgage- and asset-backed securities will be influenced by factors affecting the real estate market and the assets underlying these securities. Investments in mortgage-and asset-backed securities may be subject to credit risk, valuation risk, liquidity risk, extension risk, and prepayment risk. These securities also are subject to risk of default on the underlying mortgage or asset, particularly during periods of economic downturn.
High-Yield/High-Risk Bond Risk.High-yield/high-risk bonds are considered speculative and may be more sensitive than other types of bonds to economic changes, political changes, or adverse developments specific to the company that issued the bond, which may adversely affect their value.
Emerging Markets Risk.The risks of foreign investing are heightened when investing in emerging markets. Emerging market securities involve a number of additional risks, which may result from less government supervision and regulation of business and industry practices (including the potential lack of strict finance and accounting controls and standards), stock exchanges, brokers, and listed companies. Information about emerging market companies, including financial information, may be less available or reliable and the Adviser’s ability to conduct due diligence with respect to such companies may be limited. Accordingly, these investments may be potentially more volatile in price and less liquid than investments in developed securities markets, resulting in greater risk to investors. There is a risk in developing countries that a current or future economic or political crisis could lead to price controls, forced mergers of companies, expropriation or confiscatory taxation, imposition or enforcement of foreign ownership limits, seizure, nationalization, sanctions or imposition of restrictions by various governmental entities on investment and trading, or creation of government monopolies, any of which may have a detrimental effect on the Fund’s investments. In addition, the taxation systems at the federal, regional, and local levels in developing or emerging market countries may be less transparent, inconsistently enforced, and subject to change. Emerging markets may be subject to a higher degree of corruption and fraud than developed markets and financial institutions and transaction counterparties may have less financial sophistication, creditworthiness, and/or resources than participants in developed markets. In addition, the Fund’s investments may be denominated in foreign currencies and therefore, changes in the value of a country’s currency compared to the U.S. dollar may affect the value of the Fund’s investments. To the extent that the Fund invests a significant portion of its assets in the securities of emerging markets issuers in or companies of a single country or region, it is more likely to be impacted by events or conditions affecting that country or region, which could have a negative impact on the Fund’s performance.
Derivatives Risk.Derivatives, such as swaps, futures, forwards, and options, can be volatile and involve risks similar to those of the underlying referenced securities or assets, such as risks related to interest rates, market, credit, valuation, and liquidity, among others. There are also additional risks. Gains or losses from a derivative investment can be substantially greater than the derivative’s original cost, and can therefore involve leverage. Leverage may cause the Fund to be more volatile than if it had not used leverage. Derivatives can be complex instruments and may involve analysis that differs from that required for other investment types used by the Fund. If the value of a derivative does not correlate well with the particular market or
5 | Janus Henderson Absolute Return Income Opportunities Fund

other asset class to which the derivative is intended to provide exposure, the derivative may not produce the anticipated result. Derivatives can also reduce the opportunity for gain or result in losses by offsetting positive returns in other investments. Derivatives entail the risk that the counterparty will default on its payment obligations. If the counterparty to a derivative transaction defaults, the Fund would risk the loss of the net amount of the payments that it contractually is entitled to receive. Derivatives may be difficult to value, are susceptible to liquidity risk, and entail the risk that a party will default on its obligations to the Fund. If there is a default by the other party to such a transaction, the Fund normally will have contractual remedies pursuant to the agreements related to the transaction. Swap agreements also bear the risk that the Fund will not be able to meet its obligation to the counterparty. The Fund’s investments in interest rate futures in particular entail the risk that the Fund’s portfolio managers’ prediction of the direction of interest rates is wrong, and the Fund could incur a loss. If the Fund invests a significant portion of its assets in derivatives, its investment performance could be dependent on securities not directly owned by the Fund. Derivatives used for hedging purposes may reduce or eliminate gains or cause losses if the market moves in a manner different from that anticipated by the portfolio managers or if the cost of the derivative outweighs the benefit of the hedge.
Short Exposure Risk.The Fund may enter into a derivatives transaction to obtain short investment exposure to the reference asset. If the value of the reference asset on which the Fund has obtained a short investment exposure increases, the Fund will incur a loss. This potential loss is theoretically unlimited. A short exposure through a derivative also exposes the Fund to credit risk, counterparty risk, and leverage risk.
Sovereign Debt Risk.Some investments in U.S. and non-U.S. government debt securities (“sovereign debt”) are considered low risk. However, investments in sovereign debt, especially the debt of certain emerging market countries, can involve a high degree of risk, including the risk that the governmental entity that controls the repayment of sovereign debt may not be willing or able to repay the principal and/or to pay the interest on its sovereign debt in a timely manner. A sovereign debtor’s willingness or ability to satisfy its debt obligation may be affected by various factors including, but not limited to, its cash flow situation, the extent of its foreign currency reserves, the availability of foreign exchange when a payment is due, and the relative size of its debt position in relation to its economy as a whole. In the event of default, there may be limited or no legal remedies for collecting sovereign debt and there may be no bankruptcy proceedings through which the Fund may collect all or part of the sovereign debt that a governmental entity has not repaid. In addition, to the extent the Fund invests in non-U.S. sovereign debt, it may be subject to currency risk.
Floating Rate Obligations Risk.The Fund may invest in floating rate obligations with interest rates that reset regularly, maintaining a fixed spread over a stated reference rate. The interest rates on floating rate obligations typically reset quarterly, although rates on some obligations may adjust at other intervals. Unexpected changes in the interest rates on floating rate obligations could result in lower income to the Fund. In addition, the secondary market on which floating rate obligations are traded may be less liquid than the market for investment grade securities or other types of income-producing securities, which may have an adverse impact on their market price. There is also a potential that there is no active market to trade floating rate obligations, that there may be restrictions on their transfer, or that the issuer may default. As a result, the Fund may be unable to sell floating rate obligations at the desired time or may be able to sell only at a price less than fair market value.
LIBOR Replacement Risk.Certain debt securities, derivatives, or other financial instruments utilize the London InterBank Offered Rate (“LIBOR”) as a reference rate for various rate calculations. The U.K. Financial Conduct Authority stopped compelling or inducing banks to submit rates for many LIBOR settings and will continue to do so for certain other commonly-used U.S. dollar LIBOR settings after June 30, 2023. The elimination of LIBOR or other reference rates and the transition process away from LIBOR could adversely impact (i) volatility and liquidity in markets that are tied to those reference rates, (ii) the market for, or value of, specific securities or payments linked to those reference rates, (iii) the availability or terms of borrowing or refinancing, or (iv) the effectiveness of hedging strategies. For these and other reasons, the elimination of LIBOR or other reference rates may adversely affect the Fund’s performance and/or net asset value. Alternatives to LIBOR are established or in development in most major currencies including the Secured Overnight Financing Rate (“SOFR”) that is intended to replace the U.S. dollar LIBOR.
The effect of the discontinuation of LIBOR or other reference rates on the Fund will vary depending on, among other things (i) existing fallback or termination provisions in individual contracts and (ii) whether, how, and when industry participants develop and adopt new reference rates and fallbacks for both legacy and new products and instruments. Accordingly, it is difficult to predict the full impact of the transition away from LIBOR or other reference rates on the Fund until new reference rates and fallbacks for both legacy and new products, instruments, and contracts are commercially accepted.
6 | Janus Henderson Absolute Return Income Opportunities Fund

Currency Risk.Currency risk is the risk that changes in the exchange rate between currencies will adversely affect the value (in U.S. dollar terms) of an investment. As long as the Fund holds a foreign security, its value will be affected by the value of the local currency relative to the U.S. dollar. When the Fund sells a foreign currency denominated security, its value may be worth less in U.S. dollars even if the security increases in value in its home country. U.S. dollar-denominated securities of foreign issuers may also be affected by currency risk, as the value of these securities may also be affected by changes in the issuer’s local currency.
Restricted Securities Risk.Securities that have limitations on their resale are referred to as “restricted securities.” Investments in restricted securities, including securities issued under Regulation S and Rule 144A, could have the effect of decreasing the Fund’s liquidity profile or preventing the Fund from disposing of them promptly at advantageous prices. Restricted securities may be less liquid than other investments because such securities may not always be readily sold in broad public markets and may have no active trading market. As a result, they may be difficult to value because market quotations may not be readily available.
Portfolio Management Risk.The Fund is an actively managed investment portfolio and is therefore subject to the risk that the investment strategies employed for the Fund may fail to produce the intended results. Although the Fund seeks to provide long-term positive returns, market conditions or implementation of the Fund’s investment process may result in losses, and the Fund will not meet its investment objective. As such, there can be no assurance of positive “absolute” returns.
Short Sales Risk.Short sales are speculative transactions and involve special risks, including a greater reliance on the ability to accurately anticipate the future value of a security. The Fund will suffer a loss if it sells a security short and the value of the security rises rather than falls. The Fund’s losses are potentially unlimited in a short sale transaction. The use of short sales may also cause the Fund to have higher expenses than those of other funds. In addition, due to the investment process of long and short positions, the Fund may be subject to additional transaction costs that may lower the Fund’s returns. The Fund’s use of short sales may also have a leveraging effect on the Fund’s portfolio and may increase losses and the volatility of returns.
An investment in the Fund is not a bank deposit and is not insured or guaranteed by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation or any other government agency.
Performance information
The following information provides some indication of the risks of investing in the Fund by showing how the Fund’s performance has varied over time. Class A Shares, Class C Shares, Class S Shares, Class I Shares, Class N Shares, and Class T Shares of the Fund commenced operations with the Fund’s inception. Class R Shares of the Fund commenced operations on February 6, 2015.
The performance shown for Class A Shares, Class C Shares, Class S Shares, Class I Shares, Class N Shares, and Class T Shares is calculated using the fees and expenses of each respective share class, net of any applicable fee and expense limitations or waivers.
The performance shown for Class R Shares for periods prior to February 6, 2015, reflects the performance of the Fund’s Class I Shares, calculated using the fees and expenses of Class R Shares, without the effect of any fee and expense limitations or waivers. If Class R Shares of the Fund had been available during periods prior to February 6, 2015, the performance shown may have been different. The performance shown for the periods following the Fund’s commencement of Class R Shares reflects the fees and expenses of Class R Shares, net of any applicable fee and expense limitations or waivers.
The bar chart depicts the change in performance from year to year during the periods indicated. The bar chart figures do not include any applicable sales charges that an investor may pay when they buy or sell Class A Shares or Class C Shares of the Fund. If sales charges were included, the returns would be lower. The table compares the Fund’s average annual returns for the periods indicated to a broad-based securities market index. All figures assume reinvestment of dividends and distributions. For certain periods, the Fund’s performance reflects the effect of expense waivers. Without the effect of these expense waivers, the performance shown would have been lower.
The Fund’s past performance (before and after taxes) does not necessarily indicate how it will perform in the future. Updated performance information is available at janushenderson.com/performance or by calling 1-877-335-2687.
7 | Janus Henderson Absolute Return Income Opportunities Fund

Annual Total Returns for Class I Shares (calendar year-end)
Best Quarter:
4th Quarter 2018
2.25%
Worst Quarter:
2nd Quarter 2018
– 5.76%
The Fund’s year-to-date return as of the calendar quarter ended September 30, 2022 was – 2.99%.
Average Annual Total Returns (periods ended 12/31/21)
 
 
 
 
1 Year
5 Years
Since
Inception
(5/27/14)
Class I Shares
 
 
 
Return Before Taxes
– 0.43%
0.97%
1.08%
Return After Taxes on Distributions
– 1.02%
– 0.03%
0.08%
Return After Taxes on Distributions and Sale of Fund Shares(1)
– 0.25%
0.32%
0.39%
FTSE 3-Month U.S. Treasury Bill Index
(reflects no deduction for expenses, fees, or taxes)
0.05%
1.11%
0.77%
Class A Shares
 
 
 
Return Before Taxes(2)
– 5.36%
– 0.23%
0.19%
FTSE 3-Month U.S. Treasury Bill Index
(reflects no deduction for expenses, fees, or taxes)
0.05%
1.11%
0.77%
Class C Shares
 
 
 
Return Before Taxes(3)
– 2.37%
0.02%
0.11%
FTSE 3-Month U.S. Treasury Bill Index
(reflects no deduction for expenses, fees, or taxes)
0.05%
1.11%
0.77%
Class S Shares
 
 
 
Return Before Taxes
– 0.85%
0.52%
0.63%
FTSE 3-Month U.S. Treasury Bill Index
(reflects no deduction for expenses, fees, or taxes)
0.05%
1.11%
0.77%
Class N Shares
 
 
 
Return Before Taxes
– 0.40%
1.04%
1.12%
FTSE 3-Month U.S. Treasury Bill Index
(reflects no deduction for expenses, fees, or taxes)
0.05%
1.11%
0.77%
Class R Shares
 
 
 
Return Before Taxes
– 1.10%
0.30%
0.40%
FTSE 3-Month U.S. Treasury Bill Index
(reflects no deduction for expenses, fees, or taxes)
0.05%
1.11%
0.77%
8 | Janus Henderson Absolute Return Income Opportunities Fund

Average Annual Total Returns (periods ended 12/31/21)
 
 
 
 
1 Year
5 Years
Since
Inception
(5/27/14)
Class T Shares
 
 
 
Return Before Taxes
– 0.59%
0.81%
0.89%
FTSE 3-Month U.S. Treasury Bill Index
(reflects no deduction for expenses, fees, or taxes)
0.05%
1.11%
0.77%
(1) 
If the Fund incurs a loss, which generates a tax benefit, the Return After Taxes on Distributions and Sale of Fund Shares may exceed the Fund’s other return figures.
(2) 
Calculated assuming maximum permitted sales loads.
(3) 
The one year return is calculated to include the contingent deferred sales charge.
The Fund’s primary benchmark is the FTSE 3-Month U.S. Treasury Bill Index. The index is described below.
The FTSE 3-Month U.S. Treasury Bill Index is an unmanaged index designed to represent the average of Treasury bill rates for each of the prior 3 months, adjusted to a bond equivalent basis.
After-tax returns are calculated using the historically highest individual federal marginal income tax rates and do not reflect the impact of state and local taxes. Actual after-tax returns depend on your individual tax situation and may differ from those shown in the preceding table. The after-tax return information shown above does not apply to Fund shares held through a tax-advantaged account, such as a 401(k) plan or an IRA.
After-tax returns are only shown for Class I Shares of the Fund. After-tax returns for the other classes of Shares will vary from those shown for Class I Shares due to varying sales charges (as applicable), fees, and expenses among the classes.
Management
Investment Adviser:  Janus Henderson Investors US LLC
Portfolio Managers:  Dylan Bourke, CFA, is Executive Vice President and Co-Portfolio Manager of the Fund, which he has co-managed since June 2021. Jason England is Executive Vice President and Co-Portfolio Manager of the Fund, which he has co-managed since June 2019. Daniel Siluk is Executive Vice President and Co-Portfolio Manager of the Fund, which he has co-managed since June 2021.
Purchase and sale of Fund shares
Minimum Investment Requirements
Class A Shares, Class C Shares*, Class S Shares, Class R Shares, and Class T Shares
 
Non-retirement accounts
$2,500**
Certain tax-advantaged accounts or UGMA/UTMA accounts
$500
Class I Shares
 
Institutional investors (investing directly with the Fund)
$1,000,000
Through an intermediary institution
 
• non-retirement accounts
$2,500
• certain tax-advantaged accounts or UGMA/UTMA accounts
$500
Class N Shares
 
Retirement investors (investing through an adviser-assisted, employer-sponsored retirement plan)
None
Retail investors (investing through a financial intermediary omnibus account)
$2,500***
Institutional investors (investing directly with the Fund)
$1,000,000
Exceptions to these minimums may apply for certain tax-advantaged, tax-qualified and retirement plans, including health savings accounts, accounts held through certain wrap programs, and certain retail brokerage accounts.
*
The maximum purchase in Class C Shares is $500,000 for any single purchase.
**
Class A, Class C, Class S, and Class T shares held through certain supermarket and/or self-directed brokerage accounts, or through wrap programs, may not be subject to these minimums. Please contact your financial intermediary for more information. For Class R shareholders, there is no investment
9 | Janus Henderson Absolute Return Income Opportunities Fund

minimum for defined contribution plans. Investors in a defined contribution plan through a third party administrator should refer to their plan document or contact their plan administrator for additional information regarding account minimums.
***
Investors in certain tax-advantaged accounts or accounts held through certain wrap programs or bank trust platforms may not be subject to this minimum.
Purchases, exchanges, and redemptions can generally be made only through institutional channels, such as financial intermediaries and retirement platforms. Class I Shares may be purchased directly by certain institutional investors who established Class I Shares accounts before August 4, 2017. You should contact your financial intermediary or refer to your plan documents for information on how to invest in the Fund. Requests must be received in good order by the Fund or its agents (financial intermediary or plan sponsor, if applicable) prior to the close of the trading session of the New York Stock Exchange in order to receive that day’s net asset value. For additional information, refer to “Purchases,” “Exchanges,” and/or “Redemptions” in the Prospectus.
Tax information
The Fund’s distributions are taxable, and will be taxed as ordinary income or capital gains, unless you are investing through a tax-advantaged arrangement, such as a 401(k) plan or an individual retirement account (in which case you may be taxed upon withdrawal of your investment from such account).
Payments to broker-dealers and other financial intermediaries
If you purchase Class A Shares, Class C Shares, Class S Shares, Class I Shares, Class R Shares, or Class T Shares of the Fund through a broker-dealer or other financial intermediary (such as a bank), the Fund or its distributor (or its affiliates) may pay the intermediary for the sale of Fund shares and related services. These payments may create a conflict of interest by influencing the broker-dealer or other intermediary and your salesperson to recommend the Fund over another investment or to recommend one share class over another. There is some regulatory uncertainty concerning whether marketing support or other similar payments may be made or received in connection with Class I Shares where a financial intermediary has imposed its own sales charges or transaction fees. As a result, based on future regulatory developments, such payments may be terminated, or the Fund may prohibit financial intermediaries from imposing such sales charges or transaction fees in connection with Class I Shares. Ask your salesperson or visit your financial intermediary’s website for more information.
10 | Janus Henderson Absolute Return Income Opportunities Fund

Fund summary
Ticker:
HFAAX
Class A Shares
HFASX
Class S Shares
HFARX
Class N Shares
 
HFACX
Class C Shares
HFAIX
Class I Shares
HFATX
Class T Shares
Investment Objective
Janus Henderson Developed World Bond Fund seeks total return through current income and capital appreciation.
Fees and Expenses of the Fund
This table describes the fees and expenses that you may pay if you buy, hold, and sell Shares of the Fund. Each share class has different expenses, but represents an investment in the same Fund. For Class A Shares, you may qualify for sales charge discounts if you and your family invest, or agree to invest in the future, at least $50,000 in the Fund or in other Janus Henderson funds. More information about these and other discounts, as well as eligibility requirements for each share class, is available from your financial professional and in the “Purchases” section on page 103 of the Fund’s Prospectus and in the “Purchases” section on page 77 of the Fund’s Statement of Additional Information. In addition, please see Appendix A – Intermediary Sales Charge Waivers and Discounts. You may also incur brokerage commissions charged by your broker or financial intermediary when buying Class I Shares or Class N Shares of the Fund that are not reflected in the table or in the example below.
SHAREHOLDER FEES
(fees paid directly from your investment)
 
Class A
 
Class C
 
Class S
 
Class I
 
Class N
 
Class T
Maximum Sales Charge (load) Imposed on Purchases (as a percentage of offering
price)
 
4.75%
 
None
 
None
 
None
 
None
 
None
Maximum Deferred Sales Charge (load) (as a percentage of the lower of original
purchase price or redemption proceeds)
 
None
 
1.00%
 
None
 
None
 
None
 
None
ANNUAL FUND OPERATING EXPENSES
(expenses that you pay each year as a percentage of the value of your investment)
 
Class A
 
Class C
 
Class S
 
Class I
 
Class N
 
Class T
Management Fees
 
0.50%
 
0.50%
 
0.50%
 
0.50%
 
0.50%
 
0.50%
Distribution/Service (12b-1) Fees
 
0.25%
 
1.00%
 
0.25%
 
None
 
None
 
None
Other Expenses
 
0.18%
 
0.12%
 
0.78%
 
0.14%
 
0.05%
 
0.29%
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses
 
0.93%
 
1.62%
 
1.53%
 
0.64%
 
0.55%
 
0.79%
Fee Waiver(1)
 
0.11%
 
0.05%
 
0.46%
 
0.07%
 
0.00%
 
0.00%
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses After Fee Waiver(1)
 
0.82%
 
1.57%
 
1.07%
 
0.57%
 
0.55%
 
0.79%
(1)
The Adviser has contractually agreed to waive its investment advisory fee and/or reimburse operating expenses to the extent that the Fund’s total annual fund operating expenses (excluding the fees payable pursuant to a Rule 12b-1 plan, shareholder servicing fees, such as transfer agency fees (but excluding out-of-pocket costs); brokerage commissions; interest; dividends; taxes; acquired fund fees and expenses; and extraordinary expenses) exceed 0.57% for at least a one-year period commencing on October 28, 2022. This contractual waiver may be terminated or modified only at the discretion of the Board of Trustees.
EXAMPLE:
The Example is intended to help you compare the cost of investing in the Fund with the cost of investing in other mutual funds. The Example assumes that you invest $10,000 in the Fund for the time periods indicated and reinvest all dividends and distributions. The Example also assumes that your investment has a 5% return each year and that the Fund’s operating expenses are equal to the Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses After Fee Waiver for the first year and the Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses thereafter. Class C Shares automatically convert to Class A Shares after eight years. The Example for Class C Shares for the ten-year period reflects the conversion to Class A Shares. Although your actual costs may be higher or lower, based on these assumptions your costs would be:
If Shares are redeemed:
1 Year
3 Years
5 Years
10 Years
Class A Shares
$555
$747
$955
$1,554
Class C Shares
$ 260
$ 506
$ 877
$ 1,733
11 | Janus Henderson Developed World Bond Fund

If Shares are redeemed:
1 Year
3 Years
5 Years
10 Years
Class S Shares
$109
$438
$791
$1,784
Class I Shares
$58
$ 198
$ 350
$792
Class N Shares
$56
$176
$307
$689
Class T Shares
$81
$ 252
$ 439
$978
If Shares are not redeemed:
1 Year
3 Years
5 Years
10 Years
Class A Shares
$555
$747
$955
$1,554
Class C Shares
$ 160
$ 506
$ 877
$ 1,733
Class S Shares
$109
$438
$791
$1,784
Class I Shares
$58
$ 198
$ 350
$792
Class N Shares
$56
$176
$307
$689
Class T Shares
$81
$ 252
$ 439
$978
Portfolio Turnover: The Fund pays transaction costs, such as commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or “turns over” its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover rate may indicate higher transaction costs and may result in higher taxes when Fund shares are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are not reflected in annual fund operating expenses or in the Example, affect the Fund’s performance. During the most recent fiscal year, the Fund’s portfolio turnover rate was 86% of the average value of its portfolio.
Principal investment strategies
The Fund pursues its investment objective by investing, under normal circumstances, at least 80% of its net assets (plus any borrowings for investment purposes) in bonds or other income-producing debt-related securities from developed countries. The Fund considers “developed countries” to include, but not be limited to, those countries characterized as developed by the MSCI World Index, including the United States, United Kingdom, Canada, Australia, Sweden, Denmark, Japan, Austria, Belgium, Finland, France, Germany, Ireland, Italy, the Netherlands, Portugal, and Spain, or such other countries as the portfolio managers deem to be developed.
Under normal circumstances, the portfolio managers intend to invest at least 40% of the Fund’s net assets outside of the United States and in at least three different countries. A security is deemed to originate in a country if one or more of the following tests are met: (i) the company is organized in, or its primary business office or principal trading market of its equity is located in, the country, (ii) a majority of the company’s assets are located in the country, or (iii) a majority of the company’s revenues are derived from the country. The Fund may also invest up to 20% of its net assets in equity and equity-related securities such as convertibles and debt securities with warrants. While the Fund has no policy limiting the currency in which foreign securities may be denominated, the Fund seeks to hedge its non-dollar investments back to the U.S. dollar.
The portfolio managers use a process that combines a bottom-up approach to individual security selection rooted in thorough, independent research with a macro-economic overlay that determines appropriate country, asset sector, currency and industry exposure. In their bottom-up approach, the portfolio managers use both qualitative and quantitative credit analysis to consider a variety of factors, including the issuer’s experience, managerial strength, debt service capability, operating outlook, sensitivity to economic conditions, current financial condition, liquidity and access to capital, asset protection, structural issues, covenant protection, and equity sponsorship.
The portfolio managers perform credit analysis and meet with prospective and purchased debt issuers. They also work closely with a team of analysts to search for the most appropriate securities to include in the Fund’s portfolio.
Sector, regional and industry allocations are evaluated within a broader economic and market context and involve: (i) evaluation of the economic and interest rate environment that determines asset sector allocation and quality mix; (ii) evaluation of country and regional economic environment to support country allocation decisions; and (iii) analysis of industry weightings, including stability and growth of industries, cash flows and/or positive equity momentum.
As part of their investment process, the portfolio managers seek to (i) avoid corporate issuers that are significantly engaged in business activities that they believe may be environmentally and/or socially harmful, as discussed below; (ii) invest in a portfolio of corporate issuers that, in the aggregate, has a lower carbon intensity and/or footprint than the ICE BofA Global Corporate & High Yield Index on a monthly basis; (iii) avoid sovereign bond issuers that (a) have been sanctioned by the
12 | Janus Henderson Developed World Bond Fund

European Union or United Nations or have insufficient rankings with respect to political rights and civil liberties, as measured by third-party inputs, or (b) have not ratified the Paris Climate Accord.
To identify the universe of investible securities for the Fund, the portfolio managers apply broad-based negative screens, which incorporate third-party inputs, to seek to avoid securities of issuers that derive more than de minimis revenue from certain activities considered by the portfolio managers to be environmentally and/or socially harmful. A current list of such business activities, which may evolve over time, follows:
oil and gas generation and production;
oil sands extraction;
shale energy extraction;
thermal coal extraction and power generation;
Arctic oil and gas extraction;
tobacco;
fur;
adult entertainment;
gambling or controversial weapons; and
United Nations Global Compact violators.
The Fund does not apply the avoidance criteria noted above in managing the Fund’s exposure to cash and cash equivalents, U.S. Treasuries, and credit default swaps on indices.
The Fund will generally consider selling a security when, in the portfolio managers’ opinion, there is significant deterioration in company fundamentals, an inability to maintain open communication with management, a change in business strategy, a change in issuer-specific business outlook, realization of anticipated gains, or a failure by the issuer to meet operating/ financial targets. The Fund may also consider selling a security if, in the portfolio managers’ opinion, it no longer meets the environmental or social criteria noted above, or a superior investment opportunity arises.
The Fund may use bank borrowings to increase the amount of money the Fund can invest. Securities in which the Fund may invest include: all types of bonds, debentures, mortgage-related and other asset-backed securities, investment grade debt securities, high yield securities, U.S. Government securities, foreign securities, derivatives, subordinated bank debt, private placements, preferred stocks, collective investment schemes, domestic or foreign floating rate senior secured syndicated bank loans, floating rate unsecured loans, and other floating rate bonds, loans and notes. The bonds in which the Fund may invest include foreign investment grade debt (including developed market government bonds), international and domestic high yield debt (including lower-quality securities, “high yield” or “junk bonds”), U.S. investment grade corporate debt, U.S. government debt securities, and floating rate notes. The Fund may also invest in dividend-paying equity securities of companies domiciled in the United States or abroad. The portfolio managers may shift the Fund’s assets among various types of income-producing securities based upon changing market conditions. The Fund’s average portfolio duration normally may range from zero to plus nine years. The portfolio managers may lengthen or shorten the Fund’s duration based on their outlook on interest rates and inflation. The Fund may invest in issuers of any credit quality. The Fund may also invest in securities that cannot be offered for public resale unless registered under the applicable securities laws or that have a contractual restriction that prohibits or limits their resale (these are known as “restricted securities”), which may include Rule 144A securities.
The Fund may engage in exchange-traded or over-the-counter derivative transactions to seek return, to generate income, to hedge against fluctuations in securities prices, interest rates or currency exchange rates, to change the effective duration of the portfolio, to manage certain investment risks, or as a substitute for the purchase or sale of securities or currencies. To the extent derivatives are used, the Fund expects to use them principally when seeking to hedge currency exposure using forward foreign currency contracts, to gain exposure to equity securities by using futures contracts on securities indices, to obtain net long or net negative (short) exposures to selected interest rate, duration or credit risks using a combination of bond or interest rate futures contracts, options on bond or interest rate futures contracts, and interest rate, inflation rate and credit default swap agreements. The Fund may invest in credit default swaps to gain issuer exposure or to gain sector exposure. The Fund may invest in short sales of fixed-income securities and derivatives instruments.
The Fund may engage in active and frequent trading to achieve its investment objective.
The Fund may lend portfolio securities on a short-term or long-term basis to certain qualified broker-dealers and institutions, in an amount equal to up to one-third of its total assets as determined at the time of the loan origination.
13 | Janus Henderson Developed World Bond Fund

Principal investment risks
The biggest risk is that the Fund’s returns and yields will vary, and you could lose money. The Fund is designed for long-term investors seeking an income-producing portfolio that includes debt securities and dividend-paying equity securities, such as common stocks. Common stocks tend to be more volatile than many other investment choices. The principal risks associated with investing in the Fund are set forth below.
Fixed-Income Securities Risk.Fixed-income securities are generally subject to the following risks:
Interest rate risk is the risk that prices of bonds and other fixed-income securities will increase as interest rates fall and decrease as interest rates rise.
Credit risk is the risk that the credit strength of an issuer of a fixed-income security will weaken and/or that the issuer will be unable to make timely principal and interest payments and that the security may go into default.
Prepayment risk is the risk that, during periods of falling interest rates, certain debt obligations may be paid off quicker than originally anticipated, which may cause the Fund to reinvest its assets in securities with lower yields, resulting in a decline in the Fund’s income or return potential.
Extension risk is the risk that, during periods of rising interest rates, certain debt obligations may be paid off substantially slower than originally anticipated, and as a result, the value of those obligations may fall.
Valuation risk is the risk that one or more of the fixed-income securities in which the Fund invests are priced differently than the value realized upon such security’s sale. In times of market instability, valuation may be more difficult. Valuation may also be affected by changes in the issuer’s financial strength, the market’s perception of such strength, or in the credit rating of the issuer or the security.
Liquidity risk is the risk that fixed-income securities may be difficult or impossible to sell at the time that the portfolio managers would like or at the price the portfolio managers believe the security is currently worth. Consequently, the Fund may have to accept a lower price to sell a security, sell other securities to raise cash, or give up an investment opportunity, any of which could have a negative effect on the Fund’s performance. In unusual market conditions, even normally liquid securities may be affected by a degree of liquidity risk (i.e., if the number and capacity of traditional market participants is reduced).
Market Risk.The value of the Fund’s portfolio may decrease due to short-term market movements and over more prolonged market downturns. As a result, the Fund’s net asset value may fluctuate and it may be more difficult to value or sell the Fund’s holdings. Market risk may affect a single issuer, industry, economic sector, or the market as a whole. Market risk may be magnified if certain social, political, economic, and other conditions and events (such as terrorism, conflicts, including related sanctions, social unrest, natural disasters, epidemics and pandemics, including COVID-19) adversely interrupt the global economy and financial markets. It is important to understand that the value of your investment may fall, sometimes sharply, in response to changes in the market, and you could lose money.
High-Yield/High-Risk Bond Risk.High-yield/high-risk bonds are considered speculative and may be more sensitive than other types of bonds to economic changes, political changes, or adverse developments specific to the company that issued the bond, which may adversely affect their value. High-yield/high-risk bonds are bonds rated below investment grade by the primary rating agencies such as Standard & Poor’s Ratings Services, Fitch, Inc., and Moody’s Investors Service, Inc. or are unrated bonds of similar quality. The value of lower quality bonds generally is more dependent on credit risk than investment grade bonds. Issuers of high-yield/high-risk bonds may not be as strong financially as those issuing bonds with higher credit ratings and are more vulnerable to real or perceived economic changes, political changes, or adverse developments specific to the issuer. In addition, the junk bond market can experience sudden and sharp price swings.
Geographic Concentration Risk.To the extent the Fund invests a substantial amount of its assets in issuers located in a single country or region, the economic, political, social, regulatory, or other developments or conditions within such country or region will generally have a greater effect on the Fund than they would on a more geographically diversified fund, which may result in greater losses and volatility. Adverse developments in certain regions could also adversely affect securities of other countries whose economies appear to be unrelated and could have a negative impact on the Fund’s performance.
Europe and United Kingdom Risk.The Fund is subject to certain risks related to Europe and the United Kingdom. Investments in British companies may subject the Fund to social, regulatory, political, currency, security, and economic risk specific to the United Kingdom. The United Kingdom has one of the largest economies in Europe, and the United States and other European countries are substantial trading partners of the United Kingdom. As a result, the British economy may be impacted by changes to the economic health of the United States and other European countries. Western Europe has, in
14 | Janus Henderson Developed World Bond Fund

certain instances, been susceptible to serious financial hardship, high debt levels, and high levels of unemployment. The European Union itself has experienced difficulties in connection with the debt loads of some of its member states. The markets in Eastern Europe remain relatively undeveloped and can be particularly sensitive to political and economic developments.
Industry and Sector Risk.Although the Fund does not concentrate its investments in specific industries or sectors, it may have a significant portion of its assets invested in securities of companies conducting similar business, or business within the same economic sector. Companies in the same industry or economic sector may be similarly affected by economic or market events, making the Fund more vulnerable to unfavorable developments than funds that invest more broadly. As the Fund’s portfolio becomes more concentrated, the Fund is less able to spread risk and potentially reduce the risk of loss and volatility. In addition, the Fund may be overweight or underweight in certain industries or sectors relative to its benchmark index, which may cause the Fund’s performance to be more or less sensitive to developments affecting those sectors.
ESG Investment Risk.Because the Fund considers environmental, social, and governance (“ESG”) factors in selecting securities, the Fund may perform differently than funds that do not consider ESG factors. Due to the ESG considerations and exclusionary criteria employed by the Fund, the Fund may not be invested in certain industries or sectors, and therefore may have lower performance than portfolios that do not apply similar criteria. In addition, since ESG investing takes into consideration factors beyond traditional financial analysis, the investment opportunities for the Fund may be limited at times. ESG-related information provided by issuers and third parties, upon which the portfolio managers may rely, continues to develop, and may be incomplete, inaccurate, use different methodologies, or be applied differently across companies and industries. Further, the regulatory landscape for ESG investing in the United States is still developing and future rules and regulations may require the Fund to modify or alter its investment process. Similarly, government policies incentivizing companies to consider their environmental or social practices may fall out of favor, which could potentially limit the Fund’s investment universe. There is also a risk that the issuers identified through the investment process employed by the Fund may fail to adhere to positive environmental or social practices, which may result in selling a security when it might otherwise be disadvantageous to do so.
Derivatives Risk.Derivatives can be volatile and involve risks in addition to the risks of the underlying referenced securities or asset. Gains or losses from a derivative investment can be substantially greater than the derivative’s original cost, and can therefore involve leverage. Leverage may cause the Fund to be more volatile than if it had not used leverage. Derivatives entail the risk that the counterparty will default on its payment obligations. Derivatives used for hedging purposes may reduce or eliminate gains or cause losses if the market moves in a manner different from that anticipated by the portfolio managers or if the cost of the derivative outweighs the benefit of the hedge.
Short Exposure Risk.The Fund may enter into a derivatives transaction to obtain short investment exposure to the reference asset. If the value of the reference asset on which the Fund has obtained a short investment exposure increases, the Fund will incur a loss. This potential loss is theoretically unlimited. A short exposure through a derivative also exposes the Fund to credit risk, counterparty risk, and leverage risk.
Short Sales Risk.Short sales are speculative transactions and involve special risks, including a greater reliance on the ability to accurately anticipate the future value of a security. The Fund will suffer a loss if it sells a security short and the value of the security rises rather than falls. The Fund’s losses are potentially unlimited in a short sale transaction. The use of short sales may also cause the Fund to have higher expenses than those of other funds. In addition, due to the investment process of long and short positions, the Fund may be subject to additional transaction costs that may lower the Fund’s returns. The Fund’s use of short sales may also have a leveraging effect on the Fund’s portfolio and may increase losses and the volatility of returns.
Foreign Exposure Risk.Foreign markets, including emerging markets, can be more volatile than the U.S. market. As a result, the Fund’s returns and net asset value may be affected by fluctuations in currency exchange rates or political or economic conditions in a particular country. In addition, a market swing in one or more countries or regions where the Fund has invested a significant amount of its assets may have a greater effect on the Fund’s performance than it would in a more geographically diversified portfolio.
Sovereign Debt Risk.Some investments in U.S. and non-U.S. government debt securities (“sovereign debt”) are considered low risk. However, investments in sovereign debt can involve a high degree of risk, including the risk that the governmental entity that controls the repayment of sovereign debt may not be willing or able to repay the principal and/or to pay the interest on its sovereign debt in a timely manner. A sovereign debtor’s willingness or ability to satisfy its debt obligation may
15 | Janus Henderson Developed World Bond Fund

be affected by various factors including, but not limited to, its cash flow situation, the extent of its foreign currency reserves, the availability of foreign exchange when a payment is due, and the relative size of its debt position in relation to its economy as a whole. In the event of default, there may be limited or no legal remedies for collecting sovereign debt and there may be no bankruptcy proceedings through which the Fund may collect all or part of the sovereign debt that a governmental entity has not repaid.
Restricted Securities Risk.Securities that have limitations on their resale are referred to as “restricted securities.” Investments in restricted securities, including securities issued under Regulation S and Rule 144A, could have the effect of decreasing the Fund’s liquidity profile or preventing the Fund from disposing of them promptly at advantageous prices. Restricted securities may be less liquid than other investments because such securities may not always be readily sold in broad public markets and may have no active trading market. As a result, they may be difficult to value because market quotations may not be readily available.
Leverage Risk.Some transactions may give rise to a form of economic leverage. These transactions may include, among others, derivatives, and may expose the Fund to greater risk and increase its costs. The use of leverage may cause the Fund to liquidate portfolio positions when it may not be advantageous to do so to satisfy its obligations or to meet the applicable requirements of the Investment Company Act of 1940, as amended, and the rules thereunder. Increases and decreases in the value of the Fund’s portfolio will be magnified when the Fund uses leverage.
Floating Rate Obligations Risk.The Fund may invest in floating rate obligations with interest rates that reset regularly, maintaining a fixed spread over a stated reference rate. The interest rates on floating rate obligations typically reset quarterly, although rates on some obligations may adjust at other intervals. Unexpected changes in the interest rates on floating rate obligations could result in lower income to the Fund. In addition, the secondary market on which floating rate obligations are traded may be less liquid than the market for investment grade securities or other types of income-producing securities, which may have an adverse impact on their market price. There is also a potential that there is no active market to trade floating rate obligations, that there may be restrictions on their transfer, or that the issuer may default. As a result, the Fund may be unable to sell floating rate obligations at the desired time or may be able to sell only at a price less than fair market value.
Securities Lending Risk.There is the risk that when portfolio securities are lent, the securities may not be returned on a timely basis, and the Fund may experience delays and costs in recovering the security or gaining access to the collateral provided to the Fund to collateralize the loan. If the Fund is unable to recover a security on loan, the Fund may use the collateral to purchase replacement securities in the market. There is a risk that the value of the collateral could decrease below the cost of the replacement security by the time the replacement investment is made, resulting in a loss to the Fund.
Portfolio Management Risk.The Fund is an actively managed investment portfolio and is therefore subject to the risk that the investment strategies employed for the Fund may fail to produce the intended results. The Fund may underperform its benchmark index or other mutual funds with similar investment objectives.
An investment in the Fund is not a bank deposit and is not insured or guaranteed by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation or any other government agency.
Performance information
The following information provides some indication of the risks of investing in the Fund by showing how the Fund’s performance has varied over time. Returns shown for periods prior to June 5, 2017, are those of Henderson Strategic Income Fund (the “Predecessor Fund”). The Predecessor Fund was advised by Henderson Global Investors (North America) Inc. and subadvised by Henderson Investment Management Limited. Class A Shares, Class C Shares, Class I Shares, and Class R6 Shares of the Predecessor Fund were reorganized into Class A Shares, Class C Shares, Class I Shares, and Class N Shares, respectively, of the Fund on June 2, 2017. Class A Shares and Class C Shares of the Predecessor Fund commenced operations with the Predecessor Fund’s inception on September 30, 2003. Class I Shares and Class R6 Shares of the Predecessor Fund commenced operations on April 29, 2011 and November 30, 2015, respectively. Class S Shares and Class T Shares of the Fund commenced operations on June 5, 2017.
The performance shown for Class A Shares for periods prior to June 5, 2017, reflects the performance of Class A Shares of the Predecessor Fund and is calculated using the fees and expenses of Class A Shares of the Predecessor Fund, in effect during the periods shown, net of any applicable fee and expense limitations or waivers.
16 | Janus Henderson Developed World Bond Fund

The performance shown for Class C Shares for periods prior to June 5, 2017, reflects the performance of Class C Shares of the Predecessor Fund and is calculated using the fees and expenses of Class C Shares of the Predecessor Fund, in effect during the periods shown, net of any applicable fee and expense limitations or waivers.
The performance shown for Class I Shares for periods prior to June 5, 2017, reflects the performance of Class I Shares of the Predecessor Fund and is calculated using the fees and expenses of Class I Shares of the Predecessor Fund, in effect during the periods shown, net of any applicable fee and expense limitations or waivers, except that for periods prior to April 29, 2011, performance shown for Class I Shares reflects the performance of Class A Shares of the Predecessor Fund, calculated using the fees and expenses of Class A Shares of the Predecessor Fund (without sales charges), net of any applicable fee and expense limitations or waivers.
The performance shown for Class N Shares for periods prior to June 5, 2017, reflects the performance of Class R6 Shares of the Predecessor Fund and is calculated using the fees and expenses of Class R6 Shares of the Predecessor Fund, in effect during the periods shown, net of any applicable fee and expense limitations or waivers, except that for periods prior to November 30, 2015, performance shown for Class N Shares reflects the performance of Class A Shares of the Predecessor Fund, calculated using the fees and expenses of Class A Shares of the Predecessor Fund (without sales charges), net of any applicable fee and expense limitations or waivers.
The performance shown for Class S Shares for periods prior to June 5, 2017, reflects the performance of Class A Shares of the Predecessor Fund, calculated using the fees and expenses of Class A Shares of the Predecessor Fund (without sales charges), net of any applicable fee and expense limitations or waivers.
The performance shown for Class T Shares for periods prior to June 5, 2017, reflects the performance of Class A Shares of the Predecessor Fund, calculated using the fees and expenses of Class A Shares of the Predecessor Fund (without sales charges), net of any applicable fee and expense limitations or waivers.
Returns of the Fund will be different from the Predecessor Fund as they have different expenses.
The bar chart depicts the change in performance from year to year during the periods indicated. The bar chart figures do not include any applicable sales charges that an investor may pay when they buy or sell Class A Shares or Class C Shares of the Fund. If sales charges were included, the returns would be lower. The table compares the Fund’s average annual returns for the periods indicated to a broad-based securities market index. All figures assume reinvestment of dividends and distributions. For certain periods, the Fund’s performance reflects the effect of expense waivers. Without the effect of these expense waivers, the performance shown would have been lower.
The Fund’s (and the Predecessor Fund’s) past performance (before and after taxes) does not necessarily indicate how the Fund will perform in the future. Updated performance information is available at janushenderson.com/performance or by calling 1-877-335-2687.
Annual Total Returns for Class A Shares (calendar year-end)
Best Quarter:
2nd Quarter 2020
6.81%
Worst Quarter:
1st Quarter 2020
– 2.74%
The Fund’s year-to-date return as of the calendar quarter ended September 30, 2022 was – 17.06%.
17 | Janus Henderson Developed World Bond Fund

Average Annual Total Returns (periods ended 12/31/21)
 
 
 
 
 
1 Year
5 Years
10 Years
Since
Inception
(9/30/03)
Class A Shares(1)
 
 
 
 
Return Before Taxes
– 5.47%
3.70%
4.89%
4.78%
Return After Taxes on Distributions
– 5.98%
2.44%
3.41%
3.08%
Return After Taxes on Distributions and Sale of Fund Shares(2)
– 3.24%
2.30%
3.14%
3.01%
Bloomberg Global Aggregate Credit Index (USD Hedged)
(reflects no deduction for expenses, fees, or taxes)
– 0.95%
4.60%
4.55%
4.63%
Class C Shares
 
 
 
 
Return Before Taxes(3)
– 2.49%
3.93%
4.62%
4.25%
Bloomberg Global Aggregate Credit Index (USD Hedged)
(reflects no deduction for expenses, fees, or taxes)
– 0.95%
4.60%
4.55%
4.63%
Class S Shares
 
 
 
 
Return Before Taxes
– 0.98%
4.55%
5.28%
4.99%
Bloomberg Global Aggregate Credit Index (USD Hedged)
(reflects no deduction for expenses, fees, or taxes)
– 0.95%
4.60%
4.55%
4.63%
Class I Shares
 
 
 
 
Return Before Taxes
– 0.63%
4.95%
5.66%
5.20%
Bloomberg Global Aggregate Credit Index (USD Hedged)
(reflects no deduction for expenses, fees, or taxes)
– 0.95%
4.60%
4.55%
4.63%
Class N Shares
 
 
 
 
Return Before Taxes
– 0.50%
5.02%
5.59%
5.16%
Bloomberg Global Aggregate Credit Index (USD Hedged)
(reflects no deduction for expenses, fees, or taxes)
– 0.95%
4.60%
4.55%
4.63%
Class T Shares
 
 
 
 
Return Before Taxes
– 0.74%
4.78%
5.44%
5.07%
Bloomberg Global Aggregate Credit Index (USD Hedged)
(reflects no deduction for expenses, fees, or taxes)
– 0.95%
4.60%
4.55%
4.63%
(1) 
Fund returns calculated assuming maximum permitted sales loads.
(2) 
If the Fund incurs a loss, which generates a tax benefit, the Return After Taxes on Distributions and Sale of Fund Shares may exceed the Fund’s other return figures.
(3) 
The one year return is calculated to include the contingent deferred sales charge.
The Fund’s primary benchmark index is Bloomberg Global Aggregate Credit Index (USD Hedged). The index is described below.
The Bloomberg Global Aggregate Credit Index (USD Hedged) is the credit component of the Bloomberg Global Aggregate Index, which provides a broad-based measure of the global investment grade fixed income markets. The credit component excludes government bonds and securitized debt.
After-tax returns are calculated using distributions for the Predecessor Fund’s Class A Shares for the period prior to June 5, 2017. If Class A Shares of the Fund had been available during periods prior to June 5, 2017, the distributions used to calculate the after-tax returns may have been different. After-tax returns are calculated using the historically highest individual federal marginal income tax rates and do not reflect the impact of state and local taxes. Actual after-tax returns depend on your individual tax situation and may differ from those shown in the preceding table. The after-tax return information shown above does not apply to Fund shares held through a tax-advantaged account, such as a 401(k) plan or an IRA.
After-tax returns are only shown for Class A Shares of the Fund. After-tax returns for the other classes of Shares will vary from those shown for Class A Shares due to varying sales charges (as applicable), fees, and expenses among the classes.
18 | Janus Henderson Developed World Bond Fund

Management
Investment Adviser:  Janus Henderson Investors US LLC
Portfolio Managers:  Jenna Barnard, CFA, is Executive Vice President and Co-Portfolio Manager of the Fund, and has been a member of the Fund’s portfolio management team since December 2008. John Pattullo is Executive Vice President and Co-Portfolio Manager of the Fund, and has been a member of the Fund’s portfolio management team since December 2008.
Purchase and sale of Fund shares
Minimum Investment Requirements
Class A Shares, Class C Shares*, Class S Shares, and Class T Shares
 
Non-retirement accounts
$2,500**
Certain tax-advantaged accounts or UGMA/UTMA accounts
$500
Class I Shares
 
Institutional investors (investing directly with the Fund)
$1,000,000
Through an intermediary institution
 
• non-retirement accounts
$2,500
• certain tax-advantaged accounts or UGMA/UTMA accounts
$500
Class N Shares
 
Retirement investors (investing through an adviser-assisted, employer-sponsored retirement plan)
None
Retail investors (investing through a financial intermediary omnibus account)
$2,500***
Institutional investors (investing directly with the Fund)
$1,000,000
Exceptions to these minimums may apply for certain tax-advantaged, tax-qualified and retirement plans, including health savings accounts, accounts held through certain wrap programs, and certain retail brokerage accounts.
*
The maximum purchase in Class C Shares is $500,000 for any single purchase.
**
Class A, Class C, Class S, and Class T shares held through certain supermarket and/or self-directed brokerage accounts, or through wrap programs, may not be subject to these minimums. Please contact your financial intermediary for more information.
***
Investors in certain tax-advantaged accounts or accounts held through certain wrap programs or bank trust platforms may not be subject to this minimum.
Purchases, exchanges, and redemptions can generally be made only through institutional channels, such as financial intermediaries and retirement platforms. Class I Shares may be purchased directly by certain institutional investors who established Class I Shares accounts before August 4, 2017. You should contact your financial intermediary or refer to your plan documents for information on how to invest in the Fund. Requests must be received in good order by the Fund or its agents (financial intermediary or plan sponsor, if applicable) prior to the close of the trading session of the New York Stock Exchange in order to receive that day’s net asset value. For additional information, refer to “Purchases,” “Exchanges,” and/or “Redemptions” in the Prospectus.
Tax information
The Fund’s distributions are taxable, and will be taxed as ordinary income or capital gains, unless you are investing through a tax-advantaged arrangement, such as a 401(k) plan or an individual retirement account (in which case you may be taxed upon withdrawal of your investment from such account).
Payments to broker-dealers and other financial intermediaries
If you purchase Class A Shares, Class C Shares, Class S Shares, Class I Shares, or Class T Shares of the Fund through a broker-dealer or other financial intermediary (such as a bank), the Fund or its distributor (or its affiliates) may pay the intermediary for the sale of Fund shares and related services. These payments may create a conflict of interest by influencing the broker-dealer or other intermediary and your salesperson to recommend the Fund over another investment or to recommend one share class over another. There is some regulatory uncertainty concerning whether marketing support or other similar payments may be made or received in connection with Class I Shares where a financial intermediary has imposed its own sales charges or transaction fees. As a result, based on future regulatory developments, such payments may
19 | Janus Henderson Developed World Bond Fund

be terminated, or the Fund may prohibit financial intermediaries from imposing such sales charges or transaction fees in connection with Class I Shares. Ask your salesperson or visit your financial intermediary’s website for more information.
20 | Janus Henderson Developed World Bond Fund

Fund summary
Ticker:
JDFAX
Class A Shares
JADFX
Class S Shares
JDFNX
Class N Shares
JAFIX
Class T Shares
 
JFICX
Class C Shares
JFLEX
Class I Shares
JDFRX
Class R Shares
 
 
Investment Objective
Janus Henderson Flexible Bond Fund seeks to obtain maximum total return, consistent with preservation of capital.
Fees and Expenses of the Fund
This table describes the fees and expenses that you may pay if you buy, hold, and sell Shares of the Fund. Each share class has different expenses, but represents an investment in the same Fund. For Class A Shares, you may qualify for sales charge discounts if you and your family invest, or agree to invest in the future, at least $50,000 in the Fund or in other Janus Henderson funds. More information about these and other discounts, as well as eligibility requirements for each share class, is available from your financial professional and in the “Purchases” section on page 103 of the Fund’s Prospectus and in the “Purchases” section on page 77 of the Fund’s Statement of Additional Information. In addition, please see Appendix A – Intermediary Sales Charge Waivers and Discounts. You may also incur brokerage commissions charged by your broker or financial intermediary when buying Class I Shares or Class N Shares of the Fund that are not reflected in the table or in the example below.
SHAREHOLDER FEES
(fees paid directly from your investment)
 
Class A
 
Class C
 
Class S
 
Class I
 
Class N
 
Class R
 
Class T
Maximum Sales Charge (load) Imposed on Purchases (as a
percentage of offering price)
 
4.75%
 
None
 
None
 
None
 
None
 
None
 
None
Maximum Deferred Sales Charge (load) (as a percentage of
the lower of original purchase price or redemption
proceeds)
 
None
 
1.00%
 
None
 
None
 
None
 
None
 
None
ANNUAL FUND OPERATING EXPENSES
(expenses that you pay each year as a percentage of the value
of your investment)
 
Class A
 
Class C
 
Class S
 
Class I
 
Class N
 
Class R
 
Class T
Management Fees
 
0.41%
 
0.41%
 
0.41%
 
0.41%
 
0.41%
 
0.41%
 
0.41%
Distribution/Service (12b-1) Fees
 
0.25%
 
1.00%
 
0.25%
 
None
 
None
 
0.50%
 
None
Other Expenses
 
0.19%
 
0.10%
 
0.29%
 
0.10%
 
0.02%
 
0.28%
 
0.27%
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses
 
0.85%
 
1.51%
 
0.95%
 
0.51%
 
0.43%
 
1.19%
 
0.68%
Fee Waiver(1)
 
0.15%
 
0.06%
 
0.00%
 
0.06%
 
0.00%
 
0.00%
 
0.00%
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses After Fee Waiver(1)
 
0.70%
 
1.45%
 
0.95%
 
0.45%
 
0.43%
 
1.19%
 
0.68%
(1)
The Adviser has contractually agreed to waive its investment advisory fee and/or reimburse operating expenses to the extent that the Fund’s total annual fund operating expenses (excluding the fees payable pursuant to a Rule 12b-1 plan, shareholder servicing fees, such as transfer agency fees (but excluding out-of-pocket costs); brokerage commissions; interest; dividends; taxes; acquired fund fees and expenses; and extraordinary expenses) exceed 0.45% for at least a one-year period commencing on October 28, 2022. This contractual waiver may be terminated or modified only at the discretion of the Board of Trustees.
EXAMPLE:
The Example is intended to help you compare the cost of investing in the Fund with the cost of investing in other mutual funds. The Example assumes that you invest $10,000 in the Fund for the time periods indicated and reinvest all dividends and distributions. The Example also assumes that your investment has a 5% return each year and that the Fund’s operating expenses are equal to the Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses After Fee Waiver for the first year and the Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses thereafter. Class C Shares automatically convert to Class A Shares after eight years. The Example
21 | Janus Henderson Flexible Bond Fund

for Class C Shares for the ten-year period reflects the conversion to Class A Shares. Although your actual costs may be higher or lower, based on these assumptions your costs would be:
If Shares are redeemed:
1 Year
3 Years
5 Years
10 Years
Class A Shares
$543
$719
$910
$1,461
Class C Shares
$ 248
$ 471
$ 818
$ 1,618
Class S Shares
$97
$303
$525
$1,166
Class I Shares
$46
$ 158
$ 279
$635
Class N Shares
$44
$138
$241
$542
Class R Shares
$ 121
$ 378
$ 654
$ 1,443
Class T Shares
$69
$218
$379
$847
If Shares are not redeemed:
1 Year
3 Years
5 Years
10 Years
Class A Shares
$543
$719
$910
$1,461
Class C Shares
$ 148
$ 471
$ 818
$ 1,618
Class S Shares
$97
$303
$525
$1,166
Class I Shares
$46
$ 158
$ 279
$635
Class N Shares
$44
$138
$241
$542
Class R Shares
$ 121
$ 378
$ 654
$ 1,443
Class T Shares
$69
$218
$379
$847
Portfolio Turnover: The Fund pays transaction costs, such as commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or “turns over” its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover rate may indicate higher transaction costs and may result in higher taxes when Fund shares are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are not reflected in annual fund operating expenses or in the Example, affect the Fund’s performance. During the most recent fiscal year, the Fund’s portfolio turnover rate was 158% of the average value of its portfolio.
Principal investment strategies
The Fund pursues its investment objective by primarily investing, under normal circumstances, at least 80% of its net assets (plus any borrowings for investment purposes) in bonds. Bonds include, but are not limited to, government notes and bonds, corporate bonds, commercial and residential mortgage-backed securities, asset-backed securities, credit risk transfer securities (“CRTs”), and money market instruments. The Fund may invest in fixed and floating rate obligations with varying durations. The Fund’s average portfolio duration typically ranges between three and seven years. As of June 30, 2022, the Fund’s average portfolio duration was 6.17 years.
The Fund will invest at least 65% of its net assets in investment grade debt securities. The Fund will limit its investment in high-yield/high-risk bonds (also known as “junk” bonds) to 35% or less of its net assets. The Fund generates total return from a combination of current income and capital appreciation, but income is usually the dominant portion. The Fund may enter into “to be announced” or “TBA” commitments when purchasing mortgage-backed securities or other securities. The Fund may also invest in securities that cannot be offered for public resale unless registered under the applicable securities laws or that have a contractual restriction that prohibits or limits their resale (these are known as “restricted securities”), which may include Rule 144A securities. The Fund may also invest in foreign securities, which may include investments in emerging market securities. Due to the nature of the securities in which the Fund invests, it may have relatively high portfolio turnover compared to other funds.
Additionally, the Fund may invest its assets in derivatives, which are instruments that have a value derived from, or directly linked to, an underlying asset, such as fixed-income securities, commodities, currencies, interest rates, or market indices. In particular, the Fund may use interest rate swaps and futures, including Treasury bond futures, to manage interest rate risk, yield curve positioning, and country exposure. The Fund may also use index credit default swaps for hedging purposes (to offset risks associated with an investment exposure, or market conditions), to increase or decrease the Fund’s exposure to a particular market, to manage or adjust the risk profile of the Fund relative to its benchmark index, and to earn income, enhance returns, or preserve capital. The Fund’s exposure to derivatives will vary. For purposes of meeting its 80% investment policy, the Fund may include derivatives that have characteristics similar to the securities in which the Fund may directly invest. The Fund may take short positions on derivatives instruments.
22 | Janus Henderson Flexible Bond Fund

The portfolio managers’ investment process is research-driven, incorporating “top-down” and “bottom-up” factors to identify and manage exposure to risks across sectors, industries, and individual investments. The portfolio managers evaluate expected risk-adjusted returns on a portfolio and position level by analyzing fundamentals, valuations, and market technical indicators.
The Fund may lend portfolio securities on a short-term or long-term basis to certain qualified broker-dealers and institutions, in an amount equal to up to one-third of its total assets as determined at the time of the loan origination.
Principal investment risks
The biggest risk is that the Fund’s returns and yields will vary, and you could lose money. The principal risks associated with investing in the Fund are set forth below.
Market Risk.The value of the Fund’s portfolio may decrease due to short-term market movements and over more prolonged market downturns. As a result, the Fund’s net asset value may fluctuate and it may be more difficult to value or sell the Fund’s holdings. Market risk may affect a single issuer, industry, economic sector, or the market as a whole. Market risk may be magnified if certain social, political, economic, and other conditions and events (such as terrorism, conflicts, including related sanctions, social unrest, natural disasters, epidemics and pandemics, including COVID-19) adversely interrupt the global economy and financial markets. It is important to understand that the value of your investment may fall, sometimes sharply, in response to changes in the market, and you could lose money.
Fixed-Income Securities Risk.Fixed-income securities are generally subject to the following risks:
Interest rate risk is the risk that prices of bonds and other fixed-income securities will increase as interest rates fall and decrease as interest rates rise.
Credit risk is the risk that the credit strength of an issuer of a fixed-income security will weaken and/or that the issuer will be unable to make timely principal and interest payments and that the security may go into default.
Prepayment risk is the risk that, during periods of falling interest rates, certain debt obligations may be paid off quicker than originally anticipated, which may cause the Fund to reinvest its assets in securities with lower yields, resulting in a decline in the Fund’s income or return potential.
Extension risk is the risk that, during periods of rising interest rates, certain debt obligations may be paid off substantially slower than originally anticipated, and as a result, the value of those obligations may fall.
Valuation risk is the risk that one or more of the fixed-income securities in which the Fund invests are priced differently than the value realized upon such security’s sale. In times of market instability, valuation may be more difficult. Valuation may also be affected by changes in the issuer’s financial strength, the market’s perception of such strength, or in the credit rating of the issuer or the security.
Liquidity risk is the risk that fixed-income securities may be difficult or impossible to sell at the time that the portfolio managers would like or at the price the portfolio managers believe the security is currently worth. Consequently, the Fund may have to accept a lower price to sell a security, sell other securities to raise cash, or give up an investment opportunity, any of which could have a negative effect on the Fund’s performance. In unusual market conditions, even normally liquid securities may be affected by a degree of liquidity risk (i.e., if the number and capacity of traditional market participants is reduced).
High-Yield/High-Risk Bond Risk.High-yield/high-risk bonds are considered speculative and may be more sensitive than other types of bonds to economic changes, political changes, or adverse developments specific to the company that issued the bond, which may adversely affect their value.
Mortgage- and Asset-Backed Securities Risk.Mortgage- and asset-backed securities represent interests in “pools” of commercial or residential mortgages or other assets, including consumer loans or receivables. The value of mortgage- and asset-backed securities will be influenced by factors affecting the real estate market and the assets underlying these securities. Investments in mortgage-and asset-backed securities may be subject to credit risk, valuation risk, liquidity risk, extension risk, and prepayment risk. These securities also are subject to risk of default on the underlying mortgage or asset, particularly during periods of economic downturn.
Credit Risk Transfer Securities Risk.CRTs are unguaranteed and unsecured debt securities that are commonly issued by a government sponsored entity. CRTs are not directly linked to or backed by the underlying mortgage loans, so investors such as the Fund have no direct recourse to the underlying mortgage loans in the event of a default. The risks associated with CRTs are different from the risks associated with investments in mortgage-backed securities issued by government sponsored
23 | Janus Henderson Flexible Bond Fund

entities or private issuers because some or all of the mortgage default or credit risk associated with the underlying mortgage loans is transferred to investors. Additional risks associated with investments in CRTs may include valuation risk, mortgage credit risk, liquidity risk, and prepayment risk.
Foreign Exposure Risk.Foreign markets, including emerging markets, can be more volatile than the U.S. market. As a result, the Fund’s returns and net asset value may be affected by fluctuations in currency exchange rates or political or economic conditions in a particular country. In some foreign markets, there may not be protection against failure by other parties to complete transactions. It may not be possible for the Fund to repatriate capital, dividends, interest, and other income from a particular country or governmental entity. In addition, a market swing in one or more countries or regions where the Fund has invested a significant amount of its assets may have a greater effect on the Fund’s performance than it would in a more geographically diversified portfolio. The Fund’s investments in emerging market countries, if any, may involve risks greater than, or in addition to, the risks of investing in more developed countries.
Sovereign Debt Risk.Some investments in U.S. and non-U.S. government debt securities (“sovereign debt”) are considered low risk. However, investments in sovereign debt, especially the debt of certain emerging market countries, can involve a high degree of risk, including the risk that the governmental entity that controls the repayment of sovereign debt may not be willing or able to repay the principal and/or to pay the interest on its sovereign debt in a timely manner. A sovereign debtor’s willingness or ability to satisfy its debt obligation may be affected by various factors including, but not limited to, its cash flow situation, the extent of its foreign currency reserves, the availability of foreign exchange when a payment is due, and the relative size of its debt position in relation to its economy as a whole. In the event of default, there may be limited or no legal remedies for collecting sovereign debt and there may be no bankruptcy proceedings through which the Fund may collect all or part of the sovereign debt that a governmental entity has not repaid. In addition, to the extent the Fund invests in non-U.S. sovereign debt, it may be subject to currency risk.
Floating Rate Obligations Risk.The Fund may invest in floating rate obligations with interest rates that reset regularly, maintaining a fixed spread over a stated reference rate. The interest rates on floating rate obligations typically reset quarterly, although rates on some obligations may adjust at other intervals. Unexpected changes in the interest rates on floating rate obligations could result in lower income to the Fund. In addition, the secondary market on which floating rate obligations are traded may be less liquid than the market for investment grade securities or other types of income-producing securities, which may have an adverse impact on their market price. There is also a potential that there is no active market to trade floating rate obligations, that there may be restrictions on their transfer, or that the issuer may default. As a result, the Fund may be unable to sell floating rate obligations at the desired time or may be able to sell only at a price less than fair market value.
Portfolio Turnover Risk.Increased portfolio turnover may result in higher costs, which may have a negative effect on the Fund’s performance. In addition, higher portfolio turnover may result in the acceleration of capital gains and the recognition of greater levels of short-term capital gains, which are taxed at ordinary federal income tax rates when distributed to shareholders.
TBA Commitments Risk.Although TBA securities must meet industry-accepted “good delivery” standards, there can be no assurance that a security purchased on a forward commitment basis will ultimately be issued or delivered by the counterparty. If the counterparty to a transaction fails to deliver the securities, the Fund could suffer a loss. Because TBA commitments do not require the delivery of a specific security, the characteristics of a security delivered to the Fund may be less favorable than expected. There is a risk that the security that the Fund buys will lose value between the purchase and settlement dates. TBA purchase and sales commitments may significantly increase the Fund’s portfolio turnover rate and are not included in the portfolio turnover rate calculation.
Derivatives Risk.Derivatives can be volatile and involve risks in addition to the risks of the underlying referenced securities or asset. Gains or losses from a derivative investment can be substantially greater than the derivative’s original cost, and can therefore involve leverage. Leverage may cause the Fund to be more volatile than if it had not used leverage. Derivatives entail the risk that the counterparty will default on its payment obligations. Derivatives used for hedging purposes may reduce or eliminate gains or cause losses if the market moves in a manner different from that anticipated by the portfolio managers or if the cost of the derivative outweighs the benefit of the hedge.
Short Exposure Risk.The Fund may enter into a derivatives transaction to obtain short investment exposure to the reference asset. If the value of the reference asset on which the Fund has obtained a short investment exposure increases, the Fund will
24 | Janus Henderson Flexible Bond Fund

incur a loss. This potential loss is theoretically unlimited. A short exposure through a derivative also exposes the Fund to credit risk, counterparty risk, and leverage risk.
Restricted Securities Risk.Securities that have limitations on their resale are referred to as “restricted securities.” Investments in restricted securities, including securities issued under Regulation S and Rule 144A, could have the effect of decreasing the Fund’s liquidity profile or preventing the Fund from disposing of them promptly at advantageous prices. Restricted securities may be less liquid than other investments because such securities may not always be readily sold in broad public markets and may have no active trading market. As a result, they may be difficult to value because market quotations may not be readily available.
LIBOR Replacement Risk.Certain debt securities, derivatives, or other financial instruments utilize the London InterBank Offered Rate (“LIBOR”) as a reference rate for various rate calculations. The U.K. Financial Conduct Authority stopped compelling or inducing banks to submit rates for many LIBOR settings and will continue to do so for certain other commonly-used U.S. dollar LIBOR settings after June 30, 2023. The elimination of LIBOR or other reference rates and the transition process away from LIBOR could adversely impact (i) volatility and liquidity in markets that are tied to those reference rates, (ii) the market for, or value of, specific securities or payments linked to those reference rates, (iii) the availability or terms of borrowing or refinancing, or (iv) the effectiveness of hedging strategies. For these and other reasons, the elimination of LIBOR or other reference rates may adversely affect the Fund’s performance and/or net asset value. Alternatives to LIBOR are established or in development in most major currencies including the Secured Overnight Financing Rate (“SOFR”) that is intended to replace the U.S. dollar LIBOR.
The effect of the discontinuation of LIBOR or other reference rates on the Fund will vary depending on, among other things (i) existing fallback or termination provisions in individual contracts and (ii) whether, how, and when industry participants develop and adopt new reference rates and fallbacks for both legacy and new products and instruments. Accordingly, it is difficult to predict the full impact of the transition away from LIBOR or other reference rates on the Fund until new reference rates and fallbacks for both legacy and new products, instruments, and contracts are commercially accepted.
Securities Lending Risk.There is the risk that when portfolio securities are lent, the securities may not be returned on a timely basis, and the Fund may experience delays and costs in recovering the security or gaining access to the collateral provided to the Fund to collateralize the loan. If the Fund is unable to recover a security on loan, the Fund may use the collateral to purchase replacement securities in the market. There is a risk that the value of the collateral could decrease below the cost of the replacement security by the time the replacement investment is made, resulting in a loss to the Fund.
Portfolio Management Risk.The Fund is an actively managed investment portfolio and is therefore subject to the risk that the investment strategies employed for the Fund may fail to produce the intended results. The Fund may underperform its benchmark index or other mutual funds with similar investment objectives.
An investment in the Fund is not a bank deposit and is not insured or guaranteed by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation or any other government agency.
Performance information
The following information provides some indication of the risks of investing in the Fund by showing how the Fund’s performance has varied over time. Class T Shares (formerly named Class J Shares, the initial share class) of the Fund commenced operations with the Fund’s inception. Class A Shares, Class C Shares, Class S Shares, Class I Shares, and Class R Shares of the Fund commenced operations on July 6, 2009. Class N Shares of the Fund commenced operations on May 31, 2012.
The performance shown for Class T Shares is calculated using the fees and expenses of Class T Shares in effect during the periods shown, net of any applicable fee and expense limitations or waivers.
The performance shown for Class A Shares, Class C Shares, Class S Shares, and Class R Shares for periods prior to July 6, 2009, reflects the performance of the Fund’s former Class J Shares, calculated using the fees and expenses of each respective share class, without the effect of any fee and expense limitations or waivers.
The performance shown for Class I Shares for periods prior to July 6, 2009, reflects the performance of the Fund’s former Class J Shares, calculated using the fees and expenses of Class J Shares, net of any applicable fee and expense limitations or waivers.
25 | Janus Henderson Flexible Bond Fund

The performance shown for Class N Shares for periods prior to May 31, 2012, reflects the performance of the Fund’s Class T Shares, calculated using the fees and expenses of Class T Shares, net of any applicable fee and expense limitations or waivers.
If Class A Shares, Class C Shares, Class S Shares, Class I Shares, and Class R Shares of the Fund had been available during periods prior to July 6, 2009, or Class N Shares of the Fund had been available during periods prior to May 31, 2012, the performance shown for each respective share class may have been different. The performance shown for the periods following the Fund’s commencement of Class A Shares, Class C Shares, Class S Shares, Class I Shares, Class N Shares, and Class R Shares reflects the fees and expenses of each respective share class, net of any applicable fee and expense limitations or waivers.
The bar chart depicts the change in performance from year to year during the periods indicated. The bar chart figures do not include any applicable sales charges that an investor may pay when they buy or sell Class A Shares or Class C Shares of the Fund. If sales charges were included, the returns would be lower. The table compares the Fund’s average annual returns for the periods indicated to a broad-based securities market index. All figures assume reinvestment of dividends and distributions. For certain periods, the Fund’s performance reflects the effect of expense waivers. Without the effect of these expense waivers, the performance shown would have been lower.
The Fund’s past performance (before and after taxes) does not necessarily indicate how it will perform in the future. Updated performance information is available at janushenderson.com/performance or by calling 1-877-335-2687.
Annual Total Returns for Class T Shares (calendar year-end)
Best Quarter:
2nd Quarter 2020
6.87%
Worst Quarter:
1st Quarter 2021
– 3.37%
The Fund’s year-to-date return as of the calendar quarter ended September 30, 2022 was – 15.03%.
Average Annual Total Returns (periods ended 12/31/21)
 
 
 
 
 
1 Year
5 Years
10 Years
Since
Inception
(7/7/87)
Class T Shares
 
 
 
 
Return Before Taxes
– 0.96%
4.21%
3.58%
6.37%
Return After Taxes on Distributions
– 1.71%
3.10%
2.35%
4.17%
Return After Taxes on Distributions and Sale of Fund Shares(1)
– 0.56%
2.74%
2.23%
4.09%
Bloomberg U.S. Aggregate Bond Index
(reflects no deduction for expenses, fees, or taxes)
– 1.54%
3.57%
2.90%
6.03%
Class A Shares
 
 
 
 
Return Before Taxes(2)
– 5.74%
2.98%
2.92%
6.17%
Bloomberg U.S. Aggregate Bond Index
(reflects no deduction for expenses, fees, or taxes)
– 1.54%
3.57%
2.90%
6.03%
26 | Janus Henderson Flexible Bond Fund

Average Annual Total Returns (periods ended 12/31/21)
 
 
 
 
 
1 Year
5 Years
10 Years
Since
Inception
(7/7/87)
Class C Shares
 
 
 
 
Return Before Taxes(3)
– 2.70%
3.35%
2.72%
5.64%
Bloomberg U.S. Aggregate Bond Index
(reflects no deduction for expenses, fees, or taxes)
– 1.54%
3.57%
2.90%
6.03%
Class S Shares
 
 
 
 
Return Before Taxes
– 1.22%
3.91%
3.30%
6.18%
Bloomberg U.S. Aggregate Bond Index
(reflects no deduction for expenses, fees, or taxes)
– 1.54%
3.57%
2.90%
6.03%
Class I Shares
 
 
 
 
Return Before Taxes
– 0.78%
4.36%
3.73%
6.43%
Bloomberg U.S. Aggregate Bond Index
(reflects no deduction for expenses, fees, or taxes)
– 1.54%
3.57%
2.90%
6.03%
Class N Shares
 
 
 
 
Return Before Taxes
– 0.72%
4.44%
3.81%
6.44%
Bloomberg U.S. Aggregate Bond Index
(reflects no deduction for expenses, fees, or taxes)
– 1.54%
3.57%
2.90%
6.03%
Class R Shares
 
 
 
 
Return Before Taxes
– 1.46%
3.66%
3.06%
5.93%
Bloomberg U.S. Aggregate Bond Index
(reflects no deduction for expenses, fees, or taxes)
– 1.54%
3.57%
2.90%
6.03%
(1) 
If the Fund incurs a loss, which generates a tax benefit, the Return After Taxes on Distributions and Sale of Fund Shares may exceed the Fund’s other return figures.
(2) 
Calculated assuming maximum permitted sales loads.
(3) 
The one year return is calculated to include the contingent deferred sales charge.
The Fund’s primary benchmark index is the Bloomberg U.S. Aggregate Bond Index. The index is described below.
The Bloomberg U.S. Aggregate Bond Index is made up of U.S. dollar-denominated, fixed-rate taxable bonds, including securities that are of investment grade quality or better.
After-tax returns are calculated using distributions for the Fund’s Class T Shares (formerly named Class J Shares, the initial share class). After-tax returns are calculated using the historically highest individual federal marginal income tax rates and do not reflect the impact of state and local taxes. Actual after-tax returns depend on your individual tax situation and may differ from those shown in the preceding table. The after-tax return information shown above does not apply to Fund shares held through a tax-advantaged account, such as a 401(k) plan or an IRA.
After-tax returns are only shown for Class T Shares of the Fund. After-tax returns for the other classes of Shares will vary from those shown for Class T Shares due to varying sales charges (as applicable), fees, and expenses among the classes.
Management
Investment Adviser:  Janus Henderson Investors US LLC
Portfolio Managers:  Michael Keough is Executive Vice President and Co-Portfolio Manager of the Fund, which he has co-managed since December 2015. Greg Wilensky, CFA, is Executive Vice President and Co-Portfolio Manager of the Fund, which he has co-managed since February 2020.
27 | Janus Henderson Flexible Bond Fund

Purchase and sale of Fund shares
Minimum Investment Requirements
Class A Shares, Class C Shares*, Class S Shares, Class R Shares, and Class T Shares
 
Non-retirement accounts
$2,500**
Certain tax-advantaged accounts or UGMA/UTMA accounts
$500
Class I Shares
 
Institutional investors (investing directly with the Fund)
$1,000,000
Through an intermediary institution
 
• non-retirement accounts
$2,500
• certain tax-advantaged accounts or UGMA/UTMA accounts
$500
Class N Shares
 
Retirement investors (investing through an adviser-assisted, employer-sponsored retirement plan)
None
Retail investors (investing through a financial intermediary omnibus account)
$2,500***
Institutional investors (investing directly with the Fund)
$1,000,000
Exceptions to these minimums may apply for certain tax-advantaged, tax-qualified and retirement plans, including health savings accounts, accounts held through certain wrap programs, and certain retail brokerage accounts.
*
The maximum purchase in Class C Shares is $500,000 for any single purchase.
**
Class A, Class C, Class S, and Class T shares held through certain supermarket and/or self-directed brokerage accounts, or through wrap programs, may not be subject to these minimums. Please contact your financial intermediary for more information. For Class R shareholders, there is no investment minimum for defined contribution plans. Investors in a defined contribution plan through a third party administrator should refer to their plan document or contact their plan administrator for additional information regarding account minimums.
***
Investors in certain tax-advantaged accounts or accounts held through certain wrap programs or bank trust platforms may not be subject to this minimum.
Purchases, exchanges, and redemptions can generally be made only through institutional channels, such as financial intermediaries and retirement platforms. Class I Shares may be purchased directly by certain institutional investors who established Class I Shares accounts before August 4, 2017. You should contact your financial intermediary or refer to your plan documents for information on how to invest in the Fund. Requests must be received in good order by the Fund or its agents (financial intermediary or plan sponsor, if applicable) prior to the close of the trading session of the New York Stock Exchange in order to receive that day’s net asset value. For additional information, refer to “Purchases,” “Exchanges,” and/or “Redemptions” in the Prospectus.
Tax information
The Fund’s distributions are taxable, and will be taxed as ordinary income or capital gains, unless you are investing through a tax-advantaged arrangement, such as a 401(k) plan or an individual retirement account (in which case you may be taxed upon withdrawal of your investment from such account).
Payments to broker-dealers and other financial intermediaries
If you purchase Class A Shares, Class C Shares, Class S Shares, Class I Shares, Class R Shares, or Class T Shares of the Fund through a broker-dealer or other financial intermediary (such as a bank), the Fund or its distributor (or its affiliates) may pay the intermediary for the sale of Fund shares and related services. These payments may create a conflict of interest by influencing the broker-dealer or other intermediary and your salesperson to recommend the Fund over another investment or to recommend one share class over another. There is some regulatory uncertainty concerning whether marketing support or other similar payments may be made or received in connection with Class I Shares where a financial intermediary has imposed its own sales charges or transaction fees. As a result, based on future regulatory developments, such payments may be terminated, or the Fund may prohibit financial intermediaries from imposing such sales charges or transaction fees in connection with Class I Shares. Ask your salesperson or visit your financial intermediary’s website for more information.
28 | Janus Henderson Flexible Bond Fund

Fund summary
Ticker:
JGBAX
Class A Shares
JGBSX
Class S Shares
JGLNX
Class N Shares
 
 
 
JGBCX
Class C Shares
JGBIX
Class I Shares
JHBTX
Class T Shares
 
 
Investment Objective
Janus Henderson Global Bond Fund seeks total return, consistent with preservation of capital.
Fees and Expenses of the Fund
This table describes the fees and expenses that you may pay if you buy, hold, and sell Shares of the Fund. Each share class has different expenses, but represents an investment in the same Fund. For Class A Shares, you may qualify for sales charge discounts if you and your family invest, or agree to invest in the future, at least $50,000 in the Fund or in other Janus Henderson funds. More information about these and other discounts, as well as eligibility requirements for each share class, is available from your financial professional and in the “Purchases” section on page 103 of the Fund’s Prospectus and in the “Purchases” section on page 77 of the Fund’s Statement of Additional Information. In addition, please see Appendix A – Intermediary Sales Charge Waivers and Discounts. You may also incur brokerage commissions charged by your broker or financial intermediary when buying Class I Shares or Class N Shares of the Fund that are not reflected in the table or in the example below.
SHAREHOLDER FEES
(fees paid directly from your investment)
 
Class A
 
Class C
 
Class S
 
Class I
 
Class N
 
Class T
Maximum Sales Charge (load) Imposed on Purchases (as a percentage of
offering price)
 
4.75%
 
None
 
None
 
None
 
None
 
None
Maximum Deferred Sales Charge (load) (as a percentage of the lower of
original purchase price or redemption proceeds)
 
None
 
1.00%
 
None
 
None
 
None
 
None
ANNUAL FUND OPERATING EXPENSES
(expenses that you pay each year as a percentage of the value
of your investment)
 
Class A
 
Class C
 
Class S
 
Class I
 
Class N
 
Class T
Management Fees
 
0.60%
 
0.60%
 
0.60%
 
0.60%
 
0.60%
 
0.60%
Distribution/Service (12b-1) Fees
 
0.25%
 
1.00%
 
0.25%
 
None
 
None
 
None
Other Expenses
 
0.44%