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Global X MSCI China Communication Services ETF
NYSE Arca: CHIC
Global X MSCI Greece ETF
NYSE Arca: GREK
Global X MSCI China Consumer Discretionary ETF
NYSE Arca: CHIQ
Global X MSCI Norway ETF
NYSE Arca: NORW
Global X MSCI China Consumer Staples ETF
NYSE Arca: CHIS
Global X DAX Germany ETF
NASDAQ: DAX
Global X MSCI China Energy ETF
NYSE Arca: CHIE
Global X MSCI Portugal ETF
NYSE Arca: PGAL
Global X MSCI China Financials ETF
NYSE Arca: CHIX
Global X MSCI Colombia ETF
NYSE Arca: GXG
Global X MSCI China Health Care ETF
NYSE Arca: CHIH
Global X MSCI Argentina ETF
NYSE Arca: ARGT
Global X MSCI China Industrials ETF
NYSE Arca: CHII
Global X MSCI Pakistan ETF
NYSE Arca: PAK
Global X MSCI China Information Technology ETF
NYSE Arca: CHIK
Global X MSCI Nigeria ETF
NYSE Arca: NGE
Global X MSCI China Materials ETF
NYSE Arca: CHIM
Global X MSCI Vietnam ETF
NYSE Arca: VNAM
Global X MSCI China Real Estate ETF
NYSE Arca: CHIR
Global X MSCI Next Emerging & Frontier ETF
NYSE Arca: EMFM
Global X MSCI China Utilities ETF
NYSE Arca: CHIU
Global X FTSE Southeast Asia ETF
NYSE Arca: ASEA
  
Prospectus

March 1, 2023
  
The Securities and Exchange Commission ("SEC") has not approved or disapproved these securities or passed upon the adequacy of this Prospectus. Any representation to the contrary is a criminal offense.
 
Shares in a Fund (defined below) are not guaranteed or insured by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation or any other agency of the U.S. Government, nor are shares deposits or obligations of any bank. Such shares in a Fund involve investment risks, including the loss of principal.
As permitted by regulations adopted by the SEC, paper copies of the Funds’ shareholder reports will no longer be sent by mail, unless you specifically request paper copies of the reports from your financial intermediary (such as a broker-dealer or bank). Instead, shareholder reports will be available on the Funds’ website (www.globalxetfs.com/explore), and you will be notified by mail each time a report is posted and provided with a website link to access the report. If you already elected to receive shareholder reports electronically, you will not be affected by this change and you need not take any action. You may elect to receive shareholder reports and other communications from the Funds electronically anytime by contacting your financial intermediary. You may elect to receive all future Fund shareholder reports in paper free of charge. Please contact your financial intermediary to inform them that you wish to continue receiving paper copies of Fund shareholder reports and for details about whether your election to receive reports in paper will apply to all funds held with your financial intermediary.




TABLE OF CONTENTS
 
FUND SUMMARIES
ADDITIONAL INFORMATION ABOUT THE FUNDS
A FURTHER DISCUSSION OF PRINCIPAL RISKS
A FURTHER DISCUSSION OF OTHER RISKS
PORTFOLIO HOLDINGS INFORMATION
FUND MANAGEMENT
DISTRIBUTOR
BUYING AND SELLING FUND SHARES
FREQUENT TRADING
DISTRIBUTION AND SERVICE PLAN
DIVIDENDS AND DISTRIBUTIONS
TAXES
DETERMINATION OF NET ASSET VALUE
PREMIUM/DISCOUNT AND SHARE INFORMATION
TOTAL RETURN INFORMATION
INFORMATION REGARDING THE INDICES AND THE INDEX PROVIDERS
OTHER SERVICE PROVIDERS
ADDITIONAL INFORMATION
FINANCIAL HIGHLIGHTS
OTHER INFORMATION


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FUND SUMMARIES

Global X MSCI China Communication Services ETF
 
Ticker: CHIC Exchange: NYSE Arca
 
INVESTMENT OBJECTIVE
 
The Global X MSCI China Communication Services ETF ("Fund") seeks to provide investment results that correspond generally to the price and yield performance, before fees and expenses, of the MSCI China Communication Services 10/50 Index ("Underlying Index").
 
FEES AND EXPENSES
 
This table describes the fees and expenses that you may pay if you buy, hold, and sell shares (“Shares”) of the Fund. You may pay other fees, such as brokerage commissions and other fees to financial intermediaries, which are not reflected in the table and examples below.
 
Annual Fund Operating Expenses (expenses that you pay each year as a percentage of the value of your investment):
 
Management Fees: 0.65%
Distribution and Service (12b-1) Fees: None
Other Expenses: 0.00%
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses: 0.65%

Example: The following example is intended to help you compare the cost of investing in the Fund with the cost of investing in other funds. This example does not take into account customary brokerage commissions that you pay when purchasing or selling Shares of the Fund in the secondary market. The example assumes that you invest $10,000 in the Fund for the time periods indicated and then sell all of your Shares at the end of those periods. The example also assumes that your investment has a 5% return each year and that the Fund's operating expenses remain the same. Although your actual costs may be higher or lower, based on these assumptions, your costs would be:
 
One Year Three Years Five Years Ten Years
$66 $208 $362 $810

Portfolio Turnover: The Fund pays transaction costs, such as commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or "turns over" its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover rate may indicate higher transaction costs and may result in higher taxes when Shares are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are not reflected in annual fund operating expenses or in the example, affect the Fund's performance. During the most recent fiscal year, the Fund's portfolio turnover rate was 30.28% of the average value of its portfolio.
 
PRINCIPAL INVESTMENT STRATEGIES
 
The Fund invests at least 80% of its total assets in the securities of the MSCI China Communication Services 10/50 Index ("Underlying Index") and in American Depositary Receipts ("ADRs") and Global Depositary Receipts ("GDRs") based on the securities in the Underlying Index. The Fund will invest at least 80% of its total assets in securities of communication services companies that are economically tied to China. For purposes of this 80% investment policy, communication services companies include those companies that are classified in the communications services sector under the Global Industry Classification System ("GICS"). The Fund's 80% investment policies are non-fundamental and require 60 days prior written notice to shareholders before they can be changed. The Fund may lend securities representing up to one-third of the value of the Fund’s total assets (including the value of the collateral received).
 
The Underlying Index tracks the performance of companies in the MSCI China Index (the "Parent Index") that are classified in the communication services sector, as defined by MSCI, Inc. ("MSCI") the provider of the Underlying Index ("Index Provider"). The Parent Index is a free float-adjusted market capitalization-weighted index designed to measure the performance of securities that are classified as operating in China according to the MSCI Global Investable Markets Index Methodology, and
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that satisfy minimum market capitalization and liquidity thresholds. The securities eligible for inclusion in the Underlying Index include H-Shares (securities of companies incorporated in China that are denominated in Hong Kong Dollars and listed on the Hong Kong Stock Exchange (the "HKSE")), B-Shares (securities of companies denominated in U.S. dollars or Hong Kong dollars and listed on Shanghai Stock Exchange (the "SSE") or Shenzen Stock Exchange (the "SZSE")), Red Chips (securities of companies with a majority of their business operations in mainland China and that are controlled by the national government or local governments of China, traded on the HKSE in Hong Kong dollars), P-Chips (securities of companies with the majority of their business operations in mainland China and controlled by individuals in China, but that are incorporated outside of China), A-Shares (securities of companies incorporated in mainland China that trade on Chinese exchanges in renminbi) that are accessible through the Shanghai-Hong Kong Stock Connect program ("Shanghai Connect") or the Shenzhen-Hong Kong Stock Connect program ("Shenzhen Connect", and together with Shanghai Connect, "Stock Connect Programs"), and foreign listings such as American Depository Receipts ("ADRs"). The Stock Connect Programs are securities trading and clearing programs that aim to achieve mutual stock market access between China and Hong Kong. Under Stock Connect, the Fund's trading of eligible A-shares listed on the SSE or the SZSE, as applicable, would be effectuated through its Hong Kong brokers. Trading through the Stock Connect Programs is subject to a daily quota, which limits the maximum net purchases under Stock Connect Programs each day, and as such, buy orders for A-shares would be rejected once the daily quota is exceeded (although the Fund will be permitted to sell A-shares regardless of the daily quota balance). The daily quota is not specific to the Fund. From time to time, other stock exchanges in China may participate in Stock Connect, and A-shares listed and traded on such other stock exchanges and accessible through Stock Connect may be added to the Underlying Index, as determined by MSCI.

The Underlying Index then follows a rules-based methodology that is designed to select all constituents of the Parent Index that are classified in the communication services sector under the GICS. The Underlying Index is weighted according to each component's free-float adjusted market capitalization, but is modified so that, as of the rebalance date, no group entity (defined by the Index Provider as companies with a controlling stake owned by one entity) constitutes more than 10% of the Underlying Index and so that, in the aggregate, the individual group entities that would represent more than 5% of the Underlying Index represent no more than 50% of the Underlying Index ("10/50 Cap"). The Underlying Index is reconstituted and re-weighted quarterly. The Underlying Index may include large- and mid-capitalization companies. As of December 31, 2022, the Underlying Index had 23 constituents. The Fund's investment objective and Underlying Index may be changed without shareholder approval.
 
The Fund generally will use a replication strategy. A replication strategy is an indexing strategy that involves investing in the securities of the Underlying Index in approximately the same proportions as in the Underlying Index. However, the Fund may utilize a representative sampling strategy with respect to the Underlying Index when a replication strategy might be detrimental or disadvantageous to shareholders, such as when there are practical difficulties or substantial costs involved in compiling a portfolio of equity securities to replicate the Underlying Index, in instances in which a security in the Underlying Index becomes temporarily illiquid, unavailable or less liquid, or as a result of legal restrictions or limitations (such as tax diversification requirements) that apply to the Fund but not the Underlying Index.
  
The Adviser expects that, over time, the correlation between the Fund's performance and that of the Underlying Index, before fees and expenses, will exceed 95%. A correlation percentage of 100% would indicate perfect correlation. If the Fund uses a replication strategy, it can be expected to have greater correlation to the Underlying Index than if it uses a representative sampling strategy.
 
The Fund concentrates its investments (i.e., holds 25% or more of its total assets) in a particular industry or group of industries to approximately the same extent that the Underlying Index is concentrated. As of December 31, 2022, the Underlying Index was concentrated in the entertainment and interactive media and services industries and had significant exposure to the communication services sector.
 
SUMMARY OF PRINCIPAL RISKS
 
As with any investment, you could lose all or part of your investment in the Fund, and the Fund’s performance could trail that of other investments. There is no guarantee that the Fund will achieve its investment objective. An investment in the Fund is not a bank deposit and it is not insured or guaranteed by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation or any other government agency, the Adviser or any of its affiliates. The Fund is subject to the principal risks noted below, any of which may adversely affect the Fund’s net asset value (“NAV”), trading price, yield, total return and ability to meet its investment objective, as well as other risks that are described in greater detail in the Additional Information About the Funds section of this Prospectus and in the Statement of Additional Information (“SAI”). The order of the below risk factors does not indicate the significance of any particular risk factor.

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Asset Class Risk: Securities and other assets in the Underlying Index or otherwise held in the Fund's portfolio may underperform in comparison to the general securities markets, a particular securities market or other asset classes.

China A-Shares Risk: A-Shares are issued by companies incorporated in mainland China and are traded on Chinese exchanges. Foreign investors can access A-Shares by obtaining a Qualified Foreign Institutional Investor ("QFII") or a Renminbi Qualified Foreign Institutional Investor ("RQFII") license, as well as through the Stock Connect Program, which is a securities trading and clearing program with an aim to achieve mutual stock market access between the China and Hong Kong markets. Stock Connect was developed by Hong Kong Exchanges and Clearing Limited, the Shanghai Stock Exchange ("SSE") (in the case of Shanghai Connect) or the Shenzhen Stock Exchange ("SZSE") (in the case of Shenzhen Connect), and the China Securities Depository and Clearing Corporation Limited (“CSDCC”). The Fund currently intends to gain exposure to A-Shares through the Stock Connect Programs. Investments in A-Shares are subject to various regulations and limits, and the recoupment or repatriation of assets invested in A-Shares is subject to restrictions by the Chinese government. In addition, investors from outside mainland China may face difficulties or prohibitions accessing certain A-Shares that are part of a restricted list in countries such as the U.S. A-Shares may be subject to frequent and widespread trading halts and may become illiquid. Trading suspensions in certain stock could lead to greater market execution risk and costs for the Fund, and the creation and redemption of Creation Units (as defined below) may also be disrupted. These risks, among others, could adversely affect the value of the Fund’s investments.

Equity Securities Risk: Equity securities are subject to changes in value, and their values may be more volatile than other asset classes, as a result of such factors as a company’s business performance, investor perceptions, stock market trends and general economic conditions.

Capitalization Risk: Investing in issuers within the same market capitalization category carries the risk that the category may be out of favor due to current market conditions or investor sentiment.

Large-Capitalization Companies Risk: Large-capitalization companies may trail the returns of the overall stock market. Large-capitalization stocks tend to go through cycles of doing better - or worse - than the stock market in general. These periods have, in the past, lasted for as long as several years.

Mid-Capitalization Companies Risk: Mid-capitalization companies may have greater price volatility, lower trading volume and less liquidity than large-capitalization companies. In addition, mid-capitalization companies may have smaller revenues, narrower product lines, less management depth and experience, smaller shares of their product or service markets, fewer financial resources and less competitive strength than large-capitalization companies.

Cash Transaction Risk: Unlike most exchange-traded funds ("ETFs"), the Fund intends to effect a significant portion of creations and redemptions for cash, rather than in-kind securities. As a result, an investment in the Fund may be less tax-efficient than an investment in a more conventional ETF. Moreover, cash transactions may have to be carried out over several days if the securities market is relatively illiquid and may involve considerable brokerage fees and taxes. These factors may result in wider spreads between the bid and the offered prices of the Fund’s Shares than for more conventional ETFs.

Currency Risk: The Fund may invest in securities denominated in foreign currencies. Because the Fund's NAV is determined in U.S. dollars, the Fund's NAV could decline if the Chinese yuan depreciates against the U.S. dollar or if there are delays or limits on repatriation of such currency. Currency exchange rates can be very volatile and can change quickly and unpredictably. As a result, the Fund's NAV may change quickly and without warning, which could have a significant negative impact on the Fund. Additionally, the Chinese government heavily regulates the domestic exchange of foreign currencies and yuan exchange rates in China, which may adversely affect the operations and financial results of the Fund’s investments in China. Shares purchased through the Stock Connect Programs will be purchased using offshore yuan, the value of which may differ from and experience greater volatility than the value of onshore yuan. Offshore yuan cannot be freely remitted into or transferred out of China, and there is no assurance that there will always be sufficient amounts of offshore yuan available for the Fund to invest in all components of the Underlying Index.

Custody Risk: The Fund may hold foreign securities and cash with foreign banks, agents, and securities depositories appointed by the Fund's custodian. Investments in emerging markets may be subject to even greater custody risks than investments in more developed markets. Less developed markets are more likely to experience problems with the clearing and settling of trades and the holding of securities by local banks, agents and depositories.

Focus Risk: To the extent that the Underlying Index focuses in investments related to a particular industry or group of industries, the Fund will also focus its investments to approximately the same extent. Similarly, if the Underlying Index has
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significant exposure to one or more sectors, the Fund’s investments will likely have significant exposure to such sectors. In such event, the Fund’s performance will be particularly susceptible to adverse events impacting such industry or sector, which may include, but are not limited to, the following: general economic conditions or cyclical market patterns that could negatively affect supply and demand; competition for resources; adverse labor relations; political or world events; obsolescence of technologies; and increased competition or new product introductions that may affect the profitability or viability of companies in a particular industry or sector. As a result, the value of the Fund’s investments may rise and fall more than the value of shares of a fund that invests in securities of companies in a broader range of industries or sectors.

Risks Related to Investing in the Communication Services Sector: Companies in the communication services sector may be affected by industry competition, substantial capital requirements, government regulation, cyclicality of revenues and earnings, obsolescence of communications products and services due to technological advancement, a potential decrease in the discretionary income of targeted individuals and changing consumer tastes and interests.

Risks Related to Investing in the Entertainment Industry: Entertainment companies may be impacted by high costs of research and development of new content and services in an effort to stay relevant in a highly competitive industry, and entertainment products may face a risk of rapid obsolescence. Entertainment companies are subject to risks that include cyclicality of revenues and earnings, changing tastes and topical interests, and decreases in the discretionary income of their targeted consumers. Sales of content through physical formats and traditional content delivery services may be displaced by new content delivery mechanisms, such as streaming technology, and it is possible that such new content delivery mechanisms may themselves become obsolete over time.  The entertainment industry is regulated, and changes to rules regarding advertising and the content produced by entertainment companies can increase overall production and distribution costs. Companies in the entertainment industry have at times faced increased regulatory pressure which has delayed or prohibited the release of entertainment content.

Risks Related to Investing in the Interactive Media and Services Industry: The success of the interactive media and services industry may be tied closely to the performance of the overall domestic and global economy, interest rates, competition and consumer confidence. Success depends heavily on disposable household income and consumer spending. Also, companies in the interactive media and services industry may be subject to severe competition, which may have an adverse impact on their respective profitability. Changes in demographics and consumer tastes can also affect the demand for, and success of, interactive media and services in the marketplace.

Foreign Securities Risk: The Fund may invest, within U.S. regulations, in foreign securities. The Fund's investments in foreign securities can be riskier than U.S. securities investments. Investments in the securities of foreign issuers (including investments in ADRs and GDRs) are subject to the risks associated with investing in those foreign markets, such as heightened risks of inflation or nationalization. The prices of foreign securities and the prices of U.S. securities have, at times, moved in opposite directions. In addition, securities of foreign issuers may lose value due to political, economic and geographic events affecting a foreign issuer or market. During periods of social, political or economic instability in a country or region, the value of a foreign security traded on U.S. exchanges could be affected by, among other things, increasing price volatility, illiquidity, or the closure of the primary market on which the security (or the security underlying the ADR or GDR) is traded. You may lose money due to political, economic and geographic events affecting a foreign issuer or market. Where all or a portion of the Fund's underlying securities trade in a market that is closed when the market in which the Fund's shares are listed and trading is open, there may be differences between the last quote from the security’s closed foreign market and the value of the security during the Fund’s domestic trading day. This in turn could lead to differences between the market price of the Fund’s shares and the underlying value of those shares.

Geographic Risk: A natural, biological or other disaster could occur in a geographic region in which the Fund invests, which could affect the economy or particular business operations of companies in the specific geographic region, causing an adverse impact on the Fund’s investments in the affected region or in a region economically tied to the affected region. The securities in which the Fund invests and, consequently, the Fund are also subject to specific risks as a result of their business operations, including, but not limited to:

Risk of Investing in China: Investment exposure to China subjects the Fund to risks specific to China.

Economic, Political and Social Risk
China may be subject to considerable degrees of economic, political and social instability. Concerns about the rising government and household debt levels could impact the stability of the Chinese economy. China is an emerging market and demonstrates significantly higher volatility from time to time in comparison to developed markets. Over the last few decades, the Chinese government has undertaken reform of economic and market practices, including recent reforms to liberalize its capital markets and expand the sphere for private ownership of property in China.
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However, Chinese markets generally continue to experience inefficiency, volatility and pricing anomalies resulting from governmental influence, a lack of publicly available information and/or political and social instability. Chinese companies are also subject to the risk that Chinese authorities can intervene in their operations and structure. Internal social unrest or confrontations with other neighboring countries, including military conflicts in response to such events, may also disrupt economic development in China and result in a greater risk of currency fluctuations, currency convertibility, interest rate fluctuations and higher rates of inflation.

China has experienced major health crises. These health crises include, but are not limited to, the rapid and pandemic spread of novel viruses commonly known as SARS, MERS, and COVID-19 (Coronavirus). Such health crises could exacerbate political, social, and economic risks previously mentioned.

Export growth continues to be a major driver of China’s rapid economic growth. Elevated trade tensions between China and its trading partners, including the imposition of U.S. tariffs on certain Chinese goods and increased international pressure related to Chinese trade policy and forced technology transfers and intellectual property protections, may have a substantial impact on the Chinese economy. Reduction in spending on Chinese products and services, institution of additional tariffs or other trade barriers (including as a result of heightened trade tensions between China and the U.S. or in response to actual or alleged Chinese cyber activity), or a downturn in any of the economies of China’s key trading partners may have an adverse impact on the Chinese economy. The continuation or worsening of the current political climate between China and the U.S. could result in additional regulatory restrictions being contemplated or imposed in the U.S. or in China that could impact the Fund’s ability to invest in certain companies.

Security Risk
China has experienced security concerns, such as terrorism and strained international relations. Additionally, China is alleged to have participated in state-sponsored cyberattacks against foreign companies and foreign governments. Actual and threatened responses to such activity, including purchasing restrictions, sanctions, tariffs or cyberattacks on the Chinese government or Chinese companies, may impact China’s economy and Chinese issuers of securities in which the Fund invests. Incidents involving China’s or the region’s security, including the contagion of infectious viruses or diseases, may cause uncertainty in Chinese markets and may adversely affect the Chinese economy and the Fund’s investments.

Heavy Government Control and Regulation
Chinese companies, including Chinese companies that are listed on U.S. exchanges, are not subject to the same degree of regulatory requirements, accounting standards or auditor oversight as companies in more developed countries, and as a result, information about the Chinese securities in which the Fund invests may be less reliable or complete. There may be significant obstacles to obtaining information necessary for investigations into or litigation against Chinese companies and shareholders may have limited legal remedies. Investments in China may be subject to loss due to expropriation or nationalization of assets and property or the imposition of restrictions on foreign investments and repatriation of capital. Furthermore, government actions against leaders or other key figures within companies, or speculation about such actions, may lead to sudden and unpredictable falls in the value of securities within the Fund.

Tax Risk
China has implemented a number of tax reforms in recent years and may amend or revise its existing tax laws and/or procedures in the future, possibly with retroactive effect. Changes in applicable Chinese tax law could reduce the after-tax profits of the Fund, directly or indirectly, including by reducing the after-tax profits of companies in China in which the Fund invests. Uncertainties in Chinese tax rules could result in unexpected tax liabilities for the Fund. Should legislation limit U.S. investors’ ability to invest in specific Chinese companies through A-shares or other share class listings that are part of the underlying holdings, these shares may be excluded from Fund holdings.

Special Risk Considerations of Investing in China – Variable Interest Entity Investments
For purposes of raising capital offshore on exchanges outside of China, including on U.S. exchanges, many Chinese-based operating companies are structured as Variable Interest Entities (“VIEs”). In this structure, the Chinese-based operating company is the VIE and establishes a shell company in a foreign jurisdiction, such as the Cayman Islands. The shell company lists on a foreign exchange and enters into contractual arrangements with the VIE. This structure allows Chinese companies in which the Chinese government restricts foreign ownership to raise capital from foreign investors. While the shell company has no equity ownership of the VIE, these contractual arrangements permit the shell company to consolidate the VIE’s financial statements with its own for accounting purposes and provide for economic exposure to the performance of the underlying Chinese operating company. Therefore, an investor in the listed shell company, such as the Fund, will have exposure to the Chinese-based operating company only through contractual arrangements and has no ownership in the Chinese-based operating company. Furthermore, because the shell company only has specific rights provided for in these service agreements with the VIE, its abilities to control the
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activities at the Chinese-based operating company are limited and the operating company may engage in activities that negatively impact investment value.

While the VIE structure has been widely adopted, it is not formally recognized under Chinese law and therefore there is a risk that the Chinese government could prohibit the existence of such structures or negatively impact the VIE’s contractual arrangements with the listed shell company by making them invalid. If these contracts were found to be unenforceable under Chinese law, investors in the listed shell company, such as the Fund, may suffer significant losses with little or no recourse available. If the Chinese government determines that the agreements establishing the VIE structures do not comply with Chinese law and regulations, including those related to restrictions on foreign ownership, it could subject a Chinese-based issuer to penalties, revocation of business and operating licenses, or forfeiture of ownership interest. In addition, the listed shell company’s control over a VIE may also be jeopardized if a natural person who holds the equity interest in the VIE breaches the terms of the agreement, is subject to legal proceedings or if any physical instruments for authenticating documentation, such as chops and seals, are used without the Chinese-based issuer’s authorization to enter into contractual arrangements in China. Chops and seals, which are carved stamps used to sign documents, represent a legally binding commitment by the company. Moreover, any future regulatory action may prohibit the ability of the shell company to receive the economic benefits of the Chinese-based operating company, which may cause the value of the Fund’s investment in the listed shell company to suffer a significant loss. For example, in 2021, the Chinese government prohibited use of the VIE structure for investment in after-school tutoring companies. There is no guarantee that the Chinese government will not place similar restrictions on other industries.

Chinese equities that utilize the VIE structure to list in the U.S. as ADRs face the risk of regulatory action from U.S. authorities, including the risk of delisting. This will depend in part on whether U.S. regulatory authorities are satisfied with their access to Mainland China and Hong Kong for the purpose of conducting inspections on the quality of audits for these companies. Although the U.S. and China reached an agreement in September 2022 to grant the U.S. access for such inspections, there is no guarantee that the agreement will hold up or that U.S. regulatory authorities will continue to feel satisfied with their access. As of December 31, 2022, the Fund had significant exposure to VIEs, as defined above.

Risk of Investing in Emerging Markets: As of the date of this Prospectus, China is an emerging market country. Investments in emerging markets may be subject to a greater risk of loss than investments in developed markets. Securities markets of emerging market countries are less liquid, subject to greater price volatility, have smaller market capitalizations, have less government regulation, and are not subject to as extensive and frequent accounting, financial, and other reporting requirements as the securities markets of more developed countries, and there may be greater risk associated with the custody of securities in emerging markets. It may be difficult or impossible for the Fund to pursue claims against an emerging market issuer in the courts of an emerging market country. There may be significant obstacles to obtaining information necessary for investigations into or litigation against emerging market companies and shareholders may have limited legal rights and remedies. Emerging markets may be more likely to experience inflation, political turmoil and rapid changes in economic conditions than more developed markets. Emerging market economies’ exposure to specific industries, such as tourism, and lack of efficient or sufficient health care systems, could make these economies especially vulnerable to global crises, including but not limited to, pandemics such as the global COVID-19 pandemic. Certain emerging market countries may have privatized, or have begun the process of privatizing, certain entities and industries. Privatized entities may lose money or be re-nationalized.

Risk of Investing in Hong Kong: Investments in Hong Kong issuers may subject the Fund to legal, regulatory, political, currency, security, and economic risk specific to Hong Kong. China is Hong Kong’s largest trading partner, both in terms of exports and imports. Any changes in the Chinese economy, trade regulations or currency exchange rates, or a tightening of China’s control over Hong Kong, including in connection with recent protests and unrest, may have an adverse impact on Hong Kong’s economy.

International Closed Market Trading Risk: To the extent that the underlying investments held by the Fund trade on foreign exchanges that may be closed when the securities exchange on which the Fund’s Shares trade is open, there are likely to be deviations between the current price of such an underlying security and the last quoted price for the underlying security (i.e., the Fund’s quote from the closed foreign market). These deviations could result in premiums or discounts to the Fund’s NAV that may be greater than those experienced by other exchange-traded funds ("ETFs").

Investable Universe of Companies Risk: The investable universe of companies in which the Fund may invest may be limited. If a company no longer meets the Index Provider’s criteria for inclusion in the Underlying Index, the Fund may need to reduce or eliminate its holdings in that company. The reduction or elimination of the Fund’s holdings in the company may have an adverse impact on the liquidity of the Fund’s overall portfolio holdings and on Fund performance.

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Issuer Risk: Fund performance depends on the performance of individual companies in which the Fund invests. Changes to the financial condition of any of those companies may cause the value of such company's securities to decline.

Market Risk: Turbulence in the financial markets and reduced liquidity may negatively affect issuers, which could have an adverse effect on the Fund. If the securities held by the Fund experience poor liquidity, the Fund may be unable to transact at advantageous times or prices, which may decrease the Fund’s returns. In addition, there is a risk that policy changes by central governments and governmental agencies, including the U.S. Federal Reserve or the European Central Bank, which could include increasing interest rates, could cause increased volatility in financial markets and lead to higher levels of Fund redemptions from Authorized Participants, which could have a negative impact on the Fund. Furthermore, local, regional or global events such as war, acts of terrorism, the spread of infectious illness or other public health issues, recessions, or other events could have a significant impact on the Fund and its investments and trading of its Shares. For example, at the start of 2023, central banks had already increased interest rates at the fastest rate on record, and it is unknown how long this trend will continue and when inflation will return to target levels. This increases the risk that monetary policy may provide less support should economic growth slow. Additionally, China’s shift away from a zero-COVID policy creates both opportunities and risks, causing uncertainty for global economic growth. Market risk factors may result in increased volatility and/or decreased liquidity in the securities markets. The Fund’s NAV could decline over short periods due to short-term market movements and over longer periods during market downturns.

Non-Diversification Risk: The Fund is classified as a “non-diversified” investment company under the Investment Company Act of 1940 ("1940 Act"). As a result, the Fund is subject to the risk that it may be more volatile than a diversified fund because the Fund may invest its assets in a smaller number of issuers or may invest a larger proportion of its assets in a single issuer. As a result, the gains and losses on a single investment may have a greater impact on the Fund’s NAV and may make the Fund more volatile than more diversified funds.

Operational Risk: The Fund is exposed to operational risk arising from a number of factors, including but not limited to human error, processing and communication errors, errors of the Fund's service providers, counterparties or other third-parties, failed or inadequate processes and technology or systems failures. Additionally, cyber security failures or breaches of the electronic systems of the Fund, the Adviser, and the Fund's other service providers, market makers, Authorized Participants or the issuers of securities in which the Fund invests have the ability to cause disruptions and negatively impact the Fund's business operations, potentially resulting in financial losses to the Fund and its shareholders. The Fund and the Adviser seek to reduce these operational risks through controls and procedures. However, these measures do not address every possible risk and may be inadequate for those risks that they are intended to address.

Passive Investment Risk: The Fund is not actively managed, and the Adviser does not attempt to take defensive positions in declining markets. Unlike many investment companies, the Fund does not seek to outperform its Underlying Index. Therefore, it would not necessarily buy or sell a security unless that security is added or removed, respectively, from the Underlying Index, even if that security generally is underperforming. Additionally, if a constituent of the Underlying Index were removed, even outside of a regular rebalance of the Underlying Index, the Adviser anticipates that the Fund would sell such security. Maintaining investments in securities regardless of market conditions or the performance of individual securities could cause the Fund’s return to be lower than if the Fund employed an active strategy.

Index-Related Risk: There is no guarantee that the Fund will achieve a high degree of correlation to the Underlying Index and therefore achieve its investment objective. Market disruptions and regulatory restrictions could have an adverse effect on the Fund’s ability to adjust its exposure to the required levels in order to track the Underlying Index. Errors in index data, index computations and/or the construction of the Underlying Index in accordance with its methodology may occur from time to time and may not be identified and corrected by the Index Provider for a period of time or at all, which may have an adverse impact on the Fund and its shareholders.

Management Risk: The Fund may not fully replicate its Underlying Index and may hold securities not included in its Underlying Index. The Adviser’s investment strategy, the implementation of which is subject to a number of constraints, may cause the Fund to underperform the market or its relevant benchmark or adversely affect the ability of the Fund to achieve its investment objective.

Tracking Error Risk: Tracking error may occur because of differences between the instruments held in the Fund's portfolio and those included in the Underlying Index, pricing differences, transaction costs incurred by the Fund, the Fund's holding of uninvested cash, size of the Fund, differences in timing of the accrual of or the valuation of dividends or interest, tax gains or losses, changes to the Underlying Index or the costs to the Fund of complying with various new or existing regulatory requirements. This risk may be heightened during times of increased market volatility or other unusual market conditions. Tracking error also may result because the Fund incurs fees and
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expenses, while the Underlying Index does not. ETFs that track indices with significant weight in emerging markets issuers may experience higher tracking error than other ETFs that do not track such indices.

Reliance on Trading Partners Risk: The Fund invests in the Chinese economy, which is heavily dependent upon trading with key partners. Any reduction in this trading, including as a result of adverse economic conditions in a trading partner's economy, may cause an adverse impact on the Chinese economy in which the Fund invests. Through its portfolio companies' trading partners, the Fund is specifically exposed to Asian Economic Risk, European Economic Risk, and North American Economic Risk.

Risks Associated with Exchange-Traded Funds: As an ETF, the Fund is subject to the following risks:

Authorized Participants Concentration Risk: The Fund has a limited number of financial institutions that may act as Authorized Participants and engage in creation or redemption transactions directly with the Fund, and none of those Authorized Participants is obligated to engage in creation and/or redemption transactions. To the extent that those Authorized Participants exit the business or are unable to process creation and/or redemption orders, such as in times of market stress, Shares may be more likely to trade at a premium or discount to NAV and/or at wider intraday bid-ask spreads, and possibly face trading halts and/or delisting from an exchange. Authorized Participants Concentration Risk may be heightened because the Fund invests in non-U.S. securities.

Large Shareholder Risk: Redemptions by large shareholders could have a significant negative impact on the Fund. If a large shareholder were to redeem all, or a large portion, of its Shares, there is no guarantee that the Fund will be able to maintain sufficient assets to continue operations in which case the Board of Trustees may determine to liquidate the Fund. In addition, transactions by large shareholders may account for a large percentage of the trading volume on a national securities exchange and may, therefore, have a material upward or downward effect on the market price of the Shares.

Listing Standards Risk: The Fund is required to comply with listing requirements adopted by the listing exchange. Non-compliance with such requirements may result in the Fund's shares being delisted by the listing exchange. Any resulting liquidation of the Fund could cause the Fund to incur elevated transaction costs and could result in negative tax consequences for its shareholders.

Market Trading Risks and Premium/Discount Risks: Shares of the Fund are publicly traded on a national securities exchange, which may subject shareholders to numerous market trading risks. In stressed market conditions, the market for the Shares may become less liquid in response to the deteriorating liquidity of the Fund’s portfolio. This adverse effect on the liquidity of the Shares, as well as disruptions to creations and redemptions, the existence of extreme market volatility or potential lack of assets in the Fund or an active trading market for Shares may result in Shares trading at a significant premium or discount to NAV. If a shareholder purchases Shares at a time when the market price is at a premium to the NAV or sells Shares at a time when the market price is at a discount to the NAV, the shareholder may sustain losses. The NAV of the Fund is calculated at the end of each business day and fluctuates with changes in the market value of the Fund’s holdings. The trading price of the Fund’s shares fluctuates, in some cases materially, throughout trading hours in response to changes in the Fund’s NAV.

Risks Related to Stock Connect Programs: The Stock Connect Programs are subject to daily and aggregate quota limitations, which could affect the Fund’s ability to enter into and exit Stock Connect positions on a timely basis. The Shenzen and Shanghai markets may operate when the Stock Connect Programs are not active, and consequently the prices of shares held via Stock Connect Programs may fluctuate at times when the Fund is unable to add to or exit its positions. The Stock Connect Programs are new, and the effect of the introduction of large numbers of foreign investors on the market for trading Chinese-listed securities is not well understood. Regulations, such as limitations on redemptions or suspension of trading, may adversely impact the value of the Fund’s investments. The Fund's investments in A-Shares though the Stock Connect Program are held by its custodian in accounts in Central Clearing and Settlement System ("CCASS") maintained by the Hong Kong Securities Clearing Company Limited ("HKSCC"), which in turn holds the A-Shares, as the nominee holder, through an omnibus securities account in its name registered with the CSDCC. The precise nature and rights of the Fund as the beneficial owner of the SSE Securities or SZSE Securities through HKSCC as nominee is not well defined under Chinese law. There is no guarantee that the Shenzen, Shanghai, and Hong Kong Stock Exchanges will continue to support the Stock Connect Programs in the future.

Securities Lending Risk: Securities lending involves a risk of loss because the borrower may fail to return the securities in a timely manner or at all. If the Fund is not able to recover the securities loaned, it may sell the collateral and purchase a replacement security in the market. Lending securities entails a risk of loss to the Fund if and to the extent that the market value
8


of the loaned securities increases and the collateral is not increased accordingly. Additionally, the Fund will bear any loss on the investment of cash collateral it receives. These events could also trigger adverse tax consequences for the Fund. As securities on loan may not be voted by the Fund, there is a risk that the Fund may not be able to recall the securities in sufficient time to vote on material proxy matters.

Trading Halt Risk: An exchange or market may close or issue trading halts on specific securities, or the ability to buy or sell certain securities or financial instruments may be restricted, which may result in the Fund being unable to buy or sell certain securities or financial instruments. In such circumstances, the Fund may be unable to rebalance its portfolio, may be unable to accurately price its investments and/or may incur substantial trading losses.

Valuation Risk: The sales price the Fund could receive for a security may differ from the Fund’s valuation of the security and may differ from the value used by the Underlying Index, particularly for securities that trade in low value or volatile markets or that are valued using a fair value methodology (such as during trading halts). The value of the securities in the Fund's portfolio may change on days when shareholders will not be able to purchase or sell the Fund's Shares.

PERFORMANCE INFORMATION
 
The bar chart and table that follow show how the Fund performed on a calendar year basis and provide an indication of the risks of investing in the Fund by showing changes in the Fund's performance from year to year and by showing how the Fund's average annual returns for the indicated periods compare with the Fund's benchmark index and a broad measure of market performance. On December 6, 2018, the name of the Fund changed from the Global X NASDAQ China Technology ETF to the Global X MSCI China Communication Services ETF to reflect a change to the Fund's Index Provider from NASDAQ OMX Group, Inc. to MSCI, Inc. and a change in the Fund's underlying index from the NASDAQ OMX China Technology Index to the MSCI China Communication Services 10/50 Index. The Fund's past performance (before and after taxes) is not necessarily indicative of how the Fund will perform in the future. Updated performance information is available online at www.globalxetfs.com.
 
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Annual Total Returns (Years Ended December 31)

 ck0001432353-20221031_g2.jpg
 
Best Quarter: 9/30/2013 26.64%
Worst Quarter: 9/30/2022 -27.47%
 
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            Average Annual Total Returns (for the Periods Ended December 31, 2022)
  One Year Ended December 31, 2022 Five Years Ended December 31, 2022 Ten Years Ended December 31, 2022
Global X MSCI China Communication Services ETF:
·Return before taxes
-25.78% -13.31% 1.46%
·Return after taxes on distributions1
-26.03% -13.47% 1.08%
·Return after taxes on distributions and sale of Fund Shares1
-15.09% -9.34% 1.12%
Hybrid MSCI China Communication Services 10/50 Index (net)2
(Index returns reflect invested dividends net of withholding taxes, but reflect no deduction for fees, expenses, or other taxes)
-25.23% -12.86% 2.31%
MSCI Emerging Markets Index (net)
(Index returns reflect invested dividends net of withholding taxes, but reflect no deduction for fees, expenses, or other taxes)
-20.09% -1.40% 1.44%

1     After-tax returns are calculated using the historical highest individual U.S. federal marginal income tax rates and do not reflect the impact of state and local taxes. Your actual after-tax returns will depend on your specific tax situation and may differ from those shown above. After-tax returns are not relevant to investors who hold Shares of the Fund through tax-advantaged arrangements, such as 401(k) plans or individual retirement accounts (IRAs).

2     Hybrid Index performance reflects the performance of the Solactive China Technology Index through December 13, 2011, the NASDAQ OMX China Technology Index through December 5, 2018, and the MSCI China Communication Services 10/50 Index thereafter.

FUND MANAGEMENT
 
Investment Adviser: Global X Management Company LLC.

Portfolio Managers: The professionals primarily responsible for the day-to-day management of the Fund are Nam To, CFA; Wayne Xie; Kimberly Chan; Vanessa Yang; and Sandy Lu, CFA (“Portfolio Managers”). Mr. To has been a Portfolio Manager of the Fund since March 1, 2018. Mr. Xie has been a Portfolio Manager of the Fund since March 1, 2019. Ms. Chan has been a Portfolio Manager of the Fund since June 10, 2019. Ms. Yang has been a Portfolio Manager of the Fund since December 2020. Mr. Lu has been a Portfolio Manager of the Fund since March 2022.
 
PURCHASE AND SALE OF FUND SHARES
 
Shares of the Fund are or will be listed and traded at market prices on a national securities exchange. Shares may only be purchased and sold on the exchange through a broker-dealer. The price of Shares is based on market price, and because ETF shares trade at market prices rather than at NAV, Shares may trade at a price greater than NAV (a premium) or less than NAV (a discount). Only “Authorized Participants” (as defined in the SAI) who have entered into agreements with the Fund’s distributor, SEI Investments Distribution Co. (“Distributor”), may engage in creation or redemption transactions directly with the Fund. The Fund will only issue or redeem Shares that have been aggregated into blocks called Creation Units. The Fund will issue or redeem Creation Units in return for a basket of cash and/or securities that the Fund specifies any day that the national securities exchanges are open for business (“Business Day”). An investor may incur costs attributable to the difference between the highest price a buyer is willing to pay to purchase shares of the Fund (bid) and the lowest price a seller is willing to accept for shares of the Fund (ask) when buying or selling shares in the secondary market (the “bid-ask spread”). To access information regarding the Fund’s net asset value, market price, premiums and discounts, and bid-ask spreads, please go to https://www.globalxetfs.com.
 
TAX INFORMATION
 
The Fund intends to make distributions that may be taxable to you as ordinary income or capital gains, unless you are investing through a tax-advantaged arrangement, such as a 401(k) plan or an individual retirement account ("IRA"), in which case distributions from such tax-advantaged arrangement may be taxable to you.

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PAYMENTS TO BROKER-DEALERS AND OTHER FINANCIAL INTERMEDIARIES
 
The Adviser and its related companies may pay broker-dealers or other financial intermediaries (such as a bank) for the sale of Fund Shares and related services. These payments may create a conflict of interest by influencing your broker-dealer, sales persons or other intermediary or its employees or associated persons to recommend the Fund over another investment. Ask your financial adviser or visit your financial intermediary’s website for more information.
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Global X MSCI China Consumer Discretionary ETF
 
Ticker: CHIQ Exchange: NYSE Arca
 
INVESTMENT OBJECTIVE
 
The Global X MSCI China Consumer Discretionary ETF ("Fund") seeks to provide investment results that correspond generally to the price and yield performance, before fees and expenses, of the MSCI China Consumer Discretionary 10/50 Index ("Underlying Index").
 
FEES AND EXPENSES
 
This table describes the fees and expenses that you may pay if you buy, hold, and sell shares (“Shares”) of the Fund. You may pay other fees, such as brokerage commissions and other fees to financial intermediaries, which are not reflected in the table and examples below.
 
Annual Fund Operating Expenses (expenses that you pay each year as a percentage of the value of your investment):
Management Fees: 0.65%
Distribution and Service (12b-1) Fees: None
Other Expenses: 0.00%
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses: 0.65%

Example: The following example is intended to help you compare the cost of investing in the Fund with the cost of investing in other funds. This example does not take into account customary brokerage commissions that you pay when purchasing or selling Shares of the Fund in the secondary market. The example assumes that you invest $10,000 in the Fund for the time periods indicated and then sell all of your Shares at the end of those periods. The example also assumes that your investment has a 5% return each year and that the Fund's operating expenses remain the same. Although your actual costs may be higher or lower, based on these assumptions, your costs would be:
 
One Year Three Years Five Years Ten Years
$66 $208 $362 $810
 
Portfolio Turnover: The Fund pays transaction costs, such as commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or "turns over" its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover rate may indicate higher transaction costs and may result in higher taxes when Shares are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are not reflected in annual fund operating expenses or in the example, affect the Fund's performance. During the most recent fiscal year, the Fund's portfolio turnover rate was 22.64% of the average value of its portfolio.
 
PRINCIPAL INVESTMENT STRATEGIES
 
The Fund invests at least 80% of its total assets in the securities of the MSCI China Consumer Discretionary 10/50 Index ("Underlying Index") and in American Depositary Receipts ("ADRs") and Global Depositary Receipts ("GDRs") based on the securities in the Underlying Index. The Fund also invests at least 80% of its total assets in securities of consumer discretionary companies that are economically tied to China. For purposes of this policy, consumer discretionary companies include those companies that are classified in the consumer discretionary sector under the Global Industry Classification System ("GICS"). The Fund's 80% investment policies are non-fundamental and require 60 days prior written notice to shareholders before they can be changed. The Fund may lend securities representing up to one-third of the value of the Fund’s total assets (including the value of the collateral received).
 
The Underlying Index tracks the performance of companies in the MSCI China Index (the "Parent Index") that are classified in the consumer discretionary sector, as defined by MSCI, Inc. ("MSCI") the provider of the Underlying Index ("Index Provider"). The Parent Index is a free float-adjusted market capitalization-weighted index designed to measure the performance of securities that are classified as operating in China according to the MSCI Global Investable Markets Index Methodology, and that satisfy minimum market capitalization and liquidity thresholds. The securities eligible for inclusion in the Underlying Index
13


include H-Shares (securities of companies incorporated in China that are denominated in Hong Kong Dollars and listed on the Hong Kong Stock Exchange (the "HKSE")), B-Shares (securities of companies denominated in U.S. dollars or Hong Kong dollars and listed on Shanghai Stock Exchange (the "SSE") or Shenzen Stock Exchange (the "SZSE")), Red Chips (securities of companies with a majority of their business operations in mainland China and that are controlled by the national government or local governments of China, traded on the HKSE in Hong Kong dollars), P-Chips (securities of companies with the majority of their business operations in mainland China and controlled by individuals in China, but that are incorporated outside of China), A-Shares (securities of companies incorporated in mainland China that trade on Chinese exchanges in renminbi) that are accessible through the Shanghai-Hong Kong Stock Connect program ("Shanghai Connect") or the Shenzhen-Hong Kong Stock Connect program ("Shenzhen Connect", and together with Shanghai Connect, "Stock Connect Programs"), and foreign listings such as American Depository Receipts ("ADRs"). The Stock Connect Programs are securities trading and clearing programs that aim to achieve mutual stock market access between China and Hong Kong. Under Stock Connect, the Fund's trading of eligible A-shares listed on the SSE or the SZSE, as applicable, would be effectuated through its Hong Kong brokers. Trading through the Stock Connect Programs is subject to a daily quota, which limits the maximum net purchases under Stock Connect Programs each day, and as such, buy orders for A-shares would be rejected once the daily quota is exceeded (although the Fund will be permitted to sell A-shares regardless of the daily quota balance). The daily quota is not specific to the Fund. From time to time, other stock exchanges in China may participate in Stock Connect, and A-shares listed and traded on such other stock exchanges and accessible through Stock Connect may be added to the Underlying Index, as determined by MSCI.

The Underlying Index then follows a rules-based methodology that is designed to select all constituents of the Parent Index that are classified in the consumer discretionary sector under the GICS. The Underlying Index is weighted according to each component's free-float adjusted market capitalization, but is modified so that, as of the rebalance date, no group entity (defined by the Index Provider as companies with a controlling stake owned by one entity) constitutes more than 10% of the Underlying Index and so that, in the aggregate, the individual group entities that would represent more than 5% of the Underlying Index represent no more than 50% of the Underlying Index ("10/50 Cap"). The Underlying Index is reconstituted and re-weighted quarterly. The Underlying Index may include large- and mid-capitalization companies. As of December 31, 2022, the Underlying Index had 73 constituents. The Fund's investment objective and Underlying Index may be changed without shareholder approval.

The Fund generally will use a replication strategy. A replication strategy is an indexing strategy that involves investing in the securities of the Underlying Index in approximately the same proportions as in the Underlying Index. However, the Fund may utilize a representative sampling strategy with respect to the Underlying Index when a replication strategy might be detrimental or disadvantageous to shareholders, such as when there are practical difficulties or substantial costs involved in compiling a portfolio of equity securities to replicate the Underlying Index, in instances in which a security in the Underlying Index becomes temporarily illiquid, unavailable or less liquid, or as a result of legal restrictions or limitations (such as tax diversification requirements) that apply to the Fund but not the Underlying Index. The Fund will not invest in investment companies or other pooled investment vehicles, except for limited investment in money market funds utilized for cash management purposes in the ordinary course of business, which money market funds will not exceed 10% of Fund assets.
  
The Adviser expects that, over time, the correlation between the Fund's performance and that of the Underlying Index, before fees and expenses, will exceed 95%. A correlation percentage of 100% would indicate perfect correlation. If the Fund uses a replication strategy, it can be expected to have greater correlation to the Underlying Index than if it uses a representative sampling strategy.
 
The Fund concentrates its investments (i.e., holds 25% or more of its total assets) in a particular industry or group of industries to approximately the same extent that the Underlying Index is concentrated. As of December 31, 2022, the Underlying Index was concentrated in the internet and direct marketing retail industry and had significant exposure to the consumer discretionary sector.
 
SUMMARY OF PRINCIPAL RISKS
 
As with any investment, you could lose all or part of your investment in the Fund, and the Fund’s performance could trail that of other investments. There is no guarantee that the Fund will achieve its investment objective. An investment in the Fund is not a bank deposit and it is not insured or guaranteed by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation or any other government agency, the Adviser or any of its affiliates. The Fund is subject to the principal risks noted below, any of which may adversely affect the Fund’s net asset value (“NAV”), trading price, yield, total return and ability to meet its investment objective, as well as other risks that are described in greater detail in the Additional Information About the Funds section of this Prospectus and in the Statement of Additional Information (“SAI”). The order of the below risk factors does not indicate the significance of any particular risk factor.
 
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Asset Class Risk: Securities and other assets in the Underlying Index or otherwise held in the Fund's portfolio may underperform in comparison to the general securities markets, a particular securities market or other asset classes.

China A-Shares Risk: A-Shares are issued by companies incorporated in mainland China and are traded on Chinese exchanges. Foreign investors can access A-Shares by obtaining a Qualified Foreign Institutional Investor ("QFII") or a Renminbi Qualified Foreign Institutional Investor ("RQFII") license, as well as through the Stock Connect Program, which is a securities trading and clearing program with an aim to achieve mutual stock market access between the China and Hong Kong markets. Stock Connect was developed by Hong Kong Exchanges and Clearing Limited, the Shanghai Stock Exchange ("SSE") (in the case of Shanghai Connect) or the Shenzhen Stock Exchange ("SZSE") (in the case of Shenzhen Connect), and the China Securities Depository and Clearing Corporation Limited (“CSDCC”). The Fund currently intends to gain exposure to A-Shares through the Stock Connect Programs. Investments in A-Shares are subject to various regulations and limits, and the recoupment or repatriation of assets invested in A-Shares is subject to restrictions by the Chinese government. In addition, investors from outside mainland China may face difficulties or prohibitions accessing certain A-Shares that are part of a restricted list in countries such as the U.S. A-Shares may be subject to frequent and widespread trading halts and may become illiquid. Trading suspensions in certain stock could lead to greater market execution risk and costs for the Fund, and the creation and redemption of Creation Units (as defined below) may also be disrupted. These risks, among others, could adversely affect the value of the Fund’s investments.

Equity Securities Risk: Equity securities are subject to changes in value, and their values may be more volatile than other asset classes, as a result of such factors as a company’s business performance, investor perceptions, stock market trends and general economic conditions.

Capitalization Risk: Investing in issuers within the same market capitalization category carries the risk that the category may be out of favor due to current market conditions or investor sentiment.

Large-Capitalization Companies Risk: Large-capitalization companies may trail the returns of the overall stock market. Large-capitalization stocks tend to go through cycles of doing better - or worse - than the stock market in general. These periods have, in the past, lasted for as long as several years.

Mid-Capitalization Companies Risk: Mid-capitalization companies may have greater price volatility, lower trading volume and less liquidity than large-capitalization companies. In addition, mid-capitalization companies may have smaller revenues, narrower product lines, less management depth and experience, smaller shares of their product or service markets, fewer financial resources and less competitive strength than large-capitalization companies.

Currency Risk: The Fund may invest in securities denominated in foreign currencies. Because the Fund's NAV is determined in U.S. dollars, the Fund's NAV could decline if the Chinese yuan depreciates against the U.S. dollar or if there are delays or limits on repatriation of such currency. Currency exchange rates can be very volatile and can change quickly and unpredictably. As a result, the Fund's NAV may change quickly and without warning, which could have a significant negative impact on the Fund. Additionally, the Chinese government heavily regulates the domestic exchange of foreign currencies and yuan exchange rates in China, which may adversely affect the operations and financial results of the Fund’s investments in China. Shares purchased through the Stock Connect Programs will be purchased using offshore yuan, the value of which may differ from and experience greater volatility than the value of onshore yuan. Offshore yuan cannot be freely remitted into or transferred out of China, and there is no assurance that there will always be sufficient amounts of offshore yuan available for the Fund to invest in all components of the Underlying Index.

Custody Risk: The Fund may hold foreign securities and cash with foreign banks, agents, and securities depositories appointed by the Fund's custodian. Investments in emerging markets may be subject to even greater custody risks than investments in more developed markets. Less developed markets are more likely to experience problems with the clearing and settling of trades and the holding of securities by local banks, agents and depositories.

Focus Risk: To the extent that the Underlying Index focuses in investments related to a particular industry or group of industries, the Fund will also focus its investments to approximately the same extent. Similarly, if the Underlying Index has significant exposure to one or more sectors, the Fund’s investments will likely have significant exposure to such sectors. In such event, the Fund’s performance will be particularly susceptible to adverse events impacting such industry or sector, which may include, but are not limited to, the following: general economic conditions or cyclical market patterns that could negatively affect supply and demand; competition for resources; adverse labor relations; political or world events; obsolescence of technologies; and increased competition or new product introductions that may affect the profitability or viability of companies
15


in a particular industry or sector. As a result, the value of the Fund’s investments may rise and fall more than the value of shares of a fund that invests in securities of companies in a broader range of industries or sectors.

Risks Related to Investing in the Consumer Discretionary Sector: The consumer discretionary sector may be affected by changes in domestic and international economies, exchange and interest rates, competition, consumers’ disposable income and consumer preferences, social trends and marketing campaigns.
Risks Related to Investing in the Internet and Direct Marketing Retail Industry: Companies in the internet and direct marketing retail industry are dependent on internal infrastructure and on the availability, reliability and security of the internet and related systems. Critical systems and operations may be vulnerable to damage or interruption from fire, flood, power loss, telecommunications failure, terrorist attacks, cyber-attacks, acts of war, break-ins, earthquake and similar events. Any system interruption that results in the unavailability of a company’s website or mobile app or reduced performance of transaction systems could interrupt or substantially reduce a company’s ability to conduct its business. Companies in the internet and direct marketing retail industry are dependent on paid and unpaid natural search engines and are therefore dependent on business decisions made by companies that offer natural search engines. Any business changes by dominant providers of natural search engines can be detrimental to an internet and direct marketing retail company’s business while being totally outside of the control of such company.

Foreign Securities Risk: The Fund may invest, within U.S. regulations, in foreign securities. The Fund's investments in foreign securities can be riskier than U.S. securities investments. Investments in the securities of foreign issuers (including investments in ADRs and GDRs) are subject to the risks associated with investing in those foreign markets, such as heightened risks of inflation or nationalization. The prices of foreign securities and the prices of U.S. securities have, at times, moved in opposite directions. In addition, securities of foreign issuers may lose value due to political, economic and geographic events affecting a foreign issuer or market. During periods of social, political or economic instability in a country or region, the value of a foreign security traded on U.S. exchanges could be affected by, among other things, increasing price volatility, illiquidity, or the closure of the primary market on which the security (or the security underlying the ADR or GDR) is traded. You may lose money due to political, economic and geographic events affecting a foreign issuer or market. Where all or a portion of the Fund's underlying securities trade in a market that is closed when the market in which the Fund's shares are listed and trading is open, there may be differences between the last quote from the security’s closed foreign market and the value of the security during the Fund’s domestic trading day. This in turn could lead to differences between the market price of the Fund’s shares and the underlying value of those shares.

Geographic Risk: A natural, biological or other disaster could occur in a geographic region in which the Fund invests, which could affect the economy or particular business operations of companies in the specific geographic region, causing an adverse impact on the Fund’s investments in the affected region or in a region economically tied to the affected region. The securities in which the Fund invests and, consequently, the Fund are also subject to specific risks as a result of their business operations, including, but not limited to:

Risk of Investing in China: Investment exposure to China subjects the Fund to risks specific to China.

Economic, Political and Social Risk
China may be subject to considerable degrees of economic, political and social instability. Concerns about the rising government and household debt levels could impact the stability of the Chinese economy. China is an emerging market and demonstrates significantly higher volatility from time to time in comparison to developed markets. Over the last few decades, the Chinese government has undertaken reform of economic and market practices, including recent reforms to liberalize its capital markets and expand the sphere for private ownership of property in China. However, Chinese markets generally continue to experience inefficiency, volatility and pricing anomalies resulting from governmental influence, a lack of publicly available information and/or political and social instability. Chinese companies are also subject to the risk that Chinese authorities can intervene in their operations and structure. Internal social unrest or confrontations with other neighboring countries, including military conflicts in response to such events, may also disrupt economic development in China and result in a greater risk of currency fluctuations, currency convertibility, interest rate fluctuations and higher rates of inflation.

China has experienced major health crises. These health crises include, but are not limited to, the rapid and pandemic spread of novel viruses commonly known as SARS, MERS, and COVID-19 (Coronavirus). Such health crises could exacerbate political, social, and economic risks previously mentioned.

Export growth continues to be a major driver of China’s rapid economic growth. Elevated trade tensions between China and its trading partners, including the imposition of U.S. tariffs on certain Chinese goods and increased international pressure related to Chinese trade policy and forced technology transfers and intellectual property
16


protections, may have a substantial impact on the Chinese economy. Reduction in spending on Chinese products and services, institution of additional tariffs or other trade barriers (including as a result of heightened trade tensions between China and the U.S. or in response to actual or alleged Chinese cyber activity), or a downturn in any of the economies of China’s key trading partners may have an adverse impact on the Chinese economy. The continuation or worsening of the current political climate between China and the U.S. could result in additional regulatory restrictions being contemplated or imposed in the U.S. or in China that could impact the Fund’s ability to invest in certain companies.

Security Risk
China has experienced security concerns, such as terrorism and strained international relations. Additionally, China is alleged to have participated in state-sponsored cyberattacks against foreign companies and foreign governments. Actual and threatened responses to such activity, including purchasing restrictions, sanctions, tariffs or cyberattacks on the Chinese government or Chinese companies, may impact China’s economy and Chinese issuers of securities in which the Fund invests. Incidents involving China’s or the region’s security, including the contagion of infectious viruses or diseases, may cause uncertainty in Chinese markets and may adversely affect the Chinese economy and the Fund’s investments.

Heavy Government Control and Regulation
Chinese companies, including Chinese companies that are listed on U.S. exchanges, are not subject to the same degree of regulatory requirements, accounting standards or auditor oversight as companies in more developed countries, and as a result, information about the Chinese securities in which the Fund invests may be less reliable or complete. There may be significant obstacles to obtaining information necessary for investigations into or litigation against Chinese companies and shareholders may have limited legal remedies. Investments in China may be subject to loss due to expropriation or nationalization of assets and property or the imposition of restrictions on foreign investments and repatriation of capital. Furthermore, government actions against leaders or other key figures within companies, or speculation about such actions, may lead to sudden and unpredictable falls in the value of securities within the Fund.

Tax Risk
China has implemented a number of tax reforms in recent years and may amend or revise its existing tax laws and/or procedures in the future, possibly with retroactive effect. Changes in applicable Chinese tax law could reduce the after-tax profits of the Fund, directly or indirectly, including by reducing the after-tax profits of companies in China in which the Fund invests. Uncertainties in Chinese tax rules could result in unexpected tax liabilities for the Fund. Should legislation limit U.S. investors’ ability to invest in specific Chinese companies through A-shares or other share class listings that are part of the underlying holdings, these shares may be excluded from Fund holdings.

Special Risk Considerations of Investing in China – Variable Interest Entity Investments
For purposes of raising capital offshore on exchanges outside of China, including on U.S. exchanges, many Chinese-based operating companies are structured as Variable Interest Entities (“VIEs”). In this structure, the Chinese-based operating company is the VIE and establishes a shell company in a foreign jurisdiction, such as the Cayman Islands. The shell company lists on a foreign exchange and enters into contractual arrangements with the VIE. This structure allows Chinese companies in which the Chinese government restricts foreign ownership to raise capital from foreign investors. While the shell company has no equity ownership of the VIE, these contractual arrangements permit the shell company to consolidate the VIE’s financial statements with its own for accounting purposes and provide for economic exposure to the performance of the underlying Chinese operating company. Therefore, an investor in the listed shell company, such as the Fund, will have exposure to the Chinese-based operating company only through contractual arrangements and has no ownership in the Chinese-based operating company. Furthermore, because the shell company only has specific rights provided for in these service agreements with the VIE, its abilities to control the activities at the Chinese-based operating company are limited and the operating company may engage in activities that negatively impact investment value.

While the VIE structure has been widely adopted, it is not formally recognized under Chinese law and therefore there is a risk that the Chinese government could prohibit the existence of such structures or negatively impact the VIE’s contractual arrangements with the listed shell company by making them invalid. If these contracts were found to be unenforceable under Chinese law, investors in the listed shell company, such as the Fund, may suffer significant losses with little or no recourse available. If the Chinese government determines that the agreements establishing the VIE structures do not comply with Chinese law and regulations, including those related to restrictions on foreign ownership, it could subject a Chinese-based issuer to penalties, revocation of business and operating licenses, or forfeiture of ownership interest. In addition, the listed shell company’s control over a VIE may also be jeopardized if a natural person who holds the equity interest in the VIE breaches the terms of the agreement, is subject to legal proceedings or if any physical instruments for authenticating documentation, such as chops and seals, are used without the Chinese-based issuer’s authorization to enter into contractual arrangements in China. Chops and seals, which are carved stamps used to sign documents, represent a legally binding commitment by the company. Moreover, any future regulatory action may prohibit the ability of the shell company to receive the economic benefits of the Chinese-based
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operating company, which may cause the value of the Fund’s investment in the listed shell company to suffer a significant loss. For example, in 2021, the Chinese government prohibited use of the VIE structure for investment in after-school tutoring companies. There is no guarantee that the Chinese government will not place similar restrictions on other industries.

Chinese equities that utilize the VIE structure to list in the U.S. as ADRs face the risk of regulatory action from U.S. authorities, including the risk of delisting. This will depend in part on whether U.S. regulatory authorities are satisfied with their access to Mainland China and Hong Kong for the purpose of conducting inspections on the quality of audits for these companies. Although the U.S. and China reached an agreement in September 2022 to grant the U.S. access for such inspections, there is no guarantee that the agreement will hold up or that U.S. regulatory authorities will continue to feel satisfied with their access. As of December 31, 2022, the Fund had significant exposure to VIEs, as defined above.

Risk of Investing in Emerging Markets: As of the date of this Prospectus, China is an emerging market country. Investments in emerging markets may be subject to a greater risk of loss than investments in developed markets. Securities markets of emerging market countries are less liquid, subject to greater price volatility, have smaller market capitalizations, have less government regulation, and are not subject to as extensive and frequent accounting, financial, and other reporting requirements as the securities markets of more developed countries, and there may be greater risk associated with the custody of securities in emerging markets. It may be difficult or impossible for the Fund to pursue claims against an emerging market issuer in the courts of an emerging market country. There may be significant obstacles to obtaining information necessary for investigations into or litigation against emerging market companies and shareholders may have limited legal rights and remedies. Emerging markets may be more likely to experience inflation, political turmoil and rapid changes in economic conditions than more developed markets. Emerging market economies’ exposure to specific industries, such as tourism, and lack of efficient or sufficient health care systems, could make these economies especially vulnerable to global crises, including but not limited to, pandemics such as the global COVID-19 pandemic. Certain emerging market countries may have privatized, or have begun the process of privatizing, certain entities and industries. Privatized entities may lose money or be re-nationalized.

Risk of Investing in Hong Kong: Investments in Hong Kong issuers may subject the Fund to legal, regulatory, political, currency, security, and economic risk specific to Hong Kong. China is Hong Kong’s largest trading partner, both in terms of exports and imports. Any changes in the Chinese economy, trade regulations or currency exchange rates, or a tightening of China’s control over Hong Kong, including in connection with recent protests and unrest, may have an adverse impact on Hong Kong’s economy.

International Closed Market Trading Risk: To the extent that the underlying investments held by the Fund trade on foreign exchanges that may be closed when the securities exchange on which the Fund’s Shares trade is open, there are likely to be deviations between the current price of such an underlying security and the last quoted price for the underlying security (i.e., the Fund’s quote from the closed foreign market). These deviations could result in premiums or discounts to the Fund’s NAV that may be greater than those experienced by other exchange-traded funds ("ETFs").

Issuer Risk: Fund performance depends on the performance of individual companies in which the Fund invests. Changes to the financial condition of any of those companies may cause the value of such company's securities to decline.

Market Risk: Turbulence in the financial markets and reduced liquidity may negatively affect issuers, which could have an adverse effect on the Fund. If the securities held by the Fund experience poor liquidity, the Fund may be unable to transact at advantageous times or prices, which may decrease the Fund’s returns. In addition, there is a risk that policy changes by central governments and governmental agencies, including the U.S. Federal Reserve or the European Central Bank, which could include increasing interest rates, could cause increased volatility in financial markets and lead to higher levels of Fund redemptions from Authorized Participants, which could have a negative impact on the Fund. Furthermore, local, regional or global events such as war, acts of terrorism, the spread of infectious illness or other public health issues, recessions, or other events could have a significant impact on the Fund and its investments and trading of its Shares. For example, at the start of 2023, central banks had already increased interest rates at the fastest rate on record, and it is unknown how long this trend will continue and when inflation will return to target levels. This increases the risk that monetary policy may provide less support should economic growth slow. Additionally, China’s shift away from a zero-COVID policy creates both opportunities and risks, causing uncertainty for global economic growth. Market risk factors may result in increased volatility and/or decreased liquidity in the securities markets. The Fund’s NAV could decline over short periods due to short-term market movements and over longer periods during market downturns.

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Non-Diversification Risk: The Fund is classified as a “non-diversified” investment company under the Investment Company Act of 1940 ("1940 Act"). As a result, the Fund is subject to the risk that it may be more volatile than a diversified fund because the Fund may invest its assets in a smaller number of issuers or may invest a larger proportion of its assets in a single issuer. As a result, the gains and losses on a single investment may have a greater impact on the Fund’s NAV and may make the Fund more volatile than more diversified funds.

Operational Risk: The Fund is exposed to operational risk arising from a number of factors, including but not limited to human error, processing and communication errors, errors of the Fund's service providers, counterparties or other third-parties, failed or inadequate processes and technology or systems failures. Additionally, cyber security failures or breaches of the electronic systems of the Fund, the Adviser, and the Fund's other service providers, market makers, Authorized Participants or the issuers of securities in which the Fund invests have the ability to cause disruptions and negatively impact the Fund's business operations, potentially resulting in financial losses to the Fund and its shareholders. The Fund and the Adviser seek to reduce these operational risks through controls and procedures. However, these measures do not address every possible risk and may be inadequate for those risks that they are intended to address.

Passive Investment Risk: The Fund is not actively managed, and the Adviser does not attempt to take defensive positions in declining markets. Unlike many investment companies, the Fund does not seek to outperform its Underlying Index. Therefore, it would not necessarily buy or sell a security unless that security is added or removed, respectively, from the Underlying Index, even if that security generally is underperforming. Additionally, if a constituent of the Underlying Index were removed, even outside of a regular rebalance of the Underlying Index, the Adviser anticipates that the Fund would sell such security. Maintaining investments in securities regardless of market conditions or the performance of individual securities could cause the Fund’s return to be lower than if the Fund employed an active strategy.

Index-Related Risk: There is no guarantee that the Fund will achieve a high degree of correlation to the Underlying Index and therefore achieve its investment objective. Market disruptions and regulatory restrictions could have an adverse effect on the Fund’s ability to adjust its exposure to the required levels in order to track the Underlying Index. Errors in index data, index computations and/or the construction of the Underlying Index in accordance with its methodology may occur from time to time and may not be identified and corrected by the Index Provider for a period of time or at all, which may have an adverse impact on the Fund and its shareholders.

Management Risk: The Fund may not fully replicate its Underlying Index and may hold securities not included in its Underlying Index. The Adviser’s investment strategy, the implementation of which is subject to a number of constraints, may cause the Fund to underperform the market or its relevant benchmark or adversely affect the ability of the Fund to achieve its investment objective.

Tracking Error Risk: Tracking error may occur because of differences between the instruments held in the Fund's portfolio and those included in the Underlying Index, pricing differences, transaction costs incurred by the Fund, the Fund's holding of uninvested cash, size of the Fund, differences in timing of the accrual of or the valuation of dividends or interest, tax gains or losses, changes to the Underlying Index or the costs to the Fund of complying with various new or existing regulatory requirements. This risk may be heightened during times of increased market volatility or other unusual market conditions. Tracking error also may result because the Fund incurs fees and expenses, while the Underlying Index does not. ETFs that track indices with significant weight in emerging markets issuers may experience higher tracking error than other ETFs that do not track such indices.

Reliance on Trading Partners Risk: The Fund invests in the Chinese economy, which is heavily dependent upon trading with key partners. Any reduction in this trading, including as a result of adverse economic conditions in a trading partner's economy, may cause an adverse impact on the Chinese economy in which the Fund invests. Through its portfolio companies' trading partners, the Fund is specifically exposed to Asian Economic Risk, European Economic Risk, and North American Economic Risk.

Risks Associated with Exchange-Traded Funds: As an ETF, the Fund is subject to the following risks:

Authorized Participants Concentration Risk: The Fund has a limited number of financial institutions that may act as Authorized Participants and engage in creation or redemption transactions directly with the Fund, and none of those Authorized Participants is obligated to engage in creation and/or redemption transactions. To the extent that those Authorized Participants exit the business or are unable to process creation and/or redemption orders, such as in times of market stress, Shares may be more likely to trade at a premium or discount to NAV and/or at wider intraday bid-ask spreads, and possibly face trading halts and/or delisting from an exchange. Authorized Participants Concentration Risk may be heightened because the Fund invests in non-U.S. securities.
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Large Shareholder Risk: Redemptions by large shareholders could have a significant negative impact on the Fund. If a large shareholder were to redeem all, or a large portion, of its Shares, there is no guarantee that the Fund will be able to maintain sufficient assets to continue operations in which case the Board of Trustees may determine to liquidate the Fund. In addition, transactions by large shareholders may account for a large percentage of the trading volume on a national securities exchange and may, therefore, have a material upward or downward effect on the market price of the Shares.

Listing Standards Risk: The Fund is required to comply with listing requirements adopted by the listing exchange. Non-compliance with such requirements may result in the Fund's shares being delisted by the listing exchange. Any resulting liquidation of the Fund could cause the Fund to incur elevated transaction costs and could result in negative tax consequences for its shareholders.

Market Trading Risks and Premium/Discount Risks: Shares of the Fund are publicly traded on a national securities exchange, which may subject shareholders to numerous market trading risks. In stressed market conditions, the market for the Shares may become less liquid in response to the deteriorating liquidity of the Fund’s portfolio. This adverse effect on the liquidity of the Shares, as well as disruptions to creations and redemptions, the existence of extreme market volatility or potential lack of assets in the Fund or an active trading market for Shares may result in Shares trading at a significant premium or discount to NAV. If a shareholder purchases Shares at a time when the market price is at a premium to the NAV or sells Shares at a time when the market price is at a discount to the NAV, the shareholder may sustain losses. The NAV of the Fund is calculated at the end of each business day and fluctuates with changes in the market value of the Fund’s holdings. The trading price of the Fund’s shares fluctuates, in some cases materially, throughout trading hours in response to changes in the Fund’s NAV.

Risks Related to Stock Connect Programs: The Stock Connect Programs are subject to daily and aggregate quota limitations, which could affect the Fund’s ability to enter into and exit Stock Connect positions on a timely basis. The Shenzen and Shanghai markets may operate when the Stock Connect Programs are not active, and consequently the prices of shares held via Stock Connect Programs may fluctuate at times when the Fund is unable to add to or exit its positions. The Stock Connect Programs are new, and the effect of the introduction of large numbers of foreign investors on the market for trading Chinese-listed securities is not well understood. Regulations, such as limitations on redemptions or suspension of trading, may adversely impact the value of the Fund’s investments. The Fund's investments in A-Shares though the Stock Connect Program are held by its custodian in accounts in Central Clearing and Settlement System ("CCASS") maintained by the Hong Kong Securities Clearing Company Limited ("HKSCC"), which in turn holds the A-Shares, as the nominee holder, through an omnibus securities account in its name registered with the CSDCC. The precise nature and rights of the Fund as the beneficial owner of the SSE Securities or SZSE Securities through HKSCC as nominee is not well defined under Chinese law. There is no guarantee that the Shenzen, Shanghai, and Hong Kong Stock Exchanges will continue to support the Stock Connect Programs in the future.

Securities Lending Risk: Securities lending involves a risk of loss because the borrower may fail to return the securities in a timely manner or at all. If the Fund is not able to recover the securities loaned, it may sell the collateral and purchase a replacement security in the market. Lending securities entails a risk of loss to the Fund if and to the extent that the market value of the loaned securities increases and the collateral is not increased accordingly. Additionally, the Fund will bear any loss on the investment of cash collateral it receives. These events could also trigger adverse tax consequences for the Fund. As securities on loan may not be voted by the Fund, there is a risk that the Fund may not be able to recall the securities in sufficient time to vote on material proxy matters.

Trading Halt Risk: An exchange or market may close or issue trading halts on specific securities, or the ability to buy or sell certain securities or financial instruments may be restricted, which may result in the Fund being unable to buy or sell certain securities or financial instruments. In such circumstances, the Fund may be unable to rebalance its portfolio, may be unable to accurately price its investments and/or may incur substantial trading losses.

Valuation Risk: The sales price the Fund could receive for a security may differ from the Fund’s valuation of the security and may differ from the value used by the Underlying Index, particularly for securities that trade in low value or volatile markets or that are valued using a fair value methodology (such as during trading halts). The value of the securities in the Fund's portfolio may change on days when shareholders will not be able to purchase or sell the Fund's Shares.

PERFORMANCE INFORMATION
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The bar chart and table that follow show how the Fund performed on a calendar year basis and provide an indication of the risks of investing in the Fund by showing changes in the Fund's performance from year to year and by showing how the Fund's average annual returns for the indicated periods compare with the Fund's benchmark index and a broad measure of market performance. On December 6, 2018, the name of the Fund changed from the Global X China Consumer ETF to the Global X MSCI China Consumer Discretionary ETF to reflect a change to the Fund's Index Provider from Solactive AG to MSCI, Inc. and a change in the Fund's underlying index from the Solactive China Consumer Total Return Index to the MSCI China Consumer Discretionary 10/50 Index. The Fund's past performance (before and after taxes) is not necessarily indicative of how the Fund will perform in the future. Updated performance information is available online at www.globalxetfs.com.
 
Annual Total Returns (Years Ended December 31)

 ck0001432353-20221031_g3.jpg
Best Quarter: 12/31/2020 31.30%
Worst Quarter: 9/30/2022 -23.20%

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Average Annual Total Returns (for the Periods Ended December 31, 2022) 
  One Year Ended December 31, 2022 Five Years Ended December 31, 2022 Ten Years Ended December 31, 2022
Global X MSCI China Consumer Discretionary ETF:
·Return before taxes
-22.07% 2.55% 4.77%
·Return after taxes on distributions1
-22.13% 2.28% 4.29%
·Return after taxes on distributions and sale of Fund Shares1
-13.01% 1.86% 3.57%
Hybrid MSCI China Consumer Discretionary 10/50 Index (net)2
(Index returns reflect invested dividends net of withholding taxes, but reflect no deduction for fees, expenses, or other taxes)
-21.50% 3.09% 5.41%
MSCI Emerging Markets Index (net)
(Index returns reflect invested dividends net of withholding taxes, but reflect no deduction for fees, expenses, or other taxes)
-20.09% -1.40% 1.44%

1     After-tax returns are calculated using the historical highest individual U.S. federal marginal income tax rates and do not reflect the impact of state and local taxes. Your actual after-tax returns will depend on your specific tax situation and may differ from those shown above. After-tax returns are not relevant to investors who hold Shares of the Fund through tax-advantaged arrangements, such as 401(k) plans or individual retirement accounts (IRAs).

2     Hybrid index performance reflects the performance of the Solactive China Consumer Total Return Index through December 5, 2018, and the MSCI China Consumer Discretionary 10/50 Index thereafter.

FUND MANAGEMENT
 
Investment Adviser: Global X Management Company LLC.
 
Portfolio Managers: The professionals primarily responsible for the day-to-day management of the Fund are Nam To, CFA; Wayne Xie; Kimberly Chan; Vanessa Yang; and Sandy Lu, CFA (“Portfolio Managers”). Mr. To has been a Portfolio Manager of the Fund since March 1, 2018. Mr. Xie has been a Portfolio Manager of the Fund since March 1, 2019. Ms. Chan has been a Portfolio Manager of the Fund since June 10, 2019. Ms. Yang has been a Portfolio Manager of the Fund since December 2020. Mr. Lu has been a Portfolio Manager of the Fund since March 2022.

PURCHASE AND SALE OF FUND SHARES
 
Shares of the Fund are or will be listed and traded at market prices on a national securities exchange. Shares may only be purchased and sold on the exchange through a broker-dealer. The price of Shares is based on market price, and because ETF shares trade at market prices rather than at NAV, Shares may trade at a price greater than NAV (a premium) or less than NAV (a discount). Only “Authorized Participants” (as defined in the SAI) who have entered into agreements with the Fund’s distributor, SEI Investments Distribution Co. (“Distributor”), may engage in creation or redemption transactions directly with the Fund. The Fund will only issue or redeem Shares that have been aggregated into blocks called Creation Units. The Fund will issue or redeem Creation Units in return for a basket of cash and/or securities that the Fund specifies any day that the national securities exchanges are open for business (“Business Day”). An investor may incur costs attributable to the difference between the highest price a buyer is willing to pay to purchase shares of the Fund (bid) and the lowest price a seller is willing to accept for shares of the Fund (ask) when buying or selling shares in the secondary market (the “bid-ask spread”). To access information regarding the Fund’s net asset value, market price, premiums and discounts, and bid-ask spreads, please go to https://www.globalxetfs.com.
 
TAX INFORMATION
 
The Fund intends to make distributions that may be taxable to you as ordinary income or capital gains, unless you are investing through a tax-advantaged arrangement, such as a 401(k) plan or an individual retirement account ("IRA"), in which case distributions from such tax-advantaged arrangement may be taxable to you.
 
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PAYMENTS TO BROKER-DEALERS AND OTHER FINANCIAL INTERMEDIARIES
 
The Adviser and its related companies may pay broker-dealers or other financial intermediaries (such as a bank) for the sale of Fund Shares and related services. These payments may create a conflict of interest by influencing your broker-dealer, sales persons or other intermediary or its employees or associated persons to recommend the Fund over another investment. Ask your financial adviser or visit your financial intermediary’s website for more information.
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Global X MSCI China Consumer Staples ETF
 
Ticker: CHIS Exchange: NYSE Arca
 
INVESTMENT OBJECTIVE
 
The Global X MSCI China Consumer Staples ETF ("Fund") seeks to provide investment results that correspond generally to the price and yield performance, before fees and expenses, of the MSCI China Consumer Staples 10/50 Index ("Underlying Index").
 
FEES AND EXPENSES
 
This table describes the fees and expenses that you may pay if you buy, hold, and sell shares (“Shares”) of the Fund. You may pay other fees, such as brokerage commissions and other fees to financial intermediaries, which are not reflected in the table and examples below.
 
Annual Fund Operating Expenses (expenses that you pay each year as a percentage of the value of your investment):
 
Management Fees: 0.65%
Distribution and Service (12b-1) Fees: None
Other Expenses: 0.00%
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses: 0.65%

Example: The following example is intended to help you compare the cost of investing in the Fund with the cost of investing in other funds. This example does not take into account customary brokerage commissions that you pay when purchasing or selling Shares of the Fund in the secondary market. The example assumes that you invest $10,000 in the Fund for the time periods indicated and then sell all of your Shares at the end of those periods. The example also assumes that your investment has a 5% return each year and that the Fund's operating expenses remain the same. Although your actual costs may be higher or lower, based on these assumptions, your costs would be:
One Year Three Years Five Years Ten Years
$66 $208 $362 $810

Portfolio Turnover: The Fund pays transaction costs, such as commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or "turns over" its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover rate may indicate higher transaction costs and may result in higher taxes when Shares are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are not reflected in annual fund operating expenses or in the example, affect the Fund's performance. During the most recent fiscal year, the Fund's portfolio turnover rate was 65.46% of the average value of its portfolio.
 
PRINCIPAL INVESTMENT STRATEGIES
 
The Fund invests at least 80% of its total assets in the securities of the MSCI China Consumer Staples 10/50 Index ("Underlying Index") and in American Depositary Receipts ("ADRs") and Global Depositary Receipts ("GDRs") based on the securities in the Underlying Index. The Fund's 80% investment policy is non-fundamental and requires 60 days prior written notice to shareholders before it can be changed.
 
The Underlying Index tracks the performance of companies in the MSCI China Index (the "Parent Index") that are classified in the consumer staples sector, as defined by MSCI, Inc. ("MSCI") the provider of the Underlying Index ("Index Provider"). The Parent Index is a free float-adjusted market capitalization-weighted index designed to measure the performance of securities that are classified as operating in China according to the MSCI Global Investable Markets Index Methodology, and that satisfy minimum market capitalization and liquidity thresholds. The securities eligible for inclusion in the Underlying Index include H-Shares (securities of companies incorporated in China that are denominated in Hong Kong Dollars and listed on the Hong Kong Stock Exchange (the "HKSE")), B-Shares (securities of companies denominated in U.S. dollars or Hong Kong dollars and listed on Shanghai Stock Exchange (the "SSE") or Shenzen Stock Exchange (the "SZSE")), Red Chips (securities of companies with a majority of their business operations in mainland China and that are controlled by the national government or local governments of China, traded on the HKSE in Hong Kong dollars), P-Chips (securities of companies with the majority of their business operations in mainland China and controlled by individuals in China, but that are incorporated outside of China), A-
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Shares (securities of companies incorporated in mainland China that trade on Chinese exchanges in renminbi) that are accessible through the Shanghai-Hong Kong Stock Connect program ("Shanghai Connect") or the Shenzhen-Hong Kong Stock Connect program ("Shenzhen Connect", and together with Shanghai Connect, "Stock Connect Programs"), and foreign listings such as American Depository Receipts ("ADRs"). The Stock Connect Programs are securities trading and clearing programs that aim to achieve mutual stock market access between China and Hong Kong. Under Stock Connect, the Fund's trading of eligible A-shares listed on the SSE or the SZSE, as applicable, would be effectuated through its Hong Kong brokers. Trading through the Stock Connect Programs is subject to a daily quota, which limits the maximum net purchases under Stock Connect Programs each day, and as such, buy orders for A-shares would be rejected once the daily quota is exceeded (although the Fund will be permitted to sell A-shares regardless of the daily quota balance). The daily quota is not specific to the Fund. From time to time, other stock exchanges in China may participate in Stock Connect, and A-shares listed and traded on such other stock exchanges and accessible through Stock Connect may be added to the Underlying Index, as determined by MSCI.

The Underlying Index follows a rules-based methodology that is designed to select all constituents of the Parent Index that are classified in the consumer staples sector under the Global Industry Classification System ("GICS"). The Underlying Index is weighted according to each component's free-float adjusted market capitalization, but is modified so that, as of the rebalance date, no group entity (defined by the Index Provider as companies with a controlling stake owned by one entity) constitutes more than 10% of the Underlying Index and so that, in the aggregate, the individual group entities that would represent more than 5% of the Underlying Index represent no more than 50% of the Underlying Index ("10/50 Cap"). The Underlying Index is reconstituted and re-weighted quarterly. The Underlying Index may include large- and mid-capitalization companies. As of December 31, 2022, the Underlying Index had 54 constituents. The Fund's investment objective and Underlying Index may be changed without shareholder approval.
 
The Underlying Index is sponsored by the Index Provider, which is an organization that is independent of, and unaffiliated with, the Fund and Global X Management Company LLC, the investment adviser for the Fund ("Adviser"). The Index Provider determines the relative weightings of the securities in the Underlying Index and publishes information regarding the market value of the Underlying Index.

The Adviser uses a "passive" or indexing approach to try to achieve the Fund's investment objective. Unlike many investment companies, the Fund does not try to outperform the Underlying Index and does not seek temporary defensive positions when markets decline or appear overvalued.

The Fund generally will use a replication strategy. A replication strategy is an indexing strategy that involves investing in the securities of the Underlying Index in approximately the same proportions as in the Underlying Index. However, the Fund may utilize a representative sampling strategy with respect to the Underlying Index when a replication strategy might be detrimental or disadvantageous to shareholders, such as when there are practical difficulties or substantial costs involved in compiling a portfolio of equity securities to replicate the Underlying Index, in instances in which a security in the Underlying Index becomes temporarily illiquid, unavailable or less liquid, or as a result of legal restrictions or limitations (such as tax diversification requirements) that apply to the Fund but not the Underlying Index.

The Adviser expects that, over time, the correlation between the Fund's performance and that of the Underlying Index, before fees and expenses, will exceed 95%. A correlation percentage of 100% would indicate perfect correlation. If the Fund uses a replication strategy, it can be expected to have greater correlation to the Underlying Index than if it uses a representative sampling strategy.

The Fund concentrates its investments (i.e., holds 25% or more of its total assets) in a particular industry or group of industries to approximately the same extent that the Underlying Index is concentrated. As of December 31, 2022, the Underlying Index was concentrated in the beverages and food products industries and had significant exposure to the consumer staples sector.
 
SUMMARY OF PRINCIPAL RISKS
 
As with any investment, you could lose all or part of your investment in the Fund, and the Fund’s performance could trail that of other investments. There is no guarantee that the Fund will achieve its investment objective. An investment in the Fund is not a bank deposit and it is not insured or guaranteed by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation or any other government agency, the Adviser or any of its affiliates. The Fund is subject to the principal risks noted below, any of which may adversely affect the Fund’s net asset value (“NAV”), trading price, yield, total return and ability to meet its investment objective, as well as other risks that are described in greater detail in the Additional Information About the Funds section of this Prospectus and in the Statement of Additional Information (“SAI”). The order of the below risk factors does not indicate the significance of any particular risk factor.
 
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Asset Class Risk: Securities and other assets in the Underlying Index or otherwise held in the Fund's portfolio may underperform in comparison to the general securities markets, a particular securities market or other asset classes.

China A-Shares Risk: A-Shares are issued by companies incorporated in mainland China and are traded on Chinese exchanges. Foreign investors can access A-Shares by obtaining a Qualified Foreign Institutional Investor ("QFII") or a Renminbi Qualified Foreign Institutional Investor ("RQFII") license, as well as through the Stock Connect Program, which is a securities trading and clearing program with an aim to achieve mutual stock market access between the China and Hong Kong markets. Stock Connect was developed by Hong Kong Exchanges and Clearing Limited, the Shanghai Stock Exchange ("SSE") (in the case of Shanghai Connect) or the Shenzhen Stock Exchange ("SZSE") (in the case of Shenzhen Connect), and the China Securities Depository and Clearing Corporation Limited (“CSDCC”). The Fund currently intends to gain exposure to A-Shares through the Stock Connect Programs. Investments in A-Shares are subject to various regulations and limits, and the recoupment or repatriation of assets invested in A-Shares is subject to restrictions by the Chinese government. In addition, investors from outside mainland China may face difficulties or prohibitions accessing certain A-Shares that are part of a restricted list in countries such as the U.S. A-Shares may be subject to frequent and widespread trading halts and may become illiquid. Trading suspensions in certain stock could lead to greater market execution risk and costs for the Fund, and the creation and redemption of Creation Units (as defined below) may also be disrupted. These risks, among others, could adversely affect the value of the Fund’s investments.

Equity Securities Risk: Equity securities are subject to changes in value, and their values may be more volatile than other asset classes, as a result of such factors as a company’s business performance, investor perceptions, stock market trends and general economic conditions.

Capitalization Risk: Investing in issuers within the same market capitalization category carries the risk that the category may be out of favor due to current market conditions or investor sentiment.

Large-Capitalization Companies Risk: Large-capitalization companies may trail the returns of the overall stock market. Large-capitalization stocks tend to go through cycles of doing better - or worse - than the stock market in general. These periods have, in the past, lasted for as long as several years.

Mid-Capitalization Companies Risk: Mid-capitalization companies may have greater price volatility, lower trading volume and less liquidity than large-capitalization companies. In addition, mid-capitalization companies may have smaller revenues, narrower product lines, less management depth and experience, smaller shares of their product or service markets, fewer financial resources and less competitive strength than large-capitalization companies.

Cash Transaction Risk: Unlike most exchange-traded funds ("ETFs"), the Fund intends to effect a significant portion of creations and redemptions for cash, rather than in-kind securities. As a result, an investment in the Fund may be less tax-efficient than an investment in a more conventional ETF. Moreover, cash transactions may have to be carried out over several days if the securities market is relatively illiquid and may involve considerable brokerage fees and taxes. These factors may result in wider spreads between the bid and the offered prices of the Fund’s Shares than for more conventional ETFs.

Currency Risk: The Fund may invest in securities denominated in foreign currencies. Because the Fund's NAV is determined in U.S. dollars, the Fund's NAV could decline if the Chinese yuan depreciates against the U.S. dollar or if there are delays or limits on repatriation of such currency. Currency exchange rates can be very volatile and can change quickly and unpredictably. As a result, the Fund's NAV may change quickly and without warning, which could have a significant negative impact on the Fund. Additionally, the Chinese government heavily regulates the domestic exchange of foreign currencies and yuan exchange rates in China, which may adversely affect the operations and financial results of the Fund’s investments in China. Shares purchased through the Stock Connect Programs will be purchased using offshore yuan, the value of which may differ from and experience greater volatility than the value of onshore yuan. Offshore yuan cannot be freely remitted into or transferred out of China, and there is no assurance that there will always be sufficient amounts of offshore yuan available for the Fund to invest in all components of the Underlying Index.

Custody Risk: The Fund may hold foreign securities and cash with foreign banks, agents, and securities depositories appointed by the Fund's custodian. Investments in emerging markets may be subject to even greater custody risks than investments in more developed markets. Less developed markets are more likely to experience problems with the clearing and settling of trades and the holding of securities by local banks, agents and depositories.

Focus Risk: To the extent that the Underlying Index focuses in investments related to a particular industry or group of industries, the Fund will also focus its investments to approximately the same extent. Similarly, if the Underlying Index has
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significant exposure to one or more sectors, the Fund’s investments will likely have significant exposure to such sectors. In such event, the Fund’s performance will be particularly susceptible to adverse events impacting such industry or sector, which may include, but are not limited to, the following: general economic conditions or cyclical market patterns that could negatively affect supply and demand; competition for resources; adverse labor relations; political or world events; obsolescence of technologies; and increased competition or new product introductions that may affect the profitability or viability of companies in a particular industry or sector. As a result, the value of the Fund’s investments may rise and fall more than the value of shares of a fund that invests in securities of companies in a broader range of industries or sectors.

Risks Related to Investing in the Beverages Industry: Beverage companies operate in highly competitive categories and markets. Companies are frequently required to anticipate and effectively respond to shifts in consumer trends and preferences, including health trends and preferences, and failure to account for changes in consumer demographics or preferences can result in reduced demand for a company’s products. Beverage companies may be affected by the imposition or proposed imposition of taxes or other regulations. Any failures of process controls can increase the risk of product contamination and can result in substantial product liability risk.

Risks Related to Investing in the Consumer Staples Sector: The consumer staples sector may be affected by, among other things, marketing campaigns, changes in consumer demands, government regulations and changes in commodity prices.

Risks Related to Investing in the Food Products Industry: The food products industry is subject to various risks, including evolving consumer preferences, nutritional and health-related concerns, federal, state and local food inspection and processing controls, consumer product liability claims, risks of product tampering, and the availability and expense of liability insurance. The meat and poultry industries are subject to scrutiny due to the association of meat and poultry products with outbreaks of illness caused by food borne pathogens. Product recalls are sometimes required in the food industry to withdraw contaminated or mislabeled products from the market. Additionally, the failure to identify and react appropriately to changes in consumer trends, demands and preferences could lead to, among other things, reduced demand and price reduction for a company’s products. Companies in the food products industry may be adversely affected by changes in domestic or foreign economic conditions, including inflation or deflation, interest rates, availability of capital markets, consumer spending rates, and energy availability and costs (including fuel surcharges).

Foreign Securities Risk: The Fund may invest, within U.S. regulations, in foreign securities. The Fund's investments in foreign securities can be riskier than U.S. securities investments. Investments in the securities of foreign issuers (including investments in ADRs and GDRs) are subject to the risks associated with investing in those foreign markets, such as heightened risks of inflation or nationalization. The prices of foreign securities and the prices of U.S. securities have, at times, moved in opposite directions. In addition, securities of foreign issuers may lose value due to political, economic and geographic events affecting a foreign issuer or market. During periods of social, political or economic instability in a country or region, the value of a foreign security traded on U.S. exchanges could be affected by, among other things, increasing price volatility, illiquidity, or the closure of the primary market on which the security (or the security underlying the ADR or GDR) is traded. You may lose money due to political, economic and geographic events affecting a foreign issuer or market. Where all or a portion of the Fund's underlying securities trade in a market that is closed when the market in which the Fund's shares are listed and trading is open, there may be differences between the last quote from the security’s closed foreign market and the value of the security during the Fund’s domestic trading day. This in turn could lead to differences between the market price of the Fund’s shares and the underlying value of those shares.

Geographic Risk: A natural, biological or other disaster could occur in a geographic region in which the Fund invests, which could affect the economy or particular business operations of companies in the specific geographic region, causing an adverse impact on the Fund’s investments in the affected region or in a region economically tied to the affected region. The securities in which the Fund invests and, consequently, the Fund are also subject to specific risks as a result of their business operations, including, but not limited to:

Risk of Investing in China: Investment exposure to China subjects the Fund to risks specific to China.

Economic, Political and Social Risk
China may be subject to considerable degrees of economic, political and social instability. Concerns about the rising government and household debt levels could impact the stability of the Chinese economy. China is an emerging market and demonstrates significantly higher volatility from time to time in comparison to developed markets. Over the last few decades, the Chinese government has undertaken reform of economic and market practices, including recent reforms to liberalize its capital markets and expand the sphere for private ownership of property in China.
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However, Chinese markets generally continue to experience inefficiency, volatility and pricing anomalies resulting from governmental influence, a lack of publicly available information and/or political and social instability. Chinese companies are also subject to the risk that Chinese authorities can intervene in their operations and structure. Internal social unrest or confrontations with other neighboring countries, including military conflicts in response to such events, may also disrupt economic development in China and result in a greater risk of currency fluctuations, currency convertibility, interest rate fluctuations and higher rates of inflation.

China has experienced major health crises. These health crises include, but are not limited to, the rapid and pandemic spread of novel viruses commonly known as SARS, MERS, and COVID-19 (Coronavirus). Such health crises could exacerbate political, social, and economic risks previously mentioned.

Export growth continues to be a major driver of China’s rapid economic growth. Elevated trade tensions between China and its trading partners, including the imposition of U.S. tariffs on certain Chinese goods and increased international pressure related to Chinese trade policy and forced technology transfers and intellectual property protections, may have a substantial impact on the Chinese economy. Reduction in spending on Chinese products and services, institution of additional tariffs or other trade barriers (including as a result of heightened trade tensions between China and the U.S. or in response to actual or alleged Chinese cyber activity), or a downturn in any of the economies of China’s key trading partners may have an adverse impact on the Chinese economy. The continuation or worsening of the current political climate between China and the U.S. could result in additional regulatory restrictions being contemplated or imposed in the U.S. or in China that could impact the Fund’s ability to invest in certain companies.

Security Risk
China has experienced security concerns, such as terrorism and strained international relations. Additionally, China is alleged to have participated in state-sponsored cyberattacks against foreign companies and foreign governments. Actual and threatened responses to such activity, including purchasing restrictions, sanctions, tariffs or cyberattacks on the Chinese government or Chinese companies, may impact China’s economy and Chinese issuers of securities in which the Fund invests. Incidents involving China’s or the region’s security, including the contagion of infectious viruses or diseases, may cause uncertainty in Chinese markets and may adversely affect the Chinese economy and the Fund’s investments.

Heavy Government Control and Regulation
Chinese companies, including Chinese companies that are listed on U.S. exchanges, are not subject to the same degree of regulatory requirements, accounting standards or auditor oversight as companies in more developed countries, and as a result, information about the Chinese securities in which the Fund invests may be less reliable or complete. There may be significant obstacles to obtaining information necessary for investigations into or litigation against Chinese companies and shareholders may have limited legal remedies. Investments in China may be subject to loss due to expropriation or nationalization of assets and property or the imposition of restrictions on foreign investments and repatriation of capital. Furthermore, government actions against leaders or other key figures within companies, or speculation about such actions, may lead to sudden and unpredictable falls in the value of securities within the Fund.

Tax Risk
China has implemented a number of tax reforms in recent years and may amend or revise its existing tax laws and/or procedures in the future, possibly with retroactive effect. Changes in applicable Chinese tax law could reduce the after-tax profits of the Fund, directly or indirectly, including by reducing the after-tax profits of companies in China in which the Fund invests. Uncertainties in Chinese tax rules could result in unexpected tax liabilities for the Fund. Should legislation limit U.S. investors’ ability to invest in specific Chinese companies through A-shares or other share class listings that are part of the underlying holdings, these shares may be excluded from Fund holdings.

Special Risk Considerations of Investing in China – Variable Interest Entity Investments
For purposes of raising capital offshore on exchanges outside of China, including on U.S. exchanges, many Chinese-based operating companies are structured as Variable Interest Entities (“VIEs”). In this structure, the Chinese-based operating company is the VIE and establishes a shell company in a foreign jurisdiction, such as the Cayman Islands. The shell company lists on a foreign exchange and enters into contractual arrangements with the VIE. This structure allows Chinese companies in which the Chinese government restricts foreign ownership to raise capital from foreign investors. While the shell company has no equity ownership of the VIE, these contractual arrangements permit the shell company to consolidate the VIE’s financial statements with its own for accounting purposes and provide for economic exposure to the performance of the underlying Chinese operating company. Therefore, an investor in the listed shell company, such as the Fund, will have exposure to the Chinese-based operating company only through contractual arrangements and has no ownership in the Chinese-based operating company. Furthermore, because the shell company only has specific rights provided for in these service agreements with the VIE, its abilities to control the
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activities at the Chinese-based operating company are limited and the operating company may engage in activities that negatively impact investment value.

While the VIE structure has been widely adopted, it is not formally recognized under Chinese law and therefore there is a risk that the Chinese government could prohibit the existence of such structures or negatively impact the VIE’s contractual arrangements with the listed shell company by making them invalid. If these contracts were found to be unenforceable under Chinese law, investors in the listed shell company, such as the Fund, may suffer significant losses with little or no recourse available. If the Chinese government determines that the agreements establishing the VIE structures do not comply with Chinese law and regulations, including those related to restrictions on foreign ownership, it could subject a Chinese-based issuer to penalties, revocation of business and operating licenses, or forfeiture of ownership interest. In addition, the listed shell company’s control over a VIE may also be jeopardized if a natural person who holds the equity interest in the VIE breaches the terms of the agreement, is subject to legal proceedings or if any physical instruments for authenticating documentation, such as chops and seals, are used without the Chinese-based issuer’s authorization to enter into contractual arrangements in China. Chops and seals, which are carved stamps used to sign documents, represent a legally binding commitment by the company. Moreover, any future regulatory action may prohibit the ability of the shell company to receive the economic benefits of the Chinese-based operating company, which may cause the value of the Fund’s investment in the listed shell company to suffer a significant loss. For example, in 2021, the Chinese government prohibited use of the VIE structure for investment in after-school tutoring companies. There is no guarantee that the Chinese government will not place similar restrictions on other industries.

Chinese equities that utilize the VIE structure to list in the U.S. as ADRs face the risk of regulatory action from U.S. authorities, including the risk of delisting. This will depend in part on whether U.S. regulatory authorities are satisfied with their access to Mainland China and Hong Kong for the purpose of conducting inspections on the quality of audits for these companies. Although the U.S. and China reached an agreement in September 2022 to grant the U.S. access for such inspections, there is no guarantee that the agreement will hold up or that U.S. regulatory authorities will continue to feel satisfied with their access.

Risk of Investing in Emerging Markets: As of the date of this Prospectus, China is an emerging market country. Investments in emerging markets may be subject to a greater risk of loss than investments in developed markets. Securities markets of emerging market countries are less liquid, subject to greater price volatility, have smaller market capitalizations, have less government regulation, and are not subject to as extensive and frequent accounting, financial, and other reporting requirements as the securities markets of more developed countries, and there may be greater risk associated with the custody of securities in emerging markets. It may be difficult or impossible for the Fund to pursue claims against an emerging market issuer in the courts of an emerging market country. There may be significant obstacles to obtaining information necessary for investigations into or litigation against emerging market companies and shareholders may have limited legal rights and remedies. Emerging markets may be more likely to experience inflation, political turmoil and rapid changes in economic conditions than more developed markets. Emerging market economies’ exposure to specific industries, such as tourism, and lack of efficient or sufficient health care systems, could make these economies especially vulnerable to global crises, including but not limited to, pandemics such as the global COVID-19 pandemic. Certain emerging market countries may have privatized, or have begun the process of privatizing, certain entities and industries. Privatized entities may lose money or be re-nationalized.

Risk of Investing in Hong Kong: Investments in Hong Kong issuers may subject the Fund to legal, regulatory, political, currency, security, and economic risk specific to Hong Kong. China is Hong Kong’s largest trading partner, both in terms of exports and imports. Any changes in the Chinese economy, trade regulations or currency exchange rates, or a tightening of China’s control over Hong Kong, including in connection with recent protests and unrest, may have an adverse impact on Hong Kong’s economy.

International Closed Market Trading Risk: To the extent that the underlying investments held by the Fund trade on foreign exchanges that may be closed when the securities exchange on which the Fund’s Shares trade is open, there are likely to be deviations between the current price of such an underlying security and the last quoted price for the underlying security (i.e., the Fund’s quote from the closed foreign market). These deviations could result in premiums or discounts to the Fund’s NAV that may be greater than those experienced by other exchange-traded funds ("ETFs").

Issuer Risk: Fund performance depends on the performance of individual companies in which the Fund invests. Changes to the financial condition of any of those companies may cause the value of such company's securities to decline.

Market Risk: Turbulence in the financial markets and reduced liquidity may negatively affect issuers, which could have an adverse effect on the Fund. If the securities held by the Fund experience poor liquidity, the Fund may be unable to transact at advantageous times or prices, which may decrease the Fund’s returns. In addition, there is a risk that policy changes by central
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governments and governmental agencies, including the U.S. Federal Reserve or the European Central Bank, which could include increasing interest rates, could cause increased volatility in financial markets and lead to higher levels of Fund redemptions from Authorized Participants, which could have a negative impact on the Fund. Furthermore, local, regional or global events such as war, acts of terrorism, the spread of infectious illness or other public health issues, recessions, or other events could have a significant impact on the Fund and its investments and trading of its Shares. For example, at the start of 2023, central banks had already increased interest rates at the fastest rate on record, and it is unknown how long this trend will continue and when inflation will return to target levels. This increases the risk that monetary policy may provide less support should economic growth slow. Additionally, China’s shift away from a zero-COVID policy creates both opportunities and risks, causing uncertainty for global economic growth. Market risk factors may result in increased volatility and/or decreased liquidity in the securities markets. The Fund’s NAV could decline over short periods due to short-term market movements and over longer periods during market downturns.

Non-Diversification Risk: The Fund is classified as a “non-diversified” investment company under the Investment Company Act of 1940 ("1940 Act"). As a result, the Fund is subject to the risk that it may be more volatile than a diversified fund because the Fund may invest its assets in a smaller number of issuers or may invest a larger proportion of its assets in a single issuer. As a result, the gains and losses on a single investment may have a greater impact on the Fund’s NAV and may make the Fund more volatile than more diversified funds.

Operational Risk: The Fund is exposed to operational risk arising from a number of factors, including but not limited to human error, processing and communication errors, errors of the Fund's service providers, counterparties or other third-parties, failed or inadequate processes and technology or systems failures. Additionally, cyber security failures or breaches of the electronic systems of the Fund, the Adviser, and the Fund's other service providers, market makers, Authorized Participants or the issuers of securities in which the Fund invests have the ability to cause disruptions and negatively impact the Fund's business operations, potentially resulting in financial losses to the Fund and its shareholders. The Fund and the Adviser seek to reduce these operational risks through controls and procedures. However, these measures do not address every possible risk and may be inadequate for those risks that they are intended to address.

Passive Investment Risk: The Fund is not actively managed, and the Adviser does not attempt to take defensive positions in declining markets. Unlike many investment companies, the Fund does not seek to outperform its Underlying Index. Therefore, it would not necessarily buy or sell a security unless that security is added or removed, respectively, from the Underlying Index, even if that security generally is underperforming. Additionally, if a constituent of the Underlying Index were removed, even outside of a regular rebalance of the Underlying Index, the Adviser anticipates that the Fund would sell such security. Maintaining investments in securities regardless of market conditions or the performance of individual securities could cause the Fund’s return to be lower than if the Fund employed an active strategy.

Index-Related Risk: There is no guarantee that the Fund will achieve a high degree of correlation to the Underlying Index and therefore achieve its investment objective. Market disruptions and regulatory restrictions could have an adverse effect on the Fund’s ability to adjust its exposure to the required levels in order to track the Underlying Index. Errors in index data, index computations and/or the construction of the Underlying Index in accordance with its methodology may occur from time to time and may not be identified and corrected by the Index Provider for a period of time or at all, which may have an adverse impact on the Fund and its shareholders.

Management Risk: The Fund may not fully replicate its Underlying Index and may hold securities not included in its Underlying Index. The Adviser’s investment strategy, the implementation of which is subject to a number of constraints, may cause the Fund to underperform the market or its relevant benchmark or adversely affect the ability of the Fund to achieve its investment objective.

Tracking Error Risk: Tracking error may occur because of differences between the instruments held in the Fund's portfolio and those included in the Underlying Index, pricing differences, transaction costs incurred by the Fund, the Fund's holding of uninvested cash, size of the Fund, differences in timing of the accrual of or the valuation of dividends or interest, tax gains or losses, changes to the Underlying Index or the costs to the Fund of complying with various new or existing regulatory requirements. This risk may be heightened during times of increased market volatility or other unusual market conditions. Tracking error also may result because the Fund incurs fees and expenses, while the Underlying Index does not. ETFs that track indices with significant weight in emerging markets issuers may experience higher tracking error than other ETFs that do not track such indices.

Reliance on Trading Partners Risk: The Fund invests in the Chinese economy, which is heavily dependent upon trading with key partners. Any reduction in this trading, including as a result of adverse economic conditions in a trading partner's economy, may cause an adverse impact on the Chinese economy in which the Fund invests. Through its portfolio companies' trading
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partners, the Fund is specifically exposed to Asian Economic Risk, European Economic Risk, and North American Economic Risk.

Risks Associated with Exchange-Traded Funds: As an ETF, the Fund is subject to the following risks:

Authorized Participants Concentration Risk: The Fund has a limited number of financial institutions that may act as Authorized Participants and engage in creation or redemption transactions directly with the Fund, and none of those Authorized Participants is obligated to engage in creation and/or redemption transactions. To the extent that those Authorized Participants exit the business or are unable to process creation and/or redemption orders, such as in times of market stress, Shares may be more likely to trade at a premium or discount to NAV and/or at wider intraday bid-ask spreads, and possibly face trading halts and/or delisting from an exchange. Authorized Participants Concentration Risk may be heightened because the Fund invests in non-U.S. securities.

Large Shareholder Risk: Redemptions by large shareholders could have a significant negative impact on the Fund. If a large shareholder were to redeem all, or a large portion, of its Shares, there is no guarantee that the Fund will be able to maintain sufficient assets to continue operations in which case the Board of Trustees may determine to liquidate the Fund. In addition, transactions by large shareholders may account for a large percentage of the trading volume on a national securities exchange and may, therefore, have a material upward or downward effect on the market price of the Shares.

Listing Standards Risk: The Fund is required to comply with listing requirements adopted by the listing exchange. Non-compliance with such requirements may result in the Fund's shares being delisted by the listing exchange. Any resulting liquidation of the Fund could cause the Fund to incur elevated transaction costs and could result in negative tax consequences for its shareholders.

Market Trading Risks and Premium/Discount Risks: Shares of the Fund are publicly traded on a national securities exchange, which may subject shareholders to numerous market trading risks. In stressed market conditions, the market for the Shares may become less liquid in response to the deteriorating liquidity of the Fund’s portfolio. This adverse effect on the liquidity of the Shares, as well as disruptions to creations and redemptions, the existence of extreme market volatility or potential lack of assets in the Fund or an active trading market for Shares may result in Shares trading at a significant premium or discount to NAV. If a shareholder purchases Shares at a time when the market price is at a premium to the NAV or sells Shares at a time when the market price is at a discount to the NAV, the shareholder may sustain losses. The NAV of the Fund is calculated at the end of each business day and fluctuates with changes in the market value of the Fund’s holdings. The trading price of the Fund’s shares fluctuates, in some cases materially, throughout trading hours in response to changes in the Fund’s NAV.

Risks Related to Stock Connect Programs: The Stock Connect Programs are subject to daily and aggregate quota limitations, which could affect the Fund’s ability to enter into and exit Stock Connect positions on a timely basis. The Shenzen and Shanghai markets may operate when the Stock Connect Programs are not active, and consequently the prices of shares held via Stock Connect Programs may fluctuate at times when the Fund is unable to add to or exit its positions. The Stock Connect Programs are new, and the effect of the introduction of large numbers of foreign investors on the market for trading Chinese-listed securities is not well understood. Regulations, such as limitations on redemptions or suspension of trading, may adversely impact the value of the Fund’s investments. The Fund's investments in A-Shares though the Stock Connect Program are held by its custodian in accounts in Central Clearing and Settlement System ("CCASS") maintained by the Hong Kong Securities Clearing Company Limited ("HKSCC"), which in turn holds the A-Shares, as the nominee holder, through an omnibus securities account in its name registered with the CSDCC. The precise nature and rights of the Fund as the beneficial owner of the SSE Securities or SZSE Securities through HKSCC as nominee is not well defined under Chinese law. There is no guarantee that the Shenzen, Shanghai, and Hong Kong Stock Exchanges will continue to support the Stock Connect Programs in the future.

Trading Halt Risk: An exchange or market may close or issue trading halts on specific securities, or the ability to buy or sell certain securities or financial instruments may be restricted, which may result in the Fund being unable to buy or sell certain securities or financial instruments. In such circumstances, the Fund may be unable to rebalance its portfolio, may be unable to accurately price its investments and/or may incur substantial trading losses.

Valuation Risk: The sales price the Fund could receive for a security may differ from the Fund’s valuation of the security and may differ from the value used by the Underlying Index, particularly for securities that trade in low value or volatile markets or that are valued using a fair value methodology (such as during trading halts). The value of the securities in the Fund's portfolio may change on days when shareholders will not be able to purchase or sell the Fund's Shares.
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PERFORMANCE INFORMATION
 
The bar chart and table that follow show how the Fund performed on a calendar year basis and provide an indication of the risks of investing in the Fund by showing changes in the Fund's performance from year to year and by showing how the Fund's average annual returns for the indicated periods compare with the Fund's benchmark index and a broad measure of market performance. The Fund's past performance (before and after taxes) is not necessarily indicative of how the Fund will perform in the future. Updated performance information is available online at www.globalxetfs.com.

Annual Total Returns (Years Ended December 31)

 ck0001432353-20221031_g4.jpg
 
Best Quarter: 3/31/2019 29.26%
Worst Quarter: 3/31/2022 -19.42%

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Average Annual Total Returns (for the Periods Ended December 31, 2022) 
  One Year Ended December 31, 2022
Since Inception (12/07/2018)
Global X MSCI China Consumer Staples ETF:
·Return before taxes
-19.51% 13.47%
·Return after taxes on distributions1
-19.72% 12.64%
·Return after taxes on distributions and sale of Fund Shares1
-11.44% 10.55%
MSCI China Consumer Staples 10/50 Index (net)
(Index returns reflect invested dividends net of withholding taxes, but reflect no deduction for fees, expenses, or other taxes)
-18.88% 14.24%
MSCI Emerging Markets Index (net)
(Index returns reflect invested dividends net of withholding taxes, but reflect no deduction for fees, expenses, or other taxes)
-20.09% 1.83%

1     After-tax returns are calculated using the historical highest individual U.S. federal marginal income tax rates and do not reflect the impact of state and local taxes. Your actual after-tax returns will depend on your specific tax situation and may differ from those shown above. After-tax returns are not relevant to investors who hold Shares of the Fund through tax-advantaged arrangements, such as 401(k) plans or individual retirement accounts (IRAs).

FUND MANAGEMENT
 
Investment Adviser: Global X Management Company LLC.

Portfolio Managers: The professionals primarily responsible for the day-to-day management of the Fund are Nam To, CFA; Wayne Xie; Kimberly Chan; Vanessa Yang; and Sandy Lu, CFA (“Portfolio Managers”). Mr. To has been a Portfolio Manager of the Fund since the Fund's inception. Mr. Xie has been a Portfolio Manager of the Fund since March 1, 2019. Ms. Chan has been a Portfolio Manager of the Fund since June 10, 2019. Ms. Yang has been a Portfolio Manager of the Fund since December 2020. Mr. Lu has been a Portfolio Manager of the Fund since March 2022.
 
PURCHASE AND SALE OF FUND SHARES
 
Shares of the Fund are or will be listed and traded at market prices on a national securities exchange. Shares may only be purchased and sold on the exchange through a broker-dealer. The price of Shares is based on market price, and because ETF shares trade at market prices rather than at NAV, Shares may trade at a price greater than NAV (a premium) or less than NAV (a discount). Only “Authorized Participants” (as defined in the SAI) who have entered into agreements with the Fund’s distributor, SEI Investments Distribution Co. (“Distributor”), may engage in creation or redemption transactions directly with the Fund. The Fund will only issue or redeem Shares that have been aggregated into blocks called Creation Units. The Fund will issue or redeem Creation Units in return for a basket of cash and/or securities that the Fund specifies any day that the national securities exchanges are open for business (“Business Day”). An investor may incur costs attributable to the difference between the highest price a buyer is willing to pay to purchase shares of the Fund (bid) and the lowest price a seller is willing to accept for shares of the Fund (ask) when buying or selling shares in the secondary market (the “bid-ask spread”). To access information regarding the Fund’s net asset value, market price, premiums and discounts, and bid-ask spreads, please go to https://www.globalxetfs.com.
 
TAX INFORMATION
 
The Fund intends to make distributions that may be taxable to you as ordinary income or capital gains, unless you are investing through a tax-advantaged arrangement, such as a 401(k) plan or an individual retirement account ("IRA"), in which case distributions from such tax-advantaged arrangement may be taxable to you.
 
PAYMENTS TO BROKER-DEALERS AND OTHER FINANCIAL INTERMEDIARIES
 
The Adviser and its related companies may pay broker-dealers or other financial intermediaries (such as a bank) for the sale of Fund Shares and related services. These payments may create a conflict of interest by influencing your broker-dealer, sales persons or other intermediary or its employees or associated persons to recommend the Fund over another investment. Ask your financial adviser or visit your financial intermediary’s website for more information.
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Global X MSCI China Energy ETF
 
Ticker: CHIE Exchange: NYSE Arca
 
INVESTMENT OBJECTIVE
 
The Global X MSCI China Energy ETF ("Fund") seeks to provide investment results that correspond generally to the price and yield performance, before fees and expenses, of the MSCI China Energy IMI Plus 10/50 Index ("Underlying Index").
 
FEES AND EXPENSES
 
This table describes the fees and expenses that you may pay if you buy, hold, and sell shares (“Shares”) of the Fund. You may pay other fees, such as brokerage commissions and other fees to financial intermediaries, which are not reflected in the table and examples below.

Annual Fund Operating Expenses (expenses that you pay each year as a percentage of the value of your investment):
 
Management Fees: 0.65%
Distribution and Service (12b-1) Fees: None
Other Expenses: 0.01%
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses: 0.66%

Example: The following example is intended to help you compare the cost of investing in the Fund with the cost of investing in other funds. This example does not take into account customary brokerage commissions that you pay when purchasing or selling Shares of the Fund in the secondary market. The example assumes that you invest $10,000 in the Fund for the time periods indicated and then sell all of your Shares at the end of those periods. The example also assumes that your investment has a 5% return each year and that the Fund's operating expenses remain the same. Although your actual costs may be higher or lower, based on these assumptions, your costs would be:
 
One Year Three Years Five Years Ten Years
$67 $211 $368 $822

Portfolio Turnover: The Fund pays transaction costs, such as commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or "turns over" its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover rate may indicate higher transaction costs and may result in higher taxes when Shares are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are not reflected in annual fund operating expenses or in the example, affect the Fund's performance. During the most recent fiscal year, the Fund's portfolio turnover rate was 106.55% of the average value of its portfolio.
 
PRINCIPAL INVESTMENT STRATEGIES
 
The Fund invests at least 80% of its total assets in the securities of the MSCI China Energy IMI Plus 10/50 Index ("Underlying Index") and in American Depositary Receipts ("ADRs") and Global Depositary Receipts ("GDRs") based on the securities in the Underlying Index. The Fund also invests at least 80% of its total assets in securities of energy companies that are economically tied to China. For purposes of this policy, energy companies include those companies that are classified in the energy sector under the Global Industry Classification System ("GICS"). The Fund's 80% investment policies are non-fundamental and require 60 days prior written notice to shareholders before they can be changed.
 
The Underlying Index tracks the performance of companies in the MSCI China Investable Market Index (the "Parent Index") that are classified in the energy sector, as defined by MSCI, Inc. ("MSCI") the provider of the Underlying Index ("Index Provider"). The Parent Index is a free float-adjusted market capitalization-weighted index designed to measure the performance of securities that are classified as operating in China according to the MSCI Global Investable Markets Index Methodology, and that satisfy minimum market capitalization and liquidity thresholds. The securities eligible for inclusion in the Underlying Index include H-Shares (securities of companies incorporated in China that are denominated in Hong Kong Dollars and listed on the Hong Kong Stock Exchange (the "HKSE")), B-Shares (securities of companies denominated in U.S. dollars or Hong Kong dollars and listed on Shanghai Stock Exchange (the "SSE") or Shenzen Stock Exchange (the "SZSE")), Red Chips (securities of
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companies with a majority of their business operations in mainland China and that are controlled by the national government or local governments of China, traded on the HKSE in Hong Kong dollars), P-Chips (securities of companies with the majority of their business operations in mainland China and controlled by individuals in China, but that are incorporated outside of China), A-Shares (securities of companies incorporated in mainland China that trade on Chinese exchanges in renminbi) that are accessible through the Shanghai-Hong Kong Stock Connect program ("Shanghai Connect") or the Shenzhen-Hong Kong Stock Connect program ("Shenzhen Connect", and together with Shanghai Connect, "Stock Connect Programs"), and foreign listings such as American Depository Receipts ("ADRs"). The Stock Connect Programs are securities trading and clearing programs that aim to achieve mutual stock market access between China and Hong Kong. Under Stock Connect, the Fund's trading of eligible A-shares listed on the SSE or the SZSE, as applicable, would be effectuated through its Hong Kong brokers. Trading through the Stock Connect Programs is subject to a daily quota, which limits the maximum net purchases under Stock Connect Programs each day, and as such, buy orders for A-shares would be rejected once the daily quota is exceeded (although the Fund will be permitted to sell A-shares regardless of the daily quota balance). The daily quota is not specific to the Fund. From time to time, other stock exchanges in China may participate in Stock Connect, and A-shares listed and traded on such other stock exchanges and accessible through Stock Connect may be added to the Underlying Index, as determined by MSCI.

The Underlying Index then follows a rules-based methodology that is designed to select all constituents of the Parent Index that are classified in the energy sector under the GICS. The Underlying Index is weighted according to each component's free-float adjusted market capitalization, but is modified so that, as of the rebalance date, no issuer constitutes more than 10% of the Underlying Index and so that, in the aggregate, the issuers that would represent more than 5% of the Underlying Index represent no more than 50% of the Underlying Index ("10/50 Cap"). The Underlying Index is reconstituted and re-weighted quarterly. The Underlying Index may include large-, mid- and small-capitalization companies. As of December 31, 2022, the Underlying Index had 28 constituents. The Fund's investment objective and Underlying Index may be changed without shareholder approval.
 
The Adviser uses a "passive" or indexing approach to try to achieve the Fund's investment objective. Unlike many investment companies, the Fund does not try to outperform the Underlying Index and does not seek temporary defensive positions when markets decline or appear overvalued.
 
The Fund generally will use a replication strategy. A replication strategy is an indexing strategy that involves investing in the securities of the Underlying Index in approximately the same proportions as in the Underlying Index. However, the Fund may utilize a representative sampling strategy with respect to the Underlying Index when a replication strategy might be detrimental or disadvantageous to shareholders, such as when there are practical difficulties or substantial costs involved in compiling a portfolio of equity securities to replicate the Underlying Index, in instances in which a security in the Underlying Index becomes temporarily illiquid, unavailable or less liquid, or as a result of legal restrictions or limitations (such as tax diversification requirements) that apply to the Fund but not the Underlying Index.
 
The Adviser expects that, over time, the correlation between the Fund's performance and that of the Underlying Index, before fees and expenses, will exceed 95%. A correlation percentage of 100% would indicate perfect correlation. If the Fund uses a replication strategy, it can be expected to have greater correlation to the Underlying Index than if it uses a representative sampling strategy.
 
The Fund concentrates its investments (i.e., holds 25% or more of its total assets) in a particular industry or group of industries to approximately the same extent that the Underlying Index is concentrated. As of December 31, 2022, the Underlying Index was concentrated in the oil, gas and consumable fuels industry and had significant exposure to the energy sector.
 
SUMMARY OF PRINCIPAL RISKS
 
As with any investment, you could lose all or part of your investment in the Fund, and the Fund’s performance could trail that of other investments. There is no guarantee that the Fund will achieve its investment objective. An investment in the Fund is not a bank deposit and it is not insured or guaranteed by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation or any other government agency, the Adviser or any of its affiliates. The Fund is subject to the principal risks noted below, any of which may adversely affect the Fund’s net asset value (“NAV”), trading price, yield, total return and ability to meet its investment objective, as well as other risks that are described in greater detail in the Additional Information About the Funds section of this Prospectus and in the Statement of Additional Information (“SAI”). The order of the below risk factors does not indicate the significance of any particular risk factor.

Asset Class Risk: Securities and other assets in the Underlying Index or otherwise held in the Fund's portfolio may underperform in comparison to the general securities markets, a particular securities market or other asset classes.

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China A-Shares Risk: A-Shares are issued by companies incorporated in mainland China and are traded on Chinese exchanges. Foreign investors can access A-Shares by obtaining a Qualified Foreign Institutional Investor ("QFII") or a Renminbi Qualified Foreign Institutional Investor ("RQFII") license, as well as through the Stock Connect Program, which is a securities trading and clearing program with an aim to achieve mutual stock market access between the China and Hong Kong markets. Stock Connect was developed by Hong Kong Exchanges and Clearing Limited, the Shanghai Stock Exchange ("SSE") (in the case of Shanghai Connect) or the Shenzhen Stock Exchange ("SZSE") (in the case of Shenzhen Connect), and the China Securities Depository and Clearing Corporation Limited (“CSDCC”). The Fund currently intends to gain exposure to A-Shares through the Stock Connect Programs. Investments in A-Shares are subject to various regulations and limits, and the recoupment or repatriation of assets invested in A-Shares is subject to restrictions by the Chinese government. In addition, investors from outside mainland China may face difficulties or prohibitions accessing certain A-Shares that are part of a restricted list in countries such as the U.S. A-Shares may be subject to frequent and widespread trading halts and may become illiquid. Trading suspensions in certain stock could lead to greater market execution risk and costs for the Fund, and the creation and redemption of Creation Units (as defined below) may also be disrupted. These risks, among others, could adversely affect the value of the Fund’s investments.

Equity Securities Risk: Equity securities are subject to changes in value, and their values may be more volatile than other asset classes, as a result of such factors as a company’s business performance, investor perceptions, stock market trends and general economic conditions.

Capitalization Risk: Investing in issuers within the same market capitalization category carries the risk that the category may be out of favor due to current market conditions or investor sentiment.

Large-Capitalization Companies Risk: Large-capitalization companies may trail the returns of the overall stock market. Large-capitalization stocks tend to go through cycles of doing better - or worse - than the stock market in general. These periods have, in the past, lasted for as long as several years.

Mid-Capitalization Companies Risk: Mid-capitalization companies may have greater price volatility, lower trading volume and less liquidity than large-capitalization companies. In addition, mid-capitalization companies may have smaller revenues, narrower product lines, less management depth and experience, smaller shares of their product or service markets, fewer financial resources and less competitive strength than large-capitalization companies.

Small-Capitalization Companies Risk: Compared to mid- and large-capitalization companies, small-capitalization companies may be less stable and more susceptible to adverse developments, and their securities may be more volatile and less liquid.

Cash Transaction Risk: Unlike most exchange-traded funds ("ETFs"), the Fund intends to effect a significant portion of creations and redemptions for cash, rather than in-kind securities. As a result, an investment in the Fund may be less tax-efficient than an investment in a more conventional ETF. Moreover, cash transactions may have to be carried out over several days if the securities market is relatively illiquid and may involve considerable brokerage fees and taxes. These factors may result in wider spreads between the bid and the offered prices of the Fund’s Shares than for more conventional ETFs.

Currency Risk: The Fund may invest in securities denominated in foreign currencies. Because the Fund's NAV is determined in U.S. dollars, the Fund's NAV could decline if the Chinese yuan depreciates against the U.S. dollar or if there are delays or limits on repatriation of such currency. Currency exchange rates can be very volatile and can change quickly and unpredictably. As a result, the Fund's NAV may change quickly and without warning, which could have a significant negative impact on the Fund. Additionally, the Chinese government heavily regulates the domestic exchange of foreign currencies and yuan exchange rates in China, which may adversely affect the operations and financial results of the Fund’s investments in China. Shares purchased through the Stock Connect Programs will be purchased using offshore yuan, the value of which may differ from and experience greater volatility than the value of onshore yuan. Offshore yuan cannot be freely remitted into or transferred out of China, and there is no assurance that there will always be sufficient amounts of offshore yuan available for the Fund to invest in all components of the Underlying Index.

Custody Risk: The Fund may hold foreign securities and cash with foreign banks, agents, and securities depositories appointed by the Fund's custodian. Investments in emerging markets may be subject to even greater custody risks than investments in more developed markets. Less developed markets are more likely to experience problems with the clearing and settling of trades and the holding of securities by local banks, agents and depositories.

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Focus Risk: To the extent that the Underlying Index focuses in investments related to a particular industry or group of industries, the Fund will also focus its investments to approximately the same extent. Similarly, if the Underlying Index has significant exposure to one or more sectors, the Fund’s investments will likely have significant exposure to such sectors. In such event, the Fund’s performance will be particularly susceptible to adverse events impacting such industry or sector, which may include, but are not limited to, the following: general economic conditions or cyclical market patterns that could negatively affect supply and demand; competition for resources; adverse labor relations; political or world events; obsolescence of technologies; and increased competition or new product introductions that may affect the profitability or viability of companies in a particular industry or sector. As a result, the value of the Fund’s investments may rise and fall more than the value of shares of a fund that invests in securities of companies in a broader range of industries or sectors.

Risks Related to Investing in the Energy Sector: The value of securities issued by companies in the energy sector may decline for many reasons, including, without limitation, changes in energy prices; international politics; energy conservation; the success of exploration projects; natural disasters or other catastrophes; changes in exchange rates, interest rates, or economic conditions; changes in demand for energy products and services; and tax and other government regulatory policies. Actions taken by central governments may dramatically impact supply and demand forces that influence energy prices, resulting in sudden decreases in value for companies in the energy sector.

Risks Related to Investing in the Oil, Gas and Consumable Fuels Industry: The oil, gas and consumable fuels industry is cyclical and highly dependent on the market price of fuel. The market value of companies in the oil, gas and consumable fuels industry are strongly affected by the levels and volatility of global commodity prices, supply and demand, capital expenditures on exploration and production, energy conservation efforts, the prices of alternative fuels, exchange rates and technological advances. Companies in this sector are subject to substantial government regulation and contractual fixed pricing, which may increase the cost of business and limit these companies’ earnings. Actions taken by central governments may dramatically impact supply and demand forces that influence the market price of fuel, resulting in sudden decreases in value for companies in the oil, gas and consumable fuels industry. A significant portion of their revenues depends on a relatively small number of customers, including governmental entities and utilities. As a result, governmental budget restraints may have a material adverse effect on the stock prices of companies in the industry.

Foreign Securities Risk: The Fund may invest, within U.S. regulations, in foreign securities. The Fund's investments in foreign securities can be riskier than U.S. securities investments. Investments in the securities of foreign issuers (including investments in ADRs and GDRs) are subject to the risks associated with investing in those foreign markets, such as heightened risks of inflation or nationalization. The prices of foreign securities and the prices of U.S. securities have, at times, moved in opposite directions. In addition, securities of foreign issuers may lose value due to political, economic and geographic events affecting a foreign issuer or market. During periods of social, political or economic instability in a country or region, the value of a foreign security traded on U.S. exchanges could be affected by, among other things, increasing price volatility, illiquidity, or the closure of the primary market on which the security (or the security underlying the ADR or GDR) is traded. You may lose money due to political, economic and geographic events affecting a foreign issuer or market. Where all or a portion of the Fund's underlying securities trade in a market that is closed when the market in which the Fund's shares are listed and trading is open, there may be differences between the last quote from the security’s closed foreign market and the value of the security during the Fund’s domestic trading day. This in turn could lead to differences between the market price of the Fund’s shares and the underlying value of those shares.

Geographic Risk: A natural, biological or other disaster could occur in a geographic region in which the Fund invests, which could affect the economy or particular business operations of companies in the specific geographic region, causing an adverse impact on the Fund’s investments in the affected region or in a region economically tied to the affected region. The securities in which the Fund invests and, consequently, the Fund are also subject to specific risks as a result of their business operations, including, but not limited to:

Risk of Investing in China: Investment exposure to China subjects the Fund to risks specific to China.

Economic, Political and Social Risk
China may be subject to considerable degrees of economic, political and social instability. Concerns about the rising government and household debt levels could impact the stability of the Chinese economy. China is an emerging market and demonstrates significantly higher volatility from time to time in comparison to developed markets. Over the last few decades, the Chinese government has undertaken reform of economic and market practices, including recent reforms to liberalize its capital markets and expand the sphere for private ownership of property in China. However, Chinese markets generally continue to experience inefficiency, volatility and pricing anomalies resulting from governmental influence, a lack of publicly available information and/or political and social instability. Chinese
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companies are also subject to the risk that Chinese authorities can intervene in their operations and structure. Internal social unrest or confrontations with other neighboring countries, including military conflicts in response to such events, may also disrupt economic development in China and result in a greater risk of currency fluctuations, currency convertibility, interest rate fluctuations and higher rates of inflation.

China has experienced major health crises. These health crises include, but are not limited to, the rapid and pandemic spread of novel viruses commonly known as SARS, MERS, and COVID-19 (Coronavirus). Such health crises could exacerbate political, social, and economic risks previously mentioned.

Export growth continues to be a major driver of China’s rapid economic growth. Elevated trade tensions between China and its trading partners, including the imposition of U.S. tariffs on certain Chinese goods and increased international pressure related to Chinese trade policy and forced technology transfers and intellectual property protections, may have a substantial impact on the Chinese economy. Reduction in spending on Chinese products and services, institution of additional tariffs or other trade barriers (including as a result of heightened trade tensions between China and the U.S. or in response to actual or alleged Chinese cyber activity), or a downturn in any of the economies of China’s key trading partners may have an adverse impact on the Chinese economy. The continuation or worsening of the current political climate between China and the U.S. could result in additional regulatory restrictions being contemplated or imposed in the U.S. or in China that could impact the Fund’s ability to invest in certain companies.

Security Risk
China has experienced security concerns, such as terrorism and strained international relations. Additionally, China is alleged to have participated in state-sponsored cyberattacks against foreign companies and foreign governments. Actual and threatened responses to such activity, including purchasing restrictions, sanctions, tariffs or cyberattacks on the Chinese government or Chinese companies, may impact China’s economy and Chinese issuers of securities in which the Fund invests. Incidents involving China’s or the region’s security, including the contagion of infectious viruses or diseases, may cause uncertainty in Chinese markets and may adversely affect the Chinese economy and the Fund’s investments.

Heavy Government Control and Regulation
Chinese companies, including Chinese companies that are listed on U.S. exchanges, are not subject to the same degree of regulatory requirements, accounting standards or auditor oversight as companies in more developed countries, and as a result, information about the Chinese securities in which the Fund invests may be less reliable or complete. There may be significant obstacles to obtaining information necessary for investigations into or litigation against Chinese companies and shareholders may have limited legal remedies. Investments in China may be subject to loss due to expropriation or nationalization of assets and property or the imposition of restrictions on foreign investments and repatriation of capital. Furthermore, government actions against leaders or other key figures within companies, or speculation about such actions, may lead to sudden and unpredictable falls in the value of securities within the Fund.

Tax Risk
China has implemented a number of tax reforms in recent years and may amend or revise its existing tax laws and/or procedures in the future, possibly with retroactive effect. Changes in applicable Chinese tax law could reduce the after-tax profits of the Fund, directly or indirectly, including by reducing the after-tax profits of companies in China in which the Fund invests. Uncertainties in Chinese tax rules could result in unexpected tax liabilities for the Fund. Should legislation limit U.S. investors’ ability to invest in specific Chinese companies through A-shares or other share class listings that are part of the underlying holdings, these shares may be excluded from Fund holdings.

Special Risk Considerations of Investing in China – Variable Interest Entity Investments
For purposes of raising capital offshore on exchanges outside of China, including on U.S. exchanges, many Chinese-based operating companies are structured as Variable Interest Entities (“VIEs”). In this structure, the Chinese-based operating company is the VIE and establishes a shell company in a foreign jurisdiction, such as the Cayman Islands. The shell company lists on a foreign exchange and enters into contractual arrangements with the VIE. This structure allows Chinese companies in which the Chinese government restricts foreign ownership to raise capital from foreign investors. While the shell company has no equity ownership of the VIE, these contractual arrangements permit the shell company to consolidate the VIE’s financial statements with its own for accounting purposes and provide for economic exposure to the performance of the underlying Chinese operating company. Therefore, an investor in the listed shell company, such as the Fund, will have exposure to the Chinese-based operating company only through contractual arrangements and has no ownership in the Chinese-based operating company. Furthermore, because the shell company only has specific rights provided for in these service agreements with the VIE, its abilities to control the activities at the Chinese-based operating company are limited and the operating company may engage in activities that negatively impact investment value.

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While the VIE structure has been widely adopted, it is not formally recognized under Chinese law and therefore there is a risk that the Chinese government could prohibit the existence of such structures or negatively impact the VIE’s contractual arrangements with the listed shell company by making them invalid. If these contracts were found to be unenforceable under Chinese law, investors in the listed shell company, such as the Fund, may suffer significant losses with little or no recourse available. If the Chinese government determines that the agreements establishing the VIE structures do not comply with Chinese law and regulations, including those related to restrictions on foreign ownership, it could subject a Chinese-based issuer to penalties, revocation of business and operating licenses, or forfeiture of ownership interest. In addition, the listed shell company’s control over a VIE may also be jeopardized if a natural person who holds the equity interest in the VIE breaches the terms of the agreement, is subject to legal proceedings or if any physical instruments for authenticating documentation, such as chops and seals, are used without the Chinese-based issuer’s authorization to enter into contractual arrangements in China. Chops and seals, which are carved stamps used to sign documents, represent a legally binding commitment by the company. Moreover, any future regulatory action may prohibit the ability of the shell company to receive the economic benefits of the Chinese-based operating company, which may cause the value of the Fund’s investment in the listed shell company to suffer a significant loss. For example, in 2021, the Chinese government prohibited use of the VIE structure for investment in after-school tutoring companies. There is no guarantee that the Chinese government will not place similar restrictions on other industries.

Chinese equities that utilize the VIE structure to list in the U.S. as ADRs face the risk of regulatory action from U.S. authorities, including the risk of delisting. This will depend in part on whether U.S. regulatory authorities are satisfied with their access to Mainland China and Hong Kong for the purpose of conducting inspections on the quality of audits for these companies. Although the U.S. and China reached an agreement in September 2022 to grant the U.S. access for such inspections, there is no guarantee that the agreement will hold up or that U.S. regulatory authorities will continue to feel satisfied with their access.

Risk of Investing in Emerging Markets: As of the date of this Prospectus, China is an emerging market country. Investments in emerging markets may be subject to a greater risk of loss than investments in developed markets. Securities markets of emerging market countries are less liquid, subject to greater price volatility, have smaller market capitalizations, have less government regulation, and are not subject to as extensive and frequent accounting, financial, and other reporting requirements as the securities markets of more developed countries, and there may be greater risk associated with the custody of securities in emerging markets. It may be difficult or impossible for the Fund to pursue claims against an emerging market issuer in the courts of an emerging market country. There may be significant obstacles to obtaining information necessary for investigations into or litigation against emerging market companies and shareholders may have limited legal rights and remedies. Emerging markets may be more likely to experience inflation, political turmoil and rapid changes in economic conditions than more developed markets. Emerging market economies’ exposure to specific industries, such as tourism, and lack of efficient or sufficient health care systems, could make these economies especially vulnerable to global crises, including but not limited to, pandemics such as the global COVID-19 pandemic. Certain emerging market countries may have privatized, or have begun the process of privatizing, certain entities and industries. Privatized entities may lose money or be re-nationalized.

Risk of Investing in Hong Kong: Investments in Hong Kong issuers may subject the Fund to legal, regulatory, political, currency, security, and economic risk specific to Hong Kong. China is Hong Kong’s largest trading partner, both in terms of exports and imports. Any changes in the Chinese economy, trade regulations or currency exchange rates, or a tightening of China’s control over Hong Kong, including in connection with recent protests and unrest, may have an adverse impact on Hong Kong’s economy.

International Closed Market Trading Risk: To the extent that the underlying investments held by the Fund trade on foreign exchanges that may be closed when the securities exchange on which the Fund’s Shares trade is open, there are likely to be deviations between the current price of such an underlying security and the last quoted price for the underlying security (i.e., the Fund’s quote from the closed foreign market). These deviations could result in premiums or discounts to the Fund’s NAV that may be greater than those experienced by other exchange-traded funds ("ETFs").

Investable Universe of Companies Risk: The investable universe of companies in which the Fund may invest may be limited. If a company no longer meets the Index Provider’s criteria for inclusion in the Underlying Index, the Fund may need to reduce or eliminate its holdings in that company. The reduction or elimination of the Fund’s holdings in the company may have an adverse impact on the liquidity of the Fund’s overall portfolio holdings and on Fund performance.

Issuer Risk: Fund performance depends on the performance of individual companies in which the Fund invests. Changes to the financial condition of any of those companies may cause the value of such company's securities to decline.

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Market Risk: Turbulence in the financial markets and reduced liquidity may negatively affect issuers, which could have an adverse effect on the Fund. If the securities held by the Fund experience poor liquidity, the Fund may be unable to transact at advantageous times or prices, which may decrease the Fund’s returns. In addition, there is a risk that policy changes by central governments and governmental agencies, including the U.S. Federal Reserve or the European Central Bank, which could include increasing interest rates, could cause increased volatility in financial markets and lead to higher levels of Fund redemptions from Authorized Participants, which could have a negative impact on the Fund. Furthermore, local, regional or global events such as war, acts of terrorism, the spread of infectious illness or other public health issues, recessions, or other events could have a significant impact on the Fund and its investments and trading of its Shares. For example, at the start of 2023, central banks had already increased interest rates at the fastest rate on record, and it is unknown how long this trend will continue and when inflation will return to target levels. This increases the risk that monetary policy may provide less support should economic growth slow. Additionally, China’s shift away from a zero-COVID policy creates both opportunities and risks, causing uncertainty for global economic growth. Market risk factors may result in increased volatility and/or decreased liquidity in the securities markets. The Fund’s NAV could decline over short periods due to short-term market movements and over longer periods during market downturns.

Non-Diversification Risk: The Fund is classified as a “non-diversified” investment company under the Investment Company Act of 1940 ("1940 Act"). As a result, the Fund is subject to the risk that it may be more volatile than a diversified fund because the Fund may invest its assets in a smaller number of issuers or may invest a larger proportion of its assets in a single issuer. As a result, the gains and losses on a single investment may have a greater impact on the Fund’s NAV and may make the Fund more volatile than more diversified funds.

Operational Risk: The Fund is exposed to operational risk arising from a number of factors, including but not limited to human error, processing and communication errors, errors of the Fund's service providers, counterparties or other third-parties, failed or inadequate processes and technology or systems failures. Additionally, cyber security failures or breaches of the electronic systems of the Fund, the Adviser, and the Fund's other service providers, market makers, Authorized Participants or the issuers of securities in which the Fund invests have the ability to cause disruptions and negatively impact the Fund's business operations, potentially resulting in financial losses to the Fund and its shareholders. The Fund and the Adviser seek to reduce these operational risks through controls and procedures. However, these measures do not address every possible risk and may be inadequate for those risks that they are intended to address.

Passive Investment Risk: The Fund is not actively managed, and the Adviser does not attempt to take defensive positions in declining markets. Unlike many investment companies, the Fund does not seek to outperform its Underlying Index. Therefore, it would not necessarily buy or sell a security unless that security is added or removed, respectively, from the Underlying Index, even if that security generally is underperforming. Additionally, if a constituent of the Underlying Index were removed, even outside of a regular rebalance of the Underlying Index, the Adviser anticipates that the Fund would sell such security. Maintaining investments in securities regardless of market conditions or the performance of individual securities could cause the Fund’s return to be lower than if the Fund employed an active strategy.

Index-Related Risk: There is no guarantee that the Fund will achieve a high degree of correlation to the Underlying Index and therefore achieve its investment objective. Market disruptions and regulatory restrictions could have an adverse effect on the Fund’s ability to adjust its exposure to the required levels in order to track the Underlying Index. Errors in index data, index computations and/or the construction of the Underlying Index in accordance with its methodology may occur from time to time and may not be identified and corrected by the Index Provider for a period of time or at all, which may have an adverse impact on the Fund and its shareholders.

Management Risk: The Fund may not fully replicate its Underlying Index and may hold securities not included in its Underlying Index. The Adviser’s investment strategy, the implementation of which is subject to a number of constraints, may cause the Fund to underperform the market or its relevant benchmark or adversely affect the ability of the Fund to achieve its investment objective.

Tracking Error Risk: Tracking error may occur because of differences between the instruments held in the Fund's portfolio and those included in the Underlying Index, pricing differences, transaction costs incurred by the Fund, the Fund's holding of uninvested cash, size of the Fund, differences in timing of the accrual of or the valuation of dividends or interest, tax gains or losses, changes to the Underlying Index or the costs to the Fund of complying with various new or existing regulatory requirements. This risk may be heightened during times of increased market volatility or other unusual market conditions. Tracking error also may result because the Fund incurs fees and expenses, while the Underlying Index does not. ETFs that track indices with significant weight in emerging markets issuers may experience higher tracking error than other ETFs that do not track such indices.

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Reliance on Trading Partners Risk: The Fund invests in the Chinese economy, which is heavily dependent upon trading with key partners. Any reduction in this trading, including as a result of adverse economic conditions in a trading partner's economy, may cause an adverse impact on the Chinese economy in which the Fund invests. Through its portfolio companies' trading partners, the Fund is specifically exposed to Asian Economic Risk, European Economic Risk, and North American Economic Risk.

Risks Associated with Exchange-Traded Funds: As an ETF, the Fund is subject to the following risks:

Authorized Participants Concentration Risk: The Fund has a limited number of financial institutions that may act as Authorized Participants and engage in creation or redemption transactions directly with the Fund, and none of those Authorized Participants is obligated to engage in creation and/or redemption transactions. To the extent that those Authorized Participants exit the business or are unable to process creation and/or redemption orders, such as in times of market stress, Shares may be more likely to trade at a premium or discount to NAV and/or at wider intraday bid-ask spreads, and possibly face trading halts and/or delisting from an exchange. Authorized Participants Concentration Risk may be heightened because the Fund invests in non-U.S. securities.

Large Shareholder Risk: Redemptions by large shareholders could have a significant negative impact on the Fund. If a large shareholder were to redeem all, or a large portion, of its Shares, there is no guarantee that the Fund will be able to maintain sufficient assets to continue operations in which case the Board of Trustees may determine to liquidate the Fund. In addition, transactions by large shareholders may account for a large percentage of the trading volume on a national securities exchange and may, therefore, have a material upward or downward effect on the market price of the Shares.

Listing Standards Risk: The Fund is required to comply with listing requirements adopted by the listing exchange. Non-compliance with such requirements may result in the Fund's shares being delisted by the listing exchange. Any resulting liquidation of the Fund could cause the Fund to incur elevated transaction costs and could result in negative tax consequences for its shareholders.

Market Trading Risks and Premium/Discount Risks: Shares of the Fund are publicly traded on a national securities exchange, which may subject shareholders to numerous market trading risks. In stressed market conditions, the market for the Shares may become less liquid in response to the deteriorating liquidity of the Fund’s portfolio. This adverse effect on the liquidity of the Shares, as well as disruptions to creations and redemptions, the existence of extreme market volatility or potential lack of assets in the Fund or an active trading market for Shares may result in Shares trading at a significant premium or discount to NAV. If a shareholder purchases Shares at a time when the market price is at a premium to the NAV or sells Shares at a time when the market price is at a discount to the NAV, the shareholder may sustain losses. The NAV of the Fund is calculated at the end of each business day and fluctuates with changes in the market value of the Fund’s holdings. The trading price of the Fund’s shares fluctuates, in some cases materially, throughout trading hours in response to changes in the Fund’s NAV.

Risks Related to Stock Connect Programs: The Stock Connect Programs are subject to daily and aggregate quota limitations, which could affect the Fund’s ability to enter into and exit Stock Connect positions on a timely basis. The Shenzen and Shanghai markets may operate when the Stock Connect Programs are not active, and consequently the prices of shares held via Stock Connect Programs may fluctuate at times when the Fund is unable to add to or exit its positions. The Stock Connect Programs are new, and the effect of the introduction of large numbers of foreign investors on the market for trading Chinese-listed securities is not well understood. Regulations, such as limitations on redemptions or suspension of trading, may adversely impact the value of the Fund’s investments. The Fund's investments in A-Shares though the Stock Connect Program are held by its custodian in accounts in Central Clearing and Settlement System ("CCASS") maintained by the Hong Kong Securities Clearing Company Limited ("HKSCC"), which in turn holds the A-Shares, as the nominee holder, through an omnibus securities account in its name registered with the CSDCC. The precise nature and rights of the Fund as the beneficial owner of the SSE Securities or SZSE Securities through HKSCC as nominee is not well defined under Chinese law. There is no guarantee that the Shenzen, Shanghai, and Hong Kong Stock Exchanges will continue to support the Stock Connect Programs in the future.

Trading Halt Risk: An exchange or market may close or issue trading halts on specific securities, or the ability to buy or sell certain securities or financial instruments may be restricted, which may result in the Fund being unable to buy or sell certain securities or financial instruments. In such circumstances, the Fund may be unable to rebalance its portfolio, may be unable to accurately price its investments and/or may incur substantial trading losses.

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Turnover Risk: The Fund may engage in frequent and active trading, which may significantly increase the Fund’s portfolio turnover rate. At times, the Fund may have a portfolio turnover rate substantially greater than 100%. For example, a portfolio turnover rate of 300% is equivalent to the Fund buying and selling all of its securities three times during the course of a year. A high portfolio turnover rate would result in high brokerage costs for the Fund, may result in higher taxes when shares are held in a taxable account and lower Fund performance.

Valuation Risk: The sales price the Fund could receive for a security may differ from the Fund’s valuation of the security and may differ from the value used by the Underlying Index, particularly for securities that trade in low value or volatile markets or that are valued using a fair value methodology (such as during trading halts). The value of the securities in the Fund's portfolio may change on days when shareholders will not be able to purchase or sell the Fund's Shares.

PERFORMANCE INFORMATION
 
The bar chart and table that follow show how the Fund performed on a calendar year basis and provide an indication of the risks of investing in the Fund by showing changes in the Fund's performance from year to year and by showing how the Fund's average annual returns for the indicated periods compare with the Fund's benchmark index and a broad measure of market performance. On December 6, 2018, the name of the Fund changed from the Global X China Energy ETF to the Global X MSCI China Energy ETF to reflect a change to the Fund's Index Provider from Solactive AG to MSCI, Inc. and a change in the Fund's underlying index from the Solactive China Energy Total Return Index to the MSCI China Energy IMI Plus 10/50 Index. The Fund's past performance (before and after taxes) is not necessarily indicative of how the Fund will perform in the future. Updated performance information is available online at www.globalxetfs.com.
 
Annual Total Returns (Years Ended December 31)

 ck0001432353-20221031_g5.jpg
Best Quarter: 9/30/2021 27.30%
Worst Quarter: 3/31/2020 -24.63%


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Average Annual Total Returns (for the Periods Ended December 31, 2022)
  One Year Ended December 31, 2022 Five Years Ended December 31, 2022 Ten Years Ended December 31, 2022
Global X MSCI China Energy ETF:
·Return before taxes
26.67% 8.46% 2.84%
·Return after taxes on distributions1
26.04% 7.80% 2.24%
·Return after taxes on distributions and sale of Fund Shares1
17.20% 6.73% 2.19%
Hybrid MSCI China Energy IMI Plus 10/50 Index (net)2
(Index returns reflect invested dividends net of withholding taxes, but reflect no deduction for fees, expenses, or other taxes)
27.60% 9.55% 3.78%
MSCI Emerging Markets Index (net)
(Index returns reflect invested dividends net of withholding taxes, but reflect no deduction for fees, expenses, or other taxes)
-20.09% -1.40% 1.44%

1     After-tax returns are calculated using the historical highest individual U.S. federal marginal income tax rates and do not reflect the impact of state and local taxes. Your actual after-tax returns will depend on your specific tax situation and may differ from those shown above. After-tax returns are not relevant to investors who hold Shares of the Fund through tax-advantaged arrangements, such as 401(k) plans or individual retirement accounts (IRAs).

2     Hybrid index performance reflects the performance of the Solactive China Energy Total Return Index through December 5, 2018, and the MSCI China Energy IMI Plus 10/50 Index thereafter.

FUND MANAGEMENT
 
Investment Adviser: Global X Management Company LLC.
 
Portfolio Managers: The professionals primarily responsible for the day-to-day management of the Fund are Nam To, CFA; Wayne Xie; Kimberly Chan; Vanessa Yang; and Sandy Lu, CFA (“Portfolio Managers”). Mr. To has been a Portfolio Manager of the Fund since March 1, 2018. Mr. Xie has been a Portfolio Manager of the Fund since March 1, 2019. Ms. Chan has been a Portfolio Manager of the Fund since June 10, 2019. Ms. Yang has been a Portfolio Manager of the Fund since December 2020. Mr. Lu has been a Portfolio Manager of the Fund since March 2022.

PURCHASE AND SALE OF FUND SHARES
 
Shares of the Fund are or will be listed and traded at market prices on a national securities exchange. Shares may only be purchased and sold on the exchange through a broker-dealer. The price of Shares is based on market price, and because ETF shares trade at market prices rather than at NAV, Shares may trade at a price greater than NAV (a premium) or less than NAV (a discount). Only “Authorized Participants” (as defined in the SAI) who have entered into agreements with the Fund’s distributor, SEI Investments Distribution Co. (“Distributor”), may engage in creation or redemption transactions directly with the Fund. The Fund will only issue or redeem Shares that have been aggregated into blocks called Creation Units. The Fund will issue or redeem Creation Units in return for a basket of cash and/or securities that the Fund specifies any day that the national securities exchanges are open for business (“Business Day”). An investor may incur costs attributable to the difference between the highest price a buyer is willing to pay to purchase shares of the Fund (bid) and the lowest price a seller is willing to accept for shares of the Fund (ask) when buying or selling shares in the secondary market (the “bid-ask spread”). To access information regarding the Fund’s net asset value, market price, premiums and discounts, and bid-ask spreads, please go to https://www.globalxetfs.com.
 
TAX INFORMATION
 
The Fund intends to make distributions that may be taxable to you as ordinary income or capital gains, unless you are investing through a tax-advantaged arrangement, such as a 401(k) plan or an individual retirement account ("IRA"), in which case distributions from such tax-advantaged arrangement may be taxable to you.
 
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PAYMENTS TO BROKER-DEALERS AND OTHER FINANCIAL INTERMEDIARIES
 
The Adviser and its related companies may pay broker-dealers or other financial intermediaries (such as a bank) for the sale of Fund Shares and related services. These payments may create a conflict of interest by influencing your broker-dealer, sales persons or other intermediary or its employees or associated persons to recommend the Fund over another investment. Ask your financial adviser or visit your financial intermediary’s website for more information.


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Global X MSCI China Financials ETF
 
Ticker: CHIX Exchange: NYSE Arca
 
INVESTMENT OBJECTIVE
 
The Global X MSCI China Financials ETF ("Fund") seeks to provide investment results that correspond generally to the price and yield performance, before fees and expenses, of the MSCI China Financials 10/50 Index ("Underlying Index").
 
FEES AND EXPENSES
 
This table describes the fees and expenses that you may pay if you buy, hold, and sell shares (“Shares”) of the Fund. You may pay other fees, such as brokerage commissions and other fees to financial intermediaries, which are not reflected in the table and examples below.
 
Annual Fund Operating Expenses (expenses that you pay each year as a percentage of the value of your investment):
 
Management Fees: 0.65%
Distribution and Service (12b-1) Fees: None
Other Expenses: 0.01%
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses: 0.66%

Example: The following example is intended to help you compare the cost of investing in the Fund with the cost of investing in other funds. This example does not take into account customary brokerage commissions that you pay when purchasing or selling Shares of the Fund in the secondary market. The example assumes that you invest $10,000 in the Fund for the time periods indicated and then sell all of your Shares at the end of those periods. The example also assumes that your investment has a 5% return each year and that the Fund's operating expenses remain the same. Although your actual costs may be higher or lower, based on these assumptions, your costs would be:
 
One Year Three Years Five Years Ten Years
$67 $211 $368 $822
 
Portfolio Turnover: The Fund pays transaction costs, such as commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or "turns over" its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover rate may indicate higher transaction costs and may result in higher taxes when Shares are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are not reflected in annual fund operating expenses or in the example, affect the Fund's performance. During the most recent fiscal year, the Fund's portfolio turnover rate was 37.97% of the average value of its portfolio.
 
PRINCIPAL INVESTMENT STRATEGIES
 
The Fund invests at least 80% of its total assets in the securities of the MSCI China Financials 10/50 Index ("Underlying Index") and in American Depositary Receipts ("ADRs") and Global Depositary Receipts ("GDRs") based on the securities in the Underlying Index. The Fund also invests at least 80% of its total assets in securities of financials companies that are economically tied to China. For purposes of this policy, financials companies include those companies that are classified in the financials sector under the Global Industry Classification System ("GICS"). The Fund's 80% investment policies are non-fundamental and require 60 days prior written notice to shareholders before they can be changed. The Fund may lend securities representing up to one-third of the value of the Fund’s total assets (including the value of the collateral received).
 
The Underlying Index tracks the performance of companies in the MSCI China Index (the "Parent Index") that are classified in the financials sector, as defined by MSCI, Inc. ("MSCI") the provider of the Underlying Index ("Index Provider"). The Parent Index is a free float-adjusted market capitalization-weighted index designed to measure the performance of securities that are classified as operating in China according to the MSCI Global Investable Markets Index Methodology, and that satisfy minimum market capitalization and liquidity thresholds. The securities eligible for inclusion in the Underlying Index include H-Shares (securities of companies incorporated in China that are denominated in Hong Kong Dollars and listed on the Hong Kong Stock Exchange (the "HKSE")), B-Shares (securities of companies denominated in U.S. dollars or Hong Kong dollars and listed on Shanghai Stock Exchange (the "SSE") or Shenzen Stock Exchange (the "SZSE")), Red Chips (securities of companies with a
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majority of their business operations in mainland China and that are controlled by the national government or local governments of China, traded on the HKSE in Hong Kong dollars), P-Chips (securities of companies with the majority of their business operations in mainland China and controlled by individuals in China, but that are incorporated outside of China), A-Shares (securities of companies incorporated in mainland China that trade on Chinese exchanges in renminbi) that are accessible through the Shanghai-Hong Kong Stock Connect program ("Shanghai Connect") or the Shenzhen-Hong Kong Stock Connect program ("Shenzhen Connect", and together with Shanghai Connect, "Stock Connect Programs"), and foreign listings such as American Depository Receipts ("ADRs"). The Stock Connect Programs are securities trading and clearing programs that aim to achieve mutual stock market access between China and Hong Kong. Under Stock Connect, the Fund's trading of eligible A-shares listed on the SSE or the SZSE, as applicable, would be effectuated through its Hong Kong brokers. Trading through the Stock Connect Programs is subject to a daily quota, which limits the maximum net purchases under Stock Connect Programs each day, and as such, buy orders for A-shares would be rejected once the daily quota is exceeded (although the Fund will be permitted to sell A-shares regardless of the daily quota balance). The daily quota is not specific to the Fund. From time to time, other stock exchanges in China may participate in Stock Connect, and A-shares listed and traded on such other stock exchanges and accessible through Stock Connect may be added to the Underlying Index, as determined by MSCI.

The Underlying Index then follows a rules-based methodology that is designed to select all constituents of the Parent Index that are classified in the financials sector under the GICS. The Underlying Index is weighted according to each component's free-float adjusted market capitalization, but is modified so that, as of the rebalance date, no group entity (defined by the Index Provider as companies with a controlling stake owned by one entity) constitutes more than 10% of the Underlying Index and so that, in the aggregate, the individual group entities that would represent more than 5% of the Underlying Index represent no more than 50% of the Underlying Index ("10/50 Cap"). The Underlying Index is reconstituted and re-weighted quarterly. The Underlying Index may include large- and mid-capitalization companies. As of December 31, 2022, the Underlying Index had 92 constituents. The Fund's investment objective and Underlying Index may be changed without shareholder approval.
 
The Fund generally will use a replication strategy. A replication strategy is an indexing strategy that involves investing in the securities of the Underlying Index in approximately the same proportions as in the Underlying Index. However, the Fund may utilize a representative sampling strategy with respect to the Underlying Index when a replication strategy might be detrimental or disadvantageous to shareholders, such as when there are practical difficulties or substantial costs involved in compiling a portfolio of equity securities to replicate the Underlying Index, in instances in which a security in the Underlying Index becomes temporarily illiquid, unavailable or less liquid, or as a result of legal restrictions or limitations (such as tax diversification requirements) that apply to the Fund but not the Underlying Index.
  
The Adviser expects that, over time, the correlation between the Fund's performance and that of the Underlying Index, before fees and expenses, will exceed 95%. A correlation percentage of 100% would indicate perfect correlation. If the Fund uses a replication strategy, it can be expected to have greater correlation to the Underlying Index than if it uses a representative sampling strategy.
 
The Fund concentrates its investments (i.e., holds 25% or more of its total assets) in a particular industry or group of industries to approximately the same extent that the Underlying Index is concentrated. As of December 31, 2022, the Underlying Index was concentrated in the banking industry and had significant exposure to the financials sector.
 
SUMMARY OF PRINCIPAL RISKS
 
As with any investment, you could lose all or part of your investment in the Fund, and the Fund’s performance could trail that of other investments. There is no guarantee that the Fund will achieve its investment objective. An investment in the Fund is not a bank deposit and it is not insured or guaranteed by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation or any other government agency, the Adviser or any of its affiliates. The Fund is subject to the principal risks noted below, any of which may adversely affect the Fund’s net asset value (“NAV”), trading price, yield, total return and ability to meet its investment objective, as well as other risks that are described in greater detail in the Additional Information About the Funds section of this Prospectus and in the Statement of Additional Information (“SAI”). The order of the below risk factors does not indicate the significance of any particular risk factor.

Asset Class Risk: Securities and other assets in the Underlying Index or otherwise held in the Fund's portfolio may underperform in comparison to the general securities markets, a particular securities market or other asset classes.

China A-Shares Risk: A-Shares are issued by companies incorporated in mainland China and are traded on Chinese exchanges. Foreign investors can access A-Shares by obtaining a Qualified Foreign Institutional Investor ("QFII") or a Renminbi Qualified Foreign Institutional Investor ("RQFII") license, as well as through the Stock Connect Program, which is a securities trading and clearing program with an aim to achieve mutual stock market access between the
46


China and Hong Kong markets. Stock Connect was developed by Hong Kong Exchanges and Clearing Limited, the Shanghai Stock Exchange ("SSE") (in the case of Shanghai Connect) or the Shenzhen Stock Exchange ("SZSE") (in the case of Shenzhen Connect), and the China Securities Depository and Clearing Corporation Limited (“CSDCC”). The Fund currently intends to gain exposure to A-Shares through the Stock Connect Programs. Investments in A-Shares are subject to various regulations and limits, and the recoupment or repatriation of assets invested in A-Shares is subject to restrictions by the Chinese government. In addition, investors from outside mainland China may face difficulties or prohibitions accessing certain A-Shares that are part of a restricted list in countries such as the U.S. A-Shares may be subject to frequent and widespread trading halts and may become illiquid. Trading suspensions in certain stock could lead to greater market execution risk and costs for the Fund, and the creation and redemption of Creation Units (as defined below) may also be disrupted. These risks, among others, could adversely affect the value of the Fund’s investments.

Equity Securities Risk: Equity securities are subject to changes in value, and their values may be more volatile than other asset classes, as a result of such factors as a company’s business performance, investor perceptions, stock market trends and general economic conditions.

Capitalization Risk: Investing in issuers within the same market capitalization category carries the risk that the category may be out of favor due to current market conditions or investor sentiment.

Large-Capitalization Companies Risk: Large-capitalization companies may trail the returns of the overall stock market. Large-capitalization stocks tend to go through cycles of doing better - or worse - than the stock market in general. These periods have, in the past, lasted for as long as several years.

Mid-Capitalization Companies Risk: Mid-capitalization companies may have greater price volatility, lower trading volume and less liquidity than large-capitalization companies. In addition, mid-capitalization companies may have smaller revenues, narrower product lines, less management depth and experience, smaller shares of their product or service markets, fewer financial resources and less competitive strength than large-capitalization companies.

Cash Transaction Risk: Unlike most exchange-traded funds ("ETFs"), the Fund intends to effect a significant portion of creations and redemptions for cash, rather than in-kind securities. As a result, an investment in the Fund may be less tax-efficient than an investment in a more conventional ETF. Moreover, cash transactions may have to be carried out over several days if the securities market is relatively illiquid and may involve considerable brokerage fees and taxes. These factors may result in wider spreads between the bid and the offered prices of the Fund’s Shares than for more conventional ETFs.

Currency Risk: The Fund may invest in securities denominated in foreign currencies. Because the Fund's NAV is determined in U.S. dollars, the Fund's NAV could decline if the Chinese yuan depreciates against the U.S. dollar or if there are delays or limits on repatriation of such currency. Currency exchange rates can be very volatile and can change quickly and unpredictably. As a result, the Fund's NAV may change quickly and without warning, which could have a significant negative impact on the Fund. Additionally, the Chinese government heavily regulates the domestic exchange of foreign currencies and yuan exchange rates in China, which may adversely affect the operations and financial results of the Fund’s investments in China. Shares purchased through the Stock Connect Programs will be purchased using offshore yuan, the value of which may differ from and experience greater volatility than the value of onshore yuan. Offshore yuan cannot be freely remitted into or transferred out of China, and there is no assurance that there will always be sufficient amounts of offshore yuan available for the Fund to invest in all components of the Underlying Index.

Custody Risk: The Fund may hold foreign securities and cash with foreign banks, agents, and securities depositories appointed by the Fund's custodian. Investments in emerging markets may be subject to even greater custody risks than investments in more developed markets. Less developed markets are more likely to experience problems with the clearing and settling of trades and the holding of securities by local banks, agents and depositories.

Focus Risk: To the extent that the Underlying Index focuses in investments related to a particular industry or group of industries, the Fund will also focus its investments to approximately the same extent. Similarly, if the Underlying Index has significant exposure to one or more sectors, the Fund’s investments will likely have significant exposure to such sectors. In such event, the Fund’s performance will be particularly susceptible to adverse events impacting such industry or sector, which may include, but are not limited to, the following: general economic conditions or cyclical market patterns that could negatively affect supply and demand; competition for resources; adverse labor relations; political or world events; obsolescence of technologies; and increased competition or new product introductions that may affect the profitability or viability of companies in a particular industry or sector. As a result, the value of the Fund’s investments may rise and fall more than the value of shares of a fund that invests in securities of companies in a broader range of industries or sectors.
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Risks Related to Investing in the Banking Industry: The performance of stocks in the banking industry may be affected by extensive governmental regulation which may limit both the amounts and types of loans and other financial commitments they can make, and the interest rates and fees they can charge and the amount of capital they must maintain. Profitability is largely dependent on the availability and cost of capital funds and can fluctuate significantly when interest rates change. Credit losses resulting from financial difficulties of borrowers can negatively impact banking companies. Banks may also be subject to severe price competition. Competition is high among banking companies and failure to maintain or increase market share may result in lost market value. The impact of changes in capital requirements and recent or future regulation of any individual banking company, or of the financials sector as a whole, cannot be predicted. In recent years, cyberattacks and technology malfunctions and failures have become increasingly frequent in this sector and have caused significant losses to companies in this sector, which may negatively impact the Fund.

Risks Related to Investing in the Financials Sector: Performance of companies in the financials sector may be adversely impacted by many factors, including, among others, government regulations, economic conditions, credit rating downgrades, changes in interest rates, and decreased liquidity in credit markets. This sector has experienced significant losses in the past, and the impact of more stringent capital requirements and of current or future regulation on any individual financial company or on the sector as a whole cannot be predicted. In recent years, cyber-attacks and technology malfunctions and failures have become increasingly frequent in this sector and have caused significant losses to companies in this sector, which may negatively impact the Fund.

Foreign Securities Risk: The Fund may invest, within U.S. regulations, in foreign securities. The Fund's investments in foreign securities can be riskier than U.S. securities investments. Investments in the securities of foreign issuers (including investments in ADRs and GDRs) are subject to the risks associated with investing in those foreign markets, such as heightened risks of inflation or nationalization. The prices of foreign securities and the prices of U.S. securities have, at times, moved in opposite directions. In addition, securities of foreign issuers may lose value due to political, economic and geographic events affecting a foreign issuer or market. During periods of social, political or economic instability in a country or region, the value of a foreign security traded on U.S. exchanges could be affected by, among other things, increasing price volatility, illiquidity, or the closure of the primary market on which the security (or the security underlying the ADR or GDR) is traded. You may lose money due to political, economic and geographic events affecting a foreign issuer or market. Where all or a portion of the Fund's underlying securities trade in a market that is closed when the market in which the Fund's shares are listed and trading is open, there may be differences between the last quote from the security’s closed foreign market and the value of the security during the Fund’s domestic trading day. This in turn could lead to differences between the market price of the Fund’s shares and the underlying value of those shares.

Geographic Risk: A natural, biological or other disaster could occur in a geographic region in which the Fund invests, which could affect the economy or particular business operations of companies in the specific geographic region, causing an adverse impact on the Fund’s investments in the affected region or in a region economically tied to the affected region. The securities in which the Fund invests and, consequently, the Fund are also subject to specific risks as a result of their business operations, including, but not limited to:

Risk of Investing in China: Investment exposure to China subjects the Fund to risks specific to China.

Economic, Political and Social Risk
China may be subject to considerable degrees of economic, political and social instability. Concerns about the rising government and household debt levels could impact the stability of the Chinese economy. China is an emerging market and demonstrates significantly higher volatility from time to time in comparison to developed markets. Over the last few decades, the Chinese government has undertaken reform of economic and market practices, including recent reforms to liberalize its capital markets and expand the sphere for private ownership of property in China. However, Chinese markets generally continue to experience inefficiency, volatility and pricing anomalies resulting from governmental influence, a lack of publicly available information and/or political and social instability. Chinese companies are also subject to the risk that Chinese authorities can intervene in their operations and structure. Internal social unrest or confrontations with other neighboring countries, including military conflicts in response to such events, may also disrupt economic development in China and result in a greater risk of currency fluctuations, currency convertibility, interest rate fluctuations and higher rates of inflation.

China has experienced major health crises. These health crises include, but are not limited to, the rapid and pandemic spread of novel viruses commonly known as SARS, MERS, and COVID-19 (Coronavirus). Such health crises could exacerbate political, social, and economic risks previously mentioned.

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Export growth continues to be a major driver of China’s rapid economic growth. Elevated trade tensions between China and its trading partners, including the imposition of U.S. tariffs on certain Chinese goods and increased international pressure related to Chinese trade policy and forced technology transfers and intellectual property protections, may have a substantial impact on the Chinese economy. Reduction in spending on Chinese products and services, institution of additional tariffs or other trade barriers (including as a result of heightened trade tensions between China and the U.S. or in response to actual or alleged Chinese cyber activity), or a downturn in any of the economies of China’s key trading partners may have an adverse impact on the Chinese economy. The continuation or worsening of the current political climate between China and the U.S. could result in additional regulatory restrictions being contemplated or imposed in the U.S. or in China that could impact the Fund’s ability to invest in certain companies.

Security Risk
China has experienced security concerns, such as terrorism and strained international relations. Additionally, China is alleged to have participated in state-sponsored cyberattacks against foreign companies and foreign governments. Actual and threatened responses to such activity, including purchasing restrictions, sanctions, tariffs or cyberattacks on the Chinese government or Chinese companies, may impact China’s economy and Chinese issuers of securities in which the Fund invests. Incidents involving China’s or the region’s security, including the contagion of infectious viruses or diseases, may cause uncertainty in Chinese markets and may adversely affect the Chinese economy and the Fund’s investments.

Heavy Government Control and Regulation
Chinese companies, including Chinese companies that are listed on U.S. exchanges, are not subject to the same degree of regulatory requirements, accounting standards or auditor oversight as companies in more developed countries, and as a result, information about the Chinese securities in which the Fund invests may be less reliable or complete. There may be significant obstacles to obtaining information necessary for investigations into or litigation against Chinese companies and shareholders may have limited legal remedies. Investments in China may be subject to loss due to expropriation or nationalization of assets and property or the imposition of restrictions on foreign investments and repatriation of capital. Furthermore, government actions against leaders or other key figures within companies, or speculation about such actions, may lead to sudden and unpredictable falls in the value of securities within the Fund.

Tax Risk
China has implemented a number of tax reforms in recent years and may amend or revise its existing tax laws and/or procedures in the future, possibly with retroactive effect. Changes in applicable Chinese tax law could reduce the after-tax profits of the Fund, directly or indirectly, including by reducing the after-tax profits of companies in China in which the Fund invests. Uncertainties in Chinese tax rules could result in unexpected tax liabilities for the Fund. Should legislation limit U.S. investors’ ability to invest in specific Chinese companies through A-shares or other share class listings that are part of the underlying holdings, these shares may be excluded from Fund holdings.

Special Risk Considerations of Investing in China – Variable Interest Entity Investments
For purposes of raising capital offshore on exchanges outside of China, including on U.S. exchanges, many Chinese-based operating companies are structured as Variable Interest Entities (“VIEs”). In this structure, the Chinese-based operating company is the VIE and establishes a shell company in a foreign jurisdiction, such as the Cayman Islands. The shell company lists on a foreign exchange and enters into contractual arrangements with the VIE. This structure allows Chinese companies in which the Chinese government restricts foreign ownership to raise capital from foreign investors. While the shell company has no equity ownership of the VIE, these contractual arrangements permit the shell company to consolidate the VIE’s financial statements with its own for accounting purposes and provide for economic exposure to the performance of the underlying Chinese operating company. Therefore, an investor in the listed shell company, such as the Fund, will have exposure to the Chinese-based operating company only through contractual arrangements and has no ownership in the Chinese-based operating company. Furthermore, because the shell company only has specific rights provided for in these service agreements with the VIE, its abilities to control the activities at the Chinese-based operating company are limited and the operating company may engage in activities that negatively impact investment value.

While the VIE structure has been widely adopted, it is not formally recognized under Chinese law and therefore there is a risk that the Chinese government could prohibit the existence of such structures or negatively impact the VIE’s contractual arrangements with the listed shell company by making them invalid. If these contracts were found to be unenforceable under Chinese law, investors in the listed shell company, such as the Fund, may suffer significant losses with little or no recourse available. If the Chinese government determines that the agreements establishing the VIE structures do not comply with Chinese law and regulations, including those related to restrictions on foreign ownership, it could subject a Chinese-based issuer to penalties, revocation of business and operating licenses, or forfeiture of ownership interest. In addition, the listed shell company’s control over a VIE may also be jeopardized if a natural person who holds the equity interest in the VIE breaches the terms of the agreement, is subject to legal proceedings or if any physical instruments for authenticating documentation, such as chops and seals, are used without
49


the Chinese-based issuer’s authorization to enter into contractual arrangements in China. Chops and seals, which are carved stamps used to sign documents, represent a legally binding commitment by the company. Moreover, any future regulatory action may prohibit the ability of the shell company to receive the economic benefits of the Chinese-based operating company, which may cause the value of the Fund’s investment in the listed shell company to suffer a significant loss. For example, in 2021, the Chinese government prohibited use of the VIE structure for investment in after-school tutoring companies. There is no guarantee that the Chinese government will not place similar restrictions on other industries.

Chinese equities that utilize the VIE structure to list in the U.S. as ADRs face the risk of regulatory action from U.S. authorities, including the risk of delisting. This will depend in part on whether U.S. regulatory authorities are satisfied with their access to Mainland China and Hong Kong for the purpose of conducting inspections on the quality of audits for these companies. Although the U.S. and China reached an agreement in September 2022 to grant the U.S. access for such inspections, there is no guarantee that the agreement will hold up or that U.S. regulatory authorities will continue to feel satisfied with their access.

Risk of Investing in Emerging Markets: As of the date of this Prospectus, China is an emerging market country. Investments in emerging markets may be subject to a greater risk of loss than investments in developed markets. Securities markets of emerging market countries are less liquid, subject to greater price volatility, have smaller market capitalizations, have less government regulation, and are not subject to as extensive and frequent accounting, financial, and other reporting requirements as the securities markets of more developed countries, and there may be greater risk associated with the custody of securities in emerging markets. It may be difficult or impossible for the Fund to pursue claims against an emerging market issuer in the courts of an emerging market country. There may be significant obstacles to obtaining information necessary for investigations into or litigation against emerging market companies and shareholders may have limited legal rights and remedies. Emerging markets may be more likely to experience inflation, political turmoil and rapid changes in economic conditions than more developed markets. Emerging market economies’ exposure to specific industries, such as tourism, and lack of efficient or sufficient health care systems, could make these economies especially vulnerable to global crises, including but not limited to, pandemics such as the global COVID-19 pandemic. Certain emerging market countries may have privatized, or have begun the process of privatizing, certain entities and industries. Privatized entities may lose money or be re-nationalized.

Risk of Investing in Hong Kong: Investments in Hong Kong issuers may subject the Fund to legal, regulatory, political, currency, security, and economic risk specific to Hong Kong. China is Hong Kong’s largest trading partner, both in terms of exports and imports. Any changes in the Chinese economy, trade regulations or currency exchange rates, or a tightening of China’s control over Hong Kong, including in connection with recent protests and unrest, may have an adverse impact on Hong Kong’s economy.

International Closed Market Trading Risk: To the extent that the underlying investments held by the Fund trade on foreign exchanges that may be closed when the securities exchange on which the Fund’s Shares trade is open, there are likely to be deviations between the current price of such an underlying security and the last quoted price for the underlying security (i.e., the Fund’s quote from the closed foreign market). These deviations could result in premiums or discounts to the Fund’s NAV that may be greater than those experienced by other exchange-traded funds ("ETFs").

Issuer Risk: Fund performance depends on the performance of individual companies in which the Fund invests. Changes to the financial condition of any of those companies may cause the value of such company's securities to decline.

Market Risk: Turbulence in the financial markets and reduced liquidity may negatively affect issuers, which could have an adverse effect on the Fund. If the securities held by the Fund experience poor liquidity, the Fund may be unable to transact at advantageous times or prices, which may decrease the Fund’s returns. In addition, there is a risk that policy changes by central governments and governmental agencies, including the U.S. Federal Reserve or the European Central Bank, which could include increasing interest rates, could cause increased volatility in financial markets and lead to higher levels of Fund redemptions from Authorized Participants, which could have a negative impact on the Fund. Furthermore, local, regional or global events such as war, acts of terrorism, the spread of infectious illness or other public health issues, recessions, or other events could have a significant impact on the Fund and its investments and trading of its Shares. For example, at the start of 2023, central banks had already increased interest rates at the fastest rate on record, and it is unknown how long this trend will continue and when inflation will return to target levels. This increases the risk that monetary policy may provide less support should economic growth slow. Additionally, China’s shift away from a zero-COVID policy creates both opportunities and risks, causing uncertainty for global economic growth. Market risk factors may result in increased volatility and/or decreased liquidity in the securities markets. The Fund’s NAV could decline over short periods due to short-term market movements and over longer periods during market downturns.

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Non-Diversification Risk: The Fund is classified as a “non-diversified” investment company under the Investment Company Act of 1940 ("1940 Act"). As a result, the Fund is subject to the risk that it may be more volatile than a diversified fund because the Fund may invest its assets in a smaller number of issuers or may invest a larger proportion of its assets in a single issuer. As a result, the gains and losses on a single investment may have a greater impact on the Fund’s NAV and may make the Fund more volatile than more diversified funds.

Operational Risk: The Fund is exposed to operational risk arising from a number of factors, including but not limited to human error, processing and communication errors, errors of the Fund's service providers, counterparties or other third-parties, failed or inadequate processes and technology or systems failures. Additionally, cyber security failures or breaches of the electronic systems of the Fund, the Adviser, and the Fund's other service providers, market makers, Authorized Participants or the issuers of securities in which the Fund invests have the ability to cause disruptions and negatively impact the Fund's business operations, potentially resulting in financial losses to the Fund and its shareholders. The Fund and the Adviser seek to reduce these operational risks through controls and procedures. However, these measures do not address every possible risk and may be inadequate for those risks that they are intended to address.

Passive Investment Risk: The Fund is not actively managed, and the Adviser does not attempt to take defensive positions in declining markets. Unlike many investment companies, the Fund does not seek to outperform its Underlying Index. Therefore, it would not necessarily buy or sell a security unless that security is added or removed, respectively, from the Underlying Index, even if that security generally is underperforming. Additionally, if a constituent of the Underlying Index were removed, even outside of a regular rebalance of the Underlying Index, the Adviser anticipates that the Fund would sell such security. Maintaining investments in securities regardless of market conditions or the performance of individual securities could cause the Fund’s return to be lower than if the Fund employed an active strategy.

Index-Related Risk: There is no guarantee that the Fund will achieve a high degree of correlation to the Underlying Index and therefore achieve its investment objective. Market disruptions and regulatory restrictions could have an adverse effect on the Fund’s ability to adjust its exposure to the required levels in order to track the Underlying Index. Errors in index data, index computations and/or the construction of the Underlying Index in accordance with its methodology may occur from time to time and may not be identified and corrected by the Index Provider for a period of time or at all, which may have an adverse impact on the Fund and its shareholders.

Management Risk: The Fund may not fully replicate its Underlying Index and may hold securities not included in its Underlying Index. The Adviser’s investment strategy, the implementation of which is subject to a number of constraints, may cause the Fund to underperform the market or its relevant benchmark or adversely affect the ability of the Fund to achieve its investment objective.

Tracking Error Risk: Tracking error may occur because of differences between the instruments held in the Fund's portfolio and those included in the Underlying Index, pricing differences, transaction costs incurred by the Fund, the Fund's holding of uninvested cash, size of the Fund, differences in timing of the accrual of or the valuation of dividends or interest, tax gains or losses, changes to the Underlying Index or the costs to the Fund of complying with various new or existing regulatory requirements. This risk may be heightened during times of increased market volatility or other unusual market conditions. Tracking error also may result because the Fund incurs fees and expenses, while the Underlying Index does not. ETFs that track indices with significant weight in emerging markets issuers may experience higher tracking error than other ETFs that do not track such indices.

Reliance on Trading Partners Risk: The Fund invests in the Chinese economy, which is heavily dependent upon trading with key partners. Any reduction in this trading, including as a result of adverse economic conditions in a trading partner's economy, may cause an adverse impact on the Chinese economy in which the Fund invests. Through its portfolio companies' trading partners, the Fund is specifically exposed to Asian Economic Risk, European Economic Risk, and North American Economic Risk.

Risks Associated with Exchange-Traded Funds: As an ETF, the Fund is subject to the following risks:

Authorized Participants Concentration Risk: The Fund has a limited number of financial institutions that may act as Authorized Participants and engage in creation or redemption transactions directly with the Fund, and none of those Authorized Participants is obligated to engage in creation and/or redemption transactions. To the extent that those Authorized Participants exit the business or are unable to process creation and/or redemption orders, such as in times of market stress, Shares may be more likely to trade at a premium or discount to NAV and/or at wider intraday bid-ask spreads, and possibly face trading halts and/or delisting from an exchange. Authorized Participants Concentration Risk may be heightened because the Fund invests in non-U.S. securities.
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Large Shareholder Risk: Redemptions by large shareholders could have a significant negative impact on the Fund. If a large shareholder were to redeem all, or a large portion, of its Shares, there is no guarantee that the Fund will be able to maintain sufficient assets to continue operations in which case the Board of Trustees may determine to liquidate the Fund. In addition, transactions by large shareholders may account for a large percentage of the trading volume on a national securities exchange and may, therefore, have a material upward or downward effect on the market price of the Shares.

Listing Standards Risk: The Fund is required to comply with listing requirements adopted by the listing exchange. Non-compliance with such requirements may result in the Fund's shares being delisted by the listing exchange. Any resulting liquidation of the Fund could cause the Fund to incur elevated transaction costs and could result in negative tax consequences for its shareholders.

Market Trading Risks and Premium/Discount Risks: Shares of the Fund are publicly traded on a national securities exchange, which may subject shareholders to numerous market trading risks. In stressed market conditions, the market for the Shares may become less liquid in response to the deteriorating liquidity of the Fund’s portfolio. This adverse effect on the liquidity of the Shares, as well as disruptions to creations and redemptions, the existence of extreme market volatility or potential lack of assets in the Fund or an active trading market for Shares may result in Shares trading at a significant premium or discount to NAV. If a shareholder purchases Shares at a time when the market price is at a premium to the NAV or sells Shares at a time when the market price is at a discount to the NAV, the shareholder may sustain losses. The NAV of the Fund is calculated at the end of each business day and fluctuates with changes in the market value of the Fund’s holdings. The trading price of the Fund’s shares fluctuates, in some cases materially, throughout trading hours in response to changes in the Fund’s NAV.

Risks Related to Stock Connect Programs: The Stock Connect Programs are subject to daily and aggregate quota limitations, which could affect the Fund’s ability to enter into and exit Stock Connect positions on a timely basis. The Shenzen and Shanghai markets may operate when the Stock Connect Programs are not active, and consequently the prices of shares held via Stock Connect Programs may fluctuate at times when the Fund is unable to add to or exit its positions. The Stock Connect Programs are new, and the effect of the introduction of large numbers of foreign investors on the market for trading Chinese-listed securities is not well understood. Regulations, such as limitations on redemptions or suspension of trading, may adversely impact the value of the Fund’s investments. The Fund's investments in A-Shares though the Stock Connect Program are held by its custodian in accounts in Central Clearing and Settlement System ("CCASS") maintained by the Hong Kong Securities Clearing Company Limited ("HKSCC"), which in turn holds the A-Shares, as the nominee holder, through an omnibus securities account in its name registered with the CSDCC. The precise nature and rights of the Fund as the beneficial owner of the SSE Securities or SZSE Securities through HKSCC as nominee is not well defined under Chinese law. There is no guarantee that the Shenzen, Shanghai, and Hong Kong Stock Exchanges will continue to support the Stock Connect Programs in the future.

Securities Lending Risk: Securities lending involves a risk of loss because the borrower may fail to return the securities in a timely manner or at all. If the Fund is not able to recover the securities loaned, it may sell the collateral and purchase a replacement security in the market. Lending securities entails a risk of loss to the Fund if and to the extent that the market value of the loaned securities increases and the collateral is not increased accordingly. Additionally, the Fund will bear any loss on the investment of cash collateral it receives. These events could also trigger adverse tax consequences for the Fund. As securities on loan may not be voted by the Fund, there is a risk that the Fund may not be able to recall the securities in sufficient time to vote on material proxy matters.

Trading Halt Risk: An exchange or market may close or issue trading halts on specific securities, or the ability to buy or sell certain securities or financial instruments may be restricted, which may result in the Fund being unable to buy or sell certain securities or financial instruments. In such circumstances, the Fund may be unable to rebalance its portfolio, may be unable to accurately price its investments and/or may incur substantial trading losses.

Valuation Risk: The sales price the Fund could receive for a security may differ from the Fund’s valuation of the security and may differ from the value used by the Underlying Index, particularly for securities that trade in low value or volatile markets or that are valued using a fair value methodology (such as during trading halts). The value of the securities in the Fund's portfolio may change on days when shareholders will not be able to purchase or sell the Fund's Shares.

PERFORMANCE INFORMATION
 
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The bar chart and table that follow show how the Fund performed on a calendar year basis and provide an indication of the risks of investing in the Fund by showing changes in the Fund's performance from year to year and by showing how the Fund's average annual returns for the indicated periods compare with the Fund's benchmark index and a broad measure of market performance. On December 6, 2018, the name of the Fund changed from the Global X China Financials ETF to the Global X MSCI China Financials ETF to reflect a change to the Fund's Index Provider from Solactive AG to MSCI, Inc. and a change in the Fund's underlying index from the Solactive China Financials Total Return Index to the MSCI China Financials 10/50 Index. The Fund's past performance (before and after taxes) is not necessarily indicative of how the Fund will perform in the future. Updated performance information is available online at www.globalxetfs.com.
 
Annual Total Returns (Years Ended December 31)

 ck0001432353-20221031_g6.jpg
 
Best Quarter: 12/31/2014 24.46%
Worst Quarter: 9/30/2015 -25.28%
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Average Annual Total Returns (for the Periods Ended December 31, 2022)
  One Year Ended December 31, 2022 Five Years Ended December 31, 2022 Ten Years Ended December 31, 2022
Global X MSCI China Financials ETF:
·Return before taxes
-10.19% -4.10% 1.94%
·Return after taxes on distributions1
-11.14% -4.81% 1.36%
·Return after taxes on distributions and sale of Fund Shares1
-4.85% -2.78% 1.71%
Hybrid MSCI China Financials 10/50 Index (net)2
(Index returns reflect invested dividends net of withholding taxes, but reflect no deduction for fees, expenses, or other taxes)
-9.46% -3.45% 2.67%
MSCI Emerging Markets Index (net)
(Index returns reflect invested dividends net of withholding taxes, but reflect no deduction for fees, expenses, or other taxes)
-20.09% -1.40% 1.44%

1     After-tax returns are calculated using the historical highest individual U.S. federal marginal income tax rates and do not reflect the impact of state and local taxes. Your actual after-tax returns will depend on your specific tax situation and may differ from those shown above. After-tax returns are not relevant to investors who hold Shares of the Fund through tax-advantaged arrangements, such as 401(k) plans or individual retirement accounts (IRAs).

2     Hybrid index performance reflects the performance of the Solactive China Financials Total Return Index through December 5, 2018, and the MSCI China Financials 10/50 Index thereafter.

FUND MANAGEMENT
 
Investment Adviser: Global X Management Company LLC.
 
Portfolio Managers: The professionals primarily responsible for the day-to-day management of the Fund are Nam To, CFA; Wayne Xie; Kimberly Chan; Vanessa Yang; and Sandy Lu, CFA (“Portfolio Managers”). Mr. To has been a Portfolio Manager of the Fund since March 1, 2018. Mr. Xie has been a Portfolio Manager of the Fund since March 1, 2019. Ms. Chan has been a Portfolio Manager of the Fund since June 10, 2019. Ms. Yang has been a Portfolio Manager of the Fund since December 2020. Mr. Lu has been a Portfolio Manager of the Fund since March 2022.

PURCHASE AND SALE OF FUND SHARES
 
Shares of the Fund are or will be listed and traded at market prices on a national securities exchange. Shares may only be purchased and sold on the exchange through a broker-dealer. The price of Shares is based on market price, and because ETF shares trade at market prices rather than at NAV, Shares may trade at a price greater than NAV (a premium) or less than NAV (a discount). Only “Authorized Participants” (as defined in the SAI) who have entered into agreements with the Fund’s distributor, SEI Investments Distribution Co. (“Distributor”), may engage in creation or redemption transactions directly with the Fund. The Fund will only issue or redeem Shares that have been aggregated into blocks called Creation Units. The Fund will issue or redeem Creation Units in return for a basket of cash and/or securities that the Fund specifies any day that the national securities exchanges are open for business (“Business Day”). An investor may incur costs attributable to the difference between the highest price a buyer is willing to pay to purchase shares of the Fund (bid) and the lowest price a seller is willing to accept for shares of the Fund (ask) when buying or selling shares in the secondary market (the “bid-ask spread”). To access information regarding the Fund’s net asset value, market price, premiums and discounts, and bid-ask spreads, please go to https://www.globalxetfs.com.
 
TAX INFORMATION
 
The Fund intends to make distributions that may be taxable to you as ordinary income or capital gains, unless you are investing through a tax-advantaged arrangement, such as a 401(k) plan or an individual retirement account ("IRA"), in which case distributions from such tax-advantaged arrangement may be taxable to you.
 
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PAYMENTS TO BROKER-DEALERS AND OTHER FINANCIAL INTERMEDIARIES
 
The Adviser and its related companies may pay broker-dealers or other financial intermediaries (such as a bank) for the sale of Fund Shares and related services. These payments may create a conflict of interest by influencing your broker-dealer, sales persons or other intermediary or its employees or associated persons to recommend the Fund over another investment. Ask your financial adviser or visit your financial intermediary’s website for more information.
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Global X MSCI China Health Care ETF
 
Ticker: CHIH Exchange: NYSE Arca
 
INVESTMENT OBJECTIVE
 
The Global X MSCI China Health Care ETF ("Fund") seeks to provide investment results that correspond generally to the price and yield performance, before fees and expenses, of the MSCI China Health Care 10/50 Index ("Underlying Index").
 
FEES AND EXPENSES
 
This table describes the fees and expenses that you may pay if you buy, hold, and sell shares (“Shares”) of the Fund. You may pay other fees, such as brokerage commissions and other fees to financial intermediaries, which are not reflected in the table and examples below.
 
Annual Fund Operating Expenses (expenses that you pay each year as a percentage of the value of your investment):
 
Management Fees: 0.65%
Distribution and Service (12b-1) Fees: None
Other Expenses: 0.00%
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses: 0.65%

Example: The following example is intended to help you compare the cost of investing in the Fund with the cost of investing in other funds. This example does not take into account customary brokerage commissions that you pay when purchasing or selling Shares of the Fund in the secondary market. The example assumes that you invest $10,000 in the Fund for the time periods indicated and then sell all of your Shares at the end of those periods. The example also assumes that your investment has a 5% return each year and that the Fund's operating expenses remain the same. Although your actual costs may be higher or lower, based on these assumptions, your costs would be:
 
One Year Three Years Five Years Ten Years
$66 $208 $362 $810

Portfolio Turnover: The Fund pays transaction costs, such as commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or "turns over" its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover rate may indicate higher transaction costs and may result in higher taxes when Shares are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are not reflected in annual fund operating expenses or in the example, affect the Fund's performance. During the most recent fiscal year, the Fund's portfolio turnover rate was 20.49% of the average value of its portfolio.
 
PRINCIPAL INVESTMENT STRATEGIES
 
The Fund invests at least 80% of its total assets in the securities of the MSCI China Health Care 10/50 Index ("Underlying Index") and in American Depositary Receipts ("ADRs") and Global Depositary Receipts ("GDRs") based on the securities in the Underlying Index. The Fund's 80% investment policy is non-fundamental and requires 60 days prior written notice to shareholders before it can be changed.
 
The Underlying Index tracks the performance of companies in the MSCI China Index (the "Parent Index") that are classified in the health care sector, as defined by MSCI, Inc. ("MSCI") the provider of the Underlying Index ("Index Provider"). The Parent Index is a free float-adjusted market capitalization-weighted index designed to measure the performance of securities that are classified as operating in China according to the MSCI Global Investable Markets Index Methodology, and that satisfy minimum market capitalization and liquidity thresholds. The securities eligible for inclusion in the Underlying Index include H-Shares (securities of companies incorporated in China that are denominated in Hong Kong Dollars and listed on the Hong Kong Stock Exchange (the "HKSE")), B-Shares (securities of companies denominated in U.S. dollars or Hong Kong dollars and listed on Shanghai Stock Exchange (the "SSE") or Shenzen Stock Exchange (the "SZSE")), Red Chips (securities of companies with a majority of their business operations in mainland China and that are controlled by the national government or local governments of China, traded on the HKSE in Hong Kong dollars), P-Chips (securities of companies with the majority of their business operations in mainland China and controlled by individuals in China, but that are incorporated outside of China), A-
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Shares (securities of companies incorporated in mainland China that trade on Chinese exchanges in renminbi) that are accessible through the Shanghai-Hong Kong Stock Connect program ("Shanghai Connect") or the Shenzhen-Hong Kong Stock Connect program ("Shenzhen Connect", and together with Shanghai Connect, "Stock Connect Programs"), and foreign listings such as American Depository Receipts ("ADRs"). The Stock Connect Programs are securities trading and clearing programs that aim to achieve mutual stock market access between China and Hong Kong. Under Stock Connect, the Fund's trading of eligible A-shares listed on the SSE or the SZSE, as applicable, would be effectuated through its Hong Kong brokers. Trading through the Stock Connect Programs is subject to a daily quota, which limits the maximum net purchases under Stock Connect Programs each day, and as such, buy orders for A-shares would be rejected once the daily quota is exceeded (although the Fund will be permitted to sell A-shares regardless of the daily quota balance). The daily quota is not specific to the Fund. From time to time, other stock exchanges in China may participate in Stock Connect, and A-shares listed and traded on such other stock exchanges and accessible through Stock Connect may be added to the Underlying Index, as determined by MSCI.

The Underlying Index then follows a rules-based methodology that is designed to select all constituents of the Parent Index that are classified in the health care sector under the Global Industry Classification System ("GICS"). The Underlying Index is weighted according to each component's free-float adjusted market capitalization, but is modified so that, as of the rebalance date, no group entity (defined by the Index Provider as companies with a controlling stake owned by one entity) constitutes more than 10% of the Underlying Index and so that, in the aggregate, the individual group entities that would represent more than 5% of the Underlying Index represent no more than 50% of the Underlying Index ("10/50 Cap"). The Underlying Index is reconstituted and re-weighted quarterly. The Underlying Index may include large- and mid-capitalization companies. As of December 31, 2022, the Underlying Index had 79 constituents. The Fund's investment objective and Underlying Index may be changed without shareholder approval.

The Underlying Index is sponsored by the Index Provider, which is an organization that is independent of, and unaffiliated with, the Fund and Global X Management Company LLC, the investment adviser for the Fund ("Adviser"). The Index Provider determines the relative weightings of the securities in the Underlying Index and publishes information regarding the market value of the Underlying Index.

The Adviser uses a "passive" or indexing approach to try to achieve the Fund's investment objective. Unlike many investment companies, the Fund does not try to outperform the Underlying Index and does not seek temporary defensive positions when markets decline or appear overvalued.

The Fund generally will use a replication strategy. A replication strategy is an indexing strategy that involves investing in the securities of the Underlying Index in approximately the same proportions as in the Underlying Index. However, the Fund may utilize a representative sampling strategy with respect to the Underlying Index when a replication strategy might be detrimental or disadvantageous to shareholders, such as when there are practical difficulties or substantial costs involved in compiling a portfolio of equity securities to replicate the Underlying Index, in instances in which a security in the Underlying Index becomes temporarily illiquid, unavailable or less liquid, or as a result of legal restrictions or limitations (such as tax diversification requirements) that apply to the Fund but not the Underlying Index.

The Adviser expects that, over time, the correlation between the Fund's performance and that of the Underlying Index, before fees and expenses, will exceed 95%. A correlation percentage of 100% would indicate perfect correlation. If the Fund uses a replication strategy, it can be expected to have greater correlation to the Underlying Index than if it uses a representative sampling strategy.

The Fund concentrates its investments (i.e., holds 25% or more of its total assets) in a particular industry or group of industries to approximately the same extent that the Underlying Index is concentrated. As of December 31, 2022, the Underlying Index was concentrated in the pharmaceuticals industry and had significant exposure to the health care sector.
 
SUMMARY OF PRINCIPAL RISKS
 
As with any investment, you could lose all or part of your investment in the Fund, and the Fund’s performance could trail that of other investments. There is no guarantee that the Fund will achieve its investment objective. An investment in the Fund is not a bank deposit and it is not insured or guaranteed by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation or any other government agency, the Adviser or any of its affiliates. The Fund is subject to the principal risks noted below, any of which may adversely affect the Fund’s net asset value (“NAV”), trading price, yield, total return and ability to meet its investment objective, as well as other risks that are described in greater detail in the Additional Information About the Funds section of this Prospectus and in the Statement of Additional Information (“SAI”). The order of the below risk factors does not indicate the significance of any particular risk factor.

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Asset Class Risk: Securities and other assets in the Underlying Index or otherwise held in the Fund's portfolio may underperform in comparison to the general securities markets, a particular securities market or other asset classes.

China A-Shares Risk: A-Shares are issued by companies incorporated in mainland China and are traded on Chinese exchanges. Foreign investors can access A-Shares by obtaining a Qualified Foreign Institutional Investor ("QFII") or a Renminbi Qualified Foreign Institutional Investor ("RQFII") license, as well as through the Stock Connect Program, which is a securities trading and clearing program with an aim to achieve mutual stock market access between the China and Hong Kong markets. Stock Connect was developed by Hong Kong Exchanges and Clearing Limited, the Shanghai Stock Exchange ("SSE") (in the case of Shanghai Connect) or the Shenzhen Stock Exchange ("SZSE") (in the case of Shenzhen Connect), and the China Securities Depository and Clearing Corporation Limited (“CSDCC”). The Fund currently intends to gain exposure to A-Shares through the Stock Connect Programs. Investments in A-Shares are subject to various regulations and limits, and the recoupment or repatriation of assets invested in A-Shares is subject to restrictions by the Chinese government. In addition, investors from outside mainland China may face difficulties or prohibitions accessing certain A-Shares that are part of a restricted list in countries such as the U.S. A-Shares may be subject to frequent and widespread trading halts and may become illiquid. Trading suspensions in certain stock could lead to greater market execution risk and costs for the Fund, and the creation and redemption of Creation Units (as defined below) may also be disrupted. These risks, among others, could adversely affect the value of the Fund’s investments.

Equity Securities Risk: Equity securities are subject to changes in value, and their values may be more volatile than other asset classes, as a result of such factors as a company’s business performance, investor perceptions, stock market trends and general economic conditions.

Capitalization Risk: Investing in issuers within the same market capitalization category carries the risk that the category may be out of favor due to current market conditions or investor sentiment.

Large-Capitalization Companies Risk: Large-capitalization companies may trail the returns of the overall stock market. Large-capitalization stocks tend to go through cycles of doing better - or worse - than the stock market in general. These periods have, in the past, lasted for as long as several years.

Mid-Capitalization Companies Risk: Mid-capitalization companies may have greater price volatility, lower trading volume and less liquidity than large-capitalization companies. In addition, mid-capitalization companies may have smaller revenues, narrower product lines, less management depth and experience, smaller shares of their product or service markets, fewer financial resources and less competitive strength than large-capitalization companies.

Cash Transaction Risk: Unlike most exchange-traded funds ("ETFs"), the Fund intends to effect a significant portion of creations and redemptions for cash, rather than in-kind securities. As a result, an investment in the Fund may be less tax-efficient than an investment in a more conventional ETF. Moreover, cash transactions may have to be carried out over several days if the securities market is relatively illiquid and may involve considerable brokerage fees and taxes. These factors may result in wider spreads between the bid and the offered prices of the Fund’s Shares than for more conventional ETFs.

Currency Risk: The Fund may invest in securities denominated in foreign currencies. Because the Fund's NAV is determined in U.S. dollars, the Fund's NAV could decline if the Chinese yuan depreciates against the U.S. dollar or if there are delays or limits on repatriation of such currency. Currency exchange rates can be very volatile and can change quickly and unpredictably. As a result, the Fund's NAV may change quickly and without warning, which could have a significant negative impact on the Fund. Additionally, the Chinese government heavily regulates the domestic exchange of foreign currencies and yuan exchange rates in China, which may adversely affect the operations and financial results of the Fund’s investments in China. Shares purchased through the Stock Connect Programs will be purchased using offshore yuan, the value of which may differ from and experience greater volatility than the value of onshore yuan. Offshore yuan cannot be freely remitted into or transferred out of China, and there is no assurance that there will always be sufficient amounts of offshore yuan available for the Fund to invest in all components of the Underlying Index.

Custody Risk: The Fund may hold foreign securities and cash with foreign banks, agents, and securities depositories appointed by the Fund's custodian. Investments in emerging markets may be subject to even greater custody risks than investments in more developed markets. Less developed markets are more likely to experience problems with the clearing and settling of trades and the holding of securities by local banks, agents and depositories.

Focus Risk: To the extent that the Underlying Index focuses in investments related to a particular industry or group of industries, the Fund will also focus its investments to approximately the same extent. Similarly, if the Underlying Index has
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significant exposure to one or more sectors, the Fund’s investments will likely have significant exposure to such sectors. In such event, the Fund’s performance will be particularly susceptible to adverse events impacting such industry or sector, which may include, but are not limited to, the following: general economic conditions or cyclical market patterns that could negatively affect supply and demand; competition for resources; adverse labor relations; political or world events; obsolescence of technologies; and increased competition or new product introductions that may affect the profitability or viability of companies in a particular industry or sector. As a result, the value of the Fund’s investments may rise and fall more than the value of shares of a fund that invests in securities of companies in a broader range of industries or sectors.

Risks Related to Investing in the Health Care Sector: The health care sector may be affected by government regulations and government health care programs, increases or decreases in the cost of medical products and services, an increased emphasis on outpatient services, and product liability claims, among other factors. Many health care companies are heavily dependent on patent protection, and the expiration of a company's patent may adversely affect that company's profitability. Health care companies are subject to competitive forces that may result in price discounting and may be thinly capitalized and susceptible to product obsolescence. Companies in the health care sector may also be affected by unforeseen circumstances including but not limited to the spread of infectious disease which could impact drug development priorities and pipelines, supply and demand dynamics for health care equipment, as well as the ability to receive care in health care service facilities.

Risks Related to Investing in the Pharmaceuticals Industry: Companies in the pharmaceuticals industry may be affected by industry competition, dependency on a limited number of products, obsolescence of products, government approvals and regulations, loss or impairment of intellectual property rights and litigation regarding product liability. Demand for pharmaceuticals, generally speaking and specific to sub-segments, may fluctuate due to unexpected events, including but not limited to global health crises like pandemics which could strain health care systems and alter health care needs. Such demand fluctuations could positively or negatively impact pharmaceutical companies.

Foreign Securities Risk: The Fund may invest, within U.S. regulations, in foreign securities. The Fund's investments in foreign securities can be riskier than U.S. securities investments. Investments in the securities of foreign issuers (including investments in ADRs and GDRs) are subject to the risks associated with investing in those foreign markets, such as heightened risks of inflation or nationalization. The prices of foreign securities and the prices of U.S. securities have, at times, moved in opposite directions. In addition, securities of foreign issuers may lose value due to political, economic and geographic events affecting a foreign issuer or market. During periods of social, political or economic instability in a country or region, the value of a foreign security traded on U.S. exchanges could be affected by, among other things, increasing price volatility, illiquidity, or the closure of the primary market on which the security (or the security underlying the ADR or GDR) is traded. You may lose money due to political, economic and geographic events affecting a foreign issuer or market. Where all or a portion of the Fund's underlying securities trade in a market that is closed when the market in which the Fund's shares are listed and trading is open, there may be differences between the last quote from the security’s closed foreign market and the value of the security during the Fund’s domestic trading day. This in turn could lead to differences between the market price of the Fund’s shares and the underlying value of those shares.

Geographic Risk: A natural, biological or other disaster could occur in a geographic region in which the Fund invests, which could affect the economy or particular business operations of companies in the specific geographic region, causing an adverse impact on the Fund’s investments in the affected region or in a region economically tied to the affected region. The securities in which the Fund invests and, consequently, the Fund are also subject to specific risks as a result of their business operations, including, but not limited to:

Risk of Investing in China: Investment exposure to China subjects the Fund to risks specific to China.

Economic, Political and Social Risk
China may be subject to considerable degrees of economic, political and social instability. Concerns about the rising government and household debt levels could impact the stability of the Chinese economy. China is an emerging market and demonstrates significantly higher volatility from time to time in comparison to developed markets. Over the last few decades, the Chinese government has undertaken reform of economic and market practices, including recent reforms to liberalize its capital markets and expand the sphere for private ownership of property in China. However, Chinese markets generally continue to experience inefficiency, volatility and pricing anomalies resulting from governmental influence, a lack of publicly available information and/or political and social instability. Chinese companies are also subject to the risk that Chinese authorities can intervene in their operations and structure. Internal social unrest or confrontations with other neighboring countries, including military conflicts in response to such events, may also disrupt economic development in China and result in a greater risk of currency fluctuations, currency convertibility, interest rate fluctuations and higher rates of inflation.
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China has experienced major health crises. These health crises include, but are not limited to, the rapid and pandemic spread of novel viruses commonly known as SARS, MERS, and COVID-19 (Coronavirus). Such health crises could exacerbate political, social, and economic risks previously mentioned.

Export growth continues to be a major driver of China’s rapid economic growth. Elevated trade tensions between China and its trading partners, including the imposition of U.S. tariffs on certain Chinese goods and increased international pressure related to Chinese trade policy and forced technology transfers and intellectual property protections, may have a substantial impact on the Chinese economy. Reduction in spending on Chinese products and services, institution of additional tariffs or other trade barriers (including as a result of heightened trade tensions between China and the U.S. or in response to actual or alleged Chinese cyber activity), or a downturn in any of the economies of China’s key trading partners may have an adverse impact on the Chinese economy. The continuation or worsening of the current political climate between China and the U.S. could result in additional regulatory restrictions being contemplated or imposed in the U.S. or in China that could impact the Fund’s ability to invest in certain companies.

Security Risk
China has experienced security concerns, such as terrorism and strained international relations. Additionally, China is alleged to have participated in state-sponsored cyberattacks against foreign companies and foreign governments. Actual and threatened responses to such activity, including purchasing restrictions, sanctions, tariffs or cyberattacks on the Chinese government or Chinese companies, may impact China’s economy and Chinese issuers of securities in which the Fund invests. Incidents involving China’s or the region’s security, including the contagion of infectious viruses or diseases, may cause uncertainty in Chinese markets and may adversely affect the Chinese economy and the Fund’s investments.

Heavy Government Control and Regulation
Chinese companies, including Chinese companies that are listed on U.S. exchanges, are not subject to the same degree of regulatory requirements, accounting standards or auditor oversight as companies in more developed countries, and as a result, information about the Chinese securities in which the Fund invests may be less reliable or complete. There may be significant obstacles to obtaining information necessary for investigations into or litigation against Chinese companies and shareholders may have limited legal remedies. Investments in China may be subject to loss due to expropriation or nationalization of assets and property or the imposition of restrictions on foreign investments and repatriation of capital. Furthermore, government actions against leaders or other key figures within companies, or speculation about such actions, may lead to sudden and unpredictable falls in the value of securities within the Fund.

Tax Risk
China has implemented a number of tax reforms in recent years and may amend or revise its existing tax laws and/or procedures in the future, possibly with retroactive effect. Changes in applicable Chinese tax law could reduce the after-tax profits of the Fund, directly or indirectly, including by reducing the after-tax profits of companies in China in which the Fund invests. Uncertainties in Chinese tax rules could result in unexpected tax liabilities for the Fund. Should legislation limit U.S. investors’ ability to invest in specific Chinese companies through A-shares or other share class listings that are part of the underlying holdings, these shares may be excluded from Fund holdings.

Special Risk Considerations of Investing in China – Variable Interest Entity Investments
For purposes of raising capital offshore on exchanges outside of China, including on U.S. exchanges, many Chinese-based operating companies are structured as Variable Interest Entities (“VIEs”). In this structure, the Chinese-based operating company is the VIE and establishes a shell company in a foreign jurisdiction, such as the Cayman Islands. The shell company lists on a foreign exchange and enters into contractual arrangements with the VIE. This structure allows Chinese companies in which the Chinese government restricts foreign ownership to raise capital from foreign investors. While the shell company has no equity ownership of the VIE, these contractual arrangements permit the shell company to consolidate the VIE’s financial statements with its own for accounting purposes and provide for economic exposure to the performance of the underlying Chinese operating company. Therefore, an investor in the listed shell company, such as the Fund, will have exposure to the Chinese-based operating company only through contractual arrangements and has no ownership in the Chinese-based operating company. Furthermore, because the shell company only has specific rights provided for in these service agreements with the VIE, its abilities to control the activities at the Chinese-based operating company are limited and the operating company may engage in activities that negatively impact investment value.

While the VIE structure has been widely adopted, it is not formally recognized under Chinese law and therefore there is a risk that the Chinese government could prohibit the existence of such structures or negatively impact the VIE’s contractual arrangements with the listed shell company by making them invalid. If these contracts were found to be unenforceable under Chinese law, investors in the listed shell company, such as the Fund, may suffer significant losses with little or no recourse available. If the Chinese government determines that the agreements establishing the VIE
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structures do not comply with Chinese law and regulations, including those related to restrictions on foreign ownership, it could subject a Chinese-based issuer to penalties, revocation of business and operating licenses, or forfeiture of ownership interest. In addition, the listed shell company’s control over a VIE may also be jeopardized if a natural person who holds the equity interest in the VIE breaches the terms of the agreement, is subject to legal proceedings or if any physical instruments for authenticating documentation, such as chops and seals, are used without the Chinese-based issuer’s authorization to enter into contractual arrangements in China. Chops and seals, which are carved stamps used to sign documents, represent a legally binding commitment by the company. Moreover, any future regulatory action may prohibit the ability of the shell company to receive the economic benefits of the Chinese-based operating company, which may cause the value of the Fund’s investment in the listed shell company to suffer a significant loss. For example, in 2021, the Chinese government prohibited use of the VIE structure for investment in after-school tutoring companies. There is no guarantee that the Chinese government will not place similar restrictions on other industries.

Chinese equities that utilize the VIE structure to list in the U.S. as ADRs face the risk of regulatory action from U.S. authorities, including the risk of delisting. This will depend in part on whether U.S. regulatory authorities are satisfied with their access to Mainland China and Hong Kong for the purpose of conducting inspections on the quality of audits for these companies. Although the U.S. and China reached an agreement in September 2022 to grant the U.S. access for such inspections, there is no guarantee that the agreement will hold up or that U.S. regulatory authorities will continue to feel satisfied with their access.

Risk of Investing in Emerging Markets: As of the date of this Prospectus, China is an emerging market country. Investments in emerging markets may be subject to a greater risk of loss than investments in developed markets. Securities markets of emerging market countries are less liquid, subject to greater price volatility, have smaller market capitalizations, have less government regulation, and are not subject to as extensive and frequent accounting, financial, and other reporting requirements as the securities markets of more developed countries, and there may be greater risk associated with the custody of securities in emerging markets. It may be difficult or impossible for the Fund to pursue claims against an emerging market issuer in the courts of an emerging market country. There may be significant obstacles to obtaining information necessary for investigations into or litigation against emerging market companies and shareholders may have limited legal rights and remedies. Emerging markets may be more likely to experience inflation, political turmoil and rapid changes in economic conditions than more developed markets. Emerging market economies’ exposure to specific industries, such as tourism, and lack of efficient or sufficient health care systems, could make these economies especially vulnerable to global crises, including but not limited to, pandemics such as the global COVID-19 pandemic. Certain emerging market countries may have privatized, or have begun the process of privatizing, certain entities and industries. Privatized entities may lose money or be re-nationalized.

Risk of Investing in Hong Kong: Investments in Hong Kong issuers may subject the Fund to legal, regulatory, political, currency, security, and economic risk specific to Hong Kong. China is Hong Kong’s largest trading partner, both in terms of exports and imports. Any changes in the Chinese economy, trade regulations or currency exchange rates, or a tightening of China’s control over Hong Kong, including in connection with recent protests and unrest, may have an adverse impact on Hong Kong’s economy.

International Closed Market Trading Risk: To the extent that the underlying investments held by the Fund trade on foreign exchanges that may be closed when the securities exchange on which the Fund’s Shares trade is open, there are likely to be deviations between the current price of such an underlying security and the last quoted price for the underlying security (i.e., the Fund’s quote from the closed foreign market). These deviations could result in premiums or discounts to the Fund’s NAV that may be greater than those experienced by other exchange-traded funds ("ETFs").

Issuer Risk: Fund performance depends on the performance of individual companies in which the Fund invests. Changes to the financial condition of any of those companies may cause the value of such company's securities to decline.

Market Risk: Turbulence in the financial markets and reduced liquidity may negatively affect issuers, which could have an adverse effect on the Fund. If the securities held by the Fund experience poor liquidity, the Fund may be unable to transact at advantageous times or prices, which may decrease the Fund’s returns. In addition, there is a risk that policy changes by central governments and governmental agencies, including the U.S. Federal Reserve or the European Central Bank, which could include increasing interest rates, could cause increased volatility in financial markets and lead to higher levels of Fund redemptions from Authorized Participants, which could have a negative impact on the Fund. Furthermore, local, regional or global events such as war, acts of terrorism, the spread of infectious illness or other public health issues, recessions, or other events could have a significant impact on the Fund and its investments and trading of its Shares. For example, at the start of 2023, central banks had already increased interest rates at the fastest rate on record, and it is unknown how long this trend will continue and when inflation will return to target levels. This increases the risk that monetary policy may provide less support
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should economic growth slow. Additionally, China’s shift away from a zero-COVID policy creates both opportunities and risks, causing uncertainty for global economic growth. Market risk factors may result in increased volatility and/or decreased liquidity in the securities markets. The Fund’s NAV could decline over short periods due to short-term market movements and over longer periods during market downturns.

Non-Diversification Risk: The Fund is classified as a “non-diversified” investment company under the Investment Company Act of 1940 ("1940 Act"). As a result, the Fund is subject to the risk that it may be more volatile than a diversified fund because the Fund may invest its assets in a smaller number of issuers or may invest a larger proportion of its assets in a single issuer. As a result, the gains and losses on a single investment may have a greater impact on the Fund’s NAV and may make the Fund more volatile than more diversified funds.

Operational Risk: The Fund is exposed to operational risk arising from a number of factors, including but not limited to human error, processing and communication errors, errors of the Fund's service providers, counterparties or other third-parties, failed or inadequate processes and technology or systems failures. Additionally, cyber security failures or breaches of the electronic systems of the Fund, the Adviser, and the Fund's other service providers, market makers, Authorized Participants or the issuers of securities in which the Fund invests have the ability to cause disruptions and negatively impact the Fund's business operations, potentially resulting in financial losses to the Fund and its shareholders. The Fund and the Adviser seek to reduce these operational risks through controls and procedures. However, these measures do not address every possible risk and may be inadequate for those risks that they are intended to address.

Passive Investment Risk: The Fund is not actively managed, and the Adviser does not attempt to take defensive positions in declining markets. Unlike many investment companies, the Fund does not seek to outperform its Underlying Index. Therefore, it would not necessarily buy or sell a security unless that security is added or removed, respectively, from the Underlying Index, even if that security generally is underperforming. Additionally, if a constituent of the Underlying Index were removed, even outside of a regular rebalance of the Underlying Index, the Adviser anticipates that the Fund would sell such security. Maintaining investments in securities regardless of market conditions or the performance of individual securities could cause the Fund’s return to be lower than if the Fund employed an active strategy.

Index-Related Risk: There is no guarantee that the Fund will achieve a high degree of correlation to the Underlying Index and therefore achieve its investment objective. Market disruptions and regulatory restrictions could have an adverse effect on the Fund’s ability to adjust its exposure to the required levels in order to track the Underlying Index. Errors in index data, index computations and/or the construction of the Underlying Index in accordance with its methodology may occur from time to time and may not be identified and corrected by the Index Provider for a period of time or at all, which may have an adverse impact on the Fund and its shareholders.

Management Risk: The Fund may not fully replicate its Underlying Index and may hold securities not included in its Underlying Index. The Adviser’s investment strategy, the implementation of which is subject to a number of constraints, may cause the Fund to underperform the market or its relevant benchmark or adversely affect the ability of the Fund to achieve its investment objective.

Tracking Error Risk: Tracking error may occur because of differences between the instruments held in the Fund's portfolio and those included in the Underlying Index, pricing differences, transaction costs incurred by the Fund, the Fund's holding of uninvested cash, size of the Fund, differences in timing of the accrual of or the valuation of dividends or interest, tax gains or losses, changes to the Underlying Index or the costs to the Fund of complying with various new or existing regulatory requirements. This risk may be heightened during times of increased market volatility or other unusual market conditions. Tracking error also may result because the Fund incurs fees and expenses, while the Underlying Index does not. ETFs that track indices with significant weight in emerging markets issuers may experience higher tracking error than other ETFs that do not track such indices.

Reliance on Trading Partners Risk: The Fund invests in the Chinese economy, which is heavily dependent upon trading with key partners. Any reduction in this trading, including as a result of adverse economic conditions in a trading partner's economy, may cause an adverse impact on the Chinese economy in which the Fund invests. Through its portfolio companies' trading partners, the Fund is specifically exposed to Asian Economic Risk, European Economic Risk, and North American Economic Risk.

Risks Associated with Exchange-Traded Funds: As an ETF, the Fund is subject to the following risks:

Authorized Participants Concentration Risk: The Fund has a limited number of financial institutions that may act as Authorized Participants and engage in creation or redemption transactions directly with the Fund, and none of those
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Authorized Participants is obligated to engage in creation and/or redemption transactions. To the extent that those Authorized Participants exit the business or are unable to process creation and/or redemption orders, such as in times of market stress, Shares may be more likely to trade at a premium or discount to NAV and/or at wider intraday bid-ask spreads, and possibly face trading halts and/or delisting from an exchange. Authorized Participants Concentration Risk may be heightened because the Fund invests in non-U.S. securities.

Large Shareholder Risk: Redemptions by large shareholders could have a significant negative impact on the Fund. If a large shareholder were to redeem all, or a large portion, of its Shares, there is no guarantee that the Fund will be able to maintain sufficient assets to continue operations in which case the Board of Trustees may determine to liquidate the Fund. In addition, transactions by large shareholders may account for a large percentage of the trading volume on a national securities exchange and may, therefore, have a material upward or downward effect on the market price of the Shares.

Listing Standards Risk: The Fund is required to comply with listing requirements adopted by the listing exchange. Non-compliance with such requirements may result in the Fund's shares being delisted by the listing exchange. Any resulting liquidation of the Fund could cause the Fund to incur elevated transaction costs and could result in negative tax consequences for its shareholders.

Market Trading Risks and Premium/Discount Risks: Shares of the Fund are publicly traded on a national securities exchange, which may subject shareholders to numerous market trading risks. In stressed market conditions, the market for the Shares may become less liquid in response to the deteriorating liquidity of the Fund’s portfolio. This adverse effect on the liquidity of the Shares, as well as disruptions to creations and redemptions, the existence of extreme market volatility or potential lack of assets in the Fund or an active trading market for Shares may result in Shares trading at a significant premium or discount to NAV. If a shareholder purchases Shares at a time when the market price is at a premium to the NAV or sells Shares at a time when the market price is at a discount to the NAV, the shareholder may sustain losses. The NAV of the Fund is calculated at the end of each business day and fluctuates with changes in the market value of the Fund’s holdings. The trading price of the Fund’s shares fluctuates, in some cases materially, throughout trading hours in response to changes in the Fund’s NAV.

Risks Related to Stock Connect Programs: The Stock Connect Programs are subject to daily and aggregate quota limitations, which could affect the Fund’s ability to enter into and exit Stock Connect positions on a timely basis. The Shenzen and Shanghai markets may operate when the Stock Connect Programs are not active, and consequently the prices of shares held via Stock Connect Programs may fluctuate at times when the Fund is unable to add to or exit its positions. The Stock Connect Programs are new, and the effect of the introduction of large numbers of foreign investors on the market for trading Chinese-listed securities is not well understood. Regulations, such as limitations on redemptions or suspension of trading, may adversely impact the value of the Fund’s investments. The Fund's investments in A-Shares though the Stock Connect Program are held by its custodian in accounts in Central Clearing and Settlement System ("CCASS") maintained by the Hong Kong Securities Clearing Company Limited ("HKSCC"), which in turn holds the A-Shares, as the nominee holder, through an omnibus securities account in its name registered with the CSDCC. The precise nature and rights of the Fund as the beneficial owner of the SSE Securities or SZSE Securities through HKSCC as nominee is not well defined under Chinese law. There is no guarantee that the Shenzen, Shanghai, and Hong Kong Stock Exchanges will continue to support the Stock Connect Programs in the future.

Trading Halt Risk: An exchange or market may close or issue trading halts on specific securities, or the ability to buy or sell certain securities or financial instruments may be restricted, which may result in the Fund being unable to buy or sell certain securities or financial instruments. In such circumstances, the Fund may be unable to rebalance its portfolio, may be unable to accurately price its investments and/or may incur substantial trading losses.

Valuation Risk: The sales price the Fund could receive for a security may differ from the Fund’s valuation of the security and may differ from the value used by the Underlying Index, particularly for securities that trade in low value or volatile markets or that are valued using a fair value methodology (such as during trading halts). The value of the securities in the Fund's portfolio may change on days when shareholders will not be able to purchase or sell the Fund's Shares.

PERFORMANCE INFORMATION
 
The bar chart and table that follow show how the Fund performed on a calendar year basis and provide an indication of the risks of investing in the Fund by showing changes in the Fund's performance from year to year and by showing how the Fund's average annual returns for the indicated periods compare with the Fund's benchmark index and a broad measure of market
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performance. The Fund's past performance (before and after taxes) is not necessarily indicative of how the Fund will perform in the future. Updated performance information is available online at www.globalxetfs.com.

Annual Total Returns (Years Ended December 31)

 ck0001432353-20221031_g7.jpg
 
Best Quarter: 6/30/2020 36.25%
Worst Quarter: 9/30/2022 -22.93%

Average Annual Total Returns (for the Periods Ended December 31, 2022) 
  One Year Ended December 31, 2022
Since Inception (12/07/2018)
Global X MSCI China Health Care ETF:
·Return before taxes
-22.67% 3.03%
·Return after taxes on distributions1
-22.75% 2.93%
·Return after taxes on distributions and sale of Fund Shares1
-13.37% 2.32%
MSCI China Health Care 10/50 Index (net)
(Index returns reflect invested dividends net of withholding taxes, but reflect no deduction for fees, expenses, or other taxes)
-22.12% 3.78%
MSCI Emerging Markets Index (net)
(Index returns reflect invested dividends net of withholding taxes, but reflect no deduction for fees, expenses, or other taxes)
-20.09% 1.83%

1     After-tax returns are calculated using the historical highest individual U.S. federal marginal income tax rates and do not reflect the impact of state and local taxes. Your actual after-tax returns will depend on your specific tax situation and may differ from those shown above. After-tax returns are not relevant to investors who hold Shares of the Fund through tax-advantaged arrangements, such as 401(k) plans or individual retirement accounts (IRAs).

FUND MANAGEMENT
 
Investment Adviser: Global X Management Company LLC.
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Portfolio Managers: The professionals primarily responsible for the day-to-day management of the Fund are Nam To, CFA; Wayne Xie; Kimberly Chan; Vanessa Yang; and Sandy Lu, CFA (“Portfolio Managers”). Mr. To has been a Portfolio Manager of the Fund since the Fund's inception. Mr. Xie has been a Portfolio Manager of the Fund since March 1, 2019. Ms. Chan has been a Portfolio Manager of the Fund since June 10, 2019. Ms. Yang has been a Portfolio Manager of the Fund since December 2020. Mr. Lu has been a Portfolio Manager of the Fund since March 2022.
 
PURCHASE AND SALE OF FUND SHARES
 
Shares of the Fund are or will be listed and traded at market prices on a national securities exchange. Shares may only be purchased and sold on the exchange through a broker-dealer. The price of Shares is based on market price, and because ETF shares trade at market prices rather than at NAV, Shares may trade at a price greater than NAV (a premium) or less than NAV (a discount). Only “Authorized Participants” (as defined in the SAI) who have entered into agreements with the Fund’s distributor, SEI Investments Distribution Co. (“Distributor”), may engage in creation or redemption transactions directly with the Fund. The Fund will only issue or redeem Shares that have been aggregated into blocks called Creation Units. The Fund will issue or redeem Creation Units in return for a basket of cash and/or securities that the Fund specifies any day that the national securities exchanges are open for business (“Business Day”). An investor may incur costs attributable to the difference between the highest price a buyer is willing to pay to purchase shares of the Fund (bid) and the lowest price a seller is willing to accept for shares of the Fund (ask) when buying or selling shares in the secondary market (the “bid-ask spread”). To access information regarding the Fund’s net asset value, market price, premiums and discounts, and bid-ask spreads, please go to https://www.globalxetfs.com.
 
TAX INFORMATION
 
The Fund intends to make distributions that may be taxable to you as ordinary income or capital gains, unless you are investing through a tax-advantaged arrangement, such as a 401(k) plan or an individual retirement account ("IRA"), in which case distributions from such tax-advantaged arrangement may be taxable to you.
 
PAYMENTS TO BROKER-DEALERS AND OTHER FINANCIAL INTERMEDIARIES
 
The Adviser and its related companies may pay broker-dealers or other financial intermediaries (such as a bank) for the sale of Fund Shares and related services. These payments may create a conflict of interest by influencing your broker-dealer, sales persons or other intermediary or its employees or associated persons to recommend the Fund over another investment. Ask your financial adviser or visit your financial intermediary’s website for more information.
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Global X MSCI China Industrials ETF
 
Ticker: CHII Exchange: NYSE Arca
 
INVESTMENT OBJECTIVE
 
The Global X MSCI China Industrials ETF ("Fund") seeks to provide investment results that correspond generally to the price and yield performance, before fees and expenses, of the MSCI China Industrials 10/50 Index ("Underlying Index").
 
FEES AND EXPENSES
 
This table describes the fees and expenses that you may pay if you buy, hold, and sell shares (“Shares”) of the Fund. You may pay other fees, such as brokerage commissions and other fees to financial intermediaries, which are not reflected in the table and examples below.
 
Annual Fund Operating Expenses (expenses that you pay each year as a percentage of the value of your investment):
 
Management Fees: 0.65%
Distribution and Service (12b-1) Fees: None
Other Expenses: 0.00%
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses: 0.65%

Example: The following example is intended to help you compare the cost of investing in the Fund with the cost of investing in other funds. This example does not take into account customary brokerage commissions that you pay when purchasing or selling Shares of the Fund in the secondary market. The example assumes that you invest $10,000 in the Fund for the time periods indicated and then sell all of your Shares at the end of those periods. The example also assumes that your investment has a 5% return each year and that the Fund's operating expenses remain the same. Although your actual costs may be higher or lower, based on these assumptions, your costs would be:
 
One Year Three Years Five Years Ten Years
$66 $208 $362 $810
 
Portfolio Turnover: The Fund pays transaction costs, such as commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or "turns over" its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover rate may indicate higher transaction costs and may result in higher taxes when Shares are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are not reflected in annual fund operating expenses or in the example, affect the Fund's performance. During the most recent fiscal year, the Fund's portfolio turnover rate was 105.23% of the average value of its portfolio.
 
PRINCIPAL INVESTMENT STRATEGIES
 
The Fund invests at least 80% of its total assets in the securities of the MSCI China Industrials 10/50 Index ("Underlying Index") and in American Depositary Receipts ("ADRs") and Global Depositary Receipts ("GDRs") based on the securities in the Underlying Index. The Fund also invests at least 80% of its total assets in securities of industrials companies that are economically tied to China. For purposes of this policy, industrials companies include those companies that are classified in the industrials sector under the Global Industry Classification System ("GICS"). The Fund's 80% investment policies are non-fundamental and require 60 days prior written notice to shareholders before they can be changed.
 
The Underlying Index tracks the performance of companies in the MSCI China Index (the "Parent Index") that are classified in the industrials sector, as defined by MSCI, Inc. ("MSCI") the provider of the Underlying Index ("Index Provider"). The Parent Index is a free float-adjusted market capitalization-weighted index designed to measure the performance of securities that are classified as operating in China according to the MSCI Global Investable Markets Index Methodology, and that satisfy minimum market capitalization and liquidity thresholds. The securities eligible for inclusion in the Underlying Index include H-Shares (securities of companies incorporated in China that are denominated in Hong Kong Dollars and listed on the Hong Kong Stock Exchange (the "HKSE")), B-Shares (securities of companies denominated in U.S. dollars or Hong Kong dollars and listed on Shanghai Stock Exchange (the "SSE") or Shenzen Stock Exchange (the "SZSE")), Red Chips (securities of companies with a
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majority of their business operations in mainland China and that are controlled by the national government or local governments of China, traded on the HKSE in Hong Kong dollars), P-Chips (securities of companies with the majority of their business operations in mainland China and controlled by individuals in China, but that are incorporated outside of China), A-Shares (securities of companies incorporated in mainland China that trade on Chinese exchanges in renminbi) that are accessible through the Shanghai-Hong Kong Stock Connect program ("Shanghai Connect") or the Shenzhen-Hong Kong Stock Connect program ("Shenzhen Connect", and together with Shanghai Connect, "Stock Connect Programs"), and foreign listings such as American Depository Receipts ("ADRs"). The Stock Connect Programs are securities trading and clearing programs that aim to achieve mutual stock market access between China and Hong Kong. Under Stock Connect, the Fund's trading of eligible A-shares listed on the SSE or the SZSE, as applicable, would be effectuated through its Hong Kong brokers. Trading through the Stock Connect Programs is subject to a daily quota, which limits the maximum net purchases under Stock Connect Programs each day, and as such, buy orders for A-shares would be rejected once the daily quota is exceeded (although the Fund will be permitted to sell A-shares regardless of the daily quota balance). The daily quota is not specific to the Fund. From time to time, other stock exchanges in China may participate in Stock Connect, and A-shares listed and traded on such other stock exchanges and accessible through Stock Connect may be added to the Underlying Index, as determined by MSCI.

The Underlying Index then follows a rules-based methodology that is designed to select all constituents of the Parent Index that are classified in the industrials sector under the GICS. The Underlying Index is weighted according to each component's free-float adjusted market capitalization, but is modified so that, as of the rebalance date, no group entity (defined by the Index Provider as companies with a controlling stake owned by one entity) constitutes more than 10% of the Underlying Index and so that, in the aggregate, the individual group entities that would represent more than 5% of the Underlying Index represent no more than 50% of the Underlying Index ("10/50 Cap"). The Underlying Index is reconstituted and re-weighted quarterly. The Underlying Index may include large- and mid-capitalization companies. As of December 31, 2022, the Underlying Index had 111 constituents. The Fund's investment objective and Underlying Index may be changed without shareholder approval.
 
The Fund generally will use a replication strategy. A replication strategy is an indexing strategy that involves investing in the securities of the Underlying Index in approximately the same proportions as in the Underlying Index. However, the Fund may utilize a representative sampling strategy with respect to the Underlying Index when a replication strategy might be detrimental or disadvantageous to shareholders, such as when there are practical difficulties or substantial costs involved in compiling a portfolio of equity securities to replicate the Underlying Index, in instances in which a security in the Underlying Index becomes temporarily illiquid, unavailable or less liquid, or as a result of legal restrictions or limitations (such as tax diversification requirements) that apply to the Fund but not the Underlying Index.
  
The Adviser expects that, over time, the correlation between the Fund's performance and that of the Underlying Index, before fees and expenses, will exceed 95%. A correlation percentage of 100% would indicate perfect correlation. If the Fund uses a replication strategy, it can be expected to have greater correlation to the Underlying Index than if it uses a representative sampling strategy.
 
The Fund concentrates its investments (i.e., holds 25% or more of its total assets) in a particular industry or group of industries to approximately the same extent that the Underlying Index is concentrated. As of December 31, 2022, the Underlying Index had significant exposure to the industrials sector.
 
SUMMARY OF PRINCIPAL RISKS
 
As with any investment, you could lose all or part of your investment in the Fund, and the Fund’s performance could trail that of other investments. There is no guarantee that the Fund will achieve its investment objective. An investment in the Fund is not a bank deposit and it is not insured or guaranteed by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation or any other government agency, the Adviser or any of its affiliates. The Fund is subject to the principal risks noted below, any of which may adversely affect the Fund’s net asset value (“NAV”), trading price, yield, total return and ability to meet its investment objective, as well as other risks that are described in greater detail in the Additional Information About the Funds section of this Prospectus and in the Statement of Additional Information (“SAI”). The order of the below risk factors does not indicate the significance of any particular risk factor.
 
Asset Class Risk: Securities and other assets in the Underlying Index or otherwise held in the Fund's portfolio may underperform in comparison to the general securities markets, a particular securities market or other asset classes.

China A-Shares Risk: A-Shares are issued by companies incorporated in mainland China and are traded on Chinese exchanges. Foreign investors can access A-Shares by obtaining a Qualified Foreign Institutional Investor ("QFII") or a Renminbi Qualified Foreign Institutional Investor ("RQFII") license, as well as through the Stock Connect Program, which is a securities trading and clearing program with an aim to achieve mutual stock market access between the
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China and Hong Kong markets. Stock Connect was developed by Hong Kong Exchanges and Clearing Limited, the Shanghai Stock Exchange ("SSE") (in the case of Shanghai Connect) or the Shenzhen Stock Exchange ("SZSE") (in the case of Shenzhen Connect), and the China Securities Depository and Clearing Corporation Limited (“CSDCC”). The Fund currently intends to gain exposure to A-Shares through the Stock Connect Programs. Investments in A-Shares are subject to various regulations and limits, and the recoupment or repatriation of assets invested in A-Shares is subject to restrictions by the Chinese government. In addition, investors from outside mainland China may face difficulties or prohibitions accessing certain A-Shares that are part of a restricted list in countries such as the U.S. A-Shares may be subject to frequent and widespread trading halts and may become illiquid. Trading suspensions in certain stock could lead to greater market execution risk and costs for the Fund, and the creation and redemption of Creation Units (as defined below) may also be disrupted. These risks, among others, could adversely affect the value of the Fund’s investments.

Equity Securities Risk: Equity securities are subject to changes in value, and their values may be more volatile than other asset classes, as a result of such factors as a company’s business performance, investor perceptions, stock market trends and general economic conditions.

Capitalization Risk: Investing in issuers within the same market capitalization category carries the risk that the category may be out of favor due to current market conditions or investor sentiment.

Large-Capitalization Companies Risk: Large-capitalization companies may trail the returns of the overall stock market. Large-capitalization stocks tend to go through cycles of doing better - or worse - than the stock market in general. These periods have, in the past, lasted for as long as several years.

Mid-Capitalization Companies Risk: Mid-capitalization companies may have greater price volatility, lower trading volume and less liquidity than large-capitalization companies. In addition, mid-capitalization companies may have smaller revenues, narrower product lines, less management depth and experience, smaller shares of their product or service markets, fewer financial resources and less competitive strength than large-capitalization companies.

Cash Transaction Risk: Unlike most exchange-traded funds ("ETFs"), the Fund intends to effect a significant portion of creations and redemptions for cash, rather than in-kind securities. As a result, an investment in the Fund may be less tax-efficient than an investment in a more conventional ETF. Moreover, cash transactions may have to be carried out over several days if the securities market is relatively illiquid and may involve considerable brokerage fees and taxes. These factors may result in wider spreads between the bid and the offered prices of the Fund’s Shares than for more conventional ETFs.

Currency Risk: The Fund may invest in securities denominated in foreign currencies. Because the Fund's NAV is determined in U.S. dollars, the Fund's NAV could decline if the Chinese yuan depreciates against the U.S. dollar or if there are delays or limits on repatriation of such currency. Currency exchange rates can be very volatile and can change quickly and unpredictably. As a result, the Fund's NAV may change quickly and without warning, which could have a significant negative impact on the Fund. Additionally, the Chinese government heavily regulates the domestic exchange of foreign currencies and yuan exchange rates in China, which may adversely affect the operations and financial results of the Fund’s investments in China. Shares purchased through the Stock Connect Programs will be purchased using offshore yuan, the value of which may differ from and experience greater volatility than the value of onshore yuan. Offshore yuan cannot be freely remitted into or transferred out of China, and there is no assurance that there will always be sufficient amounts of offshore yuan available for the Fund to invest in all components of the Underlying Index.

Custody Risk: The Fund may hold foreign securities and cash with foreign banks, agents, and securities depositories appointed by the Fund's custodian. Investments in emerging markets may be subject to even greater custody risks than investments in more developed markets. Less developed markets are more likely to experience problems with the clearing and settling of trades and the holding of securities by local banks, agents and depositories.

Focus Risk: To the extent that the Underlying Index focuses in investments related to a particular industry or group of industries, the Fund will also focus its investments to approximately the same extent. Similarly, if the Underlying Index has significant exposure to one or more sectors, the Fund’s investments will likely have significant exposure to such sectors. In such event, the Fund’s performance will be particularly susceptible to adverse events impacting such industry or sector, which may include, but are not limited to, the following: general economic conditions or cyclical market patterns that could negatively affect supply and demand; competition for resources; adverse labor relations; political or world events; obsolescence of technologies; and increased competition or new product introductions that may affect the profitability or viability of companies in a particular industry or sector. As a result, the value of the Fund’s investments may rise and fall more than the value of shares of a fund that invests in securities of companies in a broader range of industries or sectors.
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Risks Related to Investing in the Industrials Sector: Companies in the industrials sector are subject to fluctuations in supply and demand for their specific product or service. The products of manufacturing companies may face product obsolescence due to rapid technological developments. Government regulation, world events and economic conditions affect the performance of companies in the industrials sector. Companies also may be adversely affected by environmental damage and product liability claims. Companies in the Industrial Sector face increased risk from trade agreements between countries that develop these technologies and countries in which customers of these technologies are based. Lack of resolution or potential imposition of trade tariffs may hinder on the companies’ ability to successfully deploy their inventories.

Foreign Securities Risk: The Fund may invest, within U.S. regulations, in foreign securities. The Fund's investments in foreign securities can be riskier than U.S. securities investments. Investments in the securities of foreign issuers (including investments in ADRs and GDRs) are subject to the risks associated with investing in those foreign markets, such as heightened risks of inflation or nationalization. The prices of foreign securities and the prices of U.S. securities have, at times, moved in opposite directions. In addition, securities of foreign issuers may lose value due to political, economic and geographic events affecting a foreign issuer or market. During periods of social, political or economic instability in a country or region, the value of a foreign security traded on U.S. exchanges could be affected by, among other things, increasing price volatility, illiquidity, or the closure of the primary market on which the security (or the security underlying the ADR or GDR) is traded. You may lose money due to political, economic and geographic events affecting a foreign issuer or market. Where all or a portion of the Fund's underlying securities trade in a market that is closed when the market in which the Fund's shares are listed and trading is open, there may be differences between the last quote from the security’s closed foreign market and the value of the security during the Fund’s domestic trading day. This in turn could lead to differences between the market price of the Fund’s shares and the underlying value of those shares.

Geographic Risk: A natural, biological or other disaster could occur in a geographic region in which the Fund invests, which could affect the economy or particular business operations of companies in the specific geographic region, causing an adverse impact on the Fund’s investments in the affected region or in a region economically tied to the affected region. The securities in which the Fund invests and, consequently, the Fund are also subject to specific risks as a result of their business operations, including, but not limited to:

Risk of Investing in China: Investment exposure to China subjects the Fund to risks specific to China.

Economic, Political and Social Risk
China may be subject to considerable degrees of economic, political and social instability. Concerns about the rising government and household debt levels could impact the stability of the Chinese economy. China is an emerging market and demonstrates significantly higher volatility from time to time in comparison to developed markets. Over the last few decades, the Chinese government has undertaken reform of economic and market practices, including recent reforms to liberalize its capital markets and expand the sphere for private ownership of property in China. However, Chinese markets generally continue to experience inefficiency, volatility and pricing anomalies resulting from governmental influence, a lack of publicly available information and/or political and social instability. Chinese companies are also subject to the risk that Chinese authorities can intervene in their operations and structure. Internal social unrest or confrontations with other neighboring countries, including military conflicts in response to such events, may also disrupt economic development in China and result in a greater risk of currency fluctuations, currency convertibility, interest rate fluctuations and higher rates of inflation.

China has experienced major health crises. These health crises include, but are not limited to, the rapid and pandemic spread of novel viruses commonly known as SARS, MERS, and COVID-19 (Coronavirus). Such health crises could exacerbate political, social, and economic risks previously mentioned.

Export growth continues to be a major driver of China’s rapid economic growth. Elevated trade tensions between China and its trading partners, including the imposition of U.S. tariffs on certain Chinese goods and increased international pressure related to Chinese trade policy and forced technology transfers and intellectual property protections, may have a substantial impact on the Chinese economy. Reduction in spending on Chinese products and services, institution of additional tariffs or other trade barriers (including as a result of heightened trade tensions between China and the U.S. or in response to actual or alleged Chinese cyber activity), or a downturn in any of the economies of China’s key trading partners may have an adverse impact on the Chinese economy. The continuation or worsening of the current political climate between China and the U.S. could result in additional regulatory restrictions being contemplated or imposed in the U.S. or in China that could impact the Fund’s ability to invest in certain companies.

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Security Risk
China has experienced security concerns, such as terrorism and strained international relations. Additionally, China is alleged to have participated in state-sponsored cyberattacks against foreign companies and foreign governments. Actual and threatened responses to such activity, including purchasing restrictions, sanctions, tariffs or cyberattacks on the Chinese government or Chinese companies, may impact China’s economy and Chinese issuers of securities in which the Fund invests. Incidents involving China’s or the region’s security, including the contagion of infectious viruses or diseases, may cause uncertainty in Chinese markets and may adversely affect the Chinese economy and the Fund’s investments.

Heavy Government Control and Regulation
Chinese companies, including Chinese companies that are listed on U.S. exchanges, are not subject to the same degree of regulatory requirements, accounting standards or auditor oversight as companies in more developed countries, and as a result, information about the Chinese securities in which the Fund invests may be less reliable or complete. There may be significant obstacles to obtaining information necessary for investigations into or litigation against Chinese companies and shareholders may have limited legal remedies. Investments in China may be subject to loss due to expropriation or nationalization of assets and property or the imposition of restrictions on foreign investments and repatriation of capital. Furthermore, government actions against leaders or other key figures within companies, or speculation about such actions, may lead to sudden and unpredictable falls in the value of securities within the Fund.

Tax Risk
China has implemented a number of tax reforms in recent years and may amend or revise its existing tax laws and/or procedures in the future, possibly with retroactive effect. Changes in applicable Chinese tax law could reduce the after-tax profits of the Fund, directly or indirectly, including by reducing the after-tax profits of companies in China in which the Fund invests. Uncertainties in Chinese tax rules could result in unexpected tax liabilities for the Fund. Should legislation limit U.S. investors’ ability to invest in specific Chinese companies through A-shares or other share class listings that are part of the underlying holdings, these shares may be excluded from Fund holdings.

Special Risk Considerations of Investing in China – Variable Interest Entity Investments
For purposes of raising capital offshore on exchanges outside of China, including on U.S. exchanges, many Chinese-based operating companies are structured as Variable Interest Entities (“VIEs”). In this structure, the Chinese-based operating company is the VIE and establishes a shell company in a foreign jurisdiction, such as the Cayman Islands. The shell company lists on a foreign exchange and enters into contractual arrangements with the VIE. This structure allows Chinese companies in which the Chinese government restricts foreign ownership to raise capital from foreign investors. While the shell company has no equity ownership of the VIE, these contractual arrangements permit the shell company to consolidate the VIE’s financial statements with its own for accounting purposes and provide for economic exposure to the performance of the underlying Chinese operating company. Therefore, an investor in the listed shell company, such as the Fund, will have exposure to the Chinese-based operating company only through contractual arrangements and has no ownership in the Chinese-based operating company. Furthermore, because the shell company only has specific rights provided for in these service agreements with the VIE, its abilities to control the activities at the Chinese-based operating company are limited and the operating company may engage in activities that negatively impact investment value.

While the VIE structure has been widely adopted, it is not formally recognized under Chinese law and therefore there is a risk that the Chinese government could prohibit the existence of such structures or negatively impact the VIE’s contractual arrangements with the listed shell company by making them invalid. If these contracts were found to be unenforceable under Chinese law, investors in the listed shell company, such as the Fund, may suffer significant losses with little or no recourse available. If the Chinese government determines that the agreements establishing the VIE structures do not comply with Chinese law and regulations, including those related to restrictions on foreign ownership, it could subject a Chinese-based issuer to penalties, revocation of business and operating licenses, or forfeiture of ownership interest. In addition, the listed shell company’s control over a VIE may also be jeopardized if a natural person who holds the equity interest in the VIE breaches the terms of the agreement, is subject to legal proceedings or if any physical instruments for authenticating documentation, such as chops and seals, are used without the Chinese-based issuer’s authorization to enter into contractual arrangements in China. Chops and seals, which are carved stamps used to sign documents, represent a legally binding commitment by the company. Moreover, any future regulatory action may prohibit the ability of the shell company to receive the economic benefits of the Chinese-based operating company, which may cause the value of the Fund’s investment in the listed shell company to suffer a significant loss. For example, in 2021, the Chinese government prohibited use of the VIE structure for investment in after-school tutoring companies. There is no guarantee that the Chinese government will not place similar restrictions on other industries.

Chinese equities that utilize the VIE structure to list in the U.S. as ADRs face the risk of regulatory action from U.S. authorities, including the risk of delisting. This will depend in part on whether U.S. regulatory authorities are satisfied with their access to Mainland China and Hong Kong for the purpose of conducting inspections on the quality of audits
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for these companies. Although the U.S. and China reached an agreement in September 2022 to grant the U.S. access for such inspections, there is no guarantee that the agreement will hold up or that U.S. regulatory authorities will continue to feel satisfied with their access. As of December 31, 2022, the Fund had significant exposure to VIEs, as defined above.

Risk of Investing in Emerging Markets: As of the date of this Prospectus, China is an emerging market country. Investments in emerging markets may be subject to a greater risk of loss than investments in developed markets. Securities markets of emerging market countries are less liquid, subject to greater price volatility, have smaller market capitalizations, have less government regulation, and are not subject to as extensive and frequent accounting, financial, and other reporting requirements as the securities markets of more developed countries, and there may be greater risk associated with the custody of securities in emerging markets. It may be difficult or impossible for the Fund to pursue claims against an emerging market issuer in the courts of an emerging market country. There may be significant obstacles to obtaining information necessary for investigations into or litigation against emerging market companies and shareholders may have limited legal rights and remedies. Emerging markets may be more likely to experience inflation, political turmoil and rapid changes in economic conditions than more developed markets. Emerging market economies’ exposure to specific industries, such as tourism, and lack of efficient or sufficient health care systems, could make these economies especially vulnerable to global crises, including but not limited to, pandemics such as the global COVID-19 pandemic. Certain emerging market countries may have privatized, or have begun the process of privatizing, certain entities and industries. Privatized entities may lose money or be re-nationalized.

Risk of Investing in Hong Kong: Investments in Hong Kong issuers may subject the Fund to legal, regulatory, political, currency, security, and economic risk specific to Hong Kong. China is Hong Kong’s largest trading partner, both in terms of exports and imports. Any changes in the Chinese economy, trade regulations or currency exchange rates, or a tightening of China’s control over Hong Kong, including in connection with recent protests and unrest, may have an adverse impact on Hong Kong’s economy.

International Closed Market Trading Risk: To the extent that the underlying investments held by the Fund trade on foreign exchanges that may be closed when the securities exchange on which the Fund’s Shares trade is open, there are likely to be deviations between the current price of such an underlying security and the last quoted price for the underlying security (i.e., the Fund’s quote from the closed foreign market). These deviations could result in premiums or discounts to the Fund’s NAV that may be greater than those experienced by other exchange-traded funds ("ETFs").

Issuer Risk: Fund performance depends on the performance of individual companies in which the Fund invests. Changes to the financial condition of any of those companies may cause the value of such company's securities to decline.

Market Risk: Turbulence in the financial markets and reduced liquidity may negatively affect issuers, which could have an adverse effect on the Fund. If the securities held by the Fund experience poor liquidity, the Fund may be unable to transact at advantageous times or prices, which may decrease the Fund’s returns. In addition, there is a risk that policy changes by central governments and governmental agencies, including the U.S. Federal Reserve or the European Central Bank, which could include increasing interest rates, could cause increased volatility in financial markets and lead to higher levels of Fund redemptions from Authorized Participants, which could have a negative impact on the Fund. Furthermore, local, regional or global events such as war, acts of terrorism, the spread of infectious illness or other public health issues, recessions, or other events could have a significant impact on the Fund and its investments and trading of its Shares. For example, at the start of 2023, central banks had already increased interest rates at the fastest rate on record, and it is unknown how long this trend will continue and when inflation will return to target levels. This increases the risk that monetary policy may provide less support should economic growth slow. Additionally, China’s shift away from a zero-COVID policy creates both opportunities and risks, causing uncertainty for global economic growth. Market risk factors may result in increased volatility and/or decreased liquidity in the securities markets. The Fund’s NAV could decline over short periods due to short-term market movements and over longer periods during market downturns.

Non-Diversification Risk: The Fund is classified as a “non-diversified” investment company under the Investment Company Act of 1940 ("1940 Act"). As a result, the Fund is subject to the risk that it may be more volatile than a diversified fund because the Fund may invest its assets in a smaller number of issuers or may invest a larger proportion of its assets in a single issuer. As a result, the gains and losses on a single investment may have a greater impact on the Fund’s NAV and may make the Fund more volatile than more diversified funds.

Operational Risk: The Fund is exposed to operational risk arising from a number of factors, including but not limited to human error, processing and communication errors, errors of the Fund's service providers, counterparties or other third-parties, failed or inadequate processes and technology or systems failures. Additionally, cyber security failures or breaches of the
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electronic systems of the Fund, the Adviser, and the Fund's other service providers, market makers, Authorized Participants or the issuers of securities in which the Fund invests have the ability to cause disruptions and negatively impact the Fund's business operations, potentially resulting in financial losses to the Fund and its shareholders. The Fund and the Adviser seek to reduce these operational risks through controls and procedures. However, these measures do not address every possible risk and may be inadequate for those risks that they are intended to address.

Passive Investment Risk: The Fund is not actively managed, and the Adviser does not attempt to take defensive positions in declining markets. Unlike many investment companies, the Fund does not seek to outperform its Underlying Index. Therefore, it would not necessarily buy or sell a security unless that security is added or removed, respectively, from the Underlying Index, even if that security generally is underperforming. Additionally, if a constituent of the Underlying Index were removed, even outside of a regular rebalance of the Underlying Index, the Adviser anticipates that the Fund would sell such security. Maintaining investments in securities regardless of market conditions or the performance of individual securities could cause the Fund’s return to be lower than if the Fund employed an active strategy.

Index-Related Risk: There is no guarantee that the Fund will achieve a high degree of correlation to the Underlying Index and therefore achieve its investment objective. Market disruptions and regulatory restrictions could have an adverse effect on the Fund’s ability to adjust its exposure to the required levels in order to track the Underlying Index. Errors in index data, index computations and/or the construction of the Underlying Index in accordance with its methodology may occur from time to time and may not be identified and corrected by the Index Provider for a period of time or at all, which may have an adverse impact on the Fund and its shareholders.

Management Risk: The Fund may not fully replicate its Underlying Index and may hold securities not included in its Underlying Index. The Adviser’s investment strategy, the implementation of which is subject to a number of constraints, may cause the Fund to underperform the market or its relevant benchmark or adversely affect the ability of the Fund to achieve its investment objective.

Tracking Error Risk: Tracking error may occur because of differences between the instruments held in the Fund's portfolio and those included in the Underlying Index, pricing differences, transaction costs incurred by the Fund, the Fund's holding of uninvested cash, size of the Fund, differences in timing of the accrual of or the valuation of dividends or interest, tax gains or losses, changes to the Underlying Index or the costs to the Fund of complying with various new or existing regulatory requirements. This risk may be heightened during times of increased market volatility or other unusual market conditions. Tracking error also may result because the Fund incurs fees and expenses, while the Underlying Index does not. ETFs that track indices with significant weight in emerging markets issuers may experience higher tracking error than other ETFs that do not track such indices.

Reliance on Trading Partners Risk: The Fund invests in the Chinese economy, which is heavily dependent upon trading with key partners. Any reduction in this trading, including as a result of adverse economic conditions in a trading partner's economy, may cause an adverse impact on the Chinese economy in which the Fund invests. Through its portfolio companies' trading partners, the Fund is specifically exposed to Asian Economic Risk, European Economic Risk, and North American Economic Risk.

Risks Associated with Exchange-Traded Funds: As an ETF, the Fund is subject to the following risks:

Authorized Participants Concentration Risk: The Fund has a limited number of financial institutions that may act as Authorized Participants and engage in creation or redemption transactions directly with the Fund, and none of those Authorized Participants is obligated to engage in creation and/or redemption transactions. To the extent that those Authorized Participants exit the business or are unable to process creation and/or redemption orders, such as in times of market stress, Shares may be more likely to trade at a premium or discount to NAV and/or at wider intraday bid-ask spreads, and possibly face trading halts and/or delisting from an exchange. Authorized Participants Concentration Risk may be heightened because the Fund invests in non-U.S. securities.

Large Shareholder Risk: Redemptions by large shareholders could have a significant negative impact on the Fund. If a large shareholder were to redeem all, or a large portion, of its Shares, there is no guarantee that the Fund will be able to maintain sufficient assets to continue operations in which case the Board of Trustees may determine to liquidate the Fund. In addition, transactions by large shareholders may account for a large percentage of the trading volume on a national securities exchange and may, therefore, have a material upward or downward effect on the market price of the Shares.

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Listing Standards Risk: The Fund is required to comply with listing requirements adopted by the listing exchange. Non-compliance with such requirements may result in the Fund's shares being delisted by the listing exchange. Any resulting liquidation of the Fund could cause the Fund to incur elevated transaction costs and could result in negative tax consequences for its shareholders.

Market Trading Risks and Premium/Discount Risks: Shares of the Fund are publicly traded on a national securities exchange, which may subject shareholders to numerous market trading risks. In stressed market conditions, the market for the Shares may become less liquid in response to the deteriorating liquidity of the Fund’s portfolio. This adverse effect on the liquidity of the Shares, as well as disruptions to creations and redemptions, the existence of extreme market volatility or potential lack of assets in the Fund or an active trading market for Shares may result in Shares trading at a significant premium or discount to NAV. If a shareholder purchases Shares at a time when the market price is at a premium to the NAV or sells Shares at a time when the market price is at a di