2022-11-10ABFYE_10_31_PRO
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American Beacon
PROSPECTUS
March 1, 2023
 
Share Class
 
A
C
Y
R6
Advisor
R5
Investor
American Beacon Balanced Fund
ABFAX
ABCCX
ACBYX
ABLSX
AADBX
AABPX
American Beacon Garcia Hamilton Quality Bond Fund
 
 
GHQYX
GHQRX
 
GHQIX
GHQPX
American Beacon International Equity Fund
AIEAX
AILCX
ABEYX
AAERX
AAISX
AAIEX
AAIPX
American Beacon Large Cap Value Fund
ALVAX
ALVCX
ABLYX
AALRX
AVASX
AADEX
AAGPX
American Beacon Small Cap Value Fund
ABSAX
ASVCX
ABSYX
AASRX
AASSX
AVFIX
AVPAX
This Prospectus contains important information you should know about investing, including information about risks. Please read it before you invest and keep it for future reference.
As with all mutual funds, the Securities and Exchange Commission has not approved or disapproved these securities or determined if this Prospectus is truthful or complete. Any representation to the contrary is a criminal offense.

 
 
Table of Contents
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Back Cover
A-1
B-1

 
American Beacon
Balanced FundSM
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Investment Objective
The Fund’s investment objective is income and capital appreciation.
Fees and Expenses of the Fund
This table describes the fees and expenses that you may pay if you buy, hold, and sell shares of the Fund. You may pay other fees, such as brokerage commissions and other fees to financial intermediaries, which are not reflected in the tables and examples below. You may qualify for sales discounts if you and your eligible family members invest, or agree to invest in the future, at least $50,000 in all classes of the American Beacon Funds on an aggregated basis. More information about these and other discounts is available from your financial professional and in “Choosing Your Share Class” on page 66 of the Prospectus and “Additional Purchase and Sale Information for A Class Shares” on page 74 of the Statement of Additional Information (“SAI”). With respect to purchases of shares through specific intermediaries, you may find additional information regarding sales charge discounts and waivers in Appendix A to the Fund’s Prospectus entitled “Intermediary Sales Charge Discounts, Waivers and Other Information.”
Shareholder Fees (fees paid directly from your investment)
Share Class
A
C
Y
Advisor
R5
Investor
Maximum sales charge imposed on purchases (as a percentage of offering price)
5.75
%
None
None
None
None
None
Maximum deferred sales charge (as a percentage of the lower of original offering price or redemption proceeds)
0.50
%
1
1.00
%
None
None
None
None
Annual Fund Operating Expenses (Expenses that you pay each year as a percentage of the value of your investment)
 
 
 
 
 
Share Class
A
C
Y
Advisor
R5
Investor
Management Fees
0.52
%
0.52
%
0.52
%
0.52
%
0.52
%
0.52
%
Distribution and/or Service (12b-1) Fees
0.25
%
1.00
%
0.00
%
0.25
%
0.00
%
0.00
%
Other Expenses
0.27
%
0.26
%
0.28
%
0.42
%
0.20
%
0.51
%
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses
1.04
%
1.78
%
0.80
%
1.19
%
0.72
%
1.03
%
1 A contingent deferred sales charge (‘‘CDSC’’) of 0.50% will be charged on certain purchases of $1,000,000 or more of A Class shares that are redeemed in whole or part within 18 months of purchase.
Example
This Example is intended to help you compare the cost of investing in the Fund with the cost of investing in other mutual funds. The Example assumes that you invest $10,000 in the Fund for the time periods indicated and then redeem all of your shares at the end of those periods. The Example also assumes that your investment has a 5% return each year and that the Fund’s operating expenses remain the same. C Class shares automatically convert to A Class shares 8 years after purchase, if the conversion is available through your financial intermediary. This Example reflects your costs as though C Class shares were held for the full 10-year period. Although your actual costs may be higher or lower, based on these assumptions, your costs would be:
Share Class
1 Year
3 Years
5 Years
10 Years
A
$675
$887
$1,116
$1,773
C
$281
$560
$964
$2,095
Y
$82
$255
$444
$990
Advisor
$121
$378
$654
$1,443
R5
$74
$230
$401
$894
Investor
$105
$328
$569
$1,259
Assuming no redemption of shares:
Share Class
1 Year
3 Years
5 Years
10 Years
C
$181
$560
$964
$2,095
Portfolio Turnover
The Fund pays transaction costs, such as commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or “turns over” its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover rate may indicate higher transaction costs and may result in higher taxes when Fund shares are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are not reflected in annual Fund operating expenses or in the Example, affect the Fund’s performance. During the most recent fiscal year, the Fund’s portfolio turnover rate was 30% of the average value of its portfolio.
Principal Investment Strategies
Under normal circumstances, between 50% and 70% of the Fund’s total assets are invested in equity securities and between 30% and 50% of the Fund’s total assets are invested in debt securities.
The Manager allocates the assets of the Fund among different sub-advisors. The Manager believes that this strategy may help the Fund outperform other investment styles over the longer term while reducing volatility and downside risk.
Prospectus – Fund Summaries1 

 
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The Fund’s equity investments may include common stocks, preferred stocks, convertible securities, including convertible preferred securities, master limited partnerships (“MLPs”), real estate investment trusts (“REITs”), depositary receipts, which may include American depositary receipts (“ADRs”) and global depositary receipts (“GDRs”), and U.S. dollar-denominated foreign stocks traded on U.S. exchanges (collectively referred to as “stocks”). The Fund’s investments in stocks include dividend-paying stocks. The Fund principally invests in large-capitalization and mid-capitalization companies.
The Fund’s sub-advisors select stocks that, in their opinion, have most or all of the following characteristics (relative to the S&P 500® Index):
above-average earnings growth potential,
 
below-average price to earnings ratio,
 
below-average price to book value ratio, and
 
above-average dividend yields.
 
Each of the Fund’s sub-advisors determines the earnings growth prospects of companies based upon a combination of internal and external research using fundamental analysis and considering changing economic trends. The sub-advisors typically seek to invest in companies that they believe to be undervalued at the time of purchase. The decision to sell a stock is typically based on the belief that the company is no longer considered undervalued or shows deteriorating fundamentals, or that better investment opportunities exist in other stocks.
The Fund’s debt securities may include: debentures; obligations of the U.S. Government, its agencies and instrumentalities, including U.S. Government-sponsored enterprises (some of which are not backed by the full faith and credit of the U.S. Government); corporate debt securities, such as notes and bonds; mortgage-backed and mortgage-related securities, including collateralized mortgage obligations and commercial mortgage-backed securities; asset-backed securities; and variable and floating rate securities, which pay interest at variable rates, certain of which are based on a lending rate.
The Fund will only buy debt securities that are deemed by the Manager or sub-advisors, as applicable, to be investment grade at the time of the purchase. If an investment held by the Fund is downgraded below investment grade, the Manager or sub-advisors, as applicable will take action that they believe to be advantageous to the Fund. The Fund has no limitations regarding the duration of the debt securities it can buy.
The Fund may have significant exposure to the Financials sector. However, as the sector composition of the Fund’s portfolio changes over time, the Fund’s exposure to the Financials sector may be lower at a future date, and the Fund’s exposure to other market sectors may be higher.
In determining which debt securities to buy and sell, the Manager and the sub-advisors generally use a “top-down” or “bottom-up” investment strategy, or a combination of both strategies. The top-down fixed income investment strategy is implemented as follows:
Develop an overall investment strategy, including a portfolio duration target, by examining the current trends in the U.S. economy.
 
Set desired portfolio duration structure by comparing the differences between corporate and U.S. Government securities of similar duration to judge their potential for optimal return in accordance with the target duration benchmark.
 
Determine the weightings of each security type by analyzing the difference in yield spreads between corporate and U.S. Government securities.
 
Select specific debt securities within each security type.
 
Review and monitor portfolio composition for changes in credit, risk-return profile and comparisons with benchmarks.
 
The bottom-up fixed income investment strategy is implemented as follows:
Search for eligible securities with a yield to maturity advantage versus a U.S. Government security with a similar duration.
 
Evaluate credit quality of the securities.
 
Perform an analysis of the expected price volatility of the securities to changes in interest rates by examining actual price volatility between U.S. Government and non-U.S. Government securities.
 
Each sub-advisor’s investment processes incorporate the sub-advisor’s environmental, social and/or governance (“ESG”) analysis as a consideration in the assessment of potential equity investments, and of potential debt security investments to which such analysis is deemed applicable by the sub-advisor. However, as ESG information is just one investment consideration, ESG considerations are not solely determinative in any investment decision made by a sub-advisor. In addition, the sub-advisors do not use ESG considerations to limit, restrict or otherwise exclude companies or sectors from the Fund’s investment universe. A sub-advisor may use ESG research and/or ratings information provided by one or more third parties in performing this analysis and considering ESG risks.
The Fund may invest cash balances in a government money market fund advised by the Manager, with respect to which the Manager receives a management fee.  The Fund may also purchase and sell equity index futures contracts to gain market exposure on cash balances or reduce market exposure in anticipation of liquidity needs. The Fund may seek to earn additional income by lending its securities to certain qualified broker-dealers and institutions.
Principal Risks
There is no assurance that the Fund will achieve its investment objective and you could lose part or all of your investment in the Fund. The Fund is not designed for investors who need an assured level of current income and is intended to be a long-term investment. The Fund is not a complete investment program and may not be appropriate for all investors. Investors should carefully consider their own investment goals and risk tolerance before investing in the Fund. The principal risks of investing in the Fund listed below are presented in alphabetical order and not in order of importance or potential exposure. Among other matters, this presentation is intended to facilitate your ability to find particular risks and compare them with the risks of other funds. Each risk summarized below is considered a “principal risk” of investing in the Fund, regardless of the order in which it appears.
Allocation Risk
The allocations among strategies, asset classes and market exposures may be less than optimal and may adversely affect the Fund’s performance. There can be no assurance, particularly during periods of market disruption and stress, that judgments about allocations will be correct. The Fund’s allocations may be invested in strategies, asset classes and market exposures during a period when such strategies, asset classes and market exposures underperform.
Asset-Backed Securities Risk
Investments in asset-backed securities are influenced by factors affecting the assets underlying the securities, including the broader market sector and individual markets, such as the auto markets. These securities may be more sensitive to changes in interest rates than other types of debt securities. Investments in asset-backed securities also are subject to risks of fixed-income securities, which include, but are not limited to, credit risk, interest rate risk, prepayment and extension risk, callable securities risk, valuation risk, liquidity risk, and restricted securities risk. A decline in the credit quality of the issuers of asset-backed securities or instability in the markets for such securities may affect the value and liquidity of such securities, which could result in losses to the Fund. These securities are also subject to the risk of default on the underlying assets, particularly during periods of market downturn, and an unexpectedly high rate of defaults on the underlying assets will adversely affect the security’s value.
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Asset Selection Risk
Assets selected for the Fund may not perform to expectations. This could result in the Fund’s underperformance compared to other funds with similar investment objectives.
Convertible Securities Risk
The value of a convertible security, including a convertible preferred security, typically increases or decreases with the price of the underlying common stock. In general, a convertible security is subject to the market risks of stocks when the underlying stock’s price is high relative to the conversion price and is subject to the market risks of debt securities when the underlying stock’s price is low relative to the conversion price. The general market risks of debt securities that are common to convertible securities include, but are not limited to, interest rate risk and credit risk. Many convertible securities have credit ratings that are below investment grade and are subject to the same risks as an investment in below investment grade debt securities (commonly known as “junk bonds”). Lower-rated debt securities may fluctuate more widely in price and yield than investment grade debt securities and may fall in price during times when the economy is weak or is expected to become weak. Convertible securities are subject to the risk that the credit standing of the issuer may have an effect on the convertible security‘s investment value. Convertible securities are sensitive to movement in interest rates.
Credit Risk
The Fund is subject to the risk that the issuer, guarantor or insurer of an obligation, or the counterparty to a transaction may fail, or become less able or unwilling, to make timely payment of interest or principal or otherwise honor its obligations or default completely. Changes in the actual or perceived creditworthiness of an issuer, or a downgrade or default affecting any of the Fund’s securities, could affect the Fund’s performance. Generally, the longer the maturity and the lower the credit quality of a security, the more sensitive it is to credit risk.
Cybersecurity and Operational Risk
Operational risks arising from, among other problems, human errors, systems and technology disruptions or failures, or cybersecurity incidents may negatively impact the Fund and its service providers as well as the ability of shareholders to transact with the Fund, and result in financial losses. Cybersecurity incidents may allow an unauthorized party to gain access to Fund assets, shareholder data, or proprietary information, or cause the Fund or its service providers, as well as securities trading venues and their service providers, to suffer data corruption or lose operational functionality. Cybersecurity incidents can result from deliberate attacks or unintentional events. It is not possible for the Fund or its service providers to identify all of the operational risks that may affect the Fund or to develop processes and controls to completely eliminate or mitigate their occurrence or effects. The Fund cannot control the cybersecurity plans and systems of its service providers, its counterparties or the issuers of securities in which the Fund invests. Most issuers in which the Fund invests are heavily dependent on computers for data storage and operations, and require ready access to the internet to conduct their business. Thus, cybersecurity incidents could also affect issuers of securities in which the Fund invests, leading to significant loss of value.
Debentures Risk
Debentures are unsecured debt securities. The holder of a debenture is protected only by the general creditworthiness of the issuer. The Fund may invest in both corporate and government debentures.
Dividend Risk
An issuer of stock held by the Fund may choose not to declare a dividend or the dividend rate might not remain at current levels or increase over time. Dividend paying stocks might not experience the same level of earnings growth or capital appreciation as non-dividend paying stocks. Securities that pay dividends may be sensitive to changes in interest rates and, as interest rates rise or fall, the prices of such securities may fall.
Environmental, Social, and/or Governance Investing Risk
The use of environmental, social, and/or governance (“ESG”) considerations by a sub-advisor may cause the Fund to make different investments than funds that have a similar investment style but do not incorporate such considerations in their strategy. As with the use of any investment considerations involved in investment decisions, there is no guarantee that the use of any ESG investment considerations will result in the selection of issuers that will outperform other issuers or help reduce risk in the Fund. The Fund may underperform funds that do not incorporate these considerations or incorporate different ESG considerations. Although a sub-advisor has established its own process to oversee ESG integration in accordance with the Fund’s strategies, successful integration of ESG factors will depend on a sub-advisor’s skill in researching, identifying, and applying these factors, as well as on the availability of relevant data. A sub-advisor may use ESG research and/or ratings information provided by one or more third parties in performing this analysis and considering ESG risks.
The regulatory landscape with respect to ESG investing in the United States is evolving and any future rules or regulations may require the Fund to change its investment process with respect to the integration of ESG factors.
Equity Investments Risk
Equity securities are subject to investment risk, issuer risk and market risk. In general, the values of stocks and other equity securities fluctuate, and sometimes widely fluctuate, in response to changes in a company’s financial condition as well as general market, economic and political conditions and other factors. The Fund may experience a significant or complete loss on its investment in an equity security. In addition, stock prices may be particularly sensitive to rising interest rates, which increase borrowing costs and the costs of capital. The Fund may invest in the following equity securities, which may expose the Fund to the following additional risks:
Common Stock Risk. The value of a company’s common stock may fall as a result of factors affecting the company, companies in the same industry or sector, or the financial markets overall. Common stock generally is subordinate to preferred stock upon the liquidation or bankruptcy of the issuing company.
 
Depositary Receipts and/or U.S. Dollar-Denominated Foreign Stocks Traded on U.S. Exchanges Risk. Depositary receipts and U.S. dollar-denominated foreign stocks traded on U.S. exchanges are subject to certain of the risks associated with investing directly in foreign securities, including, but not limited to, currency exchange rate fluctuations, political and financial instability in the home country of a particular depositary receipt or foreign stock, less liquidity, more volatility, less government regulation and supervision and delays in transaction settlement.
 
Master Limited Partnerships (“MLPs”) Risk. Investing in MLPs involves certain risks related to investing in the underlying assets of the MLPs and risks associated with pooled investment vehicles. Investments held by MLPs may be relatively illiquid, limiting the MLPs’ ability to change their portfolios promptly in response to changes in economic or other conditions. MLPs may have limited financial resources, their securities may trade infrequently and in limited volume, they may be difficult to value, and they may be subject to more abrupt or erratic price movements than securities of larger or more broadly based companies. Holders of units in MLPs have more limited rights to vote on matters affecting the partnership and may be required to sell their common units at an undesirable time or price. The Fund’s investments in MLPs will be limited to no more than 25% of its assets in order for the Fund to meet the requirements necessary to qualify as a “regulated investment company” under the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended (“Internal Revenue Code”).
 
Real Estate Investment Trusts (“REITs”) Risk. Investments in REITs are subject to the risks associated with investing in the real estate industry, including, among other risks: adverse developments affecting the real estate industry; declines in real property values; changes in interest rates; defaults by
 
Prospectus – Fund Summaries3 

 
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mortgagors or other borrowers and tenants; lack of availability of mortgage funds or financing; extended vacancies of properties, especially during economic downturns; casualty or condemnation losses; and governmental actions, such as changes to tax laws, zoning regulations or environmental regulations. REITs also are dependent upon the skills of their managers and are subject to heavy cash flow dependency or self-liquidation. Regardless of where a REIT is organized or traded, its performance may be affected significantly by events in the region where its properties are located. Domestic REITs could be adversely affected by failure to qualify for tax-free “pass-through” of distributed net income and net realized gains under the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended (“Internal Revenue Code”), or to maintain their exemption from registration under the Investment Company Act of 1940, as amended (“Investment Company Act”). REITs typically incur fees that are separate from those incurred by the Fund. Accordingly, the Fund’s investment in REITs will result in the layering of expenses such that shareholders will indirectly bear a proportionate share of the REITs’ operating expenses, in addition to paying Fund expenses. The value of REIT common stock may decline when interest rates rise. REITs tend to be small- to mid-capitalization securities and, as such, are subject to the risks of investing in small- to mid-capitalization securities.
 
Foreign Exposure Risk
Exposure to obligations of non-U.S. issuers carries potential risks not associated with investments in obligations of U.S. issuers. Such risks may include, but are not limited to: (1) currency exchange rate fluctuations, (2) political and financial instability, (3) less liquidity, (4) lack of uniform accounting, auditing and financial reporting standards, (5) greater volatility, (6) different government regulation and supervision of foreign stock exchanges, brokers and listed companies, and (7) delays in transaction settlement in some foreign markets. The Fund’s exposure to a foreign issuer may subject the Fund to regulatory, political, currency, security, economic and other risks associated with that country. Global economic and financial markets have become increasingly interconnected and conditions (including recent volatility and instability) and events (including natural disasters) in one country, region or financial market may adversely impact issuers in a different country, region or financial market.
Futures Contracts Risk
Futures contracts are derivative instruments pursuant to a contract where the parties agree to a fixed price for an agreed amount of securities or other underlying assets at an agreed date. The use of such derivative instruments may expose the Fund to additional risks, such as credit risk, liquidity risk, and counterparty risk, that it would not be subject to if it invested directly in the securities underlying those derivatives. There can be no assurance that any strategy used will succeed. There may at times be an imperfect correlation between the movement in the prices of futures contracts and the value of their underlying instruments or indexes. There also can be no assurance that, at all times, a liquid market will exist for offsetting a futures contract that the Fund has previously bought or sold, and this may result in the inability to close a futures contract when desired. Futures contracts may experience potentially dramatic price changes, which will increase the volatility of the Fund and may involve a small investment of cash (the amount of initial and variation margin) relative to the magnitude of the risk assumed (the potential increase or decrease in the price of the futures contract). Equity index futures contracts expose the Fund to volatility in an underlying securities index. Use of derivatives is a highly specialized activity that can involve investment techniques and risks different from, and in some respects greater than, those associated with investing in more traditional investments. Derivatives can be highly complex and highly volatile and may perform in unanticipated ways.
Interest Rate Risk
Generally, the value of investments with interest rate risk, such as fixed-income securities or derivatives, will move in the opposite direction to movements in interest rates. Factors including central bank monetary policy, rising inflation rates, and changes in general economic conditions may cause interest rates to rise, which could cause the value of the Fund’s investments to decline. Interest rates may rise, perhaps significantly and/or rapidly, potentially resulting in substantial losses to the Fund. Interest rate changes may have a more pronounced effect on the market value of fixed-rate instruments than on floating-rate instruments. The value of floating rate and variable securities may decline if their interest rates do not rise as quickly, or as much, as general interest rates. The prices of fixed-income securities or derivatives are also affected by their durations. Fixed-income securities or derivatives with longer durations generally have greater sensitivity to changes in interest rates. Rising interest rates may cause the value of the Fund’s investments with longer durations and terms to maturity to decline, which may adversely affect the value of the Fund. For example, if a bond has a duration of eight years, a 1% increase in interest rates could be expected to result in an 8% decrease in the value of the bond. An increase in interest rates can impact markets broadly as well. To the extent the Fund holds an investment with a negative interest rate to maturity, the Fund may generate a negative return on that investment.
Investment Risk
An investment in the Fund is not a deposit with a bank and is not insured or guaranteed by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation or any other government agency. When you sell your shares of the Fund, they could be worth less than what you paid for them. Therefore, you may lose money by investing in the Fund.
Issuer Risk
The value of, and/or the return generated by, a security may decline for a number of reasons that directly relate to the issuer, such as management performance, financial leverage and reduced demand for the issuer’s goods or services, as well as the historical and prospective earnings of the issuer and the value of its assets.
Large-Capitalization Companies Risk
The securities of large market capitalization companies may underperform other segments of the market because such companies may be less responsive to competitive challenges and opportunities and, at times, such companies may be out of favor with investors. Many larger-capitalization companies also may be unable to attain the high growth rates of successful smaller companies, especially during periods of economic expansion.
Liquidity Risk
The Fund is susceptible to the risk that certain investments held by the Fund may have limited marketability, be subject to restrictions on sale, be difficult or impossible to purchase or sell at favorable times or prices or become less liquid in response to market developments or adverse credit events that may affect issuers or guarantors of a security. An inability to sell a portfolio position can adversely affect the Fund’s value or prevent the Fund from being able to take advantage of other investment opportunities. Market prices for such instruments may be volatile. During periods of substantial market volatility, an investment or even an entire market segment may become illiquid, sometimes abruptly, which can adversely affect the Fund’s ability to limit losses. The Fund could lose money if it is unable to dispose of an investment at a time that is most beneficial to the Fund. The Fund may be required to dispose of investments at unfavorable times or prices to satisfy obligations, which may result in losses or may be costly to the Fund. For example, liquidity risk may be magnified in rising interest rate environments in the event of higher-than-normal redemption rates. Unexpected redemptions may force the Fund to sell certain investments at unfavorable prices to meet redemption requests or other cash needs. Judgment plays a greater role in pricing illiquid investments than in investments with more active markets.
Market Risk
The Fund is subject to the risk that the securities markets will move down, sometimes rapidly and unpredictably, based on overall economic conditions and other factors, which may negatively affect the Fund’s performance. Equity securities generally have greater price volatility than fixed-income securities, although under certain market conditions fixed-income securities may have comparable or greater price volatility. During a general downturn in the securities
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markets, multiple assets may decline in value simultaneously. Prices in many financial markets have increased significantly over the last decade, but there have also been periods of adverse market and financial developments and cyclical change during that timeframe, which have resulted in unusually high levels of volatility in domestic and foreign financial markets that has caused losses for investors and may occur again in the future. The value of a security may decline due to adverse issuer-specific conditions, general market conditions unrelated to a particular issuer, such as changes in interest or inflation rates, or factors that affect a particular industry or industries. Changes in the financial condition of a single issuer or market segment also can impact the market as a whole. Geopolitical and other events, including war, terrorism, economic uncertainty, trade disputes, pandemics, public health crises, natural disasters and related events have led, and in the future may continue to lead, to instability in world economies and markets generally and reduced liquidity in equity, credit and fixed-income markets, which may disrupt economies and markets and adversely affect the value of your investment. Changes in value may be temporary or may last for extended periods.
Policy changes by the U.S. government and/or Federal Reserve and political events within the U.S. and abroad, such as changes in the U.S. presidential administration and Congress, the U.S. government’s inability at times to agree on a long-term budget and deficit reduction plan, the threat of a federal government shutdown and threats not to increase the federal government’s debt limit which could result in a default on the government’s obligations, may affect investor and consumer confidence and may adversely impact financial markets and the broader economy, perhaps suddenly and to a significant degree.
Markets and market participants are increasingly reliant upon both publicly available and proprietary information data systems. Data imprecision, software or other technology malfunctions, programming inaccuracies, unauthorized use or access, and similar circumstances may impair the performance of these systems and may have an adverse impact upon a single issuer, a group of issuers, or the market at large.
The financial markets generally move in cycles, with periods of rising prices followed by periods of declining prices. The value of your investment may reflect these fluctuations.
Recent Market Events Risk. Both U.S. and international markets have experienced significant volatility in recent months and years. As a result of such volatility, investment returns may fluctuate significantly. Moreover, the risks discussed herein associated with an investment in the Fund may be increased. An outbreak of infectious respiratory illness caused by a novel coronavirus, known as COVID-19, was first detected in late 2019 and has subsequently spread globally. The transmission of various variants of COVID-19, and efforts to contain their spread, have resulted, and may continue to result, in significant disruptions to business operations, travel restrictions and closed borders, and lower consumer demand, as well as general concern and uncertainty that has negatively affected the global economy. Any resurgence of COVID-19, a variant or other significant viruses could negatively impact the Fund and adversely impact the economies of many nations, individual companies and the global securities and commodities markets, including their liquidity, in ways that cannot necessarily be foreseen at the present time.
Although interest rates were unusually low in recent years in the U.S. and abroad, in 2022, the Federal Reserve and certain foreign central banks began to raise interest rates as part of their efforts to address rising inflation. It is difficult to accurately predict the pace at which interest rates may continue to increase, or the timing, frequency or magnitude of any such increases. Additionally, various economic and political factors could cause the Federal Reserve or another foreign central bank to change their approach in the future and such actions may result in an economic slowdown in the U.S. and abroad. Unexpected increases in interest rates could lead to market volatility or reduce liquidity in certain sectors of the market. Deteriorating economic fundamentals may, in turn, increase the risk of default or insolvency of particular issuers, negatively impact market value, cause credit spreads to widen, and reduce bank balance sheets. Any of these could cause an increase in market volatility or reduce liquidity across various markets. Additionally, high public debt in the U.S. and other countries creates ongoing systemic and market risks and policymaking uncertainty.
Some countries, including the U.S., have in recent years adopted more protectionist trade policies. Slowing global economic growth; risks associated with a trade agreement between the United Kingdom and the European Union; the risks associated with ongoing trade negotiations with China; the possibility of changes to some international trade agreements; tensions, war, or open conflict between nations, such as between Russia and Ukraine or in eastern Asia; political or economic dysfunction within some nations, including major producers of oil; and dramatic changes in commodity and currency prices could affect the economies of many nations, including the United States, in ways that cannot necessarily be foreseen at the present time. Russia’s military invasion of Ukraine beginning in February 2022, the responses and sanctions by the United States and other countries, and the potential for wider conflict have had, and could continue to have, severe adverse effects on the performance and liquidity of global markets, and negatively affect the value of the Fund’s investments. The duration of ongoing hostilities and the vast array of sanctions and related events cannot be predicted. Those events present material uncertainty and risk with respect to markets globally and the performance of the Fund and its investments or operations could be negatively impacted. The recent strength of the U.S. dollar could decrease foreign demand for U.S. assets, which may negatively impact certain issuers and/or industries.
Economists and others have expressed increasing concern about the potential effects of global climate change on property and security values. Certain issuers, industries and regions may be adversely affected by the impacts of climate change, including on the demand for and the development of goods and services and related production costs, and the impacts of legislation, regulation and international accords related to climate change, as well as any indirect consequences of regulation or business trends driven by climate change.
 
Mid-Capitalization Companies Risk
Investing in the securities of mid-capitalization companies involves greater risk and the possibility of greater price volatility, which at times can be rapid and unpredictable, than investing in larger-capitalization and more established companies. Since mid-capitalization companies may have narrower commercial markets and more limited operating history, product lines, and managerial and financial resources than larger, more established companies, the securities of these companies may lack sufficient market liquidity, and they can be particularly sensitive to changes in overall economic conditions, interest rates, borrowing costs and earnings.
Mortgage-Backed and Mortgage-Related Securities Risk
Investments in mortgage-backed and mortgage-related securities are influenced by the factors affecting the mortgages underlying the securities or the housing market. These securities tend to be more sensitive to changes in interest rates than other types of debt securities. Investments in mortgage-backed and mortgage-related securities also are subject to market risks for fixed-income securities, which include, but are not limited to, credit risk, interest rate risk, prepayment and extension risk, callable securities risk, valuation risk, liquidity risk, and restricted securities risk. A decline in the credit quality of the issuers of mortgage-backed and mortgage-related securities or instability in the markets for such securities may affect the value and liquidity of such securities, which could result in losses to the Fund. These securities are also subject to the risk of default on the underlying mortgages, particularly during periods of market downturn, and an unexpectedly high rate of defaults on the underlying assets will adversely affect the security’s value. Additionally, certain mortgage-related securities may include securities backed by pools of loans made to “subprime” borrowers or borrowers with blemished credit histories; the risk of defaults is generally higher in the case of mortgage pools that include such subprime mortgages.
Collateralized Mortgage Obligation (“CMOs”) Risk. CMOs may offer a higher yield than U.S. government securities, but they may also be subject to greater price fluctuation and credit risk. In addition, CMOs typically will be issued in a variety of classes or series, which have different maturities and are retired in sequence. In the event of a default by an issuer of a CMO, there is no assurance that the collateral securing such CMO will be sufficient to pay principal and interest. It is possible that there will be limited opportunities for trading CMOs in the OTC market, the depth and liquidity of which will vary from time to time.
 
Prospectus – Fund Summaries5 

 
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Commercial Mortgage-Backed Securities (“CMBS”) Risk. CMBS include securities that reflect an interest in, and are secured by, mortgage loans on commercial real property. CMBS are subject to the risks generally associated with mortgage-backed securities. CMBS may not be backed by the full faith and credit of the U.S. Government and are subject to risk of default on the underlying mortgages. CMBS also are subject to many of the risks of investing in the real estate securing the underlying mortgage loans. These risks reflect the effects of local and other economic conditions on real estate markets, the ability of tenants to make loan payments, and the ability of a property to attract and retain tenants.
 
Multiple Sub-Advisor Risk
The Manager may allocate the Fund’s assets among multiple sub-advisors, each of which is responsible for investing its allocated portion of the Fund’s assets. To a significant extent, the Fund’s performance will depend on the success of the Manager in selecting and overseeing the sub-advisors and allocating the Fund’s assets to sub-advisors. The sub-advisors’ investment styles may not work together as planned, which could adversely affect the performance of the Fund. In addition, because each sub-advisor makes its trading decisions independently, the sub-advisors may purchase or sell the same security at the same time without aggregating their transactions. This may cause unnecessary brokerage and other expenses.
Other Investment Companies Risk
To the extent that the Fund invests in shares of other registered investment companies, the Fund will indirectly bear the fees and expenses charged by those investment companies in addition to the Fund’s direct fees and expenses. To the extent the Fund invests in other investment companies that invest in equity securities, fixed-income securities and/or foreign securities, or that track an index, the Fund is subject to the risks associated with the underlying investments held by the investment company or the index fluctuations to which the investment company is subject. The Fund will be subject to the risks associated with investments in those companies, including but not limited to the following:
Government Money Market Funds Risk. Investments in government money market funds are subject to interest rate risk, credit risk, and market risk. Interest rate risk is the risk that rising interest rates could cause the value of such an investment to decline. Credit risk is the risk that the issuer, guarantor or insurer of an obligation, or the counterparty to a transaction, may fail or become less able or unwilling, to make timely payment of interest or principal or otherwise honor its obligations, or that it may default completely.
 
Preferred Stock Risk
Preferred stocks are sensitive to movements in interest rates. Preferred stocks may be less liquid than common stocks and, unlike common stocks, participation in the growth of an issuer may be limited. Distributions on preferred stocks generally are payable at the discretion of an issuer and after required payments to bond holders. In certain situations, an issuer may call or redeem its preferred stock or convert it to common stock. The market prices of preferred stocks are generally more sensitive to actual or perceived changes in the issuer’s financial condition or prospects than are the prices of debt securities.
Prepayment and Extension Risk
Prepayment risk is the risk that the principal amount of a bond may be repaid prior to the bond’s maturity date. Due to a decline in interest rates or excess cash flow into the issuer, a debt security may be called or otherwise converted, prepaid or redeemed before maturity. If this occurs, no additional interest will be paid on the investment. The Fund may have to reinvest the proceeds in another investment at a lower rate, may not benefit from an increase in value that may result from declining interest rates, and may lose any premium it paid to acquire the security. The rate of prepayments tends to increase as interest rates fall, which could cause the average maturity of the portfolio to shorten. Variable and floating rate securities may be less sensitive to prepayment risk. Extension risk is the risk that a decrease in prepayments may, as a result of higher interest rates or other factors, result in the extension of a security’s effective maturity, increase the risk of default and delayed payment, heighten interest rate risk and increase the potential for a decline in its price. In addition, as a consequence of a decrease in prepayments, the amount of principal available to the Fund for investment would be reduced.
Redemption Risk
The Fund may experience periods of high levels of redemptions that could cause the Fund to sell assets at inopportune times or at a loss or depressed value. Heavy redemptions could hurt the Fund’s performance. The sale of assets to meet redemption requests may create net capital gains, which could cause the Fund to have to distribute substantial capital gains. Redemption risk is greater to the extent that one or more investors or intermediaries control a large percentage of investments in the Fund. In addition, redemption risk is heightened during periods of declining or illiquid markets. A rise in interest rates or other market developments may cause investors to move out of fixed-income securities on a large scale. During periods of heavy redemptions, the Fund may borrow funds through the interfund credit facility or from a bank line of credit, which may increase costs. The sale of assets to meet redemption requests may create net capital gains or losses, which could cause the Fund to have to distribute substantial capital gains.
Sector Risk
When the Fund focuses its investments in certain sectors of the economy, its performance may be driven largely by sector performance and could fluctuate more widely than if the Fund were invested more evenly across sectors. Individual sectors may be more volatile, and may perform differently, than the broader market. As the Fund’s portfolio changes over time, the Fund’s exposure to a particular sector may become higher or lower.
Financials Sector Risk. Financial services companies are subject to extensive governmental regulation, which may limit both the amounts and types of loans and other financial commitments they can make, the interest rates and fees they can charge, the scope of their activities, the prices they can charge and the amount of capital they must maintain. Profitability is largely dependent on the availability and cost of capital funds and can fluctuate significantly when interest rates change or due to increased competition. In addition, deterioration of the credit markets generally may cause an adverse impact in a broad range of markets, including U.S. and international credit and interbank money markets generally, thereby affecting a wide range of financial institutions and markets. Certain events in the Financials sector may cause an unusually high degree of volatility in the financial markets, both domestic and foreign, and cause certain financial services companies to incur large losses. Securities of financial services companies may experience a dramatic decline in value when such companies experience substantial declines in the valuations of their assets, take action to raise capital (such as the issuance of debt or equity securities), or cease operations.
 
Secured, Partially Secured and Unsecured Obligation Risk
Debt obligations may be secured, partially secured or unsecured. Interests in secured and partially-secured obligations have the benefit of collateral and, typically, of restrictive covenants limiting the ability of the borrower to further encumber its assets. However, there is no assurance that the liquidation of collateral from a secured or partially-secured obligation would satisfy the borrower’s obligation, or that the collateral can be liquidated. Furthermore, there is a risk that the value of any collateral securing an obligation in which the Fund has an interest may decline and that the collateral may not be sufficient to cover the amount owed on the obligation. In the event the borrower defaults, the Fund’s access to the collateral may be limited or delayed by bankruptcy or other insolvency laws. Unsecured debt, including senior unsecured and subordinated debt, will not be secured by any collateral and will be effectively subordinated to a borrower’s secured indebtedness (to the extent of the collateral securing such indebtedness). With respect to unsecured obligations, the Fund lacks any collateral on which to foreclose to satisfy its claim in whole or in part. Such instruments generally have greater price volatility than that of fully secured holdings and may be less liquid.
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Securities Lending Risk
To the extent the Fund lends its securities, it may be subject to the following risks: (i) the securities in which the Fund reinvests cash collateral may decrease in value, causing the Fund to incur a loss, or may not perform sufficiently to cover the Fund’s payment to the borrower of a pre-negotiated fee or “rebate” for the use of that cash collateral in connection with the loan; (ii) non-cash collateral may decline in value, resulting in the Fund becoming under-secured; (iii) delays may occur in the recovery of loaned securities from borrowers, which could result in the Fund being unable to vote proxies or settle transactions or cause the Fund to incur increased costs; and (iv) if the borrower becomes subject to insolvency or similar proceedings, the Fund could incur delays in its ability to enforce its rights in its collateral.
Securities Selection Risk
Securities selected for the Fund may not perform to expectations. This could result in the Fund’s underperformance compared to its benchmark index(es), or other funds with similar investment objectives or strategies.
Segregated Assets Risk
In connection with certain transactions that may give rise to future payment obligations, the Fund may be required to maintain a segregated amount of, or otherwise earmark, cash or liquid securities to cover the obligation. Segregated assets generally cannot be sold while the position they are covering is outstanding, unless they are replaced with other assets of equal value. The need to segregate cash or other liquid securities could limit the Fund’s ability to pursue other opportunities as they arise.
U.S. Government Securities and Government-Sponsored Enterprises Risk
A security backed by the U.S. Treasury or the full faith and credit of the United States is guaranteed only as to the timely payment of interest and principal when held to maturity. The market prices for such securities are not guaranteed and will fluctuate. Securities held by the Fund that are issued by government-sponsored enterprises, such as the Federal National Mortgage Association (‘‘Fannie Mae’’), Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation (‘‘Freddie Mac’’), Federal Home Loan Bank (‘‘FHLB’’), Federal Farm Credit Bank (“FFCB”), and the Tennessee Valley Authority, are not guaranteed by the U.S. Treasury and are not backed by the full faith and credit of the U.S. government, and no assurance can be given that the U.S. government will provide financial support if these organizations do not have the funds to meet future payment obligations. U.S. government securities and securities of government-sponsored entities are also subject to credit risk, interest rate risk and market risk. The rising U.S. national debt may lead to adverse impacts on the value of U.S. government securities due to potentially higher costs for the U.S. government to obtain new financing.
Value Stocks Risk
Value stocks are subject to the risk that their intrinsic or full value may never be realized by the market, that a stock judged to be undervalued may be appropriately priced, or that their prices may decline. Although value stocks tend to be inexpensive relative to their earnings, they can continue to be inexpensive for long periods of time. The Fund’s investments in value stocks seek to limit potential downside price risk over time; however, value stock prices still may decline substantially. In addition, the Fund may produce more modest gains as a trade-off for this potentially lower risk. The Fund’s investment in value stocks could cause the Fund to underperform funds that use a growth or non-value approach to investing or have a broader investment style.
Variable and Floating Rate Securities Risk
The coupons on variable and floating-rate securities are not fixed and may fluctuate based upon changes in market rates. A variable rate security has a coupon that is adjusted at pre-designated periods in response to changes in the market rate of interest on which the coupon is based. The coupon on a floating rate security is generally based on an interest rate, such as a money-market index, ICE LIBOR, Secured Overnight Financing Rate (“SOFR”), or a Treasury bill rate. Variable and floating rate securities are subject to interest rate risk and credit risk. As short-term interest rates decline, the coupons on variable and floating-rate securities typically decrease. Alternatively, during periods of rising short-term interest rates, the coupons on variable and floating-rate securities typically increase. Changes in the coupons of variable and floating-rate securities may lag behind changes in market rates or may have limits on the maximum increases in the coupon rates. The value of variable and floating-rate securities may decline if their coupons do not rise as much, or as quickly, as interest rates in general. Conversely, variable and floating rate securities will not generally increase in value if interest rates decline. Certain types of variable and floating rate instruments may be subject to greater liquidity risk than other debt securities.
Fund Performance
The bar chart and table below provide an indication of risk by showing changes in the Fund’s performance over time. The bar chart shows how the Fund’s performance has varied from year to year. The table shows how the Fund’s average annual total returns compare to a composite index and the two broad-based securities market indices that comprise the composite index, for the periods indicated.
The chart and the table show the performance of the Fund’s Investor Class shares for all periods. C Class shares automatically convert to A Class shares 8 years after purchase, if the conversion is available through your financial intermediary. In the table below, the performance for C Class shares reflects the conversion of C Class shares to A Class shares after 8 years.
You may obtain updated performance information on the Fund’s website at www.americanbeaconfunds.com. Past performance (before and after taxes) is not necessarily an indication of how the Fund will perform in the future.
Calendar year total returns for Investor Class Shares. Year Ended 12/31
image
Highest Quarterly Return:
15.36%4th Quarter 2020
01/01/2013 through 12/31/2022
Lowest Quarterly Return:
-19.59%1st Quarter 2020
01/01/2013 through 12/31/2022
Prospectus – Fund Summaries7 

 
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Average annual total returns for periods ended December 31, 2022
 
Inception Date of Class
1 Year
5 Years
10 Years
Investor Class
08/01/1994
Returns Before Taxes
-7.84
%
4.98
%
7.24
%
Returns After Taxes on Distributions
-10.38
%
2.11
%
4.85
%
Returns After Taxes on Distributions and Sales of Fund Shares
-2.94
%
3.54
%
5.35
%
 
Inception Date of Class
1 Year
5 Years
10 Years
Share Class (Before Taxes)
A
05/17/2010
-13.14
%
3.73
%
6.54
%
C
09/01/2010
-9.56
%
4.20
%
6.55
%*
Y
03/01/2010
-7.64
%
5.23
%
7.51
%
Advisor
05/31/2005
-7.97
%
4.82
%
7.07
%
R5
07/17/1987
-7.50
%
5.29
%
7.58
%
* As noted above, the 10-year performance for C Class shares reflects the conversion of C Class shares to A Class shares after 8 years. If C Class shares were not converted to A Class shares after 8 years, and were instead held for the full 10-year period, performance would have been 6.40%.
 
 
1 Year
5 Years
10 Years
Index (Reflects no deduction for fees, expenses or taxes)
Balanced Composite Index (40% Bloomberg US Aggregate Bond Index/60% Russell 1000® Value Index)
-9.47
%
4.39
%
6.80
%
Bloomberg US Aggregate Bond Index
-13.01
%
0.02
%
1.06
%
Russell 1000® Value Index
-7.54
%
6.67
%
10.29
%
After-tax returns are calculated using the historical highest individual federal marginal income tax rates and do not reflect the impact of state and local income taxes. Actual after-tax returns depend on an investor’s tax situation and may differ from those shown. The return after taxes on distributions and sale of Fund shares may exceed the return before taxes due to an assumed tax benefit from any losses on a sale of Fund shares at the end of the measurement period. If you are a tax-exempt entity or hold your Fund shares through a tax-deferred arrangement, such as an individual retirement account (“IRA”) or a 401(k) plan, the after-tax returns do not apply to your situation. After-tax returns are shown only for Investor Class shares of the Fund; after-tax returns for other share classes will vary.
Management
The Manager
The Fund has retained American Beacon Advisors, Inc. to serve as its Manager.
Sub-Advisors
The Fund’s assets are currently allocated among the Manager and the following investment sub-advisors:
Barrow, Hanley, Mewhinney & Strauss, LLC
 
Hotchkis and Wiley Capital Management, LLC
 
Portfolio Managers
American Beacon Advisors, Inc.
Paul B. Cavazos
Senior Vice President & Chief Investment Officer
Since 2016
Kirk L. Brown
Senior Portfolio Manager
Since 2016
Samuel Silver
Vice President,
Fixed Income Investments
Since 2014
Erin Higginbotham
Senior Portfolio Manager
Since 2011
Barrow, Hanley, Mewhinney & Strauss, LLC
Mark Giambrone
Portfolio Manager/Senior Managing Director
Since 2015
Mark C. Luchsinger*
Portfolio Manager/Senior Managing Director
Co-Head of Fixed Income
Since 1998
Justin Martin
Portfolio Manager/Director
Since 2021
Deborah A. Petruzzelli
Portfolio Manager/Managing Director
Since 2003
J. Scott McDonald
Portfolio Manager/Senior Managing Director
Co-Head of Fixed Income
Since 1998
Matthew Routh
Portfolio Manager/Director
Since 2021
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Hotchkis and Wiley Capital Management, LLC
George Davis
Principal, Portfolio Manager, and Executive Chairman
Since 1989
Scott McBride
Portfolio Manager and Chief Executive Officer
Since 2004
Judd Peters
Portfolio Manager
Since 2003
Patricia McKenna
Principal and Portfolio Manager
Since 1995
* Effective April 30, 2023, Mr. Luchsinger will retire as a Portfolio Manager for the Fund. Therefore, effective April 30, 2023, all references to Mr. Luchsinger are deleted.
Purchase and Sale of Fund Shares
You may buy or sell shares of the Fund through a retirement plan, an investment professional, a broker-dealer, or other financial intermediary. You may purchase or redeem shares of the Fund on any day the New York Stock Exchange (“NYSE”) is open, at the Fund’s net asset value (“NAV”) per share next calculated after your order is received in proper form, subject to any applicable sales charge. The Manager may, in its sole discretion, allow certain individuals to invest directly in the Fund. For more information regarding eligibility to invest directly please see “About Your Investment - Purchase and Redemption of Shares.” Direct mutual fund account shareholders may buy subsequent shares or sell shares in various ways:
Internet
www.americanbeaconfunds.com
Phone
To reach an American Beacon representative call 1-800-658-5811, option 1
Through the Automated Voice Response Service call 1-800-658-5811, option 2 (Investor Class only)
Mail
American Beacon Funds
P.O. Box 219643
Kansas City, MO 64121-9643
Overnight Delivery:
American Beacon Funds
430 W. 7th Street, Suite 219643
Kansas City, MO 64105-1407
 
New Account
Existing Account
Share Class
Minimum Initial Investment Amount
Purchase/Redemption Minimum by Check/ACH/Exchange
Purchase/Redemption Minimum by Wire
C
$1,000
$50
$250
A, Investor
$2,500
$50
$250
Advisor
$2,500
$50
None
Y
$100,000
$50
None
R5
$250,000
$50
None
Tax Information
Dividends, capital gains distributions, and other distributions, if any, that you receive from the Fund are subject to federal income tax and may also be subject to state and local income taxes, unless you are a tax-exempt entity or your account is tax-deferred, such as an individual retirement account (“IRA”) or a 401(k) plan (in which case you may be taxed later, upon the withdrawal of your investment from such account or plan).
Payments to Broker-Dealers and Other Financial Intermediaries
If you purchase shares of the Fund through a broker-dealer or other financial intermediary (such as a bank), the Fund and the Fund’s distributor, Resolute Investment Distributors, Inc., or the Manager may pay the intermediary for the sale of Fund shares and related services. These payments may create a conflict of interest by influencing the broker-dealer or other intermediary and your individual financial professional to recommend the Fund over another investment. Ask your individual financial professional or visit your financial intermediary’s website for more information.
Prospectus – Fund Summaries9 

 
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American Beacon
Garcia Hamilton Quality Bond FundSM
image
Investment Objective
The Fund’s investment objective is high current income consistent with preservation of capital.
Fees and Expenses of the Fund
This table describes the fees and expenses that you may pay if you buy, hold, and sell shares of the Fund. You may pay other fees, such as brokerage commissions and other fees to financial intermediaries, which are not reflected in the tables and examples below. More information is available from your financial professional and in “Choosing Your Share Class” on page 66 of the Prospectus.
Shareholder Fees (fees paid directly from your investment)
Share Class
Y
R6
R5
Investor
Maximum sales charge imposed on purchases (as a percentage of offering price)
None
None
None
None
Maximum deferred sales charge (as a percentage of the lower of original offering price or redemption proceeds)
None
None
None
None
Annual Fund Operating Expenses (Expenses that you pay each year as a percentage of the value of your investment)
 
 
 
Share Class
Y
R6
R5
Investor
Management Fees
0.55
%
0.55
%
0.55
%
0.55
%
Distribution and/or Service (12b-1) Fees
0.00
%
0.00
%
0.00
%
0.00
%
Other Expenses
0.18
%
0.08
%
0.11
%
0.58
%
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses
0.73
%
0.63
%
0.66
%
1.13
%
Fee Waiver and/or expense reimbursement1
(0.22
%)
(0.22
%)
(0.21
%)
(0.30
%)
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses after fee waiver and/or expense reimbursement
0.51
%
0.41
%
0.45
%
0.83
%
1 American Beacon Advisors, Inc. (the “Manager”) has contractually agreed to waive fees and/or reimburse expenses of the Fund’s Y Class, R6 Class, R5 Class, and Investor Class shares through February 29, 2024 to the extent that Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses exceed 0.51% for the Y Class, 0.41% for the R6 Class, 0.45% for the R5 Class, and 0.83% for the Investor Class (excluding taxes, interest, brokerage commissions, acquired fund fees and expenses, securities lending fees, expenses associated with securities sold short, litigation, and other extraordinary expenses). The contractual expense reimbursement can be changed or terminated only in the discretion and with the approval of a majority of the Fund’s Board of Trustees. The Manager will itself waive fees and/or reimburse expenses of the Fund to maintain the contractual expense ratio caps for each applicable class of shares or make arrangements with other service providers to do so. The Manager may also, from time to time, voluntarily waive fees and/or reimburse expenses of the Fund. The Manager can be reimbursed by the Fund for any contractual or voluntary fee waivers or expense reimbursements if reimbursement to the Manager (a) occurs within three years from the date of the Manager’s waiver/reimbursement and (b) does not cause the Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses of a class to exceed the lesser of the contractual percentage limit in effect at the time of the waiver/reimbursement or the time of the recoupment.
Example
This Example is intended to help you compare the cost of investing in the Fund with the cost of investing in other mutual funds. The Example assumes that you invest $10,000 in the Fund for the time periods indicated and then redeem all of your shares at the end of those periods. The Example also assumes that your investment has a 5% return each year and that the Fund’s operating expenses remain the same, except that the Example reflects the fee waiver/expense reimbursement arrangement for each share class through February 29, 2024. Although your actual costs may be higher or lower, based on these assumptions, whether you redeem or hold your shares, your costs would be:
Share Class
1 Year
3 Years
5 Years
10 Years
Y
$52
$211
$384
$886
R6
$42
$180
$329
$765
R5
$46
$190
$347
$803
Investor
$85
$329
$593
$1,348
Portfolio Turnover
The Fund pays transaction costs, such as commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or “turns over” its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover rate may indicate higher transaction costs and may result in higher taxes when Fund shares are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are not reflected in annual Fund operating expenses or in the Example, affect the Fund’s performance. During the most recent fiscal year, the Fund’s portfolio turnover rate was 158% of the average value of its portfolio.
Principal Investment Strategies
Under normal circumstances, the Fund invests at least 80% of its net assets (plus the amount of any borrowings for investment purposes) in investment grade bonds. For purposes of the 80% policy, investment grade bonds include other investment grade debt securities. The Fund considers investment grade debt securities to be debt securities that are rated A- or better by S&P Global Ratings (“S&P”), Moody’s Investors Service, Inc. (“Moody’s”) or Fitch Ratings Inc. (“Fitch”).
The types of investment grade debt securities that the Fund invests in primarily include obligations of the U.S. Government, its agencies and instrumentalities, including U.S. Government-sponsored enterprises (some of which are not backed by the full faith and credit of the U.S. Government), corporate bonds, debentures, and mortgage-backed and mortgage-related securities, including mortgage pass-through securities. These types of obligations may have fixed-rate or floating-rate coupons (or variable rate coupons), which pay interest at variable rates based on a lending rate, such as ICE LIBOR (“LIBOR”) or the Secured Overnight Financing Rate (“SOFR”), and are commonly referred to as fixed income securities or bonds. If an investment held by the Fund is downgraded below investment grade, the sub-advisor may sell the security or request the Manager’s permission to continue to hold the security.
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In selecting investment grade debt securities within the corporate sector, the sub-advisor first focuses on the largest U.S. issuers and companies rated A- or better by at least two of the three rating agencies. The sub-advisor then eliminates foreign companies, Yankee bonds, alcohol, tobacco, gambling, and defense companies to define their investable corporate universe. The sub-advisor then evaluates the remaining issues based on the sustainability of their operations and their consideration of environmental, social, and/or governance (“ESG”) principles as an integrated part of the sub-advisor’s evaluation and investment process. These two investment considerations are not solely determinative in any investment decision. Thereafter, if the sub-advisor deems securities to be comparable from an investment perspective, the sub-advisor generally expects to select for the Fund’s portfolio the securities with the highest scores consistent with the sub-advisor’s ESG scoring methodology. Other than alcohol, tobacco, gambling, and defense companies, the sub-advisor does not currently use ESG considerations to exclude sectors or industries from the Fund’s investment universe. The sub-advisor may use ESG research and/or ratings information provided by one or more third parties in performing this analysis and considering ESG risks.
Under normal circumstances, the Fund seeks to maintain a weighted-average duration that is 25% above or below the then-current duration of the Fund’s benchmark, the Bloomberg US Aggregate Bond Index (“Benchmark”). As of December 31, 2022, the Benchmark’s duration was 6.2 years, which means that the Fund’s duration would have been expected to range from approximately 4.6 years to approximately 7.7 years at that time. The Benchmark’s duration is expected to change over time and could be higher or lower at a future date, and the Fund’s duration may change accordingly. Duration is an indicator of a bond’s price sensitivity to a change in interest rates. For example, a duration of eight years means that a security’s price would be expected to decrease by approximately 8% with a 1% increase in interest rates. The Fund may invest in securities of any maturity, but typically invests in securities with maximum maturities of up to 30 years.
The sub-advisor follows a fixed income investment strategy that focuses on high current income, given its outlook for interest rates, and the preservation of capital. In selecting securities for the Fund, the sub-advisor employs a top-down approach, which includes a broad fundamental analysis of the current fixed income markets, including duration, the yield curve, and the performance of market sectors. Through this analysis, the sub-advisor creates defined parameters for the selection of investments for the Fund’s portfolio and implements a proprietary investment process comprised of qualitative and quantitative components.
The Fund may have a focused portfolio of fewer companies than other diversified funds. The Fund may have significant exposure to the Financials sector. However, as the sector composition of the Fund’s portfolio changes over time, the Fund’s exposure to the Financials sector may be lower at a future date, and the Fund’s exposure to other market sectors may be higher. The Fund may engage in active and frequent trading of portfolio securities to achieve its principal investment strategies. The Fund may invest cash balances in a government money market fund advised by the Manager, with respect to which the Manager receives a management fee.
Principal Risks
There is no assurance that the Fund will achieve its investment objective and you could lose part or all of your investment in the Fund. The Fund is not a complete investment program and may not be appropriate for all investors. Investors should carefully consider their own investment goals and risk tolerance before investing in the Fund. The principal risks of investing in the Fund listed below are presented in alphabetical order and not in order of importance or potential exposure. Among other matters, this presentation is intended to facilitate your ability to find particular risks and compare them with the risks of other funds. Each risk summarized below is considered a “principal risk” of investing in the Fund, regardless of the order in which it appears.
Callable Securities Risk
The Fund may invest in fixed-income securities with call features. A call feature allows the issuer of the security to redeem or call the security prior to its stated maturity date. In periods of falling interest rates, issuers may be more likely to call in securities that are paying higher coupon rates than prevailing interest rates. In the event of a call, the Fund would lose the income that would have been earned to maturity on that security, and the proceeds received by the Fund may be invested in securities paying lower coupon rates and may not benefit from any increase in value that might otherwise result from declining interest rates.
Counterparty Risk
The Fund is subject to the risk that a party or participant to a transaction, such as a broker or a derivative counterparty, will be unwilling or unable to satisfy its obligation to make timely principal, interest or settlement payments or to otherwise honor its obligations to the Fund.
Credit Risk
The Fund is subject to the risk that the issuer, guarantor or insurer of an obligation, or the counterparty to a transaction may fail, or become less able or unwilling, to make timely payment of interest or principal or otherwise honor its obligations or default completely. Changes in the actual or perceived creditworthiness of an issuer, or a downgrade or default affecting any of the Fund’s securities, could affect the Fund’s performance. Generally, the longer the maturity and the lower the credit quality of a security, the more sensitive it is to credit risk.
Cybersecurity and Operational Risk
Operational risks arising from, among other problems, human errors, systems and technology disruptions or failures, or cybersecurity incidents may negatively impact the Fund and its service providers as well as the ability of shareholders to transact with the Fund, and result in financial losses. Cybersecurity incidents may allow an unauthorized party to gain access to Fund assets, shareholder data, or proprietary information, or cause the Fund or its service providers, as well as securities trading venues and their service providers, to suffer data corruption or lose operational functionality. Cybersecurity incidents can result from deliberate attacks or unintentional events. It is not possible for the Fund or its service providers to identify all of the operational risks that may affect the Fund or to develop processes and controls to completely eliminate or mitigate their occurrence or effects. The Fund cannot control the cybersecurity plans and systems of its service providers, its counterparties or the issuers of securities in which the Fund invests. Most issuers in which the Fund invests are heavily dependent on computers for data storage and operations, and require ready access to the internet to conduct their business. Thus, cybersecurity incidents could also affect issuers of securities in which the Fund invests, leading to significant loss of value.
Debentures Risk
Debentures are unsecured debt securities. The holder of a debenture is protected only by the general creditworthiness of the issuer. The Fund may invest in both corporate and government debentures.
Environmental, Social, and/or Governance Investing Risk
The use of environmental, social, and/or governance (“ESG”) considerations by the sub-advisor may cause the Fund to make different investments than funds that have a similar investment style but do not incorporate such considerations in their strategy. As with the use of any investment considerations involved in investment decisions, there is no guarantee that the use of any ESG investment considerations will result in the selection of issuers that will outperform other issuers or help reduce risk in the Fund. The Fund may choose not to, or may not be able to, take advantage of certain investment opportunities due to these considerations, which may adversely affect investment performance. The Fund may underperform funds that do not incorporate these considerations or incorporate different ESG considerations. Although the sub-advisor has established its own process to oversee ESG integration in accordance with the Fund’s
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strategies, successful integration of ESG factors will depend on the sub-advisor’s skill in researching, identifying, and applying these factors, as well as on the availability of relevant data. The sub-advisor may use ESG research and/or ratings information provided by one or more third parties in performing this analysis and considering ESG risks.
The regulatory landscape with respect to ESG investing in the United States is evolving and any future rules or regulations may require the Fund to change its investment process with respect to the integration of ESG factors.
Focused Holdings Risk
Because the Fund may have a focused portfolio of fewer companies than other diversified funds, the increase or decrease of the value of a single investment may have a greater impact on the Fund’s net asset value (“NAV”) and total return when compared to other diversified funds.
High Portfolio Turnover Risk
Portfolio turnover is a measure of the Fund’s trading activity over a one-year period. A portfolio turnover rate of 100% would indicate that the Fund sold and replaced the entire value of its securities holdings during the period. The Fund may engage in active and frequent trading and may have a high portfolio turnover rate, which could increase the Fund’s transaction costs, have a negative impact on performance, and generate higher capital gain distributions to shareholders than if the Fund had a lower portfolio turnover rate.
Interest Rate Risk
Generally, the value of investments with interest rate risk, such as fixed-income securities, will move in the opposite direction to movements in interest rates. Factors including central bank monetary policy, rising inflation rates, and changes in general economic conditions may cause interest rates to rise, which could cause the value of the Fund’s investments to decline. Interest rates may rise, perhaps significantly and/or rapidly, potentially resulting in substantial losses to the Fund. The prices of fixed-income securities are also affected by their durations. Fixed-income securities with longer durations generally have greater sensitivity to changes in interest rates. Rising interest rates may cause the value of the Fund’s investments with longer durations and terms to maturity to decline, which may adversely affect the value of the Fund. For example, if a bond has a duration of eight years, a 1% increase in interest rates could be expected to result in an 8% decrease in the value of the bond. An increase in interest rates can impact markets broadly as well. To the extent the Fund holds an investment with a negative interest rate to maturity, the Fund may generate a negative return on that investment.
Investment Risk
An investment in the Fund is not a deposit with a bank and is not insured or guaranteed by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation or any other government agency. When you sell your shares of the Fund, they could be worth less than what you paid for them. Therefore, you may lose money by investing in the Fund.
Issuer Risk
The value of, and/or the return generated by, a security may decline for a number of reasons that directly relate to the issuer, such as management performance, financial leverage and reduced demand for the issuer’s goods or services, as well as the historical and prospective earnings of the issuer and the value of its assets.
LIBOR Risk
Certain of the instruments identified in the Fund’s principal investment strategies have coupon rates or may provide exposure to underlying investments with coupon rates, that are based on the ICE LIBOR (“LIBOR”), the Secured Overnight Financing Rate (“SOFR”), Euro Interbank Offered Rate and other similar types of reference rates (each, a “Reference Rate”). These Reference Rates are generally intended to represent the rate at which contributing banks may obtain short-term borrowings within certain financial markets. Most maturities and currencies of LIBOR were phased out at the end of 2021, with the remaining ones to be phased out on June 30, 2023. These events and any additional regulatory or market changes may have an adverse impact on the Fund or its investments, including increased volatility or illiquidity in markets for instruments that rely on LIBOR. There remains uncertainty regarding the impact of the transition from LIBOR on the Fund and the financial markets generally. SOFR has been selected by a committee established by the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System and the Federal Reserve Bank of New York to replace LIBOR as a Reference Rate in the United States and U.S. law requires that contracts without a practicable LIBOR alternative default to SOFR plus a set spread beginning in mid-2023. Other countries have undertaken similar initiatives to identify replacement Reference Rates for LIBOR in their respective markets. However, there are obstacles to converting certain existing investments and transactions to a new Reference Rate, as well as risks associated with using a new Reference Rate with respect to new investments and transactions. The transition process, or the failure of an industry to transition, could lead to increased volatility and illiquidity in markets for instruments that currently rely on LIBOR to determine interest rates and a reduction in the values of some LIBOR-based investments, all of which would impact the Fund. Since the usefulness of LIBOR as a benchmark could deteriorate during the transition period, these effects could occur prior to June 30, 2023. At this time, it is not possible to completely identify or predict the effect of any transition, establishment of alternative Reference Rates or other reforms to Reference Rates that may be enacted in the UK or elsewhere. In addition, any substitute Reference Rate and any pricing adjustments imposed by a regulator or by counterparties or otherwise may adversely affect the Fund’s performance and/or NAV.
Liquidity Risk
The Fund is susceptible to the risk that certain investments held by the Fund may have limited marketability, be subject to restrictions on sale, be difficult or impossible to purchase or sell at favorable times or prices or become less liquid in response to market developments or adverse credit events that may affect issuers or guarantors of a security. An inability to sell a portfolio position can adversely affect the Fund’s value or prevent the Fund from being able to take advantage of other investment opportunities. Market prices for such instruments may be volatile. During periods of substantial market volatility, an investment or even an entire market segment may become illiquid, sometimes abruptly, which can adversely affect the Fund’s ability to limit losses. The Fund could lose money if it is unable to dispose of an investment at a time that is most beneficial to the Fund. The Fund may be required to dispose of investments at unfavorable times or prices to satisfy obligations, which may result in losses or may be costly to the Fund. For example, liquidity risk may be magnified in rising interest rate environments in the event of higher-than-normal redemption rates. Unexpected redemptions may force the Fund to sell certain investments at unfavorable prices to meet redemption requests or other cash needs. Judgment plays a greater role in pricing illiquid investments than in investments with more active markets.
Market Risk
The Fund is subject to the risk that the securities markets will move down, sometimes rapidly and unpredictably, based on overall economic conditions and other factors, which may negatively affect the Fund’s performance. Equity securities generally have greater price volatility than fixed-income securities, although under certain market conditions fixed-income securities may have comparable or greater price volatility. During a general downturn in the securities markets, multiple assets may decline in value simultaneously. Prices in many financial markets have increased significantly over the last decade, but there have also been periods of adverse market and financial developments and cyclical change during that timeframe, which have resulted in unusually high levels of volatility in domestic and foreign financial markets that has caused losses for investors and may occur again in the future. The value of a security may decline due to adverse issuer-specific conditions, general market conditions unrelated to a particular issuer, such as changes in interest or inflation rates, or factors that affect a particular industry or industries. Changes in the financial condition of a single issuer or market segment also can impact the market as a whole.
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Geopolitical and other events, including war, terrorism, economic uncertainty, trade disputes, pandemics, public health crises, natural disasters and related events have led, and in the future may continue to lead, to instability in world economies and markets generally and reduced liquidity in equity, credit and fixed-income markets, which may disrupt economies and markets and adversely affect the value of your investment. Changes in value may be temporary or may last for extended periods.
Policy changes by the U.S. government and/or Federal Reserve and political events within the U.S. and abroad, such as changes in the U.S. presidential administration and Congress, the U.S. government’s inability at times to agree on a long-term budget and deficit reduction plan, the threat of a federal government shutdown and threats not to increase the federal government’s debt limit which could result in a default on the government’s obligations, may affect investor and consumer confidence and may adversely impact financial markets and the broader economy, perhaps suddenly and to a significant degree.
Markets and market participants are increasingly reliant upon both publicly available and proprietary information data systems. Data imprecision, software or other technology malfunctions, programming inaccuracies, unauthorized use or access, and similar circumstances may impair the performance of these systems and may have an adverse impact upon a single issuer, a group of issuers, or the market at large.
The financial markets generally move in cycles, with periods of rising prices followed by periods of declining prices. The value of your investment may reflect these fluctuations.
Recent Market Events Risk. Both U.S. and international markets have experienced significant volatility in recent months and years. As a result of such volatility, investment returns may fluctuate significantly. Moreover, the risks discussed herein associated with an investment in the Fund may be increased. An outbreak of infectious respiratory illness caused by a novel coronavirus, known as COVID-19, was first detected in late 2019 and has subsequently spread globally. The transmission of various variants of COVID-19, and efforts to contain their spread, have resulted, and may continue to result, in significant disruptions to business operations, travel restrictions and closed borders, and lower consumer demand, as well as general concern and uncertainty that has negatively affected the global economy. Any resurgence of COVID-19, a variant or other significant viruses could negatively impact the Fund and adversely impact the economies of many nations, individual companies and the global securities and commodities markets, including their liquidity, in ways that cannot necessarily be foreseen at the present time.
Although interest rates were unusually low in recent years in the U.S. and abroad, in 2022, the Federal Reserve and certain foreign central banks began to raise interest rates as part of their efforts to address rising inflation. It is difficult to accurately predict the pace at which interest rates may continue to increase, or the timing, frequency or magnitude of any such increases. Additionally, various economic and political factors could cause the Federal Reserve or another foreign central bank to change their approach in the future and such actions may result in an economic slowdown in the U.S. and abroad. Unexpected increases in interest rates could lead to market volatility or reduce liquidity in certain sectors of the market. Deteriorating economic fundamentals may, in turn, increase the risk of default or insolvency of particular issuers, negatively impact market value, cause credit spreads to widen, and reduce bank balance sheets. Any of these could cause an increase in market volatility or reduce liquidity across various markets. Additionally, high public debt in the U.S. and other countries creates ongoing systemic and market risks and policymaking uncertainty.
Some countries, including the U.S., have in recent years adopted more protectionist trade policies. Slowing global economic growth; risks associated with a trade agreement between the United Kingdom and the European Union; the risks associated with ongoing trade negotiations with China; the possibility of changes to some international trade agreements; tensions, war, or open conflict between nations, such as between Russia and Ukraine or in eastern Asia; political or economic dysfunction within some nations, including major producers of oil; and dramatic changes in commodity and currency prices could affect the economies of many nations, including the United States, in ways that cannot necessarily be foreseen at the present time. Russia’s military invasion of Ukraine beginning in February 2022, the responses and sanctions by the United States and other countries, and the potential for wider conflict have had, and could continue to have, severe adverse effects on the performance and liquidity of global markets, and negatively affect the value of the Fund’s investments. The duration of ongoing hostilities and the vast array of sanctions and related events cannot be predicted. Those events present material uncertainty and risk with respect to markets globally and the performance of the Fund and its investments or operations could be negatively impacted. The recent strength of the U.S. dollar could decrease foreign demand for U.S. assets, which may negatively impact certain issuers and/or industries.
Economists and others have expressed increasing concern about the potential effects of global climate change on property and security values. Certain issuers, industries and regions may be adversely affected by the impacts of climate change, including on the demand for and the development of goods and services and related production costs, and the impacts of legislation, regulation and international accords related to climate change, as well as any indirect consequences of regulation or business trends driven by climate change.
 
Mortgage-Backed and Mortgage-Related Securities Risk
Investments in mortgage-backed and mortgage-related securities are influenced by the factors affecting the mortgages underlying the securities or the housing market. These securities tend to be more sensitive to changes in interest rates than other types of debt securities. Investments in mortgage-backed and mortgage-related securities also are subject to market risks for fixed-income securities, which include, but are not limited to, credit risk, interest rate risk, prepayment and extension risk, callable securities risk, valuation risk, liquidity risk, and restricted securities risk. A decline in the credit quality of the issuers of mortgage-backed and mortgage-related securities or instability in the markets for such securities may affect the value and liquidity of such securities, which could result in losses to the Fund. These securities are also subject to the risk of default on the underlying mortgages, particularly during periods of market downturn, and an unexpectedly high rate of defaults on the underlying assets will adversely affect the security’s value.
Mortgage Pass-Through Securities Risk. Mortgage pass-through securities provide for the “pass through” of the monthly payments made by individual borrowers on their residential or commercial mortgage loans, net of any fees by the security issuer and guarantor, as applicable, to the holder of the security. Small movements in interest rates, both increases and decreases, may quickly and significantly affect the value of certain mortgage pass-through securities. Mortgage pass-through securities involve interest rate risk, credit risk, prepayment risk and extension risk.
 
Other Investment Companies Risk
To the extent that the Fund invests in shares of other registered investment companies, the Fund will indirectly bear the fees and expenses charged by those investment companies in addition to the Fund’s direct fees and expenses. To the extent the Fund invests in other investment companies that invest in equity securities, fixed-income securities and/or foreign securities, or that track an index, the Fund is subject to the risks associated with the underlying investments held by the investment company or the index fluctuations to which the investment company is subject. The Fund will be subject to the risks associated with investments in those companies, including but not limited to the following:
Government Money Market Funds Risk. Investments in government money market funds are subject to interest rate risk, credit risk, and market risk. Interest rate risk is the risk that rising interest rates could cause the value of such an investment to decline. Credit risk is the risk that the issuer, guarantor or insurer of an obligation, or the counterparty to a transaction, may fail or become less able or unwilling, to make timely payment of interest or principal or otherwise honor its obligations, or that it may default completely.
 
Prepayment and Extension Risk
Prepayment risk is the risk that the principal amount of a bond may be repaid prior to the bond’s maturity date. Due to a decline in interest rates or excess cash flow into the issuer, a debt security may be called or otherwise converted, prepaid or redeemed before maturity. If this occurs, no additional interest will
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be paid on the investment. The Fund may have to reinvest the proceeds in another investment at a lower rate, may not benefit from an increase in value that may result from declining interest rates, and may lose any premium it paid to acquire the security. The rate of prepayments tends to increase as interest rates fall, which could cause the average maturity of the portfolio to shorten. Variable and floating rate securities may be less sensitive to prepayment risk. Extension risk is the risk that a decrease in prepayments may, as a result of higher interest rates or other factors, result in the extension of a security’s effective maturity, increase the risk of default and delayed payment, heighten interest rate risk and increase the potential for a decline in its price. In addition, as a consequence of a decrease in prepayments, the amount of principal available to the Fund for investment would be reduced.
Redemption Risk
The Fund may experience periods of high levels of redemptions that could cause the Fund to sell assets at inopportune times or at a loss or depressed value. Heavy redemptions could hurt the Fund’s performance. The sale of assets to meet redemption requests may create net capital gains, which could cause the Fund to have to distribute substantial capital gains. Redemption risk is greater to the extent that one or more investors or intermediaries control a large percentage of investments in the Fund. In addition, redemption risk is heightened during periods of declining or illiquid markets. A rise in interest rates or other market developments may cause investors to move out of fixed-income securities on a large scale. During periods of heavy redemptions, the Fund may borrow funds through the interfund credit facility or from a bank line of credit, which may increase costs. The sale of assets to meet redemption requests may create net capital gains or losses, which could cause the Fund to have to distribute substantial capital gains.
Sector Risk
When the Fund focuses its investments in certain sectors of the economy, its performance may be driven largely by sector performance and could fluctuate more widely than if the Fund were invested more evenly across sectors. Individual sectors may be more volatile, and may perform differently, than the broader market. As the Fund’s portfolio changes over time, the Fund’s exposure to a particular sector may become higher or lower.
Financials Sector Risk. Financial services companies are subject to extensive governmental regulation, which may limit both the amounts and types of loans and other financial commitments they can make, the interest rates and fees they can charge, the scope of their activities, the prices they can charge and the amount of capital they must maintain. Profitability is largely dependent on the availability and cost of capital funds and can fluctuate significantly when interest rates change or due to increased competition. In addition, deterioration of the credit markets generally may cause an adverse impact in a broad range of markets, including U.S. and international credit and interbank money markets generally, thereby affecting a wide range of financial institutions and markets. Certain events in the Financials sector may cause an unusually high degree of volatility in the financial markets, both domestic and foreign, and cause certain financial services companies to incur large losses. Securities of financial services companies may experience a dramatic decline in value when such companies experience substantial declines in the valuations of their assets, take action to raise capital (such as the issuance of debt or equity securities), or cease operations.
 
Secured, Partially Secured and Unsecured Obligation Risk
Debt obligations may be secured, partially secured or unsecured. Interests in secured and partially-secured obligations have the benefit of collateral and, typically, of restrictive covenants limiting the ability of the borrower to further encumber its assets. However, there is no assurance that the liquidation of collateral from a secured or partially-secured obligation would satisfy the borrower’s obligation, or that the collateral can be liquidated. Furthermore, there is a risk that the value of any collateral securing an obligation in which the Fund has an interest may decline and that the collateral may not be sufficient to cover the amount owed on the obligation. In the event the borrower defaults, the Fund’s access to the collateral may be limited or delayed by bankruptcy or other insolvency laws. Unsecured debt, including senior unsecured and subordinated debt, will not be secured by any collateral and will be effectively subordinated to a borrower’s secured indebtedness (to the extent of the collateral securing such indebtedness). With respect to unsecured obligations, the Fund lacks any collateral on which to foreclose to satisfy its claim in whole or in part. Such instruments generally have greater price volatility than that of fully secured holdings and may be less liquid.
Securities Selection Risk
Securities selected for the Fund may not perform to expectations. This could result in the Fund’s underperformance compared to its benchmark index(es), or other funds with similar investment objectives or strategies.
U.S. Government Securities and Government-Sponsored Enterprises Risk
A security backed by the U.S. Treasury or the full faith and credit of the United States is guaranteed only as to the timely payment of interest and principal when held to maturity. The market prices for such securities are not guaranteed and will fluctuate. Securities held by the Fund that are issued by government-sponsored enterprises, such as the Federal National Mortgage Association (‘‘Fannie Mae’’), Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation (‘‘Freddie Mac’’), Federal Home Loan Bank (‘‘FHLB’’), Federal Farm Credit Bank (“FFCB”), and the Tennessee Valley Authority, are not guaranteed by the U.S. Treasury and are not backed by the full faith and credit of the U.S. government, and no assurance can be given that the U.S. government will provide financial support if these organizations do not have the funds to meet future payment obligations. U.S. government securities and securities of government-sponsored entities are also subject to credit risk, interest rate risk and market risk. The rising U.S. national debt may lead to adverse impacts on the value of U.S. government securities due to potentially higher costs for the U.S. government to obtain new financing.
U.S. Treasury Obligations Risk
The value of U.S. Treasury obligations may vary due to changes in interest rates. In addition, changes to the financial condition or credit rating of the U.S. government may cause the value of the Fund’s investments in obligations issued by the U.S. Treasury to decline. Certain political events in the U.S., such as a prolonged government shutdown or potential default on the national debt, may also cause investors to lose confidence in the U.S. government and may cause the value of U.S. Treasury obligations to decline.
Variable and Floating Rate Securities Risk
The coupons on variable and floating-rate securities are not fixed and may fluctuate based upon changes in market rates. A variable rate security has a coupon that is adjusted at pre-designated periods in response to changes in the market rate of interest on which the coupon is based. The coupon on a floating rate security is generally based on an interest rate, such as a money-market index, ICE LIBOR, Secured Overnight Financing Rate (“SOFR”), or a Treasury bill rate. Variable and floating rate securities are subject to interest rate risk and credit risk. As short-term interest rates decline, the coupons on variable and floating-rate securities typically decrease. Alternatively, during periods of rising short-term interest rates, the coupons on variable and floating-rate securities typically increase. Changes in the coupons of variable and floating-rate securities may lag behind changes in market rates or may have limits on the maximum increases in the coupon rates. The value of variable and floating-rate securities may decline if their coupons do not rise as much, or as quickly, as interest rates in general. Conversely, variable and floating rate securities will not generally increase in value if interest rates decline. Certain types of variable and floating rate instruments may be subject to greater liquidity risk than other debt securities.
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Fund Performance
The bar chart and table below provide an indication of risk by showing changes in the Fund’s performance over time. The bar chart shows how the Fund’s performance has varied from year to year. The table shows how the Fund’s average annual total returns compare to a broad-based market index, which is the Fund’s benchmark index, for the periods indicated.
In the table below, for the period prior to February 28, 2019, the performance of the R6 Class shares reflects the returns of the R5 Class shares of the Fund. The R6 Class shares would have had similar annual returns to the R5 Class shares of the Fund because the shares of each class represent investments in the same portfolio securities. However, as reflected in the table in the “Fees and Expenses of the Fund” section of this Fund Summary, the expenses of the R5 Class shares differ from those of the R6 Class shares, which would affect performance. The performance of the R6 Class shares shown in the table has not been adjusted for differences in operating expenses between the R6 Class and R5 Class shares.
You may obtain updated performance information on the Fund’s website at www.americanbeaconfunds.com. Past performance (before and after taxes) is not necessarily an indication of how the Fund will perform in the future.
Calendar year total returns for Investor Class Shares. Year Ended 12/31
image
Highest Quarterly Return:
4.53%2nd Quarter 2020
01/01/2017 through 12/31/2022
Lowest Quarterly Return:
-5.80%3rd Quarter 2022
01/01/2017 through 12/31/2022
Average annual total returns for periods ended December 31, 2022
 
Inception Date of Class
1 Year
5 Years
Since Inception
Investor Class
04/04/2016
Returns Before Taxes
-9.89
%
-0.80
%
-0.41
%
Returns After Taxes on Distributions
-10.69
%
-1.58
%
-1.10
%
Returns After Taxes on Distributions and Sales of Fund Shares
-5.84
%
-0.87
%
-0.56
%
 
Inception Date of Class
1 Year
5 Years
Since Inception
(04/04/2016)
Share Class (Before Taxes)
Y
04/04/2016
-9.65
%
-0.50
%
-0.13
%
R6
02/28/2019
-9.51
%
-0.41
%
-0.02
%
R5
04/04/2016
-9.63
%
-0.44
%
-0.05
%
 
 
1 Year
5 Years
Since Inception
(04/04/2016)
Index (Reflects no deduction for fees, expenses or taxes)
Bloomberg US Aggregate Bond Index
-13.01
%
0.02
%
0.47
%
After-tax returns are calculated using the historical highest individual federal marginal income tax rates and do not reflect the impact of state and local income taxes. Actual after-tax returns depend on an investor’s tax situation and may differ from those shown. The return after taxes on distributions and sale of Fund shares may exceed the return before taxes due to an assumed tax benefit from any losses on a sale of Fund shares at the end of the measurement period. If you are a tax-exempt entity or hold your Fund shares through a tax-deferred arrangement, such as an individual retirement account (“IRA”) or a 401(k) plan, the after-tax returns do not apply to your situation. After-tax returns are shown only for Investor Class shares of the Fund; after-tax returns for other share classes will vary.
Management
The Manager
The Fund has retained American Beacon Advisors, Inc. to serve as its Manager.
Sub-Advisor
The Fund’s investment sub-advisor is Garcia Hamilton & Associates, L.P.
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Portfolio Managers
Garcia Hamilton & Associates, L.P.
Gilbert Andrew Garcia, CFA
Managing Partner & Portfolio Manager
Since Fund Inception (2016)
Nancy Rodriguez
Partner & Portfolio Manager
Since Fund Inception (2016)
Purchase and Sale of Fund Shares
You may buy or sell shares of the Fund through a retirement plan, an investment professional, a broker-dealer, or other financial intermediary. You may purchase or redeem shares of the Fund on any day the New York Stock Exchange (“NYSE”) is open, at the Fund’s net asset value (“NAV”) per share next calculated after your order is received in proper form, subject to any applicable sales charge. The Manager may, in its sole discretion, allow certain individuals to invest directly in the Fund. For more information regarding eligibility to invest directly please see “About Your Investment - Purchase and Redemption of Shares.” Direct mutual fund account shareholders may buy subsequent shares or sell shares in various ways:
Internet
www.americanbeaconfunds.com
Phone
To reach an American Beacon representative call 1-800-658-5811, option 1
Through the Automated Voice Response Service call 1-800-658-5811, option 2 (Investor Class only)
Mail
American Beacon Funds
P.O. Box 219643
Kansas City, MO 64121-9643
Overnight Delivery:
American Beacon Funds
430 W. 7th Street, Suite 219643
Kansas City, MO 64105-1407
 
New Account
Existing Account
Share Class
Minimum Initial Investment Amount
Purchase/Redemption Minimum by Check/ACH/Exchange
Purchase/Redemption Minimum by Wire
Investor
$2,500
$50
$250
Y
$100,000
$50
None
R5
$250,000
$50
None
R6
None
$50
None
Tax Information
Dividends, capital gains distributions, and other distributions, if any, that you receive from the Fund are subject to federal income tax and may also be subject to state and local income taxes, unless you are a tax-exempt entity or your account is tax-deferred, such as an individual retirement account (“IRA”) or a 401(k) plan (in which case you may be taxed later, upon the withdrawal of your investment from such account or plan).
Payments to Broker-Dealers and Other Financial Intermediaries
If you purchase shares of the Fund through a broker-dealer or other financial intermediary (such as a bank), the Fund and the Fund’s distributor, Resolute Investment Distributors, Inc., or the Manager may pay the intermediary for the sale of Fund shares and related services. These payments may create a conflict of interest by influencing the broker-dealer or other intermediary and your individual financial professional to recommend the Fund over another investment. Ask your individual financial professional or visit your financial intermediary’s website for more information.
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American Beacon
International Equity FundSM
image
Investment Objective
The Fund’s investment objective is long-term capital appreciation.
Fees and Expenses of the Fund
This table describes the fees and expenses that you may pay if you buy, hold, and sell shares of the Fund. You may pay other fees, such as brokerage commissions and other fees to financial intermediaries, which are not reflected in the tables and examples below. You may qualify for sales discounts if you and your eligible family members invest, or agree to invest in the future, at least $50,000 in all classes of the American Beacon Funds on an aggregated basis. More information about these and other discounts is available from your financial professional and in “Choosing Your Share Class” on page 66 of the Prospectus and “Additional Purchase and Sale Information for A Class Shares” on page 74 of the Statement of Additional Information (“SAI”). With respect to purchases of shares through specific intermediaries, you may find additional information regarding sales charge discounts and waivers in Appendix A to the Fund’s Prospectus entitled “Intermediary Sales Charge Discounts, Waivers and Other Information.”
Shareholder Fees (fees paid directly from your investment)
Share Class
A
C
Y
R6
Advisor
R5
Investor
Maximum sales charge imposed on purchases (as a percentage of offering price)
5.75
%
None
None
None
None
None
None
Maximum deferred sales charge (as a percentage of the lower of original offering price or redemption proceeds)
0.50
%
1
1.00
%
None
None
None
None
None
Annual Fund Operating Expenses (Expenses that you pay each year as a percentage of the value of your investment)
 
 
 
 
 
 
Share Class
A
C
Y
R6
Advisor
R5
Investor
Management Fees
0.61
%
0.61
%
0.61
%
0.61
%
0.61
%
0.61
%
0.61
%
Distribution and/or Service (12b-1) Fees
0.25
%
1.00
%
0.00
%
0.00
%
0.25
%
0.00
%
0.00
%
Other Expenses2
0.28
%
0.28
%
0.20
%
0.10
%
0.34
%
0.11
%
0.46
%
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses
1.14
%
1.89
%
0.81
%
0.71
%
1.20
%
0.72
%
1.07
%
Fee Waiver and/or expense reimbursement3
0.00
%
0.00
%
0.00
%
(0.02
%)
0.00
%
0.00
%
0.00
%
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses after fee waiver and/or expense reimbursement
1.14
%
1.89
%
0.81
%
0.69
%
1.20
%
0.72
%
1.07
%
1 A contingent deferred sales charge (‘‘CDSC’’) of 0.50% will be charged on certain purchases of $1,000,000 or more of A Class shares that are redeemed in whole or part within 18 months of purchase.
2 During the fiscal year ended October 31, 2022, the Fund paid amounts to American Beacon Advisors, Inc. (the “Manager”) that were previously waived and/or reimbursed under a contractual fee waiver/expense reimbursement agreement for the Fund’s R6 Class shares in the amount of 0.01%.
3 The Manager has contractually agreed to waive fees and/or reimburse expenses of the Fund’s R6 Class shares, through February 29, 2024, to the extent that Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses exceed 0.69% for the R6 Class shares (excluding taxes, interest, brokerage commissions, acquired fund fees and expenses, securities lending fees, expenses associated with securities sold short, litigation, and other extraordinary expenses). The contractual expense reimbursement can be changed or terminated only in the discretion and with the approval of a majority of the Fund’s Board of Trustees. The Manager will itself waive fees and/or reimburse expenses of the Fund to maintain the contractual expense ratio caps for each applicable class of shares or make arrangements with other service providers to do so. The Manager may also, from time to time, voluntarily waive fees and/or reimburse expenses of the Fund. The Manager can be reimbursed by the Fund for any contractual or voluntary fee waivers or expense reimbursements if reimbursement to the Manager (a) occurs within three years from the date of the Manager’s waiver/reimbursement and (b) does not cause the Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses of a class to exceed the lesser of the contractual percentage limit in effect at the time of the waiver/reimbursement or the time of the recoupment.
Example
This Example is intended to help you compare the cost of investing in the Fund with the cost of investing in other mutual funds. The Example assumes that you invest $10,000 in the Fund for the time periods indicated and then redeem all of your shares at the end of those periods. The Example also assumes that your investment has a 5% return each year and that the Fund’s operating expenses remain the same, except that the Example reflects the fee waiver/expense reimbursement arrangement for the R6 Class shares through February 29, 2024. C Class shares automatically convert to A Class shares 8 years after purchase, if the conversion is available through your financial intermediary. This Example reflects your costs as though C Class shares were held for the full 10-year period. Although your actual costs may be higher or lower, based on these assumptions, your costs would be:
Share Class
1 Year
3 Years
5 Years
10 Years
A
$685
$916
$1,167
$1,881
C
$292
$594
$1,021
$2,212
Y
$83
$259
$450
$1,002
R6
$70
$225
$393
$881
Advisor
$122
$381
$660
$1,455
R5
$74
$230
$401
$894
Investor
$109
$340
$590
$1,306
Assuming no redemption of shares:
Share Class
1 Year
3 Years
5 Years
10 Years
C
$192
$594
$1,021
$2,212
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Portfolio Turnover
The Fund pays transaction costs, such as commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or “turns over” its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover rate may indicate higher transaction costs and may result in higher taxes when Fund shares are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are not reflected in annual Fund operating expenses or in the Example, affect the Fund’s performance. During the most recent fiscal year, the Fund’s portfolio turnover rate was 38% of the average value of its portfolio.
Principal Investment Strategies
Under normal circumstances, at least 80% of the Fund’s net assets (plus the amount of any borrowings for investment purposes) are invested in common stocks and securities convertible into common stocks (collectively, “stocks”) of issuers based in at least three different countries located outside the United States. The Fund’s investments in stocks may include depositary receipts, which may include American depositary receipts (“ADRs”), and U.S. dollar-denominated foreign stocks traded on U.S. exchanges. The Fund will primarily invest in countries comprising the MSCI® EAFE Index. The MSCI EAFE Index is designed to represent the performance of large- and mid-capitalization securities across 21 developed markets countries, including countries in Europe, Australasia and the Far East, and excluding the U.S. and Canada. It covers approximately 85% of the free float-adjusted market capitalization in each country. Companies included in the MSCI EAFE Index are selected from among the larger capitalization companies in these markets. The Fund principally invests in large-capitalization and mid-capitalization companies, and to a lesser extent in small-capitalization companies. The Fund may use futures contracts, foreign currency forward contracts, including non-deliverable forward contracts (“NDFs”), and currency swaps as a hedge against foreign currency fluctuations.
The Manager allocates the assets of the Fund among different sub-advisors. The Manager believes that this strategy may help the Fund outperform other investment styles over the longer term while reducing volatility and downside risk.
The sub-advisors select stocks that, in their opinion, have most or all of the following characteristics (relative to that stock’s country, sector or industry):
above-average return on equity or earnings growth potential,
 
below-average price to earnings or price to cash flow ratio,
 
below-average price to book value ratio, and
 
above-average dividend yields.
 
The sub-advisors may consider potential changes in currency exchange rates when choosing stocks. Each of the sub-advisors determines the earnings growth prospects of companies based upon a combination of internal and external research using fundamental analysis and considering changing economic trends. The decision to sell a stock is typically based on the belief that the company is no longer considered undervalued or shows deteriorating fundamentals, or that better investment opportunities exist in other stocks. The Fund may have significant exposure to the Financials sector and to issuers located in, or with economic ties to, Europe and the United Kingdom. However, as the sector and geographic composition of the Fund’s portfolio changes over time, the Fund’s exposure to the Financials sector, Europe and/or the United Kingdom may decline, and the Fund’s exposure to other market sectors or geographic areas may increase.
Each sub-advisor’s investment processes incorporate the sub-advisor’s environmental, social and/or governance (“ESG”) analysis as a consideration in the assessment of potential portfolio investments. However, as ESG information is just one investment consideration, ESG considerations are not solely determinative in any investment decision made by a sub-advisor. In addition, the sub-advisors do not use ESG considerations to limit, restrict or otherwise exclude companies or sectors from the Fund’s investment universe. A sub-advisor may use ESG research and/or ratings information provided by one or more third parties in performing this analysis and considering ESG risks.
The Fund may invest cash balances in a government money market fund advised by the Manager, with respect to which the Manager receives a management fee. The Fund also may purchase and sell equity index futures contracts to gain market exposure on cash balances or reduce market exposure in anticipation of liquidity needs. The Fund may seek to earn additional income by lending its securities to certain qualified broker-dealers and institutions.
Principal Risks
There is no assurance that the Fund will achieve its investment objective and you could lose part or all of your investment in the Fund. The Fund is not designed for investors who need an assured level of current income and is intended to be a long-term investment. The Fund is not a complete investment program and may not be appropriate for all investors. Investors should carefully consider their own investment goals and risk tolerance before investing in the Fund. The principal risks of investing in the Fund listed below are presented in alphabetical order and not in order of importance or potential exposure. Among other matters, this presentation is intended to facilitate your ability to find particular risks and compare them with the risks of other funds. Each risk summarized below is considered a “principal risk” of investing in the Fund, regardless of the order in which it appears.
Convertible Securities Risk
The value of a convertible security typically increases or decreases with the price of the underlying common stock. In general, a convertible security is subject to the market risks of stocks when the underlying stock’s price is high relative to the conversion price and is subject to the market risks of debt securities when the underlying stock’s price is low relative to the conversion price. The general market risks of debt securities that are common to convertible securities include, but are not limited to, interest rate risk and credit risk. Many convertible securities have credit ratings that are below investment grade and are subject to the same risks as an investment in below investment grade debt securities (commonly known as “junk bonds”). Lower-rated debt securities may fluctuate more widely in price and yield than investment grade debt securities and may fall in price during times when the economy is weak or is expected to become weak. Convertible securities are subject to the risk that the credit standing of the issuer may have an effect on the convertible security‘s investment value. In addition, to the extent the Fund invests in convertible securities issued by small- or mid-capitalization companies, it will be subject to the market risks of investing in such companies. The stocks of small- and mid-capitalization companies may fluctuate more widely in price than the market as a whole and there may also be less trading in small- or mid-capitalization stocks. Convertible securities are sensitive to movement in interest rates.
Counterparty Risk
The Fund is subject to the risk that a party or participant to a transaction, such as a broker or a derivative counterparty, will be unwilling or unable to satisfy its obligation to make timely principal, interest or settlement payments or to otherwise honor its obligations to the Fund.
Credit Risk
The Fund is subject to the risk that the issuer, guarantor or insurer of an obligation, or the counterparty to a transaction may fail, or become less able or unwilling, to make timely payment of interest or principal or otherwise honor its obligations or default completely. Changes in the actual or perceived creditworthiness of an issuer, or a downgrade or default affecting any of the Fund’s securities, could affect the Fund’s performance. Generally, the longer the maturity and the lower the credit quality of a security, the more sensitive it is to credit risk.
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Currency Risk
The Fund may have exposure to foreign currencies by using various instruments. Foreign currencies may fluctuate significantly over short periods of time, may be affected unpredictably by intervention, or the failure to intervene, of the U.S. or foreign governments or central banks, and may be affected by currency controls or political developments in the U.S. or abroad. Foreign currencies may also decline in value relative to the U.S. dollar and other currencies and thereby affect the Fund’s investments.
Cybersecurity and Operational Risk
Operational risks arising from, among other problems, human errors, systems and technology disruptions or failures, or cybersecurity incidents may negatively impact the Fund and its service providers as well as the ability of shareholders to transact with the Fund, and result in financial losses. Cybersecurity incidents may allow an unauthorized party to gain access to Fund assets, shareholder data, or proprietary information, or cause the Fund or its service providers, as well as securities trading venues and their service providers, to suffer data corruption or lose operational functionality. Cybersecurity incidents can result from deliberate attacks or unintentional events. It is not possible for the Fund or its service providers to identify all of the operational risks that may affect the Fund or to develop processes and controls to completely eliminate or mitigate their occurrence or effects. The Fund cannot control the cybersecurity plans and systems of its service providers, its counterparties or the issuers of securities in which the Fund invests. Most issuers in which the Fund invests are heavily dependent on computers for data storage and operations, and require ready access to the internet to conduct their business. Thus, cybersecurity incidents could also affect issuers of securities in which the Fund invests, leading to significant loss of value.
Derivatives Risk
Derivatives may involve significant risk. The use of derivative instruments may expose the Fund to additional risks that it would not be subject to if it invested directly in the securities or other instruments underlying those derivatives, including the high degree of leverage often embedded in such instruments, and potential material and prolonged deviations between the theoretical value and realizable value of a derivative. Some derivatives have the potential for unlimited loss, regardless of the size of the Fund’s initial investment. The use of derivatives may also increase any adverse effects resulting from the underperformance of strategies, asset classes and market exposures to which the Fund has allocated its assets. Derivatives may at times be highly illiquid, and the Fund may not be able to close out or sell a derivative at a particular time or at an anticipated price. Certain derivatives may be difficult to value, and valuation may be more difficult in times of market turmoil. Derivatives may also be more volatile than other types of investments. The Fund may buy or sell derivatives not traded on an exchange, which may be subject to heightened liquidity and valuation risk. Derivative investments can increase portfolio turnover and transaction costs. Derivatives also are subject to counterparty risk and credit risk. As a result, the Fund may not recover its investment or may only obtain a limited recovery, and any recovery may be delayed. Not all derivative transactions require a counterparty to post collateral, which may expose the Fund to greater losses in the event of a default by a counterparty. There may be imperfect correlation between the behavior of a derivative and that of the reference instrument underlying the derivative. An abrupt change in the price of a reference instrument could render a derivative worthless. Derivatives may involve risks different from, and possibly greater than, the risks associated with investing directly in the reference instrument. Suitable derivatives may not be available in all circumstances, and there can be no assurance that the Fund will use derivatives to reduce exposure to other risks when that might have been beneficial. Ongoing changes to the regulation of the derivatives markets and potential changes in the regulation of funds using derivative instruments could limit the Fund’s ability to pursue its investment strategies. New regulation of derivatives may make them more costly, or may otherwise adversely affect their liquidity, value or performance. In addition, the Fund’s investments in derivatives are subject to the following risks:
Foreign Currency Forward Contracts Risk. Foreign currency forward contracts, including non-deliverable forwards (“NDFs”), are derivative instruments pursuant to a contract where the parties agree to a fixed price for an agreed amount of foreign currency at an agreed date or to buy or sell a specific currency at a future date at a price set at the time of the contract and include the risks associated with fluctuations in currency. There are no limitations on daily price movements of forward contracts. There can be no assurance that any strategy used will succeed. Not all forward contracts, including NDFs, require a counterparty to post collateral, which may expose the Fund to greater losses in the event of a default by a counterparty. The use of foreign currency forward contracts may expose the Fund to additional risks, such as credit risk, liquidity risk, and counterparty risk, that it would not be subject to if it invested directly in the securities or currencies underlying the foreign currency forward contract.
 
Futures Contracts Risk. Futures contracts, including index futures, are derivative instruments pursuant to a contract where the parties agree to a fixed price for an agreed amount of securities or other underlying assets at an agreed date. The use of such derivative instruments may expose the Fund to additional risks, such as credit risk, liquidity risk, and counterparty risk, that it would not be subject to if it invested directly in the securities underlying those derivatives. There can be no assurance that any strategy used will succeed. There may at times be an imperfect correlation between the movement in the prices of futures contracts and the value of their underlying instruments or indexes. There also can be no assurance that, at all times, a liquid market will exist for offsetting a futures contract that the Fund has previously bought or sold, and this may result in the inability to close a futures contract when desired. Futures contracts may experience potentially dramatic price changes, which will increase the volatility of the Fund and may involve a small investment of cash (the amount of initial and variation margin) relative to the magnitude of the risk assumed (the potential increase or decrease in the price of the futures contract). Equity index futures contracts expose the Fund to volatility in an underlying securities index. Foreign currency futures contracts expose the Fund to risks associated with fluctuations in the value of foreign currencies.
 
Swap Agreements Risk. Swap agreements or “swaps” are transactions in which the Fund and a counterparty agree to pay or receive payments at specified dates based upon or calculated by reference to changes in specified prices or rates or the performance of specified securities, indices or other assets based on a specified amount (the “notional” amount). Swaps can involve greater risks than a direct investment in an underlying asset, because swaps typically include a certain amount of embedded leverage and as such are subject to leverage risk. If swaps are used as a hedging strategy, the Fund is subject to the risk that the hedging strategy may not eliminate the risk that it is intended to offset, due to, among other reasons, the occurrence of unexpected price movements or the non-occurrence of expected price movements. Swaps also may be difficult to value. Swaps may be subject to liquidity risk and counterparty risk, and swaps that are traded over-the-counter are not subject to standardized clearing requirements and may involve greater liquidity and counterparty risks. The Fund may invest in the following types of swaps:
Currency swaps, which may be subject to currency risk and credit risk.
 
Dividend Risk
An issuer of stock held by the Fund may choose not to declare a dividend or the dividend rate might not remain at current levels or increase over time. Dividend paying stocks might not experience the same level of earnings growth or capital appreciation as non-dividend paying stocks. Securities that pay dividends may be sensitive to changes in interest rates and, as interest rates rise or fall, the prices of such securities may fall.
Environmental, Social, and/or Governance Investing Risk
The use of environmental, social, and/or governance (“ESG”) considerations by a sub-advisor may cause the Fund to make different investments than funds that have a similar investment style but do not incorporate such considerations in their strategy. As with the use of any investment considerations involved in investment decisions, there is no guarantee that the use of any ESG investment considerations will result in the selection of issuers that will outperform other issuers or help reduce risk in the Fund. The Fund may underperform funds that do not incorporate these considerations or incorporate different ESG considerations. Although a sub-advisor has established its own process to oversee ESG integration in accordance with the Fund’s strategies, successful
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integration of ESG factors will depend on a sub-advisor’s skill in researching, identifying, and applying these factors, as well as on the availability of relevant data. A sub-advisor may use ESG research and/or ratings information provided by one or more third parties in performing this analysis and considering ESG risks.
The regulatory landscape with respect to ESG investing in the United States is evolving and any future rules or regulations may require the Fund to change its investment process with respect to the integration of ESG factors.
Equity Investments Risk
Equity securities are subject to investment risk, issuer risk and market risk. In general, the values of stocks and other equity securities fluctuate, and sometimes widely fluctuate, in response to changes in a company’s financial condition as well as general market, economic and political conditions and other factors. The Fund may experience a significant or complete loss on its investment in an equity security. In addition, stock prices may be particularly sensitive to rising interest rates, which increase borrowing costs and the costs of capital. The Fund may invest in the following equity securities, which may expose the Fund to the following additional risks:
Common Stock Risk. The value of a company’s common stock may fall as a result of factors affecting the company, companies in the same industry or sector, or the financial markets overall. Common stock generally is subordinate to preferred stock upon the liquidation or bankruptcy of the issuing company.
 
Depositary Receipts and/or U.S. Dollar-Denominated Foreign Stocks Traded on U.S. Exchanges Risk. Depositary receipts and U.S. dollar-denominated foreign stocks traded on U.S. exchanges are subject to certain of the risks associated with investing directly in foreign securities, including, but not limited to, currency exchange rate fluctuations, political and financial instability in the home country of a particular depositary receipt or foreign stock, less liquidity, more volatility, less government regulation and supervision and delays in transaction settlement.
 
Foreign Investing Risk
Non-U.S. investments carry potential risks not associated with U.S. investments. Such risks include, but are not limited to: (1) currency exchange rate fluctuations, (2) political and financial instability, (3) less liquidity, (4) lack of uniform accounting, auditing and financial reporting standards, (5) greater volatility, (6) different government regulation and supervision of foreign stock exchanges, brokers and listed companies, and (7) delays or failures in transaction payment and settlement in some foreign markets. The Fund’s investment in a foreign issuer may subject the Fund to regulatory, political, currency, security, economic and other risks associated with that country. Global economic and financial markets have become increasingly interconnected and conditions (including recent volatility, terrorism, war and political instability) and events (including natural disasters) in one country, region or financial market may adversely impact issuers in a different country, region or financial market.
Geographic Concentration Risk
From time to time, based on market or economic conditions, the Fund may invest a significant portion of its assets in the securities of issuers located in, or with significant economic ties to, a single country or geographic region, which could increase the risk that economic, political, business, regulatory, diplomatic, social and environmental conditions in that particular country or geographic region may have a significant impact on the Fund’s performance. Investing in such a manner could cause the Fund’s performance to be more volatile than the performance of more geographically diverse funds.
European Securities Risk. The Fund’s performance may be affected by political, social and economic conditions in Europe, such as growth of economic output (the gross national product), the rate of inflation, the rate at which capital is reinvested into European economies, the success of governmental actions to reduce budget deficits, the resource self-sufficiency of European countries and conflict between European countries. The European financial markets have experienced and may continue to experience volatility and adverse trends due to concerns relating to economic downturns; rising government debt levels and the possible default on government debt; national unemployment in several European countries; and, most recently, the COVID-19 pandemic and the Russian invasion of Ukraine. These events have adversely affected the exchange rate of the euro and may continue to significantly affect European countries. Responses to financial problems by European governments, central banks, and others, including austerity measures and other reforms, may not produce the desired results, may result in social unrest and may limit future growth and economic recovery or may have unintended consequences. In addition, one or more countries may abandon the euro and/or withdraw from the European Union (“EU”). The impact of these actions, especially if they occur in a disorderly fashion, could be significant and far-reaching.
Many EU nations are susceptible to economic risks associated with high levels of debt, and a default or debt restricting by any European country could adversely impact holders of that country’s debt and sellers of credit default swaps linked to that country’s creditworthiness, which may be located in other countries. Such a default or debt restructuring could affect exposures to other EU countries and their companies as well. In addition, issuers have faced difficulties obtaining credit or refinancing existing obligations, and financial markets have experienced extreme volatility and declines in asset values and liquidity. Russia’s war with Ukraine has negatively impacted European economic activity. The effects on the economies of European countries of the Russia/Ukraine war and Russia’s response to sanctions imposed by the U.S. and other countries are impossible to predict, but have been and could continue to be significant. For example, exports in Eastern Europe have been disrupted for certain key commodities, pushing commodity prices to record highs, and energy prices in Europe have increased significantly.
 
United Kingdom Securities Risk. The Fund’s exposure to issuers located in, or with economic ties to, the United Kingdom, could expose the Fund to risks associated with investments in the United Kingdom to a greater extent than more geographically diverse funds. Investments in United Kingdom issuers may subject the Fund to regulatory, political, currency, security, and economic risks specific to the United Kingdom. The United Kingdom has one of the largest economies in Europe, and the United States and other European countries are substantial trading partners of the United Kingdom. As a result, the United Kingdom economy may be impacted by changes to the economic condition of the United States and other European countries.
Increasing commodity prices and rising inflation levels caused or exacerbated by the war between Russia and Ukraine recently prompted the United Kingdom government to implement significant policy changes. It is difficult to predict what effects such policies (or the suggestion of such policies) may have and the duration of those effects, which may last for extended periods. These effects may negatively impact broad segments of business and the population and have a significant and rapid negative impact on the performance of the Fund’s investments.
Additionally, the transitional period following the United Kingdom’s departure from the European Union (commonly referred to as “Brexit”) ended on December 31, 2020 and European Union law ceased to have effect in the United Kingdom except to the extent retained by the United Kingdom by unilateral act. The United Kingdom and the European Union then reached a trade agreement that was ratified by all applicable United Kingdom and European Union governmental bodies. The economic effects of Brexit, including certain negative impacts on the ability of the United Kingdom to trade seamlessly with the European Union, are becoming clearer but some political, regulatory and commercial uncertainty in relation to the longer term impacts nevertheless remains to be resolved. Accordingly, there remains a risk that the aftermath of Brexit, including its ongoing effect on the United Kingdom’s relationships with other countries, including the United States, and with the European Union, may negatively impact the value of investments held by the Fund. Although a sub-advisor may hedge the Fund’s currency exposures back to the U.S. dollar, a depreciation of the British pound sterling and/or the Euro in relation to the U.S. dollar could adversely affect the Fund’s investments denominated in British pound sterling or Euros that are not fully hedged regardless of the performance of the underlying issuer.
 
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Hedging Risk
If the Fund uses a hedging instrument at the wrong time or judges the market conditions incorrectly, or the hedged instrument does not correlate to the risk sought to be hedged, the hedge might be unsuccessful, reduce the Fund’s return, or create a loss. In addition, hedges, even when successful in mitigating risk, may not prevent the Fund from experiencing losses on its investments. Hedging instruments may also reduce or eliminate gains that may otherwise have been available had the Fund not used the hedging instruments.
Investment Risk
An investment in the Fund is not a deposit with a bank and is not insured or guaranteed by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation or any other government agency. When you sell your shares of the Fund, they could be worth less than what you paid for them. Therefore, you may lose money by investing in the Fund.
Issuer Risk
The value of, and/or the return generated by, a security may decline for a number of reasons that directly relate to the issuer, such as management performance, financial leverage and reduced demand for the issuer’s goods or services, as well as the historical and prospective earnings of the issuer and the value of its assets.
Large-Capitalization Companies Risk
The securities of large market capitalization companies may underperform other segments of the market because such companies may be less responsive to competitive challenges and opportunities and, at times, such companies may be out of favor with investors. Many larger-capitalization companies also may be unable to attain the high growth rates of successful smaller companies, especially during periods of economic expansion.
Market Risk
The Fund is subject to the risk that the securities markets will move down, sometimes rapidly and unpredictably, based on overall economic conditions and other factors, which may negatively affect the Fund’s performance. Equity securities generally have greater price volatility than fixed-income securities, although under certain market conditions fixed-income securities may have comparable or greater price volatility. During a general downturn in the securities markets, multiple assets may decline in value simultaneously. Prices in many financial markets have increased significantly over the last decade, but there have also been periods of adverse market and financial developments and cyclical change during that timeframe, which have resulted in unusually high levels of volatility in domestic and foreign financial markets that has caused losses for investors and may occur again in the future. The value of a security may decline due to adverse issuer-specific conditions, general market conditions unrelated to a particular issuer, such as changes in interest or inflation rates, or factors that affect a particular industry or industries. Changes in the financial condition of a single issuer or market segment also can impact the market as a whole. Geopolitical and other events, including war, terrorism, economic uncertainty, trade disputes, pandemics, public health crises, natural disasters and related events have led, and in the future may continue to lead, to instability in world economies and markets generally and reduced liquidity in equity, credit and fixed-income markets, which may disrupt economies and markets and adversely affect the value of your investment. Changes in value may be temporary or may last for extended periods.
Policy changes by the U.S. government and/or Federal Reserve and political events within the U.S. and abroad, such as changes in the U.S. presidential administration and Congress, the U.S. government’s inability at times to agree on a long-term budget and deficit reduction plan, the threat of a federal government shutdown and threats not to increase the federal government’s debt limit which could result in a default on the government’s obligations, may affect investor and consumer confidence and may adversely impact financial markets and the broader economy, perhaps suddenly and to a significant degree.
Markets and market participants are increasingly reliant upon both publicly available and proprietary information data systems. Data imprecision, software or other technology malfunctions, programming inaccuracies, unauthorized use or access, and similar circumstances may impair the performance of these systems and may have an adverse impact upon a single issuer, a group of issuers, or the market at large.
The financial markets generally move in cycles, with periods of rising prices followed by periods of declining prices. The value of your investment may reflect these fluctuations.
Recent Market Events Risk. Both U.S. and international markets have experienced significant volatility in recent months and years. As a result of such volatility, investment returns may fluctuate significantly. Moreover, the risks discussed herein associated with an investment in the Fund may be increased. An outbreak of infectious respiratory illness caused by a novel coronavirus, known as COVID-19, was first detected in late 2019 and has subsequently spread globally. The transmission of various variants of COVID-19, and efforts to contain their spread, have resulted, and may continue to result, in significant disruptions to business operations, travel restrictions and closed borders, and lower consumer demand, as well as general concern and uncertainty that has negatively affected the global economy. Any resurgence of COVID-19, a variant or other significant viruses could negatively impact the Fund and adversely impact the economies of many nations, individual companies and the global securities and commodities markets, including their liquidity, in ways that cannot necessarily be foreseen at the present time.
Although interest rates were unusually low in recent years in the U.S. and abroad, in 2022, the Federal Reserve and certain foreign central banks began to raise interest rates as part of their efforts to address rising inflation. It is difficult to accurately predict the pace at which interest rates may continue to increase, or the timing, frequency or magnitude of any such increases. Additionally, various economic and political factors could cause the Federal Reserve or another foreign central bank to change their approach in the future and such actions may result in an economic slowdown in the U.S. and abroad. Unexpected increases in interest rates could lead to market volatility or reduce liquidity in certain sectors of the market. Deteriorating economic fundamentals may, in turn, increase the risk of default or insolvency of particular issuers, negatively impact market value, cause credit spreads to widen, and reduce bank balance sheets. Any of these could cause an increase in market volatility or reduce liquidity across various markets. Additionally, high public debt in the U.S. and other countries creates ongoing systemic and market risks and policymaking uncertainty.
Some countries, including the U.S., have in recent years adopted more protectionist trade policies. Slowing global economic growth; risks associated with a trade agreement between the United Kingdom and the European Union; the risks associated with ongoing trade negotiations with China; the possibility of changes to some international trade agreements; tensions, war, or open conflict between nations, such as between Russia and Ukraine or in eastern Asia; political or economic dysfunction within some nations, including major producers of oil; and dramatic changes in commodity and currency prices could affect the economies of many nations, including the United States, in ways that cannot necessarily be foreseen at the present time. Russia’s military invasion of Ukraine beginning in February 2022, the responses and sanctions by the United States and other countries, and the potential for wider conflict have had, and could continue to have, severe adverse effects on the performance and liquidity of global markets, and negatively affect the value of the Fund’s investments. The duration of ongoing hostilities and the vast array of sanctions and related events cannot be predicted. Those events present material uncertainty and risk with respect to markets globally and the performance of the Fund and its investments or operations could be negatively impacted. The recent strength of the U.S. dollar could decrease foreign demand for U.S. assets, which may negatively impact certain issuers and/or industries.
Economists and others have expressed increasing concern about the potential effects of global climate change on property and security values. Certain
 
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issuers, industries and regions may be adversely affected by the impacts of climate change, including on the demand for and the development of goods and services and related production costs, and the impacts of legislation, regulation and international accords related to climate change, as well as any indirect consequences of regulation or business trends driven by climate change.
 
Market Timing Risk
The Fund is subject to the risk of market timing activities by investors due to the nature of the Fund’s investments, which requires the Fund, in certain instances, to fair value certain of its investments. Some investors may engage in frequent short-term trading in the Fund to take advantage of any price differentials that may be reflected in the net asset value (“NAV”) of the Fund’s shares. Frequent trading by Fund shareholders poses risks to other shareholders in the Fund, including (i) the dilution of the Fund’s NAV, (ii) an increase in the Fund’s expenses, and (iii) interference with the ability to execute efficient investment strategies.
Mid-Capitalization Companies Risk
Investing in the securities of mid-capitalization companies involves greater risk and the possibility of greater price volatility, which at times can be rapid and unpredictable, than investing in larger-capitalization and more established companies. Since mid-capitalization companies may have narrower commercial markets and more limited operating history, product lines, and managerial and financial resources than larger, more established companies, the securities of these companies may lack sufficient market liquidity, and they can be particularly sensitive to changes in overall economic conditions, interest rates, borrowing costs and earnings.
Multiple Sub-Advisor Risk
The Manager may allocate the Fund’s assets among multiple sub-advisors, each of which is responsible for investing its allocated portion of the Fund’s assets. To a significant extent, the Fund’s performance will depend on the success of the Manager in selecting and overseeing the sub-advisors and allocating the Fund’s assets to sub-advisors. The sub-advisors’ investment styles may not work together as planned, which could adversely affect the performance of the Fund. In addition, because each sub-advisor makes its trading decisions independently, the sub-advisors may purchase or sell the same security at the same time without aggregating their transactions. This may cause unnecessary brokerage and other expenses.
Other Investment Companies Risk
To the extent that the Fund invests in shares of other registered investment companies, the Fund will indirectly bear the fees and expenses charged by those investment companies in addition to the Fund’s direct fees and expenses. To the extent the Fund invests in other investment companies that invest in equity securities, fixed-income securities and/or foreign securities, or that track an index, the Fund is subject to the risks associated with the underlying investments held by the investment company or the index fluctuations to which the investment company is subject. The Fund will be subject to the risks associated with investments in those companies, including but not limited to the following:
Government Money Market Funds Risk. Investments in government money market funds are subject to interest rate risk, credit risk, and market risk. Interest rate risk is the risk that rising interest rates could cause the value of such an investment to decline. Credit risk is the risk that the issuer, guarantor or insurer of an obligation, or the counterparty to a transaction, may fail or become less able or unwilling, to make timely payment of interest or principal or otherwise honor its obligations, or that it may default completely.
 
Sector Risk
When the Fund focuses its investments in certain sectors of the economy, its performance may be driven largely by sector performance and could fluctuate more widely than if the Fund were invested more evenly across sectors. Individual sectors may be more volatile, and may perform differently, than the broader market. As the Fund’s portfolio changes over time, the Fund’s exposure to a particular sector may become higher or lower.
Financials Sector Risk. Financial services companies are subject to extensive governmental regulation, which may limit both the amounts and types of loans and other financial commitments they can make, the interest rates and fees they can charge, the scope of their activities, the prices they can charge and the amount of capital they must maintain. Profitability is largely dependent on the availability and cost of capital funds and can fluctuate significantly when interest rates change or due to increased competition. In addition, deterioration of the credit markets generally may cause an adverse impact in a broad range of markets, including U.S. and international credit and interbank money markets generally, thereby affecting a wide range of financial institutions and markets. Certain events in the Financials sector may cause an unusually high degree of volatility in the financial markets, both domestic and foreign, and cause certain financial services companies to incur large losses. Securities of financial services companies may experience a dramatic decline in value when such companies experience substantial declines in the valuations of their assets, take action to raise capital (such as the issuance of debt or equity securities), or cease operations.
 
Securities Lending Risk
To the extent the Fund lends its securities, it may be subject to the following risks: (i) the securities in which the Fund reinvests cash collateral may decrease in value, causing the Fund to incur a loss, or may not perform sufficiently to cover the Fund’s payment to the borrower of a pre-negotiated fee or “rebate” for the use of that cash collateral in connection with the loan; (ii) non-cash collateral may decline in value, resulting in the Fund becoming under-secured; (iii) delays may occur in the recovery of loaned securities from borrowers, which could result in the Fund being unable to vote proxies or settle transactions or cause the Fund to incur increased costs; and (iv) if the borrower becomes subject to insolvency or similar proceedings, the Fund could incur delays in its ability to enforce its rights in its collateral.
Securities Selection Risk
Securities selected for the Fund may not perform to expectations. This could result in the Fund’s underperformance compared to its benchmark index(es), or other funds with similar investment objectives or strategies.
Segregated Assets Risk
In connection with certain transactions that may give rise to future payment obligations, the Fund may be required to maintain a segregated amount of, or otherwise earmark, cash or liquid securities to cover the obligation. Segregated assets generally cannot be sold while the position they are covering is outstanding, unless they are replaced with other assets of equal value. The need to segregate cash or other liquid securities could limit the Fund’s ability to pursue other opportunities as they arise.
Small-Capitalization Companies Risk
Investing in the securities of small-capitalization companies involves greater risk and the possibility of greater price volatility, which at times can be rapid and unpredictable, than investing in larger-capitalization and more established companies. Since small-capitalization companies may have narrower commercial markets, and more limited operating history, product lines, and managerial and financial resources than larger, more established companies, the securities of these companies may lack sufficient market liquidity and they can be particularly sensitive to changes in overall economic conditions, interest rates, borrowing costs and earnings.
22Prospectus – Fund Summaries 

 
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Valuation Risk
Certain of the Fund’s assets may be valued at a price different from the price at which they can be sold. This risk may be especially pronounced for investments that are illiquid or may become illiquid, or securities that trade in relatively thin markets and/or markets that experience extreme volatility. The valuation of the Fund’s investments in an accurate and timely manner may be impacted by technological issues and/or errors by third party service providers, such as pricing services or accounting agents.
Value Stocks Risk
Value stocks are subject to the risk that their intrinsic or full value may never be realized by the market, that a stock judged to be undervalued may be appropriately priced, or that their prices may decline. Although value stocks tend to be inexpensive relative to their earnings, they can continue to be inexpensive for long periods of time. The Fund’s investments in value stocks seek to limit potential downside price risk over time; however, value stock prices still may decline substantially. In addition, the Fund may produce more modest gains as a trade-off for this potentially lower risk. The Fund’s investment in value stocks could cause the Fund to underperform funds that use a growth or non-value approach to investing or have a broader investment style.
Fund Performance
The bar chart and table below provide an indication of risk by showing changes in the Fund’s performance over time. The bar chart shows how the Fund’s performance has varied from year to year. The table shows how the Fund’s average annual total returns compare to a broad-based market index, which is the Fund’s benchmark index, as well as an additional broad-based market index, for the periods indicated.
The chart and the table show the performance of the Fund’s Investor Class shares for all periods. In the table below, for the period prior to February 28, 2017, the performance of the R6 Class shares reflects the returns of the R5 Class shares of the Fund. The R6 Class shares would have had similar annual returns to the R5 Class shares of the Fund because the shares of each class represent investments in the same portfolio securities. However, as reflected in the table in the “Fees and Expenses of the Fund” section of this Fund Summary, the expenses of the R5 Class shares of the Fund differ from those of the R6 Class shares, which would affect performance. The R6 Class performance shown in the table has not been adjusted for differences in operating expenses between the R6 Class shares and the R5 Class shares. C Class shares automatically convert to A Class shares 8 years after purchase, if the conversion is available through your financial intermediary. In the table below, the performance for C Class shares reflects the conversion of C Class shares to A Class shares after 8 years.
You may obtain updated performance information on the Fund’s website at www.americanbeaconfunds.com. Past performance (before and after taxes) is not necessarily an indication of how the Fund will perform in the future.
Calendar year total returns for Investor Class Shares. Year Ended 12/31
image
Highest Quarterly Return:
20.71%4th Quarter 2022
01/01/2013 through 12/31/2022
Lowest Quarterly Return:
-29.98%1st Quarter 2020
01/01/2013 through 12/31/2022
Average annual total returns for periods ended December 31, 2022
 
Inception Date of Class
1 Year
5 Years
10 Years
Investor Class
08/01/1994
Returns Before Taxes
-11.15
%
-0.60
%
3.10
%
Returns After Taxes on Distributions
-11.39
%
-1.50
%
2.50
%
Returns After Taxes on Distributions and Sales of Fund Shares
-5.99
%
-0.20
%
2.67
%
 
Inception Date of Class
1 Year
5 Years
10 Years
Share Class (Before Taxes)
A
05/17/2010
-16.30
%
-1.84
%
2.43
%
C
09/01/2010
-12.91
%
-1.40
%
2.42
%*
Y
08/03/2009
-10.88
%
-0.34
%
3.37
%
R6
02/28/2017
-10.85
%
-0.21
%
3.50
%
Advisor
05/01/2003
-11.30
%
-0.75
%
2.97
%
R5
08/07/1991
-10.85
%
-0.27
%
3.46
%
* As noted above, the 10-year performance for C Class shares reflects the conversion of C Class shares to A Class shares after 8 years. If C Class shares were not converted to A Class shares after 8 years, and were instead held for the full 10-year period, performance would have been 2.27%.
 
 
1 Year
5 Years
10 Years
Index (Reflects no deduction for fees, expenses or taxes, other than withholding taxes, as noted)
MSCI® EAFE Index (Net)*