EDGAR HTML
Investment Company Act File No. 811-21265
Invesco Exchange-Traded Fund Trust
STATEMENT OF ADDITIONAL INFORMATION
Dated August 28, 2023
This Statement of Additional Information (the “SAI”) for Invesco Exchange-Traded Fund Trust (the “Trust”), relating to the series of the Trust listed below (each, a "Fund" and, collectively, the "Funds"), is not a prospectus. The SAI should be read in conjunction with the prospectus (the “Prospectus”) for each Fund dated August 28, 2023, as the Prospectus may be revised from time to time.
Fund
Principal U.S. Listing Exchange
Ticker
Invesco Aerospace & Defense ETF
NYSE Arca, Inc.
PPA
Invesco AI and Next Gen Software ETF (formerly, Invesco Dynamic Software
ETF)
NYSE Arca, Inc.
IGPT
Invesco Biotechnology & Genome ETF (formerly, Invesco Dynamic
Biotechnology & Genome ETF)
NYSE Arca, Inc.
PBE
Invesco Bloomberg MVP Multi-factor ETF (formerly, Invesco Dynamic Market
ETF)
NYSE Arca, Inc.
BMVP
Invesco Building & Construction ETF (formerly, Invesco Dynamic Building &
Construction ETF)
NYSE Arca, Inc.
PKB
Invesco BuyBack AchieversTM ETF
The Nasdaq Stock Market LLC
PKW
Invesco Dividend AchieversTM ETF
The Nasdaq Stock Market LLC
PFM
Invesco Dorsey Wright Basic Materials Momentum ETF (formerly, Invesco DWA
Basic Materials Momentum ETF)
The Nasdaq Stock Market LLC
PYZ
Invesco Dorsey Wright Consumer Cyclicals Momentum ETF (formerly, Invesco
DWA Consumer Cyclicals Momentum ETF)
The Nasdaq Stock Market LLC
PEZ
Invesco Dorsey Wright Consumer Staples Momentum ETF (formerly, Invesco
DWA Consumer Staples Momentum ETF)
The Nasdaq Stock Market LLC
PSL
Invesco Dorsey Wright Energy Momentum ETF (formerly, Invesco DWA Energy
Momentum ETF)
The Nasdaq Stock Market LLC
PXI
Invesco Dorsey Wright Financial Momentum ETF (formerly, Invesco DWA
Financial Momentum ETF)
The Nasdaq Stock Market LLC
PFI
Invesco Dorsey Wright Healthcare Momentum ETF (formerly, Invesco DWA
Healthcare Momentum ETF)
The Nasdaq Stock Market LLC
PTH
Invesco Dorsey Wright Industrials Momentum ETF (formerly, Invesco DWA
Industrials Momentum ETF)
The Nasdaq Stock Market LLC
PRN
Invesco Dorsey Wright Momentum ETF (formerly Invesco DWA Momentum ETF)
The Nasdaq Stock Market LLC
PDP
Invesco Dorsey Wright Technology Momentum ETF (formerly, Invesco DWA
Technology Momentum ETF)
The Nasdaq Stock Market LLC
PTF
Invesco Dorsey Wright Utilities Momentum ETF (formerly, Invesco DWA Utilities
Momentum ETF)
The Nasdaq Stock Market LLC
PUI
Invesco Dow Jones Industrial Average Dividend ETF
NYSE Arca, Inc.
DJD
Invesco Energy Exploration & Production ETF (formerly, Invesco Dynamic
Energy Exploration & Production ETF)
NYSE Arca, Inc.
PXE
Invesco Financial Preferred ETF
NYSE Arca, Inc.
PGF
Invesco FTSE RAFI US 1000 ETF
NYSE Arca, Inc.
PRF
Invesco FTSE RAFI US 1500 Small-Mid ETF
The Nasdaq Stock Market LLC
PRFZ
Invesco Food & Beverage ETF (formerly, Invesco Dynamic Food & Beverage
ETF)
NYSE Arca, Inc.
PBJ
Invesco Global Listed Private Equity ETF
NYSE Arca, Inc.
PSP
Invesco Golden Dragon China ETF
The Nasdaq Stock Market LLC
PGJ
Invesco High Yield Equity Dividend AchieversTM ETF
The Nasdaq Stock Market LLC
PEY
Invesco International Dividend AchieversTM ETF
The Nasdaq Stock Market LLC
PID
Invesco Large Cap Growth ETF (formerly, Invesco Dynamic Large Cap Growth
ETF)
NYSE Arca, Inc.
PWB
Invesco Large Cap Value ETF (formerly, Invesco Dynamic Large Cap Value
ETF)
NYSE Arca, Inc.
PWV
Invesco Leisure and Entertainment ETF (formerly, Invesco Dynamic Leisure and
Entertainment ETF)
NYSE Arca, Inc.
PEJ

Fund
Principal U.S. Listing Exchange
Ticker
Invesco MSCI Sustainable Future ETF
NYSE Arca, Inc.
ERTH
Invesco NASDAQ Internet ETF
The Nasdaq Stock Market LLC
PNQI
Invesco Next Gen Connectivity ETF (formerly, Invesco Dynamic Networking ETF)
NYSE Arca, Inc.
KNCT
Invesco Next Gen Media and Gaming ETF (formerly, Invesco Dynamic Media
ETF)
NYSE Arca, Inc.
GGME
Invesco Oil & Gas Services ETF (formerly, Invesco Dynamic Oil & Gas Services
ETF)
NYSE Arca, Inc.
PXJ
Invesco Pharmaceuticals ETF (formerly, Invesco Dynamic Pharmaceuticals ETF)
NYSE Arca, Inc.
PJP
Invesco Raymond James SB-1 Equity ETF
NYSE Arca, Inc.
RYJ
Invesco S&P 100 Equal Weight ETF
NYSE Arca, Inc.
EQWL
Invesco S&P 500 BuyWrite ETF
NYSE Arca, Inc.
PBP
Invesco S&P 500® Equal Weight ETF
NYSE Arca, Inc.
RSP
Invesco S&P 500® Equal Weight Communication Services ETF
NYSE Arca, Inc.
RSPC
Invesco S&P 500® Equal Weight Consumer Discretionary ETF
NYSE Arca, Inc.
RSPD
Invesco S&P 500® Equal Weight Consumer Staples ETF
NYSE Arca, Inc.
RSPS
Invesco S&P 500® Equal Weight Energy ETF
NYSE Arca, Inc.
RSPG
Invesco S&P 500® Equal Weight Financials ETF
NYSE Arca, Inc.
RSPF
Invesco S&P 500® Equal Weight Health Care ETF
NYSE Arca, Inc.
RSPH
Invesco S&P 500® Equal Weight Industrials ETF
NYSE Arca, Inc.
RSPN
Invesco S&P 500® Equal Weight Materials ETF
NYSE Arca, Inc.
RSPM
Invesco S&P 500® Equal Weight Real Estate ETF
NYSE Arca, Inc.
RSPR
Invesco S&P 500® Equal Weight Technology ETF
NYSE Arca, Inc.
RSPT
Invesco S&P 500® Equal Weight Utilities ETF
NYSE Arca, Inc.
RSPU
Invesco S&P 500 GARP ETF
NYSE Arca, Inc.
SPGP
Invesco S&P 500® Pure Growth ETF
NYSE Arca, Inc.
RPG
Invesco S&P 500® Pure Value ETF
NYSE Arca, Inc.
RPV
Invesco S&P 500® Quality ETF
NYSE Arca, Inc.
SPHQ
Invesco S&P 500® Top 50 ETF
NYSE Arca, Inc.
XLG
Invesco S&P 500 Value with Momentum ETF
NYSE Arca, Inc.
SPVM
Invesco S&P MidCap 400® GARP ETF (formerly, Invesco S&P MidCap 400®
Equal Weight ETF)
NYSE Arca, Inc.
GRPM
Invesco S&P MidCap 400® Pure Growth ETF
NYSE Arca, Inc.
RFG
Invesco S&P MidCap 400® Pure Value ETF
NYSE Arca, Inc.
RFV
Invesco S&P MidCap Momentum ETF
NYSE Arca, Inc.
XMMO
Invesco S&P MidCap Quality ETF
NYSE Arca, Inc.
XMHQ
Invesco S&P MidCap Value with Momentum ETF
NYSE Arca, Inc.
XMVM
Invesco S&P SmallCap 600® Pure Growth ETF
NYSE Arca, Inc.
RZG
Invesco S&P SmallCap 600® Pure Value ETF
NYSE Arca, Inc.
RZV
Invesco S&P SmallCap Momentum ETF
NYSE Arca, Inc.
XSMO
Invesco S&P SmallCap Value with Momentum ETF
NYSE Arca, Inc.
XSVM
Invesco S&P Spin-Off ETF
NYSE Arca, Inc.
CSD
Invesco Semiconductors ETF (formerly, Invesco Dynamic Semiconductors ETF)
NYSE Arca, Inc.
PSI
Invesco Water Resources ETF
The Nasdaq Stock Market LLC
PHO
Invesco WilderHill Clean Energy ETF
NYSE Arca, Inc.
PBW
Invesco Zacks Mid-Cap ETF
NYSE Arca, Inc.
CZA
Invesco Zacks Multi-Asset Income ETF
NYSE Arca, Inc.
CVY
Capitalized terms used herein that are not defined have the same meaning as in a Fund’s Prospectus, unless otherwise noted. A copy of a Fund’s Prospectus may be obtained without charge by writing to the Trust's Distributor, Invesco Distributors, Inc. (the “Distributor”), 11 Greenway Plaza, Houston, Texas 77046-1173, or by calling toll free 1-800-983-0903. The audited financial statements for each Fund contained in the Trust's Annual Reports for the fiscal year ended April 30, 2023 and the related reports of PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP, the independent registered public accounting firm of the Trust, are incorporated herein by reference in the section "Financial Statements." No other portions of the Trust's Annual Reports are incorporated by reference in to this SAI.

STATEMENT OF ADDITIONAL INFORMATION


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GENERAL DESCRIPTION OF THE TRUST AND THE FUNDS
The Trust was organized as a Massachusetts business trust on June 9, 2000 and is authorized to have multiple series or portfolios. The Trust is an open-end management investment company registered under the Investment Company Act of 1940, as amended (the “1940 Act”). The Trust currently consists of 73 Funds, and this SAI contains information for each of those Funds. Each Fund (except as indicated below) is “non-diversified” and, as such, each such Fund’s investments are not required to meet certain diversification requirements under the 1940 Act. The following Funds are classified as “diversified": Invesco Dorsey Wright Basic Materials Momentum ETF, Invesco Dorsey Wright Consumer Cyclicals Momentum ETF, Invesco Dorsey Wright Consumer Staples Momentum ETF, Invesco Dorsey Wright Energy Momentum ETF, Invesco Dorsey Wright Financial Momentum ETF, Invesco Dorsey Wright Healthcare Momentum ETF, Invesco Dorsey Wright Industrials Momentum ETF, Invesco Dorsey Wright Technology Momentum ETF, Invesco Dorsey Wright Utilities Momentum ETF, Invesco Global Listed Private Equity ETF, Invesco MSCI Sustainable Future ETF, Invesco Raymond James SB-1 Equity ETF, Invesco S&P 100 Equal Weight ETF, Invesco S&P 500® Equal Weight ETF, Invesco S&P 500® Equal Weight Consumer Discretionary ETF, Invesco S&P 500® Equal Weight Consumer Staples ETF, Invesco S&P 500 Equal Weight Energy ETF, Invesco S&P 500® Equal Weight Financials ETF, Invesco S&P 500® Equal Weight Health Care ETF, Invesco S&P 500® Equal Weight Industrials ETF, Invesco S&P 500® Equal Weight Materials ETF, Invesco S&P 500® Equal Weight Real Estate ETF, Invesco S&P 500® Equal Weight Technology ETF, Invesco S&P 500® Equal Weight Utilities ETF, Invesco S&P MidCap 400® GARP ETF, Invesco WilderHill Clean Energy ETF, Invesco Zacks Mid-Cap ETF and Invesco Zacks Multi-Asset Income ETF (the “Diversified Funds”). In addition, each of Invesco BuyBack AchieversTM ETF, Invesco Dividend AchieversTM ETF, Invesco Dorsey Wright Momentum ETF, Invesco Large Cap Growth ETF, Invesco Large Cap Value ETF, Invesco Bloomberg MVP Multi-factor ETF, Invesco FTSE RAFI US 1000 ETF, Invesco FTSE RAFI US 1500 Small-Mid ETF, Invesco High Yield Equity Dividend AchieversTM ETF, Invesco International Dividend AchieversTM ETF, Invesco S&P 500 BuyWrite ETF, Invesco S&P 500 GARP ETF, Invesco S&P 500® Pure Growth ETF, Invesco S&P 500® Pure Value ETF, Invesco S&P 500® Quality ETF, Invesco S&P 500 Value with Momentum ETF, Invesco S&P MidCap 400® Pure Growth ETF, Invesco S&P MidCap 400® Pure Value ETF, Invesco S&P MidCap Momentum ETF, Invesco S&P MidCap Quality ETF, Invesco S&P MidCap Value with Momentum ETF, Invesco S&P SmallCap 600® Pure Growth ETF, Invesco S&P SmallCap 600® Pure Value ETF, Invesco S&P SmallCap Momentum ETF and Invesco S&P SmallCap Value with Momentum ETF are classified as diversified, but may become “non-diversified” solely as a result of a change in relative market capitalization or index weighting of one or more constituents of its Underlying Index (as defined below), and shareholder approval will not be sought if these Funds cross from diversified to non-diversified under such circumstances (referred to herein as the “Diversified Funds that may change to Non-Diversified”). The shares of each of the Funds are referred to in this SAI as “Shares.”
The investment objective of each Fund is to seek to track the investment results (before fees and expenses) of its specific underlying index (each, an “Underlying Index”). Invesco Capital Management LLC (the “Adviser”), an indirect, wholly-owned subsidiary of Invesco Ltd., manages the Funds.
Each Fund issues and redeems Shares at net asset value (“NAV”) only in aggregations of a specified number of Shares set forth in the Fund’s Prospectus (each, a “Creation Unit” or a “Creation Unit Aggregation”). Each Fund generally issues and redeems Creation Units principally in exchange for a basket of securities included in its Underlying Index, as applicable (the “Deposit Securities”), together with the deposit of a specified cash payment (the “Cash Component”), plus certain transaction fees. However, each Fund also reserves the right to permit or require Creation Units to be issued in exchange for cash.
Except as set forth in the following sentence, the Shares of all of the Funds are listed on NYSE Arca, Inc. (“NYSE Arca”) (each an “NYSE Arca-listed Fund,” and collectively, the “NYSE Arca-listed Funds”). Shares of the following Funds are listed on The Nasdaq Stock Market LLC (“NASDAQ”) (each a “NASDAQ-listed Fund,” and collectively, the “NASDAQ-listed Funds”): Invesco BuyBack Achievers ETF, Invesco Dividend Achievers ETF, Invesco Dorsey Wright Basic Materials Momentum ETF, Invesco Dorsey Wright Consumer Cyclicals Momentum ETF, Invesco Dorsey Wright Consumer Staples Momentum ETF, Invesco Dorsey Wright Energy Momentum ETF, Invesco Dorsey Wright Financial Momentum ETF, Invesco Dorsey Wright Healthcare
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Momentum ETF, Invesco Dorsey Wright Industrials Momentum ETF, Invesco Dorsey Wright Momentum ETF, Invesco Dorsey Wright Technology Momentum ETF, Invesco Dorsey Wright Utilities Momentum ETF, Invesco FTSE RAFI US 1500 Small-Mid ETF, Invesco Golden Dragon China ETF, Invesco High Yield Equity Dividend Achievers ETF, Invesco International Dividend Achievers ETF, Invesco NASDAQ Internet ETF and Invesco Water Resources ETF. Together, NYSE Arca and NASDAQ are the “Exchanges” and each is an “Exchange.”
Shares trade on the respective Exchanges at market prices that may be below, at, or above NAV. In the event of the liquidation of a Fund, the Trust may decrease the number of Shares in a Creation Unit. 
Each Fund may issue Shares in advance of receipt of Deposit Securities subject to various conditions, including a requirement to maintain on deposit with the Trust cash at least equal to 105% of the market value of the missing Deposit Securities. See the “Creation and Redemption of Creation Unit Aggregations” section. To offset the added brokerage and other transaction costs a Fund incurs with using cash to purchase the requisite Deposit Securities, during each instance of cash creations or redemptions, the Funds may impose transaction fees that generally are higher than the transaction fees associated with in-kind creations or redemptions.
The following table summarizes the Funds’ name changes during the past five years (as applicable):
Fund
Fund History
Invesco AI and Next Gen Software
ETF
Prior to August 28, 2023, the Fund was known as Invesco Dynamic Software ETF.
Invesco Bloomberg MVP Multi-factor
ETF
Prior to August 28, 2023, the Fund was known as Invesco Dynamic Market ETF.
Invesco Next Gen Connectivity ETF
Prior to August 28, 2023, the Fund was known as Invesco Dynamic Networking ETF.
Invesco Next Gen Media and
Gaming ETF
Prior to August 28, 2023, the Fund was known as Invesco Dynamic Media ETF.
Invesco S&P MidCap 400® GARP
ETF
Prior to August 28, 2023, the Fund was known as Invesco S&P MidCap 400 Equal Weight ETF.
Invesco Dorsey Wright Basic
Materials Momentum ETF
Prior to August 28, 2023, the Fund was known as Invesco DWA Basic Materials Momentum
ETF.
Invesco Dorsey Wright Consumer
Cyclicals Momentum ETF
Prior to August 28, 2023, the Fund was known as Invesco DWA Consumer Cyclicals
Momentum ETF.
Invesco Dorsey Wright Consumer
Staples Momentum ETF
Prior to August 28, 2023, the Fund was known as Invesco DWA Consumer Staples Momentum
ETF.
Invesco Dorsey Wright Energy
Momentum ETF
Prior to August 28, 2023, the Fund was known as Invesco DWA Energy Momentum ETF.
Invesco Dorsey Wright Financial
Momentum ETF
Prior to August 28, 2023, the Fund was known as Invesco DWA Financial Momentum ETF.
Invesco Dorsey Wright Healthcare
Momentum ETF
Prior to August 28, 2023, the Fund was known as Invesco DWA Healthcare Momentum ETF.
Invesco Dorsey Wright Industrials
Momentum ETF
Prior to August 28, 2023, the Fund was known as Invesco DWA Industrials Momentum ETF.
Invesco Dorsey Wright Momentum
ETF
Prior to August 28, 2023, the Fund was known as Invesco DWA Momentum ETF
Invesco Dorsey Wright Technology
Momentum ETF
Prior to August 28, 2023, the Fund was known as Invesco DWA Technology Momentum ETF.
Invesco Dorsey Wright Utilities
Momentum ETF
Prior to August 28, 2023, the Fund was known as Invesco DWA Utilities Momentum ETF.
Invesco Biotechnology & Genome
ETF
Prior to August 28, 2023, the Fund was known as Invesco Dynamic Biotechnology & Genome
ETF.
Invesco Building & Construction ETF
Prior to August 28, 2023, the Fund was known as Invesco Dynamic Building & Construction
ETF.
Invesco Energy Exploration &
Production ETF
Prior to August 28, 2023, the Fund was known as Invesco Dynamic Energy Exploration &
Production ETF.
Invesco Food & Beverage ETF
Prior to August 28, 2023, the Fund was known as Invesco Dynamic Food & Beverage ETF.
Invesco Large Cap Growth ETF
Prior to August 28, 2023, the Fund was known as Invesco Dynamic Large Cap Growth ETF.
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Fund
Fund History
Invesco Large Cap Value ETF
Prior to August 28, 2023, the Fund was known as Invesco Dynamic Large Cap Value ETF.
Invesco Leisure and Entertainment
ETF
Prior to August 28, 2023, the Fund was known as Invesco Dynamic Leisure and Entertainment
ETF.
Invesco Oil & Gas Services ETF
Prior to August 28, 2023, the Fund was known as Invesco Dynamic Oil & Gas Services ETF.
Invesco Pharmaceuticals ETF
Prior to August 28, 2023, the Fund was known as Invesco Dynamic Pharmaceuticals ETF.
Invesco Semiconductors ETF
Prior to August 28, 2023, the Fund was known as Invesco Dynamic Semiconductors ETF.
Invesco MSCI Sustainable Future
ETF
Prior to March 25, 2021, the Fund was known as Invesco CleantechTM ETF.
Invesco S&P 100 Equal Weight ETF
Prior to June 24, 2019, the Fund was known as Invesco Russell Top 200 Equal Weight ETF.
Invesco S&P MidCap Quality ETF
Prior to June 24, 2019, the Fund was known as Invesco Russell Midcap Equal Weight ETF.
Invesco S&P 500 GARP ETF
Prior to June 24, 2019, the Fund was known as Invesco Russell Top 200 Pure Growth ETF.
Invesco S&P MidCap Momentum
ETF
Prior to June 24, 2019, the Fund was known as Invesco Russell Midcap Pure Growth ETF.
Invesco S&P SmallCap Momentum
ETF
Prior to June 24, 2019, the Fund was known as Invesco Russell 2000 Pure Growth ETF.
Invesco S&P 500 Value with
Momentum ETF
Prior to June 24, 2019, the Fund was known as Invesco Russell Top 200 Pure Value ETF.
Invesco S&P MidCap Value with
Momentum ETF
Prior to June 24, 2019, the Fund was known as Invesco Russell Midcap Pure Value ETF.
Invesco S&P SmallCap Value with
Momentum ETF
Prior to June 24, 2019, the Fund was known as Invesco Russell 2000 Pure Value ETF.
EXCHANGE LISTING AND TRADING
Shares of each Fund are listed for trading, and trade throughout the day, on their respective Exchange.
There can be no assurance that a Fund will continue to meet the requirements of its Exchange necessary to maintain the listing of its Shares. The Exchanges may, but are not required to, remove the Shares of a Fund from listing if: (i) following the initial 12-month period beginning at the commencement of trading of a Fund, there are fewer than 50 beneficial owners of Shares; (ii) the Fund is no longer eligible to operate in reliance on Rule 6c-11 under the 1940 Act; (iii) the Fund fails to meet certain continued listing standards of an Exchange; or (iv) such other event shall occur or condition shall exist that, in the opinion of the relevant Exchange, makes further dealings on such Exchange inadvisable. The applicable Exchange will remove the Shares of a Fund from listing and trading upon termination of the Fund.
As in the case of other stocks traded on the Exchanges, brokers’ commissions on transactions will be based on negotiated commission rates at customary levels.
The Trust reserves the right to adjust the price levels of the Shares in the future to help maintain convenient trading ranges for investors. Any adjustments would be accomplished through stock splits or reverse stock splits, which would have no effect on the net assets of a Fund.
INVESTMENT RESTRICTIONS
The Funds have adopted as fundamental policies the investment restrictions numbered (1) through (16) below, except that restrictions (1) and (2) only apply to the Diversified Funds that may change to Non-Diversified and restrictions (3) and (4) only apply to Diversified Funds. Except as noted in the prior sentence or as otherwise noted below, each Fund, as a fundamental policy, may not:
(1)  As to 75% of its total assets, invest more than 5% of the value of its total assets in the securities of any one issuer (other than obligations issued, or guaranteed, by the U.S. Government, its agencies or instrumentalities), except as may be necessary to approximate the composition of its Underlying Index.
(2)  As to 75% of its total assets, purchase more than 10% of all outstanding voting securities or any class of securities of any one issuer, except as may be necessary to approximate the composition of its Underlying Index. 
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(3)  As to 75% of its total assets, invest more than 5% of the value of its total assets in the securities of any one issuer (other than obligations issued, or guaranteed, by the U.S. Government, its agencies or instrumentalities).
(4)  As to 75% of its total assets, purchase more than 10% of all outstanding voting securities or any class of securities of any one issuer.
(5)  With respect to the Invesco Bloomberg MVP Multi-factor ETF, invest 25% or more of the value of its total assets in securities of issuers in any one industry or group of industries, except to the extent that the Underlying Index concentrates in an industry or group of industries. This restriction does not apply to obligations issued or guaranteed by the U.S. Government, its agencies or instrumentalities.
(6)  With respect to the Invesco Aerospace & Defense ETF, Invesco BuyBack Achievers ETF, Invesco Dividend Achievers ETF, Invesco Dorsey Wright Momentum ETF, Invesco Dorsey Wright Basic Materials Momentum ETF, Invesco Biotechnology & Genome ETF, Invesco Building & Construction ETF, Invesco Dorsey Wright Consumer Cyclicals Momentum ETF, Invesco Dorsey Wright Consumer Staples Momentum ETF, Invesco Energy Exploration & Production ETF, Invesco Dorsey Wright Energy Momentum ETF, Invesco Dorsey Wright Financial Momentum ETF, Invesco Food & Beverage ETF, Invesco Dorsey Wright Healthcare Momentum ETF, Invesco Dorsey Wright Industrials Momentum ETF, Invesco Large Cap Growth ETF, Invesco Large Cap Value ETF, Invesco Leisure and Entertainment ETF, Invesco Next Gen Media and Gaming ETF, Invesco Next Gen Connectivity ETF, Invesco Oil & Gas Services ETF, Invesco Pharmaceuticals ETF, Invesco Semiconductors ETF, Invesco AI and Next Gen Software ETF, Invesco Dorsey Wright Technology Momentum ETF, Invesco Dorsey Wright Utilities Momentum ETF, Invesco Financial Preferred ETF, Invesco FTSE RAFI US 1000 ETF, Invesco FTSE RAFI US 1500 Small-Mid ETF, Invesco Golden Dragon China ETF, Invesco High Yield Equity Dividend Achievers ETF, Invesco International Dividend Achievers ETF, Invesco Global Listed Private Equity ETF, Invesco MSCI Sustainable Future ETF, Invesco NASDAQ Internet ETF, Invesco S&P 100 Equal Weight ETF, Invesco S&P MidCap Momentum ETF, Invesco S&P MidCap Quality ETF, Invesco S&P MidCap Value with Momentum ETF, Invesco S&P SmallCap Momentum ETF, Invesco S&P SmallCap Value with Momentum ETF, Invesco S&P 500 BuyWrite ETF, Invesco S&P 500® Quality ETF, Invesco Water Resources ETF and Invesco WilderHill Clean Energy ETF, invest 25% or more of the value of its total assets in securities of issuers in any one industry or group of industries, except to the extent that the respective Underlying Index that the Fund replicates, concentrates in an industry or group of industries. The Invesco Water Resources ETF will invest at least 25% of the value of its total assets in the water industry. This restriction does not apply to obligations issued or guaranteed by the U.S. Government, its agencies or instrumentalities.
(7)  With respect to Invesco Dow Jones Industrial Average Dividend ETF, Invesco Raymond James SB-1 Equity ETF, Invesco S&P 500 GARP ETF, Invesco S&P 500 Value with Momentum ETF, Invesco S&P 500® Equal Weight ETF, Invesco S&P 500® Equal Weight Communication Services ETF, Invesco S&P 500® Equal Weight Consumer Discretionary ETF, Invesco S&P 500® Equal Weight Consumer Staples ETF, Invesco S&P 500® Equal Weight Energy ETF, Invesco S&P 500® Equal Weight Financials ETF, Invesco S&P 500® Equal Weight Health Care ETF, Invesco S&P 500® Equal Weight Industrials ETF, Invesco S&P 500® Equal Weight Materials ETF, Invesco S&P 500® Equal Weight Real Estate ETF, Invesco S&P 500® Equal Weight Technology ETF, Invesco S&P 500® Equal Weight Utilities ETF, Invesco S&P 500® Pure Growth ETF, Invesco S&P 500® Pure Value ETF, Invesco S&P 500® Top 50 ETF, Invesco S&P MidCap 400® GARP ETF, Invesco S&P MidCap 400® Pure Growth ETF, Invesco S&P MidCap 400® Pure Value ETF, Invesco S&P SmallCap 600® Pure Growth ETF, Invesco S&P SmallCap 600® Pure Value ETF, Invesco S&P Spin-Off ETF, Invesco Zacks Mid-Cap ETF and Invesco Zacks Multi-Asset Income ETF invest more than 25% of the value of its net assets in securities of issuers in any one industry or group of industries, except to the extent that the Underlying Index that the Fund replicates concentrates in an industry or group of industries. This restriction does not apply to obligations issued or guaranteed by the U.S. Government, its agencies or instrumentalities.
(8)  With respect to the Invesco Bloomberg MVP Multi-factor ETF, Invesco Golden Dragon China ETF and Invesco High Yield Equity Dividend Achievers ETF, borrow money, except that the Fund may (i) borrow money from banks for temporary or emergency purposes (but not for leverage or the purchase of
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investments) and (ii) make other investments or engage in other transactions permissible under the 1940 Act that may involve a borrowing, provided that the combination of (i) and (ii) shall not exceed 33 1/3% of the value of the Fund’s total assets (including the amount borrowed), less the Fund’s liabilities (other than borrowings).
(9)  With respect to the Invesco Aerospace & Defense ETF, Invesco Dividend Achievers ETF, Invesco Biotechnology & Genome ETF, Invesco Building & Construction ETF, Invesco Energy Exploration & Production ETF, Invesco Food & Beverage ETF, Invesco Large Cap Growth ETF, Invesco Large Cap Value ETF, Invesco Leisure and Entertainment ETF, Invesco Next Gen Media and Gaming ETF, Invesco Next Gen Connectivity ETF, Invesco Oil & Gas Services ETF, Invesco Pharmaceuticals ETF, Invesco Semiconductors ETF, Invesco AI and Next Gen Software ETF, Invesco Dorsey Wright Utilities Momentum ETF, Invesco FTSE RAFI US 1000 ETF, Invesco International Dividend Achievers ETF, Invesco MSCI Sustainable Future ETF, Invesco S&P MidCap Momentum ETF, Invesco S&P MidCap Value with Momentum ETF, Invesco S&P SmallCap Momentum ETF, Invesco S&P SmallCap Value with Momentum ETF, Invesco S&P 500 Quality ETF, Invesco Water Resources ETF and Invesco WilderHill Clean Energy ETF, borrow money, except that the Fund may (i) borrow money from banks for temporary or emergency purposes (but not for leverage or the purchase of investments) up to 10% of its assets and (ii) make other investments or engage in other transactions permissible under the 1940 Act that may involve a borrowing, provided that the combination of (i) and (ii) shall not exceed 33 1/3% of the value of the Fund’s total assets (including the amount borrowed), less the Fund’s liabilities (other than borrowings).
(10)  With respect to the Invesco BuyBack Achievers ETF, Invesco Dorsey Wright Momentum ETF, Invesco Dorsey Wright Basic Materials Momentum ETF, Invesco Dorsey Wright Consumer Cyclicals Momentum ETF, Invesco Dorsey Wright Consumer Staples Momentum ETF, Invesco Dorsey Wright Energy Momentum ETF, Invesco Dorsey Wright Financial Momentum ETF, Invesco Dorsey Wright Healthcare Momentum ETF, Invesco Dorsey Wright Industrials Momentum ETF, Invesco Dorsey Wright Technology Momentum ETF, Invesco Financial Preferred ETF, Invesco FTSE RAFI US 1500 Small-Mid ETF, Invesco Global Listed Private Equity ETF, Invesco NASDAQ Internet ETF, Invesco S&P 100 Equal Weight ETF, Invesco S&P MidCap Quality ETF and Invesco S&P 500 BuyWrite ETF, borrow money, except that the Fund may (i) borrow money from banks for temporary or emergency purposes (but not for leverage or the purchase of investments) up to 10% of its total assets and (ii) make other investments or engage in other transactions permissible under the 1940 Act that may involve a borrowing, provided that the combination of (i) and (ii) shall not exceed 33 1/3% of the value of the Fund’s total assets (including the amount borrowed), less the Fund’s liabilities (other than borrowings).
(11)  With respect to the Invesco Dow Jones Industrial Average Dividend ETF, Invesco Raymond James SB-1 Equity ETF, Invesco S&P 500 GARP ETF and Invesco S&P 500 Value with Momentum ETF, Invesco S&P 500® Equal Weight ETF, Invesco S&P 500® Equal Weight Communication Services ETF, Invesco S&P 500® Equal Weight Consumer Discretionary ETF, Invesco S&P 500® Equal Weight Consumer Staples ETF, Invesco S&P 500® Equal Weight Energy ETF, Invesco S&P 500® Equal Weight Financials ETF, Invesco S&P 500® Equal Weight Health Care ETF, Invesco S&P 500® Equal Weight Industrials ETF, Invesco S&P 500® Equal Weight Materials ETF, Invesco S&P 500® Equal Weight Real Estate ETF, Invesco S&P 500® Equal Weight Technology ETF, Invesco S&P 500® Equal Weight Utilities ETF, Invesco S&P 500® Pure Growth ETF, Invesco S&P 500® Pure Value ETF, Invesco S&P 500® Top 50 ETF, Invesco S&P MidCap 400® GARP ETF, Invesco S&P MidCap 400® Pure Growth ETF, Invesco S&P MidCap 400® Pure Value ETF, Invesco S&P SmallCap 600® Pure Growth ETF, Invesco S&P SmallCap 600® Pure Value ETF, Invesco S&P Spin-Off ETF, Invesco Zacks Mid-Cap ETF and Invesco Zacks Multi-Asset Income ETF, borrow money, except that the Fund may borrow money to the extent permitted by (i) the 1940 Act, (ii) the rules and regulations promulgated by the Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”) under the 1940 Act, or (iii) an exemption or other relief applicable to the Fund from the provisions of the 1940 Act.
(12)  Act as an underwriter of another issuer’s securities, except to the extent that the Fund may be deemed to be an underwriter within the meaning of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended (the “Securities Act”) in connection with the purchase and sale of portfolio securities.
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(13)  Make loans to other persons, except through (i) the purchase of debt securities permissible under the Fund’s investment policies, (ii) repurchase agreements or (iii) the lending of portfolio securities, provided that no such loan of portfolio securities may be made by the Fund if, as a result, the aggregate of such loans would exceed 33 1/3% of the value of the Fund’s total assets.
(14)  Purchase or sell physical commodities unless acquired as a result of ownership of securities or other instruments (but this shall not prevent the Fund (i) from purchasing or selling options, futures contracts or other derivative instruments, or (ii) from investing in securities or other instruments backed by physical commodities).
(15)  Purchase or sell real estate unless acquired as a result of ownership of securities or other instruments (but this shall not prohibit the Fund from purchasing or selling securities or other instruments backed by real estate or of issuers engaged in real estate activities).
(16)  Issue senior securities, except as permitted under the 1940 Act.
Except for restrictions (8), (9), (10), (11), (13)(iii) and (16), if a Fund adheres to a percentage restriction at the time of investment, a later increase in percentage resulting from a change in market value of the investment or the total assets, or the sale of a security out of the portfolio, will not constitute a violation of that restriction. With respect to restrictions (8), (9), (10), (11), (13)(iii) and (16), in the event that a Fund’s borrowings, repurchase agreements and loans of portfolio securities at any time exceed 33 1/3% of the value of the Fund’s total assets (including the amount borrowed and the collateral received), less the Fund’s liabilities (other than borrowings or loans) due to subsequent changes in the value of the Fund’s assets or otherwise, within three days (excluding Sundays and holidays), the Fund will take corrective action to reduce the amount of its borrowings, repurchase agreements and loans of portfolio securities to an extent that such borrowings, repurchase agreements and loans of portfolio securities will not exceed 33 1/3% of the value of the Fund’s total assets (including the amount borrowed and the collateral received) less the Fund’s liabilities (other than borrowings or loans).
The foregoing fundamental investment policies cannot be changed as to a Fund without approval by holders of a “majority of the Fund’s outstanding voting securities.” As defined in the 1940 Act, this means the vote of (i) 67% or more of the Shares present at a meeting, if the holders of more than 50% of the Shares are present or represented by proxy, or (ii) more than 50% of the Shares, whichever is less.
In addition to the foregoing fundamental investment policies, each Fund also is subject to the following non-fundamental investment restrictions and policies, which may be changed by the Board of Trustees of the Trust (the “Board”) without shareholder approval. Each Fund may not:
(1)  Except for Invesco S&P 500 GARP ETF and Invesco S&P 500 Value with Momentum ETF, sell securities short, unless the Fund owns or has the right to obtain securities equivalent in kind and amount to the securities sold short at no added cost, and provided that transactions in options, futures contracts, options on futures contracts or other derivative instruments are not deemed to constitute selling securities short.
(2)  With respect to Invesco S&P 500 GARP ETF and Invesco S&P 500 Value with Momentum ETF, sell securities short, unless the Fund owns or has the right to obtain securities equivalent in kind and amount to the securities sold short at no added cost.
(3)  Except for Invesco S&P 500 GARP ETF and Invesco S&P 500 Value with Momentum ETF, purchase securities on margin, except that the Fund may obtain such short-term credits as are necessary for the clearance of transactions; and provided that margin deposits in connection with futures contracts, options on futures contracts or other derivative instruments shall not constitute purchasing securities on margin.
(4)  With respect to Invesco S&P 500 GARP ETF and Invesco S&P 500 Value with Momentum ETF, purchase securities on margin, except that the Fund may obtain such short-term credits as are necessary for the clearance of transactions.
(5)  With respect to Invesco Dow Jones Industrial Average Dividend ETF, Invesco Global Listed Private Equity ETF, Invesco Raymond James SB-1 Equity ETF, Invesco S&P Spin-Off ETF, Invesco Zacks Mid-Cap
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ETF and Invesco Zacks Multi-Asset Income ETF, purchase securities of open-end or closed-end investment companies except in compliance with the 1940 Act.
(6)  Except for Invesco Dow Jones Industrial Average Dividend ETF, Invesco Global Listed Private Equity ETF, Invesco Raymond James SB-1 Equity ETF, Invesco S&P Spin-Off ETF, Invesco Zacks Mid-Cap ETF and Invesco Zacks Multi-Asset Income ETF, purchase securities of open-end or closed-end investment companies except in compliance with the 1940 Act, although the Fund may not acquire any securities of registered open-end investment companies or registered unit investment trusts in reliance on Sections 12(d)(1)(F) and 12(d)(1)(G) of the 1940 Act.
(7)  Invest in direct interests in oil, gas or other mineral exploration programs or leases; however, the Fund may invest in the securities of issuers that engage in these activities.
(8)  Invest in illiquid investments if, as a result of such investment, more than 15% of the Fund’s net assets would be invested in illiquid investments.
(9)  With respect to the Invesco Bloomberg MVP Multi-factor ETF, Invesco Golden Dragon China ETF and Invesco High Yield Equity Dividend Achievers ETF, enter into futures contracts or related options if more than 30% of the Fund’s net assets would be represented by such instruments or more than 5% of the Fund’s net assets would be committed to initial margin deposits and premiums on futures contracts and related options.
The investment objective of each Fund is a non-fundamental policy that the Board may change without approval by shareholders upon 60 days’ written notice to shareholders.
In accordance with the 1940 Act, each Fund (except Invesco Bloomberg MVP Multi-factor ETF, Invesco BuyBack Achievers ETF, Invesco Dow Jones Industrial Average Dividend ETF, Invesco Dorsey Wright Momentum ETF, Invesco FTSE RAFI US 1000 ETF, Invesco International Dividend Achievers ETF, Invesco MSCI Sustainable Future ETF, Invesco Next Gen Connectivity ETF, Invesco S&P 100 Equal Weight ETF, Invesco S&P 500 GARP ETF, Invesco S&P 500 Value with Momentum ETF, Invesco S&P 500® Equal Weight ETF, Invesco S&P 500® Pure Growth ETF, Invesco S&P 500® Pure Value ETF, Invesco S&P 500® Quality ETF, Invesco S&P 500® Top 50 ETF, Invesco S&P Spin-Off ETF and Invesco Zacks Multi-Asset Income ETF) has adopted a policy to invest at least 80% of the value of its total assets in certain types of securities (e.g., securities of companies of a particular size of capitalization, such as small-, mid-, or large-cap securities) or in securities of companies operating in a particular country or geographic region, or industry or economic sector (e.g., securities of energy, technology or healthcare companies) that is suggested by the Fund’s name (for each such Fund, an “80% investment policy”). Each Fund with an 80% investment policy considers the securities suggested by its name to be those securities that comprise its respective Underlying Index. The 80% investment policy for each of these Funds is a non-fundamental policy, and each Fund will provide its shareholders with at least 60 days’ prior written notice of any change to its 80% investment policy. If, subsequent to an investment, a Fund invests less than 80% of its total assets pursuant to its 80% investment policy, that Fund will make future investments in securities that satisfy the policy.
INVESTMENT STRATEGIES AND RISKS
Investment Strategies
Each Fund’s investment objective is to seek to track the investment results, before fees and expenses, of its respective Underlying Index. Each Fund seeks to achieve its investment objective by investing primarily in securities that comprise its Underlying Index. Each Fund operates as an index fund and will not be actively managed. Generally, each Fund (except Invesco Financial Preferred ETF) attempts to replicate, before fees and expenses, the performance of its Underlying Index by generally investing in all of the securities comprising its Underlying Index in proportion to the weightings of the securities in the Underlying Index, although any Fund may use sampling techniques for the purpose of complying with regulatory or investment restrictions or when sampling is deemed appropriate to track an Underlying Index. Invesco Financial Preferred ETF generally uses a “sampling” methodology to seek to achieve its investment objective. A Fund’s use of a
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sampling methodology may not be as well-correlated with the return of its Underlying Index as would be the case if the Fund purchased all of the securities in its Underlying Index in the proportions represented in such Underlying Index.
Investment Risks
A discussion of the risks associated with an investment in a Fund is contained in the Fund’s Prospectus in the “Summary Information—Principal Risks of Investing in the Fund”, “Additional Information About the Fund’s Strategies and Risks—Principal Risks of Investing in the Fund” and “—Additional Risks of Investing in the Fund” sections. The discussion below supplements, and should be read in conjunction with, these sections.
An investment in a Fund should be made with an understanding that the value of the Fund's portfolio holdings may fluctuate in accordance with changes in the financial condition of the issuers of those portfolio holdings and other factors that affect the market, as applicable.
An investment in each Fund also should be made with an understanding of the risks inherent in an investment in securities, including the risk that the financial condition of issuers may become impaired or that the general condition of the securities market may deteriorate (either of which may cause a decrease in the value of the portfolio securities and thus in the value of Shares). The Funds’ portfolio holdings are susceptible to general market fluctuations and to volatile increases and decreases in value as market confidence and investor confidence and perceptions change. Investor perceptions are based on various and unpredictable factors, including expectations regarding government, economic, monetary and fiscal policies, inflation and interest rates, economic expansion or contraction, and global or regional political, economic or banking crises.
The Funds are not actively managed, and therefore, the adverse financial condition of any one issuer will not result in the elimination of its securities from the securities a Fund holds unless such securities are removed from such Fund's Underlying Index. 
China Investment Risk. The value of securities of companies that derive the majority of their revenues from China is likely to be more volatile than that of other issuers. The economy of China differs, often unfavorably, from the U.S. economy in such respects as structure, general development, government involvement, wealth distribution, rate of inflation, growth rate, allocation of resources and capital reinvestment, among others. Under China’s political and economic system, the central government has historically exercised substantial control over virtually every sector of the Chinese economy through administrative regulation and/or state ownership. Since 1978, the Chinese government has been, and is expected to continue, reforming its economic policies, which has resulted in less direct central and local government control over the business and production activities of Chinese enterprises and companies. Notwithstanding the economic reforms instituted by the Chinese government and the Chinese Communist Party, actions of the Chinese central and local government authorities continue to have a substantial effect on economic conditions in China, which could affect its public and private sector companies. In the past, the Chinese government has, from time to time, taken actions that influenced the prices at which certain goods may be sold, encouraged companies to invest or concentrate in particular industries, induced mergers between companies in certain industries and induced private companies to publicly offer their securities to increase or continue the rate of economic growth, controlled the rate of inflation or otherwise regulated economic expansion. It may do so in the future as well. As a result, Chinese markets generally continue to experience inefficiency, volatility and pricing anomalies. Further, health events, such as the coronavirus (“COVID-19”) outbreak, may cause uncertainty and volatility in the Chinese economy, especially in the consumer discretionary (leisure, retail, gaming, tourism), industrials, and commodities sectors. In addition, any reduction in spending on Chinese products and services, institution of tariffs or other trade barriers or a downturn in any of the economies of China’s key trading partners may have an adverse impact on the Chinese economy. From time to time, certain companies in which a Fund invests may operate in, or have dealings with, countries subject to sanctions or embargoes imposed by the U.S. Government and the United Nations and/or in countries the U.S. Government identified as state sponsors of terrorism. One or more of these companies may be subject to constraints under U.S. law or regulations that could negatively affect the company’s performance. Additionally, one or more of these companies could
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suffer damage to its reputation if the market identifies it as a company that invests or deals with countries that the U.S. Government identifies as state sponsors of terrorism or subjects to sanctions.
China A-Share Investment Risk. The Shanghai-Hong Kong Stock Connect program and the Shenzhen-Hong Kong Stock Connect program (both programs collectively referred to as the Connect Program) are securities trading and clearing programs through which a fund can trade eligible listed China A-shares. Investing in A-shares through the Connect Program is subject to trading, clearance, settlement and other procedures, which could pose risks to a fund. Trading through the Connect Program is subject to the Daily Quota, which may restrict a fund’s ability to invest in A-shares through the Connect Program on a timely basis. The Connect Program will only operate on days when both the Chinese and Hong Kong markets are open for trading and when banking services are available in both markets on the corresponding settlement days. Therefore, an investment in A-shares through the Connect Program may subject a fund to the risk of price fluctuations on days when the Chinese markets are open, but the Connect Program is not trading.
Chinese Variable Interest Entity Investment Risk. Many Chinese companies have created a special structure, which is based in China, known as a variable interest entity (“VIE”) as a means to circumvent limits on direct foreign ownership of equity in Chinese operating companies in certain sectors, such as internet, media, education and telecommunications, imposed by the Chinese government. Typically in such an arrangement, a China-based operating company establishes an offshore “holding” company in another jurisdiction that likely does not have the same disclosure, reporting, and governance requirements as the United States. The holding company issues shares, i.e., is “listed”, on a foreign exchange such as the New York Stock Exchange or the Hong Kong Stock Exchange. The listed holding company enters into service and other contracts with the China-based operating company, typically through the China-based VIE. The VIE must be owned by Chinese nationals (and/or other Chinese companies), which often are the VIE’s founders, in order to obtain the licenses and/or assets required to operate in the restricted or prohibited sector in China. The operations and financial position of the VIE are included in consolidated financial statements of the listed holding company. Foreign investors, including mutual funds and ETFs (such as the Funds), hold stock in the listed holding company rather than directly in the China-based operating company.
The VIE structure allows foreign shareholders to exert a degree of control and obtain economic benefits arising from the operating company but without formal legal ownership because the listed holding company’s control over the operating company is predicated entirely on contracts with the VIE. The listed holding company is distinct from the underlying operating company, and an investment in the listed holding company represents exposure to a company that maintains service contracts with the operating company, not equity ownership.
Investments in companies that use VIEs may pose additional risks because the investment is made through the listed holding company’s service and other contractual arrangements with the underlying Chinese operating company. As a result, such investment may limit the rights of an investor with respect to the underlying Chinese operating company. The contractual arrangements between the VIE and the operating company may not be as effective in providing operational control as direct equity ownership. The Chinese government could determine at any time and without notice that the underlying contractual arrangements on which control of the VIE is based violate Chinese law. While VIEs are a longstanding industry practice, well known to Chinese officials and regulators, VIEs historically have not been formally recognized under Chinese law. The owners of the VIE could decide to breach the contractual arrangements with the listed holding company and it is uncertain whether the contractual arrangements, which may be subject to conflicts of interest between the legal owners of the VIE and foreign investors, would be enforced by Chinese courts or arbitration bodies. Prohibitions of these structures by the Chinese government, or the inability to enforce such contracts, from which the shell company derives its value, would likely cause the VIE-structured holding(s) to suffer significant, detrimental, and possibly permanent loss, and in turn, adversely affect a Fund’s returns and NAV.
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The Chinese government previously placed restrictions on China-based companies raising capital offshore in certain sectors, including through VIEs, and investors face uncertainty about future actions by the Chinese government that could significantly affect the operating company’s financial performance and the enforceability of the contractual arrangements underlying the VIE structure. It is uncertain whether Chinese officials or regulators will withdraw their acceptance of the VIE structure, or whether any new laws, rules or regulations relating to VIE structures will be adopted and what impact such laws may have on foreign investors. There is a risk that China might prohibit the existence of VIEs or sever their ability to transmit economic and governance rights to foreign individuals and entities; if so, the market value of any associated portfolio holdings would likely suffer substantial, detrimental, and possibly permanent loss.
Chinese companies, including those listed on U.S. exchanges, are generally not subject to the same degree of regulatory requirements, accounting standards or auditor oversight as companies in more developed countries. As a result, information about VIEs may be less reliable or complete. Foreign companies with securities listed on U.S. exchanges, including those that utilize VIEs, may be delisted if they do not meet the requirements of the listing exchange, the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board and the U.S. government, which could significantly decrease the liquidity and value of such securities. Actions by the U.S. government, such as delisting of certain Chinese companies from U.S. securities exchanges or otherwise restricting their operations in the U.S., may negatively impact the liquidity and value of such securities.
Correlation and Tracking Error.  Correlation measures the degree of association between the returns of a Fund and its Underlying Index. Each Fund seeks a correlation over time of 0.95 or better between the Fund’s performance and the performance of its Underlying Index; a figure of 1.00 would indicate perfect correlation. Correlation is calculated at each Fund’s fiscal year-end by comparing the Fund’s average monthly total returns, before fees and expenses, to its Underlying Index’s average monthly total returns over the prior one-year period (or since inception if the Fund has been in existence for less than one year). Another means of evaluating the degree of correlation between the returns of a Fund and its Underlying Index is to assess the “tracking error” between the two. Tracking error means the variation between each Fund’s annual return and the return of its Underlying Index, expressed in terms of standard deviation. Each Fund seeks to have a tracking error of less than 5%, measured on a monthly basis over a one-year period, by taking the standard deviation of the difference in the Fund’s returns versus the Underlying Index’s returns.
An investment in each Fund also should be made with an understanding that the Fund will not be able to replicate exactly the performance of its Underlying Index because the total return the securities generate will be reduced by transaction costs incurred in adjusting the actual balance of the securities and other Fund expenses, whereas such transaction costs and expenses are not included in the calculation of its Underlying Index. Also, to the extent that a Fund were to issue and redeem Creation Units principally for cash, it will incur higher costs in buying and selling securities than if it issued and redeemed Creation Units principally in-kind.
In addition, the use of a representative sampling approach (which may arise for a number of reasons, including a large number of securities within an Underlying Index, or the limited assets of a Fund) may cause a Fund not to be as well correlated with the return of its Underlying Index as would be the case if the Fund purchased all of the securities in its Underlying Index in the proportions represented in such Underlying Index. It is also possible that, for short periods of time, a Fund may not fully replicate the performance of its Underlying Index due to the temporary unavailability of certain Underlying Index securities in the secondary market or due to other extraordinary circumstances. Such events are unlikely to continue for an extended period of time, because a Fund is required to correct such imbalances by means of adjusting the composition of its portfolio holdings. It also is possible that the composition of a Fund may not replicate exactly the composition of its respective Underlying Index if the Fund has to adjust its portfolio holdings to continue to qualify as a “regulated investment company” (a “RIC”) under Subchapter M of Chapter 1 of Subtitle A of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended (the "Code").
Equity Securities. Equity securities represent ownership interests in a company or partnership and consist of common stocks, preferred stocks, warrants to acquire common stock, securities convertible into common
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stock, and investments in master limited partnerships. Investments in equity securities in general are subject to market risks that may cause their prices to fluctuate over time. Fluctuations in the value of equity securities in which a Fund invests will cause the NAV of the Fund to fluctuate. The value of equity securities may fall as a result of factors directly relating to the issuer, such as decisions made by its management or lower demand for its products or services. An equity security’s value also may fall because of factors affecting not just the issuer, but also companies in the same industry or in a number of different industries, such as increases in production costs. The value of an issuer’s equity securities also may be affected by changes in financial markets that are relatively unrelated to the issuer or its industry, such as changes in interest rates or currency exchange rates. Global stock markets, including the U.S. stock market, tend to be cyclical, with periods when stock prices generally rise and periods when stock prices generally decline. Equity securities may include:
Common Stock. Common stock represents an equity or ownership interest in an issuer. In the event an issuer is liquidated or declares bankruptcy, the claims of owners of bonds and preferred stock take precedence over the claims of those who own common stock.
Preferred Stock. Preferred stock represents an equity or ownership interest in an issuer that pays dividends at a specified rate and that has precedence over common stock in the payment of dividends. Preferred stocks may pay fixed or adjustable rates of return. Preferred stocks usually do not have voting rights. In the event an issuer is liquidated or declares bankruptcy, the claims of owners of preferred stock take precedence over the claims of those who own common stock, but are subordinate to those of bond owners.
Convertible Securities. Convertible securities are bonds, debentures, notes, preferred stocks or other securities that may be converted or exchanged (by the holder or by the issuer) into shares of the underlying common stock (or cash or securities of equivalent value) at a stated exchange ratio. A convertible security may also be called for redemption or conversion by the issuer after a particular date and under certain circumstances (including a specified price) established upon issue. If a convertible security held by a Fund is called for redemption or conversion, the Fund could be required to tender it for redemption, convert it into the underlying common stock, or sell it to a third party. In the event an issuer is liquidated or declares bankruptcy, the claims of owners of bonds take precedence over the claims of those who own convertible securities.
Convertible securities generally have less potential for gain or loss than common stocks. Convertible securities generally provide yields higher than the underlying common stocks, but generally lower than comparable nonconvertible securities. Because of this higher yield, convertible securities generally sell at a price above their “conversion value,” which is the current market value of the stock to be received upon conversion. The difference between this conversion value and the price of convertible securities will vary over time depending on changes in the value of the underlying common stocks and interest rates. When the underlying common stocks decline in value, convertible securities tend not to decline to the same extent because of the interest or dividend payments and the repayment of principal at maturity for certain types of convertible securities. However, securities that are convertible other than at the option of the holder generally do not limit the potential for loss to the same extent as securities convertible at the option of the holder. When the underlying common stocks rise in value, the value of convertible securities may also be expected to increase. At the same time, however, the difference between the market value of convertible securities and their conversion value will narrow, which means that the value of convertible securities will generally not increase to the same extent as the value of the underlying common stocks. Because convertible securities may also be interest-rate sensitive, their value may increase as interest rates fall and decrease as interest rates rise. Convertible securities are also subject to credit risk, and are often lower-quality securities.
Small and Medium Capitalization Issuers. Investing in equity securities of small and medium capitalization companies often involves greater risk than do investments in larger capitalization companies. This increased risk may be due to greater business risks customarily associated with a smaller size, limited markets and financial resources, narrow product lines and frequent lack of depth of management. The securities of smaller companies are often traded in the over-the-counter (“OTC”)
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market and even if listed on a national securities exchange may not be traded in volumes typical for that exchange. Consequently, the securities of smaller companies are less likely to be liquid, may have limited market stability, and may be subject to more abrupt or erratic market movements than securities of larger, more established growth companies or market averages in general.
Master Limited Partnerships (“MLPs”). MLPs are limited partnerships in which the ownership units are publicly traded. MLP units are registered with the SEC and are freely traded on a securities exchange or in the OTC market. MLPs often own several properties or businesses (or own interests) that are related to real estate development and oil and gas industries, but they also may finance motion pictures, research and development and other projects. Generally, a MLP is operated under the supervision of one or more managing general partners. Limited partners are not involved in the day-to-day management of the partnership.
The risks of investing in a MLP are generally those involved in investing in a partnership as opposed to a corporation. For example, state law governing partnerships is often less restrictive than state law governing corporations. Accordingly, there may be fewer protections afforded investors in a MLP than investors in a corporation. Additional risks involved with investing in a MLP are risks associated with the specific industry or industries in which the partnership invests, such as the risks of investing in real estate or oil and gas industries.
Warrants. Warrants are instruments that entitle the holder to buy an equity security at a specific price for a specific period of time. Changes in the value of a warrant do not necessarily correspond to changes in the value of its underlying security. The price of a warrant may be more volatile than the price of its underlying security, and a warrant may offer greater potential for capital appreciation as well as capital loss. Warrants do not entitle a holder to dividends or voting rights with respect to the underlying security and do not represent any rights in the assets of the issuing company. A warrant ceases to have value if it is not exercised prior to its expiration date. These factors can make warrants more speculative than other types of investments.
Rights. A right is a privilege granted to existing shareholders of a corporation to subscribe to shares of a new issue of common stock before it is issued. Rights normally have a short life of usually two to four weeks, are freely transferable and entitle the holder to buy the new common stock at a price lower than the public offering price. An investment in rights may entail greater risks than certain other types of investments. Generally, rights do not carry the right to receive dividends or exercise voting rights with respect to the underlying securities, and they do not represent any rights in the assets of the issuer. In addition, their value does not necessarily change with the value of the underlying securities, and they cease to have value if they are not exercised on or before their expiration date. Investing in rights increases the potential profit or loss to be realized from the investment as compared with investing the same amount in the underlying securities.
Lending Portfolio Securities. From time to time, a Fund (as the Adviser shall so determine) may lend its portfolio securities (principally to brokers, dealers or other financial institutions) to generate additional income. Such loans are callable at any time and are secured continuously by segregated collateral equal to at least 102% (105% for international securities) of the market value, determined daily, of the loaned securities. A Fund may lend portfolio securities to the extent of one-third of its total assets. A Fund will loan its securities only to parties that the Adviser has determined are in good standing and when, in the Adviser’s judgment, the potential income earned would justify the risks.
Although voting rights may pass with the lending of portfolio securities, a Fund will be entitled to call loaned securities, or otherwise obtain rights to vote or consent, when deemed necessary by the Adviser with respect to a material event affecting securities on loan. A Fund will receive income in lieu of dividends on loaned securities and may, at the same time, generate income on the loan collateral or on the investment of any cash collateral.
Securities lending involves a risk of loss because the borrower may fail to return the securities in a timely manner or at all. If the borrower defaults on its obligation to return the securities loaned because of insolvency
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or other reasons, a Fund could experience delays and costs in recovering securities loaned or gaining access to the collateral. If a Fund is not able to recover the securities loaned, the Fund may sell the collateral and purchase a replacement security in the market. Lending securities entails a risk of loss to a Fund if, and to the extent that, the market value of the loaned securities increases and the collateral is not increased accordingly. Securities lending also involves exposure to operational risk (the risk of loss resulting from errors in the settlement and accounting process) and “gap risk” (the risk that the return on cash collateral reinvestments will be less than the fees paid to the borrower).
Any cash received as collateral for loaned securities will be invested, in accordance with a Fund’s investment guidelines, in an affiliated money market fund. Investing this cash subjects that investment to market appreciation or depreciation. For purposes of determining whether a Fund is complying with its investment policies, strategies and restrictions, the Fund or the Adviser will consider the loaned securities as assets of the Fund, but will not consider any collateral received as a Fund asset. A Fund will bear any loss on the investment of cash collateral. A Fund may have to pay the borrower a fee based on the amount of cash collateral.
For a discussion of the federal income tax considerations relating to lending portfolio securities, see “Taxes.”
Repurchase Agreements. Each Fund may enter into repurchase agreements, which are agreements pursuant to which a Fund acquires securities from a third party with the understanding that the seller will repurchase them at a fixed price on an agreed date. These agreements may be made with respect to any of the portfolio securities in which a Fund is authorized to invest. Repurchase agreements may be characterized as loans secured by the underlying securities. Each Fund may enter into repurchase agreements with (i) member banks of the Federal Reserve System having total assets in excess of $500 million and (ii) securities dealers (“Qualified Institutions”). The Adviser will monitor the continued creditworthiness of Qualified Institutions.
The use of repurchase agreements involves certain risks. For example, if the seller of securities under a repurchase agreement defaults on its obligation to repurchase the underlying securities, as a result of its bankruptcy or otherwise, a Fund will seek to dispose of such securities, which could involve costs or delays. If the seller becomes insolvent and subject to liquidation or reorganization under applicable bankruptcy or other laws, a Fund's ability to dispose of the underlying securities may be restricted. Finally, a Fund may not be able to substantiate its interest in the underlying securities. If the seller fails to repurchase the securities, a Fund may suffer a loss to the extent proceeds from the sale of the underlying securities are less than the repurchase price.
The resale price reflects the purchase price plus an agreed upon market rate of interest. The securities underlying a repurchase agreement will be marked-to-market every business day, and if the value of the securities falls below a specified percentage of the repurchase price (typically 102%), the counterparty will be required to deliver additional collateral to a Fund in the form of cash or additional securities. Custody of the securities will be maintained by a Fund's custodian or sub-custodian for the duration of the agreement.
Reverse Repurchase Agreements. Each Fund may enter into reverse repurchase agreements, which involve the sale of securities by a Fund to financial institutions such as banks and broker-dealers with an agreement by a Fund to repurchase the securities at an agreed-upon price and date (or upon demand). During the reverse repurchase agreement period, a Fund continues to receive interest and principal payments on the securities sold, but pays interest to the other party on the proceeds received. Reverse repurchase agreements are a form of leverage and involve the risk that the market value of securities to be repurchased by a Fund may decline below the price at which the Fund is obligated to repurchase the securities, resulting in a requirement for the Fund to deliver margin to the other party in the amount of the related shortfall, or that the other party may default on its obligation so that the Fund is delayed or prevented from completing the transaction. Leverage may make the Fund's returns more volatile and increase the risk of loss. In the event the buyer of securities under a reverse repurchase agreement files for bankruptcy or becomes insolvent, a Fund's use of the proceeds from the sale of the securities may be restricted pending a determination by the other party, or its trustee or receiver, whether to enforce the Fund's obligation to repurchase the securities.
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The Funds intend to use the reverse repurchase technique only when the Adviser believes it will be advantageous to a Fund.
LIBOR Transition Risk. A Fund may have investments in financial instruments that are exposed to the London Interbank Offered Rate (“LIBOR”) as the reference or benchmark rate for variable interest rate calculations (including variable or floating rate debt securities or loans and derivatives such as interest rate futures or swaps). LIBOR was intended to measure the rate generally at which banks can lend and borrow from one another in the relevant currency on an unsecured basis. LIBOR was a common benchmark interest rate index used to make adjustments to variable-rate debt instruments, to determine interest rates for a variety of financial instruments and borrowing arrangements and as a reference rate in derivative contracts.
In the years following the 2008 financial crisis, the integrity of LIBOR was increasingly questioned because several banks contributing to its calculation were accused of rate manipulation and because of a general contraction in the unsecured interbank lending market. As a result, regulators and financial industry working groups in several jurisdictions have worked over the past several years to identify alternative reference rates (“ARRs”) to replace LIBOR and to assist with the transition to the new ARRs. The industry working group in the United States, the Alternative Reference Rate Committee, has recommended adoption of the Secured Overnight Financing Rate (“SOFR”) as a replacement for U.S. Dollar (“USD”) LIBOR. SOFR is a broad measure of the cost of overnight borrowing of cash through repurchase agreements collateralized by U.S. Treasury securities.
In connection with the LIBOR transition, on March 5, 2021 the UK Financial Conduct Authority (“FCA”), the regulator that oversees LIBOR, announced that the majority of LIBOR rates would cease to be published or would no longer be representative on January 1, 2022. Specifically, the publication of all settings of British Pound Sterling, Swiss Franc, Euro and Japanese Yen LIBOR, as well as the 1-week and 2-month settings of USD LIBOR were phased out at the end of 2021. The remaining settings of USD LIBOR, which are the most widely used in financial markets, ceased to be published after June 30, 2023. Key regulators had previously instructed banking institutions to cease entering into new contracts that reference these remaining USD LIBOR settings after December 31, 2021, subject to certain limited exceptions. The FCA will permit the use of synthetic USD LIBOR rates for non-U.S. contracts for a limited period of time after June 30, 2023, but any such rates would be considered non-representative of the underlying market.
While the transition process away from LIBOR has become increasingly well-defined, there remains uncertainty and risks relating to converting certain longer-term securities and transactions to a new ARR. For example, there can be no assurance that the composition or characteristics of any ARRs or financial instruments in which a Fund invests that utilize ARRs will be similar to or produce the same value or economic equivalence as LIBOR or that these instruments will have the same volume or liquidity. Additionally, although regulators have generally prohibited banking institutions from entering into new contracts that reference those USD LIBOR settings that continue to exist, there remains uncertainty and risks relating to certain “legacy” USD LIBOR instruments that were issued or entered into before December 31, 2021 and the process by which a replacement interest rate will be identified and implemented into these instruments. While some “legacy” USD LIBOR instruments may contemplate a scenario where LIBOR is no longer available by providing for an alternative or “fallback” rate-setting methodology, there may be significant uncertainty regarding the effectiveness of such alternative or “fallback” methodologies to replicate USD LIBOR; other “legacy” USD LIBOR instruments may not include such “fallback” rate-setting provisions at all. While it is expected that market participants will amend legacy financial instruments referencing LIBOR to include such fallback provisions to ARRs, there remains uncertainty regarding the willingness and ability of parties to add or amend such fallback provisions in legacy instruments. On December 16, 2022, the Federal Reserve Board adopted regulations implementing the Adjustable Interest Rate Act. The regulations provide a statutory fallback mechanism to replace LIBOR, by identifying benchmark rates based on SOFR that replaced LIBOR in certain financial contracts after June 30, 2023. These regulations apply only to contracts governed by U.S. law, among other limitations. The regulations include provisions that (i) provide a safe harbor for selection or use of a replacement benchmark rate selected by the Federal Reserve Board; (ii) clarify who may choose the replacement benchmark rate selected by the Federal Reserve Board; and (iii) ensure that contracts adopting a replacement benchmark rate selected by the Federal Reserve Board will not be interrupted or terminated
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following the replacement of LIBOR; however there remains significant uncertainty regarding the effectiveness of any such legislation. The Funds may have instruments linked to other interbank offered rates that may also cease to be published in the future. All of the foregoing may adversely affect a Fund’s performance or NAV.
Money Market Instruments. Each Fund may invest a portion of its assets in high-quality money market instruments on an ongoing basis to provide liquidity. The instruments in which a Fund may invest include: (i) short-term obligations issued by the U.S. Government; (ii) negotiable certificates of deposit (“CDs”), fixed time deposits and bankers' acceptances of U.S. and foreign banks and similar institutions; (iii) commercial paper rated at the date of purchase “Prime-1” by Moody’s or “A-1+” or “A-1” by S&P Global Ratings or has a similar rating from a comparable rating agency, or if unrated, of comparable quality as the Adviser determines; (iv) repurchase agreements; and (v) money market mutual funds, including affiliated money market funds. CDs are short-term negotiable obligations of commercial banks. Time deposits are non-negotiable deposits maintained in banking institutions for specified periods of time at stated interest rates. Banker's acceptances are time drafts drawn on commercial banks by borrowers, usually in connection with international transactions.
Portfolio Turnover Risk. A Fund may engage in active and frequent trading of its portfolio securities to reflect the rebalancing of the Underlying Index. A portfolio turnover rate of 200%, for example, is equivalent to a Fund buying and selling all of its securities two times during the course of the year. A high portfolio turnover rate (such as 100% or more) could result in high brokerage costs and may result in higher taxes when Shares are held in a taxable account.
U.S. Government Obligations. Each Fund may invest in short-term U.S. Government obligations. U.S. Government obligations are a type of bond and include securities issued or guaranteed as to principal and interest by the U.S. Government, its agencies or instrumentalities. These include bills, notes and bonds issued by the U.S. Treasury, as well as “stripped” or “zero coupon” U.S. Treasury obligations representing future interest or principal payments on U.S. Treasury notes or bonds.
Stripped securities are created when the issuer separates the interest and principal components of an instrument and sells them as separate securities. In general, one security is entitled to receive the interest payments on the underlying assets (the interest only or “IO” security) and the other to receive the principal payments (the principal only or “PO” security). Some stripped securities may receive a combination of interest and principal payments. The yields to maturity on IOs and POs are sensitive to the expected or anticipated rate of principal payments (including prepayments) on the related underlying assets, and principal payments may have a material effect on yield to maturity. If the underlying assets experience greater than anticipated prepayments of principal, the Fund may not fully recoup its initial investment in IOs. Conversely, if the underlying assets experience less than anticipated prepayments of principal, the yield on POs could be adversely affected. Stripped securities may be highly sensitive to changes in interest rates and rates of prepayment.
Short-term obligations of certain agencies and instrumentalities of the U.S. Government, such as the Government National Mortgage Association (“GNMA”), are supported by the full faith and credit of the U.S. Treasury; others, such as those of the Federal National Mortgage Association (“Fannie Mae”), are supported by the right of the issuer to borrow from the U.S. Treasury; others, such as those of the former Student Loan Marketing Association (“SLMA”), are supported by the discretionary authority of the U.S. Government to purchase the agency’s obligations; still others, although issued by an instrumentality chartered by the U.S. Government, like the Federal Farm Credit Bureau (“FFCB”), are supported only by the credit of the instrumentality.
In 2008, the Federal Housing Finance Agency (“FHFA”) placed Fannie Mae and the Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation (“Freddie Mac”) into conservatorship. Since that time, Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac have received significant capital support through U.S. Treasury preferred stock purchases as well as U.S. Treasury and Federal Reserve purchases of their mortgage-backed securities. While the purchase programs for mortgage-backed securities ended in 2010, the U.S. Treasury continued its support for the entities’ capital as necessary to prevent a negative net worth. However, no assurance can be given that the Federal Reserve, U.S. Treasury, or FHFA initiatives discussed above will ensure that Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac will remain
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successful in meeting their obligations with respect to the debt and mortgage-backed securities they issue. In addition, Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac are also the subject of several continuing class action lawsuits and investigations by federal regulators, which (along with any resulting financial restatements) may adversely affect the guaranteeing entities. Importantly, the future of the entities is in serious question as the U.S. Government is considering multiple options, ranging from significant reform, nationalization, privatization, consolidation, or abolishment of the entities.
The FHFA and the U.S. Treasury (through its agreements to purchase preferred stock of Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac) also have imposed strict limits on the size of the mortgage portfolios of Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac. In August 2012, the U.S. Treasury amended its preferred stock purchase agreements to provide that the portfolios of Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac will be wound down at an annual rate of 15% (up from the previously agreed annual rate of 10%), requiring Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac to reach the $250 billion target four years earlier than previously planned. Further, when a ratings agency downgraded long-term U.S. Government debt in August 2011, the agency also downgraded the bond ratings of Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, from AAA to AA+, based on their direct reliance on the U.S. Government (although that rating did not directly relate to their mortgage-backed securities). The U.S. Government’s commitment to ensure that Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac have sufficient capital to meet their obligations was, however, unaffected by the downgrade.
The U.S. Treasury has put in place a set of financing agreements to help ensure that these entities continue to meet their obligations to holders of bonds they have issued or guaranteed. The U.S. Government may choose not to provide financial support to U.S. Government-sponsored agencies or instrumentalities if it is not legally obligated to do so, in which case, if the issuer were to default, the Fund holding securities of such issuer might not be able to recover its investment from the U.S. Government.
From time to time, uncertainty regarding the status of negotiations in the U.S. Government to increase the statutory debt ceiling could increase the risk that the U.S. Government may default on payments on certain U.S. Government securities, cause the credit rating of the U.S. Government to be downgraded, increase volatility in the stock and bond markets, result in higher interest rates, reduce prices of U.S. Treasury securities, and/or increase the costs of various kinds of debt. If a U.S. Government-sponsored entity is negatively impacted by legislative or regulatory action, is unable to meet its obligations, or its creditworthiness declines, the performance of a Fund that holds securities of the entity will be adversely impacted.
Other Investment Companies. Unless otherwise indicated in this SAI or in a Fund’s Prospectus, a Fund may purchase shares of other investment companies, including exchange-traded funds (“ETFs”), non-exchange traded U.S. registered open-end investment companies (mutual funds), closed-end investment companies, or non-U.S. investment companies traded on foreign exchanges. When a Fund purchases shares of another investment company, the Fund will indirectly bear its proportionate share of the advisory fees and other operating expenses of such investment company and will be subject to the risks associated with the portfolio investments of the underlying investment company.
The investment companies in which a Fund invests may have adopted certain investment restrictions that are more or less restrictive than the Fund’s investment restrictions, which may permit the Fund to engage in investment strategies indirectly that are prohibited under the Fund’s investment restrictions. For example, to the extent a Fund invests in underlying investment companies that concentrate their investments in an industry, a corresponding portion of the Fund’s assets may be indirectly exposed to that particular industry. The investment companies in which the Fund may invest include index-based investment companies. The main risk of investing in index-based investment companies is the same as investing in a portfolio of securities comprising an index. The market prices of index-based investments will fluctuate in accordance with both changes in the market value of their underlying portfolio securities and due to supply and demand for the instruments on the exchanges on which they are traded. Index-based investments may not replicate exactly the performance of their specified index because of transaction costs and because of the temporary unavailability of certain component securities of the index.
A Fund’s investment in the securities of other investment companies is subject to the applicable provisions of the 1940 Act and the rules thereunder. Specifically, Section 12(d)(1) of the 1940 Act contains
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various limitations on the ability of a registered investment company (an “acquiring fund”) to acquire shares of another registered investment company (an “acquired fund”). Under these limits, an acquiring fund generally cannot (i) purchase more than 3% of the total outstanding voting stock of an acquired fund; (ii) invest more than 5% of its total assets in securities issued by an acquired company; and (iii) invest more than 10% of its total assets in securities issued by other investment companies. Likewise, an acquired fund, as well as its principal underwriter or any broker or dealer registered under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, cannot knowingly sell more than 3% of the total outstanding voting stock of the acquired fund to an acquiring fund, or more than 10% of the total outstanding voting stock of the acquired fund to acquiring funds generally.
Rule 12d1-4 under the 1940 Act allows a fund to acquire the securities of another investment company in excess of the limitations imposed by Section 12(d)(1) of the 1940 Act without obtaining an exemptive order from the SEC, subject to certain limitations and conditions. Among those conditions is the requirement that, prior to a fund relying on Rule 12d1-4 to acquire securities of another fund in excess of the limits of Section 12(d)(1), the acquiring fund must enter into a Fund of Funds Agreement with the acquired fund. (This requirement does not apply when the acquiring fund’s investment adviser acts as the acquired fund’s investment adviser and does not act as sub-adviser to either fund.)
Rule 12d1-4 also is designed to limit the use of complex fund structures. Under Rule 12d1-4, an acquired fund is prohibited from purchasing or otherwise acquiring the securities of another investment company or private fund if, immediately after the purchase or acquisition, the securities of investment companies and private funds owned by the acquired fund have an aggregate value in excess of 10% of the value of the acquired fund’s total assets, subject to certain limited exceptions. Accordingly, to the extent a Fund’s shares are sold to other investment companies in reliance on Rule 12d1-4, the Fund will be limited in the amount it could invest in other investment companies and private funds.
In addition to Rule 12d1-4, the 1940 Act and related rules provide other exemptions from these restrictions. For example, these limitations do not apply to investments by a Fund in investment companies that are money market funds, including money market funds that have the Adviser or an affiliate of the Adviser as an investment adviser.
Business Development Companies.  Each Fund may invest in Business Development Companies (“BDCs”). The 1940 Act imposes certain restraints upon the operations of BDCs. For example, BDCs are required to invest at least 70% of their total assets primarily in securities of private companies or thinly traded U.S. public companies, cash, cash equivalents, U.S. Government securities and high quality debt investments that mature in one year or less. Generally, little public information exists for private and thinly traded companies and there is a risk that investors may not be able to make a fully informed investment decision. With investments in debt instruments, there is a risk that the issuer may default on its payments or declare bankruptcy. Additionally, a BDC may only incur indebtedness in amounts such that the BDC’s asset coverage equals at least 200% after such incurrence. These limitations on asset mix and leverage may prohibit the way that the BDC raises capital. BDCs generally invest in less mature private companies which involve greater risk than well-established publicly-traded companies.
Real Estate Investment Trusts (“REITs”).  Each Fund may invest in the securities of REITs, which pool investors’ funds for investments primarily in real estate properties, to the extent allowed by law. Investment in REITs may be the most practical available means for a Fund to invest in the real estate industry. As a shareholder in a REIT, a Fund would bear its ratable share of the REIT’s expenses, including its advisory and administration fees. At the same time, a Fund would continue to pay its own investment advisory fees and other expenses, as a result of which the Fund and its shareholders in effect would be absorbing duplicate levels of fees with respect to investments in REITs. A REIT may focus on particular projects, such as apartment complexes, or geographic regions, such as the southeastern United States, or both.
REITs generally can be classified as equity REITs, mortgage REITs and hybrid REITs. Equity REITs generally invest a majority of their assets in income-producing real estate properties to generate cash flow from rental income and gradual asset appreciation. The income-producing real estate properties in which equity REITs invest typically include properties such as office, retail, industrial, hotel and apartment buildings, self-storage, specialty and diversified and healthcare facilities. Equity REITs can realize capital gains by
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selling properties that have appreciated in value. Mortgage REITs invest the majority of their assets in real estate mortgages and derive their income primarily from interest payments on the mortgages. Hybrid REITs combine the characteristics of both equity REITs and mortgage REITs.
REITs can be listed and traded on national securities exchanges or can be traded privately between individual owners. A Fund may invest in both publicly and privately traded REITs.
A Fund conceivably could own real estate directly as a result of a default on the securities it owns. Therefore, a Fund may be subject to certain risks associated with the direct ownership of real estate, including difficulties in valuing and trading real estate, declines in the values of real estate, risks related to general and local economic conditions, adverse changes in the climate for real estate, environmental liability risks, increases in property taxes and operating expenses, changes in zoning laws, casualty or condemnation losses, limitations on rents, changes in neighborhood values, the appeal of properties to tenants and increases in interest rates. 
In addition to the risks described above, equity REITs may be affected by any changes in the value of the underlying property owned by the trusts, while mortgage REITs may be affected by the quality of any credit extended. Equity and mortgage REITs depend upon management skill, are not diversified and therefore are subject to the risk of financing single or a limited number of projects. REITs also are subject to heavy cash flow dependency, defaults by borrowers, self-liquidation and the possibility of failing to qualify for conduit income tax treatment under the Code and/or failing to maintain an exemption from the 1940 Act. Changes in interest rates also may affect the value of debt securities held by the Funds. By investing in REITs indirectly through the Funds, a shareholder will bear not only his/her proportionate share of the expenses of a Fund, but also, indirectly, similar expenses of the REITs.
Structured Notes. A structured note is a derivative security for which the amount of principal repayment and/or interest payments is based on the movement of one or more “factors.” These factors include, but are not limited to, currency exchange rates, interest rates (such as the prime lending rate), referenced bonds and stock indices. Some of these factors may or may not correlate to the total rate of return on one or more underlying instruments referenced in such notes. Investments in structured notes involve risks including interest rate risk, credit risk and market risk. Depending on the factor(s) used and the use of multipliers or deflators, changes in interest rates and movement of such factor(s) may cause significant price fluctuations. Structured notes may be less liquid than other types of securities and more volatile than the reference factor underlying the note. This means that the Funds may lose money if the issuer of the note defaults, as the Funds may not be able to readily close out its investment in such notes without incurring losses.
Illiquid Investments. Each Fund may not acquire any illiquid investment if, immediately after the acquisition, the Fund would have invested more than 15% of its net assets in illiquid investments. For purposes of this 15% limitation, illiquid investment means any investment that a Fund reasonably expects cannot be sold or disposed of in current market conditions in seven calendar days or less without the sale or disposition significantly changing the market value of the investment, as determined pursuant to the 1940 Act and applicable rules and regulations thereunder. Each Fund will monitor its portfolio liquidity on an ongoing basis to determine whether, in light of current circumstances, the appropriate level of liquidity is being maintained, and will take steps to ensure it adjusts its liquidity consistent with the policies and procedures adopted by the Trust on behalf of the Funds. The existence of a liquid trading market for certain securities may depend on whether dealers will make a market in such securities. There can be no assurance that dealers will make or maintain a market or that any such market will be or remain liquid. The price at which securities may be sold and the value of Shares will be adversely affected if trading markets for a Fund’s portfolio securities are limited or absent, or if bid/ask spreads are wide.
Borrowing. Each Fund may borrow money from a bank or another person up to the limits and for the purposes set forth in the section “Investment Restrictions” to meet shareholder redemptions, for temporary or emergency purposes and for other lawful purposes. Borrowed money will cost a Fund interest expense and/or other fees. The costs of borrowing may reduce a Fund's return. Borrowing also may cause a Fund to liquidate positions when it may not be advantageous to do so to satisfy its obligations to repay borrowed monies. To
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the extent that a Fund has outstanding borrowings, it will be leveraged. Leveraging generally exaggerates the effect on NAV of any increase or decrease in the market value of a Fund's portfolio securities.
Under the 1940 Act, a registered investment company can borrow an amount up to 33 1/3% of its assets for temporary or emergency purposes or to allow for an orderly liquidation of securities to meet redemption requests. If there are unusually heavy redemptions, a Fund may have to sell a portion of its investment portfolio at a time when it may not be advantageous to do so. Selling securities under these circumstances may result in a Fund having a lower NAV per Share.
Derivatives Risk. Derivatives are financial instruments that derive their performance from an underlying asset, index, interest rate or currency exchange rate. Derivatives are subject to a number of risks including credit risk, interest rate risk, and market risk. They also involve the risk that changes in the value of the derivative may not correlate perfectly with the underlying asset, rate or index. The counterparty to a derivative contract might default on its obligations.
Derivatives can be volatile and may be less liquid than other securities. As a result, the value of an investment in a Fund that invests in derivatives may change quickly and without warning. For some derivatives, it is possible to lose more than the amount invested in the derivative. Derivatives may be used to create synthetic exposure to an underlying asset or to hedge a portfolio risk. If a Fund uses derivatives to “hedge” a portfolio risk, it is possible that the hedge may not succeed. This may happen for various reasons, including unexpected changes in the value of the rest of the portfolio of a Fund. Over-the-counter derivatives are also subject to counterparty risk, which is the risk that the other party to the contract will not fulfill its contractual obligation to complete the transaction with a Fund.
Leverage Risk. Leverage exists when a Fund can lose more than it originally invests because it purchases or sells an instrument or enters into a transaction without investing an amount equal to the full economic exposure of the instrument or transaction. Leverage may cause the portfolios of the Funds to be more volatile than if a portfolio had not been leveraged because leverage can exaggerate the effect of any increase or decrease in the value of securities held by a Fund. The use of some derivatives may result in economic leverage, which does not result in the possibility of a Fund incurring obligations beyond its initial investment, but that nonetheless permits the Fund to gain exposure that is greater than would be the case in an unleveraged instrument.
Futures and Options. The Funds may enter into futures contracts, options and options on futures contracts. These futures contracts and options will be used to simulate full investment in the Underlying Index, to facilitate trading or to reduce transaction costs. Each Fund will only enter into futures contracts and options on futures contracts that are traded on an exchange. The Funds will not use futures or options for speculative purposes.
A call option gives a holder the right to purchase a specific security or an index at a specified price (“exercise price”) within a specified period of time. A put option gives a holder the right to sell a specific security or an index at a specified price within a specified period of time. The initial purchaser of a call option pays the “writer,” i.e., the party selling the option, a premium which is paid at the time of purchase and is retained by the writer whether or not such option is exercised. Each Fund may purchase put options to hedge its portfolio against the risk of a decline in the market value of securities held and may purchase call options to hedge against an increase in the price of securities it is committed to purchase.
Futures contracts provide for the future sale by one party and purchase by another party of a specified amount of a specific instrument or index at a specified future time and at a specified price. Stock index contracts are based on indices that reflect the market value of common stock of the firms included in the indices. Each Fund may enter into futures contracts to purchase security indices when the Adviser anticipates purchasing the underlying securities and believes prices will rise before the purchase will be made.
An option on a futures contract, as contrasted with the direct investment in such a contract, gives the purchaser the right, in return for the premium paid, to assume a position in the underlying futures contract at a specified exercise price at any time prior to the expiration date of the option. Upon exercise of an option, the delivery of the futures position by the writer of the option to the holder of the option will be accompanied by
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delivery of the accumulated balance in the writer’s futures margin account that represents the amount by which the market price of the futures contract exceeds (in the case of a call) or is less than (in the case of a put) the exercise price of the option on the futures contract. The potential for loss related to the purchase of an option on a futures contract is limited to the premium paid for the option plus transaction costs. Because the value of the option is fixed at the point of purchase, there are no daily cash payments by the purchaser to reflect changes in the value of the underlying contract; however, the value of the option changes daily and that change would be reflected in the NAV of a Fund. The potential for loss related to writing call options on equity securities or indices is unlimited. The potential for loss related to writing put options is limited only by the aggregate strike price of the put option less the premium received.
The Funds may purchase and write put and call options on futures contracts that are traded on an exchange as a hedge against changes in value of its portfolio securities, or in anticipation of the purchase of securities, and may enter into closing transactions with respect to such options to terminate existing positions. There is no guarantee that such closing transactions can be effected.
Upon entering into a futures contract, a Fund will be required to deposit with the broker an amount of cash or cash equivalents in the range of approximately 5% to 7% of the contract amount (this amount is subject to change by the exchange on which the contract is traded). This amount, known as “initial margin,” is in the nature of a performance bond or good faith deposit on the contract and is returned to a Fund upon termination of the futures contract, assuming all contractual obligations have been satisfied. Subsequent payments, known as “variation margin,” to and from the broker will be made daily as the price of the index underlying the futures contract fluctuates, making the long and short positions in the futures contract more or less valuable, a process known as “marking-to-market.” At any time prior to expiration of a futures contract, a Fund may elect to close the position by taking an opposite position, which will operate to terminate the existing position in the contract.
Risks of Futures and Options Transactions. There are several risks accompanying the utilization of futures contracts and options on futures contracts. First, there is no guarantee that a liquid market will exist for a futures contract at a specified time. The Funds may utilize futures contracts only if an active market exists for such contracts.
Furthermore, because, by definition, futures contracts project price levels in the future and not current levels of valuation, market circumstances may result in a discrepancy between the price of the future and the movement in the Underlying Indexes. In the event of adverse price movements, a Fund would continue to be required to make daily cash payments to maintain its required margin. In such situations, if a Fund has insufficient cash, it may have to sell portfolio securities to meet daily margin requirements at a time when it may be disadvantageous to do so. In addition, a Fund may be required to deliver the instruments underlying futures contracts it has sold.
The risk of loss in trading futures contracts or uncovered call options in some strategies (e.g., selling uncovered stock index futures contracts) potentially is unlimited. No Fund plans to use futures and options contracts in this way. The risk of a futures position may still be large as traditionally measured due to the low margin deposits required. In many cases, a relatively small price movement in a futures contract may result in immediate and substantial loss or gain to the investor relative to the size of a required margin deposit. The Funds, however, intend to utilize futures and options in a manner designed to limit their risk exposure to levels comparable to direct investment in stocks.
Utilization of futures and options on futures by the Funds involves the risk of imperfect or even negative correlation to an Underlying Index if the index underlying the futures contract differs from the Underlying Indexes of the Funds.
There also is the risk of loss by a Fund of margin deposits in the event of bankruptcy of a broker with whom the Fund has an open position in the futures contract or option; however, this risk substantially is minimized because (a) of the regulatory requirement that the broker has to “segregate” customer funds from its corporate funds, and (b) in the case of regulated exchanges in the United States, the clearing corporation stands behind the broker to make good losses in such a situation. The purchase of put or call options could
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be based upon predictions by the Adviser as to anticipated trends, which could prove to be incorrect and a part or all of the premium paid therefore could be lost.
Because the futures market imposes less burdensome margin requirements than the securities market, an increased amount of participation by speculators in the futures market could result in price fluctuations. Certain financial futures exchanges limit the amount of fluctuation permitted in futures contract prices during a single trading day. The daily limit establishes the maximum amount by which the price of a futures contract may vary either up or down from the previous day's settlement price at the end of a trading session. Once the daily limit has been reached in a particular type of contract, no trades may be made on that day at a price beyond that limit. It is possible that futures contract prices could move to the daily limit for several consecutive trading days with little or no trading, thereby preventing prompt liquidation of futures positions and subjecting the Funds to substantial losses. In the event of adverse price movements, the Funds would be required to make daily cash payments of variation margin.
Swap Agreements.  Each Fund may enter into swap agreements. Invesco Global Listed Private Equity ETF is the only Fund currently using swap agreements, including total return swap agreements. Swap agreements are contracts between parties in which one party agrees to make periodic payments to the other party (the “Counterparty”) based on the change in market value or level of a specified rate, index or asset. In return, the Counterparty agrees to make periodic payments to the first party based on the return of a different specified rate, index or asset. Swap agreements usually will be done on a net basis, a Fund receiving or paying only the net amount of the two payments. The net amount of the excess, if any, of a Fund’s obligations over its entitlements with respect to each swap is accrued on a daily basis and an amount of cash or highly liquid securities having an aggregate value at least equal to the accrued excess is maintained in an account at the Trust’s custodian bank.
Risks of Swap Agreements.  The risk of loss with respect to swaps generally is limited to the net amount of payments that a Fund is contractually obligated to make. Swap agreements are subject to the risk that the Counterparty will default on its obligations. If such a default were to occur, a Fund will have contractual remedies pursuant to the agreements related to the transaction. However, such remedies may be subject to bankruptcy and insolvency laws that could affect a Fund’s rights as a creditor (e.g., the Fund may not receive the net amount of payments that it contractually is entitled to receive).
In a total return swap transaction, one party agrees to pay the other party an amount equal to the total return on a defined underlying asset or a non-asset reference during a specified period of time. The underlying asset might be a security or basket of securities, and the non-asset reference could be a securities index. In return, the other party would make periodic payments based on a fixed or variable interest rate or on the total return from a different underlying asset or non-asset reference. The payments of the two parties could be made on a net basis.
Total return swaps could result in losses for a Fund if the underlying asset or reference does not perform as anticipated. Total return swaps can have the potential for unlimited losses. A Fund may lose money in a total return swap if the Counterparty fails to meet its obligations.
Restrictions on the Use of Futures Contracts, Options on Futures Contracts and Swaps.  The Adviser has claimed an exclusion from the definition of “commodity pool operator” (“CPO”) under the Commodity Exchange Act (“CEA”) and the rules of the Commodity Futures Trading Commission (“CFTC”) with respect to the Funds. The Adviser therefore is not subject to registration or regulation as a CPO with respect to the Funds. In addition, the Adviser is relying upon a related exclusion from the definition of “commodity trading advisor” under the CEA and the rules of the CFTC. The terms of the CPO exclusion require the Funds, among other things, to adhere to certain limits on its investments in “commodity interests.” Commodity interests include commodity futures, commodity options and swaps, which in turn include non-deliverable forwards. Because the Adviser and each Fund intend to comply with the terms of the CPO exclusion, a Fund may, in the future, need to adjust its investment strategies, consistent with its investment objective, to limit its investments in these types of instruments. The Funds are not intended as a vehicle for trading in the commodity futures, commodity options or swaps markets. The CFTC has neither reviewed nor approved the Adviser’s reliance on these exclusions, or the Funds, their investment strategies or Prospectus, or this SAI. Generally, the exclusion
21

from CPO regulation requires each Fund to meet one of the following tests for its commodity interest positions, other than positions entered into for bona fide hedging purposes (as defined in the rules of the CFTC): either (1) the aggregate initial margin and premiums required to establish the Fund’s positions in commodity interests may not exceed 5% of the liquidation value of the Fund’s portfolio (after taking into account unrealized profits and unrealized losses on any such positions); or (2) the aggregate net notional value of the Fund’s commodity interest positions, determined at the time the most recent such position was established, may not exceed 100% of the liquidation value of the Fund’s portfolio (after taking into account unrealized profits and unrealized losses on any such positions). In addition to meeting one of these trading limitations, a Fund may not be marketed as a commodity pool or otherwise as a vehicle for trading in the commodity futures, commodity options or swaps markets. If, in the future, a Fund can no longer satisfy these requirements, the Adviser would withdraw its notice claiming an exclusion from the definition of a CPO and would be subject to registration and regulation as a CPO with respect to that Fund, in accordance with CFTC rules that apply to CPOs of registered investment companies. Generally, these rules allow for substituted compliance with CFTC disclosure and shareholder reporting requirements, based on Adviser’s compliance with comparable SEC requirements. However, as a result of CFTC regulation with respect to the Funds, the Funds may incur additional compliance and other expenses.
Risks Related to Russian Invasion of Ukraine. In late February 2022, Russian military forces invaded Ukraine, significantly amplifying already existing geopolitical tensions among Russia, Ukraine, Europe, the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO), and the West. Russia’s invasion, the responses of countries and political bodies to Russia’s actions, and the potential for wider conflict may increase financial market volatility and could have severe adverse effects on regional and global economic markets, including the markets for certain securities and commodities such as oil and natural gas.
Following Russia’s actions, various countries, including the U.S., Canada, the United Kingdom, Germany, and France, among others, as well as the European Union, issued broad-ranging economic sanctions against Russia. The sanctions freeze certain Russian assets and prohibit trading by individuals and entities in certain Russian securities, engaging in certain private transactions, and doing business with certain Russian corporate entities, large financial institutions, officials and oligarchs. The sanctions include a commitment by certain countries and the European Union to remove selected Russian banks from the Society for Worldwide Interbank Financial Telecommunications, commonly called “SWIFT,” the electronic network that connects banks globally, and imposed restrictive measures to prevent the Russian Central Bank from undermining the impact of the sanctions. A number of large corporations have since withdrawn from Russia or suspended or curtailed their Russia-based operations.
The imposition of these current sanctions (and the potential for further sanctions in response to Russia’s continued military activity) and other actions undertaken by countries and businesses may adversely impact various sectors of the Russian economy, including but not limited to, the financials, energy, metals and mining, engineering, and defense and defense-related materials sectors. Such actions also may result in the decline of the value and liquidity of Russian securities, a weakening of the ruble, and could impair the ability of a Fund to buy, sell, receive, or deliver those securities. Moreover, the measures could adversely affect global financial and energy markets and thereby negatively affect the value of a Fund’s investments beyond any direct exposure to Russian issuers or those of adjoining geographic regions.
In response to sanctions, the Russian Central Bank raised its interest rates and banned sales of local securities by foreigners. Russia also prevented the export of certain goods and payments to foreign shareholders of Russian securities. Russia may take additional countermeasures or retaliatory actions, which may further impair the value and liquidity of Russian securities and Fund investments. Such actions could, for example, include restricting gas exports to other countries, the seizure of U.S. and European residents’ assets, or undertaking or provoking other military conflict elsewhere in Europe, any of which could exacerbate negative consequences on global financial markets and the economy. The actions discussed above could have a negative effect on the performance of Funds that have exposure to Russia. While diplomatic efforts have been ongoing, the conflict between Russia and Ukraine is unpredictable and has the potential to result in broader military actions. The duration of the ongoing conflict and corresponding sanctions and related
22

events cannot be predicted and may result in a negative impact on Fund performance and the value of Fund investments, particularly as it relates to Russian exposure.
Due to difficulties transacting in impacted securities, a Fund’s Underlying Index may remove such securities or implement caps on the securities as a result of the actions described above. Consequently, a Fund may experience challenges liquidating the applicable positions and/or sampling the Underlying Index to continue to seek the Fund’s investment objective. Such circumstances may lead to increased tracking error between a Fund’s performance and the performance of its Underlying Index. Additionally, due to current and potential future sanctions or potential market closures impacting the ability to trade Russian securities, a Fund may experience higher transaction costs and/or Shares may trade at a premium or discount to the Fund’s NAV.
Cybersecurity Risk. With the increased use of technologies such as the Internet to conduct business, the Funds, like all companies, may be susceptible to operational, information security and related risks. Cybersecurity incidents involving the Funds or their service providers (including, without limitation, a Fund’s investment adviser, fund accountant, custodian, transfer agent and financial intermediaries) have the ability to cause disruptions and impact business operations, potentially resulting in financial losses, impediments to trading, the inability of Fund shareholders to transact business, violations of applicable privacy and other laws, regulatory fines, penalties, reputational damage, reimbursement or other compensation costs, and/or additional compliance costs.
Cybersecurity incidents can result from deliberate cyberattacks or unintentional events and may arise from external or internal sources. Cyberattacks may include infection by malicious software or gaining unauthorized access to digital systems, networks or devices that are used to service the Funds’ operations (e.g., by “hacking” or “phishing”). Cyberattacks may also be carried out in a manner that does not require gaining unauthorized access, such as causing denial-of-service attacks on websites (i.e., efforts to make network services unavailable to intended users). These cyberattacks could cause the misappropriation of assets or personal information, corruption of data or operational disruptions. Geopolitical tensions may, from time to time, increase the scale and sophistication of deliberate cyberattacks.
Similar adverse consequences could result from cybersecurity incidents affecting issuers of securities in which the Funds invest, counterparties with which the Funds engage, governmental and other regulatory authorities, exchanges and other financial market operators, banks, brokers, dealers, insurance companies, other financial institutions and other parties. In addition, substantial costs may be incurred in order to prevent any cybersecurity incidents in the future. Although the Funds’ service providers may have established business continuity plans and risk management systems to mitigate cybersecurity risks, there can be no guarantee or assurance that such plans or systems will be effective, or that all risks that exist, or may develop in the future, have been completely anticipated and identified or can be protected against. The Funds and their shareholders could be negatively impacted as a result.
Natural Disaster/Epidemic Risk. Natural or environmental disasters, such as earthquakes, fires, floods, hurricanes, tsunamis and other severe weather-related phenomena generally, and widespread disease, including pandemics and epidemics, have been and can be highly disruptive to economies and markets, adversely impacting individual companies, sectors, industries, markets, currencies, interest and inflation rates, credit ratings, investor sentiment, and other factors affecting the value of the Funds’ investments. Additionally, if a sector or sectors in which an Underlying Index is concentrated is negatively impacted to a greater extent by such events, the corresponding Fund may experience heightened volatility. Given the increasing interdependence among global economies and markets, conditions in one country, market, or region are increasingly likely to adversely affect markets, issuers, and/or foreign exchange rates in other countries, including the U.S. These disruptions could prevent the Funds from executing advantageous investment decisions in a timely manner and negatively impact the Funds’ ability to achieve their investment objectives. Any such event(s) could have a significant adverse impact on the value and risk profile of the Funds.
The recent spread of the human coronavirus disease 2019 (“COVID-19”) is an example. In the first quarter of 2020, the World Health Organization (the “WHO”) recognized COVID-19 as a global pandemic and both the WHO and the United States declared the outbreak a public health emergency. The subsequent
23

spread of COVID-19 resulted in, among other significant adverse economic impacts, instances of market closures and dislocations, extreme volatility, liquidity constraints and increased trading costs. Efforts to contain the spread of COVID-19 resulted in travel restrictions, closed international borders, disruptions of healthcare systems, business operations (including business closures) and supply chains, employee layoffs and general lack of employee availability, lower consumer demand, and defaults and credit downgrades, all of which contributed to disruption of global economic activity across many industries and exacerbated other pre-existing political, social and economic risks domestically and globally. Although the WHO and the United States ended their declarations of COVID-19 as a global health emergency in May 2023, the full economic impact at the macro-level and on individual businesses, as well as the potential for a future reoccurrence of COVID-19 or the occurrence of a similar epidemic or pandemic, are unpredictable and could result in significant and prolonged adverse impact on economies and financial markets in specific countries and worldwide and thereby could negatively affect a Fund’s performance.
Custody and Banking Risks. A Fund’s assets may be maintained with one or more banks or other depository institutions (“banking institutions”), including both US and non-US banking institutions. In addition, a Fund’s assets may be maintained at regional (or mid-size) banking institutions or large banking institutions. Regional banking institutions are generally subject to fewer regulatory safeguards than large banking institutions, causing regional banking institutions to be perceived as having greater credit risk than large banking institutions. A Fund may enter into credit facilities or have other financial relationships with banking institutions. The distress, impairment or failure of one or more banking institutions, whether or not holding a Fund’s assets, may inhibit the ability of a Fund to access depository accounts or lines of credit at all or in a timely manner. Such events can be caused by various factors including negative market sentiment, significant withdrawals, fraud, or poor management. In such cases, a Fund may need to delay or forgo making new investments, or a Fund may need to sell another investment to raise cash when it is not desirable to do so, which could result in lower performance. In the event of such a failure of a banking institution, access to such accounts could be restricted and U.S. Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (“FDIC”) protection may not be available for balances in excess of the amounts insured by the FDIC (and similar considerations may apply to banking institutions in other jurisdictions not subject to FDIC protection). In such instances, a Fund may not recover such excess uninsured amounts and instead would only have an unsecured claim against the banking institution and may be able to recover only the residual value of the banking institution’s assets, if any value is recovered at all. The loss of any assets maintained with a banking institution or the inability to access such assets for a period of time, even if ultimately recovered, could be materially adverse to a Fund. In addition, the Adviser may not be able to identify all potential solvency or stress concerns with respect to a banking institution or transfer assets from one bank to another in a timely manner in the event a banking institution comes under stress or fails. It is also possible that a Fund will incur additional expenses or delays in putting in place alternative arrangements or that such alternative arrangements will be less favorable than those formerly in place (with respect to access to capital, economic terms, or otherwise).
Changing Interest Rates. In a low or negative interest rate environment, debt securities may trade at, or be issued with, negative yields, which means the purchaser of the security may receive at maturity less than the total amount invested. In addition, in a negative interest rate environment, if a bank charges negative interest, instead of receiving interest on deposits, a depositor must pay the bank fees to keep money with the bank. To the extent a Fund holds a negatively-yielding debt security or has a bank deposit with a negative interest rate, the Fund would generate a negative return on that investment. Cash positions may also subject a Fund to increased counterparty risk to the Fund's bank. Debt market conditions are highly unpredictable and some parts of the market are subject to dislocations. In the past, the U.S. Government and certain foreign central banks have taken steps to stabilize markets by, among other things, reducing interest rates. To the extent such actions are pursued, they present heightened risks to debt securities, and such risks could be even further heightened if these actions are unexpectedly or suddenly reversed or are ineffective in achieving their desired outcomes. In recent years, the U.S. government began implementing increases to the federal funds interest rate and may implement further rate increases. As interest rates rise, there is risk that rates across the financial system also may rise. To the extent rates increase substantially and/or rapidly, a Fund may be subject to significant losses.
24

In a low or negative interest rate environment, some investors may seek to reallocate assets to other income-producing assets. This may cause the price of such higher yielding instruments to rise, could further reduce the value of instruments with a negative yield, and may limit a Fund's ability to locate fixed income instruments containing the desired risk/return profile. Changing interest rates, including, rates that fall below zero, could have unpredictable effects on the markets and may expose fixed income markets to heightened volatility, increased redemptions, and potential illiquidity.
With respect to a money market fund, which seeks to maintain a stable $1.00 price per share, a low or negative interest rate environment could impact the money market fund’s ability to maintain a stable $1.00 share price. During a low or negative interest rate environment, such money market fund may reduce the number of shares outstanding on a pro rata basis through reverse stock splits, negative dividends or other mechanisms to seek to maintain a stable $1.00 price per share, to the extent permissible by applicable law and its organizational documents. Alternatively, the money market fund may discontinue using the amortized cost method of valuation to maintain a stable $1.00 price per share and establish a fluctuating NAV per share rounded to four decimal places by using available market quotations or equivalents.
PORTFOLIO TURNOVER
Each Fund calculates its portfolio turnover rate by dividing the value of the lesser of purchases or sales of portfolio securities for the fiscal period by the monthly average of the value of portfolio securities owned by the Fund during the fiscal period. A 100% portfolio turnover rate would occur, for example, if all of the portfolio securities (other than short-term securities) were replaced once during the fiscal period. Portfolio turnover rates will vary from year to year, depending on market conditions and the nature of a Fund's holdings. Each of the following Funds experienced significant variation in portfolio turnover during the two most recently completed fiscal years ended April 30 due to the application of each Fund's Underlying Index methodology.
Fund
2023
2022
Invesco S&P 500 Equal Weight Energy ETF
20%
50%
Invesco S&P 500 Pure Growth ETF
78%
45%
Invesco S&P Spin-Off ETF
106%
68%
DISCLOSURE OF PORTFOLIO HOLDINGS
Quarterly Portfolio Schedule.  The Trust is required to disclose, after its first and third fiscal quarters, the complete schedule of each Fund’s portfolio holdings with the SEC on Form N-PORT. The Trust also discloses a complete schedule of each Fund’s portfolio holdings with the SEC on Form N-CSR after its second and fourth fiscal quarters.
The Trust’s Forms N-PORT and Forms N-CSR are available on the SEC’s website at www.sec.gov. The Trust’s Forms N-PORT and Forms N-CSR are available without charge, upon request, by calling 630.933.9600 or 800.983.0903 or by writing to Invesco Exchange-Traded Fund Trust at 3500 Lacey Road, Suite 700, Downers Grove, Illinois 60515.
Portfolio Holdings Policy.  The Trust has adopted a policy regarding the disclosure of information about the Funds’ portfolio holdings. The Board must approve all material amendments to this policy.
Each business day before the opening of regular trading on the Exchange where Shares are traded, the Fund discloses on its website (www.invesco.com/ETFs) the portfolio holdings that will form the basis for the Fund’s next calculation of NAV per Share. The Trust, the Adviser and The Bank of New York Mellon (“BNYM” or the “Administrator”) will not disseminate non-public information concerning the Trust.
Access to information concerning the Funds’ portfolio holdings may be permitted at other times: (i) to personnel of third-party service providers, including the Funds’ custodian, transfer agent, auditors and counsel, as may be necessary to conduct business in the ordinary course in a manner consistent with such service providers’ agreements with the Trust on behalf of the Funds; or (ii) in instances when the Funds’
25

President and/or Chief Compliance Officer determines that (x) such disclosure serves a reasonable business purpose and is in the best interests of the Fund’s shareholders; and (y) in making such disclosure, no conflict exists between the interests of the Fund’s shareholders and those of the Adviser or the Distributor.
MANAGEMENT
The primary responsibility of the Board is to represent the interests of the Funds and to provide oversight of the management of the Funds. The Trust currently has 10 Trustees. Nine Trustees are not “interested,” as that term is defined under the 1940 Act, and have no affiliation or business connection with the Adviser or any of its affiliated persons and do not own any stock or other securities issued by the Adviser (the “Independent Trustees”). The remaining Trustee (the “Interested Trustee”) is affiliated with the Adviser.
The Independent Trustees of the Trust, their term of office and length of time served, their principal business occupations during at least the past five years, the number of portfolios in the Fund Complex (defined below) that they oversee and other directorships, if any, that they hold are shown below. The “Fund Complex” includes all open- and closed-end funds (including all of their portfolios) advised by the Adviser and any affiliated person of the Adviser. As of the date of this SAI, the “Fund Family” consists of the Trust and five other ETF trusts advised by the Adviser.
Name, Address and
Year of Birth
of Independent Trustees
Position(s) Held
with Trust
Term of
Office and
Length of
Time Served*
Principal Occupation(s)
During the Past 5 Years
Number of
Portfolios in
Fund
Complex
Overseen by
Independent
Trustees
Other Directorships
Held by
Independent Trustees
During the Past 5 Years
Ronn R. Bagge—1958
c/o Invesco Capital
Management LLC
3500 Lacey Road,
Suite 700
Downers Grove, IL 60515
Vice Chair of
the Board;
Chair of the
Nominating and
Governance
Committee and
Trustee
Vice Chair since
2018; Chair of
the Nominating
and Governance
Committee and
Trustee since
2003
Founder and Principal,
YQA Capital Management
LLC (1998-Present);
formerly, Owner/CEO of
Electronic Dynamic
Balancing Co., Inc. (high-
speed rotating equipment
service provider).
211
Chair (since 2021) and
member (since 2017)
of the Joint Investment
Committee, Mission
Aviation Fellowship
and MAF Foundation;
Trustee, Mission
Aviation Fellowship
(2017-Present).
Todd J. Barre—1957
c/o Invesco Capital
Management LLC
3500 Lacey Road,
Suite 700
Downers Grove, IL 60515
Trustee
Since 2010
Formerly, Assistant
Professor of Business,
Trinity Christian
College (2010-2016); Vice
President and Senior
Investment Strategist
(2001-2008), Director of
Open Architecture and
Trading (2007-2008),
Head of Fundamental
Research (2004-2007)
and Vice President and
Senior Fixed Income
Strategist (1994-2001),
BMO Financial
Group/Harris Private
Bank.
211
None.
Edmund P.
Giambastiani, Jr.—1948
c/o Invesco Capital
Management LLC
3500 Lacey Road,
Suite 700
Downers Grove, IL 60515
Trustee
Since 2019
President, Giambastiani
Group LLC (national
security and energy
consulting) (2007-
Present); Director, First
Eagle Alternative Credit
LLC (2020-Present);
211
Trustee, U.S. Naval
Academy Foundation
Athletic & Scholarship
Program (2010-
Present); formerly,
Trustee, certain funds
of the Oppenheimer
26

Name, Address and
Year of Birth
of Independent Trustees
Position(s) Held
with Trust
Term of
Office and
Length of
Time Served*
Principal Occupation(s)
During the Past 5 Years
Number of
Portfolios in
Fund
Complex
Overseen by
Independent
Trustees
Other Directorships
Held by
Independent Trustees
During the Past 5 Years
 
 
 
Advisory Board Member,
Massachusetts Institute of
Technology Lincoln
Laboratory (federally-
funded research
development) (2010-
Present); Defense
Advisory Board Member,
Lawrence Livermore
National Laboratory (2013-
Present); formerly,
Director, The Boeing
Company (2009-2021);
Trustee, MITRE
Corporation (federally
funded research
development) (2008-
2020); Director, THL
Credit, Inc. (alternative
credit investment
manager) (2016-2020);
Chair (2015-2016), Lead
Director (2011-2015) and
Director (2008-2011),
Monster Worldwide, Inc.
(career services); United
States Navy, career
nuclear submarine officer
(1970-2007); Seventh Vice
Chairman of the Joint
Chiefs of Staff (2005-
2007); first NATO
Supreme Allied
Commander
Transformation (2003-
2005); Commander, U.S.
Joint Forces Command
(2002-2005).
 
Funds complex (2013-
2019); Advisory Board
Member, Maxwell
School of Citizenship
and Public Affairs of
Syracuse University
(2012-2016).
Victoria J. Herget—1951
c/o Invesco Capital
Management LLC
3500 Lacey Road,
Suite 700
Downers Grove, IL 60515
Trustee
Since 2019
Formerly, Managing
Director (1993-2001),
Principal (1985-1993),
Vice President (1978-
1985) and Assistant Vice
President (1973-1978),
Zurich Scudder
Investments (investment
adviser) (and its
predecessor firms).
211
Trustee Emerita (2017-
present), Trustee
(2000-2017) and Chair
(2010-2017), Newberry
Library; Trustee,
Chikaming Open
Lands (2014-Present);
Member (2002-
present), Rockefeller
Trust Committee;
formerly, Trustee,
Mather LifeWays
(2001-2021); Trustee,
certain funds in the
Oppenheimer Funds
complex (2012-2019);
Board Chair (2008-
2015) and Director
27

Name, Address and
Year of Birth
of Independent Trustees
Position(s) Held
with Trust
Term of
Office and
Length of
Time Served*
Principal Occupation(s)
During the Past 5 Years
Number of
Portfolios in
Fund
Complex
Overseen by
Independent
Trustees
Other Directorships
Held by
Independent Trustees
During the Past 5 Years
 
 
 
 
 
(2004-2018), United
Educators Insurance
Company; Independent
Director, First American
Funds (2003-2011);
Trustee (1992-2007),
Chair of the Board of
Trustees (1999-2007),
Investment Committee
Chair (1994-1999) and
Investment Committee
member (2007-2010),
Wellesley College;
Trustee, BoardSource
(2006-2009); Trustee,
Chicago City Day
School (1994-2005).
Marc M. Kole—1960
c/o Invesco Capital
Management LLC
3500 Lacey Road,
Suite 700
Downers Grove, IL 60515
Chair of the
Audit Committee
and Trustee
Chair of the
Audit Committee
since 2008;
Trustee since
2006
Formerly, Managing
Director of Finance (2020-
2021) and Senior Director
of Finance (2015-2020),
By The Hand Club for
Kids (not-for-profit); Chief
Financial Officer, Hope
Network (social services)
(2008-2012); Assistant
Vice President and
Controller, Priority Health
(health insurance) (2005-
2008); Regional Chief
Financial Officer, United
Healthcare (2005); Chief
Accounting Officer, Senior
Vice President of Finance,
Oxford Health Plans
(2000-2004); Audit
Partner, Arthur Andersen
LLP (1996-2000).
211
Formerly, Treasurer
(2018-2021), Finance
Committee Member
(2015-2021) and Audit
Committee Member
(2015), Thornapple
Evangelical Covenant
Church; Board and
Finance Committee
Member (2009-2017)
and Treasurer (2010-
2015, 2017),
NorthPointe Christian
Schools.
Yung Bong Lim—1964
c/o Invesco Capital
Management LLC
3500 Lacey Road,
Suite 700
Downers Grove, IL 60515
Chair of the
Investment
Oversight
Committee and
Trustee
Chair of the
Investment
Oversight
Committee since
2014; Trustee
since 2013
Managing Partner, RDG
Funds LLC (real estate)
(2008-Present); formerly,
Managing Director, Citadel
LLC (1999-2007).
211
Board Director, Beacon
Power Services, Corp.
(2019-Present);
formerly, Advisory
Board Member,
Performance Trust
Capital Partners, LLC
(2008-2020).
Joanne Pace—1958
c/o Invesco Capital
Management LLC
3500 Lacey Road,
Suite 700
Downers Grove, IL 60515
Trustee
Since 2019
Formerly, Senior Advisor,
SECOR Asset
Management, LP (2010-
2011); Managing Director
and Chief Operating
Officer, Morgan Stanley
Investment Management
211
Board Director, Horizon
Blue Cross Blue Shield
of New Jersey (2012-
Present); Governing
Council Member
(2016-Present) and
Chair of Education
28

Name, Address and
Year of Birth
of Independent Trustees
Position(s) Held
with Trust
Term of
Office and
Length of
Time Served*
Principal Occupation(s)
During the Past 5 Years
Number of
Portfolios in
Fund
Complex
Overseen by
Independent
Trustees
Other Directorships
Held by
Independent Trustees
During the Past 5 Years
 
 
 
(2006-2010); Partner and
Chief Operating Officer,
FrontPoint Partners, LLC
(alternative investments)
(2005-2006); Managing
Director (2003-2005),
Global Head of Human
Resources and member of
Executive Board and
Operating Committee
(2004-2005), Global Head
of Operations and Product
Control (2003-2004),
Credit Suisse (investment
banking); Managing
Director (1997-2003),
Controller and Principal
Accounting Officer (1999-
2003), Chief Financial
Officer (temporary
assignment) for the
Oversight Committee,
Long Term Capital
Management (1998-1999),
Morgan Stanley.
 
Committee (2017-
2021), Independent
Directors Council
(IDC); Council
Member, New York-
Presbyterian Hospital’s
Leadership Council on
Children’s and
Women’s Health
(2012-Present);
formerly, Advisory
Board Director, The
Alberleen Group LLC
(2012-2021); Board
Member, 100 Women
in Finance (2015-
2020); Trustee, certain
funds in the
Oppenheimer Funds
complex (2012-2019);
Lead Independent
Director and Chair of
the Audit and
Nominating Committee
of The Global Chartist
Fund, LLC,
Oppenheimer Asset
Management (2011-
2012); Board Director,
Managed Funds
Association (2008-
2010); Board Director
(2007-2010) and
Investment Committee
Chair (2008-2010),
Morgan Stanley
Foundation.
Gary R. Wicker—1961
c/o Invesco Capital
Management LLC
3500 Lacey Road,
Suite 700
Downers Grove, IL 60515
Trustee
Since 2013
Senior Vice President of
Global Finance and Chief
Financial Officer, RBC
Ministries (publishing
company) (2013-Present);
formerly, Executive Vice
President and Chief
Financial Officer,
Zondervan Publishing (a
division of Harper
Collins/NewsCorp) (2007-
2012); Senior Vice
President and Group
Controller (2005- 2006),
Senior Vice President and
Chief Financial Officer
(2003-2004), Chief
Financial Officer (2001-
2003), Vice President,
211
Board Member and
Treasurer, Our Daily
Bread Ministries
Canada (2015-
Present); Board and
Finance Committee
Member, West
Michigan Youth For
Christ (2010-Present).
29

Name, Address and
Year of Birth
of Independent Trustees
Position(s) Held
with Trust
Term of
Office and
Length of
Time Served*
Principal Occupation(s)
During the Past 5 Years
Number of
Portfolios in
Fund
Complex
Overseen by
Independent
Trustees
Other Directorships
Held by
Independent Trustees
During the Past 5 Years
 
 
 
Finance and Controller
(1999-2001) and Assistant
Controller (1997-1999),
divisions of The Thomson
Corporation (information
services provider); Senior
Audit Manager (1994-
1997),
PricewaterhouseCoopers
LLP.
 
 
Donald H. Wilson—1959
c/o Invesco Capital
Management LLC
3500 Lacey Road,
Suite 700
Downers Grove, IL 60515
Chair of the
Board and
Trustee
Chair
since 2012;
Trustee
since 2006
Chair, President and Chief
Executive Officer,
McHenry Bancorp Inc. and
McHenry Savings Bank
(subsidiary) (2018-
Present); formerly, Chair
and Chief Executive
Officer, Stone Pillar
Advisors, Ltd. (2010-
2017); President and
Chief Executive Officer,
Stone Pillar Investments,
Ltd. (advisory services to
the financial sector) (2016-
2018); Chair, President
and Chief Executive
Officer, Community
Financial Shares, Inc. and
Community Bank—
Wheaton/Glen Ellyn
(subsidiary) (2013-2015);
Chief Operating Officer,
AMCORE Financial, Inc.
(bank holding company)
(2007-2009); Executive
Vice President and Chief
Financial Officer,
AMCORE Financial, Inc.
(2006-2007); Senior Vice
President and Treasurer,
Marshall & Ilsley Corp.
(bank holding company)
(1995-2006).
211
Director, Penfield
Children’s Center
(2004-Present); Board
Chair, Gracebridge
Alliance, Inc.
(2015-Present).
*
This is the date the Independent Trustee began serving the Trust. Each Independent Trustee serves an indefinite term, until his or her successor is elected.
The Interested Trustee, President, and Principal Executive Officer and the other executive officers of the Trust, their term of office and length of time served, their principal business occupations during at least the
30

past five years, the number of portfolios in the Fund Complex overseen by the Interested Trustee and the other directorships, if any, held by the Interested Trustee, are shown below.
Name, Address and
Year of Birth
of Interested Trustee*
Position(s) Held
with Trust
Term of
Office and
Length of
Time Served**
Principal Occupation(s)
During the Past 5 Years
Number of
Portfolios in
Fund
Complex
Overseen by
Interested
Trustee
Other Directorships
Held by
Interested Trustee
During the Past 5 Years
Anna Paglia—1974
Invesco Capital
Management LLC
3500 Lacey Road
Suite700
Downers Grove, IL 60515
Trustee,
President and
Principal
Executive
Officer
Trustee since
2022; President
and Principal
Executive
Officer since
2020
President and Principal
Executive Officer (2020-
Present) and Trustee
(2022-Present), Invesco
Exchange-Traded Fund
Trust, Invesco Exchange-
Traded Fund Trust II,
Invesco India Exchange-
Traded Fund Trust,
Invesco Actively Managed
Exchange-Traded Fund
Trust, Invesco Actively
Managed Exchange-
Traded Commodity Fund
Trust and Invesco
Exchange-Traded Self-
Indexed Fund Trust;
Managing Director and
Global Head of ETFs and
Indexed Strategies, Chief
Executive Officer and
Principal Executive Officer,
Invesco Capital
Management LLC (2020-
Present); Chief Executive
Officer, Manager and
Principal Executive Officer,
Invesco Specialized
Products, LLC (2020-
Present); Manager,
Invesco Investment
Advisers, LLC (2023-
Present); formerly, Vice
President, Invesco
Indexing LLC (2020-2022);
Secretary, Invesco
Exchange-Traded Fund
Trust, Invesco Exchange-
Traded Fund Trust II,
Invesco India Exchange-
Traded Fund Trust and
Invesco Actively Managed
Exchange-Traded Fund
Trust (2011-2020),
Invesco Actively Managed
Exchange-Traded
Commodity Fund Trust
(2014-2020) and Invesco
Exchange-Traded Self-
Indexed Fund Trust (2015-
2020); Head of Legal
(2010-2020) and
Secretary (2015-2020),
Invesco Capital
211
None.
31

Name, Address and
Year of Birth
of Interested Trustee*
Position(s) Held
with Trust
Term of
Office and
Length of
Time Served**
Principal Occupation(s)
During the Past 5 Years
Number of
Portfolios in
Fund
Complex
Overseen by
Interested
Trustee
Other Directorships
Held by
Interested Trustee
During the Past 5 Years
 
 
 
Management LLC;
Manager and Assistant
Secretary, Invesco
Indexing LLC (2017-2020);
Head of Legal and
Secretary, Invesco
Specialized Products, LLC
(2018-2020); Partner, K&L
Gates LLP (formerly, Bell
Boyd & Lloyd LLP) (2007-
2010); and Associate
Counsel at Barclays
Global Investors
Ltd. (2004-2006).
 
 
*
Ms. Paglia is considered an “interested person” (within the meaning of Section 2(a)(19) of the 1940 Act) of the Trust because she is an officer of the Adviser to the Trust.
**
The Interested Trustee serves an indefinite term, until her successor is elected.
Name, Address and
Year of Birth
of Executive Officer
Position(s) Held
with Trust
Term of
Office and
Length of
Time Served*
Principal Occupation(s) During at Least the Past 5 Years
Adrien Deberghes — 1967
Invesco Capital
Management LLC,
11 Greenway Plaza
Suite 1000
Houston, TX 77046
Vice President
Since 2020
Vice President, Invesco Exchange-Traded Fund Trust, Invesco
Exchange-Traded Fund Trust II, Invesco India Exchange-Traded
Fund Trust, Invesco Actively Managed Exchange-Traded Fund
Trust, Invesco Actively Managed Exchange-Traded Commodity
Fund Trust and Invesco Exchange-Traded Self-Indexed Fund
Trust (2020-Present); Head of the Fund Office of the CFO, Fund
Administration and Vice President, Invesco Advisers, Inc. (2020-
Present); Principal Financial Officer, Treasurer and Vice President,
The Invesco Funds (2020-Present); formerly, Senior Vice
President and Treasurer, Fidelity Investments (2008-2020).
Kelli Gallegos — 1970
Invesco Capital
Management LLC,
11 Greenway Plaza
Suite 1000
Houston, TX 77046
Vice President
and Treasurer
Since 2018
Vice President, Invesco Advisers, Inc. (2020-Present); Principal
Financial and Accounting Officer- Pooled Investments, Invesco
Specialized Products, LLC (2018-Present); Vice President and
Treasurer, Invesco Exchange-Traded Fund Trust, Invesco
Exchange-Traded Fund Trust II, Invesco India Exchange-Traded
Fund Trust, Invesco Actively Managed Exchange-Traded Fund
Trust, Invesco Actively Managed Exchange-Traded Commodity
Fund Trust and Invesco Exchange-Traded Self-Indexed Fund
Trust (2018-Present); Principal Financial and Accounting Officer-
Pooled Investments, Invesco Capital Management LLC (2018-
Present); Vice President and Assistant Treasurer (2008-Present),
The Invesco Funds; formerly, Principal Financial Officer (2016-
2020) and Assistant Vice President (2008-2016), The Invesco
Funds; Assistant Treasurer, Invesco Specialized Products, LLC
(2018); Assistant Treasurer, Invesco Exchange-Traded Fund
Trust, Invesco Exchange-Traded Fund Trust II, Invesco India
Exchange-Traded Fund Trust and Invesco Actively Managed
Exchange-Traded Fund Trust (2012-2018), Invesco Actively
Managed Exchange-Traded Commodity Fund Trust (2014-2018)
and Invesco Exchange-Traded Self-Indexed Fund Trust (2016-
2018); and Assistant Treasurer, Invesco Capital Management LLC
(2013-2018).
Adam Henkel — 1980
Secretary
Since 2020
Head of Legal and Secretary, Invesco Capital Management LLC
32

Name, Address and
Year of Birth
of Executive Officer
Position(s) Held
with Trust
Term of
Office and
Length of
Time Served*
Principal Occupation(s) During at Least the Past 5 Years
Invesco Capital
Management LLC
3500 Lacey Road
Suite 700
Downers Grove, IL 60515
 
 
and Invesco Specialized Products, LLC (2020-present); Secretary,
Invesco Exchange-Traded Fund Trust, Invesco Exchange-Traded
Fund Trust II, Invesco India Exchange-Traded Fund Trust, Invesco
Actively Managed Exchange-Traded Fund Trust, Invesco Actively
Managed Exchange-Traded Commodity Fund Trust and Invesco
Exchange-Traded Self-Indexed Fund Trust (2020-Present);
Assistant Secretary, Invesco Capital Markets, Inc. (2020-Present);
Assistant Secretary, The Invesco Funds (2014-Present); Manager
(2020-Present) and Secretary (2022-Present), Invesco Indexing
LLC; Assistant Secretary, Invesco Investment Advisers LLC
(2020-Present); formerly, Assistant Secretary of Invesco
Exchange-Traded Fund Trust, Invesco Exchange-Traded Fund
Trust II, Invesco India Exchange-Traded Fund Trust, Invesco
Actively Managed Exchange-Traded Fund Trust and Invesco
Actively Managed Exchange-Traded Commodity Fund Trust
(2014-2020); Chief Compliance Officer of Invesco Capital
Management LLC (2017); Chief Compliance Officer of Invesco
Exchange-Traded Fund Trust, Invesco Exchange-Traded Fund
Trust II, Invesco India Exchange-Traded Fund Trust, Invesco
Actively Managed Exchange-Traded Fund Trust and Invesco
Actively Managed Exchange-Traded Commodity Fund Trust
(2017); Senior Counsel, Invesco, Ltd. (2013-2020); Assistant
Secretary, Invesco Specialized Products, LLC (2018-2020).
Peter Hubbard — 1981
Invesco Capital
Management LLC
3500 Lacey Road
Suite 700
Downers Grove, IL 60515
Vice President
Since 2009
Vice President, Invesco Specialized Products, LLC (2018-
Present); Vice President, Invesco Exchange-Traded Fund Trust,
Invesco Exchange-Traded Fund Trust II, Invesco India Exchange-
Traded Fund Trust, Invesco Actively Managed Exchange-Traded
Fund Trust (2009-Present), Invesco Actively Managed Exchange-
Traded Commodity Fund Trust (2014-Present) and Invesco
Exchange-Traded Self-Indexed Fund Trust (2016-Present); Vice
President and Director of Portfolio Management, Invesco Capital
Management LLC (2010-Present); Vice President, Invesco
Advisers, Inc. (2020-Present); formerly, Vice President of Portfolio
Management, Invesco Capital Management LLC (2008-2010);
Portfolio Manager, Invesco Capital Management LLC (2007-
2008); Research Analyst, Invesco Capital Management LLC
(2005-2007); Research Analyst and Trader, Ritchie Capital, a
hedge fund operator (2003-2005).
Sheri Morris — 1964
Invesco Capital
Management LLC,
11 Greenway Plaza
Suite 1000
Houston, TX 77046
Vice President
Since 2012
Head of Global Fund Services, Invesco Ltd. (2019-Present); Vice
President, OppenheimerFunds, Inc. (2019-Present); President and
Principal Executive Officer, The Invesco Funds (2016-Present);
Senior Vice President, Invesco Advisers, Inc. (formerly known as
Invesco Institutional (N.A.), Inc.) (registered investment adviser)
(2020-Present); Director, Invesco Trust Company (2022-Present);
and Vice President, Invesco Exchange-Traded Fund Trust,
Invesco Exchange-Traded Fund Trust II, Invesco India Exchange-
Traded Fund Trust, Invesco Actively Managed Exchange-Traded
Fund Trust (2012-Present), Invesco Actively Managed Exchange-
Traded Commodity Fund Trust (2014-Present) and Invesco
Exchange-Traded Self-Indexed Fund Trust (2016-Present);
formerly, Treasurer (2008-2020), Vice President and Principal
Financial Officer, The Invesco Funds (2008-2016); Treasurer,
Invesco Exchange-Traded Fund Trust, Invesco Exchange-Traded
Fund Trust II, Invesco India Exchange-Traded Fund Trust and
Invesco Actively Managed Exchange-Traded Fund Trust (2011-
2013); Vice President, Invesco Aim Advisers, Inc., Invesco Aim
Capital Management, Inc. and Invesco Aim Private Asset
Management, Inc.; Treasurer, Assistant Vice President and
33

Name, Address and
Year of Birth
of Executive Officer
Position(s) Held
with Trust
Term of
Office and
Length of
Time Served*
Principal Occupation(s) During at Least the Past 5 Years
 
 
 
Assistant Treasurer, The Invesco Funds and Assistant Vice
President, Invesco Advisers, Inc., Invesco Aim Capital
Management, Inc. and Invesco Aim Private Asset Management,
Inc.; Vice President, Invesco Advisers, Inc. (2009-2020).
Rudolf E. Reitmann — 1971
Invesco Capital
Management LLC
3500 Lacey Road
Suite 700
Downers Grove, IL 60515
Vice President
Since 2013
Head of Global Exchange Traded Funds Services, Invesco
Specialized Products, LLC (2018-Present); Vice President,
Invesco Exchange-Traded Fund Trust, Invesco Exchange-Traded
Fund Trust II, Invesco India Exchange-Traded Fund Trust, Invesco
Actively Managed Exchange-Traded Fund Trust (2013-Present),
Invesco Actively Managed Exchange-Traded Commodity Fund
Trust (2014-Present) and Invesco Exchange-Traded Self-Indexed
Fund Trust (2016-Present); Head of Global Exchange Traded
Funds Services, Invesco Capital Management LLC (2013-
Present); Vice President, Invesco Capital Markets, Inc. (2018-
Present).
Melanie Zimdars — 1976
Invesco Capital
Management LLC
3500 Lacey Road
Suite 700
Downers Grove, IL 60515
Chief
Compliance
Officer
Since 2017
Chief Compliance Officer, Invesco Specialized Products, LLC
(2018-Present); Chief Compliance Officer, Invesco Capital
Management LLC (2017-Present); Chief Compliance Officer,
Invesco Exchange-Traded Fund Trust, Invesco Exchange-Traded
Fund Trust II, Invesco India Exchange-Traded Fund Trust, Invesco
Actively Managed Exchange-Traded Fund Trust, Invesco Actively
Managed Exchange-Traded Commodity Fund Trust and Invesco
Exchange-Traded Self-Indexed Fund Trust (2017-Present);
formerly, Vice President and Deputy Chief Compliance Officer,
ALPS Holding, Inc. (2009-2017); Mutual Fund Treasurer/ Chief
Financial Officer, Wasatch Advisors, Inc. (2005-2008); Compliance
Officer, U.S. Bancorp Fund Services, LLC (2001-2005).
*
This is the date the Officer began serving the Trust in his or her current position. Each Officer serves an indefinite term, until his or her successor is elected.
For each Trustee, the dollar range of equity securities beneficially owned by the Trustee in the Trust and in all registered investment companies in the Fund Family overseen by the Trustee as of December 31, 2022, is shown below.
Name of Trustee
Dollar Range of
Equity Securities Per Fund
Aggregate Dollar
Range of Equity
Securities in All
Registered Investment
Companies Overseen
by Trustee in Fund Family
Independent Trustees
 
 
Ronn R. Bagge
Invesco Dorsey Wright Momentum ETF
Over $100,000
 
Over $100,000
 
 
Invesco S&P 500 Equal Weight ETF
 
 
Over $100,000
 
Todd J. Barre
Invesco FTSE RAFI US 1000 ETF
Over $100,000
 
Over $100,000
 
 
Invesco FTSE RAFI US 1500 Small-Mid ETF
 
 
Over $100,000
 
 
Invesco S&P 500 Equal Weight ETF
 
 
Over $100,000
 
Edmund P. Giambastiani, Jr.
Invesco Biotechnology & Genome ETF
$10,001 - $50,000
 
$1 - $10,000
 
Victoria J. Herget
Invesco Dorsey Wright Momentum ETF
Over $100,000
 
$10,001 - $50,000
 
34

Name of Trustee
Dollar Range of
Equity Securities Per Fund
Aggregate Dollar
Range of Equity
Securities in All
Registered Investment
Companies Overseen
by Trustee in Fund Family
 
Invesco Large Cap Value ETF
 
 
$50,001 - $100,000
 
 
Invesco S&P 500 Equal Weight ETF
 
 
$10,001 to $50,000
 
Marc M. Kole
Invesco Large Cap Growth ETF
Over $100,000
 
Over $100,000
 
 
Invesco Large Cap Value ETF
 
 
Over $100,000
 
 
Invesco S&P MidCap Momentum ETF
 
 
Over $100,000
 
 
Invesco WilderHill Clean Energy ETF
 
 
$10,001 - $50,000
 
Yung Bong Lim
Invesco Dorsey Wright Energy Momentum ETF
Over $100,000
 
Over $100,000
 
 
Invesco International Dividend Achievers ETF
 
 
Over $100,000
 
Joanne Pace
Invesco FTSE RAFI US 1000 ETF
Over $100,000
 
Over $100,000
 
 
Invesco S&P 500 Quality ETF
 
 
$50,001 - $100,000
 
Gary R. Wicker
Invesco FTSE RAFI US 1500 Small-Mid ETF
Over $100,000
 
$10,001 - $50,000
 
 
Invesco International Dividend Achievers ETF
 
 
Over $100,000
 
 
Invesco S&P 500 Equal Weight ETF
 
 
$10,001 - $50,000
 
 
Invesco S&P 500 Quality ETF
 
 
Over $100,000
 
Donald H. Wilson
Invesco Bloomberg MVP Multi-factor ETF
Over $100,000
 
$10,001 - $50,000
 
 
Invesco Financial Preferred ETF
 
 
$10,001 - $50,000
 
 
Invesco High Yield Equity Dividend Achievers ETF
 
 
$10,001 - $50,000
 
 
Invesco Large Cap Growth ETF
 
 
Over $100,000
 
 
Invesco Large Cap Value ETF
 
 
Over $100,000
 
 
Invesco S&P MidCap 400 GARP ETF
 
 
Over $100,000
 
 
Invesco S&P SmallCap Value with Momentum ETF
 
 
$50,001 - $100,000
 
 
Invesco Water Resources ETF
 
 
$50,001 - $100,000
 
Interested Trustee
 
 
Anna Paglia
Invesco Buyback Achievers ETF
Over $100,000
 
$50,001 - $100,000
 
 
Invesco FTSE RAFI US 1000 ETF
 
 
$50,001 - $100,000
 
 
Invesco Large Cap Value ETF
 
35

Name of Trustee
Dollar Range of
Equity Securities Per Fund
Aggregate Dollar
Range of Equity
Securities in All
Registered Investment
Companies Overseen
by Trustee in Fund Family
 
$1 - $10,000
 
 
Invesco S&P 500 Equal Weight ETF
 
 
$50,001 - $100,000
 
 
Invesco S&P 500 Pure Growth ETF
 
 
$10,001 - $50,000
 
 
Invesco S&P 500 Pure Value ETF
 
 
$50,001 - $100,000
 
 
Invesco S&P 500 Quality ETF
 
 
$1 - $10,000
 
The dollar range of equity securities for Messrs. Bagge and Lim and Ms. Pace shown above includes shares of certain funds in which they are deemed to be invested pursuant to the Trust’s deferred compensation plan (“DC Plan”), which is described below.
As of December 31, 2022, as to each Independent Trustee and his or her immediate family members, no person owned, beneficially or of record, securities in an investment adviser or principal underwriter of the Funds, or a person (other than a registered investment company) directly or indirectly controlling, controlled by or under common control with an investment adviser or principal underwriter of the Funds.
Board and Committee Structure. As noted above, the Board is responsible for oversight of the Funds, including oversight of the duties performed by the Adviser for each Fund under the investment advisory agreement, as amended and restated, between the Adviser and the Trust, on behalf of each Fund (the “Investment Advisory Agreement”). The Board generally meets in regularly scheduled meetings five times a year and may meet more often as required. During the Trust’s fiscal year ended April 30, 2023, the Board held six meetings.
The Board has three standing committees, the Audit Committee, the Investment Oversight Committee and the Nominating and Governance Committee, and has delegated certain responsibilities to those Committees.
Mr. Kole (Chair), Ms. Pace, and Messrs. Wicker and Wilson currently serve as members of the Audit Committee. The Audit Committee has the responsibility, among other things, to: (i) approve and recommend to the Board the selection of the Trust’s independent registered public accounting firm, (ii) review the scope of the independent registered public accounting firm’s audit activity, (iii) review the audited financial statements, and (iv) review with such independent registered public accounting firm the adequacy and the effectiveness of the Trust’s internal controls over financial reporting. During the Trust’s fiscal year ended April 30, 2023, the Audit Committee held five meetings.
Mr. Bagge, Dr. Barre, Admiral Giambastiani, Ms. Herget and Mr. Lim (Chair) currently serve as members of the Investment Oversight Committee. The Investment Oversight Committee has the responsibility, among other things, (i) to review fund investment performance, including tracking error and correlation to a Fund’s underlying index, (ii) to review any proposed changes to a Fund’s investment policies, comparative benchmark indices or underlying index, and (iii) to review a Fund’s market trading activities and portfolio transactions. The Investment Oversight Committee also oversees the Adviser’s process for fair valuing the Funds’ portfolio investments and receives reports from the Adviser regarding the fair valuation of the Funds’ portfolio investments in accordance with the Adviser’s Valuation Procedures, which have been approved by the Board (the “Valuation Procedures”). During the Trust’s fiscal year ended April 30, 2023, the Investment Oversight Committee held four meetings.
Mr. Bagge (Chair), Dr. Barre, Admiral Giambastiani, Ms. Herget, Messrs. Kole and Lim, Ms. Pace, and Messrs. Wicker and Wilson currently serve as members of the Nominating and Governance Committee. The Nominating and Governance Committee has the responsibility, among other things, to identify and
36

recommend individuals for Board membership and evaluate candidates for Board membership. The Board will consider recommendations for trustees from shareholders. Nominations from shareholders should be in writing and sent to the Secretary of the Trust to the attention of the Chair of the Nominating and Governance Committee, as described below under the caption “Shareholder Communications.” During the Trust’s fiscal year ended April 30, 2023, the Nominating and Governance Committee held four meetings.
Mr. Wilson, one of the Independent Trustees, serves as the chair of the Board (the “Independent Chair”). The Independent Chair, among other things, chairs the Board meetings, participates in the preparation of the Board agendas and serves as a liaison between, and facilitates communication among, the other Independent Trustees, the full Board, the Adviser and other service providers with respect to Board matters. Mr. Bagge, as Chair of the Nominating and Governance Committee, serves as Vice Chair of the Board (“Vice Chair”). In the absence of the Independent Chair, the Vice Chair is responsible for all of the Independent Chair’s duties and may exercise any of the Independent Chair’s powers. The Chairs of each Committee also serve as liaisons between the Adviser and other service providers and the other Independent Trustees for matters pertaining to the respective Committee. The Board believes that its current leadership structure is appropriate taking into account the assets and number of funds in the Fund Family overseen by the Trustees, the size of the Board and the nature of the funds’ business, as the Interested Trustee and officers of the Trust provide the Board with insight as to the daily management of the funds while the Independent Chair promotes independent oversight of the funds by the Board.
Risk Oversight. Each Fund is subject to a number of risks, including operational, investment and compliance risks. The Board, directly and through its Committees, as part of its oversight responsibilities, oversees the services provided by the Adviser and the Trust’s other service providers in connection with the management and operations of the Funds, as well as their associated risks. Under the oversight of the Board, the Trust, the Adviser and other service providers have adopted policies, procedures and controls to address these risks. The Board, directly and through its Committees, receives and reviews information from the Adviser, other service providers, the Trust’s independent registered public accounting firm, Trust counsel and counsel to the Independent Trustees to assist it in its oversight responsibilities. This information includes, but is not limited to, reports regarding the Funds’ investments, including Fund performance and investment practices, valuation of Fund portfolio securities, and compliance. The Board also reviews, and must approve any proposed changes to, the Funds’ investment objective, policies and restrictions, and reviews any areas of non-compliance with the Funds’ investment policies and restrictions. The Audit Committee monitors the Trust’s accounting policies, financial reporting and internal control system and reviews any internal audit reports impacting the Trust. As part of its compliance oversight, the Board reviews the annual compliance report issued by the Trust’s Chief Compliance Officer on the policies and procedures of the Trust and its service providers, proposed changes to those policies and procedures and quarterly reports on any material compliance issues that arose during the period.
Experience, Qualifications and Attributes. As noted above, the Nominating and Governance Committee is responsible for identifying, evaluating and recommending trustee candidates. The Nominating and Governance Committee reviews the background and the educational, business and professional experience of trustee candidates and the candidates’ expected contributions to the Board. Trustees selected to serve on the Board are expected to possess relevant skills and experience, time availability and the ability to work well with the other Trustees. In addition to these qualities and based on each Trustee’s experience, qualifications and attributes and the Trustees’ combined contributions to the Board, the following is a brief summary of the information that led to the conclusion that each Board member should serve as a Trustee.
Mr. Bagge has served as a trustee and Chair of the Nominating and Governance Committee with the Fund Family since 2003 and as Vice Chair with the Fund Family since 2018. He founded YQA Capital Management, LLC in 1998 and has since served as a principal. Mr. Bagge has served as Chair (since 2021) and a member (since 2017) of the Joint Investment Committee of Mission Aviation Fellowship and MAF Foundation, and has served as a member of the Board of Trustees of Mission Aviation Fellowship since 2017. Previously, Mr. Bagge was the owner and CEO of Electronic Dynamic Balancing Company from 1988 to 2001. He began his career as a securities analyst for institutional investors, including CT&T Asset Management and J.C. Bradford & Co. The Board considered that Mr. Bagge has served as a board member or advisor for
37

several privately held businesses and charitable organizations and the executive, investment and operations experience that Mr. Bagge has gained over the course of his career and through his financial industry experience.
Dr. Barre has served as a trustee with the Fund Family since 2010. He served as Assistant Professor of Business at Trinity Christian College from 2010 to 2016. Additionally, he earned his Doctor of Business Administration degree from Anderson University in 2019 with final dissertation research focused on exchange-traded funds. Previously, he served in various positions with BMO Financial Group/Harris Private Bank, including Vice President and Senior Investment Strategist (2001-2008), Director of Open Architecture and Trading (2007-2008), Head of Fundamental Research (2004-2007) and Vice President and Senior Fixed Income Strategist (1994-2001). From 1983 to 1994, Dr. Barre was with the Office of the Manager of Investments at Commonwealth Edison Co. He also was a staff accountant at Peat Marwick Mitchell & Co. from 1981 to 1983. The Board considered the executive, financial and investment experience that Dr. Barre has gained over the course of his career and through his financial industry experience.
Admiral Giambastiani has served as a trustee with the Fund Family since 2019. He founded Giambastiani Group LLC in 2007 and has since served as its President. He has served as Trustee of the U.S. Naval Academy Foundation Athletic & Scholarship Program since 2010, as Advisory Board Member of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Lincoln Laboratory since 2010, as Defense Advisory Board Member of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory since 2013, and as a Director of First Eagle Alternative Credit LLC since 2020. Previously, he served as a Director of The Boeing Company (2009-2021), Trustee of MITRE Corporation (2008-2020), Director of THL Credit, Inc. (2016-2020), Trustee of certain funds in the Oppenheimer Funds complex (2013-2019), an Advisory Board Member of the Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs of Syracuse University (2012-2016), and Chair (2015-2016), Lead Director (2011-2015) and Director (2008-2011) of Monster Worldwide, Inc. Admiral Giambastiani also served in the United States Navy as a career nuclear submarine officer (1970-2007), as Seventh Vice Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff (2005-2007), as the first NATO Supreme Allied Commander Transformation (2003-2005) and Commander, U.S. Joint Forces Command (2002-2005). Since his retirement from the U.S. Navy in October 2007, Admiral Giambastiani has also served on numerous U.S. Government advisory boards, investigations and task forces for the Secretaries of Defense, State and Interior and the Directors of National Intelligence and Central Intelligence Agency. He recently completed serving as a federal commissioner on the Military Compensation and Retirement Modernization Commission. The Board considered the executive and operations experience that Admiral Giambastiani has gained over the course of his career and through his financial industry experience.
Ms. Herget has served as a trustee with the Fund Family since 2019. She has served as Trustee (2000-2017), Chair (2010-2017) and Trustee Emerita (since 2017) of Newberry Library, as Trustee of Chikaming Open Lands since 2014, and as a member of the Rockefeller Trust Committee since 2002. Previously, she served as Trustee of Mather LifeWays (2001-2021), as Board Chair (2008-2015) and Director (2004-2018) of United Educators Insurance Company, as Trustee of certain funds in the Oppenheimer Funds complex (2012-2019) and as Independent Director of the First American Funds (2003-2011). Ms. Herget served as Managing Director (1993-2001), Principal (1985-1993), Vice President (1978-1985) and Assistant Vice President (1973-1978) of Zurich Scudder Investments (and its predecessor firms), as Trustee (1992-2007), Chair of the Board of Trustees (1999-2007), Investment Committee Chair (1994-1999) and Investment Committee member (2007-2010) of Wellesley College and as Trustee of BoardSource (2006-2009) and Chicago City Day School (1994-2005). The Board considered the executive, financial and investment experience that Ms. Herget has gained over the course of her career and through her financial industry experience.
Mr. Kole has served as a trustee with the Fund Family since 2006 and Chair of the Audit Committee with the Fund Family since 2008. He was the Managing Director of Finance from 2020 to 2021 and was Senior Director of Finance from 2015 to 2020, of By The Hand Club for Kids. Mr. Kole also was the Chief Financial Officer of Hope Network from 2008 to 2012 and he was the Assistant Vice President and Controller at Priority Health from 2005 to 2008, Regional Chief Financial Officer of United Healthcare from 2004 to 2005, Chief Accounting Officer and Senior Vice President of Finance of Oxford Health Plans from 2000 to 2004 and Audit Partner at Arthur Andersen LLP from 1996 to 2000. Mr. Kole served as Treasurer (2018-2021), Finance
38

Committee Member (2015-2021) and Audit Committee Member (2015) of Thornapple Evangelical Covenant Church and he served as Board and Finance Committee Member (2009-2017) and Treasurer (2010-2015, 2017) of NorthPointe Christian Schools. The Board has determined that Mr. Kole qualifies as an “audit committee financial expert” as defined by the SEC. The Board considered the executive, financial and operations experience that Mr. Kole has gained over the course of his career and through his financial industry experience.
Mr. Lim has served as a trustee with the Fund Family since 2013 and Chair of the Investment Oversight Committee with the Fund Family since 2014. He has been a Managing Partner of RDG Funds LLC since 2008. Previously, he was a Managing Director and the Head of the Securitized Products Group of Citadel LLC (1999-2007). Prior to his employment with Citadel LLC, he was a Managing Director with Salomon Brothers Inc. Mr. Lim has served as a Board Director of Beacon Power Services, Corp. since 2019 and served as an Advisory Board Member of Performance Trust Capital Partners, LLC (2008-2020). The Board considered the executive, financial, operations and investment experience that Mr. Lim has gained over the course of his career and through his financial industry experience.
Ms. Pace has served as a trustee with the Fund Family since 2019. She has served as Board Director of Horizon Blue Cross Blue Shield of New Jersey since 2012, as Governing Council Member (since 2016) and Chair of Education Committee (2017-2021) of Independent Directors Council (IDC), and as a Council Member of New York-Presbyterian Hospital’s Leadership Council on Children’s and Women’s Health since 2012. Previously, she has served as an Advisory Board Director of The Alberleen Group LLC (2012-2021), a Board Member of 100 Women in Finance (2015-2020), a Trustee of certain funds in the Oppenheimer Funds complex (2012-2019), as Senior Advisor of SECOR Asset Management, LP (2010-2011), as Managing Director and Chief Operating Officer of Morgan Stanley Investment Management (2006-2010) and as Partner and Chief Operating Officer of FrontPoint Partners, LLC (2005-2006). Ms. Pace also held the following positions at Credit Suisse: Managing Director (2003-2005); Global Head of Human Resources and member of Executive Board and Operating Committee (2004-2005), and Global Head of Operations and Product Control (2003-2004). She also held the following positions at Morgan Stanley: Managing Director (1997-2003), Controller and Principal Accounting Officer (1999-2003); and Chief Financial Officer (temporary assignment) for the Oversight Committee, Long Term Capital Management (1998-1999). She also served as Lead Independent Director and Chair of the Audit and Nominating Committee of The Global Chartist Fund, LLC of Oppenheimer Asset Management (2011-2012), as Board Director of Managed Funds Association (2008-2010) and as Board Director of Morgan Stanley Foundation (2007-2010) and Investment Committee Chair (2008-2010). The Board has determined that Ms. Pace qualifies as an “audit committee financial expert” as defined by the SEC. The Board considered the executive, financial, operations and investment experience that Ms. Pace has gained over the course of her career and through her financial industry experience.
Ms. Paglia has served as a trustee with the Fund Family since 2022. She has served as the Managing Director and Global Head of ETFs and Indexed Strategies, Chief Executive Officer and Principal Executive Officer of the Adviser since 2020 and as President and Principal Executive Officer of the Fund Family since 2020, and has held various senior level positions with the Adviser and its affiliates since 2010. Previously, she was a Partner at K&L Gates LLP (formerly, Bell Boyd & Lloyd LLP) from 2007 to 2010 and Associate Counsel at Barclays Global Investors Ltd. from 2004 to 2006. The Board considered Ms. Paglia’s senior executive position with the Adviser.
Mr. Wicker has served as a trustee with the Fund Family since 2013. He has served as Senior Vice President of Global Finance and Chief Financial Officer at RBC Ministries since 2013. Previously, he was the Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer of Zondervan Publishing from 2007 to 2012. Prior to his employment with Zondervan Publishing, he held various positions with divisions of The Thomson Corporation, including Senior Vice President and Group Controller (2005-2006), Senior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer (2003-2004), Chief Financial Officer (2001-2003), Vice President, Finance and Controller (1999-2001) and Assistant Controller (1997-1999). Prior to that, Mr. Wicker was Senior Manager in the Audit and Business Advisory Services Group of Price Waterhouse (1994-1996). Mr. Wicker has served as a Board Member and Treasurer of Our Daily Bread Ministries Canada (2015-Present) and as a Board and Finance Committee Member of West Michigan Youth For Christ (2010-Present). The Board has determined that Mr. Wicker
39

qualifies as an “audit committee financial expert” as defined by the SEC. The Board considered the executive, financial and operations experience that Mr. Wicker has gained over the course of his career and through his financial industry experience.
Mr. Wilson has served as a trustee with the Fund Family since 2006 and as the Independent Chair with the Fund Family since 2012. He also served as lead Independent Trustee in 2011. He has served as the Chair, President and Chief Executive Officer of McHenry Bancorp Inc. and McHenry Savings Bank since 2018. Previously, he was Chair and Chief Executive Officer of Stone Pillar Advisors, Ltd. (2010-2017). He was also President and Chief Executive Officer of Stone Pillar Investments, Ltd. (2016-2018). Mr. Wilson was also the Chair, President and Chief Executive Officer of Community Financial Shares, Inc. and its subsidiary, Community Bank—Wheaton/Glen Ellyn (2013-2015). He also was the Chief Operating Officer (2007-2009) and Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer (2006-2007) of AMCORE Financial, Inc. Mr. Wilson also served as Senior Vice President and Treasurer of Marshall & Ilsley Corp. from 1995 to 2006. He started his career with the Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago, serving in several roles in the bank examination division and the economic research division. Mr. Wilson has served as a Director of Penfield Children’s Center (2004-Present) and as Board Chair of Gracebridge Alliance, Inc. (2015-Present). The Board has determined that Mr. Wilson qualifies as an “audit committee financial expert” as defined by the SEC. The Board considered the executive, financial and operations experience that Mr. Wilson has gained over the course of his career and through his financial industry experience.
This disclosure is not intended to hold out any Trustee as having any special expertise and shall not impose greater duties, obligations or liabilities on the Trustees. The Trustees’ principal occupations during at least the past five years are shown in the above tables.
For his or her services as a Trustee of the Trust and other trusts in the Fund Family, each Independent Trustee receives an annual retainer of $350,000 (the “Retainer”). The Retainer for the Independent Trustees is allocated half pro rata among all the funds in the Fund Family and the other half is allocated among all of the funds in the Fund Family based on average net assets. The Independent Chair receives an additional $120,000 per year for his service as the Independent Chair, allocated in the same manner as the Retainer. The chair of the Audit Committee receives an additional fee of $35,000 per year and the chairs of the Investment Oversight Committee and the Nominating and Governance Committee each receive an additional fee of $20,000 per year, each allocated in the same manner as the Retainer. Each Trustee also is reimbursed for travel and other out-of-pocket expenses incurred in attending Board and committee meetings.
The DC Plan allows each Independent Trustee to defer payment of all, or a portion, of the fees that the Trustee receives for serving on the Board throughout the year. Each eligible Trustee generally may elect to have deferred amounts credited with a return equal to the total return of one or more registered investment companies within the Fund Family that are offered as investment options under the DC Plan. At the Trustee’s election, distributions are either in one lump sum payment, or in the form of equal annual installments over a period of years designated by the Trustee. The rights of an eligible Trustee and the beneficiaries to the amounts held under the DC Plan are unsecured, and such amounts are subject to the claims of the creditors of a fund. The Independent Trustees are not eligible for any pension or profit sharing plan in their capacity as Trustees.
The following sets forth the fees paid to each Trustee for the fiscal year ended April 30, 2023.
Name of Trustee
Aggregate
Compensation From
Funds
Pension or Retirement
Benefits accrued as part of
Fund Expenses
Total Compensation Paid
From Fund Complex (1)
Independent Trustees
Ronn R. Bagge
$147,169
N/A
$370,000
Todd J. Barre
$139,214
N/A
$350,000
Edmund P. Giambastiani, Jr.
$139,214
N/A
$350,000
Victoria J. Herget
$139,214
N/A
$350,000
Marc M. Kole
$153,136
N/A
$385,000
Yung Bong Lim
$147,169
N/A
$370,000
Joanne Pace
$139,214
N/A
$350,000
40

Name of Trustee
Aggregate
Compensation From
Funds
Pension or Retirement
Benefits accrued as part of
Fund Expenses
Total Compensation Paid
From Fund Complex (1)
Gary R. Wicker
$139,214
N/A
$350,000
Donald H. Wilson
$186,944
N/A
$470,000
Interested Trustee
Anna Paglia
N/A
N/A
N/A
(1)
The amounts shown in this column represent the aggregate compensation paid by all of the funds of the trusts in the Fund Family for the fiscal year ended April 30, 2023, before deferral by the Trustees under the DC Plan. During the fiscal year ended April 30, 2023, Mr. Lim deferred 100% of his compensation, and Ms. Pace deferred $233,336 of her compensation.
Personal Holdings. As of July 31, 2023, the Trustees and Officers of the Trust, as a group, owned less than 1% of each Fund’s outstanding Shares.
Principal Holders and Control Persons. The following table sets forth the name, address and percentage of ownership of each person who is known by the Trust to own, of record or beneficially, 5% or more of each Fund’s outstanding equity securities as of July 31, 2023.
INVESCO AEROSPACE & DEFENSE ETF
Name & Address
% Owned
National Financial Services LLC
200 Liberty Street
New York, NY 10281
14.87%
Charles Schwab & Co, Inc
211 Main Street
San Francisco, CA 94105
14.69%
Merrill Lynch, Pierce, Fenner & Smith Incorporated
4 Corporate Place
Piscataway, NJ 08854
8.40%
Morgan Stanley
1585 Broadway
New York, NY 10036
8.34%
LPL Financial
75 State Street
Boston, MA 02109
7.15%
Pershing LLC
1 Pershing Plaza
Jersey City, NJ 07399
5.53%
TD Ameritrade Clearing, Inc
4211 South 102nd Street
Omaha, NE 68127
5.53%
INVESCO AI AND NEXT GEN SOFTWARE ETF
Name & Address
% Owned
Charles Schwab & Co, Inc
211 Main Street
San Francisco, CA 94105
18.63%
National Financial Services LLC
200 Liberty Street
New York, NY 10281
13.19%
TD Ameritrade Clearing, Inc
4211 South 102nd Street
Omaha, NE 68127
7.09%
Morgan Stanley
1585 Broadway
New York, NY 10036
6.79%
41

INVESCO AI AND NEXT GEN SOFTWARE ETF(continued)
Name & Address
% Owned
Wells Fargo
420 Montgomery Street
San Francisco, CA 94104
6.19%
Merrill Lynch, Pierce, Fenner & Smith Incorporated
4 Corporate Place
Piscataway, NJ 08854
5.54%
INVESCO BIOTECHNOLOGY & GENOME ETF
Name & Address
% Owned
Morgan Stanley
1585 Broadway
New York, NY 10036
14.58%
Charles Schwab & Co, Inc
211 Main Street
San Francisco, CA 94105
13.04%
National Financial Services LLC
200 Liberty Street
New York, NY 10281
10.29%
LPL Financial
75 State Street
Boston, MA 02109
8.66%
Merrill Lynch, Pierce, Fenner & Smith Incorporated
4 Corporate Place
Piscataway, NJ 08854
7.56%
Wells Fargo
420 Montgomery Street
San Francisco, CA 94104
7.27%
INVESCO BLOOMBERG MVP MULTI-FACTOR ETF
Name & Address
% Owned
Morgan Stanley
1585 Broadway
New York, NY 10036
16.90%
Charles Schwab & Co, Inc
211 Main Street
San Francisco, CA 94105
13.77%
National Financial Services LLC
200 Liberty Street
New York, NY 10281
11.93%
TD Ameritrade Clearing, Inc
4211 South 102nd Street
Omaha, NE 68127
7.28%
American Enterprise Investment Services Inc
707 2nd Avenue S
Minneapolis, MN 55402
7.03%
Merrill Lynch, Pierce, Fenner & Smith Incorporated
4 Corporate Place
Piscataway, NJ 08854
7.00%
Wells Fargo
420 Montgomery Street
San Francisco, CA 94104
6.90%
42

INVESCO BUILDING & CONSTRUCTION ETF
Name & Address
% Owned
Charles Schwab & Co, Inc
211 Main Street
San Francisco, CA 94105
16.83%
National Financial Services LLC
200 Liberty Street
New York, NY 10281
12.02%
LPL Financial
75 State Street
Boston, MA 02109
9.77%
Wells Fargo
420 Montgomery Street
San Francisco, CA 94104
8.99%
Morgan Stanley
1585 Broadway
New York, NY 10036
7.17%
Merrill Lynch, Pierce, Fenner & Smith Incorporated
4 Corporate Place
Piscataway, NJ 08854
6.65%
TD Ameritrade Clearing, Inc
4211 South 102nd Street
Omaha, NE 68127
6.22%
Raymond, James & Associates, Inc.
880 Carillon Parkway
St. Petersburg, FL 33716
5.52%
INVESCO BUYBACK ACHIEVERSTM ETF
Name & Address
% Owned
Charles Schwab & Co, Inc
211 Main Street
San Francisco, CA 94105
20.56%
National Financial Services LLC
200 Liberty Street
New York, NY 10281
12.76%
Merrill Lynch, Pierce, Fenner & Smith Incorporated
4 Corporate Place
Piscataway, NJ 08854
9.70%
LPL Financial
75 State Street
Boston, MA 02109
6.77%
Morgan Stanley
1585 Broadway
New York, NY 10036
6.69%
INVESCO DIVIDEND ACHIEVERSTM ETF
Name & Address
% Owned
LPL Financial
75 State Street
Boston, MA 02109
27.48%
Charles Schwab & Co, Inc
211 Main Street
San Francisco, CA 94105
11.18%
43

INVESCO DIVIDEND ACHIEVERSTM ETF (continued)
Name & Address
% Owned
National Financial Services LLC
200 Liberty Street
New York, NY 10281
8.68%
Morgan Stanley
1585 Broadway
New York, NY 10036
7.45%
Raymond James
880 Carillon Parkway
St. Petersburg, FL 33716
6.46%
Pershing LLC
1 Pershing Plaza
Jersey City, NJ 07399
5.41%
INVESCO DORSEY WRIGHT BASIC MATERIALS MOMENTUM ETF
Name & Address
% Owned
Charles Schwab & Co, Inc
211 Main Street
San Francisco, CA 94105
23.97%
National Financial Services LLC
200 Liberty Street
New York, NY 10281
11.14%
Morgan Stanley
1585 Broadway
New York, NY 10036
9.09%
Folio Investments
8180 Greensboro Dr 8th Floor
McLean, VA 22102
8.60%
TD Ameritrade Clearing, Inc
4211 South 102nd Street
Omaha, NE 68127
8.19%
LPL Financial
75 State Street
Boston, MA 02109
5.00%
INVESCO DORSEY WRIGHT CONSUMER CYCLICALS MOMENTUM ETF
Name & Address
% Owned
Charles Schwab & Co, Inc
211 Main Street
San Francisco, CA 94105
15.11%
Merrill Lynch, Pierce, Fenner & Smith Incorporated
4 Corporate Place
Piscataway, NJ 08854
13.76%
National Financial Services LLC
200 Liberty St.
New York, NY 10281
13.06%
Morgan Stanley
1585 Broadway
New York, NY 10036
11.79%
Wells Fargo
420 Montgomery Street
San Francisco, CA 94104
10.30%
LPL Financial
75 State Street
Boston, MA 02109
6.31%
44

INVESCO DORSEY WRIGHT CONSUMER CYCLICALS MOMENTUM ETF (continued)
Name & Address
% Owned
Bank of America
100 N. Tryon St.
Charlotte, NC 28255
5.27%
INVESCO DORSEY WRIGHT CONSUMER STAPLES MOMENTUM ETF
Name & Address
% Owned
Charles Schwab & Co, Inc
211 Main Street
San Francisco, CA 94105
14.16%
Folio Investments
8180 Greensboro Dr 8th Floor
McLean, VA 22102
13.10%
National Financial Services LLC
200 Liberty Street
New York, NY 10281
11.30%
Pershing LLC
1 Pershing Plaza
Jersey City, NJ 07399
8.27%
Morgan Stanley
1585 Broadway
New York, NY 10036
6.92%
Janney Montgomery Scott LLC
1717 Arch Street
Philadelphia, PA 19103
5.91%
American Enterprise Investment Services Inc
707 2nd Avenue S
Minneapolis, MN 55402
5.89%
Merrill Lynch, Pierce, Fenner & Smith Incorporated
4 Corporate Place
Piscataway, NJ 08854
5.85%
TD Ameritrade Clearing, Inc
4211 South 102nd Street
Omaha, NE 68127
5.71%
INVESCO DORSEY WRIGHT ENERGY MOMENTUM ETF
Name & Address
% Owned
Morgan Stanley
1585 Broadway
New York, NY 10036
14.41%
Raymond, James & Associates, Inc.
880 Carillon Parkway
St. Petersburg, FL 33716
14.05%
Wells Fargo
420 Montgomery Street
San Francisco, CA 94104
10.01%
National Financial Services LLC
200 Liberty Street
New York, NY 10281
9.13%
Charles Schwab & Co, Inc
211 Main Street
San Francisco, CA 94105
7.30%
Pershing LLC
1 Pershing Plaza
Jersey City, NJ 07399
6.20%
45

INVESCO DORSEY WRIGHT ENERGY MOMENTUM ETF (continued)
Name & Address
% Owned
Merrill Lynch, Pierce, Fenner & Smith Incorporated
4 Corporate Place
Piscataway, NJ 08854
5.72%
INVESCO DORSEY WRIGHT FINANCIAL MOMENTUM ETF
Name & Address
% Owned
Charles Schwab & Co, Inc
211 Main Street
San Francisco, CA 94105