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MASSMUTUAL FUNDS
This Prospectus describes the following Funds:
Fund Name
Class I
Class M5
Class M4
Class M3
MassMutual Select T. Rowe Price Retirement Balanced Fund
MMBVX
MMBWX
MMBYX
MMBZX
MassMutual Select T. Rowe Price Retirement 2005 Fund
MMFBX
MMFDX
MMFEX
MMFGX
MassMutual Select T. Rowe Price Retirement 2010 Fund
MMXBX
MMXCX
MMXDX
MMXEX
MassMutual Select T. Rowe Price Retirement 2015 Fund
MMFHX
MMFJX
MMFKX
MMFLX
MassMutual Select T. Rowe Price Retirement 2020 Fund
MMTWX
MMTTX
MMTUX
MMTVX
MassMutual Select T. Rowe Price Retirement 2025 Fund
MMTFX
MMTGX
MMTHX
MMTIX
MassMutual Select T. Rowe Price Retirement 2030 Fund
MMTRX
MMTOX
MMTPX
MMTQX
MassMutual Select T. Rowe Price Retirement 2035 Fund
MMTJX
MMTKX
MMTLX
MMTMX
MassMutual Select T. Rowe Price Retirement 2040 Fund
MMFOX
MMFPX
MMFQX
MMFRX
MassMutual Select T. Rowe Price Retirement 2045 Fund
MMFTX
MMFUX
MMFWX
MMFZX
MassMutual Select T. Rowe Price Retirement 2050 Fund
MMDDX
MMDFX
MMDGX
MMDHX
MassMutual Select T. Rowe Price Retirement 2055 Fund
MMDJX
MMDKX
MMDMX
MMDOX
MassMutual Select T. Rowe Price Retirement 2060 Fund
MMSKX
MMSOX
MMSGX
MMSVX
MassMutual Select T. Rowe Price Retirement 2065 Fund
MMZIX
MMZLX
MMZKX
MMZJX
The Securities and Exchange Commission has not approved or disapproved these securities or passed upon the adequacy of this Prospectus. Any statement to the contrary is a crime.
PROSPECTUS
February 1, 2023
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Table Of Contents
Page
About the Funds
3
12
21
30
39
48
57
66
75
84
93
102
111
120
Management of the Funds
150
150
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MassMutual Select T. Rowe Price Retirement Balanced Fund
INVESTMENT OBJECTIVE
The Fund seeks the highest total return over time consistent with an emphasis on both capital growth and income.
FEES AND EXPENSES OF THE FUND
This table describes the fees and expenses that you may pay if you buy, hold, and sell shares of the Fund. You may pay brokerage commissions and other fees to financial intermediaries which are not reflected in the tables and examples below.
Shareholder Fees (fees paid directly from your investment)
Class I
Class M5
Class M4
Class M3
Maximum Sales Charge (Load) Imposed on Purchases (as a % of offering price)
None
None
None
None
Maximum Deferred Sales Charge (Load) (as a % of the lower of the original offering price or redemption proceeds)
None
None
None
None
Annual Fund Operating Expenses (expenses that you pay each year as a percentage of the value of your investment)
Class I
Class M5
Class M4
Class M3
Management Fees
0.40%
0.55%
0.55%
0.55%
Distribution and Service (Rule 12b-1) Fees
None
None
0.25%
0.50%
Other Expenses
0.00%
0.00%
0.00%
0.00%
Acquired Fund Fees and Expenses
0.06%
0.06%
0.06%
0.06%
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses(1)
0.46%
0.61%
0.86%
1.11%
Expense Reimbursement
(0.12%)
(0.12%)
(0.12%)
(0.12%)
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses after Expense Reimbursement(2)
0.34%
0.49%
0.74%
0.99%
(1)
Because Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses include Acquired Fund Fees and Expenses, they may not correspond to the ratios of expenses to average daily net assets shown in the “Financial Highlights” tables in the Prospectus, which reflect the operating expenses of the Fund and do not include Acquired Fund Fees and Expenses.
(2)
The expenses in the above table reflect a written agreement by MML Advisers to cap the fees and expenses of the Fund (other than extraordinary legal and other expenses, interest expense, expenses related to borrowings, securities lending, leverage, taxes, and brokerage, short sale dividend and loan expense, or other non-recurring or unusual expenses such as organizational expenses and shareholder meeting expenses, as applicable) through January 31, 2024, to the extent that Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses after Expense Reimbursement would otherwise exceed 0.34%, 0.49%, 0.74%, and 0.99% for Classes I, M5, M4, and M3,
respectively. The Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses after Expense Reimbursement shown in the above table may exceed these amounts, because, as noted in the previous sentence, certain fees and expenses are excluded from the cap. The agreement can only be terminated by mutual consent of the Board of Trustees on behalf of the Fund and MML Advisers.
Example
This example is intended to help you compare the cost of investing in the Fund with the cost of investing in other mutual funds. It assumes that you invest $10,000 in each share class of the Fund for the time periods indicated and then redeem all of your shares at the end of those periods. The example also assumes that your investment earns a 5% return each year and that the Fund’s operating expenses are exactly as described in the preceding table. Although your actual costs may be higher or lower, based on these assumptions your costs would be:
1 Year
3 Years
5 Years
10 Years
Class I $ 35 $ 136 $ 246 $ 568
Class M5 $ 50 $ 183 $ 328 $ 751
Class M4 $ 76 $ 262 $ 465 $ 1,050
Class M3 $ 101 $ 341 $ 600 $ 1,341
Portfolio Turnover
The Fund pays transaction costs, such as commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or “turns over” its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover rate may indicate higher transaction costs and may result in higher taxes when Fund shares are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are not reflected in annual fund operating expenses or in the example, affect the Fund’s performance. During the most recent fiscal year, the Fund’s portfolio turnover rate was 34% of the average value of its portfolio.
INVESTMENTS, RISKS, AND PERFORMANCE
Principal Investment Strategies
The Fund is a “fund of funds” that pursues its objective by investing in a diversified portfolio of other stock and bond series of both the MassMutual Funds and T. Rowe Price Funds that represent various asset classes and sectors (“Underlying Funds”). The Fund is subadvised by T. Rowe Price Associates, Inc. (“T. Rowe Price”). Underlying Funds in which the Fund invests are predominantly either advised or subadvised by T. Rowe Price. The Fund is intended for retired investors who seek income and relative stability
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from bonds along with some capital appreciation potential from stocks. The Fund’s “neutral” allocations, which are what T. Rowe Price considers broadly appropriate for investors during their retirement years, are 40% stock funds and 60% bond funds. The allocations are referred to as “neutral” allocations because they are strategic and do not reflect any tactical decisions made by T. Rowe Price to overweight or underweight a particular asset class or sector based on its market outlook.
These allocations are intended to reflect the need for reduced market risks, lower portfolio volatility, and an income stream throughout retirement. Although the Fund is designed for investors already in retirement, you should be aware that it does not decrease its equity holdings and become increasingly conservative over time. As such, you may want to consider a more conservative or more aggressive approach depending on your age and specific stage of retirement. The Fund is designed to be part of an investor’s overall retirement strategy, but is not intended as a complete solution to an investor’s retirement needs. While the overall asset mix generally remains consistent over time, tactical decisions may be made by T. Rowe Price to overweight or underweight a particular asset class or sector based on its market outlook. The target allocations assigned to the broad asset classes (Stocks and Bonds), which reflect these tactical decisions resulting from market outlook, are not expected to vary from the neutral allocations by more than plus (+) or minus (-) five percent (5%). The target allocations and actual allocations may differ due to significant market movements or cash flows.
The following table details the way the portfolio is generally expected to be allocated between the asset classes. The table also shows the expected allocations to the Underlying Funds that will be used within those asset classes. The information in the table represents the neutral allocations for the Fund as of February 1, 2023. The Fund’s shareholder reports set forth its actual allocations between stock funds and bond funds and to the individual Underlying Funds. T. Rowe Price may modify the selection of Underlying Funds from time to time, and may invest in other Underlying Funds, including any Underlying Funds that may be created in the future. At any given time, the Fund’s asset allocation may be affected by a variety of factors (such as, for example, whether an Underlying Fund is accepting additional investments). A description of the Underlying
Funds is included in Appendix D of the Statement of Additional Information (“SAI”).
Stock Funds
40.00%
MM S&P 500 Index Fund 4.26%
MassMutual Select T. Rowe Price Large Cap Blend Fund
17.02%
MassMutual Select T. Rowe Price Small and Mid Cap Blend Fund
5.32%
MassMutual Select T. Rowe Price International
Equity Fund
11.40%
MassMutual Select T. Rowe Price Real Assets Fund
2.00%
Bond Funds
60.00%
MassMutual Select T. Rowe Price Bond Asset Fund
24.00%
T. Rowe Price Dynamic Global Bond Fund 4.00%
MassMutual Select T. Rowe Price U.S. Treasury
Long-Term Index Fund
3.36%
T. Rowe Price Institutional High Yield Fund 3.02%
T. Rowe Price Institutional Floating Rate Fund
1.30%
MassMutual Select T. Rowe Price Emerging Markets Bond Fund
4.32%
MassMutual Select T. Rowe Price Limited Duration Inflation Focused Bond Fund
20.00%
Note: The Underlying Fund allocations above may not sum up to 100% due to rounding.
Because the Fund will invest in Underlying Funds advised by MML Advisers, T. Rowe Price, or their affiliates, the Fund will not invest in funds advised or sponsored by others, even if they are less expensive or have better historical performance records. T. Rowe Price will be subject to a conflict of interest in selecting Underlying Funds, because its selection of Underlying Funds might appear to be influenced by the expected effect of the selection on its revenues or other benefits of the selection to it. T. Rowe Price has advised the Fund that, as a fiduciary to the Fund, T. Rowe Price has a duty to put the best interests of the Fund ahead of its own interest and that, consequently, it will make investment decisions for the Fund in the best interest of the Fund to achieve the Fund’s investment objectives and not for the benefit of T. Rowe Price.
Through its investments in Underlying Funds, the Fund will be exposed to a wide range of securities and other instruments with differing characteristics (such as credit quality, duration, geography, industry, and market capitalization), which may include without limitation equity securities of small-, mid-, or large-capitalization U.S. or non-U.S. issuers (including issuers that may only recently have become public companies), fixed income securities of U.S. or non-U.S. private or governmental issuers (including “junk” or “high
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yield” bonds, including securities in default), inflation-protected securities, bank loans, and short-term investments of any kind. Equity securities may include common stocks, preferred stocks, securities convertible into common or preferred stock, real estate investment trusts (“REITs”), rights, and warrants.
An Underlying Fund may engage in foreign currency exchange transactions, including forward contracts, options on currency, futures contracts, and swap contracts, to take long or short positions in foreign currencies in order to enhance its investment return or to attempt to protect against adverse changes in currency exchange rates. An Underlying Fund may be permitted to use a wide variety of additional exchange-traded and over-the-counter derivatives, including options, futures contracts, swap contracts (including interest rate swaps, total return swaps, and credit default swaps), and hybrid instruments. An Underlying Fund may typically use these derivatives for hedging purposes, as a substitute for direct investments, to earn additional income, to gain exposure to securities or markets in which it might not be able to invest directly, or to adjust various portfolio characteristics, including the duration (interest rate volatility) of the Fund’s portfolio of debt securities. Use of derivatives by an Underlying Fund may create investment leverage.
An Underlying Fund may enter into repurchase agreement transactions. An Underlying Fund may invest in mortgage-backed or other asset-backed securities. An Underlying Fund may enter into dollar roll or reverse repurchase agreement transactions. Some investments by an Underlying Fund may be restricted as to resale or otherwise considered to be illiquid. An Underlying Fund may engage in active and frequent trading and so could have a relatively high portfolio turnover rate. The Fund will bear a pro rata share of the Underlying Funds’ expenses. The Fund also bears all of the risks associated with the investment strategies used by the Underlying Funds.
Principal Risks
The following are the Principal Risks of the Fund. An investment in this Fund is not guaranteed. The value of your investment in the Fund could go down as well as up. You can lose money by investing in the Fund, including losses near, at, or after the target date. There is no guarantee that the Fund will provide adequate income at and through your retirement. Although the descriptions below refer to the risks relating to investment
activities of the Fund, many of the risks arise due to the investment activities of the Underlying Funds. Certain risks relating to instruments and strategies used in the management of the Fund are placed first. The significance of any specific risk to an investment in the Fund will vary over time, depending on the composition of the Fund’s portfolio, market conditions, and other factors. You should read all of the risk information presented below carefully, because any one or more of these risks may result in losses to the Fund.
Allocation Risk There is no assurance that allocation decisions will result in the desired performance effects. The limited universe of Underlying Funds and the requirement that a significant percentage of Fund assets be invested in mutual funds advised by MML Advisers, T. Rowe Price, or their affiliates as noted in “Principal Investment Strategies” may adversely affect Fund performance.
Risk of Investment in Other Funds or Pools The Fund is indirectly exposed to all of the risks of the underlying funds, including ETFs, in which it invests, including the risk that the underlying funds will not perform as expected. ETFs are subject to additional risks, including secondary market trading risks and the risk that an ETF’s shares may trade above or below net asset value. The Fund indirectly pays a portion of the expenses incurred by the underlying funds.
Bank Loans Risk Many of the risks associated with bank loans are similar to the risks of investing in below investment grade debt securities. Changes in the financial condition of the borrower or economic conditions or other circumstances may reduce the capacity of the borrower to make principal and interest payments on such instruments and may lead to defaults. Senior secured bank loans are typically supported by collateral; however the value of the collateral may be insufficient to cover the amount owed to the Fund, or the Fund may be prevented or delayed from realizing on the collateral. Some loans may be unsecured; unsecured loans generally present a greater risk of loss to the Fund if the issuer defaults. If the Fund relies on a third party to administer a loan, the Fund is subject to the risk that the third party will fail to perform its obligations. In addition, if the Fund holds only a participation interest in a loan made by a third party, the Fund’s receipt of payments on the loan will depend on the third party’s willingness and ability to make those payments to the Fund. The
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settlement time for certain loans is longer than the settlement time for many other types of investments, and the Fund may not receive the payment for a loan sold by it until well after the sale; that cash would be unavailable for payment of redemption proceeds or for reinvestment. Interests in some bank loans may not be readily marketable and may be subject to restrictions on resale. In some cases, negotiations involved in disposing of indebtedness may require weeks to complete. Consequently, some indebtedness may be difficult or impossible to dispose of readily at what the Fund believes to be a fair price. Some loans may not be considered “securities” for certain purposes under the federal securities laws, and purchasers, such as the Fund, therefore may not be entitled to rely on the anti-fraud protections of the federal securities laws.
Below Investment Grade Debt Securities Risk Below investment grade debt securities, commonly known as “junk” or “high yield” bonds, have speculative characteristics and involve greater volatility of price and yield, greater risk of loss of principal and interest, and generally reflect a greater possibility of an adverse change in financial condition that could affect an issuer’s ability to honor its obligations.
Cash Position Risk If the Fund holds a significant portion of its assets in cash or cash equivalents, its investment returns may be adversely affected and the Fund may not achieve its investment objective.
Commodities-Related Investments Risk Commodity prices (including precious metals) can be extremely volatile and exposure to commodities can cause the net asset value of the Fund’s shares to decline or fluctuate in a rapid and unpredictable manner. The values of physical commodities or commodity-linked derivative instruments may be affected by changes in overall market movements, real or perceived inflationary trends, commodity index volatility, changes in interest rates or currency exchange rates, population growth and changing demographics, international economic, political, and regulatory developments, or factors affecting a particular region, industry, or commodity. A liquid secondary market may not exist for certain commodity investments, which may make it difficult for the Fund to sell them at a desirable price or at the price at which it is carrying them.
Convertible Securities Risk Convertible securities are subject to the risks of both debt instruments and equity securities. The price of a convertible
security may change in response to changes in price of the underlying equity security, the credit quality of the issuer, and interest rates. In general, the values of convertible securities tend to decline as interest rates rise and to rise when interest rates fall. A convertible security generally has less potential for gain or loss than the underlying equity security.
Credit Risk Credit risk is the risk that an issuer, guarantor, or liquidity provider of a fixed income security held by the Fund may be unable or unwilling, or may be perceived (whether by market participants, ratings agencies, pricing services or otherwise) as unable or unwilling, to make timely principal and/or interest payments, or to otherwise honor its obligations. The Fund may also be exposed to the credit risk of its counterparty to repurchase agreements, reverse repurchase agreements, swap transactions, and other derivatives transactions, and to the counterparty’s ability or willingness to perform in accordance with the terms of the transaction. The value of such transactions to the Fund will depend on the willingness and ability of the counterparty to perform its obligations, including among other things the obligation to return collateral or margin to the Fund. If a counterparty becomes bankrupt or otherwise fails to perform its obligations under a derivative contract due to financial difficulties, the Fund may experience significant delays in obtaining any recovery under the derivative contract in a bankruptcy or other reorganization proceeding. The Fund may obtain only a limited recovery or may obtain no recovery in such circumstances.
Derivatives Risk Derivatives can be highly volatile and involve risks different from, and potentially greater than, direct investments, including risks of imperfect correlation between the value of derivatives and underlying assets, counterparty default, potential losses that partially or completely offset gains, and illiquidity. Derivatives can create investment leverage. Losses from derivatives can be substantially greater than the derivatives’ original cost and can sometimes be unlimited. If the value of a derivative does not correlate well with the particular market or asset class the derivative is designed to provide exposure to, the derivative may not have the effect or benefit anticipated. Derivatives can also reduce the opportunity for gains or result in losses by offsetting positive returns in other investments. Many derivatives are traded in the over-the-counter market and not on exchanges.
Equity Securities Risk Although stocks may have the potential to outperform other asset classes
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over the long term, their prices tend to fluctuate more dramatically over the shorter term. These movements may result from factors affecting individual companies, or from broader influences like changes in interest rates, market conditions, or investor confidence, or announcements of economic, political, or financial information.
Fixed Income Securities Risk The values of fixed income securities typically will decline during periods of rising interest rates, and can also decline in response to changes in the financial condition of the issuer, borrower, counterparty, or underlying collateral assets, or changes in market, economic, industry, political, regulatory, public health, and other conditions affecting a particular type of security or issuer or fixed income securities generally. Certain events, such as market or economic developments, regulatory or government actions, natural disasters, pandemics, terrorist attacks, war, and other geopolitical events can have a dramatic adverse effect on the debt market and the overall liquidity of the market for fixed income securities. During those periods, the Fund may experience high levels of shareholder redemptions, and may have to sell securities at times when the Fund would otherwise not do so, and potentially at unfavorable prices. Certain securities may be difficult to value during such periods. Fixed income securities are subject to interest rate risk (the risk that the value of a fixed income security will fall when interest rates rise), extension risk (the risk that the average life of a security will be extended through a slowing of principal payments), prepayment risk (the risk that a security will be prepaid and the Fund will be required to reinvest at a less favorable rate), duration risk (the risk that longer-term securities may be more sensitive to interest rate changes), inflation risk (the risk that as inflation increases, the present value of the Fund’s fixed income investment typically will decline), and credit risk.
Foreign Investment Risk; Emerging Markets Risk; Currency Risk Investments in securities of foreign issuers, securities of companies with significant foreign exposure, and foreign currencies can involve additional risks relating to market, industry, political, regulatory, public health, and other conditions. Political, social, diplomatic, and economic developments, U.S. and foreign government action, or threat thereof, such as the imposition of currency or capital blockages, controls, or tariffs, economic and trade sanctions or embargoes, security trading suspensions, entering or exiting trade or other intergovernmental
agreements, or the expropriation or nationalization of assets in a particular country, can cause dramatic declines in certain or all securities with exposure to that country and other countries. In the event of nationalization, expropriation, confiscation, or other government action, intervention, or restriction, the Fund could lose its entire investment in a particular foreign issuer or country. There may be quotas or other limits on the ability of the Fund (or clients of the Fund’s investment adviser or subadviser) to invest or maintain investments in securities of issuers in certain countries. Enforcing legal rights can be more difficult, costly, and limited in certain foreign countries and with respect to certain types of investments, and can be particularly difficult against foreign governments. Because non-U.S. securities are normally denominated and traded in currencies other than the U.S. dollar, the value of the Fund’s assets may be affected favorably or unfavorably by changes in currency exchange rates, exchange control regulations, and restrictions or prohibitions on the repatriation of non-U.S. currencies. Income and gains with respect to investments in certain countries may be subject to withholding and other taxes. There may be less information publicly available about a non-U.S. company than about a U.S. company, and many non-U.S. companies are not subject to accounting, auditing, and financial reporting standards, regulatory framework and practices comparable to those in the U.S. The securities of some non-U.S. companies, especially those in emerging markets, are less liquid and at times more volatile than securities of comparable U.S. companies. Emerging markets securities are subject to greater risks than securities issued in developed foreign markets, including less liquidity, less stringent investor protection and disclosure standards, less reliable settlement practices, greater price volatility, higher relative rates of inflation, greater political, economic, and social instability, greater custody and operational risks, greater risk of new or inconsistent government treatment of or restrictions on issuers and instruments, and greater volatility in currency exchange rates, and are more susceptible to environmental problems. Many emerging market countries are highly reliant on international trade and exports, including the export of commodities. Their economies may be significantly impacted by fluctuations in commodity prices and the global demand for certain commodities. In addition, pandemics and outbreaks of contagious diseases may exacerbate pre-existing problems in emerging market countries
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with less established health care systems. Frontier markets, a subset of emerging markets, generally have smaller economies and less mature capital markets than emerging markets. As a result, the risks of investing in emerging market countries are magnified in frontier market countries. Frontier markets are more susceptible to having abrupt changes in currency values, less mature markets and settlement practices, and lower trading volumes that could lead to greater price volatility and illiquidity. Non-U.S. transaction costs, such as brokerage commissions and custody costs, may be higher than in the United States. In addition, foreign markets can react differently to market, economic, industry, political, regulatory, geopolitical, public health, and other conditions than the U.S. market.
Frequent Trading/Portfolio Turnover Risk Portfolio turnover generally involves some expense to the Fund and may result in the realization of taxable capital gains (including short-term gains). The trading costs and tax effects associated with portfolio turnover may adversely affect the Fund’s performance.
Geographic Focus Risk When the Fund focuses investments on a particular country, group of countries, or geographic region, its performance will be closely tied to the market, currency, economic, political, or regulatory conditions and developments in those countries or that region, and could be more volatile than the performance of more geographically diversified funds.
Growth Company Risk The prices of growth securities are often highly sensitive to market fluctuations because of their heavy dependence on future earnings or cash flow expectations, and can be more volatile than the market in general.
Hedging Risk The Fund’s attempts at hedging and taking long and short positions in currencies may not be successful and could cause the Fund to lose money or fail to get the benefit of a gain on a hedged position. If expected changes to securities prices, interest rates, currency values, and exchange rates, or the creditworthiness of an issuer are not accurately predicted, the Fund could be in a worse position than if it had not entered into such transactions.
Inflation Risk The value of assets or income from the Fund’s investments will be less in the future as inflation decreases the value of money. As inflation increases, the value of the Fund’s assets can decline as can the value of the Fund’s
distributions. Inflation rates may change frequently and drastically as a result of various factors, including unexpected shifts in the domestic or global economy (or expectations that such policies will change), and the Fund’s investments may not keep pace with inflation, which may result in losses to the Fund’s investors.
Large Company Risk Large-capitalization stocks as a group could fall out of favor with the market, causing the Fund’s investments in large-capitalization stocks to underperform investments that focus on small- or medium-capitalization stocks. Larger, more established companies may be slow to respond to challenges and may grow more slowly than smaller companies.
Leveraging Risk Instruments and transactions, including derivatives, dollar roll, and reverse repurchase agreement transactions, that create leverage may cause the value of an investment in the Fund to be more volatile, could result in larger losses than if they were not used, and tend to compound the effects of other risks.
Liquidity Risk Certain securities may be difficult (or impossible) to sell or certain positions may be difficult to close out at a desirable time and price, and the Fund may be required to hold an illiquid investment that is declining in value, or it may be required to sell certain illiquid investments at a price or time that is not advantageous in order to meet redemptions or other cash needs. Some securities may be subject to restrictions on resale. There can be no assurance that there will be a liquid market for instruments held by the Fund at any time. The Fund may not receive the proceeds from the sale of certain investments for an extended period.
Management Risk The Fund relies on the manager’s investment analysis and its selection of investments to achieve its investment objective. There can be no assurance that the Fund will achieve the intended results and the Fund may incur significant losses.
Market Risk The value of the Fund’s portfolio securities may decline, at times sharply and unpredictably, as a result of unfavorable market-induced changes affecting particular industries, sectors, or issuers. Stock and bond markets can decline significantly in response to issuer, market, economic, industry, political, regulatory, geopolitical, public health, and other conditions, as well as investor perceptions of these conditions. The Fund is subject to risks affecting issuers, such
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as management performance, financial leverage, industry problems, and reduced demand for goods or services.
Mortgage- and Asset-Backed Securities Risk Investments in mortgage- and asset-backed securities subject the Fund to credit risk, interest rate risk, extension risk, and prepayment risk, among other risks. Mortgage-backed and asset-backed securities not issued by a government agency generally involve greater credit risk than securities issued by government agencies. Payment of principal and interest generally depends on the cash flows generated by the underlying assets and the terms of the security. The types of mortgages (for example, residential or commercial mortgages) underlying securities held by the Fund may differ and be affected differently by market factors. Investments that receive only the interest portion or the principal portion of payments on the underlying assets may be highly volatile. Litigation with respect to the representations and warranties given in connection with the issuance of mortgage-backed securities can be an important consideration in investing in such securities, and the outcome of any such litigation could significantly impact the value of the Fund’s mortgage-backed investments.
Preferred Stock Risk Like other equity securities, preferred stock is subject to the risk that its value may decrease based on actual or perceived changes in the business or financial condition of the issuer. In addition, changes in interest rates may adversely affect the value of a preferred stock that pays a fixed dividend. Preferred stocks are also subject to additional risks, such as potentially greater volatility and risks related to deferral, non-cumulative dividends, subordination, liquidity, limited voting rights, and special redemption rights.
Real Estate Risk; REIT Risk Real estate-related investments may decline in value as a result of factors affecting the real estate industry, such as the supply of real property in certain markets, changes in zoning laws, environmental regulations and other governmental action, delays in completion of construction, changes in real estate values, changes in property taxes, levels of occupancy, losses due to natural disasters, and local and regional market conditions. Investments in REITs may be subject to risks similar to those associated with direct investment in real estate, as well as additional risks associated with equity investments. As a shareholder in a REIT, the Fund, and indirectly
the Fund’s shareholders, would bear its ratable share of the REIT’s expenses and would at the same time continue to pay its own fees and expenses.
Repurchase Agreement Risk  These transactions must be fully collateralized, but involve credit risk to a Fund if the other party should default on its obligation and the Fund is delayed or prevented from recovering the collateral.
Sector Risk The Fund may allocate more of its assets to particular industries or to particular economic, market, or industry sectors than to others. This could increase the volatility of the Fund’s portfolio, and the Fund’s performance may be more susceptible to developments affecting issuers in those industries or sectors than if the Fund invested more broadly.
Small and Mid-Cap Company Risk Market risk and liquidity risk are particularly pronounced for securities of small and medium-sized companies, which may trade less frequently and in smaller volumes than more widely-held securities, and may fluctuate in price more than other securities. Their shares can be less liquid than those of larger companies, especially during market declines. Small and medium-sized companies may have limited product lines, markets, or financial resources and may be dependent on a limited management group; they may have been recently organized and have little or no track record of success.
Sovereign Debt Obligations Risk Investments in debt securities issued by governments or by government agencies and instrumentalities involve the risk that the governmental entities responsible for repayment may be unable or unwilling to pay interest and repay principal when due. Many sovereign debt obligations may be rated below investment grade (“junk” or “high yield” bonds). Any restructuring of a sovereign debt obligation held by the Fund will likely have a significant adverse effect on the value of the obligation. In the event of default of sovereign debt, the Fund may be unable to pursue legal action against the sovereign issuer or to realize on collateral securing the debt.
U.S. Government Securities Risk Obligations of certain U.S. Government agencies and instrumentalities are not backed by the full faith and credit of the U.S. Government, and there can be no assurance that the U.S. Government would provide financial support to such agencies and instrumentalities.
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Valuation Risk The Fund is subject to the risk of mispricing or improper valuation of its investments, in particular to the extent that its securities are fair valued.
Value Company Risk The value investment approach entails the risk that the market will not recognize a security’s intrinsic value for a long time, or that a stock the investment adviser or subadviser judges to be undervalued may actually be appropriately priced.
Performance Information
The following bar chart and table provide some indication of the risks of investing in the Fund. The bar chart shows changes in the Fund’s performance from year to year for Class I shares. The table shows how the Fund’s average annual returns for 1 year, and since inception, compare with those of a broad measure of market performance. Past performance (before and after taxes) is not necessarily an indication of how the Fund will perform in the future. More up-to-date performance information is available at https://​www.massmutual.com/funds or by calling 1-888-309-3539.
Annual Performance
Class I Shares
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Highest
Quarter:
2Q ’20,
11.72% Lowest
Quarter:
1Q ’20,
10.95%
After-tax returns are calculated using the historical highest individual U.S. federal marginal income tax rates and do not reflect the impact of state and local taxes. Actual after-tax returns depend on an investor’s tax situation and may differ from those shown. After-tax returns are not relevant to investors who hold Fund shares through tax-advantaged arrangements, such as 401(k) plans or individual retirement accounts. After-tax returns are shown for Class I only. After-tax returns for other classes will vary.
Average Annual Total Returns
(for the periods ended December 31, 2022)
One
Year
Since
Inception
(02/16/18)
Class I
Return Before
Taxes
-12.97 % 3.31 %
Return After Taxes on Distributions -15.61 % 1.32 %
Return After Taxes on Distributions and Sales of Fund Shares -6.81 % 2.13 %
Class M5 Return Before
Taxes
-13.13 % 3.16 %
Class M4 Return Before
Taxes
-13.35 % 2.90 %
Class M3 Return Before
Taxes
-13.52 % 2.65 %
S&P Target Date Retirement Income
Index (reflects no deduction for fees,
expenses, or taxes)
-11.17 % 2.49 %
MANAGEMENT
Investment Adviser: MML Investment Advisers, LLC (“MML Advisers”)
Subadviser(s): T. Rowe Price Associates, Inc. (“T. Rowe Price”)
Portfolio Manager(s):
Kimberly E. DeDominicis is a Vice President and Portfolio Manager at T. Rowe Price. She has managed the Fund since October 2019.
Andrew Jacobs van Merlen, CFA is a Vice President and Portfolio Manager at T. Rowe Price. He has managed the Fund since January 2020.
Wyatt A. Lee, CFA is a Vice President and Portfolio Manager at T. Rowe Price. He has managed the Fund since its inception (February 2018).
PURCHASE AND SALE OF FUND SHARES
Shares of the Fund are generally available to retirement plans, other institutional investors, and individual retirement accounts. Fund shares are redeemable on any business day by written request, telephone, or internet (available to certain customers).
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TAX INFORMATION
The Fund intends to make distributions that may be taxed as ordinary income, qualified dividend income, or capital gains, unless you are an investor eligible for preferential tax treatment.
PAYMENTS TO BROKER-DEALERS AND OTHER FINANCIAL INTERMEDIARIES
If you purchase the Fund through a broker-dealer or other financial intermediary, the intermediary may receive a one-time or continuing payments
from the Fund, MML Advisers or its affiliates, or others for the sale of Fund shares or continuing shareholder services provided by the intermediary. These payments may create a conflict of interest by influencing the broker-dealer or other intermediary to recommend the Fund over another investment. You should contact your intermediary to obtain more information about the compensation it may receive in connection with your investment.
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MassMutual Select T. Rowe Price Retirement 2005 Fund
INVESTMENT OBJECTIVE
The Fund seeks the highest total return over time consistent with an emphasis on both capital growth and income.
FEES AND EXPENSES OF THE FUND
This table describes the fees and expenses that you may pay if you buy, hold, and sell shares of the Fund. You may pay brokerage commissions and other fees to financial intermediaries which are not reflected in the tables and examples below.
Shareholder Fees (fees paid directly from your investment)
Class I
Class M5
Class M4
Class M3
Maximum Sales Charge (Load) Imposed on Purchases (as a % of offering price)
None
None
None
None
Maximum Deferred Sales Charge (Load) (as a % of the lower of the original offering price or redemption proceeds)
None
None
None
None
Annual Fund Operating Expenses (expenses that you pay each year as a percentage of the value of your investment)
Class I
Class M5
Class M4
Class M3
Management Fees(1)
0.42%
0.57%
0.57%
0.57%
Distribution and Service (Rule 12b-1) Fees
None
None
0.25%
0.50%
Other Expenses
0.00%
0.00%
0.00%
0.00%
Acquired Fund Fees and Expenses
0.06%
0.06%
0.06%
0.06%
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses(2)
0.48%
0.63%
0.88%
1.13%
Expense Reimbursement
(0.14%)
(0.14%)
(0.14%)
(0.14%)
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses after Expense Reimbursement(3)
0.34%
0.49%
0.74%
0.99%
(1)
The Management Fees will decline over time in accordance with a predetermined contractual fee schedule, with any annual decrease occurring on June 1st of each year. The fee schedule can only be changed with approval by the Fund’s Board of Trustees, and, if required by SEC rules, the Fund’s shareholders.
(2)
Because Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses include Acquired Fund Fees and Expenses, they may not correspond to the ratios of expenses to average daily net assets shown in the “Financial Highlights” tables in the Prospectus, which reflect the operating expenses of the Fund and do not include Acquired Fund Fees and Expenses.
(3)
The expenses in the above table reflect a written agreement by MML Advisers to cap the fees and expenses of the Fund (other than extraordinary legal and other expenses, interest expense, expenses related to borrowings, securities lending, leverage, taxes, and brokerage, short sale dividend and loan
expense, or other non-recurring or unusual expenses such as organizational expenses and shareholder meeting expenses, as applicable) through January 31, 2024, to the extent that Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses after Expense Reimbursement would otherwise exceed 0.34%, 0.49%, 0.74%, and 0.99% for Classes I, M5, M4, and M3, respectively. The Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses after Expense Reimbursement shown in the above table may exceed these amounts, because, as noted in the previous sentence, certain fees and expenses are excluded from the cap. The agreement can only be terminated by mutual consent of the Board of Trustees on behalf of the Fund and MML Advisers.
Example
This example is intended to help you compare the cost of investing in the Fund with the cost of investing in other mutual funds. It assumes that you invest $10,000 in each share class of the Fund for the time periods indicated and then redeem all of your shares at the end of those periods. The example also assumes that your investment earns a 5% return each year and that the Fund’s operating expenses are exactly as described in the preceding table. Although your actual costs may be higher or lower, based on these assumptions your costs would be:
1 Year
3 Years
5 Years
10 Years
Class I $ 35 $ 140 $ 255 $ 590
Class M5 $ 50 $ 188 $ 337 $ 773
Class M4 $ 76 $ 267 $ 474 $ 1,071
Class M3 $ 101 $ 345 $ 609 $ 1,362
Portfolio Turnover
The Fund pays transaction costs, such as commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or “turns over” its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover rate may indicate higher transaction costs and may result in higher taxes when Fund shares are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are not reflected in annual fund operating expenses or in the example, affect the Fund’s performance. During the most recent fiscal year, the Fund’s portfolio turnover rate was 37% of the average value of its portfolio.
INVESTMENTS, RISKS, AND PERFORMANCE
Principal Investment Strategies
The Fund is a “fund of funds” that pursues its objective by investing in a diversified portfolio of other stock and bond series of both the MassMutual Funds and T. Rowe Price Funds that represent various asset classes and sectors (“Underlying Funds”). The Fund’s allocation among Underlying Funds will change over time in
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relation to its target retirement date. The Fund is subadvised by T. Rowe Price Associates, Inc. (“T. Rowe Price”). Underlying Funds in which the Fund invests are predominantly either advised or subadvised by T. Rowe Price.
The Fund is managed based on the specific retirement year (target date 2005) included in its name and assumes a retirement age of 65. The target date refers to the approximate year an investor in the Fund would have retired and likely stopped making new investments in the Fund. The Fund is primarily designed for an investor who retired at or about the target date and who plans to withdraw the value of the account in the Fund gradually after retirement. However, if an investor retired earlier or later than age 65, the Fund may not be an appropriate investment even if the investor retired on or near the Fund’s target date.
Over time, the allocation to asset classes and funds will change according to a predetermined “glide path” shown in the following chart (the left axis indicates the overall neutral allocation to stocks with the remainder of the allocation to bonds). The glide path represents the shifting of asset classes over time and shows how the Fund’s asset mix becomes more conservative–both prior to and after retirement–as time elapses. This reflects the need for reduced market risks as retirement approaches and the need for lower portfolio volatility after retiring. Although the glide path is meant to dampen the Fund’s potential volatility as retirement approaches, the Fund is not designed for a lump sum redemption at the retirement date. The Fund pursues an asset allocation strategy that promotes asset accumulation prior to retirement, but it is intended to also serve as a post-retirement investment vehicle with allocations designed to support an income stream made up of regular withdrawals throughout retirement along with some portfolio growth that exceeds inflation. After the target date, the Fund is designed to balance longevity and inflation risks along with the need for some income, although it does not guarantee a particular level of income.
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The glide path provides for a neutral allocation to
stocks at the target date of 55%. The Fund’s overall exposure to stocks will continue to decline until approximately 30 years after its target date, when its neutral allocations to stocks and bonds will remain unchanged. There are no maturity restrictions within the Fund’s overall allocation to bonds, although the bond funds in which the Fund invests may impose specific limits on maturity or credit quality. The allocations are referred to as “neutral” allocations because they are strategic and do not reflect any tactical decisions made by T. Rowe Price to overweight or underweight a particular asset class or sector based on its market outlook. The target allocations assigned to the broad asset classes (Stocks and Bonds), which reflect these tactical decisions resulting from market outlook, are not expected to vary from the neutral allocations set forth in the glide path by more than plus (+) or minus (-) five percent (5%). The target allocations and actual allocations may differ due to significant market movements or cash flows.
The following table details the way the portfolio is generally expected to be allocated between the asset classes. The table also shows the expected allocations to the Underlying Funds that will be used within those asset classes. The information in the table represents the neutral allocations for the Fund as of February 1, 2023. The Fund’s shareholder reports set forth its actual allocations between stock funds and bond funds and to the individual Underlying Funds. T. Rowe Price may modify the target asset allocation strategy or the selection of Underlying Funds from time to time, and may invest in other Underlying Funds,
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including any Underlying Funds that may be created in the future. At any given time, the Fund’s asset allocation may be affected by a variety of factors (such as, for example, whether an Underlying Fund is accepting additional investments). A description of the Underlying Funds is included in Appendix D of the Statement of Additional Information (“SAI”).
Stock Funds
43.00%
MM S&P 500 Index Fund 4.58%
MassMutual Select T. Rowe Price Large Cap Blend Fund
18.30%
MassMutual Select T. Rowe Price Small and Mid Cap Blend Fund
5.72%
MassMutual Select T. Rowe Price International
Equity Fund
12.26%
MassMutual Select T. Rowe Price Real Assets Fund
2.15%
Bond Funds
57.00%
MassMutual Select T. Rowe Price Bond Asset Fund
24.00%
T. Rowe Price Dynamic Global Bond Fund 4.00%
MassMutual Select T. Rowe Price U.S. Treasury
Long-Term Index Fund
3.50%
T. Rowe Price Institutional High Yield Fund 2.98%
T. Rowe Price Institutional Floating Rate Fund
1.28%
MassMutual Select T. Rowe Price Emerging Markets Bond Fund
4.25%
MassMutual Select T. Rowe Price Limited Duration Inflation Focused Bond Fund
17.00%
Note: The Underlying Fund allocations above may not sum up to 100% due to rounding.
Because the Fund will invest in Underlying Funds advised by MML Advisers, T. Rowe Price, or their affiliates, the Fund will not invest in funds advised or sponsored by others, even if they are less expensive or have better historical performance records. T. Rowe Price will be subject to a conflict of interest in selecting Underlying Funds, because its selection of Underlying Funds might appear to be influenced by the expected effect of the selection on its revenues or other benefits of the selection to it. T. Rowe Price has advised the Fund that, as a fiduciary to the Fund, T. Rowe Price has a duty to put the best interests of the Fund ahead of its own interest and that, consequently, it will make investment decisions for the Fund in the best interest of the Fund to achieve the Fund’s investment objectives and not for the benefit of T. Rowe Price.
Through its investments in Underlying Funds, the Fund will be exposed to a wide range of securities and other instruments with differing characteristics (such as credit quality, duration, geography,
industry, and market capitalization), which may include without limitation equity securities of small-, mid-, or large-capitalization U.S. or non-U.S. issuers (including issuers that may only recently have become public companies), fixed income securities of U.S. or non-U.S. private or governmental issuers (including “junk” or “high yield” bonds, including securities in default), inflation-protected securities, bank loans, and short-term investments of any kind. Equity securities may include common stocks, preferred stocks, securities convertible into common or preferred stock, real estate investment trusts (“REITs”), rights, and warrants.
An Underlying Fund may engage in foreign currency exchange transactions, including forward contracts, options on currency, futures contracts, and swap contracts, to take long or short positions in foreign currencies in order to enhance its investment return or to attempt to protect against adverse changes in currency exchange rates. An Underlying Fund may be permitted to use a wide variety of additional exchange-traded and over-the-counter derivatives, including options, futures contracts, swap contracts (including interest rate swaps, total return swaps, and credit default swaps), and hybrid instruments. An Underlying Fund may typically use these derivatives for hedging purposes, as a substitute for direct investments, to earn additional income, to gain exposure to securities or markets in which it might not be able to invest directly, or to adjust various portfolio characteristics, including the duration (interest rate volatility) of the Fund’s portfolio of debt securities. Use of derivatives by an Underlying Fund may create investment leverage.
An Underlying Fund may enter into repurchase agreement transactions. An Underlying Fund may invest in mortgage-backed or other asset-backed securities. An Underlying Fund may enter into dollar roll or reverse repurchase agreement transactions. Some investments by an Underlying Fund may be restricted as to resale or otherwise considered to be illiquid. An Underlying Fund may engage in active and frequent trading and so could have a relatively high portfolio turnover rate. The Fund will bear a pro rata share of the Underlying Funds’ expenses. The Fund also bears all of the risks associated with the investment strategies used by the Underlying Funds.
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Principal Risks
The following are the Principal Risks of the Fund. An investment in this Fund is not guaranteed. The value of your investment in the Fund could go down as well as up. You can lose money by investing in the Fund, including losses near, at, or after the target date. There is no guarantee that the Fund will provide adequate income at and through your retirement. Although the descriptions below refer to the risks relating to investment activities of the Fund, many of the risks arise due to the investment activities of the Underlying Funds. Certain risks relating to instruments and strategies used in the management of the Fund are placed first. The significance of any specific risk to an investment in the Fund will vary over time, depending on the composition of the Fund’s portfolio, market conditions, and other factors. You should read all of the risk information presented below carefully, because any one or more of these risks may result in losses to the Fund.
Allocation Risk There is no assurance that allocation decisions will result in the desired performance effects. The limited universe of Underlying Funds and the requirement that a significant percentage of Fund assets be invested in mutual funds advised by MML Advisers, T. Rowe Price, or their affiliates as noted in “Principal Investment Strategies” may adversely affect Fund performance.
Risk of Investment in Other Funds or Pools The Fund is indirectly exposed to all of the risks of the underlying funds, including ETFs, in which it invests, including the risk that the underlying funds will not perform as expected. ETFs are subject to additional risks, including secondary market trading risks and the risk that an ETF’s shares may trade above or below net asset value. The Fund indirectly pays a portion of the expenses incurred by the underlying funds.
Bank Loans Risk Many of the risks associated with bank loans are similar to the risks of investing in below investment grade debt securities. Changes in the financial condition of the borrower or economic conditions or other circumstances may reduce the capacity of the borrower to make principal and interest payments on such instruments and may lead to defaults. Senior secured bank loans are typically supported by collateral; however the value of the collateral may be insufficient to cover the amount owed to the Fund, or the Fund may be prevented or delayed from realizing on the collateral. Some loans may be
unsecured; unsecured loans generally present a greater risk of loss to the Fund if the issuer defaults. If the Fund relies on a third party to administer a loan, the Fund is subject to the risk that the third party will fail to perform its obligations. In addition, if the Fund holds only a participation interest in a loan made by a third party, the Fund’s receipt of payments on the loan will depend on the third party’s willingness and ability to make those payments to the Fund. The settlement time for certain loans is longer than the settlement time for many other types of investments, and the Fund may not receive the payment for a loan sold by it until well after the sale; that cash would be unavailable for payment of redemption proceeds or for reinvestment. Interests in some bank loans may not be readily marketable and may be subject to restrictions on resale. In some cases, negotiations involved in disposing of indebtedness may require weeks to complete. Consequently, some indebtedness may be difficult or impossible to dispose of readily at what the Fund believes to be a fair price. Some loans may not be considered “securities” for certain purposes under the federal securities laws, and purchasers, such as the Fund, therefore may not be entitled to rely on the anti-fraud protections of the federal securities laws.
Below Investment Grade Debt Securities Risk Below investment grade debt securities, commonly known as “junk” or “high yield” bonds, have speculative characteristics and involve greater volatility of price and yield, greater risk of loss of principal and interest, and generally reflect a greater possibility of an adverse change in financial condition that could affect an issuer’s ability to honor its obligations.
Cash Position Risk If the Fund holds a significant portion of its assets in cash or cash equivalents, its investment returns may be adversely affected and the Fund may not achieve its investment objective.
Commodities-Related Investments Risk Commodity prices (including precious metals) can be extremely volatile and exposure to commodities can cause the net asset value of the Fund’s shares to decline or fluctuate in a rapid and unpredictable manner. The values of physical commodities or commodity-linked derivative instruments may be affected by changes in overall market movements, real or perceived inflationary trends, commodity index volatility, changes in interest rates or currency exchange rates, population growth and changing
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demographics, international economic, political, and regulatory developments, or factors affecting a particular region, industry, or commodity. A liquid secondary market may not exist for certain commodity investments, which may make it difficult for the Fund to sell them at a desirable price or at the price at which it is carrying them.
Convertible Securities Risk Convertible securities are subject to the risks of both debt instruments and equity securities. The price of a convertible security may change in response to changes in price of the underlying equity security, the credit quality of the issuer, and interest rates. In general, the values of convertible securities tend to decline as interest rates rise and to rise when interest rates fall. A convertible security generally has less potential for gain or loss than the underlying equity security.
Credit Risk Credit risk is the risk that an issuer, guarantor, or liquidity provider of a fixed income security held by the Fund may be unable or unwilling, or may be perceived (whether by market participants, ratings agencies, pricing services or otherwise) as unable or unwilling, to make timely principal and/or interest payments, or to otherwise honor its obligations. The Fund may also be exposed to the credit risk of its counterparty to repurchase agreements, reverse repurchase agreements, swap transactions, and other derivatives transactions, and to the counterparty’s ability or willingness to perform in accordance with the terms of the transaction. The value of such transactions to the Fund will depend on the willingness and ability of the counterparty to perform its obligations, including among other things the obligation to return collateral or margin to the Fund. If a counterparty becomes bankrupt or otherwise fails to perform its obligations under a derivative contract due to financial difficulties, the Fund may experience significant delays in obtaining any recovery under the derivative contract in a bankruptcy or other reorganization proceeding. The Fund may obtain only a limited recovery or may obtain no recovery in such circumstances.
Derivatives Risk Derivatives can be highly volatile and involve risks different from, and potentially greater than, direct investments, including risks of imperfect correlation between the value of derivatives and underlying assets, counterparty default, potential losses that partially or completely offset gains, and illiquidity. Derivatives can create investment leverage. Losses from derivatives can be substantially greater than the derivatives’
original cost and can sometimes be unlimited. If the value of a derivative does not correlate well with the particular market or asset class the derivative is designed to provide exposure to, the derivative may not have the effect or benefit anticipated. Derivatives can also reduce the opportunity for gains or result in losses by offsetting positive returns in other investments. Many derivatives are traded in the over-the-counter market and not on exchanges.
Equity Securities Risk Although stocks may have the potential to outperform other asset classes over the long term, their prices tend to fluctuate more dramatically over the shorter term. These movements may result from factors affecting individual companies, or from broader influences like changes in interest rates, market conditions, or investor confidence, or announcements of economic, political, or financial information.
Fixed Income Securities Risk The values of fixed income securities typically will decline during periods of rising interest rates, and can also decline in response to changes in the financial condition of the issuer, borrower, counterparty, or underlying collateral assets, or changes in market, economic, industry, political, regulatory, public health, and other conditions affecting a particular type of security or issuer or fixed income securities generally. Certain events, such as market or economic developments, regulatory or government actions, natural disasters, pandemics, terrorist attacks, war, and other geopolitical events can have a dramatic adverse effect on the debt market and the overall liquidity of the market for fixed income securities. During those periods, the Fund may experience high levels of shareholder redemptions, and may have to sell securities at times when the Fund would otherwise not do so, and potentially at unfavorable prices. Certain securities may be difficult to value during such periods. Fixed income securities are subject to interest rate risk (the risk that the value of a fixed income security will fall when interest rates rise), extension risk (the risk that the average life of a security will be extended through a slowing of principal payments), prepayment risk (the risk that a security will be prepaid and the Fund will be required to reinvest at a less favorable rate), duration risk (the risk that longer-term securities may be more sensitive to interest rate changes), inflation risk (the risk that as inflation increases, the present value of the Fund’s fixed income investment typically will decline), and credit risk.
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Foreign Investment Risk; Emerging Markets Risk; Currency Risk Investments in securities of foreign issuers, securities of companies with significant foreign exposure, and foreign currencies can involve additional risks relating to market, industry, political, regulatory, public health, and other conditions. Political, social, diplomatic, and economic developments, U.S. and foreign government action, or threat thereof, such as the imposition of currency or capital blockages, controls, or tariffs, economic and trade sanctions or embargoes, security trading suspensions, entering or exiting trade or other intergovernmental agreements, or the expropriation or nationalization of assets in a particular country, can cause dramatic declines in certain or all securities with exposure to that country and other countries. In the event of nationalization, expropriation, confiscation, or other government action, intervention, or restriction, the Fund could lose its entire investment in a particular foreign issuer or country. There may be quotas or other limits on the ability of the Fund (or clients of the Fund’s investment adviser or subadviser) to invest or maintain investments in securities of issuers in certain countries. Enforcing legal rights can be more difficult, costly, and limited in certain foreign countries and with respect to certain types of investments, and can be particularly difficult against foreign governments. Because non-U.S. securities are normally denominated and traded in currencies other than the U.S. dollar, the value of the Fund’s assets may be affected favorably or unfavorably by changes in currency exchange rates, exchange control regulations, and restrictions or prohibitions on the repatriation of non-U.S. currencies. Income and gains with respect to investments in certain countries may be subject to withholding and other taxes. There may be less information publicly available about a non-U.S. company than about a U.S. company, and many non-U.S. companies are not subject to accounting, auditing, and financial reporting standards, regulatory framework and practices comparable to those in the U.S. The securities of some non-U.S. companies, especially those in emerging markets, are less liquid and at times more volatile than securities of comparable U.S. companies. Emerging markets securities are subject to greater risks than securities issued in developed foreign markets, including less liquidity, less stringent investor protection and disclosure standards, less reliable settlement practices, greater price volatility, higher relative rates of inflation, greater political, economic, and social instability, greater custody
and operational risks, greater risk of new or inconsistent government treatment of or restrictions on issuers and instruments, and greater volatility in currency exchange rates, and are more susceptible to environmental problems. Many emerging market countries are highly reliant on international trade and exports, including the export of commodities. Their economies may be significantly impacted by fluctuations in commodity prices and the global demand for certain commodities. In addition, pandemics and outbreaks of contagious diseases may exacerbate pre-existing problems in emerging market countries with less established health care systems. Frontier markets, a subset of emerging markets, generally have smaller economies and less mature capital markets than emerging markets. As a result, the risks of investing in emerging market countries are magnified in frontier market countries. Frontier markets are more susceptible to having abrupt changes in currency values, less mature markets and settlement practices, and lower trading volumes that could lead to greater price volatility and illiquidity. Non-U.S. transaction costs, such as brokerage commissions and custody costs, may be higher than in the United States. In addition, foreign markets can react differently to market, economic, industry, political, regulatory, geopolitical, public health, and other conditions than the U.S. market.
Frequent Trading/Portfolio Turnover Risk Portfolio turnover generally involves some expense to the Fund and may result in the realization of taxable capital gains (including short-term gains). The trading costs and tax effects associated with portfolio turnover may adversely affect the Fund’s performance.
Geographic Focus Risk When the Fund focuses investments on a particular country, group of countries, or geographic region, its performance will be closely tied to the market, currency, economic, political, or regulatory conditions and developments in those countries or that region, and could be more volatile than the performance of more geographically diversified funds.
Growth Company Risk The prices of growth securities are often highly sensitive to market fluctuations because of their heavy dependence on future earnings or cash flow expectations, and can be more volatile than the market in general.
Hedging Risk The Fund’s attempts at hedging and taking long and short positions in currencies may not be successful and could cause the Fund to lose
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money or fail to get the benefit of a gain on a hedged position. If expected changes to securities prices, interest rates, currency values, and exchange rates, or the creditworthiness of an issuer are not accurately predicted, the Fund could be in a worse position than if it had not entered into such transactions.
Inflation Risk The value of assets or income from the Fund’s investments will be less in the future as inflation decreases the value of money. As inflation increases, the value of the Fund’s assets can decline as can the value of the Fund’s distributions. Inflation rates may change frequently and drastically as a result of various factors, including unexpected shifts in the domestic or global economy (or expectations that such policies will change), and the Fund’s investments may not keep pace with inflation, which may result in losses to the Fund’s investors.
Large Company Risk Large-capitalization stocks as a group could fall out of favor with the market, causing the Fund’s investments in large-capitalization stocks to underperform investments that focus on small- or medium-capitalization stocks. Larger, more established companies may be slow to respond to challenges and may grow more slowly than smaller companies.
Leveraging Risk Instruments and transactions, including derivatives, dollar roll, and reverse repurchase agreement transactions, that create leverage may cause the value of an investment in the Fund to be more volatile, could result in larger losses than if they were not used, and tend to compound the effects of other risks.
Liquidity Risk Certain securities may be difficult (or impossible) to sell or certain positions may be difficult to close out at a desirable time and price, and the Fund may be required to hold an illiquid investment that is declining in value, or it may be required to sell certain illiquid investments at a price or time that is not advantageous in order to meet redemptions or other cash needs. Some securities may be subject to restrictions on resale. There can be no assurance that there will be a liquid market for instruments held by the Fund at any time. The Fund may not receive the proceeds from the sale of certain investments for an extended period.
Management Risk The Fund relies on the manager’s investment analysis and its selection of investments to achieve its investment objective. There can be no assurance that the Fund will
achieve the intended results and the Fund may incur significant losses.
Market Risk The value of the Fund’s portfolio securities may decline, at times sharply and unpredictably, as a result of unfavorable market-induced changes affecting particular industries, sectors, or issuers. Stock and bond markets can decline significantly in response to issuer, market, economic, industry, political, regulatory, geopolitical, public health, and other conditions, as well as investor perceptions of these conditions. The Fund is subject to risks affecting issuers, such as management performance, financial leverage, industry problems, and reduced demand for goods or services.
Mortgage- and Asset-Backed Securities Risk Investments in mortgage- and asset-backed securities subject the Fund to credit risk, interest rate risk, extension risk, and prepayment risk, among other risks. Mortgage-backed and asset-backed securities not issued by a government agency generally involve greater credit risk than securities issued by government agencies. Payment of principal and interest generally depends on the cash flows generated by the underlying assets and the terms of the security. The types of mortgages (for example, residential or commercial mortgages) underlying securities held by the Fund may differ and be affected differently by market factors. Investments that receive only the interest portion or the principal portion of payments on the underlying assets may be highly volatile. Litigation with respect to the representations and warranties given in connection with the issuance of mortgage-backed securities can be an important consideration in investing in such securities, and the outcome of any such litigation could significantly impact the value of the Fund’s mortgage-backed investments.
Preferred Stock Risk Like other equity securities, preferred stock is subject to the risk that its value may decrease based on actual or perceived changes in the business or financial condition of the issuer. In addition, changes in interest rates may adversely affect the value of a preferred stock that pays a fixed dividend. Preferred stocks are also subject to additional risks, such as potentially greater volatility and risks related to deferral, non-cumulative dividends, subordination, liquidity, limited voting rights, and special redemption rights.
Real Estate Risk; REIT Risk Real estate-related investments may decline in value as a result of
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factors affecting the real estate industry, such as the supply of real property in certain markets, changes in zoning laws, environmental regulations and other governmental action, delays in completion of construction, changes in real estate values, changes in property taxes, levels of occupancy, losses due to natural disasters, and local and regional market conditions. Investments in REITs may be subject to risks similar to those associated with direct investment in real estate, as well as additional risks associated with equity investments. As a shareholder in a REIT, the Fund, and indirectly the Fund’s shareholders, would bear its ratable share of the REIT’s expenses and would at the same time continue to pay its own fees and expenses.
Repurchase Agreement Risk  These transactions must be fully collateralized, but involve credit risk to a Fund if the other party should default on its obligation and the Fund is delayed or prevented from recovering the collateral.
Sector Risk The Fund may allocate more of its assets to particular industries or to particular economic, market, or industry sectors than to others. This could increase the volatility of the Fund’s portfolio, and the Fund’s performance may be more susceptible to developments affecting issuers in those industries or sectors than if the Fund invested more broadly.
Small and Mid-Cap Company Risk Market risk and liquidity risk are particularly pronounced for securities of small and medium-sized companies, which may trade less frequently and in smaller volumes than more widely-held securities, and may fluctuate in price more than other securities. Their shares can be less liquid than those of larger companies, especially during market declines. Small and medium-sized companies may have limited product lines, markets, or financial resources and may be dependent on a limited management group; they may have been recently organized and have little or no track record of success.
Sovereign Debt Obligations Risk Investments in debt securities issued by governments or by government agencies and instrumentalities involve the risk that the governmental entities responsible for repayment may be unable or unwilling to pay interest and repay principal when due. Many sovereign debt obligations may be rated below investment grade (“junk” or “high yield” bonds). Any restructuring of a sovereign debt obligation held by the Fund will likely have a significant adverse effect on the value of the obligation. In the
event of default of sovereign debt, the Fund may be unable to pursue legal action against the sovereign issuer or to realize on collateral securing the debt.
U.S. Government Securities Risk Obligations of certain U.S. Government agencies and instrumentalities are not backed by the full faith and credit of the U.S. Government, and there can be no assurance that the U.S. Government would provide financial support to such agencies and instrumentalities.
Valuation Risk The Fund is subject to the risk of mispricing or improper valuation of its investments, in particular to the extent that its securities are fair valued.
Value Company Risk The value investment approach entails the risk that the market will not recognize a security’s intrinsic value for a long time, or that a stock the investment adviser or subadviser judges to be undervalued may actually be appropriately priced.
Performance Information
The following bar chart and table provide some indication of the risks of investing in the Fund. The bar chart shows changes in the Fund’s performance from year to year for Class I shares. The table shows how the Fund’s average annual returns for 1 year, and since inception, compare with those of a broad measure of market performance. Past performance (before and after taxes) is not necessarily an indication of how the Fund will perform in the future. More up-to-date performance information is available at https://​www.massmutual.com/funds or by calling 1-888-309-3539.
Annual Performance
Class I Shares
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Highest
Quarter:
2Q ’20,
11.41% Lowest
Quarter:
1Q ’20,
10.42%
After-tax returns are calculated using the historical highest individual U.S. federal marginal income tax rates and do not reflect the impact of state and local taxes. Actual after-tax returns depend on
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an investor’s tax situation and may differ from those shown. After-tax returns are not relevant to investors who hold Fund shares through tax-advantaged arrangements, such as 401(k) plans or individual retirement accounts. After-tax returns are shown for Class I only. After-tax returns for other classes will vary.
Average Annual Total Returns
(for the periods ended December 31, 2022)
One
Year
Since
Inception
(02/16/18)
Class I
Return Before
Taxes
-13.51 % 3.11 %
Return After Taxes on Distributions -15.90 % 0.81 %
Return After Taxes on Distributions and Sales of Fund Shares -7.25 % 2.00 %
Class M5 Return Before
Taxes
-13.61 % 2.96 %
Class M4 Return Before
Taxes
-13.83 % 2.70 %
Class M3 Return Before
Taxes
-14.10 % 2.43 %
S&P Target Date Retirement Income
Index (reflects no deduction for fees,
expenses, or taxes)
-11.17 % 2.49 %
MANAGEMENT
Investment Adviser: MML Investment Advisers, LLC (“MML Advisers”)
Subadviser(s): T. Rowe Price Associates, Inc. (“T. Rowe Price”)
Portfolio Manager(s):
Kimberly E. DeDominicis is a Vice President and Portfolio Manager at T. Rowe Price. She has managed the Fund since October 2019.
Andrew Jacobs van Merlen, CFA is a Vice President and Portfolio Manager at T. Rowe Price. He has managed the Fund since January 2020.
Wyatt A. Lee, CFA is a Vice President and Portfolio Manager at T. Rowe Price. He has managed the Fund since its inception (February 2018).
PURCHASE AND SALE OF FUND SHARES
Shares of the Fund are generally available to retirement plans, other institutional investors, and individual retirement accounts. Fund shares are redeemable on any business day by written request, telephone, or internet (available to certain customers).
TAX INFORMATION
The Fund intends to make distributions that may be taxed as ordinary income, qualified dividend income, or capital gains, unless you are an investor eligible for preferential tax treatment.
PAYMENTS TO BROKER-DEALERS AND OTHER FINANCIAL INTERMEDIARIES
If you purchase the Fund through a broker-dealer or other financial intermediary, the intermediary may receive a one-time or continuing payments from the Fund, MML Advisers or its affiliates, or others for the sale of Fund shares or continuing shareholder services provided by the intermediary. These payments may create a conflict of interest by influencing the broker-dealer or other intermediary to recommend the Fund over another investment. You should contact your intermediary to obtain more information about the compensation it may receive in connection with your investment.
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MassMutual Select T. Rowe Price Retirement 2010 Fund
INVESTMENT OBJECTIVE
The Fund seeks the highest total return over time consistent with an emphasis on both capital growth and income.
FEES AND EXPENSES OF THE FUND
This table describes the fees and expenses that you may pay if you buy, hold, and sell shares of the Fund. You may pay brokerage commissions and other fees to financial intermediaries which are not reflected in the tables and examples below.
Shareholder Fees (fees paid directly from your investment)
Class I
Class M5
Class M4
Class M3
Maximum Sales Charge (Load) Imposed on Purchases (as a % of offering price)
None
None
None
None
Maximum Deferred Sales Charge (Load) (as a % of the lower of the original offering price or redemption proceeds)
None
None
None
None
Annual Fund Operating Expenses (expenses that you pay each year as a percentage of the value of your investment)
Class I
Class M5
Class M4
Class M3
Management Fees(1)
0.42%
0.57%
0.57%
0.57%
Distribution and Service (Rule 12b-1) Fees
None
None
0.25%
0.50%
Other Expenses
0.00%
0.00%
0.00%
0.00%
Acquired Fund Fees and Expenses
0.06%
0.06%
0.06%
0.06%
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses(2)
0.48%
0.63%
0.88%
1.13%
Expense Reimbursement
(0.14%)
(0.14%)
(0.14%)
(0.14%)
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses after Expense Reimbursement(3)
0.34%
0.49%
0.74%
0.99%
(1)
The Management Fees will decline over time in accordance with a predetermined contractual fee schedule, with any annual decrease occurring on June 1st of each year. The fee schedule can only be changed with approval by the Fund’s Board of Trustees, and, if required by SEC rules, the Fund’s shareholders.
(2)
Because Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses include Acquired Fund Fees and Expenses, they may not correspond to the ratios of expenses to average daily net assets shown in the “Financial Highlights” tables in the Prospectus, which reflect the operating expenses of the Fund and do not include Acquired Fund Fees and Expenses.
(3)
The expenses in the above table reflect a written agreement by MML Advisers to cap the fees and expenses of the Fund (other than extraordinary legal and other expenses, interest expense, expenses related to borrowings, securities lending, leverage, taxes, and brokerage, short sale dividend and loan
expense, or other non-recurring or unusual expenses such as organizational expenses and shareholder meeting expenses, as applicable) through January 31, 2024, to the extent that Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses after Expense Reimbursement would otherwise exceed 0.34%, 0.49%, 0.74%, and 0.99% for Classes I, M5, M4, and M3, respectively. The Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses after Expense Reimbursement shown in the above table may exceed these amounts, because, as noted in the previous sentence, certain fees and expenses are excluded from the cap. The agreement can only be terminated by mutual consent of the Board of Trustees on behalf of the Fund and MML Advisers.
Example
This example is intended to help you compare the cost of investing in the Fund with the cost of investing in other mutual funds. It assumes that you invest $10,000 in each share class of the Fund for the time periods indicated and then redeem all of your shares at the end of those periods. The example also assumes that your investment earns a 5% return each year and that the Fund’s operating expenses are exactly as described in the preceding table. Although your actual costs may be higher or lower, based on these assumptions your costs would be:
1 Year
3 Years
5 Years
10 Years
Class I $ 35 $ 140 $ 255 $ 590
Class M5 $ 50 $ 188 $ 337 $ 773
Class M4 $ 76 $ 267 $ 474 $ 1,071
Class M3 $ 101 $ 345 $ 609 $ 1,362
Portfolio Turnover
The Fund pays transaction costs, such as commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or “turns over” its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover rate may indicate higher transaction costs and may result in higher taxes when Fund shares are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are not reflected in annual fund operating expenses or in the example, affect the Fund’s performance. During the most recent fiscal year, the Fund’s portfolio turnover rate was 34% of the average value of its portfolio.
INVESTMENTS, RISKS, AND PERFORMANCE
Principal Investment Strategies
The Fund is a “fund of funds” that pursues its objective by investing in a diversified portfolio of other stock and bond series of both the MassMutual Funds and T. Rowe Price Funds that represent various asset classes and sectors (“Underlying Funds”). The Fund’s allocation among Underlying Funds will change over time in
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relation to its target retirement date. The Fund is subadvised by T. Rowe Price Associates, Inc. (“T. Rowe Price”). Underlying Funds in which the Fund invests are predominantly either advised or subadvised by T. Rowe Price.
The Fund is managed based on the specific retirement year (target date 2010) included in its name and assumes a retirement age of 65. The target date refers to the approximate year an investor in the Fund would have retired and likely stopped making new investments in the Fund. The Fund is primarily designed for an investor who retired at or about the target date and who plans to withdraw the value of the account in the Fund gradually after retirement. However, if an investor retired earlier or later than age 65, the Fund may not be an appropriate investment even if the investor retired on or near the Fund’s target date.
Over time, the allocation to asset classes and funds will change according to a predetermined “glide path” shown in the following chart (the left axis indicates the overall neutral allocation to stocks with the remainder of the allocation to bonds). The glide path represents the shifting of asset classes over time and shows how the Fund’s asset mix becomes more conservative–both prior to and after retirement–as time elapses. This reflects the need for reduced market risks as retirement approaches and the need for lower portfolio volatility after retiring. Although the glide path is meant to dampen the Fund’s potential volatility as retirement approaches, the Fund is not designed for a lump sum redemption at the retirement date. The Fund pursues an asset allocation strategy that promotes asset accumulation prior to retirement, but it is intended to also serve as a post-retirement investment vehicle with allocations designed to support an income stream made up of regular withdrawals throughout retirement along with some portfolio growth that exceeds inflation. After the target date, the Fund is designed to balance longevity and inflation risks along with the need for some income, although it does not guarantee a particular level of income.
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The glide path provides for a neutral allocation to
stocks at the target date of 55%. The Fund’s overall exposure to stocks will continue to decline until approximately 30 years after its target date, when its neutral allocations to stocks and bonds will remain unchanged. There are no maturity restrictions within the Fund’s overall allocation to bonds, although the bond funds in which the Fund invests may impose specific limits on maturity or credit quality. The allocations are referred to as “neutral” allocations because they are strategic and do not reflect any tactical decisions made by T. Rowe Price to overweight or underweight a particular asset class or sector based on its market outlook. The target allocations assigned to the broad asset classes (Stocks and Bonds), which reflect these tactical decisions resulting from market outlook, are not expected to vary from the neutral allocations set forth in the glide path by more than plus (+) or minus (-) five percent (5%). The target allocations and actual allocations may differ due to significant market movements or cash flows.
The following table details the way the portfolio is generally expected to be allocated between the asset classes. The table also shows the expected allocations to the Underlying Funds that will be used within those asset classes. The information in the table represents the neutral allocations for the Fund as of February 1, 2023. The Fund’s shareholder reports set forth its actual allocations between stock funds and bond funds and to the individual Underlying Funds. T. Rowe Price may modify the target asset allocation strategy or the selection of Underlying Funds from time to time, and may invest in other Underlying Funds,
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including any Underlying Funds that may be created in the future. At any given time, the Fund’s asset allocation may be affected by a variety of factors (such as, for example, whether an Underlying Fund is accepting additional investments). A description of the Underlying Funds is included in Appendix D of the Statement of Additional Information (“SAI”).
Stock Funds
46.50%
MM S&P 500 Index Fund 4.95%
MassMutual Select T. Rowe Price Large Cap Blend Fund
19.79%
MassMutual Select T. Rowe Price Small and Mid Cap Blend Fund
6.19%
MassMutual Select T. Rowe Price International
Equity Fund
13.25%
MassMutual Select T. Rowe Price Real Assets Fund
2.33%
Bond Funds
53.50%
MassMutual Select T. Rowe Price Bond Asset Fund
23.10%
T. Rowe Price Dynamic Global Bond Fund 3.85%
MassMutual Select T. Rowe Price U.S. Treasury
Long-Term Index Fund
3.50%
T. Rowe Price Institutional High Yield Fund 2.82%
T. Rowe Price Institutional Floating Rate Fund
1.21%
MassMutual Select T. Rowe Price Emerging Markets Bond Fund
4.03%
MassMutual Select T. Rowe Price Limited Duration Inflation Focused Bond Fund
15.00%
Note: The Underlying Fund allocations above may not sum up to 100% due to rounding.
Because the Fund will invest in Underlying Funds advised by MML Advisers, T. Rowe Price, or their affiliates, the Fund will not invest in funds advised or sponsored by others, even if they are less expensive or have better historical performance records. T. Rowe Price will be subject to a conflict of interest in selecting Underlying Funds, because its selection of Underlying Funds might appear to be influenced by the expected effect of the selection on its revenues or other benefits of the selection to it. T. Rowe Price has advised the Fund that, as a fiduciary to the Fund, T. Rowe Price has a duty to put the best interests of the Fund ahead of its own interest and that, consequently, it will make investment decisions for the Fund in the best interest of the Fund to achieve the Fund’s investment objectives and not for the benefit of T. Rowe Price.
Through its investments in Underlying Funds, the Fund will be exposed to a wide range of securities and other instruments with differing characteristics (such as credit quality, duration, geography,
industry, and market capitalization), which may include without limitation equity securities of small-, mid-, or large-capitalization U.S. or non-U.S. issuers (including issuers that may only recently have become public companies), fixed income securities of U.S. or non-U.S. private or governmental issuers (including “junk” or “high yield” bonds, including securities in default), inflation-protected securities, bank loans, and short-term investments of any kind. Equity securities may include common stocks, preferred stocks, securities convertible into common or preferred stock, real estate investment trusts (“REITs”), rights, and warrants.
An Underlying Fund may engage in foreign currency exchange transactions, including forward contracts, options on currency, futures contracts, and swap contracts, to take long or short positions in foreign currencies in order to enhance its investment return or to attempt to protect against adverse changes in currency exchange rates. An Underlying Fund may be permitted to use a wide variety of additional exchange-traded and over-the-counter derivatives, including options, futures contracts, swap contracts (including interest rate swaps, total return swaps, and credit default swaps), and hybrid instruments. An Underlying Fund may typically use these derivatives for hedging purposes, as a substitute for direct investments, to earn additional income, to gain exposure to securities or markets in which it might not be able to invest directly, or to adjust various portfolio characteristics, including the duration (interest rate volatility) of the Fund’s portfolio of debt securities. Use of derivatives by an Underlying Fund may create investment leverage.
An Underlying Fund may enter into repurchase agreement transactions. An Underlying Fund may invest in mortgage-backed or other asset-backed securities. An Underlying Fund may enter into dollar roll or reverse repurchase agreement transactions. Some investments by an Underlying Fund may be restricted as to resale or otherwise considered to be illiquid. An Underlying Fund may engage in active and frequent trading and so could have a relatively high portfolio turnover rate. The Fund will bear a pro rata share of the Underlying Funds’ expenses. The Fund also bears all of the risks associated with the investment strategies used by the Underlying Funds.
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Principal Risks
The following are the Principal Risks of the Fund. An investment in this Fund is not guaranteed. The value of your investment in the Fund could go down as well as up. You can lose money by investing in the Fund, including losses near, at, or after the target date. There is no guarantee that the Fund will provide adequate income at and through your retirement. Although the descriptions below refer to the risks relating to investment activities of the Fund, many of the risks arise due to the investment activities of the Underlying Funds. Certain risks relating to instruments and strategies used in the management of the Fund are placed first. The significance of any specific risk to an investment in the Fund will vary over time, depending on the composition of the Fund’s portfolio, market conditions, and other factors. You should read all of the risk information presented below carefully, because any one or more of these risks may result in losses to the Fund.
Allocation Risk There is no assurance that allocation decisions will result in the desired performance effects. The limited universe of Underlying Funds and the requirement that a significant percentage of Fund assets be invested in mutual funds advised by MML Advisers, T. Rowe Price, or their affiliates as noted in “Principal Investment Strategies” may adversely affect Fund performance.
Risk of Investment in Other Funds or Pools The Fund is indirectly exposed to all of the risks of the underlying funds, including ETFs, in which it invests, including the risk that the underlying funds will not perform as expected. ETFs are subject to additional risks, including secondary market trading risks and the risk that an ETF’s shares may trade above or below net asset value. The Fund indirectly pays a portion of the expenses incurred by the underlying funds.
Bank Loans Risk Many of the risks associated with bank loans are similar to the risks of investing in below investment grade debt securities. Changes in the financial condition of the borrower or economic conditions or other circumstances may reduce the capacity of the borrower to make principal and interest payments on such instruments and may lead to defaults. Senior secured bank loans are typically supported by collateral; however the value of the collateral may be insufficient to cover the amount owed to the Fund, or the Fund may be prevented or delayed from realizing on the collateral. Some loans may be
unsecured; unsecured loans generally present a greater risk of loss to the Fund if the issuer defaults. If the Fund relies on a third party to administer a loan, the Fund is subject to the risk that the third party will fail to perform its obligations. In addition, if the Fund holds only a participation interest in a loan made by a third party, the Fund’s receipt of payments on the loan will depend on the third party’s willingness and ability to make those payments to the Fund. The settlement time for certain loans is longer than the settlement time for many other types of investments, and the Fund may not receive the payment for a loan sold by it until well after the sale; that cash would be unavailable for payment of redemption proceeds or for reinvestment. Interests in some bank loans may not be readily marketable and may be subject to restrictions on resale. In some cases, negotiations involved in disposing of indebtedness may require weeks to complete. Consequently, some indebtedness may be difficult or impossible to dispose of readily at what the Fund believes to be a fair price. Some loans may not be considered “securities” for certain purposes under the federal securities laws, and purchasers, such as the Fund, therefore may not be entitled to rely on the anti-fraud protections of the federal securities laws.
Below Investment Grade Debt Securities Risk Below investment grade debt securities, commonly known as “junk” or “high yield” bonds, have speculative characteristics and involve greater volatility of price and yield, greater risk of loss of principal and interest, and generally reflect a greater possibility of an adverse change in financial condition that could affect an issuer’s ability to honor its obligations.
Cash Position Risk If the Fund holds a significant portion of its assets in cash or cash equivalents, its investment returns may be adversely affected and the Fund may not achieve its investment objective.
Commodities-Related Investments Risk Commodity prices (including precious metals) can be extremely volatile and exposure to commodities can cause the net asset value of the Fund’s shares to decline or fluctuate in a rapid and unpredictable manner. The values of physical commodities or commodity-linked derivative instruments may be affected by changes in overall market movements, real or perceived inflationary trends, commodity index volatility, changes in interest rates or currency exchange rates, population growth and changing
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demographics, international economic, political, and regulatory developments, or factors affecting a particular region, industry, or commodity. A liquid secondary market may not exist for certain commodity investments, which may make it difficult for the Fund to sell them at a desirable price or at the price at which it is carrying them.
Convertible Securities Risk Convertible securities are subject to the risks of both debt instruments and equity securities. The price of a convertible security may change in response to changes in price of the underlying equity security, the credit quality of the issuer, and interest rates. In general, the values of convertible securities tend to decline as interest rates rise and to rise when interest rates fall. A convertible security generally has less potential for gain or loss than the underlying equity security.
Credit Risk Credit risk is the risk that an issuer, guarantor, or liquidity provider of a fixed income security held by the Fund may be unable or unwilling, or may be perceived (whether by market participants, ratings agencies, pricing services or otherwise) as unable or unwilling, to make timely principal and/or interest payments, or to otherwise honor its obligations. The Fund may also be exposed to the credit risk of its counterparty to repurchase agreements, reverse repurchase agreements, swap transactions, and other derivatives transactions, and to the counterparty’s ability or willingness to perform in accordance with the terms of the transaction. The value of such transactions to the Fund will depend on the willingness and ability of the counterparty to perform its obligations, including among other things the obligation to return collateral or margin to the Fund. If a counterparty becomes bankrupt or otherwise fails to perform its obligations under a derivative contract due to financial difficulties, the Fund may experience significant delays in obtaining any recovery under the derivative contract in a bankruptcy or other reorganization proceeding. The Fund may obtain only a limited recovery or may obtain no recovery in such circumstances.
Derivatives Risk Derivatives can be highly volatile and involve risks different from, and potentially greater than, direct investments, including risks of imperfect correlation between the value of derivatives and underlying assets, counterparty default, potential losses that partially or completely offset gains, and illiquidity. Derivatives can create investment leverage. Losses from derivatives can be substantially greater than the derivatives’
original cost and can sometimes be unlimited. If the value of a derivative does not correlate well with the particular market or asset class the derivative is designed to provide exposure to, the derivative may not have the effect or benefit anticipated. Derivatives can also reduce the opportunity for gains or result in losses by offsetting positive returns in other investments. Many derivatives are traded in the over-the-counter market and not on exchanges.
Equity Securities Risk Although stocks may have the potential to outperform other asset classes over the long term, their prices tend to fluctuate more dramatically over the shorter term. These movements may result from factors affecting individual companies, or from broader influences like changes in interest rates, market conditions, or investor confidence, or announcements of economic, political, or financial information.
Fixed Income Securities Risk The values of fixed income securities typically will decline during periods of rising interest rates, and can also decline in response to changes in the financial condition of the issuer, borrower, counterparty, or underlying collateral assets, or changes in market, economic, industry, political, regulatory, public health, and other conditions affecting a particular type of security or issuer or fixed income securities generally. Certain events, such as market or economic developments, regulatory or government actions, natural disasters, pandemics, terrorist attacks, war, and other geopolitical events can have a dramatic adverse effect on the debt market and the overall liquidity of the market for fixed income securities. During those periods, the Fund may experience high levels of shareholder redemptions, and may have to sell securities at times when the Fund would otherwise not do so, and potentially at unfavorable prices. Certain securities may be difficult to value during such periods. Fixed income securities are subject to interest rate risk (the risk that the value of a fixed income security will fall when interest rates rise), extension risk (the risk that the average life of a security will be extended through a slowing of principal payments), prepayment risk (the risk that a security will be prepaid and the Fund will be required to reinvest at a less favorable rate), duration risk (the risk that longer-term securities may be more sensitive to interest rate changes), inflation risk (the risk that as inflation increases, the present value of the Fund’s fixed income investment typically will decline), and credit risk.
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Foreign Investment Risk; Emerging Markets Risk; Currency Risk Investments in securities of foreign issuers, securities of companies with significant foreign exposure, and foreign currencies can involve additional risks relating to market, industry, political, regulatory, public health, and other conditions. Political, social, diplomatic, and economic developments, U.S. and foreign government action, or threat thereof, such as the imposition of currency or capital blockages, controls, or tariffs, economic and trade sanctions or embargoes, security trading suspensions, entering or exiting trade or other intergovernmental agreements, or the expropriation or nationalization of assets in a particular country, can cause dramatic declines in certain or all securities with exposure to that country and other countries. In the event of nationalization, expropriation, confiscation, or other government action, intervention, or restriction, the Fund could lose its entire investment in a particular foreign issuer or country. There may be quotas or other limits on the ability of the Fund (or clients of the Fund’s investment adviser or subadviser) to invest or maintain investments in securities of issuers in certain countries. Enforcing legal rights can be more difficult, costly, and limited in certain foreign countries and with respect to certain types of investments, and can be particularly difficult against foreign governments. Because non-U.S. securities are normally denominated and traded in currencies other than the U.S. dollar, the value of the Fund’s assets may be affected favorably or unfavorably by changes in currency exchange rates, exchange control regulations, and restrictions or prohibitions on the repatriation of non-U.S. currencies. Income and gains with respect to investments in certain countries may be subject to withholding and other taxes. There may be less information publicly available about a non-U.S. company than about a U.S. company, and many non-U.S. companies are not subject to accounting, auditing, and financial reporting standards, regulatory framework and practices comparable to those in the U.S. The securities of some non-U.S. companies, especially those in emerging markets, are less liquid and at times more volatile than securities of comparable U.S. companies. Emerging markets securities are subject to greater risks than securities issued in developed foreign markets, including less liquidity, less stringent investor protection and disclosure standards, less reliable settlement practices, greater price volatility, higher relative rates of inflation, greater political, economic, and social instability, greater custody
and operational risks, greater risk of new or inconsistent government treatment of or restrictions on issuers and instruments, and greater volatility in currency exchange rates, and are more susceptible to environmental problems. Many emerging market countries are highly reliant on international trade and exports, including the export of commodities. Their economies may be significantly impacted by fluctuations in commodity prices and the global demand for certain commodities. In addition, pandemics and outbreaks of contagious diseases may exacerbate pre-existing problems in emerging market countries with less established health care systems. Frontier markets, a subset of emerging markets, generally have smaller economies and less mature capital markets than emerging markets. As a result, the risks of investing in emerging market countries are magnified in frontier market countries. Frontier markets are more susceptible to having abrupt changes in currency values, less mature markets and settlement practices, and lower trading volumes that could lead to greater price volatility and illiquidity. Non-U.S. transaction costs, such as brokerage commissions and custody costs, may be higher than in the United States. In addition, foreign markets can react differently to market, economic, industry, political, regulatory, geopolitical, public health, and other conditions than the U.S. market.
Frequent Trading/Portfolio Turnover Risk Portfolio turnover generally involves some expense to the Fund and may result in the realization of taxable capital gains (including short-term gains). The trading costs and tax effects associated with portfolio turnover may adversely affect the Fund’s performance.
Geographic Focus Risk When the Fund focuses investments on a particular country, group of countries, or geographic region, its performance will be closely tied to the market, currency, economic, political, or regulatory conditions and developments in those countries or that region, and could be more volatile than the performance of more geographically diversified funds.
Growth Company Risk The prices of growth securities are often highly sensitive to market fluctuations because of their heavy dependence on future earnings or cash flow expectations, and can be more volatile than the market in general.
Hedging Risk The Fund’s attempts at hedging and taking long and short positions in currencies may not be successful and could cause the Fund to lose
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money or fail to get the benefit of a gain on a hedged position. If expected changes to securities prices, interest rates, currency values, and exchange rates, or the creditworthiness of an issuer are not accurately predicted, the Fund could be in a worse position than if it had not entered into such transactions.
Inflation Risk The value of assets or income from the Fund’s investments will be less in the future as inflation decreases the value of money. As inflation increases, the value of the Fund’s assets can decline as can the value of the Fund’s distributions. Inflation rates may change frequently and drastically as a result of various factors, including unexpected shifts in the domestic or global economy (or expectations that such policies will change), and the Fund’s investments may not keep pace with inflation, which may result in losses to the Fund’s investors.
Large Company Risk Large-capitalization stocks as a group could fall out of favor with the market, causing the Fund’s investments in large-capitalization stocks to underperform investments that focus on small- or medium-capitalization stocks. Larger, more established companies may be slow to respond to challenges and may grow more slowly than smaller companies.
Leveraging Risk Instruments and transactions, including derivatives, dollar roll, and reverse repurchase agreement transactions, that create leverage may cause the value of an investment in the Fund to be more volatile, could result in larger losses than if they were not used, and tend to compound the effects of other risks.
Liquidity Risk Certain securities may be difficult (or impossible) to sell or certain positions may be difficult to close out at a desirable time and price, and the Fund may be required to hold an illiquid investment that is declining in value, or it may be required to sell certain illiquid investments at a price or time that is not advantageous in order to meet redemptions or other cash needs. Some securities may be subject to restrictions on resale. There can be no assurance that there will be a liquid market for instruments held by the Fund at any time. The Fund may not receive the proceeds from the sale of certain investments for an extended period.
Management Risk The Fund relies on the manager’s investment analysis and its selection of investments to achieve its investment objective. There can be no assurance that the Fund will
achieve the intended results and the Fund may incur significant losses.
Market Risk The value of the Fund’s portfolio securities may decline, at times sharply and unpredictably, as a result of unfavorable market-induced changes affecting particular industries, sectors, or issuers. Stock and bond markets can decline significantly in response to issuer, market, economic, industry, political, regulatory, geopolitical, public health, and other conditions, as well as investor perceptions of these conditions. The Fund is subject to risks affecting issuers, such as management performance, financial leverage, industry problems, and reduced demand for goods or services.
Mortgage- and Asset-Backed Securities Risk Investments in mortgage- and asset-backed securities subject the Fund to credit risk, interest rate risk, extension risk, and prepayment risk, among other risks. Mortgage-backed and asset-backed securities not issued by a government agency generally involve greater credit risk than securities issued by government agencies. Payment of principal and interest generally depends on the cash flows generated by the underlying assets and the terms of the security. The types of mortgages (for example, residential or commercial mortgages) underlying securities held by the Fund may differ and be affected differently by market factors. Investments that receive only the interest portion or the principal portion of payments on the underlying assets may be highly volatile. Litigation with respect to the representations and warranties given in connection with the issuance of mortgage-backed securities can be an important consideration in investing in such securities, and the outcome of any such litigation could significantly impact the value of the Fund’s mortgage-backed investments.
Preferred Stock Risk Like other equity securities, preferred stock is subject to the risk that its value may decrease based on actual or perceived changes in the business or financial condition of the issuer. In addition, changes in interest rates may adversely affect the value of a preferred stock that pays a fixed dividend. Preferred stocks are also subject to additional risks, such as potentially greater volatility and risks related to deferral, non-cumulative dividends, subordination, liquidity, limited voting rights, and special redemption rights.
Real Estate Risk; REIT Risk Real estate-related investments may decline in value as a result of
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factors affecting the real estate industry, such as the supply of real property in certain markets, changes in zoning laws, environmental regulations and other governmental action, delays in completion of construction, changes in real estate values, changes in property taxes, levels of occupancy, losses due to natural disasters, and local and regional market conditions. Investments in REITs may be subject to risks similar to those associated with direct investment in real estate, as well as additional risks associated with equity investments. As a shareholder in a REIT, the Fund, and indirectly the Fund’s shareholders, would bear its ratable share of the REIT’s expenses and would at the same time continue to pay its own fees and expenses.
Repurchase Agreement Risk  These transactions must be fully collateralized, but involve credit risk to a Fund if the other party should default on its obligation and the Fund is delayed or prevented from recovering the collateral.
Sector Risk The Fund may allocate more of its assets to particular industries or to particular economic, market, or industry sectors than to others. This could increase the volatility of the Fund’s portfolio, and the Fund’s performance may be more susceptible to developments affecting issuers in those industries or sectors than if the Fund invested more broadly.
Small and Mid-Cap Company Risk Market risk and liquidity risk are particularly pronounced for securities of small and medium-sized companies, which may trade less frequently and in smaller volumes than more widely-held securities, and may fluctuate in price more than other securities. Their shares can be less liquid than those of larger companies, especially during market declines. Small and medium-sized companies may have limited product lines, markets, or financial resources and may be dependent on a limited management group; they may have been recently organized and have little or no track record of success.
Sovereign Debt Obligations Risk Investments in debt securities issued by governments or by government agencies and instrumentalities involve the risk that the governmental entities responsible for repayment may be unable or unwilling to pay interest and repay principal when due. Many sovereign debt obligations may be rated below investment grade (“junk” or “high yield” bonds). Any restructuring of a sovereign debt obligation held by the Fund will likely have a significant adverse effect on the value of the obligation. In the
event of default of sovereign debt, the Fund may be unable to pursue legal action against the sovereign issuer or to realize on collateral securing the debt.
U.S. Government Securities Risk Obligations of certain U.S. Government agencies and instrumentalities are not backed by the full faith and credit of the U.S. Government, and there can be no assurance that the U.S. Government would provide financial support to such agencies and instrumentalities.
Valuation Risk The Fund is subject to the risk of mispricing or improper valuation of its investments, in particular to the extent that its securities are fair valued.
Value Company Risk The value investment approach entails the risk that the market will not recognize a security’s intrinsic value for a long time, or that a stock the investment adviser or subadviser judges to be undervalued may actually be appropriately priced.
Performance Information
The following bar chart and table provide some indication of the risks of investing in the Fund. The bar chart shows changes in the Fund’s performance from year to year for Class I shares. The table shows how the Fund’s average annual returns for 1 year, and since inception, compare with those of a broad measure of market performance. Past performance (before and after taxes) is not necessarily an indication of how the Fund will perform in the future. More up-to-date performance information is available at https://​www.massmutual.com/funds or by calling 1-888-309-3539.
Annual Performance
Class I Shares
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Highest
Quarter:
2Q ’20,
12.24% Lowest
Quarter:
1Q ’20,
11.43%
After-tax returns are calculated using the historical highest individual U.S. federal marginal income tax rates and do not reflect the impact of state and local taxes. Actual after-tax returns depend on
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an investor’s tax situation and may differ from those shown. After-tax returns are not relevant to investors who hold Fund shares through tax-advantaged arrangements, such as 401(k) plans or individual retirement accounts. After-tax returns are shown for Class I only. After-tax returns for other classes will vary.
Average Annual Total Returns
(for the periods ended December 31, 2022)
One
Year
Since
Inception
(02/16/18)
Class I
Return Before
Taxes
-13.85 % 3.35 %
Return After Taxes on Distributions 16.72 % -1.20 %
Return After Taxes on Distributions and Sales of Fund Shares -7.02 % 2.21 %
Class M5 Return Before
Taxes
-14.00 % 3.19 %
Class M4 Return Before
Taxes
-14.21 % 2.94 %
Class M3 Return Before
Taxes
-14.51 % 2.67 %
S&P Target Date 2010 Index (reflects
no deduction for fees, expenses, or
taxes)
-11.44 % 2.98 %
MANAGEMENT
Investment Adviser: MML Investment Advisers, LLC (“MML Advisers”)
Subadviser(s): T. Rowe Price Associates, Inc. (“T. Rowe Price”)
Portfolio Manager(s):
Kimberly E. DeDominicis is a Vice President and Portfolio Manager at T. Rowe Price. She has managed the Fund since October 2019.
Andrew Jacobs van Merlen, CFA is a Vice President and Portfolio Manager at T. Rowe Price. He has managed the Fund since January 2020.
Wyatt A. Lee, CFA is a Vice President and Portfolio Manager at T. Rowe Price. He has managed the Fund since its inception (February 2018).
PURCHASE AND SALE OF FUND SHARES
Shares of the Fund are generally available to retirement plans, other institutional investors, and individual retirement accounts. Fund shares are redeemable on any business day by written request, telephone, or internet (available to certain customers).
TAX INFORMATION
The Fund intends to make distributions that may be taxed as ordinary income, qualified dividend income, or capital gains, unless you are an investor eligible for preferential tax treatment.
PAYMENTS TO BROKER-DEALERS AND OTHER FINANCIAL INTERMEDIARIES
If you purchase the Fund through a broker-dealer or other financial intermediary, the intermediary may receive a one-time or continuing payments from the Fund, MML Advisers or its affiliates, or others for the sale of Fund shares or continuing shareholder services provided by the intermediary. These payments may create a conflict of interest by influencing the broker-dealer or other intermediary to recommend the Fund over another investment. You should contact your intermediary to obtain more information about the compensation it may receive in connection with your investment.
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MassMutual Select T. Rowe Price Retirement 2015 Fund
INVESTMENT OBJECTIVE
The Fund seeks the highest total return over time consistent with an emphasis on both capital growth and income.
FEES AND EXPENSES OF THE FUND
This table describes the fees and expenses that you may pay if you buy, hold, and sell shares of the Fund. You may pay brokerage commissions and other fees to financial intermediaries which are not reflected in the tables and examples below.
Shareholder Fees (fees paid directly from your investment)
Class I
Class M5
Class M4
Class M3
Maximum Sales Charge (Load) Imposed on Purchases (as a % of offering price)
None
None
None
None
Maximum Deferred Sales Charge (Load) (as a % of the lower of the original offering price or redemption proceeds)
None
None
None
None
Annual Fund Operating Expenses (expenses that you pay each year as a percentage of the value of your investment)
Class I
Class M5
Class M4
Class M3
Management Fees(1)
0.44%
0.59%
0.59%
0.59%
Distribution and Service (Rule 12b-1) Fees
None
None
0.25%
0.50%
Other Expenses
0.00%
0.00%
0.00%
0.00%
Acquired Fund Fees and Expenses
0.06%
0.06%
0.06%
0.06%
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses(2)
0.50%
0.65%
0.90%
1.15%
Expense Reimbursement
(0.14%)
(0.14%)
(0.14%)
(0.14%)
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses after Expense Reimbursement(3)
0.36%
0.51%
0.76%
1.01%
(1)
The Management Fees will decline over time in accordance with a predetermined contractual fee schedule, with any annual decrease occurring on June 1st of each year. The fee schedule can only be changed with approval by the Fund’s Board of Trustees, and, if required by SEC rules, the Fund’s shareholders.
(2)
Because Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses include Acquired Fund Fees and Expenses, they may not correspond to the ratios of expenses to average daily net assets shown in the “Financial Highlights” tables in the Prospectus, which reflect the operating expenses of the Fund and do not include Acquired Fund Fees and Expenses.
(3)
The expenses in the above table reflect a written agreement by MML Advisers to cap the fees and expenses of the Fund (other than extraordinary legal and other expenses, interest expense, expenses related to borrowings, securities lending, leverage, taxes, and brokerage, short sale dividend and loan
expense, or other non-recurring or unusual expenses such as organizational expenses and shareholder meeting expenses, as applicable) through January 31, 2024, to the extent that Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses after Expense Reimbursement would otherwise exceed 0.36%, 0.51%, 0.76%, and 1.01% for Classes I, M5, M4, and M3, respectively. The Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses after Expense Reimbursement shown in the above table may exceed these amounts, because, as noted in the previous sentence, certain fees and expenses are excluded from the cap. The agreement can only be terminated by mutual consent of the Board of Trustees on behalf of the Fund and MML Advisers.
Example
This example is intended to help you compare the cost of investing in the Fund with the cost of investing in other mutual funds. It assumes that you invest $10,000 in each share class of the Fund for the time periods indicated and then redeem all of your shares at the end of those periods. The example also assumes that your investment earns a 5% return each year and that the Fund’s operating expenses are exactly as described in the preceding table. Although your actual costs may be higher or lower, based on these assumptions your costs would be:
1 Year
3 Years
5 Years
10 Years
Class I $ 37 $ 146 $ 266 $ 615
Class M5 $ 52 $ 194 $ 348 $ 797
Class M4 $ 78 $ 273 $ 485 $ 1,095
Class M3 $ 103 $ 351 $ 619 $ 1,385
Portfolio Turnover
The Fund pays transaction costs, such as commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or “turns over” its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover rate may indicate higher transaction costs and may result in higher taxes when Fund shares are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are not reflected in annual fund operating expenses or in the example, affect the Fund’s performance. During the most recent fiscal year, the Fund’s portfolio turnover rate was 35% of the average value of its portfolio.
INVESTMENTS, RISKS, AND PERFORMANCE
Principal Investment Strategies
The Fund is a “fund of funds” that pursues its objective by investing in a diversified portfolio of other stock and bond series of both the MassMutual Funds and T. Rowe Price Funds that represent various asset classes and sectors (“Underlying Funds”). The Fund’s allocation among Underlying Funds will change over time in
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relation to its target retirement date. The Fund is subadvised by T. Rowe Price Associates, Inc. (“T. Rowe Price”). Underlying Funds in which the Fund invests are predominantly either advised or subadvised by T. Rowe Price.
The Fund is managed based on the specific retirement year (target date 2015) included in its name and assumes a retirement age of 65. The target date refers to the approximate year an investor in the Fund would have retired and likely stopped making new investments in the Fund. The Fund is primarily designed for an investor who retired at or about the target date and who plans to withdraw the value of the account in the Fund gradually after retirement. However, if an investor retired earlier or later than age 65, the Fund may not be an appropriate investment even if the investor retired on or near the Fund’s target date.
Over time, the allocation to asset classes and funds will change according to a predetermined “glide path” shown in the following chart (the left axis indicates the overall neutral allocation to stocks with the remainder of the allocation to bonds). The glide path represents the shifting of asset classes over time and shows how the Fund’s asset mix becomes more conservative-both prior to and after retirement-as time elapses. This reflects the need for reduced market risks as retirement approaches and the need for lower portfolio volatility after retiring. Although the glide path is meant to dampen the Fund’s potential volatility as retirement approaches, the Fund is not designed for a lump sum redemption at the retirement date. The Fund pursues an asset allocation strategy that promotes asset accumulation prior to retirement, but it is intended to also serve as a post-retirement investment vehicle with allocations designed to support an income stream made up of regular withdrawals throughout retirement along with some portfolio growth that exceeds inflation. After the target date, the Fund is designed to balance longevity and inflation risks along with the need for some income, although it does not guarantee a particular level of income.
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The glide path provides for a neutral allocation to
stocks at the target date of 55%. The Fund’s overall exposure to stocks will continue to decline until approximately 30 years after its target date, when its neutral allocations to stocks and bonds will remain unchanged. There are no maturity restrictions within the Fund’s overall allocation to bonds, although the bond funds in which the Fund invests may impose specific limits on maturity or credit quality. The allocations are referred to as “neutral” allocations because they are strategic and do not reflect any tactical decisions made by T. Rowe Price to overweight or underweight a particular asset class or sector based on its market outlook. The target allocations assigned to the broad asset classes (Stocks and Bonds), which reflect these tactical decisions resulting from market outlook, are not expected to vary from the neutral allocations set forth in the glide path by more than plus (+) or minus (-) five percent (5%). The target allocations and actual allocations may differ due to significant market movements or cash flows.
The following table details the way the portfolio is generally expected to be allocated between the asset classes. The table also shows the expected allocations to the Underlying Funds that will be used within those asset classes. The information in the table represents the neutral allocations for the Fund as of February 1, 2023. The Fund’s shareholder reports set forth its actual allocations between stock funds and bond funds and to the individual Underlying Funds. T. Rowe Price may modify the target asset allocation strategy or the selection of Underlying Funds from time to time, and may invest in other Underlying Funds,
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including any Underlying Funds that may be created in the future. At any given time, the Fund’s asset allocation may be affected by a variety of factors (such as, for example, whether an Underlying Fund is accepting additional investments). A description of the Underlying Funds is included in Appendix D of the Statement of Additional Information (“SAI”).
Stock Funds
49.50%
MM S&P 500 Index Fund 5.27%
MassMutual Select T. Rowe Price Large Cap Blend Fund
21.07%
MassMutual Select T. Rowe Price Small and Mid Cap Blend Fund
6.58%
MassMutual Select T. Rowe Price International
Equity Fund
14.11%
MassMutual Select T. Rowe Price Real Assets Fund
2.48%
Bond Funds
50.50%
MassMutual Select T. Rowe Price Bond Asset Fund
22.50%
T. Rowe Price Dynamic Global Bond Fund 3.75%
MassMutual Select T. Rowe Price U.S. Treasury
Long-Term Index Fund
3.50%
T. Rowe Price Institutional High Yield Fund 2.71%
T. Rowe Price Institutional Floating Rate Fund
1.16%
MassMutual Select T. Rowe Price Emerging Markets Bond Fund
3.88%
MassMutual Select T. Rowe Price Limited Duration Inflation Focused Bond Fund
13.00%
Note: The Underlying Fund allocations above may not sum up to 100% due to rounding.
Because the Fund will invest in Underlying Funds advised by MML Advisers, T. Rowe Price, or their affiliates, the Fund will not invest in funds advised or sponsored by others, even if they are less expensive or have better historical performance records. T. Rowe Price will be subject to a conflict of interest in selecting Underlying Funds, because its selection of Underlying Funds might appear to be influenced by the expected effect of the selection on its revenues or other benefits of the selection to it. T. Rowe Price has advised the Fund that, as a fiduciary to the Fund, T. Rowe Price has a duty to put the best interests of the Fund ahead of its own interest and that, consequently, it will make investment decisions for the Fund in the best interest of the Fund to achieve the Fund’s investment objectives and not for the benefit of T. Rowe Price.
Through its investments in Underlying Funds, the Fund will be exposed to a wide range of securities and other instruments with differing characteristics (such as credit quality, duration, geography,
industry, and market capitalization), which may include without limitation equity securities of small-, mid-, or large-capitalization U.S. or non-U.S. issuers (including issuers that may only recently have become public companies), fixed income securities of U.S. or non-U.S. private or governmental issuers (including “junk” or “high yield” bonds, including securities in default), inflation-protected securities, bank loans, and short-term investments of any kind. Equity securities may include common stocks, preferred stocks, securities convertible into common or preferred stock, real estate investment trusts (“REITs”), rights, and warrants.
An Underlying Fund may engage in foreign currency exchange transactions, including forward contracts, options on currency, futures contracts, and swap contracts, to take long or short positions in foreign currencies in order to enhance its investment return or to attempt to protect against adverse changes in currency exchange rates. An Underlying Fund may be permitted to use a wide variety of additional exchange-traded and over-the-counter derivatives, including options, futures contracts, swap contracts (including interest rate swaps, total return swaps, and credit default swaps), and hybrid instruments. An Underlying Fund may typically use these derivatives for hedging purposes, as a substitute for direct investments, to earn additional income, to gain exposure to securities or markets in which it might not be able to invest directly, or to adjust various portfolio characteristics, including the duration (interest rate volatility) of the Fund’s portfolio of debt securities. Use of derivatives by an Underlying Fund may create investment leverage.
An Underlying Fund may enter into repurchase agreement transactions. An Underlying Fund may invest in mortgage-backed or other asset-backed securities. An Underlying Fund may enter into dollar roll or reverse repurchase agreement transactions. Some investments by an Underlying Fund may be restricted as to resale or otherwise considered to be illiquid. An Underlying Fund may engage in active and frequent trading and so could have a relatively high portfolio turnover rate. The Fund will bear a pro rata share of the Underlying Funds’ expenses. The Fund also bears all of the risks associated with the investment strategies used by the Underlying Funds.
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Principal Risks
The following are the Principal Risks of the Fund. An investment in this Fund is not guaranteed. The value of your investment in the Fund could go down as well as up. You can lose money by investing in the Fund, including losses near, at, or after the target date. There is no guarantee that the Fund will provide adequate income at and through your retirement. Although the descriptions below refer to the risks relating to investment activities of the Fund, many of the risks arise due to the investment activities of the Underlying Funds. Certain risks relating to instruments and strategies used in the management of the Fund are placed first. The significance of any specific risk to an investment in the Fund will vary over time, depending on the composition of the Fund’s portfolio, market conditions, and other factors. You should read all of the risk information presented below carefully, because any one or more of these risks may result in losses to the Fund.
Allocation Risk There is no assurance that allocation decisions will result in the desired performance effects. The limited universe of Underlying Funds and the requirement that a significant percentage of Fund assets be invested in mutual funds advised by MML Advisers, T. Rowe Price, or their affiliates as noted in “Principal Investment Strategies” may adversely affect Fund performance.
Risk of Investment in Other Funds or Pools The Fund is indirectly exposed to all of the risks of the underlying funds, including ETFs, in which it invests, including the risk that the underlying funds will not perform as expected. ETFs are subject to additional risks, including secondary market trading risks and the risk that an ETF’s shares may trade above or below net asset value. The Fund indirectly pays a portion of the expenses incurred by the underlying funds.
Bank Loans Risk Many of the risks associated with bank loans are similar to the risks of investing in below investment grade debt securities. Changes in the financial condition of the borrower or economic conditions or other circumstances may reduce the capacity of the borrower to make principal and interest payments on such instruments and may lead to defaults. Senior secured bank loans are typically supported by collateral; however the value of the collateral may be insufficient to cover the amount owed to the Fund, or the Fund may be prevented or delayed from realizing on the collateral. Some loans may be
unsecured; unsecured loans generally present a greater risk of loss to the Fund if the issuer defaults. If the Fund relies on a third party to administer a loan, the Fund is subject to the risk that the third party will fail to perform its obligations. In addition, if the Fund holds only a participation interest in a loan made by a third party, the Fund’s receipt of payments on the loan will depend on the third party’s willingness and ability to make those payments to the Fund. The settlement time for certain loans is longer than the settlement time for many other types of investments, and the Fund may not receive the payment for a loan sold by it until well after the sale; that cash would be unavailable for payment of redemption proceeds or for reinvestment. Interests in some bank loans may not be readily marketable and may be subject to restrictions on resale. In some cases, negotiations involved in disposing of indebtedness may require weeks to complete. Consequently, some indebtedness may be difficult or impossible to dispose of readily at what the Fund believes to be a fair price. Some loans may not be considered “securities” for certain purposes under the federal securities laws, and purchasers, such as the Fund, therefore may not be entitled to rely on the anti-fraud protections of the federal securities laws.
Below Investment Grade Debt Securities Risk Below investment grade debt securities, commonly known as “junk” or “high yield” bonds, have speculative characteristics and involve greater volatility of price and yield, greater risk of loss of principal and interest, and generally reflect a greater possibility of an adverse change in financial condition that could affect an issuer’s ability to honor its obligations.
Cash Position Risk If the Fund holds a significant portion of its assets in cash or cash equivalents, its investment returns may be adversely affected and the Fund may not achieve its investment objective.
Commodities-Related Investments Risk Commodity prices (including precious metals) can be extremely volatile and exposure to commodities can cause the net asset value of the Fund’s shares to decline or fluctuate in a rapid and unpredictable manner. The values of physical commodities or commodity-linked derivative instruments may be affected by changes in overall market movements, real or perceived inflationary trends, commodity index volatility, changes in interest rates or currency exchange rates, population growth and changing
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demographics, international economic, political, and regulatory developments, or factors affecting a particular region, industry, or commodity. A liquid secondary market may not exist for certain commodity investments, which may make it difficult for the Fund to sell them at a desirable price or at the price at which it is carrying them.
Convertible Securities Risk Convertible securities are subject to the risks of both debt instruments and equity securities. The price of a convertible security may change in response to changes in price of the underlying equity security, the credit quality of the issuer, and interest rates. In general, the values of convertible securities tend to decline as interest rates rise and to rise when interest rates fall. A convertible security generally has less potential for gain or loss than the underlying equity security.
Credit Risk Credit risk is the risk that an issuer, guarantor, or liquidity provider of a fixed income security held by the Fund may be unable or unwilling, or may be perceived (whether by market participants, ratings agencies, pricing services or otherwise) as unable or unwilling, to make timely principal and/or interest payments, or to otherwise honor its obligations. The Fund may also be exposed to the credit risk of its counterparty to repurchase agreements, reverse repurchase agreements, swap transactions, and other derivatives transactions, and to the counterparty’s ability or willingness to perform in accordance with the terms of the transaction. The value of such transactions to the Fund will depend on the willingness and ability of the counterparty to perform its obligations, including among other things the obligation to return collateral or margin to the Fund. If a counterparty becomes bankrupt or otherwise fails to perform its obligations under a derivative contract due to financial difficulties, the Fund may experience significant delays in obtaining any recovery under the derivative contract in a bankruptcy or other reorganization proceeding. The Fund may obtain only a limited recovery or may obtain no recovery in such circumstances.
Derivatives Risk Derivatives can be highly volatile and involve risks different from, and potentially greater than, direct investments, including risks of imperfect correlation between the value of derivatives and underlying assets, counterparty default, potential losses that partially or completely offset gains, and illiquidity. Derivatives can create investment leverage. Losses from derivatives can be substantially greater than the derivatives’
original cost and can sometimes be unlimited. If the value of a derivative does not correlate well with the particular market or asset class the derivative is designed to provide exposure to, the derivative may not have the effect or benefit anticipated. Derivatives can also reduce the opportunity for gains or result in losses by offsetting positive returns in other investments. Many derivatives are traded in the over-the-counter market and not on exchanges.
Equity Securities Risk Although stocks may have the potential to outperform other asset classes over the long term, their prices tend to fluctuate more dramatically over the shorter term. These movements may result from factors affecting individual companies, or from broader influences like changes in interest rates, market conditions, or investor confidence, or announcements of economic, political, or financial information.
Fixed Income Securities Risk The values of fixed income securities typically will decline during periods of rising interest rates, and can also decline in response to changes in the financial condition of the issuer, borrower, counterparty, or underlying collateral assets, or changes in market, economic, industry, political, regulatory, public health, and other conditions affecting a particular type of security or issuer or fixed income securities generally. Certain events, such as market or economic developments, regulatory or government actions, natural disasters, pandemics, terrorist attacks, war, and other geopolitical events can have a dramatic adverse effect on the debt market and the overall liquidity of the market for fixed income securities. During those periods, the Fund may experience high levels of shareholder redemptions, and may have to sell securities at times when the Fund would otherwise not do so, and potentially at unfavorable prices. Certain securities may be difficult to value during such periods. Fixed income securities are subject to interest rate risk (the risk that the value of a fixed income security will fall when interest rates rise), extension risk (the risk that the average life of a security will be extended through a slowing of principal payments), prepayment risk (the risk that a security will be prepaid and the Fund will be required to reinvest at a less favorable rate), duration risk (the risk that longer-term securities may be more sensitive to interest rate changes), inflation risk (the risk that as inflation increases, the present value of the Fund’s fixed income investment typically will decline), and credit risk.
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Foreign Investment Risk; Emerging Markets Risk; Currency Risk Investments in securities of foreign issuers, securities of companies with significant foreign exposure, and foreign currencies can involve additional risks relating to market, industry, political, regulatory, public health, and other conditions. Political, social, diplomatic, and economic developments, U.S. and foreign government action, or threat thereof, such as the imposition of currency or capital blockages, controls, or tariffs, economic and trade sanctions or embargoes, security trading suspensions, entering or exiting trade or other intergovernmental agreements, or the expropriation or nationalization of assets in a particular country, can cause dramatic declines in certain or all securities with exposure to that country and other countries. In the event of nationalization, expropriation, confiscation, or other government action, intervention, or restriction, the Fund could lose its entire investment in a particular foreign issuer or country. There may be quotas or other limits on the ability of the Fund (or clients of the Fund’s investment adviser or subadviser) to invest or maintain investments in securities of issuers in certain countries. Enforcing legal rights can be more difficult, costly, and limited in certain foreign countries and with respect to certain types of investments, and can be particularly difficult against foreign governments. Because non-U.S. securities are normally denominated and traded in currencies other than the U.S. dollar, the value of the Fund’s assets may be affected favorably or unfavorably by changes in currency exchange rates, exchange control regulations, and restrictions or prohibitions on the repatriation of non-U.S. currencies. Income and gains with respect to investments in certain countries may be subject to withholding and other taxes. There may be less information publicly available about a non-U.S. company than about a U.S. company, and many non-U.S. companies are not subject to accounting, auditing, and financial reporting standards, regulatory framework and practices comparable to those in the U.S. The securities of some non-U.S. companies, especially those in emerging markets, are less liquid and at times more volatile than securities of comparable U.S. companies. Emerging markets securities are subject to greater risks than securities issued in developed foreign markets, including less liquidity, less stringent investor protection and disclosure standards, less reliable settlement practices, greater price volatility, higher relative rates of inflation, greater political, economic, and social instability, greater custody
and operational risks, greater risk of new or inconsistent government treatment of or restrictions on issuers and instruments, and greater volatility in currency exchange rates, and are more susceptible to environmental problems. Many emerging market countries are highly reliant on international trade and exports, including the export of commodities. Their economies may be significantly impacted by fluctuations in commodity prices and the global demand for certain commodities. In addition, pandemics and outbreaks of contagious diseases may exacerbate pre-existing problems in emerging market countries with less established health care systems. Frontier markets, a subset of emerging markets, generally have smaller economies and less mature capital markets than emerging markets. As a result, the risks of investing in emerging market countries are magnified in frontier market countries. Frontier markets are more susceptible to having abrupt changes in currency values, less mature markets and settlement practices, and lower trading volumes that could lead to greater price volatility and illiquidity. Non-U.S. transaction costs, such as brokerage commissions and custody costs, may be higher than in the United States. In addition, foreign markets can react differently to market, economic, industry, political, regulatory, geopolitical, public health, and other conditions than the U.S. market.
Frequent Trading/Portfolio Turnover Risk Portfolio turnover generally involves some expense to the Fund and may result in the realization of taxable capital gains (including short-term gains). The trading costs and tax effects associated with portfolio turnover may adversely affect the Fund’s performance.
Geographic Focus Risk When the Fund focuses investments on a particular country, group of countries, or geographic region, its performance will be closely tied to the market, currency, economic, political, or regulatory conditions and developments in those countries or that region, and could be more volatile than the performance of more geographically diversified funds.
Growth Company Risk The prices of growth securities are often highly sensitive to market fluctuations because of their heavy dependence on future earnings or cash flow expectations, and can be more volatile than the market in general.
Hedging Risk The Fund’s attempts at hedging and taking long and short positions in currencies may not be successful and could cause the Fund to lose
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money or fail to get the benefit of a gain on a hedged position. If expected changes to securities prices, interest rates, currency values, and exchange rates, or the creditworthiness of an issuer are not accurately predicted, the Fund could be in a worse position than if it had not entered into such transactions.
Inflation Risk The value of assets or income from the Fund’s investments will be less in the future as inflation decreases the value of money. As inflation increases, the value of the Fund’s assets can decline as can the value of the Fund’s distributions. Inflation rates may change frequently and drastically as a result of various factors, including unexpected shifts in the domestic or global economy (or expectations that such policies will change), and the Fund’s investments may not keep pace with inflation, which may result in losses to the Fund’s investors.
Large Company Risk Large-capitalization stocks as a group could fall out of favor with the market, causing the Fund’s investments in large-capitalization stocks to underperform investments that focus on small- or medium-capitalization stocks. Larger, more established companies may be slow to respond to challenges and may grow more slowly than smaller companies.
Leveraging Risk Instruments and transactions, including derivatives, dollar roll, and reverse repurchase agreement transactions, that create leverage may cause the value of an investment in the Fund to be more volatile, could result in larger losses than if they were not used, and tend to compound the effects of other risks.
Liquidity Risk Certain securities may be difficult (or impossible) to sell or certain positions may be difficult to close out at a desirable time and price, and the Fund may be required to hold an illiquid investment that is declining in value, or it may be required to sell certain illiquid investments at a price or time that is not advantageous in order to meet redemptions or other cash needs. Some securities may be subject to restrictions on resale. There can be no assurance that there will be a liquid market for instruments held by the Fund at any time. The Fund may not receive the proceeds from the sale of certain investments for an extended period.
Management Risk The Fund relies on the manager’s investment analysis and its selection of investments to achieve its investment objective. There can be no assurance that the Fund will
achieve the intended results and the Fund may incur significant losses.
Market Risk The value of the Fund’s portfolio securities may decline, at times sharply and unpredictably, as a result of unfavorable market-induced changes affecting particular industries, sectors, or issuers. Stock and bond markets can decline significantly in response to issuer, market, economic, industry, political, regulatory, geopolitical, public health, and other conditions, as well as investor perceptions of these conditions. The Fund is subject to risks affecting issuers, such as management performance, financial leverage, industry problems, and reduced demand for goods or services.
Mortgage- and Asset-Backed Securities Risk Investments in mortgage- and asset-backed securities subject the Fund to credit risk, interest rate risk, extension risk, and prepayment risk, among other risks. Mortgage-backed and asset-backed securities not issued by a government agency generally involve greater credit risk than securities issued by government agencies. Payment of principal and interest generally depends on the cash flows generated by the underlying assets and the terms of the security. The types of mortgages (for example, residential or commercial mortgages) underlying securities held by the Fund may differ and be affected differently by market factors. Investments that receive only the interest portion or the principal portion of payments on the underlying assets may be highly volatile. Litigation with respect to the representations and warranties given in connection with the issuance of mortgage-backed securities can be an important consideration in investing in such securities, and the outcome of any such litigation could significantly impact the value of the Fund’s mortgage-backed investments.
Preferred Stock Risk Like other equity securities, preferred stock is subject to the risk that its value may decrease based on actual or perceived changes in the business or financial condition of the issuer. In addition, changes in interest rates may adversely affect the value of a preferred stock that pays a fixed dividend. Preferred stocks are also subject to additional risks, such as potentially greater volatility and risks related to deferral, non-cumulative dividends, subordination, liquidity, limited voting rights, and special redemption rights.
Real Estate Risk; REIT Risk Real estate-related investments may decline in value as a result of
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factors affecting the real estate industry, such as the supply of real property in certain markets, changes in zoning laws, environmental regulations and other governmental action, delays in completion of construction, changes in real estate values, changes in property taxes, levels of occupancy, losses due to natural disasters, and local and regional market conditions. Investments in REITs may be subject to risks similar to those associated with direct investment in real estate, as well as additional risks associated with equity investments. As a shareholder in a REIT, the Fund, and indirectly the Fund’s shareholders, would bear its ratable share of the REIT’s expenses and would at the same time continue to pay its own fees and expenses.
Repurchase Agreement Risk  These transactions must be fully collateralized, but involve credit risk to a Fund if the other party should default on its obligation and the Fund is delayed or prevented from recovering the collateral.
Sector Risk The Fund may allocate more of its assets to particular industries or to particular economic, market, or industry sectors than to others. This could increase the volatility of the Fund’s portfolio, and the Fund’s performance may be more susceptible to developments affecting issuers in those industries or sectors than if the Fund invested more broadly.
Small and Mid-Cap Company Risk Market risk and liquidity risk are particularly pronounced for securities of small and medium-sized companies, which may trade less frequently and in smaller volumes than more widely-held securities, and may fluctuate in price more than other securities. Their shares can be less liquid than those of larger companies, especially during market declines. Small and medium-sized companies may have limited product lines, markets, or financial resources and may be dependent on a limited management group; they may have been recently organized and have little or no track record of success.
Sovereign Debt Obligations Risk Investments in debt securities issued by governments or by government agencies and instrumentalities involve the risk that the governmental entities responsible for repayment may be unable or unwilling to pay interest and repay principal when due. Many sovereign debt obligations may be rated below investment grade (“junk” or “high yield” bonds). Any restructuring of a sovereign debt obligation held by the Fund will likely have a significant adverse effect on the value of the obligation. In the
event of default of sovereign debt, the Fund may be unable to pursue legal action against the sovereign issuer or to realize on collateral securing the debt.
U.S. Government Securities Risk Obligations of certain U.S. Government agencies and instrumentalities are not backed by the full faith and credit of the U.S. Government, and there can be no assurance that the U.S. Government would provide financial support to such agencies and instrumentalities.
Valuation Risk The Fund is subject to the risk of mispricing or improper valuation of its investments, in particular to the extent that its securities are fair valued.
Value Company Risk The value investment approach entails the risk that the market will not recognize a security’s intrinsic value for a long time, or that a stock the investment adviser or subadviser judges to be undervalued may actually be appropriately priced.
Performance Information
The following bar chart and table provide some indication of the risks of investing in the Fund. The bar chart shows changes in the Fund’s performance from year to year for Class I shares. The table shows how the Fund’s average annual returns for 1 year, and since inception, compare with those of a broad measure of market performance. Past performance (before and after taxes) is not necessarily an indication of how the Fund will perform in the future. More up-to-date performance information is available at https://​www.massmutual.com/funds or by calling 1-888-309-3539.
Annual Performance
Class I Shares
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Highest
Quarter:
2Q ’20,
13.18% Lowest
Quarter:
1Q ’20,
12.49%
After-tax returns are calculated using the historical highest individual U.S. federal marginal income tax rates and do not reflect the impact of state and local taxes. Actual after-tax returns depend on
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an investor’s tax situation and may differ from those shown. After-tax returns are not relevant to investors who hold Fund shares through tax-advantaged arrangements, such as 401(k) plans or individual retirement accounts. After-tax returns are shown for Class I only. After-tax returns for other classes will vary.
Average Annual Total Returns
(for the periods ended December 31, 2022)
One
Year
Since
Inception
(02/16/18)
Class I
Return Before
Taxes
-14.22 % 3.58 %
Return After Taxes on Distributions -17.03 % 1.54 %
Return After Taxes on Distributions and Sales of Fund Shares -7.16 % 2.43 %
Class M5 Return Before
Taxes
-14.35 % 3.44 %
Class M4 Return Before
Taxes
-14.55 % 3.17 %
Class M3 Return Before
Taxes
-14.83 % 2.91 %
S&P Target Date 2015 Index (reflects
no deduction for fees, expenses, or
taxes)
-12.16 % 3.21 %
MANAGEMENT
Investment Adviser: MML Investment Advisers, LLC (“MML Advisers”)
Subadviser(s): T. Rowe Price Associates, Inc. (“T. Rowe Price”)
Portfolio Manager(s):
Kimberly E. DeDominicis is a Vice President and Portfolio Manager at T. Rowe Price. She has managed the Fund since October 2019.
Andrew Jacobs van Merlen, CFA is a Vice President and Portfolio Manager at T. Rowe Price. He has managed the Fund since January 2020.
Wyatt A. Lee, CFA is a Vice President and Portfolio Manager at T. Rowe Price. He has managed the Fund since its inception (February 2018).
PURCHASE AND SALE OF FUND SHARES
Shares of the Fund are generally available to retirement plans, other institutional investors, and individual retirement accounts. Fund shares are redeemable on any business day by written request, telephone, or internet (available to certain customers).
TAX INFORMATION
The Fund intends to make distributions that may be taxed as ordinary income, qualified dividend income, or capital gains, unless you are an investor eligible for preferential tax treatment.
PAYMENTS TO BROKER-DEALERS AND OTHER FINANCIAL INTERMEDIARIES
If you purchase the Fund through a broker-dealer or other financial intermediary, the intermediary may receive a one-time or continuing payments from the Fund, MML Advisers or its affiliates, or others for the sale of Fund shares or continuing shareholder services provided by the intermediary. These payments may create a conflict of interest by influencing the broker-dealer or other intermediary to recommend the Fund over another investment. You should contact your intermediary to obtain more information about the compensation it may receive in connection with your investment.
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MassMutual Select T. Rowe Price Retirement 2020 Fund
INVESTMENT OBJECTIVE
The Fund seeks the highest total return over time consistent with an emphasis on both capital growth and income.
FEES AND EXPENSES OF THE FUND
This table describes the fees and expenses that you may pay if you buy, hold, and sell shares of the Fund. You may pay brokerage commissions and other fees to financial intermediaries which are not reflected in the tables and examples below.
Shareholder Fees (fees paid directly from your investment)
Class I
Class M5
Class M4
Class M3
Maximum Sales Charge (Load) Imposed on Purchases (as a % of offering price)
None
None
None
None
Maximum Deferred Sales Charge (Load) (as a % of the lower of the original offering price or redemption proceeds)
None
None
None
None
Annual Fund Operating Expenses (expenses that you pay each year as a percentage of the value of your investment)
Class I
Class M5
Class M4
Class M3
Management Fees(1)
0.47%
0.62%
0.62%
0.62%
Distribution and Service (Rule 12b-1) Fees
None
None
0.25%
0.50%
Other Expenses
0.00%
0.00%
0.00%
0.00%
Acquired Fund Fees and Expenses
0.06%
0.06%
0.06%
0.06%
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses(2)
0.53%
0.68%
0.93%
1.18%
Expense Reimbursement
(0.16%)
(0.15%)
(0.15%)
(0.15%)
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses after Expense Reimbursement(3)
0.37%
0.53%
0.78%
1.03%
(1)
The Management Fees will decline over time in accordance with a predetermined contractual fee schedule, with any annual decrease occurring on June 1st of each year. The fee schedule can only be changed with approval by the Fund’s Board of Trustees, and, if required by SEC rules, the Fund’s shareholders.
(2)
Because Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses include Acquired Fund Fees and Expenses, they may not correspond to the ratios of expenses to average daily net assets shown in the “Financial Highlights” tables in the Prospectus, which reflect the operating expenses of the Fund and do not include Acquired Fund Fees and Expenses.
(3)
The expenses in the above table reflect a written agreement by MML Advisers to cap the fees and expenses of the Fund (other than extraordinary legal and other expenses, interest expense, expenses related to borrowings, securities lending, leverage, taxes, and brokerage, short sale dividend and loan
expense, or other non-recurring or unusual expenses such as organizational expenses and shareholder meeting expenses, as applicable) through January 31, 2024, to the extent that Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses after Expense Reimbursement would otherwise exceed 0.37%, 0.53%, 0.78%, and 1.03% for Classes I, M5, M4, and M3, respectively. The Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses after Expense Reimbursement shown in the above table may exceed these amounts, because, as noted in the previous sentence, certain fees and expenses are excluded from the cap. The agreement can only be terminated by mutual consent of the Board of Trustees on behalf of the Fund and MML Advisers.
Example
This example is intended to help you compare the cost of investing in the Fund with the cost of investing in other mutual funds. It assumes that you invest $10,000 in each share class of the Fund for the time periods indicated and then redeem all of your shares at the end of those periods. The example also assumes that your investment earns a 5% return each year and that the Fund’s operating expenses are exactly as described in the preceding table. Although your actual costs may be higher or lower, based on these assumptions your costs would be:
1 Year
3 Years
5 Years
10 Years
Class I $ 38 $ 154 $ 280 $ 650
Class M5 $ 54 $ 202 $ 364 $ 832
Class M4 $ 80 $ 281 $ 500 $ 1,129
Class M3 $ 105 $ 360 $ 635 $ 1,418
Portfolio Turnover
The Fund pays transaction costs, such as commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or “turns over” its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover rate may indicate higher transaction costs and may result in higher taxes when Fund shares are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are not reflected in annual fund operating expenses or in the example, affect the Fund’s performance. During the most recent fiscal year, the Fund’s portfolio turnover rate was 35% of the average value of its portfolio.
INVESTMENTS, RISKS, AND PERFORMANCE
Principal Investment Strategies
The Fund is a “fund of funds” that pursues its objective by investing in a diversified portfolio of other stock and bond series of both the MassMutual Funds and T. Rowe Price Funds that represent various asset classes and sectors (“Underlying Funds”). The Fund’s allocation among Underlying Funds will change over time in
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relation to its target retirement date. The Fund is subadvised by T. Rowe Price Associates, Inc. (“T. Rowe Price”). Underlying Funds in which the Fund invests are predominantly either advised or subadvised by T. Rowe Price.
The Fund is managed based on the specific retirement year (target date 2020) included in its name and assumes a retirement age of 65. The target date refers to the approximate year an investor in the Fund would have retired and likely stopped making new investments in the Fund. The Fund is primarily designed for an investor who retired at or about the target date and who plans to withdraw the value of the account in the Fund gradually after retirement. However, if an investor retired earlier or later than age 65, the Fund may not be an appropriate investment even if the investor retired on or near the Fund’s target date.
Over time, the allocation to asset classes and funds will change according to a predetermined “glide path” shown in the following chart (the left axis indicates the overall neutral allocation to stocks with the remainder of the allocation to bonds). The glide path represents the shifting of asset classes over time and shows how the Fund’s asset mix becomes more conservative-both prior to and after retirement-as time elapses. This reflects the need for reduced market risks as retirement approaches and the need for lower portfolio volatility after retiring. Although the glide path is meant to dampen the Fund’s potential volatility as retirement approaches, the Fund is not designed for a lump sum redemption at the retirement date. The Fund pursues an asset allocation strategy that promotes asset accumulation prior to retirement, but it is intended to also serve as a post-retirement investment vehicle with allocations designed to support an income stream made up of regular withdrawals throughout retirement along with some portfolio growth that exceeds inflation. After the target date, the Fund is designed to balance longevity and inflation risks along with the need for some income, although it does not guarantee a particular level of income.
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The glide path provides for a neutral allocation to
stocks at the target date of 55%. The Fund’s overall exposure to stocks will continue to decline until approximately 30 years after its target date, when its neutral allocations to stocks and bonds will remain unchanged. There are no maturity restrictions within the Fund’s overall allocation to bonds, although the bond funds in which the Fund invests may impose specific limits on maturity or credit quality. The allocations are referred to as “neutral” allocations because they are strategic and do not reflect any tactical decisions made by T. Rowe Price to overweight or underweight a particular asset class or sector based on its market outlook. The target allocations assigned to the broad asset classes (Stocks and Bonds), which reflect these tactical decisions resulting from market outlook, are not expected to vary from the neutral allocations set forth in the glide path by more than plus (+) or minus (-) five percent (5%). The target allocations and actual allocations may differ due to significant market movements or cash flows.
The following table details the way the portfolio is generally expected to be allocated between the asset classes. The table also shows the expected allocations to the Underlying Funds that will be used within those asset classes. The information in the table represents the neutral allocations for the Fund as of February 1, 2023. The Fund’s shareholder reports set forth its actual allocations between stock funds and bond funds and to the individual Underlying Funds. T. Rowe Price may modify the target asset allocation strategy or the selection of Underlying Funds from time to time, and may invest in other Underlying Funds,
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including any Underlying Funds that may be created in the future. At any given time, the Fund’s asset allocation may be affected by a variety of factors (such as, for example, whether an Underlying Fund is accepting additional investments). A description of the Underlying Funds is included in Appendix D of the Statement of Additional Information (“SAI”).
Stock Funds
53.00%
MM S&P 500 Index Fund 5.64%
MassMutual Select T. Rowe Price Large Cap Blend Fund
22.56%
MassMutual Select T. Rowe Price Small and Mid Cap Blend Fund
7.05%
MassMutual Select T. Rowe Price International
Equity Fund
15.11%
MassMutual Select T. Rowe Price Real Assets Fund
2.65%
Bond Funds
47.00%
MassMutual Select T. Rowe Price Bond Asset Fund
21.60%
T. Rowe Price Dynamic Global Bond Fund 3.60%
MassMutual Select T. Rowe Price U.S. Treasury
Long-Term Index Fund
3.50%
T. Rowe Price Institutional High Yield Fund 2.56%
T. Rowe Price Institutional Floating Rate Fund
1.10%
MassMutual Select T. Rowe Price Emerging Markets Bond Fund
3.65%
MassMutual Select T. Rowe Price Limited Duration Inflation Focused Bond Fund
11.00%
Note: The Underlying Fund allocations above may not sum up to 100% due to rounding.
Because the Fund will invest in Underlying Funds advised by MML Advisers, T. Rowe Price, or their affiliates, the Fund will not invest in funds advised or sponsored by others, even if they are less expensive or have better historical performance records. T. Rowe Price will be subject to a conflict of interest in selecting Underlying Funds, because its selection of Underlying Funds might appear to be influenced by the expected effect of the selection on its revenues or other benefits of the selection to it. T. Rowe Price has advised the Fund that, as a fiduciary to the Fund, T. Rowe Price has a duty to put the best interests of the Fund ahead of its own interest and that, consequently, it will make investment decisions for the Fund in the best interest of the Fund to achieve the Fund’s investment objectives and not for the benefit of T. Rowe Price.
Through its investments in Underlying Funds, the Fund will be exposed to a wide range of securities and other instruments with differing characteristics (such as credit quality, duration, geography,
industry, and market capitalization), which may include without limitation equity securities of small-, mid-, or large-capitalization U.S. or non-U.S. issuers (including issuers that may only recently have become public companies), fixed income securities of U.S. or non-U.S. private or governmental issuers (including “junk” or “high yield” bonds, including securities in default), inflation-protected securities, bank loans, and short-term investments of any kind. Equity securities may include common stocks, preferred stocks, securities convertible into common or preferred stock, real estate investment trusts (“REITs”), rights, and warrants.
An Underlying Fund may engage in foreign currency exchange transactions, including forward contracts, options on currency, futures contracts, and swap contracts, to take long or short positions in foreign currencies in order to enhance its investment return or to attempt to protect against adverse changes in currency exchange rates. An Underlying Fund may be permitted to use a wide variety of additional exchange-traded and over-the-counter derivatives, including options, futures contracts, swap contracts (including interest rate swaps, total return swaps, and credit default swaps), and hybrid instruments. An Underlying Fund may typically use these derivatives for hedging purposes, as a substitute for direct investments, to earn additional income, to gain exposure to securities or markets in which it might not be able to invest directly, or to adjust various portfolio characteristics, including the duration (interest rate volatility) of the Fund’s portfolio of debt securities. Use of derivatives by an Underlying Fund may create investment leverage.
An Underlying Fund may enter into repurchase agreement transactions. An Underlying Fund may invest in mortgage-backed or other asset-backed securities. An Underlying Fund may enter into dollar roll or reverse repurchase agreement transactions. Some investments by an Underlying Fund may be restricted as to resale or otherwise considered to be illiquid. An Underlying Fund may engage in active and frequent trading and so could have a relatively high portfolio turnover rate. The Fund will bear a pro rata share of the Underlying Funds’ expenses. The Fund also bears all of the risks associated with the investment strategies used by the Underlying Funds.
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Principal Risks
The following are the Principal Risks of the Fund. An investment in this Fund is not guaranteed. The value of your investment in the Fund could go down as well as up. You can lose money by investing in the Fund, including losses near, at, or after the target date. There is no guarantee that the Fund will provide adequate income at and through your retirement. Although the descriptions below refer to the risks relating to investment activities of the Fund, many of the risks arise due to the investment activities of the Underlying Funds. Certain risks relating to instruments and strategies used in the management of the Fund are placed first. The significance of any specific risk to an investment in the Fund will vary over time, depending on the composition of the Fund’s portfolio, market conditions, and other factors. You should read all of the risk information presented below carefully, because any one or more of these risks may result in losses to the Fund.
Allocation Risk There is no assurance that allocation decisions will result in the desired performance effects. The limited universe of Underlying Funds and the requirement that a significant percentage of Fund assets be invested in mutual funds advised by MML Advisers, T. Rowe Price, or their affiliates as noted in “Principal Investment Strategies” may adversely affect Fund performance.
Risk of Investment in Other Funds or Pools The Fund is indirectly exposed to all of the risks of the underlying funds, including ETFs, in which it invests, including the risk that the underlying funds will not perform as expected. ETFs are subject to additional risks, including secondary market trading risks and the risk that an ETF’s shares may trade above or below net asset value. The Fund indirectly pays a portion of the expenses incurred by the underlying funds.
Bank Loans Risk Many of the risks associated with bank loans are similar to the risks of investing in below investment grade debt securities. Changes in the financial condition of the borrower or economic conditions or other circumstances may reduce the capacity of the borrower to make principal and interest payments on such instruments and may lead to defaults. Senior secured bank loans are typically supported by collateral; however the value of the collateral may be insufficient to cover the amount owed to the Fund, or the Fund may be prevented or delayed from realizing on the collateral. Some loans may be
unsecured; unsecured loans generally present a greater risk of loss to the Fund if the issuer defaults. If the Fund relies on a third party to administer a loan, the Fund is subject to the risk that the third party will fail to perform its obligations. In addition, if the Fund holds only a participation interest in a loan made by a third party, the Fund’s receipt of payments on the loan will depend on the third party’s willingness and ability to make those payments to the Fund. The settlement time for certain loans is longer than the settlement time for many other types of investments, and the Fund may not receive the payment for a loan sold by it until well after the sale; that cash would be unavailable for payment of redemption proceeds or for reinvestment. Interests in some bank loans may not be readily marketable and may be subject to restrictions on resale. In some cases, negotiations involved in disposing of indebtedness may require weeks to complete. Consequently, some indebtedness may be difficult or impossible to dispose of readily at what the Fund believes to be a fair price. Some loans may not be considered “securities” for certain purposes under the federal securities laws, and purchasers, such as the Fund, therefore may not be entitled to rely on the anti-fraud protections of the federal securities laws.
Below Investment Grade Debt Securities Risk Below investment grade debt securities, commonly known as “junk” or “high yield” bonds, have speculative characteristics and involve greater volatility of price and yield, greater risk of loss of principal and interest, and generally reflect a greater possibility of an adverse change in financial condition that could affect an issuer’s ability to honor its obligations.
Cash Position Risk If the Fund holds a significant portion of its assets in cash or cash equivalents, its investment returns may be adversely affected and the Fund may not achieve its investment objective.
Commodities-Related Investments Risk Commodity prices (including precious metals) can be extremely volatile and exposure to commodities can cause the net asset value of the Fund’s shares to decline or fluctuate in a rapid and unpredictable manner. The values of physical commodities or commodity-linked derivative instruments may be affected by changes in overall market movements, real or perceived inflationary trends, commodity index volatility, changes in interest rates or currency exchange rates, population growth and changing
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demographics, international economic, political, and regulatory developments, or factors affecting a particular region, industry, or commodity. A liquid secondary market may not exist for certain commodity investments, which may make it difficult for the Fund to sell them at a desirable price or at the price at which it is carrying them.
Convertible Securities Risk Convertible securities are subject to the risks of both debt instruments and equity securities. The price of a convertible security may change in response to changes in price of the underlying equity security, the credit quality of the issuer, and interest rates. In general, the values of convertible securities tend to decline as interest rates rise and to rise when interest rates fall. A convertible security generally has less potential for gain or loss than the underlying equity security.
Credit Risk Credit risk is the risk that an issuer, guarantor, or liquidity provider of a fixed income security held by the Fund may be unable or unwilling, or may be perceived (whether by market participants, ratings agencies, pricing services or otherwise) as unable or unwilling, to make timely principal and/or interest payments, or to otherwise honor its obligations. The Fund may also be exposed to the credit risk of its counterparty to repurchase agreements, reverse repurchase agreements, swap transactions, and other derivatives transactions, and to the counterparty’s ability or willingness to perform in accordance with the terms of the transaction. The value of such transactions to the Fund will depend on the willingness and ability of the counterparty to perform its obligations, including among other things the obligation to return collateral or margin to the Fund. If a counterparty becomes bankrupt or otherwise fails to perform its obligations under a derivative contract due to financial difficulties, the Fund may experience significant delays in obtaining any recovery under the derivative contract in a bankruptcy or other reorganization proceeding. The Fund may obtain only a limited recovery or may obtain no recovery in such circumstances.
Derivatives Risk Derivatives can be highly volatile and involve risks different from, and potentially greater than, direct investments, including risks of imperfect correlation between the value of derivatives and underlying assets, counterparty default, potential losses that partially or completely offset gains, and illiquidity. Derivatives can create investment leverage. Losses from derivatives can be substantially greater than the derivatives’
original cost and can sometimes be unlimited. If the value of a derivative does not correlate well with the particular market or asset class the derivative is designed to provide exposure to, the derivative may not have the effect or benefit anticipated. Derivatives can also reduce the opportunity for gains or result in losses by offsetting positive returns in other investments. Many derivatives are traded in the over-the-counter market and not on exchanges.
Equity Securities Risk Although stocks may have the potential to outperform other asset classes over the long term, their prices tend to fluctuate more dramatically over the shorter term. These movements may result from factors affecting individual companies, or from broader influences like changes in interest rates, market conditions, or investor confidence, or announcements of economic, political, or financial information.
Fixed Income Securities Risk The values of fixed income securities typically will decline during periods of rising interest rates, and can also decline in response to changes in the financial condition of the issuer, borrower, counterparty, or underlying collateral assets, or changes in market, economic, industry, political, regulatory, public health, and other conditions affecting a particular type of security or issuer or fixed income securities generally. Certain events, such as market or economic developments, regulatory or government actions, natural disasters, pandemics, terrorist attacks, war, and other geopolitical events can have a dramatic adverse effect on the debt market and the overall liquidity of the market for fixed income securities. During those periods, the Fund may experience high levels of shareholder redemptions, and may have to sell securities at times when the Fund would otherwise not do so, and potentially at unfavorable prices. Certain securities may be difficult to value during such periods. Fixed income securities are subject to interest rate risk (the risk that the value of a fixed income security will fall when interest rates rise), extension risk (the risk that the average life of a security will be extended through a slowing of principal payments), prepayment risk (the risk that a security will be prepaid and the Fund will be required to reinvest at a less favorable rate), duration risk (the risk that longer-term securities may be more sensitive to interest rate changes), inflation risk (the risk that as inflation increases, the present value of the Fund’s fixed income investment typically will decline), and credit risk.
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Foreign Investment Risk; Emerging Markets Risk; Currency Risk Investments in securities of foreign issuers, securities of companies with significant foreign exposure, and foreign currencies can involve additional risks relating to market, industry, political, regulatory, public health, and other conditions. Political, social, diplomatic, and economic developments, U.S. and foreign government action, or threat thereof, such as the imposition of currency or capital blockages, controls, or tariffs, economic and trade sanctions or embargoes, security trading suspensions, entering or exiting trade or other intergovernmental agreements, or the expropriation or nationalization of assets in a particular country, can cause dramatic declines in certain or all securities with exposure to that country and other countries. In the event of nationalization, expropriation, confiscation, or other government action, intervention, or restriction, the Fund could lose its entire investment in a particular foreign issuer or country. There may be quotas or other limits on the ability of the Fund (or clients of the Fund’s investment adviser or subadviser) to invest or maintain investments in securities of issuers in certain countries. Enforcing legal rights can be more difficult, costly, and limited in certain foreign countries and with respect to certain types of investments, and can be particularly difficult against foreign governments. Because non-U.S. securities are normally denominated and traded in currencies other than the U.S. dollar, the value of the Fund’s assets may be affected favorably or unfavorably by changes in currency exchange rates, exchange control regulations, and restrictions or prohibitions on the repatriation of non-U.S. currencies. Income and gains with respect to investments in certain countries may be subject to withholding and other taxes. There may be less information publicly available about a non-U.S. company than about a U.S. company, and many non-U.S. companies are not subject to accounting, auditing, and financial reporting standards, regulatory framework and practices comparable to those in the U.S. The securities of some non-U.S. companies, especially those in emerging markets, are less liquid and at times more volatile than securities of comparable U.S. companies. Emerging markets securities are subject to greater risks than securities issued in developed foreign markets, including less liquidity, less stringent investor protection and disclosure standards, less reliable settlement practices, greater price volatility, higher relative rates of inflation, greater political, economic, and social instability, greater custody
and operational risks, greater risk of new or inconsistent government treatment of or restrictions on issuers and instruments, and greater volatility in currency exchange rates, and are more susceptible to environmental problems. Many emerging market countries are highly reliant on international trade and exports, including the export of commodities. Their economies may be significantly impacted by fluctuations in commodity prices and the global demand for certain commodities. In addition, pandemics and outbreaks of contagious diseases may exacerbate pre-existing problems in emerging market countries with less established health care systems. Frontier markets, a subset of emerging markets, generally have smaller economies and less mature capital markets than emerging markets. As a result, the risks of investing in emerging market countries are magnified in frontier market countries. Frontier markets are more susceptible to having abrupt changes in currency values, less mature markets and settlement practices, and lower trading volumes that could lead to greater price volatility and illiquidity. Non-U.S. transaction costs, such as brokerage commissions and custody costs, may be higher than in the United States. In addition, foreign markets can react differently to market, economic, industry, political, regulatory, geopolitical, public health, and other conditions than the U.S. market.
Frequent Trading/Portfolio Turnover Risk Portfolio turnover generally involves some expense to the Fund and may result in the realization of taxable capital gains (including short-term gains). The trading costs and tax effects associated with portfolio turnover may adversely affect the Fund’s performance.
Geographic Focus Risk When the Fund focuses investments on a particular country, group of countries, or geographic region, its performance will be closely tied to the market, currency, economic, political, or regulatory conditions and developments in those countries or that region, and could be more volatile than the performance of more geographically diversified funds.
Growth Company Risk The prices of growth securities are often highly sensitive to market fluctuations because of their heavy dependence on future earnings or cash flow expectations, and can be more volatile than the market in general.
Hedging Risk The Fund’s attempts at hedging and taking long and short positions in currencies may not be successful and could cause the Fund to lose
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money or fail to get the benefit of a gain on a hedged position. If expected changes to securities prices, interest rates, currency values, and exchange rates, or the creditworthiness of an issuer are not accurately predicted, the Fund could be in a worse position than if it had not entered into such transactions.
Inflation Risk The value of assets or income from the Fund’s investments will be less in the future as inflation decreases the value of money. As inflation increases, the value of the Fund’s assets can decline as can the value of the Fund’s distributions. Inflation rates may change frequently and drastically as a result of various factors, including unexpected shifts in the domestic or global economy (or expectations that such policies will change), and the Fund’s investments may not keep pace with inflation, which may result in losses to the Fund’s investors.
Large Company Risk Large-capitalization stocks as a group could fall out of favor with the market, causing the Fund’s investments in large-capitalization stocks to underperform investments that focus on small- or medium-capitalization stocks. Larger, more established companies may be slow to respond to challenges and may grow more slowly than smaller companies.
Leveraging Risk Instruments and transactions, including derivatives, dollar roll, and reverse repurchase agreement transactions, that create leverage may cause the value of an investment in the Fund to be more volatile, could result in larger losses than if they were not used, and tend to compound the effects of other risks.
Liquidity Risk Certain securities may be difficult (or impossible) to sell or certain positions may be difficult to close out at a desirable time and price, and the Fund may be required to hold an illiquid investment that is declining in value, or it may be required to sell certain illiquid investments at a price or time that is not advantageous in order to meet redemptions or other cash needs. Some securities may be subject to restrictions on resale. There can be no assurance that there will be a liquid market for instruments held by the Fund at any time. The Fund may not receive the proceeds from the sale of certain investments for an extended period.
Management Risk The Fund relies on the manager’s investment analysis and its selection of investments to achieve its investment objective. There can be no assurance that the Fund will
achieve the intended results and the Fund may incur significant losses.
Market Risk The value of the Fund’s portfolio securities may decline, at times sharply and unpredictably, as a result of unfavorable market-induced changes affecting particular industries, sectors, or issuers. Stock and bond markets can decline significantly in response to issuer, market, economic, industry, political, regulatory, geopolitical, public health, and other conditions, as well as investor perceptions of these conditions. The Fund is subject to risks affecting issuers, such as management performance, financial leverage, industry problems, and reduced demand for goods or services.
Mortgage- and Asset-Backed Securities Risk Investments in mortgage- and asset-backed securities subject the Fund to credit risk, interest rate risk, extension risk, and prepayment risk, among other risks. Mortgage-backed and asset-backed securities not issued by a government agency generally involve greater credit risk than securities issued by government agencies. Payment of principal and interest generally depends on the cash flows generated by the underlying assets and the terms of the security. The types of mortgages (for example, residential or commercial mortgages) underlying securities held by the Fund may differ and be affected differently by market factors. Investments that receive only the interest portion or the principal portion of payments on the underlying assets may be highly volatile. Litigation with respect to the representations and warranties given in connection with the issuance of mortgage-backed securities can be an important consideration in investing in such securities, and the outcome of any such litigation could significantly impact the value of the Fund’s mortgage-backed investments.
Preferred Stock Risk Like other equity securities, preferred stock is subject to the risk that its value may decrease based on actual or perceived changes in the business or financial condition of the issuer. In addition, changes in interest rates may adversely affect the value of a preferred stock that pays a fixed dividend. Preferred stocks are also subject to additional risks, such as potentially greater volatility and risks related to deferral, non-cumulative dividends, subordination, liquidity, limited voting rights, and special redemption rights.
Real Estate Risk; REIT Risk Real estate-related investments may decline in value as a result of
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factors affecting the real estate industry, such as the supply of real property in certain markets, changes in zoning laws, environmental regulations and other governmental action, delays in completion of construction, changes in real estate values, changes in property taxes, levels of occupancy, losses due to natural disasters, and local and regional market conditions. Investments in REITs may be subject to risks similar to those associated with direct investment in real estate, as well as additional risks associated with equity investments. As a shareholder in a REIT, the Fund, and indirectly the Fund’s shareholders, would bear its ratable share of the REIT’s expenses and would at the same time continue to pay its own fees and expenses.
Repurchase Agreement Risk  These transactions must be fully collateralized, but involve credit risk to a Fund if the other party should default on its obligation and the Fund is delayed or prevented from recovering the collateral.
Sector Risk The Fund may allocate more of its assets to particular industries or to particular economic, market, or industry sectors than to others. This could increase the volatility of the Fund’s portfolio, and the Fund’s performance may be more susceptible to developments affecting issuers in those industries or sectors than if the Fund invested more broadly.
Small and Mid-Cap Company Risk Market risk and liquidity risk are particularly pronounced for securities of small and medium-sized companies, which may trade less frequently and in smaller volumes than more widely-held securities, and may fluctuate in price more than other securities. Their shares can be less liquid than those of larger companies, especially during market declines. Small and medium-sized companies may have limited product lines, markets, or financial resources and may be dependent on a limited management group; they may have been recently organized and have little or no track record of success.
Sovereign Debt Obligations Risk Investments in debt securities issued by governments or by government agencies and instrumentalities involve the risk that the governmental entities responsible for repayment may be unable or unwilling to pay interest and repay principal when due. Many sovereign debt obligations may be rated below investment grade (“junk” or “high yield” bonds). Any restructuring of a sovereign debt obligation held by the Fund will likely have a significant adverse effect on the value of the obligation. In the
event of default of sovereign debt, the Fund may be unable to pursue legal action against the sovereign issuer or to realize on collateral securing the debt.
U.S. Government Securities Risk Obligations of certain U.S. Government agencies and instrumentalities are not backed by the full faith and credit of the U.S. Government, and there can be no assurance that the U.S. Government would provide financial support to such agencies and instrumentalities.
Valuation Risk The Fund is subject to the risk of mispricing or improper valuation of its investments, in particular to the extent that its securities are fair valued.
Value Company Risk The value investment approach entails the risk that the market will not recognize a security’s intrinsic value for a long time, or that a stock the investment adviser or subadviser judges to be undervalued may actually be appropriately priced.
Performance Information
The following bar chart and table provide some indication of the risks of investing in the Fund. The bar chart shows changes in the Fund’s performance from year to year for Class I shares. The table shows how the Fund’s average annual returns for 1 year, and since inception, compare with those of a broad measure of market performance. Past performance (before and after taxes) is not necessarily an indication of how the Fund will perform in the future. More up-to-date performance information is available at https://​www.massmutual.com/funds or by calling 1-888-309-3539.
Annual Performance
Class I Shares
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Highest
Quarter:
2Q ’20,