10,425,000 Shares
BlackRock Corporate High Yield Fund, Inc.
Common Stock 

 
PART I
 
INFORMATION ABOUT BLACKROCK CORPORATE HIGH YIELD FUND, INC.
 
 
Item 1. Outside Front Cover
 
1.a.
The registrant's name is BlackRock Corporate High Yield Fund, Inc. (the "Fund").
 
1.b.
The Fund is registered under the Investment Company Act of 1940, as amended (the "1940 Act"), as a diversified, closed-end management investment company.  The Fund’s primary investment objective is to provide shareholders with current income. The Fund’s secondary investment objective is to provide shareholders with capital appreciation. The Fund’s investment objectives are fundamental policies and may not be changed without the approval of a majority of the outstanding voting securities of the Fund (as defined in the 1940 Act). There can be no assurance that the investment objectives of the Fund will be realized.
 
The Fund seeks to achieve its investment objectives by investing primarily in a diversified portfolio of fixed income securities which are rated below investment grade by the established rating services (Ba or lower by Moody’s Investors Service, Inc. ("Moody’s"), BB or lower by Standard & Poor’s Ratings Services ("Standard & Poor’s" or "S&P") or BB or lower by Fitch, Inc. ("Fitch")) or, if unrated, are considered by the Investment Advisor to be of comparable quality. The Fund may invest directly in fixed income securities or synthetically through the use of derivatives.  Debt securities rated below investment grade commonly are referred to as "junk bonds."
 
Under normal market conditions, the Fund invests at least 80% of its net assets (including assets acquired from the sale of preferred stock), plus the amount of any borrowings for investment purposes, in high yield securities, including high yield bonds (commonly referred to as 'junk bonds"), corporate loans, convertible debt securities and preferred securities. This is a non-fundamental policy and may be changed by the Board of Directors of the Fund provided that stockholders are provided with at least 60 days' prior written notice of any change, unless such change was previously approved by shareholders, as required by the rules under the 1940 Act.
 
The Fund may invest in securities of any maturity.
 
The Fund may engage in various portfolio strategies both to seek to increase its return and to hedge its portfolio against movements in interest rates and in the securities markets through the use of derivatives, such as indexed and inverse securities, options, futures, options on futures, interest rate transactions, credit default swaps and short selling. There can be no assurance that the Fund will employ these strategies or that, if employed, they will be effective.
 
1.c.
The Fund is offering up to 10,425,000 shares of common stock.
 
1.d.
You should read this Prospectus, which concisely sets forth information about the Fund, before deciding whether to invest in the Fund's common stock and retain it for future reference.  Additional information about the Fund and materials incorporated by reference have been filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission (the "SEC") and are available upon either written or oral request, free of charge, by calling 1-800-882-0052, by writing to the Fund, or may be found on the SEC's website at www.sec.gov. You may also request a copy of this Prospectus, annual and semi-annual reports, other information about the Fund, and/or make investor inquiries by calling 1-800-882-0052, or by writing to the Fund.  The Fund's annual and semi-annual reports are also available on the Fund's website at www.blackrock.com free of charge.  This reference to BlackRock's website is intended to allow public access to information regarding the Fund and does not, and is not intended to, incorporate BlackRock's website into this Prospectus.
 
You should not construe the contents of this Prospectus as legal, tax or financial advice. You should consult with your own professional advisors as to the legal, tax, financial or other matters relevant to the suitability of an investment in the Fund.
 
 
I-1

 
 
The Fund's common stock does not represent a deposit or an obligation of, and are not guaranteed or endorsed by, any bank or other insured depository institution, and are not federally insured by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, the Federal Reserve Board or any other government agency.
 
1.e.
This Prospectus is dated  December 22, 2015.
 
1.f.
Not applicable.
 
1.g.
The Fund's common stock is listed on the New York Stock Exchange ("NYSE") under the symbol "HYT." Sales of the Fund's common stock, if any, under this Prospectus may be made in transactions that are deemed to be "at the market" as defined in Rule 415 under the Securities Act of 1933, as amended (the "Securities Act"), which currently would only include sales made directly on the NYSE.  The minimum price on any day at which Fund common stock may be sold will not be less than the current net asset value ("NAV") per share plus the per share amount of the commission to be paid to the Fund's distributor (the "Minimum Price"), BlackRock Investments, LLC (the "Distributor").  The Fund and the Distributor will determine whether any sales of the Fund's common stock will be authorized on a particular day; the Fund and the Distributor, however, will not authorize sales of the Fund's common stock if the per share price of the shares is less than the Minimum Price. The Fund and the Distributor may also not authorize sales of the Fund's common stock on a particular day even if the per share price of the shares is equal to or greater than the Minimum Price, or may only authorize a fixed number of shares to be sold on any particular day. The Fund and the Distributor will have full discretion regarding whether sales of shares of the Fund’s common stock will be authorized on a particular day and, if so, in what amounts. As of December 21, 2015, the last reported sale price for the Fund's common stock on the NYSE was $9.73 per share.
 
The Distributor has entered into a sub-placement agent agreement, dated December 17, 2014 (the "Sub-Placement Agent Agreement"), with UBS Securities LLC (the "Sub-Placement Agent") with respect to the Fund relating to the common stock offered by this Prospectus.  In accordance with the terms of the Sub-Placement Agent Agreement, the Fund may offer and sell its common stock from time to time through the Sub-Placement Agent as sub-placement agent for the offer and sale of its common stock.  The Fund will compensate the Distributor with respect to sales of common stock at a commission rate of 1.00% of the gross proceeds of the sale of the Fund's common stock.  Out of this commission, the Distributor will compensate broker-dealers at a rate of up to 0.80% of the gross sales proceeds of the sale of the Fund's common stock sold by that broker-dealer.
 
1.h.
Neither the SEC nor any state securities commission has approved or disapproved of these securities or determined if this Prospectus is truthful or complete. Any representation to the contrary is a criminal offense.
 
1.i.
The Fund's common stock has traded both at a premium and a discount to NAV. The Fund cannot predict whether its common stock will trade at a premium or discount to NAV in the future. The provisions of the 1940 Act generally require that the public offering price of common stock (less any underwriting commissions and discounts) must equal or exceed the NAV per share of a company's common stock (calculated within 48 hours of pricing). The Fund's issuance of common stock may have an adverse effect on prices for the Fund's common shares in the secondary market by increasing the number of shares of common stock available in the market, which may put downward pressure on the market price for the Fund's common stock. Shares of common stock of closed-end investment companies frequently trade at a discount from NAV, which may increase investors' risk of loss.
 
1.j.
Investing in the Fund's common stock involves certain risks that are described in Item 8.3 beginning on page I-19 of Part I of this Prospectus, and under Item 8 in Part II of this Prospectus under "Risk Factors," beginning on page II-30 of Part II. Certain of these risks are summarized in Item 3.2 beginning on page I-10 of Part I of this Prospectus.
 
1.k.
Not applicable.
 
2.
Not applicable.
 
 
Item 2. Cover Pages; Other Offering Information
 
1.
Exchange listing: see Item 1.g.
 
2.
Not applicable.
 
3.
Not applicable.
 
 
I-2

 
 
Item 3. Fee Table and Synopsis
 
1.
Shareholder Transaction Expenses
 
Sales load paid by you (as a percentage of offering price)
1.00%(1)
Offering expenses borne by the Fund (as a percentage of offering price)
0.01%(2)
Dividend reinvestment plan fees
$0.02 per share for open-market purchases of common stock(3)
 
 
 
Percentage of net assets
attributable to common stock
Annual Expenses
     
Management Fee(4) 
 
0.86%
 
Interest Expense(5) 
 
0.41%
 
Other Expenses(6) 
 
0.10%
 
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses(7) 
 
1.37%
 
 

 
(1)
Represents the estimated commission with respect to the Fund's common stock being sold in this offering. There is no guarantee that there will be any sales of the Fund's common stock pursuant to this Prospectus. Actual sales of the Fund's common stock under this Prospectus, if any, may be less than as set forth under "Capitalization" below. In addition, the price per share of any such sale may be greater or less than the price set forth under "Capitalization" below, depending on market price of the Fund's common stock at the time of any such sale.
 
 
(2)
Based on a sales price per share of $11.62, which represents a small premium to the Minimum Price, i.e., NAV plus sales load of the Fund's common stock on December 4, 2015.  Offering expenses generally include, but are not limited to, the preparation, review and filing with the SEC of the Fund's registration statement (including this Prospectus), the preparation, review and filing of any associated marketing or similar materials, costs associated with the printing, mailing or other distribution of the Prospectus and/or marketing materials, associated filing fees, NYSE listing fees, and legal and auditing fees associated with the offering.
 
 
(3)
The Reinvestment Plan Agent's (as defined under "Item 10—Dividend Reinvestment Plan" in Part II) fees for the handling of the reinvestment of dividends will be paid by the Fund. However, you will pay a $0.02 per share fee incurred in connection with open-market purchases, which will be deducted from the value of the dividend. You will also be charged a $2.50 sales fee and pay a $0.15 per share fee if you direct the Reinvestment Plan Agent to sell your shares of common stock held in a dividend reinvestment account. Per share fees include any applicable brokerage commissions the Reinvestment Plan Agent is required to pay.
 
 
(4)
The Fund currently pays BlackRock Advisors, LLC, its investment adviser (the “Investment Advisor”), a contractual management fee at an annual rate of 0.60% based on an aggregate of (i) the Fund's average daily Net Assets and (ii) the proceeds of any outstanding debt securities or borrowings used for leverage (together, "average daily Managed Assets").  “Net Assets” means the total assets of the Fund minus the sum of the accrued liabilities.  The liquidation preference of any outstanding preferred stock (other than accumulated dividends) is not considered a liability in determining the Fund’s net asset value.  The Fund uses leverage, in the form of a credit facility, which as of August 31, 2015 amounted to approximately 29% of the Fund's Managed Assets (approximately 41% of the Fund's net assets).  "Managed Assets" means the total assets of the Fund minus the sum of the Fund's accrued liabilities (other than the aggregate indebtedness constituting financial leverage). The Fund's net assets attributable to common stock are the Fund's Managed Assets minus the value of the Fund's assets attributable to indebtedness constituting financial leverage. Thus, when the Fund uses leverage, its net assets attributable to common stock are less than its Managed Assets and its expenses (including the management fee) stated as a percentage of its net assets attributable to common stock are greater than they would be if stated as a percentage of its Managed Assets. This table reflects the fact that you, as a common shareholder, bear the expenses of the Fund's use of leverage in the form of higher fees as a percentage of the Fund's net assets attributable to common stock than if the Fund did not use leverage.
 
 
(5)
Reflects leverage, in the form of a credit facility, in an amount equal to approximately 29% of the Fund's Managed Assets (approximately 41% of the Fund's net assets) as of August 31, 2015. The interest expense borne by the Fund will vary over time in accordance with the level of the Fund's use of leverage and variations in market interest rates. Interest expense is required to be treated as an expense of the Fund for accounting purposes.
 
 
(6)
Based on the fiscal year ended August 31, 2015.
 
 
(7)
Represents total annual expense including interest. The total annual expense excluding interest is 0.96%. The Investment Advisor voluntarily agreed to waive its investment advisory fees by the amount of investment advisory fees the Fund pays to the Investment Advisor indirectly through its investment in affiliated money market funds.  However, the Investment Advisor does not waive its investment advisory fees by the amount of investment advisory fees paid in connection with the Fund's investment in other affiliated investment companies, if any. This waiver amounted to less than 0.01% of the Fund's net assets attributable to common stock for the fiscal year ended August 31, 2015. See Item 20 below.
 
 
I-3

 
 
The purpose of the foregoing table and the example below is to help you understand all fees and expenses that you, as a holder of common stock of the Fund, bear directly or indirectly. The foregoing table should not be considered a representation of the Fund's future expenses. Actual future expenses may be greater or less than shown. Except where the context suggests otherwise, whenever this Prospectus contains a reference to fees or expenses paid by "you" or "us" or that "we" will pay fees or expenses, shareholders will indirectly bear such fees or expenses as investors in the Fund.
 
The following example illustrates the expenses (including the sales load of $10.00 and offering costs of $0.10 that you would pay on a $1,000 investment in common stock, assuming (i) total net annual expenses of 1.37% of net assets attributable to common stock in years 1 through 10, and (ii) a 5% annual return:
 
   
1 Year
 
3 Years
 
5 Years
 
10 Years
Total expenses incurred
 
$24
 
$53
 
$84
 
$173

The example should not be considered a representation of future expenses. The example assumes that the "Other expenses" set forth in the Annual Expenses table are accurate and that all dividends and distributions are reinvested at NAV.  Actual expenses may be greater or less than those assumed.  Moreover, the Fund's actual rate of return may be greater or less than the hypothetical 5% return shown in the example.

Capitalization

The Fund may offer and sell up to 10,425,000 shares of its common stock, $0.10 par value per share, from time to time through the Sub-Placement Agent as sub-placement agent under this Prospectus. There is no guarantee that there will be any sales of the Fund's common stock pursuant to this Prospectus. The table below assumes that the Fund will sell 10,425,000 shares of its common stock at a price of $11.62 per share (which represents a small premium to the Minimum Price – i.e., NAV plus sales load of the Fund's common stock on December 4, 2015). Actual sales, if any, of the Fund's common stock under this Prospectus may be greater or less than $11.62 per share, depending on the market price of the Fund's common stock at the time of any such sale and/or the Fund's NAV for purposes of calculating the Minimum Price. The Fund and the Distributor will determine whether any sales of the Fund's common stock will be authorized on a particular day; the Fund and the Distributor, however, will not authorize sales of the Fund's common stock if the per share price of the shares is less than the Minimum Price. The Fund and the Distributor may also not authorize sales of the Fund's common stock on a particular day even if the per share price of the shares is equal to or greater than the Minimum Price, or may only authorize a fixed number of shares to be sold on any particular day. The Fund and the Distributor will have full discretion regarding whether sales of shares of the Fund's common stock will be authorized on a particular day and, if so, in what amounts.

The following table sets forth the Fund's capitalization (1) on a historical basis as of August 31, 2015 (audited); and (2) on a pro forma as adjusted basis to reflect the assumed sale of 10,425,000 shares of common stock at $11.62 per share, in an offering under this Prospectus, after deducting the assumed commission of $1,251,000 (representing an estimated commission to the Distributor of 1.00% of the gross proceeds of the sale of Fund common stock, out of which the Distributor will compensate broker-dealers at a rate of up to 0.80% of the gross sales proceeds of the sale of the Fund's common stock sold by that broker-dealer).

   
As of August 31, 2015
(audited)
   
Pro Forma
(unaudited)
 
         
As adjusted
 
Common shares outstanding, $0.10 par value per share
    126,599,668       137,024,668  
Paid-in capital
  $ 1,782,827,848     $ 1,902,715,348  
Undistributed net investment income
  $ 22,469,916     $ 22,469,916  
Accumulated net realized loss
  $ (181,438,897 )   $ (181,438,897 )
Net unrealized appreciation (depreciation)
  $ (96,552,332 )   $ (96,552,332 )
Net Assets
  $ 1,527,306,535     $ 1,647,194,035  
Net asset value per share
  $ 12.06     $ 12.02  
 
 
I-4

 

2.
A summary of this Prospectus is set forth below.  This is only a summary of certain information contained in this Prospectus relating to the Fund. This summary may not contain all of the information that you should consider before investing in the Fund's common stock. You should review the more detailed information contained in this Prospectus.

The Fund
 
BlackRock Corporate High Yield Fund, Inc. is registered under the 1940 Act, as a diversified, closed-end management investment company and has been operational since 2003. The Fund was known as Corporate High Yield Fund VI, Inc. prior to September 14, 2006 and BlackRock Corporate High Yield Fund VI, Inc. prior to March 3, 2014.
     
The Offering
 
The Fund is offering up to 10,425,000 shares of common stock in transactions that are deemed to be "at the market" as defined in Rule 415 under the Securities Act, which currently would only include sales made directly on the NYSE.  The minimum price on any day at which Fund common stock may be sold will not be less than the current NAV per share plus the per share amount of the commission to be paid to the Distributor.  The Fund and the Distributor will determine whether any sales of the Fund's common stock will be authorized on a particular day; the Fund and the Distributor, however, will not authorize sales of the Fund's common stock if the per share price of the shares is less than the Minimum Price. The Fund and the Distributor may also not authorize sales of the Fund's common stock on a particular day even if the per share price of the shares is equal to or greater than the Minimum Price, or may only authorize a fixed number of shares to be sold on any particular day. The Fund and the Distributor will have full discretion regarding whether sales of shares of the Fund's common stock will be authorized on a particular day and, if so, in what amounts. As of December 21, 2015, the last reported sale price for the Fund's common stock on the NYSE was $9.73 per share.
 
The Distributor has entered into the Sub-Placement Agent Agreement with the Sub-Placement Agent with respect to the Fund relating to the common stock offered by this Prospectus.  In accordance with the terms of the Sub-Placement Agent Agreement, the Fund may offer and sell its common stock from time to time through the Sub-Placement Agent as sub-placement agent for the offer and sale of its common stock.  The Fund will compensate the Distributor with respect to sales of common stock at a commission rate of 1.00% of the gross proceeds of the sale of the Fund's common stock.  Out of this commission, the Distributor will compensate broker-dealers at a rate of up to 0.80% of the gross sales proceeds of the sale of the Fund's common stock sold by that broker-dealer.
 
The Fund's common stock has traded both at a premium and a discount to NAV. The Fund cannot predict whether its common stock will trade at a premium or discount to NAV in the future. The provisions of the 1940 Act generally require that the public offering price of common stock (less any underwriting commissions and discounts) must equal or exceed the NAV per share of a company's common stock (calculated within 48 hours of pricing). The Fund's issuance of common stock may have an adverse effect on prices for the Fund's common stock in the secondary market by increasing the number of shares of common stock available in the market, which may put downward pressure on the market price for the Fund's common stock. Shares of common stock of closed-end investment companies frequently trade at a discount from NAV, which may increase investors' risk of loss.
     
Investment Objectives
 
The Fund’s primary investment objective is to provide shareholders with current income. The Fund’s secondary investment objective is to provide shareholders with capital appreciation. The Fund’s investment objectives are fundamental policies and may not be changed without the approval of a majority of the outstanding voting securities of the Fund (as defined in the 1940 Act). There can be no assurance that the investment objectives of the Fund will be realized.
 
 
I-5

 

Investment Strategy
 
BlackRock Advisors, LLC is the Fund's investment adviser. BlackRock Financial Management, Inc., the Investment Advisor's affiliate, was the Fund's investment sub-adviser until July 1, 2014 (the "Sub-Advisor"). The Investment Advisor's and the Fund's sub-advisory arrangement with the Sub-Advisor expired as of July 1, 2014.
 
In selecting debt instruments and other securities for the Fund, BlackRock will seek to identify issuers and industries that BlackRock believes are likely to experience stable or improving financial conditions. BlackRock's analysis will include:
 
·  credit research on the issuers' financial strength;
·  assessment of the issuers' ability to meet principal and interest payments;
·  general industry trends;
·  the issuers' managerial strength;
·  analysis of deal structure and covenants;
·  changing financial conditions;
·  borrowing requirements or debt maturity schedules; and
·  the issuers' responsiveness to changes in business conditions and interest rates.
 
BlackRock will consider relative values among issuers based on anticipated cash flow, interest or dividend coverage, asset coverage and earnings prospects. Using these tools, BlackRock will seek to add consistent value and control performance volatility consistent with the Fund's investment objectives and policies. BlackRock believes this strategy should enhance the Fund's ability to achieve its investment objectives.
 
BlackRock's analysis continues on an ongoing basis for any debt instruments or other securities in which the Fund has invested. Although BlackRock uses due care in making such analysis, there can be no assurance that such analysis will reveal factors that may impair the value of the debt instruments.
     
Investment Policies
 
The Fund seeks to achieve its investment objectives by investing primarily in a diversified portfolio of fixed income securities which are rated below investment grade by the established rating services (Ba or lower by Moody’s, BB or lower by Standard & Poor’s or BB or lower by Fitch) or, if unrated, are considered by the Investment Advisor to be of comparable quality. See Appendix A—“Ratings of Investments” for additional information concerning rating categories. The Fund may invest directly in fixed income securities or synthetically through the use of derivatives.  The Fund may invest in securities of any maturity.
 
Under normal market conditions, the Fund invests at least 80% of its net assets (including assets acquired from the sale of preferred stock), plus the amount of any borrowings for investment purposes, in high yield securities, including high yield bonds, corporate loans, convertible debt securities and preferred securities. This is a non-fundamental policy and may be changed by the Board of Directors of the Fund provided that stockholders are provided with at least 60 days prior written notice of any change, unless such change was previously approved by shareholders, as required by the rules under the 1940 Act.
 
High yield securities include high yield bonds (commonly referred to as “junk bonds”), corporate loans, mortgage-related securities, convertible debt securities and preferred securities, which are rated below investment grade or, if unrated, are considered by the Investment Advisor to be of comparable quality.  The high yield securities in which the Fund invests may also include credit linked notes, structured notes or other instruments evidencing interests in special purpose vehicles or trusts that hold interests in high yield securities.
 
 
I-6

 
 
   
The Fund may receive warrants or other non-income producing equity securities in connection with its investments in high yield securities, including in unit offerings, in an exchange offer, upon the conversion of a convertible security, or upon the restructuring or bankruptcy of investments owned by the Fund. The Fund may continue to hold such securities until, in the Investment Advisor’s judgment in light of current market conditions, it is advantageous to effect a disposition of such securities.
 
Although the Fund will invest primarily in below investment grade securities, other than with respect to Distressed Securities (described below), it will not invest in securities in the lowest rating categories (Ca or lower by Moody’s, CC or lower by Standard & Poor’s or CC or lower by Fitch) unless the Investment Advisor believes that the financial condition of the issuer or the protection afforded to the particular securities is stronger than would otherwise be indicated by such low ratings.
 
The Fund may invest up to 10% of its total assets in high yield securities which are the subject of bankruptcy proceedings or otherwise in default as to the repayment of principal and/or payment of interest at the time of acquisition by the Fund or are rated in the lowest rating categories (Ca or lower by Moody’s, CC or lower by Standard & Poor’s or CC or lower by Fitch) or, if unrated, are considered by the Investment Advisor to be of comparable quality (“Distressed Securities”).
 
The Fund may invest, without limitation, in securities of issuers domiciled outside the United States or that are denominated in various foreign currencies and multinational currency units.
 
The Fund may invest up to 25% of its total assets in corporate loans extended to borrowers by commercial banks or other financial institutions (“Corporate Loans”). The Corporate Loans in which the Fund may invest may be rated below investment grade (Ba or lower by Moody’s, BB or lower by Standard & Poor’s or BB or lower by Fitch) or, if unrated, are considered by the Investment Advisor to be of comparable quality.
 
The Fund may invest up to 15% of its total assets in convertible debt securities and up to 15% of its total assets in preferred securities, including preferred securities that may be converted into common stock or other securities of the same or a different issuer, and non-convertible preferred securities. The convertible debt securities and preferred securities in which the Fund may invest may be rated below investment grade by the established rating services (Ba or lower by Moody’s, BB or lower by Standard & Poor’s or BB or lower by Fitch) or, if unrated, are considered by the Investment Advisor to be of comparable quality.
 
The Fund has no limitation on the amount of its investments that are not readily marketable or are subject to restrictions on resale.
 
The Fund may engage in strategic transactions both to seek to increase its return and to hedge its portfolio against movements in interest rates and in the securities markets through the use of derivatives, such as indexed and inverse securities, options, futures, options on futures, interest rate transactions, credit default swaps and short selling. There can be no assurance that the Fund will employ these strategies or that, if employed, they will be effective. See Item 8 in Part I and Part II.
 
The Fund is classified as diversified within the meaning of the 1940 Act, which means that it is must satisfy the 5% and 10% requirements described in item (ii)
 
 
I-7

 
 
   
below with respect to 75% of its total assets.  The Fund's investments will be limited so as to qualify the Fund as a "regulated investment company" for purposes of Federal tax laws.  Requirements for qualification as a "regulated investment company" include limiting its investments so that, at the close of each quarter of the taxable year, (i) not more than 25% of the market value of the Fund's total assets will be invested in (A) the securities of a single issuer (other than U.S. government securities and securities of other regulated investment companies), (B) the securities of two or more issuers (other than securities of other regulated investment companies) controlled by the Fund and engaged in the same, similar or related trades or businesses, or (C) the securities of one or more qualified publicly traded partnerships, and (ii) with respect to 50% of the market value of its total assets, not more than 5% of the market value of its total assets will be invested in the securities of a single issuer and the Fund will not own more than 10% of the outstanding voting securities of a single issuer (other than U.S. government securities and securities of other regulated investment companies).
 
Tax-related limitations may be changed by the Board to the extent appropriate in light of changes to applicable tax requirements.
 
For a discussion of risk factors that may affect the Fund's ability to achieve its investment objectives, see "Risk Factors" under Item 8 in Part II.
     
Leverage
 
The Fund currently utilizes leverage for investment purposes in the form of a bank credit facility.  As of August 31, 2015, this leverage represented approximately 29% of the Fund's Managed Assets (approximately 41% of the Fund's net assets).  At times, the Fund could utilize leverage through borrowings, the issuance of short term debt securities, the issuance of shares of preferred stock or a combination thereof.  The Fund has the ability to utilize leverage through borrowings or the issuance of short term debt securities in an amount up to 33 1/3% of the value of its Managed Assets (which includes the amount obtained from such borrowings or debt issuance).  The Fund also has the ability to utilize leverage through the issuance of shares of preferred stock in an amount up to 50% of the value of its Managed Assets (which includes the amount obtained from such issuance).  The Fund may also leverage through the use of reverse repurchase agreements.
 
There can be no assurance that the Fund will borrow in order to leverage its assets or, if it does, what percentage of the Fund's assets such borrowings will represent.  The Fund does not currently anticipate issuing any preferred stock.
 
The Fund also may borrow money as a temporary measure for extraordinary or emergency purposes, including the payment of dividends and the settlement of securities transactions which otherwise might require untimely dispositions of Fund securities.
 
See "Leverage" under Item 8 in Part II and the discussion of the Fund's capital structure under Item 10 in Part II.
 
The use of leverage is subject to numerous risks.  When leverage is employed, the NAV and market price of the common stock and the yield to holders of common stock will be more volatile than if leverage were not used. For example, a rise in short-term interest rates, which currently are near historically low levels, will cause the Fund's NAV to decline more than if the Fund had not used leverage. A reduction in the Fund's NAV may cause a reduction in the market price of its common stock. The Fund cannot assure you that the use of leverage will result in a higher yield on the common stock.   When the Fund uses leverage, the management fees payable to the Investment Advisor will be higher
 
 
I-8

 
 
   
than if the Fund did not use leverage because these fees are calculated on the basis of the Fund's Managed Assets, which include the proceeds of leverage.  The Fund's leveraging strategy may not be successful.
 
See "Risk Factors—Leverage Risk" under Item 8 in Part II.
     
Investment Advisor
 
BlackRock Advisors, LLC is the Fund's investment adviser. The Investment Advisor receives an annual fee, payable monthly, in an amount equal to 0.60% of the average daily value of the Fund's Managed Assets.
     
Distributions
 
The Fund intends to make regular monthly cash distributions of all or a portion of its net investment income to holders of the Fund's shares of common stock. The Fund intends to pay any capital gains distributions at least annually. A return of capital distribution may involve a return of the shareholder’s original investment. Though not currently taxable, such a distribution may lower a shareholder’s basis in the Fund, thus potentially subjecting the shareholder to future tax consequences in connection with the sale of Fund shares, even if sold at a loss to the shareholder’s original investment. When total distributions exceed total return performance for the period, the difference will reduce the Fund’s total assets and NAV and, therefore, could have the effect of increasing the Fund’s expense ratio and reducing the amount of assets the Fund has available for long term investment.
     
   
Shareholders will automatically have all dividends and distributions reinvested in common stock of the Fund in accordance with the Fund's dividend reinvestment plan, unless an election is made to receive cash by contacting the Reinvestment Plan Agent (as defined herein), at (800) 699-1236. See "Dividend Reinvestment Plan" under Item 10 in Part II.
     
   
The Fund reserves the right to change its distribution policy and the basis for establishing the rate of its monthly distributions at any time and may do so without prior notice to common shareholders. See Item 10.1 in Part I and "Distributions" under Item 10 in Part II.
     
Listing
 
The Fund's common stock is listed on the NYSE under the symbol "HYT."
     
Custodian and Transfer Agent
 
State Street Bank and Trust Company serves as the Fund's custodian, and Computershare Trust Company, N.A. serves as the Fund's transfer agent.
     
Administrator
 
State Street Bank and Trust Company serves as the Fund's administrator and fund accountant.
     
Market Price of Shares
 
Common shares of closed-end investment companies frequently trade at prices lower than their NAV. The Fund cannot assure you that its common stock will trade at a price higher than or equal to NAV. The Fund's common stock trades in the open market at market prices that are a function of several factors, including dividend levels (which are in turn affected by expenses), NAV, call protection for portfolio securities, portfolio credit quality, liquidity, dividend stability, relative demand for and supply of the common shares in the market, general market and economic conditions and other factors.  The Fund's common stock is designed primarily for long-term investors and you should not purchase common stock of the Fund if you intend to sell it shortly after purchase. The issuance of additional common stock pursuant to this Prospectus may also have an adverse effect on prices for the Fund's common stock in the secondary market by increasing the supply of common stock available for sale.
 
 
I-9

 

Special Risk Considerations
 
An investment in the Fund's common stock involves risk. You should consider carefully the risks identified below, which are described in detail under "Risk Factors" beginning on page II-30 of Part II of this Prospectus.
 
Principal risks of investing in the Fund include:
 
·      Interest Rate Risk. Interest rate risk is the risk that prices of bonds and other fixed-income securities will increase as interest rates fall and decrease as interest rates rise. This risk is heightened given that certain interest rates are at historical lows.
 
·      Issuer Risk. The value of fixed income securities may decline for a number of reasons which directly relate to the issuer, such as management performance, financial leverage, reduced demand for the issuer's goods and services, historical and prospective earnings of the issuer and the value of the assets of the issuer.
 
·      Credit Risk. Credit risk is the risk that one or more fixed income securities in the Fund's portfolio will decline in price or fail to pay interest or principal when due because the issuer of the security experiences a decline in its financial status.
 
·      Prepayment Risk. During periods of declining interest rates, borrowers may exercise their option to prepay principal earlier than scheduled.
 
·      Reinvestment Risk. Reinvestment risk is the risk that income from the Fund's portfolio will decline if the Fund invests the proceeds from matured, traded or called fixed income securities at market interest rates that are below the Fund portfolio's current earnings rate.
 
·      Duration and Maturity Risk. The Fund may incur costs in seeking to adjust the portfolio average duration or maturity.  There can be no assurance that the Investment Advisor's assessment of current and projected market conditions will be correct or that any strategy to adjust the portfolio's duration or maturity will be successful at any given time.
 
·      Corporate Bonds Risk. The market value of a corporate bond generally may be expected to rise and fall inversely with interest rates. The market value of intermediate and longer-term corporate bonds is generally more sensitive to changes in interest rates than is the market value of shorter-term corporate bonds. The market value of a corporate bond also may be affected by factors directly related to the issuer, such as investors' perceptions of the creditworthiness of the issuer, the issuer's financial performance, perceptions of the issuer in the market place, performance of management of the issuer, the issuer's capital structure and use of financial leverage and demand for the issuer's goods and services.
 
·      Mortgage Related Securities Risks. The risks associated with MBS include: credit risk associated with the performance of the underlying mortgage properties and of the borrowers owning these properties; risks associated with their structure and execution (including the collateral, the process by which principal and interest payments are allocated and distributed to investors and how credit losses affect the issuing vehicles and the return to investors in such MBS); whether the collateral represents a fixed set of specific assets or accounts, whether the underlying collateral assets are revolving or closed-end, under what terms (including maturity of the MBS) any remaining balance in the accounts may revert to the issuing entity and the extent to which the entity that is the actual source of the collateral assets is obligated to provide support to the issuing vehicles or to the investors in such MBS; risks associated with the servicer of the underlying mortgages; adverse
 
 
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changes in economic conditions and circumstances, which are more likely to have an adverse impact on MBS secured by loans on certain types of commercial properties than on those secured by loans on residential properties; prepayment risk, which can lead to significant fluctuations in the value of the MBS; loss of all or part of the premium, if any, paid; and decline in the market value of the security, whether resulting from changes in interest rates, prepayments on the underlying mortgage collateral or perceptions of the credit risk associated with the underlying mortgage collateral.
 
·      Below Investment Grade Securities ("Junk Bonds") Risk. The Fund may invest in securities that are rated, at the time of investment, below investment grade quality (rated Ba/BB or below, or unrated but judged to be of comparable quality by the Investment Advisor), which are commonly referred to as "high yield" or "junk" bonds and are regarded as predominantly speculative with respect to the issuer's capacity to pay interest and repay principal. Issuers of high yield bonds are not perceived to be as strong financially as those with higher credit ratings. These issuers are more vulnerable to financial setbacks and recession than more creditworthy issuers, which may impair their ability to make interest and principal payments.
 
·      Senior Loans Risk. Senior loans typically hold the most senior position in the capital structure of the issuing entity, are typically secured with specific collateral and typically have a claim on the assets and/or stock of the borrower that is senior to that held by subordinated debt holders and stockholders of the borrower. The Fund's investments in senior loans are typically below investment grade and are considered speculative because of the credit risk of their issuer.
 
 
3.
Not applicable.
 
 
I-11

 
 
Item 4. Financial Highlights

1.
The following table includes selected data for a common share outstanding throughout the period and other performance information derived from the Fund's financial statements. It should be read in conjunction with the Fund's financial statements and notes thereto, which are incorporated by reference into this Prospectus.  The following information with respect to the fiscal years ended August 31, 2011, August 31, 2012, August 31, 2013, August 31, 2014 and August 31, 2015 has been audited by Deloitte & Touche, LLP, independent registered public accountants, whose report thereon is incorporated by reference into this Prospectus. See Item 24.
 
   
Year Ended August 31,
 
      2015 1     2014 1     2013 1     2012 1     2011       2010       2009       2008       2007       2006  
Per Share Operating Performance
                                                                               
Net asset value, beginning of period
  $ 13.47     $ 12.62     $ 12.32     $ 11.49     $ 11.38     $ 9.68     $ 11.89     $ 13.81     $ 14.12     $ 15.08  
Net investment income
    0.87 2     0.98 2     1.00 2     1.04 2     1.06 2     1.05 2     1.05 2     1.16 2     1.18 2     1.16 2
Net realized and unrealized gain (loss)
    (1.31 )     0.91       0.41       0.83       0.05       1.67       (2.07 )     (1.87 )     (0.39 )     (0.49 )
Net increase (decrease) from investment operations
    (0.44 )     1.89       1.41       1.87       1.11       2.72       (1.02 )     (0.71 )     0.79       0.67  
Dividends and distributions from3
                                                                               
Net investment income
    (0.97 )     (1.04 )     (1.11 )     (1.04 )     (1.00 )     (1.02 )     (1.19 )     (1.21 )     (1.10 )     (1.17 )
Net realized gain
    ---       -       -       -       -       -       -       -       -       (0.46 )
Total dividends and distributions
    (0.97 )     (1.04 )     (1.11 )     (1.04 )     (1.00 )     (1.02 )     (1.19 )     (1.21 )     (1.10 )     (1.63 )
Net asset value, end of period
  $ 12.06 4   $ 13.47     $ 12.62     $ 12.32     $ 11.49     $ 11.38     $ 9.68     $ 11.89     $ 13.81     $ 14.12  
Market price, end of period
  $ 9.97     $ 12.07     $ 11.37     $ 12.96     $ 11.21     $ 11.19     $ 9.47     $ 10.14     $ 12.15     $ 12.48  
                                                                                 
Total Investment Return5
                                                                               
Based on net asset value
    (2.40 )%4     16.21 %     11.90 %     17.14 %     9.95 %     29.26 %     (4.03 )%     (4.30 )%     6.29 %     6.29 %
Based on market price
    (9.96 )%     15.58 %     (4.16 )%     26.30 %     9.09 %     29.92 %     10.09 %     (7.24 )%     5.80 %     (1.07 )
                                                                                 
Ratios to Average Net Assets
                                                                               
Total expenses
    1.37 %     1.35 %6     1.54 %7     1.51 %     1.41 %     1.34 %     2.01 %     2.24 %     3.35 %     2.89 %
Total expenses after fees waived and paid indirectly
    1.37 %     1.35 %6     1.54 %7     1.51 %     1.41 %     1.34 %     2.01 %     2.24 %     3.35 %     2.89 %
Total expenses after fees waived and paid indirectly and excluding interest expense and income tax
    0.96 %     0.98 %6     1.16 %7, 8     1.19 %9     1.12 %     1.09 %     1.28 %     1.10 %     1.12 %     1.11 %
Net investment income
    6.88 %     7.40 %     7.83 %     8.84 %     8.80 %     9.52 %     12.82 %     9.02 %     8.03 %     8.11 %
                                                                                 
Supplemental Data
                                                                               
Net assets, end of period (000)
  $ 1,527,307     $ 1,705,422     $ 446,847     $ 435,955     $ 405,697     $ 401,760     $ 341,415     $ 419,502     $ 487,251     $ 498,096  
Borrowings outstanding, end of period (000)
  $ 631,000     $ 723,000     $ 191,000     $ 181,000     $ 130,000     $ 89,000     $ 58,000     $ 110,900     $ 135,900     $ 216,200  
Average borrowings outstanding, during the period (000)
    696,756     $ 584,041     $ 180,436     $ 142,342     $ 115,512     $ 76,356     $ 73,784     $ 113,996     $ 202,705     $ 184,070  
Portfolio turnover
    57 %     64 %     77 %     61 %     87 %     85 %     60 %     45 %     51 %     62 %
Asset coverage, end of period per $1,000
  $ 3,419     $ 3,359     $ 3,340     $ 3,409     $ 4,121     $ 5,514     $ 6,886     $ 4,783     $ 4,585     $ 3,304  
 
1
Consolidated Financial Highlights.
 
2
Based on average shares outstanding.
 
3
Determined in accordance with federal income tax regulations.
 
4
For financial reporting purposes, the market value of certain total return swaps were adjusted as of report date. Accordingly the net asset value ("NAV") per share and total return performance based on net asset value presented herein are different than the information previously published on August 31, 2015.
 
5
Total investment returns based on market price, which can be significantly greater or less than the net asset value, may result in substantially different returns. Where applicable, excludes the effects of any sales charges and assumes the reinvestment of dividends and distributions.
 
6
Includes reorganization costs. Without these costs, total expenses, total expenses after fees waived and paid indirectly, and total expenses after fees waived and paid indirectly and excluding interest expense would have been 1.34 %, 1.34% and 0.97%, respectively.
 
7
Includes reorganization costs. Without these costs, total expenses, total expenses after fees waived and paid indirectly, and total expenses after fees waived and paid indirectly and excluding interest expense would have been 1.50%, 1.50% and 1.12%, respectively.
 
8
For the year ended August 31, 2013, the total expense ratio after fees waived and paid indirectly and excluding interest expense, borrowing costs and income tax was 1.15%.
 
9
For the year ended August 31, 2012, the total expense ratio after fees waived and paid indirectly and excluding interest expense and borrowing costs was 1.09%.
 
 
I-12

 
 
2.
Not applicable.

3.
See Item 4.1., above.

Item 5. Plan of Distribution

1.
The Distributor has agreed to underwrite up to 10,425,000 shares of the Fund's common stock on a reasonable efforts basis.  See Item 5 in Part II for additional information regarding the Distributor.

2.
The Fund's common stock will only be sold on such days as shall be agreed to by the Fund and the Distributor.  The Fund's common stock will be sold at market prices, which shall be determined with reference to trades on the NYSE, subject to the Minimum Price.  See Item 1.1.g., above.

3.
The sum of all compensation paid to FINRA members in connection with this public offering of shares of common stock, including the sales commission paid to or retained by the Distributor and amounts paid to or retained by participating broker-dealers, will not exceed, in the aggregate, 1.00% of the total public offering price of the shares of common stock sold in this offering. See Item 1.1g., above, and Item 5 in Part II.

4.
See Item 5 in Part II.
 
5.
Not applicable.

6.
See Item 5 in Part II.

7.
Not applicable.

8.
Not applicable.

9.
Not applicable.

10.
See Item 5 in Part II.
 
Item 6. Selling Shareholders
 
 
Not applicable.
 
Item 7. Use of Proceeds
 
The net proceeds from the issuance of common stock hereunder will be invested in accordance with the Fund's investment objectives and policies as set forth in this Prospectus.  It is presently anticipated that the Fund will be able to invest substantially all of the net proceeds in accordance with the Fund's investment objectives and policies within three months from the date on which the proceeds from an offering are received by the Fund.  Such investments may be delayed if suitable investments are unavailable at the time or for other reasons, such as market volatility and lack of liquidity in the markets of suitable investments.  Pending such investment, it is anticipated that the proceeds will be invested in short-term or long-term securities issued by the U.S. government and its agencies or instrumentalities or in high quality, short-term money market instruments.
 
Item 8. Description of the Fund
 
1.
The Fund was organized as a Maryland corporation on March 13, 2003, pursuant to its Articles of Incorporation, as subsequently amended, is governed by the laws of the State of Maryland, and commenced operations on May 30, 2003. The Fund was known as Corporate High Yield Fund VI, Inc. prior to September 14, 2006 and BlackRock Corporate High Yield Fund VI, Inc. prior to March 3, 2014.  The Fund is registered under the 1940 Act as a diversified, closed-end management investment company.  The Fund's principal office is located at 100 Bellevue Parkway, Wilmington, Delaware 19809, and its telephone number is (800) 882-0052.

2.
Investment Objectives and Principal Investment Policies:

Investment Objectives.  The Fund’s primary investment objective is to provide shareholders with current income. The Fund’s secondary investment objective is to provide shareholders with capital appreciation. The Fund’s investment objectives are fundamental policies and may not be changed without the approval of a majority of the outstanding voting securities of the Fund (as defined in the 1940 Act). There can be no assurance that the investment objectives of the Fund will be realized.

High Yield Securities ("Junk Bonds").  The Fund seeks to achieve its investment objectives by investing primarily in a diversified portfolio of fixed income securities which are rated below investment grade by the established rating services (Ba or lower by Moody’s, BB or lower by Standard & Poor’s or BB or lower by Fitch) or, if unrated, are considered by the Investment Advisor to be of comparable quality. See Appendix A—“Ratings of Investments” for additional information concerning rating categories. The Fund may invest directly in fixed income securities or synthetically through the use of derivatives.  The Fund may invest in securities of any maturity.

 
I-13

 
 
Under normal market conditions, the Fund invests at least 80% of its net assets (including assets acquired from the sale of preferred stock), plus the amount of any borrowings for investment purposes, in high yield securities, including high yield bonds, corporate loans, convertible debt securities and preferred securities. This is a non-fundamental policy and may be changed by the Board of Directors of the Fund provided that stockholders are provided with at least 60 days' prior written notice of any change, unless such change was previously approved by shareholders, as required by the rules under the 1940 Act.

High yield securities include high yield bonds (commonly referred to as “junk bonds”), corporate loans, mortgage-related securities, convertible debt securities and preferred securities, which are rated below investment grade or, if unrated, are considered by the Investment Advisor to be of comparable quality.  The high yield securities in which the Fund invests may also include credit linked notes, structured notes or other instruments evidencing interests in special purpose vehicles or trusts that hold interests in high yield securities.

The Fund may receive warrants or other non-income producing equity securities in connection with its investments in high yield securities, including in unit offerings, in an exchange offer, upon the conversion of a convertible security, or upon the restructuring or bankruptcy of investments owned by the Fund. The Fund may continue to hold such securities until, in the Investment Advisor’s judgment in light of current market conditions, it is advantageous to effect a disposition of such securities.

Although the Fund will invest primarily in below investment grade securities, other than with respect to Distressed Securities (described below), it will not invest in securities in the lowest rating categories (Ca or lower by Moody’s, CC or lower by Standard & Poor’s or CC or lower by Fitch) unless the Investment Advisor believes that the financial condition of the issuer or the protection afforded to the particular securities is stronger than would otherwise be indicated by such low ratings.

Distressed Securities.  The Fund may invest up to 10% of its total assets in high yield securities which are the subject of bankruptcy proceedings or otherwise in default as to the repayment of principal and/or payment of interest at the time of acquisition by the Fund or are rated in the lowest rating categories (Ca or lower by Moody’s, CC or lower by Standard & Poor’s or CC or lower by Fitch) or, if unrated, are considered by the Investment Advisor to be of comparable quality (“Distressed Securities”).

Non-U.S. Securities.  The Fund may invest, without limitation, in securities of issuers domiciled outside the United States or that are denominated in various foreign currencies and multinational currency units ("Non-U.S. Securities").

Corporate Loans.  The Fund may invest up to 25% of its total assets in corporate loans extended to borrowers by commercial banks or other financial institutions (“Corporate Loans”). The Corporate Loans in which the Fund may invest may be rated below investment grade (Ba or lower by Moody’s, BB or lower by Standard & Poor’s or BB or lower by Fitch) or, if unrated, are considered by the Investment Advisor to be of comparable quality.

Convertible Securities and Preferred Stock.  The Fund may invest up to 15% of its total assets in convertible debt securities and up to 15% of its total assets in preferred securities, including preferred securities that may be converted into common stock or other securities of the same or a different issuer, and non-convertible preferred securities. The convertible debt securities and preferred securities in which the Fund may invest may be rated below investment grade by the established rating services (Ba or lower by Moody’s, BB or lower by Standard & Poor’s or BB or lower by Fitch) or, if unrated, are considered by the Investment Advisor to be of comparable quality.
 
Short Sales. The Fund may make short sales of securities, provided that the market value of all securities sold short does not exceed 10% of its total assets. The Fund may make short sales both as a form of hedging to offset potential declines in long positions in similar securities and in order to seek to enhance return.  The Fund also may make short sales “against the box.” Short sales “against the box” are not subject to the foregoing 10% limitation.
 
Other Investment Companies.  The Fund may not purchase securities of other investment companies, except to the extent that such purchases are permitted by applicable law.
 
Illiquid Securities.  The Fund has no limitation on the amount of its investments that are not readily marketable or are subject to restrictions on resale.

Strategic Transactions.  The Fund may engage in various portfolio strategies both to seek to increase its return and to hedge its portfolio against movements in interest rates and in the securities markets through the use of derivatives, such as indexed and inverse securities, options, futures, options on futures, interest rate transactions, credit default swaps and short selling. There can be no assurance that the Fund will employ these strategies or that, if employed, they will be effective.
 
 
I-14

 
 
1940 Act and Tax Diversification Requirements. The Fund is classified as diversified within the meaning of the 1940 Act, which means that it is must satisfy the 5% and 10% requirements described in item (ii) below with respect to 75% of its total assets. The Fund's investments will be limited so as to qualify the Fund as a "regulated investment company" for purposes of Federal tax laws. Requirements for qualification as a "regulated investment company" include limiting its investments so that, at the close of each quarter of the taxable year, (i) not more than 25% of the market value of the Fund's total assets will be invested in (A) the securities of a single issuer (other than U.S. government securities and securities of other regulated investment companies), (B) the securities of two or more issuers (other than securities of other regulated investment companies) controlled by the Fund and engaged in the same, similar or related trades or businesses, or (C) the securities of one or more qualified publicly traded partnerships, and (ii) with respect to 50% of the market value of its total assets, not more than 5% of the market value of its total assets will be invested in the securities of a single issuer and the Fund will not own more than 10% of the outstanding voting securities of a single issuer (other than U.S. government securities and securities of other regulated investment companies).  Tax-related limitations may be changed by the Board to the extent appropriate in light of changes to applicable tax requirements.

Other Investment Policies.

Leverage. The Fund currently utilizes leverage for investment purposes in the form of a bank credit facility.  As of August 31, 2015, this leverage represented approximately 29% of the Fund's Managed Assets (which includes the amount obtained from such borrowings or debt issuance) (approximately 41% of the Fund's net assets).  The Fund generally will not utilize leverage if it anticipates that the Fund’s leveraged capital structure would result in a lower return to common stockholders than that obtainable if the common stock were unleveraged for any significant amount of time. At times, the Fund could utilize leverage through borrowings, including the issuance of short term debt securities, the issuance of shares of preferred stock or a combination thereof.  The Fund has the ability to utilize leverage through borrowings or the issuance of short term debt securities in an amount up to 33 1/3% of the value of its Managed Assets (which includes the amount obtained from such borrowings or debt issuance).  The Fund also has the ability to utilize leverage through the issuance of shares of preferred stock in an amount up to 50% of the value of its Managed Assets (which includes the amount obtained from such issuance).  The Fund may also leverage through the use of reverse repurchase agreements. There can be no assurance that the Fund will borrow in order to leverage its assets or, if it does, what percentage of the Fund's assets such borrowings will represent.  The Fund does not currently anticipate issuing any preferred stock.

The Fund also may borrow money as a temporary measure for extraordinary or emergency purposes, including the payment of dividends and the settlement of securities transactions which otherwise might require untimely dispositions of Fund securities.

Interest Rate Transactions.  In order to seek to hedge the value of the Fund's portfolio against interest rate fluctuations or to seek to enhance the Fund's return, the Fund may enter into various interest rate transactions, such as interest rate swaps and the purchase or sale of interest rate caps and floors.  The Fund may enter into these transactions to seek to preserve a return or spread on a particular investment or portion of its portfolio, to seek to protect against any increase in the price of securities the Fund anticipates purchasing at a later date, or to seek to enhance its return.  The Fund may also invest in interest rate swaps to seek to enhance income or increase the Fund’s yield, for example, during periods of steep interest rate yield curves (i.e., wide differences between short term and long term interest rates).

The Fund may also engage in interest rate transactions in the form of purchasing or selling interest rate caps or floors.  The Fund usually will enter into interest rate swaps on a net basis (i.e., the two payment streams are netted out with the Fund receiving or paying, as the case may be, only the net amount of the two payments). The Fund will not enter into caps or floors if, on a net basis, the aggregate notional principal amount with respect to such agreements exceeds the net assets of the Fund.  The Fund will only enter into interest rate swap, cap or floor transactions with counterparties the Investment Advisor believes to be creditworthy at the time they enter into such transactions.

The Fund is not required to pursue these portfolio strategies and may choose not to do so.  The Fund cannot guarantee that any strategies it uses will work.

Credit Default Swap Agreements.  The Fund may enter into credit default swap agreements for hedging purposes or to seek to enhance its returns.  The credit default swap agreement may have as reference obligations one or more securities that are not currently held by the Fund.  The protection "buyer" in a credit default contract may be obligated to pay the protection "seller" an upfront or a periodic stream of payments over the term of the contract provided that no credit event on a reference obligation has occurred.  If a credit event occurs, the seller generally must pay the buyer the "par value" (full notional value) of the swap in exchange for an equal face amount of deliverable obligations of the reference entity described in
 
 
I-15

 

the swap, or the seller may be required to deliver the related net cash amount, if the swap is cash settled.  The Fund may be either the buyer or seller in the transaction.

The Fund will enter into credit default swap agreements only with counterparties the Investment Advisor believes to be creditworthy at the time they enter into such transactions.

Options on Portfolio Securities.

Call Options. The Fund may purchase call options on any of the types of securities in which it may invest.  The Fund also is authorized to write (i.e., sell) covered call options on the securities or instruments in which it may invest and to enter into closing purchase transactions with respect to certain of such options.  The Fund also is authorized to write (i.e., sell) uncovered call options on securities or instruments in which it may invest but that are not currently held by such Fund.  The Fund also may purchase and sell call options on indices.

Put Options. The Fund is authorized to purchase put options to seek to hedge against a decline in the value of its securities or to seek to enhance its return. The Fund also has authority to write (i.e., sell) put options on the types of securities or instruments that may be held by the Fund, provided that such put options are covered, meaning that such options are secured by designating liquid assets segregated or earmarked on the Fund's books and records. The Fund will not sell puts if, as a result, more than 50% of the Fund's assets would be required to cover its potential obligations under its hedging and other investment transactions. The Fund is also authorized to write (i.e., sell) uncovered put options on securities or instruments in which it may invest but that the Fund does not currently have a corresponding short position or has not deposited cash equal to the exercise value of the put option with the broker-dealer through which it made the uncovered put option as collateral. In connection with such a transaction, the Fund will designate on its books and records unencumbered liquid assets with a value at least equal to the Fund's exposure, on a marked-to-market basis (as calculated pursuant to requirements of the SEC).

Financial Futures and Options Thereon.  The Fund is authorized to engage in transactions in financial futures contracts ("futures contracts") and related options on such futures contracts either as a hedge against adverse changes in the market value of its portfolio securities or to seek to enhance the Fund's income.  The Fund has authority to purchase and write call and put options on futures contracts.  The Fund may engage in options and futures transactions on exchanges and options in the over-the-counter markets ("OTC Options").

The Fund will engage in transactions in OTC options only with banks or dealers the Investment Advisor believes to be creditworthy at the time they enter into such transactions.

The Fund intends to enter into options and futures transactions, on an exchange or in the over-the-counter market, only if there appears to be a liquid secondary market for such options and futures.
 
The Commodity Futures Trading Commission ("CFTC") subjects advisers to registered investment companies to regulation by the CFTC if a fund that is advised by the investment adviser either (i) invests, directly or indirectly, more than a prescribed level of its liquidation value in CFTC-regulated futures, options and swaps ("CFTC Derivatives"), or (ii) markets itself as providing investment exposure to such instruments. To the extent the Fund uses CFTC Derivatives, it intends to do so below such prescribed levels and will not market itself as a "commodity pool" or a vehicle for trading such instruments. Accordingly, the Investment Advisor has claimed an exclusion from the definition of the term "commodity pool operator" under the Commodity Exchange Act ("CEA") pursuant to Rule 4.5 under the CEA. The Investment Advisor is not, therefore, subject to registration or regulation as a "commodity pool operator" under the CEA in respect of the Fund.
 
 
I-16

 

Other Investment Strategies.  The Fund may also invest in securities pursuant to repurchase agreements and purchase and sale contracts, enter into reverse repurchase agreements with respect to its portfolio investments subject to the investment restrictions set forth herein, purchase interests in senior loans and other portfolio securities on a "when-issued" basis and purchase or sell such interests or securities on a "forward commitment" basis, and enter into standby commitment agreements.

The Fund will only enter into repurchase agreements with registered securities dealers or domestic banks that, in the opinion of the Investment Advisor, present minimal credit risk.
 
When-issued securities and forward commitments may be sold prior to the settlement date, but the Fund will generally enter into when-issued and forward commitments only with the intention of actually receiving or delivering the securities, as the case may be.  The Fund may sell or enter into when-issued and forward commitments when the Investment Advisor determines it is appropriate in light of current market conditions.

Securities Lending.  The Fund may lend securities with a value up to 33 1/3% of its total assets or the limit prescribed by applicable law to banks, brokers and other financial institutions.  In return, the Fund receives collateral in cash or securities issued or guaranteed by the U.S. government, which will be maintained at all times in an amount equal to at least 100% of the current market value of the loaned securities.

Temporary Defensive Strategies.  Under unusual market or economic conditions or for temporary defensive purposes, the Fund may invest up to 100% of its total assets in securities issued or guaranteed by the U.S. government or its instrumentalities or agencies, certificates of deposit, bankers’ acceptances and other bank obligations, commercial paper rated in the highest category by an established rating agency, or other fixed income securities deemed by the Investment Advisor to be consistent with a defensive posture, or may hold investments in cash.

New Investment Strategies and Instruments.  The Fund may in the future employ new or additional investment strategies and hedging instruments if those strategies and instruments are consistent with the Fund’s investment objectives and are permissible under applicable regulations governing the Fund.

Investment Process

In selecting debt instruments and other securities for the Fund, BlackRock will seek to identify issuers and industries that BlackRock believes are likely to experience stable or improving financial conditions. BlackRock's analysis will include:

 
·
credit research on the issuers' financial strength;
 
·
assessment of the issuers' ability to meet principal and interest payments;
 
·
general industry trends;
 
·
the issuers' managerial strength;
 
·
analysis of deal structure and covenants;
 
·
changing financial conditions;
 
·
borrowing requirements or debt maturity schedules; and
 
·
the issuers' responsiveness to changes in business conditions and interest rates.

BlackRock will consider relative values among issuers based on anticipated cash flow, interest or dividend coverage, asset coverage and earnings prospects. Using these tools, BlackRock will seek to add consistent value and control performance volatility consistent with the Fund's investment objectives and policies. BlackRock believes this strategy should enhance the Fund's ability to achieve its investment objectives.

BlackRock's analysis continues on an ongoing basis for any debt instruments or other securities in which the Fund has invested. Although BlackRock uses due care in making such analysis, there can be no assurance that such analysis will reveal factors that may impair the value of the debt instruments.
 
 
I-17

 
 
Fundamental Investment Restrictions:
 
The following investment restrictions are considered fundamental by the Fund, which means that they may not be changed without the approval of the holders of a majority of the Fund's outstanding shares of common stock (which for this purpose and under the 1940 Act means the lesser of (i) 67% of the shares of common stock represented at a meeting at which more than 50% of the outstanding shares of common stock are represented, or (ii) more than 50% of the outstanding shares of common stock).  Under the fundamental investment restrictions, the Fund may not:

 
1.
Make any investment inconsistent with the Fund’s classification as a diversified company under the 1940 Act.

 
2.
Make investments for the purpose of exercising control or management.

 
3.
Purchase or sell real estate, commodities or commodity contracts, except that, to the extent permitted by applicable law, the Fund may invest in securities directly or indirectly secured by real estate or interests therein or issued by entities that invest in real estate or interests therein, and the Fund may purchase and sell financial futures contracts and options thereon.

 
4.
Issue senior securities or borrow money except as permitted by Section 18 of the 1940 Act or as otherwise permitted by applicable law.

 
5.
Underwrite securities of other issuers, except insofar as the Fund may be deemed an underwriter under the Securities Act in selling portfolio securities.

 
6.
Make loans to other persons, except (i) the Fund shall not be deemed to be making a loan to the extent that the Fund purchases Corporate Loans or other debt instruments or enters into repurchase agreements or any similar instruments and (ii) the Fund may lend its portfolio securities in an amount not in excess of 33 1/3% of its total assets, taken at market value, provided that such loans shall be made in accordance with the guidelines set forth in this Prospectus.

 
7.
Invest more than 25% of its total assets (taken at market value at the time of each investment) in the securities of issuers in any one industry; provided that this limitation shall not apply with respect to obligations issued or guaranteed by the U.S. government or by its agencies or instrumentalities.

Additional investment restrictions adopted by the Fund, which may be changed by the Board of Directors without stockholder approval, provide that the Fund may not:

 
(a)
Purchase securities of other investment companies, except to the extent that such purchases are permitted by applicable law.

 
(b)
Mortgage, pledge, hypothecate or in any manner transfer, as security for indebtedness, any securities owned or held by the Fund except as may be necessary in connection with borrowings mentioned in investment restriction (4) above or except as may be necessary in connection with transactions described under “Item 8:  Description of the Fund—Investment Objectives and Principal Investment Policies—Other Investment Strategies” above.

 
(c)
Purchase any securities on margin, except that the Fund may obtain such short term credit as may be necessary for the clearance of purchases and sales of portfolio securities (the deposit or payment by the Fund of initial or variation margin in connection with financial futures contracts and options thereon is not considered the purchase of a security on margin).

 
(d)
Change its policy of investing, under normal circumstances, at least 80% of the value of its assets in high yield securities, unless the Fund provides its stockholders with at least 60 days’ prior written notice of such change. For these purposes, “assets” means net assets, including assets acquired from the sale of preferred stock, plus the amount of any borrowings for investment purposes.

Percentage and Rating Limitations:

All percentage and ratings limitations on securities in which the Fund may invest apply at the time of making an investment and shall not be considered violated if an investment rating is subsequently downgraded to a rating that

 
I-18

 

would have precluded the Fund's initial investment in such security.  In the event that the Fund disposes of a portfolio security subsequent to its being downgraded, the Fund may experience a greater risk of loss than if such security had been sold prior to such downgrade.

All references to securities ratings by Moody's and S&P herein shall, unless otherwise indicated, include all securities within each such rating category (i.e., Ba1, Ba2 and Ba3 in the case of Moody's and BB+, BB and BB– in the case of S&P). For securities with split ratings (i.e., a security receiving two different ratings from two different rating agencies), the Fund will apply the lower of the applicable ratings.

Subsidiary:

The Fund wholly owns BLK HYT (Luxembourg) Investments, S.a.r.l., BLK HYV (Luxembourg) Investments, S.a.r.l., BLK COY (Luxembourg) Investments, S.a.r.l., and BLK CYE (Luxembourg) Investments, S.a.r.l., each a private limited liability company under the laws of Luxembourg (each, a “Subsidiary”).  Each Subsidiary hold shares of private Canadian companies. Such shares are held in a Subsidiary in order to realize benefits under the Double Tax Avoidance Convention between Canada and Luxembourg.  Income earned on the investments held by a Subsidiary may be taxable to the Subsidiary in Luxembourg.  Each Subsidiary is subject to the same investment policies and restrictions that apply to the Fund.  The Investment Advisor does not receive separate compensation from a Subsidiary for providing investment management or administrative services.  Each Subsidiary does not make investments that Section 17 of the 1940 Act would prohibit the Fund or such Subsidiary from making.  State Street Bank and Trust Company serves as each Subsidiary’s custodian.

Additional Information:

Additional information regarding the foregoing securities, instruments and investment techniques are included in "Portfolio Contents and Techniques" under Item 8 in Part II.

3.a.
The risk factors associated with an investment in the Fund are set forth in "Risk Factors" under Item 8 in Part II. Due to the nature of the Fund's investment program, the Fund is particularly susceptible to the risks of fixed-income securities (such as interest rate risk and credit risk), high-yield and distressed securities, Corporate Loans, asset-backed securities, leveraging, illiquid securities, foreign investing, credit and other derivatives (such as options, credit default swaps and interest rate transactions), currency instruments and counterparty default.
 
3.b.
The Fund currently utilizes leverage for investment purposes in the form of a bank credit facility.  As of August 31, 2015, this leverage represented approximately 29% of the Fund's Managed Assets (approximately 41% of the Fund's net assets).
 
 
Assuming the utilization of leverage by borrowings in the amount of approximately 29% of the Fund's Managed Assets, and an annual interest rate of 0.94% payable on such leverage based on market rates as of the date of this Prospectus, the annual return that the Fund's portfolio must experience (net of expenses) in order to cover such interest payments would be 0.27%.
 
 
The following table is designed to illustrate the effect on the return to a holder of common stock of the leverage obtained by borrowings in the amount of approximately 29% of the Fund's Managed Assets, assuming hypothetical annual returns on the Fund's portfolio of minus 10% to plus 10%.  As the table shows, leverage generally increases the return to stockholders when portfolio return is positive and greater than the cost of leverage and decreases the return when portfolio return is negative or less than the cost of leverage.  The figures appearing in the table are hypothetical and actual returns may be greater or less than those appearing in the table.

 
Assumed Portfolio Return (net of expenses)
 
(10)%
 
(5)%
 
0%
 
5%
 
10%
Corresponding Common Stock Return
 
(14.51)%
 
(7.44)%
 
(0.38)%
 
(6.69)%
 
(13.76)%

Common share total return is composed of two elements: the common share dividends paid by the Fund (the amount of which is largely determined by the net investment income of the Fund) and gains or losses on the value of the securities the Fund owns.  As required by SEC rules, the table assumes that the Fund is more likely to suffer capital losses than to enjoy capital appreciation.  For example, to assume a total return of 0% the Fund must assume that the interest it receives on its securities investments is entirely offset by losses in the value of those securities.
 
Additional information regarding the risks of the Fund's use of leverage is contained under "Item 8: Description of the Fund—Leverage" in Part II.
 
 
I-19

 
 
4.
See Item 8.2, above, and Item 8 in Part II.

5.
The following tables set forth the high and low market prices for shares of common stock of the Fund on the NYSE, for each full quarterly period within the Fund's two most recent fiscal years and each full quarter since the beginning of the Fund's current fiscal year, along with the NAV and discount or premium to NAV for each quotation.
 
 
   
Market Price
 
Net Asset Value
 
Premium/(Discount) to Net Asset Value
Period Ended
 
High
 
Low
 
High
 
Low
 
High
 
Low
November 30, 2015
 
$
 
10.45
 
$
 
9.76
 
$
 
11.91
 
$
 
11.58
 
(12.26)%
 
15.72%
August 31, 2015
 
$
 
11.30
 
$
 
9.67
 
$
 
12.81
 
$
 
11.55
 
(11.79)%
 
(16.28)%
May 31, 2015
 
$
 
11.53
 
$
 
11.06
 
$
 
12.83
 
$
 
12.59
 
(10.13)%
 
(12.15)%
February 28, 2015
 
$
 
11.61
 
$
 
10.78
 
$
 
12.92
 
$
 
12.31
 
(10.14)%
 
(12.43)%
November 30, 2014
 
$
 
12.10
 
$
 
11.47
 
$
 
13.47
 
$
 
12.70
 
(10.17)%
 
(9.69)%
August 31, 2014
 
$
 
12.29
 
$
 
11.75
 
$
 
13.53
 
$
 
13.20
 
(9.16)%
 
(10.98)%
May 31, 2014
 
$
 
12.61
 
$
 
12.13
 
$
 
13.45
 
$
 
13.38
 
(6.25)%
 
(9.34)%
February 28, 2014
 
$
 
12.51
 
$
 
11.77
 
$
 
12.43
 
$
 
13.05
 
0.64%
 
(9.81)%
November 30, 2013
 
$
 
12.14
 
$
 
11.46
 
$
 
13.05
 
$
 
12.65
 
(6.97)%
 
(9.41)%
 
As of December 21, 2015, the NAV per common share of the Fund was $10.98 and the market price per common share was $9.73, representing a discount to NAV of (11.38)%. Common stock of the Fund has historically traded at oth a premium and discount to NAV.

See "Repurchase of Common Stock" under Item 8 in Part II for additional information.

6.
Not applicable.
 
Item 9. Management

1.
BlackRock Advisors, LLC acts as the investment adviser for the Fund.  Pursuant to an investment management agreement between the Investment Advisor and the Fund (the "Investment Management Agreement"), the Fund pays the Investment Advisor a monthly fee at an annual rate of 0.60% of the Fund's average daily Managed Assets (0.72% of the Fund's net assets, assuming leverage of approximately 29% of the Fund's Managed Assets).  Because the management fee is calculated on the basis of Managed Assets, which includes assets attributable to leverage, the fee paid to the Investment Advisor will be higher than if the Fund did not use leverage.
 
A discussion regarding the basis for the approval of the Investment Management Agreement by the Board is available in the Fund's Annual Report to shareholders for the fiscal year ended August 31, 2015.

The Fund is managed by a team of investment professionals comprised of James E. Keenan, Managing Director at BlackRock, Mitchell Garfin, Managing Director at BlackRock and Derek Schoenhofen, Director at BlackRock. Messrs. Keenan, Garfin and Schoenhofen are the Fund’s co-portfolio managers and are responsible for the day-to-day management of the Fund’s portfolio and the selection of its investments.

 
I-20

 

Portfolio Manager
 
 
Primary Role
 
 
Since
 
 
Title and Recent Biography
James E. Keenan
 
Jointly and primarily responsible for the day-to-day management of the Fund's portfolio, which includes setting the Fund's overall investment strategy, overseeing the management of the Fund and/or selection of its investments.
 
2006
 
Managing Director of BlackRock, Inc. since 2008 and Head of the Leveraged Finance portfolio team; Director of BlackRock, Inc. from 2006 to 2007, Vice President of BlackRock, Inc. from 2004 to 2005.
Mitchell Garfin
 
Jointly and primarily responsible for the day-to-day management of the Fund's portfolio, which includes setting the Fund's overall investment strategy, overseeing the management of the Fund and/or selection of its investments.
 
2009
 
Managing Director of BlackRock since 2009; Director of BlackRock from 2005 to 2008.
Derek Schoenhofen
 
Jointly and primarily responsible for the day-to-day management of the Fund's portfolio, which includes setting the Fund's overall investment strategy, overseeing the management of the Fund and/or selection of its investments.
 
2009
 
Director of BlackRock since 2006; Vice President of BlackRock from 2000 to 2005.

Additional information regarding the Board, the Investment Advisor and the portfolio managers, including the portfolio managers' compensation, other accounts managed and ownership of Fund securities, is included under Item 21, below, and under Item 9, Item 18 and Item 21 in Part II.

State Street Bank and Trust Company provides certain administration and accounting services to the Fund pursuant to an Administrative Services Agreement (the "Administration Agreement").  State Street Bank and Trust Company is paid a monthly fee at an annual rate ranging from 0.0075% to 0.015% of the Fund's Managed Assets, along with an annual fixed fee ranging from $0 to $10,000 for the services it provides to the Fund.

Certain legal matters will be passed upon by Miles & Stockbridge P.C., which serves as special Maryland counsel to the Fund.

See "Other Service Providers" under Item 9 in Part II for additional information about State Street Bank and Trust Company, the Fund's other service providers and other matters relevant to the Fund's management.

2.
Not applicable.
 
3.
Not applicable.
 
Item 10. Capital Stock, Long-Term Debt and Other Securities

1.
The Fund is authorized to issue 200,000,000 shares of capital stock, par value $0.10 per share, all of which shares currently are classified as common stock.  The Fund intends to make regular monthly cash distributions of all or a portion of its net investment income to holders of the Fund's shares of common stock.  The Fund reserves the right to change its distribution policy and the basis for establishing the rate of its monthly distributions at any time and may do so without prior notice to common shareholders.  For additional information about the Fund's common stock, see Item 10 in Part II.

The Fund is party to a senior committed secured, 360-day rolling line of credit facility and a separate security agreement (the "SSB Agreement") with State Street Bank and Trust Company ("SSB").  The SSB Agreement allows for a maximum commitment amount of $798,000,000 for the Fund.  At August 31, 2015, the Fund had drawn $696,756,164 on the SSB credit facility.  For the year ended August 31, 2015, the Fund's weighted daily average interest rate under the SSB Agreement was 0.94%.  See "Item 10: Capital Stock, Long-Term Debt and Other Securities—Credit Facility" in Part II for additional information regarding the SSB Agreement.
 
The Fund does not have any preferred stock outstanding.
 
 
I-21

 

2.
See Item 10.1, above, and Item 10 in Part II.

3.
See Item 10.1, above, and Item 10 in Part II.

4.
See "Tax Matters" under Item 10 in Part II.

5.
Outstanding Securities, as of November 30, 2015:

Title of Class
 
Amount Authorized
 
Amount Held by Fund for its Account
 
Amount Outstanding (Exclusive of Amount Held by Fund for its Account)
 
Common Stock, par value $0.10
 
200,000,000
 
0
 
126,599,668

6.
Not applicable.
 
Item 11. Defaults and Arrears on Senior Securities

Not applicable.
 
Item 12. Legal Proceedings

Not applicable.
 
Item 13. Table of Contents of Statement of Additional Information

Not applicable.
 
Item 14.  Cover Page

Not applicable.
 
Item 15. Table of Contents

Not applicable.
 
Item 16. General Information and History

Not applicable.
 
Item 17.  Investment Objective and Policies

1.
See Item 8.2 and Item 8.3, above, and Item 8 in Part II.

2.
See Item 8.2 and Item 8.3, above, and Item 8 in Part II.

3.
See Item 8.2 and Item 8.3, above, and Item 8 in Part II.

4.
Not applicable.
 
 
I-22

 

Item 18. Management

1.
See Item 18 in Part II.

2.
See Item 18 in Part II.

3.
See Item 18 in Part II.

4.
See Item 18 in Part II.

5.
During the Fund's fiscal year ended August 31, 2015, the Board and the Board's committees held the following meetings:

Board or Committee
 
Number of Meetings
Board (Regular Meetings)
 
6
Board (Special Meetings)   2
Audit Committee
 
13
Governance and Nominating Committee
 
4
Compliance Committee
 
4
Performance Oversight Committee
 
4
Leverage Committee
 
6
Executive Committee
 
0

See Item 18 in Part II.

6.
See Item 18 in Part II.

7.
The Board of the Fund currently consists of 11 individuals, nine of whom are not "interested persons" of the Fund as defined in the 1940 Act (the "Independent Directors").  The registered investment companies advised by the Investment Advisor or its affiliates (the "BlackRock-Advised Funds") are organized into one complex of closed-end funds (the "Closed-End Complex"), two complexes of open-end funds (the "Equity-Liquidity Complex" and the "Equity-Bond Complex") and one complex of exchange-traded funds (the "Exchange-Traded Complex"; each such complex a "BlackRock Fund Complex").  The Fund is included in the Closed-End Complex.  The Directors also oversee as Board members the operations of the other closed-end registered investment companies included in the Closed-End Complex.

Information relating to each Director's share ownership in the Fund and in the other funds in the Closed-End Complex that are overseen by the respective Director as of December 31, 2014 is set forth in the chart below:

Name of Director
 
Dollar Range of Equity
Securities and Share Equivalents in the Fund*
 
Aggregate Dollar Range of Equity Securities and Share Equivalents Overseen by Directors in the Family of Registered Investment Companies**
Independent Directors
       
Michael J. Castellano
 
$150,000
 
Over $100,000
Richard E. Cavanagh
 
Over $100,000
 
Over $100,000
Frank J. Fabozzi
 
Over $100,000
 
Over $100,000
Kathleen F. Feldstein
 
Over $100,000
 
Over $100,000
James T. Flynn
 
Over $100,000
 
Over $100,000
Jerrold B. Harris
 
Over $100,000
 
Over $100,000
R. Glenn Hubbard
 
Over $100,000
 
Over $100,000
W. Carl Kester
 
Over $100,000
 
Over $100,000
Karen P. Robards
 
Over $100,000
 
Over $100,000
Interested Directors
       
John M. Perlowski
 
None
 
$50,001$100,000
Barbara G. Novick
 
None
 
Over $100,000

 
*Includes share equivalents owned under the deferred compensation plan in the Fund by certain Independent Directors who have participated in the deferred compensation plan of the funds in the Family of Registered Investment Companies.

 
**The term "Family of Registered Investment Companies" refers to all registered investment companies advised by the Investment Advisor or an affiliate thereof. Includes share equivalents owned under the deferred compensation plan in the funds in the Family of Registered Investment Companies by certain Independent Directors who have participated in the deferred compensation plan of the funds in the Family of Registered Investment Companies.
 
 
I-23

 
 
8.
See Item 18 in Part II.

9.
See Item 18 in Part II.

10.
See Item 18 in Part II.

11.
See Item 18 in Part II.

12.
See Item 18 in Part II.

13.
The following table sets forth the aggregate compensation, including deferred compensation amounts, paid to each Independent Director by the Fund during its most recently completed fiscal year and by the Closed-End Complex for the most recently completed calendar year.  Mr. Perlowski and Ms. Novick serve without compensation from the Fund because of their affiliation with BlackRock, Inc. (“BlackRock”) and the Investment Advisor.  See Item 18 in Part II for additional information regarding director compensation.
 
Name
 
Aggregate Compensation from the Fund
(Most Recently Completed Fiscal Year)
 
Aggregate Compensation from the Fund and other BlackRock-Advised Funds in the Closed-End Complex(1)
(Most Recently Completed Calendar Year)
Independent Directors
       
Michael J. Castellano
 
$13,316
 
$275,000(2)
Richard E. Cavanagh
 
$19,195
 
$395,000(2)
Frank J. Fabozzi
 
$15,512
 
$320,000(2)
Kathleen F. Feldstein
 
$12,148
 
$250,000(2)
James T. Flynn
 
$13,316
 
$275,000(2)
Jerrold B. Harris
 
$13,206
 
$270,000(2)
R. Glenn Hubbard
 
$12,667
 
$260,000(2)
W. Carl Kester
 
$14,514
 
$300,000(2)
Karen P. Robards
 
$18,227
 
$375,000(2)

 
(1)
Represents the aggregate compensation earned by such persons from the Closed-End Complex during the calendar year ended December 31, 2014. Of this amount, Mr. Castellano, Mr. Cavanagh, Dr. Fabozzi, Dr. Feldstein, Mr. Flynn, Mr. Harris, Dr. Hubbard, Dr. Kester and Ms. Robards deferred $82,500, $74,000, $29,500, $75,000, $137,500, $135,000, $130,000, $80,000 and $35,000, respectively, pursuant to the Closed-End Complex's deferred compensation plan.
 
 
(2)
Total amount of deferred compensation payable by the Closed-End Complex to Mr. Castellano, Mr. Cavanagh, Dr. Fabozzi, Dr. Feldstein, Mr. Flynn, Mr. Harris, Dr. Hubbard, Dr. Kester and Ms. Robards is $318,107, $762,212, $635,471, $842,364, $1,293,891, $1,220,933, $1,275,673, $710,821, and $595,342, respectively, as of December 31, 2014.

14.
Not applicable.
 
15.
See Item 18 in Part II.
 
16.
See Item 18 in Part II.
 
17.
See Item 18 in Part II.
 
 
I-24

 

Item 19. Control Persons and Principal Holders of Securities

1.
Not applicable.
 
2.
Unless otherwise indicated, the information set forth below is as of November 30, 2015. To the Fund's knowledge, no person beneficially owned more than 5% of the Fund's outstanding shares of common stock, except as set forth below.
 
Investor
 
Address
 
Common Stock Held†
 
Common Stock % Held
First Trust Portfolios L.P.(1)
 
120 East Liberty Drive,
Suite 400
Wheaton, Illinois 60187
 
7,381,422
 
5.83%
First Trust Advisors L.P.(1)
 
120 East Liberty Drive,
Suite 400
Wheaton, Illinois 60187
 
 
The Charger Corporation(1)
 
120 East Liberty Drive,
Suite 400
Wheaton, Illinois 60187
 
 
Saba Capital Management, L.P.(2)
 
405 Lexington Avenue,
58th Floor
New York, New York 10174
 
6,979,323
 
5.51%
Saba Capital Master Fund, Ltd.(2)
 
Intertrust Corporate Services (Cayman) Limited,
190 Elgin Avenue, George Town,
Grand Cayman KY1-9005, Cayman Islands
 
 
Saba Capital Master Fund II, Ltd.(2)
 
Intertrust Corporate Services (Cayman) Limited,
190 Elgin Avenue, George Town,
Grand Cayman KY1-9005, Cayman Islands
 
 
Saba Capital Leveraged Master Fund, Ltd.(2)
 
Intertrust Corporate Services (Cayman) Limited,
190 Elgin Avenue, George Town,
Grand Cayman KY1-9005, Cayman Islands
 
 
Saba Capital Partners (Cayman), L.P.(2)
 
Intertrust Corporate Services (Cayman) Limited,
190 Elgin Avenue, George Town,
Grand Cayman KY1-9005, Cayman Islands
 
 
Saba Capital Series LLC Series 1(2)
 
 
Intertrust Corporate Services (Cayman) Limited,
190 Elgin Avenue, George Town,
Grand Cayman KY1-9005, Cayman Islands
 
 
Boaz R. Weinstein(2)
 
405 Lexington Avenue,
58th Floor
New York, New York 10174
 
 

 
The information contained in this table is based on Schedule 13D/13G filings made on or before November 30, 2015.
 
 
(1)
 First Trust Portfolios L.P., First Trust Advisors L.P. and The Charger Corporation filed their Schedule 13G jointly and did not differentiate holdings as to each entity.
 
 
(2)
Saba Capital Management, L.P. and Boaz R. Weinstein filed their Schedule 13G jointly and did not differentiate holdings. The holdings reported by Saba Capital Management, L.P. consist of the holdings of Saba Capital Master Fund Ltd., Saba Capital Master Fund II, Ltd., Saba Capital Leveraged Master Fund Ltd., Saba Capital Partners (Cayman), L.P and Saba Capital Series LLC Series 1.
 
3.
See Item 19 in Part II.
 
Item 20. Investment Advisory and Other Services

1.
The table below sets forth information about the total advisory fees, net of any applicable fee waiver, paid by the Fund to the Investment Advisor for the last three fiscal years.
 
Year Ended August 31,
2015
 
2014
 
2013
$13,832,626(1)(2)
 
$12,171,825(1)(2)
 
$4,421,428(1)(2)(3)

 
(1)
The Investment Advisor voluntarily agreed to waive its investment advisory fees by the amount of investment advisory fees the Fund pays to the Investment Advisor indirectly through its investment in affiliated money market funds. However, the Investment Advisor does not waive its investment advisory fees by the amount of investment advisory fees paid in connection with the Fund's investment in other affiliated investment companies, if any. Pursuant to this arrangement, the figures in the table above reflect waivers by the Investment Advisor of its fees in the amounts of $1,346, $1,724 and $980 for the years ended August 31, 2015, August 31, 2014 and August 31, 2013, respectively.
 
 
(2)
The Investment Advisor provides investment management and other services to the Subsidiary. The Investment Advisor does not receive separate compensation from the Subsidiary for providing investment management or administrative services. However, the Fund pays the Investment Advisor based on the Fund's net assets which includes the assets of the Subsidiary.
 
 
(3)
Prior to November 18, 2013, the Fund's contractual management fee was at an annual rate of 0.70% of the Fund's average daily Managed Assets. In connection with the Fund’s reorganizations with BlackRock High Yield Trust, BlackRock Corporate High Yield Fund, Inc., BlackRock Corporate High Yield Fund III, Inc., BlackRock High Income Shares and BlackRock Corporate High Yield Fund V, Inc., effective November 18, 2013, the Investment Advisor reduced its contractual management fee to an annual rate of 0.60% of the Fund’s average daily Managed Assets as of November 18, 2013. The increase in the dollar amount of the advisory fee paid by the Fund is a result of the increase in the Fund's Managed Assets following these acquisitions.
 
 
I-25

 
 
The table below sets forth information about the total sub-advisory fees paid by the Investment Advisor to the Sub-Advisor for the last three fiscal years. BlackRock Financial Management, Inc. served as the sub-adviser for the Fund until July 1, 2014.  The Investment Advisor's and the Fund's sub-advisory arrangement with BlackRock Financial Management, Inc. expired as of July 1, 2014.

 
Year Ended August 31,
2015
 
2014
 
2013
$0
 
$5,729,074
 
$2,609,080
 
See Item 9.1, above, and Item 9 and Item 20 in Part II for additional information regarding the Investment Advisor and the Sub-Advisor.

2.
See Item 9.1, above, and Item 9 and Item 20 in Part II.

3.
Not applicable.

4.
State Street Bank and Trust Company provides certain administration and accounting services to the Fund pursuant to the Administration Agreement.  The table below shows the amounts paid by the Fund to State Street Bank and Trust Company for such services for the past three fiscal years:
 
Year Ended August 31,
2015
 
2014
 
2013
$226,868
 
$194,538
 
$84,419
 
 
See Item 9.1, above, and Item 9 in Part II for additional information regarding the Administration Agreement.
 
5.
Not applicable.

6.
See Item 9 in Part II.

7.
See Item 9 in Part II.

8.
Not applicable.

Item 21: Portfolio Managers

1.
The following table sets forth information about funds and accounts other than the Fund for which the portfolio managers are primarily responsible for the day-to-day portfolio management as of August 31, 2015:
 
   
Number of Other Accounts Managed
and Assets by Account Type
 
Number of Other Accounts and
Assets for Which Advisory Fee is
Performance-Based
Name of Portfolio Manager
 
Other
Registered
Investment
Companies
 
Other Pooled
Investment
Vehicles
 
Other
Accounts
 
Other
Registered
Investment
Companies
 
Other Pooled
Investment
Vehicles
 
Other
Accounts
James E. Keenan
  14   30   16   0   1  
4
    $18.13 Billion   $13.92 Billion   $6.84 Billion   $0   $0.32 Million   $566.3 Million
                         
Mitchell Garfin   10   16   22   0   0   4
    $22.29 Billion   $11.17 Billion   $8.93 Billion   $0   $0    $566.3 Million
                         
Derek Schoenhofen
  6   12   21   0   0  
4
    $19.34 Billion   $10.68 Billion    $8.39 Billion  
$0
  $0   $566.3 Million

Conflicts of Interest: Messrs. Keenan, Garfin, and Schoenhofen may be managing certain hedge fund and/or long only accounts, or may be part of a team managing certain hedge fund and/or long only accounts subject to incentive fees. Messrs. Keenan, Garfin, and Schoenhofen may therefore be entitled to receive a portion of any incentive fees earned on such accounts.  See "Portfolio Managers — Potential Material Conflicts of Interest" under Item 21 in Part II.
 
 
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2.
See Item 21 in Part II for a general overview and description of the structure of, and the method used to determine, the compensation of the portfolio managers. The principal components of compensation include a base salary, a performance-based discretionary bonus, participation in various benefits programs and one or more of the incentive compensation programs established by BlackRock.  The following sets forth how various components of this compensation structure apply specifically to these portfolio managers as of August 31, 2015.
 
Discretionary Incentive Compensation. Among other things, BlackRock's Chief Investment Officers make a subjective determination with respect to each portfolio manager's compensation based on the performance of the funds and other accounts managed by each portfolio manager relative to the various benchmarks. Performance of fixed income funds is measured on a pre-tax and/or after-tax basis over various time periods including 1-, 3- and 5- year periods, as applicable.  With respect to Messrs. Keenan, Garfin, and Schoenhofen, such benchmarks for the Fund and other accounts are: a combination of market-based indices (e.g., The Barclays U.S. Corporate High Yield 2% Issuer Cap Index), certain customized indices and certain fund industry peer groups.
 
Long-Term Incentive Plan Awards.  Mr. Keenan has unvested long-term incentive awards.
 
Deferred Compensation Program.  Any portfolio manager who is either a managing director or director at BlackRock with compensation above a specified threshold is eligible to participate in the deferred compensation program.
 
Incentive Savings Plan.  All of the eligible portfolio managers are eligible to participate in these plans.

3.
As of August 31, 2015, the portfolio managers beneficially own the following dollar ranges of equity securities in the Fund:

Portfolio Manager
 
Dollar Range of Equity Securities of the Fund Beneficially Owned
     
James E. Keenan
 
$500,001$1,000,000
     
Mitchell Garfin
 
None
     
Derek Schoenhofen
 
$10,001$50,000
 

Item 22. Brokerage Allocation and Other Practices

1.
Information about the brokerage commissions paid by the Fund is set forth in the following table:

For the Fiscal Year Ended
 
 
Aggregate
Brokerage Commissions Paid
     
August 31, 2015   $   366,681
     
August 31, 2014
 
$   283,792
     
August 31, 2013
 
$   112,947

 
See Item 22 in Part II for additional information about how the Fund effects portfolio transactions.

2.
The Investment Advisor may place portfolio transactions, to the extent permitted by law, with brokerage firms affiliated with the Fund and the Investment Advisor, if it reasonably believes that the quality of execution and the commission are comparable to that available from other qualified brokerage firms.

The Fund has not paid any brokerage commissions to affiliated broker-dealers during the three most recent fiscal years.
 
The Fund paid no security lending agent fees to the security lending agent during the Fund's previous three fiscal years.
 
 
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3.
See Item 22 in Part II.

4.
Not applicable.

5.
The Fund acquired during its most recent fiscal year securities of its regular brokers or dealers, as defined in Rule 10b-1 under the 1940 Act, as set forth below:
 
Broker or Dealer
 
Debt (D)/Equity (E)
 
Holdings of Securities of such Regular Broker or Dealer
(as of August 31, 2015)  (000's)
Bank of America Corp.
 
D
 
$18,501
JPMorgan Chase & Co.
 
D
 
$16,123
Citigroup, Inc.
 
D
 
$11,473
Goldman Sachs Group, Inc.
 
D
 
$7,937
Morgan Stanley
 
D
 
$6,253
Barclays PLC
 
D
 
$538
 
Item 23. Tax Status
 
See Item 10.4, above, and "Tax Matters" under Item 10 in Part II.
 
Item 24. Financial Statements
 
The Fund's audited financial statements for the fiscal year ended August 31, 2015 are incorporated by reference herein to the Fund's annual report filed on Form N-CSR on November 3, 2015.
 
 
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PART II
 
ADDITIONAL INFORMATION ABOUT
 
BLACKROCK CORPORATE HIGH YIELD FUND, INC.
 
 
Item 5. Plan of Distribution
 
The Fund has entered into a Distribution Agreement (the "Distribution Agreement") with BlackRock Investments, LLC, an affiliate of the Fund and the Investment Advisor located at 55 East 52nd Street, New York, NY 10055, to provide for distribution of the Fund's common stock on a reasonable efforts basis through various specified transactions, including at-the-market offerings pursuant to Rule 415 under the Securities Act, subject to various conditions.  The Distribution Agreement has been filed as an exhibit to the Registration Statement of which this Prospectus is a part.  The summary of the Distribution Agreement contained herein is qualified by reference to the Distribution Agreement.
 
Subject to the terms and conditions of the Distribution Agreement, the Fund may from time to time issue and sell its common stock through the Distributor to certain broker-dealers which have entered into sub-placement agent agreements with the Distributor.  Currently, the Distributor has entered into a sub-placement agent agreement with UBS Securities LLC, pursuant to which the Sub-Placement Agent will be acting as the Distributor's sub-placement agent with respect to at-the-market offerings of the Fund's common stock. The Sub-Placement Agent Agreement has been filed as an exhibit to the Registration Statement of which this Prospectus forms a part.  The summary of the Sub-Placement Agent Agreement contained herein is qualified by reference to the Sub-Placement Agent Agreement.
 
Under the Sub-Placement Agent Agreement, upon instructions from the Distributor the Sub-Placement Agent will use its reasonable best efforts to sell, as sub-placement agent, shares of Fund common stock under the terms and subject to the conditions set forth in the Sub-Placement Agent Agreement. The Distributor will instruct the Sub-Placement Agent as to the amount of shares of Fund common stock authorized for sale by the Sub-Placement Agent on any particular day that is a trading day for the exchange on which the Fund's common stock is listed and primarily trades. The Distributor will also instruct the Sub-Placement Agent not to sell shares of Fund common stock if the sales cannot be effected at or above a price designed by the Distributor, which price will at least be equal to the Minimum Price and which price, may, in the discretion of the Distributor and the Fund, be above the Minimum Price. The Distributor and the Fund may, in their discretion, determine not to authorize sales of the Fund's common stock on a particular day even if the per share price of the shares is equal to or greater than the Minimum Price. The Fund and the Distributor will have full discretion regarding whether sales of shares of the Fund’s common stock will be authorized on a particular day and, if so, in what amounts. The Fund, the Distributor or the Sub-Placement Agent may suspend a previously authorized offering of the Fund’s common stock upon proper notice and subject to other conditions.
 
The Sub-Placement Agent will provide written confirmation to the Distributor following the close of trading on a day on which shares of Fund common stock are sold under the Sub-Placement Agent Agreement. Each confirmation will include the number of shares sold, the net proceeds to the Fund and the compensation that the Sub-Placement Agent is owed in connection with the sales. There is no guarantee that there will be any sales of the Fund's common stock pursuant to this Prospectus. Actual sales, if any, of the Fund's common stock may be greater or less than the most recent market price set forth in this Prospectus, depending on the market price of the Fund's common stock at the time of any such sale; provided, however, that sales will not be made at less than the Minimum Price.
 
Settlements of sales of common stock will occur on the third business day following the date on which any such sales are made.
 
In connection with the sale of common stock on behalf of the Fund, the Distributor may be deemed to be an underwriter within the meaning of the Securities Act, and the compensation of the Distributor may be deemed to be underwriting commissions or discounts.
 
The offering of the Fund's common stock pursuant to the Distribution Agreement will terminate upon the earlier of (i) the sale of all shares of common stock subject thereto or (ii) termination of the Distribution Agreement.  The Fund and the Distributor each have the right to terminate the Distribution Agreement in its discretion upon advance notice to the other party.
 
The Sub-Placement Agent, its affiliates and their respective employees hold or may hold in the future, directly or indirectly, investment interests in BlackRock, Inc., the parent company of the Distributor, and funds advised by the Investment Advisor and its affiliates.  The interests held by employees of the Sub-Placement Agent or its affiliates are not attributable to, and no investment discretion is held by, the Sub-Placement Agent or its affiliates.
 
The Fund has agreed to indemnify the Distributor and hold the Distributor harmless against certain liabilities, including certain liabilities under the Securities Act, except for any liability to the Fund or its investors to which the

 
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Distributor would otherwise be subject by reason of willful misfeasance, bad faith or gross negligence in the performance of its duties or by its reckless disregard of its obligations and duties under its agreement with the Fund.
 
Additional information regarding the plan of distribution is set forth under Item 5 in Part I.
 
Item 8.  Description of the Fund
 
Portfolio Contents and Techniques
 
The Fund may invest in the following instruments and use the following investment techniques, subject to any limitations set forth in Part I. There is no guarantee the Fund will buy all of the types of securities or use all of the investment techniques that are described herein.
 
Corporate Bonds.  Corporate bonds are debt obligations issued by corporations. Corporate bonds may be either secured or unsecured. Collateral used for secured debt includes real property, machinery, equipment, accounts receivable, stocks, bonds or notes. If a bond is unsecured, it is known as a debenture. Bondholders, as creditors, have a prior legal claim over common and preferred stockholders as to both income and assets of the corporation for the principal and interest due them and may have a prior claim over other creditors if liens or mortgages are involved. Interest on corporate bonds may be fixed or floating, or the bonds may be zero coupons. Interest on corporate bonds is typically paid semi-annually and is fully taxable to the bondholder. Corporate bonds contain elements of both interest rate risk and credit risk. The market value of a corporate bond generally may be expected to rise and fall inversely with interest rates and may also be affected by the credit rating of the corporation, the corporation's performance and perceptions of the corporation in the marketplace. Corporate bonds usually yield more than government or agency bonds due to the presence of credit risk.
 
High Yield Securities ("Junk Bonds"). The Fund may invest in securities rated, at the time of investment, below investment grade quality such as those rated Ba or below by Moody's or BB or below by S&P, or securities comparably rated by other rating agencies or in unrated securities determined by the Investment Advisor to be of comparable quality. Such securities, sometimes referred to as "high yield" or "junk" bonds, are predominantly speculative with respect to the capacity to pay interest and repay principal in accordance with the terms of the security and generally involve greater price volatility than securities in higher rating categories.  Often the protection of interest and principal payments with respect to such securities may be very moderate and issuers of such securities face major ongoing uncertainties or exposure to adverse business, financial or economic conditions which could lead to inadequate capacity to meet timely interest and principal payments.
 
Lower grade securities, though high yielding, are characterized by high risk. They may be subject to certain risks with respect to the issuing entity and to greater market fluctuations than certain lower yielding, higher rated securities. The secondary market for lower grade securities may be less liquid than that of higher rated securities. Adverse conditions could make it difficult at times for the Fund to sell certain securities or could result in lower prices than those used in calculating the Fund's NAV.
 
The prices of fixed income securities generally are inversely related to interest rate changes; however, the price volatility caused by fluctuating interest rates of securities also is inversely related to the coupons of such securities. Accordingly, below investment grade securities may be relatively less sensitive to interest rate changes than higher quality securities of comparable maturity because of their higher coupon. The investor receives this higher coupon in return for bearing greater credit risk. The higher credit risk associated with below investment grade securities potentially can have a greater effect on the value of such securities than may be the case with higher quality issues of comparable maturity.
 
Lower grade securities may be particularly susceptible to economic downturns. It is likely that an economic recession could severely disrupt the market for such securities and may have an adverse impact on the value of such securities. In addition, it is likely that any such economic downturn could adversely affect the ability of the issuers of such securities to repay principal and pay interest thereon and increase the incidence of default for such securities.
 
The ratings of Moody's, S&P and other rating agencies represent their opinions as to the quality of the obligations which they undertake to rate. Ratings are relative and subjective and, although ratings may be useful in evaluating the safety of interest and principal payments, they do not evaluate the market value risk of such obligations. Although these ratings may be an initial criterion for selection of portfolio investments, the Investment Advisor also will independently evaluate these securities and the ability of the issuers of such securities to pay interest and principal. To the extent that the Fund invests in lower grade securities that have not been rated by a rating agency, the Fund's ability to achieve its investment objectives will be more dependent on the Investment Advisor's credit analysis than would be the case when the Fund invests in rated securities.
 
Distressed and Defaulted Securities.  The Fund may invest in securities of financially distressed and bankrupt issuers, including debt obligations that are in covenant or payment default. Such investments generally trade significantly below par and are considered speculative. The repayment of defaulted obligations is subject to significant uncertainties. Defaulted obligations might be repaid only after lengthy workout or bankruptcy proceedings, during which the issuer might

 
II-2

 
 
not make any interest or other payments. Typically such workout or bankruptcy proceedings result in only partial recovery of cash payments or an exchange of the defaulted obligation for other debt or equity securities of the issuer or its affiliates, which may in turn be illiquid or speculative.
 
Senior Loans.  The senior loans in which the Fund invests may consist of direct obligations of a borrower undertaken to finance the growth of the borrower's business, internally or externally, or to finance a capital restructuring. Senior loans may also include debtor in possession financings pursuant to Chapter 11 of the U.S. Bankruptcy Code and obligations of a borrower issued in connection with a restructuring pursuant to Chapter 11 of the U.S. Bankruptcy Code. A significant portion of such senior loans are highly leveraged loans such as leveraged buy-out loans, leveraged recapitalization loans and other types of acquisition loans. Such senior loans may be structured to include both term loans, which are generally fully funded at the time of the Fund's investment, and revolving credit facilities or delayed draw term loans, which would require the Fund to make additional investments in the senior loans as required under the terms of the credit facility. Such senior loans may also include receivables purchase facilities, which are similar to revolving credit facilities secured by a borrower's receivables, senior loans designed to provide "bridge" financing to a borrower pending the sale of identified assets or the arrangement of longer-term loans or the issuance and sale of debt obligations or senior loans of borrowers that have obtained bridge loans from other parties. Senior loans generally are issued in the form of senior syndicated loans, but the Fund also may invest from time to time in privately placed notes, credit linked notes, structured notes or other instruments with credit and pricing terms which are, in the opinion of the Investment Advisor, consistent with investments in senior loan obligations.
 
The senior loans in which the Fund invests typically have stated maturities ranging from five to nine years, though such stated maturities could vary from this range and the Fund is not subject to any restrictions with respect to the maturity of senior loans held in its portfolio. As a result, as short-term interest rates increase, interest payable to the Fund from its investments in senior loans should increase, and as short-term interest rates decrease, interest payable to the Fund from its investments in senior loans should decrease. Because of prepayments, the Investment Advisor expects the average life of the senior loans in which the Fund invests to be shorter than the stated maturity.
 
The senior loans in which the Fund invests generally hold a senior position in the capital structure of the borrower. Such loans may include loans that hold the most senior position, loans that hold an equal ranking with other senior debt, or loans that are, in the judgment of the Investment Advisor, in the category of senior debt. A senior position in the borrower's capital structure generally gives the holder of the senior loan a claim on some or all of the borrower's assets that is senior to that of subordinated debt, preferred stock and common stock in the event the borrower defaults or becomes bankrupt. The senior loans in which the Fund invests may be wholly or partially secured by collateral, or may be unsecured. In the event of a default, the ability of an investor to have access to any collateral may be limited by bankruptcy and other insolvency laws. The value of the collateral also may decline subsequent to the Fund's investment in the senior loan. Under certain circumstances, the collateral may be released with the consent of the Agent Bank and Co-Lenders (each as defined below), or pursuant to the terms of the underlying credit agreement with the borrower. There is no assurance that the liquidation of the collateral will satisfy the borrower's obligation in the event of nonpayment of scheduled interest or principal, or that the collateral could be readily liquidated. As a result, the Fund might not receive payments to which it is entitled and thereby may experience a decline in the value of the investment, and possibly, its NAV.
 
In the case of highly leveraged senior loans, a borrower is often required to pledge collateral that may include (i) working capital assets, such as accounts receivable and inventory, (ii) tangible fixed assets, such as real property, buildings and equipment, (iii) intangible assets, such as trademarks, copyrights and patent rights and/or (iv) security interests in securities of subsidiaries or affiliates. Collateral also may include guarantees or other credit support by subsidiaries or affiliates. In some cases the only collateral for the senior loan is the stock of the borrower and/or its subsidiaries and affiliates. To the extent a senior loan is secured by stock of the borrower and/or its subsidiaries and affiliates, such stock may lose all of its value in the event of a bankruptcy or insolvency of the borrower. In the case of senior loans to privately held companies, the companies' owners may provide additional credit support in the form of guarantees and/or pledges of other securities that they own.
 
In the case of project finance loans, the borrower is generally a special purpose entity that pledges undeveloped land and other non-income producing assets as collateral and obtains construction completion guaranties from third parties, such as the project sponsor. Project finance credit facilities typically provide for payment of interest from escrowed funds during a scheduled construction period, and for the pledge of current and fixed assets after the project is constructed and becomes operational. During the construction period, however, the lenders bear the risk that the project will not be constructed in a timely manner, or will exhaust project funds prior to completion. In such an event, the lenders may need to take legal action to enforce the completion guaranties, or may need to lend more money to the project on less favorable financing terms, or may need to liquidate the undeveloped project assets. There can be no assurance in any of such cases that the lenders will recover all of their invested capital.

 
II-3

 
 
The rate of interest payable on senior floating rate loans is established as the sum of a base lending rate plus a specified margin. These base lending rates generally are the prime rate ("Prime Rate") of a designated U.S. bank, London Interbank Offered Rate ("LIBOR"), the Certificate of Deposit ("CD") rate or another base lending rate used by commercial lenders. The interest rate on Prime Rate-based senior loans floats daily as the Prime Rate changes, while the interest rate on LIBOR-based and CD-based senior loans is reset periodically, typically every one, two, three or six months. Certain of the senior floating rate loans in which the Fund invests permit the borrower to select an interest rate reset period of up to one year. A portion of the Fund's portfolio may be invested in senior loans with interest rates that are fixed for the term of the loan. Investment in senior loans with longer interest rate reset periods or fixed interest rates may increase fluctuations in the Fund's NAV, and potentially the market price of the Fund's shares of common stock, as a result of changes in interest rates.
 
The Fund may receive and/or pay certain fees in connection with its lending activities. These fees are in addition to interest payments received and may include facility fees, commitment fees, amendment and waiver fees, commissions and prepayment fees. In certain circumstances, the Fund may receive a prepayment fee on the prepayment of a senior loan by a borrower. In connection with the acquisition of senior loans or other debt securities, the Fund also may acquire warrants and other debt and equity securities of the borrower or issuer or its affiliates.  The Fund may also acquire other debt and equity securities of the borrower or issuer in connection with an amendment, waiver, conversion or exchange of a senior loan or in connection with a bankruptcy or workout of the borrower or issuer.
 
In making an investment in a senior loan, the Investment Advisor will consider factors deemed by it to be appropriate to the analysis of the borrower and the senior loan. The Investment Advisor performs its own independent credit analysis of the borrower in addition to utilizing information prepared and supplied by the Agent Bank, Co-Lender or Participant (each defined below) from whom the Fund purchases its interest in a senior loan. Such factors include, but are not limited to, the legal/protective features associated with the securities (such as their position in the borrower's capital structure and any security through collateral), financial ratios of the borrower such as pre-tax interest coverage, leverage ratios, and the ratios of cash flows to total debts and the ratio of tangible assets to debt. In its analysis of these factors, the Investment Advisor also will be influenced by the nature of the industry in which the borrower is engaged, the nature of the borrower's assets and the Investment Advisor's assessments of the general quality of the borrower. The Investment Advisor's analysis continues on an ongoing basis for any senior loans in which the Fund has invested. Although the Investment Advisor uses due care in making such analysis, there can be no assurance that such analysis will disclose factors that may impair the value of the senior loan.
 
Senior loans made in connection with highly leveraged transactions are subject to greater credit risks than other senior loans in which each Fund may invest. These credit risks include a greater possibility of default or bankruptcy of the borrower and the assertion that the pledging of collateral to secure the loan constituted a fraudulent conveyance or preferential transfer which can be nullified or subordinated to the rights of other creditors of the borrower under applicable law.
 
Many senior loans in which the Fund invests may not be rated by a rating agency, are not registered with the SEC, or any state securities commission, and are not listed on any national securities exchange. Borrowers may have outstanding debt obligations that are rated below investment grade by a rating agency. Many of the senior loans in which the Fund invests will have been assigned below investment grade ratings by independent rating agencies. In the event senior loans are not rated, they are likely to be the equivalent of below investment grade quality. The Investment Advisor does not view ratings as the determinative factor in its investment decisions and relies more upon its credit analysis abilities than upon ratings.
 
Except with respect to Distressed Securities, the Fund has no policy with regard to minimum ratings for senior loans in which it may invest.  See Item 8:  Description of the Fund—Portfolio Contents and Techniques—Distressed and Defaulted Securities.  The Fund may purchase and retain in its portfolio senior loans where the borrower has experienced, or may be perceived to be likely to experience, credit problems, including involvement in or recent emergence from bankruptcy reorganization proceedings or other forms of debt restructuring. Such investments may provide opportunities for enhanced income as well as capital appreciation, although they also will be subject to greater risk of loss. At times, in connection with the restructuring of a senior loan either outside of bankruptcy court or in the context of bankruptcy court proceedings, the Fund may determine or be required to accept equity securities or junior fixed income securities in exchange for all or a portion of a senior loan.
 
The secondary market for trading of senior loans continues to develop and mature. One of the effects of a more active and liquid secondary market, however, is that a senior loan may trade at a premium or discount to the principal amount, or par value, of the loan. There are many factors that influence the market value of a senior loan, including technical factors relating to the operation of the loan market, supply and demand conditions, market perceptions about the credit quality or financial condition of the borrower or more general concerns about the industry in which the borrower operates. The Fund participates in this secondary market for senior loans, purchasing and selling loans that may trade at a premium or discount to the par value of the loan. However, no active trading market may exist for some senior loans and some loans may be subject to restrictions on resale. A secondary market may be subject to irregular trading activity, wide bid/ask spreads and extended

 
II-4

 
 
trade settlement periods, which may impair the ability to realize full value and thus cause a material decline in the Fund's NAV. In addition, the Fund may not be able to readily dispose of its senior loans at prices that approximate those at which the Fund could sell such loans if they were more widely-traded and, as a result of such illiquidity, the Fund may have to sell other investments or engage in borrowing transactions if necessary to raise cash to meet its obligations. During periods of limited supply and liquidity of senior loans, the Fund's yield may be lower.
 
When interest rates decline, the value of a fund invested in fixed rate obligations can be expected to rise. Conversely, when interest rates rise, the value of a fund invested in fixed rate obligations can be expected to decline. Although changes in prevailing interest rates can be expected to cause some fluctuations in the value of floating rate senior loans (due to the fact that floating rates on senior loans only reset periodically), the value of floating rate senior loans is substantially less sensitive to changes in market interest rates than fixed rate instruments. As a result, to the extent the Fund invests in floating rate senior loans, the Fund's portfolio may be less volatile and less sensitive to changes in market interest rates than if the Fund invested in fixed rate obligations. Similarly, a sudden and significant increase in market interest rates may cause a decline in the value of these investments and in the Fund's NAV. Other factors (including, but not limited to, rating downgrades, credit deterioration, a large downward movement in stock prices, a disparity in supply and demand of certain securities or market conditions that reduce liquidity) can reduce the value of senior loans and other debt obligations, impairing the Fund's NAV.
 
A borrower must comply with various restrictive covenants contained in any credit agreement between the borrower and the lending syndicate. Such covenants, in addition to requiring the scheduled payment of interest and principal, may include restrictions on dividend payments and other distributions to stockholders, provisions requiring the borrower to maintain specific financial ratios or relationships, limits on total debt and restrictions on the borrower's ability to pledge its assets. In addition, the loan agreement may contain a covenant requiring the borrower to prepay the senior loan with any excess cash flow. Excess cash flow generally includes net cash flow after scheduled debt service payments and permitted capital expenditures, among other things, as well as the proceeds from asset dispositions or sales of securities. A breach of a covenant (after giving effect to any cure period) which is not waived by the Agent Bank and the lending syndicate normally is an event of default (i.e., the Agent Bank has the right to call the outstanding senior loan).
 
Senior loans usually require, in addition to scheduled payments of interest and principal, the prepayment of the senior loan from excess cash flow, as discussed above, and typically permit the borrower to prepay at its election. The degree to which borrowers prepay senior loans, whether as a contractual requirement or at their election, may be affected by general business conditions, the financial condition of the borrower and competitive conditions among lenders, among other factors. Accordingly, prepayments cannot be predicted with accuracy. Upon a prepayment, the Fund may receive both a prepayment fee from the prepaying borrower and a facility fee on the purchase of a new senior loan with the proceeds from the prepayment of the former. Such fees may mitigate any adverse impact on the yield on the Fund's portfolio which may arise as a result of prepayments and the reinvestment of such proceeds in senior loans bearing lower interest rates.
 
A senior loan in which the Fund may invest typically is originated, negotiated and structured by a syndicate of lenders ("Co-Lenders") consisting of commercial banks, thrift institutions, insurance companies, finance companies, investment banking firms, securities brokerage houses or other financial institutions or institutional investors, one or more of which administers the loan on behalf of the syndicate (the "Agent Bank"). Co-Lenders may sell senior loans to third parties ("Participants"). The Fund invests in a senior loan either by participating in the primary distribution as a Co-Lender at the time the loan is originated or by buying an assignment or participation interest in the senior loan in the secondary market from a Co-Lender or a Participant.
 
The Fund may invest in a senior loan at origination as a Co-Lender or by acquiring an assignment or participation interest in the secondary market from a Co-Lender or Participant. If the Fund purchases an assignment, the Fund typically accepts all of the rights of the assigning lender in a senior loan, including the right to receive payments of principal and interest and other amounts directly from the borrower and to enforce its rights as a lender directly against the borrower and assumes all of the obligations of the assigning lender, including any obligations to make future advances to the borrower. As a result, therefore, the Fund has the status of a Co-Lender. In some cases, the rights and obligations acquired by a purchaser of an assignment may differ from, and may be more limited than, the rights and obligations of the assigning lender. The Fund also may purchase a participation in a portion of the rights of a Co-Lender or Participant in a senior loan by means of a participation agreement. A participation is similar to an assignment in that the Co-Lender or Participant transfers to the Fund all or a portion of an interest in a senior loan. Unlike an assignment, however, a participation does not establish any direct relationship between the Fund and the borrower. In such a case, the Fund is required to rely on the Co-Lender or Participant that sold the participation not only for the enforcement of the Fund's rights against the borrower but also for the receipt and processing of payments due to the Fund under the senior loans.
 
Because it may be necessary to assert through a Co-Lender or Participant such rights as may exist against the borrower, in the event the borrower fails to pay principal and interest when due, the Fund may be subject to delays, expenses and risks that are greater than those that would be involved if the Fund could enforce its rights directly against the borrower. Moreover, under the terms of a participation, the Fund may be regarded as a creditor of the Co-Lender or Participant that sold

 
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the participation (rather than of the borrower), so that the Fund may also be subject to the risk that the Co-Lender or Participant may become insolvent. Similar risks may arise with respect to the Agent Bank, as described below. Further, in the event of the bankruptcy or insolvency of the borrower, the obligation of the borrower to repay the senior loan may be subject to certain defenses that can be asserted by such borrower as a result of improper conduct by the Agent Bank, Co-Lender or Participant.
 
In a typical senior loan, the Agent Bank administers the terms of the credit agreement and is responsible for the collection of principal and interest and fee payments from the borrower and the apportionment of these payments to the credit of all lenders which are parties to the credit agreement. The Fund generally relies on the Agent Bank (or the Co-Lender or Participant that sold the Fund a participation interest) to collect its portion of the payments on the senior loan. Furthermore, the Fund generally relies on the Agent Bank to use appropriate creditor remedies against the borrower. Typically, under credit agreements, the Agent Bank is given broad discretion in enforcing the credit agreement, and is obligated to use only the same care it would use in the management of its own property. The borrower compensates the Agent Bank for these services. Such compensation may include special fees paid on structuring and funding the senior loan and other fees paid on a continuing basis.
 
In the event that an Agent Bank becomes insolvent, or has a receiver, conservator, or similar official appointed for it by the appropriate bank regulatory authority or becomes a debtor in a bankruptcy proceeding, assets held by the Agent Bank under the credit agreement should remain available to holders of senior loans.
 
If, however, assets held by the Agent Bank for the benefit of the Fund were determined by an appropriate regulatory authority or court to be subject to the claims of the Agent Bank's general or secured creditors, the Fund might incur certain costs and delays in realizing payment on a senior loan or suffer a loss of principal and/or interest. In situations involving a Co-Lender or Participant that sold the Fund a participation interest, similar risks may arise, as described above.
 
The Fund may have certain obligations pursuant to a credit agreement, which may include the obligation to make future advances to the borrower in connection with revolving credit facilities in certain circumstances. These commitments may have the effect of requiring the Fund to increase its investment in a borrower at a time it might not be desirable to do so (including at a time when the borrower's financial condition makes it unlikely that such amounts will be repaid). The Fund currently intends to reserve against such contingent obligations by designating sufficient investments in liquid assets on its books and records.
 
The Fund may obtain exposure to senior loans through the use of derivative instruments, which have recently become increasingly available. The Investment Advisor may utilize these instruments and similar instruments that may be available in the future. The Fund may invest in a derivative instrument known as a Select Aggregate Market Index ("SAMI"), which provides investors with exposure to a reference basket of senior loans. SAMIs are structured as floating rate instruments. SAMIs consist of a basket of credit default swaps whose underlying reference securities are senior secured loans. While investing in SAMIs will increase the universe of floating rate fixed income securities to which the Fund is exposed, such investments entail risks that are not typically associated with investments in other floating rate fixed income securities. The liquidity of the market for SAMIs will be subject to liquidity in the secured loan and credit derivatives markets. Investment in SAMIs involves many of the risks associated with investments in derivative instruments discussed generally herein.
 
Second Lien Loans.  The Fund may invest in second lien or other subordinated or unsecured floating rate and fixed rate loans or debt.  Second lien loans have the same characteristics as senior loans except that such loans are second in lien property rather than first. Second lien loans typically have adjustable floating rate interest payments. Accordingly, the risks associated with second lien loans are higher than the risk of loans with first priority over the collateral. In the event of default on a second lien loan, the first priority lien holder has first claim to the underlying collateral of the loan. It is possible that no collateral value would remain for the second priority lien holder, which may result in a loss of investment to the Fund.
 
Mezzanine Loans.  The Fund may invest in mezzanine loans. Structurally, mezzanine loans usually rank subordinate in priority of payment to senior debt, such as senior bank debt, and are often unsecured. However, mezzanine loans rank senior to common and preferred equity in a borrower's capital structure. Mezzanine debt is often used in leveraged buyout and real estate finance transactions. Typically, mezzanine loans have elements of both debt and equity instruments, offering the fixed returns in the form of interest payments associated with senior debt, while providing lenders an opportunity to participate in the capital appreciation of a borrower, if any, through an equity interest. This equity interest typically takes the form of warrants. Due to their higher risk profile and often less restrictive covenants as compared to senior loans, mezzanine loans generally earn a higher return than senior secured loans. The warrants associated with mezzanine loans are typically detachable, which allows lenders to receive repayment of their principal on an agreed amortization schedule while retaining their equity interest in the borrower. Mezzanine loans also may include a "put" feature, which permits the holder to sell its equity interest back to the borrower at a price determined through an agreed-upon formula. Mezzanine investments may be issued with or without registration rights. Similar to other high yield securities, maturities of mezzanine investments are typically seven to ten years, but the expected average life is significantly shorter at three to five years; however, maturities

 
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and expected average lives could vary from these ranges and the Fund is not subject to any restrictions with respect to the maturities or expected average lives of mezzanine loans held in its portfolio. Mezzanine investments are usually unsecured and subordinate to other obligations of the issuer.
 
Debtor-In-Possession Financings. The Fund may invest in "debtor-in-possession" or "DIP" financings newly issued in connection with "special situation" restructuring and refinancing transactions. DIP financings are loans to a debtor-in-possession in a proceeding under the U.S. Bankruptcy Code that has been approved by the bankruptcy court. These financings allow the entity to continue its business operations while reorganizing under Chapter 11 of the U.S. Bankruptcy Code. DIP financings are typically fully secured by a lien on the debtor's otherwise unencumbered assets or secured by a junior lien on the debtor's encumbered assets (so long as the loan is fully secured based on the most recent current valuation or appraisal report of the debtor). DIP financings are often required to close with certainty and in a rapid manner in order to satisfy existing creditors and to enable the issuer to emerge from bankruptcy or to avoid a bankruptcy proceeding.
 
Mortgage Related Securities.   Mortgage-backed securities ("MBS") include structured debt obligations collateralized by pools of commercial ("CMBS") or residential ("RMBS") mortgages. Pools of mortgage loans and mortgage-backed loans, such as mezzanine loans, are assembled as securities for sale to investors by various governmental, government-related and private organizations. MBS include complex instruments such as collateralized mortgage obligations ("CMOs"), stripped MBS, mortgage pass-through securities and interests in Real Estate Mortgage Investment Conduits ("REMICs"). The MBS in which the Fund may invest include those with fixed, floating or variable interest rates, those with interest rates that change based on multiples of changes in a specified reference interest rate or index of interest rates and those with interest rates that change inversely to changes in interest rates, as well as those that do not bear interest. The Fund may invest in RMBS and CMBS issued by governmental entities and private issuers, including subordinated MBS and residual interests. The Fund may invest in sub-prime mortgages or MBS that are backed by sub-prime mortgages.
 
In general, losses on a mortgaged property securing a mortgage loan included in a securitization will be borne first by the equity holder of the property, then by a cash reserve fund or letter of credit, if any, then by the holder of a mezzanine loan or B-Note, if any, then by the "first loss" subordinated security holder (generally, the "B-Piece" buyer) and then by the holder of a higher rated security. The Fund may invest in any class of security included in a securitization. In the event of default and the exhaustion of any equity support, reserve fund, letter of credit, mezzanine loans or B-Notes, and any classes of securities junior to those in which the Fund invests, the Fund will not be able to recover all of its investment in the MBS it purchases. MBS in which the Fund invests may not contain reserve funds, letters of credit, mezzanine loans and/or junior classes of securities. The prices of lower credit quality securities are generally less sensitive to interest rate changes than more highly rated investments, but more sensitive to adverse economic downturns or individual issuer developments.
 
Mortgage Pass-Through Securities.  Mortgage pass-through securities differ from other forms of fixed income securities, which normally provide for periodic payment of interest in fixed amounts with principal payments at maturity or specified call dates. Instead, these securities provide a monthly payment which consists of both interest and principal payments. In effect, these payments are a "pass through" of the monthly payments made by the individual borrowers on their residential or commercial mortgage loans, net of any fees paid to the issuer or guarantor of such securities. Additional payments are caused by repayments of principal resulting from the sale of the underlying property, refinancing or foreclosure, net of fees or costs that may be incurred. Some mortgage related securities (such as securities issued by the Government National Mortgage Association ("GNMA")) are described as "modified pass-through." These securities entitle the holder to receive all interest and principal payments owed on the mortgage pool, net of certain fees, at the scheduled payment dates regardless of whether or not the mortgagor actually makes the payment.
 
RMBS.  RMBS are securities the payments on which depend primarily on the cash flow from residential mortgage loans made to borrowers that are secured, on a first priority basis or second priority basis, subject to permitted liens, easements and other encumbrances, by residential real estate (one- to four-family properties), the proceeds of which are used to purchase real estate and purchase or construct dwellings thereon or to refinance indebtedness previously used for such purposes. Non-agency residential mortgage loans are obligations of the borrowers thereunder only and are not typically insured or guaranteed by any other person or entity. The ability of a borrower to repay a loan secured by residential property is dependent upon the income or assets of the borrower. A number of factors, including a general economic downturn, acts of God, terrorism, social unrest and civil disturbances, may impair a borrower's ability to repay its loans.
 
Agency RMBS.  The principal U.S. governmental guarantor of mortgage related securities is GNMA, which is a wholly owned U.S. government corporation.  GNMA is authorized to guarantee, with the full faith and credit of the U.S. government, the timely payment of principal and interest on securities issued by institutions approved by GNMA (such as savings and loan institutions, commercial banks and mortgage bankers) and backed by pools of mortgages insured by the Federal Housing Administration (the "FHA") or guaranteed by the Department of Veterans Affairs (the "VA").  MBS issued by GNMA include GNMA Mortgage Pass-Through Certificates (also known as "Ginnie Maes") which are guaranteed as to the timely payment of principal and interest by GNMA and such guarantees are backed by the full faith and credit of the

 
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United States. GNMA certificates also are supported by the authority of GNMA to borrow funds from the U.S. Treasury to make payments under its guarantee.
 
Government-related guarantors (i.e., not backed by the full faith and credit of the U.S. government) include the Federal National Mortgage Association ("FNMA") and the Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation ("FHLMC").  FNMA is a government-sponsored corporation the common stock of which is owned entirely by private stockholders. FNMA purchases conventional (i.e., not insured or guaranteed by any government agency) residential mortgages from a list of approved seller/servicers which include state and federally chartered savings and loan associations, mutual savings banks, commercial banks and credit unions and mortgage bankers. Pass-through securities issued by FNMA (also known as "Fannie Maes") are guaranteed as to timely payment of principal and interest by FNMA, but are not backed by the full faith and credit of the U.S. government.  FHLMC was created by Congress in 1970 for the purpose of increasing the availability of mortgage credit for residential housing. It is a government-sponsored corporation that issues FHLMC Guaranteed Mortgage Pass-Through Certificates (also known as "Freddie Macs" or "PCs"), which are pass-through securities, each representing an undivided interest in a pool of residential mortgages. FHLMC guarantees the timely payment of interest and ultimate collection of principal, but PCs are not backed by the full faith and credit of the U.S. government.
 
In 2008, the Federal Housing Finance Agency ("FHFA") placed FNMA and FHLMC into conservatorship. FNMA and FHLMC are continuing to operate as going concerns while in conservatorship and each remains liable for all of its obligations, including its guaranty obligations, associated with its MBS.
 
As the conservator, FHFA succeeded to all rights, titles, powers and privileges of FNMA and FHLMC and of any stockholder, officer or director of FNMA and FHLMC with respect to FNMA and FHLMC and the assets of FNMA and FHLMC. In connection with the conservatorship, the U.S. Treasury entered into a Senior Preferred Stock Purchase Agreement with each of FNMA and FHLMC pursuant to which the U.S. Treasury would purchase up to an aggregate of $100 billion of each of FNMA and FHLMC to maintain a positive net worth in each enterprise. This agreement contains various covenants that severely limit each enterprise's operations. In exchange for entering into these agreements, the U.S. Treasury received $1 billion of each enterprise's senior preferred stock and warrants to purchase 79.9% of each enterprise's common stock. In February 2009, the U.S. Treasury doubled the size of its commitment to each enterprise under the Senior Preferred Stock Program to $200 billion. The U.S. Treasury's obligations under the Senior Preferred Stock Program are for an indefinite period of time for a maximum amount of $200 billion per enterprise. In December 2009, the U.S. Treasury announced further amendments to the Senior Preferred Stock Purchase Agreements which included additional financial support to certain governmentally supported entities, including the Federal Home Loan Banks ("FHLBs"), FNMA and FHLMC.  It is difficult, if not impossible, to predict the future political, regulatory or economic changes that could impact FNMA, FHLMC and the FHLBs, and the values of their related securities or obligations. There is no assurance that the obligations of such entities will be satisfied in full, or that such obligations will not decrease in value or default.
 
Under the Federal Housing Finance Regulatory Reform Act of 2008 (the "Reform Act"), which was included as part of the Housing and Economic Recovery Act of 2008, FHFA, as conservator or receiver, has the power to repudiate any contract entered into by FNMA or FHLMC prior to FHFA's appointment as conservator or receiver, as applicable, if FHFA determines, in its sole discretion, that performance of the contract is burdensome and that repudiation of the contract promotes the orderly administration of FNMA's or FHLMC's affairs. The Reform Act requires FHFA to exercise its right to repudiate any contract within a reasonable period of time after its appointment as conservator or receiver. FHFA, in its capacity as conservator, has indicated that it has no intention to repudiate the guaranty obligations of FNMA or FHLMC because FHFA views repudiation as incompatible with the goals of the conservatorship. However, in the event that FHFA, as conservator or if it is later appointed as receiver for FNMA or FHLMC, were to repudiate any such guaranty obligation, the conservatorship or receivership estate, as applicable, would be liable for actual direct compensatory damages in accordance with the provisions of the Reform Act. Any such liability could be satisfied only to the extent of FNMA's or FHLMC's assets available therefor. In the event of repudiation, the payments of interest to holders of FNMA or FHLMC MBS would be reduced if payments on the mortgage loans represented in the mortgage loan groups related to such MBS are not made by the borrowers or advanced by the servicer. Any actual direct compensatory damages for repudiating these guaranty obligations may not be sufficient to offset any shortfalls experienced by such MBS holders. Further, in its capacity as conservator or receiver, FHFA has the right to transfer or sell any asset or liability of FNMA or FHLMC without any approval, assignment or consent. Although FHFA has stated that it has no present intention to do so, if FHFA, as conservator or receiver, were to transfer any such guaranty obligation to another party, holders of FNMA or FHLMC MBS would have to rely on that party for satisfaction of the guaranty obligation and would be exposed to the credit risk of that party. In addition, certain rights provided to holders of MBS issued by FNMA and FHLMC under the operative documents related to such securities may not be enforced against FHFA, or enforcement of such rights may be delayed, during the conservatorship or any future receivership. The operative documents for FNMA and FHLMC MBS may provide (or with respect to securities issued prior to the date of the appointment of the conservator may have provided) that upon the occurrence of an event of default on the part of FNMA or FHLMC, in its capacity as guarantor, which includes the appointment of a conservator or receiver, holders of such MBS have the right to replace FNMA or FHLMC as trustee if the requisite percentage of MBS

 
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holders consent. The Reform Act prevents MBS holders from enforcing such rights if the event of default arises solely because a conservator or receiver has been appointed.
 
A 2011 report to Congress from the Treasury Department and the Department of Housing and Urban Development set forth a plan to reform America's housing finance market, which would reduce the role of and eventually eliminate FNMA and FHLMC. Notably, the plan did not propose similar significant changes to GNMA, which guarantees payments on mortgage related securities backed by federally insured or guaranteed loans. The report also identified three proposals for Congress and the administration to consider for the long-term structure of the housing finance markets after the elimination of FNMA and FHLMC, including implementing: (i) a privatized system of housing finance that limits government insurance to very limited groups of creditworthy low- and moderate-income borrowers; (ii) a privatized system with a government backstop mechanism that would allow the government to insure a larger share of the housing finance market during a future housing crisis; and (iii) a privatized system where the government would offer reinsurance to holders of certain highly rated mortgage related securities insured by private insurers and would pay out under the reinsurance arrangements only if the private mortgage insurers were insolvent.
 
Non-Agency RMBS.  Non-agency RMBS are issued by commercial banks, savings and loan institutions, mortgage bankers, private mortgage insurance companies and other non-governmental issuers. Timely payment of principal and interest on RMBS backed by pools created by non-governmental issuers often is supported partially by various forms of insurance or guarantees, including individual loan, title, pool and hazard insurance. The insurance and guarantees are issued by government entities, private insurers and the mortgage poolers. There can be no assurance that the private insurers or mortgage poolers can meet their obligations under the policies, so that if the issuers default on their obligations, the holders of the security could sustain a loss. No insurance or guarantee covers the Fund or the price of the Fund's shares. RMBS issued by non-governmental issuers generally offer a higher rate of interest than government agency and government-related securities because there are no direct or indirect government guarantees of payment.
 
CMBS.  CMBS generally are multi-class debt or pass-through certificates secured or backed by mortgage loans on commercial properties. CMBS generally are structured to provide protection to the senior class investors against potential losses on the underlying mortgage loans. This protection generally is provided by having the holders of subordinated classes of securities ("Subordinated CMBS") take the first loss if there are defaults on the underlying commercial mortgage loans. Other protection, which may benefit all of the classes or particular classes, may include issuer guarantees, reserve funds, additional Subordinated CMBS, cross-collateralization and over-collateralization.
 
The Fund may invest in Subordinated CMBS, which are subordinated in some manner as to the payment of principal and/or interest to the holders of more senior CMBS arising out of the same pool of mortgages and which are often referred to as "B-Pieces." The holders of Subordinated CMBS typically are compensated with a higher stated yield than are the holders of more senior CMBS. On the other hand, Subordinated CMBS typically subject the holder to greater risk than senior CMBS and tend to be rated in a lower rating category (frequently a substantially lower rating category) than the senior CMBS issued in respect of the same mortgage pool. Subordinated CMBS generally are likely to be more sensitive to changes in prepayment and interest rates and the market for such securities may be less liquid than is the case for traditional income securities and senior CMBS.
 
CMOs. A CMO is a multi-class bond backed by a pool of mortgage pass-through certificates or mortgage loans. CMOs may be collateralized by (i) GNMA, FNMA or FHLMC pass-through certificates, (ii) unsecuritized mortgage loans insured by the FHA or guaranteed by the VA, (iii) unsecuritized conventional mortgages, (iv) other MBS or (v) any combination thereof. Each class of a CMO, often referred to as a "tranche," is issued at a specific coupon rate and has a stated maturity or final distribution date. Principal prepayments on collateral underlying a CMO may cause it to be retired substantially earlier than its stated maturity or final distribution date. The principal and interest on the underlying mortgages may be allocated among the several classes of a series of a CMO in many ways. One or more tranches of a CMO may have coupon rates which reset periodically at a specified increment over an index, such as LIBOR (or sometimes more than one index). These floating rate CMOs typically are issued with lifetime caps on the coupon rate thereon. CMO residuals represent the interest in any excess cash flow remaining after making the payments of interest and principal on the tranches issued by the CMO and the payment of administrative expenses and management fees.
 
The Fund may invest in inverse floating rate CMOs. Inverse floating rate CMOs constitute a tranche of a CMO with a coupon rate that moves in the reverse direction relative to an applicable index such as LIBOR. Accordingly, the coupon rate thereon will increase as interest rates decrease. Inverse floating rate CMOs are typically more volatile than fixed or floating rate tranches of CMOs. Many inverse floating rate CMOs have coupons that move inversely to a multiple of an index. The effect of the coupon varying inversely to a multiple of an applicable index creates a leverage factor. Inverse floating rate debt instruments (“inverse floaters”) based on multiples of a stated index are designed to be highly sensitive to changes in interest rates and can subject the holders thereof to extreme reductions of yield and loss of principal. The market for inverse floating rate CMOs with highly leveraged characteristics at times may be very thin. The Fund's ability to dispose of its positions in such securities will depend on the degree of liquidity in the markets for such securities. It is impossible to predict the amount of trading interest that may exist in such securities, and therefore the future degree of liquidity.

 
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Stripped MBS. Stripped MBS are created by segregating the cash flows from underlying mortgage loans or mortgage securities to create two or more new securities, each receiving a specified percentage of the underlying security's principal or interest payments. Mortgage securities may be partially stripped so that each investor class receives some interest and some principal. When securities are completely stripped, however, all of the interest is distributed to holders of one type of security, known as an interest-only security (or "IO"), and all of the principal is distributed to holders of another type of security, known as a principal-only security (or "PO"). Strips can be created in a pass-through structure or as tranches of a CMO. The yields to maturity on IOs and POs are very sensitive to the rate of principal payments (including prepayments) on the related underlying mortgage assets. If the underlying mortgage assets experience greater than anticipated prepayments of principal, the Fund may not fully recoup its initial investment in IOs. Conversely, if the underlying mortgage assets experience less than anticipated prepayments of principal, the yield on POs could be materially and adversely affected.
 
Adjustable Rate Mortgage Securities.  Adjustable rate mortgages ("ARMs") have interest rates that reset at periodic intervals. Acquiring ARMs permits the Fund to participate in increases in prevailing current interest rates through periodic adjustments in the coupons of mortgages underlying the pool on which ARMs are based. Such ARMs generally have higher current yield and lower price fluctuations than is the case with more traditional fixed income securities of comparable rating and maturity. In addition, when prepayments of principal are made on the underlying mortgages during periods of rising interest rates, the Fund may potentially reinvest the proceeds of such prepayments at rates higher than those at which they were previously invested. Mortgages underlying most ARMs, however, have limits on the allowable annual or lifetime increases that can be made in the interest rate that the mortgagor pays. Therefore, if current interest rates rise above such limits over the period of the limitation, the Fund, when holding an ARM, does not benefit from further increases in interest rates. Moreover, when interest rates are in excess of the coupon rates (i.e., the rates being paid by mortgagors) of the mortgages, ARMs behave more like fixed income securities and less like adjustable-rate securities and are subject to the risks associated with fixed income securities. In addition, during periods of rising interest rates, increases in the coupon rate of ARMs generally lag current market interest rates slightly, thereby creating the potential for capital depreciation on such securities.
 
Sub-Prime Mortgages. Sub-prime mortgages are mortgages rated below "A" by S&P or Moody's. Historically, sub-prime mortgage loans have been made to borrowers with blemished (or non-existent) credit records, and the borrower is charged a higher interest rate to compensate for the greater risk of delinquency and the higher costs of loan servicing and collection. Sub-prime mortgages are subject to both state and federal anti-predatory lending statutes that carry potential liability to secondary market purchasers such as the Fund. Sub-prime mortgages have certain characteristics and associated risks similar to below investment grade securities, including a higher degree of credit risk, and certain characteristics and associated risks similar to MBS, including prepayment risk.
 
Mortgage Related ABS. Asset-backed securities ("ABS") are bonds backed by pools of loans or other receivables. ABS are created from many types of assets, including in some cases mortgage related asset classes, such as home equity loan ABS.  Home equity loan ABS are subject to many of the same risks as RMBS, including interest rate risk and prepayment risk.
 
Mortgage REITs. A real estate investment trust ("REIT") is a corporation, or a business trust that would otherwise be taxed as a corporation, that meets the definitional requirements applicable to REITs under the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended (the "Code"). The Code permits a qualifying REIT to deduct dividends paid, thereby generally eliminating corporate level U.S. federal income tax and effectively making the REIT a pass-through vehicle for U.S. federal income tax purposes. To meet the definitional requirements of the Code, a REIT must, among other things, invest substantially all of its assets in interests in real estate (including mortgages and other REITs) or cash and government securities, derive most of its income from rents from real property or interest on loans secured by mortgages on real property, and distribute to shareholders annually substantially all of its otherwise taxable income. Mortgage REITs invest mostly in mortgages on real estate, which may secure construction, development or long-term loans, and the main source of their income is mortgage interest payments.  The value of securities issued by REITs is affected by tax and regulatory requirements and by perceptions of management skill. They also are subject to heavy cash flow dependency and the possibility of failing to qualify for REIT status under the Code or to maintain exemption from the 1940 Act.
 
Mortgage Related Derivative Instruments.  The Fund may invest in MBS credit default swaps.  MBS credit default swaps include swaps the reference obligation for which is an MBS or related index, such as the CMBX Index (a tradeable index referencing a basket of CMBS), the TRX Index (a tradeable index referencing total return swaps based on CMBS) or the ABX Index (a tradeable index referencing a basket of sub-prime MBS). The Fund may engage in other derivative transactions related to MBS, including purchasing and selling exchange-listed and over-the-counter put and call options, futures and forwards on mortgages and MBS.  The Fund may invest in newly developed mortgage related derivatives that may hereafter become available.
 
Net Interest Margin (NIM) Securities.  The Fund may invest in net interest margin ("NIM") securities. These securities are derivative interest-only mortgage securities structured off home equity loan transactions. NIM securities receive

 
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any "excess" interest computed after paying coupon costs, servicing costs and fees and any credit losses associated with the underlying pool of home equity loans. Like traditional stripped MBS, the yield to maturity on a NIM security is sensitive not only to changes in prevailing interest rates but also to the rate of principal payments (including prepayments) on the underlying home equity loans. NIM securities are highly sensitive to credit losses on the underlying collateral and the timing in which those losses are taken.
 
Tiered Index Bonds.  Tiered index bonds are relatively new forms of mortgage-related securities. The interest rate on a tiered index bond is tied to a specified index or market rate. So long as this index or market rate is below a predetermined "strike" rate, the interest rate on the tiered index bond remains fixed. If, however, the specified index or market rate rises above the "strike" rate, the interest rate of the tiered index bond will decrease. Thus, under these circumstances, the interest rate on a tiered index bond, like an inverse floater, will move in the opposite direction of prevailing interest rates, with the result that the price of the tiered index bond may be considerably more volatile than that of a fixed-rate bond.
 
TBA Commitments.  The Fund may enter into "to be announced" or "TBA" commitments. TBA commitments are forward agreements for the purchase or sale of securities, including MBS, for a fixed price, with payment and delivery on an agreed upon future settlement date. The specific securities to be delivered are not identified at the trade date. However, delivered securities must meet specified terms, including issuer, rate and mortgage terms.
 
Other Mortgage Related Securities. Other mortgage related securities include securities other than those described above that directly or indirectly represent a participation in, or are secured by and payable from, mortgage loans on real property. Other mortgage related securities may be equity or debt securities issued by agencies or instrumentalities of the U.S. government or by private originators of, or investors in, mortgage loans, including savings and loan associations, homebuilders, mortgage banks, commercial banks, investment banks, partnerships, trusts and special purpose entities of the foregoing.
 
Asset-Backed Securities.  ABS are a form of structured debt obligation. The securitization techniques used for ABS are similar to those used for MBS. ABS are bonds backed by pools of loans or other receivables. The collateral for these securities may include home equity loans, automobile and credit card receivables, boat loans, computer leases, airplane leases, mobile home loans, recreational vehicle loans and hospital account receivables. The Fund may invest in these and other types of ABS that may be developed in the future. ABS present certain risks that are not presented by mortgage related securities. Primarily, these securities may provide the Fund with a less effective security interest in the related collateral than do mortgage related securities. Therefore, there is the possibility that recoveries on the underlying collateral may not, in some cases, be available to support payments on these securities.
 
Collateralized Debt Obligations. The Fund may invest in collateralized debt obligations ("CDOs"), which include collateralized bond obligations ("CBOs"), collateralized loan obligations ("CLOs") and other similarly structured securities.  CDOs are types of asset-backed securities. A CBO is ordinarily issued by a fund or other special purpose entity ("SPE") and is typically backed by a diversified pool of fixed income securities (which may include high risk, below investment grade securities) held by such issuer. A CLO is ordinarily issued by a trust or other SPE and is typically collateralized by a pool of loans, which may include, among others, domestic and non-U.S. senior secured loans, senior unsecured loans, and subordinate corporate loans, including loans that may be rated below investment grade or equivalent unrated loans, held by such issuer. Although certain CDOs may benefit from credit enhancement in the form of a senior-subordinate structure, over-collateralization or bond insurance, such enhancement may not always be present, and may fail to protect the Fund against the risk of loss on default of the collateral. Certain CDO issuers may use derivatives contracts to create "synthetic" exposure to assets rather than holding such assets directly, which entails the risks of derivative instruments described elsewhere in this Prospectus. CDOs may charge management fees and administrative expenses, which are in addition to those of the Fund.
 
For both CBOs and CLOs, the cash flows from the SPE are split into two or more portions, called tranches, varying in risk and yield. The riskiest portion is the "equity" tranche, which bears the first loss from defaults from the bonds or loans in the SPE and serves to protect the other, more senior tranches from default (though such protection is not complete). Since it is partially protected from defaults, a senior tranche from a CBO or CLO typically has higher ratings and lower yields than its underlying securities, and may be rated investment grade. Despite the protection from the equity tranche, CBO or CLO tranches can experience substantial losses due to actual defaults, downgrades of the underlying collateral by rating agencies, forced liquidation of the collateral pool due to a failure of coverage tests, increased sensitivity to defaults due to collateral default and disappearance of protecting tranches, market anticipation of defaults as well as investor aversion to CBO or CLO securities as a class. Interest on certain tranches of a CDO may be paid in kind or deferred and capitalized (paid in the form of obligations of the same type rather than cash), which involves continued exposure to default risk with respect to such payments.

 
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Delayed Funding Loans and Revolving Credit Facilities.  The Fund may enter into, or acquire participations in, delayed funding loans and revolving credit facilities, in which a bank or other lender agrees to make loans up to a maximum amount upon demand by the borrower during a specified term. These commitments may have the effect of requiring the Fund to increase its investment in a company at a time when it might not be desirable to do so (including at a time when the company's financial condition makes it unlikely that such amounts will be repaid). Delayed funding loans and revolving credit facilities are subject to credit, interest rate and liquidity risk and the risks of being a lender.
 
Zero-Coupon Bonds, Step-Ups and Pay-In-Kind Securities. Zero-coupon bonds pay interest only at maturity rather than at intervals during the life of the security. Like zero-coupon bonds, "step up" bonds pay no interest initially but eventually begin to pay a coupon rate prior to maturity, which rate may increase at stated intervals during the life of the security. Pay-in-kind securities ("PIKs") are debt obligations that pay "interest" in the form of other debt obligations, instead of in cash. Each of these instruments is normally issued and traded at a deep discount from face value. Zero-coupon bonds, step-ups and PIKs allow an issuer to avoid or delay the need to generate cash to meet current interest payments and, as a result, may involve greater credit risk than bonds that pay interest currently or in cash. The Fund would be required to distribute the income on these instruments as it accrues, even though the Fund will not receive the income on a current basis or in cash. Thus, the Fund may have to sell other investments, including when it may not be advisable to do so, to make income distributions to its shareholders.
 
U.S. Government Debt Securities. The Fund may invest in debt securities issued or guaranteed by the U.S. government, its agencies or instrumentalities, including U.S. Treasury obligations, which differ in their interest rates, maturities and times of issuance.  Such obligations include U.S. Treasury bills (maturity of one year or less), U.S. Treasury notes (maturity of one to ten years) and U.S. Treasury bonds (generally maturities of greater than ten years), including the principal components or the interest components issued by the U.S. government under the separate trading of registered interest and principal securities program (i.e., "STRIPS"), all of which are backed by the full faith and credit of the United States.
 
Municipal Securities.  The Fund may invest in municipal securities. Municipal securities are either general obligation bonds or revenue bonds and typically are issued to finance public projects, such as roads or public buildings, to pay general operating expenses or to refinance outstanding debt. Municipal securities may also be issued for private activities, such as housing, medical and educational facility construction, or for privately owned industrial development and pollution control projects. General obligation bonds are backed by the full faith and credit, or taxing authority, of the issuer and may be repaid from any revenue source. Revenue bonds may be repaid only from the revenues of a specific facility or source. Municipal securities may be issued on a long term basis to provide permanent financing. The repayment of such debt may be secured generally by a pledge of the full faith and credit taxing power of the issuer, a limited or special tax, or any other revenue source, including project revenues, which may include tolls, fees and other user charges, lease payments and mortgage payments. Municipal securities may also be issued to finance projects on a short-term interim basis, anticipating repayment with the proceeds of the later issuance of long-term debt.
 
General Obligation Bonds. General obligation bonds are secured by the issuer's pledge of its faith, credit and taxing power for the payment of principal and interest. The taxing power of any governmental entity may be limited, however, by provisions of its state constitution or laws, and an entity's creditworthiness will depend on many factors, including potential erosion of its tax base due to population declines, natural disasters, declines in the state's industrial base or inability to attract new industries, economic limits on the ability to tax without eroding the tax base, state legislative proposals or voter initiatives to limit ad valorem real property taxes and the extent to which the entity relies on federal or state aid, access to capital markets or other factors beyond the state's or entity's control. Accordingly, the capacity of the issuer of a general obligation bond as to the timely payment of interest and the repayment of principal when due is affected by the issuer's maintenance of its tax base.
 
Revenue Bonds. Revenue bonds are payable only from the revenues derived from a particular facility or class of facilities or, in some cases, from the proceeds of a special excise tax or other specific revenue sources such as payments from the user of the facility being financed. Accordingly, the timely payment of interest and the repayment of principal in accordance with the terms of the revenue or special obligation bond is a function of the economic viability of such facility or such revenue source. Revenue bonds issued by state or local agencies to finance the development of low-income, multi-family housing involve special risks in addition to those associated with municipal securities generally, including that the underlying properties may not generate sufficient income to pay expenses and interest costs. Such bonds are generally non-recourse against the property owner, may be junior to the rights of others with an interest in the properties, may pay interest that changes based in part on the financial performance of the property, may be prepayable without penalty and may be used to finance the construction of housing developments which, until completed and rented, do not generate income to pay interest. Increases in interest rates payable on senior obligations may make it more difficult for issuers to meet payment obligations on subordinated bonds.

 
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Moral Obligation Bonds.  The Fund also may invest in "moral obligation" bonds, which are normally issued by special purpose public authorities. If an issuer of moral obligation bonds is unable to meet its obligations, the repayment of such bonds becomes a moral commitment but not a legal obligation of the state or municipality in question.
 
Municipal Lease Obligations.  The Fund may invest in participations in lease obligations or installment purchase contract obligations (hereinafter collectively called "Municipal Lease Obligations") of municipal authorities or entities. Although a Municipal Lease Obligation does not constitute a general obligation of the municipality for which the municipality's taxing power is pledged, a Municipal Lease Obligation is ordinarily backed by the municipality's covenant to budget for, appropriate and make the payments due under the Municipal Lease Obligation. However, certain Municipal Lease Obligations contain "non-appropriation" clauses, which provide that the municipality has no obligation to make lease or installment purchase payments in future years unless money is appropriated for such purpose on a yearly basis. In the case of a "non-appropriation" lease, the Fund's ability to recover under the lease in the event of non-appropriation or default will be limited solely to the repossession of the leased property, without recourse to the general credit of the lessee, and the disposition or re-leasing of the property might prove difficult.
 
Certificates of Participation.  A certificate of participation represents an undivided interest in an unmanaged pool of municipal leases, installment purchase agreements or other instruments. The certificates are typically issued by a municipal agency, a trust or other entity that has received an assignment of the payments to be made by the state or political subdivision under such leases or installment purchase agreements. Such certificates provide the Fund with the right to a pro rata undivided interest in the underlying municipal securities. In addition, such participations generally provide the Fund with the right to demand payment, on not more than seven days' notice, of all or any part of the Fund's participation interest in the underlying municipal securities, plus accrued interest.
 
Pre-Refunded Municipal Securities.  The principal of, and interest on, pre-refunded municipal securities are no longer paid from the original revenue source for the securities. Instead, the source of such payments is typically an escrow fund consisting of U.S. government securities. The assets in the escrow fund are derived from the proceeds of refunding bonds issued by the same issuer as the pre-refunded municipal securities. Issuers of municipal securities use this advance refunding technique to obtain more favorable terms with respect to securities that are not yet subject to call or redemption by the issuer. For example, advance refunding enables an issuer to refinance debt at lower market interest rates, restructure debt to improve cash flow or eliminate restrictive covenants in the indenture or other governing instrument for the pre-refunded municipal securities. However, except for a change in the revenue source from which principal and interest payments are made, the pre-refunded municipal securities remain outstanding on their original terms until they mature or are redeemed by the issuer.
 
Private Activity Bonds.  Private activity bonds, formerly referred to as industrial development bonds, are issued by or on behalf of public authorities to obtain funds to provide privately operated housing facilities, airports, mass transit or port facilities, sewage disposal, solid waste disposal or hazardous waste treatment or disposal facilities, and certain local facilities for water supply, gas or electricity. Other types of private activity bonds, the proceeds of which are used for the construction, equipment, repair or improvement of privately operated industrial or commercial facilities, may constitute municipal securities, although the current federal tax laws place substantial limitations on the size of such issues. Such bonds are secured primarily by revenues derived from loan repayments or lease payments due from the entity, which may or may not be guaranteed by a parent company or otherwise secured. Private activity bonds generally are not secured by a pledge of the taxing power of the issuer of such bonds. Therefore, an investor should be aware that repayment of such bonds generally depends on the revenues of a private entity and be aware of the risks that such an investment may entail. Continued ability of an entity to generate sufficient revenues for the payment of principal and interest on such bonds will be affected by many factors, including the size of the entity, capital structure, demand for its products or services, competition, general economic conditions, government regulation and the entity's dependence on revenues for the operation of the particular facility being financed.
 
Special Taxing Districts.  Special taxing districts are organized to plan and finance infrastructure developments to induce residential, commercial and industrial growth and redevelopment. Bonds issued pursuant to financing methods such as tax increment finance, tax assessment, special services district and Mello-Roos bonds (a type of municipal security established by the Mello-Roos Community Facilities District Act of 1982), are generally payable solely from taxes or other revenues attributable to the specific projects financed by the bonds without recourse to the credit or taxing power of related or overlapping municipalities. They often are exposed to real estate development-related risks and can have more taxpayer concentration risk than general tax-supported bonds, such as general obligation bonds. Further, the fees, special taxes, or tax allocations and other revenues that are established to secure such financings are generally limited as to the rate or amount that may be levied or assessed and are not subject to increase pursuant to rate covenants or municipal or corporate guarantees. The bonds could default if development failed to progress as anticipated or if larger taxpayers failed to pay the assessments, fees and taxes as provided in the financing plans of the districts.

 
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VRDOs.  Variable rate demand obligations ("VRDOs") are tax-exempt obligations that contain a floating or variable interest rate adjustment formula and right of demand on the part of the holder thereof to receive payment of the unpaid principal balance plus accrued interest upon a short notice period not to exceed seven days. There is, however, the possibility that because of default or insolvency the demand feature of VRDOs may not be honored. The interest rates are adjustable at intervals (ranging from daily to up to one year) to some prevailing market rate for similar investments, such adjustment formula being calculated to maintain the market value of the VRDOs, at approximately the par value of the VRDOs on the adjustment date. The adjustments typically are based upon SIFMA or some other appropriate interest rate adjustment index. The Fund may invest in all types of tax-exempt instruments currently outstanding or to be issued in the future. VRDOs that contain an unconditional right of demand to receive payment of the unpaid principal balance plus accrued interest on a notice period exceeding seven days may be deemed to be illiquid securities.
 
Taxable Municipal Securities.  The Fund may invest in taxable municipal securities, including Build America Bonds ("BABs"). BABs are taxable municipal obligations issued pursuant to legislation providing for the issuance of taxable municipal debt on which the issuer receives federal support of the interest paid. Enacted in February 2009, the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (the "ARRA") authorizes state and local governments to issue taxable bonds on which, assuming certain specified conditions are satisfied, issuers may either (i) receive payments from the U.S. Treasury with respect to the bonds' interest payments ("direct pay" BABs) or (ii) provide tax credits to investors in the bonds ("tax credit" BABs). BABs offer an alternative form of financing to state and local governments whose primary means for accessing the capital markets has been through issuance of tax-free municipal bonds. BABs may appeal to a broader array of investors than the high income U.S. taxpayers that have traditionally provided the market for municipal bonds. Unlike most other municipal obligations, interest received on BABs is subject to federal and state income tax. Under the terms of the ARRA, issuers of direct pay BABs are entitled to receive payments from the U.S. Treasury over the life of the bond equal to 35% (or 45% in the case of Recovery Zone Economic Development Bonds) of the interest paid and investors in tax credit BABs can receive a federal tax credit of 35% of the coupon interest received. The federal interest subsidy or tax credit continues for the life of the bonds. The Fund may invest in direct pay BABs or tax credit BABs. Pursuant to the ARRA, the issuance of BABs was discontinued on December 31, 2010.
 
Preferred Securities. The Fund may invest in preferred securities. There are two basic types of preferred securities. The first type, sometimes referred to as traditional preferred securities, consists of preferred stock issued by an entity taxable as a corporation. The second type, sometimes referred to as trust preferred securities, are usually issued by a trust or limited partnership and represent preferred interests in deeply subordinated debt instruments issued by the corporation for whose benefit the trust or partnership was established.
 
Traditional Preferred Securities.  Traditional preferred securities generally pay fixed or adjustable rate dividends to investors and generally have a "preference" over common stock in the payment of dividends and the liquidation of a company's assets. This means that a company must pay dividends on preferred stock before paying any dividends on its common stock. In order to be payable, distributions on such preferred securities must be declared by the issuer's board of directors. Income payments on typical preferred securities currently outstanding are cumulative, causing dividends and distributions to accumulate even if not declared by the board of directors or otherwise made payable. In such a case all accumulated dividends must be paid before any dividend on the common stock can be paid. However, some traditional preferred stocks are non-cumulative, in which case dividends do not accumulate and need not ever be paid. A portion of the portfolio may include investments in non-cumulative preferred securities, whereby the issuer does not have an obligation to make up any arrearages to its shareholders. Should an issuer of a non-cumulative preferred stock held by the Fund determine not to pay dividends on such stock, the amount of dividends the Fund pays may be adversely affected. There is no assurance that dividends or distributions on the preferred securities in which the Fund invests will be declared or otherwise made payable.
 
Preferred stockholders usually have no right to vote for corporate directors or on other matters. Shares of preferred stock have a liquidation value that generally equals the original purchase price at the date of issuance. The market value of preferred securities may be affected by favorable and unfavorable changes impacting companies in the utilities and financial services sectors, which are prominent issuers of preferred securities, and by actual and anticipated changes in tax laws, such as changes in corporate income tax rates or the "Dividends Received Deduction." Because the claim on an issuer's earnings represented by preferred securities may become onerous when interest rates fall below the rate payable on such securities, the issuer may redeem the securities. Thus, in declining interest rate environments in particular, the Fund's holdings, if any, of higher rate-paying fixed rate preferred securities may be reduced and the Fund may be unable to acquire securities of comparable credit quality paying comparable rates with the redemption proceeds.
 
Trust Preferred Securities.  Trust preferred securities are a comparatively new asset class. Trust preferred securities are typically issued by corporations, generally in the form of interest-bearing notes with preferred security characteristics, or by an affiliated business trust of a corporation, generally in the form of beneficial interests in subordinated debentures or similarly structured securities. The trust preferred securities market consists of both fixed and adjustable coupon rate securities that are either perpetual in nature or have stated maturity dates.

 
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Trust preferred securities are typically junior and fully subordinated liabilities of an issuer or the beneficiary of a guarantee that is junior and fully subordinated to the other liabilities of the guarantor. In addition, trust preferred securities typically permit an issuer to defer the payment of income for eighteen months or more without triggering an event of default. Generally, the deferral period is five years or more. Because of their subordinated position in the capital structure of an issuer, the ability to defer payments for extended periods of time without default consequences to the issuer, and certain other features (such as restrictions on common dividend payments by the issuer or ultimate guarantor when full cumulative payments on the trust preferred securities have not been made), these trust preferred securities are often treated as close substitutes for traditional preferred securities, both by issuers and investors. Trust preferred securities have many of the key characteristics of equity due to their subordinated position in an issuer's capital structure and because their quality and value are heavily dependent on the profitability of the issuer rather than on any legal claims to specific assets or cash flows.
 
Convertible Securities.  A convertible security is a bond, debenture, note, preferred stock or other security that may be converted into or exchanged for a prescribed amount of common stock or other equity security of the same or a different issuer within a particular period of time at a specified price or formula. A convertible security entitles the holder to receive interest paid or accrued on debt or the dividend paid on preferred stock until the convertible security matures or is redeemed, converted or exchanged. Before conversion, convertible securities have characteristics similar to nonconvertible income securities in that they ordinarily provide a stable stream of income with generally higher yields than those of common stocks of the same or similar issuers, but lower yields than comparable nonconvertible securities. The value of a convertible security is influenced by changes in interest rates, with investment value declining as interest rates increase and increasing as interest rates decline. The credit standing of the issuer and other factors also may have an effect on the convertible security's investment value. Convertible securities rank senior to common stock in a corporation's capital structure but are usually subordinated to comparable nonconvertible securities. Convertible securities may be subject to redemption at the option of the issuer at a price established in the convertible security's governing instrument.
 
A "synthetic" or "manufactured" convertible security may be created by the Fund or by a third party by combining separate securities that possess the two principal characteristics of a traditional convertible security: an income producing component and a convertible component. The income-producing component is achieved by investing in non-convertible, income-producing securities such as bonds, preferred stocks and money market instruments. The convertible component is achieved by investing in securities or instruments such as warrants or options to buy common stock at a certain exercise price, or options on a stock index. Unlike a traditional convertible security, which is a single security having a single market value, a synthetic convertible comprises two or more separate securities, each with its own market value. Because the "market value" of a synthetic convertible security is the sum of the values of its income-producing component and its convertible component, the value of a synthetic convertible security may respond differently to market fluctuations than a traditional convertible security. The Fund also may purchase synthetic convertible securities created by other parties, including convertible structured notes. Convertible structured notes are income-producing debentures linked to equity. Convertible structured notes have the attributes of a convertible security; however, the issuer of the convertible note (typically an investment bank), rather than the issuer of the underlying common stock into which the note is convertible, assumes credit risk associated with the underlying investment and the Fund in turn assumes credit risk associated with the issuer of the convertible note.
 
Restricted and Illiquid Securities.  The Fund may invest in restricted, illiquid or less liquid securities or securities in which no secondary trading market is readily available or which are otherwise illiquid, including private placement securities.
 
The liquidity of a security relates to the ability to dispose easily of the security and the price to be obtained upon disposition of the security, which may be less than would be obtained for a comparable more liquid security. “Illiquid securities” are securities which cannot be sold within seven days in the ordinary course of business at approximately the value used by the Fund in determining its NAV.  Illiquid securities may trade at a discount from comparable, more liquid investments. Investment of the Fund’s assets in illiquid securities may restrict the ability of the Fund to dispose of its investments in a timely fashion and for a fair price as well as its ability to take advantage of market opportunities. The risks associated with illiquidity will be particularly acute where the Fund’s operations require cash, such as when the Fund pays dividends, and could result in the Fund borrowing to meet short-term cash requirements or incurring capital losses on the sale of illiquid investments.
 
“Restricted securities” are securities that are not registered under the Securities Act. Restricted securities may be sold in private placement transactions between issuers and their purchasers and may be neither listed on an exchange nor traded in other established markets. In many cases, privately placed securities may not be freely transferable under the laws of the applicable jurisdiction or due to contractual restrictions on resale. As a result of the absence of a public trading market, privately placed securities may be less liquid and more difficult to value than publicly traded securities. To the extent that privately placed securities may be resold in privately negotiated transactions, the prices realized from the sales, due to restrictions on resale, could be less than those originally paid by the Fund or less than their fair market value. In addition, issuers whose securities are not publicly traded may not be subject to the disclosure and other investor protection requirements that may be applicable if their securities were publicly traded. If any privately placed securities held by the Fund are required to be registered under the securities laws of one or more jurisdictions before being resold, the Fund may be required to bear the expenses of registration. Certain of the Fund’s investments in private placements may consist of direct investments and may include investments in smaller, less seasoned issuers, which may involve greater risks. These issuers may have limited product lines, markets or financial resources, or they may be dependent on a limited management group. In making investments in such securities, the Fund may obtain access to material nonpublic information, which may restrict the Fund’s ability to conduct portfolio transactions in such securities.
 
Some of these securities are new and complex, and trade only among institutions; the markets for these securities are still developing, and may not function as efficiently as established markets. Also, because there may not be an established market price for these securities, the Fund may have to estimate their value, which means that their valuation (and thus the valuation of the Fund) may have a subjective element.
 
 
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Transactions in restricted or illiquid securities may entail registration expense and other transaction costs that are higher than those for transactions in unrestricted or liquid securities eligible for trading on national securities exchanges or in the over-the-counter markets. Where registration is required for restricted or illiquid securities a considerable time period may elapse between the time the Fund decides to sell the security and the time it is actually permitted to sell the security under an effective registration statement. If during such period, adverse market conditions were to develop, the Fund may obtain less favorable pricing terms than when it decided to sell the security.
 
Non-U.S. Securities. The Fund may invest in securities of non-U.S. issuers ("Non-U.S. Securities").  Subject to the Fund's investment policies, these securities may be U.S. dollar-denominated or non-U.S. dollar-denominated.  Some Non-U.S. Securities may be less liquid and more volatile than securities of comparable U.S. issuers. Similarly, there is less volume and liquidity in most foreign securities markets than in the United States and, at times, greater price volatility than in the United States. Because evidence of ownership of such securities usually is held outside the United States, the Fund will be subject to additional risks if it invests in Non-U.S. Securities, which include adverse political and economic developments, seizure or nationalization of foreign deposits and adoption of governmental restrictions which might adversely affect or restrict the payment of principal and interest on the foreign securities to investors located outside the country of the issuer, whether from currency blockage or otherwise. Non-U.S. Securities may trade on days when the common stock is not priced or traded.
 
Emerging Markets Investments.  The Fund may invest in securities of issuers located in emerging market countries, including securities denominated in currencies of emerging market countries.  Emerging market countries generally include every nation in the world except the United States, Canada, Japan, Australia, New Zealand and most countries located in Western Europe. These issuers may be subject to risks that do not apply to issuers in larger, more developed countries. These risks are more pronounced to the extent the Fund invests significantly in one country. Less information about non-U.S. issuers or markets may be available due to less rigorous disclosure and accounting standards or regulatory practices. Many non-U.S. markets are smaller, less liquid and more volatile than U.S. markets. In a changing market, the Investment Advisor may not be able to sell the Fund's portfolio securities in amounts and at prices it considers reasonable. The U.S. dollar may appreciate against non-U.S. currencies or an emerging market government may impose restrictions on currency conversion or trading. The economies of non-U.S. countries may grow at a slower rate than expected or may experience a downturn or recession. Economic, political and social developments may adversely affect non-U.S. securities markets.
 
Equity Securities.  The Fund may invest in equity securities, including common stocks and warrants. Common stock represents an equity ownership interest in a company. The Fund may hold or have exposure to common stocks of issuers of any size, including small and medium capitalization stocks. Warrants are privileges issued by corporations enabling the owners to subscribe to and purchase a specified number of shares of the corporation at a specified price during a specified period of time. Subscription rights normally have a short life span to expiration. The purchase of warrants involves the risk that the Fund could lose the purchase value of a right or warrant if the right to subscribe to additional shares is not exercised prior to the warrants' expiration. Also, the purchase of warrants involves the risk that the effective price paid for the warrant added to the subscription price of the related security may exceed the value of the subscribed security's market price such as when there is no movement in the level of the underlying security. Buying a warrant does not make the Fund a shareholder of the underlying stock.
 
Sovereign Governmental and Supranational Debt. The Fund may invest in all types of debt securities of governmental issuers in all countries, including emerging market countries. These sovereign debt securities may include without limitation: debt securities issued or guaranteed by governments, governmental agencies or instrumentalities and political subdivisions; debt securities issued by government owned, controlled or sponsored entities; interests in entities organized and operated for the purpose of restructuring the investment characteristics of instruments issued by any of the above issuers; Brady Bonds, which are debt securities issued under the framework of the Brady Plan as a means for debtor nations to restructure their outstanding external indebtedness; participations in loans between governments and financial institutions; or debt securities issued by supranational entities such as the World Bank. A supranational entity is a bank, commission or company established or financially supported by the national governments of one or more countries to promote reconstruction or development. Sovereign government and supranational debt involve all the risks described herein regarding foreign and emerging markets investments as well as the risk of debt moratorium, repudiation or renegotiation.
 
Brady Bonds are debt securities, generally denominated in U.S. dollars, issued under the framework of the Brady Plan as a means for debtor nations to restructure their outstanding external indebtedness. In restructuring its external debt under the Brady Plan framework, a debtor nation negotiates with its existing bank lenders as well as multilateral institutions such as the World Bank and the International Monetary Fund (the "IMF"). The Brady Plan framework, as it has developed, contemplates the exchange of external commercial bank debt for newly issued bonds known as "Brady Bonds." Brady Bonds may also be issued in respect of new money being advanced by existing lenders in connection with the debt restructuring. The World Bank and/or the IMF support the restructuring by providing funds pursuant to loan agreements or other arrangements which enable the debtor nation to collateralize the new Brady Bonds or to repurchase outstanding bank debt at a discount. Under these arrangements with the World Bank and/or the IMF, debtor nations have been required to agree to the implementation of certain domestic monetary and fiscal reforms. Such reforms have included the liberalization of trade and foreign investment, the privatization of state-owned enterprises and the setting of targets for public spending and borrowing. These policies and programs seek to promote the debtor country's economic growth and development. Investors should also recognize that the Brady Plan only sets forth general guiding principles for economic reform and debt reduction, emphasizing that solutions must be negotiated on a case-by-case basis between debtor nations and their creditors.
 
Brady Bonds involve various risk factors described elsewhere associated with investing in foreign securities, including the history of defaults with respect to commercial bank loans by public and private entities of countries issuing Brady Bonds. In light of the residual risk of Brady Bonds and, among other factors, the history of defaults, investments in Brady Bonds are considered speculative. There can be no assurance that Brady Bonds in which the Fund may invest will not be subject to restructuring arrangements or to requests for new credit, which may cause the Fund to suffer a loss of interest or principal on any of its holdings.

 
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Inflation-Indexed Bonds.  Inflation-indexed bonds (other than municipal inflation-indexed bonds and certain corporate inflation-indexed bonds) are fixed income securities the principal value of which is periodically adjusted according to the rate of inflation. If the index measuring inflation falls, the principal value of inflation-indexed bonds (other than municipal inflation-indexed bonds and certain corporate inflation-indexed bonds) will be adjusted downward, and consequently the interest payable on these securities (calculated with respect to a smaller principal amount) will be reduced. Repayment of the original bond principal upon maturity (as adjusted for inflation) is guaranteed in the case of U.S. Treasury inflation-indexed bonds ("TIPs"). For bonds that do not provide a similar guarantee, the adjusted principal value of the bond repaid at maturity may be less than the original principal. With regard to municipal inflation-indexed bonds and certain corporate inflation-indexed bonds, the inflation adjustment is typically reflected in the semi-annual coupon payment. As a result, the principal value of municipal inflation-indexed bonds and such corporate inflation-indexed bonds does not adjust according to the rate of inflation.
 
Variable and Floating Rate Instruments. Variable and floating rate securities provide for a periodic adjustment in the interest rate paid on the obligations. The terms of such obligations provide that interest rates are adjusted periodically based upon an interest rate adjustment index as provided in the respective obligations. The adjustment intervals may be regular, and range from daily up to annually, or may be event-based, such as based on a change in the prime rate.
 
The interest rate on a floating rate security is a variable rate which is tied to another interest rate, such as a money-market index or Treasury bill rate. The interest rate on a floating rate security resets periodically, typically every six months. Because of the interest rate reset feature, floating rate securities provide the Fund with a certain degree of protection against rises in interest rates, although the Fund will participate in any declines in interest rates as well.
 
Inverse Floating Rate Securities.  An inverse floater is a type of debt instrument that bears a floating or variable interest rate that moves in the opposite direction to interest rates generally or the interest rate on another security or index. Changes in interest rates generally, or the interest rate of the other security or index, inversely affect the interest rate paid on the inverse floater, with the result that the inverse floater's price will be considerably more volatile than that of a fixed rate bond. The Fund may invest in inverse floaters, which brokers typically create by depositing an income-producing instrument, including a mortgage related security, in a trust. The trust in turn issues a variable rate security and inverse floaters. The interest rate for the variable rate security is typically determined by an index or an auction process, while the inverse floater holder receives the balance of the income from the underlying income-producing instrument less an auction fee. The market prices of inverse floaters may be highly sensitive to changes in interest rates and prepayment rates on the underlying securities, and may decrease significantly when interest rates increase or prepayment rates change. In a transaction in which the Fund purchases an inverse floater from a trust, and the underlying security was held by the Fund prior to being deposited into the trust, the Fund typically treats the transaction as a secured borrowing for financial reporting purposes. As a result, for financial reporting purposes, the Fund will generally incur a non-cash interest expense with respect to interest paid by the trust on the variable rate securities and will recognize additional interest income in an amount directly corresponding to the non-cash interest expense. Therefore, the Fund's NAV per common share and performance are not affected by the non-cash interest expense. This accounting treatment does not apply to inverse floaters acquired by the Fund when the Fund did not previously own the underlying bond.
 
Strategic Transactions and Other Management Techniques. The Fund may use a variety of other investment management techniques and instruments.  The Fund may purchase and sell futures contracts, enter into various interest rate transactions such as swaps, caps, floors or collars, currency transactions such as currency forward contracts, currency futures contracts, currency swaps or options on currency or currency futures and swap contracts (including, but not limited to, credit default swaps) and may purchase and sell exchange-listed and over-the-counter put and call options on securities and swap contracts, financial indices and futures contracts and use other derivative instruments or management techniques, including derivative instruments that combine features of these instruments (collectively, "Strategic Transactions").  These Strategic Transactions may be used for duration management and other risk management purposes, including to attempt to protect against possible changes in the market value of the Fund's portfolio resulting from trends in the securities markets and changes in interest rates or to protect the Fund's unrealized gains in the value of its portfolio securities, to facilitate the sale of portfolio securities for investment purposes, to establish a position in the securities markets as a temporary substitute for purchasing particular securities or, to the extent applicable, to enhance income or gain. There is no particular strategy that requires use of one technique rather than another as the decision to use any particular strategy or instrument is a function of market conditions and the composition of the portfolio. The use of Strategic Transactions to enhance current income may be particularly speculative. The ability of the Fund to use Strategic Transactions successfully will depend on the Investment Advisor's ability to predict pertinent market movements as well as sufficient correlation among the instruments, which cannot be assured. The use of Strategic Transactions may result in losses greater than if they had not been used, may require the Fund to sell or purchase portfolio securities at inopportune times or for prices other than current market values, may limit the amount of appreciation the Fund can realize on an investment or may cause the Fund to hold a security that it might otherwise sell. Inasmuch as any obligations of the Fund that arise from the use of Strategic Transactions will be covered by segregated or earmarked liquid assets or offsetting transactions, the Fund and the Investment Advisor believe such obligations do not constitute senior securities and, accordingly, will not treat such transactions as being subject to its

 
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borrowing restrictions or policies regarding economic leverage.  Additionally, segregated or earmarked liquid assets, amounts paid by the Fund as premiums and cash or other assets held in margin accounts with respect to Strategic Transactions are not otherwise available to the Fund for investment purposes. Certain provisions of the Code may restrict or affect the ability of the Fund to engage in Strategic Transactions.  In addition, the use of certain Strategic Transactions may give rise to taxable income and have certain other consequences.  See "Risk Factors—Strategic Transactions and Derivatives Risk" under Item 8.
 
Swaps and Swaptions. The Fund may enter into swap agreements, including interest rate and index swap agreements. Swap agreements are two party contracts entered into primarily by institutional investors for periods ranging from a few weeks to more than one year. In a standard "swap" transaction, two parties agree to exchange the returns (or differentials in rates of return) earned or realized on particular predetermined investments or instruments. The gross returns to be exchanged or "swapped" between the parties are calculated with respect to a "notional amount," i.e., the dollar amount invested at a particular interest rate, in a particular foreign currency, or in a "basket" of securities representing a particular index. The "notional amount" of the swap agreement is only a fictive basis on which to calculate the obligations that the parties to a swap agreement have agreed to exchange. The Fund's obligations (or rights) under a swap agreement will generally be equal only to the net amount to be paid or received under the agreement based on the relative values of the positions held by each party to the agreement (the "net amount"). The Fund's obligations under a swap agreement will be accrued daily (offset against any amounts owing to the Fund) and the Fund will segregate with a custodian or earmark on its books and records an amount of cash or liquid assets having an aggregate net asset value at all times at least equal to any accrued but unpaid net amounts owed to a swap counterparty.
 
Whether the Fund's use of swap agreements will be successful in furthering its investment objectives will depend on the Investment Advisor's ability to correctly predict whether certain types of investments are likely to produce greater returns than other investments. Moreover, the Fund bears the risk of loss of the amount expected to be received under a swap agreement in the event of the default or bankruptcy of a swap agreement counterparty. Swap agreements also bear the risk that the Fund will not be able to meet its payment obligations to the counterparty. As noted, however, the Fund will deposit in a segregated account, or earmark on its books and records, liquid assets permitted to be so segregated or earmarked by the SEC in an amount equal to or greater than the market value of the Fund's liabilities under the swap agreement or the amount it would cost the Fund initially to make an equivalent direct investment plus or minus any amount the Fund is obligated to pay or is to receive under the swap agreement. Restrictions imposed by the tax rules applicable to regulated investment companies may limit the Fund's ability to use swap agreements. The regulation of the swap market is undergoing significant change as a result of the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act (the "Dodd-Frank Act"). See "Risk Factors—Strategic Transactions and Derivatives Risk—Dodd-Frank Act Risk" under Item 8. It is possible that developments in the swap market, including government regulation, could adversely affect the Fund's ability to terminate existing swap agreements or to realize amounts to be received under such agreements.
 
A swaption is a contract that gives a counterparty the right (but not the obligation) to enter into a new swap agreement or to shorten, extend, cancel or otherwise modify an existing swap agreement, at some designated future time on specified terms. The Fund may write (sell) and purchase put and call swaptions.  Depending on the terms of the particular option agreement, the Fund will generally incur a greater degree of risk when it writes a swaption than it will incur when it purchases a swaption. When the Fund purchases a swaption, it risks losing only the amount of the premium it has paid should it decide to let the option expire unexercised. However, when the Fund writes a swaption, upon exercise of the option the Fund will become obligated according to the terms of the underlying agreement.
 
Credit Default Swaps.  The Fund may enter into credit default swap agreements. The credit default swap agreement may have as reference obligations one or more securities that are not currently held by the Fund. The protection "buyer" in a credit default contract may be obligated to pay the protection "seller" an upfront or a periodic stream of payments over the term of the contract, provided that no credit event on the reference obligation occurs. If a credit event occurs, the seller generally must pay the buyer the "par value" (full notional amount) of the swap in exchange for an equal face amount of deliverable obligations of the reference entity described in the swap, or if the swap is cash settled the seller may be required to deliver the related net cash amount (the difference between the market value of the reference obligation and its par value). The Fund may be either the buyer or seller in the transaction.  If the Fund is a buyer and no credit event occurs, the Fund will generally receive no payments from its counterparty under the swap if the swap is held through its termination date.  However, if a credit event occurs, the buyer generally may elect to receive the full notional amount of the swap in exchange for an equal face amount of deliverable obligations of the reference entity, the value of which may have significantly decreased.  As a seller, the Fund generally receives an upfront payment or a fixed rate of income throughout the term of the swap, which typically is between six months and three years, provided that there is no credit event.  If a credit event occurs, generally the seller must pay the buyer the full notional amount of the swap in exchange for an equal face amount of deliverable obligations of the reference entity, the value of which may have significantly decreased.  As the seller, the Fund would effectively add leverage to its portfolio because, in addition to its Managed Assets, the Fund would be subject to investment exposure on the notional amount of the swap.

 
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Credit default swap agreements involve greater risks than if the Fund had taken a position in the reference obligation directly (either by purchasing or selling) since, in addition to general market risks, credit default swaps are subject to illiquidity risk, counterparty risk and credit risks.  A buyer generally will also lose its upfront payment or any periodic payments it makes to the seller counterparty and receive no payments from its counterparty should no credit event occur and the swap is held to its termination date.  If a credit event were to occur, the value of any deliverable obligation received by the seller, coupled with the upfront or periodic payments previously received, may be less than the full notional amount it pays to the buyer, resulting in a loss of value to the seller. A seller of a credit default swap or similar instrument is exposed to many of the same risks of leverage since, if a credit event occurs, the seller generally will be required to pay the buyer the full notional amount of the contract net of any amounts owed by the buyer related to its delivery of deliverable obligations.  The Fund's obligations under a credit default swap agreement will be accrued daily (offset against any amounts owed to the Fund).  The Fund will at all times segregate or designate on its books and records in connection with each such transaction liquid assets or cash with a value at least equal to the Fund's exposure (any accrued but unpaid net amounts owed by the Fund to any counterparty) on a marked-to-market basis (as required by the clearing organization with respect to cleared swaps or as calculated pursuant to requirements of the SEC).  If the Fund is a seller of protection in a credit default swap transaction, it will designate on its books and records in connection with such transaction liquid assets or cash with a value at least equal to the full notional amount of the contract.  Such designation will ensure that the Fund has assets available to satisfy its obligations with respect to the transaction and will avoid any potential leveraging of the Fund's portfolio.  Such designation will not limit the Fund's exposure to loss.
 
In addition, the credit derivatives market is subject to a changing regulatory environment.  It is possible that regulatory or other developments in the credit derivatives market could adversely affect the Fund's ability to successfully use credit derivatives.
 
Total Return Swaps.  Total return swap agreements are contracts in which one party agrees to make periodic payments to another party based on the change in market value of the assets underlying the contract, which may include a specified security, basket of securities or securities indices during the specified period, in return for periodic payments based on a fixed or variable interest rate or the total return from other underlying assets. Total return swap agreements may be used to obtain exposure to a security or market without owning or taking physical custody of such security or investing directly in such market. Total return swap agreements may effectively add leverage to the Fund's portfolio because, in addition to its Managed Assets, the Fund would be subject to investment exposure on the notional amount of the swap.
 
Total return swap agreements are subject to the risk that a counterparty will default on its payment obligations to the Fund thereunder. Swap agreements also bear the risk that the Fund will not be able to meet its obligation to the counterparty. Generally, the Fund will enter into total return swaps on a net basis (i.e., the two payment streams are netted against one another with the Fund receiving or paying, as the case may be, only the net amount of the two payments). The net amount of the excess, if any, of the Fund's obligations over its entitlements with respect to each total return swap will be accrued on a daily basis, and an amount of liquid assets having an aggregate net asset value at least equal to the accrued excess will be designated by the Fund or earmarked on its books and records. If the total return swap transaction is entered into on other than a net basis, the full amount of the Fund's obligations will be accrued on a daily basis, and the full amount of the Fund's obligations will be segregated or earmarked by the Fund in an amount equal to or greater than the market value of the liabilities under the total return swap agreement or the amount it would have cost the Fund initially to make an equivalent direct investment, plus or minus any amount the Fund is obligated to pay or is to receive under the total return swap agreement.
 
Interest Rate Transactions.  The Fund may enter into interest rate swaps and purchase or sell interest rate caps and floors. The Fund may enter into these transactions to seek to preserve a return or spread on a particular investment or portion of its portfolio, as a duration management technique to protect against any increase in the price of securities the Fund anticipates purchasing at a later date or, to the extent applicable, to seek to enhance its return or to seek to increase the Fund’s yield.
 
Interest rate swaps involve the exchange by the Fund with another party of their respective commitments to pay or receive interest (e.g., an exchange of floating rate payments for fixed rate payments with respect to a notional amount of principal). The purchase of an interest rate cap entitles the purchaser, to the extent that the level of a specified interest rate exceeds a predetermined interest rate (i.e., the strike price), to receive payments of interest on a notional principal amount from the party selling such interest rate cap. The purchase of an interest rate floor entitles the purchaser, to the extent that the level of a specified interest rate falls below a predetermined interest rate (i.e., the strike price), to receive payments of interest on a notional principal amount from the party selling such interest rate floor.

 
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For example, if the Fund holds a debt instrument with an interest rate that is reset only once each year, it may swap the right to receive interest at this fixed rate for the right to receive interest at a rate that is reset every week. This would enable the Fund to offset a decline in the value of the debt instrument due to rising interest rates but would also limit its ability to benefit from falling interest rates. Conversely, if the Fund holds a debt instrument with an interest rate that is reset every week and it would like to lock in what it believes to be a high interest rate for one year, it may swap the right to receive interest at this variable weekly rate for the right to receive interest at a rate that is fixed for one year. Such a swap would protect the Fund from a reduction in yield due to falling interest rates and may permit the Fund to enhance its income through the positive differential between one week and one year interest rates, but would preclude it from taking full advantage of rising interest rates.
 
The Fund may hedge both its assets and liabilities through interest rate swaps, caps and floors.  Usually payments with respect to interest rate swaps will be made on a net basis (i.e., the two payment streams are netted out) with the Fund receiving or paying, as the case may be, only the net amount of the two payments on the payment dates. The Fund will accrue the net amount of the excess, if any, of the Fund’s obligations over its entitlements with respect to each interest rate swap on a daily basis and will segregate with a custodian or designate on its books and records an amount of cash or liquid assets having an aggregate NAV at all times at least equal to the accrued excess.  If there is a default by the other party to an uncleared interest rate swap transaction, generally the Fund will have contractual remedies pursuant to the agreements related to the transaction.   With respect to interest rate swap transactions cleared through a central clearing counterparty, a clearing organization will be substituted for the counterparty and will guaranty the parties’ performance under the swap agreement.  However, there can be no assurance that the clearing organization will satisfy its obligation to the Fund or that the Fund would be able to recover the full amount of assets deposited on its behalf with the clearing organization in the event of the default by the clearing organization or the Fund’s clearing broker. Certain U.S. federal income tax requirements may limit the Fund’s ability to engage in interest rate swaps. Distributions attributable to transactions in interest rate swaps generally will be taxable as ordinary income to shareholders. See “Tax Matters” under Item 10.
 
Foreign Currency Transactions. The Fund's common stock is priced in U.S. dollars and the distributions paid by the Fund to common shareholders are paid in U.S. dollars. However, a portion of the Fund's assets may be denominated in non-U.S. currencies and the income received by the Fund from such securities will be paid in non-U.S. currencies. The Fund also may invest in or gain exposure to non-U.S. currencies. The Fund's investments in securities that trade in, or receive revenues in, non-U.S. currencies will be subject to currency risk, which is the risk that fluctuations in the exchange rates between the U.S. dollar and foreign currencies may negatively affect an investment. The Fund may (but is not required to) hedge some or all of its exposure to non-U.S. currencies through the use of derivative strategies, including forward foreign currency exchange contracts, foreign currency futures contracts and options on foreign currencies and foreign currency futures. Suitable hedging transactions may not be available in all circumstances and there can be no assurance that the Fund will engage in such transactions at any given time or from time to time when they would be beneficial. Although the Fund has the flexibility to engage in such transactions, the Investment Advisor may determine not to do so or to do so only in unusual circumstances or market conditions. These transactions may not be successful and may eliminate any chance for the Fund to benefit from favorable fluctuations in relevant foreign currencies. The Fund may also, to the extent applicable, use derivatives contracts for purposes of increasing exposure to a foreign currency or to shift exposure to foreign currency fluctuations from one currency to another.
 
Foreign Exchange Transactions.  The Fund may engage in spot and forward foreign exchange transactions and currency swaps, purchase and sell options on currencies and purchase and sell currency futures and related options thereon (collectively, "Currency Instruments"). Such transactions could be effected with respect to hedges on foreign dollar denominated securities owned by the Fund, sold by the Fund but not yet delivered, or committed or anticipated to be purchased by the Fund. As an illustration, the Fund may use such techniques to hedge the stated value in U.S. dollars of an investment in a yen-denominated security. In such circumstances, for example, the Fund may purchase a foreign currency put option enabling it to sell a specified amount of yen for dollars at a specified price by a future date. To the extent the hedge is successful, a loss in the value of the yen relative to the dollar will tend to be offset by an increase in the value of the put option. To offset, in whole or in part, the cost of acquiring such a put option, the Fund may also sell a call option which, if exercised, requires it to sell a specified amount of yen for dollars at a specified price by a future date (a technique called a "straddle"). By selling such a call option in this illustration, the Fund gives up the opportunity to profit without limit from increases in the relative value of the yen to the dollar. "Straddles" of the type that may be used by the Fund are considered to constitute hedging transactions. The Fund may not attempt to hedge any or all of its foreign portfolio positions.
 
Forward Foreign Currency Contracts.  The Fund may enter into forward currency contracts to purchase or sell foreign currencies for a fixed amount of U.S. dollars or another foreign currency. A forward currency contract involves an obligation to purchase or sell a specific currency at a future date, which may be any fixed number of days (term) from the date of the forward currency contract agreed upon by the parties, at a price set at the time the forward currency contract is entered into. Forward currency contracts are traded directly between currency traders (usually large commercial banks) and their customers. The Fund may purchase a forward currency contract to lock in the U.S. dollar price of a security denominated in a foreign currency that the Fund intends to acquire. The Fund may sell a forward currency contract to lock in the U.S. dollar equivalent of the proceeds from the anticipated sale of a security or a dividend or interest payment denominated in a foreign currency. The Fund may also, to the extent applicable, use forward currency contracts to shift the Fund's exposure to foreign currency exchange rate changes from one currency to another. For example, if the Fund owns securities denominated in a foreign currency and the Investment Advisor believes that currency will decline relative to another currency, the Fund might enter into a forward currency contract to sell the appropriate amount of the first foreign currency with payment to be made in the second currency. The Fund may also, to the extent applicable, purchase forward currency contracts to enhance income when the Investment Advisor anticipates that the foreign currency will appreciate in value but securities denominated in that currency do not present attractive investment opportunities. The Fund may also use forward currency

 
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contracts to hedge against a decline in the value of existing investments denominated in a foreign currency. Such a hedge would tend to offset both positive and negative currency fluctuations, but would not offset changes in security values caused by other factors. The Fund could also hedge the position by entering into a forward currency contract to sell another currency expected to perform similarly to the currency in which the Fund's existing investments are denominated. This type of transaction could offer advantages in terms of cost, yield or efficiency, but may not hedge currency exposure as effectively as a simple forward currency transaction to sell U.S. dollars. This type of transaction may result in losses if the currency used to hedge does not perform similarly to the currency in which the hedged securities are denominated. The Fund may also use forward currency contracts in one currency or a basket of currencies to attempt to hedge against fluctuations in the value of securities denominated in a different currency if the Investment Advisor anticipates that there will be a correlation between the two currencies.
 
The cost to the Fund of engaging in forward currency contracts varies with factors such as the currency involved, the length of the contract period and the market conditions then prevailing. Because forward currency contracts are usually entered into on a principal basis, no fees or commissions are involved. When the Fund enters into a forward currency contract, it relies on the counterparty to make or take delivery of the underlying currency at the maturity of the contract. Failure by the counterparty to do so would result in the loss of some or all of any expected benefit of the transaction. Secondary markets generally do not exist for forward currency contracts, with the result that closing transactions generally can be made for forward currency contracts only by negotiating directly with the counterparty. Thus, there can be no assurance that the Fund will in fact be able to close out a forward currency contract at a favorable price prior to maturity. In addition, in the event of insolvency of the counterparty, the Fund might be unable to close out a forward currency contract. In either event, the Fund would continue to be subject to market risk with respect to the position, and would continue to be required to maintain a position in securities denominated in the foreign currency or to maintain cash or liquid assets in a segregated account or earmark such cash or liquid assets on its books and records. The precise matching of forward currency contract amounts and the value of the securities involved generally will not be possible because the value of such securities, measured in the foreign currency, will change after the forward currency contract has been established. Thus, the Fund might need to purchase or sell foreign currencies in the spot (cash) market to the extent such foreign currencies are not covered by forward currency contracts. The projection of short-term currency market movements is extremely difficult and the successful execution of a short-term hedging strategy is highly uncertain.
 
Call Options. The Fund may purchase call options on any of the types of securities or instruments in which it may invest. A purchased call option gives the Fund the right to buy, and obligates the seller to sell, the underlying security at the exercise price at any time during the option period. The Fund also may purchase and sell call options on indices. Index options are similar to options on securities except that, rather than taking or making delivery of securities underlying the option at a specified price upon exercise, an index option gives the holder the right to receive cash upon exercise of the option if the level of the index upon which the option is based is greater than the exercise price of the option.
 
The Fund may write (i.e., sell) covered call options on the securities or instruments in which it may invest and enter into closing purchase transactions with respect to certain of such options. A covered call option is an option in which the Fund, in return for a premium, gives another party a right to buy specified securities owned by the Fund at a specified future date and price set at the time of the contract. The principal reason for writing call options is the attempt to realize, through the receipt of premiums, a greater return than would be realized on the securities alone. By writing covered call options, the Fund gives up the opportunity, while the option is in effect, to profit from any price increase in the underlying security above the option exercise price. In addition, the Fund's ability to sell the underlying security will be limited while the option is in effect unless the Fund enters into a closing purchase transaction. A closing purchase transaction cancels out the Fund's position as the writer of an option by means of an offsetting purchase of an identical option prior to the expiration of the option it has written. Covered call options also serve as a partial hedge to the extent of the premium received against the price of the underlying security declining.
 
The Fund may write (i.e., sell) uncovered call options on securities or instruments in which it may invest but that are not currently held by the Fund. The principal reason for writing uncovered call options is to realize income without committing capital to the ownership of the underlying securities or instruments. When writing uncovered call options, the Fund must deposit and maintain sufficient margin with the broker-dealer through which it made the uncovered call option as collateral to ensure that the securities can be purchased for delivery if and when the option is exercised. In addition, in connection with each such transaction the Fund will segregate, or designate on its books and records, liquid assets or cash with a value at least equal to the Fund's exposure (the difference between the unpaid amounts owed by the Fund on such transaction minus any collateral deposited with the broker-dealer), on a marked-to-market basis (as calculated pursuant to requirements of the SEC). Such segregation or earmarking will ensure that the Fund has assets available to satisfy its obligations with respect to the transaction and will avoid any potential leveraging of the Fund's portfolio. Such segregation or earmarking will not limit the Fund's exposure to loss. During periods of declining securities prices or when prices are stable, writing uncovered calls can be a profitable strategy to increase the Fund's income with minimal capital risk. Uncovered calls are riskier than covered calls because there is no underlying security held by the Fund that can act as a partial hedge. Uncovered calls have speculative characteristics and the potential for loss is unlimited. When an uncovered call is exercised, the Fund must purchase the underlying security to meet

 
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its call obligation. There is also a risk, especially with less liquid preferred and debt securities, that the securities may not be available for purchase. If the purchase price exceeds the exercise price, the Fund will lose the difference.
 
Put Options. The Fund may purchase put options. By buying a put option, the Fund acquires a right to sell such underlying securities or instruments at the exercise price, thus limiting the Fund's risk of loss through a decline in the market value of the securities or instruments until the put option expires. The amount of any appreciation in the value of the underlying securities or instruments will be partially offset by the amount of the premium paid for the put option and any related transaction costs. Prior to its expiration, a put option may be sold in a closing sale transaction and profit or loss from the sale will depend on whether the amount received is more or less than the premium paid for the put option plus the related transaction costs. A closing sale transaction cancels out the Fund's position as the purchaser of an option by means of an offsetting sale of an identical option prior to the expiration of the option it has purchased. The Fund also may purchase uncovered put options.
 
The Fund also may write (i.e., sell) put options on the types of securities or instruments that may be held by the Fund, provided that such put options are covered, meaning that such options are secured by liquid assets segregated or earmarked on the Fund's books and records. The Fund will receive a premium for writing a put option, which increases the Fund's return.
 
The Fund may write (i.e., sell) uncovered put options on securities or instruments in which it may invest but that the Fund does not currently have a corresponding short position or has not deposited cash equal to the exercise value of the put option with the broker-dealer through which it made the uncovered put option as collateral. The principal reason for writing uncovered put options is to receive premium income and to acquire such securities or instruments at a net cost below the current market value. The Fund has the obligation to buy the securities or instruments at an agreed upon price if the securities or instruments decrease below the exercise price. If the securities or instruments price increases during the option period, the option will expire worthless and the Fund will retain the premium and will not have to purchase the securities or instruments at the exercise price. In connection with such transaction, the Fund will segregate, or designate on its books and records, liquid assets or cash with a value at least equal to the Fund's exposure, on a marked-to-market basis (as calculated pursuant to requirements of the SEC). Such designation will ensure that the Fund has assets available to satisfy its obligations with respect to the transaction and will avoid any potential leveraging of the Fund's portfolio. Such designation will not limit the Fund's exposure to loss.
 
In selling puts, there is a risk that the Fund may be required to buy the underlying security at a price higher than the current market price.
 
Futures Contracts and Options on Futures Contracts.  The Fund may engage in transactions in financial futures contracts ("futures contracts") and related options on such futures contracts. A futures contract is an agreement between two parties which obligates the purchaser of the futures contract to buy and the seller of a futures contract to sell a security for a set price on a future date or, in the case of an index futures contract, to make and accept a cash settlement based upon the difference in value of the index between the time the contract was entered into and the time of its settlement. A majority of transactions in futures contracts, however, do not result in the actual delivery of the underlying instrument or cash settlement, but are settled through liquidation (i.e., by entering into an offsetting transaction). Futures contracts have been designed by boards of trade which have been designated "contract markets" by the CFTC.
 
The Fund may sell financial futures contracts in anticipation of an increase in the general level of interest rates. Generally, as interest rates rise, the market values of securities that may be held by the Fund will fall, thus reducing the NAV of the Fund. However, as interest rates rise, the value of the Fund's short position in the futures contract also will tend to increase, thus offsetting all or a portion of the depreciation in the market value of the Fund's investments which are being hedged. While the Fund will incur commission expenses in selling and closing out futures positions, these commissions are generally less than the transaction expenses which the Fund would have incurred had the Fund sold portfolio securities in order to reduce its exposure to increases in interest rates. The Fund also may purchase financial futures contracts in anticipation of a decline in interest rates when it is not fully invested in a particular market in which it intends to make investments to gain market exposure that may in part or entirely offset an increase in the cost of securities it intends to purchase. It is anticipated that, in a substantial majority of these transactions, the Fund will purchase securities upon termination of the futures contract.
 
The Fund also may purchase and write call and put options on futures contracts. Options on futures contracts are similar to options on securities except that an option on a futures contract gives the purchaser the right in return for the premium paid to assume a position in a futures contract (a long position if the option is a call and a short position if the option is a put). Generally, these strategies are utilized under the same market and market sector conditions (i.e., conditions relating to specific types of investments) in which the Fund enters into futures transactions. The Fund may purchase put options or write call options on futures contracts rather than selling the underlying futures contract in anticipation of a decrease in the market value of securities or an increase in interest rates. Similarly, the Fund may purchase call options, or write put options on futures contracts, as a substitute for the purchase of such futures to hedge against the increased cost resulting from an increase in the market value or a decline in interest rates of securities which the Fund intends to purchase.

 
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The Fund may engage in options and futures transactions on exchanges and options in the over-the-counter markets. In general, exchange-traded contracts are third-party contracts (i.e., performance of the parties' obligation is guaranteed by an exchange or clearing corporation) with standardized strike prices and expiration dates. Over-the-counter options ("OTC Options") transactions are two-party contracts with price and terms negotiated by the buyer and seller. See "Additional Information About Options," below.
 
At the time a futures contract is purchased or sold, the Fund must allocate cash or securities as a deposit payment ("initial margin").  The initial margin that the Fund may pay typically ranges from approximately 1% to approximately 5% of the value of the securities or commodities underlying the contract. In certain circumstances, however, such as periods of high volatility, the Fund may be required by an exchange to increase the level of its initial margin payment. Additionally, initial margin requirements may be increased generally in the future by regulatory action. An outstanding futures contract is valued daily and the payment in case of "variation margin" may be required, a process known as "marking to the market." Transactions in listed options and futures are usually settled by entering into an offsetting transaction, and are subject to the risk that the position may not be able to be closed if no offsetting transaction can be arranged.
 
When a Fund purchases a futures contract or writes a put option or purchases a call option thereon, an amount of cash or liquid assets will be segregated or designated on the Fund's books and records so that the amount so designated or segregated, plus the amount of variation margin held in the account of its broker, equals the market value of the futures contract.
 
Additional Information About Options.  In the case of either put or call options that it has purchased, if the option expires without being sold or exercised, the Fund will experience a loss in the amount of the option premium plus any commissions paid by the Fund. When the Fund sells put and call options, it receives a premium as the seller of the option. The premium that the Fund receives for selling the option will serve as a partial and limited (to the dollar amount of the premium) hedge, in the amount of the option premium, against changes in the value of the securities in its portfolio. During the term of the option, however, a covered call seller has, in return for the premium on the option, given up the opportunity for capital appreciation above the exercise price of the option if the value of the underlying security increases, but has retained the risk of loss should the price of the underlying security decline. Conversely, a put seller retains the risk of loss should the market value of the underlying security decline below the exercise price of the option, less the premium received on the sale of the option. The Fund may purchase and sell exchange-listed options and OTC Options which are privately negotiated with the counterparty.  Listed options are issued by the Options Clearing Corporation ("OCC") which guarantees the performance of the obligations of the parties to such options.
 
The Fund's ability to close out its position as a purchaser or seller of an exchange-listed put or call option is dependent upon the existence of a liquid secondary market on option exchanges. Among the possible reasons for the absence of a liquid secondary market on an exchange are: (i) insufficient trading interest in certain options; (ii) restrictions on transactions imposed by an exchange; (iii) trading halts, suspensions or other restrictions imposed with respect to particular classes or series of options or underlying securities; (iv) interruption of the normal operations on an exchange; (v) inadequacy of the facilities of an exchange or OCC to handle current trading volume; or (vi) a decision by one or more exchanges to discontinue the trading of options (or a particular class or series of options), in which event the secondary market on that exchange (or in that class or series of options) would cease to exist, although outstanding options on that exchange that had been listed by the OCC as a result of trades on that exchange would generally continue to be exercisable in accordance with their terms. OTC Options are purchased from or sold to dealers, financial institutions or other counterparties which have entered into direct agreements with the Fund. With OTC Options, such variables as expiration date, exercise price and premium will be agreed upon between the Fund and the counterparty, without the intermediation of a third party such as the OCC. If the counterparty fails to make or take delivery of the securities underlying an option it has written, or otherwise settle the transaction in accordance with the terms of that option as written, the Fund would lose the premium paid for the option as well as any anticipated benefit of the transaction.  OTC Options and assets used to cover OTC Options written by the Fund are considered by the staff of the SEC to be illiquid. The illiquidity of such options or assets may prevent a successful sale of such options or assets, result in a delay of sale, or reduce the amount of proceeds that might otherwise be realized.

 
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The hours of trading for options on debt securities may not conform to the hours during which the underlying securities are traded. To the extent that the option markets close before the markets for the underlying securities, significant price and rate movements can take place in the underlying markets that cannot be reflected in the option markets.
 
Structured Instruments. The Fund may invest in structured instruments. While structured instruments may offer the potential for a favorable rate of return from time to time, they also entail certain risks. Structured instruments may be less liquid than other securities and the price of structured instruments may be more volatile. In some cases, depending on the terms of the embedded index, a structured instrument may provide that the principal and/or interest payments may be adjusted below zero. Structured instruments also may involve significant credit risk and risk of default by the counterparty. Structured instruments may also be illiquid. Like other sophisticated strategies, the Fund's use of structured instruments may not work as intended.
 
Structured Notes.  The Fund may invest in "structured" notes and other related instruments, which are privately negotiated debt obligations in which the principal and/or interest is determined by reference to the performance of a benchmark asset, market or interest rate (an "embedded index"), such as selected securities, an index of securities or specified interest rates, or the differential performance of two assets or markets. Structured instruments may be issued by corporations, including banks, as well as by governmental agencies. Structured instruments frequently are assembled in the form of medium-term notes, but a variety of forms are available and may be used in particular circumstances. The terms of such structured instruments normally provide that their principal and/or interest payments are to be adjusted upwards or downwards (but ordinarily not below zero) to reflect changes in the embedded index while the structured instruments are outstanding. As a result, the interest and/or principal payments that may be made on a structured product may vary widely, depending on a variety of factors, including the volatility of the embedded index and the effect of changes in the embedded index on principal and/or interest payments. The rate of return on structured notes may be determined by applying a multiplier to the performance or differential performance of the referenced index(es) or other asset(s). Application of a multiplier involves leverage that will serve to magnify the potential for gain and the risk of loss.
 
Event-Linked Securities.  The Fund may obtain event-linked exposure by investing in "event-linked bonds" or "event-linked swaps" or by implementing "event-linked strategies." Event-linked exposure results in gains or losses that typically are contingent upon, or formulaically related to, defined trigger events. Examples of trigger events include hurricanes, earthquakes, weather-related phenomena or statistics relating to such events. Some event-linked bonds are commonly referred to as "catastrophe bonds." If a trigger event occurs, the Fund may lose a portion of or its entire principal invested in the bond or the entire notional amount of a swap. Event-linked exposure often provides for an extension of maturity to process and audit loss claims when a trigger event has, or possibly has, occurred. An extension of maturity may increase volatility. Event-linked exposure may also expose the Fund to certain other risks including credit risk, counterparty risk, adverse regulatory or jurisdictional interpretations and adverse tax consequences. Event-linked exposures may also be subject to liquidity risk.
 
Equity-Linked Notes.  Equity-linked notes are hybrid securities with characteristics of both fixed income and equity securities. An equity-linked note is a debt instrument, usually a bond, that pays interest based upon the performance of an underlying equity, which can be a single stock, basket of stocks or an equity index. Instead of paying a predetermined coupon, equity-linked notes link the interest payment to the performance of a particular equity market index or basket of stocks or commodities. The interest payment is typically based on the percentage increase in an index from a predetermined level, but alternatively may be based on a decrease in the index. The interest payment may in some cases be leveraged so that, in percentage terms, it exceeds the relative performance of the market. Equity-linked notes generally are subject to the risks associated with the securities of equity issuers, default risk and counterparty risk.
 
Credit Linked Notes.  A credit-linked note (“CLN”) is a derivative instrument. It is a synthetic obligation between two or more parties where the payment of principal and/or interest is based on the performance of some obligation (a reference obligation). In addition to the credit risk of the reference obligations and interest rate risk, the buyer/seller of the CLN is subject to counterparty risk.
 
Hybrid Instruments.  A hybrid instrument is a type of potentially high-risk derivative that combines a traditional bond, stock or commodity with an option or forward contract. Generally, the principal amount, amount payable upon maturity or redemption, or interest rate of a hybrid is tied (positively or negatively) to the price of some commodity, currency or securities index or another interest rate or some other economic factor (each a "benchmark"). The interest rate or (unlike most fixed income securities) the principal amount payable at maturity of a hybrid security may be increased or decreased, depending on changes in the value of the benchmark. An example of a hybrid could be a bond issued by an oil company that pays a small base level of interest with additional interest that accrues in correlation to the extent to which oil prices exceed a certain predetermined level. Such a hybrid instrument would be a combination of a bond and a call option on oil. Hybrids can be used as an efficient means of pursuing a variety of investment goals, including currency hedging, duration management and increased total return.

 
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Hybrids may not bear interest or pay dividends. The value of a hybrid or its interest rate may be a multiple of a benchmark and, as a result, may be leveraged and move (up or down) more steeply and rapidly than the benchmark. These benchmarks may be sensitive to economic and political events, such as commodity shortages and currency devaluations, which cannot be readily foreseen by the purchaser of a hybrid. Under certain conditions, the redemption value of a hybrid could be zero. Thus, an investment in a hybrid may entail significant market risks that are not associated with a similar investment in a traditional, U.S. dollar-denominated bond that has a fixed principal amount and pays a fixed rate or floating rate of interest. The purchase of hybrids also exposes the Fund to the credit risk of the issuer of the hybrids. These risks may cause significant fluctuations in the NAV of the Fund's common stock if the Fund invests in hybrid instruments.
 
Other Investment Companies. The Fund may invest in securities of other investment companies (including exchange-traded funds (“ETFs”) and business development companies (“BDCs”), subject to applicable regulatory limits.  As a shareholder in an investment company, the Fund will bear its ratable share of that investment company’s expenses and will remain subject to payment of the Fund’s advisory and other fees and expenses with respect to assets so invested. Holders of common stock will therefore be subject to duplicative expenses to the extent the Fund invests in other investment companies. The Investment Advisor will take expenses into account when evaluating the investment merits of an investment in an investment company relative to available equity and/or fixed income securities investments. In addition, the securities of other investment companies may be leveraged and will therefore be subject to the same leverage risks to which the Fund may be subject to the extent it employs a leverage strategy. As described in this Prospectus in “Risk Factors” and “Leverage” under Item 8 in Part II, the NAV and market value of securities of leveraged shares will be more volatile and the yield to shareholders will tend to fluctuate more than the yield generated by unleveraged shares. Investment companies may have investment policies that differ from those of the Fund. In addition, to the extent the Fund invests in other investment companies, the Fund will be dependent upon the investment and research abilities of persons other than the Investment Advisor.
 
The Fund may invest in ETFs, which are investment companies that typically aim to track or replicate a desired index, such as a sector, market or global segment. ETFs are typically passively managed and their shares are traded on a national exchange or The NASDAQ Stock Market, Inc. ETFs do not sell individual shares directly to investors and only issue their shares in large blocks known as “creation units.” The investor purchasing a creation unit may sell the individual shares on a secondary market. Therefore, the liquidity of ETFs depends on the adequacy of the secondary market. There can be no assurance that an ETF’s investment objective will be achieved, as ETFs based on an index may not replicate and maintain exactly the composition and relative weightings of securities in the index. ETFs are subject to the risks of investing in the underlying securities. The Fund, as a holder of the securities of the ETF, will bear its pro rata portion of the ETF’s expenses, including advisory fees. These expenses are in addition to the direct expenses of the Fund’s own operations.
 
Repurchase Agreements and Purchase and Sale Contracts. The Fund may invest in repurchase agreements. A repurchase agreement is a contractual agreement whereby the seller of securities agrees to repurchase the same security at a specified price on a future date agreed upon by the parties. The agreed upon repurchase price determines the yield during the Fund's holding period. Repurchase agreements are considered to be loans collateralized by the underlying security that is the subject of the repurchase contract. Income generated from transactions in repurchase agreements will be taxable. The risk to the Fund is limited to the ability of the issuer to pay the agreed upon repurchase price on the delivery date; however, although the value of the underlying collateral at the time the transaction is entered into always equals or exceeds the agreed upon repurchase price, if the value of the collateral declines there is a risk of loss of both principal and interest. In the event of default, the collateral may be sold but the Fund might incur a loss if the value of the collateral declines, and might incur disposition costs or experience delays in connection with liquidating the collateral. In addition, if bankruptcy proceedings are commenced with respect to the seller of the security, realization upon the collateral by the Fund may be delayed or limited. The Investment Advisor will monitor the value of the collateral at the time the transaction is entered into and at all times subsequent during the term of the repurchase agreement in an effort to determine that such value always equals or exceeds the agreed upon repurchase price. In the event the value of the collateral declines below the repurchase price, the Investment Advisor will demand additional collateral from the issuer to increase the value of the collateral to at least that of the repurchase price, including interest.
 
A purchase and sale contract is similar to a repurchase agreement, but differs from a repurchase agreement in that the contract arrangements stipulate that the securities are owned by the Fund. In the event of a default under such a repurchase agreement or a purchase and sale contract, instead of the contractual fixed rate of return, the rate of return to the Fund shall be dependent upon intervening fluctuations of the market value of such security and the accrued interest on the security. In such event, the Fund would have rights against the seller for breach of contract with respect to any losses arising from market fluctuations following the failure of the seller to perform.
 
Reverse Repurchase Agreements.  The Fund may enter into reverse repurchase agreements with respect to its portfolio investments subject to the investment restrictions set forth herein. Reverse repurchase agreements involve the sale of securities held by the Fund with an agreement by the Fund to repurchase the securities at an agreed upon price, date and interest payment. At the time the Fund enters into a reverse repurchase agreement, it may establish and maintain a segregated account with the custodian containing, or designate on its books and records cash and/or liquid assets having a value not less than the repurchase price (including accrued interest). If the Fund establishes and maintains such a segregated account, or earmarks such assets as described, a reverse repurchase agreement will not be considered a senior security under the 1940 Act and therefore will not be considered a borrowing by the Fund; however, under certain circumstances in which the Fund does not establish and maintain such segregated account, or earmark such assets on its books and records, such reverse repurchase agreement will be considered a borrowing for the purpose of the Fund's limitation on borrowings. The use by the Fund of reverse repurchase agreements involves many of the same risks of leverage since the proceeds derived from such reverse repurchase agreements may be invested in additional securities.  The Fund's use of leverage through reverse repurchase agreements will be subject to the Fund's policy with respect to the use of leverage.  Reverse repurchase agreements involve the risk that the market value of the securities acquired in connection with the reverse repurchase agreement may decline below the price of the securities the Fund has sold but is obligated to repurchase. Also, reverse repurchase agreements involve the risk that the market value of the securities retained in lieu of sale by the Fund in connection with the reverse repurchase agreement may decline in price.

 
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If the buyer of securities under a reverse repurchase agreement files for bankruptcy or becomes insolvent, such buyer or its trustee or receiver may receive an extension of time to determine whether to enforce the Fund's obligation to repurchase the securities and the Fund's use of the proceeds of the reverse repurchase agreement may effectively be restricted pending such decision. Also, the Fund would bear the risk of loss to the extent that the proceeds of the reverse repurchase agreement are less than the value of the securities subject to such agreement.
 
The Fund also may effect simultaneous purchase and sale transactions that are known as "sale-buybacks." A sale-buyback is similar to a reverse repurchase agreement, except that in a sale-buyback, the counterparty that purchases the security is entitled to receive any principal or interest payments made on the underlying security pending settlement of the Fund's repurchase of the underlying security.
 
Dollar Rolls.  The Fund may enter into "dollar roll" transactions.  In a dollar roll transaction, the Fund sells a mortgage related security or other security to a dealer and simultaneously agrees to repurchase a similar security (but not the same security) in the future at a pre-determined price. A dollar roll transaction can be viewed, like a reverse repurchase agreement, as a collateralized borrowing in which the Fund pledges a mortgage related security to a dealer to obtain cash. However, unlike reverse repurchase agreements, the dealer with which the Fund enters into a dollar roll transaction is not obligated to return the same securities as those originally sold by the Fund, but rather only securities which are "substantially identical," which generally means that the securities repurchased will bear the same interest rate and a similar maturity as those sold, but pools of mortgages collateralizing those securities may have different prepayment histories than those sold.
 
During the period between the sale and repurchase, the Fund will not be entitled to receive interest and principal payments of the securities sold. Proceeds of the sale will be invested in additional instruments for the Fund and the income from these investments will generate income for the Fund. If such income does not exceed the income, capital appreciation and gain that would have been realized on the securities sold as part of the dollar roll, the use of this technique will diminish the investment performance of the Fund compared with what the performance would have been without the use of dollar rolls.
 
At the time the Fund enters into a dollar roll transaction, it may establish and maintain a segregated account with the custodian containing, or designate on its books and records, cash and/or liquid assets having a value not less than the repurchase price (including accrued interest).  If the Fund establishes and maintains such a segregated account, or earmarks such assets as described, a dollar roll transaction will not be considered a senior security under the 1940 Act and therefore will not be considered a borrowing by the Fund.
 
Dollar roll transactions involve the risk that the market value of the securities the Fund is required to purchase may decline below the agreed upon repurchase price of those securities. The Fund's right to purchase or repurchase securities may be restricted. Successful use of mortgage dollar rolls may depend upon the investment manager's ability to correctly predict interest rates and prepayments. There is no assurance that dollar rolls can be successfully employed.
 
Short Sales. The Fund may make short sales of securities. A short sale is a transaction in which the Fund sells a security it does not own in anticipation that the market price of that security will decline. The Fund may make short sales to hedge positions, for duration and risk management, in order to maintain portfolio flexibility or, to the extent applicable, to enhance income or gain. When the Fund makes a short sale, it must borrow the security sold short and deliver it to the broker-dealer through which it made the short sale as collateral for its obligation to deliver the security upon conclusion of the sale. The Fund may have to pay a fee to borrow particular securities and is often obligated to pay over to the securities lender any income, distributions or dividends received on such borrowed securities until it returns the security to the securities lender. The Fund's obligation to replace the borrowed security will be secured by collateral deposited with the securities lender, usually cash, U.S. government securities or other liquid assets. The Fund will also be required to segregate or earmark similar collateral with its custodian to the extent, if any, necessary so that the aggregate collateral value is at all times at least equal to the current market value of the security sold short. Depending on arrangements made with the securities lender regarding payment over of any income, distributions or dividends received by the Fund on such security, the Fund may not receive any payments (including interest) on its collateral deposited with such securities lender. If the price of the security sold short increases between the time of the short sale and the time the Fund replaces the borrowed security, the Fund will incur a loss; conversely, if the price declines, the Fund will realize a gain. Any gain will be decreased, and any loss increased, by the transaction costs described above. Although the Fund's gain is limited to the price at which it sold the security short, its potential loss is theoretically unlimited. The Fund may also make short sales "against the box." Short sales, even if covered, may represent a form of economic leverage and will create risks. In this type of short sale, at the time of the sale, the Fund owns or has the immediate and unconditional right to acquire at no additional cost the identical security.
 
Bank Obligations.  Bank obligations may include certificates of deposit, bankers' acceptances and fixed time deposits. Certificates of deposit are negotiable certificates issued against funds deposited in a commercial bank for a definite period of time and earning a specified return. Bankers' acceptances are negotiable drafts or bills of exchange, normally drawn by an importer or exporter to pay for specific merchandise, which are "accepted" by a bank, meaning, in effect, that the bank unconditionally agrees to pay the face value of the instrument on maturity. Fixed time deposits are bank obligations payable at a stated maturity date and bearing interest at a fixed rate. Fixed time deposits may be withdrawn on demand by the investor,

 
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but may be subject to early withdrawal penalties, which vary depending upon market conditions and the remaining maturity of the obligation. There are no contractual restrictions on the right to transfer a beneficial interest in a fixed time deposit to a third party, although there is no market for such deposits.
 
Obligations of foreign banks involve somewhat different investment risks than those affecting obligations of U.S. banks, including the possibilities that their liquidity could be impaired because of future political and economic developments, that their obligations may be less marketable than comparable obligations of U.S. banks, that a foreign jurisdiction might impose withholding taxes on interest income payable on those obligations, that foreign deposits may be seized or nationalized, that foreign governmental restrictions such as exchange controls may be adopted which might adversely affect the payment of principal and interest on those obligations and that the selection of those obligations may be more difficult because there may be less publicly available information concerning foreign banks or the accounting, auditing and financial reporting standards, practices and requirements applicable to foreign banks may differ from those applicable to U.S. banks. Foreign banks are not generally subject to examination by any U.S. government agency or instrumentality.
 
Participation Notes.  The Fund may buy participation notes from a bank or broker-dealer ("issuer") that entitle the Fund to a return measured by the change in value of an identified underlying security or basket of securities (collectively, the "underlying security"). Participation notes are typically used when a direct investment in the underlying security is restricted due to country-specific regulations.
 
The Fund is subject to counterparty risk associated with each issuer. Investment in a participation note is not the same as investment in the constituent shares of the company. A participation note represents only an obligation of the issuer to provide the Fund the economic performance equivalent to holding shares of an underlying security. A participation note does not provide any beneficial or equitable entitlement or interest in the relevant underlying security. In other words, shares of the underlying security are not in any way owned by the Fund. However each participation note synthetically replicates the economic benefit of holding shares in the underlying security. Because a participation note is an obligation of the issuer, rather than a direct investment in shares of the underlying security, the Fund may suffer losses potentially equal to the full value of the participation note if the issuer fails to perform its obligations.
 
The counterparty may, but is not required to, purchase the shares of the underlying security to hedge its obligation. The Fund may, but is not required to, purchase credit protection against the default of the issuer. When the participation note expires or the Fund exercises the participation note and closes its position, the Fund receives a payment that is based upon the then-current value of the underlying security converted into U.S. dollars (less transaction costs). The price, performance and liquidity of the participation note are all linked directly to the underlying security. The Fund's ability to redeem or exercise a participation note generally is dependent on the liquidity in the local trading market for the security underlying the participation note.
 
When-Issued, Delayed Delivery and Forward Commitment Securities.  The Fund may purchase securities on a "when-issued" basis and may purchase or sell securities on a "forward commitment" basis (including on a "TBA" (to be announced) basis) or on a "delayed delivery" basis. When such transactions are negotiated, the price, which is generally expressed in yield terms, is fixed at the time the commitment is made, but delivery and payment for the securities take place at a later date. When-issued securities and forward commitments may be sold prior to the settlement date. If the Fund disposes of the right to acquire a when-issued security prior to its acquisition or disposes of its right to deliver or receive against a forward commitment, it might incur a gain or loss. At the time the Fund enters into a transaction on a when-issued or forward commitment basis, it will designate on its books and records cash or liquid assets with a value not less than the value of the when-issued or forward commitment securities. The value of these assets will be monitored daily to ensure that their marked to market value will at all times equal or exceed the corresponding obligations of the Fund. Pursuant to recommendations of the Treasury Market Practices Group, which is sponsored by the Federal Reserve Board of New York, the Fund or its counterparty generally is required to post collateral when entering into certain forward-settling transactions, including without limitation TBA transactions.
 
There is always a risk that the securities may not be delivered and that the Fund may incur a loss. Settlements in the ordinary course are not treated by the Fund as when-issued or forward commitment transactions and accordingly are not subject to the foregoing restrictions.
 
Standby Commitment Agreements. The Fund from time to time may enter into standby commitment agreements. Such agreements commit the Fund, for a stated period of time, to purchase a stated amount of a fixed income security that may be issued and sold to the Fund at the option of the issuer. The price and coupon of the security is fixed at the time of the commitment. At the time of entering into the agreement the Fund may be paid a commitment fee, regardless of whether or not the security ultimately is issued. The Fund will enter into such agreements only for the purpose of investing in the security underlying the commitment at a yield and price which is considered advantageous to the Fund. The Fund at all times

 
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will designate on its books and records cash or other liquid assets with a value equal to the purchase price of the securities underlying the commitment.
 
There can be no assurance that the securities subject to a standby commitment will be issued and the value of the security, if issued, on the delivery date may be more or less than its purchase price. Since the issuance of the security underlying the commitment is at the option of the issuer, the Fund may bear the risk of decline in the value of such security and may not benefit from an appreciation in the value of the security during the commitment period.
 
The purchase of a security subject to a standby commitment agreement and the related commitment fee will be recorded on the date on which the security reasonably can be expected to be issued and the value of the security thereafter will be reflected in the calculation of the Fund's NAV. The cost basis of the security will be adjusted by the amount of the commitment fee. In the event the security is not issued, the commitment fee will be recorded as income on the expiration date of the standby commitment.
 
Temporary Defensive Positions; Invest-Up Period.  During temporary defensive periods, if the Investment Advisor determines that market conditions warrant, and also during the period in which the net proceeds of this offering of common stock (or preferred stock, should the Fund determine to issue preferred stock in the future) are being invested, the Fund may invest any percentage of its assets without limitation in cash, cash equivalents, money market securities, such as U.S. Treasury and agency obligations, other U.S. government securities, short-term debt obligations of corporate issuers, certificates of deposit, bankers acceptances, commercial paper (short-term, unsecured, negotiable promissory notes of a domestic or foreign issuer), repurchase agreements, obligations of supranational organizations, bank obligations, including U.S. subsidiaries and branches of foreign banks, or other high quality fixed income securities. Temporary defensive positions may affect the Fund's ability to achieve its investment objectives.  Generally, such obligations will mature within one year from the date of settlement, but may mature within two years from the date of settlement.
 
Short-Term Debt Securities. Short-term debt securities are defined to include, without limitation:
 
 
·
U.S. government securities, including bills, notes and bonds differing as to maturity and rates of interest that are either issued or guaranteed by the U.S. Treasury or by U.S. government agencies or instrumentalities. U.S. government securities include securities issued by (a) the FHA, Farmers Home Administration, Export-Import Bank of the United States, Small Business Administration and GNMA, whose securities are supported by the full faith and credit of the United States; (b) the FHLBs, Federal Intermediate Credit Banks, and Tennessee Valley Authority, whose securities are supported by the right of the agency to borrow from the U.S. Treasury; (c) FNMA, whose securities are supported by the discretionary authority of the U.S. government to purchase certain obligations of the agency or instrumentality; and (d) the Student Loan Marketing Association, whose securities are supported only by its credit. While the U.S. government provides financial support to such U.S. government-sponsored agencies or instrumentalities, no assurance can be given that it always will do so since it is not so obligated by law. The U.S. government, its agencies and instrumentalities do not guarantee the market value of their securities. Consequently, the value of such securities may fluctuate.
 
 
·
Certificates of deposit issued against funds deposited in a bank or a savings and loan association. Such certificates are for a definite period of time, earn a specified rate of return, and are normally negotiable. The issuer of a certificate of deposit agrees to pay the amount deposited plus interest to the bearer of the certificate on the date specified thereon. Certificates of deposit pur