485BPOS


  Prospectus
January 27, 2023
Touchstone Funds Group Trust
 
Class A
Class C
Class S
Class Y
Class Z
Institutional
Class
Class R6
Touchstone Active Bond Fund
TOBAX
TODCX
 
TOBYX
 
TOBIX
 
Touchstone Anti-Benchmark® International Core
Equity Fund
 
 
 
TYBAX
 
TIABX
 
Touchstone Ares Credit Opportunities Fund
(formerly, Touchstone Credit Opportunities Fund)
TMARX
TMACX
 
TMAYX
 
TARBX
 
Touchstone Dividend Equity Fund
TQCAX
TQCCX
 
TQCYX
 
TQCIX
TQCRX
Touchstone High Yield Fund
THYAX
THYCX
 
THYYX
 
THIYX
 
Touchstone Impact Bond Fund
TCPAX
TCPCX
 
TCPYX
 
TCPNX
TIMPX
Touchstone International ESG Equity Fund
TPYAX
TPYCX
 
TPYYX
 
TPYIX
 
Touchstone Mid Cap Fund
TMAPX
TMCJX
 
TMCPX
TMCTX
TMPIX
TMPRX
Touchstone Mid Cap Value Fund
TCVAX
TMFCX
 
TCVYX
 
TCVIX
 
Touchstone Sands Capital Select Growth Fund
TSNAX
TSNCX
 
CFSIX
PTSGX
CISGX
TSNRX
Touchstone Small Cap Fund
TSFAX
TSFCX
 
TSFYX
 
TSFIX
 
Touchstone Small Cap Value Fund
TVOAX
TVOCX
 
TVOYX
 
TVOIX
 
Touchstone Ultra Short Duration Fixed Income Fund
TSDAX
TSDCX
SSSGX
TSYYX
TSDOX
TSDIX
 
The Securities and Exchange Commission has not approved or disapproved these securities or determined if this prospectus is accurate or complete. Any representation to the contrary is a criminal offense.

 Table of Contents
 
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136
2

Touchstone Active Bond Fund Summary
The Fund’s Investment Goal
The Touchstone Active Bond Fund (the “Fund”) seeks to provide as high a level of current income as is consistent with the preservation of capital. Capital appreciation is a secondary goal.
The Fund’s Fees and Expenses
This table describes the fees and expenses that you may pay if you buy, hold and sell shares of the Fund. You may pay other fees, such as brokerage commissions and other fees to financial intermediaries, which are not reflected in the tables and examples below. You may qualify for sales charge discounts for Class A shares of Touchstone equity funds and Touchstone fixed income funds if you and your family invest, or agree to invest in the future, at least $25,000 or $50,000, respectively, in Touchstone funds. More information about these and other discounts is available from your financial professional, in the section titled “Choosing a Class of Shares” in the Fund’s prospectus and Statement of Additional Information (“SAI”) on pages 100 and 101, respectively, and in Appendix A–Intermediary-Specific Sales Charge Waivers and Discounts to the Fund's prospectus.
 
Class A
Class C
Class Y
Institutional
Class
Shareholder Fees (fees paid directly from your investment)
 
 
 
 
Maximum Sales Charge (Load) Imposed on Purchases (as a percentage of
offering price)
3.25%
None
None
None
Maximum Deferred Sales Charge (Load) (as a percentage of original purchase
price or the amount redeemed, whichever is less)
None
1.00%
None
None
Wire Redemption Fee(1)
$15
$15
$15
$15
 
Annual Fund Operating Expenses (expenses that you pay each year as a
percentage of the value of your investment)
 
 
 
 
Management Fees(2)
0.35%
0.35%
0.35%
0.35%
Distribution and/or Shareholder Service (12b-1) Fees
0.25%
1.00%
None
None
Other Expenses
0.32%
0.53%
0.32%
0.23%
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses
0.92%
1.88%
0.67%
0.58%
Fee Waiver and/or Expense Reimbursement(3)
(0.09)%
(0.32)%
(0.09)%
(0.08)%
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses After Fee Waiver and/or Expense
Reimbursement(3)(4)
0.83%
1.56%
0.58%
0.50%
(1)
Up to $15.
(2)
Management Fees have been restated to reflect contractual changes to the Fund's Investment Advisory Agreement effective January 1, 2022.
(3)
Touchstone Advisors, Inc. (the “Adviser” or “Touchstone Advisors”) and Touchstone Funds Group Trust (the “Trust”) have entered into a contractual expense limitation agreement whereby Touchstone Advisors will waive a portion of its fees or reimburse certain Fund expenses (excluding dividend and interest expenses relating to short sales; interest; taxes; brokerage commissions and other transaction costs; portfolio transaction and investment related expenses, including expenses associated with the Fund's liquidity providers; other expenditures which are capitalized in accordance with U.S. generally accepted accounting principles; the cost of “Acquired Fund Fees and Expenses”, if any; and other extraordinary expenses not incurred in the ordinary course of business) in order to limit annual Fund operating expenses to 0.83%, 1.56%, 0.58%, and 0.50%  of average daily net assets for Classes A, C, Y and Institutional Class shares, respectively. This contractual expense limitation is effective through January 29, 2024, but can be terminated by a vote of the Board of Trustees of the Trust (the “Board”) if it deems the termination to be beneficial to the Fund’s shareholders. The terms of the contractual expense limitation agreement provide that Touchstone Advisors is entitled to recoup, subject to approval by the Board, such amounts waived or reimbursed for a period of up to three years from the date on which the Adviser reduced its compensation or assumed expenses for the Fund. The Fund will make repayments to the Adviser only if such repayment does not cause the annual Fund operating expenses (after the repayment is taken into account) to exceed both (1) the expense cap in place when such amounts were waived or reimbursed and (2) the Fund’s current expense limitation.
(4)
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses After Fee Waiver and/or Expense Reimbursement will differ from the ratio of net expenses to average net assets that is included in the Fund's annual report for the fiscal year ended September 30, 2022 due to contractual changes in the Fund's expense limitation agreement effective January 1, 2022.
3

Example. This example is intended to help you compare the cost of investing in the Fund with the cost of investing in other mutual funds. The example assumes that you invest $10,000 in the Fund for the time periods indicated and then, except as indicated, redeem all of your shares at the end of those periods. The example also assumes that your investment has a 5% return each year, that the Fund’s operating expenses remain the same and that all fee waivers or expense limits for the Fund will expire after one year. Although your actual costs may be higher or lower, based on these assumptions your costs would be:
 
Assuming Redemption at End of Period
Assuming
No Redemption
 
Class A
Class C
Class Y
Institutional
Class
Class C
1 Year
$407
$259
$59
$51
$159
3 Years
$600
$560
$205
$178
$560
5 Years
$809
$986
$364
$316
$986
10 Years
$1,412
$2,175
$826
$718
$2,175
Portfolio Turnover. The Fund pays transaction costs, such as brokerage commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or “turns over” its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover rate may indicate higher transaction costs and may result in higher taxes when Fund shares are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are not reflected in total annual Fund operating expenses or in the example, affect the Fund’s performance. During the most recent fiscal year, the Fund’s portfolio turnover rate was 159% of the average value of its portfolio.
The Fund’s Principal Investment Strategies
Under normal circumstances, the Fund invests at least 80% of its assets in bonds. This is a non-fundamental investment policy that the Fund can change upon 60 days’ prior notice to shareholders. Bonds include mortgage-related securities, asset-backed securities, government securities (both U.S. government securities and foreign sovereign debt), and corporate debt securities. The Fund may engage in frequent and active trading as part of its principal investment strategies.
In deciding what securities to buy and sell for the Fund, the Fund’s sub-adviser, Fort Washington Investment Advisors, Inc. (“Fort Washington”), analyzes the overall investment opportunities and risks in different sectors of the debt securities markets by focusing on maximizing total return while reducing volatility of the Fund’s portfolio. Fort Washington follows a disciplined sector allocation process in order to build a diversified portfolio of investments.
In building the Fund’s portfolio, Fort Washington primarily invests in investment-grade debt securities, but may invest up to 30% of the Fund’s total assets in non-investment-grade debt securities rated as low as a B by a Nationally Recognized Statistical Rating Organization (“NRSRO”). Non-investment-grade debt securities are often referred to as “junk bonds” and are considered speculative. The Fund’s investment policies are based on credit ratings at the time of purchase. The Fund may also invest up to 20% of its total assets in foreign-issued debt securities denominated in either the U.S. dollar or a foreign currency. Foreign-issued debt securities may include debt securities of emerging market countries.
Additionally, in order to implement its investment strategy, the Fund may invest in collateralized loan obligations, mortgage dollar-roll transactions and reverse repurchase agreements, and in derivatives, including forwards, futures contracts, interest rate and credit default swap agreements, and options. These investments may be used to gain or hedge market exposure, to adjust the Fund’s duration, to manage interest rate risk, and for any other purposes consistent with the Fund’s investment strategies and limitations.
The Fund’s Principal Risks
The Fund’s share price will fluctuate. You could lose money on your investment in the Fund and the Fund could also return less than other investments. Investments in the Fund are not bank guaranteed, are not deposits, and are not insured by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation or any other federal government agency. As with any mutual fund, there is no guarantee that the Fund will achieve its investment goal. You can find more information about the Fund’s investments and risks under the “Principal Investment Strategies and Risks” section of the Fund’s prospectus. The Fund is subject to the principal risks summarized below.
Fixed-Income Risk: The market value of the Fund’s fixed-income securities responds to economic developments, particularly interest rate changes, as well as to perceptions about the creditworthiness of individual issuers, including governments. Generally, the Fund’s fixed-income securities will decrease in value if interest rates rise and increase in value if interest rates fall. Normally, the longer the maturity or duration of the fixed-income securities the Fund owns, the more sensitive the value of the Fund’s shares will be to changes in interest rates.
Asset-Backed Securities Risk: Asset-backed securities are fixed-income securities backed by other assets such as credit card, automobile or consumer loan receivables, retail installment loans, or participations in pools of leases. The values of these securities are sensitive to changes in the credit quality of the underlying collateral, the credit strength of any credit enhancement feature, changes in interest rates, and, at times, the financial condition of the issuer.
4

Credit Risk: The fixed-income securities in the Fund’s portfolio are subject to the possibility that a deterioration, whether sudden or gradual, in the financial condition of an issuer, or a deterioration in general economic conditions, could cause an issuer to fail to make timely payments of principal or interest, when due. This may cause the issuer’s securities to decline in value.
Interest Rate Risk: In general, when interest rates rise, the prices of debt securities fall, and when interest rates fall, the prices of debt securities rise. The price volatility of a debt security also depends on its maturity. Longer-term securities are generally more volatile, so the longer the average maturity or duration of these securities, the greater their price risk. Duration is a measure used to determine the sensitivity of a security’s price to changes in interest rates that incorporates a security’s yield, coupon, final maturity, and call features, among other characteristics. The longer a fixed-income security’s duration, the more sensitive it will be to changes in interest rates. Maturity, on the other hand, is the date on which a fixed-income security becomes due for payment of principal. Recent and potential future changes in government policy may affect interest rates.
Investment-Grade Debt Securities Risk: Investment-grade debt securities may be downgraded by a NRSRO to below-investment-grade status, which would increase the risk of holding these securities. Investment-grade debt securities rated in the lowest rating category by a NRSRO involve a higher degree of risk than fixed-income securities with higher credit ratings.
Mortgage-Backed Securities Risk: Mortgage-backed securities are fixed-income securities representing an interest in a pool of underlying mortgage loans. Mortgage-backed securities are sensitive to changes in interest rates, but may respond to these changes differently from other fixed-income securities due to the possibility of prepayment of the underlying mortgage loans. Mortgage-backed securities may fluctuate in price based on deterioration in the value of the collateral underlying the pool of mortgage loans, which may result in the collateral being worth less than the remaining principal amount owed on the mortgages in the pool.
Non-Investment-Grade Debt Securities Risk: Non-investment-grade debt securities are sometimes referred to as “junk bonds” and are considered speculative with respect to their issuers’ ability to make payments of interest and principal. There is a high risk that the Fund could suffer a loss from investments in non-investment-grade debt securities caused by the default of an issuer of such securities. Non-investment-grade debt securities may also be less liquid than investment- grade debt securities.
Prepayment Risk: The risk that a debt security may be paid off and proceeds reinvested earlier than anticipated. Prepayment impacts both the interest rate sensitivity of the underlying asset, such as an asset-backed or mortgage-backed security and its cash flow projections. Therefore, prepayment risk may make it difficult to calculate the average duration of the Fund’s asset- or mortgage-backed securities which in turn would make it difficult to assess the interest rate risk of the Fund.
U.S. Government Securities Risk: Certain U.S. government securities are backed by the right of the issuer to borrow from the U.S. Treasury while others are supported only by the credit of the issuer or instrumentality. While the U.S. government is able to provide financial support to U.S. government-sponsored agencies or instrumentalities, no assurance can be given that it will always do so. Such securities are generally neither issued nor guaranteed by the U.S. Treasury.
Management Risk: In managing the Fund’s portfolio, the Adviser engages one or more sub-advisers to make investment decisions for a portion of or the entire portfolio. There is a risk that the Adviser may be unable to identify and retain sub-advisers who achieve superior investment returns relative to other similar sub-advisers.
Collateralized Loan Obligations Risk: Typically, collateralized loan obligations are privately offered and sold, and thus are not registered under the securities laws. As a result, the Fund may in certain circumstances characterize its investments in collateralized loan obligations as illiquid. Collateralized loan obligations are subject to the typical risks associated with debt instruments (i.e., interest rate risk and credit risk). Additional risks of collateralized loan obligations include the possibility that distributions from collateral securities will be insufficient to make interest or other payments, the potential for a decline in the quality of the collateral, and the possibility that the Fund may invest in a subordinate tranche of a collateralized loan obligation.
Counterparty Risk: The issuer or guarantor of a fixed-income security, a counterparty (the other party to a transaction or an agreement) to a transaction with the Fund, or a borrower of the Fund’s securities may be unable or unwilling to make timely principal, interest or settlement payments, or otherwise honor its obligations.
Derivatives Risk: The use of derivatives may expose the Fund to additional risks that it would not be subject to if it invested directly in the securities underlying those derivatives. Risks associated with derivatives may include the risk that the derivative does not correlate well with the security, index, or currency to which it relates, the risk that the Fund will be unable to sell or close out the derivative due to an illiquid market, the risk that the counterparty may be unwilling or unable to meet its obligations, and the risk that the derivative could expose the Fund to the risk of magnified losses resulting from leverage. These additional risks could cause the Fund to experience losses to which it would otherwise not be subject.
Leverage Risk: Leverage occurs when the Fund uses borrowings, derivatives (such as futures or options), or similar instruments or techniques to gain exposure to investments in an amount that exceeds the Fund’s initial investment. The use of leverage magnifies changes in the Fund’s net asset value and thus may result in increased portfolio volatility and increased risk of loss. Leverage can create an interest expense that may lower the Fund’s overall returns. There can be no guarantee that a leveraging strategy will be successful.
Forward Foreign Currency Exchange Contract Risk: A forward foreign currency exchange contract is an agreement to buy or sell a specific currency at a future date and at a price set at the time of the contract. Forward foreign currency exchange contracts may reduce
5

the risk of loss from a change in value of a currency, but they also limit any potential gains and do not protect against fluctuations in the value of the underlying position.
Futures Contracts Risk: The risks associated with the Fund’s futures positions include liquidity and counterparty risks associated with derivative instruments.
Options Risk: Options trading is a highly specialized activity that involves investment techniques and risks different from those associated with ordinary portfolio securities transactions. The value of options can be highly volatile, and their use can result in loss if the sub-adviser is incorrect in its expectation of price fluctuations. Options, whether exchange traded or over-the-counter, may also be illiquid.
Swap Agreements Risk: Swap agreements (“swaps”) are individually negotiated and structured to include exposure to a variety of different types of investments or market factors. Swaps may increase or decrease the overall volatility of the investments of the Fund and its share price. The performance of swaps may be affected by a change in the specific interest rate, currency, or other factors that determine the amounts of payments due to and from the Fund. A swap can be a form of leverage, which can magnify the Fund’s gains or losses.
Economic and Market Events Risk: Events in the U.S. and global financial markets, including actions taken by the U.S. Federal Reserve or foreign central banks to stimulate or stabilize economic growth, may at times, and for varying periods of time, result in unusually high market volatility, which could negatively impact the Fund’s performance and cause the Fund to experience illiquidity, shareholder redemptions, or other potentially adverse effects. Reduced liquidity in credit and fixed-income markets could negatively affect issuers worldwide. Financial institutions could suffer losses as interest rates rise or economic conditions deteriorate. In addition, the Funds' service providers are susceptible to operational and information or cyber security risks that could result in losses to a Fund and its shareholders. Cyber security breaches are either intentional or unintentional events that allow an unauthorized party to gain access to Fund assets, customer data, or proprietary information, or cause a Fund or Fund service provider to suffer data corruption or lose operational functionality. A cyber security breach could result in the loss or theft of customer data or funds, loss or theft of proprietary information or corporate data, physical damage to a computer or network system, or costs associated with system repairs, any of which could have a substantial impact on a Fund. Such incidents could affect issuers in which a Fund invests, thereby causing the Fund’s investments to lose value.
Foreign Securities Risk: Investing in foreign securities poses additional risks since political and economic events unique in a country or region will affect those markets and their issuers, while such events may not necessarily affect the U.S. economy or issuers located in the United States. In addition, investments in foreign securities are generally denominated in foreign currency. As a result, changes in the value of those currencies compared to the U.S. dollar may affect (positively or negatively) the value of the Fund’s investments. There are also risks associated with foreign accounting standards, government regulation, market information, and clearance and settlement procedures. Foreign markets may be less liquid and more volatile than U.S. markets and offer less protection to investors.
Emerging Markets Risk: Emerging markets may be more likely to experience political turmoil or rapid changes in market or economic conditions than more developed countries. In addition, the financial stability of issuers (including governments) in emerging market countries may be more precarious than that of issuers in other countries.
Sovereign Debt Risk: The actions of foreign governments concerning their respective economies could have an important effect on their ability or willingness to service their sovereign debt. Such actions could have significant effects on market conditions and on the prices of securities and instruments held by the Fund, including the securities and instruments of foreign private issuers.
Mortgage Dollar Roll Risk: Mortgage “dollar rolls” are transactions in which mortgage-backed securities are sold for delivery in the current month and the seller simultaneously contracts to repurchase substantially similar securities on a specified future date. If the broker-dealer to whom the Fund sells the security becomes insolvent, the Fund’s right to repurchase the security may be restricted. Other risks involved in entering into mortgage dollar rolls include the risk that the value of the security may change adversely over the term of the mortgage dollar roll and that the security the Fund is required to repurchase may be worth less than the security that the Fund held.
Portfolio Turnover Risk: Frequent and active trading may result in greater expenses to the Fund, which may lower the Fund’s performance and may result in the realization of substantial capital gains, including net short-term capital gains. As a result, high portfolio turnover may reduce the Fund’s returns.
Repurchase Agreement Risk: Under all repurchase agreements entered into by the Fund, the Fund’s custodian or its agent must take possession of the underlying collateral. However, if the counterparty defaults, the Fund could realize a loss on the sale of the underlying security to the extent that the proceeds of sale, including accrued interest, are less than the resale price provided in the agreement including interest. In addition, even though the Bankruptcy Code provides protection for most repurchase agreements, if the seller should be involved in bankruptcy or insolvency proceedings, the Fund may incur delay and costs in selling the underlying security or may suffer a loss of principal and interest if the Fund is treated as an unsecured creditor and is required to return the underlying security to the seller’s estate. Repurchase agreements are considered loans by the Fund.
6

The Fund’s Performance
On January 27, 2017, the Touchstone Active Bond Fund, previously a series of Touchstone Investment Trust (the “Predecessor Fund”), was reorganized into the Fund. As a result of the reorganization, the performance and accounting history of the Predecessor Fund was assumed by the Fund. Financial and performance information prior to January 27, 2017 is that of the Predecessor Fund.
The bar chart and performance table below illustrate some indication of the risks and volatility of an investment in the Fund by showing changes in the Fund’s performance from calendar year to calendar year and by showing how the Fund’s average annual total returns for one year, five years, and ten years compare with the Bloomberg U.S. Aggregate Bond Index. The bar chart does not reflect any sales charges, which would reduce your return. The performance table reflects any applicable sales charges. Past performance (before and after taxes) does not necessarily indicate how the Fund will perform in the future. More recent performance information is available at no cost by visiting TouchstoneInvestments.com or by calling 1.800.543.0407.
Touchstone Active Bond Fund — Class A Shares Total Return as of December 31
 
Best Quarter:
2nd Quarter 2020
7.72%
Worst Quarter:
2nd Quarter 2022
(6.21)%
After-tax returns are calculated using the highest individual marginal federal income tax rates in effect on a given distribution reinvestment date and do not reflect the impact of state and local taxes. Your actual after- tax returns may differ from those shown and depend on your tax situation. The after-tax returns do not apply to shares held in an individual retirement account (“IRA”), 401(k), or other tax-advantaged account. The after-tax returns shown in the table are for Class A shares only. The after-tax returns for other classes of shares offered by the Fund will differ from the Class A shares’ after-tax returns. The Return After Taxes on Distributions and Sale of Fund Shares may be greater than other returns for the same period due to a tax benefit of realizing a capital loss on the sale of Fund shares.
Average Annual Total Returns
For the periods ended December 31, 2022
1 Year
5 Years
10 Years
Touchstone Active Bond Fund - Class A
 
 
 
Return Before Taxes
(16.98)%
(0.87)%
0.68%
Return After Taxes on Distributions
(17.99)%
(1.94)%
(0.48)%
Return After Taxes on Distributions and Sale of Fund Shares
(10.04)%
(1.07)%
0.03%
Touchstone Active Bond Fund - Class C
 
 
 
Return Before Taxes
(15.58)%
(0.64)%
0.57%
Touchstone Active Bond Fund - Class Y
 
 
 
Return Before Taxes
(13.98)%
0.37%
1.44%
Touchstone Active Bond Fund - Institutional Class
 
 
 
Return Before Taxes
(13.83)%
0.45%
1.52%
Bloomberg U.S. Aggregate Bond Index (reflects no deductions for fees, expenses or taxes)
(13.01)%
0.02%
1.06%
7

The Fund’s Management
Investment Adviser
Touchstone Advisors, Inc. serves as the Fund’s investment adviser.
Sub-Adviser
Portfolio Managers
Investment Experience
with the Predecessor
Fund and the Fund
Primary Title with
Sub-Adviser
Fort Washington Investment
Advisors, Inc.
Daniel J. Carter, CFA
Managed the Predecessor
Fund from 2001 to 2017;
managing the Fund since
2017
Managing Director, Senior
Portfolio Manager
 
Austin R. Kummer, CFA
Managing the Fund since July
2021
Vice President, Senior Portfolio
Manager
Buying and Selling Fund Shares
Minimum Investment Requirements
 
Classes A, C, and Y
 
Initial
Investment
Additional
Investment
Regular Account
$2,500
$50
Retirement Account or Custodial Account under the Uniform Gifts/Transfers to Minors Act
$1,000
$50
Investments through the Automatic Investment Plan
$100
$50
 
Institutional Class
 
Initial
Investment
Additional
Investment
Regular Account
$500,000
$50
Fund shares may be purchased and sold on days that the New York Stock Exchange is open for trading. Existing Class A, C and Institutional Class shareholders may purchase shares directly through Touchstone Funds via the transfer agent, BNY Mellon, or through their financial intermediary. Class Y shares are available only through financial intermediaries  who have appropriate selling agreements in place with Touchstone Securities. Shares may be purchased or sold by writing to Touchstone Securities at P.O. Box 9878, Providence, Rhode Island 02940, calling 1.800.543.0407, or visiting the Touchstone Funds’ website: TouchstoneInvestments.com. You may only sell shares over the telephone or via the Internet if the value of the shares sold is less than or equal to $100,000. Shares held in IRAs and qualified retirement plans cannot be sold via the Internet. If your shares are held by a processing organization or financial intermediary you will need to follow its purchase and redemption procedures. For more information about buying and selling shares, see the “Investing with Touchstone” section of the Fund’s prospectus or call 1.800.543.0407.
Tax Information
The Fund intends to make distributions that may be taxed as ordinary income or capital gains except when shares are held through a tax-advantaged account, such as a 401(k) plan or an IRA. Withdrawals from a tax-advantaged account, however, may be taxable.
Financial Intermediary Compensation
If you purchase shares in the Fund through a broker-dealer or other financial intermediary (such as a bank), the Fund and its related companies may pay the intermediary for the sale of Fund shares and related services. These payments may create a conflict of interest by influencing the broker-dealer or other financial intermediary and your salesperson to recommend the Fund over another investment. Ask your salesperson or visit your financial intermediary’s website for more information.
8

Touchstone Anti-Benchmark® International Core Equity Fund Summary
The Fund’s Investment Goal
The Touchstone Anti-Benchmark® International Core Equity Fund (the “Fund”) seeks capital appreciation.
The Fund’s Fees and Expenses
This table describes the fees and expenses that you may pay if you buy, hold and sell shares of the Fund. You may pay other fees, such as brokerage commissions and other fees to financial intermediaries, which are not reflected in the tables and examples below. More information is available from your financial professional and in the section titled “Choosing a Class of Shares” in the Fund’s prospectus and Statement of Additional Information (“SAI”) on pages 100 and 101, respectively.
 
Class Y
Institutional
Class
Shareholder Fees (fees paid directly from your investment)
 
 
Wire Redemption Fee(1)
$15
$15
 
Annual Fund Operating Expenses (expenses that you pay each year as a percentage of the value of
your investment)
 
 
Management Fees
0.45%
0.45%
Other Expenses
4.04%
1.07%
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses
4.49%
1.52%
Fee Waiver and/or Expense Reimbursement(2)
(3.80)%
(0.93)%
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses After Fee Waiver and/or Expense Reimbursement(2)
0.69%
0.59%
(1)
Up to $15.
(2)
Touchstone Advisors, Inc. (the “Adviser” or “Touchstone Advisors”) and Touchstone Funds Group Trust (the “Trust”) have entered into a contractual expense limitation agreement whereby Touchstone Advisors will waive a portion of its fees or reimburse certain Fund expenses (excluding dividend and interest expenses relating to short sales; interest; taxes; brokerage commissions and other transaction costs; portfolio transaction and investment related expenses, including expenses associated with the Fund's liquidity providers; other expenditures which are capitalized in accordance with U.S. generally accepted accounting principles; the cost of “Acquired Fund Fees and Expenses”, if any; and other extraordinary expenses not incurred in the ordinary course of business) in order to limit annual Fund operating expenses to 0.69% and 0.59%  of average daily net assets for Class Y and Institutional Class shares, respectively. This contractual expense limitation is effective through January 29, 2024, but can be terminated by a vote of the Board of Trustees of the Trust (the “Board”) if it deems the termination to be beneficial to the Fund’s shareholders. The terms of the contractual expense limitation agreement provide that Touchstone Advisors is entitled to recoup, subject to approval by the Board, such amounts waived or reimbursed for a period of up to three years from the date on which Touchstone Advisors reduced its compensation or assumed expenses for the Fund. The Fund will make repayments to the Adviser only if such repayment does not cause the annual Fund operating expenses (after the repayment is taken into account) to exceed both (1) the expense cap in place when such amounts were waived or reimbursed and (2) the Fund’s current expense limitation.
Example. This example is intended to help you compare the cost of investing in the Fund with the cost of investing in other mutual funds. The example assumes that you invest $10,000 in the Fund for the time periods indicated and then, except as indicated, redeem all of your shares at the end of those periods. The example also assumes that your investment has a 5% return each year, that the Fund’s operating expenses remain the same and that all fee waivers or expense limits for the Fund will expire after one year. Although your actual costs may be higher or lower, based on these assumptions your costs would be:
 
Assuming Redemption at End of Period
 
Class Y
Institutional
Class
1 Year
$70
$60
3 Years
$1,012
$389
5 Years
$1,963
$741
10 Years
$4,384
$1,733
9

Portfolio Turnover. The Fund pays transaction costs, such as brokerage commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or “turns over” its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover rate may indicate higher transaction costs and may result in higher taxes when Fund shares are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are not reflected in total annual Fund operating expenses or in the example, affect the Fund’s performance. During the most recent fiscal year, the Fund’s portfolio turnover rate was 84% of the average value of its portfolio.
The Fund’s Principal Investment Strategies
The Fund invests, under normal market conditions, at least 80% of its assets in equity securities of non-U.S. issuers. The Fund’s 80% policy is a non-fundamental investment policy that can be changed by the Fund upon 60 days’ prior notice to shareholders. The Fund pursues its objective by seeking to track the total return, before Fund fees and expenses, of the TOBAM Anti–Benchmark® International Core Equity Index (the “Index”). The Index is a proprietary rules–based index created by the Fund’s sub–adviser, TOBAM S.A.S. (“TOBAM”), which is designed to create a more diversified portfolio of equity securities of non-U.S. issuers relative to traditional market capitalization weighted benchmarks. The Fund intends to fully replicate the Index to achieve its investment objective, meaning the Fund will generally invest in all of the component securities of the Index in the same approximate proportions as the Index.
The equity securities that comprise the Index primarily include common and preferred stock of non-U.S. companies that trade on foreign exchanges. TOBAM may replace the common or preferred stock of a foreign issuer with a depositary receipt when it deems the depositary receipt to be more liquid than the corresponding stock. In determining whether a company is foreign, TOBAM primarily looks to both the country of incorporation and the main listing country. If both of these countries are non-U.S., the company is considered non-U.S. for purposes of inclusion in the Index. The Index is comprised of securities of issuers located in developed markets. TOBAM considers the following countries to be developed markets for these purposes: Australia, Austria, Belgium, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Hong Kong, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Japan, Luxembourg, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Portugal, Singapore, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, and the United Kingdom.
The Index is based on TOBAM’s proprietary quantitative model, which selects and weights companies to maximize diversification. TOBAM quantitatively selects securities, subject to certain constraints, that maximize the portfolio’s patented Diversification Ratio®, a proprietary mathematical metric based on the volatility of each Index constituent and its correlation to the other Index constituents. Such constraints include a minimum and maximum weight for any given stock, as well as geographic and country constraints. TOBAM’s Anti-Benchmark® strategy seeks to avoid the concentration risk that exists in traditional market capitalization-weighted indices through its quantitative approach to diversification.
The Index typically is reconstituted (i.e., Index constituents are added or deleted and weights are reset) monthly. The Fund is rebalanced following the same schedule as the Index. The Fund may engage in frequent and active trading as part of its principal investment strategies.
The Fund’s Principal Risks
The Fund’s share price will fluctuate. You could lose money on your investment in the Fund and the Fund could also return less than other investments. Investments in the Fund are not bank guaranteed, are not deposits, and are not insured by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation or any other federal government agency. As with any mutual fund, there is no guarantee that the Fund will achieve its investment goal. You can find more information about the Fund’s investments and risks under the “Principal Investment Strategies and Risks” section of the Fund’s prospectus. The Fund is subject to the principal risks summarized below.
Equity Securities Risk: The Fund is subject to the risk that stock prices will fall over short or extended periods of time. Individual companies may report poor results or be negatively affected by industry and/or economic trends and developments, or as a result of irregular and/or unexpected trading activity among retail investors. The prices of securities issued by these companies may decline in response to such developments, which could result in a decline in the value of the Fund’s shares.
Preferred Stock Risk: In the event an issuer is liquidated or declares bankruptcy, the claims of owners of bonds take precedence over the claims of those who own preferred and common stock. If interest rates rise, the fixed dividend on preferred stocks may be less attractive, causing the price of preferred stocks to decline.
Foreign Securities Risk: Investing in foreign securities poses additional risks since political and economic events unique in a country or region will affect those markets and their issuers, while such events may not necessarily affect the U.S. economy or issuers located in the United States. In addition, investments in foreign securities are generally denominated in foreign currency. As a result, changes in the value of those currencies compared to the U.S. dollar may affect (positively or negatively) the value of the Fund’s investments. There are also risks associated with foreign accounting standards, government regulation, market information, and clearance and settlement procedures. Foreign markets may be less liquid and more volatile than U.S. markets and offer less protection to investors.
Depositary Receipts Risk: Foreign receipts, which include American Depositary Receipts, Global Depositary Receipts, and European Depositary Receipts, are securities that evidence ownership interests in a security or a pool of securities issued by a foreign issuer. The risks of depositary receipts include many risks associated with investing directly in foreign securities.
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Management Risk: In managing the Fund’s portfolio, the Adviser engages one or more sub-advisers to make investment decisions for a portion of or the entire portfolio. There is a risk that the Adviser may be unable to identify and retain sub-advisers who achieve superior investment returns relative to other similar sub-advisers.
Economic and Market Events Risk: Events in the U.S. and global financial markets, including actions taken by the U.S. Federal Reserve or foreign central banks to stimulate or stabilize economic growth, may at times, and for varying periods of time, result in unusually high market volatility, which could negatively impact the Fund’s performance and cause the Fund to experience illiquidity, shareholder redemptions, or other potentially adverse effects. Reduced liquidity in credit and fixed-income markets could negatively affect issuers worldwide. Financial institutions could suffer losses as interest rates rise or economic conditions deteriorate. In addition, the Funds' service providers are susceptible to operational and information or cyber security risks that could result in losses to a Fund and its shareholders. Cyber security breaches are either intentional or unintentional events that allow an unauthorized party to gain access to Fund assets, customer data, or proprietary information, or cause a Fund or Fund service provider to suffer data corruption or lose operational functionality. A cyber security breach could result in the loss or theft of customer data or funds, loss or theft of proprietary information or corporate data, physical damage to a computer or network system, or costs associated with system repairs, any of which could have a substantial impact on a Fund. Such incidents could affect issuers in which a Fund invests, thereby causing the Fund’s investments to lose value.
Passive Investment Risk: As the Fund is intended to track the Index, its portfolio managers do not attempt to take defensive positions under any market conditions, including during declining markets. As a result, the Fund’s performance may be adversely affected by a general decline in the market segments relating to its Index.
Quantitative Strategy Risk: TOBAM uses proprietary statistical analyses and models to construct the Index, which the Fund seeks to track. A securities portfolio selected using TOBAM’s proprietary models can perform differently than the market as a whole as a result of the correlation factors used in the analysis to construct the models, the weight placed on each factor, and changes in the factors’ historical trends. As a result, the Fund may be more or less exposed to a risk factor than its individual holdings. Quantitative models are subject to technical issues including programming and data inaccuracies, are based on assumptions, and rely on data that is subject to limitations (e.g., inaccuracies, staleness), any of which could adversely affect their effectiveness or predictive value.
Tracking Error Risk: As with all index funds, the performance of the Fund and its Index may differ from each other for a variety of reasons. For example, the Fund incurs operating expenses and portfolio transaction costs not incurred by the Index.
Portfolio Turnover Risk: Frequent and active trading may result in greater expenses to the Fund, which may lower the Fund’s performance and may result in the realization of substantial capital gains, including net short-term capital gains. As a result, high portfolio turnover may reduce the Fund’s returns.
The Fund’s Performance
The bar chart and performance table below illustrate some indication of the risks and volatility of an investment in the Fund by showing changes in the Fund’s performance from calendar year to calendar year and by showing how the Fund’s average annual total returns for one year and since inception compare with the MSCI EAFE Index. The bar chart does not reflect any sales charges, which would reduce your return. The performance table reflects any applicable sales charges. Past performance (before and after taxes) does not necessarily indicate how the Fund will perform in the future. More recent performance information is available at no cost by visiting TouchstoneInvestments.com or by calling 1.800.543.0407.
Touchstone Anti-Benchmark® International Core Equity Fund — Class Y Shares Total Return as of December 31
11

 
Best Quarter:
2nd Quarter 2020
15.41%
Worst Quarter:
1st Quarter 2020
(16.84)%
After-tax returns are calculated using the highest individual marginal federal income tax rates in effect on a given distribution reinvestment date and do not reflect the impact of state and local taxes. Your actual after- tax returns may differ from those shown and depend on your tax situation. The after-tax returns do not apply to shares held in an individual retirement account (“IRA”), 401(k), or other tax-advantaged account. The after-tax returns shown in the table are for Class Y shares only. The after-tax returns for other classes of shares offered by the Fund will differ from the Class Y shares’ after-tax returns. The Return After Taxes on Distributions and Sale of Fund Shares may be greater than other returns for the same period due to a tax benefit of realizing a capital loss on the sale of Fund shares.
Average Annual Total Returns
For the periods ended December 31, 2022
 
Since
Inception
 
1 Year
11/19/2018
Touchstone Anti-Benchmark® International Core Equity Fund - Class Y
 
 
Return Before Taxes
(17.19)%
(0.91)%
Return After Taxes on Distributions
(17.81)%
(1.99)%
Return After Taxes on Distributions and Sale of Fund Shares
(9.64)%
(0.55)%
Touchstone Anti-Benchmark® International Core Equity Fund - Institutional Class
 
 
Return Before Taxes
(16.84)%
(0.69)%
MSCI EAFE Index (reflects no deduction for fees, expenses or taxes)
(14.45)%
4.31%
The Fund’s Management
Investment Adviser
Touchstone Advisors, Inc. serves as the Fund’s investment adviser.
Sub-Adviser
Portfolio Managers
Investment Experience
with the Fund
Primary Title with
Sub-Adviser
TOBAM S.A.S.
Patrick Chedid
Managing the Fund since
December 2022
Portfolio Manager
 
Ayaaz Allymun
Managing the Fund since its
inception in November 2018
Portfolio Manager
 
Mara Maccagnan
Managing the Fund since its
inception in November 2018
Portfolio Manager
 
Guillaume Toison
Managing the Fund since its
inception in November 2018
Portfolio Manager
Buying and Selling Fund Shares
Minimum Investment Requirements
 
Class Y
 
Initial
Investment
Additional
Investment
Regular Account
$2,500
$50
Retirement Account or Custodial Account under the Uniform Gifts/Transfers to Minors Act
$1,000
$50
Investments through the Automatic Investment Plan
$100
$50
 
Institutional Class
 
Initial
Investment
Additional
Investment
Regular Account
$500,000
$50
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Fund shares may be purchased and sold on days that the New York Stock Exchange is open for trading. Class Y shares are available only through financial intermediaries  who have appropriate selling agreements in place with Touchstone Securities. Institutional Class shares are available through Touchstone Securities or your financial intermediary. Shares may be purchased or sold by writing to Touchstone Securities at P.O. Box 9878, Providence, Rhode Island 02940, calling 1.800.543.0407, or visiting the Touchstone Funds’ website: TouchstoneInvestments.com. You may only sell shares over the telephone or via the Internet if the value of the shares sold is less than or equal to $100,000. Shares held in IRAs and qualified retirement plans cannot be sold via the Internet. If your shares are held by a processing organization or financial intermediary you will need to follow its purchase and redemption procedures. For more information about buying and selling shares, see the “Investing with Touchstone” section of the Fund’s prospectus or call 1.800.543.0407.
Tax Information
The Fund intends to make distributions that may be taxed as ordinary income or capital gains except when shares are held through a tax-advantaged account, such as a 401(k) plan or an IRA. Withdrawals from a tax-advantaged account, however, may be taxable.
Financial Intermediary Compensation
If you purchase shares in the Fund through a broker-dealer or other financial intermediary (such as a bank), the Fund and its related companies may pay the intermediary for the sale of Fund shares and related services. These payments may create a conflict of interest by influencing the broker-dealer or other financial intermediary and your salesperson to recommend the Fund over another investment. Ask your salesperson or visit your financial intermediary’s website for more information.
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Touchstone Ares Credit Opportunities Fund Summary
The Fund’s Investment Goal
The Touchstone Ares Credit Opportunities Fund (formerly, Touchstone Credit Opportunities Fund) (the “Fund”) seeks absolute total return, primarily from income and capital appreciation.
The Fund’s Fees and Expenses
This table describes the fees and expenses that you may pay if you buy, hold and sell shares of the Fund. You may pay other fees, such as brokerage commissions and other fees to financial intermediaries, which are not reflected in the tables and examples below. You may qualify for sales charge discounts for Class A shares of Touchstone equity funds and Touchstone fixed income funds if you and your family invest, or agree to invest in the future, at least $25,000 or $50,000, respectively, in Touchstone funds. More information about these and other discounts is available from your financial professional, in the section titled “Choosing a Class of Shares” in the Fund’s prospectus and Statement of Additional Information (“SAI”) on pages 100 and 101, respectively, and in Appendix A–Intermediary-Specific Sales Charge Waivers and Discounts to the Fund's prospectus.
 
Class A
Class C
Class Y
Institutional
Class
Shareholder Fees (fees paid directly from your investment)
 
 
 
 
Maximum Sales Charge (Load) Imposed on Purchases (as a percentage of
offering price)
3.25%
None
None
None
Maximum Deferred Sales Charge (Load) (as a percentage of original purchase
price or the amount redeemed, whichever is less)
None
1.00%
None
None
Wire Redemption Fee(1)
$15
$15
$15
$15
 
Annual Fund Operating Expenses (expenses that you pay each year as a
percentage of the value of your investment)
 
 
 
 
Management Fees
0.60%
0.60%
0.60%
0.60%
Distribution and/or Shareholder Service (12b-1) Fees
0.25%
1.00%
None
None
Other Expenses
 
 
 
 
Dividend and Interest Expenses on Securities Sold Short
0.04%
0.04%
0.04%
0.04%
Other Operating Expenses
0.37%
0.41%
0.38%
0.51%
Total Other Expenses
0.41%
0.45%
0.42%
0.55%
Acquired Fund Fees and Expenses (AFFE)
0.01%
0.01%
0.01%
0.01%
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses(2)
1.27%
2.06%
1.03%
1.16%
Fee Waiver and/or Expense Reimbursement(3)
(0.19)%
(0.58)%
(0.15)%
(0.38)%
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses After Fee Waiver and/or Expense
Reimbursement(2)(3)
1.08%
1.48%
0.88%
0.78%
(1)
Up to $15.
(2)
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses include Acquired Fund Fees and Expenses and will differ from the ratios of expenses to average net assets that are included in the Fund’s annual report for the fiscal year ended January 27, 2023.
(3)
Touchstone Advisors, Inc. (the “Adviser” or “Touchstone Advisors”) and Touchstone Funds Group Trust (the “Trust”) have entered into a contractual expense limitation agreement whereby Touchstone Advisors will waive a portion of its fees or reimburse certain Fund expenses (excluding dividend and interest expenses relating to short sales; interest; taxes; brokerage commissions and other transaction costs; portfolio transaction and investment related expenses, including expenses associated with the Fund's liquidity providers; other expenditures which are capitalized in accordance with U.S. generally accepted accounting principles; the cost of “Acquired Fund Fees and Expenses”, if any; and other extraordinary expenses not incurred in the ordinary course of business) in order to limit annual Fund operating expenses to 1.03%, 1.43%, 0.83%, and 0.73%  of average daily net assets for Classes A, C, Y and Institutional Class shares, respectively. This contractual expense limitation is effective through January 29, 2024, but can be terminated by a vote of the Board of Trustees of the Trust (the “Board”) if it deems the termination to be beneficial to the Fund’s shareholders. The terms of the contractual expense limitation agreement provide that Touchstone Advisors is entitled to recoup, subject to approval by the Board, such amounts waived or reimbursed for a period of up to three years from the date on which the Adviser reduced its compensation or assumed expenses for the Fund. The Fund will make repayments to the Adviser only if such repayment does not cause the annual Fund operating expenses (after the repayment is taken into account) to exceed both (1) the expense cap in place when such amounts were waived or reimbursed and (2) the Fund’s current expense limitation.
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Example. This example is intended to help you compare the cost of investing in the Fund with the cost of investing in other mutual funds. The example assumes that you invest $10,000 in the Fund for the time periods indicated and then, except as indicated, redeem all of your shares at the end of those periods. The example also assumes that your investment has a 5% return each year, that the Fund’s operating expenses remain the same and that all fee waivers or expense limits for the Fund will expire after one year. Although your actual costs may be higher or lower, based on these assumptions your costs would be:
 
Assuming Redemption at End of Period
Assuming
No Redemption
 
Class A
Class C
Class Y
Institutional
Class
Class C
1 Year
$432
$251
$90
$80
$151
3 Years
$697
$590
$313
$331
$590
5 Years
$982
$1,055
$554
$602
$1,055
10 Years
$1,793
$2,344
$1,246
$1,375
$2,344
Portfolio Turnover. The Fund pays transaction costs, such as brokerage commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or “turns over” its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover rate may indicate higher transaction costs and may result in higher taxes when Fund shares are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are not reflected in total annual Fund operating expenses or in the example, affect the Fund’s performance. During the most recent fiscal year, the Fund’s portfolio turnover rate was 72% of the average value of its portfolio.
The Fund’s Principal Investment Strategies
The Fund invests, under normal circumstances, at least 80% of its assets (including the amount of borrowings for investment purposes) in U.S. and non-U.S. debt instruments.
The Fund seeks to achieve its investment goal by investing in a wide array of debt securities or other debt instruments. The Fund may invest in debt instruments of any credit quality or rating and may invest without limit in loans, bonds and other debt instruments that are rated below investment grade by one or more Nationally Recognized Statistical Ratings Organizations (“NRSRO”) (i.e., rated Ba or lower by Moody’s Investors Service, Inc. (“Moody’s”) or BB or lower by S&P Global Ratings (“S&P”)) or, if unrated, deemed by the Fund’s sub-adviser, Ares Capital Management II, LLC (“Ares”), to be of comparable quality. These investments may include distressed or defaulted debt instruments. Securities rated below investment grade are sometimes referred to as “high yield” or “junk” bonds. The Fund’s investment policies are based on credit ratings at the time of purchase.
In managing the Fund’s portfolio, Ares seeks to take advantage of opportunities presented from time to time in credit markets by systematically allocating and reallocating the Fund’s assets among core investments and opportunistic investments as credit market conditions change.
The Fund’s core investments include the following:
Opportunistic Liquid Credit—The Fund seeks to generate current income with attractive relative value by investing in senior secured and unsecured debt of U.S. and non-U.S. companies.
Structured Credit—The Fund seeks to generate current income and capital appreciation by investing in debt and equity securities of collateralized loan obligations in the U.S. and globally.
Special Situations—The Fund seeks capital appreciation by investing in distressed U.S. and non-U.S. corporate loans and bonds that trade at significant discounts to par value.
Hedges—The Fund engages in short selling, futures contracts, total return and interest rate swaps, pairs trades and options transactions in an attempt to achieve downside protection and reduce portfolio volatility. The Fund’s hedging strategies may include, among other things, entering into synthetic credit index short positions, single security short selling, pairs trades, futures contracts, total return and interest rate swaps, and certain options transactions.
The Fund may also invest in securities that may be offered and sold to only qualified institutional buyers under Rule 144A of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended (the “1933 Act”).
In addition, the Fund may make opportunistic investments from time to time in stressed and distressed securities, including debtor-in-possession loans (sometimes referred to as “DIP” loans), exit financings, rescue financings, and post-bankruptcy equity securities, as well as preferred stock, convertible debt, and other securitized vehicles. DIP loans are a special kind of financing meant for companies that are financially distressed and in bankruptcy. Such loans typically have priority over existing debt, equity and other claims.
15

The corporate loans (commonly referred to as “bank loans”) in which the Fund invests are typically senior in payment priority and secured by a lien on the borrower’s assets. These corporate loans may include second lien loans, mezzanine loans and, to a limited extent, DIP loans. The capacity of a company to borrow and the quality of the credit underlying a corporate loan are typically determined based upon one or more of the projected cash flows of the borrower, the enterprise value of the borrower or the asset value of the collateral supporting any liens.
The corporate debt securities, including high yield bonds, and other similar debt instruments in which the Fund invests are typically unsecured and may be subordinated in payment priority to other debt of the borrower. The terms governing these debt instruments may include features that can result in principal appreciation under certain circumstances. The capacity of a company to issue debt securities or other similar debt instruments and the quality of the credit underlying a company’s debt securities or other similar debt instruments are typically determined based upon the projected cash flows of the borrower, the enterprise value of the borrower or both.
The Fund is non-diversified and therefore may, from time to time, have significant exposure to a limited number of issuers.
The Fund’s Principal Risks
The Fund’s share price will fluctuate. You could lose money on your investment in the Fund and the Fund could also return less than other investments. Investments in the Fund are not bank guaranteed, are not deposits, and are not insured by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation or any other federal government agency. As with any mutual fund, there is no guarantee that the Fund will achieve its investment goal. You can find more information about the Fund’s investments and risks under the “Principal Investment Strategies and Risks” section of the Fund’s prospectus. The Fund is subject to the principal risks summarized below.
Fixed-Income Risk: The market value of the Fund’s fixed-income securities responds to economic developments, particularly interest rate changes, as well as to perceptions about the creditworthiness of individual issuers, including governments. Generally, the Fund’s fixed-income securities will decrease in value if interest rates rise and increase in value if interest rates fall. Normally, the longer the maturity or duration of the fixed-income securities the Fund owns, the more sensitive the value of the Fund’s shares will be to changes in interest rates.
Corporate Loan Risk: The corporate loans, commonly referred to as bank loans, in which the Fund invests may be rated below investment grade. As a result, such corporate loans will be considered speculative with respect to the borrowers’ ability to make payments of interest and principal and will otherwise generally bear risks similar to those associated with non-investment grade securities. There is a high risk that the Fund could suffer a loss from investments in lower rated corporate loans as a result of a default by the borrower. Direct investments in loans may be illiquid and holding a loan could expose the Fund to the risks of being a direct lender.
Credit Risk: The fixed-income securities in the Fund’s portfolio are subject to the possibility that a deterioration, whether sudden or gradual, in the financial condition of an issuer, or a deterioration in general economic conditions, could cause an issuer to fail to make timely payments of principal or interest, when due. This may cause the issuer’s securities to decline in value.
Interest Rate Risk: In general, when interest rates rise, the prices of debt securities fall, and when interest rates fall, the prices of debt securities rise. The price volatility of a debt security also depends on its maturity. Longer-term securities are generally more volatile, so the longer the average maturity or duration of these securities, the greater their price risk. Duration is a measure used to determine the sensitivity of a security’s price to changes in interest rates that incorporates a security’s yield, coupon, final maturity, and call features, among other characteristics. The longer a fixed-income security’s duration, the more sensitive it will be to changes in interest rates. Maturity, on the other hand, is the date on which a fixed-income security becomes due for payment of principal. Recent and potential future changes in government policy may affect interest rates.
Investment-Grade Debt Securities Risk: Investment-grade debt securities may be downgraded by a NRSRO to below-investment-grade status, which would increase the risk of holding these securities. Investment-grade debt securities rated in the lowest rating category by a NRSRO involve a higher degree of risk than fixed-income securities with higher credit ratings.
Non-Investment-Grade Debt Securities Risk: Non-investment-grade debt securities are sometimes referred to as “junk bonds” and are considered speculative with respect to their issuers’ ability to make payments of interest and principal. There is a high risk that the Fund could suffer a loss from investments in non-investment-grade debt securities caused by the default of an issuer of such securities. Non-investment-grade debt securities may also be less liquid than investment- grade debt securities.
Distressed Securities Risk: Distressed securities are speculative and involve significant risks in addition to the risks generally applicable to non-investment grade debt securities. Distressed securities bear a substantial risk of default, and may be in default at the time of investment. The Fund will generally not receive interest payments on distressed securities, and there is a significant risk that principal will not be repaid, in full or at all. Distressed securities will likely be illiquid and may be subject to restrictions on resale.
Management Risk: In managing the Fund’s portfolio, the Adviser engages one or more sub-advisers to make investment decisions for a portion of or the entire portfolio. There is a risk that the Adviser may be unable to identify and retain sub-advisers who achieve superior investment returns relative to other similar sub-advisers.
16

Collateralized Loan Obligations Risk: Typically, collateralized loan obligations are privately offered and sold, and thus are not registered under the securities laws. As a result, the Fund may in certain circumstances characterize its investments in collateralized loan obligations as illiquid. Collateralized loan obligations are subject to the typical risks associated with debt instruments (i.e., interest rate risk and credit risk). Additional risks of collateralized loan obligations include the possibility that distributions from collateral securities will be insufficient to make interest or other payments, the potential for a decline in the quality of the collateral, and the possibility that the Fund may invest in a subordinate tranche of a collateralized loan obligation.
Derivatives Risk: The use of derivatives may expose the Fund to additional risks that it would not be subject to if it invested directly in the securities underlying those derivatives. Risks associated with derivatives may include the risk that the derivative does not correlate well with the security, index, or currency to which it relates, the risk that the Fund will be unable to sell or close out the derivative due to an illiquid market, the risk that the counterparty may be unwilling or unable to meet its obligations, and the risk that the derivative could expose the Fund to the risk of magnified losses resulting from leverage. These additional risks could cause the Fund to experience losses to which it would otherwise not be subject.
Leverage Risk: Leverage occurs when the Fund uses borrowings, derivatives (such as futures or options), or similar instruments or techniques to gain exposure to investments in an amount that exceeds the Fund’s initial investment. The use of leverage magnifies changes in the Fund’s net asset value and thus may result in increased portfolio volatility and increased risk of loss. Leverage can create an interest expense that may lower the Fund’s overall returns. There can be no guarantee that a leveraging strategy will be successful.
Futures Contracts Risk: The risks associated with the Fund’s futures positions include liquidity and counterparty risks associated with derivative instruments.
Options Risk: Options trading is a highly specialized activity that involves investment techniques and risks different from those associated with ordinary portfolio securities transactions. The value of options can be highly volatile, and their use can result in loss if the sub-adviser is incorrect in its expectation of price fluctuations. Options, whether exchange traded or over-the-counter, may also be illiquid.
Swap Agreements Risk: Swap agreements (“swaps”), including total return swaps, are individually negotiated and structured to include exposure to a variety of different types of investments or market factors. Swaps may increase or decrease the overall volatility of the investments of the Fund and its share price. The performance of swaps may be affected by a change in the specific interest rate, currency, or other factors that determine the amounts of payments due to and from the Fund. A swap can be a form of leverage, which can magnify the Fund’s gains or losses. Total return swaps may be used to obtain exposure to a security or market without owning or taking physical custody of such security or investing directly in such market. Upon entering into a total return swap, the Fund is required to deposit initial margin but the parties do not exchange the notional amount. As a result, total return swaps may effectively add leverage to the Fund’s portfolio because the Fund would be subject to investment exposure on the notional amount of the swap.
Convertible Securities Risk: Convertible securities are subject to the risks of both debt securities and equity securities. The values of convertible securities tend to decline as interest rates rise and, due to the conversion feature, tend to vary with fluctuations in the market value of the underlying security.
Counterparty Risk: The issuer or guarantor of a fixed-income security, a counterparty (the other party to a transaction or an agreement) to a transaction with the Fund, or a borrower of the Fund’s securities may be unable or unwilling to make timely principal, interest or settlement payments, or otherwise honor its obligations.
Economic and Market Events Risk: Events in the U.S. and global financial markets, including actions taken by the U.S. Federal Reserve or foreign central banks to stimulate or stabilize economic growth, may at times, and for varying periods of time, result in unusually high market volatility, which could negatively impact the Fund’s performance and cause the Fund to experience illiquidity, shareholder redemptions, or other potentially adverse effects. Reduced liquidity in credit and fixed-income markets could negatively affect issuers worldwide. Financial institutions could suffer losses as interest rates rise or economic conditions deteriorate. In addition, the Funds' service providers are susceptible to operational and information or cyber security risks that could result in losses to a Fund and its shareholders. Cyber security breaches are either intentional or unintentional events that allow an unauthorized party to gain access to Fund assets, customer data, or proprietary information, or cause a Fund or Fund service provider to suffer data corruption or lose operational functionality. A cyber security breach could result in the loss or theft of customer data or funds, loss or theft of proprietary information or corporate data, physical damage to a computer or network system, or costs associated with system repairs, any of which could have a substantial impact on a Fund. Such incidents could affect issuers in which a Fund invests, thereby causing the Fund’s investments to lose value.
Equity Securities Risk: The Fund is subject to the risk that stock prices will fall over short or extended periods of time. Individual companies may report poor results or be negatively affected by industry and/or economic trends and developments, or as a result of irregular and/or unexpected trading activity among retail investors. The prices of securities issued by these companies may decline in response to such developments, which could result in a decline in the value of the Fund’s shares.
Preferred Stock Risk: In the event an issuer is liquidated or declares bankruptcy, the claims of owners of bonds take precedence over the claims of those who own preferred and common stock. If interest rates rise, the fixed dividend on preferred stocks may be less attractive, causing the price of preferred stocks to decline.
17

Foreign Securities Risk: Investing in foreign securities poses additional risks since political and economic events unique in a country or region will affect those markets and their issuers, while such events may not necessarily affect the U.S. economy or issuers located in the United States. In addition, investments in foreign securities are generally denominated in foreign currency. As a result, changes in the value of those currencies compared to the U.S. dollar may affect (positively or negatively) the value of the Fund’s investments. There are also risks associated with foreign accounting standards, government regulation, market information, and clearance and settlement procedures. Foreign markets may be less liquid and more volatile than U.S. markets and offer less protection to investors.
Liquidity Risk: Liquidity risk exists when particular investments are difficult to purchase or sell. This can reduce the Fund’s returns because the Fund may be unable to transact at advantageous times or prices, or at all.
Non-Diversification Risk: The Fund is non-diversified, which means that it may invest a greater percentage of its assets than a diversified mutual fund in the securities of a limited number of issuers. The use of a non- diversified investment strategy may increase the volatility of the Fund’s investment performance, as the Fund may be more susceptible to risks associated with a single economic, political or regulatory event.
Pay-In-Kind Bonds Risk: Pay-in-kind bonds, a type of mezzanine financing, are securities that, at the issuer’s option, pay interest in either cash or additional securities for a specified period. Pay-in-kind bonds, like zero coupon bonds, are designed to give an issuer flexibility in managing cash flow. Pay-in-kind bonds are expected to reflect the market value of the underlying debt plus an amount representing accrued interest since the last payment. Pay-in-kind bonds are usually less volatile than zero coupon bonds, but more volatile than cash pay securities.
Rule 144A Securities Risk: Rule 144A securities are restricted securities that may be purchased only by qualified institutional buyers in reliance on an exemption from federal registration requirements. Investing in Rule 144A securities may reduce the liquidity of the Fund’s portfolio if an adequate institutional trading market for these securities does not exist. Prices of Rule 144A securities often reflect a discount, which may be significant, from the market price of comparable exchange-listed securities for which a liquid trading market exists.
Short Sales Risk: In a short sale, the Fund sells a security or other financial instrument, such as a futures contract, that it does not own. To complete the transaction, the Fund must borrow the security to make delivery to the buyer. The Fund is then obligated to replace the borrowed security by purchasing the security at the market price at the time of replacement. If the price of the security sold short rises between the time the Fund sells the security short and the time the Fund replaces the security sold short, the Fund will realize a loss on the transaction.
The Fund’s Performance
On September 6, 2019, the Touchstone Credit Opportunities Fund, previously a series of Touchstone Strategic Trust (the “Predecessor Fund”), was reorganized into the Fund. As a result of the reorganization, the performance and accounting history of the Predecessor Fund was assumed by the Fund. Financial and performance information prior to September 6, 2019 is that of the Predecessor Fund.
The bar chart and performance table below illustrate some indication of the risks and volatility of an investment in the Fund by showing changes in the Fund’s performance from calendar year to calendar year and by showing how the Fund’s average annual total returns for one year, five years, and since inception compare with the ICE BofA 3-Month U.S. Treasury Bill Index. The bar chart does not reflect any sales charges, which would reduce your return. The performance table reflects any applicable sales charges. Past performance (before and after taxes) does not necessarily indicate how the Fund will perform in the future. More recent performance information is available at no cost by visiting TouchstoneInvestments.com or by calling 1.800.543.0407.
Touchstone Ares Credit Opportunities Fund — Class A Shares Total Return as of December 31
18

 
Best Quarter:
2nd Quarter 2020
10.90%
Worst Quarter:
1st Quarter 2020
(16.21)%
After-tax returns are calculated using the highest individual marginal federal income tax rates in effect on a given distribution reinvestment date and do not reflect the impact of state and local taxes. Your actual after- tax returns may differ from those shown and depend on your tax situation. The after-tax returns do not apply to shares held in an individual retirement account (“IRA”), 401(k), or other tax-advantaged account. The after-tax returns shown in the table are for Class A shares only. The after-tax returns for other classes of shares offered by the Fund will differ from the Class A shares’ after-tax returns. The Return After Taxes on Distributions and Sale of Fund Shares may be greater than other returns for the same period due to a tax benefit of realizing a capital loss on the sale of Fund shares.
Average Annual Total Returns
For the periods ended December 31, 2022
 
 
Since
Inception
 
1 Year
5 Years
8/31/2015
Touchstone Ares Credit Opportunities Fund - Class A
 
 
 
Return Before Taxes
(11.64)%
1.77%
3.25%
Return After Taxes on Distributions
(13.67)%
(0.75)%
0.80%
Return After Taxes on Distributions and Sale of Fund Shares
(6.87)%
0.31%
1.47%
Touchstone Ares Credit Opportunities Fund - Class C
 
 
 
Return Before Taxes
(9.87)%
2.33%
3.43%
Touchstone Ares Credit Opportunities Fund - Class Y
 
 
 
Return Before Taxes
(8.55)%
3.22%
4.32%
Touchstone Ares Credit Opportunities Fund - Institutional Class
 
 
 
Return Before Taxes
(8.39)%
3.31%
4.43%
ICE BofA 3-Month U.S. Treasury Bill Index (reflects no deductions for fees, expenses or taxes)
1.46%
1.26%
1.03%
The Fund’s Management
Investment Adviser
Touchstone Advisors, Inc. serves as the Fund’s investment adviser.
Sub-Adviser
Portfolio Managers
Investment Experience
with the Fund and the
Predecessor Fund
Primary Title with
Sub-Adviser
Ares Capital Management II
LLC
Seth Brufsky
Managing the Fund since May
2019; managed the
Predecessor Fund since its
inception in August 2015
Partner, Portfolio Manager and
Chairman of Global Liquid
Credit
 
Chris Mathewson
Managing the Fund since
September 2019
Partner and Portfolio Manager
 
Kapil Singh
Managing the Fund since May
2019; managed the
Predecessor Fund since
September 2018
Partner and Portfolio Manager
19

Buying and Selling Fund Shares
Minimum Investment Requirements
 
Classes A, C, and Y
 
Initial
Investment
Additional
Investment
Regular Account
$2,500
$50
Retirement Account or Custodial Account under the Uniform Gifts/Transfers to Minors Act
$1,000
$50
Investments through the Automatic Investment Plan
$100
$50
 
Institutional Class
 
Initial
Investment
Additional
Investment
Regular Account
$500,000
$50
Fund shares may be purchased and sold on days that the New York Stock Exchange is open for trading. Existing Class A, C and Institutional Class shareholders may purchase shares directly through Touchstone Funds via the transfer agent, BNY Mellon, or through their financial intermediary. Class Y shares are available only through financial intermediaries  who have appropriate selling agreements in place with Touchstone Securities. Shares may be purchased or sold by writing to Touchstone Securities at P.O. Box 9878, Providence, Rhode Island 02940, calling 1.800.543.0407, or visiting the Touchstone Funds’ website: TouchstoneInvestments.com. You may only sell shares over the telephone or via the Internet if the value of the shares sold is less than or equal to $100,000. Shares held in IRAs and qualified retirement plans cannot be sold via the Internet. If your shares are held by a processing organization or financial intermediary you will need to follow its purchase and redemption procedures. For more information about buying and selling shares, see the “Investing with Touchstone” section of the Fund’s prospectus or call 1.800.543.0407.
Tax Information
The Fund intends to make distributions that may be taxed as ordinary income or capital gains except when shares are held through a tax-advantaged account, such as a 401(k) plan or an IRA. Withdrawals from a tax-advantaged account, however, may be taxable.
Financial Intermediary Compensation
If you purchase shares in the Fund through a broker-dealer or other financial intermediary (such as a bank), the Fund and its related companies may pay the intermediary for the sale of Fund shares and related services. These payments may create a conflict of interest by influencing the broker-dealer or other financial intermediary and your salesperson to recommend the Fund over another investment. Ask your salesperson or visit your financial intermediary’s website for more information.
20

Touchstone Dividend Equity Fund Summary
The Fund’s Investment Goal
The Touchstone Dividend Equity Fund (the “Fund”) seeks current income and capital appreciation.
The Fund’s Fees and Expenses
This table describes the fees and expenses that you may pay if you buy, hold and sell shares of the Fund. You may pay other fees, such as brokerage commissions and other fees to financial intermediaries, which are not reflected in the tables and examples below. You may qualify for sales charge discounts for Class A shares of Touchstone equity funds and Touchstone fixed income funds if you and your family invest, or agree to invest in the future, at least $25,000 or $50,000, respectively, in Touchstone funds. More information about these and other discounts is available from your financial professional, in the section titled “Choosing a Class of Shares” in the Fund’s prospectus and Statement of Additional Information (“SAI”) on pages 100 and 101, respectively, and in Appendix A–Intermediary-Specific Sales Charge Waivers and Discounts to the Fund's prospectus. An investor transacting in Class R6 shares, which do not have any front-end sales charge, contingent deferred sales charge, or other asset-based fee for sales or distribution, may be required to pay a commission to a broker for effecting such transactions on an agency basis. Such commissions are not reflected in the table or in the “Example” below.
 
Class A
Class C
Class Y
Institutional
Class
Class R6
Shareholder Fees (fees paid directly from your investment)
 
 
 
 
 
Maximum Sales Charge (Load) Imposed on Purchases (as a
percentage of offering price)
5.00%
None
None
None
None
Maximum Deferred Sales Charge (Load) (as a percentage of
original purchase price or the amount redeemed, whichever is
less)
None
1.00%
None
None
None
Wire Redemption Fee(1)
$15
$15
$15
$15
$15
 
Annual Fund Operating Expenses (expenses that you pay
each year as a percentage of the value of your investment)
 
 
 
 
 
Management Fees
0.51%
0.51%
0.51%
0.51%
0.51%
Distribution and/or Shareholder Service (12b-1) Fees
0.25%
1.00%
None
None
None
Other Expenses
0.24%
0.25%
0.23%
1.29%
1.25%
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses
1.00%
1.76%
0.74%
1.80%
1.76%
Fee Waiver and/or Expense Reimbursement(2)
(0.01)%
(0.07)%
0.00%
(1.13)%
(1.11)%
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses After Fee Waiver and/or
Expense Reimbursement(2)
0.99%
1.69%
0.74%
0.67%
0.65%
(1)
Up to $15.
(2)
Touchstone Advisors, Inc. (the “Adviser” or “Touchstone Advisors”) and Touchstone Funds Group Trust (the “Trust”) have entered into a contractual expense limitation agreement whereby Touchstone Advisors will waive a portion of its fees or reimburse certain Fund expenses (excluding dividend and interest expenses relating to short sales; interest; taxes; brokerage commissions and other transaction costs; portfolio transaction and investment related expenses, including expenses associated with the Fund's liquidity providers; other expenditures which are capitalized in accordance with U.S. generally accepted accounting principles; the cost of “Acquired Fund Fees and Expenses”, if any; and other extraordinary expenses not incurred in the ordinary course of business) in order to limit annual Fund operating expenses to 0.99%, 1.69%, 0.77%, 0.67% and 0.65%  of average daily net assets for Classes A, C, Y, Institutional Class and Class R6 shares, respectively. This contractual expense limitation is effective through January 29, 2024, but can be terminated by a vote of the Board of Trustees of the Trust (the “Board”) if it deems the termination to be beneficial to the Fund’s shareholders. The terms of the contractual expense limitation agreement provide that Touchstone Advisors is entitled to recoup, subject to approval by the Board, such amounts waived or reimbursed for a period of up to three years from the date on which the Adviser reduced its compensation or assumed expenses for the Fund. The Fund will make repayments to the Adviser only if such repayment does not cause the annual Fund operating expenses (after the repayment is taken into account) to exceed both (1) the expense cap in place when such amounts were waived or reimbursed and (2) the Fund’s current expense limitation.
21

Example. This example is intended to help you compare the cost of investing in the Fund with the cost of investing in other mutual funds. The example assumes that you invest $10,000 in the Fund for the time periods indicated and then, except as indicated, redeem all of your shares at the end of those periods. The example also assumes that your investment has a 5% return each year, that the Fund’s operating expenses remain the same and that all fee waivers or expense limits for the Fund will expire after one year. Although your actual costs may be higher or lower, based on these assumptions your costs would be:
 
Assuming Redemption at End of Period
Assuming
No Redemption
 
Class A
Class C
Class Y
Institutional
Class
Class R6
Class C
1 Year
$596
$272
$76
$68
$66
$172
3 Years
$802
$547
$237
$456
$446
$547
5 Years
$1,024
$948
$411
$869
$850
$948
10 Years
$1,663
$2,067
$918
$2,023
$1,981
$2,067
Portfolio Turnover. The Fund pays transaction costs, such as brokerage commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or “turns over” its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover rate may indicate higher transaction costs and may result in higher taxes when Fund shares are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are not reflected in total annual Fund operating expenses or in the example, affect the Fund’s performance. During the most recent fiscal year, the Fund’s portfolio turnover rate was 12% of the average value of its portfolio.
The Fund’s Principal Investment Strategies
The Fund invests, under normal market conditions, at least 80% of its assets in equity securities of U.S. large-cap companies that have historically paid dividends. The Fund’s 80% policy is a non-fundamental investment policy that can be changed by the Fund upon 60 days’ prior notice to shareholders. For the purpose of the Fund’s 80% policy, a large capitalization company has a market capitalization within the range represented in the S&P 500 Index (between approximately $3.6 billion and $2.1 trillion as of December 31, 2022) at the time of purchase. These securities may be listed on an exchange or traded over-the-counter.
In selecting securities for the Fund, the Fund’s sub-adviser, Fort Washington Investment Advisors, Inc. (the “Sub-Adviser”), seeks to invest in companies that:
Have historically paid consistent, growing dividends
Have sustainable competitive advantages that should result in excess profits to support future dividend payments
Trade at reasonable valuations compared to their intrinsic value
The Sub-Adviser believes the unique approach results in a portfolio of high quality companies with sustainable competitive advantages that should pay reliable, growing dividends at reasonable valuations. The Sub-Adviser evaluates a company’s competitive advantage by assessing its barriers to entry. The barrier(s) to entry can be created through a cost advantage, economies of scale, high customer loyalty, or a government barrier (e.g., license or subsidy). The Sub-Adviser believes that the strongest barrier to entry is the combination of economies of scale and high customer loyalty.
The Fund will generally hold 65 to 90 companies, with residual cash and equivalents expected to represent less than 10% of the Fund’s net assets. The Fund may, at times, hold fewer securities and a higher percentage of cash and equivalents when, among other reasons, the Sub-Adviser cannot find a sufficient number of securities that meets its purchase requirements.
The Fund will generally sell a security if the security does not meet portfolio guidelines, if the security stops paying a dividend and future prospects of paying a dividend are limited, or if better opportunities exist based on the fundamentals and valuation of the business.
The Fund’s Principal Risks
The Fund’s share price will fluctuate. You could lose money on your investment in the Fund and the Fund could also return less than other investments. Investments in the Fund are not bank guaranteed, are not deposits, and are not insured by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation or any other federal government agency. As with any mutual fund, there is no guarantee that the Fund will achieve its investment goal. You can find more information about the Fund’s investments and risks under the “Principal Investment Strategies and Risks” section of the Fund’s prospectus. The Fund is subject to the principal risks summarized below.
22

Equity Securities Risk: The Fund is subject to the risk that stock prices will fall over short or extended periods of time. Individual companies may report poor results or be negatively affected by industry and/or economic trends and developments, or as a result of irregular and/or unexpected trading activity among retail investors. The prices of securities issued by these companies may decline in response to such developments, which could result in a decline in the value of the Fund’s shares.
Large-Cap Risk: Large-cap companies may be unable to respond quickly to new competitive challenges, such as changes in technology and consumer tastes, and also may not be able to attain the high growth rate of successful smaller companies, especially during extended periods of economic expansion.
Dividend Risk: There is no guarantee that the companies in which the Fund invests will declare dividends in the future or that dividends, if declared, will remain at current levels or increase over time. Securities that pay dividends may be sensitive to changes in interest rates, and as interest rates rise or fall, the prices of such securities may fall.
Management Risk: In managing the Fund’s portfolio, the Adviser engages one or more sub-advisers to make investment decisions for a portion of or the entire portfolio. There is a risk that the Adviser may be unable to identify and retain sub-advisers who achieve superior investment returns relative to other similar sub-advisers.
Economic and Market Events Risk: Events in the U.S. and global financial markets, including actions taken by the U.S. Federal Reserve or foreign central banks to stimulate or stabilize economic growth, may at times, and for varying periods of time, result in unusually high market volatility, which could negatively impact the Fund’s performance and cause the Fund to experience illiquidity, shareholder redemptions, or other potentially adverse effects. Reduced liquidity in credit and fixed-income markets could negatively affect issuers worldwide. Financial institutions could suffer losses as interest rates rise or economic conditions deteriorate. In addition, the Funds' service providers are susceptible to operational and information or cyber security risks that could result in losses to a Fund and its shareholders. Cyber security breaches are either intentional or unintentional events that allow an unauthorized party to gain access to Fund assets, customer data, or proprietary information, or cause a Fund or Fund service provider to suffer data corruption or lose operational functionality. A cyber security breach could result in the loss or theft of customer data or funds, loss or theft of proprietary information or corporate data, physical damage to a computer or network system, or costs associated with system repairs, any of which could have a substantial impact on a Fund. Such incidents could affect issuers in which a Fund invests, thereby causing the Fund’s investments to lose value.
Value Investing Risk: Value investing presents the risk that the Fund’s security holdings may never reach their full intrinsic value because the market fails to recognize what the portfolio managers consider the true business value or because the portfolio managers have misjudged those values.
The Fund’s Performance
The Fund commenced operations following the completion of the reorganization of each of the AIG Focused Dividend Strategy Fund and AIG Select Dividend Growth Fund, each a series of SunAmerica Series, Inc., into the Fund, which occurred on July 16, 2021 (the “Reorganization”). As a result of the Reorganization, the performance and accounting history of the AIG Focused Dividend Strategy Fund (the “Predecessor Fund”), as well as its assets and liabilities, were assumed by the Fund. Performance information included herein, including information on fees and expenses, prior to July 16, 2021 is that of the Predecessor Fund, which was managed by a different adviser using different investment strategies. The Fund’s performance shown below would have differed if Fort Washington Investment Advisors, Inc. (the Fund’s Sub-Adviser) had managed the Fund pursuant to its current strategies prior to July 16, 2021. The Predecessor Fund did not offer Institutional Class shares or Class R6 shares.
The bar chart and performance table below illustrate some indication of the risks and volatility of an investment in the Fund by showing changes in the Fund’s performance from calendar year to calendar year and by showing how the Fund’s average annual total returns for one year, five years, and ten years compare with the Russell 1000® Value Index. The bar chart does not reflect any sales charges, which would reduce your return. The performance table reflects any applicable sales charges. Past performance (before and after taxes) does not necessarily indicate how the Fund will perform in the future. More recent performance information is available at no cost by visiting TouchstoneInvestments.com or by calling 1.800.543.0407.
23

Touchstone Dividend Equity Fund — Class A Shares Total Return as of December 31
 
Best Quarter:
1st Quarter 2013
14.99%
Worst Quarter:
1st Quarter 2020
(27.03)%
After-tax returns are calculated using the highest individual marginal federal income tax rates in effect on a given distribution reinvestment date and do not reflect the impact of state and local taxes. Your actual after- tax returns may differ from those shown and depend on your tax situation. The after-tax returns do not apply to shares held in an individual retirement account (“IRA”), 401(k), or other tax-advantaged account. The after-tax returns shown in the table are for Class A shares only. The after-tax returns for other classes of shares offered by the Fund will differ from the Class A shares’ after-tax returns. The Return After Taxes on Distributions and Sale of Fund Shares may be greater than other returns for the same period due to a tax benefit of realizing a capital loss on the sale of Fund shares.
Average Annual Total Returns
For the periods ended December 31,2022
1 Year
5 Years
10 Years
Since
Inception
Inception
Date
Touchstone Dividend Equity Fund - Class A
 
 
 
 
 
Return Before Taxes
(10.44)%
1.18%
8.32%
N/A(3)
6/8/1998
Return After Taxes on Distributions
(11.73)%
(0.19)%
6.61%
N/A(3)
 
Return After Taxes on Distributions and Sale of Fund Shares
(5.62)%
0.70%
6.40%
N/A(3)
 
Touchstone Dividend Equity Fund - Class C
 
 
 
 
 
Return Before Taxes
(7.28)%
1.72%
8.25%
N/A(3)
6/8/1998
Touchstone Dividend Equity Fund - Class Y
 
 
 
 
 
Return Before Taxes(1)
(5.52)%
2.60%
N/A
7.37%
5/15/2013
Touchstone Dividend Equity Fund - Institutional Class
 
 
 
 
 
Return Before Taxes
(5.50)%
N/A
N/A
2.06%
7/19/2021
Touchstone Dividend Equity Fund - Class R6
 
 
 
 
 
Return Before Taxes(2)
(5.38)%
N/A
N/A
0.85%
8/2/2021
Russell 1000® Value Index (reflects no deduction for fees, expenses or
taxes)
(7.54)%
6.67%
10.29%
6.86%
 
(1)
Class Y shares of the Fund assumed the performance history of Class W shares of the Predecessor Fund. The inception date of Class W shares of the Predecessor Fund was May 15, 2013.
(2)
An investor transacting in Class R6 shares may be required to pay a commission to a broker for effecting such transactions on an agency basis. Such commissions will not be reflected in the table.
(3)
Since Inception returns are not shown for classes with greater then ten years of performance history.
24

The Fund’s Management
Investment Adviser
Touchstone Advisors, Inc. serves as the Fund’s investment adviser.
Sub-Adviser
Portfolio Manager(s)
Investment Experience
with the Fund
Primary Title with
Sub-Adviser
Fort Washington Investment
Advisors, Inc.
Austin R. Kummer, CFA
Since July 2021
Vice President, Senior Portfolio
Manager
 
Brendan M. White, CFA
Since July 2021
Senior Vice President, Co-Chief
Investment Officer and
Portfolio Manager
 
James E. Wilhelm, Jr.
Since July 2021
Managing Director, Senior
Portfolio Manager
Buying and Selling Fund Shares
Minimum Investment Requirements
 
Classes A, C, and Y
 
Initial
Investment
Additional
Investment
Regular Account
$2,500
$50
Retirement Account or Custodial Account under the Uniform Gifts/Transfers to Minors Act
$1,000
$50
Investments through the Automatic Investment Plan
$100
$50
 
Institutional Class
 
Initial
Investment
Additional
Investment
Regular Account
$500,000
$50
 
Class R6
 
Initial
Investment
Additional
Investment
Regular Account
$50,000
$50
Class R6 shares held on the Fund’s records require a $50,000 minimum initial investment and have a $50 subsequent investment minimum. Financial intermediaries may set different minimum initial and additional investment requirements, may impose other restrictions or may charge you fees for their services.
Fund shares may be purchased and sold on days that the New York Stock Exchange is open for trading. Existing Class A, C and Institutional Class shareholders may purchase shares directly through Touchstone Funds via the transfer agent, BNY Mellon, or through their financial intermediary. Class Y shares are available only through financial intermediaries  who have appropriate selling agreements in place with Touchstone Securities. Shares may be purchased or sold by writing to Touchstone Securities at P.O. Box 9878, Providence, Rhode Island 02940, calling 1.800.543.0407, or visiting the Touchstone Funds’ website: TouchstoneInvestments.com. You may only sell shares over the telephone or via the Internet if the value of the shares sold is less than or equal to $100,000. Shares held in IRAs and qualified retirement plans cannot be sold via the Internet. If your shares are held by a processing organization or financial intermediary you will need to follow its purchase and redemption procedures. For more information about buying and selling shares, see the “Investing with Touchstone” section of the Fund’s prospectus or call 1.800.543.0407.
Tax Information
The Fund intends to make distributions that may be taxed as ordinary income or capital gains except when shares are held through a tax-advantaged account, such as a 401(k) plan or an IRA. Withdrawals from a tax-advantaged account, however, may be taxable.
25

Financial Intermediary Compensation
If you purchase shares in the Fund through a broker-dealer or other financial intermediary (such as a bank), the Fund and its related companies may pay the intermediary for the sale of Fund shares and related services. These payments may create a conflict of interest by influencing the broker-dealer or other financial intermediary and your salesperson to recommend the Fund over another investment. Ask your salesperson or visit your financial intermediary’s website for more information.
26

Touchstone High Yield Fund Summary
The Fund’s Investment Goal
The Touchstone High Yield Fund (the “Fund”) seeks to achieve a high level of income as its main goal. Capital appreciation is a secondary consideration.
The Fund’s Fees and Expenses
This table describes the fees and expenses that you may pay if you buy, hold and sell shares of the Fund. You may pay other fees, such as brokerage commissions and other fees to financial intermediaries, which are not reflected in the tables and examples below. You may qualify for sales charge discounts for Class A shares of Touchstone equity funds and Touchstone fixed income funds if you and your family invest, or agree to invest in the future, at least $25,000 or $50,000, respectively, in Touchstone funds. More information about these and other discounts is available from your financial professional, in the section titled “Choosing a Class of Shares” in the Fund’s prospectus and Statement of Additional Information (“SAI”) on pages 100 and 101, respectively, and in Appendix A–Intermediary-Specific Sales Charge Waivers and Discounts to the Fund's prospectus.
 
Class A
Class C
Class Y
Institutional
Class
Shareholder Fees (fees paid directly from your investment)
 
 
 
 
Maximum Sales Charge (Load) Imposed on Purchases (as a percentage of
offering price)
3.25%
None
None
None
Maximum Deferred Sales Charge (Load) (as a percentage of original purchase
price or the amount redeemed, whichever is less)
None
1.00%
None
None
Wire Redemption Fee(1)
$15
$15
$15
$15
 
Annual Fund Operating Expenses (expenses that you pay each year as a
percentage of the value of your investment)
 
 
 
 
Management Fees
0.54%
0.54%
0.54%
0.54%
Distribution and/or Shareholder Service (12b-1) Fees
0.25%
1.00%
None
None
Other Expenses
0.47%
1.28%
0.42%
0.28%
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses
1.26%
2.82%
0.96%
0.82%
Fee Waiver and/or Expense Reimbursement(2)
(0.21)%
(1.02)%
(0.16)%
(0.10)%
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses After Fee Waiver and/or Expense
Reimbursement(2)
1.05%
1.80%
0.80%
0.72%
(1)
Up to $15.
(2)
Touchstone Advisors, Inc. (the “Adviser” or “Touchstone Advisors”) and Touchstone Funds Group Trust (the “Trust”) have entered into a contractual expense limitation agreement whereby Touchstone Advisors will waive a portion of its fees or reimburse certain Fund expenses (excluding dividend and interest expenses relating to short sales; interest; taxes; brokerage commissions and other transaction costs; portfolio transaction and investment related expenses, including expenses associated with the Fund's liquidity providers; other expenditures which are capitalized in accordance with U.S. generally accepted accounting principles; the cost of “Acquired Fund Fees and Expenses”, if any; and other extraordinary expenses not incurred in the ordinary course of business) in order to limit annual Fund operating expenses to 1.05%, 1.80%, 0.80%, and 0.72%  of average daily net assets for Classes A, C, Y and Institutional Class shares, respectively. This contractual expense limitation is effective through January 29, 2024, but can be terminated by a vote of the Board of Trustees of the Trust (the “Board”) if it deems the termination to be beneficial to the Fund’s shareholders. The terms of the contractual expense limitation agreement provide that Touchstone Advisors is entitled to recoup, subject to approval by the Board, such amounts waived or reimbursed for a period of up to three years from the date on which the Adviser reduced its compensation or assumed expenses for the Fund. The Fund will make repayments to the Adviser only if such repayment does not cause the annual Fund operating expenses (after the repayment is taken into account) to exceed both (1) the expense cap in place when such amounts were waived or reimbursed and (2) the Fund’s current expense limitation.
27

Example. This example is intended to help you compare the cost of investing in the Fund with the cost of investing in other mutual funds. The example assumes that you invest $10,000 in the Fund for the time periods indicated and then, except as indicated, redeem all of your shares at the end of those periods. The example also assumes that your investment has a 5% return each year, that the Fund’s operating expenses remain the same and that all fee waivers or expense limits for the Fund will expire after one year. Although your actual costs may be higher or lower, based on these assumptions your costs would be:
 
Assuming Redemption at End of Period
Assuming
No Redemption
 
Class A
Class C
Class Y
Institutional
Class
Class C
1 Year
$429
$283
$82
$74
$183
3 Years
$692
$778
$290
$252
$778
5 Years
$975
$1,399
$515
$445
$1,399
10 Years
$1,780
$3,074
$1,163
$1,004
$3,074
Portfolio Turnover. The Fund pays transaction costs, such as brokerage commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or “turns over” its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover rate may indicate higher transaction costs and may result in higher taxes when Fund shares are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are not reflected in total annual Fund operating expenses or in the example, affect the Fund’s performance. During the most recent fiscal year, the Fund’s portfolio turnover rate was 57% of the average value of its portfolio.
The Fund’s Principal Investment Strategies
The Fund normally invests at least 80% of its net assets (including borrowings for investment purposes) in non-investment-grade debt securities. This is a non-fundamental policy that can be changed by the Fund upon 60 days’ prior notice to shareholders. The Fund generally invests in non-investment-grade debt securities of domestic corporations, including Rule 144A securities, but may also invest in foreign-issued debt securities, including up to 5% of its total assets in securities of foreign companies that are denominated in a currency other than the U.S. dollar. Non-investment-grade debt securities are higher risk, lower quality securities, often referred to as “junk bonds,” and are considered speculative. They are rated below BBB- by S&P Global Ratings and Fitch Ratings, Inc. or below Baa3 by Moody’s Investors Services, Inc. The Fund’s investment policies are based on credit ratings at the time of purchase.
In selecting securities for the Fund, the sub-adviser, Fort Washington Investment Advisors, Inc. (“Fort Washington”), analyzes the overall investment opportunities and risks in different industry sectors focusing on those industries that exhibit stability and predictability. Having developed certain industry biases resulting from the current macroeconomic environment, Fort Washington implements a process of elimination through which certain types of securities are removed from the list of initially selected securities due to their structure. The next step is to apply a rigorous credit selection process in order to identify securities that offer attractive investment opportunities. Once a security has been purchased, the credit analysis process is re-applied to each individual security in the Fund’s portfolio on a periodic basis or as new information becomes available to determine whether or not to keep a security in the Fund’s portfolio.
The Fund’s Principal Risks
The Fund’s share price will fluctuate. You could lose money on your investment in the Fund and the Fund could also return less than other investments. Investments in the Fund are not bank guaranteed, are not deposits, and are not insured by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation or any other federal government agency. As with any mutual fund, there is no guarantee that the Fund will achieve its investment goal. You can find more information about the Fund’s investments and risks under the “Principal Investment Strategies and Risks” section of the Fund’s prospectus. The Fund is subject to the principal risks summarized below.
Fixed-Income Risk: The market value of the Fund’s fixed-income securities responds to economic developments, particularly interest rate changes, as well as to perceptions about the creditworthiness of individual issuers, including governments. Generally, the Fund’s fixed-income securities will decrease in value if interest rates rise and increase in value if interest rates fall. Normally, the longer the maturity or duration of the fixed-income securities the Fund owns, the more sensitive the value of the Fund’s shares will be to changes in interest rates.
Credit Risk: The fixed-income securities in the Fund’s portfolio are subject to the possibility that a deterioration, whether sudden or gradual, in the financial condition of an issuer, or a deterioration in general economic conditions, could cause an issuer to fail to make timely payments of principal or interest, when due. This may cause the issuer’s securities to decline in value.
Interest Rate Risk: In general, when interest rates rise, the prices of debt securities fall, and when interest rates fall, the prices of debt securities rise. The price volatility of a debt security also depends on its maturity. Longer-term securities are generally more volatile, so the longer the average maturity or duration of these securities, the greater their price risk. Duration is a measure used to determine the sensitivity of a security’s price to changes in interest rates that incorporates a security’s yield, coupon, final maturity, and call features, among other characteristics. The longer a fixed-income security’s duration, the more sensitive it will be to changes in interest rates.
28

Maturity, on the other hand, is the date on which a fixed-income security becomes due for payment of principal. Recent and potential future changes in government policy may affect interest rates.
Non-Investment-Grade Debt Securities Risk: Non-investment-grade debt securities are sometimes referred to as “junk bonds” and are considered speculative with respect to their issuers’ ability to make payments of interest and principal. There is a high risk that the Fund could suffer a loss from investments in non-investment-grade debt securities caused by the default of an issuer of such securities. Non-investment-grade debt securities may also be less liquid than investment- grade debt securities.
Management Risk: In managing the Fund’s portfolio, the Adviser engages one or more sub-advisers to make investment decisions for a portion of or the entire portfolio. There is a risk that the Adviser may be unable to identify and retain sub-advisers who achieve superior investment returns relative to other similar sub-advisers.
Rule 144A Securities Risk: Rule 144A securities are restricted securities that may be purchased only by qualified institutional buyers in reliance on an exemption from federal registration requirements. Investing in Rule 144A securities may reduce the liquidity of the Fund’s portfolio if an adequate institutional trading market for these securities does not exist. Prices of Rule 144A securities often reflect a discount, which may be significant, from the market price of comparable exchange-listed securities for which a liquid trading market exists.
Economic and Market Events Risk: Events in the U.S. and global financial markets, including actions taken by the U.S. Federal Reserve or foreign central banks to stimulate or stabilize economic growth, may at times, and for varying periods of time, result in unusually high market volatility, which could negatively impact the Fund’s performance and cause the Fund to experience illiquidity, shareholder redemptions, or other potentially adverse effects. Reduced liquidity in credit and fixed-income markets could negatively affect issuers worldwide. Financial institutions could suffer losses as interest rates rise or economic conditions deteriorate. In addition, the Funds' service providers are susceptible to operational and information or cyber security risks that could result in losses to a Fund and its shareholders. Cyber security breaches are either intentional or unintentional events that allow an unauthorized party to gain access to Fund assets, customer data, or proprietary information, or cause a Fund or Fund service provider to suffer data corruption or lose operational functionality. A cyber security breach could result in the loss or theft of customer data or funds, loss or theft of proprietary information or corporate data, physical damage to a computer or network system, or costs associated with system repairs, any of which could have a substantial impact on a Fund. Such incidents could affect issuers in which a Fund invests, thereby causing the Fund’s investments to lose value.
Foreign Securities Risk: Investing in foreign securities poses additional risks since political and economic events unique in a country or region will affect those markets and their issuers, while such events may not necessarily affect the U.S. economy or issuers located in the United States. In addition, investments in foreign securities are generally denominated in foreign currency. As a result, changes in the value of those currencies compared to the U.S. dollar may affect (positively or negatively) the value of the Fund’s investments. There are also risks associated with foreign accounting standards, government regulation, market information, and clearance and settlement procedures. Foreign markets may be less liquid and more volatile than U.S. markets and offer less protection to investors.
The Fund’s Performance
On January 27, 2017, the Touchstone High Yield Fund, previously a series of Touchstone Investment Trust (the “Predecessor Fund”), was reorganized into the Fund. As a result of the reorganization, the performance and accounting history of the Predecessor Fund was assumed by the Fund. Financial and performance information prior to January 27, 2017 is that of the Predecessor Fund.
The bar chart and performance table below illustrate some indication of the risks and volatility of an investment in the Fund by showing changes in the Fund’s performance from calendar year to calendar year and by showing how the Fund’s average annual total returns for one year, five years, and ten years compare with the ICE BofA High Yield Cash Pay Index. The bar chart does not reflect any sales charges, which would reduce your return. The performance table reflects any applicable sales charges. Past performance (before and after taxes) does not necessarily indicate how the Fund will perform in the future. More recent performance information is available at no cost by visiting TouchstoneInvestments.com or by calling 1.800.543.0407.
29

Touchstone High Yield Fund — Class A Shares Total Return as of December 31
 
Best Quarter:
2nd Quarter 2020
8.72%
Worst Quarter:
1st Quarter 2020
(13.79)%
After-tax returns are calculated using the highest individual marginal federal income tax rates in effect on a given distribution reinvestment date and do not reflect the impact of state and local taxes. Your actual after- tax returns may differ from those shown and depend on your tax situation. The after-tax returns do not apply to shares held in an individual retirement account (“IRA”), 401(k), or other tax-advantaged account. The after-tax returns shown in the table are for Class A shares only. The after-tax returns for other classes of shares offered by the Fund will differ from the Class A shares’ after-tax returns. The Return After Taxes on Distributions and Sale of Fund Shares may be greater than other returns for the same period due to a tax benefit of realizing a capital loss on the sale of Fund shares.
Average Annual Total Returns
For the periods ended December 31, 2022
1 Year
5 Years
10 Years
Touchstone High Yield Fund - Class A
 
 
 
Return Before Taxes
(13.92)%
0.38%
2.14%
Return After Taxes on Distributions
(15.62)%
(1.58)%
(0.01)%
Return After Taxes on Distributions and Sale of Fund Shares
(8.22)%
(0.50)%
0.70%
Touchstone High Yield Fund - Class C
 
 
 
Return Before Taxes
(12.55)%
0.63%
2.04%
Touchstone High Yield Fund - Class Y
 
 
 
Return Before Taxes
(10.82)%
1.63%
2.91%
Touchstone High Yield Fund - Institutional Class
 
 
 
Return Before Taxes
(10.74)%
1.73%
3.00%
ICE BofA High Yield Cash Pay Index (reflects no deductions for fees, expenses or taxes)
(11.11)%
2.14%
3.94%
30

The Fund’s Management
Investment Adviser
Touchstone Advisors, Inc. serves as the Fund’s investment adviser.
Sub-Adviser
Portfolio Managers
Investment Experience
with the Predecessor Fund
and the Fund
Primary Title with
Sub-Adviser
Fort Washington Investment
Advisors, Inc.
Garrick T. Bauer, CFA
Managing the Fund since its
inception in 2017; managed
the Predecessor Fund from
2016 to 2017
Managing Director, Portfolio
Manager and Head of Credit
 
Timothy Jossart, CFA
Managing the Fund since its
inception in 2017; managed
the Predecessor Fund from
2011 to 2017
Vice President, Portfolio
Manager and Head of
Leveraged Credit Research
Buying and Selling Fund Shares
Minimum Investment Requirements
 
Classes A, C, and Y
 
Initial
Investment
Additional
Investment
Regular Account
$2,500
$50
Retirement Account or Custodial Account under the Uniform Gifts/Transfers to Minors Act
$1,000
$50
Investments through the Automatic Investment Plan
$100
$50
 
Institutional Class
 
Initial
Investment
Additional
Investment
Regular Account
$500,000
$50
Fund shares may be purchased and sold on days that the New York Stock Exchange is open for trading. Existing Class A, C and Institutional Class shareholders may purchase shares directly through Touchstone Funds via the transfer agent, BNY Mellon, or through their financial intermediary. Class Y shares are available only through financial intermediaries  who have appropriate selling agreements in place with Touchstone Securities. Shares may be purchased or sold by writing to Touchstone Securities at P.O. Box 9878, Providence, Rhode Island 02940, calling 1.800.543.0407, or visiting the Touchstone Funds’ website: TouchstoneInvestments.com. You may only sell shares over the telephone or via the Internet if the value of the shares sold is less than or equal to $100,000. Shares held in IRAs and qualified retirement plans cannot be sold via the Internet. If your shares are held by a processing organization or financial intermediary you will need to follow its purchase and redemption procedures. For more information about buying and selling shares, see the “Investing with Touchstone” section of the Fund’s prospectus or call 1.800.543.0407.
Tax Information
The Fund intends to make distributions that may be taxed as ordinary income or capital gains except when shares are held through a tax-advantaged account, such as a 401(k) plan or an IRA. Withdrawals from a tax-advantaged account, however, may be taxable.
Financial Intermediary Compensation
If you purchase shares in the Fund through a broker-dealer or other financial intermediary (such as a bank), the Fund and its related companies may pay the intermediary for the sale of Fund shares and related services. These payments may create a conflict of interest by influencing the broker-dealer or other financial intermediary and your salesperson to recommend the Fund over another investment. Ask your salesperson or visit your financial intermediary’s website for more information.
31

Touchstone Impact Bond Fund Summary
The Fund’s Investment Goal
The Touchstone Impact Bond Fund (the “Fund”) seeks current income. Capital appreciation is a secondary goal.
The Fund’s Fees and Expenses
This table describes the fees and expenses that you may pay if you buy, hold and sell shares of the Fund. You may pay other fees, such as brokerage commissions and other fees to financial intermediaries, which are not reflected in the tables and examples below. You may qualify for sales charge discounts for Class A shares of Touchstone equity funds and Touchstone fixed income funds if you and your family invest, or agree to invest in the future, at least $25,000 or $50,000, respectively, in Touchstone funds. More information about these and other discounts is available from your financial professional, in the section titled “Choosing a Class of Shares” in the Fund’s prospectus and Statement of Additional Information (“SAI”) on pages 100 and 101, respectively, and in Appendix A–Intermediary-Specific Sales Charge Waivers and Discounts to the Fund's prospectus. An investor transacting in Class R6 shares, which do not have any front-end sales charge, contingent deferred sales charge, or other asset-based fee for sales or distribution, may be required to pay a commission to a broker for effecting such transactions on an agency basis. Such commissions are not reflected in the table or in the “Example” below.
 
Class A
Class C
Class Y
Institutional
Class
Class
R6(1)
Shareholder Fees (fees paid directly from your investment)
 
 
 
 
 
Maximum Sales Charge (Load) Imposed on Purchases (as a
percentage of offering price)
3.25%
None
None
None
None
Maximum Deferred Sales Charge (Load) (as a percentage of
original purchase price or the amount redeemed, whichever is
less)
None
1.00%
None
None
None
Wire Redemption Fee(2)
$15
$15
$15
$15
$15
 
Annual Fund Operating Expenses (expenses that you pay
each year as a percentage of the value of your investment)
 
 
 
 
 
Management Fees
0.26%
0.26%
0.26%
0.26%
0.26%
Distribution and/or Shareholder Service (12b-1) Fees
0.25%
1.00%
None
None
None
Other Expenses
0.42%
0.99%
0.26%
0.23%
238.20%
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses
0.93%
2.25%
0.52%
0.49%
238.46%
Fee Waiver and/or Expense Reimbursement(3)
(0.17)%
(0.74)%
(0.01)%
(0.08)%
(238.09)%
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses After Fee Waiver and/or
Expense Reimbursement(3)
0.76%
1.51%
0.51%
0.41%
0.37%
(1)
Class R6 shares commenced operations on November 22, 2021.
(2)
Up to $15.
(3)
Touchstone Advisors, Inc. (the “Adviser” or “Touchstone Advisors”) and Touchstone Funds Group Trust (the “Trust”) have entered into a contractual expense limitation agreement whereby Touchstone Advisors will waive a portion of its fees or reimburse certain Fund expenses (excluding dividend and interest expenses relating to short sales; interest; taxes; brokerage commissions and other transaction costs; portfolio transaction and investment related expenses, including expenses associated with the Fund's liquidity providers; other expenditures which are capitalized in accordance with U.S. generally accepted accounting principles; the cost of “Acquired Fund Fees and Expenses”, if any; and other extraordinary expenses not incurred in the ordinary course of business) in order to limit annual Fund operating expenses to 0.76%, 1.51%, 0.51%, 0.41% and 0.37% of average daily net assets for Classes A, C, Y, Institutional Class and Class R6 shares, respectively. This contractual expense limitation is effective through January 29, 2024, but can be terminated by a vote of the Board of Trustees of the Trust (the “Board”) if it deems the termination to be beneficial to the Fund’s shareholders. The terms of the contractual expense limitation agreement provide that Touchstone Advisors is entitled to recoup, subject to approval by the Board, such amounts waived or reimbursed for a period of up to three years from the date on which the Adviser reduced its compensation or assumed expenses for the Fund. The Fund will make repayments to the Adviser only if such repayment does not cause the annual Fund operating expenses (after the repayment is taken into account) to exceed both (1) the expense cap in place when such amounts were waived or reimbursed and (2) the Fund’s current expense limitation.
32

Example. This example is intended to help you compare the cost of investing in the Fund with the cost of investing in other mutual funds. The example assumes that you invest $10,000 in the Fund for the time periods indicated and then, except as indicated, redeem all of your shares at the end of those periods. The example also assumes that your investment has a 5% return each year, that the Fund’s operating expenses remain the same and that all fee waivers or expense limits for the Fund will expire after one year. Although your actual costs may be higher or lower, based on these assumptions your costs would be:
 
Assuming Redemption at End of Period
Assuming
No Redemption
 
Class A
Class C
Class Y
Institutional
Class
Class R6
Class C
1 Year
$400
$254
$52
$42
$38
$154
3 Years
$595
$632
$166
$149
$12,513
$632
5 Years
$807
$1,138
$290
$266
$12,513
$1,138
10 Years
$1,416
$2,527
$652
$608
$12,513
$2,527
Portfolio Turnover. The Fund pays transaction costs, such as brokerage commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or “turns over” its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover rate may indicate higher transaction costs and may result in higher taxes when Fund shares are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are not reflected in total annual Fund operating expenses or in the example, affect the Fund’s performance. During the most recent fiscal year, the Fund’s portfolio turnover rate was 19% of the average value of its portfolio.
The Fund’s Principal Investment Strategies
The Fund invests, under normal circumstances, at least 80% of its net assets (including borrowings for investment purposes) in fixed-income securities that meet certain positive impact criteria. This is a non-fundamental investment policy that can be changed by the Fund upon 60 days’ prior notice to shareholders. Fixed-income securities primarily consist of U.S. government obligations, corporate debt obligations (including non-investment-grade corporate debt obligations), mortgage-backed securities, asset-backed securities and taxable and tax-exempt municipal securities. U.S. government obligations include direct government obligations and those of government agencies and instrumentalities. Corporate debt obligations include corporate bonds, debentures, notes and other similar instruments of U.S. corporations. Investment-grade fixed-income securities include securities rated BBB- or higher by S&P Global Ratings (“S&P”) or Baa3 or higher by Moody’s Investors Services, Inc. (“Moody’s”) or, if unrated by S&P or Moody’s, determined by the sub-adviser, EARNEST Partners LLC (“EARNEST”), to be of comparable quality. The Fund’s investment policies are based on credit ratings at the time of purchase.
The Fund will generally invest at least 90% of its total assets in investment-grade debt securities, but may invest up to 10% of its total assets in non-investment-grade debt securities, which are sometimes referred to as “junk bonds.”
The securities in which the Fund invests may pay interest at fixed rates, variable rates, or subject to reset terms. In addition, these securities may make principal payments that are fixed, variable, or both. The Fund may also invest in mortgage dollar rolls and zero coupon securities. The Fund can invest in securities of any maturity.
EARNEST believes that entities that are cognizant of environmental, social, and governance (“ESG”) issues tend to be more successful over time. As a result, EARNEST prefers to invest in government programs and companies that have sustainable operating models and seek to achieve positive aggregate societal impact. The Fund focuses on governmental programs and companies that seek to achieve positive aggregate societal impacts in up to four specific areas: empowering the individual, community development, environmental responsibility, and sustainable infrastructure. Investments may seek to achieve multiple areas of impact. This inclusive approach views positive impact characteristics as additive to an investment’s risk/return profile. When assessing an investment’s impact profile, EARNEST considers a wide range of factors, including but not limited to support for economic development, home ownership, and job creation.
The Fund’s Principal Risks
The Fund’s share price will fluctuate. You could lose money on your investment in the Fund and the Fund could also return less than other investments. Investments in the Fund are not bank guaranteed, are not deposits, and are not insured by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation or any other federal government agency. As with any mutual fund, there is no guarantee that the Fund will achieve its investment goal. You can find more information about the Fund’s investments and risks under the “Principal Investment Strategies and Risks” section of the Fund’s prospectus. The Fund is subject to the principal risks summarized below.
33

Fixed-Income Risk: The market value of the Fund’s fixed-income securities responds to economic developments, particularly interest rate changes, as well as to perceptions about the creditworthiness of individual issuers, including governments. Generally, the Fund’s fixed-income securities will decrease in value if interest rates rise and increase in value if interest rates fall. Normally, the longer the maturity or duration of the fixed-income securities the Fund owns, the more sensitive the value of the Fund’s shares will be to changes in interest rates.
Asset-Backed Securities Risk: Asset-backed securities are fixed-income securities backed by other assets such as credit card, automobile or consumer loan receivables, retail installment loans, or participations in pools of leases. The values of these securities are sensitive to changes in the credit quality of the underlying collateral, the credit strength of any credit enhancement feature, changes in interest rates, and, at times, the financial condition of the issuer.
Credit Risk: The fixed-income securities in the Fund’s portfolio are subject to the possibility that a deterioration, whether sudden or gradual, in the financial condition of an issuer, or a deterioration in general economic conditions, could cause an issuer to fail to make timely payments of principal or interest, when due. This may cause the issuer’s securities to decline in value.
Interest Rate Risk: In general, when interest rates rise, the prices of debt securities fall, and when interest rates fall, the prices of debt securities rise. The price volatility of a debt security also depends on its maturity. Longer-term securities are generally more volatile, so the longer the average maturity or duration of these securities, the greater their price risk. Duration is a measure used to determine the sensitivity of a security’s price to changes in interest rates that incorporates a security’s yield, coupon, final maturity, and call features, among other characteristics. The longer a fixed-income security’s duration, the more sensitive it will be to changes in interest rates. Maturity, on the other hand, is the date on which a fixed-income security becomes due for payment of principal. Recent and potential future changes in government policy may affect interest rates.
Investment-Grade Debt Securities Risk: Investment-grade debt securities may be downgraded by a NRSRO to below-investment-grade status, which would increase the risk of holding these securities. Investment-grade debt securities rated in the lowest rating category by a NRSRO involve a higher degree of risk than fixed-income securities with higher credit ratings.
Mortgage-Backed Securities Risk: Mortgage-backed securities are fixed-income securities representing an interest in a pool of underlying mortgage loans. Mortgage-backed securities are sensitive to changes in interest rates, but may respond to these changes differently from other fixed-income securities due to the possibility of prepayment of the underlying mortgage loans. Mortgage-backed securities may fluctuate in price based on deterioration in the value of the collateral underlying the pool of mortgage loans, which may result in the collateral being worth less than the remaining principal amount owed on the mortgages in the pool.
Non-Investment-Grade Debt Securities Risk: Non-investment-grade debt securities are sometimes referred to as “junk bonds” and are considered speculative with respect to their issuers’ ability to make payments of interest and principal. There is a high risk that the Fund could suffer a loss from investments in non-investment-grade debt securities caused by the default of an issuer of such securities. Non-investment-grade debt securities may also be less liquid than investment- grade debt securities.
Prepayment Risk: The risk that a debt security may be paid off and proceeds reinvested earlier than anticipated. Prepayment impacts both the interest rate sensitivity of the underlying asset, such as an asset-backed or mortgage-backed security and its cash flow projections. Therefore, prepayment risk may make it difficult to calculate the average duration of the Fund’s asset- or mortgage-backed securities which in turn would make it difficult to assess the interest rate risk of the Fund.
U.S. Government Securities Risk: Certain U.S. government securities are backed by the right of the issuer to borrow from the U.S. Treasury while others are supported only by the credit of the issuer or instrumentality. While the U.S. government is able to provide financial support to U.S. government-sponsored agencies or instrumentalities, no assurance can be given that it will always do so. Such securities are generally neither issued nor guaranteed by the U.S. Treasury.
Impact Investing Risk: The Fund’s impact screening criteria may cause the Fund to forgo opportunities to buy certain securities, or forgo opportunities to gain exposure to certain industries, sectors, regions and countries. In addition, the Fund may be required to sell a security when it might otherwise be disadvantageous for it to do so.
Management Risk: In managing the Fund’s portfolio, the Adviser engages one or more sub-advisers to make investment decisions for a portion of or the entire portfolio. There is a risk that the Adviser may be unable to identify and retain sub-advisers who achieve superior investment returns relative to other similar sub-advisers.
Economic and Market Events Risk: Events in the U.S. and global financial markets, including actions taken by the U.S. Federal Reserve or foreign central banks to stimulate or stabilize economic growth, may at times, and for varying periods of time, result in unusually high market volatility, which could negatively impact the Fund’s performance and cause the Fund to experience illiquidity, shareholder redemptions, or other potentially adverse effects. Reduced liquidity in credit and fixed-income markets could negatively affect issuers worldwide. Financial institutions could suffer losses as interest rates rise or economic conditions deteriorate. In addition, the Funds' service providers are susceptible to operational and information or cyber security risks that could result in losses to a Fund and its shareholders. Cyber security breaches are either intentional or unintentional events that allow an unauthorized party to gain access to Fund assets, customer data, or proprietary information, or cause a Fund or Fund service provider to suffer data corruption or lose operational functionality. A cyber security breach could result in the loss or theft of customer data or funds, loss or theft of proprietary information or corporate data, physical damage to a computer or network system, or costs associated with system repairs, any of which could have a substantial impact on a Fund. Such incidents could affect issuers in which a Fund invests, thereby causing the Fund’s investments to lose value.
34

Municipal Securities Risk: The value of municipal securities may be affected by uncertainties in the municipal market related to legislation or litigation involving the taxation of municipal securities or the rights of municipal securities holders in the event of bankruptcy. In addition, a downturn in the national economy may negatively impact the economic performance of issuers of municipal securities, and may increase the likelihood that issuers of securities in which the Fund may invest may be unable to meet their obligations. Also, some municipal obligations may be backed by a letter of credit issued by a bank or other financial institution. Adverse developments affecting banks or other financial institutions could have a negative effect on the value of the Fund’s portfolio securities.
Mortgage Dollar Roll Risk: Mortgage “dollar rolls” are transactions in which mortgage-backed securities are sold for delivery in the current month and the seller simultaneously contracts to repurchase substantially similar securities on a specified future date. If the broker-dealer to whom the Fund sells the security becomes insolvent, the Fund’s right to repurchase the security may be restricted. Other risks involved in entering into mortgage dollar rolls include the risk that the value of the security may change adversely over the term of the mortgage dollar roll and that the security the Fund is required to repurchase may be worth less than the security that the Fund held.
ESG Investing Risk: The Fund’s sub-adviser considers ESG factors that it deems relevant or additive, along with other material factors and analysis, when selecting investments for Fund. The Fund’s ESG criteria may cause the Fund to forgo opportunities to buy certain securities, or forgo opportunities to gain exposure to certain industries, sectors, regions and municipalities. In addition, the Fund may be required to sell a security when it might otherwise be disadvantageous for it to do so.
The Fund’s Performance
Effective July 20, 2018, the Total Return Bond Fund (the “Predecessor Fund”) changed its name to Touchstone Impact Bond Fund.
The bar chart and performance table below illustrate some indication of the risks and volatility of an investment in the Fund by showing changes in the Fund’s performance from calendar year to calendar year and by showing how the Fund’s average annual total returns for one year, five years, and ten years compare with the Bloomberg U.S. Aggregate Bond Index. The bar chart does not reflect any sales charges, which would reduce your return. The performance table reflects any applicable sales charges. Past performance (before and after taxes) does not necessarily indicate how the Fund will perform in the future. More recent performance information is available at no cost by visiting TouchstoneInvestments.com or by calling 1.800.543.0407.
Touchstone Impact Bond Fund — Class Y Shares Total Return as of December 31
 
Best Quarter:
2nd Quarter 2020
3.48%
Worst Quarter:
1st Quarter 2022
(6.05)%
After-tax returns are calculated using the highest individual marginal federal income tax rates in effect on a given distribution reinvestment date and do not reflect the impact of state and local taxes. Your actual after- tax returns may differ from those shown and depend on your tax situation. The after-tax returns do not apply to shares held in an individual retirement account (“IRA”), 401(k), or other tax-advantaged account. The after-tax returns shown in the table are for Class Y shares only. The after-tax returns for other classes of shares offered by the Fund will differ from the Class Y shares’ after-tax returns. The Return After Taxes on Distributions and Sale of Fund Shares may be greater than other returns for the same period due to a tax benefit of realizing a capital loss on the sale of Fund shares.
The inception date of Class R6 shares of the Fund was November 22, 2021 . Class R6 shares’ performance information was calculated using the historical performance of Class Y shares for the periods prior to November 22, 2021. Performance for these periods has been restated to reflect the impact of the fees and expenses applicable to Class R6 shares.
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Average Annual Total Returns
For the periods ended December 31,2022
1 Year
5 Years
10 Years
Touchstone Impact Bond Fund - Class Y
 
 
 
Return Before Taxes