Transamerica Funds
Transamerica Funds
Prospectus March 1, 2023
Fund | Ticker
Class
A
Class
C
Class
I
Class
R6
Transamerica Asset Allocation-Conservative Portfolio1
ICLAX
ICLLX
TACIX
Transamerica Asset Allocation-Growth Portfolio2
IAAAX
IAALX
TAGIX
Transamerica Asset Allocation-Moderate Growth Portfolio3
IMLAX
IMLLX
TMGIX
Transamerica Asset Allocation-Moderate Portfolio4
IMOAX
IMOLX
TMMIX
Transamerica Bond
IDITX
IFLLX
TFXIX
TAFLX
Transamerica Capital Growth
IALAX
ILLLX
TFOIX
TCPWX
Transamerica Core Bond (formerly, Transamerica Intermediate Bond)
TABDX
TABEX
TABGX
TAGMX
Transamerica Emerging Markets Debt
EMTAX
EMTCX
EMTIX
TAEDX
Transamerica Emerging Markets Opportunities
TEOAX
TEOCX
TEOIX
TEOOX
Transamerica Energy Infrastructure
TMLAX
TMCLX
TMLPX
Transamerica Floating Rate
TFLAX
TFLCX
TFLIX
Transamerica Government Money Market
IATXX
IMLXX
TAMXX
Transamerica High Yield Bond
IHIYX
INCLX
TDHIX
TAHBX
Transamerica High Yield ESG
TACBX
TAFQX
TAJEX
TAVSX
Transamerica High Yield Muni
THAYX
THCYX
THYIX
Transamerica Inflation Opportunities
TIOAX
TIOCX
ITIOX
RTIOX
Transamerica Intermediate Muni
TAMUX
TCMUX
TIMUX
Transamerica International Equity
TRWAX
TRWCX
TSWIX
TAINX
Transamerica International Focus
TGRHX
TGRJX
TGRGX
TGRFX
Transamerica International Small Cap Value
TISVX
Transamerica International Stock
TIHAX
TIHBX
TIHJX
Transamerica Large Cap Value
TWQAX
TWQCX
TWQIX
TALCX
Transamerica Large Core ESG (formerly, Transamerica Large Core)
TLACX
TLASX
Transamerica Large Growth
TAGDX
Transamerica Mid Cap Growth
MCGAX
MGTCX
IMCGX
TAGFX
Transamerica Mid Cap Value Opportunities
MCVAX
MCVCX
MVTIX
MVTRX
Transamerica Multi-Asset Income
TASHX
TCSHX
TSHIX
Transamerica Multi-Managed Balanced
IBALX
IBLLX
TBLIX
TAMMX
Transamerica Short-Term Bond
ITAAX
ITACX
TSTIX
TASTX
Transamerica Small Cap Growth
ASGTX
CSGTX
ISCGX
RTSGX
Transamerica Small Cap Value
TSLAX
TSLCX
TSLIX
TSLRX
Transamerica Small/Mid Cap Value
IIVAX
IIVLX
TSVIX
TASMX
Transamerica Sustainable Bond
TARUX
TAILX
TAPKX
TAAPX
Transamerica Sustainable Equity Income
TDFAX
TDFCX
TDFIX
TADFX
Transamerica Unconstrained Bond
TUNAX
TUNBX
TUNIX
Transamerica US Growth5
TADAX
TADCX
TDEIX
TAGHX
Each of the funds listed above is a series of Transamerica Funds. Each fund with “–” listed above indicates that share class is not currently offered.
1 Class R: ICVRX; 2 Class R: IGWRX; 3 Class R: IMGRX; 4 Class R: IMDRX; 5 Class T: TWMTX.
Neither the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission nor U.S. Commodity Futures Trading Commission has approved or disapproved these securities or passed upon the adequacy or accuracy of this prospectus. Any representation to the contrary is a criminal offense.
MPCA0323

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Transamerica Asset Allocation-Conservative Portfolio
Investment Objective: Seeks current income and preservation of capital.
Fees and Expenses: This table describes the fees and expenses that you may pay if you buy, hold and sell shares of the fund. You may pay other fees, such as brokerage commissions and other fees to financial intermediaries, which are not reflected in the tables and examples below.
You may qualify for sales charge discounts if you and your family invest, or agree to invest in the future, at least $50,000 in Transamerica Funds. More information about these and other discounts is available from your financial professional, in the “Waivers and Reductions of Sales Charges” section on page 295 of the fund’s prospectus, in the Appendix – “Waivers and Discounts Available from Intermediaries,” and in the fund’s statement of additional information (SAI) under the heading “Purchase of Shares” on page 80.

Shareholder Fees (fees paid directly from your investment)
Class:
A
C
I
R
Maximum sales charge (load) imposed
on purchases (as a percentage of
offering price)
5.50%
None
None
None
Maximum deferred sales charge (load)
(as a percentage of purchase price or
redemption proceeds, whichever is
lower)
None1
1.00%2
None
None
1 Class A shares of the fund purchased in amounts of $1 million or more that are not subject to an initial sales charge may be subject to a 1.00% contingent deferred sales charge if those shares are redeemed within 24 months of their purchase. A deferred sales charge may apply to certain redemptions of Class A shares of the fund purchased through an exchange from another Transamerica Fund.
2 Purchases of Class C shares of the fund may be subject to a 1.00% contingent deferred sales charge if those shares are redeemed within 12 months of their purchase. A deferred sales charge may apply to certain redemptions of Class C shares of the fund purchased through an exchange from another Transamerica Fund.

Annual Fund Operating Expenses (expenses that you pay each year as a percentage of the value of your investment)
Class:
A
C
I
R
Management fees
0.10%
0.10%
0.10%
0.10%
Distribution and service (12b-1) fees
0.25%
1.00%
None
0.50%
Other expenses
0.12%
0.16%
0.15%1
0.12%
Acquired fund fees and expenses2
0.60%
0.60%
0.60%
0.60%
Total annual fund operating expenses
1.07%
1.86%
0.85%
1.32%
Fee waiver and/or expense
reimbursement3
0.00%
0.00%
0.10%
0.00%
Total annual fund operating expenses
after fee waiver and/or expense
reimbursement
1.07%
1.86%
0.75%
1.32%
1
Other expenses reflect current transfer agency fees with respect to Class I.
2
Acquired fund fees and expenses reflect the fund’s pro rata share of the fees and expenses incurred by investing in other investment companies. Acquired fund fees and expenses are not included in the calculation of the ratios of expenses to average net assets shown in the Financial Highlights section of the fund’s prospectus.
3
The fund’s investment manager, Transamerica Asset Management, Inc. (“TAM”), has contractually agreed to reimburse 0.095% of the transfer agency fees on Class I shares through March 1, 2024.
Example: This Example is intended to help you compare the cost of investing in the fund with the cost of investing in other mutual funds.
The Example assumes that you invest $10,000 in the fund for the time periods indicated and then redeem all shares at the end of those periods (unless otherwise indicated). The Example also assumes that your investment has a 5% return each year and that the fund’s operating expenses remain the same. The Example reflects applicable waivers and/or reimbursements for the duration of such arrangement(s). Although your actual costs may be higher or lower, based on these assumptions your costs would be:

If the shares are redeemed at the end of each period:
 
1 year
3 years
5 years
10 years
Class A
$653
$872
$1,108
$1,784
Class C
$289
$585
$1,006
$2,180
Class I
$77
$261
$462
$1,040
Class R
$134
$418
$723
$1,590
If the shares are not redeemed:
 
1 year
3 years
5 years
10 years
Class A
$653
$872
$1,108
$1,784
Class C
$189
$585
$1,006
$2,180
Class I
$77
$261
$462
$1,040
Class R
$134
$418
$723
$1,590
Portfolio Turnover: The fund pays transaction costs, such as commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or “turns over” its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover rate may indicate higher transaction costs and may result in higher taxes when fund shares are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are not reflected in annual fund operating expenses or in the Example, affect the fund’s performance.
During the most recent fiscal year, the portfolio turnover rate for the fund was 51% of the average value of its portfolio.
Principal Investment Strategies: The fund is a fund of funds that seeks to achieve its investment objective by investing its assets primarily in a broad mix of Transamerica Funds (“underlying funds”). The fund’s sub-adviser, Goldman Sachs Asset Management, L.P. (the “sub-adviser”), follows an investment process that involves longer-term portfolio positioning through strategic asset allocation and dynamic asset allocation to pursue shorter-term opportunities based on the sub-adviser’s views of current market conditions.
Under normal circumstances, investments in underlying funds are expected to achieve a mix over time of approximately 35% of net assets in equities, which may include both stocks and commodity-related securities, and approximately 65% of net assets in fixed-income securities, which may include bonds, convertible securities, cash, cash equivalents, and other money market instruments. These percentages may vary.
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The underlying funds may invest in a variety of U.S. and foreign equity and fixed-income (including high-yield) securities and alternative investments. The underlying funds may also invest in real estate investment trusts (“REITs”) and derivatives.
The sub-adviser develops and implements a strategic asset allocation for the fund. The sub-adviser seeks to budget the fund’s long term investment risk exposure across various risk factors to establish a diversified strategic asset allocation. An important component of the sub-adviser’s process is allocating risk across asset classes and strategies to increase diversification and, potentially, reduce volatility.
The sub-adviser may dynamically adjust the fund’s asset allocation as part of its investment process in response to certain changes in the markets, the economic cycle and the macroeconomic environment. This dynamic asset allocation may change the fund’s portfolio positioning based on the sub-adviser’s short- to medium-term market views on dislocations and attractive investment opportunities. These views may impact the relative weights across asset classes, and the allocation to geographies, sectors and industries, as well as the fund’s duration and sensitivity to inflation.
Allocation of assets among the underlying funds is based on factors such as diversification, general market views and outlooks, volatility in the equity markets, historical performance, current valuations, and other global economic factors.
The fund may invest directly in U.S. government securities and/or short-term commercial paper.
The fund’s investment manager, among other things, oversees and monitors the sub-adviser and is solely responsible for selecting the underlying funds among which the sub-adviser may allocate the fund’s assets. After the underlying funds have been selected, the sub-adviser determines which underlying funds it wishes to utilize to allocate the fund’s assets. The sub-adviser is not required to utilize all of the underlying funds selected by the manager in seeking to fulfill the fund’s target asset allocation.
The sub-adviser may invest up to 10% of the fund’s net assets in index-based underlying exchange-traded funds (“underlying ETFs”) that the sub-adviser selects as part of the sub-adviser’s dynamic asset allocation to gain exposure to asset classes, regions, countries, strategies or sectors that are a part of the sub-adviser’s asset allocation for the fund, but not otherwise accessible through available underlying funds. The fund may, but is not required to, invest directly in futures contracts as part of the sub-adviser’s dynamic asset allocation. The use of futures would generally be limited to exchange-traded developed market equity index and U.S. Treasury futures. The fund may also have exposure to derivatives instruments, such as options, futures or forward contracts and swaps through its investments in the underlying funds and underlying ETFs.
It is not possible to predict the extent to which the fund will be invested in a particular underlying fund at any time. The fund may be a significant shareholder in certain underlying funds.
Each underlying fund and underlying ETF has its own investment objective, principal investment strategies and investment risks. The sub-adviser for each underlying fund and adviser or sub-adviser for each underlying ETF decides which securities to purchase and sell for that underlying fund or underlying ETF. The fund’s ability to achieve its investment objective depends largely on the performance of the underlying funds and underlying ETFs.
The “Underlying Funds” section of the prospectus lists the underlying Transamerica Funds currently available for investment by the fund, provides a summary of their respective investment objectives and principal investment strategies, and identifies certain risks of those funds.
The manager may change the underlying Transamerica Funds, and the sub-adviser may change the fund’s asset allocation, at any time without notice to shareholders and without shareholder approval.
Principal Risks: Risk is inherent in all investing. Many factors and risks affect the fund's performance, including those described below. The value of your investment in the fund, as well as the amount of return you receive on your investment, may fluctuate significantly day to day and over time. You may lose part or all of your investment in the fund or your investment may not perform as well as other similar investments. The fund, through its investments in underlying funds, is subject to the risks of the underlying funds. The following is a summary description of principal risks (in alphabetical order after certain key risks) of investing in the fund (either directly or through its investments in underlying funds). Each risk described below may not apply to each underlying fund and an underlying fund may be subject to additional or different risks than those described below. An investment in the fund is not a bank deposit and is not insured or guaranteed by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation or any other government agency. You may lose money if you invest in this fund.
Market – The market prices of the fund’s securities or other assets may go up or down, sometimes rapidly or unpredictably, due to general market conditions, overall economic trends or events, inflation, changes in interest rates, governmental actions or interventions, actions taken by the U.S. Federal Reserve or foreign central banks, market disruptions caused by tariffs, trade disputes or other factors, political developments, armed conflicts, economic sanctions, cybersecurity events, investor sentiment, public health events such as the spread of infectious disease, and other factors that may or may not be related to the issuer of the security or other asset. If the market prices of the fund’s securities and assets fall, the value of your investment in the fund could go down.
Economies and financial markets throughout the world are increasingly interconnected. Events or circumstances in one or more countries or regions could be highly disruptive to, and have profound impacts on, global economies or markets. As a result, whether or not the fund invests in securities of issuers located in or with significant exposure to the countries directly affected, the value and liquidity of the fund’s investments may go down.
In recent years, the COVID-19 pandemic, the large expansion of government deficits and debt as a result of government actions to mitigate the effects of the pandemic, the Russian invasion of Ukraine and the rise of inflation have resulted in extreme volatility in the global economy and in global financial markets. These
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events could be prolonged and could continue to adversely affect the value and liquidity of the fund’s investments, impair the fund’s ability to satisfy redemption requests, and negatively impact the fund’s performance.
Asset Allocation – The fund’s investment performance is significantly impacted by the fund’s asset allocation and reallocation from time to time. The sub-adviser's decisions whether and when to tactically overweight or underweight asset classes and select a mix of underlying funds may not produce the desired results. These actions may be unsuccessful in maximizing return and/or avoiding investment losses. The value of your investment may decrease if the sub-adviser’s judgment about the attractiveness, value or market trends affecting a particular asset class, investment style, technique or strategy, underlying fund or other issuer is incorrect. The available underlying funds selected by the sub-adviser may underperform the market or similar funds.
Underlying Funds – Because the fund invests its assets in various underlying funds, its ability to achieve its investment objective depends largely on the performance of the underlying funds in which it invests. Investing in underlying funds subjects the fund to the risks of investing in the underlying securities or assets held by those underlying funds. Each of the underlying funds in which the fund may invest has its own investment risks, and those risks can affect the value of the underlying funds' shares and therefore the value of the fund's investments. There can be no assurance that the investment objective of any underlying fund will be achieved. To the extent that the fund invests more of its assets in one underlying fund than in another, the fund will have greater exposure to the risks of that underlying fund. In addition, the fund will bear a pro rata portion of the operating expenses of the underlying funds in which it invests. The “List and Description of Certain Underlying Funds” section of the fund's prospectus identifies certain risks of each underlying fund.
Fixed-Income Securities – Risks of fixed-income securities include credit risk, interest rate risk, counterparty risk, prepayment risk, extension risk, valuation risk, and liquidity risk. The value of fixed-income securities may go up or down, sometimes rapidly and unpredictably, due to general market conditions, such as real or perceived adverse economic or political conditions, tariffs and trade disruptions, inflation, changes in interest rates, lack of liquidity in the bond markets or adverse investor sentiment. In addition, the value of a fixed-income security may decline if the issuer or other obligor of the security fails to pay principal and/or interest, otherwise defaults or has its credit rating downgraded or is perceived to be less creditworthy, or the credit quality or value of any underlying assets declines. If the value of fixed-income securities owned by the fund falls, the value of your investment will go down. The fund may lose its entire investment in the fixed-income securities of an issuer.
Equity Securities – Equity securities generally have greater risk of loss than debt securities. Stock markets are volatile and the value of equity securities may go up or down, sometimes rapidly and unpredictably. The value of equity securities fluctuates based on real or perceived changes in a company’s financial condition, factors affecting a particular industry or industries, and overall market, economic and political conditions. If the market prices of the equity securities owned by the fund fall, the value of your investment in the fund will decline. The fund may lose its entire
investment in the equity securities of an issuer. A change in financial condition or other event affecting a single issuer may adversely impact securities markets as a whole.
Management – The value of your investment may go down if the investment manager’s or sub-adviser's judgments and decisions are incorrect or otherwise do not produce the desired results, or if the investment strategy does not work as intended. You may also suffer losses if there are imperfections, errors or limitations in the quantitative, analytic or other tools, resources, information and data used, investment techniques applied, or the analyses employed or relied on, by the investment manageror sub-adviser, if such tools, resources, information or data are used incorrectly or otherwise do not work as intended, or if the investment manager’s or sub-adviser's investment style is out of favor or otherwise fails to produce the desired results. Any of these things could cause the fund to lose value or its results to lag relevant benchmarks or other funds with similar objectives.
Active Trading – The fund may purchase and sell securities without regard to the length of time held. Active trading may be more pronounced during periods of market volatility, may have a negative impact on performance and may generate greater amounts of short-term capital gains.
Asset Class Variation – The underlying funds invest principally in the securities constituting their asset class (i.e., equity or fixed-income) or underlying index components. However, an underlying fund may vary the percentage of its assets in these securities (subject to any applicable regulatory requirements). Depending upon the percentage of securities in a particular asset class held by the underlying funds at any given time, and the percentage of the fund's assets invested in various underlying funds, the fund's actual exposure to the securities in a particular asset class may vary substantially from its target allocation for that asset class, and this in turn may adversely affect the fund's performance.
Commodities and Commodity-Related Securities – Commodities and commodity-related businesses or industries are subject to changes and volatility in commodity prices generally, regulatory, economic and political developments, weather events and natural disasters, tariffs and trade disruptions, and market disruptions. Commodities and commodity-linked investments may be less liquid than other investments. Commodity-linked investments also are subject to the credit risk associated with the issuer, and their value may decline substantially if the issuer’s creditworthiness deteriorates.
Convertible Securities – Convertible securities are subject to risks associated with both fixed-income and equity securities. For example, if market interest rates rise, the value of a convertible security typically falls. In addition, a convertible security is subject to the risk that the issuer will not be able to pay interest or dividends when due, and the market value of the security may change based on the issuer’s actual or perceived creditworthiness. Since the convertible security derives a portion of its value from the underlying common stock, the security is also subject to the same types of market and issuer-specific risks that apply to the underlying common stock. Convertible securities generally offer lower interest or dividend yields than non-convertible securities of similar quality.
3

Counterparty – The fund could lose money if the counterparties to derivatives, repurchase agreements and/or other financial contracts entered into for the fund do not fulfill their contractual obligations. In addition, the fund may incur costs and may be hindered or delayed in enforcing its rights against a counterparty.
Credit – If an issuer or other obligor (such as a party providing insurance or other credit enhancement) of a security held by the fund or a counterparty to a financial contract with the fund is unable or unwilling to meet its financial obligations, or is downgraded or perceived to be less creditworthy (whether by market participants or otherwise), or if the value of any underlying assets declines, the value of your investment will typically decline. A decline may be rapid and/or significant, particularly in certain market environments. In addition, the fund may incur costs and may be hindered or delayed in enforcing its rights against an issuer, obligor or counterparty.
Currency – The value of a fund’s investments in securities denominated in foreign currencies increases or decreases as the rates of exchange between those currencies and the U.S. dollar change. U.S. dollar-denominated securities of foreign issuers may also be affected by currency risk. Currency exchange rates can be volatile and may fluctuate significantly over short periods of time. Currency conversion costs and currency fluctuations could reduce or eliminate investment gains or add to investment losses. A fund may be unable or may choose not to hedge its foreign currency exposure or any hedge may not be effective.
Derivatives – The use of derivatives involves a variety of risks, which may be different from, or greater than, the risks associated with investing in traditional securities, such as stocks and bonds. Risks of derivatives include leverage risk, liquidity risk, valuation risk, market risk, counterparty risk, credit risk, operational risk and legal risk. Use of derivatives can increase fund losses, increase costs, reduce opportunities for gains, increase fund volatility, and not produce the result intended. Certain derivatives have the potential for unlimited loss, regardless of the size of the initial investment. Even a small investment in derivatives can have a disproportionate impact on the fund. Derivatives may be difficult or impossible to sell, unwind or value, and the counterparty (including, if applicable, the fund’s clearing broker, the derivatives exchange or the clearinghouse) may default on its obligations to the fund. In certain cases, the fund may incur costs and may be hindered or delayed in enforcing its rights against or closing out derivatives instruments with a counterparty, which may result in additional losses. Derivatives are also generally subject to the risks applicable to the assets, rates, indices or other indicators underlying the derivative, including market risk, credit risk, liquidity risk, management and valuation risk. Also, suitable derivative transactions may not be available in all circumstances or at reasonable prices. The value of a derivative may fluctuate more or less than, or otherwise not correlate well with, the underlying assets, rates, indices or other indicators to which it relates. The fund may segregate cash or other liquid assets to cover the funding of its obligations under derivatives contracts or make margin payments when it takes positions in derivatives involving obligations to third parties. New Rule 18f-4 under the 1940 Act provides a comprehensive regulatory framework for the use of derivatives by funds and imposes new requirements and restrictions on funds using derivatives. Rule 18f-4 could have an
adverse impact on the fund’s performance and its ability to implement its investment strategies as it has historically and may increase costs related to the fund’s use of derivatives. It is not currently clear what impact, if any, the rule will have on the availability, liquidity or performance of derivatives. The rule may not be effective to limit the risk of loss from derivatives.
Emerging Markets – Investments in securities of issuers located or doing business in emerging markets are subject to heightened foreign investments risks and may experience rapid and extreme changes in value. Emerging market countries tend to have less developed and less stable economic, political and legal systems and regulatory and accounting standards, may have policies that restrict investment by foreigners or that prevent foreign investors such as the fund from withdrawing their money at will, and are more likely to experience nationalization, expropriation and confiscatory taxation. In addition, emerging market securities may have low trading volumes and may be or become illiquid.
Extension – When interest rates rise, payments of fixed-income securities, including asset- and mortgage-backed securities, may occur more slowly than anticipated, causing their market prices to decline.
Floating Rate Loans – Floating rate loans are often made to borrowers whose financial condition is troubled or highly leveraged. These loans frequently are rated below investment grade and are therefore subject to “High-Yield Debt Securities” risk. There is no public market for floating rate loans and the loans may trade infrequently and be subject to wide bid/ask spreads. Many floating rate loans are subject to restrictions on resale. Floating rate loans may have trade settlement periods in excess of seven days, which may result in the fund not receiving proceeds from the sale of a loan for an extended period. As a result, the fund may be subject to greater “Liquidity” risk than a fund that does not invest in floating rate loans and the fund may be constrained in its ability to meet its obligations (including obligations to redeeming shareholders). The lack of an active trading market may also make it more difficult to value floating rate loans. Rising interest rates can lead to increased default rates as payment obligations increase.
Focused Investing – To the extent the fund invests in a limited number of countries, regions, sectors, industries or market segments, in a limited number of issuers, or in issuers in related businesses or that are subject to related operating risks, the fund will be more susceptible to negative events affecting those countries, regions, sectors, industries, segments or issuers, and the value of its shares may be more volatile than if it invested more widely.
Foreign Investments – Investing in securities of foreign issuers or issuers with significant exposure to foreign markets involves additional risks. Foreign markets can be less liquid, less regulated, less transparent and more volatile than U.S. markets. The value of the fund’s foreign investments may decline, sometimes rapidly or unpredictably, because of factors affecting the particular issuer as well as foreign markets and issuers generally, such as unfavorable government actions, including nationalization, expropriation or confiscatory taxation, reduction of government or central bank support, tariffs and trade disruptions, sanctions, political or financial instability, social unrest or other adverse economic or political developments. Foreign investments may also be subject to different accounting practices and different regulatory, legal, auditing, financial reporting and recordkeeping standards and practices,
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and may be more difficult to value than investments in U.S. issuers. Certain foreign clearance and settlement procedures may result in an inability to execute transactions or delays in settlement.
Growth Stocks – Returns on growth stocks may not move in tandem with returns on other categories of stocks or the market as a whole. Growth stocks typically are particularly sensitive to market movements and may involve larger price swings because their market prices tend to reflect future expectations. When it appears those expectations may not be met, the prices of growth stocks typically fall. Growth stocks may also be more volatile because they often do not pay dividends. The values of growth stocks tend to go down when interest rates rise because the rise in interest rates reduces the current value of future cash flows. Growth stocks as a group may be out of favor and underperform the overall equity market for a long period of time, for example, while the market favors “value” stocks.
High-Yield Debt Securities – High-yield debt securities, commonly referred to as “junk” bonds, are securities that are rated below “investment grade” or are of comparable quality. Changes in interest rates, the market’s perception of the issuers, the creditworthiness of the issuers and negative perceptions of the junk bond market generally may significantly affect the value of these bonds. Junk bonds are considered speculative, tend to be volatile, typically have a higher risk of default, tend to be less liquid and more difficult to value than higher grade securities, and may result in losses for the fund.
Inflation – The value of assets or income from investment may be worth less in the future as inflation decreases the value of money. As inflation increases, the real value of the fund’s assets can decline as can the value of the fund’s distributions.
Interest Rate –The value of fixed-income securities generally goes down when interest rates rise. A rise in rates tends to have a greater impact on the prices of longer term or duration securities. Changes in interest rates also may affect the liquidity of the fund’s investments. A general rise in interest rates may cause investors to sell fixed-income securities on a large scale, which could adversely affect the price and liquidity of fixed-income securities generally and could also result in increased redemptions from the fund. Increased redemptions could cause the fund to sell securities at inopportune times or depressed prices and result in further losses.
Leveraging – To the extent that the fund borrows or uses derivatives or other investments, such as ETFs, that have embedded leverage, your investment may be subject to heightened volatility, risk of loss and costs. Other risks also will be compounded because leverage generally magnifies the effect of a change in the value of an asset and creates a risk of loss of value on a larger pool of assets than the fund would otherwise have. Use of leverage may result in the loss of a substantial amount, and possibly all, of the fund’s assets. The fund also may have to sell assets at inopportune times to satisfy its obligations.
Liquidity – The fund may make investments that are illiquid or that become illiquid after purchase. Illiquid investments can be difficult to value, may trade at a discount from comparable, more liquid investments, and may be subject to wide fluctuations in value. Liquidity risk may be magnified in rising interest rate environments. If the fund is forced to sell an illiquid investment to meet redemption requests or other cash needs, the fund may be
forced to sell at a substantial loss or may not be able to sell at all. Liquidity of particular investments, or even entire asset classes, including U.S. Treasury securities, can deteriorate rapidly, particularly during times of market turmoil, and those investments may be difficult or impossible for the fund to sell. This may prevent the fund from limiting losses.
Loans – Loans are subject to the credit risk of nonpayment of principal or interest. Economic downturns or increases in interest rates may cause an increase in defaults, interest rate risk and liquidity risk. Loans may or may not be collateralized at the time of acquisition, and any collateral may be relatively illiquid or lose all or substantially all of its value subsequent to investment. The fund's investments in loans are also subject to prepayment or call risk.
Prepayment or Call – Many issuers have a right to prepay their fixed-income securities. If this happens, the fund will not benefit from the rise in the market price of the securities that normally accompanies a decline in interest rates and may be forced to reinvest the prepayment proceeds in securities with lower yields.
REITs – Investing in real estate investment trusts (“REITs”) involves unique risks. When the fund invests in REITs, it is subject to risks generally associated with investing in real estate. A REIT’s performance depends on the types and locations of the properties it owns, how well it manages those properties and cash flow. REITs may have limited financial resources, may trade less frequently and in limited volume, may engage in dilutive offerings, and may be subject to more abrupt or erratic price movements than the overall securities markets. In addition to its own expenses, the fund will indirectly bear its proportionate share of any management and other expenses paid by REITs in which it invests. U.S. REITs are subject to a number of highly technical tax-related rules and requirements; and a U.S. REIT’s failure to qualify for the favorable U.S. federal income tax treatment generally available to U.S. REITs could result in corporate-level taxation, significantly reducing the return on an investment to the fund.
Structure Conflicts – Transamerica Asset Management, Inc. (“TAM”), the fund’s investment manager, has established an investment program whereby a substantial portion of the fund’s assets are invested in underlying Transamerica funds. TAM does not consider unaffiliated funds as underlying investment options for these assets, even if unaffiliated funds have better investment performance or lower total expenses.
Underlying Exchange-Traded Funds – To the extent the fund invests its assets in underlying ETFs, its ability to achieve its investment objective will depend in part on the performance of the underlying ETFs in which it invests. Investing in underlying ETFs subjects the fund to the risks of investing in the underlying securities or assets held by those ETFs. Each of the underlying ETFs in which the fund may invest has its own investment risks, and those risks can affect the value of the underlying ETFs’ shares and therefore the value of the fund's investments. There can be no assurance that the investment objective of any underlying ETF will be achieved. To the extent that the fund invests more of its assets in one underlying ETF than in another, the fund will have greater exposure to the risks of that underlying ETF. In addition, the fund will bear a pro rata portion of the operating expenses of the underlying ETFs in which it invests.
5

U.S. Government and Agency Obligations – Government agency obligations have different levels of credit support and, therefore, different degrees of credit risk. Securities issued by agencies and instrumentalities of the U.S. government that are supported by the full faith and credit of the U.S. government generally present a lesser degree of credit risk than securities issued by agencies and instrumentalities sponsored by the U.S. government that are supported only by the issuer’s right to borrow from the U.S. Treasury and securities issued by agencies and instrumentalities sponsored by the U.S. government that are supported only by the credit of the issuing agencies. A security backed by the “full faith and credit” of the U.S. government is guaranteed only as to its stated interest rate and face value at maturity, not its current market price.
Valuation – The sales price the fund could receive for any particular portfolio investment may differ from the fund's valuation of the investment, particularly for securities that trade in thin or volatile markets, that are priced based upon valuations provided by third party pricing services that use matrix or evaluated pricing systems, or that are valued using a fair value methodology. These differences may increase significantly and affect fund investments more broadly during periods of market volatility. Investors who purchase or redeem fund shares on days when the fund is holding fair-valued securities may receive fewer or more shares or lower or higher redemption proceeds than they would have received if the fund had not fair-valued securities or had used a different valuation methodology. The fund’s ability to value its investments may also be impacted by technological issues and/or errors by pricing services or other third party service providers. Fair value pricing involves subjective judgment, which may prove to be incorrect.
Value Investing – The prices of securities the sub-adviser believes are undervalued may not appreciate as anticipated or may go down. The value approach to investing involves the risk that stocks may remain undervalued, undervaluation may become more severe, or perceived undervaluation may actually represent intrinsic value. Value stocks as a group may be out of favor and underperform the overall equity market for a long period of time, for example, while the market favors “growth” stocks.
Performance: The bar chart and the table below provide some indication of the risks of investing in the fund. The bar chart shows how the fund’s performance has varied from year to year. The table shows how the fund’s average annual total returns for different periods compare to the returns of a broad measure of market performance, as well as comparison to one or more secondary indices.
The bar chart does not reflect the impact of sales charges, which, if reflected, would lower the returns. The table includes deduction of applicable sales charges.

Absent any applicable fee waivers and/or expense limitations, performance would be lower.
As with all mutual funds, past performance (before and after taxes) is not a prediction of future results. Updated performance information is available on our website at www.transamerica.com/investments-fund-center or by calling 1-888-233-4339.
Prior to August 28, 2020, the fund had a portfolio construction manager and used different investment strategies. The performance set forth prior to that date is attributable to the previous portfolio construction manager.

Annual Total Returns (calendar years ended December 31) - Class A
 
Quarter Ended
Return
Best Quarter:
6/30/2020
11.61%
Worst Quarter:
6/30/2022
-9.04%

Average Annual Total Returns (periods ended December 31, 2022)
 
1 Year
5 Years
10 Years
Inception
Date
Class A
 
 
 
3/1/2002
Return before taxes
-19.88%
0.53%
2.94%
 
Return after taxes on
distributions
-20.39%
-0.92%
1.28%
 
Return after taxes on
distributions and sale of fund
shares
-11.70%
0.16%
1.90%
 
Class C (Return before taxes only)
-16.72%
0.88%
2.75%
11/11/2002
Class I (Return before taxes only)
-14.76%
1.98%
3.82%
11/30/2009
Class R (Return before taxes only)
-15.43%
1.35%
3.19%
6/15/2006
Bloomberg US Aggregate Bond
Index (reflects no deduction for
fees, expenses or taxes)
-13.01%
0.02%
1.06%
 
Transamerica Asset Allocation –
Conservative Portfolio Blended
Benchmark1 (reflects no deduction
for fees, expenses or taxes)
-14.58%
2.68%
4.40%
 
1
The fund’s secondary benchmark, the Transamerica Asset Allocation - Conservative Portfolio Blended Benchmark, consists of Bloomberg US Aggregate Bond Index, 65% and MSCI World Index, 35%.
The total return information for Class I of the fund reflects the impact of certain payments by Transamerica to the class in 2022.
The after-tax returns are calculated using the historic highest individual federal marginal income tax rates and do not reflect the impact of state and local taxes. Actual after-tax returns may depend on the investor’s individual tax situation and may differ from those shown. After-tax returns may not be relevant if the investment is made through a tax-exempt or tax-deferred account, such as a 401(k) plan.

After-tax returns are presented for only one class, and returns for other classes are presented before taxes only and will vary.
6

Management:
Investment Manager: Transamerica Asset Management, Inc.
Sub-Adviser: Goldman Sachs Asset Management, L.P.
Portfolio Managers:
Neill Nuttall
Portfolio Manager
since August 2020
Alexandra Wilson-Elizondo
Portfolio Manager
since January 2022
Purchase and Sale of Fund Shares: You may purchase, exchange or redeem shares of the fund on any day the New York Stock Exchange is open for business, online or through our website at www.transamerica.com, by mail to Transamerica Fund Services, Inc., P.O. Box 219945, Kansas City, MO 64121-9945, by telephone at 1-888-233-4339, by overnight mail to Transamerica Fund Services, Inc., 330 W. 9th Street, Kansas City, MO 64105 or through a financial intermediary. The minimum initial purchase for Class A and C shares is $1,000; the minimum subsequent investment is $50. The minimum initial purchase for payroll deduction and automatic investment plan is $500; the minimum subsequent investment is $50 per monthly fund account investment. The minimum investment for Class I shares is $1,000,000.
Class R shares are intended for purchase by participants in certain retirement plans such as 401(k) plans, 457 plans, employer-sponsored 403(b) plans, profit sharing and money purchase plans, defined-benefit plans and non-qualified deferred compensation plans (eligible retirement plans), and under the following conditions: Class R shares are available only when a plan’s recordkeeper or financial service firm serving as an intermediary has an agreement with Transamerica Funds, and in such eligible retirement plans where Class R shares are held on the books of the funds through omnibus or Network Level 3 accounts (either at the plan level or at the level of the financial service firm serving as an intermediary). There is no minimum investment for eligible retirement plans investing in Class R shares.
Tax Information: Fund distributions may be taxable as ordinary income, qualified dividend income, or capital gains, except when your investment is in an IRA, 401(k) or other tax-advantaged investment plan. In that case, you may be taxed when you take a distribution from such plan, depending on the type of plan, the circumstances of your distribution and other factors.
Payments to Broker-Dealers and Other Financial Intermediaries: If you purchase the fund through a broker-dealer or other financial intermediary, the fund and/or its affiliates may pay the intermediary for the sale of fund shares and related services. These payments may create a conflict of interest by influencing the broker-dealer or other intermediary and your salesperson to recommend the fund over another investment. Ask your salesperson or visit your financial intermediary’s website for more information.
7

Transamerica Asset Allocation-Growth Portfolio
Investment Objective: Seeks long-term capital appreciation.
Fees and Expenses: This table describes the fees and expenses that you may pay if you buy, hold and sell shares of the fund. You may pay other fees, such as brokerage commissions and other fees to financial intermediaries, which are not reflected in the tables and examples below.
You may qualify for sales charge discounts if you and your family invest, or agree to invest in the future, at least $50,000 in Transamerica Funds. More information about these and other discounts is available from your financial professional, in the “Waivers and Reductions of Sales Charges” section on page 295 of the fund’s prospectus, in the Appendix – “Waivers and Discounts Available from Intermediaries,” and in the fund’s statement of additional information (SAI) under the heading “Purchase of Shares” on page 80.

Shareholder Fees (fees paid directly from your investment)
Class:
A
C
I
R
Maximum sales charge (load) imposed
on purchases (as a percentage of
offering price)
5.50%
None
None
None
Maximum deferred sales charge (load)
(as a percentage of purchase price or
redemption proceeds, whichever is
lower)
None1
1.00%2
None
None
1 Class A shares of the fund purchased in amounts of $1 million or more that are not subject to an initial sales charge may be subject to a 1.00% contingent deferred sales charge if those shares are redeemed within 24 months of their purchase. A deferred sales charge may apply to certain redemptions of Class A shares of the fund purchased through an exchange from another Transamerica Fund.
2 Purchases of Class C shares of the fund may be subject to a 1.00% contingent deferred sales charge if those shares are redeemed within 12 months of their purchase. A deferred sales charge may apply to certain redemptions of Class C shares of the fund purchased through an exchange from another Transamerica Fund.

Annual Fund Operating Expenses (expenses that you pay each year as a percentage of the value of your investment)
Class:
A
C
I
R
Management fees
0.10%
0.10%
0.10%
0.10%
Distribution and service (12b-1) fees
0.25%
1.00%
None
0.50%
Other expenses
0.15%
0.20%
0.15%1
0.13%
Acquired fund fees and expenses2
0.71%
0.71%
0.71%
0.71%
Total annual fund operating expenses
1.21%
2.01%
0.96%
1.44%
Fee waiver and/or expense
reimbursement3
0.00%
0.00%
0.10%
0.00%
Total annual fund operating expenses
after fee waiver and/or expense
reimbursement
1.21%
2.01%
0.86%
1.44%
1
Other expenses reflect current transfer agency fees with respect to Class I.
2
Acquired fund fees and expenses reflect the fund’s pro rata share of the fees and expenses incurred by investing in other investment companies. Acquired fund fees and expenses are not included in the calculation of the ratios of expenses to average net assets shown in the Financial Highlights section of the fund’s prospectus.
3
The fund’s investment manager, Transamerica Asset Management, Inc. (“TAM”), has contractually agreed to reimburse 0.095% of the transfer agency fees on Class I shares through March 1, 2024.
Example: This Example is intended to help you compare the cost of investing in the fund with the cost of investing in other mutual funds.
The Example assumes that you invest $10,000 in the fund for the time periods indicated and then redeem all shares at the end of those periods (unless otherwise indicated). The Example also assumes that your investment has a 5% return each year and that the fund’s operating expenses remain the same. The Example reflects applicable waivers and/or reimbursements for the duration of such arrangement(s). Although your actual costs may be higher or lower, based on these assumptions your costs would be:

If the shares are redeemed at the end of each period:
 
1 year
3 years
5 years
10 years
Class A
$667
$913
$1,178
$1,935
Class C
$304
$631
$1,083
$2,338
Class I
$88
$296
$521
$1,169
Class R
$147
$456
$787
$1,724
If the shares are not redeemed:
 
1 year
3 years
5 years
10 years
Class A
$667
$913
$1,178
$1,935
Class C
$204
$631
$1,083
$2,338
Class I
$88
$296
$521
$1,169
Class R
$147
$456
$787
$1,724
Portfolio Turnover: The fund pays transaction costs, such as commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or “turns over” its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover rate may indicate higher transaction costs and may result in higher taxes when fund shares are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are not reflected in annual fund operating expenses or in the Example, affect the fund’s performance.
During the most recent fiscal year, the portfolio turnover rate for the fund was 24% of the average value of its portfolio.
Principal Investment Strategies: The fund is a fund of funds that seeks to achieve its investment objective by investing its assets primarily in a broad mix of Transamerica Funds (“underlying funds”). The fund’s sub-adviser, Goldman Sachs Asset Management, L.P. (the “sub-adviser”), follows an investment process that involves longer-term portfolio positioning through strategic asset allocation and dynamic asset allocation to pursue shorter-term opportunities based on the sub-adviser’s views of current market conditions.
Under normal circumstances, the fund expects to invest primarily in underlying funds that invest in U.S. and foreign (including emerging market) equities, commodity-related securities, and alternative investments.
The underlying funds may invest in a variety of U.S. and foreign equity and fixed-income (including high-yield) securities and alternative investments. The underlying funds may also invest in real estate investment trusts (“REITs”) and derivatives.
8

The sub-adviser develops and implements a strategic asset allocation for the fund. The sub-adviser seeks to budget the fund’s long term investment risk exposure across various risk factors to establish a diversified strategic asset allocation. An important component of the sub-adviser’s process is allocating risk across asset classes and strategies to increase diversification and, potentially, reduce volatility.
The sub-adviser may dynamically adjust the fund’s asset allocation as part of its investment process in response to certain changes in the markets, the economic cycle and the macroeconomic environment. This dynamic asset allocation may change the fund’s portfolio positioning based on the sub-adviser’s short- to medium-term market views on dislocations and attractive investment opportunities. These views may impact the relative weights across asset classes, and the allocation to geographies, sectors and industries, as well as the fund’s duration and sensitivity to inflation.
Allocation of assets among the underlying funds is based on factors such as diversification, general market views and outlooks, volatility in the equity markets, historical performance, current valuations, and other global economic factors.
The fund may invest directly in U.S. government securities and/or short-term commercial paper.
The fund’s investment manager, among other things, oversees and monitors the sub-adviser and is solely responsible for selecting the underlying funds among which the sub-adviser may allocate the fund’s assets. After the underlying funds have been selected, the sub-adviser determines which underlying funds it wishes to utilize to allocate the fund’s assets. The sub-adviser is not required to utilize all of the underlying funds selected by the manager in seeking to fulfill the fund’s target asset allocation.
The sub-adviser may invest up to 10% of the fund’s net assets in index-based underlying exchange-traded funds (“underlying ETFs”) that the sub-adviser selects as part of the sub-adviser’s dynamic asset allocation to gain exposure to asset classes, regions, countries, strategies or sectors that are a part of the sub-adviser’s asset allocation for the fund, but not otherwise accessible through available underlying funds.
The fund may, but is not required to, invest directly in futures contracts as part of the sub-adviser’s dynamic asset allocation. The use of futures would generally be limited to exchange-traded developed market equity index and U.S. Treasury futures. The fund may also have exposure to derivatives instruments, such as options, futures or forward contracts and swaps through its investments in the underlying funds and underlying ETFs.
It is not possible to predict the extent to which the fund will be invested in a particular underlying fund at any time. The fund may be a significant shareholder in certain underlying funds.
Each underlying fund and underlying ETF has its own investment objective, principal investment strategies and investment risks. The sub-adviser for each underlying fund and adviser or sub-adviser for each underlying ETF decides which securities to purchase and sell for that underlying fund or underlying ETF. The fund’s ability to achieve its investment objective depends largely on the performance of the underlying funds and underlying ETFs.
The “Underlying Funds” section of the prospectus lists the underlying Transamerica Funds currently available for investment by the fund, provides a summary of their respective investment objectives and principal investment strategies, and identifies certain risks of those funds.
The manager may change the underlying Transamerica Funds, and the sub-adviser may change the fund’s asset allocation, at any time without notice to shareholders and without shareholder approval.
Principal Risks: Risk is inherent in all investing. Many factors and risks affect the fund's performance, including those described below. The value of your investment in the fund, as well as the amount of return you receive on your investment, may fluctuate significantly day to day and over time. You may lose part or all of your investment in the fund or your investment may not perform as well as other similar investments. The fund, through its investments in underlying funds, is subject to the risks of the underlying funds. The following is a summary description of principal risks (in alphabetical order after certain key risks) of investing in the fund (either directly or through its investments in underlying funds). Each risk described below may not apply to each underlying fund and an underlying fund may be subject to additional or different risks than those described below. An investment in the fund is not a bank deposit and is not insured or guaranteed by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation or any other government agency. You may lose money if you invest in this fund.
Market – The market prices of the fund’s securities or other assets may go up or down, sometimes rapidly or unpredictably, due to general market conditions, overall economic trends or events, inflation, changes in interest rates, governmental actions or interventions, actions taken by the U.S. Federal Reserve or foreign central banks, market disruptions caused by tariffs, trade disputes or other factors, political developments, armed conflicts, economic sanctions, cybersecurity events, investor sentiment, public health events such as the spread of infectious disease, and other factors that may or may not be related to the issuer of the security or other asset. If the market prices of the fund’s securities and assets fall, the value of your investment in the fund could go down.
Economies and financial markets throughout the world are increasingly interconnected. Events or circumstances in one or more countries or regions could be highly disruptive to, and have profound impacts on, global economies or markets. As a result, whether or not the fund invests in securities of issuers located in or with significant exposure to the countries directly affected, the value and liquidity of the fund’s investments may go down.
In recent years, the COVID-19 pandemic, the large expansion of government deficits and debt as a result of government actions to mitigate the effects of the pandemic, the Russian invasion of Ukraine and the rise of inflation have resulted in extreme volatility in the global economy and in global financial markets. These events could be prolonged and could continue to adversely affect the value and liquidity of the fund’s investments, impair the fund’s ability to satisfy redemption requests, and negatively impact the fund’s performance.
Asset Allocation – The fund’s investment performance is significantly impacted by the fund’s asset allocation and reallocation from time to time. The sub-adviser's decisions whether and
9

when to tactically overweight or underweight asset classes and select a mix of underlying funds may not produce the desired results. These actions may be unsuccessful in maximizing return and/or avoiding investment losses. The value of your investment may decrease if the sub-adviser’s judgment about the attractiveness, value or market trends affecting a particular asset class, investment style, technique or strategy, underlying fund or other issuer is incorrect. The available underlying funds selected by the sub-adviser may underperform the market or similar funds.
Underlying Funds – Because the fund invests its assets in various underlying funds, its ability to achieve its investment objective depends largely on the performance of the underlying funds in which it invests. Investing in underlying funds subjects the fund to the risks of investing in the underlying securities or assets held by those underlying funds. Each of the underlying funds in which the fund may invest has its own investment risks, and those risks can affect the value of the underlying funds' shares and therefore the value of the fund's investments. There can be no assurance that the investment objective of any underlying fund will be achieved. To the extent that the fund invests more of its assets in one underlying fund than in another, the fund will have greater exposure to the risks of that underlying fund. In addition, the fund will bear a pro rata portion of the operating expenses of the underlying funds in which it invests. The “List and Description of Certain Underlying Funds” section of the fund's prospectus identifies certain risks of each underlying fund.
Equity Securities – Equity securities generally have greater risk of loss than debt securities. Stock markets are volatile and the value of equity securities may go up or down, sometimes rapidly and unpredictably. The value of equity securities fluctuates based on real or perceived changes in a company’s financial condition, factors affecting a particular industry or industries, and overall market, economic and political conditions. If the market prices of the equity securities owned by the fund fall, the value of your investment in the fund will decline. The fund may lose its entire investment in the equity securities of an issuer. A change in financial condition or other event affecting a single issuer may adversely impact securities markets as a whole.
Management – The value of your investment may go down if the investment manager’s or sub-adviser's judgments and decisions are incorrect or otherwise do not produce the desired results, or if the investment strategy does not work as intended. You may also suffer losses if there are imperfections, errors or limitations in the quantitative, analytic or other tools, resources, information and data used, investment techniques applied, or the analyses employed or relied on, by the investment manageror sub-adviser, if such tools, resources, information or data are used incorrectly or otherwise do not work as intended, or if the investment manager’s or sub-adviser's investment style is out of favor or otherwise fails to produce the desired results. Any of these things could cause the fund to lose value or its results to lag relevant benchmarks or other funds with similar objectives.
Active Trading – The fund may purchase and sell securities without regard to the length of time held. Active trading may be more pronounced during periods of market volatility, may have a negative impact on performance and may generate greater amounts of short-term capital gains.
Asset Class Variation – The underlying funds invest principally in the securities constituting their asset class (i.e., equity or fixed-income) or underlying index components. However, an underlying fund may vary the percentage of its assets in these securities (subject to any applicable regulatory requirements). Depending upon the percentage of securities in a particular asset class held by the underlying funds at any given time, and the percentage of the fund's assets invested in various underlying funds, the fund's actual exposure to the securities in a particular asset class may vary substantially from its target allocation for that asset class, and this in turn may adversely affect the fund's performance.
Commodities and Commodity-Related Securities – Commodities and commodity-related businesses or industries are subject to changes and volatility in commodity prices generally, regulatory, economic and political developments, weather events and natural disasters, tariffs and trade disruptions, and market disruptions. Commodities and commodity-linked investments may be less liquid than other investments. Commodity-linked investments also are subject to the credit risk associated with the issuer, and their value may decline substantially if the issuer’s creditworthiness deteriorates.
Counterparty – The fund could lose money if the counterparties to derivatives, repurchase agreements and/or other financial contracts entered into for the fund do not fulfill their contractual obligations. In addition, the fund may incur costs and may be hindered or delayed in enforcing its rights against a counterparty.
Credit – If an issuer or other obligor (such as a party providing insurance or other credit enhancement) of a security held by the fund or a counterparty to a financial contract with the fund is unable or unwilling to meet its financial obligations, or is downgraded or perceived to be less creditworthy (whether by market participants or otherwise), or if the value of any underlying assets declines, the value of your investment will typically decline. A decline may be rapid and/or significant, particularly in certain market environments. In addition, the fund may incur costs and may be hindered or delayed in enforcing its rights against an issuer, obligor or counterparty.
Currency – The value of a fund’s investments in securities denominated in foreign currencies increases or decreases as the rates of exchange between those currencies and the U.S. dollar change. U.S. dollar-denominated securities of foreign issuers may also be affected by currency risk. Currency exchange rates can be volatile and may fluctuate significantly over short periods of time. Currency conversion costs and currency fluctuations could reduce or eliminate investment gains or add to investment losses. A fund may be unable or may choose not to hedge its foreign currency exposure or any hedge may not be effective.
Derivatives – The use of derivatives involves a variety of risks, which may be different from, or greater than, the risks associated with investing in traditional securities, such as stocks and bonds. Risks of derivatives include leverage risk, liquidity risk, valuation risk, market risk, counterparty risk, credit risk, operational risk and legal risk. Use of derivatives can increase fund losses, increase costs, reduce opportunities for gains, increase fund volatility, and not produce the result intended. Certain derivatives have the potential for unlimited loss, regardless of the size of the initial investment. Even a small investment in derivatives can have a disproportionate impact on the fund. Derivatives may be difficult or impossible to
10

sell, unwind or value, and the counterparty (including, if applicable, the fund’s clearing broker, the derivatives exchange or the clearinghouse) may default on its obligations to the fund. In certain cases, the fund may incur costs and may be hindered or delayed in enforcing its rights against or closing out derivatives instruments with a counterparty, which may result in additional losses. Derivatives are also generally subject to the risks applicable to the assets, rates, indices or other indicators underlying the derivative, including market risk, credit risk, liquidity risk, management and valuation risk. Also, suitable derivative transactions may not be available in all circumstances or at reasonable prices. The value of a derivative may fluctuate more or less than, or otherwise not correlate well with, the underlying assets, rates, indices or other indicators to which it relates. The fund may segregate cash or other liquid assets to cover the funding of its obligations under derivatives contracts or make margin payments when it takes positions in derivatives involving obligations to third parties. New Rule 18f-4 under the 1940 Act provides a comprehensive regulatory framework for the use of derivatives by funds and imposes new requirements and restrictions on funds using derivatives. Rule 18f-4 could have an adverse impact on the fund’s performance and its ability to implement its investment strategies as it has historically and may increase costs related to the fund’s use of derivatives. It is not currently clear what impact, if any, the rule will have on the availability, liquidity or performance of derivatives. The rule may not be effective to limit the risk of loss from derivatives.
Emerging Markets – Investments in securities of issuers located or doing business in emerging markets are subject to heightened foreign investments risks and may experience rapid and extreme changes in value. Emerging market countries tend to have less developed and less stable economic, political and legal systems and regulatory and accounting standards, may have policies that restrict investment by foreigners or that prevent foreign investors such as the fund from withdrawing their money at will, and are more likely to experience nationalization, expropriation and confiscatory taxation. In addition, emerging market securities may have low trading volumes and may be or become illiquid.
Extension – When interest rates rise, payments of fixed-income securities, including asset- and mortgage-backed securities, may occur more slowly than anticipated, causing their market prices to decline.
Fixed-Income Securities – Risks of fixed-income securities include credit risk, interest rate risk, counterparty risk, prepayment risk, extension risk, valuation risk, and liquidity risk. The value of fixed-income securities may go up or down, sometimes rapidly and unpredictably, due to general market conditions, such as real or perceived adverse economic or political conditions, tariffs and trade disruptions, inflation, changes in interest rates, lack of liquidity in the bond markets or adverse investor sentiment. In addition, the value of a fixed-income security may decline if the issuer or other obligor of the security fails to pay principal and/or interest, otherwise defaults or has its credit rating downgraded or is perceived to be less creditworthy, or the credit quality or value of any underlying assets declines. If the value of fixed-income securities owned by the fund falls, the value of your investment will go down. The fund may lose its entire investment in the fixed-income securities of an issuer.
Focused Investing – To the extent the fund invests in a limited number of countries, regions, sectors, industries or market segments, in a limited number of issuers, or in issuers in related businesses or that are subject to related operating risks, the fund will be more susceptible to negative events affecting those countries, regions, sectors, industries, segments or issuers, and the value of its shares may be more volatile than if it invested more widely.
Foreign Investments – Investing in securities of foreign issuers or issuers with significant exposure to foreign markets involves additional risks. Foreign markets can be less liquid, less regulated, less transparent and more volatile than U.S. markets. The value of the fund’s foreign investments may decline, sometimes rapidly or unpredictably, because of factors affecting the particular issuer as well as foreign markets and issuers generally, such as unfavorable government actions, including nationalization, expropriation or confiscatory taxation, reduction of government or central bank support, tariffs and trade disruptions, sanctions, political or financial instability, social unrest or other adverse economic or political developments. Foreign investments may also be subject to different accounting practices and different regulatory, legal, auditing, financial reporting and recordkeeping standards and practices, and may be more difficult to value than investments in U.S. issuers. Certain foreign clearance and settlement procedures may result in an inability to execute transactions or delays in settlement.
Growth Stocks – Returns on growth stocks may not move in tandem with returns on other categories of stocks or the market as a whole. Growth stocks typically are particularly sensitive to market movements and may involve larger price swings because their market prices tend to reflect future expectations. When it appears those expectations may not be met, the prices of growth stocks typically fall. Growth stocks may also be more volatile because they often do not pay dividends. The values of growth stocks tend to go down when interest rates rise because the rise in interest rates reduces the current value of future cash flows. Growth stocks as a group may be out of favor and underperform the overall equity market for a long period of time, for example, while the market favors “value” stocks.
High-Yield Debt Securities – High-yield debt securities, commonly referred to as “junk” bonds, are securities that are rated below “investment grade” or are of comparable quality. Changes in interest rates, the market’s perception of the issuers, the creditworthiness of the issuers and negative perceptions of the junk bond market generally may significantly affect the value of these bonds. Junk bonds are considered speculative, tend to be volatile, typically have a higher risk of default, tend to be less liquid and more difficult to value than higher grade securities, and may result in losses for the fund.
Interest Rate –The value of fixed-income securities generally goes down when interest rates rise. A rise in rates tends to have a greater impact on the prices of longer term or duration securities. Changes in interest rates also may affect the liquidity of the fund’s investments. A general rise in interest rates may cause investors to sell fixed-income securities on a large scale, which could adversely affect the price and liquidity of fixed-income securities generally and could also result in increased redemptions from the fund. Increased redemptions could cause the fund to sell securities at inopportune times or depressed prices and result in further losses.
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Leveraging – To the extent that the fund borrows or uses derivatives or other investments, such as ETFs, that have embedded leverage, your investment may be subject to heightened volatility, risk of loss and costs. Other risks also will be compounded because leverage generally magnifies the effect of a change in the value of an asset and creates a risk of loss of value on a larger pool of assets than the fund would otherwise have. Use of leverage may result in the loss of a substantial amount, and possibly all, of the fund’s assets. The fund also may have to sell assets at inopportune times to satisfy its obligations.
Liquidity – The fund may make investments that are illiquid or that become illiquid after purchase. Illiquid investments can be difficult to value, may trade at a discount from comparable, more liquid investments, and may be subject to wide fluctuations in value. Liquidity risk may be magnified in rising interest rate environments. If the fund is forced to sell an illiquid investment to meet redemption requests or other cash needs, the fund may be forced to sell at a substantial loss or may not be able to sell at all. Liquidity of particular investments, or even entire asset classes, including U.S. Treasury securities, can deteriorate rapidly, particularly during times of market turmoil, and those investments may be difficult or impossible for the fund to sell. This may prevent the fund from limiting losses.
Prepayment or Call – Many issuers have a right to prepay their fixed-income securities. If this happens, the fund will not benefit from the rise in the market price of the securities that normally accompanies a decline in interest rates and may be forced to reinvest the prepayment proceeds in securities with lower yields.
REITs – Investing in real estate investment trusts (“REITs”) involves unique risks. When the fund invests in REITs, it is subject to risks generally associated with investing in real estate. A REIT’s performance depends on the types and locations of the properties it owns, how well it manages those properties and cash flow. REITs may have limited financial resources, may trade less frequently and in limited volume, may engage in dilutive offerings, and may be subject to more abrupt or erratic price movements than the overall securities markets. In addition to its own expenses, the fund will indirectly bear its proportionate share of any management and other expenses paid by REITs in which it invests. U.S. REITs are subject to a number of highly technical tax-related rules and requirements; and a U.S. REIT’s failure to qualify for the favorable U.S. federal income tax treatment generally available to U.S. REITs could result in corporate-level taxation, significantly reducing the return on an investment to the fund.
Structure Conflicts – Transamerica Asset Management, Inc. (“TAM”), the fund’s investment manager, has established an investment program whereby a substantial portion of the fund’s assets are invested in underlying Transamerica funds. TAM does not consider unaffiliated funds as underlying investment options for these assets, even if unaffiliated funds have better investment performance or lower total expenses.
Underlying Exchange-Traded Funds – To the extent the fund invests its assets in underlying ETFs, its ability to achieve its investment objective will depend in part on the performance of the underlying ETFs in which it invests. Investing in underlying ETFs subjects the fund to the risks of investing in the underlying securities or assets held by those ETFs. Each of the underlying ETFs in which the fund may invest has its own investment risks, and
those risks can affect the value of the underlying ETFs’ shares and therefore the value of the fund's investments. There can be no assurance that the investment objective of any underlying ETF will be achieved. To the extent that the fund invests more of its assets in one underlying ETF than in another, the fund will have greater exposure to the risks of that underlying ETF. In addition, the fund will bear a pro rata portion of the operating expenses of the underlying ETFs in which it invests.
U.S. Government and Agency Obligations – Government agency obligations have different levels of credit support and, therefore, different degrees of credit risk. Securities issued by agencies and instrumentalities of the U.S. government that are supported by the full faith and credit of the U.S. government generally present a lesser degree of credit risk than securities issued by agencies and instrumentalities sponsored by the U.S. government that are supported only by the issuer’s right to borrow from the U.S. Treasury and securities issued by agencies and instrumentalities sponsored by the U.S. government that are supported only by the credit of the issuing agencies. A security backed by the “full faith and credit” of the U.S. government is guaranteed only as to its stated interest rate and face value at maturity, not its current market price.
Valuation – The sales price the fund could receive for any particular portfolio investment may differ from the fund's valuation of the investment, particularly for securities that trade in thin or volatile markets, that are priced based upon valuations provided by third party pricing services that use matrix or evaluated pricing systems, or that are valued using a fair value methodology. These differences may increase significantly and affect fund investments more broadly during periods of market volatility. Investors who purchase or redeem fund shares on days when the fund is holding fair-valued securities may receive fewer or more shares or lower or higher redemption proceeds than they would have received if the fund had not fair-valued securities or had used a different valuation methodology. The fund’s ability to value its investments may also be impacted by technological issues and/or errors by pricing services or other third party service providers. Fair value pricing involves subjective judgment, which may prove to be incorrect.
Value Investing – The prices of securities the sub-adviser believes are undervalued may not appreciate as anticipated or may go down. The value approach to investing involves the risk that stocks may remain undervalued, undervaluation may become more severe, or perceived undervaluation may actually represent intrinsic value. Value stocks as a group may be out of favor and underperform the overall equity market for a long period of time, for example, while the market favors “growth” stocks.
Performance: The bar chart and the table below provide some indication of the risks of investing in the fund. The bar chart shows how the fund’s performance has varied from year to year. The table shows how the fund’s average annual total returns for different periods compare to the returns of a broad measure of market performance.
The bar chart does not reflect the impact of sales charges, which, if reflected, would lower the returns. The table includes deduction of applicable sales charges.
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Absent any applicable fee waivers and/or expense limitations, performance would be lower.
As with all mutual funds, past performance (before and after taxes) is not a prediction of future results. Updated performance information is available on our website at www.transamerica.com/investments-fund-center or by calling 1-888-233-4339.
Prior to August 28, 2020, the fund had a portfolio construction manager and used different investment strategies. The performance set forth prior to that date is attributable to the previous portfolio construction manager.

Annual Total Returns (calendar years ended December 31) - Class A
 
Quarter Ended
Return
Best Quarter:
6/30/2020
24.48%
Worst Quarter:
3/31/2020
-24.07%

Average Annual Total Returns (periods ended December 31, 2022)
 
1 Year
5 Years
10 Years
Inception
Date
Class A
 
 
 
3/1/2002
Return before taxes
-23.80%
2.56%
7.06%
 
Return after taxes on
distributions
-25.21%
0.40%
5.02%
 
Return after taxes on
distributions and sale of fund
shares
-13.01%
1.85%
5.43%
 
Class C (Return before taxes only)
-20.68%
2.93%
6.88%
11/11/2002
Class I (Return before taxes only)
-18.92%
4.08%
8.00%
11/30/2009
Class R (Return before taxes only)
-19.53%
3.46%
7.37%
6/15/2006
MSCI World Index (reflects no
deduction for fees, expenses or
taxes)
-18.14%
6.14%
8.85%
 
The total return information for Class C and Class I of the fund reflects the impact of certain payments by Transamerica to the class in 2022.
The after-tax returns are calculated using the historic highest individual federal marginal income tax rates and do not reflect the impact of state and local taxes. Actual after-tax returns may depend on the investor’s individual tax situation and may differ from those shown. After-tax returns may not be relevant if the investment is made through a tax-exempt or tax-deferred account, such as a 401(k) plan.

After-tax returns are presented for only one class, and returns for other classes are presented before taxes only and will vary.
Management:
Investment Manager: Transamerica Asset Management, Inc.
Sub-Adviser: Goldman Sachs Asset Management, L.P.
Portfolio Managers:
Neill Nuttall
Portfolio Manager
since August 2020
Alexandra Wilson-Elizondo
Portfolio Manager
since January 2022
Purchase and Sale of Fund Shares: You may purchase, exchange or redeem shares of the fund on any day the New York Stock Exchange is open for business, online or through our website at www.transamerica.com, by mail to Transamerica Fund Services, Inc., P.O. Box 219945, Kansas City, MO 64121-9945, by telephone at 1-888-233-4339, by overnight mail to Transamerica Fund Services, Inc., 330 W. 9th Street, Kansas City, MO 64105 or through a financial intermediary. The minimum initial purchase for Class A and C shares is $1,000; the minimum subsequent investment is $50. The minimum initial purchase for payroll deduction and automatic investment plan is $500; the minimum subsequent investment is $50 per monthly fund account investment. The minimum investment for Class I shares is $1,000,000.
Class R shares are intended for purchase by participants in certain retirement plans such as 401(k) plans, 457 plans, employer-sponsored 403(b) plans, profit sharing and money purchase plans, defined-benefit plans and non-qualified deferred compensation plans (eligible retirement plans), and under the following conditions: Class R shares are available only when a plan’s recordkeeper or financial service firm serving as an intermediary has an agreement with Transamerica Funds, and in such eligible retirement plans where Class R shares are held on the books of the funds through omnibus or Network Level 3 accounts (either at the plan level or at the level of the financial service firm serving as an intermediary). There is no minimum investment for eligible retirement plans investing in Class R shares.
Tax Information: Fund distributions may be taxable as ordinary income, qualified dividend income, or capital gains, except when your investment is in an IRA, 401(k) or other tax-advantaged investment plan. In that case, you may be taxed when you take a distribution from such plan, depending on the type of plan, the circumstances of your distribution and other factors.
Payments to Broker-Dealers and Other Financial Intermediaries: If you purchase the fund through a broker-dealer or other financial intermediary, the fund and/or its affiliates may pay the intermediary for the sale of fund shares and related services. These payments may create a conflict of interest by influencing the broker-dealer or other intermediary and your salesperson to recommend the fund over another investment. Ask your salesperson or visit your financial intermediary’s website for more information.
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Transamerica Asset Allocation-Moderate Growth Portfolio
Investment Objective: Seeks capital appreciation with current income as a secondary objective.
Fees and Expenses: This table describes the fees and expenses that you may pay if you buy, hold and sell shares of the fund. You may pay other fees, such as brokerage commissions and other fees to financial intermediaries, which are not reflected in the tables and examples below.
You may qualify for sales charge discounts if you and your family invest, or agree to invest in the future, at least $50,000 in Transamerica Funds. More information about these and other discounts is available from your financial professional, in the “Waivers and Reductions of Sales Charges” section on page 295 of the fund’s prospectus, in the Appendix – “Waivers and Discounts Available from Intermediaries,” and in the fund’s statement of additional information (SAI) under the heading “Purchase of Shares” on page 80.

Shareholder Fees (fees paid directly from your investment)
Class:
A
C
I
R
Maximum sales charge (load) imposed
on purchases (as a percentage of
offering price)
5.50%
None
None
None
Maximum deferred sales charge (load)
(as a percentage of purchase price or
redemption proceeds, whichever is
lower)
None1
1.00%2
None
None
1 Class A shares of the fund purchased in amounts of $1 million or more that are not subject to an initial sales charge may be subject to a 1.00% contingent deferred sales charge if those shares are redeemed within 24 months of their purchase. A deferred sales charge may apply to certain redemptions of Class A shares of the fund purchased through an exchange from another Transamerica Fund.
2 Purchases of Class C shares of the fund may be subject to a 1.00% contingent deferred sales charge if those shares are redeemed within 12 months of their purchase. A deferred sales charge may apply to certain redemptions of Class C shares of the fund purchased through an exchange from another Transamerica Fund.

Annual Fund Operating Expenses (expenses that you pay each year as a percentage of the value of your investment)
Class:
A
C
I
R
Management fees
0.10%
0.10%
0.10%
0.10%
Distribution and service (12b-1) fees
0.25%
1.00%
None
0.50%
Other expenses
0.12%
0.17%
0.14%1
0.13%
Acquired fund fees and expenses2
0.66%
0.66%
0.66%
0.66%
Total annual fund operating expenses
1.13%
1.93%
0.90%
1.39%
Fee waiver and/or expense
reimbursement3
0.00%
0.00%
0.10%
0.00%
Total annual fund operating expenses
after fee waiver and/or expense
reimbursement
1.13%
1.93%
0.80%
1.39%
1
Other expenses reflect current transfer agency fees with respect to Class I.
2
Acquired fund fees and expenses reflect the fund’s pro rata share of the fees and expenses incurred by investing in other investment companies. Acquired fund fees and expenses are not included in the calculation of the ratios of expenses to average net assets shown in the Financial Highlights section of the fund’s prospectus.
3
The fund’s investment manager, Transamerica Asset Management, Inc. (“TAM”), has contractually agreed to reimburse 0.095% of the transfer agency fees on Class I shares through March 1, 2024.
Example: This Example is intended to help you compare the cost of investing in the fund with the cost of investing in other mutual funds.
The Example assumes that you invest $10,000 in the fund for the time periods indicated and then redeem all shares at the end of those periods (unless otherwise indicated). The Example also assumes that your investment has a 5% return each year and that the fund’s operating expenses remain the same. The Example reflects applicable waivers and/or reimbursements for the duration of such arrangement(s). Although your actual costs may be higher or lower, based on these assumptions your costs would be:

If the shares are redeemed at the end of each period:
 
1 year
3 years
5 years
10 years
Class A
$659
$889
$1,138
$1,849
Class C
$296
$606
$1,042
$2,254
Class I
$82
$277
$489
$1,099
Class R
$142
$440
$760
$1,669
If the shares are not redeemed:
 
1 year
3 years
5 years
10 years
Class A
$659
$889
$1,138
$1,849
Class C
$196
$606
$1,042
$2,254
Class I
$82
$277
$489
$1,099
Class R
$142
$440
$760
$1,669
Portfolio Turnover: The fund pays transaction costs, such as commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or “turns over” its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover rate may indicate higher transaction costs and may result in higher taxes when fund shares are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are not reflected in annual fund operating expenses or in the Example, affect the fund’s performance.
During the most recent fiscal year, the portfolio turnover rate for the fund was 35% of the average value of its portfolio.
Principal Investment Strategies: The fund is a fund of funds that seeks to achieve its investment objective by investing its assets primarily in a broad mix of Transamerica Funds (“underlying funds”). The fund’s sub-adviser, Goldman Sachs Asset Management, L.P. (the “sub-adviser”), follows an investment process that involves longer-term portfolio positioning through strategic asset allocation and dynamic asset allocation to pursue shorter-term opportunities based on the sub-adviser’s views of current market conditions.
Under normal circumstances, investments in underlying funds are expected to achieve a mix over time of approximately 70% of net assets in equities, which may include both stocks and commodity-related securities, and approximately 30% of net assets in fixed-income securities, which may include bonds, convertible securities, cash, cash equivalents, and other money market instruments. These percentages may vary.
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The underlying funds may invest in a variety of U.S. and foreign equity and fixed-income (including high-yield) securities and alternative investments. The underlying funds may also invest in real estate investment trusts (“REITs”) and derivatives.
The sub-adviser develops and implements a strategic asset allocation for the fund. The sub-adviser seeks to budget the fund’s long term investment risk exposure across various risk factors to establish a diversified strategic asset allocation. An important component of the sub-adviser’s process is allocating risk across asset classes and strategies to increase diversification and, potentially, reduce volatility.
The sub-adviser may dynamically adjust the fund’s asset allocation as part of its investment process in response to certain changes in the markets, the economic cycle and the macroeconomic environment. This dynamic asset allocation may change the fund’s portfolio positioning based on the sub-adviser’s short- to medium-term market views on dislocations and attractive investment opportunities. These views may impact the relative weights across asset classes, and the allocation to geographies, sectors and industries, as well as the fund’s duration and sensitivity to inflation.
Allocation of assets among the underlying funds is based on factors such as diversification, general market views and outlooks, volatility in the equity markets, historical performance, current valuations, and other global economic factors.
The fund may invest directly in U.S. government securities and/or short-term commercial paper.
The fund’s investment manager, among other things, oversees and monitors the sub-adviser and is solely responsible for selecting the underlying funds among which the sub-adviser may allocate the fund’s assets. After the underlying funds have been selected, the sub-adviser determines which underlying funds it wishes to utilize to allocate the fund’s assets. The sub-adviser is not required to utilize all of the underlying funds selected by the manager in seeking to fulfill the fund’s target asset allocation.
The sub-adviser may invest up to 10% of the fund’s net assets in index-based underlying exchange-traded funds (“underlying ETFs”) that the sub-adviser selects as part of the sub-adviser’s dynamic asset allocation to gain exposure to asset classes, regions, countries, strategies or sectors that are a part of the sub-adviser’s asset allocation for the fund, but not otherwise accessible through available underlying funds.
The fund may, but is not required to, invest directly in futures contracts as part of the sub-adviser’s dynamic asset allocation. The use of futures would generally be limited to exchange-traded developed market equity index and U.S. Treasury futures. The fund may also have exposure to derivatives instruments, such as options, futures or forward contracts and swaps through its investments in the underlying funds and underlying ETFs.
It is not possible to predict the extent to which the fund will be invested in a particular underlying fund at any time. The fund may be a significant shareholder in certain underlying funds.
Each underlying fund and underlying ETF has its own investment objective, principal investment strategies and investment risks. The sub-adviser for each underlying fund and adviser or sub-adviser for each underlying ETF decides which securities to purchase and sell for that underlying fund or underlying ETF. The fund’s ability to achieve its investment objective depends largely on the performance of the underlying funds and underlying ETFs.
The “Underlying Funds” section of the prospectus lists the underlying Transamerica Funds currently available for investment by the fund, provides a summary of their respective investment objectives and principal investment strategies, and identifies certain risks of those funds.
The manager may change the underlying Transamerica Funds, and the sub-adviser may change the fund’s asset allocation, at any time without notice to shareholders and without shareholder approval.
Principal Risks: Risk is inherent in all investing. Many factors and risks affect the fund's performance, including those described below. The value of your investment in the fund, as well as the amount of return you receive on your investment, may fluctuate significantly day to day and over time. You may lose part or all of your investment in the fund or your investment may not perform as well as other similar investments. The fund, through its investments in underlying funds, is subject to the risks of the underlying funds. The following is a summary description of principal risks (in alphabetical order after certain key risks) of investing in the fund (either directly or through its investments in underlying funds). Each risk described below may not apply to each underlying fund and an underlying fund may be subject to additional or different risks than those described below. An investment in the fund is not a bank deposit and is not insured or guaranteed by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation or any other government agency. You may lose money if you invest in this fund.
Market – The market prices of the fund’s securities or other assets may go up or down, sometimes rapidly or unpredictably, due to general market conditions, overall economic trends or events, inflation, changes in interest rates, governmental actions or interventions, actions taken by the U.S. Federal Reserve or foreign central banks, market disruptions caused by tariffs, trade disputes or other factors, political developments, armed conflicts, economic sanctions, cybersecurity events, investor sentiment, public health events such as the spread of infectious disease, and other factors that may or may not be related to the issuer of the security or other asset. If the market prices of the fund’s securities and assets fall, the value of your investment in the fund could go down.
Economies and financial markets throughout the world are increasingly interconnected. Events or circumstances in one or more countries or regions could be highly disruptive to, and have profound impacts on, global economies or markets. As a result, whether or not the fund invests in securities of issuers located in or with significant exposure to the countries directly affected, the value and liquidity of the fund’s investments may go down.
In recent years, the COVID-19 pandemic, the large expansion of government deficits and debt as a result of government actions to mitigate the effects of the pandemic, the Russian invasion of Ukraine and the rise of inflation have resulted in extreme volatility in the global economy and in global financial markets. These
15

events could be prolonged and could continue to adversely affect the value and liquidity of the fund’s investments, impair the fund’s ability to satisfy redemption requests, and negatively impact the fund’s performance.
Asset Allocation – The fund’s investment performance is significantly impacted by the fund’s asset allocation and reallocation from time to time. The sub-adviser's decisions whether and when to tactically overweight or underweight asset classes and select a mix of underlying funds may not produce the desired results. These actions may be unsuccessful in maximizing return and/or avoiding investment losses. The value of your investment may decrease if the sub-adviser’s judgment about the attractiveness, value or market trends affecting a particular asset class, investment style, technique or strategy, underlying fund or other issuer is incorrect. The available underlying funds selected by the sub-adviser may underperform the market or similar funds.
Underlying Funds – Because the fund invests its assets in various underlying funds, its ability to achieve its investment objective depends largely on the performance of the underlying funds in which it invests. Investing in underlying funds subjects the fund to the risks of investing in the underlying securities or assets held by those underlying funds. Each of the underlying funds in which the fund may invest has its own investment risks, and those risks can affect the value of the underlying funds' shares and therefore the value of the fund's investments. There can be no assurance that the investment objective of any underlying fund will be achieved. To the extent that the fund invests more of its assets in one underlying fund than in another, the fund will have greater exposure to the risks of that underlying fund. In addition, the fund will bear a pro rata portion of the operating expenses of the underlying funds in which it invests. The “List and Description of Certain Underlying Funds” section of the fund's prospectus identifies certain risks of each underlying fund.
Equity Securities – Equity securities generally have greater risk of loss than debt securities. Stock markets are volatile and the value of equity securities may go up or down, sometimes rapidly and unpredictably. The value of equity securities fluctuates based on real or perceived changes in a company’s financial condition, factors affecting a particular industry or industries, and overall market, economic and political conditions. If the market prices of the equity securities owned by the fund fall, the value of your investment in the fund will decline. The fund may lose its entire investment in the equity securities of an issuer. A change in financial condition or other event affecting a single issuer may adversely impact securities markets as a whole.
Fixed-Income Securities – Risks of fixed-income securities include credit risk, interest rate risk, counterparty risk, prepayment risk, extension risk, valuation risk, and liquidity risk. The value of fixed-income securities may go up or down, sometimes rapidly and unpredictably, due to general market conditions, such as real or perceived adverse economic or political conditions, tariffs and trade disruptions, inflation, changes in interest rates, lack of liquidity in the bond markets or adverse investor sentiment. In addition, the value of a fixed-income security may decline if the issuer or other obligor of the security fails to pay principal and/or interest, otherwise defaults or has its credit rating downgraded or is perceived to be less creditworthy, or the credit quality or value of any underlying
assets declines. If the value of fixed-income securities owned by the fund falls, the value of your investment will go down. The fund may lose its entire investment in the fixed-income securities of an issuer.
Management – The value of your investment may go down if the investment manager’s or sub-adviser's judgments and decisions are incorrect or otherwise do not produce the desired results, or if the investment strategy does not work as intended. You may also suffer losses if there are imperfections, errors or limitations in the quantitative, analytic or other tools, resources, information and data used, investment techniques applied, or the analyses employed or relied on, by the investment manageror sub-adviser, if such tools, resources, information or data are used incorrectly or otherwise do not work as intended, or if the investment manager’s or sub-adviser's investment style is out of favor or otherwise fails to produce the desired results. Any of these things could cause the fund to lose value or its results to lag relevant benchmarks or other funds with similar objectives.
Active Trading – The fund may purchase and sell securities without regard to the length of time held. Active trading may be more pronounced during periods of market volatility, may have a negative impact on performance and may generate greater amounts of short-term capital gains.
Asset Class Variation – The underlying funds invest principally in the securities constituting their asset class (i.e., equity or fixed-income) or underlying index components. However, an underlying fund may vary the percentage of its assets in these securities (subject to any applicable regulatory requirements). Depending upon the percentage of securities in a particular asset class held by the underlying funds at any given time, and the percentage of the fund's assets invested in various underlying funds, the fund's actual exposure to the securities in a particular asset class may vary substantially from its target allocation for that asset class, and this in turn may adversely affect the fund's performance.
Commodities and Commodity-Related Securities – Commodities and commodity-related businesses or industries are subject to changes and volatility in commodity prices generally, regulatory, economic and political developments, weather events and natural disasters, tariffs and trade disruptions, and market disruptions. Commodities and commodity-linked investments may be less liquid than other investments. Commodity-linked investments also are subject to the credit risk associated with the issuer, and their value may decline substantially if the issuer’s creditworthiness deteriorates.
Convertible Securities – Convertible securities are subject to risks associated with both fixed-income and equity securities. For example, if market interest rates rise, the value of a convertible security typically falls. In addition, a convertible security is subject to the risk that the issuer will not be able to pay interest or dividends when due, and the market value of the security may change based on the issuer’s actual or perceived creditworthiness. Since the convertible security derives a portion of its value from the underlying common stock, the security is also subject to the same types of market and issuer-specific risks that apply to the underlying common stock. Convertible securities generally offer lower interest or dividend yields than non-convertible securities of similar quality.
16

Counterparty – The fund could lose money if the counterparties to derivatives, repurchase agreements and/or other financial contracts entered into for the fund do not fulfill their contractual obligations. In addition, the fund may incur costs and may be hindered or delayed in enforcing its rights against a counterparty.
Credit – If an issuer or other obligor (such as a party providing insurance or other credit enhancement) of a security held by the fund or a counterparty to a financial contract with the fund is unable or unwilling to meet its financial obligations, or is downgraded or perceived to be less creditworthy (whether by market participants or otherwise), or if the value of any underlying assets declines, the value of your investment will typically decline. A decline may be rapid and/or significant, particularly in certain market environments. In addition, the fund may incur costs and may be hindered or delayed in enforcing its rights against an issuer, obligor or counterparty.
Currency – The value of a fund’s investments in securities denominated in foreign currencies increases or decreases as the rates of exchange between those currencies and the U.S. dollar change. U.S. dollar-denominated securities of foreign issuers may also be affected by currency risk. Currency exchange rates can be volatile and may fluctuate significantly over short periods of time. Currency conversion costs and currency fluctuations could reduce or eliminate investment gains or add to investment losses. A fund may be unable or may choose not to hedge its foreign currency exposure or any hedge may not be effective.
Derivatives – The use of derivatives involves a variety of risks, which may be different from, or greater than, the risks associated with investing in traditional securities, such as stocks and bonds. Risks of derivatives include leverage risk, liquidity risk, valuation risk, market risk, counterparty risk, credit risk, operational risk and legal risk. Use of derivatives can increase fund losses, increase costs, reduce opportunities for gains, increase fund volatility, and not produce the result intended. Certain derivatives have the potential for unlimited loss, regardless of the size of the initial investment. Even a small investment in derivatives can have a disproportionate impact on the fund. Derivatives may be difficult or impossible to sell, unwind or value, and the counterparty (including, if applicable, the fund’s clearing broker, the derivatives exchange or the clearinghouse) may default on its obligations to the fund. In certain cases, the fund may incur costs and may be hindered or delayed in enforcing its rights against or closing out derivatives instruments with a counterparty, which may result in additional losses. Derivatives are also generally subject to the risks applicable to the assets, rates, indices or other indicators underlying the derivative, including market risk, credit risk, liquidity risk, management and valuation risk. Also, suitable derivative transactions may not be available in all circumstances or at reasonable prices. The value of a derivative may fluctuate more or less than, or otherwise not correlate well with, the underlying assets, rates, indices or other indicators to which it relates. The fund may segregate cash or other liquid assets to cover the funding of its obligations under derivatives contracts or make margin payments when it takes positions in derivatives involving obligations to third parties. New Rule 18f-4 under the 1940 Act provides a comprehensive regulatory framework for the use of derivatives by funds and imposes new requirements and restrictions on funds using derivatives. Rule 18f-4 could have an
adverse impact on the fund’s performance and its ability to implement its investment strategies as it has historically and may increase costs related to the fund’s use of derivatives. It is not currently clear what impact, if any, the rule will have on the availability, liquidity or performance of derivatives. The rule may not be effective to limit the risk of loss from derivatives.
Emerging Markets – Investments in securities of issuers located or doing business in emerging markets are subject to heightened foreign investments risks and may experience rapid and extreme changes in value. Emerging market countries tend to have less developed and less stable economic, political and legal systems and regulatory and accounting standards, may have policies that restrict investment by foreigners or that prevent foreign investors such as the fund from withdrawing their money at will, and are more likely to experience nationalization, expropriation and confiscatory taxation. In addition, emerging market securities may have low trading volumes and may be or become illiquid.
Extension – When interest rates rise, payments of fixed-income securities, including asset- and mortgage-backed securities, may occur more slowly than anticipated, causing their market prices to decline.
Floating Rate Loans – Floating rate loans are often made to borrowers whose financial condition is troubled or highly leveraged. These loans frequently are rated below investment grade and are therefore subject to “High-Yield Debt Securities” risk. There is no public market for floating rate loans and the loans may trade infrequently and be subject to wide bid/ask spreads. Many floating rate loans are subject to restrictions on resale. Floating rate loans may have trade settlement periods in excess of seven days, which may result in the fund not receiving proceeds from the sale of a loan for an extended period. As a result, the fund may be subject to greater “Liquidity” risk than a fund that does not invest in floating rate loans and the fund may be constrained in its ability to meet its obligations (including obligations to redeeming shareholders). The lack of an active trading market may also make it more difficult to value floating rate loans. Rising interest rates can lead to increased default rates as payment obligations increase.
Focused Investing – To the extent the fund invests in a limited number of countries, regions, sectors, industries or market segments, in a limited number of issuers, or in issuers in related businesses or that are subject to related operating risks, the fund will be more susceptible to negative events affecting those countries, regions, sectors, industries, segments or issuers, and the value of its shares may be more volatile than if it invested more widely.
Foreign Investments – Investing in securities of foreign issuers or issuers with significant exposure to foreign markets involves additional risks. Foreign markets can be less liquid, less regulated, less transparent and more volatile than U.S. markets. The value of the fund’s foreign investments may decline, sometimes rapidly or unpredictably, because of factors affecting the particular issuer as well as foreign markets and issuers generally, such as unfavorable government actions, including nationalization, expropriation or confiscatory taxation, reduction of government or central bank support, tariffs and trade disruptions, sanctions, political or financial instability, social unrest or other adverse economic or political developments. Foreign investments may also be subject to different accounting practices and different regulatory, legal, auditing, financial reporting and recordkeeping standards and practices,
17

and may be more difficult to value than investments in U.S. issuers. Certain foreign clearance and settlement procedures may result in an inability to execute transactions or delays in settlement.
Growth Stocks – Returns on growth stocks may not move in tandem with returns on other categories of stocks or the market as a whole. Growth stocks typically are particularly sensitive to market movements and may involve larger price swings because their market prices tend to reflect future expectations. When it appears those expectations may not be met, the prices of growth stocks typically fall. Growth stocks may also be more volatile because they often do not pay dividends. The values of growth stocks tend to go down when interest rates rise because the rise in interest rates reduces the current value of future cash flows. Growth stocks as a group may be out of favor and underperform the overall equity market for a long period of time, for example, while the market favors “value” stocks.
High-Yield Debt Securities – High-yield debt securities, commonly referred to as “junk” bonds, are securities that are rated below “investment grade” or are of comparable quality. Changes in interest rates, the market’s perception of the issuers, the creditworthiness of the issuers and negative perceptions of the junk bond market generally may significantly affect the value of these bonds. Junk bonds are considered speculative, tend to be volatile, typically have a higher risk of default, tend to be less liquid and more difficult to value than higher grade securities, and may result in losses for the fund.
Inflation – The value of assets or income from investment may be worth less in the future as inflation decreases the value of money. As inflation increases, the real value of the fund’s assets can decline as can the value of the fund’s distributions.
Interest Rate –The value of fixed-income securities generally goes down when interest rates rise. A rise in rates tends to have a greater impact on the prices of longer term or duration securities. Changes in interest rates also may affect the liquidity of the fund’s investments. A general rise in interest rates may cause investors to sell fixed-income securities on a large scale, which could adversely affect the price and liquidity of fixed-income securities generally and could also result in increased redemptions from the fund. Increased redemptions could cause the fund to sell securities at inopportune times or depressed prices and result in further losses.
Leveraging – To the extent that the fund borrows or uses derivatives or other investments, such as ETFs, that have embedded leverage, your investment may be subject to heightened volatility, risk of loss and costs. Other risks also will be compounded because leverage generally magnifies the effect of a change in the value of an asset and creates a risk of loss of value on a larger pool of assets than the fund would otherwise have. Use of leverage may result in the loss of a substantial amount, and possibly all, of the fund’s assets. The fund also may have to sell assets at inopportune times to satisfy its obligations.
Liquidity – The fund may make investments that are illiquid or that become illiquid after purchase. Illiquid investments can be difficult to value, may trade at a discount from comparable, more liquid investments, and may be subject to wide fluctuations in value. Liquidity risk may be magnified in rising interest rate environments. If the fund is forced to sell an illiquid investment to meet redemption requests or other cash needs, the fund may be
forced to sell at a substantial loss or may not be able to sell at all. Liquidity of particular investments, or even entire asset classes, including U.S. Treasury securities, can deteriorate rapidly, particularly during times of market turmoil, and those investments may be difficult or impossible for the fund to sell. This may prevent the fund from limiting losses.
Loans – Loans are subject to the credit risk of nonpayment of principal or interest. Economic downturns or increases in interest rates may cause an increase in defaults, interest rate risk and liquidity risk. Loans may or may not be collateralized at the time of acquisition, and any collateral may be relatively illiquid or lose all or substantially all of its value subsequent to investment. The fund's investments in loans are also subject to prepayment or call risk.
Prepayment or Call – Many issuers have a right to prepay their fixed-income securities. If this happens, the fund will not benefit from the rise in the market price of the securities that normally accompanies a decline in interest rates and may be forced to reinvest the prepayment proceeds in securities with lower yields.
REITs – Investing in real estate investment trusts (“REITs”) involves unique risks. When the fund invests in REITs, it is subject to risks generally associated with investing in real estate. A REIT’s performance depends on the types and locations of the properties it owns, how well it manages those properties and cash flow. REITs may have limited financial resources, may trade less frequently and in limited volume, may engage in dilutive offerings, and may be subject to more abrupt or erratic price movements than the overall securities markets. In addition to its own expenses, the fund will indirectly bear its proportionate share of any management and other expenses paid by REITs in which it invests. U.S. REITs are subject to a number of highly technical tax-related rules and requirements; and a U.S. REIT’s failure to qualify for the favorable U.S. federal income tax treatment generally available to U.S. REITs could result in corporate-level taxation, significantly reducing the return on an investment to the fund.
Structure Conflicts – Transamerica Asset Management, Inc. (“TAM”), the fund’s investment manager, has established an investment program whereby a substantial portion of the fund’s assets are invested in underlying Transamerica funds. TAM does not consider unaffiliated funds as underlying investment options for these assets, even if unaffiliated funds have better investment performance or lower total expenses.
Underlying Exchange-Traded Funds – To the extent the fund invests its assets in underlying ETFs, its ability to achieve its investment objective will depend in part on the performance of the underlying ETFs in which it invests. Investing in underlying ETFs subjects the fund to the risks of investing in the underlying securities or assets held by those ETFs. Each of the underlying ETFs in which the fund may invest has its own investment risks, and those risks can affect the value of the underlying ETFs’ shares and therefore the value of the fund's investments. There can be no assurance that the investment objective of any underlying ETF will be achieved. To the extent that the fund invests more of its assets in one underlying ETF than in another, the fund will have greater exposure to the risks of that underlying ETF. In addition, the fund will bear a pro rata portion of the operating expenses of the underlying ETFs in which it invests.
18

U.S. Government and Agency Obligations – Government agency obligations have different levels of credit support and, therefore, different degrees of credit risk. Securities issued by agencies and instrumentalities of the U.S. government that are supported by the full faith and credit of the U.S. government generally present a lesser degree of credit risk than securities issued by agencies and instrumentalities sponsored by the U.S. government that are supported only by the issuer’s right to borrow from the U.S. Treasury and securities issued by agencies and instrumentalities sponsored by the U.S. government that are supported only by the credit of the issuing agencies. A security backed by the “full faith and credit” of the U.S. government is guaranteed only as to its stated interest rate and face value at maturity, not its current market price.
Valuation – The sales price the fund could receive for any particular portfolio investment may differ from the fund's valuation of the investment, particularly for securities that trade in thin or volatile markets, that are priced based upon valuations provided by third party pricing services that use matrix or evaluated pricing systems, or that are valued using a fair value methodology. These differences may increase significantly and affect fund investments more broadly during periods of market volatility. Investors who purchase or redeem fund shares on days when the fund is holding fair-valued securities may receive fewer or more shares or lower or higher redemption proceeds than they would have received if the fund had not fair-valued securities or had used a different valuation methodology. The fund’s ability to value its investments may also be impacted by technological issues and/or errors by pricing services or other third party service providers. Fair value pricing involves subjective judgment, which may prove to be incorrect.
Value Investing – The prices of securities the sub-adviser believes are undervalued may not appreciate as anticipated or may go down. The value approach to investing involves the risk that stocks may remain undervalued, undervaluation may become more severe, or perceived undervaluation may actually represent intrinsic value. Value stocks as a group may be out of favor and underperform the overall equity market for a long period of time, for example, while the market favors “growth” stocks.
Performance: The bar chart and the table below provide some indication of the risks of investing in the fund. The bar chart shows how the fund’s performance has varied from year to year. The table shows how the fund’s average annual total returns for different periods compare to the returns of a broad measure of market performance, as well as comparison to one or more secondary indices.
The bar chart does not reflect the impact of sales charges, which, if reflected, would lower the returns. The table includes deduction of applicable sales charges.

Absent any applicable fee waivers and/or expense limitations, performance would be lower.
As with all mutual funds, past performance (before and after taxes) is not a prediction of future results. Updated performance information is available on our website at www.transamerica.com/investments-fund-center or by calling 1-888-233-4339.
Prior to August 28, 2020, the fund had a portfolio construction manager and used different investment strategies. The performance set forth prior to that date is attributable to the previous portfolio construction manager.

Annual Total Returns (calendar years ended December 31) - Class A
 
Quarter Ended
Return
Best Quarter:
6/30/2020
18.73%
Worst Quarter:
3/31/2020
-17.65%

Average Annual Total Returns (periods ended December 31, 2022)
 
1 Year
5 Years
10 Years
Inception
Date
Class A
 
 
 
3/1/2002
Return before taxes
-21.91%
1.84%
5.50%
 
Return after taxes on
distributions
-22.59%
0.04%
3.61%
 
Return after taxes on
distributions and sale of fund
shares
-12.54%
1.27%
4.08%
 
Class C (Return before taxes only)
-18.79%
2.21%
5.32%
11/11/2002
Class I (Return before taxes only)
-16.95%
3.33%
6.42%
11/30/2009
Class R (Return before taxes only)
-17.53%
2.73%
5.84%
6/15/2006
MSCI World Index (reflects no
deduction for fees, expenses or
taxes)
-18.14%
6.14%
8.85%
 
Transamerica Asset Allocation –
Moderate Growth Portfolio Blended
Benchmark1 (reflects no deduction
for fees, expenses or taxes)
-16.40%
4.98%
7.53%
 
1
The fund’s secondary benchmark, the Transamerica Asset Allocation – Moderate Growth Portfolio Blended Benchmark, consists of Bloomberg US Aggregate Bond Index, 30% and MSCI World Index, 70%.
The total return information for Class C and Class I of the fund reflects the impact of certain payments by Transamerica to the class in 2022.
The after-tax returns are calculated using the historic highest individual federal marginal income tax rates and do not reflect the impact of state and local taxes. Actual after-tax returns may depend on the investor’s individual tax situation and may differ from those shown. After-tax returns may not be relevant if the investment is made through a tax-exempt or tax-deferred account, such as a 401(k) plan.

After-tax returns are presented for only one class, and returns for other classes are presented before taxes only and will vary.
19

Management:
Investment Manager: Transamerica Asset Management, Inc.
Sub-Adviser: Goldman Sachs Asset Management, L.P.
Portfolio Managers:
Neill Nuttall
Portfolio Manager
since August 2020
Alexandra Wilson-Elizondo
Portfolio Manager
since January 2022
Purchase and Sale of Fund Shares: You may purchase, exchange or redeem shares of the fund on any day the New York Stock Exchange is open for business, online or through our website at www.transamerica.com, by mail to Transamerica Fund Services, Inc., P.O. Box 219945, Kansas City, MO 64121-9945, by telephone at 1-888-233-4339, by overnight mail to Transamerica Fund Services, Inc., 330 W. 9th Street, Kansas City, MO 64105 or through a financial intermediary. The minimum initial purchase for Class A and C shares is $1,000; the minimum subsequent investment is $50. The minimum initial purchase for payroll deduction and automatic investment plan is $500; the minimum subsequent investment is $50 per monthly fund account investment. The minimum investment for Class I shares is $1,000,000.
Class R shares are intended for purchase by participants in certain retirement plans such as 401(k) plans, 457 plans, employer-sponsored 403(b) plans, profit sharing and money purchase plans, defined-benefit plans and non-qualified deferred compensation plans (eligible retirement plans), and under the following conditions: Class R shares are available only when a plan’s recordkeeper or financial service firm serving as an intermediary has an agreement with Transamerica Funds, and in such eligible retirement plans where Class R shares are held on the books of the funds through omnibus or Network Level 3 accounts (either at the plan level or at the level of the financial service firm serving as an intermediary). There is no minimum investment for eligible retirement plans investing in Class R shares.
Tax Information: Fund distributions may be taxable as ordinary income, qualified dividend income, or capital gains, except when your investment is in an IRA, 401(k) or other tax-advantaged investment plan. In that case, you may be taxed when you take a distribution from such plan, depending on the type of plan, the circumstances of your distribution and other factors.
Payments to Broker-Dealers and Other Financial Intermediaries: If you purchase the fund through a broker-dealer or other financial intermediary, the fund and/or its affiliates may pay the intermediary for the sale of fund shares and related services. These payments may create a conflict of interest by influencing the broker-dealer or other intermediary and your salesperson to recommend the fund over another investment. Ask your salesperson or visit your financial intermediary’s website for more information.
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Transamerica Asset Allocation-Moderate Portfolio
Investment Objective: Seeks capital appreciation and current income.
Fees and Expenses: This table describes the fees and expenses that you may pay if you buy, hold and sell shares of the fund. You may pay other fees, such as brokerage commissions and other fees to financial intermediaries, which are not reflected in the tables and examples below.
You may qualify for sales charge discounts if you and your family invest, or agree to invest in the future, at least $50,000 in Transamerica Funds. More information about these and other discounts is available from your financial professional, in the “Waivers and Reductions of Sales Charges” section on page 295 of the fund’s prospectus, in the Appendix – “Waivers and Discounts Available from Intermediaries,” and in the fund’s statement of additional information (SAI) under the heading “Purchase of Shares” on page 80.

Shareholder Fees (fees paid directly from your investment)
Class:
A
C
I
R
Maximum sales charge (load) imposed
on purchases (as a percentage of
offering price)
5.50%
None
None
None
Maximum deferred sales charge (load)
(as a percentage of purchase price or
redemption proceeds, whichever is
lower)
None1
1.00%2
None
None
1 Class A shares of the fund purchased in amounts of $1 million or more that are not subject to an initial sales charge may be subject to a 1.00% contingent deferred sales charge if those shares are redeemed within 24 months of their purchase. A deferred sales charge may apply to certain redemptions of Class A shares of the fund purchased through an exchange from another Transamerica Fund.
2 Purchases of Class C shares of the fund may be subject to a 1.00% contingent deferred sales charge if those shares are redeemed within 12 months of their purchase. A deferred sales charge may apply to certain redemptions of Class C shares of the fund purchased through an exchange from another Transamerica Fund.

Annual Fund Operating Expenses (expenses that you pay each year as a percentage of the value of your investment)
Class:
A
C
I
R
Management fees
0.10%
0.10%
0.10%
0.10%
Distribution and service (12b-1) fees
0.25%
1.00%
None
0.50%
Other expenses
0.12%
0.16%
0.14%1
0.11%
Acquired fund fees and expenses2
0.63%
0.63%
0.63%
0.63%
Total annual fund operating expenses
1.10%
1.89%
0.87%
1.34%
Fee waiver and/or expense
reimbursement3
0.00%
0.00%
0.10%
0.00%
Total annual fund operating expenses
after fee waiver and/or expense
reimbursement
1.10%
1.89%
0.77%
1.34%
1
Other expenses reflect current transfer agency fees with respect to Class I.
2
Acquired fund fees and expenses reflect the fund’s pro rata share of the fees and expenses incurred by investing in other investment companies. Acquired fund fees and expenses are not included in the calculation of the ratios of expenses to average net assets shown in the Financial Highlights section of the fund’s prospectus.
3
The fund’s investment manager, Transamerica Asset Management, Inc. (“TAM”), has contractually agreed to reimburse 0.095% of the transfer agency fees on Class I shares through March 1, 2024.
Example: This Example is intended to help you compare the cost of investing in the fund with the cost of investing in other mutual funds.
The Example assumes that you invest $10,000 in the fund for the time periods indicated and then redeem all shares at the end of those periods (unless otherwise indicated). The Example also assumes that your investment has a 5% return each year and that the fund’s operating expenses remain the same. The Example reflects applicable waivers and/or reimbursements for the duration of such arrangement(s). Although your actual costs may be higher or lower, based on these assumptions your costs would be:

If the shares are redeemed at the end of each period:
 
1 year
3 years
5 years
10 years
Class A
$656
$880
$1,123
$1,816
Class C
$292
$594
$1,021
$2,212
Class I
$79
$268
$472
$1,063
Class R
$136
$425
$734
$1,613
If the shares are not redeemed:
 
1 year
3 years
5 years
10 years
Class A
$656
$880
$1,123
$1,816
Class C
$192
$594
$1,021
$2,212
Class I
$79
$268
$472
$1,063
Class R
$136
$425
$734
$1,613
Portfolio Turnover: The fund pays transaction costs, such as commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or “turns over” its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover rate may indicate higher transaction costs and may result in higher taxes when fund shares are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are not reflected in annual fund operating expenses or in the Example, affect the fund’s performance.
During the most recent fiscal year, the portfolio turnover rate for the fund was 43% of the average value of its portfolio.
Principal Investment Strategies: The fund is a fund of funds that seeks to achieve its investment objective by investing its assets primarily in a broad mix of Transamerica Funds (“underlying funds”). The fund’s sub-adviser, Goldman Sachs Asset Management, L.P. (the “sub-adviser”), follows an investment process that involves longer-term portfolio positioning through strategic asset allocation and dynamic asset allocation to pursue shorter-term opportunities based on the sub-adviser’s views of current market conditions.
Under normal circumstances, investments in underlying funds are expected to achieve a mix over time of approximately 50% of net assets in equities, which may include both stocks and commodity-related securities, and approximately 50% of net assets in fixed-income securities, which may include bonds, convertible securities, cash, cash equivalents, and other money market instruments. These percentages may vary.
21

The underlying funds may invest in a variety of U.S. and foreign equity and fixed-income (including high-yield) securities and alternative investments. The underlying funds may also invest in real estate investment trusts (“REITs”) and derivatives.
The sub-adviser develops and implements a strategic asset allocation for the fund. The sub-adviser seeks to budget the fund’s long term investment risk exposure across various risk factors to establish a diversified strategic asset allocation. An important component of the sub-adviser’s process is allocating risk across asset classes and strategies to increase diversification and, potentially, reduce volatility.
The sub-adviser may dynamically adjust the fund’s asset allocation as part of its investment process in response to certain changes in the markets, the economic cycle and the macroeconomic environment. This dynamic asset allocation may change the fund’s portfolio positioning based on the sub-adviser’s short- to medium-term market views on dislocations and attractive investment opportunities. These views may impact the relative weights across asset classes, and the allocation to geographies, sectors and industries, as well as the fund’s duration and sensitivity to inflation.
Allocation of assets among the underlying funds is based on factors such as diversification, general market views and outlooks, volatility in the equity markets, historical performance, current valuations, and other global economic factors.
The fund may invest directly in U.S. government securities and/or short-term commercial paper.
The fund’s investment manager, among other things, oversees and monitors the sub-adviser and is solely responsible for selecting the underlying funds among which the sub-adviser may allocate the fund’s assets. After the underlying funds have been selected, the sub-adviser determines which underlying funds it wishes to utilize to allocate the fund’s assets. The sub-adviser is not required to utilize all of the underlying funds selected by the manager in seeking to fulfill the fund’s target asset allocation.
The sub-adviser may invest up to 10% of the fund’s net assets in index-based underlying exchange-traded funds (“underlying ETFs”) that the sub-adviser selects as part of the sub-adviser’s dynamic asset allocation to gain exposure to asset classes, regions, countries, strategies or sectors that are a part of the sub-adviser’s asset allocation for the fund, but not otherwise accessible through available underlying funds.
The fund may, but is not required to, invest directly in futures contracts as part of the sub-adviser’s dynamic asset allocation. The use of futures would generally be limited to exchange-traded developed market equity index and U.S. Treasury futures. The fund may also have exposure to derivatives instruments, such as options, futures or forward contracts and swaps through its investments in the underlying funds and underlying ETFs.
It is not possible to predict the extent to which the fund will be invested in a particular underlying fund at any time. The fund may be a significant shareholder in certain underlying funds.
Each underlying fund and underlying ETF has its own investment objective, principal investment strategies and investment risks. The sub-adviser for each underlying fund and adviser or sub-adviser for each underlying ETF decides which securities to purchase and sell for that underlying fund or underlying ETF. The fund’s ability to achieve its investment objective depends largely on the performance of the underlying funds and underlying ETFs.
The “Underlying Funds” section of the prospectus lists the underlying Transamerica Funds currently available for investment by the fund, provides a summary of their respective investment objectives and principal investment strategies, and identifies certain risks of those funds.
The manager may change the underlying Transamerica Funds, and the sub-adviser may change the fund’s asset allocation, at any time without notice to shareholders and without shareholder approval.
Principal Risks: Risk is inherent in all investing. Many factors and risks affect the fund's performance, including those described below. The value of your investment in the fund, as well as the amount of return you receive on your investment, may fluctuate significantly day to day and over time. You may lose part or all of your investment in the fund or your investment may not perform as well as other similar investments. The fund, through its investments in underlying funds, is subject to the risks of the underlying funds. The following is a summary description of principal risks (in alphabetical order after certain key risks) of investing in the fund (either directly or through its investments in underlying funds). Each risk described below may not apply to each underlying fund and an underlying fund may be subject to additional or different risks than those described below. An investment in the fund is not a bank deposit and is not insured or guaranteed by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation or any other government agency. You may lose money if you invest in this fund.
Market – The market prices of the fund’s securities or other assets may go up or down, sometimes rapidly or unpredictably, due to general market conditions, overall economic trends or events, inflation, changes in interest rates, governmental actions or interventions, actions taken by the U.S. Federal Reserve or foreign central banks, market disruptions caused by tariffs, trade disputes or other factors, political developments, armed conflicts, economic sanctions, cybersecurity events, investor sentiment, public health events such as the spread of infectious disease, and other factors that may or may not be related to the issuer of the security or other asset. If the market prices of the fund’s securities and assets fall, the value of your investment in the fund could go down.
Economies and financial markets throughout the world are increasingly interconnected. Events or circumstances in one or more countries or regions could be highly disruptive to, and have profound impacts on, global economies or markets. As a result, whether or not the fund invests in securities of issuers located in or with significant exposure to the countries directly affected, the value and liquidity of the fund’s investments may go down.
In recent years, the COVID-19 pandemic, the large expansion of government deficits and debt as a result of government actions to mitigate the effects of the pandemic, the Russian invasion of Ukraine and the rise of inflation have resulted in extreme volatility in the global economy and in global financial markets. These
22

events could be prolonged and could continue to adversely affect the value and liquidity of the fund’s investments, impair the fund’s ability to satisfy redemption requests, and negatively impact the fund’s performance.
Asset Allocation – The fund’s investment performance is significantly impacted by the fund’s asset allocation and reallocation from time to time. The sub-adviser's decisions whether and when to tactically overweight or underweight asset classes and select a mix of underlying funds may not produce the desired results. These actions may be unsuccessful in maximizing return and/or avoiding investment losses. The value of your investment may decrease if the sub-adviser’s judgment about the attractiveness, value or market trends affecting a particular asset class, investment style, technique or strategy, underlying fund or other issuer is incorrect. The available underlying funds selected by the sub-adviser may underperform the market or similar funds.
Underlying Funds – Because the fund invests its assets in various underlying funds, its ability to achieve its investment objective depends largely on the performance of the underlying funds in which it invests. Investing in underlying funds subjects the fund to the risks of investing in the underlying securities or assets held by those underlying funds. Each of the underlying funds in which the fund may invest has its own investment risks, and those risks can affect the value of the underlying funds' shares and therefore the value of the fund's investments. There can be no assurance that the investment objective of any underlying fund will be achieved. To the extent that the fund invests more of its assets in one underlying fund than in another, the fund will have greater exposure to the risks of that underlying fund. In addition, the fund will bear a pro rata portion of the operating expenses of the underlying funds in which it invests. The “List and Description of Certain Underlying Funds” section of the fund's prospectus identifies certain risks of each underlying fund.
Equity Securities – Equity securities generally have greater risk of loss than debt securities. Stock markets are volatile and the value of equity securities may go up or down, sometimes rapidly and unpredictably. The value of equity securities fluctuates based on real or perceived changes in a company’s financial condition, factors affecting a particular industry or industries, and overall market, economic and political conditions. If the market prices of the equity securities owned by the fund fall, the value of your investment in the fund will decline. The fund may lose its entire investment in the equity securities of an issuer. A change in financial condition or other event affecting a single issuer may adversely impact securities markets as a whole.
Fixed-Income Securities – Risks of fixed-income securities include credit risk, interest rate risk, counterparty risk, prepayment risk, extension risk, valuation risk, and liquidity risk. The value of fixed-income securities may go up or down, sometimes rapidly and unpredictably, due to general market conditions, such as real or perceived adverse economic or political conditions, tariffs and trade disruptions, inflation, changes in interest rates, lack of liquidity in the bond markets or adverse investor sentiment. In addition, the value of a fixed-income security may decline if the issuer or other obligor of the security fails to pay principal and/or interest, otherwise defaults or has its credit rating downgraded or is perceived to be less creditworthy, or the credit quality or value of any underlying
assets declines. If the value of fixed-income securities owned by the fund falls, the value of your investment will go down. The fund may lose its entire investment in the fixed-income securities of an issuer.
Management – The value of your investment may go down if the investment manager’s or sub-adviser's judgments and decisions are incorrect or otherwise do not produce the desired results, or if the investment strategy does not work as intended. You may also suffer losses if there are imperfections, errors or limitations in the quantitative, analytic or other tools, resources, information and data used, investment techniques applied, or the analyses employed or relied on, by the investment manageror sub-adviser, if such tools, resources, information or data are used incorrectly or otherwise do not work as intended, or if the investment manager’s or sub-adviser's investment style is out of favor or otherwise fails to produce the desired results. Any of these things could cause the fund to lose value or its results to lag relevant benchmarks or other funds with similar objectives.
Active Trading – The fund may purchase and sell securities without regard to the length of time held. Active trading may be more pronounced during periods of market volatility, may have a negative impact on performance and may generate greater amounts of short-term capital gains.
Asset Class Variation – The underlying funds invest principally in the securities constituting their asset class (i.e., equity or fixed-income) or underlying index components. However, an underlying fund may vary the percentage of its assets in these securities (subject to any applicable regulatory requirements). Depending upon the percentage of securities in a particular asset class held by the underlying funds at any given time, and the percentage of the fund's assets invested in various underlying funds, the fund's actual exposure to the securities in a particular asset class may vary substantially from its target allocation for that asset class, and this in turn may adversely affect the fund's performance.
Commodities and Commodity-Related Securities – Commodities and commodity-related businesses or industries are subject to changes and volatility in commodity prices generally, regulatory, economic and political developments, weather events and natural disasters, tariffs and trade disruptions, and market disruptions. Commodities and commodity-linked investments may be less liquid than other investments. Commodity-linked investments also are subject to the credit risk associated with the issuer, and their value may decline substantially if the issuer’s creditworthiness deteriorates.
Convertible Securities – Convertible securities are subject to risks associated with both fixed-income and equity securities. For example, if market interest rates rise, the value of a convertible security typically falls. In addition, a convertible security is subject to the risk that the issuer will not be able to pay interest or dividends when due, and the market value of the security may change based on the issuer’s actual or perceived creditworthiness. Since the convertible security derives a portion of its value from the underlying common stock, the security is also subject to the same types of market and issuer-specific risks that apply to the underlying common stock. Convertible securities generally offer lower interest or dividend yields than non-convertible securities of similar quality.
23

Counterparty – The fund could lose money if the counterparties to derivatives, repurchase agreements and/or other financial contracts entered into for the fund do not fulfill their contractual obligations. In addition, the fund may incur costs and may be hindered or delayed in enforcing its rights against a counterparty.
Credit – If an issuer or other obligor (such as a party providing insurance or other credit enhancement) of a security held by the fund or a counterparty to a financial contract with the fund is unable or unwilling to meet its financial obligations, or is downgraded or perceived to be less creditworthy (whether by market participants or otherwise), or if the value of any underlying assets declines, the value of your investment will typically decline. A decline may be rapid and/or significant, particularly in certain market environments. In addition, the fund may incur costs and may be hindered or delayed in enforcing its rights against an issuer, obligor or counterparty.
Currency – The value of a fund’s investments in securities denominated in foreign currencies increases or decreases as the rates of exchange between those currencies and the U.S. dollar change. U.S. dollar-denominated securities of foreign issuers may also be affected by currency risk. Currency exchange rates can be volatile and may fluctuate significantly over short periods of time. Currency conversion costs and currency fluctuations could reduce or eliminate investment gains or add to investment losses. A fund may be unable or may choose not to hedge its foreign currency exposure or any hedge may not be effective.
Derivatives – The use of derivatives involves a variety of risks, which may be different from, or greater than, the risks associated with investing in traditional securities, such as stocks and bonds. Risks of derivatives include leverage risk, liquidity risk, valuation risk, market risk, counterparty risk, credit risk, operational risk and legal risk. Use of derivatives can increase fund losses, increase costs, reduce opportunities for gains, increase fund volatility, and not produce the result intended. Certain derivatives have the potential for unlimited loss, regardless of the size of the initial investment. Even a small investment in derivatives can have a disproportionate impact on the fund. Derivatives may be difficult or impossible to sell, unwind or value, and the counterparty (including, if applicable, the fund’s clearing broker, the derivatives exchange or the clearinghouse) may default on its obligations to the fund. In certain cases, the fund may incur costs and may be hindered or delayed in enforcing its rights against or closing out derivatives instruments with a counterparty, which may result in additional losses. Derivatives are also generally subject to the risks applicable to the assets, rates, indices or other indicators underlying the derivative, including market risk, credit risk, liquidity risk, management and valuation risk. Also, suitable derivative transactions may not be available in all circumstances or at reasonable prices. The value of a derivative may fluctuate more or less than, or otherwise not correlate well with, the underlying assets, rates, indices or other indicators to which it relates. The fund may segregate cash or other liquid assets to cover the funding of its obligations under derivatives contracts or make margin payments when it takes positions in derivatives involving obligations to third parties. New Rule 18f-4 under the 1940 Act provides a comprehensive regulatory framework for the use of derivatives by funds and imposes new requirements and restrictions on funds using derivatives. Rule 18f-4 could have an
adverse impact on the fund’s performance and its ability to implement its investment strategies as it has historically and may increase costs related to the fund’s use of derivatives. It is not currently clear what impact, if any, the rule will have on the availability, liquidity or performance of derivatives. The rule may not be effective to limit the risk of loss from derivatives.
Emerging Markets – Investments in securities of issuers located or doing business in emerging markets are subject to heightened foreign investments risks and may experience rapid and extreme changes in value. Emerging market countries tend to have less developed and less stable economic, political and legal systems and regulatory and accounting standards, may have policies that restrict investment by foreigners or that prevent foreign investors such as the fund from withdrawing their money at will, and are more likely to experience nationalization, expropriation and confiscatory taxation. In addition, emerging market securities may have low trading volumes and may be or become illiquid.
Extension – When interest rates rise, payments of fixed-income securities, including asset- and mortgage-backed securities, may occur more slowly than anticipated, causing their market prices to decline.
Floating Rate Loans – Floating rate loans are often made to borrowers whose financial condition is troubled or highly leveraged. These loans frequently are rated below investment grade and are therefore subject to “High-Yield Debt Securities” risk. There is no public market for floating rate loans and the loans may trade infrequently and be subject to wide bid/ask spreads. Many floating rate loans are subject to restrictions on resale. Floating rate loans may have trade settlement periods in excess of seven days, which may result in the fund not receiving proceeds from the sale of a loan for an extended period. As a result, the fund may be subject to greater “Liquidity” risk than a fund that does not invest in floating rate loans and the fund may be constrained in its ability to meet its obligations (including obligations to redeeming shareholders). The lack of an active trading market may also make it more difficult to value floating rate loans. Rising interest rates can lead to increased default rates as payment obligations increase.
Focused Investing – To the extent the fund invests in a limited number of countries, regions, sectors, industries or market segments, in a limited number of issuers, or in issuers in related businesses or that are subject to related operating risks, the fund will be more susceptible to negative events affecting those countries, regions, sectors, industries, segments or issuers, and the value of its shares may be more volatile than if it invested more widely.
Foreign Investments – Investing in securities of foreign issuers or issuers with significant exposure to foreign markets involves additional risks. Foreign markets can be less liquid, less regulated, less transparent and more volatile than U.S. markets. The value of the fund’s foreign investments may decline, sometimes rapidly or unpredictably, because of factors affecting the particular issuer as well as foreign markets and issuers generally, such as unfavorable government actions, including nationalization, expropriation or confiscatory taxation, reduction of government or central bank support, tariffs and trade disruptions, sanctions, political or financial instability, social unrest or other adverse economic or political developments. Foreign investments may also be subject to different accounting practices and different regulatory, legal, auditing, financial reporting and recordkeeping standards and practices,
24

and may be more difficult to value than investments in U.S. issuers. Certain foreign clearance and settlement procedures may result in an inability to execute transactions or delays in settlement.
Growth Stocks – Returns on growth stocks may not move in tandem with returns on other categories of stocks or the market as a whole. Growth stocks typically are particularly sensitive to market movements and may involve larger price swings because their market prices tend to reflect future expectations. When it appears those expectations may not be met, the prices of growth stocks typically fall. Growth stocks may also be more volatile because they often do not pay dividends. The values of growth stocks tend to go down when interest rates rise because the rise in interest rates reduces the current value of future cash flows. Growth stocks as a group may be out of favor and underperform the overall equity market for a long period of time, for example, while the market favors “value” stocks.
High-Yield Debt Securities – High-yield debt securities, commonly referred to as “junk” bonds, are securities that are rated below “investment grade” or are of comparable quality. Changes in interest rates, the market’s perception of the issuers, the creditworthiness of the issuers and negative perceptions of the junk bond market generally may significantly affect the value of these bonds. Junk bonds are considered speculative, tend to be volatile, typically have a higher risk of default, tend to be less liquid and more difficult to value than higher grade securities, and may result in losses for the fund.
Inflation – The value of assets or income from investment may be worth less in the future as inflation decreases the value of money. As inflation increases, the real value of the fund’s assets can decline as can the value of the fund’s distributions.
Interest Rate –The value of fixed-income securities generally goes down when interest rates rise. A rise in rates tends to have a greater impact on the prices of longer term or duration securities. Changes in interest rates also may affect the liquidity of the fund’s investments. A general rise in interest rates may cause investors to sell fixed-income securities on a large scale, which could adversely affect the price and liquidity of fixed-income securities generally and could also result in increased redemptions from the fund. Increased redemptions could cause the fund to sell securities at inopportune times or depressed prices and result in further losses.
Leveraging – To the extent that the fund borrows or uses derivatives or other investments, such as ETFs, that have embedded leverage, your investment may be subject to heightened volatility, risk of loss and costs. Other risks also will be compounded because leverage generally magnifies the effect of a change in the value of an asset and creates a risk of loss of value on a larger pool of assets than the fund would otherwise have. Use of leverage may result in the loss of a substantial amount, and possibly all, of the fund’s assets. The fund also may have to sell assets at inopportune times to satisfy its obligations.
Liquidity – The fund may make investments that are illiquid or that become illiquid after purchase. Illiquid investments can be difficult to value, may trade at a discount from comparable, more liquid investments, and may be subject to wide fluctuations in value. Liquidity risk may be magnified in rising interest rate environments. If the fund is forced to sell an illiquid investment to meet redemption requests or other cash needs, the fund may be
forced to sell at a substantial loss or may not be able to sell at all. Liquidity of particular investments, or even entire asset classes, including U.S. Treasury securities, can deteriorate rapidly, particularly during times of market turmoil, and those investments may be difficult or impossible for the fund to sell. This may prevent the fund from limiting losses.
Loans – Loans are subject to the credit risk of nonpayment of principal or interest. Economic downturns or increases in interest rates may cause an increase in defaults, interest rate risk and liquidity risk. Loans may or may not be collateralized at the time of acquisition, and any collateral may be relatively illiquid or lose all or substantially all of its value subsequent to investment. The fund's investments in loans are also subject to prepayment or call risk.
Prepayment or Call – Many issuers have a right to prepay their fixed-income securities. If this happens, the fund will not benefit from the rise in the market price of the securities that normally accompanies a decline in interest rates and may be forced to reinvest the prepayment proceeds in securities with lower yields.
REITs – Investing in real estate investment trusts (“REITs”) involves unique risks. When the fund invests in REITs, it is subject to risks generally associated with investing in real estate. A REIT’s performance depends on the types and locations of the properties it owns, how well it manages those properties and cash flow. REITs may have limited financial resources, may trade less frequently and in limited volume, may engage in dilutive offerings, and may be subject to more abrupt or erratic price movements than the overall securities markets. In addition to its own expenses, the fund will indirectly bear its proportionate share of any management and other expenses paid by REITs in which it invests. U.S. REITs are subject to a number of highly technical tax-related rules and requirements; and a U.S. REIT’s failure to qualify for the favorable U.S. federal income tax treatment generally available to U.S. REITs could result in corporate-level taxation, significantly reducing the return on an investment to the fund.
Structure Conflicts – Transamerica Asset Management, Inc. (“TAM”), the fund’s investment manager, has established an investment program whereby a substantial portion of the fund’s assets are invested in underlying Transamerica funds. TAM does not consider unaffiliated funds as underlying investment options for these assets, even if unaffiliated funds have better investment performance or lower total expenses.
Underlying Exchange-Traded Funds – To the extent the fund invests its assets in underlying ETFs, its ability to achieve its investment objective will depend in part on the performance of the underlying ETFs in which it invests. Investing in underlying ETFs subjects the fund to the risks of investing in the underlying securities or assets held by those ETFs. Each of the underlying ETFs in which the fund may invest has its own investment risks, and those risks can affect the value of the underlying ETFs’ shares and therefore the value of the fund's investments. There can be no assurance that the investment objective of any underlying ETF will be achieved. To the extent that the fund invests more of its assets in one underlying ETF than in another, the fund will have greater exposure to the risks of that underlying ETF. In addition, the fund will bear a pro rata portion of the operating expenses of the underlying ETFs in which it invests.
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U.S. Government and Agency Obligations – Government agency obligations have different levels of credit support and, therefore, different degrees of credit risk. Securities issued by agencies and instrumentalities of the U.S. government that are supported by the full faith and credit of the U.S. government generally present a lesser degree of credit risk than securities issued by agencies and instrumentalities sponsored by the U.S. government that are supported only by the issuer’s right to borrow from the U.S. Treasury and securities issued by agencies and instrumentalities sponsored by the U.S. government that are supported only by the credit of the issuing agencies. A security backed by the “full faith and credit” of the U.S. government is guaranteed only as to its stated interest rate and face value at maturity, not its current market price.
Valuation – The sales price the fund could receive for any particular portfolio investment may differ from the fund's valuation of the investment, particularly for securities that trade in thin or volatile markets, that are priced based upon valuations provided by third party pricing services that use matrix or evaluated pricing systems, or that are valued using a fair value methodology. These differences may increase significantly and affect fund investments more broadly during periods of market volatility. Investors who purchase or redeem fund shares on days when the fund is holding fair-valued securities may receive fewer or more shares or lower or higher redemption proceeds than they would have received if the fund had not fair-valued securities or had used a different valuation methodology. The fund’s ability to value its investments may also be impacted by technological issues and/or errors by pricing services or other third party service providers. Fair value pricing involves subjective judgment, which may prove to be incorrect.
Value Investing – The prices of securities the sub-adviser believes are undervalued may not appreciate as anticipated or may go down. The value approach to investing involves the risk that stocks may remain undervalued, undervaluation may become more severe, or perceived undervaluation may actually represent intrinsic value. Value stocks as a group may be out of favor and underperform the overall equity market for a long period of time, for example, while the market favors “growth” stocks.
Performance: The bar chart and the table below provide some indication of the risks of investing in the fund. The bar chart shows how the fund’s performance has varied from year to year. The table shows how the fund’s average annual total returns for different periods compare to the returns of a broad measure of market performance, as well as comparison to one or more secondary indices.
The bar chart does not reflect the impact of sales charges, which, if reflected, would lower the returns. The table includes deduction of applicable sales charges.

Absent any applicable fee waivers and/or expense limitations, performance would be lower.
As with all mutual funds, past performance (before and after taxes) is not a prediction of future results. Updated performance information is available on our website at www.transamerica.com/investments-fund-center or by calling 1-888-233-4339.
Prior to August 28, 2020, the fund had a portfolio construction manager and used different investment strategies. The performance set forth prior to that date is attributable to the previous portfolio construction manager.

Annual Total Returns (calendar years ended December 31) - Class A
 
Quarter Ended
Return
Best Quarter:
6/30/2020
14.40%
Worst Quarter:
3/31/2020
-12.75%

Average Annual Total Returns (periods ended December 31, 2022)
 
1 Year
5 Years
10 Years
Inception
Date
Class A
 
 
 
3/1/2002
Return before taxes
-20.65%
1.10%
4.05%
 
Return after taxes on
distributions
-21.05%
-0.43%
2.28%
 
Return after taxes on
distributions and sale of fund
shares
-12.13%
0.65%
2.83%
 
Class C (Return before taxes only)
-17.47%
1.46%
3.86%
11/11/2002
Class I (Return before taxes only)
-15.50%
2.56%
4.94%
11/30/2009
Class R (Return before taxes only)
-16.19%
2.00%
4.40%
6/15/2006
MSCI World Index (reflects no
deduction for fees, expenses or
taxes)
-18.14%
6.14%
8.85%
 
Transamerica Asset Allocation –
Moderate Portfolio Blended
Benchmark1 (reflects no deduction
for fees, expenses or taxes)
-15.33%
3.69%
5.74%
 
1
The fund’s secondary benchmark, the Transamerica Asset Allocation – Moderate Portfolio Blended Benchmark, consists of Bloomberg US Aggregate Bond Index, 50% and MSCI World Index, 50%.
The total return information for Class I of the fund reflects the impact of certain payments by Transamerica to the class in 2022.
The after-tax returns are calculated using the historic highest individual federal marginal income tax rates and do not reflect the impact of state and local taxes. Actual after-tax returns may depend on the investor’s individual tax situation and may differ from those shown. After-tax returns may not be relevant if the investment is made through a tax-exempt or tax-deferred account, such as a 401(k) plan.

After-tax returns are presented for only one class, and returns for other classes are presented before taxes only and will vary.
26

Management:
Investment Manager: Transamerica Asset Management, Inc.
Sub-Adviser: Goldman Sachs Asset Management, L.P.
Portfolio Managers:
Neill Nuttall
Portfolio Manager
since August 2020
Alexandra Wilson-Elizondo
Portfolio Manager
since January 2022
Purchase and Sale of Fund Shares: You may purchase, exchange or redeem shares of the fund on any day the New York Stock Exchange is open for business, online or through our website at www.transamerica.com, by mail to Transamerica Fund Services, Inc., P.O. Box 219945, Kansas City, MO 64121-9945, by telephone at 1-888-233-4339, by overnight mail to Transamerica Fund Services, Inc., 330 W. 9th Street, Kansas City, MO 64105 or through a financial intermediary. The minimum initial purchase for Class A and C shares is $1,000; the minimum subsequent investment is $50. The minimum initial purchase for payroll deduction and automatic investment plan is $500; the minimum subsequent investment is $50 per monthly fund account investment. The minimum investment for Class I shares is $1,000,000.
Class R shares are intended for purchase by participants in certain retirement plans such as 401(k) plans, 457 plans, employer-sponsored 403(b) plans, profit sharing and money purchase plans, defined-benefit plans and non-qualified deferred compensation plans (eligible retirement plans), and under the following conditions: Class R shares are available only when a plan’s recordkeeper or financial service firm serving as an intermediary has an agreement with Transamerica Funds, and in such eligible retirement plans where Class R shares are held on the books of the funds through omnibus or Network Level 3 accounts (either at the plan level or at the level of the financial service firm serving as an intermediary). There is no minimum investment for eligible retirement plans investing in Class R shares.
Tax Information: Fund distributions may be taxable as ordinary income, qualified dividend income, or capital gains, except when your investment is in an IRA, 401(k) or other tax-advantaged investment plan. In that case, you may be taxed when you take a distribution from such plan, depending on the type of plan, the circumstances of your distribution and other factors.
Payments to Broker-Dealers and Other Financial Intermediaries: If you purchase the fund through a broker-dealer or other financial intermediary, the fund and/or its affiliates may pay the intermediary for the sale of fund shares and related services. These payments may create a conflict of interest by influencing the broker-dealer or other intermediary and your salesperson to recommend the fund over another investment. Ask your salesperson or visit your financial intermediary’s website for more information.
27

Transamerica Bond
Investment Objective: Seeks to provide high total return through a combination of current income and capital appreciation.
Fees and Expenses: This table describes the fees and expenses that you may pay if you buy, hold and sell shares of the fund. You may pay other fees, such as brokerage commissions and other fees to financial intermediaries, which are not reflected in the tables and examples below.
You may qualify for sales charge discounts if you and your family invest, or agree to invest in the future, at least $50,000 in Transamerica Funds. More information about these and other discounts is available from your financial professional, in the “Waivers and Reductions of Sales Charges” section on page 295 of the fund’s prospectus, in the Appendix – “Waivers and Discounts Available from Intermediaries,” and in the fund’s statement of additional information (SAI) under the heading “Purchase of Shares” on page 80.

Shareholder Fees (fees paid directly from your investment)
Class:
A
C
I
R6
Maximum sales charge (load) imposed
on purchases (as a percentage of
offering price)
4.75%
None
None
None
Maximum deferred sales charge (load)
(as a percentage of purchase price or
redemption proceeds, whichever is
lower)
None1
1.00%2
None
None
1 Class A shares of the fund purchased in amounts of $1 million or more that are not subject to an initial sales charge may be subject to a 1.00% contingent deferred sales charge if those shares are redeemed within 24 months of their purchase. A deferred sales charge may apply to certain redemptions of Class A shares of the fund purchased through an exchange from another Transamerica Fund.
2 Purchases of Class C shares of the fund may be subject to a 1.00% contingent deferred sales charge if those shares are redeemed within 12 months of their purchase. A deferred sales charge may apply to certain redemptions of Class C shares of the fund purchased through an exchange from another Transamerica Fund.

Annual Fund Operating Expenses (expenses that you pay each year as a percentage of the value of your investment)
Class:
A
C
I
R6
Management fees
0.39%
0.39%
0.39%
0.39%
Distribution and service (12b-1) fees
0.25%
1.00%
None
None
Other expenses
0.26%
0.14%
0.15%1
0.06%
Total annual fund operating expenses
0.90%
1.53%
0.54%
0.45%
Fee waiver and/or expense
reimbursement2
0.00%
0.00%
0.04%
0.00%
Total annual fund operating expenses
after fee waiver and/or expense
reimbursement
0.90%
1.53%
0.50%
0.45%
1
Other expenses reflect current transfer agency fees with respect to Class I.
2
Contractual arrangements have been made with the fund’s investment manager, Transamerica Asset Management, Inc. (“TAM”), through March 1, 2024 to waive fees and/or reimburse fund expenses to the extent that total annual fund operating expenses exceed 0.93% for Class A shares, 1.59% for Class C shares, 0.50% for Class I shares and 0.50% for Class R6 shares, excluding, as applicable, acquired fund fees and expenses, interest, taxes, brokerage commissions, dividend and interest expenses on securities sold short, extraordinary expenses and other expenses not incurred in the ordinary course of
the fund’s business. These arrangements cannot be terminated prior to March 1, 2024 without the Board of Trustees’ consent. TAM is permitted to recapture amounts waived and/or reimbursed to a class during any of the 36 months from the date on which TAM waived fees and/or reimbursed expenses for the class if the class’ total annual fund operating expenses have fallen to a level below the limits described above. In no case will TAM recapture any amount that would result, on any particular business day of the fund, in the class’ total annual operating expenses exceeding the applicable limits described above or any other lower limit then in effect.
Example: This Example is intended to help you compare the cost of investing in the fund with the cost of investing in other mutual funds.
The Example assumes that you invest $10,000 in the fund for the time periods indicated and then redeem all shares at the end of those periods (unless otherwise indicated). The Example also assumes that your investment has a 5% return each year and that the fund’s operating expenses remain the same. The Example reflects applicable waivers and/or reimbursements for the duration of such arrangement(s). Although your actual costs may be higher or lower, based on these assumptions your costs would be:

If the shares are redeemed at the end of each period:
 
1 year
3 years
5 years
10 years
Class A
$562
$748
$950
$1,530
Class C
$256
$483
$834
$1,824
Class I
$51
$169
$298
$673
Class R6
$46
$144
$252
$567
If the shares are not redeemed:
 
1 year
3 years
5 years
10 years
Class A
$562
$748
$950
$1,530
Class C
$156
$483
$834
$1,824
Class I
$51
$169
$298
$673
Class R6
$46
$144
$252
$567
Portfolio Turnover: The fund pays transaction costs, such as commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or “turns over” its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover rate may indicate higher transaction costs and may result in higher taxes when fund shares are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are not reflected in annual fund operating expenses or in the Example, affect the fund’s performance.
During the most recent fiscal year, the portfolio turnover rate for the fund was 40% of the average value of its portfolio.
Principal Investment Strategies: The fund’s sub-adviser, Aegon USA Investment Management, LLC (the “sub-adviser”), invests, under normal circumstances, at least 80% of the fund’s net assets (plus the amount of borrowings, if any, for investment purposes) in fixed-income securities, which may include dollar rolls, U.S. government and foreign government bonds and notes (including emerging markets), mortgage-backed, commercial mortgage-backed, and asset-backed securities (including collateralized mortgage obligations), corporate bonds of issuers in the U.S. and foreign countries (including emerging markets), convertible bonds and other convertible securities, bank loans and loan participations, structured notes, and preferred securities. The sub-adviser
28

considers emerging market countries as countries that major international financial institutions, such as the World Bank, generally consider to be less economically mature than developed nations.
Under normal circumstances, at least 50% of the fund’s net assets will be invested in (a) debt securities rated investment grade or higher (rated at least BBB by Standard & Poor’s or Fitch or Baa by Moody’s) by at least two rating agencies or, if unrated, are determined to be of comparable quality by the sub-adviser; (b) securities issued or guaranteed by the U.S. government or its agencies or instrumentalities; (c) commercial paper rated Prime, Prime-1 or Prime-2 by NCO/Moody’s Commercial Paper Division, or A-1 or A-2 by Standard & Poor’s; and/or (d) cash or cash equivalents. Up to 50% of the fund’s net assets may be invested in debt securities that do not meet the investment grade criteria referred to above (commonly known as “junk bonds”). Junk bonds are high-risk debt securities rated below investment grade (that is, securities rated below BBB by Standard & Poor’s or Fitch or below Baa by Moody’s or, if unrated, determined to be of comparable quality by the fund’s sub-adviser). The fund may invest up to 20% of its net assets in equity securities, such as common stocks, rights, warrants or preferred stock. The fund may invest in securities of any maturity and does not have a target average duration.
The sub-adviser uses a combination of a global “top-down” analysis of the macroeconomic and interest rate environments and global asset classes and proprietary “bottom-up” research of sectors, industries, issuers and individual securities. In the sub-adviser’s “top-down” approach, the sub-adviser analyzes various fundamental, technical, sentiment and valuation factors that affect the movement and relative value of markets and securities prices worldwide. In its proprietary “bottom-up” research of corporate and sovereign debt and other fixed-income securities, the sub-adviser considers various fundamental and other factors, such as creditworthiness, capital structure, covenants, cash flows and, as applicable, collateral. The sub-adviser uses this combined “top-down” and “bottom-up” approach to determine asset class, sector, security, yield curve and duration positions for the fund. The sub-adviser’s research analysts also generally integrate environmental, social and governance (“ESG”) matters within their analytical process for foreign government bonds and notes (including emerging markets), private residential mortgage-backed securities, commercial mortgage-backed securities, certain asset-backed securities (including collateralized mortgage obligations), corporate bonds of issuers in the U.S. and foreign countries (including emerging markets), structured notes, certain preferred securities, certain cash equivalents (including corporate commercial paper) and privately issued debt securities issued pursuant to Rule 144A or Regulation S alongside traditional credit metrics as a risk management tool and as a method to identify financially material ESG factors and arrive at an independent, comprehensive view of the investment. The sub-adviser’s research analysts typically do not consider ESG factors when analyzing other investments, including, but not limited to, investments in dollar rolls, U.S. government bonds and notes, U.S. agency securities, convertible bonds, other convertible securities, certain bank loans and loan participations, asset-backed commercial paper, cash, certain cash equivalent securities, equity securities, common stocks, rights, warrants, derivatives, repurchase agreements and money market instruments. Consideration of ESG
matters is subjective and not determinative in the sub-adviser’s investment process. The sub-adviser may conclude that other attributes of an investment outweigh ESG considerations when making investment decisions. The sub-adviser’s research analysts do not take ESG factors into consideration with respect to every investment in the fund.
The fund may, but is not required to, engage in certain investment strategies involving derivatives, such as options, futures, forward currency contracts and swaps, including, but not limited to, interest rate, total return and credit default swaps. These investment strategies may be employed as a hedging technique, as a means of altering investment characteristics of the fund’s portfolio (such as shortening or lengthening duration), in an attempt to enhance returns or for other purposes.
The fund may purchase securities on a when-issued, delayed delivery, to be announced or forward commitment basis.
The fund may invest in privately issued securities, including those that are normally purchased pursuant to Rule 144A or Regulation S promulgated under the Securities Act of 1933, as amended.
Principal Risks: Risk is inherent in all investing. Many factors and risks affect the fund's performance, including those described below. The value of your investment in the fund, as well as the amount of return you receive on your investment, may fluctuate significantly day to day and over time. You may lose part or all of your investment in the fund or your investment may not perform as well as other similar investments. The following is a summary description of principal risks (in alphabetical order after certain key risks) of investing in the fund. An investment in the fund is not a bank deposit and is not insured or guaranteed by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation or any other government agency. You may lose money if you invest in this fund.
Market – The market prices of the fund’s securities or other assets may go up or down, sometimes rapidly or unpredictably, due to general market conditions, overall economic trends or events, inflation, changes in interest rates, governmental actions or interventions, actions taken by the U.S. Federal Reserve or foreign central banks, market disruptions caused by tariffs, trade disputes or other factors, political developments, armed conflicts, economic sanctions, cybersecurity events, investor sentiment, public health events such as the spread of infectious disease, and other factors that may or may not be related to the issuer of the security or other asset. If the market prices of the fund’s securities and assets fall, the value of your investment in the fund could go down.
Economies and financial markets throughout the world are increasingly interconnected. Events or circumstances in one or more countries or regions could be highly disruptive to, and have profound impacts on, global economies or markets. As a result, whether or not the fund invests in securities of issuers located in or with significant exposure to the countries directly affected, the value and liquidity of the fund’s investments may go down.
In recent years, the COVID-19 pandemic, the large expansion of government deficits and debt as a result of government actions to mitigate the effects of the pandemic, the Russian invasion of Ukraine and the rise of inflation have resulted in extreme volatility in the global economy and in global financial markets. These
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events could be prolonged and could continue to adversely affect the value and liquidity of the fund’s investments, impair the fund’s ability to satisfy redemption requests, and negatively impact the fund’s performance.
Fixed-Income Securities – Risks of fixed-income securities include credit risk, interest rate risk, counterparty risk, prepayment risk, extension risk, valuation risk, and liquidity risk. The value of fixed-income securities may go up or down, sometimes rapidly and unpredictably, due to general market conditions, such as real or perceived adverse economic or political conditions, tariffs and trade disruptions, inflation, changes in interest rates, lack of liquidity in the bond markets or adverse investor sentiment. In addition, the value of a fixed-income security may decline if the issuer or other obligor of the security fails to pay principal and/or interest, otherwise defaults or has its credit rating downgraded or is perceived to be less creditworthy, or the credit quality or value of any underlying assets declines. If the value of fixed-income securities owned by the fund falls, the value of your investment will go down. The fund may lose its entire investment in the fixed-income securities of an issuer.
Credit – If an issuer or other obligor (such as a party providing insurance or other credit enhancement) of a security held by the fund or a counterparty to a financial contract with the fund is unable or unwilling to meet its financial obligations, or is downgraded or perceived to be less creditworthy (whether by market participants or otherwise), or if the value of any underlying assets declines, the value of your investment will typically decline. A decline may be rapid and/or significant, particularly in certain market environments. In addition, the fund may incur costs and may be hindered or delayed in enforcing its rights against an issuer, obligor or counterparty.
Interest Rate –The value of fixed-income securities generally goes down when interest rates rise. A rise in rates tends to have a greater impact on the prices of longer term or duration securities. Changes in interest rates also may affect the liquidity of the fund’s investments. A general rise in interest rates may cause investors to sell fixed-income securities on a large scale, which could adversely affect the price and liquidity of fixed-income securities generally and could also result in increased redemptions from the fund. Increased redemptions could cause the fund to sell securities at inopportune times or depressed prices and result in further losses.
Mortgage-Related and Asset-Backed Securities – The value of mortgage-related and asset-backed securities will be influenced by factors affecting the housing market and the assets underlying such securities. As a result, during periods of declining asset values, difficult or frozen credit markets, swings in interest rates, or deteriorating economic conditions, mortgage-related and asset-backed securities may decline in value, face valuation difficulties, become more volatile and/or become illiquid, which could negatively impact the fund. Mortgage-backed securities represent direct or indirect participations in, or are collateralized by and payable from, mortgage loans secured by real property. Asset-backed securities represent participations in, or are secured by and payable from, assets such as installment sales or loan contracts, leases, credit card receivables and other categories of receivables. The value of mortgage-backed and asset-backed securities may be affected by changes in credit quality or value of the mortgage loans or other assets that support
the securities. Mortgage-backed and asset-backed securities are subject to prepayment or call and extension risks. Some of these securities may receive little or no collateral protection from the underlying assets.
High-Yield Debt Securities – High-yield debt securities, commonly referred to as “junk” bonds, are securities that are rated below “investment grade” or are of comparable quality. Changes in interest rates, the market’s perception of the issuers, the creditworthiness of the issuers and negative perceptions of the junk bond market generally may significantly affect the value of these bonds. Junk bonds are considered speculative, tend to be volatile, typically have a higher risk of default, tend to be less liquid and more difficult to value than higher grade securities, and may result in losses for the fund.
Inflation – The value of assets or income from investment may be worth less in the future as inflation decreases the value of money. As inflation increases, the real value of the fund’s assets can decline as can the value of the fund’s distributions.
Liquidity – The fund may make investments that are illiquid or that become illiquid after purchase. Illiquid investments can be difficult to value, may trade at a discount from comparable, more liquid investments, and may be subject to wide fluctuations in value. Liquidity risk may be magnified in rising interest rate environments. If the fund is forced to sell an illiquid investment to meet redemption requests or other cash needs, the fund may be forced to sell at a substantial loss or may not be able to sell at all. Liquidity of particular investments, or even entire asset classes, including U.S. Treasury securities, can deteriorate rapidly, particularly during times of market turmoil, and those investments may be difficult or impossible for the fund to sell. This may prevent the fund from limiting losses.
Counterparty – The fund could lose money if the counterparties to derivatives, repurchase agreements and/or other financial contracts entered into for the fund do not fulfill their contractual obligations. In addition, the fund may incur costs and may be hindered or delayed in enforcing its rights against a counterparty.
Extension – When interest rates rise, payments of fixed-income securities, including asset- and mortgage-backed securities, may occur more slowly than anticipated, causing their market prices to decline.
Prepayment or Call – Many issuers have a right to prepay their fixed-income securities. If this happens, the fund will not benefit from the rise in the market price of the securities that normally accompanies a decline in interest rates and may be forced to reinvest the prepayment proceeds in securities with lower yields.
Bank Obligations – Banks are sensitive to changes in money market and general economic conditions. Banks are highly regulated. Decisions by regulators may limit the loans banks make, affect the interest rates and fees they charge and reduce bank profitability.
Management – The value of your investment may go down if the investment manager’s or sub-adviser's judgments and decisions are incorrect or otherwise do not produce the desired results, or if the investment strategy does not work as intended. You may also suffer losses if there are imperfections, errors or limitations in the quantitative, analytic or other tools, resources, information and data used, investment techniques applied, or the analyses employed or relied on, by the investment manageror sub-adviser, if such tools, resources, information or data are used incorrectly or
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otherwise do not work as intended, or if the investment manager’s or sub-adviser's investment style is out of favor or otherwise fails to produce the desired results. Any of these things could cause the fund to lose value or its results to lag relevant benchmarks or other funds with similar objectives.
Active Trading – The fund may purchase and sell securities without regard to the length of time held. Active trading may be more pronounced during periods of market volatility, may have a negative impact on performance and may generate greater amounts of short-term capital gains.
Convertible Securities – Convertible securities are subject to risks associated with both fixed-income and equity securities. For example, if market interest rates rise, the value of a convertible security typically falls. In addition, a convertible security is subject to the risk that the issuer will not be able to pay interest or dividends when due, and the market value of the security may change based on the issuer’s actual or perceived creditworthiness. Since the convertible security derives a portion of its value from the underlying common stock, the security is also subject to the same types of market and issuer-specific risks that apply to the underlying common stock. Convertible securities generally offer lower interest or dividend yields than non-convertible securities of similar quality.
Currency – The value of a fund’s investments in securities denominated in foreign currencies increases or decreases as the rates of exchange between those currencies and the U.S. dollar change. U.S. dollar-denominated securities of foreign issuers may also be affected by currency risk. Currency exchange rates can be volatile and may fluctuate significantly over short periods of time. Currency conversion costs and currency fluctuations could reduce or eliminate investment gains or add to investment losses. A fund may be unable or may choose not to hedge its foreign currency exposure or any hedge may not be effective.
Currency Hedging – The fund may hedge its currency risk using currency futures, forwards or options. However, hedging strategies and/or these instruments may not always work as intended, and a fund may be worse off than if it had not used a hedging strategy or instrument. Certain countries may also impose restrictions on the exchange or export of currency or adverse currency exchange rates and may be characterized by a lack of available currency hedging instruments.
Derivatives – The use of derivatives involves a variety of risks, which may be different from, or greater than, the risks associated with investing in traditional securities, such as stocks and bonds. Risks of derivatives include leverage risk, liquidity risk, valuation risk, market risk, counterparty risk, credit risk, operational risk and legal risk. Use of derivatives can increase fund losses, increase costs, reduce opportunities for gains, increase fund volatility, and not produce the result intended. Certain derivatives have the potential for unlimited loss, regardless of the size of the initial investment. Even a small investment in derivatives can have a disproportionate impact on the fund. Derivatives may be difficult or impossible to sell, unwind or value, and the counterparty (including, if applicable, the fund’s clearing broker, the derivatives exchange or the clearinghouse) may default on its obligations to the fund. In certain cases, the fund may incur costs and may be hindered or delayed in enforcing its rights against or closing out derivatives instruments with a counterparty, which may result in additional losses. Derivatives are also generally subject to the risks applicable to the assets,
rates, indices or other indicators underlying the derivative, including market risk, credit risk, liquidity risk, management and valuation risk. Also, suitable derivative transactions may not be available in all circumstances or at reasonable prices. The value of a derivative may fluctuate more or less than, or otherwise not correlate well with, the underlying assets, rates, indices or other indicators to which it relates. The fund may segregate cash or other liquid assets to cover the funding of its obligations under derivatives contracts or make margin payments when it takes positions in derivatives involving obligations to third parties. New Rule 18f-4 under the 1940 Act provides a comprehensive regulatory framework for the use of derivatives by funds and imposes new requirements and restrictions on funds using derivatives. Rule 18f-4 could have an adverse impact on the fund’s performance and its ability to implement its investment strategies as it has historically and may increase costs related to the fund’s use of derivatives. It is not currently clear what impact, if any, the rule will have on the availability, liquidity or performance of derivatives. The rule may not be effective to limit the risk of loss from derivatives.
Distressed or Defaulted Securities – Investments in defaulted securities and obligations of distressed issuers, including securities that are, or may be, involved in reorganizations or other financial restructurings, either out of court or in bankruptcy, involve substantial risks in addition to the risks of investing in high-yield debt securities. These securities are considered speculative. The fund may incur costs to protect its investment, and the fund could lose its entire investment. Distressed securities and any securities received in an exchange for such securities may be subject to restrictions on resale.
Dollar Rolls – The use of dollar rolls is a speculative technique involving leverage, and can have an economic effect similar to borrowing money. Dollar roll transactions involve the risk that the market value of the securities the fund is required to purchase may decline below the agreed upon repurchase price of those securities. If the broker/dealer to whom the fund sells securities becomes insolvent, the fund’s ability to purchase or repurchase securities may be restricted.
Emerging Markets – Investments in securities of issuers located or doing business in emerging markets are subject to heightened foreign investments risks and may experience rapid and extreme changes in value. Emerging market countries tend to have less developed and less stable economic, political and legal systems and regulatory and accounting standards, may have policies that restrict investment by foreigners or that prevent foreign investors such as the fund from withdrawing their money at will, and are more likely to experience nationalization, expropriation and confiscatory taxation. In addition, emerging market securities may have low trading volumes and may be or become illiquid.
Equity Securities – Equity securities generally have greater risk of loss than debt securities. Stock markets are volatile and the value of equity securities may go up or down, sometimes rapidly and unpredictably. The value of equity securities fluctuates based on real or perceived changes in a company’s financial condition, factors affecting a particular industry or industries, and overall market, economic and political conditions. If the market prices of the equity securities owned by the fund fall, the value of your investment in the fund will decline. The fund may lose its entire
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investment in the equity securities of an issuer. A change in financial condition or other event affecting a single issuer may adversely impact securities markets as a whole.
Floating Rate Loans – Floating rate loans are often made to borrowers whose financial condition is troubled or highly leveraged. These loans frequently are rated below investment grade and are therefore subject to “High-Yield Debt Securities” risk. There is no public market for floating rate loans and the loans may trade infrequently and be subject to wide bid/ask spreads. Many floating rate loans are subject to restrictions on resale. Floating rate loans may have trade settlement periods in excess of seven days, which may result in the fund not receiving proceeds from the sale of a loan for an extended period. As a result, the fund may be subject to greater “Liquidity” risk than a fund that does not invest in floating rate loans and the fund may be constrained in its ability to meet its obligations (including obligations to redeeming shareholders). The lack of an active trading market may also make it more difficult to value floating rate loans. Rising interest rates can lead to increased default rates as payment obligations increas