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TABLE OF CONTENTS
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Prospectus | February 27, 2023
Schwab Funds®
Schwab Fundamental Index* Funds
Schwab® Fundamental US Large Company Index Fund
SFLNX
Schwab® Fundamental US Small Company Index Fund
SFSNX
Schwab® Fundamental International Large Company Index Fund
SFNNX
Schwab® Fundamental International Small Company Index Fund
SFILX
Schwab® Fundamental Emerging Markets Large Company Index Fund
SFENX
As with all mutual funds, the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) has not approved these securities or passed on whether the information in this prospectus is adequate and accurate. Anyone who indicates otherwise is committing a federal crime.
*
SCHWAB is a registered trademark of Charles Schwab & Co., Inc. FUNDAMENTAL INDEX is a registered trademark of Research Affiliates LLC.

TABLE OF CONTENTS
Schwab Fundamental Index Funds
Fund Summaries
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TABLE OF CONTENTS
Schwab® Fundamental US Large Company Index Fund
Ticker Symbol:
SFLNX
Investment Objective
The fund seeks investment results that correspond generally (before fees and expenses) to the total return of the Russell RAFI™ US Large Company Index.
Fund Fees and Expenses
This table describes the fees and expenses you may pay if you buy, hold and sell shares of the fund. You may pay other fees, such as brokerage commissions and other fees to financial intermediaries, which are not reflected in the table and Example below.
Shareholder Fees (fees paid directly from your investment)
None
Annual Fund Operating Expenses (expenses that you pay each year as a %
of the value of your investment)
Management fees
0.25
Other expenses
None
Total annual fund operating expenses
0.25
Example
This example is intended to help you compare the cost of investing in the fund with the cost of investing in other funds. The example assumes that you invest $10,000 in the fund for the time periods indicated and then redeem all of your shares at the end of those time periods. The example also assumes that your investment has a 5% return each year and that the fund’s operating expenses remain the same. Your actual costs may be higher or lower.
Expenses on a $10,000 Investment
1 Year
3 Years
5 Years
10 Years
$ 26 $ 80 $ 141 $ 318
Portfolio Turnover
The fund pays transaction costs, such as commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or “turns over” its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover may indicate higher transaction costs and may result in higher taxes when fund shares are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are not reflected in the annual fund operating expenses or in the example, affect the fund’s performance. During the most recent fiscal year, the fund’s portfolio turnover rate was 13% of the average value of its portfolio.
Principal Investment Strategies
To pursue its goal, the fund primarily invests in stocks that are included in the Russell RAFI US Large Company Index. The index measures the performance of the large company size segment by fundamental overall company scores (scores), which are created using as the universe the U.S. companies in the FTSE Global Total Cap Index (the parent index). Securities are grouped in order of decreasing score and each company receives a weight based on its percentage of the total scores of the U.S. companies within the parent index. Companies are split at the 87.5% point based on fundamental weights. Companies above this breakpoint make up the index. The index uses a partial quarterly reconstitution methodology in which the index is split into four equal segments at the annual reconstitution and each segment is then rebalanced on a rolling quarterly basis. The index is compiled and calculated by Frank Russell Company in conjunction with Research Affiliates LLC, and the method of calculating the components of the index is subject to change.
It is the fund’s policy that, under normal circumstances, it will invest at least 90% of its net assets (including, for this purpose, any borrowings for investment purposes) in stocks included in the index. The fund will notify its shareholders at least 60 days before changing this policy. The fund will generally give the same weight to a given stock as the index does. However, when the investment adviser believes it is in the best interest of the fund, such as to avoid purchasing odd-lots (i.e., purchasing less than the usual number of shares traded for a security), for tax considerations, or to address liquidity considerations with respect to a stock, the investment adviser may cause the fund’s weighting of a stock to be more or less than the index’s weighting of the stock. The fund may sell securities that are represented in the index in anticipation of their removal from the index, or buy securities that are not yet represented in the index in anticipation of their addition to the index.
The fund uses an “indexing” investment approach, which attempts to replicate, before expenses, the performance of the index by purchasing a basket of securities that compose the index. Using this approach, the investment adviser seeks a correlation, over time, of 0.95 or better between the fund’s performance and the performance of the index; a figure of 1.00 would represent perfect correlation. However, it is possible that the investment adviser may determine to utilize instead a “sampling” methodology in seeking to achieve the fund’s objective. Sampling means that the investment adviser

Index ownership – The Schwab Fundamental US Large Company Index Fund is not in any way sponsored, endorsed, sold or promoted by Frank Russell Company (Russell), by the London Stock Exchange Group companies (LSEG), or by Research Affiliates LLC (RA) (collectively the Licensor Parties), and none of the Licensor Parties make any warranty or representation whatsoever, expressly or impliedly, either as to the results to be obtained from the use of the Russell RAFI US Large Company Index (the Index) or otherwise. The Index is compiled and calculated by Russell in conjunction with RA. None of the Licensor Parties shall be liable (whether in negligence or otherwise) to any person for any error in the Index and none of the Licensor Parties shall be under any obligation to advise any person of any error therein. “Russell®” is a trademark of Russell. The trade names “Research Affiliates®”, “Fundamental Index®” and “RAFI®” are registered trademarks of RA. Charles Schwab Investment Management, Inc., has obtained full license from Russell to use the Index. For full disclaimer please see the fund’s statement of additional information.
Schwab Fundamental US Large Company Index Fund | Fund Summary1

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uses quantitative analysis to select stocks from the index universe to obtain a representative sample of stocks that resembles the index in terms of key risk factors, performance attributes and other characteristics. In certain circumstances it may not be possible or practicable for the fund to invest in all of the stocks comprising the index or in proportion to their weightings in the index.
There can be no guarantee that the performance of the fund will achieve a high degree of correlation with that of the index. A number of factors may affect the fund’s ability to achieve a high correlation with the index, including the degree to which the fund utilizes a sampling technique. The correlation between the performance of the fund and the index may also diverge due to transaction costs, asset valuations, corporate actions (such as mergers and spin-offs), timing variances, and differences between the fund’s portfolio and the index resulting from legal restrictions (such as diversification requirements) that apply to the fund but not to the index.
Like many index funds, the fund also may invest in derivatives, principally futures contracts, and lend its securities to minimize the gap in performance that exists between any index fund and its corresponding index. This gap occurs mainly because, unlike the index, the fund incurs expenses and must keep a small portion of its assets in cash for business operations. By using futures, the fund can gain market exposure and potentially offset a portion of the gap attributable to its cash holdings. Any income realized through securities lending may help reduce the portion of the gap attributable to expenses.
The fund may concentrate its investments (i.e., hold more than 25% of its assets) in an industry or group of industries to approximately the extent that the index the fund is designed to track is also so concentrated.
Principal Risks
The fund is subject to risks, any of which could cause an investor to lose money. The fund’s principal risks include:
Market Risk. Financial markets rise and fall in response to a variety of factors, sometimes rapidly and unpredictably. Markets may be impacted by economic, political, regulatory and other conditions, including economic sanctions and other government actions. In addition, the occurrence of global events, such as war, terrorism, environmental disasters, natural disasters and epidemics, may also negatively affect the financial markets. As with any investment whose performance is tied to these markets, the value of an investment in the fund will fluctuate, which means that an investor could lose money over short or long periods.
Equity Risk. The prices of equity securities rise and fall daily. These price movements may result from factors affecting individual companies, industries or the securities market as a whole. In addition, equity markets tend to move in cycles, which may cause stock prices to fall over short or extended periods of time.
Investment Style Risk. The fund is an index fund. Therefore, the fund follows the securities included in the index during upturns as well as downturns. Because of its indexing strategy, the fund does not
take steps to reduce market exposure or to lessen the effects of a declining market. In addition, because of the fund’s expenses, the fund’s performance may be below that of the index. Errors relating to the index may occur from time to time and may not be identified by the index provider for a period of time. In addition, market disruptions could cause delays in the index’s rebalancing schedule. Such errors and/or market disruptions may result in losses for the fund.
Market Capitalization Risk. Securities issued by companies of different market capitalizations tend to go in and out of favor based on market and economic conditions. During a period when securities of a particular market capitalization fall behind other types of investments, the fund’s performance could be impacted.
Large-Cap Company Risk. Large-cap companies are generally more mature and the securities issued by these companies may not be able to reach the same levels of growth as the securities issued by small- or mid-cap companies.
Tracking Error Risk. As an index fund, the fund seeks to track the performance of the index, although it may not be successful in doing so. The divergence between the performance of the fund and the index, positive or negative, is called “tracking error.” Tracking error can be caused by many factors and it may be significant.
Concentration Risk. To the extent that the fund’s or the index’s portfolio is concentrated in the securities of issuers in a particular market, industry, group of industries, sector or asset class, the fund may be adversely affected by the performance of those securities, may be subject to increased price volatility and may be more vulnerable to adverse economic, market, political or regulatory occurrences affecting that market, industry, group of industries, sector or asset class.
Derivatives Risk. The fund’s use of derivative instruments involves risks different from, or possibly greater than, the risks associated with investing directly in securities and other traditional investments. The fund’s use of derivatives could reduce the fund’s performance, increase its volatility and cause the fund to lose more than the initial amount invested. In addition, investments in derivatives may involve leverage, which means a small percentage of assets invested in derivatives can have a disproportionately large impact on the fund.
Liquidity Risk. The fund may be unable to sell certain securities, such as illiquid securities, readily at a favorable time or price, or the fund may have to sell them at a loss.
Sampling Index Tracking Risk. To the extent the fund uses a sampling method, the fund will not fully replicate the index and may hold securities not included in the index. As a result, the fund is subject to the risk that the investment adviser’s investment management strategy, the implementation of which is subject to a number of constraints, may not produce the intended results. If the fund utilizes a sampling approach, it may not track the return of the index as well as it would if the fund purchased all of the securities in the index.
2Schwab Fundamental US Large Company Index Fund | Fund Summary

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Securities Lending Risk. Securities lending involves the risk of loss of rights in, or delay in recovery of, the loaned securities if the borrower fails to return the security loaned or becomes insolvent.
For more information on the risks of investing in the fund, please see the “Fund Details” section in the prospectus.
Performance
The bar chart below shows how the fund’s investment results have varied from year to year, and the following table shows how the fund’s average annual total returns for various periods compared to that of the index. This information provides some indication of the risks of investing in the fund. All figures assume distributions were reinvested. Keep in mind that future performance (both before and after taxes) may differ from past performance. For current performance information, please see
www.schwabassetmanagement.com/schwabfunds_prospectus.
Annual Total Returns (%) as of 12/31
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Best Quarter: 18.47% Q2 2020
Worst Quarter: (26.07%) Q1 2020
Average Annual Total Returns as of 12/31/22
1 Year
5 Years
10 Years
Before taxes (6.87%) 9.84% 12.27%
After taxes on distributions (7.32%) 8.43% 10.94%
After taxes on distributions and sale
of shares
(3.74%) 7.54% 9.84%
Comparative Index (reflects no deduction for expenses or taxes)
Russell RAFI US Large Company Index
(6.56%) 10.09%
12.61%
The after-tax figures reflect the highest individual federal income tax rates in effect during the period and do not reflect the impact of state and local taxes. Your actual after-tax returns depend on your individual tax situation. In addition, after-tax returns are not relevant if you hold your fund shares through a tax-deferred arrangement, such as a 401(k) plan, an individual retirement account (IRA) or other tax-advantaged account. In some cases, the return after taxes on distributions and sale of shares may exceed the fund’s other returns due to an assumed benefit from any losses on a sale of shares at the end of the measurement period.
Investment Adviser
Charles Schwab Investment Management, Inc., dba Schwab Asset Management™
Portfolio Managers
Christopher Bliss, CFA, Managing Director and Head of Passive Equity Strategies, is responsible for the day-to-day co-management of the fund. He has managed the fund since 2017.
Jeremy Brown, CFA, Senior Portfolio Manager, is responsible for the day-to-day co-management of the fund. He has managed the fund since 2019.
Ferian Juwono, CFA, Senior Portfolio Manager, is responsible for the day-to-day co-management of the fund. He has managed the fund since 2013.
Sabya Sinha, Portfolio Manager, is responsible for the day-to-day co-management of the fund. He has managed the fund since 2017.
Agnes Zau, CFA, Portfolio Manager, is responsible for the day-to-day co-management of the fund. She has managed the fund since 2023.
Purchase and Sale of Fund Shares
The fund is open for business each day that the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) is open. If the NYSE is closed due to weather or other extenuating circumstances on a day it would typically be open for business, or the NYSE has an unscheduled early closing on a day it has opened for business, the fund reserves the right to treat such day as a business day and accept purchase and redemption orders and calculate its share price as of the normally scheduled close of regular trading on the NYSE for that day.
Investors may only invest in the fund through an account at Charles Schwab & Co., Inc. (Schwab) or another financial intermediary. When you place orders to purchase, exchange or redeem fund shares through an account at Schwab or another financial intermediary, you must follow Schwab’s or the other financial intermediary’s transaction procedures.
There is no minimum initial investment for the fund.
Tax Information
Dividends and capital gains distributions received from the fund will generally be taxable as ordinary income or capital gains, unless you are investing through an IRA, 401(k) or other tax-advantaged account (in which case you may be taxed later, upon withdrawal of your investment from such account).
Payments to Financial Intermediaries
If you purchase shares of the fund through a broker-dealer or other financial intermediary (such as a bank), the adviser and its related companies may pay the intermediary for the sale of fund shares and related services. These payments may create a conflict of interest by influencing the broker-dealer or other financial intermediary and your salesperson to recommend the fund over another investment. Ask your salesperson or visit your financial intermediary’s website for more information.
Schwab Fundamental US Large Company Index Fund | Fund Summary3

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Schwab® Fundamental US Small Company Index Fund
Ticker Symbol:
SFSNX
Investment Objective
The fund seeks investment results that correspond generally (before fees and expenses) to the total return of the Russell RAFI™ US Small Company Index.
Fund Fees and Expenses
This table describes the fees and expenses you may pay if you buy, hold and sell shares of the fund. You may pay other fees, such as brokerage commissions and other fees to financial intermediaries, which are not reflected in the table and Example below.
Shareholder Fees (fees paid directly from your investment)
None
Annual Fund Operating Expenses (expenses that you pay each year as a %
of the value of your investment)
Management fees
0.25
Other expenses
None
Total annual fund operating expenses
0.25
Example
This example is intended to help you compare the cost of investing in the fund with the cost of investing in other funds. The example assumes that you invest $10,000 in the fund for the time periods indicated and then redeem all of your shares at the end of those time periods. The example also assumes that your investment has a 5% return each year and that the fund’s operating expenses remain the same. Your actual costs may be higher or lower.
Expenses on a $10,000 Investment
1 Year
3 Years
5 Years
10 Years
$ 26 $ 80 $ 141 $ 318
Portfolio Turnover
The fund pays transaction costs, such as commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or “turns over” its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover may indicate higher transaction costs and may result in higher taxes when fund shares are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are not reflected in the annual fund operating expenses or in the example, affect the fund’s performance. During the most recent fiscal year, the fund’s portfolio turnover rate was 35% of the average value of its portfolio.
Principal Investment Strategies
To pursue its goal, the fund primarily invests in stocks that are included in the Russell RAFI US Small Company Index. The index measures the performance of the small company size segment by fundamental overall company scores (scores), which are created using as the universe the U.S. companies in the FTSE Global Total Cap Index (the parent index). Securities are grouped in order of decreasing score and each company receives a weight based on its percentage of the total scores of the U.S. companies within the parent index. Companies are split at the 87.5% point based on fundamental weights. Companies below this breakpoint make up the index. The index uses a partial quarterly reconstitution methodology in which the index is split into four equal segments at the annual reconstitution and each segment is then rebalanced on a rolling quarterly basis. The index is compiled and calculated by Frank Russell Company in conjunction with Research Affiliates LLC, and the method of calculating the components of the index is subject to change.
It is the fund’s policy that, under normal circumstances, it will invest at least 90% of its net assets (including, for this purpose, any borrowings for investment purposes) in stocks included in the index. The fund will notify its shareholders at least 60 days before changing this policy. The fund will generally give the same weight to a given stock as the index does. However, when the investment adviser believes it is in the best interest of the fund, such as to avoid purchasing odd-lots (i.e., purchasing less than the usual number of shares traded for a security), for tax considerations, or to address liquidity considerations with respect to a stock, the investment adviser may cause the fund’s weighting of a stock to be more or less than the index’s weighting of the stock. The fund may sell securities that are represented in the index in anticipation of their removal from the index, or buy securities that are not yet represented in the index in anticipation of their addition to the index.
The fund uses an “indexing” investment approach, which attempts to replicate, before expenses, the performance of the index by purchasing a basket of securities that compose the index. Using this approach, the investment adviser seeks a correlation, over time, of 0.95 or better between the fund’s performance and the performance of the index; a figure of 1.00 would represent perfect correlation. However, it is possible that the investment adviser may determine to utilize instead a “sampling” methodology in seeking to achieve the fund’s objective. Sampling means that the investment adviser

Index ownership – The Schwab Fundamental US Small Company Index Fund is not in any way sponsored, endorsed, sold or promoted by Frank Russell Company (Russell), by the London Stock Exchange Group companies (LSEG), or by Research Affiliates LLC (RA) (collectively the Licensor Parties), and none of the Licensor Parties make any warranty or representation whatsoever, expressly or impliedly, either as to the results to be obtained from the use of the Russell RAFI US Small Company Index (the Index) or otherwise. The Index is compiled and calculated by Russell in conjunction with RA. None of the Licensor Parties shall be liable (whether in negligence or otherwise) to any person for any error in the Index and none of the Licensor Parties shall be under any obligation to advise any person of any error therein. “Russell®” is a trademark of Russell. The trade names “Research Affiliates®”, “Fundamental Index®” and “RAFI®” are registered trademarks of RA. Charles Schwab Investment Management, Inc. has obtained full license from Russell to use the Index. For full disclaimer please see the fund’s statement of additional information.
4Schwab Fundamental US Small Company Index Fund | Fund Summary

TABLE OF CONTENTS
uses quantitative analysis to select stocks from the index universe to obtain a representative sample of stocks that resembles the index in terms of key risk factors, performance attributes and other characteristics. In certain circumstances it may not be possible or practicable for the fund to invest in all of the stocks comprising the index or in proportion to their weightings in the index.
There can be no guarantee that the performance of the fund will achieve a high degree of correlation with that of the index. A number of factors may affect the fund’s ability to achieve a high correlation with the index, including the degree to which the fund utilizes a sampling technique. The correlation between the performance of the fund and the index may also diverge due to transaction costs, asset valuations, corporate actions (such as mergers and spin-offs), timing variances, and differences between the fund’s portfolio and the index resulting from legal restrictions (such as diversification requirements) that apply to the fund but not to the index.
Like many index funds, the fund also may invest in derivatives, principally futures contracts, and lend its securities to minimize the gap in performance that exists between any index fund and the corresponding index. This gap occurs mainly because, unlike the index, the fund incurs expenses and must keep a small portion of its assets in cash for business operations. By using futures, the fund can gain market exposure and potentially offset a portion of the gap attributable to its cash holdings. Any income realized through securities lending may help reduce the portion of the gap attributable to expenses.
The fund may concentrate its investments (i.e., hold more than 25% of its total assets) in an industry or group of industries to approximately the extent that the index the fund is designed to track is also so concentrated.
Principal Risks
The fund is subject to risks, any of which could cause an investor to lose money. The fund’s principal risks include:
Market Risk. Financial markets rise and fall in response to a variety of factors, sometimes rapidly and unpredictably. Markets may be impacted by economic, political, regulatory and other conditions, including economic sanctions and other government actions. In addition, the occurrence of global events, such as war, terrorism, environmental disasters, natural disasters and epidemics, may also negatively affect the financial markets. As with any investment whose performance is tied to these markets, the value of an investment in the fund will fluctuate, which means that an investor could lose money over short or long periods.
Equity Risk. The prices of equity securities rise and fall daily. These price movements may result from factors affecting individual companies, industries or the securities market as a whole. In addition, equity markets tend to move in cycles, which may cause stock prices to fall over short or extended periods of time.
Investment Style Risk. The fund is an index fund. Therefore, the fund follows the securities included in the index during upturns as well as downturns. Because of its indexing strategy, the fund does not
take steps to reduce market exposure or to lessen the effects of a declining market. In addition, because of the fund’s expenses, the fund’s performance may be below that of the index. Errors relating to the index may occur from time to time and may not be identified by the index provider for a period of time. In addition, market disruptions could cause delays in the index’s rebalancing schedule. Such errors and/or market disruptions may result in losses for the fund.
Market Capitalization Risk. Securities issued by companies of different market capitalizations tend to go in and out of favor based on market and economic conditions. During a period when securities of a particular market capitalization fall behind other types of investments, the fund’s performance could be impacted.
Small-Cap Company Risk. Securities issued by small-cap companies may be riskier than those issued by larger companies, and their prices may move sharply, especially during market upturns and downturns.
Tracking Error Risk. As an index fund, the fund seeks to track the performance of the index, although it may not be successful in doing so. The divergence between the performance of the fund and the index, positive or negative, is called “tracking error.” Tracking error can be caused by many factors and it may be significant.
Concentration Risk. To the extent that the fund’s or the index’s portfolio is concentrated in the securities of issuers in a particular market, industry, group of industries, sector or asset class, the fund may be adversely affected by the performance of those securities, may be subject to increased price volatility and may be more vulnerable to adverse economic, market, political or regulatory occurrences affecting that market, industry, group of industries, sector or asset class.
Derivatives Risk. The fund’s use of derivative instruments involves risks different from, or possibly greater than, the risks associated with investing directly in securities and other traditional investments. The fund’s use of derivatives could reduce the fund’s performance, increase its volatility and cause the fund to lose more than the initial amount invested. In addition, investments in derivatives may involve leverage, which means a small percentage of assets invested in derivatives can have a disproportionately large impact on the fund.
Liquidity Risk. The fund may be unable to sell certain securities, such as illiquid securities, readily at a favorable time or price, or the fund may have to sell them at a loss.
Sampling Index Tracking Risk. To the extent the fund uses a sampling method, the fund will not fully replicate the index and may hold securities not included in the index. As a result, the fund is subject to the risk that the investment adviser’s investment management strategy, the implementation of which is subject to a number of constraints, may not produce the intended results. If the fund utilizes a sampling approach, it may not track the return of the index as well as it would if the fund purchased all of the securities in the index.
Schwab Fundamental US Small Company Index Fund | Fund Summary5

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Securities Lending Risk. Securities lending involves the risk of loss of rights in, or delay in recovery of, the loaned securities if the borrower fails to return the security loaned or becomes insolvent.
For more information on the risks of investing in the fund, please see the “Fund Details” section in the prospectus.
Performance
The bar chart below shows how the fund’s investment results have varied from year to year, and the following table shows how the fund’s average annual total returns for various periods compared to that of the index. This information provides some indication of the risks of investing in the fund. All figures assume distributions were reinvested. Keep in mind that future performance (both before and after taxes) may differ from past performance. For current performance information, please see
www.schwabassetmanagement.com/schwabfunds_prospectus.
Annual Total Returns (%) as of 12/31
[MISSING IMAGE: a9ti0eahmo717pnut9mqlbq9aqlk.jpg]
Best Quarter: 30.57% Q4 2020
Worst Quarter: (35.51%) Q1 2020
Average Annual Total Returns as of 12/31/22
1 Year
5 Years
10 Years
Before taxes (14.73%) 5.79% 10.12%
After taxes on distributions (16.06%) 3.96% 8.41%
After taxes on distributions and sale
of shares
(7.76%) 4.26% 7.91%
Comparative Index (reflects no deduction for expenses or taxes)
Russell RAFI US Small Company Index
(14.58%) 5.96%
10.37%
The after-tax figures reflect the highest individual federal income tax rates in effect during the period and do not reflect the impact of state and local taxes. Your actual after-tax returns depend on your individual tax situation. In addition, after-tax returns are not relevant if you hold your fund shares through a tax-deferred arrangement, such as a 401(k) plan, an individual retirement account (IRA) or other tax-advantaged account. In some cases, the return after taxes on distributions and sale of shares may exceed the fund’s other returns due to an assumed benefit from any losses on a sale of shares at the end of the measurement period.
Investment Adviser
Charles Schwab Investment Management, Inc., dba Schwab Asset Management™
Portfolio Managers
Christopher Bliss, CFA, Managing Director and Head of Passive Equity Strategies, is responsible for the day-to-day co-management of the fund. He has managed the fund since 2017.
Jeremy Brown, CFA, Senior Portfolio Manager, is responsible for the day-to-day co-management of the fund. He has managed the fund since 2019.
Ferian Juwono, CFA, Senior Portfolio Manager, is responsible for the day-to-day co-management of the fund. He has managed the fund since 2013.
Sabya Sinha, Portfolio Manager, is responsible for the day-to-day co-management of the fund. He has managed the fund since 2017.
Agnes Zau, CFA, Portfolio Manager, is responsible for the day-to-day co-management of the fund. She has managed the fund since 2023.
Purchase and Sale of Fund Shares
The fund is open for business each day that the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) is open. If the NYSE is closed due to weather or other extenuating circumstances on a day it would typically be open for business, or the NYSE has an unscheduled early closing on a day it has opened for business, the fund reserves the right to treat such day as a business day and accept purchase and redemption orders and calculate its share price as of the normally scheduled close of regular trading on the NYSE for that day.
Investors may only invest in the fund through an account at Charles Schwab & Co., Inc. (Schwab) or another financial intermediary. When you place orders to purchase, exchange or redeem fund shares through an account at Schwab or another financial intermediary, you must follow Schwab’s or the other financial intermediary’s transaction procedures.
There is no minimum initial investment for the fund.
Tax Information
Dividends and capital gains distributions received from the fund will generally be taxable as ordinary income or capital gains, unless you are investing through an IRA, 401(k) or other tax-advantaged account (in which case you may be taxed later, upon withdrawal of your investment from such account).
Payments to Financial Intermediaries
If you purchase shares of the fund through a broker-dealer or other financial intermediary (such as a bank), the adviser and its related companies may pay the intermediary for the sale of fund shares and related services. These payments may create a conflict of interest by influencing the broker-dealer or other financial intermediary and your salesperson to recommend the fund over another investment. Ask your salesperson or visit your financial intermediary’s website for more information.
6Schwab Fundamental US Small Company Index Fund | Fund Summary

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Schwab® Fundamental International Large Company Index Fund
Ticker Symbol:
SFNNX
Investment Objective
The fund seeks investment results that correspond generally (before fees and expenses) to the total return of the Russell RAFI™ Developed ex US Large Company Index.
Fund Fees and Expenses
This table describes the fees and expenses you may pay if you buy, hold and sell shares of the fund. You may pay other fees, such as brokerage commissions and other fees to financial intermediaries, which are not reflected in the table and Example below.
Shareholder Fees (fees paid directly from your investment)
None
Annual Fund Operating Expenses (expenses that you pay each year as a %
of the value of your investment)
Management fees
0.25
Other expenses
None
Total annual fund operating expenses
0.25
Example
This example is intended to help you compare the cost of investing in the fund with the cost of investing in other funds. The example assumes that you invest $10,000 in the fund for the time periods indicated and then redeem all of your shares at the end of those time periods. The example also assumes that your investment has a 5% return each year and that the fund’s operating expenses remain the same. Your actual costs may be higher or lower.
Expenses on a $10,000 Investment
1 Year
3 Years
5 Years
10 Years
$ 26 $ 80 $ 141 $ 318
Portfolio Turnover
The fund pays transaction costs, such as commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or “turns over” its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover may indicate higher transaction costs and may result in higher taxes when fund shares are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are not reflected in the annual fund operating expenses or in the example, affect the fund’s performance. During the most recent fiscal year, the fund’s portfolio turnover rate was 13% of the average value of its portfolio.
Principal Investment Strategies
To pursue its goal, the fund primarily invests in stocks that are included in the Russell RAFI Developed ex US Large Company Index. The index measures the performance of the large company size segment by fundamental overall company scores (scores), which are created using as the universe the developed ex U.S. companies in the FTSE Global Total Cap Index (the parent index). Securities are grouped in order of decreasing score and each company receives a weight based on its percentage of the total scores of the developed ex U.S. companies within the parent index. Companies are split at the 87.5% point based on fundamental weights. Companies above this breakpoint make up the index. The index uses a partial quarterly reconstitution methodology in which the index is split into four equal segments at the annual reconstitution and each segment is then rebalanced on a rolling quarterly basis. The index is compiled and calculated by Frank Russell Company in conjunction with Research Affiliates LLC, and the method of calculating the components of the index is subject to change.
It is the fund’s policy that, under normal circumstances, it will invest at least 90% of its net assets (including, for this purpose, any borrowings for investment purposes) in stocks included in the index. The fund will notify its shareholders at least 60 days before changing this policy. The fund will generally give the same weight to a given stock as the index does. However, when the investment adviser believes it is in the best interest of the fund, such as to avoid purchasing odd-lots (i.e., purchasing less than the usual number of shares traded for a security), for tax considerations, or to address liquidity considerations with respect to a stock, the investment adviser may cause the fund’s weighting of a stock to be more or less than the index’s weighting of the stock. The fund may sell securities that are represented in the index in anticipation of their removal from the index, or buy securities that are not yet represented in the index in anticipation of their addition to the index. The fund does not hedge its exposure to foreign currencies. However, the fund may use forward contracts to lock in exchange rates for the portfolio securities purchased or sold, but awaiting settlement. These transactions establish a rate of exchange that can be expected to be received upon settlement of the securities.
The fund uses an “indexing” investment approach, which attempts to replicate, before expenses, the performance of the index by purchasing a basket of securities that compose the index. Using this

Index ownership – The Schwab Fundamental International Large Company Index Fund is not in any way sponsored, endorsed, sold or promoted by Frank Russell Company (Russell), by the London Stock Exchange Group companies (LSEG), or by Research Affiliates LLC (RA) (collectively the Licensor Parties), and none of the Licensor Parties make any warranty or representation whatsoever, expressly or impliedly, either as to the results to be obtained from the use of the Russell RAFI Developed ex US Large Company Index (the Index) or otherwise. The Index is compiled and calculated by Russell in conjunction with RA. None of the Licensor Parties shall be liable (whether in negligence or otherwise) to any person for any error in the Index and none of the Licensor Parties shall be under any obligation to advise any person of any error therein. “Russell®” is a trademark of Russell. The trade names “Research Affiliates®”, “Fundamental Index®” and “RAFI®” are registered trademarks of RA. Charles Schwab Investment Management, Inc. has obtained full license from Russell to use the Index. For full disclaimer please see the fund’s statement of additional information.
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approach, the investment adviser seeks a correlation, over time, of 0.95 or better between the fund’s performance and the performance of the index; a figure of 1.00 would represent perfect correlation. However, it is possible that the investment adviser may determine to utilize instead a “sampling” methodology in seeking to achieve the fund’s objective. Sampling means that the investment adviser uses quantitative analysis to select stocks from the index universe to obtain a representative sample of stocks that resembles the index in terms of key risk factors, performance attributes and other characteristics. In certain circumstances it may not be possible or practicable for the fund to invest in all of the stocks comprising the index or in proportion to their weightings in the index.
There can be no guarantee that the performance of the fund will achieve a high degree of correlation with that of the index. A number of factors may affect the fund’s ability to achieve a high correlation with the index, including the degree to which the fund utilizes a sampling technique. The correlation between the performance of the fund and the index may also diverge due to transaction costs, asset valuations, corporate actions (such as mergers and spin-offs), timing variances, and differences between the fund’s portfolio and the index resulting from legal restrictions (such as diversification requirements) that apply to the fund but not to the index.
Like many index funds, the fund also may invest in derivatives, principally futures contracts, and lend its securities to minimize the gap in performance that exists between any index fund and the corresponding index. This gap occurs mainly because, unlike the index, the fund incurs expenses and must keep a small portion of its assets in cash for business operations. By using futures, the fund can gain market exposure and potentially offset a portion of the gap attributable to its cash holdings. Any income realized through securities lending may help reduce the portion of the gap attributable to expenses. In addition, the fund may invest in exchange-traded funds.
The fund may concentrate its investments (i.e., hold more than 25% of its total assets) in an industry or group of industries to approximately the extent that the index the fund is designed to track is also so concentrated.
Principal Risks
The fund is subject to risks, any of which could cause an investor to lose money. The fund’s principal risks include:
Market Risk. Financial markets rise and fall in response to a variety of factors, sometimes rapidly and unpredictably. Markets may be impacted by economic, political, regulatory and other conditions, including economic sanctions and other government actions. In addition, the occurrence of global events, such as war, terrorism, environmental disasters, natural disasters and epidemics, may also negatively affect the financial markets. As with any investment whose performance is tied to these markets, the value of an investment in the fund will fluctuate, which means that an investor could lose money over short or long periods.
Equity Risk. The prices of equity securities rise and fall daily. These price movements may result from factors affecting individual
companies, industries or the securities market as a whole. In addition, equity markets tend to move in cycles, which may cause stock prices to fall over short or extended periods of time.
Investment Style Risk. The fund is an index fund. Therefore, the fund follows the securities included in the index during upturns as well as downturns. Because of its indexing strategy, the fund does not take steps to reduce market exposure or to lessen the effects of a declining market. In addition, because of the fund’s expenses, the fund’s performance may be below that of the index. Errors relating to the index may occur from time to time and may not be identified by the index provider for a period of time. In addition, market disruptions could cause delays in the index’s rebalancing schedule. Such errors and/or market disruptions may result in losses for the fund.
Market Capitalization Risk. Securities issued by companies of different market capitalizations tend to go in and out of favor based on market and economic conditions. During a period when securities of a particular market capitalization fall behind other types of investments, the fund’s performance could be impacted.
Large-Cap Company Risk. Large-cap companies are generally more mature and the securities issued by these companies may not be able to reach the same levels of growth as the securities issued by small- or mid-cap companies.
Tracking Error Risk. As an index fund, the fund seeks to track the performance of the index, although it may not be successful in doing so. The divergence between the performance of the fund and the index, positive or negative, is called “tracking error.” Tracking error can be caused by many factors and it may be significant.
Concentration Risk. To the extent that the fund’s or the index’s portfolio is concentrated in the securities of issuers in a particular market, industry, group of industries, sector, country or asset class, the fund may be adversely affected by the performance of those securities, may be subject to increased price volatility and may be more vulnerable to adverse economic, market, political or regulatory occurrences affecting that market, industry, group of industries, sector, country or asset class.
Foreign Investment Risk. The fund’s investments in securities of foreign issuers involve certain risks that may be greater than those associated with investments in securities of U.S. issuers. These include risks of adverse changes in foreign economic, political, regulatory and other conditions; changes in currency exchange rates or exchange control regulations (including limitations on currency movements and exchanges); the imposition of economic sanctions or other government restrictions; differing accounting, auditing, financial reporting and legal standards and practices; differing securities market structures; and higher transaction costs. These risks may negatively impact the value or liquidity of the fund’s investments, and could impair the fund’s ability to meet its investment objective or invest in accordance with its investment strategy. There is a risk that investments in securities denominated in, and/or receiving revenues in, foreign currencies will decline in value relative to the U.S. dollar. Foreign securities also include
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American Depositary Receipts (ADRs), Global Depositary Receipts (GDRs) and European Depositary Receipts (EDRs), which may be less liquid than the underlying shares in their primary trading market, and GDRs, in particular, many of which are issued by companies in emerging markets, may be more volatile. To the extent the fund’s investments in a single country or a limited number of countries represent a large percentage of the fund’s assets, the fund’s performance may be adversely affected by the economic, political, regulatory and social conditions in those countries, and the fund’s price may be more volatile than the price of a fund that is geographically diversified.
Derivatives Risk. The fund’s use of derivative instruments involves risks different from, or possibly greater than, the risks associated with investing directly in securities and other traditional investments. The fund’s use of derivatives could reduce the fund’s performance, increase its volatility and cause the fund to lose more than the initial amount invested. In addition, investments in derivatives may involve leverage, which means a small percentage of assets invested in derivatives can have a disproportionately large impact on the fund.
Liquidity Risk. The fund may be unable to sell certain securities, such as illiquid securities, readily at a favorable time or price, or the fund may have to sell them at a loss.
Sampling Index Tracking Risk. To the extent the fund uses a sampling method, the fund will not fully replicate the index and may hold securities not included in the index. As a result, the fund is subject to the risk that the investment adviser’s investment management strategy, the implementation of which is subject to a number of constraints, may not produce the intended results. If the fund utilizes a sampling approach, it may not track the return of the index as well as it would if the fund purchased all of the securities in the index.
Securities Lending Risk. Securities lending involves the risk of loss of rights in, or delay in recovery of, the loaned securities if the borrower fails to return the security loaned or becomes insolvent.
Exchange Traded Funds (ETFs) Risk. The fund may purchase shares of ETFs to gain exposure to a particular portion of the market while awaiting an opportunity to purchase securities directly. When the fund invests in an ETF, in addition to directly bearing the expenses associated with its own operations, it will bear a proportionate share of the ETF’s expenses. Therefore, it may be more costly to own an ETF than to own the underlying securities directly. In addition, while the risks of owning shares of an ETF generally reflect the risks of owning the underlying securities the ETF holds, lack of liquidity in the market for an ETF’s shares can result in its value being more volatile than the underlying portfolio securities.
For more information on the risks of investing in the fund, please see the “Fund Details” section in the prospectus.
Performance
The bar chart below shows how the fund’s investment results have varied from year to year, and the following table shows how the fund’s
average annual total returns for various periods compared to that of the index. This information provides some indication of the risks of investing in the fund. All figures assume distributions were reinvested. Keep in mind that future performance (both before and after taxes) may differ from past performance. For current performance information, please see
www.schwabassetmanagement.com/schwabfunds_prospectus.
Annual Total Returns (%) as of 12/31
[MISSING IMAGE: i5jsq036s0gn3uc58ll3j21oadd1.jpg]
Best Quarter: 21.62% Q4 2020
Worst Quarter: (27.49%) Q1 2020
Average Annual Total Returns as of 12/31/22
1 Year
5 Years
10 Years
Before taxes (7.93%) 2.25% 5.22%
After taxes on distributions (8.35%) 1.67% 4.62%
After taxes on distributions and sale
of shares
(4.05%) 1.89% 4.25%
Comparative Index (reflects no deduction for expenses or taxes)
Russell RAFI Developed ex US Large
Company Index (Net)
(1)
(7.69%) 2.27%
5.48%
(1)
The net version of the index reflects reinvested dividends net of withholding taxes, but reflects no deductions for expenses or other taxes.
The after-tax figures reflect the highest individual federal income tax rates in effect during the period and do not reflect the impact of state and local taxes. Your actual after-tax returns depend on your individual tax situation. In addition, after-tax returns are not relevant if you hold your fund shares through a tax-deferred arrangement, such as a 401(k) plan, an individual retirement account (IRA) or other tax-advantaged account.
Investment Adviser
Charles Schwab Investment Management, Inc., dba Schwab Asset Management™
Portfolio Managers
Christopher Bliss, CFA, Managing Director and Head of Passive Equity Strategies, is responsible for the day-to-day co-management of the fund. He has managed the fund since 2017.
Chuck Craig, CFA, Senior Portfolio Manager, is responsible for the day-to-day co-management of the fund. He has managed the fund since 2017.
David Rios, Portfolio Manager, is responsible for the day-to-day co-management of the fund. He has managed the fund since 2017.
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Purchase and Sale of Fund Shares
The fund is open for business each day that the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) is open. If the NYSE is closed due to weather or other extenuating circumstances on a day it would typically be open for business, or the NYSE has an unscheduled early closing on a day it has opened for business, the fund reserves the right to treat such day as a business day and accept purchase and redemption orders and calculate its share price as of the normally scheduled close of regular trading on the NYSE for that day.
Investors may only invest in the fund through an account at Charles Schwab & Co., Inc. (Schwab) or another financial intermediary. When you place orders to purchase, exchange or redeem fund shares through an account at Schwab or another financial intermediary, you must follow Schwab’s or the other financial intermediary’s transaction procedures.
There is no minimum initial investment for the fund.
Tax Information
Dividends and capital gains distributions received from the fund will generally be taxable as ordinary income or capital gains, unless you are investing through an IRA, 401(k) or other tax-advantaged account (in which case you may be taxed later, upon withdrawal of your investment from such account).
Payments to Financial Intermediaries
If you purchase shares of the fund through a broker-dealer or other financial intermediary (such as a bank), the adviser and its related companies may pay the intermediary for the sale of fund shares and related services. These payments may create a conflict of interest by influencing the broker-dealer or other financial intermediary and your salesperson to recommend the fund over another investment. Ask your salesperson or visit your financial intermediary’s website for more information.
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Schwab® Fundamental International Small Company Index Fund
Ticker Symbol:
SFILX
Investment Objective
The fund seeks investment results that correspond generally (before fees and expenses) to the total return of the Russell RAFI™ Developed ex US Small Company Index.
Fund Fees and Expenses
This table describes the fees and expenses you may pay if you buy, hold and sell shares of the fund. You may pay other fees, such as brokerage commissions and other fees to financial intermediaries, which are not reflected in the table and Example below.
Shareholder Fees (fees paid directly from your investment)
None
Annual Fund Operating Expenses (expenses that you pay each year as a %
of the value of your investment)
Management fees
0.39
Other expenses
None
Total annual fund operating expenses
0.39
Example
This example is intended to help you compare the cost of investing in the fund with the cost of investing in other funds. The example assumes that you invest $10,000 in the fund for the time periods indicated and then redeem all of your shares at the end of those time periods. The example also assumes that your investment has a 5% return each year and that the fund’s operating expenses remain the same. Your actual costs may be higher or lower.
Expenses on a $10,000 Investment
1 Year
3 Years
5 Years
10 Years
$ 40 $ 125 $ 219 $ 493
Portfolio Turnover
The fund pays transaction costs, such as commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or “turns over” its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover may indicate higher transaction costs and may result in higher taxes when fund shares are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are not reflected in the annual fund operating expenses or in the example, affect the fund’s performance. During the most recent fiscal year, the fund’s portfolio turnover rate was 36% of the average value of its portfolio.
Principal Investment Strategies
To pursue its goal, the fund primarily invests in stocks that are included in the Russell RAFI Developed ex US Small Company Index. The index measures the performance of the small company size segment by fundamental overall company scores (scores), which are created using as the universe the developed ex U.S. companies in the FTSE Global Total Cap Index (the parent index). Securities are grouped in order of decreasing score and each company receives a weight based on its percentage of the total scores of the developed ex U.S. companies within the parent index. Companies are split at the 87.5% point based on fundamental weights. Companies below this breakpoint make up the index. The index uses a partial quarterly reconstitution methodology in which the index is split into four equal segments at the annual reconstitution and each segment is then rebalanced on a rolling quarterly basis. The index is compiled and calculated by Frank Russell Company in conjunction with Research Affiliates LLC, and the method of calculating the components of the index is subject to change.
It is the fund’s policy that, under normal circumstances, it will invest at least 90% of its net assets (including, for this purpose, any borrowings for investment purposes) in stocks included in the index. The fund will notify its shareholders at least 60 days before changing this policy. The fund will generally give the same weight to a given stock as the index does. However, when the investment adviser believes it is in the best interest of the fund, such as to avoid purchasing odd-lots (i.e., purchasing less than the usual number of shares traded for a security), for tax considerations, or to address liquidity considerations with respect to a stock, the investment adviser may cause the fund’s weighting of a stock to be more or less than the index’s weighting of the stock. The fund may sell securities that are represented in the index in anticipation of their removal from the index, or buy securities that are not yet represented in the index in anticipation of their addition to the index. The fund does not hedge its exposure to foreign currencies. However, the fund may use forward contracts to lock in exchange rates for the portfolio securities purchased or sold, but awaiting settlement. These transactions establish a rate of exchange that can be expected to be received upon settlement of the securities.
The fund uses an “indexing” investment approach, which attempts to replicate, before expenses, the performance of the index by purchasing a basket of securities that compose the index. Using this

Index ownership – The Schwab Fundamental International Small Company Index Fund is not in any way sponsored, endorsed, sold or promoted by Frank Russell Company (Russell), by the London Stock Exchange Group companies (LSEG), or by Research Affiliates LLC (RA) (collectively the Licensor Parties), and none of the Licensor Parties make any warranty or representation whatsoever, expressly or impliedly, either as to the results to be obtained from the use of the Russell RAFI Developed ex US Small Company Index (the Index) or otherwise. The Index is compiled and calculated by Russell in conjunction with RA. None of the Licensor Parties shall be liable (whether in negligence or otherwise) to any person for any error in the Index and none of the Licensor Parties shall be under any obligation to advise any person of any error therein. “Russell®” is a trademark of Russell. The trade names “Research Affiliates®”, “Fundamental Index®” and “RAFI®” are registered trademarks of RA. Charles Schwab Investment Management, Inc. has obtained full license from Russell to use the Index. For full disclaimer please see the fund’s statement of additional information.
Schwab Fundamental International Small Company Index Fund | Fund Summary11

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approach, the investment adviser seeks a correlation, over time, of 0.95 or better between the fund’s performance and the performance of the index; a figure of 1.00 would represent perfect correlation. However, it is possible that the investment adviser may determine to utilize instead a “sampling” methodology in seeking to achieve the fund’s objective. Sampling means that the investment adviser uses quantitative analysis to select stocks from the index universe to obtain a representative sample of stocks that resembles the index in terms of key risk factors, performance attributes and other characteristics. In certain circumstances it may not be possible or practicable for the fund to invest in all of the stocks comprising the index or in proportion to their weightings in the index.
There can be no guarantee that the performance of the fund will achieve a high degree of correlation with that of the index. A number of factors may affect the fund’s ability to achieve a high correlation with the index, including the degree to which the fund utilizes a sampling technique. The correlation between the performance of the fund and the index may also diverge due to transaction costs, asset valuations, corporate actions (such as mergers and spin-offs), timing variances, and differences between the fund’s portfolio and the index resulting from legal restrictions (such as diversification requirements) that apply to the fund but not to the index.
Like many index funds, the fund also may invest in derivatives, principally futures contracts, and lend its securities to minimize the gap in performance that exists between any index fund and the corresponding index. This gap occurs mainly because, unlike the index, the fund incurs expenses and must keep a small portion of its assets in cash for business operations. By using futures, the fund can gain market exposure and potentially offset a portion of the gap attributable to its cash holdings. Any income realized through securities lending may help reduce the portion of the gap attributable to expenses. In addition, the fund may invest in exchange-traded funds.
The fund may concentrate its investments (i.e., hold more than 25% of its assets) in an industry or group of industries to approximately the extent that the index the fund is designed to track is also so concentrated.
Principal Risks
The fund is subject to risks, any of which could cause an investor to lose money. The fund’s principal risks include:
Market Risk. Financial markets rise and fall in response to a variety of factors, sometimes rapidly and unpredictably. Markets may be impacted by economic, political, regulatory and other conditions, including economic sanctions and other government actions. In addition, the occurrence of global events, such as war, terrorism, environmental disasters, natural disasters and epidemics, may also negatively affect the financial markets. As with any investment whose performance is tied to these markets, the value of an investment in the fund will fluctuate, which means that an investor could lose money over short or long periods.
Equity Risk. The prices of equity securities rise and fall daily. These price movements may result from factors affecting individual
companies, industries or the securities market as a whole. In addition, equity markets tend to move in cycles, which may cause stock prices to fall over short or extended periods of time.
Investment Style Risk. The fund is an index fund. Therefore, the fund follows the securities included in the index during upturns as well as downturns. Because of its indexing strategy, the fund does not take steps to reduce market exposure or to lessen the effects of a declining market. In addition, because of the fund’s expenses, the fund’s performance may be below that of the index. Errors relating to the index may occur from time to time and may not be identified by the index provider for a period of time. In addition, market disruptions could cause delays in the index’s rebalancing schedule. Such errors and/or market disruptions may result in losses for the fund.
Market Capitalization Risk. Securities issued by companies of different market capitalizations tend to go in and out of favor based on market and economic conditions. During a period when securities of a particular market capitalization fall behind other types of investments, the fund’s performance could be impacted.
Small-Cap Company Risk. Securities issued by small-cap companies may be riskier than those issued by larger companies, and their prices may move sharply, especially during market upturns and downturns.
Tracking Error Risk. As an index fund, the fund seeks to track the performance of the index, although it may not be successful in doing so. The divergence between the performance of the fund and the index, positive or negative, is called “tracking error.” Tracking error can be caused by many factors and it may be significant.
Concentration Risk. To the extent that the fund’s or the index’s portfolio is concentrated in the securities of issuers in a particular market, industry, group of industries, sector, country or asset class, the fund may be adversely affected by the performance of those securities, may be subject to increased price volatility and may be more vulnerable to adverse economic, market, political or regulatory occurrences affecting that market, industry, group of industries, sector, country or asset class.
Foreign Investment Risk. The fund’s investments in securities of foreign issuers involve certain risks that may be greater than those associated with investments in securities of U.S. issuers. These include risks of adverse changes in foreign economic, political, regulatory and other conditions; changes in currency exchange rates or exchange control regulations (including limitations on currency movements and exchanges); the imposition of economic sanctions or other government restrictions; differing accounting, auditing, financial reporting and legal standards and practices; differing securities market structures; and higher transaction costs. These risks may negatively impact the value or liquidity of the fund’s investments, and could impair the fund’s ability to meet its investment objective or invest in accordance with its investment strategy. There is a risk that investments in securities denominated in, and/or receiving revenues in, foreign currencies will decline in value relative to the U.S. dollar. Foreign securities also include
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American Depositary Receipts (ADRs), Global Depositary Receipts (GDRs) and European Depositary Receipts (EDRs), which may be less liquid than the underlying shares in their primary trading market, and GDRs, in particular, many of which are issued by companies in emerging markets, may be more volatile. To the extent the fund’s investments in a single country or a limited number of countries represent a large percentage of the fund’s assets, the fund’s performance may be adversely affected by the economic, political, regulatory and social conditions in those countries, and the fund’s price may be more volatile than the price of a fund that is geographically diversified.
Derivatives Risk. The fund’s use of derivative instruments involves risks different from, or possibly greater than, the risks associated with investing directly in securities and other traditional investments. The fund’s use of derivatives could reduce the fund’s performance, increase its volatility and cause the fund to lose more than the initial amount invested. In addition, investments in derivatives may involve leverage, which means a small percentage of assets invested in derivatives can have a disproportionately large impact on the fund.
Liquidity Risk. The fund may be unable to sell certain securities, such as illiquid securities, readily at a favorable time or price, or the fund may have to sell them at a loss.
Sampling Index Tracking Risk. To the extent the fund uses a sampling method, the fund will not fully replicate the index and may hold securities not included in the index. As a result, the fund is subject to the risk that the investment adviser’s investment management strategy, the implementation of which is subject to a number of constraints, may not produce the intended results. If the fund utilizes a sampling approach, it may not track the return of the index as well as it would if the fund purchased all of the securities in the index.
Securities Lending Risk. Securities lending involves the risk of loss of rights in, or delay in recovery of, the loaned securities if the borrower fails to return the security loaned or becomes insolvent.
Exchange Traded Funds (ETFs) Risk. The fund may purchase shares of ETFs to gain exposure to a particular portion of the market while awaiting an opportunity to purchase securities directly. When the fund invests in an ETF, in addition to directly bearing the expenses associated with its own operations, it will bear a proportionate share of the ETF’s expenses. Therefore, it may be more costly to own an ETF than to own the underlying securities directly. In addition, while the risks of owning shares of an ETF generally reflect the risks of owning the underlying securities the ETF holds, lack of liquidity in the market for an ETF’s shares can result in its value being more volatile than the underlying portfolio securities.
For more information on the risks of investing in the fund, please see the “Fund Details” section in the prospectus.
Performance
The bar chart below shows how the fund’s investment results have varied from year to year, and the following table shows how the fund’s
average annual total returns for various periods compared to that of the index. This information provides some indication of the risks of investing in the fund. All figures assume distributions were reinvested. Keep in mind that future performance (both before and after taxes) may differ from past performance. For current performance information, please see
www.schwabassetmanagement.com/schwabfunds_prospectus.
Annual Total Returns (%) as of 12/31
[MISSING IMAGE: lvfttbt4ho7areal71b08l2ig2kp.jpg]
Best Quarter: 18.33% Q2 2020
Worst Quarter: (28.91%) Q1 2020
Average Annual Total Returns as of 12/31/22
1 Year
5 Years
10 Years
Before taxes (14.87%) (0.45%) 5.61%
After taxes on distributions (15.58%) (1.30%) 4.82%
After taxes on distributions and sale
of shares
(7.89%) (0.22%) 4.50%
Comparative Index (reflects no deduction for expenses or taxes)
Russell RAFI Developed ex US Small
Company Index (Net)
(1)
(14.50%) (0.22%)
6.08%
(1)
The net version of the index reflects reinvested dividends net of withholding taxes, but reflects no deductions for expenses or other taxes.
The after-tax figures reflect the highest individual federal income tax rates in effect during the period and do not reflect the impact of state and local taxes. Your actual after-tax returns depend on your individual tax situation. In addition, after-tax returns are not relevant if you hold your fund shares through a tax-deferred arrangement, such as a 401(k) plan, an individual retirement account (IRA) or other tax-advantaged account. In some cases, the return after taxes on distributions and sale of shares may exceed the fund’s other returns due to an assumed benefit from any losses on a sale of shares at the end of the measurement period.
Investment Adviser
Charles Schwab Investment Management, Inc., dba Schwab Asset Management™
Portfolio Managers
Christopher Bliss, CFA, Managing Director and Head of Passive Equity Strategies, is responsible for the day-to-day co-management of the fund. He has managed the fund since 2017.
Chuck Craig, CFA, Senior Portfolio Manager, is responsible for the day-to-day co-management of the fund. He has managed the fund since 2017.
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David Rios, Portfolio Manager, is responsible for the day-to-day co-management of the fund. He has managed the fund since 2017.
Purchase and Sale of Fund Shares
The fund is open for business each day that the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) is open. If the NYSE is closed due to weather or other extenuating circumstances on a day it would typically be open for business, or the NYSE has an unscheduled early closing on a day it has opened for business, the fund reserves the right to treat such day as a business day and accept purchase and redemption orders and calculate its share price as of the normally scheduled close of regular trading on the NYSE for that day.
Investors may only invest in the fund through an account at Charles Schwab & Co., Inc. (Schwab) or another financial intermediary. When you place orders to purchase, exchange or redeem fund shares through an account at Schwab or another financial intermediary, you must follow Schwab’s or the other financial intermediary’s transaction procedures.
There is no minimum initial investment for the fund.
Tax Information
Dividends and capital gains distributions received from the fund will generally be taxable as ordinary income or capital gains, unless you are investing through an IRA, 401(k) or other tax-advantaged account (in which case you may be taxed later, upon withdrawal of your investment from such account).
Payments to Financial Intermediaries
If you purchase shares of the fund through a broker-dealer or other financial intermediary (such as a bank), the adviser and its related companies may pay the intermediary for the sale of fund shares and related services. These payments may create a conflict of interest by influencing the broker-dealer or other financial intermediary and your salesperson to recommend the fund over another investment. Ask your salesperson or visit your financial intermediary’s website for more information.
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Schwab® Fundamental Emerging Markets Large Company Index Fund
Ticker Symbol:
SFENX
Investment Objective
The fund seeks investment results that correspond generally (before fees and expenses) to the total return of the Russell RAFI™ Emerging Markets Large Company Index.
Fund Fees and Expenses
This table describes the fees and expenses you may pay if you buy, hold and sell shares of the fund. You may pay other fees, such as brokerage commissions and other fees to financial intermediaries, which are not reflected in the table and Example below.
Shareholder Fees (fees paid directly from your investment)
None
Annual Fund Operating Expenses (expenses that you pay each year as a %
of the value of your investment)
Management fees
0.39
Other expenses
None
Total annual fund operating expenses
0.39
Example
This example is intended to help you compare the cost of investing in the fund with the cost of investing in other funds. The example assumes that you invest $10,000 in the fund for the time periods indicated and then redeem all of your shares at the end of those time periods. The example also assumes that your investment has a 5% return each year and that the fund’s operating expenses remain the same. Your actual costs may be higher or lower.
Expenses on a $10,000 Investment
1 Year
3 Years
5 Years
10 Years
$ 40 $ 125 $ 219 $ 493
Portfolio Turnover
The fund pays transaction costs, such as commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or “turns over” its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover may indicate higher transaction costs and may result in higher taxes when fund shares are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are not reflected in the annual fund operating expenses or in the example, affect the fund’s performance. During the most recent fiscal year, the fund’s portfolio turnover rate was 24% of the average value of its portfolio.
Principal Investment Strategies
To pursue its goal, the fund primarily invests in stocks that are included in the Russell RAFI Emerging Markets Large Company Index. The index measures the performance of the large company size segment by fundamental overall company scores (scores), which are created using as the universe the emerging markets companies in the FTSE Global Total Cap Index (the parent index). Securities are grouped in order of decreasing score and each company receives a weight based on its percentage of the total scores of the emerging markets companies within the parent index. Companies are split at the 87.5% point based on fundamental weights. Companies above this breakpoint make up the index. The index uses a partial quarterly reconstitution methodology in which the index is split into four equal segments at the annual reconstitution and each segment is then rebalanced on a rolling quarterly basis. The index is compiled and calculated by Frank Russell Company in conjunction with Research Affiliates LLC, and the method of calculating the components of the index is subject to change.
It is the fund’s policy that, under normal circumstances, it will invest at least 80% of its net assets (including, for this purpose, any borrowings for investment purposes) in stocks included in the index, including depositary receipts representing securities of the index; which may be in the form of American Depositary Receipts (ADRs), Global Depositary Receipts (GDRs) and European Depositary Receipts (EDRs). The fund will notify its shareholders at least 60 days before changing this policy. The fund may sell securities that are represented in the index in anticipation of their removal from the index, or buy securities that are not yet represented in the index in anticipation of their addition to the index. The fund does not hedge its exposure to foreign currencies. However, the fund may use forward contracts to lock in exchange rates for the portfolio securities purchased or sold, but awaiting settlement. These transactions establish a rate of exchange that can be expected to be received upon settlement of the securities.
Because it may not be possible or practicable to purchase all of the stocks in the index, the investment adviser seeks to track the total return of the index by using sampling techniques. These techniques involve investing in a limited number of index securities which, when taken together, are expected to perform similarly to the index as a whole. These techniques are based on a variety of factors, including performance attributes, tax considerations,

Index ownership – The Schwab Fundamental Emerging Markets Large Company Index Fund is not in any way sponsored, endorsed, sold or promoted by Frank Russell Company (Russell), by the London Stock Exchange Group companies (LSEG), or by Research Affiliates LLC (RA) (collectively the Licensor Parties), and none of the Licensor Parties make any warranty or representation whatsoever, expressly or impliedly, either as to the results to be obtained from the use of the Russell RAFI Emerging Markets Large Company Index (the Index) or otherwise. The Index is compiled and calculated by Russell in conjunction with RA. None of the Licensor Parties shall be liable (whether in negligence or otherwise) to any person for any error in the Index and none of the Licensor Parties shall be under any obligation to advise any person of any error therein. “Russell®” is a trademark of Russell. The trade names “Research Affiliates®”, “Fundamental Index®” and “RAFI®” are registered trademarks of RA. Charles Schwab Investment Management, Inc. has obtained full license from Russell to use the Index. For full disclaimer please see the fund’s statement of additional information.
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capitalization, dividend yield, price/earnings ratio, industry factors, risk factors and other characteristics. The fund generally expects that its portfolio will hold less than the total number of securities in the index, but reserves the right to hold as many securities as it believes necessary to achieve the fund’s investment objective. The fund generally expects its portfolio characteristics to be similar to those of the index.
The investment adviser seeks to achieve a correlation, over time, of 0.95 or better between the fund’s performance and the performance of the index; a figure of 1.00 would represent perfect correlation. However, there can be no guarantee that the performance of the fund will achieve a high degree of correlation with that of the index. A number of factors may affect the fund’s ability to achieve a high correlation with the index, including the number of index securities held by the fund as part of the sampling technique. The correlation between the performance of the fund and the index may also diverge due to transaction costs, asset valuations, corporate actions (such as mergers and spin-offs), timing variances, and differences between the fund’s portfolio and the index resulting from legal restrictions (such as diversification requirements) that apply to the fund but not to the index.
Like many index funds, the fund also may invest in derivatives, principally futures contracts, and lend its securities to minimize the gap in performance that exists between any index fund and the corresponding index. This gap occurs mainly because, unlike the index, the fund incurs expenses and must keep a small portion of its assets in cash for business operations. By using futures, the fund can gain market exposure and potentially offset a portion of the gap attributable to its cash holdings. Any income realized through securities lending may help reduce the portion of the gap attributable to expenses. The fund may also use futures contracts and other derivatives to obtain exposure substantially similar to that provided by certain securities included in the index which the fund may not be able to purchase or hold directly due to restrictions and/or regulations on investments in the applicable local market. In addition, the fund may invest in exchange-traded funds.
The fund may concentrate its investments (i.e., hold more than 25% of its assets) in an industry or group of industries to approximately the extent that the index the fund is designed to track is also so concentrated.
Principal Risks
The fund is subject to risks, any of which could cause an investor to lose money. The fund’s principal risks include:
Market Risk. Financial markets rise and fall in response to a variety of factors, sometimes rapidly and unpredictably. Markets may be impacted by economic, political, regulatory and other conditions, including economic sanctions and other government actions. In addition, the occurrence of global events, such as war, terrorism, environmental disasters, natural disasters and epidemics, may also negatively affect the financial markets. As with any investment whose performance is tied to these markets, the value of an investment in the fund will fluctuate, which means that an investor could lose money over short or long periods.
Equity Risk. The prices of equity securities rise and fall daily. These price movements may result from factors affecting individual companies, industries or the securities market as a whole. In addition, equity markets tend to move in cycles, which may cause stock prices to fall over short or extended periods of time.
Investment Style Risk. The fund is an index fund. Therefore, the fund follows the securities included in the index during upturns as well as downturns. Because of its indexing strategy, the fund does not take steps to reduce market exposure or to lessen the effects of a declining market. In addition, because of the fund’s expenses, the fund’s performance may be below that of the index. Errors relating to the index may occur from time to time and may not be identified by the index provider for a period of time. In addition, market disruptions could cause delays in the index’s rebalancing schedule. Such errors and/or market disruptions may result in losses for the fund.
Market Capitalization Risk. Securities issued by companies of different market capitalizations tend to go in and out of favor based on market and economic conditions. During a period when securities of a particular market capitalization fall behind other types of investments, the fund’s performance could be impacted.
Large-Cap Company Risk. Large-cap companies are generally more mature and the securities issued by these companies may not be able to reach the same levels of growth as the securities issued by small- or mid-cap companies.
Tracking Error Risk. As an index fund, the fund seeks to track the performance of the index, although it may not be successful in doing so. The divergence between the performance of the fund and the index, positive or negative, is called “tracking error.” Tracking error can be caused by many factors and it may be significant.
Concentration Risk. To the extent that the fund’s or the index’s portfolio is concentrated in the securities of issuers in a particular market, industry, group of industries, sector, country or asset class, the fund may be adversely affected by the performance of those securities, may be subject to increased price volatility and may be more vulnerable to adverse economic, market, political or regulatory occurrences affecting that market, industry, group of industries, sector, country or asset class.
Foreign Investment Risk. The fund’s investments in securities of foreign issuers involve certain risks that may be greater than those associated with investments in securities of U.S. issuers. These include risks of adverse changes in foreign economic, political, regulatory and other conditions; changes in currency exchange rates or exchange control regulations (including limitations on currency movements and exchanges); the imposition of economic sanctions or other government restrictions; differing accounting, auditing, financial reporting and legal standards and practices; differing securities market structures; and higher transaction costs. These risks may negatively impact the value or liquidity of the fund’s investments and could impair the fund’s ability to meet its investment objective or invest in accordance with its investment strategy. There is a risk that investments in securities denominated in, and/or
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receiving revenues in, foreign currencies will decline in value relative to the U.S. dollar. Foreign securities also include ADRs, GDRs and EDRs, which may be less liquid than the underlying shares in their primary trading market, and GDRs, in particular, many of which are issued by companies in emerging markets, may be more volatile. Foreign securities may also include investments in variable interest entities (VIEs) structures, which are created by China-based operating companies in jurisdictions outside of China to obtain indirect financing due to Chinese regulations that prohibit non-Chinese ownership of those companies. To the extent the fund’s investments in a single country or a limited number of countries represent a large percentage of the fund’s assets, the fund’s performance may be adversely affected by the economic, political, regulatory and social conditions in those countries, and the fund’s price may be more volatile than the price of a fund that is geographically diversified.
Emerging Markets Risk. Emerging market countries may be more likely to experience political turmoil or rapid changes in market or economic conditions than more developed countries. Emerging market countries often have less uniformity in accounting, auditing, financial reporting and recordkeeping requirements and greater risk associated with the custody of securities. In addition, the financial stability of issuers (including governments) in emerging market countries may be more precarious than in developed countries. As a result, there may be an increased risk of illiquidity and price volatility associated with the fund’s investments in emerging market countries, which may be magnified by currency fluctuations relative to the U.S. dollar, and, at times, it may be difficult to value such investments.
Derivatives Risk. The fund’s use of derivative instruments involves risks different from, or possibly greater than, the risks associated with investing directly in securities and other traditional investments. The fund’s use of derivatives could reduce the fund’s performance, increase its volatility and cause the fund to lose more than the initial amount invested. In addition, investments in derivatives may involve leverage, which means a small percentage of assets invested in derivatives can have a disproportionately large impact on the fund.
Liquidity Risk. The fund may be unable to sell certain securities, such as illiquid securities, readily at a favorable time or price, or the fund may have to sell them at a loss.
Sampling Index Tracking Risk. The fund may not fully replicate the index and may hold securities not included in the index. As a result, the fund is subject to the risk that the investment adviser’s investment management strategy, the implementation of which is subject to a number of constraints, may not produce the intended results. Because the fund utilizes a sampling approach it may not track the return of the index as well as it would if the fund purchased all of the securities in the index.
Securities Lending Risk. Securities lending involves the risk of loss of rights in, or delay in recovery of, the loaned securities if the borrower fails to return the security loaned or becomes insolvent.
Exchange Traded Funds (ETFs) Risk. The fund may purchase shares of ETFs to gain exposure to a particular portion of the market while awaiting an opportunity to purchase securities directly. When the fund invests in an ETF, in addition to directly bearing the expenses associated with its own operations, it will bear a proportionate share of the ETF’s expenses. Therefore, it may be more costly to own an ETF than to own the underlying securities directly. In addition, while the risks of owning shares of an ETF generally reflect the risks of owning the underlying securities the ETF holds, lack of liquidity in the market for an ETF’s shares can result in its value being more volatile than the underlying portfolio securities.
For more information on the risks of investing in the fund, please see the “Fund Details” section in the prospectus.
Performance
The bar chart below shows how the fund’s investment results have varied from year to year, and the following table shows how the fund’s average annual total returns for various periods compared to that of the index. This information provides some indication of the risks of investing in the fund. All figures assume distributions were reinvested. Keep in mind that future performance (both before and after taxes) may differ from past performance. For current performance information, please see
www.schwabassetmanagement.com/schwabfunds_prospectus.
Annual Total Returns (%) as of 12/31
[MISSING IMAGE: rg5plkd0j4edg1q9c5e5al71cugh.jpg]
Best Quarter: 21.76% Q4 2020
Worst Quarter: (30.98%) Q1 2020
Average Annual Total Returns as of 12/31/22
1 Year
5 Years
10 Years
Before taxes (15.52%) 0.09% 1.49%
After taxes on distributions (16.55%) (0.67%) 0.90%
After taxes on distributions and sale
of shares
(8.43%) 0.24% 1.28%
Comparative Index (reflects no deduction for expenses or taxes)
Russell RAFI Emerging Markets Large
Company Index (Net)
(1)
(15.93%) 0.46%
2.20%
(1)
The net version of the index reflects reinvested dividends net of withholding taxes, but reflects no deductions for expenses or other taxes.
The after-tax figures reflect the highest individual federal income tax rates in effect during the period and do not reflect the impact of state and local taxes. Your actual after-tax returns depend on
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your individual tax situation. In addition, after-tax returns are not relevant if you hold your fund shares through a tax-deferred arrangement, such as a 401(k) plan, an individual retirement account (IRA) or other tax-advantaged account. In some cases, the return after taxes on distributions and sale of shares may exceed the fund’s other returns due to an assumed benefit from any losses on a sale of shares at the end of the measurement period.
Investment Adviser
Charles Schwab Investment Management, Inc., dba Schwab Asset Management™
Portfolio Managers
Christopher Bliss, CFA, Managing Director and Head of Passive Equity Strategies, is responsible for the day-to-day co-management of the fund. He has managed the fund since 2017.
Chuck Craig, CFA, Senior Portfolio Manager, is responsible for the day-to-day co-management of the fund. He has managed the fund since 2017.
David Rios, Portfolio Manager, is responsible for the day-to-day co-management of the fund. He has managed the fund since 2017.
Purchase and Sale of Fund Shares
The fund is open for business each day that the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) is open. If the NYSE is closed due to weather or other extenuating circumstances on a day it would typically be open for business, or the NYSE has an unscheduled early closing on a day it has opened for business, the fund reserves the right to treat such day as a business day and accept purchase and redemption orders and calculate its share price as of the normally scheduled close of regular trading on the NYSE for that day.
Investors may only invest in the fund through an account at Charles Schwab & Co., Inc. (Schwab) or another financial intermediary. When you place orders to purchase, exchange or redeem fund shares through an account at Schwab or another financial intermediary, you must follow Schwab’s or the other financial intermediary’s transaction procedures.
There is no minimum initial investment for the fund.
Tax Information
Dividends and capital gains distributions received from the fund will generally be taxable as ordinary income or capital gains, unless you are investing through an IRA, 401(k) or other tax-advantaged account (in which case you may be taxed later, upon withdrawal of your investment from such account).
Payments to Financial Intermediaries
If you purchase shares of the fund through a broker-dealer or other financial intermediary (such as a bank), the adviser and its related companies may pay the intermediary for the sale of fund shares and related services. These payments may create a conflict of interest by influencing the broker-dealer or other financial intermediary and your salesperson to recommend the fund over another investment. Ask your salesperson or visit your financial intermediary’s website for more information.
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Fund Details
There can be no assurance that the funds will achieve their objectives. Except as explicitly described otherwise, the investment objectives, strategies and policies of each fund may be changed without shareholder approval.
The principal investment strategies and the main risks associated with investing in each fund are summarized in the fund summaries at the front of this prospectus. This section takes a more detailed look at some of the types of securities, the associated risks, and the various investment strategies that may be used in the day-to-day portfolio management of the funds, as described below. In addition to the particular types of securities and strategies that are described in this prospectus, each fund may use strategies that are not described herein in support of its overall investment goal. These additional strategies and the risks associated with them are described in the “Investment Strategies, Securities and Risks” section in the Statement of Additional Information (SAI).
Investment Objectives and More About Principal Risks
Schwab Fundamental US Large Company Index Fund
Investment Objective
The fund seeks investment results that correspond generally (before fees and expenses) to the total return of the Russell RAFI US Large Company Index. The fund’s investment objective is not fundamental and therefore may be changed by the fund’s board of trustees without shareholder approval.
More Information About Principal Investment Risks
The fund is subject to risks, any of which could cause an investor to lose money.
Market Risk. Financial markets rise and fall in response to a variety of factors, sometimes rapidly and unpredictably. Markets may be impacted by economic, political, regulatory and other conditions, including economic sanctions and other government actions. In addition, the occurrence of global events, such as war, terrorism, environmental disasters, natural disasters and epidemics, may also negatively affect the financial markets. These events could reduce consumer demand or economic output; result in market closures, changes in interest rates, inflation/deflation, travel restrictions or quarantines; and significantly adversely impact the economy. Governmental and quasi-governmental authorities and regulators throughout the world have in the past often responded to serious economic disruptions with a variety of significant fiscal and monetary policy changes which could have an unexpected impact on financial markets and the fund’s investments. As with any investment whose performance is tied to these markets, the value of an investment in the fund will fluctuate, which means that an investor could lose money over short or long periods.
Equity Risk. The prices of equity securities rise and fall daily. These price movements may result from factors affecting individual companies, industries or the securities market as a whole. Individual companies may report poor results or be negatively affected by industry and/or economic trends and developments. The prices of securities issued by such companies may suffer a decline in response. Governmental action, including the imposition of trade embargoes or tariffs, may also impact individual companies or markets as a whole. In addition, equity markets tend to move in cycles, which may cause stock prices to fall over short or extended periods of time.
Investment Style Risk. The fund is an index fund. Therefore, the fund follows the securities included in the index during upturns as well as downturns. Because of its indexing strategy, the fund does not take steps to reduce market exposure or to lessen the effects of a declining market, even though these stocks may go in and out of favor based on market and economic conditions. The index does not weigh securities on the basis of investor protection, limitations or differences in the quality of financial reporting or other oversight mechanisms. Therefore, the fund will follow the securities in the index without consideration of these factors. In addition, because of the fund’s expenses, the fund’s performance may be below that of the index.
At times the segment of the markets represented by the index may underperform other market segments. A significant percentage of the index may be composed of securities in a single industry or sector of the economy. If the fund is focused in an industry or sector, it may present more risks than if it were broadly diversified over numerous industries and sectors of the economy. Because of the way the index is composed, the index may perform differently or worse than an index that is based solely on market capitalization.
Index-Related Risk. The index provider does not provide any warranty as to the timeliness, accuracy or completeness of any data relating to the index. Errors relating to the index, including index data, computations and/or construction, may occur from time to time and may not be identified by the index provider for a period of time or at all. Losses resulting from index errors may be borne by the fund and its shareholders.
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In addition, market disruptions could cause delays in the index’s rebalancing schedule which may result in the index and, in turn, the fund experiencing returns different than those that would have been achieved under a normal rebalancing schedule.
Market Capitalization Risk. Securities issued by companies of different market capitalizations tend to go in and out of favor based on market and economic conditions. In addition, there may be less trading volume in securities issued by mid- and small-cap companies than those issued by larger companies and, as a result, trading volatility may have a greater impact on the value of securities of mid- and small-cap companies. Securities issued by large-cap companies, on the other hand, may not be able to attain the high growth rates of some mid- and small-cap companies. During a period when securities of a particular market capitalization fall behind other types of investments, the fund’s performance could be impacted.
Large-Cap Company Risk. Large-cap companies are generally more mature than smaller companies. They also may have fewer new market opportunities for their products or services, may focus resources on maintaining their market share, and may be unable to respond quickly to new competitive challenges. As a result, the securities issued by these companies may not be able to reach the same levels of growth as the securities issued by small- or mid-cap companies.
Tracking Error Risk. As an index fund, the fund seeks to track the performance of the index, although it may not be successful in doing so. The divergence between the performance of the fund and the index, positive or negative, is called “tracking error.” Tracking error can be caused by many factors and it may be significant. For example, the fund may not invest in certain securities in the index, match the securities’ weighting to the index, or the fund may invest in securities not in the index, due to regulatory, operational, custodial or liquidity constraints; corporate transactions; asset valuations; transaction costs and timing; tax considerations; and index rebalancing, which may result in tracking error. The fund may attempt to offset the effects of not being invested in certain index securities by making substitute investments, but these efforts may not be successful. In certain circumstances, the fund may value individual securities based on fair value prices developed using methods approved by the fund’s Board of Trustees. To the extent the fund calculates its net asset value (NAV) based on fair value prices, the fund’s performance may diverge from the index. In addition, cash flows into and out of the fund, operating expenses and trading costs all affect the ability of the fund to match the performance of the index, because the index does not have to manage cash flows and does not incur any costs.
Derivatives Risk. The fund may use derivatives to enhance returns or hedge against market declines. Examples of derivatives are options, futures, options on futures and swaps. An option is the right to buy or sell an instrument at a specific price before a specific date. A future is an agreement to buy or sell a financial instrument at a specific price on a specific day. A swap is an agreement whereby two parties agree to exchange payment streams calculated in relation to a rate, index, instrument or certain securities and a predetermined amount. The fund’s use of derivatives that are subject to regulation by the Commodity Futures Trading Commission (CFTC) could cause the fund to become a commodity pool, which would require the fund to comply with certain CFTC rules.
The fund’s use of derivative instruments involves risks different from, or possibly greater than, the risks associated with investing directly in securities and other traditional investments. Certain of these risks, such as liquidity risk, market risk and operational risk, are discussed elsewhere in this prospectus. The fund’s use of derivatives is also subject to lack of availability risk, credit risk, leverage risk, valuation risk, correlation risk and tax risk. Lack of availability risk is the risk that suitable derivative transactions may not be available in all circumstances for risk management or other purposes. Credit risk is the risk that the counterparty to a derivatives transaction may not fulfill its obligations. Leverage risk is the risk that a small percentage of assets invested in derivatives can have a disproportionately large impact on the fund. Valuation risk is the risk that a particular derivative may be valued incorrectly. Correlation risk is the risk that changes in the value of the derivative may not correlate perfectly with the underlying asset, rate or index. Tax risk is the risk that the use of derivatives may cause the fund to realize higher amounts of short-term capital gains. The fund’s use of derivatives could reduce the fund’s performance, increase the fund’s volatility, and could cause the fund to lose more than the initial amount invested. The fund’s use of derivatives also could create a risk of counterparty default under certain transactions, risks that the fund would need to liquidate portfolio positions when it may not be advantageous to do so in order to meet margin and payment obligations, and legal risks relating to insufficient documentation, insufficient capacity or authority of a counterparty, or legality or enforceability of a contract.
Liquidity Risk. Liquidity risk exists when particular investments may be difficult to purchase, sell or value, especially during stressed market conditions. The market for certain investments may become illiquid due to specific adverse changes in the conditions of a particular issuer or under adverse market or economic conditions independent of the issuer. In such cases, the fund, due to limitations on investments in illiquid securities and the difficulty in readily purchasing and selling such securities at favorable times or prices, may decline in value, experience lower returns and/or be unable to achieve its desired level of exposure to a certain issuer or sector. Further, transactions in illiquid securities may entail transaction costs that are higher than those for transactions in liquid securities. Liquidity risk also includes the risk that market conditions or large shareholder redemptions, which may occur rapidly or unexpectedly, may impact the ability of the fund to meet redemption requests within the required time period. In order to meet such redemption requests, the fund may be forced to sell securities at inopportune times or prices.
Securities Lending Risk. The fund may lend its portfolio securities to brokers, dealers, and other financial institutions provided a number of conditions are satisfied, including that the loan is fully collateralized. When the fund lends portfolio securities, its investment performance will continue to reflect changes in the value of the securities loaned, and the fund will also receive a fee or interest on the collateral. Securities
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lending involves the risk of loss of rights in, or delay in recovery of, the loaned securities if the borrower fails to return the security loaned or becomes insolvent. The fund will also bear the risk of any decline in value of securities acquired with cash collateral. The fund may pay lending fees to a party arranging the loan.
Operational Risk. The fund is exposed to operational risk arising from a number of factors, including, but not limited to, human error, processing and communication errors, errors of the fund’s service providers, counterparties or other third parties, failed or inadequate processes and technology or system failures. The fund seeks to reduce these operational risks through controls and procedures believed to be reasonably designed to address these risks. However, these controls and procedures cannot address every possible risk and may not fully mitigate the risks that they are intended to address.
Schwab Fundamental US Small Company Index Fund
Investment Objective
The fund seeks investment results that correspond generally (before fees and expenses) to the total return of the Russell RAFI US Small Company Index. The fund’s investment objective is not fundamental and therefore may be changed by the fund’s board of trustees without shareholder approval.
More Information About Principal Investment Risks
The fund is subject to risks, any of which could cause an investor to lose money.
Market Risk. Financial markets rise and fall in response to a variety of factors, sometimes rapidly and unpredictably. Markets may be impacted by economic, political, regulatory and other conditions, including economic sanctions and other government actions. In addition, the occurrence of global events, such as war, terrorism, environmental disasters, natural disasters and epidemics, may also negatively affect the financial markets. These events could reduce consumer demand or economic output; result in market closures, changes in interest rates, inflation/deflation, travel restrictions or quarantines; and significantly adversely impact the economy. Governmental and quasi-governmental authorities and regulators throughout the world have in the past often responded to serious economic disruptions with a variety of significant fiscal and monetary policy changes which could have an unexpected impact on financial markets and the fund’s investments. As with any investment whose performance is tied to these markets, the value of an investment in the fund will fluctuate, which means that an investor could lose money over short or long periods.
Equity Risk. The prices of equity securities rise and fall daily. These price movements may result from factors affecting individual companies, industries or the securities market as a whole. Individual companies may report poor results or be negatively affected by industry and/or economic trends and developments. The prices of securities issued by such companies may suffer a decline in response. Governmental action, including the imposition of trade embargoes or tariffs, may also impact individual companies or markets as a whole. In addition, equity markets tend to move in cycles, which may cause stock prices to fall over short or extended periods of time.
Investment Style Risk. The fund is an index fund. Therefore, the fund follows the securities included in the index during upturns as well as downturns. Because of its indexing strategy, the fund does not take steps to reduce market exposure or to lessen the effects of a declining market, even though these stocks may go in and out of favor based on market and economic conditions. The index does not weigh securities on the basis of investor protection, limitations or differences in the quality of financial reporting or other oversight mechanisms. Therefore, the fund will follow the securities in the index without consideration of these factors. In addition, because of the fund’s expenses, the fund’s performance may be below that of the index.
At times the segment of the markets represented by the index may underperform other market segments. A significant percentage of the index may be composed of securities in a single industry or sector of the economy. If the fund is focused in an industry or sector, it may present more risks than if it were broadly diversified over numerous industries and sectors of the economy. Because of the way the index is composed, the index may perform differently or worse than an index that is based solely on market capitalization.
Index-Related Risk. The index provider does not provide any warranty as to the timeliness, accuracy or completeness of any data relating to the index. Errors relating to the index, including index data, computations and/or construction, may occur from time to time and may not be identified by the index provider for a period of time or at all. Losses resulting from index errors may be borne by the fund and its shareholders.
In addition, market disruptions could cause delays in the index’s rebalancing schedule which may result in the index and, in turn, the fund experiencing returns different than those that would have been achieved under a normal rebalancing schedule.
Market Capitalization Risk. Securities issued by companies of different market capitalizations tend to go in and out of favor based on market and economic conditions. In addition, there may be less trading volume in securities issued by mid- and small-cap companies than those issued by larger companies and, as a result, trading volatility may have a greater impact on the value of securities of mid- and small-cap
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companies. Securities issued by large-cap companies, on the other hand, may not be able to attain the high growth rates of some mid- and small-cap companies. During a period when securities of a particular market capitalization fall behind other types of investments, the fund’s performance could be impacted.
Small-Cap Company Risk. Small-cap companies may be more vulnerable to adverse business or economic events than larger, more established companies and their securities may be riskier than those issued by larger companies. The value of securities issued by small-cap companies may be based in substantial part on future expectations rather than current achievements and their prices may move sharply, especially during market upturns and downturns. In addition, small-cap companies may have limited financial resources, management experience, product lines and markets, and their securities may trade less frequently and in more limited volumes than the securities of larger companies. Further, small-cap companies may have less publicly available information and such information may be inaccurate or incomplete.
Tracking Error Risk. As an index fund, the fund seeks to track the performance of the index, although it may not be successful in doing so. The divergence between the performance of the fund and the index, positive or negative, is called “tracking error.” Tracking error can be caused by many factors and it may be significant. For example, the fund may not invest in certain securities in the index, match the securities’ weighting to the index, or the fund may invest in securities not in the index, due to regulatory, operational, custodial or liquidity constraints; corporate transactions; asset valuations; transaction costs and timing; tax considerations; and index rebalancing, which may result in tracking error. The fund may attempt to offset the effects of not being invested in certain index securities by making substitute investments, but these efforts may not be successful. In certain circumstances, the fund may value individual securities based on fair value prices developed using methods approved by the fund’s Board of Trustees. To the extent the fund calculates its net asset value (NAV) based on fair value prices, the fund’s performance may diverge from the index. In addition, cash flows into and out of the fund, operating expenses and trading costs all affect the ability of the fund to match the performance of the index, because the index does not have to manage cash flows and does not incur any costs.
Derivatives Risk. The fund may use derivatives to enhance returns or hedge against market declines. Examples of derivatives are options, futures, options on futures and swaps. An option is the right to buy or sell an instrument at a specific price before a specific date. A future is an agreement to buy or sell a financial instrument at a specific price on a specific day. A swap is an agreement whereby two parties agree to exchange payment streams calculated in relation to a rate, index, instrument or certain securities and a predetermined amount. The fund’s use of derivatives that are subject to regulation by the CFTC could cause the fund to become a commodity pool, which would require the fund to comply with certain CFTC rules.
The fund’s use of derivative instruments involves risks different from, or possibly greater than, the risks associated with investing directly in securities and other traditional investments. Certain of these risks, such as liquidity risk, market risk and operational risk, are discussed elsewhere in this prospectus. The fund’s use of derivatives is also subject to lack of availability risk, credit risk, leverage risk, valuation risk, correlation risk and tax risk. Lack of availability risk is the risk that suitable derivative transactions may not be available in all circumstances for risk management or other purposes. Credit risk is the risk that the counterparty to a derivatives transaction may not fulfill its obligations. Leverage risk is the risk that a small percentage of assets invested in derivatives can have a disproportionately large impact on the fund. Valuation risk is the risk that a particular derivative may be valued incorrectly. Correlation risk is the risk that changes in the value of the derivative may not correlate perfectly with the underlying asset, rate or index. Tax risk is the risk that the use of derivatives may cause the fund to realize higher amounts of short-term capital gains. The fund’s use of derivatives could reduce the fund’s performance, increase the fund’s volatility, and could cause the fund to lose more than the initial amount invested. The fund’s use of derivatives also could create a risk of counterparty default under certain transactions, risks that the fund would need to liquidate portfolio positions when it may not be advantageous to do so in order to meet margin and payment obligations, and legal risks relating to insufficient documentation, insufficient capacity or authority of a counterparty, or legality or enforceability of a contract.
Liquidity Risk. Liquidity risk exists when particular investments may be difficult to purchase, sell or value, especially during stressed market conditions. The market for certain investments may become illiquid due to specific adverse changes in the conditions of a particular issuer or under adverse market or economic conditions independent of the issuer. In such cases, the fund, due to limitations on investments in illiquid securities and the difficulty in readily purchasing and selling such securities at favorable times or prices, may decline in value, experience lower returns and/or be unable to achieve its desired level of exposure to a certain issuer or sector. Further, transactions in illiquid securities may entail transaction costs that are higher than those for transactions in liquid securities. Liquidity risk also includes the risk that market conditions or large shareholder redemptions, which may occur rapidly or unexpectedly, may impact the ability of the fund to meet redemption requests within the required time period. In order to meet such redemption requests, the fund may be forced to sell securities at inopportune times or prices.
Securities Lending Risk. The fund may lend its portfolio securities to brokers, dealers, and other financial institutions provided a number of conditions are satisfied, including that the loan is fully collateralized. When the fund lends portfolio securities, its investment performance will continue to reflect changes in the value of the securities loaned, and the fund will also receive a fee or interest on the collateral. Securities lending involves the risk of loss of rights in, or delay in recovery of, the loaned securities if the borrower fails to return the security loaned or becomes insolvent. The fund will also bear the risk of any decline in value of securities acquired with cash collateral. The fund may pay lending fees to a party arranging the loan.
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Operational Risk. The fund is exposed to operational risk arising from a number of factors, including, but not limited to, human error, processing and communication errors, errors of the fund’s service providers, counterparties or other third parties, failed or inadequate processes and technology or system failures. The fund seeks to reduce these operational risks through controls and procedures believed to be reasonably designed to address these risks. However, these controls and procedures cannot address every possible risk and may not fully mitigate the risks that they are intended to address.
Schwab Fundamental International Large Company Index Fund
Investment Objective
The fund seeks investment results that correspond generally (before fees and expenses) to the total return of the Russell RAFI Developed ex US Large Company Index. The fund’s investment objective is not fundamental and therefore may be changed by the fund’s board of trustees without shareholder approval.
More Information About Principal Investment Risks
The fund is subject to risks, any of which could cause an investor to lose money.
Market Risk. Financial markets rise and fall in response to a variety of factors, sometimes rapidly and unpredictably. Markets may be impacted by economic, political, regulatory and other conditions, including economic sanctions and other government actions. In addition, the occurrence of global events, such as war, terrorism, environmental disasters, natural disasters and epidemics, may also negatively affect the financial markets. These events could reduce consumer demand or economic output; result in market closures, changes in interest rates, inflation/deflation, travel restrictions or quarantines; and significantly adversely impact the economy. Governmental and quasi-governmental authorities and regulators throughout the world have in the past often responded to serious economic disruptions with a variety of significant fiscal and monetary policy changes which could have an unexpected impact on financial markets and the fund’s investments. As with any investment whose performance is tied to these markets, the value of an investment in the fund will fluctuate, which means that an investor could lose money over short or long periods.
Equity Risk. The prices of equity securities rise and fall daily. These price movements may result from factors affecting individual companies, industries or the securities market as a whole. Individual companies may report poor results or be negatively affected by industry and/or economic trends and developments. The prices of securities issued by such companies may suffer a decline in response. Governmental action, including the imposition of trade embargoes or tariffs, may also impact individual companies or markets as a whole. In addition, equity markets tend to move in cycles, which may cause stock prices to fall over short or extended periods of time.
Investment Style Risk. The fund is an index fund. Therefore, the fund follows the securities included in the index during upturns as well as downturns. Because of its indexing strategy, the fund does not take steps to reduce market exposure or to lessen the effects of a declining market, even though these stocks may go in and out of favor based on market and economic conditions. The index does not weigh securities on the basis of investor protection, limitations or differences in the quality of financial reporting or other oversight mechanisms. Therefore, the fund will follow the securities in the index without consideration of these factors. In addition, because of the fund’s expenses, the fund’s performance may be below that of the index.
At times the segment of the markets represented by the index may underperform other market segments. A significant percentage of the index may be composed of securities in a single industry or sector of the economy. If the fund is focused in an industry or sector, it may present more risks than if it were broadly diversified over numerous industries and sectors of the economy. Because of the way the index is composed, the index may perform differently or worse than an index that is based solely on market capitalization.
Index-Related Risk. The index provider does not provide any warranty as to the timeliness, accuracy or completeness of any data relating to the index. Errors relating to the index, including index data, computations and/or construction, may occur from time to time and may not be identified by the index provider for a period of time or at all. Losses resulting from index errors may be borne by the fund and its shareholders.
In addition, market disruptions could cause delays in the index’s rebalancing schedule which may result in the index and, in turn, the fund experiencing returns different than those that would have been achieved under a normal rebalancing schedule.
Market Capitalization Risk. Securities issued by companies of different market capitalizations tend to go in and out of favor based on market and economic conditions. In addition, there may be less trading volume in securities issued by mid- and small-cap companies than those issued by larger companies and, as a result, trading volatility may have a greater impact on the value of securities of mid- and small-cap companies. Securities issued by large-cap companies, on the other hand, may not be able to attain the high growth rates of some mid- and small-cap companies. During a period when securities of a particular market capitalization fall behind other types of investments, the fund’s performance could be impacted.
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Large-Cap Company Risk. Large-cap companies are generally more mature than smaller companies. They also may have fewer new market opportunities for their products or services, may focus resources on maintaining their market share, and may be unable to respond quickly to new competitive challenges. As a result, the securities issued by these companies may not be able to reach the same levels of growth as the securities issued by small- or mid-cap companies.
Tracking Error Risk. As an index fund, the fund seeks to track the performance of the index, although it may not be successful in doing so. The divergence between the performance of the fund and the index, positive or negative, is called “tracking error.” Tracking error can be caused by many factors and it may be significant. For example, the fund may not invest in certain securities in the index, match the securities’ weighting to the index, or the fund may invest in securities not in the index, due to regulatory, operational, custodial or liquidity constraints; corporate transactions; asset valuations; transaction costs and timing; tax considerations; and index rebalancing, which may result in tracking error. In addition, the fund may not invest in issuers located in certain countries due to these considerations. The fund may attempt to offset the effects of not being invested in certain index securities by making substitute investments, but these efforts may not be successful. In certain circumstances, the fund may value securities based on fair value prices developed using methods approved by the fund’s Board of Trustees. To the extent the fund calculates its net asset value (NAV) based on fair value prices, the fund’s performance may diverge from the index. In addition, cash flows into and out of the fund, operating expenses and trading costs all affect the ability of the fund to match the performance of the index, because the index does not have to manage cash flows and does not incur any costs. Tracking error may also be impacted by timing differences in currency conversions between the fund and the index and by the fund’s use of fair valuation.
Foreign Investment Risk. The fund’s investments in securities of foreign issuers involve certain risks that may be greater than those associated with investments in securities of U.S. issuers. These include risks of adverse changes in foreign economic, political, regulatory and other conditions; changes in currency exchange rates or exchange control regulations (including limitations on currency movements and exchanges); differing accounting, auditing, financial reporting and legal standards and practices; differing securities market structures; and higher transaction costs. In certain countries, legal remedies available to investors may be more limited than those available with respect to investments in the U.S. These risks may negatively impact the value or liquidity of the fund’s investments and could impair the fund’s ability to meet its investment objective or invest in accordance with its investment strategy. In addition, the fund’s investments in foreign securities may be subject to economic sanctions or other government restrictions, including trade tariffs, embargoes or limitations on trade which could have a significant impact on a country’s markets overall as well as global economies or markets. There also is the risk that the cost of buying, selling, and holding foreign securities, including brokerage, tax, and custody costs, may be higher than those involved in domestic transactions. The securities of some foreign companies may be less liquid and, at times, more volatile than securities of comparable U.S. companies. The fund may also experience more rapid or extreme changes in value as compared to a fund that invests solely in securities of U.S. companies because the securities markets of many foreign countries are relatively small, with a limited number of companies representing a small number of industries. To the extent the fund’s investments in a single country or a limited number of countries represent a large percentage of the fund’s assets, the fund’s performance may be adversely affected by the economic, political, regulatory and social conditions in those countries, and the fund’s price may be more volatile than the price of a fund that is geographically diversified.
Depositary Receipt Risk. Foreign securities also include ADRs, which are U.S. dollar-denominated receipts representing shares of foreign-based corporations. ADRs are issued by U.S. banks or trust companies and entitle the holder to all dividends and capital gains that are paid out on the underlying foreign shares. Foreign securities also include GDRs, which are similar to ADRs, but are shares of foreign-based corporations generally issued by international banks in one or more markets around the world. In addition, foreign securities include EDRs, which are similar to GDRs, but are shares of foreign-based corporations generally issued by European banks that trade on exchanges outside of the bank’s home country. Investment in ADRs, GDRs and EDRs may be less liquid than the underlying shares in their primary trading market and GDRs, many of which are issued by companies in emerging markets, may be more volatile.
Variable Interest Entities Risk. The fund may gain exposure to certain operating companies in China through legal structures known as variable interest entities (VIEs). In China, ownership of companies in certain sectors by non-Chinese individuals and entities (including U.S. persons and entities, such as the fund) is prohibited. To facilitate indirect non-Chinese investment, many China-based operating companies have created VIE structures. In a VIE structure, a China-based operating company will establish an entity outside of China that will enter into service and other contracts with the China-based operating company. Shares of the entities established outside of China are often listed and traded on an exchange. Non-Chinese investors (such as the fund) hold equity interests in the entities established outside of China rather than directly in the China-based operating companies. This arrangement allows U.S. investors to obtain economic exposure to the China-based operating company through contractual means rather than through formal equity ownership. An investment in a VIE structure subjects the fund to the risks associated with the underlying China-based operating company. In addition, the fund may be exposed to certain associated risks, including the risks that: the Chinese government could subject the China-based operating company to penalties, revocation of business and operating licenses or forfeiture of ownership interests; the Chinese government may outlaw the VIE structure, which could cause an uncertain negative impact to existing investors in the VIE structure; the contracts underlying the VIE structure may not be enforced by Chinese courts; and shareholders of the China-based operating company may leverage the VIE structure to their benefit and to the detriment of the investors in the VIE structure. If these actions were to occur, the market value of the fund’s investments in the VIE structure would likely fall, causing investment losses, which could be substantial, for the fund.
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Currency Risk. The fund’s investments in securities denominated in, and/or receiving revenues in, foreign currencies, will subject the fund to the risk that those currencies will decline in value relative to the U.S. dollar. In either event, the dollar value of an investment in the fund would be adversely affected. Currency exchange rates may fluctuate in response to factors extrinsic to that country’s economy, which makes the forecasting of currency market movements extremely difficult. Currency rates in foreign countries may fluctuate significantly over short periods of time for a number of reasons, including changes in interest rates; intervention (or failure to intervene) by U.S. or foreign governments, central banks or supranational entities such as the International Monetary Fund; or by the imposition of currency controls or other political developments in the United States or abroad. These can result in losses to the fund if it is unable to deliver or receive currency or monies in settlement of obligations. Forward contracts on foreign currencies are not traded on exchanges; rather, a bank or dealer will act as agent or as principal in order to make or take future delivery of a specified lot of a particular currency for the fund’s account. The fund is subject to the risk of a counterparty’s failure, inability or refusal to perform with respect to such contracts.
Derivatives Risk. The fund may use derivatives to enhance returns or hedge against market declines. Examples of derivatives are options, futures, options on futures and swaps. An option is the right to buy or sell an instrument at a specific price before a specific date. A future is an agreement to buy or sell a financial instrument at a specific price on a specific day. A swap is an agreement whereby two parties agree to exchange payment streams calculated in relation to a rate, index, instrument or certain securities and a predetermined amount. The fund’s use of derivatives that are subject to regulation by the CFTC could cause the fund to become a commodity pool, which would require the fund to comply with certain CFTC rules.
The fund’s use of derivative instruments involves risks different from, or possibly greater than, the risks associated with investing directly in securities and other traditional investments. Certain of these risks, such as liquidity risk, market risk and operational risk, are discussed elsewhere in this prospectus. The fund’s use of derivatives is also subject to lack of availability risk, credit risk, leverage risk, valuation risk, correlation risk and tax risk. Lack of availability risk is the risk that suitable derivative transactions may not be available in all circumstances for risk management or other purposes. Credit risk is the risk that the counterparty to a derivatives transaction may not fulfill its obligations. Leverage risk is the risk that a small percentage of assets invested in derivatives can have a disproportionately large impact on the fund. Valuation risk is the risk that a particular derivative may be valued incorrectly. Correlation risk is the risk that changes in the value of the derivative may not correlate perfectly with the underlying asset, rate or index. Tax risk is the risk that the use of derivatives may cause the fund to realize higher amounts of short-term capital gains. The fund’s use of derivatives could reduce the fund’s performance, increase the fund’s volatility, and could cause the fund to lose more than the initial amount invested. The fund’s use of derivatives also could create a risk of counterparty default under certain transactions, risks that the fund would need to liquidate portfolio positions when it may not be advantageous to do so in order to meet margin and payment obligations, and legal risks relating to insufficient documentation, insufficient capacity or authority of a counterparty, or legality or enforceability of a contract.
Liquidity Risk. Liquidity risk exists when particular investments may be difficult to purchase, sell or value, especially during stressed market conditions. The market for certain investments may become illiquid due to specific adverse changes in the conditions of a particular issuer or under adverse market or economic conditions independent of the issuer. In such cases, the fund, due to limitations on investments in illiquid securities and the difficulty in readily purchasing and selling such securities at favorable times or prices, may decline in value, experience lower returns and/or be unable to achieve its desired level of exposure to a certain issuer or sector. Further, transactions in illiquid securities may entail transaction costs that are higher than those for transactions in liquid securities. Liquidity risk also includes the risk that market conditions or large shareholder redemptions, which may occur rapidly or unexpectedly, may impact the ability of the fund to meet redemption requests within the required time period. In order to meet such redemption requests, the fund may be forced to sell securities at inopportune times or prices.
Securities Lending Risk. The fund may lend its portfolio securities to brokers, dealers, and other financial institutions provided a number of conditions are satisfied, including that the loan is fully collateralized. When the fund lends portfolio securities, its investment performance will continue to reflect changes in the value of the securities loaned, and the fund will also receive a fee or interest on the collateral. Securities lending involves the risk of loss of rights in, or delay in recovery of, the loaned securities if the borrower fails to return the security loaned or becomes insolvent. The fund will also bear the risk of any decline in value of securities acquired with cash collateral. The fund may pay lending fees to a party arranging the loan.
Operational Risk. The fund is exposed to operational risk arising from a number of factors, including, but not limited to, human error, processing and communication errors, errors of the fund’s service providers, counterparties or other third parties, failed or inadequate processes and technology or system failures. The fund seeks to reduce these operational risks through controls and procedures believed to be reasonably designed to address these risks. However, these controls and procedures cannot address every possible risk and may not fully mitigate the risks that they are intended to address.
Schwab Fundamental International Small Company Index Fund
Investment Objective
The fund seeks investment results that correspond generally (before fees and expenses) to the total return of the Russell RAFI Developed ex US Small Company Index. The fund’s investment objective is not fundamental and therefore may be changed by the fund’s board of trustees without shareholder approval.
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More Information About Principal Investment Risks
The fund is subject to risks, any of which could cause an investor to lose money.
Market Risk. Financial markets rise and fall in response to a variety of factors, sometimes rapidly and unpredictably. Markets may be impacted by economic, political, regulatory and other conditions, including economic sanctions and other government actions. In addition, the occurrence of global events, such as war, terrorism, environmental disasters, natural disasters and epidemics, may also negatively affect the financial markets. These events could reduce consumer demand or economic output; result in market closures, changes in interest rates, inflation/deflation, travel restrictions or quarantines; and significantly adversely impact the economy. Governmental and quasi-governmental authorities and regulators throughout the world have in the past often responded to serious economic disruptions with a variety of significant fiscal and monetary policy changes which could have an unexpected impact on financial markets and the fund’s investments. As with any investment whose performance is tied to these markets, the value of an investment in the fund will fluctuate, which means that an investor could lose money over short or long periods.
Equity Risk. The prices of equity securities rise and fall daily. These price movements may result from factors affecting individual companies, industries or the securities market as a whole. Individual companies may report poor results or be negatively affected by industry and/or economic trends and developments. The prices of securities issued by such companies may suffer a decline in response. Governmental action, including the imposition of trade embargoes or tariffs, may also impact individual companies or markets as a whole. In addition, equity markets tend to move in cycles, which may cause stock prices to fall over short or extended periods of time.
Investment Style Risk. The fund is an index fund. Therefore, the fund follows the securities included in the index during upturns as well as downturns. Because of its indexing strategy, the fund does not take steps to reduce market exposure or to lessen the effects of a declining market, even though these stocks may go in and out of favor based on market and economic conditions. The index does not weigh securities on the basis of investor protection, limitations or differences in the quality of financial reporting or other oversight mechanisms. Therefore, the fund will follow the securities in the index without consideration of these factors. In addition, because of the fund’s expenses, the fund’s performance may be below that of the index.
At times the segment of the markets represented by the index may underperform other market segments. A significant percentage of the index may be composed of securities in a single industry or sector of the economy. If the fund is focused in an industry or sector, it may present more risks than if it were broadly diversified over numerous industries and sectors of the economy. Because of the way the index is composed, the index may perform differently or worse than an index that is based solely on market capitalization.
Index-Related Risk. The index provider does not provide any warranty as to the timeliness, accuracy or completeness of any data relating to the index. Errors relating to the index, including index data, computations and/or construction, may occur from time to time and may not be identified by the index provider for a period of time or at all. Losses resulting from index errors may be borne by the fund and its shareholders.
In addition, market disruptions could cause delays in the index’s rebalancing schedule which may result in the index and, in turn, the fund experiencing returns different than those that would have been achieved under a normal rebalancing schedule.
Market Capitalization Risk. Securities issued by companies of different market capitalizations tend to go in and out of favor based on market and economic conditions. In addition, there may be less trading volume in securities issued by mid- and small-cap companies than those issued by larger companies and, as a result, trading volatility may have a greater impact on the value of securities of mid- and small-cap companies. Securities issued by large-cap companies, on the other hand, may not be able to attain the high growth rates of some mid- and small-cap companies. During a period when securities of a particular market capitalization fall behind other types of investments, the fund’s performance could be impacted.
Small-Cap Company Risk. Small-cap companies may be more vulnerable to adverse business or economic events than larger, more established companies and their securities may be riskier than those issued by larger companies. The value of securities issued by small-cap companies may be based in substantial part on future expectations rather than current achievements and their prices may move sharply, especially during market upturns and downturns. In addition, small-cap companies may have limited financial resources, management experience, product lines and markets, and their securities may trade less frequently and in more limited volumes than the securities of larger companies. Further, small-cap companies may have less publicly available information and such information may be inaccurate or incomplete.
Tracking Error Risk. As an index fund, the fund seeks to track the performance of the index, although it may not be successful in doing so. The divergence between the performance of the fund and the index, positive or negative, is called “tracking error.” Tracking error can be caused by many factors and it may be significant. For example, the fund may not invest in certain securities in the index, match the securities’ weighting to the index, or the fund may invest in securities not in the index, due to regulatory, operational, custodial or liquidity constraints; corporate transactions; asset valuations; transaction costs and timing; tax considerations; and index rebalancing, which may result in tracking error. In addition, the fund may not invest in issuers located in certain countries due to these considerations. The fund may attempt to offset the effects of not being invested in certain index securities by making substitute investments, but these efforts may not be
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successful. In certain circumstances, the fund may value securities based on fair value prices developed using methods approved by the fund’s Board of Trustees. To the extent the fund calculates its net asset value (NAV) based on fair value prices, the fund’s performance may diverge from the index. In addition, cash flows into and out of the fund, operating expenses and trading costs all affect the ability of the fund to match the performance of the index, because the index does not have to manage cash flows and does not incur any costs. Tracking error may also be impacted by timing differences in currency conversions between the fund and the index and by the fund’s use of fair valuation.
Foreign Investment Risk. The fund’s investments in securities of foreign issuers involve certain risks that may be greater than those associated with investments in securities of U.S. issuers. These include risks of adverse changes in foreign economic, political, regulatory and other conditions; changes in currency exchange rates or exchange control regulations (including limitations on currency movements and exchanges); differing accounting, auditing, financial reporting and legal standards and practices; differing securities market structures; and higher transaction costs. In certain countries, legal remedies available to investors may be more limited than those available with respect to investments in the U.S. These risks may negatively impact the value or liquidity of the fund’s investments and could impair the fund’s ability to meet its investment objective or invest in accordance with its investment strategy. In addition, the fund’s investments in foreign securities may be subject to economic sanctions or other government restrictions, including trade tariffs, embargoes or limitations on trade which could have a significant impact on a country’s markets overall as well as global economies or markets. There also is the risk that the cost of buying, selling, and holding foreign securities, including brokerage, tax, and custody costs, may be higher than those involved in domestic transactions. The securities of some foreign companies may be less liquid and, at times, more volatile than securities of comparable U.S. companies. The fund may also experience more rapid or extreme changes in value as compared to a fund that invests solely in securities of U.S. companies because the securities markets of many foreign countries are relatively small, with a limited number of companies representing a small number of industries. To the extent the fund’s investments in a single country or a limited number of countries represent a large percentage of the fund’s assets, the fund’s performance may be adversely affected by the economic, political, regulatory and social conditions in those countries, and the fund’s price may be more volatile than the price of a fund that is geographically diversified.
Depositary Receipt Risk. Foreign securities also include ADRs, which are U.S. dollar-denominated receipts representing shares of foreign-based corporations. ADRs are issued by U.S. banks or trust companies and entitle the holder to all dividends and capital gains that are paid out on the underlying foreign shares. Foreign securities also include GDRs, which are similar to ADRs, but are shares of foreign-based corporations generally issued by international banks in one or more markets around the world. In addition, foreign securities include EDRs, which are similar to GDRs, but are shares of foreign-based corporations generally issued by European banks that trade on exchanges outside of the bank’s home country. Investment in ADRs, GDRs and EDRs may be less liquid than the underlying shares in their primary trading market and GDRs, many of which are issued by companies in emerging markets, may be more volatile.
Variable Interest Entities Risk. The fund may gain exposure to certain operating companies in China through legal structures known as variable interest entities (VIEs). In China, ownership of companies in certain sectors by non-Chinese individuals and entities (including U.S. persons and entities, such as the fund) is prohibited. To facilitate indirect non-Chinese investment, many China-based operating companies have created VIE structures. In a VIE structure, a China-based operating company will establish an entity outside of China that will enter into service and other contracts with the China-based operating company. Shares of the entities established outside of China are often listed and traded on an exchange. Non-Chinese investors (such as the fund) hold equity interests in the entities established outside of China rather than directly in the China-based operating companies. This arrangement allows U.S. investors to obtain economic exposure to the China-based operating company through contractual means rather than through formal equity ownership. An investment in a VIE structure subjects the fund to the risks associated with the underlying China-based operating company. In addition, the fund may be exposed to certain associated risks, including the risks that: the Chinese government could subject the China-based operating company to penalties, revocation of business and operating licenses or forfeiture of ownership interests; the Chinese government may outlaw the VIE structure, which could cause an uncertain negative impact to existing investors in the VIE structure; the contracts underlying the VIE structure may not be enforced by Chinese courts; and shareholders of the China-based operating company may leverage the VIE structure to their benefit and to the detriment of the investors in the VIE structure. If these actions were to occur, the market value of the fund’s investments in the VIE structure would likely fall, causing investment losses, which could be substantial, for the fund.
Currency Risk. The fund’s investments in securities denominated in, and/or receiving revenues in, foreign currencies, will subject the fund to the risk that those currencies will decline in value relative to the U.S. dollar. In either event, the dollar value of an investment in the fund would be adversely affected. Currency exchange rates may fluctuate in response to factors extrinsic to that country’s economy, which makes the forecasting of currency market movements extremely difficult. Currency rates in foreign countries may fluctuate significantly over short periods of time for a number of reasons, including changes in interest rates; intervention (or failure to intervene) by U.S. or foreign governments, central banks or supranational entities such as the International Monetary Fund; or by the imposition of currency controls or other political developments in the United States or abroad. These can result in losses to the fund if it is unable to deliver or receive currency or monies in settlement of obligations. Forward contracts on foreign currencies are not traded on exchanges; rather, a bank or dealer will act as agent or as principal in order to make or take future delivery of a specified lot of a particular currency for the fund’s account. The fund is subject to the risk of a counterparty’s failure, inability or refusal to perform with respect to such contracts.
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Derivatives Risk. The fund may use derivatives to enhance returns or hedge against market declines. Examples of derivatives are options, futures, options on futures and swaps. An option is the right to buy or sell an instrument at a specific price before a specific date. A future is an agreement to buy or sell a financial instrument at a specific price on a specific day. A swap is an agreement whereby two parties agree to exchange payment streams calculated in relation to a rate, index, instrument or certain securities and a predetermined amount. The fund’s use of derivatives that are subject to regulation by the CFTC could cause the fund to become a commodity pool, which would require the fund to comply with certain CFTC rules.
The fund’s use of derivative instruments involves risks different from, or possibly greater than, the risks associated with investing directly in securities and other traditional investments. Certain of these risks, such as liquidity risk, market risk and operational risk, are discussed elsewhere in this prospectus. The fund’s use of derivatives is also subject to lack of availability risk, credit risk, leverage risk, valuation risk, correlation risk and tax risk. Lack of availability risk is the risk that suitable derivative transactions may not be available in all circumstances for risk management or other purposes. Credit risk is the risk that the counterparty to a derivatives transaction may not fulfill its obligations. Leverage risk is the risk that a small percentage of assets invested in derivatives can have a disproportionately large impact on the fund. Valuation risk is the risk that a particular derivative may be valued incorrectly. Correlation risk is the risk that changes in the value of the derivative may not correlate perfectly with the underlying asset, rate or index. Tax risk is the risk that the use of derivatives may cause the fund to realize higher amounts of short-term capital gains. The fund’s use of derivatives could reduce the fund’s performance, increase the fund’s volatility, and could cause the fund to lose more than the initial amount invested. The fund’s use of derivatives also could create a risk of counterparty default under certain transactions, risks that the fund would need to liquidate portfolio positions when it may not be advantageous to do so in order to meet margin and payment obligations, and legal risks relating to insufficient documentation, insufficient capacity or authority of a counterparty, or legality or enforceability of a contract.
Liquidity Risk. Liquidity risk exists when particular investments may be difficult to purchase, sell or value, especially during stressed market conditions. The market for certain investments may become illiquid due to specific adverse changes in the conditions of a particular issuer or under adverse market or economic conditions independent of the issuer. In such cases, the fund, due to limitations on investments in illiquid securities and the difficulty in readily purchasing and selling such securities at favorable times or prices, may decline in value, experience lower returns and/or be unable to achieve its desired level of exposure to a certain issuer or sector. Further, transactions in illiquid securities may entail transaction costs that are higher than those for transactions in liquid securities. Liquidity risk also includes the risk that market conditions or large shareholder redemptions, which may occur rapidly or unexpectedly, may impact the ability of the fund to meet redemption requests within the required time period. In order to meet such redemption requests, the fund may be forced to sell securities at inopportune times or prices.
Securities Lending Risk. The fund may lend its portfolio securities to brokers, dealers, and other financial institutions provided a number of conditions are satisfied, including that the loan is fully collateralized. When the fund lends portfolio securities, its investment performance will continue to reflect changes in the value of the securities loaned, and the fund will also receive a fee or interest on the collateral. Securities lending involves the risk of loss of rights in, or delay in recovery of, the loaned securities if the borrower fails to return the security loaned or becomes insolvent. The fund will also bear the risk of any decline in value of securities acquired with cash collateral. The fund may pay lending fees to a party arranging the loan.
Operational Risk. The fund is exposed to operational risk arising from a number of factors, including, but not limited to, human error, processing and communication errors, errors of the fund’s service providers, counterparties or other third parties, failed or inadequate processes and technology or system failures. The fund seeks to reduce these operational risks through controls and procedures believed to be reasonably designed to address these risks. However, these controls and procedures cannot address every possible risk and may not fully mitigate the risks that they are intended to address.
Schwab Fundamental Emerging Markets Large Company Index Fund
Investment Objective
The fund seeks investment results that correspond generally (before fees and expenses) to the total return of the Russell RAFI Emerging Markets Large Company Index. The fund’s investment objective is not fundamental and therefore may be changed by the fund’s board of trustees without shareholder approval.
More Information About Principal Investment Risks
The fund is subject to risks, any of which could cause an investor to lose money.
Market Risk. Financial markets rise and fall in response to a variety of factors, sometimes rapidly and unpredictably. Markets may be impacted by economic, political, regulatory and other conditions, including economic sanctions and other government actions. In addition, the occurrence of global events, such as war, terrorism, environmental disasters, natural disasters and epidemics, may also negatively affect the financial markets. These events could reduce consumer demand or economic output; result in market closures, changes in interest rates, inflation/deflation, travel restrictions or quarantines; and significantly adversely impact the economy. Governmental and
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quasi-governmental authorities and regulators throughout the world have in the past often responded to serious economic disruptions with a variety of significant fiscal and monetary policy changes which could have an unexpected impact on financial markets and the fund’s investments. As with any investment whose performance is tied to these markets, the value of an investment in the fund will fluctuate, which means that an investor could lose money over short or long periods.
Equity Risk. The prices of equity securities rise and fall daily. These price movements may result from factors affecting individual companies, industries or the securities market as a whole. Individual companies may report poor results or be negatively affected by industry and/or economic trends and developments. The prices of securities issued by such companies may suffer a decline in response. Governmental action, including the imposition of trade embargoes or tariffs, may also impact individual companies or markets as a whole. In addition, equity markets tend to move in cycles, which may cause stock prices to fall over short or extended periods of time.
Investment Style Risk. The fund is an index fund. Therefore, the fund follows the securities included in the index during upturns as well as downturns. Because of its indexing strategy, the fund does not take steps to reduce market exposure or to lessen the effects of a declining market, even though these stocks may go in and out of favor based on market and economic conditions. The index does not weigh securities on the basis of investor protection, limitations or differences in the quality of financial reporting or other oversight mechanisms. Therefore, the fund will follow the securities in the index without consideration of these factors. In addition, because of the fund’s expenses, the fund’s performance may be below that of the index.
At times the segment of the markets represented by the index may underperform other market segments. A significant percentage of the index may be composed of securities in a single industry or sector of the economy. If the fund is focused in an industry or sector, it may present more risks than if it were broadly diversified over numerous industries and sectors of the economy. Because of the way the index is composed, the index may perform differently or worse than an index that is based solely on market capitalization.
Index-Related Risk. The index provider does not provide any warranty as to the timeliness, accuracy or completeness of any data relating to the index. Errors relating to the index, including index data, computations and/or construction, may occur from time to time and may not be identified by the index provider for a period of time or at all. Losses resulting from index errors may be borne by the fund and its shareholders.
In addition, market disruptions could cause delays in the index’s rebalancing schedule which may result in the index and, in turn, the fund experiencing returns different than those that would have been achieved under a normal rebalancing schedule.
Market Capitalization Risk. Securities issued by companies of different market capitalizations tend to go in and out of favor based on market and economic conditions. In addition, there may be less trading volume in securities issued by mid- and small-cap companies than those issued by larger companies and, as a result, trading volatility may have a greater impact on the value of securities of mid- and small-cap companies. Securities issued by large-cap companies, on the other hand, may not be able to attain the high growth rates of some mid- and small-cap companies. During a period when securities of a particular market capitalization fall behind other types of investments, the fund’s performance could be impacted.
Large-Cap Company Risk. Large-cap companies are generally more mature than smaller companies. They also may have fewer new market opportunities for their products or services, may focus resources on maintaining their market share, and may be unable to respond quickly to new competitive challenges. As a result, the securities issued by these companies may not be able to reach the same levels of growth as the securities issued by small- or mid-cap companies.
Tracking Error Risk. As an index fund, the fund seeks to track the performance of the index, although it may not be successful in doing so. The divergence between the performance of the fund and the index, positive or negative, is called “tracking error.” Tracking error can be caused by many factors and it may be significant. For example, the fund may not invest in certain securities in the index, match the securities’ weighting to the index, or the fund may invest in securities not in the index, due to regulatory, operational, custodial or liquidity constraints; corporate transactions; asset valuations; transaction costs and timing; tax considerations; and index rebalancing, which may result in tracking error. In addition, the fund may not invest in issuers located in certain countries due to these considerations. The fund may attempt to offset the effects of not being invested in certain index securities by making substitute investments, but these efforts may not be successful. In certain circumstances, the fund may value securities based on fair value prices developed using methods approved by the fund’s Board of Trustees. To the extent the fund calculates its net asset value (NAV) based on fair value prices, the fund’s performance may diverge from the index. In addition, cash flows into and out of the fund, operating expenses and trading costs all affect the ability of the fund to match the performance of the index, because the index does not have to manage cash flows and does not incur any costs. Tracking error may also be impacted by timing differences in currency conversions between the fund and the index and by the fund’s use of fair valuation.
Foreign Investment Risk. The fund’s investments in securities of foreign issuers involve certain risks that may be greater than those associated with investments in securities of U.S. issuers. These include risks of adverse changes in foreign economic, political, regulatory and other conditions; changes in currency exchange rates or exchange control regulations (including limitations on currency movements and exchanges); differing accounting, auditing, financial reporting and legal standards and practices; differing securities market structures;
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and higher transaction costs. In certain countries, legal remedies available to investors may be more limited than those available with respect to investments in the U.S. These risks may negatively impact the value or liquidity of the fund’s investments and could impair the fund’s ability to meet its investment objective or invest in accordance with its investment strategy. In addition, the fund’s investments in foreign securities may be subject to economic sanctions or other government restrictions, including trade tariffs, embargoes or limitations on trade which could have a significant impact on a country’s markets overall as well as global economies or markets. There also is the risk that the cost of buying, selling, and holding foreign securities, including brokerage, tax, and custody costs, may be higher than those involved in domestic transactions. The securities of some foreign companies may be less liquid and, at times, more volatile than securities of comparable U.S. companies. The fund may also experience more rapid or extreme changes in value as compared to a fund that invests solely in securities of U.S. companies because the securities markets of many foreign countries are relatively small, with a limited number of companies representing a small number of industries. To the extent the fund’s investments in a single country or a limited number of countries represent a large percentage of the fund’s assets, the fund’s performance may be adversely affected by the economic, political, regulatory and social conditions in those countries, and the fund’s price may be more volatile than the price of a fund that is geographically diversified.
Depositary Receipt Risk. Foreign securities also include ADRs, which are U.S. dollar-denominated receipts representing shares of foreign-based corporations. ADRs are issued by U.S. banks or trust companies and entitle the holder to all dividends and capital gains that are paid out on the underlying foreign shares. Foreign securities also include GDRs, which are similar to ADRs, but are shares of foreign-based corporations generally issued by international banks in one or more markets around the world. In addition, foreign securities include EDRs, which are similar to GDRs, but are shares of foreign-based corporations generally issued by European banks that trade on exchanges outside of the bank’s home country. Investment in ADRs, GDRs and EDRs may be less liquid than the underlying shares in their primary trading market and GDRs, many of which are issued by companies in emerging markets, may be more volatile.
Variable Interest Entities Risk. The fund may gain exposure to certain operating companies in China through legal structures known as variable interest entities (VIEs). In China, ownership of companies in certain sectors by non-Chinese individuals and entities (including U.S. persons and entities, such as the fund) is prohibited. To facilitate indirect non-Chinese investment, many China-based operating companies have created VIE structures. In a VIE structure, a China-based operating company will establish an entity outside of China that will enter into service and other contracts with the China-based operating company. Shares of the entities established outside of China are often listed and traded on an exchange. Non-Chinese investors (such as the fund) hold equity interests in the entities established outside of China rather than directly in the China-based operating companies. This arrangement allows U.S. investors to obtain economic exposure to the China-based operating company through contractual means rather than through formal equity ownership. An investment in a VIE structure subjects the fund to the risks associated with the underlying China-based operating company. In addition, the fund may be exposed to certain associated risks, including the risks that: the Chinese government could subject the China-based operating company to penalties, revocation of business and operating licenses or forfeiture of ownership interests; the Chinese government may outlaw the VIE structure, which could cause an uncertain negative impact to existing investors in the VIE structure; the contracts underlying the VIE structure may not be enforced by Chinese courts; and shareholders of the China-based operating company may leverage the VIE structure to their benefit and to the detriment of the investors in the VIE structure. If these actions were to occur, the market value of the fund’s investments in the VIE structure would likely fall, causing investment losses, which could be substantial, for the fund.
Emerging Markets Risk. The risks of foreign investments apply to, and may be heightened in connection with, investments in emerging market countries or securities of issuers that conduct their business in emerging markets. Emerging market countries may be more likely to experience political turmoil or rapid changes in market or economic conditions than more developed countries. Emerging market countries often have less uniformity in accounting, auditing, financial reporting and recordkeeping requirements and greater risk associated with the custody of securities. It is sometimes difficult to obtain and enforce court judgments in such countries. Material information about a company in an emerging market country may be unavailable or unreliable, and U.S. regulators may be unable to enforce a company’s regulatory obligations. There is often a greater potential for nationalization, expropriation, confiscatory taxation, government regulation, social instability or diplomatic developments (including war) in emerging market countries, which could adversely affect the economies of, or investments in securities of issuers located in, such countries. In addition, emerging markets are substantially smaller than developed markets, and the financial stability of issuers (including governments) in emerging market countries may be more precarious than in developed countries. As a result, there will tend to be an increased risk of illiquidity and price volatility associated with the fund’s investments in emerging market countries which may be magnified by currency fluctuations relative to the U.S. dollar, and, at times, it may be difficult to value such investments.
Currency Risk. The fund’s investments in securities denominated in, and/or receiving revenues in, foreign currencies, will subject the fund to the risk that those currencies will decline in value relative to the U.S. dollar. In either event, the dollar value of an investment in the fund would be adversely affected. Currency exchange rates may fluctuate in response to factors extrinsic to that country’s economy, which makes the forecasting of currency market movements extremely difficult. Currency rates in foreign countries may fluctuate significantly over short periods of time for a number of reasons, including changes in interest rates; intervention (or failure to intervene) by U.S. or foreign governments, central banks or supranational entities such as the International Monetary Fund; or by the imposition of currency controls or other political developments in the United States or abroad. These can result in losses to the fund if it is unable to deliver or receive currency
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or monies in settlement of obligations. Forward contracts on foreign currencies are not traded on exchanges; rather, a bank or dealer will act as agent or as principal in order to make or take future delivery of a specified lot of a particular currency for the fund’s account. The fund is subject to the risk of a counterparty’s failure, inability or refusal to perform with respect to such contracts.
Derivatives Risk. The fund may use derivatives to enhance returns or hedge against market declines. Examples of derivatives are options, futures, options on futures and swaps. An option is the right to buy or sell an instrument at a specific price before a specific date. A future is an agreement to buy or sell a financial instrument at a specific price on a specific day. A swap is an agreement whereby two parties agree to exchange payment streams calculated in relation to a rate, index, instrument or certain securities and a predetermined amount. The fund’s use of derivatives that are subject to regulation by the CFTC could cause the fund to become a commodity pool, which would require the fund to comply with certain CFTC rules.
The fund’s use of derivative instruments involves risks different from, or possibly greater than, the risks associated with investing directly in securities and other traditional investments. Certain of these risks, such as liquidity risk, market risk and operational risk, are discussed elsewhere in this prospectus. The fund’s use of derivatives is also subject to lack of availability risk, credit risk, leverage risk, valuation risk, correlation risk and tax risk. Lack of availability risk is the risk that suitable derivative transactions may not be available in all circumstances for risk management or other purposes. Credit risk is the risk that the counterparty to a derivatives transaction may not fulfill its obligations. Leverage risk is the risk that a small percentage of assets invested in derivatives can have a disproportionately large impact on the fund. Valuation risk is the risk that a particular derivative may be valued incorrectly. Correlation risk is the risk that changes in the value of the derivative may not correlate perfectly with the underlying asset, rate or index. Tax risk is the risk that the use of derivatives may cause the fund to realize higher amounts of short-term capital gains. The fund’s use of derivatives could reduce the fund’s performance, increase the fund’s volatility, and could cause the fund to lose more than the initial amount invested. The fund’s use of derivatives also could create a risk of counterparty default under certain transactions, risks that the fund would need to liquidate portfolio positions when it may not be advantageous to do so in order to meet margin and payment obligations, and legal risks relating to insufficient documentation, insufficient capacity or authority of a counterparty, or legality or enforceability of a contract.
Liquidity Risk. Liquidity risk exists when particular investments may be difficult to purchase, sell or value, especially during stressed market conditions. The market for certain investments may become illiquid due to specific adverse changes in the conditions of a particular issuer or under adverse market or economic conditions independent of the issuer. In such cases, the fund, due to limitations on investments in illiquid securities and the difficulty in readily purchasing and selling such securities at favorable times or prices, may decline in value, experience lower returns and/or be unable to achieve its desired level of exposure to a certain issuer or sector. Further, transactions in illiquid securities may entail transaction costs that are higher than those for transactions in liquid securities. Liquidity risk also includes the risk that market conditions or large shareholder redemptions, which may occur rapidly or unexpectedly, may impact the ability of the fund to meet redemption requests within the required time period. In order to meet such redemption requests, the fund may be forced to sell securities at inopportune times or prices.
Securities Lending Risk. The fund may lend its portfolio securities to brokers, dealers, and other financial institutions provided a number of conditions are satisfied, including that the loan is fully collateralized. When the fund lends portfolio securities, its investment performance will continue to reflect changes in the value of the securities loaned, and the fund will also receive a fee or interest on the collateral. Securities lending involves the risk of loss of rights in, or delay in recovery of, the loaned securities if the borrower fails to return the security loaned or becomes insolvent. The fund will also bear the risk of any decline in value of securities acquired with cash collateral. The fund may pay lending fees to a party arranging the loan.
Operational Risk. The fund is exposed to operational risk arising from a number of factors, including, but not limited to, human error, processing and communication errors, errors of the fund’s service providers, counterparties or other third parties, failed or inadequate processes and technology or system failures. The fund seeks to reduce these operational risks through controls and procedures believed to be reasonably designed to address these risks. However, these controls and procedures cannot address every possible risk and may not fully mitigate the risks that they are intended to address.
About the Funds
The funds in this prospectus are index funds and share the same basic investment strategy: each of the funds tracks a Russell RAFI™ Index which is based on the “Fundamental Index” methodology. In contrast to most equity indices, which generally are based on market capitalization, the Russell RAFI™ Index Series selects and weights stocks according to fundamental measures of company size: adjusted sales, retained operating cash flow, and dividends plus buybacks.
This strategy distinguishes a Fundamental Index fund from an “actively managed” mutual fund. Instead of choosing investments for a fund based on portfolio management’s judgment, an index is used to determine which securities the fund should own.
Because the composition of an index tends to be comparatively stable, index funds historically have shown low portfolio turnover compared to actively managed funds.
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The funds are designed for long-term investors. Their performance will fluctuate over time and, as with all investments, future performance may differ from past performance.
Portfolio Holdings
The funds may make various types of portfolio securities information available to shareholders. The funds post a detailed list of the securities held by each fund at www.schwabassetmanagement.com/schwabfunds_prospectus (under “Portfolio Holdings”) as of month end. This list is generally posted approximately 15-20 days after the end of the month and remains posted for at least six months. The funds also post in the fund summary section of the funds’ website and on fund fact sheets certain summary portfolio attributes, including top ten holdings, approximately 5-25 days after the end of the calendar quarter or month. The funds may exclude any portion of these portfolio holdings from publication when deemed in the best interest of a fund. Further information regarding the funds’ policy and procedures on the disclosure of portfolio holdings is available in the SAI.
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Financial Highlights
This section provides further details about each fund’s financial history for the past five years. Certain information reflects financial results for a single fund share. “Total return” shows the percentage that an investor in a fund would have earned or lost during a given period, assuming all distributions were reinvested. The information for fiscal years ended October 31, 2018 and October 31, 2019 has been audited by the funds’ prior independent registered public accounting firm. The information for the fiscal years ended October 31, 2020 through October 31, 2022 has been audited by Deloitte & Touche LLP (Deloitte). Deloitte’s full report is included in each fund’s annual report (see back cover).
Schwab Fundamental US Large Company Index Fund
11/1/21–
10/31/22
11/1/20–
10/31/21
11/1/19–
10/31/20
11/1/18–
10/31/19
11/1/17–
10/31/18
Per-Share Data
Net asset value at beginning of period $ 23.19 $ 16.28 $ 17.56 $ 17.47 $ 16.89
Income (loss) from investment operations:
Net investment income (loss)(1)
0.43 0.39 0.42 0.42 0.38
Net realized and unrealized gains (losses)
(1.33) 7.64 (0.75) 1.08 0.76
Total from investment operations
(0.90) 8.03 (0.33) 1.50 1.14
Less distributions:
Distributions from net investment income
(0.40) (0.44) (0.43) (0.42) (0.36)
Distributions from net realized gains
(0.70) (0.68) (0.52) (0.99) (0.20)
Total distributions
(1.10) (1.12) (0.95) (1.41) (0.56)
Net asset value at end of period $ 21.19 $ 23.19 $ 16.28 $ 17.56 $ 17.47
Total return (4.18%) 51.33% (2.33%) 10.56% 6.83%
Ratios/Supplemental Data
Ratios to average net assets:
Total expenses
0.25%(2) 0.25% 0.25% 0.25% 0.25%
Net investment income (loss)
1.95% 1.87% 2.57% 2.53% 2.17%
Portfolio turnover rate 13%(3) 16%(3) 13% 20% 10%
Net assets, end of period (x 1,000,000) $ 6,460 $ 6,821 $ 4,547 $ 5,237 $ 4,887
(1)
Calculated based on the average shares outstanding during the period.
?
(2)
Ratio includes less than 0.005% of non-routine proxy expenses.
(3)
Portfolio turnover rate excludes in-kind transactions.
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Schwab Fundamental US Small Company Index Fund
11/1/21–
10/31/22
11/1/20–
10/31/21
11/1/19–
10/31/20
11/1/18–
10/31/19
11/1/17–
10/31/18
Per-Share Data
Net asset value at beginning of period $ 19.32 $ 11.97 $ 13.85 $ 14.68 $ 15.32
Income (loss) from investment operations:
Net investment income (loss)(1)
0.22 0.18 0.17 0.20 0.22
Net realized and unrealized gains (losses)
(2.17) 7.38 (1.53) 0.32 0.17
Total from investment operations
(1.95) 7.56 (1.36) 0.52 0.39
Less distributions:
Distributions from net investment income
(0.24) (0.21) (0.20) (0.22) (0.21)
Distributions from net realized gains
(1.91) (0.32) (1.13) (0.82)
Total distributions
(2.15) (0.21) (0.52) (1.35) (1.03)
Net asset value at end of period $ 15.22 $ 19.32 $ 11.97 $ 13.85 $ 14.68
Total return (11.37%) 63.73% (10.42%) 5.61% 2.40%
Ratios/Supplemental Data
Ratios to average net assets:
Total expenses
0.25%(2) 0.25% 0.25% 0.25% 0.25%
Net investment income (loss)
1.35% 1.02% 1.43% 1.50% 1.42%
Portfolio turnover rate 35%(3) 36%(3) 28% 34% 30%
Net assets, end of period (x 1,000,000) $ 1,631 $ 1,945 $ 1,394 $ 1,908 $ 1,782
(1)
Calculated based on the average shares outstanding during the period.
?
(2)
Ratio includes less than 0.005% of non-routine proxy expenses.
(3)
Portfolio turnover rate excludes in-kind transactions.
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Schwab Fundamental International Large Company Index Fund
11/1/21–
10/31/22
11/1/20–
10/31/21
11/1/19–
10/31/20
11/1/18–
10/31/19
11/1/17–
10/31/18
Per-Share Data
Net asset value at beginning of period $ 10.56 $ 7.51 $ 8.98 $ 8.69 $ 9.55
Income (loss) from investment operations:
Net investment income (loss)(1)
0.34 0.31 0.21 0.30 0.29
Net realized and unrealized gains (losses)
(2.10) 2.96 (1.35) 0.27 (0.89)
Total from investment operations
(1.76) 3.27 (1.14) 0.57 (0.60)
Less distributions:
Distributions from net investment income
(0.39) (0.22) (0.33) (0.28) (0.26)
Net asset value at end of period $ 8.41 $ 10.56 $ 7.51 $ 8.98 $ 8.69
Total return (17.25%) 44.03% (13.29%) 7.04% (6.53%)
Ratios/Supplemental Data
Ratios to average net assets:
Total expenses
0.25%(2) 0.25% 0.25% 0.25% 0.25%
Net investment income (loss)
3.56% 3.10% 2.60% 3.51% 3.10%
Portfolio turnover rate 13% 21% 14% 28% 13%
Net assets, end of period (x 1,000,000) $ 1,565 $ 1,406 $ 966 $ 1,327 $ 1,349
(1)
Calculated based on the average shares outstanding during the period.
?
(2)
Ratio includes less than 0.005% of non-routine proxy expenses.
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Schwab Fundamental International Small Company Index Fund
11/1/21–
10/31/22
11/1/20–
10/31/21
11/1/19–
10/31/20
11/1/18–
10/31/19
11/1/17–
10/31/18
Per-Share Data
Net asset value at beginning of period $ 15.42 $ 11.46 $ 12.57 $ 12.67 $ 14.58
Income (loss) from investment operations:
Net investment income (loss)(1)
0.30 0.27 0.22 0.29 0.33
Net realized and unrealized gains (losses)
(4.21) 3.96 (0.97) 0.25 (1.70)
Total from investment operations
(3.91) 4.23 (0.75) 0.54 (1.37)
Less distributions:
Distributions from net investment income
(0.41) (0.27) (0.36) (0.30) (0.34)
Distributions from net realized gains
(0.44) (0.34) (0.20)
Total distributions
(0.85) (0.27) (0.36) (0.64) (0.54)
Net asset value at end of period $ 10.66 $ 15.42 $ 11.46 $ 12.57 $ 12.67
Total return (26.61%) 37.25% (6.28%) 5.13% (9.79%)
Ratios/Supplemental Data
Ratios to average net assets:
Total expenses
0.39%(2) 0.39% 0.39% 0.39% 0.39%
Net investment income (loss)
2.37% 1.84% 1.89% 2.44% 2.30%
Portfolio turnover rate 36% 35% 25% 38% 26%
Net assets, end of period (x 1,000) $ 530,184 $ 708,349 $ 576,948 $ 775,258 $ 762,630
(1)
Calculated based on the average shares outstanding during the period.
?
(2)
Ratio includes less than 0.005% of non-routine proxy expenses.
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Schwab Fundamental Emerging Markets Large Company Index Fund
11/1/21–
10/31/22
11/1/20–
10/31/21
11/1/19–
10/31/20
11/1/18–
10/31/19
11/1/17–
10/31/18
Per-Share Data
Net asset value at beginning of period $ 10.24 $ 7.51 $ 9.25 $ 8.60 $ 9.38
Income (loss) from investment operations:
Net investment income (loss)(1)
0.52 0.36 0.27 0.35 0.27
Net realized and unrealized gains (losses)
(2.96) 2.63 (1.65) 0.54