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IndexIQ ETF Trust
Prospectus
August 31, 2021
IQ Hedge Multi-Strategy Tracker ETF (QAI)
IQ Hedge Macro Tracker ETF (MCRO)
IQ Hedge Market Neutral Tracker ETF (QMN)
IQ Hedge Long/Short Tracker ETF (QLS)
IQ Hedge Event-Driven Tracker ETF (QED)
IQ Real Return ETF (CPI)
NEITHER THE SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION NOR ANY STATE SECURITIES COMMISSION HAS APPROVED OR DISAPPROVE OF THESE SECURITIES OR PASSED UPON THE ACCURACY OR ADEQUACY OF THIS PROSPECTUS. ANY REPRESENTATION TO THE CONTRARY IS A CRIMINAL OFFENSE.
As permitted by regulations adopted by the Securities and Exchange Commission, paper copies of the Funds’ shareholder reports will no longer be Sent by mail, unless you specifically request paper copies of the reports from your financial intermediary, such as a broker-dealer or bank. Instead, the reports will be available on a website, and you will be notified by mail each time a report is posted and provided with a website link to access the report.
If you already elected to receive shareholder reports electronically, you will not be affected by this change and you need not take any action. If you hold accounts through a financial intermediary, you may contact your financial intermediary to enroll in electronic delivery. Please note that not all financial intermediaries may offer this service.
You may elect to receive all future reports in paper free of charge. If you hold accounts through a financial intermediary, you can contact your financial intermediary to request that You continue to receive paper copies of your shareholder reports. Your election to receive reports in paper will apply to all funds held with your financial intermediary.
Not FDIC Insured   |   May Lose Value   |   No Bank Guarantee
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IndexIQ ETF Trust (the “Trust”) is a registered investment company that consists of separate investment Portfolios called “Funds.” This Prospectus relates to the following Funds:
Fund Name
CUSIP
Symbol
IQ Hedge Multi-Strategy Tracker ETF
45409B107
QAI
IQ Hedge Macro Tracker ETF
45409B206
MCRO
IQ Hedge Market Neutral Tracker ETF
45409B503
QMN
IQ Hedge Long/Short Tracker ETF
45409B305
QLS
IQ Hedge Event-Driven Tracker ETF
45409B404
QED
IQ Real Return ETF
45409B602
CPI
Each Fund is an exchange-traded fund (“ETF”). This means that shares of the Funds are listed on a national Securities exchange, such as the NYSE Arca, Inc. (“NYSE Arca”), and trade at market prices. The market Price for a Fund’s shares may be different from its net asset value per share (the “NAV”). Each Fund has its Own CUSIP number and exchange trading symbol.
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Summary Information
IQ Hedge Multi-Strategy Tracker ETF
Investment Objective
The Fund seeks investment results that correspond (before fees and expenses) generally to the price and yield performance of its underlying index, the IQ Hedge Multi-Strategy Index (the “Underlying Index”).
Fees and Expenses of the Fund
This table describes fees and expenses that you may pay if you buy, sell or hold shares of the Fund (“Shares”). Investors may pay other fees, such as brokerage commissions and other fees to financial intermediaries, which are not reflected in the table and example set forth below.
Shareholder Fees (fees paid directly from your investment):
None
Annual Fund Operating Expenses (expenses that you pay each year as a percentage of the value of your investment):
Management Fee 0.75%
Distribution and/or Service (12b-1) Fees 0.00%
Other Expenses 0.01%
Acquired Fund Fees & Expenses(a) 0.25%
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses(a) 1.01%
Fee Waiver(b) 0.22%
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses After Fee Waiver 0.79%
(a)
The Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses may not correlate to the ratio of expenses to average net assets as reported in the “Financial Highlights” section of the Prospectus, which reflects the operating expenses of the Fund and does not include Acquired Fund Fees & Expenses. Acquired Fund Fees & Expenses represent the Fund’s pro rata share of fees and expenses incurred indirectly as a result of investing in other funds, including ETFs and money market funds.
(b)
IndexIQ Advisors LLC (the “Advisor”) has contractually agreed, until August 31, 2022, to waive a portion of the management fee equal to 0.22% of average daily net assets.
Example. This example is intended to help you compare the cost of investing in the Fund with the cost of investing in other funds. This example does not take into account brokerage commissions that you pay when purchasing or selling Shares of the Fund.
The example assumes that you invest $10,000 in the Fund for the time periods indicated and then redeem all of your Shares at the end of those periods. The example also assumes that your investment has a 5% return each year and that the Fund’s operating expenses remain at current levels. The return of 5% and estimated expenses are for illustration purposes only, and should not be considered indicators of expected Fund expenses or performance, which may be greater or less than the estimates. Although your actual costs may be higher or lower, based on these assumptions your costs would be:
1 Year
3 Years
5 Years
10 Years
$81
$300
$536
$1,216
Portfolio Turnover
The Fund pays transaction costs, such as commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or “turns over” its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover rate may indicate higher transaction costs and may result in higher taxes when Shares are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are not reflected in annual Fund operating expenses or in the example, affect the Fund’s performance. During the most recent fiscal year, the Fund’s portfolio turnover rate was 163% of the average value of its portfolio. This rate excludes the value of portfolio securities received or delivered as a result of in-kind creations or redemptions of the Shares.
Principal Investment Strategies
The Fund is a “fund of funds” which means it invests, under normal circumstances, at least 80% of its net assets, plus the amount of any borrowings for investment purposes, in the investments included in its Underlying Index, which includes underlying funds. The Underlying Index consists of a number of components (“Underlying Index Components”) selected in accordance with IndexIQ’s rules-based methodology of such Underlying Index. Such Underlying Index Components will include primarily ETFs and/or other exchange-traded vehicles issuing
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equity securities organized in the U.S., such as exchange-traded commodity pools (“ETVs”), and may include exchange-traded notes (“ETNs”) (such ETFs, ETVs and ETNs are referred to collectively as “exchange-traded products” or “ETPs”). The Fund may also invest in one or more financial instruments, including but not limited to futures contracts and swap agreements (collectively, “Financial Instruments”).
The Fund employs a “passive management” — or indexing — investment approach designed to track the performance of the Underlying Index, which was developed by IndexIQ LLC (“IndexIQ”), an affiliate of IndexIQ Advisors LLC, the Fund’s investment advisor (the “Advisor”). The Underlying Index seeks to track the “beta” portion of the returns (i.e., that portion of the returns of hedge funds that are non-idiosyncratic, or unrelated to manager skill) of hedge funds that employ various hedge fund investment styles (the “Strategy”). These styles may include but are not limited to long/short equity, macro, market neutral, event-driven, fixed-income arbitrage, emerging markets and other strategies commonly used by hedge fund managers. The Fund does not invest in hedge funds, and the Underlying Index does not include hedge funds as Underlying Index Components. The Fund is not a fund of hedge funds.
The Underlying Index may include both long and short positions in ETFs and ETVs. As opposed to taking long positions in which an investor seeks to profit from increases in the price of a security, short selling (or “selling short”) is a technique used by the Fund to try and profit from the falling price of a security. Short selling involves selling a security that has been borrowed from a third party with the intention of buying the identical security back at a later date to return to that third party. The basic principle of short selling is that one can profit by selling a security now at a high price and later buying it back at a lower price. The short seller hopes to profit from a decline in the price of the security between the sale and the repurchase, as the seller will pay less to buy the security than it received on selling the security.
The Strategy generally seeks exposure to the following hedge fund investment styles:

Event-Driven hedge funds typically invest in a combination of credit opportunities and event-driven equities. Within the credit-oriented portion, sub-strategies include long/short high yield credit (below investment grade corporate bonds or “junk” bonds), leveraged loans (bank debt, mezzanine, or self-oriented loans), capital structure arbitrage (debt vs. debt or debt vs. equity), and reorganization equity. Within the equity portion, sub-strategies include risk (or merger) arbitrage, holding company arbitrage, special situations and value equities where a change in management, significant product launch, or some other economic catalyst is expected to unlock shareholder wealth. Event-driven managers invest across multiple asset classes and may also seek to exploit shifts in economic cycles.

Emerging Market hedge funds typically invest in financial instruments such as equities, sovereign and corporate debt issues and currencies of countries in “emerging” markets. Emerging countries are those in a transitional state from developing to developed.

Fixed Income Arbitrage hedge funds typically employ strategies that seek to take advantage of price differentials and inefficiencies between related fixed-income securities that are related either economically or statistically. Such funds may limit volatility by hedging out interest rate risk and market exposure.

Long/short hedge funds typically diversify their risks by limiting the net exposure to particular regions, industries, sectors and market capitalization bands, allowing them to focus on company-specific anomalies. At the same time, long/short managers often hedge against un-diversifiable risk, such as market risk (i.e., the returns of the overall market). Certain long/short managers focus on specific sectors, regions or industries, on particular investment styles, such as value or growth, or certain types of stocks, such as small or large.

Macro hedge funds typically employ top-down macro analysis (e.g., political trends, macroeconomics, etc.) to identify dislocations in equity, fixed-income, currency and commodity markets that are expected to lead to large price movements.

Market Neutral hedge funds typically invest in both long and short positions in stocks while minimizing exposure to the systematic components of risk. These market neutral strategies seek to have a zero “beta” ​(or “market”) exposure to one or more systematic risk factors including the overall market (as represented by the S&P 500 Index), economic sectors or industries, market capitalization, region and country. Market neutral strategies that effectively neutralize the market exposure are not impacted by directional moves in the market.
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The Underlying Index generally is based on the premise that hedge fund returns, when aggregated among hedge funds with similar investment styles, display over time significant exposures to a set of common investment strategies and asset classes. By creating an index that has similar exposures to the same investment strategies and asset classes as hedge funds generally, IndexIQ seeks to replicate the beta return characteristics of hedge funds.
The Underlying Index Components of this Strategy generally provide exposures to:

Commodities;

Emerging market equity, debt and sovereign debt, including small-capitalization equity;

Foreign currencies and currency futures;

Foreign sovereign debt and equity, including small-capitalization equity;

Municipal bonds;

The implied volatility of the S&P 500® Index;

U.S. and foreign preferred securities;

U.S. and foreign real estate investment trusts;

U.S. bank loans;

U.S. convertible debt;

U.S. floating rate bank loans;

U.S. floating rate bond;

U.S. government short-term, intermediate-term and long-term maturity bond;

U.S. growth equity;

U.S. high yield (or “junk”) debt;

U.S. investment grade corporate debt;

U.S. large-capitalization equity;

U.S. mortgage-backed debt;

U.S. small-capitalization equity;

U.S. Treasury Inflation Protection Securities (“TIPS”); and

U.S. value equity.
The Underlying Index is unlike traditional market-oriented indexes like the Standard & Poor’s 500® Composite Stock Total Return Index (the “S&P 500 Index”). Instead of tracking the performance of publicly-traded issuers representing a market or industry sector, the Underlying Index seeks to track the returns of distinct hedge fund investment styles.
The Underlying Index may include as a component one or more ETFs advised by the Advisor (“Affiliated ETFs”) and the Fund will typically invest in any Affiliated ETF included in the Underlying Index. The Fund also may invest in Affiliated ETFs that are not components of the index if such an investment will help the Fund track the Underlying Index.
The weights of the Underlying Index Components are rebalanced on a monthly basis. Annually, IndexIQ conducts a review process pursuant to which it may reconstitute the Underlying Indexes by adding or subtracting Underlying Index Components according to IndexIQ’s rules-based process.
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Principal Risks
As with all investments, there are certain risks of investing in the Fund. The Fund’s Shares will change in value and you could lose money by investing in the Fund. An investment in the Fund does not represent a complete investment program. An investment in the Fund is not a bank deposit and it is not insured or guaranteed by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation or any other government agency, the Advisor or any of its affiliates. You should consider carefully the following risks before investing in the Fund.
Authorized Participant Concentration Risk
Only certain large institutions may engage in creation or redemption transactions directly with the Fund (each, an “Authorized Participant”). The Fund has a limited number of institutions that may act as Authorized Participants on an agency basis (i.e., on behalf of other market participants). To the extent that those Authorized Participants exit the business or are unable to proceed with creation and/or redemption orders with the Fund and no other Authorized Participant is able to step forward to engage in creation and redemption transactions with the Fund, may be more likely to trade at a premium or discount to NAV and possibly face trading halts and/or delisting.
Counterparty Risk
A counterparty (the other party to a transaction or an agreement or the party with whom the Fund executes transactions) to a transaction with the Fund may be unable or unwilling to make timely principal, interest, settlement or margin payments, fulfill the delivery conditions of the contract or transaction, or otherwise honor its obligations. If a counterparty fails to meet its contractual obligations the Fund will have contractual remedies pursuant to the agreements related to the transaction but the Fund may be unable to terminate or realize any gain on the investment or transaction, resulting in a loss to the Fund. The Fund may experience significant delays in obtaining any recovery in an insolvency, bankruptcy, or other reorganization proceeding involving a counterparty (including recovery of any collateral posted by it) and may obtain limited or no recovery in such circumstances.
Cyber Security Risk
The Fund is susceptible to operational risks through breaches in cyber security. Such events may cause the Fund to lose proprietary information, suffer data corruption or lose operational capacity and could cause the Fund to incur regulatory penalties, reputational damage, additional compliance costs associated with corrective measures and/or financial loss. In addition, cyber security breaches of the securities issuers or the Fund’s third-party service providers can also subject the Fund to many of the same risks associated with direct cyber security breaches. Although the Fund has established risk management systems designed to reduce the risks associated with cyber security, there is no guarantee that such efforts will succeed.
Derivatives Risk
Derivatives are investments whose value depends on (or is derived from) the value of an underlying instrument, such as a security, asset, reference rate or index and involve risks different from, and possibly greater than, the risks associated with other investments. These risks include: (i) the risk that the counterparty to a derivatives transaction may not fulfill its contractual obligations; (ii) risk of mispricing or improper valuation; and (iii) the risk that changes in the value of the derivative may not correlate perfectly with the underlying asset. Derivative prices are highly volatile and may fluctuate substantially during a short period of time. Such prices are influenced by numerous factors that affect the markets, including, but not limited to, changing supply and demand relationships, government programs and policies, national and international political and economic events, changes in interest rates, inflation and deflation, and changes in supply and demand relationships. Unlike other investments, derivative contracts often have leverage inherent in their terms. The use of leveraged derivatives can magnify potential for gain or loss and, therefore, amplify the effects of market volatility on the Fund’s Share price. The effects of leverage may also cause the Fund to liquidate portfolio positions when it would not be advantageous to do so in order to satisfy its obligations or to meet collateral segregation requirements.
Exchange Traded Products Risk
Unlike an investment in a mutual fund, the value of the Fund’s investment in other exchange-traded funds or exchange-traded investment products (“ETPs”) is based on its market price (rather than NAV) and the Fund could lose money due to premiums/discounts of the ETP (which could cause the Fund to buy shares at market prices that are higher than their value or sell shares at market prices that are lower than their value); the failure of an active trading market to develop; or exchange trading halts or delistings. An investment in the Fund will entail more costs and expenses than a direct investment in any Underlying ETP. As the Fund’s allocations to Underlying ETPs changes, or the expense ratio of Underlying ETPs change, the operating expenses borne by the Fund from such investments may increase or decrease.
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Index Risk
There is no guarantee that the Fund’s investment results will have a high degree of correlation to those of the Underlying Index or that the Fund will achieve its investment objective. Market disruptions and regulatory restrictions could have an adverse effect on the Fund’s ability to adjust its exposure to the required levels in order to track the Underlying Index. Errors in index data, index computations or the construction of the Underlying Index in accordance with its methodology may occur from time to time and may not be identified and corrected for a period of time or at all, which may have an adverse impact on the Fund and its shareholders.
Liquidity Risk
Liquidity risk exists when particular investments are difficult to purchase or sell. Certain investments may be subject to restrictions on resale, trade over-the-counter or in limited volume, or lack an active trading market. Accordingly, the Fund may not be able to sell or close out of such investments at favorable times or prices (or at all), or at the prices approximating those at which the Fund currently values them. Illiquid securities may trade at a discount from comparable, more liquid investments and may be subject to wide fluctuations in market value.
Long/Short Risk
The Fund seeks long exposure to certain securities and short exposure to certain other securities. There is no guarantee that the returns on the Fund’s long or short positions will produce positive returns, and the Fund could lose money if either or both positions produce negative returns. In addition, the Fund may gain enhanced long exposure to certain securities (i.e., obtain investment exposure that exceeds the amount directly invested in those assets, a form of leverage) and, as a result, suffer losses that exceed the amount invested in those assets.
Market Risk
Market risks include political, regulatory, market and economic developments, including developments that impact specific economic sectors, industries or segments of the market, which may affect the Fund’s value. Turbulence in financial markets, tariffs and other protectionist measures, political developments and uncertainty, central bank policy, and reduced liquidity in equity, credit and fixed income markets may negatively affect many issuers worldwide, which could have an adverse effect on the Fund. During a general downturn in the securities markets, multiple asset classes may be negatively affected. Geopolitical and other events, including war, terrorism, economic uncertainty, trade disputes, public health crises and related geopolitical events have led, and in the future may lead, to disruptions in the US and world economies and markets, which may increase financial market volatility and have significant adverse direct or indirect effects on the Fund and its investments. Market disruptions could cause the Fund to lose money, experience significant redemptions, and encounter operational difficulties. Although multiple asset classes may be affected by a market disruption, the duration and effects may not be the same for all types of assets.
Operational Risk
The Fund is exposed to operational risks arising from a number of factors, including, but not limited to, human error, processing and communication errors, errors of the Fund’s service providers, counterparties or other third-parties, failed or inadequate processes and technology or systems failures. The Fund and Advisor seek to reduce these operational risks through controls and procedures. However, these measures do not address every possible risk and may be inadequate to address significant operational risks.
Passive Management Risk
The Fund is not actively managed and instead seeks to track the performance of an index. Passive management has the following risks associated with it:

The Fund invests in the securities included in, or representative of, the Underlying Index. The provider of the Underlying Index or the index calculation agent may make errors. The index provider may include index constituents that should have been excluded, or it may exclude index constituents that should have been included. It also may include or exclude constituents at incorrect levels. This may result in the Fund, in turn, being correctly positioned to an index that has been incorrectly calculated. This could lead to losses to the Fund.

In seeking to track the Underlying Index’s performance, the Fund may be subject to tracking error, which is the divergence of the Fund’s performance from that of the Underlying Index. Tracking error may occur because of differences between the securities and other instruments held in the Fund’s portfolio and those included in the Underlying Index, pricing differences (including, as applicable, differences
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between a security’s price at the local market close and the Fund’s valuation of a security at the time of calculation of the Fund’s NAV), differences in transaction costs, the Fund’s holding of uninvested cash, differences in timing of the accrual of or the valuation of dividends or interest, the requirements to maintain pass-through tax treatment, portfolio transactions carried out to minimize the distribution of capital gains to shareholders, changes to the Underlying Index or the costs to the Fund of complying with various new or existing regulatory requirements. Tracking error also may result because the Fund incurs fees and expenses, while the Underlying Index does not. This risk may be heightened during times of increased market volatility or other unusual market conditions

The Fund generally will not attempt to take defensive positions in declining markets and generally will not sell a security because its issuer is in financial trouble, unless that security is removed from (or was no longer useful in tracking a component of) the Underlying Index.
Portfolio Turnover Risk
The Fund’s strategy may frequently involve buying and selling portfolio securities to rebalance the Fund’s investment exposures. High portfolio turnover may result in the Fund paying higher levels of transaction costs and generating greater tax liabilities for shareholders. Portfolio turnover risk may cause the Fund’s performance to be less than expected.
Secondary Market Trading Risk
Although the Fund’s Shares are listed for trading on one or more securities exchanges, there can be no assurance that an active trading market for such Shares will develop or be maintained by market makers or Authorized Participants. In general, the trading of Shares on securities exchanges is subject to the risk of irregular trading activity and wide “bid/ask” spreads (which may be especially pronounced for smaller funds). Additionally, market makers are under no obligation to make a market in the Fund’s Shares and Authorized Participants are not obligated to submit purchase or redemption orders for Creation Units. In the event market makers cease making a market in the Fund’s Shares or Authorized Participants stop submitting purchase or redemption orders for Creation Units, the Fund’s Shares may trade at a larger premium or discount to its NAV. Wide bid-ask spreads and large premiums or discounts to NAV are likely to lead to an investor buying his or her shares at a market price that is more than their value, and selling those shares at a market price that is less than their value.
Swap Agreements Risk
Swap agreements may involve greater risks than direct investment in securities as they may be leveraged and are subject to credit risk, counterparty risk, liquidity risk and valuation risk. A swap agreement could result in losses if the underlying reference or asset does not perform as anticipated. In addition, many swaps trade over-the-counter and may be considered illiquid. It may not be possible for the Fund to liquidate a swap position at an advantageous time or price, which may result in significant losses.
Short Sales Risk
Short sales are transactions in which the Fund sells a security it does not own, or uses derivatives, such as futures or swaps, to effect short exposure to a particular reference asset. Such a position subjects the Fund to the risk that instead of declining, the price of the security or reference asset to which the Fund has short exposure will rise. If the price of the security or reference asset increases between the date of the short sale and the date on which the Fund replaces the security or otherwise closes out its short position, the Fund will experience a loss, which is theoretically unlimited since there is a theoretically unlimited potential for the market price of a security or other instrument sold short to increase.
Trading Price Risk
Shares of the Fund trade on securities exchanges at prices at, above or below the Fund’s most recent NAV. The NAV of the Fund is calculated at the end of each business day and fluctuates with changes in the market value of the Fund’s holdings. The trading price of the Fund’s Shares fluctuates continuously throughout trading hours based on both market supply of and demand for Shares and the underlying value of the Fund’s portfolio holdings or NAV. As a result, the trading prices of the Fund’s Shares may deviate significantly from NAV during periods of market volatility. Any of these factors, among others, may lead to the Fund’s Shares trading at a premium or discount to NAV. Although it is generally expected that the market price of the Shares of the Fund will approximate the Fund’s NAV, there may be times when the market price and the NAV vary significantly. Thus, an investor may pay more than NAV when purchasing Shares and receive less than NAV when selling Shares.
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Risks of Underlying ETPs
The Fund may invest in the securities of other ETPs, including Affiliated ETFs. Investments in the Fund are subject to the risks associated with an investment in the Underlying ETPs. In addition to the risks described above, the following risks should also be considered when making an investment in the Fund.

Asset-Backed Securities Risk. Asset-backed securities are securities that represent interests in, and whose values and payments are based on, a “pool” of underlying assets, which may include, among others, lower-rated debt securities and corporate loans, consumer loans or mortgages and leases of property. Asset-backed securities include collateralized debt obligations, collateralized bond obligations, and collateralized loan obligations and other similarly structured vehicles. As with other debt securities, asset-backed securities are subject to credit risk, extension risk, interest rate risk, liquidity risk and valuation risk. The impairment of the value of collateral or other assets underlying an asset-backed security, such as a result of non-payment of loans or non-performance of underlying assets, may result in a reduction in the value of such asset-backed securities and losses to the Fund.
Investments in mortgage-related securities make an investor more susceptible to adverse economic, interest rate, political or regulatory events that affect the value of real estate. Mortgage-related securities are also significantly affected by the rate of prepayments. Impairment of the underlying obligations or collateral, such as by non-payment, will reduce a mortgage-related security’s value.

Commodities Risk. Exposure to the commodities markets may subject the Fund to greater volatility than investments in traditional securities, and exposure to commodities, directly or through other securities, can cause the value of the Fund’s assets to decline or fluctuate in a rapid and unpredictable manner. The value of commodities may be affected by changes in overall market movements, real or perceived inflationary trends, commodity index volatility, changes in interest rates or currency exchange rates, population growth and changing demographics, international economic, political and regulatory developments, and factors affecting a particular region, industry or commodity, such as drought, floods, or other weather conditions, livestock disease, changes in storage costs, trade embargoes, competition from substitute products, transportation bottlenecks or shortages, fluctuations in supply and demand, and tariffs.

Convertible Securities Risk. A convertible security has characteristics of both equity and debt securities and, as a result, is exposed to risks that are typically associated with both types of securities. Convertible securities are typically subordinate to an issuer’s other debt obligations. Issuers of convertible securities may be more vulnerable to changes in the economy, such as a recession or a sustained period of rising interest rates, which could affect their ability to make interest and principal payments. If an issuer stops making interest and/or principal payments, the Fund could lose its entire investment.

Credit Risk. Credit risk is the risk that the issuer or guarantor of a debt instrument or the counterparty to a derivatives contract, repurchase agreement or loan of portfolio securities will be unable or unwilling to make its timely interest and/or principal payments when due or otherwise honor its obligations. Changes in an issuer’s or counterparty’s credit rating or the market’s perception of an issuer’s or counterparty’s creditworthiness may also adversely affect the value of the Fund’s investment in that issuer. The degree of credit risk depends on an issuer’s or counterparty’s financial condition and on the terms of an obligation.

Currency Risk. Investments directly in foreign (non-U.S.) currencies or in securities that trade in, and receive revenues in, foreign (non-U.S.) currencies are subject to the risk that those currencies will decline in value relative to the U.S. dollar or, in the case of hedging positions, that the U.S. dollar will decline in value relative to the currency being hedged. Currency rates in foreign countries may fluctuate significantly over short periods of time for a number of reasons, including changes in interest rates, intervention (or the failure to intervene) by U.S. or foreign governments, central banks or supranational entities such as the International Monetary Fund, or by the imposition of currency controls or other political developments in the United States or abroad.

Debt Securities Risk. The risks of investing in debt securities include (without limitation): (i) credit risk, e.g., the issuer or guarantor of a debt security may be unable or unwilling (or be perceived as unable or unwilling) to make timely principal and/or interest payments or otherwise honor its obligations; (ii) interest rate risk, e.g., when interest rates go up, the value of a debt security generally goes down, and when interest rates go down, the value of a debt security generally goes up; (iii) liquidity risk and valuation risk,
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e.g., debt securities generally do not trade on a securities exchange, making them generally less liquid and more difficult to value than common stock; (iv) call risk and income risk, e.g., during a period of falling interest rates, the issuer may redeem a security by repaying it early, which may reduce the Fund’s income if the proceeds are reinvested at lower interest rates; and (v) extension risk, e.g., if interest rates rise, repayments of debt securities may occur more slowly than anticipated by the market, which may drive the prices of these securities down because their interest rates are lower than the current interest rate and the securities remain outstanding longer. Debt securities most frequently trade in institutional round lot size transactions. If the Fund purchases bonds in amounts less than the institutional round lot size, which are frequently referred to as “odd” lots, the odd lot size positions may have more price volatility than institutional round lot size positions. The Fund uses a third-party pricing service to value bond holdings and the pricing service values bonds assuming orderly transactions of an institutional round lot size.

Emerging Markets Securities Risk. Securities of issuers based in countries with developing economies (emerging market countries) may present market, credit, currency, liquidity, legal, political and other risks different from, or greater than, the risks of investing in developed market countries and are generally considered speculative in nature. Emerging market countries are subject to greater market volatility, lower trading volume, political and economic instability, uncertainty regarding the existence of trading markets, rapid inflation, possible repatriation of investment income and capital, currency convertibility issues, less uniform accounting standards and more governmental limitations on foreign investment than more developed markets. Laws regarding foreign investment in emerging market securities, securities regulation, title to securities, and shareholder rights may change quickly and unpredictably. In addition, the enforcement of systems of taxation at federal, regional and local levels in emerging market countries may be inconsistent and subject to sudden change.

Emerging Markets Sovereign Debt Risk. Government obligors in emerging market countries are among the world’s largest debtors to commercial banks, other governments, international financial organizations and other financial institutions. Historically, certain issuers of the government debt securities in which an Underlying ETP may invest have experienced substantial difficulties in meeting their external debt obligations, resulting in defaults on certain obligations and the restructuring of certain indebtedness, which could result in losses to an Underlying ETP.

Equity Securities Risk. Investments in common stocks and other equity securities are particularly subject to the risk of changes in investors’ perceptions of the financial condition of an issuer, conditions affecting equity markets generally and political and/or economic events. Equity prices may also be particularly sensitive to rising interest rates, as the cost of capital rises and borrowing costs increase. Holders of an issuer’s common stock may be subject to greater risks than holders of its preferred stock and debt securities because common stockholders’ claims are subordinated to those of holders of preferred stocks and debt securities upon the bankruptcy of an issuer.

Foreign Securities Risk. Investments in the securities of non-U.S. issuers involve risks beyond those associated with investments in U.S. securities. These additional risks include greater market volatility, the availability of less reliable financial information, higher transactional and custody costs, taxation by foreign governments, decreased market liquidity and political instability. Some countries and regions have experienced security concerns, war or threats of war and aggression, terrorism, economic uncertainty, natural and environmental disasters and/or systemic market dislocations that have led, and in the future may lead, to increased short-term market volatility and may have adverse long-term effects on the U.S. and world economies and markets generally. Foreign issuers are often subject to less stringent requirements regarding accounting, auditing, financial reporting and record keeping than are U.S. issuers, and therefore not all material information will be available. Securities exchanges or foreign governments may adopt rules or regulations that may negatively impact the Fund’s ability to invest in foreign securities or may prevent the Fund from repatriating its investments. Less developed securities markets are more likely to experience problems with the clearing and settling of trades, as well as the holding of securities by local banks, agents and depositories. The less developed a country’s securities market is, the greater the likelihood of custody problems.

High Yield Securities Risk. High yield securities, or “junk” bonds, generally offer a higher current yield than the yield available from higher grade issues, but are subject to greater market fluctuations, are less liquid
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and provide a greater risk of loss than investment grade securities, and therefore are considered to be highly speculative. In general, high yield securities may have a greater risk of default than other types of securities and could cause income and principal losses for the Fund.

Interest Rate Risk. An increase in interest rates may cause the value of securities held by the Fund to decline. Fixed income securities with longer durations tend to be more sensitive to changes in interest rates, making them more volatile than securities with shorter durations or floating or adjustable interest rates. The negative impact on the Fund from potential interest rate increases could be swift and significant, including falling market values, increased redemptions and reduced liquidity. The Fund may be subject to a greater risk of rising interest rates than would normally be the case due to the current period of historically low rates and the effect of potential government fiscal policy initiatives and resulting market reaction to those initiatives.
When interest rates rise, certain obligations will be paid off by the issuer (or other obligated party) more slowly than anticipated, causing the value of these securities to fall. As a result, in a period of rising interest rates, securities may exhibit additional volatility and may lose value. The value of securities with longer maturities generally changes more in response to changes in interest rates than does the value of securities with shorter maturities.
During periods of falling interest rates, an issuer of a callable security held by the Fund may “call” or repay the security before its stated maturity, which may result in the Fund having to reinvest the proceeds in securities with lower yields, resulting in a decline in the Fund’s income, or in securities with greater risks or with other less favorable features.
The terms of floating rate notes and other instruments may be tied to the London Interbank Offered Rate (“LIBOR”), which functions as a reference rate or benchmark. It is anticipated that LIBOR will be discontinued at the end of 2021, which may cause increased volatility and illiquidity in the markets for instruments with terms tied to LIBOR or other adverse consequences, such as decreased yields and reduction in value, for these instruments. These events may adversely affect the Fund and its investments in such instruments.

Municipal Bond Risk. Issuers, including governmental issuers, may be unable to pay their obligations as they come due. The values of Municipal Bonds that depend on a specific revenue source to fund their payment obligations may fluctuate as a result of actual or anticipated changes in the cash flows generated by the revenue source or changes in the priority of the municipal obligation to receive the cash flows generated by the revenue source. The values of Municipal Bonds held by the Fund may be adversely affected by local political and economic conditions and developments. Adverse conditions in an industry significant to a local economy could have a correspondingly adverse effect on the financial condition of local issuers. This risk would be heightened to the extent that the Fund invests a substantial portion of its assets in Municipal Bonds issued pursuant to similar projects or whose interest is paid solely from revenues of similar projects. In addition, income from Municipal Bonds held by the Fund could be declared taxable because of, among other things, unfavorable changes in tax laws, adverse interpretations by the Internal Revenue Service or state tax authorities, or noncompliant conduct of an issuer or other obligated party. Loss of tax-exempt status may cause interest received and distributed to shareholders by the Fund to be taxable and may result in a significant decline in the values of such municipal securities. There are various different types of Municipal Bonds, each with its own unique risk profile. Some of these risks include:

General Obligation Bonds Risk — timely payments depend on the issuer’s credit quality, ability to raise tax revenues and ability to maintain an adequate tax base;

Revenue Bonds (including Industrial Development Bonds) Risk — timely payments depend on the money earned by the particular facility or class of facilities, or the amount of revenues derived from another source, and may be negatively impacted by the general credit of the user of the facility;

Private Activity Bonds Risk — municipalities and other public authorities issue private activity bonds to finance development of industrial facilities for use by a private enterprise, which is solely responsible for paying the principal and interest on the bonds, and payment under these bonds depends on the private enterprise’s ability to do so;

Moral Obligation Bonds Risk — moral obligation bonds are generally issued by special purpose public authorities of a state or municipality. If the issuer is unable to meet its obligations, repayment of these bonds becomes a moral commitment, but not a legal obligation, of the state or municipality;
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Municipal Notes Risk — municipal notes are shorter-term municipal debt obligations that pay interest that is, in the opinion of bond counsel for the issuer at the time of issuance, generally excludable from gross income for federal income tax purposes (except that the interest may be includable in taxable income for purposes of the federal alternative minimum tax) and that have a maturity that is generally one year or less. If there is a shortfall in the anticipated proceeds, the notes may not be fully repaid and the Fund may lose money; and

Municipal Lease Obligations Risk — in a municipal lease obligation, the issuer agrees to make payments when due on the lease obligation. Although the issuer does not pledge its unlimited taxing power for payment of the lease obligation, the lease obligation is secured by the leased property.

Preferred Securities Risk. Preferred securities combine some of the characteristics of both common stocks and bonds. Preferred securities are typically subordinated to bonds and other debt securities in a company’s capital structure in terms of priority to corporate income, subjecting them to greater credit risk than those debt securities. Generally, holders of preferred securities have no voting rights with respect to the issuing company unless preferred dividends have been in arrears for a specified number of periods, at which time the preferred security holders may obtain limited rights. In certain circumstances, an issuer of preferred securities may defer payment on the securities and, in some cases, redeem the securities prior to a specified date. Preferred securities may also be substantially less liquid than other securities, including common stock.

Real Estate Companies Risk. An investment in companies that invest in real estate (including REITs) exposes the Fund to the risks of the real estate market and the risks associated with the ownership of real estate. These risks can include fluctuations in the value of or destruction of underlying properties; realignment in tenant living and work habits (for example, movements to and from different parts of a nation, a region, a state or a city); tenant or borrower default; market saturation; changes in general and local economic conditions; decreases in market rates for rents; increases in vacancies; competition; property taxes; capital expenditures or operating expenses; other economic or political events affecting the real estate industry including interest rates and government regulation; concentration in a limited number of properties, geographic regions or property types; and low quality and/or conflicted management. Real estate is generally a less liquid asset class and companies that hold real estate may not be able to liquidate or modify their holdings quickly in response to changes in economic or other market conditions. Additionally, such companies may utilize leverage, which increases investment risk and the potential for more volatility in the Fund’s returns.

Small- and/or Mid-Capitalization Companies Risk. Small- and mid-capitalization companies may be more vulnerable to adverse general market or economic developments, and their securities may be less liquid and may experience greater price volatility than larger, more established companies.

Variable and Floating Rate Instruments Risk. Variable and floating rate instruments include debt securities issued by corporate and governmental entities, bank loans, mortgage-backed securities and asset-backed securities, preferred equity securities and derivative variable rate securities, such as inverse floaters. Variable and floating rate instruments are structured so that the instrument’s coupon rate fluctuates based upon the level of a reference rate. A variable or floating rate instrument’s coupon rate resets periodically according to its terms. Consequently, in a rising interest rate environment, variable and floating rate instruments with coupon rates that reset infrequently may lag behind the changes in market interest rates.

VIX Exposure Risk. The Fund may invest in investment products whose value is linked to the performance of the Cboe Volatility Index (the “VIX Index”). The VIX Index seeks to measure the 30-day expected volatility of the S&P 500 Index, as calculated based on the prices of certain put and call options on the S&P 500 Index. Products providing exposure to the VIX Index are not able to invest directly in the components of the VIX Index, but rather generally gain exposure to the VIX Index’s performance by purchasing or selling futures contracts on the VIX Index. The level of the S&P 500 Index, the prices of options on the S&P 500 Index, the level of the VIX Index itself and the value of futures contracts on the VIX Index may change suddenly and unpredictably, and may negatively affect the value of the Fund’s investments in VIX Index-linked products. In addition, the actual volatility of the S&P 500 Index may not conform to a level predicted by the VIX Index or to the prices of the included put and call options. Several factors may affect the price of the VIX Index, including, but not limited to: market prices and forward volatility levels; expectations that volatility as measured by the VIX Index will fluctuate; supply
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and demand of VIX Index futures and listed and over-the-counter equity derivative markets; international or domestic political, economic, geographic or financial events; natural disasters; and changes in legal and regulatory regimes in the United States.
Valuation Risk
Independent market quotations for certain investments held by the Fund may not be readily available, and such investments may be fair valued or valued by a pricing service at an evaluated price. These valuations involve subjectivity and different market participants may assign different prices to the same investment. As a result, there is a risk that the Fund may not be able to sell an investment at the price assigned to the investment by the Fund. In addition, the value of the securities or other assets in the Fund’s portfolio may change on days or during time periods when shareholders will not be able to purchase or sell the Fund’s Shares.
Performance Information
The bar chart that follows shows the annual total returns of the Fund for a full calendar year. The table that follows the bar chart shows the Fund’s average annual total returns, both before and after taxes. The bar chart and table provide an indication of the risks of investing in the Fund by comparing the Fund’s performance from year to year and by showing how the Fund’s average annual returns for one calendar year compared with its underlying index and additional broad measures of market performance. The HFRI Fund of Funds Composite Index is an equally weighted hedge fund index including over 650 domestic and off-shore funds of funds. The S&P 500® Index is a broad-based unmanaged index of 500 stocks, which is designed to represent the equity market in general (performance data assumes reinvestment of dividends, but it does not reflect management fees, transaction costs or other expenses).
All returns assume reinvestment of dividends and distributions. The Fund’s past performance (before and after taxes) is not necessarily an indication of how the Fund will perform in the future. Performance reflects fee waivers and/or expense reimbursement in effect, if such waivers or reimbursements were not in place, the Fund’s performance would be reduced. Fund performance current to the most recent month-end is available by calling 1-888-474-7725 or by visiting newyorklifeinvestments.com.
[MISSING IMAGE: tm2123983d1-bc_multibw.jpg]
The Fund’s year-to-date total return as of June 30, 2021 was 1.28%.
Best and Worst Quarter Returns (for the period reflected in the bar chart above)
Return
Quarter/Year
Highest Return 6.45% 2Q/2020
Lowest Return -7.48% 1Q/2020
Average Annual Total Returns as of December 31, 2020
1 Year
5 Years
10 Years
Returns before taxes 5.56% 3.49% 2.70%
Returns after taxes on distributions(1) 4.75% 3.02% 2.26%
Returns after taxes on distributions and sale of Fund Shares(1) 3.32% 2.49% 1.92%
IQ Hedge Multi-Strategy Index
(reflects no deduction for fees, expenses or taxes)
6.26% 4.26% 3.56%
HFRI Fund of Funds Composite Index(2)
(reflects no deduction for fees, expenses or taxes)
10.88% 4.56% 3.32%
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1 Year
5 Years
10 Years
S&P 500® Index
(reflects no deduction for fees, expenses or taxes)
17.75% 14.53% 13.18%
(1)
After-tax returns are calculated using the highest historical individual federal marginal income tax rates and do not reflect the impact of state and local taxes. Actual after-tax returns depend on your tax situation and may differ from those shown and are not relevant if you hold your Shares through tax-deferred arrangements, such as 401(k) plans or individual retirement accounts. In some cases the return after taxes may exceed the return before taxes due to an assumed tax benefit from any losses on a sale of Fund Shares at the end of the measurement period.
(2)
HFRI Fund of Funds Composite Index is calculated from March 31, 2009. Performance information for the Fund in the table above also includes the performance of HFRI Fund of Funds Composite Index. Because index comparisons are generally calculated as of the end of each month, index performance information under the “Since Inception” heading may not be coincident with the inception date of the Fund. In such instances, index performance is generally presented from the month-end nearest to the inception date of the Fund.
Investment Advisor
IndexIQ Advisors LLC is the investment advisor to the Fund.
Portfolio Manager
The professionals jointly and primarily responsible for the day-to-day management of the Fund are Greg Barrato and James Harrison. Mr. Barrato, Senior Vice President of the Advisor, has been a portfolio manager of the Fund since February 2011 and Mr. Harrison, Vice President of the Advisor, has been a portfolio manager of the Fund since April 2018.
Purchase and Sale of Fund Shares
Unlike conventional mutual funds, the Fund issues and redeems Shares on a continuous basis, at NAV, only in large blocks of Shares called “Creation Units.” Individual Shares of the Fund may only be purchased and sold on the secondary market through a broker-dealer. Since Shares of the Fund trade on securities exchanges in the secondary market at their market price rather than their NAV, the Fund’s Shares may trade at a price greater than (premium) or less than (discount) the Fund’s NAV. An investor may incur costs attributable to the difference between the highest price a buyer is willing to pay to purchase Shares of the Fund (bid) and the lowest price a seller is willing to accept for Shares of the Fund (ask) when buying or selling Shares in the secondary market (the “bid-ask spread”). Recent information, including the Fund’s NAV, market price, premiums and discounts, and bid-ask spreads, is available online at newyorklifeinvestments.com.
Tax Information
The Fund’s distributions are expected to be taxed as ordinary income, qualified dividend income and/or capital gains, unless you are investing through a tax-deferred arrangement, such as a 401(k) plan or individual retirement account. However, subsequent withdrawals from such a tax-advantaged account may be subject to U.S. federal income tax. You should consult your tax advisor about your specific situation.
Financial Intermediary Compensation
If you purchase the Fund through a broker-dealer or other financial intermediary (such as a bank), the Advisor or other related companies may pay the intermediary for marketing activities and presentations, educational training programs, conferences, the development of technology platforms and reporting systems or other services related to the sale or promotion of the Fund. These payments may create a conflict of interest by influencing the broker-dealer or other intermediary and your salesperson to recommend the Fund over another investment. Ask your salesperson or visit your financial intermediary’s website for more information.
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Summary Information
IQ Hedge Macro Tracker ETF
Investment Objective
The Fund seeks investment results that correspond (before fees and expenses) generally to the price and yield performance of its underlying index, the IQ Hedge Macro Index (the “Underlying Index”).
Fees and Expenses of the Fund
This table describes fees and expenses that you may pay if you buy, sell or hold shares of the Fund (“Shares”). Investors may pay other fees, such as brokerage commissions and other fees to financial intermediaries, which are not reflected in the table and example set forth below.
Shareholder Fees (fees paid directly from your investment):
None
Annual Fund Operating Expenses (expenses that you pay each year as a percentage of the value of your investment):
Management Fee 0.75%
Distribution and/or Service (12b-1) Fees 0.00%
Other Expenses 0.01%
Acquired Fund Fees & Expenses(a) 0.26%
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses(a) 1.02%
Fee Waiver(b) 0.35%
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses After Fee Waiver 0.67%
(a)
The Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses may not correlate to the ratio of expenses to average net assets as reported in the “Financial Highlights” section of the Prospectus, which reflects the operating expenses of the Fund and does not include Acquired Fund Fees & Expenses. Acquired Fund Fees & Expenses represent the Fund’s pro rata share of fees and expenses incurred indirectly as a result of investing in other funds, including ETFs and money market funds.
(b)
IndexIQ Advisors LLC (the “Advisor”) has contractually agreed, until August 31, 2022, to waive a portion of the management fee equal to 0.35% of average daily net assets.
Example. This example is intended to help you compare the cost of investing in the Fund with the cost of investing in other funds. This example does not take into account brokerage commissions that you pay when purchasing or selling Shares of the Fund.
The example assumes that you invest $10,000 in the Fund for the time periods indicated and then redeem all of your Shares at the end of those periods. The example also assumes that your investment has a 5% return each year and that the Fund’s operating expenses remain at current levels. The return of 5% and estimated expenses are for illustration purposes only, and should not be considered indicators of expected Fund expenses or performance, which may be greater or less than the estimates. Although your actual costs may be higher or lower, based on these assumptions your costs would be:
1 Year
3 Years
5 Years
10 Years
$68
$290
$529
$1,216
Portfolio Turnover
The Fund pays transaction costs, such as commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or “turns over” its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover rate may indicate higher transaction costs and may result in higher taxes when Shares are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are not reflected in annual Fund operating expenses or in the example, affect the Fund’s performance. During the most recent fiscal year, the Fund’s portfolio turnover rate was 104% of the average value of its portfolio. This rate excludes the value of portfolio securities received or delivered as a result of in-kind creations or redemptions of the Shares.
Principal Investment Strategies
The Fund is a “fund of funds” which means it invests, under normal circumstances, at least 80% of its net assets, plus the amount of any borrowings for investment purposes, in the investments included in its Underlying Index, which includes underlying funds. The Underlying Index consists of a number of components (“Underlying Index Components”) selected in accordance with IndexIQ’s rules-based methodology of such Underlying Index. Such Underlying Index Components will include primarily ETFs and/or other exchange-traded vehicles issuing
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equity securities organized in the U.S., such as exchange-traded commodity pools (“ETVs”), and may include exchange-traded notes (“ETNs”) (such ETFs, ETVs and ETNs are referred to collectively as “exchange-traded products” or “ETPs”). The Fund may also invest in one or more financial instruments, including but not limited to futures contracts and swap agreements (collectively, “Financial Instruments”).
The Fund employs a “passive management” — or indexing — investment approach designed to track the performance of the Underlying Index, which was developed by IndexIQ LLC (“IndexIQ”), an affiliate of IndexIQ Advisors LLC, the Fund’s investment advisor (the “Advisor”). The Underlying Index seeks to track the “beta” portion of the returns (i.e., that portion of the returns of hedge funds that are non-idiosyncratic, or unrelated to manager skill) of a combination of hedge funds pursuing a macro strategy and hedge funds pursuing an emerging markets strategy (the “Strategy”). Macro hedge funds typically employ top-down macro analysis (e.g., political trends, macroeconomics, etc.) to identify dislocations in equity, fixed-income, currency and commodity markets that are expected to lead to large price movements. Emerging Market hedge funds typically invest in financial instruments such as equities, sovereign and corporate debt issues and currencies of countries in “emerging” markets. Emerging market countries are those in a transitional state from developing to developed. The Fund does not invest in hedge funds, and the Underlying Index does not include hedge funds as Underlying Index Components. The Fund is not a fund of hedge funds.
The Underlying Index may include both long and short positions in ETFs and ETVs. As opposed to taking long positions in which an investor seeks to profit from increases in the price of a security, short selling (or “selling short”) is a technique used by the Fund to try and profit from the falling price of a security. Short selling involves selling a security that has been borrowed from a third party with the intention of buying the identical security back at a later date to return to that third party. The basic principle of short selling is that one can profit by selling a security now at a high price and later buying it back at a lower price. The short seller hopes to profit from a decline in the price of the security between the sale and the repurchase, as the seller will pay less to buy the security than it received on selling the security.
The Underlying Index generally is based on the premise that hedge fund returns, when aggregated among hedge funds with similar investment styles, display over time significant exposures to a set of common investment strategies and asset classes. By creating an index that has similar exposures to the same investment strategies and asset classes as hedge funds generally, IndexIQ seeks to replicate the beta return characteristics of hedge funds.
The Underlying Index Components of this Strategy generally provide exposures to:

Commodities;

Emerging market equity, debt and sovereign debt, including small-capitalization equity;

Foreign currencies and currency futures;

Foreign sovereign debt and equity, including small-capitalization equity;

U.S. and foreign real estate investment trusts;

U.S. floating rate bond;

U.S. government short-term, intermediate-term and long-term maturity bond;

U.S. growth equity;

U.S. high yield (or “junk”) debt;

U.S. investment grade corporate debt;

U.S. small-capitalization equity;

U.S. large-capitalization equity; and

U.S. value equity.
The Underlying Index is unlike traditional market-oriented indexes like the Standard & Poor’s 500® Composite Stock Total Return Index (the “S&P 500 Index”). Instead of tracking the performance of publicly-traded issuers representing a market or industry sector, the Underlying Index seeks to track the returns of distinct hedge fund investment styles.
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The Underlying Index may include as a component one or more ETFs advised by the Advisor (“Affiliated ETFs”) and the Fund will typically invest in any Affiliated ETF included in the Underlying Index. The Fund also may invest in Affiliated ETFs that are not components of the index if such an investment will help the Fund track the Underlying Index.
The weights of the Underlying Index Components are rebalanced on a monthly basis. Annually, IndexIQ conducts a review process pursuant to which it may reconstitute the Underlying Indexes by adding or subtracting Underlying Index Components according to IndexIQ’s rules-based process.
Principal Risks
As with all investments, there are certain risks of investing in the Fund. The Fund’s Shares will change in value and you could lose money by investing in the Fund. An investment in the Fund does not represent a complete investment program. An investment in the Fund is not a bank deposit and it is not insured or guaranteed by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation or any other government agency, the Advisor or any of its affiliates. You should consider carefully the following risks before investing in the Fund.
Authorized Participant Concentration Risk
Only certain large institutions may engage in creation or redemption transactions directly with the Fund (each, an “Authorized Participant”). The Fund has a limited number of institutions that may act as Authorized Participants on an agency basis (i.e., on behalf of other market participants). To the extent that those Authorized Participants exit the business or are unable to proceed with creation and/or redemption orders with the Fund and no other Authorized Participant is able to step forward to engage in creation and redemption transactions with the Fund, Shares may be more likely to trade at a premium or discount to NAV and possibly face trading halts and/or delisting.
Convertible Securities Risk
A convertible security has characteristics of both equity and debt securities and, as a result, is exposed to risks that are typically associated with both types of securities. Convertible securities are typically subordinate to an issuer’s other debt obligations. Issuers of convertible securities may be more vulnerable to changes in the economy, such as a recession or a sustained period of rising interest rates, which could affect their ability to make interest and principal payments. If an issuer stops making interest and/or principal payments, the Fund could lose its entire investment.
Counterparty Risk
A counterparty (the other party to a transaction or an agreement or the party with whom the Fund executes transactions) to a transaction with the Fund may be unable or unwilling to make timely principal, interest, settlement or margin payments, fulfill the delivery conditions of the contract or transaction, or otherwise honor its obligations. If a counterparty fails to meet its contractual obligations the Fund will have contractual remedies pursuant to the agreements related to the transaction but the Fund may be unable to terminate or realize any gain on the investment or transaction, resulting in a loss to the Fund. The Fund may experience significant delays in obtaining any recovery in an insolvency, bankruptcy, or other reorganization proceeding involving a counterparty (including recovery of any collateral posted by it) and may obtain limited or no recovery in such circumstances.
Cyber Security Risk
The Fund is susceptible to operational risks through breaches in cyber security. Such events may cause the Fund to lose proprietary information, suffer data corruption or lose operational capacity and could cause the Fund to incur regulatory penalties, reputational damage, additional compliance costs associated with corrective measures and/or financial loss. In addition, cyber security breaches of the securities issuers or the Fund’s third-party service providers can also subject the Fund to many of the same risks associated with direct cyber security breaches. Although the Fund has established risk management systems designed to reduce the risks associated with cyber security, there is no guarantee that such efforts will succeed.
Derivatives Risk
Derivatives are investments whose value depends on (or is derived from) the value of an underlying instrument, such as a security, asset, reference rate or index and involve risks different from, and possibly greater than, the risks associated with other investments. These risks include: (i) the risk that the counterparty to a derivatives transaction may not fulfill its contractual obligations; (ii) risk of mispricing or improper valuation; and (iii) the risk that changes in the value of the derivative may not correlate perfectly with the underlying asset. Derivative prices are highly volatile and may fluctuate substantially during a short period of time. Such prices are
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influenced by numerous factors that affect the markets, including, but not limited to, changing supply and demand relationships, government programs and policies, national and international political and economic events, changes in interest rates, inflation and deflation, and changes in supply and demand relationships. Unlike other investments, derivative contracts often have leverage inherent in their terms. The use of leveraged derivatives can magnify potential for gain or loss and, therefore, amplify the effects of market volatility on the Fund’s Share price. The effects of leverage may also cause the Fund to liquidate portfolio positions when it would not be advantageous to do so in order to satisfy its obligations or to meet collateral segregation requirements.
Exchange Traded Products Risk
Unlike an investment in a mutual fund, the value of the Fund’s investment in other exchange-traded funds or exchange-traded investment products (“ETPs”) is based on its market price (rather than NAV) and the Fund could lose money due to premiums/discounts of the ETP (which could cause the Fund to buy shares at market prices that are higher than their value or sell shares at market prices that are lower than their value); the failure of an active trading market to develop; or exchange trading halts or delistings. An investment in the Fund will entail more costs and expenses than a direct investment in any Underlying ETP. As the Fund’s allocations to Underlying ETPs changes, or the expense ratio of Underlying ETPs change, the operating expenses borne by the Fund from such investments may increase or decrease.
Index Risk
There is no guarantee that the Fund’s investment results will have a high degree of correlation to those of the Underlying Index or that the Fund will achieve its investment objective. Market disruptions and regulatory restrictions could have an adverse effect on the Fund’s ability to adjust its exposure to the required levels in order to track the Underlying Index. Errors in index data, index computations or the construction of the Underlying Index in accordance with its methodology may occur from time to time and may not be identified and corrected for a period of time or at all, which may have an adverse impact on the Fund and its shareholders.
Liquidity Risk
Liquidity risk exists when particular investments are difficult to purchase or sell. Certain investments may be subject to restrictions on resale, trade over-the-counter or in limited volume, or lack an active trading market. Accordingly, the Fund may not be able to sell or close out of such investments at favorable times or prices (or at all), or at the prices approximating those at which the Fund currently values them. Illiquid securities may trade at a discount from comparable, more liquid investments and may be subject to wide fluctuations in market value.
Long/Short Risk
The Fund seeks long exposure to certain securities and short exposure to certain other securities. There is no guarantee that the returns on the Fund’s long or short positions will produce positive returns, and the Fund could lose money if either or both positions produce negative returns. In addition, the Fund may gain enhanced long exposure to certain securities (i.e., obtain investment exposure that exceeds the amount directly invested in those assets, a form of leverage) and, as a result, suffer losses that exceed the amount invested in those assets.
Market Risk
Market risks include political, regulatory, market and economic developments, including developments that impact specific economic sectors, industries or segments of the market, which may affect the Fund’s value. Turbulence in financial markets, tariffs and other protectionist measures, political developments and uncertainty, central bank policy, and reduced liquidity in equity, credit and fixed income markets may negatively affect many issuers worldwide, which could have an adverse effect on the Fund. During a general downturn in the securities markets, multiple asset classes may be negatively affected. Geopolitical and other events, including war, terrorism, economic uncertainty, trade disputes, public health crises and related geopolitical events have led, and in the future may lead, to disruptions in the US and world economies and markets, which may increase financial market volatility and have significant adverse direct or indirect effects on the Fund and its investments. Market disruptions could cause the Fund to lose money, experience significant redemptions, and encounter operational difficulties. Although multiple asset classes may be affected by a market disruption, the duration and effects may not be the same for all types of assets.
Operational Risk
The Fund is exposed to operational risks arising from a number of factors, including, but not limited to, human error, processing and communication errors, errors of the Fund’s service providers, counterparties or other
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third-parties, failed or inadequate processes and technology or systems failures. The Fund and Advisor seek to reduce these operational risks through controls and procedures. However, these measures do not address every possible risk and may be inadequate to address significant operational risks.
Passive Management Risk
The Fund is not actively managed and instead seeks to track the performance of an index. Passive management has the following risks associated with it:

The Fund invests in the securities included in, or representative of, the Underlying Index. The provider of the Underlying Index or the index calculation agent may make errors. The index provider may include index constituents that should have been excluded, or it may exclude index constituents that should have been included. It also may include or exclude constituents at incorrect levels. This may result in the Fund, in turn, being correctly positioned to an index that has been incorrectly calculated. This could lead to losses to the Fund.

In seeking to track the Underlying Index’s performance, the Fund may be subject to tracking error, which is the divergence of the Fund’s performance from that of the Underlying Index. Tracking error may occur because of differences between the securities and other instruments held in the Fund’s portfolio and those included in the Underlying Index, pricing differences (including, as applicable, differences between a security’s price at the local market close and the Fund’s valuation of a security at the time of calculation of the Fund’s NAV), differences in transaction costs, the Fund’s holding of uninvested cash, differences in timing of the accrual of or the valuation of dividends or interest, the requirements to maintain pass-through tax treatment, portfolio transactions carried out to minimize the distribution of capital gains to shareholders, changes to the Underlying Index or the costs to the Fund of complying with various new or existing regulatory requirements. Tracking error also may result because the Fund incurs fees and expenses, while the Underlying Index does not. This risk may be heightened during times of increased market volatility or other unusual market conditions
The Fund generally will not attempt to take defensive positions in declining markets and generally will not sell a security because its issuer is in financial trouble, unless that security is removed from (or was no longer useful in tracking a component of) the Underlying Index.
Portfolio Turnover Risk
The Fund’s strategy may frequently involve buying and selling portfolio securities to rebalance the Fund’s investment exposures. High portfolio turnover may result in the Fund paying higher levels of transaction costs and generating greater tax liabilities for shareholders. Portfolio turnover risk may cause the Fund’s performance to be less than expected.
Secondary Market Trading Risk
Although the Fund’s Shares are listed for trading on one or more securities exchanges, there can be no assurance that an active trading market for such Shares will develop or be maintained by market makers or Authorized Participants. In general, the trading of Shares on securities exchanges is subject to the risk of irregular trading activity and wide “bid/ask” spreads (which may be especially pronounced for smaller funds). Additionally, market makers are under no obligation to make a market in the Fund’s Shares and Authorized Participants are not obligated to submit purchase or redemption orders for Creation Units. In the event market makers cease making a market in the Fund’s Shares or Authorized Participants stop submitting purchase or redemption orders for Creation Units, the Fund’s Shares may trade at a larger premium or discount to its NAV. Wide bid-ask spreads and large premiums or discounts to NAV are likely to lead to an investor buying his or her shares at a market price that is more than their value, and selling those shares at a market price that is less than their value.
Short Sales Risk
Short sales are transactions in which the Fund sells a security it does not own, or uses derivatives, such as futures or swaps, to effect short exposure to a particular reference asset. Such a position subjects the Fund to the risk that instead of declining, the price of the security or reference asset to which the Fund has short exposure will rise. If the price of the security or reference asset increases between the date of the short sale and the date on which the Fund replaces the security or otherwise closes out its short position, the Fund will experience a loss, which is theoretically unlimited since there is a theoretically unlimited potential for the market price of a security or other instrument sold short to increase.
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Swap Agreements Risk
Swap agreements may involve greater risks than direct investment in securities as they may be leveraged and are subject to credit risk, counterparty risk, liquidity risk and valuation risk. A swap agreement could result in losses if the underlying reference or asset does not perform as anticipated. In addition, many swaps trade over-the-counter and may be considered illiquid. It may not be possible for the Fund to liquidate a swap position at an advantageous time or price, which may result in significant losses.
Trading Price Risk
Shares of the Fund trade on securities exchanges at prices at, above or below the Fund’s most recent NAV. The NAV of the Fund is calculated at the end of each business day and fluctuates with changes in the market value of the Fund’s holdings. The trading price of the Fund’s Shares fluctuates continuously throughout trading hours based on both market supply of and demand for Shares and the underlying value of the Fund’s portfolio holdings or NAV. As a result, the trading prices of the Fund’s Shares may deviate significantly from NAV during periods of market volatility. Any of these factors, among others, may lead to the Fund’s Shares trading at a premium or discount to NAV. Although it is generally expected that the market price of the Shares of the Fund will approximate the Fund’s NAV, there may be times when the market price and the NAV vary significantly. Thus, an investor may pay more than NAV when purchasing Shares and receive less than NAV when selling Shares.
Risks of Underlying ETPs
The Fund may invest in the securities of other ETPs, including Affiliated ETFs. Investments in the Fund are subject to the risks associated with an investment in the Underlying ETPs. In addition to the risks described above, the following risks should also be considered when making an investment in the Fund.

Asset-Backed Securities Risk. Asset-backed securities are securities that represent interests in, and whose values and payments are based on, a “pool” of underlying assets, which may include, among others, lower-rated debt securities and corporate loans, consumer loans or mortgages and leases of property. Asset-backed securities include collateralized debt obligations, collateralized bond obligations, and collateralized loan obligations and other similarly structured vehicles. As with other debt securities, asset-backed securities are subject to credit risk, extension risk, interest rate risk, liquidity risk and valuation risk. The impairment of the value of collateral or other assets underlying an asset-backed security, such as a result of non-payment of loans or non-performance of underlying assets, may result in a reduction in the value of such asset-backed securities and losses to the Fund.
Investments in mortgage-related securities make an investor more susceptible to adverse economic, interest rate, political or regulatory events that affect the value of real estate. Mortgage-related securities are also significantly affected by the rate of prepayments. Impairment of the underlying obligations or collateral, such as by non-payment, will reduce a mortgage-related security’s value.

Convertible Securities Risk. A convertible security has characteristics of both equity and debt securities and, as a result, is exposed to risks that are typically associated with both types of securities. Convertible securities are typically subordinate to an issuer’s other debt obligations. Issuers of convertible securities may be more vulnerable to changes in the economy, such as a recession or a sustained period of rising interest rates, which could affect their ability to make interest and principal payments. If an issuer stops making interest and/or principal payments, the Fund could lose its entire investment.

Commodities Risk. Exposure to the commodities markets may subject the Fund to greater volatility than investments in traditional securities, and exposure to commodities, directly or through other securities, can cause the value of the Fund’s assets to decline or fluctuate in a rapid and unpredictable manner. The value of commodities may be affected by changes in overall market movements, real or perceived inflationary trends, commodity index volatility, changes in interest rates or currency exchange rates, population growth and changing demographics, international economic, political and regulatory developments, and factors affecting a particular region, industry or commodity, such as drought, floods, or other weather conditions, livestock disease, changes in storage costs, trade embargoes, competition from substitute products, transportation bottlenecks or shortages, fluctuations in supply and demand, and tariffs.

Credit Risk. Credit risk is the risk that the issuer or guarantor of a debt instrument or the counterparty to a derivatives contract, repurchase agreement or loan of portfolio securities will be unable or unwilling to make its timely interest and/or principal payments when due or otherwise honor its obligations. Changes
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in an issuer’s or counterparty’s credit rating or the market’s perception of an issuer’s or counterparty’s creditworthiness may also adversely affect the value of the Fund’s investment in that issuer. The degree of credit risk depends on an issuer’s or counterparty’s financial condition and on the terms of an obligation.

Currency Risk. Investments directly in foreign (non-U.S.) currencies or in securities that trade in, and receive revenues in, foreign (non-U.S.) currencies are subject to the risk that those currencies will decline in value relative to the U.S. dollar or, in the case of hedging positions, that the U.S. dollar will decline in value relative to the currency being hedged. Currency rates in foreign countries may fluctuate significantly over short periods of time for a number of reasons, including changes in interest rates, intervention (or the failure to intervene) by U.S. or foreign governments, central banks or supranational entities such as the International Monetary Fund, or by the imposition of currency controls or other political developments in the United States or abroad.

Debt Securities Risk. The risks of investing in debt securities include (without limitation): (i) credit risk, e.g., the issuer or guarantor of a debt security may be unable or unwilling (or be perceived as unable or unwilling) to make timely principal and/or interest payments or otherwise honor its obligations; (ii) interest rate risk, e.g., when interest rates go up, the value of a debt security generally goes down, and when interest rates go down, the value of a debt security generally goes up; (iii) liquidity risk and valuation risk, e.g., debt securities generally do not trade on a securities exchange, making them generally less liquid and more difficult to value than common stock; (iv) call risk and income risk, e.g., during a period of falling interest rates, the issuer may redeem a security by repaying it early, which may reduce the Fund’s income if the proceeds are reinvested at lower interest rates; and (v) extension risk, e.g., if interest rates rise, repayments of debt securities may occur more slowly than anticipated by the market, which may drive the prices of these securities down because their interest rates are lower than the current interest rate and the securities remain outstanding longer. Debt securities most frequently trade in institutional round lot size transactions. If the Fund purchases bonds in amounts less than the institutional round lot size, which are frequently referred to as “odd” lots, the odd lot size positions may have more price volatility than institutional round lot size positions. The Fund uses a third-party pricing service to value bond holdings and the pricing service values bonds assuming orderly transactions of an institutional round lot size.

Emerging Markets Securities Risk. Securities of issuers based in countries with developing economies (emerging market countries) may present market, credit, currency, liquidity, legal, political and other risks different from, or greater than, the risks of investing in developed market countries and are generally considered speculative in nature. Emerging market countries are subject to greater market volatility, lower trading volume, political and economic instability, uncertainty regarding the existence of trading markets, rapid inflation, possible repatriation of investment income and capital, currency convertibility issues, less uniform accounting standards and more governmental limitations on foreign investment than more developed markets. Laws regarding foreign investment in emerging market securities, securities regulation, title to securities, and shareholder rights may change quickly and unpredictably. In addition, the enforcement of systems of taxation at federal, regional and local levels in emerging market countries may be inconsistent and subject to sudden change.

Emerging Markets Sovereign Debt Risk. Government obligors in emerging market countries are among the world’s largest debtors to commercial banks, other governments, international financial organizations and other financial institutions. Historically, certain issuers of the government debt securities in which an Underlying ETP may invest have experienced substantial difficulties in meeting their external debt obligations, resulting in defaults on certain obligations and the restructuring of certain indebtedness, which could result in losses to an Underlying ETP.

Equity Securities Risk. Investments in common stocks and other equity securities are particularly subject to the risk of changes in investors’ perceptions of the financial condition of an issuer, conditions affecting equity markets generally and political and/or economic events. Equity prices may also be particularly sensitive to rising interest rates, as the cost of capital rises and borrowing costs increase. Holders of an issuer’s common stock may be subject to greater risks than holders of its preferred stock and debt securities because common stockholders’ claims are subordinated to those of holders of preferred stocks and debt securities upon the bankruptcy of an issuer.
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Foreign Securities Risk. Investments in the securities of non-U.S. issuers involve risks beyond those associated with investments in U.S. securities. These additional risks include greater market volatility, the availability of less reliable financial information, higher transactional and custody costs, taxation by foreign governments, decreased market liquidity and political instability. Some countries and regions have experienced security concerns, war or threats of war and aggression, terrorism, economic uncertainty, natural and environmental disasters and/or systemic market dislocations that have led, and in the future may lead, to increased short-term market volatility and may have adverse long-term effects on the U.S. and world economies and markets generally. Foreign issuers are often subject to less stringent requirements regarding accounting, auditing, financial reporting and record keeping than are U.S. issuers, and therefore not all material information will be available. Securities exchanges or foreign governments may adopt rules or regulations that may negatively impact the Fund’s ability to invest in foreign securities or may prevent the Fund from repatriating its investments. Less developed securities markets are more likely to experience problems with the clearing and settling of trades, as well as the holding of securities by local banks, agents and depositories. The less developed a country’s securities market is, the greater the likelihood of custody problems.

Interest Rate Risk. An increase in interest rates may cause the value of securities held by the Fund to decline. Fixed income securities with longer durations tend to be more sensitive to changes in interest rates, making them more volatile than securities with shorter durations or floating or adjustable interest rates. The negative impact on the Fund from potential interest rate increases could be swift and significant, including falling market values, increased redemptions and reduced liquidity. The Fund may be subject to a greater risk of rising interest rates than would normally be the case due to the current period of historically low rates and the effect of potential government fiscal policy initiatives and resulting market reaction to those initiatives.
When interest rates rise, certain obligations will be paid off by the issuer (or other obligated party) more slowly than anticipated, causing the value of these securities to fall. As a result, in a period of rising interest rates, securities may exhibit additional volatility and may lose value. The value of securities with longer maturities generally changes more in response to changes in interest rates than does the value of securities with shorter maturities.
During periods of falling interest rates, an issuer of a callable security held by the Fund may “call” or repay the security before its stated maturity, which may result in the Fund having to reinvest the proceeds in securities with lower yields, resulting in a decline in the Fund’s income, or in securities with greater risks or with other less favorable features.

Real Estate Companies Risk. An investment in companies that invest in real estate (including REITs) exposes the Fund to the risks of the real estate market and the risks associated with the ownership of real estate. These risks can include fluctuations in the value of or destruction of underlying properties; realignment in tenant living and work habits (for example, movements to and from different parts of a nation, a region, a state or a city); tenant or borrower default; market saturation; changes in general and local economic conditions; decreases in market rates for rents; increases in vacancies; competition; property taxes; capital expenditures or operating expenses; other economic or political events affecting the real estate industry including interest rates and government regulation; concentration in a limited number of properties, geographic regions or property types; and low quality and/or conflicted management. Real estate is generally a less liquid asset class and companies that hold real estate may not be able to liquidate or modify their holdings quickly in response to changes in economic or other market conditions. Additionally, such companies may utilize leverage, which increases investment risk and the potential for more volatility in the Fund’s returns.

Small- and/or Mid-Capitalization Companies Risk. Small- and mid-capitalization companies may be more vulnerable to adverse general market or economic developments, and their securities may be less liquid and may experience greater price volatility than larger, more established companies.

Variable and Floating Rate Instruments Risk. Variable and floating rate instruments include debt securities issued by corporate and governmental entities, bank loans, mortgage-backed securities and asset-backed securities, preferred equity securities and derivative variable rate securities, such as inverse floaters. Variable and floating rate instruments are structured so that the instrument’s coupon rate
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fluctuates based upon the level of a reference rate. A variable or floating rate instrument’s coupon rate resets periodically according to its terms. Consequently, in a rising interest rate environment, variable and floating rate instruments with coupon rates that reset infrequently may lag behind the changes in market interest rates.
Valuation Risk
Independent market quotations for certain investments held by the Fund may not be readily available, and such investments may be fair valued or valued by a pricing service at an evaluated price. These valuations involve subjectivity and different market participants may assign different prices to the same investment. As a result, there is a risk that the Fund may not be able to sell an investment at the price assigned to the investment by the Fund. In addition, the value of the securities or other assets in the Fund’s portfolio may change on days or during time periods when shareholders will not be able to purchase or sell the Fund’s Shares.
Performance Information
The bar chart that follows shows the annual total returns of the Fund for a full calendar year. The table that follows the bar chart shows the Fund’s average annual total returns, both before and after taxes. The bar chart and table provide an indication of the risks of investing in the Fund by comparing the Fund’s performance from year to year and by showing how the Fund’s average annual returns for one calendar year compared with its underlying index and additional broad measures of market performance. The HFRI Macro (Total) Index is an equally weighted index of hedge funds that employ macro strategies. The HFRI Fund of Funds Composite Index is an equally weighted hedge fund index including over 650 domestic and off-shore funds of funds. The MSCI World Index is a free float-adjusted market capitalization weighted index that is designed to measure the equity market performance of developed markets (performance data assumes reinvestment of dividends, but it does not reflect management fees, transaction costs or other expenses).
All returns assume reinvestment of dividends and distributions. The Fund’s past performance (before and after taxes) is not necessarily an indication of how the Fund will perform in the future. Performance reflects fee waivers and/or expense reimbursement in effect, if such waivers or reimbursements were not in place, the Fund’s performance would be reduced. Fund performance current to the most recent month-end is available by calling 1-888-474-7725 or by visiting newyorklifeinvestments.com.
[MISSING IMAGE: tm2123983d1-bc_macrobw.jpg]
The Fund’s year-to-date total return as of June 30, 2021 was 1.89%.
Best and Worst Quarter Returns (for the period reflected in the bar chart above)
Return
Quarter/Year
Highest Return 9.04% 2Q/2020
Lowest Return -8.65% 1Q/2020
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Average Annual Total Returns as of December 31, 2020
1 Year
5 Years
10 Years
Returns before taxes 8.68% 4.11% 1.36%
Returns after taxes on distributions(1) 7.63% 3.71% 0.96%
Returns after taxes on distributions and sale of Fund Shares(2) 5.18% 3.02% 0.88%
IQ Hedge Macro Index
(reflects no deduction for fees, expenses or taxes)
9.28% 4.86% 2.09%
HFRI Macro (Total) Index(2)
(reflects no deduction for fees, expenses or taxes)
5.38% 2.14% 1.00%
MSCI World Index
(reflects no deduction for fees, expenses or taxes)
15.90% 12.19% 9.87%
(1)
After-tax returns are calculated using the highest historical individual federal marginal income tax rates and do not reflect the impact of state and local taxes. Actual after-tax returns depend on your tax situation and may differ from those shown and are not relevant if you hold your Shares through tax-deferred arrangements, such as 401(k) plans or individual retirement accounts. In some cases the return after taxes may exceed the return before taxes due to an assumed tax benefit from any losses on a sale of Fund Shares at the end of the measurement period.
(2)
HFRI Macro (Total) Index is calculated from June 1, 2009. Performance information for the Fund in the table above also includes the performance of HFRI Macro (Total) Index. Because index comparisons are generally calculated as of the end of each month, index performance information under the “Since Inception” heading may not be coincident with the inception date of the Fund. In such instances, index performance is generally presented from the month-end nearest to the inception date of the Fund.
Investment Advisor
IndexIQ Advisors LLC (the “Advisor”) is the investment advisor to the Fund.
Portfolio Manager
The professionals jointly and primarily responsible for the day-to-day management of the Fund are Greg Barrato and James Harrison. Mr. Barrato, Senior Vice President of the Advisor, has been a portfolio manager of the Fund since February 2011 and Mr. Harrison, Vice President of the Advisor, has been a portfolio manager of the Fund since April 2018.
Purchase and Sale of Fund Shares
Unlike conventional mutual funds, the Fund issues and redeems Shares on a continuous basis, at NAV, only in large blocks of Shares called “Creation Units.” Individual Shares of the Fund may only be purchased and sold on the secondary market through a broker-dealer. Since Shares of the Fund trade on securities exchanges in the secondary market at their market price rather than their NAV, the Fund’s Shares may trade at a price greater than (premium) or less than (discount) the Fund’s NAV. An investor may incur costs attributable to the difference between the highest price a buyer is willing to pay to purchase Shares of the Fund (bid) and the lowest price a seller is willing to accept for Shares of the Fund (ask) when buying or selling Shares in the secondary market (the “bid-ask spread”). Recent information, including the Fund’s NAV, market price, premiums and discounts, and bid-ask spreads, is available online at newyorklifeinvestments.com.
Tax Information
The Fund’s distributions are expected to be taxed as ordinary income, qualified dividend income and/or capital gains, unless you are investing through a tax-deferred arrangement, such as a 401(k) plan or individual retirement account. However, subsequent withdrawals from such a tax-advantaged account may be subject to U.S. federal income tax. You should consult your tax advisor about your specific situation.
Financial Intermediary Compensation
If you purchase the Fund through a broker-dealer or other financial intermediary (such as a bank), the Advisor or other related companies may pay the intermediary for marketing activities and presentations, educational training programs, conferences, the development of technology platforms and reporting systems or other services related to the sale or promotion of the Fund. These payments may create a conflict of interest by influencing the broker-dealer or other intermediary and your salesperson to recommend the Fund over another investment. Ask your salesperson or visit your financial intermediary’s website for more information.
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Summary Information
IQ Hedge Market Neutral Tracker ETF
Investment Objective
The Fund seeks investment results that correspond (before fees and expenses) generally to the price and yield performance of its underlying index, the IQ Hedge Market Neutral Index (the “Underlying Index”).
Fees and Expenses of the Fund
This table describes fees and expenses that you may pay if you buy, sell or hold shares of the Fund (“Shares”). Investors may pay other fees, such as brokerage commissions and other fees to financial intermediaries, which are not reflected in the table and example set forth below.
Shareholder Fees (fees paid directly from your investment):
None
Annual Fund Operating Expenses (expenses that you pay each year as a percentage of the value of your investment):
Management Fee 0.75%
Distribution and/or Service (12b-1) Fees 0.00%
Other Expenses 0.01%
Acquired Fund Fees & Expenses(a) 0.25%
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses(a) 1.01%
Fee Waiver(b) 0.35%
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses After Fee Waiver 0.66%
(a)
The Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses may not correlate to the ratio of expenses to average net assets as reported in the “Financial Highlights” section of the Prospectus, which reflects the operating expenses of the Fund and does not include Acquired Fund Fees & Expenses. Acquired Fund Fees & Expenses represent the Fund’s pro rata share of fees and expenses incurred indirectly as a result of investing in other funds, including ETFs and money market funds.
(b)
IndexIQ Advisors LLC (the “Advisor”) has contractually agreed, until August 31, 2022, to waive a portion of the management fee equal to 0.35% of average daily net assets.
Example. This example is intended to help you compare the cost of investing in the Fund with the cost of investing in other funds. This example does not take into account brokerage commissions that you pay when purchasing or selling Shares of the Fund.
The example assumes that you invest $10,000 in the Fund for the time periods indicated and then redeem all of your Shares at the end of those periods. The example also assumes that your investment has a 5% return each year and that the Fund’s operating expenses remain at current levels. The return of 5% and estimated expenses are for illustration purposes only, and should not be considered indicators of expected Fund expenses or performance, which may be greater or less than the estimates.
Although your actual costs may be higher or lower, based on these assumptions your costs would be:
1 Year
3 Years
5 Years
10 Years
$67
$287
$524
$1,204
Portfolio Turnover
The Fund pays transaction costs, such as commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or “turns over” its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover rate may indicate higher transaction costs and may result in higher taxes when Shares are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are not reflected in annual Fund operating expenses or in the example, affect the Fund’s performance. During the most recent fiscal year, the Fund’s portfolio turnover rate was 116% of the average value of its portfolio. This rate excludes the value of portfolio securities received or delivered as a result of in-kind creations or redemptions of the Shares.
Principal Investment Strategies
The Fund is a “fund of funds” which means it invests, under normal circumstances, at least 80% of its net assets, plus the amount of any borrowings for investment purposes, in the investments included in its Underlying Index, which includes underlying funds. The Underlying Index consists of a number of components (“Underlying Index Components”) selected in accordance with IndexIQ’s rules-based methodology of such Underlying Index.
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Such Underlying Index Components will include primarily ETFs and/or other exchange-traded vehicles issuing equity securities organized in the U.S., such as exchange-traded commodity pools (“ETVs”), and may include exchange-traded notes (“ETNs”) (such ETFs, ETVs and ETNs are referred to collectively as “exchange-traded products” or “ETPs”). The Fund may also invest in one or more financial instruments, including but not limited to futures contracts and swap agreements (collectively, “Financial Instruments”).
The Fund employs a “passive management” — or indexing — investment approach designed to track the performance of the Underlying Index, which was developed by IndexIQ LLC (“IndexIQ”), an affiliate of IndexIQ Advisors LLC, the Fund’s investment advisor (the “Advisor”). The Underlying Index seeks to track the “beta” portion of the returns (i.e., that portion of the returns of hedge funds that are non-idiosyncratic, or unrelated to manager skill) of hedge funds pursuing a market neutral strategy (the “Strategy”). Market Neutral hedge funds typically invest in both long and short positions in stocks while minimizing exposure to the systematic components of risk. These market neutral strategies seek to have a zero “beta” ​(or “market”) exposure to one or more systematic risk factors including the overall market (as represented by the S&P 500 Index), economic sectors or industries, market capitalization, region and country. Market neutral strategies that effectively neutralize the market exposure are not impacted by directional moves in the market. The Fund does not invest in hedge funds, and the Underlying Index does not include hedge funds as Underlying Index Components. The Fund is not a fund of hedge funds.
The Underlying Index may include both long and short positions in ETFs and ETVs. As opposed to taking long positions in which an investor seeks to profit from increases in the price of a security, short selling (or “selling short”) is a technique used by the Fund to try and profit from the falling price of a security. Short selling involves selling a security that has been borrowed from a third party with the intention of buying the identical security back at a later date to return to that third party. The basic principle of short selling is that one can profit by selling a security now at a high price and later buying it back at a lower price. The short seller hopes to profit from a decline in the price of the security between the sale and the repurchase, as the seller will pay less to buy the security than it received on selling the security.
The Underlying Index generally is based on the premise that hedge fund returns, when aggregated among hedge funds with similar investment styles, display over time significant exposures to a set of common investment strategies and asset classes. By creating an index that has similar exposures to the same investment strategies and asset classes as hedge funds generally, IndexIQ seeks to replicate the beta return characteristics of hedge funds.
The Underlying Index Components of this Strategy generally provide exposures to:

Emerging market equity;

Foreign currencies and currency futures;

Foreign equity, including small-capitalization equity;

Municipal bonds;

U.S. and foreign preferred securities;

U.S. bank loans;

U.S. convertible debt;

U.S. floating rate bond;

U.S. government short- and intermediate-term maturity bond;

U.S. growth equity;

U.S. high yield (or “junk”) debt;

U.S. investment grade corporate debt;

U.S. large-capitalization equity;

U.S. mortgage-backed debt;

U.S. small-capitalization equity;
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U.S. Treasury Inflation Protection Securities (“TIPS”); and

U.S. value equity.
The Underlying Index is unlike traditional market-oriented indexes like the Standard & Poor’s 500® Composite Stock Total Return Index (the “S&P 500 Index”). Instead of tracking the performance of publicly-traded issuers representing a market or industry sector, the Underlying Index seeks to track the returns of distinct hedge fund investment styles.
The Underlying Index may include as a component one or more ETFs advised by the Advisor (“Affiliated ETFs”) and the Fund will typically invest in any Affiliated ETF included in the Underlying Index. The Fund also may invest in Affiliated ETFs that are not components of the index if such an investment will help the Fund track the Underlying Index.
The weights of the Underlying Index Components are rebalanced on a monthly basis. Annually, IndexIQ conducts a review process pursuant to which it may reconstitute the Underlying Indexes by adding or subtracting Underlying Index Components according to IndexIQ’s rules-based process.
Principal Risks
As with all investments, there are certain risks of investing in the Fund. The Fund’s Shares will change in value and you could lose money by investing in the Fund. An investment in the Fund does not represent a complete investment program. An investment in the Fund is not a bank deposit and it is not insured or guaranteed by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation or any other government agency, the Advisor or any of its affiliates. You should consider carefully the following risks before investing in the Fund.
Authorized Participant Concentration Risk
Only certain large institutions may engage in creation or redemption transactions directly with the Fund (each, an “Authorized Participant”). The Fund has a limited number of institutions that may act as Authorized Participants on an agency basis (i.e., on behalf of other market participants). To the extent that those Authorized Participants exit the business or are unable to proceed with creation and/or redemption orders with the Fund and no other Authorized Participant is able to step forward to engage in creation and redemption transactions with the Fund, Shares may be more likely to trade at a premium or discount to NAV and possibly face trading halts and/or delisting.
Counterparty Risk
A counterparty (the other party to a transaction or an agreement or the party with whom the Fund executes transactions) to a transaction with the Fund may be unable or unwilling to make timely principal, interest, settlement or margin payments, fulfill the delivery conditions of the contract or transaction, or otherwise honor its obligations. If a counterparty fails to meet its contractual obligations the Fund will have contractual remedies pursuant to the agreements related to the transaction but the Fund may be unable to terminate or realize any gain on the investment or transaction, resulting in a loss to the Fund. The Fund may experience significant delays in obtaining any recovery in an insolvency, bankruptcy, or other reorganization proceeding involving a counterparty (including recovery of any collateral posted by it) and may obtain limited or no recovery in such circumstances.
Cyber Security Risk
The Fund is susceptible to operational risks through breaches in cyber security. Such events may cause the Fund to lose proprietary information, suffer data corruption or lose operational capacity and could cause the Fund to incur regulatory penalties, reputational damage, additional compliance costs associated with corrective measures and/or financial loss. In addition, cyber security breaches of the securities issuers or the Fund’s third-party service providers can also subject the Fund to many of the same risks associated with direct cyber security breaches. Although the Fund has established risk management systems designed to reduce the risks associated with cyber security, there is no guarantee that such efforts will succeed.
Derivatives Risk
Derivatives are investments whose value depends on (or is derived from) the value of an underlying instrument, such as a security, asset, reference rate or index and involve risks different from, and possibly greater than, the risks associated with other investments. These risks include: (i) the risk that the counterparty to a derivatives transaction may not fulfill its contractual obligations; (ii) risk of mispricing or improper valuation; and (iii) the risk that changes in the value of the derivative may not correlate perfectly with the underlying asset. Derivative prices are highly volatile and may fluctuate substantially during a short period of time. Such prices are
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influenced by numerous factors that affect the markets, including, but not limited to, changing supply and demand relationships, government programs and policies, national and international political and economic events, changes in interest rates, inflation and deflation, and changes in supply and demand relationships. Unlike other investments, derivative contracts often have leverage inherent in their terms. The use of leveraged derivatives can magnify potential for gain or loss and, therefore, amplify the effects of market volatility on the Fund’s Share price. The effects of leverage may also cause the Fund to liquidate portfolio positions when it would not be advantageous to do so in order to satisfy its obligations or to meet collateral segregation requirements.
Exchange Traded Products Risk
Unlike an investment in a mutual fund, the value of the Fund’s investment in other exchange-traded funds or exchange-traded investment products (“ETPs”) is based on its market price (rather than NAV) and the Fund could lose money due to premiums/discounts of the ETP (which could cause the Fund to buy shares at market prices that are higher than their value or sell shares at market prices that are lower than their value); the failure of an active trading market to develop; or exchange trading halts or delistings. An investment in the Fund will entail more costs and expenses than a direct investment in any Underlying ETP. As the Fund’s allocations to Underlying ETPs changes, or the expense ratio of Underlying ETPs change, the operating expenses borne by the Fund from such investments may increase or decrease.
Index Risk
There is no guarantee that the Fund’s investment results will have a high degree of correlation to those of the Underlying Index or that the Fund will achieve its investment objective. Market disruptions and regulatory restrictions could have an adverse effect on the Fund’s ability to adjust its exposure to the required levels in order to track the Underlying Index. Errors in index data, index computations or the construction of the Underlying Index in accordance with its methodology may occur from time to time and may not be identified and corrected for a period of time or at all, which may have an adverse impact on the Fund and its shareholders.
Liquidity Risk
Liquidity risk exists when particular investments are difficult to purchase or sell. Certain investments may be subject to restrictions on resale, trade over-the-counter or in limited volume, or lack an active trading market. Accordingly, the Fund may not be able to sell or close out of such investments at favorable times or prices (or at all), or at the prices approximating those at which the Fund currently values them. Illiquid securities may trade at a discount from comparable, more liquid investments and may be subject to wide fluctuations in market value.
Long/Short Risk
The Fund seeks long exposure to certain securities and short exposure to certain other securities. There is no guarantee that the returns on the Fund’s long or short positions will produce positive returns, and the Fund could lose money if either or both positions produce negative returns. In addition, the Fund may gain enhanced long exposure to certain securities (i.e., obtain investment exposure that exceeds the amount directly invested in those assets, a form of leverage) and, as a result, suffer losses that exceed the amount invested in those assets.
Market Risk
Market risks include political, regulatory, market and economic developments, including developments that impact specific economic sectors, industries or segments of the market, which may affect the Fund’s value. Turbulence in financial markets, tariffs and other protectionist measures, political developments and uncertainty, central bank policy, and reduced liquidity in equity, credit and fixed income markets may negatively affect many issuers worldwide, which could have an adverse effect on the Fund. During a general downturn in the securities markets, multiple asset classes may be negatively affected. Geopolitical and other events, including war, terrorism, economic uncertainty, trade disputes, public health crises and related geopolitical events have led, and in the future may lead, to disruptions in the US and world economies and markets, which may increase financial market volatility and have significant adverse direct or indirect effects on the Fund and its investments. Market disruptions could cause the Fund to lose money, experience significant redemptions, and encounter operational difficulties. Although multiple asset classes may be affected by a market disruption, the duration and effects may not be the same for all types of assets.
Operational Risk
The Fund is exposed to operational risks arising from a number of factors, including, but not limited to, human error, processing and communication errors, errors of the Fund’s service providers, counterparties or other
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third-parties, failed or inadequate processes and technology or systems failures. The Fund and Advisor seek to reduce these operational risks through controls and procedures. However, these measures do not address every possible risk and may be inadequate to address significant operational risks.
Passive Management Risk
The Fund is not actively managed and instead seeks to track the performance of an index. Passive management has the following risks associated with it:

The Fund invests in the securities included in, or representative of, the Underlying Index. The provider of the Underlying Index or the index calculation agent may make errors. The index provider may include index constituents that should have been excluded, or it may exclude index constituents that should have been included. It also may include or exclude constituents at incorrect levels. This may result in the Fund, in turn, being correctly positioned to an index that has been incorrectly calculated. This could lead to losses to the Fund.

In seeking to track the Underlying Index’s performance, the Fund may be subject to tracking error, which is the divergence of the Fund’s performance from that of the Underlying Index. Tracking error may occur because of differences between the securities and other instruments held in the Fund’s portfolio and those included in the Underlying Index, pricing differences (including, as applicable, differences between a security’s price at the local market close and the Fund’s valuation of a security at the time of calculation of the Fund’s NAV), differences in transaction costs, the Fund’s holding of uninvested cash, differences in timing of the accrual of or the valuation of dividends or interest, the requirements to maintain pass-through tax treatment, portfolio transactions carried out to minimize the distribution of capital gains to shareholders, changes to the Underlying Index or the costs to the Fund of complying with various new or existing regulatory requirements. Tracking error also may result because the Fund incurs fees and expenses, while the Underlying Index does not. This risk may be heightened during times of increased market volatility or other unusual market conditions.

The Fund generally will not attempt to take defensive positions in declining markets and generally will not sell a security because its issuer is in financial trouble, unless that security is removed from (or was no longer useful in tracking a component of) the Underlying Index.
Portfolio Turnover Risk
The Fund’s strategy may frequently involve buying and selling portfolio securities to rebalance the Fund’s investment exposures. High portfolio turnover may result in the Fund paying higher levels of transaction costs and generating greater tax liabilities for shareholders. Portfolio turnover risk may cause the Fund’s performance to be less than expected.
Secondary Market Trading Risk
Although the Fund’s Shares are listed for trading on one or more securities exchanges, there can be no assurance that an active trading market for such Shares will develop or be maintained by market makers or Authorized Participants. In general, the trading of Shares on securities exchanges is subject to the risk of irregular trading activity and wide “bid/ask” spreads (which may be especially pronounced for smaller funds). Additionally, market makers are under no obligation to make a market in the Fund’s Shares and Authorized Participants are not obligated to submit purchase or redemption orders for Creation Units. In the event market makers cease making a market in the Fund’s Shares or Authorized Participants stop submitting purchase or redemption orders for Creation Units, the Fund’s Shares may trade at a larger premium or discount to its NAV. Wide bid-ask spreads and large premiums or discounts to NAV are likely to lead to an investor buying his or her shares at a market price that is more than their value, and selling those shares at a market price that is less than their value.
Short Sales Risk
Short sales are transactions in which the Fund sells a security it does not own, or uses derivatives, such as futures or swaps, to effect short exposure to a particular reference asset. Such a position subjects the Fund to the risk that instead of declining, the price of the security or reference asset to which the Fund has short exposure will rise. If the price of the security or reference asset increases between the date of the short sale and the date on which the Fund replaces the security or otherwise closes out its short position, the Fund will experience a loss, which is theoretically unlimited since there is a theoretically unlimited potential for the market price of a security or other instrument sold short to increase.
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Swap Agreements Risk
Swap agreements may involve greater risks than direct investment in securities as they may be leveraged and are subject to credit risk, counterparty risk, liquidity risk and valuation risk. A swap agreement could result in losses if the underlying reference or asset does not perform as anticipated. In addition, many swaps trade over-the-counter and may be considered illiquid. It may not be possible for the Fund to liquidate a swap position at an advantageous time or price, which may result in significant losses.
Trading Price Risk
Shares of the Fund trade on securities exchanges at prices at, above or below the Fund’s most recent NAV. The NAV of the Fund is calculated at the end of each business day and fluctuates with changes in the market value of the Fund’s holdings. The trading price of the Fund’s Shares fluctuates continuously throughout trading hours based on both market supply of and demand for Shares and the underlying value of the Fund’s portfolio holdings or NAV. As a result, the trading prices of the Fund’s Shares may deviate significantly from NAV during periods of market volatility. Any of these factors, among others, may lead to the Fund’s Shares trading at a premium or discount to NAV. Although it is generally expected that the market price of the Shares of the Fund will approximate the Fund’s NAV, there may be times when the market price and the NAV vary significantly. Thus, an investor may pay more than NAV when purchasing Shares and receive less than NAV when selling Shares.
Risks of Underlying ETPs
The Fund may invest in the securities of other ETPs, including Affiliated ETFs. Investments in the Fund are subject to the risks associated with an investment in the Underlying ETPs. In addition to the risks described above, the following risks should also be considered when making an investment in the Fund.

Asset-Backed Securities Risk. Asset-backed securities are securities that represent interests in, and whose values and payments are based on, a “pool” of underlying assets, which may include, among others, lower-rated debt securities and corporate loans, consumer loans or mortgages and leases of property. Asset-backed securities include collateralized debt obligations, collateralized bond obligations, and collateralized loan obligations and other similarly structured vehicles. As with other debt securities, asset-backed securities are subject to credit risk, extension risk, interest rate risk, liquidity risk and valuation risk. The impairment of the value of collateral or other assets underlying an asset-backed security, such as a result of non-payment of loans or non-performance of underlying assets, may result in a reduction in the value of such asset-backed securities and losses to the Fund.
Investments in mortgage-related securities make an investor more susceptible to adverse economic, interest rate, political or regulatory events that affect the value of real estate. Mortgage-related securities are also significantly affected by the rate of prepayments. Impairment of the underlying obligations or collateral, such as by non-payment, will reduce a mortgage-related security’s value.

Commodities Risk. Exposure to the commodities markets may subject the Fund to greater volatility than investments in traditional securities, and exposure to commodities, directly or through other securities, can cause the value of the Fund’s assets to decline or fluctuate in a rapid and unpredictable manner. The value of commodities may be affected by changes in overall market movements, real or perceived inflationary trends, commodity index volatility, changes in interest rates or currency exchange rates, population growth and changing demographics, international economic, political and regulatory developments, and factors affecting a particular region, industry or commodity, such as drought, floods, or other weather conditions, livestock disease, changes in storage costs, trade embargoes, competition from substitute products, transportation bottlenecks or shortages, fluctuations in supply and demand, and tariffs.

Convertible Securities Risk. A convertible security has characteristics of both equity and debt securities and, as a result, is exposed to risks that are typically associated with both types of securities. Convertible securities are typically subordinate to an issuer’s other debt obligations. Issuers of convertible securities may be more vulnerable to changes in the economy, such as a recession or a sustained period of rising interest rates, which could affect their ability to make interest and principal payments. If an issuer stops making interest and/or principal payments, the Fund could lose its entire investment.

Credit Risk. Credit risk is the risk that the issuer or guarantor of a debt instrument or the counterparty to a derivatives contract, repurchase agreement or loan of portfolio securities will be unable or unwilling to make its timely interest and/or principal payments when due or otherwise honor its obligations. Changes
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in an issuer’s or counterparty’s credit rating or the market’s perception of an issuer’s or counterparty’s creditworthiness may also adversely affect the value of the Fund’s investment in that issuer. The degree of credit risk depends on an issuer’s or counterparty’s financial condition and on the terms of an obligation.

Currency Risk. Investments directly in foreign (non-U.S.) currencies or in securities that trade in, and receive revenues in, foreign (non-U.S.) currencies are subject to the risk that those currencies will decline in value relative to the U.S. dollar or, in the case of hedging positions, that the U.S. dollar will decline in value relative to the currency being hedged. Currency rates in foreign countries may fluctuate significantly over short periods of time for a number of reasons, including changes in interest rates, intervention (or the failure to intervene) by U.S. or foreign governments, central banks or supranational entities such as the International Monetary Fund, or by the imposition of currency controls or other political developments in the United States or abroad.

Debt Securities Risk. The risks of investing in debt securities include (without limitation): (i) credit risk, e.g., the issuer or guarantor of a debt security may be unable or unwilling (or be perceived as unable or unwilling) to make timely principal and/or interest payments or otherwise honor its obligations; (ii) interest rate risk, e.g., when interest rates go up, the value of a debt security generally goes down, and when interest rates go down, the value of a debt security generally goes up; (iii) liquidity risk and valuation risk, e.g., debt securities generally do not trade on a securities exchange, making them generally less liquid and more difficult to value than common stock; (iv) call risk and income risk, e.g., during a period of falling interest rates, the issuer may redeem a security by repaying it early, which may reduce the Fund’s income if the proceeds are reinvested at lower interest rates; and (v) extension risk, e.g., if interest rates rise, repayments of debt securities may occur more slowly than anticipated by the market, which may drive the prices of these securities down because their interest rates are lower than the current interest rate and the securities remain outstanding longer. Debt securities most frequently trade in institutional round lot size transactions. If the Fund purchases bonds in amounts less than the institutional round lot size, which are frequently referred to as “odd” lots, the odd lot size positions may have more price volatility than institutional round lot size positions. The Fund uses a third-party pricing service to value bond holdings and the pricing service values bonds assuming orderly transactions of an institutional round lot size.

Emerging Markets Securities Risk. Securities of issuers based in countries with developing economies (emerging market countries) may present market, credit, currency, liquidity, legal, political and other risks different from, or greater than, the risks of investing in developed market countries and are generally considered speculative in nature. Emerging market countries are subject to greater market volatility, lower trading volume, political and economic instability, uncertainty regarding the existence of trading markets, rapid inflation, possible repatriation of investment income and capital, currency convertibility issues, less uniform accounting standards and more governmental limitations on foreign investment than more developed markets. Laws regarding foreign investment in emerging market securities, securities regulation, title to securities, and shareholder rights may change quickly and unpredictably. In addition, the enforcement of systems of taxation at federal, regional and local levels in emerging market countries may be inconsistent and subject to sudden change.

Emerging Markets Sovereign Debt Risk. Government obligors in emerging market countries are among the world’s largest debtors to commercial banks, other governments, international financial organizations and other financial institutions. Historically, certain issuers of the government debt securities in which an Underlying ETP may invest have experienced substantial difficulties in meeting their external debt obligations, resulting in defaults on certain obligations and the restructuring of certain indebtedness, which could result in losses to an Underlying ETP.

Equity Securities Risk. Investments in common stocks and other equity securities are particularly subject to the risk of changes in investors’ perceptions of the financial condition of an issuer, conditions affecting equity markets generally and political and/or economic events. Equity prices may also be particularly sensitive to rising interest rates, as the cost of capital rises and borrowing costs increase. Holders of an issuer’s common stock may be subject to greater risks than holders of its preferred stock and debt securities because common stockholders’ claims are subordinated to those of holders of preferred stocks and debt securities upon the bankruptcy of an issuer.
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Foreign Securities Risk. Investments in the securities of non-U.S. issuers involve risks beyond those associated with investments in U.S. securities. These additional risks include greater market volatility, the availability of less reliable financial information, higher transactional and custody costs, taxation by foreign governments, decreased market liquidity and political instability. Some countries and regions have experienced security concerns, war or threats of war and aggression, terrorism, economic uncertainty, natural and environmental disasters and/or systemic market dislocations that have led, and in the future may lead, to increased short-term market volatility and may have adverse long-term effects on the U.S. and world economies and markets generally. Foreign issuers are often subject to less stringent requirements regarding accounting, auditing, financial reporting and record keeping than are U.S. issuers, and therefore not all material information will be available. Securities exchanges or foreign governments may adopt rules or regulations that may negatively impact the Fund’s ability to invest in foreign securities or may prevent the Fund from repatriating its investments. Less developed securities markets are more likely to experience problems with the clearing and settling of trades, as well as the holding of securities by local banks, agents and depositories. The less developed a country’s securities market is, the greater the likelihood of custody problems.

High Yield Securities Risk. High yield securities, or “junk” bonds, generally offer a higher current yield than the yield available from higher grade issues, but are subject to greater market fluctuations, are less liquid and provide a greater risk of loss than investment grade securities, and therefore are considered to be highly speculative. In general, high yield securities may have a greater risk of default than other types of securities and could cause income and principal losses for the Fund.

Interest Rate Risk. An increase in interest rates may cause the value of securities held by the Fund to decline. Fixed income securities with longer durations tend to be more sensitive to changes in interest rates, making them more volatile than securities with shorter durations or floating or adjustable interest rates. The negative impact on the Fund from potential interest rate increases could be swift and significant, including falling market values, increased redemptions and reduced liquidity. The Fund may be subject to a greater risk of rising interest rates than would normally be the case due to the current period of historically low rates and the effect of potential government fiscal policy initiatives and resulting market reaction to those initiatives.
When interest rates rise, certain obligations will be paid off by the issuer (or other obligated party) more slowly than anticipated, causing the value of these securities to fall. As a result, in a period of rising interest rates, securities may exhibit additional volatility and may lose value. The value of securities with longer maturities generally changes more in response to changes in interest rates than does the value of securities with shorter maturities.
During periods of falling interest rates, an issuer of a callable security held by the Fund may “call” or repay the security before its stated maturity, which may result in the Fund having to reinvest the proceeds in securities with lower yields, resulting in a decline in the Fund’s income, or in securities with greater risks or with other less favorable features.
The terms of floating rate notes and other instruments may be tied to the London Interbank Offered Rate (“LIBOR”), which functions as a reference rate or benchmark. It is anticipated that LIBOR will be discontinued at the end of 2021, which may cause increased volatility and illiquidity in the markets for instruments with terms tied to LIBOR or other adverse consequences, such as decreased yields and reduction in value, for these instruments. These events may adversely affect the Fund and its investments in such instruments.

Municipal Bond Risk. Issuers, including governmental issuers, may be unable to pay their obligations as they come due. The values of Municipal Bonds that depend on a specific revenue source to fund their payment obligations may fluctuate as a result of actual or anticipated changes in the cash flows generated by the revenue source or changes in the priority of the municipal obligation to receive the cash flows generated by the revenue source. The values of Municipal Bonds held by the Fund may be adversely affected by local political and economic conditions and developments. Adverse conditions in an industry significant to a local economy could have a correspondingly adverse effect on the financial condition of local issuers. This risk would be heightened to the extent that the Fund invests a substantial portion of its assets in Municipal Bonds issued pursuant to similar projects or whose interest is paid solely from revenues of similar projects. In addition, income from Municipal Bonds held by the Fund could be declared taxable because of, among other things, unfavorable changes in tax laws, adverse
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interpretations by the Internal Revenue Service or state tax authorities, or noncompliant conduct of an issuer or other obligated party. Loss of tax-exempt status may cause interest received and distributed to shareholders by the Fund to be taxable and may result in a significant decline in the values of such municipal securities. There are various different types of Municipal Bonds, each with its own unique risk profile. Some of these risks include:

General Obligation Bonds Risk — timely payments depend on the issuer’s credit quality, ability to raise tax revenues and ability to maintain an adequate tax base;

Revenue Bonds (including Industrial Development Bonds) Risk — timely payments depend on the money earned by the particular facility or class of facilities, or the amount of revenues derived from another source, and may be negatively impacted by the general credit of the user of the facility;

Private Activity Bonds Risk — municipalities and other public authorities issue private activity bonds to finance development of industrial facilities for use by a private enterprise, which is solely responsible for paying the principal and interest on the bonds, and payment under these bonds depends on the private enterprise’s ability to do so;

Moral Obligation Bonds Risk — moral obligation bonds are generally issued by special purpose public authorities of a state or municipality. If the issuer is unable to meet its obligations, repayment of these bonds becomes a moral commitment, but not a legal obligation, of the state or municipality;

Municipal Notes Risk — municipal notes are shorter-term municipal debt obligations that pay interest that is, in the opinion of bond counsel for the issuer at the time of issuance, generally excludable from gross income for federal income tax purposes (except that the interest may be includable in taxable income for purposes of the federal alternative minimum tax) and that have a maturity that is generally one year or less. If there is a shortfall in the anticipated proceeds, the notes may not be fully repaid and the Fund may lose money; and

Municipal Lease Obligations Risk — in a municipal lease obligation, the issuer agrees to make payments when due on the lease obligation. Although the issuer does not pledge its unlimited taxing power for payment of the lease obligation, the lease obligation is secured by the leased property.

Preferred Securities Risk. Preferred securities combine some of the characteristics of both common stocks and bonds. Preferred securities are typically subordinated to bonds and other debt securities in a company’s capital structure in terms of priority to corporate income, subjecting them to greater credit risk than those debt securities. Generally, holders of preferred securities have no voting rights with respect to the issuing company unless preferred dividends have been in arrears for a specified number of periods, at which time the preferred security holders may obtain limited rights. In certain circumstances, an issuer of preferred securities may defer payment on the securities and, in some cases, redeem the securities prior to a specified date. Preferred securities may also be substantially less liquid than other securities, including common stock.

Real Estate Companies Risk. An investment in companies that invest in real estate (including REITs) exposes the Fund to the risks of the real estate market and the risks associated with the ownership of real estate. These risks can include fluctuations in the value of or destruction of underlying properties; realignment in tenant living and work habits (for example, movements to and from different parts of a nation, a region, a state or a city); tenant or borrower default; market saturation; changes in general and local economic conditions; decreases in market rates for rents; increases in vacancies; competition; property taxes; capital expenditures or operating expenses; other economic or political events affecting the real estate industry including interest rates and government regulation; concentration in a limited number of properties, geographic regions or property types; and low quality and/or conflicted management. Real estate is generally a less liquid asset class and companies that hold real estate may not be able to liquidate or modify their holdings quickly in response to changes in economic or other market conditions. Additionally, such companies may utilize leverage, which increases investment risk and the potential for more volatility in the Fund’s returns.

Risks of Investing in Loans. Investments in loans are subject to the same risks as investments in other types of debt securities, including credit risk, interest rate risk, liquidity risk and valuation risk that may be heightened because of the limited public information available regarding loans and because loan borrowers may be leveraged and tend to be more adversely affected by changes in market or
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economic conditions. Default in the payment of interest or principal on a loan will result in a reduction in the value of the loan and consequently a reduction in the value of an investment in that loan. If an investor holds a loan through another financial institution or relies on a financial institution to administer the loan, its receipt of principal and interest on the loan may be subject to the credit risk of that financial institution. It is possible that any collateral securing a loan may be insufficient or unavailable to the investor, and that the investor’s rights to collateral may be limited by bankruptcy or insolvency laws. Additionally, there is no central clearinghouse for loan trades and the loan market has not established enforceable settlement standards or remedies for failure to settle. Consequently, the secondary market for loans may be subject to irregular trading activity, wide bid/ask spreads and extended trade settlement periods (in some cases longer than 7 days), which may cause an investor to be unable to realize the full value of its investment. In addition, loans are generally not registered with the SEC under the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, and may not be considered “securities,” and an investor may not be entitled to rely on the anti-fraud protections of the federal securities laws. An investment in loans made to non-U.S. borrowers may be affected by political and social instability, changes in economic or taxation policies, difficulties in enforcing obligations, decreased liquidity and increased volatility. Foreign borrowers may be subject to less regulation, resulting in less publicly available information about the borrowers.
The loan market has seen a significant increase in loans with weaker lender protections including, but not limited to, limited financial maintenance covenants or, in some cases, no financial maintenance covenants (i.e., “covenant-lite loans”) that would typically be included in a traditional loan agreement and general weakening of other restrictive covenants applicable to the borrower such as limitations on incurrence of additional debt, restrictions on payments of junior debt or restrictions on dividends and distributions. Weaker lender protections such as the absence of financial maintenance covenants in a loan agreement and the inclusion of  “borrower-favorable” terms may impact recovery values and/or trading levels of loans in the future. The absence of financial maintenance covenants in a loan agreement generally means that the lender may not be able to declare a default if financial performance deteriorates. This may hinder an investor’s ability to reprice credit risk associated with a particular borrower and reduce the investor’s ability to restructure a problematic loan and mitigate potential loss. As a result, an investor’s exposure to losses on investments in loans may be increased, especially during a downturn in the credit cycle or changes in market or economic conditions.

Small- and/or Mid-Capitalization Companies Risk. Small- and mid-capitalization companies may be more vulnerable to adverse general market or economic developments, and their securities may be less liquid and may experience greater price volatility than larger, more established companies.

Variable and Floating Rate Instruments Risk. Variable and floating rate instruments include debt securities issued by corporate and governmental entities, bank loans, mortgage-backed securities and asset-backed securities, preferred equity securities and derivative variable rate securities, such as inverse floaters. Variable and floating rate instruments are structured so that the instrument’s coupon rate fluctuates based upon the level of a reference rate. A variable or floating rate instrument’s coupon rate resets periodically according to its terms. Consequently, in a rising interest rate environment, variable and floating rate instruments with coupon rates that reset infrequently may lag behind the changes in market interest rates.
Valuation Risk
Independent market quotations for certain investments held by the Fund may not be readily available, and such investments may be fair valued or valued by a pricing service at an evaluated price. These valuations involve subjectivity and different market participants may assign different prices to the same investment. As a result, there is a risk that the Fund may not be able to sell an investment at the price assigned to the investment by the Fund. In addition, the value of the securities or other assets in the Fund’s portfolio may change on days or during time periods when shareholders will not be able to purchase or sell the Fund’s Shares.
Performance Information
The bar chart that follows shows the annual total returns of the Fund for a full calendar year. The table that follows the bar chart shows the Fund’s average annual total returns, both before and after taxes. The bar chart and table provide an indication of the risks of investing in the Fund by comparing the Fund’s performance from year to year and by showing how the Fund’s average annual returns for one calendar year compared with its underlying index and additional broad measures of market performance. The HFRI Equity Market Neutral Index
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is an equally weighted hedge fund index including both Factor Based and Statistical Arbitrage/Trading strategies. The Bloomberg Barclays U.S. Short Treasury Bond Index measures the performance of public obligations of the Treasury that have a remaining maturing of between 1 and 12 months.
All returns assume reinvestment of dividends and distributions. The Fund’s past performance (before and after taxes) is not necessarily an indication of how the Fund will perform in the future. Performance reflects fee waivers and/or expense reimbursement in effect, if such waivers or reimbursements were not in place, the Fund’s performance would be reduced. Fund performance current to the most recent month-end is available by calling 1-888-474-7725 or by visiting newyorklifeinvestments.com.
[MISSING IMAGE: tm2123983d1-bc_marketbw.jpg]
The Fund’s year-to-date total return as of June 30, 2021 was 0.62%.
Best and Worst Quarter Returns (for the period reflected in the bar chart above)
Return
Quarter/Year
Highest Return 5.22% 2Q/2020
Lowest Return -6.31% 1Q/2020
Average Annual Total Returns as of December 31, 2020
1 Year
5 Years
Since
Inception(1)
Returns before taxes 4.01% 2.81% 1.96%
Returns after taxes on distributions(2) 3.16% 2.39% 1.61%
Returns after taxes on distributions and sale of Fund Shares(2) 2.39% 1.99% 1.37%
IQ Hedge Market Neutral Index
(reflects no deduction for fees, expenses or taxes)
4.51% 3.57% 2.86%
HFRI Equity Market Neutral Index(3)
(reflects no deduction for fees, expenses or taxes)
-0.11% 1.65% 2.75%
Bloomberg Barclays U.S. Short Treasury Bond Index
(reflects no deduction for fees, expenses or taxes)
0.95% 1.32% 0.85%
(1)
The Fund commenced operations on October 4, 2012.
(2)
After-tax returns are calculated using the highest historical individual federal marginal income tax rates and do not reflect the impact of state and local taxes. Actual after-tax returns depend on your tax situation and may differ from those shown and are not relevant if you hold your Shares through tax-deferred arrangements, such as 401(k) plans or individual retirement accounts. In some cases the return after taxes may exceed the return before taxes due to an assumed tax benefit from any losses on a sale of Fund Shares at the end of the measurement period.
(3)
HFRI Equity Market Neutral Index is calculated from September 30, 2012. Performance information for the Fund in the table above also includes the performance of HFRI Equity Market Neutral Index. Because index comparisons are generally calculated as of the end of each month, index performance information under the “Since Inception” heading may not be coincident with the inception date of the Fund. In such instances, index performance is generally presented from the month-end nearest to the inception date of the Fund.
Investment Advisor
IndexIQ Advisors LLC is the investment advisor to the Fund.
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Portfolio Manager
The professionals jointly and primarily responsible for the day-to-day management of the Fund are Greg Barrato and James Harrison. Mr. Barrato, Senior Vice President of the Advisor, has been a portfolio manager of the Fund since its inception and Mr. Harrison, Vice President of the Advisor, has been a portfolio manager of the Fund since April 2018.
Purchase and Sale of Fund Shares
Unlike conventional mutual funds, the Fund issues and redeems Shares on a continuous basis, at NAV, only in large blocks of Shares called “Creation Units.” Individual Shares of the Fund may only be purchased and sold on the secondary market through a broker-dealer. Since Shares of the Fund trade on securities exchanges in the secondary market at their market price rather than their NAV, the Fund’s Shares may trade at a price greater than (premium) or less than (discount) the Fund’s NAV. An investor may incur costs attributable to the difference between the highest price a buyer is willing to pay to purchase Shares of the Fund (bid) and the lowest price a seller is willing to accept for Shares of the Fund (ask) when buying or selling Shares in the secondary market (the “bid-ask spread”). Recent information, including the Fund’s NAV, market price, premiums and discounts, and bid-ask spreads, is available online at newyorklifeinvestments.com.
Tax Information
The Fund’s distributions are expected to be taxed as ordinary income, qualified dividend income and/or capital gains, unless you are investing through a tax-deferred arrangement, such as a 401(k) plan or individual retirement account. However, subsequent withdrawals from such a tax-advantaged account may be subject to U.S. federal income tax. You should consult your tax advisor about your specific situation.
Financial Intermediary Compensation
If you purchase the Fund through a broker-dealer or other financial intermediary (such as a bank), the Advisor or other related companies may pay the intermediary for marketing activities and presentations, educational training programs, conferences, the development of technology platforms and reporting systems or other services related to the sale or promotion of the Fund. These payments may create a conflict of interest by influencing the broker-dealer or other intermediary and your salesperson to recommend the Fund over another investment. Ask your salesperson or visit your financial intermediary’s website for more information.
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Summary Information  
IQ Hedge Long/Short Tracker ETF
Investment Objective
The Fund seeks investment results that correspond (before fees and expenses) generally to the price and yield performance of its underlying index, the IQ Hedge Long/Short Index (the “Underlying Index”).
Fees and Expenses of the Fund
This table describes fees and expenses that you may pay if you buy, sell or hold shares of the Fund (“Shares”). Investors may pay other fees, such as brokerage commissions and other fees to financial intermediaries, which are not reflected in the table and example set forth below.
Shareholder Fees (fees paid directly from your investment):
None
Annual Fund Operating Expenses (expenses that you pay each year as a percentage of the value of your investment):
Management Fee 0.75%
Distribution and/or Service (12b-1) Fees 0.00%
Other Expenses 0.01%
Acquired Fund Fees & Expenses(a) 0.18%
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses(a)
0.94%
Fee Waiver(b) 0.35%
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses After Fee Waiver 0.59%
(a)
The Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses may not correlate to the ratio of expenses to average net assets as reported in the “Financial Highlights” section of the Prospectus, which reflects the operating expenses of the Fund and does not include Acquired Fund Fees & Expenses. Acquired Fund Fees & Expenses represent the Fund’s pro rata share of fees and expenses incurred indirectly as a result of investing in other funds, including ETFs and money market funds.
(b)
IndexIQ Advisors LLC (the “Advisor”) has contractually agreed, until August 31, 2022, to waive a portion of the management fee equal to 0.35% of average daily net assets.
Example. This example is intended to help you compare the cost of investing in the Fund with the cost of investing in other funds. This example does not take into account brokerage commissions that you pay when purchasing or selling Shares of the Fund.
The example assumes that you invest $10,000 in the Fund for the time periods indicated and then redeem all of your Shares at the end of those periods. The example also assumes that your investment has a 5% return each year and that the Fund’s operating expenses remain at current levels. The return of 5% and estimated expenses are for illustration purposes only, and should not be considered indicators of expected Fund expenses or performance, which may be greater or less than the estimates.
Although your actual costs may be higher or lower, based on these assumptions your costs would be:
1 Year
3 Years
5 Years
10 Years
$60
$265
$486
$1,123
Portfolio Turnover
The Fund pays transaction costs, such as commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or “turns over” its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover rate may indicate higher transaction costs and may result in higher taxes when Shares are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are not reflected in annual Fund operating expenses or in the example, affect the Fund’s performance. During the most recent fiscal year, the Fund’s portfolio turnover rate was 156% of the average value of its portfolio. This rate excludes the value of portfolio securities received or delivered as a result of in-kind creations or redemptions of the Shares.
Principal Investment Strategies
The Fund is a “fund of funds” which means it invests, under normal circumstances, at least 80% of its net assets, plus the amount of any borrowings for investment purposes, in the investments included in its Underlying Index, which includes underlying funds. The Underlying Index consists of a number of components (“Underlying Index Components”) selected in accordance with IndexIQ’s rules-based methodology of such Underlying Index.
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Such Underlying Index Components will include primarily ETFs and/or other exchange-traded vehicles issuing equity securities organized in the U.S., such as exchange-traded commodity pools (“ETVs”), and may include exchange-traded notes (“ETNs”) (such ETFs, ETVs and ETNs are referred to collectively as “exchange-traded products” or “ETPs”). The Fund may also invest in one or more financial instruments, including but not limited to futures contracts and swap agreements (collectively, “Financial Instruments”).
The Fund employs a “passive management” — or indexing — investment approach designed to track the performance of the Underlying Index, which was developed by IndexIQ LLC (“IndexIQ”), an affiliate of IndexIQ Advisors LLC, the Fund’s investment advisor (the “Advisor”). The Underlying Index seeks to track the “beta” portion of the returns (i.e., that portion of the returns of hedge funds that are non-idiosyncratic, or unrelated to manager skill) of hedge funds pursuing a long/short strategy (the “Strategy”). Long/short hedge funds typically diversify their risks by limiting the net exposure to particular regions, industries, sectors and market capitalization bands, allowing them to focus on company-specific anomalies. At the same time, long/short managers often hedge against un-diversifiable risk, such as market risk (i.e., the returns of the overall market). Certain long/short managers focus on specific sectors, regions or industries, on particular investment styles, such as value or growth, or certain types of stocks, such as small or large. The Fund does not invest in hedge funds, and the Underlying Index does not include hedge funds as Underlying Index Components. The Fund is not a fund of hedge funds.
The Underlying Index may include both long and short positions in securities, including, primarily, ETPs. As opposed to taking long positions in which an investor seeks to profit from increases in the price of a security, short selling (or “selling short”) is a technique used by the Fund to try and profit from the falling price of a security. Short selling involves selling a security that has been borrowed from a third party with the intention of buying the identical security back at a later date to return to that third party. The basic principle of short selling is that one can profit by selling a security now at a high price and later buying it back at a lower price. The short seller hopes to profit from a decline in the price of the security between the sale and the repurchase, as the seller will pay less to buy the security than it received on selling the security.
The Underlying Index generally is based on the premise that hedge fund returns, when aggregated among hedge funds with similar investment styles, display over time significant exposures to a set of common investment strategies and asset classes. By creating an index that has similar exposures to the same investment strategies and asset classes as hedge funds generally, IndexIQ seeks to replicate the beta return characteristics of hedge funds.
The Underlying Index Components of this Strategy generally provide exposures to:

Emerging market equity;

Foreign equity, including small-capitalization equity;

The implied volatility of the S&P 500®​ Index;

U.S. and foreign preferred securities;

U.S. and foreign real estate investment trusts;

U.S. bank loans;

U.S. government long-term maturity obligations;

U.S. growth equity;

U.S. investment grade corporate debt;

U.S. large-capitalization equity;

U.S. small-capitalization equity; and

U.S. value equity.
The Underlying Index is unlike traditional market-oriented indexes like the Standard & Poor’s 500®​ Composite Stock Total Return Index (the “S&P 500 Index”). Instead of tracking the performance of publicly-traded issuers representing a market or industry sector, the Underlying Index seeks to track the returns of distinct hedge fund investment styles.
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The Underlying Index may include as a component one or more ETFs advised by the Advisor (“Affiliated ETFs”) and the Fund will typically invest in any Affiliated ETF included in the Underlying Index. The Fund also may invest in Affiliated ETFs that are not components of the index if such an investment will help the Fund track the Underlying Index.
The weights of the Underlying Index Components are rebalanced on a monthly basis. Annually, IndexIQ conducts a review process pursuant to which it may reconstitute the Underlying Indexes by adding or subtracting Underlying Index Components according to IndexIQ’s rules-based process.
Principal Risks
Investors in the Fund should be willing to accept a high degree of volatility in the price of the Shares and the possibility of significant losses. An investment in the Fund involves a substantial degree of risk and the Fund does not represent a complete investment program. As with all investments, you may lose money in the Fund. An investment in the Fund is not insured or guaranteed by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation or any other government agency. Therefore, you should consider carefully the following risks before investing in the Fund. A more complete discussion of Principal Risks is included under “Description of the Principal Risks of the Funds.”
Authorized Participant Concentration Risk
Only certain large institutions may engage in creation or redemption transactions directly with the Fund (each, an “Authorized Participant”). The Fund has a limited number of institutions that may act as Authorized Participants on an agency basis (i.e., on behalf of other market participants). To the extent that those Authorized Participants exit the business or are unable to proceed with creation and/or redemption orders with the Fund and no other Authorized Participant is able to step forward to engage in creation and redemption transactions with the Fund, Shares may be more likely to trade at a premium or discount to NAV and possibly face trading halts and/or delisting.
Counterparty Risk
A counterparty (the other party to a transaction or an agreement or the party with whom the Fund executes transactions) to a transaction with the Fund may be unable or unwilling to make timely principal, interest, settlement or margin payments, fulfill the delivery conditions of the contract or transaction, or otherwise honor its obligations. If a counterparty fails to meet its contractual obligations the Fund will have contractual remedies pursuant to the agreements related to the transaction but the Fund may be unable to terminate or realize any gain on the investment or transaction, resulting in a loss to the Fund. The Fund may experience significant delays in obtaining any recovery in an insolvency, bankruptcy, or other reorganization proceeding involving a counterparty (including recovery of any collateral posted by it) and may obtain limited or no recovery in such circumstances.
Cyber Security Risk
The Fund is susceptible to operational risks through breaches in cyber security. Such events may cause the Fund to lose proprietary information, suffer data corruption or lose operational capacity and could cause the Fund to incur regulatory penalties, reputational damage, additional compliance costs associated with corrective measures and/or financial loss. In addition, cyber security breaches of the securities issuers or the Fund’s third-party service providers can also subject the Fund to many of the same risks associated with direct cyber security breaches. Although the Fund has established risk management systems designed to reduce the risks associated with cyber security, there is no guarantee that such efforts will succeed.
Derivatives Risk
Derivatives are investments whose value depends on (or is derived from) the value of an underlying instrument, such as a security, asset, reference rate or index and involve risks different from, and possibly greater than, the risks associated with other investments. These risks include: (i) the risk that the counterparty to a derivatives transaction may not fulfill its contractual obligations; (ii) risk of mispricing or improper valuation; and (iii) the risk that changes in the value of the derivative may not correlate perfectly with the underlying asset. Derivative prices are highly volatile and may fluctuate substantially during a short period of time. Such prices are influenced by numerous factors that affect the markets, including, but not limited to, changing supply and demand relationships, government programs and policies, national and international political and economic events, changes in interest rates, inflation and deflation, and changes in supply and demand relationships. Unlike other investments, derivative contracts often have leverage inherent in their terms. The use of leveraged derivatives can magnify potential for gain or loss and, therefore, amplify the effects of market volatility on the Fund’s Share price. The effects of leverage may also cause the Fund to liquidate portfolio positions when it would not be advantageous to do so in order to satisfy its obligations or to meet collateral segregation requirements.
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Exchange Traded Products Risk
Unlike an investment in a mutual fund, the value of the Fund’s investment in other exchange-traded funds or exchange-traded investment products (“ETPs”) is based on its market price (rather than NAV) and the Fund could lose money due to premiums/discounts of the ETP (which could cause the Fund to buy shares at market prices that are higher than their value or sell shares at market prices that are lower than their value); the failure of an active trading market to develop; or exchange trading halts or delistings. An investment in the Fund will entail more costs and expenses than a direct investment in any Underlying ETP. As the Fund’s allocations to Underlying ETPs changes, or the expense ratio of Underlying ETPs change, the operating expenses borne by the Fund from such investments may increase or decrease.
Index Risk
There is no guarantee that the Fund’s investment results will have a high degree of correlation to those of the Underlying Index or that the Fund will achieve its investment objective. Market disruptions and regulatory restrictions could have an adverse effect on the Fund’s ability to adjust its exposure to the required levels in order to track the Underlying Index. Errors in index data, index computations or the construction of the Underlying Index in accordance with its methodology may occur from time to time and may not be identified and corrected for a period of time or at all, which may have an adverse impact on the Fund and its shareholders.
Long/Short Risk
The Fund seeks long exposure to certain securities and short exposure to certain other securities. There is no guarantee that the returns on the Fund’s long or short positions will produce positive returns, and the Fund could lose money if either or both positions produce negative returns. In addition, the Fund may gain enhanced long exposure to certain securities (i.e., obtain investment exposure that exceeds the amount directly invested in those assets, a form of leverage) and, as a result, suffer losses that exceed the amount invested in those assets.
Liquidity Risk
Liquidity risk exists when particular investments are difficult to purchase or sell. Certain investments may be subject to restrictions on resale, trade over-the-counter or in limited volume, or lack an active trading market. Accordingly, the Fund may not be able to sell or close out of such investments at favorable times or prices (or at all), or at the prices approximating those at which the Fund currently values them. Illiquid securities may trade at a discount from comparable, more liquid investments and may be subject to wide fluctuations in market value.
Market Risk
Market risks include political, regulatory, market and economic developments, including developments that impact specific economic sectors, industries or segments of the market, which may affect the Fund’s value. Turbulence in financial markets, tariffs and other protectionist measures, political developments and uncertainty, central bank policy, and reduced liquidity in equity, credit and fixed income markets may negatively affect many issuers worldwide, which could have an adverse effect on the Fund. During a general downturn in the securities markets, multiple asset classes may be negatively affected. Geopolitical and other events, including war, terrorism, economic uncertainty, trade disputes, public health crises and related geopolitical events have led, and in the future may lead, to disruptions in the US and world economies and markets, which may increase financial market volatility and have significant adverse direct or indirect effects on a Fund and its investments. Market disruptions could cause the Fund to lose money, experience significant redemptions, and encounter operational difficulties. Although multiple asset classes may be affected by a market disruption, the duration and effects may not be the same for all types of assets.
Operational Risk
The Fund is exposed to operational risks arising from a number of factors, including, but not limited to, human error, processing and communication errors, errors of the Fund’s service providers, counterparties or other third-parties, failed or inadequate processes and technology or systems failures. The Fund and Advisor seek to reduce these operational risks through controls and procedures. However, these measures do not address every possible risk and may be inadequate to address significant operational risks.
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Passive Management Risk
The Fund is not actively managed and instead seeks to track the performance of an index. Passive management has the following risks associated with it:

The Fund invests in the securities included in, or representative of, the Underlying Index. The provider of the Underlying Index or the index calculation agent may make errors. The index provider may include index constituents that should have been excluded, or it may exclude index constituents that should have been included. It also may include or exclude constituents at incorrect levels. This may result in the Fund, in turn, being correctly positioned to an index that has been incorrectly calculated. This could lead to losses to the Fund.

In seeking to track the Underlying Index’s performance, the Fund may be subject to tracking error, which is the divergence of the Fund’s performance from that of the Underlying Index. Tracking error may occur because of differences between the securities and other instruments held in the Fund’s portfolio and those included in the Underlying Index, pricing differences (including, as applicable, differences between a security’s price at the local market close and the Fund’s valuation of a security at the time of calculation of the Fund’s NAV), differences in transaction costs, the Fund’s holding of uninvested cash, differences in timing of the accrual of or the valuation of dividends or interest, the requirements to maintain pass-through tax treatment, portfolio transactions carried out to minimize the distribution of capital gains to shareholders, changes to the Underlying Index or the costs to the Fund of complying with various new or existing regulatory requirements. Tracking error also may result because the Fund incurs fees and expenses, while the Underlying Index does not. This risk may be heightened during times of increased market volatility or other unusual market conditions.

The Fund generally will not attempt to take defensive positions in declining markets and generally will not sell a security because its issuer is in financial trouble, unless that security is removed from (or was no longer useful in tracking a component of) the Underlying Index.
Portfolio Turnover Risk
The Fund’s strategy may frequently involve buying and selling portfolio securities to rebalance the Fund’s investment exposures. High portfolio turnover may result in the Fund paying higher levels of transaction costs and generating greater tax liabilities for shareholders. Portfolio turnover risk may cause the Fund’s performance to be less than expected.
Secondary Market Trading Risk
Although the Fund’s Shares are listed for trading on one or more securities exchanges, there can be no assurance that an active trading market for such Shares will develop or be maintained by market makers or Authorized Participants. In general, the trading of Shares on securities exchanges is subject to the risk of irregular trading activity and wide “bid/ask” spreads (which may be especially pronounced for smaller funds). Additionally, market makers are under no obligation to make a market in the Fund’s Shares and Authorized Participants are not obligated to submit purchase or redemption orders for Creation Units. In the event market makers cease making a market in the Fund’s Shares or Authorized Participants stop submitting purchase or redemption orders for Creation Units, the Fund’s Shares may trade at a larger premium or discount to its NAV. Wide bid-ask spreads and large premiums or discounts to NAV are likely to lead to an investor buying his or her shares at a market price that is more than their value, and selling those shares at a market price that is less than their value.
Short Sales Risk
Short sales are transactions in which the Fund sells a security it does not own, or uses derivatives, such as futures or swaps, to effect short exposure to a particular reference asset. Such a position subjects the Fund to the risk that instead of declining, the price of the security or reference asset to which the Fund has short exposure will rise. If the price of the security or reference asset increases between the date of the short sale and the date on which the Fund replaces the security or otherwise closes out its short position, the Fund will experience a loss, which is theoretically unlimited since there is a theoretically unlimited potential for the market price of a security or other instrument sold short to increase.
Swap Agreements Risk
Swap agreements may involve greater risks than direct investment in securities as they may be leveraged and are subject to credit risk, counterparty risk, liquidity risk and valuation risk. A swap agreement could result in losses if the underlying reference or asset does not perform as anticipated. In addition, many swaps trade
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over-the-counter and may be considered illiquid. It may not be possible for the Fund to liquidate a swap position at an advantageous time or price, which may result in significant losses.
Trading Price Risk
Shares of the Fund trade on securities exchanges at prices at, above or below the Fund’s most recent NAV. The NAV of the Fund is calculated at the end of each business day and fluctuates with changes in the market value of the Fund’s holdings. The trading price of the Fund’s Shares fluctuates continuously throughout trading hours based on both market supply of and demand for Shares and the underlying value of the Fund’s portfolio holdings or NAV. As a result, the trading prices of the Fund’s Shares may deviate significantly from NAV during periods of market volatility. Any of these factors, among others, may lead to the Fund’s Shares trading at a premium or discount to NAV. Although it is generally expected that the market price of the Shares of the Fund will approximate the Fund’s NAV, there may be times when the market price and the NAV vary significantly. Thus, an investor may pay more than NAV when purchasing Shares and receive less than NAV when selling Shares.
Risks of Underlying ETPs
The Fund may invest in the securities of other ETPs, including Affiliated ETFs. Investments in the Fund are subject to the risks associated with an investment in the Underlying ETPs. In addition to the risks described above, the following risks should also be considered when making an investment in the Fund.

Credit Risk. Credit risk is the risk that the issuer or guarantor of a debt instrument or the counterparty to a derivatives contract, repurchase agreement or loan of portfolio securities will be unable or unwilling to make its timely interest and/or principal payments when due or otherwise honor its obligations. Changes in an issuer’s or counterparty’s credit rating or the market’s perception of an issuer’s or counterparty’s creditworthiness may also adversely affect the value of the Fund’s investment in that issuer. The degree of credit risk depends on an issuer’s or counterparty’s financial condition and on the terms of an obligation.

Currency Risk. Investments directly in foreign (non-U.S.) currencies or in securities that trade in, and receive revenues in, foreign (non-U.S.) currencies are subject to the risk that those currencies will decline in value relative to the U.S. dollar or, in the case of hedging positions, that the U.S. dollar will decline in value relative to the currency being hedged. Currency rates in foreign countries may fluctuate significantly over short periods of time for a number of reasons, including changes in interest rates, intervention (or the failure to intervene) by U.S. or foreign governments, central banks or supranational entities such as the International Monetary Fund, or by the imposition of currency controls or other political developments in the United States or abroad.

Debt Securities Risk. The risks of investing in debt securities include (without limitation): (i) credit risk, e.g., the issuer or guarantor of a debt security may be unable or unwilling (or be perceived as unable or unwilling) to make timely principal and/or interest payments or otherwise honor its obligations; (ii) interest rate risk, e.g., when interest rates go up, the value of a debt security generally goes down, and when interest rates go down, the value of a debt security generally goes up; (iii) liquidity risk and valuation risk, e.g., debt securities generally do not trade on a securities exchange, making them generally less liquid and more difficult to value than common stock; (iv) call risk and income risk, e.g., during a period of falling interest rates, the issuer may redeem a security by repaying it early, which may reduce the Fund’s income if the proceeds are reinvested at lower interest rates; and (v) extension risk, e.g., if interest rates rise, repayments of debt securities may occur more slowly than anticipated by the market, which may drive the prices of these securities down because their interest rates are lower than the current interest rate and the securities remain outstanding longer. Debt securities most frequently trade in institutional round lot size transactions. If the Fund purchases bonds in amounts less than the institutional round lot size, which are frequently referred to as “odd” lots, the odd lot size positions may have more price volatility than institutional round lot size positions. The Fund uses a third-party pricing service to value bond holdings and the pricing service values bonds assuming orderly transactions of an institutional round lot size.

Emerging Markets Securities Risk. Securities of issuers based in countries with developing economies (emerging market countries) may present market, credit, currency, liquidity, legal, political and other risks different from, or greater than, the risks of investing in developed market countries and are generally considered speculative in nature. Emerging market countries are subject to greater market volatility, lower trading volume, political and economic instability, uncertainty regarding the existence of trading
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markets, rapid inflation, possible repatriation of investment income and capital, currency convertibility issues, less uniform accounting standards and more governmental limitations on foreign investment than more developed markets. Laws regarding foreign investment in emerging market securities, securities regulation, title to securities, and shareholder rights may change quickly and unpredictably. In addition, the enforcement of systems of taxation at federal, regional and local levels in emerging market countries may be inconsistent and subject to sudden change.

Emerging Markets Sovereign Debt Risk. Government obligors in emerging market countries are among the world’s largest debtors to commercial banks, other governments, international financial organizations and other financial institutions. Historically, certain issuers of the government debt securities in which an Underlying ETP may invest have experienced substantial difficulties in meeting their external debt obligations, resulting in defaults on certain obligations and the restructuring of certain indebtedness, which could result in losses to an Underlying ETP.

Equity Securities Risk. Investments in common stocks and other equity securities are particularly subject to the risk of changes in investors’ perceptions of the financial condition of an issuer, conditions affecting equity markets generally and political and/or economic events. Equity prices may also be particularly sensitive to rising interest rates, as the cost of capital rises and borrowing costs increase. Holders of an issuer’s common stock may be subject to greater risks than holders of its preferred stock and debt securities because common stockholders’ claims are subordinated to those of holders of preferred stocks and debt securities upon the bankruptcy of an issuer.

Foreign Securities Risk. Investments in the securities of non-U.S. issuers involve risks beyond those associated with investments in U.S. securities. These additional risks include greater market volatility, the availability of less reliable financial information, higher transactional and custody costs, taxation by foreign governments, decreased market liquidity and political instability. Some countries and regions have experienced security concerns, war or threats of war and aggression, terrorism, economic uncertainty, natural and environmental disasters and/or systemic market dislocations that have led, and in the future may lead, to increased short-term market volatility and may have adverse long-term effects on the U.S. and world economies and markets generally. Foreign issuers are often subject to less stringent requirements regarding accounting, auditing, financial reporting and record keeping than are U.S. issuers, and therefore not all material information will be available. Securities exchanges or foreign governments may adopt rules or regulations that may negatively impact the Fund’s ability to invest in foreign securities or may prevent the Fund from repatriating its investments. Less developed securities markets are more likely to experience problems with the clearing and settling of trades, as well as the holding of securities by local banks, agents and depositories. The less developed a country’s securities market is, the greater the likelihood of custody problems.

High Yield Securities Risk. High yield securities, or “junk” bonds, generally offer a higher current yield than the yield available from higher grade issues, but are subject to greater market fluctuations, are less liquid and provide a greater risk of loss than investment grade securities, and therefore are considered to be highly speculative. In general, high yield securities may have a greater risk of default than other types of securities and could cause income and principal losses for the Fund.

Interest Rate Risk. An increase in interest rates may cause the value of securities held by the Fund to decline. Fixed income securities with longer durations tend to be more sensitive to changes in interest rates, making them more volatile than securities with shorter durations or floating or adjustable interest rates. The negative impact on the Fund from potential interest rate increases could be swift and significant, including falling market values, increased redemptions and reduced liquidity. The Fund may be subject to a greater risk of rising interest rates than would normally be the case due to the current period of historically low rates and the effect of potential government fiscal policy initiatives and resulting market reaction to those initiatives.
When interest rates rise, certain obligations will be paid off by the issuer (or other obligated party) more slowly than anticipated, causing the value of these securities to fall. As a result, in a period of rising interest rates, securities may exhibit additional volatility and may lose value. The value of securities with longer maturities generally changes more in response to changes in interest rates than does the value of securities with shorter maturities.
During periods of falling interest rates, an issuer of a callable security held by the Fund may “call” or repay the security before its stated maturity, which may result in the Fund having to reinvest the
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proceeds in securities with lower yields, resulting in a decline in the Fund’s income, or in securities with greater risks or with other less favorable features.
The terms of floating rate notes and other instruments may be tied to the London Interbank Offered Rate (“LIBOR”), which functions as a reference rate or benchmark. It is anticipated that LIBOR will be discontinued at the end of 2021, which may cause increased volatility and illiquidity in the markets for instruments with terms tied to LIBOR or other adverse consequences, such as decreased yields and reduction in value, for these instruments. These events may adversely affect the Fund and its investments in such instruments.

Real Estate Companies Risk. An investment in companies that invest in real estate (including REITs) exposes the Fund to the risks of the real estate market and the risks associated with the ownership of real estate. These risks can include fluctuations in the value of or destruction of underlying properties; realignment in tenant living and work habits (for example, movements to and from different parts of a nation, a region, a state or a city); tenant or borrower default; market saturation; changes in general and local economic conditions; decreases in market rates for rents; increases in vacancies; competition; property taxes; capital expenditures or operating expenses; other economic or political events affecting the real estate industry including interest rates and government regulation; concentration in a limited number of properties, geographic regions or property types; and low quality and/or conflicted management. Real estate is generally a less liquid asset class and companies that hold real estate may not be able to liquidate or modify their holdings quickly in response to changes in economic or other market conditions. Additionally, such companies may utilize leverage, which increases investment risk and the potential for more volatility in the Fund’s returns.

Small- and/or Mid-Capitalization Companies Risk. Small- and mid-capitalization companies may be more vulnerable to adverse general market or economic developments, and their securities may be less liquid and may experience greater price volatility than larger, more established companies.

Variable and Floating Rate Instruments Risk. Variable and floating rate instruments include debt securities issued by corporate and governmental entities, bank loans, mortgage-backed securities and asset-backed securities, preferred equity securities and derivative variable rate securities, such as inverse floaters. Variable and floating rate instruments are structured so that the instrument’s coupon rate fluctuates based upon the level of a reference rate. A variable or floating rate instrument’s coupon rate resets periodically according to its terms. Consequently, in a rising interest rate environment, variable and floating rate instruments with coupon rates that reset infrequently may lag behind the changes in market interest rates.

VIX Exposure Risk. The Fund may invest in investment products whose value is linked to the performance of the Cboe Volatility Index (the “VIX Index”). The VIX Index seeks to measure the 30-day expected volatility of the S&P 500 Index, as calculated based on the prices of certain put and call options on the S&P 500 Index. Products providing exposure to the VIX Index are not able to invest directly in the components of the VIX Index, but rather generally gain exposure to the VIX Index’s performance by purchasing or selling futures contracts on the VIX Index. The level of the S&P 500 Index, the prices of options on the S&P 500 Index, the level of the VIX Index itself and the value of futures contracts on the VIX Index may change suddenly and unpredictably, and may negatively affect the value of the Fund’s investments in VIX Index-linked products. In addition, the actual volatility of the S&P 500 Index may not conform to a level predicted by the VIX Index or to the prices of the included put and call options. Several factors may affect the price of the VIX Index, including, but not limited to: market prices and forward volatility levels; expectations that volatility as measured by the VIX Index will fluctuate; supply and demand of VIX Index futures and listed and over-the-counter equity derivative markets; international or domestic political, economic, geographic or financial events; natural disasters; and changes in legal and regulatory regimes in the United States.
Valuation Risk
Independent market quotations for certain investments held by the Fund may not be readily available, and such investments may be fair valued or valued by a pricing service at an evaluated price. These valuations involve subjectivity and different market participants may assign different prices to the same investment. As a result, there is a risk that the Fund may not be able to sell an investment at the price assigned to the investment by the Fund. In addition, the value of the securities or other assets in the Fund’s portfolio may change on days or during time periods when shareholders will not be able to purchase or sell the Fund’s Shares.
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Performance Information
The bar chart that follows shows the annual total returns of the Fund for a full calendar year. The table that follows the bar chart shows the Fund’s average annual total returns, both before and after taxes. The bar chart and table provide an indication of the risks of investing in the Fund by comparing the Fund’s performance from year to year and by showing how the Fund’s average annual returns for one calendar year compared with its underlying index and additional broad measures of market performance. The HFRI Equity Hedge Index is an equally weighted hedge fund index including primarily equity and equity derivative securities. The MSCI World Index is a free float-adjusted market capitalization weighted index that is designed to measure the equity market performance of developed markets (performance data assumes reinvestment of dividends, but it does not reflect management fees, transaction costs or other expenses).
All returns assume reinvestment of dividends and distributions. The Fund’s past performance (before and after taxes) is not necessarily an indication of how the Fund will perform in the future. Performance reflects fee waivers and/or expense reimbursement in effect, if such waivers or reimbursements were not in place, the Fund’s performance would be reduced. Fund performance current to the most recent month-end is available by calling 1-888-474-7725 or by visiting newyorklifeinvestments.com.
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The Fund’s year-to-date total return as of June 30, 2021 was 5.55%.
Best and Worst Quarter Returns (for the period reflected in the bar chart above)
Return
Quarter/Year
Highest Return 14.01% 2Q/2020
Lowest Return -12.27% 1Q/2020
Average Annual Total Returns as of December 31, 2020
1 Year
5 Years
Since
Inception(1)
Returns before taxes 15.16% 8.56% 6.40%
Returns after taxes on distributions(2) 14.33% 7.88% 5.69%
Returns after taxes on distributions and sale of Fund Shares(2) 9.08% 6.47% 4.72%
IQ Hedge Long/Short Index
(reflects no deduction for fees, expenses or taxes)
15.78% 9.50% 7.38%
HFRI Equity Hedge Index(3)
(reflects no deduction for fees, expenses or taxes)
17.89% 8.26% 6.59%
MSCI World Index
(reflects no deduction for fees, expenses or taxes)
15.90% 12.19% 9.48%
(1)
The Fund commenced operations on March 24, 2015.
(2)
After-tax returns are calculated using the highest historical individual federal marginal income tax rates and do not reflect the impact of state and local taxes. Actual after-tax returns depend on your tax situation and may differ from those shown and are not relevant if you hold your Shares through tax-deferred arrangements, such as 401(k) plans or individual retirement accounts. In some cases the return after taxes may exceed the return before taxes due to an assumed tax benefit from any losses on a sale of Fund Shares at the end of the measurement period.
(3)
HFRI Equity Hedge Index is calculated from March 31, 2015. Performance information for the Fund in the table above also includes the performance of HFRI Equity Hedge Index. Because index comparisons are generally calculated as of the end of each month, index performance information under the “Since Inception” heading may not be coincident with
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the inception date of the Fund. In such instances, index performance is generally presented from the month-end nearest to the inception date of the Fund.
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Investment Advisor
IndexIQ Advisors LLC is the investment advisor to the Fund.
Portfolio Manager
The professionals jointly and primarily responsible for the day-to-day management of the Fund are Greg Barrato and James Harrison. Mr. Barrato, Senior Vice President of the Advisor, has been a portfolio manager of the Fund since its inception and Mr. Harrison, Vice President of the Advisor, has been a portfolio manager of the Fund since April 2018.
Purchase and Sale of Fund Shares
Unlike conventional mutual funds, the Fund issues and redeems Shares on a continuous basis, at NAV, only in large blocks of Shares called “Creation Units.” Individual Shares of the Fund may only be purchased and sold on the secondary market through a broker-dealer. Since Shares of the Fund trade on securities exchanges in the secondary market at their market price rather than their NAV, the Fund’s Shares may trade at a price greater than (premium) or less than (discount) the Fund’s NAV. An investor may incur costs attributable to the difference between the highest price a buyer is willing to pay to purchase Shares of the Fund (bid) and the lowest price a seller is willing to accept for Shares of the Fund (ask) when buying or selling Shares in the secondary market (the “bid-ask spread”). Recent information, including the Fund’s NAV, market price, premiums and discounts, and bid-ask spreads, is available online at newyorklifeinvestments.com.
Tax Information
The Fund’s distributions are expected to be taxed as ordinary income, qualified dividend income and/or capital gains, unless you are investing through a tax-deferred arrangement, such as a 401(k) plan or individual retirement account. However, subsequent withdrawals from such a tax-advantaged account may be subject to U.S. federal income tax. You should consult your tax advisor about your specific situation.
Financial Intermediary Compensation
If you purchase the Fund through a broker-dealer or other financial intermediary (such as a bank), the Advisor or other related companies may pay the intermediary for marketing activities and presentations, educational training programs, conferences, the development of technology platforms and reporting systems or other services related to the sale or promotion of the Fund. These payments may create a conflict of interest by influencing the broker-dealer or other intermediary and your salesperson to recommend the Fund over another investment. Ask your salesperson or visit your financial intermediary’s website for more information.
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Summary Information
IQ Hedge Event-Driven Tracker ETF
Investment Objective
The Fund seeks investment results that correspond (before fees and expenses) generally to the price and yield performance of its underlying index, the IQ Hedge Event-Driven Index (the “Underlying Index”).
Fees and Expenses of the Fund
This table describes fees and expenses that you may pay if you buy, sell or hold shares of the Fund (“Shares”). Investors may pay other fees, such as brokerage commissions and other fees to financial intermediaries, which are not reflected in the table and example set forth below.
Shareholder Fees (fees paid directly from your investment):
None
Annual Fund Operating Expenses (expenses that you pay each year as a percentage of the value of your investment):
Management Fee 0.75%
Distribution and/or Service (12b-1) Fees 0.00%
Other Expenses 0.01%
Acquired Fund Fees & Expenses(a) 0.29%
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses(a) 1.05%
Fee Waiver(b) 0.35%
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses After Fee Waiver 0.70%
(a)
The Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses may not correlate to the ratio of expenses to average net assets as reported in the “Financial Highlights” section of the Prospectus, which reflects the operating expenses of the Fund and does not include Acquired Fund Fees & Expenses. Acquired Fund Fees & Expenses represent the Fund’s pro rata share of fees and expenses incurred indirectly as a result of investing in other funds, including ETFs and money market funds.
(b)
IndexIQ Advisors LLC (the “Advisor”) has contractually agreed, until August 31, 2022, to waive a portion of the management fee equal to 0.35% of average daily net assets.
Example. This example is intended to help you compare the cost of investing in the Fund with the cost of investing in other funds. This example does not take into account brokerage commissions that you pay when purchasing or selling Shares of the Fund.
The example assumes that you invest $10,000 in the Fund for the time periods indicated and then redeem all of your Shares at the end of those periods. The example also assumes that your investment has a 5% return each year and that the Fund’s operating expenses remain at current levels. The return of 5% and estimated expenses are for illustration purposes only, and should not be considered indicators of expected Fund expenses or performance, which may be greater or less than the estimates. Although your actual costs may be higher or lower, based on these assumptions your costs would be:
1 Year
3 Years
5 Years
10 Years
$72
$299
$545
$1,251
Portfolio Turnover
The Fund pays transaction costs, such as commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or “turns over” its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover rate may indicate higher transaction costs and may result in higher taxes when Shares are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are not reflected in annual Fund operating expenses or in the example, affect the Fund’s performance. During the most recent fiscal year, the Fund’s portfolio turnover rate was 69% of the average value of its portfolio. This rate excludes the value of portfolio securities received or delivered as a result of in-kind creations or redemptions of the Shares.
Principal Investment Strategies
The Fund is a “fund of funds” which means it invests, under normal circumstances, at least 80% of its net assets, plus the amount of any borrowings for investment purposes, in the investments included in its Underlying Index, which includes underlying funds. The Underlying Index consists of a number of components (“Underlying Index Components”) selected in accordance with IndexIQ’s rules-based methodology of such Underlying Index.
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Such Underlying Index Components will include primarily ETFs and/or other exchange-traded vehicles issuing equity securities organized in the U.S., such as exchange-traded commodity pools (“ETVs”), and may include exchange-traded notes (“ETNs”) (such ETFs, ETVs and ETNs are referred to collectively as “exchange-traded products” or “ETPs”). The Fund may also invest in one or more financial instruments, including but not limited to futures contracts and swap agreements (collectively, “Financial Instruments”).
The Fund employs a “passive management” — or indexing — investment approach designed to track the performance of the Underlying Index, which was developed by IndexIQ LLC (“IndexIQ”), an affiliate of IndexIQ Advisors LLC, the Fund’s investment advisor (the “Advisor”). The Underlying Index seeks to track the “beta” portion of the returns (i.e., that portion of the returns of hedge funds that are non-idiosyncratic, or unrelated to manager skill) of hedge funds pursuing an event-driven strategy (the “Strategy”). Event-Driven hedge funds typically invest in a combination of credit opportunities and event-driven equities. Within the credit-oriented portion, sub-strategies include long/short high yield credit (below investment grade corporate bonds or “junk” bonds), leveraged loans (bank debt, mezzanine, or self-oriented loans), capital structure arbitrage (debt vs. debt or debt vs. equity), and reorganization equity. Within the equity portion, sub-strategies include risk (or merger) arbitrage, holding company arbitrage, special situations and value equities where a change in management, significant product launch, or some other economic catalyst is expected to unlock shareholder wealth. Event-Driven managers invest across multiple asset classes and may also seek to exploit shifts in economic cycles. The Fund does not invest in hedge funds, and the Underlying Index does not include hedge funds as Underlying Index Components. The Fund is not a fund of hedge funds.
The Underlying Index may include both long and short positions in securities, including, primarily, ETPs. As opposed to taking long positions in which an investor seeks to profit from increases in the price of a security, short selling (or “selling short”) is a technique used by the Fund to try and profit from the falling price of a security. Short selling involves selling a security that has been borrowed from a third party with the intention of buying the identical security back at a later date to return to that third party. The basic principle of short selling is that one can profit by selling a security now at a high price and later buying it back at a lower price. The short seller hopes to profit from a decline in the price of the security between the sale and the repurchase, as the seller will pay less to buy the security than it received on selling the security.
The Underlying Index generally is based on the premise that hedge fund returns, when aggregated among hedge funds with similar investment styles, display over time significant exposures to a set of common investment strategies and asset classes. By creating an index that has similar exposures to the same investment strategies and asset classes as hedge funds generally, IndexIQ seeks to replicate the beta return characteristics of hedge funds.
The Underlying Index Components of this Strategy generally provide exposures to:

Emerging market equity;

Foreign equity, including small-capitalization equity;

U.S. and foreign preferred securities;

U.S. bank loans;

U.S. convertible debt;

U.S. government short maturity obligations;

U.S. growth equity;

U.S. high yield (or “junk”) debt;

U.S. investment grade corporate debt;

U.S. large-capitalization equity;

U.S. mortgage-backed debt; and

U.S. small-capitalization equity.
The Underlying Index is unlike traditional market-oriented indexes like the Standard & Poor’s 500® Composite Stock Total Return Index (the “S&P 500 Index”). Instead of tracking the performance of publicly-traded issuers representing a market or industry sector, the Underlying Index seeks to track the returns of distinct hedge fund investment styles.
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The Underlying Index may include as a component one or more ETFs advised by the Advisor (“Affiliated ETFs”) and the Fund will typically invest in any Affiliated ETF included in the Underlying Index. The Fund also may invest in Affiliated ETFs that are not components of the index if such an investment will help the Fund track the Underlying Index.
The weights of the Underlying Index Components are rebalanced on a monthly basis. Annually, IndexIQ conducts a review process pursuant to which it may reconstitute the Underlying Indexes by adding or subtracting Underlying Index Components according to IndexIQ’s rules-based process.
Principal Risks
As with all investments, there are certain risks of investing in the Fund. The Fund’s Shares will change in value and you could lose money by investing in the Fund. An investment in the Fund does not represent a complete investment program. An investment in the Fund is not a bank deposit and it is not insured or guaranteed by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation or any other government agency, the Advisor or any of its affiliates. You should consider carefully the following risks before investing in the Fund.
Authorized Participant Concentration Risk
Only certain large institutions may engage in creation or redemption transactions directly with the Fund (each, an “Authorized Participant”). The Fund has a limited number of institutions that may act as Authorized Participants on an agency basis (i.e., on behalf of other market participants). To the extent that those Authorized Participants exit the business or are unable to proceed with creation and/or redemption orders with the Fund and no other Authorized Participant is able to step forward to engage in creation and redemption transactions with the Fund, Shares may be more likely to trade at a premium or discount to NAV and possibly face trading halts and/or delisting.
Cyber Security Risk
The Fund is susceptible to operational risks through breaches in cyber security. Such events may cause the Fund to lose proprietary information, suffer data corruption or lose operational capacity and could cause the Fund to incur regulatory penalties, reputational damage, additional compliance costs associated with corrective measures and/or financial loss. In addition, cyber security breaches of the securities issuers or the Fund’s third-party service providers can also subject the Fund to many of the same risks associated with direct cyber security breaches. Although the Fund has established risk management systems designed to reduce the risks associated with cyber security, there is no guarantee that such efforts will succeed.
Derivatives Risk
Derivatives are investments whose value depends on (or is derived from) the value of an underlying instrument, such as a security, asset, reference rate or index and involve risks different from, and possibly greater than, the risks associated with other investments. These risks include: (i) the risk that the counterparty to a derivatives transaction may not fulfill its contractual obligations; (ii) risk of mispricing or improper valuation; and (iii) the risk that changes in the value of the derivative may not correlate perfectly with the underlying asset. Derivative prices are highly volatile and may fluctuate substantially during a short period of time. Such prices are influenced by numerous factors that affect the markets, including, but not limited to, changing supply and demand relationships, government programs and policies, national and international political and economic events, changes in interest rates, inflation and deflation, and changes in supply and demand relationships. Unlike other investments, derivative contracts often have leverage inherent in their terms. The use of leveraged derivatives can magnify potential for gain or loss and, therefore, amplify the effects of market volatility on the Fund’s Share price. The effects of leverage may also cause the Fund to liquidate portfolio positions when it would not be advantageous to do so in order to satisfy its obligations or to meet collateral segregation requirements.
Exchange Traded Products Risk
Unlike an investment in a mutual fund, the value of the Fund’s investment in other exchange-traded funds or exchange-traded investment products (“ETPs”) is based on its market price (rather than NAV) and the Fund could lose money due to premiums/discounts of the ETP (which could cause the Fund to buy shares at market prices that are higher than their value or sell shares at market prices that are lower than their value); the failure of an active trading market to develop; or exchange trading halts or delistings. An investment in the Fund will entail more costs and expenses than a direct investment in any Underlying ETP. As the Fund’s allocations to Underlying ETPs changes, or the expense ratio of Underlying ETPs change, the operating expenses borne by the Fund from such investments may increase or decrease.
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Index Risk
There is no guarantee that the Fund’s investment results will have a high degree of correlation to those of the Underlying Index or that the Fund will achieve its investment objective. Market disruptions and regulatory restrictions could have an adverse effect on the Fund’s ability to adjust its exposure to the required levels in order to track the Underlying Index. Errors in index data, index computations or the construction of the Underlying Index in accordance with its methodology may occur from time to time and may not be identified and corrected for a period of time or at all, which may have an adverse impact on the Fund and its shareholders.
Long/Short Risk
The Fund seeks long exposure to certain securities and short exposure to certain other securities. There is no guarantee that the returns on the Fund’s long or short positions will produce positive returns, and the Fund could lose money if either or both positions produce negative returns. In addition, the Fund may gain enhanced long exposure to certain securities (i.e., obtain investment exposure that exceeds the amount directly invested in those assets, a form of leverage) and, as a result, suffer losses that exceed the amount invested in those assets.
Market Risk
Market risks include political, regulatory, market and economic developments, including developments that impact specific economic sectors, industries or segments of the market, which may affect the Fund’s value. Turbulence in financial markets, tariffs and other protectionist measures, political developments and uncertainty, central bank policy, and reduced liquidity in equity, credit and fixed income markets may negatively affect many issuers worldwide, which could have an adverse effect on the Fund. During a general downturn in the securities markets, multiple asset classes may be negatively affected. Geopolitical and other events, including war, terrorism, economic uncertainty, trade disputes, public health crises and related geopolitical events have led, and in the future may lead, to disruptions in the US and world economies and markets, which may increase financial market volatility and have significant adverse direct or indirect effects on the Fund and its investments. Market disruptions could cause the Fund to lose money, experience significant redemptions, and encounter operational difficulties. Although multiple asset classes may be affected by a market disruption, the duration and effects may not be the same for all types of assets.
Operational Risk
The Fund is exposed to operational risks arising from a number of factors, including, but not limited to, human error, processing and communication errors, errors of the Fund’s service providers, counterparties or other third-parties, failed or inadequate processes and technology or systems failures. The Fund and Advisor seek to reduce these operational risks through controls and procedures. However, these measures do not address every possible risk and may be inadequate to address significant operational risks.
Passive Management Risk
The Fund is not actively managed and instead seeks to track the performance of an index. Passive management has the following risks associated with it:

The Fund invests in the securities included in, or representative of, the Underlying Index. The provider of the Underlying Index or the index calculation agent may make errors. The index provider may include index constituents that should have been excluded, or it may exclude index constituents that should have been included. It also may include or exclude constituents at incorrect levels. This may result in the Fund, in turn, being correctly positioned to an index that has been incorrectly calculated. This could lead to losses to the Fund.

In seeking to track the Underlying Index’s performance, the Fund may be subject to tracking error, which is the divergence of the Fund’s performance from that of the Underlying Index. Tracking error may occur because of differences between the securities and other instruments held in the Fund’s portfolio and those included in the Underlying Index, pricing differences (including, as applicable, differences between a security’s price at the local market close and the Fund’s valuation of a security at the time of calculation of the Fund’s NAV), differences in transaction costs, the Fund’s holding of uninvested cash, differences in timing of the accrual of or the valuation of dividends or interest, the requirements to maintain pass-through tax treatment, portfolio transactions carried out to minimize the distribution of capital gains to shareholders, changes to the Underlying Index or the costs to the Fund of complying with various new or existing regulatory requirements. Tracking error also may result because the Fund incurs fees and expenses, while the Underlying Index does not. This risk may be heightened during times of increased market volatility or other unusual market conditions.
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The Fund generally will not attempt to take defensive positions in declining markets and generally will not sell a security because its issuer is in financial trouble, unless that security is removed from (or was no longer useful in tracking a component of) the Underlying Index.
Secondary Market Trading Risk
Although the Fund’s Shares are listed for trading on one or more securities exchanges, there can be no assurance that an active trading market for such Shares will develop or be maintained by market makers or Authorized Participants. In general, the trading of Shares on securities exchanges is subject to the risk of irregular trading activity and wide “bid/ask” spreads (which may be especially pronounced for smaller funds). Additionally, market makers are under no obligation to make a market in the Fund’s Shares and Authorized Participants are not obligated to submit purchase or redemption orders for Creation Units. In the event market makers cease making a market in the Fund’s Shares or Authorized Participants stop submitting purchase or redemption orders for Creation Units, the Fund’s Shares may trade at a larger premium or discount to its NAV. Wide bid-ask spreads and large premiums or discounts to NAV are likely to lead to an investor buying his or her shares at a market price that is more than their value, and selling those shares at a market price that is less than their value.
Short Sales Risk
Short sales are transactions in which the Fund sells a security it does not own, or uses derivatives, such as futures or swaps, to effect short exposure to a particular reference asset. Such a position subjects the Fund to the risk that instead of declining, the price of the security or reference asset to which the Fund has short exposure will rise. If the price of the security or reference asset increases between the date of the short sale and the date on which the Fund replaces the security or otherwise closes out its short position, the Fund will experience a loss, which is theoretically unlimited since there is a theoretically unlimited potential for the market price of a security or other instrument sold short to increase.
Trading Price Risk
Shares of the Fund trade on securities exchanges at prices at, above or below the Fund’s most recent NAV. The NAV of the Fund is calculated at the end of each business day and fluctuates with changes in the market value of the Fund’s holdings. The trading price of the Fund’s Shares fluctuates continuously throughout trading hours based on both market supply of and demand for Shares and the underlying value of the Fund’s portfolio holdings or NAV. As a result, the trading prices of the Fund’s Shares may deviate significantly from NAV during periods of market volatility. Any of these factors, among others, may lead to the Fund’s Shares trading at a premium or discount to NAV. Although it is generally expected that the market price of the Shares of the Fund will approximate the Fund’s NAV, there may be times when the market price and the NAV vary significantly. Thus, an investor may pay more than NAV when purchasing Shares and receive less than NAV when selling Shares.
Risks of Underlying ETPs
The Fund may invest in the securities of other ETPs, including Affiliated ETFs. Investments in the Fund are subject to the risks associated with an investment in the Underlying ETPs. In addition to the risks described above, the following risks should also be considered when making an investment in the Fund.

Asset-Backed Securities Risk. Asset-backed securities are securities that represent interests in, and whose values and payments are based on, a “pool” of underlying assets, which may include, among others, lower-rated debt securities and corporate loans, consumer loans or mortgages and leases of property. Asset-backed securities include collateralized debt obligations, collateralized bond obligations, and collateralized loan obligations and other similarly structured vehicles. As with other debt securities, asset-backed securities are subject to credit risk, extension risk, interest rate risk, liquidity risk and valuation risk. These securities are generally not backed by the full faith and credit of the U.S. government and are subject to the risk of default on the underlying asset or loan, particularly during periods of economic downturn. The impairment of the value of collateral or other assets underlying an asset-backed security, such as a result of non-payment of loans or non-performance of underlying assets, may result in a reduction in the value of such asset-backed securities and losses to the Fund.
Investments in mortgage-related securities make an investor more susceptible to adverse economic, political or regulatory events that affect the value of real estate. Mortgage-related securities are also significantly affected by the rate of prepayments and modifications of the mortgage loans underlying those securities, as well as by other factors such as borrower defaults, delinquencies, realized or liquidation losses and other shortfalls. Impairment of the underlying obligations or collateral, such as by
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non-payment, will reduce a mortgage-related security’s value. Enforcing rights against such collateral in events of default may be difficult or insufficient. These securities may have a structure that makes their reaction to interest rate changes and other factors difficult to predict, making their value highly volatile.

Convertible Securities Risk. A convertible security has characteristics of both equity and debt securities and, as a result, is exposed to risks that are typically associated with both types of securities. Convertible securities are typically subordinate to an issuer’s other debt obligations. Issuers of convertible securities may be more vulnerable to changes in the economy, such as a recession or a sustained period of rising interest rates, which could affect their ability to make interest and principal payments. If an issuer stops making interest and/or principal payments, the Fund could lose its entire investment.

Credit Risk. Credit risk is the risk that the issuer or guarantor of a debt instrument or the counterparty to a derivatives contract, repurchase agreement or loan of portfolio securities will be unable or unwilling to make its timely interest and/or principal payments when due or otherwise honor its obligations. Changes in an issuer’s or counterparty’s credit rating or the market’s perception of an issuer’s or counterparty’s creditworthiness may also adversely affect the value of the Fund’s investment in that issuer. The degree of credit risk depends on an issuer’s or counterparty’s financial condition and on the terms of an obligation.

Currency Risk. Investments directly in foreign (non-U.S.) currencies or in securities that trade in, and receive revenues in, foreign (non-U.S.) currencies are subject to the risk that those currencies will decline in value relative to the U.S. dollar or, in the case of hedging positions, that the U.S. dollar will decline in value relative to the currency being hedged. Currency rates in foreign countries may fluctuate significantly over short periods of time for a number of reasons, including changes in interest rates, intervention (or the failure to intervene) by U.S. or foreign governments, central banks or supranational entities such as the International Monetary Fund, or by the imposition of currency controls or other political developments in the United States or abroad.

Debt Securities Risk. The risks of investing in debt securities include (without limitation): (i) credit risk, e.g., the issuer or guarantor of a debt security may be unable or unwilling (or be perceived as unable or unwilling) to make timely principal and/or interest payments or otherwise honor its obligations; (ii) interest rate risk, e.g., when interest rates go up, the value of a debt security generally goes down, and when interest rates go down, the value of a debt security generally goes up; (iii) liquidity risk and valuation risk, e.g., debt securities generally do not trade on a securities exchange, making them generally less liquid and more difficult to value than common stock; (iv) call risk and income risk, e.g., during a period of falling interest rates, the issuer may redeem a security by repaying it early, which may reduce the Fund’s income if the proceeds are reinvested at lower interest rates; and (v) extension risk, e.g., if interest rates rise, repayments of debt securities may occur more slowly than anticipated by the market, which may drive the prices of these securities down because their interest rates are lower than the current interest rate and the securities remain outstanding longer. Debt securities most frequently trade in institutional round lot size transactions. If the Fund purchases bonds in amounts less than the institutional round lot size, which are frequently referred to as “odd” lots, the odd lot size positions may have more price volatility than institutional round lot size positions. The Fund uses a third-party pricing service to value bond holdings and the pricing service values bonds assuming orderly transactions of an institutional round lot size.

Emerging Markets Securities Risk. Securities of issuers based in countries with developing economies (emerging market countries) may present market, credit, currency, liquidity, legal, political and other risks different from, or greater than, the risks of investing in developed market countries and are generally considered speculative in nature. Emerging market countries are subject to greater market volatility, lower trading volume, political and economic instability, uncertainty regarding the existence of trading markets, rapid inflation, possible repatriation of investment income and capital, currency convertibility issues, less uniform accounting standards and more governmental limitations on foreign investment than more developed markets. Laws regarding foreign investment in emerging market securities, securities regulation, title to securities, and shareholder rights may change quickly and unpredictably. In addition, the enforcement of systems of taxation at federal, regional and local levels in emerging market countries may be inconsistent and subject to sudden change.

Emerging Markets Sovereign Debt Risk. Government obligors in emerging market countries are among the world’s largest debtors to commercial banks, other governments, international financial
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organizations and other financial institutions. Historically, certain issuers of the government debt securities in which an Underlying ETP may invest have experienced substantial difficulties in meeting their external debt obligations, resulting in defaults on certain obligations and the restructuring of certain indebtedness, which could result in losses to an Underlying ETP.

Equity Securities Risk. Investments in common stocks and other equity securities are particularly subject to the risk of changes in investors’ perceptions of the financial condition of an issuer, conditions affecting equity markets generally and political and/or economic events. Equity prices may also be particularly sensitive to rising interest rates, as the cost of capital rises and borrowing costs increase. Holders of an issuer’s common stock may be subject to greater risks than holders of its preferred stock and debt securities because common stockholders’ claims are subordinated to those of holders of preferred stocks and debt securities upon the bankruptcy of an issuer.

Foreign Securities Risk. Investments in the securities of non-U.S. issuers involve risks beyond those associated with investments in U.S. securities. These additional risks include greater market volatility, the availability of less reliable financial information, higher transactional and custody costs, taxation by foreign governments, decreased market liquidity and political instability. Some countries and regions have experienced security concerns, war or threats of war and aggression, terrorism, economic uncertainty, natural and environmental disasters and/or systemic market dislocations that have led, and in the future may lead, to increased short-term market volatility and may have adverse long-term effects on the U.S. and world economies and markets generally. Foreign issuers are often subject to less stringent requirements regarding accounting, auditing, financial reporting and record keeping than are U.S. issuers, and therefore not all material information will be available. Securities exchanges or foreign governments may adopt rules or regulations that may negatively impact the Fund’s ability to invest in foreign securities or may prevent the Fund from repatriating its investments. Less developed securities markets are more likely to experience problems with the clearing and settling of trades, as well as the holding of securities by local banks, agents and depositories. The less developed a country’s securities market is, the greater the likelihood of custody problems.

High Yield Securities Risk. High yield securities, or “junk” bonds, generally offer a higher current yield than the yield available from higher grade issues, but are subject to greater market fluctuations, are less liquid and provide a greater risk of loss than investment grade securities, and therefore are considered to be highly speculative. In general, high yield securities may have a greater risk of default than other types of securities and could cause income and principal losses for the Fund.

Interest Rate Risk. An increase in interest rates may cause the value of securities held by the Fund to decline. Fixed income securities with longer durations tend to be more sensitive to changes in interest rates, making them more volatile than securities with shorter durations or floating or adjustable interest rates. The negative impact on the Fund from potential interest rate increases could be swift and significant, including falling market values, increased redemptions and reduced liquidity. The Fund may be subject to a greater risk of rising interest rates than would normally be the case due to the current period of historically low rates and the effect of potential government fiscal policy initiatives and resulting market reaction to those initiatives.
When interest rates rise, certain obligations will be paid off by the issuer (or other obligated party) more slowly than anticipated, causing the value of these securities to fall. As a result, in a period of rising interest rates, securities may exhibit additional volatility and may lose value. The value of securities with longer maturities generally changes more in response to changes in interest rates than does the value of securities with shorter maturities.
During periods of falling interest rates, an issuer of a callable security held by the Fund may “call” or repay the security before its stated maturity, which may result in the Fund having to reinvest the proceeds in securities with lower yields, resulting in a decline in the Fund’s income, or in securities with greater risks or with other less favorable features.
The terms of floating rate notes and other instruments may be tied to the London Interbank Offered Rate (“LIBOR”), which functions as a reference rate or benchmark. It is anticipated that LIBOR will be discontinued at the end of 2021, which may cause increased volatility and illiquidity in the markets for instruments with terms tied to LIBOR or other adverse consequences, such as decreased yields and reduction in value, for these instruments. These events may adversely affect the Fund and its investments in such instruments.
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Liquidity Risk. Liquidity risk exists when particular investments are difficult to purchase or sell. Certain investments may be subject to restrictions on resale, trade over-the-counter or in limited volume, or lack an active trading market. Accordingly, the Fund may not be able to sell or close out of such investments at favorable times or prices (or at all), or at the prices approximating those at which the Fund currently values them. Illiquid securities may trade at a discount from comparable, more liquid investments and may be subject to wide fluctuations in market value.

Small- and/or Mid-Capitalization Companies Risk. Small- and mid-capitalization companies may be more vulnerable to adverse general market or economic developments, and their securities may be less liquid and may experience greater price volatility than larger, more established companies.

Risks of Investing in Loans. Investments in loans are subject to the same risks as investments in other types of debt securities, including credit risk, interest rate risk, liquidity risk and valuation risk that may be heightened because of the limited public information available regarding loans and because loan borrowers may be leveraged and tend to be more adversely affected by changes in market or economic conditions. Default in the payment of interest or principal on a loan will result in a reduction in the value of the loan and consequently a reduction in the value of an investment in that loan. If an investor holds a loan through another financial institution or relies on a financial institution to administer the loan, its receipt of principal and interest on the loan may be subject to the credit risk of that financial institution. It is possible that any collateral securing a loan may be insufficient or unavailable to the investor, and that the investor’s rights to collateral may be limited by bankruptcy or insolvency laws. Additionally, there is no central clearinghouse for loan trades and the loan market has not established enforceable settlement standards or remedies for failure to settle. Consequently, the secondary market for loans may be subject to irregular trading activity, wide bid/ask spreads and extended trade settlement periods (in some cases longer than 7 days), which may cause an investor to be unable to realize the full value of its investment. In addition, loans are generally not registered with the SEC under the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, and may not be considered “securities,” and an investor may not be entitled to rely on the anti-fraud protections of the federal securities laws. An investment in loans made to non-U.S. borrowers may be affected by political and social instability, changes in economic or taxation policies, difficulties in enforcing obligations, decreased liquidity and increased volatility. Foreign borrowers may be subject to less regulation, resulting in less publicly available information about the borrowers.
The loan market has seen a significant increase in loans with weaker lender protections including, but not limited to, limited financial maintenance covenants or, in some cases, no financial maintenance covenants (i.e., “covenant-lite loans”) that would typically be included in a traditional loan agreement and general weakening of other restrictive covenants applicable to the borrower such as limitations on incurrence of additional debt, restrictions on payments of junior debt or restrictions on dividends and distributions. Weaker lender protections such as the absence of financial maintenance covenants in a loan agreement and the inclusion of  “borrower-favorable” terms may impact recovery values and/or trading levels of loans in the future. The absence of financial maintenance covenants in a loan agreement generally means that the lender may not be able to declare a default if financial performance deteriorates. This may hinder an investor’s ability to reprice credit risk associated with a particular borrower and reduce the investor’s ability to restructure a problematic loan and mitigate potential loss. As a result, an investor’s exposure to losses on investments in loans may be increased, especially during a downturn in the credit cycle or changes in market or economic conditions.

Variable and Floating Rate Instruments Risk. Variable and floating rate instruments include debt securities issued by corporate and governmental entities, bank loans, mortgage-backed securities and asset-backed securities, preferred equity securities and derivative variable rate securities, such as inverse floaters. Variable and floating rate instruments are structured so that the instrument’s coupon rate fluctuates based upon the level of a reference rate. A variable or floating rate instrument’s coupon rate resets periodically according to its terms. Consequently, in a rising interest rate environment, variable and floating rate instruments with coupon rates that reset infrequently may lag behind the changes in market interest rates.

Valuation Risk. Independent market quotations for certain investments held by the Fund may not be readily available, and such investments may be fair valued or valued by a pricing service at an evaluated price. These valuations involve subjectivity and different market participants may assign
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different prices to the same investment. As a result, there is a risk that the Fund may not be able to sell an investment at the price assigned to the investment by the Fund. In addition, the value of the securities or other assets in the Fund’s portfolio may change on days or during time periods when shareholders will not be able to purchase or sell the Fund’s Shares.
Performance Information
The bar chart that follows shows the annual total returns of the Fund for a full calendar year. The table that follows the bar chart shows the Fund’s average annual total returns, both before and after taxes. The bar chart and table provide an indication of the risks of investing in the Fund by comparing the Fund’s performance from year to year and by showing how the Fund’s average annual returns for one calendar year compared with its underlying index and additional broad measures of market performance. The HFRI Event Driven Index is designed to be representative of the overall composition of the hedge fund universe implementing an event driven strategy. The Bloomberg Barclays U.S. Aggregate Bond Index is a broad-based benchmark that measures the investment-grade, U.S. dollar-denominated, fixed-rate taxable bond market, including Treasuries, government-related and corporate securities, mortgage-backed securities (agency fixed-rate and hybrid adjustable-rate mortgage pass-throughs), asset-backed securities, and commercial mortgage-backed securities.
All returns assume reinvestment of dividends and distributions. The Fund’s past performance (before and after taxes) is not necessarily an indication of how the Fund will perform in the future. Performance reflects fee waivers and/or expense reimbursement in effect, if such waivers or reimbursements were not in place, the Fund’s performance would be reduced. Fund performance current to the most recent month-end is available by calling 1-888-474-7725 or by visiting newyorklifeinvestments.com.
[MISSING IMAGE: tm2123983d1-bc_eventbw.jpg]
The Fund’s year-to-date total return as of June 30, 2021 was 2.15%.
Best and Worst Quarter Returns (for the period reflected in the bar chart above)
Return
Quarter/Year
Highest Return 11.41% 2Q/2020
Lowest Return -9.55% 1Q/2020
Average Annual Total Returns as of December 31, 2020
1 Year
5 Years
Since
Inception(1)
Returns before taxes 12.87% 7.40% 5.89%
Returns after taxes on distributions(2) 10.92% 6.11% 4.67%
Returns after taxes on distributions and sale of Fund Shares(2) 7.65% 5.21% 4.04%
IQ Hedge Event Driven Index
(reflects no deduction for fees, expenses or taxes)
13.19% 7.92% 6.43%
HFRI Event Driven Index(3)
(reflects no deduction for fees, expenses or taxes)
9.26% 6.46% 4.60%
Bloomberg Barclays U.S. Aggregate Bond Index
(reflects no deduction for fees, expenses or taxes)
7.51% 4.44% 3.65%
(1)
The Fund commenced operations on March 24, 2015.
(2)
After-tax returns are calculated using the highest historical individual federal marginal income tax rates and do not reflect the impact of state and local taxes. Actual after-tax returns depend on your tax situation and may differ from those
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shown and are not relevant if you hold your Shares through tax-deferred arrangements, such as 401(k) plans or individual retirement accounts. In some cases the return after taxes may exceed the return before taxes due to an assumed tax benefit from any losses on a sale of Fund Shares at the end of the measurement period.
(3)
HFRI Event Driven Index is calculated from March 31, 2015. Performance information for the Fund in the table above also includes the performance of HFRI Event Driven Index. Because index comparisons are generally calculated as of the end of each month, index performance information under the “Since Inception” heading may not be coincident with the inception date of the Fund. In such instances, index performance is generally presented from the month-end nearest to the inception date of the Fund.
Investment Advisor
IndexIQ Advisors LLC is the investment advisor to the Fund.
Portfolio Manager
The professionals jointly and primarily responsible for the day-to-day management of the Fund are Greg Barrato and James Harrison. Mr. Barrato, Senior Vice President of the Advisor, has been a portfolio manager of the Fund since its inception and Mr. Harrison, Vice President of the Advisor, has been a portfolio manager of the Fund since April 2018.
Purchase and Sale of Fund Shares
Unlike conventional mutual funds, the Fund issues and redeems Shares on a continuous basis, at NAV, only in large blocks of Shares called “Creation Units.” Individual Shares of the Fund may only be purchased and sold on the secondary market through a broker-dealer. Since Shares of the Fund trade on securities exchanges in the secondary market at their market price rather than their NAV, the Fund’s Shares may trade at a price greater than (premium) or less than (discount) the Fund’s NAV. An investor may incur costs attributable to the difference between the highest price a buyer is willing to pay to purchase Shares of the Fund (bid) and the lowest price a seller is willing to accept for Shares of the Fund (ask) when buying or selling Shares in the secondary market (the “bid-ask spread”). Recent information, including the Fund’s NAV, market price, premiums and discounts, and bid-ask spreads, is available online at newyorklifeinvestments.com.
Tax Information
The Fund’s distributions are expected to be taxed as ordinary income, qualified dividend income and/or capital gains, unless you are investing through a tax-deferred arrangement, such as a 401(k) plan or individual retirement account. However, subsequent withdrawals from such a tax-advantaged account may be subject to U.S. federal income tax. You should consult your tax advisor about your specific situation.
Financial Intermediary Compensation
If you purchase the Fund through a broker-dealer or other financial intermediary (such as a bank), the Advisor or other related companies may pay the intermediary for marketing activities and presentations, educational training programs, conferences, the development of technology platforms and reporting systems or other services related to the sale or promotion of the Fund. These payments may create a conflict of interest by influencing the broker-dealer or other intermediary and your salesperson to recommend the Fund over another investment. Ask your salesperson or visit your financial intermediary’s website for more information.
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Summary Information
IQ Real Return ETF
Investment Objective
The Fund seeks investment results that correspond (before fees and expenses) generally to the price and yield performance of its underlying index, the IQ Real Return Index (the “Underlying Index”).
Fees and Expenses of the Fund
This table describes fees and expenses that you may pay if you buy, sell or hold shares of the Fund (“Shares”). Investors may pay other fees, such as brokerage commissions and other fees to financial intermediaries, which are not reflected in the table and example set forth below.
Shareholder Fees (fees paid directly from your investment):
None
Annual Fund Operating Expenses (expenses that you pay each year as a percentage of the value of your investment):
Management Fee 0.48%
Distribution and/or Service (12b-1) Fees 0.00%
Other Expenses 0.01%
Acquired Fund Fees & Expenses(a) 0.17%
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses(a) 0.66%
Fee Waiver(b) 0.28%
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses After Fee Waiver 0.38%
(a)
The Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses may not correlate to the ratio of expenses to average net assets as reported in the “Financial Highlights” section of the Prospectus, which reflects the operating expenses of the Fund and does not include Acquired Fund Fees & Expenses. Acquired Fund Fees & Expenses represent the Fund’s pro rata share of fees and expenses incurred indirectly as a result of investing in other funds, including ETFs and money market funds.
(b)
IndexIQ Advisors LLC (the “Advisor”) has contractually agreed, until August 31, 2022, to waive a portion of the management fee equal to 0.28% of average daily net assets.
Example. This example is intended to help you compare the cost of investing in the Fund with the cost of investing in other funds. This example does not take into account brokerage commissions that you pay when purchasing or selling Shares of the Fund.
The example assumes that you invest $10,000 in the Fund for the time periods indicated and then redeem all of your Shares at the end of those periods. The example also assumes that your investment has a 5% return each year and that the Fund’s operating expenses remain at current levels. The return of 5% and estimated expenses are for illustration purposes only, and should not be considered indicators of expected Fund expenses or performance, which may be greater or less than the estimates. Although your actual costs may be higher or lower, based on these assumptions your costs would be:
1 Year
3 Years
5 Years
10 Years
$39
$183
$340
$796
Portfolio Turnover
The Fund pays transaction costs, such as commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or “turns over” its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover rate may indicate higher transaction costs and may result in higher taxes when Shares are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are not reflected in annual Fund operating expenses or in the example, affect the Fund’s performance. During the most recent fiscal year, the Fund’s portfolio turnover rate was 66% of the average value of its portfolio. This rate excludes the value of portfolio securities received or delivered as a result of in-kind creations or redemptions of the Shares.
Principal Investment Strategies
The Fund is a “fund of funds” which means it invests, under normal circumstances, at least 80% of its net assets, plus the amount of any borrowings for investment purposes, in the investments included in its Underlying Index, which includes underlying funds. The Underlying Index consists of a number of components (“Underlying Index Components”) selected in accordance with the rules-based methodology of such Underlying Index, which was developed by IndexIQ LLC (“IndexIQ”), an affiliate of IndexIQ Advisors LLC, the Fund’s investment advisor (the
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“Advisor”). Such Underlying Index Components will include primarily ETFs and/or other exchange-traded vehicles issuing equity securities organized in the U.S., such as exchange-traded commodity pools (“ETVs”), and may include exchange-traded notes (“ETNs”) (such ETFs, ETVs and ETNs are referred to collectively as “exchange-traded products” or “ETPs”). The Fund may also invest in one or more financial instruments, including but not limited to futures contracts and swap agreements (collectively, “Financial Instruments”).
The Fund employs a “passive management” — or indexing — investment approach designed to track the performance of the Underlying Index. The Underlying Index seeks to provide investors with a hedge against the inflation rate by providing a “real return” or a return above the rate of inflation, as represented by the CPI (the “Strategy”). The CPI, or the Consumer Price Index, which is published by the Bureau of Labor Statistics, is a measure of the average change in prices over time of goods and services purchased by households. The CPI is reported with monthly frequency, but due to seasonality and other factors the monthly change in the CPI is reported both as the 1-month change and also on a rolling 12-month basis (the “Rolling 12-month CPI Returns”). It is the Rolling 12-month CPI Returns, not the monthly returns of the CPI, that the Underlying Index incorporates into its construction process.
The Underlying Index includes exposures to asset classes whose returns incorporate inflation expectations in an attempt to achieve its investment objective. This is based on the premise that capital market returns tend to be forward looking and anticipate economic developments, including inflation expectations. Since the Underlying Index’s objective is to provide a “real return,” as described above, the index construction process involves adding a real return target over and above the CPI returns and using the resulting “nominal returns” ​(i.e., inflation plus real return) to determine the weights of the Underlying Index Components.
The Underlying Index Components of this Strategy generally provide exposures to:

U.S. large capitalization equity;

U.S. small capitalization equity;

Foreign equity (Europe, Australasia & Far East);

U.S. government short-, intermediate-, and long-term maturity obligations;

Foreign currencies and currency futures;

U.S. real estate; and

Commodities.
The Underlying Index may include as a component one or more ETFs advised by the Advisor (“Affiliated ETFs”) and the Fund will typically invest in any Affiliated ETF included in the Underlying Index. The Fund also may invest in Affiliated ETFs that are not components of the index if such an investment will help the Fund track the Underlying Index.
The weights of the Underlying Index Components are rebalanced on a monthly basis. Annually, IndexIQ conducts a review process pursuant to which it may reconstitute the Underlying Indexes by adding or subtracting Underlying Index Components according to IndexIQ’s rules-based process.
Principal Risks
As with all investments, there are certain risks of investing in the Fund. The Fund’s Shares will change in value and you could lose money by investing in the Fund. An investment in the Fund does not represent a complete investment program. An investment in the Fund is not a bank deposit and it is not insured or guaranteed by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation or any other government agency, the Advisor or any of its affiliates. You should consider carefully the following risks before investing in the Fund.
Authorized Participant Concentration Risk
Only certain large institutions may engage in creation or redemption transactions directly with the Fund (each, an “Authorized Participant”). The Fund has a limited number of institutions that may act as Authorized Participants on an agency basis (i.e., on behalf of other market participants). To the extent that those Authorized Participants exit the business or are unable to proceed with creation and/or redemption orders with the Fund and no other Authorized Participant is able to step forward to engage in creation and redemption transactions with the Fund, Shares may be more likely to trade at a premium or discount to NAV and possibly face trading halts and/or delisting.
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Cyber Security Risk
The Fund is susceptible to operational risks through breaches in cyber security. Such events may cause the Fund to lose proprietary information, suffer data corruption or lose operational capacity and could cause the Fund to incur regulatory penalties, reputational damage, additional compliance costs associated with corrective measures and/or financial loss. In addition, cyber security breaches of the securities issuers or the Fund’s third-party service providers can also subject the Fund to many of the same risks associated with direct cyber security breaches. Although the Fund has established risk management systems designed to reduce the risks associated with cyber security, there is no guarantee that such efforts will succeed.
Derivatives Risk
Derivatives are investments whose value depends on (or is derived from) the value of an underlying instrument, such as a security, asset, reference rate or index and involve risks different from, and possibly greater than, the risks associated with other investments. These risks include: (i) the risk that the counterparty to a derivatives transaction may not fulfill its contractual obligations; (ii) risk of mispricing or improper valuation; and (iii) the risk that changes in the value of the derivative may not correlate perfectly with the underlying asset. Derivative prices are highly volatile and may fluctuate substantially during a short period of time. Such prices are influenced by numerous factors that affect the markets, including, but not limited to, changing supply and demand relationships, government programs and policies, national and international political and economic events, changes in interest rates, inflation and deflation, and changes in supply and demand relationships. Unlike other investments, derivative contracts often have leverage inherent in their terms. The use of leveraged derivatives can magnify potential for gain or loss and, therefore, amplify the effects of market volatility on the Fund’s Share price. The effects of leverage may also cause the Fund to liquidate portfolio positions when it would not be advantageous to do so in order to satisfy its obligations or to meet collateral segregation requirements.
Exchange Traded Products Risk
Unlike an investment in a mutual fund, the value of the Fund’s investment in other exchange-traded funds or exchange-traded investment products (“ETPs”) is based on its market price (rather than NAV) and the Fund could lose money due to premiums/discounts of the ETP (which could cause the Fund to buy shares at market prices that are higher than their value or sell shares at market prices that are lower than their value); the failure of an active trading market to develop; or exchange trading halts or delistings. An investment in the Fund will entail more costs and expenses than a direct investment in any Underlying ETP. As the Fund’s allocations to Underlying ETPs changes, or the expense ratio of Underlying ETPs change, the operating expenses borne by the Fund from such investments may increase or decrease.
Index Risk
There is no guarantee that the Fund’s investment results will have a high degree of correlation to those of the Underlying Index or that the Fund will achieve its investment objective. Market disruptions and regulatory restrictions could have an adverse effect on the Fund’s ability to adjust its exposure to the required levels in order to track the Underlying Index. Errors in index data, index computations or the construction of the Underlying Index in accordance with its methodology may occur from time to time and may not be identified and corrected for a period of time or at all, which may have an adverse impact on the Fund and its shareholders.
Market Risk
Market risks include political, regulatory, market and economic developments, including developments that impact specific economic sectors, industries or segments of the market, which may affect the Fund’s value. Turbulence in financial markets, tariffs and other protectionist measures, political developments and uncertainty, central bank policy, and reduced liquidity in equity, credit and fixed income markets may negatively affect many issuers worldwide, which could have an adverse effect on the Fund. During a general downturn in the securities markets, multiple asset classes may be negatively affected. Geopolitical and other events, including war, terrorism, economic uncertainty, trade disputes, public health crises and related geopolitical events have led, and in the future may lead, to disruptions in the US and world economies and markets, which may increase financial market volatility and have significant adverse direct or indirect effects on a Fund and its investments. Market disruptions could cause the Fund to lose money, experience significant redemptions, and encounter operational difficulties. Although multiple asset classes may be affected by a market disruption, the duration and effects may not be the same for all types of assets.
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Operational Risk
The Fund is exposed to operational risks arising from a number of factors, including, but not limited to, human error, processing and communication errors, errors of the Fund’s service providers, counterparties or other third-parties, failed or inadequate processes and technology or systems failures. The Fund and Advisor seek to reduce these operational risks through controls and procedures. However, these measures do not address every possible risk and may be inadequate to address significant operational risks.
Passive Management Risk
The Fund is not actively managed and instead seeks to track the performance of an index. Passive management has the following risks associated with it:

The Fund invests in the securities included in, or representative of, the Underlying Index. The provider of the Underlying Index or the index calculation agent may make errors. The index provider may include index constituents that should have been excluded, or it may exclude index constituents that should have been included. It also may include or exclude constituents at incorrect levels. This may result in the Fund, in turn, being correctly positioned to an index that has been incorrectly calculated. This could lead to losses to the Fund.

In seeking to track the Underlying Index’s performance, the Fund may be subject to tracking error, which is the divergence of the Fund’s performance from that of the Underlying Index. Tracking error may occur because of differences between the securities and other instruments held in the Fund’s portfolio and those included in the Underlying Index, pricing differences (including, as applicable, differences between a security’s price at the local market close and the Fund’s valuation of a security at the time of calculation of the Fund’s NAV), differences in transaction costs, the Fund’s holding of uninvested cash, differences in timing of the accrual of or the valuation of dividends or interest, the requirements to maintain pass-through tax treatment, portfolio transactions carried out to minimize the distribution of capital gains to shareholders, changes to the Underlying Index or the costs to the Fund of complying with various new or existing regulatory requirements. Tracking error also may result because the Fund incurs fees and expenses, while the Underlying Index does not. This risk may be heightened during times of increased market volatility or other unusual market conditions.

The Fund generally will not attempt to take defensive positions in declining markets and generally will not sell a security because its issuer is in financial trouble, unless that security is removed from (or was no longer useful in tracking a component of) the Underlying Index.
Portfolio Turnover Risk
The Fund’s strategy may frequently involve buying and selling portfolio securities to rebalance the Fund’s investment exposures. High portfolio turnover may result in the Fund paying higher levels of transaction costs and generating greater tax liabilities for shareholders. Portfolio turnover risk may cause the Fund’s performance to be less than expected.
Secondary Market Trading Risk
Although the Fund’s Shares are listed for trading on one or more securities exchanges, there can be no assurance that an active trading market for such Shares will develop or be maintained by market makers or Authorized Participants. In general, the trading of Shares on securities exchanges is subject to the risk of irregular trading activity and wide “bid/ask” spreads (which may be especially pronounced for smaller funds). Additionally, market makers are under no obligation to make a market in the Fund’s Shares and Authorized Participants are not obligated to submit purchase or redemption orders for Creation Units. In the event market makers cease making a market in the Fund’s Shares or Authorized Participants stop submitting purchase or redemption orders for Creation Units, the Fund’s Shares may trade at a larger premium or discount to its NAV. Wide bid-ask spreads and large premiums or discounts to NAV are likely to lead to an investor buying his or her shares at a market price that is more than their value, and selling those shares at a market price that is less than their value.
Trading Price Risk
Shares of the Fund trade on securities exchanges at prices at, above or below the Fund’s most recent NAV. The NAV of the Fund is calculated at the end of each business day and fluctuates with changes in the market value of the Fund’s holdings. The trading price of the Fund’s Shares fluctuates continuously throughout trading hours based on both market supply of and demand for Shares and the underlying value of the Fund’s portfolio holdings or NAV. As a result, the trading prices of the Fund’s Shares may deviate significantly from NAV during
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periods of market volatility. Any of these factors, among others, may lead to the Fund’s Shares trading at a premium or discount to NAV. Although it is generally expected that the market price of the Shares of the Fund will approximate the Fund’s NAV, there may be times when the market price and the NAV vary significantly. Thus, an investor may pay more than NAV when purchasing Shares and receive less than NAV when selling Shares.
Risks of Underlying ETPs
The Fund may invest in the securities of other ETPs, including Affiliated ETFs. Investments in the Fund are subject to the risks associated with an investment in the Underlying ETPs. In addition to the risks described above, the following risks should also be considered when making an investment in the Fund.

Commodities Risk. Exposure to the commodities markets may subject the Fund to greater volatility than investments in traditional securities, and exposure to commodities, directly or through other securities, can cause the value of the Fund’s assets to decline or fluctuate in a rapid and unpredictable manner. The value of commodities may be affected by changes in overall market movements, real or perceived inflationary trends, commodity index volatility, changes in interest rates or currency exchange rates, population growth and changing demographics, international economic, political and regulatory developments, and factors affecting a particular region, industry or commodity, such as drought, floods, or other weather conditions, livestock disease, changes in storage costs, trade embargoes, competition from substitute products, transportation bottlenecks or shortages, fluctuations in supply and demand, and tariffs.

Credit Risk. Credit risk is the risk that the issuer or guarantor of a debt instrument or the counterparty to a derivatives contract, repurchase agreement or loan of portfolio securities will be unable or unwilling to make its timely interest and/or principal payments when due or otherwise honor its obligations. Changes in an issuer’s or counterparty’s credit rating or the market’s perception of an issuer’s or counterparty’s creditworthiness may also adversely affect the value of the Fund’s investment in that issuer. The degree of credit risk depends on an issuer’s or counterparty’s financial condition and on the terms of an obligation.

Currency Risk. Investments directly in foreign (non-U.S.) currencies or in securities that trade in, and receive revenues in, foreign (non-U.S.) currencies are subject to the risk that those currencies will decline in value relative to the U.S. dollar or, in the case of hedging positions, that the U.S. dollar will decline in value relative to the currency being hedged. Currency rates in foreign countries may fluctuate significantly over short periods of time for a number of reasons, including changes in interest rates, intervention (or the failure to intervene) by U.S. or foreign governments, central banks or supranational entities such as the International Monetary Fund, or by the imposition of currency controls or other political developments in the United States or abroad.

Debt Securities Risk. The risks of investing in debt securities include (without limitation): (i) credit risk, e.g., the issuer or guarantor of a debt security may be unable or unwilling (or be perceived as unable or unwilling) to make timely principal and/or interest payments or otherwise honor its obligations; (ii) interest rate risk, e.g., when interest rates go up, the value of a debt security generally goes down, and when interest rates go down, the value of a debt security generally goes up; (iii) liquidity risk and valuation risk, e.g., debt securities generally do not trade on a securities exchange, making them generally less liquid and more difficult to value than common stock; (iv) call risk and income risk, e.g., during a period of falling interest rates, the issuer may redeem a security by repaying it early, which may reduce the Fund’s income if the proceeds are reinvested at lower interest rates; and (v) extension risk, e.g., if interest rates rise, repayments of debt securities may occur more slowly than anticipated by the market, which may drive the prices of these securities down because their interest rates are lower than the current interest rate and the securities remain outstanding longer. Debt securities most frequently trade in institutional round lot size transactions. If the Fund purchases bonds in amounts less than the institutional round lot size, which are frequently referred to as “odd” lots, the odd lot size positions may have more price volatility than institutional round lot size positions. The Fund uses a third-party pricing service to value bond holdings and the pricing service values bonds assuming orderly transactions of an institutional round lot size.

Equity Securities Risk. Investments in common stocks and other equity securities are particularly subject to the risk of changes in investors’ perceptions of the financial condition of an issuer, conditions affecting equity markets generally and political and/or economic events. Equity prices may also be particularly
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sensitive to rising interest rates, as the cost of capital rises and borrowing costs increase. Holders of an issuer’s common stock may be subject to greater risks than holders of its preferred stock and debt securities because common stockholders’ claims are subordinated to those of holders of preferred stocks and debt securities upon the bankruptcy of an issuer.

Foreign Securities Risk. Investments in the securities of non-U.S. issuers involve risks beyond those associated with investments in U.S. securities. These additional risks include greater market volatility, the availability of less reliable financial information, higher transactional and custody costs, taxation by foreign governments, decreased market liquidity and political instability. Some countries and regions have experienced security concerns, war or threats of war and aggression, terrorism, economic uncertainty, natural and environmental disasters and/or systemic market dislocations that have led, and in the future may lead, to increased short-term market volatility and may have adverse long-term effects on the U.S. and world economies and markets generally. Foreign issuers are often subject to less stringent requirements regarding accounting, auditing, financial reporting and record keeping than are U.S. issuers, and therefore not all material information will be available. Securities exchanges or foreign governments may adopt rules or regulations that may negatively impact the Fund’s ability to invest in foreign securities or may prevent the Fund from repatriating its investments. Less developed securities markets are more likely to experience problems with the clearing and settling of trades, as well as the holding of securities by local banks, agents and depositories. The less developed a country’s securities market is, the greater the likelihood of custody problems.

Interest Rate Risk. An increase in interest rates may cause the value of securities held by the Fund to decline. Fixed income securities with longer durations tend to be more sensitive to changes in interest rates, making them more volatile than securities with shorter durations or floating or adjustable interest rates. The negative impact on the Fund from potential interest rate increases could be swift and significant, including falling market values, increased redemptions and reduced liquidity. The Fund may be subject to a greater risk of rising interest rates than would normally be the case due to the current period of historically low rates and the effect of potential government fiscal policy initiatives and resulting market reaction to those initiatives.
When interest rates rise, certain obligations will be paid off by the issuer (or other obligated party) more slowly than anticipated, causing the value of these securities to fall. As a result, in a period of rising interest rates, securities may exhibit additional volatility and may lose value. The value of securities with longer maturities generally changes more in response to changes in interest rates than does the value of securities with shorter maturities.
During periods of falling interest rates, an issuer of a callable security held by the Fund may “call” or repay the security before its stated maturity, which may result in the Fund having to reinvest the proceeds in securities with lower yields, resulting in a decline in the Fund’s income, or in securities with greater risks or with other less favorable features.
The terms of floating rate notes and other instruments may be tied to the London Interbank Offered Rate (“LIBOR”), which functions as a reference rate or benchmark. It is anticipated that LIBOR will be discontinued at the end of 2021, which may cause increased volatility and illiquidity in the markets for instruments with terms tied to LIBOR or other adverse consequences, such as decreased yields and reduction in value, for these instruments. These events may adversely affect the Fund and its investments in such instruments.

Liquidity Risk. Liquidity risk exists when particular investments are difficult to purchase or sell. Certain investments may be subject to restrictions on resale, trade over-the-counter or in limited volume, or lack an active trading market. Accordingly, the Fund may not be able to sell or close out of such investments at favorable times or prices (or at all), or at the prices approximating those at which the Fund currently values them. Illiquid securities may trade at a discount from comparable, more liquid investments and may be subject to wide fluctuations in market value.

Real Estate Companies Risk. An investment in companies that invest in real estate (including REITs) exposes the Fund to the risks of the real estate market and the risks associated with the ownership of real estate. These risks can include fluctuations in the value of or destruction of underlying properties; realignment in tenant living and work habits (for example, movements to and from different parts of a nation, a region, a state or a city); tenant or borrower default; market saturation; changes in general
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and local economic conditions; decreases in market rates for rents; increases in vacancies; competition; property taxes; capital expenditures or operating expenses; other economic or political events affecting the real estate industry including interest rates and government regulation; concentration in a limited number of properties, geographic regions or property types; and low quality and/or conflicted management. Real estate is generally a less liquid asset class and companies that hold real estate may not be able to liquidate or modify their holdings quickly in response to changes in economic or other market conditions. Additionally, such companies may utilize leverage, which increases investment risk and the potential for more volatility in the Fund’s returns.

Small- and/or Mid-Capitalization Companies Risk. Small- and mid-capitalization companies may be more vulnerable to adverse general market or economic developments, and their securities may be less liquid and may experience greater price volatility than larger, more established companies.

Valuation Risk. Independent market quotations for certain investments held by the Fund may not be readily available, and such investments may be fair valued or valued by a pricing service at an evaluated price. These valuations involve subjectivity and different market participants may assign different prices to the same investment. As a result, there is a risk that the Fund may not be able to sell an investment at the price assigned to the investment by the Fund. In addition, the value of the securities or other assets in the Fund’s portfolio may change on days or during time periods when shareholders will not be able to purchase or sell the Fund’s Shares.

Variable and Floating Rate Instruments Risk. Variable and floating rate instruments include debt securities issued by corporate and governmental entities, bank loans, mortgage-backed securities and asset-backed securities, preferred equity securities and derivative variable rate securities, such as inverse floaters. Variable and floating rate instruments are structured so that the instrument’s coupon rate fluctuates based upon the level of a reference rate. A variable or floating rate instrument’s coupon rate resets periodically according to its terms. Consequently, in a rising interest rate environment, variable and floating rate instruments with coupon rates that reset infrequently may lag behind the changes in market interest rates.
Performance Information
The bar chart that follows shows the annual total returns of the Fund for a full calendar year. The table that follows the bar chart shows the Fund’s average annual total returns, both before and after taxes. The bar chart and table provide an indication of the risks of investing in the Fund by comparing the Fund’s performance from year to year and by showing how the Fund’s average annual returns for one calendar year compared with its underlying index and another broad measure of market performance. The Barclays Capital U.S. Short Treasury Bond Index measures the performance of public obligations of the U.S. Treasury that have a remaining maturity of between 1 and 12 months.
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All returns assume reinvestment of dividends and distributions. The Fund’s past performance (before and after taxes) is not necessarily an indication of how the Fund will perform in the future. Performance reflects fee waivers and/or expense reimbursement in effect, if such waivers or reimbursements were not in place, the Fund’s performance would be reduced. Fund performance current to the most recent month-end is available by calling 1-888-474-7725 or by visiting newyorklifeinvestments.com.
[MISSING IMAGE: tm2123983d1-bc_realbw.jpg]
The Fund’s year-to-date total return as of June 30, 2021 was 0.33%.
Best and Worst Quarter Returns (for the period reflected in the bar chart above)
Return
Quarter/Year
Highest Return 3.60% 1Q/2019
Lowest Return -5.76% 1Q/2020
Average Annual Total Returns as of December 31, 2020
1 Year
5 Years
10 Years
Returns before taxes -1.42% 1.71% 1.30%
Returns after taxes on distributions(1) -1.81% 1.30% 1.08%
Returns after taxes on distributions and sale of Fund Shares(1) -0.84% 1.16% 0.92%
IQ Real Return Index
(reflects no deduction for fees, expenses or taxes)
-1.31% 1.94% 1.65%
Bloomberg Barclays U.S. Short Treasury Bond Index
(reflects no deduction for fees, expenses or taxes)
0.95% 1.32% 0.73%
(1)
After-tax returns are calculated using the highest historical individual federal marginal income tax rates and do not reflect the impact of state and local taxes. Actual after-tax returns depend on your tax situation and may differ from those shown and are not relevant if you hold your Shares through tax-deferred arrangements, such as 401(k) plans or individual retirement accounts. In some cases the return after taxes may exceed the return before taxes due to an assumed tax benefit from any losses on a sale of Fund Shares at the end of the measurement period.
Investment Advisor
IndexIQ Advisors LLC is the investment advisor to the Fund.
Portfolio Manager
The professionals jointly and primarily responsible for the day-to-day management of the Fund are Greg Barrato and James Harrison. Mr. Barrato, Senior Vice President of the Advisor, has been a portfolio manager of the Fund since February 2011 and Mr. Harrison, Vice President of the Advisor, has been a portfolio manager of the Fund since April 2018.
Purchase and Sale of Fund Shares
Unlike conventional mutual funds, the Fund issues and redeems Shares on a continuous basis, at NAV, only in large blocks of Shares called “Creation Units. ” Individual Shares of the Fund may only be purchased and sold on the secondary market through a broker-dealer. Since Shares of the Fund trade on securities exchanges in the secondary market at their market price rather than their NAV, the Fund’s Shares may trade at a price greater than (premium) or less than (discount) the Fund’s NAV. An investor may incur costs attributable to the difference between the highest price a buyer is willing to pay to purchase Shares of the Fund (bid) and the lowest price a seller is willing to accept for Shares of the Fund (ask) when buying or selling Shares in the secondary market (the “bid-ask spread”). Recent information, including the Fund’s NAV, market price, premiums and discounts, and bid-ask spreads, is available online at newyorklifeinvestments.com.
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Tax Information
The Fund’s distributions are expected to be taxed as ordinary income, qualified dividend income and/or capital gains, unless you are investing through a tax-deferred arrangement, such as a 401(k) plan or individual retirement account. However, subsequent withdrawals from such a tax-advantaged account may be subject to U.S. federal income tax. You should consult your tax advisor about your specific situation.
Financial Intermediary Compensation
If you purchase the Fund through a broker-dealer or other financial intermediary (such as a bank), the Advisor or other related companies may pay the intermediary for marketing activities and presentations, educational training programs, conferences, the development of technology platforms and reporting systems or other services related to the sale or promotion of the Fund. These payments may create a conflict of interest by influencing the broker-dealer or other intermediary and your salesperson to recommend the Fund over another investment. Ask your salesperson or visit your financial intermediary’s website for more information.
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Overview
The Trust is an investment company consisting of a number of separate investment portfolios (each, a “Fund” and together, the “Funds”) that are structured as exchange-traded funds (“ETFs”). Each share of a Fund represents an ownership interest in the securities and other instruments comprising a Fund’s portfolio. Unlike shares of a mutual fund, which can be bought and redeemed from the issuing fund by all shareholders at a price based on net asset value (“NAV”), shares of an ETF (such as the Funds) are listed on a national securities exchange and trade in the secondary market at market prices that change throughout the day, and may differ from a Fund’s NAV. IndexIQ Advisors LLC (the “Advisor”) is the investment advisor to each Fund.
Each Fund has a distinct investment objective and policies. Each of the policies described herein, including the investment objective of each Fund, constitutes a non-fundamental policy that may be changed by the Board of Trustees of the Trust (the “Board”) without shareholder approval. Certain fundamental policies of the Funds are set forth in the Funds’ Statement of Additional Information (the “SAI”) under “Investment Restrictions.” There can be no assurance that a Fund’s objective will be achieved.
Description of the Principal Investment Strategies of the Funds
Each Fund seeks investment results that correspond (before fees and expenses) generally to the price and yield performance of its underlying index (each, an “Underlying Index”). Each Underlying Index consists of a number of components (“Underlying Index Components”) selected in accordance with each Underlying Index’s rules-based methodology. Each Fund employs a “passive management” — or indexing — investment approach designed to track the performance of its Underlying Index. Under normal circumstances, each Fund invests at least 80% of its net assets, plus the amount of any borrowings for investment purposes, in the components that make up its Underlying Index or in depositary receipts based on the securities in its Underlying Index. In determining a Fund’s net assets for the purposes of this 80% threshold, accounting practices do not include collateral held under a Fund’s securities lending program, as such collateral does not represent a true asset of a Fund.
Each Fund will generally invest in all of the constituents comprising its Underlying Index in proportion to its weightings in the Underlying Index; however, under various circumstances, it may not be possible or practicable to purchase all of the securities in the Underlying Index in those weightings. In those circumstances, a Fund may purchase a sample of the securities in its Underlying Index or utilize various combinations of other available investment techniques in seeking to replicate generally the performance of the Underlying Index as a whole. This is known as “representative sampling” and may be utilized by a Fund. A Fund using a representative sampling strategy generally will invest in a sample of securities that collectively has an investment profile similar to that of the Underlying Index. The securities selected are expected to have, in the aggregate, investment characteristics (based on factors such as market capitalization and industry weightings), fundamental characteristics (including, but not limited to return variability, duration, maturity, credit ratings and yield) and liquidity measures similar to those of the Underlying Index. A Fund may also invest in credit default swaps and futures contracts to seek to track the Underlying Index.
There also may be instances in which the Advisor may choose to (i) overweight a security in the Underlying Index, (ii) purchase securities not contained in the Underlying Index that the Subadvisor believes are appropriate to substitute for certain securities in the Underlying Index, or (iii) utilize various combinations of other available investment techniques in seeking to track the Underlying Index. A Fund may sell securities that are represented in its Underlying Index in anticipation of their removal from the Underlying Index or purchase securities not represented in the Underlying Index in anticipation of their addition to the Underlying Index.
To the extent that a Fund’s Underlying Index concentrates (i.e., holds 25% or more of its total assets) in the securities of a particular industry or group of industries, the Fund will concentrate its investment to approximately the same extent as its Underlying Index.
Each Fund may invest up to 20% of its net assets in investments not included in its Underlying Index but which the Advisor believes will help the Fund track its Underlying Index. Such investments may include the use of one or more financial instruments, including but not limited to futures contracts and swap agreements (collectively, “Financial Instruments”). The Funds will not directly employ leverage in their investment strategies; nevertheless, a Fund may indirectly be leveraged if and to the extent the Fund invests in Financial Instruments to replicate an exposure to an inverse ETF that is leveraged.
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Rule 35d-1 under the Investment Company Act of 1940 (the “1940 Act”) requires that funds with certain names adopt a policy that they will, under normal circumstances, invest at least 80% of the value of their assets (net assets plus the amount of any borrowings for investment purposes) in investments of the type suggested by the fund’s name. To the extent a Fund adopts such a policy, it will be “non-fundamental,” which means that it may be changed without the vote of a majority of the Fund’s outstanding shares as defined in the 1940 Act. Such policies generally provide a fund’s shareholders with at least 60 days’ prior notice of any changes in a fund’s non-fundamental investment policy with respect to investments of the type suggested by its name. A Fund may count investments in underlying funds toward various guideline tests (such as the 80% test required under Rule 35d-1 under the 1940 Act).
Each Fund’s investments are subject to certain requirements imposed by law and regulation, as well as a Fund’s investment strategy. These requirements are generally applied at the time a Fund invests its assets. If, subsequent to an investment by a Fund, this requirement is no longer met, the Fund’s future investments will be made in a manner that will bring the Fund into compliance with this requirement.
Additional Investment Strategies
In addition to its principal investment strategies, each Fund may also invest in money market instruments, including short-term debt instruments and repurchase agreements or other funds that invest exclusively in money market instruments (subject to applicable limitations under the 1940 Act, or exemptions therefrom), rather than Underlying Index Components, when it would be more efficient or less expensive for a Fund to do so, or as cover for Financial Instruments, for liquidity purposes, or to earn interest. Swaps and other Financial Instruments may be used by a Fund to seek performance that corresponds to its Underlying Index and to manage cash flows.
Borrowing Money
Each Fund may borrow money from a bank as permitted by the 1940 Act or the rules thereunder, or by the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”) or other regulatory agency with authority over the Fund, but only for temporary or emergency purposes. The 1940 Act presently allows a fund to borrow from any bank (including pledging, mortgaging or hypothecating assets) in an amount up to 33 1/3% of its total assets (not including temporary borrowings not in excess of 5% of its total assets).
Securities Lending
A Fund may lend its portfolio securities. A securities lending program allows a Fund to receive a portion of the income generated by lending its securities and investing the respective collateral. In connection with such loans, a Fund receives liquid collateral equal to at least 102% (105% for foreign securities) of the value of the portfolio securities being lent. This collateral is marked to market on each trading day.
Description of the Principal Risks of the Funds
Investors in the Funds should carefully consider the risks of investing in the Funds as set forth in each Fund’s Summary Information section under “Principal Risks.” To the extent such risks apply, they are discussed hereunder in greater detail. Unless otherwise noted, the following risks apply to all of the Funds.
Authorized Participant Concentration Risk
Only an Authorized Participant may engage in creation or redemption transactions directly with a Fund. Each Fund has a limited number of institutions that may act as Authorized Participants on an agency basis (i.e., on behalf of other market participants). To the extent that Authorized Participants exit the business or are unable to proceed with creation and/or redemption orders with a Fund and no other Authorized Participant is able to step forward to create or redeem Creation Units, Shares may be more likely to trade at a premium or discount to NAV and possibly face trading halts and/or delisting. This risk may be heightened for ETFs that invest in non-U.S. securities because such securities often involve greater settlement and operational issues for Authorized Participants that may further limit the availability of Authorized Participants.
Counterparty Risk
The following risk applies to the IQ Hedge Multi-Strategy Tracker ETF, IQ Hedge Macro Tracker ETF, IQ Hedge Market Neutral Tracker ETF, IQ Hedge Long/Short Tracker ETF.
A counterparty (the other party to a transaction or an agreement or the party with whom a Fund executes transactions) to a transaction with a Fund may be unable or unwilling to make timely principal, interest, settlement or margin payments, fulfill the delivery conditions of the contract or transaction, or otherwise honor
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its obligations. If a counterparty fails to meet its contractual obligations for any reason, including bankruptcy of the counterparty or its parent, a loss to the Fund may result. A Fund may experience significant delays in obtaining any recovery in an insolvency, bankruptcy, or other reorganization proceeding involving a counterparty (including recovery of any collateral posted by it) and may obtain only a limited recovery or may obtain no recovery in such circumstances. If a Fund holds collateral posted by its counterparty, it may be delayed or prevented from realizing on the collateral in the event of a bankruptcy or insolvency proceeding relating to the counterparty. Under applicable law or contractual provisions, including if a Fund enters into an investment or transaction with a financial institution and such financial institution (or an affiliate of the financial institution) experiences financial difficulties, then the Fund may in certain situations be prevented or delayed from exercising its rights to terminate the investment or transaction, or to realize on any collateral, which may result in the suspension of payment and delivery obligations of the parties under such investment or transactions or in another institution being substituted for that financial institution without the consent of the Fund. Further, a Fund may be subject to “bail-in” risk under applicable law whereby, if required by the financial institution’s authority, the financial institution’s liabilities could be written down, eliminated or converted into equity or an alternative instrument of ownership. A bail-in of a financial institution may result in a reduction in value of some or all of its securities and, if a Fund holds such securities or has entered into a transaction with such a financial security when a bail-in occurs, the Fund may also be similarly impacted.
Cyber Security Risk
The Funds are susceptible to operational risks through breaches in cyber security. A breach in cyber security refers to both intentional and unintentional events that may cause a Fund to lose proprietary information, suffer data corruption or lose operational capacity. Such events could cause a Fund to incur regulatory penalties, reputational damage, additional compliance costs associated with corrective measures and/or financial loss. These risks typically are not covered by insurance. In general, cyber incidents can result from deliberate attacks or unintentional events. Cyber incidents include, but are not limited to, gaining unauthorized access to digital systems (e.g., through “hacking” or malicious software coding) for purposes of misappropriating assets or sensitive information, corrupting data or causing operational disruption. Cyber attacks may also be carried out in a manner that does not require gaining unauthorized access, such as causing denial-of-service attacks on websites (i.e., efforts to make network services unavailable to intended users). Cyber security failures by or breaches of the systems of security issuers, the Advisor, distributor and other service providers (including, but not limited to, sub-advisors, index providers, fund accountants, custodians, transfer agents and administrators), market makers, Authorized Participants or the issuers of securities in which a Fund invests, have the ability to cause disruptions and impact business operations, potentially resulting in financial losses, interference with a Fund’s ability to calculate its NAV, disclosure of confidential trading information, impediments to trading, submission of erroneous trades or erroneous creation or redemption orders, the inability of a Fund or its service providers to transact business, violations of applicable privacy and other laws, regulatory fines and other penalties, reputational damage, reimbursement or other compensation costs, or additional compliance costs. Substantial costs may be incurred by a Fund in order to resolve or prevent cyber incidents in the future. While the Funds have established business continuity plans in the event of, and risk management systems to prevent, such cyber attacks, there are inherent limitations in such plans and systems, including the possibility that certain risks have not been identified and that prevention and remediation efforts will not be successful. Furthermore, the Funds cannot control the cyber security plans and systems put in place by service providers to the Funds, issuers in which the Funds invest, Authorized Participants or market makers. There is no guarantee that such preventative efforts will succeed, and the Funds and their shareholders could be negatively impacted as a result.
Derivatives Risk
Derivatives are investments whose value depends on (or is derived from) the value of an underlying instrument, such as a security, asset, reference rate or index and involve risks different from, and possibly greater than, the risks associated with other investments. These risks include: (i) the risk that the counterparty to a derivatives transaction may not fulfill its contractual obligations; (ii) risk of mispricing or improper valuation; and (iii) the risk that changes in the value of the derivative may not correlate perfectly with the underlying asset. Derivative prices are highly volatile and may fluctuate substantially during a short period of time. Such prices are influenced by numerous factors that affect the markets, including, but not limited to, changing supply and demand relationships, government programs and policies, national and international political and economic events, changes in interest rates, inflation and deflation, and changes in supply and demand relationships. Unlike other investments, derivative contracts often have leverage inherent in their terms. This leverage creates
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a disconnect between the initial amount of an investment relative to the risk assumed and introduces the possibility that a relatively small movement in the value of an underlying reference asset can result in an immediate and substantial loss to a party to a derivative contract. In general, the use of leveraged derivatives can magnify potential for gain or loss and, therefore, amplify the effects of market volatility on a Fund’s Share price. The effects of leverage may also cause a Fund to liquidate portfolio positions when it would not be advantageous to do so in order to satisfy its obligations or to meet collateral segregation requirements. In the event of the bankruptcy or insolvency of a counterparty, a Fund could experience the loss of some or all of its investment in a derivative or experience delays in liquidating its positions, including declines in the value of its investment during the period in which the Fund seeks to enforce its rights, and an inability to realize any gains on its investment during such period. A Fund may also incur fees and expenses in enforcing its rights. Certain derivatives are subject to mandatory clearing. Central clearing is intended to reduce counterparty credit risk and increase liquidity, but central clearing does not make derivatives transactions risk-free.
Exchange Traded Products Risk
Unlike an investment in a mutual fund, the value of a Fund’s investment in other exchange-traded funds or exchange-traded investment products (“ETPs”) is based on its market price (rather than NAV) and the Fund could lose money due to premiums/discounts of the ETP (which could cause the Fund to buy shares at market prices that are higher than their value or sell shares at market prices that are lower than their value); the failure of an active trading market to develop or exchange trading halts or delistings. An investment in a Fund that holds ETPs will entail more costs and expenses than a direct investment in any Underlying ETPs. As a Fund’s allocations to Underlying ETPs changes, or the expense ratio of Underlying ETPs change, the operating expenses borne by such Fund from such investments may increase or decrease. Federal law prohibits a Fund from acquiring investment company shares, including shares of other registered investment companies (including ETFs), in excess of specific thresholds unless exempted by rule, regulation or exemptive order. These prohibitions may prevent a Fund from allocating its investment in an optimal manner.
Index Risk
There is no guarantee that a Fund’s investment results will have a high degree of correlation to those of its Underlying Index or that the Fund will achieve its investment objective. Market disruptions and regulatory restrictions could have an adverse effect on a Fund’s ability to adjust its exposure to the required levels in order to track its Underlying Index. Errors in index data, index computations or the construction of an Underlying Index in accordance with its methodology may occur from time to time and may not be identified and corrected for a period of time or at all, which may have an adverse impact on a Fund and its shareholders. Apart from scheduled rebalances, an Underlying Index may undergo additional ad hoc rebalances in order, for example, to correct an error in the selection of index constituents. When a Fund’s Underlying Index is rebalanced and the Fund in turn rebalances its portfolio to attempt to increase the correlation between the Fund’s portfolio and the Underlying Index, any transaction costs and market exposure arising from such portfolio rebalancing will be borne directly by the Fund and its shareholders. Unscheduled rebalances to a Fund’s Underlying Index may expose the Fund to additional tracking error risk, which is the risk that the Fund’s returns may not track those of the Underlying Index. Therefore, index errors and additional ad hoc rebalances may increase the costs to and the tracking error risk of the Fund.
In constructing an Underlying Index, the index provider may utilize quantitative models or methodologies that may be proprietary or developed by third-parties. These models and methodologies are used to determine the composition of an Underlying Index and may not adequately take into account certain factors, resulting in a decline in the value of the Underlying Index and, therefore, a Fund. Models rely on accurate financial and market data inputs. If inaccurate data is entered into a model, the resulting information will be incorrect. In addition, the models used by be predictive and nature and such models may result in an incorrect assessment of future events. The models evaluate securities or securities markets based on certain assumptions concerning the interplay of market factors. The markets or prices of individual securities may be affected by factors not foreseen in developing the models. The historical correlations and relationships between individual securities or asset classes, upon which a model may be based, may not continue in the future.
Liquidity Risk
Liquidity risk exists when particular investments are difficult to purchase or sell. To the extent a Fund invests in illiquid securities or securities that become less liquid, such investments may have a negative effect on the returns of the Fund because the Fund may be unable to sell the illiquid securities at an advantageous time or price. Securities with substantial market and/or credit risk may be especially susceptible to liquidity risk. Liquidity
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risk may be the result of, among other things, an investment being subject to restrictions on resale, trading over-the-counter or in limited volume, or lacking an active trading market. Liquid investments may become illiquid or less liquid after purchase by the Fund, particularly during periods of market turmoil or economic uncertainty. Illiquid and relatively less liquid investments may be harder to value, especially in changing markets. If a Fund is forced to sell underlying investments at reduced prices or under unfavorable conditions to meet redemption requests or for other cash needs, the Fund may suffer a loss. This may be magnified in a rising interest rate environment or under other circumstances where redemptions from a Fund may be higher than normal. It may also be the case that other market participants may be attempting to liquidate similar holdings at the same time as a Fund, causing increased supply in the market and contributing to liquidity risk and downward pricing pressure. There can be no assurance that a security that is deemed to be liquid when purchased will continue to be liquid or as long as it is held by a Fund.
Long/Short Risk
The following risk applies to the IQ Hedge Multi-Strategy Tracker ETF, IQ Hedge Macro Tracker ETF, IQ Hedge Market Neutral Tracker ETF, IQ Hedge Long/Short Tracker ETF and IQ Hedge Event-Driven Tracker ETF.
Each Fund seeks long exposure to certain securities and may seek short exposure to certain other securities. There is no guarantee that the returns on a Fund’s long or short positions will produce high, or even positive, returns, and a Fund could lose money if either or both of such Fund’s long and short positions produce negative returns. In addition, a Fund may gain enhanced long exposure to certain securities (i.e., obtain investment exposure that exceeds the amount directly invested in those assets, a form of leverage) and, under such circumstances, will lose more money in market environments that are adverse to its long positions than funds that do not employ such leverage. As a result, such investments may give rise to losses that exceed the amount invested in those assets.
Market Risk
The value of a Fund’s investments may fluctuate and/or decline because of changes in the markets in which the Fund invests, which could cause the Fund to underperform other funds with similar investment objectives and strategies. Security markets are volatile and may decline significantly in response to adverse issuer, regulatory, political, or economic developments. Different sectors of the market and different security types may react differently to such developments. Changes in these markets may be rapid and unpredictable. Fluctuations in the markets generally or in a specific industry or sector may impact the securities in which a Fund invests. From time to time, markets may experience periods of stress for potentially prolonged periods that may result in: (i) increased market volatility; (ii) reduced market liquidity; and (iii) increased redemptions of Fund shares. Such conditions may add significantly to the risk of volatility in the net asset value of a Fund’s shares and the market prices at which shares of a Fund trade on a securities exchange. During periods of market stress shares of a Fund may also experience significantly wider “bid/ask” spreads and premiums and discounts between a Fund’s net asset value and market price.
Market changes may impact equity and fixed income securities in different and, at times, conflicting manners. A Fund potentially will be prevented from executing investment decisions at an advantageous time or price as a result of any domestic or global market disruptions, particularly disruptions causing heightened market volatility and reduced market liquidity, as well as increased or changing regulations or market closures. Thus, investments that the Advisor or Subadvisor believes best enable a Fund to track the performance of its Underlying Index may be unavailable entirely or in the specific quantities sought by the Advisor or Subadvisor and the Fund may need to obtain the exposure through less advantageous or indirect investments or forgo the investment at the time. Securities and investments included as components of an Underlying Index may be susceptible to declines in value, including declines in value that are not believed to be representative of the issuer’s value or fundamentals, due to investor reactions to such events. In response to market volatility and disruption, an Underlying Index may delay rebalancing, implement temporary or permanent modifications to its methodology or take other actions.
Political and diplomatic events within the United States and abroad, such as the U.S. budget and deficit reduction plans, protectionist measures, trade tensions central bank policy and government intervention in the economy, has in the past resulted, and may in the future result, in developments that present additional risks to a Fund’s investments and operations. Geopolitical and other events, such as war, acts of terrorism, natural disasters, the spread of infectious illnesses, epidemics and pandemics, environmental and other public health issues, recessions or other events, and governments’ reactions to such events, may lead to increased market volatility and instability in world economies and markets generally and may have adverse effects on the
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performance of the Fund and its investments. Additional and/or prolonged geopolitical or other events may affect investor and consumer confidence and may adversely impact financial markets and the broader economy, perhaps suddenly and to a significant degree. Any such market, economic and other disruptions could also prevent a Fund from executing its investment strategies and processes in a timely manner.
An investment in a Fund is not a deposit in a bank and is not insured or guaranteed by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation or any other government agency. When you sell your Shares, they could be worth less than what you paid for them.
Market Disruption Risk and Recent Market Events
Geopolitical and other events, including war, terrorism, economic uncertainty, trade disputes, public health crises and related geopolitical events have led, and in the future may lead, to disruptions in the US and world economies and markets, which may increase financial market volatility and have significant adverse direct or indirect effects on a Fund and its investments. Market disruptions could cause a Fund to lose money, experience significant redemptions and encounter operational difficulties. Although multiple asset classes may be affected by a market disruption, the duration and effects may not be the same for all types of assets. Recent market disruption events include the pandemic spread of the novel coronavirus known as COVID-19, and the significant restrictions, market volatility, decreased economic and other activity and increased government activity that it has caused. Specifically, COVID-19 has led to significant death and morbidity, and concerns about its further spread have resulted in the closing of schools and non-essential businesses, cancellations, shelter-in-place orders, lower consumer spending in certain sectors, social distancing, bans on large social gatherings and travel, quarantines, government economic stimulus measures, reduced productivity, rapid increases in unemployment, increased demand for and strain on government and medical resources, border closings and global trade and supply chain interruptions, among others. The full effects, duration and costs of the COVID-19 pandemic are impossible to predict, and the circumstances surrounding the COVID-19 pandemic will continue to evolve. The pandemic may affect certain countries, industries, economic sectors, companies and investment products more than others, may exacerbate existing economic, political, or social tensions and may increase the probability of an economic recession or depression. A Fund and its investments may be adversely affected by the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic, and a prolonged pandemic may result in a Fund and its service providers experiencing operational difficulties in coordinating a remote workforce and implementing their business continuity plans, among others.
Operational Risk
Each Fund is exposed to operational risks arising from a number of factors, including, but not limited to, human error, processing and communication errors, errors of the Fund’s service providers, counterparties or other third-parties, failed or inadequate processes and technology or systems failures. The Fund, Advisor and Subadvisor seek to reduce these operational risks through controls and procedures. However, these measures do not address every possible risk and may be inadequate to address significant operational risks.
Passive Management Risk
The Funds are not actively managed and instead seeks to track the performance of an index. Passive management has the following risks associated with it:

Each Fund invests in the securities included in, or representative of, its Underlying Index. The provider of an Underlying Index or an index calculation agent may make errors. An index provider may include index constituents that should have been excluded, or it may exclude index constituents that should have been included. It also may include or exclude constituents at incorrect levels. This may result in a Fund, in turn, being correctly positioned to an index that has been incorrectly calculated. This could lead to losses to the Fund.

In seeking to track an Underlying Index’s performance, a Fund may be subject to tracking error, which is the divergence of the Fund’s performance from that of its Underlying Index. Tracking error may occur because of differences between the securities and other instruments held in a Fund’s portfolio and those included in an Underlying Index, pricing differences (including, as applicable, differences between a security’s price at the local market close and a Fund’s valuation of a security at the time of calculation of a Fund’s NAV), differences in transaction costs, a Fund’s holding of uninvested cash, differences in timing of the accrual of or the valuation of dividends or interest, the requirements to maintain pass-through tax treatment, portfolio transactions carried out to minimize the distribution of capital gains to shareholders, changes to an Underlying Index or the costs to the Fund of complying with various new
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or existing regulatory requirements. Tracking error also may result because a Fund incurs fees and expenses, while an Underlying Index does not. This risk may be heightened during times of increased market volatility or other unusual market conditions.

Each Fund generally will not attempt to take defensive positions in declining markets and generally will not sell a security because its issuer is in financial trouble, unless that security is removed from (or was no longer useful in tracking a component of) its Underlying Index.
Portfolio Turnover Risk
The following risk applies to the IQ Hedge Multi-Strategy Tracker ETF, IQ Hedge Macro Tracker ETF, IQ Hedge Market Neutral Tracker ETF and IQ Real Return ETF.
A Fund’s strategy may frequently involve buying and selling portfolio securities to rebalance the Fund’s investment exposures. High portfolio turnover may result in the Fund paying higher levels of transaction costs and generating greater tax liabilities for shareholders. Portfolio turnover risk may cause a Fund’s performance to be less than expected.
Secondary Market Trading Risk
Although each Fund’s Shares are listed for trading on one or more securities exchanges, there can be no assurance that an active trading market for such Shares will develop or be maintained by market makers or Authorized Participants. The trading of Shares on securities exchanges is subject to the risk of irregular trading activity. Additionally, market makers are under no obligation to make a market in a Fund’s Shares and Authorized Participants are not obligated to submit purchase or redemption orders for Creation Units. In the event market makers cease making a market in a Fund’s Shares or Authorized Participants stop submitting purchase or redemption orders for Creation Units, such Fund’s Shares may trade at a larger premium or discount to its NAV. Wide bid-ask spreads and large premiums or discounts to NAV are likely to lead to an investor buying his or her shares at a market price that is more than their value, and selling those shares at a market price that is less than their value.
Buying or selling Shares on an exchange involves two types of costs that apply to all securities transactions. When buying or selling Shares through a broker, you will likely incur a brokerage commission and other charges. In addition, you may incur the cost of the “spread” — the difference between what investors are willing to pay for Shares (the “bid” price) and the price at which they are willing to sell Fund shares (the “ask” price). The spread, which varies over time for Shares based on trading volume and market liquidity, is generally narrower if the Fund has more trading volume and market liquidity and wider if the Fund has less trading volume and market liquidity. The risk of wide bid and ask spreads may be especially pronounced for smaller funds. In addition, increased market volatility may cause wider spreads. There may also be regulatory and other charges that are incurred as a result of trading activity. Because of the costs inherent in buying or selling Shares, frequent trading may detract significantly from investment results and an investment in Shares may not be advisable for investors who anticipate regularly making small investments through a brokerage account.
Securities exchanges have requirements that must be met in order for Shares to be listed. There can be no assurance that the requirements of an exchange necessary to maintain the listing of Shares will continue to be met. This risk is particularly acute for funds that fail to attract a large number of shareholders. Pursuant to an exchange’s “circuit breaker” rules, trading in a Fund’s Shares may be halted due to extraordinary market volatility.
Short Sales Risk
The following risk applies to the IQ Hedge Multi-Strategy Tracker ETF, IQ Hedge Macro Tracker ETF, IQ Hedge Market Neutral Tracker ETF, IQ Hedge Long/Short Tracker ETF and IQ Hedge Event-Driven Tracker ETF.
In order to achieve its investment objective, a Fund may engage in short sales, which are designed to provide the Fund gains when the price of a particular security, basket of securities or index declines. When a Fund shorts a security, it borrows shares of that security, which it then sells. A Fund closes out a short sale by purchasing the security that it has sold short and returning that security to the entity that lent the security. A Fund may also seek inverse or “short” exposure through the use of derivatives such as swap agreements or futures contracts, which will expose the Fund to certain risks such as an increase in volatility or decrease in the liquidity of the securities of the underlying short position. A short position subjects a Fund to the risk that instead of declining, the price of the security or reference asset to which the Fund has short exposure will rise. If the price of the security or reference
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asset increases between the date of the short sale and the date on which a Fund replaces the security or otherwise closes out its short position, such Fund will experience a loss, which is theoretically unlimited since there is a theoretically unlimited potential for the market price of a security or other instrument sold short to increase.
Swap Agreements Risk
The following risk applies to the IQ Hedge Multi-Strategy Tracker ETF, IQ Hedge Macro Tracker ETF, IQ Hedge Market Neutral Tracker ETF, IQ Hedge Long/Short Tracker ETF and IQ Hedge Event-Driven Tracker ETF.
Swap agreements are two-party contracts entered into for a set period of time in which the parties agree to exchange payments based on some underlying reference or asset (such as interest rates). The use of swaps is a highly specialized activity that involves investment techniques, risk analyses and tax planning different from those associated with ordinary portfolio securities transactions. These transactions can result in sizeable realized and unrealized capital gains and losses relative to the gains and losses from a Fund’s direct investments in the reference assets. Transactions in swaps can involve greater risks than if a Fund had invested directly in the reference asset since, in addition to general market risks, swaps may be leveraged and are also subject to credit risk, counterparty risk, liquidity risk and valuation risk. Because they are two-party contracts and may have terms of greater than seven days, certain swap transactions may be considered illiquid. Moreover, a Fund bears the risk of loss of the amount expected to be received under a swap agreement in the event of the default or bankruptcy of a swap counterparty. Some swaps may be complex and difficult to value. Swaps may also be subject to pricing or “basis” risk, which exists when a particular swap becomes extraordinarily expensive relative to historical prices or the price of corresponding cash market instruments. Under certain market conditions it may not be economically feasible to initiate a transaction or liquidate a position in time to avoid a loss or take advantage of an opportunity. If a swap transaction is particularly large or if the relevant market is illiquid, it may not be possible to initiate a transaction or liquidate a position at an advantageous time or price, which may result in significant losses. The prices of swaps can be very volatile, and a variance in the degree of volatility or in the direction of the price of the reference asset from the portfolio managers’ expectations may produce significant losses in a Fund’s investments in swaps. In addition, a perfect correlation between a swap and an investment position may be impossible to achieve. As a result, a Fund’s use of swaps may not be effective in fulfilling such Fund’s investment strategies and may contribute to losses that would not have been incurred otherwise. Certain swaps are not bilateral agreements but are centrally cleared and are exchange-traded. Central clearing tends to decrease credit risk and improve liquidity but many regulations regarding centrally cleared swaps have not been fully implemented and the scope of the risks remain unclear. As central clearing does not make the agreements risk-free and there is no guarantee that a Fund would consider all centrally cleared or exchange-traded swaps to be liquid.
Trading Price Risk
Shares of a Fund trade on securities exchanges at prices at, above or below the Fund’s most recent NAV. The NAV of a Fund is calculated at the end of each business day and fluctuates with changes in the market value of the Fund’s holdings. The trading price of a Fund’s Shares fluctuates continuously throughout trading hours based on both market supply of and demand for Shares and the Fund’s NAV. As a result, the trading prices of a Fund’s Shares may deviate significantly from NAV during periods of market volatility. The market price of a Fund’s Shares during the trading day, like the price of any exchange-traded security, includes a “bid/ask” spread charged by the exchange specialist, market makers or other participants that trade the Shares. In times of severe market disruption, the bid/ask spread can increase significantly. At those times, Shares are most likely to be traded at a discount to NAV, and the discount is likely to be greatest when the price of Shares is falling fastest, which may be the time that an investor most wants to sell their Shares. Although it is generally expected that the market price of a Fund’s Shares will approximate the Fund’s NAV, there may be times when the market price and the NAV vary significantly. Thus, an investor may pay more than NAV when purchasing Shares and receive less than NAV when selling Shares. While the creation/redemption feature is designed to make it more likely that a Fund’s Shares normally will trade on securities exchanges at prices close to the Fund’s next calculated NAV, exchange prices are not expected to correlate exactly with the Fund’s NAV due to timing reasons, supply and demand imbalances and other factors. In addition, disruptions to creations and redemptions, including disruptions at market makers, Authorized Participants, or other market participants, and during periods of significant market volatility, may result in trading prices for Shares of a Fund that differ significantly from its NAV. Authorized Participants may be less willing to create or redeem Shares if there is a lack of an active market for such Shares or its underlying investments, which may contribute to the Fund’s Shares trading at a premium or discount to NAV. Additionally, similar to shares of other issuers listed on a securities
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exchange, a Fund’s Shares may be sold short and are therefore subject to the risk of increased volatility and price decreases associated with being sold short. Any of these factors, among others, may lead to a Fund’s Shares trading at a premium or discount to NAV.
Risks of Underlying ETPs
Investments in each Fund are subject to the risks associated with an investment in the Underlying ETPs. In addition to the risks described above, the following risks should also be considered when making an investment in a Fund. See also the section on “Additional Risks” for other risk factors. There is a risk that IndexIQ’s evaluations and assumptions regarding the broad asset classes represented in the Underlying Indexes may be incorrect based on actual market conditions. In addition, at times certain of the segments of the market represented by the Underlying ETPs may be out of favor and underperform other segments.

Asset-Backed Securities Risk. Asset-backed securities are securities that represent interests in, and whose values and payments are based on, a “pool” of underlying assets, which may include, among others, lower-rated debt securities and corporate loans, consumer loans or mortgages and leases of property. Asset-backed securities include collateralized debt obligations, collateralized bond obligations, and collateralized loan obligations and other similarly structured vehicles. As with other debt securities, asset-backed securities are subject to credit risk, extension risk, interest rate risk, liquidity risk and valuation risk. Certain asset-backed securities do not have the benefit of the same security interest in the related collateral as do mortgage-backed securities, nor are they provided government guarantees of repayment. Credit card receivables are generally unsecured, and the debtors are entitled to the protection of a number of state and federal consumer credit laws, many of which give such debtors the right to set off certain amounts owed on the credit cards, thereby reducing the balance due. In addition, some issuers of automobile receivables permit the servicers to retain possession of the underlying obligations. If the servicer were to sell these obligations to another party, there is a risk that the purchaser would acquire an interest superior to that of the holders of the related automobile receivables. The impairment of the value of collateral or other assets underlying an asset-backed security, such as a result of non-payment of loans or non-performance of underlying assets, may result in a reduction in the value of such asset-backed securities and losses to a Fund.
Investments in mortgage-related securities make an investor more susceptible to adverse economic, political or regulatory events that affect the value of real estate. Mortgage-related securities are also significantly affected by the rate of prepayments and modifications of the mortgage loans underlying those securities, as well as by other factors such as borrower defaults, delinquencies, realized or liquidation losses and other shortfalls. Mortgage-related securities are particularly sensitive to prepayment risk, given that the term to maturity for mortgage loans is generally substantially longer than the expected lives of those securities. As the timing and amount of prepayments cannot be accurately predicted, the timing of changes in the rate of prepayments of the mortgage loans may significantly affect a Fund’s actual yield to maturity on any mortgage-related securities. Along with prepayment risk, mortgage-related securities are significantly affected by interest rate risk. In a low interest rate environment, mortgage loan prepayments would generally be expected to increase due to factors such as refinancings and loan modifications at lower interest rates. In contrast, if prevailing interest rates rise, prepayments of mortgage loans would generally be expected to decline and therefore extend the weighted average lives of mortgage-related securities held or acquired by a Fund. Fund investments in mortgage-backed securities issued by Ginnie Mae are backed by the full faith and credit of the U.S. government. Fund investments in mortgage-backed securities issued by Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac are not backed by the full faith and credit of the U.S. government, and there can be no assurance that the U.S. government would provide financial support to its agencies or instrumentalities where it is not obligated to do so. Impairment of the underlying obligations or collateral, such as by non-payment, will reduce a mortgage-related security’s value. Enforcing rights against such collateral in events of default may be difficult or insufficient. These securities may have a structure that makes their reaction to interest rate changes and other factors difficult to predict, making their value highly volatile.

Commodities Risk. Exposure to the commodities markets may subject the Fund to greater volatility than investments in traditional securities, and exposure to commodities, directly or through other securities, can cause the value of the Fund’s assets to decline or fluctuate in a rapid and unpredictable manner. The value of commodities may be affected by changes in overall market movements, real or perceived inflationary trends, commodity index volatility, changes in interest rates or currency exchange rates,
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population growth and changing demographics, international economic, political and regulatory developments, and factors affecting a particular region, industry or commodity, such as drought, floods, or other weather conditions, livestock disease, changes in storage costs, trade embargoes, competition from substitute products, transportation bottlenecks or shortages, fluctuations in supply and demand, and tariffs.

Convertible Securities Risk. Convertible securities are bonds, debentures, notes, preferred stocks or other securities that may be converted or exchanged (by the holder or by the issuer, depending on the terms of the securities) into shares of the underlying common stock (or cash or securities of equivalent value) at a stated exchange ratio. If a convertible security held by a Fund is called for redemption or conversion, such Fund could be required to tender it for redemption, convert it into the underlying equity security or sell it to a third party, which may have an adverse effect on the Fund’s ability to achieve its investment objective. The market values of convertible securities tend to decline as interest rates increase. However, a convertible security’s market value also tends to reflect the market price of the equity security of the issuing company, particularly when the price of the equity security is greater than the convertible security’s conversion price (i.e., the predetermined price or exchange ratio at which the convertible security can be converted or exchanged for the underlying equity security). Convertible securities are also exposed to the risk that an issuer will be unable to meet its obligation to make dividend or principal payments when due as a result of changing financial or market conditions. Convertible debt securities generally offer lower interest or dividend yields than non-convertible debt securities of similar credit quality because of their potential for capital appreciation. Moreover, there can be no assurance that convertible securities will provide current income prior to conversion because the issuers of the convertible securities may default on their obligations. If the convertible security has a conversion or call feature that allows the issuer to redeem the security before the conversion date, the potential for capital appreciation may be diminished. In the event that convertible securities are not optional but mandatory based upon the price of the underlying common stock, a Fund may be subject to additional exposure to loss of income in situations where it would prefer to hold debt.

Credit Risk. Credit risk is the risk that the issuer or guarantor of a debt instrument or the counterparty to a derivatives contract, repurchase agreement or loan of portfolio securities will be unable or unwilling to make its timely interest and/or principal payments when due or otherwise honor its obligations. Changes in an issuer’s or counterparty’s credit rating or the market’s perception of an issuer’s or counterparty’s creditworthiness may also adversely affect the value of the Fund’s investment in that issuer. The degree of credit risk depends on an issuer’s or counterparty’s financial condition and on the terms of an obligation.

Currency Risk. Investments directly in foreign (non-U.S.) currencies or in securities that trade in, and receive revenues in, foreign (non-U.S.) currencies are subject to the risk that those currencies will decline in value relative to the U.S. dollar or, in the case of hedging positions, that the U.S. dollar will decline in value relative to the currency being hedged. Currency rates in foreign countries may fluctuate significantly over short periods of time for a number of reasons, including national debt levels and trade deficits, changes in balances of payments and trade, domestic and foreign interest and inflation rates, global or regional political, economic or financial events, monetary policies of governments, actual or potential government intervention and global energy prices. Political instability, the possibility of government intervention and restrictive or opaque business and investment policies may also reduce the value of a country’s currency. Government monetary policies and the buying or selling of currency by a country’s government may also influence exchange rates. As a result, a Fund’s investments in foreign currency denominated securities may reduce the return of such Fund. Because a Fund’s NAV is determined on the basis of U.S. dollars, the Fund’s NAV may decrease if the value of the non-U.S. currency to which the Fund has exposure depreciates in value relative to the U.S. dollar. This may occur even if the value of the underlying non-U.S. securities increases. Conversely, a Fund’s NAV may increase if the value of a non-U.S. currency appreciates relative to the U.S. dollar.

Debt Securities Risk. The risks of investing in debt securities include (without limitation): (i) credit risk, e.g., the issuer or guarantor of a debt security may be unable or unwilling (or be perceived as unable or unwilling) to make timely principal and/or interest payments or otherwise honor its obligations; (ii) interest rate risk, e.g., when interest rates go up, the value of a debt security generally goes down, and when interest rates go down, the value of a debt security generally goes up; (iii) liquidity risk and valuation risk, e.g., debt securities generally do not trade on a securities exchange, making them generally less liquid
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and more difficult to value than common stock; (iv) call risk and income risk, e.g., during a period of falling interest rates, the issuer may redeem a security by repaying it early, which may reduce a Fund’s income if the proceeds are reinvested at lower interest rates; and (v) extension risk, e.g., if interest rates rise, repayments of debt securities may occur more slowly than anticipated by the market, which may drive the prices of these securities down because their interest rates are lower than the current interest rate and the securities remain outstanding longer. Debt securities most frequently trade in institutional round lot size transactions. If the Fund purchases bonds in amounts less than the institutional round lot size, which are frequently referred to as “odd” lots, the odd lot size positions may have more price volatility than institutional round lot size positions. The Fund uses a third-party pricing service to value bond holdings and the pricing service values bonds assuming orderly transactions of an institutional round lot size.

Emerging Markets Securities Risk. Securities of issuers based in countries with developing economies (emerging market countries) may present market, credit, currency, liquidity, legal, political and other risks different from, or greater than, the risks of investing in developed market countries and are generally considered speculative in nature. Emerging market countries are subject to greater market volatility, lower trading volume, political and economic instability, uncertainty regarding the existence of trading markets, rapid inflation, possible repatriation of investment income and capital, currency convertibility issues, less uniform accounting standards and more governmental limitations on foreign investment than more developed markets. Laws regarding foreign investment in emerging market securities, securities regulation, title to securities, and shareholder rights may change quickly and unpredictably. In addition, the enforcement of systems of taxation at federal, regional and local levels in emerging market countries may be inconsistent and subject to sudden change.

Emerging Market Sovereign Debt Risk. Government obligors in emerging market countries are among the world’s largest debtors to commercial banks, other governments, international financial organizations and other financial institutions. Historically, certain issuers of the government debt securities in which an Underlying ETP may invest have experienced substantial difficulties in meeting their external debt obligations, resulting in defaults on certain obligations and the restructuring of certain indebtedness. Such restructuring arrangements have included obtaining additional credit to finance outstanding obligations and the reduction and rescheduling of payments of interest and principal through the negotiation of new or amended credit agreements. As a holder of government debt securities, the Fund may be asked to participate in the restructuring of such obligations and to extend further loans to their issuers. There can be no assurance that the securities in which the Fund will invest will not be subject to restructuring arrangements or to requests for additional credit. In addition, certain participants in the secondary market for such debt may be directly involved in negotiating the terms of these arrangements and may therefore have access to information not available to other market participants, such as an Underlying ETP.

Equity Securities Risk. The value of equity securities held by a Fund may fall due to general market and economic conditions, perceptions regarding the industries in which the issuers of securities held by the Fund participate or factors relating to specific companies in which the Fund invests. For example, an adverse event, such as an unfavorable earnings report, may depress the value of equity securities of an issuer held by a Fund; the price of common stock of an issuer may be particularly sensitive to general movements in the stock market; or a drop in the stock market may depress the price of most or all of the common stocks and other equity securities held by a Fund. In addition, common stock of an issuer in a Fund’s portfolio may decline in price if the issuer fails to make anticipated dividend payments because, among other reasons, the issuer of the security experiences a decline in its financial condition. Holders of an issuer’s common stock may also be subject to greater risks than holders of its preferred stock and debt securities because common stockholders’ claims are subordinated to those of holders of preferred stocks and debt securities upon the bankruptcy of an issuer.

Foreign Securities Risk. Investments in the securities of non-U.S. issuers involve risks beyond those associated with investments in U.S. securities. These additional risks include greater market volatility, the availability of less reliable financial information, higher transactional and custody costs, taxation by foreign governments, decreased market liquidity and political instability. Some countries and regions have experienced security concerns, war or threats of war and aggression, terrorism, economic uncertainty, natural and environmental disasters and/or systemic market dislocations that have led, and in the future may lead, to increased short-term market volatility and may have adverse long-term effects
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on the U.S. and world economies and markets generally. Foreign issuers are often subject to less stringent requirements regarding accounting, auditing, custody, financial reporting and record keeping than are U.S. issuers, and therefore not all material information will be available. Securities exchanges or foreign governments may adopt rules or regulations that may negatively impact a Fund’s ability to invest in foreign securities or may prevent a Fund from repatriating its investments. Non-U.S. transaction costs, such as brokerage commissions and custody costs, may be higher than in the United States. In some non-U.S. markets, custody arrangements for securities provide significantly less protection than custody arrangements in U.S. markets. Prevailing custody and trade settlement practices (e.g., the requirement to pay for securities prior to receipt) could similarly expose a Fund to credit and other risks it does not have in the United States with respect to participating brokers, custodians, clearing banks or other clearing agents, escrow agents and issuers. In addition, a Fund may not receive shareholder communications or be permitted to vote the securities it holds, as the issuers may be under no legal obligation to distribute them.
Less developed securities markets are more likely to experience problems with the clearing and settling of trades, as well as the holding of securities by local banks, agents and depositories. Low trading volumes and volatile prices in less developed markets make trades harder to complete and settle, and governments or trade groups may compel local agents to hold securities in designated depositories that are not subject to independent evaluation. Local agents are held only to the standards of care of their local markets. The less developed a country’s securities market is, the greater the likelihood of custody problems.

High Yield Securities Risk. A Fund’s investment in high yield securities, or “junk” bonds, may entail increased credit risks and the risk that the value of the Fund’s assets will decline, and may decline precipitously, with increases in interest rates. High yield securities are, under most circumstances, subject to greater market fluctuations and risk of loss of income and principal than are investments in lower-yielding, higher-rated debt securities. As interest rates rise, the value of high yield securities may decline precipitously. Increased rates may also indicate a slowdown in the economy, which may adversely affect the credit of issuers of high yield securities and result in a higher incidence of defaults among such issuers. A slowdown in the economy, or a development adversely affecting an issuer’s creditworthiness, may result in the issuer being unable to maintain earnings or sell assets at the rate and at the prices, respectively, that are required to produce sufficient cash flow to meet its interest and principal requirements. A Fund’s portfolio managers cannot predict future economic policies or their consequences or, therefore, the course or extent of any similar market fluctuations in the future. In addition, high yield securities are generally less liquid than investment grade securities.

Income Risk. A Fund’s income may decline when interest rates fall or if there are defaults in its portfolio. This decline can occur because a Fund may subsequently invest in lower-yielding securities when securities in its portfolio mature or the Fund otherwise needs to purchase additional securities.

Interest Rate Risk. An increase in interest rates may cause the value of certain fixed income securities held by a Fund to decline. Many factors can cause interest rates to rise, such as central bank monetary policies, inflation rates, general economic conditions and expectations about the foregoing. Fixed income securities with longer durations tend to be more sensitive to changes in interest rates, making them more volatile than securities with shorter durations or floating or adjustable interest rates. The negative impact on a Fund from potential interest rate increases could be swift and significant, including falling market values, increased redemptions and reduced liquidity. Substantial shareholder redemptions may worsen this impact. An increase in interest rates could also cause principal payments on a fixed income security to be repaid at a slower rate than expected. This risk is particularly prevalent for a callable debt security where an increase in interest rates could cause the issuer of that security to not redeem the security as anticipated on the call date, effectively lengthening the security’s expected maturity, in turn making that security more vulnerable to interest rate risk and reducing its market value. A Fund may be subject to a greater risk of rising interest rates than would normally be the case due to the current period of historically low rates and the effect of potential government fiscal policy initiatives and resulting market reaction to those initiatives.
When interest rates rise, certain obligations will be paid off by the issuer (or other obligated party) more slowly than anticipated, causing the value of these securities to fall. Rising interest rates tend to extend the duration of fixed income securities, making their market value more sensitive to changes in interest
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rates. As a result, in a period of rising interest rates, securities may exhibit additional volatility and may lose value. The value of securities with longer maturities generally changes more in response to changes in interest rates than does the value of securities with shorter maturities. Extension risk is particularly prevalent for a callable fixed income security where an increase in interest rates could result in the issuer of that security choosing not to redeem the security as anticipated on the security’s call date. Such a decision by the issuer could have the effect of lengthening the security’s expected maturity, making it more vulnerable to interest rate risk and reducing its market value.
Some securities may be redeemed at the option of the issuer, or “called,” before their stated maturity date. In general, an issuer will call its debt securities if they can be refinanced by issuing new debt securities which bear a lower interest rate. A Fund is subject to the possibility that during periods of falling interest rates an issuer will call its high-yielding debt securities. A Fund may then be forced to invest the unanticipated proceeds in securities with lower yields, resulting in a decline in the Fund’s income, or in securities with greater risks or with other less favorable features. Such redemptions and subsequent reinvestments would also increase a Fund’s portfolio turnover. If a called debt security was purchased by a Fund at a premium, the value of the premium may be lost in the event of a redemption.
The terms of floating rate notes and other instruments may be tied to the London Interbank Offered Rate (“LIBOR”), which functions as a reference rate or benchmark. It is anticipated that LIBOR will be discontinued at the end of 2021, which may cause increased volatility and illiquidity in the markets for instruments with terms tied to LIBOR or other adverse consequences, such as decreased yields and reduction in value, for these instruments. These events may adversely affect the Fund and its investments in such instruments. For more information on the risks associated with the discontinuation and transition of LIBOR, please see “LIBOR Replacement Risk.”

Large-Capitalization Companies Risk. Large-capitalization companies may be unable to respond quickly to new competitive challenges such as changes in technology and consumer tastes. Larger companies also may not be able to attain the high growth rates of successful smaller companies, especially during periods of economic expansion. Large capitalization companies may go in and out of favor based on market and economic conditions. Although the securities of larger companies may, on average, be less volatile than those of companies with smaller market capitalizations, during different market cycles, the performance of large-capitalization companies has trailed the overall performance of the broader securities markets and the securities of smaller companies.