Prospectus

May 1, 2022

abrdn ETFs

abrdn Bloomberg All Commodity Strategy K-1 Free ETF (BCI)
(formerly, Aberdeen Standard Bloomberg All Commodity Strategy K-1 Free ETF)

abrdn Bloomberg All Commodity Longer Dated Strategy K-1 Free ETF (BCD)
(formerly, Aberdeen Standard Bloomberg All Commodity Longer Dated Strategy K-1 Free ETF)

abrdn Bloomberg Industrial Metals Strategy K-1 Free ETF (BCIM)
(formerly, Aberdeen Bloomberg Industrial Metals Strategy K-1 Free ETF)

Principal U.S. Listing Exchange: NYSE Arca

THE U.S. SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION (“SEC”) AND THE COMMODITY FUTURES TRADING COMMISSION HAVE NOT APPROVED OR DISAPPROVED THESE SECURITIES OR PASSED UPON THE ADEQUACY OF THIS PROSPECTUS. ANY REPRESENTATION TO THE CONTRARY IS A CRIMINAL OFFENSE.

abrdn ETFs
Table of Contents

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abrdn Bloomberg All Commodity Strategy K-1 Free ETF

Investment Objective

The abrdn Bloomberg All Commodity Strategy K-1 Free ETF (the “Fund”) seeks to provide investment results that closely correspond, before fees and expenses, to the performance of the Bloomberg Commodity Index Total ReturnSM (the “Index”).

Fees and Expenses of the Fund

The following table describes the fees and expenses you may pay if you buy, hold and sell shares of the Fund (“Shares”). You may pay other fees, such as brokerage commissions and other fees to financial intermediaries, which are not reflected in the table and example below.

Annual Fund Operating Expenses
(expenses that you pay each year as a percentage of the value of your investment)

       

Management Fees of the Fund and the Subsidiary

0.30

%

Distribution and Service (12b-1) Fees

0.00

%

Other Expenses

0.00

%

Other Expenses of the Fund

0.00

%

Other Expenses of the Subsidiary

0.00

%

Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses

0.30

%

Fee Waiver(1)

(0.05

)%

Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses After Fee Waiver

0.25

%

  

(1) abrdn ETFs Advisors LLC (the “Advisor”) has contractually agreed to waive the management fees that it receives from the Fund in an amount equal to the management fee paid to the Advisor by the Subsidiary, as defined below. This undertaking will continue in effect for at least one year from the date of this Prospectus, and for so long as the Fund invests in the Subsidiary, and may be terminated only with the approval of the Fund’s Board of Trustees.

Example

The following example is intended to help you compare the cost of investing in the Fund with the cost of investing in other funds.

The example assumes that you invest $10,000 in the Fund for the time periods indicated and then sell all of your Shares at the end of those periods. The example also assumes that your investment has a 5% return each year and that the Fund’s operating expenses remain the same each year. Although your actual costs and returns may be higher or lower, based on these assumptions your costs would be:

1 Year

3 Years

5 Years

10 Years

$26

$91

$164

$376

Portfolio Turnover

The Fund pays transaction costs, such as commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or “turns over” its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover rate may cause the Fund to incur higher transaction costs and may result in higher taxes when Shares are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are not reflected in Annual Fund Operating Expenses or the example above, may affect the Fund’s performance. During the most recent fiscal year, the Fund’s portfolio turnover rate was 0% of the average value of its portfolio. Derivative instruments and instruments with a maturity of one year or less at the time of acquisition are excluded from the calculation of the portfolio turnover rate which leads to the 0% portfolio turnover rate reported above. If these instruments were included in the calculation, the Fund would have a higher portfolio turnover rate.

Principal Investment Strategies

The Fund employs a “passive management” – or indexing – investment approach designed to track the performance of the Index. The Fund operates as an index fund and is not actively managed.

 

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abrdn Bloomberg All Commodity Strategy K-1 Free ETF

Bloomberg Commodity Index Total ReturnSM

The Index reflects the return on a fully collateralized investment in the Bloomberg Commodity IndexSM (“BCOM”), which is composed of futures contracts on physical commodities and is designed to be a highly liquid and broad-based benchmark for commodities futures investments. Futures contracts on commodities generally are agreements between two parties where one party agrees to buy, and the counterparty to sell, a set amount of a physical commodity (or, in some contracts, a cash equivalent) at a pre-determined future date and price. The value of commodity futures contracts is based upon the price movements of the underlying commodities.

The Index combines the returns of the BCOM with the returns on cash collateral invested in 3-month U.S. Treasury Bills. These returns are calculated by using the most recent weekly auction high rate for 13 week (3 Month) U.S. Treasury Bills, as reported on the website http://www.treasurydirect.gov/ published by the Bureau of the Public Debt of the U.S. Treasury, or any successor source, which is generally published once per week on Monday.

The BCOM is a widely followed commodity index which is calculated and published by Bloomberg Finance L.P. and its affiliates, including Bloomberg Index Services Limited, the administrator of the Index (collectively, “Bloomberg” or the “Index Provider”). BCOM has been published since 1998 and tracks movements in the price of a rolling position in a basket of commodity futures with a maturity between 1 and 3 months. “Rolling” means selling a futures contract as it nears its expiration date and replacing it with a new futures contract that has a later expiration date. The difference between the prices of the two contracts when they are rolled is sometimes referred to as a “roll yield,” and the change in price that contracts experience while they are components of the BCOM is sometimes referred to as a “spot return.” The Index is designed to track commodity futures contracts and is not linked to the current “spot” or cash price of the underlying commodities. Futures contracts may perform very differently from the current or “spot” prices of underlying commodities.

Futures contracts with a longer term to expiration may be priced higher than futures contracts with a shorter term to expiration, a relationship called “contango.” When rolling futures contracts that are in contango, the BCOM will sell the expiring contract at a lower price and buy a longer-dated contract at a higher price, resulting in a negative roll yield. Conversely, futures contracts with a longer term to expiration may be priced lower than futures contracts with a shorter term to expiration, a relationship called “backwardation.” When rolling futures contracts that are in backwardation, the Fund will sell the expiring contract at a higher price and buy a longer-dated contract at a lower price, resulting in a positive roll yield.

As of the date of this Prospectus, the BCOM consists of 23 commodities futures contracts with respect to 21 commodities: aluminum, coffee, copper, corn, cotton, crude oil (West Texas Intermediate, or WTI, and Brent), gold, lean hogs, live cattle, low sulfur gas oil, natural gas, nickel, RBOB (reformulated blendstock for oxygenate blending) gasoline, silver, soybean meal, soybean oil, soybeans, sugar, wheat (Chicago and KC hard red winter), ULS (ultra low sulfur) diesel and zinc. As of the date of this Prospectus, there are 25 commodity futures eligible for inclusion in the BCOM but 4 of those commodities (cocoa, lead, platinum and tin) are currently not included in the BCOM. With the exception of certain metals contracts (aluminum, lead, tin, nickel and zinc) that trade on the London Metals Exchange (“LME”) and the contracts for Brent crude oil and low sulphur gas oil, each of the commodities is the subject of at least one futures contract that trades on a U.S. exchange. The BCOM uses a consistent, systematic process to represent the commodity markets. The weightings of the components of the BCOM are based on (1) liquidity data; (2) U.S. dollar-weighted production data; and (3) diversification rules that attempt to reduce disproportionate weightings of any single commodity or sector, which potentially reduces volatility in comparison with narrower commodity baskets. Liquidity data is the relative amount of trading activity for a particular commodity and U.S. dollar-weighted production data takes the figures for production in the overall commodities market for all commodities in the BCOM and weights them in the BCOM in the same proportion in U.S. dollar terms. The value of the BCOM is computed on the basis of hypothetical investments in the basket of commodities that make up the BCOM. As of the date of this Prospectus, the BCOM invests significantly in, and therefore the Fund has significant exposure to, the agriculture, energy and industrial/precious metals sectors.

The Index is sponsored by Bloomberg, which is independent of the Fund, the Advisor and Sub-Advisor. Bloomberg determines the composition and relative weightings of the securities in the Index and publishes information regarding the market value of the Index. The composition of the BCOM is rebalanced and published annually in the month of January.

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abrdn Bloomberg All Commodity Strategy K-1 Free ETF

The Fund’s Investment Strategy

The Fund uses a “passive” or representative sampling indexing approach to attempt to achieve its investment objective. The Fund does not try to outperform the Index and does not generally take temporary defensive positions. The Fund will invest in only a representative sample of the instruments in the Index, and the Fund may invest in or gain exposure to instruments not contained in the Index or in financial instruments, with the intent of tracking the Index. The Fund will also hold short-term fixed-income securities, which may be used as collateral for the Fund’s commodities futures holdings or to generate interest income and capital appreciation on the cash balances arising from its use of futures contracts (thereby providing a “total return” investment in the underlying commodities). In managing the assets of the Fund, the Advisor and Sub-Advisor do not invest the assets of the Fund in instruments based on their view of the investment merit of a particular instrument nor does it conduct conventional investment research or analysis or forecast market movement or trends. The Fund seeks to remain fully invested at all times in financial instruments that, in combination, track the returns of the Index without regard to market conditions, trends or direction. The Fund will rebalance its portfolio when the Index rebalances. Additionally, if the Fund receives a creation unit in cash, the Fund repositions its portfolio in response to assets flowing into or out of the Fund.

Under normal market conditions, the Fund intends to achieve its investment objective by investing in exchange-traded commodity futures contracts through a wholly-owned subsidiary of the Fund organized under the laws of the Cayman Islands (the “Subsidiary”). As a means to provide investment returns that are designed to track those of the Index, the Subsidiary may also invest directly in commodity-linked instruments, including pooled investment vehicles (such as exchange-traded funds and other investment companies), swaps and exchange-traded options on futures contracts, to the extent permitted under the Investment Company Act of 1940, as amended (the “1940 Act”) and any applicable exemptive relief (collectively, “Commodities-Related Assets” and, together with exchange-traded commodities futures contracts, “Commodities Instruments”). The Fund may invest up to 25% of its total assets in the Subsidiary. The Fund is called “K-1 Free” because it is designed to operate differently than commodity-based investments that distribute a “Schedule K-1” to shareholders. Schedule K-1 is a tax form containing information regarding a fund’s income and expenses, which shareholders may find complicates tax return preparation, thus requiring additional time, or the help of a professional tax adviser, at additional cost. By comparison, the Fund is designed to be taxed like a conventional mutual fund and shareholders will instead receive a Form 1099 from the broker-dealer or other financial intermediary through which they invest, from which income, gains, and losses can be entered onto the shareholder’s tax return.

The remainder of the Fund’s assets that are not invested in the Subsidiary (i.e., at least 75% of the Fund’s total assets) will principally be invested in: (1) short-term investment grade fixed-income securities that include U.S. government securities and money market instruments; and (2) cash and other cash equivalents. The Fund seeks to use such instruments to generate a total return on the cash balances arising from the use of futures contracts that, when combined with the Fund’s other investments, tracks the total return of the Index.

As noted previously, the Fund will not invest directly in commodity futures contracts but, instead, expects to gain exposure to these investments exclusively by investing in the Subsidiary. The Fund’s investment in the Subsidiary is intended to enable the Fund to gain exposure to relevant commodity markets within the limits of current federal income tax laws applicable to a regulated investment company (“RIC”) such as the Fund, which limit the ability of RICs to invest directly in commodity futures contracts. The Subsidiary and the Fund have the same investment objective. However, the Subsidiary may invest without limitation in the Commodities Instruments. Except as otherwise noted, for the purposes of this Prospectus, references to the Fund’s investments include the Fund’s indirect investments through the Subsidiary.

The Advisor and Sub-Advisor will determine the percentage of the Fund’s assets allocated to the Commodities Instruments held by the Subsidiary that will be invested in exchange-traded commodity futures contracts or Commodities-Related Assets. The Fund does not seek leveraged returns. However, the Fund’s use of instruments to collateralize the Subsidiary’s investments in Commodity Instruments has a leveraging effect and is designed to provide a total return that tracks the return of the Index.

The Fund is classified as “non-diversified” under the 1940 Act.

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abrdn Bloomberg All Commodity Strategy K-1 Free ETF

Summary of Principal Risks of Investing in the Fund

As with any investment, there is a risk that you could lose all or a portion of your investment in the Fund. The Fund’s principal risks are summarized below. The following is a list of the principal risks of investing in the Fund (in alphabetical order after the first ten risks). Some or all of these risks may adversely affect the Fund’s net asset value per share (“NAV”), trading price, total return and/or ability to meet its objective. For more information about the risks of investing in the Fund, see the sections in the Fund’s Prospectus titled “Additional Principal Risk Information about the Funds” and “Additional Non-Principal Risk Information about the Funds.”

Market Risk. The prices of the assets in which the Fund invests may decline for a number of reasons, including in response to local, regional or global economic developments, war, acts of terrorism, the spread of infectious illness or other public health issues, or other events.

Commodity Price Risk. The NAV of the Fund will be affected by movements in commodity prices generally and by the way in which those prices and other factors affect the prices of the commodity futures contracts. Commodity prices generally may fluctuate widely and may be affected by numerous factors.

Commodity Sector Risks. The daily performance of the current or “spot” price of certain commodities has a direct impact on Fund performance. To the extent the Fund has significant exposure to a particular commodity sector, the Fund may be more susceptible to loss due to adverse occurrences affecting that sector, including a decline in the price of commodities in such sector.

Agricultural Sector Investment Risk. The daily performance of the spot price of certain agricultural commodities has a direct impact on Fund performance. Investments in the agriculture sector may be highly volatile and the market values of such commodities can change quickly and unpredictably due to a number of factors, such as the supply of, and demand for, each commodity, the strength of the domestic and global economy, legislative or regulatory developments relating to food safety, the imposition of tariffs and other restraints on trade, as well as other significant events, including public health, political, legal, financial, accounting and tax matters that are beyond the Fund’s control. In addition, increased competition caused by economic recession, labor difficulties and changing consumer tastes and spending can impact the demand for agricultural products and, in turn, the value of such investments.

Energy Sector Investment Risk. The daily performance of the spot price of certain energy-related commodities has a direct impact on Fund performance. Energy commodities’ market values are significantly impacted by a number of factors, such as the supply of, and demand for, each commodity, the strength of the domestic and global economy, significant world events, capital expenditures on exploration and production, energy conservation efforts, government regulation and subsidization and technological advances. Investments in the energy sector may be cyclical and/or highly volatile and subject to swift price fluctuations. In addition, significant declines in the price of oil may contribute to significant market volatility, which may adversely affect the Fund’s performance. The energy sector has recently experienced significant volatility due to dramatic changes in the prices of energy commodities, and it is possible that such volatility will continue in the future.

Metals Sector Investment Risk. The daily performance of the spot price of certain industrial and precious metals has a direct impact on Fund performance. Investments in metals may be highly volatile and the market values of such commodities can change quickly and unpredictably due to a number of factors, such as the supply of, and demand for, each metal, the strength of the domestic and global economy, international monetary policy, environmental or labor costs, as well as other significant events, including public health, political, legal, financial, accounting and tax matters that are beyond the Fund’s control. The United States or foreign governments may pass laws or regulations limiting metal investments for strategic or other policy reasons. Further, the principal supplies of metal industries may be concentrated in a small number of countries and regions.

Passive Management Risk. Because the Fund is not “actively” managed, unless a specific security is removed from the Index, the Fund generally would not sell an investment because of the investment’s performance. Additionally, unusual market conditions may cause the Index provider to postpone a scheduled rebalance or reconstitution, which could cause the Index to vary from its normal or expected composition. Therefore, the Fund’s performance could be lower than funds that may actively shift their portfolio assets to take advantage of market opportunities or to lessen the impact of a market decline or a decline in the value of one or more investments. As the Fund may not fully replicate the Index, it is subject to the risk that the investment strategy of the Advisor or Sub-Advisor may not produce the intended results.

 

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abrdn Bloomberg All Commodity Strategy K-1 Free ETF

Index Tracking Risk. As with all index funds, the performance of the Fund and the Index may differ from each other for a variety of reasons. For example, the Fund incurs operating expenses and portfolio transaction costs not incurred by the Index. Index tracking risk may also occur because of differences between the investments held in the Fund’s portfolio and those included in the Index, pricing differences (including, as applicable, differences between a security’s price at the local market close and the Fund’s valuation of a security at the time of calculation of the Fund’s NAV), differences in transaction costs, the Fund’s holding of uninvested cash, differences in timing of the accrual of dividends or interest, the requirements to maintain pass-through tax treatment, portfolio transactions carried out to minimize the distribution of capital gains to shareholders, changes to the Index or the need to meet various new or existing regulatory requirements, among other reasons. Moreover, the Fund may be delayed in purchasing or selling investments included in the Index. In addition, the Fund may not be fully invested in the investments included in the Index at all times or may hold investments that are not included in the Index. In addition, the Fund’s use of a representative sampling approach may cause the Fund to not track the return of the Index as would be the case if the Fund purchased all of the instruments in the Index, or invested in them in the exact proportions in which they are represented in the Index. Index tracking risk may be heightened during times of increased market volatility or other unusual market conditions. Index ETFs that track indices with significant weight in futures contracts issuers may experience higher index tracking risk than other index ETFs that do not track such indices.

Index-Related Risk. There is no guarantee that the Fund’s investment results will closely correspond, before fees and taxes, to the performance of the Index or that the Fund will achieve its investment objective. Market disruptions and regulatory restrictions could have an adverse effect on the Fund’s ability to track the Index. Errors in index data, index computations or the construction of the Index in accordance with its methodology may occur from time to time and may not be identified and corrected by the Index Provider for a period of time or at all, which may have an adverse impact on the Fund and its shareholders. Unusual market conditions may cause the Index Provider to postpone a scheduled rebalance, which could cause the Index to vary from its normal or expected composition.

Fixed-Income Securities Risk. Fixed-income securities fluctuate in price based on changes in an issuer’s financial condition and overall market and economic conditions, such as real or perceived adverse economic or political conditions, inflation, changes in interest or currency rates, lack of liquidity in the bond markets or adverse investor sentiment. The value of a security may also fall due to specific conditions that affect a particular sector of the securities market or a particular issuer. Fixed-income securities are subject to, among other risks, credit risk, interest rate risk, inflation risk, market risk, liquidity risk, extension risk, and prepayment risk.

Money Market Instruments Risk. Money market instruments may be subject to market risk and credit risk. There is no guarantee that money market instruments will maintain their value.

Futures Contract Risk. The primary risks associated with the use of futures contracts, or swaps or other derivatives referencing futures contracts, are: (i) an imperfect correlation between the value of the futures contract and the value of the underlying commodity; (ii) possible lack of a liquid secondary market for a futures contract; (iii) the inability to open or close a futures contract or cash commodity position when desired; (iv) losses caused by unanticipated market movement, which may result in losses in excess of the amount invested in the futures contract (and potentially may be unlimited); (v) in the event of adverse price movements, an obligation of the Fund to make daily cash payments to maintain its required margin, including at times when it may have insufficient cash and must sell securities from its portfolio to meet those margin requirements at a disadvantageous time; (vi) the possibility that a failure to close a position may result in delivery of an illiquid commodity to the Fund; and (vii) the possibility that rapid selling to avoid delivery of a commodity may result in unfavorable execution prices. Although it is intended that the Fund will only enter into futures contracts if there is an active market for such contracts, there is no assurance that an active market will exist for the contracts at any particular time.

Roll Yield. During situations where the cost of any futures contracts for delivery on dates further in the future is higher than those for delivery closer in time, the value of the Fund holding such contracts will decrease over time unless the spot price of that contract increases by the same rate as the rate of the variation in the price of the futures contract. The rate of variation could be quite significant and last for an indeterminate period of time, reducing the value of the Fund.

Authorized Participants. Only an authorized participant that has entered into an agreement with the Fund’s distributor (an “Authorized Participant” or “AP”) may engage in creation or redemption transactions directly with the Fund, and none of those APs is obligated to engage in creation and/or redemption transactions. The Fund has entered into AP agreements with only a limited number of institutions. Should these APs cease to act as such or, for any reason, be unable to create or redeem Shares and new APs are not appointed in their place, Shares may trade at a discount to the Fund’s NAV and possibly face delisting.

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abrdn Bloomberg All Commodity Strategy K-1 Free ETF

Cash Redemption Risk. The Fund expects to effect its creations and redemptions primarily for cash due to the nature of its investments. Paying redemption proceeds in cash rather than through in-kind delivery of portfolio securities may require the Fund to dispose of or sell portfolio investments at an inopportune time in order to obtain the cash needed to distribute redemption proceeds. This may also cause the Fund to recognize investment income and/or capital gain that it might not have recognized if it had made a redemption in-kind. As a result, the Fund may be less tax efficient and may have to pay out higher annual distributions than if the Fund used the in-kind redemption process. Disposing or selling portfolio investments may also cause the Fund to incur transaction costs. The Fund may also incur borrowing fees and/or overdraft charges until the sales of portfolio investments necessary to cover a redemption request settle.

Commodity Pool Regulatory Risk. The Fund is deemed to be a commodity pool due to its investment exposure to commodity futures contracts and is subject to regulation under the Commodity Exchange Act (“CEA”) and Commodity Futures Trading Commission (“CFTC”) rules as well as the regulatory scheme applicable to registered investment companies. The Advisor is registered as a commodity pool operator (“CPO”) and the Sub-Advisor is registered as a commodity trading advisor (“CTA”). Registration as a CPO and CTA imposes additional compliance obligations on the Advisor, the Sub-Advisor, and the Fund related to additional laws, regulations, and enforcement policies, which could increase compliance costs for the Advisor or Sub-Advisor and may affect the operations and financial performance of the Fund. These requirements are also subject to change at any time.

Cybersecurity Risk. Cybersecurity incidents may allow an unauthorized party to gain access to Fund assets, customer data (including private shareholder information), or proprietary information, or cause the Fund, the Advisor and/or its service providers (including, but not limited to, Fund accountants, custodians, sub-custodians, transfer agents and financial intermediaries) to suffer data breaches, data corruption or lose operational functionality.

Investment Company Securities. To the extent the Fund or its Subsidiary invests in securities of other investment companies, including exchange-traded funds, the Fund will bear a proportionate share of the fees and expenses paid by such other investment company, including advisory and administrative fees.

Investment Risk. An investor may lose the value of their entire investment or part of their investment in Shares.

Leverage Risk. To the extent the Fund is exposed directly or indirectly to leverage (through investments in commodities futures contracts) the value of the Fund may be more volatile than if no leverage were present.

Market Trading Risk. There can be no assurance as to the price at which, or volume in which, it may at any time be possible to buy or sell Shares in the public trading market. Although the Shares are listed for trading on NYSE Arca, there can be no assurance that an active trading market for such Shares will develop or be maintained. Although it is expected that the market price of the Shares will approximate the Fund’s NAV when purchased and sold in the secondary market, the Fund faces numerous market trading risks, including the potential lack of an active market for Shares, disruptions in the securities markets in which the Fund invests, periods of high market volatility, and disruptions in the creation/redemption process. Any of these may lead to times when the market price of the Shares is more than the NAV intra-day (premium) or less than the NAV intra-day (discount).

Non-Diversification Risk. As a “non-diversified” fund, the Fund may hold a smaller number of portfolio securities than many other funds. To the extent the Fund invests in a relatively small number of issuers, a decline in the market value of a particular security held by the Fund may affect its value more than if it invested in a larger number of issuers. The value of Shares may be more volatile than the values of shares of more diversified funds. However, the Fund intends to satisfy the asset diversification requirements for classification as a RIC under Subchapter M of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended (the “Code”).

Sampling Risk. The Fund’s use of a representative sampling approach may result in it holding a smaller number of instruments than are included in the Index. As a result, an adverse development respecting an investment held by the Fund could result in a greater decline in NAV than would be the case if the Fund held all of the components of the Index. Conversely, a positive development relating to a constituent of the Index that is not held by the Fund could cause the Fund to underperform the Index. To the extent the assets in the Fund are smaller, these risks will be greater. A representative sampling strategy may increase the Fund’s susceptibility to Index Tracking Risk.

Subsidiary Investment Risk. Changes in the laws of the United States and/or the Cayman Islands, under which the Fund and the Subsidiary are organized, respectively, could result in the inability of the Subsidiary to operate as intended and could negatively affect the Fund and its shareholders. The Subsidiary is not registered under the 1940 Act, and, unless otherwise noted in this Prospectus, is not subject to the investor protections of the 1940 Act.

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abrdn Bloomberg All Commodity Strategy K-1 Free ETF

Swap Agreements. Swaps can involve greater risks than a direct investment in an underlying asset and these may increase or decrease the overall volatility of the Fund’s investment and its share price. Swaps may be subject to illiquidity risk, and it may not be possible for the Fund to liquidate a swap position at an advantageous time or price, which may result in significant losses. As with other transactions, the Fund will bear the risk that the counterparty will default, which could cause losses to the Fund.

Tax Risk. In order to qualify for the favorable U.S. federal income tax treatment accorded to a RIC under Subchapter M of the Code, the Fund must, among other requirements, derive at least 90% of its gross income in each taxable year from certain categories of income (“qualifying income”) and must satisfy certain asset diversification requirements. Certain of the Fund’s commodity-related investments, if made directly, will not generate income that is qualifying income. The Fund intends to hold such commodity-related investments indirectly, through the Subsidiary. The Fund’s investment in the Subsidiary is expected to provide the Fund with exposure to the commodities markets within the limitations of the federal tax requirements of Subchapter M of the Code for qualification as a RIC. The Advisor and/or Sub-Advisor will carefully monitor the Fund’s investment in the Subsidiary to ensure that no more than 25% of the Fund’s assets are invested in the Subsidiary to ensure compliance with the Fund’s asset diversification test for qualification as a RIC under Subchapter M of the Code. If the Fund was to fail to meet the qualifying income test or the asset diversification test and fail to qualify as a RIC, it would be taxed in the same manner as an ordinary corporation, and distributions to its shareholders would not be deductible by the Fund in computing its taxable income. The failure by the Fund to qualify as a RIC would have significant negative tax consequences to Fund shareholders and would affect a shareholder’s return on its investment in such Fund. Under certain circumstances, the Fund may be able to cure a failure to meet the qualifying income test or the asset diversification test if such failure was due to reasonable cause and not willful neglect, but in order to do so the Fund may incur significant fund-level taxes, which would effectively reduce (and could eliminate) the Fund’s returns. The Fund’s strategy of investing through its Subsidiary in commodity-related instruments may cause the Fund to recognize more ordinary income than would be the case if the Fund did not invest through a Subsidiary, resulting in distributions from the Fund that are taxable to individual shareholders at ordinary income tax rates rather than at the more favorable tax rates for long-term capital gains.

Fund Performance

The bar chart and table that follow show how the Fund has performed on a calendar year basis and provides some indication of the risks of investing in the Fund by showing the variability of the Fund’s return based on net assets and comparing the Fund’s performance to the Index, which is a broad measure of market performance. Past performance (before and after taxes) does not necessarily indicate how the Fund will perform in the future. Prior to August 3, 2021, the fund operated under certain different investment policies in connection with a change from an actively-managed ETF to a passively-managed ETF. The Fund’s historical performance prior to August 3, 2021 may not represent its current investment policies. Updated performance information is available at www.abrdn.com/usa/etf.

Annual Returns as of December 31

For the period shown in the bar chart above:

Best Quarter

June 30, 2021

13.27%

Worst Quarter

March 31, 2020

-23.14%

 

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abrdn Bloomberg All Commodity Strategy K-1 Free ETF

Average Annual Total Returns
(for the periods ended December 31, 2021)

One Year

Since Inception
of Fund

Inception Date
of Fund

Before Taxes

26.27%

3.83%

March 30, 2017

After Taxes on Distributions

17.72%

1.56%

After Taxes on Distributions and Sale of Shares

15.45%

1.93%

Bloomberg Commodity Index Total ReturnSM
(reflects no deduction for fees, expenses or taxes)

27.11%

4.37%

Average annual total returns are shown on a before- and after-tax basis for the Fund. After-tax returns are calculated using the historical highest individual federal marginal income tax rates and do not reflect the impact of state and local taxes. Actual after-tax returns depend on an investor’s tax situation and may differ from those shown. After-tax returns shown are not relevant to investors who hold shares through tax-deferred arrangements, such as 401(k) plans or individual retirement accounts (“IRAs”). After-tax returns may exceed the return before taxes due to an assumed tax benefit from realizing a capital loss on a sale of shares.

Management

Investment Advisor and Sub-Advisor

abrdn ETFs Advisors LLC serves as the investment advisor to the Fund and the Subsidiary.

Vident Investment Advisory, LLC serves as the sub-advisor to the Fund and the Subsidiary.

Portfolio Managers

Employee

Length of Service

Title

Austin Wen, CFA

Since October 2018

Co-Portfolio Manager

Ryan Dofflemeyer

Since April 2022

Co-Portfolio Manager

Buying and Selling Shares

The Fund is an ETF. Individual Shares may only be purchased and sold in the secondary market through a broker-dealer. Shares are listed for trading on a national securities exchange, such as the NYSE Arca. The price of Shares is based on market price, and because ETF Shares trade at market prices rather than NAV, shares may trade at a price greater than NAV (premium) or less than NAV (discount). An investor may incur costs attributable to the difference between the highest price a buyer is willing to pay to purchase shares of the Fund (bid) and the lowest price a seller is willing to accept for shares of the Fund (ask) when buying or selling shares in the secondary market (“the bid-ask spread”). Recent information, including information about the Fund’s NAV, market price, premiums and discounts, and bid-ask spreads, is included on the Fund’s website at www.abrdn.com/usa/etf.

Tax Information

The Fund intends to make distributions that may be taxed as ordinary income or capital gains.

Payments to Broker-Dealers and Other Financial Intermediaries

If you purchase Shares through a broker-dealer or other financial intermediary (such as a bank) (an “Intermediary”), the Advisor or its affiliates may pay Intermediaries for certain activities related to the Fund, including participation in activities that are designed to make Intermediaries more knowledgeable about exchange-traded products, including the Fund, or for other activities, such as marketing, educational training or other initiatives related to the sale or promotion of Shares. These payments may create a conflict of interest by influencing the Intermediary and your salesperson to recommend the Fund over another investment. Any such arrangements do not result in increased Fund expenses. Ask your salesperson or visit the Intermediary’s website for more information.

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Investment Objective

The abrdn Bloomberg All Commodity Longer Dated Strategy K-1 Free ETF (the “Fund”) seeks to provide investment results that closely correspond, before fees and expenses, to the performance of the Bloomberg Commodity Index 3 Month Forward Total ReturnSM (the “Index”).

Fees and Expenses of the Fund

The following table describes the fees and expenses you may pay if you buy, hold and sell shares of the Fund (“Shares”). You may pay other fees, such as brokerage commissions and other fees to financial intermediaries, which are not reflected in the table and example below.

Annual Fund Operating Expenses
(expenses that you pay each year as a percentage of the value of your investment)

       

Management Fees of the Fund and the Subsidiary

0.35

%

Distribution and Service (12b-1) Fees

0.00

%

Other Expenses

0.00

%

Other Expenses of the Fund

0.00

%

Other Expenses of the Subsidiary

0.00

%

Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses

0.35

%

Fee Waiver(1)

(0.06

)%

Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses After Fee Waiver

0.29

%

  

(1) abrdn ETFs Advisors LLC (the “Advisor”) has contractually agreed to waive the management fees that it receives from the Fund in an amount equal to the management fee paid to the Advisor by the Subsidiary, as defined below. This undertaking will continue in effect for at least one year from the date of this Prospectus, and for so long as the Fund invests in the Subsidiary, and may be terminated only with the approval of the Fund’s Board of Trustees.

Example

The following example is intended to help you compare the cost of investing in the Fund with the cost of investing in other funds.

The example assumes that you invest $10,000 in the Fund for the time periods indicated and then sell all of your Shares at the end of those periods. The example also assumes that your investment has a 5% return each year and that the Fund’s operating expenses remain the same each year. Although your actual costs and returns may be higher or lower, based on these assumptions your costs would be:

1 Year

3 Years

5 Years

10 Years

$30

$106

$190

$437

Portfolio Turnover

The Fund pays transaction costs, such as commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or “turns over” its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover rate may cause the Fund to incur higher transaction costs and may result in higher taxes when Shares are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are not reflected in Annual Fund Operating Expenses or the example above, may affect the Fund’s performance. During the most recent fiscal year, the Fund’s portfolio turnover rate was 0% of the average value of its portfolio. Derivative instruments and instruments with a maturity of one year or less at the time of acquisition are excluded from the calculation of the portfolio turnover rate which leads to the 0% portfolio turnover rate reported above. If these instruments were included in the calculation, the Fund would have a higher portfolio turnover rate.

Principal Investment Strategies

The Fund employs a “passive management” – or indexing – investment approach designed to track the performance of the Index. The Fund operates as an index fund and is not actively managed.

 

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Bloomberg Commodity Index 3 Month Forward Total ReturnSM

The Index is a three-month forward version of the Bloomberg Commodity Index Total ReturnSM (“BCOMTR”), which reflects the return on a fully collateralized investment in the Bloomberg Commodity IndexSM (“BCOM”). The Fund is called “Longer Dated” because the Index it seeks to track is designed to track commodity futures with a longer maturity than that of the BCOMTR and BCOM.

The BCOM is composed of futures contracts on physical commodities and is designed to be a highly liquid and broad-based benchmark for commodities futures investments. Futures contracts on commodities generally are agreements between two parties where one party agrees to buy, and the counterparty to sell, a set amount of a physical commodity (or, in some contracts, a cash equivalent) at a pre-determined future date and price. The value of commodity futures contracts is based upon the price movements of the underlying commodities.

The BCOMTR combines the returns of the BCOM with the returns on cash collateral invested in 3-month U.S. Treasury Bills. These returns are calculated by using the most recent weekly auction high rate for 13 week (3 Month) U.S. Treasury Bills, as reported on the website http://www.treasurydirect.gov/ published by the Bureau of the Public Debt of the U.S. Treasury, or any successor source, which is generally published once per week on Monday.

The BCOM is a widely followed commodity index which is calculated and published by Bloomberg Finance L.P. and its affiliates, including Bloomberg Index Services Limited, the administrator of the Index (collectively, “Bloomberg” or the “Index Provider”). BCOM has been published since 1998 and tracks movements in the price of a rolling position in a basket of commodity futures with a maturity between 1 and 3 months (4 to 6 months for the Index). “Rolling” means selling a futures contract as it nears its expiration date and replacing it with a new futures contract that has a later expiration date. The difference between the prices of the two contracts when they are rolled is sometimes referred to as a “roll yield,” and the change in price that contracts experience while they are components of the BCOM is sometimes referred to as a “spot return.” The Index is designed to track commodity futures contracts and is not linked to the current “spot” or cash price of the underlying commodities. Futures contracts may perform very differently from the current or “spot” prices of underlying commodities.

Futures contracts with a longer term to expiration may be priced higher than futures contracts with a shorter term to expiration, a relationship called “contango.” When rolling futures contracts that are in contango, the BCOM will sell the expiring contract at a lower price and buy a longer-dated contract at a higher price, resulting in a negative roll yield. Conversely, futures contracts with a longer term to expiration may be priced lower than futures contracts with a shorter term to expiration, a relationship called “backwardation.” When rolling futures contracts that are in backwardation, the Fund will sell the expiring contract at a higher price and buy a longer-dated contract at a lower price, resulting in a positive roll yield.

As of the date of this Prospectus, the BCOM consists of 23 commodities futures contracts with respect to 21 commodities: aluminum, coffee, copper, corn, cotton, crude oil (West Texas Intermediate, or WTI, and Brent), gold, lean hogs, live cattle, low sulfur gas oil, natural gas, nickel, RBOB (reformulated blendstock for oxygenate blending) gasoline, silver, soybean meal, soybean oil, soybeans, sugar, wheat (Chicago and KC hard red winter), ULS (ultra low sulfur) diesel and zinc. As of the date of this Prospectus, there are 25 commodity futures eligible for inclusion in the BCOM but 4 of those commodities (cocoa, lead, platinum and tin) are currently not included in the BCOM. With the exception of certain metals contracts (aluminum, lead, tin, nickel and zinc) that trade on the London Metals Exchange (“LME”) and the contracts for Brent crude oil and low sulphur gas oil, each of the commodities is the subject of at least one futures contract that trades on a U.S. exchange. The BCOM uses a consistent, systematic process to represent the commodity markets. The weightings of the components of the BCOM are based on (1) liquidity data; (2) U.S. dollar-weighted production data; and (3) diversification rules that attempt to reduce disproportionate weightings of any single commodity or sector, which potentially reduces volatility in comparison with narrower commodity baskets. Liquidity data is the relative amount of trading activity for a particular commodity and U.S. dollar-weighted production data takes the figures for production in the overall commodities market for all commodities in the BCOM and weights them in the BCOM in the same proportion in U.S. dollar terms. The value of the BCOM is computed on the basis of hypothetical investments in the basket of commodities that make up the BCOM. As of the date of this Prospectus, the BCOM invests significantly in, and therefore the Fund has significant exposure to, the agriculture, energy and industrial/precious metals sectors.

The Index is sponsored by Bloomberg, which is independent of the Fund, the Advisor and Sub-Advisor. Bloomberg determines the composition and relative weightings of the securities in the Index and publishes information regarding the market value of the Index.The composition of the BCOM is rebalanced and published annually in the month of January.

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The Fund’s Investment Strategy

The Fund uses a “passive” or representative sampling indexing approach to attempt to achieve its investment objective. The Fund does not try to outperform the Index and does not generally take temporary defensive positions. The Fund will invest in only a representative sample of the instruments in the Index, and the Fund may invest in or gain exposure to instruments not contained in the Index or in financial instruments, with the intent of tracking the Index. The Fund will also hold short-term fixed-income securities, which may be used as collateral for the Fund’s commodities futures holdings or to generate interest income and capital appreciation on the cash balances arising from its use of futures contracts (thereby providing a “total return” investment in the underlying commodities). In managing the assets of the Fund, the Advisor and Sub-Advisor do not invest the assets of the Fund in instruments based on their view of the investment merit of a particular instrument nor does it conduct conventional investment research or analysis or forecast market movement or trends. The Fund seeks to remain fully invested at all times in financial instruments that, in combination, track the returns of the Index without regard to market conditions, trends or direction. The Fund will rebalance its portfolio when the Index rebalances. Additionally, if the Fund receives a creation unit in cash, the Fund repositions its portfolio in response to assets flowing into or out of the Fund.

Under normal market conditions, the Fund intends to achieve its investment objective by investing in exchange-traded commodity futures contracts through a wholly-owned subsidiary of the Fund organized under the laws of the Cayman Islands (the “Subsidiary”). As a means to provide investment returns that are designed to track those of the Index, the Subsidiary may also invest directly in commodity-linked instruments, including pooled investment vehicles (such as exchange-traded funds and other investment companies), swaps and exchange-traded options on futures contracts, to the extent permitted under the Investment Company Act of 1940, as amended (the “1940 Act”) and any applicable exemptive relief (collectively, “Commodities-Related Assets” and, together with exchange-traded commodities futures contracts, “Commodities Instruments”). The Fund may invest up to 25% of its total assets in the Subsidiary. The Fund is called “K-1 Free” because it is designed to operate differently than commodity-based investments that distribute a “Schedule K-1” to shareholders. Schedule K-1 is a tax form containing information regarding a fund’s income and expenses, which shareholders may find complicates tax return preparation, thus requiring additional time, or the help of a professional tax adviser, at additional cost. By comparison, the Fund is designed to be taxed like a conventional mutual fund and shareholders will instead receive a Form 1099 from the broker-dealer or other financial intermediary through which they invest, from which income, gains, and losses can be entered onto the shareholder’s tax return.

The remainder of the Fund’s assets that are not invested in the Subsidiary (i.e., at least 75% of the Fund’s total assets) will principally be invested in: (1) short-term investment grade fixed-income securities that include U.S. government securities and money market instruments; and (2) cash and other cash equivalents. The Fund seeks to use such instruments to generate a total return on the cash balances arising from the use of futures contracts that, when combined with the Fund’s other investments, tracks the total return of the Index.

As noted previously, the Fund will not invest directly in commodity futures contracts but, instead, expects to gain exposure to these investments exclusively by investing in the Subsidiary. The Fund’s investment in the Subsidiary is intended to enable the Fund to gain exposure to relevant commodity markets within the limits of current federal income tax laws applicable to a regulated investment company (“RIC”) such as the Fund, which limit the ability of RICs to invest directly in commodity futures contracts. The Subsidiary and the Fund have the same investment objective. However, the Subsidiary may invest without limitation in the Commodities Instruments. Except as otherwise noted, for the purposes of this Prospectus, references to the Fund’s investments include the Fund’s indirect investments through the Subsidiary.

The Advisor and Sub-Advisor will determine the percentage of the Fund’s assets allocated to the Commodities Instruments held by the Subsidiary that will be invested in exchange-traded commodity futures contracts or Commodities-Related Assets. The Fund does not seek leveraged returns. However, the Fund’s use of instruments to collateralize the Subsidiary’s investments in Commodity Instruments has a leveraging effect and is designed to provide a total return that tracks the return of the Index.

The Fund is classified as “non-diversified” under the 1940 Act.

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Summary of Principal Risks of Investing in the Fund

As with any investment, there is a risk that you could lose all or a portion of your investment in the Fund. The Fund’s principal risks are summarized below. The following is a list of the principal risks of investing in the Fund (in alphabetical order after the first ten risks). Some or all of these risks may adversely affect the Fund’s net asset value per share (“NAV”), trading price, total return and/or ability to meet its objective. For more information about the risks of investing in the Fund, see the sections in the Fund’s Prospectus titled “Additional Principal Risk Information about the Funds” and “Additional Non-Principal Risk Information about the Funds.”

Market Risk. The prices of the assets in which the Fund invests may decline for a number of reasons, including in response to local, regional or global economic developments, war, acts of terrorism, the spread of infectious illness or other public health issues, or other events.

Commodity Price Risk. The NAV of the Fund will be affected by movements in commodity prices generally and by the way in which those prices and other factors affect the prices of the commodity futures contracts. Commodity prices generally may fluctuate widely and may be affected by numerous factors.

Commodity Sector Risks. The daily performance of the current or “spot” price of certain commodities has a direct impact on Fund performance. To the extent the Fund has significant exposure to a particular commodity sector, the Fund may be more susceptible to loss due to adverse occurrences affecting that sector, including a decline in the price of commodities in such sector.

Agricultural Sector Investment Risk. The daily performance of the spot price of certain agricultural commodities has a direct impact on Fund performance. Investments in the agriculture sector may be highly volatile and the market values of such commodities can change quickly and unpredictably due to a number of factors, such as the supply of, and demand for, each commodity, the strength of the domestic and global economy, legislative or regulatory developments relating to food safety, the imposition of tariffs and other restraints on trade, as well as other significant events, including public health, political, legal, financial, accounting and tax matters that are beyond the Fund’s control. In addition, increased competition caused by economic recession, labor difficulties and changing consumer tastes and spending can impact the demand for agricultural products and, in turn, the value of such investments.

Energy Sector Investment Risk. The daily performance of the spot price of certain energy-related commodities has a direct impact on Fund performance. Energy commodities’ market values are significantly impacted by a number of factors, such as the supply of, and demand for, each commodity, the strength of the domestic and global economy, significant world events, capital expenditures on exploration and production, energy conservation efforts, government regulation and subsidization and technological advances. Investments in the energy sector may be cyclical and/or highly volatile and subject to swift price fluctuations. In addition, significant declines in the price of oil may contribute to significant market volatility, which may adversely affect the Fund’s performance. The energy sector has recently experienced significant volatility due to dramatic changes in the prices of energy commodities, and it is possible that such volatility will continue in the future.

Metals Sector Investment Risk. The daily performance of the spot price of certain industrial and precious metals has a direct impact on Fund performance. Investments in metals may be highly volatile and the market values of such commodities can change quickly and unpredictably due to a number of factors, such as the supply of, and demand for, each metal, the strength of the domestic and global economy, international monetary policy, environmental or labor costs, as well as other significant events, including public health, political, legal, financial, accounting and tax matters that are beyond the Fund’s control. The United States or foreign governments may pass laws or regulations limiting metal investments for strategic or other policy reasons. Further, the principal supplies of metal industries may be concentrated in a small number of countries and regions.

Passive Management Risk. Because the Fund is not “actively” managed, unless a specific security is removed from the Index, the Fund generally would not sell an investment because of the investment’s performance. Additionally, unusual market conditions may cause the Index provider to postpone a scheduled rebalance or reconstitution, which could cause the Index to vary from its normal or expected composition. Therefore, the Fund’s performance could be lower than funds that may actively shift their portfolio assets to take advantage of market opportunities or to lessen the impact of a market decline or a decline in the value of one or more investments. As the Fund may not fully replicate the Index, it is subject to the risk that the investment strategy of the Advisor or Sub-Advisor may not produce the intended results.

 

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Index Tracking Risk. As with all index funds, the performance of the Fund and the Index may differ from each other for a variety of reasons. For example, the Fund incurs operating expenses and portfolio transaction costs not incurred by the Index. Index tracking risk may also occur because of differences between the investments held in the Fund’s portfolio and those included in the Index, pricing differences (including, as applicable, differences between a security’s price at the local market close and the Fund’s valuation of a security at the time of calculation of the Fund’s NAV), differences in transaction costs, the Fund’s holding of uninvested cash, differences in timing of the accrual of dividends or interest, the requirements to maintain pass-through tax treatment, portfolio transactions carried out to minimize the distribution of capital gains to shareholders, changes to the Index or the need to meet various new or existing regulatory requirements, among other reasons. Moreover, the Fund may be delayed in purchasing or selling investments included in the Index. In addition, the Fund may not be fully invested in the investments included in the Index at all times or may hold investments that are not included in the Index. In addition, the Fund’s use of a representative sampling approach may cause the Fund to not track the return of the Index as would be the case if the Fund purchased all of the instruments in the Index, or invested in them in the exact proportions in which they are represented in the Index. Index tracking risk may be heightened during times of increased market volatility or other unusual market conditions. Index ETFs that track indices with significant weight in futures contracts issuers may experience higher index tracking risk than other index ETFs that do not track such indices.

Index-Related Risk. There is no guarantee that the Fund’s investment results will closely correspond, before fees and taxes, to the performance of the Index or that the Fund will achieve its investment objective. Market disruptions and regulatory restrictions could have an adverse effect on the Fund’s ability to track the Index. Errors in index data, index computations or the construction of the Index in accordance with its methodology may occur from time to time and may not be identified and corrected by the Index Provider for a period of time or at all, which may have an adverse impact on the Fund and its shareholders. Unusual market conditions may cause the Index Provider to postpone a scheduled rebalance, which could cause the Index to vary from its normal or expected composition.

Fixed-Income Securities Risk. Fixed-income securities fluctuate in price based on changes in an issuer’s financial condition and overall market and economic conditions, such as real or perceived adverse economic or political conditions, inflation, changes in interest or currency rates, lack of liquidity in the bond markets or adverse investor sentiment. The value of a security may also fall due to specific conditions that affect a particular sector of the securities market or a particular issuer. Fixed-income securities are subject to, among other risks, credit risk, interest rate risk, inflation risk, market risk, liquidity risk, extension risk, and prepayment risk.

Money Market Instruments Risk. Money market instruments may be subject to market risk and credit risk. There is no guarantee that money market instruments will maintain their value.

Futures Contract Risk. The primary risks associated with the use of futures contracts, or swaps or other derivatives referencing futures contracts, are: (i) an imperfect correlation between the value of the futures contract and the value of the underlying commodity; (ii) possible lack of a liquid secondary market for a futures contract; (iii) the inability to open or close a futures contract or cash commodity position when desired; (iv) losses caused by unanticipated market movement, which may result in losses in excess of the amount invested in the futures contract (and potentially may be unlimited); (v) in the event of adverse price movements, an obligation of the Fund to make daily cash payments to maintain its required margin, including at times when it may have insufficient cash and must sell securities from its portfolio to meet those margin requirements at a disadvantageous time; (vi) the possibility that a failure to close a position may result in delivery of an illiquid commodity to the Fund; and (vii) the possibility that rapid selling to avoid delivery of a commodity may result in unfavorable execution prices. Although it is intended that the Fund will only enter into futures contracts if there is an active market for such contracts, there is no assurance that an active market will exist for the contracts at any particular time.

Roll Yield. During situations where the cost of any futures contracts for delivery on dates further in the future is higher than those for delivery closer in time, the value of the Fund holding such contracts will decrease over time unless the spot price of that contract increases by the same rate as the rate of the variation in the price of the futures contract. The rate of variation could be quite significant and last for an indeterminate period of time, reducing the value of the Fund.

Authorized Participants. Only an authorized participant that has entered into an agreement with the Fund’s distributor (an “Authorized Participant” or “AP”) may engage in creation or redemption transactions directly with the Fund, and none of those APs is obligated to engage in creation and/or redemption transactions. The Fund has entered into AP agreements with only a limited number of institutions. Should these APs cease to act as such or, for any reason, be unable to create or redeem Shares and new APs are not appointed in their place, Shares may trade at a discount to the Fund’s NAV and possibly face delisting.

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Cash Redemption Risk. The Fund expects to effect its creations and redemptions primarily for cash due to the nature of its investments. Paying redemption proceeds in cash rather than through in-kind delivery of portfolio securities may require the Fund to dispose of or sell portfolio investments at an inopportune time in order to obtain the cash needed to distribute redemption proceeds. This may also cause the Fund to recognize investment income and/or capital gain that it might not have recognized if it had made a redemption in-kind. As a result, the Fund may be less tax efficient and may have to pay out higher annual distributions than if the Fund used the in-kind redemption process. Disposing or selling portfolio investments may also cause the Fund to incur transaction costs. The Fund may also incur borrowing fees and/or overdraft charges until the sales of portfolio investments necessary to cover a redemption request settle.

Commodity Pool Regulatory Risk. The Fund is deemed to be a commodity pool due to its investment exposure to commodity futures contracts and is subject to regulation under the Commodity Exchange Act (“CEA”) and Commodity Futures Trading Commission (“CFTC”) rules as well as the regulatory scheme applicable to registered investment companies. The Advisor is registered as a commodity pool operator (“CPO”) and the Sub-Advisor is registered as a commodity trading advisor (“CTA”). Registration as a CPO and CTA imposes additional compliance obligations on the Advisor, the Sub-Advisor, and the Fund related to additional laws, regulations, and enforcement policies, which could increase compliance costs for the Advisor or Sub-Advisor and may affect the operations and financial performance of the Fund. These requirements are also subject to change at any time.

Cybersecurity Risk. Cybersecurity incidents may allow an unauthorized party to gain access to Fund assets, customer data (including private shareholder information), or proprietary information, or cause the Fund, the Advisor and/or its service providers (including, but not limited to, Fund accountants, custodians, sub-custodians, transfer agents and financial intermediaries) to suffer data breaches, data corruption or lose operational functionality.

Investment Company Securities. To the extent the Fund or its Subsidiary invests in securities of other investment companies, including exchange-traded funds, the Fund will bear a proportionate share of the fees and expenses paid by such other investment company, including advisory and administrative fees.

Investment Risk. An investor may lose the value of their entire investment or part of their investment in Shares.

Leverage Risk. To the extent the Fund is exposed directly or indirectly to leverage (through investments in commodities futures contracts) the value of the Fund may be more volatile than if no leverage were present.

Market Trading Risk. There can be no assurance as to the price at which, or volume in which, it may at any time be possible to buy or sell Shares in the public trading market. Although the Shares are listed for trading on NYSE Arca, there can be no assurance that an active trading market for such Shares will develop or be maintained. Although it is expected that the market price of the Shares will approximate the Fund’s NAV when purchased and sold in the secondary market, the Fund faces numerous market trading risks, including the potential lack of an active market for Shares, disruptions in the securities markets in which the Fund invests, periods of high market volatility, and disruptions in the creation/redemption process. Any of these may lead to times when the market price of the Shares is more than the NAV intra-day (premium) or less than the NAV intra-day (discount).

Non-Diversification Risk. As a “non-diversified” fund, the Fund may hold a smaller number of portfolio securities than many other funds. To the extent the Fund invests in a relatively small number of issuers, a decline in the market value of a particular security held by the Fund may affect its value more than if it invested in a larger number of issuers. The value of Shares may be more volatile than the values of shares of more diversified funds. However, the Fund intends to satisfy the asset diversification requirements for classification as a RIC under Subchapter M of the Code.

Sampling Risk. The Fund’s use of a representative sampling approach may result in it holding a smaller number of instruments than are included in the Index. As a result, an adverse development respecting an investment held by the Fund could result in a greater decline in NAV than would be the case if the Fund held all of the components of the Index. Conversely, a positive development relating to a constituent of the Index that is not held by the Fund could cause the Fund to underperform the Index. To the extent the assets in the Fund are smaller, these risks will be greater. A representative sampling strategy may increase the Fund’s susceptibility to Index Tracking Risk.

Subsidiary Investment Risk. Changes in the laws of the United States and/or the Cayman Islands, under which the Fund and the Subsidiary are organized, respectively, could result in the inability of the Subsidiary to operate as intended and could negatively affect the Fund and its shareholders. The Subsidiary is not registered under the 1940 Act, and, unless otherwise noted in this Prospectus, is not subject to the investor protections of the 1940 Act.

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Swap Agreements. Swaps can involve greater risks than a direct investment in an underlying asset and these may increase or decrease the overall volatility of the Fund’s investment and its share price. Swaps may be subject to illiquidity risk, and it may not be possible for the Fund to liquidate a swap position at an advantageous time or price, which may result in significant losses. As with other transactions, the Fund will bear the risk that the counterparty will default, which could cause losses to the Fund.

Tax Risk. In order to qualify for the favorable U.S. federal income tax treatment accorded to a RIC under Subchapter M of the Code, the Fund must, among other requirements, derive at least 90% of its gross income in each taxable year from certain categories of income (“qualifying income”) and must satisfy certain asset diversification requirements. Certain of the Fund’s commodity-related investments, if made directly, will not generate income that is qualifying income. The Fund intends to hold such commodity-related investments indirectly, through the Subsidiary. The Fund’s investment in the Subsidiary is expected to provide the Fund with exposure to the commodities markets within the limitations of the federal tax requirements of Subchapter M of the Code for qualification as a RIC. The Advisor and/or Sub-Advisor will carefully monitor the Fund’s investment in the Subsidiary to ensure that no more than 25% of the Fund’s assets are invested in the Subsidiary to ensure compliance with the Fund’s asset diversification test for qualification as a RIC under Subchapter M of the Code. If the Fund was to fail to meet the qualifying income test or the asset diversification test and fail to qualify as a RIC, it would be taxed in the same manner as an ordinary corporation, and distributions to its shareholders would not be deductible by the Fund in computing its taxable income. The failure by the Fund to qualify as a RIC would have significant negative tax consequences to Fund shareholders and would affect a shareholder’s return on its investment in such Fund. Under certain circumstances, the Fund may be able to cure a failure to meet the qualifying income test or the asset diversification test if such failure was due to reasonable cause and not willful neglect, but in order to do so the Fund may incur significant fund-level taxes, which would effectively reduce (and could eliminate) the Fund’s returns. The Fund’s strategy of investing through its Subsidiary in commodity-related instruments may cause the Fund to recognize more ordinary income than would be the case if the Fund did not invest through a Subsidiary, resulting in distributions from the Fund that are taxable to individual shareholders at ordinary income tax rates rather than at the more favorable tax rates for long-term capital gains.

Fund Performance

The bar chart and table that follow show how the Fund has performed on a calendar year basis and provides some indication of the risks of investing in the Fund by showing the variability of the Fund’s return based on net assets and comparing the Fund’s performance to the Index and to the Bloomberg Commodity Index Total ReturnSM, a broad measure of market performance. Past performance (before and after taxes) does not necessarily indicate how the Fund will perform in the future. Prior to August 3, 2021, the fund operated under certain different investment policies in connection with a change from an actively-managed ETF to a passively-managed ETF. The Fund’s historical performance prior to August 3, 2021 may not represent its current investment policies. Updated performance information is available at www.abrdn.com/usa/etf.

Annual Returns as of December 31

For the period shown in the bar chart above:

Best Quarter

June 30, 2021

14.78%

Worst Quarter

March 31, 2020

-19.93%

 

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Average Annual Total Returns
(for the periods ended December 31, 2021)

One Year

Since Inception
of Fund

Inception Date
of Fund

Before Taxes

32.40%

7.25%

March 30, 2017

After Taxes on Distributions

28.19%

6.13%

After Taxes on Distributions and Sale of Shares

19.14%

5.15%

Bloomberg Commodity Index 3 Month Forward Total ReturnSM
(reflects no deduction for fees, expenses or taxes)

33.11%

7.72%

Bloomberg Commodity Index Total ReturnSM
(reflects no deduction for fees, expenses or taxes)

27.11%

4.37%

Average annual total returns are shown on a before- and after-tax basis for the Fund. After-tax returns are calculated using the historical highest individual federal marginal income tax rates and do not reflect the impact of state and local taxes. Actual after-tax returns depend on an investor’s tax situation and may differ from those shown. After-tax returns shown are not relevant to investors who hold shares through tax-deferred arrangements, such as 401(k) plans or individual retirement accounts (“IRAs”). After-tax returns may exceed the return before taxes due to an assumed tax benefit from realizing a capital loss on a sale of shares.

Management

Investment Advisor and Sub-Advisor

abrdn ETFs Advisors LLC serves as the investment advisor to the Fund and the Subsidiary.

Vident Investment Advisory, LLC serves as the sub-advisor to the Fund and the Subsidiary.

Portfolio Managers

Employee

Length of Service

Title

Austin Wen, CFA

Since October 2018

Co-Portfolio Manager

Ryan Dofflemeyer

Since April 2022

Co-Portfolio Manager

Buying and Selling Shares

The Fund is an ETF. Individual Shares may only be purchased and sold in the secondary market through a broker-dealer. Shares are listed for trading on a national securities exchange, such as the NYSE Arca. The price of Shares is based on market price, and because ETF Shares trade at market prices rather than NAV, shares may trade at a price greater than NAV (premium) or less than NAV (discount). An investor may incur costs attributable to the difference between the highest price a buyer is willing to pay to purchase shares of the Fund (bid) and the lowest price a seller is willing to accept for shares of the Fund (ask) when buying or selling shares in the secondary market (“the bid-ask spread”). Recent information, including information about the Fund’s NAV, market price, premiums and discounts, and bid-ask spreads, is included on the Fund’s website at www.abrdn.com/usa/etf.

Tax Information

The Fund intends to make distributions that may be taxed as ordinary income or capital gains.

Payments to Broker-Dealers and Other Financial Intermediaries

If you purchase Shares through a broker-dealer or other financial intermediary (such as a bank) (an “Intermediary”), the Advisor or its affiliates may pay Intermediaries for certain activities related to the Fund, including participation in activities that are designed to make Intermediaries more knowledgeable about exchange-traded products, including the Fund, or for other activities, such as marketing, educational training or other initiatives related to the sale or promotion of Shares. These payments may create a conflict of interest by influencing the Intermediary and your salesperson to recommend the Fund over another investment. Any such arrangements do not result in increased Fund expenses. Ask your salesperson or visit the Intermediary’s website for more information.

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Investment Objective

The abrdn Bloomberg Industrial Metals Strategy K-1 Free ETF (the “Fund”) seeks to provide investment results that closely correspond, before fees and expenses, to the performance of the Bloomberg Industrial Metals Total Return SubindexSM (the “Index”).

Fees and Expenses of the Fund

The following table describes the fees and expenses you may pay if you buy, hold and sell shares of the Fund (“Shares”). You may pay other fees, such as brokerage commissions and other fees to financial intermediaries, which are not reflected in the table and example below.

Annual Fund Operating Expenses
(expenses that you pay each year as a percentage of the value of your investment)

       

Management Fees of the Fund and the Subsidiary

0.47

%

Distribution and Service (12b-1) Fees

0.00

%

Other Expenses(1)

0.00

%

Other Expenses of the Fund

0.00

%

Other Expenses of the Subsidiary

0.00

%

Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses

0.47

%

Fee Waiver(2)

(0.08

)%

Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses After Fee Waiver

0.39

%

  

(1) The Fund’s “Other Expenses” are based on estimated amounts for the current fiscal year.
(2) abrdn ETFs Advisors LLC (the “Advisor”) has contractually agreed to waive the management fees that it receives from the Fund in an amount equal to the management fee paid to the Advisor by the Subsidiary, as defined below. This undertaking will continue in effect for at least one year from the date of this Prospectus, and for so long as the Fund invests in the Subsidiary, and may be terminated only with the approval of the Fund’s Board of Trustees.

Example

The following example is intended to help you compare the cost of investing in the Fund with the cost of investing in other funds.

The example assumes that you invest $10,000 in the Fund for the time periods indicated and then sell all of your Shares at the end of those periods. The example also assumes that your investment has a 5% return each year and that the Fund’s operating expenses remain the same each year. Although your actual costs and returns may be higher or lower, based on these assumptions your costs would be:

1 Year

3 Years

$40

$143

Portfolio Turnover

The Fund pays transaction costs, such as commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or “turns over” its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover rate may cause the Fund to incur higher transaction costs and may result in higher taxes when Shares are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are not reflected in Annual Fund Operating Expenses or the example above, may affect the Fund’s performance. During the period from September 22, 2021 (commencement of operations) through December 31, 2021, the Fund’s portfolio turnover rate was 0% of the average value of its portfolio. Derivative instruments and instruments with a maturity of one year or less at the time of acquisition are excluded from the calculation of the portfolio turnover rate which leads to the 0% portfolio turnover rate reported above. If these instruments were included in the calculation, the Fund would have a higher portfolio turnover rate.

Principal Investment Strategies

The Fund employs a “passive management” – or indexing – investment approach designed to track the performance of the Index. The Fund operates as an index fund and is not actively managed.

 

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Bloomberg Industrial Metals Total Return SubindexSM

The Index reflects the return on a fully collateralized investment in the Bloomberg Industrial Metals SubindexSM (“BCOMIN”), which is composed of futures contracts on certain industrial metals commodity futures contracts. Futures contracts on commodities generally are agreements between two parties where one party agrees to buy, and the counterparty to sell, a set amount of a physical commodity (or, in some contracts, a cash equivalent) at a pre-determined future date and price. The value of commodity futures contracts is based upon the price movements of the underlying commodities.

The Index combines the returns of the BCOMIN with the returns on cash collateral invested in 3-month U.S. Treasury Bills. These returns are calculated by using the most recent weekly auction high rate for 13 week (3 Month) U.S. Treasury Bills, as reported on the website http://www.treasurydirect.gov/ published by the Bureau of the Public Debt of the U.S. Treasury, or any successor source, which is generally published once per week on Monday.

The Index is a subindex of the widely followed Bloomberg Commodity IndexSM (“BCOM”), which is composed of futures contracts on physical commodities and is designed to be a highly liquid and broad-based benchmark for commodities futures investments.

The Index and the BCOM are both calculated and published by Bloomberg Finance L.P. and its affiliates, including Bloomberg Index Services Limited, the administrator of the Index (collectively, “Bloomberg” or the “Index Provider”). The Index tracks movements in the price of a rolling position in a basket of industrial metals futures with a maturity between 1 and 3 months. “Rolling” means selling a futures contract as it nears its expiration date and replacing it with a new futures contract that has a later expiration date. The difference between the prices of the two contracts when they are rolled is sometimes referred to as a “roll yield,” and the change in price that contracts experience while they are components of the BCOMIN is sometimes referred to as a “spot return.” The Index is designed to track commodity futures contracts and is not linked to the current “spot” or cash price of the underlying commodities. Futures contracts may perform very differently from the current or “spot” prices of underlying commodities.

Futures contracts with a longer term to expiration may be priced higher than futures contracts with a shorter term to expiration, a relationship called “contango.” When rolling futures contracts that are in contango, the Index will sell the expiring contract at a lower price and buy a longer-dated contract at a higher price, resulting in a negative roll yield. Conversely, futures contracts with a longer term to expiration may be priced lower than futures contracts with a shorter term to expiration, a relationship called “backwardation.” When rolling futures contracts that are in backwardation, the Fund will sell the expiring contract at a higher price and buy a longer-dated contract at a lower price, resulting in a positive roll yield.

As of the date of this Prospectus, the Index consists of 4 commodities futures contracts with respect to aluminum, copper, nickel and zinc. As of the date of this Prospectus, there are 6 commodity futures eligible for inclusion in the Index, but 2 of those commodities (lead and tin) are not included in the Index. With the exception of copper, which trades on the Commodity Exchange, Inc. (COMEX), the other industrial metals contracts (aluminum, lead, tin, nickel and zinc) trade on the London Metals Exchange (“LME”).

The Index uses a consistent, systematic process in determining the weightings of included industrial metals. Like the broad BCOM, the weightings of the components of the Index are based on (1) liquidity data; (2) U.S. dollar-weighted production data; and (3) diversification rules that attempt to reduce disproportionate weightings of any single commodity, which potentially reduces volatility in comparison with narrower commodity baskets. Liquidity data is the relative amount of trading activity for a particular commodity and U.S. dollar-weighted production data takes the figures for production in the overall commodities market for all commodities in the Index and weights them in the Index in the same proportion in U.S. dollar terms. The value of the Index is computed on the basis of hypothetical investments in the basket of industrial metals that make up the Index. As of the date of this Prospectus, the Index invests significantly in, and therefore the Fund has significant exposure to, the industrial metals sector.

As of April 1, 2022, the weightings for the contracts included in the Index were as follows:

Commodity

Weighting

Copper

30.49%

Aluminum

26.26%

Nickel

23.15%

Zinc

20.10%

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The Index is sponsored by Bloomberg, which is independent of the Fund, the Advisor and Sub-Advisor. Bloomberg determines the composition and relative weightings of the securities in the Index and publishes information regarding the market value of the Index. The composition of the Index is rebalanced and published annually in the month of January.

The Fund’s Investment Strategy

The Fund uses a “passive” or representative sampling indexing approach to attempt to achieve its investment objective. The Fund does not try to outperform the Index and does not generally take temporary defensive positions. The Fund will invest in only a representative sample of the instruments in the Index, and the Fund may invest in or gain exposure to instruments not contained in the Index or in financial instruments, with the intent of tracking the Index. The Fund will also hold short-term fixed-income securities, which may be used as collateral for the Fund’s commodities futures holdings or to generate interest income and capital appreciation on the cash balances arising from its use of futures contracts (thereby providing a “total return” investment in the underlying commodities). In managing the assets of the Fund, the Advisor and Sub-Advisor do not invest the assets of the Fund in instruments based on their view of the investment merit of a particular instrument nor does it conduct conventional investment research or analysis or forecast market movement or trends. The Fund seeks to remain fully invested at all times in financial instruments that, in combination, track the returns of the Index without regard to market conditions, trends or direction. The Fund will rebalance its portfolio when the Index rebalances. Additionally, if the Fund receives a creation unit in cash, the Fund repositions its portfolio in response to assets flowing into or out of the Fund.

Under normal market conditions, the Fund intends to achieve its investment objective by investing in exchange-traded commodity futures contracts through a wholly-owned subsidiary of the Fund organized under the laws of the Cayman Islands (the “Subsidiary”). As a means to provide investment returns that are designed to track those of the Index, the Subsidiary may also invest directly in commodity-linked instruments, including pooled investment vehicles (such as exchange-traded funds and other investment companies), swaps and exchange-traded options on futures contracts, to the extent permitted under the Investment Company Act of 1940, as amended (the “1940 Act”) and any applicable exemptive relief (collectively, “Commodities-Related Assets” and, together with exchange-traded commodities futures contracts, “Commodities Instruments”). The Fund may invest up to 25% of its total assets in the Subsidiary. The Fund is called “K-1 Free” because it is designed to operate differently than commodity-based investments that distribute a “Schedule K-1” to shareholders. Schedule K-1 is a tax form containing information regarding a fund’s income and expenses, which shareholders may find complicates tax return preparation, thus requiring additional time, or the help of a professional tax adviser, at additional cost. By comparison, the Fund is designed to be taxed like a conventional mutual fund and shareholders will instead receive a Form 1099 from the broker-dealer or other financial intermediary through which they invest, from which income, gains, and losses can be entered onto the shareholder’s tax return.

The remainder of the Fund’s assets that are not invested in the Subsidiary (i.e., at least 75% of the Fund’s total assets) will principally be invested in: (1) short-term investment grade fixed-income securities that include U.S. government securities and money market instruments; and (2) cash and other cash equivalents. The Fund seeks to use such instruments to generate a total return on the cash balances arising from the use of futures contracts that, when combined with the Fund’s other investments, tracks the total return of the Index.

As noted previously, the Fund will not invest directly in commodity futures contracts but, instead, expects to gain exposure to these investments exclusively by investing in the Subsidiary. The Fund’s investment in the Subsidiary is intended to enable the Fund to gain exposure to relevant commodity markets within the limits of current federal income tax laws applicable to a regulated investment company (“RIC”) such as the Fund, which limit the ability of RICs to invest directly in commodity futures contracts. The Subsidiary and the Fund have the same investment objective. However, the Subsidiary may invest without limitation in the Commodities Instruments. Except as otherwise noted, for the purposes of this Prospectus, references to the Fund’s investments include the Fund’s indirect investments through the Subsidiary.

The Advisor and Sub-Advisor will determine the percentage of the Fund’s assets allocated to the Commodities Instruments held by the Subsidiary that will be invested in exchange-traded commodity futures contracts or Commodities-Related Assets. The Fund does not seek leveraged returns. However, the Fund’s use of instruments to collateralize the Subsidiary’s investments in Commodity Instruments has a leveraging effect and is designed to provide a total return that tracks the return of the Index.

The Fund is classified as “non-diversified” under the 1940 Act.

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Summary of Principal Risks of Investing in the Fund

As with any investment, there is a risk that you could lose all or a portion of your investment in the Fund. The Fund’s principal risks are summarized below. The following is a list of the principal risks of investing in the Fund (in alphabetical order after the first 11 risks). Some or all of these risks may adversely affect the Fund’s net asset value per share (“NAV”), trading price, total return and/or ability to meet its objective. For more information about the risks of investing in the Fund, see the sections in the Fund’s Prospectus titled “Additional Principal Risk Information about the Funds” and “Additional Non-Principal Risk Information about the Funds.”

Market Risk. The prices of the assets in which the Fund invests may decline for a number of reasons, including in response to local, regional or global economic developments, war, acts of terrorism, the spread of infectious illness or other public health issues, or other events.

Commodity Price Risk. The NAV of the Fund will be affected by movements in commodity prices generally and by the way in which those prices and other factors affect the prices of the commodity futures contracts. Commodity prices generally may fluctuate widely and may be affected by numerous factors.

Commodity Sector Risks. The daily performance of the current or “spot” price of certain commodities has a direct impact on Fund performance. To the extent the Fund has significant exposure to a particular commodity sector, the Fund may be more susceptible to loss due to adverse occurrences affecting that sector, including a decline in the price of commodities in such sector.

Metals Sector Investment Risk. The daily performance of the spot price of certain industrial metals has a direct impact on Fund performance. Investments in metals may be highly volatile and the market values of such commodities can change quickly and unpredictably due to a number of factors, such as the supply of, and demand for, each metal, the strength of the domestic and global economy, international monetary policy, environmental or labor costs, as well as other significant events, including public health, political, legal, financial, accounting and tax matters that are beyond the Fund’s control. The United States or foreign governments may pass laws or regulations limiting metal investments for strategic or other policy reasons. Further, the principal supplies of metal industries may be concentrated in a small number of countries and regions. As of the date of this Prospectus, the Index consists of 4 commodities futures contracts with respect to the following industrial metals: aluminum, copper, nickel and zinc. Consequently, in addition to factors affecting commodities generally that are described above, the Index may be subject to a number of additional factors specific to industrial metals, and in particular aluminum, copper, nickel and zinc, that might cause price volatility. These may include, among others:

changes in the level of industrial activity using industrial metals, and in particular aluminum, copper, nickel and zinc, including the availability of substitutes such as man-made or synthetic substitutes;

disruptions in the supply chain, from mining to storage to smelting or refining;

adjustments to inventory;

variations in production costs, including storage, labor and energy costs;

costs associated with regulatory compliance, including environmental regulations; and

changes in industrial, government and consumer demand, both in individual consuming nations and internationally.

Passive Management Risk. Because the Fund is not “actively” managed, unless a specific security is removed from the Index, the Fund generally would not sell an investment because of the investment’s performance. Additionally, unusual market conditions may cause the Index provider to postpone a scheduled rebalance or reconstitution, which could cause the Index to vary from its normal or expected composition. Therefore, the Fund’s performance could be lower than funds that may actively shift their portfolio assets to take advantage of market opportunities or to lessen the impact of a market decline or a decline in the value of one or more investments. As the Fund may not fully replicate the Index, it is subject to the risk that the investment strategy of the Advisor or Sub-Advisor may not produce the intended results.

Index Tracking Risk. As with all index funds, the performance of the Fund and the Index may differ from each other for a variety of reasons. For example, the Fund incurs operating expenses and portfolio transaction costs not incurred by the Index. Index tracking risk may also occur because of differences between the investments held in the Fund’s portfolio and those included in the Index, pricing

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differences (including, as applicable, differences between a security’s price at the local market close and the Fund’s valuation of a security at the time of calculation of the Fund’s NAV), differences in transaction costs, the Fund’s holding of uninvested cash, differences in timing of the accrual of dividends or interest, the requirements to maintain pass-through tax treatment, portfolio transactions carried out to minimize the distribution of capital gains to shareholders, changes to the Index or the need to meet various new or existing regulatory requirements, among other reasons. Moreover, the Fund may be delayed in purchasing or selling investments included in the Index. In addition, the Fund may not be fully invested in the investments included in the Index at all times or may hold investments that are not included in the Index. In addition, the Fund’s use of a representative sampling approach may cause the Fund to not track the return of the Index as would be the case if the Fund purchased all of the instruments in the Index, or invested in them in the exact proportions in which they are represented in the Index. Index tracking risk may be heightened during times of increased market volatility or other unusual market conditions. Index ETFs that track indices with significant weight in futures contracts issuers may experience higher index tracking risk than other index ETFs that do not track such indices.

Index-Related Risk. There is no guarantee that the Fund’s investment results will closely correspond, before fees and taxes, to the performance of the Index or that the Fund will achieve its investment objective. Market disruptions and regulatory restrictions could have an adverse effect on the Fund’s ability to track the Index. Errors in index data, index computations or the construction of the Index in accordance with its methodology may occur from time to time and may not be identified and corrected by the Index Provider for a period of time or at all, which may have an adverse impact on the Fund and its shareholders. Unusual market conditions may cause the Index Provider to postpone a scheduled rebalance, which could cause the Index to vary from its normal or expected composition.

Fixed-Income Securities Risk. Fixed-income securities fluctuate in price based on changes in an issuer’s financial condition and overall market and economic conditions, such as real or perceived adverse economic or political conditions, inflation, changes in interest or currency rates, lack of liquidity in the bond markets or adverse investor sentiment. The value of a security may also fall due to specific conditions that affect a particular sector of the securities market or a particular issuer. Fixed-income securities are subject to, among other risks, credit risk, interest rate risk, inflation risk, market risk, liquidity risk, extension risk, and prepayment risk.

Money Market Instruments Risk. Money market instruments may be subject to market risk and credit risk. There is no guarantee that money market instruments will maintain their value.

Futures Contract Risk. The primary risks associated with the use of futures contracts, or swaps or other derivatives referencing futures contracts, are: (i) an imperfect correlation between the value of the futures contract and the value of the underlying commodity; (ii) possible lack of a liquid secondary market for a futures contract; (iii) the inability to open or close a futures contract or cash commodity position when desired; (iv) losses caused by unanticipated market movement, which may result in losses in excess of the amount invested in the futures contract (and potentially may be unlimited); (v) in the event of adverse price movements, an obligation of the Fund to make daily cash payments to maintain its required margin, including at times when it may have insufficient cash and must sell securities from its portfolio to meet those margin requirements at a disadvantageous time; (vi) the possibility that a failure to close a position may result in delivery of an illiquid commodity to the Fund; and (vii) the possibility that rapid selling to avoid delivery of a commodity may result in unfavorable execution prices. Although it is intended that the Fund will only enter into futures contracts if there is an active market for such contracts, there is no assurance that an active market will exist for the contracts at any particular time. Certain of the futures contracts in which the Fund may invest trade on non-U.S. exchanges that impose different requirements than U.S. exchanges. These futures contracts may be subject to additional risks, including greater price volatility, temporary price aberrations and the potential imposition of trading halts and/or limits that constrain appreciation or cause depreciation of the prices of such futures contracts, as well as different and longer settlement periods. In certain circumstances, the Fund may be required to dispose of, or novate, certain of its futures contracts earlier than the contracts’ prompt date in order to meet shareholder redemption requests. The counterparties through which the Fund or the Sub-Advisor trade may impose additional fees and interest charges for novating futures contracts, which may reduce the proceeds due to the Fund on such contracts below the price at which they are valued and the Fund’s NAV may decline as a result.

Roll Yield. During situations where the cost of any futures contracts for delivery on dates further in the future is higher than those for delivery closer in time, the value of the Fund holding such contracts will decrease over time unless the spot price of that contract increases by the same rate as the rate of the variation in the price of the futures contract. The rate of variation could be quite significant and last for an indeterminate period of time, reducing the value of the Fund.

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New Fund Risk. The Fund is a new fund, with a limited operating history and a small asset base. There can be no assurance that the Fund will grow to or maintain a viable size. Due to the Fund’s small asset base, certain of the Fund’s expenses and its portfolio transaction costs may be higher than those of a fund with a larger asset base. To the extent that the Fund does not grow to or maintain a viable size, it may be liquidated, and the expenses, timing and tax consequences of such liquidation may not be favorable to some shareholders.

Authorized Participants. Only an authorized participant that has entered into an agreement with the Fund’s distributor (an “Authorized Participant” or “AP”) may engage in creation or redemption transactions directly with the Fund, and none of those APs is obligated to engage in creation and/or redemption transactions. The Fund has entered into AP agreements with only a limited number of institutions. Should these APs cease to act as such or, for any reason, be unable to create or redeem Shares and new APs are not appointed in their place, Shares may trade at a discount to the Fund’s NAV and possibly face delisting.

Cash Redemption Risk. The Fund expects to effect its creations and redemptions primarily for cash due to the nature of its investments. Paying redemption proceeds in cash rather than through in-kind delivery of portfolio securities may require the Fund to dispose of or sell portfolio investments at an inopportune time in order to obtain the cash needed to distribute redemption proceeds. This may also cause the Fund to recognize investment income and/or capital gain that it might not have recognized if it had made a redemption in-kind. As a result, the Fund may be less tax efficient and may have to pay out higher annual distributions than if the Fund used the in-kind redemption process. Disposing or selling portfolio investments may also cause the Fund to incur transaction costs. The Fund may also incur borrowing fees and/or overdraft charges until the sales of portfolio investments necessary to cover a redemption request settle. In addition, settlement periods on the LME may result in the need for the Fund to dispose of, or novate, certain futures contracts early in order to meet redemption requests. In such circumstances, the Fund may incur additional transaction fees and interest charges and the Fund’s NAV may decline based on the difference between the price at which the Fund valued the contracts and the proceeds received.

Commodity Pool Regulatory Risk. The Fund is deemed to be a commodity pool due to its investment exposure to commodity futures contracts and is subject to regulation under the Commodity Exchange Act (“CEA”) and Commodity Futures Trading Commission (“CFTC”) rules as well as the regulatory scheme applicable to registered investment companies. The Advisor is registered as a commodity pool operator (“CPO”) and the Sub-Advisor is registered as a commodity trading advisor (“CTA”). Registration as a CPO and CTA imposes additional compliance obligations on the Advisor, the Sub-Advisor, and the Fund related to additional laws, regulations, and enforcement policies, which could increase compliance costs for the Advisor or Sub-Advisor and may affect the operations and financial performance of the Fund. These requirements are also subject to change at any time.

Cybersecurity Risk. Cybersecurity incidents may allow an unauthorized party to gain access to Fund assets, customer data (including private shareholder information), or proprietary information, or cause the Fund, the Advisor and/or its service providers (including, but not limited to, Fund accountants, custodians, sub-custodians, transfer agents and financial intermediaries) to suffer data breaches, data corruption or lose operational functionality.

Investment Company Securities. To the extent the Fund or its Subsidiary invests in securities of other investment companies, including exchange-traded funds, the Fund will bear a proportionate share of the fees and expenses paid by such other investment company, including advisory and administrative fees.

Investment Risk. An investor may lose the value of their entire investment or part of their investment in Shares.

Leverage Risk. To the extent the Fund is exposed directly or indirectly to leverage (through investments in commodities futures contracts) the value of the Fund may be more volatile than if no leverage were present.

Market Trading Risk. There can be no assurance as to the price at which, or volume in which, it may at any time be possible to buy or sell Shares in the public trading market. Although the Shares are listed for trading on NYSE Arca, there can be no assurance that an active trading market for such Shares will develop or be maintained. Although it is expected that the market price of the Shares will approximate the Fund’s NAV when purchased and sold in the secondary market, the Fund faces numerous market trading risks, including the potential lack of an active market for Shares, disruptions in the securities markets in which the Fund invests, periods of high market volatility and disruptions in the creation/redemption process. Any of these may lead to times when the market price of the Shares is more than the NAV intra-day (premium) or less than the NAV intra-day (discount).

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Non-Diversification Risk. As a “non-diversified” fund, the Fund may hold a smaller number of portfolio securities than many other funds. To the extent the Fund invests in a relatively small number of issuers, a decline in the market value of a particular security held by the Fund may affect its value more than if it invested in a larger number of issuers. The value of Shares may be more volatile than the values of shares of more diversified funds. However, the Fund intends to satisfy the asset diversification requirements for classification as a RIC under Subchapter M of the Code.

Sampling Risk. The Fund’s use of a representative sampling approach may result in it holding a smaller number of instruments than are included in the Index. As a result, an adverse development respecting an investment held by the Fund could result in a greater decline in NAV than would be the case if the Fund held all of the components of the Index. Conversely, a positive development relating to a constituent of the Index that is not held by the Fund could cause the Fund to underperform the Index. To the extent the assets in the Fund are smaller, these risks will be greater. A representative sampling strategy may increase the Fund’s susceptibility to Index Tracking Risk.

Subsidiary Investment Risk. Changes in the laws of the United States and/or the Cayman Islands, under which the Fund and the Subsidiary are organized, respectively, could result in the inability of the Subsidiary to operate as intended and could negatively affect the Fund and its shareholders. The Subsidiary is not registered under the 1940 Act, and, unless otherwise noted in this Prospectus, is not subject to the investor protections of the 1940 Act.

Swap Agreements. Swaps can involve greater risks than a direct investment in an underlying asset and these may increase or decrease the overall volatility of the Fund’s investment and its share price. Swaps may be subject to illiquidity risk, and it may not be possible for the Fund to liquidate a swap position at an advantageous time or price, which may result in significant losses. As with other transactions, the Fund will bear the risk that the counterparty will default, which could cause losses to the Fund.

Tax Risk. In order to qualify for the favorable U.S. federal income tax treatment accorded to a RIC under Subchapter M of the Code, the Fund must, among other requirements, derive at least 90% of its gross income in each taxable year from certain categories of income (“qualifying income”) and must satisfy certain asset diversification requirements. Certain of the Fund’s commodity-related investments, if made directly, will not generate income that is qualifying income. The Fund intends to hold such commodity-related investments indirectly, through the Subsidiary. The Fund’s investment in the Subsidiary is expected to provide the Fund with exposure to the commodities markets within the limitations of the federal tax requirements of Subchapter M of the Code for qualification as a RIC. The Advisor and/or Sub-Advisor will carefully monitor the Fund’s investment in the Subsidiary to ensure that no more than 25% of the Fund’s assets are invested in the Subsidiary to ensure compliance with the Fund’s asset diversification test for qualification as a RIC under Subchapter M of the Code. If the Fund was to fail to meet the qualifying income test or the asset diversification test and fail to qualify as a RIC, it would be taxed in the same manner as an ordinary corporation, and distributions to its shareholders would not be deductible by the Fund in computing its taxable income. The failure by the Fund to qualify as a RIC would have significant negative tax consequences to Fund shareholders and would affect a shareholder’s return on its investment in such Fund. Under certain circumstances, the Fund may be able to cure a failure to meet the qualifying income test or the asset diversification test if such failure was due to reasonable cause and not willful neglect, but in order to do so the Fund may incur significant fund-level taxes, which would effectively reduce (and could eliminate) the Fund’s returns. The Fund’s strategy of investing through its Subsidiary in commodity-related instruments may cause the Fund to recognize more ordinary income than would be the case if the Fund did not invest through a Subsidiary, resulting in distributions from the Fund that are taxable to individual shareholders at ordinary income tax rates rather than at the more favorable tax rates for long-term capital gains.

Fund Performance

Performance information for the Fund is not provided because the Fund does not have performance history for a full calendar year as of the date of this Prospectus. When this Prospectus is updated after a full calendar year of operations, a bar chart and table will be included that will provide some indication of the risks of investing in the Fund by showing the variability of the Fund’s return based on net assets and comparing the Fund’s performance to the Index and a broad measure of market performance. Past performance does not necessarily indicate how the Fund will perform in the future. Updated performance information will be available at www.abrdn.com/usa/etf.

 

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Management

Investment Advisor and Sub-Advisor

abrdn ETFs Advisors LLC serves as the investment advisor to the Fund and the Subsidiary.

Vident Investment Advisory, LLC serves as the sub-advisor to the Fund and the Subsidiary.

Portfolio Managers

Employee

Length of Service

Title

Austin Wen, CFA

Since the Fund’s inception

Co-Portfolio Manager

Ryan Dofflemeyer

Since April 2022

Co-Portfolio Manager

Buying and Selling Shares

The Fund is an ETF. Individual Shares may only be purchased and sold in the secondary market through a broker-dealer. Shares are listed for trading on a national securities exchange, such as the NYSE Arca. The price of Shares is based on market price, and because ETF Shares trade at market prices rather than NAV, shares may trade at a price greater than NAV (premium) or less than NAV (discount). An investor may incur costs attributable to the difference between the highest price a buyer is willing to pay to purchase shares of the Fund (bid) and the lowest price a seller is willing to accept for shares of the Fund (ask) when buying or selling shares in the secondary market (“the bid-ask spread”). Recent information, including information about the Fund’s NAV, market price, premiums and discounts, and bid-ask spreads, is included on the Fund’s website at www.abrdn.com/usa/etf.

Tax Information

The Fund intends to make distributions that may be taxed as ordinary income or capital gains.

Payments to Broker-Dealers and Other Financial Intermediaries

If you purchase Shares through a broker-dealer or other financial intermediary (such as a bank) (an “Intermediary”), the Advisor or its affiliates may pay Intermediaries for certain activities related to the Fund, including participation in activities that are designed to make Intermediaries more knowledgeable about exchange-traded products, including the Fund, or for other activities, such as marketing, educational training or other initiatives related to the sale or promotion of Shares. These payments may create a conflict of interest by influencing the Intermediary and your salesperson to recommend the Fund over another investment. Any such arrangements do not result in increased Fund expenses. Ask your salesperson or visit the Intermediary’s website for more information.

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Additional Information about the Funds

Additional Investment Objective Information

Each Fund’s investment objective is a non-fundamental policy. Non-fundamental investment objectives and policies may be changed by the Board of Trustees (the “Board”) of abrdn ETFs (the “Trust”), of which each Fund is a series, without shareholder approval. In the case of any material change to the principal investment strategies of a Fund, investors in that Fund should consider whether that Fund remains an appropriate investment for them. There is no guarantee that a Fund will achieve its investment objective.

Additional Information About Each Fund’s Investment Strategy

Each Fund’s investment objective seeks to provide investment results that closely correspond, before fees and expenses, to the performance of an underlying index (respectively, an “Index” and collectively the “Indices”). Each Fund uses a “passive” representative sampling indexing approach to attempt to achieve each Fund’s investment objective. Each Fund does not try to outperform its respective Index and does not generally take temporary defensive positions. Each Fund may invest in only a representative sample of the instruments in its respective Index, and each Fund may invest in or gain exposure to instruments not contained in the Index or in financial instruments, with the intent of tracking the Index. Each Fund will also hold short-term fixed-income securities, which may be used as collateral for the Fund’s commodities futures holdings or to generate interest income and capital appreciation on the cash balances arising from its use of futures contracts (thereby providing a “total return” investment in the underlying commodities). In managing the assets of each Fund, the Advisor and Sub-Advisor do not invest the assets of the Fund in instruments based on their view of the investment merit of a particular instrument, nor do they conduct conventional investment research or analysis or forecast market movement or trends. The Fund seeks to remain fully invested at all times in financial instruments that, in combination, track the returns of its respective Index without regard to market conditions, trends or direction. The Fund will rebalance its portfolio when its respective Index rebalances. Additionally, if a Fund receives a creation unit in cash, the Fund repositions its portfolio in response to assets flowing into or out of the Fund. The quantity of holdings in the Fund will be based on a number of factors, including asset size of the Fund. The Sub-Advisor generally expects the Fund to hold less than the total number of instruments in the Index, but reserves the right to hold as many instruments as it believes necessary to achieve the Fund’s investment objective. In addition, from time to time, instruments are added to or removed from the Index. The Fund may sell instruments that are represented in the Index, or purchase securities that are not yet represented in the Index, in anticipation of their removal from or addition to the Index. Further, the Sub-Advisor may choose to underweight or overweight instruments, purchase or sell instruments not in the Index, or utilize various combinations of other available investment techniques, in seeking to track the Fund’s Index.

Under normal market conditions, each Fund intends to invest, through its Subsidiary (collectively, the “Subsidiaries”), in commodity futures, centrally and non-centrally cleared swaps, exchange-traded options on futures contracts and exchange-traded commodity linked instruments.

Commodity Instruments are linked to underlying physical and tangible assets and each Fund will seek to invest in these assets without holding the physical assets directly. Federal tax laws prevent the Funds from directly holding physical commodities or Commodity Instruments and each Fund will therefore invest indirectly in the Commodity Instruments through its holdings in its respective Subsidiary. By investing through the Subsidiaries, the Funds are able to gain exposure to the Commodity Instruments within the limits of the federal tax laws, including Subchapter M Code. Each Fund is called “K-1 Free” because it is designed to operate differently than commodity-based investments that distribute a “Schedule K-1” to shareholders. Schedule K-1 is a tax form containing information regarding a fund’s income and expenses, which shareholders may find complicates tax return preparation, thus requiring additional time, or the help of a professional tax adviser, at additional cost. By comparison, the Fund is designed to be taxed like a conventional mutual fund and shareholders will instead receive a Form 1099 from the broker-dealer or other financial intermediary through which they invest, from which income, gains, and losses can be entered onto the shareholder’s tax return.

Each Subsidiary is organized under the laws of the Cayman Islands and is wholly-owned and invested by its respective Fund. Interests in each Subsidiary, will not be sold or offered to other investors. Each Subsidiary is overseen by its own board of directors and the Advisor serves as investment advisor to each Subsidiary, managing it in accordance with the policies and procedures of the relevant Fund. Each Fund’s investment in its Subsidiary may not exceed 25% of the Fund’s total assets at each fiscal quarter end. The investment objective of each Subsidiary is the same as that of the relevant Fund that wholly-owns that Subsidiary.

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Like each Fund, each Subsidiary also may invest in cash or highly liquid securities intended to promote liquidity, serve as margin or collateralize the Subsidiary’s positions in Commodities Instruments. The remainder of each Fund’s assets that are not invested in the Subsidiary will principally be invested in: (1) short-term investment grade fixed-income securities that include U.S. government securities and money market instruments; and (2) cash and other cash equivalents. Each Fund will use such instruments to generate a total return and to provide liquidity, serve as margin or otherwise collateralize investment in Commodity Instruments.

If a registered investment company (such as each of the Funds) invests more than a specified amount of its NAV in CFTC-regulated futures, options and swaps or provides exposure to such instruments, it becomes subject to certain requirements adopted by the CFTC. As each Fund will pass this NAV threshold in its investments, it will be deemed to be a “commodity pool” and the Advisor will be registered as a commodity pool operator and the Sub-Advisor will be a CTA. The Advisor and Sub-Advisor will manage both the Funds and the Subsidiaries in accordance with applicable CFTC rules and, in addition, with respect to the Funds, to the rules that apply to registered investment companies.

The Funds may not hold more than 25% of their total assets in securities of issuers (other than in obligations issued or guaranteed by the U.S. government, its agencies or instrumentalities or securities of other investment companies) in any one industry or group of industries.

Additional Information Regarding the Indices

Each Index is an index or subindex of the Bloomberg Commodity IndexSM (“BCOM”) family of indices, which is published by Bloomberg Finance L.P. and its affiliates, including Bloomberg Index Services Limited, the administrator of the indices, (collectively, “Bloomberg” or the “Index Provider”).

The BCOM provides broad-based exposure to commodities as an asset class, since no single commodity or commodity sector dominates the BCOM. Rather than being driven by micro-economic events affecting one commodity market or sector, the BCOM is comprised of futures contracts on a broad basket of underlying commodities, which potentially reduces volatility in comparison with narrower commodity baskets.

As of the date of this Prospectus, the BCOM consists of 23 commodities futures contracts with respect to 21 commodities: aluminum, coffee, copper, corn, cotton, crude oil (West Texas Intermediate, or WTI, and Brent), gold, lean hogs, live cattle, low sulfur gas oil, natural gas, nickel, RBOB (reformulated blendstock for oxygenate blending) gasoline, silver, soybean meal, soybean oil, soybeans, sugar, wheat (Chicago and KC hard red winter), ULS (ultra low sulfur) diesel and zinc. The BCOM reflects the return from these commodity futures contracts.

The BCOM is an index that uses trading volume data in addition to production value data in determining the selection and relative weightings of represented commodity futures contracts. Commodity futures contracts are selected by the Bloomberg Index Oversight Committee (the “Oversight Committee”) for representation in the BCOM when the underlying commodities are believed to be sufficiently significant to the world economy to merit consideration. These designated futures contracts are then weighted according to a proprietary methodology for liquidity and production, and contracts with insufficient liquidity and/or production are eliminated.

Because it does not take delivery of the underlying commodities, the BCOM is a “rolling index.” The composition of the BCOM is rebalanced by Bloomberg each year pursuant to its methodology by index managers operating under the supervision of the Oversight Committee. Once approved, the new composition of the BCOM is publicly announced and takes effect in the month of January immediately following the announcement.

Principal Investment Strategies

The following are expected to be principal investment strategies of each Fund:

Commodity Futures. Each Fund, through its Subsidiary, invests in exchange-traded commodity futures contracts as part of its principal investment strategies. Commodity futures contracts are an agreement to buy or sell a certain amount of a commodity at a specific price on a specific date (their expiration) which are negotiated and traded on futures exchanges. Commodity futures contracts are generally based upon commodities within the following commodity groups: energy, industrial metals, agriculture, precious metals, foods and fibers, and livestock.

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Commodity futures contracts are traded on futures exchanges which provide a central marketplace to negotiate and transact futures contracts, a clearing corporation to process trades and a secondary market. Commodity futures exchanges provide standardization with regards to certain key features such as expiration dates, contract sizes and terms and conditions of delivery. Commodity futures exchanges set a maximum permissible price movement either up or down during a single trading day and when this limit has been reached, no trades may be placed that day at a price beyond that limit. Exchanges may also impose position limit rules limiting the value or number of contracts in one commodity that may be held by one market participant to ensure that the amount of futures contracts that any one party may hold in a particular commodity at any point in time to ensure that no one participant can control a significant portion of the market in a particular commodity. In order to comply with the position limits established by the CFTC and the relevant exchanges, the Advisor and/or Sub-Advisor could in the future reduce the size of positions that would otherwise be taken for the Fund or not trade in certain markets on behalf of the Fund in order to avoid exceeding such limits. A violation of position limits by the Advisor and/or Sub-Advisor could lead to regulatory action resulting in mandatory liquidation of certain positions held by the Advisor and/or Sub-Advisor on behalf of the Fund. In addition, in October 2020, the CFTC adopted amendments to its position limits rules that establish certain new and amended position limits for 25 specified physical commodity futures and related options contracts traded on exchanges, other futures contracts and related options directly or indirectly linked to such 25 specified contracts, and any OTC transactions that are economically equivalent to the 25 specified contracts. The Advisor and/or Sub-Advisor will need to consider whether the exposure created under these contracts might exceed the new and amended limits in anticipation of the applicable compliance dates, and the limits may constrain the ability of the Fund to use such contracts. The amendments also modify the bona fide hedging exemption for which certain swap dealers are currently eligible, which could limit the amount of speculative OTC transaction capacity each such swap dealer would have available for the Fund prior to the applicable compliance date. There can be no assurance that the Advisor and/or Sub-Advisor will liquidate positions held on behalf of all the Advisor and/or Sub-Advisor’s accounts in a proportionate manner or at favorable prices, which could result in substantial losses to the Fund. Such policies could affect the nature and extent of derivatives use by the Fund.

More commonly, as futures contracts near expiration, they are often replaced with a later dated contract in a process known as “rolling.” This involves selling the contracts before they expire and purchasing similar contacts that have a later expiration date. Any difference between the price for the nearer delivery month contract and the price for distant month contract is known as a ‘roll yield’ and this can be either a positive amount or a negative amount. Futures contracts may be satisfied at expiration by delivery of the relevant commodity from one party to the other.

Commodity futures contract prices are generally comprised of the price of the relevant commodity as well as the costs of storing the physical commodity. Storage costs include (i) the time value of money invested in the physical commodity, (ii) plus the costs of storing the commodity, (iii) less any benefits of owning the physical commodity not obtained by the holder of a futures contract (the “convenience yield”).

Due to the volatility of commodity futures and the risk of credit risk exposure to the counterparty to the contract, commodity futures exchanges each have clearing corporations which act as counterparty to all contracts by either buying or selling directly to the market participants. This means that when each Subsidiary purchases or sells commodity futures contracts, their obligations will be to the clearinghouse and it will be the clearinghouse that is obliged to satisfy the Subsidiaries’ rights under a commodity futures contract.

To ensure a party to a futures contract fulfills its obligations to the clearinghouse, all participants are required to post and maintain a level of collateral (the collateral is known as “margin”). An exchange will set the margin requirements for the contracts which trade there and these can be modified by the terms of the futures contract. Margin requirements range upward from less than 5% of the value of the futures contract being traded. Margin requirements can be offset by other opposing futures transactions, but margin payments will continue to be required.

When the price of a particular futures contract increases (in the case of a sale) or decreases (in the case of a purchase) and any loss on the futures contract means that the margin already held does not satisfy margin requirements, further margin must be posted. Conversely, if there is a favorable price change in the futures contract any excess margin may be removed from the relevant deposit account. Any margin deposited by a Subsidiary should earn interest income.

SEC guidance sets out certain requirements with respect to coverage of futures positions by registered investment companies which each Fund and each Subsidiary will comply with. This includes, in certain circumstances, the need to segregate cash or liquid securities on its books and records and to engage in other appropriate measures to ensure its obligations under particular futures or derivative contracts are covered. Cash settled futures contracts will require a Fund to segregate liquid assets in an amount equal to its daily mark-to-market (net) obligation under that contract. Any securities held in a segregated account or otherwise earmarked for these purposes may not be

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sold while a Fund maintains the relevant position, unless they are replaced with other permissible assets. Each Fund may also purchase put options as a means of covering its investments if they are on the same futures contract and their strike price is as high as or higher than the price of the relevant contract. Each Subsidiary may not enter into futures positions if such positions will require the Fund to set aside or earmark more than 100% of its net assets.

Derivatives. Each Fund uses derivative instruments as part of its investment strategies. Generally, derivatives are financial contracts whose value depends upon, or is derived from, the value of an underlying asset, reference rate or index, and may relate to bonds, interest rates, currencies, commodities, and related indexes. Examples of derivative instruments include forward contracts, currency and interest rate swaps, currency options, futures contracts, options on futures contracts and swap agreements. The Fund’s use of derivative instruments will be underpinned by investments in short-term, high-quality instruments, such as U.S. money market securities.

With respect to certain kinds of derivative transactions that involve obligations to make future payments to third parties, including, but not limited to, futures contracts, forward contracts, swap contracts, the purchase of securities on a when-issued or delayed delivery basis, or reverse repurchase agreements, under applicable federal securities laws, rules, and interpretations thereof, the Funds must “set aside” liquid assets, or engage in other measures to “cover” open positions with respect to such transactions. For example, with respect to forward contracts and futures contracts that are not contractually required to “cash-settle,” under current regulatory requirements, the Funds must cover their open positions by setting aside liquid assets equal to the contracts’ full, notional value. The Funds treat deliverable forward contracts for currencies that are liquid as the equivalent of “cash-settled” contracts. As such, the Funds may set aside liquid assets in an amount equal to the Fund’s daily marked-to-market (net) obligation (i.e., the Fund’s daily net liability, if any) rather than the full notional amount under such deliverable forward contracts. Similarly, with respect to futures contracts that are contractually required to “cash-settle” the Funds may set aside liquid assets in an amount equal to the Fund’s daily marked-to-market (net) obligation rather than the notional value. Each Fund reserves the right to modify these policies in the future.

Swap Agreements. Each Fund may enter into swap agreements, including interest rate swaps. A typical interest rate swap involves the exchange of a floating interest rate payment for a fixed interest payment. Swap agreements may be used to hedge or achieve exposure to, for example, interest rates and money market securities without actually purchasing such securities. Each Fund may use swap agreements to invest in a market without owning or taking physical custody of the underlying securities in circumstances in which direct investment is restricted for legal reasons or is otherwise impracticable. Swap agreements will tend to shift a Fund’s investment exposure from one type of investment to another or from one payment stream to another.

Investment Company Securities. Each Fund may invest in the securities of other investment companies to the extent permitted by law or regulation. If a Fund invests in and, thus, is a shareholder of, another investment company, the Fund’s shareholders will indirectly bear the Fund’s proportionate share of the fees and expenses paid by such other investment company, including advisory fees, in addition to both the management fees payable directly by the Fund to the Fund’s own investment advisor and the other expenses that the Fund bears directly in connection with the Fund’s own operations. The Fund will also be subject to the risks of the underlying investment company’s portfolio securities.

Money Market Instruments. Each Fund may invest a portion of its assets in high-quality money market instruments on an ongoing basis to provide liquidity or for other reasons. The instruments in which a Fund may invest include: (i) short-term obligations issued by the U.S. Government; (ii) negotiable certificates of deposit (“CDs”), fixed time deposits and bankers’ acceptances of U.S. and foreign banks and similar institutions; (iii) commercial paper rated at the date of purchase “Prime-1” by Moody’s or “A-1+” or “A-1” by Standard & Poor’s (“S&P”) or, if unrated, of comparable quality as determined by the Fund; and (iv) repurchase agreements. U.S. government securities are obligations of, or guaranteed by, the U.S. government, its agencies or government-sponsored enterprises and such obligations may be short-, intermediate- or long-term. CDs are short-term negotiable obligations of commercial banks. Time deposits are non-negotiable deposits maintained in banking institutions for specified periods of time at stated interest rates. Banker’s acceptances are time drafts drawn on commercial banks by borrowers, usually in connection with international transactions.

Additional Principal Risk Information about the Funds

Authorized Participants. Only an authorized participant that has entered into an agreement with a Fund’s distributor (an “Authorized Participant” or “AP”) may engage in creation or redemption transactions directly with the Fund, and none of those APs is obligated to engage in creation and/or redemption transactions. The Funds have entered into AP agreements with only a limited number of institutions. Should these APs cease to act as such or for any reason be unable to create or redeem Shares and new APs not appointed in their place, Shares may trade at a discount to that Fund’s NAV and possibly face trading halts or delisting.

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Cash Redemption Risk. Each Fund expects to effect its creations and redemptions primarily for cash due to the nature of its investments. Paying redemption proceeds in cash rather than through in-kind delivery of portfolio securities may require a Fund to dispose of or sell portfolio investments to obtain the cash needed to distribute redemption proceeds at an inopportune time. This may cause the Fund to recognize investment income and/or capital gains that it might not have recognized if it had made a redemption in-kind. As a result, the Fund may be less tax efficient and may have to pay out higher annual distributions than if the in-kind redemption process was used. As a practical matter, only institutions and large investors, such as market makers or other large broker-dealers, purchase or redeem Creation Units. Most investors will buy and sell Shares on an exchange. Redemption requests may occasionally exceed the cash balance of a Fund and result in credit line borrowing fees and/or overdraft charges to the Fund until the sales of portfolio securities necessary to cover the redemption request settle. In addition, settlement periods on the LME may result in the need for a Fund to dispose of, or novate, certain futures contracts early in order to meet redemption requests. In such circumstances, a Fund may incur additional transaction fees and interest charges and the Fund’s NAV may decline based on the difference between the price at which the Fund valued the contracts and the proceeds received.

Cayman Subsidiary. Each Fund will not invest directly in commodity futures contracts but, instead, expects to gain exposure to these investments exclusively by investing in its Subsidiary. A Fund’s investment in its Subsidiary is intended to enable that Fund to gain exposure to relevant commodity markets within the limits of current federal income tax laws applicable to investment companies such as the Funds, which limit the ability of investment companies to invest directly in commodity futures contracts. Each Subsidiary will have the same investment objective as the relevant Fund. However, the Subsidiary may invest without limitation in the Commodities Instruments. Except as otherwise noted, references to a Fund’s investments include that Fund’s indirect investments through its Subsidiary. A Fund will invest up to 25% of its total assets in the Subsidiary.

None of the Subsidiaries have registered under the 1940 Act and, except as noted in this Prospectus or the SAI, are each not directly subject to its investor protections. The Board has oversight responsibility for the investment activities of each Fund, including each Fund’s investments in its Subsidiary and each Fund’s role as the sole shareholder of its Subsidiary. The Advisor also serves as advisor to each Subsidiary and each Subsidiary pays a proportion of the management fee of the Advisor. The Advisor has contractually agreed to waive the equivalent portion of the management fee that it receives from the Fund.

Each Fund complies with the provisions of the 1940 Act governing investment policies (Section 8) and capital structure and leverage (Section 18) on an aggregate basis with the Subsidiary.

Each Subsidiary will also enter into separate contracts for the provision of custody and administration services with the same service providers or with affiliates of the same service providers that provide those services to the Funds.

Changes in the laws of the United States (where the Funds are organized) and/or the Cayman Islands (where each Subsidiary is incorporated) could prevent a Fund and/or the relevant Subsidiary from operating as described in this Prospectus and the SAI and could negatively affect a Fund and its shareholders. For example, as of the date of this Prospectus, the Cayman Islands does not impose certain taxes on each Subsidiary, including income and capital gains tax, among others. If Cayman Islands laws were changed to require a Subsidiary to pay Cayman Islands taxes, this could lead to a decrease in the NAV of the Fund.

The financial statements of a Subsidiary will be consolidated with the relevant Fund’s financial statements in that Fund’s Annual and Semi-Annual Reports.

Commodity Pool Regulatory Risk. Each Fund is deemed to be a commodity pool due to its investment exposure to commodity futures contracts and is subject to regulation under the CEA and CFTC rules as well as the regulatory scheme applicable to registered investment companies. The Advisor is registered as a CPO and the Sub-Advisor is registered as a CTA. Registration as a CPO and CTA imposes additional compliance obligations on the Advisor, the Sub-Advisor, and each Fund related to additional laws, regulations, and enforcement policies, which could increase compliance costs for the Advisor or Sub-Advisor and may affect the operations and financial performance of the Fund. These requirements are also subject to change at any time.

Commodity Price Risk. The NAV of a Fund will be affected by movements in commodity prices generally and by the way in which those prices and other factors affect the prices of the commodity futures contracts as explained in “Roll Yield” below. Commodity prices generally may fluctuate widely and may be affected by numerous factors, including:

global or regional political, economic or financial events and situations, particularly war, terrorism, expropriation and other activities which might lead to disruptions to supply from countries that are major commodity producers;

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investment trading, hedging or other activities conducted by large trading houses, producers, users, hedge funds, commodities funds, governments or other speculators which could impact global supply or demand;

the weather, which can affect short-term demand or supply for some commodities;

the future rates of economic activity and inflation, particularly in countries which are major consumers of commodities;

major discoveries of sources of commodities; and

disruptions to the infrastructure or means by which commodities are produced, distributed and stored, which are capable of causing substantial price movements in a short period of time.

Prices of commodity futures contracts fluctuate widely and have in the past experienced periods of extreme volatility and this may be affected by:

commodity prices generally;

trading activities on the exchanges upon which they trade, which might be impacted by the liquidity in the futures contracts; and

trading activity specific to particular futures contract(s) and maturities.

Commodity Sector Risks. The daily performance of the current or “spot” price of certain commodities has a direct impact on Fund performance. To the extent a Fund has significant exposure to a particular commodity sector, the Fund may be more susceptible to loss due to adverse occurrences affecting that sector, including a decline in the price of commodities in such sector.

Agricultural Sector Investment Risk. The daily performance of the spot price of certain agricultural commodities, including coffee, corn, cotton, soybeans, soybean meal, soybean oil, sugar, wheat and HRW wheat, has a direct impact on Fund performance. Investments in the agriculture sector may be highly volatile and the market values of such commodities can change quickly and unpredictably due to a number of factors, such as the supply of, and demand for, each commodity, the strength of the domestic and global economy, legislative or regulatory developments relating to food safety, as well as other significant events, including public health, political, legal, financial, accounting and tax matters that are beyond a Fund’s control. In addition, increased competition caused by economic recession, labor difficulties and changing consumer tastes and spending can impact the demand for agricultural products and, in turn, the value of such investments.

Energy Sector Investment Risk. The daily performance of the spot price of certain energy-related commodities, including Brent Crude Oil, gas oil, heating oil, low sulfur gas oil, natural gas, RBOB gasoline, ULS diesel and WTI crude oil, has a direct impact on Fund performance. Energy commodities’ market values are significantly impacted by a number of factors, such as the supply of, and demand for, each commodity, the strength of the domestic and global economy, significant world events, capital expenditures on exploration and production, energy conservation efforts, government regulation and subsidization and technological advances. Investments in the energy sector may be cyclical and/or highly volatile and subject to swift price fluctuations. In addition, significant declines in the price of oil may contribute to significant market volatility, which may adversely affect a Fund’s performance. The energy sector has recently experienced significant volatility due to dramatic changes in the prices of energy commodities, and it is possible that such volatility will continue in the future.

Metals Sector Investment Risk. The daily performance of the spot price of certain industrial and precious metals, including aluminum, copper, gold, nickel, silver and zinc, has a direct impact on Fund performance. Investments in metals may be highly volatile and the market values of such commodities can change quickly and unpredictably due to a number of factors, such as the supply of, and demand for, each metal, the strength of the domestic and global economy, international monetary policy, environmental or labor costs, as well as other significant events, including public health, political, legal, financial, accounting and tax matters that are beyond a Fund’s control. The United States or foreign governments may pass laws or regulations limiting metal investments for strategic or other policy reasons. Further, the principal supplies of metal industries may be concentrated in a small number of countries and regions.

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Cybersecurity Risk. Cybersecurity incidents may allow an unauthorized party to gain access to Fund assets, customer data (including private shareholder information), or proprietary information, or cause a Fund, the Advisor and/or its service providers (including, but not limited to, Fund accountants, custodians, sub-custodians, transfer agents and financial intermediaries) to suffer data breaches, data corruption or lose operational functionality.

Fixed-Income Securities Risk. Fixed-income securities fluctuate in price based on changes in an issuer’s financial condition and overall market and economic conditions, such as real or perceived adverse economic or political conditions, inflation, changes in interest or currency rates, lack of liquidity in the bond markets or adverse investor sentiment. The value of a security may also fall due to specific conditions that affect a particular sector of the securities market or a particular issuer. Fixed-income securities are subject to, among other risks, credit risk, interest rate risk, inflation risk, market risk, liquidity risk, extension risk, and prepayment risk. Fixed-income securities are not traded on exchanges. The over-the-counter market may be illiquid, and there may be times when no counterparty is willing to purchase or sell certain securities. The nature of the market may make valuations difficult or unreliable.

Credit Risk. Credit risk refers to the possibility that the issuer of a security will not be able to make principal and/or interest payments when due and is broadly gauged by the credit ratings of the securities in which a Fund invests. However, ratings are only the opinions of rating agencies and are not guarantees of the quality of the securities. In addition, the depth and liquidity of the market for a fixed-income security may affect its credit risk. Credit risk of a security may change over its life and rated securities are often reviewed and may be subject to downgrade by a rating agency. A Fund purchasing bonds faces the risk that the creditworthiness of an issuer may decline, or the market’s perception of an issuer’s creditworthiness may decline, causing the value of the bonds to decline. In addition, an issuer may not be able to make timely payments on the interest and/or principal on the bonds it has issued.

Interest Rate Risk. Interest rates have an effect on the value of a Fund’s fixed income investments because the value of those investments will vary as interest rates fluctuate. Generally, fixed-income securities will decrease in value when interest rates rise and when interest rates decline, the value of fixed-income securities can be expected to rise. A Fund may be subject to a greater risk of rising interest rates due to the recent period of historically low rates and the effect of potential government fiscal policy initiatives and resulting market reaction to those initiatives. In periods of market volatility, the market values of fixed-income securities may be more sensitive to changes in interest rates. In addition, a Fund’s income may decline due to falling interest rates or other factors. Interest rate risk is generally lower for shorter-term investments and higher for longer-term investments. For example, the price of a security with a ten-year duration would be expected to drop by approximately 10% in response to a 1% increase in interest rates.

Inflation Risk. Inflation risk is the risk that prices of existing fixed-rate debt securities will decline due to inflation or the threat of inflation. The income produced by these securities is worth less when prices for goods and services rise. To compensate for this loss of purchasing power, the securities trade at lower prices. Inflation also reduces the purchasing power of any income you receive from a Fund.

Liquidity Risk. A Fund may make investments that are, or may become, less liquid due to various factors, including general market conditions or conditions impacting the issuer of, or counterparty to, the investment. These investments may be more difficult to value or sell, particularly in times of market turmoil, and there may be fewer trading opportunities available for the investments. Less liquid investments may have higher risks than more liquid investments. These risks may be magnified as interest rates rise or in other circumstances. If a Fund is forced to sell a less liquid investment to fund redemptions or to raise cash, it may be forced to sell the investment at a loss or for less than its fair value.

Extension Risk. Extension risk is the risk that principal repayments will not occur as quickly as anticipated, causing the expected maturity of a security to increase. Rapidly rising interest rates may cause prepayments to occur more slowly than expected, thereby lengthening the maturity of the securities held by the Fund and making their prices more sensitive to rate changes and more volatile.

Prepayment Risk. As interest rates decline, debt issuers may repay or refinance their loans or obligations earlier than anticipated. This forces the Fund to reinvest the proceeds from the principal prepayments at lower rates, which reduces the Fund’s income.

Futures, Options and Options on Futures Contracts. The risk of loss in trading futures contracts or uncovered call options in some strategies (e.g., selling uncovered stock index futures contracts) is potentially unlimited. The Funds do not currently plan to use futures and options contracts in this way. The risk of a futures position may still be large as traditionally measured due to the low margin deposits

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required. In many cases, a relatively small price movement in a futures contract may result in immediate and substantial loss or gain to the investor relative to the size of a required margin deposit. The Funds, however, intend to utilize futures and options contracts in a manner designed to limit its risk exposure to levels comparable to direct investment in stocks.

Utilization of futures and options on futures by a Fund, through its Subsidiary, involves the risk of loss by the Subsidiary of margin deposits in the event of bankruptcy of a broker with whom the Subsidiary has an open position in the futures contract or option. The purchase of put or call options will be based upon predictions by a Subsidiary as to anticipated trends, which predictions could prove to be incorrect.

There is also liquidity risk that a particular future cannot be sold, closed out, or replaced quickly at or very close to its fundamental value. If the Subsidiary encounters problems and it is not possible to close out the relevant positions, it might be required to continue to maintain such assets or accounts or make such payments until the position expires, matures, or is closed out. This could prevent the Subsidiary from being able to sell a security or make an investment at the optimum time or require it to sell that investment at a disadvantageous time. Due to liquidity risk in the underlying instruments, there is no assurance that any futures position can be sold or closed out at a time and price that is favorable to the Subsidiary.

The potential for loss related to the purchase of an option on a futures contract is limited to the premium paid for the option plus transaction costs. Because the value of the option is fixed at the point of sale, there are no daily cash payments by the purchaser to reflect changes in the value of the underlying contract. However, the value of the option changes daily and that change would be reflected in the NAV of a Fund. The potential for loss related to writing options may be unlimited.

Although it is intended that the Funds will only enter into futures contracts if there is an active market for such contracts, there is no assurance that an active market will exist for the contracts at any particular time. An exchange may halt or suspend trading in such instruments, potentially for an extended period of time. When trading in such instruments is halted or suspended, it may not be possible to enter into or close out of positions in such instruments when it would otherwise be desirable to do so. An exchange may also cancel trades in futures contracts, which could prevent a Fund from implementing its investment strategy. These actions could significantly impact the value of such instruments and potentially subject a Fund to substantial losses. They could also make it more difficult for a Fund to value a particular instrument, potentially resulting in tracking error. In addition, they could cause a Fund to hold a particular instrument until the contractual delivery date or impair the Fund’s ability to access assets used to cover its positions in such instruments. Furthermore, when an exchange cancels, halts or suspends trading in one instrument, the value or liquidity of other instruments may also be impacted.

Certain of the futures contracts in which a Fund may invest trade on non-U.S. exchanges, such as the London Metal Exchange (“LME”), that impose different requirements than U.S. exchanges. These futures contracts may be subject to additional risks, including greater price volatility, temporary price aberrations and the potential imposition of trading halts and/or limits that constrain appreciation or cause depreciation of the prices of such futures contracts, as well as different and longer settlement periods. In certain circumstances, a Fund may be required to dispose of, or novate, certain of its futures contracts earlier than the contracts’ prompt date in order to meet shareholder redemption requests. The counterparties through which a Fund or the Sub-Advisor trade may impose additional fees and interest charges for novating futures contracts, which may reduce the proceeds due to the Fund on such contracts below the price at which they are valued and the Fund’s NAV may decline as a result. For example, unlike U.S. futures exchanges, the LME has no daily price fluctuation limits that restrict the extent of daily fluctuations in the prices of contracts traded on the LME, thereby creating the possibility that prices for one or more contracts traded on the LME, including the index component, could continue to decline without limitation over a period of trading days. However, the LME has in the past, and may again in the future, suspend and/or cancel trades in derivatives contracts traded on the LME for reasons including unprecedented price activity. Additionally, because contracts traded on the LME may call for delivery on a daily, weekly, or monthly basis, there may be an increased risk of a concentration of positions in contracts trading on the LME on particular delivery dates as compared to futures contracts traded on U.S. futures exchanges.

General Market Risk. An investment in the Funds should be made with an understanding that the value of each Fund’s assets may fluctuate in accordance with changes in the financial condition of an issuer or counterparty, changes in specific economic or political conditions that affect a particular asset or issuer and changes in general economic or political conditions (see “Commodity Price Risk”). In addition, political, economic, social and other conditions, such as war, terrorism, social unrest, public health emergencies (i.e., pandemics like COVID-19), natural disasters, or other similar issues, could reduce consumer demand or economic output, result in market closures, travel restrictions or quarantines, and generally have a significant impact on the world economy, which in turn could adversely affect a Fund’s investments. For example, the COVID-19 pandemic has caused major disruptions to economies and markets around the world, including the markets in which the Funds invest, and which has and may continue to negatively impact the value of certain of the Funds’ investments. Although vaccines for COVID-19 are becoming more widely available, the COVID-19 pandemic

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Additional Information about the Funds

and impacts thereof may continue for an extended period of time and may vary from market to market. To the extent the impacts of COVID-19 continue, the Funds may experience negative impacts that could exacerbate other risks to which the Funds are subject. In addition, armed conflict can result in significant disruptions to the commodities markets. In response to such conflict or for other reasons, governments may impose economic sanctions against certain countries, entities and/or individuals. Economic sanctions and other similar governmental actions could, among other things, prevent or prohibit certain entities or individuals from participating in the commodities markets or otherwise impact the functioning of those markets. Such actions could decrease the liquidity and value of instruments held by a Fund. Sanctions could also result in countermeasures or retaliatory actions, which may adversely impact a Fund’s investments, including those that are not economically tied to sanctioned countries, entities and/or individuals. Although it is not possible to predict the impact that any sanctions and retaliatory actions may have on a Fund, such events could significantly harm the value of a Fund’s investments and a Fund’s performance. An investor in the Funds could lose money over short or long periods of time.

Index Tracking Risk. A Fund’s return may not match the return of its Index for a number of reasons. For example, each Fund incurs a number of operating expenses, including taxes, not applicable to its Index and incurs costs associated with buying and selling securities, including when repositioning the Fund’s portfolio to reflect changes to the Index’s holdings and holding weights, which are not factored into the return of the Index, or raising cash to meet redemptions or deploying cash in connection with newly created Creation Units, which are not factored into the return of the Index. Index tracking risk may also occur because of differences between the securities and other instruments held in a Fund’s portfolio and those included in its Index, pricing differences (including, as applicable, differences between a security’s price at the local market close and the Fund’s valuation of a security at the time of calculation of the Fund’s NAV), differences in transaction costs, the Fund’s holding of uninvested cash, differences in timing of the accrual of dividends or interest, the requirements to maintain pass-through tax treatment, portfolio transactions carried out to minimize the distribution of capital gains to shareholders, changes to the Index or the need to meet various new or existing regulatory requirements, among other reasons. Transaction costs, including brokerage costs, will decrease a Fund’s NAV to the extent not offset by the transaction fee payable by an AP. Market disruptions and regulatory restrictions could have an adverse effect on a Fund’s ability to track its Index. There is no assurance that a Fund’s Index provider or any agents that may act on its behalf will compile the Index accurately, or that the Index will be determined, composed or calculated accurately. Errors in respect of the quality, accuracy and completeness of the data used to compile the Index may occur from time to time and may not be identified and corrected by the Index provider for a period of time or at all, particularly where the Index is less commonly used as a benchmark by funds or managers. Therefore, gains, losses or costs associated with errors of the Index provider or its agents will generally be borne by a Fund and its shareholders. For example, during a period where the Index contains incorrect constituents, a Fund would have market exposure to such constituents and would be underexposed to the Index’s other constituents. Such errors may negatively or positively impact a Fund and its shareholders. Any gains due to the Index provider’s or others’ errors will be kept by each Fund and its shareholders and any losses resulting from the Index provider’s or others’ errors will be borne by the Fund and its shareholders. When the Index is rebalanced and a Fund in turn rebalances its portfolio to attempt to track the Index, any transaction costs and market exposure arising from such portfolio rebalancing will be borne directly by the Fund and its shareholders. In addition, a Fund may not be able to invest in certain securities and/or other assets included in the Index, or invest in them in the exact proportions in which they are represented in the Index, due to legal restrictions or limitations imposed by the governments of certain countries, a lack of liquidity in the markets in which the Fund invests, potential adverse tax consequences or other regulatory reasons (such as diversification requirements). A lack of liquidity may be due to various events, including market events, economic conditions or investor perceptions. Illiquid securities may be difficult to value and their value may be lower than market price of comparable liquid securities, which would negatively affect a Fund’s performance. Moreover, a Fund may be delayed in purchasing or selling securities included in the Index. When markets are volatile, the ability to sell securities at fair value prices may be adversely impacted and may result in additional trading costs and/or increase the index tracking risk. For tax efficiency purposes, a Fund may sell certain securities, and such sale may cause the Fund to realize a loss and deviate from the performance of its Index.

A Fund may accept cash in connection with a purchase of Creation Units or effect its redemptions in cash rather than in-kind and, as a result, the Fund’s ability to match the return of the Index will be affected.

A Fund may fair value certain of the securities, underlying currencies and/or other assets it holds. To the extent a Fund calculates its NAV based on fair value prices or on the prices that differ from those used in calculating the Index, the Fund’s ability to track the Index may be adversely affected. The need to comply with the tax diversification and other requirements of the Code may also impact a Fund’s ability to track the performance of the Index. In addition, if a Fund utilizes depositary receipts or other derivative instruments that are not included in the Index, its return may not track as well with the returns of the Index as would be the case if the Fund purchased all the securities in the Index directly. Actions taken in response to proposed corporate actions could result in increased tracking error. In light of the factors discussed above, a Fund’s return may deviate significantly from the return of the Index. In addition, to the extent that

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Additional Information about the Funds

a Fund uses a representative sampling approach (investing in a representative selection of instruments included in an Index rather than all instruments in the Index), such approach may cause the Fund’s return to not track with the return of the Index as would be the case if the fund purchased all of the instruments in the Index in the proportions represented in the Index.

Apart from scheduled rebalances, the Index provider or its agents may carry out additional ad hoc rebalances to the Index in order, for example, to correct an error in the selection of index constituents. When an Index is rebalanced and a Fund in turn rebalances its portfolio to attempt to track the Fund’s portfolio and the Index, any transaction costs and market exposure arising from such portfolio rebalancing will be borne directly by the Fund and its shareholders. Therefore, errors and additional ad hoc rebalances carried out by the Index provider to the Index may increase the costs to and the tracking error risk of the Fund.

Index tracking risk may be heightened during times of increased market volatility or other unusual market conditions. Changes to the composition of the Index in connection with a rebalancing or reconstitution of the Index may cause a Fund to experience increased volatility, during which time the Fund’s index tracking risk may be heightened.

Investment Company Securities. To the extent a Fund or its Subsidiary invests in securities of other investment companies, including exchange-traded funds, the Fund will bear a proportionate share of the fees and expenses paid by such other investment company, including advisory and administrative fees.

Investment Risk. An investor may lose the value of their entire investment or part of their investment in Shares.

Leverage. Certain of the Funds’ investments in derivatives (through the Subsidiaries) may give rise to a form of economic leverage as changes in the value or level of the assets underlying those derivatives can result in an increase in the gains or losses on the investment held by the Funds which could lead to losses to the Funds of greater than the investment in the derivative instrument. The Funds and Subsidiaries will comply with SEC guidance which requires them to maintain segregated assets equal to the value of all such derivative investments but the impact of this economic leverage may cause a Fund to realize it positions in these or other portfolio investments to meet the associated obligations at a time when it may not be advantageous for the Fund to do so.

Liquidity. Generally, only APs may redeem Shares. Investors other than APs wishing to realize their Shares will generally need to rely on secondary trading in the public trading market. There can be no assurance as to the price at which, or volume in which, it may at any time be possible to realize Shares in the public trading market. Although the Shares are listed for trading on NYSE Arca, there can be no assurance that an active trading market for such shares will develop or be maintained.

Money Market Instruments. Like other fixed-income securities, money market instruments may be subject to market risk and credit risk. Money market instruments may also be negatively impacted by changes in short-term interest rates and adverse developments affecting issuers in the financial sector, which issue or guarantee many money market instruments. There is no guarantee that money market instruments will maintain their value.

Roll Yield. The Funds, through the Subsidiaries, invest in futures contracts that, as they near expiration, need to be replaced with later dated contracts in a process known as “rolling.” As the exchange-traded futures contracts approach expiration, they will be sold prior to their expiration date and similar contracts that have a later expiration date are purchased. Thus, for example, a futures contract purchased and held in August may specify an October expiration. As time passes, the contract expiring in October may be replaced by a contract for delivery in November. Any difference between the price for the nearer delivery month contract and the price for the distant month contract is known as a ‘roll yield’ and this can be either a positive amount or a negative amount. If the market for these contracts is (putting aside other considerations) in “backwardation”, which means that the prices are lower in the distant delivery months than in the nearer delivery months, the sale of the October contract would take place at a price that is higher than the price of the November contract, thereby creating a “roll yield.” While some of the contracts a Fund may hold have historically exhibited consistent periods of backwardation, backwardation may not exist at all times. Moreover, certain commodities, such as gold, have historically traded in “contango” markets. Contango markets are those in which the prices of contracts are higher in the distant delivery months than in the nearer delivery months. The absence of backwardation and presence of contango in a particular commodity market could result in negative “roll yields”, which could adversely affect the value of a Fund that holds the relevant futures contracts. However, the existence of contango (or backwardation) in a particular commodity market does not automatically result in negative (or positive) “roll yields.” The actual realization of a potential roll yield will be dependent upon the shape of the futures curve. The term ‘futures curve’ refers to the relationship between the price of futures contracts over different futures contract maturity dates when plotted in a graph. If the relevant part of the commodity futures curve is in backwardation — a downward sloping futures curve — then, all other factors being equal, the price of a product or index holding that future will tend to rise over time as lower futures prices converge to higher spot prices. The opposite effect would occur for contango.

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Additional Information about the Funds

Shares May Trade at Prices Other than NAV. As with all ETFs, Shares may be bought and sold in the secondary market at market prices. Although it is expected that the market price of the Shares will approximate the Fund’s NAV when purchased and sold in the secondary market, there may be times when the market price of the Shares is more than the NAV intra-day (premium) or less than the NAV intra-day (discount). This risk is heightened in times of market volatility or periods of steep market declines. The market price of a Fund’s shares on an exchange during the trading day, like the price of any exchange-traded security, includes a “bid/ask” spread charged by the exchange specialist, market makers or other participants that trade the Fund’s shares. In times of severe market disruption, the bid/ask spread can increase significantly. At those times, Shares are most likely to be traded at a discount to NAV, and the discount is likely to be greatest when the price of Shares is falling fastest, which may be the time that you most want to sell your Shares. The Advisor believes that, under normal market conditions, large market price discounts or premiums to NAV will not be sustained because of arbitrage opportunities.

Swap Agreements. Swaps can involve greater risks than a direct investment in an underlying asset and these may increase or decrease the overall volatility of a Fund’s investment and its share price. As with other transactions, a Fund will bear the risk that the counterparty will default which could cause losses to the Fund.

Tax Risk. In order to qualify for the favorable U.S. federal income tax treatment accorded to RICs under Subchapter M of the Code, each Fund must, among other requirements, derive at least 90% of its gross income in each taxable year from certain categories of income (“qualifying income”). Each Fund intends to hold certain commodity-related investments indirectly, through its Subsidiary. Each Fund’s investment in its own Subsidiary is expected to provide such Fund with exposure to the commodities markets within the limitations of the federal tax requirements of Subchapter M of the Code for qualification as a RIC. Each Fund will recognize annually as ordinary income its Subsidiary’s current year net taxable earnings, if any. The Funds will not recognize its Subsidiary’s net losses, if any, nor would such losses carryforward to future years. The Fund will be required to include in gross income for U.S. federal income tax purposes all of its Subsidiary’s “subpart F” income (defined in Section 951 of the Code to include passive income, including from commodity-linked derivatives), whether or not such income is distributed by such Subsidiary. However, each Fund must distribute to its shareholders, at least annually, all or substantially all of its investment company taxable income (determined without regard to the deduction for dividends paid), including such “subpart F” income, to qualify for treatment as a RIC under the Code and avoid U.S. federal income and excise taxes. Therefore, a Fund may have to dispose of its portfolio securities, potentially under disadvantageous circumstances, to generate cash, or may have to borrow cash, to satisfy distribution requirements. Such a disposition of securities may potentially result in additional taxable gain or loss to a Fund and may affect the amount and timing of distributions from such Fund. Each Fund’s strategy of investing through its Subsidiary in commodity-related instruments may cause the Fund to recognize more ordinary income than would be the case if the Fund did not invest through a Subsidiary, resulting in distributions from the Fund that are taxable to individual shareholders at ordinary income tax rates rather than at the more favorable tax rates for long-term capital gains. The Internal Revenue Service (“IRS”) issued final regulations pursuant to which the “subpart F” income of a Fund attributable to its investment in a Subsidiary is “qualifying income” to the Fund to the extent that such income is distributed to the Fund or is derived with respect to the Fund’s business of investing in stock, securities or currencies. The Funds expect their “subpart F” income attributable to their investment in a Subsidiary to be derived with respect to the Funds’ business of investing in stock, securities or currencies and to be treated as “qualifying income.” The Advisor and/or Sub-Advisor will carefully monitor the Funds’ investments in their respective Subsidiary to ensure that no more than 25% of such Fund’s assets are invested in its Subsidiary to ensure compliance with each Fund’s asset diversification test as described in more detail in the SAI. To the extent a Fund invests in commodities directly, it will seek to restrict its income from such investments that do not generate qualifying income to a maximum of 10% of its gross income (when combined with its other investments that produce non-qualifying income) to comply with the qualifying income test (as described in detail in the SAI) necessary for a Fund to qualify as a RIC under Subchapter M of the Code. However, a Fund might generate more non-qualifying income than anticipated, might not be able to generate qualifying income in a particular taxable year at levels sufficient to meet the qualifying income test, or might not be able to determine the percentage of qualifying income it derives for a taxable year until after year-end. Accordingly, the extent to which the Funds invest in commodities or commodity-linked derivatives directly or through their respective Subsidiary may be limited by the qualifying income and asset diversification tests, which the Funds must continue to satisfy to maintain their status as a RIC. As such, the Funds could be required to reduce their exposure to such investments, which may result in difficulty in implementing each Fund’s investment strategy. If a Fund were to fail to meet the qualifying income test or the asset diversification test and fail to qualify as a RIC, it would be taxed in the same manner as an ordinary corporation, and distributions to its shareholders would not be deductible by the Fund in computing its taxable income. The failure by a Fund to qualify as a RIC could have significant negative tax consequences to Fund shareholders and could affect a shareholder’s return on its investment in such Fund. Under certain circumstances, a Fund may be able to cure a failure to meet the qualifying income test or the asset diversification test if such failure was due to reasonable cause and not willful neglect, but in order to do so the Fund may incur significant fund-level taxes, which would effectively reduce (and could eliminate) the Fund’s returns.

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Additional Information about the Funds

U.S. Government Securities. U.S. government securities are subject to market and interest rate risk, and may be subject to varying degrees of credit risk. U.S. government securities include inflation-indexed fixed-income securities, such as U.S. Treasury Inflation Protected Securities (TIPS). U.S. government securities include zero coupon securities, which tend to be subject to greater market risk than interest-paying securities of similar maturities.

Additional Non-Principal Risk Information about the Funds

LIBOR Risk — The risk that potential changes related to the use of the London Interbank Offered Rate (‘‘LIBOR’’) could adversely affect financial instruments that reference LIBOR as a benchmark interest rate. While some instruments may contemplate a scenario when LIBOR is no longer available by providing for an alternative rate setting methodology, not all instruments provide for an alternative rate, and the effectiveness of replacement rates is uncertain. The potential abandonment of LIBOR could affect the value and liquidity of instruments that reference LIBOR, especially those that do not have fallback provisions.

Trading. Although Shares are listed for trading on NYSE Arca (the “Listing Exchange”) and may be listed or traded on U.S. and non-U.S. stock exchanges other than the Listing Exchange, there can be no assurance that an active trading market for such shares will develop or be maintained. Trading in shares may be halted due to market conditions or for reasons that, in the view of the Listing Exchange, make trading in shares inadvisable. In addition, trading in shares on the Listing Exchange is subject to trading halts caused by extraordinary market volatility pursuant to Listing Exchange “circuit breaker” rules. There can be no assurance that the requirements of the Listing Exchange necessary to maintain the listing of a Fund will continue to be met or will remain unchanged or that Shares will trade with any volume, or at all, on any stock exchange.

Costs of Buying or Selling Shares. Investors buying or selling Shares in the secondary market will pay brokerage commissions or other charges imposed by brokers, as determined by that broker. Brokerage commissions are often a fixed amount and may be a significant proportional cost for investors seeking to buy or sell relatively small amounts of Shares. In addition, secondary market investors will also incur the cost of the difference between the price that an investor is willing to buy shares (the “bid” price) and the price at which an investor is willing to sell shares (the “ask” price). This difference in bid and ask prices is often referred to as the “spread” or “bid/ask spread.” The bid/ask spread varies over time for shares based on trading volume and market liquidity, and is generally lower if a Fund’s shares have more trading volume and market liquidity and higher if a Fund’s shares have little trading volume and market liquidity. Further, increased market volatility may cause increased bid/ask spreads. Due to the costs of buying or selling Shares, including bid/ask spreads, frequent trading of Shares may significantly reduce investment results and an investment in Shares may not be advisable for investors who anticipate regularly making small investments.

Future Developments. The Trust’s Board may, in the future, authorize a Fund to invest in investments other than those listed in this Prospectus and in the Fund’s SAI, provided they are consistent with the Fund’s investment objective and do not violate any investment restrictions or policies.

Portfolio Holdings

Information about each Fund’s daily portfolio holdings is available at www.abrdn.com/usa/etf. In addition, each Fund discloses its complete portfolio holdings as of the end of its fiscal year (December 31) and its second fiscal quarter (June 30) in its reports to shareholders on Form N-CSR. Each Fund files its complete portfolio holdings as of the end of its first and third fiscal quarters (March 31 and September 30, respectively) with the SEC as an exhibit to its reports on Form N-PORT. You can find the SEC filings on the SEC’s website, sec.gov. A summarized description of the Funds’ policies and procedures with respect to the disclosure of each Fund’s portfolio holdings is available in the Statement of Additional Information (“SAI”) for the Trust.

Management of the Funds

Fund Organization

Each Fund is a series of the Trust which is an investment company registered under the 1940 Act. Each Fund is a separate Fund with its own investment objective and strategy. The Trust is a Delaware statutory trust and the Board is responsible for the management and direction of the Trust. The Board elects the Trust’s officers and approves all material contracts, including those with the Advisor, custodian and fund administrator.

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Additional Information about the Funds

Investment Advisor

abrdn ETFs Advisors LLC (the “Advisor”) has been appointed by the Board as investment advisor of each Fund and each Subsidiary. The Advisor is responsible for the management and administration of the Trust, the Funds, and the Subsidiaries.

The Advisor is a registered investment advisor located at 712 Fifth Avenue, New York, New York 10019. The Advisor is a directly-owned subsidiary of abrdn Inc. (formerly known as Aberdeen Standard Investments Inc.), an indirect wholly-owned subsidiary of abrdn plc, a London stock exchange listed company. abrdn plc and its affiliates manage or administer approximately $612.7 billion in assets as of December 31, 2021. The Advisor provides an investment program for each Fund. The Advisor also provides proactive oversight of the Sub-Advisor, daily monitoring of the Sub-Advisor’s buying and selling of securities for each Fund, and regular review of the Sub-Advisor’s performance.

The Advisor also arranges for transfer agency, custody, Fund administration, and all other non-distribution related services necessary for the Funds to operate. For its services, the Advisor expects to receive fees from the Funds, based on a percentage of each Fund’s average daily net assets, as shown in the following table:

Name of Fund

Advisory Fee Rate

abrdn Bloomberg All Commodity Strategy K-1 Free ETF

0.25%

abrdn Bloomberg All Commodity Longer Dated Strategy K-1 Free ETF

0.29%

abrdn Bloomberg Industrial Metals Strategy K-1 Free ETF

0.39%

The Advisor has contractually agreed to waive the management fees that it receives from each Fund in an amount equal to the management fee paid to the Advisor by each Subsidiary. This undertaking will continue in effect for so long as a Fund invests in its Subsidiary, and may be terminated only with the approval of the Board.

Pursuant to the terms of the Funds’ Investment Advisory Agreement, the Advisor has agreed to pay all expenses of the Funds, subject to certain exceptions. For a detailed description of the Investment Advisory Agreement for the Fund, please see the “Management of the Trust” section of the SAI.

A discussion regarding the basis for the Board’s approval of the Investment Advisory Agreement with the Advisor will be available in the Funds’ Semiannual Report to Shareholders for the period ended June 30, 2022.

Sub-Advisor

Vident Investment Advisory, LLC (the “Sub-Advisor”), is located at 1125 Sanctuary Parkway, Suite 515, Alpharetta, GA 30009. The Sub-Advisor was formed in 2014 and provides investment advisory services to the Funds and the Subsidiaries. The Sub-Advisor provides advisory services to various other exchange-traded funds as well as separate accounts. Under a sub-advisory agreement between the Advisor and the Sub-Advisor (the “Sub-Advisory Agreement”), he Sub-Advisor is responsible for trading portfolio securities on behalf of each Fund and Subsidiary, including selecting broker-dealers to execute purchase and sale transactions as instructed by the Advisor or in connection with any rebalancing or reconstitution of the Index, subject to the supervision of the Advisor and the Board. Under the Sub-Advisory Agreement, the Advisor pays the Sub-Advisor a fee, calculated daily and paid monthly, at an annual rate based on a percentage of the average daily net assets of each Fund, subject to a minimum annual fee, as set forth below:

Fund

Annual Rate

Minimum Annual Fee

abrdn Bloomberg Industrial Metals Strategy K-1 Free ETF

0.055% on first $250 million

0.045% on next $250 million

0.04% on assets over $500 million

$18,000

abrdn Bloomberg All Commodity Strategy K-1 Free ETF

0.04%

$18,000

abrdn Bloomberg All Commodity Longer Dated Strategy K-1 Free ETF

0.04%

$18,000

A discussion regarding the basis for the Board’s approval of the Funds’ Sub-Advisory Agreement between the Advisor and the Sub-Advisor will be available in the Funds’ Semiannual Report to Shareholders for the period ended June 30, 2022.

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Additional Information about the Funds

The Advisor may hire one or more sub-advisors to oversee the day-to-day activities of the Funds. The sub-advisors are subject to oversight by the Advisor. Under the terms of an exemptive order the Trust and the Advisor received from the SEC, the Advisor may, subject to Board approval but without prior approval from shareholders, change the terms of a sub-advisory agreement or hire a new sub-advisor, either as a replacement for an existing sub-advisor or as an additional sub-advisor.

The Trust will notify shareholders in the event of any change in the identity of such sub-advisor or sub-advisors. The Advisor has ultimate responsibility for the investment performance of the Funds due to its responsibility to oversee each sub-advisor and recommend their hiring, termination and replacement.

Portfolio Managers

Austin Wen and Ryan Dofflemeyer serve as the Funds’ portfolio managers (the “Portfolio Managers”) and are primarily responsible for the day-to-day management of the Funds.

Mr. Wen, CFA, has served as a Portfolio Manager of the Sub-Advisor since 2016 and has eight years of investment management experience. Mr. Wen specializes in portfolio management and trading of equity portfolios and commodities based portfolios, as well as risk monitoring and investment analysis. Mr. Wen joined Vident in 2014 and was previously an analyst for Vident Financial, working on the development and review of investment solutions. He began his career as a State Examiner for the Georgia Department of Banking and Finance. Mr. Wen obtained a BA in Finance from the University of Georgia and holds the Chartered Financial Analyst designation.

Mr. Dofflemeyer has over 16 years of trading and portfolio management experience across various asset classes including both ETFs and mutual funds. He is Senior Portfolio Manager for the Sub-Advisor specializing in managing and trading of global equity and multi-asset portfolios. Prior to joining the Sub-Advisor in August 2020, he was a Senior Portfolio Manager at ProShare Advisors LLC (“ProShare”) for over $3 billion in ETF assets across global equities, commodities, and volatility strategies. Mr. Dofflemeyer held various positions with ProShare from October 2003 until August 2020. From 2001 to 2003, he was a Research Analyst at the Investment Company Institute in Washington DC. Mr. Dofflemeyer holds a BA from the University of Virginia and an MBA from the University of Maryland.

The SAI provides additional information about the Portfolio Managers’ compensation, other accounts managed by the Portfolio Managers, and the Portfolio Managers’ ownership of Shares.

Additional Information on Buying and Selling Shares

Most investors will buy and sell Shares in secondary market transactions through brokers. Shares of each Fund are expected to be listed for trading on the Listing Exchange and elsewhere during the trading day and can be bought and sold throughout the trading day like other shares of publicly traded securities. When buying or selling shares through a broker, most investors will incur customary brokerage commissions and charges. Shares trade under the trading symbols listed on the cover of this Prospectus.

Prior to trading in the secondary market, Shares of the Fund are “created” at NAV by market makers, large investors and institutions only in block-size “Creation Units” or multiples thereof. Each “creator” is an AP that has entered into an AP agreement with the Fund’s distributor.

A creation transaction, which is subject to acceptance by the distributor and the Fund, generally takes place when an AP deposits into the Fund a designated amount of cash and/or securities in exchange for a specified number of Creation Units (a “creation basket”). Similarly, Shares can be redeemed only in Creation Units, generally for cash and/or a designated portfolio of securities held by the Fund (a “redemption basket”). Creation baskets and redemption baskets may differ, and the Trust reserves the right to accept “custom baskets.”

Except when aggregated in Creation Units, Shares are not redeemable by the Fund. Only an AP may create or redeem Creation Units directly with the Fund.

The prices at which creations and redemptions occur are based on the next calculation of NAV after a creation or redemption order is received in an acceptable form.

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Additional Information about the Funds

In the event of a system failure or other interruption, including disruptions at market makers or APs, orders to purchase or redeem Creation Units either may not be executed according to the Fund’s instructions or may not be executed at all, or the Fund may not be able to place or change orders.

To the extent the Fund engages in in-kind transactions, the Fund intends to comply with the U.S. federal securities laws in accepting securities for deposit and satisfying redemptions with redemption securities by, among other means, assuring that any securities accepted for deposit and any securities used to satisfy redemption requests will be sold in transactions that would be exempt from registration under the Securities Act of 1933, as amended (the “Securities Act”). Further, an AP that is not a “qualified institutional buyer,” as such term is defined under Rule 144A of the Securities Act, will not be able to receive restricted securities eligible for resale under Rule 144A.

Creations and redemptions must be made through a firm that is either a member of the Continuous Net Settlement System of the National Securities Clearing Corporation or a participant in the Depository Trust Company (“DTC”) and has executed an agreement with the Fund’s distributor with respect to creations and redemptions of Creation Unit aggregations. Information about the procedures regarding creation and redemption of Creation Units (including the cutoff times for receipt of creation and redemption orders) and the applicable transaction fees is included in the Fund’s SAI.

Certain affiliates of the Fund, Advisor and Sub-Advisor may purchase and resell Shares pursuant to this Prospectus.

Share Trading Prices

Transactions in a Fund’s shares will be priced at NAV only if you purchase or redeem shares directly from a Fund in Creation Units. As with other types of securities, the trading prices of shares in the secondary market can be affected by market forces such as supply and demand, economic conditions and other factors. The price you pay or receive when you buy or sell your shares in the secondary market may be more or less than the NAV of such shares.

Determination of Net Asset Value

The NAV of each Fund’s shares is calculated each day the national securities exchanges are open for trading as of the close of regular trading on the Listing Exchange, generally 4:00 p.m. New York time (the “NAV Calculation Time”). NAV per share is calculated by dividing a Fund’s net assets by the number of Shares outstanding.

In calculating its NAV, each Fund generally values its assets on the basis of market quotations, last sale prices, or estimates of value furnished by a pricing service or brokers who make markets in such instruments. Debt obligations with maturities of 60 days or less are valued at amortized cost, which approximates fair value.

Investments in futures are valued at market value, which is generally determined using the last reported official closing price or last trading price on the exchange or market on which the futures contract is primarily traded at the time of valuation. Generally, trading in futures, U.S. government securities (such as U.S. Treasury securities), money market instruments and certain fixed-income securities is substantially completed each day at various times prior to the NAV Calculation Time. The values of such securities used in computing the NAV of the Fund are determined as of such times.

Fair value pricing is used by a Fund when reliable market valuations are not readily available or are not deemed to reflect current market values. For these purposes, a price based on amortized cost is considered a market valuation. Assets that may be valued using “fair value” pricing may include, but are not limited to, those for which there are no current market quotations or whose issuer is in default or bankruptcy, securities subject to corporate actions (such as mergers or reorganizations), securities subject to non-U.S. investment limits or currency controls, and securities affected by “significant events.” An example of a significant event is an event occurring after the close of the market in which a commodities future trades but before the Fund’s next NAV calculation time that may materially affect the value of a Fund’s investment (e.g., government action, natural disaster, or significant market fluctuation). When fair value pricing is employed, the prices of securities used by a Fund to calculate its NAV may differ from quoted or published prices for the same securities. Fair value pricing involves subjective judgments, and it is possible that a fair value determination for a security or other asset is materially different than the value that could be realized upon the sale of such security or asset. In addition, fair value pricing could result in a difference between the prices used to calculate a Fund’s NAV and the prices used by the Index. This may adversely affect a Fund’s ability to track the Index.

40

abrdn ETFs

Additional Information about the Funds

Transactions in each Fund’s shares will be priced at NAV only if you purchase or redeem shares directly from the Fund in Creation Units. Shares are purchased or sold on a national securities exchange at market prices, which may be higher or lower than NAV. Each Fund discloses its NAV on a daily basis. For more information, or to obtain a Fund’s NAV, please call 844-383-7289 or visit www.abrdn.com/usa/etf.

Dividends and Distributions

Each Fund pays out dividends and distributes its net capital gains, if any, to shareholders at least annually. Ordinarily, dividends from net investment income, if any, are declared and paid annually by each Fund. Each Fund also intends to distribute its net realized capital gains, if any, to shareholders annually. Dividends and other distributions may be declared and paid more frequently to improve index tracking, to comply with the distribution requirements of Subchapter M of the Code, or to avoid a federal excise tax imposed on regulated investment companies. Distributions in cash may be reinvested automatically in additional whole Shares only if the broker through whom you purchased Shares makes such option available.

Book Entry

Shares are held in book-entry form, which means that no stock certificates are issued. The DTC or its nominee is the record owner of all outstanding Shares.

Investors owning Shares are beneficial owners as shown on the records of DTC or its participants. DTC serves as the securities depository for all Shares. Participants include DTC, securities brokers and dealers, banks, trust companies, clearing corporations, and other institutions that directly or indirectly maintain a custodial relationship with DTC. As a beneficial owner of Shares, you are not entitled to receive physical delivery of stock certificates or to have shares registered in your name, and you are not considered a registered owner of Shares. Therefore, to exercise any right as an owner of Shares, you must rely upon the procedures of DTC and its participants. These procedures are the same as those that apply to any securities that you hold in book entry or “street name” form. Your broker will provide you with account statements, confirmations of your purchases and sales, and tax information.

Delivery of Shareholder Documents – Householding

Householding is an option available to certain investors of the Funds. Householding is a method of delivery, based on the preference of the individual investor, in which a single copy of certain shareholder documents can be delivered to investors who share the same address, even if their accounts are registered under different names. Householding for the Funds is available through certain broker-dealers. If you are interested in enrolling in householding and receiving a single copy of prospectuses and other shareholder documents, please contact your broker-dealer. If you are currently enrolled in householding and wish to change your householding status, please contact your broker-dealer.

Frequent Purchases and Redemptions of Shares

The Funds impose no restrictions on the frequency of purchases and redemptions of shares. In determining not to approve a written, established policy, the Board evaluated the risks of market timing activities by Fund shareholders. Purchases and redemptions by APs, who are the only parties that may purchase or redeem shares directly with a Fund, are an essential part of the ETF process and help keep share trading prices in line with NAV. As such, the Funds accommodate frequent purchases and redemptions by APs. However, the Board has also determined that frequent purchases and redemptions for cash may increase tracking error and portfolio transaction costs and may lead to the realization of capital gains. Frequent in-kind creations and redemptions generally do not give rise to these concerns. To minimize these potential consequences of frequent purchases and redemptions, the Funds employ fair value pricing and impose transaction fees on purchases and redemptions of Creation Units to cover the custodial and other costs incurred by a Fund in effecting trades. In addition, the Funds and the Advisor reserve the right to reject any purchase order at any time.

Investments by Registered Investment Companies

Section 12(d)(1) of the 1940 Act restricts investments by registered investment companies in the securities of other investment companies, including Shares. Registered investment companies are permitted to invest in the Funds beyond the limits set forth in section 12(d)(1), subject to certain terms and conditions, including that such investment companies enter into an agreement with that Fund. The Funds’ SAI provides additional information about Section 12(d)(1) limits under the “Investment Company Securities” sub-section of the “Specific Investment Strategies and Risks” section.

41

abrdn ETFs

Additional Information about the Funds

Additional Tax Information

The following discussion is a summary of some important U.S. federal income tax considerations generally applicable to investments in the Funds. Your investment in a Fund may have other tax implications. Please consult your tax advisor about the tax consequences of an investment in Shares, including the possible application of foreign, state and local tax laws.

Each Fund intends to qualify each year for treatment as a RIC under Subchapter M of the Code. If it meets certain minimum distribution requirements, a RIC is not subject to tax at the fund level on income and gains from investments that are timely distributed to shareholders. However, a Fund’s failure to qualify as a RIC or to meet minimum distribution requirements would result (if certain relief provisions were not available) in fund-level taxation and, consequently, a reduction in income available for distribution to shareholders.

Unless you are a tax-exempt entity or your investment in Shares is made through a tax-deferred retirement account, such as an individual retirement account, you need to be aware of the possible tax consequences when:

A Fund makes distributions;

You sell Shares; and

You purchase or redeem Creation Units (institutional investors only).

Taxes on Distributions

For federal income tax purposes, distributions of investment income are generally taxable as ordinary income or qualified dividend income. Taxes on distributions of capital gains (if any) are determined by how long a Fund owned the assets that generated them, rather than how long a shareholder has owned his or her Shares. Sales of assets held by a Fund for more than one year generally result in long-term capital gains and losses, and sales of assets held by a Fund for one year or less generally result in short-term capital gains and losses. Distributions of a Fund’s net capital gain (the excess of net long-term capital gains over net short-term capital losses) that are properly reported by the Fund as capital gain dividends (“Capital Gain Dividends”) will be taxable as long-term capital gains. For non-corporate shareholders, long-term capital gains are generally subject to tax at reduced rates. Distributions of short-term capital gain will generally be taxable as ordinary income. Distributions reported by a Fund as “qualified dividend income” are generally taxed to non-corporate shareholders at rates applicable to long-term capital gains, provided holding period and other requirements are met. “Qualified dividend income” generally is income derived from dividends paid by U.S. corporations or certain foreign corporations that are either incorporated in a U.S. possession or eligible for tax benefits under certain U.S. income tax treaties. In addition, dividends that the Fund receives in respect of stock of certain foreign corporations may be qualified dividend income if that stock is readily tradable on an established U.S. securities market.

The Funds’ trading strategies and investments in their wholly-owned Subsidiaries may significantly limit their ability to distribute dividends eligible for treatment as qualified dividend income.

In general, your distributions are subject to federal income tax for the year in which they are paid. However, certain distributions paid in January may be treated as paid on December 31 of the prior year. Distributions are generally taxable even if they are paid from income or gains earned by a Fund before your investment (and thus were included in the price you paid for your shares).

Dividends and distributions from the Funds and capital gain on the sale of Shares are generally taken into account in determining a shareholder’s “net investment income” for the purposes of the Medicare contribution tax applicable to certain individuals, estates and trusts.

A Fund may include cash when paying the redemption price for Creation Units in addition to, or in place of, the delivery of a basket of securities. A Fund and/or its Subsidiary may be required to sell portfolio securities in order to obtain the cash needed to distribute redemption proceeds. This may cause the Fund to recognize investment income and/or capital gains or losses that it might not have recognized if it had completely satisfied the redemption in-kind. As a result, the Funds may be less tax efficient if they include such a cash payment than if the in-kind redemption process is used.

Distributions (other than Capital Gain Dividends) paid to individual shareholders that are neither citizens nor residents of the U.S., or to foreign entities will generally be subject to a U.S. withholding tax at the rate of 30%, unless a lower treaty rate applies. A Fund may, under certain circumstances, report all or a portion of a dividend as an “interest related dividend” or a “short term capital gain dividend,” which would generally be exempt from this 30% U.S. withholding tax, provided certain other requirements are met.

42

abrdn ETFs

Additional Information about the Funds

The Funds (or financial intermediaries, such as brokers, through which shareholders own Shares) generally are required to withhold and to remit to the U.S. Treasury a percentage of the taxable distributions and the sale or redemption proceeds paid to any shareholder who fails to properly furnish a correct taxpayer identification number, who has under-reported dividend or interest income, or who fails to certify that he, she or it is not subject to such withholding.

Taxes When You Sell Shares

Any capital gain or loss realized upon a sale of Shares is generally treated as a long-term gain or loss if you held the Shares you sold for more than one year. Any capital gain or loss realized upon a sale of Shares held for one year or less is generally treated as a short-term gain or loss, except that any capital loss on a sale of Shares held for six months or less is treated as a long-term capital loss to the extent of Capital Gain Dividends paid with respect to such shares. The ability to deduct capital losses may be limited depending on your circumstances.

Taxes on Creation and Redemption of Creation Units

An AP having the U.S. dollar as its functional currency for U.S. federal income tax purposes that exchanges securities or non-U.S. currency for Creation Units generally will recognize a gain or loss equal to the difference between (i) the sum of the market value of the Creation Units at the time of the exchange and any amount of cash received by the AP in the exchange and (ii) the sum of the exchanger’s aggregate basis in the securities or non-U.S. currency surrendered and any amount of cash paid for such Creation Units. A person who redeems Creation Units will generally recognize a gain or loss equal to the difference between the exchanger’s basis in the Creation Units and the sum of the aggregate U.S. dollar market value of the securities plus the amount of any cash or non-U.S. currency received for such Creation Units. The IRS, however, may assert that a loss that is realized by an AP upon an exchange of securities for Creation Units may not be permitted to be currently deducted under the rules governing “wash sales” (for APs that do not mark-to-market their holding) or on the basis that there has been no significant change in economic position.

Gain or loss recognized by an AP upon an issuance of Creation Units in exchange for non-U.S. currency will generally be treated as ordinary income or loss. Gain or loss recognized by an AP upon an issuance of Creation Units in exchange for securities, or upon a redemption of Creation Units, may be capital or ordinary gain or loss depending on the circumstances. Any capital gain or loss realized upon an issuance of Creation Units in exchange for securities will generally be treated as long-term capital gain or loss if the securities have been held for more than one year. Any capital gain or loss realized upon the redemption of a Creation Unit will generally be treated as long-term capital gain or loss if the Shares comprising the Creation Unit have been held for more than one year. Otherwise, such capital gains or losses are treated as short-term capital gains or losses.

A person subject to U.S. federal income tax with the U.S. dollar as its functional currency who receives non-U.S. currency upon a redemption of Creation Units and does not immediately convert the non-U.S. currency into U.S. dollars may, upon a later conversion of the non-U.S. currency into U.S. dollars, recognize any gains or losses resulting from fluctuations in the value of the non-U.S. currency relative to the U.S. dollar since the date of the redemption. Any such gains or losses will generally be treated as ordinary income or loss.

Persons exchanging securities or non-U.S. currency for Creation Units should consult their own tax advisors with respect to the tax treatment of any creation or redemption transaction and whether the wash sales rules apply and when a loss might be deductible. If you purchase or redeem Creation Units, you will be sent a confirmation statement showing how many Shares you purchased or redeemed and at what price.

Foreign Investments by the Funds

Interest, dividends, and other income received by a Fund or a Subsidiary with respect to foreign securities may give rise to withholding and other taxes imposed by foreign countries. Tax conventions between certain countries and the United States may reduce or eliminate such taxes. A Fund may need to file claims for refunds to secure the benefits of a reduced rate. If as of the close of a taxable year more than 50% of the total assets of a Fund consist of stock or securities of foreign corporations, the Fund intends to elect to “pass through” to investors the amount of foreign income and similar taxes (including withholding taxes) paid by the Fund during that taxable year. If a Fund elects to “pass through” such foreign taxes, then investors will be considered to have received as additional income their respective shares of such foreign taxes, but may be entitled to either a corresponding tax deduction in calculating taxable income or, subject to certain limitations, a credit in calculating federal income tax.

43

abrdn ETFs

Additional Information about the Funds

Investment in the Subsidiaries

In order to qualify for the favorable U.S. federal income tax treatment accorded to a RIC, each Fund must, amongst other requirements, derive at least 90% of its gross income in each taxable year from certain categories of income (“qualifying income”) and must satisfy certain asset diversification requirements, including holding no more than 25% of its total assets in a single issuer. Each Fund expects to invest up to 25% of its total assets in its Subsidiary, which each Fund expects to be treated as a controlled foreign corporation under the Code. Each Fund will recognize annually as ordinary income its Subsidiary’s current year net taxable earnings, if any, nor would such losses carryforward to future years. The Funds will not recognize its Subsidiary’s net losses, if any. The IRS issued final regulations pursuant to which the “subpart F” income (defined in Section 951 of the Code to include passive income, including from commodity-linked derivatives) of a Fund attributable to its investment in a Subsidiary is “qualifying income” to the Fund to the extent that such income is distributed to the Fund or is derived with respect to the Fund’s business of investing in stock, securities or currencies. Each Fund expects its “subpart F” income attributable to its investment in a Subsidiary to be derived with respect to such Fund’s business of investing in stock, securities or currencies and to be treated as qualifying income. The Advisor and Sub-Advisor will carefully monitor the Funds’ investments in their respective Subsidiary to ensure that no more than 25% of such Fund’s assets are invested in its Subsidiary to ensure compliance with each Fund’s asset diversification test as described in more detail in the SAI.

Distribution

ALPS Distributors, Inc. (the “Distributor”) serves as the distributor of Creation Unit Aggregations for the Funds on an agency basis. The Distributor does not maintain a secondary market in Shares. The Distributor’s principal address is 1290 Broadway, Suite 1000, Denver, Colorado 80203. The Distributor has no role in determining the policies of any Fund or the securities that are purchased or sold by any Fund.

The Board has adopted a Distribution and Service (12b-1) Plan pursuant to Rule 12b-1 under the 1940 Act. In accordance with its Rule 12b-1 Plan, each Fund is authorized to pay an amount up to 0.25% of its average daily net assets each year to reimburse the Distributor for amounts expended to finance activities primarily intended to result in the sale of Creation Units or the provision of investor services. The Distributor may also use this amount to compensate securities dealers or other entities that are APs for providing distribution and/or investor services assistance, including broker-dealer and shareholder support and educational and promotional services.

No 12b-1 fees are currently paid by any Fund, and the Board has not currently approved the commencement of any payments under the Rule 12b-1 Plan. However, in the event 12b-1 fees are charged in the future, because the fees are paid out of a Fund’s assets, over time these fees will increase the cost of your investment and may cost you more than certain other types of sales charges.

Premium/Discount and NAV Information

Information regarding each Fund’s NAV and how often Shares are traded on the Listing Exchange at a price above (i.e., at a premium) or below (i.e., at a discount) the NAV of the Fund during the past calendar year and most recent calendar quarters is posted to www.abrdn.com/usa/etf.

Additional Notices

Shares are not sponsored, endorsed, or promoted by the Listing Exchange. The Listing Exchange makes no representation or warranty, express or implied, to the owners of the Shares. The Listing Exchange is not responsible for, nor has it participated in, the determination of the timing of, prices of, or quantities of the Shares to be issued, nor in the determination or calculation of the equation by which the Shares are redeemable. The Listing Exchange has no obligation or liability to owners of the Shares in connection with the administration, marketing, or trading of the Shares. Without limiting any of the foregoing, in no event shall the Listing Exchange have any liability for any lost profits or indirect, punitive, special, or consequential damages even if notified of the possibility thereof.

ASI, the Advisor, the Sub-Advisor, Bloomberg and the Funds make no representation or warranty, express or implied, to the owners of Shares or any member of the public regarding the advisability of investing in securities generally or in a Fund particularly. Bloomberg is a licensor of certain trademarks, service marks and trade names of the Funds.

44

abrdn ETFs

Additional Information about the Funds

“Bloomberg®” and the indices and subindices of the “Bloomberg Commodity IndexSM” family, including the “Bloomberg Commodity Index Total ReturnSM”, “Bloomberg Commodity Index 3 Month Forward Total ReturnSM”, and “Bloomberg Industrial Metals Total Return SubindexSM”, are service marks of Bloomberg Finance L.P. and its affiliates, including Bloomberg Index Services Limited (“BISL”), the administrator of the indices, (collectively, “Bloomberg”) and have been licensed for use for certain purposes by the Advisor.

The Funds are not sponsored, endorsed, sold or promoted by Bloomberg. Bloomberg does not make any representation or warranty, express or implied, to the owners of or counterparties to the Funds or any member of the public regarding the advisability of investing in securities or commodities generally or in the Funds particularly. The only relationship of Bloomberg to the Licensee is the licensing of certain trademarks, trade names and service marks and of the Bloomberg Commodity Index Total ReturnSM, which is determined, composed and calculated by Bloomberg in conjunction with UBS Securities without regard to the Advisor or the Funds. Bloomberg has no obligation to take the needs of the Advisor or the owners of the Funds into consideration in determining, composing or calculating Bloomberg Commodity IndexSM. Bloomberg is not responsible for and has not participated in the determination of the timing of, prices at, or quantities of the Funds to be issued or in the determination or calculation of the equation by which the Funds’ Shares are to be converted into cash. Bloomberg shall not have any obligation or liability, including, without limitation, to the Funds’ customers, in connection with the administration, marketing or trading of the Funds.

The Prospectus relates only to the Funds and does not relate to the exchange-traded physical commodities underlying any of the Bloomberg Commodity IndexSM components. Purchasers of the Funds should not conclude that the inclusion of a futures contract in the Bloomberg Commodity IndexSM is any form of investment recommendation of the futures contract or the underlying exchange-traded physical commodity by Bloomberg. The information in the Prospectus regarding the Bloomberg Commodity IndexSM components has been derived solely from publicly available documents. Bloomberg has not made any due diligence inquiries with respect to the Bloomberg Commodity IndexSM components in connection with the Funds. Bloomberg makes no representation that these publicly available documents or any other publicly available information regarding the Bloomberg Commodity IndexSM components, including without limitation a description of factors that affect the prices of such components, are accurate or complete.

BLOOMBERG DOES NOT GUARANTEE THE ACCURACY AND/OR THE COMPLETENESS OF THE BLOOMBERG COMMODITY INDEX SM OR ANY DATA RELATED THERETO AND SHALL HAVE NO LIABILITY FOR ANY ERRORS, OMISSIONS OR INTERRUPTIONS THEREIN. BLOOMBERG DOES NOT MAKE ANY WARRANTY, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, AS TO RESULTS TO BE OBTAINED BY THE ADVISOR, OWNERS OF THE FUNDS OR ANY OTHER PERSON OR ENTITY FROM THE USE OF THE BLOOMBERG COMMODITY INDEXSM OR ANY DATA RELATED THERETO. BLOOMBERG DOES NOT MAKE ANY EXPRESS OR IMPLIED WARRANTIES AND EXPRESSLY DISCLAIMS ALL WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY OR FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE OR USE WITH RESPECT TO THE BLOOMBERG COMMODITY INDEXSM OR ANY DATA RELATED THERETO. WITHOUT LIMITING ANY OF THE FOREGOING, TO THE MAXIMUM EXTENT ALLOWED BY LAW, BLOOMBERG, ITS LICENSORS, AND ITS AND THEIR RESPECTIVE EMPLOYEES, CONTRACTORS, AGENTS, SUPPLIERS AND VENDORS SHALL HAVE NO LIABILITY OR RESPONSIBILITY WHATSOEVER FOR ANY INJURY OR DAMAGES—WHETHER DIRECT, INDIRECT, CONSEQUENTIAL, INCIDENTAL, PUNITIVE OR OTHERWISE—ARISING IN CONNECTION WITH THE FUNDS OR THE INDICES AND SUBINDICES OF THE Bloomberg Commodity IndexSM or ANY DATA OR VALUES RELATING THERETO—WHETHER ARISING FROM THEIR NEGLIGENCE OR OTHERWISE, EVEN IF NOTIFIED OF THE POSSIBILITY THEREOF.

45

46

abrdn ETFs

Additional Information about the Funds

Consolidated Financial Highlights

The tables that follow present the consolidated financial highlights for abrdn Bloomberg All Commodity Strategy K-1 Free ETF, abrdn Bloomberg All Commodity Longer Dated Strategy K-1 Free ETF and abrdn Bloomberg Industrial Metals Strategy K-1 Free ETF. The consolidated financial highlights include the accounts of each Fund’s Subsidiary. The consolidated financial highlights tables are intended to help you understand each Fund’s financial performance for the past five fiscal years or, if shorter, the period of a Fund’s operations. Certain information reflects financial results for a single Fund Share. The total returns in the table represent the rate that an investor would have earned or lost, on an investment in a Fund (assuming reinvestment of all dividends and distributions). This information has been audited by Cohen & Company, Ltd., the Funds’ independent registered public accounting firm, whose report, along with the Funds’ financial statements, is included in the Funds’ Annual Report for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2021, which is available upon request.

Selected Data For A Share Outstanding
Throughout The Periods Indicated

Selected Data For A Share Outstanding
Throughout The Periods Indicated

Per Share Operating Performance

Per Share Operating Performance

Ratios/Supplemental Data

Investment Operations

Distributions

Total Return(a)

Ratios To Average Net Assets(b)

Supplemental Data

Net asset
value,
beginning
of period

Net
investment
income
(loss)
(c)

Net
realized
and
unrealized
gain (loss) on
investments

Total from
investment
operations

Net
investment
income

Net
realized
gains

Total
distributions

Net asset
value,
end of
period

Net asset
value
(d)

Market
value
(Unaudited)
(e)

Expenses
before
expense
reductions

Expenses
net of
waivers,
if any

Net
investment
income
(loss)
before
expense
reductions

Net
investment
income
(loss) net
of waivers,
if any

Net assets,
end of period
(000)

Portfolio
turnover
rate
(a)(f)

abrdn Bloomberg All Commodity Strategy K-1 Free ETF

 

Year Ended December 31, 2021

$21.77

$(0.05

)

$5.68

$5.63

$(4.47

)

$

$(4.47

)

$22.93

26.27

%

25.85

%

0.30

%

0.25

%

(0.25

)%

(0.20

)%

$639,804

%

Year Ended December 31, 2020

22.64

0.05

(0.77

)(g)

(0.72

)

(0.15

)

(0.15

)

21.77

(3.17

)

(2.77

)

0.31

0.25

0.20

0.26

337,446

Year Ended December 31, 2019

21.38

0.45

1.14

1.59

(0.33

)

(0.33

)

22.64

7.47

7.06

0.30

0.25

1.94

2.00

176,591

Year Ended December 31, 2018

24.48

0.40

(3.26

)

(2.86

)

(0.24

)

(0.24

)

21.38

(11.70

)

(11.24

)

0.34

0.29

1.62

1.67

195,583

Year Ended December 31, 2017(h)

25.00

0.13

0.58

0.71

(1.23

)

(i)

(1.23

)

24.48

3.05

3.09

0.36

0.32

0.66

0.70

78,346

abrdn Bloomberg All Commodity Longer Dated Strategy K-1 Free ETF

 

Year Ended December 31, 2021

25.20

(0.07

)

8.18

8.11

(2.55

)

(2.55

)

30.76

32.40

31.74

0.35

0.29

(0.30

)

(0.24

)

87,653

Year Ended December 31, 2020

24.48

0.03

1.02

1.05

(0.33

)

(0.33

)

25.20

4.29

4.79

0.35

0.29

0.06

0.12

11,339

Year Ended December 31, 2019

23.10

0.46

1.30

1.76

(0.38

)

(0.38

)

24.48

7.64

7.31

0.34

0.29

1.85

1.90

3,671

Year Ended December 31, 2018

26.04

0.40

(2.97

)

(2.57

)

(0.37

)

(0.37

)

23.10

(9.89

)

(8.64

)

0.34

0.29

1.48

1.53

3,466

Year Ended December 31, 2017(h)

25.00

0.03

1.03

1.06

(0.02

)

(i)

(0.02

)

26.04

4.24

3.08

0.78

0.72

0.13

0.19

3,906

abrdn Bloomberg Industrial Metals Strategy K-1 Free ETF

 

Period Ended December 31, 2021(j)

25.00

(0.02

)

1.17

1.15

(0.40

)

(0.40

)

25.75

4.66

4.83

0.47

0.39

(0.44

)

(0.35

)

27,035

  

(a)Not annualized for periods less than one year.

(b)Annualized for periods less than one year.

(c)Per share net investment income (loss) has been calculated using the average daily shares method.

(d)Net asset value total return is calculated assuming an initial investment made at the net asset value at the beginning of the period, reinvestment of all dividends and distributions at net asset value during the period, if any, and redemption on the last day of the period at net asset value. This percentage is not an indication of the performance of a shareholder’s investment in the Fund based on market value due to differences between the market price of the shares and the net asset value per share of the Fund.

(e)Market value total return is calculated assuming an initial investment made at the market value at the beginning of the period, reinvestment of all dividends and distributions at net asset value during the period, if any, and redemption on the last day of the period at market value. Market value is determined by the composite closing price. Composite closing security price is defined as the last reported sale price from any primary listing market (e.g., NYSE and NASDAQ) or participating regional exchanges or markets. The composite closing price is the last reported sale price from any of the eligible sources, regardless of volume and not an average price and may have occurred on a date prior to the close of the reporting period. Market value may be greater or less than net asset value, depending on the Fund’s closing price on the listing market.

(f)Portfolio turnover rate is calculated without regard to instruments having a maturity of less than one year from acquisition or derivative instruments (futures contracts). If these instruments were included in the calculation, the Funds would have a higher portfolio turnover rate. In-Kind transactions are not included in the portfolio turnover calculations.

(g)The amount shown for a share outstanding throughout the period is not in accordance with the aggregate net realized and unrealized gain (loss) for that period because of the timing of sales and repurchases of the Fund shares in relation to fluctuating market value of the investments in the Fund.

(h)For the period from March 30, 2017 (commencement of investment operations) through December 31, 2017.

(i)Per share amount is less than $0.005.

(j)For the period from September 22, 2021 (commencement of operations) through December 31, 2021.

Amounts listed as “-” are $0 or round to $0.

 

 

abrdn ETFs

c/o ALPS Distributors, Inc.

1290 Broadway, Suite 1000

Denver, Colorado 80203

The Trust’s current SAI provides additional detailed information about the Funds. The Trust has electronically filed the SAI with the SEC. The SAI is incorporated by reference in this Prospectus.

Additional information about the Funds’ investments is available in the Funds’ annual and semi-annual reports to shareholders. In the annual report you will find a discussion of the market conditions and investment strategies that significantly affected each Fund’s performance during its last fiscal year.

To make shareholder inquiries, for more detailed information on a Fund or to request the SAI, annual or semi-annual shareholder reports free of charge, please:

Call:

1-844-383-7289
Monday through Friday
8:00 a.m. – 8:00 p.m. (Eastern time)

Write:

abrdn ETFs
c/o ALPS Distributors, Inc.
1290 Broadway, Suite 1000
Denver, Colorado 80203

Visit:

www.abrdn.com/usa/etf

 

 

Other information about the Funds is available on the EDGAR Database on the SEC’s internet site at sec.gov. You may also obtain copies of this information, after paying a duplicating fee, by electronic request at the following e-mail address: publicinfo@sec.gov.

No person is authorized to give any information or to make any representations about any Fund and its shares not contained in this Prospectus and you should not rely on any other information. Read and keep this Prospectus for future reference.

©2021 abrdn ETFs
abrdn ETFs Funds are distributed by

ALPS Distributors, Inc.

1290 Broadway, Suite 1000

Denver, Colorado 80203

INVESTMENT COMPANY ACT FILE NO.

811-22986