HARTFORD MUTUAL FUNDS INC/CT
Hartford Multi-Strategy Funds
Prospectus
March 1, 2023
Class A
Class C
Class I
Class R3
Class R4
Class R5
Class R6
Class Y
Class F
The Hartford Balanced Income
Fund
HBLAX
HBLCX
HBLIX
HBLRX
HBLSX
HBLTX
HBLVX
HBLYX
HBLFX
Hartford AARP Balanced Retirement
Fund*
HAFAX
HAICX
HAFIX
HAFRX
HAFSX
HAFTX
HAFVX
HAFYX
HAFDX
Hartford Multi-Asset Income Fund
ITTAX
HAFCX
ITTIX
ITTRX
ITTSX
ITTTX
ITTVX
IHAYX
ITTFX
Hartford Real Asset Fund (formerly,
The Hartford Global Real Asset Fund)
HRLAX
HRLCX
HRLIX
HRLRX
HRLSX
HRLTX
HRLZX
HRLYX
HRLFX
The Hartford Checks and Balances
Fund
HCKAX
HCKCX
HCKIX
HCKRX
HCKSX
HCKTX
HCKFX
The Hartford Conservative
Allocation Fund
HCVAX
HCVCX
HCVIX
HCVRX
HCVSX
HCVTX
HCVFX
Hartford Moderate Allocation Fund
HBAAX
HBACX
HBAIX
HBARX
HBASX
HBATX
HBADX
The Hartford Growth Allocation
Fund
HRAAX
HRACX
HRAIX
HRARX
HRASX
HRATX
HRAFX
*Classes A, C, I, R3, and R4 of the Fund are closed to new investors. No purchases of a closed share class are allowed, other than as described in this Prospectus.
As with all mutual funds, the Securities and Exchange Commission and the Commodity Futures Trading Commission have not approved or disapproved these securities or passed upon the adequacy of this Prospectus. Any representation to the contrary is a criminal offense. Mutual funds are not bank deposits and are not insured or guaranteed by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation or any other government agency. Because you could lose money by investing in the Funds, be sure to read all risk disclosures carefully before investing.

Contents
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A-1

The Hartford Balanced Income Fund Summary Section
INVESTMENT OBJECTIVE. The Fund seeks to provide current income with growth of capital as a secondary objective.
YOUR EXPENSES. The table below describes the fees and expenses that you may pay if you buy, hold and sell shares of the Fund. You may pay other fees, such as brokerage commissions and other fees to financial intermediaries, which are not reflected in the table and example below. Please contact your financial intermediary for more information regarding whether you may be required to pay a brokerage commission or other fees. You may qualify for sales charge discounts for Class A shares if you and your family invest, or agree to invest in the future, at least $50,000 in certain classes of Hartford mutual funds or in The Hartford® SMART529® College Savings Plan. More information about these and other discounts is available from your financial professional and in the “How Sales Charges Are Calculated” section beginning on page 100 of the Fund’s statutory prospectus. Descriptions of any financial intermediary specific sales charge waivers and discounts are set forth in Appendix A to the statutory prospectus.
Shareholder Fees (fees paid directly from your investment):
Share Classes
A
C
I
R3
R4
R5
R6
Y
F
Maximum sales charge (load) imposed
on purchases (as a percentage of
offering price)
5.50%
None
None
None
None
None
None
None
None
Maximum deferred sales charge (load)
(as a percentage of purchase price or
redemption proceeds, whichever is less)
None(1)
1.00%
None
None
None
None
None
None
None
Annual Fund Operating Expenses (expenses that you pay each year as a percentage of the value of your investment):
Share Classes
A
C
I
R3
R4
R5
R6
Y
F
Management fees
0.51%
0.51%
0.51%
0.51%
0.51%
0.51%
0.51%
0.51%
0.51%
Distribution and service (12b-1) fees
0.25%
1.00%
None
0.50%
0.25%
None
None
None
None
Other expenses
0.10%
0.11%
0.11%
0.23%
0.18%
0.14%
0.03%
0.14%
0.03%
Total annual fund operating expenses
0.86%
1.62%
0.62%
1.24%
0.94%
0.65%
0.54%
0.65%
0.54%
(1)
Investments of $1 million or more will not be subject to a front-end sales charge, but may be subject to a 1.00% contingent deferred sales charge.
Example. The example below is intended to help you compare the cost of investing in the Fund with the cost of investing in other mutual funds. The example assumes that you invest $10,000 in the Fund for the time periods indicated and then, except as shown below, redeem all of your shares at the end of those periods. The example also assumes that:
Your investment has a 5% return each year
The Fund’s operating expenses remain the same
You reinvest all dividends and distributions.
Although your actual costs may be higher or lower, based on these assumptions your costs would be:
Share Classes
Year 1
Year 3
Year 5
Year 10
A
$633
$809
$1,001
$1,552
C
$265
$511
$881
$1,922
I
$63
$199
$346
$774
R3
$126
$393
$681
$1,500
R4
$96
$300
$520
$1,155
R5
$66
$208
$362
$810
R6
$55
$173
$302
$677
Y
$66
$208
$362
$810
F
$55
$173
$302
$677
If you did not redeem your shares:
C
$165
$511
$881
$1,922
3

Portfolio Turnover. The Fund pays transaction costs, such as commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or “turns over” its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover rate may indicate higher transaction costs and may result in higher taxes when Fund shares are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are not reflected in annual fund operating expenses or in the example, affect the Fund’s performance. During the fiscal year ended October 31, 2022, the Fund’s portfolio turnover rate was 60% of the average value of its portfolio.
PRINCIPAL INVESTMENT STRATEGY. The Fund seeks to achieve its investment objective by investing in a mix of equity securities and fixed income investments. Under normal circumstances, the Fund targets an allocation of approximately 45% equity securities and 55% fixed income investments, with the allocation generally varying by no more than +/-5%. Allocation decisions within these bands are at the discretion of the Fund’s sub-adviser, Wellington Management Company LLP (“Wellington Management”), and are based on Wellington Management’s judgment of the projected investment environment for financial assets, relative fundamental values, the attractiveness of each asset category, and expected future returns of each asset category. The equity portion of the Fund invests primarily in common stocks with a history of above-average dividends or expectations of increasing dividends. The equity portion of the Fund may invest in a broad range of market capitalizations, but generally invests in companies with market capitalizations above $2 billion. The Fund may invest up to 25% of the equity portion of the portfolio in the securities of foreign issuers and non-dollar securities. The Fund may invest up to 20% of the fixed income portion of the portfolio in domestic non-investment grade debt (also known as “junk bonds”). The Fund may also invest up to 25% of the fixed income portion of the portfolio in non-US dollar denominated debt and up to 20% of the fixed income portion of the portfolio in emerging market debt securities. The Fund may invest in debt securities of any maturity or duration. The Fund may invest in certain restricted securities, such as securities that are only eligible for resale pursuant to Rule 144A, and securities of U.S. and non-U.S. issuers that are issued pursuant to Regulation S. The fixed income portfolio manager may allocate a portion of the Fund’s assets to specialists within Wellington Management who implement the individual sector and security selection strategies.
The Fund may use derivatives, such as interest rate futures, bond futures, swaps, and currency forwards, for risk management purposes, in pursuit of the Fund’s investment objective, and/or to equitize cash.
PRINCIPAL RISKS. The principal risks of investing in the Fund are described below. When you sell your shares they may be worth more or less than what you paid for them, which means that you could lose money as a result of your investment. An investment in the Fund is not a bank deposit and is not insured or guaranteed by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation or any other government agency. As with any fund, there is no guarantee that the Fund will achieve its investment objective.
Market Risk –  Market risk is the risk that one or more markets in which the Fund invests will go down in value, including the possibility that the markets will go down sharply and unpredictably. Securities of a company may decline in value due to its financial prospects and activities, including certain operational impacts, such as data breaches and cybersecurity attacks. Securities may also decline in value due to general market and economic movements and trends, including adverse changes to credit markets, or as a result of other events such as geopolitical events, natural disasters, or widespread pandemics (such as COVID-19) or other adverse public health developments.
Asset Allocation Risk –  The risk that if the Fund’s strategy for allocating assets among different asset classes does not work as intended, the Fund may not achieve its objective or may underperform other funds with similar investment strategies.
Equity Risk –  The risk that the price of equity or equity related securities may decline due to changes in a company’s financial condition and overall market and economic conditions.
Credit Risk –  Credit risk is the risk that the issuer of a security or other instrument will not be able to make principal and interest payments when due. Changes in an issuer’s financial strength, credit rating or the market’s perception of an issuer’s creditworthiness may also affect the value of the Fund’s investment in that issuer. The degree of credit risk depends on both the financial condition of the issuer and the terms of the obligation. Periods of market volatility may increase credit risk.
Interest Rate Risk –  The risk that your investment may go down in value when interest rates rise, because when interest rates rise, the prices of bonds and fixed rate loans fall. A wide variety of factors can cause interest rates to rise, including central bank monetary policies and inflation rates. Generally, the longer the maturity of a bond or fixed rate loan, the more sensitive it is to this risk. Falling interest rates also create the potential for a decline in the Fund’s income. These risks are greater during periods of rising inflation. Volatility in interest rates and in fixed income markets
4

may increase the risk that the Fund’s investment in fixed income securities will go down in value. Risks associated with rising interest rates are currently heightened because the Federal Reserve has raised, and may continue to raise, interest rates and inflation is elevated. Actions taken by the Federal Reserve Board or foreign central banks to stimulate or stabilize economic growth, such as decreases or increases in short-term interest rates, may adversely affect markets, which could, in turn, negatively impact Fund performance.
Active Investment Management Risk –  The risk that, if the sub-adviser’s investment strategy, including allocating assets to specialist portfolio managers, does not perform as expected, the Fund could underperform its peers or lose money. The investment styles employed by the specialist portfolio managers may not be complementary, which could adversely affect the performance of the Fund. Although the sub-adviser considers several factors when making investment decisions, the sub-adviser may not evaluate every factor prior to investing in a company or issuer, and the sub-adviser may determine that certain factors are more significant than others.
Dividend Risk –  Income provided by the Fund may be affected by changes in the dividend policies of the companies in which the Fund invests and the capital resources available for such payments at such companies. At times, the performance of dividend-paying companies may lag the performance of other companies or the broader market as a whole. In addition, the dividend payments of the companies in which the Fund invests may vary over time, and there is no guarantee that a company will pay a dividend at all.
Value Investing Style Risk –  Using a value investing style to select investments involves special risks. Overlooked or otherwise undervalued securities entail a significant risk of never attaining their potential value or may even be overpriced. Also, the value investing style may over time go in and out of favor. At times when the value investing style is out of favor, the Fund may underperform other equity funds that use different investing styles. “Value” securities can be undervalued by the market for long periods of time.
Foreign Investments Risk –  Investments in foreign securities may be riskier, more volatile, and less liquid than investments in U.S. securities. Differences between the U.S. and foreign regulatory regimes and securities markets, including the less stringent investor protection, less stringent accounting, corporate governance, financial reporting and disclosure standards of some foreign markets, as well as political and economic developments in foreign countries and regions and the U.S. (including the imposition of sanctions, tariffs, or other governmental restrictions), may affect the value of the Fund’s investments in foreign securities. Changes in currency exchange rates may also adversely affect the Fund’s foreign investments.
Currency Risk –  The risk that the value of the Fund’s investments in foreign securities or currencies will be affected by the value of the applicable currency relative to the U.S. dollar. When the Fund sells a foreign currency or foreign currency denominated security, its value may be worth less in U.S. dollars even if the investment increases in value in its local market. U.S. dollar-denominated securities of foreign issuers may also be affected by currency risk, as the revenue earned by issuers of these securities may also be affected by changes in the issuer’s local currency.
Restricted Securities Risk –  Restricted securities are subject to the risk that they may be difficult to sell at the time and price the Fund prefers.
Derivatives Risk –  Derivatives are instruments whose value depends on, or is derived from, the value of an underlying asset, reference rate or index. Derivatives may be riskier than other types of investments because they may be more sensitive to changes in economic or market conditions than other types of investments and could result in losses that significantly exceed the Fund’s original investment. Successful use of derivative instruments by the Fund depends on the sub-adviser’s judgment with respect to a number of factors and the Fund’s performance could be worse and/or more volatile than if it had not used these instruments. In addition, the fluctuations in the value of derivatives may not correlate perfectly with the value of any portfolio assets being hedged, the performance of the asset class to which the sub-adviser seeks exposure, or the overall securities markets.
Forward Currency Contracts Risk –  A forward currency contract is an agreement between two parties to buy and sell a currency at a set price on a future date. The market value of a forward currency contract fluctuates with changes in foreign currency exchange rates. While forward foreign currency exchange contracts do not eliminate fluctuations in the value of foreign securities, they do allow the Fund to establish a fixed rate of exchange for a future point in time. Use of such contracts, therefore, can have the effect of reducing returns and minimizing opportunities for gain. The Fund could also lose money when the contract is settled. The Fund’s gains from its positions in forward foreign currency contracts may accelerate and/or recharacterize the Fund’s income or gains and its distributions to
5

shareholders as ordinary income. The Fund’s losses from such positions may also recharacterize the Fund’s income and its distributions to shareholders and may cause a return of capital to Fund shareholders. Such acceleration or recharacterization could affect an investor’s tax liability.
Futures and Options Risk –  Futures and options may be more volatile than direct investments in the securities underlying the futures and options, may not correlate perfectly to the underlying securities, may involve additional costs, and may be illiquid. Futures and options also may involve the use of leverage as the Fund may make a small initial investment relative to the risk assumed, which could result in losses greater than if futures or options had not been used. Futures and options are also subject to the risk that the other party to the transaction may default on its obligation.
Swaps Risk –  A swap is a contract that generally obligates the parties to exchange payments based on a specified reference security, basket of securities, security index or index component. Swaps can involve greater risks than direct investment in securities because swaps may be leveraged and are subject to counterparty risk (e.g., the risk of a counterparty defaulting on the obligation or bankruptcy), credit risk and pricing risk (i.e., swaps may be difficult to value). Certain swaps may also be considered illiquid. It may not be possible for the Fund to liquidate a swap position at an advantageous time or price, which may result in significant losses.
Leverage Risk –  Certain transactions, such as the use of derivatives, may give rise to leverage. Leverage can increase market exposure, increase volatility in the Fund, magnify investment risks, and cause losses to be realized more quickly. The use of leverage may cause the Fund to liquidate portfolio positions to satisfy its obligations when it may not be advantageous to do so.
Securities Lending Risk –  The Fund may lose money because the borrower of the loaned securities fails to return the securities in a timely manner or at all. The Fund could also lose money in the event of a decline in the value of the collateral provided for loaned securities or a decline in the value of any investments made with cash collateral. These events could also trigger adverse tax consequences for the Fund.
Large Shareholder Transaction Risk –  The Fund may experience adverse effects when certain large shareholders redeem or purchase large amounts of shares of the Fund. Such redemptions may cause the Fund to sell securities at times when it would not otherwise do so or borrow money (at a cost to the Fund), which may negatively impact the Fund’s performance and liquidity. Similarly, large purchases may adversely affect the Fund’s performance to the extent that the Fund is delayed in investing new cash and is required to maintain a larger cash position than it ordinarily would. These transactions may also accelerate the realization of taxable income to shareholders if such sales of investments resulted in gains, and may also increase transaction costs.
The Fund is subject to certain other risks. For more information regarding risks and investments, please see “Additional Information Regarding Investment Strategies and Risks” and “More Information About Risks” in the Fund’s statutory prospectus.
PAST PERFORMANCE. The performance information indicates the risks of investing in the Fund. Keep in mind that past performance does not indicate future results. Updated performance information is available at hartfordfunds.com. The returns in the bar chart and table:
Assume reinvestment of all dividends and distributions
Reflect fee waivers and/or expense limitation arrangements, if any. Absent any applicable fee waivers and/or expense limitation arrangements, performance would have been lower.
The bar chart:
Shows how the Fund’s total return has varied from year to year
Returns do not include sales charges. If sales charges were reflected, returns would have been lower
Shows the returns of Class A shares. Returns for the Fund’s other classes differ only to the extent that the classes do not have the same expenses.
6

Total returns by calendar year (excludes sales charges)
During the periods shown in the chart above:
Returns
Quarter Ended
Best Quarter Return
10.42%
June 30, 2020
Worst Quarter Return
-11.81%
March 31, 2020
Average Annual Total Returns. The table below shows returns for the Fund over time compared to those of the Fund’s blended benchmark and four broad-based market indices. The blended benchmark is calculated by Hartford Funds Management Company, LLC. After-tax returns, which are calculated using the historical highest individual federal marginal income tax rates and do not reflect the impact of state and local taxes, are shown only for Class A shares and will vary for other classes. Actual after-tax returns, which depend on an investor’s particular tax situation, may differ from those shown and are not relevant to investors who hold their Fund shares through tax-deferred arrangements, such as 401(k) plans or individual retirement accounts.
Average annual total returns for periods ending December 31, 2022 (including sales charges)
Share Classes
1 Year
5 Years
10 Years
Class A –  Return Before Taxes
-14.07%
2.78%
5.47%
–  Return After Taxes on Distributions
-15.45%
1.30%
4.08%
–  Return After Taxes on Distributions and Sale of Fund Shares
-7.69%
1.85%
3.98%
Share Classes (Return Before Taxes)
 
 
 
Class C
-10.55%
3.17%
5.29%
Class I
-8.85%
4.21%
6.34%
Class R3
-9.41%
3.57%
5.73%
Class R4
-9.10%
3.88%
6.05%
Class R5
-8.88%
4.18%
6.33%
Class R6*
-8.72%
4.29%
6.43%
Class Y
-8.82%
4.20%
6.38%
Class F*
-8.76%
4.29%
6.40%
45% Russell 1000 Value Index/ 44% Bloomberg Corporate Index/ 5.5% JP Morgan
Emerging Markets Bond Index Plus/ 5.5% Bloomberg US Corporate High Yield Bond 2%
Issuer Cap Index
-12.18%
3.39%
5.86%
Russell 1000 Value Index (reflects no deduction for fees, expenses or taxes)
-7.54%
6.67%
10.29%
Bloomberg Corporate Index (reflects no deduction for fees, expenses or taxes)
-15.76%
0.45%
1.96%
JP Morgan Emerging Markets Bond Index Plus (reflects no deduction for fees, expenses or
taxes)
-24.67%
-3.87%
-0.35%
Bloomberg US Corporate High Yield Bond 2% Issuer Cap Index (reflects no deduction for
fees, expenses or taxes)
-11.18%
2.30%
4.03%
*
Class R6 shares commenced operations on November 7, 2014 and performance prior to that date is that of the Fund’s Class Y shares. Class F shares commenced operations on February 28, 2017. Performance for Class F shares prior to February 28, 2017 reflects the performance of Class I shares. Performance prior to an inception date of a class has not been adjusted to reflect the operating expenses of such class.
7

MANAGEMENT. The Fund’s investment manager is Hartford Funds Management Company, LLC. The Fund’s sub-adviser is Wellington Management.
Portfolio Manager
Title
Involved with
Fund Since
Scott I. St. John, CFA
Senior Managing Director and Fixed Income Portfolio Manager
2006
Matthew C. Hand, CFA
Senior Managing Director and Equity Portfolio Manager
2006
Adam H. Illfelder, CFA
Senior Managing Director and Equity Portfolio Manager
2008
PURCHASE AND SALE OF FUND SHARES. Not all share classes are available for all investors. Minimum investment amounts may be waived for certain accounts. Certain financial intermediaries may impose different restrictions than those described below.
Share Classes
Minimum Initial Investment
Minimum
Subsequent
Investment
Class A, Class C and Class I
$2,000 for all accounts except: $250, if establishing an Automatic
Investment Plan (“AIP”), with recurring monthly investments of at
least $50
$50
Class R3, Class R4, Class R5 and Class R6
No minimum initial investment
None
Class Y
$250,000
This requirement is waived when the shares are purchased
through omnibus accounts (or similar types of accounts).
None
Class F
$1,000,000
This requirement is waived when the shares are purchased
through omnibus accounts (or similar types of accounts).
None
For more information, please see the “How To Buy And Sell Shares” section of the Fund’s statutory prospectus.
You may sell your shares of the Fund on those days when the New York Stock Exchange is open, typically Monday through Friday. You may sell your shares through your financial intermediary. With respect to certain accounts, you may sell your shares on the web at hartfordfunds.com, by phone by calling 1-888-843-7824, by electronic funds transfer, or by wire. In certain circumstances you will need to write to Hartford Funds to request to sell your shares. For regular mail, please send the request to Hartford Funds, P.O. Box 219060, Kansas City, MO 64121-9060. For overnight mail, please send the request to Hartford Funds, 430 W 7th Street, Suite 219060, Kansas City, MO 64105-1407.
TAX INFORMATION. The Fund’s distributions are generally taxable, and may be taxed as ordinary income or capital gains, unless you are investing through a tax-deferred arrangement, such as a 401(k) plan or an individual retirement account. Such tax-deferred arrangements may be taxed later upon withdrawal of monies from those arrangements.
PAYMENTS TO BROKER-DEALERS AND OTHER FINANCIAL INTERMEDIARIES. If you purchase shares of the Fund through a broker-dealer or other financial intermediary (such as a bank or financial professional), the Fund and its related companies may pay the intermediary for the sale of Fund shares and related services. These payments may create a conflict of interest by influencing the broker-dealer or other intermediary and your financial professional to recommend the Fund over another investment. Ask your financial professional or visit your financial intermediary’s website for more information.
8

Hartford AARP Balanced Retirement Fund Summary Section
INVESTMENT OBJECTIVE. The Fund seeks long-term total return while seeking to mitigate downside risk.
YOUR EXPENSES. The table below describes the fees and expenses that you may pay if you buy, hold and sell shares of the Fund. You may pay other fees, such as brokerage commissions and other fees to financial intermediaries, which are not reflected in the table and example below. Please contact your financial intermediary for more information regarding whether you may be required to pay a brokerage commission or other fees. You may qualify for sales charge discounts for Class A shares if you and your family invest, or agree to invest in the future, at least $50,000 in certain classes of Hartford mutual funds or in The Hartford® SMART529® College Savings Plan. More information about these and other discounts is available from your financial professional and in the “How Sales Charges Are Calculated” section beginning on page 100 of the Fund’s statutory prospectus. Descriptions of any financial intermediary specific sales charge waivers and discounts are set forth in Appendix A to the statutory prospectus.
Shareholder Fees (fees paid directly from your investment):
Share Classes
A
C
I
R3
R4
R5
R6
Y
F
Maximum sales charge (load) imposed
on purchases (as a percentage of
offering price)
4.50%
None
None
None
None
None
None
None
None
Maximum deferred sales charge (load)
(as a percentage of purchase price or
redemption proceeds, whichever is less)
None(1)
1.00%
None
None
None
None
None
None
None
Annual Fund Operating Expenses (expenses that you pay each year as a percentage of the value of your investment):
Share Classes
A
C
I
R3
R4
R5
R6
Y
F
Management fees(2)
0.31%
0.31%
0.31%
0.31%
0.31%
0.31%
0.31%
0.31%
0.31%
Distribution and service (12b-1) fees
0.25%
1.00%
None
0.50%
0.25%
None
None
None
None
Other expenses
0.39%
0.40%
0.35%
0.47%
0.42%
0.37%
0.25%
0.34%
0.25%
Acquired fund fees and expenses
0.10%
0.10%
0.10%
0.10%
0.10%
0.10%
0.10%
0.10%
0.10%
Total annual fund operating expenses(3)
1.05%
1.81%
0.76%
1.38%
1.08%
0.78%
0.66%
0.75%
0.66%
Fee waiver and/or expense
reimbursement(4)
0.09%
0.10%
0.10%
0.20%
0.20%
0.23%
0.21%
0.20%
0.21%
Total annual fund operating expenses
after fee waiver and/or expense
reimbursement(4)
0.96%
1.71%
0.66%
1.18%
0.88%
0.55%
0.45%
0.55%
0.45%
(1)
Investments of $1 million or more will not be subject to a front-end sales charge, but may be subject to a 1.00% contingent deferred sales charge.
(2)
“Management fees” may vary based on the percentage of the Fund’s assets that is invested in one or more investment companies for which Hartford Funds Management Company, LLC (the “Investment Manager”) or its affiliates serves as investment manager (“Affiliated Funds”). The Fund does not pay a management fee for the portion of the Fund’s assets invested in the Affiliated Funds.
(3)
“Total annual fund operating expenses” do not correlate to the ratio of expenses to average net assets that is disclosed in the Fund’s annual report in the financial highlights table, which reflects the operating expenses of the Fund and does not include acquired fund fees and expenses.
(4)
The Investment Manager has contractually agreed to reimburse the Fund’s expenses (exclusive of taxes, interest expenses, brokerage commissions, extraordinary expenses, and acquired fund fees and expenses from the Fund’s investments in investment companies other than Affiliated Funds) to the extent necessary to limit total annual fund operating expenses (including acquired fund fees and expenses related to the Fund’s investments in Affiliated Funds) as follows: 0.96% (Class A), 1.71% (Class C), 0.66% (Class I), 1.18% (Class R3), 0.88% (Class R4), 0.55% (Class R5), 0.45% (Class R6), 0.55% (Class Y), and 0.45% (Class F). This contractual arrangement will remain in effect until February 29, 2024 unless the Board of Directors of The Hartford Mutual Funds, Inc. approves its earlier termination.
Example. The example below is intended to help you compare the cost of investing in the Fund with the cost of investing in other mutual funds. The example assumes that you invest $10,000 in the Fund for the time periods indicated and then, except as shown below, redeem all of your shares at the end of those periods. The example also assumes that:
Your investment has a 5% return each year
The Fund’s operating expenses remain the same (except that the example reflects the fee waiver and/or expense reimbursement arrangement reflected in the table above for only the first year)
You reinvest all dividends and distributions.
9

Although your actual costs may be higher or lower, based on these assumptions your costs would be:
Share Classes
Year 1
Year 3
Year 5
Year 10
A
$544
$761
$995
$1,667
C
$274
$560
$971
$2,118
I
$67
$233
$413
$933
R3
$120
$417
$736
$1,640
R4
$90
$324
$576
$1,299
R5
$56
$226
$411
$945
R6
$46
$190
$347
$803
Y
$56
$220
$397
$912
F
$46
$190
$347
$803
If you did not redeem your shares:
C
$174
$560
$971
$2,118
Portfolio Turnover. The Fund pays transaction costs, such as commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or “turns over” its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover rate may indicate higher transaction costs and may result in higher taxes when Fund shares are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are not reflected in annual fund operating expenses or in the example, affect the Fund’s performance. During the fiscal year ended October 31, 2022, the Fund’s portfolio turnover rate was 52% of the average value of its portfolio.
PRINCIPAL INVESTMENT STRATEGY. The Fund seeks to achieve its investment objective by investing in a broad range of equity and equity-related securities, debt securities, structured products, derivatives, money market instruments, and other investments. Under normal circumstances, the Fund targets an allocation between 30%-50% of the Fund’s net assets in equity and equity-related securities and 50%-70% of the Fund’s net assets in fixed income securities and cash instruments. Wellington Management Company LLP (“Wellington Management”), the Fund’s sub-adviser, makes asset allocation decisions within these bands at its discretion. Wellington Management regularly reviews and adjusts the asset allocations based on its fundamental research and assessment on the relative attractiveness of each asset category.
The Fund may invest in securities that principally trade in the U.S. or foreign markets. The Fund generally may invest up to 40% of its net assets in securities of foreign issuers or securities denominated in a foreign currency. The Fund may invest in equity and equity-related securities of issuers of all sizes measured by market capitalization. The Fund may invest in debt securities across varying credit quality, maturity, and duration, including investment grade debt, high yield debt, bank loans, emerging markets debt, securitized debt, convertible securities, preferred securities, government bonds, including its agencies and instrumentalities, currencies, and municipal bonds. Consistent with its investment objective, the Fund may invest in investment grade debt, non-investment grade securities (also known as “junk bonds”) and unrated securities. The Fund may purchase or sell securities on a when-issued, delayed delivery or forward commitment basis, including securities acquired or sold in the TBA market.
The Fund may buy and sell exchange-traded and over-the-counter derivative instruments. The Fund’s derivative investments may include interest rate, credit, index, and currency futures; currency, interest rate, total rate of return, and credit default swaps; currency, bond, and swap options; deliverable and non-deliverable currency forward contracts; bonds for forward settlement; and options, including buying and selling puts and calls. The Fund may invest in derivative instruments for risk management purposes and in pursuit of the Fund’s investment objective. The Fund expects to invest in equity put options as a part of its risk management component of the Fund’s investment strategy.
Wellington Management actively manages the Fund’s asset allocations among asset classes consistent with the Fund’s investment objective. To implement its asset allocation decisions, the Fund’s portfolio management team may allocate a portion of Fund assets to active strategies managed by specialized investment teams at Wellington Management that will invest the allocated assets in accordance with the Fund’s investment strategy. The Fund may invest in other investment companies advised by Hartford Funds Management Company, LLC (the “Investment Manager”) or a wholly owned subsidiary of the Investment Manager, including investment companies for which Wellington Management serves as sub-adviser, or non-affiliated investment companies. The Fund may trade portfolio securities actively.
10

PRINCIPAL RISKS. The principal risks of investing in the Fund are described below. When you sell your shares they may be worth more or less than what you paid for them, which means that you could lose money as a result of your investment. An investment in the Fund is not a bank deposit and is not insured or guaranteed by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation or any other government agency. As with any fund, there is no guarantee that the Fund will achieve its investment objective.
Market Risk –  Market risk is the risk that one or more markets in which the Fund invests will go down in value, including the possibility that the markets will go down sharply and unpredictably. Securities of a company may decline in value due to its financial prospects and activities, including certain operational impacts, such as data breaches and cybersecurity attacks. Securities may also decline in value due to general market and economic movements and trends, including adverse changes to credit markets, or as a result of other events such as geopolitical events, natural disasters, or widespread pandemics (such as COVID-19) or other adverse public health developments.
Asset Allocation Risk –  The risk that if the Fund’s strategy for allocating assets among different asset classes does not work as intended, the Fund may not achieve its objective or may underperform other funds with similar investment strategies.
Credit Risk –  Credit risk is the risk that the issuer of a security or other instrument will not be able to make principal and interest payments when due. Changes in an issuer’s financial strength, credit rating or the market’s perception of an issuer’s creditworthiness may also affect the value of the Fund’s investment in that issuer. The degree of credit risk depends on both the financial condition of the issuer and the terms of the obligation. Periods of market volatility may increase credit risk.
Active Investment Management Risk –  The risk that, if the sub-adviser’s investment strategy, including allocating assets to specialist portfolio managers, does not perform as expected, the Fund could underperform its peers or lose money. The investment styles employed by the specialist portfolio managers may not be complementary, which could adversely affect the performance of the Fund. Although the sub-adviser considers several factors when making investment decisions, the sub-adviser may not evaluate every factor prior to investing in a company or issuer, and the sub-adviser may determine that certain factors are more significant than others.
Equity Risk –  The risk that the price of equity or equity related securities may decline due to changes in a company’s financial condition and overall market and economic conditions.
Interest Rate Risk –  The risk that your investment may go down in value when interest rates rise, because when interest rates rise, the prices of bonds and fixed rate loans fall. A wide variety of factors can cause interest rates to rise, including central bank monetary policies and inflation rates. Generally, the longer the maturity of a bond or fixed rate loan, the more sensitive it is to this risk. Falling interest rates also create the potential for a decline in the Fund’s income. These risks are greater during periods of rising inflation. Volatility in interest rates and in fixed income markets may increase the risk that the Fund’s investment in fixed income securities will go down in value. Risks associated with rising interest rates are currently heightened because the Federal Reserve has raised, and may continue to raise, interest rates and inflation is elevated. Actions taken by the Federal Reserve Board or foreign central banks to stimulate or stabilize economic growth, such as decreases or increases in short-term interest rates, may adversely affect markets, which could, in turn, negatively impact Fund performance.
Loans and Loan Participations Risk –  Loans and loan participations, including floating rate loans, are subject to credit risk, including the risk of nonpayment of principal or interest. Also, substantial increases in interest rates may cause an increase in loan defaults. Although the loans the Fund holds may be fully collateralized at the time of acquisition, the collateral may decline in value, be relatively illiquid, or lose all or substantially all of its value subsequent to investment. The risks associated with unsecured loans, which are not backed by a security interest in any specific collateral, are higher than those for comparable loans that are secured by specific collateral. In addition, in the event an issuer becomes insolvent, a loan could be subject to settlement risks or administrative disruptions that could adversely affect the Fund’s investment. It may also be difficult to obtain reliable information about a loan or loan participation.
Many loans are subject to restrictions on resale (thus affecting their liquidity) and may be difficult to value. As a result, the Fund may be unable to sell its loan interests at an advantageous time or price. Loans and loan participations typically have extended settlement periods (generally greater than 7 days). As a result of these extended settlement
11

periods, the Fund may incur losses if it is required to sell other investments or temporarily borrow to meet its cash needs. Loans may also be subject to extension risk (the risk that borrowers will repay a loan more slowly in periods of rising interest rates) and prepayment risk (the risk that borrowers will repay a loan more quickly in periods of falling interest rates).
The Fund may acquire a participation interest in a loan that is held by another party. When the Fund’s loan interest is a participation, the Fund may have less control over the exercise of remedies than the party selling the participation interest, and it normally would not have any direct rights against the borrower.
Loan interests may not be considered “securities,” and purchasers, such as the Fund, may not, therefore, be entitled to rely on the anti-fraud protections of the federal securities laws. The Fund may be in possession of material non-public information about a borrower or issuer as a result of its ownership of a loan or security of such borrower or issuer. Because of prohibitions on trading in securities of issuers while in possession of such information, the Fund may be unable to enter into a transaction in a loan or security of such a borrower or issuer when it would otherwise be advantageous to do so.
High Yield Investments Risk –  High yield investments rated below investment grade (also referred to as “junk bonds”) are considered to be speculative and are subject to heightened credit risk, which may make the Fund more sensitive to adverse developments in the U.S. and abroad. Lower rated debt securities generally involve greater risk of default or price changes due to changes in the issuer’s creditworthiness than higher rated debt securities. The market prices of these securities may fluctuate more than those of higher rated securities and may decline significantly in periods of general economic difficulty. There may be little trading in the secondary market for particular debt securities, which may make them more difficult to value or sell.
Foreign Investments Risk –  Investments in foreign securities may be riskier, more volatile, and less liquid than investments in U.S. securities. Differences between the U.S. and foreign regulatory regimes and securities markets, including the less stringent investor protection, less stringent accounting, corporate governance, financial reporting and disclosure standards of some foreign markets, as well as political and economic developments in foreign countries and regions and the U.S. (including the imposition of sanctions, tariffs, or other governmental restrictions), may affect the value of the Fund’s investments in foreign securities. Changes in currency exchange rates may also adversely affect the Fund’s foreign investments.
Emerging Markets Risk –  The risks related to investing in foreign securities are generally greater with respect to investments in companies that conduct their principal business activities in emerging markets or whose securities are traded principally on exchanges in emerging markets. The risks of investing in emerging markets include risks of illiquidity, increased price volatility, smaller market capitalizations, less government regulation and oversight, less extensive and less frequent accounting, financial, auditing and other reporting requirements, significant delays in settlement of trades, risk of loss resulting from problems in share registration and custody and substantial economic and political disruptions. In addition, the imposition of exchange controls (including repatriation restrictions), sanctions, confiscations, trade restrictions (including tariffs) and other government restrictions by the United States and other governments may also result in losses. Frontier markets are those emerging markets that are considered to be among the smallest, least mature and least liquid, and as a result, the risks of investing in emerging markets are magnified in frontier markets.
Sovereign Debt Risk –  Non-U.S. sovereign and quasi-sovereign debt are subject to the risk that the issuer or government authority that controls the repayment of the debt may be unable or unwilling to repay the principal or interest when due. This may result from political or social factors, the general economic environment of a country or economic region, levels of foreign debt or foreign currency exchange rates.
Currency Risk –  The risk that the value of the Fund’s investments in foreign securities or currencies will be affected by the value of the applicable currency relative to the U.S. dollar. When the Fund sells a foreign currency or foreign currency denominated security, its value may be worth less in U.S. dollars even if the investment increases in value in its local market. U.S. dollar-denominated securities of foreign issuers may also be affected by currency risk, as the revenue earned by issuers of these securities may also be affected by changes in the issuer’s local currency.
Derivatives Risk –  Derivatives are instruments whose value depends on, or is derived from, the value of an underlying asset, reference rate or index. Derivatives may be riskier than other types of investments because they may be more sensitive to changes in economic or market conditions than other types of investments and could result in losses that significantly exceed the Fund’s original investment. Successful use of derivative instruments by the Fund
12

depends on the sub-adviser’s judgment with respect to a number of factors and the Fund’s performance could be worse and/or more volatile than if it had not used these instruments. In addition, the fluctuations in the value of derivatives may not correlate perfectly with the value of any portfolio assets being hedged, the performance of the asset class to which the sub-adviser seeks exposure, or the overall securities markets.
Futures and Options Risk –  Futures and options may be more volatile than direct investments in the securities underlying the futures and options, may not correlate perfectly to the underlying securities, may involve additional costs, and may be illiquid. Futures and options also may involve the use of leverage as the Fund may make a small initial investment relative to the risk assumed, which could result in losses greater than if futures or options had not been used. Futures and options are also subject to the risk that the other party to the transaction may default on its obligation.
Swaps Risk –  A swap is a contract that generally obligates the parties to exchange payments based on a specified reference security, basket of securities, security index or index component. Swaps can involve greater risks than direct investment in securities because swaps may be leveraged and are subject to counterparty risk (e.g., the risk of a counterparty defaulting on the obligation or bankruptcy), credit risk and pricing risk (i.e., swaps may be difficult to value). Certain swaps may also be considered illiquid. It may not be possible for the Fund to liquidate a swap position at an advantageous time or price, which may result in significant losses.
Leverage Risk –  Certain transactions, such as the use of derivatives, may give rise to leverage. Leverage can increase market exposure, increase volatility in the Fund, magnify investment risks, and cause losses to be realized more quickly. The use of leverage may cause the Fund to liquidate portfolio positions to satisfy its obligations when it may not be advantageous to do so.
Call Risk –  Call risk is the risk that an issuer, especially during a period of falling interest rates, may redeem a security by repaying it early, which may reduce the Fund’s income if the proceeds are reinvested at lower interest rates.
Mortgage-Related and Asset-Backed Securities Risk –  Mortgage-related and asset-backed securities represent interests in “pools” of mortgages or other assets, including consumer loans or receivables held in trust. These mortgage-related or asset-backed securities are subject to credit risk, interest rate risk, “prepayment risk” (the risk that borrowers will repay a loan more quickly in periods of falling interest rates) and “extension risk” (the risk that borrowers will repay a loan more slowly in periods of rising interest rates). If the Fund invests in mortgage-related or asset-backed securities that are subordinated to other interests in the same mortgage or asset pool, the Fund may only receive payments after the pool’s obligations to other investors have been satisfied. An unexpectedly high rate of defaults on the mortgages held by a mortgage pool may limit substantially the pool’s ability to make payments of principal or interest to the Fund, reducing the values of those securities or in some cases rendering them worthless. The risk of such defaults is generally higher in the case of mortgage pools that include so-called “subprime” mortgages. Uniform mortgage-backed securities, which generally align the characteristics of Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac certificates, are a recent innovation and the effect they may have on the market for mortgage-related securities is uncertain.
Restricted Securities Risk –  Restricted securities are subject to the risk that they may be difficult to sell at the time and price the Fund prefers.
Dividend Risk –  Income provided by the Fund may be affected by changes in the dividend policies of the companies in which the Fund invests and the capital resources available for such payments at such companies. At times, the performance of dividend-paying companies may lag the performance of other companies or the broader market as a whole. In addition, the dividend payments of the companies in which the Fund invests may vary over time, and there is no guarantee that a company will pay a dividend at all.
Other Investment Companies Risk –  Investments in securities of other investment companies are subject to the risks that apply to the other investment companies’ strategies and portfolio holdings. The success of the Fund’s investment in these securities is directly related, in part, to the ability of the other investment companies to meet their investment objectives. In addition, investments in exchange-traded funds (“ETFs”) and listed closed-end funds are subject to the additional risk that shares of the ETF or closed-end fund may trade at a premium or discount to their net asset value per share, or may not have an active trading market available. The Fund will indirectly bear a pro rata share of fees and expenses incurred by any investment companies in which the Fund is invested and may be higher or lower depending on the allocation of the Fund’s assets among the investment companies and the actual expenses of the investment companies.
13

U.S. Government Securities Risk –  Treasury obligations may differ in their interest rates, maturities, times of issuance and other characteristics. Securities backed by the U.S. Treasury or the full faith and credit of the United States are guaranteed only as to the timely payment of interest and principal when held to maturity. Accordingly, the current market values for these securities will fluctuate with changes in interest rates. Obligations of U.S. Government agencies and authorities are supported by varying degrees of credit but generally are not backed by the full faith and credit of the U.S. Government. No assurance can be given that the U.S. Government will provide financial support to its agencies and authorities if it is not obligated by law to do so. In addition, the value of U.S. Government securities may be affected by changes in the credit rating of the U.S. Government. U.S. Government securities are also subject to the risk that the U.S. Treasury will be unable to meet its payment obligations.
To Be Announced (TBA) Transactions Risk –  TBA transactions involve the risk that the security the Fund buys will lose value prior to its delivery. The Fund is subject to this risk whether or not the Fund takes delivery of the securities on the settlement date for a transaction. There also is the risk that the security will not be issued or that the other party to the transaction will not meet its obligation. If this occurs, the Fund loses both the investment opportunity for the assets it set aside to pay for the security and any gain in the security’s price. The Fund may also take a short position in a TBA investment when it owns or has the right to obtain, at no added cost, identical securities. If the Fund takes such a short position, it may reduce the risk of a loss if the price of the securities declines in the future, but will lose the opportunity to profit if the price rises. TBA transactions may also result in a higher portfolio turnover rate and/or increased capital gains for the Fund.
Securities Lending Risk –  The Fund may lose money because the borrower of the loaned securities fails to return the securities in a timely manner or at all. The Fund could also lose money in the event of a decline in the value of the collateral provided for loaned securities or a decline in the value of any investments made with cash collateral. These events could also trigger adverse tax consequences for the Fund.
Active Trading Risk –  Active trading could increase the Fund’s transaction costs and may increase your tax liability as compared to a fund with less active trading policies. These effects may adversely affect Fund performance.
Large Shareholder Transaction Risk –  The Fund may experience adverse effects when certain large shareholders redeem or purchase large amounts of shares of the Fund. Such redemptions may cause the Fund to sell securities at times when it would not otherwise do so or borrow money (at a cost to the Fund), which may negatively impact the Fund’s performance and liquidity. Similarly, large purchases may adversely affect the Fund’s performance to the extent that the Fund is delayed in investing new cash and is required to maintain a larger cash position than it ordinarily would. These transactions may also accelerate the realization of taxable income to shareholders if such sales of investments resulted in gains, and may also increase transaction costs.
The Fund is subject to certain other risks. For more information regarding risks and investments, please see “Additional Information Regarding Investment Strategies and Risks” and “More Information About Risks” in the Fund’s statutory prospectus.
PAST PERFORMANCE. The performance information indicates the risks of investing in the Fund. Keep in mind that past performance does not indicate future results. Updated performance information is available at hartfordfunds.com. The returns in the bar chart and table:
Assume reinvestment of all dividends and distributions
Reflect fee waivers and/or expense limitation arrangements, if any. Absent any applicable fee waivers and/or expense limitation arrangements, performance would have been lower.
Reflect the Fund’s performance when it pursued a different investment objective and principal investment strategy prior to July 10, 2019.
The bar chart:
Shows how the Fund’s total return has varied from year to year
Returns do not include sales charges. If sales charges were reflected, returns would have been lower
Shows the returns of Class A shares. Returns for the Fund’s other classes differ only to the extent that the classes do not have the same expenses.
14

Total returns by calendar year (excludes sales charges)
During the periods shown in the chart above:
Returns
Quarter Ended
Best Quarter Return
7.90%
June 30, 2020
Worst Quarter Return
-10.30%
March 31, 2020
Average Annual Total Returns. The table below shows returns for the Fund over time compared to those of the Fund’s blended benchmark and the Fund’s two broad-based market indices. The blended benchmark is calculated by the Investment Manager. After-tax returns, which are calculated using the historical highest individual federal marginal income tax rates and do not reflect the impact of state and local taxes, are shown only for Class A shares and will vary for other classes. Actual after-tax returns, which depend on an investor’s particular tax situation, may differ from those shown and are not relevant to investors who hold their Fund shares through tax-deferred arrangements, such as 401(k) plans or individual retirement accounts. For more information regarding returns, see the “Performance Notes” section in the Fund’s statutory prospectus.
Average annual total returns for periods ending December 31, 2022 (including sales charges)
 
 
Since Inception
Share Classes
1 Year
5 Years
(4/30/2014)
Class A –  Return Before Taxes
-12.73%
1.81%
2.30%
–  Return After Taxes on Distributions
-14.33%
0.42%
0.78%
–  Return After Taxes on Distributions and Sale of Fund Shares
-7.34%
0.92%
1.19%
Share Classes (Return Before Taxes)
 
 
 
Class C
-10.10%
2.00%
2.11%
Class I
-8.23%
3.01%
3.09%
Class R3
-8.73%
2.62%
2.66%
Class R4
-8.48%
2.84%
2.90%
Class R5
-8.25%
3.02%
3.07%
Class R6*
-8.13%
3.12%
3.17%
Class Y
-8.26%
3.04%
3.13%
Class F*
-8.18%
3.13%
3.17%
70% Bloomberg US Aggregate Bond Index/ 30% MSCI ACWI Index (Net)
-14.44%
1.85%
2.93%
Bloomberg US Aggregate Bond Index (reflects no deduction for fees, expenses or
taxes)
-13.01%
0.02%
1.15%
MSCI ACWI Index (Net) (reflects reinvested dividends net of withholding taxes but
reflects no deduction for fees, expenses or other taxes)
-18.36%
5.23%
6.45%
*
Class R6 shares commenced operations on February 28, 2019 and performance prior to that date is that of the Fund’s Class Y shares. Class F shares commenced operations on February 28, 2017 and performance prior to that date is that of the Fund’s Class I shares. Performance prior to an inception date of a class has not been adjusted to reflect the operating expenses of such class.
15

MANAGEMENT. The Fund’s investment manager is Hartford Funds Management Company, LLC. The Fund’s sub-adviser is Wellington Management.
Portfolio Manager
Title
Involved with
Fund Since
Lutz-Peter Wilke, CFA
Managing Director and Portfolio Manager
2020*
*
Mr. Wilke previously served as a portfolio manager to the Fund from August 13, 2015 through July 9, 2019 when the Fund pursued a different investment objective and principal investment strategy.
PURCHASE AND SALE OF FUND SHARES. Classes A, C, I, R3, and R4 of the Fund are closed to new investors. No purchases of a closed share class are allowed, except: (i) purchases by shareholders of record of the Fund as of May 31, 2019 to add to their existing Fund accounts through subsequent purchases, through conversions of their shares for another share class in the Fund, or through exchanges from other Hartford mutual funds; (ii) purchases through reinvestment of dividends or capital gains distributions; (iii) purchases by existing shareholders, or exchanges into the Fund by shareholders of other Hartford mutual funds, through participation in broker/dealer wrap-fee programs (i.e., certain approved broker/dealer wrap-fee programs can place new shareholders into the Fund); (iv) purchases by Section 529 plans that currently include the Fund within one or more of their investment options; (v) purchases by qualified employee benefit plans, such as 401(k), 403(b), 457 plans and health savings account programs (and their successor, related and affiliated plans) that have made the Fund available to participants on or before May 31, 2019; (vi) purchases by certain financial institutions or financial intermediary firms that have been approved by Hartford Funds Distributors, LLC to purchase shares of the Fund on behalf of their clients; (vii) purchases, including through reinvestment of dividends or capital gains distributions, by any shareholder who receives shares of the Fund as part of a reorganization; (viii) purchases through new accounts established with existing shares of the Fund by transfer, such as transfers as a result of death; and (ix) purchases through an approved broker-dealer by: employees of Hartford Funds Management Company, LLC and its affiliates, employees of the sub-adviser, Wellington Management Company LLP, and directors of The Hartford Mutual Funds, Inc. Please see the section entitled “Classes of Shares” in the Fund’s statutory prospectus for more information. Not all share classes are available for all investors. Minimum investment amounts may be waived for certain accounts. Certain financial intermediaries may impose different restrictions than those described below.
Share Classes
Minimum Initial Investment
Minimum
Subsequent
Investment
Class A, Class C and Class I
$2,000 for all accounts except: $250, if establishing an Automatic
Investment Plan (“AIP”), with recurring monthly investments of at
least $50
$50
Class R3, Class R4, Class R5 and Class R6
No minimum initial investment
None
Class Y
$250,000
This requirement is waived when the shares are purchased
through omnibus accounts (or similar types of accounts).
None
Class F
$1,000,000
This requirement is waived when the shares are purchased
through omnibus accounts (or similar types of accounts).
None
For more information, please see the “How To Buy And Sell Shares” section of the Fund’s statutory prospectus. You may sell your shares of the Fund on those days when the New York Stock Exchange is open, typically Monday through Friday. You may sell your shares through your financial intermediary. With respect to certain accounts, you may sell your shares on the web at hartfordfunds.com, by phone by calling 1-888-843-7824, by electronic funds transfer, or by wire. In certain circumstances you will need to write to Hartford Funds to request to sell your shares. For regular mail, please send the request to Hartford Funds, P.O. Box 219060, Kansas City, MO 64121-9060. For overnight mail, please send the request to Hartford Funds, 430 W 7th Street, Suite 219060, Kansas City, MO 64105-1407.
TAX INFORMATION. The Fund’s distributions are generally taxable, and may be taxed as ordinary income or capital gains, unless you are investing through a tax-deferred arrangement, such as a 401(k) plan or an individual retirement account. Such tax-deferred arrangements may be taxed later upon withdrawal of monies from those arrangements.
PAYMENTS TO BROKER-DEALERS AND OTHER FINANCIAL INTERMEDIARIES. If you purchase shares of the Fund through a broker-dealer or other financial intermediary (such as a bank or financial professional), the Fund and its related companies may pay the intermediary for the sale of Fund shares and related services. These payments may create a
16

conflict of interest by influencing the broker-dealer or other intermediary and your financial professional to recommend the Fund over another investment. Ask your financial professional or visit your financial intermediary’s website for more information.
17

Hartford Multi-Asset Income Fund Summary Section
INVESTMENT OBJECTIVE. The Fund seeks to provide a high level of current income consistent with growth of capital.
YOUR EXPENSES. The table below describes the fees and expenses that you may pay if you buy, hold and sell shares of the Fund. You may pay other fees, such as brokerage commissions and other fees to financial intermediaries, which are not reflected in the table and example below. Please contact your financial intermediary for more information regarding whether you may be required to pay a brokerage commission or other fees. You may qualify for sales charge discounts for Class A shares if you and your family invest, or agree to invest in the future, at least $50,000 in certain classes of Hartford mutual funds or in The Hartford® SMART529® College Savings Plan. More information about these and other discounts is available from your financial professional and in the “How Sales Charges Are Calculated” section beginning on page 100 of the Fund’s statutory prospectus. Descriptions of any financial intermediary specific sales charge waivers and discounts are set forth in Appendix A to the statutory prospectus.
Shareholder Fees (fees paid directly from your investment):
Share Classes
A
C
I
R3
R4
R5
R6
Y
F
Maximum sales charge (load) imposed
on purchases (as a percentage of
offering price)
5.50%
None
None
None
None
None
None
None
None
Maximum deferred sales charge (load)
(as a percentage of purchase price or
redemption proceeds, whichever is less)
None(1)
1.00%
None
None
None
None
None
None
None
Annual Fund Operating Expenses (expenses that you pay each year as a percentage of the value of your investment):
Share Classes
A
C
I
R3
R4
R5
R6
Y
F
Management fees
0.57%
0.57%
0.57%
0.57%
0.57%
0.57%
0.57%
0.57%
0.57%
Distribution and service (12b-1) fees
0.25%
1.00%
None
0.50%
0.25%
None
None
None
None
Other expenses
0.20%
0.18%
0.15%
0.28%
0.23%
0.18%
0.06%
0.17%
0.06%
Total annual fund operating expenses
1.02%
1.75%
0.72%
1.35%
1.05%
0.75%
0.63%
0.74%
0.63%
(1)
Investments of $1 million or more will not be subject to a front-end sales charge, but may be subject to a 1.00% contingent deferred sales charge.
Example. The example below is intended to help you compare the cost of investing in the Fund with the cost of investing in other mutual funds. The example assumes that you invest $10,000 in the Fund for the time periods indicated and then, except as shown below, redeem all of your shares at the end of those periods. The example also assumes that:
Your investment has a 5% return each year
The Fund’s operating expenses remain the same
You reinvest all dividends and distributions.
Although your actual costs may be higher or lower, based on these assumptions your costs would be:
Share Classes
Year 1
Year 3
Year 5
Year 10
A
$648
$857
$1,082
$1,729
C
$278
$551
$949
$2,062
I
$74
$230
$401
$894
R3
$137
$428
$739
$1,624
R4
$107
$334
$579
$1,283
R5
$77
$240
$417
$930
R6
$64
$202
$351
$786
Y
$76
$237
$411
$918
F
$64
$202
$351
$786
If you did not redeem your shares:
C
$178
$551
$949
$2,062
18

Portfolio Turnover. The Fund pays transaction costs, such as commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or “turns over” its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover rate may indicate higher transaction costs and may result in higher taxes when Fund shares are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are not reflected in annual fund operating expenses or in the example, affect the Fund’s performance. During the fiscal year ended October 31, 2022, the Fund’s portfolio turnover rate was 59% of the average value of its portfolio (excluding to be announced (TBA) roll transactions). If TBA roll transactions were included, the Fund’s portfolio turnover rate would have been 62% of the average value of its portfolio.
PRINCIPAL INVESTMENT STRATEGY. The Fund seeks to achieve its investment objective by investing across a broad range of asset classes. Under normal circumstances, Wellington Management Company LLP (“Wellington Management”), the Fund’s sub-adviser, targets an allocation between 30% and 50% of the Fund’s net assets in equity securities and 50% to 70% of the Fund’s net assets in fixed income securities and cash instruments. Allocation decisions within these bands will be made at the discretion of Wellington Management and will be based on its judgment of the market cycle, market risks, volatility, trends and valuations within each asset category and expected yield and total returns of each asset category. To implement their investment ideas, the portfolio managers may allocate a portion of the Fund’s assets to active strategies managed by specialized investment teams at Wellington Management that invest the allocated assets in accordance with the Fund’s investment strategy. The Fund may trade securities actively.
The equity portion of the Fund may invest in various types of equity securities, but typically invests in common stocks and equity-linked notes. The Fund may invest in equity securities of issuers with any market capitalization. The fixed income portion of the Fund may invest in various types of fixed income instruments including, but not limited to, U.S. Treasury bills, notes, and bonds; rated and unrated loan and debt obligations of corporations, including non-investment grade securities (also known as “junk bonds”) and loans and other debt obligations of corporations in default or bankruptcy; non-U.S. government and corporate securities, including emerging markets debt; convertible bonds; securitized debt (agency and non-agency), including securities acquired or sold in the TBA market; currencies; and hybrid high yield instruments, including zero coupon bonds, and units or other securities with hybrid equity characteristics. The Fund may invest in fixed income securities of any maturity or duration. The Fund may invest in foreign securities and other instruments, including investments in issuers located in emerging markets. The Fund may invest in certain restricted securities, such as securities that are only eligible for resale pursuant to Rule 144A, and securities of U.S. and non-U.S. issuers that are issued pursuant to Regulation S.
The Fund may buy and sell exchange-traded and over-the-counter derivative instruments, including interest rate, credit, index, and currency futures; currency, interest rate, total rate of return, and credit default swaps; currency, bond, and swap options; deliverable and non-deliverable currency forward contracts; bonds for forward settlement; options, including buying and selling puts and calls; and other derivative instruments for risk management purposes and otherwise in pursuit of the Fund’s investment objective.
In seeking the Fund’s investment objective, Wellington Management seeks income exposure from various sources, such as income-oriented equity securities, equity-linked notes, and fixed income securities.
PRINCIPAL RISKS. The principal risks of investing in the Fund are described below. When you sell your shares they may be worth more or less than what you paid for them, which means that you could lose money as a result of your investment. An investment in the Fund is not a bank deposit and is not insured or guaranteed by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation or any other government agency. As with any fund, there is no guarantee that the Fund will achieve its investment objective.
Asset Allocation Risk –  The risk that if the Fund’s strategy for allocating assets among different asset classes does not work as intended, the Fund may not achieve its objective or may underperform other funds with similar investment strategies.
Market Risk –  Market risk is the risk that one or more markets in which the Fund invests will go down in value, including the possibility that the markets will go down sharply and unpredictably. Securities of a company may decline in value due to its financial prospects and activities, including certain operational impacts, such as data breaches and cybersecurity attacks. Securities may also decline in value due to general market and economic movements and trends, including adverse changes to credit markets, or as a result of other events such as geopolitical events, natural disasters, or widespread pandemics (such as COVID-19) or other adverse public health developments.
19

Credit Risk –  Credit risk is the risk that the issuer of a security or other instrument will not be able to make principal and interest payments when due. Changes in an issuer’s financial strength, credit rating or the market’s perception of an issuer’s creditworthiness may also affect the value of the Fund’s investment in that issuer. The degree of credit risk depends on both the financial condition of the issuer and the terms of the obligation. Periods of market volatility may increase credit risk.
Interest Rate Risk –  The risk that your investment may go down in value when interest rates rise, because when interest rates rise, the prices of bonds and fixed rate loans fall. A wide variety of factors can cause interest rates to rise, including central bank monetary policies and inflation rates. Generally, the longer the maturity of a bond or fixed rate loan, the more sensitive it is to this risk. Falling interest rates also create the potential for a decline in the Fund’s income. These risks are greater during periods of rising inflation. Volatility in interest rates and in fixed income markets may increase the risk that the Fund’s investment in fixed income securities will go down in value. Risks associated with rising interest rates are currently heightened because the Federal Reserve has raised, and may continue to raise, interest rates and inflation is elevated. Actions taken by the Federal Reserve Board or foreign central banks to stimulate or stabilize economic growth, such as decreases or increases in short-term interest rates, may adversely affect markets, which could, in turn, negatively impact Fund performance.
Equity Risk –  The risk that the price of equity or equity related securities may decline due to changes in a company’s financial condition and overall market and economic conditions.
Equity Linked Notes (ELN) Risk –  Investments in ELNs often have risks similar to their underlying securities, which could include management risk, market risk and, as applicable, foreign securities and currency risks. In addition, since ELNs are in note form, ELNs are also subject to certain debt securities risks. Investments in ELNs are also subject to liquidity risk, which may make ELNs difficult to sell and value.
Loans and Loan Participations Risk –  Loans and loan participations, including floating rate loans, are subject to credit risk, including the risk of nonpayment of principal or interest. Also, substantial increases in interest rates may cause an increase in loan defaults. Although the loans the Fund holds may be fully collateralized at the time of acquisition, the collateral may decline in value, be relatively illiquid, or lose all or substantially all of its value subsequent to investment. The risks associated with unsecured loans, which are not backed by a security interest in any specific collateral, are higher than those for comparable loans that are secured by specific collateral. In addition, in the event an issuer becomes insolvent, a loan could be subject to settlement risks or administrative disruptions that could adversely affect the Fund’s investment. It may also be difficult to obtain reliable information about a loan or loan participation.
Many loans are subject to restrictions on resale (thus affecting their liquidity) and may be difficult to value. As a result, the Fund may be unable to sell its loan interests at an advantageous time or price. Loans and loan participations typically have extended settlement periods (generally greater than 7 days). As a result of these extended settlement periods, the Fund may incur losses if it is required to sell other investments or temporarily borrow to meet its cash needs. Loans may also be subject to extension risk (the risk that borrowers will repay a loan more slowly in periods of rising interest rates) and prepayment risk (the risk that borrowers will repay a loan more quickly in periods of falling interest rates).
The Fund may acquire a participation interest in a loan that is held by another party. When the Fund’s loan interest is a participation, the Fund may have less control over the exercise of remedies than the party selling the participation interest, and it normally would not have any direct rights against the borrower.
Loan interests may not be considered “securities,” and purchasers, such as the Fund, may not, therefore, be entitled to rely on the anti-fraud protections of the federal securities laws. The Fund may be in possession of material non-public information about a borrower or issuer as a result of its ownership of a loan or security of such borrower or issuer. Because of prohibitions on trading in securities of issuers while in possession of such information, the Fund may be unable to enter into a transaction in a loan or security of such a borrower or issuer when it would otherwise be advantageous to do so.
High Yield Investments Risk –  High yield investments rated below investment grade (also referred to as “junk bonds”) are considered to be speculative and are subject to heightened credit risk, which may make the Fund more sensitive to adverse developments in the U.S. and abroad. Lower rated debt securities generally involve greater risk of default or price changes due to changes in the issuer’s creditworthiness than higher rated debt securities. The market prices of
20

these securities may fluctuate more than those of higher rated securities and may decline significantly in periods of general economic difficulty. There may be little trading in the secondary market for particular debt securities, which may make them more difficult to value or sell.
U.S. Government Securities Risk –  Treasury obligations may differ in their interest rates, maturities, times of issuance and other characteristics. Securities backed by the U.S. Treasury or the full faith and credit of the United States are guaranteed only as to the timely payment of interest and principal when held to maturity. Accordingly, the current market values for these securities will fluctuate with changes in interest rates. Obligations of U.S. Government agencies and authorities are supported by varying degrees of credit but generally are not backed by the full faith and credit of the U.S. Government. No assurance can be given that the U.S. Government will provide financial support to its agencies and authorities if it is not obligated by law to do so. In addition, the value of U.S. Government securities may be affected by changes in the credit rating of the U.S. Government. U.S. Government securities are also subject to the risk that the U.S. Treasury will be unable to meet its payment obligations.
Active Investment Management Risk –  The risk that, if the sub-adviser’s investment strategy, including allocating assets to specialist portfolio managers, does not perform as expected, the Fund could underperform its peers or lose money. The investment styles employed by the specialist portfolio managers may not be complementary, which could adversely affect the performance of the Fund. Although the sub-adviser considers several factors when making investment decisions, the sub-adviser may not evaluate every factor prior to investing in a company or issuer, and the sub-adviser may determine that certain factors are more significant than others.
Foreign Investments Risk –  Investments in foreign securities may be riskier, more volatile, and less liquid than investments in U.S. securities. Differences between the U.S. and foreign regulatory regimes and securities markets, including the less stringent investor protection, less stringent accounting, corporate governance, financial reporting and disclosure standards of some foreign markets, as well as political and economic developments in foreign countries and regions and the U.S. (including the imposition of sanctions, tariffs, or other governmental restrictions), may affect the value of the Fund’s investments in foreign securities. Changes in currency exchange rates may also adversely affect the Fund’s foreign investments.
Emerging Markets Risk –  The risks related to investing in foreign securities are generally greater with respect to investments in companies that conduct their principal business activities in emerging markets or whose securities are traded principally on exchanges in emerging markets. The risks of investing in emerging markets include risks of illiquidity, increased price volatility, smaller market capitalizations, less government regulation and oversight, less extensive and less frequent accounting, financial, auditing and other reporting requirements, significant delays in settlement of trades, risk of loss resulting from problems in share registration and custody and substantial economic and political disruptions. In addition, the imposition of exchange controls (including repatriation restrictions), sanctions, confiscations, trade restrictions (including tariffs) and other government restrictions by the United States and other governments may also result in losses. Frontier markets are those emerging markets that are considered to be among the smallest, least mature and least liquid, and as a result, the risks of investing in emerging markets are magnified in frontier markets.
Sovereign Debt Risk –  Non-U.S. sovereign and quasi-sovereign debt are subject to the risk that the issuer or government authority that controls the repayment of the debt may be unable or unwilling to repay the principal or interest when due. This may result from political or social factors, the general economic environment of a country or economic region, levels of foreign debt or foreign currency exchange rates.
Currency Risk –  The risk that the value of the Fund’s investments in foreign securities or currencies will be affected by the value of the applicable currency relative to the U.S. dollar. When the Fund sells a foreign currency or foreign currency denominated security, its value may be worth less in U.S. dollars even if the investment increases in value in its local market. U.S. dollar-denominated securities of foreign issuers may also be affected by currency risk, as the revenue earned by issuers of these securities may also be affected by changes in the issuer’s local currency.
Derivatives Risk –  Derivatives are instruments whose value depends on, or is derived from, the value of an underlying asset, reference rate or index. Derivatives may be riskier than other types of investments because they may be more sensitive to changes in economic or market conditions than other types of investments and could result in losses that significantly exceed the Fund’s original investment. Successful use of derivative instruments by the Fund depends on the sub-adviser’s judgment with respect to a number of factors and the Fund’s performance could be
21

worse and/or more volatile than if it had not used these instruments. In addition, the fluctuations in the value of derivatives may not correlate perfectly with the value of any portfolio assets being hedged, the performance of the asset class to which the sub-adviser seeks exposure, or the overall securities markets.
Futures and Options Risk –  Futures and options may be more volatile than direct investments in the securities underlying the futures and options, may not correlate perfectly to the underlying securities, may involve additional costs, and may be illiquid. Futures and options also may involve the use of leverage as the Fund may make a small initial investment relative to the risk assumed, which could result in losses greater than if futures or options had not been used. Futures and options are also subject to the risk that the other party to the transaction may default on its obligation.
Swaps Risk –  A swap is a contract that generally obligates the parties to exchange payments based on a specified reference security, basket of securities, security index or index component. Swaps can involve greater risks than direct investment in securities because swaps may be leveraged and are subject to counterparty risk (e.g., the risk of a counterparty defaulting on the obligation or bankruptcy), credit risk and pricing risk (i.e., swaps may be difficult to value). Certain swaps may also be considered illiquid. It may not be possible for the Fund to liquidate a swap position at an advantageous time or price, which may result in significant losses.
Leverage Risk –  Certain transactions, such as the use of derivatives, may give rise to leverage. Leverage can increase market exposure, increase volatility in the Fund, magnify investment risks, and cause losses to be realized more quickly. The use of leverage may cause the Fund to liquidate portfolio positions to satisfy its obligations when it may not be advantageous to do so.
Call Risk –  Call risk is the risk that an issuer, especially during a period of falling interest rates, may redeem a security by repaying it early, which may reduce the Fund’s income if the proceeds are reinvested at lower interest rates.
Mortgage-Related and Asset-Backed Securities Risk –  Mortgage-related and asset-backed securities represent interests in “pools” of mortgages or other assets, including consumer loans or receivables held in trust. These mortgage-related or asset-backed securities are subject to credit risk, interest rate risk, “prepayment risk” (the risk that borrowers will repay a loan more quickly in periods of falling interest rates) and “extension risk” (the risk that borrowers will repay a loan more slowly in periods of rising interest rates). If the Fund invests in mortgage-related or asset-backed securities that are subordinated to other interests in the same mortgage or asset pool, the Fund may only receive payments after the pool’s obligations to other investors have been satisfied. An unexpectedly high rate of defaults on the mortgages held by a mortgage pool may limit substantially the pool’s ability to make payments of principal or interest to the Fund, reducing the values of those securities or in some cases rendering them worthless. The risk of such defaults is generally higher in the case of mortgage pools that include so-called “subprime” mortgages. The Fund may purchase or sell mortgage-backed securities on a delayed delivery or forward commitment basis through the TBA market. TBA transactions may result in a higher portfolio turnover rate and/or increased capital gains for the Fund. Uniform mortgage-backed securities, which generally align the characteristics of Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac certificates, are a recent innovation and the effect they may have on the market for mortgage-related securities is uncertain.
Restricted Securities Risk –  Restricted securities are subject to the risk that they may be difficult to sell at the time and price the Fund prefers.
Dividend Risk –  Income provided by the Fund may be affected by changes in the dividend policies of the companies in which the Fund invests and the capital resources available for such payments at such companies. At times, the performance of dividend-paying companies may lag the performance of other companies or the broader market as a whole. In addition, the dividend payments of the companies in which the Fund invests may vary over time, and there is no guarantee that a company will pay a dividend at all.
Quantitative Investing Risk –  The value of securities or other investments selected using quantitative analysis can perform differently from the market as a whole or from their expected performance. This may be as a result of the factors used in building the quantitative analytical framework, the weights placed on each factor, the accuracy of historical data supplied by third parties, and changing sources of market returns.
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Liquidity Risk –  The risk that the market for a particular investment or type of investment is or becomes relatively illiquid, making it difficult for the Fund to sell that investment at an advantageous time or price. Illiquidity may be due to events relating to the issuer of the securities, market events, rising interest rates, economic conditions or investor perceptions. Illiquid securities may be difficult to value and their value may be lower than the market price of comparable liquid securities, which would negatively affect the Fund’s performance.
Volatility Risk –  The Fund’s investments may fluctuate in value over a short period of time. This may cause the Fund’s net asset value per share to experience significant changes in value over short periods of time.
LIBOR Risk –  The Fund may invest in certain securities, derivatives, or other financial instruments that use a London Interbank Offered Rate (LIBOR) as a reference rate for various rate calculations. The ICE Benchmark Administration Limited, the administrator of LIBOR, has ceased publishing certain LIBOR settings on December 31, 2021, and the remaining LIBOR settings are expected to be discontinued on June 30, 2023. Some regulated entities (such as banks) have ceased to enter into new LIBOR-based contracts beginning January 1, 2022. The transition process away from LIBOR may lead to increased volatility and illiquidity in markets that currently rely on LIBOR to determine interest rates, and the use of an alternative reference rate (e.g., the Secured Overnight Financing Rate) may adversely affect the Fund’s performance. In addition, the usefulness of LIBOR may deteriorate in the period leading up to its discontinuation, which could adversely affect the liquidity or market value of securities that use LIBOR.
Securities Lending Risk –  The Fund may lose money because the borrower of the loaned securities fails to return the securities in a timely manner or at all. The Fund could also lose money in the event of a decline in the value of the collateral provided for loaned securities or a decline in the value of any investments made with cash collateral. These events could also trigger adverse tax consequences for the Fund.
Active Trading Risk –  Active trading could increase the Fund’s transaction costs and may increase your tax liability as compared to a fund with less active trading policies. These effects may adversely affect Fund performance.
Large Shareholder Transaction Risk –  The Fund may experience adverse effects when certain large shareholders redeem or purchase large amounts of shares of the Fund. Such redemptions may cause the Fund to sell securities at times when it would not otherwise do so or borrow money (at a cost to the Fund), which may negatively impact the Fund’s performance and liquidity. Similarly, large purchases may adversely affect the Fund’s performance to the extent that the Fund is delayed in investing new cash and is required to maintain a larger cash position than it ordinarily would. These transactions may also accelerate the realization of taxable income to shareholders if such sales of investments resulted in gains, and may also increase transaction costs.
The Fund is subject to certain other risks. For more information regarding risks and investments, please see “Additional Information Regarding Investment Strategies and Risks” and “More Information About Risks” in the Fund’s statutory prospectus.
PAST PERFORMANCE. The performance information indicates the risks of investing in the Fund. Keep in mind that past performance does not indicate future results. Updated performance information is available at hartfordfunds.com. The returns in the bar chart and table:
Assume reinvestment of all dividends and distributions
Reflect fee waivers and/or expense limitation arrangements, if any. Absent any applicable fee waivers and/or expense limitation arrangements, performance would have been lower.
Reflect the Fund’s performance when it pursued a different investment objective and principal investment strategy prior to May 1, 2019.
The bar chart:
Shows how the Fund’s total return has varied from year to year
Returns do not include sales charges. If sales charges were reflected, returns would have been lower
Shows the returns of Class A shares. Returns for the Fund’s other classes differ only to the extent that the classes do not have the same expenses.
23

Total returns by calendar year (excludes sales charges)
During the periods shown in the chart above:
Returns
Quarter Ended
Best Quarter Return
9.12%
June 30, 2020
Worst Quarter Return
-11.62%
March 31, 2020
Average Annual Total Returns. The table below shows returns for the Fund over time compared to those of the Fund’s blended benchmark and the Fund’s two broad-based market indices. The blended benchmark is calculated by Hartford Funds Management Company, LLC. After-tax returns, which are calculated using the historical highest individual federal marginal income tax rates and do not reflect the impact of state and local taxes, are shown only for Class A shares and will vary for other classes. Actual after-tax returns, which depend on an investor’s particular tax situation, may differ from those shown and are not relevant to investors who hold their Fund shares through tax-deferred arrangements, such as 401(k) plans or individual retirement accounts. For more information regarding returns, see the “Performance Notes” section in the Fund’s statutory prospectus.
Average annual total returns for periods ending December 31, 2022 (including sales charges)
Share Classes
1 Year
5 Years
10 Years
Class A –  Return Before Taxes
-16.62%
0.62%
5.12%
–  Return After Taxes on Distributions
-17.88%
-1.60%
3.78%
–  Return After Taxes on Distributions and Sale of Fund Shares
-9.60%
0.11%
3.85%
Share Classes (Return Before Taxes)
 
 
 
Class C
-13.26%
1.03%
4.96%
Class I*
-11.50%
2.08%
5.96%
Class R3
-12.04%
1.49%
5.43%
Class R4
-11.78%
1.75%
5.72%
Class R5
-11.55%
2.03%
6.03%
Class R6*
-11.43%
2.15%
6.12%
Class Y
-11.57%
2.07%
6.08%
Class F*
-11.47%
2.15%
6.01%
55% Bloomberg US Aggregate Bond Index/ 45% S&P 500 Index
-15.01%
4.55%
6.36%
Bloomberg US Aggregate Bond Index (reflects no deduction for fees, expenses or taxes)
-13.01%
0.02%
1.06%
S&P 500 Index (reflects no deduction for fees, expenses or taxes)
-18.11%
9.42%
12.56%
*
Class I shares commenced operations on March 31, 2015 and performance prior to that date is that of the Fund’s Class A shares (excluding sales charges). Class R6 shares commenced operations on February 28, 2018 and performance prior to that date is that of the Fund’s Class Y shares. Class F shares commenced operations on February 28, 2017. Performance for Class F shares prior to February 28, 2017 reflects the performance of Class I shares from March 31, 2015 through February 27, 2017 and Class A shares (excluding sales charges) prior to March 31, 2015. Performance prior to an inception date of a class has not been adjusted to reflect the operating expenses of such class.
24

MANAGEMENT. The Fund’s investment manager is Hartford Funds Management Company, LLC. The Fund’s sub-adviser is Wellington Management.
Portfolio Manager
Title
Involved with
Fund Since
Lutz-Peter Wilke, CFA
Managing Director and Portfolio Manager
2018
Loren L. Moran, CFA
Senior Managing Director and Fixed Income Portfolio Manager
2014
PURCHASE AND SALE OF FUND SHARES. Not all share classes are available for all investors. Minimum investment amounts may be waived for certain accounts. Certain financial intermediaries may impose different restrictions than those described below.
Share Classes
Minimum Initial Investment
Minimum
Subsequent
Investment
Class A, Class C and Class I
$2,000 for all accounts except: $250, if establishing an Automatic
Investment Plan (“AIP”), with recurring monthly investments of at
least $50
$50
Class R3, Class R4, Class R5 and Class R6
No minimum initial investment
None
Class Y
$250,000
This requirement is waived when the shares are purchased
through omnibus accounts (or similar types of accounts).
None
Class F
$1,000,000
This requirement is waived when the shares are purchased
through omnibus accounts (or similar types of accounts).
None
For more information, please see the “How To Buy And Sell Shares” section of the Fund’s statutory prospectus.
You may sell your shares of the Fund on those days when the New York Stock Exchange is open, typically Monday through Friday. You may sell your shares through your financial intermediary. With respect to certain accounts, you may sell your shares on the web at hartfordfunds.com, by phone by calling 1-888-843-7824, by electronic funds transfer, or by wire. In certain circumstances you will need to write to Hartford Funds to request to sell your shares. For regular mail, please send the request to Hartford Funds, P.O. Box 219060, Kansas City, MO 64121-9060. For overnight mail, please send the request to Hartford Funds, 430 W 7th Street, Suite 219060, Kansas City, MO 64105-1407.
TAX INFORMATION. The Fund’s distributions are generally taxable, and may be taxed as ordinary income or capital gains, unless you are investing through a tax-deferred arrangement, such as a 401(k) plan or an individual retirement account. Such tax-deferred arrangements may be taxed later upon withdrawal of monies from those arrangements.
PAYMENTS TO BROKER-DEALERS AND OTHER FINANCIAL INTERMEDIARIES. If you purchase shares of the Fund through a broker-dealer or other financial intermediary (such as a bank or financial professional), the Fund and its related companies may pay the intermediary for the sale of Fund shares and related services. These payments may create a conflict of interest by influencing the broker-dealer or other intermediary and your financial professional to recommend the Fund over another investment. Ask your financial professional or visit your financial intermediary’s website for more information.
25

Hartford Real Asset Fund Summary Section
formerly, The Hartford Global Real Asset Fund
INVESTMENT OBJECTIVE. The Fund seeks to provide long-term total returns that outpace inflation over a macroeconomic cycle.
YOUR EXPENSES. The table below describes the fees and expenses that you may pay if you buy, hold and sell shares of the Fund. You may pay other fees, such as brokerage commissions and other fees to financial intermediaries, which are not reflected in the table and example below. Please contact your financial intermediary for more information regarding whether you may be required to pay a brokerage commission or other fees. You may qualify for sales charge discounts for Class A shares if you and your family invest, or agree to invest in the future, at least $50,000 in certain classes of Hartford mutual funds or in The Hartford® SMART529® College Savings Plan. More information about these and other discounts is available from your financial professional and in the “How Sales Charges Are Calculated” section beginning on page 100 of the Fund’s statutory prospectus. Descriptions of any financial intermediary specific sales charge waivers and discounts are set forth in Appendix A to the statutory prospectus.
Shareholder Fees (fees paid directly from your investment):
Share Classes
A
C
I
R3
R4
R5
R6
Y
F
Maximum sales charge (load) imposed
on purchases (as a percentage of
offering price)
5.50%
None
None
None
None
None
None
None
None
Maximum deferred sales charge (load)
(as a percentage of purchase price or
redemption proceeds, whichever is less)
None(1)
1.00%
None
None
None
None
None
None
None
Annual Fund Operating Expenses (expenses that you pay each year as a percentage of the value of your investment):
Share Classes
A
C
I
R3
R4
R5
R6
Y
F
Management fees
0.80%
0.80%
0.80%
0.80%
0.80%
0.80%
0.80%
0.80%
0.80%
Distribution and service (12b-1) fees
0.25%
1.00%
None
0.50%
0.25%
None
None
None
None
Total other expenses
0.43%
0.48%
0.39%
0.51%
0.46%
0.41%
0.30%
0.40%
0.30%
Expenses of the Subsidiary(2)
0.11%
0.11%
0.11%
0.11%
0.11%
0.11%
0.11%
0.11%
0.11%
Other expenses
0.32%
0.37%
0.28%
0.40%
0.35%
0.30%
0.19%
0.29%
0.19%
Acquired fund fees and expenses
0.01%
0.01%
0.01%
0.01%
0.01%
0.01%
0.01%
0.01%
0.01%
Total annual fund operating expenses(3)
1.49%
2.29%
1.20%
1.82%
1.52%
1.22%
1.11%
1.21%
1.11%
Fee waiver and/or expense
reimbursement(4)
0.23%
0.28%
0.19%
0.31%
0.31%
0.26%
0.20%
0.30%
0.20%
Total annual fund operating expenses
after fee waiver and/or expense
reimbursement(4)
1.26%
2.01%
1.01%
1.51%
1.21%
0.96%
0.91%
0.91%
0.91%
(1)
Investments of $1 million or more will not be subject to a front-end sales charge, but may be subject to a 1.00% contingent deferred sales charge.
(2)
“Expenses of the Subsidiary” include the management fees and other expenses of the Fund’s wholly owned Cayman Islands subsidiary.
(3)
“Total annual fund operating expenses” do not correlate to the ratio of expenses to average net assets that is disclosed in the Fund’s annual report in the financial highlights table, which reflects the operating expenses of the Fund and does not include acquired fund fees and expenses.
(4)
Hartford Funds Management Company, LLC (the “Investment Manager”) has contractually agreed to reimburse expenses (exclusive of taxes, interest expenses, brokerage commissions, acquired fund fees and expenses and extraordinary expenses) to the extent necessary to limit total annual fund operating expenses as follows: 1.25% (Class A), 2.00% (Class C), 1.00% (Class I), 1.50% (Class R3), 1.20% (Class R4), 0.95% (Class R5), 0.90% (Class R6), 0.90% (Class Y), and 0.90% (Class F). This contractual arrangement will remain in effect until February 29, 2024 unless the Board of Directors of The Hartford Mutual Funds, Inc. approves its earlier termination. The Investment Manager also has contractually agreed to waive the management fee in an amount equal to the management fee paid to it by the Fund’s subsidiary. This waiver will remain in effect for as long as the Fund remains invested in the subsidiary.
26

Example. The example below is intended to help you compare the cost of investing in the Fund with the cost of investing in other mutual funds. The example assumes that you invest $10,000 in the Fund for the time periods indicated and then, except as shown below, redeem all of your shares at the end of those periods. The example also assumes that:
Your investment has a 5% return each year
The Fund’s operating expenses remain the same (except that the example reflects the fee waiver and/or expense reimbursement arrangement reflected in the table above for only the first year)
You reinvest all dividends and distributions.
Although your actual costs may be higher or lower, based on these assumptions your costs would be:
Share Classes
Year 1
Year 3
Year 5
Year 10
A
$671
$974
$1,298
$2,213
C
$304
$689
$1,200
$2,604
I
$103
$362
$641
$1,438
R3
$154
$542
$956
$2,112
R4
$123
$450
$800
$1,786
R5
$98
$361
$645
$1,454
R6
$93
$333
$592
$1,334
Y
$93
$354
$636
$1,439
F
$93
$333
$592
$1,334
If you did not redeem your shares:
C
$204
$689
$1,200
$2,604
Portfolio Turnover. The Fund pays transaction costs, such as commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or “turns over” its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover rate may indicate higher transaction costs and may result in higher taxes when Fund shares are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are not reflected in annual fund operating expenses or in the example, affect the Fund’s performance. During the fiscal year ended October 31, 2022, the Fund’s portfolio turnover rate was 206% of the average value of its portfolio.
PRINCIPAL INVESTMENT STRATEGY. Under normal circumstances, the Fund invests at least 80% of its assets in investments related to real assets and real asset companies. “Real assets” are investments that, in the judgment of Wellington Management Company LLP (“Wellington Management”), the Fund’s sub-adviser, are affected directly or indirectly by the level of and changes in the rate of inflation and, therefore, expected to provide real returns. Real return is the rate of return after adjusting for inflation. “Real assets” and “Real asset” companies include, but are not limited to: (1) investments related to telecommunications, transportation, industrial, natural resources (including energy, utilities related to natural resources, materials, metals and mining, agriculture/chemicals, and paper and forest products), infrastructure, equipment, and real estate; (2) inflation protected securities; and (3) commodities.
The Fund targets an investment allocation of approximately 50% of its net assets in equity securities, 40% of its net assets in fixed income investments, and 10% of its net assets in commodity-related investments. The allocations to fixed income securities and equity securities will generally vary by no more than +/-20% with respect to such investments and the allocation to commodity-related investments will generally range between 0% and 25%. Wellington Management has the flexibility to change such allocations significantly as market conditions change. Asset allocation decisions within these bands are at the discretion of Wellington Management and are based on Wellington Management’s judgment of the projected outlook for inflation, investment environment for financial assets, relative fundamental values, the attractiveness of each asset category, and expected future returns of each asset category. The Fund will normally invest at least 25% of its assets, in the aggregate, in the natural resources industry.
The equity portion of the Fund will invest primarily in common stocks. The fixed income portion of the Fund will invest primarily in inflation protected securities, which pay a real return plus the realized rate of inflation as measured by a benchmark price index. The fixed income portion of the Fund may invest in debt securities of any maturity or duration. The Fund may also seek commodity exposure through exchange traded funds and by investing up to 25% of its total assets in the Fund’s wholly owned Cayman Islands subsidiary, Hartford Cayman Real Asset Fund, Ltd. (“Subsidiary”). The Subsidiary (unlike the Fund) may invest without limit in commodity-related investments, including commodity-linked notes, exchange traded funds, and commodity-related derivative investments (including futures contracts, options and
27

swap agreements). The Subsidiary may also hold cash and invest in other investments, including fixed income securities, either as investments or to serve as margin or collateral. The Fund’s investment in shares of the Subsidiary is not counted for purposes of determining the Fund’s equity allocation.
The Fund may invest up to 50% of its net assets in securities of foreign issuers, including non-dollar securities and securities of emerging market issuers. Investments are deemed to be “foreign” if: (a) an issuer’s domicile or location of headquarters is in a foreign country; (b) an issuer derives a significant proportion (at least 50%) of its revenues or profits from goods produced or sold, investments made, or services performed in a foreign country or has at least 50% of its assets situated in a foreign country; (c) the principal trading market for a security is located in a foreign country; or (d) it is a foreign currency.
The Fund may use derivatives to manage portfolio risk and to replicate securities the Fund could buy. Such derivatives may include (but are not limited to) transactions designed to minimize the impact of currency movements on the Fund or to attain commodities exposure. The fixed income portion may also use derivatives for managing duration exposure and/or obtaining synthetic exposure to inflation protected securities. In connection with the Fund’s investment in certain securities and derivative instruments, the Fund may hold cash or liquid securities that can be readily converted into cash. To implement their investment ideas, the portfolio managers may allocate a portion of the Fund’s assets to active strategies managed by specialized investment teams at Wellington Management that invest the Fund’s assets in accordance with the Fund’s investment strategy.
PRINCIPAL RISKS. The principal risks of investing in the Fund are described below. When you sell your shares they may be worth more or less than what you paid for them, which means that you could lose money as a result of your investment. An investment in the Fund is not a bank deposit and is not insured or guaranteed by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation or any other government agency. As with any fund, there is no guarantee that the Fund will achieve its investment objective.
Market Risk –  Market risk is the risk that one or more markets in which the Fund invests will go down in value, including the possibility that the markets will go down sharply and unpredictably. Securities of a company may decline in value due to its financial prospects and activities, including certain operational impacts, such as data breaches and cybersecurity attacks. Securities may also decline in value due to general market and economic movements and trends, including adverse changes to credit markets, or as a result of other events such as geopolitical events, natural disasters, or widespread pandemics (such as COVID-19) or other adverse public health developments.
Asset Allocation Risk –  The risk that if the Fund’s strategy for allocating assets among different asset classes does not work as intended, the Fund may not achieve its objective or may underperform other funds with similar investment strategies.
Active Investment Management Risk –  The risk that, if the sub-adviser’s investment strategy, including allocating assets to specialist portfolio managers, does not perform as expected, the Fund could underperform its peers or lose money. The investment styles employed by the specialist portfolio managers may not be complementary, which could adversely affect the performance of the Fund. Although the sub-adviser considers several factors when making investment decisions, the sub-adviser may not evaluate every factor prior to investing in a company or issuer, and the sub-adviser may determine that certain factors are more significant than others.
Natural Resources Industry Concentration Risk –  The Fund’s investments will be focused in the natural resources industry. The natural resources industry can be significantly affected by events relating to international political and economic developments, energy conservation, the success of exploration projects, commodity prices, and taxes and other governmental regulations. Concentration in the natural resources industry may pose greater liquidity risk and increases the risk of loss should adverse economic developments occur in that industry. The securities of companies in the natural resources industry may experience more price volatility than securities of companies in other industries.
Equity Risk –  The risk that the price of equity or equity related securities may decline due to changes in a company’s financial condition and overall market and economic conditions.
Interest Rate Risk –  The risk that your investment may go down in value when interest rates rise, because when interest rates rise, the prices of bonds and fixed rate loans fall. A wide variety of factors can cause interest rates to rise, including central bank monetary policies and inflation rates. Generally, the longer the maturity of a bond or fixed rate loan, the more sensitive it is to this risk. Falling interest rates also create the potential for a decline in the Fund’s income. These risks are greater during periods of rising inflation. Volatility in interest rates and in fixed income markets may increase the risk that the Fund’s investment in fixed income securities will go down in value. Risks associated with
28

rising interest rates are currently heightened because the Federal Reserve has raised, and may continue to raise, interest rates and inflation is elevated. Actions taken by the Federal Reserve Board or foreign central banks to stimulate or stabilize economic growth, such as decreases or increases in short-term interest rates, may adversely affect markets, which could, in turn, negatively impact Fund performance.
Inflation-Protected Securities Risk –  The value of inflation-protected securities generally fluctuates in response to changes in real interest rates (stated interest rates adjusted to factor in inflation). In general, the price of an inflation-protected debt security can decrease when real interest rates increase, and can increase when real interest rates decrease. Interest payments on inflation-protected debt securities will fluctuate as the principal and/or interest is adjusted for inflation and can be unpredictable. The market for inflation-protected securities may be less developed or liquid, and more volatile, than certain other securities markets.
Credit Risk –  Credit risk is the risk that the issuer of a security or other instrument will not be able to make principal and interest payments when due. Changes in an issuer’s financial strength, credit rating or the market’s perception of an issuer’s creditworthiness may also affect the value of the Fund’s investment in that issuer. The degree of credit risk depends on both the financial condition of the issuer and the terms of the obligation. Periods of market volatility may increase credit risk.
Foreign Investments Risk –  Investments in foreign securities may be riskier, more volatile, and less liquid than investments in U.S. securities. Differences between the U.S. and foreign regulatory regimes and securities markets, including the less stringent investor protection, less stringent accounting, corporate governance, financial reporting and disclosure standards of some foreign markets, as well as political and economic developments in foreign countries and regions and the U.S. (including the imposition of sanctions, tariffs, or other governmental restrictions), may affect the value of the Fund’s investments in foreign securities. Changes in currency exchange rates may also adversely affect the Fund’s foreign investments.
Emerging Markets Risk –  The risks related to investing in foreign securities are generally greater with respect to investments in companies that conduct their principal business activities in emerging markets or whose securities are traded principally on exchanges in emerging markets. The risks of investing in emerging markets include risks of illiquidity, increased price volatility, smaller market capitalizations, less government regulation and oversight, less extensive and less frequent accounting, financial, auditing and other reporting requirements, significant delays in settlement of trades, risk of loss resulting from problems in share registration and custody and substantial economic and political disruptions. In addition, the imposition of exchange controls (including repatriation restrictions), sanctions, confiscations, trade restrictions (including tariffs) and other government restrictions by the United States and other governments may also result in losses. Frontier markets are those emerging markets that are considered to be among the smallest, least mature and least liquid, and as a result, the risks of investing in emerging markets are magnified in frontier markets.
Currency Risk –  The risk that the value of the Fund’s investments in foreign securities or currencies will be affected by the value of the applicable currency relative to the U.S. dollar. When the Fund sells a foreign currency or foreign currency denominated security, its value may be worth less in U.S. dollars even if the investment increases in value in its local market. U.S. dollar-denominated securities of foreign issuers may also be affected by currency risk, as the revenue earned by issuers of these securities may also be affected by changes in the issuer’s local currency.
Commodity Related Investments Risk –  Exposure to the commodities markets may subject the Fund to greater volatility than investments in traditional securities, which may cause rapid and substantial changes in the value of the Fund’s holdings. These investments may be affected by changes in overall market movements, commodity index volatility, changes in interest rates, lack of liquidity, speculation, or factors affecting a particular commodity, such as weather, disease, embargoes, tariffs and international economic, political, regulatory and market developments.
Derivatives Risk –  Derivatives are instruments whose value depends on, or is derived from, the value of an underlying asset, reference rate or index. Derivatives may be riskier than other types of investments because they may be more sensitive to changes in economic or market conditions than other types of investments and could result in losses that significantly exceed the Fund’s original investment. Successful use of derivative instruments by the Fund depends on the sub-adviser’s judgment with respect to a number of factors and the Fund’s performance could be worse and/or more volatile than if it had not used these instruments. In addition, the fluctuations in the value of derivatives may not correlate perfectly with the value of any portfolio assets being hedged, the performance of the asset class to which the sub-adviser seeks exposure, or the overall securities markets.
29

Leverage Risk –  Certain transactions, such as the use of derivatives, may give rise to leverage. Leverage can increase market exposure, increase volatility in the Fund, magnify investment risks, and cause losses to be realized more quickly. The use of leverage may cause the Fund to liquidate portfolio positions to satisfy its obligations when it may not be advantageous to do so.
Subsidiary Risk –  By investing in the Subsidiary, the Fund is indirectly exposed to the risks associated with the Subsidiary’s investments. The Subsidiary is not registered under the Investment Company Act of 1940, as amended (the “1940 Act”) and is not subject to all of the investor protections of the 1940 Act. Changes in the laws of the United States and/or the Cayman Islands could result in the inability of the Fund and/or the Subsidiary to operate as described in this Prospectus and the Statement of Additional Information and could adversely affect the Fund.
Volatility Risk –  The Fund’s investments may fluctuate in value over a short period of time. This may cause the Fund’s net asset value per share to experience significant changes in value over short periods of time.
Real Estate Related Securities Risk –  In addition to general market risk, the main risk of investing in real estate related securities, including real estate investment trusts (REITs), is that the value of the underlying real estate may go down due to, among other factors, the strength of the general and local economies, the amount of new construction in a particular area, the laws and regulations affecting real estate and the costs of owning, maintaining and improving real estate. The availability of mortgages and changes in interest rates may also affect real estate values. The real estate sector is particularly sensitive to economic downturns. If the Fund’s real estate related investments are concentrated in one geographic area or in one property type, the Fund will be particularly subject to the risks associated with that area or property type.
U.S. Government Securities Risk –  Treasury obligations may differ in their interest rates, maturities, times of issuance and other characteristics. Securities backed by the U.S. Treasury or the full faith and credit of the United States are guaranteed only as to the timely payment of interest and principal when held to maturity. Accordingly, the current market values for these securities will fluctuate with changes in interest rates. Obligations of U.S. Government agencies and authorities are supported by varying degrees of credit but generally are not backed by the full faith and credit of the U.S. Government. No assurance can be given that the U.S. Government will provide financial support to its agencies and authorities if it is not obligated by law to do so. In addition, the value of U.S. Government securities may be affected by changes in the credit rating of the U.S. Government. U.S. Government securities are also subject to the risk that the U.S. Treasury will be unable to meet its payment obligations.
Securities Lending Risk –  The Fund may lose money because the borrower of the loaned securities fails to return the securities in a timely manner or at all. The Fund could also lose money in the event of a decline in the value of the collateral provided for loaned securities or a decline in the value of any investments made with cash collateral. These events could also trigger adverse tax consequences for the Fund.
Active Trading Risk –  Active trading could increase the Fund’s transaction costs and may increase your tax liability as compared to a fund with less active trading policies. These effects may adversely affect Fund performance.
Large Shareholder Transaction Risk –  The Fund may experience adverse effects when certain large shareholders redeem or purchase large amounts of shares of the Fund. Such redemptions may cause the Fund to sell securities at times when it would not otherwise do so or borrow money (at a cost to the Fund), which may negatively impact the Fund’s performance and liquidity. Similarly, large purchases may adversely affect the Fund’s performance to the extent that the Fund is delayed in investing new cash and is required to maintain a larger cash position than it ordinarily would. These transactions may also accelerate the realization of taxable income to shareholders if such sales of investments resulted in gains, and may also increase transaction costs.
The Fund is subject to certain other risks. For more information regarding risks and investments, please see “Additional Information Regarding Investment Strategies and Risks” and “More Information About Risks” in the Fund’s statutory prospectus.
30

PAST PERFORMANCE. The performance information indicates the risks of investing in the Fund. Keep in mind that past performance does not indicate future results. Updated performance information is available at hartfordfunds.com. The returns in the bar chart and table:
Assume reinvestment of all dividends and distributions
Reflect fee waivers and/or expense limitation arrangements, if any. Absent any applicable fee waivers and/or expense limitation arrangements, performance would have been lower.
The bar chart:
Shows how the Fund’s total return has varied from year to year
Returns do not include sales charges. If sales charges were reflected, returns would have been lower
Shows the returns of Class A shares. Returns for the Fund’s other classes differ only to the extent that the classes do not have the same expenses.
Total returns by calendar year (excludes sales charges)
During the periods shown in the chart above:
Returns
Quarter Ended
Best Quarter Return
17.25%
June 30, 2020
Worst Quarter Return
-26.88%
March 31, 2020
Average Annual Total Returns. The table below shows returns for the Fund over time compared to those of the Fund’s blended benchmark and five broad-based market indices. The blended benchmark is calculated by the Investment Manager. After-tax returns, which are calculated using the historical highest individual federal marginal income tax rates and do not reflect the impact of state and local taxes, are shown only for Class A shares and will vary for other classes. Actual after-tax returns, which depend on an investor’s particular tax situation, may differ from those shown and are not relevant to investors who hold their Fund shares through tax-deferred arrangements, such as 401(k) plans or individual retirement accounts.
31

Average annual total returns for periods ending December 31, 2022 (including sales charges)
Share Classes
1 Year
5 Years
10 Years
Class A –  Return Before Taxes
-5.15%
2.57%
0.50%
–  Return After Taxes on Distributions
-6.68%
0.55%
-0.60%
–  Return After Taxes on Distributions and Sale of Fund Shares
-2.82%
1.31%
0.05%
Share Classes (Return Before Taxes)
 
 
 
Class C
-1.35%
2.96%
0.32%
Class I
0.63%
4.04%
1.36%
Class R3
0.12%
3.48%
0.83%
Class R4
0.37%
3.78%
1.11%
Class R5
0.64%
4.03%
1.38%
Class R6*
0.75%
4.11%
1.44%
Class Y
0.76%
4.11%
1.44%
Class F*
0.64%
4.10%
1.39%
40% Bloomberg US TIPS 1-10 Year Index/ 30% MSCI ACWI Commodity Producers Index
(Net)/ 10% Bloomberg Commodity Index Total Return/ 10% MSCI World IMI Core Real
Estate Index (Net)/ 10% MSCI ACWI Infrastructure Index (Net)
1.50%
4.40%
2.56%
Bloomberg US TIPS 1-10 Year Index (reflects no deduction for fees, expenses or taxes)
-7.35%
2.50%
1.29%
MSCI ACWI Commodity Producers Index (Net) (reflects reinvested dividends net of
withholding taxes but reflects no deduction for fees, expenses or other taxes)
21.08%
6.30%
2.94%
Bloomberg Commodity Index Total Return (reflects no deduction for fees, expenses or
taxes)
16.09%
6.44%
-1.28%
MSCI World IMI Core Real Estate Index (Net) (reflects reinvested dividends net of
withholding taxes but reflects no deduction for fees, expenses or other taxes)
-25.61%
-0.11%
3.55%
MSCI ACWI Infrastructure Index (Net) (reflects reinvested dividends net of withholding
taxes but reflects no deduction for fees, expenses or other taxes)
-4.95%
2.21%
4.34%
*
Class R6 shares commenced operations on February 28, 2022 and performance prior to that date is that of the Fund’s Class Y shares. Class F shares commenced operations on February 28, 2017 and performance prior to that date is that of the Fund’s Class I shares. Performance prior to an inception date of a class has not been adjusted to reflect the operating expenses of such class.
MANAGEMENT. The Fund’s investment manager is Hartford Funds Management Company, LLC. The Fund’s sub-adviser is Wellington Management.
Portfolio Manager
Title
Involved with
Fund Since
Nicholas J. Petrucelli
Managing Director and Portfolio Manager
2013
Brian M. Garvey
Senior Managing Director and Multi-Asset Portfolio Manager
2010
PURCHASE AND SALE OF FUND SHARES. Not all share classes are available for all investors. Minimum investment amounts may be waived for certain accounts. Certain financial intermediaries may impose different restrictions than those described below.
Share Classes
Minimum Initial Investment
Minimum
Subsequent
Investment
Class A, Class C and Class I
$5,000 for all accounts except: $250, if establishing an Automatic
Investment Plan (“AIP”), with recurring monthly investments of at
least $50
$50
Class R3, Class R4, Class R5 and Class R6
No minimum initial investment
None
Class Y
$250,000
This requirement is waived when the shares are purchased
through omnibus accounts (or similar types of accounts).
None
Class F
$1,000,000
This requirement is waived when the shares are purchased
through omnibus accounts (or similar types of accounts).
None
32

For more information, please see the “How To Buy And Sell Shares” section of the Fund’s statutory prospectus.
You may sell your shares of the Fund on those days when the New York Stock Exchange is open, typically Monday through Friday. You may sell your shares through your financial intermediary. With respect to certain accounts, you may sell your shares on the web at hartfordfunds.com, by phone by calling 1-888-843-7824, by electronic funds transfer, or by wire. In certain circumstances you will need to write to Hartford Funds to request to sell your shares. For regular mail, please send the request to Hartford Funds, P.O. Box 219060, Kansas City, MO 64121-9060. For overnight mail, please send the request to Hartford Funds, 430 W 7th Street, Suite 219060, Kansas City, MO 64105-1407.
TAX INFORMATION. The Fund’s distributions are generally taxable, and may be taxed as ordinary income or capital gains, unless you are investing through a tax-deferred arrangement, such as a 401(k) plan or an individual retirement account. Such tax-deferred arrangements may be taxed later upon withdrawal of monies from those arrangements.
PAYMENTS TO BROKER-DEALERS AND OTHER FINANCIAL INTERMEDIARIES. If you purchase shares of the Fund through a broker-dealer or other financial intermediary (such as a bank or financial professional), the Fund and its related companies may pay the intermediary for the sale of Fund shares and related services. These payments may create a conflict of interest by influencing the broker-dealer or other intermediary and your financial professional to recommend the Fund over another investment. Ask your financial professional or visit your financial intermediary’s website for more information.
33

The Hartford Checks and Balances Fund Summary Section
INVESTMENT OBJECTIVE. The Fund seeks long-term capital appreciation and income.
YOUR EXPENSES. The table below describes the fees and expenses that you may pay if you buy, hold and sell shares of the Fund. You may pay other fees, such as brokerage commissions and other fees to financial intermediaries, which are not reflected in the table and example below. Please contact your financial intermediary for more information regarding whether you may be required to pay a brokerage commission or other fees. You may qualify for sales charge discounts for Class A shares if you and your family invest, or agree to invest in the future, at least $50,000 in certain classes of Hartford mutual funds or in The Hartford® SMART529® College Savings Plan. More information about these and other discounts is available from your financial professional and in the “How Sales Charges Are Calculated” section beginning on page 100 of the Fund’s statutory prospectus. Descriptions of any financial intermediary specific sales charge waivers and discounts are set forth in Appendix A to the statutory prospectus.
Shareholder Fees (fees paid directly from your investment):
Share Classes
A
C
I
R3
R4
R5
F
Maximum sales charge (load) imposed on
purchases (as a percentage of offering price)
5.50%
None
None
None
None
None
None
Maximum deferred sales charge (load) (as a
percentage of purchase price or redemption
proceeds, whichever is less)
None(1)
1.00%
None
None
None
None
None
Annual Fund Operating Expenses (expenses that you pay each year as a percentage of the value of your investment):
Share Classes
A
C
I
R3
R4
R5
F
Management fees
None
None
None
None
None
None