2022-08-30ABFYE_08_31_PRO

 

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American Beacon
PROSPECTUS
January 1, 2023
 
Share Class
 
A
C
Y
R6
R5
Investor
American Beacon SiM High Yield Opportunities Fund
SHOAX
SHOCX
SHOYX
SHOIX
SHYPX
American Beacon The London Company Income Equity Fund
ABCAX
ABECX
ABCYX
ABCRX
ABCIX
ABCVX
American Beacon Zebra Small Cap Equity Fund
AZSAX
AZSCX
AZSYX
AZSIX
AZSPX
This Prospectus contains important information you should know about investing, including information about risks. Please read it before you invest and keep it for future reference.
As with all mutual funds, the Securities and Exchange Commission has not approved or disapproved these securities or determined if this Prospectus is truthful or complete. Any representation to the contrary is a criminal offense.

 
 
Table of Contents
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52
52
Back Cover
A-1
B-1

 
American Beacon
SiM High Yield Opportunities FundSM
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Investment Objective
The Fund’s investment objectives are to seek high current income and, secondarily, capital appreciation.
Fees and Expenses of the Fund
This table describes the fees and expenses that you may pay if you buy, hold, and sell shares of the Fund. You may pay other fees, such as brokerage commissions and other fees to financial intermediaries, which are not reflected in the tables and examples below. You may qualify for sales discounts if you and your eligible family members invest, or agree to invest in the future, at least $50,000 in all classes of the American Beacon Funds on an aggregated basis. More information about these and other discounts is available from your financial professional and in “Choosing Your Share Class” on page 42 of the Prospectus and “Additional Purchase and Sale Information for A Class Shares” on page 68 of the Statement of Additional Information (“SAI”). With respect to purchases of shares through specific intermediaries, you may find additional information regarding sales charge discounts and waivers in Appendix A to the Fund’s Prospectus entitled “Intermediary Sales Charge Discounts, Waivers and Other Information.”
Shareholder Fees (fees paid directly from your investment)
Share Class
A
C
Y
R5
Investor
Maximum sales charge imposed on purchases (as a percentage of offering price)
4.75
%
None
None
None
None
Maximum deferred sales charge (as a percentage of the lower of original offering price or redemption proceeds)
0.50
%
1
1.00
%
None
None
None
Annual Fund Operating Expenses (Expenses that you pay each year as a percentage of the value of your investment)
 
 
 
 
Share Class
A
C
Y
R5
Investor
Management Fees
0.72
%
0.72
%
0.72
%
0.72
%
0.72
%
Distribution and/or Service (12b-1) Fees
0.25
%
1.00
%
0.00
%
0.00
%
0.00
%
Other Expenses
0.16
%
0.14
%
0.16
%
0.09
%
0.44
%
Acquired Fund Fees and Expenses
0.01
%
0.01
%
0.01
%
0.01
%
0.01
%
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses2
1.14
%
1.87
%
0.89
%
0.82
%
1.17
%
Fee Waiver and/or expense reimbursement3
(0.06
%)
(0.05
%)
(0.13
%)
(0.07
%)
(0.06
%)
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses after fee waiver and/or expense reimbursement
1.08
%
1.82
%
0.76
%
0.75
%
1.11
%
1 A contingent deferred sales charge (‘‘CDSC’’) of 0.50% will be charged on certain purchases of $1,000,000 or more of A Class shares that are redeemed in whole or part within 18 months of purchase.
2 The Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses do not correlate to the ratio of expenses to average net assets provided in the Fund’s Financial Highlights table, which reflects the operating expenses of the Fund and does not include Acquired Fund Fees and Expenses.
3 American Beacon Advisors, Inc. (the “Manager”) has contractually agreed to waive fees and/or reimburse expenses of the Fund’s A Class, C Class, Y Class, R5 Class, and Investor Class shares, as applicable, through December 31, 2023, to the extent that Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses exceed 1.07% for the A Class, 1.81% for the C Class, 0.75% for the Y Class, 0.74% for the R5 Class, and 1.10% for the Investor Class (excluding taxes, interest, brokerage commissions, acquired fund fees and expenses, securities lending fees, expenses associated with securities sold short, litigation, and other extraordinary expenses). The contractual expense reimbursement can be changed or terminated only in the discretion and with the approval of a majority of the Fund’s Board of Trustees (“Board”). The Manager will itself waive fees and/or reimburse expenses of the Fund to maintain the contractual expense ratio caps for each applicable class of shares or make arrangements with other service providers to do so. The Manager may also, from time to time, voluntarily waive fees and/or reimburse expenses of the Fund. The Manager can be reimbursed by the Fund for any contractual or voluntary fee waivers or expense reimbursements if reimbursement to the Manager (a) occurs within three years from the date of the Manager’s waiver/reimbursement and (b) does not cause the Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses of a class to exceed the lesser of the contractual percentage limit in effect at the time of the waiver/reimbursement or the time of the recoupment.
Example
This Example is intended to help you compare the cost of investing in the Fund with the cost of investing in other mutual funds. The Example assumes that you invest $10,000 in the Fund for the time periods indicated and then redeem all of your shares at the end of those periods. The Example also assumes that your investment has a 5% return each year and that the Fund’s operating expenses remain the same, except that the Example reflects the fee waiver/expense reimbursement arrangement for each share class through December 31, 2023. C Class shares automatically convert to A Class shares 8 years after purchase if the conversion is available through your financial intermediary. This Example reflects your costs assuming the conversion of C Class shares to A Class shares 8 years after purchase. Although your actual costs may be higher or lower, based on these assumptions, your costs would be:
Share Class
1 Year
3 Years
5 Years
10 Years
A
$580
$814
$1,067
$1,790
C
$285
$583
$1,006
$1,996
Y
$78
$271
$480
$1,084
R5
$77
$255
$448
$1,007
Investor
$113
$366
$638
$1,415
Assuming no redemption of shares:
Share Class
1 Year
3 Years
5 Years
10 Years
C
$185
$583
$1,006
$1,996
Prospectus – Fund Summaries1 

 
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Portfolio Turnover
The Fund pays transaction costs, such as commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or turns over its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover rate may indicate higher transaction costs and may result in higher taxes when Fund shares are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are not reflected in annual Fund operating expenses or in the Example, affect the Fund’s performance. During the most recent fiscal year, the Fund’s portfolio turnover rate was 77% of the average value of its portfolio.
Principal Investment Strategies
This Fund seeks to maximize current income by investing in a diversified portfolio of fixed income securities that are generally rated below investment grade (such as Ba or lower by Moody’s Investors Service, Inc. or BB or lower by S&P Global Ratings or Fitch, Inc.) or, if unrated, are deemed to be below investment grade by the Fund’s sub-advisor, Strategic Income Management, LLC (“SiM”). These types of securities are commonly referred to as “high yield” or “junk” bonds.
The Fund seeks to achieve its investment objective by investing, under normal circumstances, at least 80% of the Fund’s net assets (plus the amount of any borrowing for investment purposes) in non-investment grade securities and/or financial instruments that provide exposure to non-investment grade securities. These financial instruments include futures contracts, foreign currency forward contracts, warrants, and swap agreements whose underlying assets are rated below investment grade.
The non-investment grade securities in which the Fund may invest include: (1) corporate bonds, (2) convertible securities, including convertible preferred securities, (3) preferred stock, and (4) variable and floating rate securities. The Fund may invest in securities of foreign issuers, including those in emerging markets. The Fund has no limitations regarding the maturities of the debt securities it can buy or whether the securities are rated. The Fund can invest in securities that are not registered and thus restricted in their ability to be traded.
The Fund’s investments in derivative instruments include futures contracts, foreign currency forward contracts, swap agreements (including credit default swaps, currency swaps, equity swaps, interest rate swaps and total return swaps) and warrants. The Fund may use these derivative instruments to enhance total return, to hedge against fluctuations in securities prices, interest rates or currency exchange rates, to manage the effective duration of its portfolio, and to manage certain investment risks or as a substitute for purchase or sale of the underlying currencies or securities.
The Fund may have exposure to non-U.S. currencies, including emerging market currencies, for investment or hedging purposes by purchasing or selling foreign currency forward contracts, including non-deliverable foreign currency forwards, and non-U.S. currency futures contracts. The Fund may also make direct investments in non-U.S. currencies and in securities denominated in non-U.S. currencies. Investments in currencies and currency hedging are established to extract value or reduce risk.
The remainder of the Fund’s assets may be invested in any other securities that SiM believes are consistent with the Fund’s objective, including investment grade fixed-income securities, Treasury futures, securities issued by the U.S. government and government-sponsored enterprises, covenant-lite” obligations and income-producing equity securities, including securities that pay dividends. The Fund may also hold certain equity securities from time to time as a result of a restructuring transaction involving a fixed income security. The Fund may invest cash balances in other investment companies, including a government money market fund advised by the Manager, with respect to which the Manager also receives a management fee.
In selecting investments for the Fund, SiM uses an approach that combines different aspects of top-down and bottom-up analysis. As part of its top-down analysis, SiM utilizes a core philosophy to identify positive long-term trends. SiM then invests in sectors, industries and companies that will benefit from these trends. Concurrent with this core philosophy, SiM’s management seeks to take advantage of market volatility by analyzing and potentially investing in sectors, industries and companies undergoing a change in dynamics that has not been fully recognized by the market. Market volatility continually provides opportunities to capture value from these types of situations. Once potential investment opportunities are identified, SiM utilizes bottom-up research to assess the fundamental strengths and weaknesses of each individual company and the best risk/reward security is chosen for inclusion in the portfolio. The Fund may have significant exposure to the Consumer Staples sector. However, as the sector composition of the Fund’s portfolio changes over time, the Fund’s exposure to the Consumer Staples sector may be lower at a future date, and the Fund’s exposure to other market sectors may be higher.
SiM may reduce or sell the Fund’s portfolio securities for a variety of reasons, including if, in SiM’s opinion, a security’s value becomes fully recognized or there is a reassessment of the fundamental attributes of the security.
Principal Risks
There is no assurance that the Fund will achieve its investment objectives and you could lose part or all of your investment in the Fund. The Fund is not designed for investors who need an assured level of current income and is intended to be a long-term investment. The Fund is not a complete investment program and may not be appropriate for all investors. Investors should carefully consider their own investment goals and risk tolerance before investing in the Fund. The principal risks of investing in the Fund listed below are presented in alphabetical order and not in order of importance or potential exposure. Among other matters, this presentation is intended to facilitate your ability to find particular risks and compare them with the risks of other funds. Each risk summarized below is considered a “principal risk” of investing in the Fund, regardless of the order in which it appears.
Allocation Risk
The allocations among strategies, asset classes and market exposures may be less than optimal and may adversely affect the Fund’s performance. There can be no assurance, particularly during periods of market disruption and stress, that judgments about allocations will be correct. The Fund’s allocations may be invested in strategies, asset classes and market exposures during a period when such strategies, asset classes and market exposures underperform.
Asset Selection Risk
Assets selected for the Fund may not perform to expectations. This could result in the Fund’s underperformance compared to other funds with similar investment objectives.
Callable Securities Risk
The Fund may invest in fixed-income securities with call features. A call feature allows the issuer of the security to redeem or call the security prior to its stated maturity date. In periods of falling interest rates, issuers may be more likely to call in securities that are paying higher coupon rates than prevailing interest rates. In the event of a call, the Fund would lose the income that would have been earned to maturity on that security, and the proceeds received by the Fund may be invested in securities paying lower coupon rates and may not benefit from any increase in value that might otherwise result from declining interest rates.
Convertible Securities Risk
The value of a convertible security, including a convertible preferred security, typically increases or decreases with the price of the underlying common stock. In general, a convertible security is subject to the market risks of stocks when the underlying stock’s price is high relative to the conversion price and is subject to the market risks of debt securities when the underlying stock’s price is low relative to the conversion price. The general market risks of debt securities that
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are common to convertible securities include, but are not limited to, interest rate risk and credit risk. Many convertible securities have credit ratings that are below investment grade and are subject to the same risks as an investment in below investment grade debt securities (commonly known as “junk bonds”). Lower-rated debt securities may fluctuate more widely in price and yield than investment grade debt securities and may fall in price during times when the economy is weak or is expected to become weak. Convertible securities are subject to the risk that the credit standing of the issuer may have an effect on the convertible security‘s investment value. Convertible securities are sensitive to movement in interest rates.
Counterparty Risk
The Fund is subject to the risk that a party or participant to a transaction, such as a broker or a derivative counterparty, will be unwilling or unable to satisfy its obligation to make timely principal, interest or settlement payments or to otherwise honor its obligations to the Fund.
“Covenant-Lite” Obligations Risk
Certain investments, such as loans in which the Fund may invest directly or have exposure to through its investments in structured securities, may be “covenant-lite.” Covenant-lite obligations contain fewer maintenance covenants than other obligations, or no maintenance covenants at all, and may not include terms which allow the lender to monitor the financial performance of the borrower and declare a default if certain criteria are breached. The Fund’s exposure to losses on such investments may be increased, especially during a downturn in the credit cycle.
Credit Risk
The Fund is subject to the risk that the issuer, guarantor or insurer of an obligation, or the counterparty to a transaction may fail, or become less able or unwilling, to make timely payment of interest or principal or otherwise honor its obligations or default completely. Changes in the actual or perceived creditworthiness of an issuer, or a downgrade or default affecting any of the Fund’s securities, could affect the Fund’s performance. Generally, the longer the maturity and the lower the credit quality of a security, the more sensitive it is to credit risk.
Currency Risk
The Fund may have exposure to foreign currencies by using various instruments. Foreign currencies may fluctuate significantly over short periods of time, may be affected unpredictably by intervention, or the failure to intervene, of the U.S. or foreign governments or central banks, and may be affected by currency controls or political developments in the U.S. or abroad. Foreign currencies may also decline in value relative to the U.S. dollar and other currencies and thereby affect the Fund’s investments.
Cybersecurity and Operational Risk
Operational risks arising from, among other problems, human errors, systems and technology disruptions or failures, or cybersecurity incidents may negatively impact the Fund and its service providers as well as the ability of shareholders to transact with the Fund, and result in financial losses. Cybersecurity incidents may allow an unauthorized party to gain access to Fund assets, shareholder data, or proprietary information, or cause the Fund or its service providers, as well as securities trading venues and their service providers, to suffer data corruption or lose operational functionality. Cybersecurity incidents can result from deliberate attacks or unintentional events. It is not possible for the Fund or its service providers to identify all of the operational risks that may affect the Fund or to develop processes and controls to completely eliminate or mitigate their occurrence or effects. The Fund cannot control the cybersecurity plans and systems of its service providers, its counterparties or the issuers of securities in which the Fund invests. Most issuers in which the Fund invests are heavily dependent on computers for data storage and operations, and require ready access to the internet to conduct their business. Thus, cybersecurity incidents could also affect issuers of securities in which the Fund invests, leading to significant loss of value.
Derivatives Risk
Derivatives may involve significant risk. The use of derivative instruments may expose the Fund to additional risks that it would not be subject to if it invested directly in the securities or other instruments underlying those derivatives, including the high degree of leverage often embedded in such instruments, and potential material and prolonged deviations between the theoretical value and realizable value of a derivative. Some derivatives have the potential for unlimited loss, regardless of the size of the Fund’s initial investment. The use of derivatives may also increase any adverse effects resulting from the underperformance of strategies, asset classes and market exposures to which the Fund has allocated its assets. Derivatives may at times be highly illiquid, and the Fund may not be able to close out or sell a derivative at a particular time or at an anticipated price. Certain derivatives may be difficult to value, and valuation may be more difficult in times of market turmoil. Derivatives may also be more volatile than other types of investments. The Fund may buy or sell derivatives not traded on an exchange, which may be subject to heightened liquidity and valuation risk. Derivative investments can increase portfolio turnover and transaction costs. Derivatives also are subject to counterparty risk and credit risk. As a result, the Fund may not recover its investment or may only obtain a limited recovery, and any recovery may be delayed. Not all derivative transactions require a counterparty to post collateral, which may expose the Fund to greater losses in the event of a default by a counterparty. There may be imperfect correlation between the behavior of a derivative and that of the reference instrument underlying the derivative. An abrupt change in the price of a reference instrument could render a derivative worthless. Derivatives may involve risks different from, and possibly greater than, the risks associated with investing directly in the reference instrument. Suitable derivatives may not be available in all circumstances, and there can be no assurance that the Fund will use derivatives to reduce exposure to other risks when that might have been beneficial. Ongoing changes to the regulation of the derivatives markets and potential changes in the regulation of funds using derivative instruments could limit the Fund’s ability to pursue its investment strategies. New regulation of derivatives may make them more costly, or may otherwise adversely affect their liquidity, value or performance. In addition, the Fund’s investments in derivatives are subject to the following risks:
Foreign Currency Forward Contracts Risk. Foreign currency forward contracts, including non-deliverable forwards (“NDFs”), are derivative instruments pursuant to a contract where the parties agree to a fixed price for an agreed amount of foreign currency at an agreed date or to buy or sell a specific currency at a future date at a price set at the time of the contract and include the risks associated with fluctuations in currency. There are no limitations on daily price movements of forward contracts. There can be no assurance that any strategy used will succeed. Not all forward contracts, including NDFs, require a counterparty to post collateral, which may expose the Fund to greater losses in the event of a default by a counterparty. The use of foreign currency forward contracts may expose the Fund to additional risks, such as credit risk, liquidity risk, and counterparty risk, that it would not be subject to if it invested directly in the securities or currencies underlying the foreign currency forward contract.
 
Futures Contracts Risk. Futures contracts are derivative instruments pursuant to a contract where the parties agree to a fixed price for an agreed amount of securities or other underlying assets at an agreed date. The use of such derivative instruments may expose the Fund to additional risks, such as credit risk, liquidity risk, and counterparty risk, that it would not be subject to if it invested directly in the securities underlying those derivatives. There can be no assurance that any strategy used will succeed. There may at times be an imperfect correlation between the movement in the prices of futures contracts and the value of their underlying instruments or indexes. There also can be no assurance that, at all times, a liquid market will exist for offsetting a futures contract that the Fund has previously bought or sold, and this may result in the inability to close a futures contract when desired. Futures contracts may experience potentially dramatic price changes, which will increase the volatility of the Fund and may involve a small investment of cash (the amount of initial and variation margin) relative to the magnitude of the risk assumed (the potential increase or decrease in the price of the futures contract). Treasury futures contracts expose the Fund to price fluctuations resulting from changes in interest rates and to potential losses if interest rates do not move as expected. Foreign currency futures contracts expose the Fund to risks associated with fluctuations in the value of foreign currencies.
 
Prospectus – Fund Summaries3 

 
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Swap Agreements Risk. Swap agreements or “swaps” are transactions in which the Fund and a counterparty agree to pay or receive payments at specified dates based upon or calculated by reference to changes in specified prices or rates or the performance of specified securities, indices or other assets based on a specified amount (the “notional” amount). Swaps can involve greater risks than a direct investment in an underlying asset, because swaps typically include a certain amount of embedded leverage and as such are subject to leverage risk. If swaps are used as a hedging strategy, the Fund is subject to the risk that the hedging strategy may not eliminate the risk that it is intended to offset, due to, among other reasons, the occurrence of unexpected price movements or the non-occurrence of expected price movements. Swaps also may be difficult to value. Swaps may be subject to liquidity risk and counterparty risk, and swaps that are traded over-the-counter are not subject to standardized clearing requirements and may involve greater liquidity and counterparty risks. The Fund may invest in the following types of swaps:
 
 
Credit default swaps, which may be subject to credit risk and the risks associated with the purchase and sale of credit protection.
 
 
Currency swaps, which may be subject to currency risk and credit risk.
 
 
Equity swaps, which may be subject to equity investments risk.
 
 
Interest rate swaps, which may be subject to interest rate risk and credit risk.
 
 
Total return swaps, which may be subject to credit risk and, if the underlying securities are bonds or other debt obligations, market risk and interest rate risk.
Warrants Risk. Warrants are derivative securities that give the holder the right to purchase a specified amount of securities at a specified price. Warrants may be more speculative than certain other types of investments because warrants do not carry with them dividend or voting rights with respect to the underlying securities, or any rights in the assets of the issuer. In addition, the value of a warrant does not necessarily change with the value of the underlying securities, and a warrant ceases to have value if it is not exercised prior to its expiration date. The market for warrants may be very limited and there may at times not be a liquid secondary market for warrants.
 
Dividend Risk
An issuer of stock held by the Fund may choose not to declare a dividend or the dividend rate might not remain at current levels or increase over time. Dividend paying stocks might not experience the same level of earnings growth or capital appreciation as non-dividend paying stocks. Securities that pay dividends may be sensitive to changes in interest rates and, as interest rates rise or fall, the prices of such securities may fall.
Emerging Markets Risk
When investing in emerging markets, the risks of investing in foreign securities are heightened. Emerging markets are generally smaller, less developed, less liquid and more volatile than the securities markets of the U.S. and other developed markets. There are also risks of: greater political or economic uncertainties; an economy’s dependence on revenues from particular commodities or on international aid or development assistance; currency transfer restrictions; a limited number of potential buyers for such securities resulting in increased volatility and limited liquidity for emerging market securities; trading suspensions and other restrictions on investment; delays and disruptions in securities clearing and settlement procedures; and significant limitations on investor rights and recourse. The governments of emerging market countries may also be more unstable and more likely to impose capital controls, nationalize a company or industry, place restrictions on foreign ownership and on withdrawing sale proceeds of securities from the country, intervene in the financial markets, and/or impose burdensome taxes that could adversely affect security prices. In addition, there may be less publicly available information about issuers in emerging markets than would be available about issuers in more developed capital markets, and such issuers may not be subject to accounting, auditing, financial reporting and recordkeeping standards and requirements comparable to those to which U.S. companies are subject.
Equity Investments Risk
Equity securities represent ownership interests in companies and are subject to investment risk, issuer risk and market risk. In general, the values of stocks and other equity securities fluctuate, and sometimes widely fluctuate, in response to changes in a company’s financial condition as well as general market, economic and political conditions and other factors. The Fund may experience a significant or complete loss on its investment in an equity security. In addition, stock prices may be particularly sensitive to rising interest rates, which increase borrowing costs and the costs of capital.
Foreign Investing Risk
Non-U.S. investments carry potential risks not associated with U.S. investments. Such risks include, but are not limited to: (1) currency exchange rate fluctuations, (2) political and financial instability, (3) less liquidity, (4) lack of uniform accounting, auditing and financial reporting standards, (5) greater volatility, (6) different government regulation and supervision of foreign stock exchanges, brokers and listed companies, and (7) delays or failures in transaction payment and settlement in some foreign markets. The Fund’s investment in a foreign issuer may subject the Fund to regulatory, political, currency, security, economic and other risks associated with that country. Global economic and financial markets have become increasingly interconnected and conditions (including recent volatility, terrorism, war and political instability) and events (including natural disasters) in one country, region or financial market may adversely impact issuers in a different country, region or financial market.
Hedging Risk
If the Fund uses a hedging instrument at the wrong time or judges the market conditions incorrectly, or the hedged instrument does not correlate to the risk sought to be hedged, the hedge might be unsuccessful, reduce the Fund’s return, or create a loss. In addition, hedges, even when successful in mitigating risk, may not prevent the Fund from experiencing losses on its investments. Hedging instruments may also reduce or eliminate gains that may otherwise have been available had the Fund not used the hedging instruments.
High-Yield Securities Risk
Exposure to high-yield, below investment-grade securities (commonly referred to as “junk bonds”) generally involves significantly greater risks than an investment in investment grade securities. High-yield debt securities may fluctuate more widely in price and yield and may fall in price when the economy is weak or expected to become weak. These securities also may be difficult to sell at the time and price the Fund desires. High-yield securities are considered to be speculative with respect to an issuer’s ability to pay interest and principal and carry a greater risk that the issuers of lower-rated securities will default on the timely payment of principal and interest. High-yield securities may experience greater price volatility and less liquidity than investment grade securities. Issuers of securities that are in default or have defaulted may fail to resume principal or interest payments, in which case the Fund may lose its entire investment.
Interest Rate Risk
Generally, the value of investments with interest rate risk, such as fixed-income securities or derivatives, will move in the opposite direction to movements in interest rates. Factors including central bank monetary policy, rising inflation rates, and changes in general economic conditions may cause interest rates to rise, which could cause the value of the Fund’s investments to decline. Additionally, the value of the income-oriented equity securities that pay dividends may decline when interest rates rise, as rising interest rates can reduce companies’ profitability and their ability to pay dividends. Interest rates may rise, perhaps significantly and/or rapidly, potentially resulting in substantial losses to the Fund. Interest rate changes may have a more pronounced effect on the market value of fixed-rate instruments than on floating-rate instruments. The value of floating rate and variable securities may decline if their interest rates do not rise as quickly, or as much, as general interest rates. The prices of fixed-income securities or derivatives are also affected by their durations. Fixed-income securities
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or derivatives with longer durations generally have greater sensitivity to changes in interest rates. Rising interest rates may cause the value of the Fund’s investments with longer durations and terms to maturity to decline, which may adversely affect the value of the Fund. For example, if a bond has a duration of eight years, a 1% increase in interest rates could be expected to result in an 8% decrease in the value of the bond. An increase in interest rates can impact markets broadly as well. To the extent the Fund holds an investment with a negative interest rate to maturity, the Fund may generate a negative return on that investment.
Investment Risk
An investment in the Fund is not a deposit with a bank and is not insured or guaranteed by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation or any other government agency. When you sell your shares of the Fund, they could be worth less than what you paid for them. Therefore, you may lose money by investing in the Fund.
Issuer Risk
The value of, and/or the return generated by, a security may decline for a number of reasons that directly relate to the issuer, such as management performance, financial leverage and reduced demand for the issuer’s goods or services, as well as the historical and prospective earnings of the issuer and the value of its assets.
Leverage Risk
The Fund’s use of derivative instruments may have the economic effect of financial leverage. Financial leverage magnifies the Fund’s exposure to the movements in prices of an asset or class of assets underlying a derivative instrument and may result in increased volatility, which means that the Fund will have the potential for greater losses than if the Fund does not use the derivative instruments that have a leveraging effect. Leverage may result in losses that exceed the amount originally invested and may accelerate the rate of losses. Leverage tends to magnify, sometimes significantly, the effect of any increase or decrease in the Fund’s exposure to an asset or class of assets and may cause the Fund’s net asset value (“NAV”) per share to be volatile. There can be no assurance that the Fund’s use of leverage will be successful.
Liquidity Risk
The Fund is susceptible to the risk that certain investments held by the Fund may have limited marketability, be subject to restrictions on sale, be difficult or impossible to purchase or sell at favorable times or prices or become less liquid in response to market developments or adverse credit events that may affect issuers or guarantors of a security. An inability to sell a portfolio position can adversely affect the Fund’s value or prevent the Fund from being able to take advantage of other investment opportunities. Market prices for such instruments may be volatile. During periods of substantial market volatility, an investment or even an entire market segment may become illiquid, sometimes abruptly, which can adversely affect the Fund’s ability to limit losses. The Fund could lose money if it is unable to dispose of an investment at a time that is most beneficial to the Fund. The Fund may be required to dispose of investments at unfavorable times or prices to satisfy obligations, which may result in losses or may be costly to the Fund. For example, liquidity risk may be magnified in rising interest rate environments in the event of higher-than-normal redemption rates. Unexpected redemptions may force the Fund to sell certain investments at unfavorable prices to meet redemption requests or other cash needs. Judgment plays a greater role in pricing illiquid investments than in investments with more active markets.
Market Risk
The Fund is subject to the risk that the securities markets will move down, sometimes rapidly and unpredictably, based on overall economic conditions and other factors, which may negatively affect the Fund’s performance. Equity securities generally have greater price volatility than fixed-income securities, although under certain market conditions fixed-income securities may have comparable or greater price volatility. During a general downturn in the securities markets, multiple assets may decline in value simultaneously. Prices in many financial markets have increased significantly over the last decade, but there have also been periods of adverse market and financial developments and cyclical change during that timeframe, which have resulted in unusually high levels of volatility in domestic and foreign financial markets that has caused losses for investors and may occur again in the future. The value of a security may decline due to adverse issuer-specific conditions, general market conditions unrelated to a particular issuer, such as changes in interest or inflation rates, or factors that affect a particular industry or industries. Changes in the financial condition of a single issuer or market segment also can impact the market as a whole. Geopolitical and other events, including war, terrorism, economic uncertainty, trade disputes, pandemics, public health crises, natural disasters and related events have led, and in the future may continue to lead, to instability in world economies and markets generally and reduced liquidity in equity, credit and fixed-income markets, which may disrupt economies and markets and adversely affect the value of your investment. Changes in value may be temporary or may last for extended periods.
Policy changes by the U.S. government and/or Federal Reserve and political events within the U.S. and abroad, such as changes in the U.S. presidential administration and Congress, the U.S. government’s inability at times to agree on a long-term budget and deficit reduction plan, the threat of a federal government shutdown and threats not to increase the federal government’s debt limit, may affect investor and consumer confidence and may adversely impact financial markets and the broader economy, perhaps suddenly and to a significant degree.
Markets and market participants are increasingly reliant upon both publicly available and proprietary information data systems. Data imprecision, software or other technology malfunctions, programming inaccuracies, unauthorized use or access, and similar circumstances may impair the performance of these systems and may have an adverse impact upon a single issuer, a group of issuers, or the market at large.
The financial markets generally move in cycles, with periods of rising prices followed by periods of declining prices. The value of your investment may reflect these fluctuations.
Recent Market Events Risk. Both U.S. and international markets have experienced significant volatility in recent months and years. As a result of such volatility, investment returns may fluctuate significantly. Moreover, the risks discussed herein associated with an investment in the Fund may be increased. An outbreak of infectious respiratory illness caused by a novel coronavirus, known as COVID-19, was first detected in late 2019 and has subsequently spread globally. The transmission of various variants of COVID-19, and efforts to contain their spread, have resulted, and may continue to result, in significant disruptions to business operations, travel restrictions and closed borders, and lower consumer demand, as well as general concern and uncertainty that has negatively affected the global economy. Any resurgence of COVID-19, a variant or other significant viruses could negatively impact the Fund and adversely impact the economies of many nations, individual companies and the global securities and commodities markets, including their liquidity, in ways that cannot necessarily be foreseen at the present time.
Although interest rates were unusually low in recent years in the U.S. and abroad, in March 2022, the Federal Reserve began to raise interest rates as part of its efforts to address rising inflation. It is difficult to accurately predict the pace at which the Federal Reserve will continue to increase interest rates, or the timing, frequency or magnitude of any such increases. Additionally, various economic and political factors could cause the Federal Reserve to change its approach in the future and the Federal Reserve’s actions may result in an economic slowdown. Unexpected increases in interest rates could lead to market volatility or reduce liquidity in certain sectors of the market.
Slowing global economic growth; risks associated with a trade agreement between the United Kingdom and the European Union; the risks associated with ongoing trade negotiations with China; the possibility of changes to some international trade agreements; tensions, war, or open conflict between nations,
 
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such as between Russia and Ukraine or in eastern Asia; political or economic dysfunction within some nations, including major producers of oil; economic stimulus by the Japanese central bank; and dramatic changes in commodity and currency prices could affect the economies of many nations, including the United States, in ways that cannot necessarily be foreseen at the present time. Russia’s military invasion of Ukraine beginning in February 2022, the responses and sanctions by the United States and other countries, and the potential for wider conflict have had, and could continue to have, severe adverse effects on regional and global economies and could further increase volatility and uncertainty in the financial markets and the prices of various commodities.
Economists and others have expressed increasing concern about the potential effects of global climate change on property and security values. Certain issuers, industries and regions may be adversely affected by the impacts of climate change, including on the demand for and the development of goods and services and related production costs, and the impacts of legislation, regulation and international accords related to climate change, as well as any indirect consequences of regulation or business trends driven by climate change.
 
Market Timing Risk
The Fund is subject to the risk of market timing activities by investors due to the nature of the Fund’s investments, which requires the Fund, in certain instances, to fair value certain of its investments. Some investors may engage in frequent short-term trading in the Fund to take advantage of any price differentials that may be reflected in the net asset value (“NAV”) of the Fund’s shares. Frequent trading by Fund shareholders poses risks to other shareholders in the Fund, including (i) the dilution of the Fund’s NAV, (ii) an increase in the Fund’s expenses, and (iii) interference with the ability to execute efficient investment strategies.
Other Investment Companies Risk
To the extent that the Fund invests in shares of other registered investment companies, the Fund will indirectly bear the fees and expenses charged by those investment companies in addition to the Fund’s direct fees and expenses. To the extent the Fund invests in other investment companies that invest in equity securities, fixed-income securities and/or foreign securities, or that track an index, the Fund is subject to the risks associated with the underlying investments held by the investment company or the index fluctuations to which the investment company is subject. The Fund will be subject to the risks associated with investments in those companies, including but not limited to the following:
Government Money Market Funds Risk. Investments in government money market funds are subject to interest rate risk, credit risk, and market risk.
 
Preferred Stock Risk
Preferred stocks are sensitive to movements in interest rates. Preferred stocks may be less liquid than common stocks and, unlike common stocks, participation in the growth of an issuer may be limited. Distributions on preferred stocks generally are payable at the discretion of an issuer and after required payments to bond holders. In certain situations, an issuer may call or redeem its preferred stock or convert it to common stock. The market prices of preferred stocks are generally more sensitive to actual or perceived changes in the issuer’s financial condition or prospects than are the prices of debt securities.
Redemption Risk
The Fund may experience periods of high levels of redemptions that could cause the Fund to sell assets at inopportune times or at a loss or depressed value. Heavy redemptions could hurt the Fund’s performance. The sale of assets to meet redemption requests may create net capital gains, which could cause the Fund to have to distribute substantial capital gains. Redemption risk is greater to the extent that one or more investors or intermediaries control a large percentage of investments in the Fund. In addition, redemption risk is heightened during periods of declining or illiquid markets. A rise in interest rates or other market developments may cause investors to move out of fixed-income securities on a large scale. During periods of heavy redemptions, the Fund may borrow funds through the interfund credit facility or from a bank line of credit, which may increase costs. The sale of assets to meet redemption requests may create net capital gains or losses, which could cause the Fund to have to distribute substantial capital gains.
Reliance on Corporate Management and Financial Reporting Risk
The sub-advisor may select investments for the Fund in part on the basis of information and data made directly available to the sub-advisor by the issuers of securities or through sources other than the issuers such as collateral pool servicers. The sub-advisor has no ability to independently verify such information and data and is therefore dependent upon the integrity of the management of these issuers and of such servicers and the financial and collateral performance reporting processes in general. Information and data provided regarding a particular issuer may not necessarily contain information that the sub-advisor normally considers when evaluating the investment prospects of a company.
Restricted Securities Risk
Securities not registered in the U.S. under the Securities Act of 1933, as amended (the “Securities Act”), or in non-U.S. markets pursuant to similar regulations, including “Section 4(a)(2)” securities and “Rule 144A” securities, are restricted as to their resale. Such securities may not be listed on an exchange and may have no active trading market. The prices of these securities may be more difficult to determine than publicly traded securities and these securities may involve heightened risk as compared to investments in securities of publicly traded companies. They may be more difficult to purchase or sell at an advantageous time or price because such securities may not be readily marketable in broad public markets or may have to be held for a certain time period before they can be resold. The Fund may not be able to sell a restricted security when the sub-advisor considers it desirable to do so and/or may have to sell the security at a lower price than the Fund believes is its fair market value. In addition, transaction costs may be higher for restricted securities and the Fund may receive only limited information regarding the issuer of a restricted security. The Fund may have to bear the expense of registering restricted securities for resale and the risk of substantial delays in effecting the registration.
Sector Risk
When the Fund focuses its investments in certain sectors of the economy, its performance may be driven largely by sector performance and could fluctuate more widely than if the Fund were invested more evenly across sectors. Individual sectors may be more volatile, and may perform differently, than the broader market. As the Fund’s portfolio changes over time, the Fund’s exposure to a particular sector may become higher or lower.
Consumer Staples Sector Risk. The consumer staples sector generally consists of companies whose primary lines of business are food, beverage and other household items. This sector can be affected by, among other things, changes in price and availability of underlying commodities, changes in energy prices and global economic conditions. Unlike the consumer discretionary sector, companies in the consumer staples sector have historically been characterized as non-cyclical in nature and therefore less volatile in times of change. Companies in the consumer staples sector are subject to government regulation affecting the permissibility of using various food additives and production methods, which could affect company profitability. Tobacco companies may be adversely affected by the adoption of proposed legislation or regulations and/or by litigation.
 
Secured, Partially Secured and Unsecured Obligation Risk
Debt obligations may be secured, partially secured or unsecured. Interests in secured and partially-secured obligations have the benefit of collateral and, typically, of restrictive covenants limiting the ability of the borrower to further encumber its assets. However, there is no assurance that the liquidation of collateral from a secured or partially-secured obligation would satisfy the borrower’s obligation, or that the collateral can be liquidated. Furthermore, there is a risk that the value of any collateral securing an obligation in which the Fund has an interest may decline and that the collateral may not be sufficient to cover the amount owed on the obligation. In the event the borrower defaults, the Fund’s access to the collateral may be limited or delayed by bankruptcy or other
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insolvency laws. Unsecured debt, including senior unsecured and subordinated debt, will not be secured by any collateral and will be effectively subordinated to a borrower’s secured indebtedness (to the extent of the collateral securing such indebtedness). With respect to unsecured obligations, the Fund lacks any collateral on which to foreclose to satisfy its claim in whole or in part. Such instruments generally have greater price volatility than that of fully secured holdings and may be less liquid.
Securities Selection Risk
Securities selected for the Fund may not perform to expectations. This could result in the Fund’s underperformance compared to its benchmark index(es), or other funds with similar investment objectives or strategies.
Segregated Assets Risk
In connection with certain transactions that may give rise to future payment obligations, the Fund may be required to maintain a segregated amount of, or otherwise earmark, cash or liquid securities to cover the obligation. Segregated assets generally cannot be sold while the position they are covering is outstanding, unless they are replaced with other assets of equal value. The need to segregate cash or other liquid securities could limit the Fund’s ability to pursue other opportunities as they arise.
U.S. Government Securities and Government-Sponsored Enterprises Risk
A security backed by the U.S. Treasury or the full faith and credit of the United States is guaranteed only as to the timely payment of interest and principal when held to maturity. The market prices for such securities are not guaranteed and will fluctuate. Securities held by the Fund that are issued by government-sponsored enterprises, such as the Federal National Mortgage Association (‘‘Fannie Mae’’), Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation (‘‘Freddie Mac’’), Federal Home Loan Bank (‘‘FHLB’’), Federal Farm Credit Bank (“FFCB”), and the Tennessee Valley Authority, are not guaranteed by the U.S. Treasury and are not backed by the full faith and credit of the U.S. government, and no assurance can be given that the U.S. government will provide financial support if these organizations do not have the funds to meet future payment obligations. U.S. government securities and securities of government-sponsored entities are also subject to credit risk, interest rate risk and market risk. The rising U.S. national debt may lead to adverse impacts on the value of U.S. government securities due to potentially higher costs for the U.S. government to obtain new financing.
Unrated Securities Risk
Because the Fund may purchase securities that are not rated by any rating organization, the sub-advisor, after assessing their credit quality, may internally assign ratings to certain of those securities in categories similar to those of rating organizations. Unrated securities are subject to the risk that the sub-advisor may not accurately evaluate the security’s comparative credit rating. Some unrated securities may not have an active trading market or may be difficult to value, which means the Fund might have difficulty selling them promptly at an acceptable price. Unrated securities may be subject to greater liquidity risk and price volatility.
Valuation Risk
The Fund may value certain assets at a price different from the price at which they can be sold. This risk may be especially pronounced for investments that are illiquid or may become illiquid, or securities that trade in relatively thin markets and/or markets that experience extreme volatility. The Fund’s ability to value its investments in an accurate and timely manner may be impacted by technological issues and/or errors by third party service providers, such as pricing services or accounting agents.
Variable and Floating Rate Securities Risk
The coupons on variable and floating-rate securities are not fixed and may fluctuate based upon changes in market rates. A variable rate security has a coupon that is adjusted at pre-designated periods in response to changes in the market rate of interest on which the coupon is based. The coupon on a floating rate security is generally based on an interest rate, such as a money-market index, LIBOR, Secured Overnight Financing Rate (“SOFR”), or a Treasury bill rate. Variable and floating rate securities are subject to interest rate risk and credit risk. As short-term interest rates decline, the coupons on variable and floating-rate securities typically decrease. Alternatively, during periods of rising short-term interest rates, the coupons on variable and floating-rate securities typically increase. Changes in the coupons of variable and floating-rate securities may lag behind changes in market rates or may have limits on the maximum increases in the coupon rates. The value of variable and floating-rate securities may decline if their coupons do not rise as much, or as quickly, as interest rates in general. Conversely, variable and floating rate securities will not generally increase in value if interest rates decline. Certain types of variable and floating rate instruments may be subject to greater liquidity risk than other debt securities.
Volatility Risk
The Fund may have investments that appreciate or decrease significantly in value over short periods of time. This may cause the Fund’s NAV to experience significant increases or declines in value over short periods of time.
Fund Performance
The bar chart and table below provide an indication of risk by showing changes in the Fund’s performance over time. The bar chart shows how the Fund’s performance has varied from year to year. The table shows how the Fund’s performance compares to a broad-based market index, which is the Fund’s benchmark index, for the periods indicated.
You may obtain updated performance information on the Fund’s website at www.americanbeaconfunds.com. Past performance (before and after taxes) is not necessarily an indication of how the Fund will perform in the future.
Calendar year total returns for Investor Class Shares. Year Ended 12/31
image
Highest Quarterly Return:
15.48%2nd Quarter 2020
01/01/2012 through 12/31/2021
Lowest Quarterly Return:
-19.50%1st Quarter 2020
01/01/2012 through 12/31/2021
The calendar year-to-date total return as of September 30, 2022 was -10.86%.
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Average annual total returns for periods ended December 31, 2021
 
Inception Date of Class
1 Year
5 Years
10 Years
Investor Class
02/14/2011
Returns Before Taxes
8.34
%
6.32
%
7.32
%
Returns After Taxes on Distributions
6.15
%
3.90
%
4.53
%
Returns After Taxes on Distributions and Sales of Fund Shares
4.92
%
3.77
%
4.43
%
 
Inception Date of Class
1 Year
5 Years
10 Years
Share Class (Before Taxes)
A
02/14/2011
3.22
%
5.21
%
6.70
%
C
02/14/2011
6.65
%
5.56
%
6.48
%
Y
02/14/2011
8.82
%
6.64
%
7.62
%
R5
02/14/2011
8.81
%
6.68
%
7.69
%
 
1 Year
5 Years
10 Years
Index (Reflects no deduction for fees, expenses, or taxes)
ICE BofA US High Yield Index
5.36
%
6.10
%
6.72
%
After-tax returns are calculated using the historical highest individual federal marginal income tax rates and do not reflect the impact of state and local income taxes. Actual after-tax returns depend on an investor’s tax situation and may differ from those shown. The return after taxes on distributions and sale of Fund shares may exceed the return before taxes due to an assumed tax benefit from any losses on a sale of Fund shares at the end of the measurement period. If you are a tax-exempt entity or hold your Fund shares through a tax-deferred arrangement, such as an individual retirement account (“IRA”) or a 401(k) plan, the after-tax returns do not apply to your situation. After-tax returns are shown only for the Fund’s Investor Class shares; after-tax returns for other share classes will vary.
Management
The Manager
The Fund has retained American Beacon Advisors, Inc. to serve as its Manager.
Sub-Advisor
The Fund’s investment sub-advisor is Strategic Income Management, LLC.
Portfolio Managers
Strategic Income Management, LLC
Gary Pokrzywinski
President
Lead Portfolio Manager
Since Fund Inception (2011)
Ryan C. Larson
Portfolio Manager
Since 2018
Purchase and Sale of Fund Shares
You may buy or sell shares of the Fund through a retirement plan, an investment professional, a broker-dealer, or other financial intermediary. You may purchase or redeem shares of the Fund on any day the New York Stock Exchange (“NYSE”) is open, at the Fund’s net asset value (“NAV”) per share next calculated after your order is received in proper form, subject to any applicable sales charge. The Manager may, in its sole discretion, allow certain individuals to invest directly in the Fund. For more information regarding eligibility to invest directly please see “About Your Investment - Purchase and Redemption of Shares.” Direct mutual fund account shareholders may buy subsequent shares or sell shares in various ways:
Internet
www.americanbeaconfunds.com
Phone
To reach an American Beacon representative call 1-800-658-5811, option 1
Through the Automated Voice Response Service call 1-800-658-5811, option 2 (Investor Class only)
Mail
American Beacon Funds
P.O. Box 219643
Kansas City, MO 64121-9643
Overnight Delivery:
American Beacon Funds
430 W. 7th Street, Suite 219643
Kansas City, MO 64105-1407
 
New Account
Existing Account
Share Class
Minimum Initial Investment Amount
Purchase/Redemption Minimum by Check/ACH/Exchange
Purchase/Redemption Minimum by Wire
C
$1,000
$50
$250
A, Investor
$2,500
$50
$250
Y
$100,000
$50
None
R5
$250,000
$50
None
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Tax Information
Dividends, capital gains distributions, and other distributions, if any, that you receive from the Fund are subject to federal income tax and may also be subject to state and local income taxes, unless you are a tax-exempt entity or your account is tax-deferred, such as an individual retirement account (“IRA”) or a 401(k) plan (in which case you may be taxed later, upon the withdrawal of your investment from such account or plan).
Payments to Broker-Dealers and Other Financial Intermediaries
If you purchase shares of the Fund through a broker-dealer or other financial intermediary (such as a bank), the Fund and the Fund’s distributor, Resolute Investment Distributors, Inc., or the Manager may pay the intermediary for the sale of Fund shares and related services. These payments may create a conflict of interest by influencing the broker-dealer or other intermediary and your individual financial professional to recommend the Fund over another investment. Ask your individual financial professional or visit your financial intermediary’s website for more information.
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American Beacon
The London Company Income Equity FundSM
image
Investment Objective
The Fund’s investment objective is current income, with a secondary objective of capital appreciation.
Fees and Expenses of the Fund
This table describes the fees and expenses that you may pay if you buy, hold, and sell shares of the Fund. You may pay other fees, such as brokerage commissions and other fees to financial intermediaries, which are not reflected in the tables and examples below. You may qualify for sales discounts if you and your eligible family members invest, or agree to invest in the future, at least $50,000 in all classes of the American Beacon Funds on an aggregated basis. More information about these and other discounts is available from your financial professional and in “Choosing Your Share Class” on page 42 of the Prospectus and “Additional Purchase and Sale Information for A Class Shares” on page 68 of the Statement of Additional Information (“SAI”). With respect to purchases of shares through specific intermediaries, you may find additional information regarding sales charge discounts and waivers in Appendix A to the Fund’s Prospectus entitled “Intermediary Sales Charge Discounts, Waivers and Other Information.”
Shareholder Fees (fees paid directly from your investment)
Share Class
A
C
Y
R6
R5
Investor
Maximum sales charge imposed on purchases (as a percentage of offering price)
5.75
%
None
None
None
None
None
Maximum deferred sales charge (as a percentage of the lower of original offering price or redemption proceeds)
0.50
%
1
1.00
%
None
None
None
None
Annual Fund Operating Expenses (Expenses that you pay each year as a percentage of the value of your investment)
 
 
 
 
 
Share Class
A
C
Y
R6
R5
Investor
Management Fees
0.66
%
0.66
%
0.66
%
0.66
%
0.66
%
0.66
%
Distribution and/or Service (12b-1) Fees
0.25
%
1.00
%
0.00
%
0.00
%
0.00
%
0.00
%
Other Expenses2
0.14
%
0.12
%
0.14
%
0.07
%
0.08
%
0.40
%
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses
1.05
%
1.78
%
0.80
%
0.73
%
0.74
%
1.06
%
Fee Waiver and/or expense reimbursement3
0.00
%
0.00
%
0.00
%
(0.02
%)
0.00
%
0.00
%
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses after fee waiver and/or expense reimbursement
1.05
%
1.78
%
0.80
%
0.71
%
0.74
%
1.06
%
1 A contingent deferred sales charge (‘‘CDSC’’) of 0.50% will be charged on certain purchases of $1,000,000 or more of A Class shares that are redeemed in whole or part within 18 months of purchase.
2 During the fiscal year ended August 31, 2022, the Fund paid amounts to American Beacon Advisors, Inc. (the “Manager”) that were previously waived and/or reimbursed under a contractual fee waiver/expense reimbursement agreement for the Fund’s R6 Class shares in the amount of 0.03%.
3 The Manager has contractually agreed to waive fees and/or reimburse expenses of the Fund’s R6 Class shares, through December 31, 2023, to the extent that Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses exceed 0.71% for the R6 Class shares (excluding taxes, interest, brokerage commissions, acquired fund fees and expenses, securities lending fees, expenses associated with securities sold short, litigation, and other extraordinary expenses). The contractual expense reimbursement can be changed or terminated only in the discretion and with the approval of a majority of the Fund’s Board of Trustees. The Manager will itself waive fees and/or reimburse expenses of the Fund to maintain the contractual expense ratio caps for each applicable class of shares or make arrangements with other service providers to do so. The Manager may also, from time to time, voluntarily waive fees and/or reimburse expenses of the Fund. The Manager can be reimbursed by the Fund for any contractual or voluntary fee waivers or expense reimbursements if reimbursement to the Manager (a) occurs within three years from the date of the Manager’s waiver/reimbursement and (b) does not cause the Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses of a class to exceed the lesser of the contractual percentage limit in effect at the time of the waiver/reimbursement or the time of the recoupment.
Example
This Example is intended to help you compare the cost of investing in the Fund with the cost of investing in other mutual funds. The Example assumes that you invest $10,000 in the Fund for the time periods indicated and then redeem all of your shares at the end of those periods. The Example also assumes that your investment has a 5% return each year and that the Fund’s operating expenses remain the same, except that the Example reflects the fee waiver/expense reimbursement arrangement for the R6 Class shares through December 31, 2023. C Class shares automatically convert to A Class shares 8 years after purchase if the conversion is available through your financial intermediary. This Example reflects your costs assuming the conversion of C Class shares to A Class shares 8 years after purchase. Although your actual costs may be higher or lower, based on these assumptions, your costs would be:
Share Class
1 Year
3 Years
5 Years
10 Years
A
$676
$890
$1,121
$1,784
C
$281
$560
$964
$1,902
Y
$82
$255
$444
$990
R6
$73
$231
$404
$905
R5
$76
$237
$411
$918
Investor
$108
$337
$585
$1,294
Assuming no redemption of shares:
Share Class
1 Year
3 Years
5 Years
10 Years
C
$181
$560
$964
$1,902
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Portfolio Turnover
The Fund pays transaction costs, such as commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or “turns over” its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover rate may indicate higher transaction costs and may result in higher taxes when Fund shares are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are not reflected in annual Fund operating expenses or in the Example, affect the Fund’s performance. During the most recent fiscal year, the Fund’s portfolio turnover rate was 9% of the average value of its portfolio.
Principal Investment Strategies
Under normal market conditions, at least 80% of the Fund’s net assets (plus the amount of any borrowings for investment purposes) are invested in equity and equity-related investments. The Fund’s investments in equity and equity-related investments include U.S. common stocks, American Depositary Receipts (“ADRs”), U.S. dollar-denominated foreign stocks traded on U.S. exchanges, preferred stocks, and real estate investment trusts (“REITs”). The Fund may invest in large- and mid-capitalization companies and will typically hold 30 to 40 issuers.
The Fund’s investment sub-advisor, The London Company of Virginia, LLC (“The London Company”), emphasizes investments in profitable, financially stable, core companies that focus on generating high dividend income, are run by shareholder-oriented management with strong corporate governance practices and trade at reasonable valuations relative to their peers and market, which may include investments in growth companies. The London Company also seeks companies with high return on capital, consistent free cash flow generation, predictability and stability. The London Company employs an investment process with bottom-up, fundamental analysis and follows a strict sell discipline.
The Fund may have significant exposure to the Information Technology sector. However, as the sector composition of the Fund’s portfolio changes over time, the Fund’s exposure to the Information Technology sector may be lower at a future date, and the Fund’s exposure to other market sectors may be higher.
The Fund may invest cash balances in other investment companies, including a government money market fund advised by the Manager, with respect to which the Manager also earns a management fee. The Fund also may purchase and sell equity index futures contracts to gain market exposure on cash balances or reduce market exposure in anticipation of liquidity needs. The Fund may seek to earn additional income by lending its securities to certain qualified broker-dealers and institutions.
Principal Risks
There is no assurance that the Fund will achieve its investment objectives and you could lose part or all of your investment in the Fund. The Fund is not designed for investors who need an assured level of current income and is intended to be a long-term investment. The Fund is not a complete investment program and may not be appropriate for all investors. Investors should carefully consider their own investment goals and risk tolerance before investing in the Fund. The principal risks of investing in the Fund listed below are presented in alphabetical order and not in order of importance or potential exposure. Among other matters, this presentation is intended to facilitate your ability to find particular risks and compare them with the risks of other funds. Each risk summarized below is considered a “principal risk” of investing in the Fund, regardless of the order in which it appears.
Cybersecurity and Operational Risk
Operational risks arising from, among other problems, human errors, systems and technology disruptions or failures, or cybersecurity incidents may negatively impact the Fund and its service providers as well as the ability of shareholders to transact with the Fund, and result in financial losses. Cybersecurity incidents may allow an unauthorized party to gain access to Fund assets, shareholder data, or proprietary information, or cause the Fund or its service providers, as well as securities trading venues and their service providers, to suffer data corruption or lose operational functionality. Cybersecurity incidents can result from deliberate attacks or unintentional events. It is not possible for the Fund or its service providers to identify all of the operational risks that may affect the Fund or to develop processes and controls to completely eliminate or mitigate their occurrence or effects. The Fund cannot control the cybersecurity plans and systems of its service providers, its counterparties or the issuers of securities in which the Fund invests. Most issuers in which the Fund invests are heavily dependent on computers for data storage and operations, and require ready access to the internet to conduct their business. Thus, cybersecurity incidents could also affect issuers of securities in which the Fund invests, leading to significant loss of value.
Dividend Risk
An issuer of stock held by the Fund may choose not to declare a dividend or the dividend rate might not remain at current levels or increase over time. Dividend paying stocks might not experience the same level of earnings growth or capital appreciation as non-dividend paying stocks. Securities that pay dividends may be sensitive to changes in interest rates and, as interest rates rise or fall, the prices of such securities may fall.
Equity Investments Risk
Equity securities are subject to investment risk, issuer risk and market risk. In general, the values of stocks and other equity securities fluctuate, and sometimes widely fluctuate, in response to changes in a company’s financial condition as well as general market, economic and political conditions and other factors. The Fund may experience a significant or complete loss on its investment in an equity security. In addition, stock prices may be particularly sensitive to rising interest rates, which increase borrowing costs and the costs of capital. The Fund may invest in the following equity securities, which may expose the Fund to the following additional risks:
Common Stock Risk. The value of a company’s common stock may fall as a result of factors affecting the company, companies in the same industry or sector, or the financial markets overall. Common stock generally is subordinate to preferred stock upon the liquidation or bankruptcy of the issuing company.
 
Depositary Receipts and/or U.S. Dollar-Denominated Foreign Stocks Traded on U.S. Exchanges Risk. Depositary receipts and U.S. dollar-denominated foreign stocks traded on U.S. exchanges are subject to certain of the risks associated with investing directly in foreign securities, including, but not limited to, currency exchange rate fluctuations, political and financial instability in the home country of a particular depositary receipt or foreign stock, less liquidity, more volatility, less government regulation and supervision and delays in transaction settlement.
 
Real Estate Investment Trusts (“REITs”) Risk. Investments in REITs are subject to the risks associated with investing in the real estate industry, including, among other risks: adverse developments affecting the real estate industry; declines in real property values; changes in interest rates; defaults by mortgagors or other borrowers and tenants; lack of availability of mortgage funds or financing; extended vacancies of properties, especially during economic downturns; casualty or condemnation losses; and governmental actions, such as changes to tax laws, zoning regulations or environmental regulations. REITs also are dependent upon the skills of their managers and are subject to heavy cash flow dependency or self-liquidation. Regardless of where a REIT is organized or traded, its performance may be affected significantly by events in the region where its properties are located. Domestic REITs could be adversely affected by failure to qualify for tax-free “pass-through” of distributed net income and net realized gains under the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended (“Internal Revenue Code”), or to maintain their exemption from registration under the Investment Company Act of 1940, as amended (“Investment Company Act”). REITs typically incur fees that are separate from those incurred by the Fund. Accordingly, the Fund’s investment in REITs will result in the layering of expenses such that shareholders will indirectly bear a proportionate share of the REITs’ operating expenses, in addition to
 
Prospectus – Fund Summaries11 

 
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paying Fund expenses. The value of REIT common stock may decline when interest rates rise. REITs tend to be small- to mid-capitalization securities and, as such, are subject to the risks of investing in small- to mid-capitalization securities.
 
Focused Holdings Risk
Because the Fund may have a focused portfolio of fewer companies than other diversified funds, the increase or decrease of the value of a single investment may have a greater impact on the Fund’s net asset value (“NAV”) and total return when compared to other diversified funds.
Foreign Exposure Risk
Exposure to obligations of non-U.S. issuers carries potential risks not associated with investments in obligations of U.S. issuers. Such risks may include, but are not limited to: (1) currency exchange rate fluctuations, (2) political and financial instability, (3) less liquidity, (4) lack of uniform accounting, auditing and financial reporting standards, (5) greater volatility, (6) different government regulation and supervision of foreign stock exchanges, brokers and listed companies, and (7) delays in transaction settlement in some foreign markets. The Fund’s exposure to a foreign issuer may subject the Fund to regulatory, political, currency, security, economic and other risks associated with that country. Global economic and financial markets have become increasingly interconnected and conditions (including recent volatility and instability) and events (including natural disasters) in one country, region or financial market may adversely impact issuers in a different country, region or financial market.
Futures Contracts Risk
Futures contracts are derivative instruments pursuant to a contract where the parties agree to a fixed price for an agreed amount of securities or other underlying assets at an agreed date. The use of such derivative instruments may expose the Fund to additional risks, such as credit risk, liquidity risk, and counterparty risk, that it would not be subject to if it invested directly in the securities underlying those derivatives.There can be no assurance that any strategy used will succeed. There may at times be an imperfect correlation between the movement in the prices of futures contracts and the value of their underlying instruments or indexes. There also can be no assurance that, at all times, a liquid market will exist for offsetting a futures contract that the Fund has previously bought or sold, and this may result in the inability to close a futures contract when desired. Futures contracts may experience potentially dramatic price changes, which will increase the volatility of the Fund and may involve a small investment of cash (the amount of initial and variation margin) relative to the magnitude of the risk assumed (the potential increase or decrease in the price of the futures contract). Equity index futures contracts expose the Fund to volatility in an underlying securities index. Use of derivatives is a highly specialized activity that can involve investment techniques and risks different from, and in some respects greater than, those associated with investing in more traditional investments. Derivatives can be highly complex and highly volatile and may perform in unanticipated ways.
Growth Companies Risk
Growth companies are expected to increase their earnings at a certain rate. When these expectations are not met or decrease, the prices of these stocks may decline, sometimes sharply, even if earnings showed an absolute increase. The Fund’s investments in growth companies may be more sensitive to company earnings and more volatile than the market in general primarily because their stock prices are based heavily on future expectations. If an assessment of the prospects for a company’s growth is incorrect, then the price of the company’s stock may fall or not approach the value placed on it. Growth company stocks may also lack the dividend yield that can cushion stock price declines in market downturns.
Investment Risk
An investment in the Fund is not a deposit with a bank and is not insured or guaranteed by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation or any other government agency. When you sell your shares of the Fund, they could be worth less than what you paid for them. Therefore, you may lose money by investing in the Fund.
Issuer Risk
The value of, and/or the return generated by, a security may decline for a number of reasons that directly relate to the issuer, such as management performance, financial leverage and reduced demand for the issuer’s goods or services, as well as the historical and prospective earnings of the issuer and the value of its assets.
Large-Capitalization Companies Risk
The securities of large market capitalization companies may underperform other segments of the market because such companies may be less responsive to competitive challenges and opportunities and, at times, such companies may be out of favor with investors. Many larger-capitalization companies also may be unable to attain the high growth rates of successful smaller companies, especially during periods of economic expansion.
Market Risk
The Fund is subject to the risk that the securities markets will move down, sometimes rapidly and unpredictably, based on overall economic conditions and other factors, which may negatively affect the Fund’s performance. Equity securities generally have greater price volatility than fixed-income securities, although under certain market conditions fixed-income securities may have comparable or greater price volatility. During a general downturn in the securities markets, multiple assets may decline in value simultaneously. Prices in many financial markets have increased significantly over the last decade, but there have also been periods of adverse market and financial developments and cyclical change during that timeframe, which have resulted in unusually high levels of volatility in domestic and foreign financial markets that has caused losses for investors and may occur again in the future. The value of a security may decline due to adverse issuer-specific conditions, general market conditions unrelated to a particular issuer, such as changes in interest or inflation rates, or factors that affect a particular industry or industries. Changes in the financial condition of a single issuer or market segment also can impact the market as a whole. Geopolitical and other events, including war, terrorism, economic uncertainty, trade disputes, pandemics, public health crises, natural disasters and related events have led, and in the future may continue to lead, to instability in world economies and markets generally and reduced liquidity in equity, credit and fixed-income markets, which may disrupt economies and markets and adversely affect the value of your investment. Changes in value may be temporary or may last for extended periods.
Policy changes by the U.S. government and/or Federal Reserve and political events within the U.S. and abroad, such as changes in the U.S. presidential administration and Congress, the U.S. government’s inability at times to agree on a long-term budget and deficit reduction plan, the threat of a federal government shutdown and threats not to increase the federal government’s debt limit, may affect investor and consumer confidence and may adversely impact financial markets and the broader economy, perhaps suddenly and to a significant degree.
Markets and market participants are increasingly reliant upon both publicly available and proprietary information data systems. Data imprecision, software or other technology malfunctions, programming inaccuracies, unauthorized use or access, and similar circumstances may impair the performance of these systems and may have an adverse impact upon a single issuer, a group of issuers, or the market at large.
The financial markets generally move in cycles, with periods of rising prices followed by periods of declining prices. The value of your investment may reflect these fluctuations.
Recent Market Events Risk. Both U.S. and international markets have experienced significant volatility in recent months and years. As a result of such volatility, investment returns may fluctuate significantly. Moreover, the risks discussed herein associated with an investment in the Fund may be increased.
 
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An outbreak of infectious respiratory illness caused by a novel coronavirus, known as COVID-19, was first detected in late 2019 and has subsequently spread globally. The transmission of various variants of COVID-19, and efforts to contain their spread, have resulted, and may continue to result, in significant disruptions to business operations, travel restrictions and closed borders, and lower consumer demand, as well as general concern and uncertainty that has negatively affected the global economy. Any resurgence of COVID-19, a variant or other significant viruses could negatively impact the Fund and adversely impact the economies of many nations, individual companies and the global securities and commodities markets, including their liquidity, in ways that cannot necessarily be foreseen at the present time.
Although interest rates were unusually low in recent years in the U.S. and abroad, in March 2022, the Federal Reserve began to raise interest rates as part of its efforts to address rising inflation. It is difficult to accurately predict the pace at which the Federal Reserve will continue to increase interest rates, or the timing, frequency or magnitude of any such increases. Additionally, various economic and political factors could cause the Federal Reserve to change its approach in the future and the Federal Reserve’s actions may result in an economic slowdown. Unexpected increases in interest rates could lead to market volatility or reduce liquidity in certain sectors of the market.
Slowing global economic growth; risks associated with a trade agreement between the United Kingdom and the European Union; the risks associated with ongoing trade negotiations with China; the possibility of changes to some international trade agreements; tensions, war, or open conflict between nations, such as between Russia and Ukraine or in eastern Asia; political or economic dysfunction within some nations, including major producers of oil; economic stimulus by the Japanese central bank; and dramatic changes in commodity and currency prices could affect the economies of many nations, including the United States, in ways that cannot necessarily be foreseen at the present time. Russia’s military invasion of Ukraine beginning in February 2022, the responses and sanctions by the United States and other countries, and the potential for wider conflict have had, and could continue to have, severe adverse effects on regional and global economies and could further increase volatility and uncertainty in the financial markets and the prices of various commodities.
Economists and others have expressed increasing concern about the potential effects of global climate change on property and security values. Certain issuers, industries and regions may be adversely affected by the impacts of climate change, including on the demand for and the development of goods and services and related production costs, and the impacts of legislation, regulation and international accords related to climate change, as well as any indirect consequences of regulation or business trends driven by climate change.
 
Mid-Capitalization Companies Risk
Investing in the securities of mid-capitalization companies involves greater risk and the possibility of greater price volatility, which at times can be rapid and unpredictable, than investing in larger-capitalization and more established companies. Since mid-capitalization companies may have narrower commercial markets and more limited operating history, product lines, and managerial and financial resources than larger, more established companies, the securities of these companies may lack sufficient market liquidity, and they can be particularly sensitive to changes in overall economic conditions, interest rates, borrowing costs and earnings.
Other Investment Companies Risk
To the extent that the Fund invests in shares of other registered investment companies, the Fund will indirectly bear the fees and expenses charged by those investment companies in addition to the Fund’s direct fees and expenses. To the extent the Fund invests in other investment companies that invest in equity securities, fixed-income securities and/or foreign securities, or that track an index, the Fund is subject to the risks associated with the underlying investments held by the investment company or the index fluctuations to which the investment company is subject. The Fund will be subject to the risks associated with investments in those companies, including but not limited to the following:
Government Money Market Funds Risk. Investments in government money market funds are subject to interest rate risk, credit risk, and market risk. Interest rate risk is the risk that rising interest rates could cause the value of such an investment to decline. Credit risk is the risk that the issuer, guarantor or insurer of an obligation, or the counterparty to a transaction, may fail or become less able or unwilling, to make timely payment of interest or principal or otherwise honor its obligations, or that it may default completely.
 
Preferred Stock Risk
Preferred stocks are sensitive to movements in interest rates. Preferred stocks may be less liquid than common stocks and, unlike common stocks, participation in the growth of an issuer may be limited. Distributions on preferred stocks generally are payable at the discretion of an issuer and after required payments to bond holders. In certain situations, an issuer may call or redeem its preferred stock or convert it to common stock. The market prices of preferred stocks are generally more sensitive to actual or perceived changes in the issuer’s financial condition or prospects than are the prices of debt securities.
Redemption Risk
The Fund may experience periods of high levels of redemptions that could cause the Fund to sell assets at inopportune times or at a loss or depressed value. Heavy redemptions could hurt the Fund’s performance. The sale of assets to meet redemption requests may create net capital gains, which could cause the Fund to have to distribute substantial capital gains. Redemption risk is greater to the extent that one or more investors or intermediaries control a large percentage of investments in the Fund. In addition, redemption risk is heightened during periods of declining or illiquid markets. During periods of heavy redemptions, the Fund may borrow funds through the interfund credit facility or from a bank line of credit, which may increase costs. The sale of assets to meet redemption requests may create net capital gains or losses, which could cause the Fund to have to distribute substantial capital gains.
Sector Risk
When the Fund focuses its investments in certain sectors of the economy, its performance may be driven largely by sector performance and could fluctuate more widely than if the Fund were invested more evenly across sectors. Individual sectors may be more volatile, and may perform differently, than the broader market. As the Fund’s portfolio changes over time, the Fund’s exposure to a particular sector may become higher or lower.
Information Technology Sector Risk. The information technology sector includes companies engaged in internet software and services, technology hardware and storage peripherals, electronic equipment and components, and semiconductors and semiconductor equipment. Information technology companies face intense competition, both domestically and internationally, which may have an adverse effect on profit margins. Information technology companies may have limited product lines, markets, financial resources or personnel. The products of information technology companies may face rapid product obsolescence due to technological developments and frequent new product introduction, unpredictable changes in growth rates and competition for the services of qualified personnel. Failure to introduce new products, develop and maintain a loyal customer base or achieve general market acceptance for their products could have a material adverse effect on a company’s business. Companies in the information technology sector are heavily dependent on intellectual property and the loss of patent, copyright or trademark protections may adversely affect the profitability of these companies. The market prices of information technology-related securities tend to exhibit a greater degree of market risk and sharp price fluctuations than other types of securities. These securities may fall in and out of favor with investors rapidly, which may cause sudden selling and dramatically lower market prices.
 
Securities Lending Risk
To the extent the Fund lends its securities, it may be subject to the following risks: (i) the securities in which the Fund reinvests cash collateral may decrease in value, causing the Fund to incur a loss, or may not perform sufficiently to cover the Fund’s payment to the borrower of a pre-negotiated fee or “rebate” for the use of that cash collateral in connection with the loan; (ii) non-cash collateral may decline in value, resulting in the Fund becoming under-secured; (iii) delays may occur in the recovery of loaned securities from borrowers, which could result in the Fund being unable to vote proxies or settle transactions or cause the Fund to incur increased costs; and (iv) if the borrower becomes subject to insolvency or similar proceedings, the Fund could incur delays in its ability to enforce its rights in its collateral.
Prospectus – Fund Summaries13 

 
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Securities Selection Risk
Securities selected for the Fund may not perform to expectations. This could result in the Fund’s underperformance compared to its benchmark index(es), or other funds with similar investment objectives or strategies.
Value Stocks Risk
Value stocks are subject to the risk that their intrinsic or full value may never be realized by the market, that a stock judged to be undervalued may be appropriately priced, or that their prices may decline. Although value stocks tend to be inexpensive relative to their earnings, they can continue to be inexpensive for long periods of time. The Fund’s investments in value stocks seek to limit potential downside price risk over time; however, value stock prices still may decline substantially. In addition, the Fund may produce more modest gains as a trade-off for this potentially lower risk. The Fund’s investment in value stocks could cause the Fund to underperform funds that use a growth or non-value approach to investing or have a broader investment style.
Fund Performance
The bar chart and table below provide an indication of risk by showing changes in the Fund’s performance over time. The bar chart shows how the Fund’s performance has varied from year to year. The table shows how the Fund’s average annual total returns compare to a broad-based market index, which is the Fund’s benchmark index, for the periods indicated.
In the table below, for the period prior to August 25, 2020, the performance of the R6 Class shares reflects the returns of the R5 Class shares of the Fund. The R6 Class shares would have had similar annual returns to the R5 Class shares of the Fund because the shares of each class represent investments in the same portfolio securities. However, as reflected in the table in the “Fees and Expenses of the Fund” section of this Fund Summary, the expenses of the R5 Class shares differ from those of the R6 Class shares, which would affect performance. To the extent that the R5 Class shares had lower expenses than the R6 Class shares, the performance of the R5 Class shares would likely have been higher than the R6 Class shares would have realized during the same period. The R6 Class performance shown in the table has not been adjusted for differences in operating expenses between the R6 Class and R5 Class shares.
You may obtain updated performance information on the Fund’s website at www.americanbeaconfunds.com. Past performance (before and after taxes) is not necessarily an indication of how the Fund will perform in the future.
Calendar year total returns for Investor Class Shares. Year Ended 12/31
image
Highest Quarterly Return:
15.98%2nd Quarter 2020
01/01/2013 through 12/31/2021
Lowest Quarterly Return:
-21.10%1st Quarter 2020
01/01/2013 through 12/31/2021
The calendar year-to-date total return as of September 30, 2022 was -20.05%.
Average annual total returns for periods ended December 31, 2021
 
Inception Date of Class
1 Year
5 Years
Since Inception (05/29/2012)
Investor Class
05/29/2012
Returns Before Taxes
25.57
%
13.82
%
13.15
%
Returns After Taxes on Distributions
25.01
%
12.86
%
12.16
%
Returns After Taxes on Distributions and Sales of Fund Shares
15.48
%
10.87
%
10.57
%
 
Inception Date of Class
1 Year
5 Years
Since Inception (05/29/2012)
Share Class (Before Taxes)
A
05/29/2012
18.40
%
12.48
%
12.40
%
C
05/29/2012
23.69
%
12.96
%
12.24
%
Y
05/29/2012
25.90
%
14.11
%
13.44
%
R6
08/25/2020
26.11
%
14.22
%
13.53
%
R5
05/29/2012
25.97
%
14.19
%
13.52
%
 
1 Year
5 Years
Since Inception (05/29/2012)
Index (Reflects no deduction for fees, expenses, or taxes)
Russell 1000® Value Index
25.16
%
11.16
%
12.96
%
After-tax returns are calculated using the historical highest individual federal marginal income tax rates and do not reflect the impact of state and local income taxes. Actual after-tax returns depend on an investor’s tax situation and may differ from those shown. The return after taxes on distributions and sale of Fund shares may exceed the return before taxes due to an assumed tax benefit from any losses on a sale of Fund shares at the end of the measurement period. If you are a tax-exempt entity or hold your Fund shares through a tax-deferred arrangement, such as an individual retirement account (“IRA”) or a 401(k) plan, the after-tax returns do not apply to your situation. After-tax returns are shown only for the Fund’s Investor Class shares; after-tax returns for other share classes will vary.
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Management
The Manager
The Fund has retained American Beacon Advisors, Inc. to serve as its Manager.
Sub-Advisor
The Fund’s investment sub-advisor is The London Company of Virginia, LLC.
Portfolio Managers
The London Company of Virginia, LLC
Stephen M. Goddard
Managing Principal, Chief Investment Officer & Lead Portfolio Manager
Since Fund Inception (2012)
Jonathan T. Moody
Principal & Portfolio Manager
Since Fund Inception (2012)
Sam Hutchings
Principal & Portfolio Manager
Since 2020
J. Brian Campbell
Principal & Portfolio Manager
Since Fund Inception (2012)
Mark E. DeVaul
Principal & Portfolio Manager
Since Fund Inception (2012)
Purchase and Sale of Fund Shares
You may buy or sell shares of the Fund through a retirement plan, an investment professional, a broker-dealer, or other financial intermediary. You may purchase or redeem shares of the Fund on any day the New York Stock Exchange (“NYSE”) is open, at the Fund’s net asset value (“NAV”) per share next calculated after your order is received in proper form, subject to any applicable sales charge. The Manager may, in its sole discretion, allow certain individuals to invest directly in the Fund. For more information regarding eligibility to invest directly please see “About Your Investment - Purchase and Redemption of Shares.” Direct mutual fund account shareholders may buy subsequent shares or sell shares in various ways:
Internet
www.americanbeaconfunds.com
Phone
To reach an American Beacon representative call 1-800-658-5811, option 1
Through the Automated Voice Response Service call 1-800-658-5811, option 2 (Investor Class only)
Mail
American Beacon Funds
P.O. Box 219643
Kansas City, MO 64121-9643
Overnight Delivery:
American Beacon Funds
430 W. 7th Street, Suite 219643
Kansas City, MO 64105-1407
 
New Account
Existing Account
Share Class
Minimum Initial Investment Amount
Purchase/Redemption Minimum by Check/ACH/Exchange
Purchase/Redemption Minimum by Wire
C
$1,000
$50
$250
A, Investor
$2,500
$50
$250
Y
$100,000
$50
None
R6
None
$50
None
R5
$250,000
$50
None
Tax Information
Dividends, capital gains distributions, and other distributions, if any, that you receive from the Fund are subject to federal income tax and may also be subject to state and local income taxes, unless you are a tax-exempt entity or your account is tax-deferred, such as an individual retirement account (“IRA”) or a 401(k) plan (in which case you may be taxed later, upon the withdrawal of your investment from such account or plan).
Payments to Broker-Dealers and Other Financial Intermediaries
If you purchase shares of the Fund through a broker-dealer or other financial intermediary (such as a bank), the Fund and the Fund’s distributor, Resolute Investment Distributors, Inc., or the Manager may pay the intermediary for the sale of Fund shares and related services. These payments may create a conflict of interest by influencing the broker-dealer or other intermediary and your individual financial professional to recommend the Fund over another investment. Ask your individual financial professional or visit your financial intermediary’s website for more information.
Prospectus – Fund Summaries15 

 
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American Beacon
Zebra Small Cap Equity FundSM
image
Investment Objective
The Fund’s investment objective is long-term capital appreciation.
Fees and Expenses of the Fund
This table describes the fees and expenses that you may pay if you buy, hold, and sell shares of the Fund. You may pay other fees, such as brokerage commissions and other fees to financial intermediaries, which are not reflected in the tables and examples below. You may qualify for sales discounts if you and your eligible family members invest, or agree to invest in the future, at least $50,000 in all classes of the American Beacon Funds on an aggregated basis. More information about these and other discounts is available from your financial professional and in “Choosing Your Share Class” on page 42 of the Prospectus and “Additional Purchase and Sale Information for A Class Shares” on page 68 of the Statement of Additional Information (“SAI”). With respect to purchases of shares through specific intermediaries, you may find additional information regarding sales charge discounts and waivers in Appendix A to the Fund’s Prospectus entitled “Intermediary Sales Charge Discounts, Waivers and Other Information.”
Shareholder Fees (fees paid directly from your investment)
Share Class
A
C
Y
R5
Investor
Maximum sales charge imposed on purchases (as a percentage of offering price)
5.75
%
None
None
None
None
Maximum deferred sales charge (as a percentage of the lower of original offering price or redemption proceeds)
0.50
%
1
1.00
%
None
None
None
Annual Fund Operating Expenses (Expenses that you pay each year as a percentage of the value of your investment)
 
 
 
 
Share Class
A
C
Y
R5
Investor
Management Fees
0.90
%
0.90
%
0.90
%
0.90
%
0.90
%
Distribution and/or Service (12b-1) Fees
0.25
%
1.00
%
0.00
%
0.00
%
0.00
%
Other Expenses2
0.41
%
0.45
%
0.43
%
0.32
%
0.70
%
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses
1.56
%
2.35
%
1.33
%
1.22
%
1.60
%
Fee Waiver and/or expense reimbursement3
(0.35
%)
(0.34
%)
(0.34
%)
(0.33
%)
(0.33
%)
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses after fee waiver and/or expense reimbursement
1.21
%
2.01
%
0.99
%
0.89
%
1.27
%
1 A contingent deferred sales charge (‘‘CDSC’’) of 0.50% will be charged on certain purchases of $1,000,000 or more of A Class shares that are redeemed in whole or part within 18 months of purchase.
2 During the fiscal year ended August 31, 2022, the Fund paid amounts to American Beacon Advisors, Inc. (the “Manager”) that were previously waived and/or reimbursed by the Manager under a contractual fee waiver/expense reimbursement agreement for the Fund’s R5 Class shares in the amount of 0.01%.
3 The Manager has contractually agreed to waive fees and/or reimburse expenses of the Fund’s A Class, C Class, Y Class, R5 Class, and Investor Class shares, as applicable, through December 31, 2023, to the extent that Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses exceed 1.21% for the A Class, 2.01% for the C Class, 0.99% for the Y Class, 0.89% for the R5 Class, and 1.27% for the Investor Class (excluding taxes, interest, brokerage commissions, acquired fund fees and expenses, securities lending fees, expenses associated with securities sold short, litigation, and other extraordinary expenses). The contractual expense reimbursement can be changed or terminated only in the discretion and with the approval of a majority of the Fund’s Board of Trustees (“Board”). The Manager will itself waive fees and/or reimburse expenses of the Fund to maintain the contractual expense ratio caps for each applicable class of shares or make arrangements with other service providers to do so. The Manager may also, from time to time, voluntarily waive fees and/or reimburse expenses of the Fund. The Manager can be reimbursed by the Fund for any contractual or voluntary fee waivers or expense reimbursements if reimbursement to the Manager (a) occurs within three years from the date of the Manager’s waiver/reimbursement and (b) does not cause the Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses of a class to exceed the lesser of the contractual percentage limit in effect at the time of the waiver/reimbursement or the time of the recoupment.
Example
This Example is intended to help you compare the cost of investing in the Fund with the cost of investing in other mutual funds. The Example assumes that you invest $10,000 in the Fund for the time periods indicated and then redeem all of your shares at the end of those periods. The Example also assumes that your investment has a 5% return each year and that the Fund’s operating expenses remain the same, except that this Example reflects the fee waiver/expense reimbursement arrangement for each share class through December 31, 2023. C Class shares automatically convert to A Class shares 8 years after purchase if the conversion is available through your financial intermediary. This Example reflects your costs assuming the conversion of C Class shares to A Class shares 8 years after purchase. Although your actual costs may be higher or lower, based on these assumptions, your costs would be:
Share Class
1 Year
3 Years
5 Years
10 Years
A
$691
$1,007
$1,345
$2,297
C
$304
$701
$1,225
$2,463
Y
$101
$388
$696
$1,572
R5
$91
$355
$639
$1,448
Investor
$129
$473
$840
$1,872
Assuming no redemption of shares:
Share Class
1 Year
3 Years
5 Years
10 Years
C
$204
$701
$1,225
$2,463
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Portfolio Turnover
The Fund pays transaction costs, such as commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or “turns over” its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover rate may indicate higher transaction costs and may result in higher taxes when Fund shares are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are not reflected in annual Fund operating expenses or in the Example, affect the Fund’s performance. During the most recent fiscal year, the Fund’s portfolio turnover rate was 108% of the average value of its portfolio.
Principal Investment Strategies
Under normal market conditions, the Fund invests at least 80% of its net assets (plus the amount of any borrowings for investment purposes) in equity securities of small market capitalization U.S. companies. These companies have market capitalizations similar to the market capitalizations of the companies in the Russell 2000® Index at the time of investment.
The Russell 2000® Index is comprised of the 2000 smallest companies in the Russell 3000® Index based on total market capitalization. Within the Russell 2000® Index, the 1000 smallest companies are considered micro-capitalization companies.
As of October 31, 2022, the market capitalizations of the companies in the Russell 2000® Index ranged from $11 million to $13 billion. The Fund principally invests in common stocks.
The Fund’s sub-advisor, Zebra Capital Management, LLC (“Zebra”), seeks to capture a liquidity premium among fundamentally strong, publicly-traded equities. A liquidity premium is the additional return that may be realized on the sales of securities that are less liquid at the time of purchase. A liquidity premium may exist in public equity markets, as more liquid stocks tend to be priced at a premium, while less liquid stocks tend to be priced at a discount, thus having higher expected appreciation. Despite producing similar levels of earnings and cash flows, less liquid stocks can typically be purchased at lower prices, offering higher expected appreciation. Frequently, a fundamentally sound stock is less traded because it has temporarily fallen out of favor. Over time, the market may recognize the inherent value of the stock again, where the Fund would stand to benefit from the liquidity premium as the stock’s trading activity and price rise. Zebra chooses the securities that comprise the Fund’s portfolio first by identifying stocks with strong fundamentals (i.e., earnings, book value, cash flows) that Zebra believes are undervalued in the market relative to their long-term appreciation potential. Zebra then applies the liquidity premium analysis using model and data analysis to identify the stocks that trade less frequently than stocks with comparable fundamentals. The Fund may also invest in growth companies.
Stocks are typically sold when fundamentals deteriorate, trading activity increases relative to changes in a stock’s fundamentals, or Zebra believes there are greater opportunities to capture liquidity premium in other stocks.
The Fund may invest cash balances in other investment companies, including a government money market fund advised by the Manager, with respect to which the Manager also receives a management fee. The Fund also may purchase and sell equity index futures contracts to gain market exposure on cash balances or reduce market exposure in anticipation of liquidity needs. The Fund may seek to earn additional income by lending its securities to certain qualified broker-dealers and institutions.
Principal Risks
There is no assurance that the Fund will achieve its investment objective and you could lose part or all of your investment in the Fund. The Fund is not designed for investors who need an assured level of current income and is intended to be a long-term investment. The Fund is not a complete investment program and may not be appropriate for all investors. Investors should carefully consider their own investment goals and risk tolerance before investing in the Fund. The principal risks of investing in the Fund listed below are presented in alphabetical order and not in order of importance or potential exposure. Among other matters, this presentation is intended to facilitate your ability to find particular risks and compare them with the risks of other funds. Each risk summarized below is considered a “principal risk” of investing in the Fund, regardless of the order in which it appears.
Cybersecurity and Operational Risk
Operational risks arising from, among other problems, human errors, systems and technology disruptions or failures, or cybersecurity incidents may negatively impact the Fund and its service providers as well as the ability of shareholders to transact with the Fund, and result in financial losses. Cybersecurity incidents may allow an unauthorized party to gain access to Fund assets, shareholder data, or proprietary information, or cause the Fund or its service providers, as well as securities trading venues and their service providers, to suffer data corruption or lose operational functionality. Cybersecurity incidents can result from deliberate attacks or unintentional events. It is not possible for the Fund or its service providers to identify all of the operational risks that may affect the Fund or to develop processes and controls to completely eliminate or mitigate their occurrence or effects. The Fund cannot control the cybersecurity plans and systems of its service providers, its counterparties or the issuers of securities in which the Fund invests. Most issuers in which the Fund invests are heavily dependent on computers for data storage and operations, and require ready access to the internet to conduct their business. Thus, cybersecurity incidents could also affect issuers of securities in which the Fund invests, leading to significant loss of value.
Equity Investments Risk
Equity securities are subject to investment risk, issuer risk and market risk. In general, the values of stocks and other equity securities fluctuate, and sometimes widely fluctuate, in response to changes in a company’s financial condition as well as general market, economic and political conditions and other factors. The Fund may experience a significant or complete loss on its investment in an equity security. In addition, stock prices may be particularly sensitive to rising interest rates, which increase borrowing costs and the costs of capital. The Fund may invest in the following equity securities, which may expose the Fund to the following additional risks:
Common Stock Risk. The value of a company’s common stock may fall as a result of factors affecting the company, companies in the same industry or sector, or the financial markets overall. Common stock generally is subordinate to preferred stock upon the liquidation or bankruptcy of the issuing company.
 
Futures Contracts Risk
Futures contracts are derivative instruments pursuant to a contract where the parties agree to a fixed price for an agreed amount of securities or other underlying assets at an agreed date. The use of such derivative instruments may expose the Fund to additional risks, such as credit risk, liquidity risk, and counterparty risk, that it would not be subject to if it invested directly in the securities underlying those derivatives.There can be no assurance that any strategy used will succeed. There may at times be an imperfect correlation between the movement in the prices of futures contracts and the value of their underlying instruments or indexes. There also can be no assurance that, at all times, a liquid market will exist for offsetting a futures contract that the Fund has previously bought or sold, and this may result in the inability to close a futures contract when desired. Futures contracts may experience potentially dramatic price changes, which will increase the volatility of the Fund and may involve a small investment of cash (the amount of initial and variation margin) relative to the magnitude of the risk assumed (the potential increase or decrease in the price of the futures contract). Equity index futures contracts expose the
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Fund to volatility in an underlying securities index. Use of derivatives is a highly specialized activity that can involve investment techniques and risks different from, and in some respects greater than, those associated with investing in more traditional investments. Derivatives can be highly complex and highly volatile and may perform in unanticipated ways.
Growth Companies Risk
Growth companies are expected to increase their earnings at a certain rate. When these expectations are not met or decrease, the prices of these stocks may decline, sometimes sharply, even if earnings showed an absolute increase. The Fund’s investments in growth companies may be more sensitive to company earnings and more volatile than the market in general primarily because their stock prices are based heavily on future expectations. If an assessment of the prospects for a company’s growth is incorrect, then the price of the company’s stock may fall or not approach the value placed on it. Growth company stocks may also lack the dividend yield that can cushion stock price declines in market downturns.
Investment Risk
An investment in the Fund is not a deposit with a bank and is not insured or guaranteed by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation or any other government agency. When you sell your shares of the Fund, they could be worth less than what you paid for them. Therefore, you may lose money by investing in the Fund.
Issuer Risk
The value of, and/or the return generated by, a security may decline for a number of reasons that directly relate to the issuer, such as management performance, financial leverage and reduced demand for the issuer’s goods or services, as well as the historical and prospective earnings of the issuer and the value of its assets.
Liquidity Risk
The Fund is susceptible to the risk that certain investments held by the Fund may have limited marketability, be subject to restrictions on sale, be difficult or impossible to purchase or sell at favorable times or prices or become less liquid in response to market developments or adverse credit events that may affect issuers or guarantors of a security. An inability to sell a portfolio position can adversely affect the Fund’s value or prevent the Fund from being able to take advantage of other investment opportunities. Market prices for such instruments may be volatile. During periods of substantial market volatility, an investment or even an entire market segment may become illiquid, sometimes abruptly, which can adversely affect the Fund’s ability to limit losses. The Fund could lose money if it is unable to dispose of an investment at a time that is most beneficial to the Fund. The Fund may be required to dispose of investments at unfavorable times or prices to satisfy obligations, which may result in losses or may be costly to the Fund. For example, liquidity risk may be magnified in rising interest rate environments in the event of higher-than-normal redemption rates. Unexpected redemptions may force the Fund to sell certain investments at unfavorable prices to meet redemption requests or other cash needs. Judgment plays a greater role in pricing illiquid investments than in investments with more active markets.
Market Risk
The Fund is subject to the risk that the securities markets will move down, sometimes rapidly and unpredictably, based on overall economic conditions and other factors, which may negatively affect the Fund’s performance. Equity securities generally have greater price volatility than fixed-income securities, although under certain market conditions fixed-income securities may have comparable or greater price volatility. During a general downturn in the securities markets, multiple assets may decline in value simultaneously. Prices in many financial markets have increased significantly over the last decade, but there have also been periods of adverse market and financial developments and cyclical change during that timeframe, which have resulted in unusually high levels of volatility in domestic and foreign financial markets that has caused losses for investors and may occur again in the future. The value of a security may decline due to adverse issuer-specific conditions, general market conditions unrelated to a particular issuer, such as changes in interest or inflation rates, or factors that affect a particular industry or industries. Changes in the financial condition of a single issuer or market segment also can impact the market as a whole. Geopolitical and other events, including war, terrorism, economic uncertainty, trade disputes, pandemics, public health crises, natural disasters and related events have led, and in the future may continue to lead, to instability in world economies and markets generally and reduced liquidity in equity, credit and fixed-income markets, which may disrupt economies and markets and adversely affect the value of your investment. Changes in value may be temporary or may last for extended periods.
Policy changes by the U.S. government and/or Federal Reserve and political events within the U.S. and abroad, such as changes in the U.S. presidential administration and Congress, the U.S. government’s inability at times to agree on a long-term budget and deficit reduction plan, the threat of a federal government shutdown and threats not to increase the federal government’s debt limit, may affect investor and consumer confidence and may adversely impact financial markets and the broader economy, perhaps suddenly and to a significant degree.
Markets and market participants are increasingly reliant upon both publicly available and proprietary information data systems. Data imprecision, software or other technology malfunctions, programming inaccuracies, unauthorized use or access, and similar circumstances may impair the performance of these systems and may have an adverse impact upon a single issuer, a group of issuers, or the market at large.
The financial markets generally move in cycles, with periods of rising prices followed by periods of declining prices. The value of your investment may reflect these fluctuations.
Recent Market Events Risk. Both U.S. and international markets have experienced significant volatility in recent months and years. As a result of such volatility, investment returns may fluctuate significantly. Moreover, the risks discussed herein associated with an investment in the Fund may be increased. An outbreak of infectious respiratory illness caused by a novel coronavirus, known as COVID-19, was first detected in late 2019 and has subsequently spread globally. The transmission of various variants of COVID-19, and efforts to contain their spread, have resulted, and may continue to result, in significant disruptions to business operations, travel restrictions and closed borders, and lower consumer demand, as well as general concern and uncertainty that has negatively affected the global economy. Any resurgence of COVID-19, a variant or other significant viruses could negatively impact the Fund and adversely impact the economies of many nations, individual companies and the global securities and commodities markets, including their liquidity, in ways that cannot necessarily be foreseen at the present time.
Although interest rates were unusually low in recent years in the U.S. and abroad, in March 2022, the Federal Reserve began to raise interest rates as part of its efforts to address rising inflation. It is difficult to accurately predict the pace at which the Federal Reserve will continue to increase interest rates, or the timing, frequency or magnitude of any such increases. Additionally, various economic and political factors could cause the Federal Reserve to change its approach in the future and the Federal Reserve’s actions may result in an economic slowdown. Unexpected increases in interest rates could lead to market volatility or reduce liquidity in certain sectors of the market.
Slowing global economic growth; risks associated with a trade agreement between the United Kingdom and the European Union; the risks associated with ongoing trade negotiations with China; the possibility of changes to some international trade agreements; tensions, war, or open conflict between nations, such as between Russia and Ukraine or in eastern Asia; political or economic dysfunction within some nations, including major producers of oil; economic stimulus by the Japanese central bank; and dramatic changes in commodity and currency prices could affect the economies of many nations, including the United States, in ways that cannot necessarily be foreseen at the present time. Russia’s military invasion of Ukraine beginning in February 2022, the
 
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responses and sanctions by the United States and other countries, and the potential for wider conflict have had, and could continue to have, severe adverse effects on regional and global economies and could further increase volatility and uncertainty in the financial markets and the prices of various commodities.
Economists and others have expressed increasing concern about the potential effects of global climate change on property and security values. Certain issuers, industries and regions may be adversely affected by the impacts of climate change, including on the demand for and the development of goods and services and related production costs, and the impacts of legislation, regulation and international accords related to climate change, as well as any indirect consequences of regulation or business trends driven by climate change.
 
Micro-Capitalization Companies Risk
Micro-capitalization companies are subject to substantially greater risks of loss and price fluctuations, sometimes rapidly and unpredictably, because their earnings and revenues tend to be less predictable. Since micro-capitalization companies may not have an operating history, product lines, or financial resources, their share prices tend to be more volatile and their markets less liquid than companies with larger market capitalizations, and they can be sensitive to changes in overall economic conditions, interest rates, borrowing costs and earnings. The shares of micro-capitalization companies tend to trade less frequently than those of larger, more established companies, which can adversely affect the pricing of these securities and the future ability to sell these securities.
Model and Data Risk
Models and data are used to screen potential investments for the Fund. When models or data prove to be incorrect or incomplete, any decisions made in reliance thereon expose the Fund to potential risks. Some of the models used by the sub-advisor are predictive in nature. The use of predictive models has inherent risks. Because predictive models are usually constructed based on historical data supplied by third parties, the success of relying on such models may depend heavily on the accuracy and reliability of the supplied historical data. There is no assurance that the models are complete, accurate, or representative of future market cycles, nor will they always be beneficial to the Fund if they are accurate. Additionally, programs may become outdated or experience malfunctions which may not be identified by the sub-advisor and therefore may also result in losses to the Fund. These models may negatively affect Fund performance for various other reasons, including human judgment, inaccuracy of historical data and non-quantitative factors (such as market or trading system dysfunctions, investor fear or overreaction).
Other Investment Companies Risk
To the extent that the Fund invests in shares of other registered investment companies, the Fund will indirectly bear the fees and expenses charged by those investment companies in addition to the Fund’s direct fees and expenses. To the extent the Fund invests in other investment companies that invest in equity securities, fixed-income securities and/or foreign securities, or that track an index, the Fund is subject to the risks associated with the underlying investments held by the investment company or the index fluctuations to which the investment company is subject. The Fund will be subject to the risks associated with investments in those companies, including but not limited to the following:
Government Money Market Funds Risk. Investments in government money market funds are subject to interest rate risk, credit risk, and market risk. Interest rate risk is the risk that rising interest rates could cause the value of such an investment to decline. Credit risk is the risk that the issuer, guarantor or insurer of an obligation, or the counterparty to a transaction, may fail or become less able or unwilling, to make timely payment of interest or principal or otherwise honor its obligations, or that it may default completely.
 
Quantitative Strategy Risk
The success of the Fund’s investment strategy may depend in part on the effectiveness of the sub-advisor’s quantitative tools for screening securities. These strategies may incorporate factors that are not predictive of a security’s value. The quantitative tools may not react as expected to market events, resulting in losses for the Fund. Additionally, a previously successful strategy may become outdated or inaccurate, which may not be identified by the sub-advisor and therefore may also result in losses.
Redemption Risk
The Fund may experience periods of high levels of redemptions that could cause the Fund to sell assets at inopportune times or at a loss or depressed value. Heavy redemptions could hurt the Fund’s performance. The sale of assets to meet redemption requests may create net capital gains, which could cause the Fund to have to distribute substantial capital gains. Redemption risk is greater to the extent that one or more investors or intermediaries control a large percentage of investments in the Fund. In addition, redemption risk is heightened during periods of declining or illiquid markets. During periods of heavy redemptions, the Fund may borrow funds through the interfund credit facility or from a bank line of credit, which may increase costs. The sale of assets to meet redemption requests may create net capital gains or losses, which could cause the Fund to have to distribute substantial capital gains.
Securities Lending Risk
To the extent the Fund lends its securities, it may be subject to the following risks: (i) the securities in which the Fund reinvests cash collateral may decrease in value, causing the Fund to incur a loss, or may not perform sufficiently to cover the Fund’s payment to the borrower of a pre-negotiated fee or “rebate” for the use of that cash collateral in connection with the loan; (ii) non-cash collateral may decline in value, resulting in the Fund becoming under-secured; (iii) delays may occur in the recovery of loaned securities from borrowers, which could result in the Fund being unable to vote proxies or settle transactions or cause the Fund to incur increased costs; and (iv) if the borrower becomes subject to insolvency or similar proceedings, the Fund could incur delays in its ability to enforce its rights in its collateral.
Securities Selection Risk
Securities selected for the Fund may not perform to expectations. This could result in the Fund’s underperformance compared to its benchmark index(es), or other funds with similar investment objectives or strategies.
Small-Capitalization Companies Risk
Investing in the securities of small-capitalization companies involves greater risk and the possibility of greater price volatility, which at times can be rapid and unpredictable, than investing in larger-capitalization and more established companies. Since small-capitalization companies may have narrower commercial markets, and more limited operating history, product lines, and managerial and financial resources than larger, more established companies, the securities of these companies may lack sufficient market liquidity and they can be particularly sensitive to changes in overall economic conditions, interest rates, borrowing costs and earnings.
Small Fund Risk
Like other smaller funds, large inflows and outflows may impact the Fund’s market exposure for limited periods of time. Investment positions may also have a disproportionate impact, negative or positive, on performance, and Fund performance may be more volatile than that of a larger fund. The Fund’s shareholder fees and annual fund operating expenses also may be higher than those of a fund that has attracted sufficient assets to achieve investment and trading efficiencies. Shareholders of the Fund may incur higher expenses if the Fund fails to attract sufficient assets to realize economies of scale. Investors in the Fund also bear the risk that, without sufficient assets, the Fund may not be successful in implementing its investment strategy or may not employ a successful investment strategy.
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Value Stocks Risk
Value stocks are subject to the risk that their intrinsic or full value may never be realized by the market, that a stock judged to be undervalued may be appropriately priced, or that their prices may decline. Although value stocks tend to be inexpensive relative to their earnings, they can continue to be inexpensive for long periods of time. The Fund’s investments in value stocks seek to limit potential downside price risk over time; however, value stock prices still may decline substantially. In addition, the Fund may produce more modest gains as a trade-off for this potentially lower risk. The Fund’s investment in value stocks could cause the Fund to underperform funds that use a growth or non-value approach to investing or have a broader investment style.
Fund Performance
The bar chart and table below provide an indication of risk of investing by showing changes in the Fund’s performance over time. The bar chart shows how the Fund’s performance has varied from year to year. The table shows how the Fund’s average annual total returns compare to a broad-based market index, which is the Fund’s benchmark index, as well as an additional broad-based market index, for the periods indicated.
You may obtain updated performance information on the Fund’s website at www.americanbeaconfunds.com. Past performance (before and after taxes) is not necessarily an indication of how the Fund will perform in the future.
Calendar year total returns for Investor Class Shares. Year Ended 12/31
image
Highest Quarterly Return:
28.98%4th Quarter 2020
01/01/2011 through 12/31/2021
Lowest Quarterly Return:
-30.57%1st Quarter 2020
1/1/2011 through 12/31/2021
The calendar year-to-date total return as of September 30, 2022 was -25.09%.
Average annual total returns for periods ended December 31, 2021
 
Inception Date of Class
1 Year
5 Years
10 Years
Investor Class
06/01/2010
Returns Before Taxes
25.70
%
9.97
%
12.65
%
Returns After Taxes on Distributions
11.84
%
6.21
%
9.65
%
Returns After Taxes on Distributions and Sales of Fund Shares
16.91
%
6.51
%
9.29
%
 
Inception Date of Class
1 Year
5 Years
10 Years
Share Class (Before Taxes)
A
06/01/2010
18.60
%
8.67
%
11.94
%
C
09/01/2010
23.77
%
9.13
%
11.76
%
Y
06/01/2010
26.07
%
10.28
%
12.96
%
R5
06/01/2010
26.22
%
10.39
%
13.09
%
 
1 Year
5 Years
10 Years
Index (Reflects no deduction for fees, expenses, or taxes)
Russell 2000® Index
14.82
%
12.02
%
13.23
%
Russell 2000® Value Index
28.27
%
9.07
%
12.03
%
After-tax returns are calculated using the historical highest individual federal marginal income tax rates and do not reflect the impact of state and local income taxes. Actual after-tax returns depend on an investor’s tax situation and may differ from those shown. The return after taxes on distributions and sale of Fund shares may exceed the return before taxes due to an assumed tax benefit from any losses on a sale of Fund shares at the end of the measurement period. If you are a tax-exempt entity or hold your Fund shares through a tax-deferred arrangement, such as an individual retirement account (“IRA”) or a 401(k) plan, the after-tax returns do not apply to your situation. After-tax returns are shown only for the Fund’s Investor Class shares; after-tax returns for other share classes will vary.
Management
The Manager
The Fund has retained American Beacon Advisors, Inc. to serve as its Manager.
Sub-Advisor
The Fund’s investment sub-advisor is Zebra Capital Management, LLC.
Portfolio Managers
Zebra Capital Management, LLC
Roger Ibbotson, Ph.D.
Chairman
Since Fund Inception (2010)
Mark Saldutti
Quantitative Researcher and Portfolio Manager
Since 2020
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Purchase and Sale of Fund Shares
You may buy or sell shares of the Fund through a retirement plan, an investment professional, a broker-dealer, or other financial intermediary. You may purchase or redeem shares of the Fund on any day the New York Stock Exchange (“NYSE”) is open, at the Fund’s net asset value (“NAV”) per share next calculated after your order is received in proper form, subject to any applicable sales charge. The Manager may, in its sole discretion, allow certain individuals to invest directly in the Fund. For more information regarding eligibility to invest directly please see “About Your Investment - Purchase and Redemption of Shares.” Direct mutual fund account shareholders may buy subsequent shares or sell shares in various ways:
Internet
www.americanbeaconfunds.com
Phone
To reach an American Beacon representative call 1-800-658-5811, option 1
Through the Automated Voice Response Service call 1-800-658-5811, option 2 (Investor Class only)
Mail
American Beacon Funds
P.O. Box 219643
Kansas City, MO 64121-9643
Overnight Delivery:
American Beacon Funds
430 W. 7th Street, Suite 219643
Kansas City, MO 64105-1407
 
New Account
Existing Account
Share Class
Minimum Initial Investment Amount
Purchase/Redemption Minimum by Check/ACH/Exchange
Purchase/Redemption Minimum by Wire
C
$1,000
$50
$250
A, Investor
$2,500
$50
$250
Y
$100,000
$50
None
R5
$250,000
$50
None
Tax Information
Dividends, capital gains distributions, and other distributions, if any, that you receive from the Fund are subject to federal income tax and may also be subject to state and local income taxes, unless you are a tax-exempt entity or your account is tax-deferred, such as an individual retirement account (“IRA”) or a 401(k) plan (in which case you may be taxed later, upon the withdrawal of your investment from such account or plan).
Payments to Broker-Dealers and Other Financial Intermediaries
If you purchase shares of the Fund through a broker-dealer or other financial intermediary (such as a bank), the Fund and the Fund’s distributor, Resolute Investment Distributors, Inc., or the Manager may pay the intermediary for the sale of Fund shares and related services. These payments may create a conflict of interest by influencing the broker-dealer or other intermediary and your individual financial professional to recommend the Fund over another investment. Ask your individual financial professional or visit your financial intermediary’s website for more information.
Additional Information About the Funds
To help you better understand the Funds, this section provides a detailed discussion of the Funds’ investment policies, their principal strategies and principal risks and performance benchmarks. However, this Prospectus does not describe all of a Fund’s investment practices. Capitalized terms that are not otherwise defined are defined in Appendix B. For additional information, please see the Funds’ SAI, which is available at www.americanbeaconfunds.com or by contacting us via telephone at 1-800-658-5811, by U.S. mail at P.O. Box 219643, Kansas City, MO 64121-9643, or by e-mail at americanbeaconfunds@ambeacon.com.
Additional Information About Investment Policies and Strategies
Investment Objectives
The American Beacon SiM High Yield Opportunities Fund’s investment objectives are to seek high current income and, secondarily, capital appreciation.
 
The American Beacon The London Company Income Equity Fund’s investment objective is current income, with a secondary objective of capital appreciation.
 
The American Beacon Zebra Small Cap Equity Fund’s investment objective is long-term capital appreciation.
 
Each Fund’s investment objective(s) is ‘‘non-fundamental,’’ which means that it may be changed by the Funds’ Board without the approval of Fund shareholders.
80% Investment Policies
The American Beacon SiM High Yield Opportunities Fund has a non-fundamental policy to invest under normal circumstances at least 80% of its net assets, plus borrowings for investment purposes, in non-investment grade securities and/or financial instruments that provide exposure to non-investment grade securities.
 
The American Beacon The London Company Income Equity Fund has a non-fundamental policy to invest under normal market conditions at least 80% of its net assets (plus the amount of any borrowings for investment purposes) in equity and equity-related investments.
 
The American Beacon Zebra Small Cap Equity Fund has a non-fundamental policy to invest under normal market conditions at least 80% of its net assets, plus the amount of any borrowings for investment purposes, in equity securities of small market capitalization U.S. companies.
 
If a Fund changes its 80% investment policy, a notice will be sent to shareholders at least 60 days in advance of the change and this prospectus will be supplemented.
Temporary Defensive Policy
Each Fund may depart from its principal investment strategy by taking temporary defensive or interim positions in response to adverse market, economic, political or other conditions. During these times, a Fund may not achieve its investment objectives.
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Additional Information About the Management of the Funds
The Funds have retained American Beacon Advisors, Inc. to serve as their Manager. The Manager may allocate the assets of each Fund among different sub-advisors. The Manager provides or oversees the provision of all administrative, investment advisory and portfolio management services to the Funds. The Manager:
develops overall investment strategies for each Fund,
 
selects and changes sub-advisors,
 
allocates assets among sub-advisors,
 
monitors and evaluates the sub-advisors’ investment performance,
 
monitors the sub-advisors’ compliance with each Fund’s investment objectives, policies and restrictions,
 
oversees each Fund’s securities lending activities and actions taken by the securities lending agent to the extent applicable, and
 
directs the investment of the portion of Fund assets that the sub-advisors determine should be allocated to short-term investments.
 
Each Fund’s assets are currently allocated by the Manager to one respective sub-advisor. Each sub-advisor has full discretion to purchase and sell securities for its respective Fund’s assets in accordance with the Funds’ objectives, policies, restrictions and more specific strategies provided by the Manager. The Manager oversees the sub-advisors but does not reassess individual security selections made by the sub-advisors for the Funds.
A Fund’s assets may be allocated to another sub-advisor or among one or more additional sub-advisors in the future by the Manager. The Funds operate in a manager of managers structure. The Funds and the Manager have received an exemptive order from the SEC that permits the Funds, subject to certain conditions and approval by the Board, to hire and replace sub-advisors, and materially amend agreements with sub-advisors, that are unaffiliated with the Manager without approval of the shareholders. In the future, the Funds and the Manager may rely on an SEC staff no-action letter, dated July 9, 2019, that would permit the Funds to expand their exemptive relief to hire and replace sub-advisors that are affiliated and unaffiliated with the Manager without shareholder approval, subject to approval by the Board and other conditions. The Manager has ultimate responsibility, subject to oversight by the Board, to oversee sub-advisors and recommend their hiring, termination and replacement. The SEC order also exempts the Funds from disclosing the advisory fees paid by the Funds to individual sub-advisors in a multi-manager fund in various documents filed with the SEC and provided to shareholders. In the future, the Funds may rely on the SEC staff no-action letter to expand their exemptive relief to individual sub-advisors that are affiliated with the Manager. Under that no-action letter, the fees payable to sub-advisors unaffiliated with or partially-owned by the Manager or its parent company would be aggregated, and fees payable to sub-advisors that are wholly-owned by the Manager or its parent company, if any, would be aggregated with fees payable to the Manager. Whenever a sub-advisor change is proposed in reliance on the order, in order for the change to be implemented, the Board, including a majority of its “non-interested” trustees, must approve the change. In addition, the Funds are required to provide shareholders with certain information regarding any new sub-advisor within 90 days of the hiring of any new sub-advisor.
Each Fund’s sub-advisor is set forth below.
American Beacon SiM High Yield Opportunities Fund
Strategic Income Management, LLC
 
American Beacon The London Company Income Equity Fund
The London Company of Virginia, LLC
 
American Beacon Zebra Small Cap Equity Fund
Zebra Capital Management, LLC
 
Additional Information About Investments
This section provides more detailed information regarding the Funds’ principal investment strategies as well as information regarding the Funds’ strategy with respect to investment of cash balances.
Cash Management
To gain market exposure on cash balances held in anticipation of liquidity needs or to reduce market exposure in anticipation of liquidity needs, a Fund may utilize the following investments:
Futures Contracts. To gain market exposure on cash balances held in anticipation of liquidity needs or to reduce market exposure in anticipation of liquidity needs, a Fund may purchase and sell non-commodity-based index futures contracts on a daily basis that relate to securities in which it may invest directly. An index futures contract is a contract to purchase or sell the cash value of an index, at a specified future date at a price agreed upon when the contract is made. Upon the expiration of the contract, settlement is made by exchanging cash in an amount equal to the difference between the contract price and the closing price of the index at expiration, net of any initial and variation margin that was previously paid. As cash balances are invested in securities, a Fund may invest simultaneously those balances in index futures contracts until the cash balances are delivered to settle the securities transactions. This exposes a Fund to the market risks associated with the purchased securities and the index, so the Fund may have more than 100% of its assets exposed to the markets. This can magnify gains and losses in a Fund. A Fund also may have to sell assets at inopportune times to satisfy its settlement or margin obligations. The risks associated with the use of index futures contracts also include that there may be an imperfect correlation between the changes in market value of the securities held by a Fund and the prices of futures contracts or the movement in the prices of futures contracts and the value of their underlying indices and that there may not be a liquid secondary market for a futures contract.
 
Government Money Market Funds. A Fund may invest cash balances in government money market funds that are registered as investment companies under the Investment Company Act, including a government money market fund advised by the Manager, with respect to which the Manager also receives a management fee. If a Fund invests in government money market funds, the Fund becomes a shareholder of that investment company. As a result, Fund shareholders will bear their proportionate share of the expenses, including, for example, advisory and administrative fees of the government money market funds in which a Fund invests, such as advisory fees charged by the Manager to any applicable government money market funds advised by the Manager, in addition to the fees and expenses Fund shareholders directly bear in connection with a Fund’s own operations. Shareholders also would be exposed to the risks associated with government money market funds and the portfolio investments of such government money market funds, including the risk that a government money market fund’s yield will be lower than the return that a Fund would have received from other investments that provide liquidity. Investments in government money market funds are not insured or guaranteed by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) or any other government agency.
 
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Convertible Securities
Convertible securities, including convertible preferred securities, include corporate bonds, notes, preferred stock, convertible preferred securities or other securities that may be converted into or exchanged for a prescribed amount of common stock or other equity securities of the same or a different issuer within a particular period of time at a specified price or formula. The conversion may occur automatically upon the occurrence of a predetermined event or at the option of either the issuer or the security holder. A convertible security may be called for redemption or conversion by the issuer after a particular date and under certain circumstances (including a specified price) established upon issue. If a convertible security held by a Fund is called for redemption or conversion, the Fund could be required to tender it for redemption, convert it into the underlying common stock, or sell it to a third party.
While typically providing a fixed-income stream, a convertible security also gives an investor the opportunity, through its conversion feature, to participate in the capital appreciation of the issuing company depending upon a market price advance in the convertible security’s underlying common stock. However, convertible securities generally have less potential for gain or loss than common stocks. A convertible security entitles the holder to receive interest paid or accrued on debt or dividends paid on preferred stock until the convertible security matures or is redeemed, converted or exchanged. While convertible securities generally offer lower interest or dividend yields than non-convertible debt securities of similar quality, generally the yields are higher than the underlying common stock, and convertible securities enable the investor to benefit from increases in the market price of the underlying common stock. Because of this higher yield, convertible securities generally sell at prices above their “conversion value,” which is the current market value of the stock to be received upon conversion. The difference between this conversion value and the price of convertible securities will vary over time depending on changes in the value of the underlying common stocks and interest rates.
While no securities investment is without some risk, investments in convertible securities generally entail less risk than the issuer’s common stock, although the extent to which such risk is reduced depends in large measure upon the degree to which the convertible security sells above its value as a fixed-income security. The market value of convertible securities tends to decline as interest rates increase and, conversely, to increase as interest rates decline. Holders of convertible securities have a claim on the assets of the issuer prior to the common stockholders, but may be subordinated to holders of similar non-convertible securities of the same issuer. Because of the conversion feature, certain convertible securities may be considered equity equivalents.
Currencies
A Fund may have exposure to foreign currencies by using various instruments. A Fund may engage in these transactions in order to hedge or protect against uncertainty in the level of future foreign exchange rates in the purchase and sale of securities, or to shift exposure to foreign currency fluctuations from one country to another. In order to convert U.S. dollars into the currency needed to buy a foreign security, or to convert foreign currency received from the sale of a foreign security into U.S. dollars, a Fund may enter into spot currency trades. In a spot trade, a Fund agrees to exchange one currency for another at the current exchange rate. Spot trades allow for prompt delivery and settlement at the rate prevailing in the currency exchange market. The exchange rate for currency derivative contracts in which a foreign currency is an underlying asset may be higher or lower than the spot exchange rate. Spot trades may increase or decrease a Fund’s exposure to currency risks. The instruments in which a Fund may invest that provide exposure to foreign currencies include the following:
Foreign Currencies
 
Foreign Currency-Denominated Securities
 
Foreign Currency Forward Contracts, including Non-Deliverable Forwards
 
Foreign Currency Futures Contracts
 
Derivative Investments
Derivatives are financial instruments that have a value that depends upon, or is derived from, a reference asset, such as one or more underlying securities, pools of securities, commodities, options, futures, interest rates, credit rating, volatility measures, indices or currencies. A Fund may invest in the following derivative instruments:
Foreign Currency Forward Contracts. Foreign currency forward contracts are two-party contracts pursuant to which one party agrees to pay the counterparty a fixed price for an agreed-upon amount of foreign currency at an agreed-upon future date, which may be any fixed number of days from the date of the contract agreed upon by the parties. A foreign currency forward contract may be a non-deliverable forward contract (NDF), which is a forward contract where there is no physical settlement of the two currencies at maturity. Rather, on the contract settlement date, a net cash settlement will be made by one party to the other based on the difference between the contracted forward rate and the prevailing spot rate, on an agreed notional amount.
 
Futures Contracts. A futures contract is a contract to purchase or sell a particular asset, or the cash value of an asset, such as a security, commodity, currency or an index of such assets, at a specified future date, at a price agreed upon when the contract is made. Under many such contracts, no delivery of the actual underlying asset is required. Rather, upon the expiration of the contract, settlement is made by exchanging cash in an amount equal to the difference between the contract price and the closing price of the asset (e.g., a security or an index) at expiration, net of initial and variation margin that was previously paid. An equity index futures contract is based on the value of an underlying index. A Treasury futures contract is a contract for the future delivery of a U.S. Treasury security. A Fund may, from time to time, use futures positions to equitize cash and expose its portfolio to changes in securities prices or index prices. This can magnify gains and losses in a Fund. A Fund may have exposure to foreign currencies for investment or hedging purposes by purchasing or selling futures contract in non-U.S. currencies. Positions in foreign currency futures contracts must be closed out through a registered U.S. exchange or foreign board of trade that provides a secondary market for such contracts. Such secondary markets may not exist or may not be accessible at a particular time, which may prevent a Fund from closing its foreign currency futures position and expose a Fund to greater losses. A Fund also may have to sell assets at inopportune times to satisfy its settlement or collateral obligations. The risks associated with the use of futures contracts also include that there may be an imperfect correlation between the changes in market value of the futures contracts and the assets underlying such contracts, and that there may not be a liquid secondary market for a futures contract.
 
Swap Agreements. A swap is a transaction in which a Fund and a counterparty agree to pay or receive payments at specified dates based upon or calculated by reference to changes in specified prices or rates (e.g., interest rates in the case of interest rate swaps) or the performance of specified securities, indices or other assets based on the nominal or face amount of a reference asset . Payments are usually made on a net basis so that, on any given day, the Fund would receive (or pay) only the amount by which its payment under the swap is less than (or exceeds) the amount of the other party’s payment. The terms of the swap transaction are either negotiated by a sub-advisor and the swap counterparty or established based on terms generally available on an exchange or contract market. Nearly any type of derivative, including forward contracts, can be structured as a swap.
Credit Default Swaps. In these transactions, a Fund is generally required to pay the par (or other agreed-upon) value of a referenced debt security to the counterparty in the event of a default on or downgrade of the debt security and/or a similar credit event. In return, a Fund receives from the counterparty a periodic stream of payments over the term of the swap. If no default occurs, a Fund keeps the stream of payments and has no payment obligations. As the seller, a Fund would effectively add leverage to its portfolio because, in addition to its net assets, a Fund would be subject to loss on the par (or other agreed-upon) value it had undertaken to pay. A credit default swap may also be entered by a Fund to attempt to hedge against a decline in the value of
 
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debt securities due to a credit event, such as an issuer’s failure to make timely payments of interest or principal, bankruptcy or restructuring. As the buyer of protection against a credit event, a Fund pays the counterparty a stream of payments over the term of the swap, regardless of whether a credit event occurs.
Currency Swaps. A Fund may enter into currency swaps to hedge foreign currency exchange risk . A currency swap involves the exchange of payments denominated in one currency for payments denominated in another. Payments are based on a notional principal amount, the value of which is fixed, in exchange rate terms, at the swap’s inception.
Equity Swaps. An equity swap involves the exchange of future cash flows between two parties, which is similar to an interest rate swap, but is based on the return of equity. A Fund may enter into an equity swap in order to invest in a market without owning or taking physical custody of securities. In an equity swap, a Fund and another party exchange the returns on one or more equity securities.
Interest Rate Swaps. A Fund may enter into an interest rate swap in order to protect against declines in the value of fixed-income securities held by a Fund. In an interest rate swap, a Fund and another party exchange the right to receive interest payments on a security or other reference rate.
Total Return Swaps. A Fund may enter into total return swaps to obtain exposure to a security or market without owning or taking physical custody of such security or market. In a total return swap, one party agrees to pay the other party an amount equal to the total return on a defined underly