Filed pursuant to Rule 497(c) under the Securities Act of 1933, as amended
Registration File No. 002-28174
Investment Company Act File No. 811-01597

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CROSSMARKGLOBAL.COMAugust 31, 2020
STEWARD FUNDS
PROSPECTUS
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Steward Covered Call Income Fund
Class A
SCJAX
Class C
SCJCX
Class R6
SCJKX
Institutional Class
SCJIX
Steward Global Equity Income Fund
Class A
SGIDX
Class C
SGIFX
Class R6
SGIGX
Institutional Class
SGISX
Steward International Enhanced Index Fund
Class A
SNTKX
Class C
SNTDX
Class R6
SNTFX
Institutional Class
SNTCX
Steward Large Cap Enhanced Index Fund
Class A
SEEKX
Class C
SEEBX
Class R6
SEEHX
Institutional Class
SEECX
Steward Select Bond Fund
Class A
SEAKX
Class C
SEAAX
Class R6
SEABX
Institutional Class
SEACX
Steward Small-Mid Cap Enhanced Index Fund
Class A
TRDFX
Class C
SSMEX
Class R6
SSMOX
Institutional Class
SCECX
Beginning on January 1, 2021, as permitted by regulations adopted by the Securities and Exchange Commission (the “SEC”), paper copies of the Funds’ annual and semi-annual shareholder reports will no longer be sent by mail, unless you specifically request paper copies of the reports. Instead, the reports will be made available on the Funds’ website at www.crossmarkglobal.com, and you will be notified by mail each time a report is posted and provided with a website link to access the report.

If you already elected to receive shareholder reports electronically, you will not be affected by this change and you need not take any action. You may elect to receive shareholder reports and other communications from the Funds electronically anytime by contacting your financial intermediary (such as a broker-dealer or bank), or if you are a direct investor, by calling 1-713-243-6746 or sending an email request to Jim Coppedge, jcoppedge@crossmarkglobal.com.
You may elect to receive all future reports in paper free of charge. If you invest through a financial intermediary, you can contact your financial intermediary to request that you continue to receive paper copies of your shareholder reports. If you invest directly with the Funds, you can call 1-713-243-6746 or sending an email request to jcoppedge@crossmarkglobal.com to continue receiving paper copies of your shareholder reports. Your election to receive reports in paper will apply to all Funds held in your account if you invest through your financial intermediary or all Funds held with the Transfer Agent if you invest directly with the Funds.
The SEC has not approved or disapproved the shares described in this Prospectus or determined if this Prospectus is truthful or complete. Any representation to the contrary is a criminal offense.

STEWARD FUNDS
Steward Covered Call Income Fund
Steward Global Equity Income Fund
Steward International Enhanced Index Fund
Steward Large Cap Enhanced Index Fund
Steward Select Bond Fund
Steward Small-Mid Cap Enhanced Index Fund
PROSPECTUS
August 31, 2020
A NOTE ABOUT THE STEWARD FUNDS MANAGEMENT COMPANIES
Throughout this Prospectus, you will see references to the following companies that manage, distribute and service the Steward Funds:

Crossmark Global Investments, Inc. (referred to as Crossmark) is the Funds’ investment adviser and is responsible for executing each Fund’s investment strategies. Crossmark also provides values-based portfolio screening services to the Funds for use in the management of the Funds’ investment portfolios, as well as administration, compliance and claim preparation services to the Funds.

Crossmark Distributors, Inc. (referred to as Crossmark Distributors) is the Funds’ distributor and is responsible for developing and maintaining relationships with brokers and other financial intermediaries who sell the Funds’ shares and service shareholder accounts.
Crossmark and Crossmark Distributors are affiliated companies, each a wholly owned subsidiary of Crossmark Global Holdings, Inc. The principal offices for these companies are located at 15375 Memorial Dr., Suite 200, Houston, TX 77079.

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TABLE OF CONTENTS
INVESTMENT PROGRAMS, PERFORMANCE, AND FEES
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ADDITIONAL FUND DETAILS
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SHAREHOLDER INFORMATION
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STEWARD COVERED CALL INCOME FUND
Investment Objective:   Dividend income and options premium income, with the potential for capital appreciation and less volatility than the broad equity market.
Fees and Expenses of the Fund
The following table describes the fees and expenses that you may pay if you buy and hold shares of the Fund.
SHAREHOLDER FEES
(fees paid directly from your investment)
Class A
Class C
Class R6
Institutional
Class
Maximum sales charge (load) imposed on purchases None None None None
Maximum deferred sales charge (CDSC) (as a percentage of redemption proceeds) None 1.00% None None
Maximum sales charge (load) imposed on reinvested dividends and other distributions None None None None
Maximum account fee None None None None
Class C shares are subject to a CDSC. If you redeem your shares within twelve months of purchase you will be assessed a 1% CDSC. Class C shares convert to Class A shares after eight years. If you purchase Class C shares through a broker-dealer or other financial intermediary (such as a bank), your intermediary may impose different conversion terms, including an earlier conversion.
Class R6 shares are made available to authorized dealers without any distribution-related payments or account servicing payments. Accordingly, you may be charged a commission or other account management or service fee by your dealer which is not reflected herein.
ANNUAL FUND OPERATING EXPENSES
(expenses that you pay each year as a percentage of the value of your investment)
Class A
Class C
Class R6
Institutional
Class
Management fees1 0.63% 0.63% 0.63% 0.63%
Distribution (12b-1) fees 0.25% 1.00% None None
Other expenses2 0.80% 0.87% 0.71% 0.72%
Total annual Fund operating expenses
1.68% 2.50% 1.34% 1.35%
Fee waiver and/or expense reimbursement3 0.43% 0.50% 0.44% 0.35%
Total annual Fund operating
expenses after fee waiver and/or
expense reimbursement
1.25% 2.00% 0.90% 1.00%
1
“Management fees” are restated to reflect the Fund’s current management fee rate effective August 1, 2019.
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2
“Other expenses” are restated to reflect the Fund’s current administration fee rate effective August 1, 2019.
3
Crossmark has contractually agreed through August 30, 2021 to waive fees and reimburse expenses to the extent that total annual Fund operating expenses (excluding brokerage costs, interest, taxes, dividend expense on short positions, litigation and indemnification expenses, acquired fund fees and expenses and extraordinary expenses (as determined under generally accepted accounting principles)) exceed 1.25%, 2.00%, 0.90% and 1.00% for Class A, Class C, Class R6 and Institutional Class, respectively. If it becomes unnecessary for Crossmark to waive fees or make reimbursements, Crossmark may recapture any of its prior waivers or reimbursements for a period not to exceed three fiscal years from the fiscal year in which the waiver or reimbursement was made to the extent that such a recapture does not cause the total annual Fund operating expenses (excluding brokerage costs, interest, taxes, dividend expense on short positions, litigation and indemnification expenses, acquired fund fees and expenses and extraordinary expenses (as determined under generally accepted accounting principles)) to exceed the applicable expense limitation in effect at the time of recoupment or in effect at the time of the waiver or reimbursement, whichever is lower. The agreement to waive fees and reimburse expenses may be terminated by the Board of Directors at any time and will terminate automatically upon termination of the Investment Advisory Agreement.
Example
This example can help you compare the cost of investing in the Fund with the cost of investing in other mutual funds. It assumes:

You invest $10,000 for the periods shown and then redeem all your shares at the end of those periods (except Class C is also shown assuming you kept your shares);

Your investment has a 5% return each year; and

The Fund’s operating expenses remain the same (including one year of capped expenses in each period).
Although your actual costs may be higher or lower, based on these assumptions your costs would be:
1 Year
3 Years
5 Years
10 Years
Class A
$ 127 $ 488 $ 872 $ 1,951
Class C (With Redemption)
$ 303 $ 731 $ 1,286 $ 2,798
Class C (Without Redemption)
$ 203 $ 731 $ 1,286 $ 2,798
Class R6
$ 92 $ 381 $ 692 $ 1,574
Institutional Class
$ 102 $ 393 $ 706 $ 1,593
Portfolio Turnover
The Fund pays transaction costs, such as commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or “turns over” its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover rate may indicate higher transaction costs and may result in higher taxes when Fund shares are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are not reflected in annual fund operating expenses or in the example, affect the Fund’s performance. The Portfolio may actively trade portfolio securities to achieve its principal investment strategies. During the most recent fiscal year, the Fund’s portfolio turnover rate was 135% of the average value of its portfolio.
Principal Investment Strategies
The Fund’s principal investment strategy is to invest in a portfolio of large-cap, dividend-paying, equity securities that are listed on U.S. exchanges and to write (sell) covered call options on those securities with the overall goal of providing options premium income
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and lowering volatility of the Fund’s portfolio when compared to the broader uncovered large-cap securities market, subject to the limitations of the Fund’s values-based screening policies. In implementing its investment strategies, the Fund applies a set of values-based screens to use its best efforts to avoid investing in companies that are determined by Crossmark, pursuant to screening guidelines approved by the Fund’s Board of Directors, to be: (1) materially involved in the production, distribution, retail, supply or licensing of alcohol or related products; (2) materially involved in the production, distribution, retail, supply or licensing of tobacco or related products (to include vaping and other alternative smoking products); (3) materially involved in gambling (to include the manufacture, distribution and operation of facilities and equipment whose intended use is gambling); (4) directly participating in providing abortions and/or the production of drugs marketed with the primary intent to terminate pregnancy; (5) directly engaged in scientific research using stem cells derived from human embryos, fetal tissue or human embryo cloning techniques; (6) directly involved in the production, distribution or retail of adult entertainment; or (7) directly involved in the production, distribution, retail, supply or licensing of psychoactive recreational cannabis or derivative products.
Under normal market circumstances, the Fund will:

write (sell) call options on at least 80% of its equity securities

invest at least 80% of its assets in the securities of companies included in the Fund’s benchmark*
The Fund’s equity investments will consist primarily of common stocks of large U.S. companies, most of which will pay dividends, with sufficient liquidity and option market interest to suggest that call options can be readily written on those securities. The Fund’s benchmark index is a widely recognized broad-based large-cap index and is the same as the first index identified in the Average Annual Total Returns table below.
Covered call options may be written on the Fund’s equity securities. A call option gives the purchaser of the option the right to buy, and the writer, in this case, the Fund, the obligation to sell, the underlying security at a specified exercise price at any time prior and up to the expiration of the contract. When call options are written, the Fund will typically write options with exercise prices that are above the current market price of the security, thus providing room for growth. The purchaser pays a premium to the Fund for the option so the premium is an extra source of income to the Fund. If the price of the underlying security rises, but does not rise to the level of the exercise price, the option would not typically be exercised and the Fund would keep both the security at its appreciated value and the option premium. However, if the price of the underlying security rises above the exercise price of the option prior to expiration of the option and the option is exercised, the Fund will lose the value of that extra appreciation, although the loss in appreciation will be moderated by the amount of the option premium received by the Fund. If the price of the security drops below the price at the time the option was written, such loss in value will be diminished by the value of the premium.
The covered call strategy used by the Fund is designed to earn extra income for the Fund from premiums to moderate the impact of market declines and to reduce the volatility of the Fund’s portfolio. This strategy means that the Fund may be expected to underperform equity markets during periods of sharply rising equity prices; conversely, by using this strategy, the Fund
*
The 80% is measured as of the time of investment and is applied to the value of the Fund’s net assets plus the amount of any borrowings for investment purposes. For purposes of this limit, investments include those made directly or through other investment companies that have substantially similar 80% policies. The Fund will provide shareholders with at least 60 days’ prior notice of any change in this policy.
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would tend to outperform equity markets during periods of flat or declining equity prices due to the Fund’s receipt of premiums from selling the call options. Covered call options on a particular equity security may be sold up to the full number of shares of that equity security held by the Fund. For securities on which options expire unexercised, the Fund can write more options, thus earning more premium income, until an option on the security is exercised. The Fund’s portfolio manager considers several factors when writing (selling) options, including the overall equity market outlook, factors affecting the particular industry sector, individual security considerations, the timing of corporate events and the levels of option premiums.
The companies included in the investment universe represent a broad spectrum of U.S. economic sectors and are primarily U.S. issuers. Changes to the companies in which the Fund invests will usually be prompted by changes in the portfolio manager’s evaluation of the relative performance of the securities, changes in a securities option market, or the development of a material portfolio construction issue. Following any changes, the portfolio manager will rebalance the portfolio in an attempt to more closely match the characteristics of the broader mid- and large-cap market. To the extent that a rebalance involves buying new securities, the Fund’s portfolio manager will write calls against those securities in due course. To the extent that a rebalance involves selling securities, the Fund’s portfolio manager will close out the option positions against the security being sold. In addition, since the Fund uses its best efforts to avoid investments in companies that do not pass the Fund’s values-based screening criteria, it will divest itself, in a timely manner, of securities that are subsequently added to the list of prohibited securities. The Fund may also close out (buy back) call options it has written in order to adjust the Fund’s risk profile or in anticipation of certain corporate actions and/or events such as ex-dividend dates, earnings announcements and/or other material corporate actions.
Values-based Investing.   The Fund applies a set of values-based screens to use its best efforts to avoid investing in companies that are determined by Crossmark, pursuant to screening guidelines approved by the Fund’s Board of Directors, to be: (1) materially involved in the production, distribution, retail, supply or licensing of alcohol or related products; (2) materially involved in the production, distribution, retail, supply or licensing of tobacco or related products (to include vaping and other alternative smoking products); (3) materially involved in gambling (to include the manufacture, distribution and operation of facilities and equipment whose intended use is gambling); (4) directly participating in providing abortions and/or the production of drugs marketed with the primary intent to terminate pregnancy; (5) directly engaged in scientific research using stem cells derived from human embryos, fetal tissue or human embryo cloning techniques; (6) directly involved in the production, distribution or retail of adult entertainment; or (7) directly involved in the production, distribution, retail, supply or licensing of psychoactive recreational cannabis or derivative products. However, the Fund may invest up to 5% of its total assets in certain collective investment vehicles or derivatives that may hold or derive value from securities issued by otherwise excluded companies.
For purposes of the alcohol, tobacco and gambling screens, material involvement means that a company derives 10% or more of its revenues from the screened activities. For purposes of the adult entertainment screen, companies directly involved in the production, distribution or retail of adult entertainment (defined as media and materials intended to appeal exclusively to the prurient interest) and companies that derive 2% or more of their revenues from the screened activities are screened. For purposes of the abortion, stem cell research and cannabis screens, there is no revenue threshold; any direct involvement in the screened activities will cause a company to be screened out of the investment universe. For purposes of
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the abortion screen, a company that is not itself directly involved in the screened activities will be screened out of the investment universe if  (a) it owns 20% or more of another company that is directly participating in the screened activities, or (b) it is 50% or more owned by another company that is directly participating in the screened activities.
Principal Risks of Investing in the Fund
Investment in the Fund involves risk. There can be no assurance that the Fund will achieve its investment objective. You can lose money on your investment in the Fund. When you sell your Fund shares, they may be worth less than what you paid for them. The Fund, by itself, does not constitute a balanced investment program. The Fund may not achieve its objective if the portfolio manager’s expectations regarding particular securities or markets are not met. The value of shares of the Fund will be influenced by market conditions as well as by the performance of the securities in which the Fund invests. The Fund’s performance may be better or worse than that of funds with similar investment policies. The Fund’s performance is also likely to be different from that of funds that use different strategies for selecting investments.
The Fund’s covered call option strategy to moderate risk may not be successful if markets or individual security prices do not move as expected and may expose the Fund to greater losses than if this strategy had not been used. This strategy can cause the Fund to lose the benefits of greater-than-anticipated increases in value of a security while not protecting it from declines in the value of a security. The Fund will also be limited in its ability to sell a security during the term of an option written on that security. The prices of options can be volatile, causing relevant exchanges to suspend trading during certain periods and limiting the Fund’s ability to trade in these instruments. Covered call options can be difficult to close out and may involve extra costs for the Fund, including the costs of higher portfolio turnover often associated with this strategy.
Risks of investing in the Fund include:
• Call Options Risk – Writing call options to generate income and to potentially hedge against market declines by generating option premiums involves risk. These risks include, but are not limited to, potential losses if equity markets or an individual equity security do not move as expected and the potential for greater losses than if these techniques had not been used. There are significant differences between the securities and options markets that could result in an imperfect correlation between these markets, causing a given transaction not to achieve its objectives.
Limited Gains:   By writing covered call options, the Fund will give up the opportunity to benefit from potential increases in the value of a Fund asset above the exercise price, but it will bear the risk of declines in the value of the asset. Writing call options may expose the Fund to additional costs.
Option Exercise:   As the writer of a call option, the Fund cannot control the time when it may be required to fulfill its obligation to the purchaser of the option. Once the Fund has received an exercise notice, it may not be able to effect a closing purchase transaction in order to terminate its obligation under the option and must then deliver the underlying security at the exercise price.
Lack of Liquidity for the Option:   Derivatives may be difficult to sell or unwind. There can be no assurance that a liquid market will exist when the Fund seeks to close out an option position. If the Fund were unable to close out a covered call position previously written on a security, it would not be able to sell the underlying security unless the option expired without exercise.
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Lack of Liquidity for the Underlying Security:   The Fund’s investment strategy may also result in a lack of liquidity of the purchase and sale of portfolio securities. Because the Fund will generally hold the stocks underlying the call option, the Fund may be less likely to sell the stocks in its portfolio to take advantage of new investment opportunities.
Value Changes:   The value of call options will be affected by changes in the value and dividend rates of the underlying common stocks, an increase in interest rates, changes in the actual or perceived volatility of the stock market and the underlying common stocks and the remaining time to the options’ expiration. Additionally, the exercise price of an option may be adjusted downward before the option’s expiration as a result of the occurrence of events affecting the underlying equity security. A reduction in the exercise price of an option would reduce the Fund’s capital appreciation potential on the underlying security.
• Values-based Screening Policies – The Fund’s values-based screening policies exclude certain securities issuers from the universe of otherwise available investments. As a result, the Fund may not achieve the same level of performance as it otherwise would have in the absence of the screening process. If the Fund has invested in a company that is later discovered to be in violation of one or more screening criteria and liquidation of an investment in that company is required, selling the securities at issue could result in a loss to the Fund. Further, the Fund’s values-based screening policies may prevent the Fund from participating in an otherwise suitable investment opportunity.
• Equity Securities – The value of equity securities will rise and fall in response to the activities of the companies that issued the securities, general market conditions and/or economic conditions. If an issuer is liquidated or declares bankruptcy, the claims of owners of the issuer’s bonds will take precedence over the claims of owners of its equity securities.
• Dividend Risk – The income of the Fund may fluctuate due to the amount of dividends that companies elect to pay.
• Security Selection and Market Risk – The Fund’s portfolio securities may underperform the market or other funds with similar objectives or may not perform in line with the expectations of the Fund’s portfolio manager. The value of the Fund’s investments may also change with general market conditions.
• Market Disruption and Geopolitical Risk – Geopolitical and other events, including war, terrorism, economic uncertainty, trade disputes, public health crises and related geopolitical events have led, and in the future may lead, to increased market volatility, which may disrupt U.S. and world economies and markets and may have significant adverse direct or indirect effects on the value of the Fund and its investments. Such events include the recent pandemic of the novel coronavirus disease known as COVID-19, the withdrawal of the United Kingdom from the European Union (Brexit) and the ongoing trade disputes between the United States and China. Likewise, natural and environmental disasters and systemic market dislocations may be highly disruptive to economies and markets. Those events as well as other changes in foreign and domestic economic and political conditions also could adversely affect individual issuers or related groups of issuers, securities markets, interest rates, credit ratings, inflation, investor sentiment and other factors affecting the value of the Fund and its investments. Given the increasing interdependence among global economies and markets, conditions in one country, market or region might adversely affect markets, issuers and/or foreign exchange rates in other countries, including the United States. Securities and financial markets may be susceptible to market manipulation or other fraudulent trade practices, which could disrupt the orderly functioning of these markets or adversely affect the value of investments traded in these markets, including investments held by the Fund.
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The recent COVID-19 pandemic has caused significant uncertainty, market volatility, decreased economic and other activity and increased government activity. Specifically, COVID-19 has led to significant death and morbidity, and concerns about its further spread have resulted in the closing of schools and non-essential businesses, cancellations, shelter-in-place orders, lower consumer spending in certain sectors, social distancing, bans on large social gatherings and travel, quarantines, government economic stimulus measures, reduced productivity, rapid increases in unemployment, increased demand for and strain on government and medical resources, border closings and global trade and supply chain interruptions, among others. The full effects, duration and costs of the COVID-19 pandemic are impossible to predict, and the circumstances surrounding the COVID-19 pandemic will continue to evolve. The pandemic may affect certain countries, industries, economic sectors, companies and investment products more than others, may exacerbate existing economic, political, or social tensions and may increase the probability of an economic recession or depression. The Fund and its investments may be adversely affected by the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic, and a prolonged pandemic may result in the Fund and its service providers experiencing operational difficulties in coordinating a remote workforce and implementing their business continuity plans, among others.
Market disruptions could cause the Fund to lose money, experience significant redemptions and encounter operational difficulties. Although multiple asset classes may be affected by a market disruption, the duration and effects may not be the same for all types of assets.
• High Portfolio Turnover Risk – High portfolio turnover could increase the Fund’s transaction costs, result in taxable distributions to shareholders and negatively impact performance.
• Tax Risk – Writing covered call options may significantly reduce or eliminate the amount of dividends that constitute qualified dividend income, which is taxed to noncorporate shareholders at lower rates for federal income tax purposes. Covered calls also are subject to federal income tax rules that: 1) limit the allowance of certain losses or deductions by the Fund; 2) convert the Fund’s long-term capital gains into higher-taxed short-term capital gains or ordinary income; 3) convert the Fund’s ordinary losses or deductions to capital losses, the deductibility of which is more limited; and/or 4) cause the Fund to recognize income or gains without a corresponding receipt of cash.
• Issuer Risk – The value of a security may decline for a number of reasons that directly relate to the issuer, such as management performance, financial leverage and reduced demand for the issuer’s goods or services.
• Management Risk – The Fund is subject to management risk because it is an actively managed investment portfolio. Crossmark will apply investment techniques and risk analyses in making investment decisions for the Fund, but there can be no guarantee that these will produce the desired results.
• Concentration Policy Risk – To the extent securities of any one industry or group of industries comprise close to 25% of the Fund, the Fund may be limited in its ability to overweight with respect to that industry or industry group, due to the Fund’s fundamental policy not to concentrate in a particular industry or industry group.
• Share Ownership Concentration Risk – To the extent that a significant portion of the Fund’s shares is held by a limited number of shareholders or their affiliates, there is a risk that the share trading activities of these shareholders could disrupt the Fund’s investment strategies, which could have adverse consequences for the Fund and other shareholders (e.g., by requiring the Fund to sell or exit investments at inopportune times or causing the Fund to maintain larger-than-expected cash positions pending acquisition of investments).
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Performance
The following bar chart and table provide some indication of the risks of investing in the Fund by showing changes in the Fund’s performance from year to year and by showing how the Fund’s average annual returns over different periods compare with those of two broad measures of market performance. The Fund’s past performance (before and after taxes) is not necessarily an indication of how the Fund will perform in the future. The Calendar Year Total Returns bar chart shows performance of Institutional Class shares year by year since the Fund’s inception. Returns for other share classes will differ only to the extent that they have different expenses. Updated performance information is available on the Fund’s website at www.crossmarkglobal.com.
INSTITUTIONAL CLASS CALENDAR YEAR TOTAL RETURNS
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The following table illustrates the impact of taxes on the Fund’s returns (Institutional Class is shown; after-tax returns for other share classes will differ). After-tax returns are calculated using the historical highest individual federal marginal income tax rates and do not reflect the impact of state and local taxes. After-tax returns depend on your own tax situation and may be different from those shown. This information does not apply if your Fund shares are held in a
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tax-advantaged account such as an individual retirement account or 401(k) plan. Two indices that are broad measures of market performance are shown because the Fund’s Board of Directors has determined that both are relevant to the types of securities in which the Fund invests.
AVERAGE ANNUAL TOTAL RETURNS
For the periods ended December 31, 2019
1 Year
Since Inception
(12/14/17)
Institutional Class
Return Before Taxes 20.75% 7.76%
Return After Taxes on Distributions 17.88% N/A
Return After Taxes on Distributions and Sale of
Fund Shares
12.67% N/A
Class A
Return Before Taxes 20.52% 7.54%
Class C
Return Before Taxes 19.68% 7.18%
Class R6
Return Before Taxes 20.12% 7.28%
Indexes
Cboe S&P 500 BuyWrite Index (reflects no deduction for fees, expenses or taxes) 15.68% 5.07%
Standard & Poor’s 500 Index (reflects no deduction for fees, expenses or taxes) 31.49% 12.31%
MANAGEMENT
Crossmark is the Fund’s investment adviser. The Fund’s portfolio manager is Paul Townsen. Mr. Townsen is a Managing Director of Crossmark and has served as portfolio manager or co-portfolio manager of the Fund since December 14, 2017, the Fund’s inception date.
Shareholder Information
For important information about purchase and sale of Fund shares, federal income tax information, and information on financial intermediary compensation, please turn to the ADDITIONAL FUND DETAILS section on page 55 of this Prospectus.
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STEWARD GLOBAL EQUITY INCOME FUND
Investment Objective:   Current income along with growth of capital.
Fees and Expenses of the Fund
The following table describes the fees and expenses that you may pay if you buy and hold shares of the Fund.
SHAREHOLDER FEES
(fees paid directly from your investment)
Class A
Class C
Class R6
Institutional
Class
Maximum sales charge (load) imposed on purchases None None None None
Maximum deferred sales charge (CDSC) (as a percentage of the redemption of proceeds) None 1.00% None None
Maximum sales charge (load) imposed on reinvested dividends and other distributions None None None None
Maximum account fee None None None None
Class C shares are subject to a CDSC. If you redeem your shares within twelve months of purchase you will be assessed a 1% CDSC. Class C shares convert to Class A shares after eight years. If you purchase Class C shares through a broker-dealer or other financial intermediary (such as a bank), your intermediary may impose different conversion terms, including an earlier conversion.
Class R6 shares are made available to authorized dealers without any distribution-related payments or account servicing payments. Accordingly, you may be charged a commission or other account management or service fee by your dealer which is not reflected herein.
ANNUAL FUND OPERATING EXPENSES
(expenses that you pay each year as a percentage of the value of your investment)
Class A
Class C
Class R6
Institutional
Class
Management fees1 0.63% 0.63% 0.63% 0.63%
Distribution (12b-1) fees 0.25% 1.00% None None
Other expenses2 0.41% 0.48% 0.28% 0.32%
Total annual Fund operating expenses
1.29% 2.11% 0.91% 0.95%
1
“Management fees” are restated to reflect the Fund’s current management fee rate effective August 1, 2019.
2
“Other expenses” are restated to reflect the Fund’s current administration fee rate effective August 1, 2019.
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Example
This example can help you compare the cost of investing in the Fund with the cost of investing in other mutual funds. It assumes:

You invest $10,000 for the periods shown and then redeem all of your shares at the end of those periods (except Class C is also shown assuming you kept your shares);

Your investment has a 5% return each year; and

The Fund’s operating expenses remain the same.
Although your actual costs may be higher or lower, based on these assumptions your costs would be:
1 Year
3 Years
5 Years
10 Years
Class A
$ 131 $ 409 $ 708 $ 1,556
Class C (With Redemption)
$ 314 $ 661 $ 1,134 $ 2,441
Class C (Without Redemption)
$ 214 $ 661 $ 1,134 $ 2,441
Class R6
$ 93 $ 290 $ 504 $ 1,120
Institutional Class
$ 97 $ 303 $ 525 $ 1,166
Portfolio Turnover
The Fund pays transaction costs, such as commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or “turns over” its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover rate may indicate higher transaction costs and may result in higher taxes when Fund shares are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are not reflected in annual Fund operating expenses or in the example, affect the Fund’s performance. During the most recent fiscal year, the Fund’s portfolio turnover rate was 48% of the average value of its portfolio.
Principal Investment Strategies
The Fund pursues its investment objective through investment in U.S. and non-U.S. dividend-paying stocks that have demonstrated above-median yield and a positive trend in dividend payouts and favorable earnings growth, subject to the limitations of the Fund’s values-based screening policies. In implementing its investment strategies, the Fund applies a set of values-based screens to use its best efforts to avoid investing in companies that are determined by Crossmark, pursuant to screening guidelines approved by the Fund’s Board of Directors, to be: (1) materially involved in the production, distribution, retail, supply or licensing of alcohol or related products; (2) materially involved in the production, distribution, retail, supply or licensing of tobacco or related products (to include vaping and other alternative smoking products); (3) materially involved in gambling (to include the manufacture, distribution and operation of facilities and equipment whose intended use is gambling); (4) directly participating in providing abortions and/or the production of drugs marketed with the primary intent to terminate pregnancy; (5) directly engaged in scientific research using stem cells derived from human embryos, fetal tissue or human embryo cloning techniques; (6) directly involved in the production, distribution or retail of adult entertainment; or (7) directly involved in the production, distribution, retail, supply or licensing of psychoactive recreational cannabis or derivative products.
The Fund invests primarily in common stocks of companies that represent a broad spectrum of the global economy and a range of market capitalizations, including large-cap, mid-cap and small-cap. The Fund may also invest in other investment companies and real estate
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investment trusts. The Fund will invest in dividend-paying securities of issuers throughout the world. The Fund seeks to diversify its investments across a number of different countries throughout the world, and, under normal market conditions, the Fund invests in at least five different countries (including the U.S.). The Fund will invest in at least five different countries at all times, unless the Fund adopts a temporary defensive position in an attempt to respond to adverse market, economic and political conditions. While the Fund will invest in at least five different countries, the Fund expects that its investments will be allocated across 7 to 15 different countries. The Fund’s investments in large capitalization companies (i.e., companies with market capitalizations greater than $10 billion) also contribute to the Fund’s global diversification as large capitalization companies generally market their products and services both domestically and internationally. The Fund invests at least 50% of its net assets in large capitalization companies throughout the world. The Fund will generally seek to have 30% to 50% of its net assets, and, under normal market conditions, no less than 30% of its net assets, invested in securities of non-U.S. issuers.
The Fund’s non-U.S. investments will be primarily in the form of depositary receipts (“DRs”) or dual listed securities, or U.S. dollar-denominated instruments representing securities of non-U.S. issuers that are traded in the U.S. or in non-U.S. markets. The Fund’s DR investments will primarily be sponsored, but the Fund may, on occasion, invest in unsponsored DRs when appropriate sponsored DRs are not available.
In managing the Fund, the portfolio manager employs a four-step process that combines this dividend income style with relative risk-controlled portfolio construction and the Fund’s values-based screening policies:

An investment universe is created comprised of U.S. exchange-traded, dividend-paying domestic and international stocks with market capitalization greater than $1 billion.

A quantitative screen is applied to the universe that identifies various positive attributes such as securities having higher dividend yields within their sectors, positive dividend growth and favorable relative earnings growth.

A quantitative validation process is then applied to each company in the remaining universe with respect to current available information focusing on trends and news that may impact the company. Any security that fails the review is removed from investment consideration.

A relative risk controlled portfolio is constructed versus a targeted benchmark using the remaining universe of companies available for investment. The remaining universe is then screened in accordance with the Fund’s values-based screening policies and those companies failing to meet these criteria are removed.
Under normal market conditions, the Fund will invest at least 80% (measured at the time of investment) of the value of its net assets, plus the amount of any borrowings for investment purposes, either directly or through other investment companies, in dividend-paying securities. The Fund will also, under normal market conditions, invest at least 80% (measured at the time of investment) of the value of its net assets, plus the amount of any borrowings for investment purposes, either directly or through other investment companies, in equity securities. (Any such other investment company will also have similar policies to invest at least 80% of the value of its net assets, plus the amount of any borrowings for investment purposes, in (a) dividend-paying securities and (b) equity securities.) The Fund will provide shareholders with at least 60 days’ prior notice of any change in these policies.
The Fund may invest up to 80% of its total assets in securities of non-U.S. issuers and no more than 40% of its total assets in securities of companies in emerging market countries.
Values-based Investing.   The Fund applies a set of values-based screens to use its best efforts to avoid investing in companies that are determined by Crossmark, pursuant to
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screening guidelines approved by the Fund’s Board of Directors, to be: (1) materially involved in the production, distribution, retail, supply or licensing of alcohol or related products; (2) materially involved in the production, distribution, retail, supply or licensing of tobacco or related products (to include vaping and other alternative smoking products); (3) materially involved in gambling (to include the manufacture, distribution and operation of facilities and equipment whose intended use is gambling); (4) directly participating in providing abortions and/or the production of drugs marketed with the primary intent to terminate pregnancy; (5) directly engaged in scientific research using stem cells derived from human embryos, fetal tissue or human embryo cloning techniques; (6) directly involved in the production, distribution or retail of adult entertainment; or (7) directly involved in the production, distribution, retail, supply or licensing of psychoactive recreational cannabis or derivative products. However, the Fund may invest up to 5% of its total assets in certain collective investment vehicles or derivatives that may hold or derive value from securities issued by otherwise excluded companies.
For purposes of the alcohol, tobacco and gambling screens, material involvement means that a company derives 10% or more of its revenues from the screened activities. For purposes of the adult entertainment screen, companies directly involved in the production, distribution or retail of adult entertainment (defined as media and materials intended to appeal exclusively to the prurient interest) and companies that derive 2% or more of their revenues from the screened activities are screened. For purposes of the abortion, stem cell research and cannabis screens, there is no revenue threshold; any direct involvement in the screened activities will cause a company to be screened out of the investment universe. For purposes of the abortion screen, a company that is not itself directly involved in the screened activities will be screened out of the investment universe if  (a) it owns 20% or more of another company that is directly participating in the screened activities, or (b) it is 50% or more owned by another company that is directly participating in the screened activities.
Principal Risks of Investing in the Fund
Investment in the Fund involves risk. There can be no assurance that the Fund will achieve its investment objective. You can lose money on your investment in the Fund. When you sell your Fund shares, they may be worth less than what you paid for them. The Fund, by itself, does not constitute a balanced investment program. The Fund may not achieve its objective if the portfolio manager’s expectations regarding particular securities or markets are not met. The value of shares of the Fund will be influenced by market conditions as well as by the performance of the securities in which the Fund invests. The Fund’s performance may be better or worse than funds with similar investment policies. The Fund’s performance is also likely to differ from that of funds that use different strategies for selecting investments.
Although the Fund may invest in equity securities of companies across all market capitalizations, in the event the Fund invests more heavily in smaller companies its risks will increase and changes in its share price may become more sudden or more erratic. (See “Securities of Small- and Mid-Cap Companies,” below.)
Risks of investing in the Fund include:
• Values-based Screening Policies – The Fund’s values-based screening policies exclude certain securities issuers from the universe of otherwise available investments. As a result, the Fund may not achieve the same level of performance as it otherwise would have in the absence of the screening process. If the Fund has invested in a company that is later discovered to be in violation of one or more screening criteria and liquidation of an
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investment in that company is required, selling the securities at issue could result in a loss to the Fund. Further, the Fund’s values-based screening policies may prevent the Fund from participating in an otherwise suitable investment opportunity.
• Equity Securities – The value of equity securities will rise and fall in response to the activities of the companies that issued the securities, general market conditions and/or economic conditions. If an issuer is liquidated or declares bankruptcy, the claims of owners of the issuer’s bonds will take precedence over the claims of owners of its equity securities.
• Dividend Risk – The income of the Fund may fluctuate due to the amount of dividends that companies elect to pay.
• Foreign Securities – Investments in securities of issuers in foreign countries involve risks not associated with domestic investments. These risks include, but are not limited to: (1) political and financial instability; (2) currency exchange rate fluctuations; (3) greater price volatility and less liquidity in particular securities and in certain foreign markets; (4) lack of uniform accounting, auditing, and financial reporting standards; (5) less government regulation and supervision of some foreign stock exchanges, brokers and listed companies; (6) delays in transaction settlement in certain foreign markets; (7) less availability of information; and (8) imposition of foreign withholding taxes.
• Emerging Market Securities – Securities of issuers in emerging and developing countries raise additional risks relative to investments in developed country issuers, including exposure to less mature and diversified economies and to less stable market and political systems, as well as to possible currency transfer restrictions, delays and disruptions in settlement of transactions, and higher volatility than is found in developed countries.
• Market Disruption and Geopolitical Risk – Geopolitical and other events, including war, terrorism, economic uncertainty, trade disputes, public health crises and related geopolitical events have led, and in the future may lead, to increased market volatility, which may disrupt U.S. and world economies and markets and may have significant adverse direct or indirect effects on the value of the Fund and its investments. Such events include the recent pandemic of the novel coronavirus disease known as COVID-19, the withdrawal of the United Kingdom from the European Union (Brexit) and the ongoing trade disputes between the United States and China. Likewise, natural and environmental disasters and systemic market dislocations may be highly disruptive to economies and markets. Those events as well as other changes in foreign and domestic economic and political conditions also could adversely affect individual issuers or related groups of issuers, securities markets, interest rates, credit ratings, inflation, investor sentiment and other factors affecting the value of the Fund and its investments. Given the increasing interdependence among global economies and markets, conditions in one country, market or region might adversely affect markets, issuers and/or foreign exchange rates in other countries, including the United States. Any partial or complete dissolution of the Economic and Monetary Union of the European Union, or any increased uncertainty as to its status, could have significant adverse effects on currency and financial markets, and on the value of the Fund and its investments. Securities and financial markets may be susceptible to market manipulation or other fraudulent trade practices, which could disrupt the orderly functioning of these markets or adversely affect the value of investments traded in these markets, including investments held by the Fund. To the extent the Fund has focused its investments in the market of a particular region, adverse geopolitical and other events could have a disproportionate impact on the Fund.
The recent COVID-19 pandemic has caused significant uncertainty, market volatility, decreased economic and other activity and increased government activity. Specifically, COVID-19 has led to significant death and morbidity, and concerns about its further spread
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have resulted in the closing of schools and non-essential businesses, cancellations, shelter-in-place orders, lower consumer spending in certain sectors, social distancing, bans on large social gatherings and travel, quarantines, government economic stimulus measures, reduced productivity, rapid increases in unemployment, increased demand for and strain on government and medical resources, border closings and global trade and supply chain interruptions, among others. The full effects, duration and costs of the COVID-19 pandemic are impossible to predict, and the circumstances surrounding the COVID-19 pandemic will continue to evolve. The pandemic may affect certain countries, industries, economic sectors, companies and investment products more than others, may exacerbate existing economic, political, or social tensions and may increase the probability of an economic recession or depression. The Fund and its investments may be adversely affected by the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic, and a prolonged pandemic may result in the Fund and its service providers experiencing operational difficulties in coordinating a remote workforce and implementing their business continuity plans, among others.
Market disruptions could cause the Fund to lose money, experience significant redemptions and encounter operational difficulties. Although multiple asset classes may be affected by a market disruption, the duration and effects may not be the same for all types of assets.
• Depositary Receipts (“DRs”) – Investments in unsponsored DRs (those that are not sponsored by the issuer or a representative of the issuer) involve certain risks not present with sponsored DRs. Investors in unsponsored DRs typically incur expenses not associated with sponsored DRs, such as expenses associated with certificate transfer, custody and dividend payment. For an unsponsored DR there may be several depositaries with no defined legal obligations to the issuer. Duplicate depositaries may lead to marketplace confusion since there would be no central source of information. There can also be greater delays in delivery of dividends and reports to investors than with sponsored DRs.
• Foreign Currency Risk – Investments in foreign securities involve the risk that the currencies in which those instruments are denominated will decline in value relative to the U.S. dollar, or, in the case of hedging positions, that the U.S. dollar will decline relative to the currency being hedged. Currency rates in foreign countries may fluctuate significantly over short periods of time for a number of reasons, including changes in interest rates, intervention (or the failure to intervene) by U.S. or foreign governments, central banks, or supranational entities such as the International Monetary Fund, or by the imposition of currency controls or other political developments in the United States or abroad. As a result, the Fund’s international investments in foreign currency-denominated securities may reduce the returns of the Fund. Although the Fund’s investments will primarily be in U.S. dollar-denominated securities, fluctuations in the value of the currencies of the countries in which the foreign companies are located may also affect the value of such companies.
• Security Selection and Market Risk – The Fund’s portfolio securities may underperform the market or other funds with similar objectives. The value of the Fund’s investments may also change with general market conditions.
• Value Stocks – Investments in value stocks are subject to risks of equity securities, as well as the risks that (i) their intrinsic values may never be realized by the market or (ii) such stocks may turn out not to have been undervalued.
• Growth Stocks – Investments in growth stocks are subject to the risks of equity securities. Growth company stocks may provide minimal dividends that could otherwise cushion stock prices in a market decline. The value of growth company stocks may rise and fall significantly based, in part, on investors’ perceptions of the companies, rather than on fundamental analysis of the stocks.
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• Securities of Small- and Mid-Cap Companies – Investments in small- and mid-cap companies are subject to the risks of equity securities. Investment in small- and mid-cap companies may involve greater risks than investment in securities of large-cap companies because mid-cap companies generally have a limited track record. Small- and mid-cap companies often have narrower markets, more limited managerial and financial resources and a less diversified product offering than larger, more established companies. As a result of these factors, the prices of these securities can be more volatile, which may increase the volatility of the Fund’s portfolio. For small-cap companies, these risks are increased.
• Investment in Other Investment Companies or Real Estate Investment Trusts – The Fund may invest in shares of other investment companies or real estate investment trusts (“funds”). The Fund bears a proportional share of the expenses of such other funds, which are in addition to those of the Fund. For example, the Fund will bear a portion of such other funds’ investment advisory fees, although the fees paid by the Fund to Crossmark will not be proportionally reduced.
• Issuer Risk – The value of a security may decline for a number of reasons that directly relate to the issuer, such as management performance, financial leverage and reduced demand for the issuer’s goods or services.
• Management Risk – The Fund is subject to management risk because it is an actively managed investment portfolio. Crossmark will apply investment techniques and risk analyses in making investment decisions for the Fund, but there can be no guarantee that these will produce the desired results.
• Concentration Policy Risk – To the extent securities of any one industry or group of industries comprise close to 25% of the Fund, the Fund may be limited in its ability to overweight with respect to that industry or industry group, due to the Fund’s fundamental policy not to concentrate in a particular industry or industry group.
• Share Ownership Concentration Risk – To the extent that a significant portion of the Fund’s shares is held by a limited number of shareholders or their affiliates, there is a risk that the share trading activities of these shareholders could disrupt the Fund’s investment strategies, which could have adverse consequences for the Fund and other shareholders (e.g., by requiring the Fund to sell or exit investments at inopportune times or causing the Fund to maintain larger-than-expected cash positions pending acquisition of investments).
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Performance
The following bar chart and table provide some indication of the risks of investing in the Fund by showing changes in the Fund’s performance from year to year and by showing how the Fund’s average annual returns over different periods compare with those of two broad measures of market performance. The Fund’s past performance (before and after taxes) is not necessarily an indication of how the Fund will perform in the future. The Calendar Year Total Returns bar chart shows performance of Institutional Class shares year by year for the last ten calendar years. Returns for other share classes will differ only to the extent that they have different expenses. Updated performance information is available on the Fund’s website at www.crossmarkglobal.com.
INSTITUTIONAL CLASS CALENDAR YEAR TOTAL RETURNS
[MISSING IMAGE: tm2025474d7-bc_geifbw.jpg]
The following table illustrates the impact of taxes on the Fund’s returns (Institutional Class is shown; after-tax returns for other share classes will differ). After-tax returns are calculated using the historical highest individual federal marginal income tax rates and do not reflect the impact of state and local taxes. After-tax returns depend on your own tax situation and may be different from those shown. This information does not apply if your Fund shares are held in a
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tax-advantaged account such as an individual retirement account or 401(k) plan. Two indices that are broad measures of market performance are shown because the Fund’s Board of Directors has determined that both are relevant to the types of securities in which the Fund invests.
AVERAGE ANNUAL TOTAL RETURNS
For the periods ended December 31, 2019
1 Year
5 Years
10 Years
Institutional Class
Return Before Taxes 24.72% 9.66% 10.42%
Return After Taxes on Distributions 22.48% 7.58% 9.01%
Return After Taxes on Distributions and Sale
of Fund Shares
16.18% 7.27% 8.33%
Class A
Return Before Taxes 24.37% 9.32% 10.06%
Indexes
Standard & Poor’s Global 1200 Index (reflects no deduction for fees, expenses or taxes) 28.22% 9.50% 9.99%
MSCI World High Dividend Yield Index (reflects no deduction for fees, expenses or taxes) 23.15% 7.31% 8.22%
Standard & Poor’s 500 Index (reflects no deduction for fees, expenses or taxes) 31.49% 11.70% 13.56%
AVERAGE ANNUAL TOTAL RETURNS
For the periods ended December 31, 2019
1 Year
Since
Class Inception
(12/14/17)
Class C
Return Before Taxes 23.29% 6.79%
Class R6
Return Before Taxes 24.46% 7.40%
Indexes
Standard & Poor’s Global 1200 Index (reflects
no deduction for fees, expenses or taxes)
28.22% 8.73%
MSCI World High Dividend Yield Index (reflects no deduction for fees, expenses or taxes) 23.15% 6.90%
Standard & Poor’s 500 Index (reflects no deduction for fees, expenses or taxes) 31.49% 12.08%
The Standard & Poor’s Global 1200 Index has replaced the Standard & Poor’s 500 Index as the Fund’s primary comparative broad-based securities market index. In addition, the MSCI World High Dividend Yield Index has been added as a secondary comparative broad-based securities market index. Crossmark believes that these indexes collectively better represent the Fund’s investment strategy.
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MANAGEMENT
Crossmark is the Fund’s investment adviser. The Fund’s portfolio manager is John Wolf. Mr. Wolf is a Managing Director of Crossmark and has served as portfolio manager or co-portfolio manager of the Fund since 2008.
Shareholder Information
For important information about purchase and sale of Fund shares, federal income tax information, and information on financial intermediary compensation, please turn to the ADDITIONAL FUND DETAILS section on page 55 of this Prospectus.
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STEWARD INTERNATIONAL ENHANCED INDEX FUND
Investment Objective:   Long-term capital appreciation.
Fees and Expenses of the Fund
The following table describes the fees and expenses that you may pay if you buy and hold shares of the Fund.
SHAREHOLDER FEES
(fees paid directly from your investment)
Class A
Class C
Class R6
Institutional
Class
Maximum sales charge (load) imposed on purchases None None None None
Maximum deferred sales charge (CDSC) (as a percentage of redemption proceeds) None 1.00% None None
Maximum sales charge (load) imposed on reinvested dividends and other distributions None None None None
Maximum account fee None None None None
Class C shares are subject to a CDSC. If you redeem your shares within twelve months of purchase you will be assessed a 1% CDSC. Class C shares convert to Class A shares after eight years. If you purchase Class C shares through a broker-dealer or other financial intermediary (such as a bank), your intermediary may impose different conversion terms, including an earlier conversion.
Class R6 shares are made available to authorized dealers without any distribution-related payments or account servicing payments. Accordingly, you may be charged a commission or other account management or service fee by your dealer which is not reflected herein.
ANNUAL FUND OPERATING EXPENSES
(expenses that you pay each year as a percentage of the value of your investment)
Class A
Class C
Class R6
Institutional
Class
Management fees1 0.37% 0.37% 0.37% 0.37%
Distribution (12b-1) fees 0.25% 1.00% None None
Other expenses2 0.45% 0.36% 0.31% 0.36%
Total annual Fund operating expenses
1.07% 1.73% 0.68% 0.73%
1
“Management fees” are restated to reflect the Fund’s current management fee rate effective August 1, 2019.
2
“Other expenses” are restated to reflect the Fund’s current administration fee rate effective August 1, 2019.
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Example
This example can help you compare the cost of investing in the Fund with the cost of investing in other mutual funds. It assumes:

You invest $10,000 for the periods shown and then redeem all of your shares at the end of those periods (except Class C is also shown assuming you kept your shares);

Your investment has a 5% return each year; and

The Fund’s operating expenses remain the same.
Although your actual costs may be higher or lower, based on these assumptions your costs would be:
1 Year
3 Years
5 Years
10 Years
Class A
$ 109 $ 340 $ 590 $ 1,306
Class C (With Redemption)
$ 276 $ 544 $ 937 $ 2,038
Class C (Without Redemption)
$ 176 $ 544 $ 937 $ 2,038
Class R6
$ 69 $ 218 $ 379 $ 847
Institutional Class
$ 75 $ 233 $ 406 $ 906
Portfolio Turnover
The Fund pays transaction costs, such as commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or “turns over” its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover rate may indicate higher transaction costs and may result in higher taxes when Fund shares are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are not reflected in annual fund operating expenses or in the example, affect the Fund’s performance. During the most recent fiscal year, the Fund’s portfolio turnover rate was 15% of the average value of its portfolio.
Principal Investment Strategies
The Fund is not a passively managed index fund. The Fund pursues its objective by seeking to enhance its performance over that of its primary benchmark index by 1) changing the relative weighting in the Fund’s portfolio of equity securities of developed market companies and of emerging market companies and 2) utilizing computer-aided, quantitative analysis of valuation, growth, dividend yield, industry, and other factors to attempt to compensate for the exclusion of certain index securities due to the Fund’s values-based screening policies. In implementing its investment strategies, the Fund applies a set of values-based screens to use its best efforts to avoid investing in companies that are determined by Crossmark, pursuant to screening guidelines approved by the Fund’s Board of Directors, to be: (1) materially involved in the production, distribution, retail, supply or licensing of alcohol or related products; (2) materially involved in the production, distribution, retail, supply or licensing of tobacco or related products (to include vaping and other alternative smoking products); (3) materially involved in gambling (to include the manufacture, distribution and operation of facilities and equipment whose intended use is gambling); (4) directly participating in providing abortions and/or the production of drugs marketed with the primary intent to terminate pregnancy; (5) directly engaged in scientific research using stem cells derived from human embryos, fetal tissue or human embryo cloning techniques; (6) directly involved in the production, distribution or retail of adult entertainment; or (7) directly involved in the production, distribution, retail, supply or licensing of psychoactive recreational cannabis or derivative products.
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Under normal circumstances, the Fund will invest at least 80% of its assets in the securities of companies included in the Fund’s primary benchmark.* The Fund’s primary benchmark index is a blend of widely recognized broad-based indexes and includes securities of companies in both developed and emerging non-U.S. markets, and is the same index identified in the Average Annual Total Returns table below. Under normal circumstances, the Fund will invest at least 80% of its assets in the securities of non-U.S. companies.* The Fund’s investments are allocated in an attempt to match the characteristics of a blend of the primary benchmark with varied weightings from time to time of a secondary broad-based index that includes only securities of issuers in emerging market countries. An emerging market country is any country that has been determined by an international organization, such as the World Bank, to have a low to middle income economy.
Generally, at least 80% of the Fund’s total assets will be in investments in the form of depositary receipts (“DRs”) or dual listed securities representing securities of companies located or domiciled outside of the United States.* These DRs will primarily be sponsored, but the Fund may, on occasion, invest in unsponsored DRs when appropriate sponsored DRs are not available. The Fund will invest in securities of issuers throughout the world, and, under normal conditions, substantially all of its non-cash assets will be invested in securities of non-U.S. issuers. The Fund may invest up to 40% of its assets in securities of issuers in emerging market countries. Fund investments may also include other investment companies and real estate investment trusts. If a material misweighting develops, the portfolio managers will rebalance the portfolio in an attempt to match the characteristics of a blend of the primary benchmark and varied weightings from time to time of a secondary broad-based index that includes only securities of issuers in emerging market countries. Because the Fund uses its best efforts to avoid investments in companies that do not pass the values-based screening criteria, it will divest itself, in a timely manner, of securities that are subsequently added to the list of prohibited securities.
Values-based Investing.   The Fund applies a set of values-based screens to use its best efforts to avoid investing in companies that are determined by Crossmark, pursuant to screening guidelines approved by the Fund’s Board of Directors, to be: (1) materially involved in the production, distribution, retail, supply or licensing of alcohol or related products; (2) materially involved in the production, distribution, retail, supply or licensing of tobacco or related products (to include vaping and other alternative smoking products); (3) materially involved in gambling (to include the manufacture, distribution and operation of facilities and equipment whose intended use is gambling); (4) directly participating in providing abortions and/or the production of drugs marketed with the primary intent to terminate pregnancy; (5) directly engaged in scientific research using stem cells derived from human embryos, fetal tissue or human embryo cloning techniques; (6) directly involved in the production, distribution or retail of adult entertainment; or (7) directly involved in the production, distribution, retail, supply or licensing of psychoactive recreational cannabis or derivative products. However, the Fund may invest up to 5% of its total assets in certain collective investment vehicles or derivatives that may hold or derive value from securities issued by otherwise excluded companies.
*
The 80% is measured as of the time of investment and is applied to the value of the Fund’s net assets plus the amount of any borrowings for investment purposes. For purposes of this limit, investments include those made directly or through other investment companies that have substantially similar 80% policies. The Fund will provide shareholders with at least 60 days’ prior notice of any change in this policy.
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For purposes of the alcohol, tobacco and gambling screens, material involvement means that a company derives 10% or more of its revenues from the screened activities. For purposes of the adult entertainment screen, companies directly involved in the production, distribution or retail of adult entertainment (defined as media and materials intended to appeal exclusively to the prurient interest) and companies that derive 2% or more of their revenues from the screened activities are screened. For purposes of the abortion, stem cell research and cannabis screens, there is no revenue threshold; any direct involvement in the screened activities will cause a company to be screened out of the investment universe. For purposes of the abortion screen, a company that is not itself directly involved in the screened activities will be screened out of the investment universe if  (a) it owns 20% or more of another company that is directly participating in the screened activities, or (b) it is 50% or more owned by another company that is directly participating in the screened activities.
Principal Risks of Investing in the Fund
Investment in the Fund involves risk. There can be no assurance that the Fund will achieve its investment objective. You can lose money on your investment in the Fund. When you sell your Fund shares, they may be worth less than what you paid for them. The Fund, by itself, does not constitute a balanced investment program. The Fund may not achieve its objective if the portfolio managers’ expectations regarding particular securities or markets are not met. The value of shares of the Fund will be influenced by market conditions as well as by the performance of the securities in which the Fund invests. The Fund’s performance may be better or worse than that of funds with similar investment policies. The Fund’s performance is also likely to differ from that of funds that use different strategies for selecting investments.
Although the Fund may invest in equity securities of companies across all market capitalizations, in the event the Fund invests more heavily in smaller companies its risks will increase and changes in its share price may become more sudden or more erratic. (See “Securities of Small- and Mid-Cap Companies,” below.)
Risks of investing in the Fund include:
• Values-based Screening Policies – The Fund’s values-based screening policies exclude certain securities issuers from the universe of otherwise available investments. As a result, the Fund may not achieve the same level of performance as it otherwise would have in the absence of the screening process. If the Fund has invested in a company that is later discovered to be in violation of one or more screening criteria and liquidation of an investment in that company is required, selling the securities at issue could result in a loss to the Fund. Further, the Fund’s values-based screening policies may prevent the Fund from participating in an otherwise suitable investment opportunity.
• Equity Securities – The value of equity securities will rise and fall in response to the activities of the companies that issued the securities, general market conditions and/or economic conditions. If an issuer is liquidated or declares bankruptcy, the claims of owners of the issuer’s bonds will take precedence over the claims of owners of its equity securities.
• Foreign Securities – Investments in securities of issuers in foreign countries involves risks not associated with domestic investments. These risks include, but are not limited to: (1) political and financial instability; (2) currency exchange rate fluctuations; (3) greater price volatility and less liquidity in particular securities and in certain foreign markets; (4) lack of uniform accounting, auditing, and financial reporting standards; (5) less government regulation and supervision of some foreign stock exchanges, brokers and listed companies; (6) delays in transaction settlement in certain foreign markets; (7) less availability of information; and (8) imposition of foreign withholding or other taxes.
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• Emerging Market Securities – Securities of issuers in emerging and developing countries raise additional risks relative to investments in developed country issuers, including exposure to less mature and diversified economies and to less stable market and political systems, as well as to possible currency transfer restrictions, delays and disruptions in settlement of transactions, and higher volatility than is found in developed countries.
• Market Disruption and Geopolitical Risk – Geopolitical and other events, including war, terrorism, economic uncertainty, trade disputes, public health crises and related geopolitical events have led, and in the future may lead, to increased market volatility, which may disrupt U.S. and world economies and markets and may have significant adverse direct or indirect effects on the value of the Fund and its investments. Such events include the recent pandemic of the novel coronavirus disease known as COVID-19, the withdrawal of the United Kingdom from the European Union (Brexit) and the ongoing trade disputes between the United States and China. Likewise, natural and environmental disasters and systemic market dislocations may be highly disruptive to economies and markets. Those events as well as other changes in foreign and domestic economic and political conditions also could adversely affect individual issuers or related groups of issuers, securities markets, interest rates, credit ratings, inflation, investor sentiment and other factors affecting the value of the Fund and its investments. Given the increasing interdependence among global economies and markets, conditions in one country, market or region might adversely affect markets, issuers and/or foreign exchange rates in other countries, including the United States. Any partial or complete dissolution of the Economic and Monetary Union of the European Union, or any increased uncertainty as to its status, could have significant adverse effects on currency and financial markets, and on the value of the Fund and its investments. Securities and financial markets may be susceptible to market manipulation or other fraudulent trade practices, which could disrupt the orderly functioning of these markets or adversely affect the value of investments traded in these markets, including investments held by the Fund. To the extent the Fund has focused its investments in the market of a particular region, adverse geopolitical and other events could have a disproportionate impact on the Fund.
The recent COVID-19 pandemic has caused significant uncertainty, market volatility, decreased economic and other activity and increased government activity. Specifically, COVID-19 has led to significant death and morbidity, and concerns about its further spread have resulted in the closing of schools and non-essential businesses, cancellations, shelter-in-place orders, lower consumer spending in certain sectors, social distancing, bans on large social gatherings and travel, quarantines, government economic stimulus measures, reduced productivity, rapid increases in unemployment, increased demand for and strain on government and medical resources, border closings and global trade and supply chain interruptions, among others. The full effects, duration and costs of the COVID-19 pandemic are impossible to predict, and the circumstances surrounding the COVID-19 pandemic will continue to evolve. The pandemic may affect certain countries, industries, economic sectors, companies and investment products more than others, may exacerbate existing economic, political, or social tensions and may increase the probability of an economic recession or depression. The Fund and its investments may be adversely affected by the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic, and a prolonged pandemic may result in the Fund and its service providers experiencing operational difficulties in coordinating a remote workforce and implementing their business continuity plans, among others.
Market disruptions could cause the Fund to lose money, experience significant redemptions and encounter operational difficulties. Although multiple asset classes may be affected by a market disruption, the duration and effects may not be the same for all types of assets.
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• Depositary Receipts (“DRs”) – Investments in unsponsored DRs (those that are not sponsored by the issuer or a representative of the issuer) involve certain risks not present with sponsored DRs. Investors in unsponsored DRs typically involve expenses not associated with sponsored DRs, such as expenses associated with certificate transfer, custody and dividend payment. For an unsponsored DR there may be several depositaries with no defined legal obligations to the issuer. Duplicate depositaries may lead to marketplace confusion since there would be no central source of information. There can also be greater delays in delivery of dividends and reports to investors than with sponsored DRs. DRs may be issued with respect to securities of issuers in emerging market countries.
• Foreign Currency Risk – Investments in foreign securities involve the risk that the currencies in which those instruments are denominated will decline in value relative to the U.S. dollar, or, in the case of hedging positions, that the U.S. dollar will decline relative to the currency being hedged. Currency rates in foreign countries may fluctuate significantly over short periods of time for a number of reasons, including changes in interest rates, intervention (or the failure to intervene) by U.S. or foreign governments, central banks or supranational entities such as the International Monetary Fund, or by the imposition of currency controls or other political developments in the United States or abroad. As a result, the Fund’s investments in foreign currency-denominated securities may reduce the returns of the Fund. Although the Fund’s international investments will primarily be in the form of U.S. dollar-denominated securities, fluctuations in the value of the currencies of the countries in which the foreign companies are located may also affect the value of such securities.
• Security Selection and Market Risk – The Fund’s portfolio securities may underperform the market or other funds with similar objectives. The value of the Fund’s investments may also change with general market conditions.
• Value Stocks – Investments in value stocks are subject to risks of equity securities, as well as the risks that (i) their intrinsic values may never be realized by the market or (ii) such stocks may turn out not to have been undervalued.
• Growth Stocks –  Investments in growth stocks are subject to the risks of equity securities. Growth company stocks may provide minimal dividends that could otherwise cushion stock prices in a market decline. The value of growth company stocks may rise and fall significantly based, in part, on investors’ perceptions of the companies, rather than on fundamental analysis of the stocks.
• Securities of Small- and Mid-Cap Companies – Investments in small- and mid-cap companies are subject to the risks of equity securities. Investment in small- and mid-cap companies may involve greater risks than securities of large-cap companies because mid-cap companies generally have a limited track record. Small- and mid-cap companies often have narrower markets, more limited managerial and financial resources and a less diversified product offering than larger, more established companies. As a result of these factors, the prices of these securities can be more volatile, which may increase the volatility of the Fund’s portfolio. For small-cap companies, these risks are increased.
• Investment in Other Investment Companies or Real Estate Investment Trusts – The Fund may invest in shares of other investment companies or real estate investment trusts (“funds”). The Fund bears a proportional share of the expenses of such other funds, which are in addition to those of the Fund. For example, the Fund will bear a portion of such other funds’ investment advisory fees, although the fees paid by the Fund to Crossmark will not be proportionally reduced.
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• Issuer Risk – The value of a security may decline for a number of reasons that directly relate to the issuer, such as management performance, financial leverage and reduced demand for the issuer’s goods or services.
• Management Risk – The Fund is subject to management risk because it is an actively managed investment portfolio. Crossmark will apply investment techniques and risk analyses in making investment decisions for the Fund, but there can be no guarantee that these will produce the desired results.
• Concentration Policy Risk – To the extent securities of any one industry or group of industries comprise close to 25% of the Fund, the Fund may be limited in its ability to overweight with respect to that industry or industry group, due to the Fund’s fundamental policy not to concentrate in a particular industry or industry group.
• Share Ownership Concentration Risk – To the extent that a significant portion of the Fund’s shares is held by a limited number of shareholders or their affiliates, there is a risk that the share trading activities of these shareholders could disrupt the Fund’s investment strategies, which could have adverse consequences for the Fund and other shareholders (e.g., by requiring the Fund to sell or exit investments at inopportune times or causing the Fund to maintain larger-than-expected cash positions pending acquisition of investments).
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Performance
The following bar chart and table provide some indication of the risks of investing in the Fund by showing changes in the Fund’s performance from year to year and by showing how the Fund’s average annual returns over different periods compares with those of a broad measure of market performance, respectively. The Fund’s past performance (before and after taxes) is not necessarily an indication of how the Fund will perform in the future. The Calendar Year Total Returns bar chart shows performance of Institutional Class shares year by year for the last ten calendar years. Returns for other share classes will differ only to the extent that they have different expenses. Updated performance information is available on the Fund’s website at www.crossmarkglobal.com.
INSTITUTIONAL CLASS CALENDAR YEAR TOTAL RETURNS
[MISSING IMAGE: tm2025474d7-bc_ieifbw.jpg]
The following table illustrates the impact of taxes on the Fund’s returns (Institutional Class is shown; after-tax returns for other share classes will differ). After-tax returns are calculated using the historical highest individual federal marginal income tax rates and do not reflect the
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impact of state and local taxes. After-tax returns depend on your own tax situation and may be different from those shown. This information does not apply if your Fund shares are held in a tax-advantaged account such as an individual retirement account or 401(k) plan.
AVERAGE ANNUAL TOTAL RETURNS
For the periods ended December 31, 2019
1 Year
5 Years
10 Years
Institutional Class
Return Before Taxes 18.96% 4.11% 2.84%
Return After Taxes on Distributions 18.54% 3.60% 2.37%
Return After Taxes on Distributions and Sale
of Fund Shares
12.05% 3.27% 2.30%
Class A
Return Before Taxes 18.59% 3.78% 2.50%
Index
S&P ADR Index (reflects no deduction for fees, expenses or taxes) 21.17% 4.59% 4.45%
AVERAGE ANNUAL TOTAL RETURNS
For the periods ended December 31, 2019
1 Year
Since
Class Inception
(12/14/17)
Class C
Return Before Taxes 16.42% 0.68%
Class R6
Return Before Taxes 17.54% 1.18%
Index
S&P ADR Index (reflects no deduction for fees, expenses or taxes) 21.17% 3.52%
MANAGEMENT
Crossmark is the Fund’s investment adviser. The Fund’s co-portfolio managers are Brent Lium, Ryan Caylor and John Wolf, with Messrs. Lium and Caylor serving as lead co-portfolio managers. Mr. Lium is a Managing Director of Crossmark and has served as lead co-portfolio manager of the Fund since 2019. Mr. Caylor is Head of Research and a Portfolio Manager of Crossmark and has served as lead co-portfolio manager of the Fund since 2020. Mr. Wolf is a Managing Director of Crossmark and has served as portfolio manager or co-portfolio manager of the Fund since 2004. The day-to-day management of the Fund and final decisions are carried out by Messrs. Lium and Caylor, with Mr. Wolf providing advice, support and backup.
Shareholder Information
For important information about purchase and sale of Fund shares, federal income tax information, and information on financial intermediary compensation, please turn to the ADDITIONAL FUND DETAILS section on page 55 of this Prospectus.
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STEWARD LARGE CAP ENHANCED INDEX FUND
Investment Objective:   Long-term capital appreciation.
Fees and Expenses of the Fund
The following table describes the fees and expenses that you may pay if you buy and hold shares of the Fund.
SHAREHOLDER FEES
(fees paid directly from your investment)
Class A
Class C
Class R6
Institutional
Class
Maximum sales charge (load) imposed on purchases None None None None
Maximum deferred sales charge (CDSC) (as a percentage of redemption proceeds) None 1.00% None None
Maximum sales charge (load) imposed on reinvested dividends and other distributions None None None None
Maximum account fee None None None None
Class C shares are subject to a CDSC. If you redeem your shares within twelve months of purchase you will be assessed a 1% CDSC. Class C shares convert to Class A shares after eight years. If you purchase Class C shares through a broker-dealer or other financial intermediary (such as a bank), your intermediary may impose different conversion terms, including an earlier conversion.
Class R6 shares are made available to authorized dealers without any distribution-related payments or account servicing payments. Accordingly, you may be charged a commission or other account management or service fee by your dealer which is not reflected herein.
ANNUAL FUND OPERATING EXPENSES
(expenses that you pay each year as a percentage of the value of your investment)
Class A
Class C
Class R6
Institutional
Class
Management fees1 0.22% 0.22% 0.22% 0.22%
Distribution (12b-1) fees 0.25% 1.00% None None
Other expenses2 0.38% 0.31% 0.25% 0.31%
Total annual Fund operating expenses
0.85% 1.53% 0.47% 0.53%
1
“Management fees” are restated to reflect the Fund’s current management fee rate effective August 1, 2019.
2
“Other expenses” are restated to reflect the Fund’s current administration fee rate effective August 1, 2019.
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Example
This example can help you compare the cost of investing in the Fund with the cost of investing in other mutual funds. It assumes:

You invest $10,000 for the periods shown and then redeem all of your shares at the end of those periods (except Class C is also shown assuming you kept your shares);

Your investment has a 5% return each year; and

The Fund’s operating expenses remain the same.
Although your actual costs may be higher or lower, based on these assumptions your costs would be:
1 Year
3 Years
5 Years
10 Years
Class A
$ 87 $ 271 $ 471 $ 1,049
Class C (With Redemption)
$ 256 $ 483 $ 834 $ 1,824
Class C (Without Redemption)
$ 156 $ 483 $ 834 $ 1,824
Class R6
$ 48 $ 151 $ 263 $ 591
Institutional Class
$ 54 $ 170 $ 296 $ 665
Portfolio Turnover
The Fund pays transaction costs, such as commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or “turns over” its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover rate may indicate higher transaction costs and may result in higher taxes when Fund shares are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are not reflected in annual fund operating expenses or in the example, affect the Fund’s performance. During the most recent fiscal year, the Fund’s portfolio turnover rate was 32% of the average value of its portfolio.
Principal Investment Strategies
The Fund is not a passively managed index fund. The Fund pursues its objective by seeking to enhance its performance over that of its primary benchmark index by 1) changing the relative weighting in the Fund’s portfolio of growth versus value style securities in the index (style tilt) and 2) utilizing computer-aided, quantitative analysis of valuation, growth, dividend yield, industry and other factors to attempt to compensate for the exclusion of certain index securities due to the Fund’s values-based screening policies. In implementing its investment strategies, the Fund applies a set of values-based screens to use its best efforts to avoid investing in companies that are determined by Crossmark, pursuant to screening guidelines approved by the Fund’s Board of Directors, to be: (1) materially involved in the production, distribution, retail, supply or licensing of alcohol or related products; (2) materially involved in the production, distribution, retail, supply or licensing of tobacco or related products (to include vaping and other alternative smoking products); (3) materially involved in gambling (to include the manufacture, distribution and operation of facilities and equipment whose intended use is gambling); (4) directly participating in providing abortions and/or the production of drugs marketed with the primary intent to terminate pregnancy; (5) directly engaged in scientific research using stem cells derived from human embryos, fetal tissue or human embryo cloning techniques; (6) directly involved in the production, distribution or retail of adult entertainment; or (7) directly involved in the production, distribution, retail, supply or licensing of psychoactive recreational cannabis or derivative products.
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Under normal circumstances, the Fund will invest at least 80% of its assets in the securities of companies included in the Fund’s benchmark.* The Fund’s benchmark index is a widely recognized broad-based large-cap index and is the same index identified in the Average Annual Total Returns table below. The Fund’s investments are allocated in an attempt to match the characteristics of a blend of the benchmark and varied weightings from time to time of two indices that are subcomponents of the benchmark: a large-cap growth index and a large-cap value index. Under normal circumstances, the Fund will invest at least 80% of its assets in securities of large-cap companies.* Large-cap companies are defined by the market capitalization range of the Fund’s benchmark index from time to time. For the Fund’s current benchmark index, this market capitalization range, as of June 30, 2020, is $1.836 billion to $1.581 trillion.
The companies included in the benchmark index represent a broad spectrum of the U.S. economy and are generally U.S. issuers. Fund investments may also include other investment companies and real estate investment trusts. In addition to its investment in securities of companies included in the benchmark index, the Fund may invest up to 5% of its total assets in securities of non-U.S. issuers not generally included in the benchmark index. Also, the Fund may not invest more than 2% of its total assets in securities of companies in emerging market countries. In the event of changes to the companies included in the benchmark index, changes in the portfolio managers’ evaluation of the relative performance of growth versus value style securities, or the development of a material misweighting, the portfolio managers will rebalance the portfolio in an attempt to match the characteristics of a blend of its benchmark index and varied weightings from time to time of two indices that are subcomponents of the benchmark: a large-cap growth index and a large-cap value index. Because the Fund uses its best efforts to avoid investments in companies that do not pass the values-based screening criteria, it will divest itself, in a timely manner, of securities that are subsequently added to the list of prohibited securities.
Values-based Investing.   The Fund applies a set of values-based screens to use its best efforts to avoid investing in companies that are determined by Crossmark, pursuant to screening guidelines approved by the Fund’s Board of Directors, to be: (1) materially involved in the production, distribution, retail, supply or licensing of alcohol or related products; (2) materially involved in the production, distribution, retail, supply or licensing of tobacco or related products (to include vaping and other alternative smoking products); (3) materially involved in gambling (to include the manufacture, distribution and operation of facilities and equipment whose intended use is gambling); (4) directly participating in providing abortions and/or the production of drugs marketed with the primary intent to terminate pregnancy; (5) directly engaged in scientific research using stem cells derived from human embryos, fetal tissue or human embryo cloning techniques; (6) directly involved in the production, distribution or retail of adult entertainment; or (7) directly involved in the production, distribution, retail, supply or licensing of psychoactive recreational cannabis or derivative products. However, the Fund may invest up to 5% of its total assets in certain collective investment vehicles or derivatives that may hold or derive value from securities issued by otherwise excluded companies.
For purposes of the alcohol, tobacco and gambling screens, material involvement means that a company derives 10% or more of its revenues from the screened activities. For purposes of
*
The 80% is measured as of the time of investment and is applied to the value of the Fund’s net assets plus the amount of any borrowings for investment purposes. For purposes of this limit, investments include those made directly or through other investment companies that have substantially similar 80% policies. The Fund will provide shareholders with at least60 days’ prior notice of any change in this policy.
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the adult entertainment screen, companies directly involved in the production, distribution or retail of adult entertainment (defined as media and materials intended to appeal exclusively to the prurient interest) and companies that derive 2% or more of their revenues from the screened activities are screened. For purposes of the abortion, stem cell research and cannabis screens, there is no revenue threshold; any direct involvement in the screened activities will cause a company to be screened out of the investment universe. For purposes of the abortion screen, a company that is not itself directly involved in the screened activities will be screened out of the investment universe if  (a) it owns 20% or more of another company that is directly participating in the screened activities, or (b) it is 50% or more owned by another company that is directly participating in the screened activities.
Principal Risks of Investing in the Fund
Investment in the Fund involves risk. There can be no assurance that the Fund will achieve its investment objective. You can lose money on your investment in the Fund. When you sell your Fund shares, they may be worth less than what you paid for them. The Fund, by itself, does not constitute a balanced investment program. The Fund may not achieve its objective if the portfolio managers’ expectations regarding particular securities or markets are not met. The value of shares of the Fund will be influenced by market conditions as well as by the performance of the securities in which the Fund invests. The Fund’s performance may be better or worse than that of funds with similar investment policies. The Fund’s performance is also likely to be different from that of funds that use different strategies for selecting investments.
Risks of investing in the Fund include:
• Values-based Screening Policies – The Fund’s values-based screening policies exclude certain securities issuers from the universe of otherwise available investments. As a result, the Fund may not achieve the same level of performance as it otherwise would have in the absence of the screening process. If the Fund has invested in a company that is later discovered to be in violation of one or more screening criteria and liquidation of an investment in that company is required, selling the securities at issue could result in a loss to the Fund. Further, the Fund’s values-based screening policies may prevent the Fund from participating in an otherwise suitable investment opportunity.
• Equity Securities – The value of equity securities will rise and fall in response to the activities of the companies that issued the securities, general market conditions and/or economic conditions. If an issuer is liquidated or declares bankruptcy, the claims of owners of the issuer’s bonds will take precedence over the claims of owners of its equity securities.
• Value Stocks – Investments in value stocks are subject to risks of equity securities, as well as the risks that (i) their intrinsic values may never be realized by the market or (ii) such stocks may turn out not to have been undervalued.
• Growth Stocks – Investments in growth stocks are subject to the risks of equity securities. Growth company stocks may provide minimal dividends that could otherwise cushion stock prices in a market decline. The value of growth company stocks may rise and fall significantly based, in part, on investors’ perceptions of the companies, rather than on fundamental analysis of the stocks.
• Security Selection and Market Risk – The Fund’s portfolio securities may underperform the market or other funds with similar objectives. The value of the Fund’s investments may also change with general market conditions.
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• Market Disruption and Geopolitical Risk – Geopolitical and other events, including war, terrorism, economic uncertainty, trade disputes, public health crises and related geopolitical events have led, and in the future may lead, to increased market volatility, which may disrupt U.S. and world economies and markets and may have significant adverse direct or indirect effects on the value of the Fund and its investments. Such events include the recent pandemic of the novel coronavirus disease known as COVID-19, the withdrawal of the United Kingdom from the European Union (Brexit) and the ongoing trade disputes between the United States and China. Likewise, natural and environmental disasters and systemic market dislocations may be highly disruptive to economies and markets. Those events as well as other changes in foreign and domestic economic and political conditions also could adversely affect individual issuers or related groups of issuers, securities markets, interest rates, credit ratings, inflation, investor sentiment and other factors affecting the value of the Fund and its investments. Given the increasing interdependence among global economies and markets, conditions in one country, market or region might adversely affect markets, issuers and/or foreign exchange rates in other countries, including the United States. Securities and financial markets may be susceptible to market manipulation or other fraudulent trade practices, which could disrupt the orderly functioning of these markets or adversely affect the value of investments traded in these markets, including investments held by the Fund.
The recent COVID-19 pandemic has caused significant uncertainty, market volatility, decreased economic and other activity and increased government activity. Specifically, COVID-19 has led to significant death and morbidity, and concerns about its further spread have resulted in the closing of schools and non-essential businesses, cancellations, shelter-in-place orders, lower consumer spending in certain sectors, social distancing, bans on large social gatherings and travel, quarantines, government economic stimulus measures, reduced productivity, rapid increases in unemployment, increased demand for and strain on government and medical resources, border closings and global trade and supply chain interruptions, among others. The full effects, duration and costs of the COVID-19 pandemic are impossible to predict, and the circumstances surrounding the COVID-19 pandemic will continue to evolve. The pandemic may affect certain countries, industries, economic sectors, companies and investment products more than others, may exacerbate existing economic, political, or social tensions and may increase the probability of an economic recession or depression. The Fund and its investments may be adversely affected by the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic, and a prolonged pandemic may result in the Fund and its service providers experiencing operational difficulties in coordinating a remote workforce and implementing their business continuity plans, among others.
Market disruptions could cause the Fund to lose money, experience significant redemptions and encounter operational difficulties. Although multiple asset classes may be affected by a market disruption, the duration and effects may not be the same for all types of assets.
• Investment in Other Investment Companies or Real Estate Investment Trusts – The Fund may invest in shares of other investment companies or real estate investment trusts (“funds”). The Fund bears a proportional share of the expenses of such other funds, which are in addition to those of the Fund. For example, the Fund will bear a portion of such other funds’ investment advisory fees, although the fees paid by the Fund to Crossmark will not be proportionally reduced.
• Issuer Risk – The value of a security may decline for a number of reasons that directly relate to the issuer, such as management performance, financial leverage and reduced demand for the issuer’s goods or services.
33​

• Management Risk – The Fund is subject to management risk because it is an actively managed investment portfolio. Crossmark will apply investment techniques and risk analyses in making investment decisions for the Fund, but there can be no guarantee that these will produce the desired results.
• Concentration Policy Risk – To the extent securities of any one industry or group of industries comprise close to 25% of the Fund, the Fund may be limited in its ability to overweight with respect to that industry or industry group, due to the Fund’s fundamental policy not to concentrate in a particular industry or industry group.
• Share Ownership Concentration Risk – To the extent that a significant portion of the Fund’s shares is held by a limited number of shareholders or their affiliates, there is a risk that the share trading activities of these shareholders could disrupt the Fund’s investment strategies, which could have adverse consequences for the Fund and other shareholders (e.g., by requiring the Fund to sell or exit investments at inopportune times or causing the Fund to maintain larger-than-expected cash positions pending acquisition of investments).
Performance
The following bar chart and table provide some indication of the risks of investing in the Fund by showing changes in the Fund’s performance from year to year and by showing how the Fund’s average annual returns over different periods compared with those of a broad measure of market performance, respectively. The Fund’s past performance (before and after taxes) is not necessarily an indication of how the Fund will perform in the future. The Calendar Year Total Returns bar chart shows performance of Institutional Class shares year by year for the last ten calendar years. Returns for other share classes will differ only to the extent that they have different expenses. Updated performance information is available on the Fund’s website at www.crossmarkglobal.com.
INSTITUTIONAL CLASS CALENDAR YEAR TOTAL RETURNS
[MISSING IMAGE: tm2025474d7-bc_lceifbw.jpg]
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The following table illustrates the impact of taxes on the Fund’s returns (Institutional Class is shown; after-tax returns for other share classes will differ). After-tax returns are calculated using the historical highest individual federal marginal income tax rates and do not reflect the impact of state and local taxes. After-tax returns depend on your own tax situation and may be different from those shown. This information does not apply if your Fund shares are held in a tax-advantaged account such as an individual retirement account or 401(k) plan.
AVERAGE ANNUAL TOTAL RETURNS
For the periods ended December 31, 2019
1 Year
5 Years
10 Years
Institutional Class
Return Before Taxes 29.48% 9.75% 13.04%
Return After Taxes on Distributions 28.77% 8.37% 11.81%
Return After Taxes on Distributions and Sale
of Fund Shares
17.91% 7.36% 10.58%
Class A
Return Before Taxes 29.11% 9.42% 12.66%
Index
Standard & Poor’s 500 Index (reflects no deduction for fees, expenses or taxes) 31.49% 11.70% 13.56%
AVERAGE ANNUAL TOTAL RETURNS
For the periods ended December 31, 2019
1 Year
Since Class
Inception
(12/14/17)
Class C
Return Before Taxes 26.42% 7.39%
Class R6
Return Before Taxes 29.47% 8.84%
Index
Standard & Poor’s 500 Index (reflects no deduction for fees, expenses or taxes) 31.49% 12.08%
MANAGEMENT
Crossmark is the Fund’s investment adviser. The Fund’s co-portfolio managers are Brent Lium, Ryan Caylor and John Wolf, with Messrs. Lium and Caylor serving as lead co-portfolio managers. Mr. Lium is a Managing Director of Crossmark and has served as lead co-portfolio manager of the Fund since 2019. Mr. Caylor is Head of Research and a Portfolio Manager of Crossmark and has served as lead co-portfolio manager of the Fund since 2020. Mr. Wolf is a Managing Director of Crossmark and has served as portfolio manager or co-portfolio manager of the Fund since 2004. The day-to-day management of the Fund and final decisions are carried out by Messrs. Lium and Caylor, with Mr. Wolf providing advice, support and backup.
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Shareholder Information
For important information about purchase and sale of Fund shares, federal income tax information, and information on financial intermediary compensation, please turn to the ADDITIONAL FUND DETAILS section on page 55 of this Prospectus.
36

STEWARD SELECT BOND FUND
Investment Objective:   To provide high current income with capital appreciation.
Fees and Expenses of the Fund
The following table describes the fees and expenses that you may pay if you buy and hold shares of the Fund.
SHAREHOLDER FEES
(fees paid directly from your investment)
Class A
Class C
Class R6
Institutional
Class
Maximum sales charge (load) imposed on purchases None None None None
Maximum deferred sales charge (CDSC) (as a percentage of redemption proceeds) None 1.00% None None
Maximum sales charge (load) imposed on reinvested dividends and other distributions None None None None
Maximum account fee None None None None
Class C shares are subject to a CDSC. If you redeem your shares within twelve months of purchase you will be assessed a 1% CDSC. Class C shares convert to Class A shares after eight years. If you purchase Class C shares through a broker-dealer or other financial intermediary (such as a bank), your intermediary may impose different conversion terms, including an earlier conversion.
Class R6 shares are made available to authorized dealers without any distribution-related payments or account servicing payments. Accordingly, you may be charged a commission or other account management or service fee by your dealer which is not reflected herein.
ANNUAL FUND OPERATING EXPENSES
(expenses that you pay each year as a percentage of the value of your investment)
Class A
Class C
Class R6
Institutional
Class
Management fees1 0.32% 0.32% 0.32% 0.32%
Distribution (12b-1) fees 0.25% 1.00% None None
Other expenses2 0.43% 0.34% 0.29%