AQR Funds
AQR Funds Prospectus
May 1, 2023
Class N Shares, Class I Shares and Class R6 Shares
 
Class
Ticker Symbol
AQR Alternative Risk Premia Fund
N
QRPNX
 
I
QRPIX
 
R6
QRPRX
AQR Diversified Arbitrage Fund
N
ADANX
 
I
ADAIX
 
R6
QDARX
AQR Equity Market Neutral Fund
N
QMNNX
 
I
QMNIX
 
R6
QMNRX
AQR Long-Short Equity Fund
N
QLENX
 
I
QLEIX
 
R6
QLERX
AQR Macro Opportunities Fund
N
QGMNX
 
I
QGMIX
 
R6
QGMRX
AQR Managed Futures Strategy Fund
N
AQMNX
 
I
AQMIX
 
R6
AQMRX
AQR Managed Futures Strategy HV Fund
N
QMHNX
 
I
QMHIX
 
R6
QMHRX
AQR Multi-Asset Fund
N
AQRNX
 
I
AQRIX
 
R6
AQRRX
AQR Risk-Balanced Commodities Strategy Fund
N
ARCNX
 
I
ARCIX
 
R6
QRCRX
AQR Style Premia Alternative Fund
N
QSPNX
 
I
QSPIX
 
R6
QSPRX
AQR Sustainable Long-Short Equity Carbon Aware Fund
N
QNZNX
 
I
QNZIX
 
R6
QNZRX
This prospectus contains important information about each Fund, including its investment objective, fees and expenses. For your benefit and protection, please read it before you invest and keep it for future reference. This prospectus relates to the Class N Shares, Class I Shares and Class R6 Shares of each Fund, as applicable.

The Securities and Exchange Commission and the Commodity Futures Trading Commission have not approved or disapproved these securities or determined if this prospectus is truthful or complete. Any representation to the contrary is a criminal offense. In addition, your investment in any of the Funds is not a deposit in a bank and is not insured or guaranteed by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation or any other government agency. You may lose money by investing in any of the Funds. The likelihood of loss may be greater if you invest for a shorter period of time.

AQR Funds–Prospectus
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AQR Funds–Prospectus1
AQR Alternative Risk Premia Fund
Fund Summary — May 1, 2023
Investment Objective
The AQR Alternative Risk Premia Fund (the “Fund”) seeks positive absolute returns.
As further described under “Details About the AQR Alternative Risk Premia Fund” in the Fund’s prospectus, a "positive absolute return" seeks to earn a positive total return over a reasonable period of time regardless of market conditions or general market direction.
Fees and Expenses of the Fund
This table describes the fees and expenses that you may pay if you buy and hold shares of the Fund. You may pay other fees, such as brokerage commissions and other fees to financial intermediaries, which are not reflected in the tables and examples below.
Annual Fund Operating Expenses (expenses that you pay each year as a percentage of the value of your investment)
 
Class N
Class I
Class R6
Management Fee
1.20%
1.20%
1.20%
Distribution (12b-1) Fee
0.25%
None
None
Other Expenses
 
 
 
Dividends on Short Sales1 and Interest Expense
1.72%
1.72%
1.72%
All Other Expenses
0.39%
0.38%
0.29%
Total Other Expenses
2.11%
2.10%
2.01%
Acquired Fund Fees and Expenses2
0.03%
0.03%
0.03%
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses
3.59%
3.33%
3.24%
Less: Expense Reimbursements3
0.19%
0.18%
0.19%
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses after Expense
Reimbursements4
3.40%
3.15%
3.05%
1When a cash dividend is declared on a stock the Fund has sold short, the Fund is required to pay an amount equal to the dividend to the party from which the Fund has borrowed the stock, and to record the payment as an expense.
2Acquired Fund Fees and Expenses reflect the expenses incurred indirectly by the Fund as a result of the Fund's investments in underlying money market mutual funds, exchange-traded funds or other pooled investment vehicles.
3The Adviser has contractually agreed to reimburse operating expenses of the Fund in an amount sufficient to limit certain Specified Expenses at no more than 0.20% for Class N Shares and Class I Shares and 0.10% for Class R6 Shares. "Specified Expenses" for this purpose include all Fund operating expenses other than management fees and 12b-1 fees and exclude interest, taxes, dividends on short sales, borrowing costs, acquired fund fees and expenses, interest expense relating to short sales, expenses related to class action claims, contingent expenses related to tax reclaim receipts, reorganization expenses and extraordinary expenses. This agreement (the “Expense Limitation Agreement”) will continue at least through April 30, 2024. The Expense Limitation Agreement may be terminated with the consent of the Board of Trustees, including a majority of the Non-Interested Trustees of the Trust. The Adviser is entitled to recapture any expenses reimbursed during the thirty-six month period following the end of the month during which the Adviser reimbursed expenses, provided that the amount recaptured may not cause the Specified Expenses attributable to a share class of the Fund during a year in which a repayment is made to exceed either of (i) the applicable limits in effect at the time of the reimbursement and (ii) the applicable limits in effect at the time of recapture.
4Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses after Expense Reimbursements are 1.68% for Class N Shares, 1.43% for Class I Shares and 1.33% for Class R6 Shares if Dividends on Short Sales and Interest Expense are not included.
Example: This Example is intended to help you compare the cost of investing in the Fund with the cost of investing in other mutual funds. The Example assumes that you invest $10,000 in the Fund for the time periods indicated and then redeem all of your shares at the end of those periods. The Example also assumes that your investment has a 5% return each year and that the Fund’s operating expenses remain the same and takes into account the effect of the Expense Limitation Agreement through April 30, 2024, as discussed in Footnote No. 3 to the Fee Table. Although your actual costs may be higher or lower, based on these assumptions your costs would be:
 
1 Year
3 Years
5 Years
10 Years
Class N Shares
$343
$1,083
$1,843
$3,841
Class I Shares
$318
$1,008
$1,721
$3,610
Class R6 Shares
$308
$980
$1,676
$3,527

AQR Funds–Prospectus2
Portfolio Turnover: The Fund pays transaction costs, such as commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or “turns over” its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover may indicate higher transaction costs and may result in higher taxes when shares are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are not reflected in annual fund operating expenses or in the example, affect the Fund’s performance. During the most recent fiscal year, the Fund’s portfolio turnover rate was 262% of the average value of its portfolio.
Principal Investment Strategies of the Fund
The Fund pursues its investment objective by aiming to provide exposure to five separate investment styles (“Styles”): value, momentum, carry, defensive and trend using both long and short positions within the following asset groups (“Asset Groups”): stocks, equity indices, bonds, currencies and commodities. The Fund will achieve its exposure to any of the Asset Groups by using derivatives or holding those assets directly. The Fund will also use derivatives for hedging purposes. The Fund implements the Styles by investing globally, including in both developed and emerging markets, in a broad range of instruments, including, but not limited to, equities, futures (including index futures, equity futures, interest rate futures, bond futures, commodity futures and currency futures), currency and commodity forwards, and swaps (including equity swaps, bond swaps, interest rate swaps, swaps on index futures, total return swaps, commodity swaps and swaps on commodity futures) (collectively, the “Instruments”). The Fund may invest in or have exposure to companies of any size. The Fund may also invest in other registered investment companies including exchange-traded funds (“ETFs”).
The Fund’s exposure to equities includes securities of U.S. and non-U.S. issuers and equity indices representing the United States and non-U.S. countries, including, with respect to non-U.S. countries, those from both developed and emerging markets. For the bonds Asset Group, the Fund will have exposure to U.S. Government securities and sovereign debt issued by other developed and emerging market countries and bond indices representing such securities. The Fund may invest in debt securities of any credit rating, maturity or duration, which may include high-yield or “junk” bonds. From time to time, the Fund can have significant exposure to non-U.S. dollar denominated currencies, including emerging market currencies.
The Fund is generally intended to have a low correlation to the equity, bond and credit markets. The Fund also is not designed to match the performance of any hedge fund index. In order to minimize market impact and reduce trading costs, where applicable, the Fund will utilize a proprietary approach to algorithmic trading. The Adviser will attempt to mitigate risk through diversification of holdings and through active monitoring of volatility, counterparties and other risk measures. There is no assurance, however, that the Fund will achieve its investment objective.
The Styles employed by the Fund are:
Value: Value strategies favor investments that appear cheap over those that appear expensive based on fundamental measures related to price, seeking to capture the tendency for relatively cheap assets to outperform relatively expensive assets. The Fund will seek to buy assets that are “cheap” and sell those that are “expensive.” Examples of value measures include using price-to-earnings and price-to-book ratios for selecting stocks.
Momentum: Momentum strategies favor investments that have performed relatively well over those that have underperformed over the medium-term (i.e., one year or less), seeking to capture the tendency that an asset’s recent relative performance will continue in the near future. The Fund will seek to buy assets that recently outperformed their peers and sell those that recently underperformed. Examples of momentum measures include simple price momentum for selecting stocks and price- and yield-based momentum for selecting bonds.
Carry: An asset’s “carry” is its expected return assuming market conditions, including its price, stay the same. Carry strategies favor investments with higher yields over those with lower yields, seeking to capture the tendency for higher-yielding assets to provide higher returns than lower-yielding assets. The Fund will seek to take long positions in high-yielding assets and short positions in low-yielding assets. An example of carry measures includes selecting currencies and bonds based on interest rates.
Defensive: Defensive strategies favor investments with low-risk characteristics over those with high-risk characteristics, seeking to capture the tendency for lower risk and higher-quality assets to generate higher risk-adjusted returns than higher risk and lower-quality assets. The Fund will seek to buy low-risk, high-quality assets and sell high-risk, low-quality assets. An example of a defensive measure includes using beta (i.e., an investment’s sensitivity to the securities markets) to select stocks.
Trend: Trend strategies favor investments that follow an identified positive or negative trend. The Adviser uses a proprietary, systematic and quantitative process that seeks to benefit from price and/or economic trends in equity index, bond, currency and commodity Instruments. The size and type (long or short) of the position taken will relate to various factors, including the Adviser’s systematic assessment of a trend and its likelihood of continuing as well as the Adviser’s estimate of the Instrument’s risk. The Fund may have both long and short positions in different assets depending on their respective price and/or economic trends. An example of a trend measure is using short-term prices (e.g., prices over a one to three month period) to select an equity index.

AQR Funds–Prospectus3
The Fund is actively managed and the Fund’s exposures to Styles and Asset Groups will vary based on the Adviser’s ongoing evaluation of investment opportunities. The Fund expects to maintain exposure to all five Styles; however, not all Styles are represented within each Asset Group. The Adviser targets balanced-risk weights across both Styles and Asset Groups, which means that lower risk Styles and Asset Groups, as determined by the Adviser, will generally have higher notional allocations (i.e., greater leverage) than higher risk Styles and Asset Groups, as determined by the Adviser. Individual investments are sold or closed out during a rebalancing process, the frequency of which is expected to vary depending on the Adviser’s ongoing evaluation of certain factors including changes in market conditions and how much the actual portfolio deviates from the target portfolio.
The Adviser will consider the potential federal income tax impact on a shareholders’ after-tax investment return of certain trading decisions, including but not limited to, selling or closing out of Instruments to realize losses, or to refrain from selling or closing out of Instruments to avoid realizing gains, when determined by the Adviser to be appropriate. The Adviser will also take into consideration various tax rules pertaining to holding periods, wash sales and tax straddles.
The Fund’s use of futures contracts, forward contracts, swaps and certain other Instruments will have the economic effect of financial leverage. Financial leverage magnifies exposure to the swings in prices of an asset class underlying an Instrument and results in increased volatility, which means the Fund will have the potential for greater gains, as well as the potential for greater losses, than if the Fund did not use Instruments that have a leveraging effect. For example, if the Adviser seeks to gain enhanced exposure to a specific asset class through an Instrument providing leveraged exposure to the asset class and that Instrument increases in value, the gain to the Fund will be magnified. If that investment decreases in value, however, the loss to the Fund will be magnified. A decline in the Fund’s assets due to losses magnified by the Instruments providing leveraged exposure may require the Fund to liquidate portfolio positions to satisfy its obligations or to meet redemption requests when it may not be advantageous to do so. There is no assurance that the Fund’s use of Instruments providing enhanced exposure will enable the Fund to achieve its investment objective.
The Adviser, on average, will target an annualized volatility level for the Fund of 8%. Volatility is a statistical measurement of the dispersion of returns of a security or fund or index, as measured by the annualized standard deviation of its returns. The Adviser expects that the Fund’s targeted annualized forecasted volatility will typically range between 6% and 12%; however, the actual or realized volatility level for longer or shorter periods may be materially higher or lower depending on market conditions. Higher volatility generally indicates higher risk. Actual or realized volatility can and will differ from the forecasted or target volatility described above.
The Fund’s strategy engages in frequent portfolio trading which may result in a higher portfolio turnover rate than a fund with less frequent trading, and correspondingly greater brokerage commissions and other transactional expenses, which are borne by the Fund, and may have adverse tax consequences.
The Fund intends to make investments through the Subsidiary and may invest up to 25% of its total assets in the Subsidiary. The Subsidiary is a wholly-owned and controlled subsidiary of the Fund, organized under the laws of the Cayman Islands as an exempted company. Generally, the Subsidiary will invest primarily in commodity-linked derivative instruments such as commodity futures, commodity forwards and commodity swaps (which may include swaps on commodity futures), but it may also invest in financial futures, option and swap contracts, fixed income securities, pooled investment vehicles, including those that are not registered pursuant to the 1940 Act, and other investments intended to serve as margin or collateral for the Subsidiary’s derivative positions. The Fund will invest in the Subsidiary in order to gain exposure to the commodities markets within the limitations of the federal tax laws, rules and regulations that apply to registered investment companies. Unlike the Fund, the Subsidiary may invest without limitation in commodity-linked derivative instruments, however, the Fund and the Subsidiary will comply with Rule 18f-4 on a consolidated basis with respect to investments in derivatives. In addition, the Fund and the Subsidiary will be subject to the same fundamental investment restrictions on a consolidated basis and, to the extent applicable to the investment activities of the Subsidiary, the Subsidiary will follow the same compliance policies and procedures as the Fund. Unlike the Fund, the Subsidiary will not seek to qualify as a regulated investment company under Subchapter M of the Code. The Fund is the sole shareholder of the Subsidiary and does not expect shares of the Subsidiary to be offered or sold to other investors.
A portion of the Fund’s assets will be held in cash or cash equivalent investments, including, but not limited to, interests in short-term investment funds, short-term bond fund shares, money market fund shares and/or U.S. Government securities.
Principal Risks of Investing in the Fund
Risk is inherent in all investing. The value of your investment in the Fund, as well as the amount of return you receive on your investment, may fluctuate significantly from day to day and over time. You may lose part or all of your investment in the Fund or your investment may not perform as well as other similar investments. The Fund is not a complete investment program and should be considered only as one part of an investment portfolio. The Fund is more appropriate for long-term investors who can bear the risk of short-term NAV fluctuations, which at times, may

AQR Funds–Prospectus4
be significant and rapid, however, all investments long- or short-term are subject to risk of loss. The following is a summary description of certain risks of investing in the Fund. The order of the below risk factors does not indicate the significance of any particular risk factor.
Below Investment Grade Securities Risk: Although bonds rated below investment grade (also known as “junk” securities) generally pay higher rates of interest than investment grade bonds, bonds rated below investment grade are high risk, speculative investments that may cause income and principal losses for the Fund.
Commodities Risk: Exposure to the commodities markets may subject the Fund to greater volatility than investments in traditional securities. The value of commodity-linked derivative investments may be affected by changes in overall market movements, commodity index volatility, changes in interest rates, or factors affecting a particular industry or commodity, such as drought, floods, weather, embargoes, tariffs and international economic, political and regulatory developments.
Common Stock Risk: The Fund may invest in, or have exposure to, common stocks. Common stocks are subject to greater fluctuations in market value than certain other asset classes as a result of such factors as a company’s business performance, investor perceptions, stock market trends and general economic conditions.
Counterparty Risk: The Fund may enter into various types of derivative contracts  as described below under “Derivatives Risk”. Many of these derivative contracts will be privately negotiated in the over-the-counter market. These contracts also involve exposure to credit risk, since contract performance depends in part on the financial condition of the counterparty. If a privately negotiated over-the-counter contract calls for payments by the Fund, the Fund must be prepared to make such payments when due. In addition, if a counterparty’s creditworthiness declines, the Fund may not receive payments owed under the contract, or such payments may be delayed under such circumstances and the value of agreements with such counterparty can be expected to decline, potentially resulting in losses to the Fund.
Credit Risk: Credit risk refers to the possibility that the issuer of a security or the issuer of the reference asset of a derivative instrument will not be able to make principal and interest payments when due. Changes in an issuer’s credit rating or the market’s perception of an issuer’s creditworthiness may also affect the value of the Fund’s investment in that issuer. The degree of credit risk depends on both the financial condition of the issuer and the terms of the obligation. Securities rated in the four highest categories (S&P Global Ratings (“S&P”) (AAA, AA, A and BBB), Fitch Ratings (“Fitch”) (AAA, AA, A and BBB) or Moody’s Investors Service, Inc. (“Moody’s”) (Aaa, Aa, A and Baa)) by the rating agencies are considered investment grade but they may also have some speculative characteristics, meaning that they carry more risk than higher rated securities and may have problems making principal and interest payments in difficult economic climates. Investment grade ratings do not guarantee that the issuer will not default on its payment obligations or that bonds will not otherwise lose value.
Currency Risk: Currency risk is the risk that changes in currency exchange rates will negatively affect securities denominated in, and/or receiving revenues in, foreign currencies. The liquidity and trading value of foreign currencies could be affected by global economic factors, such as inflation, interest rate levels, and trade balances among countries, as well as the actions of sovereign governments and central banks. Adverse changes in currency exchange rates (relative to the U.S. dollar) may erode or reverse any potential gains from the Fund’s investments in securities denominated in a foreign currency or may widen existing losses.
Derivatives Risk: In general, a derivative instrument typically involves leverage, i.e., it provides exposure to potential gain or loss from a change in the level of the market price of the underlying security, currency or commodity (or a basket or index) in a notional amount that exceeds the amount of cash or assets required to establish or maintain the derivative instrument. Adverse changes in the value or level of the underlying asset or index, which the Fund may not directly own, can result in a loss to the Fund substantially greater than the amount invested in the derivative itself. The use of derivative instruments also exposes the Fund to additional risks and transaction costs. These instruments come in many varieties and have a wide range of potential risks and rewards, and may include, as further described in the section entitled “Principal Investment Strategies of the Fund,” futures contracts, forward contracts and swaps. A risk of the Fund’s use of derivatives is that the fluctuations in their values may not correlate perfectly with the overall securities markets.
Emerging Market Risk: The Fund intends to have exposure to emerging markets. Emerging markets are riskier than more developed markets because they tend to develop unevenly and may never fully develop. Investments in emerging markets may be considered speculative. Emerging markets are more likely to experience hyperinflation and currency devaluations, which adversely affect returns to U.S. investors. In addition, many emerging securities markets have far lower trading volumes and less liquidity than developed markets. Emerging markets generally have less stable political systems, less developed securities settlement procedures and may require the establishment of special custody arrangements. Emerging securities markets generally do not have the level of market efficiency and strict standards in accounting and securities regulation as developed markets, which could impact the Adviser's ability to evaluate these securities and/or impact Fund performance.

AQR Funds–Prospectus5
Foreign Investments Risk: Foreign investments often involve special risks not present in U.S. investments that can increase the chances that the Fund will lose money. These risks include:
The Fund generally holds its foreign instruments and cash in foreign banks and securities depositories, which may be recently organized or new to the foreign custody business and may be subject to only limited or no regulatory oversight.
Changes in foreign currency exchange rates can affect the value of the Fund’s portfolio.
The economies of certain foreign markets may not compare favorably with the economy of the United States with respect to such issues as growth of gross national product, reinvestment of capital, resources and balance of payments position.
The governments of certain countries may prohibit or impose substantial restrictions on foreign investments in their capital markets or in certain industries.
Many foreign governments do not supervise and regulate stock exchanges, brokers and the sale of securities to the same extent as does the United States and may not have laws to protect investors that are comparable to U.S. securities laws.
Settlement and clearance procedures in certain foreign markets may result in delays in payment for or delivery of securities not typically associated with settlement and clearance of U.S. investments.
The regulatory, financial reporting, accounting, recordkeeping and auditing standards of foreign countries may differ, in some cases significantly, from U.S. standards.
Forward and Futures Contract Risk: The successful use of forward and futures contracts draws upon the Adviser’s  skill and experience with respect to such instruments and is subject to special risk considerations. The primary risks associated with the use of forward and futures contracts, which may adversely affect the Fund’s NAV and total return, are (a) the imperfect correlation between the change in market value of the instruments held by the Fund and the price of the forward or futures contract; (b) possible lack of a liquid secondary market for a forward or futures contract and the resulting inability to close a forward or futures contract when desired; (c) losses caused by unanticipated market movements, which are potentially unlimited; (d) the Adviser’s  inability to predict correctly the direction of securities prices, interest rates, currency exchange rates and other economic factors; (e) the possibility that the counterparty will default in the performance of its obligations; and (f) if the Fund has insufficient cash, it may have to sell securities from its portfolio to meet daily variation margin requirements, and the Fund may have to sell securities at a time when it may be disadvantageous to do so.
Hedging Transactions Risk: The Adviser  from time to time employs various hedging techniques. The success of the Fund’s hedging strategy will be subject to the Adviser’s ability to correctly assess the degree of correlation between the performance of the instruments used in the hedging strategy and the performance of the investments in the portfolio being hedged. Since the characteristics of many securities change as markets change or time passes, the success of the Fund’s hedging strategy will also be subject to the Adviser’s ability to continually recalculate, readjust, and execute hedges in an efficient and timely manner. For a variety of reasons, the Adviser  may not seek to establish a perfect correlation between such hedging instruments and the portfolio holdings being hedged. Such imperfect correlation may prevent the Fund from achieving the intended hedge or expose the Fund to risk of loss. In addition, it is not possible to hedge fully or perfectly against any risk, and hedging entails its own costs (such as trading commissions and fees).
High Portfolio Turnover Risk: The investment techniques and strategies utilized by the Fund, including investments made on a shorter-term basis or in derivative instruments or instruments with a maturity of one year or less at the time of acquisition, may result in frequent portfolio trading and high portfolio turnover. High portfolio turnover rates will cause the Fund to incur higher levels of brokerage fees and commissions, which may reduce performance, and may cause higher levels of current tax liability to shareholders in the Fund.
Interest Rate Risk: Interest rate risk is the risk that prices of fixed income securities generally increase when interest rates decline and decrease when interest rates increase. The Fund may lose money if short-term or long-term interest rates rise sharply or otherwise change in a manner not anticipated by the Adviser.
Investment in Other Investment Companies Risk: As with other investments, investments in other investment companies, including exchange-traded funds (“ETFs”), are subject to market and manager risk. In addition, if the Fund acquires shares of investment companies, shareholders bear both their proportionate share of expenses in the Fund (including management and advisory fees) and, indirectly, the expenses of the investment companies. The Fund may invest in money market mutual funds. An investment in a money market mutual fund is not insured or guaranteed by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation or any other government agency. Although money market mutual funds that invest in U.S. government securities seek to preserve the value of the Fund’s investment at $1.00 per share, it is possible to lose money by investing in a stable NAV money market mutual fund. Moreover, prime money market mutual funds are required to use floating NAVs that do not preserve the value of the Fund’s investment at $1.00 per share.

AQR Funds–Prospectus6
Leverage Risk: As part of the Fund’s principal investment strategy, the Fund will make investments in futures contracts, forward contracts, swaps and other derivative instruments. These derivative instruments provide the economic effect of financial leverage by creating additional investment exposure to the underlying instrument, as well as the potential for greater loss. If the Fund uses leverage through activities such as entering into short sales or purchasing derivative instruments, the Fund has the risk that losses may exceed the net assets of the Fund. The net asset value of the Fund while employing leverage will be more volatile and sensitive to market movements.
Manager Risk: If the Adviser makes poor investment decisions, it will negatively affect the Fund’s investment performance.
Market Risk: Market risk is the risk that the markets on which the Fund’s investments trade will increase or decrease in value. Prices may fluctuate widely over short or extended periods in response to company, market or economic news. Markets also tend to move in cycles, with periods of rising and falling prices. Recently, there have been inflationary price movements and rising interest rates. If there is a general decline in the securities and other markets, your investment in the Fund may lose value, regardless of the individual results of the securities and other instruments in which the Fund invests.
Mid-Cap Securities Risk: The Fund may invest in, or have exposure to, the securities of mid-cap companies. The prices of securities of mid-cap companies generally are more volatile than those of large capitalization companies and are more likely to be adversely affected than large-cap companies by changes in earnings results and investor expectations or poor economic or market conditions, including those experienced during a recession.
Model and Data Risk: Given the complexity of the investments and strategies of the Fund, the Adviser relies heavily on quantitative models and information and data supplied or made available by third parties (“Models and Data”). Models and Data are used to construct sets of transactions and investments, to provide risk management insights, and to assist in hedging the Fund’s investments.
When Models and Data prove to be incorrect or incomplete, including because data is stale, missing or unavailable, any decisions made in reliance thereon expose the Fund to potential risks. Similarly, any hedging based on faulty Models and Data may prove to be unsuccessful. Some of the models used by the Adviser for the Fund are predictive in nature. The use of predictive models has inherent risks. Because predictive models are usually constructed based on historical data supplied by third parties or otherwise, the success of relying on such models may depend on the accuracy and reliability of the supplied historical data. The Fund bears the risk that the quantitative models used by the Adviser will not be successful in selecting investments or in determining the weighting of investment positions that will enable the Fund to achieve its investment objective.
All models rely on correct data inputs. If incorrect data is entered into even a well-founded model, the resulting information will be incorrect. However, even if data is inputted correctly, “model prices” will often differ substantially from market prices, especially for instruments with complex characteristics, such as derivative instruments.
The Fund is unlikely to be successful unless the assumptions underlying the models are realistic and either remain realistic and relevant in the future or are adjusted to account for changes in the overall market environment. If such assumptions are inaccurate or become inaccurate and are not promptly adjusted, it is likely that profitable trading signals will not be generated, and major losses may result.
The Adviser, in its sole discretion, will continue to test, evaluate and add new models, which may result in the modification of existing models from time to time. There can be no assurance that model modifications will enable the Fund to achieve its investment objective.
Momentum Style Risk: Investing in or having exposure to securities with positive momentum entails investing in securities that have had above-average recent returns. These securities may be more volatile than a broad cross-section of securities. In addition, there may be periods during which the investment performance of the Fund while using a momentum strategy may suffer.
Real Estate-Related Investment Risk: Investments in real estate-related investments are subject to unique risks. Adverse developments affecting the real estate industry and real property values can cause the stocks of these companies to decline. In a rising interest rate environment, the stock prices of real estate-related investments may decline and the borrowing costs of these companies may increase. Historically, the returns from the stocks of real estate-related investments, which typically are small- or mid-capitalization stocks, have performed differently from the overall stock market.
Short Sale Risk: The Fund enters into a short sale by selling a security it has borrowed (typically from a broker or other institution). If the market price of a security increases after the Fund borrows the security, the Fund will suffer a (potentially unlimited) loss when it replaces the borrowed security at the higher price. In certain cases, purchasing a security to cover a short position can itself cause the price of the security to rise further, thereby exacerbating the loss. In addition, the Fund may not always be able to borrow the security at a particular time or at an acceptable price. The Fund may also take a short position in a derivative instrument, such as a future, forward or swap. A short position in a

AQR Funds–Prospectus7
derivative instrument involves the risk of a theoretically unlimited increase in the value of the underlying instrument, which could cause the Fund to suffer a (potentially unlimited) loss. Short sales also involve transaction and financing costs that will reduce potential Fund gains and increase potential Fund losses.
Small-Cap Securities Risk: Investments in or exposure to the securities of companies with smaller market capitalizations involve higher risks in some respects than do investments in securities of larger companies. For example, prices of such securities are often more volatile than prices of large capitalization securities. In addition, due to thin trading in some such securities, an investment in these securities may be less liquid (i.e., harder to sell) than that of larger capitalization securities. Smaller capitalization companies also fail more often than larger companies and may have more limited management and financial resources than larger companies.
Sovereign Debt Risk: The Fund may invest in, or have exposure to, sovereign debt instruments. These investments are subject to the risk that a governmental entity may delay or refuse to pay interest or repay principal on its sovereign debt, due, for example, to cash flow problems, insufficient foreign currency reserves, political considerations, the relative size of the governmental entity’s debt position in relation to the economy or the failure to put in place economic reforms required by the International Monetary Fund or other multilateral agencies. If a governmental entity defaults, it may ask for more time in which to pay or for further loans. There is no legal process for collecting sovereign debt that a government does not pay nor are there bankruptcy proceedings through which all or part of the sovereign debt that a governmental entity has not repaid may be collected.
Subsidiary Risk: By investing in the Subsidiary, the Fund is indirectly exposed to the risks associated with the Subsidiary’s investments. The commodity-related instruments held by the Subsidiary are generally similar to those that are permitted to be held by the Fund and are subject to the same risks that apply to similar investments if held directly by the Fund. These risks are described elsewhere in this prospectus. There can be no assurance that the investment objective of the Subsidiary will be achieved. The Subsidiary is not registered under the 1940 Act, and, unless otherwise noted in this prospectus, is not subject to all the investor protections of the 1940 Act. However, the Fund wholly owns and controls the Subsidiary, and the Fund and the Subsidiary are both managed by the Adviser, making it unlikely that the Subsidiary will take action contrary to the interests of the Fund and its shareholders. The Board of Trustees has oversight responsibility for the investment activities of the Fund, including its investment in the Subsidiary, and the Fund’s role as sole shareholder of the Subsidiary. The Fund and the Subsidiary will be subject to the same investment restrictions and limitations on a consolidated basis, and to the extent applicable to the investment activities of the Subsidiary, the Subsidiary will follow the same compliance policies and procedures as the Fund. Unlike the Fund, the Subsidiary will not seek to qualify as a regulated investment company under Subchapter M of the Code. Changes in the laws of the United States and/or the Cayman Islands could result in the inability of the Fund and/or the Subsidiary to operate as described in this prospectus and the SAI and could adversely affect the Fund.
Swap Agreements Risk: Swap agreements involve the risk that the party with whom the Fund has entered into the swap will default on its obligation to pay the Fund. Additionally, certain unexpected market events or significant adverse market movements could result in the Fund not holding enough assets to be able to meet its obligations under the agreement. Such occurrences may negatively impact the Fund’s ability to implement its principal investment strategies and could result in losses to the Fund.
Tax-Managed Investment Risk: The performance of the Fund may deviate from that of non-tax managed funds and may not provide as high a return before consideration of federal income tax consequences as non-tax managed funds. The Fund’s tax-sensitive investment strategy involves active management with the intent of minimizing the amount of realized gains from the sale of securities; however, market conditions may limit the Fund’s ability to execute such strategy. The Fund’s ability to utilize various tax-management techniques may be curtailed or eliminated in the future by tax legislation or regulation. Although the Fund expects that a smaller portion of its total return will consist of taxable distributions to shareholders as compared to non-tax managed funds, there can be no assurance about the size of taxable distributions to shareholders.
Distributions of ordinary income to shareholders may be reduced by investing in lower-yielding securities and/or stocks that pay dividends that would qualify for favorable federal tax treatment provided certain holding periods and other conditions are satisfied by the Fund. The Fund may invest a portion of its assets in stocks and other securities that generate income taxable at ordinary income rates.
Tax Risk: In order for the Fund to qualify as a regulated investment company under Subchapter M of the Code, the Fund must derive at least 90 percent of its gross income each taxable year from qualifying income, which is described in more detail in the SAI. Income from certain commodity-linked derivative instruments in which the Fund invests is not considered qualifying income. The Fund will therefore restrict its income from direct investments in commodity-linked derivative instruments that do not generate qualifying income, such as commodity-linked swaps, to a maximum of 10 percent of its gross income.
The Fund’s investment in the Subsidiary is expected to provide the Fund with exposure to the commodities markets within the limitations of the federal tax requirements of Subchapter M. Changes in the laws of the United States and/or the Cayman Islands could result in the inability of the Fund and/or the Subsidiary to operate as described in this

AQR Funds–Prospectus8
prospectus and the SAI and could adversely affect the Fund. For example, the Cayman Islands does not currently impose any income, corporate or capital gains tax, estate duty, inheritance tax, gift tax or withholding tax on the Subsidiary. If Cayman Islands law changes such that the Subsidiary must pay Cayman Islands taxes, Fund shareholders would likely suffer decreased investment returns.
U.S. Government Securities Risk: Treasury obligations may differ in their interest rates, maturities, times of issuance and other characteristics. Obligations of U.S. Government agencies and authorities are supported by varying degrees of credit but generally are not backed by the full faith and credit of the U.S. Government. No assurance can be given that the U.S. Government will provide financial support to its agencies and authorities if it is not obligated by law to do so. Certain of the government agency securities the Fund may purchase are backed only by the credit of the government agency and not by full faith and credit of the United States.
Value Style Risk: Investing in or having exposure to “value” securities presents the risk that the securities may never reach what the Adviser believes are their full market values, either because the market fails to recognize what the Adviser considers to be the security’s true value or because the Adviser misjudged that value. In addition, there may be periods during which the investment performance of the Fund while using a value strategy may suffer.
Volatility Risk: The Fund may have investments that appreciate or decrease significantly in value over short periods of time. This may cause the Fund’s net asset value per share to experience significant increases or declines in value over short periods of time, however, all investments long- or short-term are subject to risk of loss.
Performance Information
The performance information below shows summary performance information for the Fund in a bar chart and an average annual total returns table. The information shows you how the Fund’s performance has varied year by year and provides some indication of the risks of investing in the Fund.
The Fund’s past performance (before and after taxes), as provided by the bar chart and performance table that follows, is not an indication of future results. Updated information on the Fund’s performance, including its current NAV per share, can be obtained by visiting https://funds.aqr.com.
Class I Shares—Total Returns
The bar chart below provides an illustration of how the Fund’s performance has varied in each of the indicated calendar years.
Highest Quarterly Return
Lowest Quarterly Return
10.56%
6/30/22
-8.45%
6/30/20

AQR Funds–Prospectus9
Average Annual Total Returns as of December 31, 2022
The following table compares the Fund’s average annual total returns for Class I Shares, Class N Shares and Class R6 Shares for the periods ended December 31, 2022 to the ICE BofA US 3-Month Treasury Bill Index. You cannot invest directly in an index. The table includes all applicable fees and sales charges.
 
One
Year
Five
Year
Since
Inception
Share Class
Inception
Date
AQR Alternative Risk Premia Fund—Class I
 
 
 
 
Return Before Taxes
25.26%
0.28%
0.28%
09/19/2017
Return After Taxes on Distributions
25.26%
-0.06%
-0.03%
 
Return After Taxes on Distributions and
Sale of Fund Shares
14.96%
0.15%
0.16%
 
AQR Alternative Risk Premia Fund—Class N
 
 
 
 
Return Before Taxes
24.83%
0.03%
0.05%
09/19/2017
AQR Alternative Risk Premia Fund—Class R6
 
 
 
 
Return Before Taxes
25.46%
0.39%
0.41%
09/19/2017
ICE BofA US 3-Month Treasury Bill Index
(reflects no deductions for fees, expenses
or taxes)
1.46%
1.26%
1.25%
 
After-tax returns are calculated using the historical highest individual marginal tax rates and do not reflect the impact of state and local taxes. In some cases, the return after taxes on distributions and sale of Fund shares may exceed the return after taxes on distributions due to an assumed benefit from any losses on a sale of Fund shares at the end of the measurement period. Actual after-tax returns depend on an investor’s tax situation and may differ from those shown, and after-tax returns are not relevant to investors who hold their Fund shares through tax-deferred arrangements such as 401(k) plans or individual retirement accounts. After-tax returns are for Class I Shares only. After-tax returns for other classes will vary.
Investment Manager
The Fund’s investment manager is AQR Capital Management, LLC.
Portfolio Managers
Name
Portfolio Manager
of the Fund Since
Title
Jordan Brooks, Ph.D., M.A.
January 1, 2022
Principal of the Adviser
Andrea Frazzini, Ph.D., M.S.
August 31, 2022
Principal of the Adviser
John J. Huss
August 31, 2022
Principal of the Adviser
Yao Hua Ooi
September 19, 2017
Principal of the Adviser
Nathan Sosner, Ph.D.
May 1, 2019
Principal of the Adviser
For important information about purchase and sale of Fund shares, tax information, and financial intermediary compensation, please turn to “Important Additional Information” on page 99 of the prospectus.

AQR Funds–Prospectus10
AQR Diversified Arbitrage Fund
Fund Summary — May 1, 2023
Investment Objective
The AQR Diversified Arbitrage Fund (the “Fund”) seeks long-term absolute (positive) returns.
As further described under “Details About the AQR Diversified Arbitrage Fund” in the Fund’s prospectus, an “absolute (positive) return” seeks to earn a positive total return over a reasonable period of time regardless of market conditions or general market direction.
Fees and Expenses of the Fund
This table describes the fees and expenses that you may pay if you buy and hold shares of the Fund. You may pay other fees, such as brokerage commissions and other fees to financial intermediaries, which are not reflected in the tables and examples below.
Annual Fund Operating Expenses (expenses that you pay each year as a percentage of the value of your investment)
 
Class N
Class I
Class R6
Management Fee
1.00%
1.00%
1.00%
Distribution (12b-1) Fee
0.25%
None
None
Other Expenses
 
 
 
Dividends and Interest on Short Sales1 and Other
Interest Expense
0.10%
0.10%
0.10%
All Other Expenses
0.22%
0.21%
0.12%
Total Other Expenses
0.32%
0.31%
0.22%
Acquired Fund Fees and Expenses2
0.05%
0.05%
0.05%
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses
1.62%
1.36%
1.27%
Less: Expense Reimbursements3
0.02%
0.01%
0.02%
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses after Expense
Reimbursements4
1.60%
1.35%
1.25%
1When a cash dividend is declared on a stock the Fund has sold short, or an interest payment is made on a bond the Fund has sold short, the Fund is required to pay an amount equal to the dividend or interest payment, as applicable, to the party from which the Fund has borrowed the stock or bond, and to record the payment as an expense.
2Acquired Fund Fees and Expenses reflect the expenses incurred indirectly by the Fund as a result of the Fund's investments in underlying money market mutual funds, exchange-traded funds or other pooled investment vehicles.
3The Adviser has contractually agreed to reimburse operating expenses of the Fund in an amount sufficient to limit certain Specified Expenses at no more than 0.20% for Class N Shares and Class I Shares and 0.10% for Class R6 Shares. "Specified Expenses" for this purpose include all Fund operating expenses other than management fees and 12b-1 fees and exclude interest, taxes, dividends on short sales, borrowing costs, acquired fund fees and expenses, interest expense relating to short sales, expenses related to class action claims, contingent expenses related to tax reclaim receipts, reorganization expenses and extraordinary expenses. This agreement (the “Expense Limitation Agreement”) will continue at least through April 30, 2024. The Expense Limitation Agreement may be terminated with the consent of the Board of Trustees, including a majority of the Non-Interested Trustees of the Trust. The Adviser is entitled to recapture any expenses reimbursed during the thirty-six month period following the end of the month during which the Adviser reimbursed expenses, provided that the amount recaptured may not cause the Specified Expenses attributable to a share class of the Fund during a year in which a repayment is made to exceed either of (i) the applicable limits in effect at the time of the reimbursement and (ii) the applicable limits in effect at the time of recapture.
4Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses after Expense Reimbursements are 1.50% for Class N Shares, 1.25% for Class I Shares and 1.15% for Class R6 Shares if Dividends and Interest on Short Sales and Other Interest Expense are not included.
Example: This Example is intended to help you compare the cost of investing in the Fund with the cost of investing in other mutual funds. The Example assumes that you invest $10,000 in the Fund for the time periods indicated and then redeem all of your shares at the end of those periods. The Example also assumes that your investment has a 5% return each year and that the Fund’s operating expenses remain the same and takes into account the effect of the Expense Limitation Agreement through April 30, 2024, as discussed in Footnote No. 3 to the Fee Table. Although your actual costs may be higher or lower, based on these assumptions your costs would be:
 
1 Year
3 Years
5 Years
10 Years
Class N Shares
$163
$509
$879
$1,920
Class I Shares
$137
$430
$744
$1,634
Class R6 Shares
$127
$401
$695
$1,532

AQR Funds–Prospectus11
Portfolio Turnover: The Fund pays transaction costs, such as commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or “turns over” its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover may indicate higher transaction costs and may result in higher taxes when shares are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are not reflected in annual fund operating expenses or in the example, affect the Fund’s performance. During the most recent fiscal year, the Fund’s portfolio turnover rate was 164% of the average value of its portfolio.
Principal Investment Strategies of the Fund
The Fund seeks to outperform, after expenses, the ICE BofA US 3-Month Treasury Bill Index while seeking to control its tracking risk relative to this benchmark. The ICE BofA US 3-Month Treasury Bill Index is designed to measure the performance of a high-quality short-term cash-equivalent investment. An investment in the Fund is more volatile than an investment in Treasury Bills, and is not backed by the full faith and credit of the U.S. Government.
The Fund uses a number of arbitrage investment strategies employed by hedge funds and proprietary trading desks of investment banks, including merger arbitrage, convertible arbitrage, and other kinds of arbitrage strategies and corporate event strategies described more fully below. In order to pursue these investment strategies, the Fund invests in a diversified portfolio of instruments, including equities, convertible securities, debt securities, loans (including unfunded loan commitments), warrants, options, swaps (including equity swaps, credit default swaps and credit default index swaps), futures contracts, forwards or other types of derivative instruments. The securities in which the Fund invests may be restricted and/or Rule 144A securities. The Sub-Adviser tactically allocates the Fund’s assets across arbitrage and alternative investment strategies with positive anticipated returns based on market conditions. The Fund may invest in or have exposure to companies of any size.
The Sub-Adviser will employ hedging strategies with the intent of (i) reducing the risk associated with each of the arbitrage and corporate event strategies; (ii) keeping the overall volatility of the Fund’s net asset value low; and (iii) maintaining a low correlation with the overall equity market.
The Fund will also engage extensively in short sales of securities. When the Fund sells a security short, it borrows the security from a third party and sells it at the then current market price. The Fund is then obligated to buy the security on a later date so that it can return the security to the lender. For arbitrage strategies, the Fund will generally buy securities and simultaneously sell securities short in amounts that are intended to result in an approximately neutral economic exposure to overall market movements.
The Fund makes use of derivative instruments, which may be used for hedging purposes, as a substitute for investing in conventional securities and for investment purposes. The Fund will also use derivatives to increase its economic exposure, either long or short, to a particular security, currency or index. Futures and forward contracts are contractual agreements to buy or sell a particular currency, commodity or financial instrument at a pre-determined price in the future. The Fund’s use of swaps, futures contracts, forward contracts and certain other derivative instruments may have the economic effect of financial leverage. Financial leverage magnifies exposure to the swings in prices of an asset underlying a derivative instrument and results in increased volatility, which means the Fund will have the potential for greater gains, as well as the potential for greater losses, than if the Fund did not use derivative instruments that have a leveraging effect. For example, if the Adviser seeks to gain enhanced exposure to a specific asset through a derivative instrument providing leveraged exposure to the asset and that derivative instrument increases in value, the gain to the Fund will be magnified. If that investment decreases in value, however, the loss to the Fund will also be magnified. A decline in the Fund’s assets due to losses magnified by the derivative instruments providing leveraged exposure may require the Fund to liquidate portfolio positions to satisfy its obligations or to meet redemption requests when it may not be advantageous to do so. There is no assurance that the Fund’s use of derivative instruments providing enhanced exposure will enable the Fund to achieve its investment objective.
The Fund invests in debt securities, which may be of any credit rating, maturity or duration, and which may include high-yield or “junk” bonds. A portion of the Fund’s assets will be held in cash or cash equivalent investments, including, but not limited to, interests in short-term investment funds, shares of money market or short-term bond funds and/or U.S. Government securities. In response to adverse market, economic or other conditions, such as the availability of attractive arbitrage and corporate event opportunities (or lack thereof), the Fund may temporarily invest a substantial portion of its assets in such cash or cash equivalent securities and during such periods the Fund may not achieve its investment objective. The Fund will invest in issuers in foreign countries, which may include emerging market countries.
Examples of Arbitrage and Corporate Event Strategies:
Merger Arbitrage: When engaging in merger arbitrage, the Sub-Adviser buys shares of the “target” company in a proposed merger or other reorganization between two companies. If the consideration in the transaction consists of stock of the acquirer, the Sub-Adviser will typically hedge the exposure to the acquirer by shorting the stock of the acquiring company.

AQR Funds–Prospectus12
Convertible Arbitrage: When employing a convertible arbitrage strategy, the Sub-Adviser invests in convertible securities that are trading at discounts to their fundamental values and attempts to mitigate the various risks associated with investing in such convertible securities. In some cases, convertible securities trade at premiums relative to their fundamental values; in such cases the Fund would short sell the respective convertible security and employ various hedging strategies to mitigate the various risks associated with being short the convertible security.
Corporate Events: The Sub-Adviser also employs other arbitrage and corporate event strategies when market opportunities arise. Examples of such investments can include distressed investments, IPOs (Initial Public Offerings), SEOs (Seasoned Equity Offerings), “price-pressure” trades, “dual-class” arbitrage and “closed-end fund” arbitrage among other strategies. Additionally, as a part of its corporate events strategy, the Fund will invest in Special Purpose Acquisition Companies (“SPACs”). SPACs, sometimes referred to as “blank check” companies, are publicly traded companies or similar special purpose entities that pool funds to seek potential acquisition opportunities. Unless and until an acquisition is completed, a SPAC generally invests its assets (less a portion retained to cover expenses) in U.S. Government securities, money market fund securities and cash. The Fund seeks to capture a liquidity premium when these securities (initially a unit comprised of a share and a right or a warrant) are selling at a discount to their fundamental value.
Principal Risks of Investing in the Fund
Risk is inherent in all investing. The value of your investment in the Fund, as well as the amount of return you receive on your investment, may fluctuate significantly from day to day and over time. You may lose part or all of your investment in the Fund or your investment may not perform as well as other similar investments. The Fund is not a complete investment program and should be considered only as one part of an investment portfolio. The Fund is more appropriate for long-term investors who can bear the risk of short-term NAV fluctuations, which at times, may be significant and rapid, however, all investments long- or short-term are subject to risk of loss. The following is a summary description of certain risks of investing in the Fund. The order of the below risk factors does not indicate the significance of any particular risk factor.
Arbitrage or Fundamental Risk: Employing arbitrage and alternative strategies involves the risk that anticipated opportunities may not play out as planned, resulting in potentially reduced returns or losses to the Fund as it unwinds failed trades.
Below Investment Grade Securities Risk: Although bonds rated below investment grade (also known as “junk” securities) generally pay higher rates of interest than investment grade bonds, bonds rated below investment grade are high risk, speculative investments that may cause income and principal losses for the Fund.
Common Stock Risk: The Fund may invest in, or have exposure to, common stocks. Common stocks are subject to greater fluctuations in market value than certain other asset classes as a result of such factors as a company’s business performance, investor perceptions, stock market trends and general economic conditions.
Convertible Securities Risk: The market value of a convertible security performs like that of a regular debt security; that is, if market interest rates rise, the value of a convertible security usually falls. In addition, convertible securities are subject to the risk that the issuer will not be able to pay interest or dividends when due, and their market value may change based on changes in the issuer’s credit rating or the market’s perception of the issuer’s creditworthiness. Since it derives a portion of its value from the common stock into which it may be converted, a convertible security is also subject to the same types of market and issuer risks that apply to the underlying common stock.
Counterparty Risk: The Fund may enter into various types of derivative contracts. Many of these derivative contracts will be privately negotiated in the over-the-counter market. These contracts also involve exposure to credit risk, since contract performance depends in part on the financial condition of the counterparty. If a privately negotiated over-the-counter contract calls for payments by the Fund, the Fund must be prepared to make such payments when due. In addition, if a counterparty’s creditworthiness declines, the Fund may not receive payments owed under the contract, or such payments may be delayed under such circumstances and the value of agreements with such counterparty can be expected to decline, potentially resulting in losses to the Fund.
Credit Default Swap Agreements Risk: The Fund may enter into credit default swap agreements or credit default index swap agreements as a “buyer” or “seller” of credit protection. Credit default swap agreements involve special risks because they may be difficult to value, are highly susceptible to liquidity and credit risk, and generally pay a return to the party that has paid the premium only in the event of an actual default by the issuer of the underlying obligation (as opposed to a credit downgrade or other indication of financial difficulty).
Credit Risk: Credit risk refers to the possibility that the issuer of a security or the issuer of the reference asset of a derivative instrument will not be able to make principal and interest payments when due. Changes in an issuer’s credit rating or the market’s perception of an issuer’s creditworthiness may also affect the value of the Fund’s investment in

AQR Funds–Prospectus13
that issuer. Securities rated in the four highest categories by the rating agencies are considered investment grade but they may also have some speculative characteristics. Investment grade ratings do not guarantee that the issuer will not default on its payment obligations or that bonds will not otherwise lose value.
Currency Risk: Currency risk is the risk that changes in currency exchange rates will negatively affect securities denominated in, and/or receiving revenues in, foreign currencies. The liquidity and trading value of foreign currencies could be affected by global economic factors, such as inflation, interest rate levels, and trade balances among countries, as well as the actions of sovereign governments and central banks. Adverse changes in currency exchange rates (relative to the U.S. dollar) may erode or reverse any potential gains from the Fund’s investments in securities denominated in a foreign currency or may widen existing losses.
Derivatives Risk: In general, a derivative instrument typically involves leverage, i.e., it provides exposure to potential gain or loss from a change in the level of the market price of the underlying security or currency (or a basket or index) in a notional amount that exceeds the amount of cash or assets required to establish or maintain the derivative instrument. Adverse changes in the value or level of the underlying asset or index, which the Fund may not directly own, can result in a loss to the Fund substantially greater than the amount invested in the derivative itself. The use of derivative instruments also exposes the Fund to additional risks and transaction costs. These instruments come in many varieties and have a wide range of potential risks and rewards, and may include, as further described in the section entitled “Principal Investment Strategies of the Fund,” futures contracts, forward contracts, options (both written and purchased) and swaps. A risk of the Fund’s use of derivatives is that the fluctuations in their values may not correlate perfectly with the overall securities markets.
Distressed Investments Risk: The Fund may invest in distressed investments, which are issued by companies that are, or might be, involved in reorganizations or financial restructurings, either out of court or in bankruptcy. The Fund’s investments in distressed securities typically may involve the purchase of high-yield bonds, bank debt, corporate loans or other indebtedness of such companies. These investments may present a substantial risk of default or may be in default at the time of investment. The Fund may incur additional expenses to the extent it is required to seek recovery upon a default in the payment of principal or interest on its portfolio holdings. In any reorganization or liquidation proceeding relating to an investment, the Fund may lose its entire investment or may be required to accept cash or securities with a value less than its original investment. Among the risks inherent in investments in a troubled issuer is that it frequently may be difficult to obtain information as to the true financial condition of the issuer. The Adviser’s or Sub-Adviser's judgments about the credit quality of a financially distressed issuer and the relative value of its securities may prove to be wrong.
Emerging Market Risk: The Fund intends to have exposure to emerging markets. Emerging markets are riskier than more developed markets because they tend to develop unevenly and may never fully develop. Investments in emerging markets may be considered speculative. Emerging markets are more likely to experience hyperinflation and currency devaluations, which adversely affect returns to U.S. investors. In addition, many emerging securities markets have far lower trading volumes and less liquidity than developed markets. Emerging markets generally have less stable political systems, less developed securities settlement procedures and may require the establishment of special custody arrangements. Emerging securities markets generally do not have the level of market efficiency and strict standards in accounting and securities regulation as developed markets, which could impact the Adviser's ability to evaluate these securities and/or impact Fund performance.
Foreign Investments Risk: Foreign investments often involve special risks not present in U.S. investments that can increase the chances that the Fund will lose money. These risks include:
The Fund generally holds its foreign instruments and cash in foreign banks and securities depositories, which may be recently organized or new to the foreign custody business and may be subject to only limited or no regulatory oversight.
Changes in foreign currency exchange rates can affect the value of the Fund’s portfolio.
The economies of certain foreign markets may not compare favorably with the economy of the United States with respect to such issues as growth of gross national product, reinvestment of capital, resources and balance of payments position.
The governments of certain countries may prohibit or impose substantial restrictions on foreign investments in their capital markets or in certain industries.
Many foreign governments do not supervise and regulate stock exchanges, brokers and the sale of securities to the same extent as does the United States and may not have laws to protect investors that are comparable to U.S. securities laws.
Settlement and clearance procedures in certain foreign markets may result in delays in payment for or delivery of securities not typically associated with settlement and clearance of U.S. investments.
The regulatory, financial reporting, accounting, recordkeeping and auditing standards of foreign countries may differ, in some cases significantly, from U.S. standards.

AQR Funds–Prospectus14
Forward and Futures Contract Risk: The successful use of forward and futures contracts draws upon the Adviser’s or Sub-Adviser's (as applicable) skill and experience with respect to such instruments and is subject to special risk considerations. The primary risks associated with the use of forward and futures contracts, which may adversely affect the Fund’s NAV and total return, are (a) the imperfect correlation between the change in market value of the instruments held by the Fund and the price of the forward or futures contract; (b) possible lack of a liquid secondary market for a forward or futures contract and the resulting inability to close a forward or futures contract when desired; (c) losses caused by unanticipated market movements, which are potentially unlimited; (d) the Adviser’s or Sub-Adviser's (as applicable) inability to predict correctly the direction of securities prices, interest rates, currency exchange rates and other economic factors; (e) the possibility that the counterparty will default in the performance of its obligations; and (f) if the Fund has insufficient cash, it may have to sell securities from its portfolio to meet daily variation margin requirements, and the Fund may have to sell securities at a time when it may be disadvantageous to do so.
Hedging Transactions Risk: The Adviser and Sub-Adviser from time to time employ various hedging techniques. The success of the Fund’s hedging strategy will be subject to the Adviser’s or Sub-Adviser's ability to correctly assess the degree of correlation between the performance of the instruments used in the hedging strategy and the performance of the investments in the portfolio being hedged. Since the characteristics of many securities change as markets change or time passes, the success of the Fund’s hedging strategy will also be subject to the Adviser’s and Sub-Adviser's ability to continually recalculate, readjust, and execute hedges in an efficient and timely manner. For a variety of reasons, the Adviser or Sub-Adviser may not seek to establish a perfect correlation between such hedging instruments and the portfolio holdings being hedged. Such imperfect correlation may prevent the Fund from achieving the intended hedge or expose the Fund to risk of loss. In addition, it is not possible to hedge fully or perfectly against any risk, and hedging entails its own costs (such as trading commissions and fees).
High Portfolio Turnover Risk: The investment techniques and strategies utilized by the Fund, including investments made on a shorter-term basis or in derivative instruments or instruments with a maturity of one year or less at the time of acquisition, may result in frequent portfolio trading and high portfolio turnover. High portfolio turnover rates will cause the Fund to incur higher levels of brokerage fees and commissions, which may reduce performance, and may cause higher levels of current tax liability to shareholders in the Fund.
Illiquidity Risk: The Fund may experience difficulty in selling illiquid investments in a timely manner at the price that it believes the investments are worth. In addition, market conditions may cause the Fund to experience temporary mark-to-market losses, especially in less liquid positions, even in the absence of any selling of investments by the Fund.
Interest Rate Risk: Interest rate risk is the risk that prices of fixed income securities generally increase when interest rates decline and decrease when interest rates increase. The Fund may lose money if short-term or long-term interest rates rise sharply or otherwise change in a manner not anticipated by the Adviser or Sub-Adviser.
Investment in Other Investment Companies Risk: As with other investments, investments in other investment companies, including exchange-traded funds (“ETFs”), are subject to market and manager risk. In addition, if the Fund acquires shares of investment companies, shareholders bear both their proportionate share of expenses in the Fund (including management and advisory fees) and, indirectly, the expenses of the investment companies. The Fund may invest in money market mutual funds. An investment in a money market mutual fund is not insured or guaranteed by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation or any other government agency. Although money market mutual funds that invest in U.S. government securities seek to preserve the value of the Fund’s investment at $1.00 per share, it is possible to lose money by investing in a stable NAV money market mutual fund. Moreover, prime money market mutual funds are required to use floating NAVs that do not preserve the value of the Fund’s investment at $1.00 per share.
IPO and SEO Risk: “IPOs” or “New Issues” are initial public offerings of U.S. equity securities. “SEOs” are seasoned (i.e., secondary) equity offerings of U.S. equity securities. Securities issued in IPOs are subject to many of the same risks as investing in companies with smaller market capitalizations (see “Risk Factors — Small-Cap Securities Risk”). Securities issued in IPOs have no trading history, and information about the companies may be available for very limited periods. In addition, the prices of securities sold in IPOs or SEOs may be highly volatile or may decline shortly after the initial public offering or seasoned equity offering.
Leverage Risk: As part of the Fund’s principal investment strategy, the Fund will make investments in futures contracts, forward contracts, options and swaps and other derivative instruments. These derivative instruments provide the economic effect of financial leverage by creating additional investment exposure to the underlying instrument, as well as the potential for greater loss. If the Fund uses leverage through activities such as entering into short sales or purchasing derivative instruments, the Fund has the risk that losses may exceed the net assets of the Fund. The net asset value of the Fund while employing leverage will be more volatile and sensitive to market movements.
Litigation and Enforcement Risk: Investing in companies involved in significant restructuring tends to involve increased litigation risk. This risk may be greater in the event the Fund takes a large position or is otherwise prominently involved on a bankruptcy or creditors’ committee. The expense of asserting claims (or defending against counterclaims) and recovering any amounts pursuant to settlements or judgments may be borne by the Fund. Further, ownership of

AQR Funds–Prospectus15
companies over certain threshold levels involves additional filing requirements and substantive regulation on such owners, and if the Fund fails to comply with all of these requirements, the Fund may be forced to disgorge profits, pay fines or otherwise bear losses or other costs from such failure to comply.
Manager Risk: If the Adviser or Sub-Adviser makes poor investment decisions, it will negatively affect the Fund’s investment performance.
Market Risk: Market risk is the risk that the markets on which the Fund’s investments trade will increase or decrease in value. Prices may fluctuate widely over short or extended periods in response to company, market or economic news. Markets also tend to move in cycles, with periods of rising and falling prices. Recently, there have been inflationary price movements and rising interest rates. If there is a general decline in the securities and other markets, your investment in the Fund may lose value, regardless of the individual results of the securities and other instruments in which the Fund invests.
Mid-Cap Securities Risk: The Fund may invest in, or have exposure to, the securities of mid-cap companies. The prices of securities of mid-cap companies generally are more volatile than those of large capitalization companies and are more likely to be adversely affected than large-cap companies by changes in earnings results and investor expectations or poor economic or market conditions, including those experienced during a recession.
Model and Data Risk: Given the complexity of the investments and strategies of the Fund, the Adviser relies heavily on quantitative models and information and data supplied or made available by third parties (“Models and Data”). Models and Data are used to construct sets of transactions and investments, to provide risk management insights, and to assist in hedging the Fund’s investments.
When Models and Data prove to be incorrect or incomplete, including because data is stale, missing or unavailable, any decisions made in reliance thereon expose the Fund to potential risks. Similarly, any hedging based on faulty Models and Data may prove to be unsuccessful. Some of the models used by the Adviser for the Fund are predictive in nature. The use of predictive models has inherent risks. Because predictive models are usually constructed based on historical data supplied by third parties or otherwise, the success of relying on such models may depend on the accuracy and reliability of the supplied historical data. The Fund bears the risk that the quantitative models used by the Adviser will not be successful in selecting investments or in determining the weighting of investment positions that will enable the Fund to achieve its investment objective.
All models rely on correct data inputs. If incorrect data is entered into even a well-founded model, the resulting information will be incorrect. However, even if data is inputted correctly, “model prices” will often differ substantially from market prices, especially for instruments with complex characteristics, such as derivative instruments.
The Fund is unlikely to be successful unless the assumptions underlying the models are realistic and either remain realistic and relevant in the future or are adjusted to account for changes in the overall market environment. If such assumptions are inaccurate or become inaccurate and are not promptly adjusted, it is likely that profitable trading signals will not be generated, and major losses may result.
The Adviser, in its sole discretion, will continue to test, evaluate and add new models, which may result in the modification of existing models from time to time. There can be no assurance that model modifications will enable the Fund to achieve its investment objective.
Options Risk: An option is an agreement that, for a premium payment or fee, gives the option holder (the purchaser) the right but not the obligation to buy (a “call option”) or sell (a “put option”) the underlying asset (or settle for cash an amount based on an underlying asset, rate, or index) at a specified price (the “exercise price”) during a period of time or on a specified date. Investments in options are considered speculative. When the Fund purchases an option, it may lose the premium paid for it if the price of the underlying security or other assets decreased or remained the same (in the case of a call option) or increased or remained the same (in the case of a put option). If a put or call option purchased by the Fund were permitted to expire without being sold or exercised, its premium would represent a loss to the Fund. The Fund may also write call and put options, which includes the risk that the underlying instrument appreciates or depreciates sufficiently over the period to offset the net premium received by the Fund for the written option, resulting in a loss to the Fund.
PIPEs Risk: The Fund may make private investments in public companies whose stocks are quoted on stock exchanges or which trade in the over-the-counter securities market, a type of investment commonly referred to as a “PIPE” transaction. PIPE transactions will generally result in the Fund acquiring either restricted stock or an instrument convertible into restricted stock. As with investments in other types of restricted securities, such an investment may be illiquid. The Fund’s ability to dispose of securities acquired in PIPE transactions may depend upon the registration of such securities for resale. Any number of factors may prevent or delay a proposed registration. Even if the Fund is able to have securities acquired in a PIPE transaction registered or sell such securities through an exempt transaction, the Fund may not be able to sell all the securities on short notice, and the sale of the securities could lower the market price of the securities.

AQR Funds–Prospectus16
Restricted Securities Risk: Restricted securities are securities that cannot be offered for public resale unless registered under the applicable securities laws or that have a contractual restriction that prohibits or limits their resale. Restricted securities may not be listed on an exchange and may have no active trading market. Restricted securities may include private placement securities that have not been registered under the applicable securities laws. Certain restricted securities can be resold to institutional investors and traded in the institutional market under Rule 144A under the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, and are called Rule 144A securities. Rule 144A securities can be resold to qualified institutional buyers but not to the general public.
Short Sale Risk: The Fund enters into a short sale by selling a security it has borrowed (typically from a broker or other institution). If the market price of a security increases after the Fund borrows the security, the Fund will suffer a (potentially unlimited) loss when it replaces the borrowed security at the higher price. In certain cases, purchasing a security to cover a short position can itself cause the price of the security to rise further, thereby exacerbating the loss. In addition, the Fund may not always be able to borrow the security at a particular time or at an acceptable price. The Fund may also take a short position in a derivative instrument, such as a future, forward or swap. A short position in a derivative instrument involves the risk of a theoretically unlimited increase in the value of the underlying instrument, which could cause the Fund to suffer a (potentially unlimited) loss. Short sales also involve transaction and financing costs that will reduce potential Fund gains and increase potential Fund losses.
Small-Cap Securities Risk: Investments in or exposure to the securities of companies with smaller market capitalizations involve higher risks in some respects than do investments in securities of larger companies. For example, prices of such securities are often more volatile than prices of large capitalization securities. In addition, due to thin trading in some such securities, an investment in these securities may be less liquid (i.e., harder to sell) than that of larger capitalization securities. Smaller capitalization companies also fail more often than larger companies and may have more limited management and financial resources than larger companies.
SPACs Risk: The Fund may invest in stock, warrants, and other securities of special purpose acquisition companies (“SPACs”) or similar special purpose entities that pool funds to seek potential acquisition opportunities. Unless and until an acquisition is completed, a SPAC generally invests its assets (less a portion retained to cover expenses) in U.S. Government securities, money market fund securities and cash; if an acquisition that meets the requirements for the SPAC is not completed within a pre-established period of time, the invested funds are returned to the entity’s shareholders. Because SPACs and similar entities are in essence blank check companies without an operating history or ongoing business other than seeking acquisitions, the value of their securities is particularly dependent on the ability of the entity’s management to identify and complete a profitable acquisition. Some SPACs may pursue acquisitions only within certain industries or regions, which may increase the volatility of their prices. In addition, these securities, which are typically traded in the over-the-counter market, can in certain circumstances be considered illiquid and/or be subject to restrictions on resale.
Swap Agreements Risk: Swap agreements involve the risk that the party with whom the Fund has entered into the swap will default on its obligation to pay the Fund. Additionally, certain unexpected market events or significant adverse market movements could result in the Fund not holding enough assets to be able to meet its obligations under the agreement. Such occurrences may negatively impact the Fund’s ability to implement its principal investment strategies and could result in losses to the Fund.
Volatility Risk: The Fund may have investments that appreciate or decrease significantly in value over short periods of time. This may cause the Fund’s net asset value per share to experience significant increases or declines in value over short periods of time, however, all investments long- or short-term are subject to risk of loss.
Performance Information
The performance information below shows summary performance information for the Fund in a bar chart and an average annual total returns table. The information shows you how the Fund’s performance has varied year by year and provides some indication of the risks of investing in the Fund.
The Fund’s past performance (before and after taxes), as provided by the bar chart and performance table that follows, is not an indication of future results. Updated information on the Fund’s performance, including its current NAV per share, can be obtained by visiting https://funds.aqr.com.
Class I Shares—Total Returns
The bar chart below provides an illustration of how the Fund’s performance has varied in each of the indicated calendar years.

AQR Funds–Prospectus17
Highest Quarterly Return
Lowest Quarterly Return
13.28%
12/31/20
-6.67%
3/31/20
Average Annual Total Returns as of December 31, 2022
The following table compares the Fund’s average annual total returns for Class I Shares, Class N Shares and Class R6 Shares for the periods ended December 31, 2022 to the ICE BofA US 3-Month Treasury Bill Index. You cannot invest directly in an index. The table includes all applicable fees and sales charges.
 
One
Year
Five
Year
Ten
Year
Since
Inception
Share Class
Inception
Date
AQR Diversified Arbitrage Fund—
Class I
 
 
 
 
 
Return Before Taxes
-3.29%
7.37%
4.10%
-
01/15/2009
Return After Taxes on
Distributions
-3.33%
6.49%
2.73%
-
 
Return After Taxes on
Distributions and Sale of
Fund Shares
-1.95%
5.35%
2.50%
-
 
ICE BofA US 3-Month Treasury
Bill Index (reflects no
deductions for fees, expenses
or taxes)
1.46%
1.26%
0.76%
-
 
AQR Diversified Arbitrage Fund—
Class N
 
 
 
 
 
Return Before Taxes
-3.54%
7.12%
3.84%
-
01/15/2009
ICE BofA US 3-Month Treasury
Bill Index (reflects no
deductions for fees, expenses
or taxes)
1.46%
1.26%
0.76%
-
 
AQR Diversified Arbitrage Fund—
Class R6
 
 
 
 
 
Return Before Taxes
-3.22%
7.48%
-
4.71%*
09/02/2014
ICE BofA US 3-Month Treasury
Bill Index (reflects no
deductions for fees, expenses
or taxes)
1.46%
1.26%
-
0.90%*
 
*Since inception performance is shown for Class R6 since it does not have 10 years of performance history.
After-tax returns are calculated using the historical highest individual marginal tax rates and do not reflect the impact of state and local taxes. In some cases, the return after taxes on distributions and sale of Fund shares may exceed the return before taxes and the return after taxes on distributions due to an assumed benefit from any losses on a sale of Fund shares at the end of the measurement period. Actual after-tax returns depend on an investor’s tax situation and may differ from those shown, and after-tax returns are not relevant to investors who hold their Fund shares through tax-deferred arrangements such as 401(k) plans or individual retirement accounts. After-tax returns are for Class I Shares only. After-tax returns for other classes will vary.
Investment Manager
The Fund’s investment manager is AQR Capital Management, LLC. AQR Arbitrage, LLC is the Sub-Adviser of the Fund.

AQR Funds–Prospectus18
Portfolio Managers
Name
Portfolio Manager
of the Fund Since
Title
Jordan Brooks, Ph.D., M.A.
January 31, 2023
Principal of the Adviser
Robert F. Bryant
May 1, 2019
Principal of the Sub-Adviser
Mark L. Mitchell, Ph.D., M.A.
January 15, 2009
Principal of the Sub-Adviser
Todd C. Pulvino, Ph.D., A.M., M.S.
January 15, 2009
Principal of the Sub-Adviser
John Eckert
May 1, 2022
Managing Director of the Sub-Adviser
For important information about purchase and sale of Fund shares, tax information, and financial intermediary compensation, please turn to “Important Additional Information” on page 99 of the prospectus.

AQR Funds–Prospectus19
AQR Equity Market Neutral Fund
Fund Summary — May 1, 2023
Investment Objective
The AQR Equity Market Neutral Fund (the “Fund”) seeks positive absolute returns.
As further described under “Details About the AQR Equity Market Neutral Fund” in the Fund’s prospectus, a “positive absolute return” seeks to earn a positive total return over a reasonable period of time regardless of market conditions or general market direction.
Fees and Expenses of the Fund
This table describes the fees and expenses that you may pay if you buy and hold shares of the Fund. You may pay other fees, such as brokerage commissions and other fees to financial intermediaries, which are not reflected in the tables and examples below.
Annual Fund Operating Expenses (expenses that you pay each year as a percentage of the value of your investment)
 
Class N
Class I
Class R6
Management Fee
1.10%
1.10%
1.10%
Distribution (12b-1) Fee
0.25%
None
None
Other Expenses
 
 
 
Dividends on Short Sales1 and Interest Expense
0.17%
0.17%
0.17%
All Other Expenses
0.36%
0.35%
0.26%
Total Other Expenses
0.53%
0.52%
0.43%
Acquired Fund Fees and Expenses2
0.03%
0.03%
0.03%
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses
1.91%
1.65%
1.56%
Less: Expense Reimbursements3
0.16%
0.15%
0.16%
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses after Expense
Reimbursements4
1.75%
1.50%
1.40%
1When a cash dividend is declared on a stock the Fund has sold short, the Fund is required to pay an amount equal to the dividend to the party from which the Fund has borrowed the stock, and to record the payment as an expense.
2Acquired Fund Fees and Expenses reflect the expenses incurred indirectly by the Fund as a result of the Fund's investments in underlying money market mutual funds, exchange-traded funds or other pooled investment vehicles.
3The Adviser has contractually agreed to reimburse operating expenses of the Fund in an amount sufficient to limit certain Specified Expenses at no more than 0.20% for Class N Shares and Class I Shares and 0.10% for Class R6 Shares. "Specified Expenses" for this purpose include all Fund operating expenses other than management fees and 12b-1 fees and exclude interest, taxes, dividends on short sales, borrowing costs, acquired fund fees and expenses, interest expense relating to short sales, expenses related to class action claims, contingent expenses related to tax reclaim receipts, reorganization expenses and extraordinary expenses. This agreement (the “Expense Limitation Agreement”) will continue at least through April 30, 2024. The Expense Limitation Agreement may be terminated with the consent of the Board of Trustees, including a majority of the Non-Interested Trustees of the Trust. The Adviser is entitled to recapture any expenses reimbursed during the thirty-six month period following the end of the month during which the Adviser reimbursed expenses, provided that the amount recaptured may not cause the Specified Expenses attributable to a share class of the Fund during a year in which a repayment is made to exceed either of (i) the applicable limits in effect at the time of the reimbursement and (ii) the applicable limits in effect at the time of recapture.
4Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses after Expense Reimbursements are 1.58% for Class N Shares, 1.33% for Class I Shares and 1.23% for Class R6 Shares if Dividends on Short Sales and Interest Expense are not included.
Example: This Example is intended to help you compare the cost of investing in the Fund with the cost of investing in other mutual funds. The Example assumes that you invest $10,000 in the Fund for the time periods indicated and then redeem all of your shares at the end of those periods. The Example also assumes that your investment has a 5% return each year and that the Fund’s operating expenses remain the same and takes into account the effect of the Expense Limitation Agreement through April 30, 2024, as discussed in Footnote No. 3 to the Fee Table. Although your actual costs may be higher or lower, based on these assumptions your costs would be:
 
1 Year
3 Years
5 Years
10 Years
Class N Shares
$178
$585
$1,017
$2,220
Class I Shares
$153
$506
$883
$1,942
Class R6 Shares
$143
$477
$835
$1,843

AQR Funds–Prospectus20
Portfolio Turnover: The Fund pays transaction costs, such as commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or “turns over” its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover may indicate higher transaction costs and may result in higher taxes when shares are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are not reflected in annual fund operating expenses or in the example, affect the Fund’s performance. During the most recent fiscal year, the Fund’s portfolio turnover rate was 319% of the average value of its portfolio.
Principal Investment Strategies of the Fund
The Fund seeks to provide investors with returns from the potential gains from its long and short equity positions. The Fund is designed to be market- or beta-neutral, which means that the Fund seeks to achieve returns that are not closely correlated with the returns of the equity markets in which the Fund invests. Accordingly, the Adviser, on average, intends to target a portfolio beta of zero over a normal business cycle. Achieving zero portfolio beta would result in returns with no correlation to the equity markets in which the Fund invests over a normal business cycle.
Under normal market conditions, the Fund pursues its investment objective by investing at least 80% of its net assets (including borrowings for investment purposes) in equity instruments and equity related and/or derivative instruments. Equity instruments include common stock, preferred stock, depositary receipts and shares or interests in real estate investment trusts (“REITs”) or REIT-like entities (“Equity Instruments”). Equity related and/or derivative instruments are investments that provide exposure to the performance of equity instruments, including equity swaps (both single-name and index swaps), equity index futures and exchange-traded funds and similar pooled investment vehicles (collectively, “Equity Derivative Instruments” and together with Equity Instruments, “Instruments”).
In managing the Fund, the Adviser takes long positions in those Instruments that, based on proprietary quantitative models, the Adviser forecasts to be undervalued and likely to increase in price, and takes short positions in those Instruments that the Adviser forecasts to be overvalued and likely to decrease in price.
The Fund may invest in or have exposure to companies of any size. The Fund will generally invest in instruments of companies located in global developed markets, including the United States. As of the date of this prospectus, the Adviser considers global developed markets to be those countries included in the MSCI World Index. The Fund does not limit its investments to any one country and may invest in any one country without limit.
The Adviser uses a set of value, momentum, quality and other economic indicators to generate an investment portfolio based on the Adviser’s global security selection and asset allocation models.
Value indicators identify investments that appear cheap based on fundamental measures. Examples of value indicators include using price-to-earnings and price-to-book ratios for choosing individual equities.
Momentum indicators identify investments showing signs of improvement, whether based on prices or fundamentals. Examples of momentum indicators include simple price momentum for choosing individual equities based on strong recent performance.
Quality indicators identify stable companies in good business health, including those with strong profitability and stable earnings.
Sentiment indicators identify companies favored by high-conviction investors or companies whose management is acting in shareholder-friendly ways.
In addition to these indicators, the Adviser may use a number of additional indicators based on the Adviser’s proprietary research. The Adviser may add or modify the economic indicators employed in selecting portfolio holdings from time to time.
Applying these indicators, the Adviser takes long or short positions in sectors, industries and companies that it believes are attractive or unattractive.
The Fund may, but is not required to, hedge exposure to foreign currencies using foreign currency forwards or futures.
The Fund, when taking a long equity position, will purchase a security that will benefit from an increase in the price of that security. When taking a short equity position, the Fund borrows the security from a third party and sells it at the then current market price. A short equity position will benefit from a decrease in price of the security and will lose value if the price of the security increases. Similarly, the Fund also takes long and short positions in Equity Derivative Instruments. A long position in an Equity Derivative Instrument will benefit from an increase in the price of the underlying instrument. A short position in an Equity Derivative Instrument will benefit from a decrease in the price of the underlying instrument and will lose value if the price of the underlying instrument increases. Simultaneously engaging in long investing and short selling is designed to reduce the net exposure of the overall portfolio to general market movements.
The Fund uses Equity Derivative Instruments and foreign currency forwards as a substitute for investing in conventional securities and for investment purposes to increase its economic exposure to a particular security, index or currency in a cost-effective manner. At times, the Fund may gain all equity or currency exposure through the use of Equity

AQR Funds–Prospectus21
Derivative Instruments and currency derivative instruments, and may invest in such instruments without limitation. The Fund’s use of Equity Derivative Instruments and currency derivative instruments will have the economic effect of financial leverage. Financial leverage magnifies exposure to the swings in prices of an asset underlying an Equity Derivative Instrument or currency derivative instrument and results in increased volatility, which means the Fund will have the potential for greater gains, as well as the potential for greater losses, than if the Fund did not use Equity Derivative Instruments and currency derivative instruments that have a leveraging effect. For example, if the Adviser seeks to gain enhanced exposure to a specific asset through an Equity Derivative Instrument providing leveraged exposure to the asset and that Equity Derivative Instrument increases in value, the gain to the Fund will be magnified. If that investment decreases in value, however, the loss to the Fund will be magnified. A decline in the Fund’s assets due to losses magnified by the Equity Derivative Instruments providing leveraged exposure may require the Fund to liquidate portfolio positions to satisfy its obligations or to meet redemption requests when it may not be advantageous to do so. There is no assurance that the Fund’s use of Equity Derivative Instruments providing enhanced exposure will enable the Fund to achieve its investment objective.
Over the long-term, the Adviser, on average, will target an annualized volatility level for the Fund of 4-9%. Volatility is a statistical measurement of the dispersion of returns of a security or fund or index, as measured by the annualized standard deviation of its returns. While the Adviser expects that the Fund’s targeted annualized forecasted volatility will typically range between 4% and 9%; the Adviser may, on occasion, tactically target a level of volatility outside of this range. The actual or realized volatility level for longer or shorter periods may be materially higher or lower depending on market conditions. Higher volatility generally indicates higher risk. Actual or realized volatility can and will differ from the forecasted or target volatility described above.
A significant portion of the Fund’s assets may be held in cash or cash equivalents including, but not limited to, money market instruments, U.S. treasury bills, interests in short-term investment funds or shares of money market or short-term bond funds. These cash or cash equivalent holdings serve as collateral for the positions the Fund takes and also earn income for the Fund.
When taking into account derivative instruments and instruments with a maturity of one year or less at the time of acquisition, the Fund is expected to have annual turnover of approximately 200% to 400%, although actual portfolio turnover may be higher or lower and will be affected by market conditions. This estimated annual portfolio turnover rate is based on the expected regular turnover resulting from the Fund’s implementation of its investment strategy, and does not take into account turnover that may occur as a result of purchases and redemptions into and out of the Fund’s portfolio.
Principal Risks of Investing in the Fund
Risk is inherent in all investing. The value of your investment in the Fund, as well as the amount of return you receive on your investment, may fluctuate significantly from day to day and over time. You may lose part or all of your investment in the Fund or your investment may not perform as well as other similar investments. The Fund is not a complete investment program and should be considered only as one part of an investment portfolio. The Fund is more appropriate for long-term investors who can bear the risk of short-term NAV fluctuations, which at times, may be significant and rapid, however, all investments long- or short-term are subject to risk of loss. The following is a summary description of certain risks of investing in the Fund. The order of the below risk factors does not indicate the significance of any particular risk factor.
Common Stock Risk: The Fund may invest in, or have exposure to, common stocks. Common stocks are subject to greater fluctuations in market value than certain other asset classes as a result of such factors as a company’s business performance, investor perceptions, stock market trends and general economic conditions.
Counterparty Risk: The Fund may enter into various types of derivative contracts. Many of these derivative contracts will be privately negotiated in the over-the-counter market. These contracts also involve exposure to credit risk, since contract performance depends in part on the financial condition of the counterparty. If a privately negotiated over-the-counter contract calls for payments by the Fund, the Fund must be prepared to make such payments when due. In addition, if a counterparty’s creditworthiness declines, the Fund may not receive payments owed under the contract, or such payments may be delayed under such circumstances and the value of agreements with such counterparty can be expected to decline, potentially resulting in losses to the Fund.
Credit Risk: Credit risk refers to the possibility that the issuer of a security or the issuer of the reference asset of a derivative instrument will not be able to make principal and interest payments when due. Changes in an issuer’s credit rating or the market’s perception of an issuer’s creditworthiness may also affect the value of the Fund’s investment in that issuer. Securities rated in the four highest categories by the rating agencies are considered investment grade but they may also have some speculative characteristics. Investment grade ratings do not guarantee that the issuer will not default on its payment obligations or that bonds will not otherwise lose value.

AQR Funds–Prospectus22
Currency Risk: Currency risk is the risk that changes in currency exchange rates will negatively affect securities denominated in, and/or receiving revenues in, foreign currencies. The liquidity and trading value of foreign currencies could be affected by global economic factors, such as inflation, interest rate levels, and trade balances among countries, as well as the actions of sovereign governments and central banks. Adverse changes in currency exchange rates (relative to the U.S. dollar) may erode or reverse any potential gains from the Fund’s investments in securities denominated in a foreign currency or may widen existing losses.
Derivatives Risk: In general, a derivative instrument typically involves leverage, i.e., it provides exposure to potential gain or loss from a change in the level of the market price of the underlying security or currency (or a basket or index) in a notional amount that exceeds the amount of cash or assets required to establish or maintain the derivative instrument. Adverse changes in the value or level of the underlying asset or index, which the Fund may not directly own, can result in a loss to the Fund substantially greater than the amount invested in the derivative itself. The use of derivative instruments also exposes the Fund to additional risks and transaction costs. These instruments come in many varieties and have a wide range of potential risks and rewards, and may include, as further described in the section entitled “Principal Investment Strategies of the Fund,” futures contracts, forward contracts and swaps. A risk of the Fund’s use of derivatives is that the fluctuations in their values may not correlate perfectly with the overall securities markets.
Foreign Investments Risk: Foreign investments often involve special risks not present in U.S. investments that can increase the chances that the Fund will lose money. These risks include:
The Fund generally holds its foreign instruments and cash in foreign banks and securities depositories, which may be recently organized or new to the foreign custody business and may be subject to only limited or no regulatory oversight.
Changes in foreign currency exchange rates can affect the value of the Fund’s portfolio.
The economies of certain foreign markets may not compare favorably with the economy of the United States with respect to such issues as growth of gross national product, reinvestment of capital, resources and balance of payments position.
The governments of certain countries may prohibit or impose substantial restrictions on foreign investments in their capital markets or in certain industries.
Many foreign governments do not supervise and regulate stock exchanges, brokers and the sale of securities to the same extent as does the United States and may not have laws to protect investors that are comparable to U.S. securities laws.
Settlement and clearance procedures in certain foreign markets may result in delays in payment for or delivery of securities not typically associated with settlement and clearance of U.S. investments.
The regulatory, financial reporting, accounting, recordkeeping and auditing standards of foreign countries may differ, in some cases significantly, from U.S. standards.
Forward and Futures Contract Risk: The successful use of forward and futures contracts draws upon the Adviser’s  skill and experience with respect to such instruments and is subject to special risk considerations. The primary risks associated with the use of forward and futures contracts, which may adversely affect the Fund’s NAV and total return, are (a) the imperfect correlation between the change in market value of the instruments held by the Fund and the price of the forward or futures contract; (b) possible lack of a liquid secondary market for a forward or futures contract and the resulting inability to close a forward or futures contract when desired; (c) losses caused by unanticipated market movements, which are potentially unlimited; (d) the Adviser’s  inability to predict correctly the direction of securities prices, interest rates, currency exchange rates and other economic factors; (e) the possibility that the counterparty will default in the performance of its obligations; and (f) if the Fund has insufficient cash, it may have to sell securities from its portfolio to meet daily variation margin requirements, and the Fund may have to sell securities at a time when it may be disadvantageous to do so.
Hedging Transactions Risk: The Adviser  from time to time employs various hedging techniques. The success of the Fund’s hedging strategy will be subject to the Adviser’s ability to correctly assess the degree of correlation between the performance of the instruments used in the hedging strategy and the performance of the investments in the portfolio being hedged. Since the characteristics of many securities change as markets change or time passes, the success of the Fund’s hedging strategy will also be subject to the Adviser’s ability to continually recalculate, readjust, and execute hedges in an efficient and timely manner. For a variety of reasons, the Adviser  may not seek to establish a perfect correlation between such hedging instruments and the portfolio holdings being hedged. Such imperfect correlation may prevent the Fund from achieving the intended hedge or expose the Fund to risk of loss. In addition, it is not possible to hedge fully or perfectly against any risk, and hedging entails its own costs (such as trading commissions and fees).

AQR Funds–Prospectus23
High Portfolio Turnover Risk: The investment techniques and strategies utilized by the Fund, including investments made on a shorter-term basis or in derivative instruments or instruments with a maturity of one year or less at the time of acquisition, may result in frequent portfolio trading and high portfolio turnover. High portfolio turnover rates will cause the Fund to incur higher levels of brokerage fees and commissions, which may reduce performance, and may cause higher levels of current tax liability to shareholders in the Fund.
Investment in Other Investment Companies Risk: As with other investments, investments in other investment companies, including exchange-traded funds (“ETFs”), are subject to market and manager risk. In addition, if the Fund acquires shares of investment companies, shareholders bear both their proportionate share of expenses in the Fund (including management and advisory fees) and, indirectly, the expenses of the investment companies. The Fund may invest in money market mutual funds. An investment in a money market mutual fund is not insured or guaranteed by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation or any other government agency. Although money market mutual funds that invest in U.S. government securities seek to preserve the value of the Fund’s investment at $1.00 per share, it is possible to lose money by investing in a stable NAV money market mutual fund. Moreover, prime money market mutual funds are required to use floating NAVs that do not preserve the value of the Fund’s investment at $1.00 per share. Investments in real estate investment trusts or securities with similar characteristics that pool investors’ capital to purchase or finance real estate investments also involve certain unique risks, including concentration risk (by geography or property type) and interest rate risk (i.e., in a rising interest rate environment, the stock prices of real estate-related investments may decline and the borrowing costs of these companies may increase).
Leverage Risk: As part of the Fund’s principal investment strategy, the Fund will make investments in futures contracts, forward contracts, swaps and other derivative instruments. These derivative instruments provide the economic effect of financial leverage by creating additional investment exposure to the underlying instrument, as well as the potential for greater loss. If the Fund uses leverage through activities such as entering into short sales or purchasing derivative instruments, the Fund has the risk that losses may exceed the net assets of the Fund. The net asset value of the Fund while employing leverage will be more volatile and sensitive to market movements.
Manager Risk: If the Adviser makes poor investment decisions, it will negatively affect the Fund’s investment performance.
Market Risk: Market risk is the risk that the markets on which the Fund’s investments trade will increase or decrease in value. Prices may fluctuate widely over short or extended periods in response to company, market or economic news. Markets also tend to move in cycles, with periods of rising and falling prices. Recently, there have been inflationary price movements and rising interest rates. If there is a general decline in the securities and other markets, your investment in the Fund may lose value, regardless of the individual results of the securities and other instruments in which the Fund invests.
Mid-Cap Securities Risk: The Fund may invest in, or have exposure to, the securities of mid-cap companies. The prices of securities of mid-cap companies generally are more volatile than those of large capitalization companies and are more likely to be adversely affected than large-cap companies by changes in earnings results and investor expectations or poor economic or market conditions, including those experienced during a recession.
Model and Data Risk: Given the complexity of the investments and strategies of the Fund, the Adviser relies heavily on quantitative models and information and traditional and non-traditional data supplied or made available by third parties (“Models and Data”). Models and Data are used to construct sets of transactions and investments, to provide risk management insights, and to assist in hedging the Fund’s investments.
When Models and Data prove to be incorrect or incomplete, including because data is stale, missing or unavailable, any decisions made in reliance thereon expose the Fund to potential risks. Similarly, any hedging based on faulty Models and Data may prove to be unsuccessful. Some of the models used by the Adviser for the Fund are predictive in nature. The use of predictive models has inherent risks. Because predictive models are usually constructed based on historical data supplied by third parties or otherwise, the success of relying on such models may depend on the accuracy and reliability of the supplied historical data. The Fund bears the risk that the quantitative models used by the Adviser will not be successful in forecasting movements in industries, sectors or companies or in determining the weighting of investment positions that will enable the Fund to achieve its investment objective.
All models rely on correct data inputs. If incorrect data is entered into even a well-founded model, the resulting information will be incorrect. However, even if data is inputted correctly, “model prices” will often differ substantially from market prices, especially for instruments with complex characteristics, such as derivative instruments.
The Adviser currently makes use of non-traditional data, also known as “alternative data” (e.g., data related to consumer transactions or other behavior, social media sentiment, and internet search and traffic data).  There can be no assurance that using alternative data will result in positive performance.  Alternative data is often less structured than traditional data sets and usually has less history, making it more complicated (and riskier) to incorporate into quantitative models. Alternative data providers often have less robust information technology infrastructure, which can result in data sets

AQR Funds–Prospectus24
being suspended, delayed, or otherwise unavailable.  In addition, as regulators have increased scrutiny of the use of alternative data in making investment decisions, the changing regulatory landscape could result in legal, regulatory, financial and/or reputational risk.
The Fund is unlikely to be successful unless the assumptions underlying the models are realistic and either remain realistic and relevant in the future or are adjusted to account for changes in the overall market environment. If such assumptions are inaccurate or become inaccurate and are not promptly adjusted, it is likely that profitable trading signals will not be generated, and major losses may result.
The Adviser, in its sole discretion, will continue to test, evaluate and add new models, which may result in the modification of existing models from time to time. There can be no assurance that model modifications will enable the Fund to achieve its investment objective.
Momentum Style Risk: Investing in or having exposure to securities with positive momentum entails investing in securities that have had above-average recent returns. These securities may be more volatile than a broad cross-section of securities. In addition, there may be periods during which the investment performance of the Fund while using a momentum strategy may suffer.
Short Sale Risk: The Fund enters into a short sale by selling a security it has borrowed (typically from a broker or other institution). If the market price of a security increases after the Fund borrows the security, the Fund will suffer a (potentially unlimited) loss when it replaces the borrowed security at the higher price. In certain cases, purchasing a security to cover a short position can itself cause the price of the security to rise further, thereby exacerbating the loss. In addition, the Fund may not always be able to borrow the security at a particular time or at an acceptable price. The Fund may also take a short position in a derivative instrument, such as a future, forward or swap. A short position in a derivative instrument involves the risk of a theoretically unlimited increase in the value of the underlying instrument, which could cause the Fund to suffer a (potentially unlimited) loss. Short sales also involve transaction and financing costs that will reduce potential Fund gains and increase potential Fund losses.
Small-Cap Securities Risk: Investments in or exposure to the securities of companies with smaller market capitalizations involve higher risks in some respects than do investments in securities of larger companies. For example, prices of such securities are often more volatile than prices of large capitalization securities. In addition, due to thin trading in some such securities, an investment in these securities may be less liquid (i.e., harder to sell) than that of larger capitalization securities. Smaller capitalization companies also fail more often than larger companies and may have more limited management and financial resources than larger companies.
Swap Agreements Risk: Swap agreements involve the risk that the party with whom the Fund has entered into the swap will default on its obligation to pay the Fund. Additionally, certain unexpected market events or significant adverse market movements could result in the Fund not holding enough assets to be able to meet its obligations under the agreement. Such occurrences may negatively impact the Fund’s ability to implement its principal investment strategies and could result in losses to the Fund.
Value Style Risk: Investing in or having exposure to “value” securities, as described in the section titled “Principal Investment Strategies of the Fund,” presents the risk that the securities may never reach what the Adviser believes are their full market values, either because the market fails to recognize what the Adviser considers to be the security’s true value or because the Adviser misjudged that value. In addition, there may be periods during which the investment performance of the Fund while using a value strategy may suffer.
Volatility Risk: The Fund may have investments that appreciate or decrease significantly in value over short periods of time. This may cause the Fund’s net asset value per share to experience significant increases or declines in value over short periods of time, however, all investments long- or short-term are subject to risk of loss.
Performance Information
The performance information below shows summary performance information for the Fund in a bar chart and an average annual total returns table. The information shows you how the Fund’s performance has varied year by year and provides some indication of the risks of investing in the Fund.
The Fund’s past performance (before and after taxes), as provided by the bar chart and performance table that follows, is not an indication of future results. Updated information on the Fund’s performance, including its current NAV per share, can be obtained by visiting https://funds.aqr.com.
Class I Shares—Total Returns
The bar chart below provides an illustration of how the Fund’s performance has varied in each of the indicated calendar years.

AQR Funds–Prospectus25
Highest Quarterly Return
Lowest Quarterly Return
14.42%
3/31/21
-8.50%
6/30/18
Average Annual Total Returns as of December 31, 2022
The following table compares the Fund’s average annual total returns for Class I Shares, Class N Shares and Class R6 Shares for the periods ended December 31, 2022 to the ICE BofA US 3-Month Treasury Bill Index. You cannot invest directly in an index. The table includes all applicable fees and sales charges.
 
One
Year
Five
Year
Since
Inception
Share Class
Inception
Date
AQR Equity Market Neutral Fund—Class I
 
 
 
 
Return Before Taxes
27.22%
-1.16%
3.40%
10/07/2014
Return After Taxes on Distributions
24.28%
-2.60%
1.82%
 
Return After Taxes on Distributions and
Sale of Fund Shares
16.11%
-1.28%
2.08%
 
AQR Equity Market Neutral Fund—Class N
 
 
 
 
Return Before Taxes
27.03%
-1.38%
3.15%
10/07/2014
AQR Equity Market Neutral Fund—Class R6
 
 
 
 
Return Before Taxes
27.33%
-1.08%
3.47%
10/07/2014
ICE BofA US 3-Month Treasury Bill Index
(reflects no deductions for fees, expenses
or taxes)
1.46%
1.26%
0.92%
 
After-tax returns are calculated using the historical highest individual marginal tax rates and do not reflect the impact of state and local taxes. In some cases, the return after taxes on distributions and sale of Fund shares may exceed the return after taxes on distributions due to an assumed benefit from any losses on a sale of Fund shares at the end of the measurement period. Actual after-tax returns depend on an investor’s tax situation and may differ from those shown, and after-tax returns are not relevant to investors who hold their Fund shares through tax-deferred arrangements such as 401(k) plans or individual retirement accounts. After-tax returns are for Class I Shares only. After-tax returns for other classes will vary.
Investment Manager
The Fund’s investment manager is AQR Capital Management, LLC.
Portfolio Managers
Name
Portfolio Manager
of the Fund Since
Title
Clifford S. Asness, Ph.D., M.B.A
January 1, 2022
Managing and Founding Principal of the Adviser
Michele L. Aghassi, Ph.D.
March 16, 2016
Principal of the Adviser
Andrea Frazzini, Ph.D., M.S.
October 7, 2014
Principal of the Adviser
John J. Huss
January 1, 2022
Principal of the Adviser
Laura Serban, Ph.D.
May 1, 2023
Principal of the Adviser
For important information about purchase and sale of Fund shares, tax information, and financial intermediary compensation, please turn to “Important Additional Information” on page 99 of the prospectus.

AQR Funds–Prospectus26
AQR Long-Short Equity Fund
Fund Summary — May 1, 2023
Investment Objective
The AQR Long-Short Equity Fund (the “Fund”) seeks capital appreciation.
Fees and Expenses of the Fund
This table describes the fees and expenses that you may pay if you buy and hold shares of the Fund. You may pay other fees, such as brokerage commissions and other fees to financial intermediaries, which are not reflected in the tables and examples below.
Annual Fund Operating Expenses (expenses that you pay each year as a percentage of the value of your investment)
 
Class N
Class I
Class R6
Management Fee
1.10%
1.10%
1.10%
Distribution (12b-1) Fee
0.25%
None
None
Other Expenses
 
 
 
Interest Expense
0.04%
0.04%
0.04%
All Other Expenses
0.24%
0.23%
0.14%
Total Other Expenses
0.28%
0.27%
0.18%
Acquired Fund Fees and Expenses1
0.02%
0.02%
0.02%
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses
1.65%
1.39%
1.30%
Less: Expense Reimbursements2
0.04%
0.03%
0.04%
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses after Expense
Reimbursements3
1.61%
1.36%
1.26%
1Acquired Fund Fees and Expenses reflect the expenses incurred indirectly by the Fund as a result of the Fund's investments in underlying money market mutual funds, exchange-traded funds or other pooled investment vehicles.
2The Adviser has contractually agreed to reimburse operating expenses of the Fund in an amount sufficient to limit certain Specified Expenses at no more than 0.20% for Class N Shares and Class I Shares and 0.10% for Class R6 Shares. "Specified Expenses" for this purpose include all Fund operating expenses other than management fees and 12b-1 fees and exclude interest, taxes, dividends on short sales, borrowing costs, acquired fund fees and expenses, interest expense relating to short sales, expenses related to class action claims, contingent expenses related to tax reclaim receipts, reorganization expenses and extraordinary expenses. This agreement (the “Expense Limitation Agreement”) will continue at least through April 30, 2024. The Expense Limitation Agreement may be terminated with the consent of the Board of Trustees, including a majority of the Non-Interested Trustees of the Trust. The Adviser is entitled to recapture any expenses reimbursed during the thirty-six month period following the end of the month during which the Adviser reimbursed expenses, provided that the amount recaptured may not cause the Specified Expenses attributable to a share class of the Fund during a year in which a repayment is made to exceed either of (i) the applicable limits in effect at the time of the reimbursement and (ii) the applicable limits in effect at the time of recapture.
3Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses after Expense Reimbursements are 1.57% for Class N Shares, 1.32% for Class I Shares and 1.22% for Class R6 Shares if Interest Expense is not included.
Example: This Example is intended to help you compare the cost of investing in the Fund with the cost of investing in other mutual funds. The Example assumes that you invest $10,000 in the Fund for the time periods indicated and then redeem all of your shares at the end of those periods. The Example also assumes that your investment has a 5% return each year and that the Fund’s operating expenses remain the same and takes into account the effect of the Expense Limitation Agreement through April 30, 2024, as discussed in Footnote No. 2 to the Fee Table. Although your actual costs may be higher or lower, based on these assumptions your costs would be:
 
1 Year
3 Years
5 Years
10 Years
Class N Shares
$164
$516
$893
$1,951
Class I Shares
$138
$437
$758
$1,666
Class R6 Shares
$128
$408
$709
$1,564
Portfolio Turnover: The Fund pays transaction costs, such as commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or “turns over” its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover may indicate higher transaction costs and may result in higher taxes when shares are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are not reflected in annual fund operating expenses or in the example, affect the Fund’s performance. During the most recent fiscal year, the Fund’s portfolio turnover rate was 0% of the average value of its portfolio. In accordance with industry practice, derivative instruments and instruments with a maturity of one year or less at the time of acquisition are excluded from the calculation of the portfolio turnover rate, which leads to the 0% portfolio turnover rate reported above. If these instruments were included in the calculation, the Fund would have a high portfolio turnover rate (as discussed below under “Principal Investment Strategies of the Fund”).

AQR Funds–Prospectus27
Principal Investment Strategies of the Fund
The Fund seeks to provide investors with three different sources of return: 1) the potential gains from its long-short equity positions, 2) overall exposure to equity markets, and 3) the tactical variation of its net exposure to equity markets. The Fund seeks to provide higher risk-adjusted returns with lower volatility compared to global equity markets.
Under normal market conditions, the Fund pursues its investment objective by investing at least 80% of its net assets (including borrowings for investment purposes) in equity instruments and equity related and/or derivative instruments. Equity instruments include common stock, preferred stock, depositary receipts and shares or interests in real estate investment trusts (“REITs”) or REIT-like entities (“Equity Instruments”). Equity related and/or derivative instruments are investments that provide exposure to the performance of equity instruments, including equity swaps (both single-name and index swaps), equity index futures and exchange-traded funds and similar pooled investment vehicles (collectively, “Equity Derivative Instruments” and together with Equity Instruments, “Instruments”).
In managing the Fund, the Adviser takes long positions in those Instruments that, based on proprietary quantitative models, the Adviser forecasts to be undervalued and likely to increase in price, and takes short positions in those Instruments that the Adviser forecasts to be overvalued and likely to decrease in price.
The Fund may invest in or have exposure to companies of any size. The Fund has no geographic limits on where it may invest. The Fund will generally invest in instruments of companies located in global developed markets, including the United States. As of the date of this prospectus, the Adviser considers global developed markets to be those countries included in the MSCI World Index. The Fund does not limit its investments to any one country and may invest in any one country without limit.
The Adviser uses a set of value, momentum, quality and other economic indicators to generate an investment portfolio based on the Adviser’s global security selection and asset allocation models.
Value indicators identify investments that appear cheap based on fundamental measures. Examples of value indicators include using price-to-earnings and price-to-book ratios for choosing individual equities.
Momentum indicators identify investments showing signs of improvement, whether based on prices or fundamentals. Examples of momentum indicators include simple price momentum for choosing individual equities based on strong recent performance.
Quality indicators identify stable companies in good business health, including those with strong profitability and stable earnings.
Sentiment indicators identify companies favored by high-conviction investors or companies whose management is acting in shareholder-friendly ways.
In addition to these indicators, the Adviser may use a number of additional indicators based on the Adviser’s proprietary research. The Adviser may add or modify the economic indicators employed in selecting portfolio holdings from time to time.
Applying these indicators, the Adviser takes long or short positions in sectors, industries and companies that it believes are attractive or unattractive. In the aggregate the Fund expects to have net long exposure to the equity markets, which the Adviser may adjust over time. When the Adviser determines that market conditions are unfavorable, the Fund may reduce its long market exposure. Similarly, when the Adviser determines that market conditions are favorable, the Fund may increase its long market exposure.
The Fund is not designed to be market-neutral. The Adviser will use a tactical allocation overlay to manage the Fund’s beta exposure to broad global markets through the use of Equity Derivative Instruments and foreign currency forwards. The Adviser, on average, intends to target a portfolio beta of 0.5. The Adviser expects that the Fund’s target beta will typically range from 0.3 to 0.7.
Beyond the volatility associated with the Fund’s long-term market beta target, the Adviser, on average, will target an additional (i.e., active) annualized average, long-term volatility level for the Fund of 4-9%. While this active annualized volatility level is expected to be targeted over the long run, the Adviser may, on occasion tactically target a level of volatility outside of this range.
Given these two sources of volatility (i.e., the market volatility associated with the Fund’s market beta target and the Fund’s additional active security selection volatility target) and given there is no precise way to predict the market volatility over any particular period, the total volatility of the Fund is expected to be higher, potentially significantly higher, than the 4-9% active volatility target. Actual or realized volatility experienced by the Fund can and will differ from the forecasted or target volatility described above.
The Fund may, but is not required to, hedge exposure to foreign currencies using foreign currency forwards or futures.

AQR Funds–Prospectus28
The Fund, when taking a long equity position, will purchase a security that will benefit from an increase in the price of that security. When taking a short equity position, the Fund borrows the security from a third party and sells it at the then current market price. A short equity position will benefit from a decrease in price of the security and will lose value if the price of the security increases. Similarly, the Fund also takes long and short positions in Equity Derivative Instruments. A long position in an Equity Derivative Instrument will benefit from an increase in the price of the underlying instrument. A short position in an Equity Derivative Instrument will benefit from a decrease in the price of the underlying instrument and will lose value if the price of the underlying instrument increases. Simultaneously engaging in long investing and short selling is designed to reduce the net exposure of the overall portfolio to general market movements.
The Fund uses Equity Derivative Instruments and foreign currency forwards as a substitute for investing in conventional securities and for investment purposes to increase its economic exposure to a particular security, index or currency in a cost-effective manner. At times, the Fund may gain all equity or currency exposure through the use of Equity Derivative Instruments and currency derivative instruments, and may invest in such instruments without limitation. The Fund’s use of Equity Derivative Instruments and currency derivative instruments will have the economic effect of financial leverage. Financial leverage magnifies exposure to the swings in prices of an asset underlying an Equity Derivative Instrument or currency derivative instrument and results in increased volatility, which means the Fund will have the potential for greater gains, as well as the potential for greater losses, than if the Fund did not use Equity Derivative Instruments and currency derivative instruments that have a leveraging effect. For example, if the Adviser seeks to gain enhanced exposure to a specific asset through an Equity Derivative Instrument providing leveraged exposure to the asset and that Equity Derivative Instrument increases in value, the gain to the Fund will be magnified. If that investment decreases in value, however, the loss to the Fund will be magnified. A decline in the Fund’s assets due to losses magnified by the Equity Derivative Instruments providing leveraged exposure may require the Fund to liquidate portfolio positions to satisfy its obligations or to meet redemption requests when it may not be advantageous to do so. There is no assurance that the Fund’s use of Equity Derivative Instruments providing enhanced exposure will enable the Fund to achieve its investment objective.
A significant portion of the Fund’s assets may be held in cash or cash equivalents including, but not limited to, money market instruments, U.S. treasury bills, interests in short-term investment funds or shares of money market or short-term bond funds. These cash or cash equivalent holdings serve as collateral for the positions the Fund takes and also earn income for the Fund.
When taking into account derivative instruments and instruments with a maturity of one year or less at the time of acquisition, the Fund is expected to have annual turnover of approximately 250% to 500%, although actual portfolio turnover may be higher or lower and will be affected by market conditions. This estimated annual portfolio turnover rate is based on the expected regular turnover resulting from the Fund’s implementation of its investment strategy, and does not take into account turnover that may occur as a result of purchases and redemptions into and out of the Fund’s portfolio.
Principal Risks of Investing in the Fund
Risk is inherent in all investing. The value of your investment in the Fund, as well as the amount of return you receive on your investment, may fluctuate significantly from day to day and over time. You may lose part or all of your investment in the Fund or your investment may not perform as well as other similar investments. The Fund is not a complete investment program and should be considered only as one part of an investment portfolio. The Fund is more appropriate for long-term investors who can bear the risk of short-term NAV fluctuations, which at times, may be significant and rapid, however, all investments long- or short-term are subject to risk of loss. The following is a summary description of certain risks of investing in the Fund. The order of the below risk factors does not indicate the significance of any particular risk factor.
Common Stock Risk: The Fund may invest in, or have exposure to, common stocks. Common stocks are subject to greater fluctuations in market value than certain other asset classes as a result of such factors as a company’s business performance, investor perceptions, stock market trends and general economic conditions.
Counterparty Risk: The Fund may enter into various types of derivative contracts. Many of these derivative contracts will be privately negotiated in the over-the-counter market. These contracts also involve exposure to credit risk, since contract performance depends in part on the financial condition of the counterparty. If a privately negotiated over-the-counter contract calls for payments by the Fund, the Fund must be prepared to make such payments when due. In addition, if a counterparty’s creditworthiness declines, the Fund may not receive payments owed under the contract, or such payments may be delayed under such circumstances and the value of agreements with such counterparty can be expected to decline, potentially resulting in losses to the Fund.
Credit Risk: Credit risk refers to the possibility that the issuer of a security or the issuer of the reference asset of a derivative instrument will not be able to make principal and interest payments when due. Changes in an issuer’s credit rating or the market’s perception of an issuer’s creditworthiness may also affect the value of the Fund’s investment in

AQR Funds–Prospectus29
that issuer. Securities rated in the four highest categories by the rating agencies are considered investment grade but they may also have some speculative characteristics. Investment grade ratings do not guarantee that the issuer will not default on its payment obligations or that bonds will not otherwise lose value.
Currency Risk: Currency risk is the risk that changes in currency exchange rates will negatively affect securities denominated in, and/or receiving revenues in, foreign currencies. The liquidity and trading value of foreign currencies could be affected by global economic factors, such as inflation, interest rate levels, and trade balances among countries, as well as the actions of sovereign governments and central banks. Adverse changes in currency exchange rates (relative to the U.S. dollar) may erode or reverse any potential gains from the Fund’s investments in securities denominated in a foreign currency or may widen existing losses.
Derivatives Risk: In general, a derivative instrument typically involves leverage, i.e., it provides exposure to potential gain or loss from a change in the level of the market price of the underlying security or currency (or a basket or index) in a notional amount that exceeds the amount of cash or assets required to establish or maintain the derivative instrument. Adverse changes in the value or level of the underlying asset or index, which the Fund may not directly own, can result in a loss to the Fund substantially greater than the amount invested in the derivative itself. The use of derivative instruments also exposes the Fund to additional risks and transaction costs. These instruments come in many varieties and have a wide range of potential risks and rewards, and may include, as further described in the section entitled “Principal Investment Strategies of the Fund,” futures contracts, forward contracts and swaps. A risk of the Fund’s use of derivatives is that the fluctuations in their values may not correlate perfectly with the overall securities markets.
Foreign Investments Risk: Foreign investments often involve special risks not present in U.S. investments that can increase the chances that the Fund will lose money. These risks include:
The Fund generally holds its foreign instruments and cash in foreign banks and securities depositories, which may be recently organized or new to the foreign custody business and may be subject to only limited or no regulatory oversight.
Changes in foreign currency exchange rates can affect the value of the Fund’s portfolio.
The economies of certain foreign markets may not compare favorably with the economy of the United States with respect to such issues as growth of gross national product, reinvestment of capital, resources and balance of payments position.
The governments of certain countries may prohibit or impose substantial restrictions on foreign investments in their capital markets or in certain industries.
Many foreign governments do not supervise and regulate stock exchanges, brokers and the sale of securities to the same extent as does the United States and may not have laws to protect investors that are comparable to U.S. securities laws.
Settlement and clearance procedures in certain foreign markets may result in delays in payment for or delivery of securities not typically associated with settlement and clearance of U.S. investments.
The regulatory, financial reporting, accounting, recordkeeping and auditing standards of foreign countries may differ, in some cases significantly, from U.S. standards.
Forward and Futures Contract Risk: The successful use of forward and futures contracts draws upon the Adviser’s  skill and experience with respect to such instruments and is subject to special risk considerations. The primary risks associated with the use of forward and futures contracts, which may adversely affect the Fund’s NAV and total return, are (a) the imperfect correlation between the change in market value of the instruments held by the Fund and the price of the forward or futures contract; (b) possible lack of a liquid secondary market for a forward or futures contract and the resulting inability to close a forward or futures contract when desired; (c) losses caused by unanticipated market movements, which are potentially unlimited; (d) the Adviser’s  inability to predict correctly the direction of securities prices, interest rates, currency exchange rates and other economic factors; (e) the possibility that the counterparty will default in the performance of its obligations; and (f) if the Fund has insufficient cash, it may have to sell securities from its portfolio to meet daily variation margin requirements, and the Fund may have to sell securities at a time when it may be disadvantageous to do so.
Hedging Transactions Risk: The Adviser  from time to time employs various hedging techniques. The success of the Fund’s hedging strategy will be subject to the Adviser’s ability to correctly assess the degree of correlation between the performance of the instruments used in the hedging strategy and the performance of the investments in the portfolio being hedged. Since the characteristics of many securities change as markets change or time passes, the success of the Fund’s hedging strategy will also be subject to the Adviser’s ability to continually recalculate, readjust, and execute hedges in an efficient and timely manner. For a variety of reasons, the Adviser  may not seek to establish a perfect correlation between such hedging instruments and the portfolio holdings being hedged. Such imperfect correlation may prevent the Fund from achieving the intended hedge or expose the Fund to risk of loss. In addition, it is not possible to hedge fully or perfectly against any risk, and hedging entails its own costs (such as trading commissions and fees).

AQR Funds–Prospectus30
High Portfolio Turnover Risk: The investment techniques and strategies utilized by the Fund, including investments made on a shorter-term basis or in derivative instruments or instruments with a maturity of one year or less at the time of acquisition, may result in frequent portfolio trading and high portfolio turnover. High portfolio turnover rates will cause the Fund to incur higher levels of brokerage fees and commissions, which may reduce performance, and may cause higher levels of current tax liability to shareholders in the Fund.
Investment in Other Investment Companies Risk: As with other investments, investments in other investment companies, including exchange-traded funds (“ETFs”), are subject to market and manager risk. In addition, if the Fund acquires shares of investment companies, shareholders bear both their proportionate share of expenses in the Fund (including management and advisory fees) and, indirectly, the expenses of the investment companies. The Fund may invest in money market mutual funds. An investment in a money market mutual fund is not insured or guaranteed by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation or any other government agency. Although money market mutual funds that invest in U.S. government securities seek to preserve the value of the Fund’s investment at $1.00 per share, it is possible to lose money by investing in a stable NAV money market mutual fund. Moreover, prime money market mutual funds are required to use floating NAVs that do not preserve the value of the Fund’s investment at $1.00 per share. Investments in real estate investment trusts or securities with similar characteristics that pool investors’ capital to purchase or finance real estate investments also involve certain unique risks, including concentration risk (by geography or property type) and interest rate risk (i.e., in a rising interest rate environment, the stock prices of real estate-related investments may decline and the borrowing costs of these companies may increase).
Leverage Risk: As part of the Fund’s principal investment strategy, the Fund will make investments in futures contracts, forward contracts, swaps and other derivative instruments. These derivative instruments provide the economic effect of financial leverage by creating additional investment exposure to the underlying instrument, as well as the potential for greater loss. If the Fund uses leverage through activities such as entering into short sales or purchasing derivative instruments, the Fund has the risk that losses may exceed the net assets of the Fund. The net asset value of the Fund while employing leverage will be more volatile and sensitive to market movements.
Manager Risk: If the Adviser makes poor investment decisions, it will negatively affect the Fund’s investment performance.
Market Risk: Market risk is the risk that the markets on which the Fund’s investments trade will increase or decrease in value. Prices may fluctuate widely over short or extended periods in response to company, market or economic news. Markets also tend to move in cycles, with periods of rising and falling prices. Recently, there have been inflationary price movements and rising interest rates. If there is a general decline in the securities and other markets, your investment in the Fund may lose value, regardless of the individual results of the securities and other instruments in which the Fund invests.
Mid-Cap Securities Risk: The Fund may invest in, or have exposure to, the securities of mid-cap companies. The prices of securities of mid-cap companies generally are more volatile than those of large capitalization companies and are more likely to be adversely affected than large-cap companies by changes in earnings results and investor expectations or poor economic or market conditions, including those experienced during a recession.
Model and Data Risk: Given the complexity of the investments and strategies of the Fund, the Adviser relies heavily on quantitative models and information and traditional and non-traditional data supplied or made available by third parties (“Models and Data”). Models and Data are used to construct sets of transactions and investments, to provide risk management insights, and to assist in hedging the Fund’s investments.
When Models and Data prove to be incorrect or incomplete, including because data is stale, missing or unavailable, any decisions made in reliance thereon expose the Fund to potential risks. Similarly, any hedging based on faulty Models and Data may prove to be unsuccessful. Some of the models used by the Adviser for the Fund are predictive in nature. The use of predictive models has inherent risks. Because predictive models are usually constructed based on historical data supplied by third parties or otherwise, the success of relying on such models may depend on the accuracy and reliability of the supplied historical data. The Fund bears the risk that the quantitative models used by the Adviser will not be successful in forecasting movements in industries, sectors or companies or in determining the weighting of investment positions that will enable the Fund to achieve its investment objectives.
All models rely on correct data inputs. If incorrect data is entered into even a well-founded model, the resulting information will be incorrect. However, even if data is inputted correctly, “model prices” will often differ substantially from market prices, especially for instruments with complex characteristics, such as derivative instruments.
The Adviser currently makes use of non-traditional data, also known as “alternative data” (e.g., data related to consumer transactions or other behavior, social media sentiment, and internet search and traffic data).  There can be no assurance that using alternative data will result in positive performance.  Alternative data is often less structured than traditional data sets and usually has less history, making it more complicated (and riskier) to incorporate into quantitative models. Alternative data providers often have less robust information technology infrastructure, which can result in data sets

AQR Funds–Prospectus31
being suspended, delayed, or otherwise unavailable.  In addition, as regulators have increased scrutiny of the use of alternative data in making investment decisions, the changing regulatory landscape could result in legal, regulatory, financial and/or reputational risk.
The Fund is unlikely to be successful unless the assumptions underlying the models are realistic and either remain realistic and relevant in the future or are adjusted to account for changes in the overall market environment. If such assumptions are inaccurate or become inaccurate and are not promptly adjusted, it is likely that profitable trading signals will not be generated, and major losses may result.
The Adviser, in its sole discretion, will continue to test, evaluate and add new models, which may result in the modification of existing models from time to time. There can be no assurance that model modifications will enable the Fund to achieve its investment objective.
Momentum Style Risk: Investing in or having exposure to securities with positive momentum entails investing in securities that have had above-average recent returns. These securities may be more volatile than a broad cross-section of securities. In addition, there may be periods during which the investment performance of the Fund while using a momentum strategy may suffer.
Short Sale Risk: The Fund enters into a short sale by selling a security it has borrowed (typically from a broker or other institution). If the market price of a security increases after the Fund borrows the security, the Fund will suffer a (potentially unlimited) loss when it replaces the borrowed security at the higher price. In certain cases, purchasing a security to cover a short position can itself cause the price of the security to rise further, thereby exacerbating the loss. In addition, the Fund may not always be able to borrow the security at a particular time or at an acceptable price. The Fund may also take a short position in a derivative instrument, such as a future, forward or swap. A short position in a derivative instrument involves the risk of a theoretically unlimited increase in the value of the underlying instrument, which could cause the Fund to suffer a (potentially unlimited) loss. Short sales also involve transaction and financing costs that will reduce potential Fund gains and increase potential Fund losses.
Small-Cap Securities Risk: Investments in or exposure to the securities of companies with smaller market capitalizations involve higher risks in some respects than do investments in securities of larger companies. For example, prices of such securities are often more volatile than prices of large capitalization securities. In addition, due to thin trading in some such securities, an investment in these securities may be less liquid (i.e., harder to sell) than that of larger capitalization securities. Smaller capitalization companies also fail more often than larger companies and may have more limited management and financial resources than larger companies.
Swap Agreements Risk: Swap agreements involve the risk that the party with whom the Fund has entered into the swap will default on its obligation to pay the Fund. Additionally, certain unexpected market events or significant adverse market movements could result in the Fund not holding enough assets to be able to meet its obligations under the agreement. Such occurrences may negatively impact the Fund’s ability to implement its principal investment strategies and could result in losses to the Fund.
Value Style Risk: Investing in or having exposure to “value” securities, as described in the section titled “Principal Investment Strategies of the Fund,” presents the risk that the securities may never reach what the Adviser believes are their full market values, either because the market fails to recognize what the Adviser considers to be the security’s true value or because the Adviser misjudged that value. In addition, there may be periods during which the investment performance of the Fund while using a value strategy may suffer.
Volatility Risk: The Fund may have investments that appreciate or decrease significantly in value over short periods of time. This may cause the Fund’s net asset value per share to experience significant increases or declines in value over short periods of time, however, all investments long- or short-term are subject to risk of loss.
Performance Information
The performance information below shows summary performance information for the Fund in a bar chart and an average annual total returns table. The information shows you how the Fund’s performance has varied year by year and provides some indication of the risks of investing in the Fund.
The Fund’s past performance (before and after taxes), as provided by the bar chart and performance table that follows, is not an indication of future results. Updated information on the Fund’s performance, including its current NAV per share, can be obtained by visiting https://funds.aqr.com.
Class I Shares—Total Returns
The bar chart below provides an illustration of how the Fund’s performance has varied in each of the indicated calendar years.

AQR Funds–Prospectus32
Highest Quarterly Return
Lowest Quarterly Return
19.06%
3/31/21
-16.25%
3/31/20
Average Annual Total Returns as of December 31, 2022
The following table compares the Fund’s average annual total returns for Class I Shares, Class N Shares and Class R6 Shares for the periods ended December 31, 2022 to a reference benchmark comprised as follows: 50% MSCI World Index and 50% ICE BofA US 3-Month Treasury Bill Index. You cannot invest directly in an index. The table includes all applicable fees and sales charges.
 
One
Year
Five
Year
Since
Inception
Share Class
Inception
Date
AQR Long-Short Equity Fund—Class I
 
 
 
 
Return Before Taxes
19.11%
2.62%
8.62%
07/16/2013
Return After Taxes on Distributions
13.30%
1.16%
6.39%
 
Return After Taxes on Distributions and
Sale of Fund Shares
11.56%
1.46%
5.90%
 
50% MSCI World Index and 50% ICE BofA
US 3-Month Treasury Bill Index (reflects no
deductions for fees, expenses or taxes)
-8.31%
4.10%
4.59%
 
MSCI World Index (reflects no deductions for
fees, expenses or taxes)
-18.14%
6.14%
7.92%
 
ICE BofA US 3-Month Treasury Bill Index
(reflects no deductions for fees, expenses
or taxes)
1.46%
1.26%
0.80%
 
AQR Long-Short Equity Fund—Class N
 
 
 
 
Return Before Taxes
18.84%
2.34%
8.34%
07/16/2013
50% MSCI World Index and 50% ICE BofA
US 3-Month Treasury Bill Index (reflects no
deductions for fees, expenses or taxes)
-8.31%
4.10%
4.59%
 
MSCI World Index (reflects no deductions for
fees, expenses or taxes)
-18.14%
6.14%
7.92%
 
ICE BofA US 3-Month Treasury Bill Index
(reflects no deductions for fees, expenses
or taxes)
1.46%
1.26%
0.80%
 
AQR Long-Short Equity Fund—Class R6
 
 
 
 
Return Before Taxes
19.25%
2.71%
7.54%
09/02/2014
50% MSCI World Index and 50% ICE BofA
US 3-Month Treasury Bill Index (reflects no
deductions for fees, expenses or taxes)
-8.31%
4.10%
4.11%
 
MSCI World Index (reflects no deductions for
fees, expenses or taxes)
-18.14%
6.14%
6.78%
 
ICE BofA US 3-Month Treasury Bill Index
(reflects no deductions for fees, expenses
or taxes)
1.46%
1.26%
0.90%
 
After-tax returns are calculated using the historical highest individual marginal tax rates and do not reflect the impact of state and local taxes. In some cases, the return after taxes on distributions and sale of Fund shares may exceed the return after taxes on distributions due to an assumed benefit from any losses on a sale of Fund shares at the end of the

AQR Funds–Prospectus33
measurement period. Actual after-tax returns depend on an investor’s tax situation and may differ from those shown, and after-tax returns are not relevant to investors who hold their Fund shares through tax-deferred arrangements such as 401(k) plans or individual retirement accounts. After-tax returns are for Class I Shares only. After-tax returns for other classes will vary.
Investment Manager
The Fund’s investment manager is AQR Capital Management, LLC.
Portfolio Managers
Name
Portfolio Manager
of the Fund Since
Title
Clifford S. Asness, Ph.D., M.B.A.
January 1, 2022
Managing and Founding Principal of the Adviser
Michele L. Aghassi, Ph.D.
March 16, 2016
Principal of the Adviser
Andrea Frazzini, Ph.D., M.S.
July 16, 2013
Principal of the Adviser
John J. Huss
January 1, 2022
Principal of the Adviser
Laura Serban, Ph.D.
May 1, 2023
Principal of the Adviser
For important information about purchase and sale of Fund shares, tax information, and financial intermediary compensation, please turn to “Important Additional Information” on page 99 of the prospectus.

AQR Funds–Prospectus34
AQR Macro Opportunities Fund
Fund Summary — May 1, 2023
Investment Objective
The AQR Macro Opportunities Fund (the “Fund”) seeks positive absolute returns.
As further described under “Details About the AQR Macro Opportunities Fund” in the Fund’s prospectus, a “positive absolute return” seeks to earn a positive total return over a reasonable period of time regardless of market conditions or general market direction.
Fees and Expenses of the Fund
This table describes the fees and expenses that you may pay if you buy and hold shares of the Fund. You may pay other fees, such as brokerage commissions and other fees to financial intermediaries, which are not reflected in the tables and examples below.
Annual Fund Operating Expenses (expenses that you pay each year as a percentage of the value of your investment)
 
Class N
Class I
Class R6
Management Fee
1.00%
1.00%
1.00%
Distribution (12b-1) Fee
0.25%
None
None
Other Expenses
 
 
 
Interest on Short Sales1 and Other Interest Expense
0.48%
0.48%
0.48%
All Other Expenses
0.55%
0.50%
0.50%
Total Other Expenses
1.03%
0.98%
0.98%
Acquired Fund Fees and Expenses2
0.03%
0.03%
0.03%
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses
2.31%
2.01%
2.01%
Less: Expense Reimbursements3
0.35%
0.30%
0.40%
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses after Expense
Reimbursements4
1.96%
1.71%
1.61%
1When an interest payment is made on a bond the Fund has sold short, the Fund is required to pay an amount equal to the interest payment to the party from which the Fund has borrowed the bond, and to record the payment as an expense.
2Acquired Fund Fees and Expenses reflect the expenses incurred indirectly by the Fund as a result of the Fund's investments in underlying money market mutual funds, exchange-traded funds or other pooled investment vehicles.
3The Adviser has contractually agreed to reimburse operating expenses of the Fund in an amount sufficient to limit certain Specified Expenses at no more than 0.20% for Class N Shares and Class I Shares and 0.10% for Class R6 Shares. "Specified Expenses" for this purpose include all Fund operating expenses other than management fees and 12b-1 fees and exclude interest, taxes, dividends on short sales, borrowing costs, acquired fund fees and expenses, interest expense relating to short sales, expenses related to class action claims, contingent expenses related to tax reclaim receipts, reorganization expenses and extraordinary expenses. This agreement (the “Expense Limitation Agreement”) will continue at least through April 30, 2024. The Expense Limitation Agreement may be terminated with the consent of the Board of Trustees, including a majority of the Non-Interested Trustees of the Trust. The Adviser is entitled to recapture any expenses reimbursed during the thirty-six month period following the end of the month during which the Adviser reimbursed expenses, provided that the amount recaptured may not cause the Specified Expenses attributable to a share class of the Fund during a year in which a repayment is made to exceed either of (i) the applicable limits in effect at the time of the reimbursement and (ii) the applicable limits in effect at the time of recapture.
4Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses after Expense Reimbursements are 1.48% for Class N Shares, 1.23% for Class I Shares and 1.13% for Class R6 Shares if Interest on Short Sales and Other Interest Expense are not included.
Example: This Example is intended to help you compare the cost of investing in the Fund with the cost of investing in other mutual funds. The Example assumes that you invest $10,000 in the Fund for the time periods indicated and then redeem all of your shares at the end of those periods. The Example also assumes that your investment has a 5% return each year and that the Fund’s operating expenses remain the same and takes into account the effect of the Expense Limitation Agreement through April 30, 2024, as discussed in Footnote No. 3 to the Fee Table. Although your actual costs may be higher or lower, based on these assumptions your costs would be:
 
1 Year
3 Years
5 Years
10 Years
Class N Shares
$199
$688
$1,204
$2,619
Class I Shares
$174
$602
$1,055
$2,314
Class R6 Shares
$164
$592
$1,046
$2,306

AQR Funds–Prospectus35
Portfolio Turnover: The Fund pays transaction costs, such as commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or “turns over” its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover may indicate higher transaction costs and may result in higher taxes when shares are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are not reflected in annual fund operating expenses or in the example, affect the Fund’s performance. During the most recent fiscal year, the Fund’s portfolio turnover rate was 319% of the average value of its portfolio.
Principal Investment Strategies of the Fund
The Fund pursues its investment objective by investing globally across a wide range of asset classes, including equities, fixed income, currencies and commodities, and may take both long and short positions in each of the asset classes or Instruments (as defined below). The Fund has the flexibility to shift its allocation across asset classes and markets around the world, including emerging markets, based on the Adviser’s assessment of their relative attractiveness.
The Adviser uses a bottom up process that primarily considers macroeconomic themes alongside several other indicators of attractiveness, including deep value, value, carry, momentum and defensive, in determining whether to take a long and/or short position in an Instrument or asset class. The Adviser may utilize more idiosyncratic indicators of attractiveness beyond these broad themes.
Macroeconomic Themes: The Adviser evaluates the impact of macroeconomic news and macroeconomic momentum on the attractiveness of Instruments and asset classes around the world. The Adviser seeks to benefit from the insight that asset prices tend to underreact to new information by identifying new information and positioning the Fund to profit as prices gradually incorporate economically impactful news. Macroeconomic themes considered include, but are not limited to, growth, inflation, international trade, monetary policy, investor sentiment and asset-specific fundamentals.
The evaluation of macroeconomic attractiveness includes both quantitative and qualitative components.
Quantitative analysis measures an Instrument’s attractiveness based on the current level and historical evolution of key macroeconomic measures. These measures include, but are not limited to, growth and inflation forecasts, demand for exports, central bank actions and equity market performance.
Qualitative input adds a perspective not available through quantitative analysis. These considerations include, but are not limited to, the Adviser’s assessment of fiscal and monetary policy, trade policy, geo-political risks and supply-and-demand conditions.
Deep Value / Opportunistic: “Deep value” or “opportunistic” strategies favor investments that exhibit market dislocations based on price moves and valuation signals that appear extreme relative to history. Once an investment opportunity is identified, the Adviser evaluates qualitative factors to determine whether the opportunity represents a true dislocation. By combining a systematic screening process with discretionary oversight, the attractiveness of an investment’s over/under valuation is determined using both quantitative and qualitative processes. Contrasted with value opportunities, deep value opportunities are typically more idiosyncratic with availability varying over time and may require looking broadly across many different markets to uncover. Examples of deep value quantitative measures include extreme dislocations in price-to-earnings and price-to-book ratios for selected equities. Examples of deep value qualitative considerations include fiscal and monetary policy, geo-political risks, and supply-and-demand dynamics, among others.
Value: Value strategies favor investments that appear cheap over those that appear expensive based on fundamental measures related to price, seeking to capture the tendency for relatively cheap assets to outperform relatively expensive assets. The Fund will seek to buy assets that are cheap and sell those that are expensive relative to similar investments globally and relative to their historical averages. Examples of value measures include using price-to-earnings and price-to-book ratios for selecting equities.
Carry: Carry strategies favor investments with higher yields over those with lower yields, seeking to capture the tendency for higher yielding assets to provide higher returns than lower-yielding assets. The Fund will seek to buy high-yielding assets and sell low-yielding assets relative to similar investments globally and relative to their historical averages. An example of carry measures includes using interest rates to select currencies and bonds.
Momentum: Momentum strategies favor investments that have performed relatively well over those that have underperformed over the medium-term, seeking to capture the tendency that an asset’s recent performance will continue in the near future. The Fund will seek to buy assets that recently outperformed and sell those that recently underperformed relative to similar investments globally and relative to their historical averages. Examples of momentum measures include simple price momentum for selecting equities and price- and yield-based momentum for selecting bonds.
Defensive: Defensive strategies favor investments with low-risk characteristics over those with high-risk characteristics, seeking to capture the tendency for lower risk and higher-quality assets to generate higher risk-adjusted returns than higher risk and lower-quality assets. The Fund will seek to buy low-risk, high-quality assets and sell high-risk, low-quality assets. An example of a defensive measure includes the profitability of companies in an index.

AQR Funds–Prospectus36
Portfolio Construction
The Adviser considers macroeconomic themes alongside other indicators of attractiveness (including deep value, value, carry, momentum and defensive) in determining whether the Fund’s position in the Instrument in question should be long or short. The owner of a long position in an Instrument will benefit from an increase in the price of the underlying instrument. The owner of a short position in an Instrument will benefit from a decrease in the price of the underlying instrument. The Fund goes long Instruments deemed overall attractive, and short Instruments deemed overall unattractive. When there is strong agreement among the indicators, the long or short position in an Instrument or asset class will be given a greater weighting in the portfolio, while conflicting indicators will result in a lesser weighting. Individual investments are bought or sold in accordance with periodic re-ranking and rebalancing, the frequency of which is expected to vary depending on the Adviser’s assessment of the investment’s attractiveness and global market conditions.
The Adviser allocates among the different asset classes based on their contribution to the Fund’s risk budget — i.e., the targeted level of risk or volatility. The allocation process allows the Adviser to make tactical risk adjustments while maintaining long-term strategic risk weights. Within each asset class, a portion of the Fund’s target risk is allocated based on the macroeconomic indicators, with the remainder allocated based on other indicators of attractiveness. The relative weights to macroeconomic themes and such other indicators can vary depending on market conditions.
The Adviser generally expects that the Fund’s performance will have a low correlation to the performance of the general global equity, fixed income, currency and commodity markets over any given market cycle; however, the Fund’s performance may correlate to the performance of any one or more of those markets over short-term periods.
The Adviser, on average, will target an annualized volatility level for the Fund of 10%. Volatility is a statistical measurement of the dispersion of returns of a security or fund or index, as measured by the annualized standard deviation of its returns. The Adviser expects that the Fund’s targeted annualized forecasted volatility will typically range between 5% and 15%; however, the actual or realized volatility level for longer or shorter periods may be materially higher or lower depending on market conditions. Higher volatility generally indicates higher risk. Actual or realized volatility can and will differ from the forecasted or target volatility described above.
Instruments
In seeking to achieve its investment objective, the Fund will enter into both long and short positions using derivative instruments. The Adviser generally expects that the Fund will have exposure in long and short positions across all four major asset classes (commodities, currencies, fixed income and equities), but at any one time the Fund may emphasize a subset of the asset classes or a limited number of exposures within an asset class.
The Fund invests primarily in a portfolio of futures contracts, futures-related instruments, forwards, swaps, equity securities and government bonds, including, but not limited to, global developed and emerging market equity index futures, swaps on equity index futures, equity swaps and options on equity indices, global developed and emerging market currency forwards, commodity futures, forwards and swaps, global developed fixed income futures, bond and interest rate futures and swaps and global developed and emerging market credit default index swaps, global developed and emerging market common stocks, preferred stocks, depositary receipts and shares or interests in real estate investment trusts (“REITs”) or REIT-like entities and global developed and emerging market foreign government bonds (including inflation-linked bonds, such as Treasury Inflation-Protected Securities (“TIPS”)) (collectively, the “Instruments”). The Fund will either invest directly in the Instruments or indirectly by investing in the Subsidiary (as described below) that invests in the Instruments. The Fund may invest in or have exposure to issuers of any size. The Fund may invest in or have exposure to U.S. or non-U.S. issuers, including in developed and emerging markets. The Fund may also invest in exchange-traded funds and exchange-traded notes.
Futures and forward contracts are contractual agreements to buy or sell a particular currency, commodity or financial instrument at a pre-determined price in the future. The Fund’s use of futures contracts, forward contracts, swaps and certain other Instruments will have the economic effect of financial leverage. Financial leverage magnifies exposure to the swings in prices of an asset class underlying an Instrument and results in increased volatility, which means the Fund will have the potential for greater gains, as well as the potential for greater losses, than if the Fund did not use Instruments that have a leveraging effect. For example, if the Adviser seeks to gain enhanced exposure to a specific asset class through an Instrument providing leveraged exposure to the class and that Instrument increases in value, the gain to the Fund will be magnified. If that investment decreases in value, however, the loss to the Fund will be magnified. As a result of the Fund’s strategy, the Fund may have highly leveraged exposure to one or more asset classes at times. A decline in the Fund’s assets due to losses magnified by the Instruments providing leveraged exposure may require the Fund to liquidate portfolio positions to satisfy its obligations or to meet redemption requests when it may not be advantageous to do so. There is no assurance that the Fund’s use of Instruments providing enhanced exposure will enable the Fund to achieve its investment objective.

AQR Funds–Prospectus37
The Fund’s strategy engages in frequent portfolio trading which may result in a higher portfolio turnover rate than a fund with less frequent trading, and correspondingly greater brokerage commissions and other transactional expenses, which are borne by the Fund, and may have adverse tax consequences. The Adviser utilizes portfolio optimization techniques to determine the frequency of trading, taking into account the transaction costs associated with trading each Instrument, and employs sophisticated proprietary trading techniques in an effort to mitigate trading costs and execution impact on the Fund.
A significant portion of the assets of the Fund may be invested directly or indirectly in money market instruments, which may include, but are not limited to, U.S. Government securities, U.S. Government agency securities, short-term fixed income securities, overnight and/or fixed term repurchase agreements, money market fund shares, interests in short-term investment funds, short-term bond fund shares, and cash and cash equivalents with one year or less term to maturity. These cash or cash equivalent holdings serve as collateral for the positions the Fund takes and also earn income for the Fund. The Fund may also enter into repurchase and reverse repurchase agreements. Under a repurchase agreement the Fund buys securities that the seller has agreed to buy back at a specified time and at a set price. Under a reverse repurchase agreement, the Fund sells securities to another party and agrees to repurchase them at a particular date and price. Leverage may be created when the Fund enters into reverse repurchase agreements, engages in futures and swap transactions or uses certain other derivative instruments. While the Fund normally does not engage in any direct borrowing, leverage is implicit in the futures and other derivatives it trades.
The Fund intends to make investments through the Subsidiary and may invest up to 25% of its total assets in the Subsidiary. The Subsidiary is a wholly-owned and controlled subsidiary of the Fund, organized under the laws of the Cayman Islands as an exempted company. Generally, the Subsidiary will invest primarily in commodity-linked derivative instruments such as commodity futures, commodity forwards and commodity swaps (which may include swaps on commodity futures), but it may also invest in financial futures, option and swap contracts, fixed income securities, pooled investment vehicles, including those that are not registered pursuant to the 1940 Act, and other investments intended to serve as margin or collateral for the Subsidiary’s derivative positions. The Fund will invest in the Subsidiary in order to gain exposure to the commodities markets within the limitations of the federal tax laws, rules and regulations that apply to registered investment companies. Unlike the Fund, the Subsidiary may invest without limitation in commodity-linked derivatives, however, the Fund and the Subsidiary will comply with Rule 18f-4 on a consolidated basis with respect to investments in derivatives. In addition, the Fund and the Subsidiary will be subject to the same fundamental investment restrictions on a consolidated basis and, to the extent applicable to the investment activities of the Subsidiary, the Subsidiary will follow the same compliance policies and procedures as the Fund. Unlike the Fund, the Subsidiary will not seek to qualify as a regulated investment company under Subchapter M of the Code. The Fund is the sole shareholder of the Subsidiary and does not expect shares of the Subsidiary to be offered or sold to other investors.
Principal Risks of Investing in the Fund
Risk is inherent in all investing. The value of your investment in the Fund, as well as the amount of return you receive on your investment, may fluctuate significantly from day to day and over time. You may lose part or all of your investment in the Fund or your investment may not perform as well as other similar investments. The Fund is not a complete investment program and should be considered only as one part of an investment portfolio. The Fund is more appropriate for long-term investors who can bear the risk of short-term NAV fluctuations, which at times, may be significant and rapid, however, all investments long- or short-term are subject to risk of loss. The following is a summary description of certain risks of investing in the Fund. The order of the below risk factors does not indicate the significance of any particular risk factor.
China Risk: Despite economic and market reforms implemented over the last few decades, the Chinese government still exercises substantial influence over many aspects of the private sector and may own or control many companies. Investing in China also involves risks of losses due to expropriation, nationalization, confiscation of assets and property, and the imposition of restrictions on foreign investments and on repatriation of capital invested. There is also the risk that the U.S. government or other governments may sanction Chinese issuers or otherwise prohibit U.S. persons (such as the Fund) from investing in certain Chinese issuers which may negatively affect the liquidity and price of their securities. There can be no assurance that economic reforms implemented over the past few decades will continue or that they will be respected.
Commodities Risk: Exposure to the commodities markets may subject the Fund to greater volatility than investments in traditional securities. The value of commodity-linked derivative investments may be affected by changes in overall market movements, commodity index volatility, changes in interest rates, or factors affecting a particular industry or commodity, such as drought, floods, weather, embargoes, tariffs and international economic, political and regulatory developments. Additionally, the Fund may gain exposure to the commodities markets through investments in exchange-traded notes, the value of which may be influenced by, among other things, time to maturity, level of supply and demand for the exchange-traded note, volatility and lack of liquidity in underlying markets, the performance of the reference instrument, changes in the issuer’s credit rating and economic, legal, political or geographic events that affect the reference instrument.

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Common Stock Risk: The Fund may invest in, or have exposure to, common stocks. Common stocks are subject to greater fluctuations in market value than certain other asset classes as a result of such factors as a company’s business performance, investor perceptions, stock market trends and general economic conditions.
Counterparty Risk: The Fund may enter into various types of derivative contracts. Many of these derivative contracts will be privately negotiated in the over-the-counter market. These contracts also involve exposure to credit risk, since contract performance depends in part on the financial condition of the counterparty. If a privately negotiated over-the-counter contract calls for payments by the Fund, the Fund must be prepared to make such payments when due. In addition, if a counterparty’s creditworthiness declines, the Fund may not receive payments owed under the contract, or such payments may be delayed under such circumstances and the value of agreements with such counterparty can be expected to decline, potentially resulting in losses to the Fund.
Credit Default Index Swap Agreements Risk: The Fund may enter into credit default index swap agreements as a “buyer” or “seller” of credit protection. Credit default index swap agreements involve special risks because they may be difficult to value, are highly susceptible to liquidity and credit risk, and generally pay a return to the party that has paid the premium only in the event of an actual default by the issuer of the underlying obligation (as opposed to a credit downgrade or other indication of financial difficulty).
Credit Risk: Credit risk refers to the possibility that the issuer of a security or the issuer of the reference asset of a derivative instrument will not be able to make principal and interest payments when due. Changes in an issuer’s credit rating or the market’s perception of an issuer’s creditworthiness may also affect the value of the Fund’s investment in that issuer. Securities rated in the four highest categories by the rating agencies are considered investment grade but they may also have some speculative characteristics. Investment grade ratings do not guarantee that the issuer will not default on its payment obligations or that bonds will not otherwise lose value.
Currency Risk: Currency risk is the risk that changes in currency exchange rates will negatively affect securities denominated in, and/or receiving revenues in, foreign currencies. The liquidity and trading value of foreign currencies could be affected by global economic factors, such as inflation, interest rate levels, and trade balances among countries, as well as the actions of sovereign governments and central banks. Adverse changes in currency exchange rates (relative to the U.S. dollar) may erode or reverse any potential gains from the Fund’s investments in securities denominated in a foreign currency or may widen existing losses.
Derivatives Risk: In general, a derivative instrument typically involves leverage, i.e., it provides exposure to potential gain or loss from a change in the level of the market price of the underlying security, currency or commodity (or a basket or index) in a notional amount that exceeds the amount of cash or assets required to establish or maintain the derivative instrument. Adverse changes in the value or level of the underlying asset or index, which the Fund may not directly own, can result in a loss to the Fund substantially greater than the amount invested in the derivative itself. The use of derivative instruments also exposes the Fund to additional risks and transaction costs. These instruments come in many varieties and have a wide range of potential risks and rewards, and may include, as further described in the section entitled “Principal Investment Strategies of the Fund,” futures contracts, forward contracts, options and swaps. A risk of the Fund’s use of derivatives is that the fluctuations in their values may not correlate perfectly with the overall securities markets.
Emerging Market Risk: The Fund intends to have exposure to emerging markets. Emerging markets are riskier than more developed markets because they tend to develop unevenly and may never fully develop. Investments in emerging markets may be considered speculative. Emerging markets are more likely to experience hyperinflation and currency devaluations, which adversely affect returns to U.S. investors. In addition, many emerging securities markets have far lower trading volumes and less liquidity than developed markets. Emerging markets generally have less stable political systems, less developed securities settlement procedures and may require the establishment of special custody arrangements. Emerging securities markets generally do not have the level of market efficiency and strict standards in accounting and securities regulation as developed markets, which could impact the Adviser's ability to evaluate these securities and/or impact Fund performance.
Foreign Investments Risk: Foreign investments often involve special risks not present in U.S. investments that can increase the chances that the Fund will lose money. These risks include:
The Fund generally holds its foreign instruments and cash in foreign banks and securities depositories, which may be recently organized or new to the foreign custody business and may be subject to only limited or no regulatory oversight.
Changes in foreign currency exchange rates can affect the value of the Fund’s portfolio.
The economies of certain foreign markets may not compare favorably with the economy of the United States with respect to such issues as growth of gross national product, reinvestment of capital, resources and balance of payments position.
The governments of certain countries may prohibit or impose substantial restrictions on foreign investments in their capital markets or in certain industries.

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Many foreign governments do not supervise and regulate stock exchanges, brokers and the sale of securities to the same extent as does the United States and may not have laws to protect investors that are comparable to U.S. securities laws.
Settlement and clearance procedures in certain foreign markets may result in delays in payment for or delivery of securities not typically associated with settlement and clearance of U.S. investments.
The regulatory, financial reporting, accounting, recordkeeping and auditing standards of foreign countries may differ, in some cases significantly, from U.S. standards.
Forward and Futures Contract Risk: The successful use of forward and futures contracts draws upon the Adviser’s  skill and experience with respect to such instruments and is subject to special risk considerations. The primary risks associated with the use of forward and futures contracts, which may adversely affect the Fund’s NAV and total return, are (a) the imperfect correlation between the change in market value of the instruments held by the Fund and the price of the forward or futures contract; (b) possible lack of a liquid secondary market for a forward or futures contract and the resulting inability to close a forward or futures contract when desired; (c) losses caused by unanticipated market movements, which are potentially unlimited; (d) the Adviser’s  inability to predict correctly the direction of securities prices, interest rates, currency exchange rates and other economic factors; (e) the possibility that the counterparty will default in the performance of its obligations; and (f) if the Fund has insufficient cash, it may have to sell securities from its portfolio to meet daily variation margin requirements, and the Fund may have to sell securities at a time when it may be disadvantageous to do so.
Hedging Transactions Risk: The Adviser  from time to time employs various hedging techniques. The success of the Fund’s hedging strategy will be subject to the Adviser’s ability to correctly assess the degree of correlation between the performance of the instruments used in the hedging strategy and the performance of the investments in the portfolio being hedged. Since the characteristics of many securities change as markets change or time passes, the success of the Fund’s hedging strategy will also be subject to the Adviser’s ability to continually recalculate, readjust, and execute hedges in an efficient and timely manner. For a variety of reasons, the Adviser  may not seek to establish a perfect correlation between such hedging instruments and the portfolio holdings being hedged. Such imperfect correlation may prevent the Fund from achieving the intended hedge or expose the Fund to risk of loss. In addition, it is not possible to hedge fully or perfectly against any risk, and hedging entails its own costs (such as trading commissions and fees).
High Portfolio Turnover Risk: The investment techniques and strategies utilized by the Fund, including investments made on a shorter-term basis or in derivative instruments or instruments with a maturity of one year or less at the time of acquisition, may result in frequent portfolio trading and high portfolio turnover. High portfolio turnover rates will cause the Fund to incur higher levels of brokerage fees and commissions, which may reduce performance, and may cause higher levels of current tax liability to shareholders in the Fund.
Interest Rate Risk: Interest rate risk is the risk that prices of fixed income securities generally increase when interest rates decline and decrease when interest rates increase. The Fund may lose money if short-term or long-term interest rates rise sharply or otherwise change in a manner not anticipated by the Adviser.
Investment in Other Investment Companies Risk: As with other investments, investments in other investment companies, including exchange-traded funds (“ETFs”), are subject to market and manager risk. In addition, if the Fund acquires shares of investment companies, shareholders bear both their proportionate share of expenses in the Fund (including management and advisory fees) and, indirectly, the expenses of the investment companies. The Fund may invest in money market mutual funds. An investment in a money market mutual fund is not insured or guaranteed by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation or any other government agency. Although money market mutual funds that invest in U.S. government securities seek to preserve the value of the Fund’s investment at $1.00 per share, it is possible to lose money by investing in a stable NAV money market mutual fund. Moreover, prime money market mutual funds are required to use floating NAVs that do not preserve the value of the Fund’s investment at $1.00 per share. Investments in real estate investment trusts or securities with similar characteristics that pool investors’ capital to purchase or finance real estate investments also involve certain unique risks, including concentration risk (by geography or property type) and interest rate risk (i.e., in a rising interest rate environment, the stock prices of real estate-related investments may decline and the borrowing costs of these companies may increase).
Leverage Risk: As part of the Fund’s principal investment strategy, the Fund will make investments in futures contracts, forward contracts, options, swaps and other derivative instruments. These derivative instruments provide the economic effect of financial leverage by creating additional investment exposure to the underlying instrument, as well as the potential for greater loss. If the Fund uses leverage through activities such as purchasing derivative instruments, the Fund has the risk that losses may exceed the net assets of the Fund. The net asset value of the Fund while employing leverage will be more volatile and sensitive to market movements.
Manager Risk: If the Adviser makes poor investment decisions, it will negatively affect the Fund’s investment performance.

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Market Risk: Market risk is the risk that the markets on which the Fund’s investments trade will increase or decrease in value. Prices may fluctuate widely over short or extended periods in response to company, market or economic news. Markets also tend to move in cycles, with periods of rising and falling prices. Recently, there have been inflationary price movements and rising interest rates. If there is a general decline in the securities and other markets, your investment in the Fund may lose value, regardless of the individual results of the securities and other instruments in which the Fund invests.
Mid-Cap Securities Risk: The Fund may invest in, or have exposure to, the securities of mid-cap companies. The prices of securities of mid-cap companies generally are more volatile than those of large capitalization companies and are more likely to be adversely affected than large-cap companies by changes in earnings results and investor expectations or poor economic or market conditions, including those experienced during a recession.
Model and Data Risk: Given the complexity of the investments and strategies of the Fund, the Adviser relies heavily on quantitative models and information and data supplied or made available by third parties (“Models and Data”). Models and Data are used to construct sets of transactions and investments, to provide risk management insights, and to assist in hedging the Fund’s investments.
When Models and Data prove to be incorrect or incomplete, including because data is stale, missing or unavailable, any decisions made in reliance thereon expose the Fund to potential risks. Similarly, any hedging based on faulty Models and Data may prove to be unsuccessful. Some of the models used by the Adviser for the Fund are predictive in nature. The use of predictive models has inherent risks. Because predictive models are usually constructed based on historical data supplied by third parties or otherwise, the success of relying on such models may depend on the accuracy and reliability of the supplied historical data. The Fund bears the risk that the quantitative models used by the Adviser will not be successful in selecting investments or in determining the weighting of investment positions that will enable the Fund to achieve its investment objective.
All models rely on correct data inputs. If incorrect data is entered into even a well-founded model, the resulting information will be incorrect. However, even if data is inputted correctly, “model prices” will often differ substantially from market prices, especially for instruments with complex characteristics, such as derivative instruments.
The Fund is unlikely to be successful unless the assumptions underlying the models are realistic and either remain realistic and relevant in the future or are adjusted to account for changes in the overall market environment. If such assumptions are inaccurate or become inaccurate and are not promptly adjusted, it is likely that profitable trading signals will not be generated, and major losses may result.
The Adviser, in its sole discretion, will continue to test, evaluate and add new models, which may result in the modification of existing models from time to time. There can be no assurance that model modifications will enable the Fund to achieve its investment objective.
Momentum Style Risk: Investing in or having exposure to securities with positive momentum entails investing in securities that have had above-average recent returns. These securities may be more volatile than a broad cross-section of securities. In addition, there may be periods during which the investment performance of the Fund while using a momentum strategy may suffer.
Options Risk: An option is an agreement that, for a premium payment or fee, gives the option holder (the purchaser) the right but not the obligation to buy (a “call option”) or sell (a “put option”) the underlying asset (or settle for cash an amount based on an underlying asset, rate, or index) at a specified price (the “exercise price”) during a period of time or on a specified date. Investments in options are considered speculative. When the Fund purchases an option, it may lose the premium paid for it if the price of the underlying security or other assets decreased or remained the same (in the case of a call option) or increased or remained the same (in the case of a put option). If a put or call option purchased by the Fund were permitted to expire without being sold or exercised, its premium would represent a loss to the Fund.
Repurchase Agreements Risk: The Fund may invest in repurchase agreements. When entering into a repurchase agreement, the Fund essentially makes a short-term loan to a qualified bank or broker-dealer. The Fund buys securities that the seller has agreed to buy back at a specified time and at a set price that includes interest. There is a risk that the seller will be unable to buy back the securities at the time required and the Fund could experience delays in recovering amounts owed to it.
Reverse Repurchase Agreements Risk: Reverse repurchase agreements involve the sale of securities held by the Fund with an agreement to repurchase the securities at an agreed-upon price, date and interest payment. Reverse repurchase agreements involve the risk that the other party may fail to return the securities in a timely manner or at all. The Fund could lose money if it is unable to recover the securities and the value of the collateral held by the Fund, including the value of the investments made with cash collateral, is less than the value of securities. These events could also trigger adverse tax consequences to the Fund. Furthermore, reverse repurchase agreements involve the risks that (i) the interest income earned in the investment of the proceeds will be less than the interest expense, (ii) the market

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value of the securities retained in lieu of sale by the Fund may decline below the price of the securities the Fund has sold but is obligated to repurchase, and (iii) the market value of the securities sold will decline below the price at which the Fund is required to repurchase them. In addition, the use of reverse repurchase agreements may be regarded as leveraging.
Short Sale Risk: The Fund may take a short position in a derivative instrument, such as a future, forward or swap. A short position in a derivative instrument involves the risk of a theoretically unlimited increase in the value of the underlying instrument, which could cause the Fund to suffer a (potentially unlimited) loss. Short sales also involve transaction and financing costs that will reduce potential Fund gains and increase potential Fund losses.
Small-Cap Securities Risk: Investments in or exposure to the securities of companies with smaller market capitalizations involve higher risks in some respects than do investments in securities of larger companies. For example, prices of such securities are often more volatile than prices of large capitalization securities. In addition, due to thin trading in some such securities, an investment in these securities may be less liquid (i.e., harder to sell) than that of larger capitalization securities. Smaller capitalization companies also fail more often than larger companies and may have more limited management and financial resources than larger companies.
Sovereign Debt Risk: The Fund may invest in, or have exposure to, sovereign debt instruments. These investments are subject to the risk that a governmental entity may delay or refuse to pay interest or repay principal on its sovereign debt, due, for example, to cash flow problems, insufficient foreign currency reserves, political considerations, the relative size of the governmental entity’s debt position in relation to the economy or the failure to put in place economic reforms required by the International Monetary Fund or other multilateral agencies. If a governmental entity defaults, it may ask for more time in which to pay or for further loans. There is no legal process for collecting sovereign debt that a government does not pay nor are there bankruptcy proceedings through which all or part of the sovereign debt that a governmental entity has not repaid may be collected.
Subsidiary Risk: By investing in the Subsidiary, the Fund is indirectly exposed to the risks associated with the Subsidiary’s investments. The commodity-related instruments held by the Subsidiary are generally similar to those that are permitted to be held by the Fund and are subject to the same risks that apply to similar investments if held directly by the Fund. There can be no assurance that the investment objective of the Subsidiary will be achieved. The Subsidiary is not registered under the 1940 Act, and, unless otherwise noted in this prospectus, is not subject to all the investor protections of the 1940 Act. However, the Fund wholly owns and controls the Subsidiary, and the Fund and the Subsidiary are both managed by the Adviser, making it unlikely that the Subsidiary will take action contrary to the interests of the Fund and its shareholders. The Board of Trustees has oversight responsibility for the investment activities of the Fund, including its investment in the Subsidiary, and the Fund’s role as sole shareholder of the Subsidiary. The Fund and the Subsidiary will be subject to the same investment restrictions and limitations on a consolidated basis, and to the extent applicable to the investment activities of the Subsidiary, the Subsidiary will follow the same compliance policies and procedures as the Fund. Unlike the Fund, the Subsidiary will not seek to qualify as a regulated investment company under Subchapter M of the Code. Changes in the laws of the United States and/or the Cayman Islands could result in the inability of the Fund and/or the Subsidiary to operate as described in this prospectus and the SAI and could adversely affect the Fund.
Swap Agreements Risk: Swap agreements involve the risk that the party with whom the Fund has entered into the swap will default on its obligation to pay the Fund. Additionally, certain unexpected market events or significant adverse market movements could result in the Fund not holding enough assets to be able to meet its obligations under the agreement. Such occurrences may negatively impact the Fund’s ability to implement its principal investment strategies and could result in losses to the Fund.
Tax Risk: In order for the Fund to qualify as a regulated investment company under Subchapter M of the Code, the Fund must derive at least 90 percent of its gross income each taxable year from qualifying income, which is described in more detail in the SAI. Income from certain commodity-linked derivative instruments in which the Fund invests is not considered qualifying income. The Fund will therefore restrict its income from direct investments in commodity-linked derivative instruments that do not generate qualifying income, such as commodity-linked swaps, to a maximum of 10 percent of its gross income.
The Fund’s investment in the Subsidiary is expected to provide the Fund with exposure to the commodities markets within the limitations of the federal tax requirements of Subchapter M. Changes in the laws of the United States and/or the Cayman Islands could result in the inability of the Fund and/or the Subsidiary to operate as described in this prospectus and the SAI and could adversely affect the Fund. For example, the Cayman Islands does not currently impose any income, corporate or capital gains tax, estate duty, inheritance tax, gift tax or withholding tax on the Subsidiary. If Cayman Islands law changes such that the Subsidiary must pay Cayman Islands taxes, Fund shareholders would likely suffer decreased investment returns.
TIPS and Inflation-Linked Bonds Risk: The value of inflation-protected securities generally fluctuates in response to changes in real interest rates, which are in turn tied to the relationship between nominal interest rates and the rate of inflation. Therefore, if inflation were to rise at a faster rate than nominal interest rates, real interest rates might decline,

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leading to an increase in the value of inflation-protected securities. In contrast, if nominal interest rates increased at a faster rate than inflation, real interest rates might rise, leading to a decrease in the value of inflation-protected securities. If the Fund purchases inflation-protected securities in the secondary market whose principal values have been adjusted upward due to inflation since issuance, the Fund may experience a loss if there is a subsequent period of deflation. The inflation-protected securities markets are generally much smaller and less liquid than the nominal bonds from the same issuers and as such can suffer losses during times of economic stress or illiquidity.
U.S. Government Securities Risk: Treasury obligations may differ in their interest rates, maturities, times of issuance and other characteristics. Obligations of U.S. Government agencies and authorities are supported by varying degrees of credit but generally are not backed by the full faith and credit of the U.S. Government. No assurance can be given that the U.S. Government will provide financial support to its agencies and authorities if it is not obligated by law to do so. Certain of the government agency securities the Fund may purchase are backed only by the credit of the government agency and not by full faith and credit of the United States.
Value Style Risk: Investing in or having exposure to “value” securities (including those identified by the Adviser as "deep value" or "opportunistic"), as described in the section titled "Principal Investment Strategies of the Fund,"  presents the risk that the securities may never reach what the Adviser believes are their full market values, either because the market fails to recognize what the Adviser considers to be the security’s true value or because the Adviser misjudged that value. In addition, there may be periods during which the investment performance of the Fund while using a value or deep value strategy may suffer.
Volatility Risk: The Fund may have investments that appreciate or decrease significantly in value over short periods of time. This may cause the Fund’s net asset value per share to experience significant increases or declines in value over short periods of time, however, all investments long- or short-term are subject to risk of loss.
Performance Information
The performance information below shows summary performance information for the Fund in a bar chart and an average annual total returns table. The information shows you how the Fund’s performance has varied year by year and provides some indication of the risks of investing in the Fund. The Fund's returns prior to October 19, 2021 as reflected in the bar chart and the table are those of the Fund when it followed different investment strategies under the name "AQR Global Macro Fund."
The Fund’s past performance (before and after taxes), as provided by the bar chart and performance table that follows, is not an indication of future results. Updated information on the Fund’s performance, including its current NAV per share, can be obtained by visiting https://funds.aqr.com