485BPOS
PGIM Jennison International Opportunities Fund
STATEMENT OF ADDITIONAL INFORMATION  |  December 30, 2022
This Statement of Additional Information (“SAI”) of PGIM Jennison International Opportunities Fund (“Fund”) is not a prospectus and should be read in conjunction with the Prospectus of the Fund dated December 30, 2022. The Prospectus can be obtained, without charge, by calling (800) 225-1852 or by writing to Prudential Mutual Fund Services LLC, P.O. Box 9658, Providence, RI 02940. This SAI has been incorporated by reference into the Fund’s Prospectus.
The Fund is a series of Prudential World Fund, Inc. (“World Fund”). World Fund has the following other series: PGIM Emerging Markets Debt Local Currency Fund, PGIM Emerging Markets Debt Hard Currency Fund, PGIM Quant Solutions International Equity Fund, PGIM Jennison Emerging Markets Equity Opportunities Fund, PGIM Jennison Global Infrastructure Fund and PGIM Jennison Global Opportunities Fund, each of which is currently offered in separate prospectuses and separate SAIs. The information presented in this SAI applies only to the Fund.
The Fund’s audited financial statements are incorporated into this SAI by reference to the Fund’s 2022 Annual Report (File No. 811-03981). You may request a copy of the Annual Report at no charge by calling (800) 225-1852.
PGIM JENNISON INTERNATIONAL OPPORTUNITIES FUND
A: PWJAX
C: PWJCX
R: PWJRX
Z: PWJZX
R2: PWJBX
 
 
R4 PWJDX
R6 PWJQX
 
 
 
 
 
To enroll in e-delivery, go to pgim.com/investments/resource/edelivery
MF215B

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PART I
INTRODUCTION
This SAI sets forth information about the Fund. It provides information about certain of the securities, instruments, policies and strategies that are used by the Fund in seeking to achieve its objective. This SAI also provides additional information about World Fund's Board of Directors (hereafter referred to as “Board Members”), the advisory services provided to and the management fees paid by the Fund, information about other fees paid by and services provided to the Fund, and other information.
Before reading the SAI, you should consult the Glossary below, which defines certain of the terms used in the SAI:
GLOSSARY
Term
Definition
1933 Act
Securities Act of 1933, as amended
1934 Act
Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended
1940 Act
Investment Company Act of 1940, as amended
1940 Act Laws, Interpretations and Exemptions
Exemptive order, SEC release, no-action letter or similar relief or interpretations, collectively
ADR
American Depositary Receipt
ADS
American Depositary Share
Board
Fund’s Board of Directors or Trustees
Board Member
A trustee or director of the Fund’s Board
CEA
Commodity Exchange Act, as amended
CFTC
U.S. Commodity Futures Trading Commission
Code
Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended
CMO
Collateralized Mortgage Obligation
ETF
Exchange-Traded Fund
EDR
European Depositary Receipt
Exchange
NYSE Arca, Inc.
Fannie Mae
Federal National Mortgage Association
FDIC
Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation
Fitch
Fitch Ratings, Inc.
Freddie Mac
Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation
GDR
Global Depositary Receipt
Ginnie Mae
Government National Mortgage Association
IPO
Initial Public Offering
IRS
Internal Revenue Service
LIBOR
London Interbank Offered Rate
Manager or PGIM Investments
PGIM Investments LLC
Moody’s
Moody’s Investors Service, Inc.
NASDAQ
National Association of Securities Dealers Automated Quotations
NAV
Net Asset Value
NRSRO
Nationally Recognized Statistical Rating Organization
NYSE
New York Stock Exchange
OTC
Over the Counter
Prudential
Prudential Financial, Inc.
PMFS
Prudential Mutual Fund Services LLC
QPTP
“Qualified publicly traded partnership” as the term is used in the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended
REIT
Real Estate Investment Trust
RIC
Regulated Investment Company, as the term is used in the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended

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Term
Definition
S&P
S&P Global Ratings
SEC
U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission
World Bank
International Bank for Reconstruction and Development
FUND CLASSIFICATION, INVESTMENT Objective & POLICIES
World Fund is an open-end, management investment company. 
The Fund is a diversified series of World Fund. The investment objective of the Fund is to seek long-term growth of capital.
INVESTMENTS, INVESTMENT STRATEGIES AND RISKS
The principal investment strategies of the Fund are described in the Fund’s Prospectus. In addition, the Fund may from time to time also use the securities, instruments, policies and strategies that are further described below in seeking to achieve its objective.
Set forth below are descriptions of some of the types of investments and investment strategies that the Fund may use and the risks and considerations associated with those investments and investment strategies. Please also see the Prospectus of the Fund and the “Fund Classification, Investment Objective & Policies” section of this SAI. The order of the below investments, investment strategies and risks does not indicate the significance of any particular investment, investment strategy or risk. The Fund may also invest from time to time in certain types of investments and investment strategies that are not discussed below.
ASIA-PACIFIC COUNTRIES INVESTMENTS RISK. In addition to the risks of foreign investing and the risks of investing in emerging markets, the developing market Asia-Pacific countries in which the Fund may invest are subject to certain additional or specific risks. There is a high concentration of market capitalization and trading volume in a small number of issuers representing a limited number of industries, as well as a high concentration of investors and financial intermediaries. Many of these markets also may be affected by developments with respect to more established markets in the region such as in Japan and Hong Kong. Brokers in developing market Asia-Pacific countries typically are fewer in number and less well capitalized than brokers in the United States. These factors, combined with the U.S. regulatory requirements for open-end investment companies and the restrictions on foreign investment discussed below, result in potentially fewer investment opportunities for the Fund and may have an adverse impact on the investment performance of the Fund.
Many Asia-Pacific countries may be subject to a greater degree of economic, political and social instability than is the case in the United States and Western European countries. Such instability may result from, among other things: (i) authoritarian governments or military involvement in political and economic decision-making, including changes in government through extra-constitutional means; (ii) popular unrest associated with demands for improved political, economic and social conditions; (iii) monsoons and other natural disasters may cause substantial economic disruptions in Asian countries; (iv) outbreaks of infectious illness or other public health threats may reduce consumer demand, result in travel restrictions or quarantines, and may generally have a significant effect on certain Asian economies; (v) internal insurgencies; (vi) hostile relations with neighboring countries; (vii) ethnic, religious and racial disaffection; (viii) nationalization of property and/or confiscatory taxation; and (ix) piracy of intellectual property, data and other security breaches, especially of data stored electronically. In addition, the governments of many such countries, such as India, Indonesia and Vietnam, have a heavy role in regulating and supervising the economy. Another risk common to most such countries is that the economy is heavily export oriented and, accordingly, is dependent upon international trade. The existence of overburdened infrastructure and obsolete financial systems also present risks in certain countries, as do environmental problems. Certain economies also depend to a significant degree upon exports of primary commodities and, therefore, are vulnerable to changes in commodity prices that, in turn, may be affected by a variety of factors.
The legal systems in certain Asia-Pacific countries also may have an adverse impact on the Fund. For example, while the potential liability of a shareholder in a U.S. corporation with respect to acts of the corporation is generally limited to the amount of the shareholder’s investment, the notion of limited liability is less clear in certain emerging market Asia-Pacific countries. Similarly, the rights of investors in developing market Asia-Pacific companies may be more limited than those of shareholders of U.S. corporations. It may be difficult or impossible to obtain and/or enforce a judgment in a developing market Asia-Pacific country.
Governments of many Asia-Pacific countries have exercised and continue to exercise substantial influence over many aspects of the private sector. In certain cases, the government owns or controls many companies, including the largest in the country. Accordingly, government actions in the future could have a significant effect on economic conditions in Asia-Pacific countries, which could affect private sector companies and the Fund itself, as well as the value of securities in the Fund’s portfolio. In addition, economic statistics of developing market Asia-Pacific countries may be less reliable than economic statistics of more developed nations.

PGIM Jennison International Opportunities Fund 4

In addition to the relative lack of publicly available information about developing market Asia-Pacific issuers and the possibility that such issuers may not be subject to the same accounting, auditing and financial reporting standards as U.S. companies, inflation accounting rules in some developing market Asia-Pacific countries require companies that keep accounting records in the local currency, for both tax and accounting purposes, to restate certain assets and liabilities on the company’s balance sheet in order to express items in terms of currency of constant purchasing power. Inflation accounting may indirectly generate losses or profits for certain developing market Asia-Pacific companies. Satisfactory custodial services for investment securities may not be available in some developing Asia-Pacific countries, which may result in the Fund incurring additional costs and delays in providing transportation and custody services for such securities outside such countries.
Certain Asia-Pacific countries are especially large debtors to commercial banks and foreign governments. Fund management may determine that, notwithstanding otherwise favorable investment criteria, it may not be practicable or appropriate to invest in a particular Asia-Pacific country. The Fund may invest in countries in which foreign investors, including management of the Fund, have had no or limited prior experience.
Certain Asian countries have democracies with relatively short histories, which may increase the risk of political instability. These countries have faced political and military unrest, and further unrest could present a risk to their local economies and securities markets. Indonesia and the Philippines have each experienced violence and terrorism, which has negatively impacted their economies. North Korea and South Korea each have substantial military capabilities, and historical tensions between the two countries present the risk of war. Escalated tensions involving the two countries and any outbreak of hostilities between the two countries, or even the threat of an outbreak of hostilities, could have a severe adverse effect on the entire Asian region. Certain Asian countries have also developed increasingly strained relationships with the U.S., and if these relations were to worsen, they could adversely affect Asian issuers that rely on the U.S. for trade. Political, religious, and border disputes persist in India. India has recently experienced and may continue to experience civil unrest and hostilities with certain of its neighboring countries. Increased political and social unrest in these geographic areas could adversely affect the performance of investments in this region.
Restrictions on Foreign Investments in Asia-Pacific Countries. Some Asia-Pacific countries prohibit or impose substantial restrictions on investments in their capital markets, particularly their equity markets, by foreign entities such as the Fund. As illustrations, certain countries may require governmental approval prior to investments by foreign persons or limit the amount of investment by foreign persons in a particular company or limit the investment by foreign persons to only a specific class of securities of a company which may have less advantageous terms (including price) than securities of the company available for purchase by nationals. There can be no assurance that the Fund will be able to obtain required governmental approvals in a timely manner. In addition, changes to restrictions on foreign ownership of securities subsequent to the Fund’s purchase of such securities may have an adverse effect on the value of such shares. Certain countries may restrict investment opportunities in issuers or industries deemed important to national interests.
The manner in which foreign investors may invest in companies in certain Asia-Pacific countries, as well as limitations on such investments, also may have an adverse impact on the operations of the Fund. For example, the Fund may be required in certain of such countries to invest initially through a local broker or other entity and then have the shares purchased re-registered in the name of the Fund. Re-registration may in some instances not be able to occur on a timely basis, resulting in a delay during which the Fund may be denied certain of its rights as an investor, including rights as to dividends or to be made aware of certain corporate actions. There also may be instances where the Fund places a purchase order but subsequently learns, at the time of re-registration, that the permissible allocation of the investment to foreign investors has been filled, depriving the Fund of the ability to make its desired investment at that time.
Substantial limitations may exist in certain countries with respect to the Fund’s ability to repatriate investment income, capital or the proceeds of sales of securities by foreign investors. The Fund could be adversely affected by delays in, or a refusal to grant, any required governmental approval for repatriation of capital, as well as by the application to the Fund of any restrictions on investments. For example, in September 1998, Malaysia imposed currency controls that limited funds’ ability to repatriate proceeds of Malaysian investments. It is possible that Malaysia, or certain other countries may impose similar restrictions or other restrictions relating to their currencies or to securities of issuers in those countries. To the extent that such restrictions have the effect of making certain investments illiquid, securities may not be available to meet redemptions. Depending on a variety of financial factors, the percentage of the Fund’s portfolio subject to currency controls may increase. In the event other countries impose similar controls, the portion of the Fund’s assets that may be used to meet redemptions may be further decreased. Even where there is no outright restriction on repatriation of capital, the mechanics of repatriation may affect certain aspects of the operations of the Fund. In certain countries, banks or other financial institutions may be among the leading companies or have actively traded securities. The 1940 Act restricts the Fund’s investments in any equity securities of an issuer that, in its most recent fiscal year, derived more than 15% of its revenues from “securities related activities,” as defined by the rules thereunder and subject to certain exemptions. These provisions may restrict the Fund’s investments in certain foreign banks and other financial institutions.

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In addition to the risks listed above, investing in China (including in Chinese issuers that are listed on U.S. exchanges) presents additional risks. Investing in China involves a high degree of risk and special considerations not typically associated with investing in other more established economies or securities markets. Such risks may include: (a) the risk of nationalization or expropriation of assets or confiscatory taxation; (b) greater social, economic and political uncertainty (including the risk of war and social unrest); (c) dependency on exports and the corresponding importance of international trade; (d) the increasing competition from Asia’s other low-cost emerging economies; (e) greater price volatility and significantly smaller market capitalization of securities markets; (f) substantially less liquidity, particularly of certain share classes of Chinese securities; (g) currency exchange rate fluctuations and the lack of available currency hedging instruments; (h) higher rates of inflation; (i) controls on foreign investment and limitations on repatriation of invested capital and on the Fund’s ability to exchange local currencies for U.S. dollars; (j) greater governmental involvement in and control over the economy; (k) the risk that the Chinese government may decide not to continue to support the economic reform programs implemented since 1978 and could return to the prior, completely centrally planned, economy; (l) the fact that Chinese companies, particularly those located in China, may be smaller, less seasoned and newly-organized; (m) the difference in, or lack of, auditing and financial reporting standards which may result in unavailability of material information about issuers, particularly in China; (n) the fact that statistical information regarding the economy of China may be inaccurate or not comparable to statistical information regarding the U.S. or other economies; (o) the less extensive, and still developing, regulation of the securities markets, business entities and commercial transactions; (p) the fact that the settlement period of securities transactions in foreign markets may be longer; (q) the willingness and ability of the Chinese government to support the Chinese and Hong Kong economies and markets is uncertain; (r) the risk that Chinese authorities may intervene in the operations and structure of specific Chinese companies (particularly in the financial services and technology sector); (s) the risk that it may be more difficult, or impossible, to obtain and/or enforce a judgment than in other countries; and (t) the rapidity and erratic nature of growth, particularly in China, resulting in efficiencies and dislocations.
A series of executive orders issued between November 2020 and June 2021 prohibit the Fund from investing in certain companies tied to the Chinese military or China's surveillance technology sector. The prohibited companies are those identified by the U.S. Department of the Treasury as “Chinese Military Industrial Complex Companies.” The restrictions on investing in Chinese Military Industrial Complex Companies extend to instruments that are derivative of, or designed to provide investment exposure to, these companies. The orders contain a limited exception for transactions that are made solely for the purpose of divesting from restricted companies through June 3, 2022. The restrictions in these executive orders may force the subadviser to sell certain positions and may restrict the Fund from future investments the subadviser deems otherwise attractive.
Investments in China and Hong Kong are subject to certain political risks. Following the establishment of the People’s Republic of China (“PRC”) by the Communist Party in 1949, the Chinese government renounced various debt obligations incurred by China’s predecessor governments, which obligations remain in default, and expropriated assets without compensation. There can be no assurance that the Chinese government will not take similar action in the future. The political reunification of China and Taiwan is a highly contentious issue and is unlikely to be settled in the near future. This situation poses a threat to Taiwan’s economy and could negatively affect its stock market.
Hong Kong reverted to Chinese sovereignty on July 1, 1997 as a Special Administrative Region of the PRC under the principle of “one country, two systems.” Although China is obligated to maintain the current capitalist economic and social system of Hong Kong through June 30, 2047, the continuation of economic and social freedoms enjoyed in Hong Kong is dependent on the government of China. Since 1997, there have been tensions between the Chinese government and many people in Hong Kong regarding China's perceived tightening of control over Hong Kong's semi-autonomous liberal political, economic, legal, and social framework. Recent protests may prompt the Chinese and Hong Kong governments to rapidly address Hong Kong's future relationship with mainland China, which remains unresolved. Due to the interconnected nature of the Hong Kong and Chinese economies, this instability in Hong Kong may cause uncertainty in the Hong Kong and Chinese markets. In addition, the Hong Kong dollar trades at a fixed exchange rate in relation to (or, is “pegged” to) the U.S. dollar, which has contributed to the growth and stability of the Hong Kong economy. However, it is uncertain how long the currency peg will continue or what effect the establishment of an alternative exchange rate system would have on the Hong Kong economy. Because the Fund's NAV is denominated in U.S. dollars, the establishment of an alternative exchange rate system could result in a decline in the Fund’s NAV.
The Chinese economy has grown rapidly during the past several years but there is no assurance that this growth rate will be maintained. In fact, the Chinese economy may experience a significant slowdown as a result of, among other things, a deterioration in global demand for Chinese exports, as well as contraction in spending on domestic goods by Chinese consumers. In addition, China may experience substantial rates of inflation or economic recessions, which would have a negative effect on the economy and securities market. Delays in enterprise restructuring, slow development of well-functioning financial and widespread corruption have also hindered performance of the Chinese economy. China continues to receive substantial pressure from trading partners to liberalize official currency exchange rates. Reduction in spending on Chinese products and services, institution of tariffs or other trade barriers or a downturn in any of the economies of China's key trading partners may have an adverse impact on the securities of Chinese issuers. The tax laws and

PGIM Jennison International Opportunities Fund 6

regulations in the PRC are subject to change, including the issuance of authoritative guidance or enforcement, possibly with retroactive effect. The interpretation, applicability and enforcement of such laws by the PRC tax authorities are not as consistent and transparent as those of more developed nations, and may vary over time and from region to region. The application and enforcement of the PRC tax rules could have a significant adverse effect on the Fund and its investors, particularly in relation to capital gains withholding tax imposed upon non-residents. In addition, the accounting, auditing and financial reporting standards and practices applicable to Chinese companies may be less rigorous, and may result in significant differences between financial statements prepared in accordance with PRC accounting standards and practices and those prepared in accordance with international accounting standards.
The Chinese government has taken positions that prevent the U.S. Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (“PCAOB”) from inspecting the audit work and practices of accounting firms in mainland China and Hong Kong for compliance with U.S. law and professional standards. Audits performed by PCAOB-registered accounting firms in mainland China and Hong Kong may be less reliable than those performed by firms subject to PCAOB inspection. Accordingly, information about the Chinese securities in which the Fund invests may be less reliable or complete. Under amendments to the Sarbanes-Oxley Act enacted in December 2020, which requires that the PCAOB be permitted to inspect the accounting firm of a U.S.-listed Chinese issuer, if the PCAOB is unable to inspect the accounting firm of a Chinese company, trading in its securities will be prohibited in U.S. securities markets.
Chinese companies listed on U.S. exchanges often use variable interest entities (“VIEs”) in their structure. Instead of directly owning the equity securities of a Chinese operating company, in a VIE structure, a non-U.S. shell company (often organized in the Cayman Islands) that is listed and traded on a U.S. exchange enters into service contracts and other contracts with the Chinese operating company which provide the foreign shell company with exposure to the Chinese company. Although the U.S. listed shell company has no equity ownership of the Chinese operating company, the contractual arrangements provide the U.S. listed shell company economic exposure to the Chinese operating company and permit the U.S. listed shell company to consolidate the Chinese operating company into its financial statements. VIE structures are subject to legal and regulatory uncertainties and risks. Intervention by the Chinese government with respect to VIE structures or the non-enforcement of VIE-related contractual rights could significantly affect a Chinese operating company's business, the enforceability of the U.S. listed shell company's contractual arrangements with the Chinese operating company and the value of the U.S. listed stock. Intervention by the Chinese government could include nationalization of the Chinese operating company, confiscation of its assets, restrictions on operations and/or constraints on the use of VIE structures. In addition, because the Chinese operating company is not owned, directly or indirectly, by the U.S. listed shell company, the U.S. listed shell company cannot control the Chinese operating company and must rely on the Chinese operating company to perform its contractual obligations in order for the U.S. listed company to receive economic benefits.
Risk of Investing through Stock Connect. China A-shares (“A-shares”) are equity securities of companies based in mainland China that trade on Chinese stock exchanges such as the Shanghai Stock Exchange (“SSE”) and the Shenzhen Stock Exchange (“SZSE”). Foreign investment in A-shares on the SSE and SZSE has historically not been permitted, other than through a license granted under regulations in the PRC known as the Qualified Foreign Institutional Investor and Renminbi (“RMB”) Qualified Foreign Institutional Investor systems. Each license permits investment in A-shares only up to a specified quota.
Investment in eligible A-shares listed and traded on the SSE is also permitted through the Shanghai-Hong Kong Stock Connect program (“Stock Connect”). Stock Connect is a securities trading and clearing program established by Hong Kong Securities Clearing Company Limited (“HKSCC”), the SSE and China Securities Depository and Clearing Corporation Limited (“CSDCC”) that aims to provide mutual stock market access between the PRC and Hong Kong by permitting investors to trade and settle shares on each market through their local exchanges. The Fund may invest in A-shares through Stock Connect or on such other stock exchanges in China which participate in Stock Connect from time to time. Under Stock Connect, the Fund’s trading of eligible A-shares listed on the SSE would be effectuated through its Hong Kong broker.
Although no individual investment quotas or licensing requirements apply to investors in Stock Connect, trading through Stock Connect’s Northbound Trading Link is subject to aggregate and daily investment quota limitations that require that buy orders for A-shares be rejected once the remaining balance of the relevant quota drops to zero or the daily quota is exceeded (although the Fund will be permitted to sell A-shares regardless of the quota balance). These limitations may restrict the Fund from investing in A-shares on a timely basis, which could affect the Fund’s ability to effectively pursue its investment strategy. Investment quotas are also subject to change.
Investment in eligible A-shares through Stock Connect is subject to trading, clearance and settlement procedures that could pose risks to the Fund. A-shares purchased through Stock Connect generally may not be sold or otherwise transferred other than through Stock Connect in accordance with applicable rules. For example, PRC regulations require that in order for an investor to sell any A-shares on a certain trading day, there must be sufficient A-shares in the investor’s account before the market opens on that day. If there are insufficient A-shares in the investor’s account, the sell order will be rejected by the SSE. The Stock Exchange of Hong Kong (“SEHK”) carries out pre-trade checking on sell orders of certain stocks listed on the SSE market (“SSE Securities”) of its participants (i.e., stock

7

brokers) to ensure that this requirement is satisfied. While shares must be designated as eligible to be traded under Stock Connect, those shares may also lose such designation, and if this occurs, such shares may be sold but cannot be purchased through Stock Connect. In addition, Stock Connect will only operate on days when both the Chinese and Hong Kong markets are open for trading and when banks in both markets are open on the corresponding settlement days. Therefore, an investment in A-shares through Stock Connect may subject the Fund to a risk of price fluctuations on days where the Chinese market is open, but Stock Connect is not trading. Moreover, day (turnaround) trading is not permitted on the A-shares market. If an investor buys A-shares on day “T,” the investor will only be able to sell the A-shares on or after day T+1. Further, since all trades of eligible Stock Connect A-shares must be settled in RMB, investors must have timely access to a reliable supply of offshore RMB, which cannot be guaranteed. There is also no assurance that RMB will not be subject to devaluation. Any devaluation of RMB could adversely affect the Fund’s investments. If the Fund holds a class of shares denominated in a local currency other than RMB, the Fund will be exposed to currency exchange risk if the Fund converts the local currency into RMB for investments in A-shares. The Fund may also incur conversion costs.
A-shares held through the nominee structure under Stock Connect will be held through HKSCC as nominee on behalf of investors. The precise nature and rights of the Fund as the beneficial owner of the SSE Securities through HKSCC as nominee is not well defined under PRC law. There is lack of a clear definition of, and distinction between, legal ownership and beneficial ownership under PRC law and there have been few cases involving a nominee account structure in the PRC courts. The exact nature and methods of enforcement of the rights and interests of the Fund under PRC law is also uncertain. In the unlikely event that HKSCC becomes subject to winding up proceedings in Hong Kong there is a risk that the SSE Securities may not be regarded as held for the beneficial ownership of the Fund or as part of the general assets of HKSCC available for general distribution to its creditors. Notwithstanding the fact that HKSCC does not claim proprietary interests in the SSE Securities held in its omnibus stock account in the CSDCC, the CSDCC as the share registrar for SSE listed companies will still treat HKSCC as one of the shareholders when it handles corporate actions in respect of such SSE Securities. HKSCC monitors the corporate actions affecting SSE Securities and keeps participants of Central Clearing and Settlement System (“CCASS”) informed of all such corporate actions that require CCASS participants to take steps in order to participate in them. Investors may only exercise their voting rights by providing their voting instructions to the HKSCC through participants of the CCASS. All voting instructions from CCASS participants will be consolidated by HKSCC, who will then submit a combined single voting instruction to the relevant SSE-listed company.
The  Fund’s investments through Stock Connect’s Northbound Trading Link are not covered by Hong Kong’s Investor Compensation Fund. Hong Kong’s Investor Compensation Fund is established to pay compensation to investors of any nationality who suffer pecuniary losses as a result of default of a licensed intermediary or authorized financial institution in relation to exchange-traded products in Hong Kong. In addition, since the Fund is carrying out Northbound trading through securities brokers in Hong Kong but not PRC brokers, it is not protected by the China Securities Investor Protection Fund in the PRC.
Market participants are able to participate in Stock Connect subject to meeting certain information technology capability, risk management and other requirements as may be specified by the relevant exchange and/or clearing house. Further, the “connectivity” in Stock Connect requires the routing of orders across the border of Hong Kong and the PRC, including the development of new information technology systems on the part of the SEHK and exchange participants. The actual effect on the market for trading A-shares with the introduction of large numbers of foreign investors is unknown. There is no assurance that these systems will function properly or will continue to be adapted to changes and developments in both markets. In the event that the relevant systems fail to function properly, trading in A-shares through Stock Connect could be disrupted.
Stock Connect is subject to regulations promulgated by regulatory authorities for both exchanges. New regulations may be issued from time to time by the regulators and stock exchanges in PRC and Hong Kong in connection with operations, legal enforcement and cross-border trades under Stock Connect. The Fund may be adversely affected as a result of such changes. Furthermore, the securities regimes and legal systems of PRC and Hong Kong differ significantly and issues may arise based on these differences. In addition, the Fund’s investments in A-shares through Stock Connect are generally subject to Chinese securities regulations and listing rules, among other restrictions. Further, different fees, costs and taxes are imposed on foreign investors acquiring A-shares obtained through Stock Connect, and these fees, costs and taxes may be higher than comparable fees, costs and taxes imposed on owners of other securities providing similar investment exposure.
A-Share Market Suspension Risk. A-shares may only be bought from, or sold to, the Fund at times when the relevant A-shares may be sold or purchased on the relevant Chinese stock exchange. The A-shares market has historically had a higher propensity for trading suspensions than many other global equity markets. Trading suspensions in certain stocks could lead to greater market execution risk and costs for the Fund. The SSE currently applies a daily price limit, set at 10%, of the amount of fluctuation permitted in the prices of A-shares during a single trading day. The daily price limit refers to price movements only and does not restrict trading within the relevant limit. There can be no assurance that a liquid market on an exchange will exist for any particular A-share or for any particular time.

PGIM Jennison International Opportunities Fund 8

ASSET-BACKED SECURITIES. Asset-backed securities directly or indirectly represent a participation interest in, or are secured by and payable from, a stream of payments generated by particular assets such as motor vehicle or credit card receivables. Payments of principal and interest may be guaranteed up to certain amounts and for a certain time period by a letter of credit issued by a financial institution unaffiliated with the entities issuing the securities. Asset-backed securities may be classified as pass-through certificates or collateralized obligations.
Pass-through certificates are asset-backed securities which represent an undivided fractional ownership interest in an underlying pool of assets. Pass-through certificates usually provide for payments of principal and interest received to be passed through to their holders, usually after deduction for certain costs and expenses incurred in administering the pool. Because pass-through certificates represent an ownership interest in the underlying assets, the holders thereof bear directly the risk of any defaults by the obligors on the underlying assets not covered by any credit support.
Credit quality of an asset backed security depends primarily on the quality of the underlying asset, the level of credit support, if any, provided by the structure or by a third-party insurance wrap, and the credit quality of the swap counterparty, if any. The value of an asset-backed security can change because of actual or perceived changes in creditworthiness of the individual borrowers, the originator, the servicing agent, the financial institution providing credit support or the swap counterparty.
Asset-backed securities issued in the form of debt instruments include collateralized bond obligations (“CBOs”), collateralized loan obligations (“CLOs”) and other similarly structured securities. A CBO is a trust that is often backed by a diversified pool of high risk, below investment grade fixed income securities. The collateral can be from many different types of fixed income securities such as high yield debt, residential privately issued mortgage-related securities, commercial privately issued mortgage-related securities, trust preferred securities and emerging market debt. A CLO is a trust typically collateralized by a pool of loans, which may include, among others, domestic and foreign senior secured loans, senior unsecured loans, and subordinate corporate loans, including loans that may be rated below investment grade or equivalent unrated loans. CBOs and CLOs may charge management fees and administrative expenses.
For CBOs and CLOs, the cash flows from the trust are split into two or more portions, called tranches, varying in risk and yield. The riskiest portion is the “equity” tranche which bears the bulk of defaults from the bonds or loans in the trust and serves to protect the other, more senior tranches from default in all but the most severe circumstances. Since they are partially protected from defaults, senior tranches from a CBO trust or CLO trust typically have higher ratings and lower yields than their underlying securities, and can be rated investment grade. Despite the protection from the equity tranche, CBO or CLO tranches can experience substantial losses due to actual defaults, increased sensitivity to defaults due to collateral default and disappearance of protecting tranches, market anticipation of defaults, as well as aversion to CBO or CLO securities as a class.
The risks of an investment in a CBO or CLO depend largely on the type of the collateral securities and the class of the instrument in which the Fund invests. Normally, CBOs and CLOs are privately offered and sold, and thus, are not registered under the securities laws. As a result, investments in CBOs and CLOs may be characterized by the Fund as illiquid investments; however, an active dealer market may exist for CBOs and CLOs, allowing them to qualify for Rule 144A transactions. In addition to the normal risks associated with fixed income securities discussed elsewhere in this SAI and the Fund’s Prospectus (e.g., interest rate risk and default risk), CBOs and CLOs carry additional risks including, but not limited to: (i) the possibility that distributions from collateral securities will not be adequate to make interest or other payments; (ii) the possibility that the quality of the collateral may decline in value or default; (iii) the risk that the Fund may invest in CBOs or CLOs that are subordinate to other classes; and (iv) the risk that the complex structure of the security may not be fully understood at the time of investment and may produce disputes with the issuer or unexpected investment results.
BORROWING AND LEVERAGE. Unless noted otherwise, the Fund may borrow up to 33 13% of the value of its total assets (calculated at the time of the borrowing). The Fund may pledge up to 33 13% of its total assets to secure these borrowings. If the Fund’s asset coverage for borrowings falls below 300%, the Fund will take prompt action to reduce borrowings. If the Fund borrows to invest in securities, any investment gains made on the securities in excess of interest paid on the borrowing will cause the NAV of the shares to rise faster than would otherwise be the case. On the other hand, if the investment performance of the additional securities purchased fails to cover their cost (including any interest paid on the money borrowed) to the Fund, the NAV of the Fund’s shares will decrease faster than would otherwise be the case. This is the speculative factor known as “leverage.” In addition, the Fund may use certain investment management techniques (collectively, “effective leverage”), such as certain derivatives, that may provide leverage and are not subject to the borrowing limitation noted above.
The Fund may borrow from time to time, at the discretion of the subadviser, to take advantage of investment opportunities, when yields on available investments exceed interest rates and other expenses of related borrowing, or when, in the subadviser's opinion, unusual market conditions otherwise make it advantageous for the Fund to increase its investment capacity. The Fund will only borrow when there is an expectation that it will benefit the Fund after taking into account considerations such as interest income and possible losses

9

upon liquidation. Borrowing by the Fund creates an opportunity for increased net income but, at the same time, creates risks, including the fact that leverage may exaggerate changes in the NAV of Fund shares and in the yield on the Fund. Unless otherwise stated, the Fund may borrow through forward rolls, dollar rolls or reverse repurchase agreements.
CERTIFICATES OF DEPOSIT. The FDIC, an independent agency of the U.S. Government, provides deposit insurance on all types of deposits, including certificates of deposit, received at an FDIC-insured bank or savings association (“insured depository institutions”) up to applicable limits. The standard deposit insurance amount is $250,000 per depositor (including principal and accrued interest) for each insurable capacity of such depositor, per insured depository institution, which is backed by the full faith and credit of the U.S. Government. All of a depositor’s deposits in the same insurable capacity at the same insured depository institution are aggregated for purposes of the $250,000 insurance limit, including deposits held directly in the depositor’s name and for the depositor’s benefit by intermediaries. Any amounts the Fund invests in certificates of deposit in excess of the $250,000 deposit insurance limit will be uninsured. An investor’s investment in the Fund is subject to risk of loss, and is not insured or guaranteed by the FDIC or any other governmental agency.
CONVERTIBLE SECURITIES. The Fund may invest in convertible securities. Convertible securities entitle the holder to receive interest payments paid on corporate debt securities or the dividend preference on a preferred stock until such time as the convertible security matures or is redeemed or until the holder elects to exercise the conversion privilege.
The characteristics of convertible securities make them appropriate investments for an investment company seeking long-term capital appreciation and/or total return. These characteristics include the potential for capital appreciation as the value of the underlying common stock increases, the relatively high yield received from dividend or interest payments as compared to common stock dividends and decreased risks of decline in value relative to the underlying common stock due to their fixed income nature. As a result of the conversion feature, however, the interest rate or dividend preference on a convertible security is generally less than would be the case if the securities were issued in nonconvertible form.
In analyzing convertible securities, the subadviser will consider both the yield on the convertible security relative to its credit quality and the potential capital appreciation that is offered by the underlying common stock, among other things.
Convertible securities are issued and traded in a number of securities markets. Even in cases where a substantial portion of the convertible securities held by the Fund are denominated in U.S. dollars, the underlying equity securities may be quoted in the currency of the country where the issuer is domiciled. With respect to convertible securities denominated in a currency different from that of the underlying equity securities, the conversion price may be based on a fixed exchange rate established at the time the security is issued. As a result, fluctuations in the exchange rate between the currency in which the debt security is denominated and the currency in which the share price is quoted will affect the value of the convertible security. As described below, the Fund is authorized to enter into foreign currency hedging transactions in which the Fund may seek to reduce the effect of such fluctuations.
Apart from currency considerations, the value of convertible securities is influenced by both the yield of nonconvertible securities of comparable issuers and by the value of the underlying common stock. The value of a convertible security viewed without regard to its conversion feature (i.e., strictly on the basis of its yield) is sometimes referred to as its “investment value.” To the extent interest rates change, the investment value of the convertible security typically will fluctuate. However, at the same time, the value of the convertible security will be influenced by its “conversion value,” which is the market value of the underlying common stock that would be obtained if the convertible security were converted. Conversion value fluctuates directly with the price of the underlying common stock. If, because of a low price of the common stock, the conversion value is substantially below the investment value of the convertible security, the price of the convertible security is governed principally by its investment value.
To the extent the conversion value of a convertible security increases to a point that approximates or exceeds its investment value, the price of the convertible security will be influenced principally by its conversion value. A convertible security will sell at a premium over the conversion value to the extent investors place value on the right to acquire the underlying common stock while holding a fixed income security. The yield and conversion premium of convertible securities issued in Japan and the Euromarket are frequently determined at levels that cause the conversion value to affect their market value more than the securities' investment value.
Holders of convertible securities generally have a claim on the assets of the issuer prior to the common stockholders but may be subordinated to other debt securities of the same issuer. A convertible security may be subject to redemption at the option of the issuer at a price established in the charter provision, indenture or other governing instrument pursuant to which the convertible security was issued. If a convertible security held by the Fund is called for redemption, the Fund will be required to redeem the security, convert it into the underlying common stock or sell it to a third party. Certain convertible debt securities may provide a put option to the holder, which entitles the holder to cause the security to be redeemed by the issuer at a premium over the stated principal amount of the debt security under certain circumstances.

PGIM Jennison International Opportunities Fund 10

Synthetic convertible securities may be either (i) a debt security or preferred stock that may be convertible only under certain contingent circumstances or that may pay the holder a cash amount based on the value of shares of underlying common stock partly or wholly in lieu of a conversion right (a “Cash-Settled Convertible”), (ii) a combination of separate securities chosen by the subadviser in order to create the economic characteristics of a convertible security, i.e., a fixed income security paired with a security with equity conversion features, such as an option or warrant (a “Manufactured Convertible”) or (iii) a synthetic security manufactured by another party.
Synthetic convertible securities may include either Cash-Settled Convertibles or Manufactured Convertibles. Cash-Settled Convertibles are instruments that are created by the issuer and have the economic characteristics of traditional convertible securities but may not actually permit conversion into the underlying equity securities in all circumstances. As an example, a private company may issue a Cash-Settled Convertible that is convertible into common stock only if the company successfully completes a public offering of its common stock prior to maturity and otherwise pays a cash amount to reflect any equity appreciation. Manufactured Convertibles are created by the subadviser by combining separate securities that possess one of the two principal characteristics of a convertible security, i.e., fixed income (“fixed income component”) or a right to acquire equity securities (“convertibility component”). The fixed income component is achieved by investing in nonconvertible fixed income securities, such as nonconvertible bonds, preferred stocks and money market instruments. The convertibility component is achieved by investing in call options, warrants, or other securities with equity conversion features (“equity features”) granting the holder the right to purchase a specified quantity of the underlying stocks within a specified period of time at a specified price or, in the case of a stock index option, the right to receive a cash payment based on the value of the underlying stock index.
A Manufactured Convertible differs from traditional convertible securities in several respects. Unlike a traditional convertible security, which is a single security having a unitary market value, a Manufactured Convertible is comprised of two or more separate securities, each with its own market value. Therefore, the total “market value” of such a Manufactured Convertible is the sum of the values of its fixed income component and its convertibility component.
More flexibility is possible in the creation of a Manufactured Convertible than in the purchase of a traditional convertible security. Because many corporations have not issued convertible securities, the subadviser may combine a fixed income instrument and an equity feature with respect to the stock of the issuer of the fixed income instrument to create a synthetic convertible security otherwise unavailable in the market. The subadviser may also combine a fixed income instrument of an issuer with an equity feature with respect to the stock of a different issuer when the subadviser believes such a Manufactured Convertible would better promote the Fund’s objective(s) than alternate investments. For example, the subadviser may combine an equity feature with respect to an issuer's stock with a fixed income security of a different issuer in the same industry to diversify the Fund’s credit exposure, or with a U.S. Treasury instrument to create a Manufactured Convertible with a higher credit profile than a traditional convertible security issued by that issuer. A Manufactured Convertible also is a more flexible investment in that its two components may be purchased separately and, upon purchasing the separate securities, “combined” to create a Manufactured Convertible. For example, the Fund may purchase a warrant for eventual inclusion in a Manufactured Convertible while postponing the purchase of a suitable bond to pair with the warrant pending development of more favorable market conditions.
The value of a Manufactured Convertible may respond differently to certain market fluctuations than would a traditional convertible security with similar characteristics. For example, in the event the Fund created a Manufactured Convertible by combining a short-term U.S. Treasury instrument and a call option on a stock, the Manufactured Convertible would likely outperform a traditional convertible of similar maturity that is convertible into that stock during periods when Treasury instruments outperform corporate fixed income securities and underperform during periods when corporate fixed income securities outperform Treasury instruments.
CURRENCY FUTURES. The Fund may seek to enhance returns or hedge against the decline in the value of a currency through use of currency futures or options thereon. Currency futures are similar to forward foreign exchange transactions except that futures are standardized, exchange-traded contracts. See the sub-section entitled “Futures.” Currency futures involve substantial currency risk, and also involve leverage risk.
CURRENCY OPTIONS. The Fund may seek to enhance returns or hedge against the decline in the value of a currency against the U.S. dollar through the use of currency options. Currency options are similar to options on securities, but in consideration for an option premium the writer of a currency option is obligated to sell (in the case of a call option) or purchase (in the case of a put option) a specified amount of a specified currency on or before the expiration date for a specified amount of another currency. The Fund may engage in transactions in options on currencies either on exchanges or OTC markets. See “Types of Options” and “Additional Risk Factors of OTC Transactions; Limitations on the Use of OTC Derivatives” in this SAI. Currency options involve substantial currency risk, and may also involve credit, leverage or liquidity risk.

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CYBER SECURITY RISK. The Fund is susceptible to operational, information security and other risks related to the use of technology, computer systems and the Internet to conduct business. These risks, which are often collectively referred to as “cyber security” risks, may include deliberate or malicious attacks, as well as unintentional events and occurrences. Cyber security is generally defined as the technology, operations and related protocol surrounding and protecting a user’s computer hardware, network, systems and applications and the data transmitted and stored therewith. These measures ensure the reliability of a user’s systems, as well as the security, availability, integrity, and confidentiality of data assets.
Deliberate cyber attacks can include, but are not limited to, gaining unauthorized access to computer systems in order to misappropriate and/or disclose sensitive or confidential information; deleting, corrupting or modifying data; and causing operational disruptions. Cyber attacks may also be carried out in a manner that does not require gaining unauthorized access, such as causing denial-of-service attacks on websites (in order to prevent access to computer networks). In addition to deliberate breaches engineered by external actors, cyber security risks can also result from the conduct of malicious, exploited or careless insiders, whose actions may result in the destruction, release or disclosure of confidential or proprietary information stored on an organization’s systems.
Cyber security failures or breaches, whether deliberate or unintentional, arising from the Fund’s third-party service providers (e.g., custodians, financial intermediaries, transfer agents), subadviser, shareholder usage of unsecure systems to access personal accounts, as well as breaches suffered by the issuers of securities in which the Fund invests, may cause significant disruptions in the business operations of the Fund. Potential impacts may include, but are not limited to, potential financial losses for the Fund and the issuers’ securities, the inability of shareholders to conduct transactions with the Fund, an inability of the Fund to calculate NAV, and disclosures of personal or confidential shareholder information.
In addition to direct impacts on Fund shareholders, cyber security failures by the Fund and/or its service providers and others may result in regulatory inquiries, regulatory proceedings, regulatory and/or legal and litigation costs to the Fund, and reputational damage. The Fund may incur reimbursement and other expenses, including the costs of litigation and litigation settlements and additional compliance costs. The Fund may also incur considerable expenses in enhancing and upgrading computer systems and systems security following a cyber security failure.
The rapid proliferation of technologies, as well as the increased sophistication and activities of organized crime, hackers, terrorists, and others continue to pose new and significant cyber security threats. Although the Fund and its service providers and subadviser may have established business continuity plans and risk management systems to mitigate cyber security risks, there can be no guarantee or assurance that such plans or systems will be effective, or that all risks that exist, or may develop in the future, have been completely anticipated and identified or can be protected against. Furthermore, the Fund cannot control or assure the efficacy of the cyber security plans and systems implemented by third-party service providers, the subadviser, and the issuers in which the Fund invests.
DEBT SECURITIES. The Fund may invest in debt securities, such as bonds, that involve credit risk. This is the risk that the issuer will not make timely payments of principal and interest. The degree of credit risk depends on the issuer's financial condition and on the terms of the bonds. Changes in an issuer's credit rating or the market's perception of an issuer's creditworthiness may also affect the value of the Fund’s investment in that issuer. Credit risk is reduced to the extent the Fund invests its assets in U.S. Government securities. Certain debt securities, however, may be subject to interest rate risk. This is the risk that the value of the security may fall when interest rates rise. In general, the market price of debt securities with longer maturities will go up or down more in response to changes in interest rates than the market price of shorter-term securities. The Fund may lose money if short-term or long-term interest rates rise sharply or in a manner not anticipated by the subadviser.
DEPOSITARY RECEIPTS. The Fund may invest in the securities of foreign issuers in the form of Depositary Receipts or other securities convertible into securities of foreign issuers. Depositary Receipts may not necessarily be denominated in the same currency as the underlying securities into which they may be converted. ADRs and ADSs are receipts or shares typically issued by an American bank or trust company that evidence ownership of underlying securities issued by a foreign corporation. EDRs are receipts issued in Europe that evidence a similar ownership arrangement. GDRs are receipts issued throughout the world that evidence a similar arrangement. Generally, ADRs and ADSs, in registered form, are designed for use in the U.S. securities markets, and EDRs, in bearer form, are designed for use in European securities markets. GDRs are tradable both in the United States and in Europe and are designed for use throughout the world. International Depositary Receipts (“IDRs”) are the non-U.S. equivalent of an ADR.
The Fund may invest in unsponsored Depositary Receipts. The issuers of unsponsored Depositary Receipts are not obligated to disclose material information in the United States, and, therefore, there may be less information available regarding such issuers and there may not be a correlation between such information and the market value of the Depositary Receipts. Depositary Receipts are generally subject to the same risks as the foreign securities that they evidence or into which they may be converted or exchanged.

PGIM Jennison International Opportunities Fund 12

DERIVATIVES. The Fund may use instruments referred to as derivatives. Derivatives are financial instruments the value of which is derived from another security, a commodity (such as gold or oil), a currency or an index (a measure of value or rates, such as the S&P 500 Index or the prime lending rate). Derivatives allow the Fund to increase or decrease the level of risk to which the Fund is exposed more quickly and efficiently than transactions in other types of instruments. The Fund may use derivatives for hedging purposes. The Fund may also use derivatives to seek to enhance returns. The use of a derivative is speculative if the Fund is primarily seeking to achieve gains, rather than offset the risk of other positions. When the Fund invests in a derivative for speculative purposes, the Fund will be fully exposed to the risks of loss of that derivative, which may sometimes be greater than the derivative's cost. The Fund may not use any derivative to gain exposure to an asset or class of assets that the Fund would be prohibited by its investment restrictions from purchasing directly. The Fund’s use of derivatives may be limited by the 1940 Act and the rules thereunder, as discussed in more detail below under Regulatory Risk.
Risk Factors Involving Derivatives. Derivatives are volatile and involve significant risks, including:
Correlation Risk — the risk that changes in the value of a derivative will not match the changes in the value of the portfolio holdings that are being hedged or of the particular market or security to which the Fund seeks exposure.
Counterparty Risk—the risk that the counterparty on a derivative transaction will be unable to honor its financial obligation to the Fund. In particular, derivatives traded in OTC markets are not guaranteed by an exchange or clearing firm and often do not require payment of margin. The Fund is at risk to the extent that the Fund has unrealized gains or has deposited collateral with a counterparty and the counterparty becomes bankrupt or otherwise fails to honor its obligations.
Currency Risk—the risk that changes in the exchange rate between two currencies will adversely affect the value (in U.S. dollar terms) of an investment.
Illiquidity Risk— the risk that certain securities or instruments may be difficult or impossible to sell at the time that the seller would like or at the price that the seller believes the security is currently worth. Illiquidity risk is substantial for certain OTC derivatives, including swaps and OTC options. There can be no assurance that the Fund will be able to unwind or offset a derivative at its desired price, in a secondary market or otherwise.
Index Risk—a derivative linked to the performance of an index will be subject to the risks associated with changes in that index.
Legal Risk—the risk of insufficient documentation, the lack of capacity or authority of a counterparty to execute or settle a transaction, and the legality and enforceability of a derivatives contract.
Leverage Risk—the risk that the Fund’s derivatives transactions can magnify the Fund’s gains and losses. Relatively small market movements may result in large changes in the value of a derivatives position. Certain investments or trading strategies that involve leverage can result in losses that greatly exceed the amount originally invested.
Market Risk — the risk that changes in the value of one or more markets or changes with respect to the value of the underlying asset will adversely affect the value of a derivative. In the event of an adverse movement, the Fund may be required to pay substantial additional margin to maintain its position.
Operational Risk — the risk related to potential operational issues, including documentation issues, settlement issues, systems failures, inadequate controls and human error.
Regulatory Risk—the risk that new regulation of derivatives may make them more costly, may limit their availability, or may otherwise affect their value or performance. Derivative contracts, including, without limitation, swaps, currency forwards, and non-deliverable forwards (“NDFs”), are subject to regulation under the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act (“Dodd-Frank Act”) in the United States and under comparable regimes in Europe, Asia and other non-U.S. jurisdictions. Swaps, NDFs and certain other derivatives traded in the OTC market are subject to variation margin requirements. Implementation of the margining and other provisions of the Dodd-Frank Act regarding clearing, mandatory trading, reporting and documentation of swaps and other derivatives have impacted and may continue to impact the costs to the Fund of trading these instruments and, as a result, may affect returns to investors in the Fund.
Rule 18f-4 under the 1940 Act permits the Fund to enter into derivatives transactions and certain other transactions notwithstanding restrictions on the issuance of “senior securities” in the 1940 Act. Derivatives transactions as defined by Rule 18f-4 include, among other things, swaps, futures, forwards, options, short sale borrowings, reverse repurchase agreements and other financing transactions (if the Fund elects to treat such financing transactions as securities), when-issued and forward-settling securities in some circumstances, or any instrument for which the Fund is required to make any payment or delivery of an asset during the life of the

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instrument or at maturity, whether as margin, settlement payment or otherwise. Rule 18f-4 requires that, among other things, the Fund establish and maintain a derivatives risk management program and appoint a derivatives risk manager, who is appointed by the Board, including a majority of Independent Board Members and periodically reviews the program and reports to the Board. In addition, the Fund must comply with a relative or absolute limit on leverage risk calculated based on value-at-risk.
Rule 18f-4 excepts from some of the requirements, including establishing a derivatives risk management program and calculating value-at-risk, a fund whose derivatives exposure is limited to 10% of its net assets and which has adopted policies and procedures designed to manage derivatives risks.
The use of derivatives for hedging purposes involves additional correlation risk. If the value of the derivative moves more or less than the value of the hedged instruments, the Fund will experience a gain or loss that will not be completely offset by movements in the value of the hedged instruments.
The Fund generally intends to enter into transactions involving derivatives only if there appears to be a liquid market for such instruments. However, there can be no assurance that, at any specific time, either a liquid market will exist for a derivative or the Fund will otherwise be able to sell such instrument at an acceptable price. It may therefore not be possible to close a position in a derivative without incurring substantial losses, if at all.
Additional Risk Factors Of OTC Transactions; Limitations On The Use Of OTC Derivatives. Certain derivatives traded in OTC markets, including indexed securities, certain swaps and OTC options, involve substantial liquidity risk. The absence of liquidity may make it difficult or impossible for the Fund to sell such instruments promptly at an acceptable price. The absence of liquidity may also make it more difficult for the Fund to ascertain a market value for such instruments.
Because derivatives traded in OTC markets are not guaranteed by an exchange or clearing corporation and generally do not require payment of margin, to the extent that the Fund has unrealized gains in such instruments or has deposited collateral with its counterparties, the Fund is at risk that its counterparties will become bankrupt or otherwise fail to honor their obligations. The Fund will attempt to minimize the risk that a counterparty will become bankrupt or otherwise fail to honor its obligations by engaging in transactions in derivatives traded in OTC markets only with financial institutions that appear to have substantial capital or that have provided the Fund with a third-party guaranty or other credit enhancement.
EMERGING MARKETS INVESTMENTS. The  Fund may invest in the securities of issuers domiciled in various countries with emerging capital markets. Specifically, a country with an emerging capital market is any country that the World Bank, the International Finance Corporation, the United Nations or its authorities has determined to have a low or middle income economy. Countries with emerging markets can be found in regions such as Asia, Latin America, Eastern Europe and Africa.
Investments in the securities of issuers domiciled in countries with emerging capital markets involve certain additional risks not involved in investments in securities of issuers in more developed capital markets, such as (i) low or non-existent trading volume, resulting in a lack of liquidity and increased volatility in prices for such securities, as compared to securities of comparable issuers in more developed capital markets, (ii) uncertain national policies and social, political and economic instability, increasing the potential for expropriation of assets, confiscatory taxation, high rates of inflation or unfavorable diplomatic developments, (iii) fluctuations in exchange rates, differing legal systems and the existence or possible imposition of exchange controls, custodial restrictions or other non-U.S. or U.S. governmental laws or restrictions applicable to such investments, (iv) national policies that may limit the Fund’s investment opportunities such as restrictions on investment in issuers or industries deemed sensitive to national interests, (v) the lack or relatively early development of legal structures governing private and non-U.S. investments and private property, (vi) substantial difficulties U.S. governmental entities may have in bringing and enforcing actions against non-U.S. companies and non-U.S. persons, including company directors and officers, and (vii) the difficulty of bringing shareholder claims to pursue as a matter of law or practicality in certain emerging markets. In addition to withholding taxes on investment income, some countries with emerging markets may impose differential capital gains taxes on non-U.S. investors.
Such capital markets are emerging in a dynamic political and economic environment brought about by events over recent years that have reshaped political boundaries and traditional ideologies. In such a dynamic environment, there can be no assurance that these capital markets will continue to present viable investment opportunities for the Fund. In the past, governments of such nations have expropriated substantial amounts of private property, and most claims of the property owners have never been fully settled. There is no assurance that such expropriations will not reoccur. In such an event, it is possible that the Fund could lose the entire value of its investments in the affected markets.
Also, there may be less publicly available information about issuers in emerging markets than would be available about issuers in more developed capital markets, and such issuers may not be subject to accounting, auditing and financial reporting standards and requirements comparable to those governing U.S. companies. In certain countries with emerging capital markets, reporting standards

PGIM Jennison International Opportunities Fund 14

vary widely. As a result, traditional investment measurements used in the United States, such as price/earnings ratios, may not be applicable. Emerging market securities may be substantially less liquid and more volatile than those of mature markets, and companies may be held by a limited number of persons. This may adversely affect the timing and pricing of the Fund’s acquisition or disposal of securities.
Practices in relation to settlement of securities transactions in emerging markets involve higher risks than those in developed markets, in part because the Fund will need to use brokers and counterparties that are less well capitalized, and custody and registration of assets in some countries may be unreliable. The possibility of fraud, negligence, undue influence being exerted by the issuer or refusal to recognize ownership exists in some emerging markets, and, along with other factors, could result in ownership registration being completely lost. The  Fund would absorb any loss resulting from such registration problems and may have no successful claim for compensation.
ENVIRONMENTAL, SOCIAL AND GOVERNANCE (“ESG”) INTEGRATION. Although the Fund does not seek to implement a specific ESG, impact or sustainable investing strategy unless specifically disclosed in its Prospectus, ESG issues that are potentially financially or otherwise material to the issuer are embedded in various stages of the subadviser’s investment processes for the Fund. These issues will vary depending on the Fund’s particular investment strategies and may be based on the subadviser’s proprietary research, third-party research and data and/or information (estimated by the third-parties or disclosed by the issuerSuch ESG issues may not be determinative in deciding to include or exclude any particular investment in the portfolio and ESG issues are not the sole considerations when making investment decisions for the Fund and may be given more or less weight than other inputs in the investment selection process. The ESG issues utilized in the subadviser’s investment processes are expected to evolve over time and one or more ESG issues may not be material with respect to all issuers that are eligible for investment. Investors can differ in their views of what constitutes a material ESG risk or opportunity. As a result, the Fund may invest in issuers that do not reflect the beliefs and values or given standards with respect to ESG of any particular investor or region. ESG considerations may affect the Fund’s exposure to certain companies, regions or industries. The Fund is not required to take ESG issues into account in determining whether to include, maintain or exclude any potential investment.
EUROPE RECENT EVENTS RISK. A number of countries in Europe have experienced severe economic and financial difficulties. Many non-governmental issuers, and even certain governments, have defaulted on, or been forced to restructure, their debts; many other issuers have faced difficulties obtaining credit or refinancing existing obligations; financial institutions have in many cases required government or central bank support, have needed to raise capital, and/or have been impaired in their ability to extend credit; and financial markets in Europe and elsewhere have experienced extreme volatility and declines in asset values and liquidity. These difficulties may continue, worsen or spread within and beyond Europe. Responses to the financial problems by European governments, central banks and others, including austerity measures and reforms, may not work, may result in social unrest and may limit future growth and economic recovery or have other unintended consequences. Further defaults or restructurings by governments and others of their debt could have additional adverse effects on economies, financial markets and asset valuations around the world.
In addition, the United Kingdom (“UK”) has formally withdrawn from the European Union (“EU”) and one or more other countries may withdraw from the EU and/or abandon the Euro, the common currency of the EU. The UK and EU reached an agreement effective January 1, 2021 on the terms of their future trading relationship relating to the trading of goods, however, this does not cover financial services. The Fund may face risks associated with the potential uncertainty and consequences of the new relationship between the UK and EU, including volatility in exchange and interest rates and politically divergent national laws and regulations.
In addition, Russia launched a large-scale invasion of Ukraine on February 24, 2022, significantly amplifying already existing geopolitical tensions. The United States and many other countries have instituted various economic sanctions against Russian individuals and entities (including corporate and banking). The extent and duration of the military action, sanctions imposed and other punitive action taken and resulting future market disruptions in Europe and globally cannot be easily predicted, but could be significant and have a severe adverse effect on Russia and Europe in general, including significant negative impacts on the economy, sovereign debt and the markets for certain securities and commodities, such as oil and natural gas. This conflict may expand and military attacks could occur elsewhere in Europe. The potential for wider conflict may increase financial market volatility and could have severe adverse effects on regional and global economic markets. Europe has also been struggling with mass migration. The impact of these actions, especially if they occur in a disorderly fashion, is not clear but could be significant and far-reaching. Whether or not the Fund invests in securities of issuers located in Europe or with significant exposure to European issuers or countries, these events could negatively affect the value and relative liquidity of the Fund’s investments. Further, due to closures of certain markets and restrictions on trading certain securities, the value of certain securities held by the Fund could be significantly impacted, which could lead to such securities being valued at zero. The occurrence of terrorist incidents throughout Europe could also impact financial markets globally.

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EXCHANGE-TRADED FUNDS. The  Fund may invest in ETFs, which may be unit investment trusts or open-end management investment companies. ETFs may hold portfolios of securities designed to track the performance of various broad securities indices or sectors of such indices or ETFs may be actively managed. ETFs provide another means, in addition to futures and options on indices, of including exposure to global equities, global bonds, commodities and currencies markets in the Fund’s investment portfolio. The  Fund will indirectly bear its proportionate share of any management fees and other expenses paid by such ETF.
FOREIGN EXCHANGE TRANSACTIONS. The  Fund may engage in spot and forward foreign exchange transactions and currency swaps, purchase and sell options on currencies and purchase and sell currency futures and related options thereon (collectively, Currency Instruments) for purposes of hedging against the decline in the value of currencies in which its portfolio holdings are denominated against the U.S. dollar or to seek to enhance returns. Such transactions could be effected with respect to hedges on non-U.S. dollar denominated securities owned by the Fund, sold by the Fund but not yet delivered, or committed or anticipated to be purchased by the Fund.
As an illustration, the Fund may use such techniques to hedge the stated value in U.S. dollars of an investment in a yen-denominated security. In such circumstances, for example, the Fund may purchase a foreign currency put option enabling the Fund to sell a specified amount of yen for dollars at a specified price by a future date. To the extent the hedge is successful, a loss in the value of the yen relative to the dollar will tend to be offset by an increase in the value of the put option. To offset, in whole or in part, the cost of acquiring such a put option, the Fund may also sell a call option which, if exercised, requires the Fund to sell a specified amount of yen for dollars at a specified price by a future date (a technique called a “straddle”). By selling such a call option in this illustration, the Fund gives up the opportunity to profit without limit from increases in the relative value of the yen to the dollar. Straddles of the type that may be used by the Fund are considered to constitute hedging transactions and are consistent with the policies described above. The  Fund will not attempt to hedge all of its foreign portfolio positions.
Forward Foreign Exchange Transactions. Forward foreign exchange transactions are OTC contracts to purchase or sell a specified amount of a specified currency or multinational currency unit at a price and specified future date set at the time of the contract. Spot foreign exchange transactions are similar but require current, rather than future, settlement. The Fund will enter into foreign exchange transactions for purposes of hedging either a specific transaction or a portfolio position, or to seek to enhance returns. The Fund may enter into a foreign exchange transaction for purposes of hedging a specific transaction by, for example, purchasing a currency needed to settle a security transaction or selling a currency in which the Fund has received or anticipates receiving a dividend or distribution.
The Fund may enter into a foreign exchange transaction for purposes of hedging a portfolio position by selling forward a currency in which a portfolio position of the Fund is denominated or by purchasing a currency in which the Fund anticipates acquiring a portfolio position in the near future. The Fund may also hedge portfolio positions through currency swaps, which are transactions in which one currency is simultaneously bought for a second currency on a spot basis and sold for the second currency on a forward basis. Forward foreign exchange transactions involve substantial currency risk, and also involve credit and liquidity risk.
FOREIGN INVESTMENTS. The Fund may invest in foreign equity and/or debt securities. Foreign debt securities include certain foreign bank obligations and U.S. dollar or foreign currency-denominated obligations of foreign governments or their subdivisions, agencies and instrumentalities, international agencies and supranational entities.
Certain Risks of Holding Fund Assets Outside the United States. The Fund generally holds its foreign securities and cash in foreign banks and securities depositories. Some foreign banks and securities depositories may be recently organized or new to the foreign custody business. In addition, there may be limited or no regulatory oversight over their operations. Also, the laws of certain countries may put limits on the Fund’s ability to recover its assets if a foreign bank or depository or issuer of a security or any of their agents goes bankrupt. In addition, it is often more expensive for the Fund to buy, sell and hold securities in certain foreign markets than in the United States. The increased expense of investing in foreign markets reduces the amount the Fund can earn on its investments and typically results in a higher operating expense ratio for the Fund as compared to investment companies that invest only in the United States.
Currency Risk and Exchange Risk. Securities in which the Fund invests may be denominated or quoted in currencies other than the U.S. dollar. Changes in foreign currency exchange rates will affect the value of the Fund’s portfolio. Generally, when the U.S. dollar rises in value against a foreign currency, a security denominated in that currency loses value because the currency is worth fewer U.S. dollars. Conversely, when the U.S. dollar decreases in value against a foreign currency, a security denominated in that currency gains value because the currency is worth more U.S. dollars. This risk, generally known as “currency risk,” means that a stronger U.S. dollar will reduce returns on foreign currency dominated securities for U.S. investors while a weak U.S. dollar will increase those returns.

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Foreign Economy Risk. The economies of certain foreign markets often do not compare favorably with that of the United States with respect to such issues as growth of gross national product, reinvestment of capital, resources, and balance of payments position. Certain such economies may rely heavily on particular industries or foreign capital and are more vulnerable to diplomatic developments, the imposition of economic sanctions against a particular country or countries, changes in international trading patterns, trade barriers, and other protectionist or retaliatory measures. Investments in foreign markets may also be adversely affected by governmental actions such as the imposition of capital controls, nationalization of companies or industries, expropriation of assets, or the imposition of punitive taxes. In addition, the governments of certain countries may prohibit or impose substantial restrictions on foreign investing in their capital markets or in certain industries. Any of these actions could severely affect security prices, impair the Fund’s ability to purchase or sell foreign securities or transfer the Fund’s assets or income back into the United States, or otherwise adversely affect the Fund’s operations. Other foreign market risks include foreign exchange controls, difficulties in pricing securities, defaults on foreign government securities, difficulties in enforcing favorable legal judgments in foreign courts, and political and social instability. Legal remedies available to investors in certain foreign countries may be less extensive than those available to investors in the United States or other foreign countries.
Foreign Market Risk. Foreign securities offer the potential for more diversification than if the Fund invests only in the United States because securities traded on foreign markets have often (though not always) performed differently from securities in the United States. However, such investments involve special risks not present in U.S. investments that can increase the chances that the Fund will lose money. In particular, the Fund is subject to the risk that, because there are generally fewer investors on foreign exchanges and a smaller number of shares traded each day, it may be difficult for the Fund to buy and sell securities on those exchanges. In addition, prices of foreign securities may fluctuate more than prices of securities traded in the United States.
Governmental Supervision and Regulation/Accounting Standards. Many foreign governments supervise and regulate stock exchanges, brokers and the sale of securities less rigorously than the United States. Some countries may not have laws to protect investors comparable to the U.S. securities laws. For example, some foreign countries may have no laws or rules against insider trading. Insider trading occurs when a person buys or sells a company's securities based on nonpublic information about that company. Accounting standards in other countries are not necessarily the same as in the United States and auditors may not be subject to the same level of oversight. If the accounting standards in another country do not require as much detail as U.S. accounting standards, it may be harder for Fund management to completely and accurately determine a company's financial condition.
Settlement Risk. Settlement and clearance procedures in certain foreign markets differ significantly from those in the United States. Foreign settlement procedures and trade regulations also may involve certain risks (such as delays in payment for or delivery of securities) not typically generated by the settlement of U.S. investments. Communications between the United States and emerging market countries may be unreliable, increasing the risk of delayed settlements or losses of security certificates. Settlements in certain foreign countries at times have not kept pace with the number of securities transactions; these problems may make it difficult for the Fund to carry out transactions. If the Fund cannot settle or there is a delay in settling a purchase of securities, the Fund may miss attractive investment opportunities and certain assets may be uninvested with no return earned thereon for some period. If the Fund cannot settle or there is a delay in settling a sale of securities, the Fund may lose money if the value of the security then declines or, if there is a contract to sell the security to another party, the Fund could be liable to that party for any losses incurred.
Dividends or interest on, or proceeds from the sale of, foreign securities may be subject to foreign withholding taxes, thereby reducing the amount available for distribution to shareholders.
FUTURES. The Fund may engage in transactions in futures and options thereon. Futures are standardized, exchange-traded contracts which obligate a purchaser to take delivery, and a seller to make delivery, of a specific amount of an asset at a specified future date at a specified price. No price is paid upon entering into a futures contract. Rather, upon purchasing or selling a futures contract the Fund is required to deposit collateral (“margin”) equal to a percentage (generally less than 10%) of the contract value. Each day thereafter until the futures position is closed, the Fund will pay additional margin representing any loss experienced as a result of the futures position the prior day or be entitled to a payment representing any profit experienced as a result of the futures position the prior day. Futures involve substantial leverage risk.
The sale of a futures contract limits the Fund’s risk of loss through a decline in the market value of portfolio holdings correlated with the futures contract prior to the futures contract's expiration date. In the event the market value of the portfolio holdings correlated with the futures contract increases rather than decreases, however, the Fund will realize a loss on the futures position and a lower return on the portfolio holdings than would have been realized without the purchase of the futures contract.

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The purchase of a futures contract may protect the Fund from having to pay more for securities as a consequence of increases in the market value for such securities during a period when the Fund was attempting to identify specific securities in which to invest in a market the Fund believes to be attractive. In the event that such securities decline in value or the Fund determines not to complete an anticipatory hedge transaction relating to a futures contract, however, the Fund may realize a loss relating to the futures position.
The Fund is also authorized to purchase or sell call and put options on futures contracts including financial futures and stock indices in connection with its hedging activities. Generally, these strategies would be used under the same market and market sector conditions (i.e., conditions relating to specific types of investments) in which the Fund entered into futures transactions. The Fund may purchase put options or write (i.e., sell) call options on futures contracts and stock indices rather than selling the underlying futures contract in anticipation of a decrease in the market value of its securities. Similarly, the Fund can purchase call options, or write put options on futures contracts and stock indices, as a substitute for the purchase of such futures to hedge against the increased cost resulting from an increase in the market value of securities which the Fund intends to purchase.
The Fund may only write “covered” put and call options on futures contracts. The Fund will be considered “covered” with respect to a call option written on a futures contract if the Fund owns the assets that are deliverable under the futures contract or an option to purchase that futures contract having a strike price equal to or less than the strike price of the “covered” option and having an expiration date not earlier than the expiration date of the “covered” option, or if it holds segregated in an account with its custodian for the term of the option cash or other relatively liquid assets at all times equal in value to the mark-to-market value of the futures contract on which the option was written. The Fund will be considered “covered” with respect to a put option written on a futures contract if the Fund owns an option to sell that futures contract having a strike price equal to or greater than the strike price of the “covered” option, or if the Fund holds segregated in an account with its custodian for the term of the option cash or other relatively liquid assets at all times equal in value to the exercise price of the put (less any initial margin deposited by the Fund with its futures custody manager or as otherwise permitted by applicable law with respect to such option). There is no limitation on the amount of the Fund’s assets that can be segregated. Segregation requirements may impair the Fund’s ability to sell a portfolio security or make an investment at a time when it would otherwise be favorable to do so, or require the Fund to sell a portfolio security or close out a derivatives position at a disadvantageous time or price.
The Manager has filed a notice of exclusion from registration as a “commodity pool operator” with respect to the Fund under CFTC Rule 4.5 and, therefore, is not subject to registration or regulation with respect to the Fund under the CEA. In order for the Manager to claim exclusion from registration as a “commodity pool operator” under the CEA with respect to the Fund, the Fund is limited in its ability to trade instruments subject to the CFTC’s jurisdiction, including commodity futures (which include futures on broad-based securities indices, interest rate futures and currency futures), options on commodity futures, certain swaps or other investments (whether directly or indirectly through investments in other investment vehicles). Under this exclusion, the Fund must satisfy one of the following two trading limitations whenever it enters into a new commodity trading position: (1) the aggregate initial margin and premiums required to establish the Fund’s positions in CFTC-regulated instruments may not exceed 5% of the liquidation value of the Fund’s portfolio (after accounting for unrealized profits and unrealized losses on any such investments); or (2) the aggregate net notional value of such instruments, determined at the time the most recent position was established, may not exceed 100% of the liquidation value of the Fund’s portfolio (after accounting for unrealized profits and unrealized losses on any such positions). The Fund would not be required to consider its exposure to such instruments if they were held for “bona fide hedging” purposes, as such term is defined in the rules of the CFTC. In addition to meeting one of the foregoing trading limitations, the Fund may not market itself as a commodity pool or otherwise as a vehicle for trading in the markets for CFTC-regulated instruments.
HEDGING. Hedging is a strategy in which a derivative or security is used to offset the risks associated with other Fund holdings. Losses on the other investment may be substantially reduced by gains on a derivative that reacts in an opposite manner to market movements. While hedging can reduce losses, it can also reduce or eliminate gains or cause losses if the market moves in a different manner than anticipated by the Fund or if the cost of the derivative outweighs the benefit of the hedge. Hedging also involves the risk that changes in the value of the derivative will not match those of the holdings being hedged as expected by the Fund, in which case any losses on the holdings being hedged may not be reduced or may be increased. The inability to close options and futures positions also could have an adverse impact on the Fund’s ability to hedge effectively its portfolio. There is also a risk of loss by the Fund of margin deposits or collateral in the event of bankruptcy of a broker with whom the Fund has an open position in an option, a futures contract or a related option.
There can be no assurance that the Fund’s hedging strategies will be effective or that hedging transactions will be available to the Fund. The Fund is not required to engage in hedging transactions and the Fund may choose not to do so from time to time.
ILLIQUID INVESTMENTS OR RESTRICTED SECURITIES. Pursuant to Rule 22e-4 under the 1940 Act, the Fund has adopted a Board approved Liquidity Risk Management Program (“LRMP”) that requires, among other things that the Fund limit its illiquid investments to no more than 15% of its net assets.  Illiquid investments are those that, because of the absence of a readily available market or due to

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legal or contractual restrictions on resale, may not reasonably be expected to be sold or disposed of in current market conditions in seven calendar days or less without the sale or disposition significantly changing the market value of the investment. Liquidity risk is the risk that the Fund could not meet requests to redeem shares issued by the Fund without significant dilution of remaining investors' interests in the Fund. Investment of the Fund’s assets in illiquid investments may restrict the ability of the Fund to dispose of its investments in a timely fashion and for a fair price as well as its ability to take advantage of market opportunities. The risks associated with illiquidity will be particularly acute where the Fund’s operations require cash, such as when the Fund redeems shares or pays dividends, and could result in the Fund borrowing to meet short-term cash requirements or incurring capital losses on the sale of illiquid investments.
The Fund may invest in securities that are not registered (restricted securities) under the 1933 Act. Restricted securities may be sold in private placement transactions between issuers and their purchasers and may be neither listed on an exchange nor traded in other established markets. In many cases, privately placed securities may not be freely transferable under the laws of the applicable jurisdiction or due to contractual restrictions on resale. As a result of the absence of a public trading market, privately placed securities may be less liquid and more difficult to value than publicly traded securities. To the extent that privately placed securities may be resold in privately negotiated transactions, the prices realized from the sales, due to illiquidity, could be less than those originally paid by the Fund or less than their fair market value. In addition, issuers whose securities are not publicly traded may not be subject to the disclosure and other investor protection requirements that may be applicable if their securities were publicly traded. If any privately placed securities held by the Fund are required to be registered under the securities laws of one or more jurisdictions before being resold, the Fund may be required to bear the expenses of registration. Certain of the Fund’s investments in private placements may consist of direct investments and may include investments in smaller, less seasoned issuers, which may involve greater risks. These issuers may have limited product lines, markets or financial resources or they may be dependent on a limited management group. In making investments in such securities, the Fund may obtain access to material nonpublic information, which may restrict the Fund’s ability to conduct portfolio transactions in such securities.
The Fund may purchase restricted securities that can be offered and sold to “qualified institutional buyers” under Rule 144A under the 1933 Act. Restricted securities that would otherwise be considered illiquid investments pursuant to the Fund’s LRMP because of legal restrictions on resale to the general public may be traded among qualified institutional buyers under Rule 144A. Therefore, these securities, as well as commercial paper that is sold in private placements under Section 4(a)(2) under the 1933 Act, may be classified higher than “illiquid” under the LRMP (i.e., “moderately liquid” or “less liquid” investments). However, the liquidity of the Fund’s investments in restricted securities could be impaired if trading does not develop or declines.
INVESTMENT IN OTHER INVESTMENT COMPANIES. The Fund may invest in securities of other investment companies (including ETFs), subject to applicable regulatory limits.
Investing in another investment company involves risks similar to those of investing directly in the investment company’s portfolio securities, including the risk that the values of the portfolio securities may fluctuate due to changes in the financial condition of the securities’ issuers and other market factors. An investment company may not achieve its investment objective or execute its investment strategy effectively, which may adversely affect the Fund’s performance.
The Fund will indirectly bear its pro rata share of the fees and expenses incurred by an investment company, including investment companies managed by the Manager, subadviser(s) or an affiliate, in which it invests, including advisory fees (to the extent not offset by the Manager, subadviser(s) or an affiliate through waivers). In addition, the Fund could incur a sales charge in connection with purchasing an investment company security or a redemption fee upon the redemption of such security.
MARKET DISRUPTION AND GEOPOLITICAL RISKS. Market disruption can be caused by economic, financial or political events and factors, including but not limited to, international wars or conflicts (including Russia’s military invasion of Ukraine), geopolitical developments (including trading and tariff arrangements, sanctions and cybersecurity attacks), instability in regions such as Asia, Eastern Europe and the Middle East, terrorism, natural disasters and public health epidemics (including the outbreak of COVID-19 globally). The extent and duration of such events and resulting market disruptions cannot be predicted, but could be substantial and could magnify the impact of other risks to the Fund. These and other similar events could adversely affect the U.S. and foreign financial markets and lead to increased market volatility, reduced liquidity in the securities markets, significant negative impacts on issuers and the markets for certain securities and commodities and/or government intervention. They may also cause short- or long-term economic uncertainties in the United States and worldwide. As a result, whether or not the Fund invests in securities of issuers located in or with significant exposure to the countries directly affected, the value and liquidity of the Fund’s investments may be negatively impacted. Further, due to closures of certain markets and restrictions on trading certain securities, the value of certain securities held by the Fund could be significantly impacted, which could lead to such securities being valued at zero.

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COVID-19 and the related governmental and public responses have had and may continue to have an impact on the Fund’s investments and net asset value and have led and may continue to lead to increased market volatility and the potential for illiquidity in certain classes of securities and sectors of the market. They have also had and may continue to result in periods of business disruption, business closures, inability to obtain raw materials, supplies and component parts, and reduced or disrupted operations for the issuers in which the Fund invests. The occurrence, reoccurrence and pendency of public health epidemics could adversely affect the economies and financial markets either in specific countries or worldwide.
Global economies and financial markets have become increasingly interconnected, which increases the possibility that economic, financial or political events and factors in one country or region might adversely impact issuers in a different country or region or worldwide.
MONEY MARKET INSTRUMENTS. The Fund may invest in money market instruments. Money market instruments include cash equivalents and short-term obligations of U.S. banks, non-U.S. government securities, certificates of deposit and short-term obligations issued or guaranteed by the U.S. Government or its agencies. Money market instruments also include bankers' acceptances, commercial paper, certificates of deposit and Eurodollar obligations issued or guaranteed by bank holding companies in the U.S., their subsidiaries and non-U.S. branches, by non-U.S. banking institutions, and by the World Bank and other multinational instrumentalities, as well as commercial paper and other short-term obligations of, and variable amount master demand notes, variable rate notes and funding agreements issued by, U.S. and non-U.S. corporations.
MORTGAGE-BACKED SECURITIES. Investing in mortgage-backed securities involves certain unique risks in addition to those generally associated with investing in fixed income securities and in the real estate industry in general. These unique risks include the failure of a party to meet its commitments under the related operative documents, adverse interest rate changes and the effects of prepayments on mortgage cash flows. Mortgage-backed securities are “pass-through” securities, meaning that principal and interest payments made by the borrower on the underlying mortgages are passed through to the Fund. The value of mortgage-backed securities, like that of traditional fixed income securities, typically increases when interest rates fall and decreases when interest rates rise. However, mortgage-backed securities differ from traditional fixed income securities because of their potential for prepayment without penalty. The price paid by the Fund for its mortgage-backed securities, the yield the Fund expects to receive from such securities and the average life of the securities are based on a number of factors, including the anticipated rate of prepayment of the underlying mortgages. In a period of declining interest rates, borrowers may prepay the underlying mortgages more quickly than anticipated, thereby reducing the yield to maturity and the average life of the mortgage-backed securities. Moreover, when the Fund reinvests the proceeds of a prepayment in these circumstances, the likely rate of interest received will be lower than the rate on the security that was prepaid.
Mortgage-backed securities, including CMOs, can be collateralized by either fixed-rate mortgages or adjustable rate mortgages. Fixed-rate mortgage securities are collateralized by fixed-rate mortgages and tend to have high prepayment rates when the level of prevailing interest rates declines significantly below the interest rates on the mortgages. Thus, under those circumstances, the securities are generally less sensitive to interest rate movements than lower coupon fixed-rate mortgages. CMOs may be collateralized by whole mortgage loans or private mortgage pass-through securities, but are more typically collateralized by portfolios of mortgage pass-through securities guaranteed by Ginnie Mae, Freddie Mac or Fannie Mae.
Generally, adjustable rate mortgage securities (“ARMs”) have a specified maturity date and amortize principal over their life. In periods of declining interest rates, there is a reasonable likelihood that ARMs will experience increased rates of prepayment of principal. However, the major difference between ARMs and fixed-rate mortgage securities (“FRMs”) is that the interest rate and the rate of amortization of principal of ARMs can and do change in accordance with movements in a particular, pre-specified, published interest rate index. The amount of interest on an ARM is calculated by adding a specified amount, the “margin,” to the index, subject to limitations on the maximum and minimum interest that is charged during the life of the mortgage or to maximum and minimum changes to that interest rate during a given period.
The underlying mortgages which collateralize the ARMs in which the Fund invests will frequently have caps and floors which limit the maximum amount by which the loan rate to the residential borrower may change up or down (1) per reset or adjustment interval and (2) over the life of the loan. Some residential mortgage loans restrict periodic adjustments by limiting changes in the borrower's monthly principal and interest payments rather than limiting interest rate changes. These payment caps may result in negative amortization.
To the extent that the Fund purchases mortgage-backed securities at a premium, mortgage foreclosures and principal prepayments may result in a loss to the extent of the premium paid. If the Fund buys such securities at a discount, both scheduled payments of principal and unscheduled prepayments will increase current and total returns and will accelerate the recognition of income which, when distributed to shareholders, will be taxable as ordinary income. In a period of rising interest rates, prepayments of the underlying mortgages may occur at a slower than expected rate, creating maturity extension risk. This particular risk may effectively change a security that was considered short- or intermediate-term at the time of purchase into a long-term security. Since long-term securities

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generally fluctuate more widely in response to changes in interest rates than shorter-term securities, maturity extension risk could increase the inherent volatility of the Fund. Under certain interest rate and prepayment scenarios, the Fund may fail to recoup fully its investment in mortgage-backed securities notwithstanding any direct or indirect governmental or agency guarantee.
Most mortgage-backed securities are issued by federal government agencies such as Ginnie Mae, or by government sponsored enterprises such as Freddie Mac and Fannie Mae. Principal and interest payments on mortgage-backed securities issued by the federal government and some federal agencies, such as Ginnie Mae, are guaranteed by the federal government and backed by the full faith and credit of the United States. Mortgage-backed securities issued by other government agencies or government sponsored enterprises are backed only by the credit of the government agency or enterprise and are not backed by the full faith and credit of the United States. Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac are authorized to borrow from the U.S. Treasury to meet their obligations. Private mortgage-backed securities are issued by private corporations rather than government agencies and are subject to credit risk and interest rate risk.
Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac are stockholder-owned companies chartered by Congress. Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac guarantee the securities they issue as to timely payment of principal and interest, but such guarantee is not backed by the full faith and credit of the United States. In September 2008, Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac were placed into conservatorship by their regulator, the Federal Housing Finance Agency. The conservatorship has no specified end date. There can be no assurance as to when or how the conservatorship will be terminated or whether Fannie Mae or Freddie Mac will continue to exist following the conservatorship or what their respective businesses structures will be during or following the conservatorship. Although the U.S. Government has provided financial support to Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, there can be no assurance that it will support these or other government-sponsored enterprises (“GSEs”) in the future.
The  Fund may purchase certain mortgage-backed securities, the underlying investments of which consist of loans issued and/or serviced by an affiliated entity.
OPERATIONAL AND TRADING RISK. Systemic failures in the programs and systems employed by the subadviser, brokers and/or counterparties, exchanges and similar clearance and settlement facilities and other parties could result in mistakes made in the confirmation or settlement of transactions, or in transactions not being properly booked, evaluated or accounted for. The subadviser may not be in a position to verify the risks or reliability of third-party systems. These and other similar disruptions in the subadviser's operations may cause material losses to the Fund.
The subadviser makes extensive use of computer hardware, systems and software and its activities are exposed to risks caused by failures of IT infrastructure and data. Outright failure of the underlying hardware, operating system, software or network, may leave the subadviser unable to trade either generally or in certain of its strategies, and this may expose it to risk should the outage coincide with turbulent market conditions. To ameliorate this risk, backup and disaster recovery plans have been put in place by the subadviser.
OPTIONS ON SECURITIES AND SECURITIES INDICES.
TYPES OF OPTIONS. The Fund may engage in transactions in options on individual securities, baskets of securities or securities indices, or particular measurements of value or rate (an “index”), such as an index of the price of treasury securities or an index representative of short term interest rates. Such investments may be made on exchanges and in OTC markets. In general, exchange-traded options have standardized exercise prices and expiration dates and require the parties to post margin against their obligations, and the performance of the parties' obligations in connection with such options is guaranteed by the exchange or a related clearing corporation. OTC options have more flexible terms negotiated between the buyer and the seller, but generally do not require the parties to post margin and are subject to greater credit risk. OTC options also involve greater liquidity risk. See “Additional Risk Factors of OTC Transactions; Limitations on the Use of OTC Derivatives.”
CALL OPTIONS. The Fund may purchase call options on any of the types of securities or instruments in which it may invest. A call option gives the Fund the right to buy, and obligates the seller to sell, the underlying security at the exercise price at any time during the option period. The Fund also may purchase and sell call options on indices. Index options are similar to options on securities except that, rather than taking or making delivery of securities underlying the option at a specified price upon exercise, an index option gives the holder the right to receive cash upon exercise of the option if the level of the index upon which the option is based is greater than the exercise price of the option.
The Fund may only write (i.e., sell) covered call options on the securities or instruments in which it may invest and enter into closing purchase transactions with respect to certain of such options, provided such options are “covered,” as defined herein. A covered call option is an option in which the Fund owns the underlying security or has an absolute and immediate right to acquire that security, without additional consideration (or for additional consideration held in a segregated account by its custodian), upon conversion or exchange of other securities currently held in its portfolio or with respect to which the Fund holds cash or other relatively liquid assets segregated within the Fund’s account at the custodian or in a separate segregation account at the custodian. The principal reason for

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writing call options is the attempt to realize, through the receipt of premiums, a greater return than would be realized on the securities alone. By writing covered call options, the Fund gives up the opportunity, while the option is in effect, to profit from any price increase in the underlying security above the option exercise price. In addition, the Fund’s ability to sell the underlying security will be limited while the option is in effect unless the Fund enters into a closing purchase transaction. A closing purchase transaction cancels out the Fund’s position as the writer of an option by means of an offsetting purchase of an identical option prior to the expiration of the option it has written. Covered call options also serve as a partial hedge to the extent of the premium received against a decline in the price of the underlying security. Also, with respect to call options written by the Fund that are covered only by segregated portfolio securities, the Fund is exposed to the risk of loss equal to the amount by which the price of the underlying securities rises above the exercise price.
PUT OPTIONS. The Fund may purchase put options to seek to hedge against a decline in the value of its securities or to enhance its return. By buying a put option, the Fund acquires a right to sell such underlying securities or instruments at the exercise price, thus limiting the Fund’s risk of loss through a decline in the market value of the securities or instruments until the put option expires. The amount of any appreciation in the value of the underlying securities or instruments will be partially offset by the amount of the premium paid for the put option and any related transaction costs. Prior to its expiration, a put option may be sold in a closing sale transaction and profit or loss from the sale will depend on whether the amount received is more or less than the premium paid for the put option plus the related transaction costs. A closing sale transaction cancels out the Fund’s position as the purchaser of an option by means of an offsetting sale of an identical option prior to the expiration of the option it has purchased. The Fund also may purchase uncovered put options.
The Fund may write (i.e., sell) put options on the types of securities or instruments that may be held by the Fund, provided that such put options are covered (as described above, covered options are secured by cash or other relatively liquid assets held in a segregated account or the referenced security). The Fund will receive a premium for writing a put option, which increases the Fund’s return.
PREFERRED STOCK. Preferred stock represents an equity or ownership interest in an issuer. Preferred stock normally pays dividends at a specified rate and has precedence over common stock in the event the issuer is liquidated or declares bankruptcy. However, in the event an issuer is liquidated or declares bankruptcy, the claims of owners of bonds take precedence over the claims of those who own preferred and common stock. Preferred stock, unlike common stock, often has a stated dividend rate payable from the corporation's earnings. Preferred stock dividends may be cumulative or non-cumulative, participating, or auction rate. “Cumulative” dividend provisions require all or a portion of prior unpaid dividends to be paid before dividends can be paid to the issuer's common stock. “Participating” preferred stock may be entitled to a dividend exceeding the stated dividend in certain cases. If interest rates rise, the fixed dividend on preferred stocks may be less attractive, causing the price of such stocks to decline. Preferred stock may have mandatory sinking fund provisions, as well as provisions allowing the stock to be called or redeemed, which can limit the benefit of a decline in interest rates. Preferred stock is subject to many of the risks to which common stock and debt securities are subject.
REAL ESTATE INVESTMENT TRUSTS (“REITs”). Investing in REITs involves certain unique risks in addition to those risks associated with investing in the real estate industry in general. Equity REITs may be affected by changes in the value of the underlying property owned by the REITs, while mortgage REITs may be affected by the quality of any credit extended. REITs are dependent upon management skills, may not be diversified geographically or by property type, and are subject to heavy cash flow dependency, default by borrowers and self-liquidation. REITs must also meet certain requirements under the Code to avoid entity level tax and be eligible to pass-through certain tax attributes of their income to shareholders. REITs are consequently subject to the risk of failing to meet these requirements for favorable tax treatment and of failing to maintain their exemptions from registration under the 1940 Act. REITs are also subject to the risks of changes in the Code affecting their tax status.
In addition, between 2018 and 2025, a direct REIT shareholder may claim a 20% “qualified business income” deduction for ordinary REIT dividends, and a RIC may pass through to its shareholders the special character of this income. Ordinary dividends received by the Fund from a REIT will generally not constitute qualified dividend income, which would be eligible for tax at a reduced rate.
REITs (especially mortgage REITs) are also subject to interest rate risks. When interest rates decline, the value of a REIT's investment in fixed rate obligations can be expected to rise. Conversely, when interest rates rise, the value of a REIT's investment in fixed rate obligations can be expected to decline. In contrast, as interest rates on adjustable rate mortgage loans are reset periodically, yields on a REIT's investments in such loans will gradually align themselves to reflect changes in market interest rates, causing the value of such investments to fluctuate less dramatically in response to interest rate fluctuations than would investments in fixed rate obligations.
Investing in certain REITs involves risks similar to those associated with investing in small capitalization companies. These REITs may have limited financial resources, may trade less frequently and in limited volume and may be subject to more abrupt or erratic price movements than larger company securities. Historically, small capitalization stocks, such as REITs, have been more volatile in price than the larger capitalization stocks included in the S&P 500 Index. The management of a REIT may be subject to conflicts of interest with

PGIM Jennison International Opportunities Fund 22

respect to the operation of the business of the REIT and may be involved in real estate activities competitive with the REIT. REITs may own properties through joint ventures or in other circumstances in which the REIT may not have control over its investments. REITs may incur significant amounts of leverage. The Fund’s investments in REITs may subject the Fund to duplicate management and/or advisory fees.
REPURCHASE AGREEMENTS. The Fund may invest in securities pursuant to repurchase agreements. The Fund will enter into repurchase agreements only with parties meeting creditworthiness standards as set forth in the Fund’s repurchase agreement procedures.
Under such agreements, the other party agrees, upon entering into the contract with the Fund, to repurchase the security at a mutually agreed-upon time and price in a specified currency, thereby determining the yield during the term of the agreement. This results in a fixed rate of return insulated from market fluctuations during such period, although such return may be affected by currency fluctuations. In the case of repurchase agreements, the prices at which the trades are conducted do not reflect accrued interest on the underlying obligation. Repurchase agreements may be construed to be collateralized loans by the purchaser to the seller secured by the securities transferred to the purchaser.
In the case of a repurchase agreement, as a purchaser, the Fund will require all repurchase agreements to be fully collateralized at all times by cash or other relatively liquid assets in an amount at least equal to the resale price. The seller is required to provide additional collateral if the market value of the securities falls below the repurchase price at any time during the term of the repurchase agreement. In the event of default by the seller under a repurchase agreement construed to be a collateralized loan, the underlying securities are not owned by the Fund but only constitute collateral for the seller's obligation to pay the repurchase price. Therefore, the Fund may suffer time delays and incur costs or possible losses in connection with disposition of the collateral.
The Fund may participate in a joint repurchase agreement account with other investment companies managed by the Manager pursuant to an order of the SEC. On a daily basis, any uninvested cash balances of the Fund may be aggregated with those of such investment companies and invested in one or more repurchase agreements. The Fund participates in the income earned or accrued in the joint account based on the percentage of its investment.
REVERSE REPURCHASE AGREEMENTS AND DOLLAR ROLLS. The Fund may enter into reverse repurchase agreements. A reverse repurchase agreement involves the sale of a portfolio-eligible security by the Fund, coupled with its agreement to repurchase the instrument at a specified time and price. See “Repurchase Agreements.”
The Fund may enter into dollar rolls. In a dollar roll, the Fund sells securities for delivery in the current month and simultaneously contracts to repurchase substantially similar (same type and coupon) securities on a specified future date from the same party. During the roll period, the Fund forgoes principal and interest paid on the securities. The Fund is compensated by the difference between the current sale price and the forward price for the future purchase (often referred to as the drop) as well as by the interest earned on the cash proceeds of the initial sale.
Dollar rolls involve the risk that the market value of the securities retained by the Fund may decline below the price of the securities sold by the Fund but which the Fund is obligated to repurchase under the agreement. In the event the buyer of securities under a dollar roll files for bankruptcy or becomes insolvent, the Fund’s use of the proceeds of the agreement may be restricted pending a determination by the other party, or its trustee or receiver, whether to enforce the Fund’s obligation to repurchase the securities. Cash proceeds from dollar rolls may be invested in cash or other liquid assets.
RUSSIAN FEDERATION INVESTMENT RISK. Investing in the Russian securities market involves a high degree of risk and special considerations not typically associated with investing in the U.S. securities market, and should be considered highly speculative. Risks include: the absence of developed legal structures governing private and foreign investments and private property; the possibility of the loss of all or a substantial portion of the Fund’s assets invested in Russia as a result of expropriation; devaluation; certain national policies which may restrict the Fund’s investment opportunities, including, without limitation, restrictions on investing in issuers or industries deemed sensitive to relevant national interests; and potentially greater price volatility in, significantly smaller capitalization of, and relative illiquidity of, the Russian market. There can also be no assurance that the Fund’s investments in the Russian securities market would not be expropriated, nationalized or otherwise confiscated. In the event of the settlement of any such claims or such expropriation, nationalization or other confiscation, the Fund could lose its entire investment. In addition, it may be difficult and more costly to obtain and enforce a judgment in the Russian court system.
Russia is also subject to a high degree of economic, political and social instability. Such instability may result from, among other things, the following: (i) an authoritarian government or military involvement in political and economic decision-making, including changes in government through extra-constitutional means; (ii) popular unrest associated with demands for improved political, economic and social conditions; (iii) internal insurgencies; (iv) hostile relations with neighboring countries; and (v) ethnic, religious and racial discord.

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The Russian economy is heavily dependent upon the export of a range of commodities including most industrial metals, forestry products and oil and gas. Accordingly, it is strongly affected by international commodity prices and is particularly vulnerable to any weakening in global demand for these products. Any acts of terrorism or armed conflicts in Russia or internationally could have an adverse effect on the financial and commodities markets and the global economy. As Russia produces and exports large amounts of crude oil and gas, any acts of terrorism, armed conflict or government interventions (such as the imposition of sanctions or other governmental restrictions on trade) causing disruptions of Russian oil and gas exports could negatively impact the Russian economy and, thus, adversely affect the financial condition, results of operations or prospects of related companies.
Russia launched a large-scale invasion of Ukraine on February 24, 2022, significantly amplifying already existing geopolitical tensions. Actual and threatened responses to such military action may impact the markets for certain Russian commodities and may likely have collateral impacts on markets globally. The extent and duration of the military action, resulting sanctions imposed and other punitive action taken and resulting future market disruptions, including declines in its stock markets, the value of Russian sovereign debt and the value of the ruble against the U.S. dollar, cannot be easily predicted, but could be significant. Any such disruptions caused by Russian military action or other actions (including cyberattacks and espionage) or resulting actual and threatened responses to such activity, including purchasing and financing restrictions, boycotts or changes in consumer or purchaser preferences, sanctions, tariffs or cyberattacks on the Russian government, Russian companies or Russian individuals, including politicians, may impact Russia’s economy and the Fund's investments in Russian securities.
As a result of political and military actions undertaken by Russia, the United States and many other countries have instituted various economic sanctions against Russian individuals and entities (including corporate and banking). These sanctioning bodies, or others, may impose additional economic sanctions, or take other actions, against individuals and/or companies in specific sectors of the Russian economy, including, but not limited to, the financial services, energy, metals and mining, engineering, and defense and defense-related materials sectors. These sanctions, and the threat of additional punitive actions, could have adverse consequences for the Russian economy, including continued weakening of the Russian currency, downgrades in Russia’s credit rating, and a significant decline in the value and liquidity of securities issued by Russian companies or the Russian government. Russia’s invasion, the responses of countries and political bodies to Russia’s actions, and the potential for wider conflict may increase financial market volatility and could have severe adverse effects on regional and global economic markets, including the markets for certain securities and commodities, such as oil and natural gas. Any of these events could negatively impact the Fund’s investment in Russian securities. These sanctions have the possibility of impairing the Fund’s ability to invest in accordance with its investment strategy and/or to meet its investment objective. For example, the Fund may be prohibited from investing in securities issued by companies subject to such sanctions. In addition, these sanctions may require a fund to freeze its existing investments in Russian securities, thereby prohibiting the Fund from buying, selling, receiving or delivering those securities or other financial instruments. It is also possible that any counter measures or retaliatory action by Russia could further impair the value and liquidity of securities issued by Russian companies and may have an impact on the economies of other European countries and globally as well. Further, due to closures of certain markets and restrictions on trading certain securities, the value of certain securities held by the Fund could be significantly impacted, which could lead to such securities being valued at zero.
The Russian government may exercise substantial influence over many aspects of the Russian private sector and may own or control many companies. Future government actions could have a significant effect on the economic conditions in Russia, which could have a negative impact on private sector companies. There is also the possibility of diplomatic developments that could adversely affect investments in Russia. In recent years, the Russian government has taken bold steps, including military actions and alleged state sponsored cyberattacks against foreign companies and governments, to reassert its regional geopolitical influence. Such steps may increase tensions between Russia, its neighbors and Western countries, and may negatively affect its economic growth.
SECURITIES LENDING. Unless otherwise noted, the Fund may lend its portfolio securities to brokers, dealers and other financial institutions subject to applicable regulatory requirements and guidance, including the requirements that: (1) the aggregate market value of securities loaned will not at any time exceed 33 13% of the total assets of the Fund; (2) the borrower pledge and maintain with the Fund collateral consisting of cash having at all times a value of not less than 102% (or 105% for foreign securities) of the value of the securities lent; and (3) the loan be made subject to termination by the Fund at any time. Securities Finance Trust Company (“eSecLending”) serves as securities lending agent for the Fund, and in that role administers the Fund’s securities lending program. As compensation for these services, eSecLending receives a portion of any amounts earned by the Fund through lending securities.
Cash collateral is invested in an affiliated prime money market fund and will be subject to market depreciation or appreciation. The Fund will be responsible for any loss that results from this investment of collateral. The affiliated prime money market fund in which cash collateral is invested may impose liquidity fees or temporary gates on redemptions if its weekly liquid assets fall below a designated threshold. If this were to occur, the Fund may lose money on its investment of cash collateral in the affiliated prime money market fund,

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or the Fund may not be able to redeem its investment of cash collateral in the affiliated prime money market fund, which might cause the Fund to liquidate other holdings in order to return the cash collateral to the borrower upon termination of a securities loan. These events could trigger adverse tax consequences for the Fund.
On termination of the loan, the borrower is required to return the securities to the Fund, and any gain or loss in the market price during the loan would inure to the Fund. If the borrower defaults on its obligation to return the securities lent because of insolvency or other reasons, the Fund could experience delays and costs in recovering the securities lent or in gaining access to the collateral. In such situations, the Fund may sell the collateral and purchase a replacement investment in the market. There is a risk that the value of the collateral could decrease below the value of the replacement investment by the time the replacement investment is purchased.
During the time portfolio securities are on loan, the borrower will pay the Fund an amount equivalent to any dividend or interest paid on such securities. Voting or consent rights which accompany loaned securities pass to the borrower. However, all loans may be terminated at any time to facilitate the exercise of voting or other consent rights with respect to matters considered to be material. The Fund bears the risk that there may be a delay in the return of the securities which may impair the Fund’s ability to exercise such rights.
SHORT SALES AND SHORT SALES AGAINST-THE-BOX. The Fund may make short sales of securities, either as a hedge against potential declines in value of a portfolio security or to realize appreciation when a security that the Fund does not own declines in value. Because making short sales in securities not owned by the Fund exposes the Fund to the risks associated with those securities, such short sales involve speculative exposure risk. As a result, if the Fund makes short sales in securities that increase in value, the Fund will likely underperform similar mutual funds that do not make short sales in securities they do not own. The Fund will incur a loss as a result of a short sale if the price of the security increases between the date of the short sale and the date on which the Fund replaces the borrowed security. The Fund will realize a gain if the security declines in price between those dates. There can be no assurance that the Fund will be able to close out a short sale position at any particular time or at a desired price. Although the Fund’s gain is limited to the price at which the Fund sold the security short, its potential loss is limited only by the maximum attainable price of the security, less the price at which the security was sold and may, theoretically, be unlimited. There is also a risk that a borrowed security will need to be returned to the broker/dealer on short notice. If the request for the return of a security occurs at a time when other short sellers of the security are receiving similar requests, a “short squeeze” can occur, meaning that the Fund might be compelled, at the most disadvantageous time, to replace the borrowed security with a security purchased on the open market, possibly at prices significantly in excess of the proceeds received earlier.
The Fund has a short position in the securities sold short until it delivers to the broker/dealer the securities sold, at which time the Fund receives the proceeds of the sale. In addition, the Fund is required to pay to the broker/dealer the amount of any dividends or interest paid on shares sold short. The Fund will normally close out a short position by purchasing on the open market and delivering to the broker/dealer an equal amount of the securities sold short.
The Fund may also make short sales against-the-box. A short sale against-the-box is a short sale in which the Fund owns an equal amount of the securities sold short, or securities convertible or exchangeable for, with or without payment of any further consideration, such securities.
SMALLER OR EMERGING GROWTH COMPANIES. Investment in smaller or emerging growth companies involves greater risk than is customarily associated with investments in more established companies. The securities of smaller or emerging growth companies may be subject to more abrupt or erratic market movements than larger, more established companies or the market average in general. These companies may have limited product lines, markets or financial resources, or they may be dependent on a limited management group.
While smaller or emerging growth company issuers may offer greater opportunities for capital appreciation than large cap issuers, investments in smaller or emerging growth companies may involve greater risks and thus may be considered speculative. The subadviser believes that properly selected companies of this type have the potential to increase their earnings or market valuation at a rate substantially in excess of the general growth of the economy. Full development of these companies and trends frequently takes time.
Small capitalization and emerging growth securities will often be traded only in the OTC market or on a regional securities exchange and may not be traded every day or in the volume typical of trading on a national securities exchange. As a result, the disposition by the Fund of portfolio securities to meet redemptions or otherwise may require the Fund to make many small sales over a lengthy period of time, or to sell these securities at a discount from market prices or during periods when, in the subadviser's judgment, such disposition is not desirable.

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While the process of selection and continuous supervision by the subadviser does not, of course, guarantee successful investment results, it does provide access to an asset class not available to the average individual due to the time and cost involved. Careful initial selection is particularly important in this area as many new enterprises have promise but lack certain of the fundamental factors necessary to prosper. Investing in small capitalization and emerging growth companies requires specialized research and analysis. In addition, many investors cannot invest sufficient assets in such companies to provide wide diversification.
Small companies are generally little known to most individual investors although some may be dominant in their respective industries. The subadviser believes that relatively small companies will continue to have the opportunity to develop into significant business enterprises. The Fund may invest in securities of small issuers in the relatively early stages of business development that have a new technology, a unique or proprietary product or service, or a favorable market position. Such companies may not be counted upon to develop into major industrial companies, but Fund management believes that eventual recognition of their special value characteristics by the investment community can provide above-average long-term growth to the portfolio.
Equity securities of specific small capitalization issuers may present different opportunities for long-term capital appreciation during varying portions of economic or securities markets cycles, as well as during varying stages of their business development. The market valuation of small capitalization issuers tends to fluctuate during economic or market cycles, presenting attractive investment opportunities at various points during these cycles. Smaller companies, due to the size and kinds of markets that they serve, may be less susceptible than large companies to intervention from the federal government by means of price controls, regulations or litigation.
SOVEREIGN DEBT. Investment in sovereign debt can involve a high degree of risk. The governmental entity that controls the repayment of sovereign debt may not be able or willing to repay the principal and/or interest when due in accordance with the terms of such debt. A governmental entity's willingness or ability to repay principal and interest due in a timely manner may be affected by, among other factors, its cash flow situation, the extent of its foreign reserves, the availability of sufficient foreign exchange on the date a payment is due, the relative size of the debt service burden to the economy as a whole, the governmental entity's policy towards the International Monetary Fund and the political constraints to which a governmental entity may be subject. Governmental entities may also be dependent on expected disbursements from foreign governments, multilateral agencies and others abroad to reduce principal and interest arrearages on their debt. The commitment on the part of these governments, agencies and others to make such disbursements may be conditioned on the implementation of economic reforms and/or economic performance and the timely service of such debtor's obligations. Failure to implement such reforms, achieve such levels of economic performance or repay principal or interest when due may result in the cancellation of such third parties' commitments to lend funds to the governmental entity, which may further impair such debtor's ability or willingness to timely service its debts. Consequently, governmental entities may default on their sovereign debt. Holders of sovereign debt may be requested to participate in the rescheduling of such debt and to extend further loans to governmental entities. In the event of a default by a governmental entity, there may be few or no effective legal remedies for collecting on such debt.
STANDBY COMMITMENT AGREEMENTS. The  Fund may enter into standby commitment agreements. These agreements commit the Fund, for a stated period of time, to purchase a stated amount of securities that may be issued and sold to the Fund at the option of the issuer. The price of the security is fixed at the time of the commitment. At the time of entering into the agreement the Fund is paid a commitment fee, regardless of whether or not the security is ultimately issued. The  Fund will enter into such agreements for the purpose of investing in the security underlying the commitment at a price that is considered advantageous to the Fund. The  Fund will limit investment in such commitments so that the aggregate purchase price of securities subject to such commitments, together with the Fund's other illiquid investments (as determined in accordance with the Fund's Liquidity Risk Management Program), will not exceed 15% of its net assets taken at the time of the commitment. Liquid assets are segregated by the Fund in an aggregate amount equal to the purchase price of the securities underlying the commitment. There can be no assurance that the securities subject to a standby commitment will be issued, and the value of the security, if issued, on the delivery date may be more or less than its purchase price. Since the issuance of the security underlying the commitment is at the option of the issuer, the Fund may bear the risk of a decline in the value of such security and may not benefit from any appreciation in the value of the security during the commitment period. The purchase of a security subject to a standby commitment agreement and the related commitment fee will be recorded on the date on which the security can reasonably be expected to be issued, and the value of the security thereafter will be reflected in the calculation of the Fund’s NAV. The cost basis of the security will be adjusted by the amount of the commitment fee. In the event the security is not issued, the commitment fee will be recorded as income on the expiration date of the standby commitment.
STRUCTURED NOTES / STRUCTURED SECURITIES. The  Fund may invest in structured securities, including participation notes, structured notes, low exercise price warrants and other related instruments purchased by the Fund that are generally privately negotiated financial instruments where the interest or value of the structured security is linked to equity securities or equity indices or other instruments or indices (reference instruments). Issuers of structured securities include corporations and banks. Structured securities are subject to the creditworthiness of the counterparty of the structured security, and their values may decline substantially if the counterparty's creditworthiness deteriorates.

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Structured securities differ from debt securities in several aspects. The interest rate or the principal amount payable upon maturity or redemption may increase or decrease, depending upon changes in the value of the reference instrument. The terms of a structured security may provide that, in certain circumstances, no principal is due at maturity and, therefore, may result in a loss of invested capital by the Fund. Receipt of the reference instrument is also, in certain circumstances, exchanged upon maturity of the security.
A structured security may be positively, negatively, or both positively and negatively indexed; that is, its value or interest rate may increase or decrease if the value of the reference instrument increases. Similarly, its value or interest rate may increase or decrease if the value of the reference instrument decreases. Further, the change in the principal amount payable with respect to, or the interest rate of, a structured security may be calculated as a multiple of the percentage change (positive or negative) in the value of the underlying reference instrument(s); therefore, the value of such structured security may be very volatile. Also, caps can be placed on the amount of appreciation with regard to the reference instrument.
Structured securities may entail a greater degree of market risk than other types of debt obligations because the investor bears the risk of the reference instrument. Structured securities may also be more volatile, less liquid, and more difficult to accurately price than less complex securities. The secondary market for structured securities could be illiquid, making them difficult to sell when the Fund determines to sell them. The possible lack of a liquid secondary market for structured securities and the resulting inability of the Fund to sell a structured security could expose the Fund to losses and could make structured securities more difficult for the Fund to value accurately.
SUPRANATIONAL ENTITIES. The  Fund may invest in debt securities of supranational entities. Examples include the World Bank, the European Steel and Coal Community, the Asian Development Bank and the Inter-American Development Bank. The government members, or “stockholders,” usually make initial capital contributions to the supranational entity and in many cases are committed to make additional capital contributions if the supranational entity is unable to repay its borrowings. There is no guaranty that stockholders will continue to make any necessary additional capital contributions. If such contributions are not made, the entity may be unable to pay interest or repay principal on its debt securities, and the Fund may lose money on such investments.
SWAP AGREEMENTS. The  Fund may enter into swap transactions, including, but not limited to, equity, interest rate, index, credit default, total return and, to the extent that it invests in foreign currency-denominated securities, currency exchange rate swap agreements. In addition, the Fund may enter into options on swap agreements (“swap options”). These swap transactions are entered into in an attempt to obtain a particular return when it is considered desirable to do so, possibly at a lower cost to the Fund than if the Fund had invested directly in an instrument that yielded that desired return. Swap transactions are a type of derivative. Derivatives are further discussed in the sub-sections entitled “Derivatives” and “Risk Factors Involving Derivatives.”
Swap agreements are two party contracts entered into primarily by institutional investors. In a standard “swap” transaction, two parties agree to exchange the returns (or differentials in rates of return) earned or realized on or calculated with respect to particular predetermined investments or instruments, which may be adjusted for an interest factor. The gross returns to be exchanged or “swapped” between the parties are generally calculated with respect to a “notional amount,” that is, the return on or increase in value of a particular dollar amount invested at a particular interest rate or in a “basket” of securities representing a particular index or other investments or instruments. Most swap agreements entered into by the Fund would calculate the obligations of the parties to the agreement on a “net basis.” Consequently the Fund’s current obligations (or rights) under a swap agreement will generally be equal only to the net amount to be paid or received under the agreement based on the relative values of the positions held by each party to the agreement (the “net amount”). The  Fund’s current obligations under a swap agreement will be accrued daily (offset against any amounts owed to the Fund).
If there is a default by the other party to such a transaction, the Fund will have contractual remedies pursuant to the agreement related to the transaction. Since swaps are individually negotiated, the Fund expects to achieve an acceptable degree of correlation between its rights to receive a return on its portfolio securities and its rights and obligations to receive and pay a return pursuant to swaps. The  Fund will enter into swaps only with counterparties meeting certain creditworthiness standards (generally, such counterparties would have to be eligible counterparties under the terms of the Fund’s repurchase agreement guidelines approved by the Board).
Certain swaps are required to be executed through a centralized exchange or regulated facility and be cleared through a regulated clearinghouse. Although this clearing mechanism is generally expected to reduce counterparty credit risk, it may disrupt or limit the swap market and may not result in swaps being easier to trade or value. As swaps become more standardized, the Fund may not be able to enter into swaps that meet its investment needs. The  Fund also may not be able to find a clearinghouse willing to accept a swap for clearing. In a cleared swap, a central clearing organization will be the counterparty to the transaction. The  Fund will assume the risk that the clearinghouse may be unable to perform its obligations. The  Fund will be required to maintain its positions with a clearing organization through one or more clearing brokers. The clearing organization will require the Fund to post margin and the broker may require the Fund to post additional margin to secure the Fund’s obligations. The amount of margin required may change from time to

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time. In addition, cleared transactions may be more expensive to maintain than OTC transactions and may require the Fund to deposit larger amounts of margin. The  Fund may not be able to recover margin amounts if the broker has financial difficulties. Also, the broker may require the Fund to terminate a derivatives position under certain circumstances. This may cause the Fund to lose money.
TEMPORARY DEFENSIVE STRATEGY AND SHORT-TERM INVESTMENTS. The Fund may temporarily invest without limit in money market instruments, including commercial paper of U.S. corporations, certificates of deposit, bankers' acceptances and other obligations of domestic banks, and obligations issued or guaranteed by the U.S. Government, its agencies or its instrumentalities, as part of a temporary defensive strategy.
The Fund may invest in money market instruments to maintain appropriate liquidity to meet anticipated redemptions. Money market instruments typically have a maturity of one year or less as measured from the date of purchase. The Fund also may temporarily hold cash or invest in money market instruments pending investment of proceeds from new sales of Fund shares or during periods of portfolio restructuring.
TOTAL RETURN SWAP AGREEMENTS. The Fund may enter into total return swap agreements. Total return swap agreements are contracts in which one party agrees to make periodic payments based on the change in market value of the underlying assets, which may include a specified security, basket of securities or securities indices during the specified period, in return for periodic payments based on a fixed or variable interest rate or the total return from other underlying assets. Total return swap agreements may be used to obtain exposure to a security or market without owning or taking physical custody of such security or market. Total return swap agreements may effectively add leverage to the Fund’s portfolio because, in addition to its total net assets, the Fund would be subject to investment exposure on the notional amount of the swap. Total return swap agreements entail the risk that a party will default on its payment obligations to the Fund thereunder. Swap agreements also bear the risk that the Fund will not be able to meet its obligation to the counterparty.
U.S. GOVERNMENT AND AGENCY SECURITIES. The Fund may invest in adjustable rate and fixed rate U.S. Government securities. U.S. Government securities are instruments issued or guaranteed by the U.S. Treasury or by an agency or instrumentality of the U.S. Government. U.S. Government guarantees do not extend to the yield or value of the securities or the Fund’s shares. Not all U.S. Government securities are backed by the full faith and credit of the United States. Some are supported only by the credit of the issuing agency.
U.S. Treasury securities include bills, notes, bonds and other debt securities issued by the U.S. Treasury. These instruments are direct obligations of the U.S. Government and, as such, are backed by the full faith and credit of the United States. They differ primarily in their interest rates, the lengths of their maturities and the dates of their issuances.
Securities issued by agencies of the U.S. Government or instrumentalities of the U.S. Government, including those which are guaranteed by Federal agencies or instrumentalities, may or may not be backed by the full faith and credit of the United States. Obligations of Ginnie Mae, the Farmers Home Administration and the Small Business Administration are backed by the full faith and credit of the United States. In the case of securities not backed by the full faith and credit of the United States, the Fund must look principally to the agency issuing or guaranteeing the obligation for ultimate repayment and may not be able to assert a claim against the United States if the agency or instrumentality does not meet its commitments.
The Fund may also invest in component parts of U.S. Government securities, namely either the corpus (principal) of such obligations or one or more of the interest payments scheduled to be paid on such obligations. These obligations may take the form of (1) obligations from which the interest coupons have been stripped; (2) the interest coupons that are stripped; (3) book-entries at a Federal Reserve member bank representing ownership of obligation components; or (4) receipts evidencing the component parts (corpus or coupons) of U.S. Government obligations that have not actually been stripped. Such receipts evidence ownership of component parts of U.S. Government obligations (corpus or coupons) purchased by a third party (typically an investment banking firm) and held on behalf of the third party in physical or book-entry form by a major commercial bank or trust company pursuant to a custody agreement with the third party. The Fund may also invest in custodial receipts held by a third party that are not U.S. Government securities.
UTILITY INDUSTRIES. Risks that are intrinsic to the utility industries include difficulty in obtaining an adequate return on invested capital, difficulty in financing large construction programs during an inflationary period, restrictions on operations and increased cost and delays attributable to environmental considerations and regulation, difficulty in raising capital in adequate amounts on reasonable terms in periods of high inflation and unsettled capital markets, technological innovations that may render existing plants, equipment or products obsolete, the potential impact of natural or man-made disasters, increased costs and reduced availability of certain types of fuel, occasionally reduced availability and high costs of natural gas for resale, the effects of energy conservation, the effects of a national energy policy and lengthy delays and greatly increased costs and other problems associated with the design, construction, licensing, regulation and operation of nuclear facilities for electric generation, including, among other considerations, the problems associated with

PGIM Jennison International Opportunities Fund 28

the use of radioactive materials and the disposal of radioactive wastes. There are substantial differences between the regulatory practices and policies of various jurisdictions, and any given regulatory agency may make major shifts in policy from time to time. There is no assurance that regulatory authorities will, in the future, grant rate increases or that such increases will be adequate to permit the payment of dividends on common stocks. Additionally, existing and possible future regulatory legislation may make it even more difficult for these utilities to obtain adequate relief. Certain of the issuers of securities held in the Fund’s portfolio may own or operate nuclear generating facilities. Governmental authorities may from time to time review existing policies and impose additional requirements governing the licensing, construction and operation of nuclear power plants. Prolonged changes in climatic conditions can also have a significant impact on both the revenues of an electric and gas utility as well as the expenses of a utility, particularly a hydro-based electric utility.
Utility companies in the United States and in foreign countries are generally subject to regulation. In the United States, most utility companies are regulated by state and/or federal authorities. Such regulation is intended to ensure appropriate standards of service and adequate capacity to meet public demand. Generally, prices are also regulated in the United States and in foreign countries with the intention of protecting the public while ensuring that the rate of return earned by utility companies is sufficient to allow them to attract capital in order to grow and continue to provide appropriate services. There can be no assurance that such pricing policies or rates of return will continue in the future.
The nature of regulation of the utility industries continues to evolve both in the United States and in foreign countries. In recent years, changes in regulation in the United States increasingly have allowed utility companies to provide services and products outside their traditional geographic areas and lines of business, creating new areas of competition within the industries. In some instances, utility companies are operating on an unregulated basis. Because of trends toward deregulation and the evolution of independent power producers as well as new entrants to the field of telecommunications, non-regulated providers of utility services have become a significant part of their respective industries. The subadviser believes that the emergence of competition and deregulation will result in certain utility companies being able to earn more than their traditional regulated rates of return, while others may be forced to defend their core business from increased competition and may be less profitable. Reduced profitability, as well as new uses of funds (such as for expansion, operations or stock buybacks) could result in cuts in dividend payout rates. The subadviser seeks to take advantage of favorable investment opportunities that may arise from these structural changes. Of course, there can be no assurance that favorable developments will occur in the future.
Foreign utility companies are also subject to regulation, although such regulations may or may not be comparable to those in the United States. Foreign utility companies may be more heavily regulated by their respective governments than utilities in the United States and, as in the United States, generally are required to seek government approval for rate increases. In addition, many foreign utilities use fuels that may cause more pollution than those used in the United States, which may require such utilities to invest in pollution control equipment to meet any proposed pollution restrictions. Foreign regulatory systems vary from country to country and may evolve in ways different from regulation in the United States.
The  Fund’s investment policies are designed to enable it to capitalize on evolving investment opportunities throughout the world. For example, the rapid growth of certain foreign economies will necessitate expansion of capacity in the utility industries in those countries. Although many foreign utility companies currently are government-owned, thereby limiting current investment opportunities for the Fund, the subadviser believes that, in order to attract significant capital for growth, foreign governments are likely to seek global investors through the privatization of their utility industries. Privatization, which refers to the trend toward investor ownership of assets rather than government ownership, is expected to occur in newer, faster-growing economies and in mature economies. Of course, there is no assurance that such favorable developments will occur or that investment opportunities in foreign markets for the Fund will increase.
The revenues of domestic and foreign utility companies generally reflect the economic growth and development in the geographic areas in which they do business.
Electric. The electric utility industry consists of companies that are engaged principally in the generation, transmission and sale of electric energy, although many also provide other energy-related services. In the past, electric utility companies, in general, have been favorably affected by lower fuel and financing costs and the full or near completion of major construction programs. In addition, many of these companies have generated cash flows in excess of current operating expenses and construction expenditures, permitting some degree of diversification into unregulated businesses. Some electric utilities have also taken advantage of the right to sell power outside of their traditional geographic areas. Electric utility companies have historically been subject to the risks associated with increases in fuel and other operating costs, high interest costs on borrowings needed for capital construction programs, costs associated with compliance with environmental and safety regulations and changes in the regulatory climate. As interest rates declined, many utilities refinanced high cost debt and in doing so improved their fixed charges coverage. Regulators, however, lowered allowed rates of return as interest rates declined and thereby caused the benefits of the rate declines to be shared wholly or in part with customers. In a period of rising interest rates, the allowed rates of return may not keep pace with the utilities’ increased costs. The construction and operation of nuclear

29

power facilities are subject to increased scrutiny by, and evolving regulations of, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and state agencies having comparable jurisdiction. Increased scrutiny might result in higher operating costs and higher capital expenditures, with the risk that the regulators may disallow inclusion of these costs in rate authorizations or the risk that a company may not be permitted to operate or complete construction of a facility. In addition, operators of nuclear power plants may be subject to significant costs for disposal of nuclear fuel and for decommissioning such plants.
The rating agencies look closely at the business profile of utilities. Ratings for companies are expected to be impacted to a greater extent in the future by the division of their asset base. Electric utility companies that focus more on the generation of electricity may be assigned less favorable ratings as this business is expected to be competitive and the least regulated. On the other hand, companies that focus on transmission and distribution which is expected to be the least competitive and the more regulated part of the business may see higher ratings given the greater predictability of cash flow.
A number of states are considering or have enacted deregulation proposals. The introduction of competition into the industry as a result of such deregulation has at times resulted in lower revenue, lower credit ratings, increased default risk, and lower electric utility security prices. Such increased competition may also cause long-term contracts, which electric utilities previously entered into to buy power, to become “stranded assets,” which have no economic value. Any loss associated with such contracts must be absorbed by ratepayers and investors. In addition, in anticipation of increasing competition, some electric utilities have acquired electric utilities overseas to diversify, enhance earnings and gain experience in operating in a deregulated environment. In some instances, such acquisitions have involved significant borrowings, which have burdened the acquirer’s balance sheet. There is no assurance that current deregulation proposals will be adopted. However, deregulation in any form could significantly impact the electric utilities industry.
Gas. Gas transmission companies and gas distribution companies are undergoing significant changes. In the United States, interstate transmission companies are regulated by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, which is reducing its regulation of the industry. Many companies have diversified into oil and gas exploration and development, making returns more sensitive to energy prices. In the recent decade, gas utility companies have been adversely affected by disruptions in the oil industry and have also been affected by increased concentration and competition. In the opinion of the subadviser, however, environmental considerations could improve the gas industry outlook in the future. For example, natural gas is the cleanest of the hydrocarbon fuels, and this may result in incremental shifts in fuel consumption toward natural gas and away from oil and coal, even for electricity generation. However, technological or regulatory changes within the industry may delay or prevent this result.
Telecommunications. The telecommunications industry today includes both traditional telephone companies, with a history of broad market coverage and highly regulated businesses, and cable companies, which began as small, lightly regulated businesses focused on limited markets. Today these two historically different businesses are converging in an industry that is trending toward larger, competitive, national and international markets with an emphasis on deregulation. Companies that distribute telephone services and provide access to the telephone networks still comprise the greatest portion of this segment, but non-regulated activities such as wireless telephone services, paging, data transmission and processing, equipment retailing, computer software and hardware and internet services are becoming increasingly significant components as well. In particular, wireless and internet telephone services continue to gain market share at the expense of traditional telephone companies. The presence of unregulated companies in this industry and the entry of traditional telephone companies into unregulated or less regulated businesses provide significant investment opportunities with companies which may increase their earnings at faster rates than had been allowed in traditional regulated businesses. Still, increasing competition, technological innovations and other structural changes could adversely affect the profitability of such utilities and the growth rate of their dividends. Given mergers and proposed legislation and enforcement changes, it is likely that both traditional telephone companies and cable companies will continue to provide an expanding range of utility services to both residential, corporate and governmental customers.
Water. Water supply utilities are companies that collect, purify, distribute and sell water. In the United States and around the world the industry is highly fragmented because most of the supplies are owned by local authorities. Companies in this industry are generally mature and are experiencing little or no per capita volume growth. In the opinion of the subadviser, there may be opportunities for certain companies to acquire other water utility companies and for foreign acquisition of domestic companies. The subadviser believes that favorable investment opportunities may result from consolidation of this segment. As with other utilities, however, increased regulation, increased costs and potential disruptions in supply may adversely affect investments in water supply utilities. There can be no assurance that the positive developments noted above, including those relating to privatization and changing regulation, will occur or that risk factors other than those noted above will not develop in the future.
WARRANTS AND RIGHTS. Warrants and rights are securities permitting, but not obligating, the warrant holder to subscribe for other securities. Buying a warrant does not make the Fund a shareholder of the underlying stock. The warrant holder has no right to dividends or votes on the underlying stock. A warrant does not carry any right to assets of the issuer, and for this reason investment in warrants may be more speculative than other equity-based investments.

PGIM Jennison International Opportunities Fund 30

WHEN-ISSUED SECURITIES, DELAYED-DELIVERY SECURITIES AND FORWARD COMMITMENTS. The Fund may purchase or sell securities that the Fund is entitled to receive on a when-issued basis. The Fund may also purchase or sell securities on a delayed-delivery basis or through a forward commitment. When delayed-delivery securities are purchased, the price and interest rate are fixed at the time of purchase. When-issued, delayed-delivery and forward commitment transactions all involve the purchase or sale of securities with payment and delivery taking place in the future. The Fund enters into these transactions to obtain what is considered an advantageous price to the Fund at the time of entering into the transaction. The Fund has not established any limit on the percentage of its assets that may be committed in connection with these transactions.
There can be no assurance that a security purchased on a when-issued basis will be issued or that a security purchased or sold through a forward commitment will be delivered. The value of securities in these transactions on the delivery date may be more or less than the Fund’s purchase price. The Fund may bear the risk of a decline in the value of the security in these transactions and may not benefit from an appreciation in the value of the security during the commitment period.
YANKEE OBLIGATIONS. The  Fund may invest in U.S. dollar-denominated debt securities of foreign corporations issued in the United States and U.S. dollar-denominated debt securities issued or guaranteed as to payment of principal and interest by governments, quasi-governmental entities, government agencies, and other governmental entities of foreign countries and supranational entities, which securities are also issued in the United States (Yankee obligations). Debt securities of quasi-governmental entities are issued by entities owned by either a national, state or equivalent government or are obligations of a political unit that is not backed by the national government’s full faith and credit and general taxing powers.
ZERO COUPON SECURITIES, PAY-IN-KIND SECURITIES AND DEFERRED PAYMENT SECURITIES. The Fund may invest in zero coupon securities. Zero coupon securities are securities that are sold at a discount to par value and on which interest payments are not made during the life of the security. The discount approximates the total amount of interest the security will accrue and compound over the period until maturity on the particular interest payment date at a rate of interest reflecting the market rate of the security at the time of issuance. Upon maturity, the holder is entitled to receive the par value of the security. While interest payments are not made on such securities, holders of such securities are deemed to have received income (“phantom income”) annually, notwithstanding that cash may not be received currently. To the extent a distribution is paid, there may be uncertainty about the source of the distribution. The effect of owning instruments that do not make current interest payments is that a fixed yield is earned not only on the original investment but also, in effect, on all discount accretion during the life of the obligations. This implicit reinvestment of earnings at the same rate eliminates the risk of being unable to invest distributions at a rate as high as the implicit yield on the zero coupon bond, but at the same time eliminates the holder's ability to reinvest at higher rates in the future. For this reason, some of these securities may be subject to substantially greater price fluctuations during periods of changing market interest rates than are comparable securities that pay interest currently, which fluctuation increases the longer the period to maturity. These investments benefit the issuer by mitigating its need for cash to meet debt service, but also require a higher rate of return to attract investors who are willing to defer receipt of cash. Because these securities do not pay current cash income, their price can be volatile when interest rates fluctuate and an investment in these securities generally has a greater potential for complete loss of principal and/or return than an investment in debt securities that make periodic interest payments. Such investments are more vulnerable to the creditworthiness of the issuer and any other parties upon which performance relies. If the issuer defaults, the Fund may not obtain any return on its investment. These securities may be subject to less liquidity in the event of adverse market conditions than comparably rated securities that pay cash interest at regular intervals. The Fund accrues income with respect to these securities for federal income tax and accounting purposes prior to the receipt of cash payments.
Pay-in-kind securities are securities that have interest payable by delivery of additional securities. Upon maturity, the holder is entitled to receive the aggregate par value of the securities. Deferred payment securities are securities that remain a zero coupon security until a predetermined date, at which time the stated coupon rate becomes effective and interest becomes payable at regular intervals. Pay-in-kind and deferred payment securities may be subject to greater fluctuation in value and lesser liquidity in the event of adverse market conditions than comparable rated securities paying cash interest at regular intervals.
In addition to the above described risks, there are certain other risks related to investing in zero coupon, pay-in-kind and deferred payment securities. During a period of severe market conditions, the market for such securities may become even less liquid. In addition, as these securities do not pay cash interest, the Fund’s investment exposure to these securities and their risks, including credit risk, will increase during the time these securities are held in the Fund’s portfolio. Further, to maintain its qualification for pass-through treatment under the federal tax laws, the Fund is required to distribute income to its shareholders and, consequently, may have to dispose of its portfolio securities under disadvantageous circumstances to generate the cash, or may have to leverage itself by borrowing the cash to satisfy these distributions, as they relate to the distribution of phantom income and the value of the paid-in-kind interest. The required distributions will result in an increase in the Fund’s exposure to such securities.

31

INVESTMENT RESTRICTIONS
The Fund has adopted the restrictions listed below as fundamental policies. Under the 1940 Act, a fundamental policy is one that cannot be changed without the approval of the holders of a majority of the Fund’s outstanding voting securities. A “majority of the Fund’s outstanding voting securities,” when used in this SAI, means the lesser of (i) 67% of the voting shares represented at a meeting at which more than 50% of the outstanding voting shares are present in person or represented by proxy or (ii) more than 50% of the outstanding voting shares.
1. The Fund may not purchase the securities of any issuer if, as a result, the Fund would fail to be a diversified company within the meaning of the 1940 Act, and the rules and regulations promulgated thereunder, as each may be amended from time to time, except to the extent that the Fund may be permitted to do so by exemptive order, SEC release, no-action letter or similar relief or interpretations (collectively, the 1940 Act Laws, Interpretations and Exemptions).
2. The Fund may not issue senior securities or borrow money or pledge its assets, except as permitted by the 1940 Act Laws, Interpretations and Exemptions. For purposes of this restriction, the purchase or sale of securities on a when-issued or delayed delivery basis, reverse repurchase agreements, dollar rolls, short sales, derivative and hedging transactions such as interest rate swap transactions, and collateral arrangements with respect thereto, and transactions similar to any of the foregoing and collateral arrangements with respect thereto, and obligations of the Fund to its Directors pursuant to deferred compensation arrangements are not deemed to be a pledge of assets or the issuance of a senior security.
3. The Fund may not buy or sell real estate, except that investment in securities of issuers that invest in real estate and investments in mortgage-backed securities, mortgage participations or other instruments supported or secured by interests in real estate are not subject to this limitation, and except that the Fund may exercise rights relating to such securities, including the right to enforce security interests and to hold real estate acquired by reason of such enforcement until that real estate can be liquidated in an orderly manner.
4. The Fund may not buy or sell physical commodities or contracts involving physical commodities. The Fund may purchase and sell (i) derivative, hedging and similar instruments such as financial futures contracts and options thereon, and (ii) securities or instruments backed by, or the return from which is linked to, physical commodities or currencies, such as forward currency exchange contracts, and the Fund may exercise rights relating to such instruments, including the right to enforce security interests and to hold physical commodities and contracts involving physical commodities acquired as a result of the Fund's ownership of instruments supported or secured thereby until they can be liquidated in an orderly manner.
5. The Fund may not act as underwriter except to the extent that, in connection with the disposition of portfolio securities, it may be deemed to be an underwriter under certain federal securities laws.
6. The Fund may not purchase any security if as a result 25% or more of the Fund's total assets would be invested in the securities of issuers having their principal business activities in the same group of industries, except for defensive purposes, and except that this limitation does not apply to securities issued or guaranteed by the U.S. Government, its agencies or instrumentalities.
7. The Fund may make loans, including loans of assets of the Fund, repurchase agreements, trade claims, loan participations or similar investments, or as permitted by the 1940 Act Laws, Interpretations and Exemptions. The acquisition of bonds, debentures, other debt securities or instruments, or participations or other interests therein and investments in government obligations, commercial paper, certificates of deposit, bankers' acceptances or instruments similar to any of the foregoing will not be considered the making of a loan.
For purposes of Investment Restriction 1, the Fund will currently not purchase any security (other than obligations of the U.S. Government, its agencies or instrumentalities) if as a result, with respect to 75% of the Fund’s total assets, (i) more than 5% of the Fund’s total assets (determined at the time of investment) would be invested in securities of a single issuer and (ii) the Fund would own more than 10% of the outstanding voting securities of any single issuer.  With respect to the remaining 25% of its total assets, the Fund can invest more than 5% of its assets in one issuer. Under the 1940 Act, the Fund cannot change its classification from diversified to non-diversified without shareholder approval.
With respect to Investment Restriction 2 above, the 1940 Act permits the Fund to borrow money in amounts of up to one-third of the Fund’s total assets from banks for any purpose, and to borrow up to 5% of the Fund’s total assets from banks or other lenders for temporary purposes. (The Fund’s total assets include the amounts being borrowed.) To limit the risks attendant to borrowing, the 1940 Act and rules thereunder require the Fund to maintain an “asset coverage” of at least 300% of the amount of its borrowings, provided that in the event that the Fund’s asset coverage falls below 300%, the Fund is required to reduce the amount of its borrowings so that it meets the 300% asset coverage threshold within three days (not including Sundays and holidays). Asset coverage means the ratio that the value of the Fund’s total assets (including amounts borrowed), minus liabilities other than borrowings, bears to the aggregate amount of all borrowings. Borrowing money to increase portfolio holdings is known as “leveraging.” Borrowing, especially when used for

PGIM Jennison International Opportunities Fund 32

leverage, may cause the value of the Fund’s shares to be more volatile than if the Fund did not borrow. This is because borrowing tends to magnify the effect of any increase or decrease in the value of the Fund’s portfolio holdings. Borrowed money thus creates an opportunity for greater gains, but also greater losses. To repay borrowings, the Fund may have to sell securities at a time and at a price that is unfavorable to the Fund. There also are costs associated with borrowing money, and these costs would offset and could eliminate the Fund’s net investment income in any given period. Investment Restriction 2 will be interpreted to permit the Fund to engage in trading practices and investments that may be considered to be borrowing to the extent permitted by the 1940 Act and the rules thereunder. Notwithstanding the exclusion or derivatives from the limitations of Investment Restriction 2, certain trading practices and investments such as derivatives transactions, may be treated as senior securities under the 1040 Act. Rule 18f-4 under the 1940 Act provides an exemption from certain limitations on the issuance of senor securities for transaction in derivatives instruments where the fund complies with the requirements of the rule. Practices and investments that may involve leverage but are not considered to be borrowings or senior securities are not subject to the policy.  In addition, Investment Restriction 2 will be interpreted not to prevent investments in derivatives or any collateral arrangements associated therewith or the Fund’s deferred compensation arrangements with the Directors.
Investment Restriction 3 prohibits the Fund from buying or selling real estate.  The Fund may invest in real estate-related companies, companies whose businesses consist in whole or in part of investing in real estate, instruments (like mortgages and mortgage participations) that are secured by real estate or interests therein, or REIT securities.  The Fund may exercise rights relating to real estate securities, including the right to enforce security interests and to hold real estate acquired by reason of such enforcement until that real estate can be liquidated in an orderly manner.
Investment Restriction 4 prohibits the Fund from buying or selling physical commodities (such as oil or grains) or contracts involving physical commodities.  The Fund may purchase and sell derivative, hedging and similar instruments such as financial futures contracts and options thereon (such as futures or options on market indexes, currencies, interest rates or some other benchmark, and swap agreements) and securities or instruments backed by, or the return from which is linked to, physical commodities or currencies, such as forward currency exchange contracts.  In addition, the Fund may exercise rights relating to such instruments, including the right to enforce security interests and to hold physical commodities and contracts involving physical commodities acquired as a result of the Fund’s ownership of instruments supported or secured thereby until they can be liquidated in an orderly manner.
Investment Restriction 5 prohibits the Fund from acting as underwriter except to the extent that, in connection with the disposition of portfolio securities, it may be deemed to be an underwriter under certain federal securities laws.  A fund engaging in transactions involving disposition of portfolio securities may be considered to be an underwriter under the 1933 Act. Under the 1933 Act, an underwriter may be liable for material omissions or misstatements in an issuer’s registration statement or prospectus. Securities purchased from an issuer and not registered for sale under the 1933 Act are considered restricted securities. There may be a limited market for these securities. If these securities are registered under the 1933 Act, they may then be eligible for sale but participating in the sale may subject the seller to underwriter liability. These risks could apply to a fund investing in restricted securities. The Fund may purchase restricted securities without limit (except to the extent that restricted securities are subject to the limitation on investment in illiquid investments).
With respect to Investment Restriction 6 relating to concentration, the 1940 Act does not define what constitutes “concentration” in an industry. The SEC staff has taken the position that investment of 25% or more of a fund’s total assets in one or more issuers conducting their principal business activities in the same industry or group of industries constitutes concentration. It is possible that interpretations of concentration could change in the future. A fund that invests a significant percentage of its total assets in a single industry may be particularly susceptible to adverse events affecting that industry and may be more risky than a fund that does not concentrate in an industry. The policy in Investment Restriction 6 will be interpreted to refer to concentration as that term may be interpreted from time to time. Investment without limit in securities of the U.S. Government and its agencies or instrumentalities is permitted by the restriction. Accordingly, issuers of the foregoing securities will not be considered to be members of any industry. In addition, although the Fund does not concentrate its investments in a particular industry or group of industries, it may, for temporary defensive purposes, do so. If this occurs, the Fund would, on a temporary basis, be subject to risks that may be unique or pronounced relating to a particular industry or group of industries. These risks could include greater sensitivity to inflationary pressures or supply and demand for a particular product or service.
For purposes of Investment Restriction 6, the Fund relies on the “industry” classification of the Global Industry Classification Standard (“GICS”), published by S&P, when applying this 25% limit.  The Fund's reliance on the classification system is not a fundamental policy of the Fund and, therefore, can be changed without shareholder approval.
For purposes of Investment Restriction 7, the Fund may currently lend up to 33 13% of the value of its total assets.

33

With respect to Investment Restriction 7, the 1940 Act does not prohibit the Fund from making loans; however, SEC staff interpretations currently prohibit funds from lending more than one-third of their total assets, except through the purchase of debt obligations or the use of repurchase agreements. (A repurchase agreement is an agreement to purchase a security, coupled with an agreement to sell that security back to the original seller on an agreed-upon date at a price that reflects current interest rates. The SEC frequently treats repurchase agreements as loans.) Investment Restriction 7 permits the Fund to lend its portfolio securities. While lending securities may be a source of income to the Fund, as with other extensions of credit, there are risks of delay in recovery or even loss of rights in the underlying securities should the borrower fail financially. Additionally, losses could result from the reinvestment of collateral received on loaned securities in investments that decline in value, default, or do not perform as well as expected. Investment Restriction 7 also permits the Fund to make loans of money, including loans of money to other PGIM Funds pursuant to an SEC order for exemptive relief.  Investment Restriction 7 will be interpreted not to prevent the Fund from purchasing or investing in debt obligations and loans.
Whenever any fundamental investment policy or investment restriction states a maximum percentage of the Fund's assets, it is intended that, if the percentage limitation is met at the time the investment is made, a later change in percentage resulting from changing total asset values will not be considered a violation of such policy.
The Fund’s fundamental investment restrictions will be interpreted broadly. For example, the policies will be interpreted to refer to the 1940 Act and the related rules as they are in effect from time to time, and to interpretations and modifications of or relating to the 1940 Act by the SEC and others as they are given from time to time. When a restriction provides that an investment practice may be conducted as permitted by the 1940 Act, the restriction will be interpreted to mean either that the 1940 Act expressly permits the practice or that the 1940 Act does not prohibit the practice.
Non-Fundamental Investment Policies
The Fund’s non-fundamental investment policies are as follows:
The Fund may not invest in other registered open-end management investment companies and registered unit investment trusts in reliance upon the provisions of subparagraphs (G) or (F) of Section 12(d)(1) of the 1940 Act. The foregoing investment policy does not restrict the Fund from (i) acquiring securities of other registered investment companies in connection with a merger, consolidation, reorganization, or acquisition of assets, or (ii) purchasing the securities of registered investment companies, to the extent otherwise permissible under Section 12(d)(1) of the 1940 Act, Rule 12d1-4 or 1940 Act Laws, Interpretations and Exemptions.
The Fund may not purchase or otherwise acquire any security if immediately after the acquisition the value of illiquid investments held by the Fund would exceed 15% of the Fund’s net assets except as permitted by 1940 Act Laws, Interpretations and Exemptions. The Fund monitors the portion of the Fund’s net assets that is invested in illiquid investments on an ongoing basis, not only at the time of investment in such securities.
The Fund’s investment objective is not a fundamental policy.
Diversification.
The Fund is currently classified as a “diversified” fund under the 1940 Act. In general, this means that the Fund may not purchase securities of an issuer (other than obligations issued or guaranteed by the U.S. Government, its agencies or instrumentalities) if, with respect to 75% of its total assets, (a) more than 5% of the Fund’s total assets would be invested in securities of that issuer or (b) the Fund would hold more than 10% of the outstanding voting securities of that issuer. With respect to the remaining 25% of its total assets, the Fund can invest more than 5% of its assets in one issuer. Under the 1940 Act, the Fund cannot change its classification from diversified to non-diversified without shareholder approval.
INFORMATION ABOUT BOARD MEMBERS AND OFFICERS
Information about Board Members and Officers of the Fund is set forth below. Board Members who are not deemed to be “interested persons” of the Fund, as defined in the 1940 Act, are referred to as “Independent Board Members.” Board Members who are deemed to be “interested persons” of the Fund are referred to as “Interested Board Members.” The Board Members are responsible for the overall supervision of the operations of the Fund and perform the various duties imposed on the directors of investment companies by the 1940 Act. The Board in turn elects the Officers, who are responsible for administering the day-to-day operations of the Fund.

PGIM Jennison International Opportunities Fund 34

Independent Board Members
 
 
Name
Year of Birth
Position(s)
Portfolios Overseen
Principal Occupation(s)
During Past Five Years
Other Directorships
Held During
Past Five Years
Length of
Board Service
Ellen S. Alberding
1958
Board Member
Portfolios Overseen: 100
President and Board Member, The Joyce
Foundation (charitable foundation) (since
2002); formerly Vice Chair, City Colleges of
Chicago (community college system)
(2011-2015); Trustee, National Park Foundation
(charitable foundation for national park system)
(2009-2018); Trustee, Economic Club of
Chicago (2009-2016); Trustee, Loyola University
(since 2018).
None.
Since September 2013
Kevin J. Bannon
1952
Board Member
Portfolios Overseen: 100
Retired; formerly Managing Director (April
2008-May 2015) and Chief Investment Officer
(October 2008-November 2013) of Highmount
Capital LLC (registered investment adviser);
formerly Executive Vice President and Chief
Investment Officer (April 1993-August 2007) of
Bank of New York Company; President (May
2003-May 2007) of BNY Hamilton Family of
Mutual Funds.
Director of Urstadt Biddle Properties (equity real
estate investment trust) (since September
2008).
Since July 2008
Linda W. Bynoe
1952
Board Member
Portfolios Overseen: 97
President and Chief Executive Officer (since
March 1995) and formerly Chief Operating
Officer (December 1989-February 1995) of
Telemat Limited LLC (formerly Telemat Ltd)
(management consulting); formerly Vice
President (January 1985-June 1989) at Morgan
Stanley & Co. (broker-dealer).
Trustee of Equity Residential (residential real
estate) (since December 2009); Director of
Northern Trust Corporation (financial services)
(since April 2006); formerly Director of Anixter
International, Inc. (communication products
distributor) (January 2006-June 2020).
Since March 2005
Barry H. Evans
1960
Board Member
Portfolios Overseen: 99
Retired; formerly President (2005-2016), Global
Chief Operating Officer (2014-2016), Chief
Investment Officer - Global Head of Fixed
Income (1998-2014), and various portfolio
manager roles (1986-2006), Manulife Asset
Management (asset management).
Formerly Director, Manulife Trust Company
(2011-2018); formerly Director, Manulife Asset
Management Limited (2015-2017); formerly
Chairman of the Board of Directors of Manulife
Asset Management U.S. (2005-2016); formerly
Chairman of the Board, Declaration Investment
Management and Research (2008-2016).
Since September 2017
Keith F. Hartstein
1956
Board Member &
Independent Chair
Portfolios Overseen: 100
Retired; Member (November 2014-September
2022) of the Governing Council of the
Independent Directors Council (IDC)
(organization of independent mutual fund
directors); formerly Executive Committee of the
IDC Board of Governors (October
2019-December 2021); formerly President and
Chief Executive Officer (2005-2012), Senior Vice
President (2004-2005), Senior Vice President of
Sales and Marketing (1997-2004), and various
executive management positions (1990-1997),
John Hancock Funds, LLC (asset management);
Chairman, Investment Company Institute’s
Sales Force Marketing Committee (2003-2008).
None.
Since September 2013
Laurie Simon Hodrick
1962
Board Member
Portfolios Overseen: 96
A. Barton Hepburn Professor Emerita of
Economics in the Faculty of Business, Columbia
Business School (since 2018); Visiting Fellow at
the Hoover Institution, Stanford University
(since 2015); Sole Member, ReidCourt LLC
(since 2008) (a consulting firm); formerly
Visiting Professor of Law, Stanford Law School
(2015-2021); formerly A. Barton Hepburn
Professor of Economics in the Faculty of
Business, Columbia Business School
(1996-2017); formerly Managing Director,
Global Head of Alternative Investment
Strategies, Deutsche Bank (2006-2008).
Independent Director, Andela (since January
2022) (global talent network); Independent
Director, Roku (since December 2020)
(communication services); formerly Independent
Director, Synnex Corporation (2019-2021)
(information technology); formerly Independent
Director, Kabbage, Inc. (2018-2020) (financial
services); formerly Independent Director,
Corporate Capital Trust (2017-2018) (a
business development company).
Since September 2017

35

Independent Board Members
 
 
Name
Year of Birth
Position(s)
Portfolios Overseen
Principal Occupation(s)
During Past Five Years
Other Directorships
Held During
Past Five Years
Length of
Board Service
Brian K. Reid
1961
Board Member
Portfolios Overseen: 99
Retired; formerly Chief Economist for the
Investment Company Institute (ICI)
(2005-2017); formerly Senior Economist and
Director of Industry and Financial Analysis at
the ICI (1998-2004); formerly Senior Economist,
Industry and Financial Analysis at the ICI
(1996-1998); formerly Staff Economist at the
Federal Reserve Board (1989-1996); Director,
ICI Mutual Insurance Company (2012-2017).
None.
Since March 2018
Grace C. Torres
1959
Board Member
Portfolios Overseen: 99
Retired; formerly Treasurer and Principal
Financial and Accounting Officer of the PGIM
Funds, Target Funds, Advanced Series Trust,
Prudential Variable Contract Accounts and The
Prudential Series Fund (1998-June 2014);
Assistant Treasurer (March 1999-June 2014)
and Senior Vice President (September
1999-June 2014) of PGIM Investments LLC;
Assistant Treasurer (May 2003-June 2014) and
Vice President (June 2005-June 2014) of AST
Investment Services, Inc.; Senior Vice President
and Assistant Treasurer (May 2003-June 2014)
of Prudential Annuities Advisory Services, Inc.
Director (since January 2018) of OceanFirst
Financial Corp. and OceanFirst Bank; formerly
Director (July 2015-January 2018) of Sun
Bancorp, Inc. N.A. and Sun National Bank.
Since November 2014
Interested Board Members
Name
Year of Birth
Position(s)
Portfolios Overseen
Principal Occupation(s)
During Past Five Years
Other Directorships
Held During
Past Five Years
Length of
Board Service
Stuart S. Parker
1962
Board Member &
President
Portfolios Overseen: 99
President, Chief Executive Officer, Chief
Operating Officer and Officer in Charge of PGIM
Investments LLC (formerly known as Prudential
Investments LLC) (since January 2012);
President and Principal Executive Officer
(“PEO”) (since September 2022) of the PGIM
Private Credit Fund; President and PEO (since
March 2022) of the PGIM Private Real Estate
Fund, Inc.; formerly Executive Vice President of
Jennison Associates LLC and Head of Retail
Distribution of PGIM Investments LLC (June
2005-December 2011); Investment Company
Institute - Board of Governors (since May 2012).
None.
Since January 2012
Scott E. Benjamin
1973
Board Member & Vice
President
Portfolios Overseen: 100
Executive Vice President (since May 2009) of
PGIM Investments LLC; Vice President (since
June 2012) of Prudential Investment
Management Services LLC; Executive Vice
President (since September 2009) of AST
Investment Services, Inc.; Senior Vice President
of Product Development and Marketing, PGIM
Investments (since February 2006); Vice
President (since September 2022) of the PGIM
Private Credit Fund; Vice President (since March
2022) of the PGIM Private Real Estate Fund,
Inc.; formerly Vice President of Product
Development and Product Management, PGIM
Investments LLC (2003-2006).
None.
Since March 2010

PGIM Jennison International Opportunities Fund 36

Fund Officers(a)
 
 
Name
Year of Birth
Fund Position
Principal Occupation(s) During Past Five Years
Length of
Service as Fund Officer
Claudia DiGiacomo
1974
Chief Legal Officer
Chief Legal Officer (since September 2022) of the PGIM Private Credit Fund; Chief Legal Officer (since July
2022) of the PGIM Private Real Estate Fund, Inc.; Chief Legal Officer, Executive Vice President and Secretary of
PGIM Investments LLC (since August 2020); Chief Legal Officer of Prudential Mutual Fund Services LLC (since
August 2020); Chief Legal Officer of PIFM Holdco, LLC (since August 2020); Vice President and Corporate
Counsel (since January 2005) of Prudential; and Corporate Counsel of AST Investment Services, Inc. (since
August 2020); formerly Vice President and Assistant Secretary of PGIM Investments LLC (2005-2020); formerly
Associate at Sidley Austin Brown & Wood LLP (1999-2004).
Since December 2005
Isabelle Sajous
1976
Chief Compliance Officer
Chief Compliance Officer (since April 2022) of PGIM Investments LLC, the PGIM Funds, Target Funds, PGIM ETF
Trust, PGIM Global High Yield Fund, Inc., PGIM High Yield Bond Fund, Inc., PGIM Short Duration High Yield
Opportunities Fund, Advanced Series Trust, The Prudential Series Fund and Prudential’s Gibraltar Fund, Inc.;
Chief Compliance Officer (since September 2022) of the PGIM Private Credit Fund; Chief Compliance Officer
(since March 2022) of the PGIM Private Real Estate Fund, Inc.; Vice President, Compliance of PGIM
Investments LLC (since December 2020); formerly Director, Compliance (July 2018-December 2020) of Credit
Suisse Asset Management LLC; and Vice President, Associate General Counsel & Deputy Chief Compliance
Officer of Cramer Rosenthal McGlynn, LLC (August 2014-July 2018).
Since April 2022
Andrew R. French
1962
Secretary
Vice President (since December 2018) of PGIM Investments LLC; Secretary (since September 2022) of the PGIM
Private Credit Fund; Secretary (since March 2022) of the PGIM Private Real Estate Fund, Inc.; formerly Vice
President and Corporate Counsel (2010-2018) of Prudential; formerly Director and Corporate Counsel
(2006-2010) of Prudential; Vice President and Assistant Secretary (since January 2007) of PGIM Investments
LLC; Vice President and Assistant Secretary (since January 2007) of Prudential Mutual Fund Services LLC.
Since October 2006
Melissa Gonzalez
1980
Assistant Secretary
Vice President and Corporate Counsel (since September 2018) of Prudential; Vice President and Assistant
Secretary (since August 2020) of PGIM Investments LLC; Assistant Secretary (since September 2022) of the
PGIM Private Credit Fund; Assistant Secretary (since March 2022) of the PGIM Private Real Estate Fund, Inc.;
formerly Director and Corporate Counsel (March 2014-September 2018) of Prudential.
Since March 2020
Patrick E. McGuinness
1986
Assistant Secretary
Vice President and Assistant Secretary (since August 2020) of PGIM Investments LLC; Director and Corporate
Counsel (since February 2017) of Prudential; Assistant Secretary (since September 2022) of the PGIM Private
Credit Fund; Assistant Secretary (since March 2022) of the PGIM Private Real Estate Fund, Inc.
Since June 2020
Debra Rubano
1975
Assistant Secretary
Vice President and Corporate Counsel (since November 2020) of Prudential; Assistant Secretary (since
September 2022) of the PGIM Private Credit Fund; Assistant Secretary (since March 2022) of the PGIM Private
Real Estate Fund, Inc; formerly Director and Senior Counsel of Allianz Global Investors U.S. Holdings LLC
(2010-2020) and Assistant Secretary of numerous funds in the Allianz fund complex (2015-2020).
Since December 2020
Kelly A. Coyne
1968
Assistant Secretary
Director, Investment Operations of Prudential Mutual Fund Services LLC (since 2010); Assistant Secretary
(since September 2022) of the PGIM Private Credit Fund; Assistant Secretary (since March 2022) of the PGIM
Private Real Estate Fund, Inc.
Since March 2015
Christian J. Kelly
1975
Treasurer and Principal Financial
and Accounting Officer
Vice President, Head of Fund Administration of PGIM Investments LLC (since November 2018); Principal
Financial Officer (since September 2022) of the PGIM Private Credit Fund; Principal Financial Officer (since
March 2022) of the PGIM Private Real Estate Fund, Inc.; formerly, Treasurer and Principal Accounting Officer
(March 2022- July 2022) of the PGIM Private Real Estate Fund, Inc.; formerly Director of Fund Administration of
Lord Abbett & Co. LLC (2009-2018), Treasurer and Principal Accounting Officer of the Lord Abbett Family of
Funds (2017-2018); Director of Accounting, Avenue Capital Group (2008-2009); Senior Manager, Investment
Management Practice of Deloitte & Touche LLP (1998-2007). 
Since January 2019
Lana Lomuti
1967
Assistant Treasurer
Vice President (since 2007) and Director (2005-2007), within PGIM Investments Fund Administration; formerly
Assistant Treasurer (December 2007-February 2014) of The Greater China Fund, Inc.
Since April 2014
Russ Shupak
1973
Assistant Treasurer
Vice President (since 2017) and Director (2013-2017), within PGIM Investments Fund Administration;
Treasurer and Principal Accounting Officer (since July 2022) of the PGIM Private Real Estate Fund, Inc.;
Assistant Treasurer (since September 2022) of the PGIM Private Credit Fund; formerly Assistant Treasurer
(March 2022 – July 2022) of the PGIM Private Real Estate Fund, Inc.
Since October 2019
Deborah Conway
1969
Assistant Treasurer
Vice President (since 2017) and Director (2007-2017), within PGIM Investments Fund Administration.
Since October
2019
Elyse M. McLaughlin
1974
Assistant Treasurer
Vice President (since 2017) and Director (2011-2017), within PGIM Investments Fund Administration;
Treasurer and Principal Accounting Officer (since September 2022) of the PGIM Private Credit Fund; Assistant
Treasurer (since March 2022) of the PGIM Private Real Estate Fund, Inc.
Since October 2019

37

Fund Officers(a)
 
 
Name
Year of Birth
Fund Position
Principal Occupation(s) During Past Five Years
Length of
Service as Fund Officer
Kelly Florio
1978
Anti-Money Laundering Compliance
Officer
Vice President, Corporate Compliance, Global Compliance Programs and Compliance Risk Management (since
December 2021) of Prudential; formerly, Head of Fraud Risk Management (October 2019 to December 2021) at
New York Life Insurance Company; formerly, Head of Key Risk Area Operations (November 2018 to October
2019), Director of the US Anti-Money Laundering Compliance Unit (2009-2018) and Bank Loss Prevention
Associate (2006 -2009) at MetLife.
Since June 2022
(a) Excludes Mr. Parker and Mr. Benjamin, interested Board Members who also serve as President and Vice President, respectively.
Explanatory Notes to Tables:
Board Members are deemed to be “Interested,” as defined in the 1940 Act, by reason of their affiliation with PGIM Investments LLC and/or an affiliate of PGIM Investments LLC.
Unless otherwise noted, the address of all Board Members and Officers is c/o PGIM Investments LLC, 655 Broad Street, Newark, New Jersey 07102-4410.
There is no set term of office for Board Members or Officers. The Board Members have adopted a retirement policy, which calls for the retirement of Board Members on December 31 of the year in which they reach the age of 75.
“Other Directorships Held” includes all directorships of companies required to register or file reports with the SEC under the 1934 Act (that is, “public companies”) or other investment companies registered under the 1940 Act.
“Portfolios Overseen” includes all investment companies managed by PGIM Investments LLC. The investment companies for which PGIM Investments LLC serves as manager include the PGIM Mutual Funds, Target Funds, The Prudential Variable Contract Accounts, PGIM ETF Trust, PGIM Private Real Estate Fund, Inc., PGIM Private Credit Fund, PGIM High Yield Bond Fund, Inc., PGIM Global High Yield Fund, Inc., PGIM Short Duration High Yield Opportunities Fund, The Prudential Series Fund, Prudential's Gibraltar Fund, Inc. and the Advanced Series Trust.
As used in the Fund Officers table “Prudential” means The Prudential Insurance Company of America.
COMPENSATION OF BOARD MEMBERS AND OFFICERS. Pursuant to a management agreement with the Prudential World Fund, Inc. on behalf of the Fund, the Manager pays all compensation of Fund Officers and employees as well as the fees and expenses of all Interested Board Members.
The Fund pays each Independent Board Member annual compensation in addition to certain out-of-pocket expenses. Independent Board Members who serve on Board Committees may receive additional compensation. The amount of annual compensation paid to each Independent Board Member may change as a result of the introduction of additional funds on whose Boards the Board Member may be asked to serve.
Independent Board Members may defer receipt of their fees pursuant to a deferred fee agreement with the Fund. Under the terms of the agreement, the Fund accrues deferred Board Members' fees daily which, in turn, accrue interest at a rate equivalent to the prevailing rate of 90-day U.S. Treasury Bills at the beginning of each calendar quarter or at the daily rate of return of any mutual fund managed by PGIM Investments chosen by the Board Member. Payment of the interest so accrued is also deferred and becomes payable at the option of the Board Member. The obligation to make payments of deferred Board Members' fees, together with interest thereon, is a general obligation of the Fund. The Fund does not have a retirement or pension plan for Board Members.
The following table sets forth the aggregate compensation paid by the Fund for the most recently completed fiscal year to the Independent Board Members for service on the Board, and the Board of any other investment company in the Fund Complex for the most recently completed calendar year. Board Members and officers who are “interested persons” of the Fund (as defined in the 1940 Act) do not receive compensation from PGIM Investments-managed funds and therefore are not shown in the following table.
Name
Aggregate Fiscal Year
Compensation from the Fund
Pension or Retirement Benefits
Accrued as Part of Fund Expenses
Estimated Annual Benefits
Upon Retirement
Total Compensation from Fund
and Fund Complex for Most
Recent Calendar Year
Compensation Received by Independent Board Members
Ellen S. Alberding***
$8,250
None
None
$332,000* (33/95)**
Kevin J. Bannon
$7,620
None
None
$312,000* (33/95)**
Linda W. Bynoe
$8,423
None
None
$332,000* (30/92)**
Barry Evans***
$9,360
None
None
$341,500* (32/94)**
Keith F. Hartstein
$10,653
None
None
$406,000* (33/95)**
Laurie Simon Hodrick***
$7,910
None
None
$316,000* (29/91)**
Brian Reid
$9,453
None
None
$330,500* (32/94)**
Grace C. Torres
$9,453
None
None
$345,500* (32/94)**
Explanatory Notes to Board Member Compensation Tables

PGIM Jennison International Opportunities Fund 38

* Compensation relates to portfolios that were in existence for any period during 2021.
** Number of funds and portfolios represent those in existence as of December 31, 2021 and excludes funds that have merged or liquidated during the year. Additionally, the number of funds and portfolios includes those which are approved as of December 31, 2021, however may commence operations after that date. No compensation is paid out from such funds/portfolios.
*** Under the deferred fee agreement for the PGIM Investments-managed funds, certain Board Members have elected to defer all or part of their total compensation. The amount of compensation deferred during the calendar year ended December 31, 2021, amounted to $316,780, $326,000, and $305,320 for Ms. Alberding, Mr. Evans, and Ms. Hodrick, respectively. Under the deferred fee arrangement, these amounts are deposited into a trust held for the benefit of participating Board Members and are not continuing obligations of the Fund.
BOARD COMMITTEES. The Board has established four standing committees in connection with Fund governance—Audit, Nominating and Governance, Investment, and Compliance. Information on the membership of each standing committee and its functions is set forth below.
Audit Committee: The Board has determined that each member of the Audit Committee is not an “interested person” as defined in the 1940 Act. The responsibilities of the Audit Committee are to assist the Board in overseeing the Fund's independent registered public accounting firm, accounting policies and procedures and other areas relating to the Fund's auditing processes. The Audit Committee is responsible for pre-approving all audit services and any permitted non-audit services to be provided by the independent registered public accounting firm directly to the Fund. The Audit Committee is also responsible for pre-approving permitted services to be provided by the independent registered public accounting firm to (1) the Manager and (2) any entity in a control relationship with the Manager that provides ongoing services to the Fund, provided that the engagement of the independent registered public accounting firm relates directly to the operation and financial reporting of the Fund. The scope of the Audit Committee's responsibilities is oversight. It is management's responsibility to maintain appropriate systems for accounting and internal control and the independent registered public accounting firm's responsibility to plan and carry out an audit in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States). The number of Audit Committee meetings held during the Fund's most recently completed fiscal year is set forth in the table below.
The membership of the Audit Committee is set forth below:
Grace C. Torres (Chair)
Laurie Simon Hodrick
Brian K. Reid
Keith F. Hartstein (ex-officio)
Nominating and Governance Committee: The Nominating and Governance Committee of the Board is responsible for nominating Board Members and making recommendations to the Board concerning Board composition, committee structure and governance, director education, and governance practices. The Board has determined that each member of the Nominating and Governance Committee is not an “interested person” as defined in the 1940 Act. The number of Nominating and Governance Committee meetings held during the Fund's most recently completed fiscal year is set forth in the table below. The Nominating and Governance Committee Charter is available on the Fund's website.
The membership of the Nominating and Governance Committee is set forth below:
Linda W. Bynoe (Chair)
Kevin J. Bannon
Ellen S. Alberding
Barry H. Evans
Keith F. Hartstein (ex-officio)
Investment Committees: The Board of each fund in the PGIM retail mutual funds and exchange-traded funds complex has formed joint committees to review the performance of each fund in the Fund Complex. The Gibraltar Investment Committee reviews the performance of each fund that is subadvised by Jennison Associates LLC, PGIM Quantitative Solutions LLC and PGIM Wadhwani LLP. The Dryden Investment Committee reviews the performance of each fund that is subadvised by PGIM Fixed Income, PGIM Real Estate (each of which is a business unit of PGIM, Inc.), PGIM Limited and PGIM Real Estate (UK) Limited. In addition, the Dryden Investment Committee reviews the performance of the closed-end funds. Each committee meets at least four times per year and reports the results of its review to the full Board of each fund at each regularly scheduled Board meeting. Every Independent Board Member sits on one of the two committees.
The number of Gibraltar Investment Committee or Dryden Investment Committee meetings, as applicable, held during the Fund's most recently completed fiscal year is set forth in the table below.
The membership of the Gibraltar Investment Committee and the Dryden Investment Committee is set forth below:
Gibraltar Investment Committee
Ellen S. Alberding (Chair)

39

Kevin J. Bannon
Keith F. Hartstein (ex-officio)
Laurie Simon Hodrick
Brian K. Reid
Dryden Investment Committee
Barry H. Evans (Chair)
Linda W. Bynoe
Keith F. Hartstein (ex-officio)
Grace C. Torres
Compliance Committee. The Compliance Committee serves as the liaison between the Board and the Fund's Chief Compliance Officer (“CCO”). In its role as liaison, the Compliance Committee assists the Board in overseeing compliance matters and administration. The Compliance Committee's responsibilities include, among other matters, considering any material compliance matter reported by the CCO between meetings of the Board and receiving reports on any investigations into matters within the Committee's scope of responsibilities.
The number of Compliance Committee meetings held during the Fund's most recently completed fiscal year is set forth in the table below.
The membership of the Compliance Committee is set forth below:
Brian K. Reid (Chair)
Barry H. Evans
Grace C. Torres
Keith F. Hartstein (ex-officio)
Board Committee Meetings (for most recently completed fiscal year)
 
Audit Committee
Nominating & Governance Committee
Dryden and Gibraltar Investment
Committees
Compliance Committee
4
4
4
4
LEADERSHIP STRUCTURE AND QUALIFICATIONS OF BOARD MEMBERS. The Board is responsible for oversight of the Fund. The Fund has engaged the Manager to manage the Fund on a day-to-day basis. The Board oversees the Manager and certain other principal service providers in the operations of the Fund. The Board is currently composed of ten members, eight of whom are Independent Board Members. The Board meets in-person at regularly scheduled meetings four times throughout the year. In addition, the Board Members may meet in-person or by telephone at special meetings or on an informal basis at other times. As described above, the Board has established four standing committees—Audit, Nominating and Governance, Investment and Compliance—and may establish ad hoc committees or working groups from time to time, to assist the Board in fulfilling its oversight responsibilities. The Independent Board Members have also engaged independent legal counsel to assist them in fulfilling their responsibilities.
The Board is chaired by an Independent Board Member. As Chair, this Independent Board Member leads the Board in its activities. Also, the Chair acts as a member or as an ex-officio member of each standing committee and any ad hoc committee of the Board. The Board Members have determined that the Board's leadership and committee structure is appropriate because the Board believes it sets the proper tone to the relationships between the Fund, on the one hand, and the Manager, the subadviser(s) and certain other principal service providers, on the other, and facilitates the exercise of the Board's independent judgment in evaluating and managing the relationships. In addition, the structure efficiently allocates responsibility among committees.
The Board has concluded that, based on each Board Member's experience, qualifications, attributes or skills on an individual basis and in combination with those of the other Board Members, each Board Member should serve as a Board Member. Among other attributes common to all Board Members are their ability to review critically, evaluate, question and discuss information provided to them, to interact effectively with the various service providers to the Fund, and to exercise reasonable business judgment in the performance of their duties as Board Members. In addition, the Board has taken into account the actual service and commitment of the Board Members during their tenure in concluding that each should continue to serve. A Board Member's ability to perform his or her duties effectively may have been attained through a Board Member's educational background or professional training; business, consulting, public service or academic positions; experience from service as a Board Member of the Fund, other funds in the Fund Complex, public companies, or non-profit entities or other organizations; or other experiences. Set forth below is a brief discussion of the specific experience, qualifications, attributes or skills of each Board Member that led the Board to conclude that he or she should serve as a Board Member.

PGIM Jennison International Opportunities Fund 40

Ellen S. Alberding. Ms. Alberding joined the Board of the Fund and other funds in the Fund Complex in 2013. Ms. Alberding has over 30 years of experience in the non-profit sector, including over 20 years as the president of a charitable foundation, where she oversees multiple investment managers. Ms. Alberding also served as a Trustee of the Aon Funds from 2000 to 2003.
Kevin J. Bannon. Mr. Bannon joined the Board of the Fund and other funds in the Fund Complex in 2008. Mr. Bannon has held senior executive positions in the financial services industry, including serving as a senior executive of asset management firms, for over 25 years.
Linda W. Bynoe. Ms. Bynoe has been a Board Member of the Fund and other funds in the Fund Complex since 2005, having served on the boards of other mutual fund complexes since 1993. She has worked in the financial services industry over 20 years, has over 30 years of experience as a management consultant and serves as a Director of financial services and other complex global corporations.
Barry H. Evans. Mr. Evans joined the Board of the Fund and other funds in the Fund Complex in 2017. Mr. Evans has held senior executive positions and various portfolio manager roles in an asset management firm for thirty years.
Keith F. Hartstein. Mr. Hartstein joined the Board of the Fund and other funds in the Fund Complex in 2013. Mr. Hartstein has worked in the asset management industry for 30 years and served as a senior executive in an asset management firm.
Laurie Simon Hodrick. Ms. Hodrick joined the Board of the Fund and other funds in the Fund Complex in 2017. Ms. Hodrick brings more than 30 years of experience as a finance academic, practitioner, and consultant.
Brian K. Reid. Mr. Reid joined the Board of the Fund and the other funds in the Fund Complex in 2018.  Mr. Reid has more than 30 years of experience in economics and related fields, including serving as Chief Economist for the Investment Company Institute (“ICI”) for 13 years.  
Grace C. Torres. Ms. Torres joined the Board of the Fund and other funds in the Fund Complex in 2014. Ms. Torres formerly served as Treasurer and Principal Financial and Accounting Officer for the Fund and other funds in the Fund Complex for 16 years and held senior positions with the Manager from 1999 to 2014. In addition, Ms. Torres is a certified public accountant (“CPA”).
Stuart S. Parker. Mr. Parker, who has served as an Interested Board Member and President of the Fund and the other funds in the Fund Complex since 2012, is President, Chief Operating Officer and Officer-in-Charge of PGIM Investments and several of its affiliates that provide services to the Fund and has held senior positions in PGIM Investments since 2005.
Scott E. Benjamin. Mr. Benjamin, an Interested Board Member of the Fund and other funds in the Fund Complex since 2010, has served as a Vice President of the Fund and other funds in the Fund Complex since 2009 and has held senior positions in PGIM Investments since 2003.
Specific details about each Board Member's professional experience appear in the professional biography tables, above.
Risk Oversight. Investing in general and the operation of a mutual fund involve a variety of risks, such as investment risk, illiquidity risk, compliance risk, and operational risk, among others. The Board oversees risk as part of its oversight of the Fund. Risk oversight is addressed as part of various regular Board and committee activities. The Board, directly or through its committees, reviews reports from among others, the Manager, subadvisers, the Fund's Chief Compliance Officer, the Fund's independent registered public accounting firm, counsel, and internal auditors of the Manager or its affiliates, as appropriate, regarding risks faced by the Fund and the risk management programs of the Manager and certain service providers. The actual day-to-day risk management with respect to the Fund resides with the Manager and other service providers to the Fund. Although the risk management policies of the Manager and the service providers are designed to be effective, those policies and their implementation vary among service providers and over time, and there is no guarantee that they will be effective. Not all risks that may affect the Fund can be identified or processes and controls developed to eliminate or mitigate their occurrence or effects, and some risks are simply beyond any control of the Fund or the Manager, its affiliates or other service providers.
Selection of Board Member Nominees. The Nominating and Governance Committee is responsible for considering nominees for Board Members at such times as it considers electing new members to the Board. The Nominating and Governance Committee may consider recommendations by business and personal contacts of current Board Members, and by executive search firms which the Committee may engage from time to time and will also consider shareholder recommendations. The Nominating and Governance Committee has not established specific, minimum qualifications that it believes must be met by a nominee. In evaluating nominees, the Nominating and Governance Committee considers, among other things, an individual's background, skills, and experience; whether the individual is an “interested person” as defined in the 1940 Act; and whether the individual would be deemed an “audit committee financial expert” within the meaning of applicable SEC rules. The Nominating and Governance Committee also considers whether the individual's

41

background, skills, and experience will complement the background, skills, and experience of other nominees and will contribute to the diversity of the Board. There are no differences in the manner in which the Nominating and Governance Committee evaluates nominees for the Board based on whether the nominee is recommended by a shareholder.
A shareholder who wishes to recommend a board member for nomination should submit his or her recommendation in writing to the Chair of the Board or the Chair of the Nominating and Governance Committee, in either case in care of the specified Fund(s), at 655 Broad Street, 6th Floor, Newark, New Jersey 07102-4410. At a minimum, the recommendation should include: the name, address and business, educational and/or other pertinent background of the person being recommended; a statement concerning whether the person is an “interested person” as defined in the 1940 Act; any other information that the Fund would be required to include in a proxy statement concerning the person if he or she was nominated; and the name and address of the person submitting the recommendation, together with the number of Fund shares held by such person and the period for which the shares have been held. The recommendation also can include any additional information which the person submitting it believes would assist the Nominating and Governance Committee in evaluating the recommendation.
Shareholders should note that a person who owns securities issued by Prudential (the parent company of the Fund's Manager) would be deemed an “interested person” under the 1940 Act. In addition, certain other relationships with Prudential or its subsidiaries, with registered broker-dealers, or with the Fund's outside legal counsel may cause a person to be deemed an “interested person.” Before the Nominating and Governance Committee decides to nominate an individual to the Board, Committee members and other Board Members customarily interview the individual in person. In addition, the individual customarily is asked to complete a detailed questionnaire which is designed to elicit information which must be disclosed under SEC and stock exchange rules and to determine whether the individual is subject to any statutory disqualification from serving on the board of a registered investment company.
Share Ownership. Information relating to each Board Member's Fund share ownership and in all registered funds in the PGIM Investments-advised funds that are overseen by the respective Board Member as of the most recently completed calendar year is set forth in the chart below.
Name
Dollar Range of Equity
Securities in the Fund
Aggregate Dollar Range of
Equity Securities in All
Registered Investment
Companies Overseen by
Board Member in Fund Complex
Board Member Share Ownership: Independent Board Members
Ellen S. Alberding
None
Over $100,000
Kevin J. Bannon
None
Over $100,000
Linda W. Bynoe
None
Over $100,000
Barry H. Evans
None
Over $100,000
Keith F. Hartstein
Over $100,000
Over $100,000
Laurie Simon Hodrick
None
Over $100,000
Brian K. Reid
None
Over $100,000
Grace C. Torres
None
Over $100,000
Board Member Share Ownership: Interested Board Members
Stuart S. Parker
None
Over $100,000
Scott E. Benjamin
None
Over $100,000
None of the Independent Board Members, or any member of his/her immediate family, owned beneficially or of record any securities in an investment adviser or principal underwriter of the Fund or a person (other than a registered investment company) directly or indirectly controlling, controlled by, or under common control with an investment adviser or principal underwriter of the Fund as of the most recently completed calendar year.
Shareholder Communications with Board Members. Shareholders can communicate directly with Board Members by writing to the Chair of the Board, c/o the Fund, 655 Broad Street, 6th Floor, Newark, New Jersey 07102-4410. Shareholders can communicate directly with an individual Board Member by writing to that Board Member, c/o the Fund, 655 Broad Street, 6th Floor, Newark, New Jersey 07102-4410. Such communications to the Board or individual Board Members are not screened before being delivered to the addressee.

PGIM Jennison International Opportunities Fund 42

MANAGEMENT & ADVISORY ARRANGEMENTS
MANAGER. The Manager’s address is 655 Broad Street, Newark, New Jersey 07102-4410. The Manager serves as manager to all of the other investment companies that, together with the Fund, comprise the PGIM Funds. See the Prospectus for more information about PGIM Investments LLC (“PGIM Investments”). As of November 30, 2022, the Manager served as the investment manager to all of the Prudential U.S. and offshore open-end investment companies, and as administrator to closed-end investment companies, with aggregate assets of approximately $295.2 billion.
The Manager is a wholly-owned subsidiary of PIFM Holdco, LLC, which is a wholly-owned subsidiary of PGIM Holding Company LLC, which is a wholly-owned subsidiary of Prudential. PMFS, an affiliate of PGIM Investments, serves as the transfer agent and dividend distribution agent for the PGIM Funds and, in addition, provides customer service, record keeping and management and administrative services to qualified plans.
Pursuant to a management agreement between World Fund on behalf of the Fund and PGIM Investments (the “Management Agreement”), PGIM Investments, subject to the supervision of the Board and in conformity with the stated policies of the Fund, manages both the investment operations of the Fund and the composition of the Fund's portfolio, including the purchase, retention, disposition and loan of securities and other assets. In connection therewith, the Manager is obligated to keep certain books and records of the Fund. The Manager is authorized to enter into subadvisory agreements for investment advisory services in connection with the management of the Fund. The Manager will continue to have responsibility for all investment advisory services performed pursuant to any such subadvisory agreements. PGIM Investments will review the performance of the subadviser(s) and make recommendations to the Board with respect to the retention of subadvisers and the renewal of contracts. The Manager also administers the Fund's corporate affairs and, in connection therewith, furnishes the Fund with office facilities, together with those ordinary clerical and bookkeeping services which are not being furnished by the Fund's custodian (the “Custodian”) and PMFS. The management services of PGIM Investments to the Fund are not exclusive under the terms of the Management Agreement and PGIM Investments is free to, and does, render management services to others.
PGIM Investments may from time to time waive all or a portion of its management fee and subsidize all or a portion of the operating expenses of the Fund. Fee waivers and subsidies will increase the Fund's total return. These voluntary waivers may be terminated at any time without notice. To the extent that PGIM Investments agrees to waive its fee or subsidize the Fund's expenses, it may enter into a relationship agreement with the subadviser to share the economic impact of the fee waiver or expense subsidy.
In connection with its management of the corporate affairs of the Fund, PGIM Investments bears the following expenses:
the salaries and expenses of all of its and the Fund's personnel except the fees and expenses of Independent Board Members;
all expenses incurred by the Manager or the Fund in connection with managing the ordinary course of the Fund's business, other than those assumed by the Fund as described below; and
the fees, costs and expenses payable to any subadviser pursuant to a subadvisory agreement between PGIM Investments and such subadviser.
Under the terms of the Management Agreement, the Fund is responsible for the payment of the following expenses:
the fees and expenses incurred by the Fund in connection with the management of the investment and reinvestment of the Fund's assets payable to the Manager;
the fees and expenses of Independent Board Members;
the fees and certain expenses of the Custodian and transfer and dividend disbursing agent, including the cost of providing records to the Manager in connection with its obligation of maintaining required records of the Fund and of pricing the Fund's shares;
the charges and expenses of the Fund's legal counsel and independent auditors and of legal counsel to the Independent Board Members;
brokerage commissions and any issue or transfer taxes chargeable to the Fund in connection with securities (and futures, if applicable) transactions;
all taxes and corporate fees payable by the Fund to governmental agencies;
the fees of any trade associations of which the Fund may be a member;
the cost of share certificates representing, and/or non-negotiable share deposit receipts evidencing, shares of the Fund;
the cost of fidelity, directors and officers and errors and omissions insurance;
the fees and expenses involved in registering and maintaining registration of the Fund and of Fund shares with the SEC and paying notice filing fees under state securities laws, including the preparation and printing of the Fund's registration statements and prospectuses for such purposes; allocable communications expenses with respect to investor services and all expenses of shareholders' and Board meetings and of preparing, printing and mailing reports and notices to shareholders; and
litigation and indemnification expenses and other extraordinary expenses not incurred in the ordinary course of the Fund's business and distribution and service (12b-1) fees.

43

The Management Agreement provides that PGIM Investments will not be liable for any error of judgment by PGIM Investments or for any loss suffered by the Fund in connection with the matters to which the Management Agreement relates, except a loss resulting from a breach of fiduciary duty with respect to the receipt of compensation for services (in which case any award of damages shall be limited to the period and the amount set forth in Section 36(b)(3) of the 1940 Act) or loss resulting from willful misfeasance, bad faith or gross negligence or reckless disregard of duties. The Management Agreement provides that it will terminate automatically if assigned (as defined in the 1940 Act), and that it may be terminated without penalty by either PGIM Investments or the Fund by the Board or vote of a majority of the outstanding voting securities of the Fund (as defined in the 1940 Act) upon not more than 60 days', nor less than 30 days', written notice. The Management Agreement will continue in effect for a period of more than two years from the date of execution only so long as such continuance is specifically approved at least annually in accordance with the requirements of the 1940 Act.
Fees payable under the Management Agreement are computed daily and paid monthly. The applicable fee rate and the management fees received by PGIM Investments from the Fund for the indicated fiscal years are set forth below.
Management Fee Rate:

Management Fee Rate (effective July 1, 2022):
0.825% up to $1 billion of the Fund's average daily net assets;
0.800% over $1 billion to $5 billion of the Fund's average daily net assets;
0.780% over $5 billion of the Fund's average daily net assets.
Management Fee Rate (prior to July 1, 2022):
0.825% up to $1 billion of the Fund's average daily net assets;
0.800% over $1 billion of the Fund's average daily net assets.
Management Fees Received by PGIM Investments from the Fund
 
 
 
 
2022
2021
2020
Gross Fee
$39,488,955
$35,702,609
$10,449,701
Amount Waived/ Reimbursed by PGIM Investments
$(1,857,365)
$(1,310,218)
$(1,082,659)
Net Fee
$37,631,590
$34,392,391
$9,367,042
Note:  For the fiscal years shown above, PGIM Investments contractually agreed to waive fees and/or reimburse certain expenses.  The “gross fee” shown above is the fee amount that PGIM Investments earned from the Fund without reflecting the impact of the contractual fee waiver/reimbursement arrangement.  The “net fee” reflects the impact of the contractual fee waiver and is the actual fee amount paid by the Fund, if any, to PGIM Investments.
SUBADVISORY ARRANGEMENTS. The Manager has entered into a subadvisory agreement (“Subadvisory Agreement”) with the Fund's subadviser. The Subadvisory Agreement provides that the subadviser will furnish investment advisory services in connection with the management of the Fund. In connection therewith, the subadviser is obligated to keep certain books and records of the Fund. Under the Subadvisory Agreement, the subadviser, subject to the supervision of PGIM Investments, is responsible for managing the assets of the Fund in accordance with the Fund's investment objectives, investment program and policies. The subadviser determines what securities and other instruments are purchased and sold for the Fund and is responsible for obtaining and evaluating financial data relevant to the Fund. PGIM Investments continues to have responsibility for all investment advisory services pursuant to the Management Agreement and supervises the subadviser's performance of such services.
As discussed in the Prospectus, PGIM Investments employs the subadviser under a “manager of managers” structure that allows PGIM Investments to replace the subadviser or amend a Subadvisory Agreement without seeking shareholder approval. The Subadvisory Agreement provides that it will terminate in the event of its assignment (as defined in the 1940 Act) or upon the termination of the Management Agreement. The Subadvisory Agreement may be terminated by the Fund, PGIM Investments, or the subadviser upon not more than 60 days’ nor less than 30 days’ written notice. The Subadvisory Agreement provides that it will continue in effect for a period of not more than two years from its execution only so long as such continuance is specifically approved at least annually in accordance with the requirements of the 1940 Act. Any new subadvisory agreement or amendment to the Fund’s Management Agreement or Subadvisory Agreement that directly or indirectly results in an increase in the aggregate management fee rate payable by the Fund will be submitted to the Fund’s shareholders for their approval. PGIM Investments does not currently intend to retain unaffiliated subadvisers.
The applicable fee rate and the subadvisory fees paid by PGIM Investments for the indicated fiscal years are set forth below. Subadvisory fees are based on the average daily net assets of the Fund, calculated and paid on a monthly basis, at the fee rate as set forth in the Subadvisory Agreement. Subadvisory fees are paid by PGIM Investments out of the management fee that it receives from the Fund.
The subadvisory fee rate for the Fund is 0.45% of average daily net assets.

PGIM Jennison International Opportunities Fund 44

Subadvisory Fees Paid by PGIM Investments
Subadviser
2022
2021
2020
Jennison Associates LLC
$22,071,912
$19,942,093
$5,737,332
THE FUND’S PORTFOLIO MANAGERS: INFORMATION ABOUT OTHER ACCOUNTS MANAGED
The table below identifies the number and total assets of other registered investment companies and other types of investment accounts managed by each portfolio manager. For each category, the number of investment accounts and total assets in the investment accounts whose fees are based on performance, if any, is indicated in italics typeface. Information shown below is as of the Fund’s most recently completed fiscal year, unless noted otherwise.
Other Funds and Investment Accounts Managed by the Portfolio Managers
Subadviser
Portfolio Managers
Registered Investment
Companies/Total Assets (Thousands)
Other Pooled
Investment Vehicles/
Total Assets (Thousands)
Other Accounts*/
Total Assets (Thousands)
Jennison Associates LLC
Mark B. Baribeau, CFA
12/$5,796,152
10/$3,294,264
27/$3,930,248
6/$1,277,538
 
Thomas F. Davis
8/$5,071,436
9/$3,279,119
26/$3,926,298
6/$1,277,538
*Other Accounts excludes the assets and number of accounts that are managed using model portfolios.
THE FUND’S PORTFOLIO MANAGERS: PERSONAL INVESTMENTS AND FINANCIAL INTERESTS
The table below identifies the dollar value (in ranges) of investments beneficially held by, and financial interests awarded to, each portfolio manager, if any, in the Fund and in other investment accounts managed by, or which have an individual portion or sleeve managed by, each portfolio manager that utilize investment strategies, objectives and policies similar to the Fund.  Information shown below is as of the Fund’s most recently completed fiscal year, unless noted otherwise.
Personal Investments and Financial Interests of the Portfolio Managers
Subadviser
Portfolio Managers
Investments and Other Financial Interests
in the Fund and Similar Strategies*
Jennison Associates LLC
Mark B. Baribeau, CFA
Over $1,000,000
 
Thomas F. Davis
$500,001-$1,000,000
*“Investments and Other Financial Interests in the Fund and Similar Strategies” include the Fund and all other investment accounts which are managed by the same portfolio manager that utilize investment strategies, investment objectives and policies that are similar to those of the Fund. “Other Investment Accounts” in similar strategies include registered investment companies, insurance company separate accounts, and collective and commingled trusts. “Investments” include holdings in the Fund and in investment accounts in similar strategies, including shares or units that may be held through a 401(k) or other retirement plan. “Other Financial Interests” include an investment professional’s notional investments in the Fund through a deferred compensation plan for Jennison employees where such notional investments track the performance of the Fund and are subject to increase or decrease based on the annual performance of the Fund. The dollar ranges for each Portfolio Manager’s investment in the Fund are as follows: Mark B. Baribeau, CFA: Over $1,000,000; Thomas F. Davis: $500,001-$1,000,000.
ADDITIONAL INFORMATION ABOUT THE PORTFOLIO MANAGERS—COMPENSATION AND CONFLICTS OF INTEREST. Set forth below is an explanation of the structure of, and methods used to determine, portfolio manager compensation. Also set forth below is an explanation of any material conflicts of interest that may arise between a portfolio manager's management of the Fund's investments and investments in other accounts.
Jennison Associates LLC
COMPENSATION. Jennison seeks to maintain a highly competitive compensation program designed to attract and retain outstanding investment professionals, which include portfolio managers and research analysts, and to align the interests of its investment professionals with those of its clients and overall firm results. Jennison recognizes individuals for their achievements and contributions and continues to promote those who exemplify the same values and level of commitment that are hallmarks of the organization.
Jennison sponsors a profit sharing retirement plan for all eligible employees. The contribution to the profit sharing retirement plan for portfolio managers is based on a percentage of the portfolio manager’s total compensation, subject to a maximum determined by applicable law. In addition to eligibility to participate in retirement and welfare plans, senior investment professionals, including portfolio managers and senior research analysts, are eligible to participate in a voluntary deferred compensation program where all or a portion of the cash bonus can be deferred. Participants in the deferred compensation plan are permitted to allocate the deferred amounts among various options that track the gross-of-fee pre-tax performance of accounts or composites of accounts managed by Jennison.

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Investment professionals are compensated with a combination of base salary and cash bonus. Overall firm profitability determines the size of the investment professional compensation pool. In general, the discretionary cash bonus represents the majority of an investment professional’s compensation.
Investment professionals’ total compensation is determined through a process that evaluates numerous qualitative and quantitative factors. Not all factors are applicable to every investment professional, and there is no particular weighting or formula for considering the factors. 
The factors reviewed for the portfolio managers are listed below.
The quantitative factors reviewed for the portfolio managers may include:
One-, three-, five-year and longer term pre-tax investment performance for groupings of accounts managed in the same strategy (composite) relative to market conditions, pre-determined passive indices and industry peer group data for the product strategy (e.g., large cap growth, large cap value). Some portfolio managers may manage or contribute ideas to more than one product strategy, and the performance of the other product strategies is also considered in determining the portfolio manager’s overall compensation.
The investment professional’s contribution to client portfolio’s pre-tax one-, three-, five-year and longer-term performance from the investment professional’s recommended stocks relative to market conditions, the strategy’s passive benchmarks, and the investment professional’s respective coverage universes.
The qualitative factors reviewed for the portfolio managers may include:
The quality of the portfolio manager’s investment ideas and consistency of the portfolio manager’s judgment;
Qualitative factors such as teamwork and responsiveness;
Individual factors such as years of experience and responsibilities specific to the individual’s role such as being a team leader or supervisor are also factored into the determination of an investment professional’s total compensation; and
Historical and long-term business potential of the product strategies.
Potential Conflicts of Interest
Jennison manages accounts with asset-based fees alongside accounts with performance-based fees. This side-by-side management can create an incentive for Jennison and its investment professionals to favor one account over another. Specifically, Jennison has the incentive to favor accounts for which it receives performance fees, and possibly take greater investment risks in those accounts, in order to bolster performance and increase its fees.
Other types of side-by-side management of multiple accounts can also create incentives for Jennison to favor one account over another. Examples are detailed below, followed by a discussion of how Jennison addresses these conflicts.
Long only accounts/long-short accounts: Jennison manages accounts in strategies that hold only long securities positions as well as accounts in strategies that are permitted to sell securities short. As a result, Jennison may hold a long position in a security in some client accounts while selling the same security short in other client accounts. For example, Jennison permits quantitatively hedged strategies to short securities that are held long in other strategies. Additionally, Jennison permits securities that are held long in quantitatively derived strategies to be shorted by other strategies. The strategies that sell a security short held long by another strategy could lower the price for the security held long. Similarly, if a strategy is purchasing a security that is held short in other strategies, the strategies purchasing the security could increase the price of the security held short. By the same token, sales in a long only account can increase the value of a short position while shorting could create an opportunity to purchase a long position at a lower price. As a result, we have conflicts of interest in determining the timing and direction of investments.
Multiple strategies: Jennison may buy or sell, or may direct or recommend that one client buy or sell, securities of the same kind or class that are purchased or sold for another client, at prices that may be different. Jennison may also, at any time, execute trades of securities of the same kind or class in one direction for an account and in the opposite direction for another account, due to differences in investment strategy or client direction. Different strategies effecting trading in the same securities or types of securities may appear as inconsistencies in Jennison’s management of multiple accounts side-by-side.
Investments at different levels of an issuer’s capital structure: To the extent different clients invest across multiple strategies or asset classes, Jennison may invest client assets in the same issuer, but at different levels in the capital structure. Interests in these positions could be inconsistent or in potential or actual conflict with each other.
Affiliated accounts/unaffiliated accounts and seeded/nonseeded accounts and accounts receiving asset allocation assets from affiliated investment advisers: Jennison manages accounts for its affiliates and accounts in which it has an interest alongside unaffiliated accounts. Jennison could have an incentive to favor its affiliated accounts over unaffiliated accounts. Additionally, at times Jennison’s

PGIM Jennison International Opportunities Fund 46

affiliates provide initial funding or otherwise invest in vehicles managed by Jennison. When an affiliate provides “seed capital” or other capital for a fund or account, it may do so with the intention of redeeming all or part of its interest at a particular future point in time or when it deems that sufficient additional capital has been invested in that fund or account. Jennison typically requests seed capital to start a track record for a new strategy or product. Managing “seeded” accounts alongside “non-seeded” accounts can create an incentive to favor the “seeded” accounts to establish a track record for a new strategy or product. Additionally, Jennison’s affiliated investment advisers could allocate their asset allocation clients’ assets to Jennison. Jennison could have an incentive to favor accounts used by its affiliate for their asset allocation clients to receive more assets from the affiliate.
Non-discretionary accounts or models: Jennison provides non-discretionary model portfolios to some clients and manages other portfolios on a discretionary basis. Recommendations for some non-discretionary models that are derived from discretionary portfolios are communicated after the discretionary portfolio has traded. The non-discretionary clients could be disadvantaged if Jennison delivers the model investment portfolio to them after Jennison initiates trading for the discretionary clients. Discretionary clients could be disadvantaged if the non-discretionary clients receive their model investment portfolio and start trading before Jennison has started trading for the discretionary clients.
Higher fee paying accounts or products or strategies: Jennison receives more revenues from (1) larger accounts or client relationships than smaller accounts or client relationships and from (2) managing discretionary accounts than advising non-discretionary models and from (3) non-wrap fee accounts than from wrap fee accounts and from (4) charging higher fees for some strategies than others. The differences in revenue that Jennison receives could create an incentive for Jennison to favor the higher fee paying or higher revenue generating account or product or strategy over another.
Personal interests: The performance of one or more accounts managed by Jennison’s investment professionals is taken into consideration in determining their compensation. Jennison also manages accounts that are investment options in its employee benefit plans such as its defined contribution plans or deferred compensation arrangements and where its employees may have personally invested alongside other accounts where there is no personal interest. These factors could create an incentive for Jennison to favor the accounts where it has a personal interest over accounts where Jennison does not have a personal interest.
How Jennison Addresses These Conflicts of Interest
The conflicts of interest described above could create incentives for Jennison to favor one or more accounts or types of accounts over others in the allocation of investment opportunities, aggregation and timing of investments. Portfolios in a particular strategy with similar objectives are managed similarly to the extent possible. Accordingly, portfolio holdings and industry and sector exposure tend to be similar across a group of accounts in a strategy that have similar objectives, which tends to minimize the potential for conflicts of interest among accounts within a product strategy. While these accounts have many similarities, the investment performance of each account will be different primarily due to differences in guidelines, individual portfolio manager’s decisions, timing of investments, fees, expenses and cash flows.
Additionally, Jennison has developed policies and procedures that seek to address, mitigate and assess these conflicts of interest.
Jennison has adopted trade aggregation and allocation procedures that seek to treat all clients (including affiliated accounts) fairly. These policies and procedures address the allocation of limited investment opportunities, such as initial public offerings (“IPOs”) and new issues, and the allocation of transactions across multiple accounts.
Jennison has policies that limit the ability to short securities in portfolios that primarily rely on its fundamental research and investment processes (fundamental portfolios) if the security is held long in other fundamental portfolios.
Jennison has adopted procedures to review allocations or performance dispersion between accounts with performance fees and non-performance fee based accounts and to review overlapping long and short positions among long accounts and long-short accounts.
Jennison has adopted a code of ethics and policies relating to personal trading.
Jennison has adopted a conflicts of interest policy and procedures.
Jennison provides disclosure of these conflicts as described in its Form ADV brochure.
OTHER SERVICE PROVIDERS
CUSTODIAN. The Bank of New York Mellon (“BNY”), 240 Greenwich Street, New York, New York 10286, serves as Custodian for the Fund’s portfolio securities and cash, and in that capacity, maintains certain financial accounting books and records pursuant to an agreement with the Fund. Subcustodians provide custodial services for any non-U.S. assets held outside the United States.
SECURITIES LENDING ACTIVITIES. Securities Finance Trust Company (“eSecLending”) serves as securities lending agent for the Fund and in that role administers the Fund’s securities lending program pursuant to the terms of a securities lending agency agreement entered into between World Fund and eSecLending.

47

As securities lending agent, eSecLending is responsible for marketing to approved borrowers available securities from the Fund’s portfolio. As administered by eSecLending, available securities from the Fund’s portfolio are furnished to borrowers either through security-by-security loans effected by eSecLending as lending agent on behalf of the Fund or through an auction process managed and conducted by eSecLending through which a winning bidder (as selected and approved by PGIM Investments on behalf of the Fund) is given the exclusive right to borrow the securities subject to the auction for an agreed-upon period of time.
eSecLending is responsible for the administration and management of the Fund’s securities lending program, including the preparation and execution of a participant agreement with each borrower governing the terms and conditions of any securities loan, ensuring that securities loans are properly coordinated and documented with the Fund’s custodian, ensuring that loaned securities are daily valued and that the corresponding required cash collateral is delivered by the borrower(s), and arranging for the investment of cash collateral received from borrowers.
eSecLending receives as compensation for its services a portion of the amount earned by the Fund for lending securities. 
The table below sets forth, for the Fund’s most recently completed fiscal year, the Fund’s gross income received from securities lending activities, the fees and/or other compensation paid by the Fund for securities lending activities, and the net income earned by the Fund for securities lending activities. The table below also discloses any other fees or payments incurred by the Fund resulting from lending securities.
Securities Lending Activities:
Gross Income from securities lending activities
$2,935,504
Fees and/or compensation for securities lending activities and related services
 
Fees paid to securities lending agent from a revenue split
$(182,853)
Fees paid for any cash collateral management service (including fees deducted from a pooled cash collateral investment vehicle)
$(85,569)
Administrative fees not included in revenue split
$
Indemnification fee not included in revenue split
$
Rebate (paid to borrower)
$(1,022,768)
Other fees not included in revenue split (specify)
$
Aggregate fees/compensation for securities lending activities
$(1,291,190)
Net Income from securities lending activities
$1,644,314
TRANSFER AGENT. PMFS, 655 Broad Street, Newark, New Jersey 07102, serves as the transfer and dividend disbursing agent of the Fund. PMFS is an affiliate of the Manager. PMFS provides customary transfer agency services to the Fund, including the handling of shareholder communications, the processing of shareholder transactions, the maintenance of shareholder account records, the payment of dividends and distributions, and related functions. For these services, PMFS receives compensation from the Fund and is reimbursed for its transfer agent expenses which include an annual fee and certain out-of-pocket expenses including, but not limited to, postage, stationery, printing, allocable communication expenses and other costs.
BNY Mellon Asset Servicing (US) Inc. (“BNYAS”), 301 Bellevue Parkway, Wilmington, Delaware 19809, serves as sub-transfer agent to the Fund. PMFS has contracted with BNYAS to provide certain administrative functions to PMFS. PMFS will compensate BNYAS for such services.
For the most recently completed fiscal year, the Fund incurred the following amount of fees for services provided by PMFS:
Fees Paid to PMFS
 
Fund Name
Amount
PGIM Jennison International Opportunities Fund
$241,389
INDEPENDENT REGISTERED PUBLIC ACCOUNTING FIRM. PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP (“PwC”), 300 Madison Avenue, New York, New York 10017-6204 serves as the independent registered public accounting firm for the Fund.
DISTRIBUTION OF FUND SHARES
DISTRIBUTOR. Prudential Investment Management Services LLC (“PIMS” or the “Distributor”), 655 Broad Street, Newark, New Jersey 07102-4410, acts as the distributor of all of the shares of the Fund. The Distributor is a subsidiary of Prudential.

PGIM Jennison International Opportunities Fund 48

The Distributor incurs the expenses of distributing each of the Fund's share classes pursuant to separate Distribution and Service (12b-1) Plans or Distribution Plans, as applicable, for each share class (collectively, “the Plans”) adopted by the Fund pursuant to Rule 12b-1 under the 1940 Act and a distribution agreement (the “Distribution Agreement”). PIMS also incurs the expenses of distributing any share class offered by the Fund which is not subject to a Distribution and Service (12b-1) Plan, and none of the expenses incurred by PIMS in distributing such share classes are reimbursed or paid for by the Fund.
The expenses incurred under the Plans include commissions and account servicing fees paid to, or on account of, brokers or financial institutions which have entered into agreements with the Distributor, as applicable, advertising expenses, the cost of printing and mailing prospectuses to potential investors and indirect and overhead costs of the Distributor associated with the sale of Fund shares, including sales promotion expenses.
Under the Plans, the Fund is obligated to pay distribution and/or service fees to the Distributor, as applicable, as compensation for its distribution and service activities, not as reimbursement for specific expenses incurred. If the Distributor’s expenses exceed its distribution and service (12b-1) fees, the Fund will not be obligated to pay any additional expenses. If the Distributor’s expenses are less than such distribution and service (12b-1) fees, then it will retain its full fees and realize a profit.
The distribution and/or service fees may also be used by the Distributor to compensate on a continuing basis brokers in consideration for the distribution, marketing, administrative and other services and activities provided by brokers with respect to the promotion of the sale of Fund shares and the maintenance of related shareholder accounts.
Distribution expenses attributable to the sale of each share class are allocated to each such class based upon the ratio of sales of each such class to the combined sales of all classes of the Fund, other than expenses allocable to a particular class. The distribution fee and sales charge of one class will not be used to subsidize the sale of another class or another fund.
Each Plan continues in effect from year to year, provided that each such continuance is approved at least annually by a vote of the Board, including a majority vote of the Board Members who are not interested persons of the Fund and who have no direct or indirect financial interest in any of the Plans or in any agreement related to the Plans (the “Rule 12b-1 Board Members”), cast in person at a meeting called for the purpose of voting on such continuance. A Plan may be terminated at any time, without penalty, by the vote of a majority of the Rule 12b-1 Board Members or by the vote of the holders of a majority of the outstanding shares of the applicable class of the Fund. The Plans may not be amended to increase materially the amounts to be spent for the services described therein without approval by the shareholders of the applicable class, and all material amendments are required to be approved by the Board in the manner described above. The Fund will not be contractually obligated to pay expenses incurred under any Plan if it is terminated or not continued.
Pursuant to each Plan, the Board will review at least quarterly a written report of the distribution expenses incurred on behalf of each class of shares of the Fund by the Distributor. The report will include an itemization of the distribution expenses and the purposes of such expenditures. In addition, as long as the Plans remain in effect, the selection and nomination of Rule 12b-1 Board Members shall be committed to the Rule 12b-1 Board Members.
Pursuant to the Distribution Agreement, the Fund has agreed to indemnify the Distributor to the extent permitted by applicable law against certain liabilities under federal securities laws. In addition to distribution and service (12b-1) fees paid by the Fund under the Plans, the Manager (or one of its affiliates) may make payments out of its own resources to dealers and other persons which distribute shares of the Fund. Such payments may be calculated by reference to the NAV of shares sold by such persons or otherwise.
CLASS A SALES CHARGE AND DISTRIBUTION EXPENSE INFORMATION. Under the Class A Plan, the Fund may pay the Distributor for its distribution-related activities with respect to Class A shares at an annual rate of 0.30% of the average daily net assets of the Class A shares. The Class A Plan provides that (1) 0.25% of the average daily net assets of the Class A shares may be used to pay for personal service and/or the maintenance of shareholder accounts (service fee) and (2) total distribution fees (including the service fee of 0.25%) may not exceed 0.30% of the average daily net assets of the Class A shares. The Prospectus discusses any contractual or voluntary fee waivers that may be in effect. In addition, if you purchase $1 million or more of Class A shares, you are subject to a CDSC of 1.00% (defined below) for shares redeemed within 12 months of purchase. The CDSC is waived for certain retirement and/or benefit plans.
For the most recently completed fiscal year, the Distributor received payments under the Class A Plan of the Fund. These amounts were expended primarily for payments of account servicing fees to financial advisers and other persons who sell Class A shares. For the most recently completed fiscal year, the Distributor also received initial sales charges and proceeds of contingent deferred sales charges paid by shareholders upon certain redemptions of Class A shares. The payments received and amounts spent by the Distributor during the most recently completed fiscal year are detailed in the tables below.

49

CLASS C SALES CHARGE AND DISTRIBUTION EXPENSE INFORMATION. Under the Class C Plan, the Fund may pay the Distributor for its distribution-related activities with respect to Class C shares at an annual rate of 1.00% of the average daily net assets of the Class C shares. The Class C Plan provides that (1) 0.25% of the average daily net assets of the shares may be paid as a service fee and (2) 0.75% (not including the service fee) of the average daily net assets of the shares (asset based sales charge) may be paid for distribution-related expenses with respect to the Class C shares. The service fee (0.25% of average daily net assets) is used to pay for personal service and/or the maintenance of shareholder accounts. The Prospectus discusses any voluntary or contractual fee waivers that may be in effect. The Distributor also receives contingent deferred sales charges from certain redeeming shareholders.
For the most recently completed fiscal year, the Distributor received payments under the Class C Plan. These amounts were expended primarily for payments of account servicing fees to financial advisers and other persons who sell Class C shares. For the most recently completed fiscal year, the Distributor also received the proceeds of contingent deferred sales charges paid by shareholders upon certain redemptions of Class C shares. The payments received and amounts spent by the Distributor during the most recently completed fiscal year are detailed in the tables below.
CLASS R SALES CHARGE AND DISTRIBUTION EXPENSE INFORMATION. Under the Class R Plan, the Fund may pay the Distributor for its distribution-related expenses with respect to Class R shares at an annual rate of up to 0.75% of the average daily net assets of the Class R shares. The Class R Plan provides that (1) up to 0.25% of the average daily net assets of the Class R shares may be used as a service fee and (2) total distribution fees (including the service fee of 0.25%) may not exceed 0.75% of the average daily net assets of the Class R shares. There is no CDSC for the redemption of Class R shares. The Prospectus discusses any contractual or voluntary fee waivers that may be in effect. For the most recently completed fiscal year, the Distributor received payments under the Class R Plan. These amounts were expended primarily for payments of account servicing fees to financial advisors and other persons who sell Class R shares. The payments received and amounts spent by the Distributor during the most recently completed fiscal year are detailed in the tables below.
CLASS R2 SALES CHARGE AND DISTRIBUTION EXPENSE INFORMATION. Under the Class R2 Plan, the Fund may pay the Distributor for its distribution-related expenses with respect to Class R2 shares at an annual rate of up to 0.25% of the average daily net assets of the Class R2 shares. The Class R2 Plan does not include service fees in the Plan. Class R2 shares have a separate Shareholder Services Plan, described below. There is no CDSC for the redemption of Class R2 shares. The Prospectus discusses any contractual or voluntary fee waivers that may be in effect.
The expenses incurred under the Class R2 Plan include commissions and account servicing fees paid to, or on account of, brokers or financial institutions which have entered into agreements with the Distributor, as applicable, advertising expenses, the cost of printing and mailing prospectuses to potential investors and indirect and overhead costs of the Distributor associated with the sale of Fund shares, including sales promotion expenses. The payments received and amounts spent by the Distributor during the most recently completed fiscal year are detailed in the tables below.
Payments Received by the Distributor
 
CLASS A CONTINGENT DEFERRED SALES CHARGES (CDSC)
$3,246
CLASS A DISTRIBUTION AND SERVICE (12B-1) FEES
$376,580
CLASS A INITIAL SALES CHARGES
$403,166
CLASS C CONTINGENT DEFERRED SALES CHARGES (CDSC)
$13,008
CLASS C DISTRIBUTION AND SERVICE (12B-1) FEES
$307,799
CLASS R DISTRIBUTION AND SERVICE (12B-1) FEES
$1,348,886
CLASS R2 DISTRIBUTION (12B-1) FEES
$28,883
Amounts Spent by Distributor
Share Class
Printing & Mailing
Prospectuses to Other than
Current Shareholders
Compensation to Broker/Dealers for
Commissions to Representatives and
Other Expenses*
Overhead Costs**
Total Amount
Spent by the Distributor
Class A
$-
$365,964
$74,580
$440,544
Class C
$-
$287,997
$17,408
$305,405
Class R
$-
$1,345,032
$-
$1,345,032
Class Z
$-
$-
$-
$-
Class R2
$-
$28,808
$1,546
$30,354
Class R4
$-
$-
$2,945
$2,945

PGIM Jennison International Opportunities Fund 50

Amounts Spent by Distributor
Share Class
Printing & Mailing
Prospectuses to Other than
Current Shareholders
Compensation to Broker/Dealers for
Commissions to Representatives and
Other Expenses*
Overhead Costs**
Total Amount
Spent by the Distributor
Class R6
$-
$-
$-
$-
* Includes amounts paid to affiliated broker/dealers.
** Including sales promotion expenses.
SHAREHOLDER SERVICES PLAN. The Fund has adopted a Shareholder Services Plan with respect to Class R2 and Class R4 shares. Under the terms of the Shareholder Services Plan, the Fund's Class R2 and Class R4 shares are authorized to pay to PMFS, its affiliates or independent third-party service providers, as compensation for services rendered to the shareholders of such Class R2 or Class R4 shares, a shareholder service fee at an annual rate of 0.10% of the Fund’s average daily net assets attributable to the Class R2 or Class R4 shares of the Fund, as applicable.
Pursuant to the Shareholder Services Plan, the Fund's Class R2 or Class R4 shares may pay for personal shareholder services and/or account maintenance services, including responding to beneficial owner inquiries, providing information regarding beneficial owner investments, other similar personal services and/or services related to the maintenance of shareholder accounts as contemplated by Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, Inc. Rule 2341 or any successor thereto. Because service fees are ongoing, over time they will increase the cost of an investment in the Fund. With respect to the Class R2 shares, these services are in addition to those services that may be provided under the Class R2 Plan.
FEE WAIVERS AND SUBSIDIES. PGIM Investments may from time to time waive all or a portion of its management fee and subsidize all or a portion of the operating expenses of the Fund. In addition, the Distributor may from time to time waive a portion of the distribution (12b-1) fees as described in the Prospectus. Fee waivers and subsidies will increase the Fund's total return.
PAYMENTS TO FINANCIAL SERVICES FIRMS. As described in the Fund's Prospectus, the Manager or certain of its affiliates (but not the Distributor) have entered into revenue sharing or other similar arrangements with financial services firms, including affiliates of the Manager. These revenue sharing arrangements are intended to promote the sale of Fund shares or to compensate the financial services firms for marketing or marketing support activities in connection with the sale of Fund shares.
The list below includes the names of the firms (or their affiliated broker/dealers) that received from the Manager, and/or certain of its affiliates, revenue sharing payments of more than $10,000 in calendar year 2021 for marketing and product support of the Fund and other PGIM Funds as described above.
Ameriprise Financial, Inc.
Wells Fargo Advisors, LLC
Prudential Retirement
Charles Schwab & Co, Inc.
Morgan Stanley Smith Barney
Raymond James Financial
National Financial Services
Merrill Lynch Pierce Fenner & Smith Inc.
LPL Financial LLC
UBS
Edward Jones
Commonwealth Financial Network
Matrix Financial Group
Empower Retirement
Cetera Advisor Networks
Principal Securities Inc.
PNC
AIG Advisor Group
Voya Financial
ADP Broker Dealer, Inc.
John Hancock
American United Life Insurance Co.
Nationwide Investment Services Co.
TIAA

51

Massachusetts Mutual
Midatlantic Capital Group
Standard Insurance Company
Ascensus, LLC.
Northwestern Mutual
Securities America, Inc.
Talcott Resolution Life
Reliance Trust Company
Alight Solutions LLC
RBC Capital Markets, LLC
T. Rowe Price
Cambridge Investment Research
The Vanguard Group, Inc.
Sammons Retirement Solutions
Lincoln Financial Group
Valic Financial Advisors Inc.
Citigroup Inc.
Security Benefit
Janney Montgomery Scott, LLC
Newport Group, Inc.
Securities Service Network, LLC
KMS Financial Services Inc
Triad Advisors, LLC
COMPUTATION OF OFFERING PRICE PER SHARE
Using the NAV at October 31, 2022, the offering prices of Fund shares were as follows:
Offering Price Per Share
 
 
Class A
 
NAV and redemption price per Class A share
$22.03
Maximum initial sales charge (5.50% of the public offering price)
$1.28
Maximum offering price to public
$23.31
Class C
 
NAV and redemption price per Class C share
$20.32
Class R
 
NAV and redemption price per Class R share
$21.75
Class Z
 
NAV and redemption price per Class Z share
$22.45
Class R2
 
NAV and redemption price per Class R2 share
$22.09
Class R4
 
NAV and redemption price per Class R4 share
$22.31
Class R6
 
NAV and redemption price per Class R6 share
$22.50
Explanatory Notes to Table:
Class A and Class C shares are subject to a contingent deferred sales charge (“CDSC”) on certain redemptions. See “How to Buy, Sell and Exchange Fund Shares—How to Sell Your Shares—Contingent Deferred Sales Charge (“CDSC”) in the Prospectus.
PORTFOLIO TRANSACTIONS & BROKERAGE
The Fund has adopted a policy pursuant to which the Fund and its Manager, subadviser and principal underwriter are prohibited from directly or indirectly compensating a broker-dealer for promoting or selling Fund shares by directing brokerage transactions to that broker. The Fund has adopted procedures for the purpose of deterring and detecting any violations of the policy. The policy permits the

PGIM Jennison International Opportunities Fund 52

Fund, the Manager and the subadviser to use selling brokers to execute transactions in portfolio securities so long as the selection of such selling brokers is the result of a decision that executing such transactions is in the best interest of the Fund and is not influenced by considerations about the sale of Fund shares. For purposes of this section, the term “Manager” includes the subadviser.
The Manager is responsible for decisions to buy and sell securities, futures contracts and options on such securities and futures for the Fund, the selection of brokers, dealers and futures commission merchants to effect the transactions and the negotiation of brokerage commissions, if any. On a national securities exchange, broker-dealers may receive negotiated brokerage commissions on Fund portfolio transactions, including options, futures, and options on futures transactions and the purchase and sale of underlying securities upon the exercise of options. On a non-U.S. securities exchange, commissions may be fixed. Orders may be directed to any broker or futures commission merchant including, to the extent and in the manner permitted by applicable laws, one of the Manager's affiliates (an affiliated broker). Brokerage commissions on U.S. securities, options and futures exchanges or boards of trade are subject to negotiation between the Manager and the broker or futures commission merchant.
In the OTC market, securities are generally traded on a “net” basis with dealers acting as principal for their own accounts without a stated commission, although the price of the security usually includes a profit to the dealer. In underwritten offerings, securities are purchased at a fixed price which includes an amount of compensation to the underwriter, generally referred to as the underwriter's concession or discount. On occasion, certain money market instruments and U.S. Government agency securities may be purchased directly from the issuer, in which case no commissions or discounts are paid. The Fund will not deal with an affiliated broker in any transaction in which an affiliated broker acts as principal except in accordance with the rules of the SEC.
In placing orders for portfolio securities of the Fund, the Manager's overriding objective is to obtain the best possible combination of favorable price and efficient execution. The Manager seeks to effect such transaction at a price and commission that provides the most favorable total cost of proceeds reasonably attainable in the circumstances. The factors that the Manager may consider in selecting a particular broker, dealer or futures commission merchant (firms) are the Manager's knowledge of negotiated commission rates currently available and other current transaction costs; the nature of the portfolio transaction; the size of the transaction; the desired timing of the trade; the activity existing and expected in the market for the particular transaction; confidentiality; the execution, clearance and settlement capabilities of the firms; the availability of research and research-related services provided through such firms; the Manager's knowledge of the financial stability of the firms; the Manager's knowledge of actual or apparent operational problems of firms; and the amount of capital, if any, that would be contributed by firms executing the transaction. Given these factors, the Fund may pay transaction costs in excess of that which another firm might have charged for effecting the same transaction.
When the Manager selects a firm that executes orders or is a party to portfolio transactions, relevant factors taken into consideration are whether that firm has furnished research and research-related products and/or services, such as research reports, research compilations, statistical and economic data, computer databases, quotation equipment and services, research-oriented computer software and services, reports concerning the performance of accounts, valuations of securities, investment-related periodicals, investment seminars and other economic services and consultations. Such services are used in connection with some or all of the Manager's investment activities; some of such services, obtained in connection with the execution of transactions for one investment account, may be used in managing other accounts, and not all of these services may be used in connection with the Fund. The Manager maintains an internal allocation procedure to identify those firms who have provided it with research and research-related products and/or services, and the amount that was provided, and to endeavor to direct sufficient commissions to them to ensure the continued receipt of those services that the Manager believes provide a benefit to the Fund and its other clients. The Manager makes a good faith determination that the research and/or service is reasonable in light of the type of service provided and the price and execution of the related portfolio transactions.
When the Manager deems the purchase or sale of equities to be in the best interests of the Fund or its other clients, including Prudential, the Manager may, but is under no obligation to, aggregate the transactions in order to obtain the most favorable price or lower brokerage commissions and efficient execution. In such event, allocation of the transactions, as well as the expenses incurred in the transaction, will be made by the Manager in the manner it considers to be most equitable and consistent with its fiduciary obligations to its clients. The allocation of orders among firms and the commission rates paid are reviewed periodically by the Fund's Board. Portfolio securities may not be purchased from any underwriting or selling syndicate of which any affiliate, during the existence of the syndicate, is a principal underwriter (as defined in the 1940 Act), except in accordance with rules of the SEC. This limitation, in the opinion of the Fund, will not significantly affect the Fund's ability to pursue its present investment objectives. However, in the future in other circumstances, the Fund may be at a disadvantage because of this limitation in comparison to other funds with similar objectives but not subject to such limitations.
Subject to the above considerations, an affiliate may act as a broker or futures commission merchant for the Fund. In order for an affiliate of the Manager to effect any portfolio transactions for the Fund, the commissions, fees or other remuneration received by the affiliated broker must be reasonable and fair compared to the commissions, fees or other remuneration paid to other firms in connection

53

with comparable transactions involving similar securities or futures being purchased or sold on an exchange or board of trade during a comparable period of time. This standard would allow the affiliated broker to receive no more than the remuneration which would be expected to be received by an unaffiliated firm in a commensurate arm's-length transaction. Furthermore, the Board, including a majority of the Independent Board Members, has adopted procedures which are reasonably designed to provide that any commissions, fees or other remuneration paid to the affiliated broker (or any affiliate) are consistent with the foregoing standard. In accordance with Section 11(a) of the 1934 Act, an affiliate may not retain compensation for effecting transactions on a national securities exchange for the Fund unless the Fund has expressly authorized the retention of such compensation. The affiliate must furnish to the Fund at least annually a statement setting forth the total amount of all compensation retained by the affiliate from transactions effected for the Fund during the applicable period. Brokerage transactions with an affiliated broker are also subject to such fiduciary standards as may be imposed upon the affiliate by applicable law. Transactions in options by the Fund will be subject to limitations established by each of the exchanges governing the maximum number of options which may be written or held by a single investor or group of investors acting in concert, regardless of whether the options are written or held on the same or different exchanges or are written or held in one or more accounts or through one or more brokers. Thus, the number of options which the Fund may write or hold may be affected by options written or held by the Manager and other investment advisory clients of the Manager. An exchange may order the liquidation of positions found to be in excess of these limits, and it may impose certain other sanctions.
Set forth below is information concerning the payment of commissions by the Fund, including the amount of such commissions paid to an affiliate, if any, for the indicated fiscal years or periods:
Brokerage Commissions Paid by the Fund
 
2022
2021
2020
Total brokerage commissions paid by the Fund
$5,109,407
$3,286,639
$1,198,617
Total brokerage commissions paid to affiliated brokers
None
None
None
Percentage of total brokerage commissions paid to affiliated brokers
None
None
None
Percentage of the aggregate dollar amount of portfolio transactions involving the payment of commissions to affiliated brokers
None
None
None
The Fund is required to disclose its holdings of securities of its regular brokers and dealers (as defined under Rule 10b-1 under the 1940 Act) and their parents as of the most recently completed fiscal year. As of the most recently completed fiscal year, the Fund held the following securities of its regular brokers and dealers.
Broker-Dealer Securities Holdings ($)
Fund Name
Broker-Dealer
Equity or Debt
Amount
PGIM Jennison International Opportunities Fund
None
None
None
The below table shows the Fund's portfolio turnover rates over the two most recently completed fiscal years:
Portfolio Turnover Rate
 
 
Fund Name
2022
2021
PGIM Jennison International Opportunities Fund
76%
41%
ADDITIONAL INFORMATION
FUND HISTORY. The World Fund was organized under the laws of Maryland on September 28, 1994 as a corporation, originally named Prudential Global Fund, Inc. (“Global Fund”).
In 1996, Global Fund changed its name to Prudential World Fund, Inc. and the existing portfolio of assets of World Fund was renamed Global Series. In addition, a second series of World Fund was created, the International Stock Series. In 1999, Global Series became Prudential Global Growth Fund and International Stock Series became Prudential International Value Fund. In 2000, a third series of World Fund was created, the Prudential Jennison International Growth Fund. In 2003, Prudential Global Growth Fund became Jennison Global Growth Fund, Prudential International Value Fund became Strategic Partners International Value Fund and Prudential Jennison International Growth Fund became Dryden International Equity Fund. In 2007, Strategic Partners International Value Fund became Dryden International Value Fund. In 2008, the World Fund established the Jennison Global Infrastructure Fund, although the Fund was inactive until 2013. In 2010, the World Fund established the Prudential Emerging Markets Debt Local Currency Fund. In 2012, the World Fund established the Prudential Jennison Global Opportunities Fund and the Prudential Jennison International Opportunities

PGIM Jennison International Opportunities Fund 54

Fund. In 2013, the Prudential Jennison Global Infrastructure Fund commenced investment operations. In 2014, the World Fund established the Prudential Jennison Emerging Markets Equity Fund, which also commenced investment operations in 2014. Prudential Emerging Markets Debt Hard Currency Fund was established on September 13, 2017 and commenced operations on December 12, 2017.
On December 15, 2006, Dryden International Equity Fund acquired all of the assets and all of the liabilities of Jennison Global Growth Fund and shareholders of Jennison Global Growth Fund became shareholders of Dryden International Equity Fund.
Effective February 16, 2010, Dryden International Equity Fund changed its name to Prudential International Equity Fund and Dryden International Value Fund changed its name to Prudential International Value Fund.
On December 19, 2014, Prudential International Equity Fund acquired all of the assets and all of the liabilities of Prudential International Value Fund and shareholders of Prudential International Value Fund became shareholders of Prudential International Equity Fund.
Effective December 30, 2015, Prudential International Equity Fund changed its name to Prudential QMA International Equity Fund.
Effective June 11, 2018 Prudential Emerging Markets Debt Hard Currency Fund was renamed the PGIM Emerging Markets Debt Hard Currency Fund, Prudential Emerging Markets Debt Local Currency Fund was renamed the PGIM Emerging Markets Debt Local Currency Fund, Prudential QMA International Equity Fund was renamed the PGIM QMA International Equity Fund, Prudential QMA International Equity Fund was renamed the PGIM QMA International Equity Fund, Prudential Jennison Global Opportunities Fund was renamed the PGIM Jennison Global Opportunities Fund, Prudential Jennison International Opportunities Fund was renamed the PGIM Jennison International Opportunities Fund, Prudential Jennison Global Infrastructure Fund was renamed the PGIM Jennison Global Infrastructure Fund and Prudential Jennison Emerging Markets Equity Fund was renamed the PGIM Jennison Emerging Markets Equity Opportunities Fund.
Effective December 29, 2021, PGIM QMA International Equity Fund changed its name to PGIM Quant Solutions International Equity Fund.
DESCRIPTION OF SHARES AND ORGANIZATION. The World Fund is authorized to issue 10,225,000,000 shares of common stock, $0.00001 par value per share which are currently divided into seven portfolios or series, whose shares are classified and designated as follows:
PGIM Emerging Markets Debt Hard Currency Fund
Class A Common Stock: 100,000,000
Class C Common Stock: 100,000,000
Class Z Common Stock: 200,000,000
Class R6 Common Stock: 200,000,000
PGIM Emerging Markets Debt Local Currency Fund
Class A Common Stock: 10,000,000
Class C Common Stock: 50,000,000
Class Z Common Stock: 250,000,000
Class T Common Stock: 190,000,000
Class R6 Common Stock: 50,000,000
PGIM Quant Solutions International Equity Fund
Class A Common Stock: 100,000,000
Class B Common Stock: 5,000,000
Class C Common Stock: 100,000,000
Class Z Common Stock: 180,000,000
Class T Common Stock: 135,000,000
Class R6 Common Stock: 180,000,000
PGIM Jennison Global Opportunities Fund
Class A Common Stock: 150,000,000
Class C Common Stock: 100,000,000
Class R2 Common Stock: 100,000,000

55

Class R4 Common Stock: 100,000,000
Class Z Common Stock: 2,000,000,000
Class R6 Common Stock: 1,000,000,000
PGIM Jennison International Opportunities Fund
Class A Common Stock: 150,000,000
Class C Common Stock: 100,000,000
Class R Common Stock: 100,000,000
Class R2 Common Stock: 100,000,000
Class R4 Common Stock: 100,000,000
Class Z Common Stock: 2,000,000,000
Class R6 Common Stock: 1,000,000,000
PGIM Jennison Global Infrastructure Fund
Class A Common Stock: 20,000,000
Class C Common Stock: 100,000,000
Class Z Common Stock: 150,000,000
Class T Common Stock: 115,000,000
Class R6 Common Stock: 125,000,000
PGIM Jennison Emerging Markets Equity Opportunities Fund
Class A Common Stock: 25,000,000
Class C Common Stock: 65,000,000
Class Z Common Stock: 300,000,000
Class T Common Stock: 225,000,000
Class R6 Common Stock: 250,000,000
Each class of shares represents an interest in the same assets of the Fund and is identical in all respects except that (1) each class is subject to different sales charges and distribution and/or service fees (except for Class R4, Class R6 and Class Z shares, which are not subject to any sales charges and distribution and/or service fees), which may affect performance, (2) each class has exclusive voting rights on any matter submitted to shareholders that relates solely to its arrangement and has separate voting rights on any matter submitted to shareholders in which the interests of one class differ from the interests of any other class, (3) each class has a different exchange privilege, (4) only Class C shares have a conversion feature and (5) Class R2, Class R4, Class R6 and Class Z shares are offered exclusively for sale to a limited group of investors.
As of the date of this SAI, no Class B shares or Class T shares were issued or outstanding for any Fund.
The Articles of Incorporation further provide that no Board Member, officer, employee or agent of the World Fund is liable to the World Fund or to a shareholder, nor is any Board Member, officer, employee or agent liable to any third persons in connection with the affairs of the World Fund, except as such liability may arise from his or her own bad faith, willful misfeasance, gross negligence or reckless disregard of his or her duties. It also provides that all third parties shall look solely to the World Fund property for satisfaction of claims arising in connection with the affairs of the World Fund. With the exceptions stated, the Articles of Incorporation permit the Board Members to provide for the indemnification of Board Members, officers, employees or agents of the Fund against all liability in connection with the affairs of the World Fund.
The World Fund shall continue without limitation of time subject to the provisions in the Articles of Incorporation concerning termination by action of the shareholders or by the Board by written notice to the shareholders.
Pursuant to the Articles of Incorporation, the Board Members may authorize the creation of additional series of shares (the proceeds of which would be invested in separate, independently managed portfolios with distinct investment objectives and policies and share purchase, redemption and net asset value procedures) with such preferences, privileges, limitations and voting and dividend rights as the Board Members may determine. All consideration received by the World Fund for shares of any additional series, and all assets in which such consideration is invested, would belong to that series (subject only to the rights of creditors of that series) and would be subject to the liabilities related thereto.

PGIM Jennison International Opportunities Fund 56

The Board Members have the power to alter the number and the terms of office of the Board and the Board Members may at any time lengthen their own terms or make their terms of unlimited duration and appoint their own successors, provided that always at least a majority of the Board Members have been elected by the shareholders of the World Fund. The voting rights of shareholders are not cumulative, so that holders of more than 50 percent of the shares voting can, if they choose, elect all Board Members being selected, while the holders of the remaining shares would be unable to elect any Board Members.
PRINCIPAL SHAREHOLDERS AND CONTROL PERSONS
Set forth below are the name and address of any person (a “principal shareholder”) who owned of record or beneficially 5% or more of any class of outstanding shares of the Fund and their percentage of ownership. Also set forth below are the name and address of any person (a “control person”) who owned of record or beneficially either directly or through controlled companies more than 25% of the voting securities of the Fund or who acknowledges or asserts the existence of control. Control persons may be able to determine or significantly influence the outcome of matters submitted to a shareholder vote.
Principal Fund Shareholders (as of December 7,2022)
Fund Name and Share Class
Shareholder Name and Address
No. of Shares
% of Class
PGIM Jennison International Opportunities Fund Class A
NATIONAL FINANCIAL SERVICES LLC
FOR EXCLUSIVE BENEFIT OF
OUR CUSTOMERS
ATTN MUTUAL FUNDS DEPT - 4TH FLOOR
499 WASHINGTON BLVD
JERSEY CITY NJ 07310
380,510.786
8.18%
PGIM Jennison International Opportunities Fund Class A
AMERICAN ENTERPRISE INVESTMENT SVC
(FBO) 41999970
707 2ND AVE SOUTH
MINNEAPOLIS MN 55402-2405
245,216.709
5.27%
PGIM Jennison International Opportunities Fund Class A
EDWARD D JONES & CO
ATTN: MUTUAL FUND SHAREHOLDER
ACCOUNTING
201 PROGRESS PKWY
MARYLAND HTS MO 63043-3003
2,062,123.697
44.35%
PGIM Jennison International Opportunities Fund Class A
MORGAN STANLEY SMITH BARNEY LLC
FOR THE EXCLUSIVE BENEFIT OF ITS
CUSTOMERS
1 NEW YORK PLAZA FL 12
NEW YORK NY 10004-1901
379,165.623
8.16%
PGIM Jennison International Opportunities Fund Class A
PERSHING LLC
1 PERSHING PLAZA
JERSEY CITY NJ 07399-0002
290,934.581
6.26%
PGIM Jennison International Opportunities Fund Class A
TD AMERITRADE INC FBO
OUR CUSTOMERS
PO BOX 2226
OMAHA NE 68103-2226
455,693.099
9.80%
PGIM Jennison International Opportunities Fund Class C
CHARLES SCHWAB & CO INC
SPECIAL CUSTODY ACCT FBO CUSTOMERS
ATTN MUTUAL FUNDS
211 MAIN ST
SAN FRANCISCO CA 94105
124,132.925
11.32%
PGIM Jennison International Opportunities Fund Class C
NATIONAL FINANCIAL SERVICES LLC
FOR EXCLUSIVE BENEFIT OF
OUR CUSTOMERS
ATTN MUTUAL FUNDS DEPT - 4TH FLOOR
499 WASHINGTON BLVD
JERSEY CITY NJ 07310
115,056.742
10.49%
PGIM Jennison International Opportunities Fund Class C
AMERICAN ENTERPRISE INVESTMENT SVC
(FBO) 41999970
707 2ND AVE SOUTH
MINNEAPOLIS MN 55402-2405
108,553.656
9.90%

57

Principal Fund Shareholders (as of December 7,2022)
Fund Name and Share Class
Shareholder Name and Address
No. of Shares
% of Class
PGIM Jennison International Opportunities Fund Class C
WELLS FARGO CLEARING SVCS LLC
SPECIAL CUSTODY ACCT FOR THE
EXCLUSIVE BENEFIT OF CUSTOMER
2801 MARKET ST
SAINT LOUIS MO 63103-2523
114,863.076
10.47%
PGIM Jennison International Opportunities Fund Class C
MORGAN STANLEY SMITH BARNEY LLC
FOR THE EXCLUSIVE BENEFIT OF ITS
CUSTOMERS
1 NEW YORK PLAZA FL 12
NEW YORK NY 10004-1901
368,409.076
33.59%
PGIM Jennison International Opportunities Fund Class C
PERSHING LLC
1 PERSHING PLAZA
JERSEY CITY NJ 07399-0002
59,318.447
5.41%
PGIM Jennison International Opportunities Fund Class C
RAYMOND JAMES
OMNIBUS FOR MUTUAL FUNDS
HOUSE ACCT FIRM 92500015
ATTN COURTNEY WALLER
880 CARILLON PARKWAY
ST PETERSBURG FL 33716
68,776.631
6.27%
PGIM Jennison International Opportunities Fund Class R
PIMS/PRUDENTIAL RETIREMENT
AS NOMINEE FOR THE TTEE/CUST PL 007
PRUDENTIAL SMARTSOLUTION IRA
280 TRUMBULL ST.
HARTFORD CT 06103
612,206.322
5.83%
PGIM Jennison International Opportunities Fund Class CL R
PIMS/PRUDENTIAL RETIREMENT
AS NOMINEE FOR THE TTEE/CUST PL 007
PRUDENTIAL SMARTSOLUTION IRA
280 TRUMBULL ST.
HARTFORD CT 06103
5,207,436.661
49.59%
PGIM Jennison International Opportunities Fund Class R
PIMS/PRUDENTIAL RETIREMENT
AS NOMINEE FOR THE TTEE/CUST PL 006
PRUDENTIAL SMARTSOLUTION IRA
280 TRUMBULL ST.
HARTFORD CT 06103
3,429,441.864
32.66%
PGIM Jennison International Opportunities Fund Class Z
LPL FINANCIAL
A/C 1000-0005
4707 EXECUTIVE DRIVE
SAN DIEGO CA 92121-3091
4,427,781.142
5.06%
PGIM Jennison International Opportunities Fund Class Z
NATIONAL FINANCIAL SERVICES LLC
FOR EXCLUSIVE BENEFIT OF
OUR CUSTOMERS
ATTN MUTUAL FUNDS DEPT 4TH FLOOR
499 WASHINGTON BLVD
JERSEY CITY NJ 07310
20,553,803.256
23.48%
PGIM Jennison International Opportunities Fund Class Z
AMERICAN ENTERPRISE INVESTMENT SVC
(FBO) 41999970
707 2ND AVE SOUTH
MINNEAPOLIS MN 55402-2405
12,292,837.207
14.04%
PGIM Jennison International Opportunities Fund Class Z
MORGAN STANLEY SMITH BARNEY LLC
FOR THE EXCLUSIVE BENEFIT OF ITS
CUSTOMERS
1 NEW YORK PLAZA FL 12
NEW YORK NY 10004-1901
12,384,666.503
14.15%
PGIM Jennison International Opportunities Fund Class Z
UBS WM USA
0O0 11011 6100
SPEC CDY A/C EXL BEN CUSTOMERS
OF UBSFSI
1000 HARBOR BLVD
WEEHAWKEN, NJ 07086
4,914,015.045
5.61%

PGIM Jennison International Opportunities Fund 58

Principal Fund Shareholders (as of December 7,2022)
Fund Name and Share Class
Shareholder Name and Address
No. of Shares
% of Class
PGIM Jennison International Opportunities Fund Class Z
CHARLES SCHWAB CO
211 MAIN ST
SAN FRANCISCO CA 94105-1901
12,794,871.023
14.62%
PGIM Jennison International Opportunities Fund Class Z
PERSHING LLC
1 PERSHING PLAZA
JERSEY CITY NJ 07399-0002
4,864,627.789
5.56%
PGIM Jennison International Opportunities Fund Class R2
EMPOWER TRUST FBO
EMPLOYEE BENEFITS CLIENTS 401K
8515 E ORCHARD RD 2T2
GREENWOOD VILLAGE CO 80111
29,661.051
6.19%
PGIM Jennison International Opportunities Fund Class R2
FIIOC FBO
ZUKOWSKI, ROGERS, FLOOD & MCARDLE
401(K) PLAN
100 MAGELLAN WAY (KW1C)
COVINGTON KY 41015-1987
42,805.821
8.93%
PGIM Jennison International Opportunities Fund Class R2
PIMS/PRUDENTIAL RETIREMENT
AS NOMINEE FOR THE TTEE/CUST PL 007
403(B)(7) TAX DEFERRED MUTUAL
C/O PARADIGM EQUITIES, INC.
1216 KENDALE BLVD
EAST LANSING MI 488232501
181,037.139
37.76%
PGIM Jennison International Opportunities Fund Class R2
PIMS/PRUDENTIAL RETIREMENT
AS NOMINEE FOR THE TTEE/CUST PL 300
CHEROKEE HEALTH SYSTEMS, INC.
6350 W ANDREW JOHNSON HWY
TALBOTT TN 37877
168,949.752
35.24%
PGIM Jennison International Opportunities Fund Class R4
PIMS/PRUDENTIAL RETIREMENT
AS NOMINEE FOR THE TTEE/CUST PL 764
FORTNEY & WEYGANDT, INC. 401(K)
31269 BRADLEY ROAD
NORTH OLMSTED OH 44070
65,863.182
18.02%
PGIM Jennison International Opportunities Fund Class R4
EMPOWER TRUST FBO
VARIOUS SUNTRUST OMNIBUS ACCOUNTS
8515 E ORCHARD RD 2T2
GREENWOOD VILLAGE CO 80111
19,994.534
5.47%
PGIM Jennison International Opportunities Fund Class R4
PIMS/PRUDENTIAL RETIREMENT
AS NOMINEE FOR THE TTEE/CUST PL 719
LADAS & PARRY LLP 401(K)
1040 AVENUE OF THE AMERICAS
NEW YORK NY 100183738
72,043.320
19.71%
PGIM Jennison International Opportunities Fund Class R4
LINCOLN RETIREMENT SERVICES COMPANY
FBO CROSSING RIVERS HEALTH 403B PLN
PO BOX 7876
FORT WAYNE IN 46801-7876
89,736.241
24.55%
PGIM Jennison International Opportunities Fund Class R4
LINCOLN RETIREMENT SERVICES COMPANY
FBO DOOR COUNTY 403(B)
PO BOX 7876
FORT WAYNE IN 46801-7876
60,704.716
16.61%
PGIM Jennison International Opportunities Fund Class R4
VOYA INSTITUTIONAL TRUST COMPANY
ONE ORANGE WAY
WINDSOR CT 06095-4774
28,098.867
7.69%
PGIM Jennison International Opportunities Fund Class R6
NATIONAL FINANCIAL SERVICES LLC
FOR EXCLUSIVE BENEFIT OF
OUR CUSTOMERS
ATTN MUTUAL FUNDS DEPT 4TH FLOOR
499 WASHINGTON BLVD
JERSEY CITY NJ 07310
5,978,464.537
10.23%

59

Principal Fund Shareholders (as of December 7,2022)
Fund Name and Share Class
Shareholder Name and Address
No. of Shares
% of Class
PGIM Jennison International Opportunities Fund Class R6
EDWARD D JONES & CO
ATTN: MUTUAL FUND SHAREHOLDER
ACCOUNTING
201 PROGRESS PKWY
MARYLAND HTS MO 63043-3003
43,652,851.029
74.69%
Control Persons (as of December 7,2022)
Fund Name
Shareholder Name and Address
No. of Shares
% of Voting Securities
PGIM Jennison International Opportunities Fund
EDWARD D JONES & CO
ATTN: MUTUAL FUND SHAREHOLDER
ACCOUNTING
201 PROGRESS PKWY
MARYLAND HTS MO 63043-3003
19,164,445.035
37.61%
As of the date of this SAI, the Board Members and Officers of the Fund, as a group, owned less than 1% of the outstanding shares of the Fund.
FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
The financial statements for the Fund for the fiscal year ended October 31, 2022, which are incorporated in this SAI by reference to the 2022 Annual Report to shareholders (File No. 811-03981), were audited by PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP, an independent registered public accounting firm. You may obtain a copy of the Annual Report at no charge by request to the Fund by calling (800) 225-1852 or by writing to Prudential Mutual Fund Services LLC, P.O. Box 9658, Providence, RI 02940.

PGIM Jennison International Opportunities Fund 60

PART II
PURCHASE, REDEMPTION AND PRICING OF FUND SHARES
SHARE CLASSES. The Fund may offer shares of one or more classes to investors. Not every share class described in this SAI may be offered, and investors should consult their Prospectus for specific information concerning the share classes that are available to them.
Shares of the Fund may be purchased at a price equal to the next determined NAV per share plus a sales charge (if applicable) which, at the election of the investor, may be imposed either (1) at the time of purchase (Class A shares) or (2) on a deferred basis (Class C shares or Class A shares, in certain circumstances). Class R, Class R1, Class R2, Class R3, Class R4, Class R5, Class R6, and Class Z shares, if offered, are offered only to a limited group of investors at NAV without any sales charges.
Additional or different classes of shares may also be offered, including Class R, Class R1, Class R2, Class R3, Class R4, Class R5, and Class R6. If offered, specific information with respect to these share classes is set forth in the Prospectus and SAI.
For more information, see “How to Buy, Sell and Exchange Fund Shares—How to Buy Shares” in the Prospectus.
PURCHASE BY WIRE. For an initial purchase of shares of the Fund by wire, you must complete an application and telephone PMFS at (800) 225-1852 (toll-free) to receive an account number. PMFS will request the following information: your name, address, tax identification number, Fund name, class election (if applicable), dividend distribution election, amount being wired and wiring bank. PMFS will also furnish you with instructions for wiring the funds from your bank to the Fund's Custodian.
If you arrange for receipt by the Custodian of federal funds prior to the calculation of NAV (once each business day at the close of regular trading on the NYSE, usually 4:00 p.m. Eastern Time), on a business day, you may purchase shares of the Fund as of that day. In the event that regular trading on the NYSE closes before 4:00 p.m. Eastern Time, you will receive the following day's NAV if your order to purchase is received after the close of regular trading on the NYSE.
In making a subsequent purchase order by wire, you should wire the Custodian directly and should be sure that the wire specifies the Fund's name, the share class to be purchased, your name, individual account number, Direct Deposit Account (“DDA”) Number and the Fund's Bank Account registration. You do not need to call PMFS to make subsequent purchase orders utilizing federal funds. The minimum amount for subsequent purchase by wire is $100.
ISSUANCE OF FUND SHARES FOR SECURITIES. Transactions involving the issuance of Fund shares for securities (rather than cash) will be limited to (1) reorganizations, (2) statutory mergers, or (3) other acquisitions of portfolio securities that: (a) meet the investment objectives and policies of the Fund, (b) are relatively liquid and not subject to restrictions on resale, (c) have a value that is readily ascertainable via listing on or trading in a recognized United States or international exchange or market, and (d) are approved by the Fund's Manager.
MULTIPLE ACCOUNTS. An institution may open a single master account by filing an application with PMFS, signed by personnel authorized to act for the institution. Individual subaccounts may be opened at the time the master account is opened by listing them, or they may be added at a later date by written advice. Procedures will be available to identify subaccounts by name and number within the master account name. The foregoing procedures would also apply to related institutional accounts (i.e., accounts of shareholders with a common institutional or corporate parent). The investment minimums as set forth in the relevant Prospectus under “How to Buy and Sell Fund Shares—How to Buy Shares” are applicable to the aggregate amounts invested by a group, and not to the amount credited to each subaccount.
REOPENING AN ACCOUNT. Subject to the minimum investment restrictions, an investor may reopen an account, without filing a new application, at any time during the calendar year the account is closed, provided that the information on that application is still applicable.
RESTRICTIONS ON SALE OF FUND SHARES. The right of redemption may be suspended or the date of payment may be postponed for a period of up to seven days. Suspensions or postponements may not exceed seven days except at times (1) when the NYSE is closed for other than customary weekends and holidays, (2) when trading on the NYSE is restricted, (3) when an emergency exists as a result of which disposal of Fund securities is not reasonably practicable or it is not reasonably practicable for the Fund fairly to determine the value of its net assets, or (4) during any other period when the SEC, by order, so permits; provided that applicable rules and regulations of the SEC shall govern as to whether the conditions prescribed in (2), (3) or (4) exist.

61

REDEMPTION IN KIND. The Fund may pay the redemption price in whole or in part by a distribution in kind of securities from the investment portfolio of the Fund, in lieu of cash, in conformity with applicable rules of the SEC and procedures adopted by the Board. Securities will be readily marketable and will be valued in the same manner as in a regular redemption. If your shares are redeemed in kind, you would incur transaction costs in converting the assets into cash, and you would bear all market risk relating to the securities until the securities are sold. The Fund, however, has elected to be governed by Rule 18f-1 under the 1940 Act, under which the Fund is obligated to redeem shares solely in cash up to the lesser of $250,000 or 1.00% of the NAV of the Fund during any 90-day period for any one shareholder.
RIGHTS OF ACCUMULATION. Redu