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MASSMUTUAL FUNDS
This Prospectus describes the following Funds:
Fund Name
Class I
Class R5
Service
Class
Administrative
Class
Class R4
Class A
Class R3
Class Y
Class L
Class C
MassMutual Short- Duration Bond Fund
MSTZX
MSTDX
MSBYX
MSTLX
MPSDX
MSHAX
MSDNX
BXDYX
BXDLX
BXDCX
MassMutual High Yield Fund
MPHZX
MPHSX
DLHYX
MPHLX
MPHRX
MPHAX
MPHNX
BXHYX
BXHCX
The Securities and Exchange Commission has not approved or disapproved these securities or passed upon the adequacy of this Prospectus. Any statement to the contrary is a crime.
PROSPECTUS
February 1, 2022

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Table Of Contents
Page
About the Funds
3
12
20
23
23
39
39
39
44
48
50
54
54
55
56
59
62
A-1

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MassMutual Short-Duration Bond Fund (formerly known as
MassMutual Premier Short-Duration Bond Fund)
INVESTMENT OBJECTIVE
This Fund seeks to achieve a high total rate of return primarily from current income while minimizing fluctuations in capital values by investing primarily in a diversified portfolio of short-term investment grade fixed income securities.
FEES AND EXPENSES OF THE FUND
This table describes the fees and expenses that you may pay if you buy, hold, and sell shares of the Fund. You may pay brokerage commissions and other fees to financial intermediaries which are not reflected in the tables and examples below. For Class A shares, you may qualify for sales charge discounts if you invest, or agree to invest in the future, at least $25,000 in MassMutual funds. For Class L shares, you may qualify for sales charge discounts if you and your family invest, or agree to invest in the future, at least $250,000 in the Fund. More information about these and other discounts is available in the section titled Sales Charges by Class beginning on page 44 of the Fund’s Prospectus or from your financial professional.
Shareholder Fees (fees paid directly from your investment)
Class 
I
Class 
R5
Service
Class
Admini-
strative
Class
Class 
R4
Class 
A
Class 
R3
Class 
Y
Class 
L
(1)
Class 
C
Maximum Sales Charge (Load) Imposed on Purchases (as a % of offering prince)
None
None
None
None
None
2.50%
None
None
2.00%
None
Maximum Deferred Sales Charge (Load) (as a % of the lower of the original offering price or redemption proceeds)
None
None
None
None
None
None
None
None
None
None
Maximum Contingent Deferred Sales Charge (Load)(CDSC) (as a % of the lower of the original offering price or redemption proceeds)
None
None
None
None
None
None
None
None
0.50%(2)
0.50%(3)
(1)
Previous holders of Class A shares of the Barings Active Short Duration Bond Fund, which was reorganized into the MassMutual Short-Duration Bond Fund, will not be subject to the CDSC of Class L shares of the MassMutual Short-Duration Bond Fund. Purchases of Class L shares of the MassMutual Short-Duration Bond Fund made through a financial intermediary that had an agreement in place to sell Class A shares of the Barings Active Short Duration Bond Fund before the reorganization of Barings Active Short Duration Bond Fund into the MassMutual Short-Duration Bond Fund will not be subject to any initial sales charge or CDSC.
(2)
For purchases of Class L shares of $250,000 or more, the CDSC is 0.50% for shares tendered and accepted for repurchase within the first 18 months of purchase. There is no CDSC on Class L shares thereafter.
(3)
The CDSC on Class C Shares is 0.50% for shares tendered and accepted for repurchase within the first 12 months of purchase. There is no CDSC on Class C Shares thereafter.

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Annual Fund Operating Expenses (expenses that you pay each year as a percentage of the value of your investment)
Class 
I
Class 
R5
Service
Class
Admini-
strative
Class
Class 
R4
Class 
A
Class 
R3
Class 
Y
Class 
L
Class 
C
Management Fees
0.32%
0.32%
0.32%
0.32%
0.32%
0.32%
0.32%
0.32%
0.32%
0.32%
Distribution and Service (Rule 12b-1) Fees
None
None
None
None
0.25%
0.25%
0.50%
0.00%
0.25%
0.50%
Other Expenses(1)
0.09%
0.19%
0.29%
0.39%
0.29%
0.39%
0.29%
0.19%
0.14%
0.14%
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses
0.41%
0.51%
0.61%
0.71%
0.86%
0.96%
1.11%
0.51%
0.71%
0.96%
Expense Reimbursement
-0.01%
0.00%
0.00%
0.00%
0.00%
0.00%
0.00%
-0.11%
-0.06%
-0.06%
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses after Expense Reimbursement(2)
0.40%
0.51%
0.61%
0.71%
0.86%
0.96%
1.11%
0.40%
0.65%
0.90%
(1)
Other Expenses are based on estimated amounts for the current fiscal year of the Fund.
(2)
The expenses in the above table reflect a written agreement by MML Advisers to cap the fees and expenses of the Fund (other than extraordinary legal and other expenses, Acquired Fund Fees and Expenses, interest expense, expenses related to borrowings, securities lending, leverage, taxes, and brokerage, short sale dividend and loan expense, or other non-recurring or unusual expenses such as organizational expenses and shareholder meeting expenses, as applicable) through January 31, 2023, to the extent that Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses after Expense Reimbursement would otherwise exceed 0.40% for Classes I and Y, and 0.65% and 0.90% for Classes L and C, respectively. The Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses after Expense Reimbursement shown in the above table may exceed these amounts, because, as noted in the previous sentence, certain fees and expenses are excluded from the cap. The agreement can only be terminated by mutual consent of the Board of Trustees on behalf of the Fund and MML Advisers.
Example
This example is intended to help you compare the cost of investing in the Fund with the cost of investing in other mutual funds. It assumes that you invest $10,000 in each share class of the Fund for the time periods indicated and then redeem all of your shares at the end of those periods. For Class A and Class L shares, the example includes the initial sales charge. The example also assumes that your investment earns a 5% return each year and that the Fund’s operating expenses are exactly as described in the preceding table. Although your actual costs may be higher or lower, based on these assumptions your costs would be:
1 Year
3 Years
5 Years
10 Years
Class I $ 41 $ 131 $ 229 $ 517
Class R5 $ 52 $ 164 $ 285 $ 640
Service Class $ 62 $ 195 $ 340 $ 762
Administrative Class
$ 73 $ 227 $ 395 $ 883
Class R4 $ 88 $ 274 $ 477 $ 1,061
Class A $ 345 $ 548 $ 768 $ 1,399
Class R3 $ 113 $ 353 $ 612 $ 1,352
Class Y $ 41 $ 150 $ 270 $ 619
Class L $ 265 $ 414 $ 577 $ 1,049
Class C $ 142 $ 298 $ 521 $ 1,162
You would pay the following expenses if you did not redeem your shares:
1 Year
3 Years
5 Years
10 Years
Class Y $ 265 $ 414 $ 577 $ 1,049
Class L $ 92 $ 298 $ 521 $ 1,162
Portfolio Turnover
The Fund pays transaction costs, such as commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or “turns over” its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover rate may indicate higher transaction costs and may result in higher taxes when Fund shares are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are not reflected in annual fund operating expenses or in the example, affect the Fund’s performance. During the most recent fiscal year, the Fund’s portfolio turnover rate was 72% of the average value of its portfolio.
INVESTMENTS, RISKS, AND PERFORMANCE
Principal Investment Strategies
Under normal circumstances, the Fund invests at least 80% of its net assets (plus the amount of any borrowings for investment purposes) in investment grade fixed income securities (rated Baa3 or higher by Moody’s, BBB- or higher by Standard & Poor’s or the equivalent by any nationally recognized statistical rating organization, or, if unrated, determined to be of comparable quality by the Fund’s subadviser, Barings LLC (“Barings”), or sub-subadviser, Baring International Investment

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Limited (“BIIL”)). These typically include U.S. dollar-denominated corporate obligations, securities issued or guaranteed by the U.S. Government or its agencies or instrumentalities, U.S. and foreign issuer dollar-denominated bonds including, but not limited to, corporate obligations, government and agency issues, private placement bonds, securities subject to resale pursuant to Rule 144A, and mortgage-backed and other asset-backed securities, including collateralized bond and loan obligations.
The Fund may also invest in below investment grade debt securities (“junk” or “high yield” bonds), including securities in default, and including bank loans; normally, 10% or less of the Fund’s total assets will be invested in below investment grade debt securities. In the event that a security is downgraded after its purchase by the Fund, the Fund may continue to hold the security if Barings or BIIL considers that doing so would be consistent with the Fund’s investment objective. The Fund may invest up to 15% of its total assets in securities that are not denominated in U.S. dollars including, but not limited to, corporate obligations, government and agency issues, private placement bonds, and mortgage-backed and other asset-backed securities, including collateralized bond and loan obligations. Although the Fund’s investment in non-U.S. dollar denominated assets may be on a currency hedged or unhedged basis, under normal market conditions, the Fund seeks to hedge substantially all of its exposure to non-U.S. currencies. The Fund may also invest in non-dollar denominated high yield bonds, including bank loans, and may invest in securities subject to legal restrictions on resale, some of which may be subject to resale pursuant to Rule 144A.
In pursuing its investment objective, the Fund may (but is not obligated to) use a wide variety of exchange-traded and over-the-counter derivatives, including, but not limited to, futures contracts, foreign currency futures and forward contracts, including derivatives thereof (for hedging purposes, to adjust various portfolio characteristics, including the duration (interest rate volatility) of the Fund’s portfolio, or as a substitute for direct investments); interest rate swaps (for hedging purposes or as a substitute for direct investments or to gain market exposure); total return swaps (for hedging purposes or as a substitute for direct investments); and credit default swaps (for hedging purposes or as a substitute for direct investments). The Fund may invest in common stocks, exchange-traded funds (“ETFs”), or other equity
securities and derivatives thereof for hedging purposes or to enhance total return. Use of derivatives by the Fund may create investment leverage.
The Fund may invest in money market securities, including commercial paper. The Fund may enter into repurchase agreement transactions. The Fund may at times have significant exposure to one or more industries or sectors. The Fund may hold a portion of its assets in cash or cash equivalents. The Fund may purchase and sell securities on a when-issued, delayed delivery, to-be-announced, or forward commitment basis, and may enter into dollar roll or reverse repurchase agreement transactions.
The Fund may invest in (i) securities denominated in currencies of emerging market countries, (ii) fixed income securities or debt instruments issued by emerging market entities or sovereign nations and/or (iii) debt instruments denominated in or based on the currencies, interest rates, or issues of emerging market countries. Emerging market countries are defined to include any country that did not become a member of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (O.E.C.D.) prior to 1975 and Turkey.
The Fund may invest in other investment companies, including investment companies that are advised by the Fund’s investment adviser, subadviser, sub-subadviser, or its affiliates, or by unaffiliated parties.
The Fund seeks to maintain a dollar-weighted average duration of less than three years; Barings or BIIL may increase or decrease its duration in response to changes in interest rates and other factors. Duration measures the price sensitivity of a bond to changes in interest rates. Duration is the dollar weighted average time to maturity of a bond utilizing the present value of all future cash flows.
Barings or BIIL generally selects the Fund’s investments based on its analysis of opportunities and risks of various securities and market sectors. Barings or BIIL may choose to sell securities with deteriorating credit or limited upside potential compared to other available securities.
The Fund expects that it will engage in active and frequent trading and so will typically have a relatively high portfolio turnover rate.
Principal Risks
The following are the Principal Risks of the Fund. The value of your investment in the Fund could

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go down as well as up. You can lose money by investing in the Fund. References in this section to the Fund’s subadviser may include any sub-subadvisers as applicable. Certain risks relating to instruments and strategies used in the management of the Fund are placed first. The significance of any specific risk to an investment in the Fund will vary over time, depending on the composition of the Fund’s portfolio, market conditions, and other factors. You should read all of the risk information presented below carefully, because any one or more of these risks may result in losses to the Fund.
Fixed Income Securities Risk The values of fixed income securities typically will decline during periods of rising interest rates, and can also decline in response to changes in the financial condition of the issuer, borrower, counterparty, or underlying collateral assets, or changes in market, economic, industry, political, regulatory, public health, and other conditions affecting a particular type of security or issuer or fixed income securities generally. Certain events, such as market or economic developments, regulatory or government actions, natural disasters, pandemics, terrorist attacks, war, and other geopolitical events can have a dramatic adverse effect on the debt market and the overall liquidity of the market for fixed income securities. During those periods, the Fund may experience high levels of shareholder redemptions, and may have to sell securities at times when the Fund would otherwise not do so, and potentially at unfavorable prices. Certain securities may be difficult to value during such periods. Fixed income securities are subject to interest rate risk (the risk that the value of a fixed income security will fall when interest rates rise), extension risk (the risk that the average life of a security will be extended through a slowing of principal payments), prepayment risk (the risk that a security will be prepaid and the Fund will be required to reinvest at a less favorable rate), duration risk (the risk that longer-term securities may be more sensitive to interest rate changes), and credit risk.
Mortgage- and Asset-Backed Securities Risk Investments in mortgage- and asset-backed securities subject the Fund to credit risk, interest rate risk, extension risk, and prepayment risk, among other risks. Mortgage-backed and asset-backed securities not issued by a government agency generally involve greater credit risk than securities issued by government agencies. Payment of principal and interest generally depends on the cash flows generated by the underlying assets
and the terms of the security. The types of mortgages (for example, residential or commercial mortgages) underlying securities held by the Fund may differ and be affected differently by market factors. Investments that receive only the interest portion or the principal portion of payments on the underlying assets may be highly volatile. Litigation with respect to the representations and warranties given in connection with the issuance of mortgage-backed securities can be an important consideration in investing in such securities, and the outcome of any such litigation could significantly impact the value of the Fund’s mortgage-backed investments.
Bank Loans Risk Many of the risks associated with bank loans are similar to the risks of investing in below investment grade debt securities. Changes in the financial condition of the borrower or economic conditions or other circumstances may reduce the capacity of the borrower to make principal and interest payments on such instruments and may lead to defaults. Senior secured bank loans are typically supported by collateral; however the value of the collateral may be insufficient to cover the amount owed to the Fund, or the Fund may be prevented or delayed from realizing on the collateral. Some loans may be unsecured; unsecured loans generally present a greater risk of loss to the Fund if the issuer defaults. If the Fund relies on a third party to administer a loan, the Fund is subject to the risk that the third party will fail to perform its obligations. In addition, if the Fund holds only a participation interest in a loan made by a third party, the Fund’s receipt of payments on the loan will depend on the third party’s willingness and ability to make those payments to the Fund. The settlement time for certain loans is longer than the settlement time for many other types of investments, and the Fund may not receive the payment for a loan sold by it until well after the sale; that cash would be unavailable for payment of redemption proceeds or for reinvestment. Interests in some bank loans may not be readily marketable and may be subject to restrictions on resale. In some cases, negotiations involved in disposing of indebtedness may require weeks to complete. Consequently, some indebtedness may be difficult or impossible to dispose of readily at what the Fund believes to be a fair price. Some loans may not be considered “securities” for certain purposes under the federal securities laws, and purchasers, such as the Fund, therefore may not be entitled to rely on the anti-fraud protections of the federal securities laws.

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Below Investment Grade Debt Securities Risk  Below investment grade debt securities, commonly known as “junk” or “high yield” bonds, have speculative characteristics and involve greater volatility of price and yield, greater risk of loss of principal and interest, and generally reflect a greater possibility of an adverse change in financial condition that could affect an issuer’s ability to honor its obligations.
Credit Risk Credit risk is the risk that an issuer, guarantor, or liquidity provider of a fixed income security held by the Fund may be unable or unwilling, or may be perceived (whether by market participants, ratings agencies, pricing services or otherwise) as unable or unwilling, to make timely principal and/or interest payments, or to otherwise honor its obligations. The Fund may also be exposed to the credit risk of its counterparty to repurchase agreements, reverse repurchase agreements, swap transactions, and other derivatives transactions, and to the counterparty’s ability or willingness to perform in accordance with the terms of the transaction. The value of such transactions to the Fund will depend on the willingness and ability of the counterparty to perform its obligations, including among other things the obligation to return collateral or margin to the Fund. If a counterparty becomes bankrupt or otherwise fails to perform its obligations under a derivative contract due to financial difficulties, the Fund may experience significant delays in obtaining any recovery under the derivative contract in a bankruptcy or other reorganization proceeding. The Fund may obtain only a limited recovery or may obtain no recovery in such circumstances.
Derivatives Risk Derivatives can be highly volatile and involve risks different from, and potentially greater than, direct investments, including risks of imperfect correlation between the value of derivatives and underlying assets, counterparty default, potential losses that partially or completely offset gains, and illiquidity. Derivatives can create investment leverage. Losses from derivatives can be substantially greater than the derivatives’ original cost and can sometimes be unlimited. If the value of a derivative does not correlate well with the particular market or asset class the derivative is designed to provide exposure to, the derivative may not have the effect or benefit anticipated. Derivatives can also reduce the opportunity for gains or result in losses by offsetting positive returns in other investments. Many derivatives are traded
in the over-the-counter market and not on exchanges.
Foreign Investment Risk; Emerging Markets Risk; Currency Risk Investments in securities of foreign issuers, securities of companies with significant foreign exposure, and foreign currencies can involve additional risks relating to market, industry, political, regulatory, public health, and other conditions. Political, social, diplomatic, and economic developments, U.S. and foreign government action such as the imposition of currency or capital blockages, controls, or tariffs, economic and trade sanctions or embargoes, security suspensions, entering or exiting trade or other intergovernmental agreements, or the expropriation or nationalization of assets in a particular country, can cause dramatic declines in certain or all securities with exposure to that country and other countries. In the event of nationalization, expropriation, or other confiscation, the Fund could lose its entire foreign investment in a particular country. There may be quotas or other limits on the ability of the Fund (or clients of the Fund’s investment adviser or subadviser) to invest or maintain investments in securities of issuers in certain countries. Enforcing legal rights can be more difficult, costly, and limited in certain foreign countries, and can be particularly difficult against foreign governments. Because non-U.S. securities are normally denominated and traded in currencies other than the U.S. dollar, the value of the Fund’s assets may be affected favorably or unfavorably by changes in currency exchange rates, exchange control regulations, and restrictions or prohibitions on the repatriation of non-U.S. currencies. Income and gains with respect to investments in certain countries may be subject to withholding and other taxes. There may be less information publicly available about a non-U.S. company than about a U.S. company, and many non-U.S. companies are not subject to accounting, auditing, and financial reporting standards, regulatory framework and practices comparable to those in the U.S. The securities of some non-U.S. companies, especially those in emerging markets, are less liquid and at times more volatile than securities of comparable U.S. companies. Emerging markets securities are subject to greater risks than securities issued in developed foreign markets, including less liquidity, less stringent investor protection and disclosure standards, greater price volatility, higher relative rates of inflation, greater political, economic, and social instability, greater custody and operational risks, and greater volatility in currency exchange rates, and are more

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susceptible to environmental problems. Many emerging market countries are highly reliant on international trade and exports, including the export of commodities. Their economies may be significantly impacted by fluctuations in commodity prices and the global demand for certain commodities. In addition, many emerging market countries with less established health care systems have experienced outbreaks of pandemics or contagious diseases from time to time. Frontier markets, a subset of emerging markets, generally have smaller economies and less mature capital markets than emerging markets. As a result, the risks of investing in emerging market countries are magnified in frontier market countries. Frontier markets are more susceptible to having abrupt changes in currency values, less mature markets and settlement practices, and lower trading volumes that could lead to greater price volatility and illiquidity. Non-U.S. transaction costs, such as brokerage commissions and custody costs, may be higher than in the United States. In addition, foreign markets can react differently to market, economic, industry, political, regulatory, geopolitical, public health, and other conditions than the U.S. market.
Cash Position Risk If the Fund holds a significant portion of its assets in cash or cash equivalents, its investment returns may be adversely affected and the Fund may not achieve its investment objective.
Defaulted and Distressed Securities Risk Because the issuer of such securities is in default and is likely to be in distressed financial condition, repayment of defaulted securities and obligations of distressed issuers (including insolvent issuers or issuers in payment or covenant default, in workout or restructuring, or in bankruptcy or insolvency proceedings) is uncertain. To the extent the Fund is invested in distressed securities, its ability to achieve current income for its shareholders may be diminished.
Dollar Roll and Reverse Repurchase Agreement Transaction Risk These transactions generally create leverage and subject the Fund to the credit risk of the counterparty.
Frequent Trading/Portfolio Turnover Risk Portfolio turnover generally involves some expense to the Fund and may result in the realization of taxable capital gains (including short-term gains). The trading costs and tax effects associated with portfolio turnover may adversely affect the Fund’s performance.
Hedging Risk The Fund’s attempts at hedging and taking long and short positions in currencies may not be successful and could cause the Fund to lose money or fail to get the benefit of a gain on a hedged position. If expected changes to securities prices, interest rates, currency values, and exchange rates, or the creditworthiness of an issuer are not accurately predicted, the Fund could be in a worse position than if it had not entered into such transactions.
Inflation Risk The value of assets or income from the Fund’s investments will be less in the future as inflation decreases the value of money. As inflation increases, the value of the Fund’s assets can decline as can the value of the Fund’s distributions.
Leveraging Risk Instruments and transactions including derivatives, dollar roll, and reverse repurchase agreement transactions, that create leverage may cause the value of an investment in the Fund to be more volatile, could result in larger losses than if they were not used, and tend to compound the effects of other risks.
LIBOR Risk Certain instruments in which the Fund may invest rely in some fashion upon the London-Interbank Offered Rate (“LIBOR”). The United Kingdom’s Financial Conduct Authority, which regulates LIBOR, has announced plans to phase out the use of LIBOR by the end of 2021. There remains uncertainty regarding the future utilization of LIBOR, including an extension by the ICE Benchmark Administration to postpone certain aspects of the LIBOR transition to June 2023, and the nature of any replacement rate, and any potential effects of the transition away from LIBOR on the Fund or on certain instruments in which the Fund invests are not known. The transition process may involve, among other things, increased volatility or illiquidity in markets for instruments that currently rely on LIBOR. Uncertainty and volatility arising from the transition may result in a reduction in the value of certain LIBOR-based instruments held by the Fund or reduce the effectiveness of related transactions such as hedges. Any such effects of the transition away from LIBOR, as well as other unforeseen effects, could result in losses to the Fund.
Liquidity Risk Certain securities may be difficult (or impossible) to sell or certain positions may be difficult to close out at a desirable time and price, and the Fund may be required to hold an illiquid investment that is declining in value, or it may be required to sell certain illiquid investments at a

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price or time that is not advantageous in order to meet redemptions or other cash needs. Some securities may be subject to restrictions on resale. There can be no assurance that there will be a liquid market for instruments held by the Fund at any time. The Fund may not receive the proceeds from the sale of certain investments for an extended period.
Management Risk The Fund relies on the manager’s investment analysis and its selection of investments to achieve its investment objective. There can be no assurance that the Fund will achieve the intended results and the Fund may incur significant losses.
Market Risk The value of the Fund’s portfolio securities may decline, at times sharply and unpredictably, as a result of unfavorable market-induced changes affecting particular industries, sectors, or issuers. Stock and bond markets can decline significantly in response to issuer, market, economic, industry, political, regulatory, geopolitical, public health, and other conditions, as well as investor perceptions of these conditions. The Fund is subject to risks affecting issuers, such as management performance, financial leverage, industry problems, and reduced demand for goods or services.
Reinvestment Risk. Income from the Fund’s portfolio will decline if and when the Fund invests the proceeds from matured, traded, or called debt obligations at market interest rates that are below the portfolio’s current earnings rate. A decline in income could affect the Fund’s overall return.
Repurchase Agreement Risk These transactions must be fully collateralized, but involve credit risk to a Fund if the other party should default on its obligation and the Fund is delayed or prevented from recovering the collateral.
Restricted Securities Risk The Fund may hold securities that are restricted as to resale under the U.S. federal securities laws, such as securities in certain privately held companies. Such securities may be highly illiquid and their values may experience significant volatility. Restricted securities may be difficult to value.
Risk of Investment in Other Funds or Pools The Fund is indirectly exposed to all of the risks of the underlying funds, including ETFs, in which it invests, including the risk that the underlying funds will not perform as expected. ETFs are subject to additional risks, including secondary market trading risks and the risk that an ETF’s shares may trade
above or below net asset value. The Fund indirectly pays a portion of the expenses incurred by the underlying funds.
Sector Risk The Fund may allocate more of its assets to particular industries or to particular economic, market, or industry sectors than to others. This could increase the volatility of the Fund’s portfolio, and the Fund’s performance may be more susceptible to developments affecting issuers in those industries or sectors than if the Fund invested more broadly.
Sovereign Debt Obligations Risk Investments in debt securities issued by governments or by government agencies and instrumentalities involve the risk that the governmental entities responsible for repayment may be unable or unwilling to pay interest and repay principal when due. Many sovereign debt obligations may be rated below investment grade (“junk” or “high yield” bonds). Any restructuring of a sovereign debt obligation held by the Fund will likely have a significant adverse effect on the value of the obligation. In the event of default of sovereign debt, the Fund may be unable to pursue legal action against the sovereign issuer or to realize on collateral securing the debt.
U.S. Government Securities Risk Obligations of certain U.S. Government agencies and instrumentalities are not backed by the full faith and credit of the U.S. Government, and there can be no assurance that the U.S. Government would provide financial support to such agencies and instrumentalities.
Valuation Risk The Fund is subject to the risk of mispricing or improper valuation of its investments, in particular to the extent that its securities are fair valued.
When-Issued, Delayed Delivery, TBA, and Forward Commitment Transaction Risk These transactions may create leverage and involve a risk of loss if the value of the securities declines prior to settlement.
Performance Information
The following bar chart and table provide some indication of the risks of investing in the Fund. The bar chart shows changes in the Fund’s performance from year to year for Class R5 shares. The table shows how the Fund’s average annual returns for 1, 5, and 10 years compare with those of a broad measure of market performance. Performance for Class R4

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shares of the Fund for periods prior to its inception date (04/01/14) and performance for Class Y, Class L, and Class C shares of the Fund for periods prior to their inception date (12/13/21) is based on the performance of Class R5 shares, adjusted for Class R4, Class L, and Class C shares to reflect Class R4, Class L, and Class C expenses, respectively. Performance for Class A, Class L, and Class C shares of the Fund reflects any applicable sales charge. Past performance (before and after taxes) is not necessarily an indication of how the Fund will perform in the future. More up-to-date performance information is available at
https://www.massmutual.com/funds or by calling 1-888-309-3539.
Annual Performance
Class R5 Shares
[MISSING IMAGE: tm2136674d1-bc_rsharebw.jpg]
Highest Quarter:
2Q ‘20,
4.36% Lowest Quarter:
1Q ‘20,
-6.84%
After-tax returns are calculated using the historical highest individual federal marginal income tax rates and do not reflect the impact of state and local taxes. Actual after-tax returns depend on an investor’s tax situation and may differ from those shown. After-tax returns are not relevant to investors who hold Fund shares through tax-advantaged arrangements, such as 401(k) plans or individual retirement accounts. After-tax returns are shown for Class R5 only. After-tax returns for other classes will vary.
Average Annual Total Returns
(for the periods ended December 31, 2021)
One
Year
Five
Years
Ten
Years
Since
Inception
(12/13/
2021
)
Class R5
Return Before Taxes 1.93% 2.59% 2.22%
Return After Taxes on Distributions 1.10% 1.27% 1.06%
Return After Taxes on Distributions and Sales of Fund Shares
1.15% 1.42% 1.20%
Class I Return Before Taxes 2.07% 2.70% 2.34%
Service
Class
Return Before Taxes 1.84% 2.47% 2.11%
Admini-strative
Class
Return Before Taxes 1.79% 2.38% 2.03%
Class R4 Return Before Taxes 1.70% 2.25% 1.87%
Class A Return Before Taxes -0.98% 1.63% 1.53%
Class R3 Return Before Taxes 1.43% 1.97% 1.58%
Class Y Return Before Taxes 1.94% 2.60% 2.22% -0.34%
Class L Return Before Taxes 1.81% 2.46% 2.08% 0.78%
Class C Return Before Taxes 1.55% 2.21% 1.83% -9.98%
Bloomberg U.S. 1-3 Year Government Bond Index (reflects no deduction for fees, expenses, or taxes)
-0.60% 1.62% 1.10%
MANAGEMENT
Investment Adviser: MML Investment Advisers, LLC (“MML Advisers”)
Subadviser(s): Barings LLC (“Barings”)
Sub-subadviser(s): Baring International Investment Limited (“BIIL”)

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Portfolio Manager(s):
Yulia Alekseeva, CFA  is a Managing Director, the Head of Securitized Credit Research, and a portfolio manager for Barings’ Investment Grade Fixed Income Group. She has managed the Fund since December 2020.
Stephen Ehrenberg, CFA  is a Managing Director and portfolio manager for Barings’ Investment Grade Fixed Income Group. He has managed the Fund since November 2019.
Natalia Krol is a Managing Director and portfolio manager for Barings’ Emerging Markets Blended Total Return strategies. She has managed the Fund since May 2021.
Omotunde Lawal, CFA  is a Managing Director and the Head of, and a portfolio manager for, Barings’ Emerging Markets Corporate Debt Group. She has managed the Fund since May 2021.
Charles Sanford  is a Managing Director and the Head of, and a portfolio manager for, Barings’ Investment Grade Fixed Income Group. He has managed the Fund since December 2020. He previously managed the Fund from June 2006 to November 2017.
Douglas Trevallion, II, CFA  is a Managing Director, the Head of Global Securitized and Liquid Products, and a portfolio manager for Barings’ Investment Grade Fixed Income Group. He has managed the Fund since June 2018. He previously managed the Fund from October 2008 to October 2017.
PURCHASE AND SALE OF FUND SHARES
Shares of the Fund are generally available through distribution channels, such as broker-dealers or financial institutions, and to retirement plans, other institutional investors, and individual retirement accounts. Fund shares are redeemable on any business day by written request, telephone, or internet (available to certain customers).
Purchase Minimums*
Class Y
Class L
Class C
Initial Investment
$ 100,000 $ 1,000 $ 1,000
Subsequent Investment
$ 250 $ 250 $ 250
*
The Fund reserves the right to change or waive the investment minimums. For retirement plans, the investment minimum is $250 for each of the initial investment and subsequent investments.
TAX INFORMATION
The Fund intends to make distributions that may be taxed as ordinary income, qualified dividend income, or capital gains, unless you are an investor eligible for preferential tax treatment.
PAYMENTS TO BROKER-DEALERS AND OTHER FINANCIAL INTERMEDIARIES
If you purchase the Fund through a broker-dealer or other financial intermediary, the intermediary may receive a one-time or continuing payments from the Fund, MML Advisers or its affiliates, or others for the sale of Fund shares or continuing shareholder services provided by the intermediary. These payments may create a conflict of interest by influencing the broker-dealer or other intermediary to recommend the Fund over another investment. You should contact your intermediary to obtain more information about the compensation it may receive in connection with your investment.

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MassMutual High Yield Fund (formerly known as
MassMutual Premier High Yield Fund)
INVESTMENT OBJECTIVE
This Fund seeks to achieve a high level of total return, with an emphasis on current income, by investing primarily in high yield debt and related securities.
FEES AND EXPENSES OF THE FUND
This table describes the fees and expenses that you may pay if you buy, hold, and sell shares of the Fund. You may pay brokerage commissions and other fees to financial intermediaries which are not reflected in the tables and examples below. For Class A shares, you may qualify for sales charge discounts if you invest, or agree to invest in the future, at least $25,000 in MassMutual funds. More information about these and other discounts is available in the section titled Sales Charges by Class beginning on page 44 of the Fund’s Prospectus or from your financial professional.
Shareholder Fees (fees paid directly from your investment)
Class
I
Class 
R5
Service
Class
Admini-
strative
Class
Class 
R4
Class 
A
Class 
R3
Class 
Y
Class 
C
Maximum Sales Charge (Load) Imposed on Purchases (as a % of offering prince)
None
None
None
None
None
5.50%
None
None
None
Maximum Deferred Sales Charge (Load) (as a % of the lower of the original offering price or redemption proceeds)
None
None
None
None
None
None
None
None
None
Maximum Contingent Deferred Sales Charge (Load) (CDSC) (as a % of the lower of the original offering price or redemption proceeds)
None
None
None
None
None
None
None
None
1.00%(1)
(1)
The CDSC on Class C Shares is 1.00% for shares tendered and accepted for repurchase within the first 12 months of purchase. There is no CDSC on Class C Shares thereafter.
Annual Fund Operating Expenses (expenses that you pay each year as a percentage of the value of your investment)
Class 
I
Class 
R5
Service
Class
Admini-
strative
Class
Class 
R4
Class 
A
Class 
R3
Class 
Y
Class 
C
Management Fees
0.47%
0.47%
0.47%
0.47%
0.47%
0.47%
0.47%
0.47%
0.47%
Distribution and Service (Rule 12b-1) Fees
None
None
None
None
0.25%
0.25%
0.50%
None
1.00%
Other Expenses(1)
0.07%
0.17%
0.27%
0.37%
0.27%
0.37%
0.27%
0.12%
0.07%
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses
0.54%
0.64%
0.74%
0.84%
0.99%
1.09%
1.24%
0.59%
1.54%
(1)
Other Expenses are based on estimated amounts for the current fiscal year of the Fund.
Example
This example is intended to help you compare the cost of investing in the Fund with the cost of investing in other mutual funds. It assumes that you invest $10,000 in each share class of the Fund for the time periods indicated and then redeem all of your shares at the end of those periods. For
Class A shares, the example includes the initial sales charge. The example also assumes that your investment earns a 5% return each year and that the Fund’s operating expenses are exactly as described in the preceding table. Although your actual costs may be higher or lower, based on these assumptions your costs would be:

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1 Year
3 Years
5 Years
10 Years
Class I $ 55 $ 173 $ 302 $ 677
Class R5 $ 65 $ 205 $ 357 $ 798
Service Class $ 76 $ 237 $ 411 $ 918
Administrative
Class
$ 86 $ 268 $ 466 $ 1,037
Class R4 $ 101 $ 315 $ 547 $ 1,213
Class A $ 655 $ 878 $ 1,118 $ 1,806
Class R3 $ 126 $ 393 $ 681 $ 1,500
Class Y $ 60 $ 189 $ 329 $ 738
Class C $ 257 $ 486 $ 839 $ 1,834
You would pay the following expenses if you did not redeem your shares:
1 Year
3 Years
5 Years
10 Years
Class C $ 157 $ 486 $ 839 $ 1,834
Portfolio Turnover
The Fund pays transaction costs, such as commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or “turns over” its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover rate may indicate higher transaction costs and may result in higher taxes when Fund shares are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are not reflected in annual fund operating expenses or in the example, affect the Fund’s performance. During the most recent fiscal year, the Fund’s portfolio turnover rate was 68% of the average value of its portfolio.
INVESTMENTS, RISKS, AND PERFORMANCE
Principal Investment Strategies
The Fund invests primarily in lower rated U.S. debt securities (“junk” or “high yield” bonds), including securities in default. Debt securities may include, for example, corporate bonds, mortgage-backed and asset-backed securities, and obligations of the U.S. Government or its agencies or instrumentalities. Under normal circumstances, the Fund invests at least 80% of its net assets (plus the amount of any borrowings for investment purposes) in lower rated fixed income securities (rated below Baa3 by Moody’s, below BBB- by Standard & Poor’s or the equivalent by any nationally recognized statistical rating organization (using the lower rating) or, if unrated, determined to be of below investment grade quality by the Fund’s subadviser, Barings LLC (“Barings”), or sub-subadviser, Baring International Investment Limited (“BIIL”)). The Fund may also invest in convertible securities, preferred stocks, warrants,
bank loans, and other fixed income securities, including Rule 144A securities, of both U.S. and foreign issuers. Currently, Barings or BIIL does not expect that the Fund will invest more than 20% of its total assets in bank loans. The Fund may invest up to 15% of its total assets in securities that are not denominated in U.S. dollars including, but not limited to, corporate bonds, government and agency issues, Rule 144A securities, convertible securities, bank loans, mortgage-backed, and asset-backed securities.
In pursuing its investment objective, the Fund may (but is not obligated to) use a wide variety of exchange-traded and over-the-counter derivatives, including futures contracts (for hedging purposes, to adjust various portfolio characteristics, including the duration (interest rate volatility) of the Fund’s portfolio, or as a substitute for direct investments); interest rate swaps (for hedging purposes or as a substitute for direct investments); total return swaps (for hedging purposes); and credit default swaps (for hedging purposes, to adjust various portfolio characteristics, including the duration (interest rate volatility) of the Fund’s portfolio, or as a substitute for direct investments). Use of derivatives by the Fund may create investment leverage.
The Fund may enter into repurchase agreement transactions. The Fund may at times have significant exposure to one or more industries or sectors. The Fund may hold a portion of its assets in cash or cash equivalents. The Fund may enter into reverse repurchase agreement transactions. Under normal market conditions, the Fund expects to have a dollar-weighted average portfolio maturity ranging from 4 to 10 years. The Fund’s portfolio may include securities with maturities outside this range, and the range may change from time to time.
In selecting the Fund’s investments, Barings or BIIL employs a bottom-up, fundamental approach to its credit analysis, which focuses first on a specific issuer’s financial strength, among other things, before considering trends or macro economic factors. Barings or BIIL prefers companies that it believes possess one or more of the following characteristics: strong business position, ability to generate free cash flow to repay debt, favorable capital structure, high level of fixed assets, conservative accounting, and respected management or equity sponsor(s) (such management and sponsors would have a good reputation and/or have had prior positive relations with Barings or BIIL).

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The Fund expects that it will engage in active and frequent trading and so will typically have a relatively high portfolio turnover rate.
Principal Risks
The following are the Principal Risks of the Fund. The value of your investment in the Fund could go down as well as up. You can lose money by investing in the Fund. References in this section to the Fund’s subadviser may include any sub-subadvisers as applicable. Certain risks relating to instruments and strategies used in the management of the Fund are placed first. The significance of any specific risk to an investment in the Fund will vary over time, depending on the composition of the Fund’s portfolio, market conditions, and other factors. You should read all of the risk information presented below carefully, because any one or more of these risks may result in losses to the Fund.
Fixed Income Securities Risk The values of fixed income securities typically will decline during periods of rising interest rates, and can also decline in response to changes in the financial condition of the issuer, borrower, counterparty, or underlying collateral assets, or changes in market, economic, industry, political, regulatory, public health, and other conditions affecting a particular type of security or issuer or fixed income securities generally. Certain events, such as market or economic developments, regulatory or government actions, natural disasters, pandemics, terrorist attacks, war, and other geopolitical events can have a dramatic adverse effect on the debt market and the overall liquidity of the market for fixed income securities. During those periods, the Fund may experience high levels of shareholder redemptions, and may have to sell securities at times when the Fund would otherwise not do so, and potentially at unfavorable prices. Certain securities may be difficult to value during such periods. Fixed income securities are subject to interest rate risk (the risk that the value of a fixed income security will fall when interest rates rise), extension risk (the risk that the average life of a security will be extended through a slowing of principal payments), prepayment risk (the risk that a security will be prepaid and the Fund will be required to reinvest at a less favorable rate), duration risk (the risk that longer-term securities may be more sensitive to interest rate changes), and credit risk.
Below Investment Grade Debt Securities Risk Below investment grade debt securities, commonly known as “junk” or “high yield” bonds, have speculative characteristics and involve greater
volatility of price and yield, greater risk of loss of principal and interest, and generally reflect a greater possibility of an adverse change in financial condition that could affect an issuer’s ability to honor its obligations.
Bank Loans Risk Many of the risks associated with bank loans are similar to the risks of investing in below investment grade debt securities. Changes in the financial condition of the borrower or economic conditions or other circumstances may reduce the capacity of the borrower to make principal and interest payments on such instruments and may lead to defaults. Senior secured bank loans are typically supported by collateral; however the value of the collateral may be insufficient to cover the amount owed to the Fund, or the Fund may be prevented or delayed from realizing on the collateral. Some loans may be unsecured; unsecured loans generally present a greater risk of loss to the Fund if the issuer defaults. If the Fund relies on a third party to administer a loan, the Fund is subject to the risk that the third party will fail to perform its obligations. In addition, if the Fund holds only a participation interest in a loan made by a third party, the Fund’s receipt of payments on the loan will depend on the third party’s willingness and ability to make those payments to the Fund. The settlement time for certain loans is longer than the settlement time for many other types of investments, and the Fund may not receive the payment for a loan sold by it until well after the sale; that cash would be unavailable for payment of redemption proceeds or for reinvestment. Interests in some bank loans may not be readily marketable and may be subject to restrictions on resale. In some cases, negotiations involved in disposing of indebtedness may require weeks to complete. Consequently, some indebtedness may be difficult or impossible to dispose of readily at what the Fund believes to be a fair price. Some loans may not be considered “securities” for certain purposes under the federal securities laws, and purchasers, such as the Fund, therefore may not be entitled to rely on the anti-fraud protections of the federal securities laws.
Credit Risk Credit risk is the risk that an issuer, guarantor, or liquidity provider of a fixed income security held by the Fund may be unable or unwilling, or may be perceived (whether by market participants, ratings agencies, pricing services or otherwise) as unable or unwilling, to make timely principal and/or interest payments, or to otherwise honor its obligations. The Fund may also be exposed to the credit risk of its counterparty to

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repurchase agreements, reverse repurchase agreements, swap transactions, and other derivatives transactions, and to the counterparty’s ability or willingness to perform in accordance with the terms of the transaction. The value of such transactions to the Fund will depend on the willingness and ability of the counterparty to perform its obligations, including among other things the obligation to return collateral or margin to the Fund. If a counterparty becomes bankrupt or otherwise fails to perform its obligations under a derivative contract due to financial difficulties, the Fund may experience significant delays in obtaining any recovery under the derivative contract in a bankruptcy or other reorganization proceeding. The Fund may obtain only a limited recovery or may obtain no recovery in such circumstances.
Derivatives Risk Derivatives can be highly volatile and involve risks different from, and potentially greater than, direct investments, including risks of imperfect correlation between the value of derivatives and underlying assets, counterparty default, potential losses that partially or completely offset gains, and illiquidity. Derivatives can create investment leverage. Losses from derivatives can be substantially greater than the derivatives’ original cost and can sometimes be unlimited. If the value of a derivative does not correlate well with the particular market or asset class the derivative is designed to provide exposure to, the derivative may not have the effect or benefit anticipated. Derivatives can also reduce the opportunity for gains or result in losses by offsetting positive returns in other investments. Many derivatives are traded in the over-the-counter market and not on exchanges.
Foreign Investment Risk; Emerging Markets Risk; Currency Risk Investments in securities of foreign issuers, securities of companies with significant foreign exposure, and foreign currencies can involve additional risks relating to market, industry, political, regulatory, public health, and other conditions. Political, social, diplomatic, and economic developments, U.S. and foreign government action such as the imposition of currency or capital blockages, controls, or tariffs, economic and trade sanctions or embargoes, security suspensions, entering or exiting trade or other intergovernmental agreements, or the expropriation or nationalization of assets in a particular country, can cause dramatic declines in certain or all securities with exposure to that country and other countries. In the event of nationalization,
expropriation, or other confiscation, the Fund could lose its entire foreign investment in a particular country. There may be quotas or other limits on the ability of the Fund (or clients of the Fund’s investment adviser or subadviser) to invest or maintain investments in securities of issuers in certain countries. Enforcing legal rights can be more difficult, costly, and limited in certain foreign countries, and can be particularly difficult against foreign governments. Because non-U.S. securities are normally denominated and traded in currencies other than the U.S. dollar, the value of the Fund’s assets may be affected favorably or unfavorably by changes in currency exchange rates, exchange control regulations, and restrictions or prohibitions on the repatriation of non-U.S. currencies. Income and gains with respect to investments in certain countries may be subject to withholding and other taxes. There may be less information publicly available about a non-U.S. company than about a U.S. company, and many non-U.S. companies are not subject to accounting, auditing, and financial reporting standards, regulatory framework and practices comparable to those in the U.S. The securities of some non-U.S. companies, especially those in emerging markets, are less liquid and at times more volatile than securities of comparable U.S. companies. Emerging markets securities are subject to greater risks than securities issued in developed foreign markets, including less liquidity, less stringent investor protection and disclosure standards, greater price volatility, higher relative rates of inflation, greater political, economic, and social instability, greater custody and operational risks, and greater volatility in currency exchange rates, and are more susceptible to environmental problems. Many emerging market countries are highly reliant on international trade and exports, including the export of commodities. Their economies may be significantly impacted by fluctuations in commodity prices and the global demand for certain commodities. In addition, many emerging market countries with less established health care systems have experienced outbreaks of pandemics or contagious diseases from time to time. Frontier markets, a subset of emerging markets, generally have smaller economies and less mature capital markets than emerging markets. As a result, the risks of investing in emerging market countries are magnified in frontier market countries. Frontier markets are more susceptible to having abrupt changes in currency values, less mature markets and settlement practices, and lower trading volumes that could lead to greater price volatility and

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illiquidity. Non-U.S. transaction costs, such as brokerage commissions and custody costs, may be higher than in the United States. In addition, foreign markets can react differently to market, economic, industry, political, regulatory, geopolitical, public health, and other conditions than the U.S. market.
Mortgage- and Asset-Backed Securities Risk Investments in mortgage- and asset-backed securities subject the Fund to credit risk, interest rate risk, extension risk, and prepayment risk, among other risks. Mortgage-backed and asset-backed securities not issued by a government agency generally involve greater credit risk than securities issued by government agencies. Payment of principal and interest generally depends on the cash flows generated by the underlying assets and the terms of the security. The types of mortgages (for example, residential or commercial mortgages) underlying securities held by the Fund may differ and be affected differently by market factors. Investments that receive only the interest portion or the principal portion of payments on the underlying assets may be highly volatile. Litigation with respect to the representations and warranties given in connection with the issuance of mortgage-backed securities can be an important consideration in investing in such securities, and the outcome of any such litigation could significantly impact the value of the Fund’s mortgage-backed investments.
Cash Position Risk If the Fund holds a significant portion of its assets in cash or cash equivalents, its investment returns may be adversely affected and the Fund may not achieve its investment objective.
Convertible Securities Risk Convertible securities are subject to the risks of both debt instruments and equity securities. The price of a convertible security may change in response to changes in price of the underlying equity security, the credit quality of the issuer, and interest rates. In general, the values of convertible securities tend to decline as interest rates rise and to rise when interest rates fall. A convertible security generally has less potential for gain or loss than the underlying equity security.
Defaulted and Distressed Securities Risk Because the issuer of such securities is in default and is likely to be in distressed financial condition, repayment of defaulted securities and obligations of distressed issuers (including insolvent issuers or issuers in payment or covenant default, in workout or restructuring, or in bankruptcy or insolvency proceedings) is uncertain. To the extent the Fund
is invested in distressed securities, its ability to achieve current income for its shareholders may be diminished.
Frequent Trading/Portfolio Turnover Risk Portfolio turnover generally involves some expense to the Fund and may result in the realization of taxable capital gains (including short-term gains). The trading costs and tax effects associated with portfolio turnover may adversely affect the Fund’s performance.
Hedging Risk The Fund’s attempts at hedging and taking long and short positions in currencies may not be successful and could cause the Fund to lose money or fail to get the benefit of a gain on a hedged position. If expected changes to securities prices, interest rates, currency values, and exchange rates, or the creditworthiness of an issuer are not accurately predicted, the Fund could be in a worse position than if it had not entered into such transactions.
Inflation Risk The value of assets or income from the Fund’s investments will be less in the future as inflation decreases the value of money. As inflation increases, the value of the Fund’s assets can decline as can the value of the Fund’s distributions.
Leveraging Risk Instruments and transactions, including derivatives and reverse repurchase agreement transactions, that create leverage may cause the value of an investment in the Fund to be more volatile, could result in larger losses than if they were not used, and tend to compound the effects of other risks.
LIBOR Risk Certain instruments in which the Fund may invest rely in some fashion upon the London-Interbank Offered Rate (“LIBOR”). The United Kingdom’s Financial Conduct Authority, which regulates LIBOR, has announced plans to phase out the use of LIBOR by the end of 2021. There remains uncertainty regarding the future utilization of LIBOR, including an extension by the ICE Benchmark Administration to postpone certain aspects of the LIBOR transition to June 2023, and the nature of any replacement rate, and any potential effects of the transition away from LIBOR on the Fund or on certain instruments in which the Fund invests are not known. The transition process may involve, among other things, increased volatility or illiquidity in markets for instruments that currently rely on LIBOR. Uncertainty and volatility arising from the transition may result in a reduction in the value of

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certain LIBOR-based instruments held by the Fund or reduce the effectiveness of related transactions such as hedges. Any such effects of the transition away from LIBOR, as well as other unforeseen effects, could result in losses to the Fund.
Liquidity Risk Certain securities may be difficult (or impossible) to sell or certain positions may be difficult to close out at a desirable time and price, and the Fund may be required to hold an illiquid investment that is declining in value, or it may be required to sell certain illiquid investments at a price or time that is not advantageous in order to meet redemptions or other cash needs. Some securities may be subject to restrictions on resale. There can be no assurance that there will be a liquid market for instruments held by the Fund at any time. The Fund may not receive the proceeds from the sale of certain investments for an extended period.
Management Risk The Fund relies on the manager’s investment analysis and its selection of investments to achieve its investment objective. There can be no assurance that the Fund will achieve the intended results and the Fund may incur significant losses.
Market Risk The value of the Fund’s portfolio securities may decline, at times sharply and unpredictably, as a result of unfavorable market-induced changes affecting particular industries, sectors, or issuers. Stock and bond markets can decline significantly in response to issuer, market, economic, industry, political, regulatory, geopolitical, public health, and other conditions, as well as investor perceptions of these conditions. The Fund is subject to risks affecting issuers, such as management performance, financial leverage, industry problems, and reduced demand for goods or services.
Preferred Stock Risk Like other equity securities, preferred stock is subject to the risk that its value may decrease based on actual or perceived changes in the business or financial condition of the issuer. In addition, changes in interest rates may adversely affect the value of a preferred stock that pays a fixed dividend. Preferred stocks are also subject to additional risks, such as potentially greater volatility and risks related to deferral, non-cumulative dividends, subordination, liquidity, limited voting rights, and special redemption rights.
Reinvestment Risk Income from the Fund’s portfolio will decline if and when the Fund invests the proceeds from matured, traded, or called debt obligations at market interest rates that are
below the portfolio’s current earnings rate. A decline in income could affect the Fund’s overall return.
Repurchase Agreement Risk These transactions must be fully collateralized, but involve credit risk to a Fund if the other party should default on its obligation and the Fund is delayed or prevented from recovering the collateral.
Reverse Repurchase Agreement Transaction Risk These transactions typically create leverage and subject the Fund to the credit risk of the counterparty.
Sector Risk The Fund may allocate more of its assets to particular industries or to particular economic, market, or industry sectors than to others. This could increase the volatility of the Fund’s portfolio, and the Fund’s performance may be more susceptible to developments affecting issuers in those industries or sectors than if the Fund invested more broadly.
U.S. Government Securities Risk Obligations of certain U.S. Government agencies and instrumentalities are not backed by the full faith and credit of the U.S. Government, and there can be no assurance that the U.S. Government would provide financial support to such agencies and instrumentalities.
Valuation Risk The Fund is subject to the risk of mispricing or improper valuation of its investments, in particular to the extent that its securities are fair valued.
Performance Information
The following bar chart and table provide some indication of the risks of investing in the Fund. The bar chart shows changes in the Fund’s performance from year to year for Service Class shares. The table shows how the Fund’s average annual returns for 1, 5, and 10 years compare with those of a broad measure of market performance. Performance for Class R4 shares of the Fund for periods prior to its inception date (04/01/14) and performance for Class Y and Class C shares of the Fund for periods prior to their inception date (12/13/21) is based on the performance of Class R5 shares, adjusted for Class R4 and Class C shares to reflect Class R4 and Class C expenses, respectively. Performance for Class A and Class C shares of the Fund reflects any applicable sales charge. Past performance (before and after taxes) is not necessarily an indication of how the

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Fund will perform in the future. More up-to-date performance information is available at https://www.massmutual.com/funds or by calling 1-888-309-3539.
Annual Performance
Service Class Shares
[MISSING IMAGE: tm2136674d1-bc_servicebw.jpg]
Highest Quarter:
2Q ‘20,
7.23% Lowest Quarter:
1Q ‘20,
-12.73%
After-tax returns are calculated using the historical highest individual federal marginal income tax rates and do not reflect the impact of state and local taxes. Actual after-tax returns depend on an investor’s tax situation and may differ from those shown. After-tax returns are not relevant to investors who hold Fund shares through tax-advantaged arrangements, such as 401(k) plans or individual retirement accounts. After-tax returns are shown for Service Class only. After-tax returns for other classes will vary.
Average Annual Total Returns
(for the periods ended December 31, 2021)
One
Year
Five
Years
Ten
Years
Since
Inception
(12/13/2021)
Service
Class
Return Before Taxes 7.30% 5.82% 7.16%
Return After Taxes on Distributions 4.87% 3.38% 4.37%
Return After Taxes on Distributions and Sales of Fund Shares
4.31% 3.38% 4.32%
Class I
Return Before Taxes
7.46% 6.03% 7.39%
Class R5
Return Before Taxes
7.42% 5.93% 7.27%
Admini-
strative
Class
Return Before Taxes 7.19% 5.72% 7.05%
Class R4
Return Before Taxes
6.91% 5.54% 6.88%
Class A
Return Before Taxes
1.09% 4.28% 6.18%
Class R3 Return Before Taxes 6.80% 5.29% 6.59%
One
Year
Five
Years
Ten
Years
Since
Inception
(12/13/2021)
Class Y Return Before Taxes
6.46%
4.98%
6.31%
21.56%
Class C Return Before Taxes
7.42%
5.93%
7.27%
6.02%
Bloomberg U.S. Corporate High-Yield Bond Index (reflects no deduction for fees, expenses or taxes)
5.28%
6.30%
6.83%
MANAGEMENT
Investment Adviser: MML Investment Advisers, LLC (“MML Advisers”)
Subadviser(s): Barings LLC (“Barings”)
Sub-subadviser(s): Baring International Investment Limited (“BIIL”)
Portfolio Manager(s):
Sean Feeley, CFA is a Managing Director and portfolio manager for Barings’ U.S. High Yield Investments Group. He has managed the Fund since December 2010.
Scott Roth, CFA is a Managing Director and the Co-Head of, and a portfolio manager for, Barings’ U.S. High Yield Investments Group. He has managed the Fund since December 2010.
PURCHASE AND SALE OF FUND SHARES
Shares of the Fund are generally available through distribution channels, such as broker-dealers or financial institutions, and to retirement plans, other institutional investors, and individual retirement accounts. Fund shares are redeemable on any business day by written request, telephone, or internet (available to certain customers).
Purchase Minimums*
Class Y
Class C
Initial Investment
$ 100,000 $ 1,000
Subsequent Investment
$ 250 $ 250
*
The Fund reserves the right to change or waive the investment minimums. For retirement plans, the investment minimum is $250 for each of the initial investment and subsequent investments.
TAX INFORMATION
The Fund intends to make distributions that may be taxed as ordinary income, qualified dividend

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income, or capital gains, unless you are an investor eligible for preferential tax treatment.
PAYMENTS TO BROKER-DEALERS AND OTHER FINANCIAL INTERMEDIARIES
If you purchase the Fund through a broker-dealer or other financial intermediary, the intermediary may receive a one-time or continuing payments from the Fund, MML Advisers or its affiliates, or
others for the sale of Fund shares or continuing shareholder services provided by the intermediary. These payments may create a conflict of interest by influencing the broker-dealer or other intermediary to recommend the Fund over another investment. You should contact your intermediary to obtain more information about the compensation it may receive in connection with your investment.

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Additional Information Regarding Investment Objectives and Principal Investment Strategies
Changes to Investment Objectives and Strategies. Each Fund’s investment objective and strategies are non-fundamental and may be changed by the Board of Trustees (the “Trustees”) of the MassMutual Premier Funds (the “Trust”) without shareholder approval.
Note Regarding Percentage Limitations. All percentage limitations on investments in this Prospectus will apply at the time of investment, and will not be considered violated unless an excess or deficiency occurs or exists immediately after and as a result of the investment. (As a result, the actual investments making up a Fund’s portfolio may not at a particular time comport with any such limitation due to increases or decreases in the values of securities held by the Fund.) However, if, through a change in values, net assets, or other circumstances, a Fund were in a position where more than 15% of its net assets was invested in illiquid securities, the Fund would take appropriate orderly steps, as deemed necessary, to protect liquidity. With respect to a Fund whose name suggests that the Fund focuses its investments in a particular type of investment or investments, or in investments in a particular industry or group of industries, and that has adopted a policy under Rule 35d-1 under the Investment Company Act of 1940, as amended (the “1940 Act”), such Fund’s policy to invest at least 80% of its net assets in certain investments may be changed by the Trustees upon at least 60 days’ prior written notice to shareholders.
Credit Ratings. Security ratings are determined at the time of investment based on ratings published by nationally recognized statistical rating organizations; if a security is not rated, it will be deemed to have the same rating as a security determined by the investment adviser or subadviser to be of comparable quality. Unless otherwise stated, if a security is rated by more than one nationally recognized statistical rating organization, the highest rating is used. The Fund may retain any security whose rating has been downgraded after purchase.
Duration. Duration is a measure of the expected life of a debt security that is used to determine the sensitivity of the security’s value to changes in interest rates. The longer a security’s duration, the more sensitive it will be to changes in interest rates. For example, if interest rates rise by 1%, the value
of a debt security with a duration of two years would be expected to decline 2% and the value of a debt security with a duration of four years would be expected to decline 4%. Unlike the maturity of a debt security, which measures only the time until final payment is due, duration takes into account the time until all payments of interest and principal on a security are expected to be made, including how these payments are affected by prepayments and by changes in interest rates. Determining duration may involve estimates of future economic parameters, which may vary from actual future values.
Leverage. Leverage generally has the effect of increasing the amount of loss or gain a Fund might realize, and may increase volatility in the value of a Fund’s investments. Adverse changes in the value or level of the underlying asset, rate, or index may result in a loss substantially greater than the amount invested in the derivative itself.
Temporary Defensive Positions. At times, a Fund’s investment adviser or subadviser may determine that market conditions make pursuing a Fund’s basic investment strategy inconsistent with the best interests of its shareholders. At such times, the investment adviser or subadviser may (but will not necessarily), without notice, temporarily use alternative strategies primarily designed to reduce fluctuations in the values of a Fund’s assets. In implementing these defensive strategies, a Fund may hold assets without limit in cash and cash equivalents and in other investments that the investment adviser or subadviser believes to be consistent with the Fund’s best interests. If such a temporary defensive strategy is implemented, a Fund may not achieve its investment objective.
Portfolio Turnover. Changes are made in a Fund’s portfolio whenever the investment adviser or subadviser believes such changes are desirable. Portfolio turnover rates are generally not a factor in making buy and sell decisions. A high portfolio turnover rate will result in higher costs from brokerage commissions, dealer-mark-ups, bid-ask spreads, and other transaction costs and may also result in a higher percentage of short-term capital gains and a lower percentage of long-term capital gains as compared to a fund that trades less frequently (short-term capital gains generally receive less favorable tax treatment in the hands of shareholders than do long-term capital gains).

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Such costs are not reflected in the Funds’ Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses set forth in the fee tables but do have the effect of reducing a Fund’s investment return.
Non-Principal Investments; Use of Derivatives; Securities Loans; Repurchase Agreements. A Fund may hold investments that are not included in its principal investment strategies. These non-principal investments are described in the Statement of Additional Information (“SAI”) or below under “Additional Information Regarding Principal Risks.” A Fund also may choose not to invest in certain securities described in this Prospectus and in the SAI, even though it has the ability to do so. Certain Funds may engage in transactions involving derivatives as part of their principal investment strategies; the disclosures of the principal investment strategies of those Funds include specific references to those derivatives transactions. Any of the other Funds may engage in derivatives transactions not as part of their principal investment strategies, and Funds that may use certain derivatives as part of their principal investment strategies may use other derivatives (not as part of their principal investment strategies), as well. A Fund may use derivatives for hedging purposes, as a substitute for direct investment, to earn additional income, to adjust portfolio characteristics, including duration (interest rate volatility), to gain exposure to securities or markets in which it might not be able to invest directly, to provide asset/liability management, or to take long or short positions on one or more indexes, securities, or foreign currencies. If a Fund takes a short position with respect to a particular index, security, or currency, it will lose money if the index, security, or currency appreciates in value, or an expected credit or other event that might affect the value of the index, security, or currency fails to occur. Losses could be significant. Derivatives transactions may include, but are not limited to, foreign currency exchange transactions, options, futures contracts, interest rate swaps, interest rate futures contracts, forward contracts, total return swaps, credit default swaps, and hybrid instruments. A Fund may use derivatives to create investment leverage. See “Additional Information Regarding Principal Risks,” below, and the SAI for more information regarding those transactions.
A Fund may make loans of portfolio securities to broker-dealers and other financial intermediaries of up to 33% of its total assets, and may enter into repurchase agreements. These transactions must be
fully collateralized at all times, but involve some risk to a Fund if the other party should default on its obligation and the Fund is delayed or prevented from recovering the collateral, or if the Fund is required to return collateral to a borrower at a time when it may realize a loss on the investment of that collateral. Any losses from the investment of cash collateral received by the Fund will be for the Fund’s account and may exceed any income the Fund receives from its securities lending activities. A repurchase agreement is a transaction in which a Fund purchases a security from a seller, subject to the obligation of the seller to repurchase that security from the Fund at a higher price. A Fund may enter into securities loans and repurchase agreements as a non-principal investment strategy.
Foreign Securities. The globalization and integration of the world economic system and related financial markets have made it increasingly difficult to define issuers geographically. Accordingly, the Funds intend to construe geographic terms such as “foreign,” “non-U.S.,” “European,” “Latin American,” “Asian,” and “emerging markets” in the manner that affords to the Funds the greatest flexibility in seeking to achieve the investment objective(s) of the relevant Fund. Specifically, unless otherwise stated, in circumstances where the investment objective and/or strategy is to invest (a) exclusively in “foreign securities,” “non-U.S. securities,” “European securities,” “Latin American securities,” “Asian securities,” or “emerging markets” ​(or similar directions) or (b) at least some percentage of the Fund’s assets in foreign securities, etc., the Fund will take the view that a security meets this description so long as the issuer of a security is tied economically to the particular country or geographic region indicated by words of the relevant investment objective and/or strategy (the “Relevant Language”). For these purposes the issuer of a security is deemed to have that tie if:
(i) the issuer is organized under the laws of the country or a country within the geographic region suggested by the Relevant Language or maintains its principal place of business in that country or region; or
(ii) the securities are traded principally in the country or region suggested by the Relevant Language; or
(iii) the issuer, during its most recent fiscal year, derived at least 50% of its revenues or profits from goods produced or sold, investments made, or

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services performed in the country or region suggested by the Relevant Language or has at least 50% of its assets in that country or region.
In addition, the Funds intend to treat derivative securities (e.g., call options) for this purpose by reference to the underlying security. Conversely, if the investment objective and/or strategy of a Fund limits the percentage of assets that may be invested in “foreign securities,” etc. or prohibits such investments altogether, a Fund intends to categorize securities as “foreign,” etc. only if the security possesses all of the attributes described above in clauses (i), (ii), and (iii).

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Disclosure of Portfolio Holdings
A description of the Funds’ policies and procedures with respect to the disclosure of each Fund’s portfolio securities is available in the Funds’ SAI.
Additional Information
Regarding Principal Risks
A Fund, by itself, generally is not intended to provide a complete investment program. Investment in the Funds is intended to serve as part of a diversified portfolio of investments. An investment in a Fund is not a bank deposit and is not insured or guaranteed by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation or any other government agency.
The value of your investment in a Fund changes with the values of the investments in the Fund’s portfolio. Many things can affect those values. Factors that may have an important or significant effect on a particular Fund’s portfolio as a whole are called “Principal Risks.” The Principal Risks of each Fund are identified in the foregoing Fund Summaries and are described in this section. Certain Funds may be more susceptible to some risks than others. Although the Funds strive to reach their stated goals, they cannot offer guaranteed results. The value of your investment in a Fund could go down as well as up. You can lose money by investing in the Funds. References in this section to a Fund’s subadviser may include any sub-subadvisers as applicable.
The SAI contains further information about the Funds, their investments and their related risks.

Bank Loans Risk
Many of the risks associated with bank loans are similar to the risks of investing in below investment grade debt securities, although bank loans are typically (though not always) senior and secured, while below investment grade debt securities or investments are often subordinated and unsecured. Changes in the financial condition of the borrower or economic conditions or other circumstances may reduce the capacity of the borrower to make principal and interest payments on such instruments and may lead to defaults. The value of any collateral securing a bank loan may decline after a Fund invests, and there is a risk that the value of the collateral may not be
sufficient to cover the amount owed to the Fund. In addition, collateral securing a loan may be found invalid, may be used to pay other outstanding obligations of the borrower under applicable law, or may be difficult to sell. In the event that a borrower defaults, a Fund’s access to the collateral may be limited by bankruptcy and other insolvency laws. There is also the risk that the collateral may be difficult to liquidate, or that a majority of the collateral may be illiquid. In addition, some loans may be unsecured. Unsecured loans generally present a greater risk of loss to the Fund if the issuer defaults. In some cases, the Fund may rely on a third party to administer its interest in a loan, and so is subject to the risk that the third party will be unwilling or unable to perform its obligations. The Fund may invest in a loan by purchasing an indirect interest in the loan held by a third party. In that case, the Fund will be subject to both the credit risk of the borrower and of the third party, and the Fund may be unable to realize some or all of the value of its interest in the loan in the event of the insolvency of the third party. The settlement time for certain loans is longer than the settlement time for many other types of investments, and the Fund may not receive the payment for a loan sold by it until well after the sale; that cash would be unavailable for payment of redemption proceeds or for reinvestment. Interests in some bank loans may not be readily marketable and may be subject to restrictions on resale. In some cases, negotiations involved in disposing of indebtedness may require weeks to complete. Consequently, some indebtedness may be difficult or impossible to dispose of readily at what the Fund believes to be a fair price. Some bank loans may be illiquid, and bank loans generally tend to be less liquid than many other debt securities. The lack of a liquid secondary market may make it more difficult for the Fund to assign a value to such instruments for purposes of valuing the Fund’s portfolio and calculating its net asset value (“NAV”). Some loans may not be considered “securities” for certain purposes under the federal securities laws, and purchasers, such as the Fund, therefore may not be entitled to rely on the anti-fraud protections of the federal securities laws.

Below Investment Grade Debt Securities Risk
Below investment grade debt securities, which are also known as “junk” or “high yield”

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bonds, and comparable unrated securities in which a Fund may invest, have speculative characteristics, and changes in economic conditions, the financial condition of the issuer, and/or an unanticipated rise in interest rates or other circumstances are more likely to lead to a weakened capacity to make principal and interest payment than in the case of higher grade securities. Below investment grade debt securities involve greater volatility of price and yield and greater risk of loss of principal and interest than do higher quality securities. In the past, economic downturns or increases in interest rates have, under certain circumstances, resulted in a higher incidence of default by the issuers of these instruments and are likely to do so in the future, especially in the case of highly leveraged issuers. The prices for these instruments may be affected by legislative and regulatory developments. Some below investment grade debt securities are issued in connection with management buy-outs and other highly leveraged transactions, and may entail substantial risk of delays in payments of principal or interest or of defaults. The inability (or perceived inability) of issuers to make timely payment of interest and principal would likely make the values of securities held by the Fund more volatile and could limit the Fund’s ability to sell its securities at prices approximating the values the Fund has placed on such securities. In the absence of a liquid trading market for securities held by it, a Fund at times may be unable to establish the fair value of such securities. To the extent a Fund invests in securities in the lower rating categories, the achievement of the Fund’s goals is more dependent on the Fund investment adviser’s or subadviser’s investment analysis than would be the case if the Fund were investing in securities in the higher rating categories. Securities that are rated CCC or below by Standard & Poor’s or Caa or below by Moody’s Investors Service, Inc. are generally regarded by the rating agencies as having extremely poor prospects of ever attaining any real investment standing.

Cash Position Risk
A Fund may hold a significant portion of its assets in cash or cash equivalents at the sole discretion of the Fund’s investment adviser or subadviser, based on such factors as it may consider appropriate under the circumstances.
The portion of a Fund’s assets invested in cash and cash equivalents may at times exceed 25% of the Fund’s net assets. To the extent a Fund holds a significant portion of its assets in cash or cash equivalents, its investments returns may be adversely affected and the Fund may not achieve its investment objective.

Convertible Securities Risk
Convertible securities are bonds, debentures, notes or other debt securities that may be converted at either a stated price or stated rate into shares of common or preferred stock (or cash or other securities of equivalent value), and so are subject to the risks of investments in both debt securities and equity securities. The price of a convertible security may change in response to changes in price of the underlying equity security, the credit quality of the issuer, and interest rates. Due to the conversion feature, convertible debt securities generally yield less than non-convertible securities of similar credit quality and maturity. The values of convertible securities may be interest-rate sensitive and tend to decline as interest rates rise and to rise when interest rates fall. A Fund may invest at times in securities that have a mandatory conversion feature, pursuant to which the securities convert automatically into stock at a specified date and conversion ratio, or that are convertible at the option of the issuer. When conversion is not at the option of the holder, a Fund may be required to convert the security into the underlying stock even at times when the value of the underlying common stock has declined substantially or it would otherwise be disadvantageous to do so.

Credit Risk
Credit risk is the risk that an issuer, guarantor, or liquidity provider of a fixed income security held by a Fund may be unable or unwilling, or may be perceived (whether by market participants, ratings agencies, pricing services or otherwise) as unable or unwilling, to make timely principal and/or interest payments, or to otherwise honor its obligations. It includes the risk that the security will be downgraded by a credit rating agency; generally, lower credit quality issuers present higher credit risks. An actual or perceived decline in creditworthiness of an issuer of a fixed income security held by the Fund may result in a decrease in the value of the security.

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It is possible that the ability of an issuer to meet its obligations will decline substantially during the period when the Fund owns securities of the issuer or that the issuer will default on its obligations or that the obligations of the issuer will be limited or restructured. The credit rating assigned to any particular investment does not necessarily reflect the issuer’s current financial condition and does not reflect an assessment of an investment’s volatility or liquidity. Securities rated in the lowest category of investment grade are considered to have speculative characteristics. In addition, below investment grade debt securities (i.e., “junk” or “high yield” bonds) involve greater credit risk, are more volatile, involve greater risk of price declines and may be more susceptible to economic downturn than investment grade securities. If a security held by the Fund loses its rating or its rating is downgraded, the Fund may nonetheless continue to hold the security in the discretion of the investment adviser or subadviser. In the case of asset-backed or mortgage-related securities, changes in the actual or perceived ability of the obligors on the underlying assets or mortgages may affect the values of those securities.
The Fund may also be exposed to the credit risk of its counterparty to repurchase agreements, reverse repurchase agreements, swap transactions, and other derivatives transactions, and to the counterparty’s ability or willingness to perform in accordance with the terms of the transaction. The value of such transactions to the Fund will depend on the willingness and ability of the counterparty to perform its obligations, including among other things the obligation to return collateral or margin to the Fund. If a counterparty becomes bankrupt or otherwise fails to perform its obligations under a derivative contract due to financial difficulties, the Fund may experience significant delays in obtaining any recovery under the derivative contract in a bankruptcy or other reorganization proceeding. The Fund may obtain only a limited recovery or may obtain no recovery in such circumstances. In the event of a counterparty’s (or its affiliate’s) insolvency, the possibility exists that a Fund’s ability to exercise remedies, such as the termination of transactions, netting of obligations, and realization on collateral, could be stayed or eliminated under special
resolution regimes adopted in the United States, the European Union, and various other jurisdictions. Among other things, such regimes provide government authorities with broad authority to intervene when a financial institution is experiencing financial difficulty.

Currency Risk
Because foreign securities normally are denominated and traded in foreign currencies, the value of a Fund’s assets may be affected favorably or unfavorably by changes in currency exchange rates, currency exchange control regulations, intervention (or failure to intervene) by the U.S. or foreign governments in currency markets, foreign withholding taxes, and restrictions or prohibitions on the repatriation of foreign currencies. A Fund may, but will not necessarily, engage in foreign currency transactions in order to protect against fluctuations in the values of holdings denominated in or exposed to other currencies, or, for certain Funds, to generate additional returns. Derivatives transactions providing exposure to foreign currencies may create investment leverage. A Fund’s investment in foreign currencies may increase the amount of ordinary income recognized by the Fund.
Officials in foreign countries may from time to time take actions in respect of their currencies which could significantly affect the value of a Fund’s assets denominated in those currencies or the liquidity of such investments. For example, a foreign government may unilaterally devalue its currency against other currencies, which would typically have the effect of reducing the U.S. dollar value of investments denominated in that currency. A foreign government may also limit the convertibility or repatriation of its currency or assets denominated in its currency, which would adversely affect the U.S. dollar value and liquidity of investments denominated in that currency. In addition, although at times most of a Fund’s income may be received or realized in foreign currencies, the Fund will be required to compute and distribute its income in U.S. dollars. As a result, if the exchange rate for any such currency declines after the Fund’s income has been earned and translated into U.S. dollars but before payment to shareholders, the Fund could be required to sell portfolio investments to make such distributions. Similarly, if a Fund incurs an expense in a foreign currency and

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the exchange rate changes adversely to the Fund before the expense is paid, the Fund would have to convert a greater amount of U.S. dollars to pay for the expense at that time than it would have had to convert at the time the Fund incurred the expense. Investments in foreign currencies themselves (directly or through derivatives transactions) may be highly volatile and may create investment leverage.

Cyber Security and Technology Risk
The Funds and their service providers (including the Funds’ investment adviser, subadvisers, custodian, and transfer agent) are subject to operational and information security risks, including those resulting from cyber-attacks and other technological issues. Technological issues or failures, or interference or attacks by “hackers” or others, may have the effect of disabling or hindering the Funds’ operations or the operations of a service provider to the Funds. There are inherent limitations in business continuity plans and technology systems designed to prevent cyberattacks and avoid operational incidents, including the possibility that certain risks have not been identified. The Funds’ investment adviser does not control the cyber security plans and systems put in place by third-party service providers, and such third-party service providers may have limited indemnification obligations to the Funds’ investment adviser or the Funds, each of whom could be negatively impacted as a result. Similar risks also are present for issuers of securities in which the Funds invest, which could result in material adverse consequences for such issuers, and may cause a Fund’s investment in such securities to lose value.

Defaulted and Distressed Securities Risk
Defaulted securities risk refers to the uncertainty of repayment of defaulted securities and obligations of distressed issuers. Because the issuer of such securities is in default and is likely to be in distressed financial condition, repayment of defaulted securities and obligations of distressed issuers (including insolvent issuers or issuers in payment or covenant default, in workout or restructuring, or in bankruptcy or insolvency proceedings) is subject to significant uncertainties. The market will likely be less liquid for distressed or defaulted securities than for other types of securities. Reduced liquidity can affect the
valuations of distressed or defaulted securities, make their valuation and sale more difficult, and result in greater volatility. Insolvency laws and practices in foreign countries are different than those in the U.S. and the effect of these laws and practices cannot be predicted with certainty. Investments in defaulted securities and obligations of distressed issuers are considered speculative. To the extent a Fund is invested in distressed securities, its ability to achieve current income for its shareholders may be diminished.

Derivatives Risk
Derivatives are financial contracts whose values depend upon, or are derived from, the value of an underlying asset, reference rate, or index. Derivatives may relate to stocks, bonds, interest rates, currencies, credit exposures, currency exchange rates, commodities, related indexes, or other assets. The use of derivative instruments may involve risks different from, or greater than, the risks associated with investing directly in securities and other more traditional investments. Derivatives can be highly volatile and are subject to a number of potential risks described in this Prospectus, including market risk, credit risk, management risk, liquidity risk, and leveraging risk. Derivative products are highly specialized instruments that may require investment techniques and risk analyses different from those associated with stocks and bonds. The use of a derivative requires an understanding not only of the underlying instrument or index but also of the derivative itself, often without the benefit of observing the performance of the derivative under all possible market conditions. (For example, successful use of a credit default swap may require, among other things, an understanding of both the credit of the company to which it relates and of the way the swap is likely to respond to changes in various market conditions and to factors specifically affecting the company.) The use of derivatives involves the risk that a loss may be sustained as a result of the failure of another party to the contract (typically referred to as a “counterparty”) to make required payments or otherwise to comply with the contract’s terms. Derivative transactions can create investment leverage. Losses from derivatives can be substantially greater than the derivatives’ original cost and can sometimes

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be unlimited. Since the values of derivatives are calculated and derived from the values of other assets, reference rates, or indexes, there is greater risk that derivatives will be improperly valued. Derivatives also involve the risk that changes in the value of a derivative may not correlate perfectly with changes in the value of its underlying asset, rate, or index, and the risk that a derivative transaction may not have the effect or benefit the Fund’s investment adviser or subadviser anticipated. Also, suitable derivative transactions may not be available in all circumstances, and there can be no assurance that a Fund will engage in these transactions when that would be beneficial. A liquid secondary market may not always exist for a Fund’s derivative positions at any time. If a derivative transaction is particularly large or if the relevant market is illiquid (as is the case with many privately negotiated derivatives), it may not be possible to initiate a transaction or liquidate a position at an advantageous price or at all. Although the use of derivatives is intended to enhance a Fund’s performance, it may instead reduce returns and increase volatility.
Recent U.S. and non-U.S. legislative and regulatory reforms, including those related to the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act, have resulted in, and may in the future result in, new regulation of derivative instruments and the Funds’ use of such instruments. Such regulations can, among other things, restrict a Fund’s ability to engage in derivative transactions (for example, by making certain types of derivative instruments or transactions no longer available to a Fund), establish additional margin requirements and/or increase the costs of derivatives transactions, and a Fund may as a result be unable to execute its investment strategies in a manner its investment adviser or subadviser might otherwise choose. Counterparty risk with respect to derivatives has been and may continue to be affected by rules and regulations concerning the derivatives market. Some derivatives transactions are centrally cleared, and a party to a cleared derivatives transaction is subject to the credit risk of the clearing house and the clearing member through which it holds the position. Credit risk of market participants with respect to derivatives that are centrally cleared is concentrated in a few clearing houses and clearing members, and it is not clear
how an insolvency proceeding of a clearing house or clearing member would be conducted, what effect the insolvency proceeding would have on any recovery by a Fund, and what impact an insolvency of a clearing house or clearing member would have on the financial system more generally.

Futures Contract Risk.  A Fund may enter into futures contracts, in which the Fund agrees to buy or sell certain financial instruments or index units or other assets on a specified future date at a specified price or rate. A Fund may also enter into contracts to deliver in the future an amount of one currency in return for an amount of another currency. If a Fund’s investment adviser or subadviser misjudges the direction of interest rates, markets, or foreign exchange rates, a Fund’s overall performance could suffer. The risk of loss could be far greater than the investment made because a futures contract requires only a small deposit to take a large position. A small change in a futures contract could have a substantial impact on a Fund, favorable or unfavorable. An investor could also suffer losses if it is unable to close out a futures contract because of an illiquid market. Futures are subject to the creditworthiness of the futures commission merchants or brokers and clearing organizations involved in the transactions. In the event of the insolvency of its futures commission merchant or broker, a Fund may be delayed or prevented from recovering some or all of the margin it has deposited with the merchant or broker, or any increase in the value of its futures positions held through that merchant or broker.

Dollar Roll and Reverse Repurchase Agreement Transaction Risk
In a dollar roll transaction, a Fund sells mortgage-backed securities for delivery to the buyer in the current month and simultaneously contracts to purchase similar securities on a specified future date from the same party. In a reverse repurchase agreement transaction, a Fund sells securities to a bank or securities dealer and agrees to repurchase them at an agreed time and price; a reverse repurchase agreement is similar to a secured borrowing by a Fund. Both types of transactions generally create leverage (see “Leveraging Risk” below). It may be difficult or impossible for a Fund to exercise its rights under a dollar roll transaction or reverse repurchase agreement

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in the event of the insolvency or bankruptcy of the counterparty, and the Fund may not be able to purchase the securities or other assets subject to the transaction and may be required to return any collateral it holds.

Emerging Markets Risk
Investing in emerging market securities poses risks different from, and/or greater than, risks of investing in domestic securities or in the securities of foreign, developed countries.
These risks may include, for example, smaller market-capitalizations of securities markets; significant price volatility; illiquidity; limits on foreign investment; and possible limits on repatriation of investment income and capital. Future economic or political events or crises could lead to price controls, forced mergers, expropriation or confiscatory taxation, seizure, nationalization, or the creation of government monopolies. The currencies of emerging market countries may experience significant declines against the U.S. dollar, and devaluation may occur subsequent to investments in those currencies by a Fund. Inflation and rapid fluctuations in inflation rates have had, and may continue to have, negative effects on the economies and securities markets of certain emerging market countries. Although many of the emerging market securities in which a Fund may invest are traded on securities exchanges, they may trade in limited volume, and the exchanges may not provide all of the conveniences or protections provided by securities exchanges in more developed markets.
Additional risks of emerging market securities may include greater social, economic, and political uncertainty and instability; more substantial governmental involvement in the economy; less governmental supervision and regulation; greater custody and operational risks; unavailability of currency hedging techniques; less stringent investor protection and disclosure standards; companies that are newly organized and small; differences in auditing and financial reporting standards, which may result in unavailability or unreliability of material information about issuers; less developed legal, regulatory, and accounting systems; and greater environmental risk. Many emerging market countries are highly reliant on international trade and exports, including the export of commodities.
Their economies may be significantly impacted by fluctuations in commodity prices and the global demand for certain commodities. In addition, many emerging market countries with less established health care systems have experienced outbreaks of pandemics or contagious diseases from time to time. In addition, emerging securities markets may have different clearance and settlement procedures, which may be unable to keep pace with the volume of securities transactions or otherwise make it difficult to engage in such transactions. Settlement of securities transactions in emerging markets may be subject to risk of loss and may be delayed more often than transactions settled in the United States, in part because a Fund will need to use brokers and counterparties that are less well capitalized, and custody and registration of assets in some countries may be unreliable compared to more developed countries. Settlement problems may cause a Fund to miss attractive investment opportunities, hold a portion of its assets in cash pending settlement, or be delayed in disposing of a portfolio security. It may be more difficult to obtain and/or enforce a judgment in a court outside the U.S., and a judgment against a foreign government may be unenforceable.
Frontier markets, a subset of emerging markets, generally have smaller economies and less mature capital markets than emerging markets. As a result, the risks of investing in emerging market countries are magnified in frontier market countries. Frontier markets are more susceptible to having abrupt changes in currency values, less mature markets and settlement practices, and lower trading volumes that could lead to greater price volatility and illiquidity.

Fixed Income Securities Risk
The values of debt securities change in response to interest rate changes. In general, as interest rates rise, the value of a debt security is likely to fall. This risk is generally greater for obligations with longer maturities or for debt securities that do not pay current interest (such as zero-coupon securities). Debt securities with variable and floating interest rates can be less sensitive to interest rate changes, although, to the extent a Fund’s income is based on short-term interest rates that fluctuate over short periods of time,

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income received by the Fund may decrease as a result of a decline in interest rates. The value of a debt security also depends on the issuer’s actual or perceived credit quality or ability to pay principal and interest when due. The value of a debt security is likely to fall if an issuer or the guarantor of a security is unable or unwilling (or is perceived to be unable or unwilling) to make timely principal and/or interest payments or otherwise to honor its obligations or if the debt security’s rating is downgraded by a credit rating agency. The value of a debt security can also decline in response to changes in market, economic, industry, political, regulatory, public health, and other conditions that affect a particular type of debt security or issuer or debt securities generally. Certain events, such as market or economic developments, regulatory or government actions, natural disasters, pandemics, terrorist attacks, war, and other geopolitical events can have a dramatic adverse effect on the debt market and the overall liquidity of the market for fixed income securities.

Extension Risk. During periods of rising interest rates, the average life of certain types of securities may be extended because of slower than expected principal payments. This may lock in a below-market interest rate, increase the security’s duration, and reduce the value of the security.

Prepayment Risk. Prepayment risk is the risk that principal of a debt obligation will be repaid at a faster rate than anticipated. In such a case, a Fund may lose the benefit of a favorable interest rate for the remainder of the term of the security in question, and may only be able to reinvest the amount of the prepayment at a less favorable rate.

Interest Rate Risk. The values of bonds and other debt instruments usually rise and fall in response to changes in interest rates. The values of debt instruments generally increase in response to declines in interest rates and decrease in response to rises in interest rates. Interest rate risk is generally greater for fixed-rate instruments than floating-rate instruments and for investments with longer durations or maturities. Some investments give the issuer the option to call or redeem an investment before its maturity date. If an issuer calls or redeems an investment during a time
of declining interest rates, a Fund might have to reinvest the proceeds in an investment offering a lower yield, and therefore might not benefit from any increase in value as a result of declining interest rates. Negative or very low interest rates could magnify the risks associated with changes in interest rates. In general, changing interest rates, including rates that fall below zero, could have unpredictable effects on markets and may expose fixed income and related markets to heightened volatility.

Foreign Investment Risk
Investments in securities of foreign issuers, securities of companies with significant foreign exposure, and foreign currencies can involve additional risks relating to market, industry, political, regulatory, public health, and other conditions. Political, social, diplomatic, and economic developments, U.S. and foreign government action such as the imposition of currency or capital blockages, controls, or tariffs, economic and trade sanctions or embargoes, security suspensions, entering or exiting trade or other intergovernmental agreements, or the expropriation or nationalization of assets in a particular country, can cause dramatic declines in certain or all securities with exposure to that country and other countries. Economic or other sanctions imposed on a foreign country or issuer by the U.S., or on the U.S. by a foreign country, could impair a Fund’s ability to buy, sell, hold, receive, deliver, or otherwise transact in certain securities. In the event of nationalization, expropriation, or other confiscation, a Fund could lose its entire foreign investment in a particular country. There may be quotas or other limits on the ability of a Fund (or clients of a Fund’s investment adviser or subadviser) to invest or maintain investments in securities of issuers in certain countries. Enforcing legal rights can be more difficult, costly, and limited in certain foreign countries, and can be particularly difficult against foreign governments. Because non-U.S. securities are normally denominated and traded in currencies other than the U.S. dollar, the value of a Fund’s assets may be affected favorably or unfavorably by changes in currency exchange rates, exchange control regulations, and restrictions or prohibitions on the repatriation of non-U.S. currencies. Income and gains with respect to investments

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in certain countries may be subject to withholding and other taxes. There may be less information publicly available about a non-U.S. company than about a U.S. company, and many non-U.S. companies are not subject to accounting, auditing, and financial reporting standards, regulatory framework and practices comparable to those in the United States. The securities of some non-U.S. companies are less liquid and at times more volatile than securities of comparable U.S. companies. Non-U.S. transaction costs, such as brokerage commissions and custody costs may be higher than in the United States. In addition, foreign markets can perform differently from U.S. markets and can react differently to market, economic, industry, political, regulatory, geopolitical, public health, and other conditions than the U.S. market.
The willingness and ability of foreign governmental entities to pay principal and interest on government securities depends on various economic factors, including for example the issuer’s balance of payments, overall debt level, and cash-flow considerations related to the availability of tax or other revenues to satisfy the issuer’s obligations. If a foreign governmental entity defaults on its obligations on the securities, a Fund may have limited recourse available to it. The laws of some foreign countries may limit a Fund’s ability to invest in securities of certain issuers located in those countries. Special tax considerations apply to a Fund’s investments in foreign securities. A Fund’s investments in foreign securities or foreign currencies may increase or accelerate the Fund’s recognition of ordinary income and may affect the amount, timing, or character of the Fund’s distributions.
A Fund may invest in foreign securities known as depositary receipts, in the form of American Depositary Receipts (“ADRs”), European Depositary Receipts (“EDRs”), Global Depositary Receipts (“GDRs”), or other similar securities. An ADR is a U.S. dollar-denominated security issued by a U.S. bank or trust company that represents, and may be converted into, a foreign security. An EDR or a GDR is generally similar but is issued by a non-U.S. bank. Depositary receipts are subject to the same risks as direct investment in foreign securities. Depositary receipts may not necessarily be denominated
in the same currency as the underlying securities into which they may be converted, and changes in currency exchange rates may affect the value of an ADR investment in ways different from direct investments in foreign securities. Funds may invest in both sponsored and unsponsored depositary receipts. Unsponsored depositary receipts are organized independently and without the cooperation of the issuer of the underlying securities. As a result, available information concerning the issuers may not be as current for unsponsored depositary receipts and the prices of unsponsored depositary receipts may be more volatile than if such instruments were sponsored by the issuer. An investment in an ADR is subject to the credit risk of the issuer of the ADR.

Frequent Trading/Portfolio Turnover Risk
The length of time a Fund has held a particular security is not generally a consideration in investment decisions. The investment policies of a Fund may lead to frequent changes in the Fund’s investments, particularly in periods of volatile market movements, in order to take advantage of what the Fund’s investment adviser or subadviser believes to be temporary investment opportunities. A change in the securities held by a Fund is known as “portfolio turnover.” Portfolio turnover generally involves some expense to a Fund, including brokerage commissions, bid-asked spreads, dealer mark-ups, and other transaction costs on the sale of securities and reinvestments in other securities, and may result in the realization of taxable capital gains (including short-term gains, which are generally treated as ordinary income when distributed to shareholders). The trading costs and tax effects associated with portfolio turnover may adversely affect a Fund’s performance. Consult your tax adviser regarding the effect of a Fund’s portfolio turnover rate on your investments.

Hedging Risk
There can be no assurance that a Fund’s hedging transactions will be effective. If a Fund takes a short position in a particular currency, security, or bond market, it will lose money if the currency, security, or bond market appreciates in value, or an expected credit event fails to occur. Any efforts at buying or selling currencies could result in significant

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losses for the Fund. Further, foreign currency transactions that are intended to hedge the currency risk associated with investing in foreign securities and minimize the risk of loss that would result from a decline in the value of the hedged currency may also limit any potential gain that might result should the value of such currency increase.

Inflation Risk
The value of assets or income from a Fund’s investments will be less in the future as inflation decreases the value of money. As inflation increases, the value of a Fund’s assets can decline as can the value of the Fund’s distributions. The market prices of debt securities generally fall as inflation increases because the purchasing power of the future income and repaid principal is expected to be worth less when received by the Fund. Debt securities that pay a fixed rather than variable interest rate are especially vulnerable to inflation risk because variable-rate debt securities may be able to participate, over the long term, in rising interest rates which have historically accompanied long-term inflationary trends.

Leveraging Risk
The use of leverage has the potential to increase returns to shareholders, but also involves additional risks. A Fund may create leverage by borrowing money (through traditional borrowings or by means of so-called reverse repurchase agreements); certain transactions, including, for example, when-issued, delayed-delivery, to-be-announced, and forward commitment purchases, loans of portfolio securities, dollar roll transactions, and the use of some derivatives, can also result in leverage. Leverage will increase the volatility of the Fund’s investment portfolio and could result in larger losses than if it were not used. The use of leverage is considered to be a speculative investment practice and may result in losses to a Fund. Certain derivatives have the potential for unlimited loss, regardless of the size of the initial investment. A Fund will typically pay interest or incur other borrowing costs in connection with leverage transactions.

LIBOR Risk
Certain instruments in which a Fund may invest rely in some fashion upon LIBOR.
LIBOR is an average interest rate, determined by the ICE Benchmark Administration, that banks charge one another for the use of short-term money. The United Kingdom’s Financial Conduct Authority (the “FCA”), which regulates LIBOR, has announced plans to phase out the use of LIBOR by the end of 2021. The FCA and LIBOR’s administrator, ICE Benchmark Administration, have also announced that most LIBOR settings will no longer be published after the end of 2021 and a majority of U.S. dollar LIBOR settings will no longer be published after June 30, 2023. Actions by regulators have resulted in the establishment of alternative reference rates to LIBOR in most major currencies. Various financial industry groups have been planning for transition away from LIBOR, but there are obstacles to converting certain securities and transactions to new reference rates. Markets are developing but questions around liquidity in these rates and how to appropriately adjust these rates to mitigate any economic value transfer at the time of transition remain a significant concern. It is difficult to predict the full impact of the transition away from LIBOR on a Fund. The transition process may involve, among other things, increased volatility or illiquidity in markets for instruments that currently rely on LIBOR, particularly insofar as the documentation governing such instruments does not include “fall back” provisions addressing the transition from LIBOR. With respect to most LIBOR-based instruments in which a Fund may invest, the pricing and other terms governing the adoption of any successor rate are expected to limit or eliminate the direct effect of the transition to a successor rate on the value of such instruments. However, uncertainty and volatility arising from the transition may result in a reduction in the value of certain LIBOR-based instruments held by a Fund or reduce the effectiveness of related transactions such as hedges. Any such effects of the transition away from LIBOR, as well as other unforeseen effects, could result in losses to a Fund.

Liquidity Risk
Liquidity risk is the risk that particular investments may be difficult to sell or terminate at approximately the price at which the Fund is carrying the investments. The ability of a Fund to dispose of illiquid positions at

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advantageous prices may be greatly limited, and a Fund may have to continue to hold such positions during periods when the investment adviser or subadviser otherwise would have sold them. Some securities held by a Fund may be restricted as to resale, may trade in the over-the-counter (“OTC”) market, or may not have an active trading market due to adverse market, economic, industry, political, regulatory, geopolitical, public health, or other conditions. In addition, a Fund, by itself or together with other accounts managed by the investment adviser or subadviser, may hold a position in a security that is large relative to the typical trading volume for that security, which can make it difficult for the Fund to dispose of the position at an advantageous time or price.
Market values for illiquid securities may not be readily available, and there can be no assurance that any fair value assigned to an illiquid security at any time will accurately reflect the price a Fund might receive upon the sale of that security. It is possible that, during periods of extreme market volatility or unusually high and unanticipated levels of redemptions, a Fund may be forced to sell large amounts of securities or terminate outstanding transactions at a price or time that is not advantageous in order to meet redemptions or other cash needs. In such a case, the sale proceeds received by a Fund may be substantially less than if the Fund had been able to sell the securities or terminate the transactions in more orderly transactions, and the sale price may be substantially lower than the price previously used by the Fund to value the securities for purposes of determining the Fund’s NAV. To the extent a Fund holds illiquid securities, it may be more likely to pay redemption proceeds in kind.

Management Risk
Each Fund is subject to management risk because it relies on the investment adviser’s and/or subadviser’s investment analysis and its selection of investments to achieve its investment objective. A Fund’s investment adviser or subadviser manages the Fund based on its assessment of economic, financial, and market factors and its investment judgment. The investment adviser or subadviser may fail to ascertain properly the appropriate mix of securities for any particular economic cycle. A Fund’s investment adviser or subadviser
applies its investment techniques and risk analyses in making investment decisions for the Fund, but there can be no guarantee that they will produce the intended result. Management risk includes the risk that poor security selection will cause a Fund to underperform relative to other funds with similar investment objectives, or that the timing of movements from one type of security to another could have a negative effect on the overall investment performance of the Fund. There can be no assurance that there will be a liquid market for instruments held by the Fund at any time.

Market Risk
The values of a Fund’s portfolio securities may decline, at times sharply and unpredictably, as a result of unfavorable broad market developments, which may affect securities markets generally or particular industries, sectors, or issuers. The values of a Fund’s investments may decline as a result of a number of such factors, including actual or perceived changes in general economic and market conditions, industry, political, regulatory, geopolitical, public health, and other developments, including the imposition of tariffs or other protectionist actions, changes in interest rates, currency rates, or other rates of exchange, and changes in economic and competitive industry conditions. Likewise, terrorism, war, natural and environmental disasters, and epidemics or pandemics may be highly disruptive to economies and markets. For example, the global pandemic outbreak of the novel coronavirus known as COVID-19 and efforts to contain its spread have produced, and will likely continue to produce, substantial market volatility, severe market dislocations and liquidity constraints in many markets, exchange trading suspensions and closures, higher default rates, and global business disruption, and they may result in future significant adverse effects, such as declines in global financial markets and a substantial economic downturn or recession throughout the world. Such factors may have a significant adverse effect on a Fund’s performance and have the potential to impair the ability of a Fund’s investment adviser, subadviser, or other service providers to serve the Fund and could lead to disruptions that negatively impact the Fund. Different parts of the market

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and different types of securities can react differently to these conditions. The possibility that security prices in general will decline over short or even extended periods subjects a Fund to unpredictable declines in the value of its shares, as well as potentially extended periods of poor performance. In addition, the increasing popularity of passive index-based investing may have the potential to increase security price correlations and volatility. As passive strategies generally buy or sell securities based simply on inclusion and representation in an index, securities’ prices will have an increasing tendency to rise or fall based on whether money is flowing into or out of passive strategies rather than based on an analysis of the prospects and valuation of individual securities. This may result in increased market volatility as more money is invested through passive strategies.
Federal, state, and other governments, their regulatory agencies, or self-regulatory organizations may take actions that affect the regulation of the securities in which a Fund invests or the issuers of such securities in ways that are unforeseeable. The uncertainty surrounding the sovereign debt of a significant number of European Union countries, as well as the status of the Euro, the European Monetary Union, and the European Union itself, has disrupted and may continue to disrupt markets in the U.S. and around the world. The risks associated with investments in Europe may be heightened due to the United Kingdom’s exit from the European Union on January 31, 2020. An agreement between the United Kingdom and the European Union governing their future trade relationship became effective on January 1, 2021. Significant uncertainty remains in the market regarding the ramifications of that development and the arrangements that will apply to the United Kingdom’s relationship with the European Union and other countries following its withdrawal; the range and potential implications of possible political, regulatory, economic, and market outcomes are difficult to predict. There is the potential for decreased trade, capital outflows from the United Kingdom, devaluation of the pound sterling, decreased business and consumer spending and decreased foreign investment in the United Kingdom, and negative effects on the value of a Fund’s investments and/or on a Fund’s ability to enter into certain
transactions or value certain investments. If one or more additional countries leave the European Union, or the European Union partially or completely dissolves, the world’s economies and securities markets may be significantly disrupted and adversely affected. Legislation or regulation also may change the way in which a Fund, the investment adviser, or subadviser is regulated. Such legislation, regulation, or other government action could limit or preclude a Fund’s ability to achieve its investment objective and affect the Fund’s performance.

Mortgage- and Asset-Backed Securities Risk
Investments in mortgage-related and other asset-backed securities are subject to the risk of severe credit downgrades, illiquidity and defaults to a greater extent than many other types of fixed income investments. Mortgage-backed securities, including collateralized mortgage obligations and certain stripped mortgage-backed securities, represent a participation in, or are secured by, mortgage loans. Asset-backed securities are generally structured like mortgage-backed securities, but instead of mortgage loans or interests in mortgage loans, the underlying assets may include such items as motor vehicle installment sale or installment loan contracts, leases of various types of real and personal property, receivables from credit card agreements, and student loan payments. Asset-backed securities also may be backed by pools of corporate or sovereign bonds, loans made to corporations, or a combination of these bonds and loans, commonly referred to as “collateralized debt obligations,” including collateralized bond obligations (“CBOs”) and collateralized loan obligations (“CLOs”). The assets backing collateralized debt obligations may consist in part or entirely of high risk, below investment grade debt obligations (or comparable unrated obligations). In the case of CBOs and certain other collateralized debt obligations, those may include, by way of example, high yield debt, residential privately issued mortgage-related securities, commercial privately issued mortgage-related securities, trust preferred securities, and emerging market debt. In the case of CLOs, they may include, among other things, domestic and foreign senior secured loans, senior unsecured loans, and subordinate corporate loans, any or all of which may be rated below investment grade or may be comparable unrated obligations.

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Traditional debt investments typically pay a fixed rate of interest until maturity, when the entire principal amount is due. By contrast, payments on mortgage-backed and many asset-backed investments typically include both interest and partial payment of principal. Principal may also be prepaid voluntarily, or as a result of refinancing or foreclosure. The Fund may have to invest the proceeds from prepaid investments in other investments with less attractive terms and yields. As a result, these securities may have less potential for capital appreciation during periods of declining interest rates than other securities of comparable maturities, although they may have a similar risk of decline in market value during periods of rising interest rates. Because the prepayment rate generally declines as interest rates rise, an increase in interest rates will likely increase the duration, and thus the volatility, of mortgage-backed and asset-backed securities. (Duration is a measure of the expected life of a fixed income security that is used to determine the sensitivity of the security’s price to changes in interest rates. Unlike the maturity of a fixed income security, which measures only the time until final payment is due, duration takes into account the time until all payments of interest and principal on a security are expected to be made, including how these payments are affected by prepayments and by changes in interest rates.) Prepayment rates are difficult to predict and the potential impact of prepayments on the value of a mortgage-related or other asset-backed security depends on the terms of the instrument and can result in significant volatility. In addition to interest rate risk (as described under “Interest Rate Risk”), investments in mortgage-backed securities composed of subprime mortgages and investments in CDOs and CLOs backed by pools of high-risk, below investment grade debt securities may be subject to a higher degree of credit risk, valuation risk, and liquidity risk (as described under “Credit Risk,” “Valuation Risk,” and “Liquidity Risk”). Litigation with respect to the representations and warranties given in connection with the issuance of mortgage-backed securities can be an important consideration in investing in such securities, and the outcome of any such litigation could significantly impact the value of the Fund’s mortgage-backed investments.
The types of mortgages underlying securities held by the Fund may differ and may be affected differently by market factors. For example, the Fund’s investments in residential mortgage-backed securities will likely be affected significantly by factors affecting residential real estate markets and mortgages generally; similarly, investments in commercial mortgage-backed securities will likely be affected significantly by factors affecting commercial real estate markets and mortgages generally.
Some mortgage-backed and asset-backed investments receive only the interest portion (“IOs”) or the principal portion (“POs”) of payments on the underlying assets. The yields and values of these investments are extremely sensitive to changes in interest rates and in the rate of principal payments on the underlying assets. IOs tend to decrease in value if interest rates decline and rates of repayment (including prepayment) on the underlying mortgages or assets increase; it is possible that the Fund may lose the entire amount of its investment in an IO due to a decrease in interest rates. Conversely, POs tend to decrease in value if interest rates rise and rates of repayment decrease. Moreover, the market for IOs and POs may be volatile and limited, which may make them difficult for the Fund to buy or sell. The values of mortgage-related and other asset-backed securities may be substantially dependent on the servicing of the underlying asset pools, and are therefore subject to risks associated with the negligence or malfeasance by their servicers and to the credit risk of their servicers. In certain situations, the mishandling of related documentation may also affect the rights of securities holders in and to the benefits of the underlying collateral. There may be legal and practical limitations on the enforceability of any security interest granted with respect to underlying assets, or the value of the underlying assets, if any, may be insufficient if the issuer defaults.
The Fund may gain investment exposure to mortgage-backed and asset-backed investments by entering into agreements with financial institutions to buy the investments at a fixed price at a future date. The Fund may or may not take delivery of the investments at the termination date of such an agreement, but will nonetheless be exposed to changes in

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value of the underlying investments during the term of the agreement. These transactions may create investment leverage.

Preferred Stock Risk
Like other equity securities, preferred stock is subject to the risk that its value may decrease based on actual or perceived changes in the business or financial condition of the issuer. In addition, if interest rates rise, the dividends on preferred stocks may be less attractive, causing the prices of preferred stocks to decline. Preferred stock may have mandatory sinking fund provisions or call/redemption provisions that can negatively affect its value. In addition, in the event of liquidation of a corporation’s assets, the rights of preferred stock generally are subordinate to the rights associated with a corporation’s debt securities. Preferred stocks are also subject to additional risks, such as potentially greater volatility and risks related to deferral, non-cumulative dividends, subordination, liquidity, limited voting rights, and special redemption rights.

Redemptions by Affiliated Funds and by Other Significant Investors
A Fund may be an investment option for other MassMutual Funds that are managed as “funds of funds” and for other investors who may make substantial investments in the Fund. As a result, from time to time, a Fund may experience a relatively large redemption and could be required to liquidate assets at inopportune times or at a loss or depressed value, which could cause the value of your investment to decline. Similarly, large Fund share purchases may adversely affect a Fund’s performance to the extent that the Fund is delayed in investing new cash and is required to maintain a larger cash position than it ordinarily would, or if the Fund is unable to invest the cash in portfolio securities that it considers as desirable as the Fund’s portfolio securities.

Reinvestment Risk
Income from a Fund’s portfolio will decline if and when the Fund invests the proceeds from matured, traded, or called debt obligations at market interest rates that are below the portfolio’s current earnings rate. A decline in income could affect a Fund’s overall return.

Repurchase Agreement Risk
A Fund may enter into repurchase agreements. These transactions must be fully collateralized, but involve credit risk to a Fund if the other party should default on its obligation and the Fund is delayed or prevented from recovering the collateral, or if the Fund is required to return collateral to a borrower at a time when it may realize a loss on the investment of that collateral.

Restricted Securities Risk
A Fund may hold securities that are restricted as to resale under the U.S. federal securities laws, such as securities in certain privately held companies. There can be no assurance that a trading market will exist at any time for any particular restricted security. Limitations on the resale of these securities may prevent the Fund from disposing of them promptly at reasonable prices or at all. Restricted securities may be highly illiquid. A Fund may have to bear the expense of registering the securities for resale and the risk of substantial delays in effecting the registration. Restricted securities may be difficult to value because market quotations may not be readily available, and there may be little publicly available information about the securities or their issuers. The values of restricted securities may be highly volatile.

Risk of Investment in other Funds or Pools
A Fund may invest in other investment companies or pooled vehicles, including closed-end funds, trusts, and exchange-traded funds (“ETFs”), that are advised by the Fund’s investment adviser or subadviser, as applicable, their affiliates, or by unaffiliated parties, to the extent permitted by applicable law. As a shareholder in an investment company or other pool, the Fund, and indirectly that Fund’s shareholders, bear a ratable share of the investment company’s or pool’s expenses, including, but not limited to, advisory and administrative fees, and the Fund at the same time continues to pay its own fees and expenses. Investment companies or pools in which the Funds may invest may change their investment objectives or policies without the approval of a Fund, in which case a Fund may be forced to withdraw its investment from the investment company or pool at a disadvantageous time. Private investment pools in which the Funds may

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invest are not registered under the 1940 Act, and so will not offer all of the protections provided by the 1940 Act (including, among other things, independent oversight, protections against certain conflicts of interest, and custodial risks). A Fund is exposed indirectly to all of the risks applicable to any other investment company or pool in which it invests, including that the investment company or pool will not perform as expected. Investments in other investment companies or private pools may be illiquid, may be leveraged, and may be highly volatile.
Investing in other investment companies or private investment vehicles sponsored or managed by the investment adviser or subadviser, as applicable, or affiliates of the investment adviser or subadviser, as applicable, involves potential conflicts of interest. For example, the investment adviser or subadviser, as applicable, or their affiliates may receive fees based on the amount of assets invested in such other investment vehicles, which fees may be higher than the fees the investment adviser or subadviser, as applicable, receives for managing the investing Fund. Investment by a Fund in those other vehicles may be beneficial in the management of those other vehicles, by helping to achieve economies of scale or enhancing cash flows. Due to this and other factors, the investment adviser or subadviser, as applicable, will have an incentive to invest a portion of a Fund’s assets in investment vehicles sponsored or managed by the investment adviser or subadviser, as applicable, or their affiliates in lieu of investments by the Fund directly in portfolio securities, and will have an incentive to invest in such investment vehicles over non-affiliated investment companies. The investment adviser or subadviser, as applicable, will have no obligation to select the least expensive or best performing funds available to serve as an underlying investment vehicle. Similarly, the investment adviser or subadviser, as applicable, will have an incentive to delay or decide against the sale of interests held by the Fund in investment vehicles sponsored or managed by the investment adviser or subadviser, as applicable, or their affiliates.
ETFs are subject to many of the same risks applicable to investments in mutual funds generally, including that an ETF will not perform as anticipated, that a Fund will bear
its proportionate share of the ETF’s fees and expenses, and that the ETF will lose money. ETFs are also subject to additional risks, including, among others, the risk that the market price of an ETF’s shares may trade above or below its NAV, the risk that an active trading market for an ETF’s shares may not develop or be maintained, the risk that trading of an ETF’s shares may be halted, and the risk that the ETF’s shares may be delisted from the listing exchange. Many ETFs engage in derivatives strategies and use leverage, and as a result their values can be highly volatile. It is possible that an ETF’s performance will diverge from the performance of any index or indexes it seeks to replicate. Because shares of ETFs are actively traded, their values may be affected in unanticipated ways by the effects of supply and demand in the market, activities of short sellers, or unusual speculative activity in their shares. Some ETFs may experience periods of reduced liquidity due to restrictions on trading activity or due to a general lack of investor interest in the asset class represented by the ETF. Unlike shares of a mutual fund, which can be bought and redeemed from the issuing fund by all shareholders at a price based on NAV, shares of an ETF may be purchased or redeemed directly from the ETF solely by Authorized Participants (“APs”) and only in aggregations of a specified number of shares (“Creation Units”). ETFs may have a limited number of financial institutions that act as APs. To the extent that those APs exit the business, or are unable to or choose not to process creation and/or redemption orders for Creation Units, and no other AP steps forward to create and redeem ETF shares, the ETF’s shares may be more likely to trade at a premium or discount to NAV and possibly face trading halts or delisting.

Sector Risk
If a Fund allocates a substantial amount of its assets to one or more particular industries or to particular economic, market, or industry sectors, then economic, business, regulatory, or other developments affecting issuers in those industries or sectors may affect the Fund adversely to a greater extent than if the Fund had invested more broadly. Examples might include investments in the technology, health care, or financial sectors or in one or more industries within those sectors. A substantial

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investment in one or more such industries or sectors has the potential to increase the volatility of a Fund’s portfolio, and may cause the Fund to underperform other mutual funds.

Sovereign Debt Obligations Risk
Investments in debt securities issued by governments or by government agencies and instrumentalities involve the risk that the governmental entities responsible for repayment may be unable or unwilling to pay interest and repay principal when due. A governmental entity’s willingness or ability to pay interest and repay principal in a timely manner may be affected by a variety of factors, including its cash flow, the size of its reserves, its access to foreign exchange, the relative size of its debt service burden to its economy as a whole, and political constraints. A governmental entity may default on its obligations or may require renegotiation or rescheduling of debt payments. Any restructuring of a sovereign debt obligation held by the Fund will likely have a significant adverse effect on the value of the obligation. In the event of default of sovereign debt, the Fund may be unable to pursue legal action against the sovereign issuer or to realize on collateral securing the debt. The sovereign debt of many non-U.S. governments, including their sub-divisions and instrumentalities, is rated below investment grade (“junk” or “high yield” bonds). Sovereign debt risk may be greater for debt securities issued or guaranteed by emerging and/or frontier market countries. At times, certain emerging and frontier market countries have declared moratoria on the payment of principal and interest on external debt. Certain emerging and frontier market countries have experienced difficulty in servicing their sovereign debt on a timely basis, which has led to defaults and the restructuring of certain indebtedness to the detriment of debtholders.

U.S. Government Securities Risk
U.S. Government securities include a variety of securities that differ in their interest rates, maturities, and dates of issue. While securities issued or guaranteed by some agencies or instrumentalities of the U.S. Government (such as the Government National Mortgage Association) are supported by the full faith and credit of the United
States, securities issued or guaranteed by certain other agencies or instrumentalities of the U.S. Government (such as Federal Home Loan Banks) are supported only by the right of the issuer to borrow from the U.S. Government. Securities issued or guaranteed by certain other agencies and instrumentalities of the U.S. Government (such as Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac) are not supported by the full faith and credit of the U.S. Government and are supported only by the credit of the issuer itself. There is no assurance that the U.S. Government would provide financial support to its agencies and instrumentalities if not required to do so. For securities not backed by the full faith and credit of the United States, a Fund must look principally to the agency or instrumentality issuing or guaranteeing the securities for repayment and may not be able to assert a claim against the United States if the agency or instrumentality does not meet its commitment. Such securities may involve increased risk of loss of principal and interest compared to government debt securities that are backed by the full faith and credit of the United States. In addition, certain governmental entities have been subject to regulatory scrutiny regarding their accounting policies and practices and other concerns that may result in legislation, changes in regulatory oversight and/or other consequences that could adversely affect the credit quality, availability, or investment character of securities issued by these entities. Investments in these securities are also subject to, among other things, interest rate risk, prepayment risk, extension risk, and the risk that the value of the securities will fluctuate in response to political, market, or economic developments.

Valuation Risk
A portion of a Fund’s assets may be valued at fair value pursuant to guidelines that have been approved by the Trustees. A Fund’s assets may be valued using prices provided by a pricing service or, alternatively, a broker-dealer or other market intermediary (sometimes just one broker-dealer or other market intermediary) when other reliable pricing sources may not be available. The Fund, or persons acting on its behalf, may determine a fair value of a security based on such other information as may be available to them. There can be no assurance that any fair valuation

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of an investment held by a Fund will in fact approximate the price at which the Fund might sell the investment at the time. Technological issues or other service disruption issues involving third-party service providers may limit the ability of the Fund to value its investment accurately or timely. To the extent a Fund sells a security at a price lower than the price it has been using to value the security, its NAV will be adversely affected. If a Fund has overvalued securities it holds, you may pay too much for the Fund’s shares when you buy into the Fund. If a Fund underestimates the price of its portfolio securities, you may not receive the full market value for your Fund shares when you sell.

When-Issued, Delayed Delivery, TBA, and Forward Commitment Transaction Risk
A Fund may purchase securities on a when-issued, delayed delivery, to-be-announced, or
forward commitment basis. These transactions involve a commitment by a Fund to purchase securities for a predetermined price or yield, with payments and delivery taking place more than seven days in the future, or after a period longer than the customary settlement period for that type of security. These transactions involve a risk of loss if the value of the securities declines prior to the settlement date. These transactions may create investment leverage. Recently finalized rules of the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority impose mandatory margin requirements for certain types of when-issued, TBA, or forward commitment transactions, with limited exceptions. Such transactions historically have not been required to be collateralized, and mandatory collateralization could increase the cost of such transactions and impose added operational complexity and may increase the credit risk of such transactions to a Fund.

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Management of the Funds
Investment Adviser
MML Investment Advisers, LLC (“MML Advisers”), a Delaware limited liability company, located at 1295 State Street, Springfield, Massachusetts 01111-0001, is the Funds’ investment adviser and is responsible for providing all necessary investment management and administrative services. MML Advisers, formed in 2013, is a wholly-owned subsidiary of Massachusetts Mutual Life Insurance Company (“MassMutual”). Founded in 1851, MassMutual is a mutual life insurance company that provides a broad range of insurance, money management, retirement, and asset accumulation products and services for individuals and businesses. As of September 30, 2021, MML Advisers had assets under management of approximately $61.2 billion.
In 2021, each Fund paid MML Advisers an investment management fee based on a percentage of each Fund’s average daily net assets as follows: 0.35% for the Short-Duration Bond Fund and 0.47% for the High Yield Fund.
A discussion regarding the basis for the Trustees approving any investment advisory contract of the Funds is available in the Funds’ annual report to shareholders dated September 30, 2021 and the Funds’ semiannual report to shareholders dated March 31, 2021.
Each Fund also pays MML Advisers an administrative and shareholder services fee to compensate it for providing general administrative services to the Funds and for providing or causing to be provided ongoing shareholder servicing to direct and indirect investors in the Funds. MML Advisers pays substantially all of the fee to third parties who provide shareholder servicing and investor recordkeeping services. The fee is calculated and paid based on the average daily net assets attributable to each share class of the Fund separately, and is paid at the following annual rates: 0.10% for Class R5 shares of both Funds; 0.20% for Service Class shares of both Funds; 0.30% for Administrative Class shares and Class A shares of both Funds; 0.20% for Class R4 shares and Class R3 shares of both Funds; 0.10%, 0.05%, and 0.05% for Class Y shares, Class L shares, and Class C shares of the Short-Duration Bond Fund, respectively; and 0.05% and 0.00% for Class Y shares and Class C shares of the High Yield Fund, respectively. Class I shares do not pay any administrative and shareholder services fee.
Subadviser and Portfolio Managers
MML Advisers contracts with the following subadviser to help manage the Funds. Subject to the oversight of the Trustees, MML Advisers has the ultimate responsibility to oversee subadvisers and recommend their hiring, termination, and replacement. This responsibility includes, but is not limited to, analysis and review of subadviser performance, as well as assistance in the identification and vetting of new or replacement subadvisers. In addition, MML Advisers maintains responsibility for a number of other important obligations, including, among other things, board reporting, assistance in the annual advisory contract renewal process, and, in general, the performance of all obligations not delegated to a subadviser. MML Advisers also provides advice and recommendations to the Trustees, and performs such review and oversight functions as the Trustees may reasonably request, as to the continuing appropriateness of the investment objective, strategies, and policies of each Fund, valuations of portfolio securities, and other matters relating generally to the investment program of each Fund.
Barings LLC (“Barings”), an indirect, wholly-owned subsidiary of MassMutual, with principal offices located at 300 South Tryon Street, Charlotte, North Carolina 28202, manages the investments of the Short-Duration Bond Fund and High Yield Fund. In addition, Baring International Investment Limited (“BIIL”) serves as sub-subadviser for the Short-Duration Bond Fund and High Yield Fund and, subject to the supervision of Barings, is authorized to conduct securities transactions on behalf of the Funds. BIIL is a wholly-owned subsidiary of Barings and its address is 20 Old Bailey, London, EC4M 7BF, United Kingdom. Barings has provided investment advice to individual and institutional investors for more than 75 years and, with its subsidiaries, had assets under management as of September 30, 2021 of approximately $387.2 billion.

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Yulia Alekseeva, CFA
is a Managing Director, the Head of Securitized Credit Research, and a portfolio manager for Barings’ Investment Grade Fixed Income Group. Ms. Alekseeva shares primary responsibility for the day-to-day management of the Short-Duration Bond Fund. Ms. Alekseeva has worked in the industry since 2005. Prior to re-joining Barings in 2019, Ms. Alekseeva was employed at Canada Pension Plan Investment Board as a Principal in the Structured Credit department, following positions at Bank of America Merrill Lynch and PricewaterhouseCoopers.
Stephen Ehrenberg, CFA
is a Managing Director and portfolio manager for Barings’ Investment Grade Fixed Income Group. Mr. Ehrenberg shares primary responsibility for the day-to-day management of the Short-Duration Bond Fund. Mr. Ehrenberg has worked in the industry since 2002 and his experience has encompassed portfolio management and credit analysis for both investment grade and high yield corporate credit. Prior to joining Barings in 2004, Mr. Ehrenberg worked in capital markets at MassMutual as part of the firm’s executive development program.
Sean Feeley, CFA
is a Managing Director and portfolio manager for Barings’ U.S. High Yield Investments Group. Mr. Feeley shares primary responsibility for the day-to-day management of the High Yield Fund. Mr. Feeley is also a member of Barings’ U.S. High Yield Investment Committee and Global High Yield Allocation Committee. His responsibilities include portfolio management for various high yield bond total return strategies. Mr. Feeley has worked in the industry since 1996. Prior to joining Barings in 2003, he worked at Cigna Investment Management in project finance and at Credit Suisse in its leveraged finance group.
Natalia Krol
is a Managing Director and portfolio manager for Barings’ Emerging Markets Blended Total Return strategies. Ms. Krol shares primary responsibility for the day-to-day management of the Short-Duration Bond Fund. Ms. Krol is also a research analyst for the Barings Emerging Markets Corporate Debt Team, and is responsible for covering global metals & mining and energy corporates. Ms. Krol has worked in the industry since 2002. Prior to joining Barings in 2014, Ms. Krol was employed at Schroders Investment Management as a credit analyst and Barclays Capital as a research analyst.
Omotunde Lawal, CFA
is a Managing Director and the Head of, and a portfolio manager for, Barings’ Emerging Markets Corporate Debt Group. Ms. Lawal shares primary responsibility for the day-to-day management of the Short-Duration Bond Fund. Ms. Lawal is also the lead portfolio manager for the Emerging Markets Corporate Debt strategy, as well as a member of the Barings’ Emerging Markets Investment Committee. Ms. Lawal has worked in the industry since 2000. Prior to joining Barings in 2014, Ms. Lawal was employed at Cosford Capital Management as a portfolio manager focusing on high yield and distressed LATAM and CEEMEA corporates, following positions at Barclays Capital, and Deloitte & Touche/Arthur Andersen.
Scott Roth, CFA
is a Managing Director and the Co-Head of, and a portfolio manager for, Barings’ U.S. High Yield Investments Group. Mr. Roth shares primary responsibility for the day-to-day management of the High Yield Fund. Mr. Roth is also chair of Barings’ U.S. High Yield Investment Committee and a portfolio manager for various high yield bond total return strategies. Mr. Roth has worked in the industry since 1993. Prior to joining Barings in 2002, Mr. Roth was employed by Webster Bank, was a high yield analyst at Times Square Capital Management, and was an underwriter at Chubb Insurance Company.
Charles Sanford
is a Managing Director and the Head of, and a portfolio manager for, Barings’ Investment Grade Fixed Income Group. Mr. Sanford shares primary responsibility for the day-to-day management of the Short-Duration Bond Fund. Mr. Sanford is also responsible for the portfolio management of Barings’ multi-asset insurance client mandates as well as the investment grade corporate bond strategies. Mr. Sanford has worked in the industry since 1994. Prior to joining Barings in 2004, Mr. Sanford was employed at Booz, Allen and Hamilton as a management consultant and Bell South where he worked on mergers and acquisitions and internal consulting projects.

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Douglas Trevallion, II, CFA
is a Managing Director, the Head of Global Securitized and Liquid Products, and a portfolio manager for Barings’ Investment Grade Fixed Income Group. Mr. Trevallion shares primary responsibility for the day-to-day management of the Short-Duration Bond Fund. Mr. Trevallion is also responsible for the portfolio management of Barings’ securitized and multi-asset portfolio strategies. Mr. Trevallion has worked in the industry since 1987. Prior to joining Barings in 2000, Mr. Trevallion was employed at MassMutual, where he established fixed income analytical and risk capabilities.
The Funds’ SAI provides additional information about each portfolio manager’s compensation, other accounts managed by the portfolio managers, and each portfolio manager’s ownership of securities in the relevant Fund.
MML Advisers has received exemptive relief from the Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”) to permit it to change subadvisers or hire new subadvisers for a number of the series of the Trust from time to time without obtaining shareholder approval. (In the absence of that exemptive relief, shareholder approval might otherwise be required.) Several other mutual fund companies have received similar relief. MML Advisers believes having this authority is important, because it allows MML Advisers to remove and replace a subadviser in a quick, efficient, and cost-effective fashion when, for example, the subadviser’s performance is inadequate or the subadviser no longer is able to meet a Trust series’ investment objective and strategies. Pursuant to the exemptive relief, MML Advisers will provide to a Fund’s shareholders, within 90 days of the hiring of a new subadviser, an information statement describing the new subadviser. MML Advisers will not rely on this authority for any Fund unless the Fund’s shareholders have approved this arrangement. As of the date of this Prospectus, this exemptive relief is available to each Fund.

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About the Classes of Shares – I, R5, Service, Administrative, R4, A, R3, Y, L, and C Shares
Each Fund offers Class I, Class R5, Service Class, Administrative Class, Class R4, Class A, Class R3, Class Y, and Class C shares. The Short-Duration Bond Fund also offers Class L shares. The only differences among the various Classes are that (a) each Class is subject to different expenses specific to that Class, including any expenses under a Rule 12b-1 Plan and administrative and shareholder service expenses; (b) each Class has a different Class designation; (c) each Class has exclusive voting rights with respect to matters solely affecting such Class; and (d) each Class has different exchange privileges. Not all of the Classes of a Fund are available in every state.
Determining which share class is best for you depends on the dollar amount you are investing and the number of years for which you are willing to invest. Purchases of $500,000 or more cannot be made in Class C shares. Based on your personal situation, your financial intermediary can help you decide which class of shares makes the most sense for you. A financial intermediary is entitled to receive compensation for purchases made through the financial intermediary and may receive differing compensation for selling different classes of shares.
Shares of all Classes, except Class I shares, may be subject to an administrative and shareholder services fee described above under “Management of the Funds – Investment Adviser.” In addition, Class R4, Class A, Class R3, Class L, and Class C shares are subject to servicing or distribution fees paid under a Rule 12b-1 Plan. Different fees and expenses of a Class will affect performance of that Class. For actual past expenses of Class I, Class R5, Service Class, Administrative Class, Class R4, Class A, and Class R3 shares, see the “Financial Highlights” tables later in this Prospectus. Investors may receive different levels of service in connection with investments in different Classes of shares, and intermediaries may receive different levels of compensation in connection with each share Class. For additional information, call us toll free at 1-888-309-3539 or contact a sales representative or financial intermediary who offers the Classes.
Shares of Class C do not have any share class eligibility requirements. Class Y shares and Class L shares are sold through financial intermediaries that have special agreements with ALPS
Distributors, Inc. (the “Distributor”), or MML Advisers and its affiliates, for that purpose.
Class I, Class R5, Service Class, and Administrative Class shares are offered primarily to institutional investors through institutional distribution channels, such as employer-sponsored retirement plans or through broker-dealers, financial institutions, or insurance companies. Class R4, Class A, Class R3, Class Y, Class L, and Class C shares are offered primarily through other distribution channels, such as broker-dealers or financial institutions. Class I, Class A, Class Y, Class L, and Class C shares may be purchased by individual investors through a financial intermediary or through a product sponsored by a financial intermediary. Class I, Class R5, Service Class, Administrative Class, Class R4, Class A, and Class R3 shares are available for purchase by insurance company separate investment accounts, qualified plans under Section 401(a) of the Code, Code Section 403(b) plans, Code Section 457 plans, non-qualified deferred compensation plans, and other institutional investors.
Mutual funds and collective trust funds may purchase Class I, Class R5, and Service Class shares. Class R5, Class R4, Class A, and Class R3 shares may be purchased by voluntary employees’ beneficiary associations described in Code Section 501(c)(9). Class A shares of either Fund may be purchased by individual retirement accounts described in Code Section 408.
Shareholders of the High Yield Fund who held shares of the Fund prior to October 31, 2004 may purchase Service Class shares of that Fund.
Additional Information.
Purchases of Class Y shares require an initial minimum investment of $100,000, and purchases of Class L and Class C shares require an initial minimum investment of $1,000. For retirement plans, the investment minimum is $250 for each of the initial investment and subsequent investments for Class Y, Class L, and Class C shares.
Present and former officers, directors, trustees, and employees (and their eligible family members) of each Fund, MassMutual and its affiliates, and retirement plans established for the benefit of such individuals, are also permitted to purchase Class A and Class Y shares of each Fund.

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Class Y shares, which are sold at the NAV per share without a sales charge, and Class L shares, which may be subject to a sales charge, are sold through financial intermediaries that have special agreements with MML Advisers or its affiliates or the Distributor for that purpose. A financial intermediary that buys Class Y or Class L shares for its customers’ accounts may impose charges on those accounts. The procedures for buying, selling, exchanging, and transferring a Fund’s other classes of shares (other than the time those orders must be received by the transfer agent) and some of the special account features available to investors buying other classes of shares do not apply to Class Y and Class L shares. Instructions for buying, selling, exchanging, or transferring Class Y and Class L shares must be submitted by a financial intermediary, not by its customers for whose benefit the shares are held.
A plan or institutional investor will be permitted to purchase Class I, Class R5, Service Class, Administrative Class, Class R4, Class A, or Class R3 shares based upon the expected size (over time), servicing needs, or distribution or servicing costs for the plan or institutional investor as determined by the Distributor or a financial intermediary, as applicable. A financial intermediary may, by agreement with the Distributor or MML Advisers, make available to its plan or institutional clients shares of one such class or a limited number of such classes of the Funds. An investor should consult its financial intermediary for information (including expense information) regarding the share class(es) the intermediary will make available for purchase by the investor.

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Sales Charges by Class
Class A Shares
Class A shares are sold at their offering price, which is normally NAV plus an initial sales charge. However, in some cases, as described below, purchases are not subject to an initial sales charge, and the offering price will be the NAV. In other cases, reduced sales charges may be available, as described below. Out of the amount you invest, the Fund receives the NAV to invest for your account.
The sales charge varies depending on the amount of your purchase. A portion of the sales charge may be retained by the Distributor or allocated to your dealer as a concession. The Distributor reserves the right to reallow the entire sales charge as a concession to dealers. The current sales charge rates and concessions paid to dealers and brokers are as follows:
Front-End Sales Charge (As a Percentage of Offering Price)/ Front-End Sales Charge (As a Percentage of Net Amount Invested)/ Concession (As a Percentage of Offering Price) for Different Purchase Amounts:
Price
Breakpoints
General
Equity
General
Taxable
Bond
Shorter-
Term
Bond
Less than $25,000
5.50%/
4.25%/
2.50%/
5.82%/
4.44%/
2.56%/
4.50%
3.50%
2.00%
$25,000 – $49,999
5.25%/
4.25%/
2.25%/
5.54%/
4.44%/
2.30%/
4.25%
3.50%
1.75%
$50,000 – $99,999
4.50%/
4.00%/
2.00%/
4.71%/
4.17%/
2.04%/
3.50%
3.25%
1.50%
$100,000 – $249,999
3.50%/
3.00%/
1.75%/
3.63%/
3.09%/
1.78%/
2.50%
2.25%
1.25%
$250,000 – $499,999
2.25%/
1.75%/
1.25%/
2.30%/
1.78%/
1.27%/
1.75%
1.50%
0.75%
$500,000 – $999,999
1.75%/
1.00%/
0.75%/
1.78%/
1.01%/
0.76%/
1.10%
0.75%
0.50%
$1,000,000 or more
None/
None/
None/
None/
None/
None/
0.75%
0.50%
0.50%
A reduced sales charge may be obtained for Class A shares under the Funds’ “Rights of Accumulation” because of the economies of sales
efforts and reduction in expenses realized by the Distributor, dealers, and brokers making such sales.
To qualify for the lower sales charge rates that apply to larger purchases of Class A shares, you can add together:

Current purchases of Class A shares of more than one Fund subject to an initial sales charge to reduce the sales charge rate that applies to current purchases of Class A shares; and

Class A shares of Funds you previously purchased subject to an initial or contingent deferred sales charge to reduce the sales charge rate for current purchases of Class A shares, provided that you still hold your investment in the previously purchased Funds.
The Distributor will add the value, at current offering price, of the Class A shares you previously purchased and currently own to the value of current purchases to determine the sales charge rate that applies. The reduced sales charge will apply only to current purchases. You must request the reduced sales charge when you buy Class A shares and inform your broker-dealer or other financial intermediary of Class A shares of any other Funds that you own. Information regarding reduced sales charges can be found on the MassMutual website at https://www.massmutual.com/funds.
There is no initial sales charge on purchases of Class A shares of any one or more of the Funds aggregating $1 million or more. The Distributor pays dealers of record concessions in an amount equal to 0.75%, or 0.50% of purchases of $1 million or more, as shown in the above table. The concession will not be paid on purchases of shares by exchange or that were previously subject to a front-end sales charge and dealer concession.
If you redeem any of those shares within a holding period of 18 months from the date of their purchase, a contingent deferred sales charge of 1.0% will be deducted from the redemption proceeds (unless you are eligible for a waiver of that sales charge based on the categories listed below and you advise the transfer agent or another intermediary of your eligibility for the waiver when you place your redemption request).
Class L Shares
Initial Sales Charges
Your purchases of Class L shares are made at the public offering price for these shares, that is, the

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NAV per share for Class L shares plus a front-end sales charge that is based on the amount of your initial investment when you open your account. The front-end sales charge you pay on an additional investment is based on your total net investment in the Fund, including the amount of your additional purchase. Shares you purchase with reinvested dividends or other distributions are not subject to a sales charge. As shown in the table below, a portion of the sales charge is paid as a commission to your financial intermediary on the sale of Class L shares. The total amount of the sales charge, if any, differs depending on the amount you invest, as shown in the table below.
Amount of
Purchase at
Offering Price
As a %
of the
Public
Offering
Price
As a % of
Your
Investment
% of Offering
Price Paid to
Financial
Intermediary
(1)
Under $250,000
2.00
2.04
1.50
$250,000 or more
0.00
0.00
0.50
(1)
Please refer to the “Distribution Plan, Shareholder Servicing, and Payments to Intermediaries” section for all distribution and service fees paid by the Fund. The Distributor will pay an investor’s financial intermediary an up-front commission of 1.50% on sales of Class L shares for purchases under $250,000 and an up-front commission of 0.50% on sales of Class L shares for purchases of $250,000 or more.
Purchases of Class L shares under $250,000 have a front-end sales charge of 2.00% and purchases of Class L shares of $250,000 or more do not have a front-end sales charge. For purchases of Class L shares of $250,000 or more, a contingent deferred sales charge (“CDSC”) of 0.50% is applied to shares sold within the first eighteen months after they are purchased. The Distributor pays your financial intermediary an up-front commission of 1.50% on sales of Class L shares for purchases under $250,000 and an up-front commission of 0.50% on sales of Class L shares for purchases of $250,000 or more. Shares you purchase with reinvested dividends or other distributions are not subject to a sales charge.
Purchases of Class L shares made through a financial intermediary that had an agreement in place to sell Class A shares of the Barings Funds Trust will not be subject to any sales charge.
Reduced Class L Sales Charges for Larger Investments. You may pay a lower sales charge when purchasing Class L shares through Rights of Accumulation, which work as follows: if the combined value (determined at the current public offering price) of your accounts in all classes of
shares of the Fund and other Participating Funds (as defined below) maintained by you, your spouse, or your minor children, together with the value (also determined at the current public offering price) of your current purchase, reaches a sales charge discount level (according to the above chart), your current purchase will receive the lower sales charge, provided that you have notified the Distributor and your financial intermediary, if any, in writing of the identity of such other accounts and your relationship to the other account holders and submitted information (such as account statements) sufficient to substantiate your eligibility for a reduced sales charge. Such reduced sales charge will be applied upon confirmation of such shareholders’ holdings by the Fund’s transfer agent. The Fund may terminate or amend this Right of Accumulation at any time without notice. As used herein, “Participating Funds” refers to any series of MassMutual Advantage Funds, Classes Y and C of the High Yield Fund, and Classes Y, L, and C of the Short-Duration Bond Fund. You may also pay a lower sales charge when purchasing Class L shares and shares of other Participating Funds by signing a Letter of Intent within 90 days of your purchase. By doing so, you would be able to pay the lower sales charge on all purchases by agreeing to invest a total of at least $100,000 within 13 months. If your Letter of Intent purchases are not completed within 13 months, your account will be adjusted by redemption of the amount of shares needed to pay the higher initial sales charge level for the amount actually purchased. Upon your request, a Letter of Intent may reflect purchases within the previous 90 days. See the SAI for additional information about this privilege. In addition, certain investors may purchase shares at no sales charge or at a reduced sales charge. For example, Class L shares are offered at no sales charge to investors who are clients of financial intermediaries who have entered into an agreement with the Distributor to offer Fund shares through self-directed investment brokerage accounts without charging transaction fees to their clients or through other platforms. See Appendix A of this Prospectus and the SAI for a description of this and other situations in which sales charges are reduced or waived. The Fund makes available free of charge on MassMutual’s website (https://www.massmutual.com/funds) information regarding its sales charges, arrangements that result in breakpoints of the sales charges, the methods used to value accounts in order to determine whether an investor has met a breakpoint, and the information investors must provide to

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verify eligibility for a breakpoint. Hyperlinks that facilitate access to such information are available on MassMutual’s website.
Class C Shares
Your purchases of Class C shares are made at the NAV per share for Class C shares. Although Class C shares have no front-end sales charge, they carry a CDSC of 0.50% in the case of the Short-Duration Bond Fund, or 1.00% in the case of the High Yield Fund, that is applied to shares sold within the first year after they are purchased. After holding Class C shares for one year, you may sell them at any time without paying a CDSC. Shares you purchase with reinvested dividends or other distributions are not subject to a sales charge. The Distributor pays your financial intermediary an up-front commission on sales of Class C shares of 0.65% in the case of the Short-Duration Bond Fund, or 1.00% in the case of the High Yield Fund.
Class C shares held through a financial intermediary in an omnibus account will be converted into Class L shares only if the intermediary can document that the shareholder has met the required holding period. In certain circumstances, for example, when shares are invested through retirement plans or omnibus accounts, a financial intermediary may not have transparency into how long a shareholder has held Class C shares for purposes of determining whether such Class C shares are eligible for automatic conversion into Class L shares. Thus, the financial intermediary may not have the ability to track purchases to credit individual shareholders’ holding periods. In these circumstances, a Fund may not be able to automatically convert Class C shares into Class L shares as described above. In order to determine eligibility for conversion in these circumstances, it is the responsibility of the shareholder or its financial intermediary to notify the Fund that the shareholder is eligible for the conversion of Class C shares to Class L shares, and the shareholder or their financial intermediary may be required to maintain and provide the Fund with records that substantiate the holding period of Class C shares. For clients of financial intermediaries, it is the financial intermediary’s responsibility (and not the Funds’) to keep records and to ensure that the shareholder is credited with the proper holding period. Please consult with your financial intermediary about your shares’
eligibility for this conversion feature. In addition, for shareholders invested in Class C shares through a financial intermediary, Class C shares may be automatically exchanged for Class L shares of the Fund under the policies of the financial intermediary, as described in Appendix A of this Prospectus. It is solely the responsibility of the respective financial intermediary to administer and support such transactions. Please consult your financial intermediary for more information.
Contingent Deferred Sales Charges
As described above, certain investments in Class A, Class L, and Class C shares are subject to a CDSC. You will pay the CDSC only on shares you redeem within the prescribed amount of time after purchase. The CDSC is applied to the NAV at the time of purchase or redemption, whichever is lower. For purposes of calculating the CDSC, the start of the holding period is the date on which the purchase is made. A contingent deferred sales charge is not imposed on:

the amount of your account value represented by an increase in NAV over the initial purchase price,

shares purchased by the reinvestment of dividends or capital gains distributions, or

shares redeemed in the special circumstances described below.
To determine whether a contingent deferred sales charge applies to a redemption, the Fund redeems shares in the following order:
1.
shares acquired by reinvestment of dividends and capital gains distributions, and
2.
shares held the longest.
Contingent deferred sales charges are not charged when you exchange shares of the Fund for shares of any other Fund. However, if you exchange them within the applicable contingent deferred sales charge holding period, the holding period will carry over to the Fund whose shares you acquire. Similarly, if you acquire shares of a Fund by exchanging shares of another Fund that are still subject to a contingent deferred sales charge holding period, that holding period will carry over to the acquired Fund.
In certain circumstances, CDSCs may be waived, as described below and in the SAI.

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Sales Charge Waivers by Class
Waivers of Class A Initial Sales Charges
The Class A sales charges will be waived for shares purchased in the following types of transactions:

Purchases into insurance company separate investment accounts.

Purchases into retirement plans or other employee benefit plans.

Purchases of Class A shares aggregating $1 million or more of any one or more of the Funds.

Purchases into accounts for which the brokerdealer of record has entered into a special agreement with the Distributor allowing this waiver.

Purchases into accounts for which no sales concession is paid to any broker-dealer or other financial intermediary at the time of sale.

Shares sold to MassMutual or its affiliates.

Shares sold to registered management investment companies or separate accounts of insurance companies having an agreement with MassMutual, MML Advisers, or the Distributor for that purpose.

Shares issued in plans of reorganization to which the Fund is a party.

Shares sold to present or former officers, directors, trustees, or employees (and their “immediate families(1)”) of the Fund, MassMutual, and its affiliates.

Shares sold to a portfolio manager of the Fund.
Waivers of Class A Contingent Deferred Sales Charges
The Class A contingent deferred sales charges will not be applied to shares purchased in certain types of transactions or redeemed in certain circumstances described below.
A. Waivers for Redemptions in Certain Cases.
The Class A contingent deferred sales charges will be waived for redemptions of shares in the following cases:

Redemptions from insurance company separate investment accounts.

Redemptions from retirement plans or other employee benefit plans.

Redemptions from accounts other than retirement plans following the death
or disability of the last surviving shareholder, including a trustee of a grantor trust or revocable living trust for which the trustee is also the sole beneficiary. The death or disability must have occurred after the account was established, and for disability you must provide evidence of a determination of disability by the Social Security Administration.

Redemptions from accounts for which the broker-dealer of record has entered into a special agreement with the Distributor allowing this waiver.

Redemptions from accounts for which no sales concession was paid to any broker-dealer or other financial intermediary at the time of sale.

Redemptions of Class A shares under an automatic withdrawal plan from an account other than a retirement plan if the aggregate value of the redeemed shares does not exceed 10% of the account’s value annually.

In the case of an IRA, to make distributions required under a divorce or separation agreement described in Section 71(b) of the Code.
B. Waivers for Shares Sold or Issued in Certain Transactions.
The contingent deferred sales charge is also waived on Class A shares sold or issued in the following cases:

Shares sold to MassMutual or its affiliates.

Shares sold to registered management investment companies or separate accounts of insurance companies having an agreement with MassMutual, MML Advisers, or the Distributor for that purpose.

Shares issued in plans of reorganization to which the Fund is a party.

Shares sold to present or former officers, directors, trustees, or employees (and their “immediate families(1)”) of the Fund, MassMutual, and its affiliates.

Shares sold to a present or former portfolio manager of the Fund.
(1)
The term “immediate family” refers to one’s spouse, children, grandchildren, grandparents, parents, parents-in-law, brothers and sisters, sons- and daughters-in-law, a sibling’s spouse, a spouse’s siblings, aunts, uncles, nieces, and nephews; relatives by virtue of a remarriage (step-children, step-parents, etc.) are included.

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Distribution Plan, Shareholder Servicing, and Payments to
Intermediaries
Shares of all classes of the Funds, other than Class A and Class L shares, are sold without a front-end sales charge, and only Class L and Class C shares are subject to a deferred sales charge. Class A shares are sold at NAV per share plus an initial sales charge, Class L shares are sold at NAV per share plus an initial sales charge and any contingent deferred sales charge, and Class C shares are sold at NAV per share plus any contingent deferred sales charge.
Rule 12b-1 fees. The Funds have adopted a Rule 12b-1 Plan (the “Plan”). Under the Plan, the Short-Duration Bond Fund may make payments at an annual rate of up to 0.25% of the average daily net assets attributable to its Class L shares and up to 0.50% of the average daily net assets attributable to its Class C shares; the High Yield Fund may make payments at an annual rate of up to 1.00% of the average daily net assets attributable to its Class C shares; and each Fund may make payments at an annual rate of up to 0.25% of the average daily net assets attributable to its Class R4 shares and Class A shares, and up to 0.50% of the average daily net assets attributable to its Class R3 shares. The Plan is a compensation plan, under which the Funds make payments to the Distributor for the services it provides and for the expenses it bears in connection with the distribution of Class R4, Class A, Class R3, Class L, and Class C shares, and for the servicing of Class R4, Class A, Class R3, Class L, and Class C, shareholders. Because Rule 12b-1 fees are paid out of the Funds’ Class R4, Class A, Class R3, Class L, and Class C assets on an ongoing basis, they will increase the cost of your investment and may cost you more than paying other types of sales loads. All Class R4, Class A, Class R3, Class L, and Class C shareholders share in the expense of Rule 12b-1 fees paid by those classes. A Fund may pay distribution fees and other amounts described in this Prospectus at a time when shares of that Fund are unavailable for purchase.
Shareholder servicing payments. MML Advisers pays all or a portion of the administrative and shareholder services fee it receives from each Fund, as described above under “Management of the Funds – Investment Adviser,” to intermediaries as compensation for, or reimbursement of expenses relating to, services provided to shareholders of the Funds.
Payments to intermediaries. The Distributor and MML Advisers may make payments to financial intermediaries for distribution and/or shareholder services provided by them. Financial intermediaries are firms that, for compensation, sell shares of mutual funds, including the Funds, and/or provide certain administrative and account maintenance services to mutual fund shareholders. Financial intermediaries may include, among others, brokers, financial planners or advisers, banks, and insurance companies. In some cases, a financial intermediary may hold its clients’ Fund shares in nominee or street name. Shareholder services provided by a financial intermediary may (though they will not necessarily) include, among other things: processing and mailing trade confirmations, periodic statements, prospectuses, annual reports, semiannual reports, shareholder notices, and other SEC-required communications; capturing and processing tax data; issuing and mailing dividend checks to shareholders who have selected cash distributions; preparing record date shareholder lists for proxy solicitations; collecting and posting distributions to shareholder accounts; and establishing and maintaining systematic withdrawals and automated investment plans and shareholder account registrations.
The Distributor and MML Advisers may retain a portion of the Rule 12b-1 payments and/or shareholder servicing payments received by them, or they may pay the full amount to intermediaries. Rule 12b-1 fees may be paid to financial intermediaries in advance for the first year after Class R4, Class A, Class R3, Class L, and Class C shares are sold. After the first year, those fees will be paid on a quarterly basis.
The compensation paid to a financial intermediary is typically paid continually over time, during the period when the intermediary’s clients hold investments in the Funds. The amount of continuing compensation paid to different financial intermediaries for distribution and/or shareholder services varies. The compensation is typically a percentage of the value of the financial intermediary’s clients’ investments in the Funds or a per account fee. The variation in compensation may, but will not necessarily, reflect enhanced or additional services provided by the intermediary.
Additional information. The Distributor may directly, or through an affiliate, pay a sales

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concession of up to 1.00% of the purchase price of Service Class, Administrative Class, Class R4, Class A, Class R3, Class Y, Class L, and Class C shares to broker-dealers or other financial intermediaries at the time of sale. However, the total amount paid to broker-dealers or other financial intermediaries at the time of sale, including any advance of Rule 12b-1 service fees or shareholder services fees, may not be more than 1.00% of the purchase price.
In addition to the various payments described above, MML Advisers in its discretion may directly, or through an affiliate, pay up to 0.35% of the amount invested to intermediaries who provide services on behalf of shareholders of the Funds. This compensation is paid by MML Advisers from its own assets. The payments will be based on criteria established by MML Advisers and will be paid quarterly, in arrears.
MassMutual, the parent company of MML Advisers, pays to an affiliate of Empower Retirement, LLC (“Empower”) an amount equal to the profit realized by MML Advisers with respect to shares beneficially owned by retirement plans through recordkeeping platforms maintained by Empower or an affiliate.
The Distributor, MML Advisers, or MassMutual may also directly, or through an affiliate, make payments, out of its own assets, to intermediaries, including broker-dealers, insurance agents, and other service providers, that relate to the sale of shares of the Funds or certain of MassMutual’s variable annuity contracts for which the Funds are underlying investment options. This compensation may take the form of:

Payments to administrative service providers that provide enrollment, recordkeeping, and other services to pension plans;

Cash and non-cash benefits, such as bonuses and allowances or prizes and awards, for certain
broker-dealers, administrative service providers, and MassMutual insurance agents;

Payments to intermediaries for, among other things, training of sales personnel, conference support, marketing, or other services provided to promote awareness of MassMutual’s products;

Payments to broker-dealers and other intermediaries that enter into agreements providing the Distributor with access to representatives of those firms or with other marketing or administrative services; and

Payments under agreements with MassMutual not directly related to the sale of specific variable annuity contracts or the Funds, such as educational seminars and training or pricing services.
In some instances, compensation may be made available only to certain financial intermediaries whose representatives have sold or are expected to sell significant amounts of shares. Dealers may not use sales of the Funds’ shares to qualify for this compensation to the extent prohibited by the laws or rules of any state or any self-regulatory agency, such as the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority.
These compensation arrangements are not offered to all intermediaries and the terms of the arrangements may differ among intermediaries.
These arrangements may provide an intermediary with an incentive to recommend one mutual fund over another, one share class over another, or one insurance or annuity contract over another. You may want to take these compensation arrangements into account when evaluating any recommendations regarding the Funds or any contract using the Funds as investment options. You may contact your intermediary to find out more information about the compensation they may receive in connection with your investment.

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Buying, Redeeming, and Exchanging Shares
The Funds sell their shares at a price equal to their NAV plus any initial sales charge that applies (see “Determining Net Asset Value” below). The Funds have authorized one or more broker-dealers or other intermediaries to receive purchase orders on their behalf. Such broker-dealers or other intermediaries may themselves designate other intermediaries to receive purchase orders on the Funds’ behalf. Your purchase order will be priced at the next NAV calculated after your order is received in good order by the transfer agent, MML Advisers, such a broker-dealer, or another intermediary authorized for this purpose. If you purchase shares through a broker-dealer or other intermediary, then, in order for your purchase to be based on a Fund’s next determined NAV, the broker-dealer or other intermediary must receive your request before the close of regular trading on the New York Stock Exchange (“NYSE”) (normally, 4:00 p.m. Eastern time), and the broker-dealer or other intermediary must subsequently communicate the request properly to the Funds. Shares purchased through a broker-dealer or other intermediary may be subject to transaction and/or other fees. The Funds will suspend selling their shares during any period when the determination of NAV is suspended. The Funds can reject any purchase order and can suspend purchases if they believe it is in their best interest.
The Funds have authorized one or more broker-dealers or other intermediaries to receive redemption requests on their behalf. Such broker-dealers or other intermediaries may themselves designate other intermediaries to receive redemption requests on the Funds’ behalf. The Funds redeem their shares at their next NAV computed after your redemption request is received by the transfer agent, MML Advisers, such a broker-dealer, or another intermediary. If you redeem shares through a broker-dealer or other intermediary, then, in order for your redemption price to be based on a Fund’s next determined NAV, the broker-dealer or other intermediary must receive your request before the close of regular trading on the NYSE, and the broker-dealer or other intermediary must subsequently communicate the request properly to the Funds. Shares redeemed through a broker-dealer or other intermediary may be subject to transaction and/or other fees. You will usually receive payment for your shares within seven days after your redemption request is received in good order. If, however, you
request redemption of shares recently purchased by check, you may not receive payment until the check has been collected, which may take up to 15 days from time of purchase. Under unusual circumstances, the Funds can also suspend or postpone payment, when permitted by applicable law and regulations. The Funds’ transfer agent may temporarily delay for more than seven days the disbursement of redemption proceeds from the Fund account of a “Specified Adult” ​(as defined in Financial Industry Regulatory Authority Rule 2165) based on a reasonable belief that financial exploitation of the Specified Adult has occurred, is occurring, has been attempted, or will be attempted, subject to certain conditions. Under normal circumstances, each Fund expects to meet redemption requests by using cash or cash equivalents in its portfolio and/or selling portfolio assets to generate cash. Under stressed market conditions, a Fund may pay redemption proceeds using cash obtained through borrowing arrangements that may be available from time to time. To the extent consistent with applicable laws and regulations, the Funds reserve the right to satisfy all or a portion of a redemption request by distributing securities or other property in lieu of cash (“in-kind” redemptions), under both normal and stressed market conditions. Some Funds may be limited in their ability to use assets other than cash to meet redemption requests due to restrictions on ownership of their portfolio assets. The securities distributed in an in-kind redemption will be valued in the same manner as they are valued for purposes of computing the Fund’s NAV. These securities are subject to market risk until they are sold and may increase or decrease in value prior to converting them into cash. You may incur brokerage and other transaction costs, and could incur a taxable gain or loss for income tax purposes when converting the securities to cash.
The USA PATRIOT Act may require a Fund, a financial intermediary, or its authorized designee to obtain certain personal information from you which will be used to verify your identity. If you do not provide the information, it may not be possible to open an account. If a Fund, a financial intermediary, or authorized designee is unable to verify your customer information, the Fund reserves the right to close your account or to take such other steps as it deems reasonable.
Risk of Substantial Redemptions. If substantial numbers of shares in a Fund were to be redeemed

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at the same time or at approximately the same time, the Fund might be required to liquidate a significant portion of its investment portfolio quickly to meet the redemptions. A Fund might be forced to sell portfolio securities at prices or at times when it would otherwise not have sold them, resulting in a reduction in the Fund’s NAV; in addition, a substantial reduction in the size of a Fund may make it difficult for the investment adviser or subadviser to execute its investment program successfully for the Fund for a period following the redemptions. Similarly, the prices of the portfolio securities of a Fund might be adversely affected if one or more other investment accounts managed by the investment adviser or subadviser in an investment style similar to that of the Fund were to experience substantial redemptions and those accounts were required to sell portfolio securities quickly or at an inopportune time.
Exchanges
Generally, you can exchange shares of one Fund for the same class of shares of another MassMutual Fund, except in the case of the MassMutual U.S. Government Money Market Fund, MassMutual Total Return Bond Fund, and MM S&P 500® Index Fund and, with respect to certain series of the Trust, in those cases when exchanges are not permitted, as described in the applicable Prospectus under “Placing Transaction Orders—For Shareholders holding shares of the Trust prior to November 1, 2004.” Any share class of another series may be exchanged for Class R5 shares of the MassMutual U.S. Government Money Market Fund. If Class R5 shares of the MassMutual U.S. Government Money Market Fund are exchanged for Class A shares of another series, any sales charge applicable to those Class A shares will typically apply. For individual retirement accounts described in Code Section 408, Class R5 shares of the MassMutual U.S. Government Money Market Fund may only be exchanged for Class A shares of another series (in which case any sales charge applicable to those Class A shares will typically apply), Class R4 shares of the MassMutual Total Return Bond Fund and MM S&P 500 Index Fund may only be exchanged for Class A shares of another series (in which case any sales charge applicable to those Class A shares will typically apply), and Class A shares of any other series may only be exchanged for Class R4 shares of the MassMutual Total Return Bond Fund and MM S&P 500 Index Fund. An exchange is treated as a sale of shares in one series and a purchase of shares in another series at the NAV next determined after the exchange request is received
and accepted by the transfer agent, MML Advisers, a broker-dealer, or another intermediary authorized for this purpose. You can only exchange into shares of another series if you meet any qualification requirements of the series into which you seek to exchange (for example, shares of some series are not available to purchasers through certain investment channels, and some may be available only to certain types of shareholders). In addition, in limited circumstances, such as those described above, for certain series the share class available for exchange may not be the same share class as the series from which you are exchanging. Exchange requests involving a purchase into most series (except the Short-Duration Bond Fund, High Yield Fund, MassMutual Strategic Bond Fund, MassMutual U.S. Government Money Market Fund, MassMutual Inflation-Protected and Income Fund, MassMutual Core Bond Fund, MassMutual Diversified Bond Fund, MassMutual Global Floating Rate Fund, MassMutual Global Credit Income Opportunities Fund, and MassMutual Emerging Markets Debt Blended Total Return Fund), however, will not be accepted if you have already made a purchase followed by a redemption involving the same series within the last 60 days. This restriction does not apply to rebalancing trades executed by any of the MassMutual RetireSMARTSM by JPMorgan Funds, MassMutual Select T. Rowe Price Retirement Funds, and MassMutual Target Allocation Funds. This restriction also does not apply to exchanges made pursuant to certain asset allocation programs, systematic exchange programs, and dividend exchange programs. If you place an order to exchange shares of one series for another through a broker-dealer or other intermediary then, in order for your exchange to be effected based on the series’ next determined NAVs, the broker-dealer or other intermediary must receive your request before the close of regular trading on the NYSE, and the broker-dealer or other intermediary must subsequently communicate the request properly to the MassMutual Funds.
Your right to exchange shares is subject to applicable regulatory requirements or contractual obligations. The Funds may limit, restrict, or refuse exchange purchases, if, in the opinion of MML Advisers:

you have engaged in excessive trading;

a Fund receives or expects simultaneous orders affecting significant portions of the Fund’s assets;

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a pattern of exchanges occurs which coincides with a market timing strategy; or

the Fund would be unable to invest the funds effectively based on its investment objectives and policies or if the Fund would be adversely affected.
The Funds reserve the right to modify or terminate the exchange privilege as described above on 60 days written notice.
The Funds do not accept purchase, redemption, or exchange orders or compute their NAVs on days when the NYSE is closed. This includes: weekends, Good Friday, and all federal holidays other than Columbus Day and Veterans Day. Certain foreign markets may be open on days when the Funds do not accept orders or price their shares. As a result, the NAV of a Fund’s shares may change on days when you will not be able to buy or sell shares.
Placing Transaction Orders–For Shareholders holding shares of the Trust prior to November 1, 2004
Shareholders of the Trust who held their shares prior to November 1, 2004 (when the Trust’s name changed from The DLB Fund Group) and who previously placed transaction orders directly with the Trust through a DLB Fund Coordinator, will place trades by telephone or in writing directly with the transfer agent. With respect to shares received on November 1, 2004 by former DLB Fund Group investors, transaction orders are limited to purchases and redemptions. These shares may not be exchanged for shares of another Fund of the Trust.
Transaction Orders by Telephone and in Writing
In general, you may purchase, exchange, or sell (redeem) shares on any business day through your financial intermediary or by contacting the transfer agent in writing or by telephone (“MassMutual Premier Funds – (Fund Name),” Attn: Transfer Agent, P.O. Box 1920, Denver, CO 80201 or by telephone: 1-855-439-5459).
How to Invest
Outlined below are various methods for buying shares of the Funds:
Method
Instructions
Through your financial intermediary Your financial intermediary can help you establish your account and buy shares on your behalf. To receive the current trading day’s price, your financial intermediary must receive your request in good order prior to the close of regular trading on the New York Stock Exchange, usually 4:00 p.m., Eastern time. Your financial intermediary may charge you fees for executing the purchase for you.
By exchange You or your financial intermediary may acquire shares of a Fund for your account by exchanging shares you own in certain other funds advised by MML Advisers for shares of the same class of a Fund, subject to the conditions described in “Exchanges” above. In addition, you or your financial intermediary may exchange shares of a class of a Fund you own for shares of a different class of the same Fund, subject to the conditions described in “Exchanges.” To exchange, send written instructions to the applicable Fund, at the address noted below(1) or call 1-855-439-5459.
By wire
You may purchase shares of a Fund by wiring money from your bank account to your Fund account. Prior to sending wire transfers, please contact Shareholder Services at 1-855-439-5459 for specific wiring instructions and to facilitate prompt and accurate credit upon receipt of your wire.
To receive the current trading day’s price, your wire, along with a valid account number, must be received in your Fund account prior to the close of regular trading on the New York Stock Exchange, usually 4:00 p.m., Eastern time.
If your initial purchase of shares is by wire, you must first complete a new account application and promptly mail it to MassMutual Premier Funds – (Fund Name), at the address noted below.(1) After completing a new account application, please call 1-855-439-5459 to obtain your account number. Please include your account number on the wire.
By electronic funds You may purchase shares of a Fund by electronically transferring money from

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Method
Instructions
transfer via an automated clearing house (“ACH”) transaction(2) your bank account to your Fund account by calling 1-855-439-5459. An electronic funds transfer may take up to two business days to settle and be considered in good order. You must set up this feature prior to your telephone request. Be sure to complete the appropriate section of the application.
By check To purchase shares of a Fund by check, make your check payable to ‘MassMutual Premier Funds’. Your checks should include the fund name which you would like to purchase along with your account number (if previously established). Your request should be mailed to the address listed below.(1) The Funds will accept purchases only in U.S. dollars drawn from U.S. financial institutions. Cashier’s checks, third party checks, money orders, credit card convenience checks, cash or equivalents, or payments in foreign currencies are not acceptable forms of payment.
(1)
Regular Mail: “MassMutual Premier Funds – (Fund Name),” Attn: Transfer Agent, P.O. Box 1920, Denver, CO 80201.
Overnight Mail: “MassMutual Premier Funds – (Fund Name),” Attn: Transfer Agent, 1290 Broadway, Suite 1000, Denver, CO 80203.
(2)
The redemption of shares purchased by ACH transaction is subject to certain limitations (see “Redemption of Shares”). Any purchase by ACH transaction that does not clear may be cancelled, and the investor will be responsible for any associated expenses and losses to the applicable Fund.

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Cost Basis Reporting
In the case of individuals holding shares in a Fund directly, upon the redemption or exchange of shares in a Fund, the Fund or, if a shareholder purchased shares through a financial intermediary, the financial intermediary generally will be required to provide the shareholder and the Internal Revenue Service (“IRS”) with cost basis and certain other related tax information about the Fund shares redeemed or exchanged. Please contact
the Funds by calling 1-888-309-3539 or consult your financial intermediary, as appropriate, for more information regarding available methods for cost basis reporting and how to select or change a particular method.
Please consult your tax adviser to determine which available cost basis method is best for you.
Frequent Trading Policies
Purchases and exchanges of shares of the Funds should be made for investment purposes only. The Funds discourage, and do not accommodate, excessive trading and/or market timing activity. Excessive trading and/or market timing activity involving the Funds can disrupt the management of the Funds. These disruptions, in turn, can result in increased expenses and can have an adverse effect on Fund performance.
The Trustees, on behalf of the Funds, have approved the policies and procedures adopted by MML Advisers to help identify those individuals or entities MML Advisers determines may be engaging in excessive trading and/or market timing activities. MML Advisers monitors trading activity to uniformly enforce its procedures. However, those who engage in such activities may employ a variety of techniques to avoid detection. Therefore, despite MML Advisers’ efforts to prevent excessive trading and/or market timing trading activities, there can be no assurance that MML Advisers will be able to identify all those who trade excessively or employ a market timing strategy and curtail their trading in every instance.
The monitoring process involves scrutinizing transactions in fund shares that exceed certain monetary thresholds or numerical limits within a specified period of time. Trading activity identified by either, or a combination, of these factors, or as a result of any other information actually available at the time, will be evaluated to determine whether such activity might constitute excessive trading and/or market timing activity. When trading activity is determined by a Fund or MML Advisers, in their sole discretion, to be excessive in nature, certain account-related privileges, such as the ability to place purchase, redemption, and exchange orders over the internet, may be suspended for such account.
Omnibus Account Limitations. Omnibus accounts, in which shares are held in the name of an
intermediary on behalf of multiple investors, are a common form of holding shares among retirement plans and other financial intermediaries such as broker-dealers, advisers, and third-party administrators. Not all omnibus accounts apply the policies and procedures adopted by the Funds and MML Advisers. Some omnibus accounts may have different or less restrictive policies and procedures regarding frequent trading, or no trading restrictions at all. If you hold your Fund shares through an omnibus account, that financial intermediary may impose its own restrictions or limitations to discourage excessive trading and/or market timing activity. You should consult your financial intermediary to find out what trading restrictions, including limitations on exchanges, may apply. The Funds’ ability to identify and deter excessive trading and/or market timing activities through omnibus accounts is limited, and the Funds’ success in accomplishing the objectives of the policies concerning frequent trading of Fund shares in this context depends significantly upon the cooperation of the financial intermediaries. Because the Funds receive these orders on an aggregated basis and because the omnibus accounts may trade with numerous fund families with differing frequent trading policies, the Funds are limited in their ability to identify or deter those individuals or entities that may be engaging in excessive trading and/or market timing activities. While the Funds and MML Advisers encourage those financial intermediaries to apply the Funds’ policies to their customers who invest indirectly in the Funds, the Funds and MML Advisers may need to rely on those intermediaries to monitor trading in good faith in accordance with its or the Funds’ policies, since individual trades in omnibus accounts are often not disclosed to the Funds. While the Funds will generally monitor trading activity at the omnibus account level to attempt to identify excessive trading and/or market timing activity, reliance on intermediaries increases the risk

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that excessive trading and/or market timing activity may go undetected. If evidence of possible excessive trading and/or market timing activity is observed by the Funds, the financial intermediary that is the registered owner will be asked to
review the account activity, and to confirm to the Funds that appropriate action has been taken to limit any excessive trading and/or market timing activity.
Determining Net Asset Value
The NAV of each Fund’s shares is determined once daily as of the close of regular trading on the NYSE, on each Business Day. A “Business Day” is every day the NYSE is open. The NYSE normally closes at 4:00 p.m. Eastern Time, but may close earlier on some days. If the NYSE is scheduled to close early, the Business Day will be considered to end as of the time of the NYSE’s scheduled close. A Fund will not treat an intraday disruption in NYSE trading or other event that causes an unscheduled closing of the NYSE as a close of business of the NYSE for these purposes and will instead fair value securities in accordance with procedures approved annually by the Trustees, and under the general oversight of the Trustees. The NYSE currently is not open for trading on New Year’s Day, Martin Luther King, Jr. Day, President’s Day, Good Friday, Memorial Day, Juneteenth National Independence Day, Independence Day, Labor Day, Thanksgiving Day, and Christmas Day. Each Fund calculates the NAV of each of its classes of shares by dividing the total value of the assets attributable to that class, less the liabilities attributable to that class, by the number of shares of that class that are outstanding. On holidays and other days when the NYSE is closed, each Fund’s NAV generally is not calculated and the Funds do not anticipate accepting buy or sell orders. However, the value of each Fund’s assets may still be affected on such days to the extent that a Fund holds foreign securities that trade on days that foreign securities markets are open.
Equity securities and derivative contracts that are actively traded on a national securities exchange or contract market are valued on the basis of information furnished by a pricing service, which provides the last reported sale price, or, in the case of futures contracts, the settlement price, for securities or derivatives listed on the exchange or contract market or the official closing price on the NASDAQ National Market System (“NASDAQ System”), or in the case of OTC securities for which an official closing price is unavailable or not reported on the NASDAQ System, the last reported bid price. Portfolio securities traded on more than one national securities exchange are valued at the last price at the close of the exchange representing
the principal market for such securities. Debt securities are valued on the basis of valuations furnished by a pricing service, which generally determines valuations taking into account factors such as institutional-size trading in similar securities, yield, quality, coupon rate, maturity, type of issue, trading characteristics, and other market data. Shares of other open-end mutual funds are valued at their closing NAVs as reported on each Business Day.
Investments for which market quotations are readily available are marked to market daily based on those quotations. Market quotations may be provided by third-party vendors or market makers, and may be determined on the basis of a variety of factors, such as broker quotations, financial modeling, and other market data, such as market indexes and yield curves, counterparty information, and foreign exchange rates. U.S. Government and agency securities may be valued on the basis of market quotations or using a model that may incorporate market observable data such as reported sales of similar securities, broker quotes, yields, bids, offers, quoted market prices, and reference data. The fair values of OTC derivative contracts, including forward, swap, and option contracts related to interest rates, foreign currencies, credit standing of reference entities, equity prices, or commodity prices, may be based on market quotations or may be modeled using a series of techniques, including simulation models, depending on the contract and the terms of the transaction. The fair values of asset-backed securities and mortgage-backed securities are estimated based on models that consider the estimated cash flows of each debt tranche of the issuer, established benchmark yield, and estimated tranche-specific spread to the benchmark yield based on the unique attributes of the tranche including, but not limited to, prepayment speed assumptions and attributes of the collateral.
Investments for which market quotations are not available or for which a pricing service or vendor does not provide a value, or for which such market quotations or values are considered by the investment adviser or subadviser to be unreliable

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(including, for example, certain foreign securities, thinly-traded securities, certain restricted securities, certain initial public offerings, or securities whose values may have been affected by a significant event) are stated at fair valuations determined in good faith by the Funds’ Valuation Committee in accordance with procedures approved annually by the Trustees, and under the general oversight of the Trustees. It is possible that fair value prices will be used by the Funds to a significant extent. The value determined for an investment using the Funds’ fair value procedures may differ from recent market prices for the investment and may be significantly different from the value realized upon the sale of such investment.
The Funds may invest in securities that are traded principally in foreign markets and that trade on weekends and other days when the Funds do not price their shares. As a result, the values of the Funds’ portfolio securities may change on days when the prices of the Funds’ shares are not calculated. The prices of the Funds’ shares will reflect any such changes when the prices of the
Funds’ shares are next calculated, which is the next Business Day. The Funds may use fair value pricing more frequently for securities primarily traded in foreign markets because, among other things, most foreign markets close well before the Funds value their securities. The earlier close of these foreign markets gives rise to the possibility that significant events, including broad market moves, may have occurred in the interim. The Funds’ investments may be priced based on fair values provided by a third-party vendor, based on certain factors and methodologies applied by such vendor, in the event that there is movement in the U.S. market, between the close of the foreign market and the time the Funds calculate their NAVs. All assets and liabilities expressed in foreign currencies are converted into U.S. dollars at the mean between the buying and selling rates of such currencies against the U.S. dollar at the end of each Business Day.
The Funds’ valuation methods are also described in the SAI.
Taxation and Distributions
Each Fund intends to qualify each year for treatment as a regulated investment company under Subchapter M of the Code. As a regulated investment company, a Fund will not be subject to Federal income taxes on its ordinary income and net realized capital gains that are distributed in a timely manner to its shareholders. A Fund’s failure to qualify as a regulated investment company would result in corporate level taxation, and consequently, a reduction in income available for distribution to shareholders. In addition, a Fund that fails to distribute at least 98% of its ordinary income for a calendar year plus 98.2% of its capital gain net income recognized during the one-year period ending October 31 plus any retained amount from the prior year generally will be subject to a non-deductible 4% excise tax on the undistributed amount.
Certain investors, including most tax-advantaged plan investors, may be eligible for preferential Federal income tax treatment on distributions received from a Fund and dispositions of Fund shares. This Prospectus does not attempt to describe such preferential tax treatment. Any prospective investor that is a trust or other entity eligible for special tax treatment under the Code that is considering purchasing shares of a Fund, including either directly or in connection with a life
insurance company separate investment account, should consult its tax advisers about the Federal, state, local, and foreign tax consequences particular to it, as should persons considering whether to have amounts held for their benefit by such trusts or other entities in shares of a Fund.
Investors are generally subject to Federal income taxes on distributions received in respect of their shares. Distributions are taxed to investors in the manner described herein whether distributed in cash or additional shares. Taxes on distributions of capital gains are determined by how long the Fund owned (or is deemed to have owned) the investments that generated them, rather than by how long the shareholder held the shares. Distributions of a Fund’s ordinary income and short-term capital gains (i.e., gains from capital assets held for one year or less) are taxable to a shareholder as ordinary income. Certain dividends may be eligible for the dividends-received deduction for corporate shareholders to the extent they are reported as such. Dividends properly reported as capital gain dividends (relating to gains from the sale of capital assets held by a Fund for more than one year) are taxable in the hands of an investor as long-term capital gain includible in net capital gain and taxed to individuals at reduced rates. Distributions of investment income

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reported by a Fund as derived from “qualified dividend income” will be taxed in the hands of individuals at the rates applicable to long-term capital gain, provided that holding period and other requirements are met at both the shareholder and Fund level. Distributions from REITs generally do not qualify as qualified dividend income. Funds investing primarily in fixed income instruments generally do not expect a significant portion of their distributions to be derived from qualified dividend income.
The Code generally imposes a 3.8% Medicare contribution tax on the net investment income of certain individuals, trusts, and estates to the extent their income exceeds certain threshold amounts. For this purpose “net investment income” generally includes: (i) dividends paid by a Fund, including any capital gain dividends, and (ii) net capital gains recognized on the sale, redemption, exchange, or other taxable disposition of shares of a Fund. Shareholders are advised to consult their tax advisers regarding the possible implications of this additional tax on their investment in a Fund.
The nature of each Fund’s distributions will be affected by its investment strategies. A Fund whose investment return consists largely of interest, dividends, and capital gains from short-term holdings will distribute largely ordinary income. A Fund whose return comes largely from the sale of long-term holdings will distribute largely capital gain dividends. Distributions are taxable to a shareholder even though they are paid from income or gains earned by a Fund prior to the shareholder’s investment and thus were included in the price paid by the shareholder for his or her shares.
Each Fund intends to pay out as dividends substantially all of its net investment income (which comes from dividends and any interest it receives from its investments). Each Fund also intends to distribute at least annually substantially all of its net realized long- and short-term capital gains, if any, after giving effect to any available capital loss carryforwards. For each Fund, except with respect to any capital gains, the Fund intends to declare a dividend daily and to pay out any dividends to shareholders at least monthly. Distributions may be taken either in cash or in additional shares of the respective Fund at the Fund’s NAV on the first Business Day after the record date for the distribution, at the option of the shareholder. A shareholder that itself qualifies as a regulated investment company is permitted to
report a portion of its distributions as “qualified dividend income,” provided certain requirements are met.
Any gain resulting from an exchange or redemption of an investor’s shares in a Fund will generally be subject to tax as long-term or short-term capital gain. A loss incurred with respect to shares of a Fund held for six months or less will be treated as a long-term capital loss to the extent of long-term capital gains dividends received with respect to such shares.
A Fund’s investments in foreign securities may be subject to foreign withholding or other taxes. In that case, the Fund’s yield on those securities would be decreased. Shareholders of a Fund, other than a Fund that makes the election referred to below, generally will not be entitled to claim a credit or deduction with respect to such foreign taxes. If more than 50% of a Fund’s assets at taxable year end consists of the securities of foreign corporations, the Fund may be able to elect to “pass through” to its shareholders foreign income taxes that it pays directly or, under certain circumstances, indirectly through its investments in ETFs or other investment companies that are regulated investment companies for U.S. federal income tax purposes. If any Fund makes this election, a shareholder of the Fund must include its share of those taxes in gross income as a distribution from the Fund and the shareholder will be allowed to claim a credit (or a deduction, if the shareholder itemizes deductions) for such amounts on its federal tax return subject to certain limitations. Shareholders that are not subject to U.S. federal income tax, and those who invest in a Fund through tax-advantaged accounts (including those who invest through individual retirement accounts or other tax-advantaged retirement plans), generally will receive no benefit from any tax credit or deduction passed through by a Fund. A shareholder that itself qualifies for treatment as a regulated investment company and that qualifies as a “qualified fund of funds” may elect to pass through to its shareholders a tax credit or deduction passed through by a Fund.
In addition, a Fund’s investments in foreign securities, fixed income securities, derivatives, or foreign currencies may increase or accelerate the Fund’s recognition of ordinary income and may affect the timing, amount, or character of the Fund’s distributions.
Certain of a Fund’s investments, including certain debt instruments, could cause the Fund to recognize taxable income in excess of the cash

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generated by such investments; a Fund could be required to sell other investments, including when not otherwise advantageous to do so, in order to make required distributions.
Distributions by a Fund to shareholders that are not “United States persons” within the meaning of the Code (“foreign persons”) properly reported by the Fund as (i) capital gain dividends, (ii) “interest-related dividends” ​(i.e., U.S.-source interest income that, in general, would not be subject to U.S. federal income tax if earned directly by an individual foreign person), and (iii) “short-term capital gain dividends” ​(i.e., net short-term capital gains in excess of net long-term capital losses), in each case to the extent such distributions were properly reported as such by the Fund generally are not subject to withholding of U.S. federal
income tax. Distributions by a Fund to foreign persons other than capital gain dividends, interest-related dividends, and short-term capital gain dividends generally are subject to withholding of U.S. federal income tax at a rate of 30% (or lower applicable treaty rate). Foreign persons should refer to the SAI for further information, and should consult their tax advisors as to the tax consequences to them of owning Fund shares.
The discussion above is very general. Shareholders should consult their tax advisers for more information about the effect that an investment in a Fund could have on their own tax situations, including possible federal, state, local, and foreign taxes. Also, as noted above, this discussion does not apply to Fund shares held through tax-advantaged retirement plans.

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Financial Highlights
The financial highlights tables are intended to help you understand the Funds’ financial performance for the past 5 years. Since Class Y, Class L, and Class C shares of Short-Duration Bond Fund and Class Y and Class C shares of High Yield Fund commenced operations on December 13, 2021, financial highlights are not yet presented for these classes. Certain information reflects financial results for a single Fund share. The total returns in the tables represent the rate that an investor would have earned on an investment in the Fund (assuming reinvestment of all dividends and distributions). This information has been audited by Deloitte & Touche LLP, an independent registered public accounting firm, whose reports, along with each Fund’s financial statements, are included in the Trust’s Annual Report, and are incorporated by reference into the SAI, and are available on request.
MASSMUTUAL SHORT-DURATION BOND FUND
Income (loss) from investment
operations
Less distributions to shareholders
Ratios / Supplemental Data
Net
asset
value,
beginning
of the

period
Net
investment
income

(loss)c
Net
realized
and
unrealized
gain (loss)
on

investments
Total
income
(loss) from
investment

operations
From net
investment

income
From net
realized

gains
Total
distributions
Net
asset
value,
end of
the

period
Total
returnl,m
Net
assets,
end of
the
period

(000’s)
Ratio of
expenses
to average
daily net

assets
Net
investment
income
(loss) to
average
daily net

assets
Class I
9/30/21
$
 10.09
$  0.24 $   0.22 $  0.46 $  (0.45) $   — $  (0.45)
$
 10.10
4.69%