HARTFORD SERIES FUND INC
Hartford HLS Funds
Prospectus
May 1, 2023
Class IA
Class IB
Class IC
Hartford Balanced HLS Fund
HADAX
HAIBX
Hartford Capital Appreciation HLS Fund
HIACX
HIBCX
HCPCX
Hartford Disciplined Equity HLS Fund
HIAGX
HBGIX
HLSCX
Hartford Dividend and Growth HLS Fund
HIADX
HDGBX
Hartford Healthcare HLS Fund
HIAHX
HBGHX
Hartford International Opportunities HLS Fund
HIAOX
HBIOX
Hartford MidCap HLS Fund
HIMCX
HBMCX
Hartford Small Cap Growth HLS Fund
HISCX
HBSGX
Hartford Small Company HLS Fund
HIASX
HDMBX
Hartford Stock HLS Fund
HSTAX
HIBSX
Hartford Total Return Bond HLS Fund
HIABX
HBNBX
Hartford Ultrashort Bond HLS Fund
HUBAX
HUBBX
Each Fund is closed to certain investors as described in this Prospectus.
As with all mutual funds, the Securities and Exchange Commission and the Commodity Futures Trading Commission have not approved or disapproved these securities or passed upon the adequacy of this Prospectus. Any representation to the contrary is a criminal offense. Mutual funds are not bank deposits and are not insured or guaranteed by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation or any other government agency. Because you could lose money by investing in the Funds, be sure to read all risk disclosures carefully before investing.

Contents
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Hartford Balanced HLS Fund Summary Section
INVESTMENT OBJECTIVE. The Fund seeks long-term total return.
YOUR EXPENSES. The table below describes the fees and expenses that you may pay if you buy, hold, and sell shares of the Fund. Please note that fees and expenses in this table and the example below do not include fees and expenses that will be applied at the variable contract level or by a qualified pension or retirement plan and would be higher if such fees and expenses were included. You should review your variable contract prospectus (or other disclosure document) or plan documents for more information on those fees and expenses.
Annual Fund Operating Expenses (expenses that you pay each year as a percentage of the value of your investment):
Share Classes
IA
IB
Management fees
0.63%
0.63%
Distribution and/or service (12b-1) fees
None
0.25%
Other expenses
0.03%
0.03%
Total annual fund operating expenses
0.66%
0.91%
Example. The example below is intended to help you compare the cost of investing in the Fund with the cost of investing in other mutual funds. The example assumes that:
You invest $10,000
Your investment has a 5% return each year
The Fund’s operating expenses remain the same
You reinvest all dividends and distributions
Your actual costs may be higher or lower. Based on these assumptions, you would pay the following expenses whether or not you were to redeem your investment at the end of each time period indicated:
Share Classes
Year 1
Year 3
Year 5
Year 10
IA
$67
$211
$368
$822
IB
$93
$290
$504
$1,120
Portfolio Turnover. The Fund pays transaction costs, such as commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or “turns over” its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover rate may indicate higher transaction costs. These costs, which are not reflected in annual fund operating expenses or in the example, affect the Fund’s performance. During the fiscal year ended December 31, 2022, the Fund’s portfolio turnover rate was 53% of the average value of its portfolio (excluding to be announced (TBA) roll transactions). If TBA roll transactions were included, the Fund’s portfolio turnover rate would have been 61% of the average value of its portfolio.
PRINCIPAL INVESTMENT STRATEGY. The Fund seeks its investment objective by allocating its assets among equity securities, debt securities, and money market instruments. Wellington Management Company LLP (“Wellington Management”), the Fund’s sub-adviser, targets an allocation between 50% and 70% of the Fund’s net assets in equity securities and 30% to 50% of Fund’s net assets in debt securities and cash instruments. The Fund will not normally hold more than 10% in cash or cash equivalents. The Fund may invest in stocks with a broad range of market capitalizations, but tends to focus on large capitalization companies with market capitalizations similar to those of companies in the S&P 500 Index. Wellington Management evaluates securities using fundamental analysis. Based on market or economic conditions, the equity portion of the Fund may, through its stock selection process, focus in one or more sectors of the market. The debt securities (other than money market instruments) in which the Fund invests include securities issued or guaranteed by the United States government, its agencies, or its instrumentalities, and other debt securities rated investment grade, including corporate bonds, commercial and residential mortgage-backed securities (including securities acquired or sold in the TBA market), asset-backed securities, and municipal bonds, or if unrated, securities deemed by Wellington Management to be of comparable quality. The Fund is not restricted to any specific maturity or duration term. The Fund may invest up to 20% of its net assets in securities of foreign issuers and non-dollar securities.
3

PRINCIPAL RISKS. The principal risks of investing in the Fund are described below. When you sell your shares they may be worth more or less than what you paid for them, which means that you could lose money as a result of your investment. An investment in the Fund is not a bank deposit and is not insured or guaranteed by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation or any other government agency. As with any fund, there is no guarantee that the Fund will achieve its investment objective.
Market Risk –  Market risk is the risk that one or more markets in which the Fund invests will go down in value, including the possibility that the markets will go down sharply and unpredictably. Securities of a company may decline in value due to its financial prospects and activities, including certain operational impacts, such as data breaches and cybersecurity attacks. Securities may also decline in value due to general market and economic movements and trends, including adverse changes to credit markets, or as a result of other events such as geopolitical events, natural disasters, or widespread pandemics (such as COVID-19) or other adverse public health developments.
Asset Allocation Risk –  The risk that if the Fund’s strategy for allocating assets among different asset classes does not work as intended, the Fund may not achieve its objective or may underperform other funds with similar investment strategies.
Equity Risk –  The risk that the price of equity or equity related securities may decline due to changes in a company’s financial condition and overall market and economic conditions.
Large Cap Securities Risk –  The securities of large market capitalization companies may underperform other segments of the market because such companies may be less responsive to competitive challenges and opportunities and may be unable to attain high growth rates during periods of economic expansion.
Credit Risk –  Credit risk is the risk that the issuer of a security or other instrument will not be able to make principal and interest payments when due. Changes in an issuer’s financial strength, credit rating or the market’s perception of an issuer’s creditworthiness may also affect the value of the Fund’s investment in that issuer. The degree of credit risk depends on both the financial condition of the issuer and the terms of the obligation. Periods of market volatility may increase credit risk.
Interest Rate Risk –  The risk that your investment may go down in value when interest rates rise, because when interest rates rise, the prices of bonds and fixed rate loans fall. A wide variety of factors can cause interest rates to rise, including central bank monetary policies and inflation rates. Generally, the longer the maturity of a bond or fixed rate loan, the more sensitive it is to this risk. Falling interest rates also create the potential for a decline in the Fund’s income. These risks are greater during periods of rising inflation. Volatility in interest rates and in fixed income markets may increase the risk that the Fund’s investment in fixed income securities will go down in value. Risks associated with rising interest rates are currently heightened because the Federal Reserve has raised, and may continue to raise, interest rates and inflation is elevated. Actions taken by the Federal Reserve Board or foreign central banks to stimulate or stabilize economic growth, such as decreases or increases in short-term interest rates, may adversely affect markets, which could, in turn, negatively impact Fund performance.
Active Investment Management Risk –  The risk that, if the sub-adviser’s investment strategy does not perform as expected, the Fund could underperform its peers or lose money. Although the sub-adviser considers several factors when making investment decisions, the sub-adviser may not evaluate every factor prior to investing in a company or issuer, and the sub-adviser may determine that certain factors are more significant than others.
Foreign Investments Risk –  Investments in foreign securities may be riskier, more volatile, and less liquid than investments in U.S. securities. Differences between the U.S. and foreign regulatory regimes and securities markets, including the less stringent investor protection, less stringent accounting, corporate governance, financial reporting and disclosure standards of some foreign markets, as well as political and economic developments in foreign countries and regions and the U.S. (including the imposition of sanctions, tariffs, or other governmental restrictions), may affect the value of the Fund’s investments in foreign securities. Changes in currency exchange rates may also adversely affect the Fund’s foreign investments.
Currency Risk –  The risk that the value of the Fund’s investments in foreign securities or currencies will be affected by the value of the applicable currency relative to the U.S. dollar. When the Fund sells a foreign currency or foreign currency denominated security, its value may be worth less in U.S. dollars even if the investment increases in value in its local market. U.S. dollar-denominated securities of foreign issuers may also be affected by currency risk, as the revenue earned by issuers of these securities may also be affected by changes in the issuer’s local currency.
4

U.S. Government Securities Risk –  Treasury obligations may differ in their interest rates, maturities, times of issuance and other characteristics. Securities backed by the U.S. Treasury or the full faith and credit of the United States are guaranteed only as to the timely payment of interest and principal when held to maturity. Accordingly, the current market values for these securities will fluctuate with changes in interest rates. Obligations of U.S. Government agencies and authorities are supported by varying degrees of credit but generally are not backed by the full faith and credit of the U.S. Government. No assurance can be given that the U.S. Government will provide financial support to its agencies and authorities if it is not obligated by law to do so. In addition, the value of U.S. Government securities may be affected by changes in the credit rating of the U.S. Government. U.S. Government securities are also subject to the risk that the U.S. Treasury will be unable to meet its payment obligations.
Mortgage-Related and Asset-Backed Securities Risk –  Mortgage-related and asset-backed securities represent interests in “pools” of mortgages or other assets, including consumer loans or receivables held in trust. These mortgage-related or asset-backed securities are subject to credit risk, interest rate risk, “prepayment risk” (the risk that borrowers will repay a loan more quickly in periods of falling interest rates) and “extension risk” (the risk that borrowers will repay a loan more slowly in periods of rising interest rates). If the Fund invests in mortgage-related or asset-backed securities that are subordinated to other interests in the same mortgage or asset pool, the Fund may only receive payments after the pool’s obligations to other investors have been satisfied. An unexpectedly high rate of defaults on the mortgages held by a mortgage pool may limit substantially the pool’s ability to make payments of principal or interest to the Fund, reducing the values of those securities or in some cases rendering them worthless. The risk of such defaults is generally higher in the case of mortgage pools that include so-called “subprime” mortgages. The Fund may purchase or sell mortgage-backed securities on a delayed delivery or forward commitment basis through the TBA market. TBA transactions may result in a higher portfolio turnover rate.
Sector Risk –  To the extent the Fund invests more heavily in a particular sector or sectors, its performance will be especially sensitive to developments that significantly affect those sectors. Individual sectors may be more volatile, and may perform differently, from the broader market.
Securities Lending Risk –  The Fund may lose money because the borrower of the loaned securities fails to return the securities in a timely manner or at all. The Fund could also lose money in the event of a decline in the value of the collateral provided for loaned securities or a decline in the value of any investments made with cash collateral.
Large Shareholder Transaction Risk –  The Fund may experience adverse effects when certain large shareholders redeem or purchase large amounts of shares of the Fund. Such redemptions may cause the Fund to sell securities at times when it would not otherwise do so or borrow money (at a cost to the Fund), which may negatively impact the Fund’s performance and liquidity. Similarly, large purchases may adversely affect the Fund’s performance to the extent that the Fund is delayed in investing new cash and is required to maintain a larger cash position than it ordinarily would. These transactions may also increase transaction costs.
The Fund is subject to certain other risks. For more information regarding risks and investments, please see “Additional Information Regarding Investment Strategies and Risks” and “More Information About Risks” in the Fund’s statutory prospectus.
PAST PERFORMANCE. The performance information below indicates the risks of investing in the Fund. Keep in mind that past performance does not indicate future results. Updated performance information is available at hartfordfunds.com. The returns in the bar chart and table:
Assume reinvestment of all dividends and distributions
Would be lower if the effect of sales charges or other fees that may be applied at the contract or plan level were included
Reflect fee waivers, if any. Absent any applicable waivers, performance would have been lower.
The bar chart:
Shows how the Fund’s total return has varied from year to year
Shows the returns of Class IA shares. Returns for Class IB shares differ only to the extent that the classes do not have the same expenses.
5

Total returns by calendar year
During the periods shown in the chart above:
Returns
Quarter Ended
Best Quarter Return
13.68%
June 30, 2020
Worst Quarter Return
-14.50%
March 31, 2020
Average Annual Total Returns. The table below shows returns for the Fund over time compared to those of the Fund’s blended benchmark and three broad-based market indices.
Average annual total returns for periods ending December 31, 2022
Share Classes
1 Year
5 Years
10 Years
Class IA
-13.42%
6.11%
8.19%
Class IB
-13.66%
5.84%
7.92%
60% S&P 500 Index/ 35% Bloomberg US Government/Credit Bond Index/ 5% ICE BofA US
3-Month Treasury Bill Index*
-15.29%
6.10%
8.11%
S&P 500 Index (reflects no deduction for fees, expenses or taxes)
-18.11%
9.42%
12.56%
Bloomberg US Government/Credit Bond Index (reflects no deduction for fees, expenses
or taxes)
-13.58%
0.21%
1.16%
ICE BofA US 3-Month Treasury Bill Index (reflects no deduction for fees, expenses or
taxes)
1.45%
1.26%
0.76%
*
The blended benchmark is calculated by Hartford Funds Management Company, LLC.
MANAGEMENT. The Fund’s investment manager is Hartford Funds Management Company, LLC. The Fund’s sub-adviser is Wellington Management.
Portfolio Manager
Title
Involved with
Fund Since
Adam H. Illfelder, CFA
Senior Managing Director and Equity Portfolio Manager
2012
Loren L. Moran, CFA
Senior Managing Director and Fixed Income Portfolio Manager
2014
Matthew C. Hand, CFA
Senior Managing Director and Equity Portfolio Manager
2012
PURCHASE AND SALE OF FUND SHARES. Class IA shares and Class IB shares of the Fund generally may only be purchased or redeemed through variable contracts and qualified pension plans or retirement plans. Class IA shares and Class IB shares of the Fund are closed to certain qualified pension and retirement plans. For more information, please see the section entitled “Further Information on the Funds - Purchase and Redemption of Fund Shares” in the Fund’s statutory prospectus.
Class IA shares and Class IB shares of the Fund do not have any initial or subsequent investment minimums. Any initial or subsequent investment requirements and redemption procedures are governed by the applicable variable contract or plan through which you invest.
TAX INFORMATION. Under current law, owners of variable contracts and qualified pension or retirement plan participants that have invested in the Fund are not subject to federal income tax on Fund earnings and distributions or on gains realized upon the sale or redemption of Fund shares until such amounts are withdrawn from the variable contract or pension or retirement plan. You should review your variable contract prospectus (or other disclosure document) or plan documents for more information.
6

PAYMENTS TO BROKER-DEALERS AND OTHER FINANCIAL INTERMEDIARIES. The Fund and its related companies may make payments to insurance companies (or their affiliates), plan sponsors and other financial intermediaries for distribution and/or other services. These payments may create a conflict of interest by influencing the financial intermediary and its employees to include the Fund as an investment option or to recommend the Fund over another investment option. Ask your financial intermediary or visit your financial intermediary’s website for more information.
7

Hartford Capital Appreciation HLS Fund Summary Section
INVESTMENT OBJECTIVE. The Fund seeks growth of capital.
YOUR EXPENSES. The table below describes the fees and expenses that you may pay if you buy, hold, and sell shares of the Fund. Please note that fees and expenses in this table and the example below do not include fees and expenses that will be applied at the variable contract level or by a qualified pension or retirement plan and would be higher if such fees and expenses were included. You should review your variable contract prospectus (or other disclosure document) or plan documents for more information on those fees and expenses.
Annual Fund Operating Expenses (expenses that you pay each year as a percentage of the value of your investment):
Share Classes
IA
IB
IC
Management fees
0.65%
0.65%
0.65%
Distribution and/or service (12b-1) fees
None
0.25%
0.25%
Total other expenses
0.02%
0.02%
0.27%
Administrative services fee
None
None
0.25%
Other expenses
0.02%
0.02%
0.02%
Total annual fund operating expenses
0.67%
0.92%
1.17%
Example. The example below is intended to help you compare the cost of investing in the Fund with the cost of investing in other mutual funds. The example assumes that:
You invest $10,000
Your investment has a 5% return each year
The Fund’s operating expenses remain the same
You reinvest all dividends and distributions
Your actual costs may be higher or lower. Based on these assumptions, you would pay the following expenses whether or not you were to redeem your investment at the end of each time period indicated:
Share Classes
Year 1
Year 3
Year 5
Year 10
IA
$68
$214
$373
$835
IB
$94
$293
$509
$1,131
IC
$119
$372
$644
$1,420
Portfolio Turnover. The Fund pays transaction costs, such as commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or “turns over” its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover rate may indicate higher transaction costs. These costs, which are not reflected in annual fund operating expenses or in the example, affect the Fund’s performance. During the fiscal year ended December 31, 2022, the Fund’s portfolio turnover rate was 64% of the average value of its portfolio.
PRINCIPAL INVESTMENT STRATEGY. The Fund normally invests at least 65% of its net assets in common stocks. The Fund may invest in securities of any market capitalization, but tends to focus on medium and large companies. The Fund may also invest up to 25% of its net assets in equity securities of foreign issuers and non-dollar securities, including companies that conduct their principal business activities in emerging markets or whose securities are traded principally on exchanges in emerging markets. The Fund seeks its investment objective by employing a multiple sleeve structure, which means the Fund has several components that are managed separately using different investment styles. Each component sleeve has a distinct investment philosophy and analytical process to identify specific securities for purchase or sale. Wellington Management Company LLP (“Wellington Management”), the Fund’s sub-adviser, also may invest a portion of the Fund’s assets in securities that it believes may complement the risk factor biases of the other sleeves (“Risk Managed Sleeve”) and selects such securities using systematic screening methodologies. Wellington Management does not allocate a set percentage to any of these sleeves but instead seeks a flexible and diversified Fund profile. Together the investment strategies represent a wide range of investment philosophies, companies, industries and market capitalizations. Based on market or economic conditions, the Fund may, through its stock selection process, focus in one or more sectors of the market. The Fund may trade securities actively.
8

PRINCIPAL RISKS. The principal risks of investing in the Fund are described below. When you sell your shares they may be worth more or less than what you paid for them, which means that you could lose money as a result of your investment. An investment in the Fund is not a bank deposit and is not insured or guaranteed by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation or any other government agency. As with any fund, there is no guarantee that the Fund will achieve its investment objective.
Market Risk –  Market risk is the risk that one or more markets in which the Fund invests will go down in value, including the possibility that the markets will go down sharply and unpredictably. Securities of a company may decline in value due to its financial prospects and activities, including certain operational impacts, such as data breaches and cybersecurity attacks. Securities may also decline in value due to general market and economic movements and trends, including adverse changes to credit markets, or as a result of other events such as geopolitical events, natural disasters, or widespread pandemics (such as COVID-19) or other adverse public health developments.
Equity Risk –  The risk that the price of equity or equity related securities may decline due to changes in a company’s financial condition and overall market and economic conditions.
Large Cap Securities Risk –  The securities of large market capitalization companies may underperform other segments of the market because such companies may be less responsive to competitive challenges and opportunities and may be unable to attain high growth rates during periods of economic expansion.
Mid-Cap Securities Risk –  The securities of mid-capitalization companies generally trade in lower volumes and are generally subject to greater and less predictable price changes than the securities of larger capitalization companies.
Active Investment Management Risk –  The risk that, if the sub-adviser’s investment strategy does not perform as expected, the Fund could underperform its peers or lose money. Although the sub-adviser considers several factors when making investment decisions, the sub-adviser may not evaluate every factor prior to investing in a company or issuer, and the sub-adviser may determine that certain factors are more significant than others.
Asset Allocation Risk –  The risk that if the Fund’s strategy for allocating assets among different portfolio management teams does not work as intended, the Fund may not achieve its objective or may underperform other funds with similar investment strategies. The investment styles employed by the portfolio managers may not be complementary, which could adversely affect the performance of the Fund.
Foreign Investments Risk –  Investments in foreign securities may be riskier, more volatile, and less liquid than investments in U.S. securities. Differences between the U.S. and foreign regulatory regimes and securities markets, including the less stringent investor protection, less stringent accounting, corporate governance, financial reporting and disclosure standards of some foreign markets, as well as political and economic developments in foreign countries and regions and the U.S. (including the imposition of sanctions, tariffs, or other governmental restrictions), may affect the value of the Fund’s investments in foreign securities. Changes in currency exchange rates may also adversely affect the Fund’s foreign investments.
Emerging Markets Risk –  The risks related to investing in foreign securities are generally greater with respect to investments in companies that conduct their principal business activities in emerging markets or whose securities are traded principally on exchanges in emerging markets. The risks of investing in emerging markets include risks of illiquidity, increased price volatility, smaller market capitalizations, less government regulation and oversight, less extensive and less frequent accounting, financial, auditing and other reporting requirements, significant delays in settlement of trades, risk of loss resulting from problems in share registration and custody and substantial economic and political disruptions. In addition, the imposition of exchange controls (including repatriation restrictions), sanctions, confiscations, trade restrictions (including tariffs) and other government restrictions by the United States and other governments may also result in losses. Frontier markets are those emerging markets that are considered to be among the smallest, least mature and least liquid, and as a result, the risks of investing in emerging markets are magnified in frontier markets.
Currency Risk –  The risk that the value of the Fund’s investments in foreign securities or currencies will be affected by the value of the applicable currency relative to the U.S. dollar. When the Fund sells a foreign currency or foreign currency denominated security, its value may be worth less in U.S. dollars even if the investment increases in value in its local market. U.S. dollar-denominated securities of foreign issuers may also be affected by currency risk, as the revenue earned by issuers of these securities may also be affected by changes in the issuer’s local currency.
9

Sector Risk –  To the extent the Fund invests more heavily in a particular sector or sectors, its performance will be especially sensitive to developments that significantly affect those sectors. Individual sectors may be more volatile, and may perform differently, from the broader market.
Securities Lending Risk –  The Fund may lose money because the borrower of the loaned securities fails to return the securities in a timely manner or at all. The Fund could also lose money in the event of a decline in the value of the collateral provided for loaned securities or a decline in the value of any investments made with cash collateral.
Active Trading Risk –  Active trading could increase the Fund’s transaction costs (thus adversely affecting performance).
Large Shareholder Transaction Risk –  The Fund may experience adverse effects when certain large shareholders redeem or purchase large amounts of shares of the Fund. Such redemptions may cause the Fund to sell securities at times when it would not otherwise do so or borrow money (at a cost to the Fund), which may negatively impact the Fund’s performance and liquidity. Similarly, large purchases may adversely affect the Fund’s performance to the extent that the Fund is delayed in investing new cash and is required to maintain a larger cash position than it ordinarily would. These transactions may also increase transaction costs.
The Fund is subject to certain other risks. For more information regarding risks and investments, please see “Additional Information Regarding Investment Strategies and Risks” and “More Information About Risks” in the Fund’s statutory prospectus.
PAST PERFORMANCE. The performance information below indicates the risks of investing in the Fund. Keep in mind that past performance does not indicate future results. Updated performance information is available at hartfordfunds.com. The returns in the bar chart and table:
Assume reinvestment of all dividends and distributions
Would be lower if the effect of sales charges or other fees that may be applied at the contract or plan level were included.
The bar chart:
Shows how the Fund’s total return has varied from year to year
Shows the returns of Class IA shares. Returns for the Fund’s other classes differ only to the extent that the classes do not have the same expenses.
Total returns by calendar year
During the periods shown in the chart above:
Returns
Quarter Ended
Best Quarter Return
20.62%
June 30, 2020
Worst Quarter Return
-19.98%
March 31, 2020
10

Average Annual Total Returns. The table below shows returns for the Fund over time compared to those of two broad-based market indices. Class IC shares commenced operations on April 30, 2014. Class IC shares performance prior to that date reflects Class IA shares performance adjusted to reflect the 12b-1 fee of 0.25% and the administrative services fee of 0.25% applicable to Class IC shares.
Average annual total returns for periods ending December 31, 2022
Share Classes
1 Year
5 Years
10 Years
Class IA
-15.30%
7.68%
10.89%
Class IB
-15.50%
7.41%
10.62%
Class IC
-15.71%
7.15%
10.34%
Russell 3000 Index (reflects no deduction for fees, expenses or taxes)
-19.21%
8.79%
12.13%
S&P 500 Index (reflects no deduction for fees, expenses or taxes)
-18.11%
9.42%
12.56%
MANAGEMENT. The Fund’s investment manager is Hartford Funds Management Company, LLC. The Fund’s sub-adviser is Wellington Management. The Fund employs a multiple portfolio manager structure. The portfolio managers with the most significant responsibilities are set forth below.
Portfolio Manager
Title
Involved with
Fund Since
Gregg R. Thomas, CFA
Senior Managing Director and Director, Investment Strategy
2013
Thomas S. Simon, CFA, FRM
Senior Managing Director and Portfolio Manager
2016
PURCHASE AND SALE OF FUND SHARES. Class IA shares and Class IB shares of the Fund generally may only be purchased or redeemed through variable contracts and qualified pension plans or retirement plans. Class IA shares and Class IB shares of the Fund are closed to certain qualified pension and retirement plans. Class IC shares of the Fund currently may only be purchased or redeemed through variable contracts. For more information, please see the section entitled “Further Information on the Funds - Purchase and Redemption of Fund Shares” in the Fund’s statutory prospectus.
Class IA shares, Class IB shares, and Class IC shares of the Fund do not have any initial or subsequent investment minimums. Any initial or subsequent investment requirements and redemption procedures are governed by the applicable variable contract or plan through which you invest.
TAX INFORMATION. Under current law, owners of variable contracts and qualified pension or retirement plan participants that have invested in the Fund are not subject to federal income tax on Fund earnings and distributions or on gains realized upon the sale or redemption of Fund shares until such amounts are withdrawn from the variable contract or pension or retirement plan. You should review your variable contract prospectus (or other disclosure document) or plan documents for more information.
PAYMENTS TO BROKER-DEALERS AND OTHER FINANCIAL INTERMEDIARIES. The Fund and its related companies may make payments to insurance companies (or their affiliates), plan sponsors and other financial intermediaries for distribution and/or other services. These payments may create a conflict of interest by influencing the financial intermediary and its employees to include the Fund as an investment option or to recommend the Fund over another investment option. Ask your financial intermediary or visit your financial intermediary’s website for more information.
11

Hartford Disciplined Equity HLS Fund Summary Section
INVESTMENT OBJECTIVE. The Fund seeks growth of capital.
YOUR EXPENSES. The table below describes the fees and expenses that you may pay if you buy, hold, and sell shares of the Fund. Please note that fees and expenses in this table and the example below do not include fees and expenses that will be applied at the variable contract level or by a qualified pension or retirement plan and would be higher if such fees and expenses were included. You should review your variable contract prospectus (or other disclosure document) or plan documents for more information on those fees and expenses.
Annual Fund Operating Expenses (expenses that you pay each year as a percentage of the value of your investment):
Share Classes
IA
IB
IC
Management fees
0.57%
0.57%
0.57%
Distribution and/or service (12b-1) fees
None
0.25%
0.25%
Total other expenses
0.02%
0.02%
0.27%
Administrative services fee
None
None
0.25%
Other expenses
0.02%
0.02%
0.02%
Total annual fund operating expenses
0.59%
0.84%
1.09%
Example. The example below is intended to help you compare the cost of investing in the Fund with the cost of investing in other mutual funds. The example assumes that:
You invest $10,000
Your investment has a 5% return each year
The Fund’s operating expenses remain the same
You reinvest all dividends and distributions
Your actual costs may be higher or lower. Based on these assumptions, you would pay the following expenses whether or not you were to redeem your investment at the end of each time period indicated:
Share Classes
Year 1
Year 3
Year 5
Year 10
IA
$60
$189
$329
$738
IB
$86
$268
$466
$1,037
IC
$111
$347
$601
$1,329
Portfolio Turnover. The Fund pays transaction costs, such as commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or “turns over” its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover rate may indicate higher transaction costs. These costs, which are not reflected in annual fund operating expenses or in the example, affect the Fund’s performance. During the fiscal year ended December 31, 2022, the Fund’s portfolio turnover rate was 13% of the average value of its portfolio.
PRINCIPAL INVESTMENT STRATEGY. Under normal circumstances, the Fund invests at least 80% of its assets in common stocks. The Fund invests in a diversified portfolio of common stocks of issuers located primarily in the United States. Wellington Management Company LLP (“Wellington Management”), the Fund’s sub-adviser, chooses the Fund’s investments using fundamental research designed to identify issuers with improving quality metrics, business momentum and attractive relative valuations. The fundamental research emphasizes the sustainability of a business’s competitive advantages, revenue and margin drivers, and cash generation capacity. This research is aided by a proprietary screening tool that helps to identify companies with these characteristics. The Fund’s portfolio seeks to be broadly diversified by industry and company. The Fund may invest in a broad range of market capitalizations, but tends to focus on large capitalization companies with market capitalizations similar to those of companies in the S&P 500 Index.
PRINCIPAL RISKS. The principal risks of investing in the Fund are described below. When you sell your shares they may be worth more or less than what you paid for them, which means that you could lose money as a result of your investment. An investment in the Fund is not a bank deposit and is not insured or guaranteed by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation or any other government agency. As with any fund, there is no guarantee that the Fund will achieve its investment objective.
12

Market Risk –  Market risk is the risk that one or more markets in which the Fund invests will go down in value, including the possibility that the markets will go down sharply and unpredictably. Securities of a company may decline in value due to its financial prospects and activities, including certain operational impacts, such as data breaches and cybersecurity attacks. Securities may also decline in value due to general market and economic movements and trends, including adverse changes to credit markets, or as a result of other events such as geopolitical events, natural disasters, or widespread pandemics (such as COVID-19) or other adverse public health developments.
Equity Risk –  The risk that the price of equity or equity related securities may decline due to changes in a company’s financial condition and overall market and economic conditions.
Large Cap Securities Risk –  The securities of large market capitalization companies may underperform other segments of the market because such companies may be less responsive to competitive challenges and opportunities and may be unable to attain high growth rates during periods of economic expansion.
Active Investment Management Risk –  The risk that, if the sub-adviser’s investment strategy does not perform as expected, the Fund could underperform its peers or lose money. Although the sub-adviser considers several factors when making investment decisions, the sub-adviser may not evaluate every factor prior to investing in a company or issuer, and the sub-adviser may determine that certain factors are more significant than others.
Securities Lending Risk –  The Fund may lose money because the borrower of the loaned securities fails to return the securities in a timely manner or at all. The Fund could also lose money in the event of a decline in the value of the collateral provided for loaned securities or a decline in the value of any investments made with cash collateral.
Large Shareholder Transaction Risk –  The Fund may experience adverse effects when certain large shareholders redeem or purchase large amounts of shares of the Fund. Such redemptions may cause the Fund to sell securities at times when it would not otherwise do so or borrow money (at a cost to the Fund), which may negatively impact the Fund’s performance and liquidity. Similarly, large purchases may adversely affect the Fund’s performance to the extent that the Fund is delayed in investing new cash and is required to maintain a larger cash position than it ordinarily would. These transactions may also increase transaction costs.
The Fund is subject to certain other risks. For more information regarding risks and investments, please see “Additional Information Regarding Investment Strategies and Risks” and “More Information About Risks” in the Fund’s statutory prospectus.
PAST PERFORMANCE. The performance information below indicates the risks of investing in the Fund. Keep in mind that past performance does not indicate future results. Updated performance information is available at hartfordfunds.com. The returns in the bar chart and table:
Assume reinvestment of all dividends and distributions
Would be lower if the effect of sales charges or other fees that may be applied at the contract or plan level were included.
The bar chart:
Shows how the Fund’s total return has varied from year to year
Shows the returns of Class IA shares. Returns for the Fund’s other classes differ only to the extent that the classes do not have the same expenses.
13

Total returns by calendar year
During the periods shown in the chart above:
Returns
Quarter Ended
Best Quarter Return
19.44%
June 30, 2020
Worst Quarter Return
-19.79%
March 31, 2020
Average Annual Total Returns. The table below shows returns for the Fund over time compared to those of a broad-based market index. Class IC shares commenced operations on September 18, 2020. Class IC shares performance prior to that date reflects Class IA shares performance adjusted to reflect the 12b-1 fee of 0.25% and the administrative services fee of 0.25% applicable to Class IC shares.
Average annual total returns for periods ending December 31, 2022
Share Classes
1 Year
5 Years
10 Years
Class IA
-18.96%
9.56%
13.12%
Class IB
-19.20%
9.28%
12.83%
Class IC
-19.40%
9.01%
12.56%
S&P 500 Index (reflects no deduction for fees, expenses or taxes)
-18.11%
9.42%
12.56%
MANAGEMENT. The Fund’s investment manager is Hartford Funds Management Company, LLC. The Fund’s sub-adviser is Wellington Management.
Portfolio Manager
Title
Involved with
Fund Since
Mammen Chally, CFA
Senior Managing Director and Equity Portfolio Manager
1998
David A. Siegle, CFA
Managing Director and Equity Research Analyst
2008
Douglas W. McLane, CFA
Senior Managing Director and Equity Portfolio Manager
2011
PURCHASE AND SALE OF FUND SHARES. Class IA shares and Class IB shares of the Fund generally may only be purchased or redeemed through variable contracts and qualified pension plans or retirement plans. Class IA shares and Class IB shares of the Fund are closed to certain qualified pension and retirement plans. Class IC shares of the Fund currently may only be purchased or redeemed through variable contracts. For more information, please see the section entitled “Further Information on the Funds - Purchase and Redemption of Fund Shares” in the Fund’s statutory prospectus.
Class IA shares, Class IB shares, and Class IC shares of the Fund do not have any initial or subsequent investment minimums. Any initial or subsequent investment requirements and redemption procedures are governed by the applicable variable contract or plan through which you invest.
TAX INFORMATION. Under current law, owners of variable contracts and qualified pension or retirement plan participants that have invested in the Fund are not subject to federal income tax on Fund earnings and distributions or on gains realized upon the sale or redemption of Fund shares until such amounts are withdrawn from the variable contract or pension or retirement plan. You should review your variable contract prospectus (or other disclosure document) or plan documents for more information.
14

PAYMENTS TO BROKER-DEALERS AND OTHER FINANCIAL INTERMEDIARIES. The Fund and its related companies may make payments to insurance companies (or their affiliates), plan sponsors and other financial intermediaries for distribution and/or other services. These payments may create a conflict of interest by influencing the financial intermediary and its employees to include the Fund as an investment option or to recommend the Fund over another investment option. Ask your financial intermediary or visit your financial intermediary’s website for more information.
15

Hartford Dividend and Growth HLS Fund Summary Section
INVESTMENT OBJECTIVE. The Fund seeks a high level of current income consistent with growth of capital.
YOUR EXPENSES. The table below describes the fees and expenses that you may pay if you buy, hold, and sell shares of the Fund. Please note that fees and expenses in this table and the example below do not include fees and expenses that will be applied at the variable contract level or by a qualified pension or retirement plan and would be higher if such fees and expenses were included. You should review your variable contract prospectus (or other disclosure document) or plan documents for more information on those fees and expenses.
Annual Fund Operating Expenses (expenses that you pay each year as a percentage of the value of your investment):
Share Classes
IA
IB
Management fees
0.63%
0.63%
Distribution and/or service (12b-1) fees
None
0.25%
Other expenses
0.02%
0.02%
Total annual fund operating expenses
0.65%
0.90%
Example. The example below is intended to help you compare the cost of investing in the Fund with the cost of investing in other mutual funds. The example assumes that:
You invest $10,000
Your investment has a 5% return each year
The Fund’s operating expenses remain the same
You reinvest all dividends and distributions
Your actual costs may be higher or lower. Based on these assumptions, you would pay the following expenses whether or not you were to redeem your investment at the end of each time period indicated:
Share Classes
Year 1
Year 3
Year 5
Year 10
IA
$66
$208
$362
$810
IB
$92
$287
$498
$1,108
Portfolio Turnover. The Fund pays transaction costs, such as commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or “turns over” its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover rate may indicate higher transaction costs. These costs, which are not reflected in annual fund operating expenses or in the example, affect the Fund’s performance. During the fiscal year ended December 31, 2022, the Fund’s portfolio turnover rate was 23% of the average value of its portfolio.
PRINCIPAL INVESTMENT STRATEGY. The Fund invests primarily in a portfolio of equity securities that typically have above average dividend yields and whose prospects for capital appreciation are considered favorable by the sub-adviser, Wellington Management Company LLP (“Wellington Management”). Under normal market and economic conditions, at least 80% of the Fund’s net assets are invested in dividend paying equity securities. The Fund tends to focus on securities of larger, well-established companies with market capitalizations similar to those of companies in the S&P 500 Index. The Fund may invest up to 20% of its net assets in securities of foreign issuers and non-dollar securities. The Fund’s portfolio seeks to be broadly diversified by company and industry. Based on market or economic conditions, the Fund may, through its stock selection process, focus in one or more sectors of the market.
Wellington Management uses fundamental analysis to evaluate a security for purchase or sale by the Fund. As part of this analysis, Wellington Management evaluates a company’s ability to sustain and potentially increase its dividend payments. Wellington Management also evaluates a company’s free cash flow, business environment, management quality, balance sheet, income statement, anticipated earnings, revenues, and other related measures or indicators of value. Wellington Management also favors securities that appear to be undervalued in the marketplace. Wellington Management also integrates the evaluation of financially material environmental, social, and/or governance (“ESG”) characteristics (where available for a company) into its fundamental analysis. ESG characteristics are one of several factors that contribute to Wellington Management’s overall evaluation of the risk and return potential of a company.
16

PRINCIPAL RISKS. The principal risks of investing in the Fund are described below. When you sell your shares they may be worth more or less than what you paid for them, which means that you could lose money as a result of your investment. An investment in the Fund is not a bank deposit and is not insured or guaranteed by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation or any other government agency. As with any fund, there is no guarantee that the Fund will achieve its investment objective.
Market Risk –  Market risk is the risk that one or more markets in which the Fund invests will go down in value, including the possibility that the markets will go down sharply and unpredictably. Securities of a company may decline in value due to its financial prospects and activities, including certain operational impacts, such as data breaches and cybersecurity attacks. Securities may also decline in value due to general market and economic movements and trends, including adverse changes to credit markets, or as a result of other events such as geopolitical events, natural disasters, or widespread pandemics (such as COVID-19) or other adverse public health developments.
Equity Risk –  The risk that the price of equity or equity related securities may decline due to changes in a company’s financial condition and overall market and economic conditions.
Dividend Risk –  Income provided by the Fund may be affected by changes in the dividend policies of the companies in which the Fund invests and the capital resources available for such payments at such companies. At times, the performance of dividend-paying companies may lag the performance of other companies or the broader market as a whole. In addition, the dividend payments of the companies in which the Fund invests may vary over time, and there is no guarantee that a company will pay a dividend at all.
Large Cap Securities Risk –  The securities of large market capitalization companies may underperform other segments of the market because such companies may be less responsive to competitive challenges and opportunities and may be unable to attain high growth rates during periods of economic expansion.
Value Investing Style Risk –  Using a value investing style to select investments involves special risks. Overlooked or otherwise undervalued securities entail a significant risk of never attaining their potential value or may even be overpriced. Also, the value investing style may over time go in and out of favor. At times when the value investing style is out of favor, the Fund may underperform other equity funds that use different investing styles. “Value” securities can be undervalued by the market for long periods of time.
Active Investment Management Risk –  The risk that, if the sub-adviser’s investment strategy does not perform as expected, the Fund could underperform its peers or lose money. Although the sub-adviser considers several factors when making investment decisions, the sub-adviser may not evaluate every factor prior to investing in a company or issuer, and the sub-adviser may determine that certain factors are more significant than others.
Foreign Investments Risk –  Investments in foreign securities may be riskier, more volatile, and less liquid than investments in U.S. securities. Differences between the U.S. and foreign regulatory regimes and securities markets, including the less stringent investor protection, less stringent accounting, corporate governance, financial reporting and disclosure standards of some foreign markets, as well as political and economic developments in foreign countries and regions and the U.S. (including the imposition of sanctions, tariffs, or other governmental restrictions), may affect the value of the Fund’s investments in foreign securities. Changes in currency exchange rates may also adversely affect the Fund’s foreign investments.
Currency Risk –  The risk that the value of the Fund’s investments in foreign securities or currencies will be affected by the value of the applicable currency relative to the U.S. dollar. When the Fund sells a foreign currency or foreign currency denominated security, its value may be worth less in U.S. dollars even if the investment increases in value in its local market. U.S. dollar-denominated securities of foreign issuers may also be affected by currency risk, as the revenue earned by issuers of these securities may also be affected by changes in the issuer’s local currency.
Sector Risk –  To the extent the Fund invests more heavily in a particular sector or sectors, its performance will be especially sensitive to developments that significantly affect those sectors. Individual sectors may be more volatile, and may perform differently, from the broader market.
ESG Integration Risk –  Integrating ESG analysis into the investment process carries the risk that the Fund may perform differently from, and may underperform, funds that do not integrate ESG into their analysis, or funds that evaluate different ESG characteristics. ESG characteristics are not the only factors considered and as a result, the Fund’s investments may not have favorable ESG characteristics or high ESG ratings.
17

Securities Lending Risk –  The Fund may lose money because the borrower of the loaned securities fails to return the securities in a timely manner or at all. The Fund could also lose money in the event of a decline in the value of the collateral provided for loaned securities or a decline in the value of any investments made with cash collateral.
Large Shareholder Transaction Risk –  The Fund may experience adverse effects when certain large shareholders redeem or purchase large amounts of shares of the Fund. Such redemptions may cause the Fund to sell securities at times when it would not otherwise do so or borrow money (at a cost to the Fund), which may negatively impact the Fund’s performance and liquidity. Similarly, large purchases may adversely affect the Fund’s performance to the extent that the Fund is delayed in investing new cash and is required to maintain a larger cash position than it ordinarily would. These transactions may also increase transaction costs.
The Fund is subject to certain other risks. For more information regarding risks and investments, please see “Additional Information Regarding Investment Strategies and Risks” and “More Information About Risks” in the Fund’s statutory prospectus.
PAST PERFORMANCE. The performance information below indicates the risks of investing in the Fund. Keep in mind that past performance does not indicate future results. Updated performance information is available at hartfordfunds.com. The returns in the bar chart and table:
Assume reinvestment of all dividends and distributions
Would be lower if the effect of sales charges or other fees that may be applied at the contract or plan level were included.
The bar chart:
Shows how the Fund’s total return has varied from year to year
Shows the returns of Class IA shares. Returns for Class IB shares differ only to the extent that the classes do not have the same expenses.
Total returns by calendar year
During the periods shown in the chart above:
Returns
Quarter Ended
Best Quarter Return
15.09%
June 30, 2020
Worst Quarter Return
-22.87%
March 31, 2020
Average Annual Total Returns. The table below shows returns for the Fund over time compared to those of two broad-based market indices.
Average annual total returns for periods ending December 31, 2022
Share Classes
1 Year
5 Years
10 Years
Class IA
-8.93%
9.54%
12.19%
Class IB
-9.15%
9.27%
11.91%
S&P 500 Index (reflects no deduction for fees, expenses or taxes)
-18.11%
9.42%
12.56%
Russell 1000 Value Index (reflects no deduction for fees, expenses or taxes)
-7.54%
6.67%
10.29%
18

MANAGEMENT. The Fund’s investment manager is Hartford Funds Management Company, LLC. The Fund’s sub-adviser is Wellington Management.
Portfolio Manager
Title
Involved with
Fund Since
Matthew G. Baker
Senior Managing Director and Equity Portfolio Manager
2004
Nataliya Kofman
Senior Managing Director and Equity Portfolio Manager
2006
Brian J. Schmeer, CFA
Vice President and Equity Research Analyst
2016
PURCHASE AND SALE OF FUND SHARES. Class IA shares and Class IB shares of the Fund generally may only be purchased or redeemed through variable contracts and qualified pension plans or retirement plans. Class IA shares and Class IB shares of the Fund are closed to certain qualified pension and retirement plans. For more information, please see the section entitled “Further Information on the Funds - Purchase and Redemption of Fund Shares” in the Fund’s statutory prospectus.
Class IA shares and Class IB shares of the Fund do not have any initial or subsequent investment minimums. Any initial or subsequent investment requirements and redemption procedures are governed by the applicable variable contract or plan through which you invest.
TAX INFORMATION. Under current law, owners of variable contracts and qualified pension or retirement plan participants that have invested in the Fund are not subject to federal income tax on Fund earnings and distributions or on gains realized upon the sale or redemption of Fund shares until such amounts are withdrawn from the variable contract or pension or retirement plan. You should review your variable contract prospectus (or other disclosure document) or plan documents for more information.
PAYMENTS TO BROKER-DEALERS AND OTHER FINANCIAL INTERMEDIARIES. The Fund and its related companies may make payments to insurance companies (or their affiliates), plan sponsors and other financial intermediaries for distribution and/or other services. These payments may create a conflict of interest by influencing the financial intermediary and its employees to include the Fund as an investment option or to recommend the Fund over another investment option. Ask your financial intermediary or visit your financial intermediary’s website for more information.
19

Hartford Healthcare HLS Fund Summary Section
INVESTMENT OBJECTIVE. The Fund seeks long-term capital appreciation.
YOUR EXPENSES. The table below describes the fees and expenses that you may pay if you buy, hold, and sell shares of the Fund. Please note that fees and expenses in this table and the example below do not include fees and expenses that will be applied at the variable contract level or by a qualified pension or retirement plan and would be higher if such fees and expenses were included. You should review your variable contract prospectus (or other disclosure document) or plan documents for more information on those fees and expenses.
Annual Fund Operating Expenses (expenses that you pay each year as a percentage of the value of your investment):
Share Classes
IA
IB
Management fees
0.85%
0.85%
Distribution and/or service (12b-1) fees
None
0.25%
Other expenses
0.06%
0.06%
Total annual fund operating expenses
0.91%
1.16%
Example. The example below is intended to help you compare the cost of investing in the Fund with the cost of investing in other mutual funds. The example assumes that:
You invest $10,000
Your investment has a 5% return each year
The Fund’s operating expenses remain the same
You reinvest all dividends and distributions
Your actual costs may be higher or lower. Based on these assumptions, you would pay the following expenses whether or not you were to redeem your investment at the end of each time period indicated:
Share Classes
Year 1
Year 3
Year 5
Year 10
IA
$93
$290
$504
$1,120
IB
$118
$368
$638
$1,409
Portfolio Turnover. The Fund pays transaction costs, such as commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or “turns over” its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover rate may indicate higher transaction costs. These costs, which are not reflected in annual fund operating expenses or in the example, affect the Fund’s performance. During the fiscal year ended December 31, 2022, the Fund’s portfolio turnover rate was 34% of the average value of its portfolio.
PRINCIPAL INVESTMENT STRATEGY. Under normal circumstances, the Fund invests at least 80% of its assets in the equity securities of health care-related companies worldwide as selected by the sub-adviser, Wellington Management Company LLP (“Wellington Management”). Wellington Management’s investment process focuses on stock selection through fundamental analysis. The Fund takes a broad approach to investing in the health care sector. The Fund may invest in health-related companies, including companies in the pharmaceuticals, biotechnology, medical delivery, medical products, medical services, managed health care, health information services and emerging health-related subsectors. The Fund’s assets will be allocated across the major subsectors of the health care sector, with some representation typically maintained in each major subsector. The Fund will normally invest at least 25% of its total assets, in the aggregate, in the following industries: pharmaceuticals and biotechnology, medical products and health services. The Fund will invest in securities of issuers located in a number of different countries throughout the world, one of which may be the United States; however, the Fund has no limit on the amount of assets that may be invested in each country. The Fund may invest in securities of companies of any market capitalization.
PRINCIPAL RISKS. The principal risks of investing in the Fund are described below. When you sell your shares they may be worth more or less than what you paid for them, which means that you could lose money as a result of your investment. An investment in the Fund is not a bank deposit and is not insured or guaranteed by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation or any other government agency. As with any fund, there is no guarantee that the Fund will achieve its investment objective.
20

Market Risk –  Market risk is the risk that one or more markets in which the Fund invests will go down in value, including the possibility that the markets will go down sharply and unpredictably. Securities of a company may decline in value due to its financial prospects and activities, including certain operational impacts, such as data breaches and cybersecurity attacks. Securities may also decline in value due to general market and economic movements and trends, including adverse changes to credit markets, or as a result of other events such as geopolitical events, natural disasters, or widespread pandemics (such as COVID-19) or other adverse public health developments.
Healthcare Concentration Risk –  Developments affecting the healthcare sector, including the pharmaceuticals and biotechnology, medical products, and health services industries, may have a disproportionate impact on the Fund. The Fund’s focus on healthcare-related securities increases its exposure to the risks associated with the healthcare sector, including changes in laws or regulations, lawsuits and regulatory proceedings, changes in funding or subsidies, patent and intellectual property considerations, intense competition and rapid technological change, the long and costly process for obtaining product approval by government agencies, the potential for obsolescence, and the rising cost of medical products and services (especially for companies dependent upon a relatively limited number of products or services). The success of pharmaceutical companies is highly dependent on the development, procurement and marketing of drugs. Demand for biotechnology products and services may fluctuate due to unexpected events, including but not limited to global health crises like pandemics which could strain health care systems and alter health care needs. Health care providers may have difficulty obtaining staff to deliver services. As a result of the Fund’s focus on the healthcare sector, the Fund may be subject to increased price volatility and may be more susceptible to adverse developments than a fund that invests more widely.
Equity Risk –  The risk that the price of equity or equity related securities may decline due to changes in a company’s financial condition and overall market and economic conditions.
Mid Cap and Small Cap Securities Risk –  Investments in mid- and small-capitalization companies involve greater risks than investments in larger, more established companies. Many of these companies are young and have limited operating or business history. These securities may be subject to more abrupt or erratic price movements and may lack sufficient market liquidity, and these issuers often face greater business risks, including the risk of bankruptcy.
Large Cap Securities Risk –  The securities of large market capitalization companies may underperform other segments of the market because such companies may be less responsive to competitive challenges and opportunities and may be unable to attain high growth rates during periods of economic expansion.
Active Investment Management Risk –  The risk that, if the sub-adviser’s investment strategy does not perform as expected, the Fund could underperform its peers or lose money. Although the sub-adviser considers several factors when making investment decisions, the sub-adviser may not evaluate every factor prior to investing in a company or issuer, and the sub-adviser may determine that certain factors are more significant than others.
Foreign Investments Risk –  Investments in foreign securities may be riskier, more volatile, and less liquid than investments in U.S. securities. Differences between the U.S. and foreign regulatory regimes and securities markets, including the less stringent investor protection, less stringent accounting, corporate governance, financial reporting and disclosure standards of some foreign markets, as well as political and economic developments in foreign countries and regions and the U.S. (including the imposition of sanctions, tariffs, or other governmental restrictions), may affect the value of the Fund’s investments in foreign securities. Changes in currency exchange rates may also adversely affect the Fund’s foreign investments.
Emerging Markets Risk –  The risks related to investing in foreign securities are generally greater with respect to investments in companies that conduct their principal business activities in emerging markets or whose securities are traded principally on exchanges in emerging markets. The risks of investing in emerging markets include risks of illiquidity, increased price volatility, smaller market capitalizations, less government regulation and oversight, less extensive and less frequent accounting, financial, auditing and other reporting requirements, significant delays in settlement of trades, risk of loss resulting from problems in share registration and custody and substantial economic and political disruptions. In addition, the imposition of exchange controls (including repatriation restrictions), sanctions, confiscations, trade restrictions (including tariffs) and other government restrictions by the United States and other governments may also result in losses. Frontier markets are those emerging markets that are considered to be among the smallest, least mature and least liquid, and as a result, the risks of investing in emerging markets are magnified in frontier markets.
21

Currency Risk –  The risk that the value of the Fund’s investments in foreign securities or currencies will be affected by the value of the applicable currency relative to the U.S. dollar. When the Fund sells a foreign currency or foreign currency denominated security, its value may be worth less in U.S. dollars even if the investment increases in value in its local market. U.S. dollar-denominated securities of foreign issuers may also be affected by currency risk, as the revenue earned by issuers of these securities may also be affected by changes in the issuer’s local currency.
Securities Lending Risk –  The Fund may lose money because the borrower of the loaned securities fails to return the securities in a timely manner or at all. The Fund could also lose money in the event of a decline in the value of the collateral provided for loaned securities or a decline in the value of any investments made with cash collateral.
Large Shareholder Transaction Risk –  The Fund may experience adverse effects when certain large shareholders redeem or purchase large amounts of shares of the Fund. Such redemptions may cause the Fund to sell securities at times when it would not otherwise do so or borrow money (at a cost to the Fund), which may negatively impact the Fund’s performance and liquidity. Similarly, large purchases may adversely affect the Fund’s performance to the extent that the Fund is delayed in investing new cash and is required to maintain a larger cash position than it ordinarily would. These transactions may also increase transaction costs.
The Fund is subject to certain other risks. For more information regarding risks and investments, please see “Additional Information Regarding Investment Strategies and Risks” and “More Information About Risks” in the Fund’s statutory prospectus.
PAST PERFORMANCE. The performance information below indicates the risks of investing in the Fund. Keep in mind that past performance does not indicate future results. Updated performance information is available at hartfordfunds.com. The returns in the bar chart and table:
Assume reinvestment of all dividends and distributions
Would be lower if the effect of sales charges or other fees that may be applied at the contract or plan level were included.
The bar chart:
Shows how the Fund’s total return has varied from year to year
Shows the returns of Class IA shares. Returns for Class IB shares differ only to the extent that the classes do not have the same expenses.
Total returns by calendar year
During the periods shown in the chart above:
Returns
Quarter Ended
Best Quarter Return
21.04%
June 30, 2020
Worst Quarter Return
-15.60%
December 31, 2018
22

Average Annual Total Returns. The table below shows returns for the Fund over time compared to those of a broad-based sector index and a broad-based market index.
Average annual total returns for periods ending December 31, 2022
Share Classes
1 Year
5 Years
10 Years
Class IA
-11.24%
9.40%
14.41%
Class IB
-11.47%
9.13%
14.13%
S&P Composite 1500 Health Care Index (reflects no deduction for fees, expenses or taxes)
-3.31%
12.27%
15.09%
S&P 500 Index (reflects no deduction for fees, expenses or taxes)
-18.11%
9.42%
12.56%
MANAGEMENT. The Fund’s investment manager is Hartford Funds Management Company, LLC. The Fund’s sub-adviser is Wellington Management. The Fund is managed by a team of global industry analysts. Each member of the team manages a portion of the Fund based upon their specific areas of coverage within the health care sector. The allocations to each sub-sector are determined by the team with the S&P Composite 1500 Health Care Index sub-industry classifications providing a framework for such allocations.
Portfolio Manager
Title
Involved with
Fund Since
Rebecca D. Sykes, CFA
Senior Managing Director and Global Industry Analyst
2007
Wen Shi, PhD, CFA
Managing Director and Global Industry Analyst
2015
David M. Khtikian, CFA
Managing Director and Global Industry Analyst
2013
Fayyaz Mujtaba
Managing Director and Global Industry Analyst
2013
PURCHASE AND SALE OF FUND SHARES. Class IA shares and Class IB shares of the Fund generally may only be purchased or redeemed through variable contracts and qualified pension plans or retirement plans. Class IA shares and Class IB shares of the Fund are closed to certain qualified pension and retirement plans. For more information, please see the section entitled “Further Information on the Funds - Purchase and Redemption of Fund Shares” in the Fund’s statutory prospectus.
Class IA shares and Class IB shares of the Fund do not have any initial or subsequent investment minimums. Any initial or subsequent investment requirements and redemption procedures are governed by the applicable variable contract or plan through which you invest.
TAX INFORMATION. Under current law, owners of variable contracts and qualified pension or retirement plan participants that have invested in the Fund are not subject to federal income tax on Fund earnings and distributions or on gains realized upon the sale or redemption of Fund shares until such amounts are withdrawn from the variable contract or pension or retirement plan. You should review your variable contract prospectus (or other disclosure document) or plan documents for more information.
PAYMENTS TO BROKER-DEALERS AND OTHER FINANCIAL INTERMEDIARIES. The Fund and its related companies may make payments to insurance companies (or their affiliates), plan sponsors and other financial intermediaries for distribution and/or other services. These payments may create a conflict of interest by influencing the financial intermediary and its employees to include the Fund as an investment option or to recommend the Fund over another investment option. Ask your financial intermediary or visit your financial intermediary’s website for more information.
23

Hartford International Opportunities HLS Fund Summary Section
INVESTMENT OBJECTIVE. The Fund seeks long-term growth of capital.
YOUR EXPENSES. The table below describes the fees and expenses that you may pay if you buy, hold, and sell shares of the Fund. Please note that fees and expenses in this table and the example below do not include fees and expenses that will be applied at the variable contract level or by a qualified pension or retirement plan and would be higher if such fees and expenses were included. You should review your variable contract prospectus (or other disclosure document) or plan documents for more information on those fees and expenses.
Annual Fund Operating Expenses (expenses that you pay each year as a percentage of the value of your investment):
Share Classes
IA
IB
Management fees
0.71%
0.71%
Distribution and/or service (12b-1) fees
None
0.25%
Other expenses
0.04%
0.04%
Total annual fund operating expenses
0.75%
1.00%
Example. The example below is intended to help you compare the cost of investing in the Fund with the cost of investing in other mutual funds. The example assumes that:
You invest $10,000
Your investment has a 5% return each year
The Fund’s operating expenses remain the same
You reinvest all dividends and distributions
Your actual costs may be higher or lower. Based on these assumptions, you would pay the following expenses whether or not you were to redeem your investment at the end of each time period indicated:
Share Classes
Year 1
Year 3
Year 5
Year 10
IA
$77
$240
$417
$930
IB
$102
$318
$552
$1,225
Portfolio Turnover. The Fund pays transaction costs, such as commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or “turns over” its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover rate may indicate higher transaction costs. These costs, which are not reflected in annual fund operating expenses or in the example, affect the Fund’s performance. During the fiscal year ended December 31, 2022, the Fund’s portfolio turnover rate was 91% of the average value of its portfolio.
PRINCIPAL INVESTMENT STRATEGY. The Fund normally invests at least 65% of its net assets in equity securities, including non-dollar securities, of foreign issuers. The Fund diversifies its investments among a number of different countries throughout the world, with no limit on the amount of assets that may be invested in each country. The securities in which the Fund invests are denominated in both U.S. dollars and foreign currencies and generally are traded in foreign markets. The Fund may invest in companies domiciled in emerging markets as a percentage of its net assets up to the greater of: (a) 25% or (b) the weight of emerging markets in the MSCI ACWI ex USA Index plus 10%. The Fund may invest in opportunities across the market capitalization spectrum, but under normal circumstances invests primarily in mid and large capitalization companies. The Fund may trade securities actively.
The sub-adviser, Wellington Management Company LLP (“Wellington Management”), seeks to invest in companies with underappreciated assets, improving return on capital and/or stocks that it believes are mispriced by the market due to short-term issues. Wellington Management conducts fundamental research on individual companies to identify securities for purchase or sale. As part of its fundamental analysis, Wellington Management evaluates a company’s business environment, management quality, balance sheet, income statement, anticipated earnings, revenues and dividends, and other related measures or indicators of value. Wellington Management also integrates the evaluation of financially material environmental, social, and/or governance (“ESG”) characteristics (where available for a company) into its fundamental analysis. ESG characteristics are one of several factors that contribute to Wellington Management’s
24

overall evaluation of the risk and return potential of a company. Portfolio construction is driven primarily by bottom-up stock selection, with region, country and sector weightings being secondary factors. Based on market or economic conditions, the Fund may, through its normal bottom-up stock selection process, focus in one or more sectors of the market.
PRINCIPAL RISKS. The principal risks of investing in the Fund are described below. When you sell your shares they may be worth more or less than what you paid for them, which means that you could lose money as a result of your investment. An investment in the Fund is not a bank deposit and is not insured or guaranteed by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation or any other government agency. As with any fund, there is no guarantee that the Fund will achieve its investment objective.
Market Risk –  Market risk is the risk that one or more markets in which the Fund invests will go down in value, including the possibility that the markets will go down sharply and unpredictably. Securities of a company may decline in value due to its financial prospects and activities, including certain operational impacts, such as data breaches and cybersecurity attacks. Securities may also decline in value due to general market and economic movements and trends, including adverse changes to credit markets, or as a result of other events such as geopolitical events, natural disasters, or widespread pandemics (such as COVID-19) or other adverse public health developments.
Foreign Investments Risk –  Investments in foreign securities may be riskier, more volatile, and less liquid than investments in U.S. securities. Differences between the U.S. and foreign regulatory regimes and securities markets, including the less stringent investor protection, less stringent accounting, corporate governance, financial reporting and disclosure standards of some foreign markets, as well as political and economic developments in foreign countries and regions and the U.S. (including the imposition of sanctions, tariffs, or other governmental restrictions), may affect the value of the Fund’s investments in foreign securities. Changes in currency exchange rates may also adversely affect the Fund’s foreign investments.
Emerging Markets Risk –  The risks related to investing in foreign securities are generally greater with respect to investments in companies that conduct their principal business activities in emerging markets or whose securities are traded principally on exchanges in emerging markets. The risks of investing in emerging markets include risks of illiquidity, increased price volatility, smaller market capitalizations, less government regulation and oversight, less extensive and less frequent accounting, financial, auditing and other reporting requirements, significant delays in settlement of trades, risk of loss resulting from problems in share registration and custody and substantial economic and political disruptions. In addition, the imposition of exchange controls (including repatriation restrictions), sanctions, confiscations, trade restrictions (including tariffs) and other government restrictions by the United States and other governments may also result in losses. Frontier markets are those emerging markets that are considered to be among the smallest, least mature and least liquid, and as a result, the risks of investing in emerging markets are magnified in frontier markets.
Currency Risk –  The risk that the value of the Fund’s investments in foreign securities or currencies will be affected by the value of the applicable currency relative to the U.S. dollar. When the Fund sells a foreign currency or foreign currency denominated security, its value may be worth less in U.S. dollars even if the investment increases in value in its local market. U.S. dollar-denominated securities of foreign issuers may also be affected by currency risk, as the revenue earned by issuers of these securities may also be affected by changes in the issuer’s local currency.
Equity Risk –  The risk that the price of equity or equity related securities may decline due to changes in a company’s financial condition and overall market and economic conditions.
Mid-Cap Securities Risk –  The securities of mid-capitalization companies generally trade in lower volumes and are generally subject to greater and less predictable price changes than the securities of larger capitalization companies.
Large Cap Securities Risk –  The securities of large market capitalization companies may underperform other segments of the market because such companies may be less responsive to competitive challenges and opportunities and may be unable to attain high growth rates during periods of economic expansion.
Active Investment Management Risk –  The risk that, if the sub-adviser’s investment strategy does not perform as expected, the Fund could underperform its peers or lose money. Although the sub-adviser considers several factors when making investment decisions, the sub-adviser may not evaluate every factor prior to investing in a company or issuer, and the sub-adviser may determine that certain factors are more significant than others.
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Active Trading Risk –  Active trading could increase the Fund’s transaction costs (thus adversely affecting performance).
Sector Risk –  To the extent the Fund invests more heavily in a particular sector or sectors, its performance will be especially sensitive to developments that significantly affect those sectors. Individual sectors may be more volatile, and may perform differently, from the broader market.
Regional/Country Focus Risk –  To the extent that the Fund focuses its investments in a particular geographic region or country, the Fund may be subject to increased currency, political, regulatory, economic and other risks associated with that region or country. A natural or other disaster could occur in a geographic region in which the Fund invests, which could affect the economy or particular business operations of companies in the specific geographic region. As a result, the Fund may be subject to greater price volatility and risk of loss than a fund holding more geographically diverse investments.
ESG Integration Risk –  Integrating ESG analysis into the investment process carries the risk that the Fund may perform differently from, and may underperform, funds that do not integrate ESG into their analysis, or funds that evaluate different ESG characteristics. ESG characteristics are not the only factors considered and as a result, the Fund’s investments may not have favorable ESG characteristics or high ESG ratings.
Securities Lending Risk –  The Fund may lose money because the borrower of the loaned securities fails to return the securities in a timely manner or at all. The Fund could also lose money in the event of a decline in the value of the collateral provided for loaned securities or a decline in the value of any investments made with cash collateral.
Large Shareholder Transaction Risk –  The Fund may experience adverse effects when certain large shareholders redeem or purchase large amounts of shares of the Fund. Such redemptions may cause the Fund to sell securities at times when it would not otherwise do so or borrow money (at a cost to the Fund), which may negatively impact the Fund’s performance and liquidity. Similarly, large purchases may adversely affect the Fund’s performance to the extent that the Fund is delayed in investing new cash and is required to maintain a larger cash position than it ordinarily would. These transactions may also increase transaction costs.
The Fund is subject to certain other risks. For more information regarding risks and investments, please see “Additional Information Regarding Investment Strategies and Risks” and “More Information About Risks” in the Fund’s statutory prospectus.
PAST PERFORMANCE. The performance information below indicates the risks of investing in the Fund. Keep in mind that past performance does not indicate future results. Updated performance information is available at hartfordfunds.com. The returns in the bar chart and table:
Assume reinvestment of all dividends and distributions
Would be lower if the effect of sales charges or other fees that may be applied at the contract or plan level were included.
The bar chart:
Shows how the Fund’s total return has varied from year to year
Shows the returns of Class IA shares. Returns for Class IB shares differ only to the extent that the classes do not have the same expenses.
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Total returns by calendar year
During the periods shown in the chart above:
Returns
Quarter Ended
Best Quarter Return
20.95%
June 30, 2020
Worst Quarter Return
-22.16%
March 31, 2020
Average Annual Total Returns. The table below shows returns for the Fund over time compared to those of a broad-based market index.
Average annual total returns for periods ending December 31, 2022
Share Classes
1 Year
5 Years
10 Years
Class IA
-18.14%
1.78%
5.13%
Class IB
-18.32%
1.53%
4.87%
MSCI ACWI ex USA Index (Net) (reflects reinvested dividends net of withholding taxes but
reflects no deduction for fees, expenses or other taxes)
-16.00%
0.88%
3.80%
MANAGEMENT. The Fund’s investment manager is Hartford Funds Management Company, LLC. The Fund’s sub-adviser is Wellington Management.
Portfolio Manager
Title
Involved with
Fund Since
Nicolas M. Choumenkovitch*
Senior Managing Director and Equity Portfolio Manager
2000
Tara C. Stilwell, CFA
Senior Managing Director and Equity Portfolio Manager
2008
*
Nicolas M. Choumenkovitch announced his plan to retire and withdraw from the partnership of Wellington Management’s parent company, and effective June 30, 2024, he will no longer serve as a portfolio manager for the Fund. Mr. Choumenkovitch’s portfolio management responsibilities will transition to Tara C. Stilwell, CFA in the months leading up to his departure.
PURCHASE AND SALE OF FUND SHARES. Class IA shares and Class IB shares of the Fund generally may only be purchased or redeemed through variable contracts and qualified pension plans or retirement plans. Class IA shares and Class IB shares of the Fund are closed to certain qualified pension and retirement plans. For more information, please see the section entitled “Further Information on the Funds - Purchase and Redemption of Fund Shares” in the Fund’s statutory prospectus.
Class IA shares and Class IB shares of the Fund do not have any initial or subsequent investment minimums. Any initial or subsequent investment requirements and redemption procedures are governed by the applicable variable contract or plan through which you invest.
TAX INFORMATION. Under current law, owners of variable contracts and qualified pension or retirement plan participants that have invested in the Fund are not subject to federal income tax on Fund earnings and distributions or on gains realized upon the sale or redemption of Fund shares until such amounts are withdrawn from the variable contract or pension or retirement plan. You should review your variable contract prospectus (or other disclosure document) or plan documents for more information.
27

PAYMENTS TO BROKER-DEALERS AND OTHER FINANCIAL INTERMEDIARIES. The Fund and its related companies may make payments to insurance companies (or their affiliates), plan sponsors and other financial intermediaries for distribution and/or other services. These payments may create a conflict of interest by influencing the financial intermediary and its employees to include the Fund as an investment option or to recommend the Fund over another investment option. Ask your financial intermediary or visit your financial intermediary’s website for more information.
28

Hartford MidCap HLS Fund Summary Section
INVESTMENT OBJECTIVE. The Fund seeks long-term growth of capital.
YOUR EXPENSES. The table below describes the fees and expenses that you may pay if you buy, hold, and sell shares of the Fund. Please note that fees and expenses in this table and the example below do not include fees and expenses that will be applied at the variable contract level or by a qualified pension or retirement plan and would be higher if such fees and expenses were included. You should review your variable contract prospectus (or other disclosure document) or plan documents for more information on those fees and expenses.
Annual Fund Operating Expenses (expenses that you pay each year as a percentage of the value of your investment):
Share Classes
IA
IB
Management fees
0.69%
0.69%
Distribution and/or service (12b-1) fees
None
0.25%
Other expenses
0.03%
0.03%
Total annual fund operating expenses
0.72%
0.97%
Example. The example below is intended to help you compare the cost of investing in the Fund with the cost of investing in other mutual funds. The example assumes that:
You invest $10,000
Your investment has a 5% return each year
The Fund’s operating expenses remain the same
You reinvest all dividends and distributions
Your actual costs may be higher or lower. Based on these assumptions, you would pay the following expenses whether or not you were to redeem your investment at the end of each time period indicated:
Share Classes
Year 1
Year 3
Year 5
Year 10
IA
$74
$230
$401
$894
IB
$99
$309
$536
$1,190
Portfolio Turnover. The Fund pays transaction costs, such as commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or “turns over” its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover rate may indicate higher transaction costs. These costs, which are not reflected in annual fund operating expenses or in the example, affect the Fund’s performance. During the fiscal year ended December 31, 2022, the Fund’s portfolio turnover rate was 44% of the average value of its portfolio.
PRINCIPAL INVESTMENT STRATEGY. The Fund seeks its investment objective by investing primarily in stocks selected by the sub-adviser, Wellington Management Company LLP (“Wellington Management”), on the basis of potential for capital appreciation. Under normal circumstances, the Fund invests at least 80% of its assets in common stocks of mid-capitalization companies. Wellington Management favors companies that it believes are high-quality. The key characteristics of high-quality companies include a leadership position within an industry, a strong balance sheet, a high return on equity, and/or a strong management team. Wellington Management uses fundamental analysis to evaluate a security for purchase or sale by the Fund. Fundamental analysis of a company involves the assessment of such factors as its business environment, management quality, balance sheet, income statement, anticipated earnings, revenues and dividends, and other related measures and indicators of value. Wellington Management also integrates the evaluation of financially material environmental, social, and/or governance (“ESG”) characteristics (where available for a company) into its fundamental analysis. ESG characteristics are one of several factors that contribute to Wellington Management’s overall evaluation of the risk and return potential of a company. The Fund’s portfolio seeks to be diversified across the sectors included in the S&P MidCap 400 Index. The amount the Fund invests in any one sector may vary and the Fund is not required to invest in all sectors. Based on market or economic conditions, the Fund may, through its normal bottom-up stock selection process, focus in one or more sectors of the market.
The Fund defines mid-capitalization companies as companies with market capitalizations within the collective range of the Russell Midcap and S&P MidCap 400 Indices. As of December 31, 2022, this range was approximately $306.42 million to $52.82 billion. The market capitalization range of these indices changes over time.
29

PRINCIPAL RISKS. The principal risks of investing in the Fund are described below. When you sell your shares they may be worth more or less than what you paid for them, which means that you could lose money as a result of your investment. An investment in the Fund is not a bank deposit and is not insured or guaranteed by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation or any other government agency. As with any fund, there is no guarantee that the Fund will achieve its investment objective.
Market Risk –  Market risk is the risk that one or more markets in which the Fund invests will go down in value, including the possibility that the markets will go down sharply and unpredictably. Securities of a company may decline in value due to its financial prospects and activities, including certain operational impacts, such as data breaches and cybersecurity attacks. Securities may also decline in value due to general market and economic movements and trends, including adverse changes to credit markets, or as a result of other events such as geopolitical events, natural disasters, or widespread pandemics (such as COVID-19) or other adverse public health developments.
Equity Risk –  The risk that the price of equity or equity related securities may decline due to changes in a company’s financial condition and overall market and economic conditions.
Mid-Cap Securities Risk –  The securities of mid-capitalization companies generally trade in lower volumes and are generally subject to greater and less predictable price changes than the securities of larger capitalization companies.
Active Investment Management Risk –  The risk that, if the sub-adviser’s investment strategy does not perform as expected, the Fund could underperform its peers or lose money. Although the sub-adviser considers several factors when making investment decisions, the sub-adviser may not evaluate every factor prior to investing in a company or issuer, and the sub-adviser may determine that certain factors are more significant than others.
Sector Risk –  To the extent the Fund invests more heavily in a particular sector or sectors, its performance will be especially sensitive to developments that significantly affect those sectors. Individual sectors may be more volatile, and may perform differently, from the broader market.
ESG Integration Risk –  Integrating ESG analysis into the investment process carries the risk that the Fund may perform differently from, and may underperform, funds that do not integrate ESG into their analysis, or funds that evaluate different ESG characteristics. ESG characteristics are not the only factors considered and as a result, the Fund’s investments may not have favorable ESG characteristics or high ESG ratings.
Securities Lending Risk –  The Fund may lose money because the borrower of the loaned securities fails to return the securities in a timely manner or at all. The Fund could also lose money in the event of a decline in the value of the collateral provided for loaned securities or a decline in the value of any investments made with cash collateral.
Large Shareholder Transaction Risk –  The Fund may experience adverse effects when certain large shareholders redeem or purchase large amounts of shares of the Fund. Such redemptions may cause the Fund to sell securities at times when it would not otherwise do so or borrow money (at a cost to the Fund), which may negatively impact the Fund’s performance and liquidity. Similarly, large purchases may adversely affect the Fund’s performance to the extent that the Fund is delayed in investing new cash and is required to maintain a larger cash position than it ordinarily would. These transactions may also increase transaction costs.
The Fund is subject to certain other risks. For more information regarding risks and investments, please see “Additional Information Regarding Investment Strategies and Risks” and “More Information About Risks” in the Fund’s statutory prospectus.
PAST PERFORMANCE. The performance information below indicates the risks of investing in the Fund. Keep in mind that past performance does not indicate future results. Updated performance information is available at hartfordfunds.com. The returns in the bar chart and table:
Assume reinvestment of all dividends and distributions
Would be lower if the effect of sales charges or other fees that may be applied at the contract or plan level were included.
The bar chart:
Shows how the Fund’s total return has varied from year to year
Shows the returns of Class IA shares. Returns for Class IB shares differ only to the extent that the classes do not have the same expenses.
30

Total returns by calendar year
During the periods shown in the chart above:
Returns
Quarter Ended
Best Quarter Return
26.17%
December 31, 2020
Worst Quarter Return
-24.21%
March 31, 2020
Average Annual Total Returns. The table below shows returns for the Fund over time compared to those of a broad-based market index.
Average annual total returns for periods ending December 31, 2022
Share Classes
1 Year
5 Years
10 Years
Class IA
-24.30%
5.06%
10.93%
Class IB
-24.46%
4.80%
10.66%
S&P MidCap 400 Index (reflects no deduction for fees, expenses or taxes)
-13.06%
6.71%
10.78%
MANAGEMENT. The Fund’s investment manager is Hartford Funds Management Company, LLC. The Fund’s sub-adviser is Wellington Management.
Portfolio Manager
Title
Involved with
Fund Since
Philip W. Ruedi, CFA
Senior Managing Director and Equity Portfolio Manager
2004
Mark A. Whitaker, CFA
Senior Managing Director and Equity Portfolio Manager
2004
PURCHASE AND SALE OF FUND SHARES. Class IA shares and Class IB shares of the Fund generally may only be purchased or redeemed through variable contracts and qualified pension plans or retirement plans. Class IA shares and Class IB shares of the Fund are closed to certain qualified pension and retirement plans. For more information, please see the section entitled “Further Information on the Funds - Purchase and Redemption of Fund Shares” in the Fund’s statutory prospectus.
Class IA shares and Class IB shares of the Fund do not have any initial or subsequent investment minimums. Any initial or subsequent investment requirements and redemption procedures are governed by the applicable variable contract or plan through which you invest.
TAX INFORMATION. Under current law, owners of variable contracts and qualified pension or retirement plan participants that have invested in the Fund are not subject to federal income tax on Fund earnings and distributions or on gains realized upon the sale or redemption of Fund shares until such amounts are withdrawn from the variable contract or pension or retirement plan. You should review your variable contract prospectus (or other disclosure document) or plan documents for more information.
PAYMENTS TO BROKER-DEALERS AND OTHER FINANCIAL INTERMEDIARIES. The Fund and its related companies may make payments to insurance companies (or their affiliates), plan sponsors and other financial intermediaries for distribution and/or other services. These payments may create a conflict of interest by influencing the financial intermediary and its employees to include the Fund as an investment option or to recommend the Fund over another investment option. Ask your financial intermediary or visit your financial intermediary’s website for more information.
31

Hartford Small Cap Growth HLS Fund Summary Section
INVESTMENT OBJECTIVE. The Fund seeks long-term capital appreciation.
YOUR EXPENSES. The table below describes the fees and expenses that you may pay if you buy, hold, and sell shares of the Fund. Please note that fees and expenses in this table and the example below do not include fees and expenses that will be applied at the variable contract level or by a qualified pension or retirement plan and would be higher if such fees and expenses were included. You should review your variable contract prospectus (or other disclosure document) or plan documents for more information on those fees and expenses.
Annual Fund Operating Expenses (expenses that you pay each year as a percentage of the value of your investment):
Share Classes
IA
IB
Management fees
0.61%
0.61%
Distribution and/or service (12b-1) fees
None
0.25%
Other expenses
0.03%
0.03%
Total annual fund operating expenses
0.64%
0.89%
Example. The example below is intended to help you compare the cost of investing in the Fund with the cost of investing in other mutual funds. The example assumes that:
You invest $10,000
Your investment has a 5% return each year
The Fund’s operating expenses remain the same
You reinvest all dividends and distributions
Your actual costs may be higher or lower. Based on these assumptions, you would pay the following expenses whether or not you were to redeem your investment at the end of each time period indicated:
Share Classes
Year 1
Year 3
Year 5
Year 10
IA
$65
$205
$357
$798
IB
$91
$284
$493
$1,096
Portfolio Turnover. The Fund pays transaction costs, such as commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or “turns over” its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover rate may indicate higher transaction costs. These costs, which are not reflected in annual fund operating expenses or in the example, affect the Fund’s performance. During the fiscal year ended December 31, 2022, the Fund’s portfolio turnover rate was 52% of the average value of its portfolio.
PRINCIPAL INVESTMENT STRATEGY. The Fund seeks its investment objective by investing primarily in common stocks of small capitalization companies that the Fund’s sub-adviser, Wellington Management Company LLP (“Wellington Management”), believes have superior growth potential. Under normal circumstances, the Fund invests at least 80% of its assets in common stocks of small capitalization companies. Wellington Management uses fundamental research designed to identify issuers with improving quality metrics, business momentum and attractive relative valuations. The investment process is aided by a proprietary screening tool that helps to identify companies with these characteristics. Based on market or economic conditions, the Fund may, through its normal bottom-up stock selection process, focus in one or more sectors of the market.
The Fund defines small capitalization companies as companies with market capitalizations within the collective range of the Russell 2000 and S&P SmallCap 600 Indices. As of December 31, 2022, this range was approximately $6.07 million to $8.05 billion. The market capitalization range of these indices changes over time.
PRINCIPAL RISKS. The principal risks of investing in the Fund are described below. When you sell your shares they may be worth more or less than what you paid for them, which means that you could lose money as a result of your investment. An investment in the Fund is not a bank deposit and is not insured or guaranteed by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation or any other government agency. As with any fund, there is no guarantee that the Fund will achieve its investment objective.
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Market Risk –  Market risk is the risk that one or more markets in which the Fund invests will go down in value, including the possibility that the markets will go down sharply and unpredictably. Securities of a company may decline in value due to its financial prospects and activities, including certain operational impacts, such as data breaches and cybersecurity attacks. Securities may also decline in value due to general market and economic movements and trends, including adverse changes to credit markets, or as a result of other events such as geopolitical events, natural disasters, or widespread pandemics (such as COVID-19) or other adverse public health developments.
Equity Risk –  The risk that the price of equity or equity related securities may decline due to changes in a company’s financial condition and overall market and economic conditions.
Small Cap Securities Risk –  Investments in small capitalization companies involve greater risks than investments in larger, more established companies. Many of these companies are young and have limited operating or business history. These securities may be subject to more abrupt or erratic price movements and may lack sufficient market liquidity, and these issuers often face greater business risks, including the risk of bankruptcy.
Growth Investing Style Risk –  If the sub-adviser incorrectly assesses a company’s prospects for growth or how other investors will value the company’s growth, then the price of the company’s stock may decrease, or may not increase to the level anticipated by the sub-adviser. In addition, growth stocks may be more volatile than other stocks because they are more sensitive to investors’ perceptions of the issuing company’s growth potential. Also, the growth investing style may over time go in and out of favor. At times when the investing style used by the Fund is out of favor, the Fund may underperform other equity funds that use different investing styles.
Active Investment Management Risk –  The risk that, if the sub-adviser’s investment strategy does not perform as expected, the Fund could underperform its peers or lose money. Although the sub-adviser considers several factors when making investment decisions, the sub-adviser may not evaluate every factor prior to investing in a company or issuer, and the sub-adviser may determine that certain factors are more significant than others.
Volatility Risk –  The Fund’s investments may fluctuate in value over a short period of time. This may cause the Fund’s net asset value per share to experience significant changes in value over short periods of time.
Sector Risk –  To the extent the Fund invests more heavily in a particular sector or sectors, its performance will be especially sensitive to developments that significantly affect those sectors. Individual sectors may be more volatile, and may perform differently, from the broader market.
Securities Lending Risk –  The Fund may lose money because the borrower of the loaned securities fails to return the securities in a timely manner or at all. The Fund could also lose money in the event of a decline in the value of the collateral provided for loaned securities or a decline in the value of any investments made with cash collateral.
Large Shareholder Transaction Risk –  The Fund may experience adverse effects when certain large shareholders redeem or purchase large amounts of shares of the Fund. Such redemptions may cause the Fund to sell securities at times when it would not otherwise do so or borrow money (at a cost to the Fund), which may negatively impact the Fund’s performance and liquidity. Similarly, large purchases may adversely affect the Fund’s performance to the extent that the Fund is delayed in investing new cash and is required to maintain a larger cash position than it ordinarily would. These transactions may also increase transaction costs.
The Fund is subject to certain other risks. For more information regarding risks and investments, please see “Additional Information Regarding Investment Strategies and Risks” and “More Information About Risks” in the Fund’s statutory prospectus.
PAST PERFORMANCE. The performance information below indicates the risks of investing in the Fund. Keep in mind that past performance does not indicate future results. Updated performance information is available at hartfordfunds.com. The returns in the bar chart and table:
Assume reinvestment of all dividends and distributions
Would be lower if the effect of sales charges or other fees that may be applied at the contract or plan level were included.
33

The bar chart:
Shows how the Fund’s total return has varied from year to year
Shows the returns of Class IA shares. Returns for Class IB shares differ only to the extent that the classes do not have the same expenses.
Total returns by calendar year
During the periods shown in the chart above:
Returns
Quarter Ended
Best Quarter Return
31.78%
December 31, 2020
Worst Quarter Return
-26.21%
March 31, 2020
Average Annual Total Returns. The table below shows returns for the Fund over time compared to those of a broad-based market index.
Average annual total returns for periods ending December 31, 2022
Share Classes
1 Year
5 Years
10 Years
Class IA
-28.46%
3.52%
9.36%
Class IB
-28.64%
3.26%
9.08%
Russell 2000 Growth Index (reflects no deduction for fees, expenses or taxes)
-26.36%
3.51%
9.20%
MANAGEMENT. The Fund’s investment manager is Hartford Funds Management Company, LLC. The Fund’s sub-adviser is Wellington Management.
Portfolio Manager
Title
Involved with
Fund Since
Mammen Chally, CFA
Senior Managing Director and Equity Portfolio Manager
2009
David A. Siegle, CFA
Managing Director and Equity Research Analyst
2009
Douglas W. McLane, CFA
Senior Managing Director and Equity Portfolio Manager
2011
PURCHASE AND SALE OF FUND SHARES. Class IA shares and Class IB shares of the Fund generally may only be purchased or redeemed through variable contracts and qualified pension plans or retirement plans. The Fund is closed to new investors, subject to certain exceptions. For more information, please see the section entitled “Further Information on the Funds - Purchase and Redemption of Fund Shares” in the Fund’s statutory prospectus.
Class IA shares and Class IB shares of the Fund do not have any initial or subsequent investment minimums. Any initial or subsequent investment requirements and redemption procedures are governed by the applicable variable contract or plan through which you invest.
TAX INFORMATION. Under current law, owners of variable contracts and qualified pension or retirement plan participants that have invested in the Fund are not subject to federal income tax on Fund earnings and distributions or on gains realized upon the sale or redemption of Fund shares until such amounts are withdrawn from the variable contract or pension or retirement plan. You should review your variable contract prospectus (or other disclosure document) or plan documents for more information.
34

PAYMENTS TO BROKER-DEALERS AND OTHER FINANCIAL INTERMEDIARIES. The Fund and its related companies may make payments to insurance companies (or their affiliates), plan sponsors and other financial intermediaries for distribution and/or other services. These payments may create a conflict of interest by influencing the financial intermediary and its employees to include the Fund as an investment option or to recommend the Fund over another investment option. Ask your financial intermediary or visit your financial intermediary’s website for more information.
35

Hartford Small Company HLS Fund Summary Section
INVESTMENT OBJECTIVE. The Fund seeks growth of capital.
YOUR EXPENSES. The table below describes the fees and expenses that you may pay if you buy, hold, and sell shares of the Fund. Please note that fees and expenses in this table and the example below do not include fees and expenses that will be applied at the variable contract level or by a qualified pension or retirement plan and would be higher if such fees and expenses were included. You should review your variable contract prospectus (or other disclosure document) or plan documents for more information on those fees and expenses.
Annual Fund Operating Expenses (expenses that you pay each year as a percentage of the value of your investment):
Share Classes
IA
IB
Management fees
0.75%
0.75%
Distribution and/or service (12b-1) fees
None
0.25%
Other expenses
0.04%
0.04%
Total annual fund operating expenses
0.79%
1.04%
Example. The example below is intended to help you compare the cost of investing in the Fund with the cost of investing in other mutual funds. The example assumes that:
You invest $10,000
Your investment has a 5% return each year
The Fund’s operating expenses remain the same
You reinvest all dividends and distributions
Your actual costs may be higher or lower. Based on these assumptions, you would pay the following expenses whether or not you were to redeem your investment at the end of each time period indicated:
Share Classes
Year 1
Year 3
Year 5
Year 10
IA
$81
$252
$439
$978
IB
$106
$331
$574
$1,271
Portfolio Turnover. The Fund pays transaction costs, such as commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or “turns over” its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover rate may indicate higher transaction costs. These costs, which are not reflected in annual fund operating expenses or in the example, affect the Fund’s performance. During the fiscal year ended December 31, 2022, the Fund’s portfolio turnover rate was 87% of the average value of its portfolio.
PRINCIPAL INVESTMENT STRATEGY. The Fund seeks its investment objective by investing primarily in common stocks selected on the basis of potential for capital appreciation. Under normal circumstances, the Fund’s sub-adviser, Wellington Management Company LLP (“Wellington Management”), invests at least 80% of its assets in common stocks of small capitalization companies. The Fund may invest up to 20% of its net assets in securities of foreign issuers and non-dollar securities, and may trade securities actively. Based on market or economic conditions, the Fund may, through its normal bottom-up stock selection process, focus in one or more sectors of the market.
Wellington Management uses fundamental analysis to evaluate a security for purchase or sale by the Fund. As part of this analysis, Wellington Management evaluates a company across several dimensions, including an understanding of the sustainability and magnitude of growth, quality, valuation, and assessment of management quality. Wellington Management also integrates the evaluation of financially material environmental, social, and/or governance (“ESG”) characteristics (where available for a company) into its fundamental analysis. ESG characteristics are one of several factors that contribute to Wellington Management’s overall evaluation of the risk and return potential of a company.
The Fund defines small capitalization companies as companies with market capitalizations within the collective range of the Russell 2000 and S&P SmallCap 600 Indices. As of December 31, 2022, this range was approximately $6.07 million to $8.05 billion. The market capitalization range of these indices changes over time.
36

PRINCIPAL RISKS. The principal risks of investing in the Fund are described below. When you sell your shares they may be worth more or less than what you paid for them, which means that you could lose money as a result of your investment. An investment in the Fund is not a bank deposit and is not insured or guaranteed by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation or any other government agency. As with any fund, there is no guarantee that the Fund will achieve its investment objective.
Market Risk –  Market risk is the risk that one or more markets in which the Fund invests will go down in value, including the possibility that the markets will go down sharply and unpredictably. Securities of a company may decline in value due to its financial prospects and activities, including certain operational impacts, such as data breaches and cybersecurity attacks. Securities may also decline in value due to general market and economic movements and trends, including adverse changes to credit markets, or as a result of other events such as geopolitical events, natural disasters, or widespread pandemics (such as COVID-19) or other adverse public health developments.
Equity Risk –  The risk that the price of equity or equity related securities may decline due to changes in a company’s financial condition and overall market and economic conditions.
Small Cap Securities Risk –  Investments in small capitalization companies involve greater risks than investments in larger, more established companies. Many of these companies are young and have limited operating or business history. These securities may be subject to more abrupt or erratic price movements and may lack sufficient market liquidity, and these issuers often face greater business risks, including the risk of bankruptcy.
Active Investment Management Risk –  The risk that, if the sub-adviser’s investment strategy does not perform as expected, the Fund could underperform its peers or lose money. Although the sub-adviser considers several factors when making investment decisions, the sub-adviser may not evaluate every factor prior to investing in a company or issuer, and the sub-adviser may determine that certain factors are more significant than others.
Growth Investing Style Risk –  If the sub-adviser incorrectly assesses a company’s prospects for growth or how other investors will value the company’s growth, then the price of the company’s stock may decrease, or may not increase to the level anticipated by the sub-adviser. In addition, growth stocks may be more volatile than other stocks because they are more sensitive to investors’ perceptions of the issuing company’s growth potential. Also, the growth investing style may over time go in and out of favor. At times when the investing style used by the Fund is out of favor, the Fund may underperform other equity funds that use different investing styles.
Foreign Investments Risk –  Investments in foreign securities may be riskier, more volatile, and less liquid than investments in U.S. securities. Differences between the U.S. and foreign regulatory regimes and securities markets, including the less stringent investor protection, less stringent accounting, corporate governance, financial reporting and disclosure standards of some foreign markets, as well as political and economic developments in foreign countries and regions and the U.S. (including the imposition of sanctions, tariffs, or other governmental restrictions), may affect the value of the Fund’s investments in foreign securities. Changes in currency exchange rates may also adversely affect the Fund’s foreign investments.
Currency Risk –  The risk that the value of the Fund’s investments in foreign securities or currencies will be affected by the value of the applicable currency relative to the U.S. dollar. When the Fund sells a foreign currency or foreign currency denominated security, its value may be worth less in U.S. dollars even if the investment increases in value in its local market. U.S. dollar-denominated securities of foreign issuers may also be affected by currency risk, as the revenue earned by issuers of these securities may also be affected by changes in the issuer’s local currency.
Volatility Risk –  The Fund’s investments may fluctuate in value over a short period of time. This may cause the Fund’s net asset value per share to experience significant changes in value over short periods of time.
Sector Risk –  To the extent the Fund invests more heavily in a particular sector or sectors, its performance will be especially sensitive to developments that significantly affect those sectors. Individual sectors may be more volatile, and may perform differently, from the broader market.
ESG Integration Risk –  Integrating ESG analysis into the investment process carries the risk that the Fund may perform differently from, and may underperform, funds that do not integrate ESG into their analysis, or funds that evaluate different ESG characteristics. ESG characteristics are not the only factors considered and as a result, the Fund’s investments may not have favorable ESG characteristics or high ESG ratings.
37

Securities Lending Risk –  The Fund may lose money because the borrower of the loaned securities fails to return the securities in a timely manner or at all. The Fund could also lose money in the event of a decline in the value of the collateral provided for loaned securities or a decline in the value of any investments made with cash collateral.
Active Trading Risk –  Active trading could increase the Fund’s transaction costs (thus adversely affecting performance).
Large Shareholder Transaction Risk –  The Fund may experience adverse effects when certain large shareholders redeem or purchase large amounts of shares of the Fund. Such redemptions may cause the Fund to sell securities at times when it would not otherwise do so or borrow money (at a cost to the Fund), which may negatively impact the Fund’s performance and liquidity. Similarly, large purchases may adversely affect the Fund’s performance to the extent that the Fund is delayed in investing new cash and is required to maintain a larger cash position than it ordinarily would. These transactions may also increase transaction costs.
The Fund is subject to certain other risks. For more information regarding risks and investments, please see “Additional Information Regarding Investment Strategies and Risks” and “More Information About Risks” in the Fund’s statutory prospectus.
PAST PERFORMANCE. The performance information below indicates the risks of investing in the Fund. Keep in mind that past performance does not indicate future results. Updated performance information is available at hartfordfunds.com. The returns in the bar chart and table:
Assume reinvestment of all dividends and distributions
Would be lower if the effect of sales charges or other fees that may be applied at the contract or plan level were included.
The bar chart:
Shows how the Fund’s total return has varied from year to year
Shows the returns of Class IA shares. Returns for Class IB shares differ only to the extent that the classes do not have the same expenses.
Total returns by calendar year
During the periods shown in the chart above:
Returns
Quarter Ended
Best Quarter Return
39.09%
June 30, 2020
Worst Quarter Return
-24.69%
March 31, 2020
Average Annual Total Returns. The table below shows returns for the Fund over time compared to those of a broad-based market index.
Average annual total returns for periods ending December 31, 2022
Share Classes
1 Year
5 Years
10 Years
Class IA
-30.94%
7.43%
10.10%
Class IB
-31.07%
7.17%
9.83%
Russell 2000 Growth Index (reflects no deduction for fees, expenses or taxes)
-26.36%
3.51%
9.20%
38

MANAGEMENT. The Fund’s investment manager is Hartford Funds Management Company, LLC. The Fund’s sub-adviser is Wellington Management.
Portfolio Manager
Title
Involved with
Fund Since
Ranjit Ramachandran, CFA
Managing Director and Equity Portfolio Manager
2014
PURCHASE AND SALE OF FUND SHARES. Class IA shares and Class IB shares of the Fund generally may only be purchased or redeemed through variable contracts and qualified pension plans or retirement plans. The Fund is closed to new investors, subject to certain exceptions. For more information, please see the section entitled “Further Information on the Funds - Purchase and Redemption of Fund Shares” in the Fund’s statutory prospectus.
Class IA shares and Class IB shares of the Fund do not have any initial or subsequent investment minimums. Any initial or subsequent investment requirements and redemption procedures are governed by the applicable variable contract or plan through which you invest.
TAX INFORMATION. Under current law, owners of variable contracts and qualified pension or retirement plan participants that have invested in the Fund are not subject to federal income tax on Fund earnings and distributions or on gains realized upon the sale or redemption of Fund shares until such amounts are withdrawn from the variable contract or pension or retirement plan. You should review your variable contract prospectus (or other disclosure document) or plan documents for more information.
PAYMENTS TO BROKER-DEALERS AND OTHER FINANCIAL INTERMEDIARIES. The Fund and its related companies may make payments to insurance companies (or their affiliates), plan sponsors and other financial intermediaries for distribution and/or other services. These payments may create a conflict of interest by influencing the financial intermediary and its employees to include the Fund as an investment option or to recommend the Fund over another investment option. Ask your financial intermediary or visit your financial intermediary’s website for more information.
39

Hartford Stock HLS Fund Summary Section
INVESTMENT OBJECTIVE. The Fund seeks long-term growth of capital.
YOUR EXPENSES. The table below describes the fees and expenses that you may pay if you buy, hold, and sell shares of the Fund. Please note that fees and expenses in this table and the example below do not include fees and expenses that will be applied at the variable contract level or by a qualified pension or retirement plan and would be higher if such fees and expenses were included. You should review your variable contract prospectus (or other disclosure document) or plan documents for more information on those fees and expenses.
Annual Fund Operating Expenses (expenses that you pay each year as a percentage of the value of your investment):
Share Classes
IA
IB
Management fees
0.48%
0.48%
Distribution and/or service (12b-1) fees
None
0.25%
Other expenses
0.03%
0.03%
Total annual fund operating expenses
0.51%
0.76%
Example. The example below is intended to help you compare the cost of investing in the Fund with the cost of investing in other mutual funds. The example assumes that:
You invest $10,000
Your investment has a 5% return each year
The Fund’s operating expenses remain the same
You reinvest all dividends and distributions
Your actual costs may be higher or lower. Based on these assumptions, you would pay the following expenses whether or not you were to redeem your investment at the end of each time period indicated:
Share Classes
Year 1
Year 3
Year 5
Year 10
IA
$52
$164
$285
$640
IB
$78
$243
$422
$942
Portfolio Turnover. The Fund pays transaction costs, such as commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or “turns over” its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover rate may indicate higher transaction costs. These costs, which are not reflected in annual fund operating expenses or in the example, affect the Fund’s performance. During the fiscal year ended December 31, 2022, the Fund’s portfolio turnover rate was 10% of the average value of its portfolio.
PRINCIPAL INVESTMENT STRATEGY. The Fund normally invests at least 80% of its assets in equity securities. The Fund may invest in stocks within a broad range of market capitalizations, but tends to focus on large capitalization companies with market capitalizations similar to those of companies in the Russell 1000 Index as selected by the Fund’s sub-adviser, Wellington Management Company LLP (“Wellington Management”). The Fund may invest up to 20% of its net assets in the securities of foreign issuers and non-dollar securities. Wellington Management employs a “bottom-up” approach, which is the use of fundamental analysis to identify specific securities for purchase or sale. Wellington Management’s investment process focuses on companies that it believes are high quality and are expected to grow their dividends. The Fund typically employs a focused portfolio investing style (i.e., a portfolio consisting of a relatively small number of holdings).
PRINCIPAL RISKS. The principal risks of investing in the Fund are described below. When you sell your shares they may be worth more or less than what you paid for them, which means that you could lose money as a result of your investment. An investment in the Fund is not a bank deposit and is not insured or guaranteed by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation or any other government agency. As with any fund, there is no guarantee that the Fund will achieve its investment objective.
Market Risk –  Market risk is the risk that one or more markets in which the Fund invests will go down in value, including the possibility that the markets will go down sharply and unpredictably. Securities of a company may decline in value due to its financial prospects and activities, including certain operational impacts, such as data breaches and
40

cybersecurity attacks. Securities may also decline in value due to general market and economic movements and trends, including adverse changes to credit markets, or as a result of other events such as geopolitical events, natural disasters, or widespread pandemics (such as COVID-19) or other adverse public health developments.
Equity Risk –  The risk that the price of equity or equity related securities may decline due to changes in a company’s financial condition and overall market and economic conditions.
Dividend Risk –  Income provided by the Fund may be affected by changes in the dividend policies of the companies in which the Fund invests and the capital resources available for such payments at such companies. At times, the performance of dividend-paying companies may lag the performance of other companies or the broader market as a whole. In addition, the dividend payments of the companies in which the Fund invests may vary over time, and there is no guarantee that a company will pay a dividend at all.
Large Cap Securities Risk –  The securities of large market capitalization companies may underperform other segments of the market because such companies may be less responsive to competitive challenges and opportunities and may be unable to attain high growth rates during periods of economic expansion.
Active Investment Management Risk –  The risk that, if the sub-adviser’s investment strategy does not perform as expected, the Fund could underperform its peers or lose money. Although the sub-adviser considers several factors when making investment decisions, the sub-adviser may not evaluate every factor prior to investing in a company or issuer, and the sub-adviser may determine that certain factors are more significant than others.
Foreign Investments Risk –  Investments in foreign securities may be riskier, more volatile, and less liquid than investments in U.S. securities. Differences between the U.S. and foreign regulatory regimes and securities markets, including the less stringent investor protection, less stringent accounting, corporate governance, financial reporting and disclosure standards of some foreign markets, as well as political and economic developments in foreign countries and regions and the U.S. (including the imposition of sanctions, tariffs, or other governmental restrictions), may affect the value of the Fund’s investments in foreign securities. Changes in currency exchange rates may also adversely affect the Fund’s foreign investments.
Currency Risk –  The risk that the value of the Fund’s investments in foreign securities or currencies will be affected by the value of the applicable currency relative to the U.S. dollar. When the Fund sells a foreign currency or foreign currency denominated security, its value may be worth less in U.S. dollars even if the investment increases in value in its local market. U.S. dollar-denominated securities of foreign issuers may also be affected by currency risk, as the revenue earned by issuers of these securities may also be affected by changes in the issuer’s local currency.
Focused Portfolio Risk –  Because the Fund may invest in a limited number of companies, the Fund is subject to greater risk of loss if any of those securities decline in price.
Securities Lending Risk –  The Fund may lose money because the borrower of the loaned securities fails to return the securities in a timely manner or at all. The Fund could also lose money in the event of a decline in the value of the collateral provided for loaned securities or a decline in the value of any investments made with cash collateral.
Large Shareholder Transaction Risk –  The Fund may experience adverse effects when certain large shareholders redeem or purchase large amounts of shares of the Fund. Such redemptions may cause the Fund to sell securities at times when it would not otherwise do so or borrow money (at a cost to the Fund), which may negatively impact the Fund’s performance and liquidity. Similarly, large purchases may adversely affect the Fund’s performance to the extent that the Fund is delayed in investing new cash and is required to maintain a larger cash position than it ordinarily would. These transactions may also increase transaction costs.
The Fund is subject to certain other risks. For more information regarding risks and investments, please see “Additional Information Regarding Investment Strategies and Risks” and “More Information About Risks” in the Fund’s statutory prospectus.
41

PAST PERFORMANCE. The performance information below indicates the risks of investing in the Fund. Keep in mind that past performance does not indicate future results. Updated performance information is available at hartfordfunds.com. The returns in the bar chart and table:
Assume reinvestment of all dividends and distributions
Would be lower if the effect of sales charges or other fees that may be applied at the contract or plan level were included.
The bar chart:
Shows how the Fund’s total return has varied from year to year
Shows the returns of Class IA shares. Returns for Class IB shares differ only to the extent that the classes do not have the same expenses.
Total returns by calendar year
During the periods shown in the chart above:
Returns
Quarter Ended
Best Quarter Return
14.10%
March 31, 2019
Worst Quarter Return
-17.84%
March 31, 2020
Average Annual Total Returns. The table below shows returns for the Fund over time compared to those of a broad-based market index.
Average annual total returns for periods ending December 31, 2022
Share Classes
1 Year
5 Years
10 Years
Class IA
-5.14%
11.73%
12.98%
Class IB
-5.37%
11.45%
12.70%
Russell 1000 Index (reflects no deduction for fees, expenses or taxes)
-19.13%
9.13%
12.37%
MANAGEMENT. The Fund’s investment manager is Hartford Funds Management Company, LLC. The Fund’s sub-adviser is Wellington Management.
Portfolio Manager
Title
Involved with
Fund Since
Donald J. Kilbride
Senior Managing Director and Equity Portfolio Manager
2012
Peter C. Fisher
Senior Managing Director and Equity Portfolio Manager
2012
PURCHASE AND SALE OF FUND SHARES. Class IA shares and Class IB shares of the Fund generally may only be purchased or redeemed through variable contracts and qualified pension plans or retirement plans. Class IA shares and Class IB shares of the Fund are closed to certain qualified pension and retirement plans. For more information, please see the section entitled “Further Information on the Funds - Purchase and Redemption of Fund Shares” in the Fund’s statutory prospectus.
Class IA shares and Class IB shares of the Fund do not have any initial or subsequent investment minimums. Any initial or subsequent investment requirements and redemption procedures are governed by the applicable variable contract or plan through which you invest.
42

TAX INFORMATION. Under current law, owners of variable contracts and qualified pension or retirement plan participants that have invested in the Fund are not subject to federal income tax on Fund earnings and distributions or on gains realized upon the sale or redemption of Fund shares until such amounts are withdrawn from the variable contract or pension or retirement plan. You should review your variable contract prospectus (or other disclosure document) or plan documents for more information.
PAYMENTS TO BROKER-DEALERS AND OTHER FINANCIAL INTERMEDIARIES. The Fund and its related companies may make payments to insurance companies (or their affiliates), plan sponsors and other financial intermediaries for distribution and/or other services. These payments may create a conflict of interest by influencing the financial intermediary and its employees to include the Fund as an investment option or to recommend the Fund over another investment option. Ask your financial intermediary or visit your financial intermediary’s website for more information.
43

Hartford Total Return Bond HLS Fund Summary Section
INVESTMENT OBJECTIVE. The Fund seeks a competitive total return, with income as a secondary objective.
YOUR EXPENSES. The table below describes the fees and expenses that you may pay if you buy, hold, and sell shares of the Fund. Please note that fees and expenses in this table and the example below do not include fees and expenses that will be applied at the variable contract level or by a qualified pension or retirement plan and would be higher if such fees and expenses were included. You should review your variable contract prospectus (or other disclosure document) or plan documents for more information on those fees and expenses.
Annual Fund Operating Expenses (expenses that you pay each year as a percentage of the value of your investment):
Share Classes
IA
IB
Management fees
0.47%
0.47%
Distribution and/or service (12b-1) fees
None
0.25%
Other expenses
0.03%
0.03%
Total annual fund operating expenses
0.50%
0.75%
Example. The example below is intended to help you compare the cost of investing in the Fund with the cost of investing in other mutual funds. The example assumes that:
You invest $10,000
Your investment has a 5% return each year
The Fund’s operating expenses remain the same
You reinvest all dividends and distributions
Your actual costs may be higher or lower. Based on these assumptions, you would pay the following expenses whether or not you were to redeem your investment at the end of each time period indicated:
Share Classes
Year 1
Year 3
Year 5
Year 10
IA
$51
$160
$280
$628
IB
$77
$240
$417
$930
Portfolio Turnover. The Fund pays transaction costs, such as commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or “turns over” its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover rate may indicate higher transaction costs. These costs, which are not reflected in annual fund operating expenses or in the example, affect the Fund’s performance. During the fiscal year ended December 31, 2022, the Fund’s portfolio turnover rate was 58% of the average value of its portfolio (excluding to be announced (TBA) roll transactions). If TBA roll transactions were included, the Fund’s portfolio turnover rate would have been 431% of the average value of its portfolio.
PRINCIPAL INVESTMENT STRATEGY. Under normal circumstances, the Fund invests at least 80% of its assets in bonds that the sub-adviser, Wellington Management Company LLP (“Wellington Management”), considers to be attractive from a total return perspective along with current income. The Fund may invest up to 20% of its net assets in securities rated below investment grade (also known as “junk bonds”).
Bonds in which the Fund may invest include, but are not limited to, (1) securities issued or guaranteed as to principal or interest by the U.S. Government, its agencies or instrumentalities; (2) non-convertible debt securities issued or guaranteed by U.S. corporations or other issuers (including foreign governments or corporations); (3) asset-backed and mortgage-related securities, including collateralized loan obligations; and (4) securities issued or guaranteed as to principal or interest by a sovereign government or one of its agencies or political subdivisions, supranational entities such as development banks, non-U.S. corporations, banks or bank holding companies, or other foreign issuers.
The Fund may use derivatives to manage portfolio risk or for other investment purposes. The derivatives in which the Fund may invest include, but are not limited to, futures and options contracts, swap agreements and forward foreign currency contracts. Additionally, the Fund may invest up to 40% of its net assets in debt securities of foreign issuers, including from emerging markets, and up to 20% of its net assets in non-dollar securities. The Fund may purchase or sell securities on a when-issued, delayed delivery or forward commitment basis, including securities acquired or sold in the TBA market. The Fund may invest in “Rule 144A” securities, which are privately placed, restricted securities that may
44

only be resold under certain circumstances to other qualified institutional buyers. The Fund may trade securities actively. Although the Fund may invest in securities and other instruments of any maturity or duration, the Fund normally invests in debt securities with a maturity of at least one year. There is no limit on the average maturity of the Fund’s portfolio.
The investment team is organized with generalist portfolio managers leading sector, rates and risk positioning decisions. The portfolio managers may allocate a portion of the Fund’s assets to specialists within Wellington Management who drive individual sector and security selection strategies.
PRINCIPAL RISKS. The principal risks of investing in the Fund are described below. When you sell your shares they may be worth more or less than what you paid for them, which means that you could lose money as a result of your investment. An investment in the Fund is not a bank deposit and is not insured or guaranteed by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation or any other government agency. As with any fund, there is no guarantee that the Fund will achieve its investment objective.
Market Risk –  Market risk is the risk that one or more markets in which the Fund invests will go down in value, including the possibility that the markets will go down sharply and unpredictably. Securities of a company may decline in value due to its financial prospects and activities, including certain operational impacts, such as data breaches and cybersecurity attacks. Securities may also decline in value due to general market and economic movements and trends, including adverse changes to credit markets, or as a result of other events such as geopolitical events, natural disasters, or widespread pandemics (such as COVID-19) or other adverse public health developments.
Interest Rate Risk –  The risk that your investment may go down in value when interest rates rise, because when interest rates rise, the prices of bonds and fixed rate loans fall. A wide variety of factors can cause interest rates to rise, including central bank monetary policies and inflation rates. Generally, the longer the maturity of a bond or fixed rate loan, the more sensitive it is to this risk. Falling interest rates also create the potential for a decline in the Fund’s income. These risks are greater during periods of rising inflation. Volatility in interest rates and in fixed income markets may increase the risk that the Fund’s investment in fixed income securities will go down in value. Risks associated with rising interest rates are currently heightened because the Federal Reserve has raised, and may continue to raise, interest rates and inflation is elevated. Actions taken by the Federal Reserve Board or foreign central banks to stimulate or stabilize economic growth, such as decreases or increases in short-term interest rates, may adversely affect markets, which could, in turn, negatively impact Fund performance.
Credit Risk –  Credit risk is the risk that the issuer of a security or other instrument will not be able to make principal and interest payments when due. Changes in an issuer’s financial strength, credit rating or the market’s perception of an issuer’s creditworthiness may also affect the value of the Fund’s investment in that issuer. The degree of credit risk depends on both the financial condition of the issuer and the terms of the obligation. Periods of market volatility may increase credit risk.
Mortgage-Related and Asset-Backed Securities Risk –  Mortgage-related and asset-backed securities represent interests in “pools” of mortgages or other assets, including consumer loans or receivables held in trust. These mortgage-related or asset-backed securities are subject to credit risk, interest rate risk, “prepayment risk” (the risk that borrowers will repay a loan more quickly in periods of falling interest rates) and “extension risk” (the risk that borrowers will repay a loan more slowly in periods of rising interest rates). If the Fund invests in mortgage-related or asset-backed securities that are subordinated to other interests in the same mortgage or asset pool, the Fund may only receive payments after the pool’s obligations to other investors have been satisfied. An unexpectedly high rate of defaults on the mortgages held by a mortgage pool may limit substantially the pool’s ability to make payments of principal or interest to the Fund, reducing the values of those securities or in some cases rendering them worthless. The risk of such defaults is generally higher in the case of mortgage pools that include so-called “subprime” mortgages. Uniform mortgage-backed securities, which generally align the characteristics of Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac certificates, are a recent innovation and the effect they may have on the market for mortgage-related securities is uncertain.
Collateralized Loan Obligations Risk –  Collateralized loan obligations (“CLOs”) bear many of the same risks as other forms of asset-backed securities. As they are backed by pools of loans, CLOs also bear similar risks to investing in loans directly. CLOs may experience substantial losses attributable to loan defaults. Losses caused by defaults on underlying assets are borne first by the holders of subordinate tranches. The Fund’s investment in CLOs may decrease in market value when the CLO experiences loan defaults or credit impairment, the disappearance of a subordinate tranche, or market anticipation of defaults and investor aversion to CLO securities as a class.
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To Be Announced (TBA) Transactions Risk –  TBA transactions involve the risk that the security the Fund buys will lose value prior to its delivery. The Fund is subject to this risk whether or not the Fund takes delivery of the securities on the settlement date for a transaction. There also is the risk that the security will not be issued or that the other party to the transaction will not meet its obligation. If this occurs, the Fund loses both the investment opportunity for the assets it set aside to pay for the security and any gain in the security’s price. The Fund may also take a short position in a TBA investment when it owns or has the right to obtain, at no added cost, identical securities. If the Fund takes such a short position, it may reduce the risk of a loss if the price of the securities declines in the future, but will lose the opportunity to profit if the price rises. TBA transactions may also result in a higher portfolio turnover rate.
Derivatives Risk –  Derivatives are instruments whose value depends on, or is derived from, the value of an underlying asset, reference rate or index. Derivatives may be riskier than other types of investments because they may be more sensitive to changes in economic or market conditions than other types of investments and could result in losses that significantly exceed the Fund’s original investment. Successful use of derivative instruments by the Fund depends on the sub-adviser’s judgment with respect to a number of factors and the Fund’s performance could be worse and/or more volatile than if it had not used these instruments. In addition, the fluctuations in the value of derivatives may not correlate perfectly with the value of any portfolio assets being hedged, the performance of the asset class to which the sub-adviser seeks exposure, or the overall securities markets.
Leverage Risk –  Certain transactions, such as the use of derivatives, may give rise to leverage. Leverage can increase market exposure, increase volatility in the Fund, magnify investment risks, and cause losses to be realized more quickly. The use of leverage may cause the Fund to liquidate portfolio positions to satisfy its obligations when it may not be advantageous to do so.
Swaps Risk –  A swap is a contract that generally obligates the parties to exchange payments based on a specified reference security, basket of securities, security index or index component. Swaps can involve greater risks than direct investment in securities because swaps may be leveraged and are subject to counterparty risk (e.g., the risk of a counterparty defaulting on the obligation or bankruptcy), credit risk and pricing risk (i.e., swaps may be difficult to value). Certain swaps may also be considered illiquid. It may not be possible for the Fund to liquidate a swap position at an advantageous time or price, which may result in significant losses.
Futures and Options Risk –  Futures and options may be more volatile than direct investments in the securities underlying the futures and options, may not correlate perfectly to the underlying securities, may involve additional costs, and may be illiquid. Futures and options also may involve the use of leverage as the Fund may make a small initial investment relative to the risk assumed, which could result in losses greater than if futures or options had not been used. Futures and options are also subject to the risk that the other party to the transaction may default on its obligation.
Forward Currency Contracts Risk –  A forward currency contract is an agreement between two parties to buy and sell a currency at a set price on a future date. The market value of a forward currency contract fluctuates with changes in foreign currency exchange rates. While forward foreign currency exchange contracts do not eliminate fluctuations in the value of foreign securities, they do allow the Fund to establish a fixed rate of exchange for a future point in time. Use of such contracts, therefore, can have the effect of reducing returns and minimizing opportunities for gain. The Fund could also lose money when the contract is settled.
Foreign Investments Risk –  Investments in foreign securities may be riskier, more volatile, and less liquid than investments in U.S. securities. Differences between the U.S. and foreign regulatory regimes and securities markets, including the less stringent investor protection, less stringent accounting, corporate governance, financial reporting and disclosure standards of some foreign markets, as well as political and economic developments in foreign countries and regions and the U.S. (including the imposition of sanctions, tariffs, or other governmental restrictions), may affect the value of the Fund’s investments in foreign securities. Changes in currency exchange rates may also adversely affect the Fund’s foreign investments.
Emerging Markets Risk –  The risks related to investing in foreign securities are generally greater with respect to investments in companies that conduct their principal business activities in emerging markets or whose securities are traded principally on exchanges in emerging markets. The risks of investing in emerging markets include risks of illiquidity, increased price volatility, smaller market capitalizations, less government regulation and oversight, less extensive and less frequent accounting, financial, auditing and other reporting requirements, significant delays in settlement of trades, risk of loss resulting from problems in share registration and custody and substantial economic and political disruptions. In addition, the imposition of exchange controls (including repatriation restrictions), sanctions,
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confiscations, trade restrictions (including tariffs) and other government restrictions by the United States and other governments may also result in losses. Frontier markets are those emerging markets that are considered to be among the smallest, least mature and least liquid, and as a result, the risks of investing in emerging markets are magnified in frontier markets.
Currency Risk –  The risk that the value of the Fund’s investments in foreign securities or currencies will be affected by the value of the applicable currency relative to the U.S. dollar. When the Fund sells a foreign currency or foreign currency denominated security, its value may be worth less in U.S. dollars even if the investment increases in value in its local market. U.S. dollar-denominated securities of foreign issuers may also be affected by currency risk, as the revenue earned by issuers of these securities may also be affected by changes in the issuer’s local currency.
High Yield Investments Risk –  High yield investments rated below investment grade (also referred to as “junk bonds”) are considered to be speculative and are subject to heightened credit risk, which may make the Fund more sensitive to adverse developments in the U.S. and abroad. Lower rated debt securities generally involve greater risk of default or price changes due to changes in the issuer’s creditworthiness than higher rated debt securities. The market prices of these securities may fluctuate more than those of higher rated securities and may decline significantly in periods of general economic difficulty. There may be little trading in the secondary market for particular debt securities, which may make them more difficult to value or sell.
U.S. Government Securities Risk –  Treasury obligations may differ in their interest rates, maturities, times of issuance and other characteristics. Securities backed by the U.S. Treasury or the full faith and credit of the United States are guaranteed only as to the timely payment of interest and principal when held to maturity. Accordingly, the current market values for these securities will fluctuate with changes in interest rates. Obligations of U.S. Government agencies and authorities are supported by varying degrees of credit but generally are not backed by the full faith and credit of the U.S. Government. No assurance can be given that the U.S. Government will provide financial support to its agencies and authorities if it is not obligated by law to do so. In addition, the value of U.S. Government securities may be affected by changes in the credit rating of the U.S. Government. U.S. Government securities are also subject to the risk that the U.S. Treasury will be unable to meet its payment obligations.
Restricted Securities Risk –  Restricted securities are subject to the risk that they may be difficult to sell at the time and price the Fund prefers.
Call Risk –  Call risk is the risk that an issuer, especially during a period of falling interest rates, may redeem a security by repaying it early, which may reduce the Fund’s income if the proceeds are reinvested at lower interest rates.
Liquidity Risk –  The risk that the market for a particular investment or type of investment is or becomes relatively illiquid, making it difficult for the Fund to sell that investment at an advantageous time or price. Illiquidity may be due to events relating to the issuer of the securities, market events, rising interest rates, economic conditions or investor perceptions. Illiquid securities may be difficult to value and their value may be lower than the market price of comparable liquid securities, which would negatively affect the Fund’s performance.
Event Risk –  Event risk is the risk that corporate issuers may undergo restructurings, such as mergers, leveraged buyouts, takeovers, or similar events financed by increased debt. As a result of the added debt, the credit quality and market value of a company’s bonds and/or other debt securities may decline significantly.
Active Investment Management Risk –  The risk that, if the sub-adviser’s investment strategy, including allocating assets to specialist portfolio managers, does not perform as expected, the Fund could underperform its peers or lose money. The investment styles employed by the specialist portfolio managers may not be complementary, which could adversely affect the performance of the Fund. Although the sub-adviser considers several factors when making investment decisions, the sub-adviser may not evaluate every factor prior to investing in a company or issuer, and the sub-adviser may determine that certain factors are more significant than others.
LIBOR Risk –  The Fund may invest in certain securities, derivatives, or other financial instruments that use a London Interbank Offered Rate (LIBOR) as a reference rate for various rate calculations. The ICE Benchmark Administration Limited, the administrator of LIBOR, has ceased publishing certain LIBOR settings on December 31, 2021, and the remaining LIBOR settings are expected to be discontinued on June 30, 2023. Some regulated entities (such as banks) have ceased to enter into new LIBOR-based contracts beginning January 1, 2022. The transition process away from LIBOR may lead to increased volatility and illiquidity in markets that currently rely on LIBOR to determine interest rates,
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and the use of an alternative reference rate (e.g., the Secured Overnight Financing Rate) may adversely affect the Fund’s performance. In addition, the usefulness of LIBOR may deteriorate in the period leading up to its discontinuation, which could adversely affect the liquidity or market value of securities that use LIBOR.
Securities Lending Risk –  The Fund may lose money because the borrower of the loaned securities fails to return the securities in a timely manner or at all. The Fund could also lose money in the event of a decline in the value of the collateral provided for loaned securities or a decline in the value of any investments made with cash collateral.
Active Trading Risk –  Active trading could increase the Fund’s transaction costs (thus adversely affecting performance).
Large Shareholder Transaction Risk –  The Fund may experience adverse effects when certain large shareholders redeem or purchase large amounts of shares of the Fund. Such redemptions may cause the Fund to sell securities at times when it would not otherwise do so or borrow money (at a cost to the Fund), which may negatively impact the Fund’s performance and liquidity. Similarly, large purchases may adversely affect the Fund’s performance to the extent that the Fund is delayed in investing new cash and is required to maintain a larger cash position than it ordinarily would. These transactions may also increase transaction costs.
The Fund is subject to certain other risks. For more information regarding risks and investments, please see “Additional Information Regarding Investment Strategies and Risks” and “More Information About Risks” in the Fund’s statutory prospectus.
PAST PERFORMANCE. The performance information below indicates the risks of investing in the Fund. Keep in mind that past performance does not indicate future results. Updated performance information is available at hartfordfunds.com. The returns in the bar chart and table:
Assume reinvestment of all dividends and distributions
Would be lower if the effect of sales charges or other fees that may be applied at the contract or plan level were included.
The bar chart:
Shows how the Fund’s total return has varied from year to year
Shows the returns of Class IA shares. Returns for Class IB shares differ only to the extent that the classes do not have the same expenses.
Total returns by calendar year
During the periods shown in the chart above:
Returns
Quarter Ended
Best Quarter Return
6.54%
June 30, 2020
Worst Quarter Return
-6.82%
March 31, 2022
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Average Annual Total Returns. The table below shows returns for the Fund over time compared to those of a broad-based market index.
Average annual total returns for periods ending December 31, 2022
Share Classes
1 Year
5 Years
10 Years
Class IA
-14.21%
0.34%
1.50%
Class IB
-14.41%
0.10%
1.24%
Bloomberg US Aggregate Bond Index (reflects no deduction for fees, expenses or taxes)
-13.01%
0.02%
1.06%
MANAGEMENT. The Fund’s investment manager is Hartford Funds Management Company, LLC. The Fund’s sub-adviser is Wellington Management.
Portfolio Manager
Title
Involved with
Fund Since
Joseph F. Marvan, CFA
Senior Managing Director and Fixed Income Portfolio Manager
2012
Campe Goodman, CFA
Senior Managing Director and Fixed Income Portfolio Manager
2012
Robert D. Burn, CFA
Senior Managing Director and Fixed Income Portfolio Manager
2012
PURCHASE AND SALE OF FUND SHARES. Class IA shares and Class IB shares of the Fund generally may only be purchased or redeemed through variable contracts and qualified pension plans or retirement plans. Class IA shares and Class IB shares of the Fund are closed to certain qualified pension and retirement plans. For more information, please see the section entitled “Further Information on the Funds - Purchase and Redemption of Fund Shares” in the Fund’s statutory prospectus.
Class IA shares and Class IB shares of the Fund do not have any initial or subsequent investment minimums. Any initial or subsequent investment requirements and redemption procedures are governed by the applicable variable contract or plan through which you invest.
TAX INFORMATION. Under current law, owners of variable contracts and qualified pension or retirement plan participants that have invested in the Fund are not subject to federal income tax on Fund earnings and distributions or on gains realized upon the sale or redemption of Fund shares until such amounts are withdrawn from the variable contract or pension or retirement plan. You should review your variable contract prospectus (or other disclosure document) or plan documents for more information.
PAYMENTS TO BROKER-DEALERS AND OTHER FINANCIAL INTERMEDIARIES. The Fund and its related companies may make payments to insurance companies (or their affiliates), plan sponsors and other financial intermediaries for distribution and/or other services. These payments may create a conflict of interest by influencing the financial intermediary and its employees to include the Fund as an investment option or to recommend the Fund over another investment option. Ask your financial intermediary or visit your financial intermediary’s website for more information.
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Hartford Ultrashort Bond HLS Fund Summary Section
INVESTMENT OBJECTIVE. The Fund seeks total return and income consistent with preserving capital and maintaining liquidity.
YOUR EXPENSES. The table below describes the fees and expenses that you may pay if you buy, hold, and sell shares of the Fund. Please note that fees and expenses in this table and the example below do not include fees and expenses that will be applied at the variable contract level or by a qualified pension or retirement plan and would be higher if such fees and expenses were included. You should review your variable contract prospectus (or other disclosure document) or plan documents for more information on those fees and expenses.
Annual Fund Operating Expenses (expenses that you pay each year as a percentage of the value of your investment):
Share Classes
IA
IB
Management fees
0.40%
0.40%
Distribution and/or service (12b-1) fees
None
0.25%
Other expenses
0.03%
0.03%
Total annual fund operating expenses
0.43%
0.68%
Example. The example below is intended to help you compare the cost of investing in the Fund with the cost of investing in other mutual funds. The example assumes that:
You invest $10,000
Your investment has a 5% return each year
The Fund’s operating expenses remain the same
You reinvest all dividends and distributions
Your actual costs may be higher or lower. Based on these assumptions, you would pay the following expenses whether or not you were to redeem your investment at the end of each time period indicated:
Share Classes
Year 1
Year 3
Year 5
Year 10
IA
$44
$138
$241
$542
IB
$69
$218
$379
$847
Portfolio Turnover. The Fund pays transaction costs, such as commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or “turns over” its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover rate may indicate higher transaction costs. These costs, which are not reflected in annual fund operating expenses or in the example, affect the Fund’s performance. During the fiscal year ended December 31, 2022, the Fund’s portfolio turnover rate was 66% of the average value of its portfolio.
PRINCIPAL INVESTMENT STRATEGY.