Palmer Square Income Plus Fund

(Ticker Symbol: PSYPX)

 

Palmer Square Ultra-Short Duration Investment Grade Fund

(Ticker Symbol: PSDSX)

 

PROSPECTUS

November 1, 2023

 

 

 

The Securities and Exchange Commission (the “SEC”) has not approved or disapproved these securities or passed upon the accuracy or adequacy of this Prospectus. Any representation to the contrary is a criminal offense.

 

 

 

 

Palmer Square Income Plus Fund

Palmer Square Ultra-Short Duration Investment Grade Fund

Each a series of Investment Managers Series Trust (the “Trust”)

Each of the funds described in this Prospectus is referred to as a “Fund” and collectively as the “Funds.”

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

SUMMARY SECTION – PALMER SQUARE INCOME PLUS FUND 1
SUMMARY SECTION – PALMER SQUARE ULTRA-SHORT DURATION INVESTMENT GRADE FUND 9
MORE ABOUT THE FUNDS’ INVESTMENT OBJECTIVES, PRINCIPAL INVESTMENT STRATEGIES AND RISKS 17
MANAGEMENT OF THE FUNDS 31
YOUR ACCOUNT WITH THE FUNDS 34
DIVIDENDS AND DISTRIBUTIONS 42
FEDERAL INCOME TAX CONSEQUENCES 42
FINANCIAL HIGHLIGHTS 44

 

This Prospectus sets forth basic information about the Fund that you should know before investing. It should be read and retained for future reference.

 

The date of this Prospectus is November 1, 2023.

 

 

SUMMARY SECTION – PALMER SQUARE INCOME PLUS FUND

 

 

Investment Objectives

 

The investment objective of the Palmer Square Income Plus Fund (the “Fund”) is income. A secondary objective of the Fund is capital appreciation.

 

Fees and Expenses of the Fund

 

This table describes the fees and expenses that you may pay if you buy, hold and sell shares of the Fund. You may pay other fees, such as brokerage commissions and other fees to financial intermediaries, which are not reflected in the table and example below.

 

Shareholder Fees
(fees paid directly from your investment)
   
Wire fee   $20
Overnight check delivery fee   $25
Retirement account fees (annual maintenance fee)   $15
Annual Fund Operating Expenses
(expenses that you pay each year as a percentage of the value of your investment)
 
Management fees   0.49%
Distribution (Rule 12b-1) fees   None
Other expenses   0.39%
Shareholder servicing fee 0.09%  
Dividend and interest expense on short sales 0.20%  
All other expenses 0.10%  
Total annual fund operating expenses1   0.88%
     

 

1 The Fund’s advisor has contractually agreed to waive its fees and/or pay for operating expenses of the Fund to ensure that total annual fund operating expenses (excluding any taxes, leverage interest, brokerage commissions, dividend and interest expenses on short sales, acquired fund fees and expenses (as determined in accordance with Form N-1A), expenses incurred in connection with any merger or reorganization, and extraordinary expenses such as litigation expenses) do not exceed 0.75% of the average daily net assets of the Fund. This agreement is in effect until October 31, 2024, and it may be terminated before that date only by the Trust’s Board of Trustees. The Fund’s advisor is permitted to seek reimbursement from the Fund, subject to certain limitations, of fees waived or payments made to the Fund for a period ending three full fiscal years after the date of the waiver or payment. This reimbursement may be requested from the Fund if the reimbursement will not cause the Fund’s annual expense ratio to exceed the lesser of (a) the expense limitation in effect at the time such fees were waived or payments made, or (b) the expense limitation in effect at the time of the reimbursement.

 

Example

This example is intended to help you compare the cost of investing in the Fund with the cost of investing in other mutual funds. The example assumes that you invest $10,000 in the Fund for the time periods indicated and then redeem all of your shares at the end of those periods. The example also assumes that your investment has a 5% return each year and that the Fund’s operating expenses remain the same. The example reflects the Fund’s contractual fee waiver and/or expense reimbursement only for the term of the contractual fee waiver and/or expense reimbursement.

 

Although your actual costs may be higher or lower, based on these assumptions your costs would be:

 

One Year Three Years Five Years Ten Years
$90 $281 $488 $1,084

 

Portfolio Turnover

The Fund pays transaction costs, such as commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or “turns over” its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover may indicate higher transaction costs and may result in higher taxes when Fund shares are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are not reflected in annual fund operating expenses or in the example, affect the Fund’s performance. During the most recent fiscal year, the Fund’s portfolio turnover rate was 115% of the average value of its portfolio.

1

 

Principal Investment Strategies

Under normal market conditions, the Fund invests at least 80% of its net assets (plus any borrowings for investment purposes) in debt securities. The types of debt securities in which the Fund may invest include, but are not limited to, (i) asset-backed securities, including collateralized loan obligations (“CLOs”) and mortgage-backed securities, (ii) corporate bonds, notes, debentures and commercial paper, (iii) securities issued or guaranteed by the U.S. Government, its agencies, instrumentalities or sponsored entities, (iv) bank loans, (v) senior secured floating rate and fixed rate loans or debt, (vi) second lien or other subordinated or unsecured floating rate and fixed rate loans or debt and (vii) credit derivatives, including credit default swaps and their associated derivatives. The Fund may invest a significant portion of its assets in one or more investment types. The Fund’s investment strategy involves active and frequent trading.

 

The Fund’s investments in asset-backed securities may be comprised of loans or leases secured by motor vehicles or other equipment, consumer receivables from sources such as credit cards or student loans, or cash flows from operating assets such as royalties and leases.

 

Mortgage-backed securities in which the Fund may invest include those issued or guaranteed by federal agencies and/or U.S. Government sponsored instrumentalities, such as the Government National Mortgage Administration (“Ginnie Mae”), the Federal Housing Administration (“FHA”), the Federal National Mortgage Association (“Fannie Mae”) and the Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation (“Freddie Mac”). The Fund may also invest in commercial mortgage-backed securities (“CMBS”) and collateralized mortgage-backed securities (“CMOs”) issued or guaranteed by private entities.

 

The Fund may invest in debt securities of any maturity and credit quality. Under normal market conditions, the Advisor expects that the Fund will invest primarily in securities rated investment grade at time of purchase. Investment grade securities are those rated in the Baa3 or higher categories by Moody’s Investors Service, Inc. (“Moody’s”), or in the BBB- or higher categories by Standard & Poor’s, a division of McGraw Hill Companies Inc. (“S&P”), or Fitch Ratings Ltd. (“Fitch”) or, if unrated by Moody’s, S&P, or Fitch, or another Nationally Recognized Statistical Rating Organization (“NRSRO”), determined by Palmer Square Capital Management LLC (the “Advisor”), the Fund’s advisor, to be of comparable credit quality. However, the Fund may invest up to 30% of its net assets in high yield securities – securities rated below investment grade that generally have higher yields and higher risks than investment grade securities. High yield securities, commonly referred to as “junk bonds”, are rated below investment grade by at least one of Moody’s, S&P or Fitch (or if unrated, determined by the Advisor to be of comparable credit quality high yield securities). The Advisor anticipates the Fund’s average portfolio duration under normal market conditions to be less than two years. Duration is a measure of the underlying portfolio’s price sensitivity to changes in prevailing interest rates. The longer a security’s duration, the more sensitive its price will be to changes in interest rates. For example, the price of a security with a two-year duration would be expected to decrease by approximately 2% in response to a 1% increase in interest rates. Calculations of duration may be based on estimates and may not reliably predict a security’s sensitivity to changes in interest rates.

 

For the purposes of achieving the Fund’s investment objectives, hedging risks, and enhancing liquidity, the Fund may also employ derivatives, such as: puts and calls on U.S. Treasury futures; options, swaps and other interest rate derivatives; and credit default swaps and their associated derivatives on selected entities or indexes (where the Fund may act as either buyer or seller). As it pertains to the Advisor’s use of derivatives for hedging, risks that can be quantitatively measured and managed include interest rate risk (duration and convexity, which is the change to duration as interest rates change), prepayment risk, spread risk and volatility risk. The Advisor’s goal is not to eliminate all risk, but to assume only those risks the Advisor views as offering a strong risk/return profile. Additionally, the Fund may employ the types of derivatives referenced above in order to achieve its investment objectives by, among other practices, replicating a certain type of credit exposure, obtaining short or long exposures to credit and/or interest rates, or taking a position in light of a potential appreciation or depreciation in value of a company’s securities. The Advisor anticipates that, in general, the net long exposure of the Fund will not exceed 100% and the Fund will not have a net short exposure. The Fund will include the market value of its derivative positions based on debt securities or interest rates for purposes of determining whether it holds at least 80% of its net assets in debt securities.

 

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In pursuing the Fund’s investment objectives, the Advisor uses a blend of top-down analysis which includes macro analysis, cross-asset relative value analysis, and sector monitoring, and bottom-up analysis which involves individual issuer and management analysis and security/transaction evaluation that seeks to identify debt securities that it believes can provide highly competitive rate yields and total return over the long term with relatively mitigated credit risk.

 

As part of its overall investment process, the Fund’s investments are subject to the Advisor’s environmental, social and governance (“ESG”) screening process, as described below. Generally, before the Fund invests in a below investment grade (i.e., “junk bonds”) corporate security, the Advisor analyzes the issuer’s ESG risk profile using fundamental, bottom-up research as well as independent third-party data to assess whether an issuer should be considered for investment. The Advisor’s ESG screening process requires that all below investment grade corporate debt issuers considered for purchase be assigned a score rating using the Advisor’s proprietary scoring methodology (an “ESG Score”), which is used as part of the Advisor’s overall assessment of whether such an issuer should be considered for investment. The Advisor may also assign an ESG Score to investment grade issuers, although generally they are not assigned an ESG Score by the Advisor. The Advisor’s ESG screening process is designed to largely exclude issuers that it believes are inconsistent with the goals and objectives expressed in the UN Global Compact’s Principles and Sustainable Development Goals, which may change over time. In addition, the Advisor’s ESG screening process seeks to exclude debt obligations of issuers that, together with any affiliates, are involved in and derive significant revenue (i.e., more than 50% of their revenue) from certain industries or product lines, including:

 

  the speculative extraction of oil and gas (commonly referred to as exploration and production);
  the speculative extraction of thermal coal or the generation of electricity using coal;
  hazardous chemicals, pesticides and wastes, or ozone depleting substances;
  endangered or protected wildlife or wildlife products, the production or trade of which is banned by applicable global conventions and agreements;
  pornography or prostitution;
  tobacco or tobacco-related products;
  subprime lending or payday lending activities;
  firearms or weapons, including controversial weapons (e.g., cluster bombs, anti-personnel mines, and chemical or biological weapons); and
  components or services that have been specifically designed or designated for military purposes, or for the functioning of controversial weapons.

 

Principal Risks of Investing

 

Risk is inherent in all investing and you could lose money by investing in the Fund. A summary description of certain principal risks of investing in the Fund is set forth below. Before you decide whether to invest in the Fund, carefully consider these risk factors associated with investing in the Fund, which may cause investors to lose money. There can be no assurance that the Fund will achieve its investment objectives.

 

Market Risk. The market price of a security or instrument may decline, sometimes rapidly or unpredictably, due to general market conditions that are not specifically related to a particular company, such as real or perceived adverse economic or political conditions throughout the world, changes in the general outlook for corporate earnings, changes in interest or currency rates, or adverse investor sentiment generally. In addition, local, regional or global events such as war, acts of terrorism, the spread of infectious illness or other public health issues, or other events could have a significant impact on a security or instrument. The market value of a security or instrument also may decline because of factors that affect a particular industry or industries, such as labor shortages or increased production costs and competitive conditions within an industry.

 

Interest Rate Risk. Generally fixed income securities decrease in value if interest rates rise and increase in value if interest rates fall, with longer-term securities being more sensitive than shorter-term securities. For example, the price of a security with a three-year duration would be expected to drop by approximately 3% in response to a 1% increase in interest rates. Generally, the longer the maturity and duration of a bond or fixed rate loan, the more sensitive it is to this risk. Falling interest rates also create the potential for a decline in the Fund’s income. Changes in governmental policy, rising inflation rates, and general economic developments, among other factors, could cause interest rates to increase and could have a substantial and immediate effect on the values of the Fund’s investments. These risks are greater during periods of rising inflation. In addition, a potential rise in interest rates may result in periods of volatility and increased redemptions that might require the Fund to liquidate portfolio securities at disadvantageous prices and times.

 

3

 

Liquidity Risk. The Fund may not be able to sell some or all of the investments that it holds due to a lack of demand in the marketplace or other factors such as market turmoil, or if the Fund is forced to sell an illiquid asset to meet redemption requests or other cash needs it may only be able to sell those investments at a loss. In addition, the reduction in dealer market-making capacity in the fixed income markets that has occurred in recent years has the potential to decrease the liquidity of the Fund’s investments. Illiquid assets may also be difficult to value.

 

Valuation Risk. The sales price the Fund could receive for any particular portfolio investment may differ from the Fund’s valuation of the investment, particularly for securities that trade in thin or volatile markets or that are valued by the Advisor using a fair value methodology. Investors who purchase or redeem Fund shares on days when the Fund is holding fair-valued securities may receive fewer or more shares or lower or higher redemption proceeds than they would have received if the Advisor had not fair-valued the security or had used a different valuation methodology.

 

Fixed Income Securities Risk. The prices of fixed income securities respond to economic developments, particularly interest rate changes, as well as to changes in an issuer’s credit rating or market perceptions about the creditworthiness of an issuer. Generally fixed income securities decrease in value if interest rates rise and increase in value if interest rates fall, and longer-term and lower rated securities are more volatile than shorter-term and higher rated securities.

 

Credit Risk. If an issuer or guarantor of a debt security held by the Fund or a counterparty to a financial contract with the Fund defaults or is downgraded or is perceived to be less creditworthy, or if the value of the assets underlying a security declines, the value of the Fund’s portfolio will typically decline.

 

Extension Risk. If interest rates rise, repayments of fixed income securities may occur more slowly than anticipated by the market. This may drive the prices of these securities down because their interest rates are lower than the current interest rate and they remain outstanding longer.

 

High Yield (“Junk”) Bond Risk. High yield bonds are debt securities rated below investment grade (often called “junk bonds”). Junk bonds are speculative, involve greater risks of default, downgrade, or price declines and are more volatile and tend to be less liquid than investment-grade securities. Companies issuing high yield bonds are less financially strong, are more likely to encounter financial difficulties, and are more vulnerable to adverse market events and negative sentiments than companies with higher credit ratings.

 

Bank Loan Risk. The Fund’s investments in secured and unsecured participations in bank loans and assignments of such loans may create substantial risk. In making investments in such loans, which are made by banks or other financial intermediaries to borrowers, the Fund will depend primarily upon the creditworthiness of the borrower for payment of principal and interest which will expose the Fund to the credit risk of both the financial institution and the underlying borrower. The market for bank loans may not be highly liquid and the Fund may have difficulty selling them. Bank loan trades may also be subject to settlement delays. In addition, bank loans may not be considered securities under U.S. federal securities laws and, as a result, investments in them may not have the protection of federal securities laws.

 

Senior Loan Risk. The Fund may invest in floating or adjustable rate senior loans. These investments are subject to increased credit and liquidity risks. Senior loan prices also may be adversely affected by supply-demand imbalances caused by conditions in the senior loan market or related markets. Below investment grade senior loans, like high-yield debt securities or junk bonds, usually are more credit than interest rate sensitive, although the value of these instruments may be affected by interest rate swings in the overall fixed income market. Senior loans may be subject to structural subordination and, although the loans may be senior to equity and other debt securities in the borrower’s capital structure, the loans may be subordinated to other obligations of the borrower or its subsidiaries.

 

4

 

Collateralized Loan Obligations Risk. The Fund is subject to asset manager, legal and regulatory, limited recourse, liquidity, redemption, and reinvestment risks as a result of the structure of CLOs in which the Fund may invest. A CLO’s performance is linked to the expertise of the CLO manager and its ability to manage the CLO portfolio. Changes in the regulation of CLOs may adversely affect the value of the CLO investments held by the Fund and the ability of the Fund to execute its investment strategy. CLO debt is payable solely from the proceeds of the CLO’s underlying assets and, therefore, if the income from the underlying loans is insufficient to make payments on the CLO debt, no other assets will be available for payment. CLO debt securities may be subject to redemption and the timing of redemptions may adversely affect the returns on CLO debt. The CLO manager may not find suitable assets in which to invest and the CLO manager’s opportunities to invest may be limited. As of June 30, 2023, approximately 35.63% of the Fund’s assets were invested in CLOs.

 

Derivatives Risk. Derivatives include instruments and contracts that are based on and valued in relation to one or more underlying securities, financial benchmarks, indices, or other reference obligations or measures of value. Major types of derivatives include futures, options, swaps and forward contracts. Using derivatives exposes the Fund to additional or heightened risks, including leverage risk, liquidity risk, valuation risk, market risk, counterparty risk, and credit risk. Derivatives transactions can be highly illiquid and difficult to unwind or value, they can increase Fund volatility, and changes in the value of a derivative held by the Fund may not correlate with the value of the underlying instrument or the Fund’s other investments. Many of the risks applicable to trading the instruments underlying derivatives are also applicable to derivatives trading. However, derivatives trading is subject to additional risks, such as operational risk, including settlement issues, and legal risk, including that underlying documentation is incomplete or ambiguous. For derivatives that are required to be cleared by a regulated clearinghouse, other risks may arise from the Fund’s relationship with a brokerage firm through which it submits derivatives trades for clearing, including in some cases from other clearing customers of the brokerage firm.

 

Mortgage-Backed and Asset-Backed Securities Risk. Mortgage-backed and asset-backed securities represent interests in “pools” of mortgages or other assets, including consumer loans or receivables held in trust. Mortgage-backed securities are subject to “prepayment risk” (the risk that borrowers will repay a loan more quickly in periods of falling interest rates) and “extension risk” (the risk that borrowers will repay a loan more slowly in periods of rising interest rates). If the Fund invests in mortgage-backed or asset-backed securities that are subordinated to other interests in the same pool, the Fund may only receive payments after the pool’s obligations to other investors have been satisfied. An unexpectedly high rate of defaults on the assets held by a pool may limit substantially the pool’s ability to make payments of principal or interest to the Fund, reducing the values of those securities or in some cases rendering them worthless. The Fund’s investments in other asset-backed securities are subject to risks similar to those associated with mortgage-backed securities, as well as additional risks associated with the nature of the assets and the servicing of those assets. As of June 30, 2023, approximately 26.66% of the Fund’s assets were invested in mortgage-backed and asset-backed securities.

 

Government-Sponsored Entities Risk. The Fund’s investment in U.S. government obligations may include securities issued or guaranteed as to principal and interest by the U.S. government, or its agencies or instrumentalities. There can be no assurance that the U.S. government would provide financial support to its agencies or instrumentalities (including government-sponsored enterprises) where it is not obligated to do so.

 

Subordinated Securities Risk. The Fund may invest in securities that are subordinated in right of payment to more senior securities of the issuer. Subordinated securities are more likely to suffer a credit loss than non-subordinated securities of the same issuer and will be disproportionately affected by a default, downgrade or perceived decline in creditworthiness.

 

5

 

ESG Criteria Risk. While the Advisor believes that the integration of ESG analysis as part of the investment process contributes to its risk management approach, the Fund’s consideration of ESG criteria in making its investment decisions may affect the Fund’s exposure to risks associated with certain issuers, industries and sectors, which may impact the Fund’s investment performance. In addition, because the Fund’s ESG criteria exclude securities of certain issuers, the Fund may forgo some market opportunities available to funds that do not use these criteria. There are significant differences in the interpretation of what it means for an issuer to have positive ESG characteristics. While the Advisor believes its ESG criteria for excluding securities of certain issuers is reasonable, the Fund’s investments may include securities of issuers that derive significant revenue from activities that are generally not within ESG guidelines.

 

Private Placements and Restricted Securities Risk. Private placements and other restricted securities may be considered illiquid securities. Private placements typically are subject to restrictions on resale as a matter of contract or under federal securities laws. Because there may be relatively few potential purchasers for such securities, especially under adverse market or economic conditions or in the event of adverse changes in the financial condition of the issuer, the Fund could find it more difficult to sell such securities when it may be advisable to do so or it may be able to sell such securities only at prices lower than if such securities were more widely held. The absence of a liquid trading market may also make it difficult to determine the fair value of such securities for purposes of computing the Fund’s net asset value.

 

LIBOR Risk. The London Interbank Offered Rate (“LIBOR”) was a leading benchmark or reference rate for various commercial and financial contracts, including corporate and municipal bonds, bank loans, asset-backed and mortgage-related securities, interest rate swaps and other derivatives. On July 27, 2017, the United Kingdom’s Financial Conduct Authority announced the gradual phase out of the LIBOR rate, with nearly all LIBOR rate publications having ceased as of June 30, 2023 (some LIBOR rates continue to be published, but only on a temporary and synthetic basis). Alternatives to LIBOR have been established and others may be developed. The transition to a new reference rate may result in (i) increased volatility or illiquidity in markets for instruments or contracts that previously relied on or still rely on LIBOR; (ii) a reduction in the value of certain instruments or contracts held by the Fund; (iii) reduced effectiveness of related Fund transactions, such as hedging; (iv) additional tax, accounting and regulatory risks; or (v) costs incurred in connection with closing out positions and entering into new trades. Any pricing adjustments to the Fund’s investments resulting from a substitute reference rate may also adversely affect the Fund’s performance and/or NAV.

 

Management and Strategy Risk. The value of your investment depends on the judgment of the Advisor about the quality, relative yield, value or market trends affecting a particular security, industry, sector or region, which may prove to be incorrect.

 

Portfolio Focus Risk. To the extent a significant portion of the Fund’s assets is invested in one or more investment type, the Fund’s exposure to the risks associated with that investment type or types will be greater than if the Fund’s assets are diversified among many different investment types. As of June 30, 2023, approximately 35.63% of the Fund’s assets were invested in CLOs.

 

Prepayment or Call Risk. Many issuers have a right to prepay their securities. If interest rates fall, an issuer may exercise this right. If this happens, the Fund will not benefit from the rise in market price that normally accompanies a decline in interest rates, and will be forced to reinvest prepayment proceeds at a time when yields on securities available in the market are lower than the yield on the prepaid security. The Fund may also lose any premium it paid on the security.

 

Short Sales Risk. In connection with a short sale of a security or other instrument, the Fund is subject to the risk that instead of declining, the price of the security or other instrument sold short will rise. If the price of the security or other instrument sold short increases between the date of the short sale and the date on which the Fund replaces the security or other instrument borrowed to make the short sale, the Fund will experience a loss, which is theoretically unlimited since there is a theoretically unlimited potential for the market price of a security or other instrument sold short to increase. Shorting options or futures may have an imperfect correlation to the assets held by the Fund and may not adequately protect against losses in or may result in greater losses for the Fund’s portfolio.

 

6

 

Recent Market Events. Periods of market volatility may occur in response to market events and other economic, political, and global macro factors. For example, in recent years the COVID-19 pandemic, the large expansion of government deficits and debt as a result of government actions to mitigate the effects of the pandemic, Russia’s invasion of Ukraine, and the rise of inflation have resulted in extreme volatility in the global economy and in global financial markets. These and other similar events could be prolonged and could adversely affect the value and liquidity of the Fund’s investments, impair the Fund’s ability to satisfy redemption requests, and negatively impact the Fund’s performance.

 

Cybersecurity Risk. Cybersecurity incidents may allow an unauthorized party to gain access to Fund assets, customer data (including private shareholder information), or proprietary information, or cause the Fund, the Advisor, and/or other service providers (including custodians, sub-custodians, transfer agents and financial intermediaries) to suffer data breaches, data corruption or loss of operational functionality. In an extreme case, a shareholder’s ability to exchange or redeem Fund shares may be affected. Issuers of securities in which the Fund invests are also subject to cybersecurity risks, and the value of those securities could decline if the issuers experience cybersecurity incidents.

 

Portfolio Turnover Risk. Active and frequent trading of the Fund’s portfolio securities may lead to higher transaction costs and may result in a greater number of taxable transactions than would otherwise be the case, which could negatively affect the Fund’s performance. A high rate of portfolio turnover is 100% or more.

 

Performance

The bar chart and table below provide some indication of the risks of investing in the Fund by showing changes in the Fund’s performance from year to year and by showing how the average annual total returns of the Fund compare with the average annual total returns of a broad-based market index. Updated performance information is available at the Fund’s website, www.palmersquarefunds.com or by calling the Fund at 1-800-736-1145. The Fund’s past performance, before and after taxes, is not necessarily an indication of how the Fund will perform in the future.

 

Calendar-Year Total Return (before taxes)

For each calendar year at NAV

 

 

 

Return

 The year-to-date return for the Fund as of September 30, 2023 was 5.76%.

 

Highest Calendar Quarter Return at NAV (not-annualized): 8.44% Quarter Ended June 30, 2020
Lowest Calendar Quarter Return at NAV (not-annualized):  (7.97)% Quarter Ended March 31, 2020

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Average Annual Total Returns
for the periods ended December 31, 2022
1 Year 5 Years

Since Inception
February 28, 2014

Return Before Taxes  (0.76)% 2.08% 2.46%
Return After Taxes on Distributions*  (2.03)% 1.05% 1.25%
Return After Taxes on Distributions and Sale of Fund Shares*  (0.45)% 1.15% 1.34%
Bloomberg U.S. Corporate 1-3 Year Index (reflects no deduction for fees, expenses or taxes) (3.32)% 1.40% 1.45%

 

* After-tax returns are calculated using the historical highest individual federal marginal income tax rates and do not reflect the impact of state and local taxes. Actual after-tax returns depend on an investor’s tax situation and may differ from those shown. After-tax returns shown are not relevant to investors who hold their Fund shares through tax-deferred arrangements, such as 401(k) plans or individual retirement accounts.

 

Investment Advisor

Palmer Square Capital Management LLC

 

Portfolio Managers

Angie K. Long, CFA, Chief Investment Officer, and Christopher D. Long, President, have been jointly and primarily responsible for the day-to-day management of the Fund’s portfolio since its inception on February 28, 2014. Jon R. Brager, CFA, Senior Credit Analyst and Portfolio Manager, has been jointly and primarily responsible for the day-to-day management of the Fund’s portfolio since October 1, 2019.

 

Purchase and Sale of Fund Shares

Shares of the Fund are available for investment only by clients of financial intermediaries, institutional investors, and a limited number of other investors approved by the Advisor.

 

To purchase shares of the Fund, you must invest at least the following minimum amount.

 

Minimum Investments

To Open

Your Account

To Add to

Your Account

All Accounts $250,000 None

 

Shares of the Fund are redeemable on any business day the New York Stock Exchange (the “NYSE”) is open for business, by written request or by telephone. If you are purchasing or redeeming Fund shares through an intermediary such as a broker-dealer or bank, contact your intermediary directly.

 

Tax Information

The Fund’s distributions are generally taxable, and will ordinarily be taxed as ordinary income or capital gains, unless you are investing through a tax-advantaged arrangement, such as a 401(k) plan or an individual retirement account. Shareholders investing through such tax-advantaged arrangements may be taxed later upon withdrawal of monies from those arrangements.

 

Payments to Broker-Dealers and Other Financial Intermediaries

If you purchase shares of the Fund through a broker-dealer or other financial intermediary (such as a bank), the Fund and its related companies may pay the intermediary for the sale of Fund shares and related services. These payments may create a conflict of interest by influencing the broker-dealer or other intermediary and your salesperson to recommend the Fund over another investment. Ask your salesperson or visit your financial intermediary’s website for more information.

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SUMMARY SECTION – PALMER SQUARE ULTRA-SHORT DURATION INVESTMENT GRADE FUND

 

 

Investment Objectives

 

The investment objective of the Palmer Square Ultra-Short Duration Investment Grade Fund (the “Fund”) is to seek income. A secondary objective of the Fund is to seek capital appreciation.

 

Fees and Expenses of the Fund

This table describes the fees and expenses that you may pay if you buy, hold and sell shares of the Fund. You may pay other fees, such as brokerage commissions and other fees to financial intermediaries, which are not reflected in the table and example below.

 

Shareholder Fees
(fees paid directly from your investment)
   
Wire fee   $20
Overnight check delivery fee   $25
Retirement account fees (annual maintenance fee)   $15
Annual Fund Operating Expenses
(expenses that you pay each year as a percentage of the value of your investment)
 
Management fees   0.25%
Distribution (Rule 12b-1) fees   None
Other expenses   0.45%
Shareholder servicing fee 0.05%  
Dividend and interest expense on short sales 0.02%  
All other expenses 0.38%  
Total annual fund operating expenses   0.70%
Fees waived and/or expenses reimbursed1   (0.18)%

Total annual fund operating expenses after waiving fees and/or reimbursing expenses1

  0.52%
     

 

1 The Fund’s advisor has contractually agreed to waive its fees and/or pay for operating expenses of the Fund to ensure that total annual fund operating expenses (excluding any taxes, leverage interest, brokerage commissions, dividend and interest expenses on short sales, acquired fund fees and expenses (as determined in accordance with Form N-1A), expenses incurred in connection with any merger or reorganization, and extraordinary expenses such as litigation expenses) do not exceed 0.50% of the average daily net assets of the Fund. This agreement is in effect until October 31, 2024, and it may be terminated before that date only by the Trust’s Board of Trustees. The Fund’s advisor is permitted to seek reimbursement from the Fund, subject to certain limitations, of fees waived or payments made to the Fund for a period ending three full fiscal years after the date of the waiver or payment. This reimbursement may be requested from the Fund if the reimbursement will not cause the Fund’s annual expense ratio to exceed the lesser of (a) the expense limitation in effect at the time such fees were waived or payments made, or (b) the expense limitation in effect at the time of the reimbursement.

 

Example

This example is intended to help you compare the cost of investing in the Fund with the cost of investing in other mutual funds. The example assumes that you invest $10,000 in the Fund for the time periods indicated and then redeem all of your shares at the end of those periods. The example also assumes that your investment has a 5% return each year and that the Fund’s operating expenses remain the same. The example reflects the Fund’s contractual fee waiver and/or expense reimbursement only for the term of the contractual fee waiver and/or expense reimbursement.

 

Although your actual costs may be higher or lower, based on these assumptions your costs would be:

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One Year Three Years Five Years Ten Years
$53 $206 $372 $854

 

Portfolio Turnover

The Fund pays transaction costs, such as commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or “turns over” its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover may indicate higher transaction costs and may result in higher taxes when Fund shares are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are not reflected in annual fund operating expenses or in the example, affect the Fund’s performance. During the most recent fiscal year, the Fund’s portfolio turnover rate was 107% of the average value of its portfolio.

 

Principal Investment Strategies

Under normal market conditions, the Fund will invest at least 80% of its net assets (plus any borrowings for investment purposes) in debt securities rated investment grade at time of purchase. Investment grade securities are those rated in the Baa3 or higher categories by Moody’s Investors Service, Inc. (“Moody’s”), or in the BBB- or higher categories by Standard & Poor’s, a division of McGraw Hill Companies Inc. (“S&P”), or Fitch Ratings Ltd. (“Fitch”) or, if unrated by Moody’s, S&P, Fitch, or another Nationally Recognized Statistical Rating Organization (“NRSRO”), determined by Palmer Square Capital Management LLC (the “Advisor”), the Fund’s advisor, to be of comparable credit quality. The types of debt securities in which the Fund may invest include, but are not limited to, (i) asset-backed securities, including collateralized loan obligations (“CLOs”) and mortgage-backed securities, (ii) corporate bonds, notes, debentures and commercial paper, (iii) securities issued or guaranteed by the U.S. government, its agencies, instrumentalities or sponsored entities, (iv) bank loans, (v) senior secured floating rate and fixed rate loans or debt, and (vi) second lien or other subordinated or unsecured floating rate and fixed rate loans or debt. The Fund may invest a significant portion of its assets in one or more investment types. The Fund’s investment strategy involves active and frequent trading.

 

The Fund’s asset-backed securities investments may be comprised of loans or leases secured by motor vehicles or other equipment, consumer receivables from sources such as credit cards or student loans, or cash flows from operating assets such as royalties and leases.

 

Mortgage-backed securities in which the Fund may invest include those issued or guaranteed by federal agencies and/or U.S. government sponsored instrumentalities, such as the Government National Mortgage Administration (“Ginnie Mae”), the Federal Housing Administration (“FHA”), the Federal National Mortgage Association (“Fannie Mae”) and the Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation (“Freddie Mac”). The Fund may also invest in commercial mortgage-backed securities (“CMBS”) and collateralized mortgage-backed securities (“CMOs”) issued or guaranteed by private entities.

 

The Fund’s investments will generally be U.S. dollar denominated. While the Fund may invest in securities of any maturity, the Fund will maintain an average portfolio duration under normal market conditions of less than one year. Duration is a measure of the underlying portfolio’s price sensitivity to changes in prevailing interest rates. The longer a security’s duration, the more sensitive its price will be to changes in interest rates. For example, the price of a security with a one-year duration would be expected to decrease by approximately 1% in response to a 1% increase in interest rates. Calculations of duration may be based on estimates and may not reliably predict a security’s sensitivity to changes in interest rates.

 

In pursuing the Fund’s investment objectives, the Advisor uses a blend of top-down analysis, which includes macro analysis, analysis of valuation metrics across credit sectors, and sector monitoring, and bottom-up analysis, which involves individual issuer and management analysis and security/transaction evaluation that seeks to identify debt securities that it believes can provide highly competitive rate yields and total return over the long term with relatively mitigated credit risk.

 

As part of its overall investment process, the Fund’s investments are subject to the Advisor’s environmental, social and governance (“ESG”) screening process, as described below. Generally, before the Fund invests in a corporate debt security, the Advisor analyzes the issuer’s ESG risk profile using fundamental, bottom-up research as well as independent third-party data to assess whether an issuer should be considered for investment. The Advisor’s ESG screening process is designed to largely exclude issuers that it believes are inconsistent with the goals and objectives expressed in the UN Global Compact’s Principles and Sustainable Development Goals, which may change over time. In addition, the Advisor’s ESG screening process seeks to exclude debt obligations of issuers that, together with any affiliates, are involved in and derive significant revenue (i.e., more than 50% of their revenue) from certain industries or product lines, including:

 

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the speculative extraction of oil and gas (commonly referred to as exploration and production);

the speculative extraction of thermal coal or the generation of electricity using coal;

hazardous chemicals, pesticides and wastes, or ozone depleting substances;

endangered or protected wildlife or wildlife products, the production or trade of which is banned by applicable global conventions and agreements;

pornography or prostitution;

tobacco or tobacco-related products;

subprime lending or payday lending activities;

firearms or weapons, including controversial weapons (e.g., cluster bombs, anti-personnel mines, and chemical or biological weapons); and

components or services that have been specifically designed or designated for military purposes, or for the functioning of controversial weapons.

 

Principal Risks of Investing

Risk is inherent in all investing and you could lose money by investing in the Fund. A summary description of certain principal risks of investing in the Fund is set forth below. Before you decide whether to invest in the Fund, carefully consider these risk factors associated with investing in the Fund, which may cause investors to lose money. There can be no assurance that the Fund will achieve its investment objectives.

 

Market Risk. The market price of a security or instrument may decline, sometimes rapidly or unpredictably, due to general market conditions that are not specifically related to a particular company, such as real or perceived adverse economic or political conditions throughout the world, changes in the general outlook for corporate earnings, changes in interest or currency rates, or adverse investor sentiment generally. In addition, local, regional or global events such as war, acts of terrorism, the spread of infectious illness or other public health issues, or other events could have a significant impact on a security or instrument. The market value of a security or instrument also may decline because of factors that affect a particular industry or industries, such as labor shortages or increased production costs and competitive conditions within an industry.

 

Interest Rate Risk. Generally fixed income securities decrease in value if interest rates rise and increase in value if interest rates fall, with longer-term securities being more sensitive than shorter-term securities. For example, the price of a security with a three-year duration would be expected to drop by approximately 3% in response to a 1% increase in interest rates. Generally, the longer the maturity and duration of a bond or fixed rate loan, the more sensitive it is to this risk. Falling interest rates also create the potential for a decline in the Fund’s income. Changes in governmental policy, rising inflation rates, and general economic developments, among other factors, could cause interest rates to increase and could have a substantial and immediate effect on the values of the Fund’s investments. These risks are greater during periods of rising inflation. In addition, a potential rise in interest rates may result in periods of volatility and increased redemptions that might require the Fund to liquidate portfolio securities at disadvantageous prices and times.

 

Liquidity Risk. The Fund may not be able to sell some or all of the investments that it holds due to a lack of demand in the marketplace or other factors such as market turmoil, or if the Fund is forced to sell an illiquid asset to meet redemption requests or other cash needs it may only be able to sell those investments at a loss. In addition, the reduction in dealer market-making capacity in the fixed income markets that has occurred in recent years has the potential to decrease the liquidity of the Fund’s investments. Illiquid assets may also be difficult to value.

 

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Risk of Large Shareholder Redemptions. Certain entities, accounts, individuals may from time to time own (beneficially or of record) or control a significant percentage of the Fund’s shares. Redemptions by these entities, accounts or individuals of their holdings in the Fund may impact the Fund’s liquidity and NAV. These redemptions may also force the Fund to sell securities, which may negatively impact the Fund’s brokerage and tax costs.

 

Valuation Risk. The sales price the Fund could receive for any particular portfolio investment may differ from the Fund’s valuation of the investment, particularly for securities that trade in thin or volatile markets or that are valued by the Advisor using a fair value methodology. Investors who purchase or redeem Fund shares on days when the Fund is holding fair-valued securities may receive fewer or more shares or lower or higher redemption proceeds than they would have received if the Advisor had not fair-valued the security or had used a different valuation methodology.

 

Fixed Income Securities Risk. The prices of fixed income securities respond to economic developments, particularly interest rate changes, as well as to changes in an issuer’s credit rating or market perceptions about the creditworthiness of an issuer. Generally fixed income securities decrease in value if interest rates rise and increase in value if interest rates fall, and longer-term and lower rated securities are more volatile than shorter-term and higher rated securities.

 

Credit Risk. If an issuer or guarantor of a debt security held by the Fund or a counterparty to a financial contract with the Fund defaults or is downgraded or is perceived to be less creditworthy, or if the value of the assets underlying a security declines, the value of the Fund’s portfolio will typically decline.

 

Extension Risk. If interest rates rise, repayments of fixed income securities may occur more slowly than anticipated by the market. This may drive the prices of these securities down because their interest rates are lower than the current interest rate and they remain outstanding longer.

 

Bank Loan Risk. The Fund’s investments in secured and unsecured participations in bank loans and assignments of such loans may create substantial risk. In making investments in such loans, which are made by banks or other financial intermediaries to borrowers, the Fund will depend primarily upon the creditworthiness of the borrower for payment of principal and interest, which will expose the Fund to the credit risk of both the financial institution and the underlying borrower. The market for bank loans may not be highly liquid and the Fund may have difficulty selling them. Bank loan trades may also be subject to settlement delays. In addition, bank loans may not be considered securities under U.S. federal securities laws and, as a result, investments in them may not have the protection of federal securities laws.

 

Senior Loan Risk. The Fund may invest in floating or adjustable rate senior loans. These investments are subject to increased credit and liquidity risks. Senior loan prices also may be adversely affected by supply-demand imbalances caused by conditions in the senior loan market or related markets. Below investment grade senior loans, like high-yield debt securities or junk bonds, usually are more credit than interest rate sensitive, although the value of these instruments may be affected by interest rate swings in the overall fixed income market. Senior loans may be subject to structural subordination and, although the loans may be senior to equity and other debt securities in the borrower’s capital structure, the loans may be subordinated to other obligations of the borrower or its subsidiaries.

 

Collateralized Loan Obligations Risk. The Fund is subject to asset manager, legal and regulatory, limited recourse, liquidity, redemption, and reinvestment risks as a result of the structure of CLOs in which the Fund may invest. A CLO’s performance is linked to the expertise of the CLO manager and its ability to manage the CLO portfolio. Changes in the regulation of CLOs may adversely affect the value of the CLO investments held by the Fund and the ability of the Fund to execute its investment strategy. CLO debt is payable solely from the proceeds of the CLO’s underlying assets and, therefore, if the income from the underlying loans is insufficient to make payments on the CLO debt, no other assets will be available for payment. CLO debt securities may be subject to redemption and the timing of redemptions may adversely affect the returns on CLO debt. The CLO manager may not find suitable assets in which to invest and the CLO manager’s opportunities to invest may be limited. As of June 30, 2023, approximately 29% of the Fund’s assets were invested in CLOs.

 

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Mortgage-Backed and Asset-Backed Securities Risk. Mortgage-backed and asset-backed securities represent interests in “pools” of mortgages or other assets, including consumer loans or receivables held in trust. Mortgage-backed securities are subject to “prepayment risk” (the risk that borrowers will repay a loan more quickly in periods of falling interest rates) and “extension risk” (the risk that borrowers will repay a loan more slowly in periods of rising interest rates). If the Fund invests in mortgage-backed or asset-backed securities that are subordinated to other interests in the same pool, the Fund may only receive payments after the pool’s obligations to other investors have been satisfied. An unexpectedly high rate of defaults on the assets held by a pool may limit substantially the pool’s ability to make payments of principal or interest to the Fund, reducing the values of those securities or in some cases rendering them worthless. The Fund’s investments in other asset-backed securities are subject to risks similar to those associated with mortgage-backed securities, as well as additional risks associated with the nature of the assets and the servicing of those assets. As of June 30, 2023, approximately 25% of the Fund’s assets were invested in mortgage-backed and asset-backed securities.

 

Government-Sponsored Entities Risk. The Fund’s investment in U.S. government obligations may include securities issued or guaranteed as to principal and interest by the U.S. government or its agencies or instrumentalities. There can be no assurance that the U.S. government would provide financial support to its agencies or instrumentalities (including government-sponsored enterprises) where it is not obligated to do so. As of June 30, 2023, approximately 27% of the Fund’s assets were invested in U.S. government securities.

 

LIBOR Risk. The London Interbank Offered Rate (“LIBOR”) was a leading benchmark or reference rate for various commercial and financial contracts, including corporate and municipal bonds, bank loans, asset-backed and mortgage-related securities, interest rate swaps and other derivatives. On July 27, 2017, the United Kingdom’s Financial Conduct Authority announced the gradual phase out of the LIBOR rate, with nearly all LIBOR rate publications having ceased as of June 30, 2023 (some LIBOR rates continue to be published, but only on a temporary and synthetic basis). Alternatives to LIBOR have been established and others may be developed. The transition to a new reference rate may result in (i) increased volatility or illiquidity in markets for instruments or contracts that previously relied on or still rely on LIBOR; (ii) a reduction in the value of certain instruments or contracts held by the Fund; (iii) reduced effectiveness of related Fund transactions, such as hedging; (iv) additional tax, accounting and regulatory risks; or (v) costs incurred in connection with closing out positions and entering into new trades. Any pricing adjustments to the Fund’s investments resulting from a substitute reference rate may also adversely affect the Fund’s performance and/or NAV.

 

Private Placements and Restricted Securities Risk. Private placements and other restricted securities may be considered illiquid securities. Private placements typically are subject to restrictions on resale as a matter of contract or under federal securities laws. Because there may be relatively few potential purchasers for such securities, especially under adverse market or economic conditions or in the event of adverse changes in the financial condition of the issuer, the Fund could find it more difficult to sell such securities when it may be advisable to do so or it may be able to sell such securities only at prices lower than if such securities were more widely held. The absence of a liquid trading market may also make it difficult to determine the fair value of such securities for purposes of computing the Fund’s net asset value.

 

Subordinated Securities Risk. The Fund may invest in securities that are subordinated in right of payment to more senior securities of the issuer. Subordinated securities are more likely to suffer a credit loss than non-subordinated securities of the same issuer and will be disproportionately affected by a default, downgrade or perceived decline in creditworthiness.

 

ESG Criteria Risk. While the Advisor believes that the integration of ESG analysis as part of the investment process contributes to its risk management approach, the Fund’s consideration of ESG criteria in making its investment decisions may affect the Fund’s exposure to risks associated with certain issuers, industries and sectors, which may impact the Fund’s investment performance. In addition, because the Fund’s ESG criteria exclude securities of certain issuers, the Fund may forgo some market opportunities available to funds that do not use these criteria. There are significant differences in the interpretation of what it means for an issuer to have positive ESG characteristics. While the Advisor believes its ESG criteria for excluding securities of certain issuers is reasonable, the Fund’s investments may include securities of issuers that derive significant revenue from activities that are generally not within ESG guidelines.

 

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Management and Strategy Risk. The value of your investment depends on the judgment of the Advisor about the quality, relative yield, value or market trends affecting a particular security, industry, sector or region, which may prove to be incorrect.

 

Portfolio Focus Risk. To the extent a significant portion of the Fund’s assets is invested in one or more investment type, the Fund’s exposure to the risks associated with that investment type or types will be greater than if the Fund’s assets are diversified among many different investment types. As of June 30, 2023, approximately 29% of the Fund’s assets were invested in CLOs.

 

Prepayment or Call Risk. Many issuers have a right to prepay their securities. If interest rates fall, an issuer may exercise this right. If this happens, the Fund will not benefit from the rise in market price that normally accompanies a decline in interest rates, and will be forced to reinvest prepayment proceeds at a time when yields on securities available in the market are lower than the yield on the prepaid security. The Fund may also lose any premium it paid on the security.

 

Recent Market Events. Periods of market volatility may occur in response to market events and other economic, political, and global macro factors. For example, in recent years the COVID-19 pandemic, the large expansion of government deficits and debt as a result of government actions to mitigate the effects of the pandemic, Russia’s invasion of Ukraine, and the rise of inflation have resulted in extreme volatility in the global economy and in global financial markets. These and other similar events could be prolonged and could adversely affect the value and liquidity of the Fund’s investments, impair the Fund’s ability to satisfy redemption requests, and negatively impact the Fund’s performance.

 

Cybersecurity Risk. Cybersecurity incidents may allow an unauthorized party to gain access to Fund assets, customer data (including private shareholder information), or proprietary information, or cause the Fund, the Advisor, and/or other service providers (including custodians, sub-custodians, transfer agents and financial intermediaries) to suffer data breaches, data corruption or loss of operational functionality. In an extreme case, a shareholder’s ability to exchange or redeem Fund shares may be affected. Issuers of securities in which the Fund invests are also subject to cybersecurity risks, and the value of those securities could decline if the issuers experience cybersecurity incidents.

 

Portfolio Turnover Risk. Active and frequent trading of the Fund’s portfolio securities may lead to higher transaction costs and may result in a greater number of taxable transactions than would otherwise be the case, which could negatively affect the Fund’s performance. A high rate of portfolio turnover is 100% or more.

 

Performance

 

The bar chart and table below provide some indication of the risks of investing in the Fund by showing changes in the Fund’s performance from year to year and by showing how the average annual total returns of the Fund compare with the average annual total returns of a broad-based market index. Updated performance information is available at the Fund’s website, www.palmersquarefunds.com or by calling the Fund at 1-800-736-1145. The Fund’s past performance, before and after taxes, is not necessarily an indication of how the Fund will perform in the future.

 

Calendar-Year Total Return (before taxes)

For each calendar year at NAV

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The year-to-date return for the Fund as of September 30, 2023 was 4.11%.

 

Highest Calendar Quarter Return at NAV (not-annualized): 2.45% Quarter Ended June 30, 2020
Lowest Calendar Quarter Return at NAV (not-annualized): (1.61)% Quarter Ended March 31, 2020

 

Average Annual Total Returns
for the periods ended December 31, 2022  
1 Year 5 Year

Since Inception
October 7, 2016

Return Before Taxes (0.28)% 1.23% 1.27%
Return After Taxes on Distributions* (0.96)% 0.57% 0.61%
Return After Taxes on Distributions and Sale of Fund Shares*  (0.17)% 0.66% 0.69%
ICE BofA 3-Month U.S. Treasury Bill Index (reflects no deduction for fees, expenses or taxes) 1.47%

1.27%

1.17%

 

* After-tax returns are calculated using the historical highest individual federal marginal income tax rates and do not reflect the impact of state and local taxes. Actual after-tax returns depend on an investor’s tax situation and may differ from those shown. After-tax returns shown are not relevant to investors who hold their Fund shares through tax-deferred arrangements, such as 401(k) plans or individual retirement accounts.

 

Investment Advisor

Palmer Square Capital Management LLC

 

Portfolio Managers

Angie K. Long, CFA, Chief Investment Officer, and Christopher D. Long, President, have been jointly and primarily responsible for the day-to-day management of the Fund’s portfolio since its inception on October 7, 2016. Jon R. Brager, CFA, Senior Credit Analyst and Portfolio Manager, has been jointly and primarily responsible for the day-to-day management of the Fund’s portfolio since October 1, 2019.

 

Purchase and Sale of Fund Shares

Shares of the Fund are available for investment only by clients of financial intermediaries, institutional investors, and other investors approved by the Advisor.

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To purchase shares of the Fund, you must invest at least the following minimum amount.

 

Minimum Investments

To Open

Your Account

To Add to

Your Account

All Accounts $250,000 None

 

Shares of the Fund are redeemable on any business day the New York Stock Exchange (the “NYSE”) is open for business, by written request or by telephone. If you are purchasing or redeeming Fund shares through an intermediary such as a broker-dealer or bank, contact your intermediary directly.

 

Tax Information

 

The Fund’s distributions are generally taxable, and will ordinarily be taxed as ordinary income or capital gains, unless you are investing through a tax-advantaged arrangement, such as a 401(k) plan or an individual retirement account. Shareholders investing through such tax-advantaged arrangements may be taxed later upon withdrawal of monies from those arrangements.

 

Payments to Broker-Dealers and Other Financial Intermediaries

 

If you purchase shares of the Fund through a broker-dealer or other financial intermediary (such as a bank), the Fund and its related companies may pay the intermediary for the sale of Fund shares and related services. These payments may create a conflict of interest by influencing the broker-dealer or other intermediary and your salesperson to recommend the Fund over another investment. Ask your salesperson or visit your financial intermediary’s website for more information.

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MORE ABOUT THE FUNDS’ INVESTMENT OBJECTIVES, PRINCIPAL INVESTMENT STRATEGIES AND RISKS

 

 

Palmer Square Income Plus Fund

 

Investment Objectives

The Fund’s primary investment objective is to seek income. A secondary objective of the Fund is to seek capital appreciation. There is no assurance that the Fund will achieve its investment objectives. The Fund’s investment objectives are not fundamental and may be changed by the Board of Trustees without shareholder approval, upon at least 60 days’ prior written notice to shareholders. The Fund’s investment strategies and policies may be changed from time to time without shareholder approval or prior written notice, unless specifically stated otherwise in this Prospectus or the SAI.

 

Principal Investment Strategies

Under normal market conditions, the Fund invests at least 80% of its net assets (plus any borrowings for investment purposes) in debt securities. The Fund will not change this investment policy unless it gives shareholders at least 60 days’ advance written notice. The types of debt securities in which the Fund may invest include, but are not limited to, (i) asset-backed securities, including CLOs and mortgage-backed securities, (ii) corporate bonds, notes, debentures and commercial paper, (iii) securities issued or guaranteed by the U.S. Government, its agencies, instrumentalities or sponsored entities, (iv) bank loans, (v) senior secured floating rate and fixed rate loans or debt, and (vi) second lien or other subordinated or unsecured floating rate and fixed rate loans or debt and (vii) credit derivatives, including credit default swaps and their associated derivatives. The Fund may invest a significant portion of its assets in one or more investment types. The Fund’s investment strategy involves active and frequent trading.

 

The Fund’s investment in asset-backed securities may be comprised of loans or leases secured by motor vehicles or other equipment, consumer receivables from sources such as credit cards or student loans, or cash flows from operating assets such as royalties and leases.

 

Mortgage-backed securities in which the Fund may invest include those issued or guaranteed by federal agencies and/or U.S. Government sponsored instrumentalities, such as Ginnie Mae, the FHA, Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac. The Fund may also invest in CMBS and CMOs issued or guaranteed by private entities.

 

The Fund may invest in debt securities of any maturity and credit quality. Under normal market conditions, the Advisor expects that the Fund will invest primarily in securities rated investment grade at time of purchase. Investment grade securities are those rated in the Baa3 or higher categories by Moody’s, or in the BBB- or higher categories by S&P, or Fitch or, if unrated by S&P, Moody’s or Fitch, or another NRSRO, determined by the Advisor to be of comparable credit quality. However, the Fund may invest up to 30% of its net assets in high yield securities – securities rated below investment grade that generally have higher yields and higher risks than investment grade securities. High yield securities, commonly referred to as “junk bonds”, are rated below investment grade by at least one of Moody’s, S&P or Fitch (or if unrated, determined by the Advisor to be of comparable credit quality to high yield securities). The Advisor anticipates the Fund’s average portfolio duration under normal market conditions to be less than two years. Duration is a measure of the underlying portfolio’s price sensitivity to changes in prevailing interest rates. The longer a security’s duration, the more sensitive its price will be to changes in interest rates. For example, the price of a security with a two-year duration would be expected to decrease by approximately 2% in response to a 1% increase in interest rates. Calculations of duration may be based on estimates and may not reliably predict a security’s sensitivity to changes in interest rates.

 

The Fund may invest in collateralized debt obligations, including CLOs, and other similarly structured securities. CLOs are types of asset-backed securities. A CLO is a trust or other special purpose entity that is typically collateralized by a pool of loans, which may include, among others, senior secured loans, senior unsecured loans, and subordinate corporate loans, including loans that may be rated below investment grade or equivalent unrated loans.

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The Fund may invest in fixed- and floating-rate loans issued by banks. Loan interests may take the form of direct interests acquired during a primary distribution and may also take the form of assignments of, novations of or participations in a bank loan acquired in secondary markets. The Fund may purchase “assignments” of bank loans from lenders and may also invest in “participations” in bank loans.

 

The Fund may also hold short-term debt securities and money market instruments to retain flexibility in meeting redemptions and paying expenses.

 

For the purposes of achieving the Fund’s investment objectives, hedging risks, and enhancing liquidity, the Fund may also employ derivatives, such as: puts and calls on U.S. Treasury futures; options, swaps and other interest rate derivatives; and credit default swaps and their associated derivatives on selected entities or indexes (where the Fund may act as either buyer or seller). As it pertains to the Advisor’s use of derivatives for hedging, risks that can be quantitatively measured and managed include interest rate risk (duration and convexity, which is the change to duration as interest rates change), prepayment risk, spread risk and volatility risk. The Advisor’s goal is not to eliminate all risk, but to assume only those risks the Advisor views as offering a strong risk/return profile. Additionally, the Fund may employ the types of derivatives referenced above in order to achieve its investment objectives by, among other practices, replicating a certain type of credit exposure, obtaining short or long exposures to credit and/or interest rates, or taking a position in light of a potential appreciation or depreciation in value of a company’s securities. The Advisor anticipates that, in general, the net long exposure of the Fund will not exceed 100% and the Fund will not have a net short exposure. The Fund will include the market value of its derivative positions based on debt securities or interest rates for purposes of determining whether it holds at least 80% of its net assets in debt securities.

 

The Advisor employs a blend of top-down and bottom-up analysis. The top-down approach has three components: (1) macro analysis whereby the Advisor’s investment team undertakes frequent dialogues regarding macro items including the economic outlook, financial and credit markets, new and secondary issues, regulatory changes, M&A environment, and valuation levels; (2) cross-asset relative value analysis which consists of analyzing the credit spectrum for strong relative value opportunities (e.g., analysis of valuation metrics across loans, bonds, convertibles, CLOs and mortgage credits to identify and monitor optimal risk / reward opportunities); and (3) active monitoring by the investment team of the major sectors within the credit universe. With regard to the bottom-up approach, the investment team undertakes frequent dialogue discussing key analyses including items such as determining an issuer’s ability to service debt, measuring past performance and understanding the approach of the manager team and their ability to meet goals, deal structure model analysis, document analysis and other financial modeling and scenario testing. The Advisor also considers the issuer’s financial performance, business model, management quality, capital structure and balance sheet strength, and credit rating. Finally, the bottom-up approach includes trade refinement. For example, within the credit spectrum, the team also seeks to evaluate many trade specifics including, without limitation, liquidity, position size, upside/downside, and relative versus absolute value.

 

As part of its overall investment process, the Fund’s investments are subject to the Advisor’s ESG screening process, as described below. Generally, before the Fund invests in a below investment grade (i.e., “junk bonds”) corporate security, the Advisor analyzes the issuer’s ESG risk profile using fundamental, bottom-up research as well as independent third-party data to assess whether an issuer should be considered for investment. The Advisor’s ESG screening process requires that all below investment grade corporate debt issuers considered for purchased be assigned a score rating using the Advisor’s proprietary scoring methodology (an “ESG Score”), which is used as part of the Advisor’s overall assessment of whether such an issuer should be considered for investment. The Advisor may also assign an ESG Score to investment grade issuers, although generally they are not assigned an ESG Score by the Advisor. The Advisor’s ESG screening process is designed to largely exclude issuers that it believes are inconsistent with the goals and objectives expressed in the UN Global Compact’s Principles and Sustainable Development Goals, which may change over time. In addition, the Advisor’s ESG screening process seeks to exclude debt obligations of issuers that, together with any affiliates, are involved in and derive significant revenue (i.e., more than 50% of their revenue) from certain industries or product lines, including:

 

the speculative extraction of oil and gas (commonly referred to as exploration and production);

the speculative extraction of thermal coal or the generation of electricity using coal;

hazardous chemicals, pesticides and wastes, or ozone depleting substances;

endangered or protected wildlife or wildlife products, the production or trade of which is banned by applicable global conventions and agreements;

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pornography or prostitution;

tobacco or tobacco-related products;

subprime lending or payday lending activities;

firearms or weapons, including controversial weapons (e.g., cluster bombs, anti-personnel mines, and chemical or biological weapons); and

components or services that have been specifically designed or designated for military purposes, or for the functioning of controversial weapons.

 

The Advisor may sell all or a portion of a position of the Fund’s portfolio holdings when, in its opinion, one or more of the following occurs, among other reasons: (1) the deterioration of an issuer’s fundamentals; (2) changes in business strategy or key personnel; (3) rating agency downgrades or a decline in credit quality metrics; (4) the Adviser finds more attractive investment opportunities for the Fund; or (5) the Fund requires cash to meet requests for redemptions of shares.

 

When the Advisor believes that current market, economic, political or other conditions are unsuitable and would impair the pursuit of the Fund’s investment objectives, the Fund may invest some or all of its assets in cash or cash equivalents, including but not limited to, obligations of the U.S. Government, money market fund shares, commercial paper, certificates of deposit and/or bankers acceptances, as well as other interest bearing or discount obligations or debt instruments that carry an investment grade rating by a national rating agency. When the Fund takes a temporary defensive position, the Fund may not achieve its investment objectives.

 

Palmer Square Ultra-Short Duration Investment Grade Fund

 

Investment Objectives

 

The Fund’s primary investment objective is to seek income. A secondary objective of the Fund is to seek capital appreciation. There is no assurance that the Fund will achieve its investment objectives. The Fund’s investment objectives are not fundamental and may be changed by the Board of Trustees without shareholder approval, upon at least 60 days’ prior written notice to shareholders. The Fund’s investment strategies and policies may be changed from time to time without shareholder approval or prior written notice, unless specifically stated otherwise in this Prospectus or the SAI.

 

Principal Investment Strategies

 

Under normal market conditions, the Fund will invest at least 80% of its net assets (plus any borrowings for investment purposes) in debt securities rated investment grade at time of purchase. The Fund will not change this investment policy unless it gives shareholders at least 60 days’ advance written notice. Investment grade securities are those rated in the Baa3 or higher categories by Moody’s, or in the BBB- or higher categories by S&P, or Fitch or, if unrated by Moody’s, S&P, Fitch, or another NRSRO, determined by the Advisor to be of comparable credit quality.

 

The types of debt securities in which the Fund may invest include, but are not limited to, (i) asset-backed securities, including CLOs and mortgage-backed securities, (ii) corporate bonds, notes, debentures and commercial paper, (iii) securities issued or guaranteed by the U.S. government, its agencies, instrumentalities or sponsored entities, (iv) bank loans, (v) senior secured floating rate and fixed rate loans or debt, and (vi) second lien or other subordinated or unsecured floating rate and fixed rate loans or debt. The Fund may invest a significant portion of its assets in one or more investment types. While the Fund may invest in securities of any maturity, the Fund will maintain an average portfolio duration under normal market conditions of less than one year.

 

The Fund may invest in CLOs. CLOs are a type of asset-backed securities. A CLO is a trust or other special purpose entity that is typically collateralized by a pool of loans, which may include, among others, U.S. and non-U.S. senior secured loans, senior unsecured loans, and subordinate corporate loans, including loans that may be rated below investment grade or equivalent unrated loans.

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The Fund’s asset-backed securities investments may be comprised of loans or leases secured by motor vehicles or other equipment, consumer receivables from sources such as credit cards or student loans, or cash flows from operating assets such as royalties and leases.

 

Mortgage-backed securities in which the Fund may invest include those issued or guaranteed by federal agencies and/or U.S. government sponsored instrumentalities, such as Ginnie Mae, the FHA, Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac. The Fund may also invest in CMBS and CMOs issued or guaranteed by private entities.

 

The Fund’s investments will generally be U.S. dollar denominated. While the Fund may invest in securities of any maturity, the Fund will maintain an average portfolio duration under normal market conditions of less than one year. Duration is a measure of the underlying portfolio’s price sensitivity to changes in prevailing interest rates. The longer a security’s duration, the more sensitive its price will be to changes in interest rates. For example, the price of a security with a one-year duration would be expected to decrease by approximately 1% in response to a 1% increase in interest rates. Calculations of duration may be based on estimates and may not reliably predict a security’s sensitivity to changes in interest rates.

 

The Fund may invest in fixed- and floating-rate loans issued by banks. Loan interests may take the form of direct interests acquired during a primary distribution and may also take the form of assignments of, novations of or participations in a bank loan acquired in secondary markets. The Fund may purchase assignments of bank loans from lenders and may also invest in participations in bank loans.

 

The Fund may also hold short-term debt securities and money market instruments to retain flexibility in meeting redemptions and paying expenses.

 

The Advisor employs a blend of top-down and bottom-up analysis to identify debt securities that it believes can provide highly competitive rate yields and total return over the long term with relatively mitigated credit risk. The top-down approach has three components: (1) macro analysis whereby the Advisor’s investment team undertakes frequent dialogues regarding macro items, including the economic outlook, financial and credit markets, new and secondary issues, regulatory changes, M&A environment, and valuation levels; (2) cross-asset relative value analysis, which consists of analyzing the credit spectrum for strong relative value opportunities (e.g., analysis of valuation metrics across loans, bonds, convertibles, CLOs and mortgage credits to identify and monitor optimal risk / reward opportunities); and (3) active monitoring by the investment team of the major sectors within the credit universe. With regard to the bottom-up approach, the investment team undertakes frequent dialogue, discussing key analyses, including items such as determining an issuer’s ability to service debt, measuring past performance and understanding the approach of the manager team and their ability to meet goals, deal structure model analysis, document analysis and other financial modeling and scenario testing. The Advisor also considers the issuer’s financial performance, business model, management quality, capital structure and balance sheet strength, and credit rating. Finally, the bottom-up approach includes trade refinement. For example, within the credit spectrum, the team also seeks to evaluate many trade specifics including, without limitation, liquidity, position size, upside/downside, and relative versus absolute value.

 

As part of its overall investment process, the Fund’s investments are subject to the Advisor’s ESG screening process, as described below. Generally, before the Fund invests in a corporate debt security, the Advisor analyzes the issuer’s ESG risk profile using fundamental, bottom-up research as well as independent third-party data to assess whether an issuer should be considered for investment. The Advisor’s ESG screening process requires that all below investment grade corporate debt issuers be assigned a score rating using the Advisor’s proprietary scoring methodology (an “ESG Score”), which is used as part of the Advisor’s overall assessment of whether such an issuer should be considered for investment. The Advisor may also assign an ESG Score to investment grade issuers, although generally they are not assigned an ESG Score by the Advisor. The Advisor’s ESG screening process is designed to largely exclude issuers that it believes are inconsistent with the goals and objectives expressed in the UN Global Compact’s Principles and Sustainable Development Goals, which may change over time. In addition, the Advisor’s ESG screening process seeks to exclude debt obligations of issuers that, together with any affiliates, are involved in and derive significant revenue (i.e., more than 50% of their revenue) from certain industries or product lines, including:

 

the speculative extraction of oil and gas (commonly referred to as exploration and production);

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the speculative extraction of thermal coal or the generation of electricity using coal;

hazardous chemicals, pesticides and wastes, or ozone depleting substances;

endangered or protected wildlife or wildlife products, the production or trade of which is banned by applicable global conventions and agreements;

pornography or prostitution;

tobacco or tobacco-related products;

subprime lending or payday lending activities;

firearms or weapons, including controversial weapons (e.g., cluster bombs, anti-personnel mines, and chemical or biological weapons); and

components or services that have been specifically designed or designated for military purposes, or for the functioning of controversial weapons.

 

The Advisor may sell all or a portion of a position of the Fund’s portfolio holdings when, in its opinion, one or more of the following occurs, among other reasons: (1) the Advisor believes the issuer’s fundamentals have deteriorated; (2) the issuer changes its business strategy or key personnel; (3) rating agency downgrades or a decline in credit quality metrics; (4) the Advisor identifies more attractive investment opportunities for the Fund; or (5) the Fund requires cash to meet requests for redemptions of shares.

 

When the Advisor believes that current market, economic, political or other conditions are unsuitable and would impair the pursuit of the Fund's investment objectives, the Fund may invest some or all of its assets in cash or cash equivalents, including but not limited to, obligations of the U.S. government, money market fund shares, commercial paper, certificates of deposit and/or bankers acceptances, as well as other interest bearing or discount obligations or debt instruments that carry an investment grade rating by a national rating agency. When the Fund takes a temporary defensive position, it could reduce any benefit from any upswing in the general market. During such periods, the Fund may not achieve its investment objectives.

 

Principal Risks of Investing in the Funds

 

The Funds’ principal risks are set forth below. Before you decide whether to invest in the Fund, carefully consider these risk factors and special considerations associated with investing in the Fund, which may cause you to lose money.

 

Market Risk. The market price of a security or instrument may decline, sometimes rapidly or unpredictably, due to general market conditions that are not specifically related to a particular company, such as real or perceived adverse economic or political conditions throughout the world, changes in the general outlook for corporate earnings, changes in interest or currency rates, or adverse investor sentiment generally. The market value of a security or instrument also may decline because of factors that affect a particular industry or industries, such as labor shortages or increased production costs and competitive conditions within an industry. In addition, local, regional or global events such as war, acts of terrorism, the spread of infectious illness or other public health issues, or other events could have a significant impact on a security or instrument. For example, the financial crisis that began in 2007 caused a significant decline in the value and liquidity of many securities; in particular, the values of some sovereign debt and of securities of issuers that invest in sovereign debt and related investments fell, credit became more scarce worldwide and there was significant uncertainty in the markets. More recently, higher inflation, Russia’s invasion of Ukraine and the COVID-19 pandemic have negatively affected the worldwide economy, as well as the economies of individual countries, the financial health of individual companies and the market in general in significant and unforeseen ways. Such environments could make identifying investment risks and opportunities especially difficult for the Advisor. In response to the crises, the United States and other governments took steps to support financial markets. The withdrawal of support or failure of efforts in response to a crisis could negatively affect financial markets generally as well as the value and liquidity of certain securities. In addition, policy and legislative changes in the United States and in other countries are changing many aspects of financial regulation. The impact of these changes on the markets, and the practical implications for market participants, may not be fully known for some time.

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Interest Rate Risk. Prices of fixed income securities tend to move inversely with changes in interest rates. Generally fixed income securities decrease in value if interest rates rise and increase in value if interest rates fall, with longer-term securities being more sensitive than shorter-term securities. For example, the price of a security with a three-year duration would be expected to drop by approximately 3% in response to a 1% increase in interest rates. Duration is a weighted measure of the length of time required to receive the present value of future payments, both interest and principal, from a fixed income security. Generally, the longer the maturity and duration of a bond or fixed rate loan, the more sensitive it is to this risk. Falling interest rates also create the potential for a decline in the Fund’s income. Changes in governmental policy, rising inflation rates, and general economic developments, among other factors, could cause interest rates to increase and could have a substantial and immediate effect on the values of the Fund’s investments. These risks are greater during periods of rising inflation. In addition, a potential rise in interest rates may result in periods of volatility and increased redemptions that might require the Fund to liquidate portfolio securities at disadvantageous prices and times.

 

Variable and floating rate securities generally are less sensitive to interest rate changes but may decline in value if their interest rates do not rise as much, or as quickly, as interest rates in general. Floating rate and adjustable rate debt securities will not generally increase in value if interest rates decline. When the Fund holds floating or adjustable rate debt securities, a decrease (or, in the case of inverse floating rate securities, an increase) in market interest rates will adversely affect the income received from such securities and the net asset value of the Fund’s shares. Investments in debt securities pose the risk that the Advisor’s forecast of the direction of interest rates might be incorrect.

 

Liquidity Risk. Due to a lack of demand in the marketplace or other factors, such as market turmoil, the Fund may not be able to sell some or all of the investments that it holds, or if the Fund is forced to sell an illiquid asset to meet redemption requests or other cash needs, it may only be able to sell those investments at a loss. Liquidity risk arises, for example, from small average trading volumes, trading restrictions, or temporary suspensions of trading. In addition, when the market for certain investments is illiquid, the Fund may be unable to achieve its desired level of exposure to a certain sector. Liquid investments may become illiquid or less liquid after purchase by the Fund, particularly during periods of market turmoil. Illiquid and relatively less liquid investments may be harder to value, especially in changing markets. Moreover, the reduction in dealer market-making capacity in the fixed income markets that has occurred in recent years has the potential to decrease the liquidity of the Fund’s investments. Liquidity risk may be more pronounced for the Fund’s investments in developing countries.

 

Risk of Large Shareholder Redemptions (Palmer Square Ultra-Short Duration Investment Grade Fund). Certain entities, accounts, individuals may from time to time own (beneficially or of record) or control a significant percentage of the Fund’s shares. Redemptions by these entities, accounts or individuals of their holdings in the Fund may impact the Fund’s liquidity and NAV. These redemptions may also force the Fund to sell securities, which may negatively impact the Fund’s brokerage and tax costs.

 

Valuation Risk. Many factors may influence the price at which the Fund could sell any particular portfolio investment. The sales price may well differ—higher or lower—from the Fund’s last valuation, and such differences could be significant, particularly for illiquid securities and securities that trade in relatively thin markets and/or markets that experience extreme volatility. If market conditions make it difficult to value some investments, the Advisor may value these investments using more subjective methods, such as fair value methodologies. Investors who purchase or redeem Fund shares on days when the Fund is holding fair-valued securities may receive fewer or more shares, or lower or higher redemption proceeds, than they would have received if the Advisor had not fair-valued the securities or had used a different valuation methodology. The value of foreign securities, certain fixed income securities, and currencies may be materially affected by events after the close of the market on which they are valued but before the Fund determines its net asset value.

 

Fixed Income Securities Risk. The prices of fixed income securities respond to economic developments, particularly interest rate changes, as well as to changes in an issuer’s credit rating or market perceptions about the creditworthiness of an issuer. Prices of fixed income securities tend to move inversely with changes in interest rates. Generally fixed income securities decrease in value if interest rates rise and increase in value if interest rates fall, with lower rated securities more volatile than higher rated securities. The longer the effective maturity and duration of the Fund’s portfolio, the more the Fund’s share price is likely to react to changes in interest rates. Duration is a weighted measure of the length of time required to receive the present value of future payments, both interest and principal, from a fixed income security. Some fixed income securities give the issuer the option to call, or redeem, the securities before their maturity dates. If an issuer calls its security during a time of declining interest rates, the Fund might have to reinvest the proceeds in an investment offering a lower yield, and therefore might not benefit from any increase in value of the security as a result of declining interest rates. During periods of market illiquidity or rising interest rates, prices of callable issues are subject to increased price fluctuation. In addition, the Fund may be subject to extension risk, which occurs during a rising interest rate environment because certain obligations may be paid off by an issuer more slowly than anticipated, causing the value of those securities held by the Fund to fall.

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Credit Risk. If an obligor (such as the issuer itself or a party offering credit enhancement) for a security held by the Fund fails to pay amounts due when required by the terms of the security, otherwise defaults, is perceived to be less creditworthy, becomes insolvent or files for bankruptcy, a security’s credit rating is downgraded or the credit quality or value of any underlying assets declines, the value of the Fund’s investment could decline. If the Fund enters into financial contracts (such as certain derivatives, repurchase agreements, reverse repurchase agreements, and when-issued, delayed delivery and forward commitment transactions), the Fund will be subject to the credit risk presented by the counterparties. Credit risk is broadly gauged by the credit ratings of the securities in which the Fund invests.

 

Extension Risk. When interest rates rise, repayments of fixed income securities, particularly asset- and mortgage-backed securities, may occur more slowly than anticipated, extending the effective duration of these fixed income securities at below market interest rates and causing their market prices to decline more than they would have declined due to the rise in interest rates alone. This may cause the Fund’s share price to be more volatile.

 

High Yield (“Junk”) Bond Risk (Palmer Square Income Plus Fund). High yield bonds (often called “junk bonds”) are speculative, involve greater risks of default or downgrade and are more volatile and tend to be less liquid than investment-grade securities. High yield bonds involve a greater risk of price declines than investment-grade securities due to actual or perceived changes in an issuer’s creditworthiness. Companies issuing high yield fixed-income securities are less financially strong, are more likely to encounter financial difficulties, and are more vulnerable to adverse market events and negative sentiments than companies with higher credit ratings. These factors could affect such companies’ abilities to make interest and principal payments and ultimately could cause such companies to stop making interest and/or principal payments. In such cases, payments on the securities may never resume, which would result in the securities owned by the Fund becoming worthless. The market prices of junk bonds are generally less sensitive to interest rate changes than higher rated investments, but more sensitive to adverse economic or political changes or individual developments specific to the issuer.

 

Bank Loan Risk. The Fund’s investments in secured and unsecured participations in bank loans and assignments of such loans may create substantial risk. In making investments in such loans, which are made by banks or other financial intermediaries to borrowers, the Fund will depend primarily upon the creditworthiness of the borrower for payment of principal and interest, which will expose the Fund to the credit risk of both the financial institution and the underlying borrower. The market for bank loans may not be highly liquid and the Fund may have difficulty selling them. Bank loan trades may also be subject to settlement delays. In addition, bank loans may not be considered securities under U.S. federal securities laws and, as a result, investments in them may not have the protection of federal securities laws. The purchaser of an assignment typically succeeds to all the rights and obligations under the loan agreement with the same rights and obligations as the assigning lender. Assignments may, however, be arranged through private negotiations between potential assignees and potential assignors, and the rights and obligations acquired by the purchaser of an assignment may differ from, and be more limited than, those held by the assigning lender. Participations by the Fund in a lender’s portion of a bank loan typically will result in the Fund having a contractual relationship only with such lender, not with the borrower. The Fund may have the right to receive payments of principal, interest and any fees to which it is entitled only from the lender selling a loan participation and only upon receipt by such lender of such payments from the borrower. In connection with purchasing participations, the Fund generally will have no right to enforce compliance by the borrower with the terms of the loan agreement, nor any rights with respect to any funds acquired by other lenders through set-off against the borrower, and the Fund may not directly benefit from any collateral supporting the loan in which it has purchased the participation. As a result, the Fund may assume the credit risk of both the borrower and the lender selling the participation.

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Senior Loan Risk. The Fund’s investments in floating or adjustable rate senior loans are subject to increased credit and liquidity risks. Senior loan prices also may be adversely affected by supply-demand imbalances caused by conditions in the senior loan market or related markets. Below investment grade senior loans, like high-yield debt securities, or junk bonds, usually are more credit than interest rate sensitive, although the value of these instruments may be affected by interest rate swings in the overall fixed income market. Senior loans may be subject to structural subordination and, although the loans may be senior to equity and other debt securities in the borrower’s capital structure, the loans may be subordinated to other obligations of the borrower or its subsidiaries. Economic downturns generally increase non-payment rates and a senior loan could lose a substantial part of its value prior to default. Senior secured loans may not be adequately collateralized. The interest rates of senior loans reset frequently, and thus senior loans are subject to interest rate risk. Senior loans typically have less liquidity than investment grade bonds. Investing in senior loan participations exposes the Fund to the credit of the counterparty issuing the participation in addition to the credit of the ultimate borrower.

 

Many senior loans in which the Fund may invest may not be rated by a rating agency, generally will not be registered with the SEC and generally will not be listed on a securities exchange. In addition, the amount of public information available with respect to senior loans generally may be less extensive than that available for registered and exchange-listed securities. Economic and other events (whether real or perceived) can reduce the demand for certain senior loans or senior loans generally, which may reduce market prices and cause the Fund’s net asset value per share to fall. The frequency and magnitude of such changes cannot be predicted. No active trading market currently exists for some senior loans in which the Fund may invest and, thus, those loans may be illiquid. As a result, such senior loans generally are more difficult to value than more liquid securities for which a trading market exists.

 

Collateralized Loan Obligations Risk. The Fund is subject to the following risks as a result of its investments in CLOs:

 

Asset Manager Risk. The CLO’s performance is linked to the expertise of the CLO manager and its ability to manage the CLO portfolio. The experience of a CLO manager plays an important role in the rating and risk assessment of CLO debt securities. One of the primary risks to investors of a CLO is the potential change in CLO manager, over which the Fund will have no control.

 

Legal and Regulatory Risk. The Fund may be adversely affected by new (or revised) laws or regulations that may be imposed by government regulators or self-regulatory organizations that supervise the financial markets. These agencies are empowered to promulgate a variety of rules pursuant to financial reform legislation in the United States. The Fund may also be adversely affected by changes in the enforcement or interpretation of existing statutes and rules. Changes in the regulation of CLOs may adversely affect the value of the investments held by the Fund and the ability of the Fund to execute its investment strategy.

 

Limited Recourse Risk. CLO debt securities are limited recourse obligations of their issuers. CLO debt is payable solely from the proceeds of its underlying assets. Consequently, CLO investors must rely solely on distributions from the underlying assets for payments on the CLO debt they hold. No party or entity other than the issuer will be obligated to make payments on CLO debt. CLO debt is not guaranteed by the issuer or any other party or entity involved in the organization and management of a CLO. If income from the underlying loans is insufficient to make payments on the CLO debt, no other assets will be available for payment.

 

Redemption Risk. CLO debt securities may be subject to redemption. For example, certain tranches of CLO debt may be redeemed if the CLO manager is unable to identify assets suitable for investment during the period when it has the ability to reinvest the principal proceeds from the sale of assets, scheduled redemptions and prepayments in additional assets (the “Reinvestment Period”). Additionally, holders of subordinated CLO debt may cause the redemption of senior CLO debt. In the event of an early redemption, holders of the CLO debt being redeemed will be repaid earlier than the stated maturity of the debt. The timing of redemptions may adversely affect the returns on CLO debt.

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Reinvestment Risk. The CLO manager may not find suitable assets in which to invest during the Reinvestment Period or to replace assets that the manager has determined are no longer suitable for investment (for example, if a security has been downgraded by a rating agency). Additionally, the reinvestment period is a pre-determined finite period of time; however, there is a risk that the reinvestment period may terminate early if, for example, the CLO defaults on payments on the securities which it issues or if the CLO manager determines that it can no longer reinvest in underlying assets. Early termination of the Reinvestment Period could adversely affect a CLO investment.

 

Derivatives Risk (Palmer Square Income Plus Fund). Derivatives are subject to a number of risks, such as liquidity risk, interest rate risk, market risk, credit risk and management risk. They also involve the risk of mispricing or improper valuation and the risk that changes in the value of a derivative held by the Fund may not correlate with the value of the underlying asset, rate or index. The effectiveness of a derivative strategy is dependent on the Advisor’s ability to correctly predict movements in the prices of individual securities and fluctuations in interest rates, the general securities markets and other economic factors. Investing in a derivative instrument could cause the Fund to lose more than the principal amount invested and a small investment in a derivative could have a potentially large impact on the Fund’s performance. Also, derivatives used to hedge against one or more positions in the Fund’s portfolio may offset losses while limiting potential related gains. Suitable derivative transactions may not be available as needed and there is no assurance that the Advisor will be able to successfully engage in these transactions in order to reduce perceived risks to the Fund’s portfolio. Recent legislation in the United States calls for new regulation of the derivatives markets. The extent and impact of the regulation are not yet fully known and may not be for some time. New regulation of derivatives may make them more costly, may limit their availability, or may otherwise adversely affect their value or performance. Certain risks relating to various types of derivatives in which the Fund may invest are described below.

 

Futures Contracts. The Fund may invest in futures that trade on either an exchange or over-the-counter. A futures contract obligates the seller to deliver (and the purchaser to take delivery of) the specified security, commodity or currency underlying the contract on the expiration date of the contract at an agreed upon price. An index futures contract obligates the seller to deliver (and the purchaser to take) an amount of cash equal to a specific dollar amount multiplied by the difference between the value of a specific index at the close of the last trading day of the contract and the price at which the agreement is made. No physical delivery of the underlying securities in the index is made. Generally, these futures contracts are closed out prior to the expiration date of the contracts. The value of a futures contract tends to increase and decrease in correlation with the value of the underlying instrument. Risks of futures contracts may arise from an imperfect correlation between movements in the price of the instruments and the price of the underlying securities. The Fund’s use of futures contracts (and related options) exposes the Fund to leverage risk because of the small margin requirements relative to the value of the futures contract. A relatively small market movement will have a proportionately larger impact on the funds that the Fund has deposited or will have to deposit with a broker to maintain its futures position. Leverage can lead to large losses as well as gains. While futures contracts are generally liquid instruments, under certain market conditions they may become illiquid. Futures exchanges may impose daily or intraday price change limits and/or limit the volume of trading. Additionally, government regulation may further reduce liquidity through similar trading restrictions. As a result, the Fund may be unable to close out its futures contracts at a time that is advantageous. The price of futures can be highly volatile; using them could lower total return, and the potential loss from futures can exceed the Fund’s initial investment in such contracts.

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Liquidity of Futures Contracts. In connection with the Fund’s use of futures, the Advisor will determine and pursue all steps that are necessary and advisable to ensure compliance with the Commodity Exchange Act and the rules and regulations promulgated thereunder. Futures positions may be illiquid because certain commodity exchanges limit fluctuations in certain futures contract prices during a single day (each a "daily limit”). During a single trading day, no trades may be executed at prices beyond such daily limits. Once the price of a particular futures contract has increased or decreased by an amount equal to the daily limit, positions in that contract can neither be entered into nor liquidated unless traders are willing to effect trades at or within the limit. Futures prices have occasionally moved beyond the daily limits for several consecutive days with little or no trading. Over-the-counter instruments generally are not as liquid as instruments traded on recognized exchanges. These constraints could prevent the Fund from promptly liquidating unfavorable positions, thereby subjecting the Fund to substantial losses. In addition, the Commodity Futures Trading Commission and various exchanges limit the number of positions that the Fund may indirectly hold or control in particular commodities.

 

Illiquidity. Derivative instruments, especially when traded in large amounts, may not always be liquid. In such cases, in volatile markets the Fund may not be able to close out a position without incurring a loss. Daily limits on price fluctuations and speculative position limits on exchanges on which the Fund may conduct its transactions in derivative instruments may prevent profitable liquidation of positions, subjecting the Fund to potentially greater losses.

 

Call Options. The seller (writer) of a call option which is covered (i.e., the writer holds the underlying security) assumes the risk of a decline in the market price of the underlying security below the purchase price of the underlying security less the premium received, and gives up the opportunity for gain on the underlying security above the exercise price of the option. The seller of an uncovered call option assumes the risk of a theoretically unlimited increase in the market price of the underlying security above the exercise price of the option. The buyer of a call option assumes the risk of losing its entire investment in the call option. However, if the buyer of the call sells short the underlying security, the loss on the call will be offset in whole or in part by gain on the short sale of the underlying security.

 

Put Options. The seller (writer) of a put option which is covered (i.e., the writer has a short position in the underlying security) assumes the risk of an increase in the market price of the underlying security above the sales price (in establishing the short position) of the underlying security plus the premium received, and gives up the opportunity for gain on the short position for values of the underlying security below the exercise price of the option. The seller of an uncovered put option assumes the risk of a decline in the market price of the underlying security below the exercise price of the option. The buyer of a put option assumes the risk of losing its entire investment in the put option. However, if the buyer of the put holds the underlying security, the loss on the put will be offset in whole or in part by any gain on the underlying security.

 

Over-the-Counter, Non-Cleared Derivatives Transactions. The Fund may enter into derivatives that are not traded on an exchange or other organized facility or contract market. Many of these instruments are also not required to be cleared or are not cleared on a voluntary basis. Derivatives traded in an over-the-counter, non-cleared trading environment are generally illiquid. In that environment, the Fund would be exposed to the risk of nonperformance by its counterparty to a derivatives transaction. The Fund would not be able to avail itself of potential protections from that risk afforded in a cleared or on-facility trading environment, including the transfer of counterparty risk to a clearinghouse or the potential greater ease of terminating a position or entering into an offsetting transaction in a market that could have multiple potential trading counterparties. In situations where the Fund is required to post margin or other collateral with a counterparty, the counterparty may fail to segregate the collateral or may commingle the collateral with the counterparty's own assets. As a result, in the event of the counterparty's bankruptcy or insolvency, the Fund's collateral may be subject to the conflicting claims of the counterparty's creditors and the Fund may be exposed to the risk of being treated as a general unsecured creditor of the counterparty, rather than as the owner of the collateral.

 

Bilateral derivatives trading has become subject to increased regulation under recent financial reform laws, and further proposed measures – such as margin requirements for non-cleared transactions – may offer market participants additional protections once implemented. Nonetheless, the Fund will not be fully protected from risks that are present in an over-the-counter, non-cleared trading environment.

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Cleared Derivatives Transactions. Transactions in certain derivatives, including some classes of swaps, that are traded on exchanges or other organized regulated trading facilities must be settled (“cleared”) by a regulated clearinghouse. For cleared derivatives transactions, the Fund will be subject to risks that may arise from its relationship with a brokerage firm through which it submits derivatives trades for clearing, including counterparty risk. A brokerage firm typically imposes margin requirements with respect to open derivatives positions, and it is generally able to require termination of those positions in specified circumstances. These margin requirements and termination provisions may adversely affect the Fund’s ability to trade derivatives. The Fund may not be able to recover the full amount of its margin from a brokerage firm if the firm were to go into bankruptcy. The Fund would also be exposed to the credit risk of the clearinghouse.

 

Swap Transactions. The Funds may enter into swap transactions. A swap contract is a commitment between two parties to make or receive payments based on agreed upon terms, and whose value and payments are derived by changes in the value of an underlying financial instrument. Swap transactions can take many different forms and are known by a variety of names. Depending on their structure, swap transactions may increase or decrease a Fund’s exposure to long-term or short-term interest rates, foreign currency values, corporate borrowing rates, or other factors such as security prices, values of baskets of securities, or inflation rates. Interest rate swaps are contracts involving the exchange between two contracting parties of their respective commitments to pay or receive interest (e.g., an exchange of floating rate payments for fixed rate payments). Credit default swaps are contracts whereby one party makes periodic payments to a counterparty in exchange for the right to receive from the counterparty a payment equal to the par (or other agreed-upon) value of an underlying debt obligation in the event of default by the issuer of the debt security. Total return swaps are contracts in which one party agrees to make periodic payments based on the change in market value of the underlying assets, which may include a specified security, basket of securities or security indexes during the specified period, in return for periodic payments based on a fixed or variable interest rate of the total return from other underlying assets. Depending on how they are used, swap transactions may increase or decrease the overall volatility of a Fund’s portfolio. The most significant factor in the performance of a swap transaction is the change in the specific interest rate, currency, individual equity values or other factors that determine the amounts of payments due to and from a Fund.

 

Counterparty Credit Risk. Many purchases, sales, financing arrangements, and derivative transactions in which the Fund may engage involve instruments that are not traded on an exchange. Rather, these instruments are traded between counterparties based on contractual relationships. As a result, the Fund is subject to the risk that a counterparty will not perform its obligations under the related contract. Although the Fund expects to enter into transactions only with counterparties believed by the Advisor to be creditworthy, there can be no assurance that a counterparty will not default and that the Fund will not sustain a loss on a transaction as a result.

 

In situations where the Fund is required to post margin or other collateral with a counterparty, the counterparty may fail to segregate the collateral or may commingle the collateral with the counterparty's own assets. As a result, in the event of the counterparty's bankruptcy or insolvency, the Fund's collateral may be subject to the conflicting claims of the counterparty's creditors and the Fund may be exposed to the risk of being treated as a general unsecured creditor of the counterparty, rather than as the owner of the collateral.

 

The Fund is subject to the risk that issuers of the instruments in which it invests and trades may default on their obligations, and that certain events may occur that have an immediate and significant adverse effect on the value of those instruments. There can be no assurance that an issuer will not default, or that an event that has an immediate and significant adverse effect on the value of an instrument will not occur, and that the Fund will not sustain a loss on a transaction as a result.

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Mortgage-Backed and Asset-Backed Securities Risk. Mortgage-related and asset-backed securities are subject to certain additional risks. Generally, rising interest rates tend to extend the duration of fixed rate mortgage-backed securities, making them more sensitive to changes in interest rates. As a result, in a period of rising interest rates, if the Fund holds mortgage-backed securities, it may exhibit additional volatility. This is known as “extension risk.” In addition, adjustable and fixed rate mortgage-backed securities are subject to “prepayment risk.” When interest rates decline, borrowers may pay off their mortgages sooner than expected. This can reduce the returns of the Fund because the Fund may have to reinvest that money at lower prevailing interest rates. The Fund’s investments in other asset-backed securities are subject to risks similar to those associated with mortgage-backed securities, as well as additional risks associated with the nature of the assets and the servicing of those assets.

 

The Fund may invest in mortgage-backed securities issued by the U.S. Government or by non-governmental issuers. To the extent that the Fund invests in mortgage-backed securities offered by non-governmental issuers, such as commercial banks, savings and loan institutions, private mortgage insurance companies, mortgage bankers and other secondary market issuers, the Fund may be subject to additional risks. Timely payment of interest and principal of non-governmental issuers are supported by various forms of private insurance or guarantees, including individual loan, title, pool and hazard insurance purchased by the issuer. There can be no assurance that the private insurers can meet their obligations under the policies. An unexpectedly high rate of defaults on the mortgages held by a mortgage pool may adversely affect the value of a mortgage-backed security and could result in losses to the Fund. The risk of such defaults is generally higher in the case of mortgage pools that include subprime mortgages. Subprime mortgages refer to loans made to borrowers with weakened credit histories or with a lower capacity to make timely payments on their mortgages.

 

Government-Sponsored Entities Risk. The Fund’s investment in U.S. government obligations may include securities issued or guaranteed as to principal and interest by the U.S. government, or its agencies or instrumentalities. Payment of principal and interest on U.S. government obligations may be backed by the full faith and credit of the United States or may be backed solely by the issuing or guaranteeing agency or instrumentality itself. There can be no assurance that the U.S. government would provide financial support to its agencies or instrumentalities (including government-sponsored enterprises) when it is not obligated to do so.

 

Subordinated Securities Risk. The Fund may invest in securities which are subordinated in right of payment to more senior securities of the issuer, or which represent interests in pools of such subordinated securities. Holders of securities that are subordinated or “junior” to more senior securities of an issuer are entitled to payment after holders of more senior securities of the issuer. Subordinated securities are more likely to suffer a credit loss than non-subordinated securities of the same issuer, any loss incurred by the subordinated securities is likely to be proportionately greater, and any recovery of interest or principal may take more time. As a result, even a perceived decline in creditworthiness of the issuer is likely to have a greater impact on the market value of these securities. If there is a default, bankruptcy or liquidation of the issuer, most subordinated securities are paid only if sufficient assets remain after payment of the issuer’s non-subordinated securities. In addition, any recovery of interest or principal may take more time. Subordinated loans generally have greater price volatility than senior loans and may be less liquid. The risks associated with subordinated unsecured loans, which are not backed by a security interest in any specific collateral, are higher than those for comparable loans that are secured by specific collateral.

 

Private Placements and Restricted Securities Risk. Private placement securities are securities that have been privately placed and are not registered under the Securities Act of 1933, as amended (the “Securities Act”). They are eligible for sale only to certain eligible investors. Private placements often may offer attractive opportunities for investment not otherwise available on the open market. Private placement and other “restricted” securities often cannot be sold to the public without registration under the Securities Act or an exemption from registration (such as Rules 144 or 144A).

28

 

Investing in private placements and other restricted securities is subject to certain risks. Private placements may be considered illiquid securities. Private placements typically are subject to restrictions on resale as a matter of contract or under federal securities laws. Because there may be relatively few potential purchasers for such securities, especially under adverse market or economic conditions or in the event of adverse changes in the financial condition of the issuer, the Fund could find it more difficult to sell such securities when it may be advisable to do so or it may be able to sell such securities only at prices lower than if such securities were more widely held. At times, it also may be more difficult to determine the fair value of such securities for purposes of computing the Fund’s net asset value due to the absence of a trading market. Also, the Fund may get only limited information about the issuer of a restricted security, so it may be less able to predict a loss.

 

LIBOR Risk. LIBOR was a leading benchmark or reference rate for various commercial and financial contracts, including corporate and municipal bonds, bank loans, asset-backed and mortgage-related securities, interest rate swaps and other derivatives. On July 27, 2017, the United Kingdom’s Financial Conduct Authority announced the gradual phase out of the LIBOR rate, with nearly all LIBOR rate publications having ceased as of June 30, 2023 (some LIBOR rates continue to be published, but only on a temporary and synthetic basis). Alternatives to LIBOR have been established and others may be developed. The U.S. Federal Reserve, in conjunction with the Alternative Reference Rates Committee, a steering committee comprised of large U.S. financial institutions, has identified the Secured Overnight Financing Rate (“SOFR”) as the preferred alternative rate to LIBOR. SOFR is a relatively new index calculated by short-term repurchase agreements, backed by Treasury securities. There remains uncertainty surrounding the nature of any replacement rates.

 

The transition to a new reference rate may result in (i) increased volatility or illiquidity in markets for instruments or contracts that previously relied on or still rely on LIBOR; (ii) a reduction in the value of certain instruments or contracts held by the Fund; (iii) reduced effectiveness of related Fund transactions, such as hedging; (iv) additional tax, accounting and regulatory risks; or (v) costs incurred in connection with closing out positions and entering into new trades. Any pricing adjustments to the Fund’s investments resulting from a substitute reference rate may also adversely affect the Fund’s performance and/or NAV. There is no assurance that the composition or characteristics of any such alternative reference rate will be similar to or produce the same value or economic equivalence as LIBOR or that instruments or contracts using an alternative rate will have the same volume or liquidity.

 

ESG Criteria Risk. While the Advisor believes that the integration of ESG analysis as part of the investment process contributes to its risk management approach, the Fund’s consideration of ESG criteria in making its investment decisions may affect the Fund’s exposure to risks associated with certain issuers, industries and sectors, which may impact the Fund’s investment performance. In addition, because the Fund’s ESG criteria exclude securities of certain issuers, the Fund may forgo some market opportunities available to funds that do not use these criteria. There are significant differences in the interpretation of what it means for an issuer to have positive ESG characteristics. While the Advisor believes its ESG criteria for excluding securities of certain issuers is reasonable, the Fund’s investments may include securities of issuers that derive revenue from non-ESG activities. Furthermore, ESG information from third-party data providers may be incomplete, inaccurate or unavailable, which could cause the Advisor to incorrectly assess a company’s ESG characteristics. Moreover, ESG information, whether from an external and/or internal source, is, by nature and in many instances, based on a qualitative and subjective assessment. Moreover, the third-party data providers may differ in the data they provide for a given security or between industries, or may only take into account one of many ESG-related components of a company.

 

Management and Strategy Risk. The value of your investment depends on the judgment of the Advisor about the quality, relative yield, value or market trends affecting a particular security, industry, sector or region, which may prove to be incorrect. Investment strategies employed by the Advisor in selecting investments for the Fund may not result in an increase in the value of your investment or in overall performance equal to other investments.

29

 

Portfolio Focus Risk. To the extent a significant portion of the Fund’s assets is invested in one or more investment type, the Fund’s exposure to the risks associated with that investment type or types will be greater than if the Fund’s assets are diversified among many different investment types.

 

Prepayment or Call Risk. Many fixed income securities give the issuer the option to repay or call the security prior to its maturity date. Issuers often exercise this right when interest rates fall. Accordingly, if the Fund holds a fixed income security subject to prepayment or call risk, it may not benefit fully from the increase in value that other fixed income securities generally experience when interest rates fall. Upon prepayment of the security, the Fund would also be forced to reinvest the proceeds at then current yields, which would be lower than the yield of the security that was paid off. In addition, if the Fund purchases a fixed income security at a premium (at a price that exceeds its stated par or principal value), the Fund may lose the amount of the premium paid in the event of prepayment.

 

Short Sales Risk (Palmer Square Income Plus Fund). In connection with a short sale of a security or other instrument, the Fund is subject to the risk that instead of declining, the price of the security or other instrument sold short will rise. If the price of the security or other instrument sold short increases between the date of the short sale and the date on which the Fund replaces the security or other instrument borrowed to make the short sale, the Fund will experience a loss, which is theoretically unlimited since there is a theoretically unlimited potential for the market price of a security or other instrument sold short to increase. Shorting options or futures may have an imperfect correlation to the assets held by the Fund and may not adequately protect against losses in or may result in greater losses for the Fund’s portfolio. By investing the proceeds received from selling securities short, the Fund is employing leverage, which creates special risks. Furthermore, until the Fund replaces a security borrowed, or sold short, it must pay to the lender amounts equal to any dividends that accrue during the period of the short sale. In addition, the Fund will incur certain transaction fees associated with short selling.

 

Recent Market Events. Periods of market volatility may occur in response to market events and other economic, political, and global macro factors. The COVID-19 pandemic, Russia’s invasion of Ukraine, and higher inflation have resulted in extreme volatility in the financial markets, economic downturns around the world, and severe losses, particularly to some sectors of the economy and individual issuers, and reduced liquidity of certain instruments. These events have caused significant disruptions to business operations, including business closures; strained healthcare systems; disruptions to supply chains and employee availability; large fluctuations in consumer demand; large expansion of government deficits and debt as a result of government actions to mitigate the effects of such events; and widespread uncertainty regarding the long-term effects of such events.

 

Governments and central banks, including the Federal Reserve in the United States, took extraordinary and unprecedented actions to support local and global economies and the financial markets in response to the COVID-19 pandemic, including by keeping interest rates at historically low levels for an extended period. The Federal Reserve concluded its market support activities in 2022 and began to raise interest rates in an effort to fight inflation. The Federal Reserve may determine to raise interest rates further. This and other government intervention into the economy and financial markets to address the pandemic, inflation, or other significant events in the future, may not work as intended, particularly if the efforts are perceived by investors as being unlikely to achieve the desired results.

 

Such events could be prolonged and could adversely affect the value and liquidity of the Fund’s investments, impair the Fund’s ability to satisfy redemption requests, and negatively impact the Fund’s performance. Other market events may cause similar disruptions and effects.

 

Cybersecurity Risk. Cybersecurity incidents may allow an unauthorized party to gain access to Fund assets, customer data (including private shareholder information), or proprietary information, or cause the Fund, the Advisor, and/or other service providers (including custodians, sub-custodians, transfer agents and financial intermediaries) to suffer data breaches, data corruption or loss of operational functionality. A cybersecurity incident may disrupt the processing of shareholder transactions, impact the Fund’s ability to calculate its net asset values, and prevent shareholders from redeeming their shares. Issuers of securities in which the Fund invests are also subject to cybersecurity risks, and the value of those securities could decline if the issuers experience cybersecurity incidents.

30

 

Portfolio Turnover Risk. Active and frequent trading of the Fund’s securities may lead to higher transaction costs and may result in a greater number of taxable transactions, which could negatively affect the Fund’s performance. A high rate of portfolio turnover is 100% or more.

 

Additional Non-Principal Investments

 

In addition to the Principal Investment Strategies, the Palmer Square Ultra-Short Duration Investment Grade Fund may engage in additional investments including derivatives and short sales. The additional investments and techniques that the Palmer Square Ultra-Short Duration Investment Grade Fund may use are more fully described in the SAI.

 

Portfolio Holdings Information

 

A description of the Funds’ policies and procedures with respect to the disclosure of the Funds’ portfolio securities is available in the Funds’ Statement of Additional Information (“SAI”). Currently, disclosure of the Funds’ holdings is required to be made quarterly within 60 days of the end of each fiscal quarter in the Funds’ Annual Report and Semi-Annual Report to Fund shareholders and in its monthly holdings report on Form N-PORT.

 

MANAGEMENT OF THE FUNDS

 

 

Investment Advisor

 

Palmer Square Capital Management LLC, a Delaware limited liability company formed in 2009 which maintains its principal offices at 1900 Shawnee Mission Parkway, Suite 315, Mission Woods, Kansas 66205, acts as the investment advisor to the Funds pursuant to an investment advisory agreement (the “Advisory Agreement”) with the Trust. The Advisor is an investment advisor registered with the SEC and provides investment advice to open-end funds, private investment funds, and institutional and high net worth clients. The Advisor has approximately $27.7 billion in assets under management as of June 30, 2023.

 

The following table illustrates the annual contractual advisory fees to the Advisor for the services and facilities it provides to the Funds, payable on a monthly basis.

 

Fund Contractual Advisory Fees as a Percentage of Average Daily Net Assets
Palmer Square Income Plus Fund 0.49%
Palmer Square Ultra-Short Duration Investment Grade Fund 0.25%

 

With respect to the Palmer Square Income Plus Fund, for the fiscal year ended June 30, 2023, the advisor received a fee of 0.49%.

 

With respect to the Palmer Square Ultra-Short Duration Investment Grade Fund, for the fiscal year ended June 30, 2023, the Advisor received a fee of 0.07%.

 

A discussion regarding the basis for the Board’s approval of the Advisory Agreement is available in the Funds’ Semi-Annual Report to shareholders dated as of December 31, 2022.

 

Portfolio Managers

Angie K. Long, Christopher D. Long and Jon R. Brager are jointly and primarily responsible for the day-to-day management of each Fund’s portfolio.

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Angie K. Long, CFA. Ms. Long has been the Chief Investment Officer of the Advisor since February 2011. She is a member of the Advisor’s Investment Committee and has key responsibilities for all investment-related activities with a particular focus on portfolio construction and risk management. Prior to joining the Advisor, Ms. Long worked for JPMorgan Chase & Co. in New York from 1998 to 2011. There, she held a variety of management and trading roles, including Deputy Head of Credit Trading for North America, Head of High Yield Trading, and Head of Credit Derivatives Trading. She has been a trader and investor within many products and strategies including high yield bonds, high yield credit derivatives, distressed debt, capital structure arbitrage and structured credit. Among other career achievements, Ms. Long is credited with creating the High Yield Debt Index, the first liquid credit trading index. She was named a managing director of JPMorgan Chase & Co. at age 29. She was responsible for building JPMorgan’s High Yield Credit Derivatives business and Credit Options business. She received an AB degree in Economics from Princeton University in 1997 and is a CFA® charterholder.

 

Christopher D. Long. Mr. Long is the President and founder of the Advisor and is responsible for the Advisor’s alternative and credit investments business, managing both the firm’s investment activities and operations as well as defining its investment policy. Prior to founding the Advisor, Mr. Long was a Managing Director and Investment Committee Member at Prairie Capital Management, LLC (“Prairie”) from 2006 to 2009, where he was one of the team members responsible for the firm’s proprietary alternative investment products. Prior to joining Prairie, Mr. Long was at various New York City-based firms including Sandell Asset Management, Corp. (“Sandell”), a multi-billion dollar multi-strategy hedge fund, where he, as a Research Analyst, invested in both equity and debt securities from 2005 to 2006. Prior to Sandell, he worked at Morgan Stanley in the Credit Derivatives and Distressed Securities Group as an Associate, focusing on the firm’s proprietary investments during the summer of 2004. Before Morgan Stanley, Mr. Long worked at TH Lee Putnam Ventures, a $1.1 billion private equity fund sponsored by Thomas H. Lee Partners and Putnam Investments, from 1999 to 2003. Mr. Long started his career at JPMorgan & Co. in Leveraged Finance and Mergers & Acquisitions (FIG Group), advising corporations and private equity firms on investment banking and capital markets, from 1997 through 1999. Mr. Long received an MBA from the Harvard Business School in 2005, and an undergraduate degree in Economics, cum laude, from Princeton University in 1997.

 

Jon R. Brager, CFA. Mr. Brager is a Senior Credit Analyst and Portfolio Manager with responsibilities for the firm’s long/short and corporate credit strategies. In his role, Mr. Brager conducts fundamental credit research, generates investment ideas and assists in the portfolio management of opportunistic credit products. Mr. Brager has 16 years of professional experience, including 11 years in the global credit markets spanning analyst, trading and portfolio management roles. Prior to joining Palmer Square in 2015, he was a Senior Analyst at Hermes Investment Management, a London-based asset manager. At Hermes, Mr. Brager’s focus was credit research coverage of the auto, basic material, and industrial sectors. Before that, Mr. Brager was a portfolio manager for a multi-strategy credit fund at BCM & Partners, LLP, having spent several years before that as a credit analyst at BCM and LNG Capital, LLP. Mr. Brager started his career as a systems engineer at Lockheed Martin Missiles & Fire Control in Dallas. Mr. Brager earned an MBA from London Business School, a Master’s degree in Economics from Southern Methodist University as well as Bachelor’s degrees in Mathematics and Management Science. He is also a CFA® charterholder.

 

The SAI provides additional information about the portfolio managers’ method of compensation, other accounts managed by the portfolio managers and the portfolio managers’ ownership of Fund securities.

 

Other Service Providers

 

IMST Distributors, LLC (the “Distributor”) is the Trust’s principal underwriter and acts as the Trust’s distributor in connection with the offering of Fund shares. The Distributor may enter into agreements with banks, broker-dealers, or other financial intermediaries through which investors may purchase or redeem shares. The Distributor is not affiliated with the Trust, the Advisor, or any other service provider for the Funds.

 

Fund Expenses

 

Each Fund is responsible for its own operating expenses (all of which will be borne directly or indirectly by the Fund’s shareholders), including among others, legal fees and expenses of counsel to the Fund and the Fund’s independent trustees; insurance (including trustees’ and officers’ errors and omissions insurance); auditing and accounting expenses; taxes and governmental fees; listing fees; fees and expenses of the Fund’s custodians, administrators, transfer agents, registrars and other service providers; expenses for portfolio pricing services by a pricing agent, if any; expenses in connection with the issuance and offering of shares; brokerage commissions and other costs of acquiring or disposing of any portfolio holding of the Fund and any litigation expenses.

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The Advisor has contractually agreed to waive its fees and/or pay for operating expenses of each Fund to ensure that the total annual fund operating expenses (excluding any taxes, leverage interest, brokerage commissions, dividend and interest expenses on short sales, acquired fund fees and expenses (as determined in accordance with Form N-1A), expenses incurred in connection with any merger or reorganization, or extraordinary expenses such as litigation expenses) do not exceed the limits (as a percentage of average daily net assets) set forth below. This agreement is in effect until October 31, 2024, and it may be terminated before that date only by the Trust’s Board of Trustees.

 

Palmer Square Income Plus Fund  0.75%
Palmer Square Ultra-Short Duration Investment Grade Fund  0.50%

 

Any reduction in advisory fees or payment of a Fund’s expenses made by the Advisor in a fiscal year may be reimbursed by the Fund for a period ending three full fiscal years after the date of reduction or payment if the Advisor so requests. This reimbursement may be requested from a Fund if the reimbursement will not cause the Fund’s annual expense ratio to exceed the lesser of (a) the expense limitation in effect at the time such fees were waived or payments made, or (b) the expense limitation in effect at the time of the reimbursement. However, the reimbursement amount may not exceed the total amount of fees waived and/or Fund expenses paid by the Advisor and will not include any amounts previously reimbursed to the Advisor by the Fund. Any such reimbursement is contingent upon the Board’s subsequent review of the reimbursed amounts. A Fund must pay current ordinary operating expenses before the Advisor is entitled to any reimbursement of fees and/or Fund expenses.

 

Shareholder Service Fee

 

Each Fund may pay a fee at an annual rate of up to 0.15% of its average daily net assets to shareholder servicing agents. Shareholder servicing agents provide non-distribution administrative and support services to their customers, which may include establishing and maintaining accounts and records relating to shareholders, processing dividend and distribution payments from the Funds on behalf of shareholders, forwarding communications from the Funds, providing sub-accounting with respect to Fund shares, and other similar services.

 

Additional Payments to Broker-Dealers and Other Financial Intermediaries

 

The Advisor may pay service fees to intermediaries such as banks, broker-dealers, financial advisors or other financial institutions, some of which may be affiliates, for sub-administration, sub-transfer agency and other shareholder services associated with shareholders whose shares are held of record in omnibus accounts, other group accounts or accounts traded through registered securities clearing agents.

 

The Advisor, out of its own resources, and without additional cost to the Funds or their shareholders, may provide additional cash payments or non-cash compensation to broker-dealers or intermediaries that sell shares of the Funds. These additional cash payments are generally made to intermediaries that provide shareholder servicing, marketing support and/or access to sales meetings, sales representatives and management representatives of the intermediary. The Advisor may pay cash compensation for inclusion of the Funds on a sales list, including a preferred or select sales list, or in other sales programs, or may pay an expense reimbursement in cases where the intermediary provides shareholder services to the Funds’ shareholders. The Advisor may also pay cash compensation in the form of finder’s fees that vary depending on the dollar amount of the shares sold.

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YOUR ACCOUNT WITH THE FUNDS

 

 

Share Price

 

The offering price of each Fund’s shares is the net asset value per share (“NAV”). Each Fund’s NAV is calculated as of 4:00 p.m. Eastern Time, the normal close of regular trading on the NYSE on each day the NYSE is open for trading. If for example, the NYSE closes at 1:00 p.m. New York time, each Fund’s NAV would still be determined as of 4:00 p.m. New York time. In this example, portfolio securities traded on the NYSE would be valued at their closing prices unless the Advisor determines that a “fair value” adjustment is appropriate due to subsequent events. Each Fund’s NAV is determined by dividing the value of the Fund’s portfolio securities, cash and other assets (including accrued interest), less all liabilities (including accrued expenses), by the total number of outstanding shares. Each Fund’s NAV may be calculated earlier if permitted by the SEC. The NYSE is closed on weekends and most U.S. national holidays. However, foreign securities listed primarily on non-U.S. markets may trade on weekends or other days on which a Fund does not value its shares, which may significantly affect the Fund’s NAV on days when you are not able to buy or sell Fund shares.

 

The Funds’ securities generally are valued at market price. Securities are valued at fair value when market quotations are not readily available. The Board has designated the Advisor as each Fund’s valuation designee (the “Valuation Designee”) to make all fair value determinations with respect to the Fund’s portfolio investments, subject to the Board’s oversight. As the Valuation Designee, the Advisor adopted and implemented policies and procedures to be followed when a Fund must utilize fair value pricing, including when reliable market quotations are not readily available, when the Fund’s pricing service does not provide a valuation (or provides a valuation that, in the judgment of the Advisor, does not represent the security’s fair value), or when, in the judgment of the Advisor, events have rendered the market value unreliable (see, for example, the discussion of fair value pricing of foreign securities in the paragraph below). Valuing securities at fair value involves reliance on the judgment of the Advisor, and may result in a different price being used in the calculation of the Fund’s NAV from quoted or published prices for the same securities. Fair value determinations are made by the Advisor, in good faith in accordance with procedures approved by the Board. There can be no assurance that a Fund will obtain the fair value assigned to a security if it sells the security.

 

In certain circumstances, the Advisor employs fair value pricing to ensure greater accuracy in determining daily NAV and to prevent dilution by frequent traders or market timers who seek to exploit temporary market anomalies. Fair value pricing may be applied to foreign securities held by a Fund upon the occurrence of an event after the close of trading on non-U.S. markets but before the close of trading on the NYSE when the Funds’ NAVs are determined. If the event may result in a material adjustment to the price of a Fund’s foreign securities once non-U.S. markets open on the following business day (such as, for example, a significant surge or decline in the U.S. market), a Fund may value such foreign securities at fair value, taking into account the effect of such event, in order to calculate the Fund’s NAV.

 

Other types of portfolio securities that a Advisor may fair value include, but are not limited to: (1) investments that are illiquid or traded infrequently, including “restricted” securities and private placements for which there is no public market; (2) investments for which, in the judgment of the Advisor, the market price is stale; (3) securities of an issuer that has entered into a restructuring; (4) securities for which trading has been halted or suspended; and (5) fixed income securities for which there are no current market value quotations.

 

Pricing services generally value debt securities assuming orderly transactions of an institutional round lot size, but such securities may be held or transactions may be conducted in such securities in smaller, odd lot sizes. Odd lots often trade at lower prices than institutional round lots.

 

Purchase of Shares

 

This Prospectus offers one class of shares of the Palmer Square Income Plus Fund and the Palmer Square Ultra-Short Duration Investment Grade Fund.

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Shares of a Fund are available for investment only by clients of financial intermediaries or broker-dealers that have entered into an agreement with a Fund or the Distributor; employee sponsored retirement plans, foundations, endowments, and other institutional investors; officers, trustees, directors, and employees (including the employee’s spouse, domestic partner, children, grandchildren, parents, grandparents, siblings and any dependent of the employee, as defined in Section 152 of the Internal Revenue Code) of the Fund, Advisor or any of its affiliates; and other funds or accounts for which Palmer Square or any of its affiliates serves as investment advisor or manager. To purchase shares of a Fund, you must invest at least the minimum amount indicated in the following table.

 

Minimum Investments

To Open

Your Account

To Add to

Your Account

All Accounts $250,000 None

 

Shares of a Fund may be purchased by check, by wire transfer of funds via a bank or through an approved financial intermediary (i.e., a supermarket, investment advisor, financial planner or consultant, broker, dealer or other investment professional and their agents) authorized by the Funds to receive purchase orders. Financial intermediaries may provide varying arrangements for their clients to purchase and redeem shares, which may include different sales charges as described in this Prospectus, additional fees and different investment minimums. In addition, from time to time, a financial intermediary may modify or waive the initial and subsequent investment minimums. You may make an initial investment in an amount greater than the minimum amounts shown in the preceding table and a Fund may, from time to time, reduce or waive the minimum initial investment amounts. The minimum initial investment amount is automatically waived for Fund shares purchased by Trustees of the Trust and current or retired directors and employees of the Advisor and its affiliates.

 

To the extent allowed by applicable law, each Fund reserves the right to discontinue offering shares at any time or to cease operating entirely.

 

In-Kind Purchases and Redemptions

 

Each Fund reserves the right to accept payment for shares in the form of securities that are permissible investments for the Fund. Each Fund also reserves the right to pay redemptions by an “in-kind” distribution of portfolio securities (instead of cash) from the Fund. In-kind purchases and redemptions are generally taxable events and may result in the recognition of gain or loss for federal income tax purposes. See the SAI for further information about the terms of these purchases and redemptions.

 

Additional Investments

 

Additional subscriptions in a Fund generally may be made by investing at least the minimum amount shown in the table above. Exceptions may be made at a Fund’s discretion. You may purchase additional shares of a Fund by sending a check together with the investment stub from your most recent account statement to the Fund at the applicable address listed in the table below. Please ensure that you include your account number on the check. If you do not have the investment stub from your account statement, list your name, address and account number on a separate sheet of paper and include it with your check. You may also make additional investments in a Fund by wire transfer of funds or through an approved financial intermediary. The minimum additional investment amount is automatically waived for shares purchased by Trustees of the Trust and current or retired directors and employees of the Advisor and its affiliates. Please follow the procedures described in this Prospectus.

 

Dividend Reinvestment

 

You may reinvest dividends and capital gains distributions in shares of the Fund. Such shares are acquired at NAV (without a sales charge) on the applicable payable date of the dividend or capital gain distribution. Unless you instruct otherwise, dividends and distributions on Fund shares are automatically reinvested in shares of the same class of a Fund paying the dividend or distribution. This instruction may be made by writing to the Funds’ transfer agent, UMB Fund Services, Inc. (the “Transfer Agent”), or by telephone by calling 1-800-736-1145. You may, on the account application form or prior to any declaration, instruct that dividends and/or capital gain distributions be paid in cash or be reinvested in the Fund at the next determined NAV. If you elect to receive dividends and/or capital gain distributions in cash and the U.S. Postal Service cannot deliver the check, or if a check remains outstanding for six months or more, a Fund reserves the right to reinvest the distribution check in your account at the Fund’s current NAV and to reinvest all subsequent distributions.

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Customer Identification Information

 

To help the government fight the funding of terrorism and money laundering activities, federal law requires all financial institutions to obtain, verify and record information that identifies each person who opens an account. When you open an account, you will be asked for your name, date of birth (for a natural person), your residential address or principal place of business, and mailing address, if different, as well as your Social Security Number or Taxpayer Identification Number. Additional information is required for corporations, partnerships and other entities including the name, residential address, date of birth and Social Security Number of the underlying beneficial owners and authorized control persons of entity owners. Applications without such information will not be considered in good order. Each Fund reserves the right to deny any application if the application is not in good order.

 

This Prospectus should not be considered a solicitation to purchase or as an offer to sell shares of the Funds in any jurisdiction where it would be unlawful to do so under the laws of that jurisdiction. Please note that the value of your account may be transferred to the appropriate state if no activity occurs in the account within the time period specified by state law.

 

Timing and Nature of Requests

 

The purchase price you will pay for a Fund’s shares will be the next NAV calculated after the Transfer Agent or your authorized financial intermediary receives your request in good order. “Good order” means that your purchase request includes: (1) the name of the Fund, (2) the dollar amount of shares to be purchased, (3) your purchase application or investment stub, and (4) a check payable to Palmer Square Funds. All requests received in good order before 4:00 p.m. (Eastern Time) on any business day will be processed on that same day. Requests received at or after 4:00 p.m. (Eastern Time) will be transacted at the next business day’s NAV. All purchases must be made in U.S. dollars and drawn on U.S. financial institutions.

 

Methods of Buying

Through a broker-

dealer or other

financial

intermediary

 

Each Fund is offered only through certain approved financial intermediaries (and their agents). A purchase order placed with a financial intermediary or its authorized agent is treated as if such order were placed directly with the Fund, and will be deemed to have been received by the Fund when the financial intermediary or its authorized agent receives the order and executed at the next NAV calculated by the Fund. Your financial intermediary will hold your shares in a pooled account in its (or its agent’s) name. A Fund may pay your financial intermediary (or its agent) to maintain your individual ownership information, maintain required records, and provide other shareholder services. A financial intermediary which offers shares may charge its individual clients transaction fees which may be in addition to those described in this Prospectus. If you invest through your financial intermediary, its policies and fees may be different than those described in this Prospectus. For example, the financial intermediary may charge transaction fees or set different minimum investments. Your financial intermediary is responsible for processing your order correctly and promptly, keeping you advised of the status of your account, confirming your transactions and ensuring that you receive copies of the Funds’ Prospectus. Please contact your financial intermediary to determine whether it is an approved financial intermediary of the Funds or for additional information.

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By mail A Fund will not accept payment in cash, including cashier’s checks. Also, to prevent check fraud, a Fund will not accept third party checks, Treasury checks, credit card checks, traveler’s checks, money orders or starter checks for the purchase of shares. All checks must be made in U.S. dollars and drawn on U.S. financial institutions.
  To buy shares directly from a Fund by mail, complete an account application and send it together with your check for the amount you wish to invest to the Fund at the address indicated below. To make additional investments once you have opened your account, write your account number on the check and send it to the Fund together with the most recent confirmation statement received from the Transfer Agent. If your check is returned for insufficient funds, your purchase will be canceled and a $25 fee will be assessed against your account by the Transfer Agent.
 

Regular Mail

Palmer Square Funds

P.O. Box 2175

Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53201

Overnight Delivery

Palmer Square Funds

235 West Galena Street

Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53212

  The Funds do not consider the U.S. Postal Service or other independent delivery services to be its agents.
By telephone To make additional investments by telephone, you must authorize telephone purchases on your account application. If you have given authorization for telephone transactions and your account has been open for at least 15 days, call the Transfer Agent toll-free at 1-800-736-1145 and you will be allowed to move money in amounts of at least $100 but not greater than $50,000, from your bank account to the applicable Fund’s account upon request. Only bank accounts held at U.S. institutions that are Automated Clearing House (“ACH”) members may be used for telephone transactions. If your order is placed before 4:00 p.m. (Eastern Time) on a business day shares will be purchased in your account at the NAV calculated on that day. Orders received at or after 4:00 p.m. (Eastern Time) will be transacted at the next business day’s NAV. For security reasons, requests by telephone will be recorded.
By wire To open an account by wire, a completed account application form must be received by a Fund before your wire can be accepted. You may mail or send by overnight delivery your account application form to the Transfer Agent. Upon receipt of your completed account application form, an account will be established for you. The account number assigned to you will be required as part of the wiring instruction that should be provided to your bank to send the wire. Your bank must include the name of the Fund, the account number, and your name so that monies can be correctly applied. Your bank should transmit monies by wire to:
 

UMB Bank, n.a.

ABA Number 101000695

For credit to Palmer Square Funds

A/C # 9871917185

For further credit to:

Your account number

Fund Name

Name(s) of investor(s)

Social Security Number or Taxpayer Identification Number

   Before sending your wire, please contact the Transfer Agent at 1-800-736-1145 to notify it of your intention to wire funds. This will ensure prompt and accurate credit upon receipt of your wire. Your bank may charge a fee for its wiring service.
  Wired funds must be received prior to 4:00 p.m. (Eastern Time) on a business day to be eligible for same day pricing. The Funds and UMB Bank, n.a. are not responsible for the consequences of delays resulting from the banking or Federal Reserve wire system, or from incomplete wiring instructions.

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Selling (Redeeming) Fund Shares

 

Through a broker-

dealer or other

financial

intermediary

 

If you purchased your shares through an approved financial intermediary, your redemption order must be placed through the same financial intermediary. Such financial intermediaries are authorized to designate other financial intermediaries to receive purchase and redemption orders on the Fund’s behalf. A Fund will be deemed to have received a redemption order when a financial intermediary (or its authorized agent) receives the order. The financial intermediary must receive your redemption order prior to 4:00 p.m. (Eastern Time) on a business day for the redemption to be processed at the current day’s NAV. Orders received at or after 4:00 p.m. (Eastern Time) on a business day or on a day when the Fund does not value its shares will be transacted at the next business day’s NAV. Please keep in mind that your financial intermediary may charge additional fees for its services. In the event your approved financial intermediary is no longer available or in operation, you may place your redemption order directly with the Fund as described below.
By mail You may redeem shares purchased directly from a Fund by mail. Send your written redemption request to Palmer Square Funds at the address indicated below. Your request must be in good order and contain the Fund name, the name(s) on the account, your account number and the dollar amount or the number of shares to be redeemed. The redemption request must be signed by all shareholders listed on the account. Additional documents are required for certain types of shareholders, such as corporations, partnerships, executors, trustees, administrators, or guardians (i.e., corporate resolutions dated within 60 days, or trust documents indicating proper authorization).
 

Regular Mail

Palmer Square Funds

P.O. Box 2175

Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53201

Overnight Delivery

Palmer Square Funds

235 West Galena Street

Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53212

  A Medallion signature guarantee must be included if any of the following situations apply:
 

●    You wish to redeem more than $50,000 worth of shares;

●    When redemption proceeds are sent to any person, address or bank account not on record;

●    If a change of address was received by the Transfer Agent within the last 15 days;

●    If ownership is changed on your account; or

●    When establishing or modifying certain services on your account.

By telephone To redeem shares by telephone, call the Funds at 1-800-736-1145 and specify the amount of money you wish to redeem. You may have a check sent to the address of record, or, if previously established on your account, you may have proceeds sent by wire or electronic funds transfer through the ACH network directly to your bank account. Wire transfers are subject to a $20 fee paid by the shareholder and your bank may charge a fee to receive wired funds. Checks sent via overnight delivery are subject to a $25 charge. You do not incur any charge when proceeds are sent via the ACH network; however, credit may not be available for two to three business days.
  If you are authorized to perform telephone transactions (either through your account application form or by subsequent arrangement in writing with the Funds), you may redeem shares worth up to $50,000, by instructing the Funds by phone at 1-800-736-1145. Unless noted on the initial account application, a Medallion signature guarantee is required of all shareholders in order to qualify for or to change telephone redemption privileges.

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  Note: The Funds and all of their service providers will not be liable for any loss or expense in acting upon instructions that are reasonably believed to be genuine. To confirm that all telephone instructions are genuine, the caller must verify the following:
 

●    The Fund account number;

●    The name in which his or her account is registered;

●    The Social Security Number or Taxpayer Identification Number under which the account is registered; and

●    The address of the account holder, as stated in the account application form.

 

Medallion Signature Guarantee

 

In addition to the situations described above, each Fund reserves the right to require a Medallion signature guarantee in other instances based on the circumstances relative to the particular situation.

 

Shareholders redeeming more than $50,000 worth of shares by mail should submit written instructions with a Medallion signature guarantee from an eligible institution acceptable to the Transfer Agent, such as a domestic bank or trust company, broker, dealer, clearing agency or savings association, or from any participant in a Medallion program recognized by the Securities Transfer Association. The three currently recognized Medallion programs are Securities Transfer Agents Medallion Program, Stock Exchanges Medallion Program and New York Stock Exchange, Inc. Medallion Signature Program. Signature guarantees that are not part of these programs will not be accepted. Participants in Medallion programs are subject to dollar limitations which must be considered when requesting their guarantee. The Transfer Agent may reject any signature guarantee if it believes the transaction would otherwise be improper. A notary public cannot provide a signature guarantee.

 

Payment of Redemption Proceeds

 

You may redeem shares of a Fund at a price equal to the NAV next determined after the Transfer Agent and/or authorized agent receives your redemption request in good order. Generally, your redemption request cannot be processed on days the NYSE is closed. Redemption proceeds for requests received in good order by the Transfer Agent and/or authorized agent before the close of the regular trading session of the NYSE (generally 4:00 p.m. Eastern Time) will usually be sent to the address of record or the bank you indicate, or wired using the wire instructions on record, on the following business day. Payment of redemption proceeds may take longer than typically expected, but will be sent within seven calendar days after the Fund receives your redemption request, except as specified below.

 

If you purchase shares using a check and request a redemption before the check has cleared, the Fund may postpone payment of your redemption proceeds up to 15 calendar days while the Fund waits for the check to clear. Furthermore, a Fund may suspend the right to redeem shares or postpone the date of payment upon redemption for more than seven calendar days: (1) for any period during which the NYSE is closed (other than customary weekend or holiday closings) or trading on the NYSE is restricted; (2) for any period during which an emergency exists affecting the sale of the Fund’s securities or making such sale or the fair determination of the value of the Fund’s net assets not reasonably practicable; or (3) for such other periods as the SEC may permit for the protection of the Fund’s shareholders.

 

Other Redemption Information

 

IRA and retirement plan redemptions from accounts for which UMB Bank, n.a. is the custodian must be completed on an IRA Distribution Form or other acceptable form approved by UMB Bank, n.a. Shareholders who hold shares of each Fund through an IRA or other retirement plan must indicate on their redemption requests whether to withhold federal income tax. Such redemption requests will generally be subject to a 10% federal income tax withholding unless a shareholder elects not to have taxes withheld. An IRA owner with a foreign residential address may not elect to forgo the 10% withholding. In addition, if you are a resident of certain states, state income tax also applies to non-Roth IRA distributions when federal withholding applies. Please consult with your tax professional.

39

 

The Funds generally pay sale (redemption) proceeds in cash. The Funds typically expect to satisfy redemption requests by selling portfolio assets or by using holdings of cash or cash equivalents. On a less regular basis, the Funds may also satisfy redemption requests by drawing on a line of credit or may utilize a temporary overdraft facility offered through its custodian, UMB Bank, n.a., in order to assist the Fund in meeting redemption requests. The Funds use these methods during both normal and stressed market conditions. During conditions that make the payment of cash unwise and/or in order to protect the interests of a Fund’s remaining shareholders, each Fund may pay all or part of a shareholder’s redemption proceeds in portfolio securities with a market value equal to the redemption price (redemption-in-kind) in lieu of cash in order to protect the interests of the Fund’s remaining shareholders. The Funds may redeem shares in kind during both normal and stressed market conditions. Generally, in kind redemptions will be effected through a pro rata distribution of the Fund’s portfolio securities. If a Fund redeems your shares in kind, you will bear any market risks associated with investment in those securities, and you will be responsible for the costs (including brokerage charges) of converting the securities to cash.

 

The Funds may redeem all of the shares held in your account if your balance falls below the Fund’s minimum initial investment amount due to your redemption activity. In these circumstances, the Funds will notify you in writing and request that you increase your balance above the minimum initial investment amount within 30 days of the date of the notice. If, within 30 days of a Fund’s written request, you have not increased your account balance, your shares will be automatically redeemed at the current NAV. The Fund will not require that your shares be redeemed if the value of your account drops below the investment minimum due to fluctuations of the Fund’s NAV.

 

Cost Basis Information

 

Federal tax law requires that regulated investment companies, such as the Funds, report their shareholders’ cost basis, gain/loss, and holding period to the IRS on the shareholders’ Consolidated Form 1099s when “covered” shares of the regulated investment companies are sold. Covered shares are any shares acquired (including pursuant to a dividend reinvestment plan) on or after January 1, 2012.

 

Each Fund has chosen “first-in, first-out” (“FIFO”) as its standing (default) tax lot identification method for all shareholders, which means this is the method the Fund will use to determine which specific shares are deemed to be sold when there are multiple purchases on different dates at differing net asset values and the entire position is not sold at one time. A Fund’s standing tax lot identification method is the method it will use to report the sale of covered shares on your Consolidated Form 1099 if you do not select a specific tax lot identification method. Redemptions are taxable and you may realize a gain or a loss upon the sale of your shares. Certain shareholders may be subject to backup withholding.

 

Subject to certain limitations, you may choose a method other than a Fund’s standing method at the time of your purchase or upon the sale of covered shares. Please refer to the appropriate Treasury regulations or consult your tax advisor with regard to your personal circumstances.

 

Tools to Combat Frequent Transactions

 

The Trust’s Board of Trustees has adopted policies and procedures with respect to frequent purchases and redemptions of Fund shares by Fund shareholders. The Trust discourages excessive, short-term trading and other abusive trading practices that may disrupt portfolio management strategies and harm a Fund’s performance. The Trust takes steps to reduce the frequency and effect of these activities on the Funds. These steps may include monitoring trading activity and using fair value pricing. In addition, the Trust may take action, which may include using its best efforts to restrict a shareholder from making additional purchases in a Fund, if that shareholder has engaged in four or more “round trips” in the Fund during a 12-month period. Although these efforts (which are described in more detail below) are designed to discourage abusive trading practices, these tools cannot eliminate the possibility that such activity may occur. Further, while the Trust makes efforts to identify and restrict frequent trading, the Trust receives purchase and sale orders through financial intermediaries and cannot always know or detect frequent trading that may be facilitated by the use of intermediaries or the use of group or omnibus accounts by those intermediaries. The Trust seeks to exercise its judgment in implementing these tools to the best of its ability in a manner that the Trust believes is consistent with the interests of Fund shareholders.

40

 

Monitoring Trading Practices The Trust may monitor trades in Fund shares in an effort to detect short-term trading activities. If, as a result of this monitoring, the Trust believes that a shareholder of a Fund has engaged in excessive short-term trading, it may, in its discretion, ask the shareholder to stop such activities or refuse to process purchases in the shareholder’s accounts. In making such judgments, the Trust seeks to act in a manner that it believes is consistent with the best interest of Fund shareholders. Due to the complexity and subjectivity involved in identifying abusive trading activity, there can be no assurance that the Trust’s efforts will identify all trades or trading practices that may be considered abusive.

 

General Transaction Policies

 

Some of the following policies are mentioned above. In general, the Fund reserves the right to:

vary or waive any minimum investment requirement;

 

refuse, change, discontinue, or temporarily suspend account services, including purchase or telephone redemption privileges (if redemption by telephone is not available, you may send your redemption order to the Fund via regular or overnight delivery), for any reason;

 

reject any purchase request for any reason (generally the Fund does this if the purchase is disruptive to the efficient management of the Fund due to the timing of the investment or an investor’s history of excessive trading);

 

delay paying redemption proceeds for up to seven calendar days after receiving a request, if an earlier payment could adversely affect the Fund;

 

reject any purchase or redemption request that does not contain all required documentation; and

 

subject to applicable law and with prior notice, adopt other policies from time to time requiring mandatory redemption of shares in certain circumstances.

 

If you elect telephone privileges on the account application or in a letter to a Fund, you may be responsible for any fraudulent telephone orders as long as the Fund and/or its service providers have taken reasonable precautions to verify your identity. In addition, once you place a telephone transaction request, it cannot be canceled or modified.

 

During periods of significant economic or market change, telephone transactions may be difficult to complete. If you are unable to contact a Fund by telephone, you may also mail your request to the Fund at the address listed under “Methods of Buying.”

 

Your broker or other financial intermediary may establish policies that differ from those of the Funds. For example, the organization may charge transaction fees, set higher minimum investments, or impose certain limitations on buying or selling shares in addition to those identified in this Prospectus. Contact your broker or other financial intermediary for details.

 

Please note that the value of your account may be transferred to the appropriate state if no activity occurs in the account within the time period specified by state law.

 

Exchange Privilege. You may exchange shares of each Fund for shares of the other Fund. The amount of the exchange must be equal to or greater than the required minimum initial investment of the other Fund. You may realize either a gain or loss on those shares and will be responsible for paying any applicable taxes. If you exchange shares through a broker, the broker may charge you a transaction fee. You may exchange shares by sending a written request to the Fund or by telephone. Be sure that your written request includes the dollar amount or number of shares to be exchanged, the name(s) on the account and the account number(s), and is signed by all shareholders on the account. In order to limit expenses, each Fund reserves the right to limit the total number of exchanges you can make in any year.

41

 

Prospectus and Shareholder Report Mailings

 

In order to reduce the amount of mail you receive and to help reduce expenses, we generally send a single copy of any shareholder report and Prospectus to each household. If you do not want the mailing of these documents to be combined with those of other members of your household, please contact your authorized dealer or the Transfer Agent.

 

Additional Information

 

Each Fund enters into contractual arrangements with various parties, including, among others, the Advisor, who provide services to the Funds. Shareholders are not parties to, or intended (or “third party”) beneficiaries of, those contractual arrangements.

 

The Prospectus and the SAI provide information concerning the Funds that you should consider in determining whether to purchase shares of the Funds. The Funds may make changes to this information from time to time. Neither this Prospectus nor the SAI is intended to give rise to any contract rights or other rights in any shareholder, other than any rights conferred by federal or state securities laws that may not be waived.

 

DIVIDENDS AND DISTRIBUTIONS

 

 

Each Fund will make distributions of net investment income quarterly and net capital gains, if any, at least annually, typically in December. A Fund may make additional payments of dividends or distributions if it deems it desirable at any other time during the year.

 

All dividends and distributions will be reinvested in Fund shares unless you choose one of the following options: (1) to receive net investment income dividends in cash, while reinvesting capital gain distributions in additional Fund shares; or (2) to receive all dividends and distributions in cash. If you wish to change your distribution option, please write to the Transfer Agent before the payment date of the distribution.

 

If you elect to receive distributions in cash and the U.S. Postal Service cannot deliver your check, or if your distribution check has not been cashed for six months, each Fund reserves the right to reinvest the distribution check in your account at the Fund’s then current NAV and to reinvest all subsequent distributions.

 

FEDERAL INCOME TAX CONSEQUENCES

 

 

The following discussion is very general and does not address investors subject to special rules, such as investors who hold Fund shares through an IRA, 401(k) plan or other tax-advantaged account. The SAI contains further information about taxes. Because each shareholder’s circumstances are different and special tax rules may apply, you should consult your tax advisor about your investment in a Fund.

 

You will generally have to pay federal income taxes, as well as any state or local taxes, on distributions received from a Fund, whether paid in cash or reinvested in additional shares. If you sell Fund shares, it is generally considered a taxable event. If you exchange shares of a Fund for shares of another fund, the exchange will generally be treated as a sale of the Fund’s shares and any gain on the transaction may be subject to federal income tax.

 

Distributions of net investment income, other than distributions the Fund reports as “qualified dividend income,” are taxable for federal income tax purposes at ordinary income tax rates. Distributions of net short-term capital gains are also generally taxable at ordinary income tax rates. Distributions from a Fund’s net capital gain (i.e., the excess of its net long-term capital gain over its net short-term capital loss) are taxable for federal income tax purposes as long-term capital gain, regardless of how long the shareholder has held Fund shares.

42

 

Since the Funds’ income are derived primarily from sources that do not pay dividends, it is not expected that a substantial portion of the dividends paid by a Fund will qualify either for the dividends-received deduction for corporations or for any favorable U.S. federal income tax rate available to non-corporate shareholders on “qualified dividend income.”

 

You may want to avoid buying shares of a Fund just before it declares a distribution (on or before the record date), because such a distribution will be taxable to you even though it may effectively be a return of a portion of your investment.

 

Although distributions are generally taxable when received, dividends declared in October, November or December to shareholders of record as of a date in such month and paid during the following January are treated as if received on December 31 of the calendar year when the dividends were declared.

 

Information on the federal income tax status of dividends and distributions is provided annually.

 

Dividends and distributions from a Fund and net gain from redemptions of Fund shares will generally be taken into account in determining a shareholder’s “net investment income” for purposes of the Medicare contribution tax applicable to certain individuals, estates and trusts.

 

If you do not provide a Fund with your correct taxpayer identification number and any required certifications, you will be subject to backup withholding on your redemption proceeds, dividends and other distributions. The backup withholding rate is currently 24%.

 

Dividends and certain other payments made by a Fund to a non-U.S. shareholder are subject to withholding of federal income tax at the rate of 30% (or such lower rate as may be determined in accordance with any applicable treaty). Dividends that are reported by a Fund as “interest-related dividends” or “short-term capital gain dividends” are generally exempt from such withholding. In general, a Fund may report interest-related dividends to the extent of its net income derived from U.S.-source interest and a Fund may report short-term capital gain dividends to the extent its net short-term capital gain for the taxable year exceeds its net long-term capital loss. Backup withholding will not be applied to payments that have been subject to the 30% withholding tax described in this paragraph.

 

Under legislation commonly referred to as “FATCA,” unless certain non-U.S. entities that hold shares comply with IRS requirements that will generally require them to report information regarding U.S. persons investing in, or holding accounts with, such entities, a 30% withholding tax may apply to dividends payable to such entities. A non-U.S. shareholder may be exempt from the withholding described in this paragraph under an applicable intergovernmental agreement between the United States and a foreign government, provided that the shareholder and the applicable foreign government comply with the terms of the agreement.

 

Some of a Fund’s investment income may be subject to foreign income taxes that are withheld at the country of origin. Tax treaties between certain countries and the United States may reduce or eliminate such taxes, but there can be no assurance that a Fund will qualify for treaty benefits.

43

 

FINANCIAL HIGHLIGHTS

 

 

The following table is intended to help you understand each Fund’s financial performance. Certain information reflects financial results for a single Fund share. The total return figures represent the percentage that an investor in a Fund would have earned (or lost) on an investment in the Fund (assuming reinvestment of all dividends and distributions). The financial information for the periods shown has been audited by Tait, Weller & Baker LLP, an independent registered public accounting firm, whose report, along with each Fund’s financial statements, is included in the Fund’s annual report, which is available upon request (see back cover).

44

 

Palmer Square Income Plus Fund

 

Per share operating performance.   

For a capital share outstanding throughout each period.  

 

    For the Year Ended June 30,              
    2023     2022     2021     2020     For the Period February 1, 2019 through June 30, 2019*     For the Year Ended January 31, 2019  
Net asset value, beginning of period   $ 9.67     $ 10.06     $ 9.75     $ 9.87     $ 9.83     $ 9.90  
Income from Investment Operations:                                                
Net investment income (loss)1,2     0.45       0.14       0.16       0.28       0.14       0.29  
Net realized and unrealized gain (loss)     0.08       (0.40 )     0.30       (0.13 )     0.06       (0.08 )
Total from investment operations     0.53       (0.26 )     0.46       0.15       0.20       0.21  
                                                 
Less Distributions:                                                
From net investment income     (0.46 )     (0.13 )     (0.15 )     (0.27 )     (0.16 )     (0.28 )
From return of capital           - 3     -       -       -       -  
Total distributions     (0.46 )     (0.13 )     (0.15 )     (0.27 )     (0.16 )     (0.28 )
                                                 
Net asset value, end of period   $ 9.74     $ 9.67     $ 10.06     $ 9.75     $ 9.87     $ 9.83  
                                                 
Total return4     5.64 %     (2.63 )%     4.75 %     1.64 %     2.01 %7     2.11 %
                                                 
Ratios and Supplemental Data:                                                
Net assets, end of period (in thousands)   $ 812,171     $ 1,025,285     $ 856,244     $ 625,347     $ 582,734     $ 544,830  
                                                 
Ratio of expenses to average net assets (including brokerage expense, commitment fees and interest on securities sold short):                                                
Before fees waived and expenses absorbed/recovered5,6     0.88 %     0.75 %     0.90 %     0.82 %     0.77 %8     0.80 %
After fees waived and expenses absorbed/recovered5,6     0.88 %     0.75 %     0.94 %     0.85 %     0.77 %8     0.77 %
                                                 
Ratio of net investment income (loss) to average net assets (including brokerage expense, commitment fees and interest on securities sold short):                                                
Before fees waived and expenses absorbed/recovered2     4.68 %     1.39 %     1.64 %     2.86 %     3.44 %8     2.89 %
After fees waived and expenses absorbed/recovered2     4.68 %     1.39 %     1.60 %     2.83 %     3.44 %8     2.92 %
                                                 
Portfolio turnover rate     115 %     111 %     167 %     147 %     45 %7     214 %

  

 

* Fiscal year end changed to June 30 effective February 1, 2019.

1 Based on average shares outstanding for the period.
2 Recognition of net investment income by the Fund is affected by the timing of the declaration of dividends by the underlying investment companies in which the Fund invests. The ratio does not include net investment income of the investment companies in which the Fund invests.
3 Amount represents less than $0.01 per share.
4 Total returns would have been higher/lower had expenses not been recovered/waived and absorbed by the Advisor. Returns shown do not reflect the deduction of taxes that a shareholder would pay on Fund distributions or the redemption of Fund shares.
5 Does not include expenses of the investment companies in which the Fund invests.
6 If brokerage expense, commitment fees, and interest on securities sold short had been excluded, the expense ratios would have been lowered by 0.20%, 0.06%, 0.20%, and 0.10% for the fiscal years ended June 30, 2023, 2022, 2021, and 2020, respectively, 0.02% for the period ended June 30, 2019, and 0.02% for the fiscal year ended January 31, 2019.
7 Not annualized.
8 Annualized.

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Palmer Square Ultra-Short Duration Investment Grade Fund

Per share operating performance.

For a capital share outstanding throughout each period.

 

    For the Year Ended June 30,     For the Period August 1, 2018 through     For the Year Ended  
    2023     2022     2021     2020     June 30, 2019*     July 31, 2018  
Net asset value, beginning of period   $ 19.68     $ 20.06     $ 20.01     $ 20.05     $ 20.02     $ 20.03  
Income from Investment Operations:                                                
Net investment income (loss)1     0.76       0.10       0.12       0.39       0.46       0.35  
Net realized and unrealized gain (loss)     (0.09 )     (0.35 )     0.05       (0.01 )     0.06       (0.02 )
Total from investment operations     0.67       (0.25 )     0.17       0.38       0.52       0.33  
Less Distributions:                                                
From net investment income     (0.62 )     (0.13 )     (0.12 )     (0.42 )     (0.49 )     (0.34 )
Total distributions     (0.62 )     (0.13 )     (0.12 )     (0.42 )     (0.49 )     (0.34 )
                                                 
Redemption fee proceeds1     -       -       -       -       - 2     - 2
                                                 
Net asset value, end of period   $ 19.73     $ 19.68     $ 20.06     $ 20.01     $ 20.05     $ 20.02  
                                                 
Total return2     3.48 %     (1.23 )%     0.87 %     1.91 %     2.64 %4     1.66 %
                                                 
Ratios and Supplemental Data:                                                
Net assets, end of period (in thousands)   $ 80,915     $ 42,773     $ 71,362     $ 40,687     $ 47,787     $ 66,118  
                                                 
Ratio of expenses to average net assets (including commitment fees and interest on securities sold short):                                                
Before fees waived and expenses absorbed5,6     0.70 %     0.76 %     0.67 %     0.82 %     0.79 %3     0.84 %
After fees waived and expenses absorbed5,6     0.52 %     0.53 %     0.51 %     0.50 %     0.51 %3     0.51 %
                                                 
Ratio of net investment income (loss) to average net assets (including commitment fees and interest on securities sold short):                                                
Before fees waived and expenses absorbed     3.67 %     0.28 %     0.44 %     1.65 %     2.23 %3     1.44 %
After fees waived and expenses absorbed     3.85 %     0.51 %     0.60 %     1.97 %     2.51 %3     1.77 %
                                                 
Portfolio turnover rate     107 %     112 %     117 %     100 %     72 %4     147 %

 

* Fiscal year end changed to June 30 effective August 1, 2018.
1 Based on average shares outstanding for the period.
2 Total returns would have been lower had expenses not been waived and absorbed by the Advisor. Returns shown do not reflect the deduction of taxes that a shareholder would pay on Fund distributions or the redemption of Fund shares.
3 Annualized.
4 Not annualized.
5 If commitment fees and interest on securities sold short had been excluded, the expense ratios would have been lowered by 0.02%, 0.03%, 0.01% and 0.00% for the fiscal years ended June 30, 2023, 2022, 2021 and 2020, respectively, and 0.01% for the period ended June 30, 2019, and 0.01% for the fiscal year ended July 31, 2018.
6 Does not include expenses of the investment companies in which the Fund invests.

46

 

Investment Advisor

Palmer Square Capital Management LLC

1900 Shawnee Mission Parkway, Suite 315

Mission Woods, Kansas 66205

 

Fund Co-Administrator

Mutual Fund Administration, LLC

2220 E. Route 66, Suite 226

Glendora, California 91740

 

Fund Co-Administrator, Transfer Agent and Fund Accountant

UMB Fund Services, Inc.

235 West Galena Street

Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53212

 

Custodian

UMB Bank, n.a.

928 Grand Boulevard, 5th Floor

Kansas City, Missouri 64106

 

Distributor

IMST Distributors, LLC

Three Canal Plaza, Suite 100

Portland, Maine 04101

www.foreside.com

 

Counsel to the Trust

Morgan, Lewis & Bockius LLP

600 Anton Boulevard, Suite 1800 

Costa Mesa, California 92626

 

Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm

Tait, Weller & Baker LLP

Two Liberty Place

50 S. 16th Street, Suite 2900
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19102-2529

47

 

Palmer Square Income Plus Fund

Palmer Square Ultra-Short Duration Investment Grade Fund

Each a series of Investment Managers Series Trust

 

FOR MORE INFORMATION

 

 

Statement of Additional Information (SAI)

The SAI provides additional details about the investments and techniques of the Fund and certain other additional information. The SAI is on file with the SEC and is incorporated into this Prospectus by reference. This means that the SAI is legally considered a part of this Prospectus even though it is not physically within this Prospectus.

 

Shareholder Reports

Additional information about the Fund’s investments is available in the Fund’s annual and semi-annual reports to shareholders. In the Fund's annual report, you will find a discussion of the market conditions and investment strategies that significantly affected the Fund's performance during its most recent fiscal year.

 

The Fund’s SAI is available and annual and semi-annual reports are available free of charge on the Fund’s website at www.palmersquarefunds.com. You can also obtain a free copy of the Fund’s SAI or annual and semi-annual reports, request other information, or inquire about the Fund by contacting a broker that sells shares of the Fund or by calling the Fund (toll-free) at 1-800-736-1145 or by writing to:

 

Palmer Square Funds

P.O. Box 2175

Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53201

 

Reports and other information about the Fund are also available:

 

Free of charge, on the SEC’s EDGAR Database on the SEC’s Internet site at http://www.sec.gov; or

For a duplication fee, by electronic request at the following e-mail address: [email protected].

 

(Investment Company Act file no. 811-21719.)

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