1290 Funds
Prospectus
This Prospectus describes the Funds listed below. Each Fund has its own investment objective and strategies that are designed to meet different investment goals. This Prospectus contains information you should know before investing. Please read this Prospectus carefully before investing and keep it for future reference.
Fund+
Share Class (Ticker)
1290 Diversified Bond Fund
Class A (TNUAX); Class T (TNUCX)*; Class I (TNUIX); Class R (TNURX)
1290 Essex Small Cap Growth Fund
Class A (ESCFX); Class T (ESCHX)*; Class I (ESCJX); Class R (ESCKX)
1290 GAMCO Small/Mid Cap Value Fund
Class A (TNVAX); Class T (TNVCX)*; Class I (TNVIX); Class R (TNVRX)
1290 High Yield Bond Fund
Class A (TNHAX); Class T (TNHCX)*; Class I (TNHIX); Class R (TNHRX)
1290 Loomis Sayles Multi-Asset Income Fund**
Class A (TNXAX); Class T (TNXCX)*; Class I (TNVDX); Class R (TNYRX)
1290 Multi-Alternative Strategies Fund
Class A (TNMAX); Class T (TNMCX)*; Class I (TNMIX); Class R (TNMRX)
1290 SmartBeta Equity Fund
Class A (TNBAX); Class T (TNBCX)*; Class I (TNBIX); Class R (TNBRX)
+
The Funds’ shares are not offered for sale in all states.
*
Class T shares currently are not offered for sale.
**
Effective August 19, 2022, 1290 DoubleLine Dynamic Allocation Fund was renamed 1290 Loomis Sayles Multi-Asset Income Fund.
March 1, 2023
The Securities and Exchange Commission and the Commodity Futures Trading Commission have not approved or disapproved these securities or passed upon the adequacy of this Prospectus. Any representation to the contrary is a criminal offense.
1290 Funds® is a registered service mark of Equitable Investment Management Group, LLC, New York, NY 10104.

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Table of Contents 1

1. About the Funds
1290 Diversified Bond Fund— Class A (TNUAX), Class T (TNUCX), Class I (TNUIX) and Class R (TNURX) Shares
Investment Objective:Seeks to maximize total return consisting of income and capital appreciation.
Fees and Expenses of the Fund
The following table describes the fees and expenses that you may pay if you buy, hold, and sell shares of the Fund. You may pay other fees, such as brokerage commissions and other fees to financial intermediaries, which are not reflected in the table and example below. You may qualify for sales charge discounts if you and your family invest, or agree to invest in the future, at least $100,000 in 1290 Funds’ funds. More information about these and other discounts is available from your financial professional and in the “How Sales Charges are Calculated” and “Ways to Reduce or Eliminate Sales Charges” sections of the Fund’s Prospectus, and the “Purchase, Redemption and Pricing of Shares” section of the Fund’s Statement of Additional Information.

Shareholder Fees
(fees paid directly from your investment)

1290 Diversified Bond Fund
Class A
Shares
Class T
Shares
Class I
Shares
Class R
Shares
Maximum sales charge (load) imposed on purchases (as a percentage of offering price)
4.50%
2.50%
None
None
Maximum contingent deferred sales charge (load) (as a percentage of original purchase price or redemption
proceeds, whichever is lower)
1.00%1
None
None
None
Maximum account fee (deducted from accounts with a balance of less than $1,000)
$25
$25
$25
$25
1 On shares purchased without an initial sales charge and redeemed within 12 months of purchase.

Annual Fund Operating Expenses
(expenses that you pay each year as a percentage of the value of your investment)

1290 Diversified Bond Fund
Class A
Shares
Class T
Shares
Class I
Shares
Class R
Shares
Management Fee
0.60%
0.60%
0.60%
0.60%
Distribution and/or Service Fees (12b-1 fees)
0.25%
0.25%
0.00%
0.50%
Other Expenses
0.35%
0.35%1
0.35%
0.36%
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses
1.20%
1.20%
0.95%
1.46%
Fee Waiver and/or Expense Reimbursement2
(0.45)%
(0.45)%
(0.45)%
(0.46)%
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses After Fee Waiver and/or Expense Reimbursement
0.75%
0.75%
0.50%
1.00%
1
Based on estimated amounts for the current fiscal year.
2
Pursuant to a contract, Equitable Investment Management, LLC (the “Adviser”) has agreed to make payments or waive its and its affiliates' management, administrative and other fees to limit the expenses of the Fund through April 30, 2024 (unless the Board of Trustees consents to an earlier revision or termination of this arrangement) (“Expense Limitation Arrangement”) so that the annual operating expenses of the Fund (exclusive of taxes, interest, brokerage commissions, capitalized expenses (other than offering costs), fees and expenses of other investment companies in which the Fund invests, 12b-1 fees, dividend and interest expenses on securities sold short, and extraordinary expenses not incurred in the ordinary course of the Fund’s business) do not exceed an annual rate of average daily net assets of 0.50% for Class A shares, Class T shares, Class I shares, and Class R shares of the Fund. The Expense Limitation Arrangement may be terminated by the Adviser at any time after April 30, 2024. The Adviser may be reimbursed the amount of any such payments or waivers in the future provided that the payments or waivers are reimbursed within three years of the payments or waivers being recorded and the Fund’s expense ratio, after the reimbursement is taken into account, does not exceed the Fund’s expense cap at the time of the waiver or the Fund’s expense cap at the time of the reimbursement, whichever is lower. The total annual fund operating expense ratios after fee waiver and/or expense reimbursement for Class A shares, Class T shares, and Class R shares, as shown in the table, are higher than the Fund’s expense cap because these ratios include 12b-1 fees and certain other expenses, as noted above, that are excluded from the Expense Limitation Arrangement.
Example
This Example is intended to help you compare the cost of investing in the Fund with the cost of investing in other funds. The Example assumes that you invest $10,000 in the Fund for the periods indicated, that your investment has a 5% return each year, that the Fund's operating expenses remain the same and that the Expense Limitation Arrangement is not renewed.
2 1290 Diversified Bond Fund

Although your actual costs may be higher or lower, based on these assumptions, whether you redeem or hold your shares, your costs would be:
 
1 Year
3 Years
5 Years
10 Years
Class A Shares
$523
$771
$1,039
$1,801
Class T Shares
$325
$578
$851
$1,629
Class I Shares
$51
$258
$482
$1,125
Class R Shares
$102
$417
$754
$1,707
Portfolio Turnover
The Fund pays transaction costs, such as commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or “turns over” its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover rate may indicate higher transaction costs and may result in higher taxes when shares are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are not reflected in annual fund operating expenses or in the Example, affect the Fund's performance. During the most recent fiscal year, the Fund's portfolio turnover rate was 244% of the average value of its portfolio.
Investments, Risks, and Performance
Principal Investment Strategy
Under normal circumstances, the Fund invests at least 80% of its net assets, plus borrowings for investment purposes, in a diversified portfolio of U.S. and foreign bonds or other debt securities of varying maturities and other instruments that provide investment exposure to such debt securities, including forwards or derivatives such as options, futures contracts or swap agreements.
Under normal circumstances, the Fund invests primarily in a diversified mix of U.S. dollar-denominated investment grade fixed income securities, particularly U.S. government, corporate and mortgage-backed securities. The Fund may invest in securities of any maturity. Under normal circumstances, it is expected that the average portfolio duration of the Fund will be within 5 years of the duration of the benchmark. As of December 31, 2022, the average duration of the benchmark, the Bloomberg U.S. Aggregate Bond Index, was 6.32 years. Duration is a measure used to determine the sensitivity of a security’s price to changes in interest rates. The longer a security’s duration, the more sensitive it will be to changes in interest rates, which may increase the volatility of the security’s value and may lead to losses. As a separate measure, there is no limit on the weighted average maturity of the Fund’s fixed income portfolio.
Brandywine Global Investment Management, LLC (“Brandywine Global” or the “Sub-Adviser”) employs a value approach toward fixed income investing and evaluates the relative attractiveness among corporate, mortgage and U.S. government securities, and also may invest in non-dollar-denominated issues. The Sub-Adviser relies upon value measures to guide its decisions regarding sector, security and country selection, such as the relative attractiveness of the extra yield offered by securities other than those issued by the U.S. Treasury. The Sub-Adviser also measures various types of risk by monitoring interest rates, inflation, the shape of the yield curve, credit risk, prepayment risk, risks relating to conditions in different countries, and currency valuations.
The Fund may invest in securities denominated in foreign currencies and in U.S. dollar-denominated securities of foreign issuers, including securities and instruments that are economically tied to emerging market countries. The Fund will normally limit its foreign currency exposure (from non-U.S. dollar-denominated securities or currencies) to 40% of its total assets (this limitation does not apply to investment grade sovereign debt denominated in the local currency with less than 1 year remaining to maturity).
The portfolio managers intend to maintain an average weighted portfolio quality of BBB- or better, whether composed of rated securities or unrated securities deemed by the portfolio managers to be of comparable quality. The Fund may invest in both investment grade securities and high yield securities (“junk bonds”) subject to a maximum of 40% of its total assets in securities rated below investment grade by Standard & Poor’s Global Ratings (“S&P”), Fitch, Inc. (“Fitch”), or Moody’s Investors Service, Inc. (”Moody’s”) or, if unrated, determined by the Fund’s investment adviser, Equitable Investment Management, LLC (the “Adviser”), or the Sub-Adviser to be of comparable quality. The below investment grade securities in which the Fund invests are generally rated at least CC by S&P or Fitch or at least Ca by Moody’s or, if unrated, determined by the Adviser or the Sub-Adviser to be of comparable quality. The Fund may continue to hold securities that are downgraded below these ratings subsequent to purchase. The Fund does not normally invest in securities that are in default or have defaulted with respect to the payment of interest or repayment of principal, but may do so depending on market or other
1290 Diversified Bond Fund 3

conditions. The Fund may have exposure to securities rated below CC or Ca, or to securities that are in default or have defaulted, through its investments in certain derivatives described below.
The Fund may invest, without limitation, in forwards and derivative instruments such as options, futures contracts, structured securities or swap agreements (including total return swaps, credit default swaps and interest rate swaps), and in mortgage- and asset-backed securities, subject to applicable law and any other restrictions described in the Fund’s prospectus or Statement of Additional Information. Derivatives may be used for various investment purposes, including to hedge portfolio risk, to gain exposure or to short individual securities, to earn income and enhance return, and to manage duration. The Fund’s investments in derivatives may involve the use of leverage because the Fund is not required to invest the full market value of the contract upon entering into the contract but participates in gains and losses on the full contract price. The use of derivatives also may involve the use of leverage because the heightened price sensitivity of some derivatives to market changes may magnify the Fund’s gain or loss.
The Fund may enter into foreign currency exchange transactions to hedge against currency exposure in its portfolio. The Fund may enter into forward currency exchange contracts and other currency derivatives, such as swaps, options and futures, to shift its investment exposure from one currency into another. This may include shifting exposure from U.S. dollars to a foreign currency, or from one foreign currency to another foreign currency. This type of strategy, sometimes known as a “crosshedge,” will tend to reduce or eliminate exposure to the currency that is sold, and increase exposure to the currency that is purchased, much as if the Fund had sold a security denominated in one currency and purchased an equivalent security denominated in another. Cross-hedges are intended to protect against losses resulting from a decline in the value of the hedged currency, but will cause the Fund to assume the risk of fluctuations in the value of the currency it purchases, and may also limit any potential gain that might result should the value of such hedged currency increase.
The Fund may purchase or sell securities on a when-issued, delayed delivery, or forward commitment basis. The Fund may seek to obtain market exposure to the securities in which it primarily invests by entering into a series of purchase and sale contracts (such as contracts for derivative instruments) or by using other investment techniques (such as buy backs or dollar rolls). The Fund may invest in privately placed and restricted securities, collateralized loan obligations, inflation-indexed bonds, bank loans, and loan participations and assignments. The Fund may also invest in zero coupon and pay-in-kind securities. The Fund may engage in active and frequent trading to achieve its investment objective.
Principal Risks
An investment in the Fund is not a deposit of a bank and is not insured or guaranteed by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation or any other government agency. The value of your investment may fall, sometimes sharply, and you could lose money by investing in the Fund. There can be no assurance that the Fund will achieve its investment objective.
The following risks can negatively affect the Fund’s performance. The most significant risks as of the date of this Prospectus are presented first, followed by additional principal risks in alphabetical order.
Market Risk The Fund is subject to the risk that the securities markets will move down, sometimes rapidly and unpredictably, based on overall economic conditions and other factors, which may negatively affect Fund performance. Securities markets also may experience long periods of decline in value. The value of a security may decline due to factors that are specifically related to a particular company, as well as general market conditions, such as real or perceived adverse economic or political conditions, inflation rates and/or investor expectations concerning such rates, changes in interest rates, recessions, or adverse investor sentiment generally. During a general downturn in the securities markets, multiple asset classes may decline in value simultaneously. Changes in the financial condition of a single issuer can impact a market as a whole.
Geopolitical events, including terrorism, tensions, war or other open conflicts between nations, or political or economic dysfunction within some nations that are global economic powers or major producers of oil, may lead to overall instability in world economies and markets generally and have led, and may in the future lead, to increased market volatility and may have adverse long-term effects. World markets, or those in a particular region, may all react in similar fashion to important economic, political or other developments. Events such as environmental and natural disasters or other catastrophes, public health crises (such as epidemics and pandemics), social unrest, and cybersecurity incidents, and governments’ reactions to such events, could cause uncertainty in the markets and may adversely affect the performance of the global economy. Impacts from climate change may include significant risks to global financial assets and economic growth. The extent and duration of such events and resulting market disruptions could be substantial and could magnify the impact of other risks to the Fund. The value and liquidity of the Fund’s investments may be negatively affected by developments in other countries and regions, whether or not the Fund invests in securities of issuers located in or with significant exposure to the countries or regions directly affected.
4 1290 Diversified Bond Fund

The U.S. Federal Reserve (“Fed”) has invested or otherwise made available substantial amounts of money to keep credit flowing through short-term money markets and has signaled that it will continue to adjust its operations as appropriate to support short-term money markets. Amid these efforts, concerns about the markets’ dependence on the Fed’s provision of liquidity have grown. Policy changes by the U.S. government and/or the Fed and political events within the United States may affect investor and consumer confidence and may adversely impact financial markets and the broader economy, perhaps suddenly and to a significant degree. A downgrade of the ratings of U.S. government debt obligations, or concerns about the U.S. government’s credit quality in general, could have a substantial negative effect on the U.S. and global economies. High public debt in the United States and other countries creates ongoing systemic and market risks and policymaking uncertainty.
In addition, markets and market participants are increasingly reliant on information data systems. Inaccurate data, software or other technology malfunctions, programming inaccuracies, unauthorized use or access, and similar circumstances may impair the performance of these systems and may have an adverse impact upon a single issuer, a group of issuers, or the market at large.
Credit Risk The Fund is subject to the risk that the issuer or guarantor of a fixed income security, or the counterparty to a transaction, is unable or unwilling, or is perceived as unable or unwilling, to make timely interest or principal payments or otherwise honor its obligations, or defaults completely, which may cause the Fund's holdings to lose value. The downgrade of a security’s credit rating may decrease its value. Lower credit quality also may lead to greater volatility in the price of a security and may negatively affect a security’s liquidity. The credit quality of a security can deteriorate suddenly and rapidly. The Fund may experience a significant or complete loss on a fixed income security or a transaction.
Interest Rate Risk Changes in interest rates may affect the yield, liquidity and value of investments in income producing or debt securities. Changes in interest rates also may affect the value of other securities. When interest rates rise, the value of the Fund's debt securities generally declines. Conversely, when interest rates decline, the value of the Fund's debt securities generally rises. Typically, the longer the maturity or duration of a debt security, the greater the effect a change in interest rates could have on the security’s price. Thus, the sensitivity of the Fund's debt securities to interest rate risk will increase the greater the duration of those securities. A significant or rapid rise in interest rates could result in losses to the Fund.
Investment Grade Securities Risk Securities rated in the lower investment grade rating categories (e.g., BBB or Baa) are considered investment grade securities, but may have more risk than higher rated obligations because they are regarded as having only an adequate capacity to pay principal and interest, are considered to lack outstanding investment characteristics, and may possess certain speculative characteristics.
Non-Investment Grade Securities Risk Bonds rated below BBB by Standard & Poor’s Global Ratings or Fitch Ratings, Ltd., or below Baa by Moody’s Investors Service, Inc. (or, if unrated, determined by the investment manager to be of comparable quality) are speculative in nature and are subject to additional risk factors such as increased possibility of default, illiquidity of the security, and changes in value based on changes in interest rates. Non-investment grade bonds, sometimes referred to as “junk bonds,” are usually issued by companies without long track records of sales and earnings, or by those companies with questionable credit strength. The creditworthiness of issuers of non-investment grade debt securities may be more complex to analyze than that of issuers of investment grade debt securities, and reliance on credit ratings may present additional risks.
Derivatives Risk The Fund's investments in derivatives may rise or fall in value more rapidly than other investments and may reduce the Fund's returns and increase the volatility of the Fund's net asset value. Investing in derivatives involves investment techniques and risk analyses different from, and risks in some respects greater than, those associated with investing in more traditional investments, such as stocks and bonds. Derivatives may be leveraged such that a small investment can have a significant impact on the Fund's exposure to stock market values, interest rates, or other investments. As a result, a relatively small price movement in a derivatives contract may cause an immediate and substantial loss, and the Fund could lose more than the amount it invested. Some derivatives can have the potential for unlimited losses. In addition, it may be difficult or impossible for the Fund to purchase or sell certain derivatives in sufficient amounts to achieve the desired level of exposure, or to terminate or offset existing arrangements, which may result in a loss or may be costly to the Fund. Some derivatives are more sensitive to market price fluctuations and to interest rate changes than other investments. Derivatives may not behave as anticipated by the Fund, and derivatives strategies that are successful under certain market conditions may be less successful or unsuccessful under other market conditions. The Fund also may be exposed to losses if the counterparty in the transaction is unable or unwilling to fulfill its contractual obligation. In certain cases, the Fund may be hindered or delayed in exercising remedies against or closing out derivatives with a counterparty, resulting in additional losses. Derivatives also may be subject to the risk of mispricing or improper valuation, and valuation may be more difficult in times of market turmoil. Changes to the regulation of derivatives markets and mutual funds’ use of derivatives may impact the Fund's ability to maintain its investments in derivatives, make derivatives more costly, limit their availability, adversely affect their value or performance, or otherwise disrupt markets.
1290 Diversified Bond Fund 5

Leveraging Risk When the Fund leverages its holdings, the value of an investment in the Fund will be more volatile and all other risks will tend to be compounded. Investments that create leverage can result in losses to the Fund that exceed the amount originally invested and may accelerate the rate of losses (some of which may be sudden or substantial). For certain investments that create leverage, relatively small market fluctuations can result in large changes in the value of such investments. There can be no assurance that the Fund's use of any leverage will be successful.
U.S. Government Securities Risk Although the Fund may hold securities that carry U.S. government guarantees, these guarantees do not extend to shares of the Fund itself and do not guarantee the market prices of the securities. Securities issued by the U.S. Treasury or other agencies and instrumentalities of the U.S. government may decline in value as a result of, among other things, changes in interest rates, political events in the United States, international developments, including strained relations with foreign countries, and changes in the credit rating of, or investor perceptions regarding the creditworthiness of, the U.S. government. Furthermore, not all securities issued by the U.S. government and its agencies and instrumentalities are backed by the full faith and credit of the U.S. Treasury. Securities not backed by the full faith and credit of the U.S. Treasury involve greater credit risk than investments in other types of U.S. government securities.
Foreign Securities Risk Investments in foreign securities involve risks in addition to those associated with investments in U.S. securities. Foreign markets may be less liquid, more volatile and subject to less government supervision and regulation than U.S. markets, and it may take more time to clear and settle trades involving foreign securities, which could negatively impact the Fund's investments and cause it to lose money. Security values also may be negatively affected by changes in the exchange rates between the U.S. dollar and foreign currencies. Differences between U.S. and foreign legal, political and economic systems, regulatory regimes and market practices, as well as trade barriers and other protectionist trade policies (including those of the United States), governmental instability, war, or other political or economic actions, also may adversely impact security values. Foreign securities are also subject to the risks associated with the potential imposition of economic or other sanctions against a particular foreign country, its nationals, businesses or industries. World markets, or those in a particular region, may all react in similar fashion to important economic, political or other developments. Events and evolving conditions in certain economies or markets may alter the risks associated with investments tied to countries or regions that historically were perceived as comparatively stable and make such investments riskier and more volatile. Regardless of where a company is organized or its stock is traded, its performance may be significantly affected by events in regions from which it derives its profits or in which it conducts significant operations.
Currency RiskInvestments that are denominated in or that provide exposure to foreign currencies are subject to the risk that those currencies will decline in value relative to the U.S. dollar. Any such decline may erode or reverse any potential gains from an investment in securities denominated in foreign currency or may widen existing loss. In the case of hedging positions, there is the risk that the U.S. dollar will decline in value relative to the currency being hedged. Currency rates may fluctuate significantly over short periods of time.
Emerging Markets RiskThe risks associated with investments in emerging market countries often are significant, and vary from jurisdiction to jurisdiction and company to company. Investments in emerging market countries are more susceptible to loss than investments in more developed foreign countries and may present market, credit, currency, liquidity, legal, political, technical and other risks different from, or greater than, the risks of investing in more developed foreign countries. Emerging market countries may be more likely to experience rapid and significant adverse developments in their political or economic structures, intervene in financial markets, restrict foreign investments, impose high withholding or other taxes on foreign investments, impose restrictive exchange control regulations, or nationalize or expropriate the assets of private companies, which may have negative impacts on transaction costs, market price, investment returns and the legal rights and remedies available to the Fund. In addition, the securities markets of emerging market countries generally are smaller, less liquid and more volatile than those of more developed foreign countries, and emerging market countries often have less uniformity in regulatory, accounting, auditing and financial reporting requirements or standards, which may impact the availability and quality of information about issuers, and less reliable clearance and settlement, registration and custodial procedures. Emerging market countries also may be subject to high inflation and rapid currency devaluations, and currency-hedging techniques may be unavailable in certain emerging market countries. In addition, some emerging market countries may be heavily dependent on international trade, which can materially affect their securities markets. Securities of issuers traded on foreign exchanges may be suspended. The likelihood of such suspensions may be higher for securities of issuers in emerging market countries than in countries with more developed markets.
European Economic RiskThe economies of European Union (“EU”) member countries and their trading partners, as well as the broader global economy, may be adversely affected by changes in the euro’s exchange rate, changes in EU or governmental regulations on trade, geopolitical tensions or conflicts, and the threat of default or an actual default by an EU member country on its sovereign debt, which could negatively impact the Fund's investments and cause it to lose money. Recent events in Europe may continue to impact the economies of every European country and their economic partners. Russia’s military invasion of Ukraine in February 2022, the resulting responses by the United States and other countries, and
6 1290 Diversified Bond Fund

the potential for wider conflict have had, and could continue to have, severe adverse effects on regional and global economies and could further increase volatility and uncertainty in the financial markets. In addition, until the full economic effects of the United Kingdom's withdrawal from the EU, commonly referred to as “Brexit,” become clearer, there remains a risk that Brexit may negatively impact the Fund's investments and cause it to lose money. Any further withdrawals from the EU could cause additional market disruption globally.
Geographic Concentration RiskTo the extent the Fund invests a significant portion of its assets in securities of companies domiciled, or exercising the predominant part of their economic activity, in one country or geographic region, it assumes the risk that economic, political, social and environmental conditions in that particular country or region will have a significant impact on the Fund’s investment performance and that the Fund’s performance will be more volatile than the performance of more geographically diversified funds. In addition, the risks associated with investing in a narrowly defined geographic area are generally more pronounced with respect to investments in emerging market countries.
Hedging Risk If the Fund takes a hedging position (such as long or short positions) in a particular currency, security, or bond market, it will lose money if the currency, security, or bond market appreciates in value, or an expected credit event fails to occur. Any efforts at buying or selling currencies could result in significant losses for the Fund.
Liquidity Risk From time to time, there may be little or no active trading market for a particular investment in which the Fund may invest or is invested. In such a market, the value of such an investment and the Fund's share price may fall dramatically. Illiquid investments may be difficult or impossible to sell or purchase at an advantageous time or price or in sufficient amounts to achieve the Fund's desired level of exposure. To meet redemption requests during periods of illiquidity, the Fund may be forced to dispose of investments at unfavorable times or prices and/or under unfavorable conditions, which may result in a loss or may be costly to the Fund. Investments that are illiquid or that trade in lower volumes may be more difficult to value. The Fund also may not receive its proceeds from the sale of certain investments for an extended period of time. Certain investments that were liquid when purchased may later become illiquid, sometimes abruptly, particularly in times of overall economic distress or adverse investor perception. An inability to sell a portfolio position can adversely affect the Fund's value or prevent the Fund from being able to take advantage of other investment opportunities. During periods of market stress, an investment or even an entire market segment may become illiquid, sometimes abruptly, which can adversely affect the Fund's ability to limit losses. In addition, a reduction in the ability or willingness of dealers and other institutional investors to make a market in certain securities may result in decreased liquidity in certain markets.
Portfolio Management Risk The Fund is subject to the risk that strategies used by an investment manager and its securities selections fail to produce the intended results. An investment manager’s judgments or decisions about the quality, relative yield or value of, or market trends affecting, a particular security or issuer, industry, sector, region or market segment, or about the economy or interest rates, may be incorrect or otherwise may not produce the intended results, which may result in losses to the Fund. In addition, many processes used in Fund management, including security selection, rely, in whole or in part, on the use of various technologies. The Fund may suffer losses if there are imperfections, errors or limitations in the quantitative, analytic or other tools, resources, information and data used, or the analyses employed or relied on, by an investment manager, or if such tools, resources, information or data are used incorrectly, fail to produce the desired results, or otherwise do not work as intended. There can be no assurance that the use of these technologies will result in effective investment decisions for the Fund.
Cash Management Risk Upon entering into certain derivatives contracts, such as futures contracts, and to maintain open positions in certain derivatives contracts, the Fund may be required to post collateral for the contract, the amount of which may vary. In addition, the Fund may maintain cash and cash equivalent positions as part of the Fund's strategy in order to take advantage of investment opportunities as they arise, to manage the Fund's market exposure and for other portfolio management purposes. As such, the Fund may maintain cash balances, which may be significant, with counterparties such as the 1290 Funds' custodian or its affiliates. Maintaining larger cash and cash equivalent positions could negatively affect the Fund's performance due to missed investment opportunities and may also subject the Fund to additional risks, such as increased credit risk with respect to the custodian bank holding the assets and the risk that a counterparty may be unable or unwilling to honor its obligations.
Collateralized Loan Obligations Risk Investments in collateralized loan obligations (“CLOs”) involve many of the same risks associated with investments in debt securities and asset-backed securities including interest rate risk, credit risk, liquidity risk, prepayment and extension risk, and valuation risk. The risks of an investment in a CLO also depend largely on the quality and type of the collateral and the class or “tranche” of the CLO in which the Fund invests. Normally, CLOs are privately offered and sold, and thus are not registered under the securities laws. As a result, investments in CLOs may be characterized by the Fund as illiquid securities; however, an active dealer market, or other relevant measures of liquidity, may exist for CLOs allowing a CLO potentially to be deemed liquid under the Fund's liquidity policies. Additionally, CLOs carry risks, including, but not limited to: (a) the possibility that distributions from collateral securities will not be adequate to make interest or other payments; (b) the risk that the collateral securities may decline in value or quality or be downgraded or go into default, particularly during periods of economic downturn; (c) the possibility that the Fund may invest in CLOs that are subordinate to other classes; (d) the risk that the manager of the CLOs may perform poorly; and (e) the
1290 Diversified Bond Fund 7

risk that the complex structure of CLOs may produce disputes with the issuer or unexpected investment results. CLOs also can be difficult to value and may be highly leveraged (which could make them highly volatile), and the use of CLOs may result in losses to the Fund.
Dollar Roll and Sale-Buyback Transactions Risk Dollar roll and sale-buyback transactions may increase the Fund's volatility and may be viewed as a form of leverage. There is also a risk that the counterparty will be unable or unwilling to complete the transaction as scheduled, which may result in losses to the Fund.
Futures Contract Risk The primary risks associated with the use of futures contracts are (a) the imperfect correlation between the change in market value of the instruments held by the Fund and the price of the futures contract; (b) liquidity risks, including the possible absence of a liquid secondary market for a futures contract and the resulting inability to close a futures contract when desired; (c) losses (potentially unlimited) caused by unanticipated market movements; (d) an investment manager’s inability to predict correctly the direction of securities prices, interest rates, currency exchange rates and other economic factors; (e) the possibility that a counterparty, clearing member or clearinghouse will default in the performance of its obligations; (f) if the Fund has insufficient cash, it may have to sell securities from its portfolio to meet daily variation margin requirements, and the Fund may have to sell securities at a time when it may be disadvantageous to do so; and (g) transaction costs associated with investments in futures contracts may be significant, which could cause or increase losses or reduce gains. Futures contracts are also subject to the same risks as the underlying investments to which they provide exposure. In addition, futures contracts may subject the Fund to leveraging risk.
Inflation-Indexed Bonds Risk Inflation-indexed bonds are fixed income securities whose principal value is periodically adjusted according to inflation. The value of inflation-indexed bonds is expected to change in response to changes in real interest rates. Real interest rates represent nominal (stated) interest rates reduced by the expected impact of inflation. In general, inflation-indexed bonds, including Treasury inflation-indexed securities, decline in value when real interest rates rise and rise in value when real interest rates decline. In certain interest rate environments, such as when real interest rates are rising faster than nominal interest rates, inflation-indexed bonds may experience greater losses than other fixed income securities with similar durations. Interest payments on inflation-indexed debt securities can be unpredictable and may vary as the principal and/or interest is adjusted for inflation. In periods of deflation, the Fund may have no income at all from such investments.
Loan Risk A bank loan represents an interest in a loan or other direct indebtedness that entitles the acquirer of such interest to payments of interest, principal and/or other amounts due under the structure of the loan. Loan interests are subject to liquidity risk, prepayment risk, extension risk, the risk of subordination to other creditors, restrictions on resale, and the lack of a regular trading market and publicly available information. Loan interests may be difficult to value and may have extended trade settlement periods. As a result, the proceeds from the sale of a loan may not be available to make additional investments or to meet redemption obligations until potentially a substantial period after the sale of the loan. The extended trade settlement periods could force the Fund to liquidate other securities to meet redemptions and may present a risk that the Fund may incur losses in order to timely honor redemptions. There is a risk that the value of any collateral securing a loan in which the Fund has an interest may decline and that the collateral may not be sufficient to cover the amount owed on the loan. In the event the borrower defaults, the Fund's access to the collateral may be limited or delayed by bankruptcy or other insolvency laws. Loans may not be considered “securities,” and purchasers, such as the Fund, therefore may not have the benefit of the anti-fraud protections of the federal securities laws. To the extent that the Fund invests in loan participations and assignments, it is subject to the risk that the financial institution acting as agent for all interests in a loan might fail financially. It is also possible that the Fund could be held liable, or may be called upon to fulfill other obligations, as a co-lender.
Mortgage-Related and Other Asset-Backed Securities Risk Declines in the credit quality of and defaults by the issuers of mortgage-related and other asset-backed securities or instability in the markets for such securities may decrease the value of such securities, which could result in losses to the Fund, and may reduce the liquidity of such securities and make such securities more difficult to purchase or sell at an advantageous time and price. In addition, borrowers may default on the obligations that underlie mortgage-related and other asset-backed securities. The risk of defaults by borrowers generally is greater during times of rising interest rates and/or unemployment rates. The impairment (or loss) of the value of collateral or other assets underlying mortgage-related and other asset-backed securities will result in a reduction in the value of the securities. Certain collateral may be difficult to locate in the event of default, or may be lost, and recoveries of depreciated or damaged collateral may not fully cover payments due on such collateral. Asset-backed securities may not have the benefit of a security interest in collateral comparable to that of mortgage assets, resulting in additional credit risk.
In addition, certain mortgage-related and other asset-backed securities may include securities backed by pools of loans made to “subprime” borrowers or borrowers with blemished credit histories. The risk of defaults by borrowers is generally higher in the case of asset or mortgage pools that include subprime assets or mortgages, and the liquidity and value of subprime mortgages and non-investment grade mortgage-backed securities that are not guaranteed by Ginnie Mae, Fannie Mae, and Freddie Mac could change dramatically over time.
8 1290 Diversified Bond Fund

Furthermore, mortgage-related and other asset-backed securities typically provide the issuer with the right to prepay the security prior to maturity. During periods of rising interest rates, the rate of prepayments tends to decrease because borrowers are less likely to prepay debt (such as mortgage debt or automobile loans). Slower than expected payments can extend the average lives of mortgage-related and other asset-backed securities, and this may “lock in” a below market interest rate and increase the security’s duration and interest rate sensitivity, which may increase the volatility of the security’s value and may lead to losses. During periods of falling interest rates, the rate of prepayments tends to increase because borrowers are more likely to pay off debt and refinance at the lower interest rates then available. Unscheduled prepayments shorten the average lives of mortgage-related and other asset-backed securities and may result in the Fund’s having to reinvest the proceeds of the prepayments at lower interest rates, thereby reducing the Fund’s income.
Portfolio Turnover Risk High portfolio turnover (generally, turnover in excess of 100% in any given fiscal year) may result in increased transaction costs to the Fund, which may result in higher fund expenses and lower total return.
Prepayment Risk and Extension Risk Prepayment risk is the risk that the issuer of a security held by the Fund may pay off principal more quickly than originally anticipated. This may occur when interest rates fall. The Fund may have to reinvest the proceeds in an investment offering a lower yield, may not benefit from any increase in value that might otherwise result from declining interest rates and may lose any premium it paid to acquire the security. Extension risk is the risk that the issuer of a security held by the Fund may pay off principal more slowly than originally anticipated. This may occur when interest rates rise. The Fund may be prevented from reinvesting the proceeds it would have received at a given time in an investment offering a higher yield.
Privately Placed and Other Restricted Securities Risk Restricted securities, which include privately placed securities, are securities that cannot be offered for public resale unless registered under the applicable securities laws or that have a contractual restriction that prohibits or limits their resale. Difficulty in selling securities may result in a loss or be costly to the Fund. The risk that securities may not be sold for the price at which the Fund is carrying them is greater with respect to restricted securities than it is with respect to registered securities. The illiquidity of the market, as well as the lack of publicly available information regarding these securities, also may make it difficult to determine a fair value for certain securities for purposes of computing the Fund's net asset value.
Redemption Risk The Fund may experience periods of heavy redemptions that could cause the Fund to sell assets at inopportune times or at a loss or depressed value. Redemption risk is heightened during periods of declining or illiquid markets. Heavy redemptions could hurt the Fund's performance.
Market developments and other factors, including a general rise in interest rates, have the potential to cause investors to move out of fixed income securities on a large scale, which may increase redemptions from mutual funds that hold large amounts of fixed income securities. The market-making capacity of dealers has been reduced in recent years, in part as a result of structural changes, such as fewer proprietary trading desks at broker-dealers and increased regulatory capital requirements. In addition, significant securities market disruptions related to the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic have led to dislocation in the market for a variety of fixed income securities (including, without limitation, commercial paper, corporate debt securities, certificates of deposit, asset-backed debt securities and municipal obligations), which has decreased liquidity and sharply reduced returns in certain cases. Increased redemptions from mutual funds that hold large amounts of fixed income securities, coupled with a reduction in the ability or willingness of dealers and other institutional investors to buy or hold fixed income securities, may result in decreased liquidity and increased volatility in the fixed income markets.
Sector Risk From time to time, based on market or economic conditions, the Fund may have significant positions in one or more sectors of the market. To the extent the Fund invests more heavily in particular sectors, its performance will be especially sensitive to developments that significantly affect those sectors. Individual sectors may be more volatile, and may perform differently, than the broader market. The industries that constitute a sector may all react in the same way to economic, political or regulatory events.
Variable and Floating Rate Securities Risk The market prices of securities with variable and floating interest rates are generally less sensitive to interest rate changes than are the market prices of securities with fixed interest rates. Variable and floating rate securities may decline in value if market interest rates or interest rates paid by such securities do not move as expected. Conversely, variable and floating rate securities will not generally rise in value if market interest rates decline. Certain types of floating rate securities may be subject to greater liquidity risk than other debt securities.
When-Issued and Delayed Delivery Securities and Forward Commitments Risk When-issued and delayed delivery securities and forward commitments involve the risk that the security the Fund commits to purchase will decline in value prior to its delivery. This risk is in addition to the risk that the Fund's other assets will decline in value. Therefore, these transactions can have a leverage-like effect on the Fund and increase the Fund's overall investment exposure. There also is the risk that the security will not be issued or that the other party to the transaction will fail to complete the sale or purchase of the security. If this occurs, the Fund may lose the opportunity to purchase or sell the security at the agreed upon price and may forgo any gain in the security’s price.
1290 Diversified Bond Fund 9

Zero Coupon and Pay-in-Kind Securities Risk Zero coupon and pay-in-kind securities are debt securities that do not make periodic cash interest payments. Zero coupon securities are issued at a significant discount from their face value. Zero coupon and pay-in-kind securities tend to be subject to greater fluctuations in market value in response to changing interest rates than securities of comparable maturities that pay interest periodically and in cash.
Risk/Return Bar Chart and Table
The bar chart and table below provide some indication of the risks of investing in the Fund by showing changes in the Fund's performance from year to year and by showing how the Fund's average annual total returns for the past one-year, five-year and since inception periods through December 31, 2022, compared to the returns of a broad-based securities market index. The return of the broad-based securities market index (and any additional comparative index) shown for the since inception period below is the return of the index since the inception of the share class with the longest history. Past performance (before and after taxes) is not an indication of future performance.
Performance information for the periods prior to June 15, 2018, is that of the Fund when it followed a different investment objective and different principal investment strategies, and had different Sub-Advisers.
The performance results shown in the bar chart do not reflect any sales charges or account fees, which would reduce the performance results. Class T shares of the Fund have not commenced operations. Performance information for Class T shares will be available after Class T shares have been in operation for one full calendar year.

Calendar Year Annual Total Returns — Class I

Best quarter (% and time period)
10.33%
2020 2nd Quarter
Worst quarter (% and time period)
-7.83%
2022 2nd Quarter

Average Annual Total Returns

 
One
Year
Five
Years
Since
Inception
Inception
Date
1290 Diversified Bond Fund - Class I
Return Before Taxes
-12.53%
2.44%
2.54%
07/06/2015
1290 Diversified Bond Fund - Class I
Return After Taxes on Distributions
-13.68%
0.68%
0.94%
07/06/2015
1290 Diversified Bond Fund - Class I
Return After Taxes on Distributions and Sale of Fund Shares
-7.38%
1.21%
1.30%
07/06/2015
1290 Diversified Bond Fund - Class A
Return Before Taxes
-16.70%
1.26%
1.67%
07/06/2015
1290 Diversified Bond Fund - Class R
Return Before Taxes
-13.04%
1.93%
2.02%
07/06/2015
Bloomberg U.S. Aggregate Bond Index (reflects no deduction for fees, expenses, or taxes)
-13.01%
0.02%
0.88%
 
After-tax returns are calculated using the historical highest individual federal marginal income tax rates and do not reflect the impact of state and local taxes. Actual after-tax returns depend on an investor’s tax situation and may differ from those shown, and the after-tax returns shown are not relevant to investors who hold their Fund shares through tax-deferred arrangements, such as 401(k) plans or individual retirement accounts (IRAs). The returns after taxes on distributions and sale of Fund shares may be higher than other returns for the same period due to an assumed tax benefit from any losses on a
10 1290 Diversified Bond Fund

sale of Fund shares at the end of the measurement period. After-tax returns are shown only for Class I shares. After-tax returns for other Classes may vary.
Who Manages the Fund
Investment Adviser: Equitable Investment Management, LLC (the “Adviser”)
Portfolio Managers: The members of the team that are jointly and primarily responsible for the selection, monitoring and oversight of the Fund’s Sub-Adviser are:
Name
Title
Date Began
Managing
the Fund
Kenneth T. Kozlowski, CFP®, CLU, ChFC
Executive Vice President and Chief Investment
Officer of the Adviser
July 2015
Alwi Chan, CFA®
Senior Vice President and Deputy Chief
Investment Officer of the Adviser
July 2015
Sub-Adviser: Brandywine Global Investment Management, LLC (“Brandywine Global”)
Portfolio Managers: The individuals jointly and primarily responsible for the securities selection, research and trading for the Fund are:
Name
Title
Date Began
Managing
the Fund
Anujeet Sareen, CFA®
Portfolio Manager of Brandywine Global
June 2018
Tracy Chen, CFA®, CAIA
Portfolio Manager of Brandywine Global
June 2018
Brian L. Kloss, JD, CPA
Portfolio Manager and Head of High Yield of
Brandywine Global
March 2020
The Adviser is responsible for overseeing Sub-Advisers and recommending their hiring, termination and replacement to the Board of Trustees. The Adviser has been granted relief by the Securities and Exchange Commission to hire, terminate and replace Sub-Advisers and amend sub-advisory agreements subject to the approval of the Board of Trustees and without obtaining shareholder approval. However, the Adviser may not enter into a sub-advisory agreement on behalf of the Fund with an “affiliated person” of the Adviser unless the sub-advisory agreement is approved by the Fund's shareholders. The relief does not extend to any increase in the advisory fee paid by the Fund to the Adviser; any such increase would be subject to shareholder approval.
Purchase and Redemption of Fund Shares
You may purchase and redeem shares of the Fund each day the New York Stock Exchange is open for trading at the Fund’s net asset value determined after receipt of your request in good order, subject to any applicable sales charge. All share classes are currently not offered for sale in all states. Initial purchases must be effected through your financial intermediary. Subsequently, you may purchase or redeem shares either by having your financial intermediary process your purchase or redemption, or by telephone (1-888-310-0416), by overnight mail (1290 Funds, c/o SS&C GIDS, Inc., 430 W. 7th Street, Suite 219166, Kansas City, MO 64105-1407), or by mail (1290 Funds, PO Box 219166, Kansas City, MO 64121-9166). All redemption requests will be processed and payment with respect thereto will normally be made within seven days after receipt of your request in good order.
The initial and subsequent minimums for purchasing shares of the Fund generally are as follows, although the Fund may reduce or waive the minimums in some cases:
 
Class A
Class T
Class I
Class R
Minimum Initial Investment
$1,000 for all accounts
except:
• $500 for certain fee-based
programs.
$1,000 for all accounts
except:
• $500 for certain fee-based
programs.
• $1,000,000 for certain
institutions and individuals.
• $1,000 for certain
employees (or their
No minimum
1290 Diversified Bond Fund 11

 
Class A
Class T
Class I
Class R
 
• $500, if establishing an
Automatic Bank Draft Plan.
• $250 minimum for
purchases by accounts
through eligible financial
intermediary platforms
that have entered into
selling or service
agreements with the
Distributor and that are
eligible to purchase
Class A shares without a
sales charge.
• No minimum for certain
employer-sponsored
retirement plans and
certain wrap fee based
programs.
• $500, if establishing an
Automatic Bank Draft Plan.
• No minimum for certain
employer-sponsored
retirement plans and
certain wrap fee based
programs.
immediate family
members) of Equitable
Holdings, Inc. or its
subsidiaries.
• Class I shares are available
to clients of registered
investment advisers who
have $250,000 invested in
the Fund.
• No minimum investment
for a wrap account client
of an eligible broker-dealer
or a client of a fee-based
planner that is unaffiliated
with a broker-dealer, or a
client of an investment
adviser, trustee,
administrator or institution
acting in a similar capacity
that invests in the Fund
through a retirement plan
where the administrator or
service provider of such
retirement plan has
entered into a services
agreement with the Fund’s
distributor and/or
investment adviser.
 
Minimum Additional
Investment
$50 for all accounts
$50 for all accounts
No subsequent minimum
No subsequent minimum
Your financial intermediary may impose different investment minimums.
Tax Information
The Fund’s dividends and other distributions generally will be subject to federal income tax as ordinary income or long-term capital gains, unless you are a tax-exempt investor or are investing through a retirement plan or account; in the latter case, you may be subject to that tax upon withdrawal from the plan or account.
Payments to Broker-Dealers and Other Financial Intermediaries
If you purchase shares of the Fund through a broker-dealer or other financial intermediary (such as a bank), the Fund and its related companies may pay the intermediary for the sale of Fund shares, shareholder services and other purposes. These payments create a conflict of interest by influencing the broker-dealer or other intermediary and your investment professional to recommend the Fund over another investment. Ask your financial adviser or visit your financial intermediary’s website for more information.
12 1290 Diversified Bond Fund

1290 Essex Small Cap Growth Fund— Class A (ESCFX), Class T (ESCHX), Class I (ESCJX) and Class R (ESCKX) Shares
Investment Objective:Seeks long-term growth of capital.
Fees and Expenses of the Fund
The following table describes the fees and expenses that you may pay if you buy, hold, and sell shares of the Fund. You may pay other fees, such as brokerage commissions and other fees to financial intermediaries, which are not reflected in the table and example below. You may qualify for sales charge discounts if you and your family invest, or agree to invest in the future, at least $50,000 in 1290 Funds’ funds. More information about these and other discounts is available from your financial professional and in the “How Sales Charges are Calculated” and “Ways to Reduce or Eliminate Sales Charges” sections of the Fund’s Prospectus, and the “Purchase, Redemption and Pricing of Shares” section of the Fund’s Statement of Additional Information.

Shareholder Fees
(fees paid directly from your investment)

1290 Essex Small Cap Growth Fund
Class A
Shares
Class T
Shares
Class I
Shares
Class R
Shares
Maximum sales charge (load) imposed on purchases (as a percentage of offering price)
5.50%
2.50%
None
None
Maximum contingent deferred sales charge (load) (as a percentage of original purchase price or redemption
proceeds, whichever is lower)
1.00%1
None
None
None
Maximum account fee (deducted from accounts with a balance of less than $1,000)
$25
$25
$25
$25
1 On shares purchased without an initial sales charge and redeemed within 12 months of purchase.

Annual Fund Operating Expenses
(expenses that you pay each year as a percentage of the value of your investment)

1290 Essex Small Cap Growth Fund
Class A
Shares
Class T
Shares
Class I
Shares
Class R
Shares
Management Fee
0.75%
0.75%
0.75%
0.75%
Distribution and/or Service Fees (12b-1 fees)
0.25%
0.25%
0.00%
0.50%
Other Expenses1
4.74%
4.70%
4.70%
4.70%
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses
5.74%
5.70%
5.45%
5.95%
Fee Waiver and/or Expense Reimbursement2
(4.61)%
(4.57)%
(4.57)%
(4.57)%
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses After Fee Waiver and/or Expense Reimbursement
1.13%
1.13%
0.88%
1.38%
1
Based on estimated amounts for the current fiscal year.
2
Pursuant to a contract, Equitable Investment Management, LLC (the “Adviser”) has agreed to make payments or waive its and its affiliates’ management, administrative and other fees to limit the expenses of the Fund through April 30, 2024 (unless the Board of Trustees consents to an earlier revision or termination of this arrangement) (“Expense Limitation Arrangement”) so that the annual operating expenses of the Fund (exclusive of taxes, interest, brokerage commissions, capitalized expenses (other than offering costs), fees and expenses of other investment companies in which the Fund invests, 12b-1 fees, dividend and interest expenses on securities sold short, and extraordinary expenses not incurred in the ordinary course of the Fund’s business) do not exceed an annual rate of average daily net assets of 0.88% for Class A shares, Class T shares, Class I shares, and Class R shares of the Fund. The Expense Limitation Arrangement may be terminated by the Adviser at any time after April 30, 2024. The Adviser may be reimbursed the amount of any such payments or waivers in the future provided that the payments or waivers are reimbursed within three years of the payments or waivers being recorded and the Fund’s expense ratio, after the reimbursement is taken into account, does not exceed the Fund’s expense cap at the time of the waiver or the Fund’s expense cap at the time of the reimbursement, whichever is lower. The total annual fund operating expense ratios after fee waiver and/or expense reimbursement for Class A shares, Class T shares, and Class R shares, as shown in the table, are higher than the Fund’s expense cap because these ratios include 12b-1 fees and certain other expenses, as noted above, that are excluded from the Expense Limitation Arrangement.
Example
This Example is intended to help you compare the cost of investing in the Fund with the cost of investing in other funds. The Example assumes that you invest $10,000 in the Fund for the periods indicated, that your investment has a 5% return each year, that the Fund's operating expenses remain the same and that the Expense Limitation Arrangement is not renewed.
1290 Essex Small Cap Growth Fund 13

Although your actual costs may be higher or lower, based on these assumptions, whether you redeem or hold your shares, your costs would be:
 
1 Year
3 Years
Class A Shares
$659
$1,777
Class T Shares
$362
$1,509
Class I Shares
$90
$1,220
Class R Shares
$140
$1,362
Portfolio Turnover
The Fund pays transaction costs, such as commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or “turns over” its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover rate may indicate higher transaction costs and may result in higher taxes when shares are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are not reflected in annual fund operating expenses or in the Example, affect the Fund's performance. During the period July 11, 2022 (commencement of operations) through October 31, 2022, the Fund’s portfolio turnover rate was 29% of the average value of its portfolio.
Investments, Risks, and Performance
Principal Investment Strategy
Under normal circumstances, the Fund invests at least 80% of its net assets, plus borrowings for investment purposes, in equity securities of small- and micro-capitalization companies (or other financial instruments that derive their value from the securities of such companies). For the Fund, a company is considered to be a “small-capitalization” company if, at the time of purchase, its market capitalization is less than or equal to the market capitalization of the largest company included within the Russell 2000® Growth Index. As of December 31, 2022, the market capitalization of the largest company included in the Russell 2000® Growth Index was approximately $8.05 billion. This capitalization range will change over time. The Fund’s investments include U.S. micro-cap companies, which, at the time of purchase, have capitalizations that place them among the smallest 5% of companies listed on U.S. exchanges. Although the Sub-Adviser seeks to diversify the Fund’s investments across industries and sectors, the Fund’s assets may, from time to time, be over-weighted or under-weighted to certain industries and sectors relative to its benchmark index, and the Fund may from time to time invest a substantial portion of its assets in one or a limited number of sectors. The Fund’s investments may include common and preferred stocks, rights and warrants to purchase common stocks, convertible securities or real estate investment trusts. The Fund may invest up to 15% of its assets in foreign securities, including securities of companies based in developing countries and depositary receipts of foreign-based companies. The Fund may purchase put and call options on equity indexes and put and call options on exchange-traded funds tracking certain equity indexes to gain broad market exposure or for hedging purposes.
The Sub-Adviser applies fundamental investment research techniques when deciding which stocks to buy or sell for the Fund, and typically:
•  Selects companies that demonstrate accelerating growth in earnings and revenues that the Sub-Adviser believes are undervalued given their financial strength.
•  Invests in companies from any sector of the market based on fundamental research and analysis of various characteristics.
•  Reviews and evaluates a company’s financial statements, sales and expense trends, earnings estimates, market position, and industry outlook.
•  Values a company against its history, industry, and the market to identify a relatively undervalued stock as compared to its potential growth.
•  Seeks to diversify investments across companies in different phases of growth and that have a variety of catalysts for growth, to help manage risk. Such catalysts may include a new technology, product or service, an increase in market share, an improving industry, a change in management or a corporate restructuring.
The Fund may engage in active and frequent trading to achieve its investment objective. The Fund may sell all or a portion of a position in a security when the Sub-Adviser believes that a catalyst for growth is realized or adequate value is achieved, when the Sub-Adviser identifies a better investment opportunity, to minimize potential risks, to address a deterioration of
14 1290 Essex Small Cap Growth Fund

fundamentals, a change in management or operating strategy or the failure of a catalyst to develop, or for other investment reasons which the Sub-Adviser deems appropriate.
While the Fund’s overall portfolio will focus on small- and micro-capitalization companies, the Sub-Adviser may decide to keep a company’s stock if it has appreciated beyond the market capitalization of the largest company included in the Russell 2000® Growth Index, as described above.
Principal Risks
An investment in the Fund is not a deposit of a bank and is not insured or guaranteed by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation or any other government agency. The value of your investment may fall, sometimes sharply, and you could lose money by investing in the Fund. There can be no assurance that the Fund will achieve its investment objective.
The following risks can negatively affect the Fund’s performance. The most significant risks as of the date of this Prospectus are presented first, followed by additional principal risks in alphabetical order.
Market Risk The Fund is subject to the risk that the securities markets will move down, sometimes rapidly and unpredictably, based on overall economic conditions and other factors, which may negatively affect Fund performance. Securities markets also may experience long periods of decline in value. The value of a security may decline due to factors that are specifically related to a particular company, as well as general market conditions, such as real or perceived adverse economic or political conditions, inflation rates and/or investor expectations concerning such rates, changes in interest rates, recessions, or adverse investor sentiment generally. During a general downturn in the securities markets, multiple asset classes may decline in value simultaneously. Changes in the financial condition of a single issuer can impact a market as a whole.
Geopolitical events, including terrorism, tensions, war or other open conflicts between nations, or political or economic dysfunction within some nations that are global economic powers or major producers of oil, may lead to overall instability in world economies and markets generally and have led, and may in the future lead, to increased market volatility and may have adverse long-term effects. World markets, or those in a particular region, may all react in similar fashion to important economic, political or other developments. Events such as environmental and natural disasters or other catastrophes, public health crises (such as epidemics and pandemics), social unrest, and cybersecurity incidents, and governments’ reactions to such events, could cause uncertainty in the markets and may adversely affect the performance of the global economy. Impacts from climate change may include significant risks to global financial assets and economic growth. The extent and duration of such events and resulting market disruptions could be substantial and could magnify the impact of other risks to the Fund. The value and liquidity of the Fund’s investments may be negatively affected by developments in other countries and regions, whether or not the Fund invests in securities of issuers located in or with significant exposure to the countries or regions directly affected.
The U.S. Federal Reserve (“Fed”) has invested or otherwise made available substantial amounts of money to keep credit flowing through short-term money markets and has signaled that it will continue to adjust its operations as appropriate to support short-term money markets. Amid these efforts, concerns about the markets’ dependence on the Fed’s provision of liquidity have grown. Policy changes by the U.S. government and/or the Fed and political events within the United States may affect investor and consumer confidence and may adversely impact financial markets and the broader economy, perhaps suddenly and to a significant degree. A downgrade of the ratings of U.S. government debt obligations, or concerns about the U.S. government’s credit quality in general, could have a substantial negative effect on the U.S. and global economies. High public debt in the United States and other countries creates ongoing systemic and market risks and policymaking uncertainty.
In addition, markets and market participants are increasingly reliant on information data systems. Inaccurate data, software or other technology malfunctions, programming inaccuracies, unauthorized use or access, and similar circumstances may impair the performance of these systems and may have an adverse impact upon a single issuer, a group of issuers, or the market at large.
Equity Risk In general, the values of stocks and other equity securities fluctuate, and sometimes widely fluctuate, in response to changes in a company’s financial condition as well as general market, economic and political conditions and other factors. The Fund may experience a significant or complete loss on its investment in an equity security. In addition, common stock prices may be particularly sensitive to rising interest rates, which increase borrowing costs and the costs of capital.
Small-Cap and Micro-Cap Company Risk Small-cap and micro-cap companies carry additional risks because the operating histories of these companies tend to be more limited, their earnings and revenues less predictable (and some companies may be experiencing significant losses), and their share prices more volatile than those of larger, more established companies. The shares of smaller companies tend to trade less frequently than those of larger, more established companies, which can adversely affect the pricing of these securities and the Fund’s ability to purchase or sell these securities. In general, these risks are greater for micro-cap companies than for small-cap companies.
1290 Essex Small Cap Growth Fund 15

Investment Style Risk The Fund may use a particular style or set of styles — in this case, a “growth” style — to select investments. A particular style may be out of favor or may not produce the best results over short or longer time periods. Growth stocks may be more sensitive to changes in current or expected earnings than the prices of other stocks. Growth investing also is subject to the risk that the stock price of one or more companies will fall or will fail to appreciate as anticipated by the Fund, regardless of movements in the securities market. Growth stocks also tend to be more volatile than value stocks, so in a declining market their prices may decrease more than value stocks in general. Growth stocks also may increase the volatility of the Fund’s share price.
Sector Risk From time to time, based on market or economic conditions, the Fund may have significant positions in one or more sectors of the market. To the extent the Fund invests more heavily in particular sectors, its performance will be especially sensitive to developments that significantly affect those sectors. Individual sectors may be more volatile, and may perform differently, than the broader market. The industries that constitute a sector may all react in the same way to economic, political or regulatory events.
Portfolio Management Risk The Fund is subject to the risk that strategies used by an investment manager and its securities selections fail to produce the intended results. An investment manager’s judgments or decisions about the quality, relative yield or value of, or market trends affecting, a particular security or issuer, industry, sector, region or market segment, or about the economy or interest rates, may be incorrect or otherwise may not produce the intended results, which may result in losses to the Fund. In addition, many processes used in Fund management, including security selection, rely, in whole or in part, on the use of various technologies. The Fund may suffer losses if there are imperfections, errors or limitations in the quantitative, analytic or other tools, resources, information and data used, or the analyses employed or relied on, by an investment manager, or if such tools, resources, information or data are used incorrectly, fail to produce the desired results, or otherwise do not work as intended. There can be no assurance that the use of these technologies will result in effective investment decisions for the Fund.
New Fund Risk The Fund is newly or recently established and has limited operating history. The Fund may not be successful in implementing its investment strategy, and there can be no assurance that the Fund will grow to or maintain an economically viable size, which could result in the Fund being liquidated at any time without shareholder approval and at a time that may not be favorable for all shareholders. Until the Fund is fully capitalized, it may be unable to pursue its investment objective or execute its principal investment strategies.
Convertible Securities Risk A convertible security is a form of hybrid security; that is, a security with both debt and equity characteristics. The value of a convertible security fluctuates in relation to changes in interest rates and the credit quality of the issuer and also fluctuates in relation to changes in the price of the underlying common stock. A convertible security may be subject to redemption at the option of the issuer at a price established in the convertible security’s governing instrument, which may be less than the current market price of the security. If a convertible security held by the Fund is called for redemption, the Fund will be required to permit the issuer to redeem the security, convert it into underlying common stock or sell it to a third party. Convertible securities are subject to equity risk, interest rate risk and credit risk and are often lower-quality securities. Lower quality may lead to greater volatility in the price of a security and may negatively affect a security’s liquidity. Since it derives a portion of its value from the common stock into which it may be converted, a convertible security is also subject to the same types of market and issuer-specific risks that apply to the underlying common stock.
Derivatives Risk The Fund's investments in derivatives may rise or fall in value more rapidly than other investments and may reduce the Fund's returns and increase the volatility of the Fund's net asset value. Investing in derivatives involves investment techniques and risk analyses different from, and risks in some respects greater than, those associated with investing in more traditional investments, such as stocks and bonds. Derivatives may be leveraged such that a small investment can have a significant impact on the Fund's exposure to stock market values, interest rates, or other investments. As a result, a relatively small price movement in a derivatives contract may cause an immediate and substantial loss, and the Fund could lose more than the amount it invested. Some derivatives can have the potential for unlimited losses. In addition, it may be difficult or impossible for the Fund to purchase or sell certain derivatives in sufficient amounts to achieve the desired level of exposure, or to terminate or offset existing arrangements, which may result in a loss or may be costly to the Fund. Some derivatives are more sensitive to market price fluctuations and to interest rate changes than other investments. Derivatives may not behave as anticipated by the Fund, and derivatives strategies that are successful under certain market conditions may be less successful or unsuccessful under other market conditions. The Fund also may be exposed to losses if the counterparty in the transaction is unable or unwilling to fulfill its contractual obligation. In certain cases, the Fund may be hindered or delayed in exercising remedies against or closing out derivatives with a counterparty, resulting in additional losses. Derivatives also may be subject to the risk of mispricing or improper valuation, and valuation may be more difficult in times of market turmoil. Changes to the regulation of derivatives markets and mutual funds’ use of derivatives may impact the Fund's ability to maintain its investments in derivatives, make derivatives more costly, limit their availability, adversely affect their value or performance, or otherwise disrupt markets.
Foreign Securities Risk Investments in foreign securities, including depositary receipts, involve risks in addition to those associated with investments in U.S. securities. Foreign markets may be less liquid, more volatile and subject to less government supervision
16 1290 Essex Small Cap Growth Fund

and regulation than U.S. markets, and it may take more time to clear and settle trades involving foreign securities, which could negatively impact the Fund's investments and cause it to lose money. Security values also may be negatively affected by changes in the exchange rates between the U.S. dollar and foreign currencies. Differences between U.S. and foreign legal, political and economic systems, regulatory regimes and market practices, as well as trade barriers and other protectionist trade policies (including those of the United States), governmental instability, war, or other political or economic actions, also may adversely impact security values. Foreign securities are also subject to the risks associated with the potential imposition of economic or other sanctions against a particular foreign country, its nationals, businesses or industries. World markets, or those in a particular region, may all react in similar fashion to important economic, political or other developments. Events and evolving conditions in certain economies or markets may alter the risks associated with investments tied to countries or regions that historically were perceived as comparatively stable and make such investments riskier and more volatile. Regardless of where a company is organized or its stock is traded, its performance may be significantly affected by events in regions from which it derives its profits or in which it conducts significant operations.
Emerging Markets RiskThe risks associated with investments in emerging market countries often are significant, and vary from jurisdiction to jurisdiction and company to company. Investments in emerging market countries are more susceptible to loss than investments in more developed foreign countries and may present market, credit, currency, liquidity, legal, political, technical and other risks different from, or greater than, the risks of investing in more developed foreign countries. Emerging market countries may be more likely to experience rapid and significant adverse developments in their political or economic structures, intervene in financial markets, restrict foreign investments, impose high withholding or other taxes on foreign investments, impose restrictive exchange control regulations, or nationalize or expropriate the assets of private companies, which may have negative impacts on transaction costs, market price, investment returns and the legal rights and remedies available to the Fund. In addition, the securities markets of emerging market countries generally are smaller, less liquid and more volatile than those of more developed foreign countries, and emerging market countries often have less uniformity in regulatory, accounting, auditing and financial reporting requirements or standards, which may impact the availability and quality of information about issuers, and less reliable clearance and settlement, registration and custodial procedures. Emerging market countries also may be subject to high inflation and rapid currency devaluations, and currency-hedging techniques may be unavailable in certain emerging market countries. In addition, some emerging market countries may be heavily dependent on international trade, which can materially affect their securities markets. Securities of issuers traded on foreign exchanges may be suspended. The likelihood of such suspensions may be higher for securities of issuers in emerging market countries than in countries with more developed markets.
Large Transaction Risk A significant percentage of the Fund’s shares may be owned or controlled by the Adviser and its affiliates, other funds advised by the Adviser (including funds of funds), or other large shareholders. Accordingly, the Fund is subject to the potential for large-scale inflows and outflows as a result of purchases and redemptions of its shares by such shareholders. These inflows and outflows could negatively affect the Fund’s net asset value and performance.
Portfolio Turnover Risk High portfolio turnover (generally, turnover in excess of 100% in any given fiscal year) may result in increased transaction costs to the Fund, which may result in higher fund expenses and lower total return.
Preferred Stock Risk Preferred stock is subject to many of the risks associated with debt securities, including interest rate risk. Unlike interest payments on debt securities, dividends on preferred stock are generally payable at the discretion of the issuer’s board of directors. Preferred shareholders may have certain rights if dividends are not paid but generally have no legal recourse against the issuer. Shareholders may suffer a loss of value if dividends are not paid. In certain situations an issuer may call or redeem its preferred stock or convert it to common stock. The market prices of preferred stocks are generally more sensitive to actual or perceived changes in the issuer’s financial condition or prospects than are the prices of debt securities.
Real Estate Investing Risk Real estate-related investments may decline in value as a result of factors affecting the overall real estate industry. Real estate is a cyclical business, highly sensitive to supply and demand, general and local economic developments and characterized by intense competition and periodic overbuilding. Real estate income and values also may be greatly affected by demographic trends, such as population shifts or changing tastes and values. For example, the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic has impacted certain real estate sectors by accelerating the trend towards online shopping and remote-working environments. Losses may occur from casualty or condemnation, and government actions, such as tax law changes, zoning law changes, regulatory limitations on rents, or environmental regulations, also may have a major impact on real estate. The availability of mortgages and changes in interest rates may also affect real estate values. Changing interest rates and credit quality requirements also will affect the cash flow of real estate companies and their ability to meet capital needs. In addition, global climate change may have an adverse effect on property and security values and may exacerbate the risks of natural disasters.
Real estate investment trusts (“REITs”) generally invest directly in real estate (equity REITs), in mortgages secured by interests in real estate (mortgage REITs) or in some combination of the two (hybrid REITs). Investing in REITs exposes investors to the risks of owning real estate directly, as well as to risks that relate specifically to the way in which REITs are organized and operated. Equity REITs may
1290 Essex Small Cap Growth Fund 17

be affected by changes in the value of the underlying property owned by the REIT, while mortgage REITs may be affected by the quality of any credit extended. Equity and mortgage REITs are also subject to heavy cash flow dependency, defaults by borrowers, and self-liquidations. The risk of defaults is generally higher in the case of mortgage pools that include subprime mortgages involving borrowers with blemished credit histories.
Operating REITs requires specialized management skills, and a portfolio that invests in REITs indirectly bears REIT management and administration expenses along with the direct expenses of the portfolio. Individual REITs may own a limited number of properties and may concentrate in a particular region or property type. Domestic REITs also must satisfy specific Internal Revenue Code requirements to qualify for the tax-free pass-through of net investment income and net realized gains distributed to shareholders. Failure to meet these requirements may have adverse consequences on the Fund. In addition, even the larger REITs in the industry tend to be small- to medium-sized companies in relation to the equity markets as a whole. Moreover, shares of REITs may trade less frequently and, therefore, are subject to more erratic price movements than securities of larger issuers.
Risk/Return Bar Chart and Table
Performance information will be available in the Prospectus after the Fund has been in operation for one full calendar year.
Who Manages the Fund
Investment Adviser: Equitable Investment Management, LLC (the “Adviser”)
Portfolio Managers: The members of the team that are jointly and primarily responsible for the selection, monitoring and oversight of the Fund’s Sub-Adviser are:
Name
Title
Date Began
Managing
the Fund
Kenneth T. Kozlowski, CFP®, CLU, ChFC
Executive Vice President and Chief Investment
Officer of the Adviser
July 2022
Alwi Chan, CFA®
Senior Vice President and Deputy Chief
Investment Officer of the Adviser
July 2022
Sub-Adviser: Essex Investment Management Company, LLC (“Essex”)
Portfolio Manager: The individual primarily responsible for the securities selection, research and trading for the Fund is:
Name
Title
Date Began
Managing
the Fund
Nancy Prial, CFA®
Co-Chief Executive Officer and Senior Portfolio
Manager of Essex
July 2022
The Adviser is responsible for overseeing Sub-Advisers and recommending their hiring, termination and replacement to the Board of Trustees. The Adviser has been granted relief by the Securities and Exchange Commission to hire, terminate and replace Sub-Advisers and amend sub-advisory agreements subject to the approval of the Board of Trustees and without obtaining shareholder approval. However, the Adviser may not enter into a sub-advisory agreement on behalf of the Fund with an “affiliated person” of the Adviser unless the sub-advisory agreement is approved by the Fund's shareholders. The relief does not extend to any increase in the advisory fee paid by the Fund to the Adviser; any such increase would be subject to shareholder approval.
Purchase and Redemption of Fund Shares
You may purchase and redeem shares of the Fund each day the New York Stock Exchange is open for trading at the Fund’s net asset value determined after receipt of your request in good order, subject to any applicable sales charge. All share classes are currently not offered for sale in all states. Initial purchases must be effected through your financial intermediary. Subsequently, you may purchase or redeem shares either by having your financial intermediary process your purchase or redemption, or by telephone (1-888-310-0416), by overnight mail (1290 Funds, c/o SS&C GIDS, Inc., 430 W. 7th Street, Suite 219166, Kansas City, MO 64105-1407), or by mail (1290 Funds, PO Box 219166, Kansas City, MO 64121-9166). All
18 1290 Essex Small Cap Growth Fund

redemption requests will be processed and payment with respect thereto will normally be made within seven days after receipt of your request in good order.
The initial and subsequent minimums for purchasing shares of the Fund generally are as follows, although the Fund may reduce or waive the minimums in some cases:
 
Class A
Class T
Class I
Class R
Minimum Initial Investment
$1,000 for all accounts
except:
• $500 for certain fee-based
programs.
• $500, if establishing an
Automatic Bank Draft Plan.
• $250 minimum for
purchases by accounts
through eligible financial
intermediary platforms
that have entered into
selling or service
agreements with the
Distributor and that are
eligible to purchase
Class A shares without a
sales charge.
• No minimum for certain
employer-sponsored
retirement plans and
certain wrap fee based
programs.
$1,000 for all accounts
except:
• $500 for certain fee-based
programs.
• $500, if establishing an
Automatic Bank Draft Plan.
• No minimum for certain
employer-sponsored
retirement plans and
certain wrap fee based
programs.
• $1,000,000 for certain
institutions and individuals.
• $1,000 for certain
employees (or their
immediate family
members) of Equitable
Holdings, Inc. or its
subsidiaries.
• Class I shares are available
to clients of registered
investment advisers who
have $250,000 invested in
the Fund.
• No minimum investment
for a wrap account client
of an eligible broker-dealer
or a client of a fee-based
planner that is unaffiliated
with a broker-dealer, or a
client of an investment
adviser, trustee,
administrator or institution
acting in a similar capacity
that invests in the Fund
through a retirement plan
where the administrator or
service provider of such
retirement plan has
entered into a services
agreement with the Fund’s
distributor and/or
investment adviser.
No minimum
Minimum Additional
Investment
$50 for all accounts
$50 for all accounts
No subsequent minimum
No subsequent minimum
Your financial intermediary may impose different investment minimums.
Tax Information
The Fund’s dividends and other distributions generally will be subject to federal income tax as ordinary income or long-term capital gains, unless you are a tax-exempt investor or are investing through a retirement plan or account; in the latter case, you may be subject to that tax upon withdrawal from the plan or account.
Payments to Broker-Dealers and Other Financial Intermediaries
If you purchase shares of the Fund through a broker-dealer or other financial intermediary (such as a bank), the Fund and its related companies may pay the intermediary for the sale of Fund shares, shareholder services and other purposes. These payments create a conflict of interest by influencing the broker-dealer or other intermediary and your investment professional to recommend the Fund over another investment. Ask your financial adviser or visit your financial intermediary’s website for more information.
1290 Essex Small Cap Growth Fund 19

1290 GAMCO Small/Mid Cap Value Fund— Class A (TNVAX), Class T (TNVCX), Class I (TNVIX) and Class R (TNVRX) Shares
Investment Objective:Seeks to maximize capital appreciation.
Fees and Expenses of the Fund
The following table describes the fees and expenses that you may pay if you buy, hold, and sell shares of the Fund. You may pay other fees, such as brokerage commissions and other fees to financial intermediaries, which are not reflected in the table and example below. You may qualify for sales charge discounts if you and your family invest, or agree to invest in the future, at least $50,000 in 1290 Funds’ funds. More information about these and other discounts is available from your financial professional and in the “How Sales Charges are Calculated” and “Ways to Reduce or Eliminate Sales Charges” sections of the Fund’s Prospectus, and the “Purchase, Redemption and Pricing of Shares” section of the Fund’s Statement of Additional Information.

Shareholder Fees
(fees paid directly from your investment)

1290 GAMCO Small/Mid Cap Value Fund
Class A
Shares
Class T
Shares
Class I
Shares
Class R
Shares
Maximum sales charge (load) imposed on purchases (as a percentage of offering price)
5.50%
2.50%
None
None
Maximum contingent deferred sales charge (load) (as a percentage of original purchase price or redemption
proceeds, whichever is lower)
1.00%1
None
None
None
Maximum account fee (deducted from accounts with a balance of less than $1,000)
$25
$25
$25
$25
1 On shares purchased without an initial sales charge and redeemed within 12 months of purchase.

Annual Fund Operating Expenses
(expenses that you pay each year as a percentage of the value of your investment)

1290 GAMCO Small/Mid Cap Value Fund
Class A
Shares
Class T
Shares
Class I
Shares
Class R
Shares
Management Fee
0.75%
0.75%
0.75%
0.75%
Distribution and/or Service Fees (12b-1 fees)
0.25%
0.25%
0.00%
0.50%
Other Expenses
0.51%
0.51%
0.50%
0.51%
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses
1.51%
1.51%
1.25%
1.76%
Fee Waiver and/or Expense Reimbursement1,2
(0.31)%
(0.31)%
(0.30)%
(0.31)%
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses After Fee Waiver and/or Expense Reimbursement
1.20%
1.20%
0.95%
1.45%
1
Pursuant to a contract, Equitable Investment Management, LLC (the “Adviser”) has agreed to make payments or waive its and its affiliates’ management, administrative and other fees to limit the expenses of the Fund through April 30, 2024 (unless the Board of Trustees consents to an earlier revision or termination of this arrangement) (“Expense Limitation Arrangement”) so that the annual operating expenses (including Acquired Fund Fees and Expenses) of the Fund (exclusive of taxes, interest, brokerage commissions, capitalized expenses (other than offering costs), 12b-1 fees, dividend and interest expenses on securities sold short, and extraordinary expenses not incurred in the ordinary course of the Fund’s business) do not exceed an annual rate of average daily net assets of 0.95% for Class A shares, Class T shares, Class I shares, and Class R shares of the Fund. The Expense Limitation Arrangement may be terminated by the Adviser at any time after April 30, 2024. The Adviser may be reimbursed the amount of any such payments or waivers in the future provided that the payments or waivers are reimbursed within three years of the payments or waivers being recorded and the Fund’s expense ratio, after the reimbursement is taken into account, does not exceed the Fund’s expense cap at the time of the waiver or the Fund’s expense cap at the time of the reimbursement, whichever is lower. The total annual fund operating expense ratios after fee waiver and/or expense reimbursement for Class A shares, Class T shares, and Class R shares, as shown in the table, are higher than the Fund’s expense cap because these ratios include 12b-1 fees and certain other expenses, as noted above, that are excluded from the Expense Limitation Arrangement.
2
Fee Waiver and/or Expense Reimbursement information has been restated to reflect the current Expense Limitation Arrangement.
Example
This Example is intended to help you compare the cost of investing in the Fund with the cost of investing in other funds. The Example assumes that you invest $10,000 in the Fund for the periods indicated, that your investment has a 5% return each year, that the Fund's operating expenses remain the same and that the Expense Limitation Arrangement is not renewed.
20 1290 GAMCO Small/Mid Cap Value Fund

Although your actual costs may be higher or lower, based on these assumptions, whether you redeem or hold your shares, your costs would be:
 
1 Year
3 Years
5 Years
10 Years
Class A Shares
$666
$972
$1,301
$2,227
Class T Shares
$369
$686
$1,024
$1,981
Class I Shares
$97
$367
$657
$1,485
Class R Shares
$148
$524
$925
$2,048
Portfolio Turnover
The Fund pays transaction costs, such as commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or “turns over” its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover rate may indicate higher transaction costs and may result in higher taxes when shares are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are not reflected in annual fund operating expenses or in the Example, affect the Fund's performance. During the most recent fiscal year, the Fund's portfolio turnover rate was 27% of the average value of its portfolio.
Investments, Risks, and Performance
Principal Investment Strategy
Under normal circumstances, the Fund invests at least 80% of its net assets, plus borrowings for investment purposes, in securities of small- and mid-capitalization companies. For the Fund, small-capitalization companies generally are companies with a market capitalization less than $3 billion at the time of investment, and mid-capitalization companies generally are companies with a market capitalization between $3 billion and $12 billion at the time of investment.
The Fund invests primarily in common stocks, but it also may invest in other securities that GAMCO Asset Management Inc. (“GAMCO” or the “Sub-Adviser”) believes provide opportunities for capital growth, such as preferred stocks and warrants. The Fund also may invest up to 20% of its net assets in foreign securities.
GAMCO utilizes a value-oriented investment style that emphasizes companies deemed to be currently underpriced according to certain financial measurements, which may include price-to-earnings and price-to-book ratios. The Sub-Adviser utilizes a process of fundamental analysis that involves researching and evaluating individual companies for potential investment by the Fund. The Sub-Adviser uses a proprietary research technique to determine which stocks have a market price that is less than the “private market value” or what an informed investor would pay for the company. This approach will often lead the Fund to focus on “strong companies” in out-of-favor sectors or out-of-favor companies exhibiting a catalyst for change. The Sub-Adviser may sell a security for a variety of reasons, such as because it becomes overvalued or shows deteriorating fundamentals.
Principal Risks
An investment in the Fund is not a deposit of a bank and is not insured or guaranteed by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation or any other government agency. The value of your investment may fall, sometimes sharply, and you could lose money by investing in the Fund. There can be no assurance that the Fund will achieve its investment objective.
The following risks can negatively affect the Fund’s performance. The most significant risks as of the date of this Prospectus are presented first, followed by additional principal risks in alphabetical order.
Market Risk The Fund is subject to the risk that the securities markets will move down, sometimes rapidly and unpredictably, based on overall economic conditions and other factors, which may negatively affect Fund performance. Securities markets also may experience long periods of decline in value. The value of a security may decline due to factors that are specifically related to a particular company, as well as general market conditions, such as real or perceived adverse economic or political conditions, inflation rates and/or investor expectations concerning such rates, changes in interest rates, recessions, or adverse investor sentiment generally. During a general downturn in the securities markets, multiple asset classes may decline in value simultaneously. Changes in the financial condition of a single issuer can impact a market as a whole.
Geopolitical events, including terrorism, tensions, war or other open conflicts between nations, or political or economic dysfunction within some nations that are global economic powers or major producers of oil, may lead to overall instability in world economies and markets generally and have led, and may in the future lead, to increased market volatility and may have adverse long-term effects. World markets, or those in a particular region, may all react in similar fashion to important economic, political or other
1290 GAMCO Small/Mid Cap Value Fund 21

developments. Events such as environmental and natural disasters or other catastrophes, public health crises (such as epidemics and pandemics), social unrest, and cybersecurity incidents, and governments’ reactions to such events, could cause uncertainty in the markets and may adversely affect the performance of the global economy. Impacts from climate change may include significant risks to global financial assets and economic growth. The extent and duration of such events and resulting market disruptions could be substantial and could magnify the impact of other risks to the Fund. The value and liquidity of the Fund’s investments may be negatively affected by developments in other countries and regions, whether or not the Fund invests in securities of issuers located in or with significant exposure to the countries or regions directly affected.
The U.S. Federal Reserve (“Fed”) has invested or otherwise made available substantial amounts of money to keep credit flowing through short-term money markets and has signaled that it will continue to adjust its operations as appropriate to support short-term money markets. Amid these efforts, concerns about the markets’ dependence on the Fed’s provision of liquidity have grown. Policy changes by the U.S. government and/or the Fed and political events within the United States may affect investor and consumer confidence and may adversely impact financial markets and the broader economy, perhaps suddenly and to a significant degree. A downgrade of the ratings of U.S. government debt obligations, or concerns about the U.S. government’s credit quality in general, could have a substantial negative effect on the U.S. and global economies. High public debt in the United States and other countries creates ongoing systemic and market risks and policymaking uncertainty.
In addition, markets and market participants are increasingly reliant on information data systems. Inaccurate data, software or other technology malfunctions, programming inaccuracies, unauthorized use or access, and similar circumstances may impair the performance of these systems and may have an adverse impact upon a single issuer, a group of issuers, or the market at large.
Equity Risk In general, the values of stocks and other equity securities fluctuate, and sometimes widely fluctuate, in response to changes in a company’s financial condition as well as general market, economic and political conditions and other factors. The Fund may experience a significant or complete loss on its investment in an equity security. In addition, common stock prices may be particularly sensitive to rising interest rates, which increase borrowing costs and the costs of capital.
Mid-Cap and Small-Cap Company Risk Mid-cap and small-cap companies carry additional risks because the operating histories of these companies tend to be more limited, their earnings and revenues less predictable (and some companies may be experiencing significant losses), and their share prices more volatile than those of larger, more established companies, all of which can negatively affect their value. In general, these risks are greater for small-cap companies than for mid-cap companies.
Investment Style Risk The Fund may use a particular style or set of styles — in this case, a “value” style — to select investments. A particular style may be out of favor or may not produce the best results over short or longer time periods. Value stocks are subject to the risks that, notwithstanding that a stock is selling at a discount to its perceived true worth, the stock’s full value may never be fully recognized or realized by the market, or its price may go down. In addition, there is the risk that a stock judged to be undervalued may actually have been appropriately priced at the time of investment.
Sector Risk From time to time, based on market or economic conditions, the Fund may have significant positions in one or more sectors of the market. To the extent the Fund invests more heavily in particular sectors, its performance will be especially sensitive to developments that significantly affect those sectors. Individual sectors may be more volatile, and may perform differently, than the broader market. The industries that constitute a sector may all react in the same way to economic, political or regulatory events.
Portfolio Management Risk The Fund is subject to the risk that strategies used by an investment manager and its securities selections fail to produce the intended results. An investment manager’s judgments or decisions about the quality, relative yield or value of, or market trends affecting, a particular security or issuer, industry, sector, region or market segment, or about the economy or interest rates, may be incorrect or otherwise may not produce the intended results, which may result in losses to the Fund. In addition, many processes used in Fund management, including security selection, rely, in whole or in part, on the use of various technologies. The Fund may suffer losses if there are imperfections, errors or limitations in the quantitative, analytic or other tools, resources, information and data used, or the analyses employed or relied on, by an investment manager, or if such tools, resources, information or data are used incorrectly, fail to produce the desired results, or otherwise do not work as intended. There can be no assurance that the use of these technologies will result in effective investment decisions for the Fund.
Foreign Securities Risk Investments in foreign securities involve risks in addition to those associated with investments in U.S. securities. Foreign markets may be less liquid, more volatile and subject to less government supervision and regulation than U.S. markets, and it may take more time to clear and settle trades involving foreign securities, which could negatively impact the Fund's investments and cause it to lose money. Security values also may be negatively affected by changes in the exchange rates between the U.S. dollar and foreign currencies. Differences between U.S. and foreign legal, political and economic systems, regulatory regimes and market practices, as well as trade barriers and other protectionist trade policies (including those of the United States), governmental instability, war, or other political or economic actions, also may adversely impact security values. Foreign securities are also subject to the risks associated with the potential imposition of economic or other sanctions against a particular foreign country,
22 1290 GAMCO Small/Mid Cap Value Fund

its nationals, businesses or industries. World markets, or those in a particular region, may all react in similar fashion to important economic, political or other developments. Events and evolving conditions in certain economies or markets may alter the risks associated with investments tied to countries or regions that historically were perceived as comparatively stable and make such investments riskier and more volatile. Regardless of where a company is organized or its stock is traded, its performance may be significantly affected by events in regions from which it derives its profits or in which it conducts significant operations.
Currency RiskInvestments that are denominated in or that provide exposure to foreign currencies are subject to the risk that those currencies will decline in value relative to the U.S. dollar. Any such decline may erode or reverse any potential gains from an investment in securities denominated in foreign currency or may widen existing loss. In the case of hedging positions, there is the risk that the U.S. dollar will decline in value relative to the currency being hedged. Currency rates may fluctuate significantly over short periods of time.
Preferred Stock Risk Preferred stock is subject to many of the risks associated with debt securities, including interest rate risk. Unlike interest payments on debt securities, dividends on preferred stock are generally payable at the discretion of the issuer’s board of directors. Preferred shareholders may have certain rights if dividends are not paid but generally have no legal recourse against the issuer. Shareholders may suffer a loss of value if dividends are not paid. In certain situations an issuer may call or redeem its preferred stock or convert it to common stock. The market prices of preferred stocks are generally more sensitive to actual or perceived changes in the issuer’s financial condition or prospects than are the prices of debt securities.
Risk/Return Bar Chart and Table
The bar chart and table below provide some indication of the risks of investing in the Fund by showing changes in the Fund's performance from year to year and by showing how the Fund's average annual total returns for the past one-year, five-year and since inception periods through December 31, 2022, compared to the returns of a broad-based securities market index. The return of the broad-based securities market index (and any additional comparative index) shown for the since inception period below is the return of the index since the inception of the share class with the longest history. Past performance (before and after taxes) is not an indication of future performance.
The performance results shown in the bar chart do not reflect any sales charges or account fees, which would reduce the performance results.
The performance of Class T shares for periods prior to March 1, 2017 has been adjusted to reflect the current sales charges applicable to Class T shares.

Calendar Year Annual Total Returns — Class I

Best quarter (% and time period)
28.43%
2020 4th Quarter
Worst quarter (% and time period)
-34.81%
2020 1st Quarter
1290 GAMCO Small/Mid Cap Value Fund 23


Average Annual Total Returns

 
One
Year
Five
Years
Since
Inception
Inception
Date
1290 GAMCO Small/Mid Cap Value Fund - Class I
Return Before Taxes
-11.37%
4.28%
7.15%
11/12/2014
1290 GAMCO Small/Mid Cap Value Fund - Class I
Return After Taxes on Distributions
-11.91%
3.45%
6.22%
11/12/2014
1290 GAMCO Small/Mid Cap Value Fund - Class I
Return After Taxes on Distributions and Sale of Fund Shares
-6.39%
3.13%
5.38%
11/12/2014
1290 GAMCO Small/Mid Cap Value Fund - Class A
Return Before Taxes
-16.46%
2.85%
6.15%
11/12/2014
1290 GAMCO Small/Mid Cap Value Fund - Class R
Return Before Taxes
-11.83%
3.76%
6.62%
11/12/2014
1290 GAMCO Small/Mid Cap Value Fund - Class T
Return Before Taxes
-13.63%
3.75%
6.81%
11/12/2014
Russell 2500® Value Index (reflects no deduction for fees, expenses, or taxes)
-13.08%
4.75%
6.41%
 
After-tax returns are calculated using the historical highest individual federal marginal income tax rates and do not reflect the impact of state and local taxes. Actual after-tax returns depend on an investor’s tax situation and may differ from those shown, and the after-tax returns shown are not relevant to investors who hold their Fund shares through tax-deferred arrangements, such as 401(k) plans or individual retirement accounts (IRAs). The returns after taxes on distributions and sale of Fund shares may be higher than other returns for the same period due to an assumed tax benefit from any losses on a sale of Fund shares at the end of the measurement period. After-tax returns are shown only for Class I shares. After-tax returns for other Classes may vary.
Who Manages the Fund
Investment Adviser: Equitable Investment Management, LLC (the “Adviser”)
Portfolio Managers: The members of the team that are jointly and primarily responsible for the selection, monitoring and oversight of the Fund’s Sub-Adviser are:
Name
Title
Date Began
Managing
the Fund
Kenneth T. Kozlowski, CFP®, CLU, ChFC
Executive Vice President and Chief Investment
Officer of the Adviser
November 2014
Alwi Chan, CFA®
Senior Vice President and Deputy Chief
Investment Officer of the Adviser
November 2014
Sub-Adviser: GAMCO Asset Management, Inc. (“GAMCO”)
Portfolio Manager: The individual primarily responsible for the securities selection, research and trading for the Fund is:
Name
Title
Date Began
Managing
the Fund
Mario J. Gabelli
Chief Executive Officer and Chief Investment
Officer of Value Portfolios of GAMCO
November 2014
The Adviser is responsible for overseeing Sub-Advisers and recommending their hiring, termination and replacement to the Board of Trustees. The Adviser has been granted relief by the Securities and Exchange Commission to hire, terminate and replace Sub-Advisers and amend sub-advisory agreements subject to the approval of the Board of Trustees and without obtaining shareholder approval. However, the Adviser may not enter into a sub-advisory agreement on behalf of the Fund with an “affiliated person” of the Adviser unless the sub-advisory agreement is approved by the Fund's shareholders. The relief does not extend to any increase in the advisory fee paid by the Fund to the Adviser; any such increase would be subject to shareholder approval.
24 1290 GAMCO Small/Mid Cap Value Fund

Purchase and Redemption of Fund Shares
You may purchase and redeem shares of the Fund each day the New York Stock Exchange is open for trading at the Fund’s net asset value determined after receipt of your request in good order, subject to any applicable sales charge. All share classes are currently not offered for sale in all states. Initial purchases must be effected through your financial intermediary. Subsequently, you may purchase or redeem shares either by having your financial intermediary process your purchase or redemption, or by telephone (1-888-310-0416), by overnight mail (1290 Funds, c/o SS&C GIDS, Inc., 430 W. 7th Street, Suite 219166, Kansas City, MO 64105-1407), or by mail (1290 Funds, PO Box 219166, Kansas City, MO 64121-9166). All redemption requests will be processed and payment with respect thereto will normally be made within seven days after receipt of your request in good order.
The initial and subsequent minimums for purchasing shares of the Fund generally are as follows, although the Fund may reduce or waive the minimums in some cases:
 
Class A
Class T
Class I
Class R
Minimum Initial Investment
$1,000 for all accounts
except:
• $500 for certain fee-based
programs.
• $500, if establishing an
Automatic Bank Draft Plan.
• $250 minimum for
purchases by accounts
through eligible financial
intermediary platforms
that have entered into
selling or service
agreements with the
Distributor and that are
eligible to purchase
Class A shares without a
sales charge.
• No minimum for certain
employer-sponsored
retirement plans and
certain wrap fee based
programs.
$1,000 for all accounts
except:
• $500 for certain fee-based
programs.
• $500, if establishing an
Automatic Bank Draft Plan.
• No minimum for certain
employer-sponsored
retirement plans and
certain wrap fee based
programs.
• $1,000,000 for certain
institutions and individuals.
• $1,000 for certain
employees (or their
immediate family
members) of Equitable
Holdings, Inc. or its
subsidiaries.
• Class I shares are available
to clients of registered
investment advisers who
have $250,000 invested in
the Fund.
• No minimum investment
for a wrap account client
of an eligible broker-dealer
or a client of a fee-based
planner that is unaffiliated
with a broker-dealer, or a
client of an investment
adviser, trustee,
administrator or institution
acting in a similar capacity
that invests in the Fund
through a retirement plan
where the administrator or
service provider of such
retirement plan has
entered into a services
agreement with the Fund’s
distributor and/or
investment adviser.
No minimum
Minimum Additional
Investment
$50 for all accounts
$50 for all accounts
No subsequent minimum
No subsequent minimum
Your financial intermediary may impose different investment minimums.
Tax Information
The Fund’s dividends and other distributions generally will be subject to federal income tax as ordinary income or long-term capital gains, unless you are a tax-exempt investor or are investing through a retirement plan or account; in the latter case, you may be subject to that tax upon withdrawal from the plan or account.
Payments to Broker-Dealers and Other Financial Intermediaries
If you purchase shares of the Fund through a broker-dealer or other financial intermediary (such as a bank), the Fund and its related companies may pay the intermediary for the sale of Fund shares, shareholder services and other purposes. These payments create a conflict of interest by influencing the broker-dealer or other intermediary and your investment
1290 GAMCO Small/Mid Cap Value Fund 25

professional to recommend the Fund over another investment. Ask your financial adviser or visit your financial intermediary’s website for more information.
26 1290 GAMCO Small/Mid Cap Value Fund

1290 High Yield Bond Fund— Class A (TNHAX), Class T (TNHCX), Class I (TNHIX) and Class R (TNHRX) Shares
Investment Objective:Seeks to maximize current income.
Fees and Expenses of the Fund
The following table describes the fees and expenses that you may pay if you buy, hold, and sell shares of the Fund. You may pay other fees, such as brokerage commissions and other fees to financial intermediaries, which are not reflected in the table and example below. You may qualify for sales charge discounts if you and your family invest, or agree to invest in the future, at least $100,000 in 1290 Funds’ funds. More information about these and other discounts is available from your financial professional and in the “How Sales Charges are Calculated” and “Ways to Reduce or Eliminate Sales Charges” sections of the Fund’s Prospectus, and the “Purchase, Redemption and Pricing of Shares” section of the Fund’s Statement of Additional Information.

Shareholder Fees
(fees paid directly from your investment)

1290 High Yield Bond Fund
Class A
Shares
Class T
Shares
Class I
Shares
Class R
Shares
Maximum sales charge (load) imposed on purchases (as a percentage of offering price)
4.50%
2.50%
None
None
Maximum contingent deferred sales charge (load) (as a percentage of original purchase price or redemption
proceeds, whichever is lower)
1.00%1
None
None
None
Maximum account fee (deducted from accounts with a balance of less than $1,000)
$25
$25
$25
$25
1 On shares purchased without an initial sales charge and redeemed within 12 months of purchase.

Annual Fund Operating Expenses
(expenses that you pay each year as a percentage of the value of your investment)

1290 High Yield Bond Fund
Class A
Shares
Class T
Shares
Class I
Shares
Class R
Shares
Management Fee
0.60%
0.60%
0.60%
0.60%
Distribution and/or Service Fees (12b-1 fees)
0.25%
0.25%
0.00%
0.50%
Other Expenses
0.58%
0.58%
0.58%
0.57%
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses
1.43%
1.43%
1.18%
1.67%
Fee Waiver and/or Expense Reimbursement1
(0.43)%
(0.43)%
(0.43)%
(0.42)%
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses After Fee Waiver and/or Expense Reimbursement
1.00%
1.00%
0.75%
1.25%
1
Pursuant to a contract, Equitable Investment Management, LLC (the “Adviser”) has agreed to make payments or waive its and its affiliates’ management, administrative and other fees to limit the expenses of the Fund through April 30, 2024 (unless the Board of Trustees consents to an earlier revision or termination of this arrangement) (“Expense Limitation Arrangement”) so that the annual operating expenses of the Fund (exclusive of taxes, interest, brokerage commissions, capitalized expenses (other than offering costs), fees and expenses of other investment companies in which the Fund invests, 12b-1 fees, dividend and interest expenses on securities sold short, and extraordinary expenses not incurred in the ordinary course of the Fund’s business) do not exceed an annual rate of average daily net assets of 0.75% for Class A shares, Class T shares, Class I shares, and Class R shares of the Fund. The Expense Limitation Arrangement may be terminated by the Adviser at any time after April 30, 2024. The Adviser may be reimbursed the amount of any such payments or waivers in the future provided that the payments or waivers are reimbursed within three years of the payments or waivers being recorded and the Fund’s expense ratio, after the reimbursement is taken into account, does not exceed the Fund’s expense cap at the time of the waiver or the Fund’s expense cap at the time of the reimbursement, whichever is lower. The total annual fund operating expense ratios after fee waiver and/or expense reimbursement for Class A shares, Class T shares, and Class R shares, as shown in the table, are higher than the Fund’s expense cap because these ratios include 12b-1 fees and certain other expenses, as noted above, that are excluded from the Expense Limitation Arrangement.
Example
This Example is intended to help you compare the cost of investing in the Fund with the cost of investing in other funds. The Example assumes that you invest $10,000 in the Fund for the periods indicated, that your investment has a 5% return each year, that the Fund's operating expenses remain the same and that the Expense Limitation Arrangement is not renewed. Although your actual costs may be higher or lower, based on these assumptions, whether you redeem or hold your shares, your costs would be:
 
1 Year
3 Years
5 Years
10 Years
Class A Shares
$547
$842
$1,157
$2,051
1290 High Yield Bond Fund 27

 
1 Year
3 Years
5 Years
10 Years
Class T Shares
$349
$650
$972
$1,884
Class I Shares
$77
$332
$608
$1,394
Class R Shares
$127
$486
$868
$1,941
Portfolio Turnover
The Fund pays transaction costs, such as commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or “turns over” its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover rate may indicate higher transaction costs and may result in higher taxes when shares are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are not reflected in annual fund operating expenses or in the Example, affect the Fund's performance. During the most recent fiscal year, the Fund's portfolio turnover rate was 43% of the average value of its portfolio.
Investments, Risks, and Performance
Principal Investment Strategy
Under normal circumstances, the Fund invests at least 80% of its net assets, plus borrowings for investment purposes, in a broad range of high-yield, below investment-grade bonds. For purposes of this investment policy, a debt security is considered a “bond.” Debt securities represent an issuer’s obligation to repay a loan of money that generally pays interest to the holder. Bank loans, bonds, loan participations, notes and debentures are examples of debt securities. It is expected that the Fund will invest primarily in high-yield corporate bonds as well as floating rate loans, and participations in and assignments of loans. Securities below investment grade include those securities that at the time of purchase are rated Ba1 or lower by Moody’s Investors Service, Inc. (“Moody’s”), or BB+ or lower by Fitch Ratings Ltd. (“Fitch”) or by Standard & Poor’s Global Ratings (“S&P”) or, if unrated, deemed to be of comparable quality by the Fund’s investment adviser, Equitable Investment Management, LLC (the ”Adviser”), or the Fund’s sub-adviser, AXA Investment Managers US Inc. (“AXA IM” or the “Sub-Adviser”). The below investment grade securities in which the Fund invests are generally rated at least Ca by Moody’s or at least CC by Fitch or S&P or, if unrated, deemed to be of comparable quality by the Adviser or the Sub-Adviser. The Fund may continue to hold securities that are downgraded below these ratings subsequent to purchase. The Fund does not normally invest in securities that are in default or have defaulted with respect to the payment of interest or repayment of principal, but may do so depending on market or other conditions. The Fund may invest in debt securities issued by companies of any size. The Fund may invest up to 25% of its net assets in debt securities of issuers located outside the United States, including emerging markets issuers and U.S. dollar-denominated securities of non-U.S. issuers. The Fund may invest in privately placed and restricted securities (including 144A bonds).
The Fund may invest in securities of any maturity because AXA IM places greater emphasis on credit risk in selecting securities than either maturity or duration. Certain debt instruments in which the Fund may invest may be structured as pay-in-kind securities. The Fund may invest up to 15% of its net assets in illiquid securities.
Principal Risks
An investment in the Fund is not a deposit of a bank and is not insured or guaranteed by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation or any other government agency. The value of your investment may fall, sometimes sharply, and you could lose money by investing in the Fund. There can be no assurance that the Fund will achieve its investment objective.
The following risks can negatively affect the Fund’s performance. The most significant risks as of the date of this Prospectus are presented first, followed by additional principal risks in alphabetical order.
Market Risk The Fund is subject to the risk that the securities markets will move down, sometimes rapidly and unpredictably, based on overall economic conditions and other factors, which may negatively affect Fund performance. Securities markets also may experience long periods of decline in value. The value of a security may decline due to factors that are specifically related to a particular company, as well as general market conditions, such as real or perceived adverse economic or political conditions, inflation rates and/or investor expectations concerning such rates, changes in interest rates, recessions, or adverse investor sentiment generally. During a general downturn in the securities markets, multiple asset classes may decline in value simultaneously. Changes in the financial condition of a single issuer can impact a market as a whole.
Geopolitical events, including terrorism, tensions, war or other open conflicts between nations, or political or economic dysfunction within some nations that are global economic powers or major producers of oil, may lead to overall instability in world economies and markets generally and have led, and may in the future lead, to increased market volatility and may have adverse long-term
28 1290 High Yield Bond Fund

effects. World markets, or those in a particular region, may all react in similar fashion to important economic, political or other developments. Events such as environmental and natural disasters or other catastrophes, public health crises (such as epidemics and pandemics), social unrest, and cybersecurity incidents, and governments’ reactions to such events, could cause uncertainty in the markets and may adversely affect the performance of the global economy. Impacts from climate change may include significant risks to global financial assets and economic growth. The extent and duration of such events and resulting market disruptions could be substantial and could magnify the impact of other risks to the Fund. The value and liquidity of the Fund’s investments may be negatively affected by developments in other countries and regions, whether or not the Fund invests in securities of issuers located in or with significant exposure to the countries or regions directly affected.
The U.S. Federal Reserve (“Fed”) has invested or otherwise made available substantial amounts of money to keep credit flowing through short-term money markets and has signaled that it will continue to adjust its operations as appropriate to support short-term money markets. Amid these efforts, concerns about the markets’ dependence on the Fed’s provision of liquidity have grown. Policy changes by the U.S. government and/or the Fed and political events within the United States may affect investor and consumer confidence and may adversely impact financial markets and the broader economy, perhaps suddenly and to a significant degree. A downgrade of the ratings of U.S. government debt obligations, or concerns about the U.S. government’s credit quality in general, could have a substantial negative effect on the U.S. and global economies. High public debt in the United States and other countries creates ongoing systemic and market risks and policymaking uncertainty.
In addition, markets and market participants are increasingly reliant on information data systems. Inaccurate data, software or other technology malfunctions, programming inaccuracies, unauthorized use or access, and similar circumstances may impair the performance of these systems and may have an adverse impact upon a single issuer, a group of issuers, or the market at large.
Non-Investment Grade Securities Risk Bonds rated below BBB by Standard & Poor’s Global Ratings or Fitch Ratings, Ltd., or below Baa by Moody’s Investors Service, Inc. (or, if unrated, determined by the investment manager to be of comparable quality) are speculative in nature and are subject to additional risk factors such as increased possibility of default, illiquidity of the security, and changes in value based on changes in interest rates. Non-investment grade bonds, sometimes referred to as “junk bonds,” are usually issued by companies without long track records of sales and earnings, or by those companies with questionable credit strength. The creditworthiness of issuers of non-investment grade debt securities may be more complex to analyze than that of issuers of investment grade debt securities, and reliance on credit ratings may present additional risks.
Credit Risk The Fund is subject to the risk that the issuer or guarantor of a fixed income security, or the counterparty to a transaction, is unable or unwilling, or is perceived as unable or unwilling, to make timely interest or principal payments or otherwise honor its obligations, or defaults completely, which may cause the Fund's holdings to lose value. The downgrade of a security’s credit rating may decrease its value. Lower credit quality also may lead to greater volatility in the price of a security and may negatively affect a security’s liquidity. The credit quality of a security can deteriorate suddenly and rapidly. The Fund may experience a significant or complete loss on a fixed income security or a transaction.
Interest Rate Risk Changes in interest rates may affect the yield, liquidity and value of investments in income producing or debt securities. Changes in interest rates also may affect the value of other securities. When interest rates rise, the value of the Fund's debt securities generally declines. Conversely, when interest rates decline, the value of the Fund's debt securities generally rises. Typically, the longer the maturity or duration of a debt security, the greater the effect a change in interest rates could have on the security’s price. Thus, the sensitivity of the Fund's debt securities to interest rate risk will increase the greater the duration of those securities. A significant or rapid rise in interest rates could result in losses to the Fund.
Liquidity Risk From time to time, there may be little or no active trading market for a particular investment in which the Fund may invest or is invested. In such a market, the value of such an investment and the Fund's share price may fall dramatically. Illiquid investments may be difficult or impossible to sell or purchase at an advantageous time or price or in sufficient amounts to achieve the Fund's desired level of exposure. To meet redemption requests during periods of illiquidity, the Fund may be forced to dispose of investments at unfavorable times or prices and/or under unfavorable conditions, which may result in a loss or may be costly to the Fund. Investments that are illiquid or that trade in lower volumes may be more difficult to value. The Fund also may not receive its proceeds from the sale of certain investments for an extended period of time. Certain investments that were liquid when purchased may later become illiquid, sometimes abruptly, particularly in times of overall economic distress or adverse investor perception. An inability to sell a portfolio position can adversely affect the Fund's value or prevent the Fund from being able to take advantage of other investment opportunities. During periods of market stress, an investment or even an entire market segment may become illiquid, sometimes abruptly, which can adversely affect the Fund's ability to limit losses. In addition, a reduction in the ability or willingness of dealers and other institutional investors to make a market in certain securities may result in decreased liquidity in certain markets.
Sector Risk From time to time, based on market or economic conditions, the Fund may have significant positions in one or more sectors of the market. To the extent the Fund invests more heavily in particular sectors, its performance will be especially sensitive
1290 High Yield Bond Fund 29

to developments that significantly affect those sectors. Individual sectors may be more volatile, and may perform differently, than the broader market. The industries that constitute a sector may all react in the same way to economic, political or regulatory events.
Loan Risk A bank loan represents an interest in a loan or other direct indebtedness that entitles the acquirer of such interest to payments of interest, principal and/or other amounts due under the structure of the loan. Loan interests are subject to liquidity risk, prepayment risk, extension risk, the risk of subordination to other creditors, restrictions on resale, and the lack of a regular trading market and publicly available information. Loan interests may be difficult to value and may have extended trade settlement periods. As a result, the proceeds from the sale of a loan may not be available to make additional investments or to meet redemption obligations until potentially a substantial period after the sale of the loan. The extended trade settlement periods could force the Fund to liquidate other securities to meet redemptions and may present a risk that the Fund may incur losses in order to timely honor redemptions. There is a risk that the value of any collateral securing a loan in which the Fund has an interest may decline and that the collateral may not be sufficient to cover the amount owed on the loan. In the event the borrower defaults, the Fund's access to the collateral may be limited or delayed by bankruptcy or other insolvency laws. Loans may not be considered “securities,” and purchasers, such as the Fund, therefore may not have the benefit of the anti-fraud protections of the federal securities laws. To the extent that the Fund invests in loan participations and assignments, it is subject to the risk that the financial institution acting as agent for all interests in a loan might fail financially. It is also possible that the Fund could be held liable, or may be called upon to fulfill other obligations, as a co-lender.
Portfolio Management Risk The Fund is subject to the risk that strategies used by an investment manager and its securities selections fail to produce the intended results. An investment manager’s judgments or decisions about the quality, relative yield or value of, or market trends affecting, a particular security or issuer, industry, sector, region or market segment, or about the economy or interest rates, may be incorrect or otherwise may not produce the intended results, which may result in losses to the Fund. In addition, many processes used in Fund management, including security selection, rely, in whole or in part, on the use of various technologies. The Fund may suffer losses if there are imperfections, errors or limitations in the quantitative, analytic or other tools, resources, information and data used, or the analyses employed or relied on, by an investment manager, or if such tools, resources, information or data are used incorrectly, fail to produce the desired results, or otherwise do not work as intended. There can be no assurance that the use of these technologies will result in effective investment decisions for the Fund.
Foreign Securities Risk Investments in foreign securities involve risks in addition to those associated with investments in U.S. securities. Foreign markets may be less liquid, more volatile and subject to less government supervision and regulation than U.S. markets, and it may take more time to clear and settle trades involving foreign securities, which could negatively impact the Fund's investments and cause it to lose money. Security values also may be negatively affected by changes in the exchange rates between the U.S. dollar and foreign currencies. Differences between U.S. and foreign legal, political and economic systems, regulatory regimes and market practices, as well as trade barriers and other protectionist trade policies (including those of the United States), governmental instability, war, or other political or economic actions, also may adversely impact security values. Foreign securities are also subject to the risks associated with the potential imposition of economic or other sanctions against a particular foreign country, its nationals, businesses or industries. World markets, or those in a particular region, may all react in similar fashion to important economic, political or other developments. Events and evolving conditions in certain economies or markets may alter the risks associated with investments tied to countries or regions that historically were perceived as comparatively stable and make such investments riskier and more volatile. Regardless of where a company is organized or its stock is traded, its performance may be significantly affected by events in regions from which it derives its profits or in which it conducts significant operations.
Currency RiskInvestments that are denominated in or that provide exposure to foreign currencies are subject to the risk that those currencies will decline in value relative to the U.S. dollar. Any such decline may erode or reverse any potential gains from an investment in securities denominated in foreign currency or may widen existing loss. In the case of hedging positions, there is the risk that the U.S. dollar will decline in value relative to the currency being hedged. Currency rates may fluctuate significantly over short periods of time.
Emerging Markets RiskThe risks associated with investments in emerging market countries often are significant, and vary from jurisdiction to jurisdiction and company to company. Investments in emerging market countries are more susceptible to loss than investments in more developed foreign countries and may present market, credit, currency, liquidity, legal, political, technical and other risks different from, or greater than, the risks of investing in more developed foreign countries. Emerging market countries may be more likely to experience rapid and significant adverse developments in their political or economic structures, intervene in financial markets, restrict foreign investments, impose high withholding or other taxes on foreign investments, impose restrictive exchange control regulations, or nationalize or expropriate the assets of private companies, which may have negative impacts on transaction costs, market price, investment returns and the legal rights and remedies available to the Fund. In addition, the securities markets of emerging market countries generally are smaller, less liquid and more volatile than those of more developed foreign countries, and emerging market countries often have less uniformity in regulatory, accounting, auditing and financial reporting requirements or standards, which may impact the availability and
30 1290 High Yield Bond Fund

quality of information about issuers, and less reliable clearance and settlement, registration and custodial procedures. Emerging market countries also may be subject to high inflation and rapid currency devaluations, and currency-hedging techniques may be unavailable in certain emerging market countries. In addition, some emerging market countries may be heavily dependent on international trade, which can materially affect their securities markets. Securities of issuers traded on foreign exchanges may be suspended. The likelihood of such suspensions may be higher for securities of issuers in emerging market countries than in countries with more developed markets.
European Economic RiskThe economies of European Union (“EU”) member countries and their trading partners, as well as the broader global economy, may be adversely affected by changes in the euro’s exchange rate, changes in EU or governmental regulations on trade, geopolitical tensions or conflicts, and the threat of default or an actual default by an EU member country on its sovereign debt, which could negatively impact the Fund's investments and cause it to lose money. Recent events in Europe may continue to impact the economies of every European country and their economic partners. Russia’s military invasion of Ukraine in February 2022, the resulting responses by the United States and other countries, and the potential for wider conflict have had, and could continue to have, severe adverse effects on regional and global economies and could further increase volatility and uncertainty in the financial markets. In addition, until the full economic effects of the United Kingdom's withdrawal from the EU, commonly referred to as “Brexit,” become clearer, there remains a risk that Brexit may negatively impact the Fund's investments and cause it to lose money. Any further withdrawals from the EU could cause additional market disruption globally.
Investment Grade Securities Risk Securities rated in the lower investment grade rating categories (e.g., BBB or Baa) are considered investment grade securities, but may have more risk than higher rated obligations because they are regarded as having only an adequate capacity to pay principal and interest, are considered to lack outstanding investment characteristics, and may possess certain speculative characteristics.
Large Transaction Risk A significant percentage of the Fund’s shares may be owned or controlled by the Adviser and its affiliates, other Funds advised by the Adviser (including funds of funds), or other large shareholders. Accordingly, the Fund is subject to the potential for large-scale inflows and outflows as a result of purchases and redemptions of its shares by such shareholders. These inflows and outflows could negatively affect the Fund’s net asset value and performance.
Leveraging Risk When the Fund leverages its holdings, the value of an investment in the Fund will be more volatile and all other risks will tend to be compounded. Investments that create leverage can result in losses to the Fund that exceed the amount originally invested and may accelerate the rate of losses (some of which may be sudden or substantial). For certain investments that create leverage, relatively small market fluctuations can result in large changes in the value of such investments. There can be no assurance that the Fund's use of any leverage will be successful.
Prepayment Risk and Extension Risk Prepayment risk is the risk that the issuer of a security held by the Fund may pay off principal more quickly than originally anticipated. This may occur when interest rates fall. The Fund may have to reinvest the proceeds in an investment offering a lower yield, may not benefit from any increase in value that might otherwise result from declining interest rates and may lose any premium it paid to acquire the security. Extension risk is the risk that the issuer of a security held by the Fund may pay off principal more slowly than originally anticipated. This may occur when interest rates rise. The Fund may be prevented from reinvesting the proceeds it would have received at a given time in an investment offering a higher yield.
Privately Placed and Other Restricted Securities Risk Restricted securities, which include privately placed securities, are securities that cannot be offered for public resale unless registered under the applicable securities laws or that have a contractual restriction that prohibits or limits their resale. Before they are registered, such securities may be sold only in a privately negotiated transaction or pursuant to an exemption from registration. Difficulty in selling securities may result in a loss or be costly to the Fund. Rule 144A is designed to facilitate efficient trading among institutional investors by permitting the sale of certain unregistered securities to qualified institutional buyers. To the extent restricted securities held by the Fund qualify under Rule 144A and an institutional market develops for those securities, the Fund likely will be able to dispose of the securities without registering them. To the extent that institutional buyers become, for a time, uninterested in purchasing these securities, investing in Rule 144A securities could increase the level of the Fund’s illiquidity. The Adviser or Sub-Adviser may determine that certain securities qualified for trading under Rule 144A are liquid. Where registration of a security is required, the Fund may be obligated to pay all or part of the registration expenses, and a considerable period may elapse between the time the Fund desires to sell (and therefore decides to seek registration of) the security, and the time the Fund may be permitted to sell the security under an effective registration statement. If, during such a period, adverse market conditions were to develop, the Fund might obtain a less favorable price than prevailed when it desired to sell. The risk that securities may not be sold for the price at which the Fund is carrying them is greater with respect to restricted securities than it is with respect to registered securities. The illiquidity of the market, as well as the lack of publicly available information regarding these securities, also may make it difficult to determine a fair value for certain securities for purposes of computing the Fund's net asset value.
1290 High Yield Bond Fund 31

Redemption Risk The Fund may experience periods of heavy redemptions that could cause the Fund to sell assets at inopportune times or at a loss or depressed value. Redemption risk is heightened during periods of declining or illiquid markets. Heavy redemptions could hurt the Fund's performance.
Market developments and other factors, including a general rise in interest rates, have the potential to cause investors to move out of fixed income securities on a large scale, which may increase redemptions from mutual funds that hold large amounts of fixed income securities. The market-making capacity of dealers has been reduced in recent years, in part as a result of structural changes, such as fewer proprietary trading desks at broker-dealers and increased regulatory capital requirements. In addition, significant securities market disruptions related to the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic have led to dislocation in the market for a variety of fixed income securities (including, without limitation, commercial paper, corporate debt securities, certificates of deposit, asset-backed debt securities and municipal obligations), which has decreased liquidity and sharply reduced returns in certain cases. Increased redemptions from mutual funds that hold large amounts of fixed income securities, coupled with a reduction in the ability or willingness of dealers and other institutional investors to buy or hold fixed income securities, may result in decreased liquidity and increased volatility in the fixed income markets.
Zero Coupon and Pay-in-Kind Securities Risk Zero coupon and pay-in-kind securities are debt securities that do not make periodic cash interest payments. Zero coupon securities are issued at a significant discount from their face value. Zero coupon and pay-in-kind securities tend to be subject to greater fluctuations in market value in response to changing interest rates than securities of comparable maturities that pay interest periodically and in cash.
Risk/Return Bar Chart and Table
The bar chart and table below provide some indication of the risks of investing in the Fund by showing changes in the Fund's performance from year to year and by showing how the Fund's average annual total returns for the past one-year, five-year and since inception periods through December 31, 2022, compared to the returns of a broad-based securities market index. The return of the broad-based securities market index (and any additional comparative index) shown for the since inception period below is the return of the index since the inception of the share class with the longest history. Past performance (before and after taxes) is not an indication of future performance.
The performance results shown in the bar chart do not reflect any sales charges or account fees, which would reduce the performance results.
The performance of Class T shares for periods prior to March 1, 2017 has been adjusted to reflect the current sales charges applicable to Class T shares.

Calendar Year Annual Total Returns — Class I

Best quarter (% and time period)
8.99%
2020 2nd Quarter
Worst quarter (% and time period)
-10.18%
2020 1st Quarter
32 1290 High Yield Bond Fund


Average Annual Total Returns

 
One
Year
Five
Years
Since
Inception
Inception
Date
1290 High Yield Bond Fund - Class I
Return Before Taxes
-9.49%
2.19%
3.01%
11/12/2014
1290 High Yield Bond Fund - Class I
Return After Taxes on Distributions
-11.54%
-0.03%
0.54%
11/12/2014
1290 High Yield Bond Fund - Class I
Return After Taxes on Distributions and Sale of Fund Shares
-5.60%
0.76%
1.20%
11/12/2014
1290 High Yield Bond Fund - Class A
Return Before Taxes
-13.83%
0.99%
2.16%
11/12/2014
1290 High Yield Bond Fund - Class R
Return Before Taxes
-9.96%
1.68%
2.49%
11/12/2014
1290 High Yield Bond Fund - Class T
Return Before Taxes
-11.78%
1.67%
2.69%
11/12/2014
ICE BofA US High Yield Index (reflects no deduction for fees, expenses, or taxes)
-11.17%
2.13%
3.38%
 
After-tax returns are calculated using the historical highest individual federal marginal income tax rates and do not reflect the impact of state and local taxes. Actual after-tax returns depend on an investor’s tax situation and may differ from those shown, and the after-tax returns shown are not relevant to investors who hold their Fund shares through tax-deferred arrangements, such as 401(k) plans or individual retirement accounts (IRAs). The returns after taxes on distributions and sale of Fund shares may be higher than other returns for the same period due to an assumed tax benefit from any losses on a sale of Fund shares at the end of the measurement period. After-tax returns are shown only for Class I shares. After-tax returns for other Classes may vary.
Who Manages the Fund
Investment Adviser: Equitable Investment Management, LLC (the “Adviser”)
Portfolio Managers: The members of the team that are jointly and primarily responsible for the selection, monitoring and oversight of the Fund’s Sub-Adviser are:
Name
Title
Date Began
Managing
the Fund
Kenneth T. Kozlowski, CFP®, CLU, ChFC
Executive Vice President and Chief Investment
Officer of the Adviser
November 2014
Alwi Chan, CFA®
Senior Vice President and Deputy Chief
Investment Officer of the Adviser
November 2014
Sub-Adviser: AXA Investment Managers US Inc. (“AXA IM”)
Portfolio Managers: The individuals primarily responsible for the securities selection, research and trading for the Fund are:
Name
Title
Date Began
Managing
the Fund
Michael Graham, CFA®
Head of U.S. High Yield and
Senior U.S. High Yield Portfolio Manager at AXA
IM
August 2021
Robert Houle, CFA®
Senior U.S. High Yield Portfolio Manager at AXA
IM
March 2018
The Adviser is responsible for overseeing Sub-Advisers and recommending their hiring, termination and replacement to the Board of Trustees. The Adviser has been granted relief by the Securities and Exchange Commission to hire, terminate and replace Sub-Advisers and amend sub-advisory agreements subject to the approval of the Board of Trustees and without obtaining shareholder approval. However, the Adviser may not enter into a sub-advisory agreement on behalf of the Fund
1290 High Yield Bond Fund 33

with an “affiliated person” of the Adviser unless the sub-advisory agreement is approved by the Fund's shareholders. The relief does not extend to any increase in the advisory fee paid by the Fund to the Adviser; any such increase would be subject to shareholder approval.
Purchase and Redemption of Fund Shares
You may purchase and redeem shares of the Fund each day the New York Stock Exchange is open for trading at the Fund’s net asset value determined after receipt of your request in good order, subject to any applicable sales charge. All share classes are currently not offered for sale in all states. Initial purchases must be effected through your financial intermediary. Subsequently, you may purchase or redeem shares either by having your financial intermediary process your purchase or redemption, or by telephone (1-888-310-0416), by overnight mail (1290 Funds, c/o SS&C GIDS, Inc., 430 W. 7th Street, Suite 219166, Kansas City, MO 64105-1407), or by mail (1290 Funds, PO Box 219166, Kansas City, MO 64121-9166). All redemption requests will be processed and payment with respect thereto will normally be made within seven days after receipt of your request in good order.
The initial and subsequent minimums for purchasing shares of the Fund generally are as follows, although the Fund may reduce or waive the minimums in some cases:
 
Class A
Class T
Class I
Class R
Minimum Initial Investment
$1,000 for all accounts
except:
• $500 for certain fee-based
programs.
• $500, if establishing an
Automatic Bank Draft Plan.
• $250 minimum for
purchases by accounts
through eligible financial
intermediary platforms
that have entered into
selling or service
agreements with the
Distributor and that are
eligible to purchase
Class A shares without a
sales charge.
• No minimum for certain
employer-sponsored
retirement plans and
certain wrap fee based
programs.
$1,000 for all accounts
except:
• $500 for certain fee-based
programs.
• $500, if establishing an
Automatic Bank Draft Plan.
• No minimum for certain
employer-sponsored
retirement plans and
certain wrap fee based
programs.
• $1,000,000 for certain
institutions and individuals.
• $1,000 for certain
employees (or their
immediate family
members) of Equitable
Holdings, Inc. or its
subsidiaries.
• Class I shares are available
to clients of registered
investment advisers who
have $250,000 invested in
the Fund.
• No minimum investment
for a wrap account client
of an eligible broker-dealer
or a client of a fee-based
planner that is unaffiliated
with a broker-dealer, or a
client of an investment
adviser, trustee,
administrator or institution
acting in a similar capacity
that invests in the Fund
through a retirement plan
where the administrator or
service provider of such
retirement plan has
entered into a services
agreement with the Fund’s
distributor and/or
investment adviser.
No minimum
Minimum Additional
Investment
$50 for all accounts
$50 for all accounts
No subsequent minimum
No subsequent minimum
Your financial intermediary may impose different investment minimums.
Tax Information
The Fund’s dividends and other distributions generally will be subject to federal income tax as ordinary income or long-term capital gains, unless you are a tax-exempt investor or are investing through a retirement plan or account; in the latter case, you may be subject to that tax upon withdrawal from the plan or account.
34 1290 High Yield Bond Fund

Payments to Broker-Dealers and Other Financial Intermediaries
If you purchase shares of the Fund through a broker-dealer or other financial intermediary (such as a bank), the Fund and its related companies may pay the intermediary for the sale of Fund shares, shareholder services and other purposes. These payments create a conflict of interest by influencing the broker-dealer or other intermediary and your investment professional to recommend the Fund over another investment. Ask your financial adviser or visit your financial intermediary’s website for more information.
1290 High Yield Bond Fund 35

1290 Loomis Sayles Multi-Asset Income Fund1— Class A (TNXAX), Class T (TNXCX), Class I (TNVDX) and Class R (TNYRX) Shares
Investment Objective:Seeks to provide income and total return through principally investing in income generating securities and investments.
Fees and Expenses of the Fund
The following table describes the fees and expenses that you may pay if you buy, hold, and sell shares of the Fund. You may pay other fees, such as brokerage commissions and other fees to financial intermediaries, which are not reflected in the table and example below. You may qualify for sales charge discounts if you and your family invest, or agree to invest in the future, at least $50,000 in 1290 Funds’ funds. More information about these and other discounts is available from your financial professional and in the “How Sales Charges are Calculated” and “Ways to Reduce or Eliminate Sales Charges” sections of the Fund’s Prospectus, and the “Purchase, Redemption and Pricing of Shares” section of the Fund’s Statement of Additional Information.

Shareholder Fees
(fees paid directly from your investment)

1290 Loomis Sayles Multi-Asset Income Fund
Class A
Shares
Class T
Shares
Class I
Shares
Class R
Shares
Maximum sales charge (load) imposed on purchases (as a percentage of offering price)
4.50%
2.50%
None
None
Maximum contingent deferred sales charge (load) (as a percentage of original purchase price or redemption
proceeds, whichever is lower)
1.00%1
None
None
None
Maximum account fee (deducted from accounts with a balance of less than $1,000)
$25
$25
$25
$25
1 On shares purchased without an initial sales charge and redeemed within 12 months of purchase.

Annual Fund Operating Expenses
(expenses that you pay each year as a percentage of the value of your investment)

1290 Loomis Sayles Multi-Asset Income Fund
Class A
Shares
Class T
Shares
Class I
Shares
Class R
Shares
Management Fee1
0.65%
0.65%
0.65%
0.65%
Distribution and/or Service Fees (12b-1 fees)
0.25%
0.25%
0.00%
0.50%
Other Expenses
0.70%
0.67%2
0.67%
0.70%
Acquired Fund Fees and Expenses
0.04%
0.04%2
0.04%
0.04%
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses
1.64%
1.61%
1.36%
1.89%
Fee Waiver and/or Expense Reimbursement3,4
(0.55)%
(0.52)%
(0.52)%
(0.55)%
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses After Fee Waiver and/or Expense Reimbursement
1.09%
1.09%
0.84%
1.34%
1
Management Fee has been restated to reflect the current fee.
2
Based on estimated amounts for the current fiscal year.
3
Pursuant to a contract, Equitable Investment Management, LLC (the “Adviser”) has agreed to make payments or waive its and its affiliates’ management, administrative and other fees to limit the expenses of the Fund through April 30, 2024 (unless the Board of Trustees consents to an earlier revision or termination of this arrangement) (“Expense Limitation Arrangement”) so that the annual operating expenses of the Fund (exclusive of taxes, interest, brokerage commissions, capitalized expenses (other than offering costs), fees and expenses of other investment companies in which the Fund invests, 12b-1 fees, dividend and interest expenses on securities sold short, and extraordinary expenses not incurred in the ordinary course of the Fund’s business) do not exceed an annual rate of average daily net assets of 0.80% for Class A shares, Class T shares, Class I shares, and Class R shares of the Fund. The Expense Limitation Arrangement may be terminated by the Adviser at any time after April 30, 2024. The Adviser may be reimbursed the amount of any such payments or waivers in the future provided that the payments or waivers are reimbursed within three years of the payments or waivers being recorded and the Fund’s expense ratio, after the reimbursement is taken into account, does not exceed the Fund’s expense cap at the time of the waiver or the Fund’s expense cap at the time of the reimbursement, whichever is lower. The total annual fund operating expense ratios after fee waiver and/or expense reimbursement for Class A shares, Class T shares, and Class R shares, as shown in the table, are higher than the Fund’s expense cap because these ratios include 12b-1 fees and certain other expenses, as noted above, that are excluded from the Expense Limitation Arrangement.
4
Fee Waiver and/or Expense Reimbursement information has been restated to reflect the current Expense Limitation Arrangement.
Example
This Example is intended to help you compare the cost of investing in the Fund with the cost of investing in other funds. The Example assumes that you invest $10,000 in the Fund for the periods indicated, that your investment has a 5% return each

1
Effective August 19, 2022, 1290 DoubleLine Dynamic Allocation Fund was renamed 1290 Loomis Sayles Multi-Asset Income Fund.
36 1290 Loomis Sayles Multi-Asset Income Fund

year, that the Fund's operating expenses remain the same and that the Expense Limitation Arrangement is not renewed. Although your actual costs may be higher or lower, based on these assumptions, whether you redeem or hold your shares, your costs would be:
 
1 Year
3 Years
5 Years
10 Years
Class A Shares
$556
$893
$1,252
$2,262
Class T Shares
$358
$696
$1,056
$2,071
Class I Shares
$86
$379
$695
$1,590
Class R Shares
$136
$541
$970
$2,167
Portfolio Turnover
The Fund pays transaction costs, such as commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or “turns over” its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover rate may indicate higher transaction costs and may result in higher taxes when shares are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are not reflected in annual fund operating expenses or in the Example, affect the Fund's performance. During the most recent fiscal year, the Fund's portfolio turnover rate was 255% of the average value of its portfolio.
Investments, Risks, and Performance
Principal Investment Strategy
Under normal circumstances, the Fund invests in a diversified range of income generating equity and fixed income securities and other financial instruments, including derivatives, which provide investment exposure to such securities. The Fund employs a dynamic asset allocation strategy under which it shifts its allocations among global equity and fixed income asset classes. The Fund also utilizes call option strategies to generate income. The Fund’s equity allocation will typically range from 25% to 70% of the Fund’s net assets, and its fixed income allocation will typically range from 20% to 75% of the Fund’s net assets, although the Fund may invest up to 100% of its total assets in either equity or fixed income securities. The Fund allocates its assets among asset classes and market sectors based upon the Sub-Adviser’s evaluation of global economic conditions and risk premiums of income producing asset classes (that is, the expected return to be received from investing in income producing asset classes that carry greater risk). The Fund’s asset allocation changes will be based on an assessment of relative valuation; stages of an economic cycle, which include downturn, credit repair, recovery and expansion/late cycle; economic regimes; short- and long-term macroeconomic themes; and sector fundamentals. The Fund may gain or adjust exposure to each asset class through investments in individual securities or through other instruments, including derivatives. The Fund may invest in companies of any size and may invest without limit in foreign securities, including emerging market securities. In selecting investments for the Fund, the Sub-Adviser considers factors including, but not limited to, top-down macroeconomic conditions and developments as well as bottom-up security selection.
The Fund’s use of call option strategies (also called “covered call” or “buy write” strategies) under which the Fund writes (sells) call options or index based options on equity securities held in the Fund’s portfolio is intended to generate additional returns for the Fund from the option premium. The Sub-Adviser also believes that selling call options on a portion of the Fund’s equity securities may reduce volatility and downside risk; however, the use of call option strategies also may reduce capital appreciation. The Fund may write call options with an aggregate notional exposure in the range of 0-50% of the Fund’s net assets, with a typical range of exposure of 10% to 30% of the Fund’s net assets. The Fund may buy or sell call options on major equity indices as well as individual stocks in the Fund’s portfolio. For index call writing the Fund will replicate the index through purchase of individual securities and then write an index call option. To replicate the index, the Sub-Adviser may use full replication, or “sampling” techniques under which the Fund invests in a representative sample of the securities included in the index rather than buying all of the securities included in the index.
When the Fund writes a call option on an index, it agrees (in return for receipt of the option premium) to pay the option holder, upon exercise of the option prior to or upon expiration, the difference between the exercise price and price of the index if the index price is above the exercise price at the time of exercise or expiration. When a call option’s exercise price is higher than the price of the index, the call option is “out of the money.” By selling options that are out of the money, the Fund seeks to profit from the sales price of the options while capitalizing on the general tendency of options that are out of the money at the time of sale to expire without value and without being exercised by the holder. The Fund determines whether an option is “out of the money” based on the probability that it will expire worthless based on implied market pricing. The Fund writes only “covered” call options (that is, calls against positions in the Fund).
1290 Loomis Sayles Multi-Asset Income Fund 37

Equity Allocation The Fund’s equity allocation will consist primarily of equity securities, including, but not limited to, common stocks, preferred stocks, securities convertible into common or preferred stocks, and real estate investment trusts (“REITS”). The Fund’s equity allocation will typically range from approximately 25% to 70% of the Fund’s net assets, excluding the call option strategies. The Fund may also invest in publicly-traded master limited partnerships (“MLPs”), including MLPs that are not taxed as regular corporations for U.S. federal income tax purposes. The Sub-Adviser seeks to identify equity securities that it believes offer attractive income and total return.
Fixed Income Allocation The Fund’s fixed income allocation will consist primarily of fixed income securities, including, but not limited to, foreign and domestic corporate obligations, fixed income securities issued by corporations and governments in foreign countries including emerging markets issuers, bank loans, commercial and residential mortgage-backed securities, asset-backed securities, collateralized loan obligations, floating or variable rate obligations, and securities issued or guaranteed by the U.S. government, its agencies, instrumentalities, or sponsored corporations. The Fund’s fixed income allocation will typically range from approximately 20% to 75% of the Fund’s net assets. The Fund typically expects to invest approximately 10% to 40% of its net assets in investment grade securities, 10% to 60% of its net assets in non-investment grade securities, and up to 40% of its net assets in any of the following: bank loans, securitized instruments such as commercial and residential mortgage-backed securities, asset-backed securities, and collateralized loan obligations, floating or variable rate obligations, or emerging market debt. The Sub-Adviser seeks to identify fixed income securities that it believes offer attractive income and total return.
The Fund may invest in fixed income securities of any maturity or credit quality, including below investment grade securities (commonly known as “junk bonds”). Securities rated below investment grade include those that, at the time of investment, are rated Ba1 or lower by Moody’s Investors Service, Inc. or BB+ or lower by Fitch Ratings Ltd. or Standard & Poor’s Global Ratings or the equivalent by any other nationally recognized statistical rating organization, or, if unrated, determined by the Sub-Adviser to be of comparable quality. The Fund may invest in mortgage-backed or other asset-backed securities of any credit rating or credit quality. The Fund may invest in privately placed and restricted securities (including 144A bonds). The Fund does not normally invest in securities that are in default or have defaulted with respect to the payment of interest or repayment of principal, but may do so depending on market or other conditions. The Fund may continue to hold securities that go into default.
Under normal market conditions, the weighted average effective duration of the Fund's fixed income allocation is expected to range from zero to seven years. Duration is a measure of the expected life of a fixed income security that is used to determine the sensitivity of a security’s price to changes in interest rates. Effective duration is a measure of the duration of the Fund's fixed income portfolio adjusted for the anticipated effect of interest rate changes on prepayment rates. The effective duration of the Fund's fixed income investments may be longer than its target in stressed market conditions and vary materially from its target, from time to time, and there is no assurance that the duration of the Fund's fixed income investments will meet its target. The longer a security’s duration, the more sensitive it will be to changes in interest rates, which may increase the volatility of the security’s value and may lead to losses.
Other Investments The Fund will principally use derivatives in employing its call option strategies. In addition, in implementing its dynamic allocation investment strategy, the Fund may invest in derivatives, including futures, forwards, swaps and other instruments, rather than investing directly in equity or fixed income securities. The Fund may also use derivatives for purposes of managing foreign currency, interest rate or credit risk. The Fund's investments in derivatives may involve the use of leverage because the Fund is not required to invest the full market value of the contract upon entering into the contract but participates in gains and losses on the full contract price. In addition, the Fund's investments in derivatives may involve the use of leverage because the heightened price sensitivity of some derivatives to market changes may magnify the Fund's gain or loss. It is not generally expected, however, that the Fund will be leveraged by borrowing money for investment purposes.
The Fund also may invest in exchange-traded funds in seeking to carry out its investment strategies, including its call option strategies.
The Fund's holdings may be frequently adjusted to reflect the Sub-Adviser’s assessment of changing risks, which could result in high portfolio turnover.
Principal Risks
An investment in the Fund is not a deposit of a bank and is not insured or guaranteed by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation or any other government agency. The value of your investment may fall, sometimes sharply, and you could lose money by investing in the Fund. There can be no assurance that the Fund will achieve its investment objective.
The following risks can negatively affect the Fund’s performance. The most significant risks as of the date of this Prospectus are presented first, followed by additional principal risks in alphabetical order.
Market Risk The Fund is subject to the risk that the securities markets will move down, sometimes rapidly and unpredictably, based on overall economic conditions and other factors, which may negatively affect Fund performance. Securities markets also
38 1290 Loomis Sayles Multi-Asset Income Fund

may experience long periods of decline in value. The value of a security may decline due to factors that are specifically related to a particular company, as well as general market conditions, such as real or perceived adverse economic or political conditions, inflation rates and/or investor expectations concerning such rates, changes in interest rates, recessions, or adverse investor sentiment generally. During a general downturn in the securities markets, multiple asset classes may decline in value simultaneously. Changes in the financial condition of a single issuer can impact a market as a whole.
Geopolitical events, including terrorism, tensions, war or other open conflicts between nations, or political or economic dysfunction within some nations that are global economic powers or major producers of oil, may lead to overall instability in world economies and markets generally and have led, and may in the future lead, to increased market volatility and may have adverse long-term effects. World markets, or those in a particular region, may all react in similar fashion to important economic, political or other developments. Events such as environmental and natural disasters or other catastrophes, public health crises (such as epidemics and pandemics), social unrest, and cybersecurity incidents, and governments’ reactions to such events, could cause uncertainty in the markets and may adversely affect the performance of the global economy. Impacts from climate change may include significant risks to global financial assets and economic growth. The extent and duration of such events and resulting market disruptions could be substantial and could magnify the impact of other risks to the Fund. The value and liquidity of the Fund’s investments may be negatively affected by developments in other countries and regions, whether or not the Fund invests in securities of issuers located in or with significant exposure to the countries or regions directly affected.
The U.S. Federal Reserve (“Fed”) has invested or otherwise made available substantial amounts of money to keep credit flowing through short-term money markets and has signaled that it will continue to adjust its operations as appropriate to support short-term money markets. Amid these efforts, concerns about the markets’ dependence on the Fed’s provision of liquidity have grown. Policy changes by the U.S. government and/or the Fed and political events within the United States may affect investor and consumer confidence and may adversely impact financial markets and the broader economy, perhaps suddenly and to a significant degree. A downgrade of the ratings of U.S. government debt obligations, or concerns about the U.S. government’s credit quality in general, could have a substantial negative effect on the U.S. and global economies. High public debt in the United States and other countries creates ongoing systemic and market risks and policymaking uncertainty.
In addition, markets and market participants are increasingly reliant on information data systems. Inaccurate data, software or other technology malfunctions, programming inaccuracies, unauthorized use or access, and similar circumstances may impair the performance of these systems and may have an adverse impact upon a single issuer, a group of issuers, or the market at large.
Asset Allocation Risk The Fund’s investment performance depends upon how its assets are allocated across various asset classes and how its assets are invested within those asset classes. Some asset classes and investments may perform below expectations or the securities markets generally over short and extended periods. The allocation strategies used and the allocation and investment decisions made could cause the Fund to lose value and may not produce the desired results.
Equity Risk In general, the values of stocks and other equity securities fluctuate, and sometimes widely fluctuate, in response to changes in a company’s financial condition as well as general market, economic and political conditions and other factors. The Fund may experience a significant or complete loss on its investment in an equity security. In addition, common stock prices may be particularly sensitive to rising interest rates, which increase borrowing costs and the costs of capital.
Large-Cap Company Risk Larger more established companies may be unable to respond quickly to new competitive challenges such as changes in technology and consumer tastes, which may lead to a decline in their market price. Many larger companies also may not be able to attain the high growth rate of successful smaller companies, especially during extended periods of economic expansion.
Mid-Cap, Small-Cap and Micro-Cap Company Risk Mid-cap, small-cap and micro-cap companies carry additional risks because the operating histories of these companies tend to be more limited, their earnings and revenues less predictable (and some companies may be experiencing significant losses), and their share prices more volatile than those of larger, more established companies, all of which can negatively affect their value. In general, these risks are greater for small-cap and micro-cap companies than for mid-cap companies.
Investment Grade Securities Risk Securities rated in the lower investment grade rating categories (e.g., BBB or Baa) are considered investment grade securities, but may have more risk than higher rated obligations because they are regarded as having only an adequate capacity to pay principal and interest, are considered to lack outstanding investment characteristics, and may possess certain speculative characteristics.
Non-Investment Grade Securities Risk Bonds rated below BBB by Standard & Poor’s Global Ratings or Fitch Ratings, Ltd., or below Baa by Moody’s Investors Service, Inc. (or, if unrated, determined by the investment manager to be of comparable quality) are speculative in nature and are subject to additional risk factors such as increased possibility of default, illiquidity of the security,
1290 Loomis Sayles Multi-Asset Income Fund 39

and changes in value based on changes in interest rates. Non-investment grade bonds, sometimes referred to as “junk bonds,” are usually issued by companies without long track records of sales and earnings, or by those companies with questionable credit strength. The creditworthiness of issuers of non-investment grade debt securities may be more complex to analyze than that of issuers of investment grade debt securities, and reliance on credit ratings may present additional risks.
Credit Risk The Fund is subject to the risk that the issuer or guarantor of a fixed income security, or the counterparty to a transaction, is unable or unwilling, or is perceived as unable or unwilling, to make timely interest or principal payments or otherwise honor its obligations, or defaults completely, which may cause the Fund's holdings to lose value. The downgrade of a security’s credit rating may decrease its value. Lower credit quality also may lead to greater volatility in the price of a security and may negatively affect a security’s liquidity. The credit quality of a security can deteriorate suddenly and rapidly. The Fund may experience a significant or complete loss on a fixed income security or a transaction.
Interest Rate Risk Changes in interest rates may affect the yield, liquidity and value of investments in income producing or debt securities. Changes in interest rates also may affect the value of other securities. When interest rates rise, the value of the Fund's debt securities generally declines. Conversely, when interest rates decline, the value of the Fund's debt securities generally rises. Typically, the longer the maturity or duration of a debt security, the greater the effect a change in interest rates could have on the security’s price. Thus, the sensitivity of the Fund's debt securities to interest rate risk will increase the greater the duration of those securities. A significant or rapid rise in interest rates could result in losses to the Fund.
U.S. Government Securities Risk Although the Fund may hold securities that carry U.S. government guarantees, these guarantees do not extend to shares of the Fund itself and do not guarantee the market prices of the securities. Securities issued by the U.S. Treasury or other agencies and instrumentalities of the U.S. government may decline in value as a result of, among other things, changes in interest rates, political events in the United States, international developments, including strained relations with foreign countries, and changes in the credit rating of, or investor perceptions regarding the creditworthiness of, the U.S. government. Furthermore, not all securities issued by the U.S. government and its agencies and instrumentalities are backed by the full faith and credit of the U.S. Treasury. Securities not backed by the full faith and credit of the U.S. Treasury involve greater credit risk than investments in other types of U.S. government securities.
Options Risk The use of options involves investment strategies and risks different from those associated with ordinary portfolio securities transactions. The prices of options are volatile and are influenced by, among other things, actual and anticipated changes in the value of the underlying reference asset. When the Fund writes a covered call option, it assumes the risk that it will have to sell the underlying security at an exercise price that may be lower than the market price of the security, and it gives up the opportunity to profit from a price increase in the underlying security above the exercise price. If a call option that the Fund has written is exercised, the Fund will experience a gain or loss from the sale of the underlying security. If a call option that the Fund has written expires unexercised, the Fund will experience a gain in the amount of the premium it received; however, that gain may be offset by a decline in the market value of the underlying security during the option period. When the Fund writes a call option on an index, it gives up the opportunity to profit from an increase in the market value of the index above the exercise price. A securities index fluctuates with changes in the market values of the securities included in the index. The effectiveness of writing securities index options will depend upon the extent to which price movements in the Fund’s investment portfolio correlate with price movements of the securities index.
Derivatives Risk The Fund's investments in derivatives may rise or fall in value more rapidly than other investments and may reduce the Fund's returns and increase the volatility of the Fund's net asset value. Investing in derivatives involves investment techniques and risk analyses different from, and risks in some respects greater than, those associated with investing in more traditional investments, such as stocks and bonds. Derivatives may be leveraged such that a small investment can have a significant impact on the Fund's exposure to stock market values, interest rates, or other investments. As a result, a relatively small price movement in a derivatives contract may cause an immediate and substantial loss, and the Fund could lose more than the amount it invested. Some derivatives can have the potential for unlimited losses. In addition, it may be difficult or impossible for the Fund to purchase or sell certain derivatives in sufficient amounts to achieve the desired level of exposure, or to terminate or offset existing arrangements, which may result in a loss or may be costly to the Fund. Some derivatives are more sensitive to market price fluctuations and to interest rate changes than other investments. Derivatives may not behave as anticipated by the Fund, and derivatives strategies that are successful under certain market conditions may be less successful or unsuccessful under other market conditions. The Fund also may be exposed to losses if the counterparty in the transaction is unable or unwilling to fulfill its contractual obligation. In certain cases, the Fund may be hindered or delayed in exercising remedies against or closing out derivatives with a counterparty, resulting in additional losses. Derivatives also may be subject to the risk of mispricing or improper valuation, and valuation may be more difficult in times of market turmoil. Changes to the regulation of derivatives markets and mutual funds’ use of derivatives may impact the Fund's ability to maintain its investments in derivatives, make derivatives more costly, limit their availability, adversely affect their value or performance, or otherwise disrupt markets.
40 1290 Loomis Sayles Multi-Asset Income Fund

Newly Repositioned Fund Risk The Fund may not be successful in implementing its investment strategy, and there can be no assurance that the Fund will grow to or maintain an economically viable size, which could result in the Fund being liquidated at any time without shareholder approval and at a time that may not be favorable for all shareholders.
Foreign Securities Risk Investments in foreign securities, including depositary receipts, involve risks in addition to those associated with investments in U.S. securities. Foreign markets may be less liquid, more volatile and subject to less government supervision and regulation than U.S. markets, and it may take more time to clear and settle trades involving foreign securities, which could negatively impact the Fund's investments and cause it to lose money. Security values also may be negatively affected by changes in the exchange rates between the U.S. dollar and foreign currencies. Differences between U.S. and foreign legal, political and economic systems, regulatory regimes and market practices, as well as trade barriers and other protectionist trade policies (including those of the United States), governmental instability, war, or other political or economic actions, also may adversely impact security values. Foreign securities are also subject to the risks associated with the potential imposition of economic or other sanctions against a particular foreign country, its nationals, businesses or industries. World markets, or those in a particular region, may all react in similar fashion to important economic, political or other developments. Events and evolving conditions in certain economies or markets may alter the risks associated with investments tied to countries or regions that historically were perceived as comparatively stable and make such investments riskier and more volatile. Regardless of where a company is organized or its stock is traded, its performance may be significantly affected by events in regions from which it derives its profits or in which it conducts significant operations.
Currency RiskInvestments that are denominated in or that provide exposure to foreign currencies are subject to the risk that those currencies will decline in value relative to the U.S. dollar. Any such decline may erode or reverse any potential gains from an investment in securities denominated in foreign currency or may widen existing loss. In the case of hedging positions, there is the risk that the U.S. dollar will decline in value relative to the currency being hedged. Currency rates may fluctuate significantly over short periods of time.
Emerging Markets RiskThe risks associated with investments in emerging market countries often are significant, and vary from jurisdiction to jurisdiction and company to company. Investments in emerging market countries are more susceptible to loss than investments in more developed foreign countries and may present market, credit, currency, liquidity, legal, political, technical and other risks different from, or greater than, the risks of investing in more developed foreign countries. Emerging market countries may be more likely to experience rapid and significant adverse developments in their political or economic structures, intervene in financial markets, restrict foreign investments, impose high withholding or other taxes on foreign investments, impose restrictive exchange control regulations, or nationalize or expropriate the assets of private companies, which may have negative impacts on transaction costs, market price, investment returns and the legal rights and remedies available to the Fund. In addition, the securities markets of emerging market countries generally are smaller, less liquid and more volatile than those of more developed foreign countries, and emerging market countries often have less uniformity in regulatory, accounting, auditing and financial reporting requirements or standards, which may impact the availability and quality of information about issuers, and less reliable clearance and settlement, registration and custodial procedures. Emerging market countries also may be subject to high inflation and rapid currency devaluations, and currency-hedging techniques may be unavailable in certain emerging market countries. In addition, some emerging market countries may be heavily dependent on international trade, which can materially affect their securities markets. Securities of issuers traded on foreign exchanges may be suspended. The likelihood of such suspensions may be higher for securities of issuers in emerging market countries than in countries with more developed markets.
Collateralized Loan Obligations Risk Investments in collateralized loan obligations (“CLOs”) involve many of the same risks associated with investments in debt securities and asset-backed securities including interest rate risk, credit risk, liquidity risk, prepayment and extension risk, and valuation risk. The risks of an investment in a CLO also depend largely on the quality and type of the collateral and the class or “tranche” of the CLO in which the Fund invests. Normally, CLOs are privately offered and sold, and thus are not registered under the securities laws. As a result, investments in CLOs may be characterized by the Fund as illiquid securities; however, an active dealer market, or other relevant measures of liquidity, may exist for CLOs allowing a CLO potentially to be deemed liquid under the Fund's liquidity policies. Additionally, CLOs carry risks, including, but not limited to: (a) the possibility that distributions from collateral securities will not be adequate to make interest or other payments; (b) the risk that the collateral securities may decline in value or quality or be downgraded or go into default, particularly during periods of economic downturn; (c) the possibility that the Fund may invest in CLOs that are subordinate to other classes; (d) the risk that the manager of the CLOs may perform poorly; and (e) the risk that the complex structure of CLOs may produce disputes with the issuer or unexpected investment results. CLOs also can be difficult to value and may be highly leveraged (which could make them highly volatile), and the use of CLOs may result in losses to the Fund.
Convertible Securities Risk A convertible security is a form of hybrid security; that is, a security with both debt and equity characteristics. The value of a convertible security fluctuates in relation to changes in interest rates and the credit quality of the issuer and also fluctuates in relation to changes in the price of the underlying common stock. A convertible security may be subject to
1290 Loomis Sayles Multi-Asset Income Fund 41

redemption at the option of the issuer at a price established in the convertible security’s governing instrument, which may be less than the current market price of the security. If a convertible security held by the Fund is called for redemption, the Fund will be required to permit the issuer to redeem the security, convert it into underlying common stock or sell it to a third party. Convertible securities are subject to equity risk, interest rate risk and credit risk and are often lower-quality securities. Lower quality may lead to greater volatility in the price of a security and may negatively affect a security’s liquidity. Since it derives a portion of its value from the common stock into which it may be converted, a convertible security is also subject to the same types of market and issuer-specific risks that apply to the underlying common stock.
ETFs Risk The Fund’s shareholders will indirectly bear fees and expenses paid by the ETFs in which it invests, in addition to the Fund’s direct fees and expenses. The cost of investing in the Fund, therefore, may be higher than the cost of investing in a mutual fund that invests directly in individual stocks and bonds. In addition, the Fund’s net asset value will be subject to fluctuations in the market values of the ETFs in which it invests. The Fund is also subject to the risks associated with the securities or other investments in which the ETFs invest, and the ability of the Fund to meet its investment objective will directly depend on the ability of the ETFs to meet their investment objectives. A passively managed (or index-based) ETF’s performance may not match that of the index it seeks to track. An actively managed ETF’s performance will reflect its manager’s ability to make investment decisions that are suited to achieving the ETF’s investment objective. Furthermore, it is possible that an active trading market for an ETF may not develop or be maintained, in which case the liquidity and value of the Fund’s investment in the ETF could be substantially and adversely affected. The extent to which the investment performance and risks associated with the Fund correlate to those of a particular ETF will depend upon the extent to which the Fund’s assets are allocated from time to time for investment in the ETF, which will vary.
Investment Style Risk The Fund may use a particular style or set of styles — in this case, both “growth” and “value” styles — to select investments. Those styles may be out of favor or may not produce the best results over short or longer time periods. Growth stocks may be more sensitive to changes in current or expected earnings than the prices of other stocks. Growth investing also is subject to the risk that the stock price of one or more companies will fall or will fail to appreciate as anticipated by the Fund, regardless of movements in the securities market. Growth stocks also tend to be more volatile than value stocks, so in a declining market their prices may decrease more than value stocks in general. Growth stocks also may increase the volatility of the Fund's share price. Value stocks are subject to the risks that, notwithstanding that a stock is selling at a discount to its perceived true worth, the stock’s full value may never be fully recognized or realized by the market, or its price may go down. In addition, there is the risk that a stock judged to be undervalued may actually have been appropriately priced at the time of investment.
Large Transaction Risk A significant percentage of the Fund’s shares may be owned or controlled by the Adviser and its affiliates, other Funds advised by the Adviser (including funds of funds), or other large shareholders. Accordingly, the Fund is subject to the potential for large-scale inflows and outflows as a result of purchases and redemptions of its shares by such shareholders. These inflows and outflows could negatively affect the Fund’s net asset value and performance.
Leveraging Risk When the Fund leverages its holdings, the value of an investment in the Fund will be more volatile and all other risks will tend to be compounded. Investments that create leverage can result in losses to the Fund that exceed the amount originally invested and may accelerate the rate of losses (some of which may be sudden or substantial). For certain investments that create leverage, relatively small market fluctuations can result in large changes in the value of such investments. There can be no assurance that the Fund's use of any leverage will be successful.
Liquidity Risk From time to time, there may be little or no active trading market for a particular investment in which the Fund may invest or is invested. In such a market, the value of such an investment and the Fund's share price may fall dramatically. Illiquid investments may be difficult or impossible to sell or purchase at an advantageous time or price or in sufficient amounts to achieve the Fund's desired level of exposure. To meet redemption requests during periods of illiquidity, the Fund may be forced to dispose of investments at unfavorable times or prices and/or under unfavorable conditions, which may result in a loss or may be costly to the Fund. Investments that are illiquid or that trade in lower volumes may be more difficult to value. The Fund also may not receive its proceeds from the sale of certain investments for an extended period of time. Certain investments that were liquid when purchased may later become illiquid, sometimes abruptly, particularly in times of overall economic distress or adverse investor perception. An inability to sell a portfolio position can adversely affect the Fund's value or prevent the Fund from being able to take advantage of other investment opportunities. During periods of market stress, an investment or even an entire market segment may become illiquid, sometimes abruptly, which can adversely affect the Fund's ability to limit losses. In addition, a reduction in the ability or willingness of dealers and other institutional investors to make a market in certain securities may result in decreased liquidity in certain markets.
Loan Risk A bank loan represents an interest in a loan or other direct indebtedness that entitles the acquirer of such interest to payments of interest, principal and/or other amounts due under the structure of the loan. Loan interests are subject to liquidity risk, prepayment risk, extension risk, the risk of subordination to other creditors, restrictions on resale, and the lack of a regular trading market and publicly available information. Loan interests may be difficult to value and may have extended trade settlement periods. As a result, the proceeds from the sale of a loan may not be available to make additional investments or to meet redemption obligations
42 1290 Loomis Sayles Multi-Asset Income Fund

until potentially a substantial period after the sale of the loan. The extended trade settlement periods could force the Fund to liquidate other securities to meet redemptions and may present a risk that the Fund may incur losses in order to timely honor redemptions. There is a risk that the value of any collateral securing a loan in which the Fund has an interest may decline and that the collateral may not be sufficient to cover the amount owed on the loan. In the event the borrower defaults, the Fund's access to the collateral may be limited or delayed by bankruptcy or other insolvency laws. Loans may not be considered “securities,” and purchasers, such as the Fund, therefore may not have the benefit of the anti-fraud protections of the federal securities laws. To the extent that the Fund invests in loan participations and assignments, it is subject to the risk that the financial institution acting as agent for all interests in a loan might fail financially. It is also possible that the Fund could be held liable, or may be called upon to fulfill other obligations, as a co-lender.
Master Limited Partnership Risk Investing in MLPs involves certain risks related to investing in the underlying assets of the MLPs and risks associated with pooled investment vehicles. MLPs holding credit-related investments are subject to interest rate risk and the risk of default on payment obligations by debt issuers. MLPs that concentrate in a particular industry or a particular geographic region are subject to risks associated with such industry or region. Investments held by MLPs may be relatively illiquid, limiting the MLPs’ ability to vary their portfolios promptly in response to changes in economic or other conditions. MLPs may have limited financial resources, their securities may trade infrequently and in limited volume, and they may be subject to more abrupt or erratic price movements than securities of larger or more broadly based companies, and may be difficult to value. Distributions from an MLP may consist in part of a return of the amount originally invested, which would not be taxable to the extent the distributions do not exceed the investor’s adjusted basis in its MLP interest. These reductions in the Fund’s adjusted tax basis in the MLP securities will increase the amount of gain (or decrease the amount of loss) recognized by the Fund on a subsequent sale of the securities.
Mortgage-Related and Other Asset-Backed Securities Risk Declines in the credit quality of and defaults by the issuers of mortgage-related and other asset-backed securities or instability in the markets for such securities may decrease the value of such securities, which could result in losses to the Fund, and may reduce the liquidity of such securities and make such securities more difficult to purchase or sell at an advantageous time and price. In addition, borrowers may default on the obligations that underlie mortgage-related and other asset-backed securities. The risk of defaults by borrowers generally is greater during times of rising interest rates and/or unemployment rates. The impairment (or loss) of the value of collateral or other assets underlying mortgage-related and other asset-backed securities will result in a reduction in the value of the securities. Certain collateral may be difficult to locate in the event of default, or may be lost, and recoveries of depreciated or damaged collateral may not fully cover payments due on such collateral. Asset-backed securities may not have the benefit of a security interest in collateral comparable to that of mortgage assets, resulting in additional credit risk.
In addition, certain mortgage-related and other asset-backed securities may include securities backed by pools of loans made to “subprime” borrowers or borrowers with blemished credit histories. The risk of defaults by borrowers is generally higher in the case of asset or mortgage pools that include subprime assets or mortgages, and the liquidity and value of subprime mortgages and non-investment grade mortgage-backed securities that are not guaranteed by Ginnie Mae, Fannie Mae, and Freddie Mac could change dramatically over time.
Furthermore, mortgage-related and other asset-backed securities typically provide the issuer with the right to prepay the security prior to maturity. During periods of rising interest rates, the rate of prepayments tends to decrease because borrowers are less likely to prepay debt (such as mortgage debt or automobile loans). Slower than expected payments can extend the average lives of mortgage-related and other asset-backed securities, and this may “lock in” a below market interest rate and increase the security’s duration and interest rate sensitivity, which may increase the volatility of the security’s value and may lead to losses. During periods of falling interest rates, the rate of prepayments tends to increase because borrowers are more likely to pay off debt and refinance at the lower interest rates then available. Unscheduled prepayments shorten the average lives of mortgage-related and other asset-backed securities and may result in the Fund’s having to reinvest the proceeds of the prepayments at lower interest rates, thereby reducing the Fund’s income.
Portfolio Management Risk The Fund is subject to the risk that strategies used by an investment manager and its securities selections fail to produce the intended results. An investment manager’s judgments or decisions about the quality, relative yield or value of, or market trends affecting, a particular security or issuer, industry, sector, region or market segment, or about the economy or interest rates, may be incorrect or otherwise may not produce the intended results, which may result in losses to the Fund. In addition, many processes used in Fund management, including security selection, rely, in whole or in part, on the use of various technologies. The Fund may suffer losses if there are imperfections, errors or limitations in the quantitative, analytic or other tools, resources, information and data used, or the analyses employed or relied on, by an investment manager, or if such tools, resources, information or data are used incorrectly, fail to produce the desired results, or otherwise do not work as intended. There can be no assurance that the use of these technologies will result in effective investment decisions for the Fund.
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Portfolio Turnover Risk High portfolio turnover (generally, turnover in excess of 100% in any given fiscal year) may result in increased transaction costs to the Fund, which may result in higher fund expenses and lower total return.
Preferred Stock Risk Preferred stock is subject to many of the risks associated with debt securities, including interest rate risk. Unlike interest payments on debt securities, dividends on preferred stock are generally payable at the discretion of the issuer’s board of directors. Preferred shareholders may have certain rights if dividends are not paid but generally have no legal recourse against the issuer. Shareholders may suffer a loss of value if dividends are not paid. In certain situations an issuer may call or redeem its preferred stock or convert it to common stock. The market prices of preferred stocks are generally more sensitive to actual or perceived changes in the issuer’s financial condition or prospects than are the prices of debt securities.
Prepayment Risk and Extension Risk Prepayment risk is the risk that the issuer of a security held by the Fund may pay off principal more quickly than originally anticipated. This may occur when interest rates fall. The Fund may have to reinvest the proceeds in an investment offering a lower yield, may not benefit from any increase in value that might otherwise result from declining interest rates and may lose any premium it paid to acquire the security. Extension risk is the risk that the issuer of a security held by the Fund may pay off principal more slowly than originally anticipated. This may occur when interest rates rise. The Fund may be prevented from reinvesting the proceeds it would have received at a given time in an investment offering a higher yield.
Privately Placed and Other Restricted Securities Risk Restricted securities, which include privately placed securities, are securities that cannot be offered for public resale unless registered under the applicable securities laws or that have a contractual restriction that prohibits or limits their resale. Before they are registered, such securities may be sold only in a privately negotiated transaction or pursuant to an exemption from registration. Difficulty in selling securities may result in a loss or be costly to the Fund. Rule 144A is designed to facilitate efficient trading among institutional investors by permitting the sale of certain unregistered securities to qualified institutional buyers. To the extent restricted securities held by the Fund qualify under Rule 144A and an institutional market develops for those securities, the Fund likely will be able to dispose of the securities without registering them. To the extent that institutional buyers become, for a time, uninterested in purchasing these securities, investing in Rule 144A securities could increase the level of the Fund’s illiquidity. The Adviser or Sub-Adviser may determine that certain securities qualified for trading under Rule 144A are liquid. Where registration of a security is required, the Fund may be obligated to pay all or part of the registration expenses, and a considerable period may elapse between the time the Fund desires to sell (and therefore decides to seek registration of) the security, and the time the Fund may be permitted to sell the security under an effective registration statement. If, during such a period, adverse market conditions were to develop, the Fund might obtain a less favorable price than prevailed when it desired to sell. The risk that securities may not be sold for the price at which the Fund is carrying them is greater with respect to restricted securities than it is with respect to registered securities. The illiquidity of the market, as well as the lack of publicly available information regarding these securities, also may make it difficult to determine a fair value for certain securities for purposes of computing the Fund’s net asset value.
Real Estate Investing Risk Real estate-related investments may decline in value as a result of factors affecting the overall real estate industry. Real estate is a cyclical business, highly sensitive to supply and demand, general and local economic developments and characterized by intense competition and periodic overbuilding. Real estate income and values also may be greatly affected by demographic trends, such as population shifts or changing tastes and values. For example, the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic has impacted certain real estate sectors by accelerating the trend towards online shopping and remote-working environments. Losses may occur from casualty or condemnation, and government actions, such as tax law changes, zoning law changes, regulatory limitations on rents, or environmental regulations, also may have a major impact on real estate. The availability of mortgages and changes in interest rates may also affect real estate values. Changing interest rates and credit quality requirements also will affect the cash flow of real estate companies and their ability to meet capital needs. In addition, global climate change may have an adverse effect on property and security values and may exacerbate the risks of natural disasters.
Real estate investment trusts (“REITs”) generally invest directly in real estate (equity REITs), in mortgages secured by interests in real estate (mortgage REITs) or in some combination of the two (hybrid REITs). Investing in REITs exposes investors to the risks of owning real estate directly, as well as to risks that relate specifically to the way in which REITs are organized and operated. Equity REITs may be affected by changes in the value of the underlying property owned by the REIT, while mortgage REITs may be affected by the quality of any credit extended. Equity and mortgage REITs are also subject to heavy cash flow dependency, defaults by borrowers, and self-liquidations.
Operating REITs requires specialized management skills, and a portfolio that invests in REITs indirectly bears REIT management and administration expenses along with the direct expenses of the portfolio. Individual REITs may own a limited number of properties and may concentrate in a particular region or property type. Domestic REITs also must satisfy specific Internal Revenue Code requirements to qualify for the tax-free pass-through of net investment income and net realized gains distributed to shareholders. Failure to meet these requirements may have adverse consequences on the Fund. In addition, even the larger REITs in the industry
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tend to be small- to medium-sized companies in relation to the equity markets as a whole. Moreover, shares of REITs may trade less frequently and, therefore, are subject to more erratic price movements than securities of larger issuers.
Redemption Risk The Fund may experience periods of heavy redemptions that could cause the Fund to sell assets at inopportune times or at a loss or depressed value. Redemption risk is heightened during periods of declining or illiquid markets. Heavy redemptions could hurt the Fund's performance.
Market developments and other factors, including a general rise in interest rates, have the potential to cause investors to move out of fixed income securities on a large scale, which may increase redemptions from mutual funds that hold large amounts of fixed income securities. The market-making capacity of dealers has been reduced in recent years, in part as a result of structural changes, such as fewer proprietary trading desks at broker-dealers and increased regulatory capital requirements. In addition, significant securities market disruptions related to the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic have led to dislocation in the market for a variety of fixed income securities (including, without limitation, commercial paper, corporate debt securities, certificates of deposit, asset-backed debt securities and municipal obligations), which has decreased liquidity and sharply reduced returns in certain cases. Increased redemptions from mutual funds that hold large amounts of fixed income securities, coupled with a reduction in the ability or willingness of dealers and other institutional investors to buy or hold fixed income securities, may result in decreased liquidity and increased volatility in the fixed income markets.
Sector Risk From time to time, based on market or economic conditions, the Fund may have significant positions in one or more sectors of the market. To the extent the Fund invests more heavily in particular sectors, its performance will be especially sensitive to developments that significantly affect those sectors. Individual sectors may be more volatile, and may perform differently, than the broader market. The industries that constitute a sector may all react in the same way to economic, political or regulatory events.
Risk/Return Bar Chart and Table
The bar chart and table below provide some indication of the risks of investing in the Fund by showing changes in the Fund's performance from year to year and by showing how the Fund's average annual total returns for the past one-year, five-year and since inception periods through December 31, 2022, compared to the returns of a broad-based securities market index. The return of the broad-based securities market index (and any additional comparative index) shown for the since inception period below is the return of the index since the inception of the share class with the longest history. The additional broad-based securities market indexes and the hypothetical composite index show how the Fund’s performance compared with the returns of other asset classes in which the Fund invests. Past performance (before and after taxes) is not an indication of future performance.
Performance information for the periods prior to August 19, 2022, is that of